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Sample records for clinically localized prostate

  1. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  2. Perspectives on the clinical management of localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Joel B

    2014-01-01

    If cure is necessary, is it possible and if cure is possible, is it necessary?’-Willet F. Whitmore Defined broadly, prostate cancer has two states: An indolent histological manifestation of a locally proliferative and invasive process or a clinically relevant, potentially lethal disease. Likewise, the management of clinically localized prostate cancer must address two questions: what sort of disease is this and what needs to be done. PMID:24589461

  3. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase {>=}25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease {>=}25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  4. External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer: Clinical Significance of Nadir Prostate-Specific Antigen Value Within 12 Months

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka M.S.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Teshima, Teruki

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of external beam radiotherapy for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer and investigate the clinical significance of nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value within 12 months (nPSA12) as an early estimate of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four patients with localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The total radiation doses ranged from 30 to 76 Gy (median, 66 Gy), and the median follow-up period for all 84 patients was 26.9 months (range, 2.7-77.3 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates in all 84 patients after radiotherapy were 67%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Although distant metastases and/or regional lymph node metastases developed in 34 patients (40%) after radiotherapy, local progression was observed in only 5 patients (6%). Of all 84 patients, the median nPSA12 in patients with clinical failure and in patients without clinical failure was 3.1 ng/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. When dividing patients according to low (<0.5 ng/mL) and high ({>=}0.5 ng/mL) nPSA12 levels, the 3-year PFS rate in patients with low nPSA12 and in those with high nPSA12 was 96% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, nPSA12 and pretreatment PSA value had a significant impact on PFS, and in multivariate analysis nPSA12 alone was an independent prognostic factor for PFS after radiotherapy. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy had an excellent local control rate for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer, and nPSA12 was predictive of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Interim Results of a Prospective Phase II Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Pawlicki, Todd; Cotrutz, Cristian; Presti, Joseph C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The radiobiology of prostate cancer favors a hypofractionated dose regimen. We report results of a prospective Phase II clinical trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-one low-risk prostate cancer patients with 6 months' minimum follow-up received 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy with image-guided SBRT alone using the CyberKnife. The early (<3 months) and late (>6 months) urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using validated quality of life questionnaires (International Prostate Symptom Score, Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response are analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months. There were no RTOG Grade 4 acute or late rectal/urinary complications. There were 2 patients with RTOG Grade 3 late urinary toxicity and none with RTOG Grade 3 rectal complications. A reduced rate of severe rectal toxicities was observed with every-other-day vs. 5 consecutive days treatment regimen (0% vs. 38%, p = 0.0035). A benign PSA bounce (median, 0.4 ng/mL) was observed in 12 patients (29%) occurring at 18 months (median) after treatment. At last follow-up, no patient has had a PSA failure regardless of biochemical failure definition. Of 32 patients with 12 months minimum follow-up, 25 patients (78%) achieved a PSA nadir {<=}0.4 ng/mL. A PSA decline to progressively lower nadirs up to 3 years after treatment was observed. Conclusions: The early and late toxicity profile and PSA response for prostate SBRT are highly encouraging. Continued accrual and follow-up will be necessary to confirm durable biochemical control rates and low toxicity profiles.

  6. Quality control of radiation therapy in multi-institutional randomized clinical trial for localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hafermann, M.D.; Gibbons, R.P.; Murphy, G.P.

    1988-02-01

    The National Prostatic Cancer Project (NPCP) from 1978 through 1985 compared definitive radiation therapy for Stages B2, C, D1 lesions in those who received only radiation treatment to those who received two years of additional cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) or estramustine phosphate (Emcyt) chemotherapy. Two hundred fifty-four patients were entered and 229 evaluated for compliance of the spatial localization of the prostate through review of the simulation and port films. In 78 per cent this was satisfactory, whereas in 12 per cent it was unsatisfactory, and another 10 per cent were not evaluable. The principle cause of an unsatisfactory rating was failure to adequately cover the prostatic target volume, especially the apex which was found to be variable in location. Routine use of retrograde urethrocystography is urged as part of the localization method in patients to receive definitive external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer. The role and impact of quality assurance programs for radiotherapy in cooperative clinical study groups is reviewed and discussed.

  7. Significance of Image Guidance to Clinical Outcomes for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qiuzi; Gao, Hong; Li, Gaofeng; Xiu, Xia; Wu, Qinhong; Li, Ming; Xu, Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To compare toxicity profiles and biochemical tumor control outcomes between patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and non-IGRT intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods. Between 2009 and 2012, 65 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with IG-IMRT. This group of patients was retrospectively compared with a similar cohort of 62 patients who were treated between 2004 and 2009 with IMRT to the same dose without image guidance. Results. The median follow-up time was 4.8 years. The rectal volume receiving ≥40 and ≥70 Gy was significantly lower in the IG-IMRT group. Grade 2 and higher acute and late GI and GU toxicity rates were lower in IG-IMRT group, but there was no statistical difference. No significant improvement in biochemical control at 5 years was observed in two groups. In a Cox regression analysis identifying predictors for PSA relapse-free survival, only preradiotherapy PSA was significantly associated with biochemical control; IG-IMRT was not a statistically significant indicator. Conclusions. The use of image guidance in the radiation of prostate cancer at our institute did not show significant reduction in the rates of GI and GU toxicity and did not improve the biochemical control compared with IMRT. PMID:25110701

  8. Clinical Perspective of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nilesh; Gaitonde, Krishnanath

    2016-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer affecting men today. It largely affects men in the fifth and sixth decade of life. Screening for prostate cancer, though controversial, is still the only way to detect early prostate cancer. Multiple newer options such as blood tests and genetic markers are being used in the clinical domain today to improve cancer detection and avoid unnecessary biopsies. To date, biopsy of the prostate remains the only modality to stratify the grade of cancer. Significant improvements in the imaging technology have improved localizing and detecting the disease. Treatment of prostate cancer is stratified on the basis of the grade and volume of the disease. There are multiple treatment options involved in the management of prostate cancer. Treatment of localized prostate cancer still continues to have very high cure rates and long-term cancer-specific survival rates. PMID:27187167

  9. Clinical assessment of three-dimensional ultrasound prostate localization for external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Nigel P.; Jaradat, Hazim A.; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2006-12-15

    Three-dimensional ultrasound localization has been performed for external beam prostate treatments at our institution since September 2001. This article presents data from the daily shifts for 221 patients and 5005 fractions, and the results of tests performed to assess the system's performance under clinical conditions. Three tests are presented: (1) To measure the accuracy of the shifts, eight patients treated on a helical tomotherapy machine were localized daily using both ultrasound (US) and a megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scan. Comparison of the shifts showed that US localization improved alignment for six of the eight patients when compared to alignment using skin marks alone. The mean US-MVCT vector for these six patients was 3.1{+-}1.3 mm, compared to 5.1{+-}2.1 mm between the MVCT and the skin marks. The other two patients were identified as poor candidates for US prior to their first treatment fraction. (2) To assess the extent of intrafraction motion, US localization was repeated after treatment for six patients and a total of 29 fractions. The mean intrafraction prostate shift was 1.9{+-}1.0 mm, and the shift was within the 3 mm localization uncertainty [Tome et al., Med. Phys. 29, 1781-1788 (2002); in New Technologies in Radiotion Oncology, edited by W. Schlegel, T. Bortfelde, and A. Grosu (Springer, Berlin, 2005)] of the system for 25 of 29 fractions. (3) To assess the interuser variation in shifts, four experienced operators independently localized five patients for five consecutive fractions. The standard deviation of the users' shifts was found to be approximately the same as the system's localization uncertainty. For shifts larger than the system localization uncertainty, the standard deviation of the users' shifts was nearly always much smaller than the mean shift. Taken together with the results of the US-MVCT comparison, this indicates that the shifts improved patient localization despite differences between users.

  10. Efficacy of Robotic-Assisted Prostatectomy in Localized Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval Salinas, Carolina; González Rangel, Andrés L.; Cataño Cataño, Juan G.; Fuentes Pachón, Juan C.; Castillo Londoño, Juan S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Radical prostatectomy is an effective treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer. The three approaches in current use have been extensively compared in observational studies, which have methodological limitations. Objective. To compare the efficacy and safety of three radical prostatectomy approaches in patients with localized prostate cancer: open, laparoscopic, and robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery. Materials and Methods. A systematic review of the literature was carried out. Databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and CENTRAL were searched for randomized clinical trials that directly compared two or more radical prostatectomy approaches. Selection criteria, methodological rigor, and risk of bias were evaluated by two independent researchers using Cochrane Collaboration's tools. Results. Three trials were included. In one study, laparoscopic surgery was associated with fewer blood loss and transfusion rates than the open procedure, in spite of longer operating time. The other two trials compared laparoscopic and robotic-assisted surgery in which no differences in perioperative outcomes were detected. Nevertheless, robotic-assisted prostatectomy showed more favorable erectile function and urinary continence recovery. Conclusion. At the present time, no clear advantage can be attributed to any of the existing prostatectomy approaches in terms of oncologic outcomes. However, some differences in patient-related outcomes favor the newer methods. Larger trials are required. PMID:24312127

  11. Probability of Extraprostatic Disease According to the Percentage of Positive Biopsy Cores in Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valette, Thiago N.; Antunes, Alberto A.; Leite, Kátia Moreira; Srougi, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Prediction of extraprostatic disease in clinically localized prostate cancer is relevant for treatment planning of the disease. The purpose of this study was to explore the usefulness of the percentage of positive biopsy cores to predict the chance of extraprostatic cancer. Materials and Methods We evaluated 1787 patients with localized prostate cancer submitted to radical prostatectomy. The percentage of positive cores in prostate biopsy was correlated with the pathologic outcome of the surgical specimen. In the final analysis, a correlation was made between categorical ranges of positive cores (10% intervals) and the risk of extraprostatic extension and/or bladder neck invasion, seminal vesicles involvement or metastasis to iliac lymph nodes. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. Results For each 10% of positive cores we observed a progressive higher prevalence of extraprostatic disease. The risk of cancer beyond the prostate capsule for <10% positive biopsy cores was 7.4% and it increased to 76.2% at the category 90-100% positive cores. In patients with Gleason grade 4 or 5, the risk of extraprostatic cancer prostate was higher than in those without any component 4 or 5. Conclusion The percentage of positive cores in prostate biopsy can predict the risk of cancer outside the prostate. Our study shows that the percentage of positive prostate biopsy fragments helps predict the chance of extraprostatic cancer and may have a relevant role in the patient's management. PMID:26200538

  12. The Matrix Metalloproteinase-7 Polymorphism Rs10895304 Is Associated With Increased Recurrence Risk in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hwang, Misun; Lopater, Zachary; Chen Heidi; Ray, Geoffrey L.; Perez, Carmen; Cai Qiuyin; Wills, Marcia L.; Lu Bo

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether selected high-risk matrix metalloproteinase-7 single nucleotide polymorphisms influence clinicopathologic outcomes in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twelve prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy were evaluated with a median follow-up of 9.8 years. Genotyping was performed using hybridization with custom-designed allele-specific probes. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms within the matrix metalloproteinase-7 gene were assessed with respect to age at diagnosis, margin status, extracapsular extension, lymph node involvement, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival in paraffin-embedded prostate tissue specimens from patients with early-stage prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy. Results: Rs10895304 was the sole significant polymorphism. The A/G genotype of rs10895304 had a statistically significant association with recurrence-free survival in postprostatectomy patients (p = 0.0061, log-rank test). The frequency of the risk-reducing genotype (A/A) was 74%, whereas that of the risk-enhancing genotypes (A/G and G/G) were 20% and 6%, respectively. Multivariable Cox regression analyses detected a significant association between rs10895304 and recurrences after adjustment for known prognostic factors. The G allele of this polymorphism was associated with increased risk of prostate cancer recurrence (adjusted hazards ratio, 3.375; 95% confidence interval 1.567-7.269; p < 0.001). The other assayed polymorphisms were not significant, and no correlations were made to other clinical variables. Conclusions: The A/G genotype of rs10895304 is predictive of decreased recurrence-free survival in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Our data suggest that for this subset of patients, prostatectomy alone may not be adequate for local control. This is a novel and relevant marker that should be evaluated for improved risk stratification of patients who

  13. Risk of Diabetes among Patients Receiving Primary Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Huei-Ting; Keating, Nancy L.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Haque, Reina; Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E.; Yood, Marianne Ulcickas; Smith, Matthew R.; Potosky, Arnold L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Androgen deprivation therapy may increase diabetes risk. As the benefits of primary androgen deprivation therapy for localized prostate cancer are controversial, and most prostate cancer survivors are of advanced age with comorbidities, it is important to determine if primary androgen deprivation therapy increases the risk of diabetes and to determine the susceptibility factors. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 12,191 men diagnosed with incident localized prostate cancer during 1995 to 2008, age 35 to 100 years, and without diabetes or receipt of prostatectomy or radiation 1 year after diagnosis. Patients were enrolled in 1 of 3 managed health plans and followed through 2010. Primary androgen deprivation therapy was defined as androgen deprivation therapy within 1 year after diagnosis. Incident diabetes was ascertained using inpatient and outpatient diagnosis codes, diabetes medications and hemoglobin A1c values. We estimated primary androgen deprivation therapy associated diabetes risk using Cox proportional hazard models in conventional and propensity score analyses. Results Diabetes developed in 1,203 (9.9%) patients during followup (median 4.8 years) with incidence rates of 2.5 and 1.6 events per 100 person-years in the primary androgen deprivation therapy and nonprimary androgen deprivation therapy groups, respectively. Primary androgen deprivation therapy was associated with a 1.61-fold increased diabetes risk (95% CI 1.38–1.88). The number needed to harm was 29. The association was stronger in men age 70 or younger than in older men (HR 2.25 vs 1.40, p value for interaction = 0.008). Conclusions Primary androgen deprivation therapy may increase diabetes risk by 60% and should be used with caution when managing localized prostate cancer. Because of the consistent association between androgen deprivation therapy and greater diabetes risk across disease states, we recommend routine screening and lifestyle

  14. Effect of Family History on Outcomes in Patients Treated With Definitive Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Christopher A. Stock, Richard G.; Blacksburg, Seth R.; Stone, Nelson N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact familial prostate cancer has on prognosis in men treated with brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,738 consecutive patients with prostate cancer (cT1-3, N0/X, M0) received low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with external beam radiation therapy or hormone ablation from 1992 to 2005. The primary end-point was freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) using the Phoenix definition. Minimum follow-up was 2 years and the median follow-up was 60 months (range, 24-197 months). Results: A total of 187 of 1,738 men (11%) had a family history of prostate cancer in a first-degree relative. For the low-risk patients, both groups had similar actuarial 5-year FFBF (97.2% vs. 95.5%, p = 0.516). For intermediate-risk patients, there was a trend toward improved biochemical control in men positive for family history (5-yr FFBF 100% vs. 93.6%, p = 0.076). For the high-risk patients, men with a positive family history had similar 5-year FFBF (92.8% vs. 85.2%, p = 0.124). On multivariate analysis, family history was not significant; use of hormones, high biologic effective dose, initial prostate-specific antigen value, and Gleason score were the significant variables predicting biochemical control. Conclusions: This is the first study to examine the relationship of familial prostate cancer and outcomed in men treated with brachytherapy alone or in combination therapy. Men with a positive family history have clinicopathologic characteristics and biochemical outcomes similar to those with sporadic disease.

  15. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Montserrat Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  16. Neoadjuvant Treatment of High-Risk, Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Prior to Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Pietzak, Eugene J; Eastham, James A

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal strategies combining local and systemic therapy offer the greatest chance of cure for many with men with high-risk prostate cancer who may harbor occult metastatic disease. However, no systemic therapy combined with radical prostatectomy has proven beneficial. This was in part due to a lack of effective systemic agents; however, there have been several advancements in the metastatic and castrate-resistant prostate cancer that might prove beneficial if given earlier in the natural history of the disease. For example, novel hormonal agents have recently been approved for castration-resistant prostate cancer with some early phase II neoadjuvant showing promise. Additionally, combination therapy with docetaxel-based chemohormonal has demonstrated a profound survival benefit in metastatic hormone-naïve patients and might have a role in eliminating pre-existing ADT-resistant tumor cells in the neoadjuvant setting. The Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB)/Alliance 90203 trial has finished accrual and should answer the question as to whether neoadjuvant docetaxel-based chemohormonal therapy provides an advantage over prostatectomy alone. There are also several promising targeted agents and immunotherapies under investigation in phase I/II trials with the potential to provide benefit in the neoadjuvant setting. PMID:26968417

  17. Distant Metastases Following Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Recent publications have suggested high-risk patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a lower risk of distant metastases and improved cause-specific survival (CSS) than patients receiving definitive external beam radiation therapy (XRT). To date, none of these studies has compared distant metastases and CSS in brachytherapy patients. In this study, we evaluate such parameters in a consecutive cohort of brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to June 2007, 1,840 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with brachytherapy. Risk groups were stratified according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network ( (www.nccn.org)) guidelines. Subgroups of 658, 893, and 289 patients were assigned to low, intermediate, and high-risk categories. Median follow-up was 7.2 years. Along with brachytherapy implantation, 901 (49.0%) patients received supplemental XRT, and 670 (36.4%) patients received androgen deprivation therapy (median duration, 4 months). The mode of failure (biochemical, local, or distant) was determined for each patient for whom therapy failed. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on outcome. Results: For the entire cohort, metastases-free survival (MFS) and CSS at 12 years were 98.1% and 98.2%, respectively. When rates were stratified by low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, the 12-year MFS was 99.8%, 98.1%, and 93.8% (p < 0.001), respectively. CSS rates were 99.8%, 98.0%, and 95.3% (p < 0.001) for low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, respectively. Biochemical progression-free survival was 98.7%, 95.9% and 90.4% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively (p < 0.001). In multivariate Cox-regression analysis, MFS was mostly closely related to Gleason score and year of treatment, whereas CSS was most closely associated with Gleason score. Conclusions: Excellent CSS and MFS rates are achievable with high

  18. High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Treatment Evolution and Mature Results

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboglou, Nikolaos; Tselis, Nikolaos; Baltas, Dimos; Buhleier, Thomas; Martin, Thomas; Milickovic, Natasa; Papaioannou, Sokratis; Ackermann, Hanns; Tunn, Ulf W.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial (IRT) brachytherapy (BRT) as sole treatment (monotherapy) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2009, 718 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided HDR monotherapy. Three treatment protocols were applied; 141 patients received 38.0 Gy using one implant in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy with computed tomography-based treatment planning; 351 patients received 38.0 Gy in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy, using 2 implants (2 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning; and 226 patients received 34.5 Gy, using 3 single-fraction implants of 11.5 Gy (3 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus, and toxicity was evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. The 36-, 60-, and 96-month biochemical control and metastasis-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 97%, 94%, and 90% and 99%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. Toxicity was scored per event, with 5.4% acute grade 3 genitourinary and 0.2% acute grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 3.5% and 1.6%, respectively. Two patients developed grade 4 incontinence. No other instance of grade 4 or greater acute or late toxicity was reported. Conclusion: Our results confirm IRT-HDR-BRT is safe and effective as monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

  19. Radical External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer in Japan: Changing Trends in the Patterns of Care Process Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Teshima, Teruki; Mitsumori, Michihide

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To delineate changing trends in radical external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: Data from 841 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with EBRT in the Japanese Patterns of Care Study (PCS) from 1996 to 2005 were analyzed. Results: Significant increases in the proportions of patients with stage T1 to T2 disease and decrease in prostate-specific antigen values were observed. Also, there were significant increases in the percentages of patients treated with radiotherapy by their own choice. Median radiation doses were 65.0 Gy and 68.4 Gy from 1996 to 1998 and from 1999 to 2001, respectively, increasing to 70 Gy from 2003 to 2005. Moreover, conformal therapy was more frequently used from 2003 to 2005 (84.9%) than from 1996 to 1998 (49.1%) and from 1999 to 2001 (50.2%). On the other hand, the percentage of patients receiving hormone therapy from 2003 to 2005 (81.1%) was almost the same as that from 1996 to 1998 (86.3%) and from 1999 to 2001 (89.7%). Compared with the PCS in the United States, patient characteristics and patterns of treatments from 2003 to 2005 have become more similar to those in the United States than those from 1996 to 1998 and those from 1999 to 2001. Conclusions: This study indicates a trend toward increasing numbers of patients with early-stage disease and increasing proportions of patients treated with higher radiation doses with advanced equipment among Japanese prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT during 1996 to 2005 survey periods. Patterns of care for prostate cancer in Japan are becoming more similar to those in the United States.

  20. A Phase I/II Clinical Trial in Localized Prostate Cancer of an Adenovirus Expressing Nitroreductase with CB1984

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Prashant; Young, J Graham; Mautner, Vivien; Ashdown, Daniel; Bonney, Sarah; Pineda, Robert G; Collins, Stuart I; Searle, Peter F; Hull, Diana; Peers, Elizabeth; Chester, John; Wallace, D Michael; Doherty, Alan; Leung, Hing; Young, Lawrence S; James, Nicholas D

    2009-01-01

    We report a phase I/II clinical trial in prostate cancer (PCa) using direct intraprostatic injection of a replication defective adenovirus vector (CTL102) encoding bacterial nitroreductase (NTR) in conjunction with systemic prodrug CB1954. One group of patients with localized PCa scheduled for radical prostatectomy received virus alone, prior to surgery, in a dose escalation to establish safety, tolerability, and NTR expression. A second group with local failure following primary treatment received virus plus prodrug to establish safety and tolerability. Based on acceptable safety data and indications of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) responses, an extended cohort received virus at a single dose level plus prodrug. The vector was well tolerated with minimal side effects, had a short half-life in the circulation, and stimulated a robust antibody response. Immunohistochemistry of resected prostate demonstrated NTR staining in tumor and glandular epithelium at all dose levels [5 × 1010–1 × 1012 virus particles (vp)]. A total of 19 patients received virus plus prodrug and 14 of these had a repeat treatment; minimal toxicity was observed and there was preliminary evidence of change in PSA kinetics, with an increase in the time to 10% PSA progression in 6 out of 18 patients at 6 months. PMID:19367257

  1. The Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial: VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program #407 (PIVOT): design and baseline results of a randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with watchful waiting for men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilt, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. In the United States, 90% of men with prostate cancer are more than age 60 years, diagnosed by early detection with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test, and have disease believed confined to the prostate gland (clinically localized). Common treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer include watchful waiting (WW), surgery to remove the prostate gland (radical prostatectomy), external-beam radiation therapy and interstitial radiation therapy (brachytherapy), and androgen deprivation. Little is known about the relative effectiveness and harms of treatments because of the paucity of randomized controlled trials. The Department of Veterans Affairs/National Cancer Institute/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Cooperative Studies Program Study #407:Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial (PIVOT), initiated in 1994, is a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with WW in men with clinically localized prostate cancer. We describe the study rationale, design, recruitment methods, and baseline characteristics of PIVOT enrollees. We provide comparisons with eligible men declining enrollment and men participating in another recently reported randomized trial of radical prostatectomy vs WW conducted in Scandinavia. We screened 13 022 men with prostate cancer at 52 US medical centers for potential enrollment. From these, 5023 met initial age, comorbidity, and disease eligibility criteria, and a total of 731 men agreed to participate and were randomized. The mean age of enrollees was 67 years. Nearly one-third were African American. Approximately 85% reported that they were fully active. The median PSA was 7.8ng/mL (mean 10.2ng/mL). In three-fourths of men, the primary reason for biopsy leading to a diagnosis of prostate cancer was a PSA elevation or rise. Using previously developed tumor risk

  2. Long-Term Outcome for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Lief, Jonathan; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To present the largest series of prostate cancer brachytherapy patients treated with modern brachytherapy techniques and postimplant day 0 dosimetric evaluation. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and July 2006, 1,656 consecutive patients were treated with permanent interstitial brachytherapy. Risk group stratification was carried out according to the Mt. Sinai guidelines. Median follow-up was 7.0 years. The median day 0 minimum dose covering at least 90% of the target volume was 118.8% of the prescription dose. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for impact on the evaluated survival parameters. Results: At 12 years, biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort was 95.6%, 98.2%, and 72.6%, respectively. For low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, bPFS was 98.6%, 96.5%, and 90.5%; CSS was 99.8%, 99.3%, and 95.2%; and OS was 77.5%, 71.1%, and 69.2%, respectively. For biochemically controlled patients, the median posttreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration was 0.02 ng/ml. bPFS was most closely related to percent positive biopsy specimens and risk group, while Gleason score was the strongest predictor of CSS. OS was best predicted by patient age, hypertension, diabetes, and tobacco use. At 12 years, biochemical failure and cause-specific mortality were 1.8% and 0.2%, 5.1% and 2.1%, and 10.4% and 7.1% for Gleason scores 5 to 6 and 7 and {>=}8, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent long-term outcomes are achievable with high-quality brachytherapy for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. These results compare favorably to alternative treatment modalities including radical prostatectomy.

  3. Cryosurgery would be An Effective Option for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: A Meta-analysis and Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liang; Yang, Lu; Qian, Shengqiang; Tang, Zhuang; Qin, Feng; Wei, Qiang; Han, Ping; Yuan, Jiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Cryosurgery (CS) has been used on patients with clinically localized PCa for more than 10 years. However, clinical studies evaluating its effectiveness and safety have reported conflicting results. This systematic assessment was performed to obtain comprehensive evidence regarding the potential benefits and safety of CS compared with those of radiotherapy (RT) and radical prostatectomy (RP), respectively. All controlled trials comparing CS with RT or RP and single-arm studies reporting results of CS therapy were identified through comprehensive searches of PubMed, the Cochrane Library and Embase. Ten publications from seven trials, with totally 1252 patients, were included in the meta-analysis, which revealed no significant differences in comparisons of CS vs RT and CS vs RP for overall survival and disease specific survival. However, a significantly lower disease-free survival could be observed for CS than RP. Moreover, a systematic review of literature focusing on comparative data of databases and materials of single-arm trials revealed satisfactory survival results in both primary and salvage CS. Our results showed that cryosurgery would be a relatively effective method for clinically localized prostate cancer with survival results comparable to radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy. However, the large percentage of complications caused by cryosurgery should be carefully monitored. PMID:27271239

  4. Cryosurgery would be An Effective Option for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: A Meta-analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Liang; Yang, Lu; Qian, Shengqiang; Tang, Zhuang; Qin, Feng; Wei, Qiang; Han, Ping; Yuan, Jiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Cryosurgery (CS) has been used on patients with clinically localized PCa for more than 10 years. However, clinical studies evaluating its effectiveness and safety have reported conflicting results. This systematic assessment was performed to obtain comprehensive evidence regarding the potential benefits and safety of CS compared with those of radiotherapy (RT) and radical prostatectomy (RP), respectively. All controlled trials comparing CS with RT or RP and single-arm studies reporting results of CS therapy were identified through comprehensive searches of PubMed, the Cochrane Library and Embase. Ten publications from seven trials, with totally 1252 patients, were included in the meta-analysis, which revealed no significant differences in comparisons of CS vs RT and CS vs RP for overall survival and disease specific survival. However, a significantly lower disease-free survival could be observed for CS than RP. Moreover, a systematic review of literature focusing on comparative data of databases and materials of single-arm trials revealed satisfactory survival results in both primary and salvage CS. Our results showed that cryosurgery would be a relatively effective method for clinically localized prostate cancer with survival results comparable to radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy. However, the large percentage of complications caused by cryosurgery should be carefully monitored. PMID:27271239

  5. Improved Clinical Outcomes With High-Dose Image Guided Radiotherapy Compared With Non-IGRT for the Treatment of Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett; Fidaleo, Anthony; Sperling, Dahlia; Pei, Xin; Carver, Brett; Coleman, Jonathan; Lovelock, Michael; Hunt, Margie

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To compare toxicity profiles and biochemical tumor control outcomes between patients treated with high-dose image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Between 2008 and 2009, 186 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IGRT to a dose of 86.4 Gy with daily correction of the target position based on kilovoltage imaging of implanted prostatic fiducial markers. This group of patients was retrospectively compared with a similar cohort of 190 patients who were treated between 2006 and 2007 with IMRT to the same prescription dose without, however, implanted fiducial markers in place (non-IGRT). The median follow-up time was 2.8 years (range, 2-6 years). Results: A significant reduction in late urinary toxicity was observed for IGRT patients compared with the non-IGRT patients. The 3-year likelihood of grade 2 and higher urinary toxicity for the IGRT and non-IGRT cohorts were 10.4% and 20.0%, respectively (p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis identifying predictors for grade 2 or higher late urinary toxicity demonstrated that, in addition to the baseline Internatinoal Prostate Symptom Score, IGRT was associated with significantly less late urinary toxicity compared with non-IGRT. The incidence of grade 2 and higher rectal toxicity was low for both treatment groups (1.0% and 1.6%, respectively; p = 0.81). No differences in prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival outcomes were observed for low- and intermediate-risk patients when treated with IGRT and non-IGRT. For high-risk patients, a significant improvement was observed at 3 years for patients treated with IGRT compared with non-IGRT. Conclusions: IGRT is associated with an improvement in biochemical tumor control among high-risk patients and a lower rate of late urinary toxicity compared with high-dose IMRT. These data suggest that, for definitive radiotherapy, the placement of fiducial markers

  6. 78 FR 24750 - Scientific Information Request Therapies for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... randomized controlled trials and observational studies relevant to the clinical outcomes. AHRQ is interested in receiving both citations and reprints. Information identifying unpublished randomized...

  7. Multi-institutional clinical experience with the Calypso System in localization and continuous, real-time monitoring of the prostate gland during external radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kupelian, Patrick . E-mail: patrick.kupelian@orhs.org; Willoughby, Twyla; Mahadevan, Arul; Djemil, Toufik; Weinstein, Geoffrey; Jani, Shirish; Enke, Charles; Solberg, Timothy; Flores, Nicholas

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To report the clinical experience with an electromagnetic treatment target positioning and continuous monitoring system in patients with localized prostate cancer receiving external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The Calypso System is a target positioning device that continuously monitors the location of three implanted electromagnetic transponders at a rate of 10 Hz. The system was used at five centers to position 41 patients over a full course of therapy. Electromagnetic positioning was compared to setup using skin marks and to stereoscopic X-ray localization of the transponders. Continuous monitoring was performed in 35 patients. Results: The difference between skin mark vs. the Calypso System alignment was found to be >5 mm in vector length in more than 75% of fractions. Comparisons between the Calypso System and X-ray localization showed good agreement. Qualitatively, the continuous motion was unpredictable and varied from persistent drift to transient rapid movements. Displacements {>=}3 and {>=}5 mm for cumulative durations of at least 30 s were observed during 41% and 15% of sessions. In individual patients, the number of fractions with displacements {>=}3 mm ranged from 3% to 87%; whereas the number of fractions with displacements {>=}5 mm ranged from 0% to 56%. Conclusion: The Calypso System is a clinically efficient and objective localization method for positioning prostate patients undergoing radiotherapy. Initial treatment setup can be performed rapidly, accurately, and objectively before radiation delivery. The extent and frequency of prostate motion during radiotherapy delivery can be easily monitored and used for motion management.

  8. High RhoA expression at the tumor front in clinically localized prostate cancer and association with poor tumor differentiation

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, WEIHUA; DELONGCHAMPS, NICOLAS BARRY; MAO, KAILI; BEUVON, FRÉDÉRIC; PEYROMAURE, MICHAËL; LIU, ZHONGMIN; DINH-XUAN, ANH TUAN

    2016-01-01

    Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) has been reported as essential to the invasion process and aggressiveness of numerous cancers. However, there are only sparse data on the expression and activity of RhoA in clinically localised prostate cancer. In numerous cancers, tumour cells at the invasive front demonstrate more aggressive behaviour in comparison with the cells in the central regions. In the present study, the expression and activity of RhoA was evaluated in 34 paraffin-embedded and 20 frozen prostate tissue specimens obtained from 45 patients treated with radical prostatectomy for clinically localised cancer. The expression patterns of RhoA were assessed by immunohistochemical staining and western blotting. Additional comparisons were performed between the tumour centre, tumour front and distant peritumoural tissue. RhoA activity was assessed by G-LISA. Associations between RhoA expression and the clinical features and outcome of the patients were also analysed. The present study found an increasing gradient of expression from the centre to the periphery of index tumour foci. RhoA expression was significantly increased at the tumour front compared to the tumour centre, which was determined using immunohistochemistry (P=0.001). Increased RhoA expression was associated with poor tumour differentiation in the tumour front (P=0.044) and tumour centre (P=0.039). Subsequent to a median follow-up period of 52 months, the rate of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse was increased in patients with higher RhoA expression at the tumour front when compared with patients with lower RhoA expression (62.5 vs. 35.0%), although the difference was not significant (P=0.09). There was no association between RhoA expression and the PSA level or pathological stage in the present study. In conclusion, RhoA expression was increased at the tumour front and was associated with poor tumour differentiation in the tumour front and tumour centre, indicating the potential role of

  9. Retrospective Comparison of External Beam Radiotherapy and Radical Prostatectomy in High-Risk, Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Strigari, Lidia; Arcangeli, Stefano; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Saracino, Biancamaria; Gomellini, Sara; Papalia, Rocco; Simone, Giuseppe; De Carli, Piero; Gallucci, Michele

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Because of the lack of conclusive and well-conducted randomized studies, the optimal therapy for prostate tumors remains controversial. The aim of this study was to retrospectively compare the results of radical surgery vs. a conservative approach such as external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus androgen deprivation therapy using an intent-to-treat analysis on two pretreatment defined, concurrently treated, high-risk patient populations. Methods and Materials: Between January 2003 and December 2007, 162 patients with high-risk prostate cancer underwent an EBRT plus androgen deprivation therapy program at the RT department of our institute. In the same period, 122 patients with the same high-risk disease underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) at the urologic department of our institute. Patients with adverse pathologic factors also underwent adjuvant EBRT with or without androgen deprivation therapy. The primary endpoint was freedom from biochemical failure. Results: The two groups of high-risk patients were homogeneous in terms of freedom from biochemical failure on the basis of the clinical T stage, biopsy Gleason score, and initial prostate-specific antigen level. The median follow-up was 38.6 and 33.8 months in the EBRT and RP groups, respectively. The actuarial analysis of the freedom from biochemical failure showed a 3-year rate of 86.8% and 69.8% in the EBRT and RP group, respectively (p = .001). Multivariate analysis of the whole group revealed the initial prostate-specific antigen level and treatment type (EBRT vs. RP) as significant covariates. Conclusion: This retrospective intention-to-treat analysis showed a significantly better outcome after EBRT than after RP in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, although a well-conducted randomized comparison would be the best procedure to confirm these results.

  10. Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer Local Recurrence After Radiation Therapy Occurs at the Site of Primary Tumor: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Step-Section Pathology Evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Pucar, Darko Hricak, Hedvig; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Kuroiwa, Kentaro; Drobnjak, Marija; Eastham, James; Scardino, Peter T.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To determine whether prostate cancer local recurrence after radiation therapy (RT) occurs at the site of primary tumor by retrospectively comparing the tumor location on pre-RT and post-RT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and using step-section pathology after salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) as the reference standard. Methods and Materials: Nine patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with intensity modulated RT (69-86.4 Gy), and had pre-RT and post-RT prostate MRI, biopsy-proven local recurrence, and SRP. The location and volume of lesions on pre-RT and post-RT MRI were correlated with step-section pathology findings. Tumor foci >0.2 cm{sup 3} and/or resulting in extraprostatic disease on pathology were considered clinically significant. Results: All nine significant tumor foci (one in each patient; volume range, 0.22-8.63 cm{sup 3}) were detected both on pre-RT and post-RT MRI and displayed strikingly similar appearances on pre-RT and post-RT MRI and step-section pathology. Two clinically insignificant tumor foci ({<=}0.06 cm{sup 3}) were not detected on imaging. The ratios between tumor volumes on pathology and on post-RT MRI ranged from 0.52 to 2.80. Conclusions: Our study provides a direct visual confirmation that clinically significant post-RT local recurrence occurs at the site of primary tumor. Our results are in agreement with reported clinical and pathologic results and support the current practice of boosting the radiation dose within the primary tumor using imaging guidance. They also suggest that monitoring of primary tumor with pre-RT and post-RT MRI could lead to early detection of local recurrence amenable to salvage treatment.

  11. Five-year outcome of intraoperative conformal permanent I-125 interstitial implantation for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J. . E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org; Yamada, Yoshiya; Cohen, Gil'ad N.; Shippy, Alison; Chan, Heather; Fridman, David; Zaider, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year tumor control and toxicity outcomes for patients with localized prostate treated with I-125 permanent implantation using an intraoperative real-time conformal planning technique. Methods and Materials: Between January 1998 and June 2002, 367 patients with prostate cancer were treated with I-125 permanent interstitial implantation using a transrectal ultrasound-guided approach. Real-time intraoperative treatment planning which incorporated inverse planning optimization was used. The median follow-up time was 63 months. Results: The median V100 and D90 were 96% and 173 Gy, respectively. In 96% of cases a D90 of >140 Gy was achieved. The median urethral and rectal doses were 100% and 33% of the prescription doses, respectively. The 5-year PSA relapse-free survival outcomes for favorable and intermediate risk patients according to the ASTRO definition were 96% and 89%, respectively. In these patients no dosimetric parameter was identified which influenced the biochemical outcome. Of 38% who developed acute Grade 2 urinary symptoms, 63% had resolution of their symptoms within a median time of 6 months. The incidence of late rectal and urinary Grade 3 or higher toxicities were 1% and 4%, respectively. Seven percent (n = 27) developed late rectal bleeding (Grade 2) and 19% experienced late Grade 2 urinary symptoms. Conclusion: Real-time intraoperative planning consistently achieved optimal coverage of the prostate with the prescription dose with concomitant low doses delivered to the urethra and rectum. Biochemical control outcomes were excellent at 5 years and late toxicity was unusual. These data demonstrate that real-time planning methods can consistently and reliably deliver the intended dose distribution to achieve an optimal therapeutic ratio between the target and normal tissue structures.

  12. AB012. Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yong; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the security and effect of brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods Forty five patients with Tl–T2 prostate cancer were treated with real-time transperineal ultrasound-guide 125I seeds prostate implantation. Results The median operation time was 90 min, the median number of I seeds used was 56. The follow up time was 12–48 months, the cases of PSA <1 µg/L were 29, PSA 1–2 µg/L were 11 and PSA ≥2 µg/L were 5. Conclusions Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer is safe and effective.

  13. The Prostate Health Index Selectively Identifies Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Sanda, Martin G.; Broyles, Dennis L.; Shin, Sanghyuk S.; Bangma, Chris H.; Wei, John T.; Partin, Alan W.; Klee, George G.; Slawin, Kevin M.; Marks, Leonard S.; van Schaik, Ron H. N.; Chan, Daniel W.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Cruz, Amabelle B.; Mizrahi, Isaac A.; Catalona, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Prostate Health Index (phi) is a new test combining total, free and [-2]proPSA into a single score. It was recently approved by the FDA and is now commercially available in the U.S., Europe and Australia. We investigate whether phi improves specificity for detecting clinically significant prostate cancer and can help reduce prostate cancer over diagnosis. Materials and Methods From a multicenter prospective trial we identified 658 men age 50 years or older with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 ng/ml and normal digital rectal examination who underwent prostate biopsy. In this population we compared the performance of prostate specific antigen, % free prostate specific antigen, [-2]proPSA and phi to predict biopsy results and, specifically, the presence of clinically significant prostate cancer using multiple criteria. Results The Prostate Health Index was significantly higher in men with Gleason 7 or greater and “Epstein significant” cancer. On receiver operating characteristic analysis phi had the highest AUC for overall cancer (AUCs phi 0.708, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.648, [-2]proPSA 0.550 and prostate specific antigen 0.516), Gleason 7 or greater (AUCs phi 0.707, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.661, [-2]proPSA 0.558, prostate specific antigen 0.551) and significant cancer (AUCs phi 0.698, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.654, [-2]proPSA 0.550, prostate specific antigen 0.549). At the 90% sensitivity cut point for phi (a score less than 28.6) 30.1% of patients could have been spared an unnecessary biopsy for benign disease or insignificant prostate cancer compared to 21.7% using percent free prostate specific antigen. Conclusions The new phi test outperforms its individual components of total, free and [-2]proPSA for the identification of clinically significant prostate cancer. Phi may be useful as part of a multivariable approach to reduce prostate biopsies and over diagnosis. PMID:25463993

  14. Role of Focal Therapy with High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound in the Management of Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuru, Timur H; van Essen, Julius; Pfister, David; Porres, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Overtreatment of prostate cancer (PC) remains one of the main burdens in uro-oncology. Focal therapy may be a reasonable alternative with less side effects and morbidity. Application of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) induces immediate and irreversible coagulation. The treatment leads to consecutive necrosis with sharply delineated margins, making HIFU a promising tool for the focal therapy of localized PC. Unlike radiation, the treatment leaves no collateral damage outside of the heated tissue, allowing repeated use of HIFU, if necessary. In case of non-organ-confined relapse, additional radical salvage therapy can be performed. This review gives an overview of the existing evidence on focal HIFU. Today, 3 HIFU devices are approved for the treatment of localized PC: Sonablate™, Ablatherm™ and the FocalOne™ device. In summary, the first published results of focal HIFU are promising. The quality of life and potency of the patients are well preserved. Therefore, HIFU treatment, and especially focal ablation of tumor foci, seems to be a safe alternative to standard treatment, with low side effects. The oncologic results seem satisfactory but need further follow-up to validate this practice of PC control. PMID:26632846

  15. Current clinical challenges in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, Jonathan L.; Pal, Sumanta Kumar; Lewis, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the United States. Close to $12 billion are spent annually on the treatment of prostate cancer in the US alone. Yet still there remain tremendous controversies and challenges that exist in all facets of the disease. This review and discussion will focus on issues and challenges for clinicians and patients diagnosed with the disease. Appropriate risk stratification for men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer is an appropriate first step for all patients. Once risk-stratified, for those with low-risk of death, it is increasingly recognized that overtreatment creates an unnecessary burden for many patients. This is particularly evident when put in the context of competing comorbidities in an elderly population. For those with advanced or high-risk localized disease, under-treatment remains too common. For those with a high-risk of recurrence or failure following primary treatment, adjuvant or salvage therapies are an option, but how and when to best deploy these treatments are controversial. Recently, tremendous progress has been made for those with advanced disease, in particular those with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Within the last 4 years, five novel FDA approved agents, acting through distinct mechanisms have been FDA approved for mCRPC. With the introduction of these new agents a host of new challenges have arisen. Timing, sequencing and combinations of these novel agents are welcomed challenges when compared with the lack of available therapies just a few years ago. In this summary of current clinical challenges in prostate cancer we review critical recent studies that have created or shifted the current paradigms of treatment for prostate cancer. We will also highlight ongoing issues that continue to challenge our field. PMID:26816735

  16. Preoperative 3-Tesla Multiparametric Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and the Odds of Upgrading and Upstaging at Radical Prostatectomy in Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hegde, John V.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Mulkern, Robert V.; Fennessy, Fiona M.; D'Amico, Anthony V.; Tempany, Clare M.C.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether 3-T esla (3T) multiparametric endorectal MRI (erMRI) can add information to established predictors regarding occult extraprostatic or high-grade prostate cancer (PC) in men with clinically localized PC. Methods and Materials: At a single academic medical center, this retrospective study's cohort included 118 men with clinically localized PC who underwent 3T multiparametric erMRI followed by radical prostatectomy, from 2008 to 2011. Multivariable logistic regression analyses in all men and in 100 with favorable-risk PC addressed whether erMRI evidence of T3 disease was associated with prostatectomy T3 or Gleason score (GS) 8-10 (in patients with biopsy GS {<=}7) PC, adjusting for age, prostate-specific antigen level, clinical T category, biopsy GS, and percent positive biopsies. Results: The accuracy of erMRI prediction of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion was 75% and 95%, respectively. For all men, erMRI evidence of a T3 lesion versus T2 was associated with an increased odds of having pT3 disease (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36-16.98, P=.015) and pGS 8-10 (AOR 5.56, 95% CI 1.10-28.18, P=.038). In the favorable-risk population, these results were AOR 4.14 (95% CI 1.03-16.56), P=.045 and AOR 7.71 (95% CI 1.36-43.62), P=.021, respectively. Conclusions: Three-Tesla multiparametric erMRI in men with favorable-risk PC provides information beyond that contained in known preoperative predictors about the presence of occult extraprostatic and/or high-grade PC. If validated in additional studies, this information can be used to counsel men planning to undergo radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy about the possible need for adjuvant radiation therapy or the utility of adding hormone therapy, respectively.

  17. Radical Prostatectomy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Current Status.

    PubMed

    Faria, Eliney F; Chapin, Brian F; Muller, Roberto L; Machado, Roberto D; Reis, Rodolfo B; Matin, Surena F

    2015-07-01

    In the past, prostate cancer (PC) could only be detected clinically, and delayed diagnosis of locally advanced or metastatic disease at presentation was common. Prostate-specific antigen testing and magnetic resonance imaging led to PC detection in a much earlier stage. However, controversy about the best treatment for locally advanced PC remains. Recent refinements in surgery and radiation therapy have improved outcomes, but no comparative study has yet conclusively determined superiority of one option over the other. In this review, we present the most recent evidence about the role of radical prostatectomy for locally advanced PC treatment from a surgeon's perspective. PMID:26048432

  18. Fifteen-Year Biochemical Relapse-Free Survival, Cause-Specific Survival, and Overall Survival Following I{sup 125} Prostate Brachytherapy in Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Seattle Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, John E.; Grimm, Peter D.; Wong, Jason; Galbreath, Robert W.; Merrick, Gregory; Blasko, John C.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To report 15-year biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) outcomes of patients treated with I{sup 125} brachytherapy monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer early in the Seattle experience. Methods and Materials: Two hundred fifteen patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were consecutively treated from 1988 to 1992 with I{sup 125} monotherapy. They were prospectively followed as a tight cohort. They were evaluated for BRFS, CSS, and OS. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate outcomes by pretreatment clinical prognostic factors. BRFS was analyzed by the Phoenix (nadir + 2 ng/mL) definition. CSS and OS were evaluated by chart review, death certificates, and referring physician follow-up notes. Gleason scoring was performed by general pathologists at a community hospital in Seattle. Time to biochemical failure (BF) was calculated and compared by Kaplan-Meier plots. Results: Fifteen-year BRFS for the entire cohort was 80.4%. BRFS by D'Amico risk group classification cohort analysis was 85.9%, 79.9%, and 62.2% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively. Follow-up ranged from 3.6 to 18.4 years; median follow-up was 15.4 years for biochemically free of disease patients. Overall median follow-up was 11.7 years. The median time to BF in those who failed was 5.1 years. CSS was 84%. OS was 37.1%. Average age at time of treatment was 70 years. There was no significant difference in BRFS between low and intermediate risk groups. Conclusion: I{sup 125} monotherapy results in excellent 15-year BRFS and CSS, especially when taking into account the era of treatment effect.

  19. Simulated prostate biopsy: prostate cancer distribution and clinical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Dean, Robert; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    Our group has recently obtained data based upon whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator that suggests an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. A new 10-core biopsy pattern was demonstrated to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. This patter includes the traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland. The objective of this study is to confirm the higher prostate cancer defection rate obtained using our simulated 10-core biopsy pattern in a small clinical trial. We retrospectively reviewed 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent of patients were diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. Our results suggest that biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern.

  20. Duration of Androgen Suppression Before Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Randomized Clinical Trial 9910

    PubMed Central

    Pisansky, Thomas M.; Hunt, Daniel; Gomella, Leonard G.; Amin, Mahul B.; Balogh, Alexander G.; Chinn, Daniel M.; Seider, Michael J.; Duclos, Marie; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Bauman, Glenn S.; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Rotman, Marvin Z.; Lukka, Himanshu R.; Shipley, William U.; Dignam, James J.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether prolonged androgen suppression (AS) duration before radiotherapy improves survival and disease control in prostate cancer. Patients and Methods One thousand five hundred seventy-nine men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of AS followed by radiotherapy with an additional 8 weeks of concurrent AS (16 weeks total) or to 28 weeks of AS followed by radiotherapy with an additional 8 weeks of AS (36 weeks total). The trial sought primarily to detect a 33% reduction in the hazard of prostate cancer death in the 28-week assignment. Time-to-event end points are reported for up to 10 years of follow-up. Results There were no between-group differences in baseline characteristics of 1,489 eligible patients with follow-up. For the 8- and 28-week assignments, 10-year disease-specific survival rates were 95% (95% CI, 93.3% to 97.0%) and 96% (95% CI, 94.6% to 98.0%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.81; P = .45), respectively, and 10-year overall survival rates were 66% (95% CI, 62.0% to 69.9%) and 67% (95% CI, 63.0% to 70.8%; HR, 0.95; P = .62), respectively. For the 8- and 28-week assignments, 10-year cumulative incidences of locoregional progression were 6% (95% CI, 4.3% to 8.0%) and 4% (95% CI, 2.5% to 5.7%; HR, 0.65; P = .07), respectively; 10-year distant metastasis cumulative incidences were 6% (95% CI, 4.0% to 7.7%) and 6% (95% CI, 4.0% to 7.6%; HR, 1.07; P = .80), respectively; and 10-year prostate-specific antigen–based recurrence cumulative incidences were 27% (95% CI, 23.1% to 29.8%) and 27% (95% CI, 23.4% to 30.3%; HR, 0.97; P = .77), respectively. Conclusion Extending AS duration from 8 weeks to 28 weeks before radiotherapy did not improve outcomes. A lower than expected prostate cancer death rate reduced ability to detect a between-group difference in disease-specific survival. The schedule of 8 weeks of AS before radiotherapy plus 8 weeks of AS during radiotherapy remains a standard of care in intermediate

  1. Ten-Year Outcomes: The Clinical Utility of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography Capromab Pendetide (Prostascint) in a Cohort Diagnosed With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Rodney J.; Kaminsky, Deborah A.; Zhou, Esther H.; Fu, Pingfu; Chen, Wei-Dong; Faulhaber, Peter F.; Bodner, Donald

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical utility of capromab pendetide imaging with single photon emission computed tomography coregistration with computed tomography (SPECT/CT) in primary prostate cancer (CaP) for pretreatment prognostic staging and localization of biologic target volumes (BTV) for individualized image-guided radiotherapy dose escalation (IGRT-DE). Methods and Materials: Patients consecutively presenting for primary radiotherapy (February 1997 to December 2002), having a clinical diagnosis of localized CaP, were evaluated for tumor stage using conventional staging and SPECT/CT (N = 239). Distant metastatic uptake (mets) were identified by SPECT/CT in 22 (9.2%). None of the suspected mets could be clinically confirmed. Thus, all subjects were followed without alteration in disease management. The SPECT/CT pelvic images defined BTV for IGRT-DE (+150% brachytherapy dose) without (n = 150) or with (n = 89) external radiation of 45 Gy. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria defined risk groups (RG). The median survivor follow-up was 7 years. Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was reported by clinical nadir +2 ng/mL (CN+2) criteria. Statistical analyses included Kaplan-Meier, multivariate analysis, and Concordance-index models. Results: At 10-year analyses, overall survival was 84.8% and bDFS was 84.6%. With stratification by RG, CN+2 bDFS was 93.5% for the low-RG (n = 116), 78.7% for the intermediate-RG (n = 94), and 68.8% for the high-RG (n = 29), p = 0.0002. With stratification by pretreatment SPECT/CT findings, bDFS was 65.5% in patients with suspected mets (n = 22) vs. 86.6% in patients with only localized uptake (n = 217), p = 0.0014. CaP disease-specific survival (DSS) was 97.7% for the cohort. With stratification by SPECT/CT findings, DSS was 86.4% (with suspected mets) vs. 99.0% (localized only), p = 0.0001. Using multivariate analysis, the DSS hazard ratio for SPECT/CT findings (mets vs. localized) was 3.58 (p = 0.0026). Concordance

  2. Gum arabic-coated radioactive gold nanoparticles cause no short-term local or systemic toxicity in the clinically relevant canine model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Axiak-Bechtel, Sandra M; Upendran, Anandhi; Lattimer, Jimmy C; Kelsey, James; Cutler, Cathy S; Selting, Kim A; Bryan, Jeffrey N; Henry, Carolyn J; Boote, Evan; Tate, Deborah J; Bryan, Margaret E; Katti, Kattesh V; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gum arabic-coated radioactive gold nanoparticles (GA-198AuNPs) offer several advantages over traditional brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer, including homogenous dose distribution and higher dose-rate irradiation. Our objective was to determine the short-term safety profile of GA-198AuNPs injected intralesionally. We proposed that a single treatment of GA-198AuNPs would be safe with minimal-to-no evidence of systemic or local toxicity. Methods Nine dogs with spontaneously occurring prostatic cancer were treated. Injections were performed with ultrasound or computerized tomography guidance. Complete blood counts, chemistry panels, and urinalyses were performed at weekly intervals for 1 month and imaging was repeated 4 weeks postinjection. Planar scintigraphic images were obtained within 30 minutes of injection. Results No statistically significant difference was found in any hematologic or biochemical parameter studied, nor was any evidence of tumor swelling or abscessation found in eight dogs with repeat imaging; one dog died secondary to urethral obstruction 12 days following injection. At 30 minutes postinjection, an average of 53% of injected dose in seven dogs was retained in the prostate, with loss of remaining activity in the bladder and urethra; no systemic uptake was detected. Conclusion GA-198AuNP therapy had no short-term toxicity in the treatment of prostatic cancer. While therapeutic agent was found in the prostate immediately following injection, some loss of agent was detected in the bladder and urethra. Localization of radioactivity within the prostate was lower than anticipated and likely due to normal vestigial prostatic ducts. Therefore, further study of retention, dosimetry, long-term toxicity, and efficacy of this treatment is warranted prior to Phase I trials in men. PMID:25378926

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Toxicity and Biochemical Disease-Free Outcomes from a Multi-Institutional Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sanjeev; Shumway, Richard; Perry, David; Bydder, Sean; Simpson, C. Kelley; D'Ambrosio, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To report on initial patient characteristics, treatment practices, toxicity, and early biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) of localized prostate cancer treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and enrolled in the RSSearch® Patient Registry. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted on patients with clinically localized prostate cancer enrolled in RSSearch® from June 2006 - January 2015. Patients were classified as low-risk (PSA ≤ 10 ng/ml, T1c-T2a, Gleason score ≤ 6), intermediate-risk (PSA 10.1 - 20 ng/ml, T2b-T2c, or Gleason 7), or high-risk (PSA > 20 ng/ml, T3 or Gleason ≥ 8). Toxicity was reported using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. Biochemical failure was assessed using the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/ml). The Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate bDFS and association of patient and tumor characteristics with the use of SBRT. Results: Four hundred thirty-seven patients (189 low, 215 intermediate, and 33 high-risk) at a median of 69 years (range: 48-88) received SBRT at 17 centers. Seventy-eight percent of patients received 36.25 Gy/5 fractions, 13% received 37 Gy/5 fractions, 6% received 35 Gy/5 fractions, 3% received 38 Gy/4 fractions, and 5% received a boost dose of 19.5-29 Gy following external beam radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 20 months (range: 1–64 months). Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were minimal, with no acute or late Grade 3+ GU or GI toxicity. Late Grade 1 and 2 urinary frequency was 25% and 8%. Late Grade 1 and 2 proctitis was 3% and 2%. Median PSA decreased from 5.8 ng/ml (range: 0.3-43) to 0.88, 0.4, and 0.3 ng/ml at one, two, and three years. Two-year bDFS for all patients was 96.1%. Two-year bDFS was 99.0%, 94.5%, and 89.8% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients (p < 0.0001). Two-year bDFS was 99.2%, 93.2%, and 90.4% for Gleason ≤ 6, Gleason 7, and Gleason ≥ 8 (p < 0.0001). Two-year bDFS was 96.4%, 97

  4. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: from Bench to Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee Ju

    2012-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a prevalent disease, especially in old men, and often results in lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This chronic disease has important care implications and financial risks to the health care system. LUTS are caused not only by mechanical prostatic obstruction but also by the dynamic component of obstruction. The exact etiology of BPH and its consequences, benign prostatic enlargement and benign prostatic obstruction, are not identified. Various theories concerning the causes of benign prostate enlargement and LUTS, such as metabolic syndrome, inflammation, growth factors, androgen receptor, epithelial-stromal interaction, and lifestyle, are discussed. Incomplete overlap of prostatic enlargement with symptoms and obstruction encourages focus on symptoms rather than prostate enlargement and the shifting from surgery to medicine as the treatment of BPH. Several alpha antagonists, including alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin, and terazosin, have shown excellent efficacy without severe adverse effects. In addition, new alpha antagonists, silodosin and naftopidil, and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors are emerging as BPH treatments. In surgical treatment, laser surgery such as photoselective vaporization of the prostate and holmium laser prostatectomy have been introduced to reduce complications and are used as alternatives to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and open prostatectomy. The status of TURP as the gold standard treatment of BPH is still evolving. We review several preclinical and clinical studies about the etiology of BPH and treatment options. PMID:22468207

  5. Prostate Cancer Prevention: Concepts and Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Zachary; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2016-04-01

    Prevention is an important treatment strategy for diminishing prostate cancer morbidity and mortality and is applicable to both early- and late-stage disease. There are three basic classifications of cancer prevention: primary (prevention of incident disease), secondary (identification and treatment of preclinical disease), and tertiary (prevention of progression or recurrence). Based on level I evidence, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) should be considered in selected men to prevent incident prostate cancer. Level I evidence also supports the consideration of dutasteride, a 5-ARI, for tertiary prevention in active surveillance and biochemical recurrence patients. Vitamins and supplements, including selenium or vitamin E, have not been proven in clinical trials to prevent prostate cancer and in the case of Vitamin E has been found to increase the risk of incident prostate cancer. Ongoing and future trials may further elucidate the role of diet and immunotherapy for prevention of prostate cancer. PMID:26957512

  6. A Randomized Trial (Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01) Comparing Short Versus Protracted Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, John G.; Gillham, Charles M.; Dunne, Mary T.; Fitzpatrick, David A.; Finn, Marie A.; Cannon, Mairin E.; Taylor, Judy C.; O'Shea, Carmel M.; Buckney, Steven J.; Thirion, Pierre G.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To examine the long-term outcomes of a randomized trial comparing short (4 months; Arm 1) and long (8 months; Arm 2) neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2001, 276 patients were enrolled and the data from 261 were analyzed. The stratification risk factors were prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, Gleason score {>=}7, and Stage T3 or more. The intermediate-risk stratum had one factor and the high-risk stratum had two or more. Staging was done from the bone scan and computed tomography findings. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure-free survival. Results: The median follow-up was 102 months. The overall survival, biochemical failure-free survival. and prostate cancer-specific survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms, overall or at 5 years. The cumulative probability of overall survival at 5 years was 90% (range, 87-92%) in Arm 1 and 83% (range, 80-86%) in Arm 2. The biochemical failure-free survival rate at 5 years was 66% (range, 62-71%) in Arm 1 and 63% (range, 58-67%) in Arm 2. Conclusion: No statistically significant difference was found in biochemical failure-free survival between 4 months and 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

  7. Stereotactic hypofractionated accurate radiotherapy of the prostate (SHARP), 33.5 Gy in five fractions for localized disease: First clinical trial results

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, Berit L. . E-mail: ronblm@vmmc.org; Hsi, R. Alex; Pham, Huong T.; Fowler, Jack F.; Esagui, Laura C.; Corman, John

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of stereotactic hypofractionated accurate radiotherapy (SHARP) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A Phase I/II trial of SHARP performed for localized prostate cancer using 33.5 Gy in 5 fractions, calculated to be biologically equivalent to 78 Gy in 2 Gy fractions ({alpha}/{beta} ratio of 1.5 Gy). Noncoplanar conformal fields and daily stereotactic localization of implanted fiducials were used for treatment. Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated by American Urologic Association (AUA) score and Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and self-reported sexual function were recorded at specified follow-up intervals. Results: The study includes 40 patients. The median follow-up is 41 months (range, 21-60 months). Acute toxicity Grade 1-2 was 48.5% (GU) and 39% (GI); 1 acute Grade 3 GU toxicity. Late Grade 1-2 toxicity was 45% (GU) and 37% (GI). No late Grade 3 or higher toxicity was reported. Twenty-six patients reported potency before therapy; 6 (23%) have developed impotence. Median time to PSA nadir was 18 months with the majority of nadirs less than 1.0 ng/mL. The actuarial 48-month biochemical freedom from relapse is 70% for the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition and 90% by the alternative nadir + 2 ng/mL failure definition. Conclusions: SHARP for localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal acute or late toxicity. Dose escalation should be possible.

  8. Expression and Localization of Aquaporins in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Insang; Hwang, Eu-Chang; Song, Seung Hee; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Sun-Ouck; Kang, Taek-Won; Kwon, Dongdeuk; Park, Kwangsung

    2012-01-01

    The aquaporin (AQP) families of water channels are intrinsic membrane proteins that facilitate selective water and small solute movement across the plasma membrane. The purposes of this study were to determine the expression and localization of AQPs in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Prostatic tissue was collected from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia or prostate cancer by transurethral resection of the prostate. The expression and cellular localization of the AQPs were determined in the human prostate by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. AQP1, 3, and 9 were expressed in the human prostate. Western blot analysis revealed bands at 28-36 kDa for the AQP1, 3, and 9 proteins. Of these proteins, AQP3 and 9 were expressed in the epithelium. Immunolabeling showed that AQP1 was mainly expressed in the capillaries and venules of the prostate, AQP9 was expressed in the cytoplasm of the epithelium, and AQP3 was mainly associated with the plasma membrane of the prostatic epithelium. Only AQP3 expression was localized in the cell membrane, and expressed AQP3 was translocated to the cytoplasm in prostate cancer. The epithelium in the human prostate expresses AQP3 and 9 proteins, and the capillaries and venules of the prostate express AQP1. Characterizing or modifying the expression of AQP3 may lead to an understanding of the role of the AQPs in human prostatic disease. PMID:23323224

  9. A clinical review on extreme hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer using nonrobotic linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Macias, Victor A; Perez-Romasanta, Luis A

    2014-06-01

    Seven phase I-II studies fell within the inclusion criteria. Details on the radiotherapy technique, patient selection, fractionation scheme, exclusion criteria, treatment toxicity, quality-of-life, and tumor control were collected. The studies provide encouraging results of acute and late toxicity, with rare grade 3 events, that seem comparable to robotic SBRT. The biochemical disease-free survival rates look promising, but most patients belong to the low-risk group. The trials are limited by a short follow-up, small number of patients, and different approaches in prescribing dose and defining the acceptable dose heterogeneities. Currently, nonrobotic SBRT regimens should be used in the context of clinical trials. PMID:24654695

  10. Outcomes of active surveillance for the management of clinically localized prostate cancer in the prospective, multi-institutional Canary PASS cohort

    PubMed Central

    Newcomb, Lisa F.; Thompson, Ian M.; Boyer, Hilary D.; Brooks, James D.; Carroll, Peter R.; Cooperberg, Matthew R.; Dash, Atreya; Ellis, William J.; Fazli, Ladan; Feng, Ziding; Gleave, Martin E.; Kunju, Priya; Lance, Raymond S.; McKenney, Jesse K.; Meng, Maxwell V.; Nicolas, Marlo M.; Sanda, Martin G.; Simko, Jeffry; So, Alan; Tretiakova, Maria S.; Troyer, Dean A.; True, Lawrence D.; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Virgin, Jeff; Wagner, Andrew A.; Wei, John T.; Zheng, Yingye; Nelson, Peter S.; Lin, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Active surveillance represents a strategy to address the overtreatment of prostate cancer, yet uncertainty regarding individual patient outcomes remains a concern. We evaluated outcomes in a prospective multi-center study of active surveillance. Methods We studied 905 men in the prospective Canary Prostate cancer Active Surveillance Study (PASS) enrolled between 2008 to 2013. We collected clinical data at study entry and at pre-specified intervals and determined associations with adverse reclassification defined as increased Gleason grade or greater cancer volume on follow-up biopsy. We also evaluated the relationships of clinical parameters with pathology findings in participants who underwent surgery after a period of active surveillance. Results During a median follow-up of 28 months, 24% of participants experienced adverse reclassification, of whom 53% underwent treatment while 31% continued active surveillance. Overall, 19% of participants received treatment, 68% with adverse reclassification while 32% opted for treatment without disease reclassification. In multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, percent of biopsy cores with cancer, BMI, and PSA density were associated with adverse reclassification (P = 0.01, 0.04, 0.04). Of 103 participants subsequently treated by radical prostatectomy, 34% had adverse pathology, defined as primary pattern 4–5 or non-organ confined disease, including two with positive lymph nodes, with no significant relationship between risk category at diagnosis and findings at surgery (P = 0.76). Conclusion Most men remain on active surveillance at five years without adverse reclassification or adverse pathology at surgery. However, clinical factors had only modest association with disease reclassification, supporting the need for approaches that improve prediction of this outcome. PMID:26327354

  11. The ratio of oleic-to-stearic acid in the prostate predicts biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our study examined lifestyle-related factors that may influence the prognosis of clinically localized prostate cancer, we evaluated the relative impact of obesity and prostatic fatty acid concentrations at diagnosis on risk of biochemical failure following radical prostatectomy. Height and weight w...

  12. Virtual HDR{sup SM} CyberKnife Treatment for Localized Prostatic Carcinoma: Dosimetry Comparison With HDR Brachytherapy and Preliminary Clinical Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Donald B. Naitoh, John; Lee, Charles; Hardy, Steven C.; Jin, Haoran

    2008-04-01

    Background: We tested our ability to approximate the dose (38 Gy), fractionation (four fractions), and distribution of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer with CyberKnife (CK) stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans. We also report early clinical observations of CK SBRT treatment. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were treated with CK. For each CK SBRT plan, an HDR plan was designed using common contour sets and simulated HDR catheters. Planning target volume coverage, intraprostatic dose escalation, and urethra, rectum, and bladder exposure were compared. Results: Planning target volume coverage by the prescription dose was similar for CK SBRT and HDR plans, whereas percent of volume of interest receiving 125% of prescribed radiation dose (V125) and V150 values were higher for HDR, reflecting higher doses near HDR source dwell positions. Urethra dose comparisons were lower for CK SBRT in 9 of 10 cases, suggesting that CK SBRT may more effectively limit urethra dose. Bladder maximum point doses were higher with HDR, but bladder dose falloff beyond the maximum dose region was more rapid with HDR. Maximum rectal wall doses were similar, but CK SBRT created sharper rectal dose falloff beyond the maximum dose region. Second CK SBRT plans, constructed by equating urethra radiation dose received by point of maximum exposure of volume of interest to the HDR plan, significantly increased V125 and V150. Clinically, 4-month post-CK SBRT median prostate-specific antigen levels decreased 86% from baseline. Acute toxicity was primarily urologic and returned to baseline by 2 months. Acute rectal morbidity was minimal and transient. Conclusions: It is possible to construct CK SBRT plans that closely recapitulate HDR dosimetry and deliver the plans noninvasively.

  13. Radiologic presentation of chronic granulomatous prostatitis mimicking locally advanced prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Min; Joshi, Jay; Wolfe, Konrad; Acher, Peter; Liyanage, Sidath H

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of nonspecific granulomatous prostatitis (GP), a clinical mimic of prostate adenocarcinoma. A 54-year-old man presented with lower urinary tract symptoms and raised prostate-specific antigen. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features consistent with prostate cancer, including low T2-signal intensity in the peripheral and transition zones with signs of extracapsular extension. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed high-signal intensity, with low apparent diffusion coefficient values, whereas dynamic contrast enhancement demonstrated a type 3 washout curve, similar to that found in prostate cancer. Transperineal sector-guided prostate biopsy confirmed nonspecific GP, and the patient was treated conservatively. We discuss and compare nonspecific, chronic GP as a radiologic mimic of prostate adenocarcinoma patient. PMID:27257455

  14. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy. PMID:27212125

  15. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy. PMID:27212125

  16. Integrative clinical genomics of advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dan; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Wu, Yi-Mi; Schultz, Nikolaus; Lonigro, Robert J; Mosquera, Juan-Miguel; Montgomery, Bruce; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Pritchard, Colin C; Attard, Gerhardt; Beltran, Himisha; Abida, Wassim; Bradley, Robert K; Vinson, Jake; Cao, Xuhong; Vats, Pankaj; Kunju, Lakshmi P; Hussain, Maha; Feng, Felix Y; Tomlins, Scott A; Cooney, Kathleen A; Smith, David C; Brennan, Christine; Siddiqui, Javed; Mehra, Rohit; Chen, Yu; Rathkopf, Dana E; Morris, Michael J; Solomon, Stephen B; Durack, Jeremy C; Reuter, Victor E; Gopalan, Anuradha; Gao, Jianjiong; Loda, Massimo; Lis, Rosina T; Bowden, Michaela; Balk, Stephen P; Gaviola, Glenn; Sougnez, Carrie; Gupta, Manaswi; Yu, Evan Y; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Cheng, Heather H; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; True, Lawrence D; Plymate, Stephen R; Dvinge, Heidi; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Flohr, Penny; Miranda, Susana; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Tunariu, Nina; Mateo, Joaquin; Perez-Lopez, Raquel; Demichelis, Francesca; Robinson, Brian D; Schiffman, Marc; Nanus, David M; Tagawa, Scott T; Sigaras, Alexandros; Eng, Kenneth W; Elemento, Olivier; Sboner, Andrea; Heath, Elisabeth I; Scher, Howard I; Pienta, Kenneth J; Kantoff, Philip; de Bono, Johann S; Rubin, Mark A; Nelson, Peter S; Garraway, Levi A; Sawyers, Charles L; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2015-05-21

    Toward development of a precision medicine framework for metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), we established a multi-institutional clinical sequencing infrastructure to conduct prospective whole-exome and transcriptome sequencing of bone or soft tissue tumor biopsies from a cohort of 150 mCRPC affected individuals. Aberrations of AR, ETS genes, TP53, and PTEN were frequent (40%-60% of cases), with TP53 and AR alterations enriched in mCRPC compared to primary prostate cancer. We identified new genomic alterations in PIK3CA/B, R-spondin, BRAF/RAF1, APC, β-catenin, and ZBTB16/PLZF. Moreover, aberrations of BRCA2, BRCA1, and ATM were observed at substantially higher frequencies (19.3% overall) compared to those in primary prostate cancers. 89% of affected individuals harbored a clinically actionable aberration, including 62.7% with aberrations in AR, 65% in other cancer-related genes, and 8% with actionable pathogenic germline alterations. This cohort study provides clinically actionable information that could impact treatment decisions for these affected individuals. PMID:26000489

  17. Integrative clinical genomics of advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Robinson; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Wu, Yi-Mi; Schultz, Nikolaus; Lonigro, Robert J.; Mosquera, Juan-Miguel; Montgomery, Bruce; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Pritchard, Colin C; Attard, Gerhardt; Beltran, Himisha; Abida, Wassim M.; Bradley, Robert K.; Vinson, Jake; Cao, Xuhong; Vats, Pankaj; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Hussain, Maha; Feng, Felix Y.; Tomlins, Scott A.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Smith, David C.; Brennan, Christine; Siddiqui, Javed; Mehra, Rohit; Chen, Yu; Rathkopf, Dana E.; Morris, Michael J.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Reuter, Victor E.; Gopalan, Anuradha; Gao, Jianjiong; Loda, Massimo; Lis, Rosina T.; Bowden, Michaela; Balk, Stephen P.; Gaviola, Glenn; Sougnez, Carrie; Gupta, Manaswi; Yu, Evan Y.; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Cheng, Heather H.; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; True, Lawrence D.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Dvinge, Heidi; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Flohr, Penny; Miranda, Susana; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Tunariu, Nina; Mateo, Joaquin; Lopez, Raquel Perez; Demichelis, Francesca; Robinson, Brian D.; Schiffman, Marc A.; Nanus, David M.; Tagawa, Scott T.; Sigaras, Alexandros; Eng, Kenneth W.; Elemento, Olivier; Sboner, Andrea; Heath, Elisabeth I.; Scher, Howard I.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Kantoff, Philip; de Bono, Johann S.; Rubin, Mark A.; Nelson, Peter S.; Garraway, Levi A.; Sawyers, Charles L.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Toward development of a precision medicine framework for metastatic, castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), we established a multi-institutional clinical sequencing infrastructure to conduct prospective whole exome and transcriptome sequencing of bone or soft tissue tumor biopsies from a cohort of 150 mCRPC affected individuals. Aberrations of AR, ETS genes, TP53 and PTEN were frequent (40–60% of cases), with TP53 and AR alterations enriched in mCRPC compared to primary prostate cancer. We identified novel genomic alterations in PIK3CA/B, R-spondin, BRAF/RAF1, APC, β-catenin and ZBTB16/PLZF. Aberrations of BRCA2, BRCA1 and ATM were observed at substantially higher frequencies (19.3% overall) than seen in primary prostate cancers. 89% of affected individuals harbored a clinically actionable aberration including 62.7% with aberrations in AR, 65% in other cancer-related genes, and 8% with actionable pathogenic germline alterations. This cohort study provides evidence that clinical sequencing in mCRPC is feasible and could impact treatment decisions in significant numbers of affected individuals. PMID:26000489

  18. Early Choline Levels From 3-Tesla MR Spectroscopy After Exclusive Radiation Therapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer are Predictive of Plasmatic Levels of PSA at 1 Year

    SciTech Connect

    Crehange, Gilles; Maingon, Philippe; Gauthier, Melanie; Parfait, Sebastien; Cochet, Alexandre; Mirjolet, Celine; Bonnetain, Franck; Cormier, Luc; Brunotte, Francois; Walker, Paul

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the time course response of prostate metabolism to irradiation using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 3-month intervals and its impact on biochemical control. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and April 2010, 24 patients with localized prostate cancer were prospectively enrolled in the Evaluation of the Response to Irradiation with MR Spectroscopy (ERIS) trial. All the patients had been treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy with or without long-term adjuvant hormonal therapy (LTHT) and underwent 3-T MRS and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assays at baseline and every 3 months thereafter up to 12 months. Results: After radiation, the mean normalized citrate level (citrate/water) decreased significantly over time, both in the peripheral zone (PZ) (p = 0.0034) and in the entire prostate (p = 0.0008), whereas no significant change was observed in mean normalized choline levels (choline/water) in the PZ (p = 0.84) and in the entire prostate (p = 0.95). At 6 months after radiation, the mean choline level was significantly lower in the PZ for patients with a PSA value of {<=}0.5 ng/mL at 12 months (4.9 {+-} 1.7 vs. 7.1 {+-} 1.5, p = 0.0378). Similar results were observed at 12 months in the PZ (6.2 {+-} 2.3 vs. 11.4 {+-} 4.1, p = 0.0117 for choline level and 3.4 {+-} 0.7 vs. 16.1 {+-} 6.1, p = 0.0054 for citrate level) and also in the entire prostate (6.2 {+-} 1.9 vs. 10.4 {+-} 3.2, p = 0.014 for choline level and 3.0 {+-} 0.8 vs. 13.3 {+-} 4.7, p = 0.0054 for citrate level). For patients receiving LTHT, there was no correlation between choline or citrate levels and PSA value, either at baseline or at follow-up. Conclusions: Low normalized choline in the PZ, 6 months after radiation, predicts which patients attained a PSA {<=}0.5 ng/mL at 1 year. Further analyses with longer follow-up times are warranted to determine whether or not these new biomarkers can conclusively predict the early radiation response and the

  19. Final Report of Multicenter Canadian Phase III Randomized Trial of 3 Versus 8 Months of Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Before Conventional-Dose Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita Ludgate, Charles; Malone, Shawn; Perry, Gad; Eapen, Libni; Bowen, Julie; Robertson, Susan; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of 3 vs. 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before conventional-dose radiotherapy (RT) on disease-free survival for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 1995 and June 2001, 378 men were randomized to either 3 or 8 months of flutamide and goserelin before 66 Gy RT at four participating centers. The median baseline prostate-specific antigen level was 9.7 ng/mL (range, 1.3-189). Of the 378 men, 26% had low-, 43% intermediate-, and 31% high-risk disease. The two arms were balanced in terms of age, Gleason score, clinical T category, risk group, and presenting prostate-specific antigen level. The median follow-up for living patients was 6.6 years (range, 1.6-10.1). Of the 378 patients, 361 were evaluable, and 290 were still living. Results: The 5-year actuarial freedom from failure rate for the 3- vs. 8-month arms was 72% vs. 75%, respectively (p = 0.18). No difference was found in the failure types between the two arms. The median prostate-specific antigen level at the last follow-up visit for patients without treatment failure was 0.6 ng/mL in the 3-month arm vs. 0.50 ng/mL in the 8-month arm. The disease-free survival rate at 5 years was improved for the high-risk patients in the 8-month arm (71% vs. 42%, p = 0.01). Conclusion: A longer period of NHT before standard-dose RT did not alter the patterns of failure when combined with 66-Gy RT. High-risk patients in the 8-month arm had significant improvement in the 5-year disease-free survival rate.

  20. Radiation With or Without 6 Months of Androgen Suppression Therapy in Intermediate- and High-Risk Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: A Postrandomization Analysis by Risk Group

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Paul L.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Beard, Clair J.; Suh, W. Warren

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Six months of androgen suppression therapy (AST) plus radiation (RT) prolongs survival vs. RT alone in men with unfavorable risk localized prostate cancer (PCa), but it is unknown if this benefit applies to all risk subgroups and, in particular, the intermediate-risk group. Methods and Materials: Among 206 men with stages T1b to T2b PCa and either a prostate-specific antigen level of >10 or a Gleason score of {>=}7 or MRI evidence of T3 disease randomized to receive 70 Gy of RT with or without 6 months of AST, Cox multivariable analysis was used to assess the impact of AST on overall survival in intermediate- and high-risk localized PCa, adjusting for age, Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 comorbidity score, interaction between comorbidity and treatment, and known prognostic factors. Survival estimates were compared using a two-sided log-rank test. Results: After an 8.2-year median follow-up, 74 men died. Compared to treatment with AST plus RT, treatment with RT alone was associated with an increased risk of death in intermediate-risk (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.0 [95% confidence interval, 1.3-7.2]; p = 0.01) and high-risk PCa (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.3 [95% confidence interval, 0.94-11.3]; p = 0.06). The survival benefit of adding AST was restricted to men with no or mild comorbidity in both the intermediate-risk (90.9% vs. 85.8% survival, respectively, at 7 years for AST plus RT vs. RT alone; p = 0.009) and high-risk (88.9% vs. 51.2% survival, respectively, at 7 years for AST plus RT vs. RT alone; p = 0.007) subgroups. Conclusions: In men with localized PCa who have no or mild comorbidity, adding 6 months of AST to RT was associated with improved survival for those with both intermediate-risk and high-risk disease, but in men with moderate to severe comorbidity, no benefit was observed in either risk group.

  1. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Using Sonablate® Devices for the Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Localized Prostate Cancer: 18-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Toyoaki

    2011-09-01

    From 1993 to 2010, we have treated 156 patients benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 1,052 patients localized prostate cancer high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Four different HIFU devices, SonablateR-200, SonablateR-500, SonablateR-500 version 4 and Sonablate® TCM, have been used for this study. Clinical outcome of HIFU for BPH did not show any superior effects to transurethral resection of the prostate, laser surgery or transurethral vapolization of the prostate. However, HIFU appears to be a safe and minimally invasive therapy for patients with localized prostate cancer, especially low- and intermediate-risk patients. The rate of clinical outcome has significantly improved over the years due to technical improvements in the device.

  2. Is Biochemical Response More Important Than Duration of Neoadjuvant Hormone Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer? An Analysis of the 3- Versus 8-Month Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Abraham; Crook, Juanita; Jones, Stuart; Malone, Shawn; Bowen, Julie; Truong, Pauline; Pai, Howard; Ludgate, Charles

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To ascertain whether biochemical response to neoadjuvant androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) before radiotherapy (RT), rather than duration, is the critical determinant of benefit in the multimodal treatment of localized prostate cancer, by comparing outcomes of subjects from the Canadian multicenter 3- vs 8-month trial with a pre-RT, post-hormone PSA (PRPH-PSA) <=0.1 ng/ml vs those >0.1 ng/ml. Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2001, 378 men with localized prostate cancer were randomized to 3 or 8 months of neoadjuvant ADT before RT. On univariate analysis, survival indices were compared between those with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml vs >0.1 ng/ml, for all patients and subgroups, including treatment arm, risk group, and gleason Score. Multivariate analysis identified independent predictors of outcome. Results: Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was significantly higher for those with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml compared with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml (55.3% vs 49.4%, p = 0.014). No difference in survival indices was observed between treatment arms. There was no difference in bDFS between patients in the 3- and 8-month arms with a PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml nor those with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml. bDFS was significantly higher for high-risk patients with PRPH-PSA <=0.1 ng/ml compared with PRPH-PSA >0.1 ng/ml (57.0% vs 29.4%, p = 0.017). Multivariate analysis identified PRPH-PSA (p = 0.041), Gleason score (p = 0.001), initial PSA (p = 0.025), and T-stage (p = 0.003), not ADT duration, as independent predictors of outcome. Conclusion: Biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT before RT, not duration, appears to be the critical determinant of benefit in the setting of combined therapy. Individually tailored ADT duration based on PRPH-PSA would maximize therapeutic gain, while minimizing the duration of ADT and its related toxicities.

  3. Which, when and why? Rational use of tissue-based molecular testing in localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ross, A E; D'Amico, A V; Freedland, S J

    2016-03-01

    An increased molecular understanding of localized prostate cancer and the improved ability for molecular testing of pathologic tissue has led to the development of multiple clinical assays. Here we review the relevant molecular biology of localized prostate cancer, currently available tissue-based tests and describe which is best supported for use in various clinical scenarios. Literature regarding testing of human prostate cancer tissue with Ki-67, PTEN (by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or fluroescence in situ hybridization (FISH)), ProMark, Prolaris, OncotypeDX Prostate and Decipher was reviewed to allow for generation of expert opinions. At diagnosis, evaluation of PTEN status, use of ProMark or OncotypeDX Prostate in men with Gleason 6 or 3+4=7 disease may help guide the use of active surveillance. For men with Gleason 7 or above disease considering watchful waiting, Ki-67 and Prolaris add independent prognostic information. For those men who have undergone prostatectomy and have adverse pathology, Decipher testing may aid in the decision to undergo adjuvant radiation. Newly available molecular tests bring opportunities to improve decision making for men with localized prostate cancer. A review of the currently available data suggests clinical scenarios for which each of these tests may have the greatest utility. PMID:26123120

  4. Patterns of failure after primary local therapy for prostate cancer and rationale for secondary therapy.

    PubMed

    Grossfeld, Gary D; Li, Yu-ping; P Lubeck, Deborah P; Carroll, Peter R

    2002-09-01

    The timing and type of treatment for patients with biochemical disease recurrence after local therapy for prostate cancer remains controversial. This is because of many unresolved issues surrounding the natural history of disease progression in such patients, including the limited ability of clinical measures to accurately define local versus distant disease recurrence. Clinicians generally rely on clinical tumor characteristics, such as tumor stage, grade, and prostate specific antigen (PSA) kinetics after local therapy, to distinguish local from distant recurrence. This determination is important, because patients with local recurrence may be candidates for a second, potentially curative treatment, whereas those with distant recurrence are generally treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Data from a national disease registry of patients with prostate cancer, the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor (CaPSURE), suggest that the use of secondary cancer treatment after local therapy for prostate cancer is common. For patients initially treated with radical prostatectomy, secondary treatment appears to be nearly equally divided between postoperative radiation and ADT, whereas >90% of patients receiving a secondary treatment after radiation are treated with ADT. Serum PSA at diagnosis, Gleason score, and type of initial treatment appear to be predictors of secondary treatment use in this setting. Patient age, lymph node status, and margin status appear to be predictors of secondary treatment with ADT or radiation for patients initially treated with radical prostatectomy. PMID:12231051

  5. Implementation of Multi-parametric Prostate MRI in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Kierans, Andrea S; Taneja, Samir S; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2015-08-01

    While initial implementations of prostate MRI suffered from suboptimal performance in tumor detection, technological advances over the past decade have allowed modern multi-parametric prostate MRI (mpMRI) to achieve high diagnostic accuracy for detection, localization, and staging and thereby impact patient management. A particular emerging application of mpMRI is in the pre-biopsy setting to allow for MRI-targeted biopsy, for instance, through real-time MRI/ultrasound fusion, which may help reduce the over-detection of low-risk disease and selectively detect clinically significant cancers, in comparison with use of standard systematic biopsy alone. mpMRI and MRI-targeted biopsy are spreading beyond the large academic centers to increasingly be adopted within small and community practices. Aims of this review article are to summarize the hardware and sequences used for performing mpMRI, explore patient specific technical considerations, delineate approaches for study interpretation and reporting [including the recent American College of Radiology Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) version 2], and describe challenges and implications relating to the widespread clinical implementation of mpMRI. PMID:26077358

  6. Prostate cancer localization by novel magnetic resonance dispersion imaging.

    PubMed

    Mischi, M; Saidov, T; Kompatsiari, K; Engelbrecht, M R W; Breeuwer, M; Wijkstra, H

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis and focal treatment of prostate cancer, the most prevalent form of cancer in men, is hampered by the limits of current clinical imaging. Angiogenesis imaging is a promising option for detection and localization of prostate cancer. It can be imaged by dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, assessing microvascular permeability as an indicator for angiogenesis. However, information on microvascular architecture changes associated with angiogenesis is not available. This paper presents a new model enabling the combined assessment of microvascular permeability and architecture. After the intravenous injection of a gadolinium-chelate bolus, time-concentration curves (TCCs) are measured by DCE-MRI at each voxel. According to the convective dispersion equation, the microvascular architecture is reflected in the dispersion coefficient. A solution of this equation is therefore proposed to represent the intravascular blood plasma compartment in the Tofts model. Fitting the resulting model to TCCs measured at each voxel leads to the simultaneous generation of a dispersion and a permeability map. Measurement of an arterial input function is no longer required. Preliminary validation was performed by spatial comparison with the histological results in seven patients referred for radical prostatectomy. Cancer localization by the obtained dispersion maps provided an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve equal to 0.91. None of the standard DCE-MRI parametric maps could outperform this result, motivating towards an extended validation of the method, also aimed at investigating other forms of cancer with pronounced angiogenic development. PMID:24110260

  7. [Clinical significance of prostate specific antigen and gamma-seminoprotein ratio for diagnosing prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Akino, H; Suzuki, Y; Okada, K

    1998-08-01

    It has been reported that prostate specific antigen and gamma-seminoprotein ratio (PSA/gamma-Sm ratio) is an useful means for distinguishing benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer if serum PSA is measured by Eiken-PSA method. We studied the clinical significance of PSA/gamma-Sm ratio when using Markit-M-PSA method. PSA/gamma-Sm ratio had no superiority over PSA alone for detecting prostate cancer. The present results suggest that the clinical significance of PSA/gamma-Sm ratio can be varied by various PSA-assay kits. PMID:9750496

  8. Prostate segmentation with local binary patterns guided active appearance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Soumya; Oliver, Arnau; Martí, Robert; Lladó, Xavier; Freixenet, Jordi; Vilanova, Joan C.; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    2011-03-01

    Real-time fusion of Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Trans Rectal Ultra Sound (TRUS) images aid in the localization of malignant tissues in TRUS guided prostate biopsy. Registration performed on segmented contours of the prostate reduces computational complexity and improves the multimodal registration accuracy. However, accurate and computationally efficient segmentation of the prostate in TRUS images could be challenging in the presence of heterogeneous intensity distribution inside the prostate gland, and other imaging artifacts like speckle noise, shadow regions and low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). In this work, we propose to enhance the texture features of the prostate region using Local Binary Patterns (LBP) for the propagation of a shape and appearance based statistical model to segment the prostate in a multi-resolution framework. A parametric model of the propagating contour is derived from Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the prior shape and texture information of the prostate from the training data. The estimated parameters are then modified with the prior knowledge of the optimization space to achieve an optimal segmentation. The proposed method achieves a mean Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) value of 0.94+/-0.01 and a mean segmentation time of 0.68+/-0.02 seconds when validated with 70 TRUS images of 7 datasets in a leave-one-patient-out validation framework. Our method performs computationally efficient and accurate prostate segmentation in the presence of intensity heterogeneities and imaging artifacts.

  9. Body Mass Index and Prostate-Specific Antigen Failure Following Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Efstathiou, Jason A. Skowronski, Rafi Y.; Coen, John J.; Grocela, Joseph A.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Increasing body mass index (BMI) is associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure after radical prostatectomy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). We investigated whether BMI is associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analyses were conducted on 374 patients undergoing brachytherapy for stage T1c-T2cNXM0 prostate cancer from 1996-2001. Forty-nine patients (13%) received supplemental EBRT and 131 (35%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Height and weight data were available for 353 (94%). Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between BMI and PSA failure (nadir + 2 ng/ml definition). Covariates included age, race, preimplantation PSA, Gleason score, T category, percent of prescription dose to 90% of the prostate, use of supplemental EBRT, and ADT. Results: Median age, PSA, and BMI were 66 years (range, 42-80 years), 5.7 ng/ml (range, 0.4-22.6 ng/ml), and 27.1 kg/m{sup 2} (range, 18.2-53.6 kg/m{sup 2}), respectively. After a median follow-up of 6.0 years (range, 3.0-10.2 years), there were 76 PSA recurrences. The BMI was not associated with PSA failure. Six-year PSA failure rates were 30.2% for men with BMI less than 25 kg/m{sup 2}, 19.5% for BMI of 25 or greater to less than 30 kg/m{sup 2}, and 14.4% for BMI of 30 kg/m{sup 2} or greater (p = 0.19). Results were similar when BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable, using alternative definitions of PSA failure, and excluding patients treated with EBRT and/or ADT. In multivariate analyses, only baseline PSA was significantly associated with shorter time to PSA failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.20; p 0.0006). Conclusions: Unlike after surgery or EBRT, BMI is not associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer. This raises the possibility that brachytherapy may be a preferred treatment

  10. Challenges in Clinical Prostate Cancer: Role of Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kelloff, Gary J.; Choyke, Peter; Coffey, Donald S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This article reviews a recent 2-day workshop on prostate cancer and imaging technology that was conducted by the Cancer Imaging Program of the National Cancer Institute. The workshop dealt with research trends and avenues for improving imaging and applications across the clinical spectrum of the disease. Conclusion After a summary of prostate cancer incidence and mortality, four main clinical challenges in prostate cancer treatment and management—diagnostic accuracy; risk stratification, initial staging, active surveillance, and focal therapy; prostate-specific antigen relapse after radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy; and assessing response to therapy in advanced disease—were discussed by the 55-member panel. The overarching issue in prostate cancer is distinguishing lethal from nonlethal disease. New technologies and fresh uses for established procedures make imaging effective in both assessing and treating prostate cancer. PMID:19457806

  11. Clinical variability and molecular heterogeneity in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shoag, Jonathan; Barbieri, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a clinically heterogeneous disease, with some men having indolent disease that can safely be observed, while others have aggressive, lethal disease. Over the past decade, researchers have begun to unravel some of the genomic heterogeneity that contributes to these varying clinical phenotypes. Distinct molecular sub-classes of prostate cancer have been identified, and the uniqueness of these sub-classes has been leveraged to predict clinical outcomes, design novel biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis, and develop novel therapeutics. Recent work has also elucidated the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of prostate cancer, helping us understand disease pathogenesis, response to therapy, and progression. New genomic techniques have provided us with a window into the remarkable clinical and genomic heterogeneity of prostate cancer, and this new perspective will increasingly impact patient care. PMID:27080479

  12. Clinical variability and molecular heterogeneity in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shoag, Jonathan; Barbieri, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a clinically heterogeneous disease, with some men having indolent disease that can safely be observed, while others have aggressive, lethal disease. Over the past decade, researchers have begun to unravel some of the genomic heterogeneity that contributes to these varying clinical phenotypes. Distinct molecular sub-classes of prostate cancer have been identified, and the uniqueness of these sub-classes has been leveraged to predict clinical outcomes, design novel biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis, and develop novel therapeutics. Recent work has also elucidated the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of prostate cancer, helping us understand disease pathogenesis, response to therapy, and progression. New genomic techniques have provided us with a window into the remarkable clinical and genomic heterogeneity of prostate cancer, and this new perspective will increasingly impact patient care. PMID:27080479

  13. Clinical and Dosimetric Predictors of Late Rectal Syndrome After 3D-CRT for Localized Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Results of a Multicenter Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorino, Claudio Fellin, Gianni; Rancati, Tiziana; Vavassori, Vittorio; Bianchi, Carla; Borca, Valeria Casanova; Girelli, Giuseppe; Mapelli, Marco; Menegotti, Loris; Nava, Simona; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the predictors of late rectal toxicity in a prospectively investigated group of patients treated at 70-80 Gy for prostate cancer (1.8-2 Gy fractions) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,132 patients were entered into the study between 2002 and 2004. Three types of rectal toxicity, evaluated by a self-administered questionnaire, mainly based on the subjective objective management, analytic late effects of normal tissue system, were considered: stool frequency/tenesmus/pain, fecal incontinence, and bleeding. The data from 506 patients with a follow-up of 24 months were analyzed. The correlation between a number of clinical and dosimetric parameters and Grade 2 or greater toxicity was investigated by univariate and multivariate (MVA) logistic analyses. Results: Of the 1,132 patients, 21, 15, and 30 developed stool frequency/tenesmus/pain, fecal incontinence, and bleeding, respectively. Stool frequency/tenesmus/pain correlated with previous abdominal/pelvic surgery (MVA, p = 0.05, odds ratio [OR], 3.3). With regard to incontinence, MVA showed the volume receiving {>=}40 Gy (V{sub 40}) (p = 0.035, OR, 1.037) and surgery (p = 0.02, OR, 4.4) to be the strongest predictors. V{sub 40} to V{sub 70} were highly predictive of bleeding; V{sub 70} showed the strongest impact on MVA (p = 0.03), together with surgery (p = 0.06, OR, 2.5), which was also the main predictor of Grade 3 bleeding (p = 0.02, OR, 4.2). Conclusions: The predictive value of the dose-volume histogram was confirmed for bleeding, consistent with previously suggested constraints (V{sub 50} <55%, V{sub 60} <40%, V{sub 70} <25%, and V{sub 75} <5%). A dose-volume histogram constraint for incontinence can be suggested (V{sub 40} <65-70%). Previous abdominal/pelvic surgery correlated with all toxicity types; thus, a modified constraint for bleeding (V{sub 70} <15%) can be suggested for patients with a history of abdominal/pelvis surgery, although

  14. Clinical Significance of the Resistive Index of Prostatic Blood Flow According to Prostate Size in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors evaluated the relationships between the clinical factors and resistive indexes (RIs) of prostate and urethral blood flows by using power Doppler transrectal ultrasonography (PDUS) in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: The data of 110 patients with BPH and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) treated between January 2015 and July 2015 were prospectively collected. PDUS was used to identify the capsular and urethral arteries of the prostate in order to measure RIs. International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), maximal flow rate (Qmax), total prostate volume (TPV), transition zone volume (TZV), transition zone index (=TZV/TPV), presence of intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP), and the RIs of capsular and urethral arteries were evaluated for all of the patients by one urologist. Results: The 110 patients were categorized according to IPSS (mild symptoms, 0–7; moderate symptoms, 8–19; and severe symptoms, 20–35), Qmax (<10 and ≥10 mL/sec), TPV (<30 and ≥30 mL), and presence or absence of IPP. No significant relationship was found between the mean RI of any artery and IPSS or Qmax. The mean RIs of the urethral artery, and left and right capsular arteries were significantly dependent on prostate size and the presence of IPP. Conclusions: RI obtained by using PDUS correlated with the presence of IPP and prostate size. The RI of prostate blood flow can be used as a noninvasive diagnostic tool for BPH with LUTS. PMID:27032561

  15. Optimal management of prostate cancer with lethal biology--state-of-the-art local therapy.

    PubMed

    Chapin, Brian F

    2015-01-01

    Defining prostate cancer with lethal biology based upon clinical criteria is challenging. Locally advanced/High-Grade prostate cancer can be downstaged or even downgraded with cure in up to 60% of patients with primary therapy. However, what is known is that high-grade prostate cancers have a greater potential for recurrence and progression to metastatic disease, which can ultimately result in a patient's death. Patients with clinical features of "high-risk" prostate cancer (cT2c, PSA >20, ≥ Gl 8 on biopsy) are more likely to harbor more aggressive pathologic findings. The optimal management of high-risk prostate cancer is not known as there are not prospective studies comparing surgery to radiation therapy (RT). Retrospective and population-based studies are subject to many biases and attempts to compare surgery and radiation have demonstrated mixed results. Some show equivalent survival outcomes while others showing an advantage of surgery over RT. Local therapy for high-risk disease does appear to be beneficial. Improved outcomes realized with local therapy have been clearly demonstrated by several prospective studies evaluating androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) alone versus ADT plus RT. The combination of local with systemic treatment showed improved disease-specific and overall survival outcomes. Unfortunately, primary ADT for N0M0 prostate cancer is still inappropriately applied in general practice. While the surgical literature is largely retrospective, it too demonstrates that surgery in the setting of high-risk prostate cancer is effective in providing durable disease-specific and overall survivals. [ PMID:26178396

  16. Clinical Evaluation of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    McVary, Kevin T

    2003-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common neoplastic condition afflicting men and constitutes a major factor impacting male health. Clinical evaluation to assess the presence and degree of voiding dysfunction and/or the role of BPH in its presence has an increasingly broad spectrum of treatment goals. The goals of the evaluation of such men are to identify the patient’s voiding or, more appropriately, urinary tract problems, both symptomatic and physiologic; to establish the etiologic role of BPH in these problems; to evaluate the necessity for and probability of success and risks of various therapeutic approaches; and to present the results of these assessments to the patient so he can make an informed decision about management recommendations and available alternatives. PMID:16985961

  17. Clinical Evaluation of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    McVary, Kevin T

    2003-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common neoplastic condition afflicting men and constitutes a major factor impacting male health. Clinical evaluation to assess the presence and degree of voiding dysfunction and/or the role of BPH in its presence has an increasingly broad spectrum of treatment goals. The goals of the evaluation of such men are to identify the patient’s voiding or, more appropriately, urinary tract problems, both symptomatic and physiologic; to establish the etiologic role of BPH in these problems; to evaluate the necessity for and probability of success and risks of various therapeutic approaches; and to present the results of these assessments to the patient so he can make an informed decision about management recommendations and available alternatives. PMID:16985968

  18. Clinical and in vitro magnetic resonance imaging of prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Buonocore, E.; Hesemann, C.; Pavlicek, W.; Montie, J.E.

    1984-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate was accomplished in 10 patients who subsequently had surgical exploration for histological confirmation and tumor staging. Eight patients were found to have carcinoma of the prostate. Two resected prostates with carcinoma and one normal prostate were available for in vitro MRI in a clinical magnetic resonance unit. The MRI finding of prostatic carcinoma was heterogeneous signal patterns, seen best on T2-weighted studies. There was a homogeneous MRI signal pattern of the normal prostate gland examined in vitro. In two instances, the MRI studies were accurate for the identification of tumor spread to the seminal vesicles, not diagnosed at the time of surgical resection. Microscopic metastatic disease of the lymph nodes in four patients was not identified by MRI.

  19. Histotripsy Fractionation of Prostate Tissue: Local Effects and Systemic Response in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Christopher R.; Hall, Timothy L; Cain, Charles A.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Zhen; Roberts, William W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Histotripsy is an extracorporeal ultrasound (US) technology that utilizes cavitational mechanisms to produce non-thermal tissue destruction. Previously, we demonstrated the feasibility of histotripsy for fractionation and immediate debulking of prostate tissue. The purpose of this study is to characterize the local effects and systemic response after histotripsy treatment of prostate tissue in an in-vivo canine model. Materials and Methods Histotripsy was applied transabdominally to the prostate in eighteen intact male canine subjects under general anesthesia. Acoustic bursts (4 microseconds) were delivered at 300 Hz pulse repetition rate from a highly focused 750 kHz piezoelectric US transducer (15 cm aperture, 3×3×8 mm focal volume). The prostate and surrounding structures were harvested at prescribed time points (0, 7, 28, or 56 days) following histotripsy. Blood and urine parameters were assessed periodically while clinical evaluation incorporating a validated veterinary pain scale was performed daily. Results Conventional transrectal US imaging facilitated targeting of the focal volume and provided real-time assessment of cavitation activity. Fractionation of the targeted volume and clearance of the resultant debris with urination produced a treatment cavity within each prostate. No acoustic collateral damage was seen and urothelialization of the treatment cavity occurred within 28 days of treatment. Only transient lab abnormalities and minimal hematuria were noted after treatment. Pain scores revealed only mild post treatment discomfort. Conclusions Histotripsy produced consistent tissue fractionation and prostate debulking without collateral acoustic injury or clinical side effects and was well tolerated in the canine model. PMID:21334667

  20. Prostate Cancer in Young Men: An Important Clinical Entity

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Claudia A.; Tsodikov, Alex; Ishak-Howard, Miriam; Cooney, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is considered a disease of older men, but today over 10% of new diagnoses occur in U.S. men ≤ 55 years. Early onset prostate cancer, i.e., diagnosed at ≤55 years, differs from prostate cancer in older men in several ways. Among men diagnosed with high grade and stage prostate cancer, men with early onset prostate cancer are more likely to die of their cancer, with higher cause-specific mortality than all others except those diagnosed over age 80. This suggests that important biological differences may exist in early onset disease compared to late onset disease. Furthermore, early onset prostate cancer has been shown to have a more significant genetic component indicating that this group may benefit more than most from evaluation of genetic risk. Clinically, although the majority of cases ≤ 55 years are diagnosed with low risk disease, their extended life expectancy exposes them to long-term risk of disease progression resulting in death from prostate cancer, but also to prolonged impact from treatment-related morbidities. These patients pose unique challenges and opportunities for both the research and clinical communities. We therefore suggest that early onset prostate cancer is a distinct phenotype, from both an etiologic and clinical perspective, that deserves further attention. PMID:24818853

  1. Targeting Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer: Molecular and Clinical Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.; Papandreou, Christos N.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate carcinoma, either co-present with the local adenocarcinoma disease or as a result of transdifferentiation later in time, was described as one major process of emerging resistance to androgen deprivation therapies, and at the clinical level it is consistent with the development of rapidly progressive visceral disease, often in the absence of elevated serum prostate-specific antigen level. Until present, platinum-based chemotherapy has been the only treatment modality, able to produce a fair amount of responses but of short duration. Recently, several efforts for molecular characterization of this lethal phenotype have resulted in identification of novel signaling factors involved in microenvironment interactions, mitosis, and neural reprograming as potential therapeutic targets. Ongoing clinical testing of specific inhibitors of these targets, for example, Aurora kinase A inhibitors, in carefully selected patients and exploitation of expression changes of the target before and after manipulation is anticipated to increase the existing data and facilitate therapeutic decision making at this late stage of the disease when hormonal manipulations, even with the newest androgen-directed therapies are no longer feasible. PMID:25699233

  2. Development of ProCaRS Clinical Nomograms for Biochemical Failure-free Survival Following Either Low-Dose Rate Brachytherapy or Conventionally Fractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Andrew; Pickles, Tom; Crook, Juanita; Martin, Andre-Guy; Souhami, Luis; Catton, Charles; Lukka, Himu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although several clinical nomograms predictive of biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) for localized prostate cancer exist in the medical literature, making valid comparisons can be challenging due to variable definitions of biochemical failure, the disparate distribution of prognostic factors, and received treatments in patient populations. The aim of this investigation was to develop and validate clinically-based nomograms for 5-year BFFS using the ASTRO II “Phoenix” definition for two patient cohorts receiving low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy or conventionally fractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) from a large Canadian multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected from the GUROC (Genitourinary Radiation Oncologists of Canada) Prostate Cancer Risk Stratification (ProCaRS) database if they received (1) LDR brachytherapy ≥ 144 Gy (n=4208) or (2) EBRT ≥ 70 Gy  (n=822). Multivariable Cox regression analysis for BFFS was performed separately for each cohort and used to generate clinical nomograms predictive of 5-year BFFS. Nomograms were validated using calibration plots of nomogram predicted probability versus observed probability via Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results: Patients receiving LDR brachytherapy had a mean age of 64 ± 7 years, a mean baseline PSA of 6.3 ± 3.0 ng/mL, 75% had a Gleason 6, and 15% had a Gleason 7, whereas patients receiving EBRT had a mean age of 70 ± 6 years, a mean baseline PSA of 11.6 ± 10.7 ng/mL, 30% had a Gleason 6, 55% had a Gleason 7, and 14% had a Gleason 8-10. Nomograms for 5-year BFFS included age, use and duration of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), baseline PSA, T stage, and Gleason score for LDR brachytherapy and an ADT (months), baseline PSA, Gleason score, and biological effective dose (Gy) for EBRT. Conclusions: Clinical nomograms examining 5-year BFFS were developed for patients receiving either LDR brachytherapy or conventionally fractionated EBRT and

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Circulating Tumor Cells from Patients with Localized and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stott, Shannon L.; Lee, Richard J.; Nagrath, Sunitha; Yu, Min; Miyamoto, David T.; Ulkus, Lindsey; Inserra, Elizabeth J.; Ulman, Matthew; Springer, Simeon; Nakamura, Zev; Moore, Alessandra L.; Tsukrov, Dina I.; Kempner, Maria E.; Dahl, Douglas M.; Wu, Chin-Lee; Iafrate, A. John; Smith, Matthew R.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Sequist, Lecia V.; Toner, Mehmet; Haber, Daniel A.; Maheswaran, Shyamala

    2011-01-01

    Rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are present in the blood of patients with metastatic epithelial cancers but have been difficult to measure routinely. We report a quantitative automated imaging system for analysis of prostate CTCs, taking advantage of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a unique prostate tumor–associated marker. The specificity of PSA staining enabled optimization of criteria for baseline image intensity, morphometric measurements, and integration of multiple signals in a three-dimensional microfluidic device. In a pilot analysis, we detected CTCs in prostate cancer patients with localized disease, before surgical tumor removal in 8 of 19 (42%) patients (range, 38 to 222 CTCs per milliliter). For 6 of the 8 patients with preoperative CTCs, a precipitous postoperative decline (<24 hours) suggests a short half-life for CTCs in the blood circulation. Other patients had persistent CTCs for up to 3 months after prostate removal, suggesting early but transient disseminated tumor deposits. In patients with metastatic prostate cancer, CTCs were detected in 23 of 36 (64%) cases (range, 14 to 5000 CTCs per milliliter). In previously untreated patients followed longitudinally, the numbers of CTCs declined after the initiation of effective therapy. The prostate cancer–specific TMPRSS2-ERG fusion was detectable in RNA extracted from CTCs from 9 of 20 (45%) patients with metastatic disease, and dual staining of captured CTCs for PSA and the cell division marker Ki67 indicated a broad range for the proportion of proliferating cells among CTCs. This method for analysis of CTCs will facilitate the application of noninvasive tumor sampling to direct targeted therapies in advanced prostate cancer and warrants the initiation of long-term clinical studies to test the importance of CTCs in invasive localized disease. PMID:20424012

  4. [Salvage 125I brachytherapy of locally recurrent prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Gesztesi, László; Ágoston, Péter; Major, Tibor; Gődény, Mária; Andi, Judit; Lengyel, Zsolt; Polgár, Csaba

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to report a case of salvage low dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy in a patient with locally recurrent prostate cancer, four years after his first treatment with combined external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. A 61-year-old man was treated with 1x10 Gy HDR brachytherapy and a total of 60 Gy EBRT for an organ confined intermediate risk carcinoma of the prostate in 2009. The patient's tumor had been in regression with the lowest PSA level of 0.09 ng/ml, till the end of 2013. After slow but continuous elevation, his PSA level had reached 1.46 ng/ml by February 2014. Pelvis MRI and whole body acetate PET/CT showed recurrent tumor in the dorsal-right region of the prostate. Bone scan was negative. After discussing the possible salvage treatment options with the patient, he chose LDR brachytherapy. In 2014, in spinal anesthesia 21 125I "seeds" were implanted with transrectal ultrasound guidance into the prostate. The prescribed dose to the whole prostate was 100 Gy, to the volume of the recurrent tumor was 140 Gy. The patient tolerated the salvage brachytherapy well. The postimplant dosimetry was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography (MR-CT) fusion and appeared satisfactory. PSA level decreased from the pre-salvage value of 1.46 ng/ml to 0.42 ng/ml by one month and 0.18 ng/ml by two months after the brachytherapy. No gastrointestinal side effects appeared, the patient's urination became slightly more frequent. In selected patients, salvage LDR brachytherapy can be a good choice for curative treatment of locally recurrent prostate cancer, after primary radiation therapy. Multiparametric MRI is fundamental, acetate PET/CT can play an important role when defining the localization of the recurrent tumor. PMID:25260087

  5. Salvage image-guided intensity modulated or stereotactic body reirradiation of local recurrence of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jereczek-Fossa, B A; Fodor, C; Bazzani, F; Maucieri, A; Ronchi, S; Ferrario, S; Colangione, S P; Gerardi, M A; Caputo, M; Cecconi, A; Gherardi, F; Vavassori, A; Comi, S; Cambria, R; Garibaldi, C; Cattani, F; De Cobelli, O; Orecchia, R

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate external beam reirradiation (re-EBRT) delivered to the prostate/prostatic bed for local recurrence, after radical or adjuvant/salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods: 32 patients received re-EBRT between February 2008 and October 2013. All patients had clinical/radiological local relapse in the prostate or prostatic bed and no distant metastasis. re-EBRT was delivered with selective RT technologies [stereotactic RT including CyberKnifeTM (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA); image-guidance and intensity-modulated RT etc.]. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Biochemical control was assessed according to the Phoenix definition (NADIR + 2 ng ml−1). Results: Acute urinary toxicity: G0, 24 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 2 patients. Acute rectal toxicity: G0, 28 patients; G1, 2 patients; and G2, 1 patient. Late urinary toxicity (evaluated in 30 cases): G0, 23 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 1 patient. Late renal toxicity: G0, 25 patients; G1, 5 patients. A mean follow-up of 21.3 months after re-EBRT showed that 13 patients were free of cancer, 3 were alive with biochemical relapse and 12 patients were alive with clinically evident disease. Four patients had died: two of disease progression and two of other causes. Conclusion: re-EBRT using modern technology is a feasible approach for local prostate cancer recurrence offering 2-year tumour control in about half of the patients. Toxicity of re-EBRT is low. Future studies are needed to identify the patients who would benefit most from this treatment. Advances in knowledge: Our series, based on experience in one hospital alone, shows that re-EBRT for local relapse of prostate cancer is feasible and offers a 2-year cure in about half of the patients. PMID:26055506

  6. Computerised triage in a prostate assessment clinic.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, G N; Small, D R; Conn, I G

    2004-01-01

    An MS Office package has been developed to score IPSS, take a patient history, compare flows with nomograms and decide on interim management. This is based on these scores, residual volume and laboratory results. A clearly formatted GP letter is produced. The patient uses a touch screen to answer questions on the IPSS and other medical history. These questions and responses are stored in Excel spread sheets. Clinic staff then enter results of flow studies, urinalysis, U&E and PSA. Excel Visual Basic creates a detailed printout for the notes and the MS Office mail merge facility creates a summary printout, which also serves as a letter to the GP. Excel allows embedding of formulae and program code to implement the rules for management. Based on these rules, the program either generates a request for an urgent appointment in the clinic or recommends the use of either an alpha blocker (if not contraindicated by medical history) or 5 alpha reductase inhibitors in the interim period before they are reviewed in clinic. A total of 139 patients have been seen and the computer decisions compared with those of a consultant urologist. Agreement was found in 106, disagreement in 33. However, 21 of the 33 involved computer oversensitivity to flow results. We do not anticipate difficulty improving this and are investigating using an artificial neural network. Of the other 12 patients, the urologist departed from the fixed rules for IPSS, creatinine, PSA and residual urine when only one variable was slightly abnormal. To conclude, this novel user-friendly system shows great potential in the management of prostate outpatients. Some tuning is needed, with particular respect to uroflow results. PMID:15175663

  7. Ejaculatory Function After Permanent {sup 125}I Prostate Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huyghe, Eric Delannes, Martine; Wagner, Fabien M.; Delaunay, Boris; Nohra, Joe; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Shut-Yee, J. Yeung; Plante, Pierre; Soulie, Michel; Thonneau, Patrick; Bachaud, Jean Marc

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: Ejaculatory function is an underreported aspect of male sexuality in men treated for prostate cancer. We conducted the first detailed analysis of ejaculatory function in patients treated with permanent {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Of 270 sexually active men with localized prostate cancer treated with permanent {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy, 241 (89%), with a mean age of 65 years (range, 43-80), responded to a mailed questionnaire derived from the Male Sexual Health Questionnaire regarding ejaculatory function. Five aspects of ejaculatory function were examined: frequency, volume, dry ejaculation, pleasure, and pain. Results: Of the 241 sexually active men, 81.3% had conserved ejaculatory function after prostate brachytherapy; however, the number of patients with rare/absent ejaculatory function was double the pretreatment number (p < .0001). The latter finding was correlated with age (p < .001) and the preimplant International Index of Erectile Function score (p < .001). However, 84.9% of patients with maintained ejaculatory function after implantation reported a reduced volume of ejaculate compared with 26.9% before (p < .001), with dry ejaculation accounting for 18.7% of these cases. After treatment, 30.3% of the patients experienced painful ejaculation compared with 12.9% before (p = .0001), and this was associated with a greater number of implanted needles (p = .021) and the existence of painful ejaculation before implantation (p < .0001). After implantation, 10% of patients who continued to be sexually active experienced no orgasm compared with only 1% before treatment. in addition, more patients experienced late/difficult or weak orgasms (p = .001). Conclusion: Most men treated with brachytherapy have conserved ejaculatory function after prostate brachytherapy. However, most of these men experience a reduction in volume and a deterioration in orgasm.

  8. Spatial genomic heterogeneity within localized, multifocal prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Boutros, Paul C; Fraser, Michael; Harding, Nicholas J; de Borja, Richard; Trudel, Dominique; Lalonde, Emilie; Meng, Alice; Hennings-Yeomans, Pablo H; McPherson, Andrew; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y; Zia, Amin; Fox, Natalie S; Livingstone, Julie; Shiah, Yu-Jia; Wang, Jianxin; Beck, Timothy A; Have, Cherry L; Chong, Taryne; Sam, Michelle; Johns, Jeremy; Timms, Lee; Buchner, Nicholas; Wong, Ada; Watson, John D; Simmons, Trent T; P'ng, Christine; Zafarana, Gaetano; Nguyen, Francis; Luo, Xuemei; Chu, Kenneth C; Prokopec, Stephenie D; Sykes, Jenna; Dal Pra, Alan; Berlin, Alejandro; Brown, Andrew; Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle A; Yousif, Fouad; Denroche, Robert E; Chong, Lauren C; Chen, Gregory M; Jung, Esther; Fung, Clement; Starmans, Maud H W; Chen, Hanbo; Govind, Shaylan K; Hawley, James; D'Costa, Alister; Pintilie, Melania; Waggott, Daryl; Hach, Faraz; Lambin, Philippe; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Neal, David; Tetu, Bernard; Sahinalp, Cenk; Stein, Lincoln D; Fleshner, Neil; Shah, Sohrab P; Collins, Colin C; Hudson, Thomas J; McPherson, John D; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Bristow, Robert G

    2015-07-01

    Herein we provide a detailed molecular analysis of the spatial heterogeneity of clinically localized, multifocal prostate cancer to delineate new oncogenes or tumor suppressors. We initially determined the copy number aberration (CNA) profiles of 74 patients with index tumors of Gleason score 7. Of these, 5 patients were subjected to whole-genome sequencing using DNA quantities achievable in diagnostic biopsies, with detailed spatial sampling of 23 distinct tumor regions to assess intraprostatic heterogeneity in focal genomics. Multifocal tumors are highly heterogeneous for single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), CNAs and genomic rearrangements. We identified and validated a new recurrent amplification of MYCL, which is associated with TP53 deletion and unique profiles of DNA damage and transcriptional dysregulation. Moreover, we demonstrate divergent tumor evolution in multifocal cancer and, in some cases, tumors of independent clonal origin. These data represent the first systematic relation of intraprostatic genomic heterogeneity to predicted clinical outcome and inform the development of novel biomarkers that reflect individual prognosis. PMID:26005866

  9. 125-iodine reimplantation for locally progressive prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, K.E.; Nori, D.; Morse, M.J.; Sogani, P.C.; Whitmore, W.F.; Fuks, Z. )

    1990-09-01

    We treated 13 patients with a second 125-iodine implant for local recurrence of prostatic carcinoma. All patients had biopsy proved palpable recurrence without evidence of distant metastases. Full doses of irradiation were used (median matched peripheral dose 170 Gy.). Six patients had complete regression of palpable recurrence, 2 had partial regression, 2 had no apparent response and 3 were unevaluable for local response. Actuarial freedom from local disease progression at 5 years was 51%. Despite a relatively high rate of local disease control the actuarial rate of distant metastases reached 100% at 6 years after reimplantation. There were 2 severe rectal complications and 4 instances of mild to moderate urinary incontinence among the 13 patients. Local regression of recurrent prostatic carcinoma may be achieved with 125-iodine reimplantation but most patients still had distant metastases.

  10. What is the correct staging and treatment strategy for locally advanced prostate cancer extending to the bladder?

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Özgür Haki; Verit, Ayhan; Ürkmez, Ahmet

    2015-06-01

    In locally advanced prostate cancer with bladder invasion, frequently encountered problems such as bleeding, urinary retention, hydronephrosis, and pain create distress for the patients. Therefore patients' quality of life is disrupted and duration of hospitalization is prolonged. Relevant literature about accurate staging and treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer with bladder invasion was investigated. Locally advanced prostate cancer can present as a large-volume aggressive tumor extending beyond boundaries of prostate gland, and involving neighboring structures which can be involved as recurrence(s) following initial local therapy. Survival times of these patients can range between 5 and 8 years. Their common characteristics are adverse and severe local symptoms unfavorably affecting quality of life Control of local symptoms and their effective palliation are independent clinical targets influencing survival outcomes of these patients. The treatment outcomes of locally advanced prostate cancer into the bladder are currently debatable. Although in the current TNM classification, it is defined in T4a, we think that this may be categorized as a subgroup of T3 and thus encourage surgeons for the indication of radical surgeries (radical prostatectomy, radical cystoprostatectomy) in selected patient populations after discussing issues concerning consequences of the treatment alternatives, and expectations with the patients. Cystoprostatectomy followed by immediate androgen deprivation therapy may be a feasible option for selected patients with previously untreated prostate cancer involving the bladder neck because of excellent local control and long term survival. PMID:26150029

  11. Iodine 125 interstitial irradiation for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P. P.; Good, R. R.; Bartone, F. F.

    1990-01-01

    We present the technique, complications, and 5-year results of transperineal percutaneous template permanent interstitial iodine 125 endocurietherapy of localized prostate cancer in 85 treated patients. The 5-year outcome appears similar to that of external beam radiation therapy or radical surgery, but the iatrogenic mortality, morbidity, treatment time, and hospitalization are significantly reduced. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2319613

  12. Iodine 125 interstitial irradiation for localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.P.; Good, R.R.; Bartone, F.F. )

    1990-03-01

    We present the technique, complications, and 5-year results of transperineal percutaneous template permanent interstitial iodine 125 endocurietherapy of localized prostate cancer in 85 treated patients. The 5-year outcome appears similar to that of external beam radiation therapy or radical surgery, but the iatrogenic mortality, morbidity, treatment time, and hospitalization are significantly reduced.

  13. Racial Differences in Diffusion of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cobran, Ewan K; Chen, Ronald C; Overman, Robert; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Kuo, Tzy-Mey; O'Brien, Jonathon; Sturmer, Til; Sheets, Nathan C; Goldin, Gregg H; Penn, Dolly C; Godley, Paul A; Carpenter, William R

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), an innovative treatment option for prostate cancer, has rapidly diffused over the past decade. To inform our understanding of racial disparities in prostate cancer treatment and outcomes, this study compared diffusion of IMRT in African American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) prostate cancer patients during the early years of IMRT diffusion using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. A retrospective cohort of 947 AA and 10,028 CA patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer from 2002 through 2006, who were treated with either IMRT or non-IMRT as primary treatment within 1 year of diagnoses was constructed. Logistic regression was used to examine potential differences in diffusion of IMRT in AA and CA patients, while adjusting for socioeconomic and clinical covariates. A significantly smaller proportion of AA compared with CA patients received IMRT for localized prostate cancer (45% vs. 53%, p < .0001). Racial differences were apparent in multivariable analysis though did not achieve statistical significance, as time and factors associated with race (socioeconomic, geographic, and tumor related factors) explained the preponderance of variance in use of IMRT. Further research examining improved access to innovative cancer treatment and technologies is essential to reducing racial disparities in cancer care. PMID:25657192

  14. The Influence of Prostate Volume on Outcome After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Alone for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Hien Rojas, Ana; Alonzi, Roberto; Hughes, Robert; Ostler, Peter; Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda; Hoskin, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Objective: To determine whether late genitourinary toxicity, biochemical control of prostate cancer, and dosimetric parameters in patients with large prostate glands is different from those variables in men with smaller glands after treatment with high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone (HDR-BT). Methods: From November 2003 to July 2009, 164 patients with locally advanced prostate carcinoma were sequentially enrolled and treated with 34 or 36 Gy in 4 fractions and 31.5 Gy in 3 fractions of {sup 192}Ir HDR-BT alone. The median follow-up time was 71 months. Gland size was not considered in the selection criteria for this study. Estimates of freedom from biochemical relapse (FFbR) and late morbidity, stratified by median clinical target volume (CTV), were obtained, and differences were compared. Results: The median CTV volume was 60 cc (range, 15-208 cc). Dose–volume parameters D90 and V100 (ie, minimum dose to 90% of the prostate volume and volume receiving 100% of the prescribed isodose) achieved in patients with glands ≥60 cc were not significantly different from those with glands <60 cc (P≥.2). Nonetheless, biochemical control in patients with larger CTV was significantly higher (91% vs 78% at 6 years; P=.004). In univariate and multivariate analysis, CTV was a significant predictor for risk of biochemical relapse. This was not at the expense of an increase in either moderate (P=.6) or severe (P=.3) late genitourinary toxicity. The use of hormonal therapy was 17% lower in the large gland group (P=.01). Conclusions: Prostate gland size does not affect dosimetric parameters in HDR-BT assessed by D90 and V100. In patients with larger glands, a significantly higher biochemical control of disease was observed, with no difference in late toxicity. This improvement cannot be attributed to differences in dosimetry. Gland size should not be considered in the selection of patients for HDR-BT.

  15. A simple algorithm to assess patient suitability for Calypso-seed implantation for four-dimensional prostate localization.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Randall J; Wallen, Eric M; Pruthi, Raj; Marks, Lawrence B

    2010-01-01

    To retrospectively determine the proportion of prostate cancer patients who are appropriate candidates for prostate localization with Calypso (Calypso Medical, Seattle, WA); to assess the accuracy of surface anatomy in predicting prostate depth; and to describe a simple clinical algorithm predicting patient's appropriateness for Calypso localization. Medical records and archived CT scans of all patients treated for localized prostate cancer at our institution between 2006 and 2007 were reviewed. Association between the feasibility of Calypso use, the depth of the prostate from the anterior torso, and a variety of anatomic factors were assessed (ANOVA, linear regression, and ROC). Patients were appropriate for the Calypso system in 91% of cases (localize and track, 52%; localize only, 39%). Strong correlation between greater trochanter location and the posterior prostate was seen (r 2 = 0.91, mean difference 0.6 cm). The negative predictive value of the greater trochanter measurements was 31%. Thirty-one out of forty-five patients (69%) who were deemed inappropriate for Calypso based on greater trochanter to anterior torso measurements were eligible on the basis of CT-based measurements of prostate depth. Weight, BMI, waist circumference, and hip circumference correlated with distance from the prostate to the anterior torso and were predictive of Calypso appropriateness. All patients with weight prostate cancer patients are candidates for Calypso localization +/- tracking. The greater trochanter to anterior torso distance underestimates the number of eligible patients. Weight, BMI and waist/hip circumference are good predictors for Calypso appropriateness. PMID:20160683

  16. Target localization and real-time tracking using the Calypso 4D localization system in patients with localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Willoughby, Twyla R.; Kupelian, Patrick A. . E-mail: patrick.kupelian@orhs.org; Pouliot, Jean; Shinohara, Katsuto; Aubin, Michelle; Roach, Mack; Skrumeda, Lisa L.; Balter, James M.; Litzenberg, Dale W.; Hadley, Scott W.; Wei, John T.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: The Calypso 4D Localization System is being developed to provide accurate, precise, objective, and continuous target localization during radiotherapy. This study involves the first human use of the system, to evaluate the localization accuracy of this technique compared with radiographic localization and to assess its ability to obtain real-time prostate-motion information. Methods and Materials: Three transponders were implanted in each of 20 patients. Eleven eligible patients of the 20 patients participated in a study arm that compared radiographic triangulated transponder locations to electromagnetically recorded transponder locations. Transponders were tracked for 8-min periods. Results: The implantations were all successful, with no major complications. Intertransponder distances were largely stable. Comparison of the patient localization on the basis of transponder locations as per the Calypso system with the radiographic transponder localization showed an average ({+-}SD) 3D difference of 1.5 {+-} 0.9 mm. Upon tracking during 8 min, 2 of the 11 patients showed significant organ motion (>1 cm), with some motion lasting longer that 1 min. Conclusion: Calypso transponders can be used as magnetic intraprostatic fiducials. Clinical evaluation of this novel 4D nonionizing electromagnetic localization system with transponders indicates a comparable localization accuracy to isocenter (within 2 mm) compared with X-ray localiza0010ti.

  17. Race and Survival Following Brachytherapy-Based Treatment for Men With Localized or Locally Advanced Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Winkfield, Karen M.; Chen Minghui; Dosoretz, Daniel E.; Salenius, Sharon A.; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We investigated whether race was associated with risk of death following brachytherapy-based treatment for localized prostate cancer, adjusting for age, cardiovascular comorbidity, treatment, and established prostate cancer prognostic factors. Methods: The study cohort was composed of 5,360 men with clinical stage T1-3N0M0 prostate cancer who underwent brachytherapy-based treatment at 20 centers within the 21st Century Oncology consortium. Cox regression multivariable analysis was used to evaluate the risk of death in African-American and Hispanic men compared to that in Caucasian men, adjusting for age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, clinical T stage, year and type of treatment, median income, and cardiovascular comorbidities. Results: After a median follow-up of 3 years, there were 673 deaths. African-American and Hispanic races were significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.77 and 1.79; 95% confidence intervals, 1.3-2.5 and 1.2-2.7; p < 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). Other factors significantly associated with an increased risk of death included age (p < 0.001), Gleason score of 8 to 10 (p = 0.04), year of brachytherapy (p < 0.001), and history of myocardial infarction treated with stent or coronary artery bypass graft (p < 0.001). Conclusions: After adjustment for prostate cancer prognostic factors, age, income level, and revascularized cardiovascular comorbidities, African-American and Hispanic races were associated with higher ACM in men with prostate cancer. Additional causative factors need to be identified.

  18. Multiparametric MRI and targeted prostate biopsy: Improvements in cancer detection, localization, and risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bjurlin, Marc A.; Mendhiratta, Neil; Wysock, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multiparametric-MRI (mp-MRI) is an evolving noninvasive imaging modality that increases the accurate localization of prostate cancer at the time of MRI targeted biopsy, thereby enhancing clinical risk assessment, and improving the ability to appropriately counsel patients regarding therapy. Material and methods We used MEDLINE/PubMed to conduct a comprehensive search of the English medical literature. Articles were reviewed, data was extracted, analyzed, and summarized. In this review, we discuss the mp-MRI prostate exam, its role in targeted prostate biopsy, along with clinical applications and outcomes of MRI targeted biopsies. Results Mp-MRI, consisting of T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, and possibly MR spectroscopy, has demonstrated improved specificity in prostate cancer detection as compared to conventional T2-weighted images alone. An MRI suspicion score has been developed and is depicted using an institutional Likert or, more recently, a standardized reporting scale (PI-RADS). Techniques of MRI-targeted biopsy include in-gantry MRI guided biopsy, TRUS-guided visual estimation biopsy, and software co-registered MRI-US guided biopsy (MRI-US fusion). Among men with no previous biopsy, MRI-US fusion biopsy demonstrates up to a 20% increase in detection of clinically significant cancers compared to systematic biopsy while avoiding a significant portion of low risk disease. These data suggest a potential role in reducing over-detection and, ultimately, over-treatment. Among men with previous negative biopsy, 72–87% of cancers detected by MRI targeted biopsy are clinically significant. Among men with known low risk cancer, repeat biopsy by MR-targeting improves risk stratification in selecting men appropriate for active surveillance secondarily reducing the need for repetitive biopsy during surveillance. Conclusions Use of mp-MRI for targeting prostate biopsies has the potential to reduce the

  19. Local hyperthermia to canine prostate. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Servadio, C; Leib, Z; Lev, A

    1990-02-01

    Repeated treatments of localized deep microwave hyperthermia were given to a series of dogs by means of a 915 MHz, water-cooled skirt-type applicator. The applicator was inserted into the rectum and directed toward the prostate in order to heat it by means of the absorbed microwaves while keeping the rectal wall at a lower temperature by surface cooling of the applicator itself. Sessions were given for different lengths of time ranging between ninety minutes and five hours, during which the prostate temperature was kept at 42.5 degrees C (+/- 0.5 degrees C) or 44.5 degrees C (+/- 0.5 degrees C). Three-dimensional temperature distributions in the prostate were measured accurately and verified by a Luxtron Fluoroptic Unit. Temperatures were constantly monitored in the rectal wall and in the prostatic urethra. Thorough and systemic follow-up was done before, during, and after each treatment, and the observations are reported. Two interesting preliminary observations were made: (1) differential blood counts showed significantly monocytosis following the treatments and lasted for at least one week, and (2) values of creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) and serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) were found to rise irreversibly in those animals which were later found to have definite histopathologic evidence of localized necrotic damage. PMID:2305541

  20. Comparison of clinical symptoms scored according to the National Institutes of Health chronic prostatitis symptoms index and assessment of antimicrobial treatment in patients with chronic prostatitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Skerk, Visnja; Roglić, S; Cajić, V; Markotić, A; Radonić, A; Skerk, Vedrana; Granić, J; Zidovec-Lepej, S; Parazajder, J; Begovac, J

    2009-04-01

    We examined a total of 194 patients over 18 years of age with chronic prostatitis syndrome and no evidence of structural or functional lower genitourinary tract abnormalities. The following data were obtained for each patient: clinical history--the severity of chronic prostatitis symptoms scored by a Croatian translation of the NiH CPSI questionnaire, clinical status including digitorectal examination, urethral swab specimens, and selective samples of urine and expressed prostatic secretion, according to the 4-glass localization test (meares and Stamey localization technique). Patients were treated orally with antimicrobial agents in doses and duration according to clinical practice in Croatia. An infectious etiology was determined in 169 (87%) patients. Chlamydia trachomatis was the causative pathogen in 38 (20%), Trichomonas vaginalis in 35 (18%), Enterococcus in 36 (19%) and Escherichia coli in 35 (18%) patients. In the remaining 25 patients the following causative pathogens were found: Ureaplasma urealyticum, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Comparison of symptoms scores and effect on quality of life has shown that the most severe clinical presentation of disease was recorded in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis caused by E. coli and Enterococcus (p<0.001). Clinical success was paralleled by bacteriological eradication in chronic bacterial prostatitis caused by C. trachomatis, Enterococcus and E. coli (kappa >0.2<0.5), but not in inflammatory chronic pelvic pain syndrome caused by T. vaginalis. PMID:19423471

  1. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Thermal Therapy for Localized and Recurrent Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Woodrum, David A; Kawashima, Akira; Gorny, Krzysztof R; Mynderse, Lance A

    2015-11-01

    The advent of focal therapies theoretically offers new treatment options for patients with localized prostate cancer. The goal of prostate cancer treatment is effective long-term cure with minimal impact on health-related quality of life. Multiparametric MR imaging of the prostate is being increasingly used for diagnosis, image-guided targeted biopsy, guidance for targeted focal and regional therapy, and monitoring the effectiveness of treatments for prostate cancer of all stages. In this article, the use of prostate MRI in the burgeoning domain of thermal ablative therapy for localized and recurrent prostate cancer is reviewed. PMID:26499278

  2. Genetic variants in the Hippo pathway predict biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Huang, Shu-Pin; Lin, Victor C; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Juang, Shin-Hun; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2015-01-01

    While localized prostate cancer is potentially curative, many patients still show biochemical recurrence (BCR) after curative treatments such as radical prostatectomy (RP). The Hippo pathway has recently been shown to be an evolutionarily conserved regulator of tissue growth, and its perturbation can trigger tumorigenesis. We hypothesize that genetic variants of the Hippo pathway may influence clinical outcomes in localized prostate cancer patients. We genotyped 53 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from seven core Hippo pathway genes in 246 localized prostate cancer patients treated with RP. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were utilized to identify significant SNPs that correlated with BCR. For replication, five associated SNPs were genotyped in an independent cohort of 212 patients. After adjusting for known clinicopathologic factors, the association between STK3 rs7827435 and BCR (P = 0.018) was replicated in the second stage (P = 0.026; Pcombined = 0.001). Additional integrated in silico analysis provided evidence that rs7827435 affects STK3 expression, which in turn is significantly correlated with tumor aggressiveness and patient prognosis. In conclusion, genetic variants of the Hippo pathway contribute to the variable outcomes of prostate cancer, and the discovery of these biomarkers provides a molecular approach for prognostic risk assessment. PMID:25707771

  3. Identification of a novel prostate cancer biomarker, caveolin-1: Implications and potential clinical benefit

    PubMed Central

    Corn, Paul G; Thompson, Timothy C

    2010-01-01

    While prostate cancer is a common disease in men, it is uncommonly life-threatening. To better understand this phenomenon, tumor biologists have sought to elucidate the mechanisms that contribute to the development of virulent prostate cancer. The recent discovery that caveolin-1 (Cav-1) functions as an important oncogene involved in prostate cancer progression reflects the success of this effort. Cav-1 is a major structural coat protein of caveolae, specialized plasma membrane invaginations involved in multiple cellular functions, including molecular transport, cell adhesion, and signal transduction. Cav-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in human prostate cancer, with higher levels evident in metastatic versus primary sites. Intracellular Cav-1 promotes cell survival through activation of Akt and enhancement of additional growth factor pro-survival pathways. Cav-1 is also secreted as a biologically active molecule that promotes cell survival and angiogenesis within the tumor microenvironment. Secreted Cav-1 can be reproducibly detected in peripheral blood using a sensitive and specific immunoassay. Cav-1 levels distinguish men with prostate cancer from normal controls, and preoperative Cav-1 levels predict which patients are at highest risk for relapse following radical prostatectomy for localized disease. Thus, secreted Cav-1 is a promising biomarker in identifying clinically significant prostate cancer. PMID:21188102

  4. Solitary recurrence of castration-resistant prostate cancer with low or undetectable levels of prostate specific antigen salvaged with local ablative radiation therapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHIACHIEN JAKE; YING, JAMES; KAPUR, PAYAL; WOHLFELD, BRYAN; ROEHRBORN, CLAUS; KIM, DONG W. NATHAN

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer recurrences are usually first detected by increased levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA), and systemic therapy is often initiated if distant metastasis is confirmed. However, low or nearly undetectable levels of PSA in the modern era of ultrasensitive PSA assay may be difficult to interpret in patients with a history of prostate cancer. Deciding whether to initiate additional systemic therapy in limited indolent metastatic disease while balancing the quality of life of the patient and ensuring the oncologic control of the disease may be challenging. In the present study, the case of a biopsy-confirmed solitary spine recurrence of prostate cancer with nearly undetectable but persistent levels of PSA (0.05 ng/ml) is reported. Treatment of the recurrence with local ablative radiotherapy improved the pain experienced by the patient, and reduced his levels of PSA to undetectable limits (<0.05 ng/ml). Repeated imaging analysis, PSA assay and clinical assessment demonstrated durable control of the disease without the requirement for additional systemic treatments. The present case highlighted the importance of initiating appropriate work-up according to the clinical scenario. Local treatment for solitary or oligometastatic recurrence of prostate cancer may enhance the effectiveness of current therapeutic strategies and benefit certain patients. PMID:26870272

  5. Hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye Jin; Son, Seok Hyun; Kim, Myungsoo; Jo, In Young; Lee, So Jung; Lee, Dong Hwan; Suh, Hong Jin; Choi, Yong Sun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this work was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Thirty-nine patients who received radical hypofractionated IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. Based on a pelvic lymph node involvement risk of 15% as the cutoff value, we decided whether to deliver treatment prostate and seminal vesicle only radiotherapy (PORT) or whole pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT). Sixteen patients (41%) received PORT with prostate receiving 45 Gy in 4.5 Gy per fraction in 2 weeks and the other 23 patients (59%) received WPRT with the prostate receiving 72 Gy in 2.4 Gy per fraction in 6 weeks. The median equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions to the prostate was 79.9 Gy based on the assumption that the α/β ratio is 1.5 Gy. Results The median follow-up time was 38 months (range, 4 to 101 months). The 3-year biochemical failure-free survival rate was 88.2%. The 3-year clinical failure-free and overall survival rates were 94.5% and 96.3%, respectively. The rates of grade 2 acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were 20.5% and 12.8%, respectively. None of the patients experienced grade ≥3 acute GU and GI toxicities. The grade 2-3 late GU and GI toxicities were found in 8.1% and 5.4% of patients, respectively. No fatal late toxicity was observed. Conclusion Favorable biochemical control with low rates of toxicity was observed after hypofractionated IMRT, suggesting that our radiotherapy schedule can be an effective treatment option in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. PMID:27104166

  6. Targeted Androgen Pathway Suppression in Localized Prostate Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Nelson, Peter S.; Lange, Paul; Lin, Daniel W.; Taplin, Mary Ellen; Balk, Steven; Ellis, William; Kantoff, Philip; Marck, Brett; Tamae, Daniel; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; True, Lawrence D.; Vessella, Robert; Penning, Trevor; Hunter Merrill, Rachel; Gulati, Roman; Montgomery, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ligand-mediated activation of the androgen receptor (AR) is critical for prostate cancer (PCa) survival and proliferation. The failure to completely ablate tissue androgens may limit suppression of PCa growth. We evaluated combinations of CYP17A and 5-α-reductase inhibitors for reducing prostate androgen levels, AR signaling, and PCa volumes. Patients and Methods Thirty-five men with intermediate/high-risk clinically localized PCa were randomly assigned to goserelin combined with dutasteride (ZD), bicalutamide and dutasteride (ZBD), or bicalutamide, dutasteride, and ketoconazole (ZBDK) for 3 months before prostatectomy. Controls included patients receiving combined androgen blockade with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist and bicalutamide. The primary outcome measure was tissue dihydrotestosterone (DHT) concentration. Results Prostate DHT levels were substantially lower in all experimental arms (0.02 to 0.04 ng/g v 0.92 ng/g in controls; P < .001). The ZBDK group demonstrated the greatest percentage decline in serum testosterone, androsterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (P < .05 for all). Staining for AR and the androgen-regulated genes prostate-specific antigen and TMPRSS2 was strongly suppressed in benign glands and moderately in malignant glands (P < .05 for all). Two patients had pathologic complete response, and nine had ≤ 0.2 cm3 of residual tumor (defined as a near-complete response), with the largest numbers of complete and near-complete responses in the ZBDK group. Conclusion Addition of androgen synthesis inhibitors lowers prostate androgens below that achieved with standard therapy, but significant AR signaling remains. Tissue-based analysis of steroids and AR signaling is critical to informing the search for optimal local and systemic control of high-risk prostate cancer. PMID:24323034

  7. Daily variations in delivered doses in patients treated with radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kupelian, Patrick A. . E-mail: patrick.kupelian@orhs.org; Langen, Katja M.; Zeidan, Omar A.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Jeswani, Sam; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Haimerl, Jason; Olivera, Gustavo H.

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to study the variations in delivered doses to the prostate, rectum, and bladder during a full course of image-guided external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy to 78 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in 39 fractions. Daily target localization was performed using intraprostatic fiducials and daily megavoltage pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans, resulting in a total of 390 CT scans. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were manually contoured on each CT by a single physician. Daily dosimetric analysis was performed with dose recalculation. The study endpoints were D95 (dose to 95% of the prostate), rV2 (absolute rectal volume receiving 2 Gy), and bV2 (absolute bladder volume receiving 2 Gy). Results: For the entire cohort, the average D95 ({+-}SD) was 2.02 {+-} 0.04 Gy (range, 1.79-2.20 Gy). The average rV2 ({+-}SD) was 7.0 {+-} 8.1 cc (range, 0.1-67.3 cc). The average bV2 ({+-}SD) was 8.7 {+-} 6.8 cc (range, 0.3-36.8 cc). Unlike doses for the prostate, there was significant daily variation in rectal and bladder doses, mostly because of variations in volume and shape of these organs. Conclusion: Large variations in delivered doses to the rectum and bladder can be documented with daily megavoltage CT scans. Image guidance for the targeting of the prostate, even with intraprostatic fiducials, does not take into account the variation in actual rectal and bladder doses. The clinical impact of techniques that take into account such dosimetric parameters in daily patient set-ups should be investigated.

  8. Maximizing dosimetric benefits of IMRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer through multicriteria optimization planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wala, Jeremiah; Craft, David; Paly, Jon; Zietman, Anthony; Efstathiou, Jason

    2013-10-01

    We examine the quality of plans created using multicriteria optimization (MCO) treatment planning in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in treatment of localized prostate cancer. Nine random cases of patients receiving IMRT to the prostate were selected. Each case was associated with a clinically approved plan created using Corvus. The cases were replanned using MCO-based planning in RayStation. Dose-volume histogram data from both planning systems were presented to 2 radiation oncologists in a blinded evaluation, and were compared at a number of dose-volume points. Both physicians rated all 9 MCO plans as superior to the clinically approved plans (p<10{sup −5}). Target coverage was equivalent (p = 0.81). Maximum doses to the prostate and bladder and the V50 and V70 to the anterior rectum were reduced in all MCO plans (p<0.05). Treatment planning time with MCO took approximately 60 minutes per case. MCO-based planning for prostate IMRT is efficient and produces high-quality plans with good target homogeneity and sparing of the anterior rectum, bladder, and femoral heads, without sacrificing target coverage.

  9. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: A clinical review.

    PubMed

    Skinder, Danielle; Zacharia, Ilana; Studin, Jillian; Covino, Jean

    2016-08-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an increasingly common diagnosis seen in men over age 50 years. Primary care providers must be aware of patient presentation, diagnostic tests, appropriate lifestyle modifications, treatment options, and potential complications in order to properly manage and educate patients with BPH. If left untreated, BPH can significantly decrease a man's quality of life; however, many pharmacologic and surgical treatments are available to control the symptoms. PMID:27367595

  10. Multiparametric MRI of the anterior prostate gland: clinical-radiological-histopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, B; Flood, T A; Al-Dandan, O; Breau, R H; Cagiannos, I; Morash, C; Malone, S C; Schieda, N

    2016-05-01

    Anterior prostate cancer (APC) is defined as a tumour in which more than half of malignant tissue is located anterior to the urethra. APCs are increasingly recognized as clinically important, particularly in patients undergoing active surveillance and for patients with negative non-targeted systematic transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsies but with persistent clinical suspicion of cancer. Multiparametric (mp) MRI has a crucial role for the diagnosis of anterior tumours, eventual histological sampling of suspicious lesions using image-guided targeted biopsy techniques, and potentially, to improve local staging of disease. mpMRI is accurate for the detection of APC and for differentiation of tumour from other anterior prostatic structures including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and the anterior fibromuscular stroma (AFMS). Characterization and reporting of APC should rely on the recently revised Prostate Imaging and Data Reporting System (PI-RADS) version 2.0 document. T2-weighted (T2W) imaging is emphasized as the determining sequence for assessment of the anterior prostate and specific features for APC on T2W imaging include: ill-defined/spiculated margin, lenticular shape, anterior/inferior location, and growth pattern (invasion of urethra or AFMS and crossing midline). Functional imaging, mainly with diffusion-weighted imaging, is also contributory and improves the sensitivity for detection of APC compared to T2W imaging alone. APCs commonly show positive surgical margins after radical prostatectomy and staging of disease extent using conventional clinical parameters is limited. mpMRI may have a future role to improve local staging of APC. This review illustrates the importance of mpMRI in APC using a clinical-radiological-histopathological approach. PMID:26888762

  11. Estimating Preferences for Treatments in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ávila, Mónica; Becerra, Virginia; Guedea, Ferran; Suárez, José Francisco; Fernandez, Pablo; Macías, Víctor; Mariño, Alfonso; and others

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Studies of patients' preferences for localized prostate cancer treatments have assessed radical prostatectomy and external radiation therapy, but none of them has evaluated brachytherapy. The aim of our study was to assess the preferences and willingness to pay of patients with localized prostate cancer who had been treated with radical prostatectomy, external radiation therapy, or brachytherapy, and their related urinary, sexual, and bowel side effects. Methods and Materials: This was an observational, prospective cohort study with follow-up until 5 years after treatment. A total of 704 patients with low or intermediate risk localized prostate cancer were consecutively recruited from 2003 to 2005. The estimation of preferences was conducted using time trade-off, standard gamble, and willingness-to-pay methods. Side effects were measured with the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC), a prostate cancer-specific questionnaire. Tobit models were constructed to assess the impact of treatment and side effects on patients' preferences. Propensity score was applied to adjust for treatment selection bias. Results: Of the 580 patients reporting preferences, 165 were treated with radical prostatectomy, 152 with external radiation therapy, and 263 with brachytherapy. Both time trade-off and standard gamble results indicated that the preferences of patients treated with brachytherapy were 0.06 utilities higher than those treated with radical prostatectomy (P=.01). Similarly, willingness-to-pay responses showed a difference of €57/month (P=.004) between these 2 treatments. Severe urinary incontinence presented an independent impact on the preferences elicited (P<.05), whereas no significant differences were found by bowel and sexual side effects. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that urinary incontinence is the side effect with the highest impact on preferences and that brachytherapy and external radiation therapy are more valued than radical prostatectomy

  12. [Localized prostate cancer Focal Therapy: "A la carte" Model].

    PubMed

    Linares Espinós, E; Barret, E; Sivaraman, A; Pérez-Reggeti, J I; Sánchez-Salas, R; Rozet, F; Galiano, M; Cathelineau, X

    2016-07-01

    Focal therapy has settled as an alternative to radical treatment in selected cases of localized prostate cancer. The selection of patients who are candidates for focal therapy is based on imaging diagnosis relying on multiparametric MRI and image fusion techniques. Thanks to the oncological results and safety profiles of initial series, various energy sources have been developed over the last years. The availability of multiple types of energy sources for focal therapy, commits us to evaluate what type of energy would be the optimal depending on patient's profile and type of lesion. A unique energy for focal therapy would be ideal, but facing the research of the various types of energy we must identify which one is recommended for each lesion. With the experience of our center in different approaches of focal therapy we propose the "A LA CARTE" MODEL based on localization of the lesion. We present the criteria the "a la carte" model is based on, supported by the published evidence on the use of different ablative therapies for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Lesion localization, technical characteristics of each type of energy, patient's profile and secondary effects must be considered in every choice of focal therapy. PMID:27416638

  13. Patient perception of local anesthesia for prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Smathers, S; Wallner, K; Simpson, C; Roof, J

    2000-05-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is an increasingly popular treatment for early-stage prostate cancer. Until now, spinal or general anesthesia for the procedure has been the standard of care. For patient safety, patient convenience, and to limit use of operating facilities, the authors started performing implants routinely with local anesthesia. We present here an evaluation of patients' acceptance of prostate brachytherapy under local anesthesia. On arrival at our department on the morning of the procedure, the patient is brought into the simulator suite, an intravenous line is started, and a urinary catheter is inserted. With the patient in the lithotomy position, a 5-by-5-cm patch of perineal skin and subcutaneous tissue is anesthetized by local infiltration of 10 mL of 1% lidocaine, using a 25-gauge 5/8-inch needle. Immediately following injection into the subcutaneous tissues, the deeper tissues, including the pelvic floor and prostate apex, are anesthetized by injecting 15 mL lidocaine solution with approximately 8 passes of a 20-gauge 1-inch needle. Following subcutaneous and periapical lidocaine injections, the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe is positioned to reproduce the planning images and a 3.5- or 6-inch, 22-gauge spinal needle is inserted into the peripheral planned needle tracks, monitored by TRUS. When the tips of the needles reach the prostatic base, about 1 mL of lidocaine solution is injected in the intraprostatic track, as the needle is slowly withdrawn. The lidocaine infiltration procedure takes approximately 10 to 15 minutes. Seed implantation is then performed as previously described. At the time of this report preparation, 58 of the 71 patients (81%) were interviewed, with a median follow-up of 6 months since the implant procedure. On a scale of 1 to 10, the median biopsy pain score was 4.5 compared with a median pain score with the implant procedure of 3.0. There was no clear correlation between the two scores (r = .26). There was no correlation

  14. Effectiveness of Androgen-Deprivation Therapy and Radiotherapy for Older Men With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Mitra, Nandita; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Hahn, Stephen A.; Polsky, Daniel; Armstrong, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined whether the survival advantage of androgen-deprivation therapy with radiotherapy (ADT plus RT) relative to ADT alone for men with locally advanced prostate cancer reported in two randomized trials holds in real-world clinical practice and extended the evidence to patients poorly represented in the trials. Methods We conducted nonrandomized effectiveness studies of ADT plus RT versus ADT in three groups of patients diagnosed between 1995 and 2007 and observed through 2009 in the SEER-Medicare data set: (1) the randomized clinical trial (RCT) cohort, which included men age 65 to 75 years and was most consistent with participants in the randomized trials; (2) the elderly cohort, which included men age > 75 years with locally advanced prostate cancer; and (3) the screen-detected cohort, which included men age ≥ 65 years with screen-detected high-risk prostate cancer. We evaluated cause-specific and all-cause mortality using propensity score, instrumental variable (IV), and sensitivity analyses. Results In the RCT cohort, ADT plus RT was associated with reduced cause-specific and all-cause mortality relative to ADT alone (cause-specific propensity score–adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.43; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.49; all-cause propensity score–adjusted HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.67). Effectiveness estimates for the RCT cohort were not significantly different from those from randomized trials (P > .1). In the elderly and screen-detected cohorts, ADT plus RT was also associated with reduced cause-specific and all-cause mortality. IV analyses produced estimates similar to those from propensity score–adjusted methods. Conclusion Older men with locally advanced or screen-detected high-risk prostate cancer who receive ADT alone risk decrements in cause-specific and overall survival. PMID:25559808

  15. Toxicity outcome in patients treated with modulated arc radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lengua, Rafael E.; Gonzalez, Maria F.; Barahona, Kaory; Ixquiac, Milton E.; Lucero, Juan F.; Montenegro, Erick; Lopez Guerra, Jose L.; Jaén, Javier; Linares, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim This study evaluates the acute toxicity outcome in patients treated with RapidArc for localized prostate cancer. Background Modern technologies allow the delivery of high doses to the prostate while lowering the dose to the neighbouring organs at risk. Whether this dosimetric advantage translates into clinical benefit is not well known. Materials and methods Between December 2009 and May 2012, 45 patients with primary prostate adenocarcinoma were treated using RapidArc. All patients received 1.8 Gy per fraction, the median dose to the prostate gland, seminal vesicles, pelvic lymph nodes and surgical bed was 80 Gy (range, 77.4–81 Gy), 50.4 Gy, 50.4 Gy and 77.4 Gy (range, 75.6–79.2 Gy), respectively. Results The time between the last session and the last treatment follow up was a median of 10 months (range, 3–24 months). The incidence of grade 3 acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was 2.2% and 15.5%, respectively. Grade 2 acute GI and GU toxicity occurred in 30% and 27% of patients, respectively. No grade 4 acute GI and GU toxicity were observed. Older patients (>median) or patients with V60 higher than 35% had significantly higher rates of grade ≥2 acute GI toxicity compared with the younger ones. Conclusions RapidArc in the treatment of localized prostate cancer is tolerated well with no Grade >3 GI and GU toxicities. Older patients or patients with higher V60 had significantly higher rates of grade ≥2 acute GI toxicity. Further research is necessary to assess definitive late toxicity and tumour control outcome. PMID:25061516

  16. Patients' perceptions of mortality risk for localized prostate cancer vary markedly depending on their treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Kendel, Friederike; Helbig, Lukas; Neumann, Konrad; Herden, Jan; Stephan, Carsten; Schrader, Mark; Gaissmaier, Wolfgang

    2016-08-15

    Treatment choice for localized prostate cancer (PCa) is a controversial issue, and mortality risk is probably the most decisive factor in this regard. The study aimed to compare prostate-cancer-specific mortality risk estimates for different treatment options assigned by patients managed with active surveillance (AS), radical prostatectomy (RP) and patients who had discontinued AS (DAS). Patients initially managed with AS or RP (N = 370) were matched according to length of therapy. All patients completed mailed questionnaires assessing their mortality risk estimates (in %) and prostate-cancer-specific anxiety. Differences in risk estimates among the three treatment groups were analyzed using ANOVA, relationships of clinical and psychosocial variables with risk estimates using standard multiple regression. In all treatment groups, the prostate- cancer-specific mortality risk was overestimated. This applied whether it was the patient's own treatment or the alternative treatment option. RP patients assigned a mortality risk to AS that was almost three times higher than that assigned to RP (50.9 ± 25.0 vs. 17.8 ± 19.7, d = 1.48; p < 0.001). Anxiety was significantly associated with risk estimates for AS (p = 0.008) and RP (p = 0.001). Compared with clinical data that suggest that the prostate-cancer-specific mortality risk for AS is low and does not significantly differ from that for RP, patients strongly overestimated the mortality risk. This was most markedly so in RP patients, who drastically overestimated the benefits of RP compared to the risk of AS. This overestimation could increase overtreatment and should therefore be corrected by better patient education. PMID:27038059

  17. Magnetic resonance assessment of prostate localization variability in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Villeirs, Geert M. . E-mail: Geert.Villeirs@ugent.be; Meerleer, Gert O. de; Verstraete, Koenraad L.; Neve, Wilfried J. de

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To measure prostate motion with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and materials: Seven patients with prostate carcinoma were scanned supine on a 1.5-Tesla MRI system with weekly pretreatment and on-treatment HASTE T2-weighted images in 3 orthogonal planes. The bladder and rectal volumes and position of the prostatic midpoint (PMP) and margins relative to the bony pelvis were measured. Results: All pretreatment positions were at the mean position as computed from the on-treatment scans in each patient. The PMP variability (given as 1 SD) in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and right-left (RL) directions was 2.6, 2.4, and 1.0 mm, respectively. The largest variabilities occurred at the posterior (3.2 mm), superior (2.6 mm), and inferior (2.6 mm) margins. A strong correlation was found between large rectal volume (>95th percentile) and anterior PMP displacement. A weak correlation was found between bladder volume and superior PMP displacement. Conclusions: All pretreatment positions were representative of the subsequent on-treatment positions. A clinical target volume (CTV) expansion of 5.3 mm in any direction was sufficient to ascertain a 95% coverage of the CTV within the planning target volume (PTV), provided that a rectal suppository is administered to avoid rectal overdistension and that the patient has a comfortably filled bladder (<300 mL)

  18. High-dose external beam radiation for localized prostate cancer: current status and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Paul L; Zietman, Anthony L

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1960s, external beam radiation has been one of the major curative treatment options for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Efforts to improve the efficacy of this modality have focused on delivering a higher dose, and several recent randomized trials have confirmed that this higher dose results in improved oncological outcomes, particularly for patients with intermediate-risk disease. Technological advancements over the past 2 decades have allowed highly conformal treatments that spare more normal tissue and reduce early and long-term treatment side effects. In a complementary fashion, methods have been developed for better real-time localization of the prostate such that radiation fields can be shifted before each treatment to match the daily shifts in the position of the target, leading to greater accuracy and allowing for smaller treatment margins that in turn will overlap with less normal tissue. With newer and more expensive technologies such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy and protons being used with increasing frequency for the treatment of prostate cancer, it becomes imperative to study the risks and benefits of each new modality so that informed cost-benefit decisions can be made. Similarly, there has been a growing interest in hypofractionation as a means of exploiting the supposed low alpha/beta ratio of prostate cancer to shorten overall treatment time and thereby improve convenience and lower costs. However, as with any new technology, it is necessary to proceed with caution in the arena of hypofractionation while we await the results of trials that will help us to determine the long-term risks and benefits of hypofractionation and whether biological assumptions about the underlying alpha/beta ratio can translate into a true clinical advantage. PMID:17921728

  19. Active surveillance for prostate cancer: a narrative review of clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Sophie M; Bangma, Chris H; Carroll, Peter R; Leapman, Michael S; Rannikko, Antti; Petrides, Neophytos; Weerakoon, Mahesha; Bokhorst, Leonard P; Roobol, Monique J

    2016-03-01

    In the past decade active surveillance (AS) of men with localized prostate cancer has become an increasingly popular management option, and a range of clinical guidelines have been published on this topic. Existing guidelines regarding AS for prostate cancer vary widely, but predominantly state that the most suitable patients for AS are those with pretreatment clinical stage T1c or T2 tumours, serum PSA levels <10 ng/ml, biopsy Gleason scores of 6 or less, a maximum of one or two tumour-positive biopsy core samples and/or a maximum of 50% of cancer per core sample. Following initiation of an AS programme, most guidelines recommend serial serum PSA measurements, digital rectal examinations and surveillance biopsies to check for and identify pathological indications of tumour progression. Definitions of disease reclassification and progression differ among guidelines and multiple criteria for initiation of definitive treatment are proposed. The variety of descriptions of criteria for clinically insignificant prostate cancer indicates a lack of consensus on optimal AS and intervention thresholds. A single set of guidelines are needed in order to reduce variations in clinical practice and to optimize clinical decision-making. To enable truly evidence-based guidelines, further research that combines existing evidence, while also gathering information from more long-term studies is needed. PMID:26813955

  20. A Prospective Pilot Study of 89Zr-J591/Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen Positron Emission Tomography in Men with Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Joseph R.; Green, David A.; Spratt, Daniel E.; Lyashchenko, Serge; Fareedy, Shoaib B.; Robinson, Brian D.; Beattie, Bradley J.; Jain, Manu; Lewis, Jason S.; Christos, Paul; Larson, Steven M.; Bander, Neil H.; Scherr, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In this pilot study we explored the feasibility of 89Zr labeled J591 monoclonal antibody positron emission tomography of localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Before scheduled radical prostatectomy 11 patients were injected intravenously with 89Zr-J591, followed 6 days later by whole body positron emission tomography. Patients underwent surgery the day after imaging. Specimens were imaged by ex vivo micro positron emission tomography and a custom 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner coil. Positron emission tomography images and histopathology were correlated. Results Median patient age was 61 years (range 47 to 68), median prostate specific antigen was 5.2 ng/ml (range 3.5 to 12.0) and median biopsy Gleason score of the 11 index lesions was 7 (range 7 to 9). On histopathology 22 lesions were identified. Median lesion size was 5.5 mm (range 2 to 21) and median Gleason score after radical prostatectomy was 7 (range 6 to 9). Eight of 11 index lesions (72.7%) were identified by in vivo positron emission tomography. Lesion identification improved with increasing lesion size for in vivo and ex vivo positron emission tomography (each p <0.0001), and increasing Gleason score (p = 0.14 and 0.01, respectively). Standardized uptake values appeared to correlate with increased Gleason score but not significantly (p = 0.19). Conclusions To our knowledge this is the first report of 89Zr-J591/prostate specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography in localized prostate cancer cases. In this setting 89Zr-J591 bound to tumor foci in situ and positron emission tomography identified primarily Gleason score 7 or greater and larger tumors, likely corresponding to clinically significant disease warranting definitive therapy. A future, larger clinical validation trial is planned to better define the usefulness of 89Zr-J591 positron emission tomography for localized prostate cancer. PMID:24135437

  1. Update of Dutch Multicenter Dose-Escalation Trial of Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim Putten, Wim L.J. van; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Leenders, Geert J.L.H. van; Slot, Annerie; Dielwart, Michel F.H.; Incrocci, Luca; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To update the analysis of the Dutch dose-escalation trial of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 669 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive 68 or 78 Gy. The patients were stratified by age, institution, use of neoadjuvant or adjuvant hormonal therapy, and treatment group. The primary endpoint was freedom from failure (FFF), with failure defined as clinical or biochemical failure. Two definitions of biochemical failure were used: the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition (three consecutive increases in prostate-specific antigen level) and the Phoenix definition (nadir plus 2 {mu}g/L). The secondary endpoints were freedom from clinical failure, overall survival, and genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Results: After a median follow-up of 70 months, the FFF using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition was significantly better in the 78-Gy arm than in the 68-Gy arm (7-year FFF rate, 54% vs. 47%, respectively; p = 0.04). The FFF using the Phoenix definition was also significantly better in the 78-Gy arm than in the 68-Gy arm (7-year FFF rate, 56% vs. 45%, respectively; p = 0.03). However, no differences in freedom from clinical failure or overall survival were observed. The incidence of late Grade 2 or greater genitourinary toxicity was similar in both arms (40% and 41% at 7 years; p = 0.6). However, the cumulative incidence of late Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal toxicity was increased in the 78-Gy arm compared with the 68-Gy arm (35% vs. 25% at 7 years; p = 0.04). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown a statistically significant improvement in FFF in prostate cancer patients treated with 78 Gy but with a greater rate of late gastrointestinal toxicity.

  2. Is there any association between National Institute of Health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Doluoglu, Omer Gokhan; Ceylan, Cavit; Kilinc, Fatih; Gazel, Eymen; Resorlu, Berkan; Odabas, Oner

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose We investigated the association between National Institute of Health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods The data of 440 patients who had undergone prostate biopsies due to high PSA levels and suspicious digital rectal examination findings were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of accompanying NIH IV prostatitis. The exclusion criteria were as follows: Gleason score>6, PSA level>20ng/mL, >2 positive cores, >50% cancerous tissue per biopsy, urinary tract infection, urological interventions at least 1 week previously (cystoscopy, urethral catheterization, or similar procedure), history of prostate biopsy, and history of androgen or 5-alpha reductase use. All patient's age, total PSA and free PSA levels, ratio of free to total PSA, PSA density and prostate volume were recorded. Results In total, 101 patients were included in the study. Histopathological examination revealed only PCa in 78 (77.2%) patients and PCa+NIH IV prostatitis in 23 (22.7%) patients. The median total PSA level was 7.4 (3.5–20.0) ng/mL in the PCa+NIH IV prostatitis group and 6.5 (0.6–20.0) ng/mL in the PCa group (p=0.67). The PSA level was≤10ng/mL in 60 (76.9%) patients in the PCa group and in 16 (69.6%) patients in the PCa+NIH IV prostatitis group (p=0.32). Conclusions Our study showed no statistically significant difference in PSA levels between patients with and without NIH IV prostatitis accompanying PCa. PMID:27256190

  3. Anatomic Boundaries of the Clinical Target Volume (Prostate Bed) After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Brock, Kristy K.; Haider, Masoom A.; Zwahlen, Daniel; Kong, Vickie; Chan, Elisa; Moseley, Joanne; Bayley, Andrew; Catton, Charles; Chung, Peter W.M.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Milosevic, Michael; Kneebone, Andrew; Warde, Padraig; Menard, Cynthia

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: We sought to derive and validate an interdisciplinary consensus definition for the anatomic boundaries of the postoperative clinical target volume (CTV, prostate bed). Methods and Materials: Thirty one patients who had planned for radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy were enrolled and underwent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) simulation prior to radiotherapy. Through an iterative process of consultation and discussion, an interdisciplinary consensus definition was derived based on a review of published data, patterns of local failure, surgical practice, and radiologic anatomy. In validation, we analyzed the distribution of surgical clips in reference to the consensus CTV and measured spatial uncertainties in delineating the CTV and vesicourethral anastomosis. Clinical radiotherapy plans were retrospectively evaluated against the consensus CTV (prostate bed). Results: Anatomic boundaries of the consensus CTV (prostate bed) are described. Surgical clips (n = 339) were well distributed throughout the CTV. The vesicourethral anastomosis was accurately localized using central sagittal computed tomography reconstruction, with a mean {+-} standard deviation uncertainty of 1.8 {+-} 2.5 mm. Delineation uncertainties were small for both MRI and computed tomography (mean reproducibility, 0-3.8 mm; standard deviation, 1.0-2.3); they were most pronounced in the anteroposterior and superoinferior dimensions and at the superior/posterior-most aspect of the CTV. Retrospectively, the mean {+-} standard deviation CTV (prostate bed) percentage of volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose was only 77% {+-} 26%. Conclusions: We propose anatomic boundaries for the CTV (prostate bed) and present evidence supporting its validity. In the absence of gross recurrence, the role of MRI in delineating the CTV remains to be confirmed. The CTV is larger than historically practiced at our institution and should be encompassed by a microscopic tumoricidal dose.

  4. Salvage of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, William M; Henderson, Randal H; Hoppe, Bradford S; Nichols, Romaine C; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2014-08-01

    Although a significant proportion of patients with localized prostate cancer are cured after definitive radiotherapy, solitary local recurrence is observed in a subset of patients and poses a management challenge. Curative-intent treatment options include prostatectomy, reirradiation, cryotherapy, and high-intensity-focused ultrasound. Outcomes data after any of these options are relatively limited. The 5-year biochemical progression-free survival rate is approximately 50% after salvage prostatectomy. However, the morbidity rate of the procedure is significantly higher compared with that observed in previously untreated patients. The likelihood of cure after low dose rate brachytherapy is similar to that observed after salvage prostatectomy, and the morbidity, although significant is less. Although cryotherapy and high-intensity-focused ultrasound may be less morbid than a prostatectomy, the probability of cure is probably lower. PMID:22772432

  5. Drug and device development for localized prostate cancer: report of a Food and Drug Administration/American Urological Association public workshop.

    PubMed

    Jarow, Jonathan P; Thompson, Ian M; Kluetz, Paul G; Baxley, John; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Scardino, Peter; Carroll, Peter; Albertsen, Peter; Carter, H Balentine; Brawley, Otis; Sartor, Oliver; Sandler, Howard; Kiefert, James J; Morton, Ronald A

    2014-05-01

    Summary of the discussion at a public workshop cosponsored by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the American Urological Association reviewing potential trial designs for product and device development for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Product development for treatment of localized prostate cancer has been stymied by the impracticality of using overall survival as an endpoint in patients with localized disease and the lack of acceptable surrogate endpoints. A workshop evaluating potential trial designs for the development of therapies for localized prostate cancer was held in San Diego, CA, in May 2013. Invited experts represented multiple stakeholders, including urology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, industry, and patient advocates. The expert panel discussed development of products for all risk strata of clinically localized prostate cancer. The panel responded to specific questions from FDA, discussing trial design for patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer, focal therapy for prostate cancer, patients who have undergone definitive radiation therapy, and adjuvant therapy for patients undergoing radiation therapy or surgery. Expert commentary provided by the panel will inform a planned FDA guidance on pathways for product and device development for treatment of localized prostate cancer and will be discussed at meetings of the FDA's Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee. FDA intends to develop a set of principles that can be used to promote the development of new products or devices for the treatment of this disease. PMID:24661332

  6. [The role of prostate specific antigen in diagnosis of localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Nara Uro-Oncology Research Group].

    PubMed

    Hirao, Y; Ozono, S; Kagebayashi, Y; Yoshi, M; Tani, Y; Uemura, H; Momose, H; Okajima, E

    1996-10-01

    The number of cases of prostate carcinoma (PCA) is steadily inceasing in Japan. The clinical application of a reliable tumor marker, prostate specific antigen (PSA) for the diagnosis, as well as the increasing elderly population in Japan may account for this increase. The subjects were patients at the Nara Medical University and its affiliated hospitals; 1) 687 cases without PCA were evaluated for age-specific PSA and the incidence of abnormal PSA following urological manipulations, 2) 135 cases with histological proven BPH by transurethral resection of prostate (TUR-P) were examined for PSA density (PSAD) and positive PSA rate in BPH, 3) 135 cases receiving a needle biopsy with suspicion of PCA were examined for the efficacy of PSA and PSAD and other parameters, and 4) 459 PCA cases treated between 1988 and 1994, were examined for specific PSA and PSAD values by stage and degree of cell differentiation. The PSA assay used in this study was MARKIT-M PA (normal range < or = 3.6 ng/ml). The PSA was decreased gradually with age in non-PCA patients, and abnormal PSA was found in 5.5% of these patients following manipulations. The average PSA was 2.95 +/- 2.03 ng/ml in 130 BPH patients (mean age: 71.1 +/- 7.0 years old. and average prostate volume: 32.9 +/- 16.1 ml). And abnormal PSA level (more than 3.61 ng/ml) was found in 22.3%. The mean PSAD was 0.1.0 +/- 0.06, and PSAD was below 0.15 in 86.1% of these BPH cases. Among the 135 cases receiving a needle biopsy, 33 cases had PSA values between 3.61 and 10.0 ng/ml. Of these cases, PCA was found in 18.5% of the 27 cases with a PSAD below 1.5, and in 33.3% of the 6 cases with a PSAD over 1.5. PSA and PSAD were proportionally increased with stage, and a significant difference in the PSA value was observed between stage B1 and B2, and stage C and D (P < 0.05). However, PSA and PSAD values were not significantly correlated with the cell differentiation in PCA stage A2-C. In total, PSA was 18.1 ng/ml in well, 23.9 ng/ml in

  7. Economic analysis of a phase III clinical trial evaluating the addition of total androgen suppression to radiation versus radiation alone for locally advanced prostate cancer (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 86-10)

    SciTech Connect

    Konski, Andre . E-mail: a_konski@fccc.edu; Sherman, Eric; Krahn, Murray; Bremner, Karen; Beck, J. Robert; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Pilepich, Michael

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of adding hormone therapy to radiation for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, using a Monte Carlo simulation of a Markov Model. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 86-10 randomized patients to receive radiation therapy (RT) alone or RT plus total androgen suppression (RTHormones) 2 months before and during RT for the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer. A Markov model was designed with Data Pro (TreeAge Software, Williamstown, MA). The analysis took a payer's perspective. Transition probabilities from one state of health (i.e., with no disease progression or with hormone-responsive metastatic disease) to another were calculated from published rates pertaining to RTOG 86-10. Patients remained in one state of health for 1 year. Utility values for each health state and treatment were obtained from the literature. Distributions were sampled at random from the treatment utilities according to a second-order Monte Carlo simulation technique. Results: The mean expected cost for the RT-only treatments was $29,240 (range, $29,138-$29,403). The mean effectiveness for the RT-only treatment was 5.48 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) (range, 5.47-5.50). The mean expected cost for RTHormones was $31,286 (range, $31,058-$31,555). The mean effectiveness was 6.43 QALYs (range, 6.42-6.44). Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis showed RTHormones to be within the range of cost-effectiveness at $2,153/QALY. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curve analysis resulted in a >80% probability that RTHormones is cost-effective. Conclusions: Our analysis shows that adding hormonal treatment to RT improves health outcomes at a cost that is within the acceptable cost-effectiveness range.

  8. Hypofractionation in prostate cancer: radiobiological basis and clinical appliance.

    PubMed

    Mangoni, M; Desideri, I; Detti, B; Bonomo, P; Greto, D; Paiar, F; Simontacchi, G; Meattini, I; Scoccianti, S; Masoni, T; Ciabatti, C; Turkaj, A; Serni, S; Minervini, A; Gacci, M; Carini, M; Livi, L

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76-80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of α / β . Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose) demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting. PMID:24999475

  9. Hypofractionation in Prostate Cancer: Radiobiological Basis and Clinical Appliance

    PubMed Central

    Mangoni, M.; Desideri, I.; Detti, B.; Bonomo, P.; Greto, D.; Paiar, F.; Simontacchi, G.; Meattini, I.; Scoccianti, S.; Masoni, T.; Ciabatti, C.; Turkaj, A.; Serni, S.; Minervini, A.; Gacci, M.; Carini, M.; Livi, L.

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76–80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of α/β. Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose) demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting. PMID:24999475

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging for localization of prostate cancer in the setting of biochemical recurrence.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Flavio; Grompone, Marcello Domenico; Colarieti, Anna; Salvo, Vincenzo; Cardone, Gianpiero; Catalano, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    The clinical suspicion of local recurrence of prostate cancer after radical treatment is based on the onset of biochemical failure. The use of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate cancer has increased over recent years, mainly for detection, staging, and active surveillance. However, suspicion of recurrence in the set of biochemical failure is becoming a significant reason for clinicians to request multiparametric MRI. Radiologists should be able to recognize the normal posttreatment MRI findings. Fibrosis and atrophic remnant seminal vesicles (SV) after radical prostatectomy are often found and must be differentiated from local relapse. Moreover, brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, and focal therapies tend to diffusely decrease the signal intensity of the peripheral zone on T2-weighted images due to the loss of water content, consequently mimicking tumor and hemorrhage. The combination of T2-weighted images and functional studies like diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging improves the identification of local relapse. Tumor recurrence tends to restrict on diffusion images and avidly enhances after contrast administration. The authors provide a review of the normal findings and the signs of local tumor relapse after radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy and focal therapies. PMID:27012939

  11. Future Prospects in the Diagnosis and Management of Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tefekli, Ahmet; Tunc, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the commonest visceral cancer in men worldwide. Introduction of serum PSA as a highly specific biomarker for prostatic diseases has led to a dramatic increase in the diagnosis of early stage PCa in last decades. Guidelines underline that benefits as well as risks and squeals of early diagnosis and treatment should be discussed with patients. There are several new biomarkers (Pro-PSA, PCA-3 test, and TMPRSS2-ERG) available on the market but new ones are awaited in order to improve specificity and sensitivity. Investigators have also focused on identifying and isolating the gene, or genes, responsible for PCa. Current definitive treatment options for clinically localized PCa with functional and oncological success rates up to 95% include surgery (radical prostatectomy), external-beam radiation therapy, and interstitial radiation therapy (brachytherapy). Potential complications of overdiagnosis and overtreatment have resulted in arguments about screening and introduced a new management approach called “active surveillance.” Improvements in diagnostic techniques, especially multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, significantly ameliorated the accuracy of tumor localization and local staging. These advances will further support focal therapies as emerging treatment alternatives for localized PCa. As a conclusion, revolutionary changes in the diagnosis and management of PCa are awaited in the near future. PMID:24163619

  12. The prostatic acid phosphatase (ACPP) gene is localized to human chromosome 3q21-q23

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.S.L.; Sharief, F.S. )

    1993-09-01

    Human prostatic acid phosphatase (ACPP) has been used as a diagnostic marker for prostate cancer. It is synthesized under androgen regulation and secreted by the epithelial cells of the prostate gland. The authors have confirmed the previous assignment of the ACPP gene to chromosome 3 by probing a panel of 25 human-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids, and they have further localized the ACPP gene to chromosome 3q21-q23 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Newer Imaging Modalities to Assist With Target Localization in the Radiation Treatment of Prostate Cancer and Possible Lymph Node Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    John, Subhash S. Zietman, Anthony L.; Shipley, William U.; Harisinghani, Mukesh G.

    2008-05-01

    Precise localization of prostate cancer and the drainage lymph nodes is mandatory to define an accurate clinical target volume for conformal radiotherapy. Better target definition and delineation on a daily basis is surely important in quality assurance for fractionated radiation therapy. This article reviews the evidence for major emerging techniques that show promise in better identifying the clinical target volume. Partial prostate boost by brachytherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, or protons has become possible not only with standard imaging techniques but also with the availability of metabolic images obtained by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Even though fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography has not been found to be useful, novel radiolabeled tracers may eventually prove of value in the diagnosis and treatment planning of prostate cancer. For the metastatic lymph nodes, lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles has greater accuracy as compared with conventional techniques and has been instrumental in delineating the lymphatic drainage of the prostate gland. These novel investigational techniques could further help in optimizing conformal radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer. The concepts of biologic target volume, real target volume, and multidimensional conformal radiotherapy are being explored.

  14. Changing the patterns of failure for high-risk prostate cancer patients by optimizing local control

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Richard G. . E-mail: richard.stock@msnyuhealth.org; Ho, Alice; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stone, Nelson N.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Standard therapies for high-risk prostate cancer have resulted in suboptimal outcomes with both local and distant failures. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and distant metastases rates as well as biopsy outcomes are reported after a regimen of trimodality therapy with hormonal, radioactive seed, and external beam radiation therapy to demonstrate how patterns of failure are changed when local control is optimized. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 2003, a total of 360 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with trimodality therapy. Patients were defined as being at high risk if they possessed at least one of the following high-risk features: Gleason score 8 to 10, PSA >20, clinical stage t2c to t3, or two or more intermediate risk features: Gleason score 7, PSA >10 to 20, or stage t2b. Patients were followed for a median of 4.25 years (range, 2 to 10 years). Results: The actuarial 7-year freedom from PSA failure and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM) rates were 83% and 89% respectively. Patients (n = 51) developing PSA failure exhibited aggressive disease behavior with short PSA doubling times (median, 5 months) and a 7-year freedom from distant metastases rate of 48%. Local control was high. The last posttreatment biopsy results were negative in 97% of cases (68 of 70 patients). In multivariate analysis, only PSA >20 predicted biochemical failure (p = 0.04), and only seminal vesicle status predicted developing distant failure (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Trimodality therapy results in excellent local control that alters patterns of failure, resulting in similar actuarial biochemical and distant failure rates. Most failures appear to be distant and exhibit biologically aggressive behavior.

  15. Long-Term Results of a Phase II Trial of Ultrasound-Guided Radioactive Implantation of the Prostate for Definitive Management of Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate (RTOG 98-05)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Hunt, Daniel; Lee, W. Robert; Gomella, Leonard; Grignon, David; Gillin, Michael; Morton, Gerard; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Sandler, Howard

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive I{sup 125} implantation of the prostate for organ confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate compared with historical data of prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy within a cooperative group setting. Methods and Materials: Patients accrued to this study had histologically confirmed, locally confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate clinical stage T1b, T1c, or T2a; no nodal or metastatic disease; prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}10 ng/ml; and a Gleason score of {<=}6. All patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided radioactive I{sup 125} seed implantation into the prostate. The prescribed dose was 145 Gy to the prostate planning target volume. Results: A total of 101 patients from 27 institutions were accrued to this protocol; by design, no single institution accrued more than 8 patients. There were 94 eligible patients. The median follow up was 8.1 years (range, 0.1-9.2 years). After 8 years, 8 patients had protocol-defined biochemical (prostate-specific antigen) failure (cumulative incidence, 8.0%); 5 patients had local failure (cumulative incidence, 5.5%); and 1 patient had distant failure (cumulative incidence, 1.1%; this patient also had biochemical failure and died of causes not related to prostate cancer). The 8-year overall survival rate was 88%. At last follow-up, no patient had died of prostate cancer or related toxicities. Three patients had maximum late toxicities of Grade 3, all of which were genitourinary. No Grade 4 or 5 toxicities were observed. Conclusions: The long-term results of this clinical trial have demonstrated that this kind of trial can be successfully completed through the RTOG and that results in terms of biochemical failure and toxicity compare very favorably with other brachytherapy published series as well as surgical and external beam radiotherapy series. In addition, the prospective, multicenter design highlights the

  16. Incremental Learning With Selective Memory (ILSM): Towards Fast Prostate Localization for Image Guided Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yaozong; Zhan, Yiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) requires fast and accurate localization of the prostate in 3-D treatment-guided radiotherapy, which is challenging due to low tissue contrast and large anatomical variation across patients. On the other hand, the IGRT workflow involves collecting a series of computed tomography (CT) images from the same patient under treatment. These images contain valuable patient-specific information yet are often neglected by previous works. In this paper, we propose a novel learning framework, namely incremental learning with selective memory (ILSM), to effectively learn the patient-specific appearance characteristics from these patient-specific images. Specifically, starting with a population-based discriminative appearance model, ILSM aims to “personalize” the model to fit patient-specific appearance characteristics. The model is personalized with two steps: backward pruning that discards obsolete population-based knowledge and forward learning that incorporates patient-specific characteristics. By effectively combining the patient-specific characteristics with the general population statistics, the incrementally learned appearance model can localize the prostate of a specific patient much more accurately. This work has three contributions: 1) the proposed incremental learning framework can capture patient-specific characteristics more effectively, compared to traditional learning schemes, such as pure patient-specific learning, population-based learning, and mixture learning with patient-specific and population data; 2) this learning framework does not have any parametric model assumption, hence, allowing the adoption of any discriminative classifier; and 3) using ILSM, we can localize the prostate in treatment CTs accurately (DSC ∼0.89) and fast (∼4 s), which satisfies the real-world clinical requirements of IGRT. PMID:24495983

  17. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Anna Lia; Gui, Benedetta; D'Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Mattiucci, Giancarlo; Clementi, Valeria; Di Molfetta, Ippolita Valentina; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Mantini, Giovanna

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To correlate results of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and time since external beam irradiation (EBRT) in patients treated with long-term hormone therapy (HT) and EBRT for locally advanced disease to verify successful treatment by documenting the achievement of metabolic atrophy (MA). Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 109 patients were consecutively enrolled. MA was assessed by choline and citrate peak area-to-noise-ratio <5:1. Cancerous metabolism (CM) was defined by choline-to-creatine ratio >1.5:1 or choline signal-to-noise-ratio >5:1. To test the strength of association between MRSI results and the time elapsed since EBRT (TEFRT), PSA levels, Gleason score (GS), and stage, logistic regression (LR) was performed. p value <0.05 was statistically significant. The patients' outcomes were verified in 2011. Results: MRSI documented MA in 84 of 109 and CM in 25 of 109 cases. LR showed that age, GS, stage, and initial and recent PSA had no significant impact on MRSI results which were significantly related to PSA values at the time of MRSI and to TEFRT. Patients were divided into three groups according to TEFRT: <1 year, 1-2 years, and >2 years. MA was detected in 54.1% of patients of group 1, 88.9% of group 2, and in 94.5% of group 3 (100% when PSA nadir was reached). CM was detected in 50% of patients with reached PSA nadir in group 1. Local relapse was found in 3 patients previously showing CM at long TEFRT. Conclusion: MA detection, indicative of successful treatment because growth of normal or abnormal cells cannot occur without metabolism, increases with decreasing PSA levels and increasing time on HT after EBRT. This supports long-term HT in advanced prostate cancer. Larger study series are needed to assess whether MRSI could predict local relapse by detecting CM at long TEFRT.

  18. SU-D-9A-06: 3D Localization of Neurovascular Bundles Through MR-TRUS Registration in Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Ogunleye, T; Jani, A; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common complication of prostate-cancer radiotherapy (RT) and the major mechanism is radiation-induced neurovascular bundle (NVB) damage. However, the localization of the NVB remains challenging. This study's purpose is to accurately localize 3D NVB by integrating MR and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images through MR-TRUS fusion. Methods: T1 and T2-weighted MR prostate images were acquired using a Philips 1.5T MR scanner and a pelvic phase-array coil. The 3D TRUS images were captured with a clinical scanner and a 7.5 MHz biplane probe. The TRUS probe was attached to a stepper; the B-mode images were captured from the prostate base to apex at a 1-mm step and the Doppler images were acquired in a 5-mm step. The registration method modeled the prostate tissue as an elastic material, and jointly estimated the boundary condition (surface deformation) and the volumetric deformations under elastic constraint. This technique was validated with a clinical study of 7 patients undergoing RT treatment for prostate cancer. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of landmarks, as well as previous ultrasound Doppler images of patients. Results: MR-TRUS registration was successfully performed for all patients. The mean displacement of the landmarks between the post-registration MR and TRUS images was 1.37±0.42 mm, which demonstrated the precision of the registration based on the biomechanical model; and the NVB volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 92.1±3.2%, which demonstrated the accuracy of the NVB localization. Conclusion: We have developed a novel approach to improve 3D NVB localization through MR-TRUS fusion for prostate RT, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with ultrasound Doppler data. This technique could be a useful tool as we try to spare the NVB in prostate RT, monitor NBV response to RT, and potentially improve post-RT potency outcomes.

  19. A Comprehensive Review of Contemporary Role of Local Treatment of the Primary Tumor and/or the Metastases in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; Peltier, Alexandre; van Velthoven, Roland

    2014-01-01

    To provide an overview of the currently available literature regarding local control of primary tumor and oligometastases in metastatic prostate cancer and salvage lymph node dissection of clinical lymph node relapse after curative treatment of prostate cancer. Evidence Acquisition. A systematic literature search was conducted in 2014 to identify abstracts, original articles, review articles, research articles, and editorials relevant to the local control in metastatic prostate cancer. Evidence Synthesis. Local control of primary tumor in metastatic prostate cancer remains experimental with low level of evidence. The concept is supported by a growing body of genetic and molecular research as well as analogy with other cancers. There is only one retrospective observational population based study showing prolonged survival. To eradicate oligometastases, several options exist with excellent local control rates. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is safe, well tolerated, and efficacious treatment for lymph node and bone lesions. Both biochemical and clinical progression are slowed down with a median time to initiate ADT of 2 years. Salvage lymph node dissection is feasible in patients with clinical lymph node relapse after local curable treatment. Conclusion. Despite encouraging oncologic midterm results, a complete cure remains elusive in metastatic prostate cancer patients. Further advances in imaging are crucial in order to rapidly evolve beyond the proof of concept. PMID:25485280

  20. Results of a phase II trial of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive implantation of the prostate for definitive management of localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 98-05)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A. . E-mail: clawton@radonc.mcw.edu; DeSilvio, Michelle; Lee, W. Robert; Gomella, Leonard; Grignon, David; Gillin, Michael; Morton, Gerard; Pisansky, Thomas; Sandler, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of transrectal ultrasound-guided permanent radioactive {sup 125}I implantation of the prostate for organ-confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate compared with historical data of prostatectomy and external beam radiotherapy within a cooperative group setting. Methods and Materials: Patients accrued to this study had histologically confirmed, locally confined, adenocarcinoma of the prostate with clinical Stage T1b, T1c, or T2a, no nodal or metastatic disease, prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}10 ng/mL, and Gleason score of {<=}6. All patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided radioactive {sup 125}I permanent seed implantation into the prostate. The prescribed dose was 145 Gy to the prostate planning target volume. Results: A total of 27 institutions accrued a total of 101 patients to this protocol, with no institution accruing >8 patients. Six patients were ineligible, leaving 95 properly entered as eligible in the study. The median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 0.4-6.5 years). At 5 years, 5 patients had local failure, 1 had evidence of distant failure, and 6 (6%) had biochemical failure. The overall survival rate at 5 years was 96.7%. At last follow-up, no patient had died of prostate cancer or related toxicities. Eight patients had a maximal acute toxicity level of 3, and no patient had Grade 4 or 5 acute toxicity. During follow-up, 2 patients had maximal Grade 3 toxicity, both related to bladder issues, and no patient experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. Conclusion: The results of this clinical protocol (a multi-institutional trial of brachytherapy for localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate) have demonstrated that this type of trial can be successfully completed through Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Biochemical disease-free survival was comparable with other brachytherapy published series and with the results after surgery and external beam radiotherapy.

  1. Quality assurance for the clinical implementation of kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring for prostate cancer VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, J. A.; Booth, J. T.; O’Brien, R. T.; Huang, C.-Y.; Keall, P. J.; Colvill, E.; Poulsen, P. R.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM) is a real-time 3D tumor monitoring system for cancer radiotherapy. KIM uses the commonly available gantry-mounted x-ray imager as input, making this method potentially more widely available than dedicated real-time 3D tumor monitoring systems. KIM is being piloted in a clinical trial for prostate cancer patients treated with VMAT (NCT01742403). The purpose of this work was to develop clinical process and quality assurance (QA) practices for the clinical implementation of KIM. Methods: Informed by and adapting existing guideline documents from other real-time monitoring systems, KIM-specific QA practices were developed. The following five KIM-specific QA tests were included: (1) static localization accuracy, (2) dynamic localization accuracy, (3) treatment interruption accuracy, (4) latency measurement, and (5) clinical conditions accuracy. Tests (1)–(4) were performed using KIM to measure static and representative patient-derived prostate motion trajectories using a 3D programmable motion stage supporting an anthropomorphic phantom with implanted gold markers to represent the clinical treatment scenario. The threshold for system tolerable latency is <1 s. The tolerances for all other tests are that both the mean and standard deviation of the difference between the programmed trajectory and the measured data are <1 mm. The (5) clinical conditions accuracy test compared the KIM measured positions with those measured by kV/megavoltage (MV) triangulation from five treatment fractions acquired in a previous pilot study. Results: For the (1) static localization, (2) dynamic localization, and (3) treatment interruption accuracy tests, the mean and standard deviation of the difference are <1.0 mm. (4) The measured latency is 350 ms. (5) For the tests with previously acquired patient data, the mean and standard deviation of the difference between KIM and kV/MV triangulation are <1.0 mm. Conclusions: Clinical process and

  2. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in Localized Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alkhorayef, Mohammed; Mahmoud, Mustafa Z.; Alzimami, Khalid S.; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim; Fagiri, Maram A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applies high-intensity focused ultrasound energy to locally heat and destroy diseased or damaged tissue through ablation. This study intended to review HIFU to explain the fundamentals of HIFU, evaluate the evidence concerning the role of HIFU in the treatment of prostate cancer (PC), review the technologies used to perform HIFU and the published clinical literature regarding the procedure as a primary treatment for PC. Material/Methods Studies addressing HIFU in localized PC were identified in a search of internet scientific databases. The analysis of outcomes was limited to journal articles written in English and published between 2000 and 2013. Results HIFU is a non-invasive approach that uses a precisely delivered ultrasound energy to achieve tumor cell necrosis without radiation or surgical excision. In current urological oncology, HIFU is used clinically in the treatment of PC. Clinical research on HIFU therapy for localized PC began in the 1990s, and the majority of PC patients were treated with the Ablatherm device. Conclusions HIFU treatment for localized PC can be considered as an alternative minimally invasive therapeutic modality for patients who are not candidates for radical prostatectomy. Patients with lower pre-HIFU PSA level and favourable pathologic Gleason score seem to present better oncologic outcomes. Future advances in technology and safety will undoubtedly expand the HIFU role in this indication as more of patient series are published, with a longer follow-up period. PMID:25806099

  3. A prospective study of the efficacy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging for predicting locally advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Ali; Parizi, Mehdi Kardoust; Kazemeini, Seid Mohammad; Abedi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) for predicting locally advanced prostate cancer (PC). Materials and methods: Between April 2009 and July 2012, 80 consecutive patients with clinically localized PC had undergone endorectal MRSI before radical retropubic prostatectomy. Clinicopathological parameters, including age, preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score (GS) at biopsy, perinural invasion at biopsy, prostate weight at surgery, GS of surgical specimen, and pathological staging were recorded. The MRSI findings were compared with the histopathological findings of the radical prostatectomy. The diagnostic accuracy measures consisting of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) of MRSI, and other variables in the diagnosis of locally advanced PC (Pathology Stages pT3a, pT3b, or pT4) were evaluated. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRSI in detecting locally advanced PC is 42.4%, 93.6%, 82.3%, and 69.8%, respectively [area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve=0.658, p value <0.0001]. MRSI, cancer-positive core percentage at biopsy, and GS at biopsy are more accurate factors among all the predictive variables in predicting locally advanced PC. Conclusion: MRSI may be considered as a complementary diagnostic modality with high specificity and moderate sensitivity in predicting locally advanced PC. Combination of this modality with other predictive factors helps the surgeon and patient to select an appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26328204

  4. Korean clinical practice guideline for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jeong Kyun; Choi, Hun; Bae, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Heon; Yang, Seong Ok; Oh, Chul Young; Cho, Young Sam; Kim, Kyoung Woo; Kim, Hyung Ji

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the Korean Urological Association organized the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Guideline Developing Committee composed of experts in the field of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with the participation of the Korean Academy of Family Medicine and the Korean Continence Society to develop a Korean clinical practice guideline for BPH. The purpose of this clinical practice guideline is to provide current and comprehensive recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of BPH. The committee developed the guideline mainly by adapting existing guidelines and partially by using the de novo method. A comprehensive literature review was carried out primarily from 2009 to 2013 by using medical search engines including data from Korea. Based on the published evidence, recommendations were synthesized, and the level of evidence of the recommendations was determined by using methods adapted from the 2011 Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Meta-analysis was done for one key question and four recommendations. A draft guideline was reviewed by expert peer reviewers and discussed at an expert consensus meeting until final agreement was achieved. This evidence-based guideline for BPH provides recommendations to primary practitioners and urologists for the diagnosis and treatment of BPH in men older than 40 years. PMID:26966724

  5. Korean clinical practice guideline for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Jeong Kyun; Choi, Hun; Bae, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Heon; Yang, Seong Ok; Oh, Chul Young; Cho, Young Sam; Kim, Kyoung Woo

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the Korean Urological Association organized the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Guideline Developing Committee composed of experts in the field of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with the participation of the Korean Academy of Family Medicine and the Korean Continence Society to develop a Korean clinical practice guideline for BPH. The purpose of this clinical practice guideline is to provide current and comprehensive recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of BPH. The committee developed the guideline mainly by adapting existing guidelines and partially by using the de novo method. A comprehensive literature review was carried out primarily from 2009 to 2013 by using medical search engines including data from Korea. Based on the published evidence, recommendations were synthesized, and the level of evidence of the recommendations was determined by using methods adapted from the 2011 Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Meta-analysis was done for one key question and four recommendations. A draft guideline was reviewed by expert peer reviewers and discussed at an expert consensus meeting until final agreement was achieved. This evidence-based guideline for BPH provides recommendations to primary practitioners and urologists for the diagnosis and treatment of BPH in men older than 40 years. PMID:26966724

  6. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Okihara, Koji; Iwata, Tsuyoshi; Masui, Koji; Kamoi, Kazumi; Yamada, Kei; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU]) have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatment for low-risk and selected intermediate-risk prostate tumors. However, few studies have examined the use of brachytherapy to treat post-EBRT recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current state of our knowledge about the effects of salvage brachytherapy in patients who develop locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary EBRT. This article also introduces our novel permanent brachytherapy salvage method. PMID:26112477

  7. ["Expanded prostate cancer index composite" (EPIC-26): Results of functional treatment in patients with localized prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Beyer, B; Huland, H; Feick, G; Graefen, M

    2015-11-01

    The standardized collation of the quality of treatment is a subject of discussion both nationally and internationally. This article presents the work of the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) and the validated German translation of the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC-26). This questionnaire allows a standardized interdisciplinary collation of the quality of treatment for all therapy modalities of localized prostate cancer. Use of the ICHOM standard set and the EPIC-26 achieves a possibility for comparison of each form of therapy with respect to the curative success and the effect on health and quality of life of patients. PMID:26347350

  8. Preoperative irradiation, lymphadenectomy, and 125iodine implantation for patients with localized carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaney, T.F.; Shipley, W.U.; O'Leary, M.P.; Biggs, P.J.; Prout, G.R. Jr.

    1986-10-01

    Fifty-four patients with clinically and surgically localized prostatic carcinoma were treated with low-dose preoperative irradiation (1050 cGy), pelvic lymphadenectomy, and interstitial /sup 125/Iodine implantation. The follow-up range is 2 to 9 years with a median follow-up of 5 years. Overall local tumor control is 92%. Actuarial 5-year survival is 86% and the actuarial disease-free survival at 5 years is 73%. Patients with poorly differentiated tumors have a significantly worse actuarial survival (62%) at 5 years than patients with well (95%) or moderately well differentiated tumors (93%), p = 0.04. Disease-free survival at 5 years was influenced by grade: well (100%), moderate (60%), and poor (48%), p = 0.03. Multivariate regression analysis indicates that only the degree of differentiation (p = 0.05) significantly impacts on survival. Both degree of differentiation (p = 0.04) and nodal status (p = 0.03) significantly influence disease-free survival. Potency has been maintained in 71% of patients potent at the time of implantation. Late reactions have been acceptable to date: bladder outlet obstruction (13%), mild proctitis (13%), cystourethritis (6%), incontinence (2%), and prostatic calculi (2%).

  9. Perineural Invasion is a Marker for Pathologically Advanced Disease in Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Irwin H. . E-mail: irwinlee@med.umich.edu; Roberts, Rebecca; Shah, Rajal B.; Wojno, Kirk J.; Wei, John T.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To determine if perineural invasion (PNI) should be included in addition to prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy Gleason score, and clinical T-stage for risk-stratification of patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed prostatectomy findings for 1550 patients, from a prospectively collected institutional database, to determine whether PNI was a significant predictor for upgrading of Gleason score or pathologic T3 disease after patients were stratified into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups (on the basis of PSA, biopsy Gleason score, and clinical T-stage). Results: For the overall population, PNI was associated with a significantly increased frequency of upgrading and of pathologic T3 disease. After stratification, PNI was still associated with significantly increased odds of pathologic T3 disease within each risk group. In particular, for low-risk patients, there was a markedly increased risk of extraprostatic extension (23% vs. 7%), comparable to that of intermediate-risk patients. Among high-risk patients, PNI was associated with an increased risk of seminal vesicle invasion and lymph node involvement. Furthermore, over 80% of high-risk patients with PNI were noted to have an indication for postoperative radiation. Conclusions: Perineural invasion may be useful for risk-stratification of prostate cancer. Our data suggest that low-risk patients with PNI on biopsy may benefit from treatment typically reserved for those with intermediate-risk disease. In addition, men with high-risk disease and PNI, who are contemplating surgery, should be informed of the high likelihood of having an indication for postoperative radiation therapy.

  10. Genetic Profiling to Determine Risk of Relapse Free Survival in High-risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Christine M.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Lim, Jeong; Nelson, Dylan; Beadling, Carol; Warrick, Andrea; Neff, Tanaya; Higano, Celestia S.; Garzotto, Mark; Qian, David; Corless, Christopher L.; Thomas, George V.; Beer, Tomasz M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The characterization of actionable mutations in human tumors is a prerequisite for the development of individualized, targeted therapy. We examined the prevalence of potentially therapeutically actionable mutations in patients with high risk clinically localized prostate cancer. Experimental Design 48 samples of formalin fixed paraffin embedded prostatectomy tissue from a neoadjuvant chemotherapy trial were analyzed. DNA extracted from microdissected tumor was analyzed for 643 common solid tumor mutations in 53 genes using mass spectroscopy based sequencing. In addition, PTEN loss and ERG translocations were examined using immunohistochemistry in associated tissue microarrays. Association with relapse during 5 years of follow-up was examined in exploratory analyses of the potential clinical relevance of the genetic alterations. Results Of the 40 tumors evaluable for mutations, 10% had point mutations in potentially actionable cancer genes. Of the 47 tumors evaluable for IHC, 36% had PTEN loss and 40% had ERG rearrangement. Individual mutations were not frequent enough to determine associations with relapse. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis with a log-rank test, the 16 patients who had PTEN loss had a significantly shorter median relapse free survival, 19 vs. 106 months (p = .01). Conclusions This study confirms that point mutations in the most common cancer regulatory genes in prostate cancer are rare. However, the PIK3CA/AKT pathway was mutated in 10% of our samples. While point mutations alone did not have a statistically significant association with relapse, PTEN loss was associated with an increased relapse in high risk prostate cancer treated with chemotherapy followed by surgery. PMID:24352642

  11. Toxicity Profile With a Large Prostate Volume After External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkawa, Michael Fischedick, Karin; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D.; Nussen, Sandra; Eble, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of prostate volume on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) before and at different intervals after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A group of 204 patients was surveyed prospectively before (Time A), at the last day (Time B), 2 months after (Time C), and 16 months (median) after (Time D) radiotherapy, with a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). The group was divided into subgroups with a small (11-43 cm{sup 3}) and a large (44-151 cm{sup 3}) prostate volume. Results: Patients with large prostates presented with lower urinary bother scores (median 79 vs. 89; p = 0.01) before treatment. Urinary function/bother scores for patients with large prostates decreased significantly compared to patients with small prostates due to irritative/obstructive symptoms only at Time B (pain with urination more than once daily in 48% vs. 18%; p < 0.01). Health-related quality of life did not differ significantly between both patient groups at Times C and D. In contrast to a large prostate, a small initial bladder volume (with associated higher dose-volume load) was predictive for lower urinary bother scores both in the acute and late phase; at Time B it predisposed for pollakiuria but not for pain. Patients with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy reached significantly lower HRQOL scores in several domains (affecting only incontinence in the urinary domain), despite a smaller prostate volume (34 cm{sup 3} vs. 47 cm{sup 3}; p < 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with a large prostate volume have a great risk of irritative/obstructive symptoms (particularly dysuria) in the acute radiotherapy phase. These symptoms recover rapidly and do not influence long-term HRQOL.

  12. Magnetic resonance microscopy of prostate tissue: How basic science can inform clinical imaging development

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, Roger

    2013-03-15

    This commentary outlines how magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microscopy studies of prostate tissue samples and whole organs have shed light on a number of clinical imaging mysteries and may enable more effective development of new clinical imaging methods.

  13. The prostate-specific membrane antigen: Lessons and current clinical implications from 20 years of research

    PubMed Central

    Ristau, Benjamin T.; O’Keefe, Denise S.; Bacich, Dean J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite a multitude of detection and treatment advances in the past two decades, prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Technological evolution and expanding knowledge of tumor biomarkers have invigorated exploration in prostate cancer therapeutics. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) was one of the first prostate cancer biomarkers successfully cloned. Since that time, it has been characterized as the prototypical cell-surface marker for prostate cancer and has been the subject of intense clinical inquiry. We review the relevant research in PSMA on the 20th anniversary of its cloning. Methods and materials A PubMed® search using the keywords “prostate-specific membrane antigen” or “glutamate carboxypeptidase II” provided 1019 results. An additional 3 abstracts were included from scientific meetings. Articles were vetted by title and abstract with emphasis placed on those with clinically relevant findings. Results Sixty articles were selected for inclusion. PSMA was discovered and cloned in 1993. Its structure and function were further delineated in the ensuing decade. Consensus sites of expression in normal physiology are prostate, kidney, nervous system, and small intestine. PSMA has been implicated in the neovasculature of several tumors including urothelial and renal cell carcinomas. In prostate cancer, expression of PSMA is directly related to Gleason grade. PSMA has been tested both in imaging and therapeutics in a number of prostate cancer clinical trials. Several recent approaches to target PSMA include use of small molecule inhibitors, PSMA-based immunotherapy, RNA aptamer conjugates, and PSMA-targeted prodrug therapy. Future study of PSMA in prostate cancer might focus on its intracellular functions and possible role in tumor neurogenesis. Conclusions Twenty years from its discovery, PSMA represents a viable biomarker and treatment target in prostate cancer. Research to

  14. Clinical commissioning of online seed matching protocol for prostate radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Duffton, A; McNee, S; Muirhead, R; Alhasso, A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to clinically commission an online seed matching image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) protocol using modern hardware/software for patients undergoing prostate radiotherapy. An essential constraint was to achieve this within a busy centre without reducing patient throughput, which had been reported with other techniques. Methods 45 patients had 3 fiducial markers inserted into the prostate and were imaged daily using kilovoltage orthogonal images with online correction applied before treatment. A total of 1612 image pairs were acquired and analysed to identify interfractional motion, seed migration and interobserver variability, and assess ease of use. Results This method of IGRT was implemented successfully in our centre with no impact on treatment times and patient throughput. Systematic (Σ) interfractional set-up errors were 2.2, 2.7 and 3.9 mm in right–left (RL), superoinferior (SI) and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively. Random (σ) interfractional set-up errors were 3.2 (RL), 3.7 (SI) and 5.7 mm (AP). There were significant differences between patients. Seed migration and interobserver variability were not significant issues. Conclusions The described technique is facilitated by the advanced imaging system, allowing a fast and effective method of correcting set-up errors before treatment. Extended implementation of this technique has improved treatment delivery to the majority of our prostate radiotherapy patients. The measurement of interfractional motion in this study is potentially valuable for margin reduction in intensity-modulated radiotherapy/volumetric arc therapy. Advances in knowledge This technique can be used within treatment time constraints, benefiting large numbers of patients by helping to avoid geographical miss and potentially reducing toxicity to organs at risk. PMID:23175493

  15. In vivo MRI based prostate cancer localization with random forests and auto-context model.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chunjun; Wang, Li; Gao, Yaozong; Yousuf, Ambereen; Yang, Xiaoping; Oto, Aytekin; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-09-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death for men. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is being increasingly used as an important modality to localize prostate cancer. Therefore, localizing prostate cancer in MRI with automated detection methods has become an active area of research. Many methods have been proposed for this task. However, most of previous methods focused on identifying cancer only in the peripheral zone (PZ), or classifying suspicious cancer ROIs into benign tissue and cancer tissue. Few works have been done on developing a fully automatic method for cancer localization in the entire prostate region, including central gland (CG) and transition zone (TZ). In this paper, we propose a novel learning-based multi-source integration framework to directly localize prostate cancer regions from in vivo MRI. We employ random forests to effectively integrate features from multi-source images together for cancer localization. Here, multi-source images include initially the multi-parametric MRIs (i.e., T2, DWI, and dADC) and later also the iteratively-estimated and refined tissue probability map of prostate cancer. Experimental results on 26 real patient data show that our method can accurately localize cancerous sections. The higher section-based evaluation (SBE), combined with the ROC analysis result of individual patients, shows that the proposed method is promising for in vivo MRI based prostate cancer localization, which can be used for guiding prostate biopsy, targeting the tumor in focal therapy planning, triage and follow-up of patients with active surveillance, as well as the decision making in treatment selection. The common ROC analysis with the AUC value of 0.832 and also the ROI-based ROC analysis with the AUC value of 0.883 both illustrate the effectiveness of our proposed method. PMID:27048995

  16. Long-Term Results of an RTOG Phase II Trial (00-19) of External-Beam Radiation Therapy Combined With Permanent Source Brachytherapy for Intermediate-Risk Clinically Localized Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A.; Yan, Yan; Lee, W. Robert; Gillin, Michael; Firat, Selim; Baikadi, Madhava; Crook, Juanita; Kuettel, Michael; Morton, Gerald; Sandler, Howard

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: External-beam radiation therapy combined with low-doserate permanent brachytherapy are commonly used to treat men with localized prostate cancer. This Phase II trial was performed to document late gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity as well as biochemical control for this treatment in a multi-institutional cooperative group setting. This report defines the long-term results of this trial. Methods and Materials: All eligible patients received external-beam radiation (45 Gy in 25 fractions) followed 2-6 weeks later by a permanent iodine 125 implant of 108 Gy. Late toxicity was defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late radiation morbidity scoring scheme. Biochemical control was defined by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus definition and the ASTRO Phoenix definition. Results: One hundred thirty-eight patients were enrolled from 20 institutions, and 131 were eligible. Median follow-up (living patients) was 8.2 years (range, 2.7-9.3 years). The 8-year estimate of late grade >3 genitourinary and/or gastrointestinal toxicity was 15%. The most common grade >3 toxicities were urinary frequency, dysuria, and proctitis. There were two grade 4 toxicities, both bladder necrosis, and no grade 5 toxicities. In addition, 42% of patients complained of grade 3 impotence (no erections) at 8 years. The 8-year estimate of biochemical failure was 18% and 21% by the Phoenix and ASTRO consensus definitions, respectively. Conclusion: Biochemical control for this treatment seems durable with 8 years of follow-up and is similar to high-dose external beam radiation alone or brachytherapy alone. Late toxicity in this multi-institutional trial is higher than reports from similar cohorts of patients treated with high-dose external-beam radiation alone or permanent low-doserate brachytherapy alone, perhaps suggesting further attention to strategies that limit doses to

  17. NBN gain is predictive for adverse outcome following image-guided radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Alejandro; Lalonde, Emilie; Sykes, Jenna; Zafarana, Gaetano; Chu, Kenneth C; Ramnarine, Varune R; Ishkanian, Adrian; Sendorek, Dorota H S; Pasic, Ivan; Lam, Wan L; Jurisica, Igor; van der Kwast, Theo; Milosevic, Michael; Boutros, Paul C; Bristow, Robert G

    2014-11-30

    Despite the use of clinical prognostic factors (PSA, T-category and Gleason score), 20-60% of localized prostate cancers (PCa) fail primary local treatment. Herein, we determined the prognostic importance of main sensors of the DNA damage response (DDR): MRE11A, RAD50, NBN, ATM, ATR and PRKDC. We studied copy number alterations in DDR genes in localized PCa treated with image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT; n=139) versus radical prostatectomy (RadP; n=154). In both cohorts, NBN gains were the most frequent genomic alteration (14.4 and 11% of cases, respectively), and were associated with overall tumour genomic instability (p<0.0001). NBN gains were the only significant predictor of 5yrs biochemical relapse-free rate (bRFR) following IGRT (46% versus 77%; p=0.00067). On multivariate analysis, NBN gain remained a significant independent predictor of bRFR after adjusting for known clinical prognostic variables (HR=3.28, 95% CI 1.56-6.89, Wald p-value=0.0017). No DDR-sensing gene was prognostic in the RadP cohort. In vitro studies correlated NBN gene overexpression with PCa cells radioresistance. In conclusion, NBN gain predicts for decreased bRFR in IGRT, but not in RadP patients. If validated independently, Nibrin gains may be the first PCa predictive biomarker to facilitate local treatment decisions using precision medicine approaches with surgery or radiotherapy. PMID:25415046

  18. Sex steroid receptor expression and localization in benign prostatic hyperplasia varies with tissue compartment.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tristan M; Sehgal, Priyanka D; Drew, Sally A; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A

    2013-01-01

    Androgens and estrogens, acting via their respective receptors, are important in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The goals of this study were to quantitatively characterize the tissue distribution and staining intensity of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), and assess cells expressing both AR and ERα, in human BPH compared to normal prostate. A tissue microarray composed of normal prostate and BPH tissue was used and multiplexed immunohistochemistry was performed to detect AR and ERα. We used a multispectral imaging platform for automated scanning, tissue and cell segmentation and marker quantification. BPH specimens had an increased number of epithelial and stromal cells and increased percentage of epithelium. In both stroma and epithelium, the mean nuclear area was decreased in BPH relative to normal prostate. AR expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells was significantly increased in BPH compared to normal prostate. ERα expression was increased in BPH epithelium. However, stromal ERα expression and staining intensity was decreased in BPH compared to normal prostate. Double positive (AR and ERα) epithelial cells were more prevalent in BPH, and fewer double negative (AR and ERα) stromal and epithelial negative cells were observed in BPH. These data underscore the importance of tissue layer localization and expression of steroid hormone receptors in the prostate. Understanding the tissue-specific hormone action of androgens and estrogens will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis in the prostate and may lead to better treatment for BPH. PMID:23792768

  19. Sex steroid receptor expression and localization in benign prostatic hyperplasia varies with tissue compartment

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Tristan M.; Sehgal, Priyanka D.; Drew, Sally A.; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Androgens and estrogens, acting via their respective receptors, are important in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The goal of this study was to quantitatively characterize the tissue distribution and staining intensity of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), and assess cells expressing both AR and ERα, in human BPH compared to normal prostate. A tissue microarray composed of normal prostate and BPH tissue was used and multiplexed immunohistochemistry was performed to detect AR and ERα. We used a multispectral imaging platform for automated scanning, tissue and cell segmentation and marker quantification. BPH specimens had an increased number of epithelial and stromal cells and increased percentage of epithelium. In both stroma and epithelium, the mean nuclear area was decreased in BPH relative to normal prostate. AR expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells was significantly increased in BPH compared to normal prostate. ERα expression was increased in BPH epithelium. However, stromal ERα expression and staining intensity was decreased in BPH compared to normal prostate. Double positive (AR & ERα) epithelial cells were more prevalent in BPH, and fewer double negative (AR & ERα) stromal and epithelial negative cells were observed in BPH. These data underscore the importance of tissue layer localization and expression of steroid hormone receptors in the prostate. Understanding the tissue-specific hormone action of androgens and estrogens will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis in the prostate and may lead to better treatment for BPH. PMID:23792768

  20. Clinical significance of incidental FDG uptake in the prostate gland detected by PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ertan; Elboga, Umut; Kalender, Ebuzer; Basıbuyuk, Mustafa; Demir, Hasan Deniz; Celen, Yusuf Zeki

    2015-01-01

    The value of FDG-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for detecting prostate cancer is unknown. We aimed to investigate the clinical value of incidental prostate FDG uptake on PET/CT scans. We reviewed 6128 male patients who underwent FDG-PET/CT scans and selected cases that reported hypermetabolic lesion in the prostate. The patients who have prior history of prostate carcinoma or prostate surgery were excluded from the study. We have analyzed the correlation between PET/CT findings and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, imaging (USG), urological examinations and biopsy. Incidental 18F-FDG uptake of the prostate gland was observed in 79 patients (1.3%). While sixteen of them were excluded due to inadequate clinical data, the remaining 63 patients were included for further analysis. The patients were divided into two groups; 8 patients (12.7%) in the malignant group and 55 patients (87.3%) in the benign group. The SUVmax values were not significantly different between the two groups. In 6 (75%) patients with prostate cancer, FDG uptake was observed focally in the peripheral zone of the prostate glands. There was no significant correlation between the SUVmax and the PSA levels. Incidental 18F-FDG uptake in the prostate gland is a rare condition, but a substantial portion of it is associated with the cancer. Benign and malignant lesions of the prostate gland in FDG-PET/CT imaging could not be reliably distinguished. The peripheral focally FDG uptake of prostate glands should be further examined with the clinical and labaratory evaluations. PMID:26379847

  1. Role of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Reducing Toxicity in Dose Escalation for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated to a total dose of 78 Gy with either a three-conformal radiotherapy technique with a sequential boost (SEQ) or a simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 78 prostate cancer patients participating in the randomized Dutch trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy were the subject of this analysis. They were all treated at the same institution to a total dose of 78 Gy. The median follow-up was 76 and 56 months for the SEQ and SIB-IMRT groups, respectively. The primary endpoints were acute and late GI and GU toxicity. Results: A significantly lower incidence of acute Grade 2 or greater GI toxicity occurred in patients treated with SIB-IMRT compared with SEQ (20% vs. 61%, p = 0.001). For acute GU toxicity and late GI and GU toxicity, the incidence was lower after SIB-IMRT, but these differences were not statistically significant. No statistically significant difference were found in the 5-year freedom from biochemical failure rate (Phoenix definition) between the two groups (70% for the SIB-IMRT group vs. 61% for the SEQ group, p = 0.3). The same was true for the 5-year freedom from clinical failure rate (90% vs. 72%, p = 0.07). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that SIB-IMRT reduced the toxicity without compromising the outcome in patients with localized prostate cancer treated to 78 Gy radiation.

  2. Online updating of context-aware landmark detectors for prostate localization in daily treatment CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiubin; Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: In image guided radiation therapy, it is crucial to fast and accurately localize the prostate in the daily treatment images. To this end, the authors propose an online update scheme for landmark-guided prostate segmentation, which can fully exploit valuable patient-specific information contained in the previous treatment images and can achieve improved performance in landmark detection and prostate segmentation. Methods: To localize the prostate in the daily treatment images, the authors first automatically detect six anatomical landmarks on the prostate boundary by adopting a context-aware landmark detection method. Specifically, in this method, a two-layer regression forest is trained as a detector for each target landmark. Once all the newly detected landmarks from new treatment images are reviewed or adjusted (if necessary) by clinicians, they are further included into the training pool as new patient-specific information to update all the two-layer regression forests for the next treatment day. As more and more treatment images of the current patient are acquired, the two-layer regression forests can be continually updated by incorporating the patient-specific information into the training procedure. After all target landmarks are detected, a multiatlas random sample consensus (multiatlas RANSAC) method is used to segment the entire prostate by fusing multiple previously segmented prostates of the current patient after they are aligned to the current treatment image. Subsequently, the segmented prostate of the current treatment image is again reviewed (or even adjusted if needed) by clinicians before including it as a new shape example into the prostate shape dataset for helping localize the entire prostate in the next treatment image. Results: The experimental results on 330 images of 24 patients show the effectiveness of the authors’ proposed online update scheme in improving the accuracies of both landmark detection and prostate segmentation

  3. Online updating of context-aware landmark detectors for prostate localization in daily treatment CT images

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiubin; Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In image guided radiation therapy, it is crucial to fast and accurately localize the prostate in the daily treatment images. To this end, the authors propose an online update scheme for landmark-guided prostate segmentation, which can fully exploit valuable patient-specific information contained in the previous treatment images and can achieve improved performance in landmark detection and prostate segmentation. Methods: To localize the prostate in the daily treatment images, the authors first automatically detect six anatomical landmarks on the prostate boundary by adopting a context-aware landmark detection method. Specifically, in this method, a two-layer regression forest is trained as a detector for each target landmark. Once all the newly detected landmarks from new treatment images are reviewed or adjusted (if necessary) by clinicians, they are further included into the training pool as new patient-specific information to update all the two-layer regression forests for the next treatment day. As more and more treatment images of the current patient are acquired, the two-layer regression forests can be continually updated by incorporating the patient-specific information into the training procedure. After all target landmarks are detected, a multiatlas random sample consensus (multiatlas RANSAC) method is used to segment the entire prostate by fusing multiple previously segmented prostates of the current patient after they are aligned to the current treatment image. Subsequently, the segmented prostate of the current treatment image is again reviewed (or even adjusted if needed) by clinicians before including it as a new shape example into the prostate shape dataset for helping localize the entire prostate in the next treatment image. Results: The experimental results on 330 images of 24 patients show the effectiveness of the authors’ proposed online update scheme in improving the accuracies of both landmark detection and prostate segmentation

  4. Prostate clinical study of a full inversion unconstrained ultrasound elastography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. Reza; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Samani, Abbas

    2014-03-01

    Prostate cancer detection at early stages is crucial for desirable treatment outcome. Among available imaging modalities, ultrasound (US) elastography is being developed as an effective clinical tool for prostate cancer diagnosis. Current clinical US elastography systems utilise strain imaging where tissue strain images are generated to approximate the tissue elastic modulus distribution. While strain images can be generated in real-time fashion, they lack the accuracy necessary for having desirable sensitivity and specificity. To improve strain imaging, full inversion based elastography techniques were proposed. Among these techniques, a constrained elastography technique was developed which showed promising results as long as the tumor and prostate geometry can be obtained accurately from the imaging modality used in conjunction with the elastography system. This requirement is not easy to fulfill, especially with US imaging. To address this issue, we present an unconstrained full inversion prostate elastography method in conjunction with US imaging where knowledge of tissue geometry is not necessary. One of the reasons that full inversion elastography techniques have not been routinely used in the clinic is lack of clinical validation studies. To our knowledge, no quasistatic full inversion based prostate US elastography technique has been applied in vivo before. In this work, the proposed method was applied to clinical prostate data and reconstructed elasticity images were compared to corresponding annotated histopathology images which is the first quasi-static full inversion based prostate US elastography technique applied successfully in vivo. Results demonstrated a good potential for clinical utility of the proposed method.

  5. Use of Local {sup 111}In-Capromab Pendetide Scan Results to Predict Outcome After Salvage Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, Bridget F. Mouraviev, Vladimir; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Mayes, Janice; Chen, Stephanie H.; Wong, Terence Z.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Sun, Leon; Moul, Judd; Polascik, Thomas J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan (ProstaScint; Cytogen Corp., Princeton NJ) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration to evaluate increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after radical prostatectomy. This study evaluated the role of prostate bed {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan findings to predict response to salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients who had PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy and a {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan immediately before salvage prostate bed RT (median, 66 Gy) were identified from the Duke Prostate Center database. Patients with distant uptake of capromab pendetide or long-term androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. Median follow-up after salvage RT was 2.7 years. Patient demographic, clinical, and pathologic characteristics; PSA values; and {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan results were retrospectively analyzed. A PSA failure after salvage RT was defined as PSA level greater than 0.2 ng/ml. Data were combined with other published results in a secondary pooled analysis of 106 patients. Results: {sup 111}In-Capromab pendetide findings included 20 patients with negative scan results and 20 with locally positive scan results. Two-year progression-free survival rates were 60% for patients with a negative scan result and 74% for those with a locally positive scan result (p = 0.49). Combined analysis did not show a difference in outcome based on local {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan result. Conclusion: For patients without distant signal detected by using {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan, patients with locally positive scan findings did not have statistically different progression-free survival than those with a negative scan result, suggesting that salvage RT may be successful in patients with either a locally positive or negative {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan result.

  6. Evaluation of the Prostate Bed for Local Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy Using Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Pitroda, Sean P.; Eggener, Scott E.; Stadler, Walter M.; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Vannier, Michael W.; Oto, Aytek

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of a 4-year period in which endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was considered for all men referred for salvage radiation therapy (RT) at a single academic center; to describe the incidence and location of locally recurrent disease in a contemporary cohort of men with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP), and to identify prognostic variables associated with MRI findings in order to define which patients may have the highest yield of the study. Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2011, 88 men without clinically palpable disease underwent eMRI for detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after RP. The median interval between RP and eMRI was 32 months (interquartile range, 14-57 months), and the median PSA level was 0.30 ng/mL (interquartile range, 0.19-0.72 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging scans consisting of T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging were evaluated for features consistent with local recurrence. The prostate bed was scored from 0-4, whereby 0 was definitely normal, 1 probably normal, 2 indeterminate, 3 probably abnormal, and 4 definitely abnormal. Local recurrence was defined as having a score of 3-4. Results: Local recurrence was identified in 21 men (24%). Abnormalities were best appreciated on T2-weighted axial images (90%) as focal hypointense lesions. Recurrence locations were perianastomotic (67%) or retrovesical (33%). The only risk factor associated with local recurrence was PSA; recurrence was seen in 37% of men with PSA >0.3 ng/mL vs 13% if PSA {<=}0.3 ng/mL (P<.01). The median volume of recurrence was 0.26 cm{sup 3} and was directly associated with PSA (r=0.5, P=.02). The correlation between MRI-based tumor volume and PSA was even stronger in men with positive margins (r=0.8, P<.01). Conclusions: Endorectal MRI can define areas of local recurrence after RP in a minority of men without clinical evidence of disease, with yield related to PSA

  7. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Munsell, Mark F.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson; Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A.; Dong, Lei; Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a

  8. Oral selenium supplementation has no effect on PSA velocity in men undergoing active surveillance for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, M. S.; Algotar, A. M.; Ranger-Moore, J.; Stratton, S. P.; Slate, E.; Hsu, C.H; Thompson, P.A.; Clark, L. C.; Ahmann, F. R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Nutritional Prevention of Cancer Trial demonstrated a 52% lower incidence of prostate cancer in men supplemented with selenium. As a result, our study was designed to assess whether selenium supplementation attenuates the progression of prostate cancer. Methods A Phase 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in men with localized non-metastatic prostate cancer who had elected to forgo active treatment and be followed by active surveillance. A total of 140 men were randomized to placebo (n=46), 200 μg/day (n=47) or 800 μg/day (n=47) selenium p.o. (as selenized yeast) and followed every 3 months for up to 5 years. PSA velocity was used as a marker of prostate cancer progression and was estimated using mixed effects regression. Results Adjusting for age, body mass index, baseline selenium, smoking, baseline PSA, race, PSA method, and Gleason score; PSA velocities for 200 μg/day and 800 μg/day treatment groups were not statistically significantly different from placebo (p = 0.32 and p = 0.61 respectively). In the highest quartile of baseline selenium, men supplemented with 800 μg selenium demonstrated PSA velocity statistically significantly higher as compared to placebo (p = 0.018). Conclusions Selenium supplementation did not show a protective effect on PSA velocity in subjects with localized prostate cancer. On the contrary, supplementation with high dose selenium was observed to be a risk factor for increased PSA velocity in men with high baseline plasma selenium concentrations. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00752739) PMID:20647337

  9. Multiparametric MRI for Localized Prostate Cancer: Lesion Detection and Staging

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Daniel J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Multiparametric MRI of the prostate combines high-resolution anatomic imaging with functional imaging of alterations in normal tissue caused by neoplastic transformation for the identification and characterization of in situ prostate cancer. Lesion detection relies on a systematic approach to the analysis of both anatomic and functional imaging using established criteria for the delineation of suspicious areas. Staging includes visual and functional analysis of the prostate “capsule” to determine if in situ disease is, in fact, organ-confined, as well as the evaluation of pelvic structures including lymph nodes and bones for the detection of metastasis. Although intertwined, the protocol can be optimized depending on whether lesion detection or staging is of the highest priority. PMID:25525600

  10. Morbidity and mortality of local failure after definitive therapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, P.F.; Whitmore, R.B. 3d.; Kuban, D.A.; el-Mahdi, A.M.; Ladaga, L.A.

    1989-03-01

    We reviewed our experience with morbidity and mortality associated with clinical local failure after definitive therapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate by interstitial 125-iodine implantation, external beam radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. Morbid complications included unilateral ureteral obstruction; bladder obstruction and/or incontinence requiring treatment by transurethral resection, or placement of a urethral or suprapubic catheter; hematuria requiring intervention for clot evacuation or fulguration, and perineal and/or pelvic pain. Lethal complications included bilateral ureteral obstruction or bowel obstruction. We treated 108 patients with 125-iodine, 178 with external beam radiotherapy and 67 with radical prostatectomy. Clinical local failure occurred in 26 per cent of the 125-iodine, 17 per cent of the external beam radiotherapy and 12 per cent of the radical prostatectomy groups. The total incidence of local failure with 125-iodine was statistically higher than for radical prostatectomy. Stage C and poorly differentiated tumors were associated with a statistically higher incidence of local failure compared to lower stage and grade tumors. However, within each stage and grade there was no significant difference in local failure between treatment modalities. There was negligible morbidity or mortality secondary to local failure associated with stage A2, stage B1 or well differentiated tumors regardless of treatment modality. There was no difference in the morbidity and mortality between treatment modalities for stage C or poorly differentiated tumors. However, for stage B2 or moderately differentiated tumors treated by 125-iodine implantation there was a statistically greater incidence of morbidity and mortality than that associated with external beam radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy.

  11. [Opportunities and risks of 5α reductase inhibitors in the medical management of Active surveillance for localized prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Linares Espinos, Estefania; Carballido Rodriguez, Joaquin

    2014-06-01

    Active surveillance (AS) as a therapeutic option is already integrated as a primary treatment strategy in low risk localized prostate cancer (PCa). There is a recent interest for the search of therapeutic interventions that result in a delay in the progression of such indolent cancers. The evaluation of the possible implication of 5 ARI drugs in the reduction of the risk of progression of PCa was enacted by the results of the clinical trials PCPT (Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial) and REDUCE (Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events study). The results of the REDEEM clinical trial (Reduction by Dutasteride of clinical progression events in expectant management trial) revealed a delay in PCa progression favoring Dutasteride in comparison with placebo, being advanced age and PSA Density independent predictive factors for pathologic progression. Evidences regarding the influence of 5 ARIs in the evolution of AS patients come from few studies with limited follow up. Thus, the conclusions probably are far from being consiidered as definitive. PMID:24914845

  12. Integrative molecular profiling of routine clinical prostate cancer specimens

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, C. S.; Cani, A. K.; Hovelson, D. H.; Quist, M. J.; Douville, N. J.; Yadati, V.; Amin, A. M.; Nelson, P. S.; Betz, B. L.; Liu, C-J.; Knudsen, K. E.; Cooney, K. A.; Feng, F. Y.; McDaniel, A. S.; Tomlins, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Comprehensive molecular profiling led to the recognition of multiple prostate cancer (PCa) molecular subtypes and driving alterations, but translating these findings to clinical practice is challenging. Patients and methods We developed a formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue compatible integrative assay for PCa molecular subtyping and interrogation of relevant genetic/transcriptomic alterations (MiPC). We applied MiPC, which combines capture-based next generation sequencing and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), to 53 FFPE PCa specimens representing cases not well represented in frozen tissue cohorts, including 8 paired primary tumor and lymph node metastases. Results were validated using multiplexed PCR based NGS and Sanger sequencing. Results We identified known and novel potential driving, somatic mutations and copy number alterations, including a novel BRAF T599_V600insHT mutation and CYP11B2 amplification in a patient treated with ketoconazole (a potent CYP11B2 inhibitor). qRT-PCR integration enabled comprehensive molecular subtyping and provided complementary information, such as androgen receptor (AR) target gene module assessment in advanced cases and SPINK1 over-expression. MiPC identified highly concordant profiles for all 8 tumor/lymph node metastasis pairs, consistent with limited heterogeneity amongst driving events. MiPC and exome sequencing were performed on separately isolated conventional acinar PCa and prostatic small cell carcinoma (SCC) components from the same FFPE resection specimen to enable direct comparison of histologically distinct components. While both components showed TMPRSS2:ERG fusions, the SCC component exclusively harbored complete TP53 inactivation (frameshift variant and copy loss) and two CREBBP mutations. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the feasibility of integrative profiling of routine PCa specimens, which may have utility for understanding disease biology and enabling personalized

  13. Active surveillance for the management of localized prostate cancer: Guideline recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Morash, Chris; Tey, Rovena; Agbassi, Chika; Klotz, Laurence; McGowan, Tom; Srigley, John; Evans, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The objective is to provide guidance on the role of active surveillance (AS) as a management strategy for low-risk prostate cancer patients and to ensure that AS is offered to appropriate patients assessed by a standardized protocol. Prostate cancer is often a slowly progressive or sometimes non-progressive indolent disease diagnosed at an early stage with localized tumours that are unlikely to cause morbidity or death. Standard active treatments for prostate cancer include radiotherapy (RT) or radical prostatectomy (RP), but the harms from over diagnosis and overtreatment are of a significant concern. AS is increasingly being considered as a management strategy to avoid or delay the potential harms caused by unnecessary radical treatment. Methods: A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, guideline databases and relevant meeting proceedings was performed and a systematic review of identified evidence was synthesized to make recommendations relating to the role of AS in the management of localized prostate cancer. Results: No exiting guidelines or reviews were suitable for use in the synthesis of evidence for the recommendations, but 59 reports of primary studies were identified. Due to studies being either non-comparative or heterogeneous, pooled meta-analyses were not conducted. Conclusion: The working group concluded that for patients with low-risk (Gleason score ≤6) localized prostate cancer, AS is the preferred disease management strategy. Active treatment (RP or RT) is appropriate for patients with intermediate-risk (Gleason score 7) localized prostate cancer. For select patients with low-volume Gleason 3+4=7 localized prostate cancer, AS can be considered. PMID:26225165

  14. The role of cannabinoids in prostate cancer: Basic science perspective and potential clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Juan A.; Bianco, Fernando J.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a global public health problem, and it is the most common cancer in American men and the second cause for cancer-related death. Experimental evidence shows that prostate tissue possesses cannabinoid receptors and their stimulation results in anti-androgenic effects. To review currently relevant findings related to effects of cannabinoid receptors in prostate cancer. PubMed search utilizing the terms “cannabis,” “cannabinoids,” “prostate cancer,” and “cancer pain management,” giving preference to most recent publications was done. Articles identified were screened for their relevance to the field of prostate cancer and interest to both urologist and pain specialists. Prostate cancer cells possess increased expression of both cannabinoid 1 and 2 receptors, and stimulation of these results in decrease in cell viability, increased apoptosis, and decreased androgen receptor expression and prostate-specific antigen excretion. It would be of interest to conduct clinical studies utilizing cannabinoids for patients with metastatic prostate cancer, taking advantage not only of its beneficial effects on prostate cancer but also of their analgesic properties for bone metastatic cancer pain. PMID:22557710

  15. Patient-Derived Prostate Cancer: from Basic Science to the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Risbridger, Gail P; Taylor, Renea A

    2016-08-01

    Systems that model cancer form the backbone of research discovery, and their accuracy and validity are a key determinant to ensure successful translation. In many tumour types, patient-derived specimens are an important model of choice for pre-clinical drug development. In this review, we consider why this has been such a challenge for prostate cancer, resulting in relatively few patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) of prostatic tumours compared to breast cancers, for example. Nevertheless, with only a few patient specimens and PDXs, we exemplify in three vignettes how important new clinical insights were obtained resulting in benefit for future men with prostate cancer. PMID:27177552

  16. Word on the Street: Engaging Local Leaders in a Dialogue About Prostate Cancer Among African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Elinor R.; Francis, Linda E.

    2016-01-01

    African American men face the highest rates of prostate cancer, yet with no consensus for screening and treatment, making informed health care decisions is difficult. This study aimed to identify approaches to empowering African American men as proactive participants in prostate cancer decision making using an established community–campus partnership employing elements of community-based participatory research methods. Community stakeholders with an interest in, and knowledge about, health care in two local African American communities were recruited and completed key informant interviews (N = 39). Grounded theory coding identified common themes related to prostate cancer knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and responses to them. Common barriers such as gender roles, fear, and fatalism were identified as barriers to work-up and treatment, and both communities’ inadequate and inaccurate prostate cancer information described as the key problem. To build on community strengths, participants said the change must come from inside these communities, not be imposed from the outside. To accomplish this, they suggested reaching men through women, connecting men to doctors they can trust, making men’s cancer education part of broader health education initiatives designed as fun and inexpensive family entertainment events, and having churches bring community members in to speak on their experiences with cancer. This study demonstrated the success of community engagement to identify not only barriers but also local strengths and facilitators to prostate cancer care in two suburban/rural African American communities. Building collaboratively on community strengths may improve prostate cancer care specifically and health care in general. PMID:25595017

  17. Word on the Street: Engaging Local Leaders in a Dialogue About Prostate Cancer Among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Elinor R; Francis, Linda E

    2016-09-01

    African American men face the highest rates of prostate cancer, yet with no consensus for screening and treatment, making informed health care decisions is difficult. This study aimed to identify approaches to empowering African American men as proactive participants in prostate cancer decision making using an established community-campus partnership employing elements of community-based participatory research methods. Community stakeholders with an interest in, and knowledge about, health care in two local African American communities were recruited and completed key informant interviews (N = 39). Grounded theory coding identified common themes related to prostate cancer knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and responses to them. Common barriers such as gender roles, fear, and fatalism were identified as barriers to work-up and treatment, and both communities' inadequate and inaccurate prostate cancer information described as the key problem. To build on community strengths, participants said the change must come from inside these communities, not be imposed from the outside. To accomplish this, they suggested reaching men through women, connecting men to doctors they can trust, making men's cancer education part of broader health education initiatives designed as fun and inexpensive family entertainment events, and having churches bring community members in to speak on their experiences with cancer. This study demonstrated the success of community engagement to identify not only barriers but also local strengths and facilitators to prostate cancer care in two suburban/rural African American communities. Building collaboratively on community strengths may improve prostate cancer care specifically and health care in general. PMID:25595017

  18. The Impact of Definitive Local Therapy for Lymph Node-Positive Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Chad G.; Carlson, Julie A.; Waxweiler, Timothy V.; Raben, David; Dewitt, Peter E.; Crawford, E. David; Maroni, Paul D.; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival outcomes for patients with lymph node-positive, nonmetastatic prostate cancer undergoing definitive local therapy (radical prostatectomy [RP], external beam radiation therapy [EBRT], or both) versus no local therapy (NLT) in the US population in the modern prostate specific antigen (PSA) era. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was queried for patients with T1-4N1M0 prostate cancer diagnosed from 1995 through 2005. To allow comparisons of equivalent datasets, patients were analyzed in separate clinical (cN+) and pathologically confirmed (pN+) lymph node-positive cohorts. Kaplan-Meier overall survival (OS) and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) estimates were generated, with accompanying univariate log-rank and multivariate Cox proportional hazards comparisons. Results: A total of 796 cN+ and 2991 pN+ patients were evaluable. Among cN+ patients, 43% underwent EBRT and 57% had NLT. Outcomes for cN+ patients favored EBRT, with 10-year OS rates of 45% versus 29% (P<.001) and PCSS rates of 67% versus 53% (P<.001). Among pN+ patients, 78% underwent local therapy (RP 57%, EBRT 10%, or both 11%) and 22% had NLT. Outcomes for pN+ also favored local therapy, with 10-year OS rates of 65% versus 42% (P<.001) and PCSS rates of 78% versus 56% (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, local therapy in both the cN+ and pN+ cohorts remained independently associated with improved OS and PCSS (all P<.001). Local therapy was associated with favorable hazard ratios across subgroups, including patients aged ≥70 years and those with multiple positive lymph nodes. Among pN+ patients, no significant differences in survival were observed between RP versus EBRT and RP with or without adjuvant EBRT. Conclusions: In this large, population-based cohort, definitive local therapy was associated with significantly improved survival in patients with lymph node-positive prostate cancer.

  19. Ultrasonically guided 125iodine seed implantation with external radiation in management of localized prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, P.; Bak, M.; Juul, N.; Laursen, F.; von der Maase, H.; Nielsen, L.; Rasmussen, F.; Torp-Pedersen, S.; Holm, H.H. )

    1989-10-01

    Thirty-three patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated) were treated with transperineal 125Iodine seed implantation (160 Gy) guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation (47.4 Gy). The observation time was six to sixty-eight months with a median follow-up of thirty-five months. Median change in prostatic volume was a reduction of 35 percent. Re-biopsy or transurethral resection of the prostate was performed in 25 patients after one to two years, revealing still malignant histology in 12 (48%). Development of distant metastases occurred in 14 patients (44%), and 8 have died of prostatic cancer. Fourteen patients suffered from late complications of which surgical intervention was indicated in 3 cases.

  20. Low Temperature Plasma: A Novel Focal Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Adam M.; Frame, Fiona M.; Maitland, Norman J.; O'Connell, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in recent years for the focal treatment of localized prostate cancer, high recurrence rates and detrimental side effects are still a cause for concern. In this review, we compare current focal therapies to a potentially novel approach for the treatment of early onset prostate cancer: low temperature plasma. The rapidly evolving plasma technology has the potential to deliver a wide range of promising medical applications via the delivery of plasma-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Studies assessing the effect of low temperature plasma on cell lines and xenografts have demonstrated DNA damage leading to apoptosis and reduction in cell viability. However, there have been no studies on prostate cancer, which is an obvious candidate for this novel therapy. We present here the potential of low temperature plasma as a focal therapy for prostate cancer. PMID:24738076

  1. Variation in Adherence to External Beam Radiotherapy Quality Measures Among Elderly Men With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E. Zelefsky, Michael J.; Jang, Thomas L.; Basch, Ethan M.; Schrag, Deborah

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize the variation in adherence to quality measures of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer and its relation to patient and provider characteristics in a population-based, representative sample of U.S. men. Methods and Materials: We evaluated EBRT quality measures proposed by a RAND expert panel of physicians among men aged {>=}65 years diagnosed between 2000 and 2002 with localized prostate cancer and treated with primary EBRT using data from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare program. We assessed the adherence to five EBRT quality measures that were amenable to analysis using SEER-Medicare data: (1) use of conformal RT planning; (2) use of high-energy (>10-MV) photons; (3) use of custom immobilization; (4) completion of two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist in the year after therapy; and (5) radiation oncologist board certification. Results: Of the 11,674 patients, 85% had received conformal RT planning, 75% had received high-energy photons, and 97% had received custom immobilization. One-third of patients had completed two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist, although 91% had at least one visit with a urologist or radiation oncologist. Most patients (85%) had been treated by a board-certified radiation oncologist. Conclusions: The overall high adherence to EBRT quality measures masked substantial variation in geography, socioeconomic status in the area of residence, and teaching affiliation of the RT facility. Future research should examine the reasons for the variations in these measures and whether the variation is associated with important clinical outcomes.

  2. Chemotherapy-Induced Monoamine Oxidase Expression in Prostate Carcinoma Functions as a Cytoprotective Resistance Enzyme and Associates with Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chung-Ying; Harris, William P.; Sim, Hong Gee; Lucas, Jared M.; Coleman, Ilsa; Higano, Celestia S.; Gulati, Roman; True, Lawrence D.; Vessella, Robert; Lange, Paul H.; Garzotto, Mark; Beer, Tomasz M.; Nelson, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    To identify molecular alterations in prostate cancers associating with relapse following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical prostatectomy patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer were enrolled into a phase I-II clinical trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel and mitoxantrone followed by prostatectomy. Pre-treatment prostate tissue was acquired by needle biopsy and post-treatment tissue was acquired by prostatectomy. Prostate cancer gene expression measurements were determined in 31 patients who completed 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We identified 141 genes with significant transcript level alterations following chemotherapy that associated with subsequent biochemical relapse. This group included the transcript encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). In vitro, cytotoxic chemotherapy induced the expression of MAOA and elevated MAOA levels enhanced cell survival following docetaxel exposure. MAOA activity increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and increased the expression and nuclear translocation of HIF1α. The suppression of MAOA activity using the irreversible inhibitor clorgyline augmented the apoptotic responses induced by docetaxel. In summary, we determined that the expression of MAOA is induced by exposure to cytotoxic chemotherapy, increases HIF1α, and contributes to docetaxel resistance. As MAOA inhibitors have been approved for human use, regimens combining MAOA inhibitors with docetaxel may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25198178

  3. [Clinical significance of tumor markers in prostatic carcinoma--comparative study of prostatic acid phosphatase, prostate specific antigen and gamma-seminoprotein].

    PubMed

    Yoshiki, T; Okada, K; Oishi, K; Yoshida, O

    1987-12-01

    We measured the prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), gamma-Seminoprotein (gamma-Sm) and prostate specific antigen (PA) in the serum of 862 patients with various urologic diseases including 89 patients with prostatic cancer. We used a PAP radioimmunoassay kit, gamma-Sm enzyme immunoassay kit, Markit-F-PA enzyme immunoassay kit and PA test Wako enzyme immunoassay kit. Serum PA level in advanced prostatic carcinoma (stage C, D) tended to be higher than that in early stage cancer (stage A, B). The Wako kit gave a higher PA than the Markit-F in each stage. The sensitivity rate of Wako PA test was the highest (81%) of all kits. The specificity rate of PAP was the highest (83%), and the accuracy rate of Markit-F PA was the highest (79%). The positive rate in the combined assay of PAP, gamma-Sm and PA in prostatic cancer was higher than that in the single assay of each tumor marker. We regarded PAP, gamma-Sm and PA as clinically different tumor markers, because their serum level did not correlate definitely. No apparent correlation was found between histopathological grade and the level of each tumor marker. The level of PAP, gamma-Sm and PA in the reactivated patients was significantly higher than that of the well-controlled patients. In the reactivated patients, the positive rate of Markit-F PA was the highest (89%) of all the kits. PMID:2452559

  4. Focal partial salvage low-dose-rate brachytherapy for local recurrent prostate cancer after permanent prostate brachytherapy with a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wakumoto, Yoshiaki; Yamaguchi, Nanae; Horie, Shigeo; Sasai, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the treatment results for focal partial salvage re-implantation against local recurrence after permanent prostate brachytherapy. Material and methods Between January 2010 and September 2015, 12 patients were treated with focal partial salvage re-implantation for local recurrence after low-dose-rate brachytherapy using 125I seeds. The focal clinical target volume (F-CTV) was delineated on positive biopsy areas in a mapping biopsy, combining the cold spots on the post-implant dosimetry for initial brachytherapy. The F-CTV was expanded by 3 mm to create the planning target volume (PTV) as a margin to compensate for uncertainties in image registration and treatment delivery. The prescribed dose to the PTV was 145 Gy. The characteristics and biochemical disease-free survival (BdFS) rates were analyzed. Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. Results The median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at re-implantation was 4.09 ng/ml (range: 2.91-8.24 ng/ml). The median follow-up time was 56 months (range: 6-74 months). The median RD2cc and UD10 were 63 Gy and 159 Gy, respectively. The 4-year BdFS rate was 78%, which included non-responders. Biochemical recurrence occurred in two patients after 7 and 31 months, respectively. The former was treated with hormonal therapy after biochemical failure, and the latter underwent watchful waiting (PSA at the last follow-up of 53 months: 7.3 ng/ml) at the patient's request. No patients had grade 3 GU/GI toxicities or died after salvage re-implantation. Conclusions The partial salvage low-dose-rate brachytherapy used to treat local recurrence after permanent prostate brachytherapy is well-tolerated, with high biochemical response rates. This treatment can be not only a method to delay chemical castration but also a curative treatment option in cases of local recurrence of prostate carcinoma after seed implantation

  5. Clinical benefits of alpharadin in castrate-chemotherapy-resistant prostate cancer: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Croke, Jennifer; Leung, Eugene; Segal, Roanne; Malone, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer has the second-highest mortality worldwide in men. The most common site of metastasis is bone. Bone metastases and their resulting complications represent a significant source of morbidity. Radioisotopes have been used for treatment of painful bony metastases. Although shown to decrease pain and analgesia use, this has not improved outcomes. The following case report describes a patient with castrate-resistant prostate cancer who was treated with the radioisotope radium-223 as part of the phase III clinical trial Alpharadin in Patients with Symptomatic Hormone Refractory Prostate Cancer with Skeletal Metastases (ALSYMPCA). He responded to radium-223 with pain relief, bone scan response, stabilisation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and normalisation of alkaline phosphatase. Interim analysis of this trial has shown that radium-223 significantly prolongs overall survival, time to first skeletal-related event and is well tolerated. Alpharadin is a new treatment option for men with castrate-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases. PMID:23125297

  6. Natural History of Clinically Staged Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Monotherapeutic Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Wallner, Kent E.; Butler, Wayne M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history of clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with permanent interstitial seed implants as monotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and May 2005, 463 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer underwent brachytherapy as the sole definitive treatment. Men who received supplemental external beam radiotherapy or androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. Dosimetric implant quality was determined based on the minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume and the volume of the prostate gland receiving 100% of the prescribed dose. Multiple parameters were evaluated as predictors of treatment outcomes. Results: The 12-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates for the entire cohort were 97.1%, 99.7%, and 75.4%, respectively. Only pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, percent positive biopsy cores, and minimum dose that covered 90% of the target volume were significant predictors of biochemical recurrence. The bPFS, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 97.4%, 99.6%, and 76.2%, respectively, for low-risk patients and 96.4%, 100%, and 74.0%, respectively, for intermediate-risk patients. The bPFS rate was 98.8% for low-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 92.1% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01), and it was 98.3% for intermediate-risk patients with high-quality implants versus 86.4% for those with less adequate implants (p < 0.01). Conclusions: High-quality brachytherapy implants as monotherapy can provide excellent outcomes for men with clinically staged low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. For these men, a high-quality implant can achieve results comparable to high-quality surgery in the most favorable pathologically staged patient subgroups.

  7. Twelve years' experience with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) using sonablate™ devices for the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Nakano, Muyura; Shoji, Sunao; Nagata, Yoshihiro; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2012-10-01

    To report on the long-term results of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Patients with clinical Stage T1c-T3N0M0, biopsy proven, localized prostate cancer, with a serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level of <30 ng/ml, any Gleason score were included. All patients underwent HIFU using the Sonablate™ (S) device and were required to have a minimal follow-up of 2 years after the last HIFU session to be included in this analysis. Four different generation HIFU devices, S200, S500, S500 version 4 and S500 TCM, have been used for this study. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir+2ng/ml). Seven hundred and fifty-three men with prostate cancer were included. The patients were divided into two groups: in the Former group, 421 patients were treated with S200 and 500 from 1990 to 2005; in the Latter group, 332 patients were treated with S500 ver. 4 and TCM from 2005 to 2009. The mean age, PSA, Gleason score, operation time, and follow-up period in the Former and Latter groups were 68 and 67 years, 11.3 and 9.7 ng/ml, 6.2 and 6.6, 167 and 101 min, and 49 and 38 months, respectively. The biochemical disease-free rate (BDFR) in the groups at 5 years was, respectively, 67% and 53%, and was 50% at 10 years in the Former group (p<0.0001). The BDFR in patients in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups in the Former group at 5 and 10 years were 68% and 65%, 52% and 48%, and 43% and 40%, respectively (p<0.0001). The BDFR in patients in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups in the Latter group at 5 years were 83%, 76%, and 42% (p<0.0001). The negative prostate biopsy rate in the Former and Latter groups was 81% and 93%, respectively. Postoperative erectile dysfunction was noted in 45%, 38%, and 24% of patients at 6 months, 12 months, and 2 years after HIFU. The results after long-term follow-up have indicated that HIFU is an efficient and safe treatment for patients with

  8. Effect of Increasing Radiation Doses on Local and Distant Failures in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kupelian, Patrick A. Ciezki, Jay; Reddy, Chandana A.; Klein, Eric A.; Mahadevan, Arul

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of radiation dose on local failure (LF) and distant metastasis (DM) in prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study sample consisted of 919 Stage T1-T3N0M0 patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Three separate dose groups were analyzed: <72 Gy (n = 552, median dose, 68.4 Gy), {>=}72 but <82 Gy (n = 215, median dose, 78 Gy), and {>=}82 Gy (n = 152, median dose, 83 Gy). The median follow-up period for all patients and those receiving <72 Gy, {>=}72 but <82 Gy, and {>=}82 Gy was 97, 112, 94, and 65 months, respectively. Results: For all patients, the LF rate at 10 and 15 years was 6% and 13%, respectively. The 7-year LF rate stratified by dose group (<72 Gy, {>=}72 but <82 Gy, and {>=}82 Gy) was 6%, 2%, and 2%, respectively (p 0.012). For all patients, the DM rate at 10 and 15 years was 10% and 17%, respectively. The 7-year DM rate stratified by dose group (<72 Gy, {>=}72 but <82 Gy, and {>=}82 Gy) was 9%, 6%, and 1%, respectively (p = 0.008). Multivariate analysis revealed T stage (p < 0.001), pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level (p = 0.001), Gleason score (p < 0.001), and dose (p = 0.018) to be independent predictors of DM. For all 919 patients, multivariate analysis revealed only Gleason score (p = 0.009) and dose (p 0.004) to be independent predictors of LF. Conclusion: Although the effect of increasing radiation doses has been documented mostly for biochemical failure rates, the results of our study have shown a clear association between greater radiation doses and lower LF and DM rates.

  9. Malakoplakia of the prostate masquerading as locally advanced prostate cancer on mpMRI

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Robert Thomas; Metcalfe, Michael; Chang, Silvia; Jones, Edward; Black, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old man was referred for urological evaluation for an abnormal digital rectal exam (cT2a, subtle nodule at left base, 121 cc prostate) and an elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) of 8.0 ng/ml. Subsequent 12-core transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy revealed Gleason 3+4 adenocarcinoma in seven of 12 cores, including all six cores on the right side and one core at the left apex. No extraprostatic extension was identified. Post-biopsy, the patient developed urinary retention requiring a catheter, as well as an Escherichia coli (E. coli) urinary tract infection (UTI) requiring hospitalization and intravenous antibiotics. PMID:26834906

  10. Spectrum of mitochondrial genomic variation and associated clinical presentation of prostate cancer in South African men

    PubMed Central

    McCrow, John P.; Petersen, Desiree C.; Louw, Melanie; Chan, Eva K. F.; Harmeyer, Katherine; Vecchiarelli, Stefano; Lyons, Ruth J.; Bornman, M. S. Riana

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates are significantly increased in African–American men, but limited studies have been performed within Sub–Saharan African populations. As mitochondria control energy metabolism and apoptosis we speculate that somatic mutations within mitochondrial genomes are candidate drivers of aggressive prostate carcinogenesis. METHODS We used matched blood and prostate tissue samples from 87 South African men (77 with African ancestry) to perform deep sequencing of complete mitochondrial genomes. Clinical presentation was biased toward aggressive disease (Gleason score >7, 64%), and compared with men without prostate cancer either with or without benign prostatic hyperplasia. RESULTS We identified 144 somatic mtDNA single nucleotide variants (SNVs), of which 80 were observed in 39 men presenting with aggressive disease. Both the number and frequency of somatic mtDNA SNVs were associated with higher pathological stage. CONCLUSIONS Besides doubling the total number of somatic PCa‐associated mitochondrial genome mutations identified to date, we associate mutational load with aggressive prostate cancer status in men of African ancestry. Prostate 76:349–358, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. The Prostate published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660354

  11. Outcomes of high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy alone with 1 cm planning target volume posterior margin for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinically localized prostate cancer may be treated by different approaches of radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to report the results of disease control and toxicity in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with high dose IMRT alone with 1 cm PTV posterior margin. Methods From September 2001 to April 2008, 140 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with definitive IMRT (dose ≥ 74 Gy) without hormone therapy. Outcomes were measured from the conclusion of radiotherapy. Biochemical failure was defined as PSA nadir + 2.0 ng/dL. Toxicities were assessed using the NCI-CTCAE-version 3.0. Median follow-up was 58 months. Results Biochemical failure occurred in 13.6% of patients. Actuarial 5-year biochemical control rates were 91.7%, 82.5% and 85.9% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. Stage T2 patients presented a risk of biochemical failure almost three times higher than stage T1 (RR = 2.91; 95% CI: 1.04; 8.17). Distant metastases occurred in 3 (2%) patients. Five-year metastasis-free and overall survivals were 96% and 97.5%, respectively. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity rates were, respectively, 1.6% and 3%. Conclusion High-dose IMRT alone with 1 cm posterior PTV margin was effective and safe for patients with localized prostate cancer. PMID:24314072

  12. Analysis of iodine-125 interstitial therapy in the treatment of localized carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Gomella, L.G.; Steinberg, S.M.; Ellison, M.F.; Reeves, W.W.; Flanigan, R.C.; McRoberts, J.W. )

    1991-04-01

    Definitive treatment of localized carcinoma of the prostate has included radical surgery, external beam radiation therapy, and interstitial radiation therapy. The interstitial agent most commonly used is Iodine-125. Forty-eight patients were treated with interstitial radiation therapy using Iodine-125 implants with a median follow-up of 55 months. Forty-three percent of the evaluable patients had progressive disease with approximately 50% progressing at 5 years by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Overall actuarial survival in the group was 80% at 5 years. This and several other studies suggest that control of prostate cancer with Iodine-125 seeds may be suboptimal as compared with other treatment modalities, especially the radical retropubic prostatectomy. Analysis of treatment parameters is presented along with a discussion of the current status and future prospects for treatment of localized carcinoma of the prostate with interstitial radiation therapy.

  13. Validation of Novel Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Progression by the Combination of Bioinformatics, Clinical and Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Väänänen, Riina-Minna; Mattsson, Jesse; Li, Yifeng; Tallgrén, Terhi; Tong Ochoa, Natalia; Bjartell, Anders; Åkerfelt, Malin; Taimen, Pekka; Boström, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The identification and validation of biomarkers for clinical applications remains an important issue for improving diagnostics and therapy in many diseases, including prostate cancer. Gene expression profiles are routinely applied to identify diagnostic and predictive biomarkers or novel targets for cancer. However, only few predictive markers identified in silico have also been validated for clinical, functional or mechanistic relevance in disease progression. In this study, we have used a broad, bioinformatics-based approach to identify such biomarkers across a spectrum of progression stages, including normal and tumor-adjacent, premalignant, primary and late stage lesions. Bioinformatics data mining combined with clinical validation of biomarkers by sensitive, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), followed by functional evaluation of candidate genes in disease-relevant processes, such as cancer cell proliferation, motility and invasion. From 300 initial candidates, eight genes were selected for validation by several layers of data mining and filtering. For clinical validation, differential mRNA expression of selected genes was measured by qRT-PCR in 197 clinical prostate tissue samples including normal prostate, compared against histologically benign and cancerous tissues. Based on the qRT-PCR results, significantly different mRNA expression was confirmed in normal prostate versus malignant PCa samples (for all eight genes), but also in cancer-adjacent tissues, even in the absence of detectable cancer cells, thus pointing to the possibility of pronounced field effects in prostate lesions. For the validation of the functional properties of these genes, and to demonstrate their putative relevance for disease-relevant processes, siRNA knock-down studies were performed in both 2D and 3D organotypic cell culture models. Silencing of three genes (DLX1, PLA2G7 and RHOU) in the prostate cancer cell lines PC3 and VCaP by siRNA resulted in marked growth arrest

  14. Local control and survival after external irradiation for adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Rangala, N.; Cox, J.D.; Byhardt, R.W.; Wilson, J.F.; Greenberg, M.; Da Conceicao, A.L.

    1982-11-01

    From 1966 through 1978, 128 patients with biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the prostate underwent external irradiation to the entire pelvis followed by additional irradiation with a field that encompassed the entire prostate with generous margins. Local recurrence was diagnosed when palpable regrowth occurred and was confirmed by biopsy. Eighteen patients (14%) had local recurrence. Actuarial (life table) local recurrence rates, however, were 24% for both for Stage B and C patients. Actuarial five year survival was 100% for the 10 Stage A patients, 91% for the 25 Stage B, and 78% for the 93 Stage C patients. Actuarial five year disease-free survival was 59% for Stage B and 69% for Stage C patients. Local recurrence was affected by the total dose to the whole pelvis and the dose at the center of the prostate. Disease-free survival was influenced by differentiation. High dose external irradiation to the prostate and regional lymph nodes offers the greatest probability of long-term disease-free survival for patients with localized disease. Late bowel complications were seen in 14 patients (11%), two of whom required colostomies. Late urinary tract complications were observed in five patients (4%).

  15. Genomic Copy Number Variations in the Genomes of Leukocytes Predict Prostate Cancer Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Zhiguang; Martin, Amantha; Nelson, Joel B.; Tseng, George C.; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Accurate prediction of prostate cancer clinical courses remains elusive. In this study, we performed whole genome copy number analysis on leukocytes of 273 prostate cancer patients using Affymetrix SNP6.0 chip. Copy number variations (CNV) were found across all chromosomes of the human genome. An average of 152 CNV fragments per genome was identified in the leukocytes from prostate cancer patients. The size distributions of CNV in the genome of leukocytes were highly correlative with prostate cancer aggressiveness. A prostate cancer outcome prediction model was developed based on large size ratio of CNV from the leukocyte genomes. This prediction model generated an average prediction rate of 75.2%, with sensitivity of 77.3% and specificity of 69.0% for prostate cancer recurrence. When combined with Nomogram and the status of fusion transcripts, the average prediction rate was improved to 82.5% with sensitivity of 84.8% and specificity of 78.2%. In addition, the leukocyte prediction model was 62.6% accurate in predicting short prostate specific antigen doubling time. When combined with Gleason’s grade, Nomogram and the status of fusion transcripts, the prediction model generated a correct prediction rate of 77.5% with 73.7% sensitivity and 80.1% specificity. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing that CNVs in leukocyte genomes are predictive of clinical outcomes of a human malignancy. PMID:26295840

  16. The influence of family history on prostate cancer risk: implications for clinical management.

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, Stephan; Alcaraz, Antonio; Emberton, Mark; Hammerer, Peter; Ponholzer, Anton; Schröder, Fritz H; Tubaro, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    • The most recent evidence for the link between a family history of prostate cancer and individual risk for future disease was examined, with the aim of understanding what the existence and nature of a family history of prostate cancer does to a man's risk of developing the disease. • Our findings highlighted the clear association between a family history of prostate cancer and increased risk of developing the disease; with a greater proximity of relatedness, greater number of family members affected and/or earlier age at diagnosis of the family member elevating risk further. • These findings have important clinical implications for the identification and subsequent management of men deemed to be at increased risk of developing prostate cancer. The evidence for prostate cancer risk reduction with the mono 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) finasteride in a low-risk population and, more recently, with the dual 5ARI dutasteride in a population at increased risk of developing the disease, has potential to expand management options for men at risk of developing prostate cancer beyond more frequent and/or earlier surveillance. • Given that family history can be easily assessed in routine clinical practice, it should be regarded as an important parameter to consider alongside PSA level for prostate cancer risk assessment. PMID:21166744

  17. Pathological Predictors for Site of Local Recurrence After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, Supriya; Toi, Ants; Taback, Nathan; Evans, Andrew; Haider, Masoom A.; Milosevic, Michael; Bristow, Robert G.; Chung, Peter; Bayley, Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Vesprini, Danny; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles; Menard, Cynthia

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Rational design of targeted radiotherapy (RT) in prostate cancer (Pca) hinges on a better understanding of spatial patterns of recurrence. We sought to identify pathological factors predictive for site of local recurrence (LR) after external beam RT. Methods and Materials: Prospective databases were reviewed to identify men with LR after RT from 1997 through 2009. Patients with biochemical failure and biopsy-confirmed Pca more than 2 years after RT were evaluated. Prediction for site of recurrence based on the following pretreatment factors was determined on independent and cluster-sextant basis: presence of malignancy, dominant vs. nondominant percentage core length (PCL) involvement, PCL {>=} or <40%, and Gleason score. Sites of dominant PCL were defined as sextants with peak PCL involvement minus 10%, and >5% for each patient. Results: Forty-one patients with low-intermediate risk Pca constituted the study cohort. Median time to biopsy after RT was 51 months (range, 24-145). Of 246 sextants, 74 were involved with tumor at baseline. When sextants are treated as independent observations the presence of malignancy (77% vs. 22%, p = 0.0001), dominant PCL (90% vs. 46%, p = 0.0001), and PCL {>=}40% (89% vs. 68 %, p = 0.04) were found to be significant predictors for LR, although PCL {>=}40% did not retain statistical significance if sextants were considered correlated. The vast majority of patients (95%) recurred at the original site of dominant PCL or PCL {>=}40%, and 44% also recurred in regions of nondominant PCL <40% (n = 8) and/or benign sampling (n = 14) at baseline. Conclusions: LR after RT predominantly occurs in regions bearing higher histological tumor burden but are not isolated to these sites. Our data highlights the value of spatially resolved baseline pathological sampling and may assist in the design of clinical trials tailoring RT dose prescriptions to subregions of the prostate gland.

  18. Long-Term Quality of Life Outcome After Proton Beam Monotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coen, John J.; Paly, Jonathan J.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Weyman, Elizabeth; Rodrigues, Anita; Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Talcott, James A.

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: High-dose external radiation for localized prostate cancer results in favorable clinical outcomes and low toxicity rates. Here, we report long-term quality of life (QOL) outcome for men treated with conformal protons. Methods: QOL questionnaires were sent at specified intervals to 95 men who received proton radiation. Of these, 87 men reported 3- and/or 12-month outcomes, whereas 73 also reported long-term outcomes (minimum 2 years). Symptom scores were calculated at baseline, 3 months, 12 months, and long-term follow-up. Generalized estimating equation models were constructed to assess longitudinal outcomes while accounting for correlation among repeated measures in an individual patient. Men were stratified into functional groups from their baseline questionnaires (normal, intermediate, or poor function) for each symptom domain. Long-term QOL changes were assessed overall and within functional groups using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Statistically significant changes in all four symptom scores were observed in the longitudinal analysis. For the 73 men reporting long-term outcomes, there were significant change scores for incontinence (ID), bowel (BD) and sexual dysfunction (SD), but not obstructive/irritative voiding dysfunction (OID). When stratified by baseline functional category, only men with normal function had increased scores for ID and BD. For SD, there were significant changes in men with both normal and intermediate function, but not poor function. Conclusions: Patient reported outcomes are sensitive indicators of treatment-related morbidity. These results quantitate the long-term consequences of proton monotherapy for prostate cancer. Analysis by baseline functional category provides an individualized prediction of long-term QOL scores. High dose proton radiation was associated with small increases in bowel dysfunction and incontinence, with more pronounced changes in sexual dysfunction.

  19. TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in Turkish patients with localized prostate cancer: results of radical prostatectomy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Ömer; Berber, Ufuk; Okçelik, Sezgin; Soydan, Hasan; Ateş, Ferhat; Karademir, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to evaluate and determine the frequency of Transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2)-ERG fusion in Turkish patients with clinically localized prostate cancer by using immunohistochemistry and reveal its relationship with clinicopathologic variables. Material and methods Radical prostatectomy specimens of 99 patients, who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy for localized cancer, between January 2002 and December 2011 were analyzed in the study. To detect ERG fusions, monoclonal ERG antibodyclone ID: EPR3864 (Epitomics, San Diego, CA, USA) and monoclonal anti-ERG antibody (9FY) (BiocareMedical, LLC, USA) were used. The immunistochemical expression of ERG protein was assessed as positive or negative regardless of stain intensity. Patients’ age, total and primary Gleason scores, PSA levels, prostate volumes, tumor volumes, tumor stages and perineural invasion status were analysed retrospectively. Total fusion rate and correlation between the variables and fusion were evaluated. Results Mean age, prostate volume, tumor volume, PSA value of 99 patients were 62.02 years (±5.93), 50.02 cc (±20.67), 3.19 cc (±4.16), and 9.34 ng/mL (±3.37) respectively. TMPRSS2-ERG fusion was seen in 46 (46.5%) of 99 patients. When the variables analysed with independent samples t test to predict fusion (+) status, none of them was found to be statistically significant. When evaluated by logistic regression analysis for (+) or (−) status, only tumor stage was found to be statistically significantly correlated with fusion (p=0.049). Conclusion The incidence of TMPRSS-ERG fusion in patients with localised prostate cancer in our study with Turkish population was found as 46.5%. Only tumor stage correlated with TMPRSS2-ERG fusion. PMID:27274888

  20. Improved Biochemical Outcomes With Statin Use in Patients With High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Katz, Matthew S.; Mak, Kimberley; Yamada, Yoshiya; Feder, David J.; Zhang Zhigang; Jia Xiaoyu; Shi Weiji; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) and biochemical and survival outcomes after high-dose radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 1711 men with clinical stage T1-T3 prostate cancer were treated with conformal RT to a median dose of 81 Gy during 1995-2007. Preradiotherapy medication data were available for 1681 patients. Three hundred eighty-two patients (23%) were taking a statin medication at diagnosis and throughout RT. Nine hundred forty-seven patients received a short-course of neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) with RT. The median follow-up was 5.9 years. Results: The 5- and 8-year PSA relapse-free survival (PRFS) rates for statin patients were 89% and 80%, compared with 83% and 74% for those not taking statins (p = 0.002). In a multivariate analysis, statin use (hazard ratio [HR]0.69, p = 0.03), National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) low-risk group, and ADT use were associated with improved PRFS. Only high-risk patients in the statin group demonstrated improvement in PRFS (HR 0.52, p = 0.02). Across all groups, statin use was not associated with improved distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (p = 0.51). On multivariate analysis, lower NCCN risk group (p = 0.01) and ADT use (p = 0.005) predicted improved DMFS. Conclusions: Statin use during high-dose RT for clinically localized prostate cancer was associated with a significant improvement in PRFS in high-risk patients. These data suggest that statins have anticancer activity and possibly provide radiosensitization when used in conjunction with RT in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  1. Prostate brachytherapy seed localization using a mobile C-arm without tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayad, Maria S.; Lee, Junghoon; Prince, Jerry L.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2009-02-01

    The success of prostate brachytherapy depends on the faithful delivery of a dose plan. In turn, intraoperative localization and visualization of the implanted radioactive brachytherapy seeds enables more proficient and informed adjustments to the executed plan during therapy. Prior work has demonstrated adequate seed reconstructions from uncalibrated mobile c-arms using either external tracking devices or image-based fiducials for c-arm pose determination. These alternatives are either time-consuming or interfere with the clinical flow of the surgery, or both. This paper describes a seed reconstruction approach that avoids both tracking devices and fiducials. Instead, it uses the preoperative dose plan in conjunction with a set of captured images to get initial estimates of the c-arm poses followed by an auto-focus technique using the seeds themselves as fiducials to refine the pose estimates. Intraoperative seed localization is achieved through iteratively solving for poses and seed correspondences across images and reconstructing the 3D implanted seeds. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated through a series of simulations involving variable noise levels, seed densities, image separability and number of images. Preliminary results indicate mean reconstruction errors within 1.2 mm for noisy plans of 84 seeds or fewer. These are attained for additive noise whose standard deviation of the 3D mean error introduced to the plan to simulate the implant is within 3.2 mm.

  2. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dal Pra, Alan; Locke, Jennifer A.; Borst, Gerben; Supiot, Stephane; Bristow, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa). The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: (1) androgen signaling pathway; (2) hypoxic tumor cells and regions; (3) DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; and (4) abnormal extra-/intracell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa. PMID:26909338

  3. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dal Pra, Alan; Locke, Jennifer A; Borst, Gerben; Supiot, Stephane; Bristow, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa). The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: (1) androgen signaling pathway; (2) hypoxic tumor cells and regions; (3) DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; and (4) abnormal extra-/intracell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa. PMID:26909338

  4. Evaluation of an Epithelial Plasticity (EP) Biomarker Panel in Men with Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Andrew J; Healy, Patrick; Halabi, Susan; Vollmer, Robin; Lark, Amy; Kemeny, Gabor; Ware, Kathryn; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Given the potential importance of epithelial plasticity (EP) to cancer metastasis, we sought to investigate biomarkers related to EP in men with localized prostate cancer (PC) for the association with time to PSA recurrence and other clinical outcomes after surgery. Methods Men with localized PC treated with radical prostatectomy at the Durham VA medical center and whose prostatectomy tissues were included in a tissue microarray (TMA) linked to long-term outcomes. We performed immunohistochemical studies using validated antibodies against E-cadherin and Ki-67 and mesenchymal biomarkers including N-cadherin, vimentin, SNAIL, ZEB1, and TWIST. Association studies were conducted for each biomarker with baseline clinical/pathologic characteristics and risk of PSA recurrence over time. Results Two hundred and five men contributed TMA tissue and had long-term follow-up (median 11 years). Forty-three percent had PSA recurrence; 3 died of PC. The majority had high E-cadherin expression (86%); 14% had low/absent E-cadherin expression. N-cadherin was rarely expressed (<4%) and we were unable to identify an E-to-N cadherin switch as independently prognostic. No associations with clinical risk group, PSA recurrence, or Gleason sum were noted for SNAIL, ZEB1, vimentin, or TWIST, despite heterogeneous expression between patients. We observed an association of higher Ki-67 expression with Gleason sum (p=0.043), NCCN risk (p=0.013), and PSA recurrence (HR 1.08, p=0.0095). Conclusions The expression of EP biomarkers in this cohort of men with a low risk of PC-specific mortality was not associated with aggressive features or PSA relapse after surgery. PMID:26458958

  5. Quality of Life and Toxicity from Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Munsell, Mark F.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson; Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A.; Dong, Lei; Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy (PBT) for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs. SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after PBT. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified RTOG grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity and argon plasma coagulation (APC) were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results 226 men received PSPT and 65 SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel EPIC summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was one Grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade 3 or greater GI or GU toxicity. APC application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs. SSPT 1.5%; p = 0.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥ 2 GI or GU toxicity with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long term comparative results in a larger patient cohort are warranted. PMID:24139077

  6. Expression of livin, survivin and caspase-3 in prostatic cancer and their clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junfei; Ren, Lixin; Wang, Xiaolu; Qu, Changbao; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    To explore the expressions level of Livin, Survivin and Caspase-3 in prostatic cancer and the relationship among the 3 proteins and the clinicopathological features as well as the correlation among them. Totally, 43 paraffin-embedded prostate cancer tissues obtained from patients who were performed with rectal prostate biopsy or excision and 17 paraffin-embedded prostatic hyperplasia tissues were collected. All the specimens were confirmed by pathology. Immunohistochemistry SP method was used to detect the expressions of Livin, Survivin and Caspase-3 in prostatic cancer compared to hyperplasia tissues. The positive expression rates of both Livin and Survivin in prostatic cancer tissue were higher than those in prostatic hyperplasia tissue (93.02% vs. 64.70%, P < 0.05; 83.72% vs. 35.29%, P < 0.01). However, the positive expression rate of Caspase-3 in prostatic cancer tissue was obviously lower than that in prostatic hyperplasia tissue (25.58% vs. 58.82%, P < 0.01). Both Livin and Survivin expressions in prostatic cancer tissue were related to pathological grading (Gleason scores) (X2 = 14.000, P = 0.001), but not related to preoperative PSA, clinical stages and distant metastasis (P > 0.05). Capsase-3 expression in prostatic cancer tissue was related to pathological grading (Gleason scores) (X 2 = 14.000, P = 0.001) and clinical stages (X 2 = 4.896, P = 0.027), but not related to preoperative PSA and distant metastasis (P > 0.05). In prostatic cancer tissue, Livin expression had no correlation with Survivin expression (r = 0.127, P = 0.419 > 0.05), but negatively correlated with Caspase-3 expression (r = -0.497, P = 0.001). Survivin expression was negatively correlated with Caspase-3 expression (r = -0.354, P = 0.020). Livin, Survivin and Caspase-3 are closely related to the occurrence and development of prostatic cancer and which are expected to become new targets for diagnosis and treatment in future. PMID:26823716

  7. High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy: Safe and Effective Brachytherapy for Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Ghilezan, Michel; Hill, Dennis R.; Schour, Lionel; Brandt, David; Gustafson, Gary

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy used as the only treatment (monotherapy) for early prostate cancer is consistent with current concepts in prostate radiobiology, and the dose is reliably delivered in a prospectively defined anatomic distribution that meets all the requirements for safe and effective therapy. We report the disease control and toxicity of HDR monotherapy from California Endocurietherapy (CET) and William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: There were 298 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with HDR monotherapy between 1996 and 2005. Two biologically equivalent hypofractionation protocols were used. At CET the dose was 42 Gy in six fractions (two implantations 1 week apart) delivered to a computed tomography-defined planning treatment volume. At WBH the dose was 38 Gy in four fractions (one implantation) based on intraoperative transrectal ultrasound real-time treatment planning. The bladder, urethral, and rectal dose constraints were similar. Toxicity was scored with the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.2 years. The median age of the patients was 63 years, and the median value of the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen was 6.0 ng/mL. The 8-year results were 99% local control, 97% biochemical control (nadir +2), 99% distant metastasis-free survival, 99% cause-specific survival, and 95% overall survival. Toxicity was scored per event, meaning that an individual patient with more than one symptom was represented repeatedly in the morbidity data table. Genitourinary toxicity consisted of 10% transient Grade 2 urinary frequency or urgency and 3% Grade 3 episode of urinary retention. Gastrointestinal toxicity was <1%. Conclusions: High disease control rates and low morbidity demonstrate that HDR monotherapy is safe and effective for patients with localized prostate cancer.

  8. Review of the economic evaluations of hormonal therapy for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hatoum, Hind T; Crawford, E David; Nielsen, Sandy Kildegaard; Lin, Swu-Jane; Marshall, Dennis C

    2013-04-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is used as first-line therapy for locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer aiming to reduce testosterone to castrate levels. The authors present an overview of the existing cost-effectiveness studies of ADT in prostate cancer. Cost-effectiveness of ADT was reviewed using a systematic search of the peer-reviewed literature, as well as research abstracts presented at various scientific and industry meetings. Most cost-effectiveness analyses of ADT reported results within the accepted societal threshold of US$50,000 cost/quality-adjusted life year needed to adopt new technology. PMID:23570436

  9. Prognosis in patients with local recurrence after definitive irradiation for prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kuban, D.A.; el-Mahdi, A.M.; Schellhammer, P.F.

    1989-06-15

    Of 414 patients with Stage A2-C disease, all with a minimum follow-up period of 3 years, who have been definitively irradiated by external beam therapy or iodine-125 (I-125) implantation for biopsy-proven prostatic adenocarcinoma, 83 patients (20%) have experienced local recurrences. The incidence of distant metastasis was significantly higher in patients with local tumor recurrence (56 of 83; 68%), as compared with those with local control (64 of 331; 19%; P less than 0.001). This difference remained significant within each tumor grade and stage. Subsequently, survival in patients with local recurrence was significantly shorter than in those with local tumor control (66% vs. 89% at 5 years; P = 0.001). Of the 83 patients with local tumor recurrence, 56 had local recurrence and distant metastasis, and 27 had local failure alone, with a median follow-up of 76 months for the latter group. Fifteen of 83 patients with local recurrence (18%) developed major complications secondary to local disease. Three of the 83 (4%) patients were known to die of prostatic recurrence alone and another 11 of 83 (13%) as a result of some combination of local and distant disease. Therefore, in reference to the entire group of definitively irradiated patients, only 0.72% expired solely of complications associated with local tumor recurrence and an additional 2.7% expired of a combination of both local and distant disease.

  10. Defining the level of evidence for technology adoption in the localized prostate cancer pathway.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Massimo; El-Shater Bosaily, Ahmed; Emberton, Mark; Ahmed, Hashim U

    2014-08-01

    New technologies in prostate cancer are attempting to change the current prostate cancer pathway by aiming to reduce harms while maintaining the benefits associated with screening, diagnosis, and treatment. In this article, we discuss the optimal evaluation that new technologies should undergo to provide level 1 evidence typically required to change the practice. With this in mind, we focus on feasible and pragmatic trials that could be delivered in a timely fashion by many centers while retaining primary outcomes that focus on clinically meaningful outcomes. PMID:24332638

  11. Managing locally advanced prostate cancer: a urologist's and a patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Roger; Offen, Nigel

    2006-03-01

    A 60-year-old man presented to his general practitioner with prostatic symptoms and high blood pressure. Based upon a prostate-specific antigen level of 44 ng/ml and further investigations (digital rectal examination, transrectal ultrasound-guided needle biopsy, and magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and bone scans), the patient was diagnosed with locally advanced (cT3, N0, M0) prostate cancer. Here, the urologist and the patient describe treatment from their respective viewpoints. Following discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the various therapeutic options, radiotherapy plus hormonal therapy (bicalutamide 150 mg) was chosen as the approach that best suited the patient's lifestyle. In this review, the patient and the urologist consider the impact of the chosen treatment in terms of efficacy, tolerability and quality of life. PMID:16520652

  12. Neuroendocrine immunophenotype as predictor of clinical recurrence in 110 patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Autorino, R; Lamendola, M G; De Luca, G; De Sio, M; Giuliano, F; D' Armiento, M; De Placido, S; Conti, P; Di Lorenzo, G

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between NE expression and well-known prognostic factors and assessed whether tumor relapse after radical surgery correlates with the extent of NE differentiation. Radical prostatectomy specimens from 110 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were assessed. Patients were followed up every three months for the first two years after surgery and six monthly for 5 additional years until failure, or for a mean of 48 months from the time of surgery for those who did not experience failure. The percentage of cells showing CgA immunoreactivity was evaluated using a visual quantitative method. Tumor staining was categorized as positive if greater than 10 percent and negative if less than 10 percent of tumor cells were stained, to ensure that only cases with significant positivity were included in the positive group. The median follow-up was 5.4 years (range 1.8 to 7.2). The median time to clinical recurrence was 7.5 years and the median time to biochemical recurrence was 2.8 years. Of 31 patients (28 percent) who experienced a PSA recurrence, 15 developed a clinical recurrence. The mean preoperative PSA level was 9 ng/ml (range 2.7 to 25). Most cases were well differentiated (Gleason score less than 7), intraprostatic (less than pT2) tumors. Immunoreactivity in >or= 10 percent of the cells was seen in 17.2 percent (n=19) of the tumor specimens. The preoperative PSA level, Gleason score, use of neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy, lymphnode positivity were not statistically associated with NE expression. Only the primary pathologic stage appeared to be associated with CgA staining in the primary tumor (p=0.001). On the univariate analysis NE expression did not predict biochemical recurrence free survival, whereas it was associated with clinical recurrence. NE differentiation in clinically localized prostate cancer can be associated with failure after definitive surgical treatment, even if no conclusions can be drawn regarding its value

  13. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27072044

  14. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27072044

  15. Living with untreated localized prostate cancer: a qualitative analysis of patient narratives.

    PubMed

    Hedestig, Oliver; Sandman, Per-Olof; Widmark, Anders

    2003-02-01

    Few, if any, qualitative studies aimed at gaining an understanding of the experience of patients with prostate cancer have been done. The purpose of this study was to illuminate the meaning of being a patient living with untreated localized prostate cancer. Seven men with untreated localized prostate cancer were interviewed in their homes. The interviews were tape recorded and transcribed into text. The text was analyzed using a phenomenologic-hermeneutic approach inspired by Ricoeur's philosophy. The meaning of living with untreated localized prostate cancer could be interpreted as living life under a dark shadow. The disease was described as a threat to the patient's life. When living under this shadow, many of the men studied had an ambivalent wish both to share their experience with others and to be alone with their experiences of the disease. They believed that the disease had changed their lives, and their manhood was restricted by sexual dysfunctions and described as a burden. They used various coping strategies to manage this situation. Despite a positive relationship with their physicians, there is a risk that these patients will not be given the attention they need because of their good prognosis. PMID:12556713

  16. Three-dimensional modeling of biopsy protocols for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Loughlin, M; Carlbom, I; Busch, C; Douglas, T; Egevad, L; Frimmel, H; Norberg, M; Sesterhenn, I; Frogge, J M

    1998-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignant tumor in American men, yet only a small percentage of men will develop clinically significant disease. Needle core biopsies are used to confirm the presence of cancer prior to surgery. While needle core biopsies have shown some ability to predict tumor volume and grade in prostatectomy specimens, for the individual patient they are neither sensitive nor specific enough to guide therapy. In this paper, we describe a system for simulating needle biopsies on three-dimensional models of cancerous prostates reconstructed from serial sections. First we segment the serial sections, delineating tumors and landmarks. Next, we register the sections using a color-merging scheme, and reconstruct the three-dimensional model using modified-shape-based interpolation. The resulting volume can be rendered, and simulated needle core biopsies can be taken from the reconstructed model. We use our system to simulate two different biopsy protocols on a reconstructed prostate specimen. PMID:9740040

  17. Histopathological observations in the canine prostate treated by local microwave hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Leib, Z.; Rothem, A.; Lev, A.; Servadio, C.

    1986-01-01

    A large series of repeated experiments were performed applying localized microwave hyperthermia to the prostate in dogs using a new water-cooled skirt-type antenna (1), operating at 915 MHz, as part of a new hyperthermia apparatus being developed for the treatment of the prostate in humans. The prostate gland of 20 male dogs was heated repeatedly under general anesthesia, at temperatures between 40/sup 0/C and 47/sup 0/C, and for different lengths of time up to 10 h. The prostate and other tissues were evaluated histopathologically following treatments. Invariably, all treatments by hyperthermia of the prostate caused a mononuclear inflammatory infiltration in the interstitium and polymorphonuclear infiltration in the glandular elements. Permanent tissue damage was found to be time-and temperature-dependent. Heating at 42.5/sup 0/C (+/- 0.5/sup 0/5C) for up to 1.5 h was found to be harmless and could be safely repeated with our equipment. This study was part of a preclinical evaluation of a new antenna and apparatus.

  18. Histopathological observations in the canine prostate treated by local microwave hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Leib, Z; Rothem, A; Lev, A; Servadio, C

    1986-01-01

    A large series of repeated experiments were performed applying localized microwave hyperthermia to the prostate in dogs using a new water-cooled skirt-type antenna [1], operating at 915 MHz, as part of a new hyperthermia apparatus being developed for the treatment of the prostate in humans. The prostate gland of 20 male dogs was heated repeatedly under general anesthesia, at temperatures between 40 degrees C and 47 degrees C, and for different lengths of time up to 10 h. The prostate and other tissues were evaluated histopathologically following treatments. Invariably, all treatments by hyperthermia of the prostate caused a mononuclear inflammatory infiltration in the interstitium and polymorphonuclear infiltration in the glandular elements. Permanent tissue damage was found to be time-and temperature-dependent. Heating at 42.5 degrees C (+/- 0.5 degrees 5C) for up to 1.5 h was found to be harmless and could be safely repeated with our equipment. This study was part of a preclinical evaluation of a new antenna and apparatus. PMID:3945589

  19. [Measurement of serum prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) by Delfia PAP Kit using europium and clinical evaluation in patients with prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Akimoto, S; Ohki, T; Ichikawa, T; Akakura, K; Shimazaki, J

    1994-11-01

    Fundamental and clinical studies of serum prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) detected by a Delfia PAP kit were performed. The system is a time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay using europium as a tracer. The lower limit of detection was 0.2 ng/ml. Sera from 54 patients with prostate cancer, 20 with benign prostatic hypertrophy, 20 with urological malignancies other than prostate cancer and 140 adult males over 46 years old were determined. From the mean + 2 S.D. of serum PAP values obtained on the adult males, 1.5 ng/ml was considered as the upper normal level of adult males. By calculating the efficiency and ROC curve using the PAP values of prostate cancer and benign prostatic cancer, 2.5 ng/ml was decided as a cut-off value of this kit. The positive rates of adult males, prostate cancer, benign prostatic cancer and urological malignancies other than prostate cancer were 0.7%, 65%, 20% and 10%, respectively. The sensitivity of stage A2, B2, C and D1 + D2 was, 0%, 0%, 64% and 83%, respectively. The efficiency of the Delfia PAP kit was 52% and that of the Markit M PA kit was 71%. The correlation between the values assayed with the Delfia PAP kit and the Dinabot PAP kit was very high; the value obtained with the Delfia PAP kit was about 80% of that obtained with the Dinabot PAP kit. PMID:7530404

  20. Radiobiologically optimized couch shift: A new localization paradigm using cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yimei Gardner, Stephen J.; Wen, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Gordon, James; Brown, Stephen; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To present a novel positioning strategy which optimizes radiation delivery by utilizing radiobiological response knowledge and evaluate its use during prostate external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Five patients with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer were evaluated retrospectively in this IRB-approved study. For each patient, a VMAT plan with one 358° arc was generated on the planning CT (PCT) to deliver 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Five representative pretreatment cone beam CTs (CBCT) were selected for each patient. The CBCT images were registered to PCT by a human observer, which consisted of an initial automated registration with three degrees-of-freedom, followed by manual adjustment for agreement at the prostate/rectal wall interface. To determine the optimal treatment position for each CBCT, a search was performed centering on the observer-matched position (OM-position) utilizing a score function based on radiobiological and dosimetric indices (EUD{sub prostate}, D99{sub prostate}, NTCP{sub rectum}, and NTCP{sub bladder}) for the prostate, rectum, and bladder. We termed the optimal treatment position the radiobiologically optimized couch shift position (ROCS-position). Results: The dosimetric indices, averaged over the five patients’ treatment plans, were (mean ± SD) 79.5 ± 0.3 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 78.2 ± 0.4 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 11.1% ± 2.7% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 7.6% (NTCP{sub bladder}). The corresponding values from CBCT at the OM-positions were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.8 ± 0.7 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 12.1% ± 5.6% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 51.6% ± 15.2% (NTCP{sub bladder}), respectively. In comparison, from CBCT at the ROCS-positions, the dosimetric indices were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.3 ± 0.6 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 8.0% ± 3.3% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 15.7% (NTCP{sub bladder}). Excessive NTCP{sub rectum} was observed on Patient 5 (19.5% ± 6.6%) corresponding to localization at OM

  1. Immunochemical detection of serum prostatic acid phosphatase. Methodology and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chu, T M; Wang, M C; Scott, W W; Gibbons, R P; Johnson, D E; Schmidt, J D; Loening, S A; Prout, G R; Murphy, G P

    1978-01-01

    An immunochemical method for detection of prostatic acid prosphatase is described. Purified acid phosphatase was isolated from cancerous human prostate. A specific antiserum to the purified enzyme was produced in rabbits. The antiserum to postatic acid phosphatase did not react with acid phosphatase originating from other tissues. A counter immunolectrophoresis, utilizing the specific antibodies and a chemical staining technique, has been developed and clinically evaluated. Sera from patients with prostatic carcinoma (6/20 of stage B, 27/49 of stage C, and 98/125 of stage D) gave positive results. Sera from 19 patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy, from 89 patients with other tumors, from 12 patients with Gaucher's disease, from 107 healthy volunteers, and from 50 normal age-matched men all gave negative results. The sensitivity of this method was 0.4 IU of enzyme activity or 20 ng per ml of prostatic acid phosphatase protein. Further clinical evaluation of patients in the early stage of prostatic cancer and of patients undergoing chemotherapy is in progress. PMID:75196

  2. What can proteomic analyses contribute to understanding the molecular biology and clinical behavior of prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Ware, Joy L

    2004-12-01

    Identifying the proteins and their complex interactions that promote and/or sustain the aggressive malignant phenotype is essential for understanding key effectors of the molecular biology of prostate cancer. This is also essential for development of new clinical applications. A variety of proteomic techniques, ranging from mass spectrometry to new methods of multiplexing protein identification, have great potential for rapidly achieving these goals. However, in order to obtain meaningful results, these techniques must be applied within the context of our knowledge of the heterogeneity of prostate tissues and tumors, the impact of specimen processing on both the quality and quantity of proteins detected and a thorough understanding of prostate cell biology. Collaboration between the protein chemist and the prostate cell biologist will expedite progress in this important field. PMID:15966843

  3. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of Pelvic Lymph Nodes in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Planning Procedures and Early Experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Muren, Ludvig Paul Wasbo, Ellen; Helle, Svein Inge; Hysing, Liv Bolstad; Karlsdottir, Asa; Odland, Odd Harald; Valen, Harald; Ekerold, Randi; Johannessen, Dag Clement

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: We present planning and early clinical outcomes of a study of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 43 patients initially treated with an IMRT plan delivering 50 Gy to the prostate, seminal vesicles, and pelvic lymph nodes, followed by a conformal radiotherapy (CRT) plan delivering 20 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles, were studied. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data for the added plans were compared with dose-volume histogram data for the sum of two CRT plans for 15 cases. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity, based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system, was recorded weekly throughout treatment as well as 3 to 18 months after treatment and are presented. Results: Treatment with IMRT both reduced normal tissue doses and increased the minimum target doses. Intestine volumes receiving more than 40 and 50 Gy were significantly reduced (e.g., at 50 Gy, from 81 to 19 cm{sup 3}; p = 0.026), as were bladder volumes above 40, 50, and 60 Gy, rectum volumes above 30, 50, and 60 Gy, and hip joint muscle volumes above 20, 30, and 40 Gy. During treatment, Grade 2 GI toxicity was reported by 12 of 43 patients (28%), and Grade 2 to 4 GU toxicity was also observed among 12 patients (28%). With 6 to 18 months of follow-up, 2 patients (5%) experienced Grade 2 GI effects and 7 patients (16%) experienced Grade 2 GU effects. Conclusions: Use of IMRT for pelvic irradiation in prostate cancer reduces normal tissue doses, improves target coverage, and has a promising toxicity profile.

  4. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  5. Cleveland Clinic experience with interstitial laser coagulation of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulchaker, James C.; Ng, Christopher S.; Palone, David; Angie, Michelle; Kursh, Elroy D.

    2000-05-01

    Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has long been considered the gold standard therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The problems associated with the TURP, which have been extensively described, include significant bleeding, TUR syndrome, incontinence, stricture, bladder neck contracture, and sexual dysfunction. The desire for simpler, less morbid alternative therapies to TURP has led to an eruption of research and development in the last decade. This is fueled by the continued research for more economical alternatives in our current high cost health care system.

  6. Fast radioactive seed localization in intraoperative cone beam CT for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yu-chi; Xiong, Jian-ping; Cohan, Gilad; Zaider, Marco; Mageras, Gig; Zelefsky, Michael

    2013-03-01

    A fast knowledge-based radioactive seed localization method for brachytherapy was developed to automatically localize radioactive seeds in an intraoperative volumetric cone beam CT (CBCT) so that corrections, if needed, can be made during prostate implant surgery. A transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) scan is acquired for intraoperative treatment planning. Planned seed positions are transferred to intraoperative CBCT following TRUS-to-CBCT registration using a reference CBCT scan of the TRUS probe as a template, in which the probe and its external fiducial markers are pre-segmented and their positions in TRUS are known. The transferred planned seeds and probe serve as an atlas to reduce the search space in CBCT. Candidate seed voxels are identified based on image intensity. Regions are grown from candidate voxels and overlay regions are merged. Region volume and intensity variance is checked against known seed volume and intensity profile. Regions meeting the above criteria are flagged as detected seeds; otherwise they are flagged as likely seeds and sorted by a score that is based on volume, intensity profile and distance to the closest planned seed. A graphical interface allows users to review and accept or reject likely seeds. Likely seeds with approximately twice the seed volume are automatically split. Five clinical cases are tested. Without any manual correction in seed detection, the method performed the localization in 5 seconds (excluding registration time) for a CBCT scan with 512×512×192 voxels. The average precision rate per case is 99% and the recall rate is 96% for a total of 416 seeds. All false negative seeds are found with 15 in likely seeds and 1 included in a detected seed. With the new method, updating of calculations of dose distribution during the procedure is possible and thus facilitating evaluation and improvement of treatment quality.

  7. Tissue-type imaging (TTI) based on ultrasonic spectral and clinical parameters for detecting, evaluating, and managing prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feleppa, Ernest J.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Dasgupta, Shreedevi; Kalisz, Andrew; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Porter, Christopher R.

    2005-04-01

    This study seeks to develop more-sensitive and -specific ultrasonic methods of imaging cancerous prostate tissue and thereby to improve means of guiding biopsies and planning, targeting, and monitoring treatment. Ultrasonic radio-frequency, echo-signal data, and clinical variables, e.g., PSA, voiding function, etc., during biopsy examinations were acquired. Spectra of the radio-frequency signals were computed in each biopsied region, and used to train neural networks; biopsy results served as the gold standard. A lookup table gave scores for cancer likelihood on a pixel-by-pixel basis from locally computed spectral-parameter and global clinical-parameter values. ROC curves used leave-one-patient- and leave-one-biopsy-out approaches to minimize classification bias. Resulting ROC-curve areas were 0.80+/-0.03 for neural-networks versus 0.66+/-0.03 for conventional classification. TTIs generated from data acquired pre-surgically showed tumors that were unrecognized in conventional images and during surgery. 3-D renderings of prostatectomy histology and TTIs showed encouraging correlations, which shows promise for improving the detection and management of prostate cancer, e.g., for biopsy guidance, planning dose-escalation and tissue-sparing options for radiation or cryotherapy, and assessing the effects of treatment. Combining MRS parameters with US spectral parameters appears capable of further improving prostate-cancer imaging. [Work supported by NIH.

  8. Clinical, pathological and molecular prognostic factors in prostate cancer decision-making process.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Dario; Palermo, Giuseppe; Totaro, Angelo; Bassi, Pier Francesco; Pinto, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common urologic neoplasm and the second leading cause of cancer-related death among men in many developed countries. Given the highly heterogeneous behaviour of the disease, there is a great need for prognostic factors, in order to stratify the clinical risk and give the best treatment options to the patient. Clinical factors, such as prostate-specific antigen value and derivatives, and pathological factors, such as stage and Gleason grading, are well kown prognostic factors. Nomograms can provide useful prediction in each clinical sceario. The field of molecular biomarkers is briskly evolving towards personalized medicine. TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, deletion of PTEN ed and gene panels are some of the more extensively explored molecular features in prostate cancer outcome prediction. In the near future, circulating tumour cells, exosomes and microRNAs could give us further, not invasive important tools. PMID:26917215

  9. External beam radiotherapy and abiraterone in men with localized prostate cancer: safety and effect on tissue androgens

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunpi; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Russell, Kenneth J.; Liao, Jay J.; Konodi, Mark A.; Kurland, Brenda F.; Marck, Brett T.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Dalkin, Bruce L.; Montgomery, R. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Optimizing androgen suppression may provide better control of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Numerous trials have supported the benefit of combining androgen deprivation with definitive radiotherapy in men with locally advanced or high-grade disease. Addition of abiraterone to LHRH agonist (LHRHa) with radiation has not been reported. We examined the safety of this combination as well as its impact on androgen suppression. Materials/Methods A prospective, phase II study was conducted in men with localized PCa treated with 6 months of neoadjuvant and concurrent abiraterone with LHRHa and radiation. Duration of adjuvant LHRHa was at discretion of treating clinician. Prostate biopsies were obtained prior to start of therapy and prior to radiation. Serum and tissue androgen levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results 22 men with intermediate (3) and high-risk PCa (19) received study therapy. 16 men completed the intended course of abiraterone, and 19 men completed planned radiation to 77.4–81 Gy. Radiation to pelvic nodes was administered in 20 men. The following grade 3 toxicities were reported: lymphopenia (14),, fatigue (1), transaminitis (2), hypertension (2), and hypokalemia (1). There were no grade 4 toxicities. All 21 men who complied with at least 3 months of abiraterone had pre-radiation PSA nadir of <0.3. Median levels of tissue androgens downstream of CYP17A were significantly suppressed after treatment with abiraterone, and upstream steroids were increased. At median follow-up of 21 months (range 3–37), only one patient (who had discontinued abiraterone at 3 months) had biochemical relapse. Conclusions Addition of abiraterone to LHRHa with radiation is safe and achieves effective prostatic androgen suppression. Preliminary analysis of the clinical data is also promising with excellent PSA nadir and no relapse to date in this high-risk population. PMID:25772183

  10. Positional Stability of Electromagnetic Transponders Used for Prostate Localization and Continuous, Real-Time Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Litzenberg, Dale W. . E-mail: litzen@umich.edu; Willoughby, Twyla R. M.Sc.; Balter, James M.; Sandler, Howard M.; Wei, John; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Cunningham, Alexis A.; Bock, Andrea; Aubin, Michele; Roach, Mack; Shinohara, Katsuto; Pouliot, Jean

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the relative positional stability of implanted glass-encapsulated circuits (transponders) used in continuous electromagnetic localization and tracking of target volumes during radiation therapy. Ideally, the distances between transponders remains constant over the course of treament. In this work, we evaluate the accuracy of these conditions. Methods and Materials: Three transponders were implanted in each of 20 patients. Images (CT scan or X-ray pair) were acquired at 13 time points. These images occurred from the day of implant (2 weeks before simulation) to 4 weeks posttreatment. The distance between transponders was determined from each dataset. The average and standard deviation of each distance were determined, and changes were evaluated over several time periods, including pretreatment and during therapy. Results: Of 60 transponders implanted, 58 showed no significant migration from their intended positions. Of the two transponders that did migrate, one appears to have been implanted in the venous plexus, and the other in the urethra, with no clinical consequences to the patients. An analysis that included the planning CT scan and all subsequent distance measurements showed that the standard deviation of intertransponder distances was {<=}1.2 mm for up to 1 month after the completion of therapy. Conclusions: Implanted transponders demonstrate the same long-term stability characteristics as implanted gold markers, within statistical uncertainties. As with gold markers, and using the same implant procedure, basic guidelines for the placement of transponders within the prostate help ensure minimal migration.

  11. Treatment patterns among Canadian men diagnosed with localized low-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, C.; Tran, K.; Rahal, R.; Porter, G.; Fung, S.; Louzado, C.; Liu, J.; Bryant, H.

    2015-01-01

    In general, guideline-recommended treatment options for men with low-risk prostate cancer (pca) include active surveillance, radical prostatectomy, and external-beam radiation therapy or brachytherapy. Because of the concern about overdiagnosis and consequent overtreatment of pca, patients with low-risk disease are increasingly being managed with active surveillance. Using data from six provincial cancer registries, we examined treatment patterns within a year of a diagnosis of localized low-risk pca, and we assessed differences by age. Of patients diagnosed in 2010 in four of the six reporting provinces, most received surgery or radiation therapy within 1 year of diagnosis. Depending on the province, either surgery or radiation therapy was the most commonly used primary treatment. In the other two provinces, most patients had no record of treatment within a year of diagnosis. Examining treatment patterns by age demonstrated a lesser likelihood of receiving surgery or radiation therapy within 1 year of diagnosis among men more than 75 years of age than among men 75 years of age or younger (no record of treatment in 69.1% and 46.3% respectively). In conclusion, we observed interprovincial and age-specific variations in the patterns of care for men with low-risk pca. The findings presented in this report are intended to identify opportunities for improvement in clinical practice that could lead to improved care and experience. PMID:26715876

  12. Regulation of local steroidogenesis in the brain and in prostate cancer: lessons learned from interdisciplinary collaboration.

    PubMed

    Fokidis, H Bobby; Adomat, Hans H; Kharmate, Geetanjali; Hosseini-Beheshti, Elham; Guns, Emma S; Soma, Kiran K

    2015-01-01

    Sex steroids play critical roles in the regulation of the brain and many other organs. Traditionally, researchers have focused on sex steroid signaling that involves travel from the gonads via the circulation to intracellular receptors in target tissues. This classic concept has been challenged, however, by the growing number of cases in which steroids are synthesized locally and act locally within diverse tissues. For example, the brain and prostate carcinoma were previously considered targets of gonadal sex steroids, but under certain circumstances, these tissues can upregulate their steroidogenic potential, particularly when circulating sex steroid concentrations are low. We review some of the similarities and differences between local sex steroid synthesis in the brain and prostate cancer. We also share five lessons that we have learned during the course of our interdisciplinary collaboration, which brought together neuroendocrinologists and cancer biologists. These lessons have important implications for future research in both fields. PMID:25223867

  13. Designing Normative Messages About Active Surveillance for Men With Localized Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Volk, Robert J; Kinsman, Gianna T; Le, Yen-Chi L; Swank, Paul; Blumenthal-Barby, Jennifer; McFall, Stephanie L; Byrd, Theresa L; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Cantor, Scott B

    2015-01-01

    Active surveillance is increasingly recognized as a reasonable option for men with low-risk, localized prostate cancer, yet few men who might benefit from conservative management receive it. The authors examined the acceptability of normative messages about active surveillance as a management option for patients with low-risk prostate cancer. Men with a diagnosis of localized prostate cancer who were recruited through prostate cancer support organizations completed a web-based survey (N = 331). They rated messages about active surveillance for believability, accuracy, and importance for men to hear when making treatment decisions. The message "You don't have to panic … you have time to think about your options" was perceived as believable, accurate, and important by more than 80% of the survivors. In contrast, messages about trust in the active surveillance protocol and "knowing in plenty of time" if treatment is needed were rated as accurate by only about 36% of respondents. For active surveillance to be viewed as a reasonable alternative, men will need reassurance that following an active surveillance protocol is likely to allow time for curative treatment if the cancer progresses. PMID:26066011

  14. Designing normative messages about active surveillance for men with localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Robert J.; Kinsman, Gianna T.; Le, Yen-Chi L.; Swank, Paul; Blumenthal-Barby, Jennifer; McFall, Stephanie L.; Byrd, Theresa L.; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Cantor, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    Active surveillance (AS) is increasingly recognized as a reasonable option for men with low-risk, localized prostate cancer, yet few men who might benefit from conservative management receive it. We examined the acceptability of normative messages about AS as a management option for patients with low-risk prostate cancer. Men with a diagnosis of localized prostate cancer who were recruited through prostate cancer support organizations completed a web-based survey (N=331). They rated messages about AS for believability, accuracy, and importance for men to hear when making treatment decisions. The message “you don’t have to panic…you have time to think about your options” was perceived as believable, accurate, and important by over 80% of the survivors. In contrast, messages about trust in the AS protocol and “knowing in plenty of time” if treatment is needed were rated as accurate by only about 36% of respondents. For AS to be viewed as a reasonable alternative, men will need reassurance that following an AS protocol is likely to allow time for curative treatment if the cancer progresses. PMID:26066011

  15. Final Report of the Intergroup Randomized Study of Combined Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Plus Radiotherapy Versus Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Alone in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Malcolm D.; Parulekar, Wendy R.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Brundage, Michael; Kirkbride, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Cowan, Richard; Kostashuk, Edmund C.; Anderson, John; Swanson, Gregory; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Hayter, Charles; Jovic, Gordana; Hiltz, Andrea; Hetherington, John; Sathya, Jinka; Barber, James B.P.; McKenzie, Michael; El-Sharkawi, Salah; Souhami, Luis; Hardman, P.D. John; Chen, Bingshu E.; Warde, Padraig

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We have previously reported that radiotherapy (RT) added to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) improves survival in men with locally advanced prostate cancer. Here, we report the prespecified final analysis of this randomized trial. Patients and Methods NCIC Clinical Trials Group PR.3/Medical Research Council PR07/Intergroup T94-0110 was a randomized controlled trial of patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Patients with T3-4, N0/Nx, M0 prostate cancer or T1-2 disease with either prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of more than 40 μg/L or PSA of 20 to 40 μg/L plus Gleason score of 8 to 10 were randomly assigned to lifelong ADT alone or to ADT+RT. The RT dose was 64 to 69 Gy in 35 to 39 fractions to the prostate and pelvis or prostate alone. Overall survival was compared using a log-rank test stratified for prespecified variables. Results One thousand two hundred five patients were randomly assigned between 1995 and 2005, 602 to ADT alone and 603 to ADT+RT. At a median follow-up time of 8 years, 465 patients had died, including 199 patients from prostate cancer. Overall survival was significantly improved in the patients allocated to ADT+RT (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; 95% CI, 0.57 to 0.85; P < .001). Deaths from prostate cancer were significantly reduced by the addition of RT to ADT (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.61; P < .001). Patients on ADT+RT reported a higher frequency of adverse events related to bowel toxicity, but only two of 589 patients had grade 3 or greater diarrhea at 24 months after RT. Conclusion This analysis demonstrates that the previously reported benefit in survival is maintained at a median follow-up of 8 years and firmly establishes the role of RT in the treatment of men with locally advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25691677

  16. Survey of Clinical and Pathological Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients With Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, M.; Alizadeh, S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The importance of implementation: Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Therefore, further studies about the protests of disease, diagnosis and timely treatment are essential. Study Method: In this study, 80 prostate cancer patients admitted to Imam Khomeini Hospital, Urmia in Iran from 2000 to 2008 were reviewed. Patients were studied according to their age, clinical protests, Gleason scoring, positive family history, smoking, type of treatment and post-treatment conditions. Questionnaires were adjusted based on the objectives and the data were extracted from the medical records of patients and the desired results were achieved. Results: In this study, the most common age group for prostate cancer is older than 60 years (92/5%). The most common type of pathology for prostate cancer is adenocarcinoma that 93.75% of cases are included. Secondary TCC with secondary source is present in 5% and sarcoma in 1.25% of cases. 46.25% of patients with prostate cancer are smokers. The most common clinical symptoms among patients are obstructive symptoms (56.25%), and irritation of the urinary tract (52.81%). Hematuria in 26.25% and urinary incontinence in 5% of cases have been recorded. 16.3% of patients referred with metastatic symptoms. Most patients with prostate cancer have Gleason score 5-7 (40%). All patients were undergoing prostatectomy (82.5% TURP and 17.5% SPP) and 47.5% of cases were bilateral orchiectomy. The cases reviewed, 22 were followed that included 27.5% of cases. Among them, 6 people have died due prostate cancer (27.27%) that the mean age of the patients after diagnosis until death was 34.4 months. 2 others died from other causes (9.09%). The remaining 14 cases were elder patients with a mean follow-up duration of 44 months. Conclusion: According to the results obtained in the present study, the most common type of prostate cancer pathology is adenocarcinoma

  17. NMR-based metabolomics of prostate cancer: a protagonist in clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Gupta, Ashish; Nath, Kavindra

    2016-06-01

    Advances in the application of NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomic profiling of prostate cancer comprises a potential tactic for understanding the impaired biochemical pathways arising due to a disease evolvement and progression. This technique involves qualitative and quantitative estimation of plethora of small molecular weight metabolites of body fluids or tissues using state-of-the-art chemometric methods delivering an important platform for translational research from basic to clinical, to reveal the pathophysiological snapshot in a single step. This review summarizes the present arrays and recent advancements in NMR-based metabolomics and a glimpse of currently used medical imaging tactics, with their role in clinical diagnosis of prostate cancer. PMID:26959614

  18. Pathological features of localized prostate cancer in China: a contemporary analysis of radical prostatectomy specimens.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yao; Yang, Xiao-Qun; Han, Cheng-Tao; Dai, Bo; Zhang, Hai-Liang; Shi, Guo-Hai; Wang, Chao-Fu; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2015-01-01

    There has been a rapid increase in the incidence of prostate cancer in China, especially in areas with boosted economic development. In this study, we analyzed the pathological features of a contemporary series of radical prostatectomy cases. A total of 230 consecutive, whole-mounted radical prostatectomy specimens collected from 2012 to 2014 were reviewed. The median age of the patients was 68 years, and 64.3% of patients presented with prostate specific antigen alone. Pathological examination indicated that a high proportion (77.4%) of patients had intermediate- or high-risk disease according to the Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment Post-Surgical score. After surgery, only 28 patients met the criteria for active surveillance (organ-confined Gleason ≥6 disease). The Prostate Cancer Research International Active Surveillance criteria achieved a sensitivity of 57.1% and a specificity of 98.0% for identifying candidates. The probability of Gleason score upgrading was 24.8% in the entire group and 59.0% in biopsy-confirmed Gleason ≥6 disease. The predominant tumor was located in the transition zone in 14.8% of cases, while only three patients (1.3%) had a predominant tumor located in the anterior region. Patients with transition zone-predominant tumor were likely to have been referred with urinary symptoms and high prostate specific antigen levels. The results of this study highlight the contemporary pathological features of localized prostate cancer in urban China. There was an increased trend towards asymptomatic cases, though most patients had intermediate- or high-risk disease and were suitable for definitive treatment. The low prevalence of dominant cancer in the anterior region may reflect race-based pathological differences. PMID:25799190

  19. CIP2A is a candidate therapeutic target in clinically challenging prostate cancer cell populations.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Anchit; Rane, Jayant K; Kivinummi, Kati K; Urbanucci, Alfonso; Helenius, Merja A; Tolonen, Teemu T; Saramäki, Outi R; Latonen, Leena; Manni, Visa; Pimanda, John E; Maitland, Norman J; Westermarck, Jukka; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2015-08-14

    Residual androgen receptor (AR)-signaling and presence of cancer stem-like cells (SCs) are the two emerging paradigms for clinically challenging castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Therefore, identification of AR-target proteins that are also overexpressed in the cancer SC population would be an attractive therapeutic approach.Our analysis of over three hundred clinical samples and patient-derived prostate epithelial cultures (PPECs), revealed Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) as one such target. CIP2A is significantly overexpressed in both hormone-naïve prostate cancer (HN-PC) and CRPC patients . CIP2A is also overexpressed, by 3- and 30-fold, in HN-PC and CRPC SCs respectively. In vivo binding of the AR to the intronic region of CIP2A and its functionality in the AR-moderate and AR-high expressing LNCaP cell-model systems is also demonstrated. Further, we show that AR positively regulates CIP2A expression, both at the mRNA and protein level. Finally, CIP2A depletion reduced cell viability and colony forming efficiency of AR-independent PPECs as well as AR-responsive LNCaP cells, in which anchorage-independent growth is also impaired.These findings identify CIP2A as a common denominator for AR-signaling and cancer SC functionality, highlighting its potential therapeutic significance in the most clinically challenging prostate pathology: castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:25965834

  20. MOLECULAR IMAGING OF PROSTATE CANCER: translating molecular biology approaches into the clinical realm

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Grimm, Jan; Donati, Olivio F.; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of prostate cancer has dramatically changed since the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in the 1980’s. Most prostate cancers today are detected at early stages of the disease and are considered “indolent”, however some patients’ prostate cancers demonstrate a more aggressive behavior which leads to rapid progression and death. Increasing understanding of the biology underlying the heterogeneity that characterizes this disease has lead to a continuously evolving role of imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Functional and metabolic imaging techniques are gaining importance as the impact on the therapeutic paradigm has shifted from structural tumor detection alone to distinguishing patients with indolent tumors that can be managed conservatively (e.g., by active surveillance) from patients with more aggressive tumors that may require definitive treatment with surgery or radiation. In this review, we discuss advanced imaging techniques that allow direct visualization of molecular interactions relevant to prostate cancer and their potential for translation to the clinical setting in the near future. The potential use of imaging to follow molecular events during drug therapy as well as the use of imaging agents for therapeutic purposes will also be discussed. PMID:25693661

  1. Optimization of Radiation Therapy Techniques for Prostate Cancer With Prostate-Rectum Spacers: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, Gary; Benz, Eileen; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Miralbell, Raymond; Zilli, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Dose-escalated radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer improves disease control but is also associated with worse rectal toxicity. A spacer placed between the prostate and rectum can be used to displace the anterior rectal wall outside of the high-dose radiation regions and potentially minimize radiation-induced rectal toxicity. This systematic review focuses on the published data regarding the different types of commercially available prostate-rectum spacers. Dosimetric results and preliminary clinical data using prostate-rectum spacers in patients with localized prostate cancer treated by curative radiation therapy are compared and discussed.

  2. Clinical and economic considerations in the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Varenhorst, E; Carlsson, P; Pedersen, K

    1994-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a growing health problem with considerable economic consequences. Despite progress in the management of this disease, few areas in medicine generate greater disagreement. The larger part of healthcare resources are allocated to 'halfway technologies' aimed at palliative intervention to prolong life, while a relatively small part goes to measures aimed at preventing or curing the disease. The aetiology of this cancer is multifactorial and no practical measures for primary prevention are known. The number of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer is increasing steadily. The age-adjusted mortality, however, has increased only slightly. In its early stages, prostate cancer is often asymptomatic and is usually not diagnosed until it has advanced. Programmes for the early detection of prostate cancer (screening) claimed to reduce morbidity and mortality are a matter of controversy. Furthermore, there has been much debate regarding optimal treatment in the early stages of the disease. Economic considerations have not as yet been integrated into studies concerning localised prostate cancer. The routine first-line treatment of advanced prostate cancer usually involves some type of endocrine treatment. The most straightforward technique is surgical castration. Oral estrogens are as effective as castration, but have significant cardiovascular adverse effects. These may possibly be prevented if estrogens are given parenterally. A third principal endocrine treatment is the administration of antiandrogens. Medical castration can be attained by the administration of recently developed synthetic peptides, gonadotrophin-releasing hormone {luteinising hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH)} (GnRH) analogue agonists which are given parenterally. The advantage of this type of medical castration is that the trauma of surgical castration and the adverse effects of oral estrogens are avoided. In an attempt to improve the results obtained with endocrine treatment, the

  3. Integration of co-localized glandular morphometry and protein biomarker expression in immunofluorescent images for prostate cancer prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Richard; Khan, Faisal M.; Zeineh, Jack; Donovan, Michael; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2015-03-01

    Immunofluorescent (IF) image analysis of tissue pathology has proven to be extremely valuable and robust in developing prognostic assessments of disease, particularly in prostate cancer. There have been significant advances in the literature in quantitative biomarker expression as well as characterization of glandular architectures in discrete gland rings. However, while biomarker and glandular morphometric features have been combined as separate predictors in multivariate models, there is a lack of integrative features for biomarkers co-localized within specific morphological sub-types; for example the evaluation of androgen receptor (AR) expression within Gleason 3 glands only. In this work we propose a novel framework employing multiple techniques to generate integrated metrics of morphology and biomarker expression. We demonstrate the utility of the approaches in predicting clinical disease progression in images from 326 prostate biopsies and 373 prostatectomies. Our proposed integrative approaches yield significant improvements over existing IF image feature metrics. This work presents some of the first algorithms for generating innovative characteristics in tissue diagnostics that integrate co-localized morphometry and protein biomarker expression.

  4. Improving Clinical Risk Stratification at Diagnosis in Primary Prostate Cancer: A Prognostic Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Karen A.; Muir, Kenneth R.; Gavin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Over 80% of the nearly 1 million men diagnosed with prostate cancer annually worldwide present with localised or locally advanced non-metastatic disease. Risk stratification is the cornerstone for clinical decision making and treatment selection for these men. The most widely applied stratification systems use presenting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration, biopsy Gleason grade, and clinical stage to classify patients as low, intermediate, or high risk. There is, however, significant heterogeneity in outcomes within these standard groupings. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) has recently adopted a prognosis-based pathological classification that has yet to be included within a risk stratification system. Here we developed and tested a new stratification system based on the number of individual risk factors and incorporating the new ISUP prognostic score. Methods and Findings Diagnostic clinicopathological data from 10,139 men with non-metastatic prostate cancer were available for this study from the Public Health England National Cancer Registration Service Eastern Office. This cohort was divided into a training set (n = 6,026; 1,557 total deaths, with 462 from prostate cancer) and a testing set (n = 4,113; 1,053 total deaths, with 327 from prostate cancer). The median follow-up was 6.9 y, and the primary outcome measure was prostate-cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). An external validation cohort (n = 1,706) was also used. Patients were first categorised as low, intermediate, or high risk using the current three-stratum stratification system endorsed by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. The variables used to define the groups (PSA concentration, Gleason grading, and clinical stage) were then used to sub-stratify within each risk category by testing the individual and then combined number of risk factors. In addition, we incorporated the new ISUP prognostic score as a discriminator

  5. Risk Prediction for Prostate Cancer Recurrence Through Regularized Estimation with Simultaneous Adjustment for Nonlinear Clinical Effects*

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qi; Chung, Matthias; Moreno, Carlos S.; Johnson, Brent A.

    2011-01-01

    In biomedical studies, it is of substantial interest to develop risk prediction scores using high-dimensional data such as gene expression data for clinical endpoints that are subject to censoring. In the presence of well-established clinical risk factors, investigators often prefer a procedure that also adjusts for these clinical variables. While accelerated failure time (AFT) models are a useful tool for the analysis of censored outcome data, it assumes that covariate effects on the logarithm of time-to-event are linear, which is often unrealistic in practice. We propose to build risk prediction scores through regularized rank estimation in partly linear AFT models, where high-dimensional data such as gene expression data are modeled linearly and important clinical variables are modeled nonlinearly using penalized regression splines. We show through simulation studies that our model has better operating characteristics compared to several existing models. In particular, we show that there is a non-negligible effect on prediction as well as feature selection when nonlinear clinical effects are misspecified as linear. This work is motivated by a recent prostate cancer study, where investigators collected gene expression data along with established prognostic clinical variables and the primary endpoint is time to prostate cancer recurrence. We analyzed the prostate cancer data and evaluated prediction performance of several models based on the extended c statistic for censored data, showing that 1) the relationship between the clinical variable, prostate specific antigen, and the prostate cancer recurrence is likely nonlinear, i.e., the time to recurrence decreases as PSA increases and it starts to level off when PSA becomes greater than 11; 2) correct specification of this nonlinear effect improves performance in prediction and feature selection; and 3) addition of gene expression data does not seem to further improve the performance of the resultant risk

  6. Calculated organ doses using Monte Carlo simulations in a reference male phantom undergoing HDR brachytherapy applied to localized prostate carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to obtain equivalent doses in radiosensitive organs (aside from the bladder and rectum) when applying high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to a localized prostate carcinoma using {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir sources. These data are compared with results in a water phantom and with expected values in an infinite water medium. A comparison with reported values from proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is also provided. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed using a voxelized phantom described in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110, which reproduces masses and shapes from an adult reference man defined in ICRP Publication 89. Point sources of {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir with photon energy spectra corresponding to those exiting their capsules were placed in the center of the prostate, and equivalent doses per clinical absorbed dose in this target organ were obtained in several radiosensitive organs. Values were corrected to account for clinical circumstances with the source located at various positions with differing dwell times throughout the prostate. This was repeated for a homogeneous water phantom. Results: For the nearest organs considered (bladder, rectum, testes, small intestine, and colon), equivalent doses given by {sup 60}Co source were smaller (8%-19%) than from {sup 192}Ir. However, as the distance increases, the more penetrating gamma rays produced by {sup 60}Co deliver higher organ equivalent doses. The overall result is that effective dose per clinical absorbed dose from a {sup 60}Co source (11.1 mSv/Gy) is lower than from a {sup 192}Ir source (13.2 mSv/Gy). On the other hand, equivalent doses were the same in the tissue and the homogeneous water phantom for those soft tissues closer to the prostate than about 30 cm. As the distance increased, the differences of photoelectric effect in water and soft tissue, and appearance of other materials

  7. Localization of MCT2 at peroxisomes is associated with malignant transformation in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valença, Isabel; Pértega-Gomes, Nelma; Vizcaino, José Rámon; Henrique, Rui M; Lopes, Carlos; Baltazar, Fátima; Ribeiro, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on monocarboxylate transporters expression in prostate cancer (PCa) have shown that monocarboxylate transporter 2 (MCT2) was clearly overexpressed in prostate malignant glands, pointing it out as a putative biomarker for PCa. However, its localization and possible role in PCa cells remained unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that MCT2 localizes mainly at peroxisomes in PCa cells and is able to take advantage of the peroxisomal transport machinery by interacting with Pex19. We have also shown an increase in MCT2 expression from non-malignant to malignant cells that was directly correlated with its peroxisomal localization. Upon analysis of the expression of several peroxisomal β-oxidation proteins in PIN lesions and PCa cells from a large variety of human prostate samples, we suggest that MCT2 presence at peroxisomes is related to an increase in β -oxidation levels which may be crucial for malignant transformation. Our results present novel evidence that may not only contribute to the study of PCa development mechanisms but also pinpoint novel targets for cancer therapy. PMID:25639644

  8. Feasibility of vibro-acoustography with a quasi-2D ultrasound array transducer for detection and localizing of permanent prostate brachytherapy seeds: A pilot ex vivo study

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Kinnick, Randall R.; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra; Davis, Brian J.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Effective permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) requires precise placement of radioactive seeds in and around the prostate. The impetus for this research is to examine a new ultrasound-based imaging modality, vibro-acoustography (VA), which may serve to provide a high rate of PPB seed detection while also effecting enhanced prostate imaging. The authors investigate the ability of VA, implemented on a clinical ultrasound (US) scanner and equipped with a quasi-2D (Q2D) array US transducer, to detect and localize PPB seeds in excised prostate specimens. Methods: Nonradioactive brachytherapy seeds were implanted into four excised cadaver prostates. A clinical US scanner equipped with a Q2D array US transducer was customized to acquire both US and C-scan VA images at various depths. The VA images were then used to detect and localize the implanted seeds in prostate tissue. To validate the VA results, computed tomography (CT) images of the same tissue samples were obtained to serve as the reference by which to evaluate the performance of VA in PPB seed detection. Results: The results indicate that VA is capable of accurately identifying the presence and distribution of PPB seeds with a high imaging contrast. Moreover, a large ratio of the PPB seeds implanted into prostate tissue samples could be detected through acquired VA images. Using CT-based seed identification as the standard, VA was capable of detecting 74%–92% of the implanted seeds. Additionally, the angular independency of VA in detecting PPB seeds was demonstrated through a well-controlled phantom experiment. Conclusions: Q2DVA detected a substantial portion of the seeds by using a 2D array US transducer in excised prostate tissue specimens. While VA has inherent advantages associated with conventional US imaging, it has the additional advantage of permitting detection of PPB seeds independent of their orientation. These results suggest the potential of VA as a method for PPB imaging that

  9. Feasibility of vibro-acoustography with a quasi-2D ultrasound array transducer for detection and localizing of permanent prostate brachytherapy seeds: A pilot ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Alizad, Azra; Kinnick, Randall R.; Davis, Brian J.; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Effective permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) requires precise placement of radioactive seeds in and around the prostate. The impetus for this research is to examine a new ultrasound-based imaging modality, vibro-acoustography (VA), which may serve to provide a high rate of PPB seed detection while also effecting enhanced prostate imaging. The authors investigate the ability of VA, implemented on a clinical ultrasound (US) scanner and equipped with a quasi-2D (Q2D) array US transducer, to detect and localize PPB seeds in excised prostate specimens. Methods: Nonradioactive brachytherapy seeds were implanted into four excised cadaver prostates. A clinical US scanner equipped with a Q2D array US transducer was customized to acquire both US and C-scan VA images at various depths. The VA images were then used to detect and localize the implanted seeds in prostate tissue. To validate the VA results, computed tomography (CT) images of the same tissue samples were obtained to serve as the reference by which to evaluate the performance of VA in PPB seed detection. Results: The results indicate that VA is capable of accurately identifying the presence and distribution of PPB seeds with a high imaging contrast. Moreover, a large ratio of the PPB seeds implanted into prostate tissue samples could be detected through acquired VA images. Using CT-based seed identification as the standard, VA was capable of detecting 74%–92% of the implanted seeds. Additionally, the angular independency of VA in detecting PPB seeds was demonstrated through a well-controlled phantom experiment. Conclusions: Q2DVA detected a substantial portion of the seeds by using a 2D array US transducer in excised prostate tissue specimens. While VA has inherent advantages associated with conventional US imaging, it has the additional advantage of permitting detection of PPB seeds independent of their orientation. These results suggest the potential of VA as a method for PPB imaging that

  10. External Beam Radiation Therapy and Abiraterone in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer: Safety and Effect on Tissue Androgens

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Eunpi; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Russell, Kenneth J.; Liao, Jay J.; Konodi, Mark A.; Kurland, Brenda F.; Marck, Brett T.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Dalkin, Bruce L.; Montgomery, R. Bruce

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Optimizing androgen suppression may provide better control of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Numerous trials have supported the benefit of combining androgen deprivation therapy with definitive radiation therapy in men with locally advanced or high-grade disease. Addition of abiraterone to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) with radiation has not been reported. We examined the safety of this combination as well as its impact on androgen suppression. Methods and Materials: A prospective, phase 2 study was conducted in men with localized PCa treated with 6 months of neoadjuvant and concurrent abiraterone with LHRHa and radiation. Duration of adjuvant LHRHa was at the discretion of the treating clinician. Prostate biopsy assays were obtained prior to the start of therapy and prior to radiation. Sera and tissue androgen levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 22 men with intermediate- (n=3) and high-risk PCa (n=19) received study therapy. Sixteen men completed the intended course of abiraterone, and 19 men completed planned radiation to 77.4 to 81 Gy. Radiation to pelvic nodes was administered in 20 men. The following grade 3 toxicities were reported: lymphopenia (14 patients), fatigue (1 patient), transaminitis (2 patients), hypertension (2 patients), and hypokalemia (1 patient). There were no grade 4 toxicities. All 21 men who complied with at least 3 months of abiraterone therapy had a preradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration nadir of <0.3 ng/mL. Median levels of tissue androgen downstream of CYP17A were significantly suppressed after treatment with abiraterone, and upstream steroids were increased. At median follow-up of 21 months (range: 3-37 months), only 1 patient (who had discontinued abiraterone at 3 months) had biochemical relapse. Conclusions: Addition of abiraterone to LHRHa with radiation is safe and achieves effective prostatic androgen suppression

  11. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR brachytherapy for treatment of locally advanced cancer of the prostate and cervix.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Chris J; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Juang, Titania; Scott, Serena; Chen, Xin; Cunha, Adam; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I C

    2011-02-22

    A clinical treatment delivery platform has been developed and is being evaluated in a clinical pilot study for providing 3D controlled hyperthermia with catheter-based ultrasound applicators in conjunction with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Catheter-based ultrasound applicators are capable of 3D spatial control of heating in both angle and length of the devices, with enhanced radial penetration of heating compared to other hyperthermia technologies. Interstitial and endocavity ultrasound devices have been developed specifically for applying hyperthermia within HDR brachytherapy implants during radiation therapy in the treatment of cervix and prostate. A pilot study of the combination of catheter based ultrasound with HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate and cervical cancer has been initiated, and preliminary results of the performance and heating distributions are reported herein. The treatment delivery platform consists of a 32 channel RF amplifier and a 48 channel thermocouple monitoring system. Controlling software can monitor and regulate frequency and power to each transducer section as required during the procedure. Interstitial applicators consist of multiple transducer sections of 2-4 cm length × 180 deg and 3-4 cm × 360 deg. heating patterns to be inserted in specific placed 13g implant catheters. The endocavity device, designed to be inserted within a 6 mm OD plastic tandem catheter within the cervix, consists of 2-3 transducers × dual 180 or 360 deg sectors. 3D temperature based treatment planning and optimization is dovetailed to the HDR optimization based planning to best configure and position the applicators within the catheters, and to determine optimal base power levels to each transducer section. To date we have treated eight cervix implants and six prostate implants. 100 % of treatments achieved a goal of >60 min duration, with therapeutic temperatures achieved in all cases. Thermal dosimetry within the hyperthermia target

  12. Modified Logistic Regression Models Using Gene Coexpression and Clinical Features to Predict Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongya; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Gorlov, Ivan P.; Zeng, Jia; Dai, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    Predicting disease progression is one of the most challenging problems in prostate cancer research. Adding gene expression data to prediction models that are based on clinical features has been proposed to improve accuracy. In the current study, we applied a logistic regression (LR) model combining clinical features and gene co-expression data to improve the accuracy of the prediction of prostate cancer progression. The top-scoring pair (TSP) method was used to select genes for the model. The proposed models not only preserved the basic properties of the TSP algorithm but also incorporated the clinical features into the prognostic models. Based on the statistical inference with the iterative cross validation, we demonstrated that prediction LR models that included genes selected by the TSP method provided better predictions of prostate cancer progression than those using clinical variables only and/or those that included genes selected by the one-gene-at-a-time approach. Thus, we conclude that TSP selection is a useful tool for feature (and/or gene) selection to use in prognostic models and our model also provides an alternative for predicting prostate cancer progression. PMID:24367394

  13. A clinical data validated mathematical model of prostate cancer growth under intermittent androgen suppression therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portz, Travis; Kuang, Yang; Nagy, John D.

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is commonly treated by a form of hormone therapy called androgen suppression. This form of treatment, while successful at reducing the cancer cell population, adversely affects quality of life and typically leads to a recurrence of the cancer in an androgen-independent form. Intermittent androgen suppression aims to alleviate some of these adverse affects by cycling the patient on and off treatment. Clinical studies have suggested that intermittent therapy is capable of maintaining androgen dependence over multiple treatment cycles while increasing quality of life during off-treatment periods. This paper presents a mathematical model of prostate cancer to study the dynamics of androgen suppression therapy and the production of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a clinical marker for prostate cancer. Preliminary models were based on the assumption of an androgen-independent (AI) cell population with constant net growth rate. These models gave poor accuracy when fitting clinical data during simulation. The final model presented hypothesizes an AI population with increased sensitivity to low levels of androgen. It also hypothesizes that PSA production is heavily dependent on androgen. The high level of accuracy in fitting clinical data with this model appears to confirm these hypotheses, which are also consistent with biological evidence.

  14. Elevated expression of HIF-lα in actively growing prostate tissues is associated with clinical features of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Wang, Hui; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Haihu; Bi, Dongbin; Ding, Kejia; Lu, Jiaju

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases in middle-age or older men. Increasing evidence has shown that BPH is associated with hypoxia microenvironment. Methods We retrospectively collected patient data and tissue samples from fetal prostates(FP), normal prostates(NP), intra-acinar of BPH, peri-acinar of BPH, prostate cancers and sarcomas of prostate. The expression of HIF-1α, as well as VEGF was visualized by immunohistochemistry and statistically analyzed with clinical parameters. Results Expression of HIF-lα was observed in intra-acinar of BPH (69.5%), prostate cancer (85.7%) and all FPs, while NP and peri-acinar of BPH tissues were all stained negative. HIF-lα levels in FPs and the malignant tumors were higher than BPH tissues(p < 0.05), and the expression of HIF-lα in intra-acinar of BPH was higher than NP and peri-acinar of BPH (p < 0.05). The expression of HIF-lα was correlated with the weight of intra-acinar of prostate (p < 0.05). And patients with prostate weight larger that 72.45g were prone to have HIF-lα moderate-positive expression, according to the ROC curve (AUC = 0.734, 95%CI = 0.630-0.838). Moreover, the risk of acute urine retention (AUR) for HIF-lα moderate-positive patients increased significantly (OR=5.517, 95%CI = 2.434-12.504). Conclusions HIF-lα expression is increased in highly proliferative prostate tissues and correlated with the weight of intra-acinar prostate. Moreover, HIF-lα is also an independent risk factor for AUR occurrence in BPH patients. PMID:26919249

  15. Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring for Prostate Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy: First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Jin Aun; Booth, Jeremy T.; Poulsen, Per R.; Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben Schjodt; Eade, Thomas; Hegi, Fiona; Kneebone, Andrew; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Most linear accelerators purchased today are equipped with a gantry-mounted kilovoltage X-ray imager which is typically used for patient imaging prior to therapy. A novel application of the X-ray system is kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM), in which the 3-dimensional (3D) tumor position is determined during treatment. In this paper, we report on the first use of KIM in a prospective clinical study of prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducial markers undergoing conventionally fractionated IMAT (RapidArc) were enrolled in an ethics-approved study of KIM. KIM involves acquiring kV images as the gantry rotates around the patient during treatment. Post-treatment, markers in these images were segmented to obtain 2D positions. From the 2D positions, a maximum likelihood estimation of a probability density function was used to obtain 3D prostate trajectories. The trajectories were analyzed to determine the motion type and the percentage of time the prostate was displaced {>=}3, 5, 7, and 10 mm. Independent verification of KIM positional accuracy was performed using kV/MV triangulation. Results: KIM was performed for 268 fractions. Various prostate trajectories were observed (ie, continuous target drift, transient excursion, stable target position, persistent excursion, high-frequency excursions, and erratic behavior). For all patients, 3D displacements of {>=}3, 5, 7, and 10 mm were observed 5.6%, 2.2%, 0.7% and 0.4% of the time, respectively. The average systematic accuracy of KIM was measured at 0.46 mm. Conclusions: KIM for prostate IMAT was successfully implemented clinically for the first time. Key advantages of this method are (1) submillimeter accuracy, (2) widespread applicability, and (3) a low barrier to clinical implementation. A disadvantage is that KIM delivers additional imaging dose to the patient.

  16. A comparison of CT- and ultrasound-based imaging to localize the prostate for external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    McNair, Helen A. . E-mail: Helen.McNair@rmh.nhs.uk; Mangar, Stephen A.; Coffey, Jerome; Shoulders, Beverley; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Norman, Andrew; Staffurth, John; Sohaib, S. Aslam; Warrington, Alan P.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the accuracy of NOMOS B-mode acquisition and targeting system (BAT) compared with computed tomography (CT) in localizing the prostate. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients were CT scanned, and the prostate was localized by 3 observers using the BAT system. The BAT couch shift measurements were compared with the CT localization. Six of the patients had gold markers present in the prostate, and the prostate movement determined by BAT was compared with the movement determined by the gold markers. Results: Using the BAT system, the 3 observers determined the prostate position to be a mean of 1-5 mm over all directions with respect to the CT. The proportion of readings with a difference >3 mm between the observers was in the range of 25% to 44%. The prostate movement based on gold markers was an average of 3-5 mm different from that measured by BAT. The literature assessing the accuracy and reproducibility on BAT is summarized and compared with our findings. Conclusions: We have found that there are systematic differences between the BAT-defined prostate position compared with that estimated on CT using gold grain marker seeds.

  17. Clinical results of early stage prostatic cancer treated by pelvic lymphadenectomy and /sup 125/I implants

    SciTech Connect

    Kandzari, S.J.; Belis, J.A.; Kim, J.C.; Gnepp, D.R.; Riley, R.S.

    1982-05-01

    Eighty patients with clinically early stage adenocarcinoma of the prostate were treated with pelvic lymphadenectomy and interstitial implantation of /sup 125/I seeds. A new applicator that permits greater accuracy in spacing the seeds has been developed. Postoperative complications were minimal, with urinary irritability being the most common. Multiple transrectal needle biopsies were performed 12 and 18 months after treatment in 46 patients. The prostatic biopsies were negative for carcinoma in 61 per cent and positive in 39 per cent of the patients. Long-term followup is needed to correlate post-treatment biopsies with survival and to determine if patients with positive biopsies should receive further treatment.

  18. Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer Diagnosis and Monitoring: An Appraisal of Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Galletti, Giuseppe; Portella, Luigi; Tagawa, Scott T.; Kirby, Brian J.; Giannakakou, Paraskevi

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as a viable solution to the lack of tumor tissue availability for patients with a variety of solid tumors, including prostate cancer. Different approaches have been used to capture this tumor cell population and several of these techniques have been used to assess the potential role of CTCs as a biological marker to predict treatment efficacy and clinical outcome. CTCs are now considered a strong tool to understand the molecular characteristics of prostate cancer, and to be used and analyzed as a ‘liquid biopsy’ in the attempt to grasp the biological portrait of the disease in the individual patient. PMID:24809501

  19. Automatic localization of the prostate for on-line or off-line image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Wolthaus, Jochem W.H.; Artignan, Xavier; Bois, Josien de; Jaffray, David A.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Herk, Marcel van . E-mail: portal@nki.nl

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: With higher radiation dose, higher cure rates have been reported in prostate cancer patients. The extra margin needed to account for prostate motion, however, limits the level of dose escalation, because of the presence of surrounding organs at risk. Knowledge of the precise position of the prostate would allow significant reduction of the treatment field. Better localization of the prostate at the time of treatment is therefore needed, e.g. using a cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system integrated with the linear accelerator. Localization of the prostate relies upon manual delineation of contours in successive axial CT slices or interactive alignment and is fairly time-consuming. A faster method is required for on-line or off-line image-guided radiotherapy, because of prostate motion, for patient throughput and efficiency. Therefore, we developed an automatic method to localize the prostate, based on 3D gray value registration. Methods and materials: A study was performed on conventional repeat CT scans of 19 prostate cancer patients to develop the methodology to localize the prostate. For each patient, 8-13 repeat CT scans were made during the course of treatment. First, the planning CT scan and the repeat CT scan were registered onto the rigid bony structures. Then, the delineated prostate in the planning CT scan was enlarged by an optimum margin of 5 mm to define a region of interest in the planning CT scan that contained enough gray value information for registration. Subsequently, this region was automatically registered to a repeat CT scan using 3D gray value registration to localize the prostate. The performance of automatic prostate localization was compared to prostate localization using contours. Therefore, a reference set was generated by registering the delineated contours of the prostates in all scans of all patients. Gray value registrations that showed large differences with respect to contour registrations were detected with a {chi

  20. Unraveling Brazilian Indian population prostate good health: clinical, anthropometric and genetic features

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Mario M.; Reis, Leonardo O.; Ferreira, Ubirajara; Cardoso, Ulieme Oliveira; Barbieri, Raquel Bueno; de Mendonça, Gustavo B.; Ward, Laura S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare dietary, lifestyle, clinical, anthropometric, genetic and prostatic features of Brazilian Indians and non-Indians (Amazon). Methods 315 men, 228 Indians and 89 non-Indians, ≥40 years old were submitted to digital rectal examination, serum prostate specific antigen (PSA), testosterone, TP53 and GSTP1 genotyping, anthropometric, lifestyle, dietary, personal and familial medical history. Prostatic symptoms were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Results Macuxis and Yanomamis represented 43.6% and 14.5% of Indians respectively who spontaneously referred no prostate symptoms. Mean IPSS was 7, range 3-19, with only 15% of moderate symptoms (score 8-19); Mean age was 54.7 years, waist circumference 86.6 cm, BMI 23.9 kg/m2. Yanomamis presented both lower BMI (21.4 versus 24.8 and 23.3, p=0,001) and prostate volume than Macuxis and “other ethnic groups” (15 versus 20, p=0.001). Testosterone (414 versus 502 and 512, p=0.207) and PSA (0.48 versus 0.6 and 0.41, p=0.349) were similar with progressive PSA increase with aging. Val/Val correlated with lower PSA (p=0.0361). Indians compared to control population presented: - TP53 super representation of Arg/Arg haplotype, 74.5% versus 42.5%, p<0.0001. -GSTP1 Ile/Ile 35.3% versus 60.9%; Ile/Val 45.9% versus 28.7%; Val/Val 18.8% versus 10.3%; p=0.0003. Conclusions Observed specific dietary, lifestyle, anthropometric and genetic profile for TP53 and GSTP1 may contribute to Brazilian Indian population prostate good health. PMID:26005978

  1. Therapeutic vaccines and immunotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer: current progress and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Gulley, James L; Madan, Ravi A; Heery, Christopher R

    2013-01-01

    Results of recent clinical trials have intensified interest in immunotherapy for cancer. Among the most promising candidates for immunotherapy are patients with prostate cancer. Results of therapeutic vaccine clinical trials in this population have suggested statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in overall survival, with substantially fewer side effects than with chemotherapy. Of particular interest are sipuleucel-T, the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved therapeutic cancer vaccine, and PSA-TRICOM (PROSTVAC), a therapeutic cancer vaccine in phase III testing. The immune checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab is also stirring considerable interest, with two phase III trials ongoing in prostate cancer. This article highlights data emerging from these trials and addresses remaining questions and practical clinical implications of this therapeutic strategy. PMID:23714490

  2. [Screening for prostate cancer: clinical significance and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuto; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The merits of introducing PSA-based screening would be cause-specific mortality reduction and prevention of developing metastatic disease, which was recently confirmed by prospective randomized controlled trials. On the other hand, some men participating in the screening program may be of drawbacks in terms of overdetection and overtreatment. Therefore, providing a fact sheet on screening for prostate cancer and also progress in an optimal screening system including more accurate cancer detection, minimally invasive treatment and active surveillance strategy, which can reduce overdetection, overtreatment, and loss of QOL due to treatment, would be very important. PMID:26793883

  3. Common Gene Rearrangements in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Mark A.; Maher, Christopher A.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common heterogeneous disease, and most patients diagnosed in the post prostate-specific antigen (PSA) era present with clinically localized disease, the majority of which do well regardless of treatment regimen undertaken. Overall, those with advanced prostate cancer at time of diagnosis do poorly after androgen withdrawal therapy. Understanding the biologic underpinning of prostate cancer is necessary to best determine the risk of disease progression and would be advantageous for the development of novel therapeutic approaches to impede or prevent disease. This review focuses on the recently identified common ETS and non-ETS gene rearrangements in prostate cancer. Although multiple molecular alterations have been detected in prostate cancer, a detailed understanding of gene fusion prostate cancer should help explain the clinical and biologic diversity, providing a rationale for a molecular subclassification of the disease. PMID:21859993

  4. A C-14 labeled Py-Im polyamide localizes to a subcutaneous prostate cancer tumor

    PubMed Central

    Raskatov, Jevgenij A.; Puckett, James W.; Dervan, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to quantitate Py-Im polyamide concentrations in vivo, we synthesized the C-14 radioactively labeled compounds 1-3, and investigated their tumor localization in a subcutaneous xenograft model of prostate cancer (LNCaP). Tumor concentrations were compared with representative host tissues, and exhibited a certain degree of preferential localization to the xenograft. Compound accumulation upon repeated administration was measured. Py-Im polyamide 1 was found to accumulate in LNCaP tumors at concentrations similar to the IC50 value for this compound in cell culture experiments. PMID:24780272

  5. Using circulating tumor cells to inform on prostate cancer biology and clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Gregory, Simon G.; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.; Armstrong, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Substantial advances in the molecular biology of prostate cancer have led to the approval of multiple new systemic agents to treat men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). These treatments encompass androgen receptor directed therapies, immunotherapies, bone targeting radiopharmaceuticals and cytotoxic chemotherapies. There is, however, great heterogeneity in the degree of patient benefit with these agents, thus fueling the need to develop predictive biomarkers that are able to rationally guide therapy. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have the potential to provide an assessment of tumor-specific biomarkers through a non-invasive, repeatable “liquid biopsy” of a patient’s cancer at a given point in time. CTCs have been extensively studied in men with mCRPC, where CTC enumeration using the Cellsearch® method has been validated and FDA approved to be used in conjunction with other clinical parameters as a prognostic biomarker in metastatic prostate cancer. In addition to enumeration, more sophisticated molecular profiling of CTCs is now feasible and may provide more clinical utility as it may reflect tumor evolution within an individual particularly under the pressure of systemic therapies. Here, we review technologies used to detect and characterize CTCs, and the potential biological and clinical utility of CTC molecular profiling in men with metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26079252

  6. Immunochemical Assays and Nucleic-Acid Detection Techniques for Clinical Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanyong, Prosper; Rawlinson, Sean; Davis, James

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and the most common cancer in men in Europe, North America, and some parts of Africa. The established methods for detecting PCa are normally based on tests using Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) in blood, Prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) in urine and tissue Alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) as tumour markers in patient samples. Prior to the introduction of PSA in clinics, prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) was the most widely used biomarker. An early diagnosis of PCa through the detection of these biomarkers requires the availability of simple, reliable, cost-effective and robust techniques. Immunoassays and nucleic acid detection techniques have experienced unprecedented growth in recent years and seem to be the most promising analytical tools. This growth has been driven in part by the surge in demand for near-patient-testing systems in clinical diagnosis. This article reviews immunochemical assays, and nucleic-acid detection techniques that have been used to clinically diagnose PCa. PMID:26958088

  7. Prostate Cancer Screening in Jamaica: Results of the Largest National Screening Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Belinda F.; Aiken, William; Mayhew, Richard; Gordon, Yulit; Reid, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is highly prevalent in Jamaica and is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Our aim was to evaluate the patterns of screening in the largest organized screening clinic in Jamaica at the Jamaica Cancer Society. A retrospective analysis of all men presenting for screening at the Jamaica Cancer Society from 1995 to 2005 was done. All patients had digital rectal examinations (DRE) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) tests done. Results of prostate biopsies were noted. 1117 men of mean age 59.9 ± 8.2 years presented for screening. The median documented PSA was 1.6 ng/mL (maximum of 5170 ng/mL). Most patients presented for only 1 screen. There was a gradual reduction in the mean age of presentation for screening over the period. Prostate biopsies were requested on 11% of screening visits; however, only 59% of these were done. 5.6% of all persons screened were found to have cancer. Of the cancers diagnosed, Gleason 6 adenocarcinoma was the commonest grade and median PSA was 8.9 ng/mL (range 1.5–1059 ng/mL). Older men tend to screen for prostate cancer in Jamaica. However, compliance with regular maintenance visits and requests for confirmatory biopsies are poor. Screening needs intervention in the Jamaican population. PMID:27034668

  8. Assessing the Role of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Relative to IMRT and Helical Tomotherapy in the Management of Localized, Locally Advanced, and Post-Operative Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Melanie T.M.; Blake, Samuel J.; Batchelar, Deidre L.; Cheung, Patrick; Mah, Katherine

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To quantify differences in treatment delivery efficiency and dosimetry between step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for prostate treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five prostate cancer patients were selected retrospectively for this planning study. Treatment plans were generated for: prostate alone (n = 5), prostate + seminal vesicles (n = 5), prostate + seminal vesicles + pelvic lymph nodes (n = 5), prostate bed (n = 5), and prostate bed + pelvic lymph nodes (n = 5). Target coverage, dose homogeneity, integral dose, monitor units (MU), and sparing of organs at risk (OAR) were compared across techniques. Time required to deliver each plan was measured. Results: The dosimetric quality of IMRT, VMAT, and HT plans were comparable for target coverage (planning target volume V95%, clinical target volume V100% all >98.7%) and sparing of organs at risk (OAR) for all treatment groups. Although HT resulted in a slightly higher integral dose and mean doses to the OAR, it yielded a lower maximum dose to all OAR examined. VMAT resulted in reductions in treatment times over IMRT (mean = 75%) and HT (mean = 70%). VMAT required 15-38% fewer monitor units than IMRT over all treatment volumes, with the reduction per fraction ranging from 100-423 MU from the smallest to largest volumes. Conclusions: VMAT improves efficiency of delivery for equivalent dosimetric quality as IMRT and HT across various prostate cancer treatment volumes in the intact and postoperative settings.

  9. Androgen Control in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pelekanou, Vasiliki; Castanas, Elias

    2016-10-01

    Research on prostate cancer has extensively advanced in the past decade, through an improved understanding for its genetic basis and risk-stratification. Molecular classification of prostate cancer into distinct subtypes and the recognition of new histologic entities promise the development of tailored-made management strategies of patients. Nowadays, various alternatives are available for clinical management of localized disease ranging from observation alone through radical prostatectomy. In patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer, the approval of new drugs for the management of metastatic disease has offered promising results improving the survival of these patients. In this context, androgen receptors (AR) remain at the epicenter of prostate cancer research holding a prominent role in the biology and therapeutic regimens of prostate cancer. As many of castration-resistant tumors retain hormone-responsiveness, AR is a clinical relevant, druggable target. However, AR paradoxically remains neglected as a prostate cancer biomarker. The great advancements in prostate cancer preclinical and clinical research, imply further improvement in clinical and translational data, for patient selection and treatment optimization. For a precision medicine-guided clinical management of prostate cancer, AR evaluation has to be implemented in companion and complementary diagnostics, as discussed here. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2224-2234, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27104784

  10. Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy Using Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost Technique for Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Acute Toxicity Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Tee S.; Cheung, Patrick Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Sixel, Katharina E.; Pang, Geordi; Basran, Parminder; Zhang Liying; Tirona, Romeo; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril; Choo, Richard; Thomas, Gillian

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute toxicities of hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) using a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost in conjunction with elective pelvic nodal irradiation for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This report focused on 66 patients entered into this prospective Phase I study. The eligible patients had clinically localized prostate cancer with at least one of the following high-risk features (Stage T3, Gleason score {>=}8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL). Patients were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the pelvic lymph nodes using a conventional four-field technique. A concomitant intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost of 22.5 Gy in 25 fractions was delivered to the prostate. Thus, the prostate received 67.5 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. Next, the patients underwent 3 years of adjuvant androgen ablative therapy. Acute toxicities were assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment and at 3 months after RT. Results: The median patient age was 71 years. The median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level and Gleason score was 18.7 ng/L and 8, respectively. Grade 1-2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were common during RT but most had settled at 3 months after treatment. Only 5 patients had acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, in the form of urinary incontinence (n = 1), urinary frequency/urgency (n = 3), and urinary retention (n = 1). None of the patients developed Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or Grade 4 or greater genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that hypofractionated accelerated RT with a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost and pelvic nodal irradiation is feasible with acceptable acute toxicity.

  11. A Study of Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Fiducials for Localized Prostate Cancer Including Pelvic Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Annie; Pawlicki, Todd; Luxton, Gary; Hara, Wendy; King, Christopher R. . E-mail: crking@stanford.edu

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To study the impact on nodal coverage and dose to fixed organs at risk when using daily fiducial localization of the prostate to deliver intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Five patients with prostate cancer in whom prostate and pelvic nodes were irradiated with IMRT were studied. Dose was prescribed such that 95% of the prostate planning target volume (PTV) and 90% of the nodal PTV were covered. Random and systematic prostate displacements in the anterior-posterior, superior-inferior, and left-right directions were simulated to shift the original isocenter of the IMRT plan. The composite dose during the course of treatment was calculated. Results: Compared with a static setup, simulating random shifts reduced dose by less than 1.5% for nodal hotspot (i.e., dose to 1 cm{sup 3}), by less than 1% for the 90% nodal PTV coverage, and by less than 0.5% for the nodal mean dose. Bowel and femoral head hotspots were reduced by less than 1.5% and 2%, respectively. A 10-mm systematic offset reduced nodal coverage by up to 10%. Conclusion: The use of prostate fiducials for daily localization during IMRT treatment results in negligible changes in dose coverage of pelvic nodes or normal tissue sparing in the absence of a significant systematic offset. This offers a simple and practical solution to the problem of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer when including pelvic nodes.

  12. CMDX©-based single source information system for simplified quality management and clinical research in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Histopathological evaluation of prostatectomy specimens is crucial to decision-making and prediction of patient outcomes in prostate cancer (PCa). Topographical information regarding PCa extension and positive surgical margins (PSM) is essential for clinical routines, quality assessment, and research. However, local hospital information systems (HIS) often do not support the documentation of such information. Therefore, we investigated the feasibility of integrating a cMDX-based pathology report including topographical information into the clinical routine with the aims of obtaining data, performing analysis and generating heat maps in a timely manner, while avoiding data redundancy. Methods We analyzed the workflow of the histopathological evaluation documentation process. We then developed a concept for a pathology report based on a cMDX data model facilitating the topographical documentation of PCa and PSM; the cMDX SSIS is implemented within the HIS of University Hospital Muenster. We then generated a heat map of PCa extension and PSM using the data. Data quality was assessed by measuring the data completeness of reports for all cases, as well as the source-to-database error. We also conducted a prospective study to compare our proposed method with recent retrospective and paper-based studies according to the time required for data analysis. Results We identified 30 input fields that were applied to the cMDX-based data model and the electronic report was integrated into the clinical workflow. Between 2010 and 2011, a total of 259 reports were generated with 100% data completeness and a source-to-database error of 10.3 per 10,000 fields. These reports were directly reused for data analysis, and a heat map based on the data was generated. PCa was mostly localized in the peripheral zone of the prostate. The mean relative tumor volume was 16.6%. The most PSM were localized in the apical region of the prostate. In the retrospective study, 1623 paper

  13. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy planning using multicriteria optimization for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghandour, Sarah; Matzinger, Oscar; Pachoud, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) multicriteria optimization (MCO) algorithm clinically available in the RayStation treatment planning system (TPS) and its ability to reduce treatment planning time while providing high dosimetric plan quality. Nine patients with localized prostate cancer who were previously treated with 78 Gy in 39 fractions using VMAT plans and rayArc system based on the direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO) algorithm were selected and replanned using the VMAT-MCO system. First, the dosimetric quality of the plans was evaluated using multiple conformity metrics that account for target coverage and sparing of healthy tissue, used in our departmental clinical protocols. The conformity and homogeneity index, number of monitor units, and treatment planning time for both modalities were assessed. Next, the effects of the technical plan parameters, such as constraint leaf motion CLM (cm/°) and maximum arc delivery time T (s), on the accuracy of delivered dose were evaluated using quality assurance passing rates (QAs) measured using the Delta4 phantom from ScandiDos. For the dosimetric plan's quality analysis, the results show that the VMAT-MCO system provides plans comparable to the rayArc system with no statistical difference for V95% (p < 0.01), D1% (p < 0.01), CI (p < 0.01), and HI (p < 0.01) of the PTV, bladder (p < 0.01), and rectum (p < 0.01) constraints, except for the femoral heads and healthy tissues, for which a dose reduction was observed using MCO compared with rayArc (p < 0.01). The technical parameter study showed that a combination of CLM equal to 0.5 cm/degree and a maximum delivery time of 72 s allowed the accurate delivery of the VMAT-MCO plan on the Elekta Versa HD linear accelerator. Planning evaluation and dosimetric measurements showed that VMAT-MCO can be used clinically with the advantage of enhanced planning process efficiency by reducing the treatment planning time

  14. Current Status of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Targeting in Nuclear Medicine: Clinical Translation of Chelator Containing Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Ligands Into Diagnostics and Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kratochwil, Clemens; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Kopka, Klaus; Haberkorn, Uwe; Giesel, Frederik L

    2016-09-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed by approximately 90% of prostate carcinomas. The expression correlates with unfavorable prognostic factors, such as a high Gleason score, infiltrative growth, metastasis, and hormone-independence. The high specificity, especially in the undifferentiated stage, makes it an excellent target for diagnosis and therapy. Therefore, antibodies and small molecule inhibitors have been developed for imaging and therapy. In 2011 PSMA-11, a ligand that consists of the Glu-urea-motif and the chelator HBED-CC, which can be exclusively radiolabeled with (68)Ga for PET imaging, presented the clinical breakthrough for prostate cancer diagnostics. In two large diagnostic studies (n = 319 and n = 248) PET/CT with PSMA-11 successfully localized the recurrent tumor in approximately 90% of patients with biochemical relapse. Integrating PSMA-PET/CT into the planning phase of radiotherapy, the treatment concept is changed in 30%-50% of the patients. The combination of the Glu-urea-motif with DOTA, which can be labeled with several diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides, opened new avenues for therapeutic usage of the small-molecule PSMA ligands. In the beginning of 2016, there are four confirmative reports (n = 19, n = 24, n = 30, and n = 56) from four different centers reporting a PSA response in approximately 70% of patients treated with (177)Lu-labeled PSMA ligands. In conclusion, the data available up to now indicate a widespread use of PSMA ligands for diagnostic applications with respect to staging, detection of recurrence, or metastases in patients with rising tumor markers and for therapy in case of failure of guideline-compliant treatment. PMID:27553466

  15. Identifying Clinically Significant Prostate Cancers using 3-D In Vivo Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging with Whole-Mount Histology Validation.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, Mark L; Glass, Tyler J; Miller, Zachary A; Rosenzweig, Stephen J; Buck, Andrew; Polascik, Thomas J; Gupta, Rajan T; Brown, Alison F; Madden, John; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2016-06-01

    Overly aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) treatment adversely affects patients and places an unnecessary burden on our health care system. The inability to identify and grade clinically significant PCa lesions is a factor contributing to excessively aggressive PCa treatment, such as radical prostatectomy, instead of more focal, prostate-sparing procedures such as cryotherapy and high-dose radiation therapy. We have performed 3-D in vivo B-mode and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using a mechanically rotated, side-fire endorectal imaging array to identify regions suspicious for PCa in 29 patients being treated with radical prostatectomies for biopsy-confirmed PCa. Whole-mount histopathology analyses were performed to identify regions of clinically significant/insignificant PCa lesions, atrophy and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Regions of suspicion for PCa were reader-identified in ARFI images based on boundary delineation, contrast, texture and location. These regions of suspicion were compared with histopathology identified lesions using a nearest-neighbor regional localization approach. Of all clinically significant lesions identified on histopathology, 71.4% were also identified using ARFI imaging, including 79.3% of posterior and 33.3% of anterior lesions. Among the ARFI-identified lesions, 79.3% corresponded to clinically significant PCa lesions, with these lesions having higher indices of suspicion than clinically insignificant PCa. ARFI imaging had greater sensitivity for posterior versus anterior lesions because of greater displacement signal-to-noise ratio and finer spatial sampling. Atrophy and benign prostatic hyperplasia can cause appreciable prostate anatomy distortion and heterogeneity that confounds ARFI PCa lesion identification; however, in general, ARFI regions of suspicion did not coincide with these benign pathologies. PMID:26947445

  16. Salvage brachytherapy in prostate local recurrence after radiation therapy: predicting factors for control and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate efficacy and toxicity after salvage brachytherapy (BT) in prostate local recurrence after radiation therapy. Methods and materials Between 1993 and 2007, we retrospectively analyzed 56 consecutively patients (pts) undergoing salvage brachytherapy. After local biopsy-proven recurrence, pts received 145 Gy LDR-BT (37 pts, 66%) or HDR-BT (19 pts, 34%) in different dose levels according to biological equivalent doses (BED2 Gy). By the time of salvage BT, only 15 pts (27%) received ADT. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of biochemical control and toxicities. Acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were graded using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCv3.0). Results Median follow-up after salvage BT was 48 months. The 5-year FFbF was 77%. HDR and LDR late grade 3 GU toxicities were observed in 21% and 24%. Late grade 3 GI toxicities were observed in 2% (HDR) and 2.7% (LDR). On univariate analysis, pre-salvage prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 10 ng/ml (p = 0.004), interval to relapse after initial treatment < 24 months (p = 0.004) and salvage HDR-BT doses BED2 Gy level < 227 Gy (p = 0.012) were significant in predicting biochemical failure. On Cox multivariate analysis, pre-salvage PSA, and time to relapse were significant in predicting biochemical failure. HDR-BT BED2 Gy (α/β 1.5 Gy) levels ≥ 227 (p = 0.013), and ADT (p = 0.049) were significant in predicting grade ≥ 2 urinary toxicity. Conclusions Prostate BT is an effective salvage modality in some selected prostate local recurrence patients after radiation therapy. Even, we provide some potential predictors of biochemical control and toxicity for prostate salvage BT, further investigation is recommended. PMID:24885287

  17. Emerging treatments in management of prostate cancer: biomarker validation and endpoints for immunotherapy clinical trial design

    PubMed Central

    Slovin, Susan F

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly emerging field of immunotherapy and the development of novel immunologic agents that have been approved in melanoma and successfully studied in lung cancer, kidney cancer, and prostate cancer have mandated that there be uniformity in clinical trial analysis beyond conventional survival endpoints and imaging. This includes some measure of determining whether the immunologic target is hit and how the treatment has impacted on the immune system in toto. While melanoma is leading the field towards these ends, there is some doubt that not all of the recent successes with immune therapies, for example, checkpoint inhibitors, will be effective for every cancer, and that the toxicities may also be different depending on the malignancy. This review serves to elucidate the current issues facing clinical investigators who perform immunologic trials targeted at patients with prostate cancer and discusses the challenges in assessing the right immunologic endpoints to demonstrate biologic/immunologic targeting leading to clinical benefit.

  18. Automatic classification of prostate stromal tissue in histological images using Haralick descriptors and Local Binary Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D. L. L.; Nascimento, M. Z.; Neves, L. A.; Batista, V. R.; Godoy, M. F.; Jacomini, R. S.; Duarte, Y. A. S.; Arruda, P. F. F.; Neto, D. S.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we presente a classification system that uses a combination of texture features from stromal regions: Haralick features and Local Binary Patterns (LBP) in wavelet domain. The system has five steps for classification of the tissues. First, the stromal regions were detected and extracted using segmentation techniques based on thresholding and RGB colour space. Second, the Wavelet decomposition was applied in the extracted regions to obtain the Wavelet coefficients. Third, the Haralick and LBP features were extracted from the coefficients. Fourth, relevant features were selected using the ANOVA statistical method. The classication (fifth step) was performed with Radial Basis Function (RBF) networks. The system was tested in 105 prostate images, which were divided into three groups of 35 images: normal, hyperplastic and cancerous. The system performance was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve and resulted in 0.98 for normal versus cancer, 0.95 for hyperplasia versus cancer and 0.96 for normal versus hyperplasia. Our results suggest that texture features can be used as discriminators for stromal tissues prostate images. Furthermore, the system was effective to classify prostate images, specially the hyperplastic class which is the most difficult type in diagnosis and prognosis.

  19. Voxel-based population analysis for correlating local dose and rectal toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Oscar; Drean, Gael; Ospina, Juan David; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Lafond, Caroline; De Crevoisier, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    The majority of current models utilized for predicting toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy are based on dose-volume histograms. One of their main drawbacks is the lack of spatial accuracy, since they consider the organs as a whole volume and thus ignore the heterogeneous intra-organ radio-sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a dose-image-based framework to reveal the relationships between local dose and toxicity. In this approach, the three-dimensional (3D) planned dose distributions across a population are non-rigidly registered into a common coordinate system and compared at a voxel level, therefore enabling the identification of 3D anatomical patterns, which may be responsible for toxicity, at least to some extent. Additionally, different metrics were employed in order to assess the quality of the dose mapping. The value of this approach was demonstrated by prospectively analyzing rectal bleeding (≥Grade 1 at 2 years) according to the CTCAE v3.0 classification in a series of 105 patients receiving 80Gy to the prostate by IMRT. Within the patients presenting bleeding, a significant dose excess (6Gy on average, p<0.01) was found in a region of the anterior rectal wall. This region, close to the prostate (1cm), represented less than 10% of the rectum. This promising voxel-wise approach allowed subregions to be defined within the organ that may be involved in toxicity and, as such, must be considered during the inverse IMRT planning step. PMID:23528429

  20. Accuracy of localization of prostate lesions using manual palpation and ultrasound elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kut, Carmen; Schneider, Caitlin; Carter-Monroe, Naima; Su, Li-Ming; Boctor, Emad; Taylor, Russell

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of detecting tumor location and size in the prostate using both manual palpation and ultrasound elastography (UE). Methods: Tumors in the prostate were simulated using both synthetic and ex vivo tissue phantoms. 25 participants were asked to provide the presence, size and depth of these simulated lesions using manual palpation and UE. Ultrasound images were captured using a laparoscopic ultrasound probe, fitted with a Gore-Tetrad transducer with frequency of 7.5 MHz and a RF capture depth of 4-5 cm. A MATLAB GUI application was employed to process the RF data for ex vivo phantoms, and to generate UE images using a cross-correlation algorithm. Ultrasonix software was used to provide real time elastography during laparoscopic palpation of the synthetic phantoms. Statistical analyses were performed based on a two-tailed, student t-test with α = 0.05. Results: UE displays both a higher accuracy and specificity in tumor detection (sensitivity = 84%, specificity = 74%). Tumor diameters and depths are better estimated using ultrasound elastography when compared with manual palpation. Conclusions: Our results indicate that UE has strong potential in assisting surgeons to intra-operatively evaluate the tumor depth and size. We have also demonstrated that ultrasound elastography can be implemented in a laparoscopic environment, in which manual palpation would not be feasible. With further work, this application can provide accurate and clinically relevant information for surgeons during prostate resection.

  1. Local anesthetic bupivacaine induced ovarian and prostate cancer apoptotic cell death and underlying mechanisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Wei; Zhao, Hailin; Hankin, James; Chen, Lin; Yao, Shanglong; Ma, Daqing

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective studies indicate that the use of regional anesthesia can reduce cancer recurrence after surgery which could be due to ranging from immune function preservation to direct molecular mechanisms. This study was to investigate the effects of bupivacaine on ovarian and prostate cancer cell biology and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cell viability, proliferation and migration of ovarian carcinoma (SKOV-3) and prostate carcinoma (PC-3) were examined following treatment with bupivacaine. Cleaved caspase 3, 8 and 9, and GSK-3β, pGSK-3β(tyr216) and pGSK-3β(ser9) expression were assessed by immunofluorescence. FAS ligand neutralization, caspase and GSK-3 inhibitors and GSK-3β siRNA were applied to further explore underlying mechanisms. Clinically relevant concentrations of bupivacaine reduced cell viability and inhibited cellular proliferation and migration in both cell lines. Caspase 8 and 9 inhibition generated partial cell death reversal in SKOV-3, whilst only caspase 9 was effective in PC-3. Bupivacaine increased the phosphorylation of GSK-3β(Tyr216) in SKOV-3 but without measurable effect in PC3. GSK-3β inhibition and siRNA gene knockdown decreased bupivacaine induced cell death in SKOV-3 but not in PC3. Our data suggests that bupivacaine has direct 'anti-cancer' properties through the activation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in ovarian cancer but only the intrinsic pathway in prostate cancer. PMID:27195613

  2. Local anesthetic bupivacaine induced ovarian and prostate cancer apoptotic cell death and underlying mechanisms in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Wei; Zhao, Hailin; Hankin, James; Chen, Lin; Yao, Shanglong; Ma, Daqing

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective studies indicate that the use of regional anesthesia can reduce cancer recurrence after surgery which could be due to ranging from immune function preservation to direct molecular mechanisms. This study was to investigate the effects of bupivacaine on ovarian and prostate cancer cell biology and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cell viability, proliferation and migration of ovarian carcinoma (SKOV-3) and prostate carcinoma (PC-3) were examined following treatment with bupivacaine. Cleaved caspase 3, 8 and 9, and GSK-3β, pGSK-3βtyr216 and pGSK-3βser9 expression were assessed by immunofluorescence. FAS ligand neutralization, caspase and GSK-3 inhibitors and GSK-3β siRNA were applied to further explore underlying mechanisms. Clinically relevant concentrations of bupivacaine reduced cell viability and inhibited cellular proliferation and migration in both cell lines. Caspase 8 and 9 inhibition generated partial cell death reversal in SKOV-3, whilst only caspase 9 was effective in PC-3. Bupivacaine increased the phosphorylation of GSK-3βTyr216 in SKOV-3 but without measurable effect in PC3. GSK-3β inhibition and siRNA gene knockdown decreased bupivacaine induced cell death in SKOV-3 but not in PC3. Our data suggests that bupivacaine has direct ‘anti-cancer’ properties through the activation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in ovarian cancer but only the intrinsic pathway in prostate cancer. PMID:27195613

  3. Clinical Experiences of Incidental Prostate Cancer after Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP) According to Initial Treatment: A Study of a Korean High Volume Center

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Chung, Doo Yong; Lee, Kwang-suk; Kim, In Kyong; Rha, Koon Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Chung, Byung Ha; Hong, Sung Joon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose These are the clinical experiences of Korean incidental prostate cancer patients detected by transurethral resection of the prostate according to initial treatment: active surveillance (AS), radical prostatectomy (RP) and hormone therapy (HT). Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 156 incidental prostate cancer patients between 2001 and 2012. The clinicopathologic outcomes were reviewed and follow-up results were obtained. Results Among 156 patients, 97 (62.2%) had T1a and 59 (37.8%) had T1b. Forty-six (29.5%) received AS, 67 (42.9%) underwent RP, 34 (21.8%) received HT, 4 (2.6%) received radiotherapy, and 5 (3.2%) chose watchful waiting. Of 46 patients on AS, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression occurred in 12 (26.1%) patients. Among them, 3 patients refused treatment despite PSA progression. Five patients, who underwent RP as an intervention, all had organ-confined Gleason score ≤6 disease. In 67 patients who underwent RP, 50 (74.6%) patients had insignificant prostate cancer and 8 (11.9%) patients showed unfavorable features. During follow-up, biochemical recurrence occurred in 2 patients. Among 34 patients who received HT, 3 (8.8%) patients had PSA progression. Among 156 patients, 6 patients died due to other causes during follow-up. There were no patients who died due to prostate cancer. Conclusion The clinical outcomes of incidental prostate cancer were satisfactory regardless of the initial treatment. However, according to recent researches and guidelines, immediate definite therapy should be avoided without a careful assessment. We also believe that improved clinical staging is needed for these patients. PMID:24339290

  4. Phase 3 clinical trial investigating the effect of selenium supplementation in men at high risk for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Algotar, Amit M.; Stratton, M. Suzanne; Ahmann, Frederick. R.; Ranger-Moore, James; Nagle, Raymond B.; Thompson, Patricia A.; Slate, Elizabeth; Hsu, Chiu H.; Dalkin, Bruce L.; Sindhwani, Puneet; Holmes, Michael A.; Tuckey, John A.; Graham, David. L.; Parnes, Howard L.; Clark, Lawrence C.; Stratton, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to investigate the effect of Se supplementation on prostate cancer incidence in men at high risk for prostate cancer. Methods A Phase 3 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 699 men at high risk for prostate cancer (prostate specific antigen (PSA) >4 ng/ml and/or suspicious digital rectal examination and/or PSA velocity >0.75ng/ml/year), but with a negative prostate biopsy. Participants were randomized to receive daily oral placebo (N = 232), 200 µg selenium (N =234), or 400 µg selenium (N=233) as selenized yeast. They were followed every six months for up five years. The time to diagnosis of prostate cancer was compared between treatment groups using the Cox-proportional hazards model. Result Compared to placebo, the hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals] for risk of developing prostate cancer in the selenium 200 µg/day or the selenium 400 µg/day group were 0.94 [0.52, 1.7] and 0.90 [0.48, 1.7] respectively. PSA velocity in the selenium arms was not significantly different from that observed in the placebo group (p=0.18 and p=0.17, respectively). Conclusion Selenium supplementation appeared to have no effect on the incidence of prostate cancer in men at high risk. In conjunction with results of other studies, these data indicate that selenium supplementation may not have a role in prostate cancer chemoprevention. PMID:22887343

  5. A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial With Magnesium Oxide to Reduce Intrafraction Prostate Motion for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lips, Irene M.; Gils, Carla H. van; Kotte, Alexis N.T.J.; Leerdam, Monique E. van; Franken, Stefan P.G.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Vulpen, Marco van

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether magnesium oxide during external-beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer reduces intrafraction prostate motion in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. Methods and Materials: At the Department of Radiotherapy, prostate cancer patients scheduled for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (77 Gy in 35 fractions) using fiducial marker-based position verification were randomly assigned to receive magnesium oxide (500 mg twice a day) or placebo during radiotherapy. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction prostate motion, defined as the proportion of patients who demonstrated in {>=}50% of the fractions an intrafraction motion outside a range of 2 mm. Secondary outcome measures included quality of life and acute toxicity. Results: In total, 46 patients per treatment arm were enrolled. The primary endpoint did not show a statistically significant difference between the treatment arms with a percentage of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction motion of 83% in the magnesium oxide arm as compared with 80% in the placebo arm (p = 1.00). Concerning the secondary endpoints, exploratory analyses demonstrated a trend towards worsened quality of life and slightly more toxicity in the magnesium oxide arm than in the placebo arm; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Magnesium oxide is not effective in reducing the intrafraction prostate motion during external-beam radiotherapy, and therefore there is no indication to use it in clinical practice for this purpose.

  6. Improving prostate cancer detection in veterans through the development of a clinical decision rule for prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We sought to improve prostate cancer (PC) detection through developing a prostate biopsy clinical decision rule (PBCDR), based on an elevated PSA and laboratory biomarkers. This decision rule could be used after initial PC screening, providing the patient and clinician information to consider prior to biopsy. Methods This case–control study evaluated men from the Tampa, Florida, James A. Haley (JH) Veteran’s Administration (VA) (N = 1,378), from January 1, 1998, through April 15, 2005. To assess the PBCDR we did all of the following: 1) Identified biomarkers that are related to PC and have the capability of improving the efficiency of PC screening; 2) Developed statistical models to determine which can best predict the probability of PC; 3) Compared each potential model to PSA alone using Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves, to evaluate for improved overall effectiveness in PC detection and reduction in (negative) biopsies; and 4) Evaluated dose–response relationships between specified lab biomarkers (surrogates for extra-prostatic disease development) and PC progression. Results The following biomarkers were related to PC: hemoglobin (HGB) (OR = 1.42 95% CI 1.27, 1.59); red blood cell (RBC) count (OR = 2.52 95% CI 1.67, 3.78); PSA (OR = 1.04 95% CI 1.03, 1.05); and, creatinine (OR = 1.55 95% CI 1.12, 2.15). Comparing all PC stages versus non-cancerous conditions, the ROC curve area under the curve (AUC) enlarged (increasing the probability of correctly classifying PC): PSA (alone) 0.59 (95% CI 0.55, 0.61); PBCDR model 0.68 (95% CI 0.65, 0.71), and the positive predictive value (PPV) increased: PSA 44.7%; PBCDR model 61.8%. Comparing PC (stages II, III, IV) vs. other, the ROC AUC increased: PSA (alone) 0.63 (95% CI 0.58, 0.66); PBCDR model 0.72 (95% CI 0.68, 0.75), and the PPV increased: 20.6% (PSA); PBCDR model 55.3%. Conclusions These results suggest evaluating certain common biomarkers in conjunction with PSA may improve PC prediction

  7. Androgen receptor variant-driven prostate cancer: clinical implications and therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Antonarakis, E S; Armstrong, A J; Dehm, S M; Luo, J

    2016-09-01

    While there are myriad mechanisms of primary and acquired resistance to conventional and next-generation hormonal therapies in prostate cancer, the potential role of androgen receptor splice variants (AR-Vs) has recently gained momentum. AR-Vs are abnormally truncated isoforms of the androgen receptor (AR) protein that lack the COOH-terminal domain but retain the NH2-terminal domain and DNA-binding domain and are thus constitutively active even in the absence of ligands. Although multiple preclinical studies have previously implicated AR-Vs in the development of castration resistance as well as resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide, recent technological advances have made it possible to reliably detect and quantify AR-Vs from human clinical tumor specimens including blood samples. Initial clinical studies have now shown that certain AR-Vs, in particular AR-V7, may be associated with resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide but not taxane chemotherapies when detected in circulating tumor cells. Efforts are now underway to clinically validate AR-V7 as a relevant treatment-selection biomarker in the context of other key genomic aberrations in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Additional efforts are underway to therapeutically target both AR and AR-Vs either directly or indirectly. Whether AR-Vs represent drivers of castration-resistant prostate cancer, or whether they are simply passenger events associated with aggressive disease or clonal heterogeneity, will ultimately be answered only through these types of clinical trials. PMID:27184811

  8. Complications associated with preoperative radiation therapy and Iodine-125 brachytherapy for localized prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Flanigan, R.C.; Patterson, J.; Mendiondo, O.A.; Gee, W.F.; Lucas, B.A.; McRoberts, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-five consecutive patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with 1,050 rad preoperative radiation therapy and Iodine-125 seed brachytherapy are reviewed. Significant long-term postoperative complications included radiation cystitis (12%), radiation proctitis (4%), genital and leg edema (12%), stress incontinence (8%), total incontinence (4%), and impotence (26%). Complications occurred in 75 per cent of patients who received additional postoperative radiation. Improved staging with CT scan, lymphangiography, and Chiba needle biopsy of any possibly abnormal lymph nodes provided excellent preoperative staging with only 1 patient (6%) upstaged at surgery to Stage D1.

  9. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Using Kilovoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Pos, Floris J. Nuver, Tonnis T.; Jong, Rianne de; Remeijer, Peter; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the first clinical results of an off-line adaptive radiotherapy (ART) protocol for prostate cancer using kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in combination with a diet and mild laxatives. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients began treatment with a planning target volume (PTV) margin of 10 mm. The CBCT scans acquired during the first six fractions were used to generate an average prostate clinical target volume (AV-CTV), and average rectum (AV-Rect). Using these structures, a new treatment plan was generated with a 7-mm PTV margin. Weekly CBCT scans were used to monitor the CTV coverage. A diet and mild laxatives were introduced to improve image quality and reduce prostate motion. Results: Twenty patients were treated with conform ART protocol. For these patients, 91% of the CBCT scans could be used to calculate the AV-CTV and AV-Rect. In 96% of the follow-up CBCT scans, the CTV was located within the average PTV. In the remaining 4%, the prostate extended the PTV by a maximum of 1 mm. Systematic and random errors for organ motion were reduced by a factor of two compared with historical data without diet and laxatives. An average PTV reduction of 29% was achieved. The volume of the AV-Rect that received >65 Gy was reduced by 19%. The mean dose to the anal wall was reduced on average by 4.8 Gy. Conclusions: We safely reduced the high-dose region by 29%. The reduction in irradiated volume led to a significant reduction in the dose to the rectum. The diet and laxatives improved the image quality and tended to reduce prostate motion.

  10. CYP17 inhibitors in prostate cancer: latest evidence and clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Anitha B.; Pal, Sumanta K.; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Since androgen signaling plays a pivotal role in the proliferation and metastasis of prostate cancer, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or castration therapy is considered the backbone of treatment for newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer. However, almost all men experience disease progression on ADT to a state known as metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), which continues to be driven by intratumoral androgen synthesis or androgen receptor signaling. Hence, the extragonadal ablation of androgen synthesis from pregnane precursors holds much promise. An inhibitor of cytochrome P450 17α−hydroxy/17,20-lyase (CYP17) enzymes, abiraterone acetate, has already been approved for men with mCRPC. Newer CYP17 inhibitors continue to be developed which are either more selective or have concomitant inhibitory actions on AR signaling. These include VT-464, orteronel, and galeterone. Herein, we focus on the molecular mechanism of action, efficacy, latest evidence, and clinical potential of CYP17 inhibitors in prostate cancer. PMID:27482286

  11. System for interstitial photodynamic therapy with online dosimetry: first clinical experiences of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartling, Johannes; Axelsson, Johan; Ahlgren, Göran; Kälkner, Karl Mikael; Nilsson, Sten; Svanberg, Sune; Svanberg, Katarina; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2010-09-01

    The first results from a clinical study for Temoporfin-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) of low-grade (T1c) primary prostate cancer using online dosimetry are presented. Dosimetric feedback in real time was applied, for the first time to our knowledge, in interstitial photodynamic therapy. The dosimetry software IDOSE provided dose plans, including optical fiber positions and light doses based on 3-D tissue models generated from ultrasound images. Tissue optical property measurements were obtained using the same fibers used for light delivery. Measurements were taken before, during, and after the treatment session. On the basis of these real-time measured optical properties, the light-dose plan was recalculated. The aim of the treatment was to ablate the entire prostate while minimizing exposure to surrounding organs. The results indicate that online dosimetry based on real-time tissue optical property measurements enabled the light dose to be adapted and optimized. However, histopathological analysis of tissue biopsies taken six months post-PDT treatment showed there were still residual viable cancer cells present in the prostate tissue sections. The authors propose that the incomplete treatment of the prostate tissue could be due to a too low light threshold dose, which was set to 5 J/cm2.

  12. Hypoxic Prostate/Muscle PO{sub 2} Ratio Predicts for Outcome in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Turaka, Aruna; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Movsas, Benjamin

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To correlate tumor oxygenation status with long-term biochemical outcome after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Custom-made Eppendorf PO{sub 2} microelectrodes were used to obtain PO{sub 2} measurements from the prostate (P), focused on positive biopsy locations, and normal muscle tissue (M), as a control. A total of 11,516 measurements were obtained in 57 men with localized prostate cancer immediately before prostate brachytherapy was given. The Eppendorf histograms provided the median PO{sub 2}, mean PO{sub 2}, and % <5 mm Hg or <10 mm Hg. Biochemical failure (BF) was defined using both the former American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) (three consecutive raises) and the current Phoenix (prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL) definitions. A Cox proportional hazards regression model evaluated the influence of hypoxia using the P/M mean PO{sub 2} ratio on BF. Results: With a median follow-up time of 8 years, 12 men had ASTRO BF and 8 had Phoenix BF. On multivariate analysis, P/M PO{sub 2} ratio <0.10 emerged as the only significant predictor of ASTRO BF (p = 0.043). Hormonal therapy (p = 0.015) and P/M PO{sub 2} ratio <0.10 (p = 0.046) emerged as the only independent predictors of the Phoenix BF. Kaplan-Meier freedom from BF for P/M ratio <0.10 vs. {>=}0.10 at 8 years for ASTRO BF was 46% vs. 78% (p = 0.03) and for the Phoenix BF was 66% vs. 83% (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Hypoxia in prostate cancer (low mean P/M PO{sub 2} ratio) significantly predicts for poor long-term biochemical outcome, suggesting that novel hypoxic strategies should be investigated.

  13. Screening for prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cher, M L; Carroll, P R

    1995-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a serious health care problem in the United States. Whether or not to screen for it has become a timely issue. Although a large number of men have clinically important, asymptomatic, undetected prostate cancer, an even larger number have clinically unimportant cancer. To justify screening programs, not only must we avoid detecting biologically unimportant cancers, we must also detect and effectively treat that subset of tumors that, if undiagnosed, would progress, produce symptoms, and reduce life expectancy. Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay, or its variations such as PSA density, PSA velocity, and age-specific reference ranges, and the digital rectal examination are the best tests for detecting clinically important, asymptomatic, curable tumors. Recent data suggest that using serum PSA levels does not result in an overdetection of unimportant tumors. Highly effective, curative treatment of localized prostate cancer is available. These factors promote optimism that screening for prostate cancer will ultimately prove beneficial. Nonetheless, men should be informed regarding the benefits and possible risks before being screened for prostate cancer. PMID:7536993

  14. Prostate on the menu: an overview of cooking techniques and clinical outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Swol, Christiaan F. P.; Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.; van Venrooij, Ger E. P. M.; Boon, Tom A.

    1997-06-01

    In the past years there has been a significant increase in the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia. Transurethral electroresection of the abundant tissue (TURP) has since the early seventies been the golden standard. The main drawback of a TURP is the relative lack of hemostasis, due to a confined energy and heat distribution around the resection loop. As sufficient tissue needs to be removed to overcome the bladder outlet obstruction, the ideal treatment has to combine both ablative and hemostatic abilities. After 1992, endoscopic laser and 'non laser' treatment modalities have been introduced, that competed with TURP as to clinical outcome. These treatments have in common that a high amounts of energy is delivered to the prostate to remove tissue either indirectly by coagulation necrosis or directly by vaporization. Various in-vitro and clinical studies were performed using different energy sources, such as Nd:YAG and diode laser light in combination with a large variety of delivery devices. Also TURP was included in the evaluation. The in-vitro results provided understanding of the efficiency in energy delivery, the extent of heat induced in the prostatic tissue and possible side-effects, using thermal imaging techniques. Over the last five years clinical data have been collected for various techniques with a follow-up of two years showing the contact techniques to be superior over non-contact and comparable with the outcome of the 'standard' TURP.

  15. Locally-constrained boundary regression for segmentation of prostate and rectum in the planning CT images.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yeqin; Gao, Yaozong; Wang, Qian; Yang, Xin; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-12-01

    Automatic and accurate segmentation of the prostate and rectum in planning CT images is a challenging task due to low image contrast, unpredictable organ (relative) position, and uncertain existence of bowel gas across different patients. Recently, regression forest was adopted for organ deformable segmentation on 2D medical images by training one landmark detector for each point on the shape model. However, it seems impractical for regression forest to guide 3D deformable segmentation as a landmark detector, due to large number of vertices in the 3D shape model as well as the difficulty in building accurate 3D vertex correspondence for each landmark detector. In this paper, we propose a novel boundary detection method by exploiting the power of regression forest for prostate and rectum segmentation. The contributions of this paper are as follows: (1) we introduce regression forest as a local boundary regressor to vote the entire boundary of a target organ, which avoids training a large number of landmark detectors and building an accurate 3D vertex correspondence for each landmark detector; (2) an auto-context model is integrated with regression forest to improve the accuracy of the boundary regression; (3) we further combine a deformable segmentation method with the proposed local boundary regressor for the final organ segmentation by integrating organ shape priors. Our method is evaluated on a planning CT image dataset with 70 images from 70 different patients. The experimental results show that our proposed boundary regression method outperforms the conventional boundary classification method in guiding the deformable model for prostate and rectum segmentations. Compared with other state-of-the-art methods, our method also shows a competitive performance. PMID:26439938

  16. Potentially clinically relevant prostate cancer is found more frequently after complete than after partial histopathological processing of radical cystoprostatectomy specimens.

    PubMed

    Fritsche, H M; Aziz, A; Eder, F; Otto, W; Denzinger, S; Wieland, W F; May, M; Hofstädter, F; Hartmann, A; Burger, M

    2012-12-01

    Incidental prostate cancer is often found in cystoprostatectomy specimens. The presence of a clinically significant tumour has an impact on follow-up strategies. In prostatectomy specimen for prostate cancer, whole-mount sections improve diagnostic accuracy. The present study compares detection of incidental prostate cancer in complete to routine processing. We included 295 consecutive patients who underwent radical cystoprostatectomy. Between 01/1995 and 12/2003 (period I), specimens of 129 patients were partially processed, whereas between 01/2004 and 03/2009 (period II), specimens of 166 patients were completely processed. Incidental prostate cancer was detected overall in 91 (30.8 %) patients. Prostate cancer was detected in 24 (18.6 %) patients in period 1 and in 67 (40.4 %) patients in period 2 (p < 0.001). Potentially clinically significant prostate cancer was detected in 12 (9.2 %) and 29 (17.5 %) patients, respectively (p = 0.044). Complete embedding and processing of cystoprostatectomy specimen yield significantly more potentially clinically relevant prostate cancers. The present data suggest that notably in younger men the specimens should be completely processed. PMID:23052374

  17. African American Participation in Oncology Clinical Trials--Focus on Prostate Cancer: Implications, Barriers, and Potential Solutions.

    PubMed

    Ahaghotu, Chiledum; Tyler, Robert; Sartor, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, the incidence and mortality rates of many cancers, especially prostate cancer, are disproportionately high among African American men compared with Caucasian men. Recently, mortality rates for prostate cancer have declined more rapidly in African American versus Caucasian men, but prostate cancer is still the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in African American men in the United States. Compared with Caucasian men, prostate cancer occurs at younger ages, has a higher stage at diagnosis, and is more likely to progress after definitive treatments in African American men. Reasons for racial discrepancies in cancer are multifactorial and potentially include socioeconomic, cultural, nutritional, and biologic elements. In addition to improving access to novel therapies, clinical trial participation is essential to adequately establish the risks and benefits of treatments in African American populations. Considering the disproportionately high mortality rates noted in these groups, our understanding of the natural history and responses to therapies is limited. This review will explore African American underrepresentation in clinical trials with a focus on prostate cancer, and potentially effective strategies to engage African American communities in prostate cancer research. Solutions targeting physicians, investigators, the community, and health care systems are identified. Improvement of African American participation in prostate cancer clinical trials will benefit all stakeholders. PMID:26786562

  18. Does Local Recurrence of Prostate Cancer After Radiation Therapy Occur at the Site of Primary Tumor? Results of a Longitudinal MRI and MRSI Study

    SciTech Connect

    Arrayeh, Elnasif; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Roach, Mack; Jung, Adam J.; Carroll, Peter R.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine if local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy occurs at the same site as the primary tumor before treatment, using longitudinal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging to assess dominant tumor location. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study was HIPAA compliant and approved by our Committee on Human Research. We identified all patients in our institutional prostate cancer database (1996 onward) who underwent endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging before radiotherapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer and again at least 2 years after radiotherapy (n = 124). Two radiologists recorded the presence, location, and size of unequivocal dominant tumor on pre- and postradiotherapy scans. Recurrent tumor was considered to be at the same location as the baseline tumor if at least 50% of the tumor location overlapped. Clinical and biopsy data were collected from all patients. Results: Nine patients had unequivocal dominant tumor on both pre- and postradiotherapy imaging, with mean pre- and postradiotherapy dominant tumor diameters of 1.8 cm (range, 1-2.2) and 1.9 cm (range, 1.4-2.6), respectively. The median follow-up interval was 7.3 years (range, 2.7-10.8). Dominant recurrent tumor was at the same location as dominant baseline tumor in 8 of 9 patients (89%). Conclusions: Local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation usually occurs at the same site as the dominant primary tumor at baseline, suggesting supplementary focal therapy aimed at enhancing local tumor control would be a rational addition to management.

  19. Individualized margins for prostate patients using a wireless localization and tracking system.

    PubMed

    Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema; Wang, Brian; Szegedi, Martin; Tward, Jonathan; Zhao, Hui; Huang, Y Jessica; Sarkar, Vikren; Shrieve, Dennis; Salter, Bill

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the dosimetric benefits of designing patient-specific margins for prostate cancer patients based on 4D localization and tracking. Ten prostate patients, each implanted with three radiofrequency transponders, were localized and tracked for 40 fractions. "Conventional margin" (CM) planning target volumes (PTV) and PTVs resulting from uniform margins of 5 mm (5M) and 7 mm (7M) were explored. Through retrospective review of each patient's tracking data, an individualized margin (IM) design for each patient was determined. IMRT treatment plans with identical constraints were generated for all four margin strategies and compared. The IM plans generally created the smallest PTV volumes. For similar PTV coverage, the IM plans had a lower mean bladder (rectal) dose by an average of 3.9% (2.5%), 8.5% (5.7%) and 16.2 % (9.8%) compared to 5M, 7M and CM plans, respectively. The IM plan had the lowest gEUD value of 23.8 Gy for bladder, compared to 35.1, 28.4 and 25.7, for CM, 7M and 5M, respectively. Likewise, the IM plan had the lowest NTCP value for rectum of 0.04, compared to 0.07, 0.06 and 0.05 for CM, 7M and 5M, respectively. Individualized margins can lead to significantly reduced PTV volumes and critical structure doses, while still ensuring a minimum delivered CTV dose equal to 95% of the prescribed dose. PMID:21844865

  20. Seven-Year Outcomes Following HIFU in Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Shoji, Sunao; Nagata, Yoshihiro; Terachi, Toshiro; Illing, Rowland O.; Emberton, Mark

    2007-05-01

    We evaluated 409 patients suffering from localized prostate cancer treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). All patients were followed for at least 12 months after treatment. Biochemical failure was defined according to the criteria recommended by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel. None of the patients received hormonal or other anticancer therapy before documentation of a biochemical failure. The biochemical disease-free rates at 5 years in patients with low, intermediate and high risk groups were 93%, 68% and 44%, respectively (p<0.0001). The biochemical disease-free rates at 5 years for patients with pretreatment PSA less than 10 ng/ml, 10.01 to 20.0 ng/ml and more than 20.0 ng/ml were 89%, 62% and 179%, respectively (p<0.0001). According to multivariate analysis preoperative PSA (p<0.0001) was significant independent predictors of time to biochemical recurrence. HIFU therapy appears to be a safe and efficacious minimally invasive therapy for patients with localized prostate cancer, especially those with a pretreatment PSA level less than 20 ng/ml or patients with low-risk group.

  1. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer using Sonablate-500

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Ohkusa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Hideyuki; Nagata, Yoshihiro

    2005-03-01

    We evaluated 181 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for biochemical disease-free rate, safety, morbidity and predictors of biochemical outcome. A total of 181 patients underwent HIFU with the Sonablate-500 and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Biochemical failure was defined according to the criteria recommended by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel. The biochemical disease-free rates at 1, 3 and 5 years in all patients were 84%, 80% and 78%, respectively. The biochemical disease-free rates at 3 years for patients with pretreatment PSA less than 10 ng/ml, 10.01 to 20.0 ng/ml and more than 20.0 ng/ml were 94%, 75% and 35%, respectively (p<0.0001). According to multivariate analysis preoperative PSA (p<0.0001) was a significant independent predictor of time to biochemical recurrence. HIFU therapy appears to be a safe and efficacious minimally invasive therapy for patients with localized prostate cancer, especially those with a pretreatment PSA level less than 20 ng/ml.

  2. Decision aids for localized prostate cancer treatment choice: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Violette, Philippe D; Agoritsas, Thomas; Alexander, Paul; Riikonen, Jarno; Santti, Henrikki; Agarwal, Arnav; Bhatnagar, Neera; Dahm, Philipp; Montori, Victor; Guyatt, Gordon H; Tikkinen, Kari A O

    2015-01-01

    Patients who are diagnosed with localized prostate cancer need to make critical treatment decisions that are sensitive to their values and preferences. The role of decision aids in facilitating these decisions is unknown. The authors conducted a systematic review of randomized trials of decision aids for localized prostate cancer. Teams of 2 reviewers independently identified, selected, and abstracted data from 14 eligible trials (n = 3377 men), of which 10 were conducted in North America. Of these, 11 trials compared decision aids with usual care, and 3 trials compared decision aids with other decision aids. Two trials suggested a modest positive impact on decisional regret. Results across studies varied widely for decisional conflict (4 studies), satisfaction with decision (2 studies), and knowledge (2 studies). No impact on treatment choices was observed (6 studies). In conclusion, scant evidence at high risk of bias suggests the variable impact of existing decision aids on a limited set of decisional processes and outcomes. Because current decision aids provide information but do not directly facilitate shared decision making, subsequent efforts would benefit from user-centered design of decision aids that promote shared decision making. PMID:25772796

  3. Ten-year Biochemical Disease-free Survival After High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for Localized Prostate Cancer: Comparison with Four Different Generation Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, T.; Nakano, M.; Shoji, S.; Omata, T.; Harano, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Usui, Y.; Terachi, T.

    2010-03-01

    HIFU has been recognized as a minimally invasive treatment option for localized prostate cancer. The purpose of the study was to assess with a long-term outcome of HIFU for prostate cancer. From January 1999, a total of 657 patients who had HIFU with at least 2 year follow-up were treated with four different types of Sonablate® (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, USA) devices. Thirty-three patients were treated with Sonablate® 200 (S200) from 1999 to 2001, 406 patients with Sonablate® 500 (S500) from 2001 to 2005, 200 patients with Sonablate® 500 version 4 (V4) from 2005-2008 and 19 patients with Sonablate® 500 TCM (TCM) from 2007. Biochemical disease-free survival rate (bDFS) in all patients was 59% in 8 years. bDFS in 8 years in patients with S200 and S500 groups were 55% and 56%, and bDFS in 4 and 2 years in patients with V4 and TCM group were 72% and 84%, respectively. bDFS in low, intermediate, and high risk groups were 75%, 54%, and 43% in S200/S500 and 93%, 72%, and 58% in V4/TCM group. Negative prostate biopsy rate after HIFU was 97% in S200, 79% in S500, 94% in V4 and 100% in TCM group. HIFU as primary therapy for prostate cancer is indicated in patients with low- and intermediate-risk (T1-T2b N0M0 disease, a Gleason score of ⩽7, a PSA level of <20 ng/mL) and a prostate volume of less than 40 mL. The rate of clinical outcome has significantly improved over the years due to technical improvements in the device.

  4. Ten-year Biochemical Disease-free Survival After High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for Localized Prostate Cancer: Comparison with Four Different Generation Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Nakano, M.; Shoji, S.; Omata, T.; Harano, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Usui, Y.; Terachi, T.

    2010-03-09

    HIFU has been recognized as a minimally invasive treatment option for localized prostate cancer. The purpose of the study was to assess with a long-term outcome of HIFU for prostate cancer. From January 1999, a total of 657 patients who had HIFU with at least 2 year follow-up were treated with four different types of Sonablate registered (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, USA) devices. Thirty-three patients were treated with Sonablate registered 200 (S200) from 1999 to 2001, 406 patients with Sonablate registered 500 (S500) from 2001 to 2005, 200 patients with Sonablate registered 500 version 4 (V4) from 2005-2008 and 19 patients with Sonablate registered 500 TCM (TCM) from 2007. Biochemical disease-free survival rate (bDFS) in all patients was 59% in 8 years. bDFS in 8 years in patients with S200 and S500 groups were 55% and 56%, and bDFS in 4 and 2 years in patients with V4 and TCM group were 72% and 84%, respectively. bDFS in low, intermediate, and high risk groups were 75%, 54%, and 43% in S200/S500 and 93%, 72%, and 58% in V4/TCM group. Negative prostate biopsy rate after HIFU was 97% in S200, 79% in S500, 94% in V4 and 100% in TCM group. HIFU as primary therapy for prostate cancer is indicated in patients with low- and intermediate-risk (T1-T2b N0M0 disease, a Gleason score of <=7, a PSA level of <20 ng/mL) and a prostate volume of less than 40 mL. The rate of clinical outcome has significantly improved over the years due to technical improvements in the device.

  5. Establishment of a New Prostate Cancer Multidisciplinary Clinic: Format and Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sundi, Debasish; Cohen, Jason E; Cole, Alexander P; Neuman, Brian P; Cooper, John; Faisal, Farzana A; Ross, Ashley E; Schaeffer, Edward M

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of multidisciplinary clinics (MDCs) for outpatient cancer evaluation is increasing. MDCs may vary in format, and data on whether MDCs change prostate cancer (PCa) care are limited. Here we report on the setup and design of a relatively new PCa MDC clinic. Because MDC evaluation was associated with a comprehensive re-evaluation of all patients' staging and risk stratification data, we studied the frequency of changes in PCa grade and stage upon MDC evaluation, which provides a unique estimate of the magnitude of pathology, radiology, and exam-based risk stratification in a modern tertiary setting. Methods In 2008–2012, 887 patients underwent consultation for newly diagnosed PCa at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) weekly MDC. In a same-day process, patients are interviewed and examined in a morning clinic. Examination findings, radiology studies, and biopsy slides are then reviewed during a noon conference that involves real-time collaboration among JHH attending specialty physicians: urologists, radiation oncologists, medical oncologists, pathologists, and radiologists. During afternoon consultations, attending physicians appropriate to each patients' eligible treatment options individually meet with patients to discuss management strategies and/or clinical trials. Retrospective chart review identified presenting tumor characteristics based on outside assessment, which was compared with stage and grade as determined at MDC evaluation. Results Overall, 186/647 (28.7%) had a change in their risk category or stage. For example, 2.9% of men were down-classified as very-low-risk, rendering them eligible for active surveillance. 5.7% of men thought to have localized cancer were up-classified as metastatic, thus prompting systemic management approaches. Using NCCN guidelines as a benchmark, many men were found to have undergone nonindicated imaging (bone scan 23.9%, CT/MRI 47.4%). The three most chosen treatments after MDC evaluation were external beam

  6. Clinical significance of single microscopic focus of adenocarcinoma at prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Çalışkan, Selahattin; Koca, Orhan; Akyüz, Mehmet; Öztürk, Metin; Karaman, Muhammet

    2015-01-01

    Objective Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most common cancer and an important reason of cancer specific death. The incidence of patients who diagnosed at low stage increased because of widespread using Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) testing. We evaluated the patients who were diagnosed single microscopic focus of adenocarcinoma and treated radical prostatectomy at final pathology. Methods The patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy between January 2004 and January 2012 were enrolled retrospectively. We extracted the patients who were diagnosed single microscopic focus of adenocarcinoma and treated with RP. Single microscopic adenocarcinoma was defined as one single focus measuring 3 mm or less, well differentiated (Gleason ≤6) adenocarcinoma. 37 patients were included at the study. Clinical data; including age, serum PSA levels, PSA density and prior biopsy and prostatectomy specimen results were recorded. In pathological examination; high molecular weight cytokeratin (HMW-CK), p63, and alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) were used for differential diagnosis. Results The patients' ages were between 42 and 77 with a mean age of 64.9 ± 7.57 years. Mean PSA levels and prostate volumes were 8.03 ± 5.21 ng/ml and 54 ± 25.51 cc. T0, T2a, T2c and T3a were reported in 2 patients, 17 patients, 17 patients and 1 patient after pathological evaluation. According to the Gleason grading system; 6 patients were 7 (3 + 4), one patient was 7 (4 + 3), one patient was 5 (3 + 2) and 27 patients were 6 (3 + 3). Conclusion Small volume of cancer at prostate biopsy is not necessarily small cancer in radical prostatectomy. The treatment choice may be over or under treatment for some patients, so the patients must be informed when choosing the treatment. PMID:26779460

  7. Conventional Versus Automated Implantation of Loose Seeds in Prostate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Dosimetric and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Genebes, Caroline; Filleron, Thomas; Graff, Pierre; Jonca, Frédéric; Huyghe, Eric; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Soulie, Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Aziza, Richard; Brun, Thomas; Delannes, Martine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the clinical outcome of I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and to compare 2 techniques of loose-seed implantation. Methods and Materials: 574 consecutive patients underwent I-125 PPB for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2000 and 2008. Two successive techniques were used: conventional implantation from 2000 to 2004 and automated implantation (Nucletron, FIRST system) from 2004 to 2008. Dosimetric and biochemical recurrence-free (bNED) survival results were reported and compared for the 2 techniques. Univariate and multivariate analysis researched independent predictors for bNED survival. Results: 419 (73%) and 155 (27%) patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease, respectively, were treated (median follow-up time, 69.3 months). The 60-month bNED survival rates were 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively, for patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease (P=.04). In univariate analysis, patients treated with automated implantation had worse bNED survival rates than did those treated with conventional implantation (P<.0001). By day 30, patients treated with automated implantation showed lower values of dose delivered to 90% of prostate volume (D90) and volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100). In multivariate analysis, implantation technique, Gleason score, and V100 on day 30 were independent predictors of recurrence-free status. Grade 3 urethritis and urinary incontinence were observed in 2.6% and 1.6% of the cohort, respectively, with no significant differences between the 2 techniques. No grade 3 proctitis was observed. Conclusion: Satisfactory 60-month bNED survival rates (93.1%) and acceptable toxicity (grade 3 urethritis <3%) were achieved by loose-seed implantation. Automated implantation was associated with worse dosimetric and bNED survival outcomes.

  8. Long-Term Functional Outcomes after Treatment for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Matthew J.; Koyama, Tatsuki; Fan, Kang-Hsien; Albertsen, Peter C.; Goodman, Michael; Hamilton, Ann S.; Hoffman, Richard M.; Potosky, Arnold L.; Stanford, Janet L.; Stroup, Antoinette M.; Van Horn, R. Lawrence; Penson, David F.

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this analysis was to compare long-term urinary, bowel, and sexual function after radical prostatectomy or external-beam radiation therapy. Methods The Prostate Cancer Outcomes Study (PCOS) enrolled 3533 men in whom prostate cancer had been diagnosed in 1994 or 1995. The current cohort comprised 1655 men in whom localized prostate cancer had been diagnosed between the ages of 55 and 74 years and who had undergone either surgery (1164 men) or radiotherapy (491 men). Functional status was assessed at baseline and at 2, 5, and 15 years after diagnosis. We used multivariable propensity scoring to compare functional outcomes according to treatment. Results Patients undergoing prostatectomy were more likely to have urinary incontinence than were those undergoing radiotherapy at 2 years (odds ratio, 6.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.92 to 20.29) and 5 years (odds ratio, 5.10; 95% CI, 2.29 to 11.36). However, no significant between-group difference in the odds of urinary incontinence was noted at 15 years. Similarly, although patients undergoing prostatectomy were more likely to have erectile dysfunction at 2 years (odds ratio, 3.46; 95% CI, 1.93 to 6.17) and 5 years (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.05 to 3.63), no significant between-group difference was noted at 15 years. Patients undergoing prostatectomy were less likely to have bowel urgency at 2 years (odds ratio, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.68) and 5 years (odds ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.84), again with no significant between-group difference in the odds of bowel urgency at 15 years. Conclusions At 15 years, no significant relative differences in disease-specific functional outcomes were observed among men undergoing prostatectomy or radiotherapy. Nonetheless, men treated for localized prostate cancer commonly had declines in all functional domains during 15 years of follow-up. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute.) PMID:23363497

  9. Localized Prostate Cancer Detection with 18F FACBC PET/CT: Comparison with MR Imaging and Histopathologic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Esther; Shih, Joanna; Pinto, Peter A.; Merino, Maria J.; Lindenberg, Maria L.; Bernardo, Marcelino; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Adler, Stephen; Owenius, Rikard; Choyke, Peter L.; Kurdziel, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize uptake of 1-amino-3-fluorine 18-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (18F FACBC) in patients with localized prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal prostate tissue and to evaluate its potential utility in delineation of intraprostatic cancers in histopathologically confirmed localized prostate cancer in comparison with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study. Twenty-one men underwent dynamic and static abdominopelvic 18F FACBC combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) and multiparametric (MP) 3-T endorectal MR imaging before robotic-assisted prostatectomy. PET/CT and MR images were coregistered by using pelvic bones as fiducial markers; this was followed by manual adjustments. Whole-mount histopathologic specimens were sliced with an MR-based patient-specific mold. 18F FACBC PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) were compared with those at MR imaging and histopathologic analysis for lesion- and sector-based (20 sectors per patient) analysis. Positive and negative predictive values for each modality were estimated by using generalized estimating equations with logit link function and working independence correlation structure. Results 18F FACBC tumor uptake was rapid but reversible. It peaked 3.6 minutes after injection and reached a relative plateau at 15–20 minutes (SUVmax[15–20min]). Mean prostate tumor SUVmax(15–20min) was significantly higher than that of the normal prostate (4.5 ± 0.5 vs 2.7 ± 0.5) (P < .001); however, it was not significantly different from that of BPH (4.3 ± 0.6) (P = .27). Sector-based comparison with histopathologic analysis, including all tumors, revealed sensitivity and specificity of 67% and 66%, respectively, for 18F FACBC PET/CT and 73% and 79%, respectively, for T2-weighted MR imaging. 18F FACBC PET/CT and MP MR

  10. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abusamra, Ashraf; Murshid, Esam; Kushi, Hussain; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Al-Mansour, Mubarak; Saadeddin, Ahmad; Rabah, Danny; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Alghamdi, Khalid; Alsharm, Abdullah; Ahmad, Imran

    2016-01-01

    This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors) who were selected by the Saudi oncology society and Saudi urological association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate to. PMID:27141178

  11. Voxel-based population analysis for correlating local dose and rectal toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Oscar; Drean, Gael; Ospina, Juan D.; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Lafond, Caroline; de Crevoisier, Renaud

    2013-04-01

    The majority of current models utilized for predicting toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy are based on dose-volume histograms. One of their main drawbacks is the lack of spatial accuracy, since they consider the organs as a whole volume and thus ignore the heterogeneous intra-organ radio-sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a dose-image-based framework to reveal the relationships between local dose and toxicity. In this approach, the three-dimensional (3D) planned dose distributions across a population are non-rigidly registered into a common coordinate system and compared at a voxel level, therefore enabling the identification of 3D anatomical patterns, which may be responsible for toxicity, at least to some extent. Additionally, different metrics were employed in order to assess the quality of the dose mapping. The value of this approach was demonstrated by prospectively analyzing rectal bleeding (⩾Grade 1 at 2 years) according to the CTCAE v3.0 classification in a series of 105 patients receiving 80 Gy to the prostate by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Within the patients presenting bleeding, a significant dose excess (6 Gy on average, p < 0.01) was found in a region of the anterior rectal wall. This region, close to the prostate (1 cm), represented less than 10% of the rectum. This promising voxel-wise approach allowed subregions to be defined within the organ that may be involved in toxicity and, as such, must be considered during the inverse IMRT planning step.

  12. Intraoperative Radiotherapy During Radical Prostatectomy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Technical and Dosimetric Aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Krengli, Marco; Terrone, Carlo; Ballare, Andrea; Loi, Gianfranco; Tarabuzzi, Roberto; Marchioro, Giansilvio; Beldi, Debora; Mones, Eleonora; Bolchini, Cesare R.T.; Volpe, Alessandro; Frea, Bruno

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer and candidates for radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: A total of 38 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were enrolled. No patients had evidence of lymph node or distant metastases, probability of organ-confined disease >25%, or risk of lymph node involvement >15% according to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Nomogram. The IORT was delivered after exposure of the prostate by a dedicated linear accelerator with beveled collimators using electrons of 9 to 12 MeV to a total dose of 10-12 Gy. Rectal dose was measured in vivo by radiochromic films placed on a rectal probe. Administration of IORT was followed by completion of radical prostatectomy and regional lymph node dissection. All cases with extracapsular extension and/or positive margins were scheduled for postoperative radiotherapy. Patients with pT3 to pT4 disease or positive nodes received adjuvant hormonal therapy. Results: Mean dose detected by radiochromic films was 3.9 Gy (range, 0.4-8.9 Gy) to the anterior rectal wall. The IORT procedure lasted 31 min on average (range, 15-45 min). No major intra- or postoperative complications occurred. Minor complications were observed in 10/33 (30%) of cases. Of the 27/31 patients who completed the postoperative external beam radiotherapy, 3/27 experienced Grade 2 rectal toxicity and 1/27 experienced Grade 2 urinary toxicity. Conclusions: Use of IORT during radical prostatectomy is feasible and allows safe delivery of postoperative external beam radiotherapy to the tumor bed without relevant acute rectal toxicity.

  13. Voxel-based population analysis for correlating local dose and rectal toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Oscar; Drean, Gael; Ospina, Juan D; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Lafond, Caroline; de Crevoisier, Renaud

    2013-04-21

    The majority of current models utilized for predicting toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy are based on dose-volume histograms. One of their main drawbacks is the lack of spatial accuracy, since they consider the organs as a whole volume and thus ignore the heterogeneous intra-organ radio-sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a dose-image-based framework to reveal the relationships between local dose and toxicity. In this approach, the three-dimensional (3D) planned dose distributions across a population are non-rigidly registered into a common coordinate system and compared at a voxel level, therefore enabling the identification of 3D anatomical patterns, which may be responsible for toxicity, at least to some extent. Additionally, different metrics were employed in order to assess the quality of the dose mapping. The value of this approach was demonstrated by prospectively analyzing rectal bleeding (≥Grade 1 at 2 years) according to the CTCAE v3.0 classification in a series of 105 patients receiving 80 Gy to the prostate by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Within the patients presenting bleeding, a significant dose excess (6 Gy on average, p < 0.01) was found in a region of the anterior rectal wall. This region, close to the prostate (1 cm), represented less than 10% of the rectum. This promising voxel-wise approach allowed subregions to be defined within the organ that may be involved in toxicity and, as such, must be considered during the inverse IMRT planning step. PMID:23528429

  14. Towards Clinically Optimized MRI-guided Surgical Manipulator for Minimally Invasive Prostate Percutaneous Interventions: Constructive Design*

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, Sohrab; Fischer, Gregory S.; Song, Sang-Eun; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M.; Iordachita, Iulian

    2013-01-01

    This paper undertakes the modular design and development of a minimally invasive surgical manipulator for MRI-guided transperineal prostate interventions. Severe constraints for the MRI-compatibility to hold the minimum artifact on the image quality and dimensions restraint of the bore scanner shadow the design procedure. Regarding the constructive design, the manipulator kinematics has been optimized and the effective analytical needle workspace is developed and followed by proposing the workflow for the manual needle insertion. A study of the finite element analysis is established and utilized to improve the mechanism weaknesses under some inevitable external forces to ensure the minimum structure deformation. The procedure for attaching a sterile plastic drape on the robot manipulator is discussed. The introduced robotic manipulator herein is aimed for the clinically prostate biopsy and brachytherapy applications. PMID:24683502

  15. Towards Clinically Optimized MRI-guided Surgical Manipulator for Minimally Invasive Prostate Percutaneous Interventions: Constructive Design.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Sohrab; Fischer, Gregory S; Song, Sang-Eun; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M; Iordachita, Iulian

    2013-12-31

    This paper undertakes the modular design and development of a minimally invasive surgical manipulator for MRI-guided transperineal prostate interventions. Severe constraints for the MRI-compatibility to hold the minimum artifact on the image quality and dimensions restraint of the bore scanner shadow the design procedure. Regarding the constructive design, the manipulator kinematics has been optimized and the effective analytical needle workspace is developed and followed by proposing the workflow for the manual needle insertion. A study of the finite element analysis is established and utilized to improve the mechanism weaknesses under some inevitable external forces to ensure the minimum structure deformation. The procedure for attaching a sterile plastic drape on the robot manipulator is discussed. The introduced robotic manipulator herein is aimed for the clinically prostate biopsy and brachytherapy applications. PMID:24683502

  16. Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy Versus Prostate Only Radiotherapy in the Management of Locally Advanced or Aggressive Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Aizer, Ayal A.; Yu, James B.; McKeon, Anne M.; Decker, Roy H.; Colberg, John W.; Peschel, Richard E.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) or prostate-only radiotherapy (PORT) yields improved biochemical disease-free survival (BDFS) in patients with advanced or aggressive prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2007, a consecutive sample of 277 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and at least a 15% likelihood of lymph node involvement who had undergone WPRT (n = 68) or PORT (n = 209) at two referral centers was analyzed. The median radiation dose in both arms was 75.6 Gy. The outcome measure was BDFS, as determined using the prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL definition of failure. BDFS was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. A multivariate analysis was performed to assess for confounding. Treatment-related toxicity was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events guidelines. The median follow-up was 30 months. Results: WPRT patients had more advanced and aggressive disease at baseline (p < .001). The 4-year BDFS rate was 69.4% in the PORT cohort and 86.3% in the WPRT cohort (p = .02). Within the entire cohort, after adjustment for confounding variables, the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (p < .001), Gleason score (p < .001), use of hormonal therapy (p = .002), and use of WPRT (vs. PORT, p = .006) predicted for BDFS. Patients undergoing WPRT had increased acute gastrointestinal toxicity (p = .048), but no significant difference in acute genitourinary toxicity was seen (p = .09). No difference in late toxicity was found. Conclusion: WPRT may yield improved BDFS in patients with advanced or aggressive prostate adenocarcinoma, but results in a greater incidence of acute toxicity.

  17. Is "Active Surveillance" an Acceptable Alternative?: A Qualitative Study of Couples' Decision Making about Early-Stage, Localized Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Le, Chi L; McFall, Stephanie L; Byrd, Theresa L; Volk, Robert J; Cantor, Scott B; Kuban, Deborah A; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of our study was to describe decision making by men and their partners regarding active surveillance (AS) or treatment for early-stage, localized prostate cancer. Fifteen couples were recruited from a cancer center multispecialty clinic, which gave full information about all options, including AS. Data were collected via individual, semi-structured telephone interviews. Most patients were white, non-Hispanic, had private insurance, had completed at least some college, and were aged 49-72 years. Ten chose AS. All partners were female, and couples reported strong marital satisfaction and cohesion. All couples described similar sequences of a highly emotional initial reaction and desire to be rid of the cancer, information seeking, and decision making. The choice of AS was built on a nuanced evaluation of the man's condition in which the couple differentiated prostate cancer from other cancers and early stage from later stages, wanted to avoid/delay side effects, and trusted the AS protocol to identify negative changes in time for successful treatment. Treated couples continued to want immediate treatment to remove the cancer. We concluded that having a partner's support for AS may help a man feel more comfortable with choosing and adhering to AS. Using decision aids that address both a man's and his partner's concerns regarding AS may increase its acceptability. Our research shows that some patients want to and do involve their partners in the decision-making process. Ethical issues are related to the tension between desire for partner involvement and the importance of the patient as autonomous decision-maker. The extended period of decision making, particularly for AS, is also an ethical issue that requires additional support for patients and couples in the making of fully informed choices that includes AS. PMID:27346824

  18. A Phase II Trial of Arc-Based Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, Michael; Best, Lara; Wong, Eugene; Bauman, Glenn; D'Souza, David; Venkatesan, Varagur; Sexton, Tracy; Ahmad, Belal; Izawa, Jonathan; Rodrigues, George

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity and biochemical control of hypofractionated, image-guided (fiducial markers or ultrasound guidance), simplified intensity-modulated arc therapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This Phase II prospective clinical trial for T1a-2cNXM0 prostate cancer enrolled 66 patients who received 63.2 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks. Fiducial markers were used for image guidance in 30 patients and daily ultrasound for the remainder. Toxicity was scored according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 36 months. Acute Phase Grade 2 and 3 toxicity was 34% and 9% for GU vs. 25% and 10% for GI symptoms. One Grade 4 acute GI toxicity occurred in a patient with unrecognized Crohn's disease. Late Grade 2 and 3 toxicity for GU was 14% and 5%, and GI toxicity was 25% and 3%. One late GI Grade 4 toxicity was observed in a patient with significant comorbidities (anticoagulation, vascular disease). Acute GI toxicity {>=}Grade 2 was shown to be a predictor for late toxicity Grade {>=}2 (p < 0.001). The biochemical disease-free survival at 3 years was 95%. Conclusions: Hypofractionated simplified intensity-modulated arc therapy radiotherapy given as 63.2 Gy in 20 fractions demonstrated promising biochemical control rates; however, higher rates of acute Grade 3 GU and GI toxicity and higher late Grade 2 GU and GI toxicity were noted. Ongoing randomized controlled trials should ultimately clarify issues regarding patient selection and the true rate of severe toxicity that can be directly attributed to hypofractionated radiotherapy.

  19. Phase I trial of motexafin-lutetium-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy in patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stripp, Diana C. H.; Mick, Rosemarie; Zhu, Timothy C.; Whittington, Richard; Smith, Debbie; Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod C.; Miles, Jeremy; Busch, Theresa M.; Shin, Daniel; Kachur, Alex; Tochner, Zelig A.; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Glatstein, Eli; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2004-06-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with locally recurrent prostate cancer after treatment with radiation therapy are limited. An ongoing Phase I trial of interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the photosensitizer motexafin lutetium (MLu) was initiated in year 2000 for men with locally recurrent prostate cancer. The primary objective of this trial is to determine the maximally tolerated dose of motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT. Twelve men with biopsy-proven recurrent prostate cancer and no evidence of distant metastatic disease have been enrolled. Pre-treatment evaluation included an MRI of the prostate, bone scan, laboratory studies, cystoscopy, and transrectal ultrasound. Treatment plans were generated based upon the ultrasound findings. PDT dose was escalated by increasing the motexafin lutetium dose, increasing the 732 nm light dose, and decreasing the drug-light interval. Motexafin lutetium doses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mg/kg administered IV 3, 6, or 24 hours prior to 732 nm light delivery. The light dose measured in real time with in situ spherical detectors was 25-100 J/cm2 for all patients. Light was delivered through optical fibers inserted through a transperineal brachytherapy template in the operating room and optical property measurements were made before and after light therapy. Prostate biopsies were obtained before and after light delivery for spectrofluorometric measurements of photosensitizer uptake. Twelve patients have completed protocol treatment on eight dose levels without dose-limiting toxicity. Grade I PDT-related genitourinary symptoms were observed. One patient had Grade II urinary urgency that was urinary catheter-related. No rectal or other GI PDT-related toxicities were observed. Measurements of motexafin lutetium in prostate tissue demonstrated the presence of photosensitizer at all dose levels. Conclusions: Motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT designed to treat comprehensively the entired prostate gland has been well-tolerated at the doses

  20. [PSA bounce phenomenon after local treatment with radiation for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M A Cabeza; Escutia, M A Pérez; Antolín, A Rodríguez; Costoso, N Gascón; García, A Cascales; González, E Lanzós

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a curative treatment for localized prostate cancer in its modalities of brachytherapy (BT) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). A temporary increase in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values following a radiotherapy treatment coupled with a decrease without therapeutic intervention may happen in 30% of the patients. This phenomenon is known as PSA bounce and lacks prognostic effect in relation to tumor control. Additionally, it produces anxiety in the patient because of the fear of failure, and in the physicists due to the uncertainty about the state of the tumor. The etiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. Several factors associated with the tumor and the treatments have been evaluated in the studies which analyze this phenomenon, the age is the only observed factor with the highest consistency as a bounce predictor. The definition of biologic failure (BF)after EBRT or BT with or without androgenic deprivation (ADT) according to Phoenix criteria, which considers an increase of at least 2 ng/ml over PSA nadir, enables better taking the bounce phenomenon into account, although is not free from false BF that may affect to the relapse-free survival in patients with follow-up shorter than 3 years. PMID:22318175

  1. Evaluation of Image-Guidance Strategies in the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kupelian, Patrick A. Lee, Choonik; Langen, Katja M.; Zeidan, Omar A.; Manon, Rafael R.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To compare different image-guidance strategies in the alignment of prostate cancer patients. Using data from patients treated using daily image guidance, the remaining setup errors for several different strategies were retrospectively calculated. Methods and Materials: The alignment data from 74 patients treated with helical tomotherapy were analyzed, resulting in a data set of 2,252 fractions during which a megavoltage computed tomography image was used for image guidance with intraprostatic metallic fiducials. Given the daily positional adjustments, a variety of protocols, differing in imaging frequency and method, were retrospectively studied. The residual setup errors were determined for each protocol. Results: As expected, the systematic errors were effectively reduced with imaging. However, the random errors were unaffected. Even when image guidance was performed every other day with a running mean of the previous displacements, residual setup errors >5 mm occurred in 24% of all fractions. This frequency increased to about 40% if setup errors >3 mm were scored. Conclusion: Setup errors increased with decreasing frequency of image guidance. However, residual errors were still significant at the 5-mm level, even with imaging was performed every other day. This suggests that localizations must be performed daily in the set up of prostate cancer patients during a course of external beam radiotherapy.

  2. Prostate biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate gland biopsy; Transrectal prostate biopsy; Fine needle biopsy of the prostate; Core biopsy of the prostate; Targeted prostate biopsy; Prostate biopsy - transrectal ultrasound (TRUS); Stereotactic ...

  3. Low-complexity atlas-based prostate segmentation by combining global, regional, and local metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Qiuliang; Ruan, Dan

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To improve the efficiency of atlas-based segmentation without compromising accuracy, and to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method on MRI-based prostate segmentation application. Methods: Accurate and efficient automatic structure segmentation is an important task in medical image processing. Atlas-based methods, as the state-of-the-art, provide good segmentation at the cost of a large number of computationally intensive nonrigid registrations, for anatomical sites/structures that are subject to deformation. In this study, the authors propose to utilize a combination of global, regional, and local metrics to improve the accuracy yet significantly reduce the number of required nonrigid registrations. The authors first perform an affine registration to minimize the global mean squared error (gMSE) to coarsely align each atlas image to the target. Subsequently, atarget-specific regional MSE (rMSE), demonstrated to be a good surrogate for dice similarity coefficient (DSC), is used to select a relevant subset from the training atlas. Only within this subset are nonrigid registrations performed between the training images and the target image, to minimize a weighted combination of gMSE and rMSE. Finally, structure labels are propagated from the selected training samples to the target via the estimated deformation fields, and label fusion is performed based on a weighted combination of rMSE and local MSE (lMSE) discrepancy, with proper total-variation-based spatial regularization. Results: The proposed method was applied to a public database of 30 prostate MR images with expert-segmented structures. The authors’ method, utilizing only eight nonrigid registrations, achieved a performance with a median/mean DSC of over 0.87/0.86, outperforming the state-of-the-art full-fledged atlas-based segmentation approach of which the median/mean DSC was 0.84/0.82 when applying to their data set. Conclusions: The proposed method requires a fixed number of nonrigid

  4. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, high-dose rate brachytherapy, and low-dose rate permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruijie; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Anyan; Wang, Hao; Qu, Ang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, and low-dose rate (LDR) permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer. A total of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer were selected for this study. VMAT, HDR brachytherapy, and LDR permanent seeds implant plans were created for each patient. For VMAT, planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the clinical target volume plus a margin of 5mm. Rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads were considered as organs at risk. A 78Gy in 39 fractions were prescribed for PTV. For HDR and LDR plans, the dose prescription was D90 of 34Gy in 8.5Gy per fraction, and 145Gy to clinical target volume, respectively. The dose and dose volume parameters were evaluated for target, organs at risk, and normal tissue. Physical dose was converted to dose based on 2-Gy fractions (equivalent dose in 2Gy per fraction, EQD2) for comparison of 3 techniques. HDR and LDR significantly reduced the dose to rectum and bladder compared with VMAT. The Dmean (EQD2) of rectum decreased 22.36Gy in HDR and 17.01Gy in LDR from 30.24Gy in VMAT, respectively. The Dmean (EQD2) of bladder decreased 6.91Gy in HDR and 2.53Gy in LDR from 13.46Gy in VMAT. For the femoral heads and normal tissue, the mean doses were also significantly reduced in both HDR and LDR compared with VMAT. For the urethra, the mean dose (EQD2) was 80.26, 70.23, and 104.91Gy in VMAT, HDR, and LDR brachytherapy, respectively. For localized prostate cancer, both HDR and LDR brachytherapy were clearly superior in the sparing of rectum, bladder, femoral heads, and normal tissue compared with VMAT. HDR provided the advantage in sparing of urethra compared with VMAT and LDR. PMID:27400663

  5. Salvage HIFU for biopsy confirmed local prostate cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rittberg, Rebekah; Kroczak, Tadeusz; Fleshner, Neil; Drachenberg, Darrel

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a treatment option for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and more recently has been used as salvage therapy after failed radiation therapy. We present a case of local recurrence with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy and salvage external beam radiation therapy with salvage HIFU without biochemical recurrence at 20 months. PMID:26425239

  6. Plasma genetic and genomic abnormalities predict treatment response and clinical outcome in advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shu; Kohli, Manish; Du, Meijun; Dittmar, Rachel L; Lee, Adam; Nandy, Debashis; Yuan, Tiezheng; Guo, Yongchen; Wang, Yuan; Tschannen, Michael R; Worthey, Elizabeth; Jacob, Howard; See, William; Kilari, Deepak; Wang, Xuexia; Hovey, Raymond L; Huang, Chiang-Ching; Wang, Liang

    2015-06-30

    Liquid biopsies, examinations of tumor components in body fluids, have shown promise for predicting clinical outcomes. To evaluate tumor-associated genomic and genetic variations in plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and their associations with treatment response and overall survival, we applied whole genome and targeted sequencing to examine the plasma cfDNAs derived from 20 patients with advanced prostate cancer. Sequencing-based genomic abnormality analysis revealed locus-specific gains or losses that were common in prostate cancer, such as 8q gains, AR amplifications, PTEN losses and TMPRSS2-ERG fusions. To estimate tumor burden in cfDNA, we developed a Plasma Genomic Abnormality (PGA) score by summing the most significant copy number variations. Cox regression analysis showed that PGA scores were significantly associated with overall survival (p < 0.04). After androgen deprivation therapy or chemotherapy, targeted sequencing showed significant mutational profile changes in genes involved in androgen biosynthesis, AR activation, DNA repair, and chemotherapy resistance. These changes may reflect the dynamic evolution of heterozygous tumor populations in response to these treatments. These results strongly support the feasibility of using non-invasive liquid biopsies as potential tools to study biological mechanisms underlying therapy-specific resistance and to predict disease progression in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25915538

  7. Plasma genetic and genomic abnormalities predict treatment response and clinical outcome in advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Meijun; Dittmar, Rachel L.; Lee, Adam; Nandy, Debashis; Yuan, Tiezheng; Guo, Yongchen; Wang, Yuan; Tschannen, Michael R.; Worthey, Elizabeth; Jacob, Howard; See, William; Kilari, Deepak; Wang, Xuexia; Hovey, Raymond L.; Huang, Chiang-Ching; Wang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Liquid biopsies, examinations of tumor components in body fluids, have shown promise for predicting clinical outcomes. To evaluate tumor-associated genomic and genetic variations in plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and their associations with treatment response and overall survival, we applied whole genome and targeted sequencing to examine the plasma cfDNAs derived from 20 patients with advanced prostate cancer. Sequencing-based genomic abnormality analysis revealed locus-specific gains or losses that were common in prostate cancer, such as 8q gains, AR amplifications, PTEN losses and TMPRSS2-ERG fusions. To estimate tumor burden in cfDNA, we developed a Plasma Genomic Abnormality (PGA) score by summing the most significant copy number variations. Cox regression analysis showed that PGA scores were significantly associated with overall survival (p < 0.04). After androgen deprivation therapy or chemotherapy, targeted sequencing showed significant mutational profile changes in genes involved in androgen biosynthesis, AR activation, DNA repair, and chemotherapy resistance. These changes may reflect the dynamic evolution of heterozygous tumor populations in response to these treatments. These results strongly support the feasibility of using non-invasive liquid biopsies as potential tools to study biological mechanisms underlying therapy-specific resistance and to predict disease progression in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25915538

  8. Early versus deferred androgen suppression therapy for patients with lymph node-positive prostate cancer after local therapy with curative intent: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is currently no consensus regarding the optimal timing for androgen suppression therapy in patients with prostate cancer that have undergone local therapy with curative intent but are proven to have node-positive disease without signs of distant metastases at the time of local therapy. The objective of this systematic review was to determine the benefits and harms of early (at the time of local therapy) versus deferred (at the time of clinical disease progression) androgen suppression therapy for patients with node-positive prostate cancer after local therapy. Methods The protocol was registered prospectively (CRD42011001221; http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO). We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases, as well as reference lists, the abstracts of three major conferences, and three trial registers, to identify randomized controlled trials (search update 04/08/2012). Two authors independently screened the identified articles, assessed trial quality, and extracted data. Results Four studies including 398 patients were identified for inclusion. Early androgen suppression therapy lead to a significant decrease in overall mortality (HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.46-0.84), cancer-specific mortality (HR 0.34, 95% CI 0.18-0.64), and clinical progression at 3 or 9 years (RR 0.29, 95% CI 0.16-0.52 at 3 years and RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.36-0.67 at 9 years). One study showed an increase of adverse effects with early androgen suppression therapy. All trials had substantial methodological limitations. Conclusions The data available suggest an improvement in survival and delayed disease progression but increased adverse events for patients with node-positive prostate cancer after local therapy treated with early androgen suppression therapy versus deferred androgen suppression therapy. However, quality of data is low. Randomized controlled trials with blinding of outcome assessment, planned to determine the timing of androgen suppression therapy in node

  9. Clinical study on the application of a 2-μm continuous wave laser in transurethral vaporesection of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    XU, YONG; SUN, DONGCHONG; WEI, ZHITAO; HONG, BAOFA; YANG, YONG

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the method and clinical effects of transurethral dividing vaporesection of the prostate in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) using the RevoIix 70 W 2-μm continuous wave (cw) laser. A total of 155 BPH patients were treated transurethrally under epidural or sacral anesthesia using the dividing vaporesection technique. Of these, 80 had a prostate volume of ≤80 ml and 75 had a prostate volume of >80 ml. Pre- and post-operative data were evaluated for prostate-specific antigens (PSAs), post-void residual volume (PVR), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and quality of life (QoL). Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS 16.0 software. Treatment effectiveness evaluations were also conducted. In the ≤80 ml prostate volume group, the mean PSA level decreased from 3.8±0.9 to 2.6±1.3 ng/ml. The PVR, mean Qmax, IPSS and QoL score improved significantly (P<0.05) in each group but no statistically significant difference was identified between the two groups. With a shorter surgery duration, safe use and high cutting efficiency and rapid vaporization ability, the 2-μm laser vaporesection technique shows superiority compared to standard techniques in the treatment of BPH. PMID:23596476

  10. Vibro-acoustography with 1.75D ultrasound array transducer for detection and localization of permanent prostate brachytherapy seeds: ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Alizad, Azra; Kinnick, Randall R.; Davis, Brian J.; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2013-03-01

    Effective brachytherapy procedures require precise placement of radioactive seeds in the prostate. Currently, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is one of the main intraoperative imaging modalities to assist physicians in placement of brachytherapy seeds. However, the seed detection rate with TRUS is poor mainly because ultrasound imaging is highly sensitive to variations in seed orientation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the abilities of a new acoustic radiation force imaging modality, vibro-acoustography (VA), equipped with a 1.75D array transducer and implemented on a customized clinical ultrasound scanner, to image and localize brachytherapy seeds in prostatic tissue. To perform experiments, excised cadaver prostate specimens were implanted with dummy brachytherapy seeds, and embedded in tissue mimicking gel to simulate the properties of the surrounding soft tissues. The samples were scanned using the VA system and the resulting VA signals were used to reconstruct VA images at several depths inside the tissue. To further evaluate the performance of VA in detecting seeds, X-ray computed tomography (CT) images of the same tissue sample, were obtained and used as a gold-standard to compare the number of seeds detected by the two methods. Our results indicate that VA is capable of imaging of brachytherapy seeds with accuracy and high contrast, and can detect a large percentage of the seeds implanted within the tissue samples.

  11. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease. They received 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with intensity-modulated radiotherapy including daily on-line image guidance with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results: Between June 2001 and March 2004, 92 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL. The majority had Gleason grade 5-6 (38%) or 7 (59%) disease, and 82 patients had T1c-T2a clinical staging. Overall, 29 patients had low-risk, 56 intermediate-risk, and 7 high-risk disease. Severe acute toxicity (Grade 3-4) was rare, occurring in only 1 patient. Median follow-up was 38 months. According to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the rate of biochemical control at 14 months was 97%. According to the previous American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, biochemical control at 3 years was 76%. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with no severe (Grade {>=}3) toxicity at the most recent assessment. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with image guidance is feasible and is associated with low rates of late bladder and rectal toxicity. At early follow-up, biochemical outcome is comparable to that reported for conventionally fractionated controls. The findings are being tested in an ongoing, multicenter, Phase III trial.

  12. The Evolving Biology of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Review of Recommendations From the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Working Group 3.

    PubMed

    Geethakumari, Praveen Ramakrishnan; Cookson, Michael S; Kelly, William Kevin

    2016-02-01

    In 2008, the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Working Group 2 (PCWG2) developed consensus guidelines for clinical trial design and conduct that redefined trial endpoints, with a dual-objective paradigm: to (1) controlling, relieving, or eliminating disease manifestations at the start of treatment; and (2) preventing or delaying further disease manifestations. Clinical and translational research in prostate cancer has expanded our current-day understanding of the mechanisms of its pathogenesis, as well as the different clinicopathologic and molecular subtypes of the disease, and has improved the therapeutic armamentarium for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). These new advances led to the development of the updated PCWG3 guidelines in 2015. In this review, we analyze our evolving understanding of the biology of CRPC, acquired resistance mechanisms, and emerging therapeutic targets in light of the updated PCWG3 guidelines. We present a joint perspective from the medical oncology and urologic disciplines on the ongoing efforts to advance clinical trial performance in order to discover new therapies for this fatal disease. PMID:26888794

  13. Bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy, iridium 192 template, and external beam therapy for localized prostatic carcinoma: complications and results

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, F.A.; Ali, M.M.; Marks, S.E.; Hackler, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma were treated by bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy and temporary implantation of iridium 192 strands with adjuvant external beam radiotherapy. With the implant the prostate received between 3200 and 3500 gray (Gy) followed in two weeks by small-field external beam irradiation for an additional dose of approximately 3400 Gy. Morbidity included an ileofemoral thrombosis in one patient, and transient radiation proctitis in four patients; one patient required transurethral prostatic resection for obstruction at one year. Local response of the primary tumor was dramatic in every case at three-month follow-up. In 11 of 15 patients (73%), biopsy at one year showed no evidence of disease.

  14. Localization and physical mapping of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSM) gene to human chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker-Schaeffer, C.W.; Hawkins, A.L.; Griffin, C.A.; Isaacs, J.T.

    1995-11-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSM) was identified by the monoclonal antibody 7E11-C5.3, which was raised against the human prostatic carcinoma cell line LNCaP. The PSM antigen is expressed by normal, neoplastic, and metastatic prostatic tissues. The 2.65-kb cDNA encoding the 100-kDa PSM glycoprotein was cloned from LNCaP cells. Studies have shown that the expression of PSM is tissue-specific. In the present study monochromosomal somatic cell hybrids were used to localize the PSM gene to human chromosome 11. Using this information, initial mapping studies identified two potential PSM gene loci at 11p11.1-p13 and 11q14. Further high-stringency analysis using cosmid probes identified the 11q14 region as the location of the PSM gene. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ... Physicians The full report is titled “Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ...

  16. Response shift due to diagnosis and primary treatment of localized prostate cancer: a then-test and a vignette study

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, Harry J.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2007-01-01

    Aim Whether a prostate cancer diagnosis induces response shift has not been established so far. Therefore, we assessed response shift in men who were diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. Patients and methods Out of 3,892 men who completed a questionnaire before screening, 82 were subsequently diagnosed with prostate cancer. Response shift was assessed in 52 (response 63%) by the then-test (EuroQol self-rating of health, Short-Form 36 mental health and vitality) and a novel method: rating of vignettes relating to side effects of prostate cancer treatment (urinary, bowel and erectile dysfunction). Three then-tests were conducted: two referencing pre-diagnosis (measured pre- and post-treatment), and one referencing pre-treatment (measured post-treatment). Results Then-test scores of pre-diagnosis health were significantly higher than original scores, indicating a more positive judgement in retrospect. Then-test scores of pre-treatment health were lower than original scores. Especially the vignette on erectile dysfunction was rated less bad after diagnosis versus before (P < 0.001, moderate effect size). Conclusions We found evidence for response shift in men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Men evaluated urinary, bowel, and erectile dysfunction as less bad after they had become patients who can expect to experience these side effects. The rating of vignettes is a promising additional technique to assess response shift. PMID:17917793

  17. Maximum vs. Mono Androgen Blockade and the Risk of Recurrence in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer Undergoing Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C. Sadetsky, Natalia; Chen, M.-H.; Carroll, Peter R.; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: We examined whether maximum androgen blockade (MAB) is associated with a decreased recurrence risk vs. single-agent androgen suppression (monotherapy) for men undergoing brachytherapy (BT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Data from 223 men in Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor database who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) concurrent with BT for intermediate- or high-risk prostatic adenocarcinoma were included; 159 (71%) received MAB, and 64 (29%) monotherapy (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist or anti-androgen alone). Cox regression analysis was performed to assess whether the choice of ADT was associated with disease recurrence adjusting for known prognostic factors. Results: Men who received MAB had similar Gleason scores, T categories, and pretreatment prostate-specific antigen as those who received monotherapy. After a median follow-up of 49 months, the use of MAB was not associated with a decrease in the risk recurrence (p = 0.72), after adjusting for known prognostic factors. A higher PSA at diagnosis (p = 0.03) and younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.01) were associated with increased recurrence risk. The 3-year recurrence free survival was 76% for patients in both monotherapy and MAB groups. Conclusions: There are varied practice patterns in physicians' choice of the extent of concurrent ADT when used with brachytherapy for men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. Given a lack of demonstrated superiority from either ADT choice, both appear to be reasonable options.

  18. Advanced image reconstruction strategies for 4D prostate DCE-MRI: steps toward clinical practicality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson, Eric G.; Borisch, Eric A.; Froemming, Adam T.; Kawashima, Akira; Young, Phillip M.; Warndahl, Brent A.; Grimm, Roger C.; Manduca, Armando; Riederer, Stephen J.; Trzasko, Joshua D.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI is an important tool for the detection and characterization of primary and recurring prostate cancer. Advanced reconstruction strategies (e.g., sparse or low-rank regression) provide improved depiction of contrast dynamics and pharmacokinetic parameters; however, the high computation cost of reconstructing 4D (3D+time, 50+ frames) datasets typically inhibits their routine clinical use. Here, a novel alternating direction method-of-multipliers (ADMM) optimization strategy is described that enables these methods to be executed in ∠5 minutes, and thus within the standard clinical workflow. After overviewing the mechanics of this approach, high-performance implementation strategies will be discussed and demonstrated through clinical cases.

  19. Health-Related Quality of Life After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Results From a Multi-institutional Consortium of Prospective Trials

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R.; Collins, Sean; Fuller, Donald; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kupelian, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael; Katz, Alan

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the early and late health-related quality of life (QOL) outcomes among prostate cancer patients following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Patient self-reported QOL was prospectively measured among 864 patients from phase 2 clinical trials of SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Data from the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) instrument were obtained at baseline and at regular intervals up to 6 years. SBRT delivered a median dose of 36.25 Gy in 4 or 5 fractions. A short course of androgen deprivation therapy was given to 14% of patients. Results: Median follow-up was 3 years and 194 patients remained evaluable at 5 years. A transient decline in the urinary and bowel domains was observed within the first 3 months after SBRT which returned to baseline status or better within 6 months and remained so beyond 5 years. The same pattern was observed among patients with good versus poor baseline function and was independent of the degree of early toxicities. Sexual QOL decline was predominantly observed within the first 9 months, a pattern not altered by the use of androgen deprivation therapy or patient age. Conclusion: Long-term outcome demonstrates that prostate SBRT is well tolerated and has little lasting impact on health-related QOL. A transient and modest decline in urinary and bowel QOL during the first few months after SBRT quickly recovers to baseline levels. With a large number of patients evaluable up to 5 years following SBRT, it is unlikely that unexpected late adverse effects will manifest themselves.

  20. Prolactin-induced prostate tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Goffin, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The physiological role of prolactin (PRL) in the prostate gland is not clearly understood. Genetically-modified mouse models that have invalidated actors of the PRL signaling axis failed to identify an essential regulatory function on this tissue. However, a large body of evidence suggests an important role for PRL in prostate tumorigenesis. Mainly through the activation of its downstream target STAT5, PRL can induce growth and survival of prostate cancer cells and tissues in several experimental settings. In the clinic, PRL expression and STAT5 activation in human prostate tumors correlate with disease severity. Available data point to a role of local (autocrine/paracrine) rather than circulating (endocrine) PRL in the induction of disease progression. In mice, transgenic expression of PRL in the prostate leads to enhanced epithelial hyperplasia and dysplasia, with amplification of basal/stem cells which have been recently identified as prostate cancer-initiating cells. Thus, targeting PRL receptor (PRLR)/STAT5 signaling may provide an alternative therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Corresponding targeted therapies currently in preclinical development include antagonists or blocking antibodies for the PRLR and small molecule inhibitors directed against the tyrosine kinase JAK2 upstream of STAT5. Present efforts are aimed at validating these therapies for the treatment of prostate cancer, while understanding the mechanisms of disease progression induced by PRL/STAT5. PMID:25472541

  1. Early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Wagner; Nag; Young; Bahnson

    2000-12-15

    Introduction: Transperineal prostate brachytherapy is gaining popularity as a treatment for clinically localized carcinoma of the prostate. Very little prospective data exists addressing the issue of complications associated with this procedure. We present an analysis of the early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: Forty-six consecutive patients who underwent Palladium-103 (Pd-103) seed placement for clinically localized prostate carcinoma were evaluated prospectively for any morbidity associated with the procedure. Twenty-three patients completed an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire preoperatively, at their first postoperative visit, and at their second postoperative visit. The total IPSS, each of the seven individual components, and the "bother" score were evaluated separately for each visit, and statistical significance was determined. Results: Urinary retention occurred in 7/46 patients (15%). Of these, 5 were able to void spontaneously after catheter removal. One patient is maintained with a suprapubic tube, and one patient is currently on continuous intermittent catheterization. Baseline IPSS was 7.1 and this went to 20.0 at the first postoperative visit (p<0.001). By the second postoperative visit, the IPSS was 8.0. Conclusions: In our experience, prostate brachytherapy for localized carcinoma of the prostate is associated with a 15% catheterization rate and a significant increase in the IPSS (7.1 to 20.0). This increase in the IPSS seems to be self-limited. Patients need to be educated on these issues prior to prostate brachytherapy. PMID:11113369

  2. Advantages and limitations of navigation-based multicriteria optimization (MCO) for localized prostate cancer IMRT planning

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, Conor K.; Bokrantz, Rasmus; O’Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.

    2014-10-01

    Efficacy of inverse planning is becoming increasingly important for advanced radiotherapy techniques. This study’s aims were to validate multicriteria optimization (MCO) in RayStation (v2.4, RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden) against standard intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization in Oncentra (v4.1, Nucletron BV, the Netherlands) and characterize dose differences due to conversion of navigated MCO plans into deliverable multileaf collimator apertures. Step-and-shoot IMRT plans were created for 10 patients with localized prostate cancer using both standard optimization and MCO. Acceptable standard IMRT plans with minimal average rectal dose were chosen for comparison with deliverable MCO plans. The trade-off was, for the MCO plans, managed through a user interface that permits continuous navigation between fluence-based plans. Navigated MCO plans were made deliverable at incremental steps along a trajectory between maximal target homogeneity and maximal rectal sparing. Dosimetric differences between navigated and deliverable MCO plans were also quantified. MCO plans, chosen as acceptable under navigated and deliverable conditions resulted in similar rectal sparing compared with standard optimization (33.7 ± 1.8 Gy vs 35.5 ± 4.2 Gy, p = 0.117). The dose differences between navigated and deliverable MCO plans increased as higher priority was placed on rectal avoidance. If the best possible deliverable MCO was chosen, a significant reduction in rectal dose was observed in comparison with standard optimization (30.6 ± 1.4 Gy vs 35.5 ± 4.2 Gy, p = 0.047). Improvements were, however, to some extent, at the expense of less conformal dose distributions, which resulted in significantly higher doses to the bladder for 2 of the 3 tolerance levels. In conclusion, similar IMRT plans can be created for patients with prostate cancer using MCO compared with standard optimization. Limitations exist within MCO regarding conversion of navigated plans to

  3. Sexual Function After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; King, Christopher R.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To study the sexual quality of life for prostate cancer patients after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-validated quality-of-life questionnaire, the sexual function of 32 consecutive patients who received prostate SBRT in a prospective Phase II clinical trial were analyzed at baseline, and at median times of 4, 12, 20, and 50 months after treatment. SBRT consisted of 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy using the Cyberknife. No androgen deprivation therapy was given. The use of erectile dysfunction (ED) medications was monitored. A comprehensive literature review for radiotherapy-alone modalities based on patient self-reported questionnaires served as historical comparison. Results: Median age at treatment was 67.5 years, and median follow-up was 35.5 months (minimum 12 months). The mean EPIC sexual domain summary score, sexual function score, and sexual bother score decreased by 45%, 49%, and 25% respectively at 50 months follow-up. These differences reached clinical relevance by 20 months after treatment. Baseline ED rate was 38% and increased to 71% after treatment (p = 0.024). Use of ED medications was 3% at baseline and progressed to 25%. For patients aged <70 years at follow-up, 60% maintained satisfactory erectile function after treatment compared with only 12% aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.008). Penile bulb dose was not associated with ED. Conclusions: The rates of ED after treatment appear comparable to those reported for other modalities of radiotherapy. Given the modest size of this study and the uncertainties in the physiology of radiotherapy-related ED, these results merit further investigations.

  4. Impact of hormonal treatment duration in combination with radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: Meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hormone therapy plus radiotherapy significantly decreases recurrences and mortality of patients affected by locally advanced prostate cancer. In order to determine if difference exists according to the hormonal treatment duration, a literature-based meta-analysis was performed. Methods Relative risks (RR) were derived through a random-effect model. Differences in primary (biochemical failure, BF; cancer-specific survival, CSS), and secondary outcomes (overall survival, OS; local or distant recurrence, LR/DM) were explored. Absolute differences (AD) and the number needed to treat (NNT) were calculated. Heterogeneity, a meta-regression for clinic-pathological predictors and a correlation test for surrogates were conducted. Results Five trials (3,424 patients) were included. Patient population ranged from 267 to 1,521 patients. The longer hormonal treatment significantly improves BF (with significant heterogeneity) with an absolute benefit of 10.1%, and a non significant trend in CSS. With regard to secondary end-points, the longer hormonal treatment significantly decrease both the LR and the DM with an absolute difference of 11.7% and 11.5%. Any significant difference in OS was observed. None of the three identified clinico-pathological predictors (median PSA, range 9.5-20.35, Gleason score 7-10, 27-55% patients/trial, and T3-4, 13-77% patients/trial), did significantly affect outcomes. At the meta-regression analysis a significant correlation between the overall treatment benefit in BF, CSS, OS, LR and DM, and the length of the treatment was found (p≤0.03). Conclusions Although with significant heterogeneity (reflecting different patient' risk stratifications), a longer hormonal treatment duration significantly decreases biochemical, local and distant recurrences, with a trend for longer cancer specific survival. PMID:21143897

  5. Prostate Localization on Daily Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Images: Accuracy Assessment of Similarity Metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinkoo; Hammoud, Rabih; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong Hualiang; Jin, Ryan Y.; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate different similarity metrics (SM) using natural calcifications and observation-based measures to determine the most accurate prostate and seminal vesicle localization on daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Methods and Materials: CBCT images of 29 patients were retrospectively analyzed; 14 patients with prostate calcifications (calcification data set) and 15 patients without calcifications (no-calcification data set). Three groups of test registrations were performed. Test 1: 70 CT/CBCT pairs from calcification dataset were registered using 17 SMs (6,580 registrations) and compared using the calcification mismatch error as an endpoint. Test 2: Using the four best SMs from Test 1, 75 CT/CBCT pairs in the no-calcification data set were registered (300 registrations). Accuracy of contour overlays was ranked visually. Test 3: For the best SM from Tests 1 and 2, accuracy was estimated using 356 CT/CBCT registrations. Additionally, target expansion margins were investigated for generating registration regions of interest. Results: Test 1-Incremental sign correlation (ISC), gradient correlation (GC), gradient difference (GD), and normalized cross correlation (NCC) showed the smallest errors ({mu} {+-} {sigma}: 1.6 {+-} 0.9 {approx} 2.9 {+-} 2.1 mm). Test 2-Two of the three reviewers ranked GC higher. Test 3-Using GC, 96% of registrations showed <3-mm error when calcifications were filtered. Errors were left/right: 0.1 {+-} 0.5mm, anterior/posterior: 0.8 {+-} 1.0mm, and superior/inferior: 0.5 {+-} 1.1 mm. The existence of calcifications increased the success rate to 97%. Expansion margins of 4-10 mm were equally successful. Conclusion: Gradient-based SMs were most accurate. Estimated error was found to be <3 mm (1.1 mm SD) in 96% of the registrations. Results suggest that the contour expansion margin should be no less than 4 mm.

  6. SU-E-J-166: Sensitivity of Clinically Relevant Dosimetric Parameters to Contouring Uncertainty During Post Implant Dosimetry of Prostate Permanent Seed Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Mashouf, S; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There is a strong evidence relating post-implant dosimetry for permanent seed prostate brachytherpy to local control rates. The delineation of the prostate on CT images, however, represents a challenge as it is difficult to confidently identify the prostate borders from soft tissue surrounding it. This study aims at quantifying the sensitivity of clinically relevant dosimetric parameters to prostate contouring uncertainty. Methods: The post-implant CT images and plans for a cohort of 43 patients, who have received I–125 permanent prostate seed implant in our centre, were exported to MIM Symphony LDR brachytherapy treatment planning system (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH). The prostate contours in post-implant CT images were expanded/contracted uniformly for margins of ±1.00mm, ±2.00mm, ±3.00mm, ±4.00mm and ±5.00mm (±0.01mm). The values for V100 and D90 were extracted from Dose Volume Histograms for each contour and compared. Results: The mean value of V100 and D90 was obtained as 92.3±8.4% and 108.4±12.3% respectively (Rx=145Gy). V100 was reduced by −3.2±1.5%, −7.2±3.0%, −12.8±4.0%, −19.0±4.8%, − 25.5±5.4% for expanded contours of prostate with margins of +1mm, +2mm, +3mm, +4mm, and +5mm, respectively, while it was increased by 1.6±1.2%, 2.4±2.4%, 2.7±3.2%, 2.9±4.2%, 2.9±5.1% for the contracted contours. D90 was reduced by −6.9±3.5%, −14.5±6.1%, −23.8±7.1%, − 33.6±8.5%, −40.6±8.7% and increased by 4.1±2.6%, 6.1±5.0%, 7.2±5.7%, 8.1±7.3% and 8.1±7.3% for the same set of contours. Conclusion: Systematic expansion errors of more than 1mm may likely render a plan sub-optimal. Conversely contraction errors may Result in labeling a plan likely as optimal. The use of MRI images to contour the prostate should results in better delineation of prostate organ which increases the predictive value of post-op plans. Since observers tend to overestimate the prostate volume on CT, compared with MRI, the impact of the

  7. Daily Isocenter Correction With Electromagnetic-Based Localization Improves Target Coverage and Rectal Sparing During Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, Ramji Ramaswamy; Plastaras, John P.; Mick, Rosemarie; McMichael Kohler, Diane; Kassaee, Alireza; Vapiwala, Neha

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric consequences of daily isocenter correction during prostate cancer radiation therapy using the Calypso 4D localization system. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed from 28 patients with electromagnetic transponders implanted in their prostates for daily target localization and tracking. Treatment planning isocenters were recorded based on the values of the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral axes. Isocenter location obtained via alignment with skin tattoos was compared with that obtained via the electromagnetic localization system. Daily isocenter shifts, based on the isocenter location differences between the two alignment methods in each spatial axis, were calculated for each patient over their entire course. The mean isocenter shifts were used to determine dosimetric consequences of treatment based on skin tattoo alignments alone. Results: The mean += SD of the percentages of treatment days with shifts beyond += 0.5 cm for vertical, longitudinal and lateral shifts were 62% += 28%, 35% += 26%, and 38% +=21%, respectively. If daily electromagnetic localization was not used, the excess in prescribed dose delivered to 70% of the rectum was 10 Gy and the deficit in prescribed dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume was 10 Gy. The mean isocenter shift was not associated with the volumes of the prostate, rectum, or bladder, or with patient body mass index. Conclusions: Daily isocenter localization can reduce the treatment dose to the rectum. Correcting for this variability could lead to improved dose delivery, reduced side effects, and potentially improved treatment outcomes.

  8. Chronic prostatitis: management strategies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adam B; Macejko, Amanda; Taylor, Aisha; Nadler, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has redefined prostatitis into four distinct entities. Category I is acute bacterial prostatitis. It is an acute prostatic infection with a uropathogen, often with systemic symptoms of fever, chills and hypotension. The treatment hinges on antimicrobials and drainage of the bladder because the inflamed prostate may block urinary flow. Category II prostatitis is called chronic bacterial prostatitis. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of documented urinary tract infections with the same uropathogen and causes pelvic pain, urinary symptoms and ejaculatory pain. It is diagnosed by means of localization cultures that are 90% accurate in localizing the source of recurrent infections within the lower urinary tract. Asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis comprises NIH category IV. This entity is, by definition, asymptomatic and is often diagnosed incidentally during the evaluation of infertility or prostate cancer. The clinical significance of category IV prostatitis is unknown and it is often left untreated. Category III prostatitis is called chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). It is characterized by pelvic pain for more than 3 of the previous 6 months, urinary symptoms and painful ejaculation, without documented urinary tract infections from uropathogens. The syndrome can be devastating, affecting 10-15% of the male population, and results in nearly 2 million outpatient visits each year. The aetiology of CP/CPPS is poorly understood, but may be the result of an infectious or inflammatory initiator that results in neurological injury and eventually results in pelvic floor dysfunction in the form of increased pelvic muscle tone. The diagnosis relies on separating this entity from chronic bacterial prostatitis. If there is no history of documented urinary tract infections with a urinary tract pathogen, then cultures should be taken when patients are symptomatic. Prostatic localization cultures, called the

  9. Prognostic role of genetic biomarkers in clinical progression of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Cubero, Maria Jesus; Martinez-Gonzalez, Luis Javier; Saiz, Maria; Carmona-Saez, Pedro; Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Pascual-Geler, Manrique; Lorente, Jose Antonio; Cozar, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the use of 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes ELAC2, RNASEL and MSR1 as biomarkers for prostate cancer (PCa) detection and progression, as well as perform a genetic classification of high-risk patients. A cohort of 451 men (235 patients and 216 controls) was studied. We calculated means of regression analysis using clinical values (stage, prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score and progression) in patients and controls at the basal stage and after a follow-up of 72 months. Significantly different allele frequencies between patients and controls were observed for rs1904577 and rs918 (MSR1 gene) and for rs17552022 and rs5030739 (ELAC2). We found evidence of increased risk for PCa in rs486907 and rs2127565 in variants AA and CC, respectively. In addition, rs627928 (TT–GT), rs486907 (AG) and rs3747531 (CG–CC) were associated with low tumor aggressiveness. Some had a weak linkage, such as rs1904577 and rs2127565, rs4792311 and rs17552022, and rs1904577 and rs918. Our study provides the proof-of-principle that some of the genetic variants (such as rs486907, rs627928 and rs2127565) in genes RNASEL, MSR1 and ELAC2 can be used as predictors of aggressiveness and progression of PCa. In the future, clinical use of these biomarkers, in combination with current ones, could potentially reduce the rate of unnecessary biopsies and specific treatments. PMID:26251261

  10. Therapeutic efficacy and safety of photo-selective vaporization of prostate under local anaesthesia with light sedation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arum, Carl-Jørgen; Romundstad, Paal; Mjønes, Jan

    2007-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the therapeutic efficacy and safety of photo-selective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) under local anaesthesia in patients suffering from lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to prostatic obstruction. MATERIAL & METHODS: 150 patients at the average age of 73 (range 51-92) and a mean/median ASA-score of 2.4/2.0 were included. PVP was performed under either general or spinal anaesthesia in the first 67 patients and under local anaesthesia (peri-prostatic infiltration with 0.25% bupivacain-adrenalin 20 ml) and light sedation in the remaining 83 patients. Surgical variables including asa-score, operative-time, blood-pressure, oxygen saturation, pre- and post-op haemoglobin (Hgb) were recorded. Post operative need for pain medication, catheter-time, and time to pts. hospital discharge were also recorded. RESULTS: No patient with local anaesthesia required conversion to general anaesthesia. The median Hgb fall from pre-op. to post-op. was 0.55g/dl. The median requirement for post-op. catheterization was 2 hrs after local anaesthesia and 9 hrs after general or spinal anaesthesia. The median time from operation to hospital discharge was 12 hrs in local anaesthesia and 24 hrs for general or spinal anaesthesia (p<0.001). At 12 and 18 months postoperatively, the following factors were significantly (p<0.001) improved: trans-rectal ultrasound, international prostate symptom score, quality of life score, post-void residual urine volume, flow max/average. At 12 months urodynamic studies revealed significant improvement (p<0.001) for opening pressure, pressure @ flow-max, micturation resistance and bladder outlet obstruction index. CONCLUSION: PVP under local anaesthesia and light sedation provides excellent intraoperative safety, expedient post operative recovery, significant symptom relief as well as improvement in uro-dynamic outcomes.

  11. Prostate Cancer for the Internist

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Shikha; Sarmad, Rehan; Arora, Sumant; Dasaraju, Radhikha; Sarmad, Komal

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, approximately 240,000 men are diagnosed annually with prostate cancer. Although effective treatment options are available for clinically localized cancer, the potential burdensome co-morbidities and attendant healthcare costs from over diagnosis and over treatment have escalated the discussion and controversy regarding appropriate screening, diagnosis, and optimal management of prostate cancer. Although the lifetime risk of developing prostate cancer is approximately 1 in 6 (~16%), the risk of dying from the disease is only ~2%. The discrepancy between the cancer incidence and lethality has led to widespread scrutiny of prostate cancer patient management, particularly for low-grade, low-stage (indolent) disease. The vast majority of men diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer are treated with interventional therapies despite studies demonstrating that even without treatment, prostate cancer-specific mortality is low. A MedLine/PubMed search was performed using PICO format (Patient, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome) identifying all relevant articles. No restrictions were used for publication dates. The terms “Prostate Cancer”, “Screening”, “Mortality”, “Morbidity” yielded 307 results. “Diagnosis”, “Prognosis” and “Survival” yielded 1504 results. Further filters were applied to narrow down the results using keywords “Prostate cancer screening guidelines 2014”, “Beyond PSA”, “NCCN Guidelines prostate”, “MRI guided Prostate biopsy” yielding 72, 274, 54 and 568 results respectively. Of these, approximately 137 articles were found relevant and were reviewed. References from the reviewed articles were included in the final article. PMID:26713287

  12. Prospective evaluation of quality of life 54 months after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine late toxicity and quality of life (QoL) in patients with localized prostate cancer after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Patient and methods This was a prospective study in patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma who had been treated by IMRT (76 Gy) between February and November 2006. Physicians scored acute and late toxicity using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3.0). Patients completed cancer and prostate-specific QoL questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PR25) before IMRT (baseline) and at 2, 6, 18 and 54 months. Result Data were available for 38 patients (median age, 73 years) (18% low risk; 60% intermediate risk; 32% high risk). The incidence of urinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was respectively: immediately post IMRT: 36.8% and 23.7% (grade 1), 5.3% and 5.3% (grade 2), 2.6% and 0% (grade 3); at 18 months: 23.7% and 10.3% (grade 1), 26.3% and 13.2% (grade 2), 0% and 2.6% (grade 3); at 54 months: 34.2% and 23.7% (grade 1), 5.3% and 15.8% (grade 2), 5.3% and 0% (grade 3). At 54 months, significant worsening was reported by patients for 11/19 QoL items but the worsening was clinically relevant (>10 points) for 7 items only: physical, role as well as social functioning, fatigue, pain, dyspnoea and constipation. There was no significant difference between 54-month and baseline QoL scores for global health, gastrointestinal symptoms, treatment-related symptoms and sexual function. However, there was significant - but clinically non-relevant (<10 points) - worsening of urinary symptom. Conclusion High-dose IMRT to the prostate with accurate patient positioning did not induce any clinically relevant worsening in late urinary and gastrointestinal QoL at 54 months. Impaired physical and role functioning may be related to age and comorbidities. PMID:23510499

  13. Clinical, Laboratorial, and Urodynamic Findings of Prostatic Artery Embolization for the Treatment of Urinary Retention Related to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. A Prospective Single-Center Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Antunes, Alberto A.; Carnevale, Francisco C. Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim M. da; Yoshinaga, Eduardo M.; Cerri, Luciana M. O.; Baroni, Ronaldo H.; Marcelino, Antonio S. Z.; Cerri, Giovanni G.; Srougi, Miguel

    2013-08-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to describe the clinical, laboratorial, and urodynamic findings of prostatic artery embolization (PAE) in patients with urinary retention due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).MethodsA prospective study of 11 patients with urinary retention due to BPH was conducted. Patients underwent physical examination, prostate specific antigen (PSA) measurement, transrectal ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. International prostate symptom score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), and urodynamic testing were used to assess the outcome before and after 1 year.ResultsClinical success was 91 % (10/11 patients) with a mean follow-up of 22.3 months (range, 12-41 months). At the first year follow-up, the mean IPSS score was 2.8 points (p = 0.04), mean QoL was 0.4 points (p = 0.001), mean PSA decreased from 10.1 to 4.3 ng/mL (p = 0.003), maximum urinary flow (Qmax) improved from 4.2 to 10.8 mL/sec (p = 0.009), and detrusor pressure (Pdet) decreased from 85.7 to 51.5 cm H{sub 2}O (p = 0.007). Before PAE, Bladder Outlet Obstruction Index (BOOI) showed values >40 in 100 % of patients. After PAE, 30 % of patients were >40 (obstructed), 40 % were between 20 and 40 (undetermined), and 30 % were <20 (unobstructed). Patients with a BOOI <20 had higher PSA values at 1-day after PAE.ConclusionsClinical and urodynamic parameters improved significantly after PAE in patients with acute urinary retention due to BPH. Total PSA at day 1 after PAE was higher in patients with unobstructed values in pressure flow studies.

  14. Loss of TIMP-1 immune expression and tumor recurrence in localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Sabrina Thalita; Viana, Nayara Izabel; Iscaife, Alexandre; Pontes, José; Dip, Nelson; Antunes, Alberto Azoubel; Guimarães, Vanessa Ribeiro; Santana, Isaque; Nahas, William Carlos; Srougi, Miguel; Leite, Katia Ramos Moreira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction and objective: Overexpression of MMPs has been related to biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. TIMP1 and TIMP2 are controllers of MMPs and the aim of this study is to evaluate the expression levels of MMPs and their regulators using immunohistochemistry in tissue microarray of localized prostate cancer (PC). Materials and Methods: Immune-expression of MMP-9, MMP-2, TIMP1, TIMP-2, MMP-14 and IL8, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in radical prostatectomy specimens of 40 patients with localized PC who underwent surgery between September 1997 and February 2000. Protein expression was considered as categorical variables, negative or positive. The results of the immune-expression were correlated to Gleason score (GS), pathological stage (TNM), pre-operatory PSA serum levels and biochemical recurrence in a mean follow up period of 92.5 months. Results: The loss of TIMP1 immune-expression was related to biochemical recurrence. When TIMP1 was negative, 56.3% patients recurred versus 22.2% of those whose TIMP1 was positive (p=0.042). MMP-9, MMP-2, IL8 and MMP-14 were positive in the majority of PC. TIMP-2 was negative in all cases. Conclusion: Negative immune-expression of TIMP1 is correlated with biochemical recurrence in patients with PC possibly by failing to control MMP-9, an important MMP related to cancer progression. PMID:26742965

  15. Polyunsaturated fatty acids affect the localization and signaling of PIP3/AKT in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhennan; Wu, Jiansheng; Wang, Shihua; Suburu, Janel; Chen, Haiqin; Thomas, Michael J; Shi, Lihong; Edwards, Iris J; Berquin, Isabelle M; Chen, Yong Q

    2013-09-01

    AKT is a serine-threonine protein kinase that plays important roles in cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. It is activated after binding to phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs) with phosphate groups at positions 3,4 and 3,4,5 on the inositol ring. In spite of extensive research on AKT, one aspect has been largely overlooked, namely the role of the fatty acid chains on PIPs. PIPs are phospholipids composed of a glycerol backbone with fatty acids at the sn-1 and sn-2 position and inositol at the sn-3 position. Here, we show that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) modify phospholipid content. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an ω3 PUFA, can replace the fatty acid at the sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone, thereby changing the species of phospholipids. DHA also inhibits AKT(T308) but not AKT(S473) phosphorylation, alters PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) and phospho-AKT(S473) protein localization, decreases pPDPK1(S241)-AKT and AKT-BAD interaction and suppresses prostate tumor growth. Our study highlights a potential novel mechanism of cancer inhibition by ω3 PUFA through alteration of PIP3 and AKT localization and affecting the AKT signaling pathway. PMID:23633519

  16. An Eight-Year Experience of HDR Brachytherapy Boost for Localized Prostate Cancer: Biopsy and PSA Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Bachand, Francois; Martin, Andre-Guy; Beaulieu, Luc; Harel, Francois M.Sc.; Vigneault, Eric

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), the 2-year biopsy outcome and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce in patients with localized prostate cancer treated with an inversely planned high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Materials and methods: Data were collected from 153 patients treated between 1999 and 2006 with external beam pelvic radiation followed by an HDR Ir-192 prostate boost. These patients were given a boost of 18 to 20 Gy using inverse-planning with simulated annealing (IPSA).We reviewed and analyzed all prostate-specific antigen levels and control biopsies. Results: The median follow-up was 44 months (18-95 months). When categorized by risk of progression, 74.5% of patients presented an intermediate risk and 14.4% a high one. Prostate biopsies at 2 years posttreatment were negative in 86 of 94 patients (91.5%), whereas two biopsies were inconclusive. Biochemical control at 60 months was at 96% according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and the Phoenix consensus definitions. A PSA bounce (PSA values of 2 ng/mL or more above nadir) was observed in 15 patients of 123 (9.8%). The median time to bounce was 15.2 months (interquartile range, 11.0-17.7) and the median bounce duration 18.7 months (interquartile range, 12.1-29). The estimate of overall survival at 60 months was 97.1% (95% CI, 91.6-103%). Conclusions: Considering that inverse planned HDR brachytherapy prostate boosts led to an excellent biochemical response, with a 2-year negative biopsy rate, we recommend a conservative approach in face of a PSA bounce even though it was observed in 10% of patients.

  17. Localized scleroderma: clinical spectrum and therapeutic update*

    PubMed Central

    Careta, Mariana Figueiroa; Romiti, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Scleroderma is a rare connective tissue disease that is manifested by cutaneous sclerosis and variable systemic involvement. Two categories of scleroderma are known: systemic sclerosis, characterized by cutaneous sclerosis and visceral involvement, and localized scleroderma or morphea which classically presents benign and self-limited evolution and is confined to the skin and/or underlying tissues. Localized scleroderma is a rare disease of unknown etiology. Recent studies show that the localized form may affect internal organs and have variable morbidity. Treatment should be started very early, before complications occur due to the high morbidity of localized scleroderma. In this review, we report the most important aspects and particularities in the treatment of patients diagnosed with localized scleroderma. PMID:25672301

  18. Hypofractionated External-Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, L. Chinsoo; Timmerman, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian

    2013-01-01

    There are radiobiological rationales supporting hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The recent advancements in treatment planning and delivery allow sophisticated radiation treatments to take advantage of the differences in radiobiology of prostate cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. The preliminary results from clinical studies indicate that abbreviated fractionation programs can result in successful treatment of localized prostate cancer without escalation of late toxicity. PMID:23533777

  19. Review. Facts and fiction of phytotherapy for prostate cancer: a critical assessment of preclinical and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Von Löw, Eva C; Perabo, Frank G E; Siener, Roswitha; Müller, Stefan C

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to substantially review all preclinical and clinical data on phytochemicals, such as genistein, lycopene, curcumin, epigallocatechin-gallate, and resveratrol, in terms of their effects as a potential treatment of prostate cancer. It is known, that prostate cancer patients increasingly use complementary and alternative medicines in the hope of preventing or curing cancer. The preclinical data for the phytochemicals presented in this review show a remarkable efficacy against prostate cancer cells in vitro, with molecular targets ranging from cell cycle regulation to induction of apoptosis. In addition, well-conducted animal experiments support the belief that these substances might have a clinical activity on human cancer. However, it is impossible to make definite statements or conclusions on the clinical efficacy in cancer patients because of the great variability and differences of the study designs, small patient numbers, short treatment duration and lack of a standardised drug formulation. Although some results from these clinical studies seem encouraging, reliable or long-term data on tumor recurrence, disease progression and survival are unknown. At present, there is no convincing clinical proof or evidence that the cited phythochemicals might be used in an attempt to cure cancer of the prostate. PMID:17436567

  20. Clinical validity and utility of genetic risk scores in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Helfand, Brian T; Kearns, James; Conran, Carly; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Current issues related to prostate cancer (PCa) clinical care (e.g., over-screening, over-diagnosis, and over-treatment of nonaggressive PCa) call for risk assessment tools that can be combined with family history (FH) to stratify disease risk among men in the general population. Since 2007, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified more than 100 SNPs associated with PCa susceptibility. In this review, we discuss (1) the validity of these PCa risk-associated SNPs, individually and collectively; (2) the various methods used for measuring the cumulative effect of multiple SNPs, including genetic risk score (GRS); (3) the adequate number of SNPs needed for risk assessment; (4) reclassification of risk based on evolving numbers of SNPs used to calculate genetic risk, (5) risk assessment for men from various racial groups, and (6) the clinical utility of genetic risk assessment. In conclusion, data available to date support the clinical validity of PCa risk-associated SNPs and GRS in risk assessment among men with or without FH. PCa risk-associated SNPs are not intended for diagnostic use; rather, they should be used the same way as FH. Combining GRS and FH can significantly improve the performance of risk assessment. Improved risk assessment may have important clinical utility in targeted PCa testing. However, clinical trials are urgently needed to evaluate this clinical utility as well as the acceptance of GRS by patients and physicians. PMID:27297129

  1. Clinical validity and utility of genetic risk scores in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Helfand, Brian T; Kearns, James; Conran, Carly; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Current issues related to prostate cancer (PCa) clinical care (e.g., over-screening, over-diagnosis, and over-treatment of nonaggressive PCa) call for risk assessment tools that can be combined with family history (FH) to stratify disease risk among men in the general population. Since 2007, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified more than 100 SNPs associated with PCa susceptibility. In this review, we discuss (1) the validity of these PCa risk-associated SNPs, individually and collectively; (2) the various methods used for measuring the cumulative effect of multiple SNPs, including genetic risk score (GRS); (3) the adequate number of SNPs needed for risk assessment; (4) reclassification of risk based on evolving numbers of SNPs used to calculate genetic risk, (5) risk assessment for men from various racial groups, and (6) the clinical utility of genetic risk assessment. In conclusion, data available to date support the clinical validity of PCa risk-associated SNPs and GRS in risk assessment among men with or without FH. PCa risk-associated SNPs are not intended for diagnostic use; rather, they should be used the same way as FH. Combining GRS and FH can significantly improve the performance of risk assessment. Improved risk assessment may have important clinical utility in targeted PCa testing. However, clinical trials are urgently needed to evaluate this clinical utility as well as the acceptance of GRS by patients and physicians. PMID:27297129

  2. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics after stereotactic body radiotherapy as monotherapy or boost after whole pelvic radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun Jung; Phak, Jung Hoon; Kim, Woo Chul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. However, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics after SBRT has not been well characterized. The purpose of the current study is to assess the kinetics of PSA for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with SBRT using Cyberknife as both monotherapy and boost after whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) in the absence of androgen deprivation therapy. Methods A total of 61 patients with low- and intermediated-risk prostate cancer treated with SBRT as monotherapy (36.25 Gy in 5 fractions in 32 patients) and SBRT (21 Gy in 3 fractions in 29 patients) boost combined with WPRT (45 Gy in 25 fractions). Patients were excluded if they failed therapy by the Phoenix definition or had androgen deprivation therapy. PSA nadir and rate of change in PSA over time (slope) were calculated and compared. Results With a median follow-up of 52.4 months (range, 14–74 months), for SBRT monotherapy, the median PSA nadir was 0.31 ng/mL (range, 0.04–1.15 ng/mL) and slopes were –0.41 ng/mL/mo, –0.17 ng/mL/mo, –0.12 ng/mL/mo, and –0.09 ng/mL/mo, respectively, for durations of 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years postradiotherapy. Similarly, for SBRT boost after WPRT, the median PSA nadir was 0.34 ng/mL (range, 0.04–1.44 ng/mL) and slopes were –0.53 ng/mL/mo, –0.25 ng/mL/mo, –0.14 ng/mL/mo, and –0.09 ng/mL/mo, respectively. The median nadir and slopes of SBRT monotherapy did not differ significantly from those of SBRT boost after WPRT. Benign PSA bounces were common in 30.4% of all cohorts, and the median time to PSA bounce was 12 months (range, 6–25 months). Conclusions In this report of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients, an initial period of rapid PSA decline was followed by a slow decline, which resulted in a lower PSA nadir. The PSA kinetics of SBRT monotherapy appears to be comparable to those achieved

  3. Increased risk of biochemical and local failure in patients with distended rectum on the planning CT for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crevoisier, Renaud de; Tucker, Susan L. . E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org; Dong Lei; Mohan, Radhe; Cheung, Rex; Cox, James D.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively test the hypothesis that rectal distension on the planning computed tomography (CT) scan is associated with an increased risk of biochemical and local failure among patients irradiated for prostate carcinoma when a daily repositioning technique based on direct prostate-organ localization is not used. Methods and Materials: This study included 127 patients who received definitive three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer to a total dose of 78 Gy at University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Rectal distension was assessed by calculation of the average cross-sectional rectal area (CSA; defined as the rectal volume divided by length) and measuring three rectal diameters on the planning CT. The impact of rectal distension on biochemical control, 2-year prostate biopsy results, and incidence of Grade 2 or greater late rectal bleeding was assessed. Results: The incidence of biochemical failure was significantly higher among patients with distended rectums (CSA >11.2 cm{sup 2}) on the planning CT scan (p 0.0009, log-rank test). Multivariate analysis indicates that rectal distension and high-risk disease are independent risk factors for biochemical failure, with hazard ratios of 3.89 (95% C.I. 1.58 to 9.56, p = 0.003) and 2.45 (95% C.I. 1.18 to 5.08, p = 0.016), respectively. The probability of residual tumor without evidence of radiation treatment (as scored by the pathologist) increased significantly with rectal distension (p = 0.010, logistic analysis), and a lower incidence of Grade 2 or greater late rectal bleeding within 2 years was simultaneously observed with higher CSA values (p = 0.031, logistic analysis). Conclusions: We found strong evidence that rectal distension on the treatment-planning CT scan decreased the probability of biochemical control, local control, and rectal toxicity in patients who were treated without daily image-guided prostate localization, presumably because of geographic misses. Therefore

  4. Clinical and Pathological Characteristics of Hard Nodules Resistant to Morcellation During Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Songzhe; Choo, Min Soo; Wang, Yue; Lee, Young Ju; Bae, Jungbum; Oh, Seung-June

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the clinical and pathological characteristics of hard nodules resistant to morcellation (HNRM) during holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: Between July 2008 and October 2011, 246 patients underwent HoLEP for symptomatic BPH. The first 30 patients were excluded from the analysis due to the learning curve of the procedure. The remaining patients were divided into HNRM (n=29) and non-HNRM groups (n=187), and comparative analysis of the clinical parameters of the two groups was performed. International prostate symptom score analysis and urodynamic studies were performed preoperatively. Histological analysis was performed after hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson trichrome staining of the HNRM specimens. Results: Twenty-nine patients (13.4%) had HNRM. The patients in the HNRM group had significantly higher proportions of advanced age (≥65 years, P=0.029), total prostate volume ≥65 mL (P<0.001), transition zone volume ≥35 mL (P<0.001), serum prostate-specific antigen levels ≥10 ng/mL (P=0.007), and functional urethral length ≥70 mm (P=0.009); larger enucleation weight (P<0.001); longer operation (P=0.001), enucleation (P=0.042), and morcellation times (P<0.001); and higher enucleation ratio (P=0.028) and enucleation efficacy (P=0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors, multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age ≥65 years and total prostate volume ≥65 mL were independent risk factors for HNRM. Pathological examination did not reveal any malignant cells, with mainly dense fibrous tissue found in the HNRM. Conclusions: HNRM can make morcellation cumbersome and time-consuming, and older patients with larger prostates have a higher incidence of HNRM. However, the histopathology of HNRM revealed mainly fibrotic tissue. PMID:26126438

  5. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Treatment of Localized and Locally Advanced Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer: 2,5 Year Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovov, V. A.; Dvoynikov, S. Y.; Vozdvizhenskiy, M. O.

    2011-09-01

    Introduction & Objectives: High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to be a successful treatment for localised prostate cancer (PC). Here we have explored the effectiveness of the HIFU treatment for hormone-resistant prostate cancer (HRPC). Materials & Methods: 341 patients were treated in our center between September 2007 and December 2009; all of them showed treatment failure following hormone ablation. The median time before hormone-resistance was 20 (3-48) months. In the group with localised PC: number of patients 237, Gleason score ≤7, stage T1-2N0M0, age 69 (60-89) years, mean PSA before treatment 40,0 (5,8-92,9) ng/ml, mean prostate volume—39,3 (28-92) cc; in the group with locally advanced PC: number of patients 104, Gleason score ≤9, stage T2-3N0M0, age 72 (52-83) years, PSA before treatment 30,3 (20,1-60) ng/ml, mean prostate volume—41,2 (25-198) cc. HIFU was delivered under spinal anesthesia using the Ablatherm HIFU device (EDAP, France). Pre HIFU transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was performed for all patients. Mean follow-up time 18 months (3-30). Results: The median PSA level 12 months after HIFU treatment was 0,04 (0-2,24) ng/ml—localised PC, and for locally advanced disease—0,05 (0-48,4) ng/ml, at 18 months after HIFU treatment this was 0,2 (0,02-2,0) ng/ml for localised PC, and for locally advanced disease 0,18 (0,04-7,45) ng/ml. Patients with localised PC has 4,5% recurrence, those with locally advanced PC 20%. Kaplan-Meir analyses of the total group indicated that the risk of recurrence after 1 year follow-up was 10%, the risk of recurrence was 19% after 2 years of follow-up. Conclusions: Our initial experience shows that ultrasound ablation is safe, minimally invasive and effective as a treatment for localised and locally advanced hormone-resistant prostate cancer.

  6. Clinically Relevant Doses of Candesartan Inhibit Growth of Prostate Tumor Xenografts In Vivo through Modulation of Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Alhusban, Ahmed; Al-Azayzih, Ahmad; Goc, Anna; Gao, Fei; Fagan, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockers (ARBs), widely used antihypertensive drugs, have also been investigated for their anticancer effects. The effect of ARBs on prostate cancer in experimental models compared with meta-analysis data from clinical trials is conflicting. Whereas this discrepancy might be due to the use of supratherapeutic doses of ARBs in cellular and animal models as compared with the clinical doses used in human trials, further investigation of the effects of clinical doses of ARBs on prostate cancer in experimental models is warranted. In the current study, we sought to determine the effects of candesartan on prostate cancer cellular function in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, and characterize the underlying mechanisms. Our analysis indicated that clinically relevant doses of candesartan significantly inhibited growth of PC3 cell tumor xenografts in mice. Interestingly, the same concentrations of candesartan actually promoted prostate cancer cellular function in vitro, through a modest but significant inhibition in apoptosis. Inhibition of tumor growth by candesartan was associated with a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in tumors and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, but normalization of tumor vasculature. Although candesartan did not impair PC3 cell viability, it inhibited endothelial-barrier disruption by tumor-derived factors. Furthermore, candesartan significantly inhibited expression of VEGF in PC3 and DU145 cell lines independent of angiotensin II type 2 receptor, but potentially via angiotensin II type 1 receptor inhibition. Our findings clearly demonstrate the therapeutic potential of candesartan for prostate cancer and establish a link between ARBs, VEGF expression, and prostate tumor angiogenesis. PMID:24990940

  7. RhoA as a Mediator of Clinically Relevant Androgen Action in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Lucy J.; Duncan, Kelly; Yadav, Neelu; Regan, Kevin M.; Verone, Alissa R.; Lohse, Christine M.; Pop, Elena A.; Attwood, Kristopher; Wilding, Gregory; Mohler, James L.; Sebo, Thomas J.; Tindall, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we have identified serum response factor (SRF) as a mediator of clinically relevant androgen receptor (AR) action in prostate cancer (PCa). Genes that rely on SRF for androgen responsiveness represent a small fraction of androgen-regulated genes, but distinguish benign from malignant prostate, correlate with aggressive disease, and are associated with biochemical recurrence. Thus, understanding the mechanism(s) by which SRF conveys androgen regulation to its target genes may provide novel opportunities to target clinically relevant androgen signaling. Here, we show that the small GTPase ras homolog family member A (RhoA) mediates androgen-responsiveness of more than half of SRF target genes. Interference with expression of RhoA, activity of the RhoA effector Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK), and actin polymerization necessary for nuclear translocation of the SRF cofactor megakaryocytic acute leukemia (MAL) prevented full androgen regulation of SRF target genes. Androgen treatment induced RhoA activation, increased the nuclear content of MAL, and led to MAL recruitment to the promoter of the SRF target gene FHL2. In clinical specimens RhoA expression was higher in PCa cells than benign prostate cells, and elevated RhoA expression levels were associated with aggressive disease features and decreased disease-free survival after radical prostatectomy. Overexpression of RhoA markedly increased the androgen-responsiveness of select SRF target genes, in a manner that depends on its GTPase activity. The use of isogenic cell lines and a xenograft model that mimics the transition from androgen-stimulated to castration-recurrent PCa indicated that RhoA levels are not altered during disease progression, suggesting that RhoA expression levels in the primary tumor determine disease aggressiveness. Androgen-responsiveness of SRF target genes in castration-recurrent PCa cells continued to rely on AR, RhoA, SRF, and MAL and the presence of

  8. [Bilateral testicular metastasis of cancer of the prostate].

    PubMed

    el Moussaoui, A; Sarf, I; Dakir, M; Zamiati, S; Benjelloun, S

    1997-01-01

    Testicular metastasis of prostate cancer rarely occurs. Bilateral localization is exceptional. We report a new case of prostate adenocarcinoma with bilateral testicular metastasis. The diagnosis was made on clinical and ultrasonic arguments, and confirmed on the pathological specimen. Treatment consisted in a bilateral orchidectomy, associated with nonsteroid androgens. PMID:9765784

  9. Higher-Than-Conventional Radiation Doses in Localized Prostate Cancer Treatment: A Meta-analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda Stefano, Eduardo Jose; Afonso, Sergio Luis

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To determine in a meta-analysis whether the outcomes in men with localized prostate cancer treated with high-dose radiotherapy (HDRT) are better than those in men treated with conventional-dose radiotherapy (CDRT), by quantifying the effect of the total dose of radiotherapy on biochemical control (BC). Methods and Materials: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases, as well as the proceedings of annual meetings, were systematically searched to identify randomized, controlled studies comparing HDRT with CDRT for localized prostate cancer. To evaluate the dose-response relationship, we conducted a meta-regression analysis of BC ratios by means of weighted linear regression. Results: Seven RCTs with a total patient population of 2812 were identified that met the study criteria. Pooled results from these RCTs showed a significant reduction in the incidence of biochemical failure in those patients with prostate cancer treated with HDRT (p < 0.0001). However, there was no difference in the mortality rate (p = 0.38) and specific prostate cancer mortality rates (p = 0.45) between the groups receiving HDRT and CDRT. However, there were more cases of late Grade >2 gastrointestinal toxicity after HDRT than after CDRT. In the subgroup analysis, patients classified as being at low (p = 0.007), intermediate (p < 0.0001), and high risk (p < 0.0001) of biochemical failure all showed a benefit from HDRT. The meta-regression analysis also detected a linear correlation between the total dose of radiotherapy and biochemical failure (BC = -67.3 + [1.8 x radiotherapy total dose in Gy]; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed that HDRT is superior to CDRT in preventing biochemical failure in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer patients, suggesting that this should be offered as a treatment for all patients, regardless of their risk status.

  10. Long-Term Outcome and Toxicity of Salvage Brachytherapy for Local Failure After Initial Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Burri, Ryan J.; Stone, Nelson N.; Unger, Pam; Stock, Richard G.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To describe long-term outcomes and toxicity after salvage brachytherapy (BT) for local failure after initial radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2008, 37 men with local failure after initial prostate radiotherapy (32 external-beam radiation therapy [EBRT] and 5 BT) underwent salvage BT with {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I. Estimates of freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF, Phoenix definition) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicities were graded using CTCv3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 86 months (range, 2-156). The median dose to 90% of the prostate volume was 122 Gy (range, 67-166). The 10-year FFbF and CSS were 54% and 96%, respectively. On univariate analysis, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >10 ng/mL at initial diagnosis was significantly associated with FFbF (p = 0.01), and there were trends for both age <70 years (p = 0.08) and PSA <6 ng/mL (p = 0.08) at the time of salvage BT. On multivariate analysis, only presalvage PSA <6 ng/mL (p = 0.046) was significantly associated with improved FFbF. There were three Grade 3 toxicities and one Grade 4 toxicity. Pelvic lymph node dissection before salvage BT was the only variable significantly associated with Grade {>=}2 toxicity (p = 0.03). Conclusion: With a median follow-up of 86 months, salvage prostate BT was associated with a 10-year FFbF of 54% and CSS of 96%. Improved FFbF was associated with a presalvage PSA <6 ng/mL. Toxicity was worse in patients who had undergone pelvic lymph node dissection before salvage BT. Careful patient selection for salvage BT may result in improved outcomes and reduced toxicity.

  11. The influence of the local effect model parameters on the prediction of the tumor control probability for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanrion, M.-A.; Sauerwein, W.; Jelen, U.; Wittig, A.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R.; Beuve, M.

    2014-06-01

    In carbon ion beams, biological effects vary along the ion track; hence, to quantify them, specific radiobiological models are needed. One of them, the local effect model (LEM), in particular version I (LEM I), is implemented in treatment planning systems (TPS) clinically used in European particle therapy centers. From the physical properties of the specific ion radiation, the LEM calculates the survival probabilities of the cell or tissue type under study, provided that some determinant input parameters are initially defined. Mathematical models can be used to predict, for instance, the tumor control probability (TCP), and then evaluate treatment outcomes. This work studies the influence of the LEM I input parameters on the TCP predictions in the specific case of prostate cancer. Several published input parameters and their combinations were tested. Their influence on the dose distributions calculated for a water phantom and for a patient geometry was evaluated using the TPS TRiP98. Changing input parameters induced clinically significant modifications of the mean dose (up to a factor of 3.5), spatial dose distribution, and TCP predictions (up to factor of 2.6 for D50). TCP predictions were found to be more sensitive to the parameter threshold dose (Dt) than to the biological parameters α and β. Additionally, an analytical expression was derived for correlating α, β and Dt, and this has emphasized the importance of \\frac{D_t}{\\alpha /\\beta }. The improvement of radiobiological models for particle TPS will only be achieved when more patient outcome data with well-defined patient groups, fractionation schemes and well-defined end-points are available.

  12. Prostate PDT dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We provide a review of the current state of dosimetry in prostate photodynamic therapy (PDT). PDT of the human prostate has been performed with a number of different photosensitizers and with a variety of dosimetry schemes. The simplest clinical light dose prescription is to quantify the total light energy emitted per length (J/cm) of cylindrical diffusing fibers (CDF) for patients treated with a defined photosensitizer injection per body weight. However, this approach does not take into account the light scattering by tissue and usually underestimates the local light fluence rate, and consequently the fluence. Techniques have been developed to characterize tissue optical properties and light fluence rates in vivo using interstitial measurements during prostate PDT. Optical methods have been developed to characterize tissue absorption and scattering spectra, which in turn provide information about tissue oxygenation and drug concentration. Fluorescence techniques can be used to quantify drug concentrations and photobleaching rates of photosensitizers. PMID:25046988

  13. Localization of linked {sup 125}I seeds in postimplant TRUS images for prostate brachytherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Jinyu . E-mail: Jinyu.Xue@mail.tju.edu; Waterman, Frank; Handler, Jay; Gressen, Eric

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that {sup 125}I seeds can be localized in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images obtained with a high-resolution probe when the implant is performed with linked seeds and spacers. Adequate seed localization is essential to the implementation of TRUS-based intraoperative dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirteen preplanned peripherally loaded prostate implants were performed using {sup 125}I seeds and spacers linked together in linear arrays that prevent seed migration and maintain precise seed spacing. A set of two-dimensional transverse images spaced at 0.50-cm intervals were obtained with a high-resolution TRUS probe at the conclusion of the procedure with the patient still under anesthesia. The image set extended from 1.0 cm superior to the base to 1.0 cm inferior to the apex. The visible echoes along each needle track were first localized and then compared with the known construction of the implanted array. The first step was to define the distal and proximal ends of each array. The visible echoes were then identified as seeds or spacers from the known sequence of the array. The locations of the seeds that did not produce a visible echo were interpolated from their known position in the array. A CT scan was obtained after implantation for comparison with the TRUS images. Results: On average, 93% (range, 86-99%) of the seeds were visible in the TRUS images. However, it was possible to localize 100% of the seeds in each case, because the locations of the missing seeds could be determined from the known construction of the arrays. Two factors complicated the interpretation of the TRUS images. One was that the spacers also produced echoes. Although weak and diffuse, these echoes could be mistaken for seeds. The other was that the number of echoes along a needle track sometimes exceeded the number of seeds and spacers implanted. This was attributed to the overall length of the array, which was approximately 0.5 cm

  14. Cost-effectiveness analysis comparing degarelix with leuprolide in hormonal therapy for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hatoum, Hind T; Crawford, E David; Nielsen, Sandy Kildegaard; Lin, Swu-Jane; Marshall, Dennis C

    2013-04-01

    Degarelix, approved in the USA in 2008, is a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist, representing one of the latest additions to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). ADT is used as first-line therapy for locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer with the aim to reduce testosterone to castrate levels. Like other gonadotropin-releasing hormone-antagonists, degarelix treatment results in rapid decrease in luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone levels without the associated risk of flare. Using one registration trial for degarelix with leuprolide as the active control, a cost-effectiveness analysis with a Markov model and a 20-year time horizon found the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for degarelix to be US$245/quality-adjusted life years. Degarelix provides a cost-effective treatment for ADT among patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. PMID:23570437

  15. Ultrasound-guided high dose rate conformal brachytherapy boost in prostate cancer: Treatment description and preliminary results of a phase I/II clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Stromberg, J.; Martinez, A.; Edmundson, G.

    1995-08-30

    To improve results for locally advanced prostate cancer, a prospective clinical trial of concurrent external beam irradiation and fractionated iridium-192 (IR-192) high dose rate (HDR) conformal boost brachytherapy was initiated. This technique of concurrent external pelvic irradiation and conformal HDR brachytherapy was well tolerated. No significant intraoperative or perioperative complications occurred. Three patients (9%) experienced Grade 3 acute toxicity (two dysuria and one diarrhea). All toxicities were otherwise Grades 1 or 2 and were primarily as expected from pelvic external irradiation. Persistent implant-related toxicities included Grades 1-2 perineal pain (12%) and hematospermia (15%). Median follow-up time was 13 months. Serum prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) levels normalized in 91% of patients (29 out of 32) within 1-14 months (median 2.8 months) after irradiation. PSA levels were progressively decreasing in the other three patients at last measurement. Prospectively planned prostatic rebiopsies done at 18 months in the first 10 patients were negative in 9 out of 10 (90%). Acute toxicity has been acceptable with this unique approach using conformal high dose rate IR-192 boost brachytherapy with concurrent external irradiation. The initial tumor response as assessed by serial PSA measurement and rebiopsy is extremely encouraging. Dose escalation will proceed in accordance with the protocol guidelines. Further patient accrual and longer follow-up will allow comparison to other techniques. 58 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Combined androgen deprivation therapy and radiation therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: a randomised, phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Warde, Padraig; Mason, Malcolm; Ding, Keyue; Kirkbride, Peter; Brundage, Michael; Cowan, Richard; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Sanders, Karen; Kostashuk, Edmund; Swanson, Greg; Barber, Jim; Hiltz, Andrea; Parmar, Mahesh KB; Sathya, Jinka; Anderson, John; Hayter, Charles; Hetherington, John; Sydes, Matthew R; Parulekar, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Whether the addition of radiation therapy (RT) improves overall survival in men with locally advanced prostate cancer managed with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is unclear. Our aim was to compare outcomes in such patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods Patients with: locally advanced (T3 or T4) prostate cancer (n=1057); or organ-confined disease (T2) with either a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration more than 40 ng/mL (n=119) or PSA concentration more than 20 ng/mL and a Gleason score of 8 or higher (n=25), were randomly assigned (done centrally with stratification and dynamic minimisation, not masked) to receive lifelong ADT and RT (65–69 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles, 45 Gy to the pelvic nodes). The primary endpoint was overall survival. The results presented here are of an interim analysis planned for when two-thirds of the events for the final analysis were recorded. All efficacy analyses were done by intention to treat and were based on data from all patients. This trial is registered at controlledtrials.com as ISRCTN24991896 and Clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00002633. Results Between 1995 and 2005, 1205 patients were randomly assigned (602 in the ADT only group and 603 in the ADT and RT group); median follow-up was 6·0 years (IQR 4·4–8·0). At the time of analysis, a total of 320 patients had died, 175 in the ADT only group and 145 in the ADT and RT group. The addition of RT to ADT improved overall survival at 7 years (74%, 95% CI 70–78 vs 66%, 60–70; hazard ratio [HR] 0·77, 95% CI 0·61–0·98, p=0·033). Both toxicity and health-related quality-of-life results showed a small effect of RT on late gastrointestinal toxicity (rectal bleeding grade >3, three patients (0·5%) in the ADT only group, two (0·3%) in the ADT and RT group; diarrhoea grade >3, four patients (0·7%) vs eight (1·3%); urinary toxicity grade >3, 14 patients (2·3%) in both groups). Interpretation The benefits of combined

  17. Results from a multicenter prostate IMRT dosimetry intercomparison for an OCOG-TROG clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, B.; Frantzis, J.; Murry, R.; Martin, J.; Plank, A.; Middleton, M.; Catton, C.; Kron, T.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: A multi-institution dosimetry intercomparison has been undertaken of prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery. The dosimetry intercomparison was incorporated into the quality assurance for site credentialing for the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Prostate Fractionated Irradiation Trial 08.01 clinical trial.Methods: An anthropomorphic pelvic phantom with realistic anatomy was used along with multiplanar dosimetry tools for the assessment. Nineteen centers across Australia and New Zealand participated in the study.Results: In comparing planned versus measured dose to the target at the isocenter within the phantom, all centers were able to achieve a total delivered dose within 3% of planned dose. In multiplanar analysis with radiochromic film using the gamma analysis method to compare delivered and planned dose, pass rates for a 5%/3 mm criterion were better than 90% for a coronal slice through the isocenter. Pass rates for an off-axis coronal slice were also better than 90% except for one instance with 84% pass rate.Conclusions: Strengths of the dosimetry assessment procedure included the true anthropomorphic nature of the phantom used, the involvement of an expert from the reference center in carrying out the assessment at every site, and the ability of the assessment to detect and resolve dosimetry discrepancies.

  18. Transrectal ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of local disease after I-125 seed implantation for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, F.; Torp-Pedersen, S.; Meiselman, L.; Siders, D.B.; Littrup, P.; Dorr, R.P.; Pauli, F.J.

    1988-12-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the ability of transrectal ultrasound (TR/US), digital rectal examination (DRE), and Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), to diagnose persistent prostate cancer following an I-125 seed implant (SI). Twenty-six patients formed the study group. The median follow-up time was 38 months, and the range was 20 to 60 months. Eighty-eight percent (23/26) had suspicious lesions on TR/US, followed by ultrasound-guided biopsies. Biopsies were performed only on those patients having suspicious lesions on TR/US. Histologically proven adenocarcinoma was found in 81% (21/26) of the patients. Statistical evaluation was done using tissue obtained at biopsy as the gold standard. The sensitivities for the DRE and PSA were 33% and 76%, respectively. The specificities for DRE and PSA were 50% and 0%, respectively. The positive predictive values for cancer were 91% by TR/US, 100% by DRE, and 89% by PSA. The negative predictive values were 13% for DRE and 0% for PSA. Overall detection rates (N = 26) were 81% for TR/US, 27% for DRE, and 62% for PSA. We conclude that ultrasound criteria for the presence of cancer are the same for both the post-irradiated prostate and the untreated prostate, and that TR/US is the most sensitive test for the diagnosis of persistent local cancer following I125 seed implantation.

  19. Patient Positioning Based on a Radioactive Tracer Implanted in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer: A Performance and Safety Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kruijf, Willy J.M. de; Verstraete, Jan; Neustadter, David; Corn, Benjamin W.; Hol, Sandra; Venselaar, Jack L.M.; Davits, Rob J.; Wijsman, Bart P.; Van den Bergh, Laura; Budiharto, Tom; Oyen, Raymond; Haustermans, Karin; Poortmans, Philip M.P.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance and safety of a radiation therapy positioning system (RealEye) based on tracking a radioactive marker (Tracer) implanted in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a single-arm multi-institutional trial in 20 patients. The iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir)-containing Tracer was implanted in the patient together with 4 standard gold seed fiducials. Patient prostate-related symptoms were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Computed tomography (CT) was performed for treatment planning, during treatment, and after treatment to evaluate the migration stability of the Tracer. At 5 treatment sessions, cone beam CT was performed to test the positioning accuracy of the RealEye. Results: The Tracer was successfully implanted in all patients. No device or procedure-related adverse events occurred. Changes in IPSS scores were limited. The difference between the mean change in Tracer-fiducial distance and the mean change in fiducial-fiducial distance was -0.39 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] upper boundary, -0.22 mm). The adjusted mean difference between Tracer position according to RealEye and the Tracer position on the CBCT for all patients was 1.34 mm (95% CI upper boundary, 1.41 mm). Conclusions: Implantation of the Tracer is feasible and safe. Migration stability of the Tracer is good. Prostate patients can be positioned and monitored accurately by using RealEye.

  20. Localization of a Portion of an Endorectal Balloon for Prostate Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Using Cone-Beam Tomosynthesis: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Sook Kien; Zygmanski, Piotr; Lyatskaya, Yulia; D'Amico, Anthony V.; Cormack, Robert A.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of using cone-beam tomosynthesis (CBTS) to localize the air-tissue interface for the application of prostate image-guided radiation therapy using an endorectal balloon for immobilization and localization. Methods and Materials: A Feldkamp-David-Kress-based CBTS reconstruction was applied to selected sets of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) projection data to simulate volumetric imaging achievable from tomosynthesis for a limited range of scan angles. Projection data were calculated from planning CT images of 10 prostate cancer patients treated with an endorectal balloon, as were experimental CBCT projections for a pelvic phantom in two patients. More than 50 points at the air-tissue interface were objectively identified by an intensity-based interface-finding algorithm. Using three-dimensional point sets extracted from CBTS images compared with points extracted from corresponding CBCT images, the relative shift resulting from a reduced scan angle was determined. Because the CBCT and CBTS images were generated from the same projection data set, shift identified was presumed to be due to distortions introduced by the tomosynthesis technique. Results: Scans of {>=}60 Degree-Sign were shown to be able to localize an air-tissue interface near the isocenter with accuracy on the order of a millimeter. The accuracy was quantified in terms of the mean discrepancy as a function of reconstruction angle. Conclusion: This work provides an understanding of the effect of scan angle used in localization of a portion of an endorectal balloon by means of CBTS. CBTS with relatively small scan angles is capable of accurately localizing an extended interface near the isocenter and may provide clinically relevant measurements to guide IGRT treatments while reducing imaging radiation to the patient.

  1. Importance of Local Control in Early-Stage Prostate Cancer: Outcomes of Patients With Positive Post-Radiation Therapy Biopsy Results Treated in RTOG 9408

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Daniel J.; Hu, Chen; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Souhami, Luis; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Chafe, Susan Maria Jacinta; Leibenhaut, Mark H.; Narayan, Samir; Torres-Roca, Javier; Michalski, Jeff; Zeitzer, Kenneth L.; Donavanik, Viroon; Sandler, Howard; McGowan, David G.; Jones, Christopher U.; Shipley, William U.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the association between positive post-radiation therapy (RT) biopsy results and subsequent clinical outcomes in males with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group study 94-08 analyzed 1979 males with prostate cancer, stage T1b-T2b and prostate-specific antigen concentrations of ≤20 ng/dL, to investigate whether 4 months of total androgen suppression (TAS) added to RT improved survival compared to RT alone. Patients randomized to receive TAS received flutamide with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist. According to protocol, patients without evidence of clinical recurrence or initiation of additional endocrine therapy underwent repeat prostate biopsy 2 years after RT completion. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of positive post-RT biopsy results on clinical outcomes. Results: A total of 831 patients underwent post-RT biopsy, 398 were treated with RT alone and 433 with RT plus TAS. Patients with positive post-RT biopsy results had higher rates of biochemical failure (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-2.1) and distant metastasis (HR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.3-4.4) and inferior disease-specific survival (HR = 3.8; 95% CI = 1.9-7.5). Positive biopsy results remained predictive of such outcomes after correction for potential confounders such as Gleason score, tumor stage, and TAS administration. Prior TAS therapy did not prevent elevated risk of adverse outcome in the setting of post-RT positive biopsy results. Patients with Gleason score ≥7 with a positive biopsy result additionally had inferior overall survival compared to those with a negative biopsy result (HR = 1.56; 95% CI = 1.04-2.35). Conclusions: Positive post-RT biopsy is associated with increased rates of distant metastases and inferior disease-specific survival in patients treated with definitive RT and was associated with inferior overall

  2. Impact of Ultrahigh Baseline PSA Levels on Biochemical and Clinical Outcomes in Two Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Prostate Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, George; Bae, Kyounghwa; Roach, Mack; Lawton, Colleen; Donnelly, Bryan; Grignon, David; Hanks, Gerald; Porter, Arthur; Lepor, Herbert; Sandler, Howard

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To assess ultrahigh (UH; prostate-specific antigen [PSA]levels {>=}50 ng/ml) patient outcomes by comparison to other high-risk patient outcomes and to identify outcome predictors. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer patients (PCP) from two Phase III Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials (studies 9202 and 9413) were divided into two groups: high-risk patients with and without UH baseline PSA levels. Predictive variables included age, Gleason score, clinical T stage, Karnofsky performance score, and treatment arm. Outcomes included overall survival (OS), distant metastasis (DM), and biochemical failure (BF). Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using either the Cox or Fine and Gray's regression model with associated 95% confidence intervals (CI) and p values. Results: There were 401 patients in the UH PSA group and 1,792 patients in the non-UH PSA PCP group of a total of 2,193 high-risk PCP. PCP with UH PSA were found to have inferior OS (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.02-1.39, p = 0.02), DM (HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.19-1.92; p = 0.0006), and BF (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.29-1.73; p < 0.0001) compared to other high-risk PCP. In the UH cohort, PSA level was found to be a significant factor for the risk of DM (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.001-1.02) but not OS and BF. Gleason grades of 8 to 10 were found to consistently predict for poor OS, DM, and BF outcomes (with HR estimates ranging from 1.41-2.36) in both the high-risk cohort and the UH cohort multivariable analyses. Conclusions: UH PSA levels at diagnosis are related to detrimental changes in OS, DM, and BF. All three outcomes can be modeled by various combinations of all predictive variables tested.

  3. Urinary microRNA-based signature improves accuracy of detection of clinically relevant prostate cancer within the prostate-specific antigen grey zone.

    PubMed

    Salido-Guadarrama, Alberto Ivan; Morales-Montor, Jorge Gustavo; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Langley, Elizabeth; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Cruz Colin, Jose Luis; Rodriguez-Dorantes, Mauricio

    2016-06-01

    At present, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is used as a clinical biomarker for prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis; however, a large number of patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) with PSA levels in the 'gray area' (4-10 ng/ml) are currently subjected to unnecessary biopsy due to overdiagnosis. Certain microRNAs (miRs) have been proven to be useful biomarkers, several of which are detectable in bodily fluids. The present study identified and validated a urinary miR‑based signature to enhance the specificity of PCa diagnosis and to reduce the number of patients with benign conditions undergoing biopsy. Seventy‑three urine samples from Mexican patients with diagnosis of PCa with a Gleason score ≥7 and 70 patients diagnosed with BPH were collected after digital rectal examination (DRE) of the prostate. miR expression profiles were determined using TaqMan Low Density Array experiments, and normalized Ct values for the miRs were compared between PCa and BPH groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate whether miR detection in urine is suitable for distinguishing patients with PCa from those with BPH. The identified miR‑100/200b signature was significantly correlated with PCa. Using a multivariable logistic regression approach, a base model including the clinical variables age, prostate‑specific antigen (PSA), the percentage of free PSA and DRE was generated, and a second base model additionally contained the miR‑100/200b signature. ROC analysis demonstrated that the combined model significantly outperformed the capacity of PSA (P<0.001) and the base model (P=0.01) to discriminate between PCa and BPH patients. In terms of evaluation of the sub‑group of patients in the gray zone of PSA levels, the performance of the combined model for predicting PCa cases was significantly superior to PSA level determination (P<0.001) and the base model (P=0.009). In addition, decision curve analysis demonstrated that the

  4. SU-F-19A-11: Retrospective Evaluation of Thermal Coverage by Thermobrachytherapy Seed Arrangements of Clinical LDR Prostate Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Warrell, G; Shvydka, D; Chen, C; Parsai, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The superiority of a properly-administered combination of radiation therapy and hyperthermia over radiation alone in treatment of human cancers has been demonstrated in multiple studies examining radiobiology, local control, and survival. Unfortunately, hyperthermia is not yet a common modality in oncology practice, due in part to the technical difficulty of heating a deep-seated target volume to sufficient temperature. To address this problem, our group has invented a thermobrachytherapy (TB) seed based on a commonly-used low dose-rate permanent brachytherapy seed for implant in solid tumors. Instead of the tungsten radiographic marker of the standard seed, the TB seed contains one of a self-regulating ferromagnetic alloy. Placement of a patient implanted with such seeds in an oscillating magnetic field generates heat via induction of eddy currents. We present the results of studies of the capability of clinically-realistic TB seed arrangements to adequately heat defined target volumes. Methods: Seed distributions for several past LDR prostate permanent implant brachytherapy patients were reproduced in the finite element analysis software package COMSOL Multiphysics 4.4, with the difference that TB seeds were modelled, rather than the radiation-only seeds actually used for their treatments. The implant geometries were mainly of the modified peripheral loading type; a range of prostatic volumes and blood perfusion rates likely to be seen in a clinical setting were examined. Results: According to the simulations, when distributed to optimize radiation dose, TB seeds also produce sufficient heat to provide thermal coverage of the target given proper selection of the magnetic field strength. However, the thermal distributions may be improved by additional use of hyperthermia-only seeds. Conclusion: A dual-modality seed intended as an alternative to and using the same implantation apparatus and technique as the standard LDR permanent implant seed has been

  5. Minimal Benefit of an Endorectal Balloon for Prostate Immobilization as Verified by Daily Localization

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Arthur Y.; Garzotto, Mark; Kaurin, Darryl

    2011-07-01

    We wanted to investigate whether using an endorectal balloon (ERB) in lieu of image guidance is reasonable. We compared daily prostate motion in 2 cohorts of patients with fiducial markers implanted in the prostate, one group with the ERB and the other without. Twenty-nine patients were treated using intensity-modulated radiation therapy: 14 with an ERB, and 15 without. All had fiducial markers placed in the prostate. We reviewed the daily displacements necessary to place the isocenter on the prostate as determined by portal imaging. In addition, we used the data to determine whether there is a change in prostate motion over the treatment course. The average prostate displacement for patients treated without an ERB was slightly greater than the average displacement for patients treated with the ERB. However, the difference observed with the ERB was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The margins necessary to encompass the prostate 95% of the time for the patients treated without an ERB in the lateral, cranio/caudal, and anterior/posterior dimensions would be 4.8, 12.1, and 15.2 mm, respectively. When using the ERB, the margins necessary would be 4.1, 10.4, and 11 mm, respectively. Prostate motion in the anterior-posterior direction actually increased over the course of treatment in patients without an ERB. This increase was prevented by use of the ERB. Day-to-day variability of the position of the prostate is reduced in all dimensions with the water-filled ERB, but not significantly statistically. Use of the water-filled ERB did not obviate performing some form of image guidance daily.

  6. Do we use the right criteria for determining the clinical significance of incidental prostate cancer at radical cystoprostatectomy?

    PubMed

    Gakis, Georgios; Stenzl, Arnulf; Renninger, Markus

    2013-10-01

    Prostate-sparing techniques have been advocated to improved functional outcomes after radical cystoprostatectomy (RCP) for invasive bladder cancer, but this may endanger the oncological outcome. This review addresses the current status of risk factors of prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence in patients with incidental PCa after RCP. The overall 7-year risk of PCa recurrence after RCP is approximately 9%. Increased risk has been suggested in the presence of clinically significant PCa as: ≥ pT3a stage, presence of lymph-node metastasis, positive surgical margins, Gleason pattern ≥ 4, tumour multifocality (three or more foci) and tumour volume >0.5 cm(3). However, the prognostic significance of these parameters has not been evaluated within multivariable analyses so far. Preoperatively elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values correlate weakly with the clinical significance of incidental PCa, while prostate biopsy has a limited accuracy for detecting incidental PCa in the preoperative setting. Genetic markers, e.g. the prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) gene, have recently been associated with risk of recurrence in patients with incidental PCa. Incidental PCa at RCP is usually clinically insignificant. Yet, clinicopathological parameters for clinical significant cancers have not been investigated independently in the literature so far. Consequently, lifelong PSA surveillance should be conducted in all patients with incidental PCa after RCP. In the presence of clinically significant PCa treatment decisions should be based not only on histological criteria but also on patient-centred parameters (e.g. patient age and comorbidities). Assessment of PSCA expression in RCP specimens may enable improved risk assessment for PCa recurrence after RCP. PMID:23078550

  7. Brachytherapy versus prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer: Results of a French multicenter prospective medico-economic study

    SciTech Connect

    Buron, Catherine; Le Vu, Beatrice; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Peiffert, Didier; Delannes, Martine; Flam, Thierry; Guerif, Stephane; Salem, Naji; Chauveinc, Laurent; Livartowski, Alain . E-mail: alain.livartowski@curie.net

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare health-related quality of life (HRQOL), patient-reported treatment-related symptoms, and costs of iodine-125 permanent implant interstitial brachytherapy (IB) with those of radical prostatectomy (RP) during the first 2 years after these treatments for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 435 men with localized low-risk prostate cancer, from 11 French hospitals, treated with IB (308) or RP (127), were offered to complete the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core Quality of Life Questionnaire QLQ-C30 version 3 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the prostate cancer specific EORTC QLQ-PR25 module before and at the end of treatment, 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after treatment. Repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance were conducted on HRQOL changes. Comparative cost analysis covered initial treatment, hospital follow-up, outpatient and production loss costs. Results: Just after treatment, the decrease of global HRQOL was less pronounced in the IB than in the RP group, with a 13.5 points difference (p < 0.0001). A difference slightly in favor of RP was observed 6 months after treatment (-7.5 points, p = 0.0164) and was maintained at 24 months (-8.2 points, p = 0.0379). Impotence and urinary incontinence were more pronounced after RP, whereas urinary frequency, urgency, and urination pain were more frequent after IB. Mean societal costs did not differ between IB ( Euro 8,019 at T24) and RP ( Euro 8,715 at T24, p = 0.0843) regardless of the period. Conclusions: This study suggests a similar cost profile in France for IB and RP but with different HRQOL and side effect profiles. Those findings may be used to tailor localized prostate cancer treatments to suit individual patients' needs.

  8. DNA alterations in the tumor genome and their associations with clinical outcome in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wennuan

    2016-01-01

    Although most prostate cancer (PCa) cases are not life-threatening, approximately 293 000 men worldwide die annually due to PCa. These lethal cases are thought to be caused by coordinated genomic alterations that accumulate over time. Recent genome-wide analyses of DNA from subjects with PCa have revealed most, if not all, genetic changes in both germline and PCa tumor genomes. In this article, I first review the major, somatically acquired genomic characteristics of various subtypes of PCa. I then recap key findings on the relationships between genomic alterations and clinical parameters, such as biochemical recurrence or clinical relapse, metastasis and cancer-specific mortality. Finally, I outline the need for, and challenges with, validation of recent findings in prospective studies for clinical utility. It is clearer now than ever before that the landscape of somatically acquired aberrations in PCa is highlighted by DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) and TMPRSS2-ERG fusion derived from complex rearrangements, numerous single nucleotide variations or mutations, tremendous heterogeneity, and continuously punctuated evolution. Genome-wide CNAs, PTEN loss, MYC gain in primary tumors, and TP53 loss/mutation and AR amplification/mutation in advanced metastatic PCa have consistently been associated with worse cancer prognosis. With this recently gained knowledge, it is now an opportune time to develop DNA-based tests that provide more accurate patient stratification for prediction of clinical outcome, which will ultimately lead to more personalized cancer care than is possible at present. PMID:26975494

  9. DNA alterations in the tumor genome and their associations with clinical outcome in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wennuan

    2016-01-01

    Although most prostate cancer (PCa) cases are not life-threatening, approximately 293 000 men worldwide die annually due to PCa. These lethal cases are thought to be caused by coordinated genomic alterations that accumulate over time. Recent genome-wide analyses of DNA from subjects with PCa have revealed most, if not all, genetic changes in both germline and PCa tumor genomes. In this article, I first review the major, somatically acquired genomic characteristics of various subtypes of PCa. I then recap key findings on the relationships between genomic alterations and clinical parameters, such as biochemical recurrence or clinical relapse, metastasis and cancer-specific mortality. Finally, I outline the need for, and challenges with, validation of recent findings in prospective studies for clinical utility. It is clearer now than ever before that the landscape of somatically acquired aberrations in PCa is highlighted by DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) and TMPRSS2-ERG fusion derived from complex rearrangements, numerous single nucleotide variations or mutations, tremendous heterogeneity, and continuously punctuated evolution. Genome-wide CNAs, PTEN loss, MYC gain in primary tumors, and TP53 loss/mutation and AR amplification/mutation in advanced metastatic PCa have consistently been associated with worse cancer prognosis. With this recently gained knowledge, it is now an opportune time to develop DNA-based tests that provide more accurate patient stratification for prediction of clinical outcome, which will ultimately lead to more personalized cancer care than is possible at present. PMID:26975494

  10. Case-Matched comparison of contemporary radiation therapy to surgery in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Sophie G.; Mills, Stacey E.; Smolkin, Mark E.; Theodorescu, Dan . E-mail: dt9d@virginia.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Few studies critically compare current radiotherapy techniques to surgery for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, despite an urgent need to determine which approach offers superior cancer control. Our objective was to compare rates of biochemical relapse-free survival (BFS) and surrogates of disease specific survival among men with high risk adenocarcinoma of the prostate as a function of treatment modality. Methods and Materials: Retrospective data from 409 men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) {>=}10 or Gleason 7-10 or Stage {>=}T2b cancer treated uniformly at one university between March 1988 and December 2000 were analyzed. Patients had undergone radical prostatectomy (RP), brachytherapy implant alone (BTM), or external beam radiotherapy with brachytherapy boost with short-term neoadjuvant and adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (BTC). From the total study population a 1:1 matched-cohort analysis (208 patients matched via prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score) comparing RP with BTC was performed as well. Results: Estimated 4-year BFS rates were superior for patients treated with BTC (BTC 72%, BTM 25%, RP 53%; p < 0.001). Matched analysis of BTC vs. RP confirmed these results (BTC 73%, BTM 55%; p = 0.010). Relative risk (RR) of biochemical relapse for BTM and BTC compared with RP were 2.92 (1.95-4.36) and 0.56 (0.36-0.87) (p < 0.001, p = 0.010). RR for BTC from the matched cohort analysis was 0.44 (0.26-0.74; p = 0.002). Conclusions: High-risk prostate cancer patients receiving multimodality radiation therapy (BTC) display apparently superior BFS compared with those receiving surgery (RP) or brachytherapy alone (BTM)

  11. Comparison of High-Dose Proton Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy in Localized Prostate Cancer: A Case-Matched Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Coen, John J.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Rossi, Carl J.; Grocela, Joseph A.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Yan, Yan; Shipley, William U.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case-matched analysis comparing high-dose external-beam radiation (EBRT) for prostate cancer delivered on Proton Radiation Oncology Group (PROG) 95-09, a randomized trial, with permanent prostate brachytherapy over the same era. Methods: From 1996 to 1999, 196 patients were accrued to the high-dose arm (79.2 Gray equivalent (GyE) using photons and protons) of PROG 95-09 at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Loma Linda University Medical Center. Entry criteria specified T1-2 and prostate-specific antigen {<=}15 ng/mL. When Gleason score >7 was excluded, 177 men were left for case matching. At Massachusetts General Hospital, 203 similar patients were treated by a single brachytherapist from 1997 to 2002. Minimum follow-up was 3 years. Case matching, based on T stage, Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, and age resulted in 141 matches (282 patients). Median follow-up was 8.6 and 7.4 years for EBRT and brachytherapy, respectively. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure (BF). Results: Using the Phoenix definition, the 8-year BF rates were 7.7% and 16.1% for EBRT and brachytherapy, respectively (p = 0.42). A stratified analysis was performed by risk group. In the EBRT group, 113 and 28 patients were low and intermediate risk, respectively. In the brachytherapy group, 118 and 23 were. When stratified by risk group, the BF rates were similar by either technique. Conclusions: High-dose EBRT and brachytherapy result in similar BF rates for men with localized prostate cancer. Comparative quality-of-life and cost-effectiveness studies are warranted.

  12. Integrated clinical, whole-genome, and transcriptome analysis of multisampled lethal metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bova, G. Steven; Kallio, Heini M.L.; Annala, Matti; Kivinummi, Kati; Högnäs, Gunilla; Häyrynen, Sergei; Rantapero, Tommi; Kivinen, Virpi; Isaacs, William B.; Tolonen, Teemu; Nykter, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    We report the first combined analysis of whole-genome sequence, detailed clinical history, and transcriptome sequence of multiple prostate cancer metastases in a single patient (A21). Whole-genome and transcriptome sequence was obtained from nine anatomically separate metastases, and targeted DNA sequencing was performed in cancerous and noncancerous foci within the primary tumor specimen removed 5 yr before death. Transcriptome analysis revealed increased expression of androgen receptor (AR)-regulated genes in liver metastases that harbored an AR p.L702H mutation, suggesting a dominant effect by the mutation despite being present in only one of an estimated 16 copies per cell. The metastases harbored several alterations to the PI3K/AKT pathway, including a clonal truncal mutation in PIK3CG and present in all metastatic sites studied. The list of truncal genomic alterations shared by all metastases included homozygous deletion of TP53, hemizygous deletion of RB1 and CHD1, and amplification of FGFR1. If the patient were treated today, given this knowledge, the use of second-generation androgen-directed therapies, cessation of glucocorticoid administration, and therapeutic inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway or FGFR1 receptor could provide personalized benefit. Three previously unreported truncal clonal missense mutations (ABCC4 p.R891L, ALDH9A1 p.W89R, and ASNA1 p.P75R) were expressed at the RNA level and assessed as druggable. The truncal status of mutations may be critical for effective actionability and merit further study. Our findings suggest that a large set of deeply analyzed cases could serve as a powerful guide to more effective prostate cancer basic science and personalized cancer medicine clinical trials. PMID:27148588

  13. Integrated clinical, whole-genome, and transcriptome analysis of multisampled lethal metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bova, G Steven; Kallio, Heini M L; Annala, Matti; Kivinummi, Kati; Högnäs, Gunilla; Häyrynen, Sergei; Rantapero, Tommi; Kivinen, Virpi; Isaacs, William B; Tolonen, Teemu; Nykter, Matti; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2016-05-01

    We report the first combined analysis of whole-genome sequence, detailed clinical history, and transcriptome sequence of multiple prostate cancer metastases in a single patient (A21). Whole-genome and transcriptome sequence was obtained from nine anatomically separate metastases, and targeted DNA sequencing was performed in cancerous and noncancerous foci within the primary tumor specimen removed 5 yr before death. Transcriptome analysis revealed increased expression of androgen receptor (AR)-regulated genes in liver metastases that harbored an AR p.L702H mutation, suggesting a dominant effect by the mutation despite being present in only one of an estimated 16 copies per cell. The metastases harbored several alterations to the PI3K/AKT pathway, including a clonal truncal mutation in PIK3CG and present in all metastatic sites studied. The list of truncal genomic alterations shared by all metastases included homozygous deletion of TP53, hemizygous deletion of RB1 and CHD1, and amplification of FGFR1. If the patient were treated today, given this knowledge, the use of second-generation androgen-directed therapies, cessation of glucocorticoid administration, and therapeutic inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway or FGFR1 receptor could provide personalized benefit. Three previously unreported truncal clonal missense mutations (ABCC4 p.R891L, ALDH9A1 p.W89R, and ASNA1 p.P75R) were expressed at the RNA level and assessed as druggable. The truncal status of mutations may be critical for effective actionability and merit further study. Our findings suggest that a large set of deeply analyzed cases could serve as a powerful guide to more effective prostate cancer basic science and personalized cancer medicine clinical trials. PMID:27148588

  14. Recruitment of Participants to a Clinical Trial of Botanical Therapy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Harris E.; McVary, Kevin T.; Meleth, Sreelatha; Stavris, Karen; Downey, Joe; Kusek, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The timely recruitment of study participants is a critical component of successful trials. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a common nonmalignant urologic condition among older men, is characterized by lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Successful recruitment methods for a trial of medical therapy for BPH, Medical Therapy of Prostate Symptoms (MTOPS), were mass mailing and advertising. The Complementary and Alternative Medicines Trial for Urological Symptoms (CAMUS) was designed to evaluate a botanical therapy, saw palmetto, for the treatment of BPH. The objective of this study was to evaluate recruitment strategies for CAMUS and to contrast the baseline characteristics of CAMUS participants with those recruited to a similar trial using conventional medical therapy. Design CAMUS is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial designed to evaluate the effects of saw palmetto given at escalating doses over an 18-month period on relief from LUTS. Subjects The target enrollment goal was 350 men with LUTS from 11 clinical centers over a 12-month period. The recruitment techniques used and participants contacted, screened, and randomized through each technique were obtained from the clinical centers. Baseline characteristics of the CAMUS participants were compared with participants in the MTOPS trial who met the CAMUS eligibility criteria for LUTS. Results The target enrollment goal was achieved in 11 months. The overall monthly recruitment rate per site was 3.7 and ranged from 2.4 to 8.0. The most successful recruitment methods were mass mailing and advertising, which accounted for 39% and 35% of the study participants, respectively. In comparison to MTOPS participants, CAMUS participants were younger, more highly educated, more diverse, and had less severe urinary symptoms. Conclusions Successful recruitment methods for CAMUS were similar to those in MTOPS. The use of botanical therapy attracted a less symptomatic and more educated

  15. Combined AKT and MEK Pathway Blockade in Pre-Clinical Models of Enzalutamide-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toren, Paul; Kim, Soojin; Johnson, Fraser; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent improvements in patient outcomes using newer androgen receptor (AR) pathway inhibitors, treatment resistance in castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) continues to remain a clinical problem. Co-targeting alternate resistance pathways are of significant interest to treat CRPC and delay the onset of resistance. Both the AKT and MEK signaling pathways become activated as prostate cancer develops resistance to AR-targeted therapies. This pre-clinical study explores co-targeting these pathways in AR-positive prostate cancer models. Using various in vitro models of prostate cancer disease states including androgen dependent (LNCaP), CRPC (V16D and 22RV1) and ENZ-resistant prostate cancer (MR49C and MR49F), we evaluate the relevance of targeting both AKT and MEK pathways. Our data reveal that AKT inhibition induces apoptosis and inhibits cell growth in PTEN null cell lines independently of their sensitivity to hormone therapy; however, AKT inhibition had no effect on the PTEN positive 22RV1 cell line. Interestingly, we found that MEK inhibition had greater effect on 22RV1 cells compared to LNCaP, V16D or ENZ-resistant cells MR49C and MR49F cells. In vitro, combination AKT and MEK blockade had evidence of synergy observed in some cell lines and assays, but this was not consistent across all results. In vivo, the combination of AKT and MEK inhibition resulted in more consistent tumor growth inhibition of MR49F xenografts and longer disease specific survival compared to AKT inhibitor monotherapy. As in our in vitro study, 22RV1 xenografts were more resistant to AKT inhibition while they were more sensitive to MEK inhibition. Our results suggest that targeting AKT and MEK in combination may be a valuable strategy in prostate cancer when both pathways are activated and further support the importance of characterizing the dominant oncogenic pathway in each patient’s tumor in order to select optimal therapy. PMID:27046225

  16. Interfraction rotation of the prostate as evaluated by kilovoltage X-ray fiducial marker imaging in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Graf, Reinhold; Boehmer, Dirk; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the daily rotation of the prostate during a radiotherapy course using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imaging and intraprostatic fiducials for localization and positioning correction. From 2005 to 2009, radio-opaque fiducial markers were inserted into 38 patients via perineum into the prostate. The ExacTrac/Novalis Body X-ray 6-day image acquisition system (ET/NB; BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) was used to determine and correct the target position. During the first period in 10 patients we recorded all rotation errors but used only Y (table) for correction. For the next 28 patients we used for correction all rotational coordinates, i.e., in addition Z (superior-inferior [SI] or roll) and X (left-right [LR] or tilt/pitch) according to the fiducial marker position by use of the Robotic Tilt Module and Varian Exact Couch. Rotation correction was applied above a threshold of 1° displacement. The systematic and random errors were specified. Overall, 993 software-assisted rotational corrections were performed. The interfraction rotation errors of the prostate as assessed from the radiodense surrogate markers around the three axes Y, Z, and X were on average 0.09, -0.52, and -0.01° with standard deviations of 2.01, 2.30, and 3.95°, respectively. The systematic uncertainty per patient for prostate rotation was estimated with 2.30, 1.56, and 4.13° and the mean random components with 1.81, 2.02, and 3.09°. The largest rotational errors occurred around the X-axis (pitch), but without preferring a certain orientation. Although the error around Z (roll) can be compensated on average by a transformation with 4 coordinates, a significant error around X remains and advocates the full correction with 6 coordinates. Rotational errors as assessed via daily stereoscopic online imaging are significant and dominate around X. Rotation possibly degrades the dosimetric coverage of the target volume and may require suitable strategies for correction. PMID:22534137

  17. Interfraction rotation of the prostate as evaluated by kilovoltage X-ray fiducial marker imaging in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Reinhold; Boehmer, Dirk; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the daily rotation of the prostate during a radiotherapy course using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imaging and intraprostatic fiducials for localization and positioning correction. From 2005 to 2009, radio-opaque fiducial markers were inserted into 38 patients via perineum into the prostate. The ExacTrac/Novalis Body X-ray 6-day image acquisition system (ET/NB; BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) was used to determine and correct the target position. During the first period in 10 patients we recorded all rotation errors but used only Y (table) for correction. For the next 28 patients we used for correction all rotational coordinates, i.e., in addition Z (superior-inferior [SI] or roll) and X (left-right [LR] or tilt/pitch) according to the fiducial marker position by use of the Robotic Tilt Module and Varian Exact Couch. Rotation correction was applied above a threshold of 1 Degree-Sign displacement. The systematic and random errors were specified. Overall, 993 software-assisted rotational corrections were performed. The interfraction rotation errors of the prostate as assessed from the radiodense surrogate markers around the three axes Y, Z, and X were on average 0.09, -0.52, and -0.01 Degree-Sign with standard deviations of 2.01, 2.30, and 3.95 Degree-Sign , respectively. The systematic uncertainty per patient for prostate rotation was estimated with 2.30, 1.56, and 4.13 Degree-Sign and the mean random components with 1.81, 2.02, and 3.09 Degree-Sign . The largest rotational errors occurred around the X-axis (pitch), but without preferring a certain orientation. Although the error around Z (roll) can be compensated on average by a transformation with 4 coordinates, a significant error around X remains and advocates the full correction with 6 coordinates. Rotational errors as assessed via daily stereoscopic online imaging are significant and dominate around X. Rotation possibly degrades the dosimetric coverage of the target volume and may require

  18. 70 Gy Versus 80 Gy in Localized Prostate Cancer: 5-Year Results of GETUG 06 Randomized Trial;Prostate cancer; Dose escalation; Conformal radiotherapy; Randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Guerif, Stephane; Le Prise, Elisabeth; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Bougnoux, Agnes; Chauvet, Bruno; Salem, Naji; Chapet, Olivier; Bourdain, Sylvain; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Maingon, Philippe; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Malissard, Luc; Simon, Jean-Marc; Pommier, Pascal; Hay, Men; Dubray, Bernard; Lagrange, Jean-Leon; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Bey, Pierre

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To perform a randomized trial comparing 70 and 80 Gy radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 306 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomized. No androgen deprivation was allowed. The primary endpoint was biochemical relapse according to the modified 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and Phoenix definitions. Toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 1991 criteria and the late effects on normal tissues-subjective, objective, management, analytic scales (LENT-SOMA) scales. The patients' quality of life was scored using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30-item cancer-specific and 25-item prostate-specific modules. Results: The median follow-up was 61 months. According to the 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 39% and 28% in the 70- and 80-Gy arms, respectively (p = .036). Using the Phoenix definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 32% and 23.5%, respectively (p = .09). The subgroup analysis showed a better biochemical outcome for the higher dose group with an initial prostate-specific antigen level >15 ng/mL. At the last follow-up date, 26 patients had died, 10 of their disease and none of toxicity, with no differences between the two arms. According to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, the Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity rate was 14% and 19.5% for the 70- and 80-Gy arms (p = .22), respectively. The Grade 2 or greater urinary toxicity was 10% at 70 Gy and 17.5% at 80 Gy (p = .046). Similar results were observed using the LENT-SOMA scale. Bladder toxicity was more frequent at 80 Gy than at 70 Gy (p = .039). The quality-of-life questionnaire results before and 5 years after treatment were available for 103 patients with no differences found between the 70- and 80-Gy arms. Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy provided a

  19. Validation of Planning Target Volume Margins by Analyzing Intrafractional Localization Errors for 14 Prostate Cancer Patients Based on Three-Dimensional Cross-Correlation between the Prostate Images of Planning CT and Intrafraction Cone-Beam CT during Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Futaguchi, Masahiko; Haga, Akihiro; Sakumi, Akira; Sasaki, Katsutake; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Igaki, Hiroshi; Ohtomo, Kuni; Yoda, Kiyoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Time-averaged intreatment prostate localization errors were calculated, for the first time, by three-dimensional prostate image cross-correlation between planning CT and intrafraction kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The intrafraction CBCT volume was reconstructed by an inhouse software after acquiring cine-mode projection images during VMAT delivery. Subsequently, the margin between a clinical target volume and a planning target volume (PTV) was obtained by applying the van Herk and variant formulas using the calculated localization errors. The resulting PTV margins were approximately 2 mm in lateral direction and 4 mm in craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions, which are consistent with the margin prescription employed in our facility. PMID:24977167

  20. Validation of planning target volume margins by analyzing intrafractional localization errors for 14 prostate cancer patients based on three-dimensional cross-correlation between the prostate images of planning CT and intrafraction cone-beam CT during volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Futaguchi, Masahiko; Haga, Akihiro; Sakumi, Akira; Sasaki, Katsutake; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Igaki, Hiroshi; Ohtomo, Kuni; Yoda, Kiyoshi; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Time-averaged intreatment prostate localization errors were calculated, for the first time, by three-dimensional prostate image cross-correlation between planning CT and intrafraction kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The intrafraction CBCT volume was reconstructed by an inhouse software after acquiring cine-mode projection images during VMAT delivery. Subsequently, the margin between a clinical target volume and a planning target volume (PTV) was obtained by applying the van Herk and variant formulas using the calculated localization errors. The resulting PTV margins were approximately 2 mm in lateral direction and 4 mm in craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions, which are consistent with the margin prescription employed in our facility. PMID:24977167

  1. An examination of clinical differences between carriers and non-carriers of chromosome 8q24 risk alleles in a New Zealand Caucasian population with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dug Yeo; Karunasinghe, Nishi; Goudie, Megan; Masters, Jonathan G.; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Prostate cancer makes up approximately 15% of all cancers diagnosed in men in developed nations and approximately 4% of cases in developing nations. Although it is clear that prostate cancer has a genetic component and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can contribute to prostate cancer risk, detecting associations is difficult in multi-factorial diseases, as environmental and lifestyle factors also play a role. In this study, specific clinical characteristics, environmental factors and genetic risk factors were assessed for interaction with prostate cancer. Methods. A total of 489 prostate cancer cases and 427 healthy controls were genotyped for SNPs found on chromosome 8q24 and a genetic risk score was calculated. In addition the SNPs were tested for an association with a number of clinical and environmental factors. Results. Age and tobacco use were positively associated, whilst alcohol consumption was negatively associated with prostate cancer risk. The following SNPs found on chromosome 8q24 were statistically significantly associated with prostate cancer: rs10086908, rs16901979; rs1447295and rs4242382. No association between Gleason score and smoking status, or between Gleason score and genotype were detected. Conclusion. A genetic risk score was calculated based on the 15 SNPs tested and found to be significantly associated with prostate cancer risk. Smoking significantly contributed to the risk of developing prostate cancer, and this risk was further increased by the presence of four SNPs in the 8q24 chromosomal region. PMID:26966665

  2. Biologically Effective Dose (BED) Correlation With Biochemical Control After Low-Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy for Clinically Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Edward F.; Nelson, John W.; Alkaissi, Ali K.; Das, Shiva; Clough, Robert W.; Broadwater, Gloria; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Chino, Junzo P.; Oleson, James R.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the correlation of postimplant dosimetric quantifiers with biochemical control of prostate cancer after low-dose rate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The biologically effective dose (BED), dose in Gray (Gy) to 90% of prostate (D{sub 90}), and percent volume of the prostate receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V{sub 100}) were calculated from the postimplant dose-volume histogram for 140 patients undergoing low-dose rate prostate brachytherapy from 1997 to 2003 at Durham Regional Hospital and the Durham VA Medical Center (Durham, NC). Results: The median follow-up was 50 months. There was a 7% biochemical failure rate (10 of 140), and 91% of patients (127 of 140) were alive at last clinical follow-up. The median BED was 148 Gy (range, 46-218 Gy). The median D{sub 90} was 139 Gy (range, 45-203 Gy). The median V{sub 100} was 85% (range, 44-100%). The overall 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rate was 90.1%. On univariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, no pretreatment characteristic (Gleason score sum, age, baseline prostate-specific antigen, or clinical stage) was predictive of bRFS. The BED, D{sub 90}, and V{sub 100} were all highly correlated (Pearson coefficients >92%), and all were strongly correlated with bRFS. Using the Youden method, we identified the following cut points for predicting freedom from biochemical failure: D{sub 90} >= 110 Gy, V{sub 100} >= 74%, and BED >= 115 Gy. None of the covariates significantly predicted overall survival. Conclusions: We observed significant correlation between BED, D{sub 90}, and V{sub 100} with bRFS. The BED is at least as predictive of bRFS as D{sub 90} or V{sub 100}. Dosimetric quantifiers that account for heterogeneity in tumor location and dose distribution, tumor repopulation, and survival probability of tumor clonogens should be investigated.

  3. Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART): Radiobiological and dose escalation considerations for localized carcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Song, William; Schaly, Bryan; Bauman, Glenn; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of various image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) techniques to deliver and escalate dose to the prostate in the presence of geometric uncertainties. Five prostate patients with 15-16 treatment CT studies each were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were planned with an 18 MV, six-field conformal technique with a 10 mm margin size and an initial prescription of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The adaptive strategy employed in this work for patient-specific dose escalation was to increase the prescription dose in 2 Gy-per-fraction increments until the rectum normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) reached a level equal to that of the nominal plan NTCP (i.e., iso-NTCP dose escalation). The various target localization techniques simulated were: (1) daily laser-guided alignment to skin tattoo marks that represents treatment without image-guidance, (2) alignment to bony landmarks with daily portal images, and (3) alignment to the clinical target volume (CTV) with daily CT images. Techniques (1) and (3) were resimulated with a reduced margin size of 5 mm to investigate further dose escalation. When delivering the original clinical prescription dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions, the "CTV registration" technique yielded the highest tumor control probability (TCP) most frequently, followed by the "bone registration" and "tattoo registration" techniques. However, the differences in TCP among the three techniques were minor when the margin size was 10 mm (< or = 1.1 %). Reducing the margin size to 5 mm significantly degraded the TCP values of the "tattoo registration" technique in two of the five patients, where a large difference was found compared to the other techniques (< or = 11.8 %). The "CTV registration" technique, however, did maintain similar TCP values compared to their 10 mm margin counterpart. In terms of normal tissue sparing, the technique producing the lowest NTCP varied from patient to patient. Reducing

  4. PROMIS — Prostate MR imaging study: A paired validating cohort study evaluating the role of multi-parametric MRI in men with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    El-Shater Bosaily, A.; Parker, C.; Brown, L.C.; Gabe, R.; Hindley, R.G.; Kaplan, R.; Emberton, M.; Ahmed, H.U.

    2015-01-01

    Background Transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies are prone to detection errors. Multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) may improve the diagnostic pathway. Methods PROMIS is a prospective validating paired-cohort study that meets criteria for level 1 evidence in diagnostic test evaluation. PROMIS will investigate whether multi-parametric (MP)-MRI can discriminate between men with and without clinically-significant prostate cancer who are at risk prior to first biopsy. Up to 714 men will have MP-MRI (index), 10–12 core TRUS-biopsy (standard) and 5 mm transperineal template mapping (TPM) biopsies (reference). The conduct and reporting of each test will be blinded to the others. Results PROMIS will measure and compare sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of both MP-MRI and TRUS-biopsy against TPM biopsies. The MP-MRI results will be used to determine the proportion of men who could safely avoid biopsy without compromising detection of clinically-significant cancers. For the primary outcome, significant cancer on TPM is defined as Gleason grade >/= 4 + 3 and/or maximum cancer core length of ≥ 6 mm. PROMIS will also assess inter-observer variability among radiologists among other secondary outcomes. Cost-effectiveness of MP-MRI prior to biopsy will also be evaluated. Conclusions PROMIS will determine whether MP-MRI of the prostate prior to first biopsy improves the detection accuracy of clinically-significant cancer. PMID:25749312

  5. Comparison of Transperineal Mapping Biopsy Results with Whole-Mount Radical Prostatectomy Pathology in Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Darren J.; Richards, Kyle A.; Godoy, Guilherme; Udo, Kazuma; Nogueira, Lucas; Cronin, Angel M.; Fine, Samson W.; Scardino, Peter T.; Coleman, Jonathon A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of transperineal mapping biopsy (TMB) by comparing it to the pathology specimen of patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) for localized prostate cancer. Methods. From March 2007 to September 2009, 78 men at a single center underwent TMB; 17 of 78 subsequently underwent RP. TMB cores were grouped into four quadrants and matched to data from RP whole-mount slides. Gleason score, tumor location and volume, cross-sectional area, and maximal diameter were measured; sensitivity and specificity were assessed. Results. For the 17 patients who underwent RP, TMB revealed 12 (71%) had biopsy Gleason grades ≥ 3 + 4 and 13 (76%) had bilateral disease. RP specimens showed 14 (82%) had Gleason scores ≥ 3 + 4 and 13 (76%) had bilateral disease. Sensitivity and specificity of TMB for prostate cancer detection were 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 72%–94%) and 83% (95% CI 62%–95%), respectively. Four quadrants negative for cancer on TMB were positive on prostatectomy, and six positive on TMB were negative on prostatectomy. Conclusion. TMB is a highly invasive procedure that can accurately detect and localize prostate cancer. These findings help establish baseline performance characteristics for TMB and its utility for organ-sparing strategies. PMID:24900923

  6. 1.5T MRI-guided trans-perineal laser ablation of locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, E. Frederick; Mynderse, Lance A.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; McNichols, Roger J.; Atwell, Thomas D.; Gettman, Matthew T.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Kawashima, Akira; Woodrum, David A.

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after definitive therapy with radical prostatectomy (RP) is known to occur between 25-30%. We present the first known case of 1.5T MRI guided ablation using laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer following RP. Methods: The patient elected to undergo MRI-guided LITT of the biopsy proven cancer recurrence using an FDAapproved MRI compatible, 980nm, 15-watt laser system with MR thermometry. Under T2-weighted MR(1.5T Siemens) imaging, guidance and targeting of the lesions with trans-perineal placement of laser applicators. Multiple cycles of laser energy were used to ablate the tumor. A MRI-compatible urethral cooling catheter was placed to prevent urethral thermal damage. Results: Intra-procedural temperature mapping allowed continuous monitoring of the ablation zone and permitted ablation control until tumor coverage was achieved. Additionally, the protective cooling effects of the urethral cooling catheter could also be seen with the temperature mapping. Post-ablation gadolinium and T2 weighted MR imaging demonstrated an ablation defect encompassing the recurrent tumor with no residual hyper-enhancing nodules. Three month follow-up shows no residual or recurrent tumor seen on MR imaging. Conclusion: This represents the first known, successful, MRI-guided, LITT procedures at 1.5T for locally recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following RP.

  7. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Dose Painting for Localized Prostate Cancer Using {sup 11}C-choline Positron Emission Tomography Scans

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe H.; Lim Joon, Daryl; Lee, Sze Ting; Gong, Sylvia J.; Anderson, Nigel J.; Scott, Andrew M.; Davis, Ian D.; Clouston, David; Bolton, Damien; Hamilton, Christopher S.; Khoo, Vincent

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technical feasibility of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose painting using {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography PET scans in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was an RT planning study of 8 patients with prostate cancer who had {sup 11}C-choline PET scans prior to radical prostatectomy. Two contours were semiautomatically generated on the basis of the PET scans for each patient: 60% and 70% of the maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub 60%} and SUV{sub 70%}). Three IMRT plans were generated for each patient: PLAN{sub 78}, which consisted of whole-prostate radiation therapy to 78 Gy; PLAN{sub 78-90}, which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 78 Gy, a boost to the SUV{sub 60%} to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV{sub 70%} to 90 Gy; and PLAN{sub 72-90}, which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 72 Gy, a boost to the SUV{sub 60%} to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV{sub 70%} to 90 Gy. The feasibility of these plans was judged by their ability to reach prescription doses while adhering to published dose constraints. Tumor control probabilities based on PET scan-defined volumes (TCP{sub PET}) and on prostatectomy-defined volumes (TCP{sub path}), and rectal normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were compared between the plans. Results: All plans for all patients reached prescription doses while adhering to dose constraints. TCP{sub PET} values for PLAN{sub 78}, PLAN{sub 78-90}, and PLAN{sub 72-90} were 65%, 97%, and 96%, respectively. TCP{sub path} values were 71%, 97%, and 89%, respectively. Both PLAN{sub 78-90} and PLAN{sub 72-90} had significantly higher TCP{sub PET} (P=.002 and .001) and TCP{sub path} (P<.001 and .014) values than PLAN{sub 78}. PLAN{sub 78-90} and PLAN{sub 72-90} were not significantly different in terms of TCP{sub PET} or TCP{sub path}. There were no significant differences in rectal NTCPs between the 3 plans. Conclusions: IMRT dose painting for

  8. A Dosimetric Comparison between Conventional Fractionated and Hypofractionated Image-guided Radiation Therapies for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Li, Gao-Feng; Hou, Xiu-Yu; Gao, Hong; Xu, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Background: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is the preferred method for curative treatment of localized prostate cancer, which could improve disease outcome and reduce normal tissue toxicity reaction. IGRT using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in combination with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) potentially allows smaller treatment margins and dose escalation to the prostate. The aim of this study was to compare the difference of dosimetric diffusion in conventional IGRT using 7-field, step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and hypofractionated IGRT using VMAT for patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods: We studied 24 patients who received 78 Gy in 39 daily fractions or 70 Gy in 28 daily fractions to their prostate with/without the seminal vesicles using IMRT (n = 12) or VMAT (n = 12) for prostate cancer between November 2013 and October 2015. Image guidance was performed using kilovoltage CBCT scans equipped on the linear accelerator. Offline planning was performed using the daily treatment images registered with simulation computed tomography (CT) images. A total of 212 IMRT plans in conventional cohort and 292 VMAT plans in hypofractionated cohort were enrolled in the study. Dose distributions were recalculated on CBCT images registered with the planning CT scanner. Results: Compared with 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT, VMAT plans resulted in improved planning target volume (PTV) D95% (7663.17 ± 69.57 cGy vs. 7789.17 ± 131.76 cGy, P < 0.001). VMAT reduced the rectal D25 (P < 0.001), D35 (P < 0.001), and D50 (P < 0.001), bladder V50 (P < 0.001), D25 (P = 0.002), D35 (P = 0.028), and D50 (P = 0.029). However, VMAT did not statistically significantly reduce the rectal V50, compared with 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT (25.02 ± 5.54% vs. 27.43 ± 8.79%, P = 0.087). Conclusions: To deliver the hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer, VMAT significantly increased PTV D95% dose and decreased the dose of radiation

  9. Long-term Survival and Toxicity in Patients Treated With High-Dose Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Josh; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Cox, Brett; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term survival and toxicity outcomes with the use of high-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 86.4 Gy for patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between August 1997 and December 2008, 1002 patients were treated to a dose of 86.4 Gy using a 5-7 field IMRT technique. Patients were stratified by prognostic risk group based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk classification criteria. A total of 587 patients (59%) were treated with neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen deprivation therapy. The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 5.5 years (range, 1-14 years). Results: For low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, 7-year biochemical relapse-free survival outcomes were 98.8%, 85.6%, and 67.9%, respectively (P<.001), and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 99.4%, 94.1%, and 82.0% (P<.001), respectively. On multivariate analysis, T stage (P<.001), Gleason score (P<.001), and >50% of initial biopsy positive core (P=.001) were predictive for distant mestastases. No prostate cancer-related deaths were observed in the low-risk group. The 7-year prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) rates, using competing risk analysis for intermediate- and high-risk groups, were 3.3% and 8.1%, respectively (P=.008). On multivariate analysis, Gleason score (P=.004), percentage of biopsy core positivity (P=.003), and T-stage (P=.033) were predictive for PCSM. Actuarial 7-year grade 2 or higher late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicities were 4.4% and 21.1%, respectively. Late grade 3 gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity was experienced by 7 patients (0.7%) and 22 patients (2.2%), respectively. Of the 427 men with full potency at baseline, 317 men (74%) retained sexual function at time of last follow-up. Conclusions: This study represents the largest cohort of patients treated with high-dose radiation to 86.4 Gy, using IMRT for localized prostate cancer, with the longest follow-up to date

  10. Clinical Outcome of Patients Treated With 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT) for Prostate Cancer on RTOG 9406

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Jeff; Winter, Kathryn; Roach, Mack; Markoe, Arnold; Sandler, Howard M.; Ryu, Janice; Parliament, Matthew; Purdy, James A.; Valicenti, Richard K.; Cox, James D.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Report of clinical cancer control outcomes on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9406, a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) dose escalation trial for localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: RTOG 9406 is a Phase I/II multi-institutional dose escalation study of 3D-CRT for men with localized prostate cancer. Patients were registered on five sequential dose levels: 68.4 Gy, 73.8 Gy, 79.2 Gy, 74 Gy, and 78 Gy with 1.8 Gy/day (levels I-III) or 2.0 Gy/day (levels IV and V). Neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NHT) from 2 to 6 months was allowed. Protocol-specific, American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), and Phoenix biochemical failure definitions are reported. Results: Thirty-four institutions enrolled 1,084 patients and 1,051 patients are analyzable. Median follow-up for levels I, II, III, IV, and V was 11.7, 10.4, 11.8, 10.4, and 9.2 years, respectively. Thirty-six percent of patients received NHT. The 5-year overall survival was 90%, 87%, 88%, 89%, and 88% for dose levels I-V, respectively. The 5-year clinical disease-free survival (excluding protocol prostate-specific antigen definition) for levels I-V is 84%, 78%, 81%, 82%, and 82%, respectively. By ASTRO definition, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 57%, 59%, 52%, 64% and 75% (low risk); 46%, 52%, 54%, 56%, and 63% (intermediate risk); and 50%, 34%, 46%, 34%, and 61% (high risk) for levels I-V, respectively. By the Phoenix definition, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 68%, 73%, 67%, 84%, and 80% (low risk); 70%, 62%, 70%, 74%, and 69% (intermediate risk); and 42%, 62%, 68%, 54%, and 67% (high risk) for levels I-V, respectively. Conclusion: Dose-escalated 3D-CRT yields favorable outcomes for localized prostate cancer. This multi-institutional experience allows comparison to other experiences with modern radiation therapy.

  11. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Localization of Recurrent Prostate Cancer After External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Masoom A. Chung, Peter; Sweet, Joan; Toi, Ants; Jhaveri, Kartik; Menard, Cynthia; Warde, Padraig; Trachtenberg, John; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.; Milosevic, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of T2-weighted (T2w) imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate gland in the localization of recurrent prostate cancer in patients with biochemical failure after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: T2-weighted imaging and DCE MRI were performed in 33 patients with suspected relapse after EBRT. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed with a temporal resolution of 95 s. Voxels enhancing at 46 s after injection to a greater degree than the mean signal intensity of the prostate at 618 s were considered malignant. Results from MRI were correlated with biopsies from six regions in the peripheral zone (PZ) (base, mid, and apex). The percentage of biopsy core positive for malignancy from each region was correlated with the maximum diameter of the tumor on DCE MRI with a linear regression model. Results: On a sextant basis, DCE MRI had significantly better sensitivity (72% [21of 29] vs. 38% [11 of 29]), positive predictive value (46% [21 of 46] vs. 24% [11 of 45]) and negative predictive value (95% [144 of 152] vs. 88% [135 of 153] than T2w imaging. Specificities were high for both DCE MRI and T2w imaging (85% [144 of 169] vs. 80% [135 of 169]). There was a linear relationship between tumor diameters on DCE MRI and the percentage of cancer tissue in the corresponding biopsy core (r = 0.9, p < 0.001), with a slope of 1.2. Conclusions: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI performs better than T2w imaging in the detection and localization of prostate cancer in the peripheral zone after EBRT. This may be helpful in the planning of salvage therapy.

  12. Impact of Metformin on Clinical Outcomes among Men with Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Raval, AD; Thakker, D; Vyas, A; Salkini, M; Madhavan, S; Sambamoorthi, U

    2016-01-01

    Background Conflicting evidence exists regarding the beneficial effects of metformin in prostate cancer. Objective To determine the association between metformin and clinical outcomes in prostate cancer using systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods Original articles published in English until third week of July, 2014 were searched in electronic databases (Medline-Ovid, Scopus, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, ProQuest) for studies on metformin use in prostate cancer. The clinical outcomes assessed were: development of biochemical recurrence, metastases or castration-resistant metastatic cancer (CRPC), all-cause and prostate cancer-specific mortality. Meta-analysis was performed to calculate the pooled hazard ratio (pHR) and their 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Heterogeneity between the studies was examined using I2 statistics. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to assess the robustness of findings and publication bias was assessed by the Egger’s regression asymmetry test and contour plot. Results Out of 230 retrieved citations, eight retrospective cohort studies and one nested-case-control study met the inclusion criteria. Metformin use was marginally associated with reduction in the risk of biochemical recurrence (pHR: 0.82, 95% CI: 0.67, 1.01, P-value = 0.06, I2= 25%, 5 studies). Metformin use was not significantly associated with metastases (pHR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.38-1.18, P-value = 0.14, I2 = 74%, 3 studies), all-cause mortality (pHR: 0.86; 95% CI, 0.65, 1.15, P-Value = 0.31, I2: 78%, 5 studies) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (pHR: 1.22, 95% CI: 0.58, 2.56, P-value = 0.60, I2 = 60%, 4 studies). Pooled estimates for all outcomes varied in sensitivity analysis by diabetes status and primary treatment of prostate cancer. Systematic review revealed mixed findings on metformin use and the risk of CRPC. Conclusion Metformin may reduce the risk of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. Given the potential of selection-bias in the observational

  13. Prospective evaluation of quality of life after interstitial brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Caffo, Orazio . E-mail: orazio.caffo@apss.tn.it; Fellin, Gianni; Bolner, Andrea; Coccarelli, Franco; Divan, Claudio; Frisinghelli, Michela; Mussari, Salvatore; Ziglio, Franco; Malossini, Gianni; Tomio, Luigi; Galligioni, Enzo

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: Permanent interstitial brachytherapy (IB) has become an increasingly appealing therapeutic option for localized prostate cancer (LPC) among physicians and patients because it involves short hospitalization and treatment and its postulated low degree of toxicity may reduce its impact on the patients' quality of life (QoL). The aim of this prospective study was to assess the impact of IB on the QoL of patients with LPC. Methods and Materials: A validated self-completed questionnaire was administered to the patients before and after IB and then at yearly intervals. The items allowed the identification of seven subscales exploring physical well-being (PHY), physical autonomy (POW), psychological well-being (PSY), relational life (REL), urinary function (URI), rectal function (REC), and sexual function (SEX). Results: The assessment of the QoL of 147 patients treated between May 2000 and February 2005 revealed no relevant differences in the PHY scale scores 1 month after IB or later, and the same was true of the POW, PSY, and REL scales. Urinary function significantly worsened after IB and returned to pretreatment levels only after 3 years; the impact of the treatment on the URI scale was greater in the patients with good baseline urinary function than in those presenting more urinary symptoms before IB. Rectal and sexual functions were significantly worse only at the post-IB evaluation. Conclusions: The results of the present study confirm that the impact of IB on the patients' QoL is low despite its transient negative effects on some function, and extend existing knowledge concerning QoL after IB.

  14. Dosimetric Impact and Theoretical Clinical Benefits of Fiducial Markers for Dose Escalated Prostate Cancer Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, Isabelle Carrier, Jean-Francois; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Fortin, Bernard; Taussky, Daniel

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of fiducial markers and daily kilovoltage imaging (FM-kV) on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for the rectum and bladder during prostate cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Two different setup scenarios were compared for 20 patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for localized prostate cancer to a total dose of 76 Gy: a traditional setup with planning target volume (PTV) margins associated with skin mark alignment vs. another setup using FM-kV. Various DVH parameters were compared, including Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) dose-volume constraints for the rectum and bladder. Analysis of NTCPs was also performed according to the Lyman model. Results: With the traditional setup, 85% of patients had rectal V70{sub Gy} >25% compared with 45% with FM-kV. Moreover, 30% of patients with traditional setup vs. 5% with FM-kV did not fulfill at least 3 RTOG constraint parameters for the rectum. Mean rectal and bladder dose were 4.7 Gy and 6.7 Gy less, respectively, with FM-kV. The NTCP for the rectum was 11.5% with the traditional setup and 9% with FM-kV. This indicates that with FM-kV, the prescription dose could be increased by 2.1 Gy while keeping the same level of late rectal toxicity as with the traditional setup. Conclusions: Use of FM-kV is an efficient way of lowering the proportion of patients not fulfilling RTOG rectal and bladder dose-volume constraints. The results of the NTCP analysis suggest that the PTV margin reduction allowed by FM-kV should decrease the rate of late rectal toxicities or may allow moderate dose escalation.

  15. Targeted prostate biopsy and MR-guided therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Woodrum, David A; Kawashima, Akira; Gorny, Krzysztof R; Mynderse, Lance A

    2016-05-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer and second-leading cause of death in men. Many patients with clinically organ-confined prostate cancer undergo definitive treatment of the whole gland including radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, and cryosurgery. Active surveillance is a growing alternative option for patients with documented low-volume, low-grade prostate cancer. With recent advances in software and hardware of MRI, multiparametric MRI of the prostate has been shown to improve the accuracy in detecting and characterizing clinically significant prostate cancer. Targeted biopsy is increasingly utilized to improve the yield of MR-detected, clinically significant prostate cancer and to decrease in detection of indolent prostate cancer. MR-guided targeted biopsy techniques include cognitive MR fusion TRUS biopsy, in-bore transrectal targeted biopsy using robotic transrectal device, and in-bore direct MR-guided transperineal biopsy with a software-based transperineal grid template. In addition, advances in MR compatible thermal ablation technology allow accurate focal or regional delivery of optimal thermal energy to the biopsy-proved, MRI-detected tumor, utilizing cryoablation, laser ablation, high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation under MR guidance and real-time or near simultaneous monitoring of the ablation zone. Herein we present a contemporary review of MR-guided targeted biopsy techniques of MR-detected lesions as well as MR-guided focal or regional thermal ablative therapies for localized naïve and recurrent cancerous foci of the prostate. PMID:26907717

  16. Evaluation of clinical margins via simulation of patient setup errors in prostate IMRT treatment plans

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J. J.; Crimaldi, A. J.; Hagan, M.; Moore, J.; Siebers, J. V.

    2007-01-15

    This work evaluates: (i) the size of random and systematic setup errors that can be absorbed by 5 mm clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins in prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT); (ii) agreement between simulation results and published margin recipes; and (iii) whether shifting contours with respect to a static dose distribution accurately predicts dose coverage due to setup errors. In 27 IMRT treatment plans created with 5 mm CTV-to-PTV margins, random setup errors with standard deviations (SDs) of 1.5, 3, 5 and 10 mm were simulated by fluence convolution. Systematic errors with identical SDs were simulated using two methods: (a) shifting the isocenter and recomputing dose (isocenter shift), and (b) shifting patient contours with respect to the static dose distribution (contour shift). Maximum tolerated setup errors were evaluated such that 90% of plans had target coverage equal to the planned PTV coverage. For coverage criteria consistent with published margin formulas, plans with 5 mm margins were found to absorb combined random and systematic SDs{approx_equal}3 mm. Published recipes require margins of 8-10 mm for 3 mm SDs. For the prostate IMRT cases presented here a 5 mm margin would suffice, indicating that published recipes may be pessimistic. We found significant errors in individual plan doses given by the contour shift method. However, dose population plots (DPPs) given by the contour shift method agreed with the isocenter shift method for all structures except the nodal CTV and small bowel. For the nodal CTV, contour shift DPP differences were due to the structure moving outside the patient. Small bowel DPP errors were an artifact of large relative differences at low doses. Estimating individual plan doses by shifting contours with respect to a static dose distribution is not recommended. However, approximating DPPs is acceptable, provided care is taken with structures such as the nodal CTV which lie close

  17. Implementing intensity modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed: Dosimetric study and early clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Riou, Olivier; Laliberté, Benoit; Azria, David; Menkarios, Cathy; Llacer Moscardo, Carmen; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Aillères, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2013-07-01

    Salvage intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to the prostate bed has hardly been studied so far. We present here a feasibility study and early clinical results for 10 patients. These patients were selected on the basis of having either a biochemical relapse or high risk histology after prostatectomy. They were treated using “sliding-window” IMRT to 68 Gy in 34 fractions. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were generated using the same planning computed tomography data set. Dose coverage of planning target volumes (PTVs) and of organs-at-risk (OAR, namely: rectum, bladder, and femoral heads) were compared. Acute toxicity and chronic toxicity were measured using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 scale. IMRT significantly reduces the dose above the prescription dose given to the PTV1 (mean dose: IMRT 67.2 Gy vs 3D-CRT 67.7 Gy (p = 0.0137)), without altering dose coverage for PTV2 (mean dose: IMRT 68.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 68.0 Gy (p = 0.3750)). Doses to OAR were lower with IMRT and differences were statistically significant (mean dose: IMRT 51.4 Gy vs 3D-CRT 56.6 Gy for rectum (p = 0.002), IMRT 45.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 53.1 Gy for bladder (p = 0.002), and IMRT 26.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 28.4 Gy for femoral heads (p = 0.0059)). There was no acute or chronic genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity >1 with a median follow-up of 38 months. IMRT to the prostatic fossa is feasible and reduces dose to OAR, with consequential limited toxicity.

  18. End points of clinical trials in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Giuseppe; Venturino, Antonella; Governato, Ilaria

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To review the definition and performance of the commonly used end points in trials of systemic therapies in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. METHODS: A literature search was undertaken on PubMed database to identify studies meeting established criteria, with the aim of selecting randomized clinical trials and study definition and performance of their end points. The end points were grouped into three categories: overall survival (OS), time-to-event end points, and response end points. A special analysis was performed for secondary end points of the studies which documented a benefit in OS in the experimental arm. Finally, publishes analyses for surrogacy of the included end points were also reported. RESULTS: OS, time-to-event and response end points in 31 selected trials were analyzed. OS was the primary end point in 14 trials, and the secondary end point in 17. A time-to-event end point was the primary end point in 8 studies, and the secondary end point in 22; the most reported time-to-event end points were composite end points, and the events changed among trials. A response end point was the primary end point in 9 studies, in 3 it was prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-related, in 3 pain-related and in 3 mixed. A response end point was the secondary end point in 19 studies: PSA response and radiologic response were the most frequently used secondary end points in 19 and 11 trials, respectively, while pain response was used in 5 studies. CONCLUSION: A homogeneous definition of progression in future trials is mandatory. Among response end points, pain-response and PSA-response appear to be the most reliable. PMID:25332911

  19. Patterns of care and treatment trends for Canadian men with localized low-risk prostate cancer: an analysis of provincial cancer registry data

    PubMed Central

    Tran, K.; Rahal, R.; Fung, S.; Louzado, C.; Porter, G.; Xu, J.; Bryant, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many prostate cancers (pcas) are indolent and, if left untreated, are unlikely to cause death or morbidity in a man’s lifetime. As a result of testing for prostate-specific antigen, more such cases are being identified, leading to concerns about “overdiagnosis” and consequent overtreatment of pca. To mitigate the risks associated with overtreatment (that is, invasive therapies that might cause harm to the patient without tangible benefit), approaches such as active surveillance are now preferred for many men with low-risk localized pca (specifically, T1/2a, prostate-specific antigen ≤ 10 ng/mL, and Gleason score ≤ 6). Here, we report on patterns of care and treatment trends for men with localized low-risk pca. Results The provinces varied substantially with respect to the types of primary treatment received by men with localized low-risk pca. From 2010 to 2013, many men had no record of surgical or radiation treatment within 1 year of diagnosis—a proxy for active surveillance; the proportion ranged from 53.3% in Nova Scotia to 80.8% in New Brunswick. Among men who did receive primary treatment, the use of radical prostatectomy ranged from 12.0% in New Brunswick to 35.9% in Nova Scotia. The use of radiation therapy (external-beam radiation therapy or brachytherapy) ranged from 4.1% in Newfoundland and Labrador to 17.6% in Alberta. Treatment trends over time suggest an increase in the use of active surveillance. The proportion of men with low-risk pca and no record of surgical or radiation treatment rose to 69.9% in 2013 from 46.1% in 2010 for all provinces combined. Conclusions The provinces varied substantially with respect to patterns of care for localized low-risk pca. Treatment trends over time suggest an increasing use of active surveillance. Those findings can further the discussion about the complex care associated with pca and identify opportunities for improvement in clinical practice. PMID:26966405

  20. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC ELASTOGRAPHY OF THE LIVER, SPLEEN, KIDNEYS, AND PROSTATE IN CLINICALLY NOR-MAL BEAGLE DOGS [corrected].

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sunghoon; Lee, Gahyun; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Kim, Hyunwoo; Yu, Dohyeon; Choi, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    Standard ultrasonography is often insensitive for distinguishing normal vs. diseased states for canine abdominal organs. Ultrasonographic elastography is a new technique that is becoming increasingly available and may help to improve sensitivity. This study evaluated the feasibility, repeatability, and reproducibility of strain elastography of the liver, spleen, kidneys, and prostate in healthy dogs and described the elasticity of each organ using strain values and strain ratios. The reproducibility of strain elastography was excellent, and intraobserver repeatability was moderate to excellent. The strain value of each organ was not significantly different among dogs (liver = 143.38 ± 7.41, spleen = 141.04 ± 9.03, left renal cortex = 141.26 ± 7.50, right renal cortex = 145.80 ± 7.79, and prostate = 135.46 ± 5.80), except for the renal medulla (left = 51.19 ± 4.54 and right = 51.93 ± 5.09) (P < 0.05). The strain ratios for the liver, spleen, renal cortex, and prostate were similar with no significant difference (liver = 10.20 ± 1.47, spleen = 8.40 ± 1.53, left renal cortex = 9.62 ± 1.56, right renal cortex = 8.29 ± 1.63, and prostate = 8.20 ± 1.21), except for the renal medulla (left = 3.48 ± 0.68 and right = 2.95 ± 0.63) (P < 0.05). Our results indicated that strain elastography was feasible for estimating tissue stiffness in the canine liver, spleen, kidneys, and prostate. This study provides basic information for strain values and strain ratios for the liver, spleen, kidneys, and prostate in clinically normal dogs. PMID:25619362