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Sample records for clitoral blood flow

  1. [Operative technique: The clitoral transposition].

    PubMed

    Chevrot, A; Lousquy, R; Arfi, A; Haddad, B; Paniel, B J; Touboul, C

    2015-10-01

    Female sexual mutilations result in an important physical and mental suffering. A large number of women have been affected and require a global management, including surgical clitoral transposition. This surgical technique is allowing a rapid improvement of clinical symptoms. In this article, we will describe the indications and operative technique of the clitoral transposition. PMID:25818112

  2. Sexual Response in Women with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Controlled Laboratory Study Measuring Vaginal Blood Flow and Subjective Sexual Arousal.

    PubMed

    Both, Stephanie; Ter Kuile, Moniek; Enzlin, Paul; Dekkers, Olaf; van Dijk, Marieke; Weijenborg, Philomeen

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have indicated that women with diabetes mellitus are at higher risk to develop sexual dysfunctions. In the current study, we hypothesized that lower genital arousal response-as a consequence of diabetes-related damage to nerves and blood vessels-might play a part in these higher prevalence rates. Vaginal blood flow, subjective sexual response, and clitoral sensitivity were compared between women with diabetes and healthy controls, and associations with diabetes complications were investigated. In pre- and postmenopausal women with type 1 diabetes (n = 42) and healthy controls (n = 46), vaginal blood flow was measured as vaginal pulse amplitude (VPA). VPA was assessed at rest, during erotic film viewing, and during vibrotactile clitoral stimulation. Subjective sexual arousal was measured using a questionnaire. Clitoral sensitivity was assessed by a vibration perception test. Data on diabetes complications were obtained from medical records, and neuropathy was assessed by quantitative sensory testing. VPA, subjective sexual arousal, and clitoral sensitivity were not significantly different between women with diabetes and controls. Nevertheless, women with diabetes who had retinopathy showed significantly lower VPA than women without retinopathy, and women with diabetes who had neuropathy showed significantly higher sensation thresholds for vibrotactile clitoral stimulation. The results do not support the hypothesis of a disrupted genital arousal response in women with diabetes. However, the observed associations between retinopathy and vaginal blood flow, and between neuropathy and clitoral sensitivity, suggest that diabetes-related complications might adversely affect the physiological basis of female sexual response. PMID:26054485

  3. Blood flow

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    As the heart pumps, the arteries carry oxygen-rich blood (shown in red) away from the heart and toward the body’s tissues and ... returns to the heart from the lungs, which pumps it throughout the body.

  4. Blood flow

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    As the heart pumps, the arteries carry oxygen-rich blood (shown in red) away from the heart and toward the body's tissues and vital organs. ... brain, liver, kidneys, stomach, and muscles, including the heart muscle itself. At the same time, the veins ...

  5. Mechanics of blood flow.

    PubMed

    Skalak, R; Keller, S R; Secomb, T W

    1981-05-01

    The historical development of the mechanics of blood flow can be traced from ancient times, to Leonardo da Vinci and Leonhard Euler and up to the present times with increasing biological knowledge and mathematical analysis. In the last two decades, quantitative and numerical methods have steadily given more complete and precise understanding. In the arterial system wave propagation computations based on nonlinear one-dimensional modeling have given the best representation of pulse wave propagation. In the veins, the theory of unsteady flow in collapsible tubes has recently been extensively developed. In the last decade, progress has been made in describing the blood flow at junctions, through stenoses, in bends and in capillary blood vessels. The rheological behavior of individual red blood cells has been explored. A working model consists of an elastic membrane filled with viscous fluid. This model forms a basis for understanding the viscous and viscoelastic behavior of blood. PMID:7024641

  6. Tissue blood flow mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    The operating principles of Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging (LDPI) for visualization of the tissue blood perfusion are explained. Using this emerging technology skin perfusion has been investigated in healthy volunteers and in patients with various conditions that affect skin blood flow. LDPI is anticipated to be particularly useful in evaluation of peripheral circulation in diabetics, as an objective tool in irritancy patch testing, assessment of burnt skin and visualization of spot-wise hyperperfusion in breast skin in association with carcinoma.

  7. Modeling blood flow heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    King, R B; Raymond, G M; Bassingthwaighte, J B

    1996-01-01

    It has been known for some time that regional blood flows within an organ are not uniform. Useful measures of heterogeneity of regional blood flows are the standard deviation and coefficient of variation or relative dispersion of the probability density function (PDF) of regional flows obtained from the regional concentrations of tracers that are deposited in proportion to blood flow. When a mathematical model is used to analyze dilution curves after tracer solute administration, for many solutes it is important to account for flow heterogeneity and the wide range of transit times through multiple pathways in parallel. Failure to do so leads to bias in the estimates of volumes of distribution and membrane conductances. Since in practice the number of paths used should be relatively small, the analysis is sensitive to the choice of the individual elements used to approximate the distribution of flows or transit times. Presented here is a method for modeling heterogeneous flow through an organ using a scheme that covers both the high flow and long transit time extremes of the flow distribution. With this method, numerical experiments are performed to determine the errors made in estimating parameters when flow heterogeneity is ignored, in both the absence and presence of noise. The magnitude of the errors in the estimates depends upon the system parameters, the amount of flow heterogeneity present, and whether the shape of the input function is known. In some cases, some parameters may be estimated to within 10% when heterogeneity is ignored (homogeneous model), but errors of 15-20% may result, even when the level of heterogeneity is modest. In repeated trials in the presence of 5% noise, the mean of the estimates was always closer to the true value with the heterogeneous model than when heterogeneity was ignored, but the distributions of the estimates from the homogeneous and heterogeneous models overlapped for some parameters when outflow dilution curves were

  8. Local Control of Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Philip S.

    2011-01-01

    Organ blood flow is determined by perfusion pressure and vasomotor tone in the resistance vessels of the organ. Local factors that regulate vasomotor tone include myogenic and metabolic autoregulation, flow-mediated and conducted responses, and vasoactive substances released from red blood cells. The relative importance of each of these factors…

  9. Endovascular blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khe, A. K.; Cherevko, A. A.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Orlov, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper an endovascular measurement system used for intraoperative cerebral blood flow monitoring is described. The system is based on a Volcano ComboMap Pressure and Flow System extended with analogue-to-digital converter and PC laptop. A series of measurements performed in patients with cerebrovascular pathologies allows us to introduce “velocity-pressure” and “flow rate-energy flow rate” diagrams as important characteristics of the blood flow. The measurement system presented here can be used as an additional instrument in neurosurgery for assessment and monitoring of the operation procedure. Clinical data obtained with the system are used for construction of mathematical models and patient-specific simulations. The monitoring of the blood flow parameters during endovascular interventions was approved by the Ethics Committee at the Meshalkin Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology and included in certain surgical protocols for pre-, intra- and postoperative examinations.

  10. Brain Function and Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassen, Niels A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the use of radioactive isotopes to graphically represent changes in the amount of blood flowing in areas of the human cerebral cortex, reflecting changes in the activity of those areas. Numerous illustrations are included. (Author/MA)

  11. 21 CFR 884.5970 - Clitoral engorgement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clitoral engorgement device. 884.5970 Section 884.5970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... entitled: “Guidance for Industry and FDA Reviewers: Class II Special Controls Guidance Document...

  12. 21 CFR 884.5970 - Clitoral engorgement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Clitoral engorgement device. 884.5970 Section 884.5970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... apply a vacuum to the clitoris. It is intended for use in the treatment of female sexual...

  13. 21 CFR 884.5970 - Clitoral engorgement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clitoral engorgement device. 884.5970 Section 884.5970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... apply a vacuum to the clitoris. It is intended for use in the treatment of female sexual...

  14. 21 CFR 884.5970 - Clitoral engorgement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Clitoral engorgement device. 884.5970 Section 884.5970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... apply a vacuum to the clitoris. It is intended for use in the treatment of female sexual...

  15. 21 CFR 884.5970 - Clitoral engorgement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clitoral engorgement device. 884.5970 Section 884.5970 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... apply a vacuum to the clitoris. It is intended for use in the treatment of female sexual...

  16. Chaotic advection in blood flow.

    PubMed

    Schelin, A B; Károlyi, Gy; de Moura, A P S; Booth, N A; Grebogi, C

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we argue that the effects of irregular chaotic motion of particles transported by blood can play a major role in the development of serious circulatory diseases. Vessel wall irregularities modify the flow field, changing in a nontrivial way the transport and activation of biochemically active particles. We argue that blood particle transport is often chaotic in realistic physiological conditions. We also argue that this chaotic behavior of the flow has crucial consequences for the dynamics of important processes in the blood, such as the activation of platelets which are involved in the thrombus formation. PMID:19658798

  17. Variation in Clitoral Length in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Beatriz; Cabello, Pedro H; Kugelmeier, Tatiana; Pereira, Barbara B; Lopes, Claudia A; Fasano, Daniele M; Andrade, Marcia C; Santos, Joice S; Marinho, Antonio M

    2009-01-01

    Clitoromegaly in the neonatal period is an important morphologic sign that can be useful for sexual determination in aberrant cases. In rhesus monkeys, differentiation of the external genitalia occurs early during gestation (at 55 to 60 d) and is complete by approximately 80 d. Most of the critical steps in genital differentiation in primates occur prenatally. We sought to determine clitoral size in normal rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and possible effects of age and inheritance. Clitoral length was highly variable and had no relationship to fertility. Statistical evaluation revealed no association in the distribution of daughters with and without clitoris between mothers with and without clitoris. However, even when mated with several female monkeys, some male macaques produced primarily daughters without clitoris. PMID:19807967

  18. Regulation of pulpal blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.

    1985-04-01

    The regulation of blood flow of the dental pulp was investigated in dogs and rats anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. Pulpal blood flow was altered by variations of local and systemic hemodynamics. Macrocirculatory blood flow (ml/min/100 g) in the dental pulp was measured with both the /sup 133/Xe washout and the 15-microns radioisotope-labeled microsphere injection methods on the canine teeth of dogs, to provide a comparison of the two methods in the same tooth. Microcirculatory studies were conducted in the rat incisor tooth with microscopic determination of the vascular pattern, RBC velocity, and intravascular volumetric flow distribution. Pulpal resistance vessels have alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors. Activation of alpha-receptors by intra-arterial injection of norepinephrine (NE) caused both a reduction in macrocirculatory Qp in dogs and decreases in arteriolar and venular diameters and intravascular volumetric flow (Qi) in rats. These responses were blocked by the alpha-antagonist PBZ. Activation of beta-receptors by intra-arterial injection of isoproterenal (ISO) caused a paradoxical reduction of Qp in dogs. In rats, ISO caused a transient increase in arteriolar Qi followed by a flow reduction; arteriolar dilation was accompanied by venular constriction. These macrocirculatory and microcirculatory responses to ISO were blocked by the alpha-antagonist propranolol.

  19. [Surgical treatment of clitoral cysts complicating female genital mutilation].

    PubMed

    Diouf, A A; Mbaye, M; Gueye, M; Coly, A N; Moreira, P; Moreau, J C; Diouf, A

    2014-04-01

    We report the surgical management of eight vulvar tumors occurred at the waning of female genital mutilation practiced in childhood. Patients were aged 19 to 38 years. It was essentially excision type 2. Surgical excision of the labia minora with a refund without clitoral plasty gave satisfactory aesthetic and functional results. Histological examination of these tumors showed a single cyst containing keratin without inflammatory reaction. PMID:24440129

  20. Ocular Blood Flow Autoregulation Mechanisms and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xue; Shen, Yu-meng; Jiang, Meng-nan; Lou, Xiang-feng; Shen, Yin

    2015-01-01

    The main function of ocular blood flow is to supply sufficient oxygen and nutrients to the eye. Local blood vessels resistance regulates overall blood distribution to the eye and can vary rapidly over time depending on ocular need. Under normal conditions, the relation between blood flow and perfusion pressure in the eye is autoregulated. Basically, autoregulation is a capacity to maintain a relatively constant level of blood flow in the presence of changes in ocular perfusion pressure and varied metabolic demand. In addition, ocular blood flow dysregulation has been demonstrated as an independent risk factor to many ocular diseases. For instance, ocular perfusion pressure plays key role in the progression of retinopathy such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. In this review, different direct and indirect techniques to measure ocular blood flow and the effect of myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms on ocular blood flow are discussed. Moreover, ocular blood flow regulation in ocular disease will be described. PMID:26576295

  1. Some potential blood flow experiments for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cokelet, G. R.; Meiselman, H. J.; Goldsmith, H. L.

    1979-01-01

    Blood is a colloidal suspension of cells, predominantly erythrocytes, (red cells) in an aqueous solution called plasma. Because the red cells are more dense than the plasma, and because they tend to aggregate, erythrocyte sedimentation can be significant when the shear stresses in flowing blood are small. This behavior, coupled with equipment restrictions, has prevented certain definitive fluid mechanical studies from being performed with blood in ground-based experiments. Among such experiments, which could be satisfactorily performed in a microgravity environment, are the following: (1) studies of blood flow in small tubes, to obtain pressure-flow rate relationships, to determine if increased red cell aggregation can be an aid to blood circulation, and to determine vessel entrance lengths, and (2) studies of blood flow through vessel junctions (bifurcations), to obtain information on cell distribution in downstream vessels of (arterial) bifurcations, and to test flow models of stratified convergent blood flows downstream from (venous) bifurcations.

  2. Blood flow and blood cell interactions and migration in microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosov, Dmitry; Fornleitner, Julia; Gompper, Gerhard

    2011-11-01

    Blood flow in microcirculation plays a fundamental role in a wide range of physiological processes and pathologies in the organism. To understand and, if necessary, manipulate the course of these processes it is essential to investigate blood flow under realistic conditions including deformability of blood cells, their interactions, and behavior in the complex microvascular network which is characteristic for the microcirculation. We employ the Dissipative Particle Dynamics method to model blood as a suspension of deformable cells represented by a viscoelastic spring-network which incorporates appropriate mechanical and rheological cell-membrane properties. Blood flow is investigated in idealized geometries. In particular, migration of blood cells and their distribution in blood flow are studied with respect to various conditions such as hematocrit, flow rate, red blood cell aggregation. Physical mechanisms which govern cell migration in microcirculation and, in particular, margination of white blood cells towards the vessel wall, will be discussed. In addition, we characterize blood flow dynamics and quantify hemodynamic resistance. D.F. acknowledges the Humboldt Foundation for financial support.

  3. Cutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Klemp, P.; Staberg, B.

    1983-12-01

    The disappearance rate of /sup 133/Xe was studied in 20 patients with psoriasis vulgaris, using an epicutaneous labeling technique in involved skin lesions or normal-appearing skin of the proximal extensor site of the forearm. Control experiments were performed in 10 normal subjects. Calculations of the cutaneous blood flow (CBF) in psoriatic skin lesions were performed using a tissue-to-blood partition coefficient for /sup 133/Xe, lambda c,pso, of 1.2 ml/100 g/min. lambda c,pso was estimated after the relative content of water, lipids, and proteins had been analyzed in psoriatic skin biopsies of 6 patients with untreated psoriasis. The mean relative content of water was markedly reduced to 23.5 +/- 1.5% (SEM), and lipids and proteins were markedly increased to 2.5 +/- 0.7% and 74.0 +/- 2.2, respectively, compared to previously published data for normal skin (water 72.5%, lipids 1%, proteins 26.5%). Mean CBF in untreated psoriatic skin was 63.5 +/- 9.0 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than the mean CBF in 10 normal subjects, 6.3 +/- 0.5 ml/100 g/min (p much less than 0.0001). Mean CBF in normal-appearing skin in patients with psoriasis was 11.0 +/- 1.3 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than CBF in normal subjects (p less than 0.0002).

  4. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Duncan, G.C.; Weinman, M.L.; Barr, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured via xenon133 inhalation technique in 23 patients with schizophrenia and 18 age- and sex-matched controls. The mean blood flow to both hemispheres was found to be lower for the patients. The patients and their controls did not differ on interhemispheric differences in blood flow. There were no differences in rCBF between medicated and unmedicated, subchronic and chronic, and paranoid and nonparanoid patients. Hallucinations were associated with reduced blood flow to several postcentral regions.

  5. 21 CFR 870.2120 - Extravascular blood flow probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... blood flow probe. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood flow probe is an extravascular ultrasonic or electromagnetic probe used in conjunction with a blood flowmeter to measure blood flow in...

  6. Multifractality of cerebral blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Latka, Miroslaw; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Latka, Dariusz

    2003-02-01

    Scale invariance, the property relating time series across multiple scales, has provided a new perspective of physiological phenomena and their underlying control systems. The traditional “signal plus noise” paradigm of the engineer was first replaced with a model in which biological time series have a fractal structure in time (Fractal Physiology, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1994). This new paradigm was subsequently shown to be overly restrictive when certain physiological signals were found to be characterized by more than one scaling parameter and therefore to belong to a class of more complex processes known as multifractals (Fractals, Plenum Press, New York, 1988). Here we demonstrate that in addition to heart rate (Nature 399 (1999) 461) and human gait (Phys. Rev. E, submitted for publication), the nonlinear control system for cerebral blood flow (CBF) (Phys. Rev. Lett., submitted for publication; Phys. Rev. E 59 (1999) 3492) is multifractal. We also find that this multifractality is greatly reduced for subjects with “serious” migraine and we present a simple model for the underlying control process to describe this effect.

  7. Vascular structure determines pulmonary blood flow distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlastala, M. P.; Glenny, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    Scientific knowledge develops through the evolution of new concepts. This process is usually driven by new methodologies that provide observations not previously available. Understanding of pulmonary blood flow determinants advanced significantly in the 1960s and is now changing rapidly again, because of increased spatial resolution of regional pulmonary blood flow measurements.

  8. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future. PMID:27124642

  9. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future. PMID:27124642

  10. Impact of Endothelium Roughness on Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sangwoo; Intaglietta, Marcos; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Cell free layer (CFL), a plasma layer bounded by the red blood cell (RBC) core and the endothelium, plays an important physiological role. Its width affects the effective blood viscosity as well as the scavenging and production of nitric oxide (NO). Measurements of the CFL and its spatio-temporal variability are highly uncertain, exhibiting random fluctuations. Yet traditional models of blood flow and NO scavenging treat the CFL’s bounding surfaces as deterministic and smooth. We investigate the effects of the endothelium roughness and uncertain (random) spatial variability on blood flow and estimates of effective blood viscosity. PMID:22300799

  11. Subcutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Klemp, P.

    1985-03-01

    The simultaneously recorded disappearance rates of /sup 133/xe from subcutaneous adipose tissue in the crus were studied in 10 patients with psoriasis vulgaris using atraumatic labeling of the tissue in lesional skin (LS) areas and symmetrical, nonlesional skin (NLS) areas. Control experiments were performed bilaterally in 10 younger, healthy subjects. The subcutaneous washout rate constant was significantly higher in LS, 0.79 +/- 0.05 min-1 x 10(2) compared to the washout rate constant of NLS, 0.56 +/- 0.07 min-1. 10(2), or the washout rate constant in the normal subjects, 0.46 +/- 0.17 min-1 x 10(2). The mean washout rate constant in NLS was 25% higher than the mean washout rate constant in the normal subjects. The difference was, however, not statistically significant. Differences in the washout rate constants might be due to abnormal subcutaneous tissue-to-blood partition (lambda) in the LS--and therefore not reflecting the real differences in the subcutaneous blood flow (SBF). The lambda for /sup 133/Xe was therefore measured--using a double isotope washout method (/sup 133/Xe and (/sup 131/I)antipyrine)--in symmetrical sites of the lateral crus in LS and NLS of 10 patients with psoriasis vulgaris and in 10 legs of normal subjects. In LS the lambda was 4.52 +/- 1.67 ml/g, which was not statistically different from that of NLS, 5.25 +/- 2.19 ml/g, nor from that of normal subcutaneous tissue, 4.98 +/- 1.04 ml/g. Calculations of the SBF using the obtained lambda values gave a significantly higher SBF in LS, 3.57 +/- 0.23 ml/100 g/min, compared to SBF in the NLS, 2.94 +/- 0.37 ml/100 g/min. There was no statistically significant difference between SBF in NLS and SBF in the normal subjects. The increased SBF in LS of psoriatics might be a secondary phenomenon to an increased heat loss in the lesional skin.

  12. Radioisotopic flow scanning for portal blood flow and portal hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Hesdorffer, C.S.; Bezwoda, W.R.; Danilewitz, M.D.; Esser, J.D.; Tobias, M.

    1987-08-01

    The use of a simple, noninvasive, isotope scanning technique for the determination of relative portal blood flow and detection of portal hypertension is described. Using this technique the presence of portal hypertension was demonstrated in seven of nine patients known to have elevated portal venous pressure. By contrast, esophageal varices were demonstrated in only five of these patients, illustrating the potential value of the method. Furthermore, this technique has been adapted to the study of portal blood flow in patients with myeloproliferative disorders with splenomegaly but without disturbances in hepatic architecture. Results demonstrate that the high relative splenic flow resulting from the presence of splenomegaly may in turn be associated with elevated relative portal blood flow and portal hypertension. The theoretic reasons for the development of flow-related portal hypertension and its relationship to splenic blood flow are discussed.

  13. Blood flow and oxygen uptake during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. W.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.; Nadel, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    A model is developed for predicting oxygen uptake, muscle blood flow, and blood chemistry changes under exercise conditions. In this model, the working muscle mass system is analyzed. The conservation of matter principle is applied to the oxygen in a unit mass of working muscle under transient exercise conditions. This principle is used to relate the inflow of oxygen carried with the blood to the outflow carried with blood, the rate of change of oxygen stored in the muscle myoglobin, and the uptake by the muscle. Standard blood chemistry relations are incorporated to evaluate venous levels of oxygen, pH, and carbon dioxide.

  14. CARBOXYHEMOGLOBIN AND BRAIN BLOOD FLOW IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been shown that with increased carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and associated decrease in blood oxygen-carrying capacity, a compensatory increase in brain-blood flow (BBF) develops. he BBF response in humans has been shown to be quite variable. wo experiments were conducted in wh...

  15. Nutrient and nonnutrient renal blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.S.; Passmore, J.C.; Hartupee, D.A.; Baker, C.H. )

    1990-06-01

    The role of prostaglandins in the distribution of total renal blood flow (TRBF) between nutrient and nonnutrient compartments was investigated in anesthetized mongrel dogs. Renal blood flow distribution was assessed by the xenon 133 freeze-dissection technique and by rubidium 86 extraction after ibuprofen treatment. Ibuprofen (13 mg/kg) significantly decreased TRBF by 16.3% +/- 1.2% (mean +/- SEM electromagnetic flow probe; p less than 0.005), but did not alter blood flows to the outer cortex (3.7 vs 4.3 ml/min per gram), the inner cortex (2.6 vs 2.7 ml/min per gram), and the other medulla (1.5 vs 1.5 ml/min per gram), which suggests a decrease in nonnutrient flow. In a separate group of animals the effect of reduced blood flow on the nutrient and nonnutrient components was determined by mechanically reducing renal arterial blood flow by 48%. Unlike the ibuprofen group, nutrient blood flows were proportionally reduced with the mechanical decrease in TRBF in the outer cortex (1.9 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.05), the inner cortex (1.4 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.05), and the outer medulla (0.8 ml/min per gram, p less than 0.01). These results indicate no shift between nutrient and nonnutrient compartments. Nutrient and nonnutrient renal blood flows of the left kidney were also determined by 86Rb extraction. After ibuprofen treatment, nonextracted 86Rb decreased to 12.1% from the control value of 15.6% (p less than 0.05). Mechanical reduction of TRBF did not significantly decrease the proportion of unextracted 86Rb (18.7%).

  16. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.R.; Millar, A.M.; Taylor, T.V.

    1982-05-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with /sup 86/RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory.

  17. Raynaud's disease: reduced hand blood flows with normal blood viscosity.

    PubMed

    McGrath, M A; Peek, R; Penny, R

    1978-04-01

    Hand blood flows and the blood and plasma viscosities were measured in patients with Raynaud's disease in an attempt to identify the mechanism of the episodic vascular insufficiency. Using venous occlusion plethysmography the following observations were made: (1) the hand blood flows were significantly less than in normals at 32 degrees, 27 degrees and 20 degrees C; (2) the percentage decrease in flow with cooling was greater in normals and (3) cooling of one hand from 32 degrees to 27 degrees C caused an abnormal decrease in flow through the contralateral hand. Using a rotational viscometer the blood and plasma viscosities were found to be normal at both high and low shear rates. The percentage increase in the blood viscosity with cooling from 35 degrees to 25 degrees was also normal. These studies demonstrate an increased constrictive response of the cutaneous vasculature of the hand to both local and reflex stimulation, and exclude a rheological abnormality, under conditions similar to those of the present study. PMID:277163

  18. Patient Satisfaction of Surgical Treatment of Clitoral Phimosis and Labial Adhesions Caused by Lichen Sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    King, Michelle; Rieff, Mollie; Krapf, Jill; Goldstein, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis, usually affecting the anogenital skin in women. This chronic inflammation can cause scarring of genitalia including narrowing of the introitus and phimosis of the clitoris. These architectural changes can lead to recurrent tearing during intercourse (vulvar granuloma fissuratum) and decreased clitoral sensation. Surgical correction of vulvar granuloma fissuratum (VGF) and clitoral phimosis can be performed, but there is little data on the patient satisfaction and complications following these surgical procedures. Aim To evaluate patient experience and outcomes in women undergoing surgical correction of scarring caused by anogenital LS. Methods A retrospective chart review of patients at a vulvar disorders clinic was performed to identify women who had undergone surgical correction of clitoral phimosis or lysis of vulvar adhesions for VGF due to LS. Twenty‐eight women were contacted via telephone between 4 and 130 months postoperatively. An eight‐question survey was used to determine patient experience and outcomes. Main Outcome Measures All participants completed an eight‐question survey to evaluate patient satisfaction with the surgery, effects on clitoral sensation, orgasm and pain with intercourse, postoperative symptoms or complications, and the presence of recurrent vulvar scarring. Results Participants reported that they were either very satisfied (44%) or satisfied (40%) with the procedure. Of the women who experienced decreased clitoral sensation prior to surgery, 75% endorsed increased clitoral sensitivity postoperatively. Of the women who had dyspareunia prior to surgery, the majority of women reported having pain‐free sex (33%) or improved but not completely pain‐free sex (58%) after surgery. There were no complications or symptoms made worse by the surgical procedures. Conclusions This study shows high patient satisfaction and low complication risk associated

  19. 21 CFR 870.2120 - Extravascular blood flow probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Extravascular blood flow probe. 870.2120 Section... blood flow probe. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood flow probe is an extravascular ultrasonic or electromagnetic probe used in conjunction with a blood flowmeter to measure blood flow in...

  20. 21 CFR 870.2120 - Extravascular blood flow probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Extravascular blood flow probe. 870.2120 Section... blood flow probe. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood flow probe is an extravascular ultrasonic or electromagnetic probe used in conjunction with a blood flowmeter to measure blood flow in...

  1. 21 CFR 870.2120 - Extravascular blood flow probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Extravascular blood flow probe. 870.2120 Section... blood flow probe. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood flow probe is an extravascular ultrasonic or electromagnetic probe used in conjunction with a blood flowmeter to measure blood flow in...

  2. 21 CFR 870.2120 - Extravascular blood flow probe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Extravascular blood flow probe. 870.2120 Section... blood flow probe. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood flow probe is an extravascular ultrasonic or electromagnetic probe used in conjunction with a blood flowmeter to measure blood flow in...

  3. The Role of Clitoral Anatomy in Female to Male Sex Reassignment Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Controversies on clitoral anatomy and its role in female sexual function still make clitoral reconstructive surgery very challenging. We evaluated the role of clitoral anatomic features in female to male sex reassignment surgery. Material and Methods. The study included 97 female transsexuals, aged from 18 to 41 years, who underwent single stage metoidioplasty between March 2008 and January 2013. The operative technique involved vaginectomy, the release of clitoral ligaments and urethral plate, urethroplasty by combining buccal mucosa graft and genital flaps, and scrotoplasty with insertion of testicle prostheses. Postoperative questionnaire was used to evaluate aesthetic, functional, and sexual outcome. Results. The mean followup was 30 months. The mean length of the neophallus was 7 cm, compared to mean preoperative length of the hypertrophied clitoris of 3.3 cm. Complications occurred in 27.84% of all patients, related mostly to urethroplasty. Voiding while standing was achieved in all cases. None of the patients had problems in sexual arousal, masturbation, or orgasms. Conclusion. Accurate knowledge of the clitoral anatomy, physiology, and neurovascular supply is crucial for a successful outcome of female to male sex reassignment surgery. Our approach appears to ensure overall satisfaction and high quality of sexual life. PMID:24982953

  4. Modeling Blood Flow in the Aorta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Colin J.; Carmichael, Jonathan B.; DeMont, M. Edwin

    1997-01-01

    Presents an exercise to demonstrate two fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics: the Reynolds number and the Principle of Continuity. The exercise demonstrates flow in a major blood vessel, such as the aorta, with and without a stenosis. Students observe the transition from laminar to turbulent flow as well as downstream persistence of turbulence.…

  5. Mesoscale simulation of blood flow in microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2006-11-01

    Computational modeling of blood flow in microvessels (20--500 micron) is a major challenge. Blood in such vessels behaves as a multiphase suspension of deformable particles. Individual red blood cell (RBC), which is highly deformable, must be considered in the model. Multiple cells, often a few thousands in number, must also be considered. We present two dimensional computational simulation of blood flow in 20--300 micron vessels at discharge hematocrit of 10--60 percent taking into consideration the particulate nature of blood and cell deformation. The numerical model is based on the immersed boundary method, and the red blood cells are modeled as liquid capsules. A large RBC population of up to 2500 cells is simulated. Migration of the cells normal to the wall of the vessel and the formation of the cell- free layer are studied. Results on the trajectory and velocity traces of the RBCs are presented. Also presented are the plug flow velocity profile of blood, the apparent viscosity, and the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect. The computational results are in good agreement with the experimental results of Bishop et al (2001, 2002) and Pries et al (1992).

  6. Blood flow structure related to red cell flow: determinant of blood fluidity in narrow microvessels.

    PubMed

    McHedlishvili, G; Maeda, N

    2001-02-01

    The review article deals with phenomena of the blood flow structure (structuring) in narrow microvessels-capillaries and the adjacent arterioles and venules. It is particularly focused on the flow behavior of red blood cells (RBCs), namely, on their specific arrangements of mutual interaction while forming definite patterns of self-organized microvascular flow. The principal features of the blood flow structure in microvessels, including capillaries, include axial RBC flow and parietal plasma layer, velocity profile in larger microvessels, plug (or bolus) flow in narrow capillaries, and deformation and specific behavior of the RBCs in the flow. The actual blood flow structuring in microvessels seems to be a most significant factor in the development of pathological conditions, including arterial hypertension, brain and cardiac infarctions, inflammation, and many others. The blood flow structuring might become a basic concept in determining the blood rheological properties and disorders in the narrow microvessels. No solid theoretical (biorheological) basis of the blood flow structuring in microvessel has been found, but in the future it might become a foundation for a better understanding of the mechanisms of these properties under normal and pathological conditions in the narrowest microvessels 5 to 25 microm large. It is also a topic for further biorheological research directed to find the background of actual physiopathological phenomena in the microcirculation. PMID:11281993

  7. An implantable blood pressure and flow transmitter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, R. D.; Meehan, J. P.; Henriksen, J. K. C.

    1973-01-01

    A miniature totally implantable FM/FM telemetry system has been developed to simultaneously measure blood pressure and blood flow, thus providing an appreciation of the hemodynamics of the circulation to the entire body or to a particular organ. Developed for work with animal subjects, the telemetry system's transmission time is controlled by an RF signal that permits an operating life of several months. Pressure is detected by a miniature intravascular transducer and flow is detected by an extravascular interferometric ultrasonic technique. Both pressure and flow are calibrated prior to implanting. The pressure calibration can be checked after the implanting by cannulation; flow calibration can be verified only at the end of the experiment by determining the voltage output from the implanted sensing system as a function of several measured flow rates. The utility of this device has been established by its use in investigating canine renal circulation during exercise, emotional encounters, administration of drugs, and application of accelerative forces.

  8. Blood flow distribution in cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Zarrinkoob, Laleh; Ambarki, Khalid; Wåhlin, Anders; Birgander, Richard; Eklund, Anders; Malm, Jan

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution phase–contrast magnetic resonance imaging can now assess flow in proximal and distal cerebral arteries. The aim of this study was to describe how total cerebral blood flow (tCBF) is distributed into the vascular tree with regard to age, sex and anatomic variations. Forty-nine healthy young (mean 25 years) and 45 elderly (mean 71 years) individuals were included. Blood flow rate (BFR) in 21 intra- and extracerebral arteries was measured. Total cerebral blood flow was defined as BFR in the internal carotid plus vertebral arteries and mean cerebral perfusion as tCBF/brain volume. Carotid/vertebral distribution was 72%/28% and was not related to age, sex, or brain volume. Total cerebral blood flow (717±123 mL/min) was distributed to each side as follows: middle cerebral artery (MCA), 21% distal MCA, 6% anterior cerebral artery (ACA), 12%, distal ACA, 4% ophthalmic artery, 2% posterior cerebral artery (PCA), 8% and 20% to basilar artery. Deviating distributions were observed in subjects with ‘fetal' PCA. Blood flow rate in cerebral arteries decreased with increasing age (P<0.05) but not in extracerebral arteries. Mean cerebral perfusion was higher in women (women: 61±8; men: 55±6 mL/min/100 mL, P<0.001). The study describes a new method to outline the flow profile of the cerebral vascular tree, including reference values, and should be used for grading the collateral flow system. PMID:25564234

  9. The Role of Neuronal Signaling in Controlling Cerebral Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Carrie T.; Iadecola, Costantino

    2007-01-01

    Well-regulated blood flow within the brain is vital to normal function. The brain's requirement for sufficient blood flow is ensured by a tight link between neural activity and blood flow. The link between regional synaptic activity and regional cerebral blood flow, termed functional hyperemia, is the basis for several modern imaging techniques…

  10. Transcutaneous measurement of volume blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, R. E.; Mcleod, F. D.; Miller, C. W.; Histand, M. B.; Wells, M. K.

    1974-01-01

    Blood flow velocity measurements, using Doppler velocimeter, are described. The ability to measure blood velocity using ultrasound is derived from the Doppler effect; the change in frequency which occurs when sound is reflected or transmitted from a moving target. When ultrasound of the appropriate frequency is transmitted through a moving blood stream, the blood cells act as point scatterers of ultrasonic energy. If this scattered ultrasonic energy is detected, it is found to be shifted in frequency according to the velocity of the blood cells, nu, the frequency of the incident sound, f sub o, the speed of sound in the medium, c, and the angle between the sound beam and the velocity vector, o. The relation describing this effect is known as the Doppler equation. Delta f = 2 f sub o x nu x cos alpha/c. The theoretical and experimental methods are evaluated.

  11. Blood flow characteristics in the aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Mihaiescu, Mihai; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2012-11-01

    The purpose with this study is to investigate the flow characteristics of blood in the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are associated with specific locations in the arterial tree. Considering atherogenesis, it is claimed that the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) along with its temporal and spatial gradients play an important role in the development of the disease. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics, that in turn depends on the geometry as well as the rheological properties of blood. In this numerical work, the time dependent fluid flow during the entire cardiac cycle is fully resolved. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different Red Blood Cell loading. Data obtained through Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging have been used in order to reconstruct geometries of the the aortic arch. Here, three different geometries are studied out of which two display malformations that can be found in patients having the genetic disorder Turner's syndrome. The simulations show a highly complex flow with regions of secondary flow that is enhanced for the diseased aortas. The financial support from the Swedish Research Council (VR) and the Sweden-America Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. UK-414,495, a selective inhibitor of neutral endopeptidase, potentiates pelvic nerve-stimulated increases in female genital blood flow in the anaesthetized rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Wayman, CP; Baxter, D; Turner, L; Van Der Graaf, PH; Naylor, AM

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Female sexual arousal consists of a number of physiological responses resulting from increased genital blood. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), neuropeptide Y and to a lesser extent nitric oxide are neurotransmitters found in the vasculature of the genitalia. Neutral endopeptidase (NEP) modulates the activity of neuropeptides including VIP. The aim of this study was to investigate the control of genital blood flow by VIP and endogenous neuropeptides using a selective NEP inhibitor [UK-414,495, ((R)-2-({1-[(5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl) carbamoyl]cyclopentyl}methyl) valeric acid)]. Experimental approach: Vaginal and clitoral blood flow (VBF and CBF) were monitored using laser Doppler in terminally anaesthetized New Zealand rabbits. Increases in VBF and CBF were induced by either electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve or by i.v. infusion of VIP. Key results: Stimulation of the pelvic nerve increased VBF and CBF, compared with basal flow. Increases were mimicked by infusion of exogenous VIP. UK-414,495 dose-dependently potentiated pelvic nerve-stimulated increases in VBF (EC50= 37 ± 9 nM; 3.6 × IC50 rabbit NEP). Nerve-stimulated increases in VBF and CBF were both enhanced after UK-414,495. UK-414,495 increased the amplitude and duration of VIP-induced increases in VBF. UK-414,495 had no effect on basal VBF or cardiovascular parameters. Conclusions and implications: Inhibition of NEP potentiates pelvic nerve-stimulated increases in genital blood flow. This suggests that the endogenous neurotransmitter mediating genital blood flow is a substrate for NEP (most likely VIP). NEP inhibitors may restore sexual arousal in women adversely affected by female sexual arousal disorder. This article is commented on by Angulo, pp. 48–50 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00693.x PMID:20412068

  13. Blood flow dynamics in the snake spectacle.

    PubMed

    van Doorn, Kevin; Sivak, Jacob G

    2013-11-15

    The eyes of snakes are shielded beneath a layer of transparent integument referred to as the 'reptilian spectacle'. Well adapted to vision by virtue of its optical transparency, it nevertheless retains one characteristic of the integument that would otherwise prove detrimental to vision: its vascularity. Given the potential consequence of spectacle blood vessels on visual clarity, one might expect adaptations to have evolved that mitigate their negative impact. Earlier research demonstrated an adaptation to their spatial layout in only one species to reduce the vessels' density in the region serving the foveal and binocular visual fields. Here, we present a study of spectacle blood flow dynamics and provide evidence of a mechanism to mitigate the spectacle blood vessels' deleterious effect on vision by regulation of blood flow through them. It was found that when snakes are at rest and undisturbed, spectacle vessels undergo cycles of dilation and constriction, such that the majority of the time the vessels are fully constricted, effectively removing them from the visual field. When snakes are presented with a visual threat, spectacle vessels constrict and remain constricted for longer periods than occur during the resting cycles, thus guaranteeing the best possible visual capabilities in times of need. Finally, during the snakes' renewal phase when they are generating a new stratum corneum, the resting cycle is abolished, spectacle vessels remain dilated and blood flow remains strong and continuous. The significance of these findings in terms of the visual capabilities and physiology of snakes is discussed. PMID:24172887

  14. Effects of flow geometry on blood viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Thurston, George B; Henderson, Nancy M

    2006-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of blood are dominated by microstructures formed by red cells. The microstructures are of several types such as irregular aggregates, rouleaux, and layers of aligned cells. The dynamic deformability of the red cells, aggregation tendency, cell concentration, size of confining vessel and rate of flow are determining factors in the microstructure. Viscoelastic properties, viscosity and elasticity, relate to energy loss and storage in flowing blood while relaxation time and Weissenberg number play a role in assessing the importance of the elasticity relative to the viscosity. These effects are shown herein for flow in a large straight cylindrical tube, a small tube, and a porous medium. These cases approximate the geometries of the arterial system: large vessels, small vessels and vessels with many branches and bifurcations. In each case the viscosity, elasticity, relaxation time and Weissenberg number for normal human blood as well as blood with enhanced cell aggregation tendency and diminished cell deformability are given. In the smaller spaces of the microtubes and porous media, the diminished viscosity shows the possible influence of the Fåhraeus-Lindqvist effect and at high shear rates, the viscoelasticity of blood shows dilatancy. This is true for normal, aggregation enhanced and hardened cells. PMID:17148856

  15. Ergot alkaloids decrease rumen epithelial blood flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine if ergot alkaloids affect blood flow to the absorptive surface of the rumen of steers. Steers (n=8 total) were pair-fed alfalfa cubes at 1.5× NEM and received ground endophyte-infected tall fescue seed (E+) or endophyte-free tall fescue seed (E-) via rumen...

  16. Hypovolemic shock, pancreatic blood flow, and pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Robert, J H; Toledano, A E; Toth, L S; Premus, G; Dreiling, D A

    1988-05-01

    Electromagnetic blood flow determinations were carried out on the superior pancreatic duodena (SPDA), the splenic (SA) and the superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries and compared to cardiac output (CO, thermodilution technique) in 12 anesthetized dogs submitted to hypovolemic shock of various duration: 5 dogs underwent a one-hour and 7 a three-hour period of shock. A 50 mm Hg level of mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was maintained throughout hypovolemia. Dogs were then reinfused. Control preshock values were 4.12 l/min for CO, 38.0 ml/min for SPDA, 405.9 ml/min for SA, and 963.6 ml/min for SMA. SPDA, SA and SMA flows expressed as % of CO amounted to 0.9, 9.8 and 23.4% respectively. No significant changes in SPDA and SMA flows were noted within the first hour of shock. However, from the end of the second hour on, both flows differed significantly (P less than 0.01), SMA increasing from -75.6% of its control value at the end of bleeding to -61.0%, and SPDA decreasing from -75.6 to -86.9%. Similar observations were made when respective flows were considered as % of CO. The SA behaved somewhat in an intermediate fashion. This relative spoliation in pancreatic blood supply as hypovolemia proceeds supports an ischemic etiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), which could account for some of the so-called idiopathic cases of AP. PMID:3385221

  17. Local aggregation characteristics of microscale blood flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliviotis, Efstathios; Sherwood, Joseph M.; Dusting, Jonathan; Balabani, Stavroula

    2015-11-01

    Erythrocyte aggregation (EA) is an important aspect of microvascular flows affecting blood flow and viscosity. Microscale blood flows have been studied extensively in recent years using computational and microfluidic based approaches. However, the relationship between the local structural characteristics of blood and the velocity field has not been quantified. We report simultaneous measurements of the local velocity, aggregation and haematocrit distributions of human erythrocytes flowing in a microchannel. EA was induced using Dextran and flows were imaged using brightfield microscopy. Local aggregation characteristics were investigated using statistical and edge-detection image processing techniques while velocity profiles were obtained using PIV algorithms. Aggregation intensity was found to strongly correlate with local variations in velocity in both the central and wall regions of the channel. The edge detection method showed that near the side wall large aggregates are associated with high local velocities and low local shear rates. In the central region large aggregates occurred in regions of low velocity and high erythrocyte concentration. The results demonstrate the combined effect of haematocrit and velocity distributions on local aggregation characteristics.

  18. Modeling of blood flow in arterial trees.

    PubMed

    Anor, Tomer; Grinberg, Leopold; Baek, Hyoungsu; Madsen, Joseph R; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Karniadakis, George E

    2010-01-01

    Advances in computational methods and medical imaging techniques have enabled accurate simulations of subject-specific blood flows at the level of individual blood cell and in complex arterial networks. While in the past, we were limited to simulations with one arterial bifurcation, the current state-of-the-art is simulations of arterial networks consisting of hundreds of arteries. In this paper, we review the advances in methods for vascular flow simulations in large arterial trees. We discuss alternative approaches and validity of various assumptions often made to simplify the modeling. To highlight the similarities and discrepancies of data computed with different models, computationally intensive three-dimensional (3D) and inexpensive one-dimensional (1D) flow simulations in very large arterial networks are employed. Finally, we discuss the possibilities, challenges, and limitations of the computational methods for predicting outcomes of therapeutic interventions for individual patients. PMID:20836052

  19. Dexmedetomidine decreases the oral mucosal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Togami, Kohei; Tada, Hitoshi; Ganzberg, Steven; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    There is an abundance of blood vessels in the oral cavity, and intraoperative bleeding can disrupt operations. There have been some interesting reports about constriction of vessels in the oral cavity, one of which reported that gingival blood flow in cats is controlled by sympathetic α-adrenergic fibres that are involved with vasoconstriction. Dexmedetomidine is a sedative and analgesic agent that acts through the α-2 adrenoceptor, and is expected to have a vasoconstrictive action in the oral cavity. We have focused on the relation between the effects of α-adrenoceptors by dexmedetomidine and vasoconstriction in oral tissues, and assessed the oral mucosal blood flow during sedation with dexmedetomidine. The subjects comprised 13 healthy male volunteers, sedated with dexmedetomidine in a loading dose of 6 μg/kg/h for 10 min and a continuous infusion of 0.7 μg/kg/h for 32 min. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and palatal mucosal blood flow (PMBF) were measured at 0, 5, 10, 12, 22, and 32 min after the start of the infusion. The HR, CO, and PBMF decreased significantly during the infusion even though there were no differences in the SV. The SVR increased significantly but the PMBF decreased significantly. In conclusion, PMBF was reduced by the mediating effect of dexmedetomidine on α-2 adrenoceptors. PMID:23958351

  20. Ocular Blood Flow and Normal Tension Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ning; Wang, Pei; Tang, Li; Liu, Xuyang

    2015-01-01

    Normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is known as a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by progressive retinal ganglion cell death and glaucomatous visual field loss, even though the intraocular pressure (IOP) does not exceed the normal range. The pathophysiology of NTG remains largely undetermined. It is hypothesized that the abnormal ocular blood flow is involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. A number of evidences suggested that the vascular factors played a significant role in the development of NTG. In recent years, the new imaging techniques, fluorescein angiography, color Doppler imaging (CDI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG), have been used to evaluate the ocular blood flow and blood vessels, and the impaired vascular autoregulation was found in patients with NTG. Previous studies showed that NTG was associated with a variety of systemic diseases, including migraine, Alzheimer's disease, primary vascular dysregulation, and Flammer syndrome. The vascular factors were involved in these diseases. The mechanisms underlying the abnormal ocular blood flow in NTG are still not clear, but the risk factors for glaucomatous optic neuropathy likely included oxidative stress, vasospasm, and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26558263

  1. Ocular Blood Flow and Normal Tension Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ning; Wang, Pei; Tang, Li; Liu, Xuyang

    2015-01-01

    Normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is known as a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by progressive retinal ganglion cell death and glaucomatous visual field loss, even though the intraocular pressure (IOP) does not exceed the normal range. The pathophysiology of NTG remains largely undetermined. It is hypothesized that the abnormal ocular blood flow is involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. A number of evidences suggested that the vascular factors played a significant role in the development of NTG. In recent years, the new imaging techniques, fluorescein angiography, color Doppler imaging (CDI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG), have been used to evaluate the ocular blood flow and blood vessels, and the impaired vascular autoregulation was found in patients with NTG. Previous studies showed that NTG was associated with a variety of systemic diseases, including migraine, Alzheimer's disease, primary vascular dysregulation, and Flammer syndrome. The vascular factors were involved in these diseases. The mechanisms underlying the abnormal ocular blood flow in NTG are still not clear, but the risk factors for glaucomatous optic neuropathy likely included oxidative stress, vasospasm, and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26558263

  2. Measurement of Liver Blood Flow: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Stansby, G. P.; Hobbs, K. E. F.; Hawkes, D. J.; Colchester, A. C. F.

    1991-01-01

    The study of hepatic haemodynamics is of importance in understanding both hepatic physiology and disease processes as well as assessing the effects of portosystemic shunting and liver transplantation. The liver has the most complicated circulation of any organ and many physiological and pathological processes can affect it1,2. This review surveys the methods available for assessing liver blood flow, examines the different parameters being measured and outlines problems of applicability and interpretation for each technique. The classification of these techniques is to some extent arbitrary and several so called “different” methods may share certain common principles. The methods reviewed have been classified into two groups (Table 1): those primarily reflecting flow through discrete vessels or to the whole organ and those used to assess local microcirculatory blood flow. All techniques have their advantages and disadvantages and in some situations a combination may provide the most information. In addition, because of the many factors affecting liver blood flow and sinusoidal perfusion, readings in a single subject may vary depending on positioning, recent food intake, anxiety, anaesthesia and drug therapy. This must be borne in mind if different studies are to be meaningfully compared. PMID:1931785

  3. Caffeine reduces myocardial blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed

    Higgins, John P; Babu, Kavita M

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine consumption has been receiving increased interest from both the medical and lay press, especially given the increased amounts now available in energy products. Acute ingestion of caffeine usually increases cardiac work; however, caffeine impairs the expected proportional increase in myocardial blood flow to match this increased work of the heart, most notably during exercise. This appears to be mainly due to caffeine's effect on blocking adenosine-induced vasodilatation in the coronary arteries in normal healthy subjects. This review summarizes the available medical literature specifically relating to pure caffeine tablet ingestion and reduced exercise coronary blood flow, and suggests possible mechanisms. Further studies are needed to evaluate this effect for other common caffeine-delivery systems, including coffee, energy beverages, and energy gels, which are often used for exercise performance enhancement, especially in teenagers and young athletes. PMID:23764265

  4. Deterministic Aperiodic Sickle Cell Blood Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsaves, Louis; Harris, Wesley

    2013-11-01

    In this paper sickle cell blood flow in the capillaries is modeled as a hydrodynamical system. The hydrodynamical system consists of the axisymmetric unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a set of constitutive equations for oxygen transport. Blood cell deformation is not considered in this paper. The hydrodynamical system is reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations that are then transformed into a system of three autonomous non-linear ordinary differential equations and a set of algebraic equations. We examine the hydrodynamical system to discern stable/unstable, periodic/nonperiodic, reversible/irreversible properties of the system. The properties of the solutions are driven in large part by the coefficients of the governing system of equations. These coefficients depend on the physiological properties of the sickle cell blood. The chaotic nature of the onset of crisis in sickle cell patients is identified. Research Assistant.

  5. Myocardial blood flow: Roentgen videodensitometry techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. C.; Robb, R. A.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The current status of roentgen videodensitometric techniques that provide an objective assessment of blood flow at selected sites within the coronary circulation were described. Roentgen videodensitometry employs conventional radiopaque indicators, radiological equipment and coronary angiographic techniques. Roentgen videodensitometry techniques developed in the laboratory during the past nine years, and for the past three years were applied to analysis of angiograms in the clinical cardiac catheterization laboratory.

  6. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  7. Blood flow dynamics in heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Naylor, H. L.; Hogeman, C. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise intolerance in heart failure (HF) may be due to inadequate vasodilation, augmented vasoconstriction, and/or altered muscle metabolic responses that lead to fatigue. METHODS AND RESULTS: Vascular and metabolic responses to rhythmic forearm exercise were tested in 9 HF patients and 9 control subjects (CTL) during 2 protocols designed to examine the effect of HF on the time course of oxygen delivery versus uptake (protocol 1) and on vasoconstriction during exercise with 50 mm Hg pressure about the forearm to evoke a metaboreflex (protocol 2). In protocol 1, venous lactate and H+ were greater at 4 minutes of exercise in HF versus CTL (P<0.05) despite similar blood flow and oxygen uptake responses. In protocol 2, mean arterial pressure increased similarly in each group during ischemic exercise. In CTL, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were similar at the end of ischemic and ambient exercise. In HF, forearm blood flow and vascular conductance were reduced during ischemic exercise compared with the ambient trial. CONCLUSIONS: Intrinsic differences in skeletal muscle metabolism, not vasodilatory dynamics, must account for the augmented glycolytic metabolic responses to moderate-intensity exercise in class II and III HF. The inability to increase forearm vascular conductance during ischemic handgrip exercise, despite a normal pressor response, suggests that enhanced vasoconstriction of strenuously exercising skeletal muscle contributes to exertional fatigue in HF.

  8. Gender Differences in Ocular Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Schmidl, Doreen; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina

    2015-01-01

    Gender medicine has been a major focus of research in recent years. The present review focuses on gender differences in the epidemiology of the most frequent ocular diseases that have been found to be associated with impaired ocular blood flow, such as age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. Data have accumulated indicating that hormones have an important role in these diseases, since there are major differences in the prevalence and incidence between men and pre- and post-menopausal women. Whether this is related to vascular factors is, however, not entirely clear. Interestingly, the current knowledge about differences in ocular vascular parameters between men and women is sparse. Although little data is available, estrogen, progesterone and testosterone are most likely important regulators of blood flow in the retina and choroid, because they are key regulators of vascular tone in other organs. Estrogen seems to play a protective role since it decreases vascular resistance in large ocular vessels. Some studies indicate that hormone therapy is beneficial for ocular vascular disease in post-menopausal women. This evidence is, however, not sufficient to give any recommendation. Generally, remarkably few data are available on the role of sex hormones on ocular blood flow regulation, a topic that requires more attention in the future. PMID:24892919

  9. Restoring Blood Flow Beats Exercise for Poor Leg Circulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_158683.html Restoring Blood Flow Beats Exercise for Poor Leg Circulation Opening vessels could prevent ... restore blood flow may have greater benefits than exercise, preliminary research suggests. People with peripheral artery disease ( ...

  10. Microconfined flow behavior of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; D'Apolito, Rosa; Cassinese, Antonio; Guido, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) perform essential functions in human body, such as gas exchange between blood and tissues, thanks to their ability to deform and flow in the microvascular network. The high RBC deformability is mainly due to the viscoelastic properties of the cell membrane. Since an impaired RBC deformability could be found in some diseases, such as malaria, sickle cell anemia, diabetes and hereditary disorders, there is the need to provide further insight into measurement of RBC deformability in a physiologically relevant flow field. Here, RBCs deformability has been studied in terms of the minimum apparent plasma-layer thickness by using high-speed video microscopy of RBCs flowing in cylindrical glass capillaries. An in vitro systematic microfluidic investigation of RBCs in micro-confined conditions has been performed, resulting in the determination of the RBCs time recovery constant, RBC volume and surface area and RBC membrane shear elastic modulus and surface viscosity. It has been noticed that the deformability of RBCs induces cells aggregation during flow in microcapillaries, allowing the formation of clusters of cells. Overall, our results provide a novel technique to estimate RBC deformability and also RBCs collective behavior, which can be used for the analysis of pathological RBCs, for which reliable quantitative methods are still lacking. PMID:26071649

  11. Gender differences in regional cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, R.E.; Gur, R.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Gender differences have been noted in neurobehavioral studies. The 133xenon inhalation method for measuring regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) can contribute to the understanding of the neural basis of gender differences in brain function. Few studies have examined gender differences in rCBF. In studies of normal subjects, women have higher rates of CBF than men, and this is related to age. Usually by the sixth decade men and women have similar flow rates. Fewer studies on rCBF in schizophrenia have examined sex differences. The pattern of higher flows for females maintains, but its correlates with gender differences in clinical as well as other parameters of brain function remain to be examined.

  12. Foetal placental blood flow in the lamb

    PubMed Central

    Faber, J. Job; Green, Thomas J.

    1972-01-01

    1. Fifteen sheep foetuses of 1·5-5·2 kg body weight were prepared with indwelling arterial and venous catheters for experimentation one to six days later. 2. Unanaesthetized foetuses were found to have mean arterial and central venous blood pressures of 40 ± 1·5 (S.E. of mean) and 2·0 ± 0·3 (S.E. of mean) mm Hg respectively, compared to intra-uterine pressure. Intra-uterine pressure was 16 ± 0·8 (S.E. of mean) mm Hg with respect to atmospheric pressure at mid-uterine level. 3. Mean placental blood flow of the foetuses was 199 ± 20 (S.E. of mean) ml./(min.kg body wt.). Mean cardiac output in eleven of the foetuses was 658 ± 102 (S.E. of mean) ml./(min.kg). 4. Mean foetal and maternal colloid osmotic pressures were 17·5 ± 0·7 (S.E. of mean) and 20·5 ± 0·6 (S.E. of mean) mm Hg respectively at 38° C. 5. Intravenous infusions into six ewes of 1·8 mole of mannitol and 0·4 mole of NaCl resulted in significant increases in foetal plasma osmolarity, sodium, potassium, and haemoglobin concentrations, without detectable transfer of mannitol to the foetal circulation. 6. In the sheep placenta there is osmotic and hydrostatic equilibration of water. As a consequence, there should be an interaction between foetal placental blood flow and foetal water exchange with the maternal circulation. It was concluded that this interaction tends to stabilize foetal placental blood flow. PMID:5039279

  13. Unsteady Flow in Stenotic Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayz, Vitaliy L.; Devi Williamson, Shobha; Berger, Stanley A.; Saloner, David

    2003-11-01

    Recent studies show that many heart attacks and strokes occur from sudden rupture of partially occluding atherosclerotic plaque rather than total vessel occlusion. Our goal is to understand how the mechanical forces induced by blood flow on specific plaque deposits makes them vulnerable to rupture. Models of severely stenotic carotid bifurcations are created from MR images and grids generated for the flow domains. The three-dimensional, unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in finite-volume form are solved numerically using physiological boundary conditions. During systole a high velocity jet forms at the stenotic throat in one of the branches, and a long recirculation zone is observed downstream of the plaque. During diastole the flow is more stagnant. The flow is highly three-dimensional and unsteady with chaotic streamlines. Whereas flow in healthy arteries is laminar, irregular geometries and sharp changes in vessel diameter of a severely stenotic artery significantly disrupt the flow, with consequences for shear and normal wall stresses at the wall, and important implications for plaque stability. Supported by NIH Grant HL61823

  14. Regional cerebral blood flow in childhood headache

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, E.S.; Stump, D.A.

    1989-06-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 16 cranial regions in 23 children and adolescents with frequent headaches using the non-invasive Xenon-133 inhalation technique. Blood flow response to 5% carbon dioxide (CO2) was also determined in 21 patients, while response to 50% oxygen was measured in the two patients with hemoglobinopathy. Included were 10 patients with a clinical diagnosis of migraine, 4 with musculoskeletal headaches, and 3 with features of both types. Also studied were 2 patients with primary thrombocythemia, 2 patients with hemoglobinopathy and headaches, 1 patient with polycythemia, and 1 with headaches following trauma. With two exceptions, rCBF determinations were done during an asymptomatic period. Baseline rCBF values tended to be higher in these young patients than in young adults done in our laboratory. Localized reduction in the expected blood flow surge after CO2 inhalation, most often noted posteriorly, was seen in 8 of the 13 vascular headaches, but in none of the musculoskeletal headache group. Both patients with primary thrombocythemia had normal baseline flow values and altered responsiveness to CO2 similar to that seen in migraineurs; thus, the frequently reported headache and transient neurologic signs with primary thrombocythemia are probably not due to microvascular obstruction as previously suggested. These data support the concept of pediatric migraine as a disorder of vasomotor function and also add to our knowledge of normal rCBF values in younger patients. Demonstration of altered vasomotor reactivity to CO2 could prove helpful in children whose headache is atypical.

  15. Renal pericytes: regulators of medullary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy-Lydon, T M; Crawford, C; Wildman, S S P; Peppiatt-Wildman, C M

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of medullary blood flow (MBF) is essential in maintaining normal kidney function. Blood flow to the medulla is supplied by the descending vasa recta (DVR), which arise from the efferent arterioles of juxtamedullary glomeruli. DVR are composed of a continuous endothelium, intercalated with smooth muscle-like cells called pericytes. Pericytes have been shown to alter the diameter of isolated and in situ DVR in response to vasoactive stimuli that are transmitted via a network of autocrine and paracrine signalling pathways. Vasoactive stimuli can be released by neighbouring tubular epithelial, endothelial, red blood cells and neuronal cells in response to changes in NaCl transport and oxygen tension. The experimentally described sensitivity of pericytes to these stimuli strongly suggests their leading role in the phenomenon of MBF autoregulation. Because the debate on autoregulation of MBF fervently continues, we discuss the evidence favouring a physiological role for pericytes in the regulation of MBF and describe their potential role in tubulo-vascular cross-talk in this region of the kidney. Our review also considers current methods used to explore pericyte activity and function in the renal medulla. PMID:23126245

  16. Integrative regulation of human brain blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Christopher K; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Fisher, Joseph A; Ainslie, Philip N

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we review mechanisms regulating cerebral blood flow (CBF), with specific focus on humans. We revisit important concepts from the older literature and describe the interaction of various mechanisms of cerebrovascular control. We amalgamate this broad scope of information into a brief review, rather than detailing any one mechanism or area of research. The relationship between regulatory mechanisms is emphasized, but the following three broad categories of control are explicated: (1) the effect of blood gases and neuronal metabolism on CBF; (2) buffering of CBF with changes in blood pressure, termed cerebral autoregulation; and (3) the role of the autonomic nervous system in CBF regulation. With respect to these control mechanisms, we provide evidence against several canonized paradigms of CBF control. Specifically, we corroborate the following four key theses: (1) that cerebral autoregulation does not maintain constant perfusion through a mean arterial pressure range of 60–150 mmHg; (2) that there is important stimulatory synergism and regulatory interdependence of arterial blood gases and blood pressure on CBF regulation; (3) that cerebral autoregulation and cerebrovascular sensitivity to changes in arterial blood gases are not modulated solely at the pial arterioles; and (4) that neurogenic control of the cerebral vasculature is an important player in autoregulatory function and, crucially, acts to buffer surges in perfusion pressure. Finally, we summarize the state of our knowledge with respect to these areas, outline important gaps in the literature and suggest avenues for future research. PMID:24396059

  17. Integrative regulation of human brain blood flow.

    PubMed

    Willie, Christopher K; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Fisher, Joseph A; Ainslie, Philip N

    2014-03-01

    Herein, we review mechanisms regulating cerebral blood flow (CBF), with specific focus on humans. We revisit important concepts from the older literature and describe the interaction of various mechanisms of cerebrovascular control. We amalgamate this broad scope of information into a brief review, rather than detailing any one mechanism or area of research. The relationship between regulatory mechanisms is emphasized, but the following three broad categories of control are explicated: (1) the effect of blood gases and neuronal metabolism on CBF; (2) buffering of CBF with changes in blood pressure, termed cerebral autoregulation; and (3) the role of the autonomic nervous system in CBF regulation. With respect to these control mechanisms, we provide evidence against several canonized paradigms of CBF control. Specifically, we corroborate the following four key theses: (1) that cerebral autoregulation does not maintain constant perfusion through a mean arterial pressure range of 60-150 mmHg; (2) that there is important stimulatory synergism and regulatory interdependence of arterial blood gases and blood pressure on CBF regulation; (3) that cerebral autoregulation and cerebrovascular sensitivity to changes in arterial blood gases are not modulated solely at the pial arterioles; and (4) that neurogenic control of the cerebral vasculature is an important player in autoregulatory function and, crucially, acts to buffer surges in perfusion pressure. Finally, we summarize the state of our knowledge with respect to these areas, outline important gaps in the literature and suggest avenues for future research. PMID:24396059

  18. Labia Minora, Labia Majora, and Clitoral Hood Alteration: Experience-Based Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, John G

    2016-01-01

    Aesthetic alteration of the genitalia is increasingly sought by women unhappy with the size, shape, and appearance of their vulva. Although the labia minora are usually the focus of concern, the entire anatomic region--minora, labia majora, clitoral hood, perineum, and mons pubis--should be evaluated in a preoperative assessment of women seeking labiaplasty. Labiaplasty is associated with high patient satisfaction and low complication rates. The three basic labia minora reduction techniques--edge excision, wedge excision, and central deepithelialization--as well as their advantages and disadvantages are discussed to assist the surgeon in tailoring technique selection to individual genital anatomy and aesthetic desires. We present key points of the preoperative anatomic evaluation, technique selection, operative risks, perioperative care, and potential complications for labia minora, labia majora, and clitoral hood alterations, based on a large operative experience. Labiaplasty competency should be part of the skill set of all plastic surgeons. PMID:26499942

  19. Proliferative and nonproliferative lesions of the rat and mouse mammary, Zymbal's, preputial, and clitoral glands.

    PubMed

    Rudmann, Daniel; Cardiff, Robert; Chouinard, Luc; Goodman, Dawn; Küttler, Karin; Marxfeld, Heike; Molinolo, Alfredo; Treumann, Silke; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko

    2012-08-01

    The mammary gland of laboratory rodents is an important organ for the evaluation of effects of xenobiotics, especially those that perturb hormonal homeostasis or are potentially carcinogenic. Mammary gland cancer is a leading cause of human mortality and morbidity worldwide and is a subject of major research efforts utilizing rodent models. Zymbal's, preputial, and clitoral glands are standard tissues that are evaluated in animal models that enable human risk assessment of xenobiotics. A widely accepted and utilized international harmonization of nomenclature for mammary, Zymbal's, preputial, and clitoral gland lesions in laboratory animals will improve diagnostic alignment among regulatory and scientific research organizations and enrich international exchanges of information among toxicologists and pathologists. PMID:22949413

  20. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cohan, S.L.; Mun, S.K.; Petite, J.; Correia, J.; Tavelra Da Silva, A.T.; Waldhorn, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage.

  1. Thermoregulatory control of finger blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, C. B.; Roberts, M. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1975-01-01

    In the present experiment, exercise was used to vary internal temperature and ambient air heat control was used to vary skin temperature. Finger temperature was fixed at about 35.7 C. Esophageal temperature was measured with a thermocouple at the level of the left atrium, and mean skin temperature was calculated from a weighted mean of thermocouple temperatures at different skin sites. Finger blood flow was measured by electrocapacitance plethysmography. An equation in these quantities is given which accounts for the data garnered.

  2. Effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, F.M.; Mayhan, W.G.; Williams, J.K.; Heistad, D.D. )

    1988-02-01

    The goal of this study was to examine effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus. The authors used microspheres to measure blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum in anesthetized dogs and rabbits. A critical assumption of the microsphere method is that microspheres do not pass through arteriovenous shunts. Blood flow values obtained with simultaneous injection of 15- and 50-{mu}m microspheres were similar, which suggest that shunting of 15-{mu}m microspheres was minimal. Blood flow to choroid plexus under control conditions was 287 {plus minus} 26 (means {plus minus} SE) ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 100 g{sup {minus}1} in dogs and 385 {plus minus} 73 ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} 100 g{sup {minus}1} in rabbits. Consecutive measurements under control conditions indicated that values for blood flow are reproducible. Adenosine did not alter blood flow to cerebrum but increased blood flow to choroid plexus two- to threefold in dogs and rabbits. Norepinephrine and phenylephrine did not affect blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum but decreased blood flow to choroid plexus by {approx} 50%. The authors suggest that (1) the microsphere method provides reproducible valid measurements of blood flow to the choroid plexus in dogs and rabbits and (2) vasoactive stimuli may have profoundly different effects on blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum.

  3. Heat transfer analysis for peripheral blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Hattori, Hideharu; Sato, Nobuhiko; Ichige, Yukiko; Kiguchi, Masashi

    2009-06-01

    Some disorders such as circulatory disease and metabolic abnormality cause many problems to peripheral blood flow condition. Therefore, frequent measurement of the blood flow condition is bound to contribute to precaution against those disorders and to control of conditions of the diseases. We propose a convenient means of blood flow volume measurement at peripheral part, such as fingertips. Principle of this measurement is based on heat transfer characteristics of peripheral part containing the blood flow. Transition response analysis of skin surface temperature has provided measurement model of the peripheral blood flow volume. We developed the blood flow measurement system based on that model and evaluated it by using artificial finger under various temperature conditions of ambience and internal fluid. The evaluation results indicated that proposed method could estimate the volume of the fluid regardless of temperature condition of them. Finally we applied our system to real finger testing and have obtained results correlated well with laser Doppler blood flow meter values.

  4. Blood-Flow Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingxia; Cheng, Haiying; Shen, Qiang; Kim, Moon; Thule, Peter M; Olson, Darin E; Pardue, Machelle T; Duong, Timothy Q

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate quantitative basal blood flow, hypercapnia- and hyperoxia-induced blood-flow changes in the retinas of the Royal-College-of-Surgeons (RCS) rats with spontaneous retinal degeneration and to compare with those of normal rat retinas. Methods Experiments were performed on male RCS rats at post-natal day P90 (n=4), P220 (n=5) and age-matched controls at P90 (n=7) and P220 (n=6). Hyperoxic (100% O2) and hypercapnic (5% CO2, 21% O2, balance N2) challenges were used to modulate blood flow. Quantitative baseline blood flow, hypercapnia- and hyperoxia-induced blood-flow changes in the retinas were imaged using continuous arterial-spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging at 90×90×1500 μm. Results In the normal rat retinas, basal blood flow was 5.5ml/gram/min, significantly higher than those reported in the brain (∼1ml/gram/min). Hyperoxia decreased blood flow due to vasoconstriction and hypercapnia increased blood flow due to vasodilation in the normal retinas. In the RCS rat retinas, basal blood flow was diminished significantly (P<0.05). Interestingly, absolute hyperoxia- and hypercapnia-induced blood-flow changes in the RCS retinas were not statistically different from those in the normal retinas (P>0.05). However, percent changes in blood-flow were significantly larger than in normal retinas due to lower basal blood flow. Conclusion Retinal degeneration markedly reduces basal blood-flow but does not appear to impair vascular reactivity. These data also suggest caution when interpreting the relative stimulus-evoked functional MRI changes in diseased states where basal parameters are significantly perturbed. Quantitative blood-flow MRI may serve as a valuable tool to study the retina without depth limitation. PMID:18952917

  5. Cerebral blood flow tomography with xenon-133

    SciTech Connect

    Lassen, N.A.

    1985-10-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) can be measured tomographically by inhalation of Xenon-/sup 133/. The calculation is based on taking a sequence of tomograms during the wash-in and wash-out phase of the tracer. Due to the dynamic nature of the process, a highly sensitive and fast moving single photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT) is required. Two brain-dedicated SPECT systems designed for this purpose are mentioned, and the method is described with special reference to the limitations inherent in the soft energy of the 133Xe primary photons. CBF tomography can be used for a multitude of clinical and investigative purposes. This article discusses in particular its use for the selection of patients with carotid occlusion for extracranial/intracranial bypass surgery, for detection of severe arterial spasm after aneurysm bleeding, and for detection of low flow areas during severe migraine attacks. The use of other tracers for CBF tomography using SPECT is summarized with emphasis on the /sup 99m/Tc chelates that freely pass the intact blood-brain barrier. The highly sensitive brain-dedicated SPECT systems described are a prerequisite for achieving high resolution tomograms with such tracers.

  6. Modified Beer-Lambert law for blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Wesley B.; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Busch, David R.; Mesquita, Rickson C.; Greenberg, Joel H.; Yodh, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    We develop and validate a Modified Beer-Lambert law for blood flow based on diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements. The new formulation enables blood flow monitoring from temporal intensity autocorrelation function data taken at single or multiple delay-times. Consequentially, the speed of the optical blood flow measurement can be substantially increased. The scheme facilitates blood flow monitoring of highly scattering tissues in geometries wherein light propagation is diffusive or non-diffusive, and it is particularly well-suited for utilization with pressure measurement paradigms that employ differential flow signals to reduce contributions of superficial tissues. PMID:25426330

  7. Modified Beer-Lambert law for blood flow.

    PubMed

    Baker, Wesley B; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B; Busch, David R; Mesquita, Rickson C; Greenberg, Joel H; Yodh, A G

    2014-11-01

    We develop and validate a Modified Beer-Lambert law for blood flow based on diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements. The new formulation enables blood flow monitoring from temporal intensity autocorrelation function data taken at single or multiple delay-times. Consequentially, the speed of the optical blood flow measurement can be substantially increased. The scheme facilitates blood flow monitoring of highly scattering tissues in geometries wherein light propagation is diffusive or non-diffusive, and it is particularly well-suited for utilization with pressure measurement paradigms that employ differential flow signals to reduce contributions of superficial tissues. PMID:25426330

  8. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Fluorescently Labeled Red Blood Cells1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Tess E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Blood flow is a useful indicator of the metabolic state of the retina. However, accurate measurement of retinal blood flow is difficult to achieve in practice. Most existing optical techniques used for measuring blood flow require complex assumptions and calculations. We describe here a simple and direct method for calculating absolute blood flow in vessels of all sizes in the rat retina. The method relies on ultrafast confocal line scans to track the passage of fluorescently labeled red blood cells (fRBCs). The accuracy of the blood flow measurements was verified by (1) comparing blood flow calculated independently using either flux or velocity combined with diameter measurements, (2) measuring total retinal blood flow in arterioles and venules, (3) measuring blood flow at vessel branch points, and (4) measuring changes in blood flow in response to hyperoxic and hypercapnic challenge. Confocal line scans oriented parallel and diagonal to vessels were used to compute fRBC velocity and to examine velocity profiles across the width of vessels. We demonstrate that these methods provide accurate measures of absolute blood flow and velocity in retinal vessels of all sizes. PMID:26082942

  9. Topical menthol increases cutaneous blood flow.

    PubMed

    Craighead, Daniel H; Alexander, Lacy M

    2016-09-01

    Menthol, the active ingredient in several topically applied analgesics, activates transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) receptors on sensory nerves and on the vasculature inducing a cooling sensation on the skin. Ilex paraguariensis is also a common ingredient in topical analgesics that has potential vasoactive properties and may alter the mechanisms of action of menthol. We sought to characterize the microvascular effects of topical menthol and ilex application and to determine the mechanism(s) through which these compounds may independently and combined alter cutaneous blood flow. We hypothesized that menthol would induce vasoconstriction and that ilex would not alter skin blood flow (SkBF). Three separate protocols were conducted to examine menthol and ilex-mediated changes in SkBF. In protocol 1, placebo, 4% menthol, 0.7% ilex, and combination menthol+ilex gels were applied separately to the skin and red cell flux was continuously measured utilizing laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). In protocol 2, seven concentrations of menthol gel (0.04%, 0.4%, 1%, 2%, 4%, 7%, 8%) were applied to the skin to model the dose-response curve. In protocol 3, placebo, menthol, ilex, and menthol+ilex gels were applied to skin under local thermal control (34°C) both with and without sensory nerve blockage (topical lidocaine 4%). Post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) and local heating (42°C) protocols were conducted to determine the relative contribution of endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs)/sensory nerves and nitric oxide (NO), respectively. Red cell flux was normalized to mean arterial pressure expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC: flux·mmHg(-1)) in all protocols. Topical menthol application increased SkBF compared to placebo (3.41±0.33 vs 1.1±0.19CVC: p<0.001). During the dose-response, SkBF increased with increasing doses of menthol (main effect, p<0.05) with an ED50 of 1.0%. Similarly, SkBF was increased after menthol

  10. Laser Speckle Imaging of Cerebral Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qingming; Jiang, Chao; Li, Pengcheng; Cheng, Haiying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Zheng; Tuchin, Valery V.

    Monitoring the spatio-temporal characteristics of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is crucial for studying the normal and pathophysiologic conditions of brain metabolism. By illuminating the cortex with laser light and imaging the resulting speckle pattern, relative CBF images with tens of microns spatial and millisecond temporal resolution can be obtained. In this chapter, a laser speckle imaging (LSI) method for monitoring dynamic, high-resolution CBF is introduced. To improve the spatial resolution of current LSI, a modified LSI method is proposed. To accelerate the speed of data processing, three LSI data processing frameworks based on graphics processing unit (GPU), digital signal processor (DSP), and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) are also presented. Applications for detecting the changes in local CBF induced by sensory stimulation and thermal stimulation, the influence of a chemical agent on CBF, and the influence of acute hyperglycemia following cortical spreading depression on CBF are given.

  11. Cerebral blood flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Mamo, H.L.; Meric, P.C.; Ponsin, J.C.; Rey, A.C.; Luft, A.G.; Seylaz, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    A xenon-133 method was used to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) before and after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) removal in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Preliminary results suggested that shunting should be performed on patients whose CBF increased after CSF removal. There was a significant increase in CBF in patients with NPH, which was confirmed by the favorable outcome of 88% of patients shunted. The majority of patients with senile and presenile dementia showed a decrease or no change in CBF after CSF removal. It is suggested that although changes in CBF and clinical symptoms of NPH may have the same cause, i.e., changes in the cerebral intraparenchymal pressure, there is no simple direct relation between these two events. The mechanism underlying the loss of autoregulation observed in NPH is also discussed.

  12. Intraoperative cerebral blood flow imaging of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hangdao; Li, Yao; Yuan, Lu; Wu, Caihong; Lu, Hongyang; Tong, Shanbao

    2014-09-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is of interest to neuroscience researchers, which offers the assessment of hemodynamic responses throughout the process of neurosurgery and provides an early biomarker for surgical guidance. However, intraoperative CBF imaging has been challenging due to animal's motion and position change during the surgery. In this paper, we presented a design of an operation bench integrated with laser speckle contrast imager which enables monitoring of the CBF intraoperatively. With a specially designed stereotaxic frame and imager, we were able to monitor the CBF changes in both hemispheres during the rodent surgery. The rotatable design of the operation plate and implementation of online image registration allow the technician to move the animal without disturbing the CBF imaging during surgery. The performance of the system was tested by middle cerebral artery occlusion model of rats.

  13. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery.

  14. Mapping blood flow directionality in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Hong; Do, Won-Joon; Choi, Seung Hong; Zhao, Tiejun; Bae, Kyongtae Ty

    2016-07-01

    Diffusion properties of tissue are often expressed on the basis of directional variance, i.e., diffusion tensor imaging. In comparison, common perfusion-weighted imaging such as arterial spin labeling yields perfusion in a scalar quantity. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of mapping cerebral blood flow directionality using alternate ascending/descending directional navigation (ALADDIN), a recently-developed arterial spin labeling technique with sensitivity to blood flow directions. ALADDIN was applied along 3 orthogonal directions to assess directional blood flow in a vector form and also along 6 equally-spaced directions to extract blood flow tensor matrix (P) based on a blood flow ellipsoid model. Tensor elements (eigenvalues, eigenvectors, etc) were calculated to investigate characteristics of the blood flow tensor, in comparison with time-of-flight MR angiogram. While the directions of the main eigenvectors were heterogeneous throughout the brain, regional clusters of blood flow directionality were reproducible across subjects. The technique could show heterogeneous blood flow directionality within and around brain tumor, which was different from that of the contralateral normal side. The proposed method is deemed to provide information of blood flow directionality, which has not been demonstrated before. The results warrant further studies to assess changes in the directionality map as a function of scan parameters, to understand the signal sources, to investigate the possibility of mapping local blood perfusion directionality, and to evaluate its usefulness for clinical diagnosis. PMID:26968145

  15. Effect of trabeculectomy on ocular blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Berisha, F; Schmetterer, K; Vass, C; Dallinger, S; Rainer, G; Findl, O; Kiss, B; Schmetterer, L

    2005-01-01

    Background/aim: Current evidence suggests that vascular insufficiencies in the optic nerve head play an important part in the pathogenesis of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Trabeculectomy is the most common operative procedure for the treatment of medically uncontrolled glaucoma. This study was conducted to investigate whether trabeculectomy may improve ocular haemodynamics. Methods: 30 patients with primary open angle glaucoma about to undergo trabeculectomy were included in the study. Patients were evaluated before surgery and at 2 and 10 weeks after trabeculectomy. Optic nerve head blood flow (OnhBF) was assessed with scanning laser Doppler flowmetry. Fundus pulsation amplitude (FPA) measurements were obtained with laser interferometry. Results: Because of the decrease in intraocular pressure there was a significant increase in ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) following trabeculectomy (18.5% (SD 12.0%) and 19.0% (17.1%) at 2 and 10 weeks postoperatively; p <0.001). A significant increase in OnhBF was observed after trabeculectomy (11.6% (16.4%) and 16.2% (20.2%) for each postoperative visit, respectively; p <0.001). FPA was also significantly higher compared with baseline values (17.2% (17.3%) and 17.4% (16.3%), respectively; p <0.001). A significant association between the increase in OPP and the increase in OnhBF and FPA was observed 10 weeks after surgery (r = 0.47; p = 0.009, and r = 0.50; p = 0.005, respectively). Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that trabeculectomy improves ocular blood flow in patients with chronic open angle glaucoma. PMID:15665350

  16. Blood flow in microvascular networks: A study in nonlinear biology

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, John B.; Carr, Russell T.; Wu, Fan; Lao, Yingyi; Maher, Meaghan

    2010-01-01

    Plasma skimming and the Fahraeus–Lindqvist effect are well-known phenomena in blood rheology. By combining these peculiarities of blood flow in the microcirculation with simple topological models of microvascular networks, we have uncovered interesting nonlinear behavior regarding blood flow in networks. Nonlinearity manifests itself in the existence of multiple steady states. This is due to the nonlinear dependence of viscosity on blood cell concentration. Nonlinearity also appears in the form of spontaneous oscillations in limit cycles. These limit cycles arise from the fact that the physics of blood flow can be modeled in terms of state dependent delay equations with multiple interacting delay times. In this paper we extend our previous work on blood flow in a simple two node network and begin to explore how topological complexity influences the dynamics of network blood flow. In addition we present initial evidence that the nonlinear phenomena predicted by our model are observed experimentally. PMID:21198135

  17. Quantitative Estimation of Tissue Blood Flow Rate.

    PubMed

    Tozer, Gillian M; Prise, Vivien E; Cunningham, Vincent J

    2016-01-01

    The rate of blood flow through a tissue (F) is a critical parameter for assessing the functional efficiency of a blood vessel network following angiogenesis. This chapter aims to provide the principles behind the estimation of F, how F relates to other commonly used measures of tissue perfusion, and a practical approach for estimating F in laboratory animals, using small readily diffusible and metabolically inert radio-tracers. The methods described require relatively nonspecialized equipment. However, the analytical descriptions apply equally to complementary techniques involving more sophisticated noninvasive imaging.Two techniques are described for the quantitative estimation of F based on measuring the rate of tissue uptake following intravenous administration of radioactive iodo-antipyrine (or other suitable tracer). The Tissue Equilibration Technique is the classical approach and the Indicator Fractionation Technique, which is simpler to perform, is a practical alternative in many cases. The experimental procedures and analytical methods for both techniques are given, as well as guidelines for choosing the most appropriate method. PMID:27172960

  18. Dynamic Effect of Rolling Massage on Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan-Yan; Yi, Hou-Hui; Li, Hua-Bing; Fang, Hai-Ping

    2009-02-01

    The Chinese traditional medical massage has been used as a natural therapy to eliminate some diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage frequency to the blood flow in the blood vessels under the rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulation results show that when the frequency is smaller than or comparable to the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the effect on the blood flux by the rolling massage is small. On the contrast, if the frequency is twice or more times of the pulsatile frequency of the blood flow, the blood flux is greatly enhanced and increases linearly with respect to the frequency. Similar behavior has also been observed on the shear stress on the blood vessel walls. The result is helpful for understanding that the rolling massage has the function of promoting the blood circulation and removing the blood stasis.

  19. Transport of platelets in flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, E C; Bilsker, D L; Waters, C M; Kippenhan, J S; Tilles, A W

    1987-01-01

    Distribution and transport of platelets in flowing blood were studied experimentally using suspensions of washed red cells and fluorescent latex beads as platelet analogues. Distributions of the platelet analogues were obtained from stroboscopic epifluorescence photomicrographs of flow in 50-micron channels and from images of the cut cross sections of cryogenically frozen thin-walled 200-micron tubes. Concentration profiles of platelet analogues had a substantial near-wall excess for situations with a substantial hematocrit (greater than 10%) and a substantial wall shear rate (greater than 400 s-1). The viscosity of the suspending fluid was found to affect the size of the near-wall excess and its shear-dependent onset. Additionally, the shear-rate dependence of the near-wall excess did not occur with suspensions of hardened red cells. The excess extended a substantial distance from the wall in the 200-micron tubes and a portion of the profile could be fitted to an exponential curve. The random walk model that is used to describe enhanced platelet diffusion is envisioned as a walk (lateral platelet motion) caused by shear-induced collisions with red cells. A more comprehensive random walk model that includes biased collisions produces an effective lateral motion of convective nature in addition to a diffusional motion; it is used to explain the observed nonuniform distributions of platelet analogues. PMID:3439741

  20. Noninvasive method of estimating human newborn regional cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, D.P.; Reivich, M.; Jaggi, J.; Obrist, W.; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, M.

    1982-12-01

    A noninvasive method of estimating regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in premature and full-term babies has been developed. Based on a modification of the /sup 133/Xe inhalation rCBF technique, this method uses eight extracranial NaI scintillation detectors and an i.v. bolus injection of /sup 133/Xe (approximately 0.5 mCi/kg). Arterial xenon concentration was estimated with an external chest detector. Cerebral blood flow was measured in 15 healthy, neurologically normal premature infants. Using Obrist's method of two-compartment analysis, normal values were calculated for flow in both compartments, relative weight and fractional flow in the first compartment (gray matter), initial slope of gray matter blood flow, mean cerebral blood flow, and initial slope index of mean cerebral blood flow. The application of this technique to newborns, its relative advantages, and its potential uses are discussed.

  1. Bone blood flow after spinal paralysis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Yamamuro, T.; Okumura, H.; Kasai, R.; Tada, K. )

    1990-05-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the acute and chronic effects of paralysis induced by spinal cord section or sciatic neurotomy on bone blood flow in the rat. Regional bone blood flow was measured in the early stage with the hydrogen washout technique and the change of whole bone blood flow was measured in the early and the late stages with the radioactive microsphere technique. Four to 6 h after cordotomy at the level of the 13th thoracic vertebra, the regional bone blood flow in the denervated tibia increased significantly (p less than 0.01). After hemicordotomy with rhizotomy at the same level, the regional bone blood flow in the denervated tibia increased significantly (p less than 0.05) 6 h postoperatively. The whole bone blood flow in the denervated tibia had also increased significantly (p less than 0.05) at 6 h and at 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively. After sciatic neurotomy, the regional and the whole bone blood flow in the paralytic tibia did not change significantly. The present study demonstrated that monoplegic paralysis caused an increase in bone blood flow in the denervated hind limb from a very early stage. It was suggested that the spinal nervous system contributed to the control of bone blood flow.

  2. A Discussion on the Regulation of Blood Flow and Pressure.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Christopher B; Collier, David J; Shah, Mussadiq; Saxena, Manish; Brier, Timothy J; Kapil, Vikas; Green, David; Lobo, Melvin

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses two kinds of regulation essential to the circulatory system: namely the regulation of blood flow and that of (systemic) arterial blood pressure. It is pointed out that blood flow requirements sub-serve the nutritional needs of the tissues, adequately catered for by keeping blood flow sufficient for the individual oxygen needs. Individual tissue oxygen requirements vary between tissue types, while highly specific for a given individual tissue. Hence, blood flows are distributed between multiple tissues, each with a specific optimum relationship between the rate of oxygen delivery (DO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2). Previous work has illustrated that the individual tissue blood flows are adjusted proportionately, where there are variations in metabolic rate and where arterial oxygen content (CaO2) varies. While arterial blood pressure is essential for the provision of a sufficient pressure gradient to drive blood flow, it is applicable throughout the arterial system at any one time. Furthermore, It is regulated independently of the input resistance to individual tissues (local arterioles), since they are regulated locally, that being the means by which the highly specific adequate local requirement for DO2 is ensured. Since total blood flow is the summation of all the individually regulated tissue blood flows cardiac inflow (venous return) amounts to total tissue blood flow and as the heart puts out what it receives cardiac output is therefore determined at the tissues. Hence, regulation of arterial blood pressure is independent of the distributed independent regulation of individual tissues. It is proposed here that mechanical features of arterial blood pressure regulation will depend rather on the balance between blood volume and venous wall tension, determinants of venous pressure. The potential for this explanation is treated in some detail. PMID:26782204

  3. Prediction of Anomalous Blood Viscosity in Confined Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiébaud, Marine; Shen, Zaiyi; Harting, Jens; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2014-06-01

    Red blood cells play a major role in body metabolism by supplying oxygen from the microvasculature to different organs and tissues. Understanding blood flow properties in microcirculation is an essential step towards elucidating fundamental and practical issues. Numerical simulations of a blood model under a confined linear shear flow reveal that confinement markedly modifies the properties of blood flow. A nontrivial spatiotemporal organization of blood elements is shown to trigger hitherto unrevealed flow properties regarding the viscosity η, namely ample oscillations of its normalized value [η]=(η-η0)/(η0ϕ) as a function of hematocrit ϕ (η0=solvent viscosity). A scaling law for the viscosity as a function of hematocrit and confinement is proposed. This finding can contribute to the conception of new strategies to efficiently detect blood disorders, via in vitro diagnosis based on confined blood rheology. It also constitutes a contribution for a fundamental understanding of rheology of confined complex fluids.

  4. Blood flow distribution in submerged and surface-swimming ducks.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, R; Jones, D R

    1992-05-01

    Observations that the response of the avian heart rate to submergence varies under different circumstances have led to speculation about variability of blood flow distribution during voluntary dives. We used a radiological imaging technique to examine the patterns of circulating blood flow in captive redhead ducks (Aythya americana) during rest, swimming, escape dives, forced dives and trapped escape dives and have shown that blood flow distribution in escape dives was the same as that in ducks swimming at the water surface. The response during trapped escape dives, however, was highly variable. Blood pressure was unchanged from the resting value during all activities. Predictions made about blood flow distribution during unrestrained dives on the basis of heart rate and other indirect data were confirmed in this study. However, the trapped escape dive responses indicated that heart rate alone is not always a reliable indicator of tissue blood flow in exercising ducks. PMID:1602277

  5. Numerical Simulation of Sickle Cell Blood Flow in the Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Stanley A.; Carlson, Brian E.

    2001-11-01

    A numerical simulation of normal and sickle cell blood flow through the transverse arteriole-capillary microcirculation is carried out to model the dominant mechanisms involved in the onset of vascular stasis in sickle cell disease. The transverse arteriole-capillary network is described by Strahler's network branching method, and the oxygen and blood transport in the capillaries is modeled by a Krogh cylinder analysis utilizing Lighthill's lubrication theory, as developed by Berger and King. Poiseuille's law is used to represent blood flow in the arterioles. Applying this flow and transport model and utilizing volumetric flow continuity at each network bifurcation, a nonlinear system of equations is obtained, which is solved iteratively using a steepest descent algorithm coupled with a Newton solver. Ten different networks are generated and flow results are calculated for normal blood and sickle cell blood without and with precapillary oxygen loss. We find that total volumetric blood flow through the network is greater in the two sickle cell blood simulations than for normal blood owing to the anemia associated with sickle cell disease. The percentage of capillary blockage in the network increases dramatically with decreasing pressure drop across the network in the sickle cell cases while there is no blockage when normal blood flows through simulated networks. It is concluded that, in sickle cell disease, without any vasomotor dilation response to decreasing oxygen concentrations in the blood, capillary blockage will occur in the microvasculature even at average pressure drops across the transverse arteriole-capillary networks.

  6. Blood flow augmentation by intrinsic venular contraction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M; Quick, Christopher M; Vo, Jonathan C; Meisner, Joshua K; Laine, Glen A; Davis, Michael J; Stewart, Randolph H

    2012-06-15

    Venomotion, spontaneous cyclic contractions of venules, was first observed in the bat wing 160 years ago. Of all the functional roles proposed since then, propulsion of blood by venomotion remains the most controversial. Common animal models that require anesthesia and surgery have failed to provide evidence for venular pumping of blood. To determine whether venomotion actively pumps blood in a minimally invasive, unanesthetized animal model, we reintroduced the batwing model. We evaluated the temporal and functional relationship between the venous contraction cycle and blood flow and luminal pressure. Furthermore, we determined the effect of inhibiting venomotion on blood flow. We found that the active venous contractions produced an increase in the blood flow and exhibited temporal vessel diameter-blood velocity and pressure relationships characteristic of a peristaltic pump. The presence of valves, a characteristic of reciprocating pumps, enhances the efficiency of the venular peristaltic pump by preventing retrograde flow. Instead of increasing blood flow by decreasing passive resistance, venular dilation with locally applied sodium nitroprusside decreased blood flow. Taken together, these observations provide evidence for active venular pumping of blood. Although strong venomotion may be unique to bats, venomotion has also been inferred from venous pressure oscillations in other animal models. The conventional paradigm of microvascular pressure and flow regulation assumes venules only act as passive resistors, a proposition that must be reevaluated in the presence of significant venomotion. PMID:22513742

  7. Measuring tissue blood flow using ultrasound modulated diffused light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, A.; Racheli, N.; Breskin, I.; Metzger, Y.; Silman, Z.; Kamar, M.; Nini, A.; Shechter, R.; Balberg, M.

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate the ability of a novel device employing ultrasound modulation of near infrared light (referred as "Ultrasound tagged light" or UTL) to perform non-invasive monitoring of blood flow in the microvascular level in tissue. Monitoring microcirculatory blood flow is critical in clinical situations affecting flow to different organs, such as the brain or the limbs. . However, currently there are no non-invasive devices that measure microcirculatory blood flow in deep tissue continuously. Our prototype device (Ornim Medical, Israel) was used to monitor tissue blood flow on anesthetized swine during controlled manipulations of increased and decreased blood flow. Measurements were done on the calf muscle and forehead of the animal and compared with Laser Doppler (LD). ROC analysis of the sensitivity and specificity for detecting an increase in blood flow on the calf muscle, demonstrated AUC = 0.951 for 23 systemic manipulations of cardiac output by Epinephrine injection, which is comparable to AUC = 0.943 using laser Doppler. Some examples of cerebral blood flow monitoring are presented, along with their individual ROC curves. UTL flowmetry is shown to be effective in detecting changes in cerebral and muscle blood flow in swine, and has merit in clinical applications.

  8. Design and optimization of a widely tunable semiconductor laser for blood oxygenation and blood flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yafei; Deng, Haoyu; Song, Guangyi; He, Jian-Jun

    2014-11-01

    A method for measuring blood oxygenation and blood flow rate using a single widely tunable semiconductor laser is proposed and investigated. It is shown that a 700-nm-band tunable laser gives the highest sensitivity for blood oxygen measurement. The corresponding tunable laser is designed using the V-coupled cavity structure. The wavelength tuning range can reach 8 nm, which is sufficient for the blood oxygenation measurement in the 700-nm-band by using the Beer- Lambert law. In contrast to conventional blood oxygenation measurement method based on two LEDs, the laser can be used at the same time to measure the blood flow rate based on the Doppler principle.

  9. A mechanistic approach to blood flow occlusion.

    PubMed

    Loenneke, J P; Wilson, G J; Wilson, J M

    2010-01-01

    Low-Intensity occlusion training provides a unique beneficial training mode for promoting muscle hypertrophy. Training at intensities as low as 20% 1RM with moderate vascular occlusion results in muscle hypertrophy in as little as three weeks. The primary mechanisms by which occlusion training is thought to stimulate growth include, metabolic accumulation, which stimulates a subsequent increase in anabolic growth factors, fast-twitch fiber recruitment (FT), and increased protein synthesis through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Heat shock proteins, Nitric oxide synthase-1 (NOS-1) and Myostatin have also been shown to be affected by an occlusion stimulus. In conclusion, low-intensity occlusion training appears to work through a variety of mechanisms. The research behind these mechanisms is incomplete thus far, and requires further examination, primarily to identify the actual metabolite responsible for the increase in GH with occlusion, and determine which mechanisms are associated to a greater degree with the hypertrophic/anti-catabolic changes seen with blood flow restriction. PMID:19885776

  10. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-02-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100-1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function.

  11. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Sarveswaran, K; Kurz, V; Dong, Z; Tanaka, T; Penny, S; Timp, G

    2016-01-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using "live cell lithography"(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision-no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100-1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function. PMID:26905751

  12. Blood flow-restricted exercise in space

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity results in chronic physiological adaptations including skeletal muscle atrophy, cardiovascular deconditioning, and bone demineralization. To attenuate the negative consequences of weightlessness during spaceflight missions, crewmembers perform moderate- to high-load resistance exercise in conjunction with aerobic (cycle and treadmill) exercise. Recent evidence from ground-based studies suggests that low-load blood flow-restricted (BFR) resistance exercise training can increase skeletal muscle size, strength, and endurance when performed in a variety of ambulatory populations. This training methodology couples a remarkably low exercise training load (approximately 20%–50% one repetition maximum (1RM)) with an inflated external cuff (width, ranging between approximately 30–90 mm; pressure, ranging between approximately 100–250 mmHg) that is placed around the exercising limb. BFR aerobic (walking and cycling) exercise training methods have also recently emerged in an attempt to enhance cardiovascular endurance and functional task performance while incorporating minimal exercise intensity. Although both forms of BFR exercise training have direct implications for individuals with sarcopenia and dynapenia, the application of BFR exercise training during exposure to microgravity to prevent deconditioning remains controversial. The aim of this review is to present an overview of BFR exercise training and discuss the potential usefulness of this method as an adjunct exercise countermeasure during prolonged spaceflight. The work will specifically emphasize ambulatory BFR exercise training adaptations, mechanisms, and safety and will provide directions for future research. PMID:23849078

  13. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-01-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100–1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function. PMID:26905751

  14. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  15. Tissue Blood Flow During Remifentanil Infusion With Carbon Dioxide Loading.

    PubMed

    Kanbe, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Nobuyuki; Kasahara, Masataka; Ichinohe, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of changes in end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (ETCO2) during remifentanil (Remi) infusion on oral tissue blood flow in rabbits. Eight male tracheotomized Japan White rabbits were anesthetized with sevoflurane under mechanical ventilation. The infusion rate of Remi was 0.4 μg/kg/min. Carbon dioxide was added to the inspired gas to change the inspired CO2 tension to prevent changes in the ventilating condition. Observed variables were systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), common carotid artery blood flow (CCBF), tongue mucosal blood flow (TBF), mandibular bone marrow tissue blood flow (BBF), masseter muscle tissue blood flow (MBF), upper alveolar tissue blood flow (UBF), and lower alveolar tissue blood flow (LBF). The CCBF, TBF, BBF, UBF, and LBF values were increased, while MBF was decreased, under hypercapnia, and vice versa. The BBF, UBF, and LBF values were increased, while the MBF value was decreased, under hypercapnia during Remi infusion, and vice versa. The BBF, MBF, UBF, and LBF values, but not the CCBF and TBF values, changed along with ETCO2 changes during Remi infusion. PMID:26061573

  16. Effect of prolonged hypokinesia on tissue blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levites, Z. P.; Fedotova, V. F.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of hypokinesia on the blood flow in the tissues of rabbits was studied. Motor activity of animals was restricted during 90 days and blood flow recorded through resorption rate of NaI-131. Perfusion of tissues under the influence of hypokinesia was found to be reduced.

  17. Statistical variations of ultrasound signals backscattered from flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Shyh-Hau

    2007-12-01

    The statistical distributions of ultrasonic signals backscattered from blood have recently been used to characterize hemodynamic properties, such as red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and blood coagulation. However, a thorough understanding of the relationship between blood properties and the statistical behavior of signals backscattered from flowing blood is still lacking. This prompted us to use the statistical parameter to characterize signals backscattered from both whole blood and RBC suspensions at different flow velocities (from 10 to 60 cm/s) and hematocrits (from 20% to 50%) under a steady laminar flow condition. The Nakagami parameter, scaling parameter, backscatter amplitude profile and flow velocity profile across a flow tube were acquired using a 10 MHz focused ultrasonic transducer. The backscattered signal peaked approximately at the centerline of the flow tube due to the effects of RBC aggregation, with the peak value increasing as the flow velocity of whole blood decreased. The Nakagami parameter increased from 0.45 to 0.78 as the flow velocity increased from 10 to 60 cm/s. The probability density function (PDF) of signals backscattered from flowing whole blood conformed with a pre-Rayleigh distribution. The Nakagami parameter was close to 1 for signals backscattered from RBC suspensions at all the flow velocities and hematocrits tested, for which the PDF was Rayleigh distributed. These differences in the statistical distributions of backscattered signals between whole blood and RBC suspensions suggest that variations in the size of dynamic scatterers in the flow affect the shape of the backscattered signal envelope, which should be considered in future statistical models used to characterize blood properties. PMID:17673357

  18. Muscle metaboreflex and cerebral blood flow regulation in humans: implications for exercise with blood flow restriction.

    PubMed

    Prodel, Eliza; Balanos, George M; Braz, Igor D; Nobrega, Antonio C L; Vianna, Lauro C; Fisher, James P

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the effect of activating metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex) on cerebral blood flow and the potentially confounding influence of concomitant changes in the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide. Eleven healthy males (25 ± 4 yr) performed submaximal leg cycling exercise on a semirecumbent cycle ergometer (heart rate: ∼120 beats/min), and assessments were made of the partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO2 ), internal carotid artery blood flow (ICAQ) and conductance (ICACVC), and middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCAvm) and conductance index (MCACVCi).The muscle metaboreflex was activated during cycling with leg blood flow restriction (BFR) or isolated with postexercise ischemia (PEI). In separate trials, PetCO2 was either permitted to fluctuate spontaneously (control trial) or was clamped at 1 mmHg above resting levels (PetCO2 clamp trial). In the control trial, leg cycling with BFR decreased PetCO2 (Δ-4.8 ± 0.9 mmHg vs. leg cycling exercise) secondary to hyperventilation, while ICAQ, ICACVC, and MCAvm were unchanged and MCACVCi decreased. However, in the PetCO2 clamp trial, leg cycling with BFR increased both MCAvm (Δ5.9 ± 1.4 cm/s) and ICAQ (Δ20.0 ± 7.8 ml/min) and attenuated the decrease in MCACVCi, while ICACVC was unchanged. In the control trial, PEI decreased PetCO2 (Δ-7.0 ± 1.3 mmHg vs. rest), MCAvm and MCACVCi, whereas ICAQ and ICACVC were unchanged. In contrast, in the PetCO2 clamp trial both ICAQ (Δ18.5 ± 11.9 ml/min) and MCAvm (Δ8.8 ± 2.0 cm/s) were elevated, while ICACVC and MCACVCi were unchanged. In conclusion, when hyperventilation-related decreases in PetCO2 are prevented the activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferent fibers increases cerebral blood flow. PMID:26873971

  19. Effects of Red Blood Cell Aggregation on the Apparent Viscosity of Blood Flow in Tubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitt, Darren L.; Lowe, Mary L.

    1996-11-01

    In arterioles and venules (20-200μ diameter), the low shear rates enable red blood cells to form aggregate structures of varying sizes and morphology. The size and distribution of the aggregates affect the flow impedance within a microvascular network; this effect may be characterized by an "apparent viscosity". In this study, we measure the apparent viscosity of blood flow in 50μ glass tubes as a function of shear rate and red blood cell volume fraction (hematocrit); for a fixed tube geometry and an imposed flow rate, the viscosity is determined by measuring the pressure drop across the tube. To correlate the apparent viscosity with the size and spatial distribution of the aggregates in the flow, video images of the flow are recorded and analyzed using power spectral techniques. Pig blood and sheep blood are used as the models for aggregating and non-aggregating blood, respectively. Supported by NSF PFF Award CTS-9253633

  20. Mammary blood flow regulation in the nursing rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, M.; Creasy, R.K.

    1984-11-01

    Cardiac output and mammary blood flow distribution prior to and after suckling were studied in 10 nursing rabbits by means of radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Suckling was followed by a 5.8% rise in cardiac output and a 20.4% rise in mammary blood flow. Determinations of intraglandular blood flow distribution have shown that there was a 43% increase in blood flow to the glands suckled from as compared to a 22.7% rise to the contralateral untouched glands and a 4.9% rise in the remainder of untouched glands. The conclusion is that a local mechanism may be involved in the regulation of mammary blood flow in the nursing rabbit.

  1. Regional cerebral blood flow changes associated with ethanol intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1986-11-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured via the 133Xenon inhalation technique in 26 healthy volunteers before and 60 minutes after the oral administration of ethyl alcohol or placebo on a double-blind basis. The cerebral blood flow values, corrected for test-retest differences in carbon dioxide showed a significant bilateral increase after ethanol administration. Blood levels of ethanol, estimated with a breath analyser, did not correlate with the CBF changes.

  2. Ultrasonic Doppler measurement of renal artery blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, W. R.; Beaver, W. L.; Meindl, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Studies were made of (1) blood flow redistribution during lower body negative pressure (LBNP), (2) the profile of blood flow across the mitral annulus of the heart (both perpendicular and parallel to the commissures), (3) testing and evaluation of a number of pulsed Doppler systems, (4) acute calibration of perivascular Doppler transducers, (5) redesign of the mitral flow transducers to improve reliability and ease of construction, and (6) a frequency offset generator designed for use in distinguishing forward and reverse components of blood flow by producing frequencies above and below the offset frequency. Finally methodology was developed and initial results were obtained from a computer analysis of time-varying Doppler spectra.

  3. Blood flow changes in arteriovenous malformation during behavioral activation.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, G

    1983-01-01

    Striking task-dependent fluctuations were observed in the cerebral blood flow pattern of a patient with a left posterior hemispheric arteriovenous malformation (AVM). Two-dimensional measures of regional cerebral flow in the resting state, using the xenon 133 inhalation technique, revealed a region of high flow coincident with the AVM seen on the patient's arteriograms. In subsequent studies, the AVM stood out as a region of high blood flow during a relaxed state, while it approached normal levels of flow when there was attentional demand. These observations suggest that focal regulatory mechanisms exist at the AVM or else that very substantial redistributions of blood flow are taking place which the flow rate in the AVM reflects only passively. Patients considered for embolic treatment of an AVM would benefit from an assessment of behavioral influences on flow in the AVM. PMID:6830163

  4. Fluid dynamics aspects of miniaturized axial-flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kang, Can; Huang, Qifeng; Li, Yunxiao

    2014-01-01

    Rotary blood pump (RBP) is a kind of crucial ventricular assist device (VAD) and its advantages have been evidenced and acknowledged in recent years. Among the factors that influence the operation performance and the durability of various rotary blood pumps, medium property and the flow features in pump's flow passages are conceivably significant. The major concern in this paper is the fluid dynamics aspects of such a kind of miniaturized pump. More specifically, the structural features of axial-flow blood pump and corresponding flow features are analyzed in detail. The narrow flow passage between blade tips and pump casing and the rotor-stator interaction (RSI) zone may exert a negative effect on the shear stress distribution in the blood flow. Numerical techniques are briefly introduced in view of their contribution to facilitating the optimal design of blood pump and the visualization of shear stress distribution and multiphase flow analysis. Additionally, with the development of flow measurement techniques, the high-resolution, effective and non-intrusive flow measurement techniques catering to the measurement of the flows inside rotary blood pumps are highly anticipated. PMID:24211957

  5. Dynamics of blood flow in a microfluidic ladder network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddala, Jeevan; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; McCarty, Owen

    The dynamics of a complex mixture of cells and proteins, such as blood, in perturbed shear flow remains ill-defined. Microfluidics is a promising technology for improving the understanding of blood flow under complex conditions of shear; as found in stent implants and in tortuous blood vessels. We model the fluid dynamics of blood flow in a microfluidic ladder network with dimensions mimicking venules. Interaction of blood cells was modeled using multiagent framework, where cells of different diameters were treated as spheres. This model served as the basis for predicting transition regions, collision pathways, re-circulation zones and residence times of cells dependent on their diameters and device architecture. Based on these insights from the model, we were able to predict the clot formation configurations at various locations in the device. These predictions were supported by the experiments using whole blood. To facilitate platelet aggregation, the devices were coated with fibrillar collagen and tissue factor. Blood was perfused through the microfluidic device for 9 min at a physiologically relevant venous shear rate of 600 s-1. Using fluorescent microscopy, we observed flow transitions near the channel intersections and at the areas of blood flow obstruction, which promoted larger thrombus formation. This study of integrating model predictions with experimental design, aids in defining the dynamics of blood flow in microvasculature and in development of novel biomedical devices.

  6. Retinal blood flow measurement by using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Shuichi; Fabritius, Tapio; Miura, Masahiro; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2008-02-01

    Quantification of the three-dimensional (3D) retinal vessel structure and blood flow is demonstrated. 3D blood flow distribution is obtained by Doppler optical coherence angiography (D-OCA). Vessel parameters, i.e. diameter, orientation, and position, are determined in an en face vessel image. The Doppler angle is estimated as the angle between the retinal vessel and the incident probing beam in representative cross-sectional flow image which extracted from the 3D flow distribution according to the vessel parameters. Blood flow velocity and volume rate can be quantified with these vessel parameters. The retinal blood flow velocity and volume rate are measured in the retinal vessels around the optic nerve head.

  7. Cerebral blood flow at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Philip N; Subudhi, Andrew W

    2014-06-01

    This brief review traces the last 50 years of research related to cerebral blood flow (CBF) in humans exposed to high altitude. The increase in CBF within the first 12 hours at high altitude and its return to near sea level values after 3-5 days of acclimatization was first documented with use of the Kety-Schmidt technique in 1964. The degree of change in CBF at high altitude is influenced by many variables, including arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions, oxygen content, cerebral spinal fluid pH, and hematocrit, but can be collectively summarized in terms of the relative strengths of four key integrated reflexes: 1) hypoxic cerebral vasodilatation; 2) hypocapnic cerebral vasoconstriction; 3) hypoxic ventilatory response; and 4) hypercapnic ventilatory response. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these reflexes and their interactions with one another is critical to advance our understanding of global and regional CBF regulation. Whether high altitude populations exhibit cerebrovascular adaptations to chronic levels of hypoxia or if changes in CBF are related to the development of acute mountain sickness are currently unknown; yet overall, the integrated CBF response to high altitude appears to be sufficient to meet the brain's large and consistent demand for oxygen. This short review is organized as follows: An historical overview of the earliest CBF measurements collected at high altitude introduces a summary of reported CBF changes at altitude over the last 50 years in both lowlanders and high-altitude natives. The most tenable candidate mechanism(s) regulating CBF at altitude are summarized with a focus on available data in humans, and a role for these mechanisms in the pathophysiology of AMS is considered. Finally, suggestions for future directions are provided. PMID:24971767

  8. Hemodilution increases cerebral blood flow in acute ischemic stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Vorstrup, S.; Andersen, A.; Juhler, M.; Brun, B.; Boysen, G.

    1989-07-01

    We measured cerebral blood flow in 10 consecutive, but selected, patients with acute ischemic stroke (less than 48 hours after onset) before and after hemodilution. Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 inhalation and emission tomography, and only patients with focal hypoperfusion in clinically relevant areas were included. Hemodilution was done according to the hematocrit level: for a hematocrit greater than or equal to 42%, 500 ml whole blood was drawn and replaced by the same volume of dextran 40; for a hematocrit between 37% and 42%, only 250 ml whole blood was drawn and replaced by 500 cc of dextran 40. Mean hematocrit was reduced by 16%, from 46 +/- 5% (SD) to 39 +/- 5% (SD) (p less than 0.001). Cerebral blood flow increased in both hemispheres by an average of 20.9% (p less than 0.001). Regional cerebral blood flow increased in the ischemic areas in all cases, on an average of 21.4 +/- 12.0% (SD) (p less than 0.001). In three patients, a significant redistribution of flow in favor of the hypoperfused areas was observed, and in six patients, the fractional cerebral blood flow increase in the hypoperfused areas was of the same magnitude as in the remainder of the brain. In the last patient, cerebral blood flow increased relatively less in the ischemic areas. Our findings show that cerebral blood flow increases in the ischemic areas after hemodilution therapy in stroke patients. The marked regional cerebral blood flow increase seen in some patients could imply an improved oxygen delivery to the ischemic tissue.

  9. Spiral blood flow in aorta-renal bifurcation models.

    PubMed

    Javadzadegan, Ashkan; Simmons, Anne; Barber, Tracie

    2016-07-01

    The presence of a spiral arterial blood flow pattern in humans has been widely accepted. It is believed that this spiral component of the blood flow alters arterial haemodynamics in both positive and negative ways. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of spiral flow on haemodynamic changes in aorta-renal bifurcations. In this regard, a computational fluid dynamics analysis of pulsatile blood flow was performed in two idealised models of aorta-renal bifurcations with and without flow diverter. The results show that the spirality effect causes a substantial variation in blood velocity distribution, while causing only slight changes in fluid shear stress patterns. The dominant observed effect of spiral flow is on turbulent kinetic energy and flow recirculation zones. As spiral flow intensity increases, the rate of turbulent kinetic energy production decreases, reducing the region of potential damage to red blood cells and endothelial cells. Furthermore, the recirculation zones which form on the cranial sides of the aorta and renal artery shrink in size in the presence of spirality effect; this may lower the rate of atherosclerosis development and progression in the aorta-renal bifurcation. These results indicate that the spiral nature of blood flow has atheroprotective effects in renal arteries and should be taken into consideration in analyses of the aorta and renal arteries. PMID:26414530

  10. On the Role of the Blood Vessel Endothelial Microvilli in the Blood Flow in Small Capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Makarov, Vladimir; Zueva, Lidia; Sanabria, Priscila; Wessinger, William Dave; Golubeva, Tatiana; Khmelinskii, Igor; Inyushin, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial microvilli that protrude into the capillary lumen, although invisible in the optical microscopy, may play an important role in the blood flow control in the capillaries. Because of the plug effects, the width of the gap between the capillary wall and the blood cell is especially critical for the blood flow dynamics in capillaries, while microvilli located on the capillary wall can easily control the velocity of the blood flow. We report that microvilli in the capillaries of different vertebrate species have similar characteristics and density, suggesting similarities between the respective regulation mechanisms. A simplified physical model of the capillary effective diameter control by the microvilli is presented. PMID:26604921

  11. Carreau model for oscillatory blood flow in a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakova, S.; Nikolova, E.; Radev, St.

    2014-11-01

    The analysis of the blood flow dynamics (hemodynamics) in tubes is crucial when investigating the rupture of different types of aneurysms. The blood viscosity nonlinear dependence on the flow shear rate creates complicated manifestations of the blood pulsations. Although a great number of studies exists, experimental and numerical, this phenomenon is still not very well understood. The aim of the present work is to propose a numerical model of the oscillatory blood flow in a tube on the basis of the Carreau model of the blood viscosity (nonlinear model with respect to the shear rate). The obtained results for the flow velocity and tangential stress on the tube wall are compared well with other authors' results.

  12. The importance of splenic blood flow in clearing pneumococcal organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, J; Ogden, M E; Williams, S; Coln, D

    1982-01-01

    Overwhelming infection from encapsulated bacteria occurs after splenectomy. Decreases in IgM, tufsin, and serum opsonin are known to occur in animals and humans after splenectomy. A substantial immunologic advantage exists if some splenic tissue remains, but this may not offer sufficient protection from encapsulated bacteria if splenic arterial blood flow is reduced. This experiment was designed to examine the rate of pneumococcal clearance by the spleen and to determine the relationship between splenic blood flow and splenic tissue mass in bacterial clearance from the blood. Pneumococcal clearance, splenic blood flow, and residual splenic weight were measured in 171 rabbits with normal spleens, ligated splenic arteries, splenic autotransplants, hemisplenectomies, and splenectomies. Interruption of the splenic artery results in delayed pneumococcal clearance that is due to reduced blood flow and not to a decrease in splenic tissue mass. Splenic artery ligation to preserve an injured spleen cannot be assumed to give protection from sepsis. PMID:7055394

  13. Laser speckle technique for monitoring of blood and lymph flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosov, Ivan V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2004-07-01

    Laser speckle technique developed for monitoring of micro scale blood and lymph flows is described and discussed. It is based on the space-time correlation properties of dynamic speckle field formed by coherent light scattered by capillary flow of blood or lymph. As it was proved experimentally, the estimating of cross-correlation of speckle-field intensity fluctuations recorded in two different point allows for measurement of flow velocity and flow direction discrimination. Developed technique was applied for investigation of push-pull dynamics of lymph flow in rat mesentery. The results of experiments with models of bioflows and in vivo measurements are presented.

  14. Nasal mucosal blood flow after intranasal allergen challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Holmberg, K.; Bake, B.; Pipkorn, U.

    1988-03-01

    The nasal mucosal blood flow in patients with allergic rhinitis was determined at nasal allergen challenges with the /sup 133/Xenon washout method. Determinations were made in 12 subjects before and 15 minutes after challenge with diluent and increasing doses of allergen. The time course was followed in eight subjects by means of repeated measurements during 1 hour after a single allergen dose. Finally, the blood flow was measured after unilateral allergen challenge in the contralateral nasal cavity. A dose-dependent decrease in blood flow was found after nasal challenge with increasing doses of allergens, whereas challenge with diluent alone did not induce any changes. The highest allergen dose, which also induced pronounced nasal symptoms, resulted in a decrease in blood flow of 25% (p less than 0.001). The time-course study demonstrated a maximum decrease in blood flow 10 to 20 minutes after challenge and then a gradual return to baseline. Unilateral allergen challenge resulted in a decrease in blood flow in the contralateral, unchallenged nasal cavity, suggesting that part of the allergen-induced changes in blood flow were reflex mediated.

  15. Acute cocaine administration alters posttraumatic blood pressure and cerebral blood flow in rats.

    PubMed

    Muir, J K; Ellis, E F

    1995-01-01

    Cocaine abuse is widespread, and it is possible that its two main pharmacological actions, sympathomimetic and local anesthetic, could influence the blood pressure and cerebral blood flow response to brain injury, which occurs with increased frequency in drug abusers. We tested this hypothesis in ventilated barbiturate-anesthetized rats. Brain injury was induced using the fluid-percussion method, and cortical blood flow was measured using laser-Doppler flowmetry. Saline, cocaine, methamphetamine, or lidocaine was administered 10 min before injury. Upon injury, both cocaine- and saline-pretreated rats showed a similar acute hypertensive phase, which was followed by a period of more pronounced hypotension in the cocaine group (68 +/- 4 vs. 100 +/- 6 mmHg). Cortical blood flow increased dramatically 3-15 s following injury-induced hypertension in both the cocaine and saline groups (approximately 230-260%), but then fell below preinjury values within minutes. At 1 h postinjury, the blood flow in the saline group was 53 +/- 6% of the preinjury value, while in the cocaine group, flow was 74 +/- 7% of preinjury baseline. Similar to the cocaine-treated animals, methamphetamine also caused a more pronounced hypotensive event, but blood flow was not significantly different from saline controls. Lidocaine did not alter posttraumatic blood pressure but did significantly elevate blood flow throughout the 1-h postinjury period. At 60 min posttrauma, blood flow in the lidocaine group was 80 +/- 10% of the preinjury value. The mechanism by which cocaine alters blood pressure and blood flow after injury is not entirely certain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7840303

  16. Effects of non Newtonian spiral blood flow through arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Mahmudul; Maruf, Mahbub Alam; Ali, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    The spiral component of blood flow has both beneficial and detrimental effects in human circulatory system. A numerical investigation is carried out to analyze the effect of spiral blood flow through an axisymmetric three dimensional artery having 75% stenosis at the center. Blood is assumed as a Non-Newtonian fluid. Standard k-ω model is used for the simulation with the Reynolds number of 1000. A parabolic velocity profile with spiral flow is used as inlet boundary condition. The peak values of all velocity components are found just after stenosis. But total pressure gradually decreases at downstream. Spiral flow of blood has significant effects on tangential component of velocity. However, the effect is mild for radial and axial velocity components. The peak value of wall shear stress is at the stenosis zone and decreases rapidly in downstream. The effect of spiral flow is significant for turbulent kinetic energy. Detailed investigation and relevant pathological issues are delineated throughout the paper.

  17. Anharmonic analysis of arterial blood pressure and flow pulses.

    PubMed

    Voltairas, P A; Fotiadis, D I; Massalas, C V; Michalis, L K

    2005-07-01

    Fourier analysis is usually employed for the computation of blood flow in arteries. Although the orthogonality of Fourier eigenfunctions guarantees the accurate mathematical modeling of the blood pressure and flow waveforms, the physics behind this objective function is frequently missing. We propose a new method to account for the blood pressure and flow, single-cycle (systole-diastole) waveforms. It is based on the one dimensional hydrodynamic mass and momentum conservation equations for viscous flow. The similarity of the linear problem, under discussion, with related transmission line theory in electromagnetic wave propagation, permits expansion in anharmonic, non-separable eigenfunctions. In some cases one term in the expansion is adequate to fit the main peak of the observed waveforms. Analytical formulas are derived for the dependence of the pressure and flow main peaks on whole blood viscosity and distance from the heart, which interpret observations related to hypertension. PMID:15922753

  18. Uterine artery blood flow, fetal hypoxia and fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Vaughn A.; Julian, Colleen G.; Toledo-Jaldin, Lillian; Cioffi-Ragan, Darleen; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary trade-offs required for bipedalism and brain expansion influence the pregnancy rise in uterine artery (UtA) blood flow and, in turn, reproductive success. We consider the importance of UtA blood flow by reviewing its determinants and presenting data from 191 normotensive (normal, n = 125) or hypertensive (preeclampsia (PE) or gestational hypertension (GH), n = 29) Andean residents of very high (4100–4300 m) or low altitude (400 m, n = 37). Prior studies show that UtA blood flow is reduced in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) but whether the IUGR is due to resultant fetal hypoxia is unclear. We found higher UtA blood flow and Doppler indices of fetal hypoxia in normotensive women at high versus low altitude but similar fetal growth. UtA blood flow was markedly lower in early-onset PE versus normal high-altitude women, and their fetuses more hypoxic as indicated by lower fetal heart rate, Doppler indices and greater IUGR. We concluded that, despite greater fetal hypoxia, fetal growth was well defended by higher UtA blood flows in normal Andeans at high altitude but when compounded by lower UtA blood flow in early-onset PE, exaggerated fetal hypoxia caused the fetus to respond by decreasing cardiac output and redistributing blood flow to help maintain brain development at the expense of growth elsewhere. We speculate that UtA blood flow is not only an important supply line but also a trigger for stimulating the metabolic and other processes regulating feto-placental metabolism and growth. Studies using the natural laboratory of high altitude are valuable for identifying the physiological and genetic mechanisms involved in human reproductive success. PMID:25602072

  19. Uterine artery blood flow, fetal hypoxia and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Browne, Vaughn A; Julian, Colleen G; Toledo-Jaldin, Lillian; Cioffi-Ragan, Darleen; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G

    2015-03-01

    Evolutionary trade-offs required for bipedalism and brain expansion influence the pregnancy rise in uterine artery (UtA) blood flow and, in turn, reproductive success. We consider the importance of UtA blood flow by reviewing its determinants and presenting data from 191 normotensive (normal, n = 125) or hypertensive (preeclampsia (PE) or gestational hypertension (GH), n = 29) Andean residents of very high (4100-4300 m) or low altitude (400 m, n = 37). Prior studies show that UtA blood flow is reduced in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) but whether the IUGR is due to resultant fetal hypoxia is unclear. We found higher UtA blood flow and Doppler indices of fetal hypoxia in normotensive women at high versus low altitude but similar fetal growth. UtA blood flow was markedly lower in early-onset PE versus normal high-altitude women, and their fetuses more hypoxic as indicated by lower fetal heart rate, Doppler indices and greater IUGR. We concluded that, despite greater fetal hypoxia, fetal growth was well defended by higher UtA blood flows in normal Andeans at high altitude but when compounded by lower UtA blood flow in early-onset PE, exaggerated fetal hypoxia caused the fetus to respond by decreasing cardiac output and redistributing blood flow to help maintain brain development at the expense of growth elsewhere. We speculate that UtA blood flow is not only an important supply line but also a trigger for stimulating the metabolic and other processes regulating feto-placental metabolism and growth. Studies using the natural laboratory of high altitude are valuable for identifying the physiological and genetic mechanisms involved in human reproductive success. PMID:25602072

  20. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the progress made towards developing complete blood flow simulation capability in humans, especially in the presence of artificial devices such as valves and ventricular assist devices. Devices modeling poses unique challenges different from computing the blood flow in natural hearts and arteries. There are many elements needed to quantify the flow in these devices such as flow solvers, geometry modeling including flexible walls, moving boundary procedures and physiological characterization of blood. As a first step, computational technology developed for aerospace applications was extended to the analysis and development of a ventricular assist device (VAD), i.e., a blood pump. The blood flow in a VAD is practically incompressible and Newtonian, and thus an incompressible Navier-Stokes solution procedure can be applied. A primitive variable formulation is used in conjunction with the overset grid approach to handle complex moving geometry. The primary purpose of developing the incompressible flow analysis capability was to quantify the flow in advanced turbopump for space propulsion system. The same procedure has been extended to the development of NASA-DeBakey VAD that is based on an axial blood pump. Due to massive computing requirements, high-end computing is necessary for simulating three-dimensional flow in these pumps. Computational, experimental, and clinical results are presented.

  1. Noninvasive blood-flow meter using a curved cannula with zero compensation for an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Fukuda, Kyohei; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In order to monitor the condition of a patient using a left ventricular assist system (LVAS), blood flow should be measured. However, the reliable determination of blood-flow rate has not been established. The purpose of the present study is to develop a noninvasive blood-flow meter using a curved cannula with zero compensation for an axial flow blood pump. The flow meter uses the centrifugal force generated by the flow rate in the curved cannula. Two strain gauges served as sensors. The first gauges were attached to the curved area to measure static pressure and centrifugal force, and the second gauges were attached to straight area to measure static pressure. The flow rate was determined by the differences in output from the two gauges. The zero compensation was constructed based on the consideration that the flow rate could be estimated during the initial driving condition and the ventricular suction condition without using the flow meter. A mock circulation loop was constructed in order to evaluate the measurement performance of the developed flow meter with zero compensation. As a result, the zero compensation worked effectively for the initial calibration and the zero-drift of the measured flow rate. We confirmed that the developed flow meter using a curved cannula with zero compensation was able to accurately measure the flow rate continuously and noninvasively. PMID:24110631

  2. Modified Beer-Lambert law for blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Wesley B.; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Busch, David R.; Mesquita, Rickson C.; Greenberg, Joel H.; Yodh, A. G.

    2015-03-01

    The modified Beer-Lambert law is among the most widely used approaches for analysis of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) reflectance signals for measurements of tissue blood volume and oxygenation. Briefly, the modified Beer-Lambert paradigm is a scheme to derive changes in tissue optical properties based on continuous-wave (CW) diffuse optical intensity measurements. In its simplest form, the scheme relates differential changes in light transmission (in any geometry) to differential changes in tissue absorption. Here we extend this paradigm to the measurement of tissue blood flow by diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). In the new approach, differential changes of the intensity temporal auto-correlation function at a single delay-time are related to differential changes in blood flow. The key theoretical results for measurement of blood flow changes in any tissue geometry are derived, and we demonstrate the new method to monitor cerebral blood flow in a pig under conditions wherein the semi-infinite geometry approximation is fairly good. Specifically, the drug dinitrophenol was injected in the pig to induce a gradual 200% increase in cerebral blood flow, as measured with MRI velocity flow mapping and by DCS. The modified Beer-Lambert law for flow accurately recovered these flow changes using only a single delay-time in the intensity auto-correlation function curve. The scheme offers increased DCS measurement speed of blood flow. Further, the same techniques using the modified Beer-Lambert law to filter out superficial tissue effects in NIRS measurements of deep tissues can be applied to the DCS modified Beer-Lambert law for blood flow monitoring of deep tissues.

  3. A Porous Media Model for Blood Flow within Reticulated Foam

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    A porous media model is developed for non-Newtonian blood flow through reticulated foam at Reynolds numbers ranging from 10−8 to 10. This empirical model effectively divides the pressure gradient versus flow speed curve into three regimes, in which either the non-Newtonian viscous forces, the Newtonian viscous forces, or the inertial fluid forces are most prevalent. When compared to simulation data of blood flow through two reticulated foam geometries, the model adequately captures the pressure gradient within all three regimes, especially that within the Newtonian regime where blood transitions from a power-law to a constant viscosity fluid. PMID:24031095

  4. Abnormal Myocardial Blood Flow Reserve Observed in Cardiac Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Nel, Karen; Senior, Roxy; Greaves, Kim

    2016-01-01

    We performed real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography on a patient with cardiac amyloidosis and previous normal coronary angiography presenting with atypical chest pain to assess myocardial blood flow reserve (MBFR). Myocardial contrast echocardiography was performed and flash microbubble destruction and replenishment analysis was used to calculate myocardial blood flow. Dipyridamole was used to achieve hyperemia. MBFR was derived from the ratio of peak myocardial blood flow at hyperemia and rest. The results show a marked reduction in MBFR in our patient. Previous reports of luminal obstruction of intramyocardial rather than epicardial vessels by amyloid deposition may be causing microvascular dysfunction. PMID:27081447

  5. Numerical Simulation of Cellular Blood Flow through a Rigid Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reasor, Daniel; Clausen, Jonathan; Aidun, Cyrus

    2009-11-01

    In blood flow, red blood cells (RBCs), the most numerous constituent of blood, influence continuum-level measures by altering the suspension at microscopic scales. The presence of RBCs alters the stress and diffusion individual cells experience, which can influence cardiovascular diseases by affecting other cells present in blood like platelets and white blood cells. Simulations of blood at a cellular level provide a tool that allows exploration of both the rheology and the stress and diffusion of individual suspended cells. In this work, a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann/finite element method is used to simulate suspension flows characteristic of blood with deformable RBCs at realistic hematocrit values. We have shown the ability to simulate thousands deformable suspensions capturing non-Newtonian flow characteristics such as shear thinning, and the results agree well with experimental observations. Simulations through rigid arteries have been deformed with as many as 2500 RBCs. This work outlines results obtained for pressure-gradient driven blood flow through a rigid artery with 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50% hematocrit values. Results include the effect these deformable RBCs have on mean velocity, flow rate, radial variation of RBC concentration, and the effective viscosity for simulations at moderate to low cell capillary numbers, Ca <=0.08.

  6. Capillary pericytes regulate cerebral blood flow in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Brad A.; O’Farrell, Fergus M.; Buchan, Alastair M.; Lauritzen, Martin; Attwell, David

    2014-01-01

    Brain blood flow increases, evoked by neuronal activity, power neural computation and are the basis of BOLD functional imaging. It is controversial whether blood flow is controlled solely by arteriole smooth muscle, or also by capillary pericytes. We demonstrate that neuronal activity and the neurotransmitter glutamate evoke the release of messengers that dilate capillaries by actively relaxing pericytes. Dilation is mediated by prostaglandin E2, but requires nitric oxide release to suppress vasoconstricting 20-HETE synthesis. In vivo, when sensory input increases blood flow, capillaries dilate before arterioles and are estimated to produce 84% of the blood flow increase. In pathology, ischaemia evokes capillary constriction by pericytes. We show that this is followed by pericyte death in rigor, which may irreversibly constrict capillaries and damage the blood-brain barrier. Thus, pericytes are major regulators of cerebral blood flow and initiators of functional imaging signals. Prevention of pericyte constriction and death may reduce the long-lasting blood flow decrease which damages neurons after stroke. PMID:24670647

  7. Regulation of exercise blood flow: Role of free radicals.

    PubMed

    Trinity, Joel D; Broxterman, Ryan M; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-09-01

    During exercise, oxygen and nutrient rich blood must be delivered to the active skeletal muscle, heart, skin, and brain through the complex and highly regulated integration of central and peripheral hemodynamic factors. Indeed, even minor alterations in blood flow to these organs have profound consequences on exercise capacity by modifying the development of fatigue. Therefore, the fine-tuning of blood flow is critical for optimal physical performance. At the level of the peripheral circulation, blood flow is regulated by a balance between the mechanisms responsible for vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Once thought of as toxic by-products of in vivo chemistry, free radicals are now recognized as important signaling molecules that exert potent vasoactive responses that are dependent upon the underlying balance between oxidation-reduction reactions or redox balance. Under normal healthy conditions with low levels of oxidative stress, free radicals promote vasodilation, which is attenuated with exogenous antioxidant administration. Conversely, with advancing age and disease where background oxidative stress is elevated, an exercise-induced increase in free radicals can further shift the redox balance to a pro-oxidant state, impairing vasodilation and attenuating blood flow. Under these conditions, exogenous antioxidants improve vasodilatory capacity and augment blood flow by restoring an "optimal" redox balance. Interestingly, while the active skeletal muscle, heart, skin, and brain all have unique functions during exercise, the mechanisms by which free radicals contribute to the regulation of blood flow is remarkably preserved across each of these varied target organs. PMID:26876648

  8. Coronary blood flow in the anesthetized American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bjarke; Elfwing, Magnus; Elsey, Ruth M; Wang, Tobias; Crossley, Dane A

    2016-01-01

    Coronary circulation of the heart evolved early within ectothermic vertebrates and became of vital importance to cardiac performance in some teleost fish, mammals and birds. In contrast, the role and function of the coronary circulation in ectothermic reptiles remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated the systemic and coronary arterial responses of five anesthetized juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) to hypoxia, acetylcholine, adenosine, sodium nitroprusside, isoproterenol, and phenylephrine. We recorded electrocardiograms, monitored systemic blood pressure, blood flows in both aortae, and blood flow in a major coronary artery supplying most of the right ventricle. Coronary arterial blood flow was generally forward, but there was a brief retrograde flow during a ventricular contraction. Blood pressure was significantly changed in all conditions. Acetylcholine decreased coronary forward flow, but this response was confounded by the concomitant lowered work of the ventricles due to decreased heart rate and blood pressure. Coronary forward flow was poorly correlated with heart rate and mean arterial pressure across treatments. Overall changes in coronary forward flow, significant and not significant, were generally in the same direction as mean arterial pressure and ventricular power, approximated as the product of systemic cardiac output and mean arterial pressure. PMID:26436857

  9. Relationship between beta-adrenoceptors and coronary blood flow heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Upsher, M.E.; Weiss, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the heterogeneous distribution of ..beta.. adrenoceptors contributes to the control of flow heterogeneity in the canine myocardium. ..beta.. adrenoceptor density and affinity were measured simultaneously with coronary blood flow in multiple sections of the left ventricle of 14 anesthetized open chest dogs. Radioactive microspheres were used for the measurement of blood flow. Receptor density (Bmax) and dissociation constant (Kd) were measured using (/sup 125/I)- iodopindolol. The average control myocardial blood flow (MBF) was 86/+-/15 ml/min/100 g. Isoproterenol increased MBF by 82%, whereas propranolol reduced MBF by 13%. The mean value of Bmax was unaltered by either treatment. Under control conditions, a significant positive positive correlation was observed between Bmax and blood flow. In the isoproterenol treatment group, this correlation was enhanced. Beta adrenoceptor blockade led to a negative correlation. Kd showed no overall correlation with blood flow. Kd but not Bmax was significantly higher in the EPI than in the ENDO and in the base compared to the apex. There appears to be a direct linear relationship between the distribution of beta adrenoceptors and MBF distribution which is enhanced under conditions of high beta adrenergic activity. There is a correlation between beta adrenoceptor activity and blood flow distribution in the canine myocardium.

  10. Optic Nerve Head Blood Flow Autoregulation during Changes in Arterial Blood Pressure in Healthy Young Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Boltz, Agnes; Told, Reinhard; Napora, Katarzyna J.; Palkovits, Stefan; Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2013-01-01

    Aim In the present study the response of optic nerve head blood flow to an increase in ocular perfusion pressure during isometric exercise was studied. Based on our previous studies we hypothesized that subjects with an abnormal blood flow response, defined as a decrease in blood flow of more than 10% during or after isometric exercise, could be identified. Methods A total of 40 healthy subjects were included in this study. Three periods of isometric exercise were scheduled, each consisting of 2 minutes of handgripping. Optic nerve head blood flow was measured continuously before, during and after handgripping using laser Doppler flowmetry. Blood pressure was measured non-invasively in one-minute intervals. Intraocular pressure was measured at the beginning and the end of the measurements and ocular perfusion pressure was calculated as 2/3*mean arterial pressure –intraocular pressure. Results Isometric exercise was associated with an increase in ocular perfusion pressure during all handgripping periods (p < 0.001). By contrast no change in optic nerve head blood flow was seen. However, in a subgroup of three subjects blood flow showed a consistent decrease of more than 10% during isometric exercise although their blood pressure values increased. In addition, three other subjects showed a consistent decline of blood flow of more than 10% during the recovery periods. Conclusion Our data confirm previous results indicating that optic nerve head blood flow is autoregulated during an increase in perfusion pressure. In addition, we observed a subgroup of 6 subjects (15%) that showed an abnormal response, which is in keeping with our previous data. The mechanisms underlying this abnormal response remain to be shown. PMID:24324774

  11. Skeletal Blood Flow in Bone Repair and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Ryan E.; Silva, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a highly vascularized tissue, although this aspect of bone is often overlooked. In this article, the importance of blood flow in bone repair and regeneration will be reviewed. First, the skeletal vascular anatomy, with an emphasis on long bones, the distinct mechanisms for vascularizing bone tissue, and methods for remodeling existing vasculature are discussed. Next, techniques for quantifying bone blood flow are briefly summarized. Finally, the body of experimental work that demonstrates the role of bone blood flow in fracture healing, distraction osteogenesis, osteoporosis, disuse osteopenia, and bone grafting is examined. These results illustrate that adequate bone blood flow is an important clinical consideration, particularly during bone regeneration and in at-risk patient groups. PMID:26273509

  12. Aging, regional cerebral blood flow, and neuropsychological functioning

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, W.D.; Golden, C.J.; Gillen, R.W.; Sawicki, R.F.; Quaife, M.; Uhl, H.S.; Greenhouse, A.J.

    1984-10-01

    Previous studies found changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) patterns related to both age and various cognitive tasks. However, no study has yet demonstrated a relationship between rCBF and performance on the Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery (LNNB) in an elderly group. Seventy-nine elderly volunteers (56-88 years old), both healthy and demented, underwent the /sup 133/xenon inhalation rCBF procedure and were given the LNNB. The decrements in the gray-matter blood flow paralleled decrements in performance on the LNNB. Using partial correlations, a significant proportion of shared variance was observed between gray-matter blood flow and the LNNB scales. However, there was much less of a relationship between white-matter blood flow and performance on the LNNB. This study suggests that even within a restricted age sample rCBF is related in a global way to neuropsychological functioning.

  13. Regional blood flow during continuous low-dose endotoxin infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, R.E.; Lang, C.H.; Spitzer, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Escherichia coli endotoxin (ET) was administered to adult rats by continuous IV infusion from a subcutaneously implanted osmotic pump (Alzet). Cardiac output and regional blood flow were determined by the radiolabeled microsphere method after 6 and 30 hr of ET or saline infusion. Cardiac output (CO) of ET rats was not different from time-matched controls, whereas arterial pressure was 13% lower after 30 hr of infusion. After both 6 and 30 hr of ET, pancreatic blood flow and percentage of cardiac output were lower than in controls. Estimated portal venous flow was decreased at each time point, and an increased hepatic arterial flow (significant after 30 hr) resulted in an unchanged total hepatic blood flow. Blood flow to most other tissues, including epididymal fat, muscle, kidneys, adrenals, and gastrointestinal tract, was similar between treatments. Maintenance of blood flow to metabolically important tissues indicates that the previously reported alterations in in vitro cellular metabolism are not due to tissue hypoperfusion. Earlier observations of in vitro myocardial dysfunction, coexistent with the significant impairment in pancreatic flow, raise the possibility that release of a myocardial depressant factor occurs not only in profound shock but also under less severe conditions of sepsis and endotoxemia.

  14. Experimental comparison of mammalian and avian blood flow in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Kathryn; Liepmann, Dorian

    2015-11-01

    The non-Newtonian, shear rate dependent behavior of blood in microchannel fluid dynamics has been studied for nearly a century, with a significant focus on the characteristics of human blood. However, for over 200 years biologists have noted significant differences in red blood cell characteristics across vertebrate species, with particularly drastic differences in cell size and shape between mammals and non-mammalian classes. We present an experimental analysis of flow in long microchannels for several varieties of mammalian and avian blood, across a range of hematocrits, channel diameters, and flow rates. Correlation of shear rate and viscosity is compared to existing constitutive equations for human blood to further quantify the importance of red blood cell characteristics. Ongoing experimental results are made available in an online database for reference or collaboration. K.F. acknowledges funding from the ARCS Foundation and an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship through NSF Grant DGE 1106400.

  15. APPLICATION OF THE THEORY OF INTERACTING CONTINUA TO BLOOD FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Kim, Jeongho; Hund, Samuel J.; Antaki, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-scale investigations of the flow and deformation of blood and its formed elements have been studied for many years. Early in vitro investigations in the rotational viscometers or small glass tubes revealed important rheological properties such as the reduced blood apparent viscosity, Fahraeus effect and Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect [1], exhibiting the nonhomogeneous property of blood in microcirculation. We have applied Mixture Theory, also known as Theory of Interacting Continua, to study and model this property of blood [2, 3]. This approach holds great promise for predicting the trafficking of RBCs in micro-scale flows (such as the depletion layer near the wall), and other unique hemorheological phenomena relevant to blood trauma. The blood is assumed to be composed of an RBC component modeled as a nonlinear fluid, suspended in plasma, modeled as a linearly viscous fluid.

  16. Microvascular blood flow resistance: Role of red blood cell migration and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Katanov, Dinar; Gompper, Gerhard; Fedosov, Dmitry A

    2015-05-01

    Microvascular blood flow resistance has a strong impact on cardiovascular function and tissue perfusion. The flow resistance in microcirculation is governed by flow behavior of blood through a complex network of vessels, where the distribution of red blood cells across vessel cross-sections may be significantly distorted at vessel bifurcations and junctions. In this paper, the development of blood flow and its resistance starting from a dispersed configuration of red blood cells is investigated in simulations for different hematocrit levels, flow rates, vessel diameters, and aggregation interactions between red blood cells. Initially dispersed red blood cells migrate toward the vessel center leading to the formation of a cell-free layer near the wall and to a decrease of the flow resistance. The development of cell-free layer appears to be nearly universal when scaled with a characteristic shear rate of the flow. The universality allows an estimation of the length of a vessel required for full flow development, lc ≲ 25D, for vessel diameters in the range 10 μm < D < 100 μm. Thus, the potential effect of red blood cell dispersion at vessel bifurcations and junctions on the flow resistance may be significant in vessels which are shorter or comparable to the length lc. Aggregation interactions between red blood cells generally lead to a reduction of blood flow resistance. The simulations are performed using the same viscosity for both external and internal fluids and the RBC membrane viscosity is not considered; however, we discuss how the viscosity contrast may affect the results. Finally, we develop a simple theoretical model which is able to describe the converged cell-free-layer thickness at steady-state flow with respect to flow rate. The model is based on the balance between a lift force on red blood cells due to cell-wall hydrodynamic interactions and shear-induced effective pressure due to cell-cell interactions in flow. We expect that these results can

  17. Effect of pulsatile swirling flow on stenosed arterial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hojin; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-09-01

    The existence of swirling flow phenomena is frequently observed in arterial vessels, but information on the fluid-dynamic roles of swirling flow is still lacking. In this study, the effects of pulsatile swirling inlet flows with various swirling intensities on the flow field in a stenosis model are experimentally investigated using a particle image velocimetry velocity field measurement technique. A pulsatile pump provides cyclic pulsating inlet flow and spiral inserts with two different helical pitches (10D and 10/3D) induce swirling flow in the stenosed channel. Results show that the pulsatile swirling flow has various beneficial effects by reducing the negative wall shear stress, the oscillatory shear index, and the flow reverse coefficient at the post-stenosis channel. Temporal variations of vorticity fields show that the short propagation length of the jet flow and the early breakout of turbulent flow are initiated as the swirling flow disturbs the symmetric development of the shear layer. In addition, the overall energy dissipation rate of the flow is suppressed by the swirling component of the flow. The results will be helpful for elucidating the hemodynamic characteristics of atherosclerosis and discovering better diagnostic procedures and clinical treatments. PMID:24984589

  18. Blood-flow measurement in muscle with Xe-133

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.Y.; Kim, I.; Ryo, U.Y.; Maskin, C.; Pinsky, S.

    1987-11-01

    An alternative method to the conventional miniature probe system for the measurement of blood flow in muscle has been developed. Xenon-133 was injected into the quadriceps muscles of ten subjects. A gamma camera and an online computer were then used to measure the half-clearance time of the Xe-133 while the subject was both at rest and exercising on an upright bicycle ergometer. The blood flow in the muscle was then calculated from the acquired data.

  19. Effect of tropicamide on ocular blood flow in the rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado, D.; Michel, P.; Jaanus, S.D.

    1982-05-01

    Intracardiac injection of 15 microspheres labeled with /sup 85/Sr (strontium) and /sup 141/Ce (cerium) were used to determine ocular blood flow in seven rabbits before and 25 min after bilateral application of tropicamide to the cornea. By using two different isotopes distinguishable under gammaspectrometry, each animal served as its own control. After administration of two drops of 1% tropicamide, no significant difference in blood flow between treated and untreated eyes was observed.

  20. Non-invasive pulmonary blood flow analysis and blood pressure mapping derived from 4D flow MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delles, Michael; Rengier, Fabian; Azad, Yoo-Jin; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley, Sebastian; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2015-03-01

    In diagnostics and therapy control of cardiovascular diseases, detailed knowledge about the patient-specific behavior of blood flow and pressure can be essential. The only method capable of measuring complete time-resolved three-dimensional vector fields of the blood flow velocities is velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), often denoted as 4D flow MRI. Furthermore, relative pressure maps can be computed from this data source, as presented by different groups in recent years. Hence, analysis of blood flow and pressure using 4D flow MRI can be a valuable technique in management of cardiovascular diseases. In order to perform these tasks, all necessary steps in the corresponding process chain can be carried out in our in-house developed software framework MEDIFRAME. In this article, we apply MEDIFRAME for a study of hemodynamics in the pulmonary arteries of five healthy volunteers. The study included measuring vector fields of blood flow velocities by phase-contrast MRI and subsequently computing relative blood pressure maps. We visualized blood flow by streamline depictions and computed characteristic values for the left and the right pulmonary artery (LPA and RPA). In all volunteers, we observed a lower amount of blood flow in the LPA compared to the RPA. Furthermore, we visualized blood pressure maps using volume rendering and generated graphs of pressure differences between the LPA, the RPA and the main pulmonary artery. In most volunteers, blood pressure was increased near to the bifurcation and in the proximal LPA, leading to higher average pressure values in the LPA compared to the RPA.

  1. Radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives for evaluating local cerebral blood flow

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1990-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals useful in brain imaging comprising radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives. The compounds are 5-halo-thiophene-2-isopropyl amines able to cross the blood-brain barrier and be retained for a sufficient length of time to allow the evaluation or regional blood flow by radioimaging of the brain.

  2. Radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives for evaluating local cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M.M.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1990-02-13

    This patent describes radiopharmaceuticals useful in brain imaging. They comprise radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives. The compounds are 5-halo-thiophene-2-isopropyl amines able to cross the blood-brain barrier and be retained for a sufficient length of time to allow the evaluation or regional blood flow by radioimaging of the brain.

  3. Cerebral blood flow velocity underestimates cerebral blood flow during modest hypercapnia and hypocapnia.

    PubMed

    Coverdale, Nicole S; Gati, Joseph S; Opalevych, Oksana; Perrotta, Amanda; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2014-11-15

    To establish the accuracy of transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) measures of middle cerebral artery (MCA) cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) as a surrogate of cerebral blood flow (CBF) during hypercapnia (HC) and hypocapnia (HO), we examined whether the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the MCA changed during HC or HO and whether TCD-based estimates of CBFV were equivalent to estimates from phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging. MCA CSA was measured from 3T magnetic resonance images during baseline, HO (hyperventilation at 30 breaths/min), and HC (6% carbon dioxide). PC and TCD measures of CBFV were measured during these protocols on separate days. CSA and TCD CBFV were used to calculate CBF. During HC, CSA increased from 5.6 ± 0.8 to 6.5 ± 1.0 mm(2) (P < 0.001, n = 13), while end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PETCO2) increased from 37 ± 3 to 46 ± 5 Torr (P < 0.001). During HO, CSA decreased from 5.8 ± 0.9 to 5.3 ± 0.9 mm(2) (P < 0.001, n = 15), while PetCO2 decreased from 36 ± 4 to 23 ± 3 Torr (P < 0.001). CBFVs during baseline, HO, and HC were compared between PC and TCD, and the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.83 (P < 0.001). The relative increase from baseline was 18 ± 8% greater (P < 0.001) for CBF than TCD CBFV during HC, and the relative decrease of CBF during HO was 7 ± 4% greater than the change in TCD CBFV (P < 0.001). These findings challenge the assumption that the CSA of the MCA does not change over modest changes in PETCO2. PMID:25012027

  4. Acupuncture affects regional blood flow in various organs.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sae; Hotta, Harumi

    2008-06-01

    In this review, our recent studies using anesthetized animals concerning the neural mechanisms of vasodilative effect of acupuncture-like stimulation in various organs are briefly summarized. Responses of cortical cerebral blood flow and uterine blood flow are characterized as non-segmental and segmental reflexes. Among acupuncture-like stimuli delivered to five different segmental areas of the body; afferent inputs to the brain stem (face) and to the spinal cord at the cervical (forepaw), thoracic (chest or abdomen), lumbar (hindpaw) and sacral (perineum) levels, cortical cerebral blood flow was increased by stimuli to face, forepaw and hindpaw. The afferent pathway of the responses is composed of somatic groups III and IV afferent nerves and whose efferent nerve pathway includes intrinsic cholinergic vasodilators originating in the basal forebrain. Uterine blood flow was increased by cutaneous stimulation of the hindpaw and perineal area, with perineal predominance. The afferent pathway of the response is composed of somatic group II, III and IV afferent nerves and the efferent nerve pathway includes the pelvic parasympathetic cholinergic vasodilator nerves. Furthermore, we briefly summarize vasodilative regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow via a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) induced by antidromic activation of group IV somatic afferent nerves. These findings in healthy but anesthetized animals may be applicable to understanding the neural mechanisms improving blood flow in various organs following clinical acupuncture. PMID:18604254

  5. Establishing the diffuse correlation spectroscopy signal relationship with blood flow.

    PubMed

    Boas, David A; Sakadžić, Sava; Selb, Juliette; Farzam, Parisa; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Carp, Stefan A

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements of blood flow rely on the sensitivity of the temporal autocorrelation function of diffusively scattered light to red blood cell (RBC) mean square displacement (MSD). For RBCs flowing with convective velocity [Formula: see text], the autocorrelation is expected to decay exponentially with [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the delay time. RBCs also experience shear-induced diffusion with a diffusion coefficient [Formula: see text] and an MSD of [Formula: see text]. Surprisingly, experimental data primarily reflect diffusive behavior. To provide quantitative estimates of the relative contributions of convective and diffusive movements, we performed Monte Carlo simulations of light scattering through tissue of varying vessel densities. We assumed laminar vessel flow profiles and accounted for shear-induced diffusion effects. In agreement with experimental data, we found that diffusive motion dominates the correlation decay for typical DCS measurement parameters. Furthermore, our model offers a quantitative relationship between the RBC diffusion coefficient and absolute tissue blood flow. We thus offer, for the first time, theoretical support for the empirically accepted ability of the DCS blood flow index ([Formula: see text]) to quantify tissue perfusion. We find [Formula: see text] to be linearly proportional to blood flow, but with a proportionality modulated by the hemoglobin concentration and the average blood vessel diameter. PMID:27335889

  6. Blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-05-01

    Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Volumetric blood flow velocity was supporting on constant level (1 ml/h). Silicone tube of diameter comparable with coronary arteries diameter was used as vessel model. Cell-cell interactions were studied under glucose and anticoagulants influence. Increased adhesiveness of blood cells to tube walls was revealed in patient with coronary heart disease (CHD) compare to practically healthy persons (PHP). In patients with stable angina pectoris of high functional class and patients with AMI shear stress resistant erythrocyte aggregates were predominating in blood flow structure up to microclots formation. Clotting and erythrocytes aggregation increase as response to glucose solution injection, sharply defined in patients with CHD. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with CHD and PHP. After compare our results with other author's data we can consider that method used in our study is sensible enough to investigate blood flow structure violations in patients with CHD and PHP. Several differences of cell-cell interaction in flow under glucose and anticoagulant influence were found out in patients with CHD and PHP.

  7. Microprobes For Blood Flow Measurements In Tissue And Small Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberg, P. A.; Salerud, E. G.

    1988-04-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry is a method for the continuous and non-invasive recording of tissue blood flow. The method has already proved to be advantageous in a number of clinical as well as theoretical medical disciplines. In dermatology, plastic- and gastrointestinal surgery laser Doppler measurements have substantially contributed to increase knowledge of microvascular perfusion. In experimental medicine, the method has been used in the study of a great variety of microvascular problems. Spontaneous rhythmical variations, spatial and temporal fluctuations in human skin blood flow are mentioned as examples of problem areas in which new knowledge has been generated. The method has facilitated further investigations of the nature of spongeous bone blood flow, testis and kidney cortex blood flow. Recently we have showed that a variant of the laser Doppler method principle, using a single optical fiber, can be advantageous in deep tissue measurements. With this method laser light is transmitted bidirectionally in a single fiber. The tissue trauma which affects blood flow can be minimized by introducing small diameter fibers (0.1-0.5 mm). A special set-up utilizing the same basic principle has been used for the recording of blood flow in small vessels.

  8. Cerebral aneurysms treated with flow-diverting stents: Computational models using intravascular blood flow measurements

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Michael R; McGah, Patrick M; Aliseda, Alberto; Mourad, Pierre D; Nerva, John D; Vaidya, Sandeep S; Morton, Ryan P; Ghodke, Basavaraj V; Kim, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Computational fluid dynamics modeling is useful in the study of the hemodynamic environment of cerebral aneurysms, but patient-specific measurements of boundary conditions, such as blood flow velocity and pressure, have not been previously applied to the study of flow-diverting stents. We integrated patient-specific intravascular blood flow velocity and pressure measurements into computational models of aneurysms before and after treatment with flow-diverting stents to determine stent effects on aneurysm hemodynamics. Methods Blood flow velocity and pressure were measured in peri-aneurysmal locations using an intravascular dual-sensor pressure and Doppler velocity guidewire before and after flow-diverting stent treatment of four unruptured cerebral aneurysms. These measurements defined inflow and outflow boundary conditions for computational models. Intra-aneurysmal flow rates, wall shear stress and wall shear stress gradient were calculated. Results Measurements of inflow velocity and outflow pressure were successful in all four patients. Computational models incorporating these measurements demonstrated significant reductions in intra-aneurysmal wall shear stress and wall shear stress gradient, and a trend in reduced intra-aneurysmal blood flow. Conclusions Integration of intravascular dual-sensor guidewire measurements of blood flow velocity and blood pressure provided patient-specific computational models of cerebral aneurysms. Aneurysm treatment with flow-diverting stents reduces blood flow and hemodynamic shear stress in the aneurysm dome. PMID:23868162

  9. Measuring bovine mammary gland blood flow using a transit time ultrasonic flow probe.

    PubMed

    Gorewit, R C; Aromando, M C; Bristol, D G

    1989-07-01

    Lactating cattle were used to validate a transit time ultrasonic blood flow metering system for measuring mammary gland arterial blood flow. Blood flow probes were surgically placed around the right external pudic artery. An electromagnetic flow probe was implanted in tandem with the ultrasonic probe in two cows for comparative measurements. The absolute accuracy of the implanted flow probes was assessed in vivo by mechanical means on anesthetized cows after 2 to 3 wk of implantation. The zero offset of the ultrasonic probes ranged from -12 to 8 ml/min. When the ultrasonic probe was properly implanted, the slopes of the calibration curves were linear and ranged from .92 to .95, tracking absolute flow to within 8%. The transit time instrument's performance was examined under a variety of physiological conditions. These included milking and hormone injections. The transit time ultrasonic flow meter accurately measured physiological changes in mammary arterial blood flow in chronically prepared conscious cattle. Blood flow increased 29% during milking. Epinephrine decreased mammary blood flow by 90 to 95%. Oxytocin doses increased mammary blood flow by 15 to 24%. PMID:2674232

  10. Blood flow and arterial endothelial dysfunction: Mechanisms and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, Abdul I.

    2013-06-01

    The arterial endothelium exquisitely regulates vascular function, and endothelial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerotic lesions develop preferentially at arterial branches and bifurcations where the blood flow is disturbed. Understanding the basis for this observation requires elucidating the effects of blood flow on the endothelial cell (EC) function. The goal of this review is: (1) to describe our current understanding of the relationships between arterial blood flow and atherosclerosis, (2) to present the wide array of flow-induced biological responses in ECs, and (3) to discuss the mechanisms by which ECs sense, transmit, and transduce flow-derived mechanical forces. We conclude by presenting some future perspectives in the highly interdisciplinary field of EC mechanotransduction.

  11. Measurement of normal portal venous blood flow by Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Brown, H S; Halliwell, M; Qamar, M; Read, A E; Evans, J M; Wells, P N

    1989-04-01

    The volume flow rate of blood in the portal vein was measured using a duplex ultrasound system. The many errors inherent in the duplex method were assessed with particular reference to the portal vein and appropriate correction factors were obtained by in vitro calibration. The effect of posture on flow was investigated by examining 45 healthy volunteers in three different positions; standing, supine and tilted head down at 20 degrees from the horizontal. The mean volume blood flow in the supine position was 864 (188)ml/min (mean 1SD). When standing, the mean volume blood flow was significantly reduced by 26% to 662 (169)ml/min. There was, however, no significant difference between flow when supine and when tilted head down at 20 degrees from the horizontal. PMID:2653973

  12. Validation studies for brain blood flow assessment by radioxenon tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Rezai, K.; Kirchner, P.T.; Armstrong, C.; Ehrhardt, J.C.; Heistad, D.

    1988-03-01

    A tomographic technique has been used recently for cerebral blood flow measurements with inhaled radioxenon. Based on experiments in a specially developed dynamic phantom and on studies in primates in vivo, we have analyzed the validity of this method for measurements of both regional and total blood flow in the brain. We have also examined the errors introduced into flow computations as a function of changes in such parameters as: rate of xenon input, size of region of interest, magnitude of regional flow rates, and inter-regional flow differences. Our findings indicate a reasonable degree of accuracy for flow measurements in gray matter regions that are 3 cm in diameter or larger, while white matter blood flow is generally overestimated. The accuracy for regional flow assessments degrades as a function of: diminishing region size, increasing inter-regional flow differences, and flow rates in excess of 100 ml/100 g/min. Measurements for brain regions 2 cm or smaller in diameter can be in error by 25-50% as a result of partial volume averaging. Although the technique is not ideal for accurate flow measurements in small regions of the brain, it nevertheless provides a convenient means of assessing perfusion in major vascular territories of the brain in routine clinical applications.

  13. Measurement of directed blood flow by laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Evan R.; Thompson, Oliver B.; Andrews, Michael K.

    2011-03-01

    Recent success in reconciling laser Doppler and speckle measurements of dermal perfusion by the use of multi-exposure speckle has prompted an investigation of speckle effects arising from directed blood flow which might be expected in the small blood vessels of the eye. Unlike dermal scatter, the blood in retinal vessels is surrounded by few small and stationary scatterers able to assist the return of light energy by large-angle scatter. Returning light is expected to come from multiple small angle scatter from the large red blood cells which dominate the fluid. This work compares speckle measurements on highly scattering skin, with measurements on flow in a retinal phantom consisting of a glass capillary which is itself immersed in an index matching fluid to provide a flat air-phantom interface. Brownian motion dominated measurements when small easily levitated scatters were used, and flow was undetectable. With whole-blood, Brownian motion was small and directed flows in the expected region of tens of mm/s were detectable. The nominal flow speed relates to the known pump rate; within the capillary the flow will have a profile reducing toward the walls. The pulsatile effects on laser speckle contrast in the retina are discussed with preliminary multi-exposure measurements on retinal vessels using a fundus camera. Differences between the multiple exposure curves and power spectra of perfused tissue and ordered flow are discussed.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of the blood flow studied by Lyapunov exponents.

    PubMed

    Bracic, M; Stefanovska, A

    1998-05-01

    In order to gain an insight into the dynamics of the cardiovascular system throughout which the blood circulates, the signals measured from peripheral blood flow in humans were analyzed by calculating the Lyapunov exponents. Over a wide range of algorithm parameters, paired values of both the global and the local Lyapunov exponents were obtained, and at least one exponent equaled zero within the calculation error. This may be an indication of the deterministic nature and finite number of degrees of freedom of the cardiovascular system governing the blood-flow dynamics on a time scale of minutes. A difference was observed in the Lyapunov dimension of controls and athletes. PMID:9608852

  15. Extensional flow of blood analog solutions in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, P. C.; Pinho, F. T.; Oliveira, M. S. N.; Alves, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we show the importance of extensional rheology, in addition to the shear rheology, in the choice of blood analog solutions intended to be used in vitro for mimicking the microcirculatory system. For this purpose, we compare the flow of a Newtonian fluid and two well-established viscoelastic blood analog polymer solutions through microfluidic channels containing both hyperbolic and abrupt contractions∕expansions. The hyperbolic shape was selected in order to impose a nearly constant strain rate at the centerline of the microchannels and achieve a quasihomogeneous and strong extensional flow often found in features of the human microcirculatory system such as stenoses. The two blood analog fluids used are aqueous solutions of a polyacrylamide (125 ppm w∕w) and of a xanthan gum (500 ppm w∕w), which were characterized rheologically in steady-shear flow using a rotational rheometer and in extension using a capillary breakup extensional rheometer (CaBER). Both blood analogs exhibit a shear-thinning behavior similar to that of whole human blood, but their relaxation times, obtained from CaBER experiments, are substantially different (by one order of magnitude). Visualizations of the flow patterns using streak photography, measurements of the velocity field using microparticle image velocimetry, and pressure-drop measurements were carried out experimentally for a wide range of flow rates. The experimental results were also compared with the numerical simulations of the flow of a Newtonian fluid and a generalized Newtonian fluid with shear-thinning behavior. Our results show that the flow patterns of the two blood analog solutions are considerably different, despite their similar shear rheology. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the elastic properties of the fluid have a major impact on the flow characteristics, with the polyacrylamide solution exhibiting a much stronger elastic character. As such, these properties must be taken into account in the

  16. Blood Flow: Multi-scale Modeling and Visualization (July 2011)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Multi-scale modeling of arterial blood flow can shed light on the interaction between events happening at micro- and meso-scales (i.e., adhesion of red blood cells to the arterial wall, clot formation) and at macro-scales (i.e., change in flow patterns due to the clot). Coupled numerical simulations of such multi-scale flow require state-of-the-art computers and algorithms, along with techniques for multi-scale visualizations. This animation presents early results of two studies used in the development of a multi-scale visualization methodology. The fisrt illustrates a flow of healthy (red) and diseased (blue) blood cells with a Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method. Each blood cell is represented by a mesh, small spheres show a sub-set of particles representing the blood plasma, while instantaneous streamlines and slices represent the ensemble average velocity. In the second we investigate the process of thrombus (blood clot) formation, which may be responsible for the rupture of aneurysms, by concentrating on the platelet blood cells, observing as they aggregate on the wall of an aneruysm. Simulation was performed on Kraken at the National Institute for Computational Sciences. Visualization was produced using resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory.

  17. Blood Flow through an Open-Celled Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason; Maitland, Duncan

    2011-11-01

    The Hazen-Dupuit-Darcy (HDD) equation is commonly used in engineering applications to model the pressure gradient of flow through a porous media. One major advantage of this equation is that it simplifies the complex geometric details of the porous media into two coefficients: the permeability, K, and form factor, C. However through this simplification, the flow details within the porous media are no longer accessible, making it difficult to study the phenomena that contribute to changes in K and C due to clotting of blood flow. To obtain a more detailed understanding of blood flow through a porous media, a direct assessment of the complex interstitial geometry and flow is required. In this study, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations for Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood flow through an open-celled foam geometry obtained from a micro-CT scan. The nominal strut size of the foam sample is of O(10e-5) m and the corresponding Reynolds number based upon this length ranges up to O(10). Fitting the pressure gradient vs. Darcy velocity data with the HDD equation demonstrates that both viscous and inertial forces play an important role in the flow through the foam at these Reynolds numbers. Recirculation zones are observed to form in the wake of the pore struts, producing regions of flow characterized by both low shear rates and long fluid residence times, factors of which have been shown in previous studies to promote blood clotting.

  18. Research Advances: DRPS--Let The Blood Flow!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2007-01-01

    A team from the University of Pittsburgh's McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine has shown the potential for clinical use of the drag-reducing polymer (DRP) poly(N-vinylformamide), or PNVF. The high molecular weight PNVF is shown to reduce resistance to turbulent flow in a pipe and to enhance blood flow in animal models and it also…

  19. Cerebral blood flow measured by NMR indicator dilution in cats

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, J.R.; Branch, C.A.; Helpern, J.A.; Smith, M.B.; Butt, S.M.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-02-01

    We developed techniques to assess the utility of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) indicator for cerebral blood flow studies in cats, using Freon-22 for the first candidate. A PIN-diode-switched NMR experiment allowed the acquisition of an arterial as well as a cerebral fluorine-19 signal proportional to concentration vs. time in a 1.89 T magnet. Mean +/- SD blood:brain partition coefficients for Freon-22 were estimated at 0.93 +/- 0.08 for gray matter and 0.77 +/- 0.12 for white matter. Using maximum-likelihood curve fitting, estimates of mean +/- SD resting cerebral blood flow were 50 +/- 19 ml/100 g-min for gray matter and 5.0 +/- 2.0 ml/100 g-min for white matter. Hypercapnia produced the expected increases in gray and white matter blood flow. The physiologic effects of Freon-22, including an increase in cerebral blood flow itself with administration of 40% by volume, may limit its use as an indicator. Nevertheless, the NMR techniques described demonstrate the feasibility of fluorine-19-labeled compounds as cerebral blood flow indicators and the promise for their use in humans.

  20. The effects of hypoxemia on myocardial blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed

    Paridon, S M; Bricker, J T; Dreyer, W J; Reardon, M; Smith, E O; Porter, C B; Michael, L; Fisher, D J

    1989-03-01

    We evaluated the adequacy of regional and transmural blood flow during exercise and rapid pacing after 1 wk of hypoxemia. Seven mature mongrel dogs were made hypoxemic (mean O2 saturation = 72.4%) by anastomosis of left pulmonary artery to left atrial appendage. Catheters were placed in the left atrium, right atrium, pulmonary artery, and aorta. Atrial and ventricular pacing wires were placed. An aortic flow probe was placed to measure cardiac output. Ten nonshunted dogs, similarly instrumented, served as controls. Recovery time was approximately 1 wk. Cardiac output, mean aortic pressure, and oxygen saturation were measured at rest, with ventricular pacing, atrial pacing, and with treadmill exercise. Ventricular and atrial pace and exercise were at a heart rate of 200. Right ventricular free wall, left ventricular free wall, and septal blood flow were measured with radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Cardiac output, left atrial blood pressure, and aortic blood pressure were similar between the two groups of dogs in all testing states. Myocardial blood flow was significantly higher in the right and left ventricular free wall in the hypoxemic animals during resting and exercise testing states. Myocardial oxygen delivery was similar between the two groups of animals. Pacing resulted in an increase in myocardial blood flow in the control animals but not the hypoxemic animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2704596

  1. The effect of ventricular assist devices on cerebral blood flow and blood pressure fractality.

    PubMed

    Bellapart, Judith; Chan, Gregory S H; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Ainslie, Philip N; Dunster, Kimble R; Barnett, Adrian G; Boots, Rob; Fraser, John F

    2011-09-01

    Biological signals often exhibit self-similar or fractal scaling characteristics which may reflect intrinsic adaptability to their underlying physiological system. This study analysed fractal dynamics of cerebral blood flow in patients supported with ventricular assist devices (VAD) to ascertain if sustained modifications of blood pressure waveform affect cerebral blood flow fractality. Simultaneous recordings of arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity using transcranial Doppler were obtained from five cardiogenic shock patients supported by VAD, five matched control patients and five healthy subjects. Computation of a fractal scaling exponent (α) at the low-frequency time scale by detrended fluctuation analysis showed that cerebral blood flow velocity exhibited 1/f fractal scaling in both patient groups (α = 0.95 ± 0.09 and 0.97 ± 0.12, respectively) as well as in the healthy subjects (α = 0.86 ± 0.07). In contrast, fluctuation in blood pressure was similar to non-fractal white noise in both patient groups (α = 0.53 ± 0.11 and 0.52 ± 0.09, respectively) but exhibited 1/f scaling in the healthy subjects (α = 0.87 ± 0.04, P < 0.05 compared with the patient groups). The preservation of fractality in cerebral blood flow of VAD patients suggests that normal cardiac pulsation and central perfusion pressure changes are not the integral sources of cerebral blood flow fractality and that intrinsic vascular properties such as cerebral autoregulation may be involved. However, there is a clear difference in the fractal scaling properties of arterial blood pressure between the cardiogenic shock patients and the healthy subjects. PMID:21775798

  2. Detecting Blood Flow Response to Stimulation of the Human Eye

    PubMed Central

    Pechauer, Alex D.; Huang, David; Jia, Yali

    2015-01-01

    Retinal blood supply is tightly regulated under a variety of hemodynamic considerations in order to satisfy a high metabolic need and maintain both vessel structure and function. Simulation of the human eye can induce hemodynamics alterations, and attempt to assess the vascular reactivity response has been well documented in the scientific literature. Advancements in noninvasive imaging technologies have led to the characterization of magnitude and time course in retinal blood flow response to stimuli. This allowed for a better understanding of the mechanism in which blood flow is regulated, as well as identifying functional impairments in the diseased eye. Clinically, the ability to detect retinal blood flow reactivity during stimulation of the eye offers potential for the detection, differentiation, and diagnosis of diseases. PMID:26504775

  3. A multiple disk centrifugal pump as a blood flow device.

    PubMed

    Miller, G E; Etter, B D; Dorsi, J M

    1990-02-01

    A multiple disk, shear force, valveless centrifugal pump was studied to determine its suitability as a blood flow device. A pulsatile version of the Tesla viscous flow turbine was designed by modifying the original steady flow pump concept to produce physiological pressures and flows with the aid of controlling circuitry. Pressures and flows from this pump were compared to a Harvard Apparatus pulsatile piston pump. Both pumps were connected to an artificial circulatory system. Frequency and systolic duration were varied over a range of physiological conditions for both pumps. The results indicated that the Tesla pump, operating in a pulsatile mode, is capable of producing physiologic pressures and flows similar to the Harvard pump and other pulsatile blood pumps. PMID:2312140

  4. Use of laser speckle flowgraphy in ocular blood flow research.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Tetsuya; Araie, Makoto; Riva, Charles E; Schmetterer, Leopold; Orgul, Selim

    2010-11-01

    Laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG) allows for the quantitative estimation of blood flow in the optic nerve head, choroid, retina and iris in vivo. It was developed to facilitate the non-contact analysis of ocular blood flow in living eyes, utilizing the laser speckle phenomenon. The technique uses a fundus camera, a diode laser, an image sensor, an infrared charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and a high-resolution digital CCD camera. Normalized blur (NB), an approximate reciprocal of speckle contrast, represents an index of blood velocity, and shows a good correlation with tissue blood flow rates determined with the microsphere method in the retina, choroid or iris, as well as blood flow rates determined with the hydrogen gas clearance method in the optic nerve head. The square blur ratio (SBR), another index for quantitative estimation of blood velocity, is proportional to the square of the NB. The SBR is theoretically a more exact measurement which is proportional to velocity, whereas the NB is an approximation. Normalized blur was calculated in earlier versions of LSFG because of technical limitations; the SBR is used in current versions of the LSFG instrument. As these values are in arbitrary units, they should not be used to make comparisons between different eyes or different sites in an eye. Clinical protocols, calibration, evaluation procedures and possible limitations of the LSFG technique are described and the results of ocular blood flow studies using LSFG are briefly summarized. The LSFG method is suitable for monitoring the time-course of change in the tissue circulation at the same site in the same eye at various intervals, ranging from seconds to months. Unresolved issues concern the effect of pupil size on measurement results, the effects of various stimulations, and how to measure choroidal and retinal blood flow velocity separately without using the blue-component of argon laser. PMID:19725814

  5. Appearance of rapidly flowing blood on magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Waluch, V.; Lai, K.S.; Fernandez, E.J.; Spalter, C.

    1984-12-01

    The appearance of rapidly flowing blood on imaging (MRI) was evaluated using flow phantoms and dye infusion experiments. Laminar flow can be maintained at high velocities in small-diameter vessels. Under such conditions, flow-related enhancement may be observed several slices into a multislice imaging volume. As the velocity increases, turbulence occurs. The increased random motion of the protons causes loss of intensity on the first-echo image, although rephasing with increased intensity can be noted on the second-echo image. The flow pattern of a simple intraluminal obstruction is demonstrated by MRI and dye infusion experiments. Clinical examples of the phantom findings are shown and applications are discussed.

  6. Quantitative OCT angiography of optic nerve head blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yali; Morrison, John C.; Tokayer, Jason; Tan, Ou; Lombardi, Lorinna; Baumann, Bernhard; Lu, Chen D.; Choi, WooJhon; Fujimoto, James G.; Huang, David

    2012-01-01

    Optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow may be associated with glaucoma development. A reliable method to quantify ONH blood flow could provide insight into the vascular component of glaucoma pathophysiology. Using ultrahigh-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT), we developed a new 3D angiography algorithm called split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) for imaging ONH microcirculation. In this study, a method to quantify SSADA results was developed and used to detect ONH perfusion changes in early glaucoma. En face maximum projection was used to obtain 2D disc angiograms, from which the average decorrelation values (flow index) and the percentage area occupied by vessels (vessel density) were computed from the optic disc and a selected region within it. Preperimetric glaucoma patients had significant reductions of ONH perfusion compared to normals. This pilot study indicates OCT angiography can detect the abnormalities of ONH perfusion and has the potential to reveal the ONH blood flow mechanism related to glaucoma. PMID:23243564

  7. Quantifying the glycocalyx effects in blood flow in capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Mingge; Lei, Huan; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George

    2011-11-01

    We employ Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) to simulate blood flow in small capillaries with the glycocalyx attached to the endothelial surface. The effects of the glycocalyx on hematocrit and resistance to blood flow are analyzed by comparing with and without glycocalyx attached to the surface. Of particular interest is the quantification of the slip boundary condition at the edge of glycocalyx and also of the glycocalyx deformation at different grafting densities, stiffness and height of the glycocalyx. In addition to the physical insight gained for this important but relatively unexplored bio-flow, simple models for the slip velocity will be proposed that can be used in continuum simulations of blood flow in micro-vessels.

  8. Regional myocardial blood flow in man during dipyridamole coronary vasodilation

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, S.G.; Groves, B.M.; Horwitz, L.D.; Chaudhuri, T.K.

    1985-06-01

    Regional myocardial blood flow before and after intravenous dipyridamole (0.56 mg/kg) was measured during cardiac catheterization in 11 patients using the /sup 133/Xe washout technique. Significant increases in heart rate and decreases in systolic blood pressure were observed with dipyridamole infusion. However, double product and cardiac output did not differ before or after drug infusion. Regional myocardial blood flow increased from 67 to 117 ml/100 mg/min in myocardial segments supplied by nonobstructed coronary arteries. In stenotic coronary arteries, flow increased from 57 to 79 ml/100 mg/min with dipyridamole. We conclude that dipyridamole infusion results in flow differences which discriminate stenotic from nonstenotic coronary arteries.

  9. Dissipative particle dynamics modeling of blood flow in arterial bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuejin; Lykov, Kirill; Pivkin, Igor V.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-11-01

    The motion of a suspension of red blood cells (RBCs) flowing in bifurcations is investigated using both low-dimensional RBC (LD-RBC) and multiscale RBC (MS-RBC) models based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The blood flow is first simulated in a symmetric geometry between the diverging and converging channels to satisfy the periodic flow assumption along the flow direction. The results show that the flowrate ratio of the daughter channels and the feed hematocrit level has considerable influence on blood-plasma separation. We also propose a new method to model the inflow and outflow boundaries for the blood flow simulations: the inflow at the inlet is duplicated from a fully developed flow generated by DPD fluid with periodic boundary conditions; the outflow in two adjacent regions near the outlet is controlled by adaptive forces to keep the flowrate and velocity gradient equal, while the particles leaving the microfluidic channel at the outlet at each time step are removed from the system. The simulation results of the developing flow match analytical solutions from continuum theory. Plasma skimming and the all-or-nothing phenomenon of RBCs in bifurcation have been investigated in the simulations. The simulation results are consistent with previous experimental results and theoretical predictions. This work is supported by the NIH Grant R01HL094270.

  10. Ultrasonic Enrichment of Flowing Blood Cells in Capillars: Influence of the Flow Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreras, Pilar; Gonzalez, Itziar; Ahumada, Oscar

    Red blood cells subjected to standing waves collect at the pressure nodes during their flow motion. Blood is a non-newtonian fluid whose density and other properties are defined by its flow velocity. Their drift motion is governed by the radiation force together with hydrodynamic conditions. This work presents a study of the blood cell enrichment performed in a rectangular capillar at f=1 MHz as a function of their flow motion. The cells collect along the central axis of the capillary in very few seconds, with a clearance in other lateral areas. Optimal flow rates below 100uL/min were found in the experiments.

  11. One dimensional blood flow in a planetocentric orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haranas, Ioannis; Gkigkitzis, Ioannis

    2012-05-01

    All life on earth is accustomed to the presence of gravity. When gravity is altered, biological processes can go awry. It is of great importance to ensure safety during a spaceflight. Long term exposure to microgravity can trigger detrimental physiological responses in the human body. Fluid redistribution coupled with fluid loss is one of the effects. In particular, in microgravity blood volume is shifted towards the thorax and head. Sympathetic nervous system-induced vasoconstriction is needed to maintain arterial pressure, while venoconstriction limits venous pooling of blood prevents further reductions in venous return of blood to the heart. In this paper, we modify an existing one dimensional blood flow model with the inclusion of the hydrostatic pressure gradient that further depends on the gravitational field modified by the oblateness and rotation of the Earth. We find that the velocity of the blood flow VB is inversely proportional to the blood specific volume d, also proportional to the oblateness harmonic coefficient J2, the angular velocity of the Earth ωE, and finally proportional to an arbitrary constant c. For c = -0.39073 and ξH = -0.5 mmHg, all orbits result to less blood flow velocities than that calculated on the surface of the Earth. From all considered orbits, elliptical polar orbit of eccentricity e = 0.2 exhibit the largest flow velocity VB = 1.031 m/s, followed by the orbits of inclination i = 45°and 0°. The Earth's oblateness and its rotation contribute a 0.7% difference to the blood flow velocity.

  12. Intraperitoneal Resuscitation Improves Intestinal Blood Flow Following Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, El Rasheid; Garrison, R. Neal; Spain, David A.; Matheson, Paul J.; Harris, Patrick D.; Richardson, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of peritoneal resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock. Summary Background Data Methods for conventional resuscitation (CR) from hemorrhagic shock (HS) often fail to restore adequate intestinal blood flow, and intestinal ischemia has been implicated in the activation of the inflammatory response. There is clinical evidence that intestinal hypoperfusion is a major factor in progressive organ failure following HS. This study presents a novel technique of peritoneal resuscitation (PR) that improves visceral perfusion. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were bled to 50% of baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP) and resuscitated with shed blood plus 2 equal volumes of saline (CR). Groups were 1) sham, 2) HS + CR, and 3) HS + CR + PR with a hyperosmolar dextrose-based solution (Delflex 2.5%). Groups 1 and 2 had normal saline PR. In vivo videomicroscopy and Doppler velocimetry were used to assess terminal ileal microvascular blood flow. Endothelial cell function was assessed by the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine. Results Despite restored heart rate and MAP to baseline values, CR animals developed a progressive intestinal vasoconstriction and tissue hypoperfusion compared to baseline flow. PR induced an immediate and sustained vasodilation compared to baseline and a marked increase in average intestinal blood flow during the entire 2-hour post-resuscitation period. Endothelial-dependent dilator function was preserved with PR. Conclusions Despite the restoration of MAP with blood and saline infusions, progressive vasoconstriction and compromised intestinal blood flow occurs following HS/CR. Hyperosmolar PR during CR maintains intestinal blood flow and endothelial function. This is thought to be a direct effect of hyperosmolar solutions on the visceral microvessels. The addition of PR to a CR protocol prevents the splanchnic ischemia that initiates systemic inflammation. PMID:12724637

  13. Effects of Aortic Irregularities on the Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark-Little, Iris; Prahl-Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Mihaescu, Mihai; Fuchs, Laszlo; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark, Ephraim

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular defects characterized by geometrical anomalies of the aorta and its effect on the blood flow are investigated. The flow characteristics change with the aorta geometry and the rheological properties of the blood. Flow characteristics such as wall shear stress often play an important role in the development of vascular disease. In the present study, blood is considered to be non-Newtonian and is modeled using the Quemada model, an empirical model that is valid for different red blood cell loading. Three patient-specific aortic geometries are studied using Large Eddy Simulations (LES). The three geometries represent malformations that are typical in patients populations having a genetic disorder called Turner syndrome. The results show a highly complex flow with regions of recirculation that are enhanced in two of the three aortas. Moreover, blood flow is diverted, due to the malformations, from the descending aorta to the three side branches of the arch. The geometry having an elongated transverse aorta has larger areas of strong oscillatory wall shear stress.

  14. Regional neurohypophysial and hypothalamic blood flow in rats during hypercapnia

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, R.M. Jr.; Myers, C.L.; Page, R.B.

    1988-08-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in the neurohypophysis and hypothalamus in normocapnic and hypercapnic rats using (/sup 14/C)isopropyliodoamphetamine. Rats were surgically prepared using nitrous oxide and halothane and placed in plaster restraining casts. Hypercapnia was produced by increasing the fractional concentration of inspired CO/sub 2/ (FICO/sub 2/). rCBF in normocapnic rats was higher in the paraventricular nucleus, supraoptic nucleus, median eminence, and neural lobe than rates previously measured by use of diffusible tracers. During hypercapnia blood flow increased linearly with arterial PCO/sub 2/ (PACO/sub 2/) in all regions except the median eminence and neural lobe, which were not affected by hypercapnia. When rats were pretreated with phentolamine (1 mg/kg) to block the alpha-adrenergic receptors, blood flow in the median eminence and neural lobe increased significantly during hypercapnia. We conclude that blood flow in the cell bodies of the paraventricular nucleus and supraoptic nucleus is regulated differently during hypercapnia than blood flow in the nerve terminals in the median eminence and neural lobe. Furthermore, vasodilation produced by increased CO/sub 2/ is offset by alpha-receptor stimulation in the median eminence and neural lobe.

  15. Development of miniaturized mass flow meter for an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Yamane, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    To grasp the conditions of patients and implantable artificial hearts, it is essential to monitor the blood flow rate continuously and noninvasively. However, it is difficult to monitor the pump flow rate in an implantable artificial heart, because the conventional flow meter is too large to implant into the human body, and the flow estimation method is influenced by changes in the blood characteristics and the pump performance. In particular, the power consumption has neither linearity nor uniqueness with respect to the pump flow rate in an axial flow blood pump. In this research, we develop a prototype miniaturized mass flow meter that uses centrifugal force F(c) for discharged patients with an axial flow blood pump. This flow meter measures the F(c) corresponding to the mass flow rate, and implements compensation for static pressure. Because the strain gauges are attached outside of the curved tube, this mass flow meter has no blood contact point, resulting in a compact design. To evaluate the measurement accuracy and the tracking performance, the mass flow meter was compared with the conventional ultrasonic flow meter in a mock-up circulation study. As a result, the measurement error ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 L/min was less than +/-10% with respect to the maximum flow rate. The tracking performance of pulsation flow was approximately equivalent to that of the conventional flow meter. These experiments demonstrated that the prototype miniaturized mass flow meter using F(c) could accurately measure the mass flow rate continuously and noninvasively. PMID:17470214

  16. Hall effect in electrolyte flow measurements: introduction to blood flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Szwast, Maciej; Piatkiewicz, Wojciech

    2012-06-01

    The Hall effect has been applied to electrolyte flow measurement. It has been proven that Hall voltage does not depend on electrolyte concentration; however, there is a linear relationship between Hall voltage and flow velocity. Obtained results for electrolyte allow us to suppose that Hall effect can be used to determine blood flow. Research on blood will be conducted as the next step. PMID:22145845

  17. Pentobarbital changes compartmental contribution to cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, J.P.; Lawner, P.; Simeone, F.A.; Fink, E.

    1982-04-01

    Barbiturates were administered to normal dogs, establishing an isoelectric electrocorticogram. Cortical cerebral blood flows (CBF) and deeper CBF's were respectively measured by krypton-85 (85Kr) and xenon-133 (133 Xe). Following barbiturate administration, the two methods of measuring CBF showed a poor coefficient of variation (r.0.12, p less than 0.05). The cortical flows decreased less than the fast compartment flows. A shifting of percentage contribution of flow to the slow compartment (60% increase, p less than 0.001) was observed after barbiturate infusion. A selective shunting of blood flow to the slower areas may explain the lowering of intracranial pressure and protection of the deep white matter observed by many authors who use barbiturates in clinical an experimental situations.

  18. The effects of recirculation flows on mass transfer from the arterial wall to flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Guidoin, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Using a sudden tubular expansion as a model of an arterial stenosis, the effect of disturbed flow on mass transfer from the arterial wall to flowing blood was studied theoretically and tested experimentally by measuring the dissolution rate of benzoic acid disks forming the outer tube of a sudden tubular expansion. The study revealed that mass transfer from vessel wall to flowing fluid in regions of disturbed flow is independent of wall shear rates. The rate of mass transfer is significantly higher in regions of disturbed flow with a local maximum around the reattachment point where the wall shear rate is zero. The experimental study also revealed that the rate of mass transfer from the vessel wall to a flowing fluid is much higher in the presence of microspheres (as models of blood cells) in the flowing fluid and under the condition of pulsatile flow than in steady flow. These results imply that flow disturbance may enhance the transport of biochemicals and macromolecules, such as plasma proteins and lipoproteins synthesized within the blood vessel wall, from the blood vessel wall to flowing blood. PMID:18204314

  19. Femoral Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Blood Flow Restricted Leg Press Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, M. E.; Hackney, K.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Low load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (LBFR) causes muscle hypertrophy that may be stimulated by the local ischemic environment created by the cuff pressure. However, local blood flow (BF) during such exercise is not well understood. PURPOSE: To characterize femoral artery BF and cardiac output (CO) during leg press exercise (LP) performed at a high load (HL) and low load (LL) with different levels of cuff pressure. METHODS: Eleven subjects (men/women 4/7, age 31.4+/-12.8 y, weight 68.9+/-13.2 kg, mean+/-SD) performed 3 sets of supine left LP to fatigue with 90 s of rest in 4 conditions: HL (%1-RM/cuff pressure: 80%/0); LL (20%/0); LBFR(sub DBP) (20%/1.3 x diastolic blood pressure, BP); LBFR(sub SBP) (20%/1.3 x supine systolic BP). The cuff remained inflated throughout the LBFR exercise sessions. Artery diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using Doppler ultrasound at rest and immediately after each set of exercise. Heart rate (HR) was monitored using a 3-lead ECG. BF was calculated as VTI x vessel cross-sectional area. CO was calculated as HR x SV. The data obtained after each set of exercise were averaged and used for analyses. Multi-level modeling was used to determine the effect of exercise condition on dependent variables. Statistical significance was set a priori at p< 0.05. RESULTS: Artery diameter did not change from baseline. BF increased (p<0.05) after exercise in each condition except LBFR(sub SBP) in the order of HL (12.73+/-1.42 cm3,mean+/-SE) > LL (9.92+/-0.82 cm3) > LBFR(sub dBP)(6.47+/-0.79 cm3) > LBFR(sub SBP) (3.51+/-0.59 cm3). Blunted exercise induced increases occurred in HR, SV, and CO after LBFR compared to HL and LL. HR increased 45% after HL and LL and 28% after LBFR (p<0.05), but SV increased (p<0.05) only after HL. Consequently, the increase (p<0.05) in CO was greater in HL and LL (approximately 3 L/min) than in LBFR (approximately 1 L/min). CONCLUSION: BF during LBFR(sub SBP) was 1/3 of

  20. Verapamil buffering effect on the abrupt elevation in blood pressure, linkage with microcirculatory blood flow.

    PubMed

    Gmitrov, J

    2008-01-01

    1 We studied the effects of verapamil on sudden elevation in blood pressure, microcirculation and arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). 2 Thirty experiments (10 controls and 20 with verapamil) were performed in rabbits sedated using pentobarbital infusion (5 mg kg(-1) h(-1)). 3 BRS, mean femoral artery blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, estimated using microphotoelectric plethysmography (MPPG), were simultaneously measured during 30 min of verapamil infusion (20 mug kg(-1) min(-1)). BRS was assessed from HR and MAP responses to intravenous phenylephrine (Ph) and by power spectral analysis using transfer function (TF) from MAP to the HR (BRS(Ph,TF)). 4 Verapamil significantly increased microcirculatory blood flow, and decreased BRS(Ph,TF) and phenylephrine-induced abrupt elevation in MAP (MAP(AE)). 5 A significant inverse correlation was found between verapamil-induced changes in MAP(AE), BRS and in microcirculatory blood flow, measured before phenylephrine blood pressure ramps (DeltaMAP(AE) with DeltaBRS(TF), r = -0.47, P < 0.036; DeltaMAP(AE) with DeltaMPPG, r = -0.49, P < 0.025). 6 These results suggest involvement of the arterial baroreflex and vascular blood pressure-buffering mechanisms, their enhancement by verapamil, and thus a potential benefit of verapamil in cardiovascular conditions where patients present with abrupt high elevations in blood pressure. PMID:18598288

  1. Intravital video microscopy measurements of retinal blood flow in mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Norman R; Watts, Megan N; Leskova, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in retinal blood flow can contribute to, or be a consequence of, ocular disease and visual dysfunction. Therefore, quantitation of altered perfusion can aid research into the mechanisms of retinal pathologies. Intravital video microscopy of fluorescent tracers can be used to measure vascular diameters and bloodstream velocities of the retinal vasculature, specifically the arterioles branching from the central retinal artery and of the venules leading into the central retinal vein. Blood flow rates can be calculated from the diameters and velocities, with the summation of arteriolar flow, and separately venular flow, providing values of total retinal blood flow. This paper and associated video describe the methods for applying this technique to mice, which includes 1) the preparation of the eye for intravital microscopy of the anesthetized animal, 2) the intravenous infusion of fluorescent microspheres to measure bloodstream velocity, 3) the intravenous infusion of a high molecular weight fluorescent dextran, to aid the microscopic visualization of the retinal microvasculature, 4) the use of a digital microscope camera to obtain videos of the perfused retina, and 5) the use of image processing software to analyze the video. The same techniques can be used for measuring retinal blood flow rates in rats. PMID:24429840

  2. Blood flow and wall motion in an idealized left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavoularis, Stavros; Doyle, Matthew; Bourgault, Yves

    2006-11-01

    During diastole of the heart, the left ventricle (LV) expands as a result of both incoming blood flow and wall material relaxation. In this work, we simulate both of these effects, along with the fluid-structure interaction between the blood and the heart wall. As a first step leading to more realistic studies, we approximate the LV by a prolate ellipsoid and the valves by cylindrical tubes. The mitral valve is open, allowing blood to enter the LV, whereas the aortic valve is closed. To account for the effects of muscle fibers in the heart wall, we model the wall as a multi-layered orthotropic linear elastic material with different material properties in the fiber, sheet, and sheet-normal directions within each layer. Results will be presented for this idealized configuration, while simulations of blood flow in realistic canine left and right ventricles are currently underway.

  3. Bone Blood Flow During Simulated Microgravity: Physiological and Molecular Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, Susan A.

    1999-01-01

    Blood flow to bone has been shown to affect bone mass and presumably bone strength. Preliminary data indicate that blood flow to the rat femur decreases after 14 days of simulated microgravity, using hindlimb suspension (HLS). If adult rats subjected to HLS are given dobutamine, a synthetic catecholamine which can cause peripheral vasodilation and increased blood flow, the loss of cortical bone area usually observed is prevented. Further, mechanisms exist at the molecular level to link changes in bone blood flow to changes in bone cell activity, particularly for vasoactive agents like nitric oxide (NO). The decreases in fluid shear stress created by fluid flow associated with the shifts of plasma volume during microgravity may result in alterations in expression of vasoactive agents such as NO, producing important functional effects on bone cells. The primary aim of this project is to characterize changes in 1) bone blood flow, 2) indices of bone mass, geometry, and strength, and 3) changes in gene expression for modulators of nitric oxide activity (e.g., nitric oxide synthase) and other candidate genes involved in signal transduction of mechanical loading after 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of HLS in the adult rat. Using a rat of at least 5 months of age avoids inadvertently studying effects of simulated microgravity on growing, rather than adult, bone. Utilizing the results of these studies, we will then define how altered blood flow contributes to changes in bone with simulated microgravity by administering a vasodilatory agent (which increases blood flow to tissues) during hindlimb suspension. In all studies, responses in the unloaded hindlimb bones (tibial shaft, femoral neck) will be compared with those in the weightbearing humeral shaft and the non-weightbearing calvarium (skull) from the same animal. Bone volumetric mineral density and geometry will be quantified by peripheral quantitative CT; structural and material properties of the long bones will be

  4. Association of Meteorological Variables and Coronary Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ali; Sezen, Yusuf; Gunebakmaz, Ozgur; Kaya, Zekeriya; Altiparmak, Ibrahim Halil; Erkus, Emre; Demirbag, Recep; Yilmaz, Remzi

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to assess the impact of meteorological variables on coronary blood flow (CBF). Coronary blood flow was evaluated using the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction frame count (TFC). The association of CBF with meteorological parameters such as temperature, relative humidity, total solar radiation, atmospheric pressure, wind velocity, and total sunshine duration were investigated as well as demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics. Assessment of 1206 patients (median age = 53 years, 723 females) revealed the presence of slow coronary flow (SCF) in 196 patients. Daily maximum temperature [odds ratio = 0.951, 95% confidence interval = 0.916-0.986, P = .007] was the only independent predictor of the presence of SCF, whereas systolic blood pressure (β = -0.139, P = .026), hematocrit level (β = 0.128, P = .044), and daily maximum temperature (β = -1.479, P = .049) were independent predictors of log10 (mean TFC). Findings of the present study suggest a role of meteorological parameters in CBF regulation. PMID:25313313

  5. A numerical study of blood flow using mixture theory

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Kim, Jeongho; Antaki, James F.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the two dimensional flow of blood in a rectangular microfluidic channel. We use Mixture Theory to treat this problem as a two-component system: One component is the red blood cells (RBCs) modeled as a generalized Reiner–Rivlin type fluid, which considers the effects of volume fraction (hematocrit) and influence of shear rate upon viscosity. The other component, plasma, is assumed to behave as a linear viscous fluid. A CFD solver based on OpenFOAM® was developed and employed to simulate a specific problem, namely blood flow in a two dimensional micro-channel, is studied. Finally to better understand this two-component flow system and the effects of the different parameters, the equations are made dimensionless and a parametric study is performed. PMID:24791016

  6. A numerical study of blood flow using mixture theory.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Kim, Jeongho; Antaki, James F

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we consider the two dimensional flow of blood in a rectangular microfluidic channel. We use Mixture Theory to treat this problem as a two-component system: One component is the red blood cells (RBCs) modeled as a generalized Reiner-Rivlin type fluid, which considers the effects of volume fraction (hematocrit) and influence of shear rate upon viscosity. The other component, plasma, is assumed to behave as a linear viscous fluid. A CFD solver based on OpenFOAM(®) was developed and employed to simulate a specific problem, namely blood flow in a two dimensional micro-channel, is studied. Finally to better understand this two-component flow system and the effects of the different parameters, the equations are made dimensionless and a parametric study is performed. PMID:24791016

  7. A Porous Media Model for Blood Flow within Reticulated Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason

    2013-11-01

    A porous media model is developed for non-Newtonian blood flow through reticulated foam at Reynolds numbers ranging from 10-8 to 10. This empirical model effectively divides the pressure gradient versus flow speed curve into three regimes, in which either the non-Newtonian viscous forces, the Newtonian viscous forces, or the inertial fluid forces are most prevalent. When compared to simulation data of blood flow through two reticulated foam geometries, the model adequately captures the pressure gradient within all three regimes, especially that within the Newtonian regime where blood transitions from a power-law to a constant viscosity fluid. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Grant R01EB000462 and partially performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Shear stress related blood damage in laminar couette flow.

    PubMed

    Paul, Reinhard; Apel, Jörn; Klaus, Sebastian; Schügner, Frank; Schwindke, Peter; Reul, Helmut

    2003-06-01

    Artificial organs within the blood stream are generally associated with flow-induced blood damage, particularly hemolysis of red blood cells. These damaging effects are known to be dependent on shear forces and exposure times. The determination of a correlation between these flow-dependent properties and actual hemolysis is the subject of this study. For this purpose, a Couette device has been developed. A fluid seal based on fluorocarbon is used to separate blood from secondary external damage effects. The shear rate within the gap is controlled by the rotational speed of the inner cylinder, and the exposure time by the amount of blood that is axially pumped through the device per given time. Blood damage is quantified by the index of hemolysis (IH), which is calculated from photometric plasma hemoglobin measurements. Experiments are conducted at exposure times from texp=25 - 1250 ms and shear rates ranging from tau=30 up to 450 Pa ensuring Taylor-vortex free flow characteristics. Blood damage is remarkably low over a broad range of shear rates and exposure times. However, a significant increase in blood damage can be observed for shear stresses of tau>or= 425 Pa and exposure times of texp>or= 620 ms. Maximum hemolysis within the investigated range is IH=3.5%. The results indicate generally lower blood damage than reported in earlier studies with comparable devices, and the measurements clearly indicate a rather abrupt (i.e., critical levels of shear stresses and exposure times) than gradual increase in hemolysis, at least for the investigated range of shear rates and exposure times. PMID:12780506

  9. Heart blood flow simulation: a perspective review.

    PubMed

    Doost, Siamak N; Ghista, Dhanjoo; Su, Boyang; Zhong, Liang; Morsi, Yosry S

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death today, incorporates a wide range of cardiovascular system malfunctions that affect heart functionality. It is believed that the hemodynamic loads exerted on the cardiovascular system, the left ventricle (LV) in particular, are the leading cause of CVD initiation and propagation. Moreover, it is believed that the diagnosis and prognosis of CVD at an early stage could reduce its high mortality and morbidity rate. Therefore, a set of robust clinical cardiovascular assessment tools has been introduced to compute the cardiovascular hemodynamics in order to provide useful insights to physicians to recognize indicators leading to CVD and also to aid the diagnosis of CVD. Recently, a combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and different medical imaging tools, image-based CFD (IB-CFD), has been widely employed for cardiovascular functional assessment by providing reliable hemodynamic parameters. Even though the capability of CFD to provide reliable flow dynamics in general fluid mechanics problems has been widely demonstrated for many years, up to now, the clinical implications of the IB-CFD patient-specific LVs have not been applicable due to its limitations and complications. In this paper, we review investigations conducted to numerically simulate patient-specific human LV over the past 15 years using IB-CFD methods. Firstly, we divide different studies according to the different LV types (physiological and different pathological conditions) that have been chosen to reconstruct the geometry, and then discuss their contributions, methodologies, limitations, and findings. In this regard, we have studied CFD simulations of intraventricular flows and related cardiology insights, for (i) Physiological patient-specific LV models, (ii) Pathological heart patient-specific models, including myocardial infarction, dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Finally, we

  10. Coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in swine

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy, R.F.; DeGuzman, L.R.; Pedersen, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Recent papers have raised doubt as to the magnitude of coronary blood flow during closed-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We will describe experiments that concern the methods of coronary flow measurement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Nine anesthetized swine were instrumented to allow simultaneous measurements of coronary blood flow by both electromagnetic cuff flow probes and by the radiomicrosphere technique. Cardiac arrest was caused by electrical fibrillation and closed-chest massage was performed by a Thumper (Dixie Medical Inc., Houston). The chest was compressed transversely at a rate of 66 strokes/min. Compression occupied one-half of the massage cycle. Three different Thumper piston strokes were studied: 1.5, 2, and 2.5 inches. Mean aortic pressure and total systemic blood flow measured by the radiomicrosphere technique increased as Thumper piston stroke was lengthened (mean +/- SD): 1.5 inch stroke, 23 +/- 4 mm Hg, 525 +/- 195 ml/min; 2 inch stroke, 33 +/- 5 mm Hg, 692 +/- 202 ml/min; 2.5 inch stroke, 40 +/- 6 mm Hg, 817 +/- 321 ml/min. Both methods of coronary flow measurement (electromagnetic (EMF) and radiomicrosphere (RMS)) gave similar results in technically successful preparations (data expressed as percent prearrest flow mean +/- 1 SD): 1.5 inch stroke, EMF 12 +/- 5%, RMS 16 +/- 5%; 2 inch stroke, EMF 30 +/- 6%, RMS 26 +/- 11%; 2.5 inch stroke, EMF 50 +/- 12%, RMS 40 +/- 20%. The phasic coronary flow signal during closed-chest compression indicated that all perfusion occurred during the relaxation phase of the massage cycle. We concluded that coronary blood flow is demonstrable during closed-chest massage, but that the magnitude is unlikely to be more than a fraction of normal.

  11. Renal blood flow and oxygenation drive nephron progenitor differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rymer, Christopher; Paredes, Jose; Halt, Kimmo; Schaefer, Caitlin; Wiersch, John; Zhang, Guangfeng; Potoka, Douglas; Vainio, Seppo; Gittes, George K.; Bates, Carlton M.

    2014-01-01

    During kidney development, the vasculature develops via both angiogenesis (branching from major vessels) and vasculogenesis (de novo vessel formation). The formation and perfusion of renal blood vessels are vastly understudied. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory role of renal blood flow and O2 concentration on nephron progenitor differentiation during ontogeny. To elucidate the presence of blood flow, ultrasound-guided intracardiac microinjection was performed, and FITC-tagged tomato lectin was perfused through the embryo. Kidneys were costained for the vasculature, ureteric epithelium, nephron progenitors, and nephron structures. We also analyzed nephron differentiation in normoxia compared with hypoxia. At embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5), the major vascular branches were perfused; however, smaller-caliber peripheral vessels remained unperfused. By E15.5, peripheral vessels started to be perfused as well as glomeruli. While the interior kidney vessels were perfused, the peripheral vessels (nephrogenic zone) remained unperfused. Directly adjacent and internal to the nephrogenic zone, we found differentiated nephron structures surrounded and infiltrated by perfused vessels. Furthermore, we determined that at low O2 concentration, little nephron progenitor differentiation was observed; at higher O2 concentrations, more differentiation of the nephron progenitors was induced. The formation of the developing renal vessels occurs before the onset of blood flow. Furthermore, renal blood flow and oxygenation are critical for nephron progenitor differentiation. PMID:24920757

  12. Renal blood flow and oxygenation drive nephron progenitor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rymer, Christopher; Paredes, Jose; Halt, Kimmo; Schaefer, Caitlin; Wiersch, John; Zhang, Guangfeng; Potoka, Douglas; Vainio, Seppo; Gittes, George K; Bates, Carlton M; Sims-Lucas, Sunder

    2014-08-01

    During kidney development, the vasculature develops via both angiogenesis (branching from major vessels) and vasculogenesis (de novo vessel formation). The formation and perfusion of renal blood vessels are vastly understudied. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory role of renal blood flow and O2 concentration on nephron progenitor differentiation during ontogeny. To elucidate the presence of blood flow, ultrasound-guided intracardiac microinjection was performed, and FITC-tagged tomato lectin was perfused through the embryo. Kidneys were costained for the vasculature, ureteric epithelium, nephron progenitors, and nephron structures. We also analyzed nephron differentiation in normoxia compared with hypoxia. At embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5), the major vascular branches were perfused; however, smaller-caliber peripheral vessels remained unperfused. By E15.5, peripheral vessels started to be perfused as well as glomeruli. While the interior kidney vessels were perfused, the peripheral vessels (nephrogenic zone) remained unperfused. Directly adjacent and internal to the nephrogenic zone, we found differentiated nephron structures surrounded and infiltrated by perfused vessels. Furthermore, we determined that at low O2 concentration, little nephron progenitor differentiation was observed; at higher O2 concentrations, more differentiation of the nephron progenitors was induced. The formation of the developing renal vessels occurs before the onset of blood flow. Furthermore, renal blood flow and oxygenation are critical for nephron progenitor differentiation. PMID:24920757

  13. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels.

    PubMed

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis. PMID:27319318

  14. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-06-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis.

  15. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis. PMID:27319318

  16. High speed optical holography of retinal blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzari, M.; Simonutti, M.; Degardin, J.; Sahel, J.-A.; Fink, M.; Paques, M.; Atlan, M.

    2016-08-01

    We performed non-invasive video imaging of retinal blood flow in a pigmented rat by holographic interferometry of near-infrared laser light backscattered by retinal tissue, beating against an off-axis reference beam sampled at a frame rate of 39 kHz with a high throughput camera. Local Doppler contrasts emerged from the envelopes of short-time Fourier transforms and the phase of autocorrelation functions of holograms rendered by Fresnel transformation. This approach permitted imaging of blood flow in large retinal vessels (30 microns diameter) over 400 by 400 pixels with a spatial resolution of 8 microns and a temporal resolution of 6.5 ms.

  17. Esophageal blood flow in the cat. Normal distribution and effects of acid perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hollwarth, M.E.; Smith, M.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.

    1986-03-01

    The radioactive microsphere technique was used to estimate blood flow to different regions of the esophagus and to adjacent regions of the stomach before and after perfusion of the esophagus with hydrochloric acid (pH 1.5) for 5 min. Under resting conditions total blood flow, as well as blood flow to the mucosal-submucosal layer and the muscular layer, to both sphincters was significantly higher than to the esophageal body. Blood flow to the adjacent regions of the stomach was significantly higher than esophageal blood flow. Acid perfusion resulted in a large increase in total blood flow in both sphincters and the lower esophageal body. Gastric blood flow was not altered by acid perfusion. The esophageal hyperemia resulted primarily from an increase in blood flow to the muscular layer; mucosal-submucosal blood flow was increased only in the lower esophageal sphincter. The present study indicates that short periods (5 min) of gastroesophageal reflux may increase esophageal blood flow.

  18. Computational biorheology of human blood flow in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Dao, Ming; Karniadakis, George Em; Suresh, Subra

    2014-02-01

    Hematologic disorders arising from infectious diseases, hereditary factors and environmental influences can lead to, and can be influenced by, significant changes in the shape, mechanical and physical properties of red blood cells (RBCs), and the biorheology of blood flow. Hence, modeling of hematologic disorders should take into account the multiphase nature of blood flow, especially in arterioles and capillaries. We present here an overview of a general computational framework based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) which has broad applicability in cell biophysics with implications for diagnostics, therapeutics and drug efficacy assessments for a wide variety of human diseases. This computational approach, validated by independent experimental results, is capable of modeling the biorheology of whole blood and its individual components during blood flow so as to investigate cell mechanistic processes in health and disease. DPD is a Lagrangian method that can be derived from systematic coarse-graining of molecular dynamics but can scale efficiently up to arterioles and can also be used to model RBCs down to the spectrin level. We start from experimental measurements of a single RBC to extract the relevant biophysical parameters, using single-cell measurements involving such methods as optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy and micropipette aspiration, and cell-population experiments involving microfluidic devices. We then use these validated RBC models to predict the biorheological behavior of whole blood in healthy or pathological states, and compare the simulations with experimental results involving apparent viscosity and other relevant parameters. While the approach discussed here is sufficiently general to address a broad spectrum of hematologic disorders including certain types of cancer, this paper specifically deals with results obtained using this computational framework for blood flow in malaria and sickle cell anemia. PMID:24419829

  19. An Electromagnetic Catheter Blood Flow Meter of Minimal Lateral Dimensions*

    PubMed Central

    Kolin, Alexander

    1970-01-01

    A method is described to reduce the lateral dimensions of an electromagnetic catheter blood flow meter to the maximum possible extent. To achieve this, the magnetic field is generated by a magnet placed outside the subject. Thus, only the electrodes and a minimal supporting structure have to be introduced into the blood vessel to pick up the electromotive force induced in the blood streaming at right angles to the magnetic field. To suppress induction of a transformer electromotive force in the electrode leads, the latter form a co-axial lead system of small gauge. One electrode is at the tip of the insulated external tube of this lead system (a gauge no. 28 hypodermic tube) and is insulated from it. The other electrode is a bare section of the external tube about 2 cm from its tip. The tube is bent at an angle of about 30° just below the second electrode. Thus, this bent section places the two electrodes near two diametrically opposite wall sections of the blood vessels after insertion of the fine catheter via a hollow catheter through a branch blood vessel into the main vessel. The catheter is rotated until the plane containing the bent section is perpendicular to the magnetic field. The potential difference between the two electrodes measures the volume rate of flow through the blood vessel. This principle can be used to monitor the flow in the major blood vessels as well as in their branches. Catheter flow meters down to about 0.5 mm in external diameter have thus been made and much smaller ones can be made without excessive difficulty. Images PMID:5273901

  20. Blood Pump Development Using Rocket Engine Flow Simulation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the transfer of rocket engine flow simulation technology to work involving the development of blood pumps. Details are offered regarding the design and requirements of mechanical heart assist devices, or VADs (ventricular assist device). There are various computational fluid dynamics issues involved in the visualization of flow in such devices, and these are highlighted and compared to those of rocket turbopumps.

  1. Vortex method for blood flow through heart valves

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, M.F.; Peskin, C.S.

    1980-04-01

    A combination vortex-grid method for solving the two-dimensional, incompressible Navier--Stokes equations in regions with complicated internal, elastic boundaries is presented. The authors believe the method to be applicable to the case of at least moderately high Reynolds number flow. The method is applied to the study of blood flow through the mammalian mitral valve. Previous work of Peskin is extended and the conjecture that the behavior of mammalian heart valves is independent of Reynolds number is supported.

  2. Recovery of testicular blood flow following ligation of testicular vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Pascual, J.A.; Villanueva-Meyer, J.; Salido, E.; Ehrlich, R.M.; Mena, I.; Rajfer, J.

    1989-08-01

    To determine whether initial ligation of the testicular vessels of the high undescended testis followed by a delayed secondary orchiopexy is a viable alternative to the classical Fowler-Stephens procedure, a series of preliminary experiments were conducted in the rat in which testicular blood flow was measured by the 133-xenon washout technique before, and 1 hour and 30 days after ligation of the vessels. In addition, testicular histology, and testis and sex-accessory tissue weights were measured in 6 control, 6 sham operated and 6 testicular vessel ligated rats 54 days after vessel ligation. The data demonstrate that ligation and division of the testicular blood vessels produce an 80 per cent decrease in testicular blood flow 1 hour after ligation of the vessels. However, 30 days later testis blood flow returns to the control and pre-treatment value. There were no significant changes in testis or sex-accessory tissue weights 54 days after vessel ligation. Histologically, 4 of the surgically operated testes demonstrated necrosis of less than 25 per cent of the seminiferous tubules while 1 testis demonstrated more than 75 per cent necrosis. The rest of the tubules in all 6 testes demonstrated normal spermatogenesis. From this study we conclude that initial testicular vessel ligation produces an immediate decrease in testicular blood flow but with time the collateral vessels are able to compensate and return the testis blood flow to its normal pre-treatment value. These preliminary observations lend support for the concept that initial ligation of the testicular vessels followed by a delayed secondary orchiopexy in patients with a high undescended testis may be a possible alternative to the classical Fowler-Stephens approach.

  3. Effect of blood flow parameters on flow patterns at arterial bifurcations--studies in models.

    PubMed

    Liepsch, D W

    1990-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are found primarily at arterial bends and bifurcations. Flow disturbances at these anatomic sites play a major role in atherogenesis. How hemodynamic factors such as vessel geometry, the pulsatile nature of blood flow, vessel wall elasticity and the non-Newtonian flow behavior of blood influence the flow field at these sites must be clarified. We have performed fundamental studies using a birefringent solution in a simplified rigid 90 degree T-bifurcation and pulsatile flow. The velocity distribution was measured with a laser Doppler anemometer. Flow in an elastic abdominal aorta model has been visualized using magnetic resonance imaging. In both flow studies, zones with negative velocity were found. These model measurements demonstrate that no flow parameter can be neglected. Further detailed studies are necessary to examine the interaction between fluid dynamic and cellular surface properties. PMID:2404201

  4. Synchronization patterns in cerebral blood flow and peripheral blood pressure under minor stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Ivanov, Plamen C.; Hu, Kun; Stanley, H. Eugene; Novak, Vera

    2003-05-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. The autoregulation of cerebral blood flow that adapts to changes in systemic blood pressure is impaired after stroke. We investigate blood flow velocities (BFV) from right and left middle cerebral arteries (MCA) and beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) simultaneously measured from the finger, in 13 stroke and 11 healthy subjects using the mean value statistics and phase synchronization method. We find an increase in the vascular resistance and a much stronger cross-correlation with a time lag up to 20 seconds with the instantaneous phase increment of the BFV and BP signals for the subjects with stroke compared to healthy subjects.

  5. Age and gender related differences in aortic blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enevoldsen, Marie Sand; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Lönn, Lars; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-03-01

    The abdominal aorta (AA) is predisposed to development of abdominal aneurysms (AAA), a focal dilatation with fatal consequences if left untreated. The blood flow patterns is thought to play an important role in the development of AAA. The purpose of this work is to investigate the blood flow patterns within a group of healthy volunteers (six females, eight males) aged 23 to 76 years to identify changes and differences related to age and gender. The healthy volunteers were categorized by gender (male/female) and age (below/above 35 years). Subject-specific flow and geometry data were acquired using the research interface on a Profocus ultrasound scanner (B-K Medical, Herlev, Denmark; segmentation of 3D magnetic resonance angiography (Magnetom Trio, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany). The largest average diameter was among the elderly males (19.7 (+/- 1.33) mm) and smallest among the young females (12.4 (+/- 0.605) mm). The highest peak systolic velocity was in the young female group (1.02 (+/- 0.336) m/s) and lowest in the elderly male group (0.836 (+/- 0.127) m/s). A geometrical change with age was observed as the AA becomes more bended with age. This also affects the blood flow velocity patterns, which are markedly different from young to elderly. Thus, changes in blood flow patterns in the AA related to age and gender are observed. Further investigations are needed to determine the relation between changes in blood flow patterns and AAA development.

  6. Cerebral blood flow links insulin resistance and baroreflex sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John P; Sheu, Lei K; Verstynen, Timothy D; Onyewuenyi, Ikechukwu C; Gianaros, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance confers risk for diabetes mellitus and associates with a reduced capacity of the arterial baroreflex to regulate blood pressure. Importantly, several brain regions that comprise the central autonomic network, which controls the baroreflex, are also sensitive to the neuromodulatory effects of insulin. However, it is unknown whether peripheral insulin resistance relates to activity within central autonomic network regions, which may in turn relate to reduced baroreflex regulation. Accordingly, we tested whether resting cerebral blood flow within central autonomic regions statistically mediated the relationship between insulin resistance and an indirect indicator of baroreflex regulation; namely, baroreflex sensitivity. Subjects were 92 community-dwelling adults free of confounding medical illnesses (48 men, 30-50 years old) who completed protocols to assess fasting insulin and glucose levels, resting baroreflex sensitivity, and resting cerebral blood flow. Baroreflex sensitivity was quantified by measuring the magnitude of spontaneous and sequential associations between beat-by-beat systolic blood pressure and heart rate changes. Individuals with greater insulin resistance, as measured by the homeostatic model assessment, exhibited reduced baroreflex sensitivity (b = -0.16, p < .05). Moreover, the relationship between insulin resistance and baroreflex sensitivity was statistically mediated by cerebral blood flow in central autonomic regions, including the insula and cingulate cortex (mediation coefficients < -0.06, p-values < .01). Activity within the central autonomic network may link insulin resistance to reduced baroreflex sensitivity. Our observations may help to characterize the neural pathways by which insulin resistance, and possibly diabetes mellitus, relates to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:24358272

  7. Ultrasonic Doppler blood flow meter for extracorporeal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantas, Ricardo G.; Costa, Eduardo T.; Maia, Joaquim M.; Nantes Button, Vera L. d. S.

    2000-04-01

    In cardiac surgeries it is frequently necessary to carry out interventions in internal heart structures, and where the blood circulation and oxygenation are made by artificial ways, out of the patient's body, in a procedure known as extracorporeal circulation (EC). During this procedure, one of the most important parameters, and that demands constant monitoring, is the blood flow. In this work, an ultrasonic pulsed Doppler blood flowmeter, to be used in an extracorporeal circulation system, was developed. It was used a 2 MHz ultrasonic transducer, measuring flows from 0 to 5 liters/min, coupled externally to the EC arterial line destined to adults perfusion (diameter of 9.53 mm). The experimental results using the developed flowmeter indicated a maximum deviation of 3.5% of full scale, while the blood flow estimator based in the rotation speed of the peristaltic pump presented deviations greater than 20% of full scale. This ultrasonic flowmeter supplies the results in a continuous and trustworthy way, and it does not present the limitations found in those flowmeters based in other transduction methods. Moreover, due to the fact of not being in contact with the blood, it is not disposable and it does not need sterilization, reducing operational costs and facilitating its use.

  8. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  9. Control of cutaneous blood flow by central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Ootsuka, Youichirou; Tanaka, Mutsumi

    2015-01-01

    Hairless skin acts as a heat exchanger between body and environment, and thus greatly contributes to body temperature regulation by changing blood flow to the skin (cutaneous) vascular bed during physiological responses such as cold- or warm-defense and fever. Cutaneous blood flow is also affected by alerting state; we ‘go pale with fright’. The rabbit ear pinna and the rat tail have hairless skin, and thus provide animal models for investigating central pathway regulating blood flow to cutaneous vascular beds. Cutaneous blood flow is controlled by the centrally regulated sympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic premotor neurons in the medullary raphé in the lower brain stem are labeled at early stage after injection of trans-synaptic viral tracer into skin wall of the rat tail. Inactivation of these neurons abolishes cutaneous vasomotor changes evoked as part of thermoregulatory, febrile or psychological responses, indicating that the medullary raphé is a common final pathway to cutaneous sympathetic outflow, receiving neural inputs from upstream nuclei such as the preoptic area, hypothalamic nuclei and the midbrain. Summarizing evidences from rats and rabbits studies in the last 2 decades, we will review our current understanding of the central pathways mediating cutaneous vasomotor control. PMID:27227053

  10. Optically measured microvascular blood flow contrast of malignant breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Choe, Regine; Putt, Mary E; Carlile, Peter M; Durduran, Turgut; Giammarco, Joseph M; Busch, David R; Jung, Ki Won; Czerniecki, Brian J; Tchou, Julia; Feldman, Michael D; Mies, Carolyn; Rosen, Mark A; Schnall, Mitchell D; DeMichele, Angela; Yodh, Arjun G

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular blood flow contrast is an important hemodynamic and metabolic parameter with potential to enhance in vivo breast cancer detection and therapy monitoring. Here we report on non-invasive line-scan measurements of malignant breast tumors with a hand-held optical probe in the remission geometry. The probe employs diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), a near-infrared optical method that quantifies deep tissue microvascular blood flow. Tumor-to-normal perfusion ratios are derived from thirty-two human subjects. Mean (95% confidence interval) tumor-to-normal ratio using surrounding normal tissue was 2.25 (1.92-2.63); tumor-to-normal ratio using normal tissues at the corresponding tumor location in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.94-2.66), and using normal tissue in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.90-2.70). Thus, the mean tumor-to-normal ratios were significantly different from unity irrespective of the normal tissue chosen, implying that tumors have significantly higher blood flow than normal tissues. Therefore, the study demonstrates existence of breast cancer contrast in blood flow measured by DCS. The new, optically accessible cancer contrast holds potential for cancer detection and therapy monitoring applications, and it is likely to be especially useful when combined with diffuse optical spectroscopy/tomography. PMID:24967878

  11. Dynamic deformability of sickle red blood cells in microphysiological flow

    PubMed Central

    Alapan, Y.; Matsuyama, Y.; Little, J. A.; Gurkan, U. A.

    2016-01-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), hemoglobin molecules polymerize intracellularly and lead to a cascade of events resulting in decreased deformability and increased adhesion of red blood cells (RBCs). Decreased deformability and increased adhesion of sickle RBCs lead to blood vessel occlusion (vaso-occlusion) in SCD patients. Here, we present a microfluidic approach integrated with a cell dimensioning algorithm to analyze dynamic deformability of adhered RBC at the single-cell level in controlled microphysiological flow. We measured and compared dynamic deformability and adhesion of healthy hemoglobin A (HbA) and homozygous sickle hemoglobin (HbS) containing RBCs in blood samples obtained from 24 subjects. We introduce a new parameter to assess deformability of RBCs: the dynamic deformability index (DDI), which is defined as the time-dependent change of the cell’s aspect ratio in response to fluid flow shear stress. Our results show that DDI of HbS-containing RBCs were significantly lower compared to that of HbA-containing RBCs. Moreover, we observed subpopulations of HbS containing RBCs in terms of their dynamic deformability characteristics: deformable and non-deformable RBCs. Then, we tested blood samples from SCD patients and analyzed RBC adhesion and deformability at physiological and above physiological flow shear stresses. We observed significantly greater number of adhered non-deformable sickle RBCs than deformable sickle RBCs at flow shear stresses well above the physiological range, suggesting an interplay between dynamic deformability and increased adhesion of RBCs in vaso-occlusive events. PMID:27437432

  12. Ascending aortic blood flow dynamics following intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Kilgour, R D; Sellers, W R

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast aortic blood flow kinetics during recovery from intense aerobic (maximal oxygen uptake test) and anaerobic (Wingate anaerobic power test) exercise. Fifteen healthy male subjects (VO2max = 56.1 +/- 5.8 mk/kg/min) participated in this study. Beat-to-beat peak aortic blood flow velocity (pkV) and acceleration (pkA) measurements were obtained by placing a 3.0 MHz continuous-wave ultrasonic transducer on the suprasternal notch at rest and during recovery (immediately post-exercise, 2.5 min, and 5.0 min) following the two exercise conditions. Peak velocity and acceleration significantly increased (p less than 0.01) from rest to immediately post-exercise and remained elevated throughout the 5-min recovery period. No differences were observed between the aerobic and anaerobic tests. Stroke distance significantly declined (p less than 0.01) immediately following exercise and progressively rose during the 5-min recovery period. The results indicate that: 1) aortic blood flow kinetics remained elevated during short-term recovery, and 2) intense aerobic and anaerobic exercise exhibit similar post-exercise aortic blood flow kinetics. PMID:2262232

  13. Control of cutaneous blood flow by central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ootsuka, Youichirou; Tanaka, Mutsumi

    2015-01-01

    Hairless skin acts as a heat exchanger between body and environment, and thus greatly contributes to body temperature regulation by changing blood flow to the skin (cutaneous) vascular bed during physiological responses such as cold- or warm-defense and fever. Cutaneous blood flow is also affected by alerting state; we 'go pale with fright'. The rabbit ear pinna and the rat tail have hairless skin, and thus provide animal models for investigating central pathway regulating blood flow to cutaneous vascular beds. Cutaneous blood flow is controlled by the centrally regulated sympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic premotor neurons in the medullary raphé in the lower brain stem are labeled at early stage after injection of trans-synaptic viral tracer into skin wall of the rat tail. Inactivation of these neurons abolishes cutaneous vasomotor changes evoked as part of thermoregulatory, febrile or psychological responses, indicating that the medullary raphé is a common final pathway to cutaneous sympathetic outflow, receiving neural inputs from upstream nuclei such as the preoptic area, hypothalamic nuclei and the midbrain. Summarizing evidences from rats and rabbits studies in the last 2 decades, we will review our current understanding of the central pathways mediating cutaneous vasomotor control. PMID:27227053

  14. Study of blood flow sensing with microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.; Wentz, F. J., III

    1973-01-01

    A study and experimental investigation has been performed to determine the feasibility of measuring regional blood flow and volume in man by means of microwave radiometry. An indication was expected of regional blood flow from measurement of surface and subsurface temperatures with a sensitive radiometer. Following theoretical modeling of biological tissue, to determine the optimum operating frequency for adequate sensing depth, a sensitive microwave radiometer was designed for operation at 793 MHz. A temperature sensitivity of of 0.06 K rms was realized in this equipment. Measurements performed on phantom tissue models, consisting of beef fat and lean beefsteak showed that the radiometer was capable of sensing temperatures from a depth between 3.8 and 5.1 cm. Radiometric and thermodynamic temperature measurements were also performed on the hind thighs of large dogs. These showed that the radiometer could sense subsurface temperatures from a depth of, at least, 1.3 cm. Delays caused by externally-generated RF interference, coupled with the lack of reliable blood flow measurement equipment, prevented correlation of radiometer readings with reginal blood flow. For the same reasons, it was not possible to extend the radiometric observations to human subjects.

  15. Integration and Modulation of Intercellular Signaling Underlying Blood Flow Control

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Steven S.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular resistance networks control tissue blood flow in concert with regulating arterial perfusion pressure. In response to increased metabolic demand, vasodilation arising in arteriolar networks ascends to encompass proximal feed arteries. By reducing resistance upstream, ascending vasodilation (AVD) increases blood flow into the microcirculation. Once initiated [e.g., through local activation of K+ channels in endothelial cells (ECs)], hyperpolarization is conducted through gap junctions along the endothelium. Via EC projections through the internal elastic lamina, hyperpolarization spreads into the surrounding smooth muscle cells (SMCs) through myoendothelial gap junctions (MEGJs) to promote their relaxation. Intercellular signaling through electrical signal transmission (i.e., cell-to-cell conduction) can thereby coordinate vasodilation along and among the branches of microvascular resistance networks. Perivascular sympathetic nerve fibers course through the adventitia and release norepinephrine to stimulate SMCs via α-adrenoreceptors to produce contraction. In turn, SMCs can signal ECs through MEGJs to activate K+ channels and attenuate sympathetic vasoconstriction. Activation of K+ channels along the endothelium will dissipate electrical signal transmission and inhibit AVD, thereby restricting blood flow into the microcirculation while maintaining peripheral resistance and perfusion pressure. This review explores the origins and nature of intercellular signaling governing blood flow control in skeletal muscle with respect to the interplay between AVD and sympathetic innervation. Whereas these interactions are integral to physical daily activity and athletic performance, resolving the interplay between respective signaling events provides insight into how selective interventions can improve tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery during vascular disease. PMID:26368324

  16. [Changes of cerebral blood flow during diving reactions in humans].

    PubMed

    Baranova, T I; Berlov, D N; Ianvareva, I N

    2014-05-01

    The characteristics of human cerebral blood flow were estimated during the implementation of the diving response, simulated by complex cold-hypoxic-hypercapnic exposure (CHHE), and under the influence of separate cold, hypercapnic and hypoxic stimuli. Was studied 18 people aged 18-22 years who had no special training. Cerebral blood flow was recorded by transcranial Doppler. It is shown that in the CHHE with the respect initial state to observe a marked increase in cerebral blood flow linear velocity (BFV) to 82.3 ± 15.2%, as well as reducing characterizing the tone of resistance vessels of the brain pulsatility index (PI) to 77.2 ± 13.1%. During cold and tactile stimulation of facial skin BFV and PI did not change significantly, with a single breath hold (Genchi test) BFV increased by 52.3 ± 12.5%, PI at 64.5 ± 15%. The latent period of cerebral blood flow (14-43) allow suppose metabolic (chemical) nature of regulatory influences, which provide changes of considered indicators. PMID:25669101

  17. Naloxone increases blood flow in the human hand.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, A G; Benroubi, M; Pyke, D A; Wiles, P G

    1985-01-01

    Intravenous injection of 2 mg naloxone produced a rapid and pronounced rise of blood flow (6.3 +/- 5.0 to 67.0 +/- 15.1 ml min-1 100 ml-1) and skin temperature (28.3 +/- 3.0 to 32.4 +/- 1.2 degrees C) in the finger and hand of seven of ten normal volunteers. In the other three there was only a small response. Skin temperature did not change in either the face or the foot. Three responding subjects who were retested with 0.4 mg naloxone showed a smaller and briefer response. To exclude a local effect of naloxone on skin blood flow due to release of histamine, responders and non-responders were tested with naloxone and morphine pricked into the skin of the hand and forearm. All showed a weal and flare reaction to morphine which was not abolished by mixture with naloxone; none showed any reaction to naloxone alone. These results suggest that, in some subjects at least, skin blood flow in the hand may be under endogenous opioid control and they raise the possibility that opioid antagonists might have value in the treatment of disorders of skin blood flow such as Raynaud's disease. PMID:4020703

  18. Red blood cells radial dispersion in blood flowing through microchannels: The role of temperature.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Diana; Rodrigues, Raquel O; Faustino, Vera; Yaginuma, Tomoko; Exposto, José; Lima, Rui

    2016-07-26

    The behavior of suspensions of individual blood cells, such as red blood cells (RBCs), flowing through microvessels and microfluidic systems depend strongly on the hematocrit (Hct), microvessel topology and cell properties. Although it is well known that blood rheological properties are temperature dependent, to the best of our knowledge no work has studied the role of the temperature on the RBCs dispersion. A powerful way to investigate this latter effect is through a high-speed video microscopy system, which provides detailed flow measurements of each individual RBC. Hence, the effect of temperature on the RBCs dispersion flowing through a 100μm glass capillary was examined by means of a confocal micro-PTV system. Hundreds of labeled RBCs were tracked at moderate Hct (12%) and at four different temperatures, i.e., 25°C, 32°C, 37°C and 42°C. The results yielded an enhancement of the RBCs diffusion as the temperature increases. Hence, our findings show that RBCs radial dispersion is temperature dependent and as a result the temperature should not be ignored in future blood flow studies. We believe that this finding is important for a better understanding of blood mass transport mechanisms under both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26671221

  19. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Blood Flow in Blood Vessels with the Rolling Massage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hou-Hui; Xu, Shi-Xiong; Qian, Yue-Hong; Fang, Hai-Ping

    2005-12-01

    The rolling massage manipulation is a classic Chinese massage, which is expected to improve the circulation by pushing, pulling and kneading of the muscle. A model for the rolling massage manipulation is proposed and the lattice Boltzmann method is applied to study the blood flow in the blood vessels. The simulation results show that the blood flux is considerably modified by the rolling massage and the explicit value depends on the rolling frequency, the rolling depth, and the diameter of the vessel. The smaller the diameter of the blood vessel, the larger the enhancement of the blood flux by the rolling massage. The model, together with the simulation results, is expected to be helpful to understand the mechanism and further development of rolling massage techniques.

  20. Effects of midazolam on cerebral blood flow in human volunteers

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, A.; Juge, O.; Morel, D.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of intravenously administered midazolam on cerebral blood flow were evaluated in eight healthy volunteers using the /sup 133/Xe inhalation technique. Six minutes after an intravenous dose of 0.15 mg/kg midazolam, the cerebral blood flow decreased significantly (P less than 0.001) from a value of 40.6 +/- 3.3 to a value of 27.0 +/- 5.0 ml . 100 g-1 . min-1. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) increased from 2.8 +/- 0.2 to 3.9 to 0.6 mmHg/(ml . 100 g-1 . min-1)(P less than 0.001). Mean arterial blood pressure decreased significantly (P less than 0.05) from 117 +/- 8 to 109 +/- 9 mmHg and arterial carbon dioxide tension increased from 33.9 +/- 2.3 to 38.6 +/- 3.2 mmHg (P less than 0.05). Arterial oxygen tension remained stable throughout the study, 484 +/- 95 mmHg before the administration of midazolam and 453 +/- 76 mmHg after. All the subjects slept after the injection of the drug and had anterograde amnesia of 24.5 +/- 5 min. The decrease in mean arterial blood pressure was probably not important since it remained in the physiologic range for cerebral blood flow autoregulation. The increase in arterial carbon dioxide tension observed after the midazolam injection may have partially counteracted the effect of this new benzodiazepine on cerebral blood flow. Our data suggest that midazolam might be a safe agent to use for the induction of anethesia in neurosurgical patients with intracranial hypertension.

  1. Diurnal variations in blood flow at optic nerve head and choroid in healthy eyes: diurnal variations in blood flow.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Ra, Eimei; Murotani, Kenta; Matsui, Shigeyuki; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the diurnal variations of the ocular blood flow in healthy eyes using laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG), and to determine the relationship of the diurnal variations between the ocular blood flow and other ocular parameters.This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted at Nagoya University Hospital. We studied 13 healthy volunteers whose mean age was 33.5 ± 7.6 years. The mean blur rate (MBR), expressing the relative blood flow, on the optic nerve head (ONH) and choroidal blood flow was determined by LSFG (LSFG-NAVI) every 3 hours from 6:00 to 24:00 hours. The intraocular pressure (IOP), choroidal thickness measured by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography, systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure, and heart rate (HR) in the brachial artery were also recorded. We evaluated the diurnal variations of the parameters and compared the MBR to the other parameters using a linear mixed model.The diurnal variations of the MBR on the ONH varied significantly with a trough at 9:00 hours and a peak at 24:00 hours (P < 0.001, linear mixed model). The MBR of choroid also had significant diurnal variations with a trough at 15:00 hours and a peak at 18:00 hours (P = 0.001). The IOP (P < 0.001), choroidal thickness (P < 0.001), SBP (P = 0.005), DBP (P = 0.001), and HR (P < 0.001) also had significant diurnal variations. Although the diurnal variation of the MBR on the ONH was different from the other parameters, that on the choroid was significantly and positively correlated with the DBP (P = 0.002), mean arterial pressure (P = 0.023), and mean ocular perfusion pressure (P = 0.047).We found significant diurnal variations in the ONH and choroidal blood flow. Although the ONH blood flow had its own diurnal variation because of strong autoregulation, the choroidal blood flow was more likely affected by systemic circulatory factors because of poor autoregulation. PMID:25674750

  2. Mechanical axial flow blood pump to support cavopulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, A L; Kapadia, J; Madduri, D

    2008-11-01

    We are developing a collapsible, percutaneously inserted, axial flow blood pump to support the cavopulmonary circulation in infants with a failing single ventricle physiology. An initial design of the impeller for this axial flow blood pump was performed using computational fluid dynamics analysis, including pressure-flow characteristics, scalar stress estimations, blood damage indices, and fluid force predictions. A plastic prototype was constructed for hydraulic performance testing, and these experimental results were compared with the numerical predictions. The numerical predictions and experimental findings of the pump performance demonstrated a pressure generation of 2-16 mm Hg for 50-750 ml/min over 5,500-7,500 RPM with deviation found at lower rotational speeds. The axial fluid forces remained below 0.1 N, and the radial fluid forces were determined to be virtually zero due to the centered impeller case. The scalar stress levels remained below 250 Pa for all operating conditions. Blood damage analysis yielded a mean residence time of the released particles, which was found to be less than 0.4 seconds for both flow rates that were examined, and a maximum residence time was determined to be less than 0.8 seconds. We are in the process of designing a cage with hydrodynamically shaped filament blades to act as a diffuser and optimizing the impeller blade shape to reduce the flow vorticity at the pump outlet. This blood pump will improve the clinical treatment of patients with failing Fontan physiology and provide a unique catheter-based therapeutic approach as a bridge to recovery or transplantation. PMID:19089799

  3. Choroidal Blood Flow Change in Eyes with High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Young Seong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate choroidal blood flow changes in eyes with high myopia according to the pulsatile components of ocular blood flow analysis. Methods A total of 104 subjects (52 males and 52 females) were included in this study. One eye of each participant was randomly selected and assigned to one of four refractive groups, designated as, hyperopes (n = 20; refractive error, ≥+1.00 diopter [D]), emmetropes (n = 28; refractive error, ±0.75 D), lower myopes (n = 33; refractive error, -1.00 to -4.75 D), and high myopes (n = 23; refractive error, ≤-5.00 D). Components of pulse amplitude (OBFa), pulse volume (OBFv), pulse rate (OBFr), and pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) were analyzed using a blood flow analyzer. Intraocular pressure and axial length were measured. Results Pulsatile components of OBFa, OBFv, and POBF showed positive correlations with refractive error and showed negative correlations with axial length (r = 0.729, r = 0.772, r = 0.781, respectively, all p < 0.001; r = -0.727, r = -0.762, r = -0.771, respectively, all p < 0.001). The correlations of refractive error and axial length with OBFr were irrelevant (r = -0.157, p = 0.113; r = 0.123, p = 0.213). High myopes showed significantly lower OBFa, OBFv, and POBF than the other groups (all p < 0.001). Conclusions Axial length changes in high myopes potentially influence choroidal blood flow, assuming the changes are caused by narrowing of the choroidal vessel diameter and increasing rigidity of the choroidal vessel wall. These finding explains the influence of axial length on OBFa, OBFv, and POBF, but not on OBFr. Thus, changes in axial length and the possible influence of these changes on the physical properties of choroidal vessels is the mechanism believed to be responsible for putting high myopes at risk for ocular vascular diseases. PMID:26457036

  4. Determination of renal blood flow by thermodilution method.

    PubMed

    Leivestad, T; Brodwall, E K; Simonsen, S

    1978-09-01

    The single bolus thermodilution method for measurement of renal vein blood flow was tested. In model experiments the thermodilution method was compared with graduated cylinder measurements over a flow range from 50 to 1050 ml/min. There was a good correlation between the two methods (r = 0.98) with a mean of differences of 5.2%. In eighteen patients measurements were performed in duplicate in thirty-one renal veins. Comparison was made between the first (x) and second (u) measurement--performed within 3 min. The correlation between the two was very good (r = 0.99; y = 1.03x - 11.48). In twelve patients bilateral renal vein blood flow measurements were performed simultaneous to blood flow measurement by PAH clearance. The correlation between total flow measured by thermodilution (y) and by the clearance method (x) was good (r = 0.98; y = 0.79x + 221). It is concluded that the thermodilution method requires catheterization of the renal veins, but is otherwise simple to perform, is inexpensive and gives reliable results. It is particularly advantageous when repeated measurements in the study of acute changes in renal haemodynamics is desirable. PMID:705231

  5. SPECT study of regional cerebral blood flow in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bonte, F.J.; Ross, E.D.; Chehabi, H.H.; Devous, M.D. Sr.

    1986-07-01

    A common cause of dementia in late midlife and old age is Alzheimer disease (AD), which affects more than one in 20 individuals over the age of 65. Past studies of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with AD here suggested blood flow abnormalities, but findings have differed. We have studied 37 patients diagnosed as having AD with inhalation and washout of /sup 133/Xe and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), obtaining evidence of abnormal rCBF patterns in 19. Flow reductions were most common in the temporoparietal regions and were occasionally found in the frontal areas. Investigators using positron-emission tomography (PET) have identified similar findings with respect to rCBF and regional oxygen, glucose, and protein metabolism. The SPECT determination of rCBF, which gives information similar to that provided by PET, may assume importance in the diagnosis of AD and in the differential diagnosis of the dementias.

  6. Quantitative blood flow velocity imaging using laser speckle flowmetry.

    PubMed

    Nadort, Annemarie; Kalkman, Koen; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Faber, Dirk J

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckle flowmetry suffers from a debated quantification of the inverse relation between decorrelation time (τc) and blood flow velocity (V), i.e. 1/τc = αV. Using a modified microcirculation imager (integrated sidestream dark field - laser speckle contrast imaging [SDF-LSCI]), we experimentally investigate on the influence of the optical properties of scatterers on α in vitro and in vivo. We found a good agreement to theoretical predictions within certain limits for scatterer size and multiple scattering. We present a practical model-based scaling factor to correct for multiple scattering in microcirculatory vessels. Our results show that SDF-LSCI offers a quantitative measure of flow velocity in addition to vessel morphology, enabling the quantification of the clinically relevant blood flow, velocity and tissue perfusion. PMID:27126250

  7. Quantitative blood flow velocity imaging using laser speckle flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadort, Annemarie; Kalkman, Koen; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2016-04-01

    Laser speckle flowmetry suffers from a debated quantification of the inverse relation between decorrelation time (τc) and blood flow velocity (V), i.e. 1/τc = αV. Using a modified microcirculation imager (integrated sidestream dark field - laser speckle contrast imaging [SDF-LSCI]), we experimentally investigate on the influence of the optical properties of scatterers on α in vitro and in vivo. We found a good agreement to theoretical predictions within certain limits for scatterer size and multiple scattering. We present a practical model-based scaling factor to correct for multiple scattering in microcirculatory vessels. Our results show that SDF-LSCI offers a quantitative measure of flow velocity in addition to vessel morphology, enabling the quantification of the clinically relevant blood flow, velocity and tissue perfusion.

  8. Quantitative blood flow velocity imaging using laser speckle flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    Nadort, Annemarie; Kalkman, Koen; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckle flowmetry suffers from a debated quantification of the inverse relation between decorrelation time (τc) and blood flow velocity (V), i.e. 1/τc = αV. Using a modified microcirculation imager (integrated sidestream dark field - laser speckle contrast imaging [SDF-LSCI]), we experimentally investigate on the influence of the optical properties of scatterers on α in vitro and in vivo. We found a good agreement to theoretical predictions within certain limits for scatterer size and multiple scattering. We present a practical model-based scaling factor to correct for multiple scattering in microcirculatory vessels. Our results show that SDF-LSCI offers a quantitative measure of flow velocity in addition to vessel morphology, enabling the quantification of the clinically relevant blood flow, velocity and tissue perfusion. PMID:27126250

  9. Influence of Gravity on Blood Volume and Flow Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendergast, D.; Olszowka, A.; Bednarczyk, E.; Shykoff, B.; Farhi, L.

    1999-01-01

    In our previous experiments during NASA Shuttle flights SLS 1 and 2 (9-15 days) and EUROMIR flights (30-90 days) we observed that pulmonary blood flow (cardiac output) was elevated initially, and surprisingly remained elevated for the duration of the flights. Stroke volume increased initially and then decreased, but was still above 1 Gz values. As venous return was constant, the changes in SV were secondary to modulation of heart rate. Mean blood pressure was at or slightly below 1 Gz levels in space, indicating a decrease in total peripheral resistance. It has been suggested that plasma volume is reduced in space, however cardiac output/venous return do not return to 1 Gz levels over the duration of flight. In spite of the increased cardiac output, central venous pressure was not elevated in space. These data suggest that there is a change in the basic relationship between cardiac output and central venous pressure, a persistent "hyperperfusion" and a re-distribution of blood flow and volume during space flight. Increased pulmonary blood flow has been reported to increase diffusing capacity in space, presumably due to the improved homogeneity of ventilation and perfusion. Other studies have suggested that ventilation may be independent of gravity, and perfusion may not be gravity- dependent. No data for the distribution of pulmonary blood volume were available for flight or simulated microgravity. Recent studies have suggested that the pulmonary vascular tree is influenced by sympathetic tone in a manner similar to that of the systemic system. This implies that the pulmonary circulation is dilated during microgravity and that the distribution of blood flow and volume may be influenced more by vascular control than by gravity. The cerebral circulation is influenced by sympathetic tone similarly to that of the systemic and pulmonary circulations; however its effects are modulated by cerebral autoregulation. Thus it is difficult to predict if cerebral perfusion is

  10. In vitro validation of volumetric blood flow measurement using Doppler flow wire.

    PubMed

    Jenni, R; Kaufmann, P A; Jiang, Z; Attenhofer, C; Linka, A; Mandinov, L

    2000-10-01

    Determination of any volumetric blood flow requires assessment of mean blood flow velocity and vessel cross-sectional area. For evaluation of coronary blood flow and flow reserve, however, assessment of average peak velocity alone is widely used, but changes in velocity profile and vessel area are not taken into account. We studied the feasibility of a new method for calculation of volumetric blood flow by Doppler power using a Doppler flow wire. An in vitro model with serially connected silicone tubes of known lumen diameters (1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0 mm) and pulsatile blood flow ranging from 10 to 200 mL/min was used. A Doppler flow wire was connected to a commercially available Doppler system (FloMap(R), Cardiometrics) for online calculation of the zeroth (M(0)) and the first (M(1)) Doppler moment, as well as mean flow velocity (V(m)). Two different groups of sample volumes (at different gate depths) were used: 1. two proximal sample volumes lying completely within the vessel were required to evaluate the effect of scattering and attenuation on Doppler power, and 2. distal sample volumes intersecting completely the vessel lumen to assess the vessel cross-sectional area. Area (using M(0)) and V(m) (using M(1)/M(0)) obtained from the distal gates were corrected for scattering and attenuation by the data obtained from the proximal gates, allowing calculation of absolute volumetric flow. These results were compared to the respective time collected flow. Correlation between time collected and Doppler-derived flow measurements was 0.98 (p < 0.0001), with a regression line close to the line of equality indicating an excellent agreement of the two measurements in each individual tube. The mean paired flow difference between the two techniques was 1.5 +/- 9.0 mL/min (ns). Direct volumetric blood flow measurement from received Doppler power using a Doppler flow wire system is feasible. This technique may potentially be of great clinical value because it allows an