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Sample records for clinically important proteolytic

  1. Mitochondrial membrane potential regulates PINK1 import and proteolytic destabilization by PARL.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seok Min; Lazarou, Michael; Wang, Chunxin; Kane, Lesley A; Narendra, Derek P; Youle, Richard J

    2010-11-29

    PINK1 is a mitochondrial kinase mutated in some familial cases of Parkinson's disease. It has been found to work in the same pathway as the E3 ligase Parkin in the maintenance of flight muscles and dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila melanogaster and to recruit cytosolic Parkin to mitochondria to mediate mitophagy in mammalian cells. Although PINK1 has a predicted mitochondrial import sequence, its cellular and submitochondrial localization remains unclear in part because it is rapidly degraded. In this study, we report that the mitochondrial inner membrane rhomboid protease presenilin-associated rhomboid-like protein (PARL) mediates cleavage of PINK1 dependent on mitochondrial membrane potential. In the absence of PARL, the constitutive degradation of PINK1 is inhibited, stabilizing a 60-kD form inside mitochondria. When mitochondrial membrane potential is dissipated, PINK1 accumulates as a 63-kD full-length form on the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it can recruit Parkin to impaired mitochondria. Thus, differential localization to the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes appears to regulate PINK1 stability and function. PMID:21115803

  2. Mitochondrial membrane potential regulates PINK1 import and proteolytic destabilization by PARL

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Seok Min; Lazarou, Michael; Wang, Chunxin; Kane, Lesley A.; Narendra, Derek P.

    2010-01-01

    PINK1 is a mitochondrial kinase mutated in some familial cases of Parkinson’s disease. It has been found to work in the same pathway as the E3 ligase Parkin in the maintenance of flight muscles and dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila melanogaster and to recruit cytosolic Parkin to mitochondria to mediate mitophagy in mammalian cells. Although PINK1 has a predicted mitochondrial import sequence, its cellular and submitochondrial localization remains unclear in part because it is rapidly degraded. In this study, we report that the mitochondrial inner membrane rhomboid protease presenilin-associated rhomboid-like protein (PARL) mediates cleavage of PINK1 dependent on mitochondrial membrane potential. In the absence of PARL, the constitutive degradation of PINK1 is inhibited, stabilizing a 60-kD form inside mitochondria. When mitochondrial membrane potential is dissipated, PINK1 accumulates as a 63-kD full-length form on the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it can recruit Parkin to impaired mitochondria. Thus, differential localization to the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes appears to regulate PINK1 stability and function. PMID:21115803

  3. Loneliness: Clinical Import and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Cacioppo, Stephanie; Grippo, Angela J.; London, Sarah; Goossens, Luc; Cacioppo, John T.

    2014-01-01

    In 1978, when the Task Panel report to the US President’s Commission on Mental Health emphasized the importance of improving health care and easing the pain of those suffering from emotional distress syndromes including loneliness, few anticipated that this issue would still need to be addressed 40 years later. A meta-analysis (Masi et al., 2011) on the efficacy of treatments to reduce loneliness identified a need for well-controlled randomized clinical trials focusing on the rehabilitation of maladaptive social cognition. We review assessments of loneliness and build on this meta-analysis to discuss the efficacy of various treatments for loneliness. With the advances made over the past 5 years in the identification of the psychobiological and pharmaceutical mechanisms associated with loneliness and maladaptive social cognition, there is increasing evidence for the potential efficacy of integrated interventions that combine (social) cognitive behavioral therapy with short-term adjunctive pharmacological treatments. PMID:25866548

  4. Clinical Severity of β-thalassaemia/Hb E Disease Is Associated with Differential Activities of the Calpain-Calpastatin Proteolytic System

    PubMed Central

    Sukati, Suriyan; Svasti, Saovaros; Stifanese, Roberto; Averna, Monica; Panutdaporn, Nantika; Penglong, Tipparat; Melloni, Edon; Fucharoen, Suthat; Katzenmeier, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Earlier observations in the literature suggest that proteolytic degradation of excess unmatched α-globin chains reduces their accumulation and precipitation in β-thalassaemia erythroid precursor cells and have linked this proteolytic degradation to the activity of calpain protease. The aim of this study was to correlate the activity of calpain and its inhibitor, calpastatin, with different degrees of disease severity in β-thalassaemia. CD34+ cells were enriched from peripheral blood of healthy individuals (control group) and patients with mild and severe clinical presentations of β0-thalassaemia/Hb E disease. By ex vivo cultivation promoting erythroid cell differentiation for 7 days, proerythroblasts, were employed for the functional characterization of the calpain-calpastatin proteolytic system. In comparison to the control group, enzymatic activity and protein amounts of μ-calpain were found to be more than 3-fold increased in proerythroblasts from patients with mild clinical symptoms, whereas no significant difference was observed in patients with severe clinical symptoms. Furthermore, a 1.6-fold decrease of calpastatin activity and 3.2-fold accumulation of a 34 kDa calpain-mediated degradation product of calpastatin were observed in patients with mild clinical symptoms. The increased activity of calpain may be involved in the removal of excess α-globin chains contributing to a lower degree of disease severity in patients with mild clinical symptoms. PMID:22615919

  5. The clinical importance of fungal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ramage, Gordon; Williams, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Fungal biofilms have become an increasingly important clinical problem. The widespread use of antibiotics, frequent use of indwelling medical devices, and a trend toward increased patient immunosuppression have resulted in a creation of opportunity for clinically important yeasts and molds to form biofilms. This review will discuss the diversity and importance of fungal biofilms in the context of clinical medicine, provide novel insights into the clinical management of fungal biofilm infection, present evidence why these structures are recalcitrant to antifungal therapy, and discuss how our knowledge and understanding may lead to novel therapeutic intervention. PMID:23763758

  6. beta -Lactamases: which ones are clinically important?

    PubMed

    Rice, Louis B.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2000-06-01

    The introduction of a large array of beta-lactam antibiotics has spawned the emergence of an even larger variety of beta-lactamases designed to confer resistance to these agents. beta-lactamases are produced by both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, but their clinical importance is far greater among the gram-negatives. The virtual explosion in our knowledge about the variety of these enzymes can often create confusion and frustration among those not well versed in the field. In this paper, we attempt to focus the discussion of beta-lactamases on those enzymes that are of the greatest clinical importance, the Ambler Class A and C enzymes. We also discuss the growing importance of the Ambler Class B metallo beta-lactamases, which hydrolyze carbapenems and are increasing in prevalence in areas of significant carbapenem usage. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd. PMID:11498383

  7. Vertebral Fractures: Clinical Importance and Management.

    PubMed

    Kendler, D L; Bauer, D C; Davison, K S; Dian, L; Hanley, D A; Harris, S T; McClung, M R; Miller, P D; Schousboe, J T; Yuen, C K; Lewiecki, E M

    2016-02-01

    Vertebral fractures are common and can result in acute and chronic pain, decreases in quality of life, and diminished lifespan. The identification of vertebral fractures is important because they are robust predictors of future fractures. The majority of vertebral fractures do not come to clinical attention. Numerous modalities exist for visualizing suspected vertebral fracture. Although differing definitions of vertebral fracture may present challenges in comparing data between different investigations, at least 1 in 5 men and women aged >50 years have one or more vertebral fractures. There is clinical guidance to target spine imaging to individuals with a high probability of vertebral fracture. Radiology reports of vertebral fracture need to clearly state that the patient has a "fracture," with further pertinent details such as the number, recency, and severity of vertebral fracture, each of which is associated with risk of future fractures. Patients with vertebral fracture should be considered for antifracture therapy. Physical and pharmacologic modalities of pain control and exercises or physiotherapy to maintain spinal movement and strength are important components in the care of vertebral fracture patients. PMID:26524708

  8. Lactobacillus helveticus: the proteolytic system

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, M. W.; Tellez, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus is one of the species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) most commonly used in the production of fermented milk beverages and some types of hard cheese. The versatile nature of this bacterium is based on its highly efficient proteolytic system consisting of cell-envelope proteinases (CEPs), transport system and intracellular peptidases. Besides use of L. helveticus in cheese processing, the production of fermented milk preparations with health promoting properties has become an important industrial application. Studies have shown that fermented dairy products are able to decrease blood pressure, stimulate the immune system, promote calcium absorption, and exert an anti-virulent effect against pathogens. These beneficial effects are produced by a variety of peptides released during the hydrolysis of milk proteins by the proteolytic system of L. helveticus, which provides the bacterium with its nutritional requirements for growth. In recent years, studies have focused on understanding the factors that affect the kinetics of milk protein hydrolysis by specific strains and have concentrated on the effect of pH, temperature, growth phase, and matrix composition on the bacterial enzymatic system. This review focuses on the role of the proteolytic system of L. helveticus in the production of bioactive compounds formed during fermentation of dairy products. Taking advantage of the powerful proteolytic system of this bacterium opens up future opportunities to search for novel food-derived compounds with potential health promoting properties. PMID:23467265

  9. Statistical controversies in clinical research: the importance of importance.

    PubMed

    Gleiss, A; Zeillinger, R; Braicu, E I; Trillsch, F; Vergote, I; Schemper, M

    2016-07-01

    We define the notion of 'importance' of prognostic factors in studies of survival and suggest quantifying it by the Schemper-Henderson measure of explained variation. Conceptual differences to the standard approach for the statistical analysis of oncologic studies of survival are discussed and exemplified by means of a study of ovarian cancer. Explained variation permits to establish a ranking of the importance of factors, also if measured on different scales, or of different types (dichotomous, qualitative or continuous), and permits to compare groups of related factors. In practice, the importance of prognostic factors often is disappointingly low. From this, it follows that even strong and highly significant prognostic factors often do not translate into close determination of individual survival of patients. PMID:27052655

  10. Statistics in clinical research: Important considerations

    PubMed Central

    Barkan, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Statistical analysis is one of the foundations of evidence-based clinical practice, a key in conducting new clinical research and in evaluating and applying prior research. In this paper, we review the choice of statistical procedures, analyses of the associations among variables and techniques used when the clinical processes being examined are still in process. We discuss methods for building predictive models in clinical situations, and ways to assess the stability of these models and other quantitative conclusions. Techniques for comparing independent events are distinguished from those used with events in a causal chain or otherwise linked. Attention then turns to study design, to the determination of the sample size needed to make a given comparison, and to statistically negative studies. PMID:25566715

  11. Elastinolytic and proteolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Efrat; Safrin, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes into its environment at least seven extracellular proteases: pseudolysin (LasB protease; elastase), aeruginolysin (alkaline proteinase), staphylolysin (staphylolytic endopeptidase; LasA protease), lysyl endopeptidase (protease IV; PrpL), PASP (P. aeruginosa small protease), LepA (Large ExoProtease A), and an aminopeptidase. Their action on host proteins, both individually and synergistically, plays important roles in pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infections. Methods to measure/detect their activities are fundamental for understanding their physiological functions, roles in pathogenesis, mechanisms of action, regulation, and secretion. Most assays for determination/detection of proteolytic activity employ modified/non-modified casein or gelatin as substrates. In the quantitative assay, fragments generated from azocasein are separated from undigested substrate by trichloroacetic acid precipitation and their absorbance is measured. In non-quantitative assays, proteolytic activity is detected as clearing zones around bacterial growth or samples of culture supernatants on casein containing solid media formed due to local casein degradation. In zymography, individual proteases are detected as clear bands in gelatin/casein containing gels after SDS-PAGE separation, renaturation and protein staining. The elastinolytic capacity of P. aeruginosa is reflected by clearing zones on nutrient agar plates containing insoluble elastin instead of casein. Mueller-Hinton agar plates on which S. aureus cells are grown as a lawn are used to assess the susceptibility of S. aureus isolates to staphylolysin. A clear zone around a staphylolysin-containing sample indicates inhibition of S. aureus growth. Methods for measuring the activity of individual proteases are based on their cleavage specificity. These include assays of elastinolytic activity of pseudolysin and/or staphylolysin using elastin-Congo red as a substrate, a method for determination of

  12. Clinical Importance and Epidemiology of Quinolone Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eu Suk

    2014-01-01

    The quinolone class of antimicrobial agents is one of most widely used classes of antimicrobial agents in outpatient and inpatient treatment. However, quinolone resistance in gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria has emerged and increased globally. This resistance limits the usefulness of quinolones in clinical practice. The review summarizes mechanisms of quinolone resistance and its epidemiology and implications in the most common clinical settings, urinary tract infections, respiratory tract infections, intraabdominal infections, skin and skin structure infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:25566402

  13. The importance of clinical and management scripts.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger P

    2004-07-01

    Simply having excellent clinical skills is not enough to enable you to achieve practice goals. In the end, people will validate the quality of the practice based on the way you and your team communicate. It is amazing to realize how much impact we have on other individuals, based purely on what we say. A well-groomed dentist and staff possessing very attractive features and beautiful teeth almost invariably will work in the practice's favor. However, these traits, powerful as they may be, are incomplete without the ability to say the right thing at the right time. In the practice, the easiest way to ensure consistently excellent communication is to use clinical and management scripts. Nothing you do in your practice will equal the impact of what you say because it affects patient perceptions of quality and overall customer service experiences. Your goal is to have all routine communications in the practice turned into written scripts within 6 months. PMID:15637966

  14. Fluorescence Characterization of Clinically-Important Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dartnell, Lewis R.; Roberts, Tom A.; Moore, Ginny; Ward, John M.; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HCAI/HAI) represent a substantial threat to patient health during hospitalization and incur billions of dollars additional cost for subsequent treatment. One promising method for the detection of bacterial contamination in a clinical setting before an HAI outbreak occurs is to exploit native fluorescence of cellular molecules for a hand-held, rapid-sweep surveillance instrument. Previous studies have shown fluorescence-based detection to be sensitive and effective for food-borne and environmental microorganisms, and even to be able to distinguish between cell types, but this powerful technique has not yet been deployed on the macroscale for the primary surveillance of contamination in healthcare facilities to prevent HAI. Here we report experimental data for the specification and design of such a fluorescence-based detection instrument. We have characterized the complete fluorescence response of eleven clinically-relevant bacteria by generating excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) over broad wavelength ranges. Furthermore, a number of surfaces and items of equipment commonly present on a ward, and potentially responsible for pathogen transfer, have been analyzed for potential issues of background fluorescence masking the signal from contaminant bacteria. These include bedside handrails, nurse call button, blood pressure cuff and ward computer keyboard, as well as disinfectant cleaning products and microfiber cloth. All examined bacterial strains exhibited a distinctive double-peak fluorescence feature associated with tryptophan with no other cellular fluorophore detected. Thus, this fluorescence survey found that an emission peak of 340nm, from an excitation source at 280nm, was the cellular fluorescence signal to target for detection of bacterial contamination. The majority of materials analysed offer a spectral window through which bacterial contamination could indeed be detected. A few instances were found of potential problems

  15. [Selenium. Its physiologic and clinical importance].

    PubMed

    da Silva, A P

    1993-07-01

    Since its discovery in 1817, Selenium has had great biological importance as a key element of cellular protection and in its absence of pathological symptoms. In this revised work, historical aspects of selenium are considered, its characteristics, properties and source as well as its nutritional value, metabolism, physiopathological and biochemical function in humans and finally its future therapeutical application in humans and animals considering some of the traditional ways of treatment. PMID:8379356

  16. Importance of QT interval in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ambhore, Anand; Teo, Swee-Guan; Bin Omar, Abdul Razakjr; Poh, Kian-Keong

    2014-12-01

    Long QT interval is an important finding that is often missed by electrocardiogram interpreters. Long QT syndrome (inherited and acquired) is a potentially lethal cardiac channelopathy that is frequently mistaken for epilepsy. We present a case of long QT syndrome with multiple cardiac arrests presenting as syncope and seizures. The long QTc interval was aggravated by hypomagnesaemia and drugs, including clarithromycin and levofloxacin. Multiple drugs can cause prolongation of the QT interval, and all physicians should bear this in mind when prescribing these drugs. PMID:25630313

  17. Clinical Importance of Echogenic Swirling Pleural Effusions.

    PubMed

    Lane, Alison B; Petteys, Sarah; Ginn, Meghan; Nations, Joel A

    2016-04-01

    Thoracic sonography is an important tool in diagnosis and assessment of pleural effusions and can provide valuable information about the characteristics of accumulated pleural fluid, in addition to improving the safety of thoracentesis. In addition to the 4 classic sonographic pleural effusion patterns (anechoic, complex nonseptate, complex septate, and homogeneously echogenic), an echogenic swirling pattern has been previously described, which was originally thought to be associated with malignant effusion. Two cases of pleural effusion with an echogenic swirling pattern are described below, illustrating that this sonographic finding can be seen in both exudative and transudative effusions. PMID:26931787

  18. [Clinical importance of hypocaloric parenteral feeding].

    PubMed

    Behrendt, W; Kunitz, O; Kauhl, W; Lade, R

    1994-01-01

    Hypocaloric parenteral nutrition (HPN) is mainly and frequently used in surgical medicine since it allows a reliable and standardized supply of nutrients. Ready-mix solutions which are suitable for peripheral venous nutrition generally contain about 50 g carbohydrates (glucose and/or xylitol), 25 g amino acids and electrolytes per liter. The osmolarity of the solutions averages between 600 and 800 mosmol/l. HPN has two distinct advantages: firstly the minimal effects on carbohydrate metabolism and secondly the good improvement in nitrogen balance. If 2 g/kg and day glucose are administered, even postoperatively, the mean blood sugar levels are only just above the normal range and an amino acid dosage of 1 g/kg and day, compared with liquid substitution alone or the administration of small amounts of carbohydrates, leads to an approximately 60% improvement in postoperative N-balance. Experience gained with HPN in surgical medicine to date permits the following recommendation: 1. HPN should not be used after small and moderate interventions with short nutritional abstinence; it is not necessary to administer nutrients in such cases. 2. HPN may be used after moderate to serious surgical interventions; e.g. after gastrointestinal resections in the case of elective surgery on patients with a normal nutritional status. However, studies have yet to prove the clinical efficacy of HPN, e.g. as evidenced by shorter hospitalization or a reduced perioperative morbidity or mortality, although this reservation equally applies to the routinely administered complete parenteral or enteral nutrition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7975956

  19. [Clinical importance and diagnosis of halitosis].

    PubMed

    Akos, Nagy; Zsolt, Brugoviczky; Péter, Novák; Gábor, Nagy

    2012-09-01

    The origin of halitosis comes from the Latin word "halitus" meaning 'breath, exhaled air', and in the Hungarian terminology it means bad and smelly breath. The human body emits a number of volatile molecules, which have a peculiar odour. Their presence is influenced by several factors, such as genetic, nutritional and psychological factors. Since bad breath belongs to taboo subjects, halitosis can often lead to social isolation. To determine the incidence of halitosis, an exact diagnosis is needed which sometimes predestinates the possible treatment as well. Investigators estimate the incidence about 50% in the whole population. The male/female ratio is the same and the incidence is growing with age. The diagnosis can be genuine halitosis, pseudo halitosis and halitophobia. We can divide the genuine type into physiological and pathophysiological subtypes. The cause of the halitosis usually can be found in the oral cavity. The volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) produced by some of the oral bacteria are responsible for its development. Only 10% of the causes are extraoral, mostly inflammation of airways or gastrointestinal disorders. The judgment of halitosis is based on three objective methods: the organoleptic, the sulphide monitoring and the gas cromatography methods. Since the origin of the halitosis is mainly the oral cavity, dentists should treat them. Beyond the dental treatments the enhancement of the oral hygiene, the continuous motivation and monitoring are also very important, such as the use of tongue cleansing and special anti-malodour rinses. PMID:23240492

  20. The Importance of Early Experiences: Clinical, Research, and Policy Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeanah, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    The degree to which early adverse experiences exert long term effects on development and how much early adversity may be overcome through subsequent experiences are important mental health questions. The clinical, research and policy perspectives on these questions lead to different answers. From a clinical perspective, change is always possible,…

  1. Interprofessional clinical education: clinicians' views on the importance of leadership.

    PubMed

    Missen, Karen; Jacob, Elisabeth R; Barnett, Tony; Walker, Lorraine; Cross, Merylin

    2012-01-01

    The current shortage of health professionals necessitates new approaches to clinical education that can expand the number of undergraduate students undertaking clinical placements without increasing the burden on clinical staff or placing patients at risk. Interprofessional education has the potential to help increase clinical capacity whilst enriching students' clinical experience. This paper reports on a project which investigated the potential for interprofessional education to increase undergraduate clinical placement capacity in clinical settings. The project utilised an exploratory descriptive methodology to obtain the views of health care professionals about the use of interprofessional education in clinical education at three rural health facilities in Victoria, Australia. Participants (n = 57) had a key role with each health care facility in coordinating and facilitating undergraduate clinical placements. This paper examines the clinicians' views about the central role that leadership plays in actioning interprofessional education in the clinical setting. Whilst interprofessional education was regarded favourably by the majority of participants, data indicated that leadership from education providers, health services, and regulatory authorities was crucial to enable interprofessional education to be implemented and sustained within the clinical learning environment. Without leadership from each of these three spheres of influence, interprofessional education will continue to be difficult to implement for undergraduate students and compromise their exposure to an important aspect of the working life of health care professionals. Such a failure will limit graduates' readiness for collaborative and cross-disciplinary practice. PMID:23362604

  2. Clinical audit: still an important tool for improving healthcare.

    PubMed

    Paton, James Y; Ranmal, Rita; Dudley, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The use of data to challenge and improve healthcare has a long and distinguished history but has often failed to bring about expected improvements. It has never become fully embedded in clinical practice, probably because data alone are insufficient to drive change. There is now a greater appreciation that changing and improving healthcare requires changing behaviours. Clinical audit remains one of the important tools that can be used to facilitate such change. PMID:25122156

  3. Sequence-derived structural features driving proteolytic processing.

    PubMed

    Belushkin, Alexander A; Vinogradov, Dmitry V; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Osterman, Andrei L; Cieplak, Piotr; Kazanov, Marat D

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic signaling, or regulated proteolysis, is an essential part of many important pathways such as Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog. How the structure of the cleaved substrate regions influences the efficacy of proteolytic processing remains underexplored. Here, we analyzed the relative importance in proteolysis of various structural features derived from substrate sequences using a dataset of more than 5000 experimentally verified proteolytic events captured in CutDB. Accessibility to the solvent was recognized as an essential property of a proteolytically processed polypeptide chain. Proteolytic events were found nearly uniformly distributed among three types of secondary structure, although with some enrichment in loops. Cleavages in α-helices were found to be relatively abundant in regions apparently prone to unfolding, while cleavages in β-structures tended to be located at the periphery of β-sheets. Application of the same statistical procedures to proteolytic events divided into separate sets according to the catalytic classes of proteases proved consistency of the results and confirmed that the structural mechanisms of proteolysis are universal. The estimated prediction power of sequence-derived structural features, which turned out to be sufficiently high, presents a rationale for their use in bioinformatic prediction of proteolytic events. PMID:24227478

  4. SEQUENCE-DERIVED STRUCTURAL FEATURES DRIVING PROTEOLYTIC PROCESSING

    PubMed Central

    Belushkin, Alexander A.; Vinogradov, Dmitry V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Cieplak, Piotr; Kazanov, Marat D.

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic signaling, or regulated proteolysis, is an essential part of many important pathways such as Notch, Wnt, and Hedgehog. How the structure of the cleaved substrate regions influences the efficacy of proteolytic processing remains underexplored. Here, we analyzed the relative importance in proteolysis of various structural features derived from substrate sequences using a dataset of more than five thousand experimentally verified proteolytic events captured in CutDB. Accessibility to the solvent was recognized as an essential property of a proteolytically processed polypeptide chain. Proteolytic events were found nearly uniformly distributed among three types of secondary structure, although with some enrichment in loops. Cleavages in α-helices were found to be relatively abundant in regions apparently prone to unfolding, while cleavages in β-structures tended to be located at the periphery of β-sheets. Application of the same statistical procedures to proteolytic events divided into separate sets according to the catalytic classes of proteases proved consistency of the results and confirmed that the structural mechanisms of proteolysis are universal. The estimated prediction power of sequence-derived structural features, which turned out to be sufficiently high, presents a rationale for their use in bioinformatic prediction of proteolytic events. PMID:24227478

  5. Research Applications of Proteolytic Enzymes in Molecular Biology

    PubMed Central

    Mótyán, János András; Tóth, Ferenc; Tőzsér, József

    2013-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes (also termed peptidases, proteases and proteinases) are capable of hydrolyzing peptide bonds in proteins. They can be found in all living organisms, from viruses to animals and humans. Proteolytic enzymes have great medical and pharmaceutical importance due to their key role in biological processes and in the life-cycle of many pathogens. Proteases are extensively applied enzymes in several sectors of industry and biotechnology, furthermore, numerous research applications require their use, including production of Klenow fragments, peptide synthesis, digestion of unwanted proteins during nucleic acid purification, cell culturing and tissue dissociation, preparation of recombinant antibody fragments for research, diagnostics and therapy, exploration of the structure-function relationships by structural studies, removal of affinity tags from fusion proteins in recombinant protein techniques, peptide sequencing and proteolytic digestion of proteins in proteomics. The aim of this paper is to review the molecular biological aspects of proteolytic enzymes and summarize their applications in the life sciences. PMID:24970197

  6. Prostate Cancer in Young Men: An Important Clinical Entity

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Claudia A.; Tsodikov, Alex; Ishak-Howard, Miriam; Cooney, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is considered a disease of older men, but today over 10% of new diagnoses occur in U.S. men ≤ 55 years. Early onset prostate cancer, i.e., diagnosed at ≤55 years, differs from prostate cancer in older men in several ways. Among men diagnosed with high grade and stage prostate cancer, men with early onset prostate cancer are more likely to die of their cancer, with higher cause-specific mortality than all others except those diagnosed over age 80. This suggests that important biological differences may exist in early onset disease compared to late onset disease. Furthermore, early onset prostate cancer has been shown to have a more significant genetic component indicating that this group may benefit more than most from evaluation of genetic risk. Clinically, although the majority of cases ≤ 55 years are diagnosed with low risk disease, their extended life expectancy exposes them to long-term risk of disease progression resulting in death from prostate cancer, but also to prolonged impact from treatment-related morbidities. These patients pose unique challenges and opportunities for both the research and clinical communities. We therefore suggest that early onset prostate cancer is a distinct phenotype, from both an etiologic and clinical perspective, that deserves further attention. PMID:24818853

  7. Importance of population-based studies in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ronnie, George; Ve, Ramesh Sathyamangalam; Velumuri, Lokapavani; Asokan, Rashima; Vijaya, Lingam

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, there have been reports on the prevalence of glaucoma from the Vellore Eye Survey, Andhra Pradesh Eye Diseases Survey, Aravind Comprehensive Eye Survey, Chennai Glaucoma Study and West Bengal Glaucoma Study. Population-based studies provide important information regarding the prevalence and risk factors for glaucoma. They also highlight regional differences in the prevalence of various types of glaucoma. It is possible to gather important insights regarding the number of persons affected with glaucoma and the proportion with undiagnosed disease. We reviewed the different population-based studies from India and compare their findings. The lacunae in ophthalmic care that can be inferred from these studies are identified and possible reasons and solutions are discussed. We also discuss the clinical relevance of the various findings, and how it reflects on clinical practice in the country. Since India has a significantly high disease burden, we examine the possibility of population-based screening for disease in the Indian context. PMID:21150021

  8. [Clinical importance and diagnostic methods of minimal hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Stawicka, Agnieszka; Zbrzeźniak, Justyna; Świderska, Aleksandra; Kilisińska, Natalia; Świderska, Magdalena; Jaroszewicz, Jerzy; Flisiak, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) encompasses a number of neuropsychological and neurophysiological disorders in patients suffering from liver cirrhosis, who do not display abnormalities during a medical interview or physical examination. A negative influence of MHE on the quality of life of patients suffering from liver cirrhosis was confirmed, which include retardation of ability of operating motor vehicles and disruption of multiple health-related areas, as well as functioning in the society. The data on frequency of traffic offences and accidents amongst patients diagnosed with MHE in comparison to patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis without MHE, as well as healthy persons is alarming. Those patients are unaware of their disorder and retardation of their ability to operate vehicles, therefore it is of utmost importance to define this group. The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (formerly "subclinical" encephalopathy) erroneously suggested the unnecessity of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with liver cirrhosis. Diagnosing MHE is an important predictive factor for occurrence of overt encephalopathy - more than 50% of patients with this diagnosis develop overt encephalopathy during a period of 30 months after. Early diagnosing MHE gives a chance to implement proper treatment which can be a prevention of overt encephalopathy. Due to continuing lack of clinical research there exist no commonly agreed-upon standards for definition, diagnostics, classification and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. This article introduces the newest findings regarding the importance of MHE, scientific recommendations and provides detailed descriptions of the most valuable diagnostic methods. PMID:27000818

  9. The Incidence, Clinical Importance and Management of Incompetent Gastrocnemius Vein

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence, clinical importance and management of the incompetent gastrocnemius vein. Methods: The incompetency was examined by duplex and pulse-Doppler ultrasound at the popliteal fossa in a standing position between July 2006 and August 2014. Results: Among 1805 legs surveyed, 14 legs showed primary incompetent gastrocnemius vein (0.78%). The incompetency was in medial gastrocnemius vein in 13 legs (93%). Clinical manifestation was varicose vein in the small saphenous territory in nine, varicose vein in great saphenous territory in one, congestive dermatitis in two, calf clamp in one and no symptom in one. The nine cases with varicose vein in the small saphenous territory received surgical management. These included three cases with residual varicose veins after saphenopopliteal disconnection and stripping small saphenous vein. The root of the gastrocnemius vein was divided leaving no complication. In cases without varicose vein in small saphenous territory, an elastic compression socks was useful in some degree. Conclusions: Incompetency of gastrocnemius vein was not so rare. When a case is accompanied by small saphenous varicose veins, division of the root of gastrocnemius vein along with small saphenous vein stripping is recommended in order to reduce residual varicose vein. PMID:27087871

  10. Radiological findings and the clinical importance of megacalycosis

    PubMed Central

    Kalaitzis, Christos; Patris, Emmanuel; Deligeorgiou, Evangelia; Sountoulides, Petros; Bantis, Athanasios; Giannakopoulos, Stilianos; Touloupidis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the radiological findings and the clinical importance of megacalycosis. Materials and methods On the basis of a case report and literature review, diagnostic criteria and clinical significance of megacalycosis are presented. Result Megacalycosis is mostly asymptomatic and is usually discovered either accidentally or as a result of its complications, such as stone formation, flank pain, hematuria, infection, and fever. The renal pelvis, infundibulum, and ureter are not dilated. Calyces have a semilunar configuration rather than the conventional triangular or conical form. The tip of each pyramid is flat, and the calyces possess neither fornix nor papillae impressions. The number of calyces is increased compared to the healthy condition, typically from 20–25. The renal parenchyma has a normal width but with a slight narrowing of the renal medulla. The kidney exhibits normal function, in particular with respect to its ability to concentrate the urine. Conclusion Megacalycosis is a rare, usually unilateral dilatation of the kidney calyces in the presence of a normal, undilated renal pelvis and ureter. Its pathological significance lies in the occurrence of complications. PMID:26528455

  11. Proteolytic Cleavage Driven by Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Kötzler, Miriam P; Withers, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of human host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) to its mature form was recently shown, unexpectedly, to occur in a UDP-GlcNAc-dependent fashion within the transferase active site of O-GlcNAc-transferase (OGT) (Lazarus, M. B., Jiang, J., Kapuria, V., Bhuiyan, T., Janetzko, J., Zandberg, W. F., Vocadlo, D. J., Herr, W., and Walker, S. (2013) Science 342, 1235-1239). An interesting mechanism involving formation and then intramolecular rearrangement of a covalent glycosyl ester adduct of the HCF-1 polypeptide was proposed to account for this unprecedented proteolytic activity. However, the key intermediate remained hypothetical. Here, using a model enzyme system for which the formation of a glycosyl ester within the enzyme active site has been shown unequivocally, we show that ester formation can indeed lead to proteolysis of the adjacent peptide bond, thereby providing substantive support for the mechanism of HCF-1 processing proposed. PMID:26515062

  12. 77 FR 72409 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services..., 2012, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown, Pennsylvania 18106, made... controlled substance for analytical research and clinical trials. The import of the above listed basic...

  13. 77 FR 75670 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Fisher Clinical Services,Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... FR 60143, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown, Pennsylvania 18106, made... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Fisher Clinical Services... registration of Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., to import the basic class of controlled substance is...

  14. 78 FR 59064 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services... 21, 2013, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown, Pennsylvania 18106, made... for clinical trials, analytical research and testing. The import of the above listed basic classes...

  15. 77 FR 60143 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services..., Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown, Pennsylvania 18106, made application by... substance for analytical research and clinical trials. The import of the above listed basic class...

  16. The Importance of Children in Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Medicines for Children The Importance of Children in Clinical Trials Past Issues / Winter 2012 Table ... say to a parent who asks you why children’s clinical trials are important? Clinical research is critically ...

  17. Airsickness: Etiology, Treatment, and Clinical Importance-A Review.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Orit; Tal, Dror

    2015-11-01

    Airsickness is one of the forms of motion sickness, and is of significance in both commercial and military flight. Whereas commercial airline passengers may simply feel poorly, the effect of airsickness on military aircrew may lead to a decrement in performance and adversely affect the mission. This is of major importance in the case of flight safety, when a pilot who is incapacitated may endanger the aircraft. The problem is particularly evident in pilot training, because of the high incidence of airsickness at this stage in the pilot's career. The majority of aircrew undergo habituation to airsickness during their service, with a reduction in symptoms and improved function. Although airsickness is a wellknown problem in aviation, we were unable to locate a review of this topic in the literature. This review focuses on the characteristics, clinical evaluation, and treatment of airsickness. It also presents the experience of the Israeli flight academy, and our solution for Navy pilots who have to contend with the risk of seasickness before taking to the air. PMID:26540704

  18. Single Cell Proteolytic Assays to Investigate Cancer Clonal Heterogeneity and Cell Dynamics Using an Efficient Cell Loading Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Yu-Heng; Ingram, Patrick; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in cancer invasion, and recent work suggests that heterogeneous cancer populations cooperate in this process. Despite the importance of cell heterogeneity, conventional proteolytic assays measure average activity, requiring thousands of cells and providing limited information about heterogeneity and dynamics. Here, we developed a microfluidic platform that provides high-efficiency cell loading and simple valveless isolation, so the proteolytic activity of a small sample (10–100 cells) can be easily characterized. Combined with a single cell derived (clonal) sphere formation platform, we have successfully demonstrated the importance of microenvironmental cues for proteolytic activity and also investigated the difference between clones. Furthermore, the platform allows monitoring single cells at multiple time points, unveiling different cancer cell line dynamics in proteolytic activity. The presented tool facilitates single cell proteolytic analysis using small samples, and our findings illuminate the heterogeneous and dynamic nature of proteolytic activity. PMID:27283981

  19. Single Cell Proteolytic Assays to Investigate Cancer Clonal Heterogeneity and Cell Dynamics Using an Efficient Cell Loading Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Yu-Heng; Ingram, Patrick; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-06-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in cancer invasion, and recent work suggests that heterogeneous cancer populations cooperate in this process. Despite the importance of cell heterogeneity, conventional proteolytic assays measure average activity, requiring thousands of cells and providing limited information about heterogeneity and dynamics. Here, we developed a microfluidic platform that provides high-efficiency cell loading and simple valveless isolation, so the proteolytic activity of a small sample (10–100 cells) can be easily characterized. Combined with a single cell derived (clonal) sphere formation platform, we have successfully demonstrated the importance of microenvironmental cues for proteolytic activity and also investigated the difference between clones. Furthermore, the platform allows monitoring single cells at multiple time points, unveiling different cancer cell line dynamics in proteolytic activity. The presented tool facilitates single cell proteolytic analysis using small samples, and our findings illuminate the heterogeneous and dynamic nature of proteolytic activity.

  20. Clinical Data Acquisition Standards Harmonization importance and benefits in clinical data management

    PubMed Central

    Gaddale, Jagadeeswara Rao

    2015-01-01

    In the clinical trial process, precise and concise data collection at the source is imperative and requires statistical analysis to be performed to derive the primary and secondary endpoints. The quality of raw data collection has a direct impact on the statistical outputs generated as per the statistical analysis plan. Hence, the data collection tools used for data transcription must be clear, understandable, and precise, which helps the investigator to provide the accurate subject data. Clinical Data Acquisition Standards Harmonization (CDASH) provides guidance to develop the case report form (CRF) for domains that are commonly used for the majority of the clinical trials across the therapeutic areas. This white paper describes the importance of CDASH standards, its advantages and its impact on the efforts and the cost in designing the CRF. PMID:26623387

  1. Copy number variation plays an important role in clinical epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Heather; Shen, Yiping; Avallone, Jennifer; Sheidley, Beth R.; Pinsky, Rebecca; Bergin, Ann M.; Berry, Gerard T.; Duffy, Frank H.; Eksioglu, Yaman; Harris, David J.; Hisama, Fuki M.; Ho, Eugenia; Irons, Mira; Jacobsen, Christina M.; James, Philip; Kothare, Sanjeev; Khwaja, Omar; Lipton, Jonathan; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Markowitz, Jennifer; Maski, Kiran; Megerian, J. Thomas; Neilan, Edward; Raffalli, Peter C.; Robbins, Michael; Roberts, Amy; Roe, Eugene; Rollins, Caitlin; Sahin, Mustafa; Sarco, Dean; Schonwald, Alison; Smith, Sharon E.; Soul, Janet; Stoler, Joan M.; Takeoka, Masanori; Tan, Wen-Han; Torres, Alcy R.; Tsai, Peter; Urion, David K.; Weissman, Laura; Wolff, Robert; Wu, Bai-Lin; Miller, David T.; Poduri, Annapurna

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the role of copy number abnormalities detectable by chromosomal microarray (CMA) testing in patients with epilepsy at a tertiary care center. Methods We identified patients with ICD-9 codes for epilepsy or seizures and clinical CMA testing performed between October 2006 and February 2011 at Boston Children’s Hospital. We reviewed medical records and included patients meeting criteria for epilepsy. We phenotypically characterized patients with epilepsy-associated abnormalities on CMA. Results Of 973 patients who had CMA and ICD-9 codes for epilepsy or seizures, 805 patients satisfied criteria for epilepsy. We observed 437 copy number variants (CNVs) in 323 patients (1–4 per patient), including 185 (42%) deletions and 252 (58%) duplications. Forty (9%) were confirmed de novo, 186 (43%) were inherited, and parental data were unavailable for 211 (48%). Excluding full chromosome trisomies, CNV size ranged from 18 kb to 142 Mb, and 34% were over 500 kb. In at least 40 cases (5%), the epilepsy phenotype was explained by a CNV, including 29 patients with epilepsy-associated syndromes and 11 with likely disease-associated CNVs involving epilepsy genes or “hotspots.” We observed numerous recurrent CNVs including 10 involving loss or gain of Xp22.31, a region described in patients with and without epilepsy. Interpretation Copy number abnormalities play an important role in patients with epilepsy. Given that the diagnostic yield of CMA for epilepsy patients is similar to the yield in autism spectrum disorders and in prenatal diagnosis, for which published guidelines recommend testing with CMA, we recommend the implementation of CMA in the evaluation of unexplained epilepsy. PMID:24811917

  2. [Laboratory results in clinical practice: importance of interpretation in the clinical context].

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Annic; Schuetz, Philipp

    2015-02-01

    Recently, a plenitude of novel laboratory tests has become available for physicians to improve the diagnostic and prognostic work up of patients. Yet, as with all tests, laboratory test can be falsely positive or falsely negative and potentially misguide clinicians and caregivers. Shortcomings of pre-analytical factors, test performance as well as an inappropriate ordering of laboratory tests contributes to diagnostic errors and potentially generate unnecessary costs. Laboratory tests should only be ordered, if results have clinical consequences and improve the assessment of the patient. Within this review focusing on the example of the inflammatory biomarker "Procalcitonin" for antibiotic stewardship and the hormonal marker testosterone, we aim to exemplify important draw backs and shortcomings in laboratory tests and the importance of interpretation of these results in the context of the clinical situation. PMID:25630294

  3. Clinical and Business Intelligence: Why It's Important to Your Pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Brian; Fox, Brent I

    2016-07-01

    According to the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society, "Clinical & Business Intelligence (C&BI) is the use and analysis of data captured in the healthcare setting to directly inform decision-making" (http://www.himss.org/library/clinical-business-intelligence). Some say that it is the right information given to the right person at the right time in the right way. No matter how you define it, the fact remains that timely access, synthesis, and visualization of clinical data have become key to how health professionals make patient care decisions and improve care delivery. PMID:27559195

  4. Importance of placebo effect in cough clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Eccles, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Cough is a unique symptom because, unlike sneeze and other symptoms, it can be under voluntary control and this complicates clinical trials on cough medicines. All over-the-counter cough medicines (OTC) are very effective treatments because of their placebo effect. The placebo effect is enhanced by expectancy related to advertising, brand, packaging, and formulation. This placebo effect creates a problem for the conduct of clinical trials on OTC cough medicines that attempt to demonstrate the efficacy of a pharmacological agent above that of any placebo effect. Up to 85% of the efficacy of some cough medicines can be attributed to a placebo effect. The placebo effect apparent in clinical trials consists of several components: natural recovery, regression of cough response toward mean, demulcent effect, effect of sweetness, voluntary control, and effects related to expectancy and meaning of the treatment. The placebo effect has been studied most in the pain model, and placebo analgesia is reported to depend on the activation of endogenous opioid systems in the brain; this model may be applicable to cough. A balanced placebo design may help to control for the placebo effect, but this trial design may not be acceptable due to deception of patients. The placebo effect in clinical trials may be controlled by use of a crossover design, where feasible, and the changes in the magnitude of the placebo effect in this study design are discussed. PMID:19760296

  5. The importance of standard operating procedures in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sajdak, Rebecca; Trembath, Lisaann; Thomas, Kathy S

    2013-09-01

    This special contribution provides insight into the role that standard operating procedures (SOPs) play in an imaging department and their value in building a high-quality research site. If you have ever participated in a clinical trial, many of the principles described in this article should be familiar. However, this article goes a step further by presenting information from a pharmaceutical or device sponsor's point of view-what the sponsor expects from a site during the course of a research study. This article is intended not to provide a complete set of instructions on how to create a great SOP but, instead, to present guidelines to ensure that the key elements are included. After reading the article, you will be able to define SOPs as they pertain to the clinical trial environment, describe key components of an SOP, list the clinical research SOPs that exist in your institution and imaging department, identify which additional SOPs might improve site performance, and describe how the sponsor relies on SOPs to ensure that the highest quality of research is attained. PMID:23853088

  6. [Iatrogeny. The importance of clinical diagnosis. Myopathies induced by clofibrate].

    PubMed

    Godoy, J M; Nicaretta, D H; Balassiano, S L; Skacel, M

    1992-03-01

    The authors describe the neurological manifestations of a female patient with hypercholesterolemia who developed myopathy in the course of her treatment with clofibrate. After the drug was tapered off, the neurological signs and symptoms disappeared. Therefore, attention is called for the importance of the differential diagnosis of iatrogenic myopathies with polymyositis. PMID:1307471

  7. Recent progress and clinical importance on pharmacogenetics in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Thomas I Peng; Yong, Wei Peng; Innocenti, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances have provided unprecedented opportunities to identify prognostic and predictive markers of efficacy of cancer therapy. Genetic markers can be used to exclude patients who will not benefit from therapy, exclude patients at high risk of severe toxicity, and adjust dosing. Genomic approaches for marker discovery now include genome-wide association studies and tumor DNA sequencing. The challenge is now to select markers for which there is enough evidence to transition them to the clinic. The hurdles include the inherent low frequency of many of these markers, the lengthy validation process through trials, as well as legislative and economic hurdles. Attempts to answer questions about certain markers more quickly have led to an increased popularity of trials with enrichment design, especially in the light of the dramatic phase I results seen in recent months. Personalized medicine in oncology is a step closer to reality. PMID:21950596

  8. Natural Green Coating Inhibits Adhesion of Clinically Important Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Trentin, Danielle S.; Silva, Denise B.; Frasson, Amanda P.; Rzhepishevska, Olena; da Silva, Márcia V.; de L. Pulcini, Elinor; James, Garth; Soares, Gabriel V.; Tasca, Tiana; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Giordani, Raquel B.; Lopes, Norberto P.; Macedo, Alexandre J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite many advances, biomaterial-associated infections continue to be a major clinical problem. In order to minimize bacterial adhesion, material surface modifications are currently being investigated and natural products possess large potential for the design of innovative surface coatings. We report the bioguided phytochemical investigation of Pityrocarpa moniliformis and the characterization of tannins by mass spectrometry. It was demonstrated that B-type linked proanthocyanidins-coated surfaces, here termed Green coatings, reduced Gram-positive bacterial adhesion and supported mammalian cell spreading. The proposed mechanism of bacterial attachment inhibition is based on electrostatic repulsion, high hydrophilicity and the steric hindrance provided by the coating that blocks bacterium-substratum interactions. This work shows the applicability of a prototype Green-coated surface that aims to promote necessary mammalian tissue compatibility, while reducing bacterial colonization. PMID:25655943

  9. Is clinical breast examination important for breast cancer detection?

    PubMed Central

    Provencher, L.; Hogue, J.C.; Desbiens, C.; Poirier, B.; Poirier, E.; Boudreau, D.; Joyal, M.; Diorio, C.; Duchesne, N.; Chiquette, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Screening clinical breast examination (cbe) is controversial; the use of cbe is declining not only as a screening tool, but also as a diagnostic tool. In the present study, we aimed to assess the value of cbe in breast cancer detection in a tertiary care centre for breast diseases. Methods This retrospective study of all breast cancers diagnosed between July 1999 and December 2010 at our centre categorized cases according to the mean of detection (cbe, mammography, or both). A cbe was considered “abnormal” in the presence of a mass, nipple discharge, skin or nipple retraction, edema, erythema, peau d’orange, or ulcers. Results During the study period, a complete dataset was available for 6333 treated primary breast cancers. Cancer types were ductal carcinoma in situ (15.3%), invasive ductal carcinoma (75.7%), invasive lobular carcinoma (9.0%), or others (2.2%). Of the 6333 cancers, 36.5% (n = 2312) were detected by mammography alone, 54.8% (n = 3470) by mammography and cbe, and 8.7% (n = 551) by physician-performed cbe alone (or 5.3% if considering ultrasonography). Invasive tumours diagnosed by cbe alone were more often triple-negative, her2-positive, node-positive, and larger than those diagnosed by mammography alone (p < 0.05). Conclusions A significant number of cancers would have been missed if cbe had not been performed. Compared with cancers detected by mammography alone, those detected by cbe had more aggressive features. Clinical breast examination is a very low-cost test that could improve the detection of breast cancer and could prompt breast ultrasonography in the case of a negative mammogram. PMID:27536182

  10. Central blood pressure: current evidence and clinical importance

    PubMed Central

    McEniery, Carmel M.; Cockcroft, John R.; Roman, Mary J.; Franklin, Stanley S.; Wilkinson, Ian B.

    2014-01-01

    Pressure measured with a cuff and sphygmomanometer in the brachial artery is accepted as an important predictor of future cardiovascular risk. However, systolic pressure varies throughout the arterial tree, such that aortic (central) systolic pressure is actually lower than corresponding brachial values, although this difference is highly variable between individuals. Emerging evidence now suggests that central pressure is better related to future cardiovascular events than is brachial pressure. Moreover, anti-hypertensive drugs can exert differential effects on brachial and central pressure. Therefore, basing treatment decisions on central, rather than brachial pressure, is likely to have important implications for the future diagnosis and management of hypertension. Such a paradigm shift will, however, require further, direct evidence that selectively targeting central pressure, brings added benefit, over and above that already provided by brachial artery pressure. PMID:24459197

  11. Central blood pressure: current evidence and clinical importance.

    PubMed

    McEniery, Carmel M; Cockcroft, John R; Roman, Mary J; Franklin, Stanley S; Wilkinson, Ian B

    2014-07-01

    Pressure measured with a cuff and sphygmomanometer in the brachial artery is accepted as an important predictor of future cardiovascular risk. However, systolic pressure varies throughout the arterial tree, such that aortic (central) systolic pressure is actually lower than corresponding brachial values, although this difference is highly variable between individuals. Emerging evidence now suggests that central pressure is better related to future cardiovascular events than is brachial pressure. Moreover, anti-hypertensive drugs can exert differential effects on brachial and central pressure. Therefore, basing treatment decisions on central, rather than brachial pressure, is likely to have important implications for the future diagnosis and management of hypertension. Such a paradigm shift will, however, require further, direct evidence that selectively targeting central pressure, brings added benefit, over and above that already provided by brachial artery pressure. PMID:24459197

  12. Methods for Cultivation of Luminal Parasitic Protists of Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    Clark, C. Graham; Diamond, Louis S.

    2002-01-01

    Cultivation of luminal protistan parasites has a long history. In this review we discuss the methods and media that are most widely used for the establishment and maintenance of the following organisms in culture: Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Dientamoeba fragilis, Blastocystis hominis, and Balantidium coli. While cultivation is of limited importance in the diagnostic laboratory, it is essential to most research laboratories, and it is toward the latter that this review is primarily aimed. PMID:12097242

  13. Porphyromonas gingivalis-derived lysine gingipain enhances osteoclast differentiation induced by tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β but suppresses that by interleukin-17A: importance of proteolytic degradation of osteoprotegerin by lysine gingipain.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Tomohito; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Yamada, Atsushi; Takami, Masamichi; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Hoshino, Marie; Imamura, Takahisa; Akiyama, Chie; Yasuhara, Rika; Mishima, Kenji; Maruyama, Toshifumi; Kohda, Chikara; Tanaka, Kazuo; Potempa, Jan; Yasuda, Hisataka; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2014-05-30

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease accompanied by alveolar bone resorption by osteoclasts. Porphyromonas gingivalis, an etiological agent for periodontitis, produces cysteine proteases called gingipains, which are classified based on their cleavage site specificity (i.e. arginine (Rgps) and lysine (Kgps) gingipains). We previously reported that Kgp degraded osteoprotegerin (OPG), an osteoclastogenesis inhibitory factor secreted by osteoblasts, and enhanced osteoclastogenesis induced by various Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands (Yasuhara, R., Miyamoto, Y., Takami, M., Imamura, T., Potempa, J., Yoshimura, K., and Kamijo, R. (2009) Lysine-specific gingipain promotes lipopolysaccharide- and active-vitamin D3-induced osteoclast differentiation by degrading osteoprotegerin. Biochem. J. 419, 159-166). Osteoclastogenesis is induced not only by TLR ligands but also by proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-17A, in inflammatory conditions, such as periodontitis. Although Kgp augmented osteoclastogenesis induced by TNF-α and IL-1β in co-cultures of mouse osteoblasts and bone marrow cells, it suppressed that induced by IL-17A. In a comparison of proteolytic degradation of these cytokines by Kgp in a cell-free system with that of OPG, TNF-α and IL-1β were less susceptible, whereas IL-17A and OPG were equally susceptible to degradation by Kgp. These results indicate that the enhancing effect of Kgp on cytokine-induced osteoclastogenesis is dependent on the difference in degradation efficiency between each cytokine and OPG. In addition, elucidation of the N-terminal amino acid sequences of OPG fragments revealed that Kgp primarily cleaved OPG in its death domain homologous region, which might prevent dimer formation of OPG required for inhibition of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand. Collectively, our results suggest that degradation of OPG by Kgp is a crucial event in the development of

  14. Juvenile spondyloarthropathy: an important clinical lesson to remember.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Radhika; Ngiu, Chai Soon; Shaharir, Syahrul Sazliyana; Said, Mohd Shahrir Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Spondyloarthropathy (SpA) is a group of inflammatory conditions that include spondylitis, sacroiliitis, asymmetrical peripheral arthritis and enthesitis. This condition is known as juvenile SpA when the diagnosis is made in patients up to 16 years of age. Enthesitis is a highly specific feature that occurs more often in juvenile SpA than in the adult form. In contrast to adult onset SpA, the initial manifestation of juvenile SpA rarely presents as inflammatory back pain. Peripheral arthritis is the more common presenting feature. We report a case of a 12-year-old boy who presented with a 1-year history of progressive low back pain, gluteal pain and thigh pain. There were no clinical symptoms of arthropathy of the distal extremities. MRI of the whole spine was performed twice, which, unfortunately, was unyielding. Finally, MRI of the sacroiliac joints revealed asymmetric sacroiliitis as well as enthesitis of the hips and pelvis. Further laboratory data showed negative rheumatoid factor and positive human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27. A diagnosis of juvenile SpA with sacroiliitis and enthesitis was made. The imaging characteristics of juvenile SpA are highlighted. PMID:26677159

  15. Understanding developmental pharmacodynamics: importance for drug development and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mulla, Hussain

    2010-08-01

    Developmental pharmacodynamics is the study of age-related maturation of the structure and function of biologic systems and how this affects response to pharmacotherapy. This may manifest as a change in the potency, efficacy, or therapeutic range of a drug. The paucity of studies exploring developmental pharmacodynamics reflects the lack of suitable juvenile animal models and the ethical and practical constraints of conducting studies in children. However, where data from animal models are available, valuable insight has been gained into how response to therapy can change through the course of development. For example, animal neurodevelopmental models have revealed that temporal differences in the maturation of norepinephrine and serotonin neurotransmitter systems may explain the lack of efficacy of some antidepressants in children. GABA(A) receptors that switch from an excitatory to inhibitory mode during early development help to explain paradoxical seizures experienced by infants after exposure to benzodiazepines. The increased sensitivity of neonates to morphine may be due to increased postnatal expression of the mu opioid receptor. An age dependency to the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship has also been found in some clinical studies. For example, immunosuppressive effects of ciclosporin (cyclosporine) revealed markedly enhanced sensitivity in infants compared with older children and adults. A study of sotalol in the treatment of children with supraventricular tachycardia showed that neonates exhibited a higher sensitivity towards QTc interval prolongation compared with older children. However, the data are limited and efforts to increase and establish data on developmental pharmacodynamics are necessary to achieve optimal drug therapy in children and to ensure long-term success of pediatric drug development. This requires a dual 'bottom up' (ontogeny knowledge driven) and 'top down' (pediatric pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies) approach. PMID

  16. Host Response to Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections of Current Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria are a large group of acid-fast bacteria that are very widely distributed in the environment. While Mycobacterium avium was once regarded as innocuous, its high frequency as a cause of disseminated disease in HIV-positive individuals illustrated its potential as a pathogen. Much more recently, there is growing evidence that the incidence of M. avium and related nontuberculous species is increasing in immunocompetent individuals. The same has been observed for M. abscessus infections, which are very difficult to treat; accordingly, this review focuses primarily on these two important pathogens. Like the host response to M. tuberculosis infections, the host response to these infections is of the TH1 type but there are some subtle and as-yet-unexplained differences. PMID:24914222

  17. From the NIH Director: The Importance of Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. From the NIH Director: The Importance of Clinical Trials Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents NIH ... early June to attendees of a 2011 conference, “Clinical Trials: New Challenges and Opportunities,” cosponsored by the National ...

  18. Chronic venous disease - Part II: Proteolytic biomarkers in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ligi, Daniela; Mosti, Giovanni; Croce, Lidia; Raffetto, Joseph D; Mannello, Ferdinando

    2016-10-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLU) are characterized by sustained proteolytic microenvironment impairing the healing process. Wound fluid (WF) reflect the biomolecular activities occurring within the wound area; however, it is unclear if WF from different healing phases have different proteolytic profiles and how VLU microenvironment affects the wound healing mechanisms. We investigated the proteolytic network of WF from distinct VLU phases, and in WF- and LPS-stimulated THP-1 monocytes treated with glycosaminoglycan sulodexide, a well known therapeutic approach for VLU healing. WF were collected from patients with VLU during inflammatory (Infl) and granulating (Gran) phases. WF and THP-1 supernatants were analyzed for nine matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and four tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP) by multiplex immunoassays. Our results demonstrated that: 1) WF from Infl VLU contained significantly increased concentrations of MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-12, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 compared to Gran WF; 2) WF from Gran VLU showed significantly increased levels of MMP-1, MMP-7, MMP-13, and TIMP-4 compared to Infl WF; 3) LPS- and WF-stimulation of THP-1 cells significantly increased the expression of several MMP compared to untreated cells; 4) Sulodexide treatment of both LPS- and WF-stimulated THP-1 significantly down-regulated the release of several MMPs. Our study provides evidence-based medicine during treatment of patients with VLU. WF from Infl and Gran VLU have different MMP and TIMP signatures, consistent with their clinical state. The modulation of proteolytic pathways in wound microenvironment by glycosaminoglycan sulodexide, provide insights for translating research into clinical practice during VLU therapy. PMID:27460704

  19. 78 FR 5497 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... FR 67396, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown, Pennsylvania 18106, made application to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered as an importer of Tapentadol...

  20. Proteolytic properties of Funastrum clausum latex.

    PubMed

    Morcelle, Susana R; Caffini, Néstor O; Priolo, Nora

    2004-07-01

    As part of a screening of latex endopeptidases from plants growing in Argentina, the presence of proteolytic activity in the latex of Funastrum clausum stems is reported. The proteases present in the crude extract showed the main characteristics of the cysteine proteolytic class, i.e. optimum pH at alkaline range, isoelectric point (pI) higher than 9.0, and inhibition of proteolytic activity by thiol blocking reagents. A remarkable thermal stability was also evident in the crude extract. Endosterolytic preference tried on p-nitrophenyl esters of N-alpha-carbobenzoxy-L-amino acids was higher for the alanine, asparagine and tyrosine derivatives. Preliminary peptidase purification by two-step ionic exchange showed the presence of two proteolytic fractions with molecular masses of approximately 24.0 kDa according to SDS-PAGE. PMID:15261386

  1. Proteolytic Activity in the Genus Ficus 1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Donald C.; Sgarbieri, Valdemiro C.; Whitaker, John R.

    1968-01-01

    The latices of only 13 of a total of 46 species of Ficus examined contained appreciable proteolytic activity. Therefore, high proteolytic activity in the latex is not a distinguishing feature of the genus. The latex of F. stenocarpa had the highest specific activity followed closely by the latices of F. carica and F. glabrata. Latices of 6 species of Ficus were examined by chromatography on CM-cellulose and compared with the results obtained for 9 varieties of F. carica. All of the latices were found to contain multiple proteolytic enzymes. Chromatographically, the multiple enzyme components of the several varieties of F. carica were more similar than those of the several species examined. The latices of 16 varieties of F. carica were all different as determined by free boundary electrophoresis although the specific proteolytic activity of the latices was reasonably constant. PMID:16656886

  2. 78 FR 23958 - Importer of Controlled Substances: Notice of Registration; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... FR 72409, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown, Pennsylvania 18106, made... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances: Notice of Registration; Fisher Clinical Services... effect on May 1, 1971. DEA has investigated Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., to ensure that the...

  3. 77 FR 24984 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Clinical Supplies Management, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745-46, all applicants for registration to import... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Clinical Supplies.... Therefore, in accordance with 21 CFR 1301.34(a), this is notice that on November 13, 2011, Clinical...

  4. [The importance of clinical data management in improvement of drug evaluation].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qin; Wang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Although the importance of clinical data is drawing more attention in drug development in China, the clinical data management is not good enough in the clinical trials right now. With the development of internet and progress of information technology, especially with the setup of the state innovation strategy for drug development, it is necessary and urgent to improve the clinical data quality. Good data quality is the primary basis of technical evaluation of drug at the marketing authorization. So Center for Drug Evaluation of CFDA has made some endeavors to enhance data management in the clinical trials in recent years. This article is focused on these aspects of data managment. PMID:26911033

  5. 78 FR 39339 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Clinical Supplies Management, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ..., 77 FR 50162, Clinical Supplies Management, Inc., 342 42nd Street South, Fargo, North Dakota 58103... importer of the basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Methylphenidate (1724) II...

  6. Proteolytic activity during senescence of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    Although information has rapidly developed concerning the intracellular localization of plant proteins, relatively few reports concern the intracellular location of endo- and exo-proteolytic activities. Relatively few proteases have been purified, characterized, and associated with a specific cellular location. With the exception of the processing proteases involved in transport of proteins across membranes, little progress has yet been made concerning determination of in vivo products of specific proteases. Information on the turnover of individual proteins and the assessment of rate-limiting steps in pathways as proteins are turned over is steadily appearing. Since chloroplasts are the major site of both protein synthesis and, during senescence, degradation, it was important to show unambiguously that chloroplasts can degrade their own constituents. Another important contribution was to obtain evidence that the chloroplasts contain proteases capable of degrading their constituents. This work has been more tenuous because of the low activities found and the possibility of contamination by vacuolar enzymes during the isolation of organelles. The possible targeting of cytoplasmic proteins for degradation by facilitating their transport into vacuoles is a field which hopefully will develop more rapidly in the future. Information on targeting of proteins for degradation via the ubiquitin (Ub) degradation pathway is developing rapidly. Future research must determine how much unity exists across the different eukaryotic systems. At present, it has important implications for protein turnover in plants, since apparently Ub is involved in the degradation of phytochrome. Little information has been developed regarding what triggers increased proteolysis with the onset of senescence, although it appears to involve protein synthesis. Thus far, the evidence indicates that the complement of proteases prior to senescence is sufficient to carry out the observed protein

  7. The Importance of Considering Clinical Utility in the Construction of a Diagnostic Manual.

    PubMed

    Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N; Lengel, Gregory J; DeShong, Hilary L

    2016-01-01

    The development of major diagnostic manuals primarily has been guided by construct validity rather than clinical utility. The purpose of this article is to summarize recent research and theory examining the importance of clinical utility when constructing and evaluating a diagnostic manual. We suggest that construct validity is a necessary but not sufficient criterion for diagnostic constructs. This article discusses components of clinical utility and how these have applied to the current and forthcoming diagnostic manuals. Implications and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:26666967

  8. Improvement of proteolytic and oxidative stability of Chondroitinase ABC I by cosolvents.

    PubMed

    Nazari-Robati, Mahdieh; Golestani, Abolfazl; Asadikaram, GholamReza

    2016-10-01

    Recently, utilization of the enzyme Chondroitinase ABC I (cABC I) has received considerable attention in treatment of spinal cord injury. cABC I removes chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans which are inhibitory to axon growth and enhances nerve regeneration. Therefore, determination of cABC I resistance to proteolysis and oxidation provides valuable information for optimizing its clinical application. In this work, proteolytic stability of cABC I to trypsin and chymotrypsin as well as its oxidative resistance to H2O2 was measured. Moreover, the effect of cosolvents glycerol, sorbitol and trehalose on cABC I proteolytic and oxidative stability was determined. The results indicated that cABC I is highly susceptible to proteolysis and oxidation. Comparison of proteolytic patterns demonstrated a high degree of similarity which confirmed the exposure of specific regions of cABC I to proteolysis. However, proteolytic degradation was significantly reduced in the presence of cosolvents. In addition, cosolvents decreased the rate of both cABC I proteolytic and oxidative inactivation. Notably, the degree of stabilization provided by these cosolvents varied greatly. These findings indicated the high potential of cosolvents in protein stabilization to proteolysis and oxidative inactivation. PMID:27311501

  9. Implementation of new clinical programs in the VHA healthcare system: the importance of early collaboration between clinical leadership and research.

    PubMed

    Wu, R Ryanne; Kinsinger, Linda S; Provenzale, Dawn; King, Heather A; Akerly, Patricia; Barnes, Lottie K; Datta, Santanu K; Grubber, Janet M; Katich, Nicholas; McNeil, Rebecca B; Monte, Robert; Sperber, Nina R; Atkins, David; Jackson, George L

    2014-12-01

    Collaboration between policy, research, and clinical partners is crucial to achieving proven quality care. The Veterans Health Administration has expended great efforts towards fostering such collaborations. Through this, we have learned that an ideal collaboration involves partnership from the very beginning of a new clinical program, so that the program is designed in a way that ensures quality, validity, and puts into place the infrastructure necessary for a reliable evaluation. This paper will give an example of one such project, the Lung Cancer Screening Demonstration Project (LCSDP). We will outline the ways that clinical, policy, and research partners collaborated in design, planning, and implementation in order to create a sustainable model that could be rigorously evaluated for efficacy and fidelity. We will describe the use of the Donabedian quality matrix to determine the necessary characteristics of a quality program and the importance of the linkage with engineering, information technology, and clinical paradigms to connect the development of an on-the-ground clinical program with the evaluation goal of a learning healthcare organization. While the LCSDP is the example given here, these partnerships and suggestions are salient to any healthcare organization seeking to implement new scientifically proven care in a useful and reliable way. PMID:25355086

  10. RN students' ratings and opinions related to the importance of certain clinical teacher behaviors.

    PubMed

    Viverais-Dresler, G; Kutschke, M

    2001-01-01

    Clinical teachers make a necessary and valuable contribution to clinical nursing courses with non-RN learners. This contribution is often not considered necessary in degree nursing programs with an RN student population. This study describes the perceptions of RN students and the importance they attach to certain clinical teacher behaviors. Fifty-six participants in a distance education baccalaureate nursing program completed a questionnaire, including a rating scale and open-ended questions. Based on the mean values, items were ranked in importance. Sample quotes were provided to elaborate on the highest and lowest-ranked items. Participants rated the four categories in descending order of importance: Evaluation, Professional Competence, Interpersonal Relationships, and Teaching Ability. The top items gave the profile of a teacher who is approachable, fair, open, honest, and who creates mutual respect. The findings support a clinical teacher for RN learners. The data also reflect similarities and differences with findings of studies with non-RN student participants. The findings of this study provide information, not available in the literature, regarding clinical teacher behaviors of significance to RN students. PMID:11868719

  11. Proteolytic crosstalk in multi-protease networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Curtis T.; Mather, William H.

    2016-04-01

    Processive proteases, such as ClpXP in E. coli, are conserved enzyme assemblies that can recognize and rapidly degrade proteins. These proteases are used for a number of purposes, including degrading mistranslated proteins and controlling cellular stress response. However, proteolytic machinery within the cell is limited in capacity and can lead to a bottleneck in protein degradation, whereby many proteins compete (‘queue’) for proteolytic resources. Previous work has demonstrated that such queueing can lead to pronounced statistical relationships between different protein counts when proteins compete for a single common protease. However, real cells contain many different proteases, e.g. ClpXP, ClpAP, and Lon in E. coli, and it is not clear how competition between proteins for multiple classes of protease would influence the dynamics of cellular networks. In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate that a multi-protease proteolytic bottleneck can substantially couple the dynamics for both simple and complex (oscillatory) networks, even between substrates with substantially different affinities for protease. For these networks, queueing often leads to strong positive correlations between protein counts, and these correlations are strongest near the queueing theoretic point of balance. Furthermore, we find that the qualitative behavior of these networks depends on the relative size of the absolute affinity of substrate to protease compared to the cross affinity of substrate to protease, leading in certain regimes to priority queue statistics.

  12. Proteolytic crosstalk in multi-protease networks.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Curtis T; Mather, William H

    2016-01-01

    Processive proteases, such as ClpXP in E. coli, are conserved enzyme assemblies that can recognize and rapidly degrade proteins. These proteases are used for a number of purposes, including degrading mistranslated proteins and controlling cellular stress response. However, proteolytic machinery within the cell is limited in capacity and can lead to a bottleneck in protein degradation, whereby many proteins compete ('queue') for proteolytic resources. Previous work has demonstrated that such queueing can lead to pronounced statistical relationships between different protein counts when proteins compete for a single common protease. However, real cells contain many different proteases, e.g. ClpXP, ClpAP, and Lon in E. coli, and it is not clear how competition between proteins for multiple classes of protease would influence the dynamics of cellular networks. In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate that a multi-protease proteolytic bottleneck can substantially couple the dynamics for both simple and complex (oscillatory) networks, even between substrates with substantially different affinities for protease. For these networks, queueing often leads to strong positive correlations between protein counts, and these correlations are strongest near the queueing theoretic point of balance. Furthermore, we find that the qualitative behavior of these networks depends on the relative size of the absolute affinity of substrate to protease compared to the cross affinity of substrate to protease, leading in certain regimes to priority queue statistics. PMID:27042892

  13. Minimal Clinically Important Difference on Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale 2nd Version

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Krisztina; Aschermann, Zsuzsanna; Ács, Péter; Deli, Gabriella; Janszky, József; Komoly, Sámuel; Karádi, Kázmér; Kovács, Márton; Makkos, Attila; Faludi, Béla; Kovács, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims. The aim of the present study was to determine the estimates of minimal clinically important difference for Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale 2nd version (PDSS-2) total score and dimensions. Methods. The subject population consisted of 413 PD patients. At baseline, MDS-UPDRS, Hoehn-Yahr Scale, Mattis Dementia Rating Scale, and PDSS-2 were assessed. Nine months later the PDSS-2 was reevaluated with the Patient-Reported Global Impression Improvement Scale. Both anchor-based techniques (within patients' score change method and sensitivity- and specificity-based method by receiver operating characteristic analysis) and distribution-based approaches (effect size calculations) were utilized to determine the magnitude of minimal clinically important difference. Results. According to our results, any improvements larger than −3.44 points or worsening larger than 2.07 points can represent clinically important changes for the patients. These thresholds have the effect size of 0.21 and −0.21, respectively. Conclusions. Minimal clinically important differences are the smallest change of scores that are subjectively meaningful to patients. Studies using the PDSS-2 as outcome measure should utilize the threshold of −3.44 points for detecting improvement or the threshold of 2.07 points for observing worsening. PMID:26539303

  14. RN Students' Ratings and Opinions Related to the Importance of Certain Clinical Teacher Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viverais-Dresler, Gloria; Kutschke, Myrtle

    2001-01-01

    Registered nurses in a bachelor's degree program (n=56) rated the following as important clinical teacher behaviors: evaluation, professional competence, interpersonal relationship, and teaching ability. They valued teachers who were approachable, fair, open, and honest and who fostered mutual respect. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  15. An Update on the Epidemiology of Schizophrenia with a Special Reference to Clinically Important Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Missiry, Ahmed; Aboraya, Ahmed Sayed; Manseur, Hader; Manchester, Johnna; France, Cheryl; Border, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic mental illness which poses a tremendous burden on the families, caregivers and the society. The purpose of this paper is to provide an updated review of the epidemiology of schizophrenia with a special attention to the clinically important risk factors such as drug abuse, hormonal factors and the new advances in genetic…

  16. The attitudes of medical students in Europe toward the clinical importance of embryology.

    PubMed

    Moxham, Bernard John; Emmanouil-Nikoloussi, Elpida; Standley, Henrietta; Brenner, Erich; Plaisant, Odile; Brichova, Hana; Pais, Diogo; Stabile, Isobel; Borg, Jordy; Chirculescu, Andy

    2016-03-01

    Although there have been many studies reporting the attitudes of medical students to the clinical importance of gross anatomy, little is known about their opinions concerning the clinical importance of embryology. Using Thurstone and Chave methods to assess attitudes, nearly 1,600 medical students across Europe in the early stages of their training provided responses to a survey that tested the hypothesis that they do not regard embryology as highly clinically relevant. Indeed, we further proposed that student attitudes to gross anatomy are much more positive than those toward embryology. Our findings show that our hypotheses hold, regardless of the university and country surveyed and regardless of the teaching methods employed for embryology. Clearly, embryology has a significant part to play in medical education in terms of understanding prenatal life, of appreciating how the organization of the mature human body has developed, and of providing essential information for general medical practice, obstetrics and pediatrics, and teratology. However, while newly recruited medical students understand the importance of gross anatomy in the development of professional competence, understanding the importance of embryology requires teachers, medical educationalists, and devisors of medical curricula to pay special attention to informing students of the significant role played by embryology in attaining clinical competence and achieving the knowledge and understanding of the biomedical sciences that underpins becoming a learned member of a health care profession. PMID:26538399

  17. Regulation of Trichophyton rubrum proteolytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Apodaca, G; McKerrow, J H

    1989-01-01

    Trichophyton rubrum is the most common dermatophyte of humans and normally colonizes the superficial layers of the epidermis (stratum corneum). Several proteinases with a possible role in the metabolism of host proteins have been purified from this fungus. The regulation of these enzymes and their role in fungal metabolism were studied at the biochemical level. General proteolytic (azocollytic) activity was repressed when log-phase cultures of T. rubrum were grown in a minimal medium that contained readily metabolized sources of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus. When either carbon, nitrogen, or sulfur was deleted from this minimal medium, azocollytic activity was derepressed. In all cases a high-molecular-weight activity (Mr, greater than 200,000) was expressed. A 71,000-Mr proteinase was observed in nitrogen-depleted cultures, and proteolytic species of Mr 124,000 and 27,000 were secreted in sulfur-depleted cultures. The addition of either inorganic (MgSO4, Na2SO3, NaS2O3) or organic (methionine, cysteine) sulfur to the sulfur-depleted medium repressed the expression of azocollytic activity. In contrast, keratinolytic activity was not repressed by carbon, nitrogen, or sulfur but instead was induced when a protein source was included in the minimal medium. Stationary-phase cultures of T. rubrum secreted all proteolytic activities constitutively. Unlike log-phase cultures, the stationary-phase cultures secreted azocollytic, elastinolytic, and keratinolytic activity in minimal medium. These activities fell in the carbon-, nitrogen-, and phosphorous-depleted media but remained high in sulfur-depleted medium. The following model is proposed for the regulation of T. rubrum proteolytic activity. In the initial stages of infection, T. rubrum grows logarithmically. In this state, proteolytic activity is derepressed whenever carbon, nitrogen, or sulfur is lacking in the fungal milieu. The general proteinases produced would act on the nonkeratinous proteins in the

  18. Program Directors' and Clinical Instructors' Perceptions of Important Clinical-Instructor Behavior Categories in the Delivery of Athletic Training Clinical Instruction

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Powell E.; Leary, Paul A.; Martin, R. Daniel; Killian, Clyde B.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the perceived importance of clinical instructors' behaviors and behavior categories in the roles of program director (PD) and clinical instructor (CI) and to ascertain the relative importance of these items within each role. Design and Setting: From the literature, we developed a questionnaire, validated by a panel of experts, to collect data regarding the perceived importance of 30 specific CI behavior statements within 5 categories (instructional, interpersonal, evaluative, professional, and personal). The instrument used in the study had a Cronbach alpha of .92. Subjects: Independent groups of 75 PDs and 242 CIs from Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs–accredited entry-level undergraduate athletic training programs returned usable surveys. Measurements: We computed mean and variation measures for each behavior and category and analyzed these items for between-role and within-role category differences. Results: Program directors and CIs differed significantly in the perceived importance of the evaluative category of CI behaviors as well as in 3 specific evaluative behaviors. Program directors and CIs did not differ in the other 4 categories. For within-role groupings, we noted significant differences of perceived importance among the behavioral categories. Conclusions: Program directors and CIs perceived all 5 categories to be very important, and they should work to demonstrate these behaviors in clinical-education settings. Collaboration between the groups enhances the understanding of role responsibility in the delivery of athletic training clinical instruction. PMID:14737217

  19. Program Directors' and Clinical Instructors' Perceptions of Important Clinical-Instructor Behavior Categories in the Delivery of Athletic Training Clinical Instruction.

    PubMed

    Lauber, Christine A.; Toth, Powell E.; Leary, Paul A.; Martin, R Daniel; Killian, Clyde B.

    2003-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the perceived importance of clinical instructors' behaviors and behavior categories in the roles of program director (PD) and clinical instructor (CI) and to ascertain the relative importance of these items within each role. DESIGN AND SETTING: From the literature, we developed a questionnaire, validated by a panel of experts, to collect data regarding the perceived importance of 30 specific CI behavior statements within 5 categories (instructional, interpersonal, evaluative, professional, and personal). The instrument used in the study had a Cronbach alpha of.92. SUBJECTS: Independent groups of 75 PDs and 242 CIs from Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs-accredited entry-level undergraduate athletic training programs returned usable surveys. MEASUREMENTS: We computed mean and variation measures for each behavior and category and analyzed these items for between-role and within-role category differences. RESULTS: Program directors and CIs differed significantly in the perceived importance of the evaluative category of CI behaviors as well as in 3 specific evaluative behaviors. Program directors and CIs did not differ in the other 4 categories. For within-role groupings, we noted significant differences of perceived importance among the behavioral categories. CONCLUSIONS: Program directors and CIs perceived all 5 categories to be very important, and they should work to demonstrate these behaviors in clinical-education settings. Collaboration between the groups enhances the understanding of role responsibility in the delivery of athletic training clinical instruction. PMID:14737217

  20. Importance of Selected Athletic Trainer Employment Characteristics in Collegiate, Sports Medicine Clinic, and High School Settings

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Brent L.; Gansneder, Bruce M.; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.; Szczerba, Joseph E.; Mattacola, Carl G.; Perrin, David H.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: We examined employer importance ratings of 35 employee characteristics in the collegiate, sports medicine clinic, and high school settings and made comparisons among these settings. Design and Setting: All prospective employers were sent a survey. Of the 472 surveys mailed, 282 (60%) were returned, with a sample error rate of 1.9%. Subjects: All prospective employers listed on the NATA position vacancy notices from January 1, 1994 to October 1, 1994. Measurements: Employers were asked to rate 35 employee characteristics as “not important” “ minimally important,” “ important.” or “very important.” Additionally, employers chose 1 of 15 job descriptors that best identified their position vacancy. These 15 descriptors were then categorized into collegiate, sports medicine clinic, and high school settings. Discriminant analysis and analysis of variance procedures were used to determine if the 35 employee characteristics differed across the 3 settings. Results: The discriminant analysis produced 2 significant discriminant functions (P < .05) with 23 of the original 35 characteristics remaining in the analysis. The first function discriminated between the collegiate setting and the other settings, with the collegiate setting scoring the highest. The second function discriminated among all 3 groups, with the sports medicine clinic and high school settings scoring the highest and lowest, respectively. Additionally, the analyses of variance (ANOVAs) revealed that 21 of the characteristics remaining in the discriminant analysis differed across the 3 settings. Conclusions: Employers from all 3 settings rated educational program reputation, written recommendations, job interview performance, and NATA-BOC certification eligibility as important to very important. For the collegiate setting, 7 characteristics were rated above important and included such characteristics as possession of a master's degree and collegiate experience. For the sports medicine

  1. Proteolytic activity regarding Sarconesiopsis magellanica (Diptera: Calliphoridae) larval excretions and secretions.

    PubMed

    Pinilla, Yudi T; Moreno-Pérez, Darwin A; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Bello, Felio J

    2013-12-01

    Sarconesiopsis magellanica (Diptera: Calliphoridae) is a medically important necrophagous fly which is used for establishing the post-mortem interval. Diptera maggots release proteolytic enzymes contained in larval excretion and secretion (ES) products playing a key role in digestion. Special interest in proteolytic enzymes has also been aroused regarding understanding their role in wound healing since they degrade necrotic tissue during larval therapy. This study was thus aimed at identifying and characterising S. magellanica proteolytic enzyme ES products for the first time. These products were obtained from first-, second- and third-instar larvae taken from a previously-established colony. ES proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and their proteolytic activity was characterised by zymograms and inhibition assays involving BAPNA (Nα-benzoyl-dl-Arg-p-nitroanilide) and SAPNA substrates, using synthetic inhibitors. The protein profile ranged from ∼69kDa to ∼23kDa; several of them coincided with the Lucilia sericata ES protein profile. Serine-protease hydrolysis activity (measured by zymogram) was confirmed when a ∼25kDa band disappeared upon ES incubation with PMSF inhibitor at pH 7.8. Analysis of larval ES proteolytic activity on BAPNA and SAPNA substrates (determined by using TLCK and TPCK specific inhibitors) suggested a greater amount of trypsin-like protease. These results support the need for further experiments aimed at validating S. magellanica use in larval therapy. PMID:24076089

  2. Clinical importance of androgen receptor in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Honma, Naoko; Horii, Rie; Iwase, Takuji; Saji, Shigehira; Younes, Mamoun; Ito, Yoshinori; Akiyama, Futoshi

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite many studies, the clinicopathological importance of the androgen receptor (AR) in breast cancer is not well established, and its significance as an independent predictor of clinical outcome is controversial. A large and systematic study is needed to address these issues. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether AR has independent clinical value, examining its importance in a large and well-predefined patient group with a long follow-up period and complete clinicopathological data. METHODS: Archival materials of 403 invasive breast cancers from women treated with adjuvant tamoxifen monotherapy (median follow-up period 11.0 years) were subjected to immunohistochemical study using anti-AR monoclonal antibody. AR expression was compared with established clinicopathological factors, estrogen receptor (ER)-β expression, and clinical outcome. RESULTS: AR positivity was correlated with ER-α positivity, progesterone receptor positivity, ER-β positivity, and a lower nuclear grade. Patients with AR-positive carcinomas exhibited a significantly better clinical outcome than those with AR-negative carcinomas (P = 0.0165 for disease-free survival, P = 0.0344 for overall survival). Multivariate analysis did not yield significant differences in clinical outcome according to the AR status, whereas the ER-β status showed significant differences in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Although, and in agreement with previous reports, AR positivity correlated with some established favorable prognostic factors and with ER-β positivity, AR was not an independent predictor of clinical outcome. Controversy regarding the value of AR as an independent predictor of clinical outcome may at least partly reflect the relatively limited power of AR in breast cancer. PMID:22302643

  3. Skin barrier and immune dysregulation in atopic dermatitis: an evolving story with important clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Czarnowicki, Tali; Krueger, James G; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is the most common chronic inflammatory skin disease. Its pathogenesis combines barrier defects, immune dysregulation, and increased skin infections; however, the relative contribution of each of these components is yet to be determined. Uninvolved atopic dermatitis skin also displays broad immune and barrier abnormalities, which highlights a role for proactive treatment strategy. The residual disease genomic profile that accompanies clinical resolution provides further support for proactive treatment approaches. Although intrinsic and extrinsic atopic dermatitis subtypes share a common clinical phenotype, they show some important differences in their Th22/Th17 cytokine profile, which opens the door for personalized specific therapeutics for each disease category. PMID:25017523

  4. Resin-assisted Enrichment of N-terminal Peptides for Characterizing Proteolytic Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong Seo; Dai, Ziyu; Aryal, Uma K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Baker, Scott E.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-06-17

    Proteolytic processing is a ubiquitous, irreversible posttranslational modification that plays an important role in cellular regulation in all living organisms. Herein we report a resin-assisted positive selection method for specifically enriching protein N-terminal peptides to facilitate the characterization of proteolytic processing events by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In this approach, proteins are initially reduced and alkylated and their lysine residues are converted to homoarginines. Then, protein N-termini are selectively converted to reactive thiol groups. We demonstrate that these sequential reactions were achieved with nearly quantitative efficiencies. Thiol-containing N-terminal peptides are then captured (>98% efficiency) by a thiol-affinity resin, a significant improvement over the traditional avidin/biotin enrichment. Application to cell lysates of Aspergillus niger, a filamentous fungus of interest for biomass degradation, enabled the identification of 1672 unique protein N-termini and proteolytic cleavage sites from 690 unique proteins.

  5. Proteolytic regulation of stress response pathways in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Micevski, Dimce; Dougan, David A

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining correct cellular function is a fundamental biological process for all forms of life. A critical aspect of this process is the maintenance of protein homeostasis (proteostasis) in the cell, which is largely performed by a group of proteins, referred to as the protein quality control (PQC) network. This network of proteins, comprised of chaperones and proteases, is critical for maintaining proteostasis not only during favourable growth conditions, but also in response to stress. Indeed proteases play a crucial role in the clearance of unwanted proteins that accumulate during stress, but more importantly, in the activation of various different stress response pathways. In bacteria, the cells response to stress is usually orchestrated by a specific transcription factor (sigma factor). In Escherichia coli there are seven different sigma factors, each of which responds to a particular stress, resulting in the rapid expression of a specific set of genes. The cellular concentration of each transcription factor is tightly controlled, at the level of transcription, translation and protein stability. Here we will focus on the proteolytic regulation of two sigma factors (σ(32) and σ(S)), which control the heat and general stress response pathways, respectively. This review will also briefly discuss the role proteolytic systems play in the clearance of unwanted proteins that accumulate during stress. PMID:23479439

  6. Rapid Identification of Candida Species and Other Clinically Important Yeast Species by Flow Cytometry†

    PubMed Central

    Page, Brent T.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.

    2005-01-01

    Two rapid diagnostic assays, utilizing two different Luminex flow cytometry methods, were developed for identification of clinically important ascomycetous yeast species. Direct hybridization and allele-specific primer extension methods were both successful in establishing a DNA-based assay that can rapidly and accurately identify Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, and Candida tropicalis as well as other clinical species. The direct hybridization assay was designed to identify a total of 19 ascomycetous yeast species, and the allele-specific primer extension assay was designed to identify a total of 34 species. Probes were validated against 438 strains representing 303 species. From culture to identification, the allele-specific primer extension method takes 8 h and the direct hybridization method takes less than 5 h to complete. These assays represent comprehensive, rapid tests that are well suited for the clinical laboratory. PMID:16145099

  7. The comparative importance of books: clinical psychology in the health sciences library.

    PubMed Central

    Wehmeyer, J M; Wehmeyer, S

    1999-01-01

    Clinical psychology has received little attention as a subject in health sciences library collections. This study seeks to demonstrate the relative importance of the monographic literature to clinical psychology through the examination of citations in graduate student theses and dissertations at the Fordham Health Sciences Library, Wright State University. Dissertations and theses were sampled randomly; citations were classified by format, counted, and subjected to statistical analysis. Books and book chapters together account for 35% of the citations in clinical psychology dissertations, 25% in nursing theses, and 8% in biomedical sciences theses and dissertations. Analysis of variance indicates that the citations in dissertations and theses in the three areas differ significantly (F = 162.2 with 2 and 253 degrees of freedom, P = 0.0001). Dissertations and theses in biomedical sciences and nursing theses both cite significantly more journals per book than the dissertations in clinical psychology. These results support the hypothesis that users of clinical psychology literature rely more heavily on books than many other users of a health sciences library. Problems with using citation analyses in a single subject to determine a serials to monographs ratio for a health sciences library are pointed out. PMID:10219478

  8. Clinical trials in molecular imaging: the importance of following the protocol.

    PubMed

    Trembath, LisaAnn; Opanowski, Adam

    2011-06-01

    Nuclear medicine technologists and investigators who perform imaging procedures in clinical trials often have not received training on clinical research regulations, such as Title 21, part 312, of the Code of Federal Regulations or Good Clinical Practices. These regulations directly affect implementation of the therapeutic or imaging protocol. Lack of understanding of the regulatory expectations in clinical research can lead to unintended errors or omissions in critical data that are needed for development of a new drug. One common error is not following the protocol exactly as written, or modifying the imaging parameters in some way as to make the data nonstandard from site to site. These errors and omissions are a source of delay in the development of new imaging and therapeutic products. Although not following the protocol does not result in criminal penalties per se, errors and omissions can lead to regulatory consequences such as warning letters to the investigator or sponsor, which if not resolved can lead to barring a site or investigator from participation in any future research trials. Pharmaceutical sponsors, device sponsors, and federal granting agencies such as the National Cancer Institute enter into contracts with imaging sites under the expectation that the investigator and all research staff know and understand clinical research regulations. This article is intended to teach imaging personnel what any sponsor (pharmaceutical, device, or federal agency) is expecting from research imaging and how lack of understanding of Good Clinical Practices and federal regulations can impede the optimal success of a research study. After reading this article, nuclear medicine technologists should be able to understand the importance of following the clinical trial protocol to exact specifications, create a list of questions that should be answered by the sponsor or trial organizers before patient enrollment, describe Form FDA 1572, and describe the terms protocol

  9. Molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar Saintpaul isolated from imported seafood, pepper, environmental and clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Tatsuya; Khan, Ashraf A; Cheng, Chorng-Ming; Stefanova, Rossina

    2011-09-01

    A total of 39 Salmonella enterica serovar Saintpaul strains from imported seafood, pepper and from environmental and clinical samples were analyzed for the presence of virulence genes, antibiotic resistance, plasmid and plasmid replicon types. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprinting using the XbaI restriction enzyme and plasmid profiling were performed to assess genetic diversity. None of the isolates showed resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline. Seventeen virulence genes were screened for by PCR. All strains were positive for 14 genes (spiA, sifA, invA, spaN, sopE, sipB, iroN, msgA, pagC, orgA, prgH, lpfC, sitC, and tolC) and negative for three genes (spvB, pefA, and cdtB). Twelve strains, including six from clinical samples and six from seafood, carried one or more plasmids. Large plasmids, sized greater than 50 kb were detected in one clinical and three food isolates. One plasmid was able to be typed as IncI1 by PCR-based replicon typing. There were 25 distinct PFGE-XbaI patterns, clustered to two groups. Cluster A, with 68.5% similarity mainly consists of clinical isolates, while Cluster C, with 67.6% similarity, mainly consisted of shrimp isolates from India. Our findings indicated the genetic diversity of S. Saintpaul in clinical samples, imported seafood, and the environment and that this serotype possesses several virulent genes and plasmids which can cause salmonellosis. PMID:21645810

  10. Characteristics Associated With Important Clinical End Points in Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia at Initial Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wierda, William G.; O'Brien, Susan; Wang, Xuemei; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Do, Kim-Anh; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge; Thomas, Deborah; Koller, Charles; Burger, Jan; Lerner, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Keating, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Response to front-line treatment and subsequent clinical course for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are heterogeneous. Identifying pretreatment patient characteristics or prognostic factors associated with clinical outcomes is important for counseling patients, conducting clinical research, and evaluating trial results. Patients and Methods We evaluated the pretreatment characteristics of 595 previously untreated patients who had National Cancer Institute Working Group indications to initiate front-line therapy for predictors of complete response (CR), time to treatment failure (TTF), and overall survival (OS). Multivariable models were developed for all three end points. Results CR is an important treatment end point correlated with longer TTF and OS. In this retrospective analysis, front-line treatment regimen was a significant independent predictive factor for all three end points; chemoimmunotherapy was the superior treatment regimen. Considering front-line treatment regimen, other independent patient characteristics associated with CR included age and β2-microglobulin (β-2M). TTF was independently associated with age, β-2M, percent lymphocytes in bone marrow, and treatment regimen. Improved OS was independently associated with younger age, lower β-2M, and treatment regimen. Two weighted prognostic models or nomograms, one including and one excluding treatment regimen, were constructed using significant characteristics to predict 5- and 10-year survival probability and estimate median survival time. Conclusion Identifying pretreatment patient characteristics associated with CR, TTF, and OS establishes a baseline to compare and incorporate new prognostic factors. Treatment had an impact on the significance of these factors. Prognostic models may help patients and clinicians in decision making as well as facilitate clinical research through design and analyses of clinical trials. PMID:19224852

  11. Not lost in translation: Emerging clinical importance of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPER.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    It has been 20years that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) was cloned as the orphan receptor GPR30 from multiple cellular sources, including vascular endothelial cells. Here, I will provide an overview of estrogen biology and the historical background leading to the discovery of rapid vascular estrogen signaling. I will also review the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying GPER function, its role in physiology and disease, some of the currently available GPER-targeting drugs approved for clinical use such as SERMs (selective estrogen receptor modulators) and SERDs (selective estrogen receptor downregulators). Many of currently used drugs such as tamoxifen, raloxifene, or faslodex™/fulvestrant were discovered targeting GPER many years after they had been introduced to the clinics for entirely different purposes. This has important implications for the clinical use of these drugs and their modes of action, which I have termed 'reverse translational medicine'. In addition, environmental pollutants known as 'endocrine disruptors' have been found to bind to GPER. This article also discusses recent evidence in these areas as well as opportunities in translational clinical medicine and GPER research, including medical genetics, personalized medicine, prevention, and its theranostic use. PMID:26921679

  12. Medically important venomous animals: biology, prevention, first aid, and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Junghanss, Thomas; Bodio, Mauro

    2006-11-15

    Venomous animals are a significant health problem for rural populations in many parts of the world. Given the current level of the international mobility of individuals and the inquisitiveness of travelers, clinicians and travel clinics need to be able to give advice on the prevention, first aid, and clinical management of envenoming. Health professionals often feel overwhelmed by the taxonomy of venomous animals; however, venomous animals can be grouped, using a simple set of criteria, into cnidarians, venomous fish, sea snakes, scorpions, spiders, hymenoterans, and venomous terrestrial snakes. Geographic distribution, habitats, and circumstances of accidents further reduce the range of culprits that need to be considered in any single event. Clinical management of envenomed patients relies on supportive therapy and, if available, specific antivenoms. Supplies of life-saving antivenoms are scarce, and this scarcity particularly affects rural populations in resource-poor settings. Travel clinics and hospitals in highly industrialized areas predominantly see patients with injuries caused by accidents involving marine animals: in particular, stings by venomous fish and skin damage caused by jellyfish. However, globally, terrestrial venomous snakes are the most important group of venomous animals. PMID:17051499

  13. Pragmatic Characteristics of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures are Important for Use in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kroenke, Kurt; Monahan, Patrick O.; Kean, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Objective Measures for assessing patient-reported outcomes (PROs) that may have initially been developed for research are increasingly being recommended for use in clinical practice as well. While psychometric rigor is essential, this paper focuses on pragmatic characteristics of PROs that may enhance uptake into clinical practice. Methods Three sources were drawn upon in identifying pragmatic criteria for PROs: 1) selected literature review including recommendations by other expert groups; 2) key features of several model public domain PROs; 3) the author' experience in developing practical PROs. Results Eight characteristics of a practical PRO include: 1) actionability (i.e., scores guide diagnostic or therapeutic actions/decision-making); 2) appropriateness for the relevant clinical setting; 3) universality (i.e., for screening, severity assessment, and monitoring across multiple conditions); 4) self-administration; 5) item features (number of items and bundling issues); 6) response options (option number and dimensions, uniform vs. varying options, timeframe, intervals between options); 7) scoring (simplicity, interpretability); and 8) accessibility (nonproprietary, downloadable, available in different languages and for vulnerable groups, incorporated into electronic health records) Conclusion Balancing psychometric and pragmatic factors in the development of PROs is important for accelerating the incorporation of PROs into clinical practice. PMID:25962972

  14. Occurrence and Diversity of Clinically Important Vibrio Species in the Aquatic Environment of Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Kokashvili, Tamar; Whitehouse, Chris A.; Tskhvediani, Ana; Grim, Christopher J.; Elbakidze, Tinatin; Mitaishvili, Nino; Janelidze, Nino; Jaiani, Ekaterine; Haley, Bradd J.; Lashkhi, Nino; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.; Tediashvili, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Among the more than 70 different Vibrio species inhabiting marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecosystems, 12 are recognized as human pathogens. The warm subtropical climate of the Black Sea coastal area and inland regions of Georgia likely provides a favorable environment for various Vibrio species. From 2006 to 2009, the abundance, ecology, and diversity of clinically important Vibrio species were studied in different locations in Georgia and across seasons. Over a 33-month period, 1,595 presumptive Vibrio isolates were collected from the Black Sea (n = 657) and freshwater lakes around Tbilisi (n = 938). Screening of a subset of 440 concentrated and enriched water samples by PCR-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (PCR-ESI/MS) detected the presence of DNA from eight clinically important Vibrio species: V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. mimicus, V. alginolyticus, V. harveyi, V. metschnikovii, and V. cincinnatiensis. Almost 90% of PCR/ESI-MS samples positive for Vibrio species were collected from June through November. Three important human-pathogenic Vibrio species (V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus) were detected in 62.8, 37.8, and 21.4% of samples testing positive for Vibrios, respectively. The results of these activities suggest that natural reservoirs for human-pathogenic Vibrios exist in Georgian aquatic environments. Water temperature at all sampling sites was positively correlated with the abundance of clinically important Vibrio spp. (except V. metschnikovii), and salinity was correlated with species composition at particular Black Sea sites as well as inland reservoirs. PMID:26528464

  15. Importance of Building Confidence in Patient Communication and Clinical Skills Among Chiropractic Students

    PubMed Central

    Hecimovich, Mark D.; Volet, Simone E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: One important objective of chiropractic education is to foster student professional confidence and competence in patient communication and clinical skills. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the extant literature on this topic, stressing the significance of building students' confidence for effective practice and the need for more research in this area. Methods: The authors reviewed MEDLINE and ERIC from 1980 through 2008 using several key words pertinent to confidence and health care. Three distinct, but interrelated, bodies of literature were assessed, including professional confidence in health care research, the nature and development of confidence in educational psychology research, and fostering professional confidence in chiropractic education. Results: It was apparent through the review that chiropractic education has developed educational methods and opportunities that may help develop and build student confidence in patient communication and clinical skills. However, there has not been sufficient research to provide empirical evidence of the impact. Conclusion: Fostering chiropractic students' development of confidence in what they say and do is of paramount importance not only to them as new practitioners but more importantly to the patient. There is no doubt that a better understanding of how confidence can be developed and consolidated during tertiary study should be a major goal of chiropractic education PMID:19826543

  16. Clinical Importance of Steps Taken per Day among Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Motl, Robert W.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Learmonth, Yvonne C.; Goldman, Myla D.; Brown, Ted

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of steps taken per day (steps/day) provides a reliable and valid outcome of free-living walking behavior in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective This study examined the clinical meaningfulness of steps/day using the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) value across stages representing the developing impact of MS. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of de-identified data from 15 investigations totaling 786 persons with MS and 157 healthy controls. All participants provided demographic information and wore an accelerometer or pedometer during the waking hours of a 7-day period. Those with MS further provided real-life, health, and clinical information and completed the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12) and Patient Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) scale. MCID estimates were based on regression analyses and analysis of variance for between group differences. Results The mean MCID from self-report scales that capture subtle changes in ambulation (1-point change in PDSS scores and 10-point change in MSWS-12 scores) was 779 steps/day (14% of mean score for MS sample); the mean MCID for clinical/health outcomes (MS type, duration, weight status) was 1,455 steps/day (26% of mean score for MS sample); real-life anchors (unemployment, divorce, assistive device use) resulted in a mean MCID of 2,580 steps/day (45% of mean score for MS sample); and the MCID for the cumulative impact of MS (MS vs. control) was 2,747 steps/day (48% of mean score for MS sample). Conclusion The change in motion sensor output of ∼800 steps/day appears to represent a lower-bound estimate of clinically meaningful change in free-living walking behavior in interventions of MS. PMID:24023843

  17. Clinical Prediction Models for Sleep Apnea: The Importance of Medical History over Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ustun, Berk; Westover, M. Brandon; Rudin, Cynthia; Bianchi, Matt T.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a treatable contributor to morbidity and mortality. However, most patients with OSA remain undiagnosed. We used a new machine learning method known as SLIM (Supersparse Linear Integer Models) to test the hypothesis that a diagnostic screening tool based on routinely available medical information would be superior to one based solely on patient-reported sleep-related symptoms. Methods: We analyzed polysomnography (PSG) and self-reported clinical information from 1,922 patients tested in our clinical sleep laboratory. We used SLIM and 7 state-of-the-art classification methods to produce predictive models for OSA screening using features from: (i) self-reported symptoms; (ii) self-reported medical information that could, in principle, be extracted from electronic health records (demographics, comorbidities), or (iii) both. Results: For diagnosing OSA, we found that model performance using only medical history features was superior to model performance using symptoms alone, and similar to model performance using all features. Performance was similar to that reported for other widely used tools: sensitivity 64.2% and specificity 77%. SLIM accuracy was similar to state-of-the-art classification models applied to this dataset, but with the benefit of full transparency, allowing for hands-on prediction using yes/no answers to a small number of clinical queries. Conclusion: To predict OSA, variables such as age, sex, BMI, and medical history are superior to the symptom variables we examined for predicting OSA. SLIM produces an actionable clinical tool that can be applied to data that is routinely available in modern electronic health records, which may facilitate automated, rather than manual, OSA screening. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 159. Citation: Ustun B, Westover MB, Rudin C, Bianchi MT. Clinical prediction models for sleep apnea: the importance of medical history over symptoms

  18. Clinic expert information extraction based on domain model and block importance model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanpeng; Wang, Li; Qian, Danmin; Geng, Xingyun; Yao, Dengfu; Dong, Jiancheng

    2015-11-01

    To extract expert clinic information from the Deep Web, there are two challenges to face. The first one is to make a judgment on forms. A novel method based on a domain model, which is a tree structure constructed by the attributes of query interfaces is proposed. With this model, query interfaces can be classified to a domain and filled in with domain keywords. Another challenge is to extract information from response Web pages indexed by query interfaces. To filter the noisy information on a Web page, a block importance model is proposed, both content and spatial features are taken into account in this model. The experimental results indicate that the domain model yields a precision 4.89% higher than that of the rule-based method, whereas the block importance model yields an F1 measure 10.5% higher than that of the XPath method. PMID:26231612

  19. CHROMagar Candida, a new differential isolation medium for presumptive identification of clinically important Candida species.

    PubMed Central

    Odds, F C; Bernaerts, R

    1994-01-01

    CHROMagar Candida is a novel, differential culture medium that is claimed to facilitate the isolation and presumptive identification of some clinically important yeast species. We evaluated the use of this medium with 726 yeast isolates, including 82 isolated directly on the medium from clinical material. After 2 days of incubation at 37 degrees C, 285 C. albicans isolates gave distinctive green colonies that were not seen with any of 441 other yeast isolates representing 21 different species. A total of 54 C. tropicalis isolates also developed distinctive dark blue-gray colonies with a halo of dark brownish purple in the surrounding agar. C. krusei isolates (n = 43) also formed highly characteristic rough, spreading colonies with pale pink centers and a white edge that was otherwise encountered only rarely with isolates of C. norvegensis. Trichosporon spp. (n = 34) formed small, pale colonies that became larger and characteristically rough with prolonged incubation. Most of the other 310 yeasts studied formed colonies with a color that ranged from white to pink to purple with a brownish tint. The only exceptions were found among isolates identified as Geotrichum sp. or Pichia sp., some of which formed colonies with a gray to blue color and which in two instances formed a green pigment or a dark halo in the agar. The specificity and sensitivity of the new medium for the presumptive identification of C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis exceeded 99% for all three species. A blinded reading test involving four personnel and 57 yeast isolates representing nine clinically important species confirmed that colonial appearance after 48 h of incubation on CHROMagar Candida afforded the correct presumptive recognition of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C, krusei, and Trichosporon spp. None of nine bacterial isolates grew on CHROMagar Candida within 72 h, and bacteria (Escherichia coli) grew from only 4 of 104 vaginal, 100 oral, and 99 anorectal swabs. The new medium

  20. Silk microgels formed by proteolytic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Dash, Mamoni; Chiellini, Federica; Kaplan, David L; Chiellini, Emo

    2013-09-01

    The proteolytic enzyme α-chymotrypsin selectively cleaves the amorphous regions of silk fibroin protein (SFP) and allows the crystalline regions to self-assemble into silk microgels (SMGs) at physiological temperature. These microgels consist of lamellar crystals in the micrometer scale, in contrast to the nanometer-scaled crystals in native silkworm fibers. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and zeta potential results demonstrated that α-chymotrypsin utilized only the non-amorphous domains or segments of the heavy chain of SFP to form negatively charged SMGs. The SMGs were characterized in terms of size, charge, structure, morphology, crystallinity, swelling kinetics, water content and thermal properties. The results suggest that the present technique of preparing SMGs by α-chymotrypsin is simple and efficient, and that the prepared SMGs have useful features for studies related to biomaterial and pharmaceutical needs. This process is also an easy way to obtain the amorphous peptide chains for further study. PMID:23756227

  1. Cellulolytic and proteolytic ability of bacteria isolated from gastrointestinal tract and composting of a hippopotamus.

    PubMed

    da Cruz Ramos, Geomárcia Feitosa; Ramos, Patricia Locosque; Passarini, Michel Rodrigo Zambrano; Vieira Silveira, Marghuel A; Okamoto, Débora Noma; de Oliveira, Lilian Caroline Gonçalves; Zezzo, Larissa Vieira; Marem, Alyne; Santos Rocha, Rafael Costa; da Cruz, João Batista; Juliano, Luiz; de Vasconcellos, Suzan Pantaroto

    2016-03-01

    The bioprospection for cellulase and protease producers is a promise strategy for the discovery of potential biocatalysts for use in hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials as well as proteic residues. These enzymes can increment and turn viable the production of second generation ethanol from different and alternative sources. In this context, the goal of this study was the investigation of cellulolytic and proteolytic abilities of bacteria isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of a hippopotamus as well as from its composting process. It is important to highlight that hippopotamus gastrointestinal samples were a non-typical sources of efficient hydrolytic bacteria with potential for application in biotechnological industries, like biofuel production. Looking for this, a total of 159 bacteria were isolated, which were submitted to qualitative and quantitative enzymatic assays. Proteolytic analyzes were conducted through the evaluation of fluorescent probes. Qualitative assays for cellulolytic abilities revealed 70 positive hits. After quantitative analyzes, 44 % of these positive hits were selected, but five (5) strains showed cellulolytic activity up to 11,8 FPU/mL. Regarding to proteolytic activities, six (6) strains showed activity above 10 %, which overpassed results described in the literature. Molecular analyzes based on the identification of 16S rDNA, revealed that all the selected bacterial isolates were affiliated to Bacillus genus. In summary, these results strongly indicate that the isolated bacteria from a hippopotamus can be a potential source of interesting biocatalysts with cellulolytic and proteolytic activities, with relevance for industrial applications. PMID:26931430

  2. A common type of the spectrin alpha I 46-50a-kD peptide abnormality in hereditary elliptocytosis and pyropoikilocytosis is associated with a mutation distant from the proteolytic cleavage site. Evidence for the functional importance of the triple helical model of spectrin.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, P G; Tse, W T; Coetzer, T; Lecomte, M C; Garbarz, M; Zarkowsky, H S; Baruchel, A; Ballas, S K; Dhermy, D; Palek, J

    1992-01-01

    We studied nine individuals from five unrelated families with alpha I/46-50a hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) or hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP), including one of the original HHP probands first reported by Zarkowsky and colleagues (1975. Br. J. Haematol. 29:537-543). Biochemical analysis of erythrocyte membrane proteins from these patients revealed, as a common abnormality, the presence of the alpha I/46-50a peptide after limited tryptic digestion of spectrin. The polymerase chain reaction was utilized to study the structure of the DNA encoding the alpha I domain of spectrin in the affected individuals. The DNA sequence of the alpha-spectrin gene encoding the region of the alpha-spectrin chain surrounding the abnormal proteolytic cleavage site was normal. We identified a point mutation causing the replacement of a highly conserved leucine residue by proline at position 207 in the alpha-spectrin chain, a site 51 residues to the amino-terminal side of the abnormal proteolytic cleavage site. Analysis of the proposed triple helical model of spectrin repeats reveals that the mutation occurs in helix 2 at a position directly opposite the abnormal proteolytic cleavage site in helix 3, making this the first report of a mutation occurring in helix 2 of a repeat in the alpha I domain of spectrin. These results add to the molecular heterogeneity of mutations associated with HE/HPP and provide further support for the proposed triple helical model of spectrin. Disruption of this proposed alpha-helical structure by helix-breaking proline substitutions may result in a functionally defective spectrin chain. Images PMID:1541680

  3. Candida and other yeasts of clinical importance in Aseer region, southern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Mohamed E.; Assiry, Mohammed M.; Joseph, Martin R.; Haimour, Waleed O.; Abdelrahim, Ihab M.; Al-Abed, Fatin; Fadul, Abdalla N.; Al-Hakami, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To isolate, identify, and determine the prevalence of Candida and other yeasts of clinical importance in Aseer region, Saudi Arabia. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study involving retrospective analysis of 6100 samples submitted to the Microbiology Laboratory, Aseer Central Hospital, Abha, Saudi Arabia between 2011 and 2012, and prospective isolation and identification of 84 isolates recovered from various clinical specimens presented to the Microbiology Laboratory between 2012 and 2013 using the classic morphological schemes and the Vitek 2 automated system. Results: The results of the retrospective analysis (2011-2012) indicated that of the 6100 various clinical specimens submitted to the routine microbiology analysis, 143 (2.35%) revealed the presence of Candida spp. The distribution of the 143 Candida spp. according to specimens was as follows: urine 72%, sputum 10.5%, endotracheal tube 7%, blood 4.2%, catheter tip 2.1%, throat swab 2.1%, eye swab 0.7%, wound exudates 0.7%, and cerebrospinal fluid 0.7%. The results of the prospective study (2012-2013), which involved the identification of yeast recovered from 84 specimens indicated that Candida albicans 28.6% was the predominant species, followed by Candida parapsilosis 21.4%, Candida tropicalis 14.3%, and Candida lusitaniae 9.5%. Conclusions: Along with the commonly encountered Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, and Candida lusitaniae were detected with significant rates. Many other Candida species and some other pathogenic yeasts have been detected for the first time in the region. Urinary tract samples were the main source of Candida species. PMID:25316465

  4. Using complete genome comparisons to identify sequences whose presence accurately predicts clinically important phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hall, Barry G; Cardenas, Heliodoro; Barlow, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    In clinical settings it is often important to know not just the identity of a microorganism, but also the danger posed by that particular strain. For instance, Escherichia coli can range from being a harmless commensal to being a very dangerous enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) strain. Determining pathogenic phenotypes can be both time consuming and expensive. Here we propose a simple, rapid, and inexpensive method of predicting pathogenic phenotypes on the basis of the presence or absence of short homologous DNA segments in an isolate. Our method compares completely sequenced genomes without the necessity of genome alignments in order to identify the presence or absence of the segments to produce an automatic alignment of the binary string that describes each genome. Analysis of the segment alignment allows identification of those segments whose presence strongly predicts a phenotype. Clinical application of the method requires nothing more that PCR amplification of each of the set of predictive segments. Here we apply the method to identifying EHEC strains of E. coli and to distinguishing E. coli from Shigella. We show in silico that with as few as 8 predictive sequences, if even three of those predictive sequences are amplified the probability of being EHEC or Shigella is >0.99. The method is thus very robust to the occasional amplification failure for spurious reasons. Experimentally, we apply the method to screening a set of 98 isolates to distinguishing E. coli from Shigella, and EHEC from non-EHEC E. coli strains and show that all isolates are correctly identified. PMID:23935901

  5. Chronic Chagas cardiopathy in Chile. Importance of Trypanosoma cruzi burden and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Apt, Werner; Arribada, Arturo; Zulantay, Inés; Saavedra, Miguel; Muñoz, Catalina; Toro, Bruno; Vega, Bastián; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Currently there are no biological markers to indicate which individuals with chronic indeterminate period of Chagas disease develop heart disease and who will remain all his life in this phase. The aim of this survey was to determine if Trypanosoma cruzi burden is related to the presence of heart disease in patients with chronic Chagas disease. 200 patients who had not been treated, 100 with cardiopathy and 100 without, groups A and B respectively, were submitted to clinical study and electrocardiogram, Echo-Doppler was performed for group A in which all important known causes of cardiopathy were discarded. In both groups xenodiagnosis, conventional PCR and quantitative PCR were undertaken. The 100 cardiopaths had 133 electrocardiographic alterations most of them in grade II of the New York Heart Association classification. 98 cardiopaths were classified in grade I by Echo-Doppler and only 2 cases were in grade III due to low ejection fraction. The difference in average parasitemia in patients of group A and B was not significant and no statistically differences were observed between average parasitemia of cardiopaths grade II versus grade I of NYHA. This results allow to characterize same clinical, electrocardiographical and parasitological features in chagasic cardiopaths of Chile. PMID:27353063

  6. Anatomical Localization of Lister's Tubercle and its Clinical and Surgical Importance.

    PubMed

    Ağır, Ismail; Aytekin, Mahmut Nedim; Küçükdurmaz, Fatih; Gökhan, Servan; Cavuş, Umut Yücel

    2014-01-01

    The dorsal tubercle of the radius, once called Lister's tubercle, is used as a landmark in wrist arthroscopy, wrist joint injections, and similar surgical and clinical procedures. However, there is no useful information in the reference anatomy books and literature. The aim of this study was to identify the anatomical localization of Lister's tubercle on the dorsum of radius in relation to the radial styloid process and the ulnar notch of radius and to demonstrate the clinical and surgical importance of these relationships. We studied 20 dried cadaver radius specimens. The distances from Lister's tubercle to the radial styloid process and to the ulnar notch were measured by using a digital micrometer caliber and the ratio of the two measures was calculated. The dorsal tubercle of the radius is variable in position and can be either closer to the radial styloid process or to the ulnar notch. The present study showed that in 11 of the radii the dorsal tubercle of the radius was nearer to the radial styloid process than the ulnar notch, while in 9 subjects it was nearer to the ulnar notch. This anatomical variation may be relevant for wrist injections, wrist artroscopy or wrist surgery. PMID:24843388

  7. Anatomical Localization of Lister’s Tubercle and its Clinical and Surgical Importance

    PubMed Central

    Ağır, İsmail; Aytekin, Mahmut Nedim; Küçükdurmaz, Fatih; Gökhan, Servan; Çavuş, Umut Yücel

    2014-01-01

    The dorsal tubercle of the radius, once called Lister’s tubercle, is used as a landmark in wrist arthroscopy, wrist joint injections, and similar surgical and clinical procedures. However, there is no useful information in the reference anatomy books and literature. The aim of this study was to identify the anatomical localization of Lister’s tubercle on the dorsum of radius in relation to the radial styloid process and the ulnar notch of radius and to demonstrate the clinical and surgical importance of these relationships. We studied 20 dried cadaver radius specimens. The distances from Lister’s tubercle to the radial styloid process and to the ulnar notch were measured by using a digital micrometer caliber and the ratio of the two measures was calculated. The dorsal tubercle of the radius is variable in position and can be either closer to the radial styloid process or to the ulnar notch. The present study showed that in 11 of the radii the dorsal tubercle of the radius was nearer to the radial styloid process than the ulnar notch, while in 9 subjects it was nearer to the ulnar notch. This anatomical variation may be relevant for wrist injections, wrist artroscopy or wrist surgery. PMID:24843388

  8. The biological and clinical importance of the 'new generation' cytokines in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gabay, Cem; McInnes, Iain B

    2009-01-01

    A better understanding of cytokine biology over the last two decades has allowed the successful development of cytokine inhibitors against tumour necrosis factor and interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6. The introduction of these therapies should be considered a breakthrough in the management of several rheumatic diseases. However, many patients will exhibit no or only partial response to these therapies, thus emphasising the importance of exploring other therapeutic strategies. In this article, we review the most recent information on novel cytokines that are often members of previously described cytokine families such as the IL-1 superfamily (IL-18 and IL-33), the IL-12 superfamily (IL-27 and IL-35), the IL-2 superfamily (IL-15 and IL-21), and IL-17. Several data derived from experimental models and clinical samples indicate that some of these cytokines contribute to the pathophysiology of arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. Targeting of some of these cytokines has already been tested in clinical trials with interesting results. PMID:19519923

  9. Autonomic dysfunction in early breast cancer: Incidence, clinical importance, and underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lakoski, Susan G; Jones, Lee W; Krone, Ronald J; Stein, Phyllis K; Scott, Jessica M

    2015-08-01

    Autonomic dysfunction represents a loss of normal autonomic control of the cardiovascular system associated with both sympathetic nervous system overdrive and reduced efficacy of the parasympathetic nervous system. Autonomic dysfunction is a strong predictor of future coronary heart disease, vascular disease, and sudden cardiac death. In the current review, we will discuss the clinical importance of autonomic dysfunction as a cardiovascular risk marker among breast cancer patients. We will review the effects of antineoplastic therapy on autonomic function, as well as discuss secondary exposures, such as psychological stress, sleep disturbances, weight gain/metabolic derangements, and loss of cardiorespiratory fitness, which may negatively impact autonomic function in breast cancer patients. Lastly, we review potential strategies to improve autonomic function in this population. The perspective can help guide new therapeutic interventions to promote longevity and cardiovascular health among breast cancer survivors. PMID:26299219

  10. Autonomic Dysfunction in Early Breast Cancer: Incidence, Clinical Importance, and Underlying Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lakoski, Susan G.; Jones, Lee W.; Krone, Ronald J.; Stein, Phyllis K.; Scott, Jessica M.

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic dysfunction represents a loss of normal autonomic control of the cardiovascular system associated with both sympathetic nervous system overdrive and reduced efficacy of the parasympathetic nervous system. Autonomic dysfunction is a strong predictor of future coronary heart disease, vascular disease and sudden cardiac death. In the current review, we will discuss the clinical importance of autonomic dysfunction as a cardiovascular risk marker among breast cancer patients. We will review the effects of antineoplastic therapy on autonomic function, as well as discuss secondary exposures, such as psychological stress, sleep disturbances, weight gain/metabolic derangements, and loss of cardiorespiratory fitness which may negatively impact autonomic function in breast cancer patients. Lastly, we review potential strategies to improve autonomic function in this population. The perspective can help guide new therapeutic interventions to promote longevity and cardiovascular health among breast cancer survivors. PMID:26299219

  11. The minimum clinically important difference for EQ-5D index: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Coretti, Silvia; Ruggeri, Matteo; McNamee, Paul

    2014-04-01

    The European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions Questionnaire (EQ-5D) is the most common instrument to value health outcomes under the patient's perspective. Several studies have investigated whether observed changes are meaningful to patients, using a variety of approaches to estimate the minimum clinically important difference (MCID). This study provides an overview of the state of art of the estimation of the MCID for the three-level EQ-5D index based on the UK scoring algorithm, critically assessing the available evidence. The interest in estimation of MCID for the EQ-5D has been increasing in recent years. However, some additional standardization in the estimation procedures may be of value, in order to enhance the ability to make comparisons across measures and disease areas. Further methodological research might also contribute to reducing gaps between theory and practice. PMID:24625040

  12. Differential Diagnoses of Overgrowth Syndromes: The Most Important Clinical and Radiological Disease Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda, Letícia da Silva; Alves, Úrsula David; Zanier, José Fernando Cardona; Machado, Dequitier Carvalho; Camilo, Gustavo Bittencourt; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2014-01-01

    Overgrowth syndromes comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that are characterized by excessive tissue development. Some of these syndromes may be associated with dysfunction in the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/PI3K/AKT pathway, which results in an increased expression of the insulin receptor. In the current review, four overgrowth syndromes were characterized (Proteus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome, Madelung's disease, and neurofibromatosis type I) and illustrated using cases from our institution. Because these syndromes have overlapping clinical manifestations and have no established genetic tests for their diagnosis, radiological methods are important contributors to the diagnosis of many of these syndromes. The correlation of genetic discoveries and molecular pathways that may contribute to the phenotypic expression is also of interest, as this may lead to potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:25009745

  13. Non-clinical factors associated with TB: important for DOTS impact evaluation and disease elimination.

    PubMed

    Hill, Philip C; Whalen, Christopher C

    2014-09-01

    Initial optimism that DOTS (Directly Observed Treatment, Short-course) would have a dramatic effect on TB incidence rates in developing countries has not been supported by the evidence accumulated so far. Indeed, where TB incidence rates have decreased, non-clinical socio-economic factors appear to have played at least as great a role. We postulate that in those settings with little or no decrease in TB incidence, there are likely to be common pathway blockages that interfere with the effectiveness of DOTS implementation as socio-economic factors evolve. Measuring socio-economic trends, as well as DOTS implementation, is important for understanding TB control and opens up the opportunity for broader public health engagement. PMID:25059524

  14. Importance of patient-centred signage and navigation guide in an orthopaedic and plastics clinic

    PubMed Central

    Maqbool, Talha; Raju, Sneha; In, Eunji

    2016-01-01

    Gulshan & Nanji Orthopaedic and Plastics Center at the North York General Hospital is the second busiest site after the emergency department serving more than 26,000 patients annually. Increase in patient flow, overworked staff, and recent renovations to the hospital have resulted in patients experiencing long wait times, and thusly patient dissatisfaction and stress. Several factors contribute to patient dissatisfaction and stress: i) poor and unfriendly signage; ii) inconsistent utilization of the numbering system; and iii) difficulty navigating to and from the imaging center. A multidisciplinary QI team was assembled to improve the patient experience. We developed a questionnaire to assess patient stress levels at the baseline. Overall, more than half of the patients (54.8%) strongly agreed or agreed to having a stressful waiting experience. Subsequently, based on patient feedback and staff perspectives, we implemented two PDSA cycles. For PDSA 1, we placed a floor graphic (i.e. black tape) to assist patients in navigating from the clinic to the imaging centre and back. For PDSA 2, we involved creating a single 21”×32” patient-friendly sign at the entrance to welcome patients, with clear instructions outlining registration procedures. Surveys were re-administered to assess patient stress levels. A combination of both interventions caused a statistically significant reduction in patient stress levels based on the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U Tests. The present project highlighted the importance of involving stakeholders as well as frontline staff when undertaking quality improvement projects as a way to identify bottlenecks as well as establish sustainable solutions. Additionally, the team recognized the importance of incorporating empirical based solutions and involving experts in the field to optimize results. The present project successfully implemented strategies to improve patient satisfaction and reduce stress in a high flow community clinic

  15. Reliably Detecting Clinically Important Variants Requires Both Combined Variant Calls and Optimized Filtering Strategies.

    PubMed

    Field, Matthew A; Cho, Vicky; Andrews, T Daniel; Goodnow, Chris C

    2015-01-01

    A diversity of tools is available for identification of variants from genome sequence data. Given the current complexity of incorporating external software into a genome analysis infrastructure, a tendency exists to rely on the results from a single tool alone. The quality of the output variant calls is highly variable however, depending on factors such as sequence library quality as well as the choice of short-read aligner, variant caller, and variant caller filtering strategy. Here we present a two-part study first using the high quality 'genome in a bottle' reference set to demonstrate the significant impact the choice of aligner, variant caller, and variant caller filtering strategy has on overall variant call quality and further how certain variant callers outperform others with increased sample contamination, an important consideration when analyzing sequenced cancer samples. This analysis confirms previous work showing that combining variant calls of multiple tools results in the best quality resultant variant set, for either specificity or sensitivity, depending on whether the intersection or union, of all variant calls is used respectively. Second, we analyze a melanoma cell line derived from a control lymphocyte sample to determine whether software choices affect the detection of clinically important melanoma risk-factor variants finding that only one of the three such variants is unanimously detected under all conditions. Finally, we describe a cogent strategy for implementing a clinical variant detection pipeline; a strategy that requires careful software selection, variant caller filtering optimizing, and combined variant calls in order to effectively minimize false negative variants. While implementing such features represents an increase in complexity and computation the results offer indisputable improvements in data quality. PMID:26600436

  16. Reliably Detecting Clinically Important Variants Requires Both Combined Variant Calls and Optimized Filtering Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Field, Matthew A.; Cho, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    A diversity of tools is available for identification of variants from genome sequence data. Given the current complexity of incorporating external software into a genome analysis infrastructure, a tendency exists to rely on the results from a single tool alone. The quality of the output variant calls is highly variable however, depending on factors such as sequence library quality as well as the choice of short-read aligner, variant caller, and variant caller filtering strategy. Here we present a two-part study first using the high quality ‘genome in a bottle’ reference set to demonstrate the significant impact the choice of aligner, variant caller, and variant caller filtering strategy has on overall variant call quality and further how certain variant callers outperform others with increased sample contamination, an important consideration when analyzing sequenced cancer samples. This analysis confirms previous work showing that combining variant calls of multiple tools results in the best quality resultant variant set, for either specificity or sensitivity, depending on whether the intersection or union, of all variant calls is used respectively. Second, we analyze a melanoma cell line derived from a control lymphocyte sample to determine whether software choices affect the detection of clinically important melanoma risk-factor variants finding that only one of the three such variants is unanimously detected under all conditions. Finally, we describe a cogent strategy for implementing a clinical variant detection pipeline; a strategy that requires careful software selection, variant caller filtering optimizing, and combined variant calls in order to effectively minimize false negative variants. While implementing such features represents an increase in complexity and computation the results offer indisputable improvements in data quality. PMID:26600436

  17. Health status instruments for patients with COPD in pulmonary rehabilitation: defining a minimal clinically important difference.

    PubMed

    Alma, Harma; de Jong, Corina; Jelusic, Danijel; Wittmann, Michael; Schuler, Michael; Blok, Bertine Flokstra-de; Kocks, Janwillem; Schultz, Konrad; Molen, Thys van der

    2016-01-01

    The minimal clinically important difference (MCID) defines to what extent change on a health status instrument is clinically relevant, which aids scientists and physicians in measuring therapy effects. This is the first study that aimed to establish the MCID of the Clinical chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Questionnaire (CCQ), the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) and the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) in the same pulmonary rehabilitation population using multiple approaches. In total, 451 COPD patients participated in a 3-week Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) programme (58 years, 65% male, 43 pack-years, GOLD stage II/III/IV 50/39/11%). Techniques used to assess the MCID were anchor-based approaches, including patient-referencing, criterion-referencing and questionnaire-referencing, and the distribution-based methods standard error of measurement (SEM), 1.96SEM and half standard deviation (0.5s.d.). Patient- and criterion-referencing led to MCID estimates of 0.56 and 0.62 (CCQ); 3.12 and 2.96 (CAT); and 8.40 and 9.28 (SGRQ). Questionnaire-referencing suggested MCID ranges of 0.28-0.61 (CCQ), 1.46-3.08 (CAT) and 6.86-9.47 (SGRQ). The SEM, 1.96SEM and 0.5s.d. were 0.29, 0.56 and 0.46 (CCQ); 3.28, 6.43 and 2.80 (CAT); 5.20, 10.19 and 6.06 (SGRQ). Pooled estimates were 0.52 (CCQ), 3.29 (CAT) and 7.91 (SGRQ) for improvement. MCID estimates differed depending on the method used. Pooled estimates suggest clinically relevant improvements needing to exceed 0.40 on the CCQ, 3.00 on the CAT and 7.00 on the SGRQ for moderate to very severe COPD patients. The MCIDs of the CAT and SGRQ in the literature might be too low, leading to overestimation of treatment effects for patients with COPD. PMID:27597571

  18. Health status instruments for patients with COPD in pulmonary rehabilitation: defining a minimal clinically important difference

    PubMed Central

    Alma, Harma; de Jong, Corina; Jelusic, Danijel; Wittmann, Michael; Schuler, Michael; Blok, Bertine Flokstra-de; Kocks, Janwillem; Schultz, Konrad; Molen, Thys van der

    2016-01-01

    The minimal clinically important difference (MCID) defines to what extent change on a health status instrument is clinically relevant, which aids scientists and physicians in measuring therapy effects. This is the first study that aimed to establish the MCID of the Clinical chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Questionnaire (CCQ), the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) and the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) in the same pulmonary rehabilitation population using multiple approaches. In total, 451 COPD patients participated in a 3-week Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) programme (58 years, 65% male, 43 pack-years, GOLD stage II/III/IV 50/39/11%). Techniques used to assess the MCID were anchor-based approaches, including patient-referencing, criterion-referencing and questionnaire-referencing, and the distribution-based methods standard error of measurement (SEM), 1.96SEM and half standard deviation (0.5s.d.). Patient- and criterion-referencing led to MCID estimates of 0.56 and 0.62 (CCQ); 3.12 and 2.96 (CAT); and 8.40 and 9.28 (SGRQ). Questionnaire-referencing suggested MCID ranges of 0.28–0.61 (CCQ), 1.46–3.08 (CAT) and 6.86–9.47 (SGRQ). The SEM, 1.96SEM and 0.5s.d. were 0.29, 0.56 and 0.46 (CCQ); 3.28, 6.43 and 2.80 (CAT); 5.20, 10.19 and 6.06 (SGRQ). Pooled estimates were 0.52 (CCQ), 3.29 (CAT) and 7.91 (SGRQ) for improvement. MCID estimates differed depending on the method used. Pooled estimates suggest clinically relevant improvements needing to exceed 0.40 on the CCQ, 3.00 on the CAT and 7.00 on the SGRQ for moderate to very severe COPD patients. The MCIDs of the CAT and SGRQ in the literature might be too low, leading to overestimation of treatment effects for patients with COPD. PMID:27597571

  19. Proteolytic Activation of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Coronavirus Spike Fusion Protein by Trypsin in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Wicht, Oliver; Li, Wentao; Willems, Lione; Meuleman, Tom J.; Wubbolts, Richard W.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.; Rottier, Peter J. M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Isolation of porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV) from clinical material in cell culture requires supplementation of trypsin. This may relate to the confinement of PEDV natural infection to the protease-rich small intestine of pigs. Our study focused on the role of protease activity on infection by investigating the spike protein of a PEDV isolate (wtPEDV) using a reverse genetics system based on the trypsin-independent cell culture-adapted strain DR13 (caPEDV). We demonstrate that trypsin acts on the wtPEDV spike protein after receptor binding. We mapped the genetic determinant for trypsin-dependent cell entry to the N-terminal region of the fusion subunit of this class I fusion protein, revealing a conserved arginine just upstream of the putative fusion peptide as the potential cleavage site. Whereas coronaviruses are typically processed by endogenous proteases of the producer or target cell, PEDV S protein activation strictly required supplementation of a protease, enabling us to study mechanistic details of proteolytic processing. IMPORTANCE Recurring PEDV epidemics constitute a serious animal health threat and an economic burden, particularly in Asia but, as of recently, also on the North-American subcontinent. Understanding the biology of PEDV is critical for combatting the infection. Here, we provide new insight into the protease-dependent cell entry of PEDV. PMID:24807723

  20. Proteolytic activation of the porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus spike fusion protein by trypsin in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Wicht, Oliver; Li, Wentao; Willems, Lione; Meuleman, Tom J; Wubbolts, Richard W; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Rottier, Peter J M; Bosch, Berend Jan

    2014-07-01

    Isolation of porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV) from clinical material in cell culture requires supplementation of trypsin. This may relate to the confinement of PEDV natural infection to the protease-rich small intestine of pigs. Our study focused on the role of protease activity on infection by investigating the spike protein of a PEDV isolate (wtPEDV) using a reverse genetics system based on the trypsin-independent cell culture-adapted strain DR13 (caPEDV). We demonstrate that trypsin acts on the wtPEDV spike protein after receptor binding. We mapped the genetic determinant for trypsin-dependent cell entry to the N-terminal region of the fusion subunit of this class I fusion protein, revealing a conserved arginine just upstream of the putative fusion peptide as the potential cleavage site. Whereas coronaviruses are typically processed by endogenous proteases of the producer or target cell, PEDV S protein activation strictly required supplementation of a protease, enabling us to study mechanistic details of proteolytic processing. Importance: Recurring PEDV epidemics constitute a serious animal health threat and an economic burden, particularly in Asia but, as of recently, also on the North-American subcontinent. Understanding the biology of PEDV is critical for combatting the infection. Here, we provide new insight into the protease-dependent cell entry of PEDV. PMID:24807723

  1. PEGylated ofloxacin nanoparticles render strong antibacterial activity against many clinically important human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Marslin, Gregory; Revina, Ann Mary; Khandelwal, Vinoth Kumar Megraj; Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Sheeba, Caroline J; Franklin, Gregory

    2015-08-01

    The rise of bacterial resistance against important drugs threatens their clinical utility. Fluoroquinones, one of the most important classes of contemporary antibiotics has also reported to suffer bacterial resistance. Since the general mechanism of bacterial resistance against fluoroquinone antibiotics (e.g. ofloxacin) consists of target mutations resulting in reduced membrane permeability and increased efflux by the bacteria, strategies that could increase bacterial uptake and reduce efflux of the drug would provide effective treatment. In the present study, we have compared the efficiencies of ofloxacin delivered in the form of free drug (OFX) and as nanoparticles on bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity. Although both poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (OFX-PLGA) and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (OFX-mPEG-PLGA) nanoformulations presented improved bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity against all the tested human bacterial pathogens, namely, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus, OFX-mPEG-PLGA showed significantly higher bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity compared to OFX-PLGA. We have also found that mPEG-PLGA nanoencapsulation could significantly inhibit Bacillus subtilis resistance development against OFX. PMID:26005932

  2. Proteolytic and antimicrobial activity of lactic acid bacteria grown in goat milk

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Jivka; Moncheva, Penka; Ivanova, Iskra

    2014-01-01

    We examined 62 strains and 21 trade starter cultures from the collection of LB Bulgaricum PLC for proteolytic and antimicrobial activity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) grown in goat milk. The aim of this study was to investigate the fermentation of caseins, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin by LAB, using the o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) spectrophotometric assay and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The proteolysis targeted mainly caseins, especially β-casein. Whey proteins were proteolyzed, essentially β-lactoglobulin. The proteolytic activity of Lactococcus lactis l598, Streptococcus thermophilus t3D1, Dt1, Lactobacillus lactis 1043 and L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus b38, b122 and b24 was notably high. The proteolysis process gave rise to medium-sized peptide populations. Most of the examined strains showed antimicrobial activity against some food pathogens, such as Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella cholere enteridis, Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua and Enterobacter aerogenes. The most active producers of antimicrobial-active peptides were strains of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus, which are of practical importance. The starter cultures containing the examined species showed high proteolytic and antimicrobial activity in skimmed goat milk. The greatest antimicrobial activity of the cultures was detected against E. aerogenes. The obtained results demonstrated the significant proteolytic potential of the examined strains in goat milk and their potential for application in the production of dairy products from goat's milk. The present results could be considered as the first data on the proteolytic capacity of strains and starter cultures in goat milk for the purposes of trade interest of LB Bulgaricum PLC. PMID:26019593

  3. Evaluation of proteolytic activity to differentiate some dematiaceous fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Goldson, P R; McGinnis, M R; Kerkering, T M

    1988-01-01

    A total of 123 isolates of Cladosporium spp., Exophiala spp., Fonsecaea spp., Lecythophora hoffmannii, Phaeoannellomyces werneckii, Phialophora spp., Wangiella dermatitidis, and Xylohypha bantiana were tested for proteolytic activity by using 26 different formulations of gelatin, milk, casein, and Loeffler media. Other physiological properties examined included hydrolysis of tyrosine and xanthine, sodium nitrate utilization in Czapek Dox agar, and thermotolerance. Isolates of Exophiala jeanselmei, Fonsecaea compacta, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, W. dermatitidis, and X. bantiana lacked proteolytic activity. Proteolytic activity was variable among the remaining species, depending on the type of medium used. Thermotolerance had value in distinguishing some taxa. PMID:3343325

  4. Radiologist-initiated double reading of abdominal CT: retrospective analysis of the clinical importance of changes to radiology reports

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jack Gunnar; Stokke, Mali Victoria; Tennstrand, Anne Lise; Aamodt, Rolf; Heggelund, Thomas; Dahl, Fredrik A; Sandbæk, Gunnar; Hurlen, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Background Misinterpretation of radiological examinations is an important contributing factor to diagnostic errors. Consultant radiologists in Norwegian hospitals frequently request second reads by colleagues in real time. Our objective was to estimate the frequency of clinically important changes to radiology reports produced by these prospectively obtained double readings. Methods We retrospectively compared the preliminary and final reports from 1071 consecutive double-read abdominal CT examinations of surgical patients at five public hospitals in Norway. Experienced gastrointestinal surgeons rated the clinical importance of changes from the preliminary to final report. The severity of the radiological findings in clinically important changes was classified as increased, unchanged or decreased. Results Changes were classified as clinically important in 146 of 1071 reports (14%). Changes to 3 reports (0.3%) were critical (demanding immediate action), 35 (3%) were major (implying a change in treatment) and 108 (10%) were intermediate (requiring further investigations). The severity of the radiological findings was increased in 118 (81%) of the clinically important changes. Important changes were made less frequently when abdominal radiologists were first readers, more frequently when they were second readers, and more frequently to urgent examinations. Conclusion A 14% rate of clinically important changes made during double reading may justify quality assurance of radiological interpretation. Using expert second readers and a targeted selection of urgent cases and radiologists reading outside their specialty may increase the yield of discrepant cases. PMID:27013638

  5. Clinically important respiratory effects of dust exposure and smoking in British coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Marine, W.M.; Gurr, D.; Jacobsen, M.

    1988-01-01

    A unique data set of 3380 British coal miners has been reanalyzed with major focus on nonpneumoconiotic respiratory conditions. The aim was to assess the independent contribution of smoking and exposure to respirable dust to clinically significant measures of respiratory dysfunction. Exposure to coal-mine dust was monitored over a 10-yr period. Medical surveys provided estimates of prior dust exposure and recorded respiratory symptoms. Each man's FEV1 was compared with the level predicted for his age and height by an internally derived prediction equation for FEV1. Four respiratory indices were considered at the end of the 10-yr period: FEV1 less than 80%, chronic bronchitis, chronic bronchitis with FEV1 less than 80%, and FEV1 less than 65%. Results were uniformly incorporated into logistic regression equations for each condition. The equations include coefficients for age, dust, and when indicated, an interaction term for age and dust. Dust-related increases in prevalence of each of the 4 conditions were statistically significant and were similar for smokers and nonsmokers at the mean age (47 yr). There was no evidence that smoking potentiates the effect of exposure to dust. Estimates of prevalences at the mean age of all 4 measures of respiratory dysfunction were greater in smokers. At intermediate and high dust exposure the prevalence of the 4 conditions in nonsmokers approached the prevalence in smokers at hypothetically zero dust exposure. Both smoking and dust exposure can cause clinically important respiratory dysfunction and their separate contributions to obstructive airway disease in coal miners appear to be additive.

  6. Clinical Trials With Large Numbers of Variables: Important Advantages of Canonical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cleophas, Ton J

    2016-01-01

    Canonical analysis assesses the combined effects of a set of predictor variables on a set of outcome variables, but it is little used in clinical trials despite the omnipresence of multiple variables. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of canonical analysis as compared with traditional multivariate methods using multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). As an example, a simulated data file with 12 gene expression levels and 4 drug efficacy scores was used. The correlation coefficient between the 12 predictor and 4 outcome variables was 0.87 (P = 0.0001) meaning that 76% of the variability in the outcome variables was explained by the 12 covariates. Repeated testing after the removal of 5 unimportant predictor and 1 outcome variable produced virtually the same overall result. The MANCOVA identified identical unimportant variables, but it was unable to provide overall statistics. (1) Canonical analysis is remarkable, because it can handle many more variables than traditional multivariate methods such as MANCOVA can. (2) At the same time, it accounts for the relative importance of the separate variables, their interactions and differences in units. (3) Canonical analysis provides overall statistics of the effects of sets of variables, whereas traditional multivariate methods only provide the statistics of the separate variables. (4) Unlike other methods for combining the effects of multiple variables such as factor analysis/partial least squares, canonical analysis is scientifically entirely rigorous. (5) Limitations include that it is less flexible than factor analysis/partial least squares, because only 2 sets of variables are used and because multiple solutions instead of one is offered. We do hope that this article will stimulate clinical investigators to start using this remarkable method. PMID:23591025

  7. In vivo sensing of proteolytic activity with an NSET-based NIR fluorogenic nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Ku, Minhee; Hong, Yoochan; Heo, Dan; Lee, Eugene; Hwang, Seungyeon; Suh, Jin-Suck; Yang, Jaemoon

    2016-03-15

    Biomedical in vivo sensing methods in the near-infrared (NIR) range, which that provide relatively high photon transparency, separation from auto-fluorescence background, and extended sensitivity, are being used increasingly for non-invasive mapping and monitoring of molecular events in cancer cells. In this study, we fabricated an NIR fluorogenic nanosensor based on the nanoparticle surface energy transfer effect, by conjugation of fluorescent proteolytic enzyme-specific cleavable peptides with gold nanorods (GNRs). Membrane-anchored membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinases (MT1-MMPs), a family of zinc-dependent proteolytic enzymes, can induce the metastatic potential of cancer cells by promoting degradation of the extracellular matrix. Therefore, sensitive detection of MT1-MMP activity can provide essential information in the clinical setting. We have applied in vivo NIR sensing to evaluate MT1-MMP activity, as an NIR imaging target, in an MT1-MMP-expressing metastatic tumor mouse model. PMID:26454829

  8. Management of Deep Brain Stimulator Battery Failure: Battery Estimators, Charge Density, and Importance of Clinical Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Fakhar, Kaihan; Hastings, Erin; Butson, Christopher R.; Foote, Kelly D.; Zeilman, Pam; Okun, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed in this investigation to study deep brain stimulation (DBS) battery drain with special attention directed toward patient symptoms prior to and following battery replacement. Background Previously our group developed web-based calculators and smart phone applications to estimate DBS battery life (http://mdc.mbi.ufl.edu/surgery/dbs-battery-estimator). Methods A cohort of 320 patients undergoing DBS battery replacement from 2002–2012 were included in an IRB approved study. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 20.0 (IBM, Armonk, NY). Results The mean charge density for treatment of Parkinson’s disease was 7.2 µC/cm2/phase (SD = 3.82), for dystonia was 17.5 µC/cm2/phase (SD = 8.53), for essential tremor was 8.3 µC/cm2/phase (SD = 4.85), and for OCD was 18.0 µC/cm2/phase (SD = 4.35). There was a significant relationship between charge density and battery life (r = −.59, p<.001), as well as total power and battery life (r = −.64, p<.001). The UF estimator (r = .67, p<.001) and the Medtronic helpline (r = .74, p<.001) predictions of battery life were significantly positively associated with actual battery life. Battery status indicators on Soletra and Kinetra were poor predictors of battery life. In 38 cases, the symptoms improved following a battery change, suggesting that the neurostimulator was likely responsible for symptom worsening. For these cases, both the UF estimator and the Medtronic helpline were significantly correlated with battery life (r = .65 and r = .70, respectively, both p<.001). Conclusions Battery estimations, charge density, total power and clinical symptoms were important factors. The observation of clinical worsening that was rescued following neurostimulator replacement reinforces the notion that changes in clinical symptoms can be associated with battery drain. PMID:23536810

  9. Prevention of clinically important deteriorations in COPD with umeclidinium/vilanterol

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dave; Maleki-Yazdi, M Reza; Tombs, Lee; Iqbal, Ahmar; Fahy, William A; Naya, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimizing the risk of disease progression and exacerbations is the key goal of COPD management, as these are well-established indicators of poor COPD prognosis. We developed a novel composite end point assessing three important aspects (lung function, health status, and exacerbations) of worsening in COPD. The objective was to determine whether dual bronchodilation with umeclidinium/vilanterol (UMEC/VI) reduces clinically important deteriorations (CIDs) in COPD versus placebo or bronchodilator monotherapy. Methods This study is a post hoc analysis of two 24-week trials comparing UMEC/VI 62.5/25 µg with UMEC 62.5 µg, VI 25 µg, or placebo (Study A; NCT01313650), or UMEC/VI 62.5/25 µg with tiotropium (TIO) 18 µg (Study B; NCT01777334) in patients with symptomatic COPD, without a history of frequent exacerbations. Deterioration was assessed as the time to a first CID, a composite measure defined as a decrease of ≥100 mL in trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second or ≥4-unit increase in St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire total score or an on-treatment moderate-to-severe COPD exacerbation. Results In Study A, fewer patients experienced a first CID with UMEC/VI (44%) versus UMEC (50%), VI (56%), and placebo (75%). The risk of a first CID was reduced with UMEC/VI (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.37 [95% confidence interval, CI: 0.30, 0.45]), UMEC (HR: 0.46 [95% CI: 0.38, 0.56]), and VI (HR: 0.55 [95% CI: 0.45, 0.66]; all P<0.001) versus placebo, and with UMEC/VI versus UMEC (HR: 0.80 [95% CI: 0.65, 0.97]; P<0.05) and versus VI (HR: 0.67 [95% CI: 0.55, 0.81]; P<0.001). In Study B, fewer patients experienced a first CID with UMEC/VI (41%) versus TIO (59%). UMEC/VI reduced the risk of a first composite CID by 43% versus TIO (HR: 0.57 [95% CI: 0.47, 0.69]; P<0.001). Conclusion This exploratory analysis, using a new assessment of clinical deterioration in COPD, revealed that a majority of symptomatic patients with low exacerbation risk experienced a

  10. Enteric fever imported to the Czech Republic: epidemiology, clinical characteristics and antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Trojánek, Milan; Dědičová, Daniela; Žemličková, Helena; Jakubů, Vladislav; Malíková, Eliška; Reisingerová, Marie; Gabrielová, Alice; Papagiannitsis, Costas C; Hrabák, Jaroslav; Horová, Blanka; Urbášková, Pavla; Marešová, Vilma; Stejskal, František

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe epidemiological and clinical characteristics of imported enteric fever in Czech travellers and to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated strains. Retrospective descriptive study included adult patients treated with enteric fever at Hospital Na Bulovce during January 2004-December 2012. A case of typhoid or paratyphoid fever was defined as isolation of Salmonella Typhi or Paratyphi from blood or stool. During the study period, there have been diagnosed 19 cases of enteric fever (12 males and 7 females) with age median of 30 years; 14 cases were caused by Salmonella Typhi and 5 cases by S. Paratyphi A. The infection has been acquired in South Asia (16 patients; 84.2 %), in Africa (Egypt, Angola) in two cases (10.5 %), and in Mexico (1; 5.3 %). Symptoms included fever (all patients), diarrhoea (16 cases; 84.2 %), headache (9; 47.4 %), and abdominal pain (7; 36.8 %). Seventeen patients (89.5 %) were treated with fluoroquinolones; however, the treatment failure was observed in seven of them (41.2 %). Decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility was detected in eight strains (66.7 %), and one strain (8.3 %) was multidrug resistant. Sequence analysis of quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDR) of the gyrA gene revealed the presence of amino acid substitutions in all tested isolates with decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility. Typhoid and paratyphoid fevers represent epidemiologically important diseases that may lead to potentially life-threatening complications. Major issue in the management of enteric fever represents the non-susceptibility of Salmonella strains to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials. PMID:25394534

  11. Child-Rearing Practices toward Children with Hemophilia: The Relative Importance of Clinical Characteristics and Parental Emotional Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banis, S.; Suurmeijer, Th. P. B. M.; van Peer, D. R.

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the relative importance of clinical characteristics of the child and parental emotional reactions, to child-rearing practices towards children with hemophilia. Results indicate that mother's emotional reactions appear to have a stronger influence on child-rearing uncertainty and overprotection than clinical characteristics of the child.…

  12. Reinvestigation of the proteolytically active components of Bromelia pinguin fruit.

    PubMed

    Payrol, Juan Abreu; Obregón, Walter D; Natalucci, Claudia L; Caffini, Néstor O

    2005-09-01

    Pinguinain is the name given to a proteolytic enzyme preparation obtained from Bromelia pinguin fruits that has been scarcely studied. The present paper deals on the reexamination of the proteases present in fruits of B. pinguin grown in Cienfuegos, Cuba. The preparation (partially purified pinguinain, PPP) showed the main characteristics of the cysteine proteases, i.e., optimum pH within alkaline range (pH 7.2-8.8), inhibition of proteolytic activity by thiol blocking reagents, which is usually reverted by addition of cysteine, a remarkable thermal stability and notable stability at high ionic strength values. Isoelectric focusing and zymogram of PPP revealed the presence of several proteolytic components between pI 4.6 and 8.1. Preliminary peptidase purification by cationic exchange chromatography showed the presence of two main proteolytic fractions with molecular masses of approximately 20.0 kDa, according to SDS-PAGE. PMID:15978746

  13. Clinical importance of assessment of type 2 diabetes mellitus with visceral obesity. A Japanese perspective.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Ken; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2012-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders including hyperglycemia and impaired insulin action and/or insulin secretion. Obesity T2DM has become a serious problem in Japan as in Western countries, with over-eating and physical inactivity. Obese Asians have mild degree of adiposity, compared with Western subjects. Unlike total body fat, body fat distribution, especially excess accumulation of visceral fat, correlates with various diabetogenic, atherogenic, prothrombotic and proinflammatory metabolic abnormalities, which increase the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Obese patients with T2DM have poor glycemic control with disordered eating behaviors, and complications of hypertension and dyslipidemia, leading to ACVD. The major therapies in obese T2DM, hyperinsulinemia and low insulin sensitivity, available for weight loss, especially visceral fat reduction, include caloric restriction, physical activity and behavior modification. On the other hand, the major therapies in non-obese T2DM with insufficient insulin secretion, are insulin-secretory agents and injectable insulin. For clinically meaningful prevention/reduction in the rate of future ACVD in T2DM, it may be important to stratify T2DM subjects into those with and without visceral obesity and design specific management protocols for each group. PMID:22309596

  14. Dental Erosion and Its Growing Importance in Clinical Practice: From Past to Present

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Ann-Katrin; Omar, Ridwaan; Carlsson, Gunnar E.; Johansson, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, the focus of studies on tooth wear has steadily shifted from the general condition towards the more specific area of dental erosion; equally, a shift has occurred from studies in adults to those in children and adolescents. During this time, understanding of the condition has increased greatly. This paper attempts to provide a critical overview of the development of this body of knowledge, from earlier perceptions to the present. It is accepted that dental erosion has a multifactorial background, in which individual and lifestyle factors have great significance. Notwithstanding methodological differences across studies, data from many countries confirm that dental erosion is common in children and young people, and that, when present, it progresses rapidly. That the condition, and its ramifications, warrants serious consideration in clinical dentistry, is clear. It is important for the oral healthcare team to be able to recognize its early signs and symptoms and to understand its pathogenesis. Preventive strategies are essential ingredients in the management of patients with dental erosion. When necessary, treatment aimed at correcting or improving its effects might best be of a minimally invasive nature. Still, there remains a need for further research to forge better understanding of the subject. PMID:22505907

  15. The importance of resistance to direct antiviral drugs in HCV infection in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA) is associated with high rates of sustained virologic response. Remaining factors associated with treatment failure include advanced stages of liver fibrosis, response to previous antiviral therapy and viral factors such as baseline viral load and suboptimal interaction of the DAA with the target based on viral variants. Heterogeneity within NS3, NS5A, and NS5B areas interacting with DAAs exist between HCV geno- and subtypes as well as HCV isolates of the same geno- and subtype and amino acid polymorphisms associated with suboptimal efficacy of DAAs are termed resistance-associated variants (RAVs). RAVs may be associated with virologic treatment failure. However, virologic treatment failure typically occurs only if other negative predictive host or viral factors are present at the same time, susceptibility to additional antiviral agents is reduced or duration of treatment is suboptimal. In this review geno- and phenotypic resistance testing as well as clinical data on the importance of RAVs for conventional triple therapies with sofosbuvir, simeprevir, and daclatasvir and available interferon-free DAA combinations are discussed. PMID:26409317

  16. Clinical importance of median mandibular flexure in oral rehabilitation: a review.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, K; Chopra, A; Venkatesh, S B

    2016-03-01

    The mandible has a property to flex inwards around the mandibular symphysis with change in shape and decrease in mandibular arch width during opening and protrusion of the mandible. The mandibular deformation may range from a few micrometres to more than 1 mm. The movement occurs because of the contraction of lateral pterygoid muscles that pulls mandibular condyles medially and causes a sagittal movement of the posterior segments. This movement of mandible can have a profound influence on prognosis and treatment outcome for various restorative, endodontics, fixed, removable and implant-related prosthesis. The review unfolds the causes, importance and clinical implications of median mandibular flexure in oral rehabilitation. This review also highlights the appropriate preventive measures and techniques that should be adopted by clinicians to minimise the effect of flexural movement of the jaw during oral rehabilitation. This would not only help clinicians to achieve a good prosthesis with accurate fit and longevity but also maintain the health of the surrounding periodontal or periimplant gingival tissues and bone. PMID:26498998

  17. Inhibitory effect of Allium sativum and Zingiber officinale extracts on clinically important drug resistant pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Herbs and spices are very important and useful as therapeutic agent against many pathological infections. Increasing multidrug resistance of pathogens forces to find alternative compounds for treatment of infectious diseases. Methods In the present study the antimicrobial potency of garlic and ginger has been investigated against eight local clinical bacterial isolates. Three types of extracts of each garlic and ginger including aqueous extract, methanol extract and ethanol extract had been assayed separately against drug resistant Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcusepidermidis and Salmonella typhi. The antibacterial activity was determined by disc diffusion method. Results All tested bacterial strains were most susceptible to the garlic aqueous extract and showed poor susceptibility to the ginger aqueous extract. The (minimum inhibitory concentration) MIC of different bacterial species varied from 0.05 mg/ml to 1.0 mg/ml. Conclusion In the light of several socioeconomic factors of Pakistan mainly poverty and poor hygienic condition, present study encourages the use of spices as alternative or supplementary medicine to reduce the burden of high cost, side effects and progressively increasing drug resistance of pathogens. PMID:22540232

  18. Cardiac Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors: Novel Aspects of Expression, Signaling Mechanisms, Physiologic Function, and Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Timothy D.; Jensen, Brian C.; Baker, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors (AR) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have a crucial role in cardiac physiology in health and disease. Alpha1-ARs signal through Gαq, and signaling through Gq, for example, by endothelin and angiotensin receptors, is thought to be detrimental to the heart. In contrast, cardiac alpha1-ARs mediate important protective and adaptive functions in the heart, although alpha1-ARs are only a minor fraction of total cardiac ARs. Cardiac alpha1-ARs activate pleiotropic downstream signaling to prevent pathologic remodeling in heart failure. Mechanisms defined in animal and cell models include activation of adaptive hypertrophy, prevention of cardiac myocyte death, augmentation of contractility, and induction of ischemic preconditioning. Surprisingly, at the molecular level, alpha1-ARs localize to and signal at the nucleus in cardiac myocytes, and, unlike most GPCRs, activate “inside-out” signaling to cause cardioprotection. Contrary to past opinion, human cardiac alpha1-AR expression is similar to that in the mouse, where alpha1-AR effects are seen most convincingly in knockout models. Human clinical studies show that alpha1-blockade worsens heart failure in hypertension and does not improve outcomes in heart failure, implying a cardioprotective role for human alpha1-ARs. In summary, these findings identify novel functional and mechanistic aspects of cardiac alpha1-AR function and suggest that activation of cardiac alpha1-AR might be a viable therapeutic strategy in heart failure. PMID:24368739

  19. Novel chromogenic aminopeptidase substrates for the detection and identification of clinically important microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Cellier, Marie; James, Arthur L; Orenga, Sylvain; Perry, John D; Rasul, Ari K; Robinson, Shaun N; Stanforth, Stephen P

    2014-10-01

    A series of amino acid derivatives 8-10, 42 and 43 have been prepared as chromogenic enzyme substrates in order to detect aminopeptidase activity in clinically important Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Enzymatic hydrolysis liberates the amino acid moiety and either a 4-aminophenol or a 4-dialkylaminoaniline derivative which undergoes oxidative coupling with 1-naphthol or a substituted 1-naphthol giving an indophenol dye. Substrates and 1-naphthols were incorporated into an agar-based culture medium and this allowed growth of intensely coloured bacterial colonies based on hydrolysis by specific enzymes. Red/pink coloured colonies were produced by the substrates 8-10 and blue coloured colonies were formed by the substrates 42 and 43. The L-alanyl aminopeptidase substrates 8 targeted L-alanyl aminopeptidase activity and gave coloured colonies with a range of Gram-negative bacteria. Substrates 9 targeted β-alanyl aminopeptidase activity and generated coloured colonies with selected Gram-negative species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Three substrates for L-pyroglutamyl acid aminopeptidase (10a, 10c and 43) were hydrolysed by enterococci and Streptococcus pyogenes to generate coloured colonies. Two yeasts were also included in the study, but they did not produce coloured colonies with any of the substrates examined. PMID:25172150

  20. Proteolytic cleavage, trafficking, and functions of nuclear receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Kuang; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-10-01

    Intracellular localization has been reported for over three-quarters of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) families in response to environmental stimuli. Internalized RTK may bind to non-canonical substrates and affect various cellular processes. Many of the intracellular RTKs exist as fragmented forms that are generated by γ-secretase cleavage of the full-length receptor, shedding, alternative splicing, or alternative translation initiation. Soluble RTK fragments are stabilized and intracellularly transported into subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, by binding to chaperone or transcription factors, while membrane-bound RTKs (full-length or truncated) are transported from the plasma membrane to the ER through the well-established Rab- or clathrin adaptor protein-coated vesicle retrograde trafficking pathways. Subsequent nuclear transport of membrane-bound RTK may occur via two pathways, INFS or INTERNET, with the former characterized by release of receptors from the ER into the cytosol and the latter characterized by release of membrane-bound receptor from the ER into the nucleoplasm through the inner nuclear membrane. Although most non-canonical intracellular RTK signaling is related to transcriptional regulation, there may be other functions that have yet to be discovered. In this review, we summarize the proteolytic processing, intracellular trafficking and nuclear functions of RTKs, and discuss how they promote cancer progression, and their clinical implications. PMID:26096795

  1. Clinical Instructors' Perceptions of the Importance of Affective Behaviors in Undergraduate Athletic Training Clinical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokris, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    The affective domain represents a set of learning objectives that are difficult to assess and instruct. Affective behaviors consist of different attributes such as interpersonal relationships, professionalism, trust, empathy, and integrity to name a few. This study surveyed athletic training clinical instructors' perception of the importance…

  2. Office-based DLCO tests help pulmonologists to make important clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Enright Md, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Measurement of diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO), also known as transfer factor, is the second most important pulmonary function test (PFT), after spirometry. Previously available only in hospital-based PFT labs, DLCO testing is now available at outpatient clinics using a portable device. Compared to spirometry tests, assessments with these devices require very little effort. The patient breathes quietly, inhales the test gas, holds the breath for ten seconds, and then exhales. In adult smokers with post-bronchodilator airway obstruction, a low DLCO greatly increases the probability of the emphysema phenotype of COPD due to cigarette smoking, while a normal DLCO makes chronic asthma more likely. In patients with spirometric restriction (a low FVC with a normal FEV1/FVC), a low DLCO increases the pre-test probability of an interstitial lung disease (ILD), while a normal DLCO makes a chest wall type of restriction more likely. A normal TLC (VA from the single-breath helium dilution provided by a DLCO test) rules out restriction of lung volumes without the need for a body box measurement. In patients with dyspnea of unknown cause, the pattern of a low DLCO with normal spirometry increases the likelihood of pulmonary vascular disease, but this pattern also occurs with several other diseases such as a mild ILD. Once a diagnosis is made, the percent predicted DLCO provides an objective index of disease severity and prognosis. A DLCO below 40% predicted, or a decline in DLCO of more than 4 units, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:27566377

  3. 77 FR 38084 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Clinical Supplies Management, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... U.S.C. 823(a) and 952(a) and determined that the registration of Clinical Supplies Management, Inc... laws, and a review of the company's background and history. Therefore, pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 952(a) and... FR 24984, Clinical Supplies Management, Inc., 342 42nd Street South, Fargo, North Dakota 58103,...

  4. Leucoagglutinating phytohemagglutinin: purification, characterization, proteolytic digestion and assessment for allergenicity potential in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Sharma, Akanksha; Das, Mukul; Jain, S K; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2014-04-01

    Red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is consumed worldwide as a vegetarian protein source. But, at the same time the allergenicity potential of red kidney bean is a matter of concern. This study is aimed towards purification, characterization, thermal stability, proteolytic digestion and allergenicity assessment of one of the clinically relevant allergens of red kidney bean. The purification of red kidney bean allergic protein was carried out with the help of column chromatography, IgE immunoblotting and reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The purified protein was characterized by peptide mass finger printing (PMF) and studied for its thermal stability, and proteolytic resistance using simulated gastric fluid (SGF) assay. The allergenicity potential of the purified protein was studied in BALB/c mice. The purified protein was identified as leucoagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (PHA-L) with molecular weight 29.5 kDa. The PHA-L showed resistance to heat as well as proteolytic enzyme. Higher levels of total IgE, specific IgE, and histamine were observed in PHA-L treated BALB/c mice when compared to control. Overall, PHA-L possesses characteristics of allergens and may play a potential role in the red kidney bean induced allergy. PMID:24548135

  5. Independent evolution of neurotoxin and flagellar genetic loci in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T; Paul, Catherine J; Mason, David R; Twine, Susan M; Alston, Mark J; Logan, Susan M; Austin, John W; Peck, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteolytic Clostridium botulinum is the causative agent of botulism, a severe neuroparalytic illness. Given the severity of botulism, surprisingly little is known of the population structure, biology, phylogeny or evolution of C. botulinum. The recent determination of the genome sequence of C. botulinum has allowed comparative genomic indexing using a DNA microarray. Results Whole genome microarray analysis revealed that 63% of the coding sequences (CDSs) present in reference strain ATCC 3502 were common to all 61 widely-representative strains of proteolytic C. botulinum and the closely related C. sporogenes tested. This indicates a relatively stable genome. There was, however, evidence for recombination and genetic exchange, in particular within the neurotoxin gene and cluster (including transfer of neurotoxin genes to C. sporogenes), and the flagellar glycosylation island (FGI). These two loci appear to have evolved independently from each other, and from the remainder of the genetic complement. A number of strains were atypical; for example, while 10 out of 14 strains that formed type A1 toxin gave almost identical profiles in whole genome, neurotoxin cluster and FGI analyses, the other four strains showed divergent properties. Furthermore, a new neurotoxin sub-type (A5) has been discovered in strains from heroin-associated wound botulism cases. For the first time, differences in glycosylation profiles of the flagella could be linked to differences in the gene content of the FGI. Conclusion Proteolytic C. botulinum has a stable genome backbone containing specific regions of genetic heterogeneity. These include the neurotoxin gene cluster and the FGI, each having evolved independently of each other and the remainder of the genetic complement. Analysis of these genetic components provides a high degree of discrimination of strains of proteolytic C. botulinum, and is suitable for clinical and forensic investigations of botulism outbreaks. PMID:19298644

  6. The importance of, and the benefits derived from, forward dental peripatetic clinics in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Davies, T J; McCormick, R J

    2015-03-13

    The majority of dental care for military personnel is carried out in clinics that would be familiar to all dental professionals. In times of conflict, however, dental care is often required to travel to those in need. Dental morbidity has a detrimental effect on a fighting force, both at the personal level and for maintaining combat efficiency. In Afghanistan, two main dental centres provided the majority of emergency care to coalition forces, but from March to September 2012, 23 peripatetic clinics also took place with 472 dental casualties treated. Assessment of these peripatetic clinics demonstrates both quantitative and qualitative benefits. Return travel to main base clinics takes between three to five days. If all personnel during this period had attended a main base and returned to their duty station in only three days, over 1,000 duty days would have been lost. This compares to the 32 days actually lost by attending peripatetic clinics instead and illustrates the considerable time that was saved. Additionally, time spent travelling in a hostile environment is also time at risk of attack. Forty-one anonymous comments about the clinics were left by personnel. All were positive and enthusiastic. The results of this review demonstrate that these clinics save considerable mission time, reduce risk to military personnel, and were greatly valued by those suffering dental problems. PMID:25766173

  7. The genetic and molecular bases of monogenic disorders affecting proteolytic systems

    PubMed Central

    Richard, I

    2005-01-01

    Complete and limited proteolysis represents key events that regulate many biological processes. At least 5% of the human genome codes for components of proteolytic processes if proteases, inhibitors, and cofactors are taken into account. Accordingly, disruption of proteolysis is involved in numerous pathological conditions. In particular, molecular genetic studies have identified a growing number of monogenic disorders caused by mutations in protease coding genes, highlighting the importance of this class of enzymes in development, organogenesis, immunity, and brain function. This review provides insights into the current knowledge about the molecular genetic causes of these disorders. It should be noted that most are due to loss of function mutations, indicating absolute requirement of proteolytic activities for normal cellular functions. Recent progress in understanding the function of the implicated proteins and the disease pathogenesis is detailed. In addition to providing important clues to the diagnosis, treatment, and pathophysiology of disease, functional characterisation of mutations in proteolytic systems emphasises the pleiotropic functions of proteases in the body homeostasis. PMID:15994873

  8. Single cell multiplexed assay for proteolytic activity using droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2016-07-15

    Cellular enzymes interact in a post-translationally regulated fashion to govern individual cell behaviors, yet current platform technologies are limited in their ability to measure multiple enzyme activities simultaneously in single cells. Here, we developed multi-color Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based enzymatic substrates and use them in a microfluidics platform to simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities from water-in-oil droplets that contain single cells. By integrating the microfluidic platform with a computational analytical method, Proteolytic Activity Matrix Analysis (PrAMA), we are able to infer six different protease activity signals from individual cells in a high throughput manner (~100 cells/experimental run). We characterized protease activity profiles at single cell resolution for several cancer cell lines including breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, lung cancer cell line PC-9, and leukemia cell line K-562 using both live-cell and in-situ cell lysis assay formats, with special focus on metalloproteinases important in metastasis. The ability to measure multiple proteases secreted from or expressed in individual cells allows us to characterize cell heterogeneity and has potential applications including systems biology, pharmacology, cancer diagnosis and stem cell biology. PMID:26995287

  9. Stimulation of proteolytic digestion by intestinal goblet cell mucus.

    PubMed

    Shora, W; Forstner, G G; Forstner, J F

    1975-03-01

    Intestinal goblet cell mucus (GCM) was added to incubations of casein and trypsin (or chymotrypsin) to discover whether mucus could inhibit proteolysis. Contrary to expectation, GCM stimulated casein hydrolysis, reaching a maximum effect at a GCM to casein ratio (w/w) of 0.083. GCM did not contain proteolytic enzymes or proenzymes as contaminants, nor did GCM serve as a substrate for trypsin. Stimulation was not reduced by removing 85% of the sialic acid from GCM. Harsh physical treatment (boiling and freezing) of casein decreased (50%) the GCM effect, as did partial predigestion of casein by trypsin, and elevation of trypsin concentration beyond 3 mug per ml. Thus the undegraded structure of casein appeared to be important for the stimulation of proteolysis by GCM. GCM also enhanced the hydrolysis by trypsin of intestinal brush border membrane protein, but had no effect on the hydrolysis of hemoglobin, albumin, or benzoyl arginine ethyl ester. These results suggest that GCM reacts with specific substrates, in a fashion which promotes their digestion by trypsin or chymotrypsin. PMID:1112451

  10. 77 FR 66848 - Minimum Clinically Important Difference: An Outcome Metric in Orthopaedic Device Science and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... number of participants from each organization. If time and space permits, onsite registration on Day 1 of... medicine guidelines advise the use of PRO instruments for assessing the successes of clinical treatment...

  11. The Importance of Children in Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... thousands of babies who would otherwise die of respiratory failure are saved each year. Clinical trials showed that giving antiretroviral therapy (AZT) to pregnant women with HIV-AIDS prevents ...

  12. The Clinical Importance of Assessing Tumor Hypoxia: Relationship of Tumor Hypoxia to Prognosis and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Joseph C.; Lebedev, Artem; Aten, Edward; Madsen, Kathleen; Marciano, Liane

    2014-01-01

    I. Introduction II. The Clinical Importance of Tumor Hypoxia A. Pathophysiology of hypoxia B. Hypoxia's negative impact on the effectiveness of curative treatment 1. Hypoxic tumors accumulate and propagate cancer stem cells 2. Hypoxia reduces the effectiveness of radiotherapy 3. Hypoxia increases metastasis risk and reduces the effectiveness of surgery 4. Hypoxic tumors are resistant to the effects of chemotherapy and chemoradiation C. Hypoxia is prognostic for poor patient outcomes III. Diagnosis of Tumor Hypoxia A. Direct methods 1. Oxygen electrode—direct pO2 measurement most used in cancer research 2. Phosphorescence quenching—alternative direct pO2 measurement 3. Electron paramagnetic resonance 4. 19F-magnetic resonance spectroscopy 5. Overhauser-enhanced MRI B. Endogenous markers of hypoxia 1. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α 2. Carbonic anhydrase IX 3. Glucose transporter 1 4. Osteopontin 5. A combined IHC panel of protein markers for hypoxia 6. Comet assay C. Physiologic methods 1. Near-infrared spectroscopy/tomography—widely used for pulse oximetry 2. Photoacoustic tomography 3. Contrast-enhanced color duplex sonography 4. MRI-based measurements 5. Blood oxygen level-dependent MRI 6. Pimonidazole 7. EF5 (pentafluorinated etanidazole) 8. Hypoxia PET imaging—physiologic hypoxia measurement providing tomographic information a. 18F-fluoromisonidazole b. 18F-fluoroazomycinarabinofuranoside c. 18F-EF5 (pentafluorinated etanidazole) d. 18F-flortanidazole e. Copper (II) (diacetyl-bis (N4-methylthiosemicarbazone)) f. 18F-FDG imaging of hypoxia IV. Modifying Hypoxia to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes A. Use of hypoxia information in radiation therapy planning B. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients responsive to nimorazole C. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients responsive to tirapazamine D. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients

  13. What is the clinical and ethical importance of incidental abnormalities found by knee MRI?

    PubMed Central

    Grainger, Rebecca; Stuckey, Stephen; O'Sullivan, Richard; Davis, Susan R; Ebeling, Peter R; Wluka, Anita E

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to examine joints for research purposes. It may detect both suspected and unsuspected abnormalities. This raises both clinical and ethical issues, especially when incidental abnormalities are detected. The prevalence of incidental, potentially clinically significant abnormalities identified by MRI and their clinical significance in a population undergoing knee MRI in research studies are unknown. Methods We examined the prevalence of such lesions in healthy asymptomatic adults and those with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) undergoing knee MRI with limited sequences for the purpose of research. The MRI findings in 601 asymptomatic subjects and 132 with knee OA who underwent at least one limited knee MRI scan for cartilage volume measurement were examined by an MRI radiologist for the presence of potentially clinically significant abnormalities. Results These were present in 2.3% of healthy and 2.3% of OA subjects. All required further investigation to exclude non-benign disease, including four with bone marrow expansion (0.7%), requiring further investigation and management. A single potentially life-threatening lesion, a myeloma lesion, was identified in a subject with symptomatic knee OA on their second MRI scan in a longitudinal study. Conclusion As musculoskeletal MRI is increasingly used clinically and for research purposes, the potential for detecting unsuspected abnormalities that require further investigation should be recognized. Incorporating a system to detect these, to characterize unexpected findings, and to facilitate appropriate medical follow-up when designing studies using this technology should be considered ethical research practice. PMID:18252003

  14. The importance of avoiding unnecessary right ventricular pacing in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Akerström, Finn; Arias, Miguel A; Pachón, Marta; Jiménez-López, Jesús; Puchol, Alberto; Juliá-Calvo, Justo

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic bradycardia is effectively treated with the implantation of a cardiac pacemaker. Although a highly successful therapy, during recent years there has been a focus on the negative effects associated with long-term pacing of the apex of the right ventricle (RV). It has been shown in both experimental and clinical studies that RV pacing leads to ventricular dyssynchrony, similar to that of left bundle branch block, with subsequent detrimental effects on cardiac structure and function, and in some cases adverse clinical outcomes such as atrial fibrillation, heart failure and death. There is substantial evidence that patients with reduced left ventricular function (LVEF) are at particular high risk of suffering the detrimental clinical effects of long-term RV pacing. The evidence is, however, incomplete, coming largely from subanalyses of pacemaker and implantable cardiac defibrillator studies. In this group of patients with reduced LVEF and an expected high amount of RV pacing, biventricular pacing (cardiac resynchronization therapy) devices can prevent the negative effects of RV pacing and reduce ventricular dyssynchrony. Therefore, cardiac resynchronization therapy has emerged as an attractive option with promising results and more clinical studies are underway. Furthermore, specific pacemaker algorithms, which minimize RV pacing, can also reduce the negative effects of RV stimulation on cardiac function and may prevent clinical deterioration. PMID:24340139

  15. Clinically Important Changes in Health-related Quality of Life for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wyrwich, Kathleen W; Fihn, Stephan D; Tierney, William M; Babu, Ajit N; Wolinsky, Fredric D; Kroenke, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Without clinical input on what constitutes a significant change, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures are less likely to be adopted by clinicians for use in daily practice. Although standards can be determined empirically by within-person change studies based on patient self-reports, these anchor-based methods incorporate only the patients' perspectives of important HRQoL change, and do not reflect an informed clinical evaluation. The objective of this study was to establish clinically important difference standards from the physician's perspective for use of 2 HRQoL measures among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). DESIGN We assembled a 9-person expert panel of North American physicians familiar with the use of the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ), a disease-specific HRQoL measure, or the generic Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36, Version 2.0) among patients with COPD. RESULTS Using 2 rounds of the Delphi process, 1 in-person meeting, and an iterative improvement process for circulating and correcting the final report, the expert panel established small, moderate, and large clinically important change levels for the CRQ and SF-36. CONCLUSIONS For this expert physician panel, levels for detecting clinically important differences on the CRQ were equal to or slightly higher than previous studies based on patient-reported differences. Clinically important differences on the SF-36, Version 2.0, were noticeably larger than previous estimates based on cross-sectional differences between clinically defined patient groups. PMID:12648251

  16. Proteolytic Pathways Induced by Herbicides That Inhibit Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Villamor, Joji Grace; Zabalza, Ana; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Royuela, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicides glyphosate (Gly) and imazamox (Imx) inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling. Results Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined. PMID:24040092

  17. Obstetric litigation: the importance of the quality of clinical files and its influence on expertise conclusions.

    PubMed

    Domingues, A P; Moura, P; Vieira, D N

    2015-02-01

    To appreciate the Portuguese circumstances concerning situations of obstetric medico-legal conflicts and to evaluate the influence of the quality of files in expert conclusions, an analysis of all cases of obstetric medical responsibility from 2001-11 was carried out. File quality was evaluated by absence or insufficiency of clinical information supplied, by poor quality of document copies and by the registered incongruities among all the health professionals involved. Clinical files sent for forensic analysis were defective in most cases (89.5%). In about 11% of cases, expert opinion was inconclusive as a result of the poor quality of the clinical files sent for technical and scientific analysis. This situation is particularly serious in cases where the reason for the dispute was asphyxia, traumatic lesions of the newborn following instrumented delivery or shoulder dystocia and maternal sequelae, where the lack or absence of information, and poor quality copies were significantly associated with inconclusive opinions. PMID:25153007

  18. Immunosuppression by hypoxic cell radiosensitizers: a phenomenon of potential clinical importance

    SciTech Connect

    Rockwell, S.; Kapp, D.S.

    1982-06-01

    The nitroimidazoles metronidazole, misonidazol, and desmethyl misonidazole are currently undergoing clinical trials as possible adjuncts to radiotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the effectiveness of these agents and also documenting the pharmacokinetics and toxicities of radiosensitizing doses of these drugs in man. A variety of toxic effects have been noted in man, including anorexia, nausea and vomiting, peripheral neuropathy, central nervous system symptoms, ototoxicity, allergy, and fear. Laboratory studies have also suggested that these agents have potential to be mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic. In the editorial presented, the author attempts to draw attention to an additional toxic effect of nitroimidazoles - the inhibition of cell-mediated immune responses. (JMT)

  19. Perceptions of the Importance and Utilization of Clinical Supervision among Certified Rural School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Kelly; Brown-Rice, Kathleen; Bardhoshi, Gerta

    2014-01-01

    This study explored rural school counselors' perceptions of clinical supervision. School counselors working in rural communities commonly encounter issues that challenge their ability to provide competent counseling services to the students they serve. School counselors serving in these areas are often the only rural mental health provider in…

  20. 78 FR 23594 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... independent of, the procedures described in 21 CFR 1301.34(b), (c), (d), (e), and (f). As noted in a previous...(a); 21 U.S.C. 823(a); and 21 CFR 1301.34(b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) are satisfied. Dated: April 10... controlled substances will be granted only for analytical testing and clinical trials. This...

  1. Small-Fiber Neuropathy: A Diabetic Microvascular Complication of Special Clinical, Diagnostic, and Prognostic Importance.

    PubMed

    Körei, A E; Istenes, I; Papanas, N; Kempler, P

    2016-01-01

    Damage of small nerve fibers may lead to a large variety of clinical symptoms. Small-fiber neuropathy underlies the symptoms of painful diabetic neuropathy, which may decrease quality of life. It also contributes to the poor prognosis of diabetic neuropathy because it plays a key role in the pathogenesis of foot ulceration and autonomic neuropathy. Impairment of small nerve fibers is considered the earliest alteration in the course of diabetic neuropathy. Therefore, assessment of functional and morphological abnormalities of small nerve fibers may enable timely diagnosis. The definition, symptoms, and clinical significance of small-fiber neuropathy are considered in the present review. An apparently more complex interaction between small-fiber impairment and microcirculation is extensively discussed. Diagnostic modalities include morphometric and functional methods. Corneal confocal microscopy and punch skin biopsy are considered gold standards, but noninvasive functional tests are also diagnostically useful. However, in routine clinical practice, small-fiber neuropathy is diagnosed by its typical clinical presentation. Finally, prompt treatment should be initiated following diagnosis. PMID:25957257

  2. Small Non-coding RNAs Associated with Viral Infectious Diseases of Veterinary Importance: Potential Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Samir, Mohamed; Pessler, Frank

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA (sncRNA) molecules that can regulate mRNAs by inducing their degradation or by blocking translation. Considering that miRNAs are ubiquitous, stable, and conserved across animal species, it seems feasible to exploit them for clinical applications. Unlike in human viral diseases, where some miRNA-based molecules have progressed to clinical application, in veterinary medicine, this concept is just starting to come into view. Clinically, miRNAs could represent powerful diagnostic tools to pinpoint animal viral diseases and/or prognostic tools to follow up disease progression or remission. Additionally, the possible consequences of miRNA dysregulation make them potential therapeutic targets and open the possibilities to use them as tools to generate viral disease-resistant livestock. This review presents an update of preclinical studies on using sncRNAs to combat viral diseases that affect pet and farm animals. Moreover, we discuss the possibilities and challenges of bringing these bench-based discoveries to the veterinary clinic. PMID:27092305

  3. Clinical importance of F-waves as a prognostic factor in Guillain-Barré syndrome in children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eung-Bin; Lee, Yun Young; Lee, Jae Min; Son, Su Min; Hwang, Su-Kyeong; Kwon, Soonhak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A limited number of studies have examined the link between F-wave abnormalities and clinical presentation in pediatric Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Therefore, this study examined the importance of F-wave abnormalities as a prognostic factor in pediatric GBS patients. Methods The records and electrodiagnostic studies (EDS) of 70 GBS patients were retrospectively evaluated, and divided into 2 groups according to the results of EDS. Group A (n=33) presented with F-wave abnormalities, and group B (n=26) exhibited normal findings. We compared laboratory reports, clinical features, response to treatment, and prognosis between the 2 groups. Results Motor weakness was the most frequently observed symptom for either group. Clinically, the incidence of fever and upper respiratory symptoms differed between the 2 groups, while the prevalence of abnormal deep tendon reflex (DTR) was significantly higher in group A than B (P<0.05). Patients diagnosed with GBS had received intravenous immunoglobulin treatment: 94% in group A and 58% in group B. Furthermore, significantly greater numbers of patients in group A showed H-reflex abnormalities and poor prognosis compared with group B (P<0.05). Conclusion This study demonstrated that F-waves are a clinically important prognostic factor in GBS. F-wave abnormalities were associated with abnormal DTR and poor prognosis in patients. Limited studies have examined the link between F-wave abnormalities and clinical results; therefore, further randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm the clinical characteristics and efficacy of treatments. PMID:27462356

  4. The importance of communication for clinical leaders in mental health nursing: the perspective of nurses working in mental health.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Gary; Happell, Brenda; Broadbent, Marc; Reid-Searl, Kerry

    2013-11-01

    Communication has been identified as an important attribute of clinical leadership in nursing. However, there is a paucity of research on its relevance in mental health nursing. This article presents the findings of a grounded theory informed study exploring the attributes and characteristics required for effective clinical leadership in mental health nursing, specifically the views of nurses working in mental health about the importance of effective communication in day to day clinical leadership. In-depth interviews were conducted to gain insight into the participants' experiences and views on clinical leadership in mental health nursing. The data that emerged from these interviews were constantly compared and reviewed, ensuring that any themes that emerged were based on the participants' own experiences and views. Participants recognized that effective communication was one of the attributes of effective clinical leadership and they considered communication as essential for successful working relationships and improved learning experiences for junior staff and students in mental health nursing. Four main themes emerged: choice of language; relationships; nonverbal communication, and listening and relevance. Participants identified that clinical leadership in mental health nursing requires effective communication skills, which enables the development of effective working relationships with others that allows them to contribute to the retention of staff, improved outcomes for clients, and the development of the profession. PMID:24131413

  5. Investigation of the types and characteristics of the proteolytic enzymes formed by diverse strains of Proteus species.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W

    1999-07-01

    Many diverse clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis (48 strains), P. penneri (25), P. vulgaris biogroup 2 (48) and P. vulgaris biogroup 3 (21) from man were examined for their ability to produce proteolytic enzymes and the nature and characteristics of the proteases were studied. All the P. penneri isolates, most (94-90%) of the P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris biogroup 2 isolates, but only 71% of the P. vulgaris biogroup 3 isolates, secreted proteolytic enzymes. These were detected most readily at pH 8 with gelatin as substrate. A strong correlation was found between the ability of a strain to form swarming growth and its ability to secrete proteases. Non-swarming isolates invariably appeared to be non-proteolytic. However, some isolates, particularly of P. vulgaris biogroup 3, were non-proteolytic even when they formed swarming growth. Analysis of the secreted enzymes of the different Proteus spp. on polyacrylamide-gelatin gels under various constraints of pH and other factors showed that they were all EDTA-sensitive metalloproteinases. Analysis of the kinetics of production of the proteases revealed the formation of an additional protease of undefined type and function that was cell-associated and formed before the others were secreted. The secreted protease was subsequently modified to two isoforms whose mass (53-46 kDa) varied with the Proteus spp. and the strain. There was no evidence that the secreted proteases of strains of Proteus spp. were of types other than metalloproteinases. PMID:10403412

  6. Current perspectives on effective migraine treatments: are small clinical differences important for patients?

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Michel D

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of 5-HT(1B/1D) agonists, i.e. triptans, the first drugs specifically developed for the treatment of acute migraine, has revolutionized the treatment of migraine attacks. Triptans have met the needs of many migraine patients, however given the lack of direct comparative trials including all triptans, a meta-analysis of results with all available triptans needed to be conducted. Similar clinical trial design, patient population characteristics and main endpoints certainly facilitated the performance of this meta-analysis. Results from 53 randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trials on acute triptan therapy in 24,089 patients were compared with respect to the main efficacy and tolerability variables. At recommended doses, almotriptan 12.5 mg, eletriptan 80 mg and rizatriptan 10 mg provided the highest likelihood of consistent success. PMID:15071619

  7. Assay for Lipolytic and Proteolytic Activity Using Marine Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Tom, Raymond A.; Crisan, Eli V.

    1975-01-01

    Nondestructive assay procedures for determining microbial lipolytic and proteolytic activity on marine substrates were developed and tested with 287 isolates of bacteria, filamentous fungi, and yeasts. A definite substrate specificity was noted when the enzymatic activities on marine and nonmarine substrates was compared. Of 170 lipolytic isolates, 14 were only active on menhaden oil, 11 could hydrolyze menhaden oil and Tween 80 and/or tributyrin, and 145 isolates could only hydrolyze one or both of the nonmarine lipids. Of the 198 proteolytic isolates, 10 were specific for codfish extract, 152 were active against the marine substrate plus casein and/or gelatin, and 36 were specific for nonmarine substrates. PMID:1167775

  8. Clinical importance of achieving biochemical control with medical therapy in adult patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Christofides, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    In acromegaly, achieving biochemical control (growth hormone [GH] level <1.0 ng/mL and age- and sex-normalized levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1]) through timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment provides an opportunity to improve patient outcomes. Diagnosis of acromegaly is challenging because it is rooted in observing subtle clinical manifestations, and it is typical for acromegaly to evolve for up to 10 years before it is recognized. This results in chronic exposure to elevated levels of GH and IGF-1 and delay in patients receiving appropriate treatment, which consequently increases mortality risk. In this review, the clinical impact of elevated GH and IGF-1 levels, the effectiveness of current therapies, and the potential role of novel treatments for acromegaly will be discussed. Clinical burden of acromegaly and benefits associated with management of GH and IGF-1 levels will be reviewed. Major treatment paradigms in acromegaly include surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. With medical therapies, such as somatostatin analogs, dopamine agonists, and GH receptor antagonists, a substantial proportion of patients achieve reduced GH and normalized IGF-1 levels. In addition, signs and symptoms, quality of life, and comorbidities have also been reported to improve to varying degrees in patients who achieve biochemical control. Currently, there are several innovative therapies in development to improve patient outcomes, patient use, and access. Timely biochemical control of acromegaly ensures that the patient can ultimately improve morbidity and mortality from this disease and its extensive consequences. PMID:27471378

  9. Rehabilitation Counselor Educators' Perceptions of Importance, Student Preparedness, and Teaching Proficiency in Clinical Judgment Skill Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Bryan Scott

    2012-01-01

    Given the importance of clinical judgment in rehabilitation counseling (Strohmer & Leierer, 2000), prevalence and consequences of rehabilitation counselor biases (Berven & Rosenthal, 1999), and the emerging trend to educate rehabilitation counselors in evidence-based practice (EBP) (Leahy & Arokiasamy, 2010), the explicit teaching of…

  10. 77 FR 50162 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Almac Clinical Services, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ..., Inc. By Notice dated April 17, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on April 26, 2012, 77 FR... Tapentadol (9780) II Fentanyl (9801) II The company plans to import small quantities of the listed...

  11. 77 FR 67396 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... noted in a previous notice published in the Federal Register on September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745-46, all... application to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for registration as an importer of Tapentadol...

  12. 78 FR 46371 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Almac Clinical Services, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ..., Inc. By Notice dated April 10, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on April 19, 2013, 78 FR... Tapentadol (9780) II Fentanyl (9801) II The company plans to import small quantities of the listed...

  13. 77 FR 24985 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... September 23, 1975, 40 FR 43745-46, all applicants for registration to import the basic class of any... controlled substances: Drug Schedule Oxycodone (9143) II Hydromorphone (9150) II Tapentadol (9780)...

  14. Identifying important outcome domains for chronic pain clinical trials: an IMMPACT survey of people with pain.

    PubMed

    Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Revicki, Dennis; Harding, Gale; Burke, Laurie B; Cella, David; Cleeland, Charles S; Cowan, Penney; Farrar, John T; Hertz, Sharon; Max, Mitchell B; Rappaport, Bob A

    2008-07-15

    This two-phase study was conducted to identify relevant domains of patient-reported outcomes from the perspective of people who experience chronic pain. In Phase 1, focus groups were conducted to generate a pool of patient outcome-related domains and their components. The results of the focus groups identified 19 aspects of their lives that were significantly impacted by the presence of their symptoms and for which improvements were important criteria they would use in evaluating the effectiveness of any treatment. Phase 2 was conducted to examine the importance and relevance of domains identified from a much larger and diverse sample of people with chronic pain. A survey was developed and posted on the American Chronic Pain Association website. Participants were asked to rate the importance of each item or domain identified by the focus groups on a scale of 0 to10 (i.e., 0="not at all important" and 10="extremely important"). The survey was completed by 959 individuals. The results indicate that all 19 aspects of daily life derived from the focus groups were considered important with a majority of respondents indicating a score of 8 or greater. In addition to pain reduction, the most important aspects were enjoyment of life, emotional well-being, fatigue, weakness, and sleep-related problems. Chronic pain clearly impacts health-related quality of life. The results of the two phases of the study indicate that people with chronic pain consider functioning and well-being as important areas affected by the presence of symptoms and as appropriate targets of treatment. These multiple outcomes should be considered when evaluating the efficacy and effectiveness of chronic pain treatments. PMID:17937976

  15. Did Weir Mitchell anticipate important concepts in ambulatory care and clinical epidemiology?

    PubMed

    Biderman, Aya; Herman, Joseph

    2002-04-01

    During the decade from 1977 to 1986, four models of care pertaining to ambulatory medicine and certain aspects of clinical epidemiology were proposed. All were concerned with the frequently heard accusation that medicine was becoming dehumanized by being overly dependent on powerful new technologies. Some of the authors went so far as to suggest that the view, according to which medical science must restrict itself to "hard" data of the kind provided by the serum multichannel analyzer, should be considered outdated and, in fact, unscientific. Their plea was to develop a science of the clinical encounter that would shift the emphasis from explication to prediction and management, the latter term being virtually synonymous with decision making. For this change to come about, they wrote, it would be necessary to collect "soft" data on such subjects as family relationships, psychic traits and states, perceptions of life quality, patient expectations and many others. We believe that some of these subjects as well as the models themselves were anticipated in the writings, both medical and fictional, of Weir Mitchell, nearly a century earlier. This paper, after presenting a brief overview of the career of a colorful and commanding figure from the annals of American medicine, will seek to illustrate his extraordinary farsightedness as a practitioner of primary care and his relevance for some aspects of clinical epidemiology. Because the attempts to link his ideas to modern concepts are ours, we accept the possibility that, here and there, we may have read things into his writings that he did not intend. PMID:11927212

  16. Comparison of proteolytic activity of Candida sp. strains depending on their origin.

    PubMed

    Modrzewska, B; Kurnatowski, P; Khalid, K

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the research was to evaluate the proteolytic activity of various Candida strains isolated from the oral cavity of persons without clinical symptoms of fungal infection, outpatients with oral cavity disorders and patients hospitalized due to head and neck tumors. A secondary aim was to confirm the presence of secreted aspartyl protease (SAP) genes in the isolated strains and then to compare it depending on the fungal species. Material consisted of 134 fungal strains that were analysed by a modified Staib method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the use of specific primer pairs. The greatest proteolytic activity of fungi was observed at pH 3.5. The proteolysis were the strongest for strains isolated from dental patients and the weakest from persons without changes in the oral cavity. In total, 61.9% of the strains exhibited the presence of at least one of the SAP1-3 genes in all examined groups, SAP1 being the most common; SAP4-6 genes were not observed. All genes were more frequent in the strains isolated from the dental patients than from other groups. SAP1-3 genes were present in Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata, C. humicola and C. lipolytica, but were not noted in other isolated species. The lowest activity of proteolytic enzymes and the least number of aspartyl protease genes are observed among strains isolated from patients without clinical symptoms of mycosis. SAP1-3 genes are most frequently detected in the strains isolated from the oral cavity; their presence varies depending on the species of the fungi. PMID:26922385

  17. Amino Acid Compositions of 27 Food Fishes and Their Importance in Clinical Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Mahanty, Arabinda; Sankar, T. V.; Chakraborty, Kajal; Rangasamy, Anandan; Paul, Baidyanath; Sarma, Debajit; Mathew, Suseela; Asha, Kurukkan Kunnath; Behera, Bijay; Aftabuddin, Md.; Debnath, Dipesh; Vijayagopal, P.; Sridhar, N.; Akhtar, M. S.; Sahi, Neetu; Mitra, Tandrima; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Das, Debajeet; Das, Pushpita; Vijayan, K. K.; Laxmanan, P. T.; Sharma, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins and amino acids are important biomolecules which regulate key metabolic pathways and serve as precursors for synthesis of biologically important substances; moreover, amino acids are building blocks of proteins. Fish is an important dietary source of quality animal proteins and amino acids and play important role in human nutrition. In the present investigation, crude protein content and amino acid compositions of important food fishes from different habitats have been studied. Crude protein content was determined by Kjeldahl method and amino acid composition was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and information on 27 food fishes was generated. The analysis showed that the cold water species are rich in lysine and aspartic acid, marine fishes in leucine, small indigenous fishes in histidine, and the carps and catfishes in glutamic acid and glycine. The enriched nutrition knowledge base would enhance the utility of fish as a source of quality animal proteins and amino acids and aid in their inclusion in dietary counseling and patient guidance for specific nutritional needs. PMID:25379285

  18. The clinical course of cirrhosis: The importance of multistate models and competing risks analysis.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2015-07-01

    Multistate models are models of disease progression that, for a patient group, define multiple outcome events, each of which may affect the time to develop another outcome event. Multistate models are highly relevant for studies of patients with cirrhosis; both the classical perception of cirrhosis as either compensated or decompensated and the recent, more complex models of cirrhosis progression are multistate models. Therefore, researchers who conduct clinical studies of patients with cirrhosis must realize that most of their research questions assume a multistate disease model. Failure to do so can result in severely biased results and bad clinical decisions. The analyses that can be used to study disease progression in a multistate disease model may be called competing risks analysis, named after the competing risks disease model, which is the simplest multistate disease model. In this review article, we introduce multistate disease models and competing risks analysis and explain why the standard armamentarium of Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and Cox regression sometimes gives bad answers to good questions. We also use real data to answer typical research questions about the course of cirrhosis and illustrate biases resulting from inadequate methods. Finally, we suggest statistical software packages that are helpful and accessible to the clinician-researcher. PMID:25376655

  19. Dopamine cell transplantation for Parkinson's disease: the importance of controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Freed, Curt R; Zhou, Wenbo; Breeze, Robert E

    2011-10-01

    Transplantation of human fetal dopamine neurons into the brain of Parkinson's disease patients started in the late 1980s, less than 10 years after experiments in rats showed that embryonic dopamine neurons from a narrow window of development are suitable for transplantation. For human transplantation, the critical stage of development is 6 to 8 weeks after conception. Because putamen is the basal ganglia structure most depleted of dopamine in Parkinson's disease and because it is the structure most closely mapped to the motor cortex, it has been the primary target for neurotransplantation. The double blind trial conducted at the University of Colorado, Columbia University, and North Shore University is the first controlled surgical trial performed in the field of neurosurgery. Results have shown that transplants of fetal dopamine neurons can survive transplantation without immunosuppression and without regard to the age of the patients. Transplants improved objective signs of Parkinson's disease to the best effects of L-DOPA seen preoperatively. Placebo surgery produced no clinical changes. In subjects in whom transplants replaced the need for L-DOPA, the implants replicated the preoperative effects of L-DOPA, including dyskinesias in susceptible patients. Our trial has provided the first controlled evidence that dopamine cell transplants can improve the clinical state of patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:21997523

  20. The Importance of Medication Errors Reporting in Improving the Quality of Clinical Care Services

    PubMed Central

    Elden, Nesreen Mohamed Kamal; Ismail, Amira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Medication errors have significant implications on patient safety. Error detection through an active management and effective reporting system discloses medication errors and encourages safe practices. Objectives: To improve patient safety through determining and reducing the major causes of medication errors (MEs), after applying tailored preventive strategies. Methodology: A pre-test, post-test study was conducted on all inpatients at a 177 bed hospital where all medication procedures in each ward were monitored by a clinical pharmacist. The patient files were reviewed, as well. Error reports were submitted to a hospital multidisciplinary committee to identify major causes of errors. Accordingly, corrective interventions that consisted of targeted training programs for nurses and physicians were conducted. Results: Medication errors were higher during ordering/prescription stage (38.1%), followed by administration phase (20.9%). About 45% of errors reached the patients: 43.5% were harmless and 1.4% harmful. 7.7% were potential errors and more than 47% could be prevented. After the intervention, error rates decreased from (6.7%) to (3.6%) (P≤0.001). Conclusion: The role of a ward based clinical pharmacist with a hospital multidisciplinary committee was effective in recognizing, designing and implementing tailored interventions for reduction of medication errors. A systematic approach is urgently needed to decrease organizational susceptibility to errors, through providing required resources to monitor, analyze and implement effective interventions. PMID:27045415

  1. Evaluation of endothelial function by flow mediated dilation: methodological issues and clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Salvetti, Massimo; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Taddei, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Endothelium plays a primary role in the control of vascular function and structure by protective properties of nitric oxide, which have stimulated the development of methods to assess of endothelial function. Flow-mediated dilation is the most widely used method to test endothelial function since it is non-invasive, and measures by ultrasounds the response to increased shear stress, commonly in the brachial artery. This review focuses on available evidence on FMD, which has been tested for the association with risk factors, target organ damage and the predictive value for future cardiovascular events. FMD has been studied widely in clinical research as it enables serial evaluation, also testing the effect of lifestyle and pharmacological interventions on endothelial function at an early preclinical stage, when the disease process is most likely to be reversible. Despite these advantages, endothelial tests, including FMD, are not yet recommended by guidelines for cardiovascular prevention, for the absence of clear additional prognostic value and particularly the poorly standardized non-invasive methodology. However, recent multicenter studies suggest that accurate methodology ensures reproducible FMD measurements, which can be used in future clinical research to test whether interventions ameliorating FMD function are associated to better cardiovascular prognosis. PMID:24619864

  2. In vitro susceptibility patterns of clinically important Trichophyton and Epidermophyton species against nine antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Badali, Hamid; Mohammadi, Rasoul; Mashedi, Olga; de Hoog, G Sybren; Meis, Jacques F

    2015-05-01

    Despite the common, worldwide, occurrence of dermatophytes, little information is available regarding susceptibility profiles against currently available and novel antifungal agents. A collection of sixty-eight clinical Trichophyton species and Epidermophyton floccosum were previously identified and verified to the species level by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA. MICs of amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, isavuconazole, terbinafine and MECs of caspofungin and anidulafungin were performed based on CLSI M38-A2. The resulting MIC90 s of all strains were, in increasing order, as follows: terbinafine (0.063 mg l(-1) ); posaconazole (1 mg l(-1) ); isavuconazole and anidulafungin (2 mg l(-1) ); itraconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin (4 mg l(-1) ) and fluconazole (>64 mg l(-1) ). These results confirm that terbinafine is an excellent agent for treatment of dermatophytosis due to T. rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, T. verrucosum, T. schoenleinii and E. floccosum. In addition, the new azoles POS and ISA are potentially useful antifungals to treat dermatophytosis. However, the clinical effectiveness of these novel antifungals remains to be determined. PMID:25757042

  3. Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of cerebral malaria imported in Albania.

    PubMed

    Ndreu, Arben; Hajdari, Diana; Ndoni, Anduena; Shkurti, Klodiana; Kraja, Dhimiter; Çomo, Najada; Bino, Silva; Gjermeni, Nevila; Domi, Rudin; Mingomataj, Ervin Çerçiz

    2016-02-01

    This is a case-report of two patients with cerebral malaria (CM) imported from West-African countries. Notably, this form of malaria was developed as a second disease episode, while the first episode was experienced in West Africa. These findings suggest that the second episode of malaria was caused by a different strain of Plasmodium falciparum as compared to the first one. They are the first cerebral malaria cases imported in Albania after the eradication and absence of Plasmodium for five decades. Early treatment of cerebral malaria is decisive on the duration of coma and disease's outcome. PMID:26927463

  4. A Visitor's Guide to Effect Sizes--Statistical Significance versus Practical (Clinical) Importance of Research Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Xu, Gang

    2004-01-01

    Effect Sizes (ES) are an increasingly important index used to quantify the degree of practical significance of study results. This paper gives an introduction to the computation and interpretation of effect sizes from the perspective of the consumer of the research literature. The key points made are: (1) "ES" is a useful indicator of the…

  5. Name Changes in Medically Important Fungi and Their Implications for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    de Hoog, G. Sybren; Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Denning, David W.; Dyer, Paul S.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Geiser, David; Gräser, Yvonne; Guarro, Josep; Haase, Gerhard; Kwon-Chung, Kyung-Joo; Meyer, Wieland; Pitt, John I.; Samson, Robert A.; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Vitale, Roxana G.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent changes in the Fungal Code of Nomenclature and developments in molecular phylogeny are about to lead to dramatic changes in the naming of medically important molds and yeasts. In this article, we present a widely supported and simple proposal to prevent unnecessary nomenclatural instability. PMID:25297326

  6. Positive feedback of protein kinase C proteolytic activation during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Leverrier, Sabrina; Vallentin, Alice; Joubert, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    In contrast with protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and PKCepsilon, which are better known for promoting cell survival, PKCdelta is known for its pro-apoptotic function, which is exerted mainly through a caspase-3-dependent proteolytic activation pathway. In the present study, we used the rat GH3B6 pituitary adenoma cell line to show that PKCalpha and PKCepsilon are activated and relocalized together with PKCdelta when apoptosis is induced by a genotoxic stress. Proteolytic activation is a crucial step used by the three isoforms since: (1) the catalytic domains of the PKCalpha, PKCepsilon or PKCdelta isoforms (CDalpha, CDepsilon and CDdelta respectively) accumulated, and this accumulation was dependent on the activity of both calpain and caspase; and (2) transient expression of CDalpha, CDepsilon or CDdelta sufficed to induce apoptosis. However, following this initial step of proteolytic activation, the pathways diverge; cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation are induced by CDepsilon and CDdelta, but not by CDalpha. Another interesting finding of the present study is the proteolysis of PKCdelta induced by CDepsilon expression that revealed the existence of a cross-talk between PKC isoforms during apoptosis. Hence the PKC family may participate in the apoptotic process of pituitary adenoma cells at two levels: downstream of caspase and calpain, and via retro-activation of caspase-3, resulting in the amplification of its own proteolytic activation. PMID:12238950

  7. Amyloid-forming peptides selected proteolytically from phage display library.

    PubMed

    Koscielska-Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Otlewski, Jacek

    2003-08-01

    We demonstrated that amyloid-forming peptides could be selected from phage-displayed library via proteolysis-based selection protocol. The library of 28-residue peptides based on a sequence of the second zinc finger domain of Zif268, and computationally designed betabetaalpha peptide, FSD-1, was presented monovalently on the surface of M13 phage. The library coupled the infectivity of phage particles to proteolytic stability of a peptide introduced into the coat protein III linker. It was designed to include variants with a strong potential to fold into betabetaalpha motif of zinc finger domains, as expected from secondary structure propensities, but with no structure stabilization via zinc ion coordination. As our primary goal was to find novel monomeric betabetaalpha peptides, the library was selected for stable domains with the assumption that folded proteins are resistant to proteolysis. After less than four rounds of proteolytic selection with trypsin, chymotrypsin, or proteinase K, we obtained a number of proteolysis-resistant phage clones containing several potential sites for proteolytic attack with the proteinases. Eight peptides showing the highest proteolysis resistance were expressed and purified in a phage-free form. When characterized, the peptides possessed proteolytic resistance largely exceeding that of the second zinc finger domain of Zif268 and FSD-1. Six of the characterized peptides formed fibrils when solubilized at high concentrations. Three of them assembled into amyloids as determined through CD measurements, Congo red and thioflavin T binding, and transmission electron microscopy. PMID:12876317

  8. Sirtuins and Proteolytic Systems: Implications for Pathogenesis of Synucleinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Ludovico, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Insoluble and fibrillar forms of α-synuclein are the major components of Lewy bodies, a hallmark of several sporadic and inherited neurodegenerative diseases known as synucleinopathies. α-Synuclein is a natural unfolded and aggregation-prone protein that can be degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasomal system and the lysosomal degradation pathways. α-Synuclein is a target of the main cellular proteolytic systems, but it is also able to alter their function further, contributing to the progression of neurodegeneration. Aging, a major risk for synucleinopathies, is associated with a decrease activity of the proteolytic systems, further aggravating this toxic looping cycle. Here, the current literature on the basic aspects of the routes for α-synuclein clearance, as well as the consequences of the proteolytic systems collapse, will be discussed. Finally, particular focus will be given to the sirtuins’s role on proteostasis regulation, since their modulation emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy to rescue cells from α-synuclein toxicity. The controversial reports on the potential role of sirtuins in the degradation of α-synuclein will be discussed. Connection between sirtuins and proteolytic systems is definitely worth of further studies to increase the knowledge that will allow its proper exploration as new avenue to fight synucleinopathies. PMID:25946078

  9. Beta-blockers in heart failure: are pharmacological differences clinically important?

    PubMed

    Metra, Marco; Cas, Livio Dei; di Lenarda, Andrea; Poole-Wilson, Philip

    2004-04-01

    Beta-blockers are not an homogeneous group of agents. Only three beta-blockers, carvedilol, bisoprolol and metoprolol succinate, have had favorable effects on prognosis in controlled clinical trials in the patients with chronic heart failure. However, pharmacological differences exist between them. Metoprolol and bisoprolol are selective for beta(1)-adrenergic receptors while carvedilol blocks also beta(2)-, and alpha(1)- adrenergic receptors, and has associated antioxidant, anti-endothelin and antiproliferative properties. In COMET carvedilol was associated with a significant reduction in mortality compared to metoprolol tartrate further showing that different beta-blockers may have different effects on the outcome. These differences may be related to the ancillary properties of carvedilol or to its broader antiadrenergic profile. However, also more effective and prolonged blockade of beta1 adrenergic receptors may occur with carvedilol compared to metoprolol. PMID:15516860

  10. Importance of reporting segmental bowel preparation scores during colonoscopy in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Momeni, Mojdeh; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Anand, Sury; Singhal, Shashideep

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of reporting bowel preparation using Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS) in clinical practice. METHODS: The study was a prospective observational cohort study which enrolled subjects reporting for screening colonoscopy. All subjects received a gallon of polyethylene glycol as bowel preparation regimen. After colonoscopy the endoscopists determined quality of bowel preparation using BBPS. Segmental scores were combined to calculate composite BBPS. Site and size of the polyps detected was recorded. Pathology reports were reviewed to determine advanced adenoma detection rates (AADR). Segmental AADR’s were calculated and categorized based on the segmental BBPS to determine the differential impact of bowel prep on AADR. RESULTS: Three hundred and sixty subjects were enrolled in the study with a mean age of 59.2 years, 36.3% males and 63.8% females. Four subjects with incomplete colonoscopy due BBPS of 0 in any segment were excluded. Based on composite BBPS subjects were divided into 3 groups; Group-0 (poor bowel prep, BBPS 0-3) n = 26 (7.3%), Group-1 (Suboptimal bowel prep, BBPS 4-6) n = 121 (34%) and Group-2 (Adequate bowel prep, BBPS 7-9) n = 209 (58.7%). AADR showed a linear trend through Group-1 to 3; with an AADR of 3.8%, 14.8% and 16.7% respectively. Also seen was a linear increasing trend in segmental AADR with improvement in segmental BBPS. There was statistical significant difference between AADR among Group 0 and 2 (3.8% vs 16.7%, P < 0.05), Group 1 and 2 (14.8% vs 16.7%, P < 0.05) and Group 0 and 1 (3.8% vs 14.8%, P < 0.05). χ2 method was used to compute P value for determining statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Segmental AADRs correlate with segmental BBPS. It is thus valuable to report segmental BBPS in colonoscopy reports in clinical practice. PMID:25852286

  11. Effective case presentations--an important clinical skill for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Coralli, Connie H

    2006-05-01

    Effective case presentations are an important component of the nurse practitioner's skills, yet very little literature exists to guide the development of this skill, and frequently little priority is given to teaching this skill during the education of the nurse practitioner. This report discusses the importance of effective case presentations, describes the organization of the presentation, and outlines the appropriate information to be included. The main components of a case presentation-introduction, history of the present illness, physical examination, diagnostic studies, differential diagnosis, management, and summary of the case-are discussed in detail. Examples of a formal and an informal case presentation are presented and used to illustrate key points in the text. PMID:16681708

  12. Emerging transporters of clinical importance: an update from the International Transporter Consortium.

    PubMed

    Hillgren, K M; Keppler, D; Zur, A A; Giacomini, K M; Stieger, B; Cass, C E; Zhang, L

    2013-07-01

    The International Transporter Consortium (ITC) has recently described seven transporters of particular relevance to drug development. Based on the second ITC transporter workshop in 2012, we have identified additional transporters of emerging importance in pharmacokinetics, interference of drugs with transport of endogenous compounds, and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in humans. The multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs, gene symbol SLC47A) mediate excretion of organic cations into bile and urine. MATEs are important in renal DDIs. Multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs or ABCCs) are drug and conjugate efflux pumps, and impaired activity of MRP2 results in conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. The bile salt export pump (BSEP or ABCB11) prevents accumulation of toxic bile salt concentrations in hepatocytes, and BSEP inhibition or deficiency may cause cholestasis and liver injury. In addition, examples are presented on the roles of nucleoside and peptide transporters in drug targeting and disposition. PMID:23588305

  13. Autosomal ichthyosis with hypotrichosis syndrome displays low matriptase proteolytic activity and is phenocopied in ST14 hypomorphic mice.

    PubMed

    List, Karin; Currie, Brooke; Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Szabo, Roman; Shireman, Jessica; Molinolo, Alfredo; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Segre, Julia; Bugge, Thomas H

    2007-12-14

    Human autosomal recessive ichthyosis with hypotrichosis (ARIH) is an inherited disorder recently linked to homozygosity for a point mutation in the ST14 gene that causes a G827R mutation in the matriptase serine protease domain (G216 in chymotrypsin numbering). Here we show that human G827R matriptase has strongly reduced proteolytic activity toward small molecule substrates, as well as toward its candidate epidermal target, prostasin. To further investigate the possible contribution of low matriptase activity to ARIH, we generated an ST14 hypomorphic mouse strain that displays a 100-fold reduction in epidermal matriptase mRNA levels. Interestingly, unlike ST14 null mice, ST14 hypomorphic mice were viable and fertile but displayed a spectrum of abnormalities that strikingly resembled ARIH. Thus, ST14 hypomorphic mice developed hyperproliferative and retention ichthyosis with impaired desquamation, hypotrichosis with brittle, thin, uneven, and sparse hair, and tooth defects. Biochemical analysis of ST14 hypomorphic epidermis revealed reduced prostasin proteolytic activation and profilaggrin proteolytic processing, compatible with a primary role of matriptase in this process. This work strongly indicates that reduced activity of a matriptase-prostasin proteolytic cascade is the etiological origin of human ARIH and provides an important mouse model for the exploration of matriptase function in ARIH, as well as multiple other physiological and pathological processes. PMID:17940283

  14. Does Neostigmine Administration Produce a Clinically Important Increase in Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ching-Rong; Sessler, Daniel I.; Apfel, Christian C.

    2005-01-01

    Neostigmine is used to antagonize neoromuscluar blocker-induced residual neuromuscular paralysis. Despite a previous meta-analysis, the effect of neostigmine on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) remains unresolved. We reevaluated the effect of neostigmine on PONV while considering the different anticholinergics as potentially confounding factors. We performed a systematic literature search using Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, reference listings, and hand searching with no language restriction through December 2004 and identified 10 clinical, randomized, controlled trials evaluating neostigmine's effect on PONV. Data on nausea or vomiting from 933 patients were extracted for the early (0-6 h), delayed (6-24 h), and overall postoperative periods (0-24 h) and analyzed with RevMan 4.2 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK) and multiple logistic regression analysis. The combination of neostigmine with either atropine or glycopyrrolate did not significantly increase the incidence of overall (0-24 h) vomiting (relative risk (RR) 0.91 [0.70-1.18], P=0.48) or nausea (RR 1.24 [95% CI: 0.98-1.59], P=0.08). Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that that there was not a significant increase in the risk of vomiting with large compared with small doses of neostigmine. In contrast to a previous analysis, we conclude that there is insufficient evidence to conclude that neostigmine increases the risk of PONV. PMID:16243993

  15. Antibacterial effect of imipenem in vitro against important aerobic and anaerobic strains isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Klietmann, W; Focht, J; Nösner, K

    1987-08-01

    Imipenem is a thienamycin antibiotic of the first generation with broad antibacterial activity. It covers all gram-positive organisms (including Streptococcus faecalis) and gram-negative bacteria (including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia spp.) as well as Bacteroides fragilis and other Bacteroides species. In this comparative study the antimicrobic effect against 1020 gram-negative, 927 gram-positive and 352 anaerobic strains from fresh clinical isolates was tested and compared with that of other frequently used antibiotics. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined by means of a serial dilution test with micro standard plates. Within the group of gram-negative strains, imipenem was the most active antibiotic with a MIC90 of less than or equal to 0.25 mg/l for most isolates. Imipenem shows a broad spectrum of activity against gram-negative pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp, Enterobacter spp., Citrobacter spp. and Serratia spp., and also covers resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. and Alcaligenes faecalis. Imipenem also shows high inhibiting activity against gram-positive strains and anaerobic pathogens. PMID:3477332

  16. Changes in Heart Rate Variability after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Clinical Importance of These Findings

    PubMed Central

    Lakusic, Nenad; Mahovic, Darija; Cerkez Habek, Jasna; Novak, Miroslav; Cerovec, Dusko

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability is a physiological feature indicating the influence of the autonomic nervous system on the heart rate. Association of the reduced heart rate variability due to myocardial infarction and the increased postinfarction mortality was first described more than thirty years ago. Many studies have unequivocally demonstrated that coronary artery bypass grafting surgery generally leads to significant reduction in heart rate variability, which is even more pronounced than after myocardial infarction. Pathophysiologically, however, the mechanisms of heart rate variability reduction associated with acute myocardial infarction and coronary artery bypass grafting are different. Generally, heart rate variability gradually recovers to the preoperative values within six months of the procedure. Unlike the reduced heart rate variability in patients having sustained myocardial infarction, a finding of reduced heart rate variability after coronary artery bypass surgery is not considered relevant in predicting mortality. Current knowledge about changes in heart rate variability in coronary patients and clinical relevance of such a finding in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting are presented. PMID:26078960

  17. Clinically important features of porphyrin and heme metabolism and the porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Besur, Siddesh; Hou, Wehong; Schmeltzer, Paul; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2014-01-01

    Heme, like chlorophyll, is a primordial molecule and is one of the fundamental pigments of life. Disorders of normal heme synthesis may cause human diseases, including certain anemias (X-linked sideroblastic anemias) and porphyrias. Porphyrias are classified as hepatic and erythropoietic porphyrias based on the organ system in which heme precursors (5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), porphobilinogen and porphyrins) are chiefly overproduced. The hepatic porphyrias are further subdivided into acute porphyrias and chronic hepatic porphyrias. The acute porphyrias include acute intermittent, hereditary copro-, variegate and ALA dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Chronic hepatic porphyrias include porphyria cutanea tarda and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria. The erythropoietic porphyrias include congenital erythropoietic porphyria (Gűnther's disease) and erythropoietic protoporphyria. In this review, we summarize the key features of normal heme synthesis and its differing regulation in liver versus bone marrow. In both organs, principal regulation is exerted at the level of the first and rate-controlling enzyme, but by different molecules (heme in the liver and iron in the bone marrow). We also describe salient clinical, laboratory and genetic features of the eight types of porphyria. PMID:25372274

  18. Clinically Important Features of Porphyrin and Heme Metabolism and the Porphyrias

    PubMed Central

    Besur, Siddesh; Hou, Weihong; Schmeltzer, Paul; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2014-01-01

    Heme, like chlorophyll, is a primordial molecule and is one of the fundamental pigments of life. Disorders of normal heme synthesis may cause human diseases, including certain anemias (X-linked sideroblastic anemias) and porphyrias. Porphyrias are classified as hepatic and erythropoietic porphyrias based on the organ system in which heme precursors (5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), porphobilinogen and porphyrins) are chiefly overproduced. The hepatic porphyrias are further subdivided into acute porphyrias and chronic hepatic porphyrias. The acute porphyrias include acute intermittent, hereditary copro-, variegate and ALA dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Chronic hepatic porphyrias include porphyria cutanea tarda and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria. The erythropoietic porphyrias include congenital erythropoietic porphyria (Gűnther’s disease) and erythropoietic protoporphyria. In this review, we summarize the key features of normal heme synthesis and its differing regulation in liver versus bone marrow. In both organs, principal regulation is exerted at the level of the first and rate-controlling enzyme, but by different molecules (heme in the liver and iron in the bone marrow). We also describe salient clinical, laboratory and genetic features of the eight types of porphyria. PMID:25372274

  19. A forgotten vascular disease with important clinical implications. Subclavian steal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alcocer, Fernando; David, Mariam; Goodman, Rachel; Jain, Sachin Kumar Amruthlal; David, Shukri

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background: Subclavian Steal Syndrome (SSS) is a fascinating vascular phenomenon in which a steno-occlusive lesion of the proximal subclavian artery causes retrograde flow in the vertebral artery away from the brain stem subsequently causing vertebrobasilar insufficiency. SSS can present with a myriad of neurological and vascular signs and symptoms, but most commonly this phenomenon presents as an incidental finding in an asymptomatic patient. Case Report: Our patient is a 73-year-old female sent to the cardiology clinic for surgical clearance in preparation for an elective cholecystectomy. Shortness of breath was her only complaint. Review of systems was remarkable for left arm pain and blurry vision with repetitive movement. Physical examination noticeable for absence of left radial pulse. Percutaneous angiography demonstrated a totally occulted left subclavian artery with collateral circulation form the vertebrobasilar apparatus. Conclusions: Atypical presentation of this unique entity represents a challenge for physicians who require a high index of suspicion to make the diagnosis. We present an atypical case with radiographical evidence of the steal syndrome, followed by an extensive literature review of the most current diagnostic methods as well as latest recommendations for treatment options and secondary prevention. PMID:23569564

  20. Inferior Phrenic Arteries and Their Branches, Their Anatomy and Possible Clinical Importance: An Experimental Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Gürses, İlke Ali; Gayretli, Özcan; Kale, Ayşin; Öztürk, Adnan; Usta, Ahmet; Şahinoğlu, Kayıhan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization is a common treatment for patients with inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma. If the carcinoma is advanced or the main arterial supply, the hepatic artery, is occluded, extrahepatic collateral arteries may develop. Both, right and left inferior phrenic arteries (RIPA and LIPA) are the most frequent and important among these collaterals. However, the topographic anatomy of these arteries has not been described in detail in anatomy textbooks, atlases and most previous reports. Aims: To investigate the anatomy and branching patterns of RIPA and LIPA on cadavers and compare our results with the literature. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: We bilaterally dissected 24 male and 2 female cadavers aged between 49 and 88 years for this study. Results: The RIPA and LIPA originated as a common trunk in 5 cadavers. The RIPA originated from the abdominal aorta in 13 sides, the renal artery in 2 sides, the coeliac trunk in 1 side and the left gastric artery in 1 side. The LIPA originated from the abdominal aorta in 9 sides and the coeliac trunk in 6 sides. In 6 cadavers, the ascending and posterior branches of the LIPA had different sources of origin. Conclusion: As both the RIPA and LIPA represent the half of all extrahepatic arterial collaterals to hepatocellular carcinomas, their anatomy gains importance not only for anatomists but interventional radiologists as well. PMID:26167344

  1. Immunohistochemistry as an Important Tool in Biomarkers Detection and Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    de Matos, Leandro Luongo; Trufelli, Damila Cristina; de Matos, Maria Graciela Luongo; da Silva Pinhal, Maria Aparecida

    2010-01-01

    The immunohistochemistry technique is used in the search for cell or tissue antigens that range from amino acids and proteins to infectious agents and specific cellular populations. The technique comprises two phases: (1) slides preparation and stages involved for the reaction; (2) interpretation and quantification of the obtained expression. Immunohistochemistry is an important tool for scientific research and also a complementary technique for the elucidation of differential diagnoses which are not determinable by conventional analysis with hematoxylin and eosin. In the last couple of decades there has been an exponential increase in publications on immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry techniques. This review covers the immunohistochemistry technique; its history, applications, importance, limitations, difficulties, problems and some aspects related to results interpretation and quantification. Future developments on the immunohistochemistry technique and its expression quantification should not be disseminated in two languages—that of the pathologist and another of clinician or surgeon. The scientific, diagnostic and prognostic applications of this methodology must be explored in a bid to benefit of patient. In order to achieve this goal a collaboration and pooling of knowledge from both of these valuable medical areas is vital PMID:20212918

  2. Histological and prognostic importance of CD44(+) /CD24(+) /EpCAM(+) expression in clinical pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Yusuke; Oda, Tatsuya; Sugano, Masato; Hashimoto, Shinji; Enomoto, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Keiichi; Akashi, Yoshimasa; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Morishita, Yukio; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2013-08-01

    CD44(+) /CD24(+) /EpCAM(+) cells have been reported to be cancer stem cells in pancreatic cancer; however, the histological and clinical importance of these cells has not yet been investigated. Here we clarified the characteristics of CD44(+) /CD24(+) /EpCAM(+) cells in clinical specimens of pancreatic cancer using immunohistochemical assay. We used surgical specimens of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma from 101 patients. In view of tumor heterogeneity, we randomly selected 10 high-power fields per case, and triple-positive CD44(+) /CD24(+) /EpCAM(+) expression was identified using our scoring system. The distribution, histological characteristics, and prognostic importance of CD44(+) /CD24(+) /EpCAM(+) cells were then analyzed. As a result, the distribution of CD44(+) /CD24(+) /EpCAM(+) cells varied widely among the 101 cases examined, and CD44(+) /CD24(+) /EpCAM(+) expression was correlated with poor glandular differentiation and high proliferation. Survival analysis showed that CD44(+) /CD24(+) /EpCAM(+) expression was not correlated with patient outcome; however, CD44(+) /CD24(+) expression appeared to be correlated with poor prognosis. In conclusion, CD44(+) /CD24(+) /EpCAM(+) expression overlapped with poorly differentiated cells and possessed high proliferative potential in clinical pancreatic cancer. In particular, the presence of double-positive CD44(+) /CD24(+) expression seemed to have clinical relevance, associating with poor prognosis. PMID:23679813

  3. Automated Import of Clinical Data from HL7 Messages into OpenClinica and tranSMART Using Mirth Connect.

    PubMed

    Camacho Rodriguez, Juan Carlos; Stäubert, Sebastian; Löbe, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Electronic data capture (EDC) tools are designed to simplify data acquisition, improving data quality and managing clinical data electronically. Some data are collected from the laboratory information management system (LIMS), which is an important data source for a study. OpenClinica is an open source clinical data management system (CDMS) for web-based electronic data capture (EDC), which is used widely in academic clinical research. TranSMART is also an open source web-based platform used for the management and analysis of different data types common in clinical and translational research. Many LIMS use the Health Level 7 standard - Version 2.x (HL7) as a message exchange protocol. In this paper, we implement Mirth Connect as a Communication Server (CS) to convert these HL7 messages either to Operational Data Model (ODM) data for the automatic import in OpenClinica or tabular-delimited text format files, whose data is uploaded in tranSMART using the tMDataLoader tool. PMID:27577395

  4. Cannabidiol for neurodegenerative disorders: important new clinical applications for this phytocannabinoid?

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Sagredo, Onintza; Pazos, M Ruth; García, Concepción; Pertwee, Roger; Mechoulam, Raphael; Martínez-Orgado, José

    2013-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a phytocannabinoid with therapeutic properties for numerous disorders exerted through molecular mechanisms that are yet to be completely identified. CBD acts in some experimental models as an anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, anti-oxidant, anti-emetic, anxiolytic and antipsychotic agent, and is therefore a potential medicine for the treatment of neuroinflammation, epilepsy, oxidative injury, vomiting and nausea, anxiety and schizophrenia, respectively. The neuroprotective potential of CBD, based on the combination of its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties, is of particular interest and is presently under intense preclinical research in numerous neurodegenerative disorders. In fact, CBD combined with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol is already under clinical evaluation in patients with Huntington's disease to determine its potential as a disease-modifying therapy. The neuroprotective properties of CBD do not appear to be exerted by the activation of key targets within the endocannabinoid system for plant-derived cannabinoids like Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, i.e. CB1 and CB2 receptors, as CBD has negligible activity at these cannabinoid receptors, although certain activity at the CB2 receptor has been documented in specific pathological conditions (i.e. damage of immature brain). Within the endocannabinoid system, CBD has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the inactivation of endocannabinoids (i.e. inhibition of FAAH enzyme), thereby enhancing the action of these endogenous molecules on cannabinoid receptors, which is also noted in certain pathological conditions. CBD acts not only through the endocannabinoid system, but also causes direct or indirect activation of metabotropic receptors for serotonin or adenosine, and can target nuclear receptors of the PPAR family and also ion channels. PMID:22625422

  5. Cannabidiol for neurodegenerative disorders: important new clinical applications for this phytocannabinoid?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Sagredo, Onintza; Pazos, M Ruth; García, Concepción; Pertwee, Roger; Mechoulam, Raphael; Martínez-Orgado, José

    2013-02-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a phytocannabinoid with therapeutic properties for numerous disorders exerted through molecular mechanisms that are yet to be completely identified. CBD acts in some experimental models as an anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, anti-oxidant, anti-emetic, anxiolytic and antipsychotic agent, and is therefore a potential medicine for the treatment of neuroinflammation, epilepsy, oxidative injury, vomiting and nausea, anxiety and schizophrenia, respectively. The neuroprotective potential of CBD, based on the combination of its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties, is of particular interest and is presently under intense preclinical research in numerous neurodegenerative disorders. In fact, CBD combined with Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol is already under clinical evaluation in patients with Huntington's disease to determine its potential as a disease-modifying therapy. The neuroprotective properties of CBD do not appear to be exerted by the activation of key targets within the endocannabinoid system for plant-derived cannabinoids like Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, i.e. CB(1) and CB(2) receptors, as CBD has negligible activity at these cannabinoid receptors, although certain activity at the CB(2) receptor has been documented in specific pathological conditions (i.e. damage of immature brain). Within the endocannabinoid system, CBD has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the inactivation of endocannabinoids (i.e. inhibition of FAAH enzyme), thereby enhancing the action of these endogenous molecules on cannabinoid receptors, which is also noted in certain pathological conditions. CBD acts not only through the endocannabinoid system, but also causes direct or indirect activation of metabotropic receptors for serotonin or adenosine, and can target nuclear receptors of the PPAR family and also ion channels. PMID:22625422

  6. A national survey of the clinical features, treatment and importance of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Slatter, D H; Edwards, M E; Hawkins, C D; Wilcox, G E

    1982-09-01

    A postal survey of cattle producers throughout Australia was conducted to obtain information concerning the occurrence, signs and treatment of infectious bovine keratocojunctivitis, animals breeds, animal numbers and types, environmental conditions under which the animals were kept and management routines and systems of the animals (Slatter et al 1982). The most common clinical signs reported were ocular discharge (43.9%), corneal opacity (9.9%), or both (46.1%). The majority of respondents (54.8%) indicated duration of infections of at least 3 weeks. The condition was predominantly unilateral (74.7%) but 22.3% of respondents reported an equal occurrence of the condition unilaterally and bilaterally. The most frequently used drugs were homidium bromide (26.7%), oxytetracycline hydrochloride (22.8%), chloramphenicol derivatives (13.7%) and penicillin derivatives (13.5%). However, described treatment regimes indicated that therapeutic levels of antibiotics would not be maintained in the eyes of treated animals. Producers considered that 75% of affected animals showed reduced rates of weight gain, and 64% indicated they were more difficult to handle. An approximate figure of +22,000,000 was determined for loss of national production due to the disease, based on producers' estimates. In addition, a further cost of +1,566,500 was estimated for the labour involved in current treatment regimes. Beef and dairy producers spent different amounts on medications and treated for different durations. The economic significance of the disease justifies further studies on production losses due to the disease and cost effective methods of treatment. PMID:7159309

  7. In vitro antifungal activity of pneumocandin L-743,872 against a variety of clinically important molds.

    PubMed Central

    Del Poeta, M; Schell, W A; Perfect, J R

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro activity of the new antifungal drug pneumocandin L-743,872 against 55 isolates of clinically important molds was examined by an adapted macrobroth dilution method for yeasts. Pneumocandin L-743,872 exhibited in vitro antifungal activity against Alternaria sp., Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Curvularia lunata, Exophiala jeanselmei, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, Paecilomyces variotii, and Scedosporium apiospermum. The drug appeared to lack significant in vitro inhibitory activity against Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, Rhizopus arrhizus, Paecilomyces lilacinus, and Scedosporium prolificans. PMID:9257774

  8. [The importance of clinical information in diagnostic imaging in the febrile patient].

    PubMed

    Szücs-Farkas, Z; Vock, P

    2006-10-01

    From conventional radiography to cross-sectional imaging methods, modern radiology offers a wide range of diagnostic tools for investigating patients with fever. To achieve the best results and to yield a correct diagnosis, the radiologist must tailor the diagnostic protocol individually for every patient. The decision on the most suitable imaging method, and the type and timing of contrast media strongly depends on the suspected diagnosis. Based on patient history and laboratory data, some modalities may be contraindicated or the patient may need a premedication. The authors give a short overview of diagnostic strategies in evaluating the most important causes of fever and point to the need of discussion and co-operation between clinicians and radiologists. PMID:17048182

  9. Differences among mechanoreceptors in healthy and injured anterior cruciate ligaments and their clinical importance

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Mandeep Sing; Bali, Kamal; Prabhakar, Sharad

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mechanoreceptors in an intact Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) contribute towards functional stability of the knee joint. Injury to the ACL not only causes mechanical instability, but also leads to a disturbance in the neuromuscular control of the injured knee due to loss or damage to mechanoreceptors. ACL reconstruction restores proprioceptive potential of the knee to some extent, but the results vary. Although the remnant ACL contains residual mechanoreceptors, the number and functionality of these receptors is dependent, to some extent, on the physical characteristics of the remnant and duration of injury. Remnants, especially that adherent to the PCL, may actually act as a possible source of reinnervation of the graft. These remnants are worth preserving during ACL reconstruction and can play an important role in restoration of proprioception of knee following ACL reconstruction. PMID:23738272

  10. Prognostic Importance of Serum Alkaline Phosphatase in CKD Stages 3–4 in a Clinical Population

    PubMed Central

    Taliercio, Jonathan J.; Schold, Jesse D.; Simon, James F.; Arrigain, Susana; Tang, Anne; Saab, Georges; Nally, Joseph V.; Navaneethan, Sankar D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Elevated total serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels have been associated with mortality in the general population and in dialysis patients. Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting & Participants 28,678 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3 and 4 (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], 15–59 ml/min/1.73 m2) were identified using the Cleveland Clinic Chronic Kidney Disease Registry. CKD was defined as two eGFR values <60 ml/min/1.73 m2 drawn >90 days apart using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration creatinine equation. Predictor ALP levels measured using the calorimetric assay was examined as quartiles (quartile 1, <66 U/L; Q2, 66–81 U/L; Q3, 82–101 U/L; and Q4, ≥102 U/L) and as a continuous measure. Outcomes & Measurements All-cause mortality and ESRD were ascertained using the Social Security Death Index and US Renal Data System. Results After a median follow up of 2.2 years, 588 patients progressed to ESRD and 4,755 died. There was a graded increase in the risk for mortality with higher ALP quartiles (Q2, Q3, Q4) when compared to the reference quartile (Q1) after adjusting for demographics, comorbid conditions, use of relevant medications and liver function tests. The highest quartile of ALP was associated with a hazard ratio for ESRD of 1.38 (95% CI, 1.09–1.76). Each 1-standard deviation (42.7 U/L) higher ALP level was associated with 15% (95% CI, 1.09–1.22) and 16% (95% CI, 1.14–1.18) increased risk of ESRD and mortality respectively. Limitations Single center observational study, lack complete data including PTH for all study participants and attrition bias. Conclusions Higher serum ALP levels in CKD stages 3–4 were independently associated with all-cause mortality and ESRD. PMID:23769134

  11. Importance of high-throughput cell separation technologies for genomics/proteomics-based clinical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, James F.; Szaniszlo, Peter; Prow, Tarl W.; Reece, Lisa M.; Wang, Nan; Asmuth, David M.

    2002-06-01

    be about 100 times more sensitive than they are now to be able to do many biologically and biomedically meaningful experiments and clinical tests.

  12. Import and visualization of clinical medical imagery into multiuser VR environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrle, Andreas H.; Freysinger, Wolfgang; Kikinis, Ron; Gunkel, Andreas; Kral, Florian

    2005-03-01

    The graphical representation of three-dimensional data obtained from tomographic imaging has been the central problem since this technology is available. Neither the representation as a set of two-dimensional slices nor the 2D projection of three-dimensional models yields satisfactory results. In this paper a way is outlined which permits the investigation of volumetric clinical data obtained from standard CT, MR, PET, SPECT or experimental very high resolution CT-scanners in a three dimensional environment within a few worksteps. Volumetric datasets are converted into surface data (segmentation process) using the 3D-Slicer software tool and saved as .vtk files and exported as a collection of primitives in any common file format (.iv, .pfb). Subsequently this files can be displayed and manipulated in the CAVE virtual reality center. The CAVE is a multiuser walkable virtual room consisting of several walls on which stereoscopic images are projected by rear panel beamers. Adequate tracking of the head position and separate image calculation for each eye yields a vivid impression for one or several users. With the use of a seperately tracked 6D joystick manipulations such as rotation, translation, zooming, decomposition or highlighting can be done intuitively. The usage of the CAVE technology opens new possibilities especially in surgical training ("hands-on-effect") and as an educational tool (availability of pathological data). Unlike concurring technologies the CAVE permits a walk-through into the virtual scene but preserves enough physical perception to allow interaction between multiple users, e.g. gestures and movements. By training in a virtual environment on one hand the learning process of students in complex anatomic findings may be improved considerably and on the other hand unaccustomed views such as the one through a microscope or endoscope can be trained in advance. The availability of low-cost PC based CAVE-like systems and the rapidly decreasing price

  13. [Clinical Importance of GFR-Estimating Equations (eGFRcreat and eGFRcys)].

    PubMed

    Horio, Masaru

    2015-02-01

    Evaluation of the renal function is fundamental for the diagnosis and treatment of kidney diseases. It is also important for adjustment of the doses of drugs that are excreted by the kidney. The incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy is high in subjects with a low GFR. Assessment of the renal function is required prior to contrast medium injections. Renal inulin clearance with continuous venous injection is the gold standard for measuring GFR. However, the method is time-consuming. The recent Japanese CKD guide and KDIGO guidelines for CKD management recommended the use of the estimated GFR based on serum creatinine (eGFRcreat) or serum cystatin C (eGFRcys). Because the serum creatinine level is affected by the muscle mass, eGFRcreat is under- or overestimated in subjects with a high or low muscle mass, respectively. The serum cystatin C concentration is less influenced by the muscle mass. Assessment of the renal function by eGFRcys may be useful in subjects with a low or high muscle mass. Recently, it was reported that the association between eGFRcys and the risk of all-cause mortality was much closer compared with eGFRcreat. eGFRcys may be useful for detecting a high risk of complications in a general population and in subjects with CKD. PMID:26529980

  14. Zika virus infections imported to Italy: clinical, immunological and virological findings, and public health implications.

    PubMed

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Stella, Giulia; Mantella, Antonia; Bartolozzi, Dario; Tappe, Dennis; Günther, Stephan; Oestereich, Lisa; Cadar, Daniel; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas

    2015-02-01

    We report the first two cases of laboratory confirmed Zika virus (ZIKV) infections imported into Italy from French Polynesia. Both patients presented with low grade fever, malaise, conjunctivitis, myalgia, arthralgia, ankle oedema, and axillary and inguinal lymphadenopathy. One patient showed leukopenia with relative monocytosis and thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis was based on ZIKV seroconversion in both cases and on ZIKV RNA detection in one patient from acute serum sample. Sera from both patients exhibited cross-reactivity with dengue virus antigens. Our immunological analysis demonstrated that recovery from ZIKV infection is associated with restoration of normal numbers of immune cells in the periphery as well as with normal function of antigen-presenting cells. ZIKV is an emerging arbovirus, which has recently spread extensively in tourist destinations on several West Pacific islands. Returning viremic travelers may ignite autochthonous infections in countries like Italy, which are infested by Aedes albopictus, a suitable vector for ZIKV. The role of clinicians is crucial and includes early diagnosis and timely notification of public health authorities in order to quickly implement adequate focal vector control measurements. PMID:25600600

  15. Oblique Retro-Aortic Left Renal Vein and its Clinical Importance.

    PubMed

    Bhagavath, P; Nayak, B S; Monteiro, N Pf; Kumar, G P

    2015-01-01

    Kidneys are the organs that remove the waste products of the metabolic activities. A smooth blood flow to the kidneys is essential to maintain their function. Abnormalities of the renal vasculature may result not only in impairing the renal function but can lead to conditions like varicocele. During an autopsy of an adult male, we observed renal vascular variations. The left renal vein had a retro-aortic course before its termination into the inferior vena cava. It was joined with the inferior vena cava at the level of inferior mesenteric artery with an acute angle. The left testicular vein joined the left renal vein with an acute angle. The right kidney was supplied by two renal arteries. The knowledge about retro-aortic course of the left renal vein may be important during renal transplantation. The oblique course of left renal vein and the termination of left testicular vein into it with an acute angle may increase the chances of left sided varicocele. PMID:27423291

  16. Epileptic encephalopathy: Use and misuse of a clinically and conceptually important concept.

    PubMed

    Howell, Katherine B; Harvey, A Simon; Archer, John S

    2016-03-01

    The term epileptic encephalopathy (EE) denotes a process by which epileptic activity adversely affects brain function over and above the underlying etiology. Underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, but recent studies demonstrate that seizures and interictal epileptiform discharges can disrupt distributed neural networks that underpin cognitive functions, both temporarily and permanently. EE is just one of a number of factors that can affect development in epilepsy. The presence and relative contribution of EE to cognitive impairment is often difficult to separate from that of the underlying etiology or even effects of antiepileptic medication (AEM). This difficulty has led to the increasing use of the term EE to encapsulate "severe" epileptic syndromes, or etiologies associated with severe epilepsy and intellectual disability (ID), regardless of evidence that the epileptic process has impacted cognition. The use of the term EE in the literature to describe both the process of cognitive impairment by epileptic activity and as a category for severe epilepsy syndromes is creating confusion. We propose that use of the term EE be restricted to the central concept of a pervasive epileptic process disrupting development, and that the use of EE as a classifier be avoided. A different term is needed to encapsulate the broad and heterogenous group of patients with severe epilepsy and ID, for which the mechanisms may be unknown but are often closely related to the underlying genetic, metabolic, or structural etiology. An improved understanding of the mechanisms by which EE develops is of critical importance, potentially leading to identification of biomarkers for early detection and treatment. PMID:26778176

  17. [Anaesthetists learn--do institutions also learn? Importance of institutional learning and corporate culture in clinics].

    PubMed

    Schüpfer, G; Gfrörer, R; Schleppers, A

    2007-10-01

    In only a few contexts is the need for substantial learning more pronounced than in health care. For a health care provider, the ability to learn is essential in a changing environment. Although individual humans are programmed to learn naturally, organisations are not. Learning that is limited to individual professions and traditional approaches to continuing medical education is not sufficient to bring about substantial changes in the learning capacity of an institution. Also, organisational learning is an important issue for anaesthesia departments. Future success of an organisation often depends on new capabilities and competencies. Organisational learning is the capacity or processes within an organisation to maintain or improve performance based on experience. Learning is seen as a system-level phenomenon as it stays in the organisation regardless of the players involved. Experience from other industries shows that learning strategies tend to focus on single loop learning, with relatively little double loop learning and virtually no meta-learning or non-learning. The emphasis on team delivery of health care reinforces the need for team learning. Learning organisations make learning an intrinsic part of their organisations and are a place where people continually learn how to learn together. Organisational learning practice can help to improve existing skills and competencies and to change outdated assumptions, procedures and structures. So far, learning theory has been ignored in medicine, due to a wide variety of complex political, economic, social, organisational culture and medical factors that prevent innovation and resist change. The organisational culture is central to every stage of the learning process. Learning organisations move beyond simple employee training into organisational problem solving, innovation and learning. Therefore, teamwork and leadership are necessary. Successful organisations change the competencies of individuals, the systems

  18. [THE CONDITION AND TENDENCIES OF DEVELOPMENT OF CLINICAL AND SANITARY MICROBIOLOGY IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION AND PROBLEM OF IMPORT SUBSTITUTION].

    PubMed

    Dyatlov, I A; Mironov, A Yu; Shepelin, A P; Aleshkin, V A

    2015-08-01

    The import substitution becomes one of the strategic tasks of national economy as a result of prolongation of economic sanctions concerning the Russian Federation of part of the USA, EU countries, Japan and number of other countries. It is not proper to be limited in import substitution only by goods because in conditions ofsanctions when access toforeign technologies is complicated Russia is needed to substitute foreign technologies by national designs in faster manner One of directions of effective import substitution is localization of production of laboratory equipment and consumables for clinical and sanitary microbiology on the territory ofthe Russian Federation and countries of Customs union. In Russia, in the field ofdiagnostic of dangerous and socially significant infections, all components for import substitution to implement gene diagnostic, immune diagnostic. bio-sensory and biochip approaches, isolation and storage of live microbial cultures, implementation of high-tech methods of diagnostic are available. At the same time, national diagnostic instrument-making industry for microbiology is factually absent. The few devices of national production more than on 50% consist of import components. The microbiological laboratories are to be equipped only with import devices of open type for applying national components. The most perspective national designs to be implemented are multiplex polimerase chain reaction test-systems and biochips on the basis of national plotters and readers. The modern development of diagnostic equipment and diagnostic instruments requires supplement of national collections of bacterial and viral pathogens and working-through of organizational schemes of supplying collections with strains. The presented data concerning justification of nomenclature of laboratory equipment and consumables permits to satisfy in fill scope the needs of clinical and sanitary microbiology in devices, growth mediums, consumables of national production

  19. Quantitative proteomic view associated with resistance to clinically important antibiotics in Gram-positive bacteria: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Kwang Seung; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2015-01-01

    The increase of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) poses a worldwide and serious health threat. Although new antibiotics, such as daptomycin and linezolid, have been developed for the treatment of infections of Gram-positive pathogens, the emergence of daptomycin-resistant and linezolid-resistant strains during therapy has now increased clinical treatment failures. In the past few years, studies using quantitative proteomic methods have provided a considerable progress in understanding antibiotic resistance mechanisms. In this review, to understand the resistance mechanisms to four clinically important antibiotics (methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid, and daptomycin) used in the treatment of Gram-positive pathogens, we summarize recent advances in studies on resistance mechanisms using quantitative proteomic methods, and also examine proteins playing an important role in the bacterial mechanisms of resistance to the four antibiotics. Proteomic researches can identify proteins whose expression levels are changed in the resistance mechanism to only one antibiotic, such as LiaH in daptomycin resistance and PrsA in vancomycin resistance, and many proteins simultaneously involved in resistance mechanisms to various antibiotics. Most of resistance-related proteins, which are simultaneously associated with resistance mechanisms to several antibiotics, play important roles in regulating bacterial envelope biogenesis, or compensating for the fitness cost of antibiotic resistance. Therefore, proteomic data confirm that antibiotic resistance requires the fitness cost and the bacterial envelope is an important factor in antibiotic resistance. PMID:26322035

  20. The importance of integrating basic and clinical research toward the development of new therapies for Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Bates, Gillian P.

    2011-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder that results from expansion of the polyglutamine repeat in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. There are currently no effective treatments for this devastating disease. Given its monogenic nature, disease modification therapies for HD should be theoretically feasible. Currently, pharmacological therapies aimed at disease modification by altering levels of HTT protein are in late-stage preclinical development. Here, we review current efforts to develop new treatments for HD based on our current understanding of HTT function and the main pathological mechanisms. We emphasize the need to enhance translational efforts and highlight the importance of aligning the clinical and basic research communities to validate existing hypotheses in clinical studies. Human and animal therapeutic trials are presented with an emphasis on cellular and molecular mechanisms relevant to disease progression. PMID:21285520

  1. Proteolytic components of serum IgG preparations

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Kalaga, R; Paul, S

    2000-01-01

    Chemical catalysis, an effector mechanism utilized by fully assembled antibodies, can also be mediated by the isolated antibody subunits. Because trace amounts of free light chains (L chains) are present in IgG preparations, a detailed study was undertaken to identify the constituents responsible for the polyreactive proteolytic activity of IgG purified from human sera, determined as the extent of cleavage of the model peptide substrate Pro-Phe-Arg-methylcoumarinamide. Two proteolytic species with approximate mass of 50 kD and 150 kD were separated by repetitive gel filtration in a denaturing solvent (6 m guanidine hydrochloride). The activity of the renatured 50-kD fraction (in fluorescence units/μg protein) was more than 45-fold greater than of the 150-kD fraction. Both fractions lost the activity following immunoadsorption on immobilized anti-IgG antibody. Fab fragments prepared from the 150-kD IgG fraction retained the activity. Reducing and non-reducing SDS-electrophoresis suggested the 50-kD fraction isolated from the IgG preparations to be a mixture of heavy chain (H chain) monomers and disulphide bonded L chain dimers. Electrophoretically homogeneous monomers of 50-kD H chains and 25-kD L chains were prepared by gel filtration of reduced and alkylated IgG from seven human subjects. Each of the alkylated L chain preparations displayed the proteolytic activity. The activity in alkylated H chains was undetectable or only marginally greater than the background values. L chain dimers appear to be the major species responsible for the polyreactive proteolytic activity of serum IgG preparations, with a smaller contribution furnished by tetrameric IgG. PMID:10792374

  2. PMAP: databases for analyzing proteolytic events and pathways.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Yoshinobu; Heureux, Emily; Doctor, Kutbuddin S; Talwar, Priti; Gramatikova, Svetlana; Gramatikoff, Kosi; Zhang, Ying; Blinov, Michael; Ibragimova, Salmaz S; Boyd, Sarah; Ratnikov, Boris; Cieplak, Piotr; Godzik, Adam; Smith, Jeffrey W; Osterman, Andrei L; Eroshkin, Alexey M

    2009-01-01

    The Proteolysis MAP (PMAP, http://www.proteolysis.org) is a user-friendly website intended to aid the scientific community in reasoning about proteolytic networks and pathways. PMAP is comprised of five databases, linked together in one environment. The foundation databases, ProteaseDB and SubstrateDB, are driven by an automated annotation pipeline that generates dynamic 'Molecule Pages', rich in molecular information. PMAP also contains two community annotated databases focused on function; CutDB has information on more than 5000 proteolytic events, and ProfileDB is dedicated to information of the substrate recognition specificity of proteases. Together, the content within these four databases will ultimately feed PathwayDB, which will be comprised of known pathways whose function can be dynamically modeled in a rule-based manner, and hypothetical pathways suggested by semi-automated culling of the literature. A Protease Toolkit is also available for the analysis of proteases and proteolysis. Here, we describe how the databases of PMAP can be used to foster understanding of proteolytic pathways, and equally as significant, to reason about proteolysis. PMID:18842634

  3. Quantum-dot-based nanosensors designed for proteolytic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Clapp, Aaron R.; Brunel, Florence M.; Goldman, Ellen R.; Chang, Eddie L.; Dawson, Phillip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2006-02-01

    We have previously assembled QD-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors specific for the sugar nutrient maltose and the explosive TNT. These sensors utilize several inherent benefits of QDs as FRET donors. In this report, we show that QD-FRET based sensors can also function in the monitoring of proteolytic enzyme activity. We utilize a QD with multiple dye-labeled proteins attached to the surface as a substrate for a prototypical protease. We then demonstrate how this strategy can be extended to detect protease activity by utilizing a dye-labeled peptide attached to the QD as a proteolytic substrate. Self-assembly of the peptide-dye on the QD brings the dye in close proximity to the QD and result in efficient FRET. Addition of a proteolytic enzyme that specifically recognizes and cleaves the peptide alters the FRET signature of the sensor in a concentration-dependent manner. Both qualitative and quantitative data can be derived from these sensors. The potential benefits of this type of QD sensing strategy are discussed.

  4. Proteolytic activation defines distinct lymphangiogenic mechanisms for VEGFC and VEGFD

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Hung M.; Enis, David; Robciuc, Marius R.; Nurmi, Harri J.; Cohen, Jennifer; Chen, Mei; Yang, Yiqing; Dhillon, Veerpal; Johnson, Kathy; Zhang, Hong; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Traxler, Elizabeth; Alitalo, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangiogenesis is supported by 2 homologous VEGFR3 ligands, VEGFC and VEGFD. VEGFC is required for lymphatic development, while VEGFD is not. VEGFC and VEGFD are proteolytically cleaved after cell secretion in vitro, and recent studies have implicated the protease a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 3 (ADAMTS3) and the secreted factor collagen and calcium binding EGF domains 1 (CCBE1) in this process. It is not well understood how ligand proteolysis is controlled at the molecular level or how this process regulates lymphangiogenesis, because these complex molecular interactions have been difficult to follow ex vivo and test in vivo. Here, we have developed and used biochemical and cellular tools to demonstrate that an ADAMTS3-CCBE1 complex can form independently of VEGFR3 and is required to convert VEGFC, but not VEGFD, into an active ligand. Consistent with these ex vivo findings, mouse genetic studies revealed that ADAMTS3 is required for lymphatic development in a manner that is identical to the requirement of VEGFC and CCBE1 for lymphatic development. Moreover, CCBE1 was required for in vivo lymphangiogenesis stimulated by VEGFC but not VEGFD. Together, these studies reveal that lymphangiogenesis is regulated by two distinct proteolytic mechanisms of ligand activation: one in which VEGFC activation by ADAMTS3 and CCBE1 spatially and temporally patterns developing lymphatics, and one in which VEGFD activation by a distinct proteolytic mechanism may be stimulated during inflammatory lymphatic growth. PMID:27159393

  5. PMAP: databases for analyzing proteolytic events and pathways

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Yoshinobu; Heureux, Emily; Doctor, Kutbuddin S.; Talwar, Priti; Gramatikova, Svetlana; Gramatikoff, Kosi; Zhang, Ying; Blinov, Michael; Ibragimova, Salmaz S.; Boyd, Sarah; Ratnikov, Boris; Cieplak, Piotr; Godzik, Adam; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Eroshkin, Alexey M.

    2009-01-01

    The Proteolysis MAP (PMAP, http://www.proteolysis.org) is a user-friendly website intended to aid the scientific community in reasoning about proteolytic networks and pathways. PMAP is comprised of five databases, linked together in one environment. The foundation databases, ProteaseDB and SubstrateDB, are driven by an automated annotation pipeline that generates dynamic ‘Molecule Pages’, rich in molecular information. PMAP also contains two community annotated databases focused on function; CutDB has information on more than 5000 proteolytic events, and ProfileDB is dedicated to information of the substrate recognition specificity of proteases. Together, the content within these four databases will ultimately feed PathwayDB, which will be comprised of known pathways whose function can be dynamically modeled in a rule-based manner, and hypothetical pathways suggested by semi-automated culling of the literature. A Protease Toolkit is also available for the analysis of proteases and proteolysis. Here, we describe how the databases of PMAP can be used to foster understanding of proteolytic pathways, and equally as significant, to reason about proteolysis. PMID:18842634

  6. Proteolytic activity of probiotic strain Lactobacillus helveticus M92.

    PubMed

    Beganović, Jasna; Kos, Blaženka; Leboš Pavunc, Andreja; Uroić, Ksenija; Džidara, Petra; Šušković, Jagoda

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the potential of previously defined probiotic strain Lactobacillus helveticus M92 as functional starter culture for fermented dairy products. Therefore, proteolytic activity of L. helveticus M92 was investigated and compared with those of different representatives of probiotic and starter culture strains. Cluster analysis of AFLP fingerprints showed a difference of L. helveticus M92 compared to five other L. helveticus strains, but the percentage of similarity confirmed the identification on species level. Casein hydrolysis by L. helveticus M92 was monitored by agar-well diffusion test, SDS-PAGE and Anson's method. L. helveticus M92 exhibited the highest proteolytic activity among tested probiotic and starter cultures strains with the fastest acidification rate and the highest pH decrease after overnight incubation in skim milk. The presence of prtH2 gene was confirmed by PCR amplification with specific primers, while PCR product was not obtained after amplification with primers specific to prtH. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE LC-MS/MS analysis of insoluble proteome of L. helveticus M92 enabled identification of several proteins involved in proteolytic system of L. helveticus such as protease PrtM as well as proteins involved in Opp peptide transport system and the intracellular peptidases PepE, PepN, and PepQ. PMID:23454496

  7. Neutrophil proteolytic activation cascades: a possible mechanistic link between chronic periodontitis and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Alfakry, Hatem; Malle, Ernst; Koyani, Chintan N; Pussinen, Pirkko J; Sorsa, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are chronic inflammatory diseases that affect a large segment of society. Coronary heart disease (CHD), the most common cardiovascular disease, progresses over several years and affects millions of people worldwide. Chronic infections may contribute to the systemic inflammation and enhance the risk for CHD. Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic infections that affects up to 50% of the adult population. Under inflammatory conditions the activation of endogenous degradation pathways mediated by immune responses leads to the release of destructive cellular molecules from both resident and immigrant cells. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their regulators can activate each other and play an important role in immune response via degrading extracellular matrix components and modulating cytokines and chemokines. The action of MMPs is required for immigrant cell recruitment at the site of inflammation. Stimulated neutrophils represent the major pathogen-fighting immune cells that upregulate expression of several proteinases and oxidative enzymes, which can degrade extracellular matrix components (e.g. MMP-8, MMP-9 and neutrophil elastase). The activity of MMPs is regulated by endogenous inhibitors and/or candidate MMPs (e.g. MMP-7). The balance between MMPs and their inhibitors is thought to mirror the proteolytic burden. Thus, neutrophil-derived biomarkers, including myeloperoxidase, may activate proteolytic destructive cascades that are involved in subsequent immune-pathological events associated with both periodontitis and CHD. Here, we review the existing studies on the contribution of MMPs and their regulators to the infection-related pathology. Also, we discuss the possible proteolytic involvement and role of neutrophil-derived enzymes as an etiological link between chronic periodontitis and CHD. PMID:26608308

  8. Modulation of bovine microvascular endothelial cell proteolytic properties by inhibitors of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pepper, M S; Vassalli, J D; Wilks, J W; Schweigerer, L; Orci, L; Montesano, R

    1994-08-01

    A tightly controlled increase in extracellular proteolysis, restricted both in time and space, is an important component of the angiogenic process, while anti-proteolysis is effective in inhibiting angiogenesis. By focussing on the plasminogen activator (PA)-plasmin system, the objective of the present studies was to assess whether previously described inhibitors of angiogenesis modify bovine microvascular endothelial cell proteolytic properties. We demonstrate that although synthetic angiostatic steroids (U-24067 and U-42129), heparin, suramin, interferon alpha-2a, and retinoic acid are all inhibitors of in vitro angiogenesis, each of these agents has distinct effects on the plasminogen-dependent proteolytic system. Specifically, angiostatic steroids and interferon alpha-2a reduce urokinase-type PA (u-PA) and PA inhibitor-1 activity, while heparin and retinoic acid increase u-PA activity. Suramin reduces cell-associated u-PA activity and greatly increases PAI-1 production at doses which induce monolayer disruption. These findings demonstrate that a spectrum of alterations in extracellular proteolysis is associated with anti-angiogenesis, and that anti-angiogenesis and anti-proteolysis are not necessarily correlated. A reduction in extracellular proteolysis would be expected to reduce invasion, whereas an increase in proteolysis might modulate the activity of inhibitory cytokines, which in turn could reduce endothelial cell proliferation and migration and inhibit angiogenesis. The spectrum of effects on different elements of the PA system observed in response to the agents assessed suggests that the role of modulations in extracellular proteolytic activity in anti-angiogenesis is likely to be varied and complex. PMID:7525617

  9. Complex Negative Regulation of TLR9 by Multiple Proteolytic Cleavage Events.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Siddhartha S; Cameron, Jody; Brooks, James C; Leifer, Cynthia A

    2016-08-15

    TLR9 is an innate immune receptor important for recognizing DNA of host and foreign origin. A mechanism proposed to prevent excessive response to host DNA is the requirement for proteolytic cleavage of TLR9 in endosomes to generate a mature form of the receptor (TLR9(471-1032)). We previously described another cleavage event in the juxtamembrane region of the ectodomain that generated a dominant-negative form of TLR9. Thus, there are at least two independent cleavage events that regulate TLR9. In this study, we investigated whether an N-terminal fragment of TLR9 could be responsible for regulation of the mature or negative-regulatory form. We show that TLR9(471-1032), corresponding to the proteolytically cleaved form, does not function on its own. Furthermore, activity is not rescued by coexpression of the N-terminal fragment (TLR9(1-440)), inclusion of the hinge region (TLR9(441-1032)), or overexpression of UNC93B1, the last of which is critical for trafficking and cleavage of TLR9. TLR9(1-440) coimmunoprecipitates with full-length TLR9 and TLR9(471-1032) but does not rescue the native glycosylation pattern; thus, inappropriate trafficking likely explains why TLR9(471-1032) is nonfunctional. Lastly, we show that TLR9(471-1032) is also a dominant-negative regulator of TLR9 signaling. Together, these data provide a new perspective on the complexity of TLR9 regulation by proteolytic cleavage and offer potential ways to inhibit activity through this receptor, which may dampen autoimmune inflammation. PMID:27421483

  10. A Bayesian elicitation of veterinary beliefs regarding systemic dry cow therapy: Variation and importance for clinical trial design

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, H.M.; Dryden, I.L.; Green, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The two key aims of this research were: (i) to conduct a probabilistic elicitation to quantify the variation in veterinarians’ beliefs regarding the efficacy of systemic antibiotics when used as an adjunct to intra-mammary dry cow therapy and (ii) to investigate (in a Bayesian statistical framework) the strength of future research evidence required (in theory) to change the beliefs of practising veterinary surgeons regarding the efficacy of systemic antibiotics, given their current clinical beliefs. The beliefs of 24 veterinarians in 5 practices in England were quantified as probability density functions. Classic multidimensional scaling revealed major variations in beliefs both within and between veterinary practices which included: confident optimism, confident pessimism and considerable uncertainty. Of the 9 veterinarians interviewed holding further cattle qualifications, 6 shared a confidently pessimistic belief in the efficacy of systemic therapy and whilst 2 were more optimistic, they were also more uncertain. A Bayesian model based on a synthetic dataset from a randomised clinical trial (showing no benefit with systemic therapy) predicted how each of the 24 veterinarians’ prior beliefs would alter as the size of the clinical trial increased, assuming that practitioners would update their beliefs rationally in accordance with Bayes’ theorem. The study demonstrated the usefulness of probabilistic elicitation for evaluating the diversity and strength of practitioners’ beliefs. The major variation in beliefs observed raises interest in the veterinary profession's approach to prescribing essential medicines. Results illustrate the importance of eliciting prior beliefs when designing clinical trials in order to increase the chance that trial data are of sufficient strength to alter the clinical beliefs of practitioners and do not merely serve to satisfy researchers. PMID:22336321

  11. Clinical importance of increased sensitivity of BacT/Alert FAN aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, L C; Fune, J; Gaido, L B; Weinstein, M P; Reimer, L G; Flynn, T M; Wilson, M L; Mirrett, S; Reller, L B

    1996-01-01

    Two recent multicenter blood culture studies found that BacT/Alert FAN (FAN) bottles (Organon Teknika, Durham, N.C.) had increased yields in detecting bacteremia and fungemia compared with standard BacT/Alert (STD) bottles. Because the clinical importance of this increase in microbial recovery is unknown, we performed a retrospective analysis to determine the frequency with which FAN bottles were the sole means of detecting an episode of bacteremia. There were 1,047 positive blood cultures in which both study bottles were adequately filled and the organism isolated was judged to be the cause of sepsis: 240 (23%) were positive only in FAN bottles and 73 (7%) were positive only in STD bottles. Of a total of 664 episodes of bacteremia, 126 (19%) were identified only by FAN bottles and 43 (7%) were identified only by STD bottles (P < 0.0001). Episodes detected only by FAN bottles more often were recurrent events (23 of 126, or 18%) than episodes detected only by STD bottles (2 of 43, or 5%) (P < 0.05) and more commonly occurred in patients receiving theoretically effective antibiotic therapy (33 of 126 [26%] versus 4 of 43 [9%]) (P < 0.05). The medical records for patients with 127 of these episodes (92 FAN bottles only; 35 STD bottles only) were available for review. More than half of both FAN bottle-only (60 of 92, or 65%) and STD bottle-only (20 of 35, or 57%) episodes were judged to be clinically important. We conclude that FAN bottles improve the detection of bacteremia and that the majority of the additional episodes detected are clinically important. The benefits of the greater yield in specific patient populations must be balanced against the higher costs of FAN bottles. PMID:8862581

  12. THE 6-MINUTE WALK TEST AND OTHER CLINICAL ENDPOINTS IN DUCHENNE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY: RELIABILITY, CONCURRENT VALIDITY, AND MINIMAL CLINICALLY IMPORTANT DIFFERENCES FROM A MULTICENTER STUDY

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Craig M; Henricson, Erik K; Abresch, R Ted; Florence, Julaine; Eagle, Michelle; Gappmaier, Eduard; Glanzman, Allan M; Spiegel, Robert; Barth, Jay; Elfring, Gary; Reha, Allen; Peltz, Stuart W

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An international clinical trial enrolled 174 ambulatory males ≥5 years old with nonsense mutation Duchenne muscular dystrophy (nmDMD). Pretreatment data provide insight into reliability, concurrent validity, and minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) of the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and other endpoints. Methods: Screening and baseline evaluations included the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), timed function tests (TFTs), quantitative strength by myometry, the PedsQL, heart rate–determined energy expenditure index, and other exploratory endpoints. Results: The 6MWT proved feasible and reliable in a multicenter context. Concurrent validity with other endpoints was excellent. The MCID for 6MWD was 28.5 and 31.7 meters based on 2 statistical distribution methods. Conclusions: The ratio of MCID to baseline mean is lower for 6MWD than for other endpoints. The 6MWD is an optimal primary endpoint for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) clinical trials that are focused therapeutically on preservation of ambulation and slowing of disease progression. Muscle Nerve 48: 357–368, 2013 PMID:23674289

  13. Antifungal and proteolytic activities of endophytic fungi isolated from Piper hispidum Sw.

    PubMed

    Orlandelli, Ravely Casarotti; de Almeida, Tiago Tognolli; Alberto, Raiani Nascimento; Polonio, Julio Cesar; Azevedo, João Lúcio; Pamphile, João Alencar

    2015-06-01

    Endophytes are being considered for use in biological control, and the enzymes they secrete might facilitate their initial colonization of internal plant tissues and direct interactions with microbial pathogens. Microbial proteases are also biotechnologically important products employed in bioremediation processes, cosmetics, and the pharmaceutical, photographic and food industries. In the present study, we evaluated antagonism and competitive interactions between 98 fungal endophytes and Alternaria alternata, Colletotrichum sp., Phyllosticta citricarpa and Moniliophthora perniciosa. We also examined the proteolytic activities of endophytes grown in liquid medium and conducted cup plate assays. The results showed that certain strains in the assemblage of P. hispidum endophytes are important sources of antifungal properties, primarily Lasiodiplodia theobromae JF766989, which reduced phytopathogen growth by approximately 54 to 65%. We detected 28 endophytes producing enzymatic halos of up to 16.40 mm in diameter. The results obtained in the present study highlight the proteolytic activity of the endophytes Phoma herbarum JF766995 and Schizophyllum commune JF766994, which presented the highest enzymatic halo diameters under at least one culture condition tested. The increased activities of certain isolates in the presence of rice or soy flour as a substrate (with halos up to 17.67 mm in diameter) suggests that these endophytes have the potential to produce enzymes using agricultural wastes. PMID:26273250

  14. Antifungal and proteolytic activities of endophytic fungi isolated from Piper hispidum Sw

    PubMed Central

    Orlandelli, Ravely Casarotti; de Almeida, Tiago Tognolli; Alberto, Raiani Nascimento; Polonio, Julio Cesar; Azevedo, João Lúcio; Pamphile, João Alencar

    2015-01-01

    Endophytes are being considered for use in biological control, and the enzymes they secrete might facilitate their initial colonization of internal plant tissues and direct interactions with microbial pathogens. Microbial proteases are also biotechnologically important products employed in bioremediation processes, cosmetics, and the pharmaceutical, photographic and food industries. In the present study, we evaluated antagonism and competitive interactions between 98 fungal endophytes and Alternaria alternata, Colletotrichum sp., Phyllosticta citricarpa and Moniliophthora perniciosa. We also examined the proteolytic activities of endophytes grown in liquid medium and conducted cup plate assays. The results showed that certain strains in the assemblage of P. hispidum endophytes are important sources of antifungal properties, primarily Lasiodiplodia theobromae JF766989, which reduced phytopathogen growth by approximately 54 to 65%. We detected 28 endophytes producing enzymatic halos of up to 16.40 mm in diameter. The results obtained in the present study highlight the proteolytic activity of the endophytes Phoma herbarum JF766995 and Schizophyllum commune JF766994, which presented the highest enzymatic halo diameters under at least one culture condition tested. The increased activities of certain isolates in the presence of rice or soy flour as a substrate (with halos up to 17.67 mm in diameter) suggests that these endophytes have the potential to produce enzymes using agricultural wastes. PMID:26273250

  15. Integrated genomic and prospective clinical studies show the importance of modular pleiotropy for disease susceptibility, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Translational research typically aims to identify and functionally validate individual, disease-specific genes. However, reaching this aim is complicated by the involvement of thousands of genes in common diseases, and that many of those genes are pleiotropic, that is, shared by several diseases. Methods We integrated genomic meta-analyses with prospective clinical studies to systematically investigate the pathogenic, diagnostic and therapeutic roles of pleiotropic genes. In a novel approach, we first used pathway analysis of all published genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to find a cell type common to many diseases. Results The analysis showed over-representation of the T helper cell differentiation pathway, which is expressed in T cells. This led us to focus on expression profiling of CD4+ T cells from highly diverse inflammatory and malignant diseases. We found that pleiotropic genes were highly interconnected and formed a pleiotropic module, which was enriched for inflammatory, metabolic and proliferative pathways. The general relevance of this module was supported by highly significant enrichment of genetic variants identified by all GWAS and cancer studies, as well as known diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Prospective clinical studies of multiple sclerosis and allergy showed the importance of both pleiotropic and disease specific modules for clinical stratification. Conclusions In summary, this translational genomics study identified a pleiotropic module, which has key pathogenic, diagnostic and therapeutic roles. PMID:24571673

  16. An Imported Case of Severe Falciparum Malaria with Prolonged Hemolytic Anemia Clinically Mimicking a Coinfection with Babesiosis

    PubMed Central

    Na, Young Ju; Chai, Jong-Yil; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Lee, Hyun Jung; Song, Ji Young; Je, Ji Hye; Seo, Ji Hye; Park, Sung Hun; Choi, Ji Seon

    2014-01-01

    While imported falciparum malaria has been increasingly reported in recent years in Korea, clinicians have difficulties in making a clinical diagnosis as well as in having accessibility to effective anti-malarial agents. Here we describe an unusual case of imported falciparum malaria with severe hemolytic anemia lasting over 2 weeks, clinically mimicking a coinfection with babesiosis. A 48-year old Korean man was diagnosed with severe falciparum malaria in France after traveling to the Republic of Benin, West Africa. He received a 1-day course of intravenous artesunate and a 7-day course of Malarone (atovaquone/proguanil) with supportive hemodialysis. Coming back to Korea 5 days after discharge, he was readmitted due to recurrent fever, and further treated with Malarone for 3 days. Both the peripheral blood smears and PCR test were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. However, he had prolonged severe hemolytic anemia (Hb 5.6 g/dl). Therefore, 10 days after the hospitalization, Babesia was considered to be potentially coinfected. A 7-day course of Malarone and azithromycin was empirically started. He became afebrile within 3 days of this babesiosis treatment, and hemolytic anemia profiles began to improve at the completion of the treatment. He has remained stable since his discharge. Unexpectedly, the PCR assays failed to detect DNA of Babesia spp. from blood. In addition, during the retrospective review of the case, the artesunate-induced delayed hemolytic anemia was considered as an alternative cause of the unexplained hemolytic anemia. PMID:25548419

  17. Physicians' knowledge of health-related quality of life and perception of its importance in daily clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Health-related quality of life (QoL) has become a crucial outcome in medical care. However, few studies have assessed physician knowledge of QoL and rate of physicians adopting QoL measures in clinical practice. The present study aimed at assessing the level of knowledge of QoL and the perceived importance of incorporating QoL assessment in clinical practice among physicians of a tertiary level academic hospital in Rome, Italy. Materials and methods A survey study performed through the distribution of a questionnaire assessing knowledge of QoL studies that used the SF-36 scale, participation in studies evaluating QoL as well as knowledge of journals publishing articles on QoL Physicians and residents at the hospital Policlinico Gemelli, Catholic University of Rome. Results Three-hundred nine physicians completed the questionnaire. Thirty-eight percent % reported knowing studies on QoL and using their results in clinical practice or for research purposes; 29% reported knowing the SF-36 questionnaire; 30% stated that at least one study assessing QoL had been conducted in their department. Fourty-six percent % stated that QoL must influence much or very much diagnostic choices and an even higher percentage reported that QoL must influence much or very much therapeutic and palliative strategies (70.8% and 91.3%, respectively). Reported barriers to the use of QoL measures in clinical practice were related to time constraints (8.7%) but also to doubts on methodological issues of QoL (30.7%). The large majority of physicians (94.3%) would have used more expensive drugs if these could improve QoL. Conclusions The present study shows that in a tertiary level academic italian hospital one third of the physicians, reported to know QoL measures and that more than 80% of them would like to use QoL in their daily clinical practice. Future studies are needed to identify the best strategies to implement the use of QoL measures in clinical practice. PMID:20416062

  18. Molecular characterization of NRXN1 deletions from 19,263 clinical microarray cases identifies exons important for neurodevelopmental disease expression

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, Chelsea; Speevak, Marsha; Armour, Christine M.; Goh, Elaine S.; Graham, Gail E.; Li, Chumei; Zeesman, Susan; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J.M.; Schultz, Lee-Anne; Morra, Antonella; Nicolson, Rob; Bikangaga, Peter; Samdup, Dawa; Zaazou, Mostafa; Boyd, Kerry; Jung, Jack H.; Siu, Victoria; Rajguru, Manjulata; Goobie, Sharan; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Prasad, Chitra; Dick, Paul T.; Hussain, Asmaa S.; Walinga, Margreet; Reijenga, Renske G.; Gazzellone, Matthew; Lionel, Anath C.; Marshall, Christian R.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J.; McCready, Elizabeth; Bassett, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the current study was to assess the penetrance of NRXN1 deletions. Methods We compared the prevalence and genomic extent of NRXN1 deletions identified among 19,263 clinically referred cases to that of 15,264 controls. The burden of additional clinically relevant CNVs was used as a proxy to estimate the relative penetrance of NRXN1 deletions. Results We identified 41 (0.21%) previously unreported exonic NRXN1 deletions ascertained for developmental delay/intellectual disability, significantly greater than in controls [OR=8.14 (95% CI 2.91–22.72), p< 0.0001)]. Ten (22.7%) of these had a second clinically relevant CNV. Subjects with a deletion near the 3′ end of NRXN1 were significantly more likely to have a second rare CNV than subjects with a 5′ NRXN1 deletion [OR=7.47 (95% CI 2.36–23.61), p=0.0006]. The prevalence of intronic NRXN1 deletions was not statistically different between cases and controls (p=0.618). The majority (63.2%) of intronic NRXN1 deletion cases had a second rare CNV, a two-fold greater prevalence than for exonic NRXN1 deletion cases (p=0.0035). Conclusions The results support the importance of exons near the 5′ end of NRXN1 in the expression of neurodevelopmental disorders. Intronic NRXN1 deletions do not appear to substantially increase the risk for clinical phenotypes. PMID:27195815

  19. Interaction specificity between the chaperone and proteolytic components of the cyanobacterial Clp protease.

    PubMed

    Tryggvesson, Anders; Ståhlberg, Frida M; Mogk, Axel; Zeth, Kornelius; Clarke, Adrian K

    2012-09-01

    The Clp protease is conserved among eubacteria and most eukaryotes, and uses ATP to drive protein substrate unfolding and translocation into a chamber of sequestered proteolytic active sites. In plant chloroplasts and cyanobacteria, the essential constitutive Clp protease consists of the Hsp100/ClpC chaperone partnering a proteolytic core of catalytic ClpP and noncatalytic ClpR subunits. In the present study, we have examined putative determinants conferring the highly specific association between ClpC and the ClpP3/R core from the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Two conserved sequences in the N-terminus of ClpR (tyrosine and proline motifs) and one in the N-terminus of ClpP3 (MPIG motif) were identified as being crucial for the ClpC-ClpP3/R association. These N-terminal domains also influence the stability of the ClpP3/R core complex itself. A unique C-terminal sequence was also found in plant and cyanobacterial ClpC orthologues just downstream of the P-loop region previously shown in Escherichia coli to be important for Hsp100 association to ClpP. This R motif in Synechococcus ClpC confers specificity for the ClpP3/R core and prevents association with E. coli ClpP; its removal from ClpC reverses this core specificity. PMID:22657732

  20. Molecular mechanisms for the conversion of zymogens to active proteolytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, A. R.; James, M. N.

    1998-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are synthesized as inactive precursors, or "zymogens," to prevent unwanted protein degradation, and to enable spatial and temporal regulation of proteolytic activity. Upon sorting or appropriate compartmentalization, zymogen conversion to the active enzyme typically involves limited proteolysis and removal of an "activation segment." The sizes of activation segments range from dipeptide units to independently folding domains comprising more than 100 residues. A common form of the activation segment is an N-terminal extension of the mature enzyme, or "prosegment," that sterically blocks the active site, and thereby prevents binding of substrates. In addition to their inhibitory role, prosegments are frequently important for the folding, stability, and/or intracellular sorting of the zymogen. The mechanisms of conversion to active enzymes are diverse in nature, ranging from enzymatic or nonenzymatic cofactors that trigger activation, to a simple change in pH that results in conversion by an autocatalytic mechanism. Recent X-ray crystallographic studies of zymogens and comparisons with their active counterparts have identified the structural changes that accompany conversion. This review will focus upon the structural basis for inhibition by activation segments, as well as the molecular events that lead to the conversion of zymogens to active enzymes. PMID:9568890

  1. Thrombin stimulates fibroblast procollagen production via proteolytic activation of protease-activated receptor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, R C; Dabbagh, K; McAnulty, R J; Gray, A J; Blanc-Brude, O P; Laurent, G J

    1998-01-01

    Thrombin is a multifunctional serine protease that has a crucial role in blood coagulation. It is also a potent mesenchymal cell mitogen and chemoattractant and might therefore have an important role in the recruitment and local proliferation of mesenchymal cells at sites of tissue injury. We hypothesized that thrombin might also affect the deposition of connective tissue proteins at these sites by directly stimulating fibroblast procollagen production. To address this hypothesis, the effect of thrombin on procollagen production and gene expression by human foetal lung fibroblasts was assessed over 48 h. Thrombin stimulated procollagen production at concentrations of 1 nM and above, with maximal increases of between 60% and 117% at 10 nM thrombin. These effects of thrombin were, at least in part, due to increased steady-state levels of alpha1(I) procollagen mRNA. They could furthermore be reproduced with thrombin receptor-activating peptides for the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) and were completely abolished when thrombin was rendered proteolytically inactive with the specific inhibitors d-Phe-Pro-ArgCH2Cl and hirudin, indicating that thrombin is mediating these effects via the proteolytic activation of PAR-1. These results suggest that thrombin might influence the deposition of connective tissue proteins during normal wound healing and the development of tissue fibrosis by stimulating fibroblast procollagen production. PMID:9639571

  2. Activation and Proteolytic Activity of the Treponema pallidum Metalloprotease, Pallilysin

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Simon; Hof, Rebecca; Honeyman, Lisa; Hassler, Julia; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2012-01-01

    Treponema pallidum is a highly invasive pathogen that undergoes rapid dissemination to establish widespread infection. Previous investigations identified the T. pallidum adhesin, pallilysin, as an HEXXH-containing metalloprotease that undergoes autocatalytic cleavage and degrades laminin and fibrinogen. In the current study we characterized pallilysin's active site, activation requirements, cellular location, and fibrin clot degradation capacity through both in vitro assays and heterologous treponemal expression and degradation studies. Site-directed mutagenesis showed the pallilysin HEXXH motif comprises at least part of the active site, as introduction of three independent mutations (AEXXH [H198A], HAXXH [E199A], and HEXXA [H202A]) abolished pallilysin-mediated fibrinogenolysis but did not adversely affect host component binding. Attainment of full pallilysin proteolytic activity was dependent upon autocatalytic cleavage of an N-terminal pro-domain, a process which could not occur in the HEXXH mutants. Pallilysin was shown to possess a thrombin cleavage site within its N-terminal pro-domain, and in vitro studies confirmed cleavage of pallilysin with thrombin generates a truncated pallilysin fragment that has enhanced proteolytic activity, suggesting pallilysin can also exploit the host coagulation process to facilitate protease activation. Opsonophagocytosis assays performed with viable T. pallidum demonstrated pallilysin is a target of opsonic antibodies, consistent with a host component-interacting, surface-exposed cellular location. Wild-type pallilysin, but not the HEXXA mutant, degraded fibrin clots, and similarly heterologous expression of pallilysin in the non-invasive spirochete Treponema phagedenis facilitated fibrin clot degradation. Collectively these results identify pallilysin as a surface-exposed metalloprotease within T. pallidum that possesses an HEXXH active site motif and requires autocatalytic or host-mediated cleavage of a pro-domain to attain

  3. Assessment of first-year veterinary students' communication skills using an objective structured clinical examination: the importance of context.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Kent G; Adams, Cindy L; Coe, Jason B

    2012-01-01

    Communication skills are considered to be a core clinical skill in veterinary medicine and essential for practice success, including outcomes of care for patients and clients. While veterinary schools include communication skills training in their programs, there is minimal knowledge on how best to assess communication competence throughout the undergraduate program. The purpose of this study was to further our understanding of the reliability, utility, and suitability of a communication skills Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Specifically we wanted to (1) identify the greatest source of variability (student, rater, station, and track) within a first-year, four station OSCE using exam scores and scores from videotape review by two trained raters, and (2) determine the effect of different stations on students' communication skills performance. Reliability of the scores from both the exam data and the two expert raters was 0.50 and 0.46 respectively, with the greatest amount of variance attributable to student by station. The percentage of variance due to raters in the exam data was 16.35%, whereas the percentage of variance for the two expert raters was 0%. These results have three important implications. First, the results reinforce the need for communication educators to emphasize that use of communication skills is moderated by the context of the clinical interaction. Second, by increasing rater training the amount of error in the scores due to raters can be reduced and inter-rater reliability increases. Third, the communication assessment method (in this case the OSCE checklist) should be built purposefully, taking into consideration the context of the case. PMID:22951466

  4. The status of zinc in the development of hepatocellular cancer: an important, but neglected, clinically established relationship.

    PubMed

    Costello, Leslie C; Franklin, Renty B

    2014-04-01

    Liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma, HCC) is increasing worldwide. About 75% of HCC cases result in death generally within one year. The factors responsible for the initiation and progression of HCC remain largely unknown and speculative, thereby impeding advancements in the development of effective therapeutic agents and biomarkers for early detection of HCC. A consistent marked decrease in zinc in HCC tumors compared with normal liver is an established clinical relationship, which occurs in virtually all cases of HCC. However, this relationship has been largely ignored by the contemporary clinical and research community. Consequently, the factors and mechanisms involved in this relationship have not been addressed. Thus, the opportunity and potential for its employment as biomarkers for early identification of malignancy, and for development of a chemotherapeutic approach have been lacking. This presentation includes a review of the literature and the description of important recent and new data, which provide the basis for a concept of the role of zinc in the development of HCC. The basis is presented for characterizing HCC malignancy as ZIP14-deficient tumors, and its requirement to prevent zinc cytotoxic effects on the malignant cells. The potential for an efficacious zinc treatment approach for HCC is described. The involvement of zinc in the predisposition for HCC by chronic liver disease/cirrhosis is presented. Hopefully, this presentation will raise the awareness, interest, and support for the much needed research in the implications of zinc in the development and progression of HCC. PMID:24448510

  5. Defining the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) of the Heinrichs-carpenter quality of life scale (QLS).

    PubMed

    Falissard, Bruno; Sapin, Christophe; Loze, Jean-Yves; Landsberg, Wally; Hansen, Karina

    2016-06-01

    To determine the Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID) of the Heinrichs-Carpenter Quality of Life Scale (QLS). Data from the "Schizophrenia Trial of Aripiprazole" (STAR) study were used in this analysis. The MCID value of the QLS total score was estimated using the anchor-based method. These findings were substantiated/validated by comparing the MCID estimate to other measurements collected in the study. Half of the patients (49%) showed improvement in Clinical Global Impressions of Severity (CGI-S) during the trial. The estimated MCID of the QLS total score was 5.30 (standard error: 2.60; 95% confidence interval: [0.16; 10.43]; p < 0.05). Patients were divided into two groups: "QLS improvers" (QLS total score increased ≥ six points) and "non-improvers". The QLS improvers had significantly better effectiveness and reported significantly higher levels of preference for their current medications. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in the change in two of the four domains of QLS; "Interpersonal relations" and "Intrapsychic foundations" domains during the study. These findings support the value of the estimated MCID for the QLS and may be a useful tool in evaluating antipsychotic treatment effects and improving long-term patient outcomes in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26238598

  6. Predicting dangerousness with two Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory psychopathy scales: the importance of egocentric and callous traits.

    PubMed

    Salekin, Randall T; Ziegler, Tracey A; Larrea, Maria A; Anthony, Virginia Lee; Bennett, Allyson D

    2003-04-01

    Psychopathy in youth has received increased recognition as a critical clinical construct for the evaluation and management of adolescents who have come into contact with the law (e.g., Forth, Hare, & Hart, 1990; Frick, 1998; Lynam, 1996, 1998). Although considerable attention has been devoted to the adult construct of psychopathy and its relation to recidivism, psychopathy in adolescents has been less thoroughly researched. Recently, a psychopathy scale (Murrie and Cornell Psychopathy Scale; Murrie & Cornell, 2000) was developed from items of the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI; Millon, 1993). This scale was found to be highly related to the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (Hare, 1991) and was judged to have demonstrated good criterion validity. A necessary step in the validation process of any psychopathy scale is establishing its predictive validity. With this in mind, we investigated the ability of the MACI Psychopathy Scale to predict recidivism with 55 adolescent offenders 2 years after they had been evaluated at a juvenile court evaluation unit. In addition, we devised a psychopathy scale from MACI items that aligned more closely with Cooke and Michie (2001) and Frick, Bodin, and Barry's (2001) recommendations for the refinement of psychopathy and tested its predictive validity. Results indicate that both scales had predictive utility. Interpersonal and affective components of the revised scale were particularly important in the prediction of both general and violent reoffending. PMID:12700018

  7. Kallikrein-8 Proteolytically Processes Human Papillomaviruses in the Extracellular Space To Facilitate Entry into Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Carla; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Vogeley, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entry of human papillomaviruses into host cells is a complex process. It involves conformational changes at the cell surface, receptor switching, internalization by a novel endocytic mechanism, uncoating in endosomes, trafficking of a subviral complex to the Golgi complex, and nuclear entry during mitosis. Here, we addressed how the stabilizing contacts in the capsid of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) may be reversed to allow uncoating of the viral genome. Using biochemical and cell-biological analyses, we determined that the major capsid protein L1 underwent proteolytic cleavage during entry. In addition to a dispensable cathepsin-mediated proteolysis that occurred likely after removal of capsomers from the subviral complex in endosomes, at least two further proteolytic cleavages of L1 were observed, one of which was independent of the low-pH environment of endosomes. This cleavage occurred extracellularly. Further analysis showed that the responsible protease was the secreted trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein-8 (KLK8) involved in epidermal homeostasis and wound healing. Required for infection, the cleavage was facilitated by prior interaction of viral particles with heparan sulfate proteoglycans. KLK8-mediated cleavage was crucial for further conformational changes exposing an important epitope of the minor capsid protein L2. Occurring independently of cyclophilins and of furin that mediate L2 exposure, KLK8-mediated cleavage of L1 likely facilitated access to L2, located in the capsid lumen, and potentially uncoating. Since HPV6 and HPV18 also required KLK8 for entry, we propose that the KLK8-dependent entry step is conserved. IMPORTANCE Our analysis of the proteolytic processing of incoming HPV16, an etiological agent of cervical cancer, demonstrated that the capsid is cleaved extracellularly by a serine protease active during wound healing and that this cleavage was crucial for infection. The cleavage of L1 is one of at least four structural

  8. Degradation of oxidized proteins by the proteasome: Distinguishing between the 20S, 26S, and immunoproteasome proteolytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Raynes, Rachel; Pomatto, Laura C D; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome is a ubiquitous and highly plastic multi-subunit protease with multi-catalytic activity that is conserved in all eukaryotes. The most widely known function of the proteasome is protein degradation through the 26S ubiquitin-proteasome system, responsible for the vast majority of protein degradation during homeostasis. However, the proteasome also plays an important role in adaptive immune responses and adaptation to oxidative stress. The unbound 20S proteasome, the core common to all proteasome conformations, is the main protease responsible for degrading oxidized proteins. During periods of acute stress, the 19S regulatory cap of the 26S proteasome disassociates from the proteolytic core, allowing for immediate ATP/ubiquitin-independent protein degradation by the 20S proteasome. Despite the abundance of unbound 20S proteasome compared to other proteasomal conformations, many publications fail to distinguish between the two proteolytic systems and often regard the 26S proteasome as the dominant protease. Further confounding the issue are the differential roles these two proteolytic systems have in adaptation and aging. In this review, we will summarize the increasing evidence that the 20S core proteasome constitutes the major conformation of the proteasome system and that it is far from a latent protease requiring activation by binding regulators. PMID:27155164

  9. Screening for antimicrobial and proteolytic activities of lactic acid bacteria isolated from cow, buffalo and goat milk and cheeses marketed in the southeast region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tulini, Fabricio L; Hymery, Nolwenn; Haertlé, Thomas; Le Blay, Gwenaelle; De Martinis, Elaine C P

    2016-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can be isolated from different sources such as milk and cheese, and the lipolytic, proteolytic and glycolytic enzymes of LAB are important in cheese preservation and in flavour production. Moreover, LAB produce several antimicrobial compounds which make these bacteria interesting for food biopreservation. These characteristics stimulate the search of new strains with technological potential. From 156 milk and cheese samples from cow, buffalo and goat, 815 isolates were obtained on selective agars for LAB. Pure cultures were evaluated for antimicrobial activities by agar antagonism tests and for proteolytic activity on milk proteins by cultivation on agar plates. The most proteolytic isolates were also tested by cultivation in skim milk followed by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of the fermented milk. Among the 815 tested isolates, three of them identified as Streptococcus uberis (strains FT86, FT126 and FT190) were bacteriocin producers, whereas four other ones identified as Weissella confusa FT424, W. hellenica FT476, Leuconostoc citreum FT671 and Lactobacillus plantarum FT723 showed high antifungal activity in preliminary assays. Complementary analyses showed that the most antifungal strain was L. plantarum FT723 that inhibited Penicillium expansum in modified MRS agar (De Man, Rogosa, Sharpe, without acetate) and fermented milk model, however no inhibition was observed against Yarrowia lipolytica. The proteolytic capacities of three highly proteolytic isolates identified as Enterococcus faecalis (strains FT132 and FT522) and Lactobacillus paracasei FT700 were confirmed by SDS-PAGE, as visualized by the digestion of caseins and whey proteins (β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin). These results suggest potential applications of these isolates or their activities (proteolytic activity or production of antimicrobials) in dairy foods production. PMID:26608755

  10. Haemolytic and proteolytic activity of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from mastitis cows.

    PubMed

    Bochniarz, M; Wawron, W

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the haemolytic and proteolytic activity of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) isolated from cows with mastitis. The study was conducted on 100 CNS strains: S. xylosus (n=28), S. chromogenes (n=26), S. haemolyticus (n=25), S. sciuri (n=14), S. warneri (n=4), S. hominis (n=2), S. saprophyticus (n=1); 22 CNS were isolated from cows with clinical mastitis and 78 from those with subclinical mastitis. The CNS studied showed the ability to produce only alpha-haemolysin and belonged to one strain - S. haemolyticus (21.0% of isolated CNS strains). Haemolysin-positive CNS were responsible for both clinical and subclinical mastitis (22.7% and 20.5%, respectively). The ability to produce protease was found in 31.0% of CNS belonging to two strains: S. chromogenes and S. sciuri. Protease-positive CNS were the etiological factor of both clinical and subclinical mastitis (31.8% and 30.8%, respectively). All S. xylosus, S. warneri, S. hominis, and S. saprophyticus strains were found protease-negative and haemolysin-negative, irrespective of whether they caused clinical or subclinical mastitis in cows. PMID:22708359

  11. Importance and Repercussions of Renal and Cardiovascular Pathology on Stroke in Young Adults: An Anatomopathologic Study of 52 Clinical Necropsies

    PubMed Central

    Arismendi-Morillo, Gabriel; Fernández-Abreu, Mary; Cardozo-Duran, José; Vilchez-Barrios, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Stroke in young adults has seldom been studied in a necropsy series. The objective of the present clinical necropsy-based investigation was to analyze stroke and its relationship with cardiovascular and renal pathology in young adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS The protocols of 52 clinical necropsies with diagnoses of stroke in patients aged 18 – 49 years, performed between the years 1990–2006, were reviewed. RESULTS Hemorrhagic stroke was diagnosed in 36 patients (69.3%), whereas the remaining 16 (30.7%) had ischemic stroke. Hypertensive cardiopathy was evident in 88.4% of the cases. Chronic renal pathology, directly or indirectly related to hypertension, was observed in 55.7% of the patients. Ischemic stroke as a result of occlusive atherosclerotic disease was seen in 50% of cases. Cardiogenic emboli were found in 25% of the cadavers. Hemorrhagic stroke was associated with hypertension in 43% of the cases, with ruptured vascular malformations in 29%, and coagulopathies in 17% of the cases. Hypertensive cardiopathy was present in patients with either ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke (81.2% and 91.6%, respectively). The most frequently observed renal ailments were chronic pyelonephritis (23%) and nephrosclerosis (21.1%). These were associated with ischemic stroke in 43.7%, and 12.5% of the cases, respectively, and with 13.8% and 25% of the hemorrhagic stroke cases. DISCUSSION Hypertensive cardiopathy, occlusive atherosclerotic disease, chronic pyelonephritis and nephrosclerosis are among the pathophysiologycal mechanisms that apparently and eventually interact to induce a significant number of cases of stroke in young adults. A chronic systemic inflammatory state appears to be an important related condition because it possibly constitutes an accelerant of the pathophysiologycal process. PMID:18297202

  12. Clinical importance and representation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile cultivated from stool samples of hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Predrag, Stojanovic; Branislava, Kocic; Miodrag, Stojanovic; Biljana, Miljkovic – Selimovic; Suzana, Tasic; Natasa, Miladinovic – Tasic; Tatjana, Babic

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to fortify the clinical importance and representation of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolated from stool samples of hospitalized patients. This survey included 80 hospitalized patients with diarrhea and positive findings of Clostridium difficile in stool samples, and 100 hospitalized patients with formed stool as a control group. Bacteriological examination of a stool samples was conducted using standard microbiological methods. Stool sample were inoculated directly on nutrient media for bacterial cultivation (blood agar using 5% sheep blood, Endo agar, selective Salmonella Shigella agar, Selenite-F broth, CIN agar and Skirrow’s medium), and to selective cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar (CCFA) (Biomedics, Parg qe tehnicologico, Madrid, Spain) for isolation of Clostridium difficile. Clostridium difficile toxin was detected by ELISA-ridascreen Clostridium difficile Toxin A/B (R-Biopharm AG, Germany) and ColorPAC ToxinA test (Becton Dickinson, USA). Examination of stool specimens for the presence of parasites (causing diarrhea) was done using standard methods (conventional microscopy), commercial concentration test Paraprep S Gold kit (Dia Mondial, France) and RIDA®QUICK Cryptosporidium/Giardia Combi test (R-Biopharm AG, Germany). Examination of stool specimens for the presence of fungi (causing diarrhea) was performed by standard methods. All stool samples positive for Clostridium difficile were tested for Rota, Noro, Astro and Adeno viruses by ELISA – ridascreen (R-Biopharm AG, Germany). In this research we isolated 99 Clostridium difficile strains from 116 stool samples of 80 hospitalized patients with diarrhea. The 53 (66.25%) of patients with diarrhea were positive for toxins A and B, one (1.25%) were positive for only toxin B. Non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile isolated from samples of 26 (32.5%) patients. However, other pathogenic microorganisms of intestinal tract cultivated from samples of 16 patients

  13. Mitochondrial AAA proteases--towards a molecular understanding of membrane-bound proteolytic machines.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Florian; Tatsuta, Takashi; Langer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial AAA proteases play an important role in the maintenance of mitochondrial proteostasis. They regulate and promote biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins by acting as processing enzymes and ensuring the selective turnover of misfolded proteins. Impairment of AAA proteases causes pleiotropic defects in various organisms including neurodegeneration in humans. AAA proteases comprise ring-like hexameric complexes in the mitochondrial inner membrane and are functionally conserved from yeast to man, but variations are evident in the subunit composition of orthologous enzymes. Recent structural and biochemical studies revealed how AAA proteases degrade their substrates in an ATP dependent manner. Intersubunit coordination of the ATP hydrolysis leads to an ordered ATP hydrolysis within the AAA ring, which ensures efficient substrate dislocation from the membrane and translocation to the proteolytic chamber. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the molecular mechanisms underlying the versatile functions of mitochondrial AAA proteases and their relevance to those of the other AAA+ machines. PMID:22001671

  14. Trichomonas vaginalis Cysteine Proteinases: Iron Response in Gene Expression and Proteolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Rossana; Cárdenas-Guerra, Rosa Elena; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa Elvira; Puente-Rivera, Jonathan; Zamudio-Prieto, Olga; Ortega-López, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    We focus on the iron response of Trichomonas vaginalis to gene family products such as the cysteine proteinases (CPs) involved in virulence properties. In particular, we examined the effect of iron on the gene expression regulation and function of cathepsin L-like and asparaginyl endopeptidase-like CPs as virulence factors. We addressed some important aspects about CPs genomic organization and we offer possible explanations to the fact that only few members of this large gene family are expressed at the RNA and protein levels and the way to control their proteolytic activity. We also summarized all known iron regulations of CPs at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels along with new insights into the possible epigenetic and miRNA processes. PMID:26090464

  15. Urban riverine environment is a source of multidrug-resistant and ESBL-producing clinically important Acinetobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Maravić, Ana; Skočibušić, Mirjana; Fredotović, Željana; Šamanić, Ivica; Cvjetan, Svjetlana; Knezović, Mia; Puizina, Jasna

    2016-02-01

    Some Acinetobacter species have emerged as very important opportunistic pathogens in humans. We investigated Acinetobacter spp. from the polluted urban riverine environment in Croatia in regard to species affiliation, antibiotic resistance pattern, and resistance mechanisms. Considerable number of isolates produced acquired extended-spectrum β-lactamase(s) (ESBLs), CTX-M-15 solely or with TEM-116. By Southern blot hybridization, bla TEM-116 was identified on plasmids ca. 10, 3, and 1.2 kb in Acinetobacter junii, A. gandensis, and A. johnsonii. The bla TEM-116-carrying plasmid in A. gandensis was successfully transferred by conjugation to azide-resistant Escherichia coli J53. A. radioresistens isolate also carried an intrinsic carbapenemase gene bla OXA-133 with ISAba1 insertion sequence present upstream to promote its expression. Majority of ESBL-producing isolates harbored integrases intI1 and/or intI2 and the sulfamethoxazole resistance gene sul1. Almost all isolates had overexpressed resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) efflux system, indicating that this mechanism may have contributed to multidrug resistance phenotypes. This is the first report of environmental CTX-M-15-producing Acinetobacter spp. and the first identification of CTX-M-15 in A. johnsonii, A. junii, A. calcoaceticus, A. gandensis, A. haemolyticus, and A. radioresistens worldwide. We identified, also for the first time, the environmental Acinetobacter-producing TEM ESBLs, highlighting the potential risk for human health, and the role of these bacteria in maintenance and dissemination of clinically important antibiotic resistance genes in community through riverine environments. PMID:26490931

  16. Is the Information about a Test Important? Applying the Methods of Evidence-Based Medicine to the Clinical Examination of Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbek, John C.; McCullough, Gary H.; Wertz, Robert T.

    2004-01-01

    A hotly debated topic in oropharyngeal dysphagia is the Clinical Swallowing Examination's (CSE) importance in clinical practice. That debate can profit from the application of evidence-based medicine's (EBM) principles and procedures. These can guide both appropriate data collection and interpretation as will be demonstrated in the present report.…

  17. Simple, Sensitive and Accurate Multiplex Detection of Clinically Important Melanoma DNA Mutations in Circulating Tumour DNA with SERS Nanotags

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Eugene J.H.; Wang, Yuling; Tsao, Simon Chang-Hao; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive and accurate identification of specific DNA mutations can influence clinical decisions. However accurate diagnosis from limiting samples such as circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is challenging. Current approaches based on fluorescence such as quantitative PCR (qPCR) and more recently, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) have limitations in multiplex detection, sensitivity and the need for expensive specialized equipment. Herein we describe an assay capitalizing on the multiplexing and sensitivity benefits of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with the simplicity of standard PCR to address the limitations of current approaches. This proof-of-concept method could reproducibly detect as few as 0.1% (10 copies, CV < 9%) of target sequences thus demonstrating the high sensitivity of the method. The method was then applied to specifically detect three important melanoma mutations in multiplex. Finally, the PCR/SERS assay was used to genotype cell lines and ctDNA from serum samples where results subsequently validated with ddPCR. With ddPCR-like sensitivity and accuracy yet at the convenience of standard PCR, we believe this multiplex PCR/SERS method could find wide applications in both diagnostics and research. PMID:27446486

  18. The diameter of the ileal J-pouch-anal anastomosis as an important risk factor of pouchitis – clinical observations

    PubMed Central

    Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Marciniak, Ryszard; Kaczmarek, Elżbieta; Meissner, Wiktor; Krokowicz, Piotr; Paszkowski, Jacek; Walkowiak, Jarosław; Majewski, Przemysław; Marszałek, Andrzej; Drews, Michał

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Patients’ quality of life after restorative proctocolectomy depends on the potential complications. Stricture of the ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is one of the complications following restorative proctocolectomy. Material/Methods We analyzed the correlation between the diameter of the anastomosis and clinical parameters, including pouchitis disease activity index (PDAI), the activity of fecal M2-pyruvate kinase and maximum tolerable volume of the pouch. The study group consisted of 31 patients in whom covering ileostomy had been closed 72±50 months before enrolement to the study. Restorative proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis coli had been performed in this group. Results The study did not show any correlation between the diameter of the anastomosis and primary indication for surgery, the time elapsed after restoration of the bowel continuity, the activity of fecal M2-pyruvate kinase, or maximum tolerable volume. However, meaningful correlations between the stricture of the anastomosis and the presence and activity of pouchitis, together with the ileal villi atrophy, were detected. Conclusions Stricture of the anastomosis appears to be an important factor increasing the incidence of pouchitis, and is independent of the underlying condition and time after the operation. Dilation of the anastomosis and prevention of stricture should constitute a permanent element of postoperative follow-up. PMID:21278694

  19. Chiral separation of the clinically important compounds fucose and pipecolic acid using CE: determination of the most effective chiral selector.

    PubMed

    Hadjistasi, Christoforos A; Stavrou, Ioannis J; Stefan-Van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Kapnissi-Christodoulou, Constantina P

    2013-09-01

    In this study, simple electrophoretic methods were developed for the chiral separation of the clinically important compounds fucose and pipecolic acid. In recent years, these analytes, and particularly their individual enantiomers, have attracted considerable attention due to their role in biological functions and disorders. The detectability and sensitivity of pipecolic acid and fucose were improved by reacting them with fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl chloride (FMOC-Cl) and 5-amino-2-naphthalene-sulfonic acid (ANSA), respectively. The enantioseparation conditions were optimized by initially investigating the type of the chiral selector. Different chiral selectors, such as polymeric surfactants and cyclodextrins, were used and the most effective ones were determined with regard to resolution and analysis time. A 10-mM β-cyclodextrin was able to separate the enantiomers of ANSA-DL-fucose and the polymeric surfactant poly(sodium N-undecanoyl-LL-leucine-valinate) was able to separate the enantiomers of FMOC-DL-pipecolic acid, with resolution values of 3.45 and 2.78, respectively. Additional parameters, such as the concentration and the pH of the background electrolyte (BGE), the concentration of the chiral selector, and the addition of modifiers were examined in order to optimize the separations. The addition of the chiral ionic liquid D-alanine tert-butyl ester lactate into the BGE was also investigated, for the first time, in order to improve resolution of the enantiomers. PMID:23757267

  20. Multiplexed homogeneous assays of proteolytic activity using a smartphone and quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Petryayeva, Eleonora; Algar, W Russ

    2014-03-18

    Semiconductor quantum dot (QD) bioconjugates, with their unique and highly advantageous physicochemical and optical properties, have been extensively utilized as probes for bioanalysis and continue to generate widespread interest for these applications. An important consideration for expanding the utility of QDs and making their use routine is to make assays with QDs more accessible for laboratories that do not specialize in nanomaterials. Here, we show that digital color imaging of QD photoluminescence (PL) with a smartphone camera is a viable, easily accessible readout platform for quantitative, multiplexed, and real-time bioanalyses. Red-, green-, and blue-emitting CdSeS/ZnS QDs were conjugated with peptides that were labeled with a deep-red fluorescent dye, Alexa Fluor 647, and the dark quenchers, QSY9 and QSY35, respectively, to generate Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pairs sensitive to proteolytic activity. Changes in QD PL caused by the activity of picomolar to nanomolar concentrations of protease were detected as changes in the red-green-blue (RGB) channel intensities in digital color images. Importantly, measurements of replicate samples made with smartphone imaging and a sophisticated fluorescence plate reader yielded the same quantitative results, including initial proteolytic rates and specificity constants. Homogeneous two-plex and three-plex assays for the activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, and enterokinase were demonstrated with RGB imaging. Given the ubiquity of smartphones, this work largely removes any instrumental impediments to the adoption of QDs as routine tools for bioanalysis in research laboratories and is a critical step toward the use of QDs for point-of-care diagnostics. This work also adds to the growing utility of smartphones in analytical methods by enabling multiplexed fluorimetric assays within a single sample volume and across multiple samples in parallel. PMID:24571675

  1. Socioeconomic Status of Counties Where Dialysis Clinics Are Located Is an Important Factor in Comparing Dialysis Providers.

    PubMed

    Almachraki, Fadi; Tuffli, Michael; Lee, Paul; Desmarais, Mark; Shih, Huai-Che; Nissenson, Allen R; Krishnan, Mahesh

    2016-02-01

    This study assessed the hypothesis that the clinic site of service socioeconomic status (SES) represents an unmeasured confounder for clinical outcome comparisons between dialysis clinics and provider types, using data from the federal pay-for-performance program for end-stage renal disease. A total of 6506 dialysis facilities were categorized by clinic SES status (rurality and poverty status). Clinics were then grouped by provider type (chain size and tax status). Lastly, performance penalties were determined by each of these classifications. Findings were that 7.4% of dialysis clinics could be classified as being in rural locations, and 20.6% could be classified as being in high-poverty locations. Large dialysis organizations served more rural (65%) and high-poverty areas (metropolitan, 69%; micropolitan, 75%; rural, 75%) compared to other providers (medium, small, hospital/university). For-profit providers accounted for a majority of dialysis clinics in rural areas (78%) and high poverty areas (metropolitan, 84%; micropolitan, 85%; rural, 90%). This study found that dialysis clinic performance penalties did vary by SES, with poorer outcomes observed for clinic locations with lower SES. This finding, along with the nonrandom distribution of provider types by SES status, suggests that clinic and provider location SES may need to be considered when comparing providers. PMID:26090696

  2. Effect of midgut proteolytic activity on susceptibility of lepidopteran larvae to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. Kurstaki

    PubMed Central

    Talaei-Hassanloui, Reza; Bakhshaei, Raziyeh; Hosseininaveh, Vahid; Khorramnezhad, Ayda

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is the most effective microbial control agent for controlling numerous species from different insect orders. All subspecies and strains of B. thuringiensis can produce a spore and a crystalline parasporal body. This crystal which contains proteinaceous protoxins is dissolved in the alkaline midgut, the resulting molecule is then cleaved and activated by proteolytic enzymes and acts as a toxin. An interesting aspect of this activation process is that variations in midgut pH and protease activity have been shown to account for the spectrum of some Bt proteins activity. Thus, an important factor that could be a determinant of toxin activity is the presence of proteases in the midgut microenvironment of susceptible insects. Reciprocally, any alteration in the midgut protease composition of the host can result in resistance to Bt. Here in this paper, we reviewed this processes in general and presented our assays to reveal whether resistance mechanism to Bt in Diamondback Moth (DbM) larvae could be due to the function of the midgut proteases? We estimated LC50 for both probable susceptible and resistant populations in laboratory and greenhouse tests. Then, the midgut protease activities of the B. thuringiensis induced-resistant and susceptible populations of the DbM were assayed on Hemoglubin and on N-alpha-benzoyl-DL-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BapNA) for total and tryptic activities, respectively. Six hours after feeding on Bt treated and untreated canola leaves, the midguts of instar larvae of both populations were isolated. Following related protocols, peptides released through the activity of proteinases on Hemoglubin and BApNA were recorded using microplate reader. Control (Blank) was also considered with adding TCA to reaction mix before adding enzymatic extract. Data analysis indicated that there are significant differences for tryptic activity on BApNA and also for total proteolytic activity on Hemoglubin between susceptible and

  3. Isolation and removal of proteolytic enzymes with magnetic cross-linked erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šafařík, Ivo; Šafaříková, Mirka

    2001-01-01

    New magnetic adsorbents for batch isolation and removal of various proteolytic enzymes were prepared by glutaraldehyde cross-linking of bovine, porcine and human erythrocytes in the presence of fine magnetic particles. Trypsin, chymotrypsin, alkaline bacterial protease and proteases present in various commercial enzyme preparations were efficiently adsorbed on these adsorbents; on the contrary, proteins without proteolytic activity were not adsorbed.

  4. Effect of dietary fiber on proteolytic pancreatic enzymes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hansen, W E

    1986-12-01

    Chymotrypsin, trypsin, carboxypeptidase A and B, elastase and enterokinase activities were measured in buffer solutions and in human duodenal juice after incubation with wheat bran, cellulose, guar gum, pectin, psyllium and lignin. The different types of dietary fiber led to inhibition of enzymatic activity in most experiments, e.g., lignin could totally ablish the activity of isolated trypsin and chymotrypsin. Only in enterokinase was there no influence. Inhibition depended on incubation time; the effect was proportional to fiber concentration and inversely related to enzyme level. Treatment of fiber with hydrochloric acid (pH 1.5) and heat (95 degrees C) destroyed inhibitory activity in some experiments. The effect of lignin on one enzyme (trypsin) was reduced by the addition of another enzyme (chymotrypsin). It is concluded that dietary fiber could affect digestion by inhibiting proteolytic pancreatic enzymes. PMID:2824629

  5. Wound dressings for a proteolytic-rich environment.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2011-04-01

    Wound dressings have experienced continuous and significant changes over the years based on the knowledge of the biochemical events associated with chronic wounds. The development goes from natural materials used to just cover and conceal the wound to interactive materials that can facilitate the healing process, addressing specific issues in non-healing wounds. These new types of dressings often relate with the proteolytic wound environment and the bacteria load to enhance the healing. Recently, the wound dressing research is focusing on the replacement of synthetic polymers by natural protein materials to delivery bioactive agents to the wounds. This article provides an overview on the novel protein-based wound dressings such as silk fibroin keratin and elastin. The improved properties of these dressings, like the release of antibiotics and growth factors, are discussed. The different types of wounds and the effective parameters of healing process will be reviewed. PMID:21360151

  6. The fine-tuning of proteolytic pathways in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cecarini, Valentina; Bonfili, Laura; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Angeletti, Mauro; Keller, Jeffrey N; Eleuteri, Anna Maria

    2016-09-01

    Several integrated proteolytic systems contribute to the maintenance of cellular homeostasis through the continuous removal of misfolded, aggregated or oxidized proteins and damaged organelles. Among these systems, the proteasome and autophagy play the major role in protein quality control, which is a fundamental issue in non-proliferative cells such as neurons. Disturbances in the functionality of these two pathways are frequently observed in neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease, and reflect the accumulation of protease-resistant, deleterious protein aggregates. In this review, we explored the sophisticated crosstalk between the ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy in the removal of the harmful structures that characterize Alzheimer's disease neurons. We also dissected the role of the numerous shuttle factors and chaperones that, directly or indirectly interacting with ubiquitin and LC3, are used for cargo selection and delivery to one pathway or the other. PMID:27120560

  7. Electrochemical Proteolytic Beacon for Detection of Matrix Metalloproteinase Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Wunschel, David S.; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-09-27

    This communication describes a novel method for detecting of matrix metalloproteinase-7 activity using a peptide substrate labeled with a ferrocene reporter. The substrate serves as a selective ‘electrochemical proteolytic beacon’ (EPB) for this metalloproteinase. The EPB is immobilized on a gold electrode surface to enable ‘on-off’ electrochemical signaling capability for uncleaved and cleaved events. The EPB is efficiently and selectively cleaved by MMP-7 as measured by the rate of decrease in redox current of ferrocene. Direct transduction of a signal corresponding to peptide cleavage events into an electronic signal thus provides a simple, sensitive route for detecting the MMP activity. The new method allows for identification of the activity of MMP-7 in concentrations as low as 3.4 pM. The concept can be extended to design multiple peptide substrate labeled with different electroactive reporters for assaying multiple MMPs activities.

  8. Predicting the minimum clinically important difference in patients undergoing surgery for the treatment of degenerative cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Tetreault, Lindsay; Wilson, Jefferson R; Kotter, Mark R N; Nouri, Aria; Côté, Pierre; Kopjar, Branko; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The minimum clinically important difference (MCID) is defined as the minimum change in a measurement that a patient would identify as beneficial. Before undergoing surgery, patients are likely to inquire about the ultimate goals of the operation and of their chances of experiencing meaningful improvements. The objective of this study was to define significant predictors of achieving an MCID on the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale at 2 years following surgery for the treatment of degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). METHODS Seven hundred fifty-seven patients were prospectively enrolled in either the AOSpine North America or International study at 26 global sites. Fourteen patients had a perfect preoperative mJOA score of 18 and were excluded from this analysis (n = 743). Data were collected for each participating subject, including demographic information, symptomatology, medical history, causative pathology, and functional impairment. Univariate log-binominal regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the association between preoperative clinical factors and achieving an MCID on the mJOA scale. Modified Poisson regression using robust error variances was used to create the final multivariate model and compute the relative risk for each predictor. RESULTS The sample consisted of 463 men (62.31%) and 280 women (37.69%), with an average age of 56.48 ± 11.85 years. At 2 years following surgery, patients exhibited a mean change in functional status of 2.71 ± 2.89 points on the mJOA scale. Of the 687 patients with available follow-up data, 481 (70.01%) exhibited meaningful gains on the mJOA scale, whereas 206 (29.98%) failed to achieve an MCID. Based on univariate analysis, significant predictors of achieving the MCID on the mJOA scale were younger age; female sex; shorter duration of symptoms; nonsmoking status; a lower comorbidity score and absence of cardiovascular disease; and absence of upgoing plantar responses, lower

  9. Proteolytic Cleavage of Apolipoprotein E in the Down Syndrome Brain

    PubMed Central

    Day, Ryan J.; McCarty, Katie L.; Ockerse, Kayla E.; Head, Elizabeth; Rohn, Troy T.

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the most common genetic causes of intellectual disability and is characterized by a number of behavioral as well as cognitive symptoms. Many of the neuropathological features of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD) including senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are also present in people with DS as a result of triplication of the amyloid precursor gene on chromosome 21. Evidence suggests that harboring one or both apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4) alleles may increase the risk for AD due to the proteolytic cleavage of apoE4 and a subsequent loss of function. To investigate a role for the apoE proteolysis in vivo, we compared three autopsy groups; 7 DS with AD neuropathology cases over 40 years, 5 young DS cases without AD pathology under 40 years (YDS) and 5 age-matched control cases over 40 years by immunohistochemistry utilizing an antibody that detects the amino-terminal fragment of apoE. Application of this antibody, termed the amino-terminal apoE fragment antibody (nApoECF) revealed labeling of pyramidal neurons in the frontal cortex of YDS cases, whereas in the DS-AD group, labeling with nApoECF was prominent within NFTs. NFT labeling with nApoECF was significantly greater in the hippocampus versus the frontal cortex in the same DS-AD cases, suggesting a regional distribution of truncated apoE. Colocalization immunofluorescence experiments indicated that 52.5% and 53.2% of AT8- and PHF-1-positive NFTs, respectively, also contained nApoECF. Collectively, these data support a role for the proteolytic cleavage of apoE in DS and suggest that apoE fragmentation is closely associated with NFTs. PMID:27330841

  10. Proteolytic Cleavage of Apolipoprotein E in the Down Syndrome Brain.

    PubMed

    Day, Ryan J; McCarty, Katie L; Ockerse, Kayla E; Head, Elizabeth; Rohn, Troy T

    2016-05-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the most common genetic causes of intellectual disability and is characterized by a number of behavioral as well as cognitive symptoms. Many of the neuropathological features of early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) including senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are also present in people with DS as a result of triplication of the amyloid precursor gene on chromosome 21. Evidence suggests that harboring one or both apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4) alleles may increase the risk for AD due to the proteolytic cleavage of apoE4 and a subsequent loss of function. To investigate a role for the apoE proteolysis in vivo, we compared three autopsy groups; 7 DS with AD neuropathology cases over 40 years, 5 young DS cases without AD pathology under 40 years (YDS) and 5 age-matched control cases over 40 years by immunohistochemistry utilizing an antibody that detects the amino-terminal fragment of apoE. Application of this antibody, termed the amino-terminal apoE fragment antibody (nApoECF) revealed labeling of pyramidal neurons in the frontal cortex of YDS cases, whereas in the DS-AD group, labeling with nApoECF was prominent within NFTs. NFT labeling with nApoECF was significantly greater in the hippocampus versus the frontal cortex in the same DS-AD cases, suggesting a regional distribution of truncated apoE. Colocalization immunofluorescence experiments indicated that 52.5% and 53.2% of AT8- and PHF-1-positive NFTs, respectively, also contained nApoECF. Collectively, these data support a role for the proteolytic cleavage of apoE in DS and suggest that apoE fragmentation is closely associated with NFTs. PMID:27330841

  11. Isolation and identification of thermophilic and mesophylic proteolytic bacteria from shrimp paste "Terasi"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murwani, R.; Supriyadi, Subagio, Trianto, A.; Ambariyanto

    2015-12-01

    Terasi is a traditional product generally made of fermented shrimp. There were many studies regarding lactic acid bacteria of terasi but none regarding proteolitic bacteria. This study was conducted to isolate and identify the thermophilic and mesophylic proteolytic bacteria from terasi. In addition, the effect of different salt concentrations on the growth of the isolated proteolytic bacteria with the greatest proteolytic activity was also studied. Terasi samples were obtained from the Northern coast region of Java island i.e. Jepara, Demak and Batang. The study obtained 34 proteolytic isolates. Four isolates were identified as Sulfidobacillus, three isolates as Vibrio / Alkaligenes / Aeromonas, two isolates as Pseudomonas, 21 isolates as Bacillus, three isolates as Kurthia/ Caryophanon and one isolates as Amphibacillus. The growth of proteolytic bacteria was affected by salt concentration. The largest growth was found at 0 ppm salt concentrations and growth was declined as salt concentration increased. Maximum growth at each salt concentration tested was found at 8 hours incubation.

  12. Proteolytic and non-proteolytic regulation of collective cell invasion: tuning by ECM density and organization

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kapoor, Aastha; Desai, Sejal; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Sen, Shamik

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells manoeuvre through extracellular matrices (ECMs) using different invasion modes, including single cell and collective cell invasion. These modes rely on MMP-driven ECM proteolysis to make space for cells to move. How cancer-associated alterations in ECM influence the mode of invasion remains unclear. Further, the sensitivity of the two invasion modes to MMP dynamics remains unexplored. In this paper, we address these open questions using a multiscale hybrid computational model combining ECM density-dependent MMP secretion, MMP diffusion, ECM degradation by MMP and active cell motility. Our results demonstrate that in randomly aligned matrices, collective cell invasion is more efficient than single cell invasion. Although increase in MMP secretion rate enhances invasiveness independent of cell–cell adhesion, sustenance of collective invasion in dense matrices requires high MMP secretion rates. However, matrix alignment can sustain both single cell and collective cell invasion even without ECM proteolysis. Similar to our in-silico observations, increase in ECM density and MMP inhibition reduced migration of MCF-7 cells embedded in sandwich gels. Together, our results indicate that apart from cell intrinsic factors (i.e., high cell–cell adhesion and MMP secretion rates), ECM density and organization represent two important extrinsic parameters that govern collective cell invasion and invasion plasticity. PMID:26832069

  13. Heart Failure Clinical Trials in East and Southeast Asia: Understanding the Importance and Defining the Next Steps.

    PubMed

    Mentz, Robert J; Roessig, Lothar; Greenberg, Barry H; Sato, Naoki; Shinagawa, Kaori; Yeo, Daniel; Kwok, Bernard W K; Reyes, Eugenio B; Krum, Henry; Pieske, Burkert; Greene, Stephen J; Ambrosy, Andrew P; Kelly, Jacob P; Zannad, Faiez; Pitt, Bertram; Lam, Carolyn S P

    2016-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a major and increasing global public health problem. In Asia, aging populations and recent increases in cardiovascular risk factors have contributed to a particularly high burden of HF, with outcomes that are poorer than those in the rest of the world. Representation of Asians in landmark HF trials has been variable. In addition, HF patients from Asia demonstrate clinical differences from patients in other geographic regions. Thus, the generalizability of some clinical trial results to the Asian population remains uncertain. In this article, we review differences in HF phenotype, HF management, and outcomes in patients from East and Southeast Asia. We describe lessons learned in Asia from recent HF registries and clinical trial databases and outline strategies to improve the potential for success in future trials. This review is based on discussions among scientists, clinical trialists, industry representatives, and regulatory representatives at the CardioVascular Clinical Trialist Asia Forum in Singapore on July 4, 2014. PMID:27256745

  14. A novel synthetic quinolinone inhibitor presents proteolytic and hemorrhagic inhibitory activities against snake venom metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, Patrícia T; Magro, Angelo J; Matioli, Fábio F; Marcussi, Silvana; Lemke, Ney; Calderon, Leonardo A; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Soares, Andreimar M; Correa, Arlene G; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2016-02-01

    Metalloproteases play a fundamental role in snake venom envenomation inducing hemorrhagic, fibrigen(ogen)olytic and myotoxic effects in their victims. Several snake venoms, such as those from the Bothrops genus, present important local effects which are not efficiently neutralized by conventional serum therapy. Consequently, these accidents may result in permanent sequelae and disability, creating economic and social problems, especially in developing countries, leading the attention of the World Health Organization that considered ophidic envenomations a neglected tropical disease. Aiming to produce an efficient inhibitor against bothropic venoms, we synthesized different molecules classified as quinolinones - a group of low-toxic chemical compounds widely used as antibacterial and antimycobacterial drugs - and tested their inhibitory properties against hemorrhage caused by bothropic venoms. The results from this initial screening indicated the molecule 2-hydroxymethyl-6-methoxy-1,4-dihydro-4-quinolinone (Q8) was the most effective antihemorrhagic compound among all of the assayed synthetic quinolinones. Other in vitro and in vivo experiments showed this novel compound was able to inhibit significantly the hemorrhagic and/or proteolytic activities of bothropic crude venoms and isolated snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs) even at lower concentrations. Docking and molecular dynamic simulations were also performed to get insights into the structural basis of Q8 inhibitory mechanism against proteolytic and hemorrhagic SVMPs. These structural studies demonstrated that Q8 may form a stable complex with SVMPs, impairing the access of substrates to the active sites of these toxins. Therefore, both experimental and structural data indicate that Q8 compound is an interesting candidate for antiophidic therapy, particularly for the treatment of the hemorrhagic and necrotic effects induced by bothropic venoms. PMID:26700145

  15. Determinants of Affinity and Proteolytic Stability in Interactions of Kunitz Family Protease Inhibitors with Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    M Salameh; A Soares; D Navaneetham; D Sinha; P Walsh; E Radisky

    2011-12-31

    An important functional property of protein protease inhibitors is their stability to proteolysis. Mesotrypsin is a human trypsin that has been implicated in the proteolytic inactivation of several protein protease inhibitors. We have found that bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a Kunitz protease inhibitor, inhibits mesotrypsin very weakly and is slowly proteolyzed, whereas, despite close sequence and structural homology, the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APPI) binds to mesotrypsin 100 times more tightly and is cleaved 300 times more rapidly. To define features responsible for these differences, we have assessed the binding and cleavage by mesotrypsin of APPI and BPTI reciprocally mutated at two nonidentical residues that make direct contact with the enzyme. We find that Arg at P{sub 1} (versus Lys) favors both tighter binding and more rapid cleavage, whereas Met (versus Arg) at P'{sub 2} favors tighter binding but has minimal effect on cleavage. Surprisingly, we find that the APPI scaffold greatly enhances proteolytic cleavage rates, independently of the binding loop. We draw thermodynamic additivity cycles analyzing the interdependence of P{sub 1} and P'{sub 2} substitutions and scaffold differences, finding multiple instances in which the contributions of these features are nonadditive. We also report the crystal structure of the mesotrypsin-APPI complex, in which we find that the binding loop of APPI displays evidence of increased mobility compared with BPTI. Our data suggest that the enhanced vulnerability of APPI to mesotrypsin cleavage may derive from sequence differences in the scaffold that propagate increased flexibility and mobility to the binding loop.

  16. Determinants of Affinity and Proteolytic Stability in Interactions of Kunitz Family Protease Inhibitors with Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Salameh, M.A.; Soares, A.; Navaneetham, D.; Sinha, D.; Walsh, P. N.; Radisky, E. S.

    2010-11-19

    An important functional property of protein protease inhibitors is their stability to proteolysis. Mesotrypsin is a human trypsin that has been implicated in the proteolytic inactivation of several protein protease inhibitors. We have found that bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a Kunitz protease inhibitor, inhibits mesotrypsin very weakly and is slowly proteolyzed, whereas, despite close sequence and structural homology, the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APPI) binds to mesotrypsin 100 times more tightly and is cleaved 300 times more rapidly. To define features responsible for these differences, we have assessed the binding and cleavage by mesotrypsin of APPI and BPTI reciprocally mutated at two nonidentical residues that make direct contact with the enzyme. We find that Arg at P{sub 1} (versus Lys) favors both tighter binding and more rapid cleavage, whereas Met (versus Arg) at P'{sub 2} favors tighter binding but has minimal effect on cleavage. Surprisingly, we find that the APPI scaffold greatly enhances proteolytic cleavage rates, independently of the binding loop. We draw thermodynamic additivity cycles analyzing the interdependence of P1 and P'{sub 2} substitutions and scaffold differences, finding multiple instances in which the contributions of these features are nonadditive. We also report the crystal structure of the mesotrypsin {center_dot} APPI complex, in which we find that the binding loop of APPI displays evidence of increased mobility compared with BPTI. Our data suggest that the enhanced vulnerability of APPI to mesotrypsin cleavage may derive from sequence differences in the scaffold that propagate increased flexibility and mobility to the binding loop.

  17. Antioxidative and proteolytic systems protect mitochondria from oxidative damage in S-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ostaszewska-Bugajska, Monika; Rychter, Anna M; Juszczuk, Izabela M

    2015-08-15

    We examined the functioning of the antioxidative defense system in Arabidopsis thaliana under sulphur (S) deficiency with an emphasis on the role of mitochondria. In tissue extracts and in isolated mitochondria from S-deficient plants, the concentration of non-protein thiols declined but protein thiols did not change. Superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide were accumulated in leaf blades and the generation of superoxide anion by isolated mitochondria was higher. Lower abundance of reduced (GSH) plus oxidized (GSSG) glutathione in the leaf and root tissues, and leaf mitochondria from S-deficient plants was accompanied by a decrease in the level of GSH and the changes in the GSH/GSSG ratios. In the chloroplasts, the total level of glutathione decreased. Lower levels of reduced (AsA) and oxidized (DHA) ascorbate were reflected in much higher ratios of AsA/DHA. Sulphur deficiency led to an increase in the activity of cytosolic, mitochondrial and chloroplastic antioxidative enzymes, peroxidases, catalases and superoxide dismutases. The protein carbonyl level was higher in the leaves of S-deficient plants and in the chloroplasts, while in the roots, leaf and root mitochondria it remained unchanged. Protease activity in leaf extracts of S-deficient plants was higher, but in root extracts it did not differ. The proteolytic system reflected subcellular specificity. In leaf and root mitochondria the protease activity was higher, whereas in the chloroplasts it did not change. We propose that the preferential incorporation of S to protein thiols and activation of antioxidative and proteolytic systems are likely important for the survival of S-deficient plants and that the mitochondria maintain redox homeostasis. PMID:26339750

  18. Medication reviews in primary care in Sweden: importance of clinical pharmacists' recommendations on drug-related problems.

    PubMed

    Modig, Sara; Holmdahl, Lydia; Bondesson, Åsa

    2016-02-01

    Background One way of preventing and solving drug-related problems in frail elderly is to perform team-based medication reviews. Objective To evaluate the quality of the clinical pharmacy service to primary care using structured medication reviews, focusing on the clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists. Setting A random sample of 150 patients (out of 1541) who received structured team based medication reviews. The patients lived at a geriatric nursing home or were ≥65 years and lived in ordinary housing with medication-related community help. Method Based on information on symptoms, kidney function, blood pressure, diagnoses and the medication list, a pharmacist identified possible drug-related problems and supplied recommendations for the general practitioner to act on. Two independent physicians retrospectively ranked the clinical significance of the recommendations according to Hatoum, with rankings ranging between 1 (adverse significance) and 6 (extremely significant). Main outcome measure The clinical significance of the recommendations. Results In total 349 drug-related problems were identified, leading to recommendations. The vast majority of the recommendations (96 %) were judged to have significance 3 or higher and more than the half were judged to have significance 4 or higher. Conclusion The high proportion of clinically significant recommendations provided by pharmacists when performing team-based medication reviews suggest that these clinical pharmacy services have potential to increase prescribing quality. As such, the medication reviews have the potential for contributing to a better and safer drug therapy for elderly patients. PMID:26582483

  19. Anti-proteolytic capacity and bonding durability of proanthocyanidin-biomodified demineralized dentin matrix

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui-Rui; Fang, Ming; Zhang, Ling; Tang, Cheng-Fang; Dou, Qi; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that biomodification of demineralized dentin collagen with proanthocyanidin (PA) for a clinically practical duration improves the mechanical properties of the dentin matrix and the immediate resin–dentin bond strength. The present study sought to evaluate the ability of PA biomodification to reduce collagenase-induced biodegradation of demineralized dentin matrix and dentin/adhesive interfaces in a clinically relevant manner. The effects of collagenolytic and gelatinolytic activity on PA-biomodified demineralized dentin matrix were analysed by hydroxyproline assay and gelatin zymography. Then, resin-/dentin-bonded specimens were prepared and challenged with bacterial collagenases. Dentin treated with 2% chlorhexidine and untreated dentin were used as a positive and negative control, respectively. Collagen biodegradation, the microtensile bond strengths of bonded specimens and the micromorphologies of the fractured interfaces were assessed. The results revealed that both collagenolytic and gelatinolytic activity on demineralized dentin were notably inhibited in the PA-biomodified groups, irrespective of PA concentration and biomodification duration. When challenged with exogenous collagenases, PA-biomodified bonded specimens exhibited significantly less biodegradation and maintained higher bond strengths than the untreated control. These results suggest that PA biomodification was effective at inhibiting proteolytic activity on demineralized dentin matrix and at stabilizing the adhesive/dentin interface against enzymatic degradation, is a new concept that has the potential to improve bonding durability. PMID:24810807

  20. Patient specific proteolytic activity of monocyte-derived macrophages and osteoclasts predicted with temporal kinase activation states during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Keon-Young; Li, Weiwei A.; Platt, Manu O.

    2012-01-01

    Patient-to-patient variability in disease progression continues to complicate clinical decisions of treatment regimens for cardiovascular diseases, metastatic cancers and osteoporosis. Here, we investigated if monocytes, circulating white blood cells that enter tissues and contribute to disease progression by differentiating into macrophages or osteoclasts, could be useful in understanding this variability. Monocyte-derived macrophages and osteoclasts produce cysteine cathepsins, powerful extracellular matrix proteases which have been mechanistically linked to accelerated atherosclerotic, osteoporotic, and tumor progression. We hypothesized that multivariate analysis of temporal kinase activation states during monocyte differentiation could predict cathepsin proteolytic responses of monocyte-derived macrophages and osteoclasts in a patient-specific manner. Freshly isolated primary monocytes were differentiated with M-CSF or RANKL into macrophages or osteoclasts, respectively, and phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt, p38 MAPK, JNK, c-jun, and IκB-α were measured at days 1, 3, 6, and 9. In parallel, cell diameters and numbers of nuclei were measured, and multiplex cathepsin zymography was used to quantify cathepsins K, L, S, and V activity from cell extracts and conditioned media. There was extensive patient-to-patient variability in temporal kinase activation states, cell morphologies, and cathepsin K, L, S, and V proteolytic activity. Partial least squares regression models trained with temporal kinase activation states successfully predicted patient-specific morphological characteristics (mean cell diameter and number of nuclei) and patient-specific cathepsin proteolytic activity with predictability as high as 95%, even with the challenge of incorporating the complex, unknown cues from individual patients’ unique genetic and biochemical backgrounds. This personalized medicine approach considers patient variability in kinase signals to predict cathepsin activity

  1. The importance of clinical experience for mental health nursing - part 2: relationships between undergraduate nursing students' attitudes, preparedness, and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda

    2008-10-01

    Clinical experience is consistently emphasized in research findings as the primary influence in encouraging more positive attitudes to mental health nursing. The available research, however, presents two major limitations. First, it does not measure the specific factors that might contribute to a positive clinical experience. Second, it does not consider the relationship between clinical experience and attitudes towards people experiencing a mental illness or towards mental health nursing. This is the second of a two-part paper presenting findings from a statewide survey of undergraduate nursing students in Victoria. A pre-/post-test design was used to measure the impact of clinical experience on the following subscales: (i) attitudes towards people experiencing a mental illness; (ii) attitudes toward mental health nursing; and (iii) preparedness for mental health practice. Subscale (iv) satisfaction with clinical experience was also measured in the post-test phase. The findings demonstrated an improvement on all three subscales in the post-test phase and a high level of satisfaction with clinical experience. Furthermore, a relationship between all four subscales was evident. PMID:18789043

  2. Identification of clinically important ascomycetous yeasts based on nucleotide divergence in the 5' end of the large-subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtzman, C P; Robnett, C J

    1997-01-01

    Clinically important species of Candida and related organisms were compared for extent of nucleotide divergence in the 5' end of the large-subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene. This rDNA region is sufficiently variable to allow reliable separation of all known clinically significant yeast species. Of the 204 described species examined, 21 appeared to be synonyms of previously described organisms. Phylogenetic relationships among the species are presented. PMID:9114410

  3. The importance of patient-reported outcomes: a call for their comprehensive integration in cardiovascular clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Anker, Stefan D; Agewall, Stefan; Borggrefe, Martin; Calvert, Melanie; Jaime Caro, J; Cowie, Martin R; Ford, Ian; Paty, Jean A; Riley, Jillian P; Swedberg, Karl; Tavazzi, Luigi; Wiklund, Ingela; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2014-08-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs), such as symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), or patient perceived health status, are reported directly by the patient and are powerful tools to inform patients, clinicians, and policy-makers about morbidity and 'patient suffering', especially in chronic diseases. Patient-reported outcomes provide information on the patient experience and can be the target of therapeutic intervention. Patient-reported outcomes can improve the quality of patient care by creating a holistic approach to clinical decision-making; however, PROs are not routinely used as key outcome measures in major cardiovascular clinical trials. Thus, limited information is available on the impact of cardiovascular therapeutics on PROs to guide patient-level clinical decision-making or policy-level decision-making. Cardiovascular clinical research should shift its focus to include PROs when evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic interventions, and PRO assessments should be scientifically rigorous. The European Society of Cardiology and other professional societies can take action to influence the uptake of PRO data in the research and clinical communities. This process of integrating PRO data into comprehensive efficacy evaluations will ultimately improve the quality of care for patients across the spectrum of cardiovascular disease. PMID:24904027

  4. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure, update 2009: Diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis, device therapy and recent important clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Jonathan G; McKelvie, Robert S; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Costigan, Jeannine; Dorian, Paul; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Herd, Anthony M; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Kouz, Simon; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; Moe, Gordon W; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Ross, Heather J; White, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops and through active solicitation of stakeholders, several topics were identified because of their importance to the practicing clinician. Topics chosen for the present update include best practices for the diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis and device therapy, and a review of recent important or landmark clinical trials. These recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. The present update has been written from a clinical perspective to provide a user-friendly and practical approach. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What is right-sided heart failure and how should one approach the diagnostic work-up? What other clinical entities may masquerade as this nebulous condition and how can we tell them apart? When should we be concerned about the presence of myocarditis and how quickly should patients with this condition be referred to an experienced centre? Among the myriad of recently published landmark clinical trials, which ones will impact our standards of clinical care? The goals are to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada. PMID:19214293

  5. The role of flow limitation as an important diagnostic tool and clinical finding in mild sleep-disordered breathing

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nevin; Meskill, Gerard; Guilleminault, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is defined by quantifying apneas and hypopneas along with symptoms suggesting sleep disruption. Subtler forms of sleep-disordered breathing can be missed when this criteria is used. Newer technologies allow for non-invasive detection of flow limitation, however consensus classification is needed. Subjects with flow limitation demonstrate electroencephalogram changes and clinical symptoms indicating sleep fragmentation. Flow limitation may be increased in special populations and treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been shown to improve outcomes. Titrating CPAP to eliminate flow limitation may be associated with improved clinical outcomes compared to treating apneas and hypopneas. PMID:26779320

  6. Importance of multidrug efflux pumps in the antimicrobial resistance property of clinical multidrug-resistant isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Golparian, Daniel; Shafer, William M; Ohnishi, Makoto; Unemo, Magnus

    2014-06-01

    The contribution of drug efflux pumps in clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae that express extensively drug-resistant or multidrug-resistant phenotypes has heretofore not been examined. Accordingly, we assessed the effect on antimicrobial resistance of loss of the three gonococcal efflux pumps associated with a known capacity to export antimicrobials (MtrC-MtrD-MtrE, MacA-MacB, and NorM) in such clinical isolates. We report that the MIC of several antimicrobials, including seven previously and currently recommended for treatment was significantly impacted. PMID:24733458

  7. Cold Temperature Induces the Reprogramming of Proteolytic Pathways in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Isasa, Marta; Suñer, Clara; Díaz, Miguel; Puig-Sàrries, Pilar; Zuin, Alice; Bichman, Anne; Gygi, Steven P; Rebollo, Elena; Crosas, Bernat

    2016-01-22

    Despite much evidence of the involvement of the proteasome-ubiquitin signaling system in temperature stress response, the dynamics of the ubiquitylome during cold response has not yet been studied. Here, we have compared quantitative ubiquitylomes from a strain deficient in proteasome substrate recruitment and a reference strain during cold response. We have observed that a large group of proteins showing increased ubiquitylation in the proteasome mutant at low temperature is comprised by reverses suppressor of Ty-phenotype 5 (Rsp5)-regulated plasma membrane proteins. Analysis of internalization and degradation of plasma membrane proteins at low temperature showed that the proteasome becomes determinant for this process, whereas, at 30 °C, the proteasome is dispensable. Moreover, our observations indicate that proteasomes have increased capacity to interact with lysine 63-polyubiquitylated proteins during low temperature in vivo. These unanticipated observations indicate that, during cold response, there is a proteolytic cellular reprogramming in which the proteasome acquires a role in the endocytic-vacuolar pathway. PMID:26601941

  8. Addressing proteolytic efficiency in enzymatic degradation therapy for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Martial; Yang, Menglin; Lee, Linda; Zhang, Ye; Sheff, Joey G.; Sensen, Christoph W.; Mrazek, Hynek; Halada, Petr; Man, Petr; McCarville, Justin L; Verdu, Elena F.; Schriemer, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is triggered by partially digested gluten proteins. Enzyme therapies that complete protein digestion in vivo could support a gluten-free diet, but the barrier to completeness is high. Current options require enzyme amounts on the same order as the protein meal itself. In this study, we evaluated proteolytic components of the carnivorous pitcher plant (Nepenthes spp.) for use in this context. Remarkably low doses enhance gliadin solubilization rates, and degrade gliadin slurries within the pH and temporal constraints of human gastric digestion. Potencies in excess of 1200:1 (substrate-to-enzyme) are achieved. Digestion generates small peptides through nepenthesin and neprosin, the latter a novel enzyme defining a previously-unknown class of prolyl endoprotease. The digests also exhibit reduced TG2 conversion rates in the immunogenic regions of gliadin, providing a twin mechanism for evading T-cell recognition. When sensitized and dosed with enzyme-treated gliadin, NOD/DQ8 mice did not show intestinal inflammation, when compared to mice challenged with only pepsin-treated gliadin. The low enzyme load needed for effective digestion suggests that gluten detoxification can be achieved in a meal setting, using metered dosing based on meal size. We demonstrate this by showing efficient antigen processing at total substrate-to-enzyme ratios exceeding 12,000:1. PMID:27481162

  9. Analysis of the proteolytic degradation products of hyaline cartilage proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Liszt, F; Schnittker-Schulze, K; Stuhlsatz, H W; Greiling, H

    1990-01-01

    The proteolytic degradation products of nasal hyaline cartilage proteoglycans produced by polymorphonuclear leukocyte lysosomal enzymes were investigated. The protein content of the degradation products is 7.0-8.6% corresponding to a peptide chain of 24-28 amino acids and the relative molecular mass of the total fragment is M(r) = 37,600-39,200. On an average, each proteoglycan fragment contains two chondroitin-sulphate chains (M(r) = 22,000-22,400), every fourth fragment contains a keratan sulphate chain (M(r) = 7000-7200) and every seventh to eighth contains an O-glycosidic oligosaccharide. The results of the disaccharide analysis show that the galactosaminoglycan chains contain 76.2-83.6% chondroitin-4-sulphate, 12.9-19.4% chondroitin-6-sulphate, 3.5-3.8% chondroitin and no dermatan sulphate. Since composition and relative molecular mass of the chondroitin sulphate and keratan sulphate chains from the degradation products resemble those from native proteoglycans, it is suggested that the degradation of the proteoglycans occurs by proteinases that attack preferably the chondroitin sulphate region of the core protein. PMID:1726643

  10. Addressing proteolytic efficiency in enzymatic degradation therapy for celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Rey, Martial; Yang, Menglin; Lee, Linda; Zhang, Ye; Sheff, Joey G; Sensen, Christoph W; Mrazek, Hynek; Halada, Petr; Man, Petr; McCarville, Justin L; Verdu, Elena F; Schriemer, David C

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is triggered by partially digested gluten proteins. Enzyme therapies that complete protein digestion in vivo could support a gluten-free diet, but the barrier to completeness is high. Current options require enzyme amounts on the same order as the protein meal itself. In this study, we evaluated proteolytic components of the carnivorous pitcher plant (Nepenthes spp.) for use in this context. Remarkably low doses enhance gliadin solubilization rates, and degrade gliadin slurries within the pH and temporal constraints of human gastric digestion. Potencies in excess of 1200:1 (substrate-to-enzyme) are achieved. Digestion generates small peptides through nepenthesin and neprosin, the latter a novel enzyme defining a previously-unknown class of prolyl endoprotease. The digests also exhibit reduced TG2 conversion rates in the immunogenic regions of gliadin, providing a twin mechanism for evading T-cell recognition. When sensitized and dosed with enzyme-treated gliadin, NOD/DQ8 mice did not show intestinal inflammation, when compared to mice challenged with only pepsin-treated gliadin. The low enzyme load needed for effective digestion suggests that gluten detoxification can be achieved in a meal setting, using metered dosing based on meal size. We demonstrate this by showing efficient antigen processing at total substrate-to-enzyme ratios exceeding 12,000:1. PMID:27481162

  11. High Proteolytic Resistance of Spider-Derived Inhibitor Cystine Knots

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kyoko; Sugiura, Mika; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Proteolytic stability in gastrointestinal tract and blood plasma is the major obstacle for oral peptide drug development. Inhibitor cystine knots (ICKs) are linear cystine knot peptides which have multifunctional properties and could become promising drug scaffolds. ProTx-I, ProTx-II, GTx1-15, and GsMTx-4 were spider-derived ICKs and incubated with pepsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase in physiological conditions to find that all tested peptides were resistant to pepsin, and ProTx-II, GsMTx-4, and GTx1-15 showed resistance to all tested proteases. Also, no ProTx-II degradation was observed in rat blood plasma for 24 hours in vitro and ProTx-II concentration in circulation decreased to half in 40 min, indicating absolute stability in plasma and fast clearance from the system. So far, linear peptides are generally thought to be unsuitable in vivo, but all tested ICKs were not degraded by pepsin and stomach could be selected for the alternative site of drug absorption for fast onset of the drug action. Since spider ICKs are selective inhibitors of various ion channels which are related to the pathology of many diseases, engineered ICKs will make a novel class of peptide medicines which can treat variety of bothering symptoms. PMID:26843868

  12. Parental Functioning in Families of Children with ADHD: Evidence for Behavioral Parent Training and Importance of Clinically Meaningful Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdes, Alyson C.; Haack, Lauren M.; Schneider, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective/Method: Statistically significant and clinically meaningful effects of behavioral parent training on parental functioning were examined for 20 children with ADHD and their parents who had successfully completed a psychosocial treatment for ADHD. Results/Conclusion: Findings suggest that behavioral parent training resulted in…

  13. Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A, B, and F Proteolytic Activity in Complex Matrices with Picomolar to Femtomolar Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, F. Mark; Ruge, Daniel R.; Piazza, Timothy M.; Stanker, Larry H.; Zeytin, Füsûn N.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid, high-throughput assays that detect and quantify botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) activity in diverse matrices are required for environmental, clinical, pharmaceutical, and food testing. The current standard, the mouse bioassay, is sensitive but is low in throughput and precision. In this study, we present three biochemical assays for the detection and quantification of BoNT serotype A, B, and F proteolytic activities in complex matrices that offer picomolar to femtomolar sensitivity with small assay volumes and total assay times of less than 24 h. These assays consist of magnetic beads conjugated with BoNT serotype-specific antibodies that are used to purify BoNT from complex matrices before the quantification of bound BoNT proteolytic activity using the previously described BoTest reporter substrates. The matrices tested include human serum, whole milk, carrot juice, and baby food, as well as buffers containing common pharmaceutical excipients. The limits of detection were below 1 pM for BoNT/A and BoNT/F and below 10 pM for BoNT/B in most tested matrices using 200-μl samples and as low as 10 fM for BoNT/A with an increased sample volume. Together, these data describe rapid, robust, and high-throughput assays for BoNT detection that are compatible with a wide range of matrices. PMID:22923410

  14. [Correlation between clinical parameters and quantitative analysis of inflammatory infiltrate. Importance in the diagnosis of active periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Mendieta Fiter, C

    1989-05-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the destruction in chronic periodontal disease occurs in relatively short periods of time which are followed of prolonged periods of inactivity. These bursts of activity are characterized by an increase in the inflammatory reaction. It has been the purpose of this paper to study the correlation between the clinical measurements of periodontal disease and the histomorphometric quantification of areas of dense inflammatory infiltrate. The results of this study show that the clinical parameters that measure gingival inflammation or loss of periodontal attachment are useful to distinguish pathology from normal (p less than 0.003), but lack sensitivity to detect burst of periodontal disease activity (p greater than 0.05). PMID:2489938

  15. [How to convince the head of department and managing director of the importance of specialised headache clinics].

    PubMed

    Riesco, N; Garcia-Cabo, C; Martinez-Ramos, J; Pascual, J

    2015-01-01

    In spite that headache is, by far, the most frequent reason for neurological consultation and that the diagnosis and treatment of some patients with headache is difficult, the number of headache clinics is scarce in our country. In this paper the main arguments which should allow us, as neurologists, to defend the necessity of implementing headache clinics are reviewed. To get this aim we should first overcome our internal reluctances, which still make headache as scarcely appreciated within our specialty. The facts that more than a quarter of consultations to our Neurology Services are due to headache, that there are more than 200 different headaches, some of them actually invalidating, and the new therapeutic options for chronic patients, such as OnabotulinumtoxinA or neuromodulation techniques, oblige us to introduce specialised headache attendance in our current neurological offer. Even though there are no definite data, available results indicate that headache clinics are efficient in patients with chronic headaches, not only in terms of health benefit but also from an economical point of view. PMID:26337642

  16. A Meta-analysis of Factors Impacting Detection of Antidepressant Efficacy in Clinical Trials: The Importance of Academic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Boadie W; Thase, Michael E; Wun, Chuan-Chuan; Fayyad, Rana; Guico-Pabia, Christine J; Musgnung, Jeff; Ninan, Philip T

    2012-01-01

    Variability in placebo response greatly complicates the design, conduct, and interpretation of clinical trials of antidepressant medications. To identify factors that impact detection of antidepressant–placebo differences, we conducted a meta-analysis of all relevant phase II–IV clinical trials for major depressive disorder conducted by the manufacturer of venlafaxine and desvenlafaxine completed by March 2011. We examined 15 factors potentially relevant to trial outcomes, using the standardized mean difference on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D17) score as the primary outcome. Thirty trials comprising 8933 patients were included. In univariate analyses, antidepressant efficacy (ie, drug vs placebo difference) was predicted most strongly (β=3.74, p=0.0002) by the proportion of patients in the trial enrolled from academic sites. Other factors predicting larger drug–placebo differences included lower participant completion rate, fewer post-baseline study visits, earlier year of study, and study drug (venlafaxine>desvenlafaxine). In multivariate meta-regression modeling, only the proportion of patients from academic sites maintained statistical significance as a predictor of drug–placebo separation for both HAM-D17 continuous score change (β=2.24, p=0.034) and response rate (β=2.26, p=0.035). Including a higher proportion of academic sites may increase the ability to detect differences between active drug and placebo in clinical trials of major depressive disorder. PMID:22910458

  17. Structural analysis and proteolytic activation of Enterococcus faecalis cytolysin, a novel lantibiotic.

    PubMed

    Booth, M C; Bogie, C P; Sahl, H G; Siezen, R J; Hatter, K L; Gilmore, M S

    1996-09-01

    Clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis more commonly produce a cytolysin than do commensal isolates. Epidemiologic evidence and animal-model studies have established a role for the cytolysin in the pathogenesis of enterococcal disease. The cytolysin consists of two structural subunits, CylLL and CylLS, that are activated by a third component, CylA. Genetic and biochemical characterization of CylA indicate that it is a serine protease, and that activation putatively results from cleavage of one or both cytolysin subunits. Genetic evidence also suggests that the cytolysin subunits are related to the rapidly growing class of bacteriocins termed lantibiotics. However, unlike lantibiotics, the cytolysin is lytic for eukaryotic as well as prokaryotic cells, and it consists of two structural subunits. This report describes the purification and characterization of the cytolysin subunits and detection of lanthionine-type post-translational modifications within their structures. Furthermore, the cleavage specificity of the CylA activator is reported and it is shown that proteolytic activation of both subunits is essential for activity. PMID:8898386

  18. Patient and healthcare perspectives on the importance and efficacy of addressing spiritual issues within an interdisciplinary bone marrow transplant clinic: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Shane; McConnell, Shelagh; Raffin Bouchal, Shelley; Ager, Naree; Booker, Reanne; Enns, Bert; Fung, Tak

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to use a qualitative approach to better understand the importance and efficacy of addressing spiritual issues within an interdisciplinary bone marrow transplant clinic from the perspectives of patients and healthcare providers. Setting Participants were recruited from the bone marrow transplant clinic of a large urban outpatient cancer care centre in western Canada. Participants: Focus groups were conducted with patients (n=7) and healthcare providers (n=9) to explore the importance of addressing spiritual issues across the treatment trajectory and to identify factors associated with effectively addressing these needs. Results Data were analysed using the qualitative approach of latent content analysis. Addressing spiritual issues was understood by patients and healthcare providers, as a core, yet under addressed, component of comprehensive care. Both sets of participants felt that addressing basic spiritual issues was the responsibility of all members of the interdisciplinary team, while recognising the need for specialised and embedded support from a spiritual care professional. While healthcare providers felt that the impact of the illness and treatment had a negative effect on patients’ spiritual well-being, patients felt the opposite. Skills, challenges, key time points and clinical indicators associated with addressing spiritual issues were identified. Conclusions Despite a number of conceptual and clinical challenges associated with addressing spiritual issues patients and their healthcare providers emphasised the importance of an integrated approach whereby basic spiritual issues are addressed by members of the interdisciplinary team and by an embedded spiritual care professional, who in addition also provides specialised support. The identification of clinical issues associated with addressing spiritual needs provides healthcare providers with clinical guidance on how to better integrate this aspect of care into

  19. Which aspects of non-clinical quality of care are most important? Results from WHO's general population surveys of "health systems responsiveness" in 41 countries.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Nicole; Darby, Charles; Bonsel, Gouke J

    2008-05-01

    Quality of care research has reached some agreement on concepts like structure, process and outcome, and non-clinical versus clinical processes of care. These concepts are commonly explored through surveys measuring patient experiences, yet few surveys have focused on patient, or "user", priorities across different quality dimensions. Population surveys on priorities can contribute to, although not replace participation in, policy decision making. Using 105,806 survey interview records from the World Health Organization's (WHO's) general population surveys in 41 countries, this paper describes the relative importance of eight domains in the non-clinical quality of care concept WHO calls "health systems responsiveness". Responsiveness domains are divided into interpersonal domains (dignity, autonomy, communication and confidentiality) and structural domains (quality of basic amenities, choice, access to social support networks and prompt attention). This paper explores variations in domain importance by country-level variables (country of residence, human development, health system expenditure, and "geographic zones") and by subpopulations defined by sex, age, education, health status, and utilization. Most respondents selected prompt attention as the most important domain. Dignity was selected second, followed by communication. Access to social support networks was identified as the least important domain. In general, convergence in rankings was stronger across subpopulations within countries than across countries. Yet even across diverse countries, there was more convergence than divergence in views. These results provide a ranking of quality of care criteria for consideration during health reform processes further to the usual emphasis on clinical quality and supply-side efficiency. PMID:18313822

  20. Proteolytic Processing Causes Extensive Heterogeneity of Tissue Matrilin Forms*

    PubMed Central

    Ehlen, Harald W. A.; Sengle, Gerhard; Klatt, Andreas R.; Talke, Anja; Müller, Stefan; Paulsson, Mats; Wagener, Raimund

    2009-01-01

    The matrilins are a family of multidomain extracellular matrix proteins with adapter functions. The oligomeric proteins have a bouquet-like structure and bind to a variety of different ligands whereby the avidity of their interactions is dependent on the number of subunits and domains present. Here we show the contribution of post-translational proteolytic processing to the heterogeneity of matrilins seen in tissue extracts and cell culture supernatants. A cleavage site after two glutamate residues in the hinge region close to the C-terminal coiled-coil oligomerization domain is conserved among the matrilins. Cleavage at this site yields molecules that lack almost complete subunits. The processing is least pronounced in matrilin-1 and particularly complex in matrilin-2, which contains additional cleavage sites. Replacement of the hinge region in matrilin-4 by the matrilin-1 hinge region had no marked effect on the processing. A detailed study revealed that matrilin-4 is processed already in the secretory pathway and that the activation of the responsible enzymes is dependent on proprotein convertase activity. Matrilin-3 and -4, but not matrilin-1 subunits present in matrilin-1/-3 hetero-oligomers, were identified as substrates for ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5, whereas ADAMTS1 did not cleave any matrilin. A neo-epitope antibody raised against the N terminus of the C-terminal cleavage product of matrilin-4 detected processed matrilin-4 in cultures of primary chondrocytes as well as on cartilage sections showing that the conserved cleavage site is used in vivo. PMID:19531486

  1. Determination of lipolytic and proteolytic activities of mycoflora isolated from dry-cured teruel ham.

    PubMed

    Alapont, C; Martínez-Culebras, P V; López-Mendoza, M C

    2015-08-01

    Fungi play a key role in dry-cured ham production because of their lipolytic and proteolytic activities. In the present study, 74 fungal strains from dry-cured Teruel hams and air chambers were tested for proteolytic and lipolytic activities, with a view to their possible use as starter cultures. Lipolytic activity of fungi was studied against lauric, palmitic, stearic and oleic acids, whereas proteolytic activity was studied against casein and myosin. Of the 74 fungal strains tested, most of them demonstrated lipolytic activity (94.59 %). Lipolytic activity against lauric and oleic acids was stronger than against palmitic and stearic acids. 39 strains (52.70 %) demonstrated proteolytic activity against casein and the 6 highest proteolytic strains were also tested for pork myosin proteolysis. Some strains belonging to Penicillium commune, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium nalgiovense and Cladosporium cladosporioides were selected because of their significant proteolytic and lipolytic activities and could be suitable to use as starters in dry-cured ham. PMID:26243949

  2. Cysteine protease gene expression and proteolytic activity during senescence of Alstroemeria petals.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Carol; Leverentz, Michael K; Griffiths, Gareth; Thomas, Brian; Chanasut, Usawadee; Stead, Anthony D; Rogers, Hilary J

    2002-02-01

    The functional life of the flower is terminated by senescence and/or abscission. Multiple processes contribute to produce the visible signs of petal wilting and inrolling that typify senescence, but one of the most important is that of protein degradation and remobilization. This is mediated in many species through protein ubiquitination and the action of specific protease enzymes. This paper reports the changes in protein and protease activity during development and senescence of Alstroemeria flowers, a Liliaceous species that shows very little sensitivity to ethylene during senescence and which shows perianth abscission 8-10 d after flower opening. Partial cDNAs of ubiquitin (ALSUQ1) and a putative cysteine protease (ALSCYP1) were cloned from Alstroemeria using degenerate PCR primers and the expression pattern of these genes was determined semi-quantitatively by RT-PCR. While the levels of ALSUQ1 only fluctuated slightly during floral development and senescence, there was a dramatic increase in the expression of ALSCYP1 indicating that this gene may encode an important enzyme for the proteolytic process in this species. Three papain class cysteine protease enzymes showing different patterns of activity during flower development were identified on zymograms, one of which showed a similar expression pattern to the cysteine protease cDNA. PMID:11807127

  3. Small-molecule-mediated rescue of protein function by an inducible proteolytic shunt

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Matthew R.; Schwartz, Edmund C.; Muir, Tom W.

    2007-01-01

    Controlling protein function through posttranslational manipulations has emerged as an attractive complementary technology to existing genetic systems. Often these methods involve developing pharmacological agents to probe protein function without the need to generate a unique compound for each protein family. One common strategy uses small molecules that act as chemical inducers of dimerization by mediating the interaction of two proteins. Herein we report the use of a chemical inducer of dimerization for the development of a posttranslational technology for the manipulation of protein function. This system, split ubiquitin for the rescue of function (SURF), places the complementation of genetically split ubiquitin under the control of rapamycin-induced dimerization of FK506-binding protein and FKBP12-rapamycin-binding protein. Before complementation a “degron” dooms a protein of interest for destruction by the proteasome. Addition of rapamycin results in a proteolytic shunt away from degradation by inducing ubiquitin complementation and cleavage of the protein of interest from the degron. Importantly, the native protein is rescued. We characterized this system with firefly luciferase and went on to apply it to members of three important classes of proteins: proteases (caspase-3), kinases (v-Src), and transcription factors (Smad3). This general strategy should allow for inducible rescue of a variety of proteins in such a way that their native structure and function are maintained. PMID:17563385

  4. Lung squamous cell carcinoma mRNA expression subtypes are reproducible, clinically important and correspond to different normal cell types

    PubMed Central

    Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Yin, Xiaoying; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Liu, Yufeng; Hayward, Michele C.; Cabanski, Christopher R.; Muldrew, Kenneth; Miller, C. Ryan; Randell, Scott H.; Socinski, Mark A.; Parsons, Alden M.; Funkhouser, William K.; Lee, Carrie B.; Roberts, Patrick J.; Thorne, Leigh; Bernard, Philip S.; Perou, Charles M.; Hayes, D. Neil

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and current diagnostic practices do not adequately substratify this heterogeneity. A robust, biologically-based SCC subclassification may describe this variability and lead to more precise patient prognosis and management. We sought to determine if SCC mRNA expression subtypes exist, are reproducible across multiple patient cohorts, and are clinically relevant. Experimental Design Subtypes were detected by unsupervised consensus clustering in five published discovery cohorts of mRNA microarrays, totaling 382 SCC patients. An independent validation cohort of 56 SCC patients was collected and assayed by microarrays. A nearest-centroid subtype predictor was built using discovery cohorts. Validation cohort subtypes were predicted and evaluated for confirmation. Subtype survival outcome, clinical covariates, and biological processes were compared by statistical and bioinformatic methods. Results Four lung SCC mRNA expression subtypes, named primitive, classical, secretory, and basal, were detected and independently validated (P < 0.001). The primitive subtype had the worst survival outcome (P < 0.05) and is an independent predictor of survival (P < 0.05). Tumor differentiation and patient sex were associated with subtype. The subtypes’ expression profiles contained distinct biological processes (primitive – proliferation, classical – xeniobiotics metabolism, secretory – immune response, basal – cell adhesion) and suggested distinct pharmacologic interventions. Comparison to lung model systems revealed distinct subtype to cell type correspondence. Conclusions Lung SCC consists of four mRNA expression subtypes that have different survival outcomes, patient populations, and biological processes. The subtypes stratify patients for more precise prognosis and targeted research. PMID:20643781

  5. A debate on the subject "Are SIRS and MODS important entities in the clinical evaluation of patients?" The con position.

    PubMed

    Baue, A E

    2000-12-01

    SIRS, MODS, and MOF are not diseases or even syndromes. They are simply clinical descriptors of people that are sick. They are symptoms and signs of various stages of illness progressing to death in the modern organ supporting ICU. They are catchy, popular acronyms but they cannot be treated specifically, and then only by support of organ functions. To help our patients and improve morbidity and mortality we must focus on specific diseases. Although ventilator associated pneumonia and pancreatitis may both produce an inflammatory response, cytokine-mediator activation and SIRS, they must each be treated in a different way. I believe that SIRS has led us astray. PMID:11131906

  6. Six-month freedom from treatment failure is an important end point for acute GVHD clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sengsayadeth, S; Savani, B N; Jagasia, M; Goodman, S; Greer, J P; Chen, H; Chinratanalab, W; Kassim, A A; Engelhardt, B G

    2014-02-01

    We studied the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) 6-month (m) freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) as a predictor of survival for patients with acute GVHD (aGVHD) requiring treatment. Adult patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) from February 2007 to March 2009 who were enrolled in a prospective biomarker clinical trial and developed aGVHD requiring systemic corticosteroids by day +100 were included (N=44). Six-month FFTF was defined as per the ASBMT guidelines (absence of death, malignancy relapse/progression or systemic immunosuppression change within 6 months of starting steroids and before chronic GVHD development). aGVHD was treated with systemic corticosteroids in 44 patients. Day 28 response after steroid initiation (complete response+very good partial response+partial response) occurred in 38 (87%) patients, but only 28 (64%) HCT recipients met the 6-m FFTF end point. Day 28 response predicted 6-m FFTF. Achieving 6-m FFTF was associated with improved 2-year (y) OS (81% vs 48%; P=0.03) and decreased 2-y non-relapse mortality (8% vs 49%; P=0.01). In multivariate analysis, 6-m FFTF continued to predict improved OS (hazard ratio, 0.27; P=0.03). The 6-m FFTF end point measures fixed outcomes, predicts long-term therapeutic success and could be less prone to measurement error than aGVHD clinical response at day 28. PMID:24096824

  7. Six Month Freedom from Treatment Failure is an Important Endpoint for Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Sengsayadeth, Salyka; Savani, Bipin N.; Jagasia, Madan; Goodman, Stacey; Greer, John P.; Chen, Heidi; Chinratanalab, Wichai; Kassim, Adetola A.; Engelhardt, Brian G.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the ASBMT 6 month (m) freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) as a predictor of survival for patients with acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) requiring treatment. Adult patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) from February 2007 to March 2009 who were enrolled in a prospective biomarker clinical trial and developed aGVHD requiring systemic corticosteroids by day +100 were included (N=44). Six month FFTF was defined per ASBMT guidelines [absence of death, malignancy relapse/progression, or systemic immunosuppression change within 6 months of starting steroids and before chronic GVHD development]. aGVHD was treated with systemic corticosteroids in 44 patients. Day 28 response after steroid initiation (CR+VGPR+PR) occurred in 38 (87%) patients, but only 28 (64%) HCT recipients met the 6 m FFTF endpoint. Day 28 response predicted 6 m FFTF. Achieving 6 m FFTF was associated with improved 2 year (y) overall survival (OS) [81% vs. 48%, P= 0.03)] and decreased 2 y non-relapse mortality [8% vs. 49% (P= 0.01)]. In multivariate analysis, 6 m FFTF continued to predict improved OS (HR, 0.27; P=0.03). The 6 m FFTF endpoint measures fixed outcomes, predicts long-term therapeutic success, and could be less prone to measurement error than aGVHD clinical response at day 28. PMID:24096824

  8. Medical physics in radiotherapy: The importance of preserving clinical responsibilities and expanding the profession's role in research, education, and quality control

    PubMed Central

    Malicki, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Medical physicists have long had an integral role in radiotherapy. In recent decades, medical physicists have slowly but surely stepped back from direct clinical responsibilities in planning radiotherapy treatments while medical dosimetrists have assumed more responsibility. In this article, I argue against this gradual withdrawal from routine therapy planning. It is essential that physicists be involved, at least to some extent, in treatment planning and clinical dosimetry for each and every patient; otherwise, physicists can no longer be considered clinical specialists. More importantly, this withdrawal could negatively impact treatment quality and patient safety. Medical physicists must have a sound understanding of human anatomy and physiology in order to be competent partners to radiation oncologists. In addition, they must possess a thorough knowledge of the physics of radiation as it interacts with body tissues, and also understand the limitations of the algorithms used in radiotherapy. Medical physicists should also take the lead in evaluating emerging challenges in quality and safety of radiotherapy. In this sense, the input of physicists in clinical audits and risk assessment is crucial. The way forward is to proactively take the necessary steps to maintain and advance our important role in clinical medicine. PMID:25949219

  9. [Importance of Post-Marketing Studies in Gathering of Clinical Evidences for Proper Usage of Anti-Cancer Drugs, and the StudyRequirements for Their Credibility].

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Pharmaceutical companies recognize the importance of post-marketing studies because they are crucial in the generation of clinical evidences for the usage of new medicines. To generate clinical evidences, quality of post-marketing studies should be well controlled from view point of "ethical conduction" and "reliability of results". In addition, control of conflict of interest (COI) between researchers and industries is also indispensable and is requested for the transparency of the studies. Japan Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association(JPMA)stresses its commitment to the progressof transparency in post-marketing studies. PMID:27220799

  10. Phosphorylation regulates proteolytic efficiency of TEV protease detected by a 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein-pyrene based fluorescent sensor.

    PubMed

    He, Yao-Hui; Li, Yan-Mei; Chen, Yong-Xiang

    2016-04-01

    TEV protease is of great importance for in vitro and in vivo site-specific cleavage of proteins. The proteolytic efficiency of TEV protease is often regulated by mutation of the substrate, which is irreversible and hard to be modulated. Herein, a facile and reversible method, based on phosphorylation in the substrate, is developed to regulate the cleavage capability of TEV protease. Phosphorylation at P3 tyrosine hinders the recognition of TEV protease to the substrate by using a robust fluorescent protease sensor. Moreover, the phosphate group can be easily removed by alkaline phosphatases for recovering the proteolytic efficiency of TEV protease. Additionally, 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein and pyrene have been used as high-efficiency mutual fluorophore-quencher pair in the peptide-based protease sensor for the first time, which provides a chance to simultaneously monitor the cleavage process in two respective fluorescence channels. Further studies indicated both dynamic and static components contributing to the mutual quenching system. The phosphorylation-regulated TEV protease proteolysis system can be used in conditional cleavage of protein or peptide tag. PMID:26838417

  11. Multilocus phylogeny reveals an association of agriculturally important Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) 11, and clinically important FSSC 5 and FSSC 3 + 4 with soybean roots in the north central United States.

    PubMed

    Chitrampalam, P; Nelson, B

    2016-02-01

    The Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) includes important root pathogens of soybean in the United States, but the evolutionary lineages associated with soybean root rot are unknown. A multilocus phylogeny based on 93 isolates from soybean and pea roots from North Dakota and Minnesota revealed that root rot was associated with three known phylogenetic species, FSSC 3 + 4 (=Fusarium falciforme) (3 % of isolates), FSSC 5 (60 %), FSSC 11 (34 %), and one unknown species, FSSC X (2 %). Of these species FSSC 5 and FSSC 3 + 4 are clinically important while FSSC 11 is a plant pathogen. Isolates from FSSC 11 were pathogenic on soybean, dry bean, pea and lentil, and did not grow at 37 °C. However, isolates from FSSC 5 were weakly to non-pathogenic, but grew at 37 °C. Isolates from both FSSC 5 and FSSC 11 were highly resistant to fludioxonil in vitro. This is the first study revealing the pathogenic robustness of FSSC 11 in causing root rot among Fabaceae crops and also the association of clinically important members of the FSSC with roots of a widely grown field crop in the United States. PMID:26671414

  12. A smallest 6 kda metalloprotease, mini-matrilysin, in living world: a revolutionary conserved zinc-dependent proteolytic domain- helix-loop-helix catalytic zinc binding domain (ZBD)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Aim of this study is to study the minimum zinc dependent metalloprotease catalytic folding motif, helix B Met loop-helix C, with proteolytic catalytic activities in metzincin super family. The metzincin super family share a catalytic domain consisting of a twisted five-stranded β sheet and three long α helices (A, B and C). The catalytic zinc is at the bottom of the cleft and is ligated by three His residues in the consensus sequence motif, HEXXHXXGXXH, which is located in helix B and part of the adjacent Met turn region. An interesting question is - what is the minimum portion of the enzyme that still possesses catalytic and inhibitor recognition?” Methods We have expressed a 60-residue truncated form of matrilysin which retains only the helix B-Met turn-helix C region and deletes helix A and the five-stranded β sheet which form the upper portion of the active cleft. This is only 1/4 of the full catalytic domain. The E. coli derived 6 kDa MMP-7 ZBD fragments were purified and refolded. The proteolytic activities were analyzed by Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay and CM-transferrin zymography analysis. SC44463, BB94 and Phosphoramidon were computationally docked into the 3day structure of the human MMP7 ZBD and TAD and thermolysin using the docking program GOLD. Results This minimal 6 kDa matrilysin has been refolded and shown to have proteolytic activity in the Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay. Triton X-100 and heparin are important factors in the refolding environment for this mini-enzyme matrilysin. This minienzyme has the proteolytic activity towards peptide substrate, but the hexamer and octamer of the mini MMP-7 complex demonstrates the CM-transferrin proteolytic activities in zymographic analysis. Peptide digestion is inhibited by SC44463, specific MMP7 inhibitors, but not phosphorimadon. Interestingly, the mini MMP-7 can be processed by autolysis and producing ~ 6 ~ 7 kDa fragments. Thus

  13. The importance of the one carbon cycle nutritional support in human male fertility: a preliminary clinical report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sperm chromatin structure is often impaired; mainly due to oxidative damage. Antioxidant treatments do not consistently produce fertility improvements and, when given at high doses, they might block essential oxidative processes such as chromatin compaction. This study was intended to assess the effect on male sub-fertility of a pure one carbon cycle nutritional support without strong antioxidants. Methods Male partners of couples resistant to at least 2 assisted reproductive technology (ART) attempts, with no evidence of organic causes of infertility and with either DNA fragmentation index (DFI) measured by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) or nuclear decondensation index (SDI) measured by aniline blue staining exceeding 20%, were invited to take part in a trial of a nutritional support in preparation for a further ART attempt. The treatment consisted of a combination of B vitamins, zinc, a proprietary opuntia fig extract and small amounts of N-acetyl-cysteine and Vitamin E (Condensyl™), all effectors of the one carbon cycle. Results 84 patients were enrolled, they took 1 or 2 Condensyl™ tablets per day for 2 to 12 months. Positive response rates were 64.3% for SDI, 71.4% for DFI and 47.6% for both SDI and DFI. Eighteen couples (21%) experienced a spontaneous pregnancy before the planned ART cycle, all ended with a live birth. The remaining 66 couples underwent a new ART attempt (4 IUI; 18 IVF; 44 ICSI) resulting in 22 further clinical pregnancies and 15 live births. The clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) and the live birth rate (LBR) were 47.6% and 39.3% respectively. The full responders, i.e. the 40 patients achieving an improvement of both SDI and DFI, reported a CPR of 70% and a LBR of 57.5% (p < 0.001). Conclusions Nutritional support of the one carbon cycle without strong antioxidants improves both the SDI and the DFI in ART resistant male partners and results in high pregnancy rates suggesting a positive

  14. Risk assessment of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum in canned foie gras.

    PubMed

    Membré, Jeanne-Marie; Diao, Moctar; Thorin, Chantal; Cordier, Grégoire; Zuber, François; André, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a risk assessment of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum in canned foie gras was performed, the number of illnesses per year in France due to C. botulinum in foie gras was estimated. Data on initial level in raw materials were collected at manufacturers and analysed using a Negative Binomial distribution. The effect of the usual foie gras heat treatment (equivalent time at 121 °C: F0=0.5 min) was considered at two levels: first, it led to an inactivation (estimated to 2.3 log); second it led to a spore injury and then to a spore inhibition. This latter effect was assessed by analysing data from a challenge test study carried out with Clostridium sporogenes spores in the foie gras product. The probability of spore recovering after thermal inhibition was estimated to 9.5×10(-8) (corresponding to 7.0 log). The data on the consumption pattern were collected on the French market. The Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA) model and all the assumptions are reported in detail in the study. The initial contamination of raw materials, effect of thermal treatment on microbial inactivation and spore inhibition were handled mathematically using a probabilistic framework, considering only the variability dimension. The model was implemented in Excel and run through Monte Carlo simulation, using @Risk software. In parallel, epidemiological data collected from the French Institute for Public Health Surveillance during the period 2001-2012 were used to estimate an Appropriate Level Of Protection (ALOP) and then a Food Safety Objective (FSO): ALOP equalled to 2.5×10(-3) illnesses per million inhabitant per year, FSO equalled to 1.4×10(-9) foie gras portions containing C. botulinum spore (expressed in decimal logarithm, FSO=-8.9). The QMRA model output values were smaller, but on the same order of magnitude as these two figures: 8.0×10(-4) illnesses per million inhabitants per year, and, 4.5×10(-10) (-9.3 log) foie gras portions containing C

  15. Identification of Clinically Important Chromosomal Aberrations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia by Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Ravandi, Farhad; Sargent, Rachel L.; Barkoh, Bedia A; Abraham, Ronald; Mishra, Bal Mukund; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Patel, Keyur P.

    2014-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) chromosomal analysis facilitates rapid detection of cytogenetic abnormalities previously undetectable by conventional cytogenetics. In this study, we analyze 48 uniformly treated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients by 44K aCGH and correlated the findings with clinical outcome. aCGH identified previously undetected aberrations, as small as 5 kb, of currently unknown significance. The 36.7 Mb minimally deleted region on chromosome 5 lies between 5q14.3 to 5q33.3 contains 634 genes and 15 microRNAs whereas loss of chromosome 17 spans 3,194 kb involves 342 genes and 12 microRNAs. Loss of 155 kilobase (kb) region on 5q33.3 (p<0.05) is associated with achievement of complete remission. In contrast, loss of 17p11.2-q11.1 was associated with lower CR rate and poorer overall survival (Kaplan-Meier analysis, p<0.0096). aCGH detected loss of 17p in 12/48 patients as compared to 9/48 by conventional karyotyping. In conclusion, aCGH analysis adds to the prognostic stratification of AML patients. PMID:24446873

  16. Clinical importance of hyperemic coronary blood flow (thrombolysis in myocardial infarction-intravenous flow) after primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Karakoyun, Süleyman; Tanboga, Ibrahim Halil; Kurt, Mustafa; Aksakal, Enbiya; Kaya, Ahmet; Isik, Turgay; Ekinci, Mehmet; Sevimli, Serdar; Acikel, Mahmut

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to investigate clinical, demographic and angiographic factors associated with hyperemic coronary blood flow (HCBF) and the relation of HCBF with mortality at 30 days. Our study included 809 consecutive patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We divided corrected thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count (TFC) values into three tertiles: less than 14, 14-28 and more than 28. Corrected TFC less than 14 was defined as HCBF or TIMI intravenous flow. The primary end-point of the present study was all-cause mortality within 30 days. Among the HCBF group (n = 58), the patients with poor myocardial perfusion demonstrated the highest mortality rate within the 30-day follow-up period (33%). Low TIMI myocardial perfusion grade, history of no smoking, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and high Killip status and low LVEF were found to be independently associated with 1-month all-cause mortality. The present study showed that HCBF after primary PCI has a high 30-day mortality when associated with impaired reperfusion. PMID:24842315

  17. The classical versus the Cabrera presentation system for resting electrocardiography: Impact on recognition and understanding of clinically important electrocardiographic changes.

    PubMed

    Lam, Anny; Wagner, Galen S; Pahlm, Olle

    2015-01-01

    The classical system for presentation of the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) reflects the electrical activity of the heart as viewed in the transverse plane by 6 leads with a single anatomically ordered sequence, V1-V6; but in the frontal plane by 6 leads with dual sequences, I, II, and III, and aVR, aVL, and aVF. However, there is also a single anatomically ordered sequence of leads, called the Cabrera display that presents the six frontal plane leads in their anatomically ordered sequence of: aVL, I, -aVR, II, aVF, and III. Although it has been recognized that the Cabrera system has clinical diagnostic advantages compared to the classical display, it is currently only used in Sweden. The primary explanation of why the Cabrera system has not been adopted internationally has been that analog ECG recorders had technical limitations. Currently, however, the classical system is most often seen as a historical remnant that prevails because of conservatism within the cardiology community. PMID:26051487

  18. Membrane-associated proteolytic activity in Escherichia coli that is stimulated by ATP

    SciTech Connect

    Klemes, Y.; Voellmy, R.W.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1986-05-01

    The degradation of proteins in bacteria requires metabolism energy. One important enzyme in this process is protease La, a soluble ATP-dependent protease encoded by the lon gene. However, lon mutants that lack a functional protease La still show some ATP-dependent protein breakdown. The authors have reported an ATP-stimulated endoproteolytic activity associated with the inner membrane of E. coli. This ATP-stimulated activity is found in normal levels in membranes derived from lon mutants, including strains carrying insertions in the lon gene. The membrane-bound activity hydrolyzes /sup 14/C-methylglobin at a linear rate for up to 3 hours. These fractions also contain appreciable proteolytic activity that is not affected by ATP. The stimulation by ATP requires the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/. Nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs (e.g. AMPPNP or ATP-..gamma..-S) and ADP do not enhance proteolysis. Unlike protease La, the membrane-associated enzyme does not degrade the fluorometric substrate, Glt-Ala-Ala-Phe-MNA, in an ATP-stimulated fashion, and its level is not influenced by high temperature of by the gene which regulates the heat-shock response. The enzyme is inhibited by dichloroisocoumarin and certain peptide chloromethyl ketones. They conclude that E. coli contain at least two ATP-dependent proteases with distinct specificities: one is soluble and the other is membrane-associated.

  19. Proteolytic processing of Atg32 by the mitochondrial i-AAA protease Yme1 regulates mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Jin, Meiyan; Liu, Xu; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2013-11-01

    Mitophagy, the autophagic removal of mitochondria, occurs through a highly selective mechanism. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mitochondrial outer membrane protein Atg32 confers selectivity for mitochondria sequestration as a cargo by the autophagic machinery through its interaction with Atg11, a scaffold protein for selective types of autophagy. The activity of mitophagy in vivo must be tightly regulated considering that mitochondria are essential organelles that produce most of the cellular energy, but also generate reactive oxygen species that can be harmful to cell physiology. We found that Atg32 was proteolytically processed at its C terminus upon mitophagy induction. Adding an epitope tag to the C terminus of Atg32 interfered with its processing and caused a mitophagy defect, suggesting the processing is required for efficient mitophagy. Furthermore, we determined that the mitochondrial i-AAA protease Yme1 mediated Atg32 processing and was required for mitophagy. Finally, we found that the interaction between Atg32 and Atg11 was significantly weakened in yme1∆ cells. We propose that the processing of Atg32 by Yme1 acts as an important regulatory mechanism of cellular mitophagy activity. PMID:24025448

  20. Self-assembled quantum dot-bioconjugates: characterization and use for sensing proteolytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Pons, Thomas; Sapsford, Kim E.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2008-04-01

    We present a characterization of the metal-affinity driven self-assembly between luminescent CdSe-ZnS core-shell semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and either peptides or proteins appended with various length terminal polyhistidine tags. We first monitor the kinetics of self-assembly between surface-immobilized QDs and proteins/peptides under flow conditions (immobilized). To accomplish this, the QDs were immobilized onto functionalized substrates and then exposed to dye-labeled peptides/proteins. By using evanescent wave excitation of the substrate, self-assembly was assessed by monitoring the time-dependent changes in the dye fluorescence. This configuration was complemented with experiments using freely diffusing QDs and proteins/peptides (solution-phase) via energy transfer between QDs and dye-labeled proteins/peptides. Cumulatively, these measurements allowed determination of kinetic parameters, including association and dissociation rates (k on and k off) and the binding constant (K d). We find that self-assembly is rapid with an equilibrium constant K d -1 in the low nM. We next demonstrate the importance of understanding this self-assembly by creating QD-peptide bioconjugates which we employ as substrates to monitor the cleavage activity of proteolytic enzymes. This confirms that metal-affinity interactions can provide QD-bioconjugates that are functional and stable.

  1. Hypoxia Associated Proteolytic Processing of OS-9 by the Metalloproteinase Meprin β

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Barry Lee; Conley, Sabena Michelle; Harris, Regine Simone; Stanley, Corshe Devon

    2016-01-01

    Meprin metalloproteases play a role in the pathology of ischemia/reperfusion- (IR-) induced renal injury. The endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein, osteosarcoma-9 (OS-9), has been shown to interact with the carboxyl-terminal tail of meprin β. More importantly, OS-9 interacts with the hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the prolyl-hydroxylase, proteins which mediate the cell's response to hypoxia. To determine if OS-9 is a meprin substrate, kidney proteins from meprin αβ knockout mice (αβKO) (which lack endogenous meprins) and purified human OS-9 were incubated with activated forms of meprin A and meprin B, and Western blot analysis was used to evaluate proteolytic processing of OS-9. Fragmentation of OS-9 was observed in reactions with meprin B, but not meprin A. To determine whether meprin B cleaves OS-9 in vivo, wild-type (WT) and meprin αβKO mice were subjected to IR-induced renal injury. Fragmentation of OS-9 was observed in kidney proteins from WT mice subjected to IR, but not in meprin αβKO counterparts. Transfection of kidney cells (MDCK and HEK293) with meprin β cDNA prevented accumulation of OS-9 following exposure to the hypoxia mimic, CoCl2. These data suggest that meprin β interaction with OS-9 plays a role in the hypoxia response associated with IR-induced renal injury. PMID:27478637

  2. Hypoxia Associated Proteolytic Processing of OS-9 by the Metalloproteinase Meprin β.

    PubMed

    Martin, Barry Lee; Conley, Sabena Michelle; Harris, Regine Simone; Stanley, Corshe Devon; Niyitegeka, Jean-Marie Vianney; Ongeri, Elimelda Moige

    2016-01-01

    Meprin metalloproteases play a role in the pathology of ischemia/reperfusion- (IR-) induced renal injury. The endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein, osteosarcoma-9 (OS-9), has been shown to interact with the carboxyl-terminal tail of meprin β. More importantly, OS-9 interacts with the hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the prolyl-hydroxylase, proteins which mediate the cell's response to hypoxia. To determine if OS-9 is a meprin substrate, kidney proteins from meprin αβ knockout mice (αβKO) (which lack endogenous meprins) and purified human OS-9 were incubated with activated forms of meprin A and meprin B, and Western blot analysis was used to evaluate proteolytic processing of OS-9. Fragmentation of OS-9 was observed in reactions with meprin B, but not meprin A. To determine whether meprin B cleaves OS-9 in vivo, wild-type (WT) and meprin αβKO mice were subjected to IR-induced renal injury. Fragmentation of OS-9 was observed in kidney proteins from WT mice subjected to IR, but not in meprin αβKO counterparts. Transfection of kidney cells (MDCK and HEK293) with meprin β cDNA prevented accumulation of OS-9 following exposure to the hypoxia mimic, CoCl2. These data suggest that meprin β interaction with OS-9 plays a role in the hypoxia response associated with IR-induced renal injury. PMID:27478637

  3. Internalization and proteolytic action of botulinum toxins in CNS neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Verderio, C; Coco, S; Rossetto, O; Montecucco, C; Matteoli, M

    1999-07-01

    Tetanus and botulinum toxins bind and are internalized at the neuromuscular junction. Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) enter the cytosol at the motor nerve terminal; tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) proceeds retroaxonally inside the motor axon to reach the spinal cord inhibitory interneurons. Although the major target of BoNTs is the peripheral cholinergic terminals, CNS neurons are susceptible to intoxication as well. We investigated the route of entry and the proteolytic activity of BoNT/B and BoNT/F in cultured hippocampal neurons and astrocytes. We show that, differently from TeNT, which enters hippocampal neurons via the process of synaptic vesicle (SV) recycling, BoNTs are internalized and cleave the substrate synaptobrevin/VAMP2 via a process independent of synaptic activity. Labeling of living neurons with Texas Red-conjugated BoNTs and fluoresceinated dextran revealed that these toxins enter hippocampal neurons via endocytic processes not mediated by SV recycling. Botulinum toxins also exploit endocytosis to enter cultured astrocytes, where they partially cleave cellubrevin, a ubiquitous synaptobrevin/VAMP isoform. These results indicate that, in spite of their closely related protein structure, TeNT and BoNTs use different routes to penetrate hippocampal neurons. These findings bear important implications for the identification of the protein receptors of clostridial toxins. PMID:10386990

  4. Butyrate and bioactive proteolytic form of Wnt-5a regulate colonic epithelial proliferation and spatial development.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Sakiyama, Toshio; Hasebe, Takumu; Musch, Mark W; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasushi; He, Tong-Chuan; Lichtenstein, Lev; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Jabri, Bana; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Chang, Eugene B

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation and spatial development of colonic epithelial cells are highly regulated along the crypt vertical axis, which, when perturbed, can result in aberrant growth and carcinogenesis. In this study, two key factors were identified that have important and counterbalancing roles regulating these processes: pericrypt myofibroblast-derived Wnt-5a and the microbial metabolite butyrate. Cultured YAMC cell proliferation and heat shock protein induction were analzyed after butryate, conditioned medium with Wnt5a activity, and FrzB containing conditioned medium. In vivo studies to modulate Hsp25 employed intra-colonic wall Hsp25 encoding lentivirus. To silence Wnt-5a in vivo, intra-colonic wall Wnt-5a silencing RNA was used. Wnt-5a, secreted by stromal myofibroblasts of the lower crypt, promotes proliferation through canonical β-catenin activation. Essential to this are two key requirements: (1) proteolytic conversion of the highly insoluble ~40 kD Wnt-5a protein to a soluble 36 mer amino acid peptide that activates epithelial β-catenin and cellular proliferation, and (2) the simultaneous inhibition of butyrate-induced Hsp25 by Wnt-5a which is necessary to arrest the proliferative process in the upper colonic crypt. The interplay and spatial gradients of these factors insures that crypt epithelial cell proliferation and development proceed in an orderly fashion, but with sufficient plasticity to adapt to physiological perturbations including inflammation. PMID:27561676

  5. Proteolytic cleavage of ataxin-7 promotes SCA7 retinal degeneration and neurological dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Guyenet, Stephan J; Mookerjee, Shona S; Lin, Amy; Custer, Sara K; Chen, Sylvia F; Sopher, Bryce L; La Spada, Albert R; Ellerby, Lisa M

    2015-07-15

    The neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is caused by a polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the ataxin-7 protein, categorizing SCA7 as one member of a large class of heritable neurodegenerative proteinopathies. Cleavage of ataxin-7 by the protease caspase-7 has been demonstrated in vitro, and the accumulation of proteolytic cleavage products in SCA7 patients and mouse models has been identified as an early pathological change. However, it remains unknown whether a causal relationship exists between ataxin-7 proteolysis and in vivo SCA7 disease progression. To determine whether caspase cleavage is a critical event in SCA7 disease pathogenesis, we generated transgenic mice expressing polyQ-expanded ataxin-7 with a second-site mutation (D266N) to prevent caspase-7 proteolysis. When we compared SCA7-D266N mice with SCA7 mice lacking the D266N mutation, we found that SCA7-D266N mice exhibited improved motor performance, reduced neurodegeneration and substantial lifespan extension. Our findings indicate that proteolysis at the D266 caspase-7 cleavage site is an important mediator of ataxin-7 neurotoxicity, suggesting that inhibition of caspase-7 cleavage of polyQ-ataxin-7 may be a promising therapeutic strategy for this untreatable disorder. PMID:25859008

  6. Butyrate and bioactive proteolytic form of Wnt-5a regulate colonic epithelial proliferation and spatial development

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Sakiyama, Toshio; Hasebe, Takumu; Musch, Mark W.; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasushi; He, Tong-Chuan; Lichtenstein, Lev; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Jabri, Bana; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Chang, Eugene B.

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation and spatial development of colonic epithelial cells are highly regulated along the crypt vertical axis, which, when perturbed, can result in aberrant growth and carcinogenesis. In this study, two key factors were identified that have important and counterbalancing roles regulating these processes: pericrypt myofibroblast-derived Wnt-5a and the microbial metabolite butyrate. Cultured YAMC cell proliferation and heat shock protein induction were analzyed after butryate, conditioned medium with Wnt5a activity, and FrzB containing conditioned medium. In vivo studies to modulate Hsp25 employed intra-colonic wall Hsp25 encoding lentivirus. To silence Wnt-5a in vivo, intra-colonic wall Wnt-5a silencing RNA was used. Wnt-5a, secreted by stromal myofibroblasts of the lower crypt, promotes proliferation through canonical β-catenin activation. Essential to this are two key requirements: (1) proteolytic conversion of the highly insoluble ~40 kD Wnt-5a protein to a soluble 36 mer amino acid peptide that activates epithelial β-catenin and cellular proliferation, and (2) the simultaneous inhibition of butyrate-induced Hsp25 by Wnt-5a which is necessary to arrest the proliferative process in the upper colonic crypt. The interplay and spatial gradients of these factors insures that crypt epithelial cell proliferation and development proceed in an orderly fashion, but with sufficient plasticity to adapt to physiological perturbations including inflammation. PMID:27561676

  7. Broad coverage identification of multiple proteolytic cleavage site sequences in complex high molecular weight proteins using quantitative proteomics as a complement to edman sequencing.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Alain; Overall, Christopher M

    2011-05-01

    Proteolytic processing modifies the pleiotropic functions of many large, complex, and modular proteins and can generate cleavage products with new biological activity. The identification of exact proteolytic cleavage sites in the extracellular matrix laminins, fibronectin, and other extracellular matrix proteins is not only important for understanding protein turnover but is needed for the identification of new bioactive cleavage products. Several such products have recently been recognized that are suggested to play important cellular regulatory roles in processes, including angiogenesis. However, identifying multiple cleavage sites in extracellular matrix proteins and other large proteins is challenging as N-terminal Edman sequencing of multiple and often closely spaced cleavage fragments on SDS-PAGE gels is difficult, thus limiting throughput and coverage. We developed a new liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach we call amino-terminal oriented mass spectrometry of substrates (ATOMS) for the N-terminal identification of protein cleavage fragments in solution. ATOMS utilizes efficient and low cost dimethylation isotopic labeling of original N-terminal and proteolytically generated N termini of protein cleavage fragments followed by quantitative tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Being a peptide-centric approach, ATOMS is not dependent on the SDS-PAGE resolution limits for protein fragments of similar mass. We demonstrate that ATOMS reliably identifies multiple proteolytic sites per reaction in complex proteins. Fifty-five neutrophil elastase cleavage sites were identified in laminin-1 and fibronectin-1 with 34 more identified by matrix metalloproteinase cleavage. Hence, our degradomics approach offers a complimentary alternative to Edman sequencing with broad applicability in identifying N termini such as cleavage sites in complex high molecular weight extracellular matrix proteins after in vitro cleavage assays. ATOMS can therefore be useful in

  8. The Importance of Integrating Clinical Relevance and Statistical Significance in the Assessment of Quality of Care –Illustrated Using the Swedish Stroke Register

    PubMed Central

    Lindmark, Anita; van Rompaye, Bart; Goetghebeur, Els; Glader, Eva-Lotta; Eriksson, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background When profiling hospital performance, quality inicators are commonly evaluated through hospital-specific adjusted means with confidence intervals. When identifying deviations from a norm, large hospitals can have statistically significant results even for clinically irrelevant deviations while important deviations in small hospitals can remain undiscovered. We have used data from the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) to illustrate the properties of a benchmarking method that integrates considerations of both clinical relevance and level of statistical significance. Methods The performance measure used was case-mix adjusted risk of death or dependency in activities of daily living within 3 months after stroke. A hospital was labeled as having outlying performance if its case-mix adjusted risk exceeded a benchmark value with a specified statistical confidence level. The benchmark was expressed relative to the population risk and should reflect the clinically relevant deviation that is to be detected. A simulation study based on Riksstroke patient data from 2008–2009 was performed to investigate the effect of the choice of the statistical confidence level and benchmark value on the diagnostic properties of the method. Results Simulations were based on 18,309 patients in 76 hospitals. The widely used setting, comparing 95% confidence intervals to the national average, resulted in low sensitivity (0.252) and high specificity (0.991). There were large variations in sensitivity and specificity for different requirements of statistical confidence. Lowering statistical confidence improved sensitivity with a relatively smaller loss of specificity. Variations due to different benchmark values were smaller, especially for sensitivity. This allows the choice of a clinically relevant benchmark to be driven by clinical factors without major concerns about sufficiently reliable evidence. Conclusions The study emphasizes the importance of combining clinical relevance

  9. Two Japanese siblings affected with Chikungunya fever with different clinical courses: Imported infections from the Cook Islands.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Makoto; Akachi, Shigehiro; Ando, Katsuhiko; Nomura, Tatsuma; Yamanaka, Keiichi; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Two Japanese siblings visited the Cook Islands on business and stayed for 2 months. The sister developed a high fever, arthralgia, erythema and leg edema on the day after returning to Japan. The brother also developed neck and joint pain on the day following the sister's onset. Subsequently, his erythematous lesions spread over his whole body. Chikungunya virus was detected from the sister's blood and urine by specific reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, but not in the brother's samples. Retrospectively, his history of Chikungunya fever was confirmed by the presence of the anti-Chikungunya virus immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG antibodies using the specific enzyme-linked immunoassay. In Japan, no autochthonous case of Chikungunya fever was reported previously. We should give attention to the imported infectious diseases for epidemic prevention. This report warns about the danger of the imported infectious diseases, and also suggests that covering the topic of infectious disease in the world is critical to doctors as well as travelers. PMID:26813362

  10. Clinical importance of histologic grading of lobular carcinoma in situ in breast core needle biopsy specimens: current issues and controversies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Faye; Carter, Gloria; Tseng, George; Chivukula, Mamatha

    2010-05-01

    Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is considered a risk factor for development of invasive carcinoma (IC). Many variants of LCIS have been described based on pathologic features such as nuclear grade, pleomorphism, and necrosis, but little is known about the biology of these variants. The proposed 3-tier grading system for LCIS has not been validated or endorsed across laboratories. We found significant upstaging of pure pleomorphic LCIS (LCIS with nuclear grade [NG] 3), up to 25% in core needle biopsy (CNB) specimens, in an earlier study. The aim of the current study was to address the importance of pure classical LCIS (NGs 1 and 2) in CNB specimens along with clinicopathologic follow-up. In follow-up resection specimens, IC or ductal carcinoma in situ was seen in 18% (7/39), a high incidence of residual LCIS was seen in 69% (27/39), and other high-risk lesions, such as atypical ductal hyperplasia, were seen in 36% (14/39) of LCIS NG 2 cases. Our study illustrates the importance of grading LCIS; we recommend follow-up excision in LCIS NG 2 cases owing to a high incidence of residual LCIS and the likelihood of identifying other high-risk lesions. PMID:20395524

  11. The importance of the concepts of disaster, catastrophe, violence, trauma and barbarism in defining posttraumatic stress disorder in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Luciana L; Fiks, Jose P; Mari, Jair J; Mello, Marcelo F

    2008-01-01

    Background Several terms in the scientific literature about posttraumatic stress disorder are used with different meanings in studies conducted by different authors. Words such as trauma, violence, catastrophe, disaster and barbarism are often used vaguely or confusingly, and their meanings change in different articles. The lack of conceptual references for these expressions complicates the organization of literature. Furthermore, the absence of clear concepts may be an obstacle to clinical treatment because the use of these words by the patients does not necessarily point to a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder. Discussion A critical review of scientific literature showed that stress can be divided in stages to facilitate specific terminological adjustments to the event itself, to the subject-event interaction and to psychological responses. Moreover, it demonstrated that the varying concept of trauma expands into fundamental psychotherapeutic definitions and that the meanings of violence associated with barbarism are an obstacle to resilience. Therefore, this study updates the etymological origins and applications of these words, connects them to the expansions of meanings that can be operated in the clinical care of patients with posttraumatic stress disorder, and analyzes them critically according to the criterion A of DSM-IV and ICD-10. Summary The terminology in the literature about posttraumatic stress disorder includes a plethora of terms whose meanings are not fully understood, and that, therefore, limit this terminology. The analysis of these terms suggested that the transformation of the concept of trauma led to a broader understanding of this phenomenon in its psychic dimensions, that a barbarian type of violence constitutes an obstacle to resilience, and that the criterion A of the DSM-IV and ICD-10 shows imprecision and conceptual fragilities. Methods To develop this debate article, a current specialized literature review was achieved by

  12. The importance of HLA DRB1 gene allele to clinical features and disability in patients with multiple sclerosis in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of HLA DRB1 alleles with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) has been consistently reported although its effect on the clinical features and disability is still unclear probably due to diversity in ethnicity and geographic location of the studied populations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of HLA DRB1 alleles on the clinical features and disability of the patients with MS in Lithuania. Methods This was a prospective study of 120 patients with MS. HLA DRB1 alleles were genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction. Results The first symptoms of MS in patients with HLA DRB1*15 allele manifested at younger age than in those without this allele (28.32 +/− 5.49 yrs vs. 30.94 +/− 8.43 yrs, respectively, p = 0.043). HLA DRB1*08 allele was more prevalent among relapsing-remitting (RR) MS patients than among patients with progressive course of MS (25.0% vs. 8.3%, respectively, chi^2 = 6.000, p = 0.05). MS patients with this allele had lower relapse rate than those without this allele (1.00 +/− 0.97 and 1.44 +/− 0.85, respectively, p = 0.043). Degree of disability during the last visit was lower among the patients with HLA DRB1*08 allele (EDSS score 3.15 +/− 1.95 vs. 4.49 +/− 1.96, p = 0.006), and higher among those with HLA DRB1*15 allele (EDSS score 4.60 +/− 2.10 vs.4.05 +/− 1.94, p = 0.047) compared to patients without these alleles but there were no significant associations between these alleles and the duration of the disease to disability. HLA DRB1*08 allele (OR = 0.18, 95% CI 0,039-0,8, p = 0.029) was demonstradet to be independent factor to take a longer time to reach an EDSS of 6, while HLA DRB1*01 allele (OR = 5.92, 95% CI 1,30-26,8, p = 0.021) was related in a shorter time to reach and EDSS of 6. Patients with HLA DRB1*08 allele had lower IgG index compared to patients without this allele (0.58 +/− 0.17 and 0.73 +/− 0.31, respectively, p

  13. Two clinical cases of renal syndrome caused by Dobrava/Saaremaa hantaviruses imported to the Netherlands from Poland and Belarus, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    GeurtsvanKessel, Corine H; Goeijenbier, Marco; Verner-Carlsson, Jenny; Litjens, Eline; Bos, Willem-Jan; Pas, Suzan D; Melo, Mariana Medonça; Koopmans, Marion; Lundkvist, Åke; Reusken, Chantal B E M

    2016-01-01

    We report the rare event of two imported cases in the Netherlands presenting with renal syndrome caused by Dobrava (DOBV)/Saaremaa (SAAV) hantaviruses. DOBV/SAAV hantaviruses are not circulating in the Netherlands and their clinical manifestation is typically more severe than that of the endemic Puumala virus (PUUV). This report aims to increase awareness among healthcare professionals and diagnostic laboratories to consider different hantaviruses as a cause of renal failure. PMID:26818411

  14. Two clinical cases of renal syndrome caused by Dobrava/Saaremaa hantaviruses imported to the Netherlands from Poland and Belarus, 2012–2014

    PubMed Central

    GeurtsvanKessel, Corine H.; Goeijenbier, Marco; Verner-Carlsson, Jenny; Litjens, Eline; Bos, Willem-Jan; Pas, Suzan D.; Medonça Melo, Mariana; Koopmans, Marion; Lundkvist, Åke; Reusken, Chantal B. E. M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the rare event of two imported cases in the Netherlands presenting with renal syndrome caused by Dobrava (DOBV)/Saaremaa (SAAV) hantaviruses. DOBV/SAAV hantaviruses are not circulating in the Netherlands and their clinical manifestation is typically more severe than that of the endemic Puumala virus (PUUV). This report aims to increase awareness among healthcare professionals and diagnostic laboratories to consider different hantaviruses as a cause of renal failure. PMID:26818411

  15. Comparison of the growth kinetics and proteolytic activities of Chryseobacterium species and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Bekker, A; Steyn, L; Charimba, G; Jooste, P; Hugo, C

    2015-12-01

    The effect of temperature on the growth kinetics and proteolytic activity of Chryseobacterium joostei and Chryseobacterium bovis was determined during this study. The results were compared with the activities of Pseudomonas fluorescens, which is regarded to be a major food spoilage psychrotolerant microorganism. For the growth studies, cultures were incubated in nutrient broth in a temperature gradient incubator (from 9 to 50 °C) and separately at 4 °C, and the optical density was measured at different time intervals. Growth temperature profiles for each organism were constructed. For determination of proteolytic activity, the cultures were incubated in fat-free ultra-high temperature processed milk in the temperature gradient incubator for 72 h (temperature range as above). Cell-free extracts were used to determine the proteolytic activity using the azocasein method. Results of the growth studies showed that C. joostei had the ability to grow over a wider temperature range than C. bovis and P. fluorescens without being affected by changes in the temperature. For the proteolytic activity, C. joostei had significantly (p < 0.001) higher activity per milligram of protein at 15.5 °C, followed by C. bovis and P. fluorescens. The results showed that C. joostei potentially has an even greater spoilage capacity in milk on the basis of growth rate and proteolytic activity than did P. fluorescens. PMID:26451905

  16. Near Infrared Optical Proteolytic Beacons for In Vivo Imaging of Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, J. Oliver; Scherer, Randy L.; Matrisian, Lynn M.

    2010-01-01

    The exuberant expression of proteinases by tumor cells has long been associated with the breakdown of the extracellular matrix, tumor invasion, and metastasis to distant organs. There is both epidemiological and experimental data that support a causative role for proteinases of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family in tumor progression. Optical imaging techniques provide an extraordinary opportunity for non-invasive “molecular imaging” of tumor-associated proteolytic activity. The application of optical proteolytic beacons for the detection of specific proteinase activities associated with tumors has several potential purposes: 1) Detection of small, early-stage tumors with increased sensitivity due to the catalytic nature of proteolytic activity, 2) Diagnosis and Prognosis to distinguished tumors that require particularly aggressive therapy or those that will not benefit from therapy, 3) Identification of tumors appropriate for specific anti-proteinase therapeutics and optimization of drug and dose based on determination of target modulation, and 4) as an indicator of efficacy of proteolytically-activated pro-drugs. This chapter describes the synthesis, characterization, and application of reagents that use visible and near infrared fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) fluorophore pairs to detect and measure MMP-referable proteolytic activity in tumors in mouse models of cancer. PMID:20135290

  17. The Regenerative Medicine in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: The Most Important Innovations in the Clinical Application of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tatullo, Marco; Marrelli, Massimo; Paduano, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is an emerging field of biotechnology that combines various aspects of medicine, cell and molecular biology, materials science and bioengineering in order to regenerate, repair or replace tissues. The oral surgery and maxillofacial surgery have a role in the treatment of traumatic or degenerative diseases that lead to a tissue loss: frequently, to rehabilitate these minuses, you should use techniques that have been improved over time. Since 1990, we started with the use of growth factors and platelet concentrates in oral and maxillofacial surgery; in the following period we start to use biomaterials, as well as several type of scaffolds and autologous tissues. The frontier of regenerative medicine nowadays is represented by the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs): overcoming the ethical problems thanks to the use of mesenchymal stem cells from adult patient, and with the increasingly sophisticated technology to support their manipulation, MSCs are undoubtedly the future of medicine regenerative and they are showing perspectives unimaginable just a few years ago. Most recent studies are aimed to tissues regeneration using MSCs taken from sites that are even more accessible and rich in stem cells: the oral cavity turned out to be an important source of MSCs with the advantage to be easily accessible to the surgeon, thus avoiding to increase the morbidity of the patient. The future is the regeneration of whole organs or biological systems consisting of many different tissues, starting from an initial stem cell line, perhaps using innovative scaffolds together with the nano-engineering of biological tissues. PMID:25552921

  18. Crowdsourced Health Research Studies: An Important Emerging Complement to Clinical Trials in the Public Health Research Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    outcomes for a variety of health conditions. PatientsLikeMe and 23andMe are the leading operators of researcher-organized, crowdsourced health research studies. These operators have published findings in the areas of disease research, drug response, user experience in crowdsourced studies, and genetic association. Quantified Self, Genomera, and DIYgenomics are communities of participant-organized health research studies where individuals conduct self-experimentation and group studies. Crowdsourced health research studies have a diversity of intended outcomes and levels of scientific rigor. Conclusions Participatory health initiatives are becoming part of the public health ecosystem and their rapid growth is facilitated by Internet and social networking influences. Large-scale parameter-stratified cohorts have potential to facilitate a next-generation understanding of disease and drug response. Not only is the large size of crowdsourced cohorts an asset to medical discovery, too is the near-immediate speed at which medical findings might be tested and applied. Participatory health initiatives are expanding the scope of medicine from a traditional focus on disease cure to a personalized preventive approach. Crowdsourced health research studies are a promising complement and extension to traditional clinical trials as a model for the conduct of health research. PMID:22397809

  19. Proteolytic fragmentation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors: a novel mechanism regulating channel activity?

    PubMed

    Wang, Liwei; Alzayady, Kamil J; Yule, David I

    2016-06-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3 Rs) are a family of ubiquitously expressed intracellular Ca(2+) release channels. Regulation of channel activity by Ca(2+) , nucleotides, phosphorylation, protein binding partners and other cellular factors is thought to play a major role in defining the specific spatiotemporal characteristics of intracellular Ca(2+) signals. These properties are, in turn, believed pivotal for the selective and specific physiological activation of Ca(2+) -dependent effectors. IP3 Rs are also substrates for the intracellular cysteine proteases, calpain and caspase. Cleavage of the IP3 R has been proposed to play a role in apoptotic cell death by uncoupling regions important for IP3 binding from the channel domain, leaving an unregulated leaky Ca(2+) pore. Contrary to this hypothesis, we demonstrate following proteolysis that N- and C-termini of IP3 R1 remain associated, presumably through non-covalent interactions. Further, we show that complementary fragments of IP3 R1 assemble into tetrameric structures and retain their ability to be regulated robustly by IP3 . While peptide continuity is clearly not necessary for IP3 -gating of the channel, we propose that cleavage of the IP3 R peptide chain may alter other important regulatory events to modulate channel activity. In this scenario, stimulation of the cleaved IP3 R may support distinct spatiotemporal Ca(2+) signals and activation of specific effectors. Notably, in many adaptive physiological events, the non-apoptotic activities of caspase and calpain are demonstrated to be important, but the substrates of the proteases are poorly defined. We speculate that proteolytic fragmentation may represent a novel form of IP3 R regulation, which plays a role in varied adaptive physiological processes. PMID:26486785

  20. Absence of clinically important HERG channel blockade by three compounds that inhibit phosphodiesterase 5--sildenafil, tadalafil, and vardenafil.

    PubMed

    Dustan Sarazan, R; Crumb, William J; Beasley, Charles M; Emmick, Jeffrey T; Ferguson, Kenneth M; Strnat, Christine A; Sausen, Peter J

    2004-10-19

    Compounds that inhibit phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) have been developed for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. Because men with erectile dysfunction frequently have comorbid cardiovascular disease, they may have limited cardiac repolarization reserve and be at risk of arrhythmia if treated with medications that prolong ventricular repolarization. The human ether-a-go-go related gene (HERG) channel is important for repolarization in human myocardium and is a common target for drugs that prolong the QT interval. We studied the ability of three compounds that inhibit PDE5--sildenafil, tadalafil, and vardenafil--to block the HERG channel. Using a whole cell variant of the patch-clamp method, the HERG current was measured in a stably transfected human embryonic kidney cell line expressing the HERG channel. The compounds produced dose-dependent reductions in HERG current amplitude over a concentration range of 0.1 to 100 microM. The IC50 values were 12.8 microM for vardenafil and 33.3 microM for sildenafil. Because the maximum soluble concentration of tadalafil (100 microM) produced only a 50.9% inhibition of the HERG current amplitude, the IC50 value for tadalafil could not be determined with the Hill equation. Tadalafil had the weakest capacity to block the HERG channel, producing a 50.9% blockade at the maximum soluble concentration (100 microM), compared with 86.2% for vardenafil (100 microM) and 75.2% for sildenafil (100 microM). In conclusion, the concentrations of the PDE5 inhibitors required to evoke a 50% inhibition of the HERG current were well above reported therapeutic plasma concentrations of free and total compound. None of the three compounds was a potent blocker of the HERG channel. PMID:15476742

  1. A Comparative Study of New Aspergillus Strains for Proteolytic Enzymes Production by Solid State Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Gastón Ezequiel; Noseda, Diego Gabriel; Ponce Mora, María Clara; Recupero, Matías Nicolás; Blasco, Martín; Albertó, Edgardo

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study of the proteolytic enzymes production using twelve Aspergillus strains previously unused for this purpose was performed by solid state fermentation. A semiquantitative and quantitative evaluation of proteolytic activity were carried out using crude enzymatic extracts obtained from the fermentation cultures, finding seven strains with high and intermediate level of protease activity. Biochemical, thermodynamics, and kinetics features such as optimum pH and temperature values, thermal stability, activation energy (E a), quotient energy (Q 10), K m , and V max were studied in four enzymatic extracts from the selected strains that showed the highest productivity. Additionally, these strains were evaluated by zymogram analysis obtaining protease profiles with a wide range of molecular weight for each sample. From these four strains with the highest productivity, the proteolytic extract of A. sojae ATCC 20235 was shown to be an appropriate biocatalyst for hydrolysis of casein and gelatin substrates, increasing its antioxidant activities in 35% and 125%, respectively. PMID:26989505

  2. Proteolytic activity of molds and their metabiotic association with Salmonella in a model system.

    PubMed

    Cibelli, F; Ciccarone, C; Altieri, C; Bevilacqua, A; Sinigaglia, M

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the proteolytic ability of some strains of aspergilli, fusaria, and penicillia and the metabiotic effect of Fusarium oxysporum and Penicillium expansum on Salmonella. The proteolytic activity of the target molds was determined on tomato juice agar and tomato juice, whereas the metabiotic effect of F. oxysporum and P. expansum on Salmonella was assessed in a model system consisting of tryptone soy broth with different amounts of tomato juice added. Fusaria, some aspergilli, and one strain of penicillium showed a proteolytic activity on tomato juice agar. In addition, Salmonella survival was enhanced in tryptone soy broth plus 20 or 50% tomato juice in the model system previously inoculated with F. oxysporum. PMID:18939766

  3. A Comparative Study of New Aspergillus Strains for Proteolytic Enzymes Production by Solid State Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Gastón Ezequiel; Noseda, Diego Gabriel; Ponce Mora, María Clara; Recupero, Matías Nicolás; Blasco, Martín; Albertó, Edgardo

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study of the proteolytic enzymes production using twelve Aspergillus strains previously unused for this purpose was performed by solid state fermentation. A semiquantitative and quantitative evaluation of proteolytic activity were carried out using crude enzymatic extracts obtained from the fermentation cultures, finding seven strains with high and intermediate level of protease activity. Biochemical, thermodynamics, and kinetics features such as optimum pH and temperature values, thermal stability, activation energy (Ea), quotient energy (Q10), Km, and Vmax were studied in four enzymatic extracts from the selected strains that showed the highest productivity. Additionally, these strains were evaluated by zymogram analysis obtaining protease profiles with a wide range of molecular weight for each sample. From these four strains with the highest productivity, the proteolytic extract of A. sojae ATCC 20235 was shown to be an appropriate biocatalyst for hydrolysis of casein and gelatin substrates, increasing its antioxidant activities in 35% and 125%, respectively. PMID:26989505

  4. Proteolytic Equilibria of Vanillic Acid in the Ground and Excited States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vusovich, O. V.; Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Sokolova, I. V.; Vasil‧eva, N. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    Proteolytic equilibria of vanillic acid in aqueous solutions were studied using electronic spectroscopy. The pH ranges for anionic, dianionic, cationic, and neutral forms of vanillic acid in the ground and excited states were determined. The electron density distribution on atoms in the proteolytic forms was determined using quantum-chemistry methods. The anion formed as a result of dissociation of the carboxylic acid. The dianion formed in the presence of two and more equivalents of alkali as a result of proton loss from the phenol and carboxylic acid. The vanillic acid cation formed via protonation of the carbonyl oxygen. Differences in spectral features of the proteolytic forms in the ground and excited states were observed.

  5. Non-infectious granulomatous diseases of the skin and their associated systemic diseases: an evidence-based update to important clinical questions.

    PubMed

    Hawryluk, Elena Balestreire; Izikson, Leonid; English, Joseph C

    2010-01-01

    Non-infectious granulomatous diseases of the skin are a broad group of distinct reactive inflammatory conditions that share important similarities. As a group, they are relatively difficult to diagnose and distinguish both clinically as well as histologically. Many of these disorders have significant associations with systemic diseases that impact the patient's overall prognosis. In this update, we offer a discussion of emerging concepts and controversies in this field, as presented through evidence-based answers to seven important clinical questions regarding palisading and epithelioid granulomata. These questions offer an opportunity to review ten non-infectious granulomatous conditions that have implications for systemic disease: granuloma annulare, annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma, necrobiosis lipoidica, methotrexate-induced accelerated rheumatoid nodulosis, necrobiotic xanthogranuloma, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis, interstitial granulomatous drug reaction, palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis, sarcoidosis, and metastatic Crohn disease. Recent clinical, epidemiologic, and laboratory studies have shed some light on these diseases, the association of these conditions with systemic disorders, and their overall prognoses. PMID:20184390

  6. Identification of cultured isolates of clinically important yeast species using fluorescent fragment length analysis of the amplified internally transcribed rRNA spacer 2 region

    PubMed Central

    De Baere, Thierry; Claeys, Geert; Swinne, Danielle; Massonet, Caroline; Verschraegen, Gerda; Muylaert, An; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2002-01-01

    Background The number of patients with yeast infection has increased during the last years. Also the variety of species of clinical importance has increased. Correct species identification is often important for efficient therapy, but is currently mostly based on phenotypic features and is sometimes time-consuming and depends largely on the expertise of technicians. Therefore, we evaluated the feasibility of PCR-based amplification of the internally transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2), followed by fragment size analysis on the ABI Prism 310 for the identification of clinically important yeasts. Results A rapid DNA-extraction method, based on simple boiling-freezing was introduced. Of the 26 species tested, 22 could be identified unambiguously by scoring the length of the ITS2-region. No distinction could be made between the species Trichosporon asteroides and T. inkin or between T. mucoides and T. ovoides. The two varieties of Cryptococcus neoformans (var. neoformans and var. gattii) could be differentiated from each other due to a one bp length difference of the ITS2 fragment. The three Cryptococcus laurentii isolates were split into two groups according to their ITS2-fragment lengths, in correspondence with the phylogenetic groups described previously. Since the obtained fragment lengths compare well to those described previously and could be exchanged between two laboratories, an internationally usable library of ITS2 fragment lengths can be constructed. Conclusions The existing ITS2 size based library enables identification of most of the clinically important yeast species within 6 hours starting from a single colony and can be easily updated when new species are described. Data can be exchanged between laboratories. PMID:12139769

  7. Neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1 does not exhibit proteolytic activities to exert its pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteases are well-known virulence factors that promote survival, pathogenesis and immune evasion of many pathogens. Several lines of evidence suggest that the blood–brain barrier permeability is a prerequisite in microbial invasion of the central nervous system. Because proteases are frequently associated with vascular permeability by targeting junctional proteins, here it is hypothesized that neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1 exhibit proteolytic activities to exert its pathogenicity. Methods Zymographic assays were performed using collagen and gelatin as substrates. The lysates of whole E. coli K1 strain E44, or E. coli K-12 strain HB101 were tested for proteolytic activities. The conditioned media were prepared by incubating bacteria in RPMI-1640 in the presence or absence of serum. The cell-free supernatants were collected and tested for proteases in zymography as mentioned above. Additionally, proteolytic degradation of host immune factors was determined by co-incubating conditioned media with albumin/immunoglobulins using protease assays. Results When collagen or gelatin were used as substrates in zymographic assays, neither whole bacteria nor conditioned media exhibited proteolytic activities. The conditioned media of neuropathogenic E. coli K1 strain E44, or E. coli K-12 strain HB101 did not affect degradation of albumin and immunoglobulins using protease assays. Conclusions Neither zymographic assays nor protease assays detected proteolytic activities in either the whole bacteria or conditioned media of E. coli K1 strain E44 and E. coli K-12 strain HB101. These findings suggest that host cell monolayer disruptions and immune evasion strategies are likely independent of proteolytic activities of neuropathogenic E. coli K1. PMID:23634997

  8. Seasonal variation in the temperature sensitivity of proteolytic enzyme activity in temperate forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostek, Edward R.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2012-03-01

    Increasing soil temperature has the potential to alter the activity of the extracellular enzymes that mobilize nitrogen (N) from soil organic matter (SOM) and ultimately the availability of N for primary production. Proteolytic enzymes depolymerize N from proteinaceous components of SOM into amino acids, and their activity is a principal driver of the within-system cycle of soil N. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the soils of temperate forest tree species differ in the temperature sensitivity of proteolytic enzyme activity over the growing season and the role of substrate limitation in regulating temperature sensitivity. Across species and sampling dates, proteolytic enzyme activity had relatively low sensitivity to temperature with a mean activation energy (Ea) of 33.5 kJ mol-1. Ea declined in white ash, American beech, and eastern hemlock soils across the growing season as soils warmed. By contrast, Eain sugar maple soil increased across the growing season. We used these data to develop a species-specific empirical model of proteolytic enzyme activity for the 2009 calendar year and studied the interactive effects of soil temperature (ambient or +5°C) and substrate limitation (ambient or elevated protein) on enzyme activity. Declines in substrate limitation had a larger single-factor effect on proteolytic enzyme activity than temperature, particularly in the spring. There was, however, a large synergistic effect of increasing temperature and substrate supply on proteolytic enzyme activity. Our results suggest limited increases in N availability with climate warming unless there is a parallel increase in the availability of protein substrates.

  9. REGULATED PROTEOLYTIC PROCESSING OF TIE1 MODULATES LIGAND RESPONSIVENESS OF THE RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASE TIE2

    PubMed Central

    Marron, Marie B; Singh, Harprit; Tahir, Tariq A; Kavumkal, Jais; Kim, Hak-Zoo; Koh, Gou Young; Brindle, Nicholas PJ

    2008-01-01

    Regulated ectodomain shedding followed by intramembrane proteolysis has recently been recognized as important in cell signaling and for degradation of several type I transmembrane proteins. The receptor tyrosine kinase Tie1 is known to undergo ectodomain cleavage generating a membrane tethered endodomain. Here we show Tie1 is a substrate for regulated intramembrane proteolysis. Following Tie1 ectodomain cleavage the newly formed 45 kDa endodomain undergoes additional proteolytic processing mediated by γ-secretase to generate an amino-terminally truncated 42 kDa fragment which is subsequently degraded by proteasomal activity. This sequential processing occurs constitutively and is stimulated by phorbol ester and vascular endothelial growth factor. To assess the biological significance of regulated Tie1 processing we analyzed its effects on angiopoietin signaling. Activation of ectodomain cleavage causes loss of phosphorylated Tie1 holoreceptor and generation of phosphorylated receptor fragments in the presence of COMP-Angiopoietin1. A key function of γ-secretase is in preventing accumulation of these phosphorylated fragments. We also find that regulated Tie1 processing modulates ligand responsiveness of the Tie-1-associated receptor Tie2. Activation of Tie1 ectodomain cleavage increases COMP-Angiopoietin1 activation of Tie2. This correlates with increased ability of Tie2 to bind ligand following shedding of the Tie1 extracellular domain. A similar enhancement of ligand activation of Tie2 is seen when Tie1 expression is suppressed by RNA interference. Together these data indicate that Tie1, via its extracellular domain, limits the ability of ligand to bind and activate Tie2. Furthermore the data suggests regulated processing of Tie1 may be an important mechanism for controlling signaling by Tie2. PMID:17728252

  10. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits proteolytic processing of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) via activation of AMP-activated kinase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiong; Dong, Qingming; Bridges, Dave; Raghow, Rajendra; Park, Edwards A; Elam, Marshall B

    2015-12-01

    In hyperinsulinemic states including obesity and T2DM, overproduction of fatty acid and triglyceride contributes to steatosis of the liver, hyperlipidemia and hepatic insulin resistance. This effect is mediated in part by the transcriptional regulator sterol responsive element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), which stimulates the expression of genes involved in hepatic fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis. SREBP-1c is up regulated by insulin both via increased transcription of nascent full-length SREBP-1c and by enhanced proteolytic processing of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound precursor to yield the transcriptionally active n-terminal form, nSREBP-1c. Polyunsaturated fatty acids of marine origin (n-3 PUFA) prevent induction of SREBP-1c by insulin thereby reducing plasma and hepatic triglycerides. Despite widespread use of n-3 PUFA supplements to reduce triglycerides in clinical practice, the exact mechanisms underlying their hypotriglyceridemic effect remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:5 n-3) reduces nSREBP-1c by inhibiting regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of the nascent SREBP-1c. We further show that this effect of DHA is mediated both via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and by inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The inhibitory effect of AMPK on SREBP-1c processing is linked to phosphorylation of serine 365 of SREBP-1c in the rat. We have defined a novel regulatory mechanism by which n-3 PUFA inhibit induction of SREBP-1c by insulin. These findings identify AMPK as an important negative regulator of hepatic lipid synthesis and as a potential therapeutic target for hyperlipidemia in obesity and T2DM. PMID:26327595

  11. Cerebral Palsy Gait, Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    TUGUI, Raluca Dana; ANTONESCU, Dinu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cerebral palsy refers to a lesion on an immature brain, that determines permanent neurological disorders. Knowing the exact cause of the disease does not alter the treatment management. The etiology is 2-2.5/1000 births and the rate is constant in the last 40-50 years because advances in medical technologies have permitted the survival of smaller and premature new born children. Gait analysis has four directions: kinematics (represents body movements analysis without calculating the forces), kinetics (represents body moments and forces), energy consumption (measured by oximetry), and neuromuscular activity (measured by EMG). Gait analysis can observe specific deviations in a patient, allowing us to be more accurate in motor diagnoses and treatment solutions: surgery intervention, botulinum toxin injection, use of orthosis, physical kinetic therapy, oral medications, baclofen pump. PMID:24790675

  12. Inhibition of proteolytic processing of adenoviral proteins by epsilon-aminocaproic acid and ambenum in adenovirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Nosach, Lidiya; Dyachenko, Nataliya; Zhovnovataya, Valentina; Lozinskiy, Miron; Lozitsky, Victor

    2002-01-01

    Maturation of adenovirus particles is markedly affected by proteolytic processing. The possibility for blocking the conversion of precursor structural core protein (preVII) into mature structure protein VII by officinal drugs epsilon-aminocaproic acid and ambenum has been demonstrated in Hep-2 cells infected with adenovirus. Proteolytic processing may be regarded as one of the targets for inhibiting adenovirus reproduction. PMID:12545207

  13. Racial differences in DSM diagnosis using a semi-structured instrument: the importance of clinical judgment in the diagnosis of African Americans.

    PubMed

    Neighbors, Harold W; Trierweiler, Steven J; Ford, Briggett C; Muroff, Jordana R

    2003-09-01

    Schizophrenia is diagnosed more frequently among African Americans while mood disorders are identified more often among whites. Such findings have raised serious questions about the accuracy of clinical judgment. This article analyzes data on 665 African American and white psychiatric inpatients using a semi-structured diagnostic instrument. The paper explores the relationship of patient race to schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, major depression, and bipolar disorder. The paper also explores the extent to which patient race is related to the manner in which clinicians link individual symptoms to diagnoses. Results indicate some significant race differences in diagnosis remain even when a semi-structured instrument and DSM criteria are used, whites, were more likely than African Americans to receive a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and less likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia. There were no race differences in major depression. Some patterns of symptom attribution differed by race. The results are consistent with previous sociological research showing that patient race is related to diagnosis even when standardized diagnostic criteria are used. These findings underscore the importance of clinical judgment within the context of cross-race and cross-ethnic diagnosis. Clinical training programs must reduce ethnocentric bias by teaching the appropriate use of the socio-cultural information necessary to employ DSM-IV's Cultural Formulation. PMID:14582306

  14. The importance of staphylococci and threshold value of somatic cell count for diagnosis of sub-clinical mastitis in Pirlak sheep at mid-lactation.

    PubMed

    Ozenc, E; Seker, E; Baki Acar, D; Birdane, M K; Darbaz, I; Dogan, N

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the bacterial agents causing sub-clinical mastitis and the mean somatic cell counts (SCC) of milk in Pirlak sheep at mid-lactation. The percentage of infected udder halves was 11.4% (53/464). The most frequently isolated species were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) (64.2%), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (24.5%) and Escherichia coli (11.3%). Among the CNS, the most common species was Staphylococcus epidermidis (38.2%). The other species isolated from milk samples were Staphylococcus xylosus (17.7%), Staphylococcus chromogenes (14.7%), Staphylococcus simulans (8.8%) and Staphylococcus hyicus (8.8%). The mean SCC for culture positive and negative samples was 1742×10(3) and 161×10(3) cells/ml, respectively. A significant difference (p<0.05) was determined between with and without microbial growth groups in terms of the SCC values. Threshold limit for SCC was 374×10(3) cells/ml for Pirlak sheep. In conclusion, it was considered that SCC is an important predictor of sub-clinical mastitis in Pirlak sheep. This is the first study to describe the bacterial agents causing sub-clinical mastitis and threshold limit for SCC in Pirlak sheep in Turkey. PMID:21366722

  15. Urinary Proteolytic Activation of Renal Epithelial Na+ Channels in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Liu, Xuefei; Sharma, Neeru M; Li, Yulong; Pliquett, Rainer U; Patel, Kaushik P

    2016-01-01

    One of the key mechanisms involved in renal Na(+) retention in chronic heart failure (CHF) is activation of epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC) in collecting tubules. Proteolytic cleavage has an important role in activating ENaC. We hypothesized that enhanced levels of proteases in renal tubular fluid activate ENaC, resulting in renal Na(+) retention in rats with CHF. CHF was produced by left coronary artery ligation in rats. By immunoblotting, we found that several urinary serine proteases were significantly increased in CHF rats compared with sham rats (fold increases: furin 6.7, prostasin 23.6, plasminogen 2.06, and plasmin 3.57 versus sham). Similar increases were observed in urinary samples from patients with CHF. Whole-cell patch clamp was conducted in cultured renal collecting duct M-1 cells to record Na(+) currents. Protease-rich urine (from rats and patients with CHF) significantly increased the Na(+) inward current in M-1 cells. Two weeks of protease inhibitor treatment significantly abrogated the enhanced diuretic and natriuretic responses to ENaC inhibitor benzamil in rats with CHF. Increased podocyte lesions were observed in the kidneys of rats with CHF by transmission electron microscopy. Consistent with these results, podocyte damage markers desmin and podocin expressions were also increased in rats with CHF (increased ≈2-folds). These findings suggest that podocyte damage may lead to increased proteases in the tubular fluid, which in turn contributes to the enhanced renal ENaC activity, providing a novel mechanistic insight for Na(+) retention commonly observed in CHF. PMID:26628676

  16. Proteolytic Processing and Activation of Clostridium perfringens Epsilon Toxin by Caprine Small Intestinal Contents

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John C.; Li, Jihong; Uzal, Francisco A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epsilon toxin (ETX), a pore-forming toxin produced by type B and D strains of Clostridium perfringens, mediates severe enterotoxemia in livestock and possibly plays a role in human disease. During enterotoxemia, the nearly inactive ETX prototoxin is produced in the intestines but then must be activated by proteolytic processing. The current study sought to examine ETX prototoxin processing and activation ex vivo using the intestinal contents of a goat, a natural host species for ETX-mediated disease. First, this study showed that the prototoxin has a KEIS N-terminal sequence with a molecular mass of 33,054 Da. When the activation of ETX prototoxin ex vivo by goat small intestinal contents was assessed by SDS-PAGE, the prototoxin was processed in a stepwise fashion into an ~27-kDa band or higher-molecular-mass material that could be toxin oligomers. Purified ETX corresponding to the ~27-kDa band was cytotoxic. When it was biochemically characterized by mass spectrometry, the copresence of three ETX species, each with different C-terminal residues, was identified in the purified ~27-kDa ETX preparation. Cytotoxicity of each of the three ETX species was then demonstrated using recombinant DNA approaches. Serine protease inhibitors blocked the initial proteotoxin processing, while carboxypeptidase inhibitors blocked further processing events. Taken together, this study provides important new insights indicating that, in the intestinal lumen, serine protease (including trypsin and possibly chymotrypsin) initiates the processing of the prototoxin but other proteases, including carboxypeptidases, then process the prototoxin into multiple active and stable species. PMID:25336460

  17. Human ZMPSTE24 disease mutations: residual proteolytic activity correlates with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Barrowman, Jemima; Wiley, Patricia A.; Hudon-Miller, Sarah E.; Hrycyna, Christine A.; Michaelis, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24 plays a critical role in nuclear lamin biology by cleaving the prenylated and carboxylmethylated 15-amino acid tail from the C-terminus of prelamin A to yield mature lamin A. A defect in this proteolytic event, caused by a mutation in the lamin A gene (LMNA) that eliminates the ZMPSTE24 cleavage site, underlies the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS). Likewise, mutations in the ZMPSTE24 gene that result in decreased enzyme function cause a spectrum of diseases that share certain features of premature aging. Twenty human ZMPSTE24 alleles have been identified that are associated with three disease categories of increasing severity: mandibuloacral dysplasia type B (MAD-B), severe progeria (atypical ‘HGPS’) and restrictive dermopathy (RD). To determine whether a correlation exists between decreasing ZMPSTE24 protease activity and increasing disease severity, we expressed mutant alleles of ZMPSTE24 in yeast and optimized in vivo yeast mating assays to directly compare the activity of alleles associated with each disease category. We also measured the activity of yeast crude membranes containing the ZMPSTE24 mutant proteins in vitro. We determined that, in general, the residual activity of ZMPSTE24 patient alleles correlates with disease severity. Complete loss-of-function alleles are associated with RD, whereas retention of partial, measureable activity results in MAD-B or severe progeria. Importantly, our assays can discriminate small differences in activity among the mutants, confirming that the methods presented here will be useful for characterizing any new ZMPSTE24 mutations that are discovered. PMID:22718200

  18. Host Defense Functions of Proteolytically Processed and Parent (Unprocessed) Cathelicidins of Rabbit Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zarember, Kol A.; Katz, Seth S.; Tack, Brian F.; Doukhan, Laurence; Weiss, Jerrold; Elsbach, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Members of the cathelicidin family are present in all mammals studied. Generally, these proteins contain a conserved N-terminal domain and a structurally and functionally divergent C-terminal region that expresses antibacterial or other activities when proteolytically released. Rabbit granulocytes produce CAP18, a cathelicidin that conforms to this structural and functional organization, and also 15-kDa protein isoforms (p15s) that share several key structural features with other cathelicidins but apparently do not undergo processing with release of an active peptide. To further define the importance of proteolysis in the antibacterial activities of these proteins, we have purified from granulocytes proCAP18, its C-terminal peptide (CAP18p), and two p15 isoforms to apparent homogeneity. Of these four polypeptides, only CAP18p was independently cytotoxic to encapsulated Escherichia coli (90% inhibitory concentration, ∼600 nM) but it was ∼50-fold less potent on a molar basis than the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI). However, all four cathelicidin species, notably including proCAP18, exhibited antibacterial synergy with BPI, and the p15s also displayed synergy with CAP18p in the absence of BPI. Subnanomolar concentrations of proCAP18 blocked lipopolysaccharide-induced chemiluminescence of human leukocytes, showing a molar potency more than 100-fold greater than that of CAP18p (∼20 nM) or BPI (∼50 nM). Thus, while independent bactericidal activity of cathelicidins requires processing, other host-defense functions do not and are more potently expressed by the unprocessed protein than by the C-terminal peptide. PMID:11796584

  19. Importance of dose intensity in neuro-oncology clinical trials: summary report of the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Consortium.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, N D; Anderson, C P; Bleyer, W A; Cairncross, J G; Cloughesy, T; Eck, S L; Guastadisegni, P; Hall, W A; Muldoon, L L; Patel, S J; Peereboom, D; Siegal, T; Neuwelt, E A

    2001-01-01

    Therapeutic options for the treatment of malignant brain tumors have been limited, in part, because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier. For this reason, the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Consortium, the focus of which was the "Importance of Dose Intensity in Neuro-Oncology Clinical Trials," was convened in April 2000, at Government Camp, Mount Hood, Oregon. This meeting, which was supported by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, brought together clinicians and basic scientists from across the U.S. to discuss the role of dose intensity and enhanced chemotherapy delivery in the treatment of malignant brain tumors and to design multicenter clinical trials. Optimizing chemotherapy delivery to the CNS is crucial, particularly in view of recent progress identifying certain brain tumors as chemosensitive. The discovery that specific constellations of genetic alterations can predict which tumors are chemoresponsive, and can therefore more accurately predict prognosis, has important implications for delivery of intensive, effective chemotherapy regimens with acceptable toxicities. This report summarizes the discussions, future directions, and key questions regarding dose-intensive treatment of primary CNS lymphoma, CNS relapse of systemic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, high-grade glioma, and metastatic cancer of the brain. The promising role of cytoenhancers and chemoprotectants as part of dose-intensive regimens for chemosensitive brain tumors and development of improved gene therapies for malignant gliomas are discussed. PMID:11305417

  20. The proteolytic action of Arvin on human fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Ewart, M. R.; Hatton, M. W. C.; Basford, J. M.; Dodgson, K. S.

    1970-01-01

    1. Human fibrinogen was subjected to proteolysis by enzyme preparations (clinical Arvin and IRC-50 Arvin) from the venom of Agkistrodon rhodostoma. 2. IRC-50 Arvin releases three peptides from fibrinogen, and these were identified as fibrinopeptides AP, AY and A. 3. The less purified `clinical' Arvin releases, in addition to fibrinopeptides AP, AY and A, small amounts of two heptapeptides derived from fibrinopeptides AP and A, probably because it contains another enzyme as well as Arvin. 4. No fibrinopeptide B is released by either Arvin preparation. 5. Thus, although Arvin is known to differ from `reptilase' from Bothrops jararaca in that it does not activate the enzyme that cross-links fibrin (fibrin-stabilizing factor), it is identical with reptilase with respect to the peptides that it liberates from fibrinogen. PMID:5529716

  1. A putative biomarker signature for clinically effective AKT inhibition: correlation of in vitro, in vivo and clinical data identifies the importance of modulation of the mTORC1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cheraghchi-Bashi, Azadeh; Salazar, Jean-Frederic; Gungor, Hatice; Saleem, Azeem; Cunnea, Paula; Rama, Nona; Salinas, Cristian; Mills, Gordon B.; Morris, Shannon R.; Kumar, Rakesh; Gabra, Hani; Stronach, Euan A.

    2015-01-01

    Our identification of dysregulation of the AKT pathway in ovarian cancer as a platinum resistance specific event led to a comprehensive analysis of in vitro, in vivo and clinical behaviour of the AKT inhibitor GSK2141795. Proteomic biomarker signatures correlating with effects of GSK2141795 were developed using in vitro and in vivo models, well characterised for related molecular, phenotypic and imaging endpoints. Signatures were validated in temporally paired biopsies from patients treated with GSK2141795 in a clinical study. GSK2141795 caused growth-arrest as single agent in vitro, enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in vitro and reduced tumour volume in combination with platinum in vivo. GSK2141795 treatment in vitro and in vivo resulted in ~50-90% decrease in phospho-PRAS40 and 20-80% decrease in fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. Proteomic analysis of GSK2141795 in vitro and in vivo identified a signature of pathway inhibition including changes in AKT and p38 phosphorylation and total Bim, IGF1R, AR and YB1 levels. In patient biopsies, prior to treatment with GSK2141795 in a phase 1 clinical trial, this signature was predictive of post-treatment changes in the response marker CA125. Development of this signature represents an opportunity to demonstrate the clinical importance of AKT inhibition for re-sensitisation of platinum resistant ovarian cancer to platinum. PMID:26497682

  2. A putative biomarker signature for clinically effective AKT inhibition: correlation of in vitro, in vivo and clinical data identifies the importance of modulation of the mTORC1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheraghchi-Bashi, Azadeh; Parker, Christine A; Curry, Ed; Salazar, Jean-Frederic; Gungor, Hatice; Saleem, Azeem; Cunnea, Paula; Rama, Nona; Salinas, Cristian; Mills, Gordon B; Morris, Shannon R; Kumar, Rakesh; Gabra, Hani; Stronach, Euan A

    2015-12-01

    Our identification of dysregulation of the AKT pathway in ovarian cancer as a platinum resistance specific event led to a comprehensive analysis of in vitro, in vivo and clinical behaviour of the AKT inhibitor GSK2141795. Proteomic biomarker signatures correlating with effects of GSK2141795 were developed using in vitro and in vivo models, well characterised for related molecular, phenotypic and imaging endpoints. Signatures were validated in temporally paired biopsies from patients treated with GSK2141795 in a clinical study. GSK2141795 caused growth-arrest as single agent in vitro, enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in vitro and reduced tumour volume in combination with platinum in vivo. GSK2141795 treatment in vitro and in vivo resulted in ~50-90% decrease in phospho-PRAS40 and 20-80% decrease in fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. Proteomic analysis of GSK2141795 in vitro and in vivo identified a signature of pathway inhibition including changes in AKT and p38 phosphorylation and total Bim, IGF1R, AR and YB1 levels. In patient biopsies, prior to treatment with GSK2141795 in a phase 1 clinical trial, this signature was predictive of post-treatment changes in the response marker CA125. Development of this signature represents an opportunity to demonstrate the clinical importance of AKT inhibition for re-sensitisation of platinum resistant ovarian cancer to platinum. PMID:26497682

  3. Sequencer-Based Capillary Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE) Targeting the rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) Regions for Accurate Identification of Clinically Important Yeast Species

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sharon C.-A.; Wang, He; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Kong, Fanrong; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Accurate species identification of Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon and other yeast pathogens is important for clinical management. In the present study, we developed and evaluated a yeast species identification scheme by determining the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region length types (LTs) using a sequencer-based capillary gel electrophoresis (SCGE) approach. A total of 156 yeast isolates encompassing 32 species were first used to establish a reference SCGE ITS LT database. Evaluation of the ITS LT database was then performed on (i) a separate set of (n = 97) clinical isolates by SCGE, and (ii) 41 isolates of 41 additional yeast species from GenBank by in silico analysis. Of 156 isolates used to build the reference database, 41 ITS LTs were identified, which correctly identified 29 of the 32 (90.6%) species, with the exception of Trichosporon asahii, Trichosporon japonicum and Trichosporon asteroides. In addition, eight of the 32 species revealed different electropherograms and were subtyped into 2–3 different ITS LTs each. Of the 97 test isolates used to evaluate the ITS LT scheme, 96 (99.0%) were correctly identified to species level, with the remaining isolate having a novel ITS LT. Of the additional 41 isolates for in silico analysis, none was misidentified by the ITS LT database except for Trichosporon mucoides whose ITS LT profile was identical to that of Trichosporon dermatis. In conclusion, yeast identification by the present SCGE ITS LT assay is a fast, reproducible and accurate alternative for the identification of clinically important yeasts with the exception of Trichosporon species. PMID:27105313

  4. TAILS N-terminomics of human platelets reveals pervasive metalloproteinase-dependent proteolytic processing in storage.

    PubMed

    Prudova, Anna; Serrano, Katherine; Eckhard, Ulrich; Fortelny, Nikolaus; Devine, Dana V; Overall, Christopher M

    2014-12-18

    Proteases, and specifically metalloproteinases, have been linked to the loss of platelet function during storage before transfusion, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We used a dedicated N-terminomics technique, iTRAQ terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates (TAILS), to characterize the human platelet N-terminome, proteome, and posttranslational modifications throughout platelet storage over 9 days under blood-banking conditions. From the identified 2938 proteins and 7503 unique peptides, we characterized N-terminal methionine excision, co- and posttranslational Nα acetylation, protein maturation, and proteolytic processing of proteins in human platelets. We also identified for the first time 10 proteins previously classified by the Human Proteome Organization as "missing" in the human proteome. Most N termini (77%) were internal neo-N termini (105 were novel potential alternative translation start sites, and 2180 represented stable proteolytic products), thus highlighting a prominent yet previously uncharacterized role of proteolytic processing during platelet storage. Protease inhibitor studies revealed metalloproteinases as being primarily responsible for proteolytic processing (as opposed to degradation) during storage. System-wide identification of metalloproteinase and other proteinase substrates and their respective cleavage sites suggests novel mechanisms of the effect of proteases on protein activity and platelet function during storage. All data sets and metadata are available through ProteomeXchange with the data set identifier PXD000906. PMID:25331112

  5. Proteolytic Enzymes in Detergents: Evidence of Their Presence through Activity Measurements Based on Electrophoresis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saperas, Nuria; Fonfria-Subiros, Elsa

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory exercise uses a problem-based approach to expose students to some basic concepts relating to proteins and enzymes. One of the main applications of enzymes at the industrial level is their use in the detergent market. The students examine a detergent sample to ascertain whether proteolytic enzymes are a component and, if so, which…

  6. Splicing and proteolytic processing in VEGF signaling: now it is the coreceptor's turn.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaolan; Bouyain, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing and proteolytic processing of VEGFs generate proteins with distinct physiological roles. In this issue of Structure, Parker et al. show that proteolysis of an isoform of the VEGF-C coreceptor Nrp2 produces a soluble receptor that inhibits VEGF-C/Nrp2 interactions. PMID:25862932

  7. Extracellular thermostable proteolytic activity of the milk spoilage bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PS19 on bovine caseins.

    PubMed

    Stuknytė, M; Decimo, M; Colzani, M; Silvetti, T; Brasca, M; Cattaneo, S; Aldini, G; De Noni, I

    2016-06-01

    We studied the thermostable proteolytic activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens PS19 isolated from raw bovine milk. The heat-treated cell-free supernatant (HT-CFS) contained a thermostable protease of approximately 45 kDa, as revealed by casein zymography. We assigned this enzyme to P. fluorescens AprX metalloprotease (UniProtKB Acc. No. C9WKP6). After concentration by ultrafiltration at 10 kDa, the HT-CFS showed 2 other thermostable proteolytic bands on zymogram, with molecular masses of approximately 15 and 25 kDa. The former resulted a fragment of the AprX protease, whereas the 25-kDa protease was not homologous to any known protein of Pseudomonas spp. Subsequently, we assessed the proteolytic activity of the HT-CFS on bovine αS-, β-, and κ-casein during in vitro incubation at 7 or 22°C. By means of ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry we identified the released peptides (n=591). Some of them resisted proteolysis during the whole incubation period at both incubation temperatures and, therefore, they could be assumed as indicators of the proteolytic action of P. fluorescens PS19 on bovine caseins. PMID:26995139

  8. Glucocorticoids activate the ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic system in skeletal muscle during fasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, S. S.; Goldberg, A. L.; Goldberger, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are essential for the increase in protein breakdown in skeletal muscle normally seen during fasting. To determine which proteolytic pathway(s) are activated upon fasting, leg muscles from fed and fasted normal rats were incubated under conditions that block or activate different proteolytic systems. After food deprivation (1 day), the nonlysosomal ATP-dependent process increased by 250%, as shown in experiments involving depletion of muscle ATP. Also, the maximal capacity of the lysosomal process increased 60-100%, but no changes occurred in the Ca(2+)-dependent or the residual energy-independent proteolytic processes. In muscles from fasted normal and adrenalectomized (ADX) rats, the protein breakdown sensitive to inhibitors of the lysosomal or Ca(2+)-dependent pathways did not differ. However, the ATP-dependent process was 30% slower in muscles from fasted ADX rats. Administering dexamethasone to these animals or incubating their muscles with dexamethasone reversed this defect. During fasting, when the ATP-dependent process rises, muscles show a two- to threefold increase in levels of ubiquitin (Ub) mRNA. However, muscles of ADX animals failed to show this response. Injecting dexamethasone into the fasted ADX animals increased muscle Ub mRNA within 6 h. Thus glucocorticoids activate the ATP-Ub-dependent proteolytic pathway in fasting apparently by enhancing the expression of components of this system such as Ub.

  9. Changes in expression of proteolytic genes in response to anabolic and catabolic signals in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rates of protein accrual are largely affected by rates of protein degradation. Determining how proteolytic pathways are affected by catabolic and anabolic signals will contribute to the understanding of the impact and regulation these pathways have on protein turnover. Real time RT-PCR was used to...

  10. Site-specific proteolytic degradation of IgG monoclonal antibodies expressed in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Hehle, Verena K; Lombardi, Raffaele; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Paul, Mathew J; Di Micco, Patrizio; Morea, Veronica; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello; Ma, Julian K-C

    2015-02-01

    Plants are promising hosts for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, proteolytic degradation of antibodies produced both in stable transgenic plants and using transient expression systems is still a major issue for efficient high-yield recombinant protein accumulation. In this work, we have performed a detailed study of the degradation profiles of two human IgG1 mAbs produced in plants: an anti-HIV mAb 2G12 and a tumour-targeting mAb H10. Even though they use different light chains (κ and λ, respectively), the fragmentation pattern of both antibodies was similar. The majority of Ig fragments result from proteolytic degradation, but there are only a limited number of plant proteolytic cleavage events in the immunoglobulin light and heavy chains. All of the cleavage sites identified were in the proximity of interdomain regions and occurred at each interdomain site, with the exception of the VL /CL interface in mAb H10 λ light chain. Cleavage site sequences were analysed, and residue patterns characteristic of proteolytic enzymes substrates were identified. The results of this work help to define common degradation events in plant-produced mAbs and raise the possibility of predicting antibody degradation patterns 'a priori' and designing novel stabilization strategies by site-specific mutagenesis. PMID:25283551

  11. Alleviation of Proteolytic Sensitivity To Enhance Recombinant Lipase Production in Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Niju; Chou, C. Perry

    2009-01-01

    Two amino acids, Leu149 and Val223, were identified as proteolytically sensitive when Pseudozyma antarctica lipase (PalB) was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The functional expression was enhanced using the double mutant for cultivation. However, the recombinant protein production was still limited by PalB misfolding, which was resolved by DsbA coexpression. PMID:19542329

  12. Proteolytic processing of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus nsp2 replicase protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One critical step in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) replication is the proteolytic processing of the ORF1 polyprotein (replicase). The replicase polyprotein is generally believed to be processed to generate at least 12 smaller nonstructural proteins (nsps) involved in r...

  13. Proteolytic Products of the Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Nsp2 Replicase Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nsp2 replicase protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) was recently demonstrated to be processed from its precursor by the PL2 protease at or near the G1196|G1197 dipeptide in transfected CHO cells. Here, the proteolytic cleavage of PRRSV nsp2 was further investiga...

  14. Importance of Client Orientation Domains in Non-Clinical Quality of Care: A Household Survey in High and Low Income Districts of Mashhad

    PubMed Central

    Fazaeli, Somayeh; Yousefi, Mehdi; Banikazemi, Seyed Hasan; Hashemi, Seyed Amir Hossein Ghazizadeh; Vakilzadeh, Ali Khorsand; Aval, Narges Hoseinzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Responsiveness introduced by WHO as a key indicator to assess the performance of health systems and measures by common set of domains that are categorized in to two main categories “Respect for persons” and “client orientation”. This study measured importance of client orientation domains in high and low income districts of Mashhad. In this cross-sectional and explanatory study, Sample of 923 households were selected randomly from two high and low income districts of Mashhad. World Health Organization (WHO) questionnaire was used for data collection. Standard frequency analyses and Ordinal logistic regression (OLR) was employed for data analysis. In general, respondents selected quality of basic amenities as the most important domain and access to social support networks was identified as the least important domain. Households in high income area scored higher domains of prompt attentions and choice Compared to low income. There was a significant relationship between variables of ages, having member that need to care and self-assessed health with the ranking of client orientation domains. Study of households’ view on ranking of non-clinical aspects of quality of care, especially when faced with limited resources, can help to conduct efforts towards subjects that are more important, and lead to improve the health system performance and productivity. PMID:26925911

  15. Importance of Client Orientation Domains in Non-Clinical Quality of Care: A Household Survey in High and Low Income Districts of Mashhad.

    PubMed

    Fazaeli, Somayeh; Yousefi, Mehdi; Banikazemi, Seyed Hasan; Ghazizadeh Hashemi, Seyed Amir Hossein; Vakilzadeh, Ali Khorsand; Hoseinzadeh Aval, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Responsiveness introduced by WHO as a key indicator to assess the performance of health systems and measures by common set of domains that are categorized in to two main categories "Respect for persons" and "client orientation". This study measured importance of client orientation domains in high and low income districts of Mashhad. In this cross-sectional and explanatory study, Sample of 923 households were selected randomly from two high and low income districts of Mashhad. World Health Organization (WHO) questionnaire was used for data collection. Standard frequency analyses and Ordinal logistic regression (OLR) was employed for data analysis. In general, respondents selected quality of basic amenities as the most important domain and access to social support networks was identified as the least important domain. Households in high income area scored higher domains of prompt attentions and choice Compared to low income. There was a significant relationship between variables of ages, having member that need to care and self-assessed health with the ranking of client orientation domains.Study of households' view on ranking of non-clinical aspects of quality of care, especially when faced with limited resources, can help to conduct efforts towards subjects that are more important, and lead to improve the health system performance and productivity. PMID:26925911

  16. Proteolytic Activation of the Human Epithelial Sodium Channel by Trypsin IV and Trypsin I Involves Distinct Cleavage Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Haerteis, Silke; Krappitz, Annabel; Krappitz, Matteus; Murphy, Jane E.; Bertog, Marko; Krueger, Bettina; Nacken, Regina; Chung, Hyunjae; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Knecht, Wolfgang; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Korbmacher, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic activation is a unique feature of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and the physiologically relevant proteases remain to be identified. The serine protease trypsin I can activate ENaC in vitro but is unlikely to be the physiologically relevant activating protease in ENaC-expressing tissues in vivo. Herein, we investigated whether human trypsin IV, a form of trypsin that is co-expressed in several extrapancreatic epithelial cells with ENaC, can activate human ENaC. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, we monitored proteolytic activation of ENaC currents and the appearance of γENaC cleavage products at the cell surface. We demonstrated that trypsin IV and trypsin I can stimulate ENaC heterologously expressed in oocytes. ENaC cleavage and activation by trypsin IV but not by trypsin I required a critical cleavage site (Lys-189) in the extracellular domain of the γ-subunit. In contrast, channel activation by trypsin I was prevented by mutating three putative cleavage sites (Lys-168, Lys-170, and Arg-172) in addition to mutating previously described prostasin (RKRK178), plasmin (Lys-189), and neutrophil elastase (Val-182 and Val-193) sites. Moreover, we found that trypsin IV is expressed in human renal epithelial cells and can increase ENaC-mediated sodium transport in cultured human airway epithelial cells. Thus, trypsin IV may regulate ENaC function in epithelial tissues. Our results show, for the first time, that trypsin IV can stimulate ENaC and that trypsin IV and trypsin I activate ENaC by cleavage at distinct sites. The presence of distinct cleavage sites may be important for ENaC regulation by tissue-specific proteases. PMID:24841206

  17. Fibrinogen cleavage by the Streptococcus pyogenes extracellular cysteine protease and generation of antibodies that inhibit enzyme proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuka, Y V; Pillai, S; Gubba, S; Musser, J M; Olmsted, S B

    1999-09-01

    The extracellular cysteine protease from Streptococcus pyogenes is a virulence factor that plays a significant role in host-pathogen interaction. Streptococcal protease is expressed as an inactive 40-kDa precursor that is autocatalytically converted into a 28-kDa mature (active) enzyme. Replacement of the single cysteine residue involved in formation of the enzyme active site with serine (C192S mutation) abolished detectable proteolytic activity and eliminated autocatalytic processing of zymogen to the mature form. In the present study, we investigated activity of the wild-type (wt) streptococcal protease toward human fibrinogen and bovine casein. The former is involved in blood coagulation, wound healing, and other aspects of hemostasis. Treatment with streptococcal protease resulted in degradation of the COOH-terminal region of fibrinogen alpha chain, indicating that fibrinogen may serve as an important substrate for this enzyme during the course of human infection. Polyclonal antibodies generated against recombinant 40- and 28-kDa (r40- and r28-kDa) forms of the C192S streptococcal protease mutant exhibited high enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titers but demonstrated different inhibition activities toward proteolytic action of the wt enzyme. Activity of the wt protease was readily inhibited when the reaction was carried out in the presence of antibodies generated against r28-kDa C192S mutant. Antibodies produced against r40-kDa C192S mutant had no significant effect on proteolysis. These data suggest that the presence of the NH(2)-terminal prosegment prevents generation of functionally active antibodies and indicate that inhibition activity of antibodies most likely depends on their ability to bind the active-site region epitope(s) of the protein. PMID:10456870

  18. Fibrinogen Cleavage by the Streptococcus pyogenes Extracellular Cysteine Protease and Generation of Antibodies That Inhibit Enzyme Proteolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Matsuka, Yury V.; Pillai, Subramonia; Gubba, Siddeswar; Musser, James M.; Olmsted, Stephen B.

    1999-01-01

    The extracellular cysteine protease from Streptococcus pyogenes is a virulence factor that plays a significant role in host-pathogen interaction. Streptococcal protease is expressed as an inactive 40-kDa precursor that is autocatalytically converted into a 28-kDa mature (active) enzyme. Replacement of the single cysteine residue involved in formation of the enzyme active site with serine (C192S mutation) abolished detectable proteolytic activity and eliminated autocatalytic processing of zymogen to the mature form. In the present study, we investigated activity of the wild-type (wt) streptococcal protease toward human fibrinogen and bovine casein. The former is involved in blood coagulation, wound healing, and other aspects of hemostasis. Treatment with streptococcal protease resulted in degradation of the COOH-terminal region of fibrinogen α chain, indicating that fibrinogen may serve as an important substrate for this enzyme during the course of human infection. Polyclonal antibodies generated against recombinant 40- and 28-kDa (r40- and r28-kDa) forms of the C192S streptococcal protease mutant exhibited high enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titers but demonstrated different inhibition activities toward proteolytic action of the wt enzyme. Activity of the wt protease was readily inhibited when the reaction was carried out in the presence of antibodies generated against r28-kDa C192S mutant. Antibodies produced against r40-kDa C192S mutant had no significant effect on proteolysis. These data suggest that the presence of the NH2-terminal prosegment prevents generation of functionally active antibodies and indicate that inhibition activity of antibodies most likely depends on their ability to bind the active-site region epitope(s) of the protein. PMID:10456870

  19. Proteolytic Digestion and TiO2 Phosphopeptide Enrichment Microreactor for Fast MS Identification of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jingren; Lazar, Iulia M

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of phosphorylation state(s) of a protein is best accomplished by using isolated or enriched phosphoprotein samples or their corresponding phosphopeptides. The process is typically time-consuming as, often, a combination of analytical approaches must be used. To facilitate throughput in the study of phosphoproteins, a microreactor that enables a novel strategy for performing fast proteolytic digestion and selective phosphopeptide enrichment was developed. The microreactor was fabricated using 100 μm i.d. fused-silica capillaries packed with 1-2 mm beds of C18 and/or TiO2 particles. Proteolytic digestion-only, phosphopeptide enrichment-only, and sequential proteolytic digestion/phosphopeptide enrichment microreactors were developed and tested with standard protein mixtures. The protein samples were adsorbed on the C18 particles, quickly digested with a proteolytic enzyme infused over the adsorbed proteins, and further eluted onto the TiO2 microreactor for enrichment in phosphopeptides. A number of parameters were optimized to speed up the digestion and enrichments processes, including microreactor dimensions, sample concentrations, digestion time, flow rates, buffer compositions, and pH. The effective time for the steps of proteolytic digestion and enrichment was less than 5 min. For simple samples, such as standard protein mixtures, this approach provided equivalent or better results than conventional bench-top methods, in terms of both enzymatic digestion and selectivity. Analysis times and reagent costs were reduced ~10- to 15-fold. Preliminary analysis of cell extracts and recombinant proteins indicated the feasibility of integration of these microreactors in more advanced workflows amenable for handling real-world biological samples. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26883530

  20. Proteolytic Enzymes Clustered in Specialized Plasma-Membrane Domains Drive Endothelial Cells’ Migration

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, Monica; Carfì Pavia, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In vitro cultured endothelial cells forming a continuous monolayer establish stable cell-cell contacts and acquire a “resting” phenotype; on the other hand, when growing in sparse conditions these cells acquire a migratory phenotype and invade the empty area of the culture. Culturing cells in different conditions, we compared expression and clustering of proteolytic enzymes in cells having migratory versus stationary behavior. In order to observe resting and migrating cells in the same microscopic field, a continuous cell monolayer was wounded. Increased expression of proteolytic enzymes was evident in cell membranes of migrating cells especially at sprouting sites and in shed membrane vesicles. Gelatin zymography and western blotting analyses confirmed that in migrating cells, expression of membrane-bound and of vesicle-associated proteolytic enzymes are increased. The enzymes concerned include MMP-2, MMP-9, MT1-MMP, seprase, DPP4 (DiPeptidyl Peptidase 4) and uPA. Shed membrane vesicles were shown to exert degradative activity on ECM components and produce substrates facilitating cell migration. Vesicles shed by migrating cells degraded ECM components at an increased rate; as a result their effect on cell migration was amplified. Inhibiting either Matrix Metallo Proteases (MMPs) or Serine Integral Membrane Peptidases (SIMPs) caused a decrease in the stimulatory effect of vesicles, inhibiting the spontaneous migratory activity of cells; a similar result was also obtained when a monoclonal antibody acting on DPP4 was tested. We conclude that proteolytic enzymes have a synergistic stimulatory effect on cell migration and that their clustering probably facilitates the proteolytic activation cascades needed to produce maximal degradative activity on cell substrates during the angiogenic process. PMID:27152413

  1. Combinatorial protein engineering of proteolytically resistant mesotrypsin inhibitors as candidates for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Itay; Kayode, Olumide; Hockla, Alexandra; Sankaran, Banumathi; Radisky, Derek C; Radisky, Evette S; Papo, Niv

    2016-05-15

    Engineered protein therapeutics offer advantages, including strong target affinity, selectivity and low toxicity, but like natural proteins can be susceptible to proteolytic degradation, thereby limiting their effectiveness. A compelling therapeutic target is mesotrypsin, a protease up-regulated with tumour progression, associated with poor prognosis, and implicated in tumour growth and progression of many cancers. However, with its unique capability for cleavage and inactivation of proteinaceous inhibitors, mesotrypsin presents a formidable challenge to the development of biological inhibitors. We used a powerful yeast display platform for directed evolution, employing a novel multi-modal library screening strategy, to engineer the human amyloid precursor protein Kunitz protease inhibitor domain (APPI) simultaneously for increased proteolytic stability, stronger binding affinity and improved selectivity for mesotrypsin inhibition. We identified a triple mutant APPIM17G/I18F/F34V, with a mesotrypsin inhibition constant (Ki) of 89 pM, as the strongest mesotrypsin inhibitor yet reported; this variant displays 1459-fold improved affinity, up to 350 000-fold greater specificity and 83-fold improved proteolytic stability compared with wild-type APPI. We demonstrated that APPIM17G/I18F/F34V acts as a functional inhibitor in cell-based models of mesotrypsin-dependent prostate cancer cellular invasiveness. Additionally, by solving the crystal structure of the APPIM17G/I18F/F34V-mesotrypsin complex, we obtained new insights into the structural and mechanistic basis for improved binding and proteolytic resistance. Our study identifies a promising mesotrypsin inhibitor as a starting point for development of anticancer protein therapeutics and establishes proof-of-principle for a novel library screening approach that will be widely applicable for simultaneously evolving proteolytic stability in tandem with desired functionality for diverse protein scaffolds. PMID:26957636

  2. Enhanced Proteolytic Processing of Recombinant Human Coagulation Factor VIII B-Domain Variants by Recombinant Furins.

    PubMed

    Demasi, Marcos A; de S Molina, Erika; Bowman-Colin, Christian; Lojudice, Fernando H; Muras, Angelita; Sogayar, Mari C

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant human factor VIII (rFVIII) is used in replacement therapy for hemophilia A. Current research efforts are focused on bioengineering rFVIII molecules to improve its secretion efficiency and stability, limiting factors for its efficient production. However, high expression yield in mammalian cells of these rFVIII variants is generally associated with limited proteolytic processing. Non-processed single-chain polypeptides constitute non-natural FVIII molecule configurations with unpredictable toxicity and/or antigenicity. Our main objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of promoting full-proteolytic processing of an rFVIII variant retaining a portion of the B-domain, converting it into the smallest natural activatable form of rFVIII, while keeping its main advantage, i.e., improved secretion efficiency. We generated and employed a CHO-DG44 cell clone producing an rFVIII variant retaining a portion of the B-domain and the FVIII native cleavage site between Arg(1648) and Glu(1649). By bioengineering CHO-DG44 cells to express stably the recombinant human endoproteases PACE, PACE-SOL, PCSK5, PCSK6, or PCKS7, we were able to achieve complete intra- or extracellular proteolytic processing of this rFVIII variant. Additionally, our quantitative data indicated that removal of the B-domain segment by intracellular proteolytic processing does not interfere with this rFVIII variant secretion efficiency. This work also provides the first direct evidence of (1) intracellular cleavage at the Arg(1648) FVIII processing site promoted by wild-type PACE and PCSK7 and (2) proteolytic processing at the Arg(1648) FVIII processing site by PCSK6. PMID:27126696

  3. Proteolytic Digestion and TiO2 Phosphopeptide Enrichment Microreactor for Fast MS Identification of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jingren; Lazar, Iulia M.

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of phosphorylation state(s) of a protein is best accomplished by using isolated or enriched phosphoprotein samples or their corresponding phosphopeptides. The process is typically time-consuming as, often, a combination of analytical approaches must be used. To facilitate throughput in the study of phosphoproteins, a microreactor that enables a novel strategy for performing fast proteolytic digestion and selective phosphopeptide enrichment was developed. The microreactor was fabricated using 100 μm i.d. fused-silica capillaries packed with 1-2 mm beds of C18 and/or TiO2 particles. Proteolytic digestion-only, phosphopeptide enrichment-only, and sequential proteolytic digestion/phosphopeptide enrichment microreactors were developed and tested with standard protein mixtures. The protein samples were adsorbed on the C18 particles, quickly digested with a proteolytic enzyme infused over the adsorbed proteins, and further eluted onto the TiO2 microreactor for enrichment in phosphopeptides. A number of parameters were optimized to speed up the digestion and enrichments processes, including microreactor dimensions, sample concentrations, digestion time, flow rates, buffer compositions, and pH. The effective time for the steps of proteolytic digestion and enrichment was less than 5 min. For simple samples, such as standard protein mixtures, this approach provided equivalent or better results than conventional bench-top methods, in terms of both enzymatic digestion and selectivity. Analysis times and reagent costs were reduced ~10- to 15-fold. Preliminary analysis of cell extracts and recombinant proteins indicated the feasibility of integration of these microreactors in more advanced workflows amenable for handling real-world biological samples.

  4. Clinical spectrum and survival analysis of 145 cases of HIV-negative Castleman’s disease: renal function is an important prognostic factor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Li, Zhiyuan; Cao, Xinxin; Feng, Jun; Zhong, Dingrong; Wang, Shujie; Zhou, Daobin; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Castleman’s disease (CD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder with clinical features and prognostic factors that are incompletely characterized. This retrospective single-center study reviewed the largest HIV-negative CD patient cohort (n = 145) to date. By clinical classification, we identified 69 patients (47.6%) as unicentric CD (UCD) and 76 patients (52.4%) as multicentric CD (MCD). Pathological classification identified 74 patients (51.0%) with the hyaline-vascular variant, 51 patients (35.2%) with the plasma-cell variant, and 20 patients (13.8%) with a mixed variant. After a median follow-up duration of 58 months (range, 1–180 months), the 1-year and 5-year survival rates were 95.1% and 91.0%, respectively. UCD patients exhibited significantly better survival (1-year and 5-year survival rates of 98.5% and 97.1%, respectively) compared with MCD patients (1-year and 5-year survival rates of 92.1% and 85.5%, respectively; p = 0.005). By univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses, the estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 ml/min (with the MDRD equation; hazard ratio = 4.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.50–14.12; p = 0.008) was clinically significant and represented an independent predictor for death in MCD patients. In summary, this large-scale study suggests that UCD patients enjoy better survival than MCD patients and that renal function is an important prognostic factor for MCD patients. PMID:27029894

  5. Clinically important improvement in the WOMAC and predictor factors for response to non-specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in osteoarthritic patients: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aims of the present study were first to detect MCID for WOMAC in a Moroccan population, and second, to identify the best pre-treatment predictors on the change of health after treatment by non-specific, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and to evaluate whether the predictors were dependent on the choice of the response criterion. Methods The study involved 173 patients with osteoarthritis in whom primary care physicians decided to start treatment with non-selective NSAIDs. Assessments at admission and after 6 weeks were conducted. In order to determine the threshold levels associated with a definition of clinically important improvement, the receiver operating characteristic method was used. Three different measures of response to a 6-week NSAIDs treatment were used: one indirect measure (MCID in the total WOMAC score), one direct measure (transition question) and a combination of both criteria. Results Eighty patients (46.3%) reported "a slightly better" general health status compared to that of 6 weeks before NSAIDs treatment. The MCID proportion is a 16.0% reduction in WOMAC. The most stable pre-treatment predictors on the improvement of health after treatment by NSAIDs were the absence of previous knee injury and a high level of education. Conclusions In our data, a 16.0% reduction of the total WOMAC score from baseline was associated with the highest degree of improvement on the transition scale category. This cut-off point had good accuracy, and should be appropriate for use in the interpretation of clinical studies results, as well as in clinical care. PMID:22269793

  6. The aberrant right subclavian artery (arteria lusoria): the morphological and clinical aspects of one of the most important variations--a systematic study of 141 reports.

    PubMed

    Polguj, Michał; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Kasprzak, Jarosław D; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Topol, Mirosław; Majos, Agata

    2014-01-01

    The most important abnormality of the aortic arch is arguably the presence of an aberrant right subclavian artery (arteria lusoria). If this vessel compresses the adjacent structures, several symptoms may be produced. The aim of the study is to present the morphological and clinical aspects of the aberrant right subclavian artery. Three different databases searched for a review of pertinent literature using strictly predetermined criteria. Of 141 cases, 15 were cadaveric and 126 were clinically documented. The gender distribution of the subjects was 55.3% female and 44.7% male. The mean age of the patients at symptoms onset was 49.9 ± 19.4 years for all patients but 54.0 ± 19.6 years and 44.9 ± 18.1 years for female and male subjects, respectively (P = 0.0061). The most common symptoms in this group were dysphagia (71.2%), dyspnea (18.7%), retrosternal pain (17.0%), cough (7.6%), and weight loss (5.9%). The vascular anomalies coexisting with an arteria lusoria were truncus bicaroticus (19.2%), Kommerell's diverticulum (14.9%), aneurysm of the artery itself (12.8%), and a right sided aortic arch (9.2%). In conclusion, compression of adjacent structures by an aberrant right subclavian artery needs to be differentiated from other conditions presenting dysphagia, dyspnea, retrosternal pain, cough, and weight loss. PMID:25105156

  7. The Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery (Arteria Lusoria): The Morphological and Clinical Aspects of One of the Most Important Variations—A Systematic Study of 141 Reports

    PubMed Central

    Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Kasprzak, Jarosław D.; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Topol, Mirosław; Majos, Agata

    2014-01-01

    The most important abnormality of the aortic arch is arguably the presence of an aberrant right subclavian artery (arteria lusoria). If this vessel compresses the adjacent structures, several symptoms may be produced. The aim of the study is to present the morphological and clinical aspects of the aberrant right subclavian artery. Three different databases searched for a review of pertinent literature using strictly predetermined criteria. Of 141 cases, 15 were cadaveric and 126 were clinically documented. The gender distribution of the subjects was 55.3% female and 44.7% male. The mean age of the patients at symptoms onset was 49.9 ± 19.4 years for all patients but 54.0 ± 19.6 years and 44.9 ± 18.1 years for female and male subjects, respectively (P = 0.0061). The most common symptoms in this group were dysphagia (71.2%), dyspnea (18.7%), retrosternal pain (17.0%), cough (7.6%), and weight loss (5.9%). The vascular anomalies coexisting with an arteria lusoria were truncus bicaroticus (19.2%), Kommerell's diverticulum (14.9%), aneurysm of the artery itself (12.8%), and a right sided aortic arch (9.2%). In conclusion, compression of adjacent structures by an aberrant right subclavian artery needs to be differentiated from other conditions presenting dysphagia, dyspnea, retrosternal pain, cough, and weight loss. PMID:25105156

  8. What are the effects of varenicline compared with nicotine replacement therapy on long-term smoking cessation and clinically important outcomes? Protocol for a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Neil M; Taylor, Gemma; Taylor, Amy E; Thomas, Kyla H; Windmeijer, Frank; Martin, Richard M; Munafò, Marcus R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Smoking is a major avoidable cause of ill-health and premature death. Treatments that help patients successfully quit smoking have an important effect on health and life expectancy. Varenicline is a medication that can help smokers successfully quit smoking. However, there are concerns that it may cause adverse effects, such as increase in the occurrence of depression, self-harm and suicide and cardiovascular disease. In this study we aim to examine the effects of varenicline versus other smoking cessation pharmacotherapies on smoking cessation, health service use, all-cause and cause-specific mortality and physical and mental health conditions. Methods In this project we will investigate the effects of varenicline compared to nicotine replacement therapies on: (1) long-term smoking cessation and whether these effects differ by area level deprivation; and (2) the following clinically-important outcomes: rate of general practice and hospital attendance; all-cause mortality and death due to diseases of the respiratory system and cardiovascular disease; and a primary care diagnosis of respiratory illness, myocardial infarction or depression and anxiety. The study is based on a cohort of patients prescribed these smoking cessation medications from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). We will use three methods to overcome confounding: multivariable adjusted Cox regression, propensity score matched Cox regression, and instrumental variable regression. The total expected sample size for analysis will be at least 180 000. Follow-up will end with the earliest of either an ‘event’ or censoring due to the end of registration or death. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was not required for this study. This project has been approved by the CPRD's Independent Scientific Advisory Committee (ISAC). We will disseminate our findings via publications in international peer-reviewed journals and presentations at international conferences. PMID

  9. Proteolytic processing and activation of Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin by caprine small intestinal contents.

    PubMed

    Freedman, John C; Li, Jihong; Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Epsilon toxin (ETX), a pore-forming toxin produced by type B and D strains of Clostridium perfringens, mediates severe enterotoxemia in livestock and possibly plays a role in human disease. During enterotoxemia, the nearly inactive ETX prototoxin is produced in the intestines but then must be activated by proteolytic processing. The current study sought to examine ETX prototoxin processing and activation ex vivo using the intestinal contents of a goat, a natural host species for ETX-mediated disease. First, this study showed that the prototoxin has a KEIS N-terminal sequence with a molecular mass of 33,054 Da. When the activation of ETX prototoxin ex vivo by goat small intestinal contents was assessed by SDS-PAGE, the prototoxin was processed in a stepwise fashion into an ~27-kDa band or higher-molecular-mass material that could be toxin oligomers. Purified ETX corresponding to the ~27-kDa band was cytotoxic. When it was biochemically characterized by mass spectrometry, the copresence of three ETX species, each with different C-terminal residues, was identified in the purified ~27-kDa ETX preparation. Cytotoxicity of each of the three ETX species was then demonstrated using recombinant DNA approaches. Serine protease inhibitors blocked the initial proteotoxin processing, while carboxypeptidase inhibitors blocked further processing events. Taken together, this study provides important new insights indicating that, in the intestinal lumen, serine protease (including trypsin and possibly chymotrypsin) initiates the processing of the prototoxin but other proteases, including carboxypeptidases, then process the prototoxin into multiple active and stable species. Importance: Processing and activation by intestinal proteases is a prerequisite for ETX-induced toxicity. Previous studies had characterized the activation of ETX using only arbitrarily chosen amounts of purified trypsin and/or chymotrypsin. Therefore, the current study examined ETX activation ex vivo by natural

  10. A new method for monitoring the extracellular proteolytic activity of wine yeasts during alcoholic fermentation of grape must.

    PubMed

    Chasseriaud, Laura; Miot-Sertier, Cécile; Coulon, Joana; Iturmendi, Nerea; Moine, Virginie; Albertin, Warren; Bely, Marina

    2015-12-01

    The existing methods for testing proteolytic activity are time consuming, quite difficult to perform, and do not allow real-time monitoring. Proteases have attracted considerable interest in winemaking and some yeast species naturally present in grape must, such as Metschnikowia pulcherrima, are capable of expressing this activity. In this study, a new test is proposed for measuring proteolytic activity directly in fermenting grape must, using azocasein, a chromogenic substrate. Several yeast strains were tested and differences in proteolytic activity were observed. Moreover, analysis of grape must proteins in wines revealed that protease secreted by Metschnikowia strains may be active against wine proteins. PMID:26529648

  11. Autodigestion: Proteolytic Degradation and Multiple Organ Failure in Shock.

    PubMed

    Altshuler, Angelina E; Kistler, Erik B; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2016-05-01

    There is currently no effective treatment for multiorgan failure following shock other than supportive care. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of these sequelae to shock is required. The intestine plays a central role in multiorgan failure. It was previously suggested that bacteria and their toxins are responsible for the organ failure seen in circulatory shock, but clinical trials in septic patients have not confirmed this hypothesis. Instead, we review here evidence that the digestive enzymes, synthesized in the pancreas and discharged into the small intestine as requirement for normal digestion, may play a role in multiorgan failure. These powerful enzymes are nonspecific, highly concentrated, and fully activated in the lumen of the intestine. During normal digestion they are compartmentalized in the lumen of the intestine by the mucosal epithelial barrier. However, if this barrier becomes permeable, e.g. in an ischemic state, the digestive enzymes escape into the wall of the intestine. They digest tissues in the mucosa and generate small molecular weight cytotoxic fragments such as unbound free fatty acids. Digestive enzymes may also escape into the systemic circulation and activate other degrading proteases. These proteases have the ability to clip the ectodomain of surface receptors and compromise their function, for example cleaving the insulin receptor causing insulin resistance. The combination of digestive enzymes and cytotoxic fragments leaking into the central circulation causes cell and organ dysfunction, and ultimately may lead to complete organ failure and death. We summarize current evidence suggesting that enteral blockade of digestive enzymes inside the lumen of the intestine may serve to reduce acute cell and organ damage and improve survival in experimental shock. PMID:26717111

  12. Neprilysin Inhibits Coagulation through Proteolytic Inactivation of Fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Matthew; Henderson, Simon J; Ravnefjord, Anna; Schweikart, Fritz; Fowler, Susan B; Witt, Susanne; Hansson, Kenny M; Webster, Carl I

    2016-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is an endogenous protease that degrades a wide range of peptides including amyloid beta (Aβ), the main pathological component of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have engineered NEP as a potential therapeutic for AD but found in pre-clinical safety testing that this variant increased prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The objective of the current study was to investigate the effect of wild type NEP and the engineered variant on coagulation and define the mechanism by which this effect is mediated. PT and APTT were measured in cynomolgus monkeys and rats dosed with a human serum albumin fusion with an engineered variant of NEP (HSA-NEPv) as well as in control plasma spiked with wild type or variant enzyme. The coagulation factor targeted by NEP was determined using in vitro prothrombinase, calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) and fibrin formation assays as well as N-terminal sequencing of fibrinogen treated with the enzyme. We demonstrate that HSA-NEP wild type and HSA-NEPv unexpectedly impaired coagulation, increasing PT and APTT in plasma samples and abolishing fibrin formation from fibrinogen. This effect was mediated through cleavage of the N-termini of the Aα- and Bβ-chains of fibrinogen thereby significantly impairing initiation of fibrin formation by thrombin. Fibrinogen has therefore been identified for the first time as a substrate for NEP wild type suggesting that the enzyme may have a role in regulating fibrin formation. Reductions in NEP levels observed in AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy may contribute to neurovascular degeneration observed in these conditions. PMID:27437944

  13. Neprilysin Inhibits Coagulation through Proteolytic Inactivation of Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Burrell, Matthew; Henderson, Simon J.; Ravnefjord, Anna; Schweikart, Fritz; Fowler, Susan B.; Witt, Susanne; Hansson, Kenny M.; Webster, Carl I.

    2016-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is an endogenous protease that degrades a wide range of peptides including amyloid beta (Aβ), the main pathological component of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We have engineered NEP as a potential therapeutic for AD but found in pre-clinical safety testing that this variant increased prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The objective of the current study was to investigate the effect of wild type NEP and the engineered variant on coagulation and define the mechanism by which this effect is mediated. PT and APTT were measured in cynomolgus monkeys and rats dosed with a human serum albumin fusion with an engineered variant of NEP (HSA-NEPv) as well as in control plasma spiked with wild type or variant enzyme. The coagulation factor targeted by NEP was determined using in vitro prothrombinase, calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) and fibrin formation assays as well as N-terminal sequencing of fibrinogen treated with the enzyme. We demonstrate that HSA-NEP wild type and HSA-NEPv unexpectedly impaired coagulation, increasing PT and APTT in plasma samples and abolishing fibrin formation from fibrinogen. This effect was mediated through cleavage of the N-termini of the Aα- and Bβ-chains of fibrinogen thereby significantly impairing initiation of fibrin formation by thrombin. Fibrinogen has therefore been identified for the first time as a substrate for NEP wild type suggesting that the enzyme may have a role in regulating fibrin formation. Reductions in NEP levels observed in AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy may contribute to neurovascular degeneration observed in these conditions. PMID:27437944

  14. Characterisation of a novel proteolytic enzyme localised to goblet cells in rat and man.

    PubMed Central

    Nexø, E; Poulsen, S S; Hansen, S N; Kirkegaard, P; Olsen, P S

    1984-01-01

    A proteolytic enzyme, ingobsin , purified from rat duodenal extracts is shown to be localised to intestinal goblet cells of both man and rat. Enzyme positive cells decrease in number from duodenum to colon. The enzyme is a 33 000 Mr protein with an isoelectric point of 5.1. The pH optimum for enzymatic activity is 7.4-8.0. Based on substrate specificity for arg-x, lys-x and to a lesser degree tyr-x, on the effect of diisopropylphosphorofluoride , Trasylol and phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride and on proteolytic activity towards intact proteins, ingobsin is classified as a serine proteinase with endoproteolytic activity. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:6735249

  15. [A micromethod for the rapid detection of proteolytic activity of microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, G G

    1989-01-01

    The author has developed a micromodification of the rapid photoemulsion method for the detection of the microorganism proteolytic activity. The test is carried out on polystyrene plates, meat-peptone broth is used as the suspension fluid. Rectangular film strips are vertically placed into the wells, thus preventing false-negative reactions possible in case of an erroneous horizontal position of the film with the emulsion layer turned upwards if square or round film fragments are used. The proteolytic activities of 120 microorganism strains (95 of these hydrolyze gelatin) have been examined by the micromethod and the routine test with gelatin. The suggested test is 2-4-fold more rapid than the routine one used in investigations of the cultures slowly hydrolyzing gelatin. The fact that the test is carried out on the plates considerably reduces the nutrient medium and the number of laboratory glassware and helps obtain more accurate results. PMID:2468029

  16. When activity requires breaking up: LEKTI proteolytic activation cascade for specific proteinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Furio, Laetitia; Hovnanian, Alain

    2011-11-01

    Lymphoepithelial Kazal-type related inhibitor (LEKTI) is a multidomain proteinase inhibitor whose defective expression causes Netherton syndrome (NS). LEKTI is encoded by SPINK5, which is also a susceptibility gene for atopic disease. In this issue, Fortugno et al. report an elegant and thorough study of the LEKTI proteolytic activation process in which they identify the precise nature of the cleavage sites used and the bioactive fragments generated. They propose a proteolytic activation model in human skin and confirm differential inhibition of kallikrein (KLK) 5, 7, and 14 by the major physiological LEKTI fragments. They show that these bioactive fragments inhibit KLK-mediated proteolysis of desmoglein 1 (DSG1) and suggest a fine-tuned inhibition process controlling target serine proteinase (SP) activity. PMID:21997416

  17. The calcium-dependent proteolytic system calpain-calpastatin in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Pintér, M; Friedrich, P

    1988-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent proteolytic activity was detected at pH 7.5 in head extracts of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. This activity was abolished by iodoacetate, but was unaffected by phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride. These properties resemble those of the Ca2+-dependent thiol-proteinase calpain. The activity appeared at Mr 280,000 on Sepharose CL-6B gel chromatography. DEAE-cellulose chromatography revealed two activity peaks, with elution positions corresponding to vertebrate calpains I and II. The fly head enzymes were inhibited by a heat-stable and trypsin-sensitive component of the fly head extract, which also inhibited calpains from rat kidney. The inhibitor emerged from Sepharose CL-6B columns at Mr 310,000 and from DEAE-cellulose at a position corresponding to the protein inhibitor calpastatin from other sources. It is concluded that Drosophila heads comprise the Ca2+-dependent calpain-calpastatin proteolytic system. PMID:2845920

  18. Intestinal Absorption of Fibrinolytic and Proteolytic Lumbrokinase Extracted from Earthworm, Eisenia andrei

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiang Mei; Kim, Chung-Hyo; Lee, Chul Kyu; Shin, Jang Sik; Cho, Il Hwan

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the intestinal absorption of a fibrinolytic and proteolytic lumbrokinase extracted from Eisenia andrei, we used rat everted gut sacs and an in situ closed-loop recirculation method. We extracted lumbrokinase from Eisenia andrei, and then raised polyclonal antibody against lumbrokinase. Fibrinolytic activity and proteolytic activity in the serosal side of rat everted gut sacs incubated with lumbrokinase showed dose- and time-dependent patterns. Immunological results obtained by western blotting serosal side solution using rat everted gut sacs method showed that lumbrokinase proteins between 33.6 and 54.7 kDa are absorbed mostly by the intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis of plasma fractions obtained by in situ recirculation method confirmed that lumbrokinase F1 is absorbed into blood. These results support the notion that lumbrokinase can be absorbed from mucosal lumen into blood by oral administration. PMID:20473377

  19. Intestinal Absorption of Fibrinolytic and Proteolytic Lumbrokinase Extracted from Earthworm, Eisenia andrei.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiang Mei; Kim, Chung-Hyo; Lee, Chul Kyu; Shin, Jang Sik; Cho, Il Hwan; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the intestinal absorption of a fibrinolytic and proteolytic lumbrokinase extracted from Eisenia andrei, we used rat everted gut sacs and an in situ closed-loop recirculation method. We extracted lumbrokinase from Eisenia andrei, and then raised polyclonal antibody against lumbrokinase. Fibrinolytic activity and proteolytic activity in the serosal side of rat everted gut sacs incubated with lumbrokinase showed dose- and time-dependent patterns. Immunological results obtained by western blotting serosal side solution using rat everted gut sacs method showed that lumbrokinase proteins between 33.6 and 54.7 kDa are absorbed mostly by the intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis of plasma fractions obtained by in situ recirculation method confirmed that lumbrokinase F1 is absorbed into blood. These results support the notion that lumbrokinase can be absorbed from mucosal lumen into blood by oral administration. PMID:20473377

  20. Loss of proteolytically processed filaggrin caused by epidermal deletion of Matriptase/MT-SP1

    PubMed Central

    List, Karin; Szabo, Roman; Wertz, Philip W.; Segre, Julie; Haudenschild, Christian C.; Kim, Soo-Youl; Bugge, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    Profilaggrin is a large epidermal polyprotein that is proteolytically processed during keratinocyte differentiation to release multiple filaggrin monomer units as well as a calcium-binding regulatory NH2-terminal filaggrin S-100 protein. We show that epidermal deficiency of the transmembrane serine protease Matriptase/MT-SP1 perturbs lipid matrix formation, cornified envelope morphogenesis, and stratum corneum desquamation. Surprisingly, proteomic analysis of Matriptase/MT-SP1–deficient epidermis revealed the selective loss of both proteolytically processed filaggrin monomer units and the NH2-terminal filaggrin S-100 regulatory protein. This was associated with a profound accumulation of profilaggrin and aberrant profilaggrin-processing products in the stratum corneum. The data identify keratinocyte Matriptase/MT-SP1 as an essential component of the profilaggrin-processing pathway and a key regulator of terminal epidermal differentiation. PMID:14638864

  1. An ALS disease mutation in Cdc48/p97 impairs 20S proteasome binding and proteolytic communication.

    PubMed

    Barthelme, Dominik; Jauregui, Ruben; Sauer, Robert T

    2015-09-01

    Cdc48 (also known as p97 or VCP) is an essential and highly abundant, double-ring AAA+ ATPase, which is ubiquitous in archaea and eukaryotes. In archaea, Cdc48 ring hexamers play a direct role in quality control by unfolding and translocating protein substrates into the degradation chamber of the 20S proteasome. Whether Cdc48 and 20S cooperate directly in protein degradation in eukaryotic cells is unclear. Two regions of Cdc48 are important for 20S binding, the pore-2 loop at the bottom of the D2 AAA+ ring and a C-terminal tripeptide. Here, we identify an aspartic acid in the pore-2 loop as an important element in 20S recognition. Importantly, mutation of this aspartate in human Cdc48 has been linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In archaeal or human Cdc48 variants, we find that mutation of this pore-2 residue impairs 20S binding and proteolytic communication but does not affect the stability of the hexamer or rates of ATP hydrolysis and protein unfolding. These results suggest that human Cdc48 interacts functionally with the 20S proteasome. PMID:26134898

  2. The Relative Importance of Family History, Gender, Mode of Onset, and Age at Onset in Predicting Clinical Features of First-Episode Psychotic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Compton, Michael T; Berez, Chantal; Walker, Elaine F

    2014-11-01

    Objective: Family history of psychosis, gender, mode of onset, and age at onset are considered prognostic factors important to clinicians evaluating first-episode psychosis; yet, clinicians have little guidance as to how these four factors differentially predict early-course substance abuse, symptomatology, and functioning. We conducted a "head-to-head comparison" of these four factors regarding their associations with key clinical features at initial hospitalization. We also assessed potential interactions between gender and family history with regard to age at onset of psychosis and symptom severity.Methods: Consecutively admitted first-episode patients (n=334) were evaluated in two studies that rigorously assessed a number of early-course variables. Associations among variables of interest were examined using Pearson correlations, ÷2 tests, Student's t-tests, and 2x2 factorial analyses of variance.Results: Substance (nicotine, alcohol, and cannabis) abuse and positive symptom severity were predicted only by male gender. Negative symptom severity and global functioning impairments were predicted by earlier age at onset of psychosis. General psychopathology symptom severity was predicted by both mode of onset and age at onset. Interaction effects were not observed with regard to gender and family history in predicting age at onset or symptom severity.Conclusions: The four prognostic features have differential associations with substance abuse, domains of symptom severity, and global functioning. Gender and age at onset of psychosis appear to be more predictive of clinical features at the time of initial evaluation (and thus presumably longer-term outcomes) than the presence of a family history of psychosis and a more gradual mode of onset. PMID:25367167

  3. Heterogeneous clinical spectrum of anti-SRP myositis and importance of the methods of detection of anti-SRP autoantibodies: a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Picard, Cécile; Vincent, Thierry; Lega, Jean-Christophe; Hue, Sophie; Fortenfant, Françoise; Lakomy, Daniela; Humbel, René-Louis; Goetz, Joelle; Molinari, Nicolas; Bardin, Nathalie; Bertin, Daniel; Johanet, Catherine; Chretien, Pascale; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Desplat-Jégo, Sophie; Bossuyt, Xavier; Sibilia, Jean; Abreu, Isabelle; Chevailler, Alain; Fabien, Nicole

    2016-06-01

    Anti-signal recognition particle (SRP) antibodies are important serological markers for the diagnosis and the prognosis of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM), especially to distinguish immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM). This study was set up to investigate the phenotype associated with anti-SRP antibodies and to evaluate the methods for detecting these antibodies. Clinical and biological data were retrospectively obtained from 60 adult patients with anti-SRP antibodies detected by a dot immunoassay from 12 centers. Thirty-six (60 %) out of these 60 patients suffered from an IIM, and among them, 21 patients were diagnosed as IMNM. Among patients with a definite IIM, proximal weakness and myalgia were prominent symptoms at the time of diagnosis. Only few patients displayed severe extra-muscular symptoms such as cardiac involvement or severe myositis. Mean creatine kinase levels were high for all patients except for two of them. When testing by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on HEp2 cells, the fraction of patients displaying the typical anti-SRP fine speckled staining of the cytoplasm was higher in patients with IIM (30/36) (83 %) than in patients with non-IIM (3/24) (12.5 %) (p < 0.0001). Thirty (91 %) out of 33 patients with a positive immunodot and a characteristic IIF cytoplasmic staining suffered from a clinical definite myositis, whereas only 6 (22 %) out of 27 patients with a positive immunodot but a negative cytoplasmic pattern suffered from a myositis (p < 0.00001). This series highlights the strong heterogeneity of anti-SRP positivity that encompassed IMNM and non-IMNM and supports the necessity of considering both IIF and dot immunoassay to confirm the diagnosis of anti-SRP-associated myositis. PMID:26744256

  4. Activation of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) [alpha]-amylase inhibitor requires proteolytic processing of the proprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Pueyo, J.J.; Hunt, D.C.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain a plant defense protein that inhibits the [alpha]-amylases of mammals and insects. This [alpha]-amylase inhibitor ([alpha]Al) is synthesized as a proprotein on the endoplasmic reticulum and is proteolytically processed after arrival in the protein storage vacuoles to polypeptides of relative molecular weight (M[sub r]) 15,000 to 18,000. The authors report two types of evidence that proteolytic processing is linked to activation of the inhibitory activity. First, by surveying seed extracts of wild accessions of P. vulgaris and other species in the genus Phaseolus, they found that antibodies to [alpha]Al recognize large (M[sub r] 30,000-35,000) polypeptides as well as typical [alpha]Al processing products (M[sub r] 15,000-18,000). [alpha]Al activity was found in all extracts that had the typical [alpha]Al processed polypeptides, but was absent from seed extracts that lacked such polypeptides. Second, they made a mutant [alpha]Al in which asparagine-77 is changed to aspartic acid-77. This mutation slows down the proteolytic processing of pro-[alpha]Al when the gene is expressed in tobacco. When pro-[alpha]Al was separated from mature [alpha]Al by gel filtration, pro-[alpha]Al was found not to have [alpha]-amylase inhibitory activity. The authors interpret these results to mean that formation of the active inhibitor is causally related to proteolytic processing of the proprotein. They suggest that the polypeptide cleavage removes a conformation constraint on the precursor to produce the biochemically active molecule. 43 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Composition and proteolytic processing of corneal deposits associated with mutations in the TGFBI gene

    PubMed Central

    Karring, Henrik; Runager, Kasper; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Klintworth, Gordon K.; Højrup, Peter; Enghild, Jan J.

    2012-01-01

    Different types of granular corneal dystrophy (GCD)1 and lattice corneal dystrophy (LCD) are associated with mutations in the transforming growth factor beta induced gene (TGFBI). These dystrophies are characterized by the formation of non-amyloid granular deposits (GCDs) and amyloid (LCD type 1 and its variants) in the cornea. Typical corneal non-amyloid deposits from GCD type 2 (R124H), amyloid from a variant of LCD type 1 (V624M) and disease-free tissue controls were procured by laser capture microdissection and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Label-free quantitative comparisons of deposits and controls suggested that the non-amyloid sample (R124H) specifically accumulated transforming growth factor beta induced protein (TGFBIp/keratoepithelin/βig-h3), serum amyloid P-component, clusterin, type III collagen, keratin 3, and histone H3-like protein. The amyloid (V624M) similarly accumulated serum amyloid P-component and clusterin but also a C-terminal fragment of TGFBIp containing residues Y571-R588 derived from the fourth fasciclin-1 domain (FAS1-4), apolipoprotein E and apolipoprotein A-IV. Significantly, analyses of the amyloid sample also revealed the presence of the serine protease Htr (High-temperature requirement) A1 and a number of proteolytic cleavage sites in the FAS1-4 domain of TGFBIp. These cleavage sites were consistent with the ligand binding and proteolytic activity of HtrA1 suggesting that it plays a role in the proteolytic processing of the amyloidogenic FAS1-4 domain. Taken together, the data suggest that the amyloidogenic-prone region of the fourth FAS1 domain of TGFBIp encompasses the Y571-R588 peptide and that HtrA1 is involved in the proteolytic processing of TGFBIp-derived amyloid in vivo. PMID:22155582

  6. N-Terminal Enrichment: Developing a Protocol to Detect Specific Proteolytic Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Schepmoes, Athena A.; Zhang, Qibin; Petritis, Brianne O.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Proteolytic processing events are essential to physiological processes such as reproduction, development, and host responses, as well as regulating proteins in cancer; therefore, there is a significant need to develop robust approaches for characterizing such events. The current mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics techniques employs a “bottom-up” strategy, which does not allow for identification of different proteolytic proteins since the strategy measures all the small peptides from any given protein. The aim of this development is to enable the effective identification of specific proteolytic fragments. The protocol utilizes an acetylation reaction to block the N-termini of a protein, as well as any lysine residues. Following digestion, N-terminal peptides are enriched by removing peptides that contain free amines, using amine-reactive silica-bond succinic anhydride beads. The resulting enriched sample has one N-terminal peptide per protein, which reduces sample complexity and allows for increased analytical sensitivity compared to global proteomics.1 We initially compared the peptide identification and efficiency of blocking lysine using acetic anhydride (a 42 Da modification) or propionic anhydride (a 56 Da modification) in our protocol. Both chemical reactions resulted in comparable peptide identifications and ∼95 percent efficiency for blocking lysine residues. However, the use of propionic anhydride allowed us to distinguish in vivo acetylated peptides from chemically-tagged peptides.2 In an initial experiment using mouse plasma, we were able to identify >300 unique N-termini peptides, as well as many known cleavage sites. This protocol holds potential for uncovering new information related to proteolytic pathways, which will assist our understanding about cancer biology and efforts to identify potential biomarkers for various diseases. PMID:19949699

  7. Proteolytic cleavage and shedding of the bovine prion protein in two cell culture systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongxing; Klingeborn, Mikael; Simonsson, Magnus; Linné, Tommy

    2006-01-01

    We have compared the processing, turnover and release of bovine PrP (boPrP) in transfected baby hamster kidney (BHK) and mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. In BHK cells, boPrP was subjected to two distinct proteolytic cleavage events, the first was mapped between K(121) and H(122) generating an N-terminal and a C-terminal PrP fragment. Transport block experiments, cell surface biotinylation and PIPLC analyses showed that the bulk of boPrP on the cell surface was the C-terminal fragment and indicated that the first cleavage of boPrP took place prior to or very soon after it appears at the cell surface. The second cleavage was situated at the extreme C-terminus of the boPrP GPI-anchored C-terminal fragment and as a result of this was shed into the medium rapidly. The kinetics, the migration in SDS-PAGE of the released fragment and protease inhibition studies indicate that a proteolytic activity was responsible for the release of the boPrP fragment from its GPI-anchor. Both N- and C-terminal fragments of boPrP could be detected in the medium. Moreover, in normal bovine brain, a C-terminal fragment was identified, suggesting that similar proteolytic processing events occur in vivo. In N2a cells, the majority of boPrP was subjected to a more complete degradation process, and only trace amounts of full length boPrP was shed into cell culture medium in a process which also indicated a release by proteolytic cleavage. PMID:16140411

  8. N-Terminal Enrichment: Developing a Protocol to Detect Specific Proteolytic Fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Schepmoes, Athena A.; Zhang, Qibin; Petritis, Brianne O.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-12-01

    Proteolytic processing events are essential to physiological processes such as reproduction, development, and host responses, as well as regulating proteins in cancer; therefore, there is a significant need to develop robust approaches for characterizing such events. The current mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics techniques employs a “bottom-up” strategy, which does not allow for identification of different proteolytic proteins since the strategy measures all the small peptides from any given protein. The aim of this development is to enable the effective identification of specific proteolytic fragments. The protocol utilizes an acetylation reaction to block the N-termini of a protein, as well as any lysine residues. Following digestion, N-terminal peptides are enriched by removing peptides that contain free amines, using amine-reactive silica-bond succinic anhydride beads. The resulting enriched sample has one N-terminal peptide per protein, which reduces sample complexity and allows for increased analytical sensitivity compared to global proteomics.1 We initially compared the peptide identification and efficiency of blocking lysine using acetic anhydride (a 42 Da modification) or propionic anhydride (a 56 Da modification) in our protocol. Both chemical reactions resulted in comparable peptide identifications and *95 percent efficiency for blocking lysine residues. However, the use of propionic anhydride allowed us to distinguish in vivo acetylated peptides from chemically-tagged peptides.2 In an initial experiment using mouse plasma, we were able to identify *300 unique N-termini peptides, as well as many known cleavage sites. This protocol holds potential for uncovering new information related to proteolytic pathways, which will assist our understanding about cancer biology and efforts to identify potential biomarkers for various diseases.

  9. Activation of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor requires proteolytic processing of the proprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Pueyo, J J; Hunt, D C; Chrispeels, M J

    1993-01-01

    Seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain a plant defense protein that inhibits the alpha-amylases of mammals and insects. This alpha-amylase inhibitor (alpha AI) is synthesized as a proprotein on the endoplasmic reticulum and is proteolytically processed after arrival in the protein storage vacuoles to polypeptides of relative molecular weight (M(r)) 15,000 to 18,000. We report two types of evidence that proteolytic processing is linked to activation of the inhibitory activity. First, by surveying seed extracts of wild accessions of P. vulgaris and other species in the genus Phaseolus, we found that antibodies to alpha AI recognize large (M(r) 30,000-35,000) polypeptides as well as typical alpha AI processing products (M(r) 15,000-18,000). Alpha AI activity was found in all extracts that had the typical alpha AI processed polypeptides, but was absent from seed extracts that lacked such polypeptides. Second, we made a mutant alpha AI in which asparagine-77 is changed to aspartic acid-77. This mutation slows down the proteolytic processing of pro-alpha AI when the gene is expressed in tobacco. When pro-alpha AI was separated from mature alpha AI by gel filtration, pro-alpha AI was found not to have alpha-amylase inhibitory activity. We interpret these results to mean that formation of the active inhibitor is causally related to proteolytic processing of the proprotein. We suggest that the polypeptide cleavage removes a conformational constraint on the precursor to produce the biochemically active molecule. PMID:8310064

  10. [Activity of proteolytic and nucleolytic enzymes from the gonades of hydrobionts].

    PubMed

    Pozdniakova, Iu M; Pivnenko, T N; Epshteĭn, L M

    2004-01-01

    The activity of nucleolytic and proteolytic enzymes in milt of nine kinds of fishes belonging to various families and of three kinds invertebrates is determined. There is carried out electrophoreses division of preparations DNA, received from milts by various methods; there are determined structure and molecular weights of oligonucleotides. The influence of activity tissue enzymes on a destruction degree of DNA is established at addition enzymes of exogenic origin. PMID:19621738

  11. Coronavirus and Influenza Virus Proteolytic Priming Takes Place in Tetraspanin-Enriched Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Earnest, James T.; Hantak, Michael P.; Park, Jung-Eun

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coronaviruses (CoVs) and low-pathogenicity influenza A viruses (LP IAVs) depend on target cell proteases to cleave their viral glycoproteins and prime them for virus-cell membrane fusion. Several proteases cluster into tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs), suggesting that TEMs are preferred virus entry portals. Here we found that several CoV receptors and virus-priming proteases were indeed present in TEMs. Isolated TEMs, when mixed with CoV and LP IAV pseudoparticles, cleaved viral fusion proteins to fusion-primed fragments and potentiated viral transductions. That entering viruses utilize TEMs as a protease source was further confirmed using tetraspanin antibodies and tetraspanin short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). Tetraspanin antibodies inhibited CoV and LP IAV infections, but their virus-blocking activities were overcome by expressing excess TEM-associated proteases. Similarly, cells with reduced levels of the tetraspanin CD9 resisted CoV pseudoparticle transductions but were made susceptible by overproducing TEM-associated proteases. These findings indicated that antibodies and CD9 depletions interfere with viral proteolytic priming in ways that are overcome by surplus proteases. TEMs appear to be exploited by some CoVs and LP IAVs for appropriate coengagement with cell receptors and proteases. IMPORTANCE Enveloped viruses use their surface glycoproteins to catalyze membrane fusion, an essential cell entry step. Host cell components prime these viral surface glycoproteins to catalyze membrane fusion at specific times and places during virus cell entry. Among these priming components are proteases, which cleave viral surface glycoproteins, unleashing them to refold in ways that catalyze virus-cell membrane fusions. For some enveloped viruses, these proteases are known to reside on target cell surfaces. This research focuses on coronavirus and influenza A virus cell entry and identifies TEMs as sites of viral proteolysis, thereby defining subcellular

  12. On the agglutinogens of red cells developed with proteolytic enzymes and neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, K; Takahashi, K

    1976-10-01

    It has been known that the agglutinability of human red cells is changed or enhanced by treatments with proteolytic enzymes or neuraminidase. In this paper, the serological properties of agglutinogens developed by proteolytic enzymes (bromelin, ficin, papain, trypsin and pronase) and neuraminidase are investigated by using antisera to trypsin- and neuraminidase-treated red cells. The adsorptions of the antiserum to trypsinized red cells with the cells treated with each of the proteolytic enzymes showed that the agglutinogens uncovered by bromelin, ficin and papain were different from those by pronase and trypsin. It was demonstrated that pronase was the most effective enzyme to uncover the agglutinogen located on deeper site of red cell membrane. This was confirmed by the agglutination with the test cells treated twice with two kinds of the enzymes. The reactions of the antiserum to neuraminidase-treated red cells treated with six kinds of the enzymes indicated that the agglutinogens developed by neuraminidase resembled those by bromelin, ficin and papain more than those by trypsin and pronase. PMID:982434

  13. Analyzing Protease Specificity and Detecting in Vivo Proteolytic Events Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Nitin; Hixson, Kim K.; Culley, David E.; Smith, Richard D.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2010-07-01

    While trypsin remains the most commonly used protease in mass spectrometry, other proteases may be employed for increasing peptide-coverage or generating overlapping peptides. Knowledge of the accurate specifcity rules of these proteases is helpful for database search tools to detect peptides, and becomes crucial when mass spectrometry is used to discover in vivo proteolytic cleavages. In this study, we use tandem mass spectrometry to analyze the specifcity rules of selected proteases and describe MS- Proteolysis, a software tool for identifying putative sites of in vivo proteolytic cleavage. Our analysis suggests that the specifcity rules for some commonly used proteases can be improved, e.g., we find that V8 protease cuts not only after Asp and Glu, as currently expected, but also shows a smaller propensity to cleave after Gly for the conditions tested in this study. Finally, we show that comparative analysis of multiple proteases can be used to detect putative in vivo proteolytic sites on a proteome-wide scale.

  14. Use of proteolytic enzymes as an additional tool for trypanosomatid identification.

    PubMed

    Santos, A L S; Abreu, C M; Alviano, C S; Soares, R M A

    2005-01-01

    The expression of proteolytic activities in the Trypanosomatidae family was explored as a potential marker to discriminate between the morphologically indistinguishable flagellates isolated from insects and plants. We have comparatively analysed the proteolytic profiles of 19 monoxenous trypanosomatids (Herpetomonas anglusteri, H. samuelpessoai, H. mariadeanei, H. roitmani, H. muscarum ingenoplastis, H. muscarum muscarum, H. megaseliae, H. dendoderi, Herpetomoas sp., Crithidia oncopelti, C. deanei, C. acanthocephali, C. harmosa, C. fasciculata, C. guilhermei, C. luciliae, Blastocrithidia culicis, Leptomonas samueli and Lept. seymouri) and 4 heteroxenous flagellates (Phytomonas serpens, P. mcgheei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania amazonensis) by in situ detection of enzyme activities on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE ) containing co-polymerized gelatine as substrate, in association with specific proteinase inhibitors. All 23 trypanosomatids expressed at least 1 acidic proteolytic enzyme. In addition, a characteristic and specific pattern of cell-associated metallo and/or cysteine proteinases was observed, except for the similar profiles detected in 2 Herpetomonas (H. anglusteri and H. samuelpessoai) and 3 Crithidia (C. fasciculata, C. guilhermei and C. luciliae) species. However, these flagellates released distinct secretory proteinase profiles into the extracellular medium. These findings strongly suggest that the association of cellular and secretory proteinase pattern could represent a useful marker to help trypanosomatid identification. PMID:15700759

  15. Curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogels with controlled anti-proteolytic and pro-angiogenic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Dharunya, G; Duraipandy, N; Lakra, Rachita; Korapatti, Purna Sai; Jayavel, R; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala

    2016-01-01

    This paper elucidates the development of a curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogel system with controlled anti-proteolytic activity and pro-angiogenic efficacy. The results of this study showed that in situ cross-linking of curcumin with collagen leads to the development of aerogels with enhanced physical and mechanical properties. The integrity of collagen after cross-linking with curcumin was studied via FTIR spectroscopy. The results confirmed that the cross-linking with curcumin did not induce any structural changes in the collagen. The curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogels exhibited potent anti-proteolytic and anti-microbial activity. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopic analysis of curcumin cross-linked collagen aerogels showed a 3D microstructure that enhanced the adhesion and proliferation of cells. The highly organized geometry of collagen-curcumin aerogels enhanced the permeability and water-retaining ability required for the diffusion of nutrients that aid cellular growth. The pro-angiogenic properties of collagen-curcumin aerogels were ascribed to the cumulative effect of the nutraceutical and the collagen molecule, which augmented the restoration of damaged tissue. Further, these aerogels exhibited controlled anti-proteolytic activity, which makes them suitable 3D scaffolds for biomedical applications. This study provides scope for the development of biocompatible and bioresorbable collagen aerogel systems that use a nutraceutical as a cross-linker for biomedical applications. PMID:27509047

  16. A potent reporter applicable to the monitoring of caspase-3-dependent proteolytic cleavage.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoungsook; Kang, Hyo-Jin; Ahn, Junhyoung; Yi, So Yeon; Han, Sang Hee; Park, Hye-Jung; Chung, Sang J; Chung, Bong Hyun; Kim, Moonil

    2008-11-01

    In this study, we developed a chimeric caspase-3 substrate (GST:DEVD:EGFP) comprised of glutathione-S transferase (GST) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) with a specialized linker peptide harboring the caspase-3 cleavage sequence, DEVD. Using this reporter, we assessed the proteolytic cleavage of the artificial caspase-3 substrate for caspase-3. The common feature of this approach is that the presence of the DEVD sequence between GST and EGFP allows for caspase-3-dependent cleavage after the Asp (D) residue, resulting in the elimination of EGFP from the GST:DEVD:EGFP reporter. To the best of our knowledge, this study reports the first application employing a chimeric protein substrate, with the similar accuracy level compared to the conventional methods such as fluorometric assays. As a result, using this GST:DEVD:EGFP reporter, caspase-3 activation based on proteolytic properties could be monitored via a variety of bioanalytical techniques such as immunoblot analysis, glutathione-agarose bead assay, and on-chip visualization, providing both technical and economical advantages over the extensively utilized fluorogenic peptide assay. Our results convincingly showed that this versatile reporter (GST:DEVD:EGFP) constitutes a useful system for the monitoring of caspase-3 activation, potentially enabling the monitoring of the proteolytic activities of different intra-cellular proteases via the substitution of the cleavage sequence within the same schematic construct. PMID:18775457

  17. The Proteolytic Activity of Philibertia gilliesii Latex. Purification of Philibertain g II.

    PubMed

    Sequeiros, Cynthia; Torres, María J; Nievas, Marina L; Caffini, Néstor O; Natalucci, Claudia L; López, Laura M I; Trejo, Sebastián A

    2016-05-01

    The latex from the patagonic plant Philibertia gilliesii Hook. et Arn. (Apocynaceae) is a milky-white suspension containing a proteolytic system constituted by several cysteine endopeptidases. A proteolytic preparation (philibertain g) from the latex of P. gilliesii fruits was obtained and characterized to evaluate its potential use in bioprocesses. Philibertain g contained 1.2 g/L protein and a specific (caseinolytic) activity of 7.0 Ucas/mg protein. It reached 80 % of its maximum caseinolytic activity in the pH 7-10 range, retained 80 % of the original activity after 2 h of incubation at temperatures ranging from 25 to 45 °C and could be fully inactivated after 5 min at 75 °C. Philibertain g retained 60 % of the initial activity even at 1 M NaCl and was able to hydrolyze proteins from stickwater one, of the main waste effluents generated during fishmeal production. Furthermore, as a contribution to the knowledge of the proteolytic system of P. gilliesii, we are reporting the purification of a new peptidase, named philibertain g II (pI 9.4, molecular mass 23,977 Da, N-terminus LPESVDWREKGVVFPXRNQ) isolated from philibertain g through a purification scheme including acetone fractionation, cation exchange, molecular exclusion chromatography, and ultrafiltration. PMID:26852027

  18. Detection of the apr gene in proteolytic psychrotrophic bacteria isolated from refrigerated raw milk.

    PubMed

    Martins, Maurilio L; de Araújo, Elza F; Mantovani, Hilário C; Moraes, Célia A; Vanetti, Maria C D

    2005-07-15

    Bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas have been associated with the spoilage of raw milk and dairy products due to the production of thermostable proteolytic enzymes. The apr gene encodes for alkaline metalloprotease in Pseudomonas and other related bacteria. Its presence in psychrotrophic proteolytic bacteria isolated from raw milk collected from cooling tanks was verified. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used with degenerate primers. Total DNA from 112 isolates was pooled in different groups and then used as template for the amplification reactions. Controls consisted of DNA extracted from 26 cultures. An expected DNA fragment of 194 bp was detected in groups that contained bacteria identified as Pseudomonas. The PCR product was observed only when DNA from control cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia marcescens and Aeromonas hydrophila were used. A detection limit assay indicated that the apr gene could be directly amplified from pasteurized milk inoculated with 10(8) CFU/ml of P. fluorescens. With this method it was possible to detect proteolytic bacteria at 10(5) CFU/ml in reconstituted skim milk powder if cells were recovered for DNA extraction before amplification. PMID:15992619

  19. Longterm persistence of proteolytic activities in frass of Blattella germanica increases its allergenic potential.

    PubMed

    Erban, T; Hubert, J

    2011-06-01

    Chromogenic microplate assays in 96 wells were used to determine the stability of enzyme activity in frass of Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Blattellidae). Frass samples were exposed to controlled conditions [temperature 15-35 °C and/or 53-100% relative humidity (RH)] and to household conditions (apartment). Exposure times were 0 (control), 90, 183 and 276 days. Starch digestion and cellulolytic activities decreased during exposure. Non-specific proteolytic activities were affected by changes in selective proteolytic activities. Activities towards AAPpNA and SA(3) pNA strongly increased at 100% RH, indicating the possible influence of microorganisms growing on frass. Activities towards BApNA and ArgpNA decreased with increasing decomposition time, whereas activity towards ZRRpNA was not influenced by exposure time. The largest decrease in activities towards ArgpNA and BApNA occurred at temperatures of 15 °C, 30 °C and 35 °C and at 100% RH. Activities towards BApNA and ZRRpNA were very stable under different temperature and RH conditions; this was confirmed by findings showing that these activities were stable in the experimental apartment. In comparison with the control, activities towards ZRRpNA and BApNA after 276 days decreased by 1% and 19%, respectively. The longterm persistence of proteolytic activities in cockroach frass increases their allergenic hazard potential. PMID:21198710

  20. [Secretion of proteolytic enzymes by three phytopathogenic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Serine proteinases from three phytopathogenic microorganisms that belong to different fungal families and cause diseases in potatoes were studied and characterized. The oomycete Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary and the fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium culmorum were shown to secrete serine proteinases. An analysis of the substrate specificity of these enzymes and their sensitivity to synthetic and protein inhibitors allowed us to refer them to trypsin- and subtilisin-like proteinases. The correlation between the trypsin- and subtilisin-like proteinases depended on the composition of the culture medium, particularly on the form of the nitrogen source. A phylogenetic analysis was carried out. In contrast to basidiomycetes R. solani, ascomycetes F. culmorum and oomycetes P. infestans produced a similar set of exoproteinases, although they had more distant phylogenetic positions. This indicated that the secretion of serine proteinases by various phytopathogenic microorganisms also depended on their phylogenetic position. These results allowed us to suggest that exoproteinases from phytopathogenic fungi play a different role in pathogenesis. They may promote the adaptation of fungi if the range of hosts is enlarged. On the other hand, they may play an important role in the survival of microorganisms in hostile environements outside their hosts. PMID:25508654

  1. [Secretion of proteolytic enzymes by three phytopathogenic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Kudriavtseva, N N; Sof'in, A V; Revina, T A; Gvozdeva, E L; Ievleva, E V; Valueva, T A

    2013-01-01

    Serine proteinases from three phytopathogenic microorganisms that belong to different fungal families and cause diseases in potatoes were studied and characterized. The oomycete Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary and the fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium culmorum were shown to secrete serine proteinases. An analysis of the substrate specificity of these enzymes and their sensitivity to synthetic and protein inhibitors allowed us to refer them to trypsin- and subtilisin-like proteinases. The correlation between the trypsin- and subtilisin-like proteinases depended on the composition of the culture medium, particularly on the form of the nitrogen source. A phylogenetic analysis was carried out. In contrast to basidiomycetes R. solani, ascomycetes F. culmorum and oomycetes P. infestans produced a similar set of exoproteinases, although they had more distant phylogenetic positions. This indicated that the secretion of serine proteinases by various phytopathogenic microorganisms also depended on their phylogenetic position. These results allowed us to suggest that exoproteinases from phytopathogenic fungi play a different role in pathogenesis. They may promote the adaptation of fungi if the range of hosts is enlarged. On the other hand, they may play an important role in the survival of microorganisms in hostile environements outside their hosts. PMID:25474875

  2. Cell-associated proteolytic enzymes from marine phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, J.A.; Falkowski, P.G.

    1996-08-01

    Despite their central importance in cell metabolism, little is known about proteases in marine phytoplankton. Caseinolytic and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) activities was surveyed in log-phase cultures of the chlorophyte Dunaliella tertiolecta Butcher, the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii Fryxell et Hasle, the chrysophyte Isochrysis galbana Parke, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi Hay et Mohler, and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. LAP activity was very low at pH < 6 and peaked between pH 7.5 and 8.5 in all species, whereas caseinolytic activity in most species showed only minor peaks in the pH 4-5 range and broad maxima above pH 8. Acidic vacuolar proteases apparently represented only a small fraction of total protease activity. Attempts to classify protease using selective inhibitors were inconclusive. Caserinolytic activities were remarkably stable. Casein zymograms were used to identify >200-and <20-kDa proteases in homogenates of log-phase T. weissflogii; only the smaller protease was found in D. tertiolecta. Antibodies in the ATPase subunit (C) of the conserved, chloroplastic Clp protease from Pisum cross-reacted with proteins in Synechococcus, D. tertiolecta, and I. galbana, but no cross-reactions were found for any species with antibodies against the ClpP subunit from either E. coli or Nicotiana. Our results show that phytoplankton contain a diverse complement of proteases with novel characteristics. 46 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Contribution of the autophagy-lysosomal and ubiquitin-proteasomal proteolytic systems to total proteolysis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) myotubes.

    PubMed

    Seiliez, Iban; Dias, Karine; Cleveland, Beth M

    2014-12-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is recognized as the major contributor to total proteolysis in mammalian skeletal muscle, responsible for 50% or more of total protein degradation in skeletal muscle, whereas the autophagic-lysosome system (ALS) plays a more minor role. While the relative contribution of these systems to muscle loss is well documented in mammals, little is known in fish species. The current study uses myotubes derived from rainbow trout myogenic precursor cells as an in vitro model of white muscle tissue. Cells were incubated in complete or serum-deprived media or media supplemented with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and exposed to selective proteolytic inhibitors to determine the relative contribution of the ALS and UPS to total protein degradation in myotubes in different culture conditions. Results indicate that the ALS is responsible for 30-34% and 50% of total protein degradation in myotubes in complete and serum-deprived media, respectively. The UPS appears to contribute much less to total protein degradation at almost 4% in cells in complete media to nearly 17% in serum-deprived cells. IGF-1 decreases activity of both systems, as it inhibited the upregulation of both proteolytic systems induced by serum deprivation. The combined inhibition of both the ALS and UPS reduced degradation by a maximum of 55% in serum-deprived cells, suggesting an important contribution of other proteolytic systems to total protein degradation. Collectively, these data identify the ALS as a potential target for strategies aimed at improving muscle protein retention and fillet yield through reductions in protein degradation. PMID:25274907

  4. Circulating FGF21 proteolytic processing mediated by fibroblast activation protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Eugene Y.; Jin, Zhaoyan; Ackermann, Bradley L.; Thomas, Melissa K.; Gutierrez, Jesus A.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a hormone implicated in the regulation of glucose homoeostasis, insulin sensitivity, lipid metabolism and body weight, is considered to be a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic disorders. Despite observations that FGF21 is rapidly proteolysed in circulation rending it potentially inactive, little is known regarding mechanisms by which FGF21 protein levels are regulated. We systematically investigated human FGF21 protein processing using mass spectrometry. In agreement with previous reports, circulating human FGF21 was found to be cleaved primarily after three proline residues at positions 2, 4 and 171. The extent of FGF21 processing was quantified in a small cohort of healthy human volunteers. Relative abundance of FGF21 proteins cleaved after Pro-2, Pro-4 and Pro-171 ranged from 16 to 30%, 10 to 25% and 10 to 34%, respectively. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) was found to be the primary protease responsible for N-terminal cleavages after residues Pro-2 and Pro-4. Importantly, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) was implicated as the protease responsible for C-terminal cleavage after Pro-171, rendering the protein inactive. The requirement of FAP for FGF21 proteolysis at the C-terminus was independently demonstrated by in vitro digestion, immunodepletion of FAP in human plasma, administration of an FAP-specific inhibitor and by human FGF21 protein processing patterns in FAP knockout mouse plasma. The discovery that FAP is responsible for FGF21 inactivation extends the FGF21 signalling pathway and may enable novel approaches to augment FGF21 actions for therapeutic applications. PMID:26635356

  5. A novel proteasome inhibitor suppresses tumor growth via targeting both 19S proteasome deubiquitinases and 20S proteolytic peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ningning; Liu, Chunjiao; Li, Xiaofen; Liao, Siyan; Song, Wenbin; Yang, Changshan; Zhao, Chong; Huang, Hongbiao; Guan, Lixia; Zhang, Peiquan; Liu, Shouting; Hua, Xianliang; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Ping; Lan, Xiaoying; Yi, Songgang; Wang, Shunqing; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q. Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-01-01

    The successful development of bortezomib-based therapy for treatment of multiple myeloma has established proteasome inhibition as an effective therapeutic strategy, and both 20S proteasome peptidases and 19S deubiquitinases (DUBs) are becoming attractive targets of cancer therapy. It has been reported that metal complexes, such as copper complexes, inhibit tumor proteasome. However, the involved mechanism of action has not been fully characterized. Here we report that (i) copper pyrithione (CuPT), an alternative to tributyltin for antifouling paint biocides, inhibits the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) via targeting both 19S proteasome-specific DUBs and 20S proteolytic peptidases with a mechanism distinct from that of the FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib; (ii) CuPT potently inhibits proteasome-specific UCHL5 and USP14 activities; (iii) CuPT inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces cytotoxicity in vitro and ex vivo. This study uncovers a novel class of dual inhibitors of DUBs and proteasome and suggests a potential clinical strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:24912524

  6. Antibody-drug conjugate model fast characterization by LC-MS following IdeS proteolytic digestion

    PubMed Central

    Wagner-Rousset, Elsa; Janin-Bussat, Marie-Claire; Colas, Olivier; Excoffier, Melissa; Ayoub, Daniel; Haeuw, Jean-François; Rilatt, Ian; Perez, Michel; Corvaïa, Nathalie; Beck, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the design and production of an antibody-fluorophore conjugate (AFC) as a non-toxic model of an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC). This AFC is based on the conjugation of dansyl sulfonamide ethyl amine (DSEA)-linker maleimide on interchain cysteines of trastuzumab used as a reference antibody. The resulting AFC was first characterized by routine analytical methods (SEC, SDS-PAGE, CE-SDS, HIC and native MS), resulting in similar chromatograms, electropherograms and mass spectra to those reported for hinge Cys-linked ADCs. IdeS digestion of the AFC was then performed, followed by reduction and analysis by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry analysis. Dye loading and distribution on light chain and Fd fragments were calculated, as well as the average dye to antibody ratio (DAR) for both monomeric and multimeric species. In addition, by analyzing the Fc fragment in the same run, full glyco-profiling and demonstration of the absence of additional conjugation was easily achieved.   As for naked antibodies and Fc-fusion proteins, IdeS proteolytic digestion may rapidly become a reference analytical method at all stages of ADC discovery, preclinical and clinical development. The method can be routinely used for comparability assays, formulation, process scale-up and transfer, and to define critical quality attributes in a quality-by-design approach. PMID:24135617

  7. A novel proteasome inhibitor suppresses tumor growth via targeting both 19S proteasome deubiquitinases and 20S proteolytic peptidases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ningning; Liu, Chunjiao; Li, Xiaofen; Liao, Siyan; Song, Wenbin; Yang, Changshan; Zhao, Chong; Huang, Hongbiao; Guan, Lixia; Zhang, Peiquan; Liu, Shouting; Hua, Xianliang; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Ping; Lan, Xiaoying; Yi, Songgang; Wang, Shunqing; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-01-01

    The successful development of bortezomib-based therapy for treatment of multiple myeloma has established proteasome inhibition as an effective therapeutic strategy, and both 20S proteasome peptidases and 19S deubiquitinases (DUBs) are becoming attractive targets of cancer therapy. It has been reported that metal complexes, such as copper complexes, inhibit tumor proteasome. However, the involved mechanism of action has not been fully characterized. Here we report that (i) copper pyrithione (CuPT), an alternative to tributyltin for antifouling paint biocides, inhibits the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) via targeting both 19S proteasome-specific DUBs and 20S proteolytic peptidases with a mechanism distinct from that of the FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib; (ii) CuPT potently inhibits proteasome-specific UCHL5 and USP14 activities; (iii) CuPT inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces cytotoxicity in vitro and ex vivo. This study uncovers a novel class of dual inhibitors of DUBs and proteasome and suggests a potential clinical strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:24912524

  8. The putative role of proteolytic pathways in the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes mellitus: the 'autophagy' hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2014-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders affecting different organs and tissues. New tools, such as genome-wide association studies, have provided evidence for new susceptibility loci and candidate genes in the disease process including common susceptibility genes involved in the immunological synapse and T cell activation. Close linkages have been found in a number of diseases, including ankylosing spondylitis, multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (Type 1 diabetes mellitus). Evidence for some association with Type 1 diabetes was previously found in the region containing 5q15/ERAP1 (endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1) (rs30187, ARTS1). Recent data suggest that in eukaryotic cells in addition to the ubiquitin/proteasome system another proteolytic pathway may have a significant role in the autoimmunity process, i.e. the autophagic pathway which constitutes the principal regulated catabolic process mediated by lysosomes. Autophagy could play a role in MHC class I and class II self-antigen presentation at the basis of the autoimmunity process. Furthermore cross-talk among different proteolytic pathways was recently highlighted i.e. components processed in the ubiquitin/proteasome system possibly engaged in autophagic pathways. T1D is an autoimmune disease characterised by the destruction of pancreatic beta cells by autoreactive T cells. Immunological abnormalities can precede months to years the initial symptoms and clinical diagnosis. Our hypothesis suggests that in the autoimmune process autophagy can intervene at different levels, during the thymic selection process of T lymphocytes causing escape of autoreactive T cells, at the initiation stage of the disease, in the preclinical period or subsequently to the disease onset having a role at the level of perpetuation of the autoimmunity process. Supporting evidence derives from the already reported discovery of polymorphisms in autophagy-related genes in

  9. Clinical, geographical, and temporal risk factors associated with presentation and outcome of vivax malaria imported into the United Kingdom over 27 years: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Claire; Nadjm, Behzad; Smith, Valerie; Blaze, Marie; Checkley, Anna; Chiodini, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine temporal and geographical trends, risk factors, and seasonality of imported vivax malaria in the United Kingdom to inform clinical advice and policy. Design Observational study. Setting National surveillance data from the UK Public Health England Malaria Reference Laboratory, data from the International Passenger Survey, and international climactic data. Participants All confirmed and notified cases of malaria in the UK (n=50 187) from 1987 to 2013, focusing on 12 769 cases of vivax malaria. Main outcome measures Mortality, sociodemographic details (age, UK region, country of birth and residence, and purpose of travel), destination, and latency (time between arrival in the UK and onset of symptoms). Results Of the malaria cases notified, 25.4% (n=12 769) were due to Plasmodium vivax, of which 78.6% were imported from India and Pakistan. Most affected patients (53.5%) had travelled to visit friends and relatives, and 11.1% occurred in tourists. Imported P vivax is concentrated in areas with large communities of south Asian heritage. Overall mortality was 7/12 725 (0.05%), but with no deaths in 9927 patients aged under 50 years. Restricting the analysis to those aged more than 50 years, mortality was 7/2798 (0.25%), increasing to 4/526 (0.76%) (adjusted odds ratio 32.0, 95% confidence interval 7.1 to 144.0, P<0.001) in those aged 70 years or older. Annual notifications decreased sharply over the period, while traveller numbers between the UK and South Asia increased. The risk of acquiring P vivax from South Asia was year round but was twice as high from June to September (40 per 100 000 trips) compared with the rest of the year. There was strong seasonality in the latency from arrival in the UK to presentation, significantly longer in those arriving in the UK from South Asia from October to March (median 143 days) versus those arriving from April to September (37 days, P<0.001). Conclusions Travellers visiting friends and family in

  10. Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane vesicle-associated proteolytic activity promotes bacterial invasion by mediating cleavage of intestinal epithelial cell E-cadherin and occludin.

    PubMed

    Elmi, Abdi; Nasher, Fauzy; Jagatia, Heena; Gundogdu, Ozan; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Wren, Brendan; Dorrell, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) play an important role in the pathogenicity of Gram-negative bacteria. Campylobacter jejuni produces OMVs that trigger IL-8, IL-6, hBD-3 and TNF-α responses from T84 intestinal epithelial cells and are cytotoxic to Caco-2 IECs and Galleria mellonella larvae. Proteomic analysis of 11168H OMVs identified the presence of three proteases, HtrA, Cj0511 and Cj1365c. In this study, 11168H OMVs were shown to possess proteolytic activity that was reduced by pretreatment with specific serine protease inhibitors. OMVs isolated from 11168H htrA, Cj0511 or Cj1365c mutants possess significantly reduced proteolytic activity. 11168H OMVs are able to cleave both E-cadherin and occludin, but this cleavage is reduced with OMVs pretreated with serine protease inhibitors and also with OMVs isolated from htrA or Cj1365c mutants. Co-incubation of T84 monolayers with 11168H OMVs results in a visible reduction in both E-cadherin and occludin. The addition of 11168H OMVs to the co-culture of live 11168H bacteria with T84 cells results in enhanced levels of bacterial adhesion and invasion in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Further investigation of the cleavage of host cell structural proteins by C. jejuni OMVs should enhance our understanding of the interactions of this important pathogen with intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26451973

  11. Uptake of 18F-DCFPyL in Paget’s Disease of Bone, an Important Potential Pitfall in Clinical Interpretation of PSMA PET Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Deville, Curtiland; Paller, Channing; Cho, Steve Y.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Pomper, Martin G.; Ross, Ashley E.; Gorin, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted PET imaging is an emerging technique for evaluating patients with prostate cancer (PCa) in a variety of clinical contexts. As with any new imaging modality, there are interpretive pitfalls that are beginning to be recognized. In this image report, we describe the findings in a 63-year-old male with biochemically recurrent PCa after radical prostatectomy who was imaged with 18F-DCFPyL, a small molecule inhibitor of PSMA. Diffuse radiotracer uptake was noted throughout the sacrum, corresponding to imaging findings on contrast-enhanced CT, bone scan, and pelvic MRI consistent with Paget’s disease of bone. The uptake of 18F-DCFPyL in Paget’s disease is most likely due to hyperemia and increased radiotracer delivery. In light of the overlap in patients affected by PCa and Paget’s, it is important for nuclear medicine physicians and radiologists interpreting PSMA PET/CT scans to be aware of the potential for this diagnostic pitfall. Correlation to findings on conventional imaging such as diagnostic CT and bone scan can help confirm the diagnosis. PMID:26807444

  12. Development of a high-resolution melting analysis assay for rapid and high-throughput identification of clinically important dermatophyte species.

    PubMed

    Didehdar, M; Khansarinejad, B; Amirrajab, N; Shokohi, T

    2016-07-01

    Accurate identification of dermatophyte species is important both for epidemiological studies and for implementing antifungal treatment strategies. Although nucleic acid amplification-based assays have several advantages over conventional mycological methods, a major disadvantage is their high cost. The aim of this study was to develop a rapid and accurate real-time PCR-based high-resolution melting (HRM) assay for differentiation of the most common dermatophyte species. The oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify highly conserved regions of the dermatophyte ribosomal DNA. Analysis of a panel containing potentially interfering fungi demonstrated no cross reactivity with the assay. To evaluate the performance characteristics of the method, a total of 250 clinical isolates were tested in comparison with the long-established PCR-RFLP method and the results were reassessed using DNA sequencing, as the reference standard method. The assay is able to type dermatophytes using normalised melting peak, difference plot analysis or electrophoresis on agarose gel methods. The results showed that, in comparison to PCR-RFLP, the developed HRM assay was able to differentiate at least 10 common dermatophytes species with a higher speed, throughput and accuracy. These results indicate that the HRM assay will be a useful sensitive, high throughput and cost-effective method for differentiating the most common dermatophyte species. PMID:26991756

  13. Recovery of clinically important microorganisms from the BacT/Alert blood culture system does not require testing for seven days.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M L; Mirrett, S; Reller, L B; Weinstein, M P; Reimer, L G

    1993-01-01

    Recently, we published a comparison of the BacT/Alert blood culture system with the BACTEC 660/730 nonradiometric blood culture system using blood inocula of 5 ml per bottle. By reanalyzing data collected during that study, we found that, for true-positive isolates causing bacteremia or fungemia, 363 (97.6%) of 376 and 341 (97.7%) of 349 isolates were recovered by the end of day 5 of testing, and 364 (97.9%) of 376 and 343 (98.3%) of 349 isolates were recovered by the end of day 6 of testing for aerobic and anaerobic bottles, respectively. Most isolates recovered on days 6 (24 of 27) and 7 (20 of 25) of testing were either contaminants or indeterminate as a cause of sepsis. When used as recommended by the manufacturer, only six (1.3%) of 464 clinically important isolates recovered on test days 6-7 would have gone undetected had testing been limited to 5 days and four (0.9%) of 464 had testing been limited to 6 days. We conclude that BacT/Alert bottles can be tested for as few as 5 days and then discarded with minimal loss of true-positive isolates and maximal reduction of contaminants. PMID:8425375

  14. Unmasking Proteolytic Activity for Adult Visual Cortex Plasticity by the Removal of Lynx1

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Noreen; Burman, Poromendro N.; Hussein, Ayan; Demars, Michael P.; Sadahiro, Masato; Brady, Daniel M.; Tsirka, Stella E.; Russo, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Experience-dependent cortical plasticity declines with age. At the molecular level, experience-dependent proteolytic activity of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) becomes restricted in the adult brain if mice are raised in standard cages. Understanding the mechanism for the loss of permissive proteolytic activity is therefore a key link for improving function in adult brains. Using the mouse primary visual cortex (V1) as a model, we demonstrate that tPA activity in V1 can be unmasked following 4 d of monocular deprivation when the mice older than 2 months are raised in standard cages by the genetic removal of Lynx1, a negative regulator of adult plasticity. This was also associated with the reduction of stubby and thin spine density and enhancement of ocular dominance shift in adult V1 of Lynx1 knock-out (KO) mice. These structural and functional changes were tPA-dependent because genetic removal of tPA in Lynx1 KO mice can block the monocular deprivation-dependent reduction of dendritic spine density, whereas both genetic and adult specific inhibition of tPA activity can ablate the ocular dominance shift in Lynx1 KO mice. Our work demonstrates that the adult brain has an intrinsic potential for experience-dependent elevation of proteolytic activity to express juvenile-like structural and functional changes but is effectively limited by Lynx1 if mice are raised in standard cages. Insights into the Lynx1-tPA plasticity mechanism may provide novel therapeutic targets for adult brain disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Experience-dependent proteolytic activity of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) becomes restricted in the adult brain in correlation with the decline in cortical plasticity when mice are raised in standard cages. We demonstrated that removal of Lynx1, one of negative regulators of plasticity, unmasks experience-dependent tPA elevation in visual cortex of adult mice reared in standard cages. This proteolytic elevation facilitated dendritic spine reduction

  15. Caspase-3-Dependent Proteolytic Cleavage of Tau Causes Neurofibrillary Tangles and Results in Cognitive Impairment During Normal Aging.

    PubMed

    Means, John C; Gerdes, Bryan C; Kaja, Simon; Sumien, Nathalie; Payne, Andrew J; Stark, Danny A; Borden, Priscilla K; Price, Jeffrey L; Koulen, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) are important for understanding how pathological signaling cascades change neural circuitry and with time interrupt cognitive function. Here, we introduce a non-genetic preclinical model for aging and show that it exhibits cleaved tau protein, active caspases and neurofibrillary tangles, hallmarks of AD, causing behavioral deficits measuring cognitive impairment. To our knowledge this is the first report of a non-transgenic, non-interventional mouse model displaying structural, functional and molecular aging deficits associated with AD and other tauopathies in humans with potentially high impact on both new basic research into pathogenic mechanisms and new translational research efforts. Tau aggregation is a hallmark of tauopathies, including AD. Recent studies have indicated that cleavage of tau plays an important role in both tau aggregation and disease. In this study we use wild type mice as a model for normal aging and resulting age-related cognitive impairment. We provide evidence that aged mice have increased levels of activated caspases, which significantly correlates with increased levels of truncated tau and formation of neurofibrillary tangles. In addition, cognitive decline was significantly correlated with increased levels of caspase activity and tau truncated by caspase-3. Experimentally induced inhibition of caspases prevented this proteolytic cleavage of tau and the associated formation of neurofibrillary tangles. Our study shows the strength of using a non-transgenic model to study structure, function and molecular mechanisms in aging and age related diseases of the brain. PMID:27220334

  16. One-Minute Walk and modified Timed Up and Go tests in children with cerebral palsy: performance and minimum clinically important differences.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Sahar; Krzak, Joseph J; Johnson, Barbara; Flanagan, Ann; Gorton, George; Bagley, Anita; Ounpuu, Sylvia; Romness, Mark; Tylkowski, Chester; Oeffinger, Donna

    2014-05-01

    AIM This prospective multicenter study assessed performance and changes over time, with and without surgical intervention, in the modified Timed Up and Go (mTUG) and One-Minute Walk tests (1MWT) in children with bilateral cerebral palsy (CP). Minimum clinically important differences (MCIDs) were established for these tools. METHOD Two hundred and nineteen participants with bilateral spastic CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS] levels I–III) were evaluated at baseline and 12 months follow-up. The non-surgical group (n=168; 54 females, 114 males; mean age 12y 11mo, [SD 2y 7mo], range 8y 1mo–19y) had no surgical interventions during the study. The surgical group (n=51; 19 females, 32 males; mean age 12y 10mo [SD 2y 8mo] range 8y 2mo–17y 5mo) underwent soft-tissue and/or bony procedures within 12 months from baseline. The mTUG and 1MWT were collected and MCIDs were established from the change scores of the non-surgical group. RESULTS Dependent walkers (GMFCS level III) required more time to complete the mTUG (p≤0.01) than independent walkers (GMFCS levels I and II). For the 1MWT, distance walked decreased with increasing impairment (p≤0.01). 1MWT and mTUG change scores were not significantly different at any GMFCS level for either the surgical or non-surgical groups (p≤0.01). INTERPRETATION Children with varying levels of function (GMFCS level) perform differently on the 1MWT and mTUG. The data and MCID values can assist clinicians in interpreting changes over time and in assessing interventions. PMID:24843890

  17. The Synthesis of L-Alanyl and β-Alanyl Derivatives of 2-Aminoacridone and Their Application in the Detection of Clinically-Important Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Cellier, Marie; Orenga, Sylvain; Perry, John D.; Stanforth, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    In clinical microbiology the speed with which pathogenic microorganisms may be detected has a direct impact on patient health. One important strategy used in the laboratory is the growth of cultures in the presence of an enzymatic substrate which, once transformed by the appropriate microbial enzyme, generates a detectable colour or fluorescence output. Such substrates have previously been prepared by our group and others and are available as commercial diagnostic kits, however they all suffer from some degree of diffusion when used in a solid growth medium. This diffusion complicates the detection and differentiation of species in polymicrobial cultures and so we sought to improve on our previous work. In this work we have prepared and evaluated a series of novel fluorogenic enzyme substrates based on N-substituted-2-aminoacridones. All of the prepared substrates were found to be suitable for the detection and differentiation of certain microorganisms, however those based on the 2-amino-10-benzylacridone core in particular showed no apparent diffusion when incorporated into solid growth media. On transformation these substrates generated brightly fluorescent colonies that are clearly contrasted with the background medium due to the difference in emission wavelength (λem 445–450 nm for the substrate, λem 550 nm for the product). Here we have shown that our L-alanyl aminopeptidase substrate, 2-(N-L-alanylamino)-10-benzylacridone, is particularly suited to the detection of Gram-negative bacteria, and our β-alanyl aminopeptidase substrate, 2-(N- β-alanylamino)-10-benzylacridone, to the detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens when grown on solid media incorporating these substrates. The resulting fluorophore shows no apparent diffusion from the colonies of interest, and the enhanced sensitivity offered by fluorescent emission may allow for the detection of these organisms as microcolonies using automated fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27391894

  18. Kinetic characterization of trans-proteolytic activity of Chikungunya virus capsid protease and development of a FRET-based HTS assay

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Megha; Sharma, Rajesh; Kumar, Pravindra; Parida, Manmohan; Tomar, Shailly

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) capsid protein (CVCP) is a serine protease that possesses cis-proteolytic activity essential for the structural polyprotein processing and plays a key role in the virus life cycle. CHIKV being an emerging arthropod-borne pathogenic virus, is a public health concern worldwide. No vaccines or specific antiviral treatment is currently available for chikungunya disease. Thus, it is important to develop inhibitors against CHIKV enzymes to block key steps in viral reproduction. In view of this, CVCP was produced recombinantly and purified to homogeneity. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based proteolytic assay was developed for high throughput screening (HTS). A FRET peptide substrate (DABCYL-GAEEWSLAIE-EDANS) derived from the cleavage site present in the structural polyprotein of CVCP was used. The assay with a Z’ factor of 0.64 and coefficient of variation (CV) is 8.68% can be adapted to high throughput format for automated screening of chemical libraries to identify CVCP specific protease inhibitors. Kinetic parameters Km and kcat/Km estimated using FRET assay were 1.26 ± 0.34 μM and 1.11 × 103 M−1 sec−1 respectively. The availability of active recombinant CVCP and cost effective fluorogenic peptide based in vitro FRET assay may serve as the basis for therapeutics development against CHIKV. PMID:26439734

  19. M1 and M2 macrophage proteolytic and angiogenic profile analysis in atherosclerotic patients reveals a distinctive profile in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Roma-Lavisse, Charlotte; Tagzirt, Madjid; Zawadzki, Christophe; Lorenzi, Rodrigo; Vincentelli, André; Haulon, Stephan; Juthier, Francis; Rauch, Antoine; Corseaux, Delphine; Staels, Bart; Jude, Brigitte; Van Belle, Eric; Susen, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Dupont, Annabelle

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate atherosclerotic mediators' expression levels in M1 and M2 macrophages and to focus on the influence of diabetes on M1/M2 profiles. Macrophages from 36 atherosclerotic patients (19 diabetics and 17 non-diabetics) were cultured with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or IL-4 to induce M1 or M2 phenotype, respectively. The atherosclerotic mediators' expression was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that M1 and M2 macrophages differentially expressed mediators involved in proteolysis and angiogenesis processes. The proteolytic balance (matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), MMP-9/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and MMP-9/tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) ratios) was higher in M1 versus M2, whereas M2 macrophages presented higher angiogenesis properties (increased vascular endothelial growth factor/TFPI-2 and tissue factor/TFPI-2 ratios). Moreover, M1 macrophages from diabetics displayed more important proangiogenic and proteolytic activities than non-diabetics. This study reveals that M1 and M2 macrophages could differentially modulate major atherosclerosis-related pathological processes. Moreover, M1 macrophages from diabetics display a deleterious phenotype that could explain the higher plaque vulnerability observed in these subjects. PMID:25966737

  20. Soluble form of complement C3b/C4b receptor (CR1) results from a proteolytic cleavage in the C-terminal region of CR1 transmembrane domain.

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, I; Paccaud, J P; Belin, D; Maeder, C; Carpentier, J L

    1998-01-01

    The complement C3b/C4b receptor (CR1) is an integral protein, anchored in the plasma membrane through a hydrophobic domain of 25 amino acids, but is also found in the plasma in soluble form (sCR1). A recombinant, soluble form of CR1 has been demonstrated to reduce complement-dependent tissue injury in animal models of ischaemia/reperfusion. In view of the important pathophysiological relevance of sCR1, we have investigated the mechanisms governing CR1 release by using various mutated and chimaeric receptors transiently expressed in COS cells. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that (1) sCR1 is produced by a proteolytic process, (2) the cleavage site lies within the C-terminus of CR1 transmembrane domain, (3) the proteolytic process involves a fully glycosylated CR1 form and (4) this process takes place in late secretory vesicles or at the plasma membrane. PMID:9405292

  1. Proteolytic Activation of the Essential Parasitophorous Vacuole Cysteine Protease SERA6 Accompanies Malaria Parasite Egress from Its Host Erythrocyte*

    PubMed Central

    Ruecker, Andrea; Shea, Michael; Hackett, Fiona; Suarez, Catherine; Hirst, Elizabeth M. A.; Milutinovic, Katarina; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Blackman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The malaria parasite replicates within an intraerythrocytic parasitophorous vacuole (PV). The PV and host cell membranes eventually rupture, releasing merozoites in a process called egress. Certain inhibitors of serine and cysteine proteases block egress, indicating a crucial role for proteases. The Plasmodium falciparum genome encodes nine serine-repeat antigens (SERAs), each of which contains a central domain homologous to the papain-like (clan CA, family C1) protease family. SERA5 and SERA6 are indispensable in blood-stage parasites, but the function of neither is known. Here we show that SERA6 localizes to the PV where it is precisely cleaved just prior to egress by an essential serine protease called PfSUB1. Mutations that replace the predicted catalytic Cys of SERA6, or that block SERA6 processing by PfSUB1, could not be stably introduced into the parasite genomic sera6 locus, indicating that SERA6 is an essential enzyme and that processing is important for its function. We demonstrate that cleavage of SERA6 by PfSUB1 converts it to an active cysteine protease. Our observations reveal a proteolytic activation step in the malarial PV that may be required for release of the parasite from its host erythrocyte. PMID:22984267

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies that Inhibit the Proteolytic Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype/B.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yongfeng; Dong, Jianbo; Lou, Jianlong; Wen, Weihua; Conrad, Fraser; Geren, Isin N; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Smith, Theresa J; Smith, Leonard A; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A; Marks, James D

    2015-09-01

    Existing antibodies (Abs) used to treat botulism cannot enter the cytosol of neurons and bind to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) at its site of action, and thus cannot reverse paralysis. However, Abs targeting the proteolytic domain of the toxin could inhibit the proteolytic activity of the toxin intracellularly and potentially reverse intoxication, if they could be delivered intracellularly. As such, antibodies that neutralize toxin activity could serve as potent inhibitory cargos for therapeutic antitoxins against botulism. BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B) contains a zinc endopeptidase light chain (LC) domain that cleaves synaoptobrevin-2, a SNARE protein responsible for vesicle fusion and acetylcholine vesicle release. To generate monoclonal Abs (mAbs) that could reverse paralysis, we targeted the protease domain for Ab generation. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) libraries from immunized mice or humans were displayed on yeast, and 19 unique BoNT/B LC-specific mAbs isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) of these mAbs for BoNT/B LC ranged from 0.24 nM to 14.3 nM (mean KD 3.27 nM). Eleven mAbs inhibited BoNT/B LC proteolytic activity. The fine epitopes of selected mAbs were identified by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing that inhibitory mAbs bound near the active site, substrate-binding site or the extended substrate-binding site. The results provide mAbs that could prove useful for intracellular reversal of paralysis and identify epitopes that could be targeted by small molecules inhibitors. PMID:26343720

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies that Inhibit the Proteolytic Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype/B

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongfeng; Dong, Jianbo; Lou, Jianlong; Wen, Weihua; Conrad, Fraser; Geren, Isin N.; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Smith, Theresa J.; Smith, Leonard A.; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A.; Marks, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Existing antibodies (Abs) used to treat botulism cannot enter the cytosol of neurons and bind to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) at its site of action, and thus cannot reverse paralysis. However, Abs targeting the proteolytic domain of the toxin could inhibit the proteolytic activity of the toxin intracellularly and potentially reverse intoxication, if they could be delivered intracellularly. As such, antibodies that neutralize toxin activity could serve as potent inhibitory cargos for therapeutic antitoxins against botulism. BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B) contains a zinc endopeptidase light chain (LC) domain that cleaves synaoptobrevin-2, a SNARE protein responsible for vesicle fusion and acetylcholine vesicle release. To generate monoclonal Abs (mAbs) that could reverse paralysis, we targeted the protease domain for Ab generation. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) libraries from immunized mice or humans were displayed on yeast, and 19 unique BoNT/B LC-specific mAbs isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) of these mAbs for BoNT/B LC ranged from 0.24 nM to 14.3 nM (mean KD 3.27 nM). Eleven mAbs inhibited BoNT/B LC proteolytic activity. The fine epitopes of selected mAbs were identified by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing that inhibitory mAbs bound near the active site, substrate-binding site or the extended substrate-binding site. The results provide mAbs that could prove useful for intracellular reversal of paralysis and identify epitopes that could be targeted by small molecules inhibitors. PMID:26343720

  4. Interaction of Leptospira interrogans with Human Proteolytic Systems Enhances Dissemination through Endothelial Cells and Protease Levels

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Monica L.; Alvarez-Flores, Miryam P.; Kirchgatter, Karin; Romero, Eliete C.; Alves, Ivy J.; de Morais, Zenaide M.; Vasconcellos, Silvio A.; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported the ability of Leptospira to capture plasminogen (PLG) and generate plasmin (PLA) bound on the microbial surface in the presence of exogenous activators. In this work, we examined the effects of leptospiral PLG binding for active penetration through the endothelial cell barrier and activation. The results indicate that leptospires with PLG association or PLA activation have enhanced migration activity through human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers compared with untreated bacteria. Leptospira cells coated with PLG were capable of stimulating the expression of PLG activators by HUVECs. Moreover, leptospires endowed with PLG or PLA promoted transcriptional upregulation matrix metalloprotease 9 (MMP-9). Serum samples from patients with confirmed leptospirosis showed higher levels of PLG activators and total MMP-9 than serum samples from normal (healthy) subjects. The highest level of PLG activators and total MMP-9 was detected with microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-negative serum samples, suggesting that this proteolytic activity stimulation occurs at the early stage of the disease. Furthermore, a gelatin zymography profile obtained for MMPs with serum samples from patients with leptospirosis appears to be specific to leptospiral infection because serum samples from patients with unrelated infectious diseases produced no similar degradation bands. Altogether, the data suggest that the Leptospira-associated PLG or PLA might represent a mechanism that contributes to bacterial penetration of endothelial cells through an activation cascade of events that enhances the proteolytic capability of the organism. To our knowledge, this is the first proteolytic activity associated with leptospiral pathogenesis described to date. PMID:23478319

  5. Measurement of Separase Proteolytic Activity in Single Living Cells by a Fluorogenic Flow Cytometry Assay

    PubMed Central

    Haaß, Wiltrud; Kleiner, Helga; Müller, Martin C.; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Fabarius, Alice; Seifarth, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    ESPL1/Separase, an endopeptidase, is required for centrosome duplication and separation of sister-chromatides in anaphase of mitosis. Overexpression and deregulated proteolytic activity of Separase as frequently observed in human cancers is associated with the occurrence of supernumerary centrosomes, chromosomal missegregation and aneuploidy. Recently, we have hypothesized that increased Separase proteolytic activity in a small subpopulation of tumor cells may serve as driver of tumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Currently, there is no quantitative assay to measure Separase activity levels in single cells. Therefore, we have designed a flow cytometry-based assay that utilizes a Cy5- and rhodamine 110 (Rh110)-biconjugated Rad21 cleavage site peptide ([Cy5-D-R-E-I-M-R]2-Rh110) as smart probe and intracellular substrate for detection of Separase enzyme activity in living cells. As measured by Cy5 fluorescence the cellular uptake of the fluorogenic peptide was fast and reached saturation after 210 min of incubation in human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells. Separase activity was recorded as the intensity of Rh110 fluorescence released after intracellular peptide cleavage providing a linear signal gain within a 90–180 min time slot. Compared to conventional cell extract-based methods the flow cytometric assay delivers equivalent results but is more reliable, bypasses the problem of vague loading controls and unspecific proteolysis associated with whole cell extracts. Especially suited for the investigaton of blood- and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells the flow cytometric Separase assay allows generation of Separase activity profiles that tell about the number of Separase positive cells within a sample i.e. cells that currently progress through mitosis and about the range of intercellular variation in Separase activity levels within a cell population. The assay was used to quantify Separase proteolytic activity in leukemic

  6. A radiolabel-release microwell assay for proteolytic enzymes present in cell culture media

    SciTech Connect

    Rucklidge, G.J.; Milne, G. )

    1990-03-01

    A modified method for the measurement of proteolytic enzyme activity in cell culture-conditioned media has been developed. Using the release of 3H-labeled peptides from 3H-labeled gelatin the method is performed in microwell plates. The substrate is insolubilized and attached to the wells by glutaraldehyde treatment, thus eliminating the need for a precipitation step at the end of the assay. The assay is sensitive, reproducible, and convenient for small sample volumes. The effect of different protease inhibitors on activity can be assessed rapidly allowing an early characterization of the enzyme. It can also be adapted to microplate spectrophotometric analysis by staining residual substrate with Coomassie blue.

  7. Proteolytic yeasts isolated from raw, ripe tomatoes and metabiotic association of Geotrichum candidum with Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Wade, Wendy N; Vasdinnyei, Rita; Deak, Tibor; Beuchat, Larry R

    2003-09-01

    Metabiotic associations between food-borne fungi and bacteria capable of causing human diseases are a public health concern. A survey of decayed and damaged, uncooked, ripe tomatoes was done to determine the presence and prevalence of yeasts capable of increasing the pH pulp tissue, thus creating a more favorable environment for survival and growth of enteric pathogens. Sixty-two of the 371 (16.7%) fungi isolated from 215 decayed or damaged tomatoes; 12 of the 62 (19.4%) yeasts showed proteolytic activity on gelatin agar (GA) and/or standard methods caseinate (SMC) agar. The pH of tomato pericarp (pulp) tissue from which 9 of the 12 yeasts were isolated ranged from 4.3 to 7.5 (mean=5.3) compared to 4.2-5.1 (mean=4.8) for sound pulp tissue in the same tomatoes. The 12 proteolytic yeasts consisted of four strains of Cryptococcus albidus, two strains each of Debaryomyces hansenii and Trichosporon pullulans, and one strain each of Cryptococcus humicolus, Cryptococcus laurentii, Geotrichum candidum, and Sporidiobolus pararoseus. Survival and growth characteristics of a five-serotype mixture of Salmonella co-inoculated with G. candidum into sound (not chill injured) and chill-injured tomatoes were studied. Storage of sound tomatoes at 15 degrees C for 10 days resulted in an increase in population of 7.6 log(10) cfu of Salmonella/g of a 2-g sample of co-infected pulp tissue. Increases were less in tissue inoculated with Salmonella only, Salmonella on day 0 followed by G. candidum on day 3, or G. candidum on day 0 followed by Salmonella on day 3. Trends were similar in sound inoculated tomatoes stored at 25 degrees C. Growth of Salmonella was enhanced in chill-injured tomatoes compared to sound tomatoes; a population of 10 log(10) cfu/g of chill-injured pulp tissue was reached within 10 days at 25 degrees C. Results clearly show that growth of a proteolytic, alkalinizing yeast such as G. candidum in raw tomatoes enhances conditions for growth of Salmonella. The removal of

  8. Sensitive microplate assay for the detection of proteolytic enzymes using radiolabeled gelatin

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, B.D.; Kwan-Lim, G.E.; Maizels, R.M.

    1988-07-01

    A sensitive, microplate assay is described for the detection of a wide range of proteolytic enzymes, using radio-iodine-labeled gelatin as substrate. The technique uses the Bolton-Hunter reagent to label the substrate, which is then coated onto the wells of polyvinyl chloride microtiter plates. By measuring the radioactivity released the assay is able to detect elastase, trypsin, and collagenase in concentrations of 1 ng/ml or less, while the microtiter format permits multiple sample handling and minimizes sample volumes required for analysis.

  9. Purification and Properties of Two Proteolytic Enzymes with Carboxypeptidase Activity in Germinated Wheat 1

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Ken R.; Kruger, James E.

    1976-01-01

    Two proteolytic enzymes with carboxypeptidase activity have been isolated from a germinated wheat extract and partially characterized. Both enzymes rapidly released amino acids from hemoglobin and gluten and hydrolyzed carbobenzoxy-phenylalanylalanine. The enzymes were inhibited by diisopropylphosphofluoridate, but unaffected by salts, ethylenediaminetetraacetate, and sulfhydryl reagents at lower concentrations, and had molecular weights of approximately 55,000 and 61,000. Analysis of the hydrolysis products of hemoglobin and gluten indicated that both enzymes had broad specificities, including the ability to release proline. Images PMID:16659708

  10. Colon tumour secretopeptidome: insights into endogenous proteolytic cleavage events in the colon tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Greening, David W; Kapp, Eugene A; Ji, Hong; Speed, Terry P; Simpson, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    The secretopeptidome comprises endogenous peptides derived from proteins secreted into the tumour microenvironment through classical and non-classical secretion. This study characterised the low-Mr (<3kDa) component of the human colon tumour (LIM1215, LIM1863) secretopeptidome, as a first step towards gaining insights into extracellular proteolytic cleavage events in the tumour microenvironment. Based on two biological replicates, this secretopeptidome isolation strategy utilised differential centrifugal ultrafiltration in combination with analytical RP-HPLC and nanoLC-MS/MS. Secreted peptides were identified using a combination of Mascot and post-processing analyses including MSPro re-scoring, extended feature sets and Percolator, resulting in 474 protein identifications from 1228 peptides (≤1% q-value, ≤5% PEP) - a 36% increase in peptide identifications when compared with conventional Mascot (homology ionscore thresholding). In both colon tumour models, 122 identified peptides were derived from 41 cell surface protein ectodomains, 23 peptides (12 proteins) from regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), and 12 peptides (9 proteins) generated from intracellular domain proteolysis. Further analyses using the protease/substrate database MEROPS, (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), revealed 335 (71%) proteins classified as originating from classical/non-classical secretion, or the cell membrane. Of these, peptides were identified from 42 substrates in MEROPS with defined protease cleavage sites, while peptides generated from a further 205 substrates were fragmented by hitherto unknown proteases. A salient finding was the identification of peptides from 88 classical/non-classical secreted substrates in MEROPS, implicated in tumour progression and angiogenesis (FGFBP1, PLXDC2), cell-cell recognition and signalling (DDR1, GPA33), and tumour invasiveness and metastasis (MACC1, SMAGP); the nature of the proteases responsible for these proteolytic events is unknown. To

  11. Angelman syndrome-associated ubiquitin ligase UBE3A/E6AP mutants interfere with the proteolytic activity of the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Tomaić, V; Banks, L

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome, a severe neurodevelopmental disease, occurs primarily due to genetic defects, which cause lack of expression or mutations in the wild-type E6AP/UBE3A protein. A proportion of the Angelman syndrome patients bear UBE3A point mutations, which do not interfere with the expression of the full-length protein, however, these individuals still develop physiological conditions of the disease. Interestingly, most of these mutations are catalytically defective, thereby indicating the importance of UBE3A enzymatic activity role in the Angelman syndrome pathology. In this study, we show that Angelman syndrome-associated mutants interact strongly with the proteasome via the S5a proteasomal subunit, resulting in an overall inhibitory effect on the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Our results suggest that mutated catalytically inactive forms of UBE3A may cause defects in overall proteasome function, which could have an important role in the Angelman syndrome pathology. PMID:25633294

  12. Effects of Ghrelin on the Proteolytic Pathways of Alzheimer's Disease Neuronal Cells.

    PubMed

    Cecarini, Valentina; Bonfili, Laura; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Keller, Jeffrey N; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Eleuteri, Anna Maria

    2016-07-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone with a role in the onset and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. It has been recently associated to Alzheimer's disease (AD) for its neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic activity. In the present study, we dissected the effect of ghrelin treatment on the two major intracellular proteolytic pathways, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, in cellular models of AD (namely SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells stably transfected with either the wild-type AβPP gene or the 717 valine-to-glycine AβPP-mutated gene). Ghrelin showed a growth-promoting effect on neuronal cells inducing also time-dependent modifications of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1 (GHS-R1) expression. Interestingly, we demonstrated for the first time that ghrelin was able to activate the proteasome in neural cells playing also a role in the interplay between the UPS and autophagy. Our data provide a novel mechanism by which circulating hormones control neural homeostasis through the regulation of proteolytic pathways implicated in AD. PMID:26033219

  13. Tracing the history of the ubiquitin proteolytic system: the pioneering article.

    PubMed

    Ciechanover, Aaron

    2009-09-11

    A series of findings made by several researchers during a two-decade period between the mid-1950s and mid-1970s raised the suspicion that the lysosome might not be the organelle that degrades the bulk of cellular proteins under basal conditions. These findings predicted the existence of a nonlysosomal, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent proteolytic system. Yet, following the initial discovery of such activity in a crude cell extract, it was a single article published in this journal [A. Ciechanover, Y. Hod, A. Hershko, A heat-stable polypeptide component of an ATP-dependent proteolytic system from reticulocytes, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 81 (1978) 1100-1105], my first study as a graduate student of Avram Hershko, that made it clear that the system that catalyzes the activity is novel and complex, and does not follow the paradigm in the field of proteolysis where a single protease typically cleaves its substrate; here at least two components were required to carry out this activity, and one of them was an unusual, small, and heat-stable protein later identified as ubiquitin. PMID:19539608

  14. Investigation of plant latices of Asteraceae and Campanulaceae regarding proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Sytwala, Sonja; Domsalla, André; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-12-01

    Occurrence of plant latices is widespread, there are more than 40 families of plants characterized to establish lactiferous structures. The appearance of hydrolytic active proteins, incorporated in latices is already characterized, and hydrolytic active proteins are considerable, and for several plant families, the occurrence of hydrolytic active proteins is already specified e.g. Apocynaceae Juss., Caricaceae Dumort, Euphorbiaceae Juss., Moraceae Gaudich and Papaveraceae Juss. In our investigation, focused on latex bearing plants of order Asterales, Asteraceae and Campanulaceae in particular. The present outcomes represent a comprehensive study, relating to the occurrence of proteolytic active enzymes of order Asterales for the first time. 131 different species of Asteraceae and Campanulaceae were tested, and the appearance of plant latex proteases were determined in different quantities. Proteolytic activity was investigated by inhibitory studies and determination of residual activity in the following, enable us to characterize the proteases. Most of the considered species exhibit a serine protease activity and a multiplicity of species exhibited two or more subclasses of proteases. PMID:26458257

  15. Structural identification and proteolytic effects of the hatching enzyme from starfish Asterias amurensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi Jiang; Kim, Sang Moo

    2014-07-01

    Hatching enzyme (HE) is secreted from the blastula stage during fertilization and can cleave the egg membrane. The structural identification and proteolytic effects on the collagen and fibrinogen were investigated in this study. Approximate 20 kDa of Asn-linked oligosaccharides were attached to the HE. Five peptide fragments of the starfish HE were homogenous to those of the coat matrix protein of starfish Patiria pectinifera. Amino acids of the starfish HE consisted of mainly Leu (10.0%), Asp (12.5%), and Glu (12.8%). Collagenolytic and fibrinolytic activities of the starfish HE were weaker than those of collagenase and α-chymotrypsin. The degree values of hydrolysis for collagenase and α- chymotrypsin were significantly higher than those of HE in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The peptide mappings of the starfish HE on the collagenolysis (110.7, 84.7, and 20.8 kDa) and fibrinogenolysis (34, 30, and 29 kDa) were different from those of collagenase and α-chymotrypsin. Based on the proteolytic effects on the collagen and fibrinogen, the starfish hatching enzyme might have the potential application to remove the matrix composition in scar or keloid tissue. PMID:24559163

  16. Histone H3.3 and its proteolytically processed form drive a cellular senescence program

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Luis F.; Young, Andrew R. J.; Wang, Zichen; Wu, Hsan-Au; Panda, Taniya; Kou, Yan; Kapoor, Avnish; Hasson, Dan; Mills, Nicholas R.; Ma’ayan, Avi; Narita, Masashi; Bernstein, Emily

    2014-01-01

    The process of cellular senescence generates a repressive chromatin environment, however, the role of histone variants and histone proteolytic cleavage in senescence remains unclear. Using models of oncogene-induced and replicative senescence, here we report novel histone H3 tail cleavage events mediated by the protease Cathepsin L. We find that cleaved forms of H3 are nucleosomal and the histone variant H3.3 is the preferred cleaved form of H3. Ectopic expression of H3.3 and its cleavage product (H3.3cs1), which lacks the first twenty-one amino acids of the H3 tail, is sufficient to induce senescence. Further, H3.3cs1 chromatin incorporation is mediated by the HUCA histone chaperone complex. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling revealed that H3.3cs1 facilitates transcriptional silencing of cell cycle regulators including RB/E2F target genes, likely via the permanent removal of H3K4me3. Collectively, our study identifies histone H3.3 and its proteolytically processed forms as key regulators of cellular senescence. PMID:25394905

  17. Functionalized Biopolymer Particles Enhance Performance of a Tissue-Protective Peptide under Proteolytic and Thermal Stress.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kevin; Devalliere, Julie; Uygun, Basak E; Yarmush, Martin L

    2016-06-13

    Cutaneous burns are often exacerbated by poor perfusion and subsequent necrosis of the microvasculature surrounding the primary injury. Preservation of these vessels can reduce necrotic tissue expansion and increase success rates of skin graft procedures. Recent work has identified a peptide derived from erythropoietin, ARA290, with the ability to mediate tissue protection in a variety of cell types. Here we demonstrate the advantages of fusing ARA290 to an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) to salvage microvascular endothelial cells in harsh proteolytic conditions following thermal shock. These fusion proteins were expressed recombinantly in bacterial hosts and rapidly purified by inverse transition cycling. They were shown to spontaneously aggregate into particles at subphysiological temperatures. The bifunctional submicron particles were resistant to digestion in enzymes upregulated after burn injury. Furthermore, the data strongly suggest these ARA290-functionalized particles were superior to treatment with the peptide alone in preventing microvascular cell death in these conditions. The results bring to light an efficient and cost-effective strategy for the delivery therapeutic peptides to proteolytically active wound sites. PMID:27219509

  18. Biochemical and Functional Characterization of Parawixia bistriata Spider Venom with Potential Proteolytic and Larvicidal Activities

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Gizeli S.; Coutinho-Neto, Antonio; Kayano, Anderson M.; Simões-Silva, Rodrigo; Trindade, Frances; de Almeida e Silva, Alexandre; Marcussi, Silvana; da Silva, Saulo L.; Fernandes, Carla F. C.; Zuliani, Juliana P.; Calderon, Leonardo A.; Soares, Andreimar M.; Stábeli, Rodrigo G.

    2014-01-01

    Toxins purified from the venom of spiders have high potential to be studied pharmacologically and biochemically. These biomolecules may have biotechnological and therapeutic applications. This study aimed to evaluate the protein content of Parawixia bistriata venom and functionally characterize its proteins that have potential for biotechnological applications. The crude venom showed no phospholipase, hemorrhagic, or anti-Leishmania activities attesting to low genotoxicity and discrete antifungal activity for C. albicans. However the following activities were observed: anticoagulation, edema, myotoxicity and proteolysis on casein, azo-collagen, and fibrinogen. The chromatographic and electrophoretic profiles of the proteins revealed a predominance of acidic, neutral, and polar proteins, highlighting the presence of proteins with high molecular masses. Five fractions were collected using cation exchange chromatography, with the P4 fraction standing out as that of the highest purity. All fractions showed proteolytic activity. The crude venom and fractions P1, P2, and P3 showed larvicidal effects on A. aegypti. Fraction P4 showed the presence of a possible metalloprotease (60 kDa) that has high proteolytic activity on azo-collagen and was inhibited by EDTA. The results presented in this study demonstrate the presence of proteins in the venom of P. bistriata with potential for biotechnological applications. PMID:24895632

  19. CleavPredict: A Platform for Reasoning about Matrix Metalloproteinases Proteolytic Events

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sonu; Ratnikov, Boris I.; Kazanov, Marat D.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Cieplak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    CleavPredict (http://cleavpredict.sanfordburnham.org) is a Web server for substrate cleavage prediction for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). It is intended as a computational platform aiding the scientific community in reasoning about proteolytic events. CleavPredict offers in silico prediction of cleavage sites specific for 11 human MMPs. The prediction method employs the MMP specific position weight matrices (PWMs) derived from statistical analysis of high-throughput phage display experimental results. To augment the substrate cleavage prediction process, CleavPredict provides information about the structural features of potential cleavage sites that influence proteolysis. These include: secondary structure, disordered regions, transmembrane domains, and solvent accessibility. The server also provides information about subcellular location, co-localization, and co-expression of proteinase and potential substrates, along with experimentally determined positions of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), and posttranslational modification (PTM) sites in substrates. All this information will provide the user with perspectives in reasoning about proteolytic events. CleavPredict is freely accessible, and there is no login required. PMID:25996941

  20. CleavPredict: A Platform for Reasoning about Matrix Metalloproteinases Proteolytic Events.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sonu; Ratnikov, Boris I; Kazanov, Marat D; Smith, Jeffrey W; Cieplak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    CleavPredict (http://cleavpredict.sanfordburnham.org) is a Web server for substrate cleavage prediction for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). It is intended as a computational platform aiding the scientific community in reasoning about proteolytic events. CleavPredict offers in silico prediction of cleavage sites specific for 11 human MMPs. The prediction method employs the MMP specific position weight matrices (PWMs) derived from statistical analysis of high-throughput phage display experimental results. To augment the substrate cleavage prediction process, CleavPredict provides information about the structural features of potential cleavage sites that influence proteolysis. These include: secondary structure, disordered regions, transmembrane domains, and solvent accessibility. The server also provides information about subcellular location, co-localization, and co-expression of proteinase and potential substrates, along with experimentally determined positions of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), and posttranslational modification (PTM) sites in substrates. All this information will provide the user with perspectives in reasoning about proteolytic events. CleavPredict is freely accessible, and there is no login required. PMID:25996941

  1. Endosomal localization of TLR8 confers distinctive proteolytic processing on human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Noriko; Funami, Kenji; Tatematsu, Megumi; Seya, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Misako

    2014-11-15

    Nucleic acid-sensing TLRs are involved in both antimicrobial immune responses and autoimmune inflammation. TLR8 is phylogenetically and structurally related to TLR7 and TLR9, which undergo proteolytic processing in the endolysosomes to generate functional receptors. Recent structural analyses of human TLR8 ectodomain and its liganded form demonstrated that TLR8 is also cleaved, and both the N- and C-terminal halves contribute to ligand binding. However, the structures and ssRNA recognition mode of endogenous TLR8 in human primary cells are largely unknown. In this study, we show that proteolytic processing of TLR8 occurs in human monocytes and macrophages in a different manner compared with TLR7/9 cleavage. The insertion loop between leucine-rich repeats 14 and 15 in TLR8 is indispensable for the cleavage and stepwise processing that occurs in the N-terminal fragment. Both furin-like proprotein convertase and cathepsins contribute to TLR8 cleavage in the early/late endosomes. TLR8 recognizes viral ssRNA and endogenous RNA, such as microRNAs, resulting in the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Hence, localization sites of the receptors are crucial for the nucleic acid-sensing mode and downstream signaling. PMID:25297876

  2. Proteolytic activity of Enterococcus faecalis VB63F for reduction of allergenicity of bovine milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Biscola, V; Tulini, F L; Choiset, Y; Rabesona, H; Ivanova, I; Chobert, J-M; Todorov, S D; Haertlé, T; Franco, B D G M

    2016-07-01

    With the aim of screening proteolytic strains of lactic acid bacteria to evaluate their potential for the reduction of allergenicity of the major bovine milk proteins, we isolated a new proteolytic strain of Enterococcus faecalis (Ent. faecalis VB63F) from raw bovine milk. The proteases produced by this strain had strong activity against caseins (αS1-, αS2-, and β-casein), in both skim milk and sodium caseinate. However, only partial hydrolysis of whey proteins was observed. Proteolysis of Na-caseinate and whey proteins, observed after sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE, was confirmed by analysis of peptide profiles by reversed-phase HPLC. Inhibition of proteolysis with EDTA indicated that the proteases produced by Ent. faecalis VB63F belonged to the group of metalloproteases. The optimal conditions for their activity were 42°C and pH 6.5. The majority of assessed virulence genes were absent in Ent. faecalis VB63F. The obtained results suggest that Ent. faecalis VB63F could be efficient in reducing the immunoreactivity of bovine milk proteins. PMID:27179865

  3. Proteolytic processing of Alzheimer’s β-amyloid precursor protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Ma, Qilin; Zhang, Yun-wu; Xu, Huaxi

    2011-01-01

    β–amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). APP undergoes posttranslational proteolysis/processing to generate the hydrophobic β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Deposition of Aβ in the brain, forming oligomeric Aβ and plaques, is identified as one of the key pathological hallmarks of AD. The processing of APP to generate Aβ is executed by β- and γ-secretase and is highly regulated. Aβ toxicity can lead to synaptic dysfunction, neuronal cell death, impaired learning/memory and abnormal behaviors in AD models in vitro and in vivo. Aside from Aβ, proteolytic cleavages of APP can also give rise to the APP intracellular domain (AICD), reportedly involved in multiple types of cellular events such as gene transcription and apoptotic cell death. In addition to amyloidogenic processing, APP can also be cleaved by α-secretase to form a soluble or secreted APP ectodomain (sAPP-α) that has been shown to be mostly neuro-protective. In this review, we describe the mechanisms involved in APP metabolism and the likely functions of its various proteolytic products to give a better understanding of the patho/physiological functions of APP. PMID:22122372

  4. Intrinsic Tau Acetylation Is Coupled to Auto-Proteolytic Tau Fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Todd J.; Constance, Brian H.; Hwang, Andrew W.; James, Michael; Yuan, Chao-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Tau proteins are abnormally aggregated in a range of neurodegenerative tauopathies including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recently, tau has emerged as an extensively post-translationally modified protein, among which lysine acetylation is critical for normal tau function and its pathological aggregation. Here, we demonstrate that tau isoforms have different propensities to undergo lysine acetylation, with auto-acetylation occurring more prominently within the lysine-rich microtubule-binding repeats. Unexpectedly, we identified a unique intrinsic property of tau in which auto-acetylation induces proteolytic tau cleavage, thereby generating distinct N- and C-terminal tau fragments. Supporting a catalytic reaction-based mechanism, mapping and mutagenesis studies showed that tau cysteines, which are required for acetyl group transfer, are also essential for auto-proteolytic tau processing. Further mass spectrometry analysis identified the C-terminal 2nd and 4th microtubule binding repeats as potential sites of auto-cleavage. The identification of acetylation-mediated auto-proteolysis provides a new biochemical mechanism for tau self-regulation and warrants further investigation into whether auto-catalytic functions of tau are implicated in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:27383765

  5. Electrochemical sensing system employing fructosamine 6-kinase enables glycated albumin measurement requiring no proteolytic digestion.

    PubMed

    Kameya, Miho; Tsugawa, Wakako; Yamada-Tajima, Mayumi; Hatada, Mika; Suzuki, Keita; Sakaguchi-Mikami, Akane; Ferri, Stefano; Klonoff, David C; Sode, Koji

    2016-06-01

    Currently available enzymatic methods for the measurement of glycated proteins utilize fructosyl amino acid/peptide oxidases (FAOXs/FPOXs) as sensing elements. FAOXs/FPOXs oxidize glycated amino acids or glycated dipeptides but they are not able to accept longer glycated peptides or intact glycated proteins as substrates. Therefore, pretreatment via proteolytic digestion is unavoidable with the current enzymatic methods, and there remains a need for simpler measurement methods for glycated proteins. In this study, in order to develop a novel sensing system for glycated albumin (GA), a marker for diabetes, with no requirement for proteolytic digestion, we created an electrochemical sensor based on fructosamine 6-kinase (FN6K) from Escherichia coli. Uniquely, FN6K can react directly with intact GA unlike FAOXs/FPOXs. The concentration of GA in samples was measured using a carbon-printed disposable electrode upon which FN6K as well as two additional enzymes, pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase were overlaid. A clear correlation between the response current and the concentration of GA was observed in the range of 20-100 µM GA, which is suitable for measurement of GA in diluted blood samples from both healthy individuals and patients with diabetes. The sensing system reported here could be applied to point-of-care-testing devices for measurement of glycated proteins. PMID:27067959

  6. Preliminary investigation of intrinsic UV fluorescence spectroscopic changes associated with proteolytic digestion of bovine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, William; Padilla-Martinez, Juan-Pablo; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Franco, Walfre

    2016-03-01

    Degradation and destruction of articular cartilage is the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA), an entity second only to cardiovascular disease as a cause of disability in the United States. Joint mechanics and cartilage biochemistry are believed to play a role in OA; an optical tool to detect structural and chemical changes in articular cartilage might offer benefit for its early detection and treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the spectral changes in intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of cartilage that occur after proteolytic digestion of cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in varying concentrations of collagenase ranging from 10ug/mL up to 5mg/mL for 18 hours at 37°C, a model of OA. Pre- and post-incubation measurements were taken of the UV excitation-emission spectrum of each cartilage sample. Mechanical tests were performed to determine the pre- and post-digestion force/displacement ratio associated with indentation of each sample. Spectral changes in intrinsic cartilage fluorescence and stiffness of the cartilage were associated with proteolytic digestion. In particular, changes in the relative intensity of fluorescence peaks associated with pentosidine crosslinks (330 nm excitation, 390 nm emission) and tryptophan (290 nm excitation, 340 nm emission) were found to correlate with different degrees of cartilage digestion and cartilage stiffness. In principle, it may be possible to use UV fluorescence spectral data for early detection of damage to articular cartilage, and as a surrogate measure for cartilage stiffness.

  7. The importance of clinical suspicion in the diagnosis of a successfully managed case with De Bakey Type 1 acute aortic dissection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Salman, A. Ebru; Çeliksoy, Muzaffer; Yetişir, Fahri; Atasoy, Şevket; Katırcıoğlu, Fehmi

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 aortic dissection is a catastrophic clinical entity originating from the ascending aorta. Clinical suspicion in patients with epigastric pain, chest pain and gastrointestinal symptoms might be life saving. Aortic dissection and acute mesenteric ischemia might be confusing in diagnosis of patients with epigastric pain, chest pain, gastrointestinal symptoms and high white blood cell count and D-dimer. In this case report of a patient who was admitted to the emergency room with a presentation resembling acute mesenteric ischemia, this diagnosis was excluded within the first 24 hours as a result of clinical suspicion. In this case report, the successful management in diagnosis and treatment of a 30-year-old male patient with type 1 aortic dissection is discussed in light of the literature. PMID:25931881

  8. The Alcohol Clinical Trials Initiative (ACTIVE): Purpose and Goals for Assessing Important and Salient Issues for Medications Development in Alcohol Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Raymond F; Litten, Raye Z; Falk, Daniel E; Palumbo, Joseph M; Bartus, Raymond T; Robinson, Rebecca L; Kranzler, Henry R; Kosten, Thomas R; Meyer, Roger E; O'Brien, Charles P; Mann, Karl; Meulien, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Although progress has been made in the treatment of alcohol use disorders, more effective treatments are needed. In the last 15 years, several medications have been approved for use in alcohol dependence but have only limited effectiveness and clinical acceptance. While academics have developed some ‘standards' for the performance of clinical trials for alcohol dependence, they vary considerably, in the type of populations to be studied, the length of trials, salient outcome measures, and data analyses to be used (especially in the treatment of missing data). This variability impedes the commercial development of medications to treat alcohol dependence. Using a model similar to that used to develop an expert consensus for medications to improve cognitive aspects of schizophrenia (MATRICS) and in the treatment of pain (IMMPACT), a workgroup has been formed under the auspices of ACNP, known as the ACTIVE (Alcohol Clinical Trials Initiative) group, to evaluate data from completed clinical trials to develop a consensus on key issues in the conduct of clinical trials in alcohol dependence. ACTIVE consists of academic experts, industry representatives, and staff from the Food and Drug Administration, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. This paper describes the rationale behind the effort, its history and organization, and initial key questions that have been identified as the primary focus of the workgroup. Future papers will focus on knowledge gained from the re-analysis of completed trials and provide consensus opinions regarding the performance of clinical trials that might be undertaken in the future. PMID:21900883

  9. [Proteolytic enzymes in the prevention and treatment of early ventilatory complications following lung resection in patients with tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ershov, V N; Krylov, V V; Zolotarev, V P

    1989-01-01

    The authors examined 259 patients with tuberculosis of the lungs before and after partial resection of the lungs. Proteolytic enzymes were administered endotracheally in the pre- and postoperative periods to 132 patients (main group), 127 patients (control group) received a placebo. Endotracheal administration of proteolytic enzymes in the main group reduced the number of early pleuropulmonary complications of the type of atelectasis and hypoventilation by half to one third and accelerated their resolution by 3-4 times as compared to these values in the control group. Fibrous changes and pleural adhesions on the side of the operation formed from the early pleuropulmonary complications more often in the control than in the main group. The function of external respiration was restored under the effect of the proteolytic enzymes in the control group 1-2 months after segmental and combined resection, in the control group it was restored 3-4 months and later after the operation. PMID:2687135

  10. The Importance of Seeing the Patient: Test-Enhanced Learning with Standardized Patients and Written Tests Improves Clinical Application of Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Douglas P.; Butler, Andrew C.; Lawson, Amy L.; Roediger, Henry L., III

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that repeated retrieval with written tests produces superior long-term retention compared to repeated study. However, the degree to which this increased retention transfers to clinical application has not been investigated. In addition, increased retention obtained through written testing has not been compared to other…

  11. Students' Perception of Important Teaching Behaviors in Classroom and Clinical Environments of a Community College Nursing and Dental Hygiene Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrough-Walls, Vickie J.

    2012-01-01

    Student success is dependent on effective instruction. Yet, effective teaching is difficult to define and described differently by students, faculty, and administrators. Nursing and dental hygiene education programs require faculty to teach in both classroom and clinical environments. However, accreditation agencies for these programs mandate…

  12. Sadaaki Iwanaga: Discovery of the lipopolysaccharide- and beta-1,3-D-glucan-mediated proteolytic cascade and unique proteins in invertebrate immunity.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Muta, Tatsushi

    2010-05-01

    Horseshoe crab haemolymph contains a single type of cells, granular haemocytes, which are extremely sensitive to bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and lead to haemolymph coagulation. Sadaaki Iwanaga isolated protease zymogens from the haemocytes and reconstituted LPS and beta-1,3-d-glucans-mediated haemolymph coagulation. This led to the first discovery of a proteolytic cascade triggered by pathogen-associated molecular patterns, an important milestone for studies on invertebrate innate immunity. Moreover, he separated components derived from haemocyte granules and haemolymph plasma, and consequently identified unique defense molecules, such as lectins, serpins, cystatins, antimicrobial substances and substrates for transglutaminase. Through steady and persistent studies on the horseshoe crab host defense system, he made great progress in the field. Now we know that LPS-induced haemocyte exocytosis leads not only to coagulation but also activates a sophisticated immune response network that coordinately induces pathogen recognition, elimination and wound healing. PMID:20406733

  13. In vitro antifungal activity of ZJ-522, a new triazole restructured from fluconazole and butenafine, against clinically important fungi in comparison with fluconazole and butenafine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ping-Hui; Cao, Yong-Bing; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Jun-Dong; Zhang, Wan-Nian; Wang, Yan; Gu, Jun; Cao, Ying-Ying; Li, Ruo-Yu; Jia, Xin-Ming; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2005-08-01

    The antifungal activity of ZJ-522, a new triazole antifungal agent restructured from fluconazole and butenafine, was compared to that of fluconazole and butenafine against 43 strains of fungi representing 13 fungal species. MICs were determined by using the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS)-recommended broth microdilution method for yeasts, which was modified for filamentous fungi. ZJ-522 was about 50-fold and 2 to 16-fold more potent than fluconazole against yeasts and filamentous fungi respectively, but it was less active than butenafine against filamentous fungi, although butenafine was inactive against most yeasts. Thus, the fashion of ZJ-522 antifungal activity more similar to that of fluconazole than that of butenafine indicates that ZJ-522 should be an inhibitor of lanosterol 14alpha-demethylase but not of squalene epoxidase, and should be a candidate for clinical development. PMID:16079485

  14. Activities of indigenous proteolytic enzymes in caprine milk of different somatic cell counts.

    PubMed

    Albenzio, M; Santillo, A; Kelly, A L; Caroprese, M; Marino, R; Sevi, A

    2015-11-01

    Individual caprine milk with different somatic cell counts (SCC) were studied with the aim of investigating the percentage distribution of leukocyte cell types and the activities of indigenous proteolytic enzymes; proteolysis of casein was also studied in relation to cell type following recovery from milk. The experiment was conducted on 5 intensively managed dairy flocks of Garganica goats; on the basis of SCC, the experimental groups were denoted low (L-SCC; <700,000 cells/mL), medium (M-SCC; from 701,000 to 1,500,000 cells/mL), and high (H-SCC; >1,501,000 cells/mL) SCC. Leukocyte distribution differed between groups; polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes were higher in M-SCC and H-SCC milk samples, the percentage macrophages was the highest in H-SCC, and levels of nonviable cells significantly decreased with increasing SCC. Activities of all the main proteolytic enzymes were affected by SCC; plasmin activity was the highest in H-SCC milk and the lowest in L-SCC, and elastase and cathepsin D activities were the highest in M-SCC. Somatic cell count influenced casein hydrolysis patterns, with less intact α- and β-casein in H-SCC milk. Higher levels of low electrophoretic mobility peptides were detected in sodium caseinate incubated with leukocytes isolated from L-SCC milk, independent of cell type, whereas among cells recovered from M-SCC milk, macrophages yielded the highest levels of low electrophoretic mobility peptides from sodium caseinate. The level of high electrophoretic mobility peptides was higher in sodium caseinate incubated with polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes and macrophages isolated from M-SCC, whereas the same fraction of peptides was always the highest, independent of leukocyte type, for cells recovered from H-SCC milk. In caprine milk, a level of 700,000 cells/mL represented the threshold for changes in leukocyte distribution, which is presumably related to the immune status of the mammary gland. Differences in the profile of

  15. Assembly and proteolytic processing of mycobacterial ClpP1 and ClpP2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Caseinolytic proteases (ClpPs) are barrel-shaped self-compartmentalized peptidases involved in eliminating damaged or short-lived regulatory proteins. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) genome contains two genes coding for putative ClpPs, ClpP1 and ClpP2 respectively, that are likely to play a role in the virulence of the bacterium. Results We report the first biochemical characterization of ClpP1 and ClpP2 peptidases from MTB. Both proteins were produced and purified in Escherichia coli. Use of fluorogenic model peptides of diverse specificities failed to show peptidase activity with recombinant mycobacterial ClpP1 or ClpP2. However, we found that ClpP1 had a proteolytic activity responsible for its own cleavage after the Arg8 residue and cleavage of ClpP2 after the Ala12 residue. In addition, we showed that the absence of any peptidase activity toward model peptides was not due to an obstruction of the entry pore by the N-terminal flexible extremity of the proteins, nor to an absolute requirement for the ClpX or ClpC ATPase complex. Finally, we also found that removing the putative propeptides of ClpP1 and ClpP2 did not result in cleavage of model peptides. We have also shown that recombinant ClpP1 and ClpP2 do not assemble in the conventional functional tetradecameric form but in lower order oligomeric species ranging from monomers to heptamers. The concomitant presence of both ClpP1 and ClpP2 did not result in tetradecameric assembly. Deleting the amino-terminal extremity of ClpP1 and ClpP2 (the putative propeptide or entry gate) promoted the assembly in higher order oligomeric species, suggesting that the flexible N-terminal extremity of mycobacterial ClpPs participated in the destabilization of interaction between heptamers. Conclusion Despite the conservation of a Ser protease catalytic triad in their primary sequences, mycobacterial ClpP1 and ClpP2 do not have conventional peptidase activity toward peptide models and display an unusual

  16. Four proteolytic processes of myocardium, one insensitive to thiol reactive agents and thiol protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Thorne, D P; Lockwood, T D

    1993-07-01

    Four distinct processes mediating protein degradation were identified in the Langendorff perfused rat heart. Hearts were biosynthetically labeled in vitro with [3H]leucine for 10 min. The subsequent release of [3H]leucine at 1.5-min intervals (2 mM nonradioactive leucine) was determined from 20 min to 8 h after labeling in rhythmically contracting hearts. Rapid turnover proteins were eliminated during the first 3 h; this degradation was not inhibited by insulin (5 nM) or isoproterenol (0.5 microM). However, the nontoxic thiol reactive agent diamide (100 microM) caused a complete inhibition of the [3H]leucine release from rapidly degraded proteins. After the elimination of rapidly degraded proteins at 3 h, the release of [3H]leucine was inhibited 35-40% by insulin (5 nM) or the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine (30 microM), thereby defining a second vesicular process. The beta-agonist isoproterenol (0.5 microM) or the nonselective alpha-agonist naphazoline (100 microM) caused 30-35% proteolytic inhibitions, defining a third adrenergic-responsive process. The inhibitory effects of simultaneously combined insulin and chloroquine did not exceed the effect of either agent alone. However, the combined effects of insulin and isoproterenol were additive, inhibiting two-thirds of basal degradation. Beginning at 3 h after labeling a 75% proteolytic inhibition resulted from the thiol reactive agents diamide (100 microM) or N-ethylmaleimide (10 microM); the thiol protease active site inhibitor trans-epoxysuccinly-L-leucylamino-(4-quinidino)butane (50 microM) caused 65% inhibition. The 75% inhibition caused by diamide includes both the insulin-responsive and beta-adrenergic-responsive pathways. A novel fourth proteolytic process (25% of proteolysis) was thereby distinguished from the above three by its resistance to inhibition by insulin, adrenergic agonists, thiol reactive agents, or thiol protease inhibitor. Only the adrenergic-responsive process was correlated with changes in

  17. Effect of Allium sativum and fish collagen on the proteolytic and angiotensin-I converting enzyme-inhibitory activities in cheese and yogurt.

    PubMed

    Shori, A B; Baba, A S; Keow, J N

    2012-12-15

    There is an increasing demand of functional foods in developed countries. Yogurt plays an important role in the management of blood pressure. Several bioactive peptides isolated from Allium sativum or fish collagen have shown antihypertensive activity. Thus, in the present study the effects of A. sativum and/or Fish Collagen (FC) on proteolysis and ACE inhibitory activity in yogurt (0, 7 and 14 day) and cheese (0, 14 and 28 day) were investigated. Proteolytic activities were the highest on day 7 of refrigerated storage in A. sativum-FC-yogurt (337.0 +/- 5.3 microg g(-1)) followed by FC-yogurt (275.3 +/- 2.0 microg g(-1)), A. sativum-yogurt (245.8 +/- 4.2 microg g(-1)) and plain-yogurt (40.4 +/- 1.2 microg g(-1)). On the other hand, proteolytic activities in cheese ripening were the highest (p < 0.05) on day 14 of storage for plain and A. sativum-cheeses (411.4 +/- 4.3 and 528.7 +/- 1.6 microg g(-1), respectively). However, the presence of FC increased the proteolysis to the highest level on day 28 of storage for FC- and A. sativum-FC cheeses (641.2 +/- 0.1 and 1128.4 +/- 4.5 microg g(-1), respectively). In addition, plain- and A. sativum-yogurts with or without FC showed maximal inhibition of ACE on day 7 of storage. Fresh plain- and A. sativum-cheeses showed ACE inhibition (72.3 +/- 7.8 and 50.4 +/- 1.6 % respectively), the presence of FC in both type of cheeses reduced the ACE inhibition to 62.9 +/- 0.8 and 44.5 +/- 5.0%, respectively. However, refrigerated storage increased ACE inhibition in cheeses (p < 0.05 on day 28) in the presence of FC more than in the absence. In conclusion, the presence of FC in A. sativum-yogurt or cheese enhanced the proteolytic activity. Thus, it has potential in the development of an effective dietary strategy for hypertension associated cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23755406

  18. The effects of Capn1 gene inactivation on skeletal muscle growth, development, and atrophy, and the compensatory role of other proteolytic systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Myofibrillar protein turnover is a key component of muscle growth and degeneration, requiring proteolytic enzymes to degrade the skeletal muscle proteins. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of the calpain proteolytic system in muscle growth development using µ-calpain knockout (...

  19. Sequencing Lys-N proteolytic peptides by ESI and MALDI tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Verdié, Pascal; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we explored the MS/MS behavior of various synthetic peptides that possess a lysine residue at the N-terminal position. These peptides were designed to mimic peptides produced upon proteolysis by the Lys-N enzyme, a metalloendopeptidase issued from a Japanese fungus Grifola frondosa that was recently investigated in proteomic studies as an alternative to trypsin digestion, as a specific cleavage at the amide X-Lys chain is obtained that provides N-terminal lysine peptide fragments. In contrast to tryptic peptides exhibiting a lysine or arginine residue solely at the C-terminal position, and are thus devoid of such basic amino acids within the sequence, these Lys-N proteolytic peptides can contain the highly basic arginine residue anywhere within the peptide chain. The fragmentation patterns of such sequences with the ESI-QqTOF and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometers commonly used in proteomic bottom-up experiments were investigated. PMID:21472586

  20. Sequencing Lys-N Proteolytic Peptides by ESI and MALDI Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Verdié, Pascal; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we explored the MS/MS behavior of various synthetic peptides that possess a lysine residue at the N-terminal position. These peptides were designed to mimic peptides produced upon proteolysis by the Lys-N enzyme, a metalloendopeptidase issued from a Japanese fungus Grifola frondosa that was recently investigated in proteomic studies as an alternative to trypsin digestion, as a specific cleavage at the amide X-Lys chain is obtained that provides N-terminal lysine peptide fragments. In contrast to tryptic peptides exhibiting a lysine or arginine residue solely at the C-terminal position, and are thus devoid of such basic amino acids within the sequence, these Lys-N proteolytic peptides can contain the highly basic arginine residue anywhere within the peptide chain. The fragmentation patterns of such sequences with the ESI-QqTOF and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometers commonly used in proteomic bottom-up experiments were investigated.

  1. Activation of the heat-stable polypeptide of the ATP-dependent proteolytic system.

    PubMed Central

    Ciechanover, A; Heller, H; Katz-Etzion, R; Hershko, A

    1981-01-01

    It had been shown previously that the heat-stable polypeptide of the ATP-dependent proteolytic system of reticulocytes, designated APF-1, forms covalent conjugates with protein substrates in an ATP-requiring process. We now describe an enzyme that carries out the activation by ATP of the polypeptide with pyrophosphate displacement. The formation of AMP-polypeptide and transfer of the polypeptide to a secondary acceptor are suggested by an APF-1 requirement for ATP-PPi and ATP-AMP exchange reactions, respectively. With radiolabeled polypeptide, an ATP-dependent labeling of the enzyme was shown to be by a linkage that is acid stable but is labile to treatment with mild alkali, hydroxylamine, borohydride, or mercuric salts. It therefore appears that the AMP-polypeptide undergoes attack by an -SH group of the enzyme to form a thiolester. PMID:6262770

  2. The role of proteolytic enzymes in degradation of plant tissues: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewosz, J.; Kelman, A.; Sequeira, L.

    1989-01-01

    The proteolytic enzymes produced by Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc-strain SR 394) grown on various media were examined by isoelectrofocusing in polyacrylamide gels over a pH range of 3-10. In addition to the main protease present in culture filtrates, low concentrations of several other proteases were present in extracts from potato tubers infected by Ecc. Proteases from all these sources were similar and had the following properties: pH optimum near 8.0, calcium dependent, insensitive to serine proteinase and SH-proteinase inhibitors, inhibited by EDTA, and highly thermostable. These enzymes degraded gelatin, soluble collagen and Hide Powder Azure, and showed weak activity on casein, but did not degrade insoluble collagen or elastin.

  3. Fibrin Clots Are Equilibrium Polymers That Can Be Remodeled Without Proteolytic Digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysh, Irina N.; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Purohit, Prashant K.; Weisel, John W.

    2012-11-01

    Fibrin polymerization is a necessary part of hemostasis but clots can obstruct blood vessels and cause heart attacks and strokes. The polymerization reactions are specific and controlled, involving strong knob-into-hole interactions to convert soluble fibrinogen into insoluble fibrin. It has long been assumed that clots and thrombi are stable structures until proteolytic digestion. On the contrary, using the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we demonstrate here that there is turnover of fibrin in an uncrosslinked clot. A peptide representing the knobs involved in fibrin polymerization can compete for the holes and dissolve a preformed fibrin clot, or increase the fraction of soluble oligomers, with striking rearrangements in clot structure. These results imply that in vivo clots or thrombi are more dynamic structures than previously believed that may be remodeled as a result of local environmental conditions, may account for some embolization, and suggest a target for therapeutic intervention.

  4. Influence of Amitraz and Oxalic Acid on the Cuticle Proteolytic System of Apis mellifera L. Workers

    PubMed Central

    Strachecka, Aneta; Paleolog, Jerzy; Olszewski, Krzysztof; Borsuk, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    This work verifies that amitraz and oxalic acid treatment affect honeybee cuticle proteolytic enzymes (CPE). Three bee groups were monitored: oxalic acid treatment, amitraz treatment, control. Electrophoresis of hydrophilic and hydrophobic CPE was performed. Protease and protease inhibitor activities (in vitro) and antifungal/antibacterial efficiencies (in vivo), were analyzed. Amitraz and oxalic acid treatment reduced hydrophobic, but did not affect hydrophilic, protein concentrations and reduced both hydrophilic and hydrophobic body surface asparagine and serine protease activities in relation to most substrates and independently of pH. The activities of natural cuticle inhibitors of acidic, neutral, and alkaline proteases were suppressed as a result of the treatments, corresponding with reduced antifungal and antibacterial activity. Electrophoretic patterns of low-, medium-, and high-molecular-weight proteases and protease inhibitors were also affected by the treatments. PMID:26466630

  5. Recovery of Proteolytic and Collagenolytic Activities from Viscera By-products of Rayfish (Raja clavata)

    PubMed Central

    Murado, Miguel Anxo; del Pilar González, María; Vázquez, José Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the recovery of proteolytic and collagenolytic activities from rayfish (Raja clavata) viscera wastes. Initially, different parts of the gastrointestinal tract by-products (stomach, duodenum section including pancreas, final intestine) were evaluated. The extracts from proximal intestine yielded the highest values of both enzymatic activities. Optimal conditions for protease activity quantification were established at pH = 6, T = 40 °C and incubation time ≤20 min. The mathematical equation used to model the joint effect of pH and temperature led to maximum activity at pH = 8.66 and 59.4 °C, respectively. Overcooled acetone was found to be best option for recovery of enzymatic activities in comparison with ethanol, PEG-4000, ammonium sulphate and ultrafiltration system. Finally, a simple and systematic protocol of partial purification and total recovery of proteases and collagenases was defined. PMID:20098611

  6. Changes in nitrogen fractions and proteolytic activities in the cotyledons of germinating lentils.

    PubMed

    Guerra, H; Nicolás, G

    1983-09-01

    Changes in ninhydrin positive material, free amino acids and protein content during germination of seeds of Lens culinaris Med. have been studied. Ninhydrin positive material and free amino acids reached their highest concentration at the fifth day of germination. Total protein which represents 21% of the total dry weight of the lentil cotyledons, suffers a degradation of only 24% in seven days of germination; in the same period of time, reserve proteins underwent a degradation of 69%, legumin being the more abundant at the start, and the more rapidly depleted. Five different classes of proteolytic activities have been reported in lentil cotyledons: caseinolytic, active against the reserve proteins of the lentil cotyledons themselves, aminopeptidase, peptidehydrolase, carboxypeptidase and dipeptidase. The removal of the axis did not seem to exert any significant influence on the enzymatic activity. PMID:6361930

  7. Mechanical Allostery: Evidence for a Force Requirement in the Proteolytic Activation of Notch

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Wendy R.; Zimmerman, Brandon; He, Li; Miles, Laura J.; Huang, Jiuhong; Tiyanont, Kittichoat; McArthur, Debbie G.; Aster, Jon C.; Perrimon, Norbert; Loparo, Joseph J.; Blacklow, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ligands stimulate Notch receptors by inducing regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) to produce a transcriptional effector. Notch activation requires unmasking of a metalloprotease cleavage site remote from the site of ligand binding, raising the question of how proteolytic sensitivity is achieved. Here, we show that application of physiologically relevant forces to the regulatory switch results in sensitivity to metalloprotease cleavage, and that bound ligands induce Notch signal transduction in cells only in the presence of applied mechanical force. Synthetic receptor-ligand systems that remove the native ligand-receptor interaction also activate Notch by inducing proteolysis of the regulatory switch. Together, these studies show that mechanical force exerted by signal-sending cells is required for ligand-induced Notch activation, and establish that force-induced proteolysis can act as a mechanism of cellular mechanotransduction. PMID:26051539

  8. Proteolytic activation of latent Paraguaya peach PPO. Characterization of monophenolase activity.

    PubMed

    Laveda, F; Núñez-Delicado, E; García-Carmona, F; Sánchez-Ferrer, A

    2001-02-01

    The kinetics of the activation process of latent peach PPO by trypsin was studied. By coupling this activation process to the oxidation of 4-tert-butylcatechol (TBC) to its corresponding quinone, it was possible to evaluate the specific rate constant of active PPO formation, k(3), which showed a value of 0.04 s(-1). This proteolytic activation of latent peach PPO permitted us to characterize the monophenolase activity of peach PPO for the first time using p-cresol as substrate, and it showed the characteristic lag period of the kinetic mechanism of monophenols hydroxylation, which depended on the enzyme and substrate concentration, the pH and the presenc