Science.gov

Sample records for clonal lineage st398

  1. Role of the ESAT-6 secretion system in virulence of the emerging community-associated Staphylococcus aureus lineage ST398

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanan; Hu, Mo; Liu, Qian; Qin, Juanxiu; Dai, Yingxin; He, Lei; Li, Tianming; Zheng, Bing; Zhou, Fan; Yu, Kaiwen; Fang, Jingyuan; Liu, Xiaoyun; Otto, Michael; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Novel Staphylococcus aureus clones continue to emerge that cause infections in otherwise healthy people. One example is the sequence type (ST) 398 lineage, which we show here is increasing in importance as a significant cause of community-associated (CA) human infections in China. We have a profound lack of understanding about what determines the considerable virulence potential of such newly emerging clones. Information about the contribution to virulence of the more recently discovered ESAT-6 secretion system (ESS) has remained particularly scarce. The Chinese ST398 isolates exhibited significantly increased expression of ESS genes as compared to predominant hospital-associated clones, which we found is likely due to increased expression of the accessory gene regulator (Agr) system and control of ESS by Agr. Importantly, deletion of essB in ST398 resulted in significantly reduced resistance to neutrophil killing and decreased virulence in murine skin and blood infection models. Our results demonstrate a key function of ESS in promoting virulence and mechanisms of resistance to innate host defense in an important emerging CA-S. aureus lineage. They suggest that ESS has a so far underestimated role in promoting aggressive virulence and epidemiological success of S. aureus. PMID:27112266

  2. Comparative Genotypic and Phenotypic Characterisation of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 Isolated from Animals and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jamrozy, Dorota M.; Fielder, Mark D.; Butaye, Patrick; Coldham, Nick G.

    2012-01-01

    The high prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 among pigs in certain European countries and North America and its occurrence in other animal species raises a question concerning the molecular mechanisms mediating the success of this lineage. In this study a panel of S. aureus strains belonging to sequence type (ST) 5 (n = 4), ST8 (n = 5), ST15 (n = 5), ST22 (n = 8), clonal complex (CC) 30 (n = 8), CC97 (n = 8), CC130 (n = 4), CC151 (n = 4) and ST398 (n = 18) were screened by DNA microarray and PCR for the carriage of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes. Isolates belonging to the same sequence type/clonal complex (ST/CC) were found to share similar virulence gene profiles. The ST398 lineage displayed the lowest content of virulence genes, which consisted mainly of genes detected among the majority or all of the analysed lineages. All MRSA ST398 isolates lacked accessory virulence genes that were detected in other ST/CC. In contrast to virulence genotype, the antimicrobial resistance genes profiles varied between isolates belonging to the same ST/CC and profile similarities could be observed for isolates from different lineages. MRSA ST398 isolates in particular displayed significant diversity and high content of antimicrobial resistance genes. This was comparable with certain MRSA belonging to other sequence types particularly the equine MRSA ST8. The apparent lack of significant virulence genes among MRSA ST398 strains, demonstrates that the lineage features a unique genetic background but no ST398-specific virulence markers could be identified. PMID:22792335

  3. Comparative genotypic and phenotypic characterisation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 isolated from animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Jamrozy, Dorota M; Fielder, Mark D; Butaye, Patrick; Coldham, Nick G

    2012-01-01

    The high prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 among pigs in certain European countries and North America and its occurrence in other animal species raises a question concerning the molecular mechanisms mediating the success of this lineage. In this study a panel of S. aureus strains belonging to sequence type (ST) 5 (n = 4), ST8 (n = 5), ST15 (n = 5), ST22 (n = 8), clonal complex (CC) 30 (n = 8), CC97 (n = 8), CC130 (n = 4), CC151 (n = 4) and ST398 (n = 18) were screened by DNA microarray and PCR for the carriage of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes. Isolates belonging to the same sequence type/clonal complex (ST/CC) were found to share similar virulence gene profiles. The ST398 lineage displayed the lowest content of virulence genes, which consisted mainly of genes detected among the majority or all of the analysed lineages. All MRSA ST398 isolates lacked accessory virulence genes that were detected in other ST/CC. In contrast to virulence genotype, the antimicrobial resistance genes profiles varied between isolates belonging to the same ST/CC and profile similarities could be observed for isolates from different lineages. MRSA ST398 isolates in particular displayed significant diversity and high content of antimicrobial resistance genes. This was comparable with certain MRSA belonging to other sequence types particularly the equine MRSA ST8. The apparent lack of significant virulence genes among MRSA ST398 strains, demonstrates that the lineage features a unique genetic background but no ST398-specific virulence markers could be identified. PMID:22792335

  4. Comparative Host Specificity of Human- and Pig- Associated Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Arshnee; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Nielsen, Søren S.; McCarthy, Alex J.; Lindsay, Jodi A.; Guardabassi, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is a crucial step in colonization of the skin. In this study, we investigated the differential adherence to human and pig corneocytes of six Staphylococcus aureus strains belonging to three human-associated [ST8 (CC8), ST22 (CC22) and ST36(CC30)] and two pig-associated [ST398 (CC398) and ST433(CC30)] clonal lineages, and their colonization potential in the pig host was assessed by in vivo competition experiments. Corneocytes were collected from 11 humans and 21 pigs using D-squame® adhesive discs, and bacterial adherence to corneocytes was quantified by a standardized light microscopy assay. A previously described porcine colonization model was used to assess the potential of the six strains to colonize the pig host. Three pregnant, S. aureus-free sows were inoculated intravaginally shortly before farrowing with different strain mixes [mix 1) human and porcine ST398; mix 2) human ST36 and porcine ST433; and mix 3) human ST8, ST22, ST36 and porcine ST398] and the ability of individual strains to colonize the nasal cavity of newborn piglets was evaluated for 28 days after birth by strain-specific antibiotic selective culture. In the corneocyte assay, the pig-associated ST433 strain and the human-associated ST22 and ST36 strains showed significantly greater adhesion to porcine and human corneocytes, respectively (p<0.0001). In contrast, ST8 and ST398 did not display preferential host binding patterns. In the in vivo competition experiment, ST8 was a better colonizer compared to ST22, ST36, and ST433 prevailed over ST36 in colonizing the newborn piglets. These results are partly in agreement with previous genetic and epidemiological studies indicating the host specificity of ST22, ST36 and ST433 and the broad-host range of ST398. However, our in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed an unexpected ability of ST8 to adhere to porcine corneocytes and persist in the nasal cavity of pigs. PMID:23166643

  5. Lineage and clonal development of gastric glands.

    PubMed

    Nomura, S; Esumi, H; Job, C; Tan, S S

    1998-12-01

    Individual gastric glands of the stomach are composed of cells of different phenotypes. These are derived from multipotent progenitor stem cells located at the isthmus region of the gland. Previous cell lineage analyses suggest that gastric glands, as in the colon and small intestine, are invariably monoclonal by adult stages. However, little is known about the ontogenetic progression of glandular clonality in the stomach. To examine this issue, we employed an in situ cell lineage marker in female mice heterozygous for an X-linked transgene. We found that stomach glands commence development as polyclonal units, but by adulthood (6 weeks), the majority progressed to monoclonal units. Our analysis suggests that at least three progenitor cells are required to initiate the development of individual gastric glands if they are analyzed just after birth. Hence, unlike the colon and small intestine, stomachs showed a significant fraction (10-25%) of polyclonal glands at adult stages. We suggest that these glands persist from polyclonal glands present in the embryonic stomach and hypothesize that they represent a subpopulation of glands with larger numbers of self-renewing stem cells. PMID:9851847

  6. Phenotypic differences among three clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are three major clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum present in North America and Europe named NA1, NA2, and EU1. Twenty-three isolates representing all three lineages were evaluated for phenotype including (i) aggressiveness on detached Rhododendron leaves and (ii) growth rate at minimum, ...

  7. Standardizing the Nomenclature for Clonal Lineages of the Sudden Oak Death Pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death and ramorum blight, is known to exist as three distinct clonal lineages based on a range of molecular marker systems. However, in the recent literature there exists no consensus on naming of lineages. Here we name clonal lineages of P. ramor...

  8. Prevalence and Molecular Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 Resistant to Tetracycline at a Spanish Hospital over 12 Years

    PubMed Central

    Camoez, Mariana; Sierra, Josep M.; Pujol, Miquel; Hornero, Ana; Martin, Rogélio; Domínguez, M. Angeles

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398, associated with livestock animals, was described in 2003 as a new lineage infecting or colonizing humans. We evaluated the prevalence and molecular characteristics of MRSA ST398 isolated in the Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge from January 2000 to June 2011. Tetracycline resistant (Tet-R) MRSA isolates from single patients (pts) were screened by SmaI-pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Nontypable MRSA strains by SmaI (NTSmaI)-MRSA were further analysed by ApaI-PFGE, spa, SCCmec, agr, MLST typing, and by DNA microarray hybridization. Among 164 pts harboring Tet-R MRSA, NTSmaI-MRSA ST398-agrI was found in 33 pts (20%). Although the first pt was detected in 2003, 22/33 pts (67%) were registered in the 2010–2011 period. Ten pts (30%) were infected and cancer was the most frequent underlying disease. In one case, death was due to MRSA-ST398-related infection. Five pulsotypes (A–E) were detected using ApaI-PFGE, with type A accounting for 76% of the strains. The majority of the studied isolates presented spa type t011 (70%) and SCCmec type V (88%). One strain was spa negative both by PCR and microarray analysis. Forty-nine percent of the studied isolates showed resistance to 3 or more antibiotic classes, in addition to beta-lactams. Ciprofloxacin resistance was 67%. Tet-R was mediated by tet(M) and tet(K) in 26 isolates. All isolates lacked Panton-Valentine Leukocidin production, as well as other significant toxins. This study displays the molecular features of MRSA-ST398 clone and shows the increase in tetracycline resistance together with arise in MRSA-ST398 isolates infecting or colonizing patients in our clinical setting. PMID:24039806

  9. Staphylococcus aureus ST398 from slaughter pigs in northeast China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaomei; Yu, Xiaojie; Tao, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Binghua; Dong, Rui; Xue, Chengyu; Grundmann, Hajo; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2014-05-01

    To describe the prevalence and population structure of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria that colonize pigs at slaughterhouses in northeastern China, nose swabs were collected from pigs in two slaughterhouses in Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China in 2009. S. aureus isolates were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, SCCmec typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing and pvl gene detection. A total of 200 S. aureus isolates were collected from 590 pigs (33.9%, 200/590), of which 162 (81%, 162/200) were methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and 38 (19%, 38/200) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Ninety-nine of the MSSA isolates (99/162, 61.1%) were ST398, which represented the dominant sequence type overall. Eighty-seven isolates were ST9 (87/200, 43.5%), and all MRSA belonged to that sequence type which consisted of the spa types t899 and t2922. Among the MSSA strains, t034, t899 and t4358 were the most dominant spa types (139/162, 85.8%). All MRSA isolates harbored SCCmec type IVb. The pvl gene was only detected in 3 ST7/t2119 MSSA isolates. All MRSA but more importantly also 82.7% (134/162) of the MSSA isolates were resistant to six or more antibiotics. Moreover, a novel resistance determinant-lsa(E) was identified among 22% (44/200) of all isolates. In conclusion, pigs in northeast China are frequently colonized with ST398 MSSA. MRSA with this sequence type, typically associated with pigs in Europe, was not found. High levels of multiple antibiotic resistance among MRSA isolates as well as MSSA isolates are a public health concern. PMID:24418357

  10. Global evolution of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clonal lineages.

    PubMed

    Zarrilli, Raffaele; Pournaras, Spyros; Giannouli, Maria; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2013-01-01

    The rapid expansion of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to carbapenems and most or all available antibiotics during the last decade is a worrying evolution. The apparent predominance of a few successful multidrug-resistant lineages worldwide underlines the importance of elucidating the mode of spread and the epidemiology of A. baumannii isolates in single hospitals, at a country-wide level and on a global scale. The evolutionary advantage of the dominant clonal lineages relies on the capability of the A. baumannii pangenome to incorporate resistance determinants. In particular, the simultaneous presence of divergent strains of the international clone II and their increasing prevalence in international hospitals further support the ongoing adaptation of this lineage to the hospital environment. Indeed, genomic and genetic studies have elucidated the role of mobile genetic elements in the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes and substantiate the rate of genetic alterations associated with acquisition in A. baumannii of various resistance genes, including OXA- and metallo-β-lactamase-type carbapenemase genes. The significance of single nucleotide polymorphisms and transposon mutagenesis in the evolution of A. baumannii has been also documented. Establishment of a network of reference laboratories in different countries would generate a more complete picture and a fuller understanding of the importance of high-risk A. baumannii clones in the international dissemination of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23127486

  11. Virulence, sporulation, and elicitin production in three clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum populations are clonal and consist of three lineages. Recent studies have shown that the clonal lineages may have varying degrees of aggressiveness on some host species, such as Quercus rubra. In this study, we examined virulence, sporulation and elicitin production of five P. ...

  12. SNP-based differentiation of Phytophthora infestans clonal lineages using locked nucleic acid probes and high resolution melt analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora infestans, the cause of the devastating late blight disease of potato and tomato, exhibits a clonal reproductive lifestyle in North America. Phenotypes such as fungicide sensitivity and host preference are conserved among individuals within clonal lineages, while substantial phenotypic ...

  13. Novel erm(T)-Carrying Multiresistance Plasmids from Porcine and Human Isolates of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 That Also Harbor Cadmium and Copper Resistance Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Kadlec, Kristina; Feßler, Andrea T.; Zarazaga, Myriam; Schwarz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This study describes three novel erm(T)-carrying multiresistance plasmids that also harbor cadmium and copper resistance determinants. The plasmids, designated pUR1902, pUR2940, and pUR2941, were obtained from porcine and human methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) of the clonal lineage ST398. In addition to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance gene erm(T), all three plasmids also carry the tetracycline resistance gene tet(L). Furthermore, plasmid pUR2940 harbors the trimethoprim resistance gene dfrK and the MLSB resistance gene erm(C), while plasmids pUR1902 and pUR2941 possess the kanamycin/neomycin resistance gene aadD. Sequence analysis of approximately 18.1 kb of the erm(T)-flanking region from pUR1902, 20.0 kb from pUR2940, and 20.8 kb from pUR2941 revealed the presence of several copies of the recently described insertion sequence ISSau10, which is probably involved in the evolution of the respective plasmids. All plasmids carried a functional cadmium resistance operon with the genes cadD and cadX, in addition to the multicopper oxidase gene mco and the ATPase copper transport gene copA, which are involved in copper resistance. The comparative analysis of S. aureus RN4220 and the three S. aureus RN4220 transformants carrying plasmid pUR1902, pUR2940, or pUR2941 revealed an 8-fold increase in CdSO4 and a 2-fold increase in CuSO4 MICs. The emergence of multidrug resistance plasmids that also carry heavy metal resistance genes is alarming and requires further surveillance. The colocalization of antimicrobial resistance genes and genes that confer resistance to heavy metals may facilitate their persistence, coselection, and dissemination. PMID:23629701

  14. Identification of a Highly Transmissible Animal-Independent Staphylococcus aureus ST398 Clone with Distinct Genomic and Cell Adhesion Properties

    PubMed Central

    Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin; Porcella, Stephen F.; Trivedi, Sheetal; Sullivan, Sean B.; Hafer, Cory; Kennedy, Adam D.; Barbian, Kent D.; McCarthy, Alex J.; Street, Craig; Hirschberg, David L.; Lipkin, W. Ian; Lindsay, Jodi A.; DeLeo, Frank R.; Lowy, Franklin D.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT A methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clone known as ST398 has emerged as a major cause of acute infections in individuals who have close contact with livestock. More recently, the emergence of an animal-independent ST398 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) clone has been documented in several countries. However, the limited surveillance of MSSA has precluded an accurate assessment of the global spread of ST398 and its clinical relevance. Here we provide evidence that ST398 is a frequent source of MSSA infections in northern Manhattan and is readily transmitted between individuals in households. This contrasts with the limited transmissibility of livestock-associated ST398 (LA-ST398) MRSA strains between humans. Our whole-genome sequence analysis revealed that the chromosome of the human-associated ST398 MSSA clone is smaller than that of the LA-ST398 MRSA reference strain S0385, due mainly to fewer mobile genetic elements (MGEs). In contrast, human ST398 MSSA isolates harbored the prophage φ3 and the human-specific immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes chp and scn. While most of the core genome was conserved between the human ST398 MSSA clone and S0385, these strains differed substantially in their repertoire and composition of intact adhesion genes. These genetic changes were associated with significantly enhanced adhesion of human ST398 MSSA isolates to human skin keratinocytes and keratin. We propose that the human ST398 MSSA clone can spread independent of animal contact using an optimized repertoire of MGEs and adhesion molecules adapted to transmission among humans. PMID:22375071

  15. Survival of Sporangia of New Clonal Lineages of Phytophthora infestans in Soil under Semiarid Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently there is no information on the viability of sporangia in soil of the new metalaxyl-resistant genotypes of P. infestans in the semiarid Columbia Basin of WA, and in potato growing regions throughout the world. Sporangia of metalaxyl-resistant US-8 and US-11 clonal lineages of P. infestans ...

  16. Survival of Staphylococcus aureus ST398 in the human nose after artificial inoculation.

    PubMed

    Slingerland, Bibi C G C; Tavakol, Mehri; McCarthy, Alex J; Lindsay, Jodi A; Snijders, Susan V; Wagenaar, Jaap A; van Belkum, Alex; Vos, Margreet C; Verbrugh, Henri A; van Wamel, Willem J B

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that MRSA ST398 of animal origin is only capable of temporarily occupying the human nose, and it is therefore, often considered a poor human colonizer.We inoculated 16 healthy human volunteers with a mixture of the human MSSA strain 1036 (ST931, CC8) and the bovine MSSA strain 5062 (ST398, CC398), 7 weeks after a treatment with mupirocin and chlorhexidine-containing soap. Bacterial survival was studied by follow-up cultures over 21 days. The human strain 1036 was eliminated faster (median 14 days; range 2-21 days) than the bovine strain 5062 (median 21 days; range 7-21 days) but this difference was not significant (p = 0.065). The bacterial loads were significantly higher for the bovine strain on day 7 and day 21. 4/14 volunteers (28.6%) showed elimination of both strains within 21 days. Of the 10 remaining volunteers, 5 showed no differences in bacterial counts between both strains, and in the other 5 the ST398 strain far outnumbered the human S. aureus strain. Within the 21 days of follow-up, neither human strain 1036 nor bovine strain 5062 appeared to acquire or lose any mobile genetic elements. In conclusion, S. aureus ST398 strain 5062 is capable of adequately competing for a niche with a human strain and survives in the human nose for at least 21 days. PMID:23155425

  17. Clonal tracking of rhesus macaque hematopoiesis highlights a distinct lineage origin for natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuanfeng; Li, Brian; Lu, Rong; Koelle, Samson J; Yang, Yanqin; Jares, Alexander; Krouse, Alan E; Metzger, Mark; Liang, Frank; Loré, Karin; Wu, Colin O; Donahue, Robert E; Chen, Irvin S Y; Weissman, Irving; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2014-04-01

    Analysis of hematopoietic stem cell function in nonhuman primates provides insights that are relevant for human biology and therapeutic strategies. In this study, we applied quantitative genetic barcoding to track the clonal output of transplanted autologous rhesus macaque hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells over a time period of up to 9.5 months. We found that unilineage short-term progenitors reconstituted myeloid and lymphoid lineages at 1 month but were supplanted over time by multilineage clones, initially myeloid restricted, then myeloid-B clones, and then stable myeloid-B-T multilineage, long-term repopulating clones. Surprisingly, reconstitution of the natural killer (NK) cell lineage, and particularly the major CD16(+)/CD56(-) peripheral blood NK compartment, showed limited clonal overlap with T, B, or myeloid lineages, and therefore appears to be ontologically distinct. Thus, in addition to providing insights into clonal behavior over time, our analysis suggests an unexpected paradigm for the relationship between NK cells and other hematopoietic lineages in primates. PMID:24702997

  18. Clonally Expanding Thymocytes Having Lineage Capability in Gamma-Ray-Induced Mouse Atrophic Thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Morita, Shin-ichi; Go, Rieka; Obata, Miki; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Fujita, Yukari; Maeda, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Mishima, Yukio; Kominami, Ryo

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To characterize, in the setting of gamma-ray-induced atrophic thymus, probable prelymphoma cells showing clonal growth and changes in signaling, including DNA damage checkpoint. Methods and Materials: A total of 111 and 45 mouse atrophic thymuses at 40 and 80 days, respectively, after gamma-irradiation were analyzed with polymerase chain reaction for D-J rearrangements at the TCRbeta locus, flow cytometry for cell cycle, and Western blotting for the activation of DNA damage checkpoints. Results: Limited D-J rearrangement patterns distinct from normal thymus were detected at high frequencies (43 of 111 for 40-day thymus and 21 of 45 for 80-day thymus). Those clonally expanded thymocytes mostly consisted of CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} double-positive cells, indicating the retention of lineage capability. They exhibited pausing at a late G1 phase of cell cycle progression but did not show the activation of DNA damage checkpoints such as gammaH2AX, Chk1/2, or p53. Of interest is that 17 of the 52 thymuses showing normal D-J rearrangement patterns at 40 days after irradiation showed allelic loss at the Bcl11b tumor suppressor locus, also indicating clonal expansion. Conclusion: The thymocytes of clonal growth detected resemble human chronic myeloid leukemia in possessing self-renewal and lineage capability, and therefore they can be a candidate of the lymphoma-initiating cells.

  19. Infection Efficiency of Four Phytophthora infestans Clonal Lineages and DNA-Based Quantification of Sporangia

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Mamadou Lamine; Tremblay, David Mathieu; Gobeil-Richard, Mélanie; Couillard, Julie; Rocheleau, Hélène; Van der Heyden, Hervé; Lévesque, Camile André; Beaulieu, Carole; Carisse, Odile

    2015-01-01

    The presence and abundance of pathogen inoculum is with host resistance and environmental conditions a key factor in epidemic development. Therefore, several spore-sampling devices have been proposed to monitor pathogen inoculum above fields. However, to make spore sampling more reliable as a management tool and to facilitate its adoption, information on infection efficiency and molecular tools for estimating airborne sporangia concentration are needed. Experiments were thus undertaken in a growth chamber to study the infection efficiency of four clonal lineages of P. infestans (US-8, US-11, US-23, and US-24) by measuring the airborne sporangia concentration and resulting disease intensity. The relationship between the airborne sporangia concentration and the number of lesions per leaf was exponential. For the same concentration, the sporangia of US-23 caused significantly more lesions than the sporangia of the other clonal lineages did. Under optimal conditions, an airborne sporangia concentration of 10 sporangia m−3 for US-23 was sufficient to cause one lesion per leaf, whereas for the other clonal lineages, it took 15 to 25 sporangia m−3 to reach the same disease intensity. However, in terms of diseased leaf area, there was no difference between clonal lineages US-8, US-23 and US-24. Also, a sensitive quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tool was developed to quantify P. infestans airborne sporangia with detection sensitivity of one sporangium. The specificity of the qPCR assay was rigorously tested for airborne inoculum and was either similar to, or an improvement on, other published PCR assays. This assay allows rapid and reliable detection and quantification of P. infestans airborne sporangia and thereby, facilitates the implementation of spores-sampling network. PMID:26301826

  20. Characterization of staphylococci in urban wastewater treatment plants in Spain, with detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Paula; Lozano, Carmen; Benito, Daniel; Estepa, Vanesa; Tenorio, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam; Torres, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus in urban wastewater treatment plants (UWTP) of La Rioja (Spain), and to characterize de obtained isolates. 16 wastewater samples (8 influent, 8 effluent) of six UWTPs were seeded on mannitol-salt-agar and oxacillin-resistance-screening-agar-base for staphylococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus recovery. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined for 16 antibiotics and the presence of 35 antimicrobial resistance genes and 14 virulence genes by PCR. S. aureus was typed by spa, agr, and multilocus-sequence-typing, and the presence of immune-evasion-genes cluster was analyzed. Staphylococcus spp. were detected in 13 of 16 tested wastewater samples (81%), although the number of CFU/mL decreased after treatment. 40 staphylococci were recovered (1-5/sample), and 8 of them were identified as S. aureus being typed as (number of strains): spa-t011/agr-II/ST398 (1), spa-t002/agr-II/ST5 (2), spa-t3262/agr-II/ST5 (1), spa-t605/agr-II/ST126 (3), and spa-t878/agr-III/ST2849 (1). S. aureus ST398 strain was methicillin-resistant and showed a multidrug resistance phenotype. Virulence genes tst, etd, sea, sec, seg, sei, sem, sen, seo, and seu, were detected among S. aureus and only ST5 strains showed genes of immune evasion cluster. Thirty-two coagulase-negative Staphylococcus of 12 different species were recovered (number of strains): Staphylococcus equorum (7), Staphylococcus vitulinus (4), Staphylococcus lentus (4), Staphylococcus sciuri (4), Staphylococcus fleurettii (2), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (2), Staphylococcus hominis (2), Staphylococcus saprophyticus (2), Staphylococcus succinus (2), Staphylococcus capitis (1), Staphylococcus cohnii (1), and Staphylococcus epidermidis (1). Five presented a multidrug resistance phenotype. The following resistance and virulence genes were found: mecA, lnu(A), vga(A), tet(K), erm(C), msr(A)/(B), mph(C), tst, and sem. We found that

  1. Clonal Expansion and Migration of a Highly Virulent, Defoliating Lineage of Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Milgroom, Michael G; Del Mar Jiménez-Gasco, María; Olivares-García, Concepción; Jiménez-Díaz, Rafael M

    2016-09-01

    We used a population genomics approach to test the hypothesis of clonal expansion of a highly fit genotype in populations of Verticillium dahliae. This fungal pathogen has a broad host range and can be dispersed in contaminated seed or other plant material. It has a highly clonal population structure, with several lineages having nearly worldwide distributions in agricultural crops. Isolates in lineage 1A are highly virulent and cause defoliation in cotton, okra, and olive (denoted 1A/D), whereas those in other lineages cause wilting but not defoliation (ND). We tested whether the highly virulent lineage 1A/D could have spread from the southwestern United States to the Mediterranean basin, as predicted from historical records. We found 187 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), determined by genotyping by sequencing, among 91 isolates of lineage 1A/D and 5 isolates in the closely related lineage 1B/ND. Neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood analyses on the 187 SNPs showed a clear divergence between 1A/D and 1B/ND haplotypes. Data for only 77 SNPs were obtained for all 96 isolates (no missing data); lineages 1A/D and 1B/ND differed by 27 of these 77 SNPs, confirming a clear divergence between the two lineages. No evidence of recombination was detected within or between these two lineages. Phylogenetic and genealogical analyses resulted in five distinct subclades of 1A/D isolates that correlated closely with geographic origins in the Mediterranean basin, consistent with the hypothesis that the D pathotype was introduced at least five times in independent founder events into this region from a relatively diverse source population. The inferred ancestral haplotype was found in two isolates sampled before 1983 from the southwestern United States, which is consistent with historical records that 1A/D originated in North America. The five subclades coalesce with the ancestral haplotype at the same time, consistent with a hypothesis of rapid population expansion in the

  2. Clonal analysis of the cell lineages in the male flower of maize

    SciTech Connect

    Dawe, R.K.; Freeling, M. )

    1990-11-01

    The cell lineages in the male flower of maize were characterized using X-rays and transposable elements to produce clonal sectors differing in anthocyanin pigmentation. Less than 50% of the somatic tassel mutations (caused by reversion of unstable color mutations) that were visible on the anther wall were sexually transmitted by the male gametes, unless the sectors were larger than half the tassel circumference. This result is explained by showing that: (a) both the outer (LI) and inner (LII) lineages of the shoot apical meristem form a cell layer in the bilayered anther wall, and that anther pigmentation can be derived from either cell layer; and that (b) the male germ cells are derived almost exclusively from the LII. Therefore, while reversion events in either the LI or LII are visible on the anther, only the LII events are heritable. Reversion events that occur prior to the organization of the shoot apical meristem however, produce large (usually more than one-half tassel) sectors that include both the outer and inner lineages. In contrast to the high level of cell layer invasion previously reported during leaf development, during anther development less than 10(-3) cells in the LI invade the LII to form male gametes. The strong correlation between cell lineage and cell fate in the maize anther has implications for studies on plant evolution and the genetic improvement of cereals by DNA transformation.

  3. Rapid Resistome Fingerprinting and Clonal Lineage Profiling of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates by Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Arena, Fabio; Rolfe, P. Alexander; Doran, Graeme; Conte, Viola; Gruszka, Sarah; Clarke, Thomas; Adesokan, Yemi; Giani, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    Thirty-two carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates, representative of different resistance mechanisms and clonal lineages, were analyzed with the Pathogenica HAI BioDetection system, based on targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. With most strains, the system simultaneously yielded comprehensive information on relevant β-lactam resistance determinants and accurate discrimination of clonal lineages, in a shorter time frame and in a less labor-intensive manner than currently available methods for molecular epidemiology analysis. Results supported the usefulness of targeted NGS-based technologies for similar applications. PMID:24403299

  4. Cryptic clonal lineages and genetic diversity in the loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Teleostei: Cobitidae) inferred from nuclear and mitochondrial DNA analyses.

    PubMed

    Morishima, Kagayaki; Nakamura-Shiokawa, Yuka; Bando, Etsuko; Li, Ya-Juan; Boroń, Alicja; Khan, Md Mukhlesur Rahman; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2008-02-01

    In the loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, the asexual lineage, which produces unreduced clonal diploid eggs, has been identified. Among 833 specimens collected from 54 localities in Japan and two localities in China, 82 candidates of other lineage(s) of cryptic clones were screened by examining RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism)-PCR haplotypes in the control region of mtDNA. This analysis was performed because triploid loaches arise from the accidental incorporation of the sperm nucleus into unreduced diploid eggs of a clone. The categorization of members belonging to three newly identified lineages (clones 2-4) and the previously identified clonal lineage (clone 1) was verified by evaluating the genetic identity between two or more individuals from each clonal lineage based on RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA)-PCR and multilocus DNA fingerprints. We detected 75 haplotypes by observing the nucleotide status at variable sites from the control region of mtDNA. Phylogenic trees constructed from such sequences showed two highly diversified clades, A and B, that were beyond the level common for interspecific genetic differentiation. That result suggests that M. anguillicaudatus in Japan is not a single species entity. Two clone-specific mtDNA sequences were included in clade A, and the loaches with such sequences may be the maternal origin of the clones. PMID:17578669

  5. SNP markers identify widely distributed clonal lineages of Phytophthora colocasiae in Vietnam, Hawaii and Hainan Island, China.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sandesh; Hu, Jian; Fryxell, Rebecca Trout; Mudge, Joann; Lamour, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Taro (Colocasia esculenta) is an important food crop, and taro leaf blight caused by Phytophthora colocasiae can significantly affect production. Our objectives were to develop single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for P. colocasiae and characterize populations in Hawaii (HI), Vietnam (VN) and Hainan Island, China (HIC). In total, 379 isolates were analyzed for mating type and multilocus SNP profiles including 214 from HI, 97 from VN and 68 from HIC. A total of 1152 single nucleotide variant (SNV) sites were identified via restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing of two field isolates. Genotyping with 27 SNPs revealed 41 multilocus SNP genotypes grouped into seven clonal lineages containing 2-232 members. Three clonal lineages were shared among countries. In addition, five SNP markers had a low incidence of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) during asexual laboratory growth. For HI and VN, >95% of isolates were the A2 mating type. On HIC, isolates within single clonal lineages had A1, A2 and A0 (neuter) isolates. The implications for the wide dispersal of clonal lineages are discussed. PMID:24895424

  6. Introduction of plasmid DNA into an ST398 livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MRS926 is a livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain of sequence type (ST) 398. In order to facilitate in vitro and in vivo studies of this strain, we sought to tag it with a fluorescent marker. We cloned a codon-optimized gene for TurboGFP into a shuttle vector...

  7. Metalaxyl Resistance in Phytophthora infestans: Assessing Role of RPA190 Gene and Diversity Within Clonal Lineages.

    PubMed

    Matson, Michael E H; Small, Ian M; Fry, William E; Judelson, Howard S

    2015-12-01

    Prior work has shown that the inheritance of resistance to metalaxyl, an oomycete-specific fungicide, is complex and may involve multiple genes. Recent research indicated that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the gene encoding RPA190, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I, confers resistance to metalaxyl (or mefenoxam) in some isolates of the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Using both DNA sequencing and high resolution melt assays for distinguishing RPA190 alleles, we show here that the SNP is absent from certain resistant isolates of P. infestans from North America, Europe, and Mexico. The SNP is present in some members of the US-23 and US-24 clonal lineages, but these tend to be fairly sensitive to the fungicide based on artificial media and field test data. Diversity in the level of sensitivity, RPA190 genotype, and RPA190 copy number was observed in these lineages but were uncorrelated. Controlled laboratory crosses demonstrated that RPA190 did not cosegregate with metalaxyl resistance from a Mexican and British isolate. We conclude that while metalaxyl may be used to control many contemporary strains of P. infestans, an assay based on RPA190 will not be sufficient to diagnose the sensitivity levels of isolates. PMID:26551315

  8. The Staphylococcus aureus lineage-specific markers collagen adhesin and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 distinguish multilocus sequence typing clonal complexes within spa clonal complexes.

    PubMed

    Deurenberg, Ruud H; Rijnders, Michelle I A; Sebastian, Silvie; Welling, Maaike A; Beisser, Patrick S; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2009-10-01

    Spa typing/based upon repeat pattern (BURP) sometimes cannot differentiate multilocus sequence typing (MLST) clonal complexes (CCs) within spa-CCs. It has been observed previously that virulence factors, such as collagen adhesin (CNA) and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), are associated with certain Staphylococcus aureus lineages. Analysis of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus by spa typing/BURP and detection of CNA and TSST-1 observed an association between CNA and MLST CC1, 12, 22, 30, 45, 51, and 239 and between TSST-1 and MLST CC30. In spa-CC 012, associated with MLST CC7, CC15, and CC30, MLST CC30 could be distinguished from MLST CC7 and CC15 with CNA and TSST-1 as lineage-specific markers. Lineage-specific markers can overcome clustering of nonrelated MLST CCs into 1 spa-CC. PMID:19748421

  9. Ancient isolation and independent evolution of the three clonal lineages of the exotic sudden oak death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum.

    PubMed

    Goss, E M; Carbone, I; Grünwald, N J

    2009-03-01

    The genus Phytophthora includes some of the most destructive plant pathogens affecting agricultural and native ecosystems and is responsible for a number of recent emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases of plants. Sudden oak death, caused by the exotic pathogen P. ramorum, has caused extensive mortality of oaks and tanoaks in Northern California, and has brought economic losses to US and European nurseries as well due to its infection of common ornamental plants. In its known range, P. ramorum occurs as three distinct clonal lineages. We inferred the evolutionary history of P. ramorum from nuclear sequence data using coalescent-based approaches. We found that the three lineages have been diverging for at least 11% of their history, an evolutionarily significant amount of time estimated to be on the order of 165,000 to 500,000 years. There was also strong evidence for historical recombination between the lineages, indicating that the ancestors of the P. ramorum lineages were members of a sexually reproducing population. Due to this recombination, the ages of the lineages varied within and between loci, but coalescent analyses suggested that the European lineage may be older than the North American lineages. The divergence of the three clonal lineages of P. ramorum supports a scenario in which the three lineages originated from different geographic locations that were sufficiently isolated from each other to allow independent evolution prior to introduction to North America and Europe. It is thus probable that the emergence of P. ramorum in North America and Europe was the result of three independent migration events. PMID:19222751

  10. Reconstructing a B-Cell Clonal Lineage. II. Mutation, Selection, and Affinity Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kepler, Thomas B.; Munshaw, Supriya; Wiehe, Kevin; Zhang, Ruijun; Yu, Jae-Sung; Woods, Christopher W.; Denny, Thomas N.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Alam, S. Munir; Moody, M. Anthony; Kelsoe, Garnett; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity maturation of the antibody response is a fundamental process in adaptive immunity during which B-cells activated by infection or vaccination undergo rapid proliferation accompanied by the acquisition of point mutations in their rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) genes and selection for increased affinity for the eliciting antigen. The rate of somatic hypermutation at any position within an Ig gene is known to depend strongly on the local DNA sequence, and Ig genes have region-specific codon biases that influence the local mutation rate within the gene resulting in increased differential mutability in the regions that encode the antigen-binding domains. We have isolated a set of clonally related natural Ig heavy chain–light chain pairs from an experimentally infected influenza patient, inferred the unmutated ancestral rearrangements and the maturation intermediates, and synthesized all the antibodies using recombinant methods. The lineage exhibits a remarkably uniform rate of improvement of the effective affinity to influenza hemagglutinin (HA) over evolutionary time, increasing 1000-fold overall from the unmutated ancestor to the best of the observed antibodies. Furthermore, analysis of selection reveals that selection and mutation bias were concordant even at the level of maturation to a single antigen. Substantial improvement in affinity to HA occurred along mutationally preferred paths in sequence space and was thus strongly facilitated by the underlying local codon biases. PMID:24795717

  11. Analysis of genetic variation within clonal lineages of grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch) using AFLP fingerprinting and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Vorwerk, S; Forneck, A

    2007-07-01

    Two AFLP fingerprinting methods were employed to estimate the potential of AFLP fingerprints for the detection of genetic diversity within single founder lineages of grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch). Eight clonal lineages, reared under controlled conditions in a greenhouse and reproducing asexually throughout a minimum of 15 generations, were monitored and mutations were scored as polymorphisms between the founder individual and individuals of succeeding generations. Genetic variation was detected within all lineages, from early generations on. Six to 15 polymorphic loci (from a total of 141 loci) were detected within the lineages, making up 4.3% of the total amount of genetic variation. The presence of contaminating extra-genomic sequences (e.g., viral material, bacteria, or ingested chloroplast DNA) was excluded as a source of intraclonal variation. Sequencing of 37 selected polymorphic bands confirmed their origin in mostly noncoding regions of the grape phylloxera genome. AFLP techniques were revealed to be powerful for the identification of reproducible banding patterns within clonal lineages. PMID:17893744

  12. Systemic mastocytosis with associated clonal haematological non-mast cell lineage diseases: a histopathological challenge

    PubMed Central

    Horny, H-P; Sotlar, K; Sperr, W R; Valent, P

    2004-01-01

    Aims: Although systemic mastocytosis (SM) with an associated clonal haematological non-mast cell lineage disease (SM-AHNMD) is a major subtype of SM, little is known about its frequency among myelogenous neoplasms, and mastocytosis in particular, or about AHNMD subtype frequencies. Methods: Approximately 19 500 routine bone marrow biopsies were evaluated. Immunostaining with antibodies against tryptase, KIT, and CD25 and molecular analysis for detection of C-KIT point mutations were performed in approximately 550/4100 myelogenous malignancies including mastocytosis, almost all subtypes of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative syndrome (MDS/MPD), MPD, and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Results: SM was rare—it was diagnosed in only 64 bone marrows (0.3%) and made up 1.5% of myelogenous tumours. SM-AHNMD was the second most frequent subtype (20). SM-AHNMD was never included in the clinical differential diagnoses and was confirmed histologically in most cases only after appropriate immunostaining. The abnormal mast cell phenotype was confirmed by immunohistochemical demonstration of tryptase and CD25 coexpression. The following associated haematological neoplasms were found: MDS/MPS, AML, MPS, MDS, plasma cell myeloma, and unclassifiable myelogenous malignancy. C-KIT point mutations were detected in 16 of 20 cases. Conclusions: SM-AHNMD can be diagnosed histologically in bone marrow trephines only after immunostaining with antibodies against tryptase, KIT, and CD25. Eighteen of 20 AHNMDs were of myeloid origin. C-KIT point mutations were present in 16 of 20 cases. The prognostic relevance of detecting SM associated with another haematological neoplasm remains unclear, but mast cell resistance to most cytoreductive agents is of major importance for treatment planning. PMID:15166264

  13. The Effectiveness of Bacteriophages against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 Nasal Colonization in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Duim, Birgitta; Fluit, Ad C; Carney, Jennifer; van Nes, Arie; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important colonizer in animals and an opportunistic pathogen in humans. In humans, MRSA can cause infections that might be difficult to treat because of antimicrobial resistance. The use of bacteriophages has been suggested as a potential approach for the control of MRSA colonization to minimize the—often occupational—exposure of humans. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of bacteriophage treatment on porcine nasal colonization with MRSA in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. The effectiveness of a bacteriophage combination of phage K*710 and P68 was assessed in vitro by incubating them with MRSA V0608892/1 (ST398) measuring the OD600 hourly. To study the in vivo effect, bacteriophages were administered in a gel developed for human application, which contain 109 plaque-forming units (pfu)/mL (K and P68 in a 19.25:1 ratio) for 5 days to piglets (N = 8) that were experimentally colonized with the MRSA strain. Eight piglets experimentally colonized were used as a negative control. The MRSA strain was also used to colonize porcine nasal mucosa explants and bacteriophages were applied to assess the ex vivo efficacy of treatment. Bacteriophages were effective in vitro. In vivo, sixteen piglets were colonized with MRSA but the number of CFU recovered after the application of the bacteriophages in 8 piglets was not reduced compared to the control animals (approx. 105 CFU/swab). In the ex vivo model, 108 CFU were used to establish colonization with MRSA; a reduction of colonization was not observed after application of bacteriophages. However, application of mupirocin both in vivo and ex vivo resulted in a near eradication of MRSA. In conclusion: i) The MRSA strain was killed in the presence of the bacteriophages phage K*710 and P68 in vitro. ii) Bacteriophages did not reduce porcine nasal colonization in vivo or ex vivo. Physiological in vivo and ex vivo conditions may explain these observations. Efficacy

  14. Phenotypes and Virulence among Staphylococcus aureus USA100, USA200, USA300, USA400, and USA600 Clonal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    King, Jessica M.; Kulhankova, Katarina; Stach, Christopher S.; Vu, Bao G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus diseases affect ~500,000 individuals per year in the United States. Worldwide, the USA100, USA200, USA400, and USA600 lineages cause many of the life-threatening S. aureus infections, such as bacteremia, infective endocarditis, pneumonia, toxic shock syndrome, and surgical site infections. However, the virulence mechanisms associated with these clonal lineages, in particular the USA100 and USA600 isolates, have been severely understudied. We investigated the virulence of these strains, in addition to strains in the USA200, USA300, and USA400 types, in well-established in vitro assays and in vivo in the rabbit model of infective endocarditis and sepsis. We show in the infective endocarditis and sepsis model that strains in the USA100 and USA600 lineages cause high lethality and are proficient in causing native valve infective endocarditis. Strains with high cytolytic activity or producing toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) or staphylococcal enterotoxin C (SEC) caused lethal sepsis, even with low cytolytic activity. Strains in the USA100, USA200, USA400, and USA600 lineages consistently contained genes that encode for the enterotoxin gene cluster proteins, SEC, or TSST-1 and were proficient at causing infective endocarditis, while the USA300 strains lacked these toxins and were deficient in promoting vegetation growth. The USA100, USA200, and USA400 strains in our collection formed strong biofilms in vitro, whereas the USA200 and USA600 strains exhibited increased blood survival. Hence, infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis are multifactorial and not intrinsic to any one individual clonal group, further highlighting the importance of expanding our knowledge of S. aureus pathogenesis to clonal lineages causative of invasive disease. IMPORTANCE S. aureus is the leading cause of infective endocarditis in the developed world, affecting ~40,000 individuals each year in the United States, and the second leading cause of bacteremia (D

  15. Phenotypes and Virulence among Staphylococcus aureus USA100, USA200, USA300, USA400, and USA600 Clonal Lineages.

    PubMed

    King, Jessica M; Kulhankova, Katarina; Stach, Christopher S; Vu, Bao G; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus diseases affect ~500,000 individuals per year in the United States. Worldwide, the USA100, USA200, USA400, and USA600 lineages cause many of the life-threatening S. aureus infections, such as bacteremia, infective endocarditis, pneumonia, toxic shock syndrome, and surgical site infections. However, the virulence mechanisms associated with these clonal lineages, in particular the USA100 and USA600 isolates, have been severely understudied. We investigated the virulence of these strains, in addition to strains in the USA200, USA300, and USA400 types, in well-established in vitro assays and in vivo in the rabbit model of infective endocarditis and sepsis. We show in the infective endocarditis and sepsis model that strains in the USA100 and USA600 lineages cause high lethality and are proficient in causing native valve infective endocarditis. Strains with high cytolytic activity or producing toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) or staphylococcal enterotoxin C (SEC) caused lethal sepsis, even with low cytolytic activity. Strains in the USA100, USA200, USA400, and USA600 lineages consistently contained genes that encode for the enterotoxin gene cluster proteins, SEC, or TSST-1 and were proficient at causing infective endocarditis, while the USA300 strains lacked these toxins and were deficient in promoting vegetation growth. The USA100, USA200, and USA400 strains in our collection formed strong biofilms in vitro, whereas the USA200 and USA600 strains exhibited increased blood survival. Hence, infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis are multifactorial and not intrinsic to any one individual clonal group, further highlighting the importance of expanding our knowledge of S. aureus pathogenesis to clonal lineages causative of invasive disease. IMPORTANCE S. aureus is the leading cause of infective endocarditis in the developed world, affecting ~40,000 individuals each year in the United States, and the second leading cause of bacteremia (D. R

  16. Infection and colonization with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 versus other MRSA in an area with a high density of pig farms.

    PubMed

    Wulf, M W H; Verduin, C M; van Nes, A; Huijsdens, X; Voss, A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the emergence of animal related methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 in an area with a high density of pig farms. A retrospective analysis was performed of all MRSA isolates in the laboratory database from 2002 till 2008 including typing results and clinical data from infection control archives and patient charts. The implementation of the screening of people in contact with pigs and veal calves for MRSA led to an increase in the average number of newly identified carriers from 16 per year between July 2002 and July 2006 to 148 between July 2006 and December 2008. This is a 925% increase of which 82% (108/132) was due to ST398. The majority (74%) came from targeted screening but 7% was due to unexpected findings. A wide range of infections with ST398 occurred in patients with and without contact with livestock varying from post-operative wound infections to sepsis and post-trauma osteomyelitis with an overrepresentation of spa type t567 among the clinical isolates. ST398 isolates were more often multi-resistant than isolates of other spa-types. The emergence of MRSA ST398 led to an increase in both MRSA carriers and MRSA infections. PMID:21533878

  17. Clonal identification of multipotent precursors from adult mouse pancreas that generate neural and pancreatic lineages.

    PubMed

    Seaberg, Raewyn M; Smukler, Simon R; Kieffer, Timothy J; Enikolopov, Grigori; Asghar, Zeenat; Wheeler, Michael B; Korbutt, Gregory; van der Kooy, Derek

    2004-09-01

    The clonal isolation of putative adult pancreatic precursors has been an elusive goal of researchers seeking to develop cell replacement strategies for diabetes. We report the clonal identification of multipotent precursor cells from the adult mouse pancreas. The application of a serum-free, colony-forming assay to pancreatic cells enabled the identification of precursors from pancreatic islet and ductal populations. These cells proliferate in vitro to form clonal colonies that coexpress neural and pancreatic precursor markers. Upon differentiation, individual clonal colonies produce distinct populations of neurons and glial cells, pancreatic endocrine beta-, alpha- and delta-cells, and pancreatic exocrine and stellate cells. Moreover, the newly generated beta-like cells demonstrate glucose-dependent Ca(2+) responsiveness and insulin release. Pancreas colonies do not express markers of embryonic stem cells, nor genes suggestive of mesodermal or neural crest origins. These cells represent a previously unidentified adult intrinsic pancreatic precursor population and are a promising candidate for cell-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:15322557

  18. Utilities for High-Throughput Analysis of B-Cell Clonal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Lees, William D.; Shepherd, Adrian J.

    2015-01-01

    There are at present few tools available to assist with the determination and analysis of B-cell lineage trees from next-generation sequencing data. Here we present two utilities that support automated large-scale analysis and the creation of publication-quality results. The tools are available on the web and are also available for download so that they can be integrated into an automated pipeline. Critically, and in contrast to previously published tools, these utilities can be used with any suitable phylogenetic inference method and with any antibody germline library and hence are species-independent. PMID:26527585

  19. Major clonal lineages in impetigo Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated in Czech and Slovak maternity hospitals.

    PubMed

    Růžičková, Vladislava; Pantůček, Roman; Petráš, Petr; Machová, Ivana; Kostýlková, Karla; Doškař, Jiří

    2012-11-01

    One hundred and twenty-seven exfoliative toxin-producing (ET-positive) strains of Staphylococcus aureus collected in 23 Czech and one Slovak maternity hospitals from 1998 to 2011 were genotypically characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiling, spa gene polymorphism analysis, and ETA-converting prophage carriage, which resulted in the identification of 21 genotypes grouped into 4 clonal complexes (CC). Ninety-one isolates carried the eta gene alone whilst 12 isolates harboured only the etb gene. Two new, to date not defined, spa types (t6644 and t6645) and 2 novel sequence types (ST2194 and ST2195) were identified in the set of strains under study. The predominant CC121 occurred in 13 Czech hospitals. CC15, CC9, and ST88 (CC88) exclusively included eta gene-positive strains while the strains belonging to ST121 harboured the eta and/or etb genes. This study highlights not only significant genomic diversity among impetigo strains and the distribution of major genotypes disseminated in the Czech and Slovak maternity hospitals, but also reveals their impact in epidermolytic infections. PMID:22664376

  20. Differential Distribution of Novel Restriction-Modification Systems in Clonal Lineages of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Claus, Heike; Friedrich, Alexander; Frosch, Matthias; Vogel, Ulrich

    2000-01-01

    Using representational difference analysis, we isolated novel meningococcal restriction-modification (R-M) systems. NmeBI, which is a homologue of the R-M system HgaI of Pasteurella volantium, was present in meningococci of the ET-5 complex and of lineage III. NmeAI was found in serogroup A, ET-37 complex, and cluster A4 meningococci. NmeDI was harbored by meningococci of the ET-37 complex and of cluster A4, but not by serogroup A meningococci. Two of the R-M systems, NmeBI and NmeDI, were located at homologous positions between the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase genes pheS and pheT, which appeared to be a preferential target for the insertion of foreign DNA in meningococci. The distribution of the three R-M systems was tested with 103 meningococcal strains comprising 49 sequence types. The vast majority of the strains had either NmeBI, NmeAI, or both NmeAI and NmeDI. Using cocultivation experiments, we could demonstrate that NmeBI, which was present in ET-5 complex meningococci, was responsible for a partial restriction of DNA transfer from meningococci of the ET-37 complex to meningococci of the ET-5 complex. PMID:10671450

  1. Gene Loss and Lineage-Specific Restriction-Modification Systems Associated with Niche Differentiation in the Campylobacter jejuni Sequence Type 403 Clonal Complex

    PubMed Central

    Morley, Laura; McNally, Alan; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Corander, Jukka; Méric, Guillaume; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Blom, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a highly diverse species of bacteria commonly associated with infectious intestinal disease of humans and zoonotic carriage in poultry, cattle, pigs, and other animals. The species contains a large number of distinct clonal complexes that vary from host generalist lineages commonly found in poultry, livestock, and human disease cases to host-adapted specialized lineages primarily associated with livestock or poultry. Here, we present novel data on the ST403 clonal complex of C. jejuni, a lineage that has not been reported in avian hosts. Our data show that the lineage exhibits a distinctive pattern of intralineage recombination that is accompanied by the presence of lineage-specific restriction-modification systems. Furthermore, we show that the ST403 complex has undergone gene decay at a number of loci. Our data provide a putative link between the lack of association with avian hosts of C. jejuni ST403 and both gene gain and gene loss through nonsense mutations in coding sequences of genes, resulting in pseudogene formation. PMID:25795671

  2. The unstable 'clone': evidence from monitoring AFLP-based mutations for short-term clonal genetic variation in two asexual lineages of the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae (F.).

    PubMed

    Loxdale, H D; Vorwerk, S; Forneck, A

    2013-02-01

    Clones have been in the forefront of biological interest for many years. Even so, open discussions continue to surround the concept of clonality, which has been recently much debated in the scientific literature, both in terms of philosophical meaning as well as empirical determination. Philosophically, the clone is the horizontally produced lineage from a single fertlized egg (e.g. mammals by division of the fertilized egg and representing a single generation) or vertically produced offspring (e.g. aphids representing different successive generations) from a single asexual stem mother (originally for a particular lineage, following hatching of the overwintering sexual egg in the spring); empirically, the aspect of genetic fidelity is also considered important, so-called clones being assumed to have an identical genome among clone mates. In reality of course, such members of a clonal lineage must differ at various regions of the genome, since mutation is a fundamental property of the DNA itself. Yet few studies have so far set out to show this empirically in eukaryotic organisms, which indulge in periods of asexual reproduction, sometimes, as in aphids, over many generations. In the present study, we have investigated asexual lineages of the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae (F.), a global pest of cereals, over five successive generations employing AFLP-PCR molecular techniques. Our main interest was to see how much variation was present in the early generations and if this variation was transmitted through the asexual lineages. By monitoring AFLP-based polymorphisms, we show that, in this aphid species, of a total of 110 individuals from two lineages tested (termed SA and SB), random mutations (band deletions, more rarely additions) were apparent from the third generation onwards, and although some mutations were found to be transmitted transgenerationally, others were rarely transmitted through the particular lineages they were detected in. Using Arlequin v. 2

  3. Effect of Temperature on Growth and Sporulation of US-22, US-23, and US-24 Clonal Lineages of Phytophthora infestans and Implications for Late Blight Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Seidl Johnson, Anna C; Frost, Kenneth E; Rouse, Douglas I; Gevens, Amanda J

    2015-04-01

    Epidemics of late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, have been studied by plant pathologists and regarded with great concern by potato and tomato growers since the Irish potato famine in the 1840s. P. infestans populations have continued to evolve, with unique clonal lineages arising which differ in pathogen fitness and pathogenicity, potentially impacting epidemiology. In 2012 and 2013, the US-23 clonal lineage predominated late blight epidemics in most U.S. potato and tomato production regions, including Wisconsin. This lineage was unknown prior to 2009. For isolates of three recently identified clonal lineages of P. infestans (US-22, US-23, and US-24), sporulation rates were experimentally determined on potato and tomato foliage and the effect of temperature on lesion growth rate on tomato was investigated. The US-22 and US-23 isolates had greater lesion growth rates on tomato than US-24 isolates. Sporulation rates for all isolates were greater on potato than tomato, and the US-23 isolates had greater sporulation rates on both tomato and potato than the US-22 and US-24 isolates. Experimentally determined correlates of fitness were input to the LATEBLIGHT model and epidemics were simulated using archived Wisconsin weather data from four growing seasons (2009 to 2012) to investigate the effect of isolates of these new lineages on late blight epidemiology. The fast lesion growth rates of US-22 and US-23 isolates resulted in severe epidemics in all years tested, particularly in 2011. The greater sporulation rates of P. infestans on potato resulted in simulated epidemics that progressed faster than epidemics simulated for tomato; the high sporulation rates of US-23 isolates resulted in simulated epidemics more severe than simulated epidemics of isolates of the US-22 and US-24 isolates and EC-1 clonal lineages on potato and tomato. Additionally, US-23 isolates consistently caused severe simulated epidemics when lesion growth rate and sporulation

  4. Diversity of Prophage DNA Regions of Streptococcus agalactiae Clonal Lineages from Adults and Neonates with Invasive Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Mazen; van der Mee-Marquet, Nathalie; Valentin-Domelier, Anne-Sophie; Quentin, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The phylogenetic position and prophage DNA content of the genomes of 142 S. agalactiae (group-B streptococcus, GBS) isolates responsible for bacteremia and meningitis in adults and neonates were studied and compared. The distribution of the invasive isolates between the various serotypes, sequence types (STs) and clonal complexes (CCs) differed significantly between adult and neonatal isolates. Use of the neighbor-net algorithm with the PHI test revealed evidence for recombination in the population studied (PHI, P = 2.01×10−6), and the recombination-mutation ratio (R/M) was 6∶7. Nevertheless, the estimated R/M ratio differed between CCs. Analysis of the prophage DNA regions of the genomes of the isolates assigned 90% of the isolates to five major prophage DNA groups: A to E. The mean number of prophage DNA fragments amplified per isolate varied from 2.6 for the isolates of prophage DNA group E to 4.0 for the isolates of prophage DNA group C. The isolates from adults and neonates with invasive diseases were distributed differently between the various prophage DNA groups (P<0.00001). Group C prophage DNA fragments were found in 52% of adult invasive isolates, whereas 74% of neonatal invasive isolates had prophage DNA fragments of groups A and B. Differences in prophage DNA content were also found between serotypes, STs and CCs (P<0.00001). All the ST-1 and CC1 isolates, mostly of serotype V, belonged to the prophage DNA group C, whereas 84% of the ST-17 and CC17 isolates, all of serotype III, belonged to prophage DNA groups A and B. These data indicate that the transduction mechanisms, i.e., gene transfer from one bacterium to another by a bacteriophage, underlying genetic recombination in S. agalactiae species, are specific to each intraspecies lineage and population of strains responsible for invasive diseases in adults and neonates. PMID:21633509

  5. Sequence Analysis of 96 Genomic Regions Identifies Distinct Evolutionary Lineages within CC156, the Largest Streptococcus pneumoniae Clonal Complex in the MLST Database

    PubMed Central

    Moschioni, Monica; Lo Sapio, Morena; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Torricelli, Giulia; Guidotti, Silvia; Muzzi, Alessandro; Barocchi, Michèle A.; Donati, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) of Streptococcus pneumoniae is based on the sequence of seven housekeeping gene fragments. The analysis of MLST allelic profiles by eBURST allows the grouping of genetically related strains into Clonal Complexes (CCs) including those genotypes with a common descent from a predicted ancestor. However, the increasing use of MLST to characterize S. pneumoniae strains has led to the identification of a large number of new Sequence Types (STs) causing the merger of formerly distinct lineages into larger CCs. An example of this is the CC156, displaying a high level of complexity and including strains with allelic profiles differing in all seven of the MLST loci, capsular type and the presence of the Pilus Islet-1 (PI-1). Detailed analysis of the CC156 indicates that the identification of new STs, such as ST4945, induced the merging of formerly distinct clonal complexes. In order to discriminate the strain diversity within CC156, a recently developed typing schema, 96-MLST, was used to analyse 66 strains representative of 41 different STs. Analysis of allelic profiles by hierarchical clustering and a minimum spanning tree identified ten genetically distinct evolutionary lineages. Similar results were obtained by phylogenetic analysis on the concatenated sequences with different methods. The identified lineages are homogenous in capsular type and PI-1 presence. ST4945 strains were unequivocally assigned to one of the lineages. In conclusion, the identification of new STs through an exhaustive analysis of pneumococcal strains from various laboratories has highlighted that potentially unrelated subgroups can be grouped into a single CC by eBURST. The analysis of additional loci, such as those included in the 96-MLST schema, will be necessary to accurately discriminate the clonal evolution of the pneumococcal population. PMID:23593373

  6. Distinguishing between Incomplete Lineage Sorting and Genomic Introgressions: Complete Fixation of Allospecific Mitochondrial DNA in a Sexually Reproducing Fish (Cobitis; Teleostei), despite Clonal Reproduction of Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Choleva, Lukas; Musilova, Zuzana; Kohoutova-Sediva, Alena; Paces, Jan; Rab, Petr; Janko, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing between hybrid introgression and incomplete lineage sorting causing incongruence among gene trees in that they exhibit topological differences requires application of statistical approaches that are based on biologically relevant models. Such study is especially challenging in hybrid systems, where usual vectors mediating interspecific gene transfers - hybrids with Mendelian heredity - are absent or unknown. Here we study a complex of hybridizing species, which are known to produce clonal hybrids, to discover how one of the species, Cobitis tanaitica, has achieved a pattern of mito-nuclear mosaic genome over the whole geographic range. We appplied three distinct methods, including the method using solely the information on gene tree topologies, and found that the contrasting mito-nuclear signal might not have resulted from the retention of ancestral polymorphism. Instead, we found two signs of hybridization events related to C. tanaitica; one concerning nuclear gene flow and the other suggested mitochondrial capture. Interestingly, clonal inheritance (gynogenesis) of contemporary hybrids prevents genomic introgressions and non-clonal hybrids are either absent or too rare to be detected among European Cobitis. Our analyses therefore suggest that introgressive hybridizations are rather old episodes, mediated by previously existing hybrids whose inheritance was not entirely clonal. Cobitis complex thus supports the view that the type of resulting hybrids depends on a level of genomic divergence between sexual species. PMID:24971792

  7. Two Distinct Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Specificities of Different Clonal Lineages in a Single HIV-1-Infected Donor: Implications for Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Montefiori, David C.; Wu, Xueling; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Kozink, Daniel M.; Parks, Robert J.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Kwong, Peter D.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Mascola, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma from a small subset of subjects chronically infected with HIV-1 shows remarkable magnitude and breadth of neutralizing activity. From one of these individuals (CH0219), we isolated two broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs), CH01 and VRC-CH31, from two clonal lineages of memory B cells with distinct specificities (variable loop 1 and 2 [V1V2] conformational specificity and CD4-binding site specificity, respectively) that recapitulate 95% of CH0219 serum neutralization breadth. These data provide proof of concept for an HIV-1 vaccine that aims to elicit bnAbs of multiple specificities. PMID:22301150

  8. Population genetic structure of Phytophthora cinnamomi associated with avocado in California and the discovery of a potentially recent introduction of a new clonal lineage.

    PubMed

    Pagliaccia, D; Pond, E; McKee, B; Douhan, G W

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR) of avocado (Persea americana), caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi, is the most serious disease of avocado worldwide. Previous studies have determined that this pathogen exhibits a primarily clonal reproductive mode but no population level studies have been conducted in the avocado-growing regions of California. Therefore, we used amplified fragment length polymorphism based on 22 polymorphic loci and mating type to investigate pathogen diversity from 138 isolates collected in 2009 to 2010 from 15 groves from the Northern and Southern avocado-growing regions. Additional isolates collected from avocado from 1966 to 2007 as well as isolates from other countries and hosts were also used for comparative purposes. Two distinct clades of A2 mating-type isolates from avocado were found based on neighbor joining analysis; one clade contained both newer and older collections from Northern and Southern California, whereas the other clade only contained isolates collected in 2009 and 2010 from Southern California. A third clade was also found that only contained A1 isolates from various hosts. Within the California population, a total of 16 genotypes were found with only one to four genotypes identified from any one location. The results indicate significant population structure in the California avocado P. cinnamomi population, low genotypic diversity consistent with asexual reproduction, potential evidence for the movement of clonal genotypes between the two growing regions, and a potential introduction of a new clonal lineage into Southern California. PMID:23228146

  9. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 80 Type IV (CC80-MRSA-IV) Isolated from the Middle East: A Heterogeneous Expanding Clonal Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Harastani, Houda H.; Tokajian, Sima T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The emergence of community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has caused a change in MRSA epidemiology worldwide. In the Middle East, the persistent spread of CA-MRSA isolates that were associated with multilocus sequence type (MLST) clonal complex 80 and with staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IV (CC80-MRSA-IV), calls for novel approaches for infection control that would limit its spread. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, the epidemiology of CC80-MRSA-IV was investigated in Jordan and Lebanon retrospectively covering the period from 2000 to 2011. Ninety-four S. aureus isolates, 63 (67%) collected from Lebanon and 31 (33%) collected from Jordan were included in this study. More than half of the isolates (56%) were associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), and 73 (78%) were Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) positive. Majority of the isolates (84%) carried the gene for exofoliative toxin d (etd), 19% had the Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 gene (tst), and seven isolates from Jordan had a rare combination being positive for both tst and PVL genes. spa typing showed the prevalence of type t044 (85%) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) recognized 21 different patterns. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed the prevalence (36%) of a unique resistant profile, which included resistance to streptomycin, kanamycin, and fusidic acid (SKF profile). Conclusions The genetic diversity among the CC80 isolates observed in this study poses an additional challenge to infection control of CA-MRSA epidemics. CA-MRSA related to ST80 in the Middle East was distinguished in this study from the ones described in other countries. Genetic diversity observed, which may be due to mutations and differences in the antibiotic regimens between countries may have led to the development of heterogeneous strains. Hence, it is difficult to maintain “the European CA-MRSA clone” as a uniform clone and it

  10. Evidence of possible methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 spread between pigs and other animals and people residing on the same farm.

    PubMed

    Pletinckx, Larissa J; Verhegghe, Marijke; Crombé, Florence; Dewulf, Jeroen; De Bleecker, Yves; Rasschaert, Geertrui; Butaye, Patrick; Goddeeris, Bruno M; De Man, Ingrid

    2013-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged in a wide variety of animal species. However, little is known about the transmission routes of MRSA ST398 between different animal species, the barn environment and people residing on the same farm. In this study, two pig farms, two poultry-pig and two dairy-pig farms were investigated with respect to the presence of MRSA. On each farm, samples were collected from all animal species present, the barn environment, the farmer, household members and the herd veterinarians. Besides the MRSA prevalence, the obtained spa-, SCCmec-type and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were also compared. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that MRSA ST398 was found in all animal species, in humans present on the farms and also in the pig barn environment. The presence of MRSA with the same spa-, SCCmec-type and antibiotic profile in the different animal species in direct or indirect contact with pigs suggests MRSA transfer. Furthermore, different pig age categories were investigated, with weaned piglets having the highest MRSA prevalence (86.3%). The herd-level prevalence was highly correlated (r=0.86, p=0.03) between sows and pre-weaned piglets. The results also indicate that companion animals, rats, mice and farmers could play an important role in the dissemination of MRSA, emphasizing the importance of internal biosecurity. However, external biosecurity is equally important because other spa-, SCCmec-types or antimicrobial resistances can be introduced through purchase of gilts. In this study we demonstrated that MRSA likely spreads between animal species, humans and the pig barn environment, which is why it is important to accurately implement control practices, in which not only pigs should be targeted, but also all other animal species present on farms. PMID:23200313

  11. Existence of two geographically-linked clonal lineages in the bacterial fish pathogen Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida evidenced by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Magariños, B; Toranzo, A E; Barja, J L; Romalde, J L

    2000-08-01

    In this work, we applied the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique to evaluate the genetic diversity in Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida (formerly Pasteurella piscicida), an important pathogen for different marine fish. Regardless of the oligonucleotide primer employed, the 29 isolates of Ph. damselae subsp. piscicida tested were separated into two groups, the RAPD-PCR analysis differentiated the European strains from the Japanese strains. The similarity between both groups estimated on the basis of the Dice coefficient was 75-80%. These results show that European and Japanese isolates of Ph. damselae subsp. piscicida, regardless of their host fish species, belong to two different clonal lineages. Our findings also indicate that RAPD profiling constitutes a useful tool for epidemiological studies of this fish pathogen. PMID:11057980

  12. Widespread acquisition of antimicrobial resistance among Campylobacter isolates from UK retail poultry and evidence for clonal expansion of resistant lineages

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial resistance is increasing among clinical Campylobacter cases and is common among isolates from other sources, specifically retail poultry - a major source of human infection. In this study the antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates from a UK-wide survey of Campylobacter in retail poultry in 2001 and 2004–5 was investigated. The occurrence of phenotypes resistant to tetracycline, quinolones (ciprofloxacin and naladixic acid), erythromycin, chloramphenicol and aminoglycosides was quantified. This was compared with a phylogeny for these isolates based upon Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) to investigate the pattern of antimicrobial resistance acquisition. Results Antimicrobial resistance was present in all lineage clusters, but statistical testing showed a non-random distribution. Erythromycin resistance was associated with Campylobacter coli. For all antimicrobials tested, resistant isolates were distributed among relatively distant lineages indicative of widespread acquisition. There was also evidence of clustering of resistance phenotypes within lineages; indicative of local expansion of resistant strains. Conclusions These results are consistent with the widespread acquisition of antimicrobial resistance among chicken associated Campylobacter isolates, either through mutation or horizontal gene transfer, and the expansion of these lineages as a proportion of the population. As Campylobacter are not known to multiply outside of the host and long-term carriage in humans is extremely infrequent in industrialized countries, the most likely location for the proliferation of resistant lineages is in farmed chickens. PMID:23855904

  13. Phenotypic plasticity in life-history traits of Daphnia galeata in response to temperature - a comparison across clonal lineages separated in time.

    PubMed

    Henning-Lucass, Nicole; Cordellier, Mathilde; Streit, Bruno; Schwenk, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    Climatic changes are projected to result in rapid adaptive events with considerable phenotypic shifts. In order to reconstruct the impact of increased mean water temperatures during past decades and to reveal possible thermal micro-evolution, we applied a resurrection ecology approach using dormant eggs of the freshwater keystone species Daphnia galeata. To this end, we compared the adaptive response of D. galeata clones from Lake Constance of two different time periods, 1965-1974 ("historical") versus 2000-2009 ("recent"), to experimentally increased temperature regimes. In order to distinguish between genetic versus environmentally induced effects, we performed a common garden experiment in a flow-through system and measured variation in life-history traits. Experimental thermal regimes were chosen according to natural temperature conditions during the reproductive period of D. galeata in Central European lakes, with one additional temperature regime exceeding the currently observable maximum (+2°C). Increased water temperatures were shown to significantly affect measured life-history traits, and significant "temperature × clonal age" interactions were revealed. Compared to historical clones, recent clonal lineages exhibited a shorter time to first reproduction and a higher survival rate, which may suggest temperature-driven micro-evolution over time but does not allow an explicit conclusion on the adaptive nature of such responses. PMID:26941934

  14. Clonal Dissemination, Emergence of Mutator Lineages and Antibiotic Resistance Evolution in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Chronic Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mulet, Xavier; Cabot, Gabriel; Moyà, Bartolomé; Figuerola, Joan; Togores, Bernat; Pérez, José L.; Oliver, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Chronic respiratory infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF). We investigated the interplay between three key microbiological aspects of these infections: the occurrence of transmissible and persistent strains, the emergence of variants with enhanced mutation rates (mutators) and the evolution of antibiotic resistance. For this purpose, 10 sequential isolates, covering up to an 8-year period, from each of 10 CF patients were studied. As anticipated, resistance significantly accumulated overtime, and occurred more frequently among mutator variants detected in 6 of the patients. Nevertheless, highest resistance was documented for the nonmutator CF epidemic strain LES-1 (ST-146) detected for the first time in Spain. A correlation between resistance profiles and resistance mechanisms evaluated [efflux pump (mexB, mexD, mexF, and mexY) and ampC overexpression and OprD production] was not always obvious and hypersusceptibility to certain antibiotics (such as aztreonam or meropenem) was frequently observed. The analysis of whole genome macrorestriction fragments through Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed that a single genotype (clone FQSE-A) produced persistent infections in 4 of the patients. Multilocus Sequence typing (MLST) identified clone FQSE-A as the CF epidemic clone ST-274, but striking discrepancies between PFGE and MLST profiles were evidenced. While PFGE macrorestriction patterns remained stable, a new sequence type (ST-1089) was detected in two of the patients, differing from ST-274 by only two point mutations in two of the genes, each leading to a nonpreviously described allele. Moreover, detailed genetic analyses revealed that the new ST-1089 is a mutS deficient mutator lineage that evolved from the epidemic strain ST-274, acquired specific resistance mechanisms, and underwent further interpatient spread. Thus, presented results provide the first evidence of interpatient dissemination of mutator

  15. Analysis of the Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrum of Staphylococcus aureus Identifies Mutations That Allow Differentiation of the Main Clonal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Josten, Michaele; Reif, Marion; Szekat, Christiane; Al-Sabti, Nahed; Roemer, Terry; Sparbier, Katrin; Kostrzewa, Markus; Rohde, Holger; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2013-01-01

    Nosocomial infections involving epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are a serious problem in many countries. In order to analyze outbreaks, the infectious isolates have to be typed; however, most molecular methods are expensive or labor-intensive. Here, we evaluated matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of cell extracts for the molecular characterization of S. aureus strains. The peak patterns of 401 MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains, including clinical and laboratory strains, were analyzed. Database searches indicated the peptides that were represented by the corresponding peaks in the spectra. The identities of the peptides were confirmed by the sequencing of mutants, the expression of antisense RNA fragments that resulted in the knockdown of the peptide of interest and the concomitant loss of the signal, or tandem MALDI-TOF MS (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). It was shown that the signals derive mainly from stress proteins and ribosomal proteins. Peak shifts that differentiate the main S. aureus clonal complexes CC5, CC22, CC8, CC45, CC30, and CC1 correlate to point mutations in the respective genes. Retrospective typing of an MRSA outbreak showed that it is possible to differentiate unrelated MSSA, MRSA, and borderline resistant S. aureus (BORSA) strains isolated from health care workers. In conclusion, this method allows for the detection of the epidemic lineages of S. aureus during species identification by MALDI-TOF MS analysis. PMID:23554199

  16. A Livestock-Associated, Multidrug-Resistant, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 97 Lineage Spreading in Dairy Cattle and Pigs in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Feltrin, Fabiola; Alba, Patricia; Kraushaar, Britta; Ianzano, Angela; Argudín, María Angeles; Di Matteo, Paola; Porrero, María Concepción; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Butaye, Patrick; Franco, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Pandemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 97 (CC97) lineages originated from livestock-to-human host jumps. In recent years, CC97 has become one of the major MRSA lineages detected in Italian farmed animals. The aim of this study was to characterize and analyze differences in MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) mainly of swine and bovine origins. Forty-seven CC97 isolates, 35 MRSA isolates, and 6 MSSA isolates from different Italian pig and cattle holdings; 5 pig MRSA isolates from Germany; and 1 human MSSA isolate from Spain were characterized by macrorestriction pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and antimicrobial resistance pattern analysis. Virulence and resistance genes were investigated by PCR and microarray analysis. Most of the isolates were of SCCmec type V (SCCmec V), except for two German MRSA isolates (SCCmec III). Five main clusters were identified by PFGE, with the German isolates (clusters I and II) showing 60.5% similarity with the Italian isolates, most of which (68.1%) grouped into cluster V. All CC97 isolates were Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) negative, and a few (n = 7) tested positive for sak or scn. All MRSA isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), and the main features were erm(B)- or erm(C)-mediated (n = 18) macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance, vga(A)-mediated (n = 37) pleuromutilin resistance, fluoroquinolone resistance (n = 33), tet(K) in 32/37 tet(M)-positive isolates, and blaZ in almost all MRSA isolates. Few host-associated differences were detected among CC97 MRSA isolates: their extensive MDR nature in both pigs and dairy cattle may be a consequence of a spillback from pigs of a MRSA lineage that originated in cattle as MSSA and needs further investigation. Measures should be implemented at the farm level to prevent spillover to humans in intensive farming

  17. Genetic Diversity of Human Pathogenic Members of the Fusarium oxysporum Complex Inferred from Multilocus DNA Sequence Data and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analyses: Evidence for the Recent Dispersion of a Geographically Widespread Clonal Lineage and Nosocomial Origin

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Kerry; Sutton, Deanna A.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Magnon, Karen C.; Cox, Patricia A.; Revankar, Sanjay G.; Sanche, Stephen; Geiser, David M.; Juba, Jean H.; van Burik, Jo-Anne H.; Padhye, Arvind; Anaissie, Elias J.; Francesconi, Andrea; Walsh, Thomas J.; Robinson, Jody S.

    2004-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a phylogenetically diverse monophyletic complex of filamentous ascomycetous fungi that are responsible for localized and disseminated life-threatening opportunistic infections in immunocompetent and severely neutropenic patients, respectively. Although members of this complex were isolated from patients during a pseudoepidemic in San Antonio, Tex., and from patients and the water system in a Houston, Tex., hospital during the 1990s, little is known about their genetic relatedness and population structure. This study was conducted to investigate the global genetic diversity and population biology of a comprehensive set of clinically important members of the F. oxysporum complex, focusing on the 33 isolates from patients at the San Antonio hospital and on strains isolated in the United States from the water systems of geographically distant hospitals in Texas, Maryland, and Washington, which were suspected as reservoirs of nosocomial fusariosis. In all, 18 environmental isolates and 88 isolates from patients spanning four continents were genotyped. The major finding of this study, based on concordant results from phylogenetic analyses of multilocus DNA sequence data and amplified fragment length polymorphisms, is that a recently dispersed, geographically widespread clonal lineage is responsible for over 70% of all clinical isolates investigated, including all of those associated with the pseudoepidemic in San Antonio. Moreover, strains of the clonal lineage recovered from patients were conclusively shown to genetically match those isolated from the hospital water systems of three U.S. hospitals, providing support for the hypothesis that hospitals may serve as a reservoir for nosocomial fusarial infections. PMID:15528703

  18. GENOTYPING STUDIES OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII ISOLATES FROM AFRICA REVEALED THAT THE ARCHYTYPAL CLONAL LINEAGES PREDOMINATE AS IN NORTH AMERICA AND EUROPE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Until recently, Toxoplasma gondii was considered to be clonal with very little genetic variability. Recent studies indicate that T. gondii isolates from Brazil are genetically and biologically different from T. gondii isolates from USA and Europe. However, little is known of the genetics of T. gondi...

  19. USA300 and USA500 Clonal Lineages of Staphylococcus aureus Do Not Produce a Capsular Polysaccharide Due to Conserved Mutations in the cap5 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Read, Timothy D.; Sieth, Julia; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Dobbins, Ginette; David, Michael Z.; Kumar, Neha; Eells, Samantha J.; Miller, Loren G.; Boxrud, David J.; Chambers, Henry F.; Lynfield, Ruth; Lee, Jean C.; Daum, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The surface capsular polysaccharide (CP) is a virulence factor that has been used as an antigen in several successful vaccines against bacterial pathogens. A vaccine has not yet been licensed against Staphylococcus aureus, although two multicomponent vaccines that contain CP antigens are in clinical trials. In this study, we evaluated CP production in USA300 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates that have become the predominant community-associated MRSA clones in the United States. We found that all 167 USA300 MRSA and 50 USA300 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates were CP negative (CP−). Moreover, all 16 USA500 isolates, which have been postulated to be the progenitor lineage of USA300, were also CP−. Whole-genome sequence analysis of 146 CP− USA300 MRSA isolates revealed they all carry a cap5 locus with 4 conserved mutations compared with strain Newman. Genetic complementation experiments revealed that three of these mutations (in the cap5 promoter, cap5D nucleotide 994, and cap5E nucleotide 223) ablated CP production in USA300 and that Cap5E75 Asp, located in the coenzyme-binding domain, is essential for capsule production. All but three USA300 MSSA isolates had the same four cap5 mutations found in USA300 MRSA isolates. Most isolates with a USA500 pulsotype carried three of these four USA300-specific mutations, suggesting the fourth mutation occurred in the USA300 lineage. Phylogenetic analysis of the cap loci of our USA300 isolates as well as publicly available genomes from 41 other sequence types revealed that the USA300-specific cap5 mutations arose sequentially in S. aureus in a common ancestor of USA300 and USA500 isolates. PMID:25852165

  20. Emergence of a Clonal Lineage of Multidrug-Resistant ESBL-Producing Salmonella Infantis Transmitted from Broilers and Broiler Meat to Humans in Italy between 2011 and 2014

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Alessia; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Feltrin, Fabiola; Alba, Patricia; Cordaro, Gessica; Iurescia, Manuela; Tolli, Rita; D’Incau, Mario; Staffolani, Monica; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Battisti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We report the spread of a clone of multidrug-resistant (MDR), ESBL-producing (blaCTX-M-1) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis, in the Italian broiler chicken industry and along the food-chain. This was first detected in Italy in 2011 and led to human infection in Italy in 2013–2014.A set (n = 49) of extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)-resistant (R) isolates of S. Infantis (2011–2014) from humans, food-producing animals and meat thereof, were studied along with a selected set of earlier and more recent ESC-susceptible (ESC-S) isolates (n = 42, 2001–2014). They were characterized by macrorestriction-PFGE analysis and genetic environment of ESC-resistance. Isolates representative of PFGE-patterns and origin were submitted to Whole Genome Sequencing. The emerging ESC-R clone, detected mainly from broiler chickens, broiler meat and humans, showed a minimum pattern of clinical resistance to cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfonamides, and trimethoprim, beside ciprofloxacin microbiological resistance (MIC 0.25 mg/L). All isolates of this clone harbored a conjugative megaplasmid (~ 280–320 Kb), similar to that described in ESC-susceptible S. Infantis in Israel (pESI-like) in 2014. This megaplasmid carried the ESBL gene blaCTX-M-1, and additional genes [tet(A), sul1, dfrA1 and dfrA14] mediating cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfonamide, and trimethoprim resistance. It also contained genes conferring enhanced colonization capability, virulence (fimbriae, yersiniabactin), resistance and fitness (qacE1, mer) in the intensive-farming environment. This emerging clone of S. Infantis has been causing infections in humans, most likely through the broiler industry. Since S. Infantis is among major serovars causing human infections in Europe and is an emerging non-typhoidal Salmonella globally, further spread of this lineage in primary productions deserves quick and thorough risk-management strategies. PMID:26716443

  1. Kin Recognition in a Clonal Fish, Poecilia formosa

    PubMed Central

    Makowicz, Amber M.; Tiedemann, Ralph; Schlupp, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Relatedness strongly influences social behaviors in a wide variety of species. For most species, the highest typical degree of relatedness is between full siblings with 50% shared genes. However, this is poorly understood in species with unusually high relatedness between individuals: clonal organisms. Although there has been some investigation into clonal invertebrates and yeast, nothing is known about kin selection in clonal vertebrates. We show that a clonal fish, the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa), can distinguish between different clonal lineages, associating with genetically identical, sister clones, and use multiple sensory modalities. Also, they scale their aggressive behaviors according to the relatedness to other females: they are more aggressive to non-related clones. Our results demonstrate that even in species with very small genetic differences between individuals, kin recognition can be adaptive. Their discriminatory abilities and regulation of costly behaviors provides a powerful example of natural selection in species with limited genetic diversity. PMID:27483372

  2. Kin Recognition in a Clonal Fish, Poecilia formosa.

    PubMed

    Makowicz, Amber M; Tiedemann, Ralph; Steele, Rachel N; Schlupp, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Relatedness strongly influences social behaviors in a wide variety of species. For most species, the highest typical degree of relatedness is between full siblings with 50% shared genes. However, this is poorly understood in species with unusually high relatedness between individuals: clonal organisms. Although there has been some investigation into clonal invertebrates and yeast, nothing is known about kin selection in clonal vertebrates. We show that a clonal fish, the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa), can distinguish between different clonal lineages, associating with genetically identical, sister clones, and use multiple sensory modalities. Also, they scale their aggressive behaviors according to the relatedness to other females: they are more aggressive to non-related clones. Our results demonstrate that even in species with very small genetic differences between individuals, kin recognition can be adaptive. Their discriminatory abilities and regulation of costly behaviors provides a powerful example of natural selection in species with limited genetic diversity. PMID:27483372

  3. Strong but diverging clonality - climate relationships of different plant clades explain weak overall pattern across China

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Duo; Liu, Guofang; Song, Yao-Bin; Cornwell, William K.; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.

    2016-01-01

    The clonal strategy should be relatively important in stressful environments (i.e. of low resource availability or harsh climate), e.g. in cold habitats. However, our understanding of the distribution pattern of clonality along environmental gradients is still far from universal. The weakness and inconsistency of overall clonality-climate relationships across taxa, as reported in previous studies, may be due to different phylogenetic lineages having fundamental differences in functional traits other than clonality determining their climate response. Thus, in this study we compared the clonality-climate relationships along a latitudinal gradient within and between different lineages at several taxonomic levels, including four major angiosperm lineages (Magnoliidae, Monocotyledoneae, Superrosidae and Superasteridae), orders and families. To this aim we used a species clonality dataset for 4015 vascular plant species in 545 terrestrial communities across China. Our results revealed clear predictive patterns of clonality proportion in relation to environmental gradients for the predominant representatives of each of the taxonomic levels above, but the relationships differed in shape and strength between the 4 major angiosperm lineages, between the 12 orders and between the 12 families. These different relationships canceled out one another when all lineages at a certain taxonomic level were pooled. Our findings highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the functional or taxonomic scale for studying variation in plant ecological strategy across environmental gradients. PMID:27246203

  4. Strong but diverging clonality - climate relationships of different plant clades explain weak overall pattern across China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Duo; Liu, Guofang; Song, Yao-Bin; Cornwell, William K.; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.

    2016-06-01

    The clonal strategy should be relatively important in stressful environments (i.e. of low resource availability or harsh climate), e.g. in cold habitats. However, our understanding of the distribution pattern of clonality along environmental gradients is still far from universal. The weakness and inconsistency of overall clonality-climate relationships across taxa, as reported in previous studies, may be due to different phylogenetic lineages having fundamental differences in functional traits other than clonality determining their climate response. Thus, in this study we compared the clonality-climate relationships along a latitudinal gradient within and between different lineages at several taxonomic levels, including four major angiosperm lineages (Magnoliidae, Monocotyledoneae, Superrosidae and Superasteridae), orders and families. To this aim we used a species clonality dataset for 4015 vascular plant species in 545 terrestrial communities across China. Our results revealed clear predictive patterns of clonality proportion in relation to environmental gradients for the predominant representatives of each of the taxonomic levels above, but the relationships differed in shape and strength between the 4 major angiosperm lineages, between the 12 orders and between the 12 families. These different relationships canceled out one another when all lineages at a certain taxonomic level were pooled. Our findings highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the functional or taxonomic scale for studying variation in plant ecological strategy across environmental gradients.

  5. Strong but diverging clonality - climate relationships of different plant clades explain weak overall pattern across China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Duo; Liu, Guofang; Song, Yao-Bin; Cornwell, William K; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2016-01-01

    The clonal strategy should be relatively important in stressful environments (i.e. of low resource availability or harsh climate), e.g. in cold habitats. However, our understanding of the distribution pattern of clonality along environmental gradients is still far from universal. The weakness and inconsistency of overall clonality-climate relationships across taxa, as reported in previous studies, may be due to different phylogenetic lineages having fundamental differences in functional traits other than clonality determining their climate response. Thus, in this study we compared the clonality-climate relationships along a latitudinal gradient within and between different lineages at several taxonomic levels, including four major angiosperm lineages (Magnoliidae, Monocotyledoneae, Superrosidae and Superasteridae), orders and families. To this aim we used a species clonality dataset for 4015 vascular plant species in 545 terrestrial communities across China. Our results revealed clear predictive patterns of clonality proportion in relation to environmental gradients for the predominant representatives of each of the taxonomic levels above, but the relationships differed in shape and strength between the 4 major angiosperm lineages, between the 12 orders and between the 12 families. These different relationships canceled out one another when all lineages at a certain taxonomic level were pooled. Our findings highlight the importance of explicitly accounting for the functional or taxonomic scale for studying variation in plant ecological strategy across environmental gradients. PMID:27246203

  6. First Report of the European Lineage of Phytophthora ramorum in a California Nursery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum is the causal agent of Sudden Oak Death in California and Oregon forests and Ramorum blight on broad range of host species in wildlands and nurseries. It is thought to be an introduced pathogen and only three clonal lineages are known. The North American lineage (lineage NA1, ma...

  7. Defining Clonal Color in Fluorescent Multi-Clonal Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Juwell W.; Turcotte, Raphaël; Alt, Clemens; Runnels, Judith M.; Tsao, Hensin; Lin, Charles P.

    2016-01-01

    Clonal heterogeneity and selection underpin many biological processes including development and tumor progression. Combinatorial fluorescent protein expression in germline cells has proven its utility for tracking the formation and regeneration of different organ systems. Such cell populations encoded by combinatorial fluorescent proteins are also attractive tools for understanding clonal expansion and clonal competition in cancer. However, the assignment of clonal identity requires an analytical framework in which clonal markings can be parameterized and validated. Here we present a systematic and quantitative method for RGB analysis of fluorescent melanoma cancer clones. We then demonstrate refined clonal trackability of melanoma cells using this scheme. PMID:27073117

  8. Clonal reproduction in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John W.; Hann-Soden, Christopher; Branco, Sara; Sylvain, Iman; Ellison, Christopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Research over the past two decades shows that both recombination and clonality are likely to contribute to the reproduction of all fungi. This view of fungi is different from the historical and still commonly held view that a large fraction of fungi are exclusively clonal and that some fungi have been exclusively clonal for hundreds of millions of years. Here, we first will consider how these two historical views have changed. Then we will examine the impact on fungal research of the concept of restrained recombination [Tibayrenc M, Ayala FJ (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109 (48):E3305–E3313]. Using animal and human pathogenic fungi, we examine extrinsic restraints on recombination associated with bottlenecks in genetic variation caused by geographic dispersal and extrinsic restraints caused by shifts in reproductive mode associated with either disease transmission or hybridization. Using species of the model yeast Saccharomyces and the model filamentous fungus Neurospora, we examine intrinsic restraints on recombination associated with mating systems that range from strictly clonal at one extreme to fully outbreeding at the other and those that lie between, including selfing and inbreeding. We also consider the effect of nomenclature on perception of reproductive mode and a means of comparing the relative impact of clonality and recombination on fungal populations. Last, we consider a recent hypothesis suggesting that fungi thought to have the most severe intrinsic constraints on recombination actually may have the fewest. PMID:26195774

  9. Microdissection and visualization of individual hair follicles for lineage tracing studies.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Inês; Legué, Emilie; Capgras, Suzanne; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    In vivo lineage tracing is a valuable technique to study cellular behavior. Our lab developed a lineage tracing method, based on the Cre/lox system, to genetically induce clonal labelling of cells and follow their progeny. Here we describe a protocol for temporally controlled clonal labelling and for microdissection of individual mouse hair follicles. We further present staining and visualization techniques used in our lab to analyze clones issued from genetically induced labelling. PMID:24281870

  10. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila brain: I. Development of the lineage-associated fiber tracts

    PubMed Central

    Lovick, Jennifer K.; Ngo, Kathy T.; Omoto, Jaison J.; Wong, Darren C.; Nguyen, Joseph D.; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Neurons of the Drosophila central brain fall into approximately 100 paired groups, termed lineages. Each lineage is derived from a single asymmetrically-dividing neuroblast. Embryonic neuroblasts produce 1,500 primary neurons (per hemisphere) that make up the larval CNS followed by a second mitotic period in the larva that generates approximately 10,000 secondary, adult-specific neurons. Clonal analyses based on previous works using lineage-specific Gal4 drivers have established that such lineages form highly invariant morphological units. All neurons of a lineage project as one or a few axon tracts (secondary axon tracts, SATs) with characteristic trajectories, thereby representing unique hallmarks. In the neuropil, SATs assemble into larger fiber bundles (fascicles) which interconnect different neuropil compartments. We have analyzed the SATs and fascicles formed by lineages during larval, pupal, and adult stages using antibodies against membrane molecules (Neurotactin/Neuroglian) and synaptic proteins (Bruchpilot/N-Cadherin). The use of these markers allows one to identify fiber bundles of the adult brain and associate them with SATs and fascicles of the larval brain. This work lays the foundation for assigning the lineage identity of GFP-labeled MARCM clones on the basis of their close association with specific SATs and neuropil fascicles, as described in the accompanying paper (Wong et al., 2013. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila brain: II. Identification of lineage projection patterns based on MARCM clones. Submitted.). PMID:23880429

  11. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila brain: I. Development of the lineage-associated fiber tracts.

    PubMed

    Lovick, Jennifer K; Ngo, Kathy T; Omoto, Jaison J; Wong, Darren C; Nguyen, Joseph D; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-12-15

    Neurons of the Drosophila central brain fall into approximately 100 paired groups, termed lineages. Each lineage is derived from a single asymmetrically-dividing neuroblast. Embryonic neuroblasts produce 1,500 primary neurons (per hemisphere) that make up the larval CNS followed by a second mitotic period in the larva that generates approximately 10,000 secondary, adult-specific neurons. Clonal analyses based on previous works using lineage-specific Gal4 drivers have established that such lineages form highly invariant morphological units. All neurons of a lineage project as one or a few axon tracts (secondary axon tracts, SATs) with characteristic trajectories, thereby representing unique hallmarks. In the neuropil, SATs assemble into larger fiber bundles (fascicles) which interconnect different neuropil compartments. We have analyzed the SATs and fascicles formed by lineages during larval, pupal, and adult stages using antibodies against membrane molecules (Neurotactin/Neuroglian) and synaptic proteins (Bruchpilot/N-Cadherin). The use of these markers allows one to identify fiber bundles of the adult brain and associate them with SATs and fascicles of the larval brain. This work lays the foundation for assigning the lineage identity of GFP-labeled MARCM clones on the basis of their close association with specific SATs and neuropil fascicles, as described in the accompanying paper (Wong et al., 2013. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila brain: II. Identification of lineage projection patterns based on MARCM clones. Submitted.). PMID:23880429

  12. Wide Dispersion and Diversity of Clonally Related Inhibitory Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Harwell, Corey C.; Fuentealba, Luis C.; Gonzalez-Cerrillo, Adrian; Parker, Phillip R.L.; Gertz, Caitlyn C.; Mazzola, Emanuele; Turrero Garcia, Miguel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cepko, Constance L.; Kriegstein, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex is composed of two major neuronal cell types with distinct origins: excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, generated in dorsal and ventral progenitor zones of the embryonic telencephalon respectively. Thus, inhibitory neurons migrate relatively long distances to reach their destination in the developing forebrain. The role of lineage in the organization and circuitry of interneurons is still not well understood. Utilizing a combination of genetics, retroviral fate mapping and lineage-specific retroviral barcode labeling, we find that clonally related interneurons can be widely dispersed while unrelated interneurons can be closely clustered. These data suggest that migratory mechanisms related to the clustering of interneurons occur largely independent of their clonal origin. PMID:26299474

  13. Wide Dispersion and Diversity of Clonally Related Inhibitory Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Harwell, Corey C; Fuentealba, Luis C; Gonzalez-Cerrillo, Adrian; Parker, Phillip R L; Gertz, Caitlyn C; Mazzola, Emanuele; Garcia, Miguel Turrero; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cepko, Constance L; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian neocortex is composed of two major neuronal cell types with distinct origins: excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, generated in dorsal and ventral progenitor zones of the embryonic telencephalon, respectively. Thus, inhibitory neurons migrate relatively long distances to reach their destination in the developing forebrain. The role of lineage in the organization and circuitry of interneurons is still not well understood. Utilizing a combination of genetics, retroviral fate mapping, and lineage-specific retroviral barcode labeling, we find that clonally related interneurons can be widely dispersed while unrelated interneurons can be closely clustered. These data suggest that migratory mechanisms related to the clustering of interneurons occur largely independent of their clonal origin. PMID:26299474

  14. Colponemids represent multiple ancient alveolate lineages.

    PubMed

    Janouškovec, Jan; Tikhonenkov, Denis V; Mikhailov, Kirill V; Simdyanov, Timur G; Aleoshin, Vladimir V; Mylnikov, Alexander P; Keeling, Patrick J

    2013-12-16

    The alveolates comprise three well-studied protist lineages of significant environmental, medical, and economical importance: apicomplexans (e.g., Plasmodium), dinoflagellates (e.g., Symbiodinium), and ciliates (e.g., Tetrahymena). These major lineages have evolved distinct and unusual characteristics, the origins of which have proved to be difficult evolutionary puzzles. Mitochondrial genomes are a prime example: all three groups depart from canonical form and content, but in different ways. Reconstructing such ancient transitions is difficult without deep-branching lineages that retain ancestral characteristics. Here we describe two such lineages and how they illuminate the ancestral state of alveolate mitochondrial genomes. We established five clonal cultures of colponemids, predatory alveolates without cultured representatives and molecular data. Colponemids represent at least two independent lineages at the phylum level in multilocus phylogenetic analysis; one sister to apicomplexans and dinoflagellates, and the other at a deeper position. A genome survey from one strain showed that ancestral state of the mitochondrial genomes in the three major alveolate lineages consisted of an unusual linear chromosome with telomeres and a substantially larger gene set than known alveolates. Colponemid sequences also identified several environmental lineages as colponemids, altogether suggesting an untapped potential for understanding the origin and evolution of apicomplexans, dinoflagellates, and ciliates. PMID:24316202

  15. The Complex, Clonal, and Controversial Nature of Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Evans, James A; McDonald, Stuart A C

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BO) is a preneoplastic condition described as the replacement of the stratified squamous epithelium of the distal esophagus with one that histologically presents as a diverse mixture of metaplastic glands resembling gastric or intestinal-type columnar epithelium. The clonal origins of BO are still unclear. More recently, we have begun to investigate the relationship between the various metaplastic gland phenotypes observed in BO, how they evolve, and the cancer risk they bestow. Studies have revealed that glands along the BO segment are clonal units containing a single stem cell clone that can give rise to all the differentiated epithelial cell types in glands. Clonal lineage tracing analysis has revealed that Barrett's glands are capable of bifurcation and this facilitates clonal expansion and competition. In fact, BO in some patients appears to consist of multiple, independently initiated clones that compete with each other for space and possibly resources. This chapter discusses the concepts of clonal competition and expansion in BO and sets out to query what we know about the role of gland diversity and phenotypic evolution within this complex columnar metaplasia. PMID:27573766

  16. Scaling of processes shaping the clonal dynamics and genetic mosaic of seagrasses through temporal genetic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Becheler, R; Benkara, E; Moalic, Y; Hily, C; Arnaud-Haond, S

    2014-02-01

    Theoretically, the dynamics of clonal and genetic diversities of clonal plant populations are strongly influenced by the competition among clones and rate of seedling recruitment, but little empirical assessment has been made of such dynamics through temporal genetic surveys. We aimed to quantify 3 years of evolution in the clonal and genetic composition of Zostera marina meadows, comparing parameters describing clonal architecture and genetic diversity at nine microsatellite markers. Variations in clonal structure revealed a decrease in the evenness of ramet distribution among genets. This illustrates the increasing dominance of some clonal lineages (multilocus lineages, MLLs) in populations. Despite the persistence of these MLLs over time, genetic differentiation was much stronger in time than in space, at the local scale. Contrastingly with the short-term evolution of clonal architecture, the patterns of genetic structure and genetic diversity sensu stricto (that is, heterozygosity and allelic richness) were stable in time. These results suggest the coexistence of (i) a fine grained (at the scale of a 20 × 30 m quadrat) stable core of persistent genets originating from an initial seedling recruitment and developing spatial dominance through clonal elongation; and (ii) a local (at the scale of the meadow) pool of transient genets subjected to annual turnover. This simultaneous occurrence of initial and repeated recruitment strategies highlights the different spatial scales at which distinct evolutionary drivers and mating systems (clonal competition, clonal growth, propagule dispersal and so on) operate to shape the dynamics of populations and the evolution of polymorphism in space and time. PMID:24022498

  17. Scaling of processes shaping the clonal dynamics and genetic mosaic of seagrasses through temporal genetic monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Becheler, R; Benkara, E; Moalic, Y; Hily, C; Arnaud-Haond, S

    2014-01-01

    Theoretically, the dynamics of clonal and genetic diversities of clonal plant populations are strongly influenced by the competition among clones and rate of seedling recruitment, but little empirical assessment has been made of such dynamics through temporal genetic surveys. We aimed to quantify 3 years of evolution in the clonal and genetic composition of Zostera marina meadows, comparing parameters describing clonal architecture and genetic diversity at nine microsatellite markers. Variations in clonal structure revealed a decrease in the evenness of ramet distribution among genets. This illustrates the increasing dominance of some clonal lineages (multilocus lineages, MLLs) in populations. Despite the persistence of these MLLs over time, genetic differentiation was much stronger in time than in space, at the local scale. Contrastingly with the short-term evolution of clonal architecture, the patterns of genetic structure and genetic diversity sensu stricto (that is, heterozygosity and allelic richness) were stable in time. These results suggest the coexistence of (i) a fine grained (at the scale of a 20 × 30 m quadrat) stable core of persistent genets originating from an initial seedling recruitment and developing spatial dominance through clonal elongation; and (ii) a local (at the scale of the meadow) pool of transient genets subjected to annual turnover. This simultaneous occurrence of initial and repeated recruitment strategies highlights the different spatial scales at which distinct evolutionary drivers and mating systems (clonal competition, clonal growth, propagule dispersal and so on) operate to shape the dynamics of populations and the evolution of polymorphism in space and time. PMID:24022498

  18. Lineage, Temperature, and Host Species Have Interacting Effects on Lesion Development in Phytophthora Ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are four recognized clonal lineages of the pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. The two major lineages present in North America are NA1 and NA2. With a few exceptions, NA1 is found in natural forest ecosystems and nurseries, and NA2 is generally restricted to nurseries. Isolates from the NA1 and NA2...

  19. The population genetics of clonal and partially clonal diploids.

    PubMed Central

    Balloux, François; Lehmann, Laurent; de Meeûs, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The consequences of variable rates of clonal reproduction on the population genetics of neutral markers are explored in diploid organisms within a subdivided population (island model). We use both analytical and stochastic simulation approaches. High rates of clonal reproduction will positively affect heterozygosity. As a consequence, nearly twice as many alleles per locus can be maintained and population differentiation estimated as F(ST) value is strongly decreased in purely clonal populations as compared to purely sexual ones. With increasing clonal reproduction, effective population size first slowly increases and then points toward extreme values when the reproductive system tends toward strict clonality. This reflects the fact that polymorphism is protected within individuals due to fixed heterozygosity. Contrarily, genotypic diversity smoothly decreases with increasing rates of clonal reproduction. Asexual populations thus maintain higher genetic diversity at each single locus but a lower number of different genotypes. Mixed clonal/sexual reproduction is nearly indistinguishable from strict sexual reproduction as long as the proportion of clonal reproduction is not strongly predominant for all quantities investigated, except for genotypic diversities (both at individual loci and over multiple loci). PMID:12930767

  20. Is Bordetella pertussis clonal?

    PubMed Central

    Khattak, M. N.; Matthews, R. C.; Burnie, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish whether Bordetella pertussis is essentially clonal. DESIGN--Analysis of restriction fragments of XbaI digests of DNA from clinical and control isolates of B pertussis by pulse field gel electrophoresis. MATERIALS--105 isolates of B pertussis: 67 clinical isolates from throughout the United Kingdom and 23 from Germany (collected during the previous 18 months); vaccine strains 2991 and 3700; and 13 control isolates from Manchester University's culture collection. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Frequency of DNA types according to country of origin and classical serotyping. RESULTS--17 DNA types were identified on the basis of the variation in 11 fragments, banding at 200-412 kilobases; 15 types were found in the clinical and control isolates from the United Kingdom and seven in those from Germany. There was no correlation with serotype. DNA type 1 was the commonest overall (22/105 strains, 22%), predominating in serotypes 1,2 and 1,2,3 and including the vaccine strains but not the isolates from Germany. CONCLUSIONS--Current infections due to B pertussis are not caused by a clonal pathogen as multiple strains are circulating in a given population at one time. There is also considerable epidemiological variation in the pathogen population between countries. These findings may have implications for the design of acellular vaccines. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 PMID:1392709

  1. Clonify: unseeded antibody lineage assignment from next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Briney, Bryan; Le, Khoa; Zhu, Jiang; Burton, Dennis R

    2016-01-01

    Defining the dynamics and maturation processes of antibody clonal lineages is crucial to understanding the humoral response to infection and immunization. Although individual antibody lineages have been previously analyzed in isolation, these studies provide only a narrow view of the total antibody response. Comprehensive study of antibody lineages has been limited by the lack of an accurate clonal lineage assignment algorithm capable of operating on next-generation sequencing datasets. To address this shortcoming, we developed Clonify, which is able to perform unseeded lineage assignment on very large sets of antibody sequences. Application of Clonify to IgG+ memory repertoires from healthy individuals revealed a surprising lack of influence of large extended lineages on the overall repertoire composition, indicating that this composition is driven less by the order and frequency of pathogen encounters than previously thought. Clonify is freely available at www.github.com/briney/clonify-python. PMID:27102563

  2. Clonify: unseeded antibody lineage assignment from next-generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Briney, Bryan; Le, Khoa; Zhu, Jiang; Burton, Dennis R.

    2016-01-01

    Defining the dynamics and maturation processes of antibody clonal lineages is crucial to understanding the humoral response to infection and immunization. Although individual antibody lineages have been previously analyzed in isolation, these studies provide only a narrow view of the total antibody response. Comprehensive study of antibody lineages has been limited by the lack of an accurate clonal lineage assignment algorithm capable of operating on next-generation sequencing datasets. To address this shortcoming, we developed Clonify, which is able to perform unseeded lineage assignment on very large sets of antibody sequences. Application of Clonify to IgG+ memory repertoires from healthy individuals revealed a surprising lack of influence of large extended lineages on the overall repertoire composition, indicating that this composition is driven less by the order and frequency of pathogen encounters than previously thought. Clonify is freely available at www.github.com/briney/clonify-python. PMID:27102563

  3. A Monomorphic Haplotype of Chromosome Ia Is Associated with Widespread Success in Clonal and Nonclonal Populations of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asis; Miller, Natalie; Roos, David S.; Dubey, J. P.; Ajzenberg, Daniel; Dardé, Marie Laure; Ajioka, James W.; Rosenthal, Benjamin; Sibley, L. David

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxoplasma gondii is a common parasite of animals that also causes a zoonotic infection in humans. Previous studies have revealed a strongly clonal population structure that is shared between North America and Europe, while South American strains show greater genetic diversity and evidence of sexual recombination. The common inheritance of a monomorphic version of chromosome Ia (referred to as ChrIa*) among three clonal lineages from North America and Europe suggests that inheritance of this chromosome might underlie their recent clonal expansion. To further examine the diversity and distribution of ChrIa, we have analyzed additional strains with greater geographic diversity. Our findings reveal that the same haplotype of ChrIa* is found in the clonal lineages from North America and Europe and in older lineages in South America, where sexual recombination is more common. Although lineages from all three continents harbor the same conserved ChrIa* haplotype, strains from North America and Europe are genetically separate from those in South America, and these respective geographic regions show limited evidence of recent mixing. Genome-wide, array-based profiling of polymorphisms provided evidence for an ancestral flow from particular older southern lineages that gave rise to the clonal lineages now dominant in the north. Collectively, these data indicate that ChrIa* is widespread among nonclonal strains in South America and has more recently been associated with clonal expansion of specific lineages in North America and Europe. These findings have significant implications for the spread of genetic loci influencing transmission and virulence in pathogen populations. PMID:22068979

  4. Clonal reproduction with androgenesis and somatic recombination: the case of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi.

    PubMed

    Okita, Ichiro; Tsuchida, Koji

    2016-04-01

    In haplodiploid insects such as ants, male sexuals develop from unfertilised haploid eggs, while female sexuals and workers develop from fertilized diploid eggs. However, some ant species do not exchange their gene pool between sexes; both male and female sexuals are clonally produced, while workers are sexually produced. To date, three ant species, Wasmannia auropunctata, Vollenhovia emeryi, and Paratrechina longicornis, have been reported to reproduce using such reproductive systems. In this study, we reveal that in one lineage of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi, male and female sexuals are also clonally produced. In contrast to the abovementioned three species, the workers were not only sexually produced but had recombinant sequences in their nuclear internal transcribed spacer regions, although the recombinant sequences were not detected in male or female sexuals. These results suggest that the lineage likely possesses a mechanism to compensate for the reduction in genetic variation due to clonal reproduction with somatic recombination that occurs within the workers. PMID:26922778

  5. Clonal reproduction with androgenesis and somatic recombination: the case of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Ichiro; Tsuchida, Koji

    2016-04-01

    In haplodiploid insects such as ants, male sexuals develop from unfertilised haploid eggs, while female sexuals and workers develop from fertilized diploid eggs. However, some ant species do not exchange their gene pool between sexes; both male and female sexuals are clonally produced, while workers are sexually produced. To date, three ant species, Wasmannia auropunctata, Vollenhovia emeryi, and Paratrechina longicornis, have been reported to reproduce using such reproductive systems. In this study, we reveal that in one lineage of the ant Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi, male and female sexuals are also clonally produced. In contrast to the abovementioned three species, the workers were not only sexually produced but had recombinant sequences in their nuclear internal transcribed spacer regions, although the recombinant sequences were not detected in male or female sexuals. These results suggest that the lineage likely possesses a mechanism to compensate for the reduction in genetic variation due to clonal reproduction with somatic recombination that occurs within the workers.

  6. The clonal origin and clonal evolution of epithelial tumours

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sergio Britto; Novelli, Marco; Wright, Nicholas A

    2000-01-01

    While the origin of tumours, whether from one cell or many, has been a source of fascination for experimental oncologists for some time, in recent years there has been a veritable explosion of information about the clonal architecture of tumours and their antecedents, stimulated, in the main, by the ready accessibility of new molecular techniques. While most of these new results have apparently confirmed the monoclonal origin of human epithelial (and other) tumours, there are a significant number of studies in which this conclusion just cannot be made. Moreover, analysis of many articles show that the potential impact of such considerations as patch size and clonal evolution on determinations of clonality have largely been ignored, with the result that a number of these studies are confounded. However, the clonal architecture of preneoplastic lesions provide some interesting insights — many lesions which might have been hitherto regarded as hyperplasias are apparently clonal in derivation. If this is indeed true, it calls into some question our hopeful corollary that a monoclonal origin presages a neoplastic habitus. Finally, it is clear, for many reasons, that methods of analysis which involve the disaggregation of tissues, albeit microdissected, are far from ideal and we should be putting more effort into techniques where the clonal architecture of normal tissues, preneoplastic and preinvasive lesions and their derivative tumours can be directly visualized in situ. PMID:10762440

  7. Clonality in myeloproliferative disorders: Analysis by means of polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, D.G.; Blanchard, K.L.; Levy, J.; Perrin, S.; Bunn, H.F. )

    1991-08-01

    The myeloproliferative syndromes are acquired disorders of hematopoiesis that provide insights into the transition from somatic cell mutation to neoplasia. The clonal origin of specific blood cells can be assessed in patients with X chromosome-linked polymorphisms, taking advantage of random inactivation of the X chromosome. The authors have adapted the PCR for determination of clonality on as few as 100 cells, including individual colonies grown in culture. Amplifying a polymorphic portion of the X chromosome-linked phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) gene after selective digestion of the active X chromosome with a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme gave results fully concordant with standard Southern blotting of DNA samples form normal (polyclonal) polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) as well as clonal PMN from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and polycythemia vera (PCV). They have used this technique to demonstrate heterogeneity of lineage involvement in patients with PCV. The same clinical phenotype may arise from clonal proliferation of different hematopoietic progenitors.

  8. Novel R tools for analysis of genome-wide population genetic data with emphasis on clonality

    PubMed Central

    Kamvar, Zhian N.; Brooks, Jonah C.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    2015-01-01

    To gain a detailed understanding of how plant microbes evolve and adapt to hosts, pesticides, and other factors, knowledge of the population dynamics and evolutionary history of populations is crucial. Plant pathogen populations are often clonal or partially clonal which requires different analytical tools. With the advent of high throughput sequencing technologies, obtaining genome-wide population genetic data has become easier than ever before. We previously contributed the R package poppr specifically addressing issues with analysis of clonal populations. In this paper we provide several significant extensions to poppr with a focus on large, genome-wide SNP data. Specifically, we provide several new functionalities including the new function mlg.filter to define clone boundaries allowing for inspection and definition of what is a clonal lineage, minimum spanning networks with reticulation, a sliding-window analysis of the index of association, modular bootstrapping of any genetic distance, and analyses across any level of hierarchies. PMID:26113860

  9. Novel R tools for analysis of genome-wide population genetic data with emphasis on clonality.

    PubMed

    Kamvar, Zhian N; Brooks, Jonah C; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2015-01-01

    To gain a detailed understanding of how plant microbes evolve and adapt to hosts, pesticides, and other factors, knowledge of the population dynamics and evolutionary history of populations is crucial. Plant pathogen populations are often clonal or partially clonal which requires different analytical tools. With the advent of high throughput sequencing technologies, obtaining genome-wide population genetic data has become easier than ever before. We previously contributed the R package poppr specifically addressing issues with analysis of clonal populations. In this paper we provide several significant extensions to poppr with a focus on large, genome-wide SNP data. Specifically, we provide several new functionalities including the new function mlg.filter to define clone boundaries allowing for inspection and definition of what is a clonal lineage, minimum spanning networks with reticulation, a sliding-window analysis of the index of association, modular bootstrapping of any genetic distance, and analyses across any level of hierarchies. PMID:26113860

  10. Clonal development and organization of the adult Drosophila central brain

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hung-Hsiang; Awasaki, Takeshi; Schroeder, Mark David; Long, Fuhui; Yang, Jacob S.; He, Yisheng; Ding, Peng; Kao, Jui-Chun; Wu, Gloria Yueh-Yi; Peng, Hanchuan; Myers, Gene; Lee, Tzumin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The insect brain can be divided into neuropils that are formed by neurites of both local and remote origin. The complexity of the interconnections obscures how these neuropils are established and interconnected through development. The Drosophila central brain develops from a fixed number of neuroblasts (NBs) that deposit neurons in regional clusters. Results By determining individual NB clones and pursuing their projections into specific neuropils we unravel the regional development of the brain neural network. Exhaustive clonal analysis revealed 95 stereotyped neuronal lineages with characteristic cell body locations and neurite trajectories. Most clones show complex projection patterns, but despite the complexity, neighboring clones often co-innervate the same local neuropil(s) and further target a restricted set of distant neuropils. Conclusions These observations argue for regional clonal development of both neuropils and neuropil connectivity throughout the Drosophila central brain. PMID:23541733

  11. PCR techniques for clonality assays.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Cano, S J; Blanes, A; Wolfe, H J

    2001-03-01

    Clonal overgrowths represent the hallmark of neoplastic proliferations, and their demonstration has been proved useful clinically for the diagnosis of malignant lymphomas based on the detection of specific and dominant immunoglobulin and/or T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. Nonrandom genetic alterations can also be used to test clonal expansions and the clonal evolution of neoplasms, especially analyzing hypervariable deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) regions from patients heterozygous for a given marker. These tests rely basically on the demonstration of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) resulting from either hemizygosity (nonrandom interstitial DNA deletions) or homozygosity of mutant alleles observed in neoplasms. LOH analyses identify clonal expansions of a tumor cell population, and point to monoclonal proliferation when multiple and consistent LOH are demonstrated. Based on the methylation-related inactivation of one X chromosome in female subjects, X-linked markers (e.g., androgen receptor gene) will provide clonality information using LOH analyses after DNA digestion with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases. Therefore, both non-X-linked and X-linked analyses give complementary information, related and not related to the malignant transformation pathway respectively. Applied appropriately, these tools can establish the clonal evolution of tumor cell populations (tumor heterogeneity), identify early relapses, distinguish recurrent tumors from other metachronic neoplasms, and differentiate field transformation from metastatic tumor growths in synchronic and histologically identical neoplasms. PMID:11277392

  12. Identification of new polymorphic microsatellite markers in the NA1 and NA2 lineages of Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum is a recently introduced pathogen consisting of three clonal lineages. Due to the very limited intra-lineage genetic variation, only a few polymorphic markers are available for use in studies involving the epidemiology and evolution of P. ramorum. A total of 159 primer pairs for...

  13. Neuroblast lineage identification and lineage-specific Hox gene action during postembryonic development of the subesophageal ganglion in the Drosophila central brain.

    PubMed

    Kuert, Philipp A; Hartenstein, Volker; Bello, Bruno C; Lovick, Jennifer K; Reichert, Heinrich

    2014-06-15

    The central brain of Drosophila consists of the supraesophageal ganglion (SPG) and the subesophageal ganglion (SEG), both of which are generated by neural stem cell-like neuroblasts during embryonic and postembryonic development. Considerable information has been obtained on postembryonic development of the neuroblasts and their lineages in the SPG. In contrast, very little is known about neuroblasts, neural lineages, or any other aspect of the postembryonic development in the SEG. Here we characterize the neuroanatomy of the larval SEG in terms of tracts, commissures, and other landmark features as compared to a thoracic ganglion. We then use clonal MARCM labeling to identify all adult-specific neuroblast lineages in the late larval SEG and find a surprisingly small number of neuroblast lineages, 13 paired and one unpaired. The Hox genes Dfd, Scr, and Antp are expressed in a lineage-specific manner in these lineages during postembryonic development. Hox gene loss-of-function causes lineage-specific defects in axonal targeting and reduction in neural cell numbers. Moreover, it results in the formation of novel ectopic neuroblast lineages. Apoptosis block also results in ectopic lineages suggesting that Hox genes are required for lineage-specific termination of proliferation through programmed cell death. Taken together, our findings show that postembryonic development in the SEG is mediated by a surprisingly small set of identified lineages and requires lineage-specific Hox gene action to ensure the correct formation of adult-specific neurons in the Drosophila brain. PMID:24713419

  14. Genetic distance and age affect the cuticular chemical profiles of the clonal ant Cerapachys biroi.

    PubMed

    Teseo, Serafino; Lecoutey, Emmanuel; Kronauer, Daniel J C; Hefetz, Abraham; Lenoir, Alain; Jaisson, Pierre; Châline, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Although cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) have received much attention from biologists because of their important role in insect communication, few studies have addressed the chemical ecology of clonal species of eusocial insects. In this study we investigated whether and how differences in CHCs relate to the genetics and reproductive dynamics of the parthenogenetic ant Cerapachys biroi. We collected individuals of different ages and subcastes from several colonies belonging to four clonal lineages, and analyzed their cuticular chemical signature. CHCs varied according to colonies and clonal lineages in two independent data sets, and correlations were found between genetic and chemical distances between colonies. This supports the results of previous research showing that C. biroi workers discriminate between nestmates and non-nestmates, especially when they belong to different clonal lineages. In C. biroi, the production of individuals of a morphological subcaste specialized in reproduction is inversely proportional to colony-level fertility. As chemical signatures usually correlate with fertility and reproductive activity in social Hymenoptera, we asked whether CHCs could function as fertility-signaling primer pheromones determining larval subcaste fate in C. biroi. Interestingly, and contrary to findings for several other ant species, fertility and reproductive activity showed no correlation with chemical signatures, suggesting the absence of fertility related CHCs. This implies that other cues are responsible for subcaste differentiation in this species. PMID:24756691

  15. Synthetic clonal reproduction through seeds.

    PubMed

    Marimuthu, Mohan P A; Jolivet, Sylvie; Ravi, Maruthachalam; Pereira, Lucie; Davda, Jayeshkumar N; Cromer, Laurence; Wang, Lili; Nogué, Fabien; Chan, Simon W L; Siddiqi, Imran; Mercier, Raphaël

    2011-02-18

    Cloning through seeds has potential revolutionary applications in agriculture, because it would allow vigorous hybrids to be propagated indefinitely. However, asexual seed formation or apomixis, avoiding meiosis and fertilization, is not found in the major food crops. To develop de novo synthesis of apomixis, we crossed Arabidopsis MiMe and dyad mutants that produce diploid clonal gametes to a strain whose chromosomes are engineered to be eliminated after fertilization. Up to 34% of the progeny were clones of their parent, demonstrating the conversion of clonal female or male gametes into seeds. We also show that first-generation cloned plants can be cloned again. Clonal reproduction through seeds can therefore be achieved in a sexual plant by manipulating two to four conserved genes. PMID:21330535

  16. A Computational Clonal Analysis of the Developing Mouse Limb Bud

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, Luciano; Arqués, Carlos G.; Torres, Miguel S.; Sharpe, James

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive spatio-temporal description of the tissue movements underlying organogenesis would be an extremely useful resource to developmental biology. Clonal analysis and fate mappings are popular experiments to study tissue movement during morphogenesis. Such experiments allow cell populations to be labeled at an early stage of development and to follow their spatial evolution over time. However, disentangling the cumulative effects of the multiple events responsible for the expansion of the labeled cell population is not always straightforward. To overcome this problem, we develop a novel computational method that combines accurate quantification of 2D limb bud morphologies and growth modeling to analyze mouse clonal data of early limb development. Firstly, we explore various tissue movements that match experimental limb bud shape changes. Secondly, by comparing computational clones with newly generated mouse clonal data we are able to choose and characterize the tissue movement map that better matches experimental data. Our computational analysis produces for the first time a two dimensional model of limb growth based on experimental data that can be used to better characterize limb tissue movement in space and time. The model shows that the distribution and shapes of clones can be described as a combination of anisotropic growth with isotropic cell mixing, without the need for lineage compartmentalization along the AP and PD axis. Lastly, we show that this comprehensive description can be used to reassess spatio-temporal gene regulations taking tissue movement into account and to investigate PD patterning hypothesis. PMID:21347315

  17. Modern Lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Exhibit Lineage-Specific Patterns of Growth and Cytokine Induction in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rajesh; Lenders, Laura; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Nicol, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vary in virulence. Strains that have caused outbreaks in the United States and United Kingdom have been shown to subvert the innate immune response as a potential immune evasion mechanism. There is, however, little information available as to whether these patterns of immune subversion are features of individual strains or characteristic of broad clonal lineages of M. tuberculosis. Methods Strains from two major modern lineages (lineage 2 [East-Asian] and lineage 4 [Euro-American]) circulating in the Western Cape in South Africa as well as a comparator modern lineage (lineage 3 [CAS/Delhi]) were identified. We assessed two virulence associated characteristics: mycobacterial growth (in liquid broth and monocyte derived macrophages) and early pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Results In liquid culture, Lineage 4 strains grew more rapidly and reached higher plateau levels than other strains (lineage 4 vs. lineage 2 p = 0.0024; lineage 4 vs. lineage 3 p = 0.0005). Lineage 3 strains were characterized by low and early plateau levels, while lineage 2 strains showed an intermediate growth phenotype. In monocyte-derived macrophages, lineage 2 strains grew faster than lineage 3 strains (p<0.01) with lineage 4 strains having an intermediate phenotype. Lineage 2 strains induced the lowest levels of pro-inflammatory TNF and IL-12p40 as compared to other lineages (lineage 2: median TNF 362 pg/ml, IL-12p40 91 pg/ml; lineage 3: median TNF 1818 pg/ml, IL-12p40 123 pg/ml; lineage 4: median TNF 1207 pg/ml, IL-12p40 205 pg/ml;). In contrast, lineage 4 strains induced high levels of IL-12p40 and intermediate level of TNF. Lineage 3 strains induced high levels of TNF and intermediate levels of IL-12p40. Conclusions Strains of M. tuberculosis from the three major modern strain lineages possess distinct patterns of growth and cytokine induction. Rapid growth and immune subversion may be key characteristics to the success of

  18. Listeria monocytogenes lineages: Genomics, evolution, ecology, and phenotypic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Renato H; den Bakker, Henk C; Wiedmann, Martin

    2011-02-01

    isolates are clonal and show a low prevalence of plasmids and IS elements, suggesting that lineage I isolates may have mechanisms that limit the acquisition of foreign DNA by horizontal gene transfer. Diversifying selection has also been shown to have played an important role during evolution of the L. monocytogenes lineages and during divergence of L. monocytogenes from the non-pathogenic species L. innocua. Overall evidence thus suggests that the 4 L. monocytogenes lineages identified so far represent distinct ecologic, genetic, and phenotypic characteristics, which appear to affect their ability to be transmitted through foods and to cause human disease. Further insights into the ecology, evolution, and characteristics of these lineages will thus not only provide an improved understanding of the evolution of this foodborne pathogen, but may also facilitate improved control of foodborne listeriosis. PMID:20708964

  19. Genetic Mosaics and the Germ Line Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Mark E.; Friedman, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mosaics provide information about cellular lineages that is otherwise difficult to obtain, especially in humans. De novo mutations act as cell markers, allowing the tracing of developmental trajectories of all descendants of the cell in which the new mutation arises. De novo mutations may arise at any time during development but are relatively rare. They have usually been observed through medical ascertainment, when the mutation causes unusual clinical signs or symptoms. Mutational events can include aneuploidies, large chromosomal rearrangements, copy number variants, or point mutations. In this review we focus primarily on the analysis of point mutations and their utility in addressing questions of germ line versus somatic lineages. Genetic mosaics demonstrate that the germ line and soma diverge early in development, since there are many examples of combined somatic and germ line mosaicism for de novo mutations. The occurrence of simultaneous mosaicism in both the germ line and soma also shows that the germ line is not strictly clonal but arises from at least two, and possibly multiple, cells in the embryo with different ancestries. Whole genome or exome DNA sequencing technologies promise to expand the range of studies of genetic mosaics, as de novo mutations can now be identified through sequencing alone in the absence of a medical ascertainment. These technologies have been used to study mutation patterns in nuclear families and in monozygotic twins, and in animal model developmental studies, but not yet for extensive cell lineage studies in humans. PMID:25898403

  20. Lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Connor, Alicia L; Kelley, Philip M; Tempero, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    Postnatal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis presumably requires precise regulatory processes to properly assemble proliferating lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). The specific mechanisms that regulate the assembly of LECs during new lymphatic vessel synthesis are unclear. Dynamic endothelial shuffling and rearrangement has been proposed as a mechanism of blood vessel growth. We developed genetic lineage-tracing strategies using an inductive transgenic technology to track the fate of entire tandem dimer tomato-positive (tdT) lymphatic vessels or small, in some cases clonal, populations of LECs. We coupled this platform with a suture-induced mouse model of corneal lymphangiogenesis and used different analytic microscopy techniques including serial live imaging to study the spatial properties of proliferating tdT(+) LEC progenies. LEC precursors and their progeny expanded from the corneal limbal lymphatic vessel and were assembled contiguously to comprise a subunit within a new lymphatic vessel. VE-cadherin blockade induced morphologic abnormalities in newly synthesized lymphatic vessels, but did not disrupt the tdT(+) lymphatic endothelial lineage assembly. Analysis of this static and dynamic data based largely on direct in vivo observations supports a model of lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26658452

  1. Lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Alicia L.; Kelley, Philip M.; Tempero, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Post natal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis presumably requires precise regulatory processes to properly assemble proliferating lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). The specific mechanisms that regulate the assembly of LECs during new lymphatic vessel synthesis are unclear. Dynamic endothelial shuffling and rearrangement has been proposed as a mechanism of blood vessel growth. We developed genetic lineage tracing strategies using an inductive transgenic technology to track the fate of entire tandem dimer tomato positive (tdT) lymphatic vessels or small, in some cases clonal, populations of LECs. We coupled this platform with a suture induced mouse model of corneal lymphangiogenesis and used different analytic microscopy techniques including serial live imaging to study the spatial properties of proliferating tdT+ LEC progenies. LEC precursors and their progeny expanded from the corneal limbal lymphatic vessel and were assembled contiguously to comprise a subunit within a new lymphatic vessel. VE-cadherin blockade induced morphologic abnormalities in newly synthesized lymphatic vessels, but did not disrupt the tdT+ lymphatic endothelial lineage assembly. Analysis of this static and dynamic data based largely on direct in vivo observations supports a model of lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26658452

  2. Clonal origins of ETV6-RUNX1⁺ acute lymphoblastic leukemia: studies in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Alpar, D; Wren, D; Ermini, L; Mansur, M B; van Delft, F W; Bateman, C M; Titley, I; Kearney, L; Szczepanski, T; Gonzalez, D; Ford, A M; Potter, N E; Greaves, M

    2015-04-01

    Studies on twins with concordant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have revealed that ETV6-RUNX1 gene fusion is a common, prenatal genetic event with other driver aberrations occurring subclonally and probably postnatally. The fetal cell type that is transformed by ETV6-RUNX1 is not identified by such studies or by the analysis of early B-cell lineage phenotype of derived progeny. Ongoing, clonal immunoglobulin (IG) and cross-lineage T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements are features of B-cell precursor leukemia and commence at the pro-B-cell stage of normal B-cell lineage development. We reasoned that shared clonal rearrangements of IG or TCR genes by concordant ALL in twins would be informative about the fetal cell type in which clonal advantage is elicited by ETV6-RUNX1. Five pairs of twins were analyzed for all varieties of IG and TCR gene rearrangements. All pairs showed identical incomplete or complete variable-diversity-joining junctions coupled with substantial, subclonal and divergent rearrangements. This pattern was endorsed by single-cell genetic scrutiny in one twin pair. Our data suggest that the pre-leukemic initiating function of ETV6-RUNX1 fusion is associated with clonal expansion early in the fetal B-cell lineage. PMID:25388957

  3. The Drosophila neural lineages: a model system to study brain development and circuitry.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Shana R; Hartenstein, Volker

    2010-06-01

    In Drosophila, neurons of the central nervous system are grouped into units called lineages. Each lineage contains cells derived from a single neuroblast. Due to its clonal nature, the Drosophila brain is a valuable model system to study neuron development and circuit formation. To better understand the mechanisms underlying brain development, genetic manipulation tools can be utilized within lineages to visualize, knock down, or over-express proteins. Here, we will introduce the formation and development of lineages, discuss how one can utilize this model system, offer a comprehensive list of known lineages and their respective markers, and then briefly review studies that have utilized Drosophila neural lineages with a look at how this model system can benefit future endeavors. PMID:20306203

  4. The Drosophila neural lineages: a model system to study brain development and circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Spindler, Shana R.

    2010-01-01

    In Drosophila, neurons of the central nervous system are grouped into units called lineages. Each lineage contains cells derived from a single neuroblast. Due to its clonal nature, the Drosophila brain is a valuable model system to study neuron development and circuit formation. To better understand the mechanisms underlying brain development, genetic manipulation tools can be utilized within lineages to visualize, knock down, or over-express proteins. Here, we will introduce the formation and development of lineages, discuss how one can utilize this model system, offer a comprehensive list of known lineages and their respective markers, and then briefly review studies that have utilized Drosophila neural lineages with a look at how this model system can benefit future endeavors. PMID:20306203

  5. Sexual recombination punctuated by outbreaks and clonal expansions predicts Toxoplasma gondii population genetics

    PubMed Central

    Grigg, Michael E.; Sundar, Natarajan

    2009-01-01

    The cosmopolitan parasitic pathogen Toxoplasma gondii is capable of infecting essentially any warm-blooded vertebrate worldwide, including most birds and mammals, and establishes chronic infections in one-third of the globe’s human population. The success of this highly prevalent zoonosis is largely the result of its ability to propagate both sexually and clonally. Frequent genetic exchanges via sexual recombination among extant parasite lineages that mix in the definitive felid host produces new lines that emerge to expand the parasite’s host range and cause outbreaks. Highly successful lines spread clonally via carnivorism and in some cases sweep to pandemic levels. The extent to which sexual reproduction versus clonal expansion shapes Toxoplasma’s current, global population genetic structure is the central question this review will attempt to answer. PMID:19217909

  6. The Independent Probabilistic Firing of Transcription Factors: A Paradigm for Clonal Variability in the Zebrafish Retina

    PubMed Central

    Boije, Henrik; Rulands, Steffen; Dudczig, Stefanie; Simons, Benjamin D.; Harris, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Early retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) in vertebrates produce lineages that vary greatly both in terms of cell number and fate composition, yet how this variability is achieved remains unknown. One possibility is that these RPCs are individually distinct and that each gives rise to a unique lineage. Another is that stochastic mechanisms play upon the determinative machinery of equipotent early RPCs to drive clonal variability. Here we show that a simple model, based on the independent firing of key fate-influencing transcription factors, can quantitatively account for the intrinsic clonal variance in the zebrafish retina and predict the distributions of neuronal cell types in clones where one or more of these fates are made unavailable. PMID:26343455

  7. Enrichment of Oligodendrocyte Progenitors from Differentiated Neural Precursors by Clonal Sphere Preparations.

    PubMed

    Umebayashi, Daisuke; Coles, Brenda; van der Kooy, Derek

    2016-05-01

    Remyelination is the goal of potential cell transplantation therapies for demyelinating diseases and other central nervous system injuries. Transplantation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can result in remyelination in the central nervous system, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are envisioned to be an autograft cell source of transplantation therapy for many cell types. However, it remains time-consuming and difficult to generate OPCs from iPSCs. Clonal sphere preparations are reliable cell culture methods for purifying select populations of proliferating cells. To make clonal neurospheres from human embryonic stem cell (ESC)/iPSC colonies, we have found that a monolayer differentiation phase helps to increase the numbers of neural precursor cells. Indeed, we have compared a direct isolation of neural stem cells from human ESC/iPSC colonies (protocol 1) with monolayer neural differentiation, followed by clonal neural stem cell sphere preparations (protocol 2). The two-step method combining monolayer neuralization, followed by clonal sphere preparations, is more useful than direct sphere preparations in generating mature human oligodendrocytes. The initial monolayer culture stage appears to bias cells toward the oligodendrocyte lineage. This method of deriving oligodendrocyte lineage spheres from iPSCs represents a novel strategy for generating OPCs. PMID:26972950

  8. Phylogenetic lineages in Entomophthoromycota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomophthoromycota Humber is one of five major phylogenetic lineages among the former phylum Zygomycota. These early terrestrial fungi share evolutionarily ancestral characters such as coenocytic mycelium and gametangiogamy as a sexual process resulting in zygospore formation. Previous molecular st...

  9. Maximal stomatal conductance to water and plasticity in stomatal traits differ between native and invasive introduced lineages of Phragmites australis in North America.

    PubMed

    Douhovnikoff, V; Taylor, S H; Hazelton, E L G; Smith, C M; O'Brien, J

    2016-01-01

    The fitness costs of reproduction by clonal growth can include a limited ability to adapt to environmental and temporal heterogeneity. Paradoxically, some facultatively clonal species are not only able to survive, but colonize, thrive and expand in heterogeneous environments. This is likely due to the capacity for acclimation (sensu stricto) that compensates for the fitness costs and complements the ecological advantages of clonality. Introduced Phragmites australis demonstrates great phenotypic plasticity in response to temperature, nutrient availability, geographic gradient, water depths, habitat fertility, atmospheric CO2, interspecific competition and intraspecific competition for light. However, no in situ comparative subspecies studies have explored the difference in plasticity between the non-invasive native lineage and the highly invasive introduced lineage. Clonality of the native and introduced lineages makes it possible to control for genetic variation, making P. australis a unique system for the comparative study of plasticity. Using previously identified clonal genotypes, we investigated differences in their phenotypic plasticity through measurements of the lengths and densities of stomata on both the abaxial (lower) and adaxial (upper) surfaces of leaves, and synthesized these measurements to estimate impacts on maximum stomatal conductance to water (gwmax). Results demonstrated that at three marsh sites, invasive lineages have consistently greater gwmax than their native congeners, as a result of greater stomatal densities and smaller stomata. Our analysis also suggests that phenotypic plasticity, determined as within-genotype variation in gwmax, of the invasive lineage is similar to, or exceeds, that shown by the native lineage. PMID:26819257

  10. Maximal stomatal conductance to water and plasticity in stomatal traits differ between native and invasive introduced lineages of Phragmites australis in North America

    PubMed Central

    Douhovnikoff, V.; Taylor, S. H.; Hazelton, E. L. G.; Smith, C. M.; O'Brien, J.

    2016-01-01

    The fitness costs of reproduction by clonal growth can include a limited ability to adapt to environmental and temporal heterogeneity. Paradoxically, some facultatively clonal species are not only able to survive, but colonize, thrive and expand in heterogeneous environments. This is likely due to the capacity for acclimation (sensu stricto) that compensates for the fitness costs and complements the ecological advantages of clonality. Introduced Phragmites australis demonstrates great phenotypic plasticity in response to temperature, nutrient availability, geographic gradient, water depths, habitat fertility, atmospheric CO2, interspecific competition and intraspecific competition for light. However, no in situ comparative subspecies studies have explored the difference in plasticity between the non-invasive native lineage and the highly invasive introduced lineage. Clonality of the native and introduced lineages makes it possible to control for genetic variation, making P. australis a unique system for the comparative study of plasticity. Using previously identified clonal genotypes, we investigated differences in their phenotypic plasticity through measurements of the lengths and densities of stomata on both the abaxial (lower) and adaxial (upper) surfaces of leaves, and synthesized these measurements to estimate impacts on maximum stomatal conductance to water (gwmax). Results demonstrated that at three marsh sites, invasive lineages have consistently greater gwmax than their native congeners, as a result of greater stomatal densities and smaller stomata. Our analysis also suggests that phenotypic plasticity, determined as within-genotype variation in gwmax, of the invasive lineage is similar to, or exceeds, that shown by the native lineage. PMID:26819257

  11. Loss of heterozygosity drives clonal diversity of Phytophthora capsici in China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Diao, Yongzhao; Zhou, Yuxin; Lin, Dong; Bi, Yang; Pang, Zhili; Trout Fryxell, Rebecca; Liu, Xili; Lamour, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora capsici causes significant loss to pepper (Capsicum annum) in China and our goal was to develop single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for P. capsici and characterize genetic diversity nationwide. Eighteen isolates of P. capsici from locations worldwide were re-sequenced and candidate nuclear and mitochondrial SNPs identified. From 2006 to 2012, 276 isolates of P. capsici were recovered from 136 locations in 27 provinces and genotyped using 45 nuclear and 2 mitochondrial SNPs. There were two main mitochondrial haplotypes and 95 multi-locus genotypes (MLGs) identified. Genetic diversity was geographically structured with a high level of genotypic diversity in the north and on Hainan Island in the south, suggesting outcrossing contributes to diversity in these areas. The remaining areas of China are dominated by four clonal lineages that share mitochondrial haplotypes, are almost exclusively the A1 or A2 mating type and appear to exhibit extensive diversity based on loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Analysis of SNPs directly from infected peppers confirmed LOH in field populations. One clonal lineage is dominant throughout much of the country. The overall implications for long-lived genetically diverse clonal lineages amidst a widely dispersed sexual population are discussed. PMID:24349339

  12. Decoding astrocyte heterogeneity: New tools for clonal analysis.

    PubMed

    Bribián, A; Figueres-Oñate, M; Martín-López, E; López-Mascaraque, L

    2016-05-26

    The importance of astrocyte heterogeneity came out as a hot topic in neurosciences especially over the last decades, when the development of new methodologies allowed demonstrating the existence of big differences in morphological, neurochemical and physiological features between astrocytes. However, although the knowledge about the biology of astrocytes is increasing rapidly, an important characteristic that remained unexplored, until the last years, has been the relationship between astrocyte lineages and cell heterogeneity. To fill this gap, a new method called StarTrack was recently developed, a powerful genetic tool that allows tracking astrocyte lineages forming cell clones. Using StarTrack, a single astrocyte progenitor and its progeny can be specifically labeled from its generation, during embryonic development, to its final fate in the adult brain. Because of this specific labeling, astrocyte clones, exhibiting heterogeneous morphologies and features, can be easily analyzed in relation to their ontogenetic origin. This review summarizes how astrocyte heterogeneity can be decoded studying the embryonic development of astrocyte lineages and their clonal relationship. Finally, we discuss about some of the challenges and opportunities emerging in this exciting area of investigation. PMID:25917835

  13. Clonal diversity of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates revealed by a snapshot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is a notorious opportunistic pathogen mainly associated with hospital-acquired infections. Studies on the clonal relatedness of isolates could lay the foundation for effective infection control. A snapshot study was performed to investigate the clonal relatedness of A. baumannii clinical isolates in our local settings. Results Among 82 non-repetitive Acinetobacter spp. clinical isolates that were recovered during a period of four days in 13 hospitals in Sichuan, Southwest China, 67 isolates were identified as A. baumannii. Half of the 67 A. baumannii isolates were non-susceptible to carbapenems. blaOXA-23 was the only acquired carbapenemase gene detected, present in 40 isolates including five carbapenem-susceptible ones. The isolates belonged to 62 pulsotypes determined by PFGE and 31 sequence types (ST) by multi-locus sequence typing. Forty-three isolates belonged to the globally-disseminated clonal complex 92, among which ST75, ST92 and ST208 were the most common sequence types. Conclusions Clinical isolates of A. baumannii were diverse in clonality in this snapshot study. However, most of the isolates belonged to the globally-distributed clonal complex CC92. ST75, ST92 and ST208 were the most common types in our region. In particular, ST208 might be an emerging lineage carrying blaOXA-23. PMID:24144168

  14. How clonal are bacteria over time?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, B Jesse

    2016-06-01

    Bacteria and archaea reproduce clonally (vertical descent), but exchange genes by recombination (horizontal transfer). Recombination allows adaptive mutations or genes to spread rapidly within (or even between) species, and reduces the burden of deleterious mutations. Clonality-defined here as the balance between vertical and horizontal inheritance-is therefore a key microbial trait, determining how quickly a population can adapt and the size of its gene pool. Here, I discuss whether clonality varies over time and if it can be considered a stable trait of a given population. I show that, in some cases, clonality is clearly not static. For example, non-clonal (highly recombining) populations can give rise to clonal expansions, often of pathogens. However, an analysis of time-course metagenomic data from a lake suggests that a bacterial population's past clonality (as measured by its genetic diversity) is a good predictor of its future clonality. Clonality therefore appears to be relatively-but not completely-stable over evolutionary time. PMID:27057964

  15. Influences of clonality on plant sexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Spencer C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Flowering plants possess an unrivaled diversity of mechanisms for achieving sexual and asexual reproduction, often simultaneously. The commonest type of asexual reproduction is clonal growth (vegetative propagation) in which parental genotypes (genets) produce vegetative modules (ramets) that are capable of independent growth, reproduction, and often dispersal. Clonal growth leads to an expansion in the size of genets and increased fitness because large floral displays increase fertility and opportunities for outcrossing. Moreover, the clonal dispersal of vegetative propagules can assist “mate finding,” particularly in aquatic plants. However, there are ecological circumstances in which functional antagonism between sexual and asexual reproductive modes can negatively affect the fitness of clonal plants. Populations of heterostylous and dioecious species have a small number of mating groups (two or three), which should occur at equal frequency in equilibrium populations. Extensive clonal growth and vegetative dispersal can disrupt the functioning of these sexual polymorphisms, resulting in biased morph ratios and populations with a single mating group, with consequences for fertility and mating. In populations in which clonal propagation predominates, mutations reducing fertility may lead to sexual dysfunction and even the loss of sex. Recent evidence suggests that somatic mutations can play a significant role in influencing fitness in clonal plants and may also help explain the occurrence of genetic diversity in sterile clonal populations. Highly polymorphic genetic markers offer outstanding opportunities for gaining novel insights into functional interactions between sexual and clonal reproduction in flowering plants. PMID:26195747

  16. Environmental gradients structure Daphnia pulex × pulicaria clonal distribution.

    PubMed

    Pantel, J H; Juenger, T E; Leibold, M A

    2011-04-01

    The rarity of eukaryotic asexual reproduction is frequently attributed to the disadvantage of reduced genetic variation relative to sexual reproduction. However, parthenogenetic lineages that evolved repeatedly from sexual ancestors can generate regional pools of phenotypically diverse clones. Various theories to explain the maintenance of this genetic diversity as a result of environmental and spatial heterogeneity [frozen niche variation (FNV), general-purpose genotype] are conceptually similar to community ecological explanations for the maintenance of regional species diversity. We employed multivariate statistics common in community ecological research to study population genetic structure in the freshwater crustacean, Daphnia pulex × pulicaria. This parthenogenetic hybrid arose repeatedly from sexual ancestors. Daphnia pulex × pulicaria populations harboured substantial genetic variation among populations and the clonal composition at each pond corresponded to nutrient levels and invertebrate predator densities. The interclonal selection process described by the FNV hypothesis likely structured our D. pulex × pulicaria populations. PMID:21288271

  17. Clonal Evolution of Stem Cells in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Fink, Juergen; Koo, Bon-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    The field of gastrointestinal epithelial stem cells is a rapidly developing area of adult stem cell research. The discovery of Lgr5(+) intestinal stem cells has enabled us to study many hidden aspects of the biology of gastrointestinal adult stem cells. Marked by Lgr5 and Troy, several novel endodermal stem cells have been identified in the gastrointestinal tract. A precise working model of stem cell propagation, dynamics, and plasticity has been revealed by a genetic labeling method, termed lineage tracing. This chapter introduces the reidentification of crypt base columnar cells as Lgr5(+) stem cells in the intestine. Subsequently, it will discuss dynamic clonal evolution and cellular plasticity in the intestinal stem cell zone, as well as in stem cell zones of stomach glands. PMID:27573765

  18. Comparing nonparametric Bayesian tree priors for clonal reconstruction of tumors.

    PubMed

    Deshwar, Amit G; Vembu, Shankar; Morris, Quaid

    2015-01-01

    Statistical machine learning methods, especially nonparametric Bayesian methods, have become increasingly popular to infer clonal population structure of tumors. Here we describe the treeCRP, an extension of the Chinese restaurant process (CRP), a popular construction used in nonparametric mixture models, to infer the phylogeny and genotype of major subclonal lineages represented in the population of cancer cells. We also propose new split-merge updates tailored to the subclonal reconstruction problem that improve the mixing time of Markov chains. In comparisons with the tree-structured stick breaking prior used in PhyloSub, we demonstrate superior mixing and running time using the treeCRP with our new split-merge procedures. We also show that given the same number of samples, TSSB and treeCRP have similar ability to recover the subclonal structure of a tumor… PMID:25592565

  19. Clonal relationships among bloodstream isolates of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, J N; Whittam, T S; Gilks, C F; Wilson, R A; Mulligan, M E; Adams, K S; Arbeit, R D

    1995-01-01

    The clonal relationships among 187 bloodstream isolates of Escherichia coli from 179 patients at Boston, Mass., Long Beach, Calif., and Nairobi, Kenya, were determined by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), analysis of polymorphisms associated with the ribosomal operon (ribotyping), and serotyping. MLEE based on 20 enzymes resolved 101 electrophoretic types (ETs), forming five clusters; ribotyping resolved 56 distinct patterns concordant with the analysis by MLEE. The isolates at each study site formed a genetically diverse group and demonstrated similar clonal structures, with the same small subset of lineages accounting for the majority of isolates at each site. Moreover, two ribotypes accounted for approximately 30% of the isolates at each study site. One cluster contained the majority (65%) of isolates and, by direct comparison of the ETs and ribotypes of individual isolates, was genetically indistinguishable from the largest cluster for each of two other collections of E. coli causing pyelonephritis and neonatal meningitis (R. K. Selander, T. K. Korhonen, V. Väisänen-Rhen, P. H. Williams, P. E. Pattison, and D. A. Caugent, Infect. Immun. 52:213-222, 1986; M. Arthur, C. E. Johnson, R. H. Rubin, R. D. Arbeit, C. Campanelli, C. Kim, S. Steinbach, M. Agarwal, R. Wilkinson, and R. Goldstein, Infect. Immun. 57:303-313, 1989), thus defining a virulent set of lineages. The isolates within these virulent lineages typically carried DNA homologous to the adhesin operon pap or sfa and the hemolysin operon hly and expressed O1, O2, O4, O6, O18, O25, or O75 antigens. DNA homologous to pap was distributed among isolates of each major cluster, whereas hly was restricted to isolates of two clusters, typically detected in pap-positive strains, and sfa was restricted to isolates of one cluster, typically detected in pap- and hly-positive strains. The occurrence of pap-positive isolates in the same geographically and genetically divergent lineages suggests that this

  20. Genetic characterisation of Toxoplasma gondii in wildlife from North America revealed widespread and high prevalence of the fourth clonal type.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Velmurugan, G V; Rajendran, C; Yabsley, M J; Thomas, N J; Beckmen, K B; Sinnett, D; Ruid, D; Hart, J; Fair, P A; McFee, W E; Shearn-Bochsler, V; Kwok, O C H; Ferreira, L R; Choudhary, S; Faria, E B; Zhou, H; Felix, T A; Su, C

    2011-09-01

    Little is known of the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife. In the present study wild animals, from the USA were examined for T. gondii infection. Tissues of naturally exposed animals were bioassayed in mice for isolation of viable parasites. Viable T. gondii was isolated from 31 animals including, to our knowledge for the first time, from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), five gray wolves (Canis lupus), a woodrat (Neotoma micropus), and five Arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus). Additionally, 66 T. gondii isolates obtained previously, but not genetically characterised, were revived in mice. Toxoplasma gondii DNA isolated from these 97 samples (31+66) was characterised using 11 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers (SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico). A total of 95 isolates were successfully genotyped. In addition to clonal Types II, and III, 12 different genotypes were found. These genotype data were combined with 74 T. gondii isolates previously characterised from wildlife from North America and a composite data set of 169 isolates comprised 22 genotypes, including clonal Types II, III and 20 atypical genotypes. Phylogenetic network analysis showed limited diversity with dominance of a recently designated fourth clonal type (Type 12) in North America, followed by the Type II and III lineages. These three major lineages together accounted for 85% of strains in North America. The Type 12 lineage includes previously identified Type A and X strains from sea otters. This study revealed that the Type 12 lineage accounts for 46.7% (79/169) of isolates and is dominant in wildlife of North America. No clonal Type I strain was identified among these wildlife isolates. These results suggest that T. gondii strains in wildlife from North America have limited diversity, with the occurrence of only a few major clonal types. PMID:21802422

  1. Genetic characterisation of Toxoplasma gondii in wildlife from North America revealed widespread and high prevalence of the fourth clonal type

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dubey, J.P.; Velmurugan, G.V.; Ragendran, C.; Yabsley, M.J.; Thomas, N.J.; Beckmen, K.B.; Sinnett, D.; Ruid, D.; Hart, J.; Fair, P.A.; McFee, W.E.; Shearn-Bochsler, V.; Kwok, O.C.H.; Ferreira, L.R.; Choudhary, S.; Faria, E.B.; Zhou, H.; Felix, T.A.; Su, C.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known of the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife. In the present study wild animals, from the USA were examined for T. gondii infection. Tissues of naturally exposed animals were bioassayed in mice for isolation of viable parasites. Viable T. gondii was isolated from 31 animals including, to our knowledge for the first time, from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), five gray wolves (Canis lupus), a woodrat (Neotoma micropus), and five Arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus). Additionally, 66 T. gondii isolates obtained previously, but not genetically characterised, were revived in mice. Toxoplasma gondii DNA isolated from these 97 samples (31+66) was characterised using 11 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers (SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico). A total of 95 isolates were successfully genotyped. In addition to clonal Types II, and III, 12 different genotypes were found. These genotype data were combined with 74 T. gondii isolates previously characterised from wildlife from North America and a composite data set of 169 isolates comprised 22 genotypes, including clonal Types II, III and 20 atypical genotypes. Phylogenetic network analysis showed limited diversity with dominance of a recently designated fourth clonal type (Type 12) in North America, followed by the Type II and III lineages. These three major lineages together accounted for 85% of strains in North America. The Type 12 lineage includes previously identified Type A and X strains from sea otters. This study revealed that the Type 12 lineage accounts for 46.7% (79/169) of isolates and is dominant in wildlife of North America. No clonal Type I strain was identified among these wildlife isolates. These results suggest that T. gondii strains in wildlife from North America have limited diversity, with the occurrence of only a few major clonal types.

  2. Escherichia coli ST131, an Intriguing Clonal Group

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Xavier; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, a previously unknown Escherichia coli clonal group, sequence type 131 (ST131), was identified on three continents. Today, ST131 is the predominant E. coli lineage among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) isolates worldwide. Retrospective studies have suggested that it may originally have risen to prominence as early as 2003. Unlike other classical group B2 ExPEC isolates, ST131 isolates are commonly reported to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases, such as CTX-M-15, and almost all are resistant to fluoroquinolones. Moreover, ST131 E. coli isolates are considered to be truly pathogenic, due to the spectrum of infections they cause in both community and hospital settings and the large number of virulence-associated genes they contain. ST131 isolates therefore seem to contradict the widely held view that high levels of antimicrobial resistance are necessarily associated with a fitness cost leading to a decrease in pathogenesis. Six years after the first description of E. coli ST131, this review outlines the principal traits of ST131 clonal group isolates, based on the growing body of published data, and highlights what is currently known and what we need to find out to provide public health authorities with better information to help combat ST131. PMID:24982321

  3. Clonality and intracellular polyploidy in virus evolution and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Perales, Celia; Moreno, Elena; Domingo, Esteban

    2015-07-21

    In the present article we examine clonality in virus evolution. Most viruses retain an active recombination machinery as a potential means to initiate new levels of genetic exploration that go beyond those attainable solely by point mutations. However, despite abundant recombination that may be linked to molecular events essential for genome replication, herein we provide evidence that generation of recombinants with altered biological properties is not essential for the completion of the replication cycles of viruses, and that viral lineages (near-clades) can be defined. We distinguish mechanistically active but inconsequential recombination from evolutionarily relevant recombination, illustrated by episodes in the field and during experimental evolution. In the field, recombination has been at the origin of new viral pathogens, and has conferred fitness advantages to some viruses once the parental viruses have attained a sufficient degree of diversification by point mutations. In the laboratory, recombination mediated a salient genome segmentation of foot-and-mouth disease virus, an important animal pathogen whose genome in nature has always been characterized as unsegmented. We propose a model of continuous mutation and recombination, with punctuated, biologically relevant recombination events for the survival of viruses, both as disease agents and as promoters of cellular evolution. Thus, clonality is the standard evolutionary mode for viruses because recombination is largely inconsequential, since the decisive events for virus replication and survival are not dependent on the exchange of genetic material and formation of recombinant (mosaic) genomes. PMID:26195777

  4. Ecological Consequences of Clonal Integration in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fenghong; Liu, Jian; Dong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Clonal plants are widespread throughout the plant kingdom and dominate in diverse habitats. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity of environment is pervasive at multiple scales, even at scales relevant to individual plants. Clonal integration refers to resource translocation and information communication among the ramets of clonal plants. Due to clonal integration, clonal plant species possess a series of peculiar attributes: plasticity in response to local and non-local conditions, labor division with organ specialization for acquiring locally abundant resources, foraging behavior by selective placement of ramets in resource-rich microhabitats, and avoidance of intraclonal competition. Clonal integration has very profound ecological consequences for clonal plants. It allows them to efficiently cope with environmental heterogeneity, by alleviating local resource shortages, buffering environmental stresses and disturbances, influencing competitive ability, increasing invasiveness, and altering species composition and invasibility at the community level. In this paper, we present a comprehensive review of research on the ecological consequences of plant clonal integration based on a large body of literature. We also attempt to propose perspectives for future research. PMID:27446093

  5. Early and multiple origins of metastatic lineages within primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Ming; Zhao, Bixiao; Bai, Yalai; Iamarino, Atila; Gaffney, Stephen G; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lifton, Richard P; Rimm, David L; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2016-02-23

    Many aspects of the evolutionary process of tumorigenesis that are fundamental to cancer biology and targeted treatment have been challenging to reveal, such as the divergence times and genetic clonality of metastatic lineages. To address these challenges, we performed tumor phylogenetics using molecular evolutionary models, reconstructed ancestral states of somatic mutations, and inferred cancer chronograms to yield three conclusions. First, in contrast to a linear model of cancer progression, metastases can originate from divergent lineages within primary tumors. Evolved genetic changes in cancer lineages likely affect only the proclivity toward metastasis. Single genetic changes are unlikely to be necessary or sufficient for metastasis. Second, metastatic lineages can arise early in tumor development, sometimes long before diagnosis. The early genetic divergence of some metastatic lineages directs attention toward research on driver genes that are mutated early in cancer evolution. Last, the temporal order of occurrence of driver mutations can be inferred from phylogenetic analysis of cancer chronograms, guiding development of targeted therapeutics effective against primary tumors and metastases. PMID:26858460

  6. Clonal Integration Enhances the Performance of a Clonal Plant Species under Soil Alkalinity Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Juanjuan; Chen, Jishan; Zhang, Yingjun

    2015-01-01

    Clonal plants have been shown to successfully survive in stressful environments, including salinity stress, drought and depleted nutrients through clonal integration between original and subsequent ramets. However, relatively little is known about whether clonal integration can enhance the performance of clonal plants under alkalinity stress. We investigated the effect of clonal integration on the performance of a typical rhizomatous clonal plant, Leymus chinensis, using a factorial experimental design with four levels of alkalinity and two levels of rhizome connection treatments, connected (allowing integration) and severed (preventing integration). Clonal integration was estimated by comparing physiological and biomass features between the rhizome-connected and rhizome-severed treatments. We found that rhizome-connected treatment increased the biomass, height and leaf water potential of subsequent ramets at highly alkalinity treatments but did not affect them at low alkalinity treatments. However, rhizome-connected treatment decreased the root biomass of subsequent ramets and did not influence the photosynthetic rates of subsequent ramets. The biomass of original ramets was reduced by rhizome-connected treatment at the highest alkalinity level. These results suggest that clonal integration can increase the performance of clonal plants under alkalinity stress. Rhizome-connected plants showed dramatically increased survival of buds with negative effects on root weight, indicating that clonal integration influenced the resource allocation pattern of clonal plants. A cost-benefit analysis based on biomass measures showed that original and subsequent ramets significantly benefited from clonal integration in highly alkalinity stress, indicating that clonal integration is an important adaptive strategy by which clonal plants could survive in local alkalinity soil. PMID:25790352

  7. Clonal growth and plant species abundance

    PubMed Central

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Zuzana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Both regional and local plant abundances are driven by species' dispersal capacities and their abilities to exploit new habitats and persist there. These processes are affected by clonal growth, which is difficult to evaluate and compare across large numbers of species. This study assessed the influence of clonal reproduction on local and regional abundances of a large set of species and compared the predictive power of morphologically defined traits of clonal growth with data on actual clonal growth from a botanical garden. The role of clonal growth was compared with the effects of seed reproduction, habitat requirements and growth, proxied both by LHS (leaf–height–seed) traits and by actual performance in the botanical garden. Methods Morphological parameters of clonal growth, actual clonal reproduction in the garden and LHS traits (leaf-specific area – height – seed mass) were used as predictors of species abundance, both regional (number of species records in the Czech Republic) and local (mean species cover in vegetation records) for 836 perennial herbaceous species. Species differences in habitat requirements were accounted for by classifying the dataset by habitat type and also by using Ellenberg indicator values as covariates. Key Results After habitat differences were accounted for, clonal growth parameters explained an important part of variation in species abundance, both at regional and at local levels. At both levels, both greater vegetative growth in cultivation and greater lateral expansion trait values were correlated with higher abundance. Seed reproduction had weaker effects, being positive at the regional level and negative at the local level. Conclusions Morphologically defined traits are predictive of species abundance, and it is concluded that simultaneous investigation of several such traits can help develop hypotheses on specific processes (e.g. avoidance of self-competition, support of offspring) potentially

  8. Hematopoietic Lineage Diversification, Simplified.

    PubMed

    Drissen, Roy; Nerlov, Claus

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoiesis is a complex process that requires a high degree of transcriptional diversification during lineage commitment and differentiation. de Graaf et al. (2016) have now generated a comprehensive gene expression dataset that allows cell-type-specific genes as well as associated transcription factor expression patterns to be readily identified. PMID:27494670

  9. Clonal Dynamics Reveal Two Distinct Populations of Basal Cells in Slow-Turnover Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Watson, Julie K; Rulands, Steffen; Wilkinson, Adam C; Wuidart, Aline; Ousset, Marielle; Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Göttgens, Berthold; Blanpain, Cédric; Simons, Benjamin D; Rawlins, Emma L

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial lineages have been studied at cellular resolution in multiple organs that turn over rapidly. However, many epithelia, including those of the lung, liver, pancreas, and prostate, turn over slowly and may be regulated differently. We investigated the mouse tracheal epithelial lineage at homeostasis by using long-term clonal analysis and mathematical modeling. This pseudostratified epithelium contains basal cells and secretory and multiciliated luminal cells. Our analysis revealed that basal cells are heterogeneous, comprising approximately equal numbers of multipotent stem cells and committed precursors, which persist in the basal layer for 11 days before differentiating to luminal fate. We confirmed the molecular and functional differences within the basal population by using single-cell qRT-PCR and further lineage labeling. Additionally, we show that self-renewal of short-lived secretory cells is a feature of homeostasis. We have thus revealed early luminal commitment of cells that are morphologically indistinguishable from stem cells. PMID:26119728

  10. In vitro clonal analysis of mouse neural crest development.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Morita, T; Sieber-Blum, M

    1993-06-01

    Analysis of lineage segregation during mammalian neural crest development has not been sufficiently performed due to technical difficulties. In the present study, therefore, we established a clonal culture system of mouse neural crest cells in order to analyze developmental potentials of individual neural crest cells and their patterns of lineage segregation. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and cholera toxin (CT) were applied to culture medium to trigger melanogenic differentiation of mouse neural crest cells. Three morphologically distinct types of clones were observed. (1) "Pigmented clones" consisted of melanocytes only, suggesting that the clone-forming cells were committed to the melanogenic lineage. These clones were observed only in the presence of TPA and CT. The proportion of this type of clone (8%) was much lower than that of the equivalent type of clone in quail trunk neural crest (40-60%; Sieber-Blum and Cohen, 1980, Dev. Biol. 80, 96-106). It therefore appears that the segregation pattern to the melanogenic lineage during mouse neural crest development in vitro differs quantitatively from that in the quail. (2) "Mixed clones" consisted of pigmented and unpigmented cells. Like pigmented clones, they were observed only in the presence of TPA and CT. The clones contained up to four types of cells: melanocytes, S100-positive cells (Schwann cells or melanogenic precursor cells), serotonin (5-HT)-positive autonomic neuron-like cells, and substance P (SP)-immunoreactive sensory neuron-like cells. Thus, at least some mixed clone-forming cells are pluripotent. (3) Two classes of "unpigmented clones" were observed that consisted of unpigmented cells only. These clones developed in the presence and absence of TPA and CT. Unpigmented clones in one class contained up to three types of cells as well as other, as yet unidentified cells: S100-, 5-HT-, and SP-positive cells. This observation suggests that at least some of these clones originate from cells

  11. Clonal Evolution in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Bita; Vij, Ravi

    2016-08-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy encountered among patients in the United States. The last decade has seen incremental improvements in the survival of patients with MM. These advances are, to a large extent, attributable to the addition of proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs to the armamentarium of treatment options. The adoption of these drug classes was the result of an empiric research paradigm. However, with the application of next generation sequencing technologies, we are now starting to unravel the genomic landscape of MM. It is hoped that this will allow us to better disentangle the biology of the disease and allow for identification of new therapeutic targets. In this article, we review what we have learned to date about the mutational profile, clonal architecture, and evolution of the disease, and discuss the potential clinical implications of these findings. PMID:27521309

  12. Lineage-tracking of stem cell differentiation: a neutral model of hematopoiesis in rhesus macaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom

    How a potentially diverse population of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) differentiates and proliferates to supply more than 1011 mature blood cells every day in humans remains a key biological question. We investigated this process by quantitatively analyzing the clonal structure of peripheral blood that is generated by a population of transplanted lentivirus-marked HSCs in myeloablated rhesus macaques. Each transplanted HSC generates a clonal lineage of cells in the peripheral blood that is then detected and quantified through deep sequencing of the viral vector integration sites (VIS) common within each lineage. This approach allowed us to observe, over a period of 4-12 years, hundreds of distinct clonal lineages. Surprisingly, while the distinct clone sizes varied by three orders of magnitude, we found that collectively, they form a steady-state clone size-distribution with a distinctive shape. Our concise model shows that slow HSC differentiation followed by fast progenitor growth is responsible for the observed broad clone size-distribution. Although all cells are assumed to be statistically identical, analogous to a neutral theory for the different clone lineages, our mathematical approach captures the intrinsic variability in the times to HSC differentiation after transplantation. Steady-state solutions of our model show that the predicted clone size-distribution is sensitive to only two combinations of parameters. By fitting the measured clone size-distributions to our mechanistic model, we estimate both the effective HSC differentiation rate and the number of active HSCs. NSF and NIH.

  13. Geographic ranges, population structure, and ages of sexual and parthenogenetic snail lineages.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven G

    2006-07-01

    Asexual reproduction is thought to doom organisms to extinction due to mutation accumulation and parasite exploitation. Theoretical models suggest that parthenogens may escape the negative effects of conspecifics and biological enemies through escape in space. Through intensive sequencing of a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and a nuclear intron locus in sexual and parthenogenetic freshwater snails (Campeloma), I examine three questions: (1) Are sexual mtDNA lineages more restricted geographically than parthenogenetic mtDNA lineages? (2) Are independent parthenogenetic lineages shorter lived than sexual lineages? and (3) Do parthenogens have higher intraindividual nuclear sequence diversity and form well-differentiated monophyletic groups as expected under the Meselson effect? Geographic ranges of parthenogenetic lineages are significantly larger than geographic ranges of sexual lineages. Based on coalescence times under different demographic assumptions, asexual lineages are short lived, but there is variation in clonal ages. Although alternative explanations exist, these results suggest that asexual lineages may persist in the short term through dispersal, and that various constraints may cause geographic restriction of sexual lineages. Both allotriploid and diploid Campeloma parthenogens have significantly higher allelic divergence within individuals, but show limited nuclear sequence divergence from sexual ancestors. In contrast to previous allozyme evidence for nonhybrid origins of diploid Campeloma parthenogens, cryptic hybridization may account for elevated heterozygosity. PMID:16929658

  14. Clonal Structure, Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases, and Acquired AmpC-Type Cephalosporinases of Escherichia coli Populations Colonizing Patients in Rehabilitation Centers in Four Countries

    PubMed Central

    Izdebski, R.; Baraniak, A.; Fiett, J.; Adler, A.; Kazma, M.; Salomon, J.; Lawrence, C.; Rossini, A.; Salvia, A.; Vidal Samso, J.; Fierro, J.; Paul, M.; Lerman, Y.; Malhotra-Kumar, S.; Lammens, C.; Goossens, H.; Hryniewicz, W.; Brun-Buisson, C.; Carmeli, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The prospective project MOSAR was conducted in five rehabilitation units: the Berck Maritime Hôpital (Berck, France), Fondazione Santa Lucia (Rome, Italy), Guttmann Institute (GI; Barcelona, Spain), and Loewenstein Hospital and Tel-Aviv Souraski Medical Center (TA) (Tel-Aviv, Israel). Patients were screened for carriage of Enterobacteriaceae resistant to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) from admission until discharge. The aim of this study was to characterize the clonal structure, extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), and acquired AmpC-like cephalosporinases in the Escherichia coli populations collected. A total of 376 isolates were randomly selected. The overall number of sequence types (STs) was 76, including 7 STs that grouped at least 10 isolates from at least three centers each, namely, STs 10, 38, 69, 131, 405, 410, and 648. These clones comprised 65.2% of all isolates, and ST131 alone comprised 41.2%. Of 54 STs observed only in one center, some STs played a locally significant role, like ST156 and ST393 in GI or ST372 and ST398 in TA. Among 16 new STs, five arose from evolution within the ST10 and ST131 clonal complexes. ESBLs and AmpCs accounted for 94.7% and 5.6% of the ESC-hydrolyzing β-lactamases, respectively, being dominated by the CTX-M-like enzymes (79.9%), followed by the SHV (13.5%) and CMY-2 (5.3%) types. CTX-M-15 was the most prevalent β-lactamase overall (40.6%); other ubiquitous enzymes were CTX-M-14 and CMY-2. Almost none of the common clones correlated strictly with one β-lactamase; although 58.7% of ST131 isolates produced CTX-M-15, the clone also expressed nine other enzymes. A number of clone variants with specific pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and ESBL types were spread in some locales, potentially representing newly emerging E. coli epidemic strains. PMID:23114774

  15. Cytogenetic abnormalities in acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: an overview.

    PubMed

    Manola, Kalliopi N

    2013-10-01

    Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage (ALAL) is a rare complex entity with heterogeneous clinical, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic and molecular genetic features and adverse outcome. According to World Health Organization 2008 classification, ALAL encompasses those leukaemias that show no clear evidence of differentiation along a single lineage. The rarity of ALAL and the lack of uniform diagnostic criteria have made it difficult to establish its cytogenetic features, although cytogenetic analysis reveals clonal chromosomal abnormalities in 59-91% of patients. This article focuses on the significance of cytogenetic analysis in ALAL supporting the importance of cytogenetic analysis in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, follow up and treatment selection of ALAL. It reviews in detail the types of chromosomal aberrations, their molecular background, their correlation with immunophenotype and age distribution and their prognostic relevance. It also summarizes some novel chromosome aberrations that have been observed only once. Furthermore, it highlights the ongoing and future research on ALAL in the field of cytogenetics. PMID:23888868

  16. Multiplex cell and lineage tracking with combinatorial labels.

    PubMed

    Loulier, Karine; Barry, Raphaëlle; Mahou, Pierre; Le Franc, Yann; Supatto, Willy; Matho, Katherine S; Ieng, Siohoi; Fouquet, Stéphane; Dupin, Elisabeth; Benosman, Ryad; Chédotal, Alain; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Morin, Xavier; Livet, Jean

    2014-02-01

    We present a method to label and trace the lineage of multiple neural progenitors simultaneously in vertebrate animals via multiaddressable genome-integrative color (MAGIC) markers. We achieve permanent expression of combinatorial labels from new Brainbow transgenes introduced in embryonic neural progenitors with electroporation of transposon vectors. In the mouse forebrain and chicken spinal cord, this approach allows us to track neural progenitor's descent during pre- and postnatal neurogenesis or perinatal gliogenesis in long-term experiments. Color labels delineate cytoarchitecture, resolve spatially intermixed clones, and specify the lineage of astroglial subtypes and adult neural stem cells. Combining colors and subcellular locations provides an expanded marker palette to individualize clones. We show that this approach is also applicable to modulate specific signaling pathways in a mosaic manner while color-coding the status of individual cells regarding induced molecular perturbations. This method opens new avenues for clonal and functional analysis in varied experimental models and contexts. PMID:24507188

  17. Subpopulations of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 121 are associated with distinct clinical entities.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Kevin; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Laurent, Frederic; Goering, Richard V; Žemličková, Helena; Machova, Ivana; Struelens, Marc J; Zautner, Andreas E; Holtfreter, Silva; Bröker, Barbara; Ritchie, Stephen; Reaksmey, Sin; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J; Cuny, Christiane; Layer, Franziska; Witte, Wolfgang; Nübel, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the population structure of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex CC121 by mutation discovery at 115 genetic housekeeping loci from each of 154 isolates, sampled on five continents between 1953 and 2009. In addition, we pyro-sequenced the genomes from ten representative isolates. The genome-wide SNPs that were ascertained revealed the evolutionary history of CC121, indicating at least six major clades (A to F) within the clonal complex and dating its most recent common ancestor to the pre-antibiotic era. The toxin gene complement of CC121 isolates was correlated with their SNP-based phylogeny. Moreover, we found a highly significant association of clinical phenotypes with phylogenetic affiliations, which is unusual for S. aureus. All isolates evidently sampled from superficial infections (including staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, bullous impetigo, exfoliative dermatitis, conjunctivitis) clustered in clade F, which included the European epidemic fusidic-acid resistant impetigo clone (EEFIC). In comparison, isolates from deep-seated infections (abscess, furuncle, pyomyositis, necrotizing pneumonia) were disseminated in several clades, but not in clade F. Our results demonstrate that phylogenetic lineages with distinct clinical properties exist within an S. aureus clonal complex, and that SNPs serve as powerful discriminatory markers, able to identify these lineages. All CC121 genomes harboured a 41-kilobase prophage that was dissimilar to S. aureus phages sequenced previously. Community-associated MRSA and MSSA from Cambodia were extremely closely related, suggesting this MRSA arose in the region. PMID:23505464

  18. Clonal tracing of Sox9+ liver progenitors in oval cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Tarlow, Branden D.; Finegold, Milton J.; Grompe, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating ducts, termed “oval cells”, have long thought to be bipotential, i.e. produce both biliary ducts and hepatocytes during chronic liver injury. The precursor to oval cells is considered to be a facultative liver stem cell (LSC). Recent lineage tracing experiments indicated that the LSC is Sox9+ and can replace the bulk of hepatocyte mass in several settings. However, no clonal relationship between Sox9+ cells and the two epithelial liver lineages was established. We labeled Sox9+ mouse liver cells at low density with a multicolor fluorescent confetti reporter. Organoid formation validated the progenitor activity of the labeled population. Sox9+ cells were traced in multiple oval cell injury models using both histology and FACS. Surprisingly, only rare clones containing both hepatocytes and oval cells were found in any experiment. Quantitative analysis showed that Sox9+ cells contributed only minimally (<1%) to the hepatocyte pool, even in classic oval cell injury models. In contrast, clonally marked mature hepatocytes demonstrated the ability to self-renew in all classic mouse oval cell activation injuries. A hepatocyte chimera model to trace hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells also demonstrated the prevalence of hepatocyte-driven regeneration in mouse oval cell injury models. Conclusion Sox9+ ductal progenitor cells give rise to clonal oval cell proliferation and bipotential organoids but rarely produce hepatocytes in vivo. Hepatocytes themselves are the predominant source of new parenchyma cells in prototypical mouse models of oval cell activation. PMID:24700457

  19. Subpopulations of Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 121 Are Associated with Distinct Clinical Entities

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Kevin; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Laurent, Frederic; Goering, Richard V.; Žemličková, Helena; Machova, Ivana; Struelens, Marc J.; Zautner, Andreas E.; Holtfreter, Silva; Bröker, Barbara; Ritchie, Stephen; Reaksmey, Sin; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J.; Cuny, Christiane; Layer, Franziska; Witte, Wolfgang; Nübel, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the population structure of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex CC121 by mutation discovery at 115 genetic housekeeping loci from each of 154 isolates, sampled on five continents between 1953 and 2009. In addition, we pyro-sequenced the genomes from ten representative isolates. The genome-wide SNPs that were ascertained revealed the evolutionary history of CC121, indicating at least six major clades (A to F) within the clonal complex and dating its most recent common ancestor to the pre-antibiotic era. The toxin gene complement of CC121 isolates was correlated with their SNP-based phylogeny. Moreover, we found a highly significant association of clinical phenotypes with phylogenetic affiliations, which is unusual for S. aureus. All isolates evidently sampled from superficial infections (including staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, bullous impetigo, exfoliative dermatitis, conjunctivitis) clustered in clade F, which included the European epidemic fusidic-acid resistant impetigo clone (EEFIC). In comparison, isolates from deep-seated infections (abscess, furuncle, pyomyositis, necrotizing pneumonia) were disseminated in several clades, but not in clade F. Our results demonstrate that phylogenetic lineages with distinct clinical properties exist within an S. aureus clonal complex, and that SNPs serve as powerful discriminatory markers, able to identify these lineages. All CC121 genomes harboured a 41-kilobase prophage that was dissimilar to S. aureus phages sequenced previously. Community-associated MRSA and MSSA from Cambodia were extremely closely related, suggesting this MRSA arose in the region. PMID:23505464

  20. PCR-RFLP Markers Identify Three Lineages of the North American and European Populations of Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum, the cause of Sudden Oak Death, has a wide host range and is found in the northern hemisphere. It is thought to be introduced to North America and Europe, but its origin is unknown. It has three major clonal lineages and two mating types. Sexual reproduction can only occur when ...

  1. Direct somatic lineage conversion.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Koji; Haag, Daniel; Wernig, Marius

    2015-10-19

    The predominant view of embryonic development and cell differentiation has been that rigid and even irreversible epigenetic marks are laid down along the path of cell specialization ensuring the proper silencing of unrelated lineage programmes. This model made the prediction that specialized cell types are stable and cannot be redirected into other lineages. Accordingly, early attempts to change the identity of somatic cells had little success and was limited to conversions between closely related cell types. Nuclear transplantation experiments demonstrated, however, that specialized cells even from adult mammals can be reprogrammed into a totipotent state. The discovery that a small combination of transcription factors can reprogramme cells to pluripotency without the need of oocytes further supported the view that these epigenetic barriers can be overcome much easier than assumed, but the extent of this flexibility was still unclear. When we showed that a differentiated mesodermal cell can be directly converted to a differentiated ectodermal cell without a pluripotent intermediate, it was suggested that in principle any cell type could be converted into any other cell type. Indeed, the work of several groups in recent years has provided many more examples of direct somatic lineage conversions. Today, the question is not anymore whether a specific cell type can be generated by direct reprogramming but how it can be induced. PMID:26416679

  2. Enforced Clonality Confers a Fitness Advantage

    PubMed Central

    Martínková, Jana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2016-01-01

    In largely clonal plants, splitting of a maternal plant into potentially independent plants (ramets) is usually spontaneous; however, such fragmentation also occurs in otherwise non-clonal species due to application of external force. This process might play an important yet largely overlooked role for otherwise non-clonal plants by providing a mechanism to regenerate after disturbance. Here, in a 5-year garden experiment on two short-lived, otherwise non-clonal species, Barbarea vulgaris and Barbarea stricta, we compared the fitness of plants fragmented by simulated disturbance (“enforced ramets”) both with plants that contemporaneously originate in seed and with individuals unscathed by the disturbance event. Because the ability to regrow from fragments is related to plant age and stored reserves, we compared the effects of disturbance applied during three different ontogenetic stages of the plants. In B. vulgaris, enforced ramet fitness was higher than the measured fitness values of both uninjured plants and plants established from seed after the disturbance. This advantage decreased with increasing plant age at the time of fragmentation. In B. stricta, enforced ramet fitness was lower than or similar to fitness of uninjured plants and plants grown from seed. Our results likely reflect the habitat preferences of the study species, as B. vulgaris occurs in anthropogenic, disturbed habitats where body fragmentation is more probable and enforced clonality thus more advantageous than in the more natural habitats preferred by B. stricta. Generalizing from our results, we see that increased fitness yielded by enforced clonality would confer an evolutionary advantage in the face of disturbance, especially in habitats where a seed bank has not been formed, e.g., during invasion or colonization. Our results thus imply that enforced clonality should be taken into account when studying population dynamics and life strategies of otherwise non-clonal species in disturbed

  3. Comparative analysis of CRISPR loci in different Listeria monocytogenes lineages.

    PubMed

    Di, Huiling; Ye, Lei; Yan, He; Meng, Hecheng; Yamasak, Shinji; Shi, Lei

    2014-11-21

    Listeria monocytogenes, an important food-borne pathogen, causes high mortality rate of listeriosis. Pan-genomic comparisons revealed the species genome of L. monocytogenes is highly stable but not completely clonal. The population structure of this species displays at least four evolutionary lineages (I-IV). Isolates of different lineages displayed distinct genetic, phenotypic and ecologic characteristics, which appear to affect their ability to be transmitted through foods and to cause human disease, as well as their ability to thrive in markedly phage-rich environments. CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindrome repeats), a recently described adaptive immunity system, not only confers defense against invading elements derived from bacteriophages or plasmids in many bacteria and archaeal, but also displays strains-level variations in almost any given endowed species. This work was aimed to investigate CRISPR diversity in L. monocytogenes strains of different lineages and estimated the potential practicability of the CRISPR-based approach to resolve this species' biodiversity. Only a third of strains contained all three CRISPR loci (here defined as LMa, LMb and LMc) at same time. Combined the strain-level variations in presence/absence of each CRISPR locus and its relative size and spacer arrangements, a total of 29 CRISPR genotypes and 11 groups were defined within a collection of 128 strains covering all serotypes. The CRISPR-based approach showed powerful ability to subtype the more commonly food-borne isolates of serotype 1/2a (lineage II) and serotypes 1/2b (lineage I), but limited by the absence of typical CRISPR structure in many lineage I isolates. Strikingly, we found a long associated cas1 gene as well as two self-targeting LMb spacers accidently homologous with endogenous genes in a fraction of serotype 1/2a isolations, demonstrated that CRISPR I B system might involve in bacterial physiology besides antiviral immunity. PMID:25445602

  4. Low incidence of clonality in cold water corals revealed through the novel use of standardized protocol adapted to deep sea sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becheler, Ronan; Cassone, Anne-Laure; Noel, Philippe; Mouchel, Olivier; Morrison, Cheryl; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Sampling in the deep sea is a technical challenge, which has hindered the acquisition of robust datasets that are necessary to determine the fine-grained biological patterns and processes that may shape genetic diversity. Estimates of the extent of clonality in deep-sea species, despite the importance of clonality in shaping the local dynamics and evolutionary trajectories, have been largely obscured by such limitations. Cold-water coral reefs along European margins are formed mainly by two reef-building species, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata. Here we present a fine-grained analysis of the genotypic and genetic composition of reefs occurring in the Bay of Biscay, based on an innovative deep-sea sampling protocol. This strategy was designed to be standardized, random, and allowed the georeferencing of all sampled colonies. Clonal lineages discriminated through their Multi-Locus Genotypes (MLG) at 6–7 microsatellite markers could thus be mapped to assess the level of clonality and the spatial spread of clonal lineages. High values of clonal richness were observed for both species across all sites suggesting a limited occurrence of clonality, which likely originated through fragmentation. Additionally, spatial autocorrelation analysis underlined the possible occurrence of fine-grained genetic structure in several populations of both L. pertusa and M. oculata. The two cold-water coral species examined had contrasting patterns of connectivity among canyons, with among-canyon genetic structuring detected in M. oculata, whereas L. pertusa was panmictic at the canyon scale. This study exemplifies that a standardized, random and georeferenced sampling strategy, while challenging, can be applied in the deep sea, and associated benefits outlined here include improved estimates of fine grained patterns of clonality and dispersal that are comparable across sites and among species.

  5. Phylogenetic and genomic diversity in isolates from the globally distributed Acinetobacter baumannii ST25 lineage

    PubMed Central

    Sahl, Jason W.; Del Franco, Mariateresa; Pournaras, Spyros; Colman, Rebecca E.; Karah, Nabil; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Zarrilli, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a globally distributed nosocomial pathogen that has gained interest due to its resistance to most currently used antimicrobials. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) and phylogenetics has begun to reveal the global genetic diversity of this pathogen. The evolution of A. baumannii has largely been defined by recombination, punctuated by the emergence and proliferation of defined clonal lineages. In this study we sequenced seven genomes from the sequence type (ST)25 lineage and compared them to 12 ST25 genomes deposited in public databases. A recombination analysis identified multiple genomic regions that are homoplasious in the ST25 phylogeny, indicating active or historical recombination. Genes associated with antimicrobial resistance were differentially distributed between ST25 genomes, which matched our laboratory-based antimicrobial susceptibility typing. Differences were also observed in biofilm formation between ST25 isolates, which were demonstrated to produce significantly more extensive biofilm than an isolate from the ST1 clonal lineage. These results demonstrate that within A. baumannii, even a fairly recently derived monophyletic lineage can still exhibit significant genotypic and phenotypic diversity. These results have implications for associating outbreaks with sequence typing as well as understanding mechanisms behind the global propagation of successful A. baumannii lineages. PMID:26462752

  6. Ice age cloning--comparison of the Quaternary evolutionary histories of sexual and clonal forms of spiny loaches (Cobitis; Teleostei) using the analysis of mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Janko, K; Culling, M A; Ráb, P; Kotlík, P

    2005-09-01

    Recent advances in population history reconstruction offered a powerful tool for comparisons of the abilities of sexual and clonal forms to respond to Quaternary climatic oscillations, ultimately leading to inferences about the advantages and disadvantages of a given mode of reproduction. We reconstructed the Quaternary historical biogeography of the sexual parental species and clonal hybrid lineages within the Europe-wide hybrid complex of Cobitis spiny loaches. Cobitis elongatoides and Cobitis taenia recolonizing Europe from separated refuges met in central Europe and the Pontic region giving rise to hybrid lineages during the Holocene. Cobitis elongatoides due to its long-term reproductive contact with the remaining parental species of the complex--C. tanaitica and C. spec.--gave rise to two clonal hybrid lineages probably during the last interglacial or even earlier, which survived the Würmian glaciation with C. elongatoides. These lineages followed C. elongatoides postglacial expansion and probably decreased its dispersal rate. Our data indicate the frequent origins of asexuality irrespective of the parental populations involved and the comparable dispersal potential of diploid and triploid lineages. PMID:16101769

  7. G-TRACE: rapid Gal4-based cell lineage analysis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Cory J.; Olson, John M.; Ngo, Kathy T.; Kim, Eunha; Lee, Noemi E.; Kuoy, Edward; Patananan, Alexander N.; Sitz, Daniel; Tran, PhuongThao; Do, Minh-Tu; Yackle, Kevin; Cespedes, Albert; Hartenstein, Volker; Call, Gerald B.; Banerjee, Utpal

    2009-01-01

    We combine Gal4/UAS, FLP/FRT and fluorescent reporters to generate cell clones that provide spatial, temporal, and genetic information about the origins of individual cells in Drosophila. We name this combination the Gal4 Technique for Real-time and Clonal Expression (G-TRACE). The approach should allow for screening and the identification of real-time and lineage-traced expression patterns on a genomic scale. PMID:19633663

  8. G-TRACE: rapid Gal4-based cell lineage analysis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Evans, Cory J; Olson, John M; Ngo, Kathy T; Kim, Eunha; Lee, Noemi E; Kuoy, Edward; Patananan, Alexander N; Sitz, Daniel; Tran, Phuongthao; Do, Minh-Tu; Yackle, Kevin; Cespedes, Albert; Hartenstein, Volker; Call, Gerald B; Banerjee, Utpal

    2009-08-01

    We combined Gal4-UAS and the FLP recombinase-FRT and fluorescent reporters to generate cell clones that provide spatial, temporal and genetic information about the origins of individual cells in Drosophila melanogaster. We named this combination the Gal4 technique for real-time and clonal expression (G-TRACE). The approach should allow for screening and the identification of real-time and lineage-traced expression patterns on a genomic scale. PMID:19633663

  9. Enhancing cancer clonality analysis with integrative genomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It is understood that cancer is a clonal disease initiated by a single cell, and that metastasis, which is the spread of cancer from the primary site, is also initiated by a single cell. The seemingly natural capability of cancer to adapt dynamically in a Darwinian manner is a primary reason for therapeutic failures. Survival advantages may be induced by cancer therapies and also occur as a result of inherent cell and microenvironmental factors. The selected "more fit" clones outmatch their competition and then become dominant in the tumor via propagation of progeny. This clonal expansion leads to relapse, therapeutic resistance and eventually death. The goal of this study is to develop and demonstrate a more detailed clonality approach by utilizing integrative genomics. Methods Patient tumor samples were profiled by Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) and RNA-seq on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 and methylation profiling was performed on the Illumina Infinium 450K array. STAR and the Haplotype Caller were used for RNA-seq processing. Custom approaches were used for the integration of the multi-omic datasets. Results Reported are major enhancements to CloneViz, which now provides capabilities enabling a formal tumor multi-dimensional clonality analysis by integrating: i) DNA mutations, ii) RNA expressed mutations, and iii) DNA methylation data. RNA and DNA methylation integration were not previously possible, by CloneViz (previous version) or any other clonality method to date. This new approach, named iCloneViz (integrated CloneViz) employs visualization and quantitative methods, revealing an integrative genomic mutational dissection and traceability (DNA, RNA, epigenetics) thru the different layers of molecular structures. Conclusion The iCloneViz approach can be used for analysis of clonal evolution and mutational dynamics of multi-omic data sets. Revealing tumor clonal complexity in an integrative and quantitative manner facilitates improved mutational

  10. Genetic analyses of atypical Toxoplasma gondii strains reveals a fourth clonal lineage in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we examined an expanded set of strains using sequenced-based phylogenetic and population analyses to re-evaluate the population structure of T. gondii in North America. Our findings reveal that strains previous defined by atypical RFLP patterns fall into two discrete groups. In one case, these...

  11. Evolutionary perspectives on clonal reproduction in vertebrate animals

    PubMed Central

    Avise, John C.

    2015-01-01

    A synopsis is provided of different expressions of whole-animal vertebrate clonality (asexual organismal-level reproduction), both in the laboratory and in nature. For vertebrate taxa, such clonal phenomena include the following: human-mediated cloning via artificial nuclear transfer; intergenerational clonality in nature via parthenogenesis and gynogenesis; intergenerational hemiclonality via hybridogenesis and kleptogenesis; intragenerational clonality via polyembryony; and what in effect qualifies as clonal replication via self-fertilization and intense inbreeding by simultaneous hermaphrodites. Each of these clonal or quasi-clonal mechanisms is described, and its evolutionary genetic ramifications are addressed. By affording an atypical vantage on standard vertebrate reproduction, clonality offers fresh perspectives on the evolutionary and ecological significance of recombination-derived genetic variety. PMID:26195735

  12. Spatial genetic structure reflects extensive clonality, low genotypic diversity and habitat fragmentation in Grevillea renwickiana (Proteaceae), a rare, sterile shrub from south-eastern Australia

    PubMed Central

    James, Elizabeth A.; McDougall, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The association of clonality, polyploidy and reduced fecundity has been identified as an extinction risk for clonal plants. Compromised sexual reproduction limits both their ability to adapt to new conditions and their capacity to disperse to more favourable environments. Grevillea renwickiana is a prostrate, putatively sterile shrub reliant on asexual reproduction. Dispersal is most likely limited by the rate of clonal expansion via rhizomes. The nine localized populations constituting this species provide an opportunity to examine the extent of clonality and spatial genotypic diversity to evaluate its evolutionary prospects. Methods Ten microsatellite loci were used to compare genetic and genotypic diversity across all sites with more intensive sampling at four locations (n = 185). The spatial distribution of genotypes and chloroplast DNA haplotypes based on the trnQ–rps16 intergenic spacer region were compared. Chromosome counts provided a basis for examining genetic profiles inconsistent with diploidy. Key Results Microsatellite analysis identified 46 multilocus genotypes (MLGs) in eight multilocus clonal lineages (MLLs). MLLs are not shared among sites, with two exceptions. Spatial autocorrelation was significant to 1·6 km. Genotypic richness ranged from 0 to 0·33. Somatic mutation is likely to contribute to minor variation between MLGs within clonal lineages. The eight chloroplast haplotypes identified were correlated with eight MLLs defined by ordination and generally restricted to single populations. Triploidy is the most likely reason for tri-allelic patterns. Conclusions Grevillea renwickiana comprises few genetic individuals. Sterility has most likely been induced by triploidy. Extensive lateral suckering in long-lived sterile clones facilitates the accumulation of somatic mutations, which contribute to the measured genetic diversity. Genetic conservation value may not be a function of population size. Despite facing evolutionary

  13. T-Cell Lineage Determination

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Bell, J. Jeremiah; Bhandoola, Avinash

    2010-01-01

    Summary T cells originate from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow but complete their development in the thymus. HSCs give rise to a variety of non-renewing hematopoietic progenitors, among which a rare subset migrates to the thymus via the bloodstream. The earliest T-cell progenitors identified in the thymus are not T-lineage restricted but possess the ability to give rise to cells of many different lineages. Alternative lineage potentials are gradually lost as progenitors progress towards later developmental stages. Here, we review the early developmental events that might be involved in T-cell lineage fate determination, including the properties of possible thymus settling progenitors, their homing into the thymus, and their T-cell lineage specification and commitment. PMID:20969581

  14. Cortical and Clonal Contribution of Tbr2 Expressing Progenitors in the Developing Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Vasistha, Navneet A; García-Moreno, Fernando; Arora, Siddharth; Cheung, Amanda F P; Arnold, Sebastian J; Robertson, Elizabeth J; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-10-01

    The individual contribution of different progenitor subtypes towards the mature rodent cerebral cortex is not fully understood. Intermediate progenitor cells (IPCs) are key to understanding the regulation of neuronal number during cortical development and evolution, yet their exact contribution is much debated. Intermediate progenitors in the cortical subventricular zone are defined by expression of T-box brain-2 (Tbr2). In this study we demonstrate by using the Tbr2(Cre) mouse line and state-of-the-art cell lineage labeling techniques, that IPC derived cells contribute substantial proportions 67.5% of glutamatergic but not GABAergic or astrocytic cells to all cortical layers including the earliest generated subplate zone. We also describe the laminar dispersion of clonally derived cells from IPCs using a recently described clonal analysis tool (CLoNe) and show that pair-generated cells in different layers cluster closer (142.1 ± 76.8 μm) than unrelated cells (294.9 ± 105.4 μm). The clonal dispersion from individual Tbr2 positive intermediate progenitors contributes to increasing the cortical surface. Our study also describes extracortical contributions from Tbr2+ progenitors to the lateral olfactory tract and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. PMID:24927931

  15. Cortical and Clonal Contribution of Tbr2 Expressing Progenitors in the Developing Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Vasistha, Navneet A.; García-Moreno, Fernando; Arora, Siddharth; Cheung, Amanda F.P.; Arnold, Sebastian J.; Robertson, Elizabeth J.; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    The individual contribution of different progenitor subtypes towards the mature rodent cerebral cortex is not fully understood. Intermediate progenitor cells (IPCs) are key to understanding the regulation of neuronal number during cortical development and evolution, yet their exact contribution is much debated. Intermediate progenitors in the cortical subventricular zone are defined by expression of T-box brain-2 (Tbr2). In this study we demonstrate by using the Tbr2Cre mouse line and state-of-the-art cell lineage labeling techniques, that IPC derived cells contribute substantial proportions 67.5% of glutamatergic but not GABAergic or astrocytic cells to all cortical layers including the earliest generated subplate zone. We also describe the laminar dispersion of clonally derived cells from IPCs using a recently described clonal analysis tool (CLoNe) and show that pair-generated cells in different layers cluster closer (142.1 ± 76.8 μm) than unrelated cells (294.9 ± 105.4 μm). The clonal dispersion from individual Tbr2 positive intermediate progenitors contributes to increasing the cortical surface. Our study also describes extracortical contributions from Tbr2+ progenitors to the lateral olfactory tract and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. PMID:24927931

  16. Multilocus Sequence Typing Analysis of Staphylococcus lugdunensis Implies a Clonal Population Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chassain, Benoît; Lemée, Ludovic; Didi, Jennifer; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Brisse, Sylvain; Pons, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is recognized as one of the major pathogenic species within the genus Staphylococcus, even though it belongs to the coagulase-negative group. A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme was developed to study the genetic relationships and population structure of 87 S. lugdunensis isolates from various clinical and geographic sources by DNA sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes (aroE, dat, ddl, gmk, ldh, recA, and yqiL). The number of alleles ranged from four (gmk and ldh) to nine (yqiL). Allelic profiles allowed the definition of 20 different sequence types (STs) and five clonal complexes. The 20 STs lacked correlation with geographic source. Isolates recovered from hematogenic infections (blood or osteoarticular isolates) or from skin and soft tissue infections did not cluster in separate lineages. Penicillin-resistant isolates clustered mainly in one clonal complex, unlike glycopeptide-tolerant isolates, which did not constitute a distinct subpopulation within S. lugdunensis. Phylogenies from the sequences of the seven individual housekeeping genes were congruent, indicating a predominantly mutational evolution of these genes. Quantitative analysis of the linkages between alleles from the seven loci revealed a significant linkage disequilibrium, thus confirming a clonal population structure for S. lugdunensis. This first MLST scheme for S. lugdunensis provides a new tool for investigating the macroepidemiology and phylogeny of this unusually virulent coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. PMID:22785196

  17. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of Staphylococcus lugdunensis implies a clonal population structure.

    PubMed

    Chassain, Benoît; Lemée, Ludovic; Didi, Jennifer; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Brisse, Sylvain; Pons, Jean-Louis; Pestel-Caron, Martine

    2012-09-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is recognized as one of the major pathogenic species within the genus Staphylococcus, even though it belongs to the coagulase-negative group. A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme was developed to study the genetic relationships and population structure of 87 S. lugdunensis isolates from various clinical and geographic sources by DNA sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes (aroE, dat, ddl, gmk, ldh, recA, and yqiL). The number of alleles ranged from four (gmk and ldh) to nine (yqiL). Allelic profiles allowed the definition of 20 different sequence types (STs) and five clonal complexes. The 20 STs lacked correlation with geographic source. Isolates recovered from hematogenic infections (blood or osteoarticular isolates) or from skin and soft tissue infections did not cluster in separate lineages. Penicillin-resistant isolates clustered mainly in one clonal complex, unlike glycopeptide-tolerant isolates, which did not constitute a distinct subpopulation within S. lugdunensis. Phylogenies from the sequences of the seven individual housekeeping genes were congruent, indicating a predominantly mutational evolution of these genes. Quantitative analysis of the linkages between alleles from the seven loci revealed a significant linkage disequilibrium, thus confirming a clonal population structure for S. lugdunensis. This first MLST scheme for S. lugdunensis provides a new tool for investigating the macroepidemiology and phylogeny of this unusually virulent coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. PMID:22785196

  18. Clonal deletion and clonal anergy in the thymus induced by cellular elements with different radiation sensitivities

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.L.; Sharrow, S.O.; Singer, A. )

    1990-03-01

    The present study demonstrates that immune tolerance can be achieved in the thymus both by clonal deletion and by clonal inactivation, but that the two tolerant states are induced by cellular elements with different radiation sensitivities. TCR engagement of self antigens on bone marrow-derived, radiation-sensitive (presumably dendritic) cells induces clonal deletion of developing thymocytes, whereas TCR engagement of self antigens on radiation-resistant cellular elements, such as thymic epithelium, induces clonal anergy. The nondeleted, anergic thymocytes can express IL-2-Rs but are unable to proliferate in response to either specific antigen or anti-TCR antibodies, and do develop into phenotypically mature cells that emigrate out of the thymus and into the periphery.

  19. Quality improvement in Vignoles through clonal selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our goal is to select an improved, loose-clustered clone of Vignoles that will contribute to an integrated approach to disease control. Clonal selection has historically proven useful in reducing cluster compactness through a variety of mechanisms, including decreased berry size, lengthening of the ...

  20. Plant Diseases Impact USDA Clonal Vaccinium Genebank

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA Agricultural Research Service maintains a diverse collection of Vaccinium genotypes at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository, a temperate fruit and nut genebank in Corvallis, Oregon. Vaccinium species are hosts for two emerging diseases in the U.S. Pacific Northwest that impact the colle...

  1. 'Sharpe', a clonal plum rootstock for peach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sharpe clonal rootstock for peach is jointly released for grower trial by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (Byron, GA), and Florida Agricultural Experiment Station. Sharpe, previously tested as FLA1-1, was discovered in the wild and appears to be a hybrid of Chickas...

  2. HIV genetic information and clonal growth

    Cancer.gov

    Based on an analysis of blood cells from five HIV-infected individuals, NCI researchers have identified more than 2,400 HIV DNA insertion sites. Analysis of these sites showed that there is extensive clonal expansion (growth) of HIV infected cells.

  3. Molecular genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii from Central and South America revealed highly diverse populations and suggested possible different origins of the three archetypal lineages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most T. gondii strains in North America and Europe belong to three archetypal clonal lineages including the Type I, II and III but, isolates from Brazil are highly diverse. Here, we analyzed 164 T. gondii isolates from three countries in Central America (Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica), from one c...

  4. Group B Streptococci Causing Neonatal Infections in Barcelona Are a Stable Clonal Population: 18-Year Surveillance▿

    PubMed Central

    Martins, E. R.; Andreu, A.; Correia, P.; Juncosa, T.; Bosch, J.; Ramirez, M.; Melo-Cristino, J.

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed 212 group B streptococci (GBS) from newborns with invasive infections in the area of Barcelona, Spain, between 1992 and 2009, with the aim of documenting changes in the prevalences of serotypes, antimicrobial resistance, and genetic lineages and evaluating their associations with either early-onset disease (EOD) or late-onset disease (LOD). Serotypes III (n = 118) and Ia (n = 47) together accounted for nearly 78% of the isolates. All isolates carried an alpha or alpha-like protein gene, and specific associations between genes and serotypes, such as serotype Ib and bca, serotype II and bca, serotype III and rib, and serotype V and alp3, reflected the presence of particular genetic lineages. Macrolide resistance (14.2%) was significantly associated with serotype V. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) clustering was an excellent predictor of serotype and antibiotic resistance. The combination of PFGE and multilocus sequence typing revealed a large number of genetically distinct lineages. Still, specific lineages were dominant in our collection, particularly the serotype III/ST17/rib lineage, which had enhanced potential to cause LOD. Serotype Ia was concentrated in a single PFGE cluster composed of two genetic lineages: ST23/eps and ST24/bca. The ST24/bca sublineage of serotype Ia, which is found infrequently elsewhere, may be emerging as an important cause of neonatal invasive infections in the Mediterranean region. In spite of the introduction of prophylaxis, resulting in a pronounced decline in the frequency of EOD, the study revealed a remarkably stable clonal structure of GBS causing neonatal infections in Barcelona over a period of 18 years. PMID:21697333

  5. Ancestral reconstruction of tick lineages.

    PubMed

    Mans, Ben J; de Castro, Minique H; Pienaar, Ronel; de Klerk, Daniel; Gaven, Philasande; Genu, Siyamcela; Latif, Abdalla A

    2016-06-01

    Ancestral reconstruction in its fullest sense aims to describe the complete evolutionary history of a lineage. This depends on accurate phylogenies and an understanding of the key characters of each parental lineage. An attempt is made to delineate our current knowledge with regard to the ancestral reconstruction of the tick (Ixodida) lineage. Tick characters may be assigned to Core of Life, Lineages of Life or Edges of Life phenomena depending on how far back these characters may be assigned in the evolutionary Tree of Life. These include housekeeping genes, sub-cellular systems, heme processing (Core of Life), development, moulting, appendages, nervous and organ systems, homeostasis, respiration (Lineages of Life), specific adaptations to a blood-feeding lifestyle, including the complexities of salivary gland secretions and tick-host interactions (Edges of Life). The phylogenetic relationships of lineages, their origins and importance in ancestral reconstruction are discussed. Uncertainties with respect to systematic relationships, ancestral reconstruction and the challenges faced in comparative transcriptomics (next-generation sequencing approaches) are highlighted. While almost 150 years of information regarding tick biology have been assembled, progress in recent years indicates that we are in the infancy of understanding tick evolution. Even so, broad reconstructions can be made with relation to biological features associated with various lineages. Conservation of characters shared with sister and parent lineages are evident, but appreciable differences are present in the tick lineage indicating modification with descent, as expected for Darwinian evolutionary theory. Many of these differences can be related to the hematophagous lifestyle of ticks. PMID:26868413

  6. Clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Seishi

    2016-07-21

    Clonal hematopoiesis (CH) in aplastic anemia (AA) has been closely linked to the evolution of late clonal disorders, including paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which are common complications after successful immunosuppressive therapy (IST). With the advent of high-throughput sequencing of recent years, the molecular aspect of CH in AA has been clarified by comprehensive detection of somatic mutations that drive clonal evolution. Genetic abnormalities are found in ∼50% of patients with AA and, except for PIGA mutations and copy-neutral loss-of-heterozygosity, or uniparental disomy (UPD) in 6p (6pUPD), are most frequently represented by mutations involving genes commonly mutated in myeloid malignancies, including DNMT3A, ASXL1, and BCOR/BCORL1 Mutations exhibit distinct chronological profiles and clinical impacts. BCOR/BCORL1 and PIGA mutations tend to disappear or show stable clone size and predict a better response to IST and a significantly better clinical outcome compared with mutations in DNMT3A, ASXL1, and other genes, which are likely to increase their clone size, are associated with a faster progression to MDS/AML, and predict an unfavorable survival. High frequency of 6pUPD and overrepresentation of PIGA and BCOR/BCORL1 mutations are unique to AA, suggesting the role of autoimmunity in clonal selection. By contrast, DNMT3A and ASXL1 mutations, also commonly seen in CH in the general population, indicate a close link to CH in the aged bone marrow, in terms of the mechanism for selection. Detection and close monitoring of somatic mutations/evolution may help with prediction and diagnosis of clonal evolution of MDS/AML and better management of patients with AA. PMID:27121470

  7. Consequences of clonality for sexual fitness: Clonal expansion enhances fitness under spatially restricted dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Van Drunen, Wendy E.; van Kleunen, Mark; Dorken, Marcel E.

    2015-01-01

    Clonality is a pervasive feature of sessile organisms, but this form of asexual reproduction is thought to interfere with sexual fitness via the movement of gametes among the modules that comprise the clone. This within-clone movement of gametes is expected to reduce sexual fitness via mate limitation of male reproductive success and, in some cases, via the production of highly inbred (i.e., self-fertilized) offspring. However, clonality also results in the spatial expansion of the genetic individual (i.e., genet), and this should decrease distances gametes and sexually produced offspring must travel to avoid competing with other gametes and offspring from the same clone. The extent to which any negative effects of clonality on mating success might be offset by the positive effects of spatial expansion is poorly understood. Here, we develop spatially explicit models in which fitness was determined by the success of genets through their male and female sex functions. Our results indicate that clonality serves to increase sexual fitness when it is associated with the outward expansion of the genet. Our models further reveal that the main fitness benefit of clonal expansion might occur through the dispersal of offspring over a wider area compared with nonclonal phenotypes. We conclude that, instead of interfering with sexual reproduction, clonal expansion should often serve to enhance sexual fitness. PMID:26195748

  8. Evaluating Clonal Expansion of HIV-Infected Cells: Optimization of PCR Strategies to Predict Clonality

    PubMed Central

    Laskey, Sarah B.; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W.; Bruner, Katherine M.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    In HIV-infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy, the virus persists indefinitely in a reservoir of latently infected cells. The proliferation of these cells may contribute to the stability of the reservoir and thus to the lifelong persistence of HIV-1 in infected individuals. Because the HIV-1 replication process is highly error-prone, the detection of identical viral genomes in distinct host cells provides evidence for the clonal expansion of infected cells. We evaluated alignments of unique, near-full-length HIV-1 sequences to determine the relationship between clonality in a short region and clonality in the full genome. Although it is common to amplify and sequence short, subgenomic regions of the viral genome for phylogenetic analysis, we show that sequence identity of these amplicons does not guarantee clonality across the full viral genome. We show that although longer amplicons capture more diversity, no subgenomic region can recapitulate the diversity of full viral genomes. Consequently, some identical subgenomic amplicons should be expected even from the analysis of completely unique viral genomes, and the presence of identical amplicons alone is not proof of clonally expanded HIV-1. We present a method for evaluating evidence of clonal expansion in the context of these findings. PMID:27494508

  9. Evaluating Clonal Expansion of HIV-Infected Cells: Optimization of PCR Strategies to Predict Clonality.

    PubMed

    Laskey, Sarah B; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W; Bruner, Katherine M; Siliciano, Robert F

    2016-08-01

    In HIV-infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy, the virus persists indefinitely in a reservoir of latently infected cells. The proliferation of these cells may contribute to the stability of the reservoir and thus to the lifelong persistence of HIV-1 in infected individuals. Because the HIV-1 replication process is highly error-prone, the detection of identical viral genomes in distinct host cells provides evidence for the clonal expansion of infected cells. We evaluated alignments of unique, near-full-length HIV-1 sequences to determine the relationship between clonality in a short region and clonality in the full genome. Although it is common to amplify and sequence short, subgenomic regions of the viral genome for phylogenetic analysis, we show that sequence identity of these amplicons does not guarantee clonality across the full viral genome. We show that although longer amplicons capture more diversity, no subgenomic region can recapitulate the diversity of full viral genomes. Consequently, some identical subgenomic amplicons should be expected even from the analysis of completely unique viral genomes, and the presence of identical amplicons alone is not proof of clonally expanded HIV-1. We present a method for evaluating evidence of clonal expansion in the context of these findings. PMID:27494508

  10. Synchronous waves of failed soft sweeps in the laboratory: remarkably rampant clonal interference of alleles at a single locus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Chun; Marx, Christopher J

    2013-03-01

    It has increasingly been recognized that adapting populations of microbes contain not one, but many lineages continually arising and competing at once. This process, termed "clonal interference," alters the rate and dynamics of adaptation and biases winning mutations toward those with the largest selective effect. Here we uncovered a dramatic example of clonal interference between multiple similar mutations occurring at the same locus within replicate populations of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1. Because these mutational events involved the transposition of an insertion sequence into a narrow window of a single gene, they were both readily detectable at low frequencies and could be distinguished due to differences in insertion sites. This allowed us to detect up to 17 beneficial alleles of this type coexisting in a single population. Despite conferring a large selective benefit, the majority of these alleles rose and then fell in frequency due to other lineages emerging that were more fit. By comparing allele-frequency dynamics to the trajectories of fitness gains by these populations, we estimated the fitness values of the genotypes that contained these mutations. Collectively across all populations, these alleles arose upon backgrounds with a wide range of fitness values. Within any single population, however, multiple alleles tended to rise and fall synchronously during a single wave of multiple genotypes with nearly identical fitness values. These results suggest that alleles of large benefit arose repeatedly in failed "soft sweeps" during narrow windows of adaptation due to the combined effects of epistasis and clonal interference. PMID:23307898

  11. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park residents in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Drougka, E.; Foka, A.; Posantzis, D.; Giormezis, N.; Anastassiou, E.D.; Petinaki, E.; Spiliopoulou, I.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a part of the microbiota flora in many animal species. The clonal spread of S. aureus among animals and personnel in a Zoological Park was investigated. Samples were collected from colonized and infected sites among 32 mammals, 11 birds and eight humans. The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL) and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1) were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST), spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst–negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected Squirrel monkey. Clonal analysis revealed the occurrence of seven STs, eight PFGE and five spa types including ones of human origin. Even though a variety of genotypes were identified among S. aureus strains colonizing zoo park residents, our results indicate that colonization with human lineages has indeed occurred. PMID:26623381

  12. Phenotypes and Genotypes of Old and Contemporary Porcine Strains Indicate a Temporal Change in the S. aureus Population Structure in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Moodley, Arshnee; Lipinska, Urszula; Broens, Els M.; Hermans, Katleen; Butaye, Patrick; Devriese, Luc A.; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Guardabassi, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Staphylococcus aureus sequence type ST398 has recently gained attention due to the spread of methicillin-resistant strains among people exposed to livestock. The aim of this study was to explore temporal changes in the population structure of S. aureus in pigs over the last 40 years with particular reference to the occurrence of ST398. Methods We analysed a unique collection of 91 porcine strains isolated in six countries between 1973 and 2009 using a biotyping scheme described in the 1970's in combination with spa typing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The collection comprised 32 historical isolates from 1973–1974 (n = 19) and from 1991–2003 (n = 13), and 59 contemporary isolates from 2004–2009. The latter isolates represented the most common MLST types (ST1, ST9, ST97 and ST433) and spa types isolated from pigs in Europe. Results and Discussion S. aureus sequence type ST398 was not found among old isolates from the 1970's or from 1991–2003, suggesting that this lineage was absent or present at low frequencies in pigs in the past. This hypothesis is supported by the observed association of ST398 with the ovine ecovar, which was not described in pigs by studies carried out in the 1970's. In addition, various phenotypic and genotypic differences were observed between old and contemporary isolates. Some biotypes commonly reported in pigs in the 1970's were either absent (human ecovar) or rare (biotype A) among contemporary isolates. Nine clonal lineages found among old porcine isolates are occasionally reported in pigs today (ST8, ST30, ST97, ST387, ST1092, ST2468) or have never been described in this animal host (ST12, ST133, ST1343). These results indicate that the population structure of porcine S. aureus has changed over the last 40 years and confirm the current theory that S. aureus ST398 does not originate from pigs. PMID:25000530

  13. Analysis of the Genetic Phylogeny of Multifocal Prostate Cancer Identifies Multiple Independent Clonal Expansions in Neoplastic and Morphologically Normal Prostate Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gundem, Gunes; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Kremeyer, Barbara; Butler, Adam; Lynch, Andrew G; Camacho, Niedzica; Massie, Charlie E; Kay, Jonathan; Luxton, Hayley J; Edwards, Sandra; Kote-Jarai, ZSofia; Dennis, Nening; Merson, Sue; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Zamora, Jorge; Corbishley, Cathy; Thomas, Sarah; Nik-Zainal, Serena; O’Meara, Sarah; Matthews, Lucy; Clark, Jeremy; Hurst, Rachel; Mithen, Richard; Bristow, Robert G; Boutros, Paul C; Fraser, Michael; Cooke, Susanna; Raine, Keiran; Jones, David; Menzies, Andrew; Stebbings, Lucy; Hinton, Jon; Teague, Jon; McLaren, Stuart; Mudie, Laura; Hardy, Claire; Anderson, Elizabeth; Joseph, Olivia; Goody, Victoria; Robinson, Ben; Maddison, Mark; Gamble, Stephen; Greenman, Christopher; Berney, Dan; Hazell, Steven; Livni, Naomi; Fisher, Cyril; Ogden, Christopher; Kumar, Pardeep; Thompson, Alan; Woodhouse, Christopher; Nicol, David; Mayer, Erik; Dudderidge, Tim; Shah, Nimish C; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Voet, Thierry; Campbell, Peter; Futreal, Andrew; Easton, Douglas; Stratton, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome DNA sequencing was used to decrypt the phylogeny of multiple samples from distinct areas of cancer and morphologically normal tissue taken from the prostates of three men. Mutations were present at high levels in morphologically normal tissue distant from the cancer reflecting clonal expansions, and the underlying mutational processes at work in morphologically normal tissue were also at work in cancer. Our observations demonstrate the existence of on-going abnormal mutational processes, consistent with field-effects, underlying carcinogenesis. This mechanism gives rise to extensive branching evolution and cancer clone mixing as exemplified by the coexistence of multiple cancer lineages harboring distinct ERG fusions within a single cancer nodule. Subsets of mutations were shared either by morphologically normal and malignant tissue or between different ERG-lineages, indicating earlier or separate clonal cell expansions. Our observations inform on the origin of multifocal disease and have implications for prostate cancer therapy in individual cases. PMID:25730763

  14. How Clonal Is Clonal? Genome Plasticity across Multicellular Segments of a "Candidatus Marithrix sp." Filament from Sulfidic, Briny Seafloor Sediments in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Salman-Carvalho, Verena; Fadeev, Eduard; Joye, Samantha B; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    "Candidatus Marithrix" is a recently described lineage within the group of large sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoaceae, Gammaproteobacteria). This genus of bacteria comprises vacuolated, attached-living filaments that inhabit the sediment surface around vent and seep sites in the marine environment. A single filament is ca. 100 μm in diameter, several millimeters long, and consists of hundreds of clonal cells, which are considered highly polyploid. Based on these characteristics, "Candidatus Marithrix" was used as a model organism for the assessment of genomic plasticity along segments of a single filament using next generation sequencing to possibly identify hotspots of microevolution. Using six consecutive segments of a single filament sampled from a mud volcano in the Gulf of Mexico, we recovered ca. 90% of the "Candidatus Marithrix" genome in each segment. There was a high level of genome conservation along the filament with average nucleotide identities between 99.98 and 100%. Different approaches to assemble all reads into a complete consensus genome could not fill the gaps. Each of the six segment datasets encoded merely a few hundred unique nucleotides and 5 or less unique genes-the residual content was redundant in all datasets. Besides the overall high genomic identity, we identified a similar number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the clonal segments, which are comparable to numbers reported for other clonal organisms. An increase of SNPs with greater distance of filament segments was not observed. The polyploidy of the cells was apparent when analyzing the heterogeneity of reads within a segment. Here, a strong increase in single nucleotide variants, or "intrasegmental sequence heterogeneity" (ISH) events, was observed. These sites may represent hotspots for genome plasticity, and possibly microevolution, since two thirds of these variants were not co-localized across the genome copies of the multicellular filament. PMID:27536274

  15. Arrested development of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis, in certain populations of mitochondrial 16S lineage III Tubifex tubifex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baxa, D.V.; Kelley, G.O.; Mukkatira, K.S.; Beauchamp, K.A.; Rasmussen, C.; Hedrick, R.P.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory populations of Tubifex tubifex from mitochondrial (mt)16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) lineage III were generated from single cocoons of adult worms releasing the triactinomyxon stages (TAMs) of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis. Subsequent worm populations from these cocoons, referred to as clonal lines, were tested for susceptibility to infection with the myxospore stages of M. cerebralis. Development and release of TAMs occurred in five clonal lines, while four clonal lines showed immature parasitic forms that were not expelled from the worm (non-TAM producers). Oligochaetes from TAM- and non-TAM-producing clonal lines were confirmed as lineage III based on mt16S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) sequences, but these genes did not differentiate these phenotypes. In contrast, random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses of genomic DNA demonstrated unique banding patterns that distinguished the phenotypes. Cohabitation of parasite-exposed TAM- and non-TAM-producing phenotypes showed an overall decrease in expected TAM production compared to the same exposure dose of the TAM-producing phenotype without cohabitation. These studies suggest that differences in susceptibility to parasite infection can occur in genetically similar T. tubifex populations, and their coexistence may affect overall M. cerebralis production, a factor that may influence the severity of whirling disease in wild trout populations. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Arrested development of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis, in certain populations of mitochondrial 16S lineage III Tubifex tubifex.

    PubMed

    Baxa, D V; Kelley, G O; Mukkatira, K S; Beauchamp, K A; Rasmussen, C; Hedrick, R P

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory populations of Tubifex tubifex from mitochondrial (mt)16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) lineage III were generated from single cocoons of adult worms releasing the triactinomyxon stages (TAMs) of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis. Subsequent worm populations from these cocoons, referred to as clonal lines, were tested for susceptibility to infection with the myxospore stages of M. cerebralis. Development and release of TAMs occurred in five clonal lines, while four clonal lines showed immature parasitic forms that were not expelled from the worm (non-TAM producers). Oligochaetes from TAM- and non-TAM-producing clonal lines were confirmed as lineage III based on mt16S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) sequences, but these genes did not differentiate these phenotypes. In contrast, random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses of genomic DNA demonstrated unique banding patterns that distinguished the phenotypes. Cohabitation of parasite-exposed TAM- and non-TAM-producing phenotypes showed an overall decrease in expected TAM production compared to the same exposure dose of the TAM-producing phenotype without cohabitation. These studies suggest that differences in susceptibility to parasite infection can occur in genetically similar T. tubifex populations, and their coexistence may affect overall M. cerebralis production, a factor that may influence the severity of whirling disease in wild trout populations. PMID:17891544

  17. Comparison against 186 canid whole-genome sequences reveals survival strategies of an ancient clonally transmissible canine tumor

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Brennan; Davis, Brian W.; Rimbault, Maud; Long, Adrienne H.; Karlins, Eric; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Reiman, Rebecca; Parker, Heidi G.; Drögemüller, Cord; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Chapman, Erica S.; Trent, Jeffery M.; Leeb, Tosso; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Wayne, Robert K.; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2015-01-01

    Canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is a parasitic cancer clone that has propagated for thousands of years via sexual transfer of malignant cells. Little is understood about the mechanisms that converted an ancient tumor into the world's oldest known continuously propagating somatic cell lineage. We created the largest existing catalog of canine genome-wide variation and compared it against two CTVT genome sequences, thereby separating alleles derived from the founder's genome from somatic mutations that must drive clonal transmissibility. We show that CTVT has undergone continuous adaptation to its transmissible allograft niche, with overlapping mutations at every step of immunosurveillance, particularly self-antigen presentation and apoptosis. We also identified chronologically early somatic mutations in oncogenesis- and immune-related genes that may represent key initiators of clonal transmissibility. Thus, we provide the first insights into the specific genomic aberrations that underlie CTVT's dogged perseverance in canids around the world. PMID:26232412

  18. Detectable Clonal Mosaicism in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Human genetic mosaicism is the presence of two or more cellular populations with distinct genotypes in an individual who developed from a single fertilized ovum. While initially observed across a spectrum of rare genetic disorders, detailed assessment of data from genome-wide association studies now reveal that detectable clonal mosaicism involving large structural alterations (> 2 Mb) can also be seen in populations of apparently healthy individuals. The first generation of descriptive studies have generated new interest in understanding the molecular basis of the affected genomic regions, percent of the cellular subpopulation involved, and developmental timing of the underlying mutational event, which could reveal new insights into the initiation, clonal expansion and phenotypic manifestations of mosaic events. Early evidence indicates detectable clonal mosaicism increases in frequency with age and could preferentially occur in males. The observed pattern of recurrent events affecting specific chromosomal regions indicates some regions are more susceptible to these events, which could reflect inter-individual differences in genomic stability. Moreover, it is also plausible that the presence of large structural events could be associated with cancer risk. The characterization of detectable genetic mosaicism reveals that there could be important dynamic changes in the human genome associated with the aging process, which could be associated with risk for common disorders, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and neurological disorders. PMID:24246702

  19. Lineage Structure of the Human Antibody Repertoire in Response to Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ning; He, Jiankui; Weinstein, Joshua A.; Penland, Lolita; Sasaki, Sanae; He, Xiao-Song; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Zheng, Nai-ying; Huang, Min; Sullivan, Meghan; Wilson, Patrick C.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Davis, Mark M.; Fisher, Daniel S.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    The human antibody repertoire is one of the most important defenses against infectious disease, and the development of vaccines has enabled the conferral of targeted protection to specific pathogens. However, there are many challenges to measuring and analyzing the immunoglobulin sequence repertoire, such as the fact that each B cell contains a distinct antibody sequence encoded in its genome, that the antibody repertoire is not constant but changes over time, and the high similarity between antibody sequences. We have addressed this challenge by using high-throughput long read sequencing to perform immunogenomic characterization of expressed human antibody repertoires in the context of influenza vaccination. Informatic analysis of 5 million antibody heavy chain sequences from healthy individuals allowed us to perform global characterizations of isotype distributions, determine the lineage structure of the repertoire and measure age and antigen related mutational activity. Our analysis of the clonal structure and mutational distribution of individuals’ repertoires shows that elderly subjects have a decreased number of lineages but an increased pre-vaccination mutation load in their repertoire and that some of these subjects have an oligoclonal character to their repertoire in which the diversity of the lineages is greatly reduced relative to younger subjects. We have thus shown that global analysis of the immune system’s clonal structure provides direct insight into the effects of vaccination and provides a detailed molecular portrait of age-related effects. PMID:23390249

  20. Implications of Differential Age Distribution of Disease-Associated Meningococcal Lineages for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Caroline L.; Ramsay, Mary E.; Chandra, Manosree; Jolley, Keith A.; van der Ende, Arie; Carion, Françoise; Berthelsen, Lene; Hoffmann, Steen; Harðardóttir, Hjördís; Vazquez, Julio A.; Murphy, Karen; Toropainen, Maija; Caniça, Manuela; Ferreira, Eugenia; Diggle, Mathew; Edwards, Giles F.; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Stefanelli, Paola; Kriz, Paula; Gray, Steve J.; Fox, Andrew J.; Jacobsson, Susanne; Claus, Heike; Vogel, Ulrich; Tzanakaki, Georgina; Heuberger, Sigrid; Caugant, Dominique A.; Frosch, Matthias; Maiden, Martin C. J.

    2014-01-01

    New vaccines targeting meningococci expressing serogroup B polysaccharide have been developed, with some being licensed in Europe. Coverage depends on the distribution of disease-associated genotypes, which may vary by age. It is well established that a small number of hyperinvasive lineages account for most disease, and these lineages are associated with particular antigens, including vaccine candidates. A collection of 4,048 representative meningococcal disease isolates from 18 European countries, collected over a 3-year period, were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Age data were available for 3,147 isolates. The proportions of hyperinvasive lineages, identified as particular clonal complexes (ccs) by MLST, differed among age groups. Subjects <1 year of age experienced lower risk of sequence type 11 (ST-11) cc, ST-32 cc, and ST-269 cc disease and higher risk of disease due to unassigned STs, 1- to 4-year-olds experienced lower risk of ST-11 cc and ST-32 cc disease, 5- to 14-year-olds were less likely to experience ST-11 cc and ST-269 cc disease, and ≥25-year-olds were more likely to experience disease due to less common ccs and unassigned STs. Younger and older subjects were vulnerable to a more diverse set of genotypes, indicating the more clonal nature of genotypes affecting adolescents and young adults. Knowledge of temporal and spatial diversity and the dynamics of meningococcal populations is essential for disease control by vaccines, as coverage is lineage specific. The nonrandom age distribution of hyperinvasive lineages has consequences for the design and implementation of vaccines, as different variants, or perhaps targets, may be required for different age groups. PMID:24695776

  1. Clonal-Level Responses of Functionally Distinct Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Trophic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mallaney, Cates; Kothari, Alok; Martens, Andrew; Challen, Grant A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings from several groups have identified distinct classes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow, each with inherent functional biases in terms of their differentiation, self-renewal, proliferation and lifespan. It has previously been demonstrated that myeloid- and lymphoid-biased HSCs can be prospectively enriched based on their degree of Hoechst dye efflux. In the present study, we used differential Hoechst efflux to enrich lineage-biased HSC subtypes and analyzed their functional potentials. Despite similar outputs in vitro, bone marrow transplantation assays revealed contrasting lineage differentiation in vivo. To stratify the molecular differences underlying these contrasting functional potentials at the clonal level, single-cell gene expression analysis was performed using the Fluidigm Biomark system and revealed dynamic expression of genes including Meis1, CEBP/α, Sfpi1 and Dnmt3a. Finally, single-cell gene expression analysis was used to unravel the opposing proliferative responses of lineage-biased HSCs to the growth factor TGFβ1, revealing a potential role for the cell cycle inhibitor Cdkn1c as molecular mediator. This work lends further credence to the concept of HSC heterogeneity and presents unprecedented molecular resolution of the HSC response to trophic factors using single-cell gene expression analysis. PMID:24373928

  2. Clonal-level responses of functionally distinct hematopoietic stem cells to trophic factors.

    PubMed

    Mallaney, Cates; Kothari, Alok; Martens, Andrew; Challen, Grant A

    2014-04-01

    Recent findings from several groups have identified distinct classes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow, each with inherent functional biases in terms of their differentiation, self-renewal, proliferation, and lifespan. It has previously been demonstrated that myeloid- and lymphoid-biased HSCs can be prospectively enriched based on their degree of Hoechst dye efflux. In the present study, we used differential Hoechst efflux to enrich lineage-biased HSC subtypes and analyzed their functional potentials. Despite similar outputs in vitro, bone marrow transplantation assays revealed contrasting lineage differentiation in vivo. To stratify the molecular differences underlying these contrasting functional potentials at the clonal level, single-cell gene expression analysis was performed using the Fluidigm BioMark system and revealed dynamic expression of genes including Meis1, CEBP/α, Sfpi1, and Dnmt3a. Finally, single-cell gene expression analysis was used to unravel the opposing proliferative responses of lineage-biased HSCs to the growth factor TGF-β1, revealing a potential role for the cell cycle inhibitor Cdkn1c as molecular mediator. This work lends further credence to the concept of HSC heterogeneity, and it presents unprecedented molecular resolution of the HSC response to trophic factors using single-cell gene expression analysis. PMID:24373928

  3. Clonal Dynamics Reveal Two Distinct Populations of Basal Cells in Slow-Turnover Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Julie K.; Rulands, Steffen; Wilkinson, Adam C.; Wuidart, Aline; Ousset, Marielle; Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Göttgens, Berthold; Blanpain, Cédric; Simons, Benjamin D.; Rawlins, Emma L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Epithelial lineages have been studied at cellular resolution in multiple organs that turn over rapidly. However, many epithelia, including those of the lung, liver, pancreas, and prostate, turn over slowly and may be regulated differently. We investigated the mouse tracheal epithelial lineage at homeostasis by using long-term clonal analysis and mathematical modeling. This pseudostratified epithelium contains basal cells and secretory and multiciliated luminal cells. Our analysis revealed that basal cells are heterogeneous, comprising approximately equal numbers of multipotent stem cells and committed precursors, which persist in the basal layer for 11 days before differentiating to luminal fate. We confirmed the molecular and functional differences within the basal population by using single-cell qRT-PCR and further lineage labeling. Additionally, we show that self-renewal of short-lived secretory cells is a feature of homeostasis. We have thus revealed early luminal commitment of cells that are morphologically indistinguishable from stem cells. PMID:26119728

  4. Clonality, genetic diversity and support for the diversifying selection hypothesis in natural populations of a flower-living yeast.

    PubMed

    Herrera, C M; Pozo, M I; Bazaga, P

    2011-11-01

    Vast amounts of effort have been devoted to investigate patterns of genetic diversity and structuring in plants and animals, but similar information is scarce for organisms of other kingdoms. The study of the genetic structure of natural populations of wild yeasts can provide insights into the ecological and genetic correlates of clonality, and into the generality of recent hypotheses postulating that microbial populations lack the potential for genetic divergence and allopatric speciation. Ninety-one isolates of the flower-living yeast Metschnikowia gruessii from southeastern Spain were DNA fingerprinted using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Genetic diversity and structuring was investigated with band-based methods and model- and nonmodel-based clustering. Linkage disequilibrium tests were used to assess reproduction mode. Microsite-dependent, diversifying selection was tested by comparing genetic characteristics of isolates from bumble bee vectors and different floral microsites. AFLP polymorphism (91%) and genotypic diversity were very high. Genetic diversity was spatially structured, as shown by amova (Φ(st)  = 0.155) and clustering. The null hypothesis of random mating was rejected, clonality seeming the prevailing reproductive mode in the populations studied. Genetic diversity of isolates declined from bumble bee mouthparts to floral microsites, and frequency of five AFLP markers varied significantly across floral microsites, thus supporting the hypothesis of diversifying selection on clonal lineages. Wild populations of clonal fungal microbes can exhibit levels of genetic diversity and spatial structuring that are not singularly different from those shown by sexually reproducing plants or animals. Microsite-dependent, divergent selection can maintain high local and regional genetic diversity in microbial populations despite extensive clonality. PMID:21851437

  5. A microfluidic platform enabling single-cell RNA-seq of multigenerational lineages

    PubMed Central

    Kimmerling, Robert J.; Lee Szeto, Gregory; Li, Jennifer W.; Genshaft, Alex S.; Kazer, Samuel W.; Payer, Kristofor R.; de Riba Borrajo, Jacob; Blainey, Paul C.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Shalek, Alex K.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a microfluidic platform that enables off-chip single-cell RNA-seq after multi-generational lineage tracking under controlled culture conditions. We use this platform to generate whole-transcriptome profiles of primary, activated murine CD8+ T-cell and lymphocytic leukemia cell line lineages. Here we report that both cell types have greater intra- than inter-lineage transcriptional similarity. For CD8+ T-cells, genes with functional annotation relating to lymphocyte differentiation and function—including Granzyme B—are enriched among the genes that demonstrate greater intra-lineage expression level similarity. Analysis of gene expression covariance with matched measurements of time since division reveals cell type-specific transcriptional signatures that correspond with cell cycle progression. We believe that the ability to directly measure the effects of lineage and cell cycle-dependent transcriptional profiles of single cells will be broadly useful to fields where heterogeneous populations of cells display distinct clonal trajectories, including immunology, cancer, and developmental biology. PMID:26732280

  6. Evidence of Clonal Expansion in the Genome of a Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolate from Peru.

    PubMed

    Galarza, M; Tarazona, D; Borda, V; Agapito, J C; Guio, H

    2014-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis INS-MDR from Peru, a multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and Latin American-Mediterranean (LAM) lineage strain. Our analysis showed mutations related to drug resistance in the rpoB (D516V), katG (S315T), kasA (G269S), and pncA (Q10R) genes. Our evidence suggests that INS-MDR may be a clonal expansion related to the African strain KZN 1435. PMID:24578270

  7. Clonal Structure and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Strains from Invasive Infections in Paediatric Patients from South Poland: Association between Age, spa Types, Clonal Complexes, and Genetic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ilczyszyn, Weronika M.; Sabat, Artur J.; Akkerboom, Viktoria; Szkarlat, Anna; Klepacka, Joanna; Sowa-Sierant, Iwona; Wasik, Barbara; Kosecka-Strojek, Maja; Buda, Aneta; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of current study was to examine clonal structure and genetic profile of invasive Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from infants and children treated at the Jagiellonian University Children’s Hospital of Krakow, Poland. The 107 invasive S. aureus isolates, collected between February 2012 and August 2014, were analysed retrospectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, spa typing and DNA microarray analysis were performed to determine clonal distribution, diversity and gene content in regard to patients characteristics. In total, 107 isolates were recovered from 88 patients with clinical symptoms of invasive bacterial infection. The final set of 92 non-duplicate samples included 38 MRSA isolates. Additionally, a set of 54 S. aureus isolates collected during epidemiological screening was genotyped and analysed. There were 72 healthcare-associated (HCA) and 20 community-onset (CO) infection events caused by 33 and 5 MRSA isolates, respectively. The majority of isolates were affiliated with the major European clonal complexes CC5 (t003, spa-CC 002), CC45 (spa-CC 015), CC7 or CC15 (t084, t091, spa-CC 084). Two epidemic clones (CC5-MRSA-II or CC45-MRSA-IV) dominated among MRSA isolates, while MSSA population contained 15 different CCs. The epidemiological screening isolates belonged to similar genetic lineages as those collected from invasive infection cases. The HCA infection events, spa types t003, t2642 or CC5 were significantly associated with infections occurring in neonates and children under 5 years of age. Moreover, carriage of several genetic markers, including erm(A), sea (N315), egc-cluster, chp was significantly higher in isolates obtained from children in this age group. The spa types t091 and t008 were underrepresented among patients aged 5 years or younger, whereas spa type t008, CC8 and presence of splE was associated with infection in children aged 10 years or older. The HCA-MRSA strains were most frequently found in children under 5

  8. Clonal Structure and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Strains from Invasive Infections in Paediatric Patients from South Poland: Association between Age, spa Types, Clonal Complexes, and Genetic Markers.

    PubMed

    Ilczyszyn, Weronika M; Sabat, Artur J; Akkerboom, Viktoria; Szkarlat, Anna; Klepacka, Joanna; Sowa-Sierant, Iwona; Wasik, Barbara; Kosecka-Strojek, Maja; Buda, Aneta; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Friedrich, Alexander W

    2016-01-01

    The aim of current study was to examine clonal structure and genetic profile of invasive Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from infants and children treated at the Jagiellonian University Children's Hospital of Krakow, Poland. The 107 invasive S. aureus isolates, collected between February 2012 and August 2014, were analysed retrospectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, spa typing and DNA microarray analysis were performed to determine clonal distribution, diversity and gene content in regard to patients characteristics. In total, 107 isolates were recovered from 88 patients with clinical symptoms of invasive bacterial infection. The final set of 92 non-duplicate samples included 38 MRSA isolates. Additionally, a set of 54 S. aureus isolates collected during epidemiological screening was genotyped and analysed. There were 72 healthcare-associated (HCA) and 20 community-onset (CO) infection events caused by 33 and 5 MRSA isolates, respectively. The majority of isolates were affiliated with the major European clonal complexes CC5 (t003, spa-CC 002), CC45 (spa-CC 015), CC7 or CC15 (t084, t091, spa-CC 084). Two epidemic clones (CC5-MRSA-II or CC45-MRSA-IV) dominated among MRSA isolates, while MSSA population contained 15 different CCs. The epidemiological screening isolates belonged to similar genetic lineages as those collected from invasive infection cases. The HCA infection events, spa types t003, t2642 or CC5 were significantly associated with infections occurring in neonates and children under 5 years of age. Moreover, carriage of several genetic markers, including erm(A), sea (N315), egc-cluster, chp was significantly higher in isolates obtained from children in this age group. The spa types t091 and t008 were underrepresented among patients aged 5 years or younger, whereas spa type t008, CC8 and presence of splE was associated with infection in children aged 10 years or older. The HCA-MRSA strains were most frequently found in children under 5

  9. Identification of emergent blaCMY-2-carrying Proteus mirabilis lineages by whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mac Aogáin, M.; Rogers, T.R.; Crowley, B.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of 24 Proteus mirabilis isolates revealed the clonal expansion of two cefoxitin-resistant strains among patients with community-onset infection. These strains harboured blaCMY-2 within a chromosomally located integrative and conjugative element and exhibited multidrug resistance phenotypes. A predominant strain, identified in 18 patients, also harboured the PGI-1 genomic island and associated resistance genes, accounting for its broader antibiotic resistance profile. The identification of these novel multidrug-resistant strains among community-onset infections suggests that they are endemic to this region and represent emergent P. mirabilis lineages of clinical significance. PMID:26865983

  10. Genome Evolution and Innovation across the Four Major Lineages of Cryptococcus gattii

    PubMed Central

    Farrer, Rhys A.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Gujja, Sharvari; Saif, Sakina; Zeng, Qiandong; Chen, Yuan; Voelz, Kerstin; Heitman, Joseph; May, Robin C.; Fisher, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus gattii is a fungal pathogen of humans, causing pulmonary infections in otherwise healthy hosts. To characterize genomic variation among the four major lineages of C. gattii (VGI, -II, -III, and -IV), we generated, annotated, and compared 16 de novo genome assemblies, including the first for the rarely isolated lineages VGIII and VGIV. By identifying syntenic regions across assemblies, we found 15 structural rearrangements, which were almost exclusive to the VGI-III-IV lineages. Using synteny to inform orthology prediction, we identified a core set of 87% of C. gattii genes present as single copies in all four lineages. Remarkably, 737 genes are variably inherited across lineages and are overrepresented for response to oxidative stress, mitochondrial import, and metal binding and transport. Specifically, VGI has an expanded set of iron-binding genes thought to be important to the virulence of Cryptococcus, while VGII has expansions in the stress-related heat shock proteins relative to the other lineages. We also characterized genes uniquely absent in each lineage, including a copper transporter absent from VGIV, which influences Cryptococcus survival during pulmonary infection and the onset of meningoencephalitis. Through inclusion of population-level data for an additional 37 isolates, we identified a new transcontinental clonal group that we name VGIIx, mitochondrial recombination between VGII and VGIII, and positive selection of multidrug transporters and the iron-sulfur protein aconitase along multiple branches of the phylogenetic tree. Our results suggest that gene expansion or contraction and positive selection have introduced substantial variation with links to mechanisms of pathogenicity across this species complex. PMID:26330512

  11. Clonal reproduction and population genetic structure of grape phylloxera, Daktulosphaira vitifoliae, in Australia.

    PubMed

    Corrie, A M; Crozier, R H; Van Heeswijck, R; Hoffmann, A A

    2002-03-01

    The grape phylloxera, Daktulosphaira vitifoliae, is a viticultural pest that in the past has devastated vineyards worldwide, yet little is known about this insect's biology. The genetic structure of Australian populations of grape phylloxera and its mode of reproduction were studied following the development of four polymorphic microsatellite loci. Insects were collected from 28 vineyards, with a total of 361 insects included in the study. The majority of vineyards were infested by functionally parthenogenetic lineages of grape phylloxera that inhabit the root system and there was little support for the traditionally described holocyclic life cycle for this species. Clonal diversity was limited in all of the vineyard regions, with the exception of the Rutherglen region. A multiple founder scenario or occasional sex may contribute to diversity within the Rutherglen region. Leaf galling populations comprised classes distinct from the common genotypic classes identified on the roots, suggesting limited exchange between these groups. Implications for the management of D. vitifoliae are discussed. PMID:11920122

  12. Clonal relatedness is a predictor of spontaneous multidrug efflux pump gene overexpression in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Bryan D; Jacinto, Pauline L; Buensalido, Joseph Adrian L; Seo, Susan M; Kaatz, Glenn W

    2015-05-01

    Increased expression of genes encoding multidrug resistance efflux pumps (MDR-EPs) contributes to antimicrobial agent and biocide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. Previously identified associations between norA overexpression and spa type t002 meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and a similar yet weaker association between mepA overexpression and type t008 meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), in clinical isolates are suggestive of clonal dissemination. It is also possible that related strains are prone to mutations resulting in overexpression of specific MDR-EP genes. Exposure of non-MDR-EP-overexpressing clinical isolates to biocides and dyes can select for MDR-EP-overexpressing mutants. spa types t002 and t008 isolates are predominated by multilocus sequencing typing sequence types (STs) 5 and 8, respectively. In this study, non-MDR-EP gene-overexpressing clinical isolates (MRSA and MSSA) representing ST5 and ST8 were subjected to single exposures of ethidium bromide (EtBr) to select for EtBr-resistant mutants. Measurements of active EtBr transport among mutants were used to demonstrate an efflux-proficient phenotype. Using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, it was found that EtBr-resistant mutants of ST5 and ST8 parental strains predominantly overexpressed mepA (100%) and mdeA (83%), respectively, regardless of meticillin sensitivity. Associations between clonal lineage and MDR-EP gene overexpression differed from those previously observed and suggest the latter is due to clonal spread of efflux-proficient strains. The predilection of in vitro-selected mutants of related strains to overexpress the same MDR-EP gene indicates the presence of a consistent mutational process. PMID:25548027

  13. Clonal types of Toxoplasma gondii among immune compromised and immune competent individuals in Accra, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ayi, Irene; Kwofie, Kofi Dadzie; Blay, Emmanuel Awusah; Osei, Joseph Harold Nyarko; Frempong, Kwadwo Kyeremeh; Koku, Roberta; Ghansah, Anita; Lartey, Margaret; Suzuki, Takashi; Boakye, Daniel Adjei; Koram, Kwadwo Ansah; Ohta, Nobuo

    2016-06-01

    There are three major clonal lineages, types I, II, and III, of Toxoplasma gondii known to cause human toxoplasmosis worldwide. Toxoplasma gondii infections have, however, not been genotyped in Ghana. This study detected the clonal types infecting immune compromised and immune competent individuals in Accra, Ghana. Blood samples were obtained from 148 HIV seropositive pre-antiretroviral therapy individuals (0≤CD4(+) T-cell count/μl blood ≤200) at the Fevers Unit and 149 HIV seronegative apparently healthy blood donors at the blood bank, all of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital. Genomic DNA was extracted and multilocus genotyping conducted by nested PCR-RFLP analysis using GRA6, SAG3, and BTUB gene markers. Among the HIV seropositive participants, 54.7% (81/148) were T. gondii DNA positive for any of the markers. Out of the 81, 42.0% (34) were positive for SAG3 only, 30.9% (25) for GRA6 only, 24.7% (20) for both SAG3 and GRA6, and 2.5% (2) for SAG3, GRA6, and BTUB. Overall, 93.8% of the positives were of clonal type II, 1.2% type I, while 4.9% (4) were atypical or mixed types (I and II). In the healthy blood donors, prevalence of T. gondii DNA positivity was 3.4% (5/149) by SAG3 and/or GRA6; among them, 60.0% (3/5) were type I, and the remaining 40.0%, type II. This study showed a relatively high prevalence of active T. gondii infections in immune compromised patients and low prevalence in immune competent individuals in Accra. Type II was highly prevalent. Detection of T. gondii in blood donors raises public health concerns and screening for T. gondii should be considered. PMID:26775819

  14. Clonal Analysis and Hierarchy of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C. Chang I.; Christensen, Jared E.; Yoder, Mervin C.; Tarantal, Alice F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to assess adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells at a single cell level and to determine a hierarchy based on proliferative potential. Methods Adult bone marrow mesenchymal cells expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were sorted as single cells into 24-well plates, each well confirmed with single EGFP-positive cells by fluorescence microscopy, and counted every three days. Colonies derived from single cells were expanded then sorted and evaluated using established differentiation protocols for adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic lineages. Cells were further analyzed by real-time RT-PCR (PPARγ2, LEP, LPL, LUM, COMP, BIG, CBFA1, IBSP, BGLAP) and immunocytochemistry (PPARγ1/2, Collagen II, Bone Sialoprotein II) specific for tri-lineage differentiation. Results Bone marrow mesenchymal cells were found to contain high proliferative potential-mesenchymal colony-forming cells (HPP-MCFC, 7%), low proliferative potential-mesenchymal colony-forming cells (LPP-MCFC, 29%), mesenchymal cell clusters (MCC, 26%), and mature mesenchymal cells (MMC, 38%). All LPP-MCFC, MCC, and MMC colonies reached senescence at the end of the evaluation period. However, HPP-MCFC continued to grow, showed differentiation toward all three lineages, and demonstrated the capacity to give rise to secondary HPP-MCFC upon replating at a clonal level. Conclusion These findings suggest that there is a low frequency of bone marrow derived HPP-MCFC that can both self-renew at a single cell level and differentiate toward multiple lineages of mesenchymal origin. PMID:19900502

  15. Clonal diversity and clone formation in the parthenogenetic Caucasian rock Lizard Darevskia dahli [corrected].

    PubMed

    Vergun, Andrey A; Martirosyan, Irena A; Semyenova, Seraphima K; Omelchenko, Andrey V; Petrosyan, Varos G; Lazebny, Oleg E; Tokarskaya, Olga N; Korchagin, Vitaly I; Ryskov, Alexey P

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa. PMID:24896777

  16. Clonal diversity and clone formation in the parthenogenetic Caucasian rock lizard Darevskia dahlia.

    PubMed

    Vergun, Andrey A; Martirosyan, Irena A; Semyenova, Seraphima K; Omelchenko, Andrey V; Petrosyan, Varos G; Lazebny, Oleg E; Tokarskaya, Olga N; Korchagin, Vitaly I; Ryskov, Alexey P

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa. PMID:24618670

  17. Clonal Diversity and Clone Formation in the Parthenogenetic Caucasian Rock Lizard Darevskia dahli

    PubMed Central

    Vergun, Andrey A.; Martirosyan, Irena A.; Semyenova, Seraphima K.; Omelchenko, Andrey V.; Petrosyan, Varos G.; Lazebny, Oleg E.; Tokarskaya, Olga N.; Korchagin, Vitaly I.; Ryskov, Alexey P.

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa. PMID:24618670

  18. Endothelin-1 supports clonal derivation and expansion of cardiovascular progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Boon-Seng; Ng, Shi-Yan; Wu, Hao; Buac, Kristina; Park, Joo-Hye C.; Lian, Xiaojun; Xu, Jiejia; Foo, Kylie S.; Felldin, Ulrika; He, Xiaobing; Nichane, Massimo; Yang, Henry; Bu, Lei; Li, Ronald A.; Lim, Bing; Chien, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary arteriogenesis is a central step in cardiogenesis, requiring coordinated generation and integration of endothelial cell and vascular smooth muscle cells. At present, it is unclear whether the cell fate programme of cardiac progenitors to generate complex muscular or vascular structures is entirely cell autonomous. Here we demonstrate the intrinsic ability of vascular progenitors to develop and self-organize into cardiac tissues by clonally isolating and expanding second heart field cardiovascular progenitors using WNT3A and endothelin-1 (EDN1) human recombinant proteins. Progenitor clones undergo long-term expansion and differentiate primarily into endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineages in vitro, and contribute extensively to coronary-like vessels in vivo, forming a functional human–mouse chimeric circulatory system. Our study identifies EDN1 as a key factor towards the generation and clonal derivation of ISL1+ vascular intermediates, and demonstrates the intrinsic cell-autonomous nature of these progenitors to differentiate and self-organize into functional vasculatures in vivo. PMID:26952167

  19. Endothelin-1 supports clonal derivation and expansion of cardiovascular progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Soh, Boon-Seng; Ng, Shi-Yan; Wu, Hao; Buac, Kristina; Park, Joo-Hye C; Lian, Xiaojun; Xu, Jiejia; Foo, Kylie S; Felldin, Ulrika; He, Xiaobing; Nichane, Massimo; Yang, Henry; Bu, Lei; Li, Ronald A; Lim, Bing; Chien, Kenneth R

    2016-01-01

    Coronary arteriogenesis is a central step in cardiogenesis, requiring coordinated generation and integration of endothelial cell and vascular smooth muscle cells. At present, it is unclear whether the cell fate programme of cardiac progenitors to generate complex muscular or vascular structures is entirely cell autonomous. Here we demonstrate the intrinsic ability of vascular progenitors to develop and self-organize into cardiac tissues by clonally isolating and expanding second heart field cardiovascular progenitors using WNT3A and endothelin-1 (EDN1) human recombinant proteins. Progenitor clones undergo long-term expansion and differentiate primarily into endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineages in vitro, and contribute extensively to coronary-like vessels in vivo, forming a functional human-mouse chimeric circulatory system. Our study identifies EDN1 as a key factor towards the generation and clonal derivation of ISL1(+) vascular intermediates, and demonstrates the intrinsic cell-autonomous nature of these progenitors to differentiate and self-organize into functional vasculatures in vivo. PMID:26952167

  20. Quantification of clonal heterogeneity of mesenchymal progenitor cells in dental pulp and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Jodie; Sloan, Alastair J; Waddington, Rachel J

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to compare the expression of "classical" stem cell markers, the proliferative capacity and differentiation ability of clonal mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) populations isolated from animal matched dental pulp (DP) and bone marrow (BM) of rats. MSCs were derived from the aforementioned tissues, with immature MSCs selected for by preferential fibronectin-adherence and resultant single-cell derived clonal populations culture expanded. Colony forming efficiencies were 12 times greater for DP clones compared with BM clones. Expansion of isolated colonies, however, was 5 times more successful for BM clones. All clones exceeded 40 population doublings (PDs) and all exhibited periods of high and low proliferative rates. PDs were approximately 1.5 times higher for BM clones. All BM clones readily differentiated towards osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Of the three DP clones analysed, all demonstrated osteogenesis, albeit with reduced efficiency compared to BM clones. One clone demonstrated adipogenesis and one clone chodrogenesis. qPCR determined quantifiable differences in Msx2, Vcam2 and Mcam with no clone showing similarity to another. The expression of a specific mesenchymal marker did not predict proliferative or differentiation potential. These results also suggest lineage restriction of the DP clones. PMID:25158183

  1. Clonal diversity and geographic structure in Pleurochaete squarrosa (Pottiaceae): different sampling scale approach.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, Valeria; Terracciano, Stefano; Giordano, Simonetta

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes our investigation of genetic variation and clonal structure of the Mediterranean moss Pleurochaete squarrosa (Brid.) Lindb. (Pottiaceae), using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers and trnL(UAA) (intron of plastid gene for Leu tRNA) sequence, choosing different sampling strategies and scales on 16 European populations. Moreover, the intercontinental distribution of two trnL haplotypes, previously found over a large area and including 24 populations in three continents, was also investigated. Despite the prevalent asexual reproduction, P. squarrosa shows a high level of genetic diversity. Some site features seem to affect the clonal structure at the local scale, influencing the relocation of detached fragments and the level of intermingling, but they do not substantially affect genetic diversity. The peculiar vegetative reproduction coupled with somatic mutation could partly account for the genetic variation detected. Genetic distances highlight geographic isolation and limited gene flow among populations. We found only two trnL haplotypes in Europe due to length polymorphism, but, over an intercontinental scale, only non-delete trnL was found in Africa and the USA. ISSR analysis within each population detected a higher genetic distance between the samples with different trnL haplotypes, suggesting the presence of two different genetic lineages within this species, geographically overlapping in the Mediterranean Basin. PMID:19129968

  2. Clonality Testing in Veterinary Medicine: A Review With Diagnostic Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Keller, S M; Vernau, W; Moore, P F

    2016-07-01

    The accurate distinction of reactive and neoplastic lymphoid proliferations can present challenges. Given the different prognoses and treatment strategies, a correct diagnosis is crucial. Molecular clonality assays assess rearranged lymphocyte antigen receptor gene diversity and can help differentiate reactive from neoplastic lymphoid proliferations. Molecular clonality assays are commonly used to assess atypical, mixed, or mature lymphoid proliferations; small tissue fragments that lack architecture; and fluid samples. In addition, clonality testing can be utilized to track neoplastic clones over time or across anatomic sites. Molecular clonality assays are not stand-alone tests but useful adjuncts that follow clinical, morphologic, and immunophenotypic assessment. Even though clonality testing provides valuable information in a variety of situations, the complexities and pitfalls of this method, as well as its dependency on the experience of the interpreter, are often understated. In addition, a lack of standardized terminology, laboratory practices, and interpretational guidelines hinders the reproducibility of clonality testing across laboratories in veterinary medicine. The objectives of this review are twofold. First, the review is intended to familiarize the diagnostic pathologist or interested clinician with the concepts, potential pitfalls, and limitations of clonality testing. Second, the review strives to provide a basis for future harmonization of clonality testing in veterinary medicine by providing diagnostic guidelines. PMID:26933096

  3. Inferring Clonal Composition from Multiple Sections of a Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Alex; Weber, Kris; Smith, Josh; Nickerson, Debbie; Song, ChaoZhong; Witten, Daniela; Blau, C. Anthony; Noble, William Stafford

    2014-01-01

    Cancers arise from successive rounds of mutation and selection, generating clonal populations that vary in size, mutational content and drug responsiveness. Ascertaining the clonal composition of a tumor is therefore important both for prognosis and therapy. Mutation counts and frequencies resulting from next-generation sequencing (NGS) potentially reflect a tumor's clonal composition; however, deconvolving NGS data to infer a tumor's clonal structure presents a major challenge. We propose a generative model for NGS data derived from multiple subsections of a single tumor, and we describe an expectation-maximization procedure for estimating the clonal genotypes and relative frequencies using this model. We demonstrate, via simulation, the validity of the approach, and then use our algorithm to assess the clonal composition of a primary breast cancer and associated metastatic lymph node. After dividing the tumor into subsections, we perform exome sequencing for each subsection to assess mutational content, followed by deep sequencing to precisely count normal and variant alleles within each subsection. By quantifying the frequencies of 17 somatic variants, we demonstrate that our algorithm predicts clonal relationships that are both phylogenetically and spatially plausible. Applying this method to larger numbers of tumors should cast light on the clonal evolution of cancers in space and time. PMID:25010360

  4. Antioxidant activities from different rosemary clonal lines.

    PubMed

    Ban, Lan; Narasimhamoorthy, Brindha; Zhao, Liuqing; Greaves, John A; Schroeder, William D

    2016-06-15

    Rosemary extract is widely used in food industry and carnosic acid is reported to be the major component that is responsible for its antioxidant activities. However, it is unclear how the numerous plant metabolites interact and contribute to the overall antioxidant activity. In this study, with poultry fat as the model food system, rosemary extract from six clonal lines were evaluated that each represented a different genetic variant. As expected, rosemary extract with higher carnosic acid content had higher antioxidant activity. However, rosemary extract which had carnosic acid removed retained a significant amount of activity. Furthermore, when the individual contributions of carnosic acid and the portion without carnosic acid were evaluated separately, neither was shown to be responsible for the overall level of its stabilization effect from rosemary extract as a whole entity. The interactions among different plant metabolites have a major impact on the overall antioxidant capabilities of rosemary extract. PMID:26868574

  5. Natural epigenetic variation contributes to heritable flowering divergence in a widespread asexual dandelion lineage.

    PubMed

    Wilschut, Rutger A; Oplaat, Carla; Snoek, L Basten; Kirschner, Jan; Verhoeven, Koen J F

    2016-04-01

    Epigenetic variation has been proposed to contribute to the success of asexual plants, either as a contributor to phenotypic plasticity or by enabling transient adaptation via selection on transgenerationally stable, but reversible, epialleles. While recent studies in experimental plant populations have shown the potential for epigenetic mechanisms to contribute to adaptive phenotypes, it remains unknown whether heritable variation in ecologically relevant traits is at least partially epigenetically determined in natural populations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DNA methylation variation contributes to heritable differences in flowering time within a single widespread apomictic clonal lineage of the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale s. lat.). Apomictic clone members of the same apomictic lineage collected from different field sites showed heritable differences in flowering time, which was correlated with inherited differences in methylation-sensitive AFLP marker profiles. Differences in flowering between apomictic clone members were significantly reduced after in vivo demethylation using the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor zebularine. This synchronization of flowering times suggests that flowering time divergence within an apomictic lineage was mediated by differences in DNA methylation. While the underlying basis of the methylation polymorphism at functional flowering time-affecting loci remains to be demonstrated, our study shows that epigenetic variation contributes to heritable phenotypic divergence in ecologically relevant traits in natural plant populations. This result also suggests that epigenetic mechanisms can facilitate adaptive divergence within genetically uniform asexual lineages. PMID:26615058

  6. Fine-scale temporal and spatial variation of taxon and clonal structure in the Daphnia longispina hybrid complex in heterogeneous environments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyclical parthenogenetic water fleas of the genus Daphnia have become a prominent model organism in ecology and evolution. In the past, analyses of their population structure have been limited by the prevailing use of allozyme markers, which in general do not allow for the distinction of individual clones. In this study, we used 10 microsatellite markers to track changes in the taxonomic and clonal composition of Daphnia populations, and traced the abundance of the most common clones in two European reservoirs. One of the localities was inhabited by a single species of the Daphnia longispina complex (D. galeata), the other by two parental species (D. galeata and D. longispina) and their interspecific hybrids. The study took place during the transition from summer stratification to autumn mixing, representing a period of major environmental change within lake habitats. Results In both reservoirs, we observed temporal (generation-to-generation) and spatial (along the heterogeneous reservoir environment) changes in Daphnia community structure. In the single-species reservoir, the clonal diversity of D. galeata increased with time, as a few dominant clones were replaced by a higher number of less common clones. A loss in selective advantage for the dominant clones may have been due to gradual changes in the environment, or due to selection acting in a negative frequency-dependent manner. In the multispecies reservoir, there were no apparent temporal trends in clonal diversity but we observed significantly lower clonal diversity in the interspecific hybrids than in the coexisting parental species, supporting the existence of reproductive barriers between the parental genomes. Conclusions Our study, tracing clonal lineages of Daphnia in time and space by the fine-resolution markers, contributes to the understanding of how clonal reproduction impacts community structure in cyclically parthenogenetic organisms. PMID:22280487

  7. Clonal multipotency and effect of long-term in vitro expansion on differentiation potential of human hair follicle derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Vivek K.; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2011-01-01

    Hair follicle harbors a rich stem cell pool with mesenchymal lineage differentiation potential. Although previous studies with rodent cells demonstrated that hair follicle sheath and papilla cells possess multi-lineage differentiation potential, human hair follicle derived mesenchymal stem cells (hHF-MSCs) have not been characterized in detail in terms of their multipotency. In addition, it is not clear whether these cells are true stem cells that can differentiate along multiple lineages or whether they represent a collection of progenitor cells with restricted differentiation potential. Here we report that hHF-MSCs are highly proliferative cells that can be maintained in culture for ~45 population doublings before they start to show signs of cellular senescence. Under appropriate culture conditions, hHF-MSCs differentiated along the myogenic, osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic lineages, as demonstrated by kinetic gene expression profiling and functional assays. Interestingly, the differentiation potential decreased with time in culture in a lineage-specific manner. Specifically, myogenesis and chondrogenesis showed a moderate decrease over time; osteogenesis was maximum at intermediate passages and adipogenesis was highly sensitive to long-term culture and was diminished at late passages. Finally, hHF-MSCs were clonally multipotent as the majority of hHF-MSCs clones (73%) demonstrated bi- or tri-lineage differentiation potential. These results suggest that hHF-MSCs may present an alternative source of easily accessible, autologous stem cells for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:22099022

  8. Highly Recombinant VGII Cryptococcus gattii Population Develops Clonal Outbreak Clusters through both Sexual Macroevolution and Asexual Microevolution

    PubMed Central

    Croll, Daniel; Li, Wenjun; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Carter, Dee A.; Cuomo, Christina A.; Kronstad, James W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT An outbreak of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus gattii began in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) in the late 1990s. This outbreak consists of three clonal subpopulations: VGIIa/major, VGIIb/minor, and VGIIc/novel. Both VGIIa and VGIIc are unique to the PNW and exhibit increased virulence. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of isolates from these three groups, as well as global isolates, and analyzed a total of 53 isolates. We found that VGIIa/b/c populations show evidence of clonal expansion in the PNW. Whole-genome sequencing provided evidence that VGIIb originated in Australia, while VGIIa may have originated in South America, and these were likely independently introduced. Additionally, the VGIIa outbreak lineage may have arisen from a less virulent clade that contained a mutation in the MSH2 ortholog, but this appears to have reverted in the VGIIa outbreak strains, suggesting that a transient mutator phenotype may have contributed to adaptation and evolution of virulence in the PNW outbreak. PNW outbreak isolates share genomic islands, both between the clonal lineages and with global isolates, indicative of sexual recombination. This suggests that VGII C. gattii has undergone sexual reproduction, either bisexual or unisexual, in multiple locales contributing to the production of novel, virulent subtypes. We also found that the genomes of two basal VGII isolates from HIV+ patients contain an introgression tract spanning three genes. Introgression substantially contributed to intra-VGII polymorphism and likely occurred through sexual reproduction with VGI. More broadly, these findings illustrate how both microevolution and sexual reproduction play central roles in the development of infectious outbreaks from avirulent or less virulent progenitors. PMID:25073643

  9. In Vivo Tracking of Human Hematopoiesis Reveals Patterns of Clonal Dynamics during Early and Steady-State Reconstitution Phases.

    PubMed

    Biasco, Luca; Pellin, Danilo; Scala, Serena; Dionisio, Francesca; Basso-Ricci, Luca; Leonardelli, Lorena; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Baricordi, Cristina; Ferrua, Francesca; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Giannelli, Stefania; Neduva, Victor; Dow, David J; Schmidt, Manfred; Von Kalle, Christof; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Ciceri, Fabio; Vicard, Paola; Wit, Ernst; Di Serio, Clelia; Naldini, Luigi; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) are capable of supporting the lifelong production of blood cells exerting a wide spectrum of functions. Lentiviral vector HSPC gene therapy generates a human hematopoietic system stably marked at the clonal level by vector integration sites (ISs). Using IS analysis, we longitudinally tracked >89,000 clones from 15 distinct bone marrow and peripheral blood lineages purified up to 4 years after transplant in four Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome patients treated with HSPC gene therapy. We measured at the clonal level repopulating waves, populations' sizes and dynamics, activity of distinct HSPC subtypes, contribution of various progenitor classes during the early and late post-transplant phases, and hierarchical relationships among lineages. We discovered that in-vitro-manipulated HSPCs retain the ability to return to latency after transplant and can be physiologically reactivated, sustaining a stable hematopoietic output. This study constitutes in vivo comprehensive tracking in humans of hematopoietic clonal dynamics during the early and late post-transplant phases. PMID:27237736

  10. Phylogenetic lineages in the Botryosphaeriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Crous, Pedro W.; Slippers, Bernard; Wingfield, Michael J.; Rheeder, John; Marasas, Walter F.O.; Philips, Alan J.L.; Alves, Artur; Burgess, Treena; Barber, Paul; Groenewald, Johannes Z.

    2006-01-01

    Botryosphaeria is a species-rich genus with a cosmopolitan distribution, commonly associated with dieback and cankers of woody plants. As many as 18 anamorph genera have been associated with Botryosphaeria, most of which have been reduced to synonymy under Diplodia (conidia mostly ovoid, pigmented, thick-walled), or Fusicoccum (conidia mostly fusoid, hyaline, thin-walled). However, there are numerous conidial anamorphs having morphological characteristics intermediate between Diplodia and Fusicoccum, and there are several records of species outside the Botryosphaeriaceae that have anamorphs apparently typical of Botryosphaeria s.str. Recent studies have also linked Botryosphaeria to species with pigmented, septate ascospores, and Dothiorella anamorphs, or Fusicoccum anamorphs with Dichomera synanamorphs. The aim of this study was to employ DNA sequence data of the 28S rDNA to resolve apparent lineages within the Botryosphaeriaceae. From these data, 12 clades are recognised. Two of these lineages clustered outside the Botryosphaeriaceae, namely Diplodia-like anamorphs occurring on maize, which are best accommodated in Stenocarpella (Diaporthales), as well as an unresolved clade including species of Camarosporium/Microdiplodia. We recognise 10 lineages within the Botryosphaeriaceae, including an unresolved clade (Diplodia/Lasiodiplodia/Tiarosporella), Botryosphaeria s.str. (Fusicoccum anamorphs), Macrophomina, Neoscytalidium gen. nov., Dothidotthia (Dothiorella anamorphs), Neofusicoccum gen. nov. (Botryosphaeria-like teleomorphs, Dichomera-like synanamorphs), Pseudofusicoccum gen. nov., Saccharata (Fusicoccum- and Diplodia-like synanamorphs), “Botryosphaeria” quercuum (Diplodia-like anamorph), and Guignardia (Phyllosticta anamorphs). Separate teleomorph and anamorph names are not provided for newly introduced genera, even where both morphs are known. The taxonomy of some clades and isolates (e.g. B. mamane) remains unresolved due to the absence of ex

  11. Clonal dynamics following p53 loss of heterozygosity in Kras-driven cancers.

    PubMed

    Muzumdar, Mandar Deepak; Dorans, Kimberly Judith; Chung, Katherine Minjee; Robbins, Rebecca; Tammela, Tuomas; Gocheva, Vasilena; Li, Carman Man-Chung; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    Although it has become increasingly clear that cancers display extensive cellular heterogeneity, the spatial growth dynamics of genetically distinct clones within developing solid tumours remain poorly understood. Here we leverage mosaic analysis with double markers (MADM) to trace subclonal populations retaining or lacking p53 within oncogenic Kras-initiated lung and pancreatic tumours. In both models, p53 constrains progression to advanced adenocarcinomas. Comparison of lineage-related p53 knockout and wild-type clones reveals a minor role of p53 in suppressing cell expansion in lung adenomas. In contrast, p53 loss promotes both the initiation and expansion of low-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), likely through differential expression of the p53 regulator p19ARF. Strikingly, lineage-related cells are often dispersed in lung adenomas and PanINs, contrasting with more contiguous growth of advanced subclones. Together, these results support cancer type-specific suppressive roles of p53 in early tumour progression and offer insights into clonal growth patterns during tumour development. PMID:27585860

  12. Molecular Evolution of the Escherichia Coli Chromosome. III. Clonal Frames

    PubMed Central

    Milkman, R.; Bridges, M. M.

    1990-01-01

    PCR fragments, 1500-bp, from 15 previously sequenced regions in the Escherichia coli chromosome have been compared by restriction analysis in a large set of wild (ECOR) strains. Prior published observations of segmental clonality are confirmed: each of several sequence types is shared by a number of strains. The rate of recombinational replacement and the average size of the replacements are estimated in a set of closely related strains in which a clonal frame is dotted with occasional stretches of DNA belonging to other clones. A clonal hierarchy is described. Some new comparative sequencing data are presented. PMID:1979037

  13. Effects of clonal integration on the invasive clonal plant Alternanthera philoxeroides under heterogeneous and homogeneous water availability

    PubMed Central

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Liu, Chun-Hua; Yu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, living in heterogeneous or homogeneous habitats. To understand how clonal integration affects the performance of these plants in different habitat conditions, an 8-week greenhouse experiment was conducted: ramet pairs of A. philoxeroides were grown in two habitats, either heterogeneous or homogeneous in water availability, with the stolon connections either severed or kept intact. Under heterogeneous water availability, compared with ramets in homogeneous habitats, clonal integration significantly promoted the growth and photosynthetic performance of water-stressed apical ramets, whereas it only increased the photosynthetic performance but did not affect the growth of water-stressed basal ramets. Moreover, clonal integration markedly increased the root/shoot ratios of ramets grown in habitats with high water supply but decreased it under low water availability. Under homogeneous water availability, stolon connection (clonal integration) did not influence the growth, photosynthetic performance and biomass allocation of water-stressed ramets, but it significantly promoted the growth of well-watered ramets in both apical and basal sections. These findings deepen our understanding of the bidirectional and differentiated (mainly acropetal) clonal integration of A. philoxeroides, suggesting that the invasive plant A. philoxeroides can benefit from clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats. PMID:27416868

  14. Effects of clonal integration on the invasive clonal plant Alternanthera philoxeroides under heterogeneous and homogeneous water availability.

    PubMed

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Liu, Chun-Hua; Yu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, living in heterogeneous or homogeneous habitats. To understand how clonal integration affects the performance of these plants in different habitat conditions, an 8-week greenhouse experiment was conducted: ramet pairs of A. philoxeroides were grown in two habitats, either heterogeneous or homogeneous in water availability, with the stolon connections either severed or kept intact. Under heterogeneous water availability, compared with ramets in homogeneous habitats, clonal integration significantly promoted the growth and photosynthetic performance of water-stressed apical ramets, whereas it only increased the photosynthetic performance but did not affect the growth of water-stressed basal ramets. Moreover, clonal integration markedly increased the root/shoot ratios of ramets grown in habitats with high water supply but decreased it under low water availability. Under homogeneous water availability, stolon connection (clonal integration) did not influence the growth, photosynthetic performance and biomass allocation of water-stressed ramets, but it significantly promoted the growth of well-watered ramets in both apical and basal sections. These findings deepen our understanding of the bidirectional and differentiated (mainly acropetal) clonal integration of A. philoxeroides, suggesting that the invasive plant A. philoxeroides can benefit from clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats. PMID:27416868

  15. NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Kostadinov, Rumen L; Kuhner, Mary K; Li, Xiaohong; Sanchez, Carissa A; Galipeau, Patricia C; Paulson, Thomas G; Sather, Cassandra L; Srivastava, Amitabh; Odze, Robert D; Blount, Patricia L; Vaughan, Thomas L; Reid, Brian J; Maley, Carlo C

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is considered an outcome of decades-long clonal evolution fueled by acquisition of somatic genomic abnormalities (SGAs). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to reduce cancer risk, including risk of progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). However, the cancer chemopreventive mechanisms of NSAIDs are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution by reducing SGA acquisition rate. We evaluated thirteen individuals with BE. Eleven had not used NSAIDs for 6.2±3.5 (mean±standard deviation) years and then began using NSAIDs for 5.6±2.7 years, whereas two had used NSAIDs for 3.3±1.4 years and then discontinued use for 7.9±0.7 years. 161 BE biopsies, collected at 5-8 time points over 6.4-19 years, were analyzed using 1Million-SNP arrays to detect SGAs. Even in the earliest biopsies there were many SGAs (284±246 in 10/13 and 1442±560 in 3/13 individuals) and in most individuals the number of SGAs changed little over time, with both increases and decreases in SGAs detected. The estimated SGA rate was 7.8 per genome per year (95% support interval [SI], 7.1-8.6) off-NSAIDs and 0.6 (95% SI 0.3-1.5) on-NSAIDs. Twelve individuals did not progress to EA. In ten we detected 279±86 SGAs affecting 53±30 Mb of the genome per biopsy per time point and in two we detected 1,463±375 SGAs affecting 180±100 Mb. In one individual who progressed to EA we detected a clone having 2,291±78 SGAs affecting 588±18 Mb of the genome at three time points in the last three of 11.4 years of follow-up. NSAIDs were associated with reduced rate of acquisition of SGAs in eleven of thirteen individuals. Barrett's cells maintained relative equilibrium level of SGAs over time with occasional punctuations by expansion of clones having massive amount of SGAs. PMID:23785299

  16. NSAIDs Modulate Clonal Evolution in Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinov, Rumen L.; Kuhner, Mary K.; Li, Xiaohong; Sanchez, Carissa A.; Galipeau, Patricia C.; Paulson, Thomas G.; Sather, Cassandra L.; Srivastava, Amitabh; Odze, Robert D.; Blount, Patricia L.; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Reid, Brian J.; Maley, Carlo C.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is considered an outcome of decades-long clonal evolution fueled by acquisition of somatic genomic abnormalities (SGAs). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to reduce cancer risk, including risk of progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). However, the cancer chemopreventive mechanisms of NSAIDs are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NSAIDs modulate clonal evolution by reducing SGA acquisition rate. We evaluated thirteen individuals with BE. Eleven had not used NSAIDs for 6.2±3.5 (mean±standard deviation) years and then began using NSAIDs for 5.6±2.7 years, whereas two had used NSAIDs for 3.3±1.4 years and then discontinued use for 7.9±0.7 years. 161 BE biopsies, collected at 5–8 time points over 6.4–19 years, were analyzed using 1Million-SNP arrays to detect SGAs. Even in the earliest biopsies there were many SGAs (284±246 in 10/13 and 1442±560 in 3/13 individuals) and in most individuals the number of SGAs changed little over time, with both increases and decreases in SGAs detected. The estimated SGA rate was 7.8 per genome per year (95% support interval [SI], 7.1–8.6) off-NSAIDs and 0.6 (95% SI 0.3–1.5) on-NSAIDs. Twelve individuals did not progress to EA. In ten we detected 279±86 SGAs affecting 53±30 Mb of the genome per biopsy per time point and in two we detected 1,463±375 SGAs affecting 180±100 Mb. In one individual who progressed to EA we detected a clone having 2,291±78 SGAs affecting 588±18 Mb of the genome at three time points in the last three of 11.4 years of follow-up. NSAIDs were associated with reduced rate of acquisition of SGAs in eleven of thirteen individuals. Barrett's cells maintained relative equilibrium level of SGAs over time with occasional punctuations by expansion of clones having massive amount of SGAs. PMID:23785299

  17. Molecular Mimicry and Clonal Deletion: A Fresh Look

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Noel R.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I trace the historic background of clonal deletion and molecular mimicry, two major pillars underlying our present understanding of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease. Clonal deletion originated as a critical element of the clonal selection theory of antibody formation in order to explain tolerance of self. If we did have complete clonal deletion, there would be major voids, the infamous “black holes”, in our immune repertoire. For comprehensive, protective adaptive immunity, full deletion is necessarily a rare event. Molecular mimicry, the sharing of epitopes among self and non-self antigens, is extraordinary common and provides the evidence that complete deletion of self-reactive clones is rare. If molecular mimicry were not common, protective adaptive immunity could not be all-encompassing. By taking a fresh look at these two processes together we can envision their evolutionary basis and understand the need for regulatory devices to prevent molecular mimicry from progressing to autoimmune disease. PMID:25172771

  18. GENETIC VARIATION IN CLONAL VERTEBRATES DETECTED BY SIMPLE SEQUENCE FINGERPRINTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of clonal heterogeneity is central to understanding evolutionary and population genetics of roughly 50 species of vertebrates lack effective genetic recombination. imple-sequence DNA fingerprinting with oligonucleotide probes (CAG)5 and (GACA)4 was used to detect hete...

  19. Clonal Expansion (CE) Models in Cancer Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer arises when cells accumulate sufficient critical mutations. Carcinogens increase the probability of mutation during cell division or promote clonal expansion within stages. Multistage CE models recapitulate this process and provide a framework for incorporating relevant da...

  20. Molecular mimicry and clonal deletion: A fresh look.

    PubMed

    Rose, Noel R

    2015-06-21

    In this article, I trace the historic background of clonal deletion and molecular mimicry, two major pillars underlying our present understanding of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease. Clonal deletion originated as a critical element of the clonal selection theory of antibody formation in order to explain tolerance of self. If we did have complete clonal deletion, there would be major voids, the infamous "black holes", in our immune repertoire. For comprehensive, protective adaptive immunity, full deletion is necessarily a rare event. Molecular mimicry, the sharing of epitopes among self and non-self antigens, is extraordinary common and provides the evidence that complete deletion of self-reactive clones is rare. If molecular mimicry were not common, protective adaptive immunity could not be all-encompassing. By taking a fresh look at these two processes together we can envision their evolutionary basis and understand the need for regulatory devices to prevent molecular mimicry from progressing to autoimmune disease. PMID:25172771

  1. Clonal integration in Ludwigia hexapetala under different light regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological integration among ramets of invasive plant species may support their colonization and spread in novel aquatic environments where growth-limiting resources are spatially heterogeneous. Under contrasting light conditions, we investigated how clonal integration influences growth, biomass...

  2. Phenotypic plasticity or speciation? A case from a clonal marine organism

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Clonal marine organisms exhibit high levels of morphological variation. Morphological differences may be a response to environmental factors but also they can be attributed to accumulated genetic differences due to disruption of gene flow among populations. In this study, we examined the extensive morphological variation (of 14 characters) in natural populations observed in the gorgonian Eunicea flexuosa, a widely distributed Caribbean octocoral. Eco-phenotypic and genetic effects were evaluated by reciprocal transplants of colonies inhabiting opposite ends of the depth gradient and analysis of population genetics of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, respectively. Results Significant differences (P < 0.001) in 14 morphological traits were found among colonies inhabiting 12 locations distributed in seven reefs in southwest Puerto Rico. Results from principal component analysis indicated the presence of two groups based on depth distribution, suggesting the presence of two discrete morphotypes (i.e. shallow type < 5 m and deep type > 17 m). A discriminant function analysis based on a priori univariate and multivariate analyses (which separated the colonies in morphotypes) correctly classified 93% of the colonies for each environment. Light, water motion and sediment transport might influence the distribution of the two morphotypes. Reaction norms of morphological characters of colonies reciprocally transplanted showed gradual significant changes through the 15 months of transplantation. Sclerites of shallow water colonies became larger when transplanted to deeper environments and vice versa, but neither of the two transplanted groups overlapped with the residents' morphology. Genetic analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear genes suggested that such discrete morphology and non-overlapping phenotypic plasticity is correlated with the presence of two independent evolutionary lineages. The distribution of the lineages is non-random and may be related to

  3. Roles of Clonal Integration in both Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Habitats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haijie; Liu, Fenghong; Wang, Renqing; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that clonal integration can promote the performance of clonal plants in heterogeneous habitats, but the roles of clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats were rarely studied simultaneously. Ramet pairs of Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb were placed in two habitats either heterogeneous or homogeneous in soil nutrient availability, with stolon connections left intact or severed. Total biomass, total length of stolons, and number of new ramets of distal (relatively young) ramets located in low-nutrient environments were significantly greater when the distal ramets were connected to than when they were disconnected from proximal (relatively old) ramets located in high-nutrient environments. Total length of stolons of proximal ramets growing in low-nutrient environments was significantly higher when the proximal ramets were connected to than when they were disconnected from the distal ramets growing in high-nutrient environments, but stolon connection did not affect total biomass or number of new ramets of the proximal ramets. Stolon severing also did not affect the growth of the whole ramet pairs in heterogeneous environments. In homogeneous high-nutrient environments stolon severing promoted the growth of the proximal ramets and the ramet pairs, but in homogeneous low-nutrient environments it did not affect the growth of the proximal or distal ramets. Hence, for A. philoxeroides, clonal fragmentation appears to be more advantageous than clonal integration in resource-rich homogeneous habitats, and clonal integration becomes beneficial in heterogeneous habitats. Our study contributes to revealing roles of clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats and expansion patterns of invasive clonal plants such as A. philoxeroides in multifarious habitats. PMID:27200026

  4. Roles of Clonal Integration in both Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijie; Liu, Fenghong; Wang, Renqing; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that clonal integration can promote the performance of clonal plants in heterogeneous habitats, but the roles of clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats were rarely studied simultaneously. Ramet pairs of Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb were placed in two habitats either heterogeneous or homogeneous in soil nutrient availability, with stolon connections left intact or severed. Total biomass, total length of stolons, and number of new ramets of distal (relatively young) ramets located in low-nutrient environments were significantly greater when the distal ramets were connected to than when they were disconnected from proximal (relatively old) ramets located in high-nutrient environments. Total length of stolons of proximal ramets growing in low-nutrient environments was significantly higher when the proximal ramets were connected to than when they were disconnected from the distal ramets growing in high-nutrient environments, but stolon connection did not affect total biomass or number of new ramets of the proximal ramets. Stolon severing also did not affect the growth of the whole ramet pairs in heterogeneous environments. In homogeneous high-nutrient environments stolon severing promoted the growth of the proximal ramets and the ramet pairs, but in homogeneous low-nutrient environments it did not affect the growth of the proximal or distal ramets. Hence, for A. philoxeroides, clonal fragmentation appears to be more advantageous than clonal integration in resource-rich homogeneous habitats, and clonal integration becomes beneficial in heterogeneous habitats. Our study contributes to revealing roles of clonal integration in both heterogeneous and homogeneous habitats and expansion patterns of invasive clonal plants such as A. philoxeroides in multifarious habitats. PMID:27200026

  5. Genotypic variation within asexual lineages of Taraxacum officinale.

    PubMed Central

    King, L M; Schaal, B A

    1990-01-01

    Restriction site variation in DNA that encodes rRNA (rDNA) was surveyed among 714 offspring within 31 lineages (26 genotypes) of obligate asexually reproducing Taraxacum officinale (dandelions). Although clonal offspring are expected, plants with nonparental rDNA were produced from two parents that were themselves siblings (same genotype). The variation is best characterized by the loss of an EcoRI restriction site that maps to the spacer region in the parental rDNA and is most likely involved in amplification of rare or unique rDNA repeats. In one family, 41 surveyed offspring lacked the EcoRI site. In the other family, only 1 of 26 offspring lost the EcoRI site. Other classes of DNA surveyed, chloroplast DNA and the alcohol dehydrogenase 2 gene (Adh2), showed no variation. However, offspring with nonparental rDNA also had nonparental alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) restriction fragments. Because somatic mutations in plants can be incorporated into reproductive tissue, we propose that somatic events affecting at least both multicopy rDNA and DNA homologous to the maize Adh1 gene occurred at different developmental times in the two families. An event early in development would result in all variant offspring; an event late in development would result in a single variant offspring. These results support the view that mutation (in the broad sense) influences the level of genotypic variation in asexual organisms, which may facilitate adaptive evolution of asexual species. Images PMID:2300590

  6. Divergent clonal selection dominates medulloblastoma at recurrence.

    PubMed

    Morrissy, A Sorana; Garzia, Livia; Shih, David J H; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Huang, Xi; Skowron, Patryk; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M G; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Lindsay, Patricia E; Jelveh, Salomeh; Donovan, Laura K; Wang, Xin; Luu, Betty; Zayne, Kory; Li, Yisu; Mayoh, Chelsea; Thiessen, Nina; Mercier, Eloi; Mungall, Karen L; Ma, Yusanne; Tse, Kane; Zeng, Thomas; Shumansky, Karey; Roth, Andrew J L; Shah, Sohrab; Farooq, Hamza; Kijima, Noriyuki; Holgado, Borja L; Lee, John J Y; Matan-Lithwick, Stuart; Liu, Jessica; Mack, Stephen C; Manno, Alex; Michealraj, K A; Nor, Carolina; Peacock, John; Qin, Lei; Reimand, Juri; Rolider, Adi; Thompson, Yuan Y; Wu, Xiaochong; Pugh, Trevor; Ally, Adrian; Bilenky, Mikhail; Butterfield, Yaron S N; Carlsen, Rebecca; Cheng, Young; Chuah, Eric; Corbett, Richard D; Dhalla, Noreen; He, An; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I; Long, William; Mayo, Michael; Plettner, Patrick; Qian, Jenny Q; Schein, Jacqueline E; Tam, Angela; Wong, Tina; Birol, Inanc; Zhao, Yongjun; Faria, Claudia C; Pimentel, José; Nunes, Sofia; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; Pollack, Ian F; Hamilton, Ronald L; Li, Xiao-Nan; Bendel, Anne E; Fults, Daniel W; Walter, Andrew W; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Collins, V Peter; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Hoffman, Caitlin; Lyden, David; Wisoff, Jeffrey H; Garvin, James H; Stearns, Duncan S; Massimi, Luca; Schüller, Ulrich; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Puget, Stephanie; Ayrault, Olivier; Dunn, Sandra E; Tirapelli, Daniela P C; Carlotti, Carlos G; Wheeler, Helen; Hallahan, Andrew R; Ingram, Wendy; MacDonald, Tobey J; Olson, Jeffrey J; Van Meir, Erwin G; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Kim, Seung-Ki; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Pietsch, Torsten; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Ra, Young Shin; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C; Clifford, Steven C; Eberhart, Charles G; Cooper, Michael K; Packer, Roger J; Massimino, Maura; Garre, Maria Luisa; Bartels, Ute; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Dirks, Peter; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Weiss, William A; Collier, Lara S; Dupuy, Adam J; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T W; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A; Pfister, Stefan M; Largaespada, David A; Mungall, Andrew J; Moore, Richard A; Jabado, Nada; Bader, Gary D; Jones, Steven J M; Malkin, David; Marra, Marco A; Taylor, Michael D

    2016-01-21

    The development of targeted anti-cancer therapies through the study of cancer genomes is intended to increase survival rates and decrease treatment-related toxicity. We treated a transposon-driven, functional genomic mouse model of medulloblastoma with 'humanized' in vivo therapy (microneurosurgical tumour resection followed by multi-fractionated, image-guided radiotherapy). Genetic events in recurrent murine medulloblastoma exhibit a very poor overlap with those in matched murine diagnostic samples (<5%). Whole-genome sequencing of 33 pairs of human diagnostic and post-therapy medulloblastomas demonstrated substantial genetic divergence of the dominant clone after therapy (<12% diagnostic events were retained at recurrence). In both mice and humans, the dominant clone at recurrence arose through clonal selection of a pre-existing minor clone present at diagnosis. Targeted therapy is unlikely to be effective in the absence of the target, therefore our results offer a simple, proximal, and remediable explanation for the failure of prior clinical trials of targeted therapy. PMID:26760213

  7. Divergent clonal selection dominates medulloblastoma at recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Morrissy, A. Sorana; Garzia, Livia; Shih, David J. H.; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Huang, Xi; Skowron, Patryk; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M. G.; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jelveh, Salomeh; Donovan, Laura K.; Wang, Xin; Luu, Betty; Zayne, Kory; Li, Yisu; Mayoh, Chelsea; Thiessen, Nina; Mercier, Eloi; Mungall, Karen L.; Ma, Yusanne; Tse, Kane; Zeng, Thomas; Shumansky, Karey; Roth, Andrew J. L.; Shah, Sohrab; Farooq, Hamza; Kijima, Noriyuki; Holgado, Borja L.; Lee, John J. Y.; Matan-Lithwick, Stuart; Liu, Jessica; Mack, Stephen C.; Manno, Alex; Michealraj, K. A.; Nor, Carolina; Peacock, John; Qin, Lei; Reimand, Juri; Rolider, Adi; Thompson, Yuan Y.; Wu, Xiaochong; Pugh, Trevor; Ally, Adrian; Bilenky, Mikhail; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Cheng, Young; Chuah, Eric; Corbett, Richard D.; Dhalla, Noreen; He, An; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Long, William; Mayo, Michael; Plettner, Patrick; Qian, Jenny Q.; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Tam, Angela; Wong, Tina; Birol, Inanc; Zhao, Yongjun; Faria, Claudia C.; Pimentel, José; Nunes, Sofia; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael; Pollack, Ian F.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Li, Xiao-Nan; Bendel, Anne E.; Fults, Daniel W.; Walter, Andrew W.; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Teiji; Collins, V. Peter; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Hoffman, Caitlin; Lyden, David; Wisoff, Jeffrey H.; Garvin, James H.; Stearns, Duncan S.; Massimi, Luca; Schüller, Ulrich; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Puget, Stephanie; Ayrault, Olivier; Dunn, Sandra E.; Tirapelli, Daniela P. C.; Carlotti, Carlos G.; Wheeler, Helen; Hallahan, Andrew R.; Ingram, Wendy; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Kim, Seung-Ki; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Pietsch, Torsten; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Ra, Young Shin; Bailey, Simon; Lindsey, Janet C.; Clifford, Steven C.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Cooper, Michael K.; Packer, Roger J.; Massimino, Maura; Garre, Maria Luisa; Bartels, Ute; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia E.; Dirks, Peter; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Weiss, William A.; Collier, Lara S.; Dupuy, Adam J.; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T. W.; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Largaespada, David A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Jabado, Nada; Bader, Gary D.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Malkin, David; Marra, Marco A.; Taylor, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The development of targeted anti-cancer therapies through the study of cancer genomes is intended to increase survival rates and decrease treatment-related toxicity. We treated a transposon–driven, functional genomic mouse model of medulloblastoma with ‘humanized’ in vivo therapy (microneurosurgical tumour resection followed by multi-fractionated, image-guided radiotherapy). Genetic events in recurrent murine medulloblastoma exhibit a very poor overlap with those in matched murine diagnostic samples (<5%). Whole-genome sequencing of 33 pairs of human diagnostic and post-therapy medulloblastomas demonstrated substantial genetic divergence of the dominant clone after therapy (<12% diagnostic events were retained at recurrence). In both mice and humans, the dominant clone at recurrence arose through clonal selection of a pre-existing minor clone present at diagnosis. Targeted therapy is unlikely to be effective in the absence of the target, therefore our results offer a simple, proximal, and remediable explanation for the failure of prior clinical trials of targeted therapy. PMID:26760213

  8. Clonal complex Pseudomonas aeruginosa in horses.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Timothy J; Gibson, Justine S; Moss, Susan; Greer, Ristan M; Cobbold, Rowland N; Wright, John D; Ramsay, Kay A; Grimwood, Keith; Bell, Scott C

    2011-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with infectious endometritis in horses. Although infectious endometritis is often considered a venereal infection, there is relatively limited genotypic-based evidence to support this mode of transmission. The study sought to determine the relatedness between genital P. aeruginosa isolates collected from a limited geographical region using molecular strain typing. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR typing was performed on 93 isolates collected between 2005 and 2009 from 2058 thoroughbred horses (including 18 stallions) at 66 studs. While P. aeruginosa was not detected in the stallions, 53/93 (57%) mares harbouring P. aeruginosa had clonally related strains, which included a single dominant genotype detected in 42 (45%) mares from 13 different studs. These novel findings suggest that most equine genital P. aeruginosa infections in this region may have been acquired from mechanisms other than direct horse to horse transmission. Instead, other potential acquisition pathways, as well as strain specific adaptation to the equine genital tract, should be investigated. PMID:21183294

  9. Theory and Practice of Lineage Tracing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    Lineage tracing is a method that delineates all progeny produced by a single cell or a group of cells. The possibility of performing lineage tracing initiated the field of Developmental Biology and continues to revolutionize Stem Cell Biology. Here, I introduce the principles behind a successful lineage-tracing experiment. In addition, I summarize and compare different methods for conducting lineage tracing and provide examples of how these strategies can be implemented to answer fundamental questions in development and regeneration. The advantages and limitations of each method are also discussed. PMID:26284340

  10. High-Resolution Longitudinal Study of HIV-1 Env Vaccine-Elicited B Cell Responses to the Virus Primary Receptor Binding Site Reveals Affinity Maturation and Clonal Persistence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimeng; Sundling, Christopher; Wilson, Richard; O'Dell, Sijy; Chen, Yajing; Dai, Kaifan; Phad, Ganesh E; Zhu, Jiang; Xiao, Yongli; Mascola, John R; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Wyatt, Richard T; Li, Yuxing

    2016-05-01

    Because of the genetic variability of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), the elicitation of neutralizing Abs to conserved neutralization determinants including the primary receptor binding site, CD4 binding site (CD4bs), is a major focus of vaccine development. To gain insight into the evolution of Env-elicited Ab responses, we used single B cell analysis to interrogate the memory B cell Ig repertoires from two rhesus macaques after five serial immunizations with Env/adjuvant. We observed that the CD4bs-specific repertoire displayed unique features in the third CDR of Ig H chains with minor alterations along the immunization course. Progressive affinity maturation occurred as evidenced by elevated levels of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in Ab sequences isolated at the late immunization time point compared with the early time point. Abs with higher SHM were associated with increased binding affinity and virus neutralization capacity. Moreover, a notable portion of the CD4bs-specific repertoire was maintained between early and late immunization time points, suggesting that persistent clonal lineages were induced by Env vaccination. Furthermore, we found that the predominant persistent CD4bs-specific clonal lineages had larger population sizes and higher affinities than that from the rest of the repertoires, underscoring the critical role of Ag affinity selection in Ab maturation and clonal expansion. Genetic and functional analyses revealed that the accumulation of SHM in both framework regions and CDRs contributed to the clonal affinity and antigenicity evolution. Our longitudinal study provides high-resolution understanding of the dynamically evolving CD4bs-specific B cell response after Env immunization in primates. PMID:27001953

  11. Hematopoietic expression of oncogenic BRAF promotes aberrant growth of monocyte-lineage cells resistant to PLX4720

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, Tamihiro; Dankort, David; Kang, Jing; Giblett, Susan; Pritchard, Catrin A.; McMahon, Martin; Leavitt, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mutational activation of BRAF leading to expression of the BRAFV600E oncoprotein was recently identified in a high percentage of specific hematopoietic neoplasms in monocyte/histiocyte and mature B-cell lineages. Although BRAFV600E is a driver oncoprotein and pharmacological target in solid tumors such as melanoma, lung and thyroid cancer, it remains unknown whether BRAFV600E is an appropriate therapeutic target in hematopoietic neoplasms. To address this critical question, we generated a mouse model expressing inducible BRAFV600E in the hematopoietic system, and evaluated the efficacy of pathway-targeted therapeutics against primary hematopoietic cells. In this model, BRAFV600E expression conferred cytokine-independent growth to monocyte/macrophage-lineage progenitors leading to aberrant in vivo and in vitro monocyte/macrophage expansion. Furthermore, transplantation of BRAFV600E-expressing bone marrow cells promoted an in vivo pathology most notable for monocytosis in hematopoietic tissues and visceral organs. In vitro analysis revealed that MEK inhibition, but not RAF inhibition, effectively suppressed cytokine-independent clonal growth of monocyte/macrophage-lineage progenitors. However, combined RAF and PI3K inhibition effectively inhibited cytokine-independent colony formation, suggesting autocrine PI3K pathway activation. Taken together, these results provide evidence that constitutively activated BRAFV600E drives aberrant proliferation of monocyte-lineage cells. This study supports the development of pathway-targeted therapeutics in the treatment of BRAFV600E-expressing hematopoietic neoplasms in the monocyte/histiocyte lineage. PMID:24152792

  12. An evolutionary legacy of sex and clonal reproduction in the protistan oyster parasite Perkinsus marinus.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Peter C; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Hare, Matthew P

    2011-04-01

    Perkinsus marinus, a protozoan parasite of the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, causes Dermo disease which limits fecundity and causes high mortality in host populations. The long-term efficacy of management strategies for suppressing this disease in both aquaculture and restoration settings depends on the potential rate of evolutionary response by P. marinus. Sexual reproduction has never been demonstrated in vitro or in previous population genetic studies. We developed high resolution microsatellite markers and amplified alleles directly from infected oyster genomic DNA. Of 336 infected oysters from four populations between Massachusetts and Florida, 129 (48%) appeared to be infected with a single parasite genotype and were subjected to population genetic analyses assuming diploidy. The great diversity of multilocus genotypes observed is incompatible with strictly clonal reproduction. Substantial heterozygote deficits in three populations suggest that sexual reproduction often involves inbreeding. At the same time, significant multilocus linkage disequilibrium occurred in most sampled populations, and several genotypes were sampled repeatedly in each of two populations, indicating that asexual reproduction also occurs in P. marinus populations. Interestingly, where this parasite has recently expanded its range, lower strain diversity, significant heterozygote excess, and highly heterozygous multilocus genotypes suggests clonal propagation of recent recombinants. Taken together, these data suggest that P. marinus employs multiple reproductive modes, and that over the short term, selection acts upon independent parasite lineages rather than upon individual loci in a cohesive, interbreeding population. Nevertheless, high genotypic diversity is the evolutionary legacy of sex in P. marinus. Anthropogenic movement of infected oysters may increase outcrossing opportunities, potentially facilitating rapid evolution of this parasite. PMID:21256249

  13. An invasive clonal plant benefits from clonal integration more than a co-occurring native plant in nutrient-patchy and competitive environments.

    PubMed

    You, Wenhua; Fan, Shufeng; Yu, Dan; Xie, Dong; Liu, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, however, little is known about the different roles of clonal integration effects between invasive and native plants. Here, we hypothesize that clonal integration affect growth, photosynthetic performance, biomass allocation and thus competitive ability of invasive and native clonal plants, and invasive clonal plants benefit from clonal integration more than co-occurring native plants in heterogeneous habitats. To test these hypotheses, two stoloniferous clonal plants, Alternanthera philoxeroides (invasive), Jussiaea repens (native) were studied in China. The apical parts of both species were grown either with or without neighboring vegetation and the basal parts without competitors were in nutrient- rich or -poor habitats, with stolon connections were either severed or kept intact. Competition significantly reduced growth and photosynthetic performance of the apical ramets in both species, but not the biomass of neighboring vegetation. Without competition, clonal integration greatly improved the growth and photosynthetic performance of both species, especially when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. When grown with neighboring vegetation, growth of J. repens and photosynthetic performance of both species were significantly enhanced by clonal integration with the basal parts in both nutrient-rich and -poor habitats, while growth and relative neighbor effect (RNE) of A. philoxeroides were greatly improved by clonal integration only when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. Moreover, clonal integration increased A. philoxeroides's biomass allocation to roots without competition, but decreased it with competition, especially when the basal ramets were in nutrient-rich sections. Effects of clonal integration on biomass allocation of J. repens was similar to that of A. philoxeroides but with less significance. These results supported our hypothesis that invasive clonal plants A. philoxeroides benefits

  14. An Invasive Clonal Plant Benefits from Clonal Integration More than a Co-Occurring Native Plant in Nutrient-Patchy and Competitive Environments

    PubMed Central

    You, Wenhua; Fan, Shufeng; Yu, Dan; Xie, Dong; Liu, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, however, little is known about the different roles of clonal integration effects between invasive and native plants. Here, we hypothesize that clonal integration affect growth, photosynthetic performance, biomass allocation and thus competitive ability of invasive and native clonal plants, and invasive clonal plants benefit from clonal integration more than co-occurring native plants in heterogeneous habitats. To test these hypotheses, two stoloniferous clonal plants, Alternanthera philoxeroides (invasive), Jussiaea repens (native) were studied in China. The apical parts of both species were grown either with or without neighboring vegetation and the basal parts without competitors were in nutrient- rich or -poor habitats, with stolon connections were either severed or kept intact. Competition significantly reduced growth and photosynthetic performance of the apical ramets in both species, but not the biomass of neighboring vegetation. Without competition, clonal integration greatly improved the growth and photosynthetic performance of both species, especially when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. When grown with neighboring vegetation, growth of J. repens and photosynthetic performance of both species were significantly enhanced by clonal integration with the basal parts in both nutrient-rich and -poor habitats, while growth and relative neighbor effect (RNE) of A. philoxeroides were greatly improved by clonal integration only when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. Moreover, clonal integration increased A. philoxeroides's biomass allocation to roots without competition, but decreased it with competition, especially when the basal ramets were in nutrient-rich sections. Effects of clonal integration on biomass allocation of J. repens was similar to that of A. philoxeroides but with less significance. These results supported our hypothesis that invasive clonal plants A. philoxeroides benefits

  15. Evidence of Clonal Expansion in the Genome of a Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolate from Peru

    PubMed Central

    Galarza, M.; Tarazona, D.; Borda, V.; Agapito, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis INS-MDR from Peru, a multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and Latin American-Mediterranean (LAM) lineage strain. Our analysis showed mutations related to drug resistance in the rpoB (D516V), katG (S315T), kasA (G269S), and pncA (Q10R) genes. Our evidence suggests that INS-MDR may be a clonal expansion related to the African strain KZN 1435. PMID:24578270

  16. Propagule Pressure, Habitat Conditions and Clonal Integration Influence the Establishment and Growth of an Invasive Clonal Plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides

    PubMed Central

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Fang, Long-Xiang; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, spreading mainly by vegetative propagules. Propagule pressure (the number of propagules) may affect the establishment, growth, and thus invasion success of these clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. To understand how propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration affect the establishment and growth of the invasive clonal plants, an 8-week greenhouse with an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides was conducted. High (five fragments) or low (one fragment) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil (open habitat) or dense native vegetation of Jussiaea repens (vegetative habitat), with the stolon connections either severed from or connected to the relatively older ramets. High propagule pressure greatly increased the establishment and growth of A. philoxeroides, especially when it grew in vegetative habitats. Surprisingly, high propagule pressure significantly reduced the growth of individual plants of A. philoxeroides in open habitats, whereas it did not affect the individual growth in vegetative habitats. A shift in the intraspecific interaction on A. philoxeroides from competition in open habitats to facilitation in vegetative habitats may be the main reason. Moreover, clonal integration significantly improved the growth of A. philoxeroides only in open habitats, especially with low propagule pressure, whereas it had no effects on the growth and competitive ability of A. philoxeroides in vegetative habitats, suggesting that clonal integration may be of most important for A. philoxeroides to explore new open space and spread. These findings suggest that propagule pressure may be crucial for the invasion success of A. philoxeroides, and such an effect also depends on habitat conditions. PMID:27200041

  17. Propagule Pressure, Habitat Conditions and Clonal Integration Influence the Establishment and Growth of an Invasive Clonal Plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    PubMed

    You, Wen-Hua; Han, Cui-Min; Fang, Long-Xiang; Du, Dao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, spreading mainly by vegetative propagules. Propagule pressure (the number of propagules) may affect the establishment, growth, and thus invasion success of these clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. To understand how propagule pressure, habitat conditions and clonal integration affect the establishment and growth of the invasive clonal plants, an 8-week greenhouse with an invasive clonal plant, Alternanthera philoxeroides was conducted. High (five fragments) or low (one fragment) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil (open habitat) or dense native vegetation of Jussiaea repens (vegetative habitat), with the stolon connections either severed from or connected to the relatively older ramets. High propagule pressure greatly increased the establishment and growth of A. philoxeroides, especially when it grew in vegetative habitats. Surprisingly, high propagule pressure significantly reduced the growth of individual plants of A. philoxeroides in open habitats, whereas it did not affect the individual growth in vegetative habitats. A shift in the intraspecific interaction on A. philoxeroides from competition in open habitats to facilitation in vegetative habitats may be the main reason. Moreover, clonal integration significantly improved the growth of A. philoxeroides only in open habitats, especially with low propagule pressure, whereas it had no effects on the growth and competitive ability of A. philoxeroides in vegetative habitats, suggesting that clonal integration may be of most important for A. philoxeroides to explore new open space and spread. These findings suggest that propagule pressure may be crucial for the invasion success of A. philoxeroides, and such an effect also depends on habitat conditions. PMID:27200041

  18. Multiple disturbances accelerate clonal growth in a potentially monodominant bamboo.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Paul R; Platt, William J

    2008-03-01

    Organisms capable of rapid clonal growth sometimes monopolize newly freed space and resources. We hypothesize that sequential disturbances might change short-term clonal demography of these organisms in ways that promote formation of monotypic stands. We examined this hypothesis by studying the clonal response of Arundinaria gigantea (giant cane, a bamboo) to windstorm and fire. We studied giant cane growing in both a large tornado-blowdown gap and under forest canopy, in burned and unburned plots, using a split-block design. We measured density of giant cane ramets (culms) and calculated finite rates of increase (lamda) for populations of ramets over three years. Ramet density nearly doubled in stands subjected to both windstorm and fire; the high ramet densities that resulted could inhibit growth in other plants. In comparison, ramet density increased more slowly after windstorm alone, decreased after fire alone, and remained in stasis in controls. We predict that small, sparse stands of giant cane could spread and amalgamate to form dense, monotypic stands (called "canebrakes") that might influence fire return intervals and act as an alternative state to bottomland forest. Other clonal species may similarly form monotypic stands following successive disturbances via rapid clonal growth. PMID:18459325

  19. Clonal integration in homogeneous environments increases performance of Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bi-Cheng; Alpert, Peter; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2015-10-01

    Physiological integration between connected ramets can increase the performance of clonal plants when ramets experience contrasting levels of resource availabilities in heterogeneous environments. It has generally been shown or assumed that clonal integration has little effect on clonal performance in homogeneous environments. However, a conceptual model suggests that integration could increase performance in a homogeneous environment when connected ramets differ in uptake ability and external resource supply is high. We tested this hypothesis in a greenhouse experiment with the amphibious plant Alternanthera philoxeroides. Ramets in clonal fragments containing three rooted and two unrooted ramets were either left connected or divided into a basal part with two rooted ramets and an apical part with the other ramets. To simulate realistic, homogeneous environments of the species with different levels of resource supply, plants were grown at 0, 20, or 40 cm of water depth. Water depth had a positive effect on most measures of growth, indicating that resource supply increased with depth. Connection had negative to neutral effects on total growth of fragments at a water depth of 0 cm, and neutral to positive effects at 20- and 40-cm depths; effects on the apical part were generally positive and larger at greater depth; effects on the basal part were generally negative and smaller at greater depth. Results largely supported the hypothesis and further suggest that clonal integration of allocation and reproduction may modify benefits of resource sharing in homogeneous environments. PMID:26009243

  20. Molecular epidemiology of clonal diploids: a quick overview and a short DIY (do it yourself) notice.

    PubMed

    De Meeûs, Thierry; Lehmann, Laurent; Balloux, François

    2006-03-01

    In this short review we report the basic notions needed for understanding the population genetics of clonal diploids. We focus on the consequences of clonality on the distribution of genetic diversity within individuals, between individuals and between populations. We then summarise how to detect clonality in mainly sexual populations, conversely, how to detect sexuality in mainly clonal populations and also how genetic differentiation between populations is affected by clonality in diploids. This information is then used for building recipes on how to analyse and interpret genetic polymorphism data in molecular epidemiology studies of clonal diploids. PMID:16290062

  1. Ancient Isolation and Independent Evolution of the Three Clonal Lineages of the Emerging Sudden Oak Death Pathogen Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Phytophthora includes some of the most destructive plant pathogens affecting agricultural and native ecosystems and a number of recent emerging and reemerging infectious diseases of plants. Sudden oak death, an emerging disease caused by the exotic pathogen P. ramorum, is responsible for e...

  2. How Clonal Is Clonal? Genome Plasticity across Multicellular Segments of a “Candidatus Marithrix sp.” Filament from Sulfidic, Briny Seafloor Sediments in the Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Salman-Carvalho, Verena; Fadeev, Eduard; Joye, Samantha B.; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    “Candidatus Marithrix” is a recently described lineage within the group of large sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoaceae, Gammaproteobacteria). This genus of bacteria comprises vacuolated, attached-living filaments that inhabit the sediment surface around vent and seep sites in the marine environment. A single filament is ca. 100 μm in diameter, several millimeters long, and consists of hundreds of clonal cells, which are considered highly polyploid. Based on these characteristics, “Candidatus Marithrix” was used as a model organism for the assessment of genomic plasticity along segments of a single filament using next generation sequencing to possibly identify hotspots of microevolution. Using six consecutive segments of a single filament sampled from a mud volcano in the Gulf of Mexico, we recovered ca. 90% of the “Candidatus Marithrix” genome in each segment. There was a high level of genome conservation along the filament with average nucleotide identities between 99.98 and 100%. Different approaches to assemble all reads into a complete consensus genome could not fill the gaps. Each of the six segment datasets encoded merely a few hundred unique nucleotides and 5 or less unique genes—the residual content was redundant in all datasets. Besides the overall high genomic identity, we identified a similar number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the clonal segments, which are comparable to numbers reported for other clonal organisms. An increase of SNPs with greater distance of filament segments was not observed. The polyploidy of the cells was apparent when analyzing the heterogeneity of reads within a segment. Here, a strong increase in single nucleotide variants, or “intrasegmental sequence heterogeneity” (ISH) events, was observed. These sites may represent hotspots for genome plasticity, and possibly microevolution, since two thirds of these variants were not co-localized across the genome copies of the multicellular filament. PMID

  3. Dynamic clonal equilibrium and predetermined cancer risk in Barrett's oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Pierre; Timmer, Margriet R.; Lau, Chiu T.; Calpe, Silvia; Sancho-Serra, Maria del Carmen; Straub, Danielle; Baker, Ann-Marie; Meijer, Sybren L.; Kate, Fiebo J. W. ten; Mallant-Hent, Rosalie C.; Naber, Anton H. J.; van Oijen, Arnoud H. A. M.; Baak, Lubbertus C.; Scholten, Pieter; Böhmer, Clarisse J. M.; Fockens, Paul; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Maley, Carlo C.; Graham, Trevor A.; Krishnadath, Kausilia K

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance of Barrett's oesophagus allows us to study the evolutionary dynamics of a human neoplasm over time. Here we use multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization on brush cytology specimens, from two time points with a median interval of 37 months in 195 non-dysplastic Barrett's patients, and a third time point in a subset of 90 patients at a median interval of 36 months, to study clonal evolution at single-cell resolution. Baseline genetic diversity predicts progression and remains in a stable dynamic equilibrium over time. Clonal expansions are rare, being detected once every 36.8 patient years, and growing at an average rate of 1.58 cm2 (95% CI: 0.09–4.06) per year, often involving the p16 locus. This suggests a lack of strong clonal selection in Barrett's and that the malignant potential of ‘benign' Barrett's lesions is predetermined, with important implications for surveillance programs. PMID:27538785

  4. Dynamic clonal equilibrium and predetermined cancer risk in Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Timmer, Margriet R; Lau, Chiu T; Calpe, Silvia; Sancho-Serra, Maria Del Carmen; Straub, Danielle; Baker, Ann-Marie; Meijer, Sybren L; Kate, Fiebo J W Ten; Mallant-Hent, Rosalie C; Naber, Anton H J; van Oijen, Arnoud H A M; Baak, Lubbertus C; Scholten, Pieter; Böhmer, Clarisse J M; Fockens, Paul; Bergman, Jacques J G H M; Maley, Carlo C; Graham, Trevor A; Krishnadath, Kausilia K

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance of Barrett's oesophagus allows us to study the evolutionary dynamics of a human neoplasm over time. Here we use multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization on brush cytology specimens, from two time points with a median interval of 37 months in 195 non-dysplastic Barrett's patients, and a third time point in a subset of 90 patients at a median interval of 36 months, to study clonal evolution at single-cell resolution. Baseline genetic diversity predicts progression and remains in a stable dynamic equilibrium over time. Clonal expansions are rare, being detected once every 36.8 patient years, and growing at an average rate of 1.58 cm(2) (95% CI: 0.09-4.06) per year, often involving the p16 locus. This suggests a lack of strong clonal selection in Barrett's and that the malignant potential of 'benign' Barrett's lesions is predetermined, with important implications for surveillance programs. PMID:27538785

  5. Pretransplant cytotoxic conditioning produces effects consistent with clonal deletion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zheng, T L; Johnson, C P; Sutherland, D E

    1987-05-01

    A rat cardiac allograft model (ACl to Lewis) was used to investigate the clonal deletion theory. Twelve groups of Lewis recipients received various combinations of donor-specific blood transfusions (DSTs), immediate post-DST immunosuppression with azathioprine/prednisone, and low-dose cyclosporine (1 mg/kg/day) posttransplant. DSTs and cyclosporine together gave modest prolongation of graft survival (from 6.0 to 17 days). DSTs plus immediate post-DST immunosuppression followed by low-dose cyclosporine prolonged graft survival to an average of 45 days. Third-party transfusions alone and in combination with immunosuppression did not significantly prolong allograft survival. Postoperative cyclosporine was required for the expression of this effect suggesting that clonal depression rather than clonal deletion had occurred. Combining DSTs with brief but intense preoperative immunosuppression may be a more effective method of pretransplant conditioning than DSTs alone. PMID:3295388

  6. [Clonal eosinophilia revealed by recurrent Staphylococcus aureus infection].

    PubMed

    Vandenbos, F; Figueredo, M; Dumon-Gubeno, M-C; Nicolle, I; Tarhini, A; Medioni, L-D; Naman, H; Mouroux, J

    2011-06-01

    Acquired eosinophilia is currently classified into secondary (reactional to underlying diseases), clonal (presence of a bone marrow histological, cytogenetic or molecular marker of a myeloid malignancy) and idiopathic (neither secondary nor clonal) categories. We report the case of a 47-year-old male who was admitted to the hospital for Staphylococcus aureus recurring infections. An hypereosinophilia was discovered and led to molecular analysis. The identification of FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene permitted the diagnostic of clonal eosinophilia. Treatment by imatinib mesylate induced an haematological remission, the control of the infection and thoracotomy cicatrization. This case is original because of its infectious presentation and the efficacy of imatinib mesylate to control the infectious process. PMID:21665081

  7. Female and male fitness consequences of clonal growth in a dwarf bamboo population with a high degree of clonal intermingling

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ayumi; Tomimatsu, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Jun-Ichirou; Saitoh, Tomoyuki; Shibata, Shozo; Makita, Akifumi; Suyama, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Although many studies have reported that clonal growth interferes with sexual reproduction as a result of geitonogamous self-pollination and inbreeding depression, the mating costs of clonal growth are expected to be reduced when genets are spatially intermingled with others. This study examined how clonal growth affects both female and male reproductive success by studying a population of a mass-flowering plant, Sasa veitchii var. hirsuta, with a high degree of clonal intermingling. Methods In a 10 × 10 m plot, genets were discriminated based on the multilocus genotypes of 11 nuclear microsatellite loci. The relationships between genet size and the components of reproductive success were then investigated. Male siring success and female and male selfing rates were assessed using paternity analysis. Key Results A total of 111 genets were spatially well intermingled with others. In contrast to previous studies with species forming distinct monoclonal patches, seed production linearly increased with genet size. While male siring success was a decelerating function of genet size, selfing rates were relatively low and not related to genet size. Conclusions The results, in conjunction with previous studies, emphasize the role of the spatial arrangement of genets on both the quantity and quality of offpsring, and suggest that an intermingled distribution of genets can reduce the mating costs of clonal growth and enhance overall fitness, particularly female fitness. PMID:25228034

  8. Genomic epidemiology of age-associated meningococcal lineages in national surveillance: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Dorothea M C; Lucidarme, Jay; Gray, Stephen J; Newbold, Lynne S; Ure, Roisin; Brehony, Carina; Harrison, Odile B; Bray, James E; Jolley, Keith A; Bratcher, Holly B; Parkhill, Julian; Tang, Christoph M; Borrow, Ray; Maiden, Martin C J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is a worldwide health issue that is potentially preventable with vaccination. In view of its sporadic nature and the high diversity of Neisseria meningitidis, epidemiological surveillance incorporating detailed isolate characterisation is crucial for effective control and understanding the evolving epidemiology of IMD. The Meningitis Research Foundation Meningococcus Genome Library (MRF-MGL) exploits whole-genome sequencing (WGS) for this purpose and presents data on a comprehensive and coherent IMD isolate collection from England and Wales via the internet. We assessed the contribution of these data to investigating IMD epidemiology. Methods WGS data were obtained for all 899 IMD isolates available for England and Wales in epidemiological years 2010–11 and 2011–12. The data had been annotated at 1720 loci, analysed, and disseminated online. Information was also available on meningococcal population structure and vaccine (Bexsero, GlaxoSmithKline, Brentford, Middlesex, UK) antigen variants, which enabled the investigation of IMD-associated genotypes over time and by patients' age groups. Population genomic analyses were done with a hierarchical gene-by-gene approach. Findings The methods used by MRF-MGL efficiently characterised IMD isolates and information was provided in plain language. At least 20 meningococcal lineages were identified, three of which (hyperinvasive clonal complexes 41/44 [lineage 3], 269 [lineage 2], and 23 [lineage 23]) were responsible for 528 (59%) of IMD isolates. Lineages were highly diverse and showed evidence of extensive recombination. Specific lineages were associated with IMD in particular age groups, with notable diversity in the youngest and oldest individuals. The increased incidence of IMD from 1984 to 2010 in England and Wales was due to successive and concurrent epidemics of different lineages. Genetically, 74% of isolates were characterised as encoding group B capsules

  9. Population-based epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: clonal complex 30 genotype is associated with mortality.

    PubMed

    Blomfeldt, A; Eskesen, A N; Aamot, H V; Leegaard, T M; Bjørnholt, J V

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (SABSI) are associated with a high burden of morbidity and mortality. The impact of specific S. aureus genotypes on outcome is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology and outcome of SABSI, with a special emphasis on the impact of bacterial clonal lineage on mortality. We conducted a 3-year population-based prospective study between 2011 and 2014, including 303 consecutive adult patients. Clinical data were obtained from interviews and medical records. S. aureus isolates were genotyped using DNA microarrays. The incidence rate of SABSI was 27.6 per 100,000 inhabitants [95 % confidence interval (CI) 24.6-31.0]. The median age of the patients was 71 years (interquartile range 56-81 years) and 61.4 % were male. Most SABSI (70.6 %) occurred in hospitals or associated to healthcare, and 34.1 % of these were associated with intravascular catheters. Only five (1.6 %) SABSI were caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The 30-day case fatality rate was 20.8 % (95 % CI 16.6-25.7). S. aureus clonal complex 30 [hazard ratio (HR) 3.9; 95 % CI 1.8-8.5, p = 0.001], unknown focus of infection (HR 4.5; 95 % CI 1.9-10.8, p = 0.001) and respiratory tract infection (HR 12.7; 95 % CI 4.6-34.6, p < 0.001) were independent predictors of mortality in a Cox regression analysis after adjusting for age, sex and underlying conditions. A high proportion of potential preventable SABSI calls for effective infection control measures. S. aureus clonal complex 30 genotype was associated with mortality in patients with bloodstream infections. The genetic basis underlying this association remains to be demonstrated. PMID:26873380

  10. Discriminating micropathogen lineages and their reticulate evolution through graph theory-based network analysis: the case of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Moalic, Yann; Barnabé, Christian; Ayala, Francisco José; Tibayrenc, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Micropathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, parasitic protozoa) share a common trait, which is partial clonality, with wide variance in the respective influence of clonality and sexual recombination on the dynamics and evolution of taxa. The discrimination of distinct lineages and the reconstruction of their phylogenetic history are key information to infer their biomedical properties. However, the phylogenetic picture is often clouded by occasional events of recombination across divergent lineages, limiting the relevance of classical phylogenetic analysis and dichotomic trees. We have applied a network analysis based on graph theory to illustrate the relationships among genotypes of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasitic protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, to identify major lineages and to unravel their past history of divergence and possible recombination events. At the scale of T. cruzi subspecific diversity, graph theory-based networks applied to 22 isoenzyme loci (262 distinct Multi-Locus-Enzyme-Electrophoresis -MLEE) and 19 microsatellite loci (66 Multi-Locus-Genotypes -MLG) fully confirms the high clustering of genotypes into major lineages or "near-clades". The release of the dichotomic constraint associated with phylogenetic reconstruction usually applied to Multilocus data allows identifying putative hybrids and their parental lineages. Reticulate topology suggests a slightly different history for some of the main "near-clades", and a possibly more complex origin for the putative hybrids than hitherto proposed. Finally the sub-network of the near-clade T. cruzi I (28 MLG) shows a clustering subdivision into three differentiated lesser near-clades ("Russian doll pattern"), which confirms the hypothesis recently proposed by other investigators. The present study broadens and clarifies the hypotheses previously obtained from classical markers on the same sets of data, which demonstrates the added value of this approach. This underlines the potential of graph