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Sample records for clopidogrel response evaluated

  1. Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1) Mediated Platelet Aggregation is Dependant on Clopidogrel Response

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Rolf P.; Breall, Jeffrey A.; Kreutz, Yvonne; Owens, Janelle; Lu, Deshun; Bolad, Islam; von der Lohe, Elisabeth; Sinha, Anjan; Flockhart, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Clopidogrel inhibits ADP mediated platelet aggregation through inhibition of the P2Y12 receptor by its active metabolite. Thrombin induces platelet aggregation by binding to protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), and inhibition of PAR-1 has been evaluated in patients treated with clopidogrel to reduce ischemic events after acute coronary syndromes. Residual PAR-1 mediated platelet aggregation may be dependent on extent of clopidogrel response. Material and Methods Platelet aggregation was measured in 55 patients undergoing elective PCI at 16-24 hours after 600mg clopidogrel loading dose by light transmittance aggregometry using ADP 20μM and thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) at 15 μM and 25 μM as agonists. Genomic DNA was genotyped for common CYP2C19 variants. Results Increasing quartiles of 20 μM ADP induced platelet aggregation after clopidogrel loading were associated with increasing levels of TRAP mediated platelet aggregation. Patients in the highest quartile (clopidogrel non-responders) of post treatment ADP aggregation had significantly higher TRAP mediated aggregation than the patients in the lowest quartile (clopidogrel responders) [TRAP 15 μM: 79.6±5% vs. 69.5±8%, p<0.001]. Conclusions Non-responders to clopidogrel show increased residual platelet aggregation induced by TRAP, whereas clopidogrel responders exhibit attenuated response to TRAP. Addition of PAR-1 antiplatelet drugs may be most effective in patients with reduced clopidogrel response and high residual TRAP mediated platelet aggregation. PMID:22459907

  2. Clopidogrel Responsiveness in Patients Undergoing Peripheral Angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Pastromas, Georgios Spiliopoulos, Stavros Katsanos, Konstantinos Diamantopoulos, Athanasios Kitrou, Panagiotis Karnabatidis, Dimitrios Siablis, Dimitrios

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and clinical significance of platelet responsiveness in patients receiving clopidogrel after peripheral angioplasty procedures. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included patients receiving antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel 75 mg after infrainguinal angioplasty or stenting and who presented to our department during routine follow-up. Clopidogrel responsiveness was tested using the VerifyNow P2Y12 Assay. Patients with residual platelet reactivity units (PRU) {>=} 235 were considered as nonresponders (NR group NR), whereas patients with PRU < 235 were considered as normal (responders [group R]). Primary end points were incidence of resistance to clopidogrel and target limb reintervention (TLR)-free survival, whereas secondary end points included limb salvage rates and the identification of any independent predictors influencing clinical outcomes. Results: In total, 113 consecutive patients (mean age 69 {+-} 8 years) with 139 limbs were enrolled. After clopidogrel responsiveness analysis, 61 patients (53.9 %) with 73 limbs (52.5 %) were assigned to group R and 52 patients (46.1 %) with 66 limbs (47.5 %) to group NR. Mean follow-up interval was 27.7 {+-} 22.9 months (range 3-95). Diabetes mellitus, critical limb ischemia, and renal disease were associated with clopidogrel resistance (Fisher's exact test; p < 0.05). According to Kaplan-Meier analysis, TLR-free survival was significantly superior in group R compared with group NR (20.7 vs. 1.9 %, respectively, at 7-year follow-up; p = 0.001), whereas resistance to clopidogrel was identified as the only independent predictor of decreased TLR-free survival (hazard rate 0.536, 95 % confidence interval 0.31-0.90; p = 0.01). Cumulative TLR rate was significantly increased in group NR compared with group R (71.2 % [52 of 73] vs. 31.8 % [21 of 66], respectively; p < 0.001). Limb salvage was similar in both groups. Conclusion: Clopidogrel resistance was related with

  3. [Current options to manage clopidogrel poor responsiveness].

    PubMed

    Fileti, Luca; Campo, Gianluca; Valgimigli, Marco; Marchesini, Jlenia; Ferrari, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    Antiplatelet therapy (aspirin + clopidogrel) is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with acute coronary syndromes and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). More than 40 million patients worldwide receive clopidogrel, but about 20% of them are nonresponders or poor responders. Many studies using different techniques, platelet agonists and definitions have shown that patients who are poor responders to clopidogrel have an increased risk of death, reinfarction and stent thrombosis. The mechanisms leading to poor responsiveness are not fully elucidated and are likely multifactorial: genetic factors, accelerated platelet turnover, up-regulation of the P2Y12 pathways, high baseline platelet reactivity, poor compliance, underdosing and drug-drug interactions. The management of these patients is very difficult, but evidence does exist showing that a strategy of higher maintenance dose or switch to different thienopyridines (e.g. ticlopidine or prasugrel) or use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors during PCI may be helpful to overcome poor responsiveness and improve the long-term clinical outcome. This review describes the impact of poor responsiveness to clopidogrel on clinical outcomes, the mechanisms leading to poor effect, and the different assays to assess it. Finally, current and future options for its management are discussed. PMID:21355335

  4. Clopidogrel

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cancer-related deaths or cancer-related adverse events with long-term treatment.FDA is working with the manufacturers of clopidogrel to update the label to reflect the results of the mortality meta-analysis.BACKGROUND: Clopidogrel is an antiplatelet medicine used to ...

  5. Impact of genetic polymorphisms and drug-drug interactions on clopidogrel and prasugrel response variability.

    PubMed

    Ancrenaz, V; Daali, Y; Fontana, P; Besson, M; Samer, C; Dayer, P; Desmeules, J

    2010-10-01

    Thienopyridine antiaggregating platelet agents (clopidogrel and prasugrel) act as irreversible P2Y12 receptor inhibitors. They are used with aspirin to prevent thrombotic complications after an acute coronary syndrome or percutaneous coronary intervention. A large interindividual variability in response to clopidogrel and to a lesser extent to prasugrel is observed and may be related to their metabolism. Clopidogrel and prasugrel are indeed prodrugs converted into their respective active metabolites by several cytochromes P450 (CYPs). Besides clopidogrel inactivation (85%) by esterases to the carboxylic acid, clopidogrel is metabolized by CYPs to 2-oxo-clopidogrel (15%) and further metabolized to an unstable but potent platelet-aggregating inhibitor. Prasugrel is more potent than clopidogrel with a better bioavailability and lower pharmacodynamic variability. Prasugrel is completely converted by esterases to an intermediate oxo-metabolite (R-95913) further bioactivated by CYPs. Numerous clinical studies have shown the influence of CYP2C19 polymorphism on clopidogrel antiplatelet activity. Moreover, unwanted drug-drug pharmacokinetic interactions influencing CYP2C19 activity and clopidogrel bioactivation such as with proton pump inhibitors remain a matter of intense controversy. Several studies have also demonstrated that CYP3A4/5 and CYP1A2 are important in clopidogrel bioactivation and should also be considered as potential targets for unwanted drug-drug interactions. Prasugrel bioactivation is mainly related to CYP3A4 and 2B6 activity and therefore the question of the effect of drug-drug interaction on its activity is open. The purpose of this review is to critically examine the current literature evaluating the influence of genetic and environmental factors such as unwanted drug-drug interaction affecting clopidogrel and prasugrel antiplatelet activity. PMID:20942779

  6. Determinants to optimize response to clopidogrel in acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Betti; Gori, Anna Maria; Marcucci, Rossella; Saracini, Claudia; Vestrini, Anna; Abbate, Rosanna

    2010-01-01

    The inhibition of platelet function by antiplatelet therapy determines the improvement of the survival of patients with clinically evident cardiovascular disease. Clopidogrel in combination with aspirin is the recommended standard of care for reducing the occurrence of cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. However, major adverse cardiovascular events including stent thrombosis occur in patients taking clopidogrel and aspirin. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that high post-treatment platelet reactivity on antiplatelet treatment is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical events. Clopidogrel requires conversion to active metabolite by cytochrome P450 isoenzymes. The active metabolite inhibits ADP-stimulated platelet activation by irreversibly binding to P2Y12 receptors. Recently, the loss-of-function CYP2C19*2 allele has been associated with decreased metabolization of clopidogrel, poor antiaggregant effect, and increased cardiovascular events. In high risk vascular patients, the CYP2C19*2 polymorphism is a strong predictor of adverse cardiovascular events and particularly of stent thrombosis. Prospective studies evaluating if an antiplatelet treatment tailored on individual characteristics of patients, CYP2C19*2 genotypes, platelet phenotype, drug–drug interaction, as well as traditional and procedural risk factors, are now urgently needed for the identification of therapeutic strategies providing the best benefit for the single subject. PMID:23226041

  7. The use of amlodipine, but not of P-glycoprotein inhibiting calcium channel blockers is associated with clopidogrel poor-response.

    PubMed

    Harmsze, Ankie M; Robijns, Karen; van Werkum, Jochem W; Breet, Nicoline J; Hackeng, Christian M; Ten Berg, Jurrien M; Ruven, Hendrik J T; Klungel, Olaf H; de Boer, Anthonius; Deneer, Vera H M

    2010-05-01

    Clopidogrel is a prodrug that has to be converted in vivo to its active metabolite by cytochrome (CYP)P450 iso-enzymes. As calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are inhibitors of CYP3A4, concomitant use of these drugs might play a role in the wide inter-individual variability in the response to clopidogrel. However, some CCBs also have strong inhibitory effects on the drug transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp), which mediates clopidogrel's intestinal absorption. It was the aim of this study to evaluate the effect of co-administration of Pgp-inhibiting and non-Pgp-inhibiting CCBs on on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In a total of 623 consecutive patients undergoing elective PCI treated with clopidogrel and aspirin, platelet reactivity to 5 and 20 muM adenosine diphospate (ADP) and clopidogrel poor-response (defined as > 70% platelet aggregation to 20 muM ADP) were evaluated by light transmittance aggregometry. A total of 222 patients (35.6%) were on CCB treatment, of which 98 used Pgp-inhibiting CCBs (verapamil, nifedipine, diltiazem, barnidipine) and 124 patients used the non-Pgp-inhibiting CCB amlodipine. Adjusted mean ADP-induced on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity was significantly higher in both users of Pgp-inhibiting CCBs and amlodipine as compared to CCB non-users (all p<0.05). However, only the use of amlodipine was significantly associated with a 2.3-fold increased risk of clopidogrel poor-response. This study demonstrates that concomitant use of Pgp-inhibiting CCBs and amlodipine increases on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity. Only amlodipine was associated with clopidogrel poor-response. The drug-drug interaction between clopidogrel and amlodipine might be more clinically relevant as compared to P-glycoprotein-inhibiting CCBs. PMID:20352154

  8. Design, development and evaluation of clopidogrel bisulfate floating tablets

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K. Rama Koteswara; Lakshmi, K. Rajya

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present work was to formulate and to characterize a floating drug delivery system for clopidogrel bisulphate to improve bioavailability and to minimize the side effects of the drug such as gastric bleeding and drug resistance development. Materials and Methods: Clopidogrel floating tablets were prepared by direct compression technique by the use of three polymers xanthan gum, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) K15M and HPMC K4M in different concentrations (20%, 25% and 30% w/w). Sodium bicarbonate (15% w/w) and microcrystalline cellulose (30% w/w) were used as gas generating agent and diluent respectively. Studies were carried out on floating behavior and influence of type of polymer on drug release rate. All the formulations were subjected to various quality control and in-vitro dissolution studies in 0.1 N hydrochloric acid (1.2 pH) and corresponding dissolution data were fitted to popular release kinetic equations in order to evaluate release mechanisms and kinetics. Results and Discussion: All the clopidogrel floating formulations followed first order kinetics, Higuchi drug release kinetics with diffusion as the dominant mechanism of drug release. As per Korsmeyer-Peppas equation, the release exponent “n” ranged 0.452-0.654 indicating that drug release from all the formulations was by non-Fickian diffusion mechanism. The drug release rate of clopidogrel was found to be affected by the type and concentration of the polymer used in the formulation (P < 0.05). As the concentration of the polymer was increased, the drug release was found to be retarded. Conclusion: Based on the results, clopidogrel floating tablets prepared by employing xanthan gum at concentration 25% w/w (formulation F2) was the best formulation with desired in-vitro floating time and drug dissolution. PMID:24678458

  9. Clopidogrel responsiveness in stroke patients on a chronic aspirin regimen.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Zohara; Ching, Marilou; Sawyer, Robert N; Chichelli, Trevor; Li, Fan; Janicke, David; Radovic, Vladan; Mehta, Bijal; Farooq, Osman; Munschauer, Frederick E

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel (CPG) in patients sustaining acute ischemic stroke who were already receiving chronic outpatient aspirin therapy (81-325 mg/day). Platelet function was measured using 3 different "point-of-care" platelet function analyzers: the Thrombelastograph hemostasis system, the Accumetrics VerifyNow system, and the Chronolog 570VS impedance aggregometer. Platelet function was assessed before administration of a 300-mg CPG loading dose and again at 26 hours and 64 hours after this loading dose along with a 75-mg daily maintenance dose. All 3 instruments detected marked inhibition of platelet function at 26 hours and 64 hours after CPG administration. There were significant variations among the 3 instruments in monitoring antiplatelet responses to aspirin and CPG; however, these variations were eliminated when the platelet function results were corrected for baseline platelet variability. The percentage of patients who were poor responders to CPG after switching from aspirin depended on the measurement instrument used, but was higher at 26 hours after CPG administration than at 64 hours after CPG administration. Our findings indicate that poor response to antiplatelet agents in general, and to CPG in particular, is a function of the measuring instrument. The correction for baseline platelet variability results in similar levels of platelet inhibition measured by the 3 platelet function analyzers. Future studies are warranted to examine the association between ex vivo CPG-induced platelet inhibition and clinical outcomes in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:22209644

  10. Evaluation of Clopidogrel Conjugation Metabolism: PK Studies in Man and Mice of Clopidogrel Acyl Glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Savu, Simona Nicoleta; Silvestro, Luigi; Surmeian, Mariana; Remis, Lina; Rasit, Yuksel; Savu, Simona Rizea; Mircioiu, Constantin

    2016-09-01

    The existence of a glucuronide conjugate of the major circulating clopidogrel metabolites, called clopidogrel acyl glucuronide (CAG), is already known. However, information regarding its pharmacokinetics (PK), metabolism, and clearance are modest. We investigated in vivo the potential CAG trans-esterification to clopidogrel (reaction occurring in vitro in particular conditions) by administering the metabolite to mice. Experiments were then carried out on men, clopidogrel administered alone or followed by activated charcoal intake (intestinal reabsorption blockade). Study objectives included: PK comparison of CAG, clopidogrel carboxylic acid (CCA), and clopidogrel in plasma, determination of their elimination patterns in urine and feces, and tracking of charcoal-induced changes in PK and/or urinary excretion that would indicate relevant enterohepatic recycling of CAG. In mice, CAG was rapidly hydrolyzed to CCA after oral administration, whereas by intravenous route metabolic conversion to CCA was delayed. No levels of clopidogrel were detected in mice plasma, excluding any potential trans-esterification or other form of back-conversion in vivo. PK experiments in man showed that CAG is hydrolyzed in the gastrointestinal tract (very low concentrations in feces), but there is no evidence of enterohepatic recirculation. Quantitation of the three moieties in stool samples accounted for only 1.2% of an administered dose, suggesting that other yet unknown metabolites/degradation products formed through metabolic processes and/or the activity of local microflora are mainly excreted by this route. In man CAG was confirmed as one of the major terminal metabolites of clopidogrel, with a PK behavior similar to CCA. PMID:27402727

  11. Effect of genetic and coexisting polymorphisms on platelet response to clopidogrel in Chinese Han patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Luo, Yu; Lai, Yan; Yao, Yian; Li, Jimin; Wang, Yunkai; Zheng, S Lilly; Xu, Jianfeng; Liu, Xuebo

    2016-06-01

    Polymorphisms of CYP2C19 are associated with platelet response to clopidogrel. This study was conducted to evaluate the contribution of the previously identified polymorphisms to the response of clopidogrel in a cohort of Chinese Han patients. A total of 222 acute coronary syndrome patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention treated with clopidogrel were enrolled from September 2012 to June 2013. Residual platelet aggregations for all patients were measured by the Verify Now P2Y12 system. Sixteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms among nine genes were genotyped including CYP2C19, ABCB1 and PON1. In this study, CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*17 were strongly associated with higher platelet aggregation and lower platelet aggregation to clopidogrel treatment, respectively (P <0.001). Patients with CYP2C19*2 allele had a higher risk of high on-treatment platelet reactivity than non carriers (adjusted OR, 5.434; 95% CI, 1.918-15.399, P =0.01). The coexistence of CYP2B6*9 (rs8192719) and P2Y12 (rs2046934) and the coexistence of CYP2B6*1B (rs7254579) and P2Y12 (rs2046934) were also associated with poor response to clopidogrel. No significant relation of CYP2C19*3 and other polymorphisms to the platelet aggregation was found. In conclusion, CYP2C19*2, CYP2C19*17 coexistence of CYP2B6*9 (rs8192719) and P2Y12 (rs2046934) and coexistence of CYP2B6*1B (rs7254579) and P2Y12 (rs2046934) were identified to be associated with response to clopidogrel treatment in Chinese Han patients. PMID:27350664

  12. Comparison of VerifyNow P2Y12 and thrombelastography for assessing clopidogrel response in stroke patients in China.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hui-Hui; Wu, Shuai; Liu, Xu; Yang, Xiao-Li; Xu, Jian-Feng; Guan, Yang-Tai; Dong, Qiang; Zheng, S Lilly; Jiang, Jian-Ming; Li, Shi-Xu; Luo, Zheng; Li, Li; An, Li-Xian; Han, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Poor response to clopidogrel is often associated with recurrent ischemic events, and reliable platelet function tests are needed to identify clopidogrel low response (CLR). The aim of the study was to compare the consistency of VerifyNow P2Y12 and thrombelastography (TEG) in acute ischemic stroke patients treated with clopidogrel. Patients hospitalized in Changhai Hospital from August 2012 to September 2013 and assigned to treatment with a daily 75-mg dose of clopidogrel. The blood samples were taken on the 5-7th day to assess the capability of VerifyNow P2Y12 and TEG for evaluation of clopidogrel response, and all instrument parameters were used to perform correlation analysis. Patients with CLR were detected by using the methods and criteria published earlier (PRU ≥ 230 assayed by VerifyNow P2Y12 or TEG-Inhib% ≤30 % measured by TEG). Totally 58 patients were enrolled for the study and there were wide varieties in parameters of VerifyNow P2Y12 and TEG. Results showed a total of 17 and 9 patients, respectively, identified as CLR assessed by VerifyNow P2Y12 and TEG, but only three patients were detected to be clopidogrel low responders with both tests. The kappa consistency analysis showed poor consistency between VerifyNow P2Y12 and TEG results in terms of CLR (Kappa = -0.0349, p = 0.7730). Linear regression also demonstrated poor correlation between VerifyNow-PRU/VerifyNow-Inhib% and TEG-Inhib% (p = 0.07901 and p = 0.3788, respectively). Our study demonstrated that there was poor correlation between VerifyNow P2Y12 and TEG results, and VerifyNow P2Y12 showed a larger proportion of CLR than TEG. PMID:26520845

  13. Prevalence and risk factors of clopidogrel non-response among Saudi patients undergoing coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sakr, Haitham I.; Alamri, Hussein S.; Almoghairi, Abdulrahman M.; Alkhudair, Ashraf A.; AlMasood, Ali S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of clopidogrel non-response and identify its risk factors among Saudi patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Prince Sultan Cardiac Center, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January and June 2013, to assess the degree of platelet inhibition using the VerifyNow assay (Accumetrics, San Diego, CA, USA) after receiving clopidogrel standard loading dose. Clopidogrel resistance was defined as ≤15% platelet inhibition or >213 P2Y12 reaction units (PRU). Results: Three hundred and four patients were included in the study. The mean age was 60.3 ± 11.4 years, and 73% were males. Clopidogrel doses were 300 mg (57%), 600 mg (27%), and 75 mg (16%). All patients used aspirin (81 mg in 94%). Approximately 66% (200/304) showed in vitro clopidogrel non-response, 54% had low platelet inhibitions, and 61% had high post-loading PRU. Using multivariate regression analysis that included all significant characteristics; only diabetes (odds ratio [OR]: 2.36, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30-4.27, p=0.005) and higher preloading PRU (OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.40-4.11, p=0.002) remained significantly associated with higher clopidogrel non-response while myocardial infarction (OR: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.15-0.81, p=0.014) remained significantly associated with lower clopidogrel non-response. The associations of morbid obesity and diuretics use with higher clopidogrel non-response were slightly attenuated. Conclusion: Our findings indicate a high rate of clopidogrel in-vitro non-response among Saudi patients undergoing coronary angiography. PMID:26837400

  14. Optimizing clopidogrel dose response: a new clinical algorithm comprising CYP2C19 pharmacogenetics and drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Saab, Yolande B; Zeenny, Rony; Ramadan, Wijdan H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Response to clopidogrel varies widely with nonresponse rates ranging from 4% to 30%. A reduced function of the gene variant of the CYP2C19 has been associated with lower drug metabolite levels, and hence diminished platelet inhibition. Drugs that alter CYP2C19 activity may also mimic genetic variants. The aim of the study is to investigate the cumulative effect of CYP2C19 gene polymorphisms and drug interactions that affects clopidogrel dosing, and apply it into a new clinical-pharmacogenetic algorithm that can be used by clinicians in optimizing clopidogrel-based treatment. Method Clopidogrel dose optimization was analyzed based on two main parameters that affect clopidogrel metabolite area under the curve: different CYP2C19 genotypes and concomitant drug intake. Clopidogrel adjusted dose was computed based on area under the curve ratios for different CYP2C19 genotypes when a drug interacting with CYP2C19 is added to clopidogrel treatment. A clinical-pharmacogenetic algorithm was developed based on whether clopidogrel shows 1) expected effect as per indication, 2) little or no effect, or 3) clinical features that patients experience and fit with clopidogrel adverse drug reactions. Results The study results show that all patients under clopidogrel treatment, whose genotypes are different from *1*1, and concomitantly taking other drugs metabolized by CYP2C19 require clopidogrel dose adjustment. To get a therapeutic effect and avoid adverse drug reactions, therapeutic dose of 75 mg clopidogrel, for example, should be lowered to 6 mg or increased to 215 mg in patients with different genotypes. Conclusion The implementation of clopidogrel new algorithm has the potential to maximize the benefit of clopidogrel pharmacological therapy. Clinicians would be able to personalize treatment to enhance efficacy and limit toxicity. PMID:26445541

  15. Poor response to clopidogrel: current and future options for its management.

    PubMed

    Campo, Gianluca; Fileti, Luca; Valgimigli, Marco; Tebaldi, Matteo; Cangiano, Elisa; Cavazza, Caterina; Marchesini, Jlenia; Ferrari, Roberto

    2010-10-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with acute coronary syndromes and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Clopidogrel, a thienopyridine antiplatelet agent, has been used to prevent vascular complication in atherothrombotic patients, to prevent stent thrombosis in patients undergoing PCI, and in long term prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. More than 40 million patients in the world receive clopidogrel but unfortunately about 20% of these are either non or poor responders. Several methods have been used to assess clopidogrel-induced antiplatelet effects. However, none of these tests have been fully standardized or fully agreed upon to measure clopidogrel responsiveness. Nevertheless, many studies using different techniques, platelet agonists and definitions, showed that patients with a poor response to clopidogrel have an increased risk of death, reinfarction and stent thrombosis. The mechanisms leading to poor responsiveness are not fully clarified and are likely multifactorial: genetic factors, accelerated platelet turnover, up-regulation of the P2Y(12) pathways, high baseline platelet reactivity, poor compliance, under-dosing and drug-drug interactions. The management of these patients is very difficult, but some evidence showed that a strategy of higher maintenance dose or switch to different thienopyridine (e.g. ticlopidine or prasugrel) or use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors during PCI may be helpful to overcome poor responsiveness and improve the long-term clinical outcome. This paper reviews the impact of clopidogrel poor responsiveness on clinical outcomes, the mechanisms leading to poor effect and the different assays to assess it. Finally, current and future options for its management is discussed. PMID:20157839

  16. Snapshot of the prescribing practice for the clopidogrel and esomeprazole coprescription and cost evaluation of the application guidelines.

    PubMed

    Vernaz, Nathalie; Rollason, Victoria; Adlere, Liene; Combescure, Christophe; Poncet, Antoine; Bonnabry, Pascal; Desmeules, Jules

    2016-06-01

    The antiplatelet clopidogrel and the proton pump inhibitor esomeprazole demonstrate a pharmacokinetic interaction through CYP2C19 that could translate into clinical inefficacy of clopidogrel. No medical consensus as to their coprescription has been reached, and different guidelines are available. We evaluated the prescribing practices at the Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) by measuring whether the coprescription was staggered as suggested by experts. We estimated the financial impact of different implementation guidelines. We used the HUG electronic patient records to follow the physicians' prescriptions and the administration by nurses from January 2013 to April 2014. We performed a time series analysis to assess 15 years of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and antiplatelet drug use. "Extra costs" were calculated assuming that clopidogrel or esomeprazole would replace prasugrel or ticagrelor and pantoprazole or ranitidine, respectively. Only 10.8% of the patient medical orders for the clopidogrel and esomeprazole coprescription specified to stagger the administration, 12.6% specified a concomitant coprescription, and 76.6% had no clear information. A high rate of 49.6% of the nurses staggered the clopidogrel and esomeprazole coprescription when no clear information was given. We found a statistically significant decrease in clopidogrel use after the publication of the OCLA (Omeprazole-CLopidogrel-Aspirin) study and a significant increase in the trend of esomeprazole. Alternative treatments to avoid this interaction are cost ineffective or offer therapeutic options of lesser quality. We observed a high rate of 56.2% of the clopidogrel and esomeprazole coprescription in our hospital and can therefore not ignore the PK/PD interaction. The most common prescription practice was to not specify the time frame of administration, which was translated by nurses in 49.6% of the cases to a scheduled staggered coprescription of clopidogrel and esomeprazole. As long as no

  17. Clopidogrel resistance: The way forward

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Shuvanan

    2014-01-01

    Clopidogrel, a second generation thienopyridine has been the mainstay of ACS (Acute Coronary Syndrome) treatment for more than a decade. Clopidogrel Resistance has been associated with increased mortality in ACS patients with an increase in number of Stent Thrombosis. This review article tries to find out the causes of Clopidogrel Resistance, the main factors involving it, Laboratory evaluation of Clopidogrel Resistance. The overall incidence of Clopidogrel Resistance across the Globe & India has also been considered. The article also discusses the clinical significance of Clopidogrel Resistance & its relationship with adverse cardiovascular events. This review ends with the probable solutions to Clopidogrel Resistance & the new generation of antiplatelets which can be used for the same. PMID:25443607

  18. Clopidogrel resistance response in patients with coronary artery disease and metabolic syndrome: the role of hyperglycemia and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhao-Ke; Wang, Jing-Jing; Wang, Ting; Zhu, Shen-Shen; Chen, Xi-Ling; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the proven benefits of clopidogrel combined aspirin therapy for coronary artery disease (CAD), CAD patients with metabolic syndrome (MS) still tend to have coronary thrombotic events. We aimed to investigate the influence of metabolic risk factors on the efficacy of clopidogrel treatment in patients with CAD undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods Cohorts of 168 MS and 168 non-MS subjects with CAD identified by coronary angiography (CAG) were enrolled in our study. MS was defined by modified Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. All subjects had taken 100 mg aspirin and 75 mg clopidogrel daily for more than 1 month, and administered loading doses of 600 mg clopidogrel and 300 mg aspirin before PCI. Blood samples were taken 24 h after the loading doses of clopidogrel and aspirin. Platelet aggregation was measured using light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) and thrombelastography (TEG). Clopidogrel resistance was defined as more than 50% adenosine diphosphate (ADP) induced platelet aggregation as measured by TEG. Results Platelet aggregation inhibition rate by ADP was significantly lower in patients with MS as measured both by TEG (55% ± 31% vs. 68% ± 32%; P < 0.001) and LTA (29% ± 23% vs. 42% ± 29%; P < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, elderly [OR (95% CI): 1.483 (1.047–6.248); P = 0.002], obesity [OR (95% CI): 3.608 (1.241–10.488); P = 0.018], high fasting plasma glucose level [OR (95% CI): 2.717 (1.176–6.277); P = 0.019] and hyperuricemia [OR (95% CI): 2.583 (1.095–6.094); P = 0.030] were all statistically risk factors for clopidogrel resistance. CAD patients with diabetes and obesity were more likely to have clopidogrel resistance than the CAD patients without diabetes and obesity [75% (61/81) vs. 43% (67/156); P < 0.001]. Conclusions CAD patients with MS appeared to have poorer antiplatelet response to clopidogrel compared to those without MS. Obesity, diabetes and hyperuricemia were all significantly

  19. Hyper-Response to Clopidogrel in Japanese Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken; Ishikawa, Shuichi; Hosogoe, Naoyoshi; Isshiki, Takaaki

    2016-03-22

    Dual antiplatelet therapy is empirically recommended following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The aims of the present study were to analyze the effect of clopidogrel on platelet function and to determine the relative contribution of each CYP2C19 loss-of-function genotype undergoing TAVI.Thirty-two patients undergoing TAVI and with clopidogrel treatment were studied. All patients were treated with an Edwards SapienXT valve. Platelet reactivity was measured by the VerifyNow P2Y12 point-of-care assay at 7 days and 30 days after the procedure and a cutoff value of 95 PRU was used to identify a hyper-response of platelet reactivity. The Spartan RX(TM) sample-to-result point-of-care DNA testing system was used to identify CYP2C19 loss-of-function genotypes. Hyper-response of platelet reactivity was identified in 11 (34.3%) patients, although 24 (80%) were carriers of at least one CYP2C19 reduced-function allele. The PRU values did not change significantly from 7 days to 30 days after TAVI (136.7 ± 73.4 versus 150.4 ± 83.2, P = 0.13). The incidences of life-threatening bleeding, minor bleeding, and transfusion were significantly higher among the hyper-response of platelet reactivity group (27.3% versus 0%, P = 0.03, 36.4% versus 4.8%, P = 0.04, 81.8% versus 42.9%, P = 0.04, respectively).A hyper-response to clopidogrel was observed in one-third of patients undergoing TAVI and was related to bleeding events, even though 80% of the patients were carriers of the CYP2C19 reduced-function allele. PMID:26973266

  20. The Pharmacogenomics of Anti-Platelet Intervention (PAPI) Study: Variation in Platelet Response to Clopidogrel and Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Bozzi, Laura M.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Lewis, Joshua P.; Ryan, Kathy A.; Herzog, William R.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Horenstein, Richard B.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel and aspirin are commonly prescribed anti-platelet medications indicated for patients who have experienced, or are at risk for, ischemic cardiovascular events. The Pharmacogenomics of Anti-Platelet Intervention (PAPI) Study was designed to characterize determinants of clopidogrel and dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) response in a healthy cohort of Old Order Amish from Lancaster, PA. Following a loading dose, clopidogrel was taken once a day for 7 days. One hour after the last dose of clopidogrel, 325 mg of aspirin was given. Ex vivo platelet aggregometry was performed at baseline, post-clopidogrel, and post-DAPT. Platelet aggregation measurements were significantly lower after both interventions for all agonists tested (p <0.05), although there was large inter-individual variation in the magnitude of anti-platelet response. Female sex and older age were associated with higher platelet aggregation at all three time-points. Change in aggregation was correlated among the various agonists at each time point. Heritability (h2) of change in platelet aggregation was significant for most traits at all time-points (range h2=0.14–0.57). Utilization of a standardized, short-term intervention provided a powerful approach to investigate sources of variation in platelet aggregation response due to drug therapy. Further, this short-term intervention approach may provide a useful paradigm for pharmacogenomics studies. PMID:26374108

  1. The Pharmacogenomics of Anti-Platelet Intervention (PAPI) Study: Variation in Platelet Response to Clopidogrel and Aspirin.

    PubMed

    Bozzi, Laura M; Mitchell, Braxton D; Lewis, Joshua P; Ryan, Kathy A; Herzog, William R; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Horenstein, Richard B; Shuldiner, Alan R; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel and aspirin are commonly prescribed anti-platelet medications indicated for patients who have experienced, or are at risk for, ischemic cardiovascular events. The Pharmacogenomics of Anti-Platelet Intervention (PAPI) Study was designed to characterize determinants of clopidogrel and dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) response in a healthy cohort of Old Order Amish from Lancaster, PA. Following a loading dose, clopidogrel was taken once a day for 7 days. One hour after the last dose of clopidogrel, 325 mg of aspirin was given. Ex vivo platelet aggregometry was performed at baseline, post-clopidogrel, and post-DAPT. Platelet aggregation measurements were significantly lower after both interventions for all agonists tested (p <0.05), although there was large inter-individual variation in the magnitude of anti-platelet response. Female sex and older age were associated with higher platelet aggregation at all three time-points. Change in aggregation was correlated among the various agonists at each time point. Heritability (h2) of change in platelet aggregation was significant for most traits at all time-points (range h2=0.14-0.57). Utilization of a standardized, short-term intervention provided a powerful approach to investigate sources of variation in platelet aggregation response due to drug therapy. Further, this short-term intervention approach may provide a useful paradigm for pharmacogenomics studies. PMID:26374108

  2. [Polymorphs of clopidogrel bisulfate].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Huang, Hai-Wei; Wu, Jian-Min; Shi, Ya-Qin; Yang, La-Hu

    2013-08-01

    This paper is to report the polymorphism of raw materials of clopidogrel bisulfate at home and abroad. By the analysis of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD), samples are roughly classified into two groups, except one patent material. And the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) examination showed more detailed information for these materials. The results of the study could provide comprehensive basis for the quality evaluation of clopidogrel bisulfate. PMID:24187849

  3. Does "smoker's paradox" exist in clopidogrel-treated Turkish patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Edem, Efe; Kirdök, Ali Hikmet; Kınay, Ahmet Ozan; Tekin, Ümit İlker; Taş, Sedat; Alpaslan, Erkan; Pabuccu, Mustafa Türker; Akdeniz, Bahri

    2016-01-01

    Previously conducted studies revealed that smoking enhanced the efficacy of clopidogrel by increasing formation of the active metabolite (AM) from the prodrug through induction of the cytochrome CYP1A2. The expression of cytochrome enzymes depends on genotype and no data exists in literature conducted in Turkish patients comparing the clopidogrel responsiveness between active smokers and non-active smokers treated with clopidogrel. In this study, our aim was to investigate the clopidogrel responsiveness in clopidogrel-treated Turkish acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients according to their smoking status. We retrospectively enrolled 258 patients who were hospitalized due to ACS. Clinical variables of the patients, especially smoking status were recorded. Clopidogrel resistance was evaluated by using adenosine diphosphate (ADP) induced platelet aggregometry. Clopidogrel resistance was detected as a change in maximal aggregation ≤20% from baseline. A total of 139 patients were active smokers while 12 were former smokers. 107 patients did not have a history of smoking. Ten of the smokers were hyporesponsive to clopidogrel, whereas 36 of non-smokers were hyporesponsive to clopidogrel (p < 0.001). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that Au-min value >612.5 predicted the clopidogrel resistance with a sensitivity of 60% (OR: 100.65, %95 CI = 19.996-506.615 p < 0.001). Results of this study demonstrated that ADP responses were lower in smokers receiving clopidogrel and aspirin than in non-smokers receiving the same drug regimen. This finding indicates that smoking was related to an enhanced clopidogrel responsiveness in Turkish patients hospitalized due to ACS, suggesting that "smoker's paradox" probably exists in Turkish ACS patients. PMID:26367336

  4. Development of a physiology-directed population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic model for characterizing the impact of genetic and demographic factors on clopidogrel response in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi-Ling; Samant, Snehal; Lewis, Joshua P; Horenstein, Richard B; Shuldiner, Alan R; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Peletier, Lambertus A; Lesko, Lawrence J; Schmidt, Stephan

    2016-01-20

    Clopidogrel (Plavix®), is a widely used antiplatelet agent, which shows high inter-individual variability in treatment response in patients following the standard dosing regimen. In this study, a physiology-directed population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model was developed based on clopidogrel and clopidogrel active metabolite (clop-AM) data from the PAPI and the PGXB2B studies using a step-wise approach in NONMEM (version 7.2). The developed model characterized the in vivo disposition of clopidogrel, its bioactivation into clop-AM in the liver and subsequent platelet aggregation inhibition in the systemic circulation reasonably well. It further allowed the identification of covariates that significantly impact clopidogrel's dose-concentration-response relationship. In particular, CYP2C19 intermediate and poor metabolizers converted 26.2% and 39.5% less clopidogrel to clop-AM, respectively, compared to extensive metabolizers. In addition, CES1 G143E mutation carriers have a reduced CES1 activity (82.9%) compared to wild-type subjects, which results in a significant increase in clop-AM formation. An increase in BMI was found to significantly decrease clopidogrel's bioactivation, whereas increased age was associated with increased platelet reactivity. Our PK/PD model analysis suggests that, in order to optimize clopidogrel dosing on a patient-by-patient basis, all of these factors have to be considered simultaneously, e.g. by using quantitative clinical pharmacology tools. PMID:26524713

  5. The variability of platelet response to aspirin and clopidogrel: revisiting the Caprie, Cure, Credo, and Match trials

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    In a significant number of patients, platelets do not respond to aspirin and/or clopidogrel. Furthermore, this lack of response has recently been shown to affect cardiovascular outcome. At the time of the CAPRIE, CURE, CREDO, and MATCH studies, no in vitro assessment was made to determine platelet response. In vitro platelet response should be considered as an important correctable risk factor for atherosclerotic events. PMID:16252024

  6. Effects of cytochrome P450 2C19 and paraoxonase 1 polymorphisms on antiplatelet response to clopidogrel therapy in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Tresukosol, Damrus; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Hunnangkul, Saowalak; Kamkaew, Ruttakarn; Poldee, Saiphon; Tassaneetrithep, Boonrat; Likidlilid, Atip

    2014-01-01

    Clopidogrel is an antiplatelet prodrug that is recommended to reduce the risk of recurrent thrombosis in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is suggested to be a rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of 2-oxo-clopidogrel to active thiol metabolite with inconsistent results. Here, we sought to determine the associations of CYP2C19 and PON1 gene polymorphisms with clopidogrel response and their role in ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Clopidogrel response and platelet aggregation were determined using Multiplate aggregometer in 211 patients with established CAD who received 75 mg clopidogrel and 75-325 mg aspirin daily for at least 14 days. Polymorphisms in CYP2C19 and PON1 were genotyped and tested for association with clopidogrel resistance. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) and their epistatic interaction effects on ADP-induced platelet aggregation were analysed. The prevalence of clopidogrel resistance in this population was approximately 33.2% (n = 70). The frequencies of CYP2C19*2 and *3 were significantly higher in non-responder than those in responders. After adjusting for established risk factors, CYP2C19*2 and *3 alleles independently increased the risk of clopidogrel resistance with adjusted ORs 2.94 (95%CI, 1.65-5.26; p<0.001) and 11.26 (95%CI, 2.47-51.41; p = 0.002, respectively). Patients with *2 or *3 allele and combined with smoking, diabetes and increased platelet count had markedly increased risk of clopidogrel resistance. No association was observed between PON1 Q192R and clopidogrel resistance (adjusted OR = 1.13, 95%CI, 0.70-1.82; p = 0.622). Significantly higher platelet aggregation values were found in CYP2C19*2 and *3 patients when compared with *1/*1 allele carriers (p = 1.98 × 10(-6)). For PON1 Q192R genotypes, aggregation values were similar across all genotype groups (p = 0.359). There was no evidence of gene-gene interaction or LD between CYP2C19 and PON1 polymorphisms on ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Our

  7. Positive clinical response to clopidogrel is independent of paraoxonase 1 Q192R and CYP2C19 genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Medina-Gil, José M; Rodríguez-González, Fayna; Garay-Sánchez, Paloma; Limiñana, José M; Saavedra, Pedro; Tugores, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing controversy about the influence of serum paraoxonase type 1 and cytochrome CYP2C19 in the conversion of clopidogrel to its pharmaceutically active metabolite. The effect of concomitant medication with the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole has been also subject of intense scrutiny. We present a cohort of 263 patients receiving anti-platelet aggregation treatment with clopidogrel and aspirin for 1 year. The paraoxonase 1 gene Q192R variant along with the presence of CYP2C19*2 and *3 loss of function alleles, concomitant medication with proton pump inhibitors and known cardiovascular risk factors were examined to determine their influence in disease relapse due to an ischaemic event during the 12 month treatment period. The low number of patients suffering a relapse (20 out of 263), indicates that double anti-aggregation therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel was very effective in our patients. Among the relapsers, evidence of coronary heart disease was the most influencial factor affecting response to therapy, while the presence of the paraoxonase 1 Q192R variant, loss of function of CYP2C19, and concomitant medication with omeprazole were non-significant. PMID:24504666

  8. Significant Improvement of Antithrombotic Responses to Clopidogrel by Use of a Novel Conjugate as Revealed in an Arterial Model of Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoming; Lauver, D Adam; Wang, Hui; Sun, Duxin; Hollenberg, Paul F; Chen, Y Eugene; Osawa, Yoichi; Eitzman, Daniel T

    2016-10-01

    Clopidogrel is a prodrug that requires bioactivation by cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes to a pharmacologically active metabolite for antiplatelet action. The clinical limitations of clopidogrel are in large part due to its poor pharmacokinetics resulting from inefficient bioactivation by P450s. In this study, we determined the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a novel conjugate of clopidogrel, referred to as ClopNPT, in animal models and we evaluated its potential to overcome the limitations of clopidogrel. Results from pharmacokinetic (PK) studies showed that ClopNPT released the active metabolite with a time to maximal plasma concentration of <5 minutes in C57BL/6 mice after either oral or intravenous administration, and plasma concentrations of the active metabolite reached Cmax values of 1242 and 1100 ng/ml after a 10-mg/kg oral dose and a 5-mg/kg intravenous dose, respectively. Furthermore, ClopNPT was highly effective in preventing arterial thrombosis in rabbits and mice after vascular injuries. Formation of occlusive thrombi was prevented by ClopNPT at the 1-mg/kg dose with no significant increase in tongue bleeding time, whereas clopidogrel was ineffective at the same dose. These results suggest that ClopNPT has favorable PK/pharmacodynamic properties that can potentially overcome the attenuated PK properties of clopidogrel and thus significantly improve the efficacy of antiplatelet therapy. PMID:27511819

  9. Clopidogrel: A multifaceted affair.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Tugores, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Clopidogrel has been the therapy of choice, combined with aspirin, against platelet aggregation in patients at risk of suffering a vascular thrombotic event. Not all patients respond equally to clopidogrel, an observation that has led to searching for a test that, in the clinical setting, could predict patients' "resistance" to therapy. The evidence reveals a complex pharmacokinetic profile for clopidogrel, with multiple players involved, including cytochromes, characteristics of the target tissue, and accompanying clinical conditions. Despite FDA black box warnings recommending CYP2C19 genotyping before clopidogrel use, no robust evidence indicates that CYP2C19 function determines clinical response to the drug, either based on the presence of loss of function alleles or drug interactions with CYP2C19 inhibitors, like omeprazole. A tailored anti-aggregation treatment based on ex vivo platelet reactivity also seems unlikely due to the lack of robustness of most assays. The identification of clinical conditions that are at higher risk of new cardiovascular events, such as diabetes, obesity, coronary artery disease, or specific stenting procedures, seems to be a prudent approach to tailor anti-platelet therapy with more powerful drugs, accompanied by careful counseling to promote patient compliance. PMID:25328019

  10. Resistance to Clopidogrel among Iranian Patients Undergoing Angioplasty Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Haji Aghajani, Mohammad; Kobarfard, Farzad; Safi, Olia; Sheibani, Kourosh; Sistanizad, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    To study the resistance to standard dosage of clopidogrel among Iranian patients following percutaneous coronary intervention measured by platelet aggregation test. Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in Imam Hussein Medical center, Tehran, Iran, who were under treatment with aspirin, but had no history of clopidogrel usage, entered the study. Patients received standard dosage of clopidogrel (Plavix®, Sanofi, France, 600 mg loading dose and 75 mg/day afterward). Platelet aggregation was measured using light transmission aggregometer. The response to the drug was categorized as complete resistance (platelet aggregation decreased less than 10%), intermediate resistance (platelet aggregation decreased between 10 to 30%) and complete response (platelet aggregation decreased to 30% or more). All patients were evaluated for major adverse cardio vascular events one month after the angioplasty based on MACE criteria by phone contact. Thirty-one patients with a mean age of 59 ± 13 entered the study. Sixty-five percent of patients showed complete response to clopidogrel (95% CI: 45% to 81%), 22% showed intermediate resistance (95% CI: 10-41%) and 13% showed complete resistance (95% CI: 4-30%). One month after the angioplasty, no major adverse cardiovascular event was recorded. Based on our findings, it seems that there is no major difference between Iranian population and other studies regarding the resistance to clopidogrel. Due to the limited number of participants in our study, further investigations with higher number of patients are recommended to more precisely calculate the percentage of resistance among Iranian patients. PMID:24250685

  11. PON1 Q192R genetic variant and response to clopidogrel and prasugrel: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and a meta-analysis of clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mega, Jessica L; Close, Sandra L; Wiviott, Stephen D; Man, Michael; Duvvuru, Suman; Walker, Joseph R; Sundseth, Scott S; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Delaney, Jessica T; Hulot, Jean-Sebastien; Murphy, Sabina A; Paré, Guillaume; Price, Matthew J; Sibbing, Dirk; Simon, Tabassome; Trenk, Dietmar; Antman, Elliott M; Sabatine, Marc S

    2016-04-01

    response to clopidogrel, nor was it associated with the response to prasugrel. The meta-analysis reinforced a lack of a significant association between Q192R and cardiovascular outcomes in clopidogrel-treated patients. PMID:26573179

  12. Exome sequencing of extreme clopidogrel response phenotypes identifies B4GALT2 as a determinant of on-treatment platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Scott, S A; Collet, J-P; Baber, U; Yang, Y; Peter, I; Linderman, M; Sload, J; Qiao, W; Kini, A S; Sharma, S K; Desnick, R J; Fuster, V; Hajjar, R J; Montalescot, G; Hulot, J-S

    2016-09-01

    Interindividual variability in platelet aggregation is common among patients treated with clopidogrel and both high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) and low on-treatment platelet reactivity (LTPR) increase risks for adverse clinical outcomes. CYP2C19 influences clopidogrel response but only accounts for ∼12% of the variability in platelet reactivity. To identify novel variants implicated in on-treatment platelet reactivity, patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) with extreme pharmacodynamic responses to clopidogrel and wild-type CYP2C19 were subjected to exome sequencing. Candidate variants that clustered in the LTPR subgroup subsequently were genotyped across the discovery cohort (n = 636). Importantly, carriers of B4GALT2 c.909C>T had lower on-treatment P2Y12 reaction units (PRUs; P = 0.0077) and residual platelet aggregation (P = 0.0008) compared with noncarriers, which remained significant after adjusting for CYP2C19 and other clinical variables in both the discovery (P = 0.0298) and replication (n = 160; PRU: P = 0.0001) cohorts. B4GALT2 is a platelet-expressed galactosyltransferase, indicating that B4GALT2 c.909C>T may influence clopidogrel sensitivity through atypical cell-surface glycoprotein processing and platelet adhesion. PMID:27213804

  13. Clopidogrel reduces the inflammatory response of lung in a rat model of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiao-Chen; Chen, Hong; Fang, Yi-Qun; Yuan, Heng-Rong; You, Pu; Ma, Jun; Wang, Fang-Fang

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation and platelet activation are critical phenomena in the setting of decompression sickness. Clopidogrel (Clo) inhibits platelet activation and may also reduce inflammation. The goal of this study was to investigate if Clo had a protective role in decompression sickness (DCS) through anti-inflammation way. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=111) were assigned to three groups: control+vehicle group, DCS+vehicle, DCS+Clo group. The experimental group received 50 mg/kg of Clo or vehicle for 3 days, then compressed to 1,600 kPa (150 msw) in 28 s, maintained at 150 msw for 242 s and decompressed to surface at 3m/s. In a control experiment, rats were also treated with vehicle for 3 days and maintained at atmospheric pressure for an equivalent period of time. Clinical assessment took place over a period of 30 min after surfacing. At the end, blood samples were collected for blood cells counts and cytokine detection. The pathology and the wet/dry ratio of lung tissues, immunohistochemical detection of lung tissue CD41 expression, the numbers of P-selectin positive platelets and platelet-leukocyte conjugates in blood were tested. We found that Clo significantly reduced the DCS mortality risk (mortality rate: 11/45 with Clo vs. 28/46 in the untreated group, P<0.01). Clo reduced the lung injury, the wet/dry ratio of lung, the accumulation of platelet and leukocyte in lung, the fall in platelet count, the WBC count, the numbers of activated platelets and platelet-leukocyte complexes in peripheral blood. It was concluded that Clo can play a protective role in decompression sickness through reducing post-decompression platelet activation and inflammatory process. PMID:25784626

  14. Expression of miRNA-26a in platelets is associated with clopidogrel resistance following coronary stenting

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, SHUXIA; QI, XIAOYONG; CHEN, HUA; LI, MINGQUAN; GU, JIAN; LIU, CHUNXIA; XUE, HUA; WANG, LILI; GENG, YANPING; QI, PENG; HAN, YUPING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the association between platelet microRNA (miRNA)-26a expression and clopidogrel resistance in patients who underwent coronary stenting. Between September 2013 and August 2014, 43 patients with coronary heart disease underwent percutaneous coronary intervention at Heibei General Hospital (Shijiazhuang, China). In the same period, 20 healthy volunteers without any history of cardiovascular disease were enrolled in the present study as the control group. Flow cytometry was used to measure the phosphorylation levels of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), and to calculate the platelet reactivity index (PRI). Low response to clopidogrel was defined as PRI ≥50% on day 7 following clopidogrel administration. Western blotting was used to measure protein expression of VASP and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to determine the expression levels of mRNA and miRNAs. Bioinformatics tools were employed to predict that miR-26a, miR-199 and miR-23a may target VASP mRNA. The results of the present study demonstrated that the activity of platelets in patients with low or high clopidogrel response was increased, as compared with healthy subjects. No differences in platelet VASP protein expression levels were detected between patients with high clopidogrel response and healthy subjects; whereas VASP protein expression was elevated in patients with low clopidogrel response. Furthermore VASP gene transcription was maintained at low levels in healthy subjects and patients with high clopidogrel response, whereas patients with low clopidogrel response exhibited increased VASP mRNA expression levels. Platelet expression of miRNA-26a, but not miRNA-199 or miRNA-23a, was associated with high platelet reactivity. Serum miRNA-26a, miRNA-199 and miRNA-23a were not demonstrated to be involved in clopidogrel resistance. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that platelet miRNA-26a has an

  15. Clopidogrel and ticlopidine: P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate-receptor antagonists for the prevention of atherothrombosis.

    PubMed

    Savi, Pierre; Herbert, Jean-Marc

    2005-04-01

    Ticlopidine and clopidogrel belong to the same chemical family of thienopyridine adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-receptor antagonists. They have shown their efficacy as platelet antiaggregant and antithrombotic agents in many animal models, both ex vivo and in vivo. Although ticlopidine was discovered more than 30 years ago, it was only recently that the mechanism of action of ADP-receptor antagonists was characterized in detail. Ticlopidine and clopidogrel both behave in vivo as specific antagonists of P2Y (12), one of the ADP receptors on platelets. Metabolic steps that involve cytochrome P450-dependent pathways are required to generate the active metabolite responsible for this in vivo activity. The active moiety is a reactive thiol derivative that targets P2Y (12) on platelets. The interaction is irreversible, accounting for the observation that platelets are definitely antiaggregated, even if no active metabolite is detectable in plasma. The interaction is specific for P2Y (12); other purinoceptors such as P2Y (1) and P2Y (13) are spared. This results in inhibition of the binding of the P2Y (12) agonist 2-methylthio-ADP and the ADP-induced downregulation of adenylyl cyclase. Platelet aggregation is affected not only when triggered by ADP but also by aggregation inducers when used at concentrations requiring released ADP as an amplifier. The efficacy and safety of clopidogrel has been established in several large, randomized, controlled trials. The clopidogrel versus aspirin in patients at risk of ischaemic events (CAPRIE) trial demonstrated the superiority of clopidogrel over acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in patients at risk of ischemic events, including ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), and peripheral arterial disease. The clopidogrel in unstable angina to prevent recurrent ischemic events (CURE) trial showed a sustained, incremental benefit when clopidogrel was added to standard therapy (including ASA) in patients with unstable angina and non-Q-wave MI

  16. Potent and Orally Bioavailable Antiplatelet Agent, PLD-301, with the Potential of Overcoming Clopidogrel Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyu; Wang, Michael Zhiyan

    2016-01-01

    PLD-301, a phosphate prodrug of clopidogrel thiolactone discovered by Prelude Pharmaceuticals with the aim to overcome clopidogrel resistance, was evaluated for its in vivo inhibitory effect on ADP-induced platelet aggregation in rats. The potency of PLD-301 was similar to that of prasugrel, but much higher than that of clopidogrel. The results of pharmacokinetic analysis showed that the oral bioavailability of clopidogrel thiolactone converted from PLD-301 was 4- to 5-fold higher than that of the one converted from clopidogrel, suggesting that in comparison with clopidogrel, lower doses of PLD-301 could be used clinically. In summary, PLD-301 presents a potent and orally bioavailable antiplatelet agent that might have some advantages over clopidogrel, such as overcoming clopidogrel resistance for CYP2C19-allele loss-of-function carriers, and lowering dose-related toxicity due to a much lower effective dose.

  17. Relation between clopidogrel active metabolite levels and different platelet aggregation methods in patients receiving clopidogrel and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Johnston, Marilyn; Hirsh, Jack; Pare, Guillaume; Li, Chunjian; Mehta, Shamir; Teo, Koon K; Sloane, Debi; Yi, Qilong; Zhu, Jun; Eikelboom, John W

    2012-11-01

    Clopidogrel is a prodrug that undergoes bioconversion via cytochrome P450 system to form an active metabolite (AM) that binds to the platelet ADP receptor. The antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel is commonly assessed by measuring the aggregatory response to 5 μM ADP by light transmission aggregation (LTA) or multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) or by the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein platelet reactivity index (VASP-PRI). To determine which of these three tests of platelet ADP receptor pathway inhibition most closely correlates with clopidogrel AM levels. We analyzed blood samples from 82 patients with coronary artery disease who were randomized to receive double-dose or standard dose clopidogrel for 2 weeks. We measured peak clopidogrel AM levels, platelet aggregation in response to ADP and VASP-PRI on days 1, and repeated all the measures on days 7 and 14. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the correlation between clopidogrel AM and LTA, MEA and VASP-PRI. Bland-Altman plots were used to explore the agreement between tests of the antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel. Clopidogrel AM on day 1 correlated most closely with VASP-PRI (r = -0.5767) and demonstrated weaker correlations with LTA (r = -0.4656) and MEA (r = -0.3384) (all p < 0.01). Intra-class correlation (ICC) between VASP-PRI and LTA was 0.6446; VASP-PRI and MEA was 0.4720; and LTA and MEA was 0.4693. Similar results were obtained on days 7 and 14. Commonly used pharmacodynamic measures of clopidogrel response are only moderately correlated with clopidogrel AM levels and may not be suitable to measure the adequacy of clopidogrel therapy. PMID:22797934

  18. CYP2C19*2 and Other Allelic Variants Affecting Platelet Response to Clopidogrel Tested by Thrombelastography in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Nie, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Yun; Shi, Lu-Wen; Wang, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the contributions of CYP2C19 polymorphisms to the various clopidogrel responses tested by thrombelastography (TEG) in Chinese patients with the acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods: Patients were screened prospectively with ACS diagnose and were treated with clopidogrel and aspirin dual antiplatelet therapy. CYP2C19 loss of function (LOF) and gain of function (GOF) genotype, adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP)-channel platelet inhibition rate (PIR) tested by TEG and the occurrence of 3-month major adverse cardiovascular events and ischemic events were assessed in 116 patients. Results: High on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) prevalence defined by PIR <30% by TEG in ADP-channel was 32.76% (38/116). With respect to the normal wild type, CYP2C19*2, and *3 LOF alleles, and *17 GOF alleles, patients were classified into three metabolism phenotypes: 41.38% were extensive metabolizers (EMs), 56.90% were intermediate metabolizers (IMs), and 1.72% were poor metabolizers (PMs). Of the enrolled patients, 31.47%, 5.17%, and 0.43%, respectively, were carriers of *2, *3, and *17 alleles. The HTPR incidence differed significantly according to CYP2C19 genotypes, accounting for 18.75%, 41.54%, and 100.00% in EMs, IMs, and PMs, respectively. Eighteen (17.24%) ischemic events occurred during the 3-month follow-up, and there was a significant difference in ischemic events between HTPR group and nonhigh on-treatment platelet reactivity group. Conclusions: Genetic CYP2C19 polymorphisms are relative to the inferior, the antiplatelet activity after clopidogrel admission and may increase the incidence of ischemic events in patients with ACS. PMID:26265611

  19. Paraoxonase 1 Gene Polymorphism Does Not Affect Clopidogrel Response Variability but Is Associated with Clinical Outcome after PCI

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeehoon; Jeon, Ki-Hyun; Kang, Si-Hyuck; Han, Jung-Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Yang, Han-Mo; Lee, Hae-Young; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Oh, Byung-Hee; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Background Paraoxonase (PON) is a high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) associated enzyme with antioxidative and anti-atherogenic property. Its function is associated with coronary artery disease and its activity genetically controlled. We evaluated whether genetic variation of PON-1 is associated with clinical outcome in a large cohort of Korean patients with drug-eluting stents implantation. Methods A total of 1676 patients with drug-eluting stent implantation were enrolled in the prospective CROSS-VERIFY cohort from June 2006 to June 2010. We genotyped the PON1-Q192R gene, measured clopidogrel on-treatment platelet reactivity (OPR), and analyzed lipid profiles. The primary endpoint was the composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis at 12 months. Results PON-1 genotyping data were available in 1336 patients. Since the Q-allele is associated with decreased PON-activity, we analyzed the outcome between patients with QQ/QR (815 patients, 61%) and those with RR-genotype (521 patients, 39%). After adjustment for common cardiac risk factors, the QQ/QR-genotype was an independent predictor of the primary thrombotic endpoint with an 11-fold increased risk (HR 11.6, 95% CI: 1.55–87.0), but not repeat revascularization (HR 1.12, 95% CI: 0.78–1.61). The QQ/QR-genotype was not associated with OPR (QQ/QR: 231±86 PRU vs. RR 236±82 PRU, p = 0.342) but higher small-dense LDL levels (1.20±0.12 mg/dL vs. 0.76±0.15 mg/dL, p = 0.027). The increased risk of thrombotic outcomes was more profound in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients compared with non-ACS patients. Conclusion PON1 Q-allele is an independent predictor of worse cardiovascular outcome independent of platelet function and is associated with significantly higher levels of small dense LDL-C. PMID:23418418

  20. Relation of genetic polymorphisms in the cytochrome P450 gene with clopidogrel resistance after drug-eluting stent implantation in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Myung; Park, Sungha; Shin, Dong-Jik; Choi, Donghoon; Shim, Chi Young; Ko, Young-Guk; Kim, Jung-Sun; Shin, Eun-Soon; Chang, Chong Won; Lee, Jong-Eun; Jang, Yangsoo

    2009-07-01

    Clopidogrel is a prodrug that has to be converted to an active metabolite by hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes to inhibit platelet aggregation. Individual variability of platelet inhibition by clopidogrel suggests a possibility for genetic factors having a significant influence on clopidogrel responsiveness. In this study, we sought to determine the relation of genetic polymorphisms of CYP genes to clopidogrel resistance in Koreans. Four hundred fifty patients who underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stents were randomly assigned to treatment with dual antiplatelet regimen (aspirin plus clopidogrel) or triple antiplatelet regimen (aspirin plus clopidogrel plus cilostazol). Clopidogrel resistance using VerifyNow P2Y12 assay and genetic analysis were performed in 387 patients. Clopidogrel resistance was found in 112 patients (28.9%). In the clopidogrel-responsive group, there was a significantly higher proportion of cilostazol use. Because cilostazol showed a significant influence on clopidogrel resistance, we examined the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and clopidogrel resistance in the dual and triple antiplatelet therapy groups, respectively. In all subjects, the CYP2C19*3A allele was significantly more prevalent in the clopidogrel-resistant group compared with the clopidogrel-responsive group. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that CYP2C19*3 is an independent predictor of clopidogrel resistance. In conclusion, CYP2C19*3 single-nucleotide polymorphisms is an independent risk factor of clopidogrel resistance in Korean subjects with coronary artery disease. PMID:19576320

  1. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine. PMID:26341013

  2. Determination of clopidogrel main metabolite in plasma: a useful tool for monitoring therapy?

    PubMed

    Mani, Helen; Toennes, Stefan W; Linnemann, Birgit; Urbanek, Dorota A; Schwonberg, Jan; Kauert, Gerold F; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2008-02-01

    This study was performed to determine whether analysis of clopidogrel and its main carboxylic acid metabolite in plasma provides additional information about the wide variability of platelet aggregation inhibition in clopidogrel-treated patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Consecutive outpatients (n = 56) with stable peripheral arterial occlusive disease treated with 75 mg clopidogrel daily, without co-administration of aspirin, were investigated. With use of a standardized questionnaire, the time of drug intake was documented. Blood sampling was performed within 24 hours after the most recent drug intake. Platelet function was measured by optical aggregometry using adenosine diphosphate (ADP) (2 mumol/L) as the agonist. Plasma concentrations of clopidogrel and its main metabolite, clopidogrel carboxylic acid, were quantitated using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis coupled to mass spectrometry. In 95% (53/56) of patients, clopidogrel carboxylic acid was detected. In 40% (22/56) of patients, the ADP-induced aggregation response was within the normal range despite clopidogrel treatment. In 14% (3/22) of these patients, neither clopidogrel nor its main metabolite could be detected. Two of these patients agreed to ingest 75 mg/d clopidogrel under observation and to undergo blood sampling after 2, 12, and 24 hours. Clopidogrel carboxylic acid and a significant inhibition of platelet aggregation were detected even after 24 hours in both patients, confirming noncompliance as the reason for the lack of inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation observed in the initial measurements. In the subgroup of patients who had taken clopidogrel within 4 hours before blood sampling, a large range of carboxylic acid concentrations was detected, indicating a high variability of drug metabolism among patients. In conclusion, determining clopidogrel metabolite plasma concentrations could be a useful tool for identifying poor compliance and variable

  3. Chiral Stability of an Extemporaneously Prepared Clopidogrel Bisulfate Oral Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Tynes, Clay R.; Livingston, Brad; Patel, Hetesh; Arnold, John J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chiral stability of clopidogrel bisulfate in an extemporaneously compounded oral suspension for a period of 60 days. METHODS A 5 mg/mL oral suspension of clopidogrel bisulfate was prepared from commercially available Plavix tablets. The clopidogrel suspension was then evenly divided between two light-resistant prescription bottles and stored either under refrigeration (4°C) or at room temperature (25°C). Samples were drawn from the stored suspensions immediately after preparation and on days 7, 14, 28, and 60. Samples were subsequently analyzed at each time point by high-performance liquid chromatography using a reversed-phase column, with chemical stability defined as the retention of at least 90% of the initial intact clopidogrel concentration measured. To determine the chiral stability of the suspension, samples were also analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography using a chiral column to investigate possible enantiomeric inversion. Chiral stability was defined as the retention of at least 90% of the initial concentration of the suspension as the S-enantiomer, the active moiety of Plavix. RESULTS Regardless of storage conditions, the oral suspension of clopidogrel retained at least 98% of the active S-enantiomer for 60 days after preparation. Compared with the clopidogrel suspension stored in the refrigerator, more chiral inversion was noted in the clopidogrel suspension stored at room temperature. CONCLUSIONS Our investigation of chiral stability indicates that a 5 mg/mL clopidogrel oral suspension stored under refrigeration and at room temperature maintains chiral stability as the active S-enantiomer. PMID:24782688

  4. Intensified Antiplatelet Treatment Reduces Major Cardiac Events in Patients with Clopidogrel Low Response: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Hu, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Shu-Hua; Li, Ji-Min; Zhu, Hui; Xu, Ke; Chen, Jun; Li, Chun-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clopidogrel low response (CLR) is an independent risk factor of adverse outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and intensified antiplatelet treatments (IAT) guided by platelet function assays might overcome laboratory CLR. However, whether IAT improves clinical outcomes is controversial. Methods: Relevant trials were identified in PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the Chinese Medical Journal Network databases from their establishment to September 9, 2014. Trials were screened using predefined inclusion criteria. Conventional meta-analysis and cumulative meta-analysis were performed using the Review Manager 5.0 and STATA 12.0 software programs. Results: Thirteen randomized controlled trials involving 5111 patients with CLR were recruited. During a follow-up period of 1–12 months, the incidences of cardiovascular (CV) death, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), and stent thrombosis were significantly lower in the IAT arm than in the conventional antiplatelet treatment arm (relative risk [RR] = 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.36–0.57, P < 0.000,01), whereas bleeding was similar between the two arms (RR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.86–1.27, P = 0.65). Conclusions: IAT guided by platelet function assays reduces the risk of CV death, nonfatal MI, and stent thrombosis (ST) without an increased risk of bleeding in patients undergoing PCI and with CLR. PMID:27064045

  5. Differences in Whole Blood Platelet Aggregation at Baseline and in Response to Aspirin and Aspirin Plus Clopidogrel in Patients With Versus Without Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nishank; Li, Xilong; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Sarode, Ravi; Toto, Robert D; Banerjee, Subhash; Hedayati, S Susan

    2016-02-15

    Thrombotic events while receiving antiplatelet agents (APAs) are more common in subjects with versus without chronic kidney disease (CKD). Data on antiplatelet effects of APA in CKD are scarce and limited by lack of baseline platelet function before APA treatment. We hypothesized subjects with stages 4 to 5 CKD versus no CKD have greater baseline platelet aggregability and respond poorly to aspirin and clopidogrel. In a prospective controlled study, we measured whole blood platelet aggregation (WBPA) in 28 CKD and 16 non-CKD asymptomatic stable outpatients not on APA, frequency-matched for age, gender, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. WBPA was remeasured after 2 weeks of each aspirin and aspirin plus clopidogrel. The primary outcome was percent inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) from baseline. The secondary outcome was residual platelet aggregability (RPA; proportion with <50% IPA). Baseline platelet aggregability was similar between groups except adenosine diphosphate-induced WBPA, which was higher in CKD versus non-CKD; median (interquartile range) = 13.5 (9.5 to 16.0) versus 9.0 (6.0 to 12.0) Ω, p = 0.007. CKD versus non-CKD participants had lower clopidogrel-induced IPA, 38% versus 72%, p = 0.04. A greater proportion of CKD versus non-CKD participants had RPA after clopidogrel treatment (56% vs 8.3%, p = 0.01). There were no significant interactions between CKD and the presence of cytochrome P450 2C19 polymorphisms for platelet aggregability in clopidogrel-treated participants. In conclusion, CKD versus non-CKD subjects exhibited similar platelet aggregation at baseline, similar aspirin effects and greater RPA on clopidogrel, which was independent of cytochrome P450 2C19 polymorphisms. PMID:26725101

  6. Genetics Home Reference: clopidogrel resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... be divided into two categories: intermediate metabolizers and poor metabolizers. Intermediate metabolizers are able to process some ... not protected from developing a harmful blood clot. Poor metabolizers process little or no clopidogrel, so they ...

  7. Changes in CYP2C19 enzyme activity evaluated by the [(13)C]-pantoprazole breath test after co-administration of clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors following percutaneous coronary intervention and correlation to platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Adrien; Modak, Anil; Déry, Ugo; Roy, Mélanie; Rinfret, Stéphane; Bertrand, Olivier F; Larose, Éric; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Barbeau, Gérald; Gleeton, Onil; Nguyen, Can Manh; Proulx, Guy; Noël, Bernard; Roy, Louis; Paradis, Jean-Michel; De Larochellière, Robert; Déry, Jean-Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with clopidogrel and aspirin is used for the prevention of cardiovascular events following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). These agents increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. To prevent these events, proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are routinely prescribed. It has been reported that with the exception of pantoprazole and dexlanzoprazole, PPIs can impede conversion of clopidogrel by cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) to its active metabolite, a critical step required for clopidogrel efficacy. Changes in CYP2C19 enzyme activity (phenotype) and its correlation with platelet reactivity following PPI therapy has not yet been fully described. In this study we attempted to determine if the [ (13)C]-pantoprazole breath test (Ptz-BT) can evaluate changes in CYP2C19 enzyme activity (phenoconversion) following the administration of PPI in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients treated with DAPT after PCI. Thirty (30) days after successful PCI with stent placement, 59 patients enrolled in the Evaluation of the Influence of Statins and Proton Pump Inhibitors on Clopidogrel Antiplatelet Effects (SPICE) trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00930670) were recruited to participate in this sub study. Patients were randomized to one of 4 antacid therapies (omeprazole, esomeprazole. pantoprazole or ranitidine). Subjects were administered the Ptz-BT and platelet function was evaluated by vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation and light transmittance aggregometry before and 30 d after treatment with antacid therapy. Patients randomized to esomeprazole and omeprazole had greater high on-treatment platelet reactivity and lowering of CYP2C19 enzyme activity at Day 60 after 30 d of PPI therapy. Patients randomized to ranitidine and pantoprazole did not show any changes in platelet activity or CYP 2C19 enzyme activity. In patients treated with esomeprazole and omeprazole, changes in CYP2C19 enzyme activity

  8. Variability of residual platelet function despite clopidogrel treatment in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Schwonberg, Jan; Toennes, Stefan W; Mani, Helen; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2010-04-01

    Residual platelet function despite treatment with clopidogrel may predict an unfavourable cardiovascular outcome. The majority of studies have investigated the effects of clopidogrel administration in conjunction with aspirin in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. The primary objective of the present study was to assess the platelet response to clopidogrel in the absence of aspirin in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and to investigate whether non-responsiveness to clopidogrel is reproducible during long-term follow-up. Fifty-four clinically stable PAOD patients on a maintenance dose of 75 mg/d clopidogrel were enrolled in this study. Platelet function was assessed at baseline and after a median follow-up of 18 months using light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) with 2 microM ADP as an agonist. HPLC-coupled mass spectrometry was used to detect clopidogrel and clopidogrel carboxylic acid, the main metabolite of clopidogrel. Residual platelet function, as defined by late aggregation values within the reference range (i.e., >43%), was observed in 35.2% of patients at baseline and 17.6% during follow-up. During the observation period, 26.5% had switched from responder to non-responder status or vice versa. Among non-responders, either clopidogrel or its metabolite was detected in 89.5% and 83.3% of patients at baseline and at follow-up, respectively. We conclude that non-responsiveness to clopidogrel as determined by ADP-induced LTA is not stable over time. This phenomenon cannot be attributed to non-compliance alone. PMID:20153859

  9. Lower Loading Dose of Prasugrel Compared with Conventional Loading Doses of Clopidogrel and Prasugrel in Korean Patients Undergoing Elective Coronary Angiography: A Randomized Controlled Study Evaluating Pharmacodynamic Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hyun; Guo, Long Zhe; Park, Min Kyu; Yi, So Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Although prasugrel allows for rapid and potent platelet inhibition, the efficacy and safety of lower doses of prasugrel for patients of East Asian ethnicity has not yet been investigated. We compared the effect of a lower loading dose (LD) of prasugrel with conventional LDs of clopidogrel and prasugrel in Korean patients. Subjects and Methods Forty-three Korean patients undergoing coronary angiography were enrolled in the study. Participants were randomly administered LDs of clopidogrel 600 mg, prasugrel 30 mg or prasugrel 60 mg prior to coronary angiography. Platelet reactivity was assessed at baseline and at the time of peak platelet inhibition using light transmission aggregometry (LTA), the VerifyNow assay, and multiple electrode aggregometry. Results Although baseline platelet reactivity between the groups showed no significant differences, at the time of peak platelet inhibition, the prasugrel 30 mg (18.9±10.0%) and 60 mg groups (13.8±10.8%) showed significantly more potent platelet inhibition than the clopidogrel 600 mg group (52.9±15.8%; p<0.001) by LTA. However, there were no significant differences between the prasugrel 30 mg and 60 mg groups (p=0.549). Conclusion The loading effect of prasugrel 30 mg was more potent than clopidogrel 600 mg and was not significantly different from prasugrel 60 mg. PMID:25469140

  10. Plateletworks: A screening assay for clopidogrel therapy monitoring in healthy cats

    PubMed Central

    Hamel-Jolette, Avril; Dunn, Marilyn; Bédard, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Plateletworks is a screening assay used in human medicine to monitor platelet-inhibiting drugs. As arterial thromboembolism is a common complication in cats suffering from cardiomyopathy, they are often treated with anti-platelet medication. Clopidogrel (Plavix), an anti-platelet aggregation drug, has recently been evaluated in healthy cats. The purpose of this study was to determine if the Plateletworks method can detect a decrease in platelet aggregation in cats receiving clopidogrel. Nine healthy adult cats were used for this study. Platelet aggregation was measured before and after a 3-day clopidogrel treatment (18.75 mg SID). Platelet aggregation after the clopidogrel treatment was significantly lower (P < 0.01). The Plateletworks method appears to be a promising test to monitor clopidogrel therapy in cats. PMID:19337399

  11. Mutational analysis clopidogrel resistance and platelet function in patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Correll, Mick; Johnson, Christopher K; Ferrari, Giovanni; Brizzio, Mariano; Mak, Andrew W C; Quackenbush, John; Shaw, Richard E; Zapolanski, Alex; Grau, Juan B

    2013-06-01

    Clopidogrel is an oral antiplatelet pro-drug prescribed to 40 million patients worldwide who are at risk for thrombotic events or receiving percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However about a fifth of patients treated with clopidogrel do not respond adequately to the drug. From a cohort of 105 patients on whom we had functional data on clopidogrel response, we used ultra-high throughput sequencing to assay mutations in CYP2C19 and ABCB1, the two genes genetically linked to respond. Testing for mutations in CYP2C19, as recommended by the FDA, only correctly predicted if a patient would respond to clopidogrel 52.4% of the time. Similarly, testing of the ABCB1 gene only correctly foretold response in 51 (48.6%) patients. These results are clinically relevant and suggest that until additional genetic factors are discovered that predict response more completely, functional assays are more appropriate for clinical use. PMID:23462555

  12. Impact of Aspirin and Clopidogrel Interruption on Platelet Function in Patients Undergoing Major Vascular Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Le Manach, Yannick; Kahn, David; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla; Le Sache, Frederic; Smadja, David M.; Remones, Veronique; Loriot, Marie-Anne; Coriat, Pierre; Gaussem, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate functional platelet recovery after preoperative withdrawal of aspirin and clopidogrel and platelet function 5 days after treatment resumption. Methods/Results We conducted an observational study, which prospectively included consecutive patients taking aspirin, taking clopidogrel, and untreated controls (15 patients in each group). The antiplatelet drugs were withdrawn five days before surgery (baseline) and were reintroduced two days after surgery. Platelet function was evaluated by optical aggregation in the presence of collagen, arachidonic acid (aspirin) and ADP (clopidogrel) and by VASP assay (clopidogrel). Platelet-leukocyte complex (PLC) level was quantified at each time-point. At baseline, platelet function was efficiently inhibited by aspirin and had recovered fully in most patients 5 days after drug withdrawal. PLC levels five days after aspirin reintroduction were similar to baseline (+4±10%; p = 0.16), in line with an effective platelet inhibition. Chronic clopidogrel treatment was associated with variable platelet inhibition and its withdrawal led to variable functional recovery. PLC levels were significantly increased five days after clopidogrel reintroduction (+10±15%; p = 0.02), compared to baseline. Conclusions Aspirin withdrawal 5 days before high-bleeding-risk procedures was associated with functional platelet recovery, and its reintroduction two days after surgery restored antiplaletet efficacy five days later. This was not the case of clopidogrel, and further work is therefore needed to define its optimal perioperative management. PMID:25141121

  13. National Quality Assessment of Early Clopidogrel Therapy in Chinese Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) in 2006 and 2011: Insights From the China Patient-Centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events (PEACE)–Retrospective AMI Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihua; Desai, Nihar R; Li, Jing; Hu, Shuang; Wang, Qing; Li, Xi; Masoudi, Frederick A; Spertus, John A; Nuti, Sudhakar V; Wang, Sisi; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Background Early clopidogrel administration to patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been demonstrated to improve outcomes in a large Chinese trial. However, patterns of use of clopidogrel for patients with AMI in China are unknown. Methods and Results From a nationally representative sample of AMI patients from 2006 and 2011, we identified 11 944 eligible patients for clopidogrel therapy and measured early clopidogrel use, defined as initiation within 24 hours of hospital admission. Among the patients eligible for clopidogrel, the weighted rate of early clopidogrel therapy increased from 45.7% in 2006 to 79.8% in 2011 (P<0.001). In 2006 and 2011, there was significant variation in early clopidogrel use by region, ranging from 1.5% to 58.0% in 2006 (P<0.001) and 48.7% to 87.7% in 2011 (P<0.001). While early use of clopidogrel was uniformly high in urban hospitals in 2011 (median 89.3%; interquartile range: 80.1% to 94.5%), there was marked heterogeneity among rural hospitals (median 50.0%; interquartile range: 11.5% to 84.4%). Patients without reperfusion therapy and those admitted to rural hospitals were less likely to be treated with clopidogrel. Conclusions Although the use of early clopidogrel therapy in patients with AMI has increased substantially in China, there is notable wide variation across hospitals, with much less adoption in rural hospitals. Quality improvement initiatives are needed to increase consistency of early clopidogrel use for patients with AMI. Clinical Trial Registration URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/. Unique identifier: NCT01624883. PMID:26163041

  14. Potential drug interaction between paclitaxel and clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    SHINODA, YASUTAKA; KIMURA, MICHIO; USAMI, EISEKI; ASANO, HIROKI; YOSHIMURA, TOMOAKI

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel is mainly inactivated in vivo by cytochrome P5402C8 (CYP2C8). In recent years, the clopidogrel metabolite has been reported to potently inhibit CYP2C8. However, clinical information regarding the interaction between these two drugs is limited. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first retrospective study investigating the potential for the drug interaction between paclitaxel and clopidogrel. A total of 8 cases in which clopidogrel and paclitaxel were used in combination were examined. The incidence of adverse events and discontinuation rate in these cases were assessed. Neutrophil counts were compared in patients prior and subsequent to the combined administration of clopidogrel and paclitaxel. Grade 3 neutropenia occurred in all cases of combination therapy and grade 4 occurred in 7 cases (88%). In addition, 4 cases (50%) showed febrile neutropenia. Four cases (50%) involved a severe adverse event requiring discontinuation of drug administration. In 1 case involving 6 courses of paclitaxel and nedaplatin therapy prior and subsequent to clopidogrel, there was a significant reduction in the average neutrophil count after 8 days of combination treatment (1,240±395 counts/mm3 without clopidogrel; 370±148 counts/mm3 with clopidogrel; mean ± standard deviation, P<0.01). Drug interactions during co-administration of clopidogrel and paclitaxel may cause severe neutropenia. To avoid these interactions, alternative medications should be considered. If these two drugs are used in combination, it may be necessary to monitor for adverse events more carefully. PMID:27347418

  15. Modulation of Circulating MicroRNAs Levels during the Switch from Clopidogrel to Ticagrelor

    PubMed Central

    Carino, Annarita; De Rosa, Salvatore; Sorrentino, Sabato; Polimeni, Alberto; Sabatino, Jolanda; Caiazzo, Gianluca; Torella, Daniele; Spaccarotella, Carmen; Mongiardo, Annalisa; Strangio, Antonio; Filippis, Carol; Indolfi, Ciro

    2016-01-01

    Background. Circulating microRNAs are appealing biomarkers to monitor several processes underlying cardiovascular diseases. Platelets are a major source for circulating microRNAs. Interestingly, the levels of specific microRNAs were reported to correlate with the level of platelet activation. The aim of the present study was to test whether the treatment with the novel antiplatelet agent, ticagrelor, is associated with modulation in the levels of key platelet-derived microRNAs. Methods and Results. Patients were randomly selected from those participating in the SHIFT-OVER study, in which we had previously evaluated the effect of the therapeutic switch from clopidogrel to ticagrelor on platelet aggregation. Circulating levels of selected microRNAs were measured before and after the therapeutic switch from a dual antiplatelet therapy including acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and clopidogrel to the more potent ticagrelor. Interestingly, the circulating levels of miR-126 (p = 0.030), miR-223 (p = 0.044), and miR-150 (p = 0.048) were significantly reduced, while the levels of miR-96 were increased (p = 0.038). No substantial differences were observed for the remaining microRNAs. Conclusions. Switching from a dual antiplatelet treatment with clopidogrel to ticagrelor is associated with significant modulation in the circulating levels of specific microRNAs. If confirmed in larger, independent cohorts, our results pave the way for the use of circulating microRNAs as biomarkers of platelets activity in response to specific pharmacological treatments. PMID:27366745

  16. Significant Improvement of Metabolic Characteristics and Bioactivities of Clopidogrel and Analogs by Selective Deuteration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xueyu; Zhao, Xue; Yang, Zhichao; Wang, Hao; Meng, Xiangjun; Su, Chong; Liu, Mingyuan; Fawcett, John Paul; Yang, Yan; Gu, Jingkai

    2016-01-01

    In the search for prodrug analogs of clopidogrel with improved metabolic characteristics and antiplatelet bioactivity, a group of clopidogrel and vicagrel analogs selectively deuterated at the benzylic methyl ester group were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated. The compounds included clopidogrel-d₃ (8), 2-oxoclopidogrel-d₃ (9), vicagrel-d₃ (10a), and 12 vicagrel-d₃ analogs (10b-10m) with different alkyl groups in the thiophene ester moiety. The D₃C-O bond length in 10a was shown by X-ray single crystal diffraction to be shorter than the H₃C-O bond length in clopidogrel, consistent with the slower rate of hydrolysis of 8 than of clopidogrel in rat whole blood in vitro. A study of the ability of the compounds to inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation in fresh rat whole blood collected 2 h after oral dosing of rats with the compounds (7.8 μmol/kg) showed that deuteration increased the activity of clopidogrel and that increasing the size of the alkyl group in the thiophene ester moiety reduced activity. A preliminary pharmacokinetic study comparing 10a with vicagrel administered simultaneously as single oral doses (72 μmol/kg of each drug) to male Wistar rats showed 10a generated more of its active metabolite than vicagrel. These results suggest that 10a is a potentially superior antiplatelet agent with improved metabolic characteristics and bioactivity, and less dose-related toxicity. PMID:27248988

  17. Developments in Oral Antiplatelet Agents for the Treatment of Acute Coronary Syndromes: Clopidogrel, Prasugrel, and Ticagrelor.

    PubMed

    Roffman, David S

    2016-06-01

    A review of the literature was conducted for clinical trials evaluating the antiplatelet P2Y12 receptor antagonists, clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor, as well as the guidelines for the management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or myocardial infarction. Clinical guidelines recommend that patients with ACS be treated with dual oral antiplatelet therapy of aspirin plus clopidogrel, prasugrel, or ticagrelor. The selection of an appropriate antiplatelet agent depends on the treatment approach and a patient's bleeding risk and clinical history. With respect to antiplatelet activity, prasugrel and ticagrelor demonstrate greater potency and less interpatient variability than clopidogrel. In phase III clinical trials, prasugrel and ticagrelor reduced the incidence of ischemic events in patients with ACS compared with clopidogrel. Ticagrelor and clopidogrel were associated with a similar risk of major bleeding, whereas patients receiving prasugrel had an increased risk of major bleeding versus those receiving clopidogrel. Pharmacists can provide guidance on the appropriate use of antiplatelet agents as well as the use of concomitant medications, while being vigilant for any potential drug interactions. PMID:25660584

  18. Clopidogrel: A possible exacerbating factor for psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vikram K.; Khatri, Gayatri; Prabha, Neel; Abhinav, C.; Sharma, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    A 64-year-old man developed palmoplantar pustulosis eventuating into palmoplantar pustular psoriasis following treatment with diltiazem, atenolol, aspirin and atorvastatin for suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Treatment for psoriasis, stopping atenolol and substituting aspirin with clopidogrel did not benefit. Subsequently, he stopped all his drugs and did not develop psoriasis or symptoms/signs of CAD. Re-challenge with oral clopidogrel precipitated his skin lesions. This case has implications for patients having psoriasis and cardiovascular comorbidity where clopidogrel/ticlopidine or aspirin may not be a useful alternative. PMID:24550599

  19. Clopidogrel: a possible exacerbating factor for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Vikram K; Khatri, Gayatri; Prabha, Neel; Abhinav, C; Sharma, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    A 64-year-old man developed palmoplantar pustulosis eventuating into palmoplantar pustular psoriasis following treatment with diltiazem, atenolol, aspirin and atorvastatin for suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Treatment for psoriasis, stopping atenolol and substituting aspirin with clopidogrel did not benefit. Subsequently, he stopped all his drugs and did not develop psoriasis or symptoms/signs of CAD. Re-challenge with oral clopidogrel precipitated his skin lesions. This case has implications for patients having psoriasis and cardiovascular comorbidity where clopidogrel/ticlopidine or aspirin may not be a useful alternative. PMID:24550599

  20. Evaluator Responsiveness to Stakeholders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzam, Tarek

    2010-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted in an attempt to examine how evaluators modify their evaluation design in response to differing stakeholder groups. In this study, evaluators were provided with a fictitious description of a school-based program. They were then asked to design an evaluation of the program. After the evaluation design decisions were…

  1. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters do not Improve Clopidogrel Associated P2Y12 Inhibition in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Kamal, Haris; Baxter, Melissa; Mehta, Bijal K.

    2015-01-01

    The specific action of omega-3 fatty acid ethyl esters (OFA) in preventing cerebrovascular disease remains unknown, but research has demonstrated multiple possible mechanisms. In addition to altering lipid profiles, OFA may inhibit platelet aggregation. Clopidogrel inhibits platelets via the P2Y12 receptor. OFA may alter clopidogrel-associated platelet-inhibition via a possible combined effect on P2Y12 inhibition. To determine if OFA affects clopidogrel associated P2Y12 platelet receptor inhibition by comparing the percentage of responders in patients with cerebrovascular disease who were taking clopidogrel with or without OFA. We retrospectively reviewed data from adult patients with cerebrovascular disease or cerebral aneurysms and taking clopidogrel, who were seen at a single hospital between March 2010 to September 2011. We included 438 subjects in the study. For the 67 subjects who received loading doses of both clopidogrel and OFA, 71.6% had a P2Y12 inhibition response more than 20%, which is considered a positive response. For the 55 subjects who received just clopidogrel load, 67.2% of subjects were responders. There were 70.4% responders in the 274 subjects who were taking 75 mg of clopidogrel alone at home, and 73.8% responders in the 42 subjects who were taking both clopidogrel and OFA at home. However, these percentage differences were not statistically significant. This study did not find additional P2Y12 platelet inhibition when patients were given OFA, either given as a loading dose or taking it daily. PMID:26294943

  2. Effects of genetic factors to stent thrombosis due to clopidogrel resistance after coronary stent placement.

    PubMed

    Kirac, D; Erdem, A; Avcilar, T; Yesilcimen, K; Guney, A I; Emre, A; Yazici, S; Terzi, S; Kaspar, E C; Cetin, S E; Isbir, T

    2016-01-01

    Stent thrombosis (ST) is considered as a multifactorial problem which is mostly occurs due to clopidogrel resistance. It may be due to some CYP450 enzyme deficiencies which play role in clopidogrel metabolism. Therefore the aim of this study is to detect the mutations in CYP2C19 and CYP2C9 genes which may cause ST, and to investigate the relation between other risk factors and ST. 50 individuals who have stent thrombosis and 50 individuals who haven't got any complication were enrolled as patient and control group respectively. *2,*3,*4,*5,*17 mutations in CYP2C19 gene and *2 ve *3 mutations in CYP2C9 gene were investigated with RT-PCR. Clopidogrel and aspirin resistance were investigated with multiple electrode platelet aggregometry. Results were evaluated statistically. CYP2C19*2 mutation was found statistically higher in patients (% 18), whereas CYP2C19*17 was found statistically higher in controls (% 36)(p<0.05). Additionally, it was found that patients who have clopidogrel and/or aspirin resistance also have CYP2C19*1/*2 or CYPC19*2/*2 genotype. These relations were also found statistically significant. (p=0,000005 for clopidogrel resistance and p=0,000059 for aspirin resistance). In conclusion, it was suggested that there is a relation between CYP2C19*2 mutations and ST due to clopidogrel resistance, and CYP2C19*17 may have a protective role in this process. The use of novel and more potent drug or high clopidogrel maintenance dosing before stent implantation may be beneficial treatment options for antiplatelet therapy in CYP2C19*2 carriers. PMID:26828987

  3. Clopidogrel

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for ...

  4. Successful Prasugrel Therapy for Recurrent Left Main Stent Thrombosis in a Clopidogrel Hyporesponder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Stent thrombosis is a life-threatening sequela of drug-eluting stent implantation. Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and thienopyridine is typically used to prevent this catastrophic event. In terms of stent thrombosis, the major concern is the variable response of patients to clopidogrel, and this has raised interest in new antiplatelet agents. We present the case of a 64-year-old woman whom we successfully treated with prasugrel after she had repeated episodes of stent thrombosis caused by a poor response to clopidogrel. This case highlights the potential role of new antiplatelet agents for patients who are undergoing drug-eluting stent implantation. PMID:26504448

  5. Pharmacogenetic Selection of Volunteers Increases Stringency of Bioequivalence Studies; The Case of Clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Garcés-Eisele, J.; Ruiz-Argüelles, A.; Estrada-Marín, Larisa; Reyes-Núñez, Virginia; Vázquez-Pérez, R.; Guzmán-García, Olga; Coutiño-Medina, R.; Acosta-Sandria, Leticia; Cedillo-Carvallo, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Clinical response to clopidogrel varies widely due to under-dosing, drug interactions and intrinsic interindividual differences resulting from genetic polymorphisms. Cytochrome P450-2C19 is the principal enzyme involved in the activation of the prodrug and loss-of-function alleles have been described. Upon expiration of the pharmaceutical patent of clopidogrel, generic manufacturers have started to subject interchangeable formulations to bioequivalence studies. The purpose of the current investigation was to study the effect of selection of volunteers homozygous for the CYP2C19*1 haplotype on the bioavailability of clopidogrel. A regular 2×2 bioequivalence study between two formulations of clopidogrel was performed in volunteers selected and unselected for relevant CYP2C19 haplotypes for the Mexican population. It was found that selection of volunteers homozygous for the CYP2C19*1 haplotype, increased the stringency of bioequivalence statistics and resulted in bioinequivalence of a generic clopidogrel compound that otherwise proved equivalent when tested in an open unselected population. Augmentation of bioequivalence strictness is expected to result from pharmacogenetic selection of volunteers. PMID:25284925

  6. Predictors of biochemical aspirin and clopidogrel resistance in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fong, Joanna; Cheng-Ching, Esteban; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Katzan, Irene; Gupta, Rishi

    2011-01-01

    Variable platelet response to aspirin and clopidogrel is a well-established phenomenon in patients with coronary artery disease. We sought to determine the predictors of an impaired biochemical response to aspirin and clopidogrel in patients with ischemic stroke. Patients with established cerebrovascular disease who underwent an aspirin/clopidogrel response panel (ie, light transmittance aggregometry) between June 2003 and March 2007 were identified through an electronic database. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed, and demographic characteristics, medical history, and laboratory results were recorded. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess for factors associated with antiplatelet resistance. Of the 465 patients included in this study, 120 (28%) were biochemical aspirin nonresponders and 83 (28%) were biochemical clopidogrel nonresponders. Of the 270 patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, 25 (9.3%) were dual biochemical nonresponders. In binary logistic regression modeling, patients with congestive heart failure (odds ratio [OR] = 4.54; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.33-15.5; P = .02) and those with higher hemoglobin A1c values (OR = 1.41; 95% CI = 1.12-1.79; P = .004) had a significantly greater likelihood of having a biochemical nonresponse to aspirin therapy. African-American patients (OR = 2.19; 95% CI = 1.23-3.91; P < .007) were significantly more likely to be nonresponders to clopidogrel. This preliminary study shows that aspirin and clopidogrel biochemical nonresponse frequently occurs in ischemic stroke patients. In addition, some associated variables may affect the biochemical response to antiplatelet therapy. Further study is needed to explore whether this nonresponse has an impact on clinical outcomes. PMID:20621513

  7. Clopidogrel in non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes: an overview of the submission by the British Cardiac Society and the Royal College of Physicians of London to the National Institute for Clinical Excellence, and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, S J; Spence, M S; Crossman, D; Adgey, A A J

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive appraisal was undertaken on behalf of the British Cardiac Society and the Royal College of Physicians of London to assess the use of clopidogrel in acute coronary syndromes. The appraisal was submitted to the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) in August 2003 and contributed to the development of the recently published guidelines for the use of clopidogrel in acute coronary syndromes. The submission to NICE and more recent publications evaluating the use of clopidogrel are reviewed. PMID:16103539

  8. Effectiveness of clopidogrel dose escalation to normalize active metabolite exposure and antiplatelet effects in CYP2C19 poor metabolizers.

    PubMed

    Horenstein, Richard B; Madabushi, Rajnikanth; Zineh, Issam; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Peer, Cody J; Schuck, Robert N; Figg, William Douglas; Shuldiner, Alan R; Pacanowski, Michael A

    2014-08-01

    Carriers of two copies of the loss-of-function CYP2C19*2 variant convert less clopidogrel into its active metabolite, resulting in diminished antiplatelet responses and higher cardiovascular event rates. To evaluate whether increasing the daily clopidogrel dose in poor metabolizers (PM) overcomes the effect of the CYP2C19 * 2 variant, we enrolled 18 healthy participants in a genotype-stratified, multi-dose, three-period, fixed-sequence crossover study. Six participants with the *1/*1 extensive (EM), *1/*2 intermediate (IM), and *2/*2 poor metabolizer genotypes each received 75 mg, 150 mg, and 300 mg each for 8 days. In each period, maximal platelet aggregation 4 hours post-dose (MPA4) and active metabolite area under the curve (AUC) differed among genotype groups (P < .05 for all). At day 8, PMs needed 300 mg daily and IMs needed 150 mg daily to attain a similar MPA4 as EMs on the 75 mg dose (32.6%, 33.2%, 31.3%, respectively). Similarly, PMs needed 300 mg daily to achieve active metabolite concentrations that were similar to EMs on 75 mg (AUC 37.7 and 33.5 ng h/mL, respectively). These results suggest that quadrupling the usual clopidogrel dose might be necessary to overcome the effect of poor CYP2C19 metabolism. PMID:24710841

  9. The antithrombotic effect of melagatran in combination with clopidogrel and/or aspirin (carotid artery primary thrombosis study).

    PubMed

    Hong, Ting-Ting; Huang, Jinbao; Driscoll, Edward; Lucchesi, Benedict R

    2005-10-01

    Melagatran with aspirin and/or clopidogrel was evaluated for prevention of arterial thrombosis in a model of vessel wall injury. Thirty-five dogs were randomized to receive placebo (n=14), aspirin (7 to 8 mg/kg, p.o. q12 h for three doses with the last dose administered 12 hours before surgery, n=7), clopidogrel (1 mg/kg p.o. QDx3, n=7), or aspirin+clopidogrel (n=7). The right carotid artery (RCA) was the control vessel, whereas the left carotid artery (LCA) was subjected to injury after administration of Melagatran (0.033 mg/kg i.v.+0.1 mg/kg/h). Clopidogrel, but not aspirin pretreatment, increased time (135.6+/-13.5 vs. 116.1+/-27.8 minutes) to RCA thrombosis versus placebo (88.1+/-10.5 minutes). Melagatran prolonged time to occlusion (min) in the LCA (192.4+/-10.9) versus the placebo-treated RCA (88.1+/-10.5). Addition of Melagatran plus aspirin or clopidogrel prevented formation of occlusive thrombosis, in all LCAs. A two-fold increase in tongue bleeding time was observed after aspirin+Melagatran (178.6+/-14.7 to 347.1+/-87.3 seconds) or clopidogrel+Melagatran (279.9+/-97.3 to 437.1+/-142.5 seconds). However, the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel prevented occlusive thrombosis in the RCA and the subsequent addition of Melagatran did not further increase bleeding time. The combination of Melagatran+aspirin or clopidogrel can reduce formation of occlusive arterial thrombosis without eliciting a significant increase in bleeding-time. PMID:16160608

  10. Aspirin decreases systemic exposure to clopidogrel through modulation of P-glycoprotein but does not alter its antithrombotic activity.

    PubMed

    Oh, J; Shin, D; Lim, K S; Lee, S; Jung, K-H; Chu, K; Hong, K S; Shin, K-H; Cho, J-Y; Yoon, S H; Ji, S C; Yu, K-S; Lee, H; Jang, I-J

    2014-06-01

    Decreased oral clopidogrel absorption caused by induction of intestinal permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) expression after aspirin administration was observed in rats. This study evaluated the effect of aspirin coadministration on the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel in humans. A single 75-mg dose of clopidogrel was orally administered before and after 2 and 4 weeks of once-daily 100-mg aspirin administration in 18 healthy volunteers who were recruited based on CYP2C19 and PON1 genotypes. Plasma concentrations of clopidogrel and its active metabolite, H4, and relative platelet inhibition (RPI) were determined. The P-gp microRNA miR-27a increased by up to 7.67-fold (P = 0.004) and the clopidogrel area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) decreased by 14% (P > 0.05), but the AUC of H4 remained unchanged and RPI increased by up to 15% (P = 0.002) after aspirin administration. These findings indicate low-dose aspirin coadministration may decrease clopidogrel bioavailability but does not decrease its efficacy. PMID:24566733

  11. Association of Cytochrome P450 2C19 Genotype With the Antiplatelet Effect and Clinical Efficacy of Clopidogrel Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shuldiner, Alan R.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Bliden, Kevin P.; Gandhi, Amish; Ryan, Kathleen; Horenstein, Richard B.; Damcott, Coleen M.; Pakyz, Ruth; Tantry, Udaya S.; Gibson, Quince; Pollin, Toni I.; Post, Wendy; Parsa, Afshin; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Faraday, Nauder; Herzog, William; Gurbel, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Context Clopidogrel therapy improves cardiovascular outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndromes and following percutaneous coronary intervention by inhibiting adenosine diphosphate (ADP)–dependent platelet activation. However, nonresponsiveness is widely recognized and is related to recurrent ischemic events. Objective To identify gene variants that influence clopidogrel response. Design, Setting, and Participants In the Pharmacogenomics of Antiplatelet Intervention (PAPI) Study (2006-2008), we administered clopidogrel for 7 days to 429 healthy Amish persons and measured response by ex vivo platelet aggregometry. A genome-wide association study was performed followed by genotyping the loss-of-function cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C19*2 variant (rs4244285). Findings in the PAPI Study were extended by examining the relation of CYP2C19*2 genotype to platelet function and cardiovascular outcomes in an independent sample of 227 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Main Outcome Measure ADP-stimulated platelet aggregation in response to clopidogrel treatment and cardiovascular events. Results Platelet response to clopidogrel was highly heritable (h2=0.73; P<.001). Thirteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 10q24 within the CYP2C18-CYP2C19-CYP2C9-CYP2C8 cluster were associated with diminished clopidogrel response, with a high degree of statistical significance (P=1.5 × 10−13 for rs12777823, additive model). The rs12777823 polymorphism was in strong linkage disequilibrium with the CYP2C19*2 variant, and was associated with diminished clopidogrel response, accounting for 12% of the variation in platelet aggregation to ADP (P=4.3 × 10−11). The relation between CYP2C19*2 genotype and platelet aggregation was replicated in clopidogrel-treated patients undergoing coronary intervention (P=.02). Furthermore, patients with the CYP2C19*2 variant were more likely (20.9% vs 10.0%) to have a cardiovascular ischemic event or death during 1 year of

  12. Ticlopidine- and clopidogrel-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP): review of clinical, laboratory, epidemiological, and pharmacovigilance findings (1989–2008)

    PubMed Central

    Zakarija, Anaadriana; Kwaan, Hau C.; Moake, Joel L.; Bandarenko, Nicholas; Pandey, Dilip K.; McKoy, June M.; Yarnold, Paul R.; Raisch, Dennis W.; Winters, Jeffrey L.; Raife, Thomas J.; Cursio, John F.; Luu, Thanh Ha; Richey, Elizabeth A.; Fisher, Matthew J.; Ortel, Thomas L.; Tallman, Martin S.; Zheng, X. Long; Matsumoto, Masanori; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Bennett, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a fulminant disease characterized by platelet aggregates, thrombocytopenia, renal insufficiency, neurologic changes, and mechanical injury to erythrocytes. Most idiopathic cases of TTP are characterized by a deficiency of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease, with thrombospondin-1-like domains) metalloprotease activity. Ironically, use of anti-platelet agents, the thienopyridine derivates clopidogrel and ticlopidine, is associated with drug induced TTP. Data were abstracted from a systematic review of English-language literature for thienopyridine-associated TTP identified in MEDLINE, EMBASE, the public website of the Food and Drug Administration, and abstracts from national scientific conferences from 1991 to April 2008. Ticlopidine and clopidogrel are the two most common drugs associated with TTP in FDA safety databases. Epidemiological studies identify recent initiation of anti-platelet agents as the most common risk factor associated with risks of developing TTP. Laboratory studies indicate that most cases of thienopyridine-associated TTP involve an antibody to ADAMTS13 metalloprotease, present with severe thrombocytopenia, and respond to therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE); a minority of thienopyridine-associated TTP presents with severe renal insufficiency, involves direct endothelial cell damage, and is less responsive to TPE. The evaluation of this potentially fatal drug toxicity can serve as a template for future efforts to comprehensively characterize other severe adverse drug reactions. PMID:19180126

  13. Enhanced active metabolite generation and platelet inhibition with prasugrel compared to clopidogrel regardless of genotype in thienopyridine metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Braun, Oscar Ö; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Ferreiro, Jose L; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Winters, Kenneth J; Effron, Mark B; Duvvuru, Suman; Costigan, Timothy M; Sundseth, Scott; Walker, Joseph R; Saucedo, Jorge F; Kleiman, Neal S; Varenhorst, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    Clopidogrel response varies according to the presence of genetic polymorphisms. The CYP2C19*2 allele has been associated with impaired response; conflicting results have been reported for CYP2C19*17, ABCB1, and PON1 genotypes. We assessed the impact of CYP2C19, PON1, and ABCB1 polymorphisms on clopidogrel and prasugrel pharmacodynamic (PD) and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters. Aspirin-treated patients (N=194) with coronary artery disease from two independent, prospective, randomised, multi-centre studies comparing clopidogrel (75 mg) and prasugrel (10 mg) were genotyped and classified by predicted CYP2C19 metaboliser phenotype (ultra metabolisers [UM] = *17 carriers; extensive metabolisers [EM] = *1/1 homozygotes; reduced metabolisers [RM] = *2 carriers). ABCB1 T/T and C/T polymorphisms and PON1 A/A, A/G and G/G polymorphisms were also genotyped. PD parameters were assessed using VerifyNow® P2Y12 and vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) expressed as platelet reactivity index (PRI) after 14 days of maintenance dosing. Clopidogrel and prasugrel active metabolite (AM) exposure was calculated in a cohort of 96 patients. For clopidogrel, genetic variants in CYP2C19, but not ABCB1 or PON1, affected PK and PD. For prasugrel, none of the measured genetic variants affected PK or PD. Compared with clopidogrel, platelet inhibition with prasugrel was greater even in the CYP2C19 UM phenotype. Prasugrel generated more AM and achieved greater platelet inhibition than clopidogrel irrespective of CYP2C19, ABCB1, and PON1 polymorphisms. The lack of effect from genetic variants on prasugrel AM generation or antiplatelet activity is consistent with previous studies in healthy volunteers and is consistent with improved efficacy in acute coronary syndrome patients managed with percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:24009042

  14. Comparison of P2Y12 receptor inhibition by clopidogrel and prasugrel in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Haq, M M; Ahsan, C H; Amin, M N; Karim, M R; Ali, M L; Khan, S R; Chowdhury, M Z; Mansur, M; Millat, M H; Rashid, M A

    2013-12-01

    Dual antiplatelet treatment (DAPT) with aspirin and clopidogrel is vital after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Clopidogrel and prasugrel act on P2Y12 platelet surface receptors. Both these P2Y12 inhibitors are pro-drugs and depend on cytochrome system of the liver for their conversion to active metabolite. There is growing concern regarding suboptimal response in platelet inhibition by clopidogrel. Verify Now system got approval by Federal Drug Administration, USA, for assessing platelet function as its result is almost comparable to gold standard Light Transmission Aggregometry (LTA). There are no data on the prevalence of clopidogrel resistance in Bangladeshi population. Prasugrel, as an antiplatelet drug, is a newer introduction in this country. This study will show light on the efficacy of these drugs on our population especially in patients who undergo PCI where DAPT is mandatory. A total 120 (60 diabetics) patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS), were alternatively given 600 mg clopidogrel loading dose (LD) followed by 75 mg maintenance dose (MD) daily or 60 mg LD of prasugrel followed by 10 mg MD daily. Five samples of blood were taken at different time intervals over a period of 2 weeks. Measurement of percent inhibition of P2Y12 was done by VerifyNow. Patients who showed less than 20% inhibition (clopidogrel resistant) at any stage were switched to prasugrel. The outcomes of clopidogrel, prasugrel and clopidogrel switched to prasugrel groups were then compared. Nearly half (46.7%) of the patients in the clopidogrel group was found resistant to the drug as opposed to none in the prasugrel group. No difference was found between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects with respect to drug resistance. Intracoronary blood samples showed high degree of platelet inhibition with prasugrel. There was a gradual decline of platelet inhibition over two weeks with prasugrel. Almost fifty percent of the population is clopidogrel resistant in our study

  15. [Proton pump inhibitors and clopidogrel: a hazardous association?].

    PubMed

    Szymezak, J; Gaussem, P

    2013-02-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) and antiplatelet agents, especially aspirin and clopidogrel, are among the most prescribed medications worldwide. Their co-administration is justified by the increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding related to the antiplatelet therapy. The issue of the interaction between PPI and clopidogrel has been raised with the emergence of the concept of "high on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity" (or "clopidogrel resistance") together with the discovery of the role of CYP2C19 isoform in the pharmacokinetics of those two medications. Indeed, CYP2C19 is involved in the conversion of the clopidogrel pro-drug into its active metabolite and is involved in the metabolisation of PPI into inactive metabolites, acting as substrates/inhibitors of CYP2C19. Despite their heterogeneity, most pharmacodynamic studies have shown a decreased clopidogrel antiplatelet effect when associated to PPI, especially those with the highest CYP2C19 inhibiting activity (omeprazole, lansoprazole, rabeprazole). On the other hand, clinical studies are inconclusive. Retrospective studies have shown an increased risk of major cardiovascular events or mortality when clopidogrel and PPI are associated in comparison with clopidogrel alone, particularly in the patients with the higher cardiovascular risk. However, the two prospective randomized studies published so far did not find any interaction and confirmed the benefit of PPI on the gastrointestinal bleeding. As a conclusion, as the clinical studies are not conclusive, the French health authorities have recently removed the alert about this interaction. PPI and clopidogrel can thus be co-prescribed. PMID:23200799

  16. Non-Carriers of Reduced-Function CYP2C19 Alleles are Most Susceptible to Impairment of the Anti-Platelet Effect of Clopidogrel by Proton-Pump Inhibitors: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jen-Kuang; Wu, Cho-Kai; Juang, Jyh-Ming; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Lin, Jiuun-Lee; Chiang, Fu-Tien

    2016-01-01

    Background The phenomenon of CYP2C19 polymorphism affects the metabolism of both clopidogrel and proton-pump inhibitors (PPI). However, concomitant use of both drugs may reduce the desired therapeutic effects. In this study, we evaluated whether individuals with different numbers of reduced-function CYP2C19 alleles were equally affected and whether PPIs with different dependencies on CYP2C19 metabolism were equally involved. Methods Thirty healthy volunteers were recruited to a six-week regimen of clopidogrel. Three PPIs with different metabolic dependencies on CYP2C19 were included and separately administered in this order. Each PPI was given for a week, followed by a one-week washout period before the intervention of the next PPI. The anti-platelet effect was examined by Thromboelastography Platelet MappingTM (TEG®) and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) assays. Results Both TEG® and VASP tests showed the same general qualitative trend, but TEG® detected a statistically significant fluctuation of platelet aggregation in response to different drug interventions. The TEG® results also demonstrated that non-carriers experienced the most significant impairment of anti-platelet effect of clopidogrel after concomitant use of PPIs. This impairment was closely related to the metabolic dependence on CYP2C19 of PPI. Conclusions Our study indicated that non-carriers of reduced-function CYP2C19 alleles are most susceptible to impairment of the anti-platelet effect of clopidogrel after concomitant PPI use. Individual subjects are not equally affected, and PPIs are not equally involved. However, large-scale randomized clinical trials are needed to evaluate the clinical outcome. PMID:27122952

  17. Clinical relevance of clopidogrel-proton pump inhibitors interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bouziana, Stella D; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Clopidogrel is a widely used antiplatelet agent for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary heart disease, acute coronary syndromes and ischemic stroke. Even though clopidogrel is safer than aspirin in terms of risk for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, the elderly, and patients with a history of prior GI bleeding, with Helicobacter pylori infection or those who are also treated with aspirin, anticoagulants, corticosteroids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are at high risk for GI complications when treated with clopidogrel. Accordingly, proton pump inhibitors are frequently administered in combination with clopidogrel to reduce the risk for GI bleeding. Nevertheless, pharmacodynamic studies suggest that omeprazole might attenuate the antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel. However, in observational studies, this interaction does not appear to translate into increased cardiovascular risk in patients treated with this combination. Moreover, in the only randomized, double-blind study that assessed the cardiovascular implications of combining clopidogrel and omeprazole, patients treated with clopidogrel/omeprazole combination had reduced risk for GI events and similar risk for cardiovascular events than patients treated with clopidogrel and placebo. However, the premature interruption of the study and the lack of power analysis in terms of the cardiovascular endpoint do not allow definite conclusions regarding the cardiovascular safety of clopidogrel/omeprazole combination. Other proton pump inhibitors do not appear to interact with clopidogrel. Nevertheless, given the limitations of existing observational and interventional studies, the decision to administer proton pump inhibitors to patients treated with clopidogrel should be individualized based on the patient’s bleeding and cardiovascular risk. PMID:25949846

  18. Multi-parameter assessment of platelet inhibition and its stability during aspirin and clopidogrel therapy

    PubMed Central

    Timur, A. Anil; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Zhang, Li; Barnard, John; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Poor response to antiplatelet drugs is associated with adverse outcomes. We assessed platelet inhibition and its stability and tested correlation and agreement between platelet function assays. Methods Peripheral blood from 58 patients on both aspirin and clopidogrel who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was collected at hospital discharge (visit-1) and at 30–90 days (visit-2). Platelet function was measured using light transmission aggregometry (LTA-AA and LTA-ADP), VerifyNow (Aspirin; ARU and P2Y12; PRU), ex vivo TxB2, urinary 11dhTxB2, and VASP (PRI) assays. Data were analyzed as continuous, quartiles and binary. Patients were defined as aspirin poor responder (PR) with ARU ≥550, LTA-AA maximum ≥20%, TxB2 ≥1 ng/mL or 11dhTxB2 ≥1,500 pg/mg of creatinine and as clopidogrel PR with PRU ≥240, PRU ≥208, LTA-ADP maximum ≥40%, PRI ≥50%, or PRI ≥66%. Results Aspirin PR was 3–33% and clopidogrel PR was 10–35% in visit-1. LTA-AA, 11dhTxB2, and all clopidogrel-response measures showed correlation and agreement between visit-1 and visit-2. The highest agreement between two visits was revealed by PRU ≥240 and PRI ≥66% (PRU-κ=0.7, 95% CI=0.47, 0.93; PRI-κ=0.69, 95% CI=0.42, 0.95, p-values<0.001). Comparison of platelet function assays in a single visit (Visit-1) revealed a poor correlation between LTA-AA and 11dhTxB2 assays and no agreement among aspirin-response assays. The highest correlation and agreement were obtained between VerifyNow P2Y12 and VASP assays (rho=0.7, p-value<0.001 and PRU ≥208-PRI-κ=0.41–0.42, 95% CI=0.13, 0.69, p-values<0.001). Conclusions Platelet inhibition is stable during aspirin and clopidogrel treatment. Clopidogrel-response assays correlate and agree with each other better than aspirin-response assays. PMID:24852729

  19. Comparison of the antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel hydrogenosulfate and clopidogrel besylate in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hamilos, Michalis; Saloustros, Ilias; Skalidis, Emmanuel; Igoumenidis, Nikolaos; Kambouris, Marios; Chlouverakis, Grigorios; Vougia, Despina; Loggakis, Ioannis; Vardas, Panos E; Kochiadakis, George

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that patients with poor response to antiplatelet therapy are most likely to have more thrombotic events. Clopidogrel hydrogensulfate (CHS) is a thienopyridine acting as an important antiplatelet agent alone or in combination with acetylsalicylic acid to prevent cardiovascular complications. A different clopidogrel salt, clopidogrel besylate (CB), was recently approved as a generic drug for the same purpose while data about its antiplatelet effect are very scarce. Our study compared the antiplatelet effect of CHS and CB in patients with stable coronary artery disease. Patients with stable coronary artery disease (n = 101) (coronary lesions defined angiographically 30-70 %) were randomized to either CHS (n = 50) or CB (n = 51). After randomization a 600 mg loading dose of the drug was given and monitoring of antiplatelet effect was done 12-14 h later with VerifyNow assay. Antiplatelet response was measured with P2Y12 reaction units (PRU) and % inhibition P2Y12 from baseline (% inhibition P2Y12). Moreover CYP2C19*2, CYP2C19*3 and CYP3Α5 polymorphisms were studied in all patients. Clinical characteristics were similar between the two study groups. No significant difference was observed for baseline platelet reactivity between CHS and CB patients (258 ± 38 vs. 256 ± 38 respectively, p = 0.79). No difference was found for antiplatelet response between the CHS and the CB group, assessed by PRU (195 ± 74 vs. 204 ± 67 respectively, p = 0.51) and by % inhibition P2Y12 (24 ± 25 vs. 24 ± 22 % respectively, p = 0.95). Number of heterozygotes for CYP2C19*2 polymorphism was comparable and their platelet reactivity was similar between the two study groups. Our results indicate that both CB and CHS had an identical antiplatelet effect in patients with stable coronary artery disease. No difference on platelet reactivity of heterozygotes for CYP2C19*2 polymorphism was found between the two study groups. PMID:25662861

  20. Clinical evidence of interaction between clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shoa-Lin; Chang, Hui-Min; Liu, Chun-Peng; Chou, Li-Ping; Chan, Jaw-Wen

    2011-01-01

    Clopidogrel is approved for reduction of atherothrombotic events in patients with cardiovascular (CV) and cerebrovascular disease. Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel decreases the risk of major adverse cardiac events after acute coronary syndrome or percutaneous coronary intervention, compared with aspirin alone. Due to concern about gastrointestinal bleeding in patients who are receiving clopidogrel and aspirin therapy, current guidelines recommend combined use of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) to decrease the risk of bleeding. Data from previous pharmacological studies have shown that PPIs, which are extensively metabolized by the cytochrome system, may decrease the ADP-induced platelet aggregation of clopidogrel. Results from retrospective cohort studies have shown a higher incidence of major CV events in patients receiving both clopidogrel and PPIs than in those without PPIs. However, other retrospective analyses of randomized clinical trials have not shown that the concomitant PPI administration is associated with increased CV events among clopidogrel users. These controversial results suggest that large specific studies are needed. This article reviews the metabolism of clopidogrel and PPIs, existing clinical data regarding the interaction between clopidogrel and PPIs, and tries to provide recommendations for health care professionals. PMID:21666816

  1. Bleeding risk with clopidogrel and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Sohail, Umair; Harleen, Chela; Mahdi, Amin O; Arif, Murtaza; Nguyen, Douglas L; Bechtold, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare bleeding within 48 h in patients undergoing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) with or without clopidogrel. METHODS After institutional review board approval, a retrospective study involving a single center was conducted on adult patients having PEG (1/08-1/14). Patients were divided into two groups: Clopidogrel group consisting of those patients taking clopidogrel within 5 d of PEG and the non-clopidogrel group including those patients not taking clopidogrel within 5 d of the PEG. RESULTS Three hundred and nineteen PEG patients were found. One hundred and sixty-eight males and 151 females with mean body mass index 28.47 ± 9.75 kg/m2 and mean age 65.03 ± 16.11 years were identified. Thirty-three patients were on clopidogrel prior to PEG with 286 patients not on clopidogrel. No patients in either group developed hematochezia, melena, or hematemesis within 48 h of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). No statistical differences were observed between the two groups with 48 h for hemoglobin decrease of > 2 g/dL (2 vs 5 patients; P = 0.16), blood transfusions (2 vs 7 patients; P = 0.24), and repeat endoscopy for possible gastrointestinal bleeding (no patients in either group). CONCLUSION Based on the results, no significant post-procedure bleeding was observed in patients undergoing PEG with recent use of clopidogrel.

  2. "Influence of methadone on clopidogrel in addicts on methadone maintenance therapy" Drug interaction between methadone and clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Ferigol; Hamidikenari, Abolhasan; Sajadi, Seyed Navid; Sajadi, Seyed Rohollah; Shiran, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clopidogrel is a prodrug that converts in the liver to an active thiol metabolite, which irreversibly inhibits the platelet P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate receptor. It seems that methadone as CYP2C19 inhibitor affects ticlopidine activity in vivo. This study aimed to test the ability of methadone in changing ticlopidine pharmacokinetics. Methods: We conducted a case–control study in 10 subjects. The cases (5 subjects) in our study were addicts who were receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) for preventing opium withdrawal symptoms. The control group were opiate users before starting MMT. In both groups, the patients received clopidogrel (75mg/day) for 5 days. On the 6th day, the subjects returned to the clinic, blood samples were taken up to 12 hours following clopidogrel dosing in case and control groups. Plasma concentration of clopidogrel was measured by GC-MAS. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel software to estimate PK parameters. Results: In this study, methadone decreased clopidogrel clearance by 25% and increased the AUC0-inf nearly 1.3 fold during the coadministration of clopidogrel as an antiplatelet drug. Conclusion: A significant decrease in the clearance of clopidogrel during the coadministration of methadone consistent with a decrease in clopidogrel conversion to its active metabolite and this may decrease its efficacy and may have life-threatening consequences for the patients undergoing clopidogerel maintenance therapy. PMID:27386066

  3. Efficacy of Leflunomide, Telmisartan, and Clopidogrel for Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Duan, Shu-Wei; Sun, Xue-Feng; Li, Wen-Ge; Wang, Ya-Ping; Liu, Wen-Hu; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Lun, Li-De; Li, Xue-Mei; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Li, Ji-Jun; Liu, Shu-Wen; Xie, Yuan-Sheng; Cai, Guang-Yan; Ma, Lu; Huang, Wen; Wu, Hua; Jia, Qiang; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background: The efficacy and safety of telmisartan combined with clopidogrel, leflunomide, or both drugs for immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) are unclear. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of telmisartan combined with clopidogrel, leflunomide, or both drugs for IgAN. Methods: It is a multicenter, prospective, double-dummy randomized controlled trial. Primary IgAN patients were recruited in 13 renal units across Beijing, China, from July 2010 to June 2012. After a 4-week telmisartan (80 mg/d) wash-in, 400 patients continuing on 80 mg/d telmisartan were randomly assigned to additionally receive placebo (Group A), 50 mg/d clopidogrel (Group B), 20 mg/d leflunomide (Group C), or 50 mg/d clopidogrel and 20 mg/d leflunomide (Group D). The 24-week intervention was completed by 360 patients. The primary endpoint was change in 24-h proteinuria at 24 weeks. A linear mixed-effect model was used to analyze the changes at 4, 12, and 24 weeks. Generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate changes in hematuria grade. This trial was registered at the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry. Results: The effects of telmisartan combined with leflunomide on changes in proteinuria (0.36 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.18–0.55] g/d, P < 0.001), in serum uric acid (76.96 [95% CI 57.44–96.49] μmol/L, P < 0.001), in serum creatinine (9.49 [95% CI 6.54–12.44] μmol/L, P < 0.001), and in estimated glomerular filtration rate (−6.72 [95% CI −9.46 to −3.98] ml∙min−1∙1.73 m−2, P < 0.001) were statistically significant, whereas they were not statistically significant on changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and weight (P > 0.05). Telmisartan combined with clopidogrel had no statistical effect on any outcome, and there was no interaction between the interventions. No obvious adverse reactions were observed. Conclusions: Telmisartan combined with leflunomide, not clopidogrel, is safe and effective for decreasing proteinuria in certain

  4. Efficacy of Clopidogrel and Clinical Outcome When Clopidogrel Is Coadministered With Atorvastatin and Lansoprazole: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-rong; Wang, Di-qing; Du, Jun; Qu, Guang-su; Du, Jian-lin; Deng, Song-bai; Liu, Ya-jie; Cai, Jin-xi; She, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    This prospective, randomized, nonblind, controlled trial evaluated the effects of clopidogrel on platelet function upon coadministration with atorvastatin and lansoprazole. One hundred four adult patients with non-ST-segment elevated acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stent implantation were included. All patients were treated with standard dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) plus rosuvastatin 10  mg daily after the operation. On the sixth day after PCI, patients were randomly divided into 4 groups, Group A: DAPT + atorvastatin 20  mg daily (a change from rosuvastatin to atorvastatin) + lansoprazole 30  mg daily, Group B: DAPT + atorvastatin 20  mg daily (a change from rosuvastatin to atorvastatin), Group C: DAPT + lansoprazole 30  mg daily (continuing to take rosuvastatin), Group D is the control group. Additional drugs were used according to the situation of patients. Platelet function and concentrations of platelet activation markers (granular membrane protein 140 (P-selectin), thromboxane B2 (TXB2), and human soluble cluster of differentiation 40 ligand (sCD40L)) were assessed before randomization and at 15- and 30-day follow-up visits. All patients were maintained on treatment for 6 months and observed for bleeding and ischemic events. A total of 104 patients were enrolled, 27 patients in group A, 26 patients in Group B/C, 25 patients in Group D separately, and all the patients were analyzed. There were no differences in platelet function and the levels of platelet activation markers (P-selectin, TXB2, and sCD40L) among or within the 4 groups at the 3 time points of interest (P > 0.05). In the subsequent 6 months, no significant bleeding events occurred, and 12 patients experienced ischemic events, these results were also not significantly different among the groups (P > 0.05). In patients diagnosed with NSTE-ACS who have had drug-eluting stent implantation

  5. Photoselective vaporization of the prostate in men taking clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Spernat, Daniel M. G.; Hossack, Tania A.; Woo, Henry H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the peri-operative morbidity of men taking clopidogrel who underwent photoselective vaporisation of the prostate (PVP). Patients and Methods: A prospective database was collected. Between March 2005 and July 2010, 480 men underwent PVP. Of these, 18 men underwent PVP treatment while on clopidogrel. The surgery was carried out with either an 80W KTP laser or a 120W lithium triborate laser. Results: In the peri-operative period there were no complications related to PVP. There were no urinary tract infections, nor did any patient require bladder re-catheterisation. No cardiovascular events were reported within 3 months of the procedure. At 3 months post operatively, the International Prostate Symptom Score±standard deviation had improved from was 17.5±10.6 to 9.2±6.1 P<0.05. While the Quality of Life±standard deviation improved from 4.7±1.2 to 2.2±1.5 P<0.01. The maximum flow rate (Qmax), and post void residual volume (PVR) improved from 6.2±3.0 mL/s to 19.7±9.1 mL/s (P<0.01), and 140±102 mL to 59±77 mL (P<0.05), respectively. Conclusions: PVP is a safe and efficacious in the treatment of high risk patients with bladder outlet obstruction. Further, the ability to continue therapeutic anticoagulation and anti-platelet agents, is a significant advantage over Holmium enucleation of the prostate and conventional transurethral resection of the prostate. Larger studies with greater numbers of patients are required prior to PVP becoming the gold standard for high-risk patients with bladder outlet obstruction. PMID:21747600

  6. Cytochrome allelic variants and clopidogrel metabolism in cardiovascular diseases therapy.

    PubMed

    Jarrar, Mohammed; Behl, Shalini; Manyam, Ganiraju; Ganah, Hany; Nazir, Mohammed; Nasab, Reem; Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-06-01

    Clopidogrel and aspirin are among the most prescribed dual antiplatelet therapies to treat the acute coronary syndrome and heart attacks. However, their potential clinical impacts are a subject of intense debates. The therapeutic efficiency of clopidogrel is controlled by the actions of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYPs) enzymes and impacted by individual genetic variations. Inter-individual polymorphisms in CYPs enzymes affect the metabolism of clopidogrel into its active metabolites and, therefore, modify its turnover and clinical outcome. So far, clinical trials fail to confirm higher or lower adverse cardiovascular effects in patients treated with combinations of clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors, compared with clopidogrel alone. Such inconclusive findings may be due to genetic variations in the cytochromes CYP2C19 and CYP3A4/5. To investigate potential interactions/effects of these cytochromes and their allele variants on the treatment of acute coronary syndrome with clopidogrel alone or in combination with proton pump inhibitors, we analyze recent literature and discuss the potential impact of the cytochrome allelic variants on cardiovascular events and stent thrombosis treated with clopidogrel. The diversity of CYP2C19 polymorphisms and prevalence span within various ethnic groups, subpopulations and demographic areas are also debated. PMID:27072373

  7. Antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel and aspirin after interventional patent foramen ovale/ atrium septum defect closure.

    PubMed

    Polzin, Amin; Dannenberg, Lisa; Sophia Popp, Valérie-; Kelm, Malte; Zeus, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    The optimal antiplatelet therapy after patent foramen ovale (PFO)/ atrium septum defect (ASD) closure is a matter of discussion. It is challenging as inter-individual responses to antiplatelet medication vary significantly and common complications are bleeding and ischemic events. In this study, we aimed to analyze the incidence of high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) to antiplatelet medication in patients undergoing PFO/ASD closure as well as clinical complications and thrombus formation on the occluder during six-month follow-up. This hypothesis generating pilot study was observed, which included 140 patients undergoing PFO/ASD closure. The primary endpoint was pharmacodynamic response to antiplatelet medication. A composite of death, myocardial infarction, bleeding, stroke and thrombus formation on the occluder during six-month follow-up was the secondary endpoint. HTPR to clopidogrel was analyzed using the vasodilator-stimulated protein phosphorylation (VASP), HTPR to aspirin by light-transmission aggregometry (LTA). In 71% of patients HTPR to clopidogrel was detected, HTPR to aspirin in only 4%. We observed 12 complications, 9 bleeding events (including 3 major bleeding events) and 3 transient ischemic attacks. No stroke and no thrombus formation on the occluder occurred. The primary endpoint was not associated with the secondary endpoint. The incidence of HTPR to clopidogrel in PFO/ASD closure patients is very high. Despite this high incidence, no stroke or thrombus formation on the occluder occurred at all. This leads to the hypothesis, that the benefit of additional clopidogrel medication is questionable and has to be investigated in large-scale clinical trials. PMID:26556101

  8. Purpuric herpes zoster in patients in therapy with clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Veraldi, S; Vaira, F; Nazzaro, G

    2015-08-01

    Clopidogrel is an adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonist used for the prevention of vascular events in patients with atherothrombotic diseases manifested by recent myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or peripheral arterial disease. Diarrhoea, rash and pruritus are rather common side effects of clopidogrel. Other side effects include epistaxis, nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer. Thrombocytopenia is the most common laboratory abnormality. Leucopenia and neutropenia are rare. We report three cases of purpuric herpes zoster in patients in therapy with clopidogrel. To our knowledge, only one case of haemorrhagic herpes zoster has been published in a patient in therapy with this drug. PMID:26209393

  9. Ticagrelor as an alternative in clopidogrel-associated neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rahman; Keough, Leigh Anne; Belalcazar-Portacio, Astrid; Ramanathan, Kodangudi B

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin in combination with platelet P2Y12 receptor blocker has become the mainstay antiplatelet treatment strategy for the prevention of stent thrombosis. Ticlopidine was the first widely used P2Y12 receptor blockers, but clopidogrel has mostly replaced the use of ticlopidine due to its more favorable adverse event profile on bone marrow. However, when clopidogrel induced bone marrow toxicity occurs, little is known about the efficacy and safety of alternative treatments, and thus, in these cases, medical decisions may be very difficult. We report a case of clopidogrel-induced severe neutropenia in a patient treated with coronary stent and safety of alternative treatment with ticagrelor. PMID:24433137

  10. Online Course Evaluations Response Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guder, Faruk; Malliaris, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the reasons for low response rates in online evaluations. Survey data are collected from the students to understand factors that might affect student participation in the course evaluation process. When course evaluations were opened to the student body, an email announcement was sent to all students, and a reminder email was…

  11. Antiplatelet Agents in Cardiology: A Report on Aspirin, Clopidogrel, Prasugrel, and Ticagrelor.

    PubMed

    Dobesh, Paul P; Varnado, Sara; Doyle, Meagan

    2016-01-01

    Antiplatelet drugs are the cornerstone of therapy in many cardiovascular conditions. With the current success and increased use of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), the use of antiplatelet therapy is considered part of the medical therapy for these patients. Clinicians caring for these patients need to have a thorough understanding of the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamic, and clinical efficacy and safety of commonly used antiplatelet therapy. While aspirin therapy is widely used, dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel has become part of standard of care. Despite the extensive experience with clopidogrel, there are limitations such as drug interactions, metabolism genetic polymorphisms, and variability in the antiplatelet response. More predictable and more potent antiplatelet agents, prasugrel and ticagrelor, have demonstrated superior reductions in ischemic endpoints as part of dual antiplatelet therapy compared to clopidogrel, but at the cost of more major bleeding in patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Significant research needs to be conducted in the setting of TAVI to help define the optimal antiplatelet regimen. PMID:26642781

  12. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of prasugrel and clopidogrel in aspirin-treated patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Ernest, C Steven; Small, David S; Rohatagi, Shashank; Salazar, Daniel E; Wallentin, Lars; Winters, Kenneth J; Wrishko, Rebecca E

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the current analysis was to characterize the population PK of prasugrel and clopidogrel metabolites, the resulting PD response, and identification of covariates for key PK/PD parameters. Aspirin-treated subjects with coronary artery disease were randomized to double-blind treatment with clopidogrel 600 mg loading dose (LD) followed by daily 75 mg maintenance dose (MD) or prasugrel 60 mg LD and daily 10 mg MD for 28 days. Plasma concentrations of prasugrel active metabolite (Pras-AM) and prasugrel's inactive thiolactone metabolite (Pras-thiolactone) were simultaneously fit to a multicompartmental model; a similar model adequately described clopidogrel's active metabolite (Clop-AM) PK. By linking to the PK model through the active metabolite concentrations, the PK/PD model characterized the irreversible inhibition of platelet aggregation through a sigmoidal Emax model. Although dose, sex, and weight were identified as significant covariates in the prasugrel PK model, only the effect of body weight produced significant changes in Pras-AM exposure. Generally, these factors resulted in only minor changes in Pras-AM exposures such that, overall, the change in the resulting maximal platelet aggregation (MPA) was predicted to be < or =10% points on average. The clopidogrel PK model included dose as a covariate indicating that a significantly less-than-proportional increase in Clop-AM exposure is expected over the dose range of 75-600 mg, thus, the model-predicted PD response is lower than might be anticipated given an 8-fold difference in dose and lower than that typically achieved following prasugrel 60 mg LD. The greater PD response with prasugrel compared with clopidogrel was accounted for by greater conversion of dose to active metabolite. PMID:19023649

  13. Genetic determinants of on-clopidogrel high platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Campo, Gianluca; Miccoli, Matteo; Tebaldi, Matteo; Marchesini, Jlenia; Fileti, Luca; Monti, Monia; Valgimigli, Marco; Ferrari, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Clopidogrel has been used (alone or in association with aspirin) to prevent vascular complications in atherothrombotic patients, to prevent stent thrombosis (ST) in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and as a long-term prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Unfortunately, it is important to note that there are a number of patients who, during clopidogrel therapy, show and maintain a high platelet reactivity (PR), similar to that observed before the start of antiplatelet therapy. Clopidogrel pro-drug is absorbed in the intestine and this process is influenced by P-glycoprotein-1 (P-GP). Its conversion into 2-oxo clopidogrel is regulated by cytochromes (CYP) called CYP2C19, CYP2B6 and CYP1A2. Whereas, the final transformation into the active metabolite is regulated by CYP called CYP2C19, CYP2C9, CYP2B6, CYP3A4, CYP3A5 and, as recently emerged, by the glycoprotein paraoxonase-1 (PON1). The genes encoding these enzymes are characterized by several polymorphisms. Some of these are able to modify the activity of proteins, reducing the concentration of active metabolite and the values of on-clopidogrel PR. Only one gene polymorphism (CYP2C19*17) increases the clopidogrel metabolization and so the clopidogrel-induced platelet inhibition. Several studies have clearly associated these gene polymorphisms to both ischemic and bleeding complications in patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy. The aim of this review is to describe the principal gene polymorphisms influencing on-clopidogrel PR and their relationship with long-term clinical outcome. PMID:21627411

  14. Temporal variability in the antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel and aspirin after elective drug-eluting stent implantation. An ADAPT-DES substudy.

    PubMed

    Nührenberg, Thomas G; Stratz, Christian; Leggewie, Stefan; Hochholzer, Willibald; Valina, Christian M; Gick, Michael; Kirtane, Ajay J; Stone, Gregg W; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Trenk, Dietmar

    2015-11-01

    Given conflicting data on temporal variability in pharmacodynamic platelet responses to clopidogrel, we investigated platelet reactivity on clopidogrel and aspirin for up to six months after elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stents. Platelet reactivity was determined in 102 patients before loading with clopidogrel and aspirin, and on maintenance therapy after PCI on day 1, at one month and six months by VerifyNow™ P2Y12 and Aspirin assays and by residual platelet aggregation (RPA) on light transmission aggregometry using adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid. By VerifyNow testing, median (interquartile range) P2Y12 reaction units (PRU) on clopidogrel were 166 (90-234), 195 (124-257), and 198 (141-252) on day 1, one month and six months after PCI, respectively (p=0.005 day 1 to 1 month, and p=0.86 1 month to 6 months). Using a cut-off of > 208 PRU, 35 % of patients had high platelet reactivity (HPR) to clopidogrel on day 1, 43 % at one month, and 46 % at six months after PCI. Between day 1 and six months after PCI, 38.2 % of patients changed clopidogrel responder status at least once. Other cut-offs and RPA yielded similar results. Platelet inhibition by aspirin was consistent over time with only five patients being characterised as having HPR. Considerable variation in individual on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity was present during both the subacute and the late phases of maintenance therapy after elective PCI. Hence, the utility of contemporary platelet function testing to guide antiplatelet therapy may be limited. PMID:26305340

  15. Different effects of proton pump inhibitors and famotidine on the clopidogrel metabolic activation by recombinant CYP2B6, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4.

    PubMed

    Ohbuchi, Masato; Noguchi, Kiyoshi; Kawamura, Akio; Usui, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    Inhibitory potential of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and famotidine, an H(2) receptor antagonist, on the metabolic activation of clopidogrel was evaluated using recombinant CYP2B6, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4. Formation of the active metabolite from an intermediate metabolite, 2-oxo-clopidogrel, was investigated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and three peaks corresponding to the pharmacologically active metabolite and its stereoisomers were detected. Omeprazole potently inhibited clopidogrel activation by CYP2C19 with an IC(50) of 12.8 μmol/L and more weakly inhibited that by CYP2B6 and CYP3A4. IC(50) of omeprazole for CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 was decreased about two- and three-fold, respectively, by 30-min preincubation with NADPH. Lansoprazole, esomeprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole and rabeprazole thioether, a major metabolite, also inhibited metabolic activation by CYP2C19, with an IC(50) of 4.3, 8.9, 48.3, 36.2 and 30.5 μmol/L, respectively. In contrast, famotidine showed no more than 20% inhibition of clopidogrel activation by CYP2B6, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 at up to 100 μmol/L and had no time-dependent CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 inhibition. These results provide direct evidence that PPIs inhibit clopidogrel metabolic activation and suggest that CYP2C19 inhibition is the main cause of drug-drug interaction between clopidogrel and omeprazole. Famotidine is considered as a safe anti-acid agent for patients taking clopidogrel. PMID:22313038

  16. Comparative fasting bioavailability of two clopidogrel formulations in healthy Mediterranean volunteers: an in vitro–in vivo correlation

    PubMed Central

    Zaid, Abdel Naser; Al Ramahi, Rowa’; Bustami, Rana; Mousa, Ayman; Khasawneh, Sewar

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioequivalence of two drug products, generic clopidogrel bisulfate 75 mg film-coated tablets versus the reference Plavix® clopidogrel bisulfate 75 mg film-coated tablets. Methods Bioequivalence of tablets was tested by comparisons against the reference brand product in accordance with the requirements of the Declaration of Helsinki, the current Good Clinical Practice Guidelines, and the International Conference on Harmonization. Results The relationship between concentration and peak area ratio was found to be linear within the range 24.500–1,836.600 pg/mL for clopidogrel. The correlation coefficient (r) was always greater than 0.99 during the course of the validation. Statistical comparison of the main pharmacokinetic parameters showed no significant difference between test and reference. The point estimates (ratios of geometric mean) were 104.122%, 104.184%, and 109.091% for areas under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) AUC0-last, AUC0-∞, and peak plasma concentration Cmax, respectively. These pharmacokinetic parameter values of clopidogrel and its main metabolite lie within the bioequivalence limit (80%–125%) specified by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. Conclusion The tested drug product was bioequivalent to the reference drug under fasting conditions and had the same safety profile, which is important to achieve equivalent therapeutic effect with the reference. PMID:25987833

  17. The impact of genetic polymorphisms of drug metabolizing enzymes on the pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel under steady state conditions.

    PubMed

    Nakkam, Nontaya; Tiamkao, Somsak; Kanjanawart, Sirimas; Tiamkao, Siriporn; Vannaprasaht, Suda; Tassaneeyakul, Wongwiwat; Tassaneeyakul, Wichittra

    2015-08-01

    Clopidogrel is an antiplatelet drug that requires biotransformation steps to its active metabolite via cytochromes P450 (CYP), particularly CYP2C19 and CYP3A5 as well as paraoxonase-1 (PON1). The impact of CYP3A5 and PON1 genetic polymorphisms on the response of this drug is unclear. This study aimed to elucidate the degree of genetic polymorphisms of key drug metabolizing enzymes on the antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel. Thirty-five healthy subjects were treated with 75 mg/day clopidogrel for 7 days and serial blood samples were collected for measurement of antiplatelet effect using whole blood impedance aggregometry and VerifyNow(®) P2Y12 methods. The areas under the antiplatelet effect-time curves, maximal and minimal antiplatelet effects of clopidogrel obtained from both methods were significantly different among subjects with different CYP2C19 genotypes. In contrast, these pharmacodymamic parameters measured by both methods of subjects with different PON1 or CYP3A5 genotypes were not significantly different. Among the heterozygous CYP2C19*2 subjects, all pharmacodynamic parameters measured by whole blood impedance aggregometry were significantly different between subjects with different CYP3A5*3 genotypes. Our data suggests that CYP2C19 genetic polymorphism play a major role in the clopidogrel response, however, the impact of CYP3A5 genetic polymorphism, may be pronounced in the subjects who carried the loss-functional allele of CYP2C19. PMID:26099919

  18. Information Science and Responsive Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stake, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Responsive evaluation builds upon the methods of informal evaluation in disciplined ways: getting personally acquainted with the evaluand, observation of activities, interviewing people who are in different ways familiar with the evaluand, searching documents that reveal what happened in the past or somewhere else. It calls for sustained effort to…

  19. The Pharmacogenetic Control of Antiplatelet Response: Candidate Genes and CYP2C19

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yao; Lewis, Joshua P.; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Scott, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aspirin, clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor are antiplatelet agents for the prevention of ischemic events in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and other indications. Variability in response is observed to different degrees with these agents, which can translate to increased risks for adverse cardiovascular events. As such, potential pharmacogenetic determinants of antiplatelet pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical outcomes have been actively studied. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the available antiplatelet pharmacogenetics literature. Evidence supporting the significance of candidate genes and their potential influence on antiplatelet response and clinical outcomes are summarized and evaluated. Additional focus is directed at CYP2C19 and clopidogrel response, including the availability of clinical testing and genotype-directed antiplatelet therapy. Expert opinion The reported aspirin response candidate genes have not been adequately replicated and few candidate genes have thus far been implicated in prasugrel or ticagrelor response. However, abundant data supports the clinical validity of CYP2C19 and clopidogrel response variability among ACS/PCI patients. Although limited prospective trial data are available to support the utility of routine CYP2C19 testing, the increased risks for reduced clopidogrel efficacy among ACS/PCI patients that carry CYP2C19 loss-of-function alleles should be considered when genotype results are available. PMID:26173871

  20. Residual platelet ADP reactivity after clopidogrel treatment is dependent on activation of both the unblocked P2Y1 and the P2Y12 receptor and is correlated with protein expression of P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Oscar Ö; Amisten, Stefan; Wihlborg, Anna-Karin; Hunting, Karen; Nilsson, David

    2006-01-01

    Two ADP receptors have been identified on human platelets: P2Y1 and P2Y12. The P2Y12 receptor blocker clopidogrel is widely used to reduce the risks in acute coronary syndromes, but, currently, there is no P2Y1 blocker in clinical use. Evidence for variable responses to clopidogrel has been described in several reports. The mechanistic explanation for this phenomenon is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to examine mechanisms responsible for variability of 2MeS-ADP, a stable ADP analogue, induced platelet reactivity in clopidogrel-treated patients. Platelet reactivity was assessed by flow cytometry measurements of P-selectin (CD62P) and activated GpIIb/IIIa complex (PAC-1). Residual 2MeS-ADP activation via the P2Y12 and P2Y1 receptors was determined by co-incubation with the selective antagonists AR-C69931 and MRS2179 in vitro. P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptor expression on both RNA and protein level were determined, as well as the P2Y12 H1 or H2 haplotypes. Our data suggest that the residual platelet activation of 2MeS-ADP after clopidogrel treatment is partly due to an inadequate antagonistic effect of clopidogrel on the P2Y12 receptor and partly due to activation of the P2Y1 receptor, which is unaffected by clopidogrel. Moreover, a correlation between increased P2Y12 protein expression on platelets and decreased response to clopidogrel was noticed, r2=0.43 (P<0.05). No correlation was found between P2Y12 mRNA levels and clopidogrel resistance, indicating post-transcriptional mechanisms. To achieve additional ADP inhibition in platelets, antagonists directed at the P2Y1 receptor could be more promising than the development of more potent P2Y12 receptor antagonists. PMID:18404433

  1. [Clopidogrel- induced hepatotoxicity in hemodialyzed patient: a case report].

    PubMed

    Papagni, Sergio; Bonifati, Carmen; Dagostino, Filippo; Murgo, Angelo Marco

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is a frequent cause of acute liver failure. It may cause clinical manifestations ranging from simple alteration of the common liver function tests until more severe manifestations including encephalopathy, coagulopathy, and in many cases progressive multi-organ dysfunction. The condition, therefore, may be associated with higher morbidity and mortality as well as higher consumption of economic resources. In this paper, we present the case of a 71-year-old patient treated with hemodialysis, diabetic, with ischemic cardiopathy and severe peripheral vascular disease. The patient presented a progressive clinical deterioration with the development of ascites, jaundice and significant deterioration of liver function. Diagnostic studies have ruled out viral and immunological diseases and, in agreement with the score obtained from the Maria and Victorino scale, clopidogrel was identified as the major factor responsible for the damage. After the suspension of the drug, the follow-up has led to the complete and stable recovery of liver function. PMID:26913747

  2. Delayed clopidogrel transit during myocardial infarction evident on angiography.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, Joanna; Gibson, C Michael; Pinto, Duane S

    2015-05-01

    We describe the case of a patient with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) where a limitation of oral clopidogrel loading prior to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was directly visualized on angiography. Clopidogrel is a thienopyridine antiplatelet agent used in acute coronary syndromes. It reduces platelet aggregation via inhibition of the P2Y12 receptor. Clopidogrel is an inactive metabolite that is metabolized into the active metabolite by the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes located mostly in the liver and partly in the gastrointestinal system. As such, it requires at least 2 hours to reach maximal effect. A 63-year-old female went to an outside facility where she was diagnosed with NSTEMI and underwent angiography. She was administered 324 mg of aspirin and 600 mg of clopidogrel, and was transferred to our facility. Upon arrival, approximately 1.5 hours after the oral loading dose, the clopidogrel tablets were visualized intact in the stomach during angiography, implying a very low likelihood of adequate absorption or antiplatelet effect. This observation raises the concern that delayed gastrointestinal transit, apart from other metabolic derangements, may be a factor in achieving optimal platelet inhibition using oral agents. PMID:25929306

  3. Counterintuitive compaction behavior of clopidogrel bisulfate polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Khomane, Kailas S; More, Parth K; Bansal, Arvind K

    2012-07-01

    Being a density violator, clopidogrel bisulfate (CLP) polymorphic system (forms I and II) allows us to study individually the impact of molecular packing (true density) and thermodynamic properties such as heat of fusion on the compaction behavior. These two polymorphs of CLP were investigated for in-die and out-of-die compaction behavior using CTC profile, Heckel, and Walker equations. Compaction studies were performed on a fully instrumented rotary tabletting machine. Detailed examinations of the molecular packing of each form revealed that arrangement of the sulfate anion differs significantly in both crystal forms, thus conferring different compaction behavior to two forms. Close cluster packing of molecules in form I offers a rigid structure, which has poor compressibility and hence resists deformation under compaction pressure. This results into lower densification, higher yield strength, and mean yield pressure, as compared with form II at a given pressure. However, by virtue of higher bonding strength, form I showed superior tabletability, despite its poor compressibility and deformation behavior. Form I, having higher true density and lower heat of fusion showed higher bonding strength. Hence, true density and not heat of fusion can be considered predictor of bonding strength of the pharmaceutical powders. PMID:22488254

  4. Bioactivation of clopidogrel and prasugrel: factors determining the stereochemistry of the thiol metabolite double bond.

    PubMed

    Dansette, Patrick M; Levent, Dan; Hessani, Assia; Mansuy, Daniel

    2015-06-15

    The antithrombotics of the tetrahydrothienopyridine series, clopidogrel and prasugrel, are prodrugs that must be metabolized in two steps to become pharmacologically active. The first step is the formation of a thiolactone metabolite. The second step is a further oxidation with the formation of a thiolactone sulfoxide whose hydrolytic opening leads to a sulfenic acid that is eventually reduced into the corresponding active cis thiol. Very few data were available on the formation of the isomer of the active cis thiol having a trans configuration of the double bond, the most striking result in that regard being that both cis and trans thiols were formed upon the metabolism of clopidogrel by human liver microsomes in the presence of glutathione (GSH), whereas only the cis thiol was detected in the sera of patients treated with this drug. This article shows that trans thiols are also formed upon the microsomal metabolism of prasugrel or its thiolactone metabolite in the presence of GSH and that metabolites having the trans configuration of the double bond are only formed when microsomal incubations are done in the presence of thiols, such as GSH, N-acetyl-cysteine, and mercaptoethanol. Intermediate formation of thioesters resulting from the reaction of GSH with the thiolactone sulfoxide metabolite appears to be responsible for trans thiol formation. Addition of human liver cytosol to the microsomal incubations led to a dramatic decrease of the formation of the trans thiol metabolites. These data suggest that cytosolic esterases would accelerate the hydrolytic opening of thiolactone sulfoxide intermediates and disfavor the formation of thioesters resulting from the reaction of these intermediates with GSH that is responsible for trans isomer formation. This would explain why trans thiols have not been detected in the sera of patients treated with clopidogrel. PMID:25970225

  5. [Efficacy of clopidogrel as ADP-dependent platelet aggregation inhibitor. Study on individuals with coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Izaguirre Avila, R; de la Peña, A; González Pacheco, H; Ramírez Gutiérrez, A; González Valdez, H; Quiroz, A; Cortina, E; Huerta, M; Lupi, E

    2000-01-01

    Acetyl-salicylic acid inhibits thromboxane A2 production and reduces the risk of vascular occlusive events by 20 to 25%. Ticlopidine inhibits ADP-dependent platelet aggregation and reduces the same risk by 30 to 35%, but produces some adverse effects. Clopidogrel is a ticlopidin-derived antiplatelet-drug, with the same mechanism of action; reduces the expression of the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, the fibrinogen receptor on the platelet surface. Clopidogrel has the same clinical efficacy of ticlopidin and lowers the incidence of adverse effects. In this study, we evaluated the effects of one daily dosis of 75 mg of clopidogrel on platelet function in 33 subjects with coronary artery disease. Before treatment and after the 6th and 12th week, the following parameters were evaluated: 5 microM-ADP and 20 micrograms/mL collagen-induced platelet aggregation, bleeding time and fibrinogen concentration. In basal and in the 6th and 12th week samples, ADP-induced platelet aggregation was 90.7% +/- 13.2, 54.6% +/- 23.2 and 49.2% +/- 23.7 respectively, that represents a significant reduction of 38.6% and 44.4%. Reduction of collagen-induced platelet aggregation was not significative. Plasmatic fibrinogen did not suffer variation during treatment. Bleeding time was significant prolonged from 4.1 minutes to 15.4 and 14.6 minutes (3.7-3.5 times compared with the test before treatment). There were no haemorrhagic complications, only digestive discomfort in fewer than 3% of patients. We concluded that clopidogrel is a safe and efficacious drug for patients, it efficiently reduces ADP-induced platelet aggregation and prolongs bleeding time. PMID:11534098

  6. Static platelet adhesion, flow cytometry and serum TXB2 levels for monitoring platelet inhibiting treatment with ASA and clopidogrel in coronary artery disease: a randomised cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Andreas C; Jonasson, Lena; Lindahl, Tomas L; Hedbäck, Bo; Whiss, Per A

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the use of anti-platelet agents such as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and clopidogrel in coronary heart disease, some patients continue to suffer from atherothrombosis. This has stimulated development of platelet function assays to monitor treatment effects. However, it is still not recommended to change treatment based on results from platelet function assays. This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of a static platelet adhesion assay to detect platelet inhibiting effects of ASA and clopidogrel. The adhesion assay measures several aspects of platelet adhesion simultaneously, which increases the probability of finding conditions sensitive for anti-platelet treatment. Methods With a randomised cross-over design we evaluated the anti-platelet effects of ASA combined with clopidogrel as well as monotherapy with either drug alone in 29 patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome. Also, 29 matched healthy controls were included to evaluate intra-individual variability over time. Platelet function was measured by flow cytometry, serum thromboxane B2 (TXB2)-levels and by static platelet adhesion to different protein surfaces. The results were subjected to Principal Component Analysis followed by ANOVA, t-tests and linear regression analysis. Results The majority of platelet adhesion measures were reproducible in controls over time denoting that the assay can monitor platelet activity. Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet adhesion decreased significantly upon treatment with clopidogrel compared to ASA. Flow cytometric measurements showed the same pattern (r2 = 0.49). In opposite, TXB2-levels decreased with ASA compared to clopidogrel. Serum TXB2 and ADP-induced platelet activation could both be regarded as direct measures of the pharmacodynamic effects of ASA and clopidogrel respectively. Indirect pharmacodynamic measures such as adhesion to albumin induced by various soluble activators as well as SFLLRN-induced activation measured by flow

  7. Pharmacogenetics of antiplatelets and anticoagulants: a report on clopidogrel, warfarin and dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Ross, Stephanie; Paré, Guillaume

    2013-10-01

    Genetic polymorphisms are thought to contribute to the wide intraindividual variability in antiplatelet and anticoagulant drug response. Pharmacogenetics is the study of how genetic variants influence drug response and how the adoption of a more personalized approach in antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy may help to minimize harmful drug effects and optimize care for individual patients. However, due to sometimes conflicting evidence, the uptake of pharmacogenetics in the clinical setting has been slow. In this article, we review the genetic mechanisms contributing to the variability in response to three commonly used and emerging antiplatelet and anticoagulant drug therapies, namely clopidogrel, warfarin and dabigatran. We will focus on common genetic variants that influence the absorption, metabolism and/or action of these agents, including CYP2C19 (*2, *3 and *17), CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, ABCB1, P2RY12, CYP2C9 (*2/*3), VKORC1 and CESI. PMID:24088127

  8. ABCB1 C3435T and CYP2C19*2 polymorphisms in a Palestinian and Turkish population: A pharmacogenetic perspective to clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Suheir; Amro, Omar; Abu-Rmaileh, Hilal; Alshaer, Inji; Korachi, May; Ayesh, Suhail

    2014-01-01

    Clopidogrel is an antiplatelet drug used to prevent recurrent ischemic events after acute coronary syndrome and/or coronary stent implantation. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) such as CYP2C19*2 and ABCB1 C3435T have been found to play a role in different individual responses to clopidogrel. Since the prevalence of these SNPs is generally known to differ from one population to another, the aim of this study was to examine their prevalence in both a Palestinian and Turkish population. One hundred unrelated Palestinian subjects and 100 unrelated Turkish subjects were analyzed for CYP2C19*2 and ABCB1 C3435T polymorphisms by the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS). Results showed an ABCB1 3435 T allele frequency of 0.46 (95% CI 0.391 to 0.529) in the Palestinian sample and 0.535 (95% CI 0.4664 to 0.6036) in the Turkish sample. CYP2C19*2 allele frequency was 0.095 (95% CI 0.0558 to 0.134) in the Palestinian sample and 0.135 (95% CI 0.088 to 0.182) in the Turkish sample. Our results provide information about the prevalence of the polymorphisms related to clopidogrel response in both the Palestinian and Turkish populations, in order to improve the safety and efficacy of clopidogrel through use of genetically guided, individualized treatment. The prevalence of these clinically significant alleles shed light on the importance of testing them before prescribing clopidogrel. PMID:25606414

  9. Changing CS Features Alters Evaluative Responses in Evaluative Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unkelbach, Christian; Stahl, Christoph; Forderer, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Evaluative conditioning (EC) refers to changes in people's evaluative responses toward initially neutral stimuli (CSs) by mere spatial and temporal contiguity with other positive or negative stimuli (USs). We investigate whether changing CS features from conditioning to evaluation also changes people's evaluative response toward these CSs. We used…

  10. [Switching from clopidogrel to prasugrel: Efficacy and safety data].

    PubMed

    Yamaç, Aylin Hatice; Göktekin, Omer

    2015-10-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a P2Y12 receptor antagonist is standard therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention and in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Switching from clopidogrel to prasugrel may be required in some patients for efficacy and safety. However, there are potential concerns that overlap of these two agents might increase the risk of bleeding. This review summarizes pharmacodynamic and clinical data to guide clinicians on how and when switching from clopidogrel to prasugrel should be conducted. Loading dose prasugrel should be considered in nearly all indications to avoid any possible gap in adequate platelet inhibition during switching, as overlap of these two agents is unlikely to result in bleeding. PMID:27326447

  11. Cost-effectiveness of clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor for dual antiplatelet therapy after acute coronary syndrome: a decision-analytic model

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Qadir, Husam; Roifman, Idan; Wijeysundera, Harindra C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of prasugrel or ticagrelor as part of dual antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) improves clinical outcomes relative to clopidogrel. The relative cost-effectiveness of these agents are unknown. We conducted an economic analysis evaluating 12 months of treatment with clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor after ACS. Methods: We developed a fully probabilistic Markov cohort decision-analytic model using a lifetime horizon, from the perspective of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The model incorporated risks of death, recurrent ACS, heart failure, major bleeding and other adverse effects of treatment. Data on probabilities and utilities were obtained from the published literature where available. The primary outcome was quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Results: Treatment with clopidogrel was associated with the lowest effectiveness (7.41 QALYs, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-14.79) and the lowest cost ($39 601, 95% CI $8434-$111 186). Ticagrelor treatment had an effectiveness of 7.50 QALYs (95% CI 1.13-14.84) at a cost of $40 649 (95% CI $9327-$111 881). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for ticagrelor relative to clopidogrel was $12 205 per QALY gained. Prasugrel had an ICER of $57 630 per QALY gained relative to clopidogrel. Ticagrelor was the preferred option in 90% of simulations at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50 000 per QALY gained. Interpretation: Ticagrelor was the most cost-effective agent when used as part of dual antiplatelet therapy after ACS. This conclusion was robust to wide variations in model parameters. PMID:26770967

  12. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions with clopidogrel: updated review and risk management in combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Yu; Chen, Meng; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su; Xiang, Mei-Xiang; Zhou, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Background Coprescribing of clopidogrel and other drugs is common. Available reviews have addressed the drug–drug interactions (DDIs) when clopidogrel is as an object drug, or focused on combination use of clopidogrel and a special class of drugs. Clinicians may still be ignorant of those DDIs when clopidogrel is a precipitant drug, the factors determining the degree of DDIs, and corresponding risk management. Methods A literature search was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library to analyze the pharmacokinetic DDIs of clopidogrel and new P2Y12 receptor inhibitors. Results Clopidogrel affects the pharmacokinetics of cerivastatin, repaglinide, ferulic acid, sibutramine, efavirenz, and omeprazole. Low efficacy of clopidogrel is anticipated in the presence of omeprazole, esomeprazole, morphine, grapefruit juice, scutellarin, fluoxetine, azole antifungals, calcium channel blockers, sulfonylureas, and ritonavir. Augmented antiplatelet effects are anticipated when clopidogrel is coprescribed with aspirin, curcumin, cyclosporin, St John’s wort, rifampicin, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The factors determining the degree of DDIs with clopidogrel include genetic status (eg, cytochrome P540 [CYP]2B6*6, CYP2C19 polymorphism, CYP3A5*3, CYP3A4*1G, and CYP1A2-163C.A), species differences, and dose strength. The DDI risk does not exhibit a class effect, eg, the effects of clopidogrel on cerivastatin versus other statins, the effects of proton pump inhibitors on clopidogrel (omeprazole, esomeprazole versus pantoprazole, rabeprazole), the effects of rifampicin on clopidogrel versus ticagrelor and prasugrel, and the effects of calcium channel blockers on clopidogrel (amlodipine versus P-glycoprotein-inhibiting calcium channel blockers). The mechanism of the DDIs with clopidogrel involves modulating CYP enzymes (eg, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4), paraoxonase-1, hepatic carboxylesterase 1, P-glycoprotein, and organic anion

  13. Aligning Collaborative and Culturally Responsive Evaluation Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askew, Karyl; Beverly, Monifa Green; Jay, Michelle L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors, three African-American women trained as collaborative evaluators, offer a comparative analysis of collaborative evaluation (O'Sullivan, 2004) and culturally responsive evaluation approaches (Frierson, Hood, & Hughes, 2002; Kirkhart & Hopson, 2010). Collaborative evaluation techniques immerse evaluators in the cultural milieu of the…

  14. Improving Beta Test Evaluation Response Rates: A Meta-Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ-Eft, Darlene; Preskill, Hallie

    2005-01-01

    This study presents a meta-evaluation of a beta-test of a customer service training program. The initial evaluation showed a low response rate. Therefore, the meta-evaluation focused on issues related to the conduct of the initial evaluation and reasons for nonresponse. The meta-evaluation identified solutions to the nonresponse problem as related…

  15. The Practice and Politics of Responsive Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abma, Tineke

    2006-01-01

    Responsive evaluation offers a perspective in which evaluation is reframed from the assessment of program interventions on the basis of policy makers' goals to an engagement with and among all stakeholders about the value and meaning of their practice. Responsive evaluators have to be extra sensitive to power relations given the deliberate…

  16. Clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) interaction: separate intake and a non-omeprazole PPI the solution?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dual therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel increases the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Therefore, co-therapy with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is recommended by most guidelines. However, there are warnings against combining PPIs with clopidogrel because of their interactions with cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 2C19 (CYP2C19). Methods The effects of the combined or separate intake of 20 mg of omeprazole and 75 mg of clopidogrel on the clopidogrel-induced inhibition of platelet aggregation were measured in four healthy subjects whose CYP2C19 exon sequences were determined. The effects of co-therapy with 10 mg of rabeprazole were also examined. Results Two subjects showed the wild-type CYP2C19 sequence. The concurrent intake of omeprazole had no effect on clopidogrel-induced platelet inhibition in these subjects. Two subjects were heterozygous for the *2 allele, with predicted reduced CYP2C19 activity. One of them was a clopidogrel non-responder. In the second heterozygous subject, omeprazole co-therapy reduced the clopidogrel anti-platelet effect when taken simultaneously or separately. However, the simultaneous intake of rabeprazole did not reduce the clopidogrel effect. Conclusion The clopidogrel-PPI interaction does not seem to be a PPI class effect. Rabeprazole did not affect the clopidogrel effect in a subject with a clear omeprazole-clopidogrel interaction. The separate intake of PPI and clopidogrel may not be sufficient to prevent their interaction. PMID:20562062

  17. Clopidogrel-Induced Severe Hepatitis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Keshmiri, Hesam; Behal, Anuj; Shroff, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel is a commonly prescribed antiplatelet agent that carries a rare risk of hepatotoxicity. We describe a case of severe clopidogrel-induced hepatitis with liver biopsy assessment. Prompt recognition and withdrawal of the offending agent are imperative to prevent progression and potentially fatal liver injury. PMID:27429813

  18. [Spinal cord ischaemia and preoperative clopidogrel withdrawal in an arteriosclerotic patient].

    PubMed

    Murat, O; Durand, E; Delépine, G; Nguyen, P; Malinovsky, J-M

    2008-04-01

    We report the case of a motor impairment associated with bladder dysfunction several days after clopidogrel withdrawal in an arteriosclerotic woman scheduled for thoracotomy under general and thoracic epidural anaesthesia. Even if spinal artery syndrome may have a lot of aetiologies, we believe in a direct link between clopidogrel withdrawal and medulla ischaemia. PMID:18378112

  19. Bleeding tendency in dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin/clopidogrel: rescue of the template bleeding time in a single-center prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with heightened platelet reactivity in response to antiplatelet agents are at an increased risk of recurrent ischemic events. However, there is a lack of diagnostic criteria for increased response to combined aspirin/clopidogrel therapy. The challenge is to identify patients at risk of bleeding. This study sought to characterize bleeding tendency in patients treated with aspirin and clopidogrel. Patients/methods In a single-center prospective study, 100 patients under long-term aspirin/clopidogrel treatment, the effect of therapy was assayed by template bleeding time (BT) and the inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) by light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Arachidonic acid (0.625 mmol/L) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP; 2, 4, and 8 μmol/L) were used as platelet agonists. Results Bleeding episodes (28 nuisance, 2 hematuria [1 severe], 1 severe proctorrhagia, 1 severe epistaxis) were significantly more frequent in patients with longer BT. Template BT ≥ 24 min was associated with bleeding episodes (28 of 32). Risk of bleeding increased 17.4% for each 1 min increase in BT. Correlation was found between BT and IPAmax in response to ADP 2 μmol/L but not to ADP 4 or 8 μmol/L. Conclusion In patients treated with dual aspirin/clopidogrel therapy, nuisance and internal bleeding were significantly associated with template BT and with IPAmax in response to ADP 2 μmol/L but not in response to ADP 4 μmol/L or 8 μmol/L. PMID:22236361

  20. Clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors - where do we stand in 2012?

    PubMed Central

    Drepper, Michael D; Spahr, Laurent; Frossard, Jean Louis

    2012-01-01

    Clopidogrel in association with aspirine is considered state of the art of medical treatment for acute coronary syndrome by reducing the risk of new ischemic events. Concomitant treatment with proton pump inhibitors in order to prevent gastrointestinal side effects is recommended by clinical guidelines. Clopidogrel needs metabolic activation predominantly by the hepatic cytochrome P450 isoenzyme Cytochrome 2C19 (CYP2C19) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are extensively metabolized by the CYP2C19 isoenzyme as well. Several pharmacodynamic studies investigating a potential clopidogrel-PPI interaction found a significant decrease of the clopidogrel platelet antiaggregation effect for omeprazole, but not for pantoprazole. Initial clinical cohort studies in 2009 reported an increased risk for adverse cardiovascular events, when under clopidogrel and PPI treatment at the same time. These observations led the United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Medecines Agency to discourage the combination of clopidogrel and PPI (especially omeprazole) in the same year. In contrast, more recent retrospective cohort studies including propensity score matching and the only existing randomized trial have not shown any difference concerning adverse cardiovascular events when concomitantly on clopidogrel and PPI or only on clopidogrel. Three meta-analyses report an inverse correlation between clopidogrel-PPI interaction and study quality, with high and moderate quality studies not reporting any association, rising concern about unmeasured confounders biasing the low quality studies. Thus, no definite evidence exists for an effect on mortality. Because PPI induced risk reduction clearly overweighs the possible adverse cardiovascular risk in patients with high risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, combination of clopidogrel with the less CYP2C19 inhibiting pantoprazole should be recommended. PMID:22611308

  1. Effect of fluvoxamine on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Yang, Yu; Fang, Chunxue; Zhao, Jincheng; Han, Mei; Zhu, Qiushuang; Bai, Xue; Liu, Mingyuan; Yang, Guangyuan

    2015-01-01

    1. Fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is often coprescribed with clopidogrel for the treatment of ischemic vascular diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of fluvoxamine on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel. 2. Twelve male rats were employed to investigate the effect of fluvoxamine on the pharmacokinetics of clopidogrel in vivo. Clopidogrel carboxylic acid was used for the pharmacokinetic study of clopidogrel. 3. After pretreatment with high dose of fluvoxamine (27 mg/kg), there were significant increases in the AUC0-t (from 9850±4060 to 27,300±6910 µg/l h; p<0.05), AUC0-∞ (from 9850±4060 to 27,600±6800 µg/l h; p<0.05) and t1/2 (from 2.07±0.0942 to 7.49±1.22 h; p<0.05) of clopidogrel carboxylic acid. The pharmacokinetic data for clopidogrel carboxylic acid showed significant decreases in VLz/F (from 0.765±0.299 to 0.256±0.0594 l/kg; p<0.05) after pretreatment with high dose of fluvoxamine. Pharmacodynamic studies that measure platelet aggregation percentage (from 21.63±6.05% to 45.98±5.11%; p<0.01) show that high doses of fluvoxamine significantly inhibit the effect of clopidogrel. 4. In conclusion, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel were significantly affected by high doses of fluvoxamine. This study indicated that potential drug-drug interaction between fluvoxamine and clopidogrel should be taken into consideration in clinical use. PMID:26068527

  2. A Ranking Method for Evaluating Constructed Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a comparative judgment approach for holistically scored constructed response tasks. In this approach, the grader rank orders (rather than rate) the quality of a small set of responses. A prior automated evaluation of responses guides both set formation and scaling of rankings. Sets are formed to have similar prior scores and…

  3. The effect of acenocoumarol on the antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Dewilde, Willem J M; Janssen, Paul W A; Bergmeijer, Thomas O; Kelder, Johannes C; Hackeng, Christian M; ten Berg, Jurriën M

    2015-10-01

    Patients exhibiting high on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity (HPR) are at an increased risk of atherothrombotic events following percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). The use of concomitant medication which is metabolised by the hepatic cytochrome P450 system, such as phenprocoumon, is associated with HPR. We assessed the level of platelet reactivity on clopidogrel in patients who received concomitant treatment with acenocoumarol (another coumarin derivative). Patients scheduled for PCI were included in a prospective, single centre, observational registry. Patients who were adequately pre-treated with clopidogrel were eligible for this analysis, which included 1,582 patients, of whom 104 patients (6.6%) received concomitant acenocoumarol treatment. Platelet reactivity, as measured with the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay and expressed in P2Y12 Reaction Units (PRU), was significantly higher in patients on concomitant acenocoumarol treatment (mean PRU 229 ± 88 vs 187 ± 95; p < 0.001). In patients with concomitant acenocoumarol use, the proportion of patients with HPR was higher, defined as PRU > 208 (57.7% vs 41.1%; p=0.001) and PRU ≥ 236 (49.0% vs 31.4%; p< 0.001). In multivariable analysis, concomitant acenocoumarol use was independently associated with a higher PRU and the occurrence of HPR defined as PRU ≥ 236 (OR 2.00, [1.07-3.79]), but not with HPR defined as PRU > 208 (OR 1.37, [0.74-2.54]). PRU also was significantly increased after 1:1 propensity matching (+28.2; p < 0.001). As this was an observational study, confounding by indication cannot be excluded, although multivariable analyses and propensity matching were performed. The impact of the findings from this hypothesis-generating study on clinical outcome requires further investigation. PMID:26177793

  4. Aspirin and Clopidogrel Alter Core Temperature and Skin Blood Flow during Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bruning, Rebecca S.; Dahmus, Jessica D.; Kenney, W. Larry; Holowatz, Lacy A.

    2012-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy with oral aspirin or clopidogrel (PlavixR) is associated with an attenuated skin vasodilator response and a greater rate of rise in core temperature in healthy, middle-aged individuals during passive heating in a water perfused suit. Purpose The present double-blind, crossover study examined the functional consequences of 7 days of low-dose aspirin (ASA, 81 mg/day) vs. clopidogrel (CLO, 75 mg/day) treatment in 14 healthy, middle-aged (50–65 yrs) men and women during passive heating in air (40 min at 30°C, 40% rh) followed by exercise (60% V̇O2peak). Methods Oral temperature (Tor) was measured in the antechamber (23.0 ± 0.1°C) before entering a warm environmental chamber. After 40 minutes of rest subjects cycled on a recumbent cycle ergometer for up to 120 minutes. Esophageal temperature (Tes) and laser Doppler flux were measured continuously, and the latter was normalized to maximal cutaneous vascular conductance (%CVCmax). Results Prior to entry into the environmental chamber there were no differences in Tor among treatments; however, after 40 minutes of rest in the heat, Tes was significantly higher for ASA and CLO vs. placebo (37.2±0.1°C, 37.3±0.1°C, vs. 37.0±0.1°C, both P<0.001), a difference that persisted throughout exercise (P<0.001 vs. placebo). The mean body temperature thresholds for the onset of cutaneous vasodilation were shifted to the right for both ASA and CLO during exercise (P<0.05). Conclusion ASA and CLO resulted in elevated core temperatures during passive heat stress and shifted the onset of peripheral thermoeffector mechanisms toward higher body temperatures during exercise heat stress. PMID:23135368

  5. Successful gestation and delivery using clopidogrel for secondary stroke prophylaxis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Christopher R; Cuesta-Fernandez, Ana; Kayaleh, Omar R

    2014-09-01

    Literature is scarce regarding the use of clopidogrel during pregnancy and the potential hazard to maternal and fetal health. We report a 33-year-old female, who presented to our clinic at 40 weeks gestation with a history of multiple prior ischemic strokes and transient ischemic attacks. The patient was placed on clopidogrel for secondary stroke prophylaxis prior to conception and maintained therapy throughout pregnancy without interruption or complication. Clopidogrel was discontinued 7 days prior to induction of labor, and a healthy baby was vaginally delivered without bleeding complications or congenital anomalies. Clopidogrel was restarted 12 hours postpartum without an incident. To our knowledge, this is the first report of clopidogrel use in pregnancy for secondary stroke prophylaxis. We also provide a current review of the literature of the use of clopidogrel in pregnancy. Based on the limited data available, clopidogrel use in pregnancy has not demonstrated significant toxicity to either the mother or the newborn. However, additional studies are needed to further assess the efficacy and safety of this medication in this patient population. PMID:24798936

  6. An Assay of Measuring Platelet Reactivity Using Monoclonal Antibody against Activated Platelet Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa in Patients Taking Clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon-Hyouk; Kim, Song-Yi; Kim, Ki-Seok; Kim, Young Ree; Kang, Sung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Residual platelet reactivity in patients who are taking clopidogrel is commonly measured with VerifyNow assay, which is based on the principle of light transmission aggregometry. However, to evaluate the residual platelet reactivity, it would be more accurate if the reactivity of platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa is directly monitored. In this study, PAC1, a monoclonal antibody against activated platelet GP IIb/IIIa, was used to measure the residual platelet reactivity. Subjects and Methods Twenty seven patients with coronary artery disease taking clopidogrel were enrolled. Platelets in whole blood were stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated PAC1. Mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) and % positive platelets (PP) were measured with flow cytometry, and the binding index (BI; MFI × %PP/100) was calculated. P2Y12 reaction unit (PRU) and % inhibition of VerifyNow assay were also measured in the usual manner. Results PRU of VerifyNow assay correlated significantly with MFI, %PP, and BI at 10 µM (r=0.59, 0.73, and 0.60, respectively, all p<0.005) and 20 µM of adenosine diphosphate (ADP; r=0.61, 0.75, and 0.63, respectively, all p<0.005). The % inhibition also correlated significantly with MFI, %PP, and BI at 10 µM (r=-0.60, -0.69, and -0.59, respectively, all p<0.005) and 20 µM of ADP (r=-0.63, -0.71, and -0.62, respectively, all p<0.005). Conclusion Direct measurements of the reactivity of platelet GP IIb/IIIa were feasible using PAC1 and flow cytometry in patients taking clopidogrel. Further clinical studies are required to determine the cut-off values which would define high residual platelet reactivity in patients on this treatment protocol. PMID:26413105

  7. Bleeding after tooth extraction in patients taking aspirin and clopidogrel (Plavix®) compared with healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Ghahrody, Mohsen; Yousefi-Malekshah, Seyed Hamid; Karimi-Sari, Hamidreza; Yazdanpanah, Hamid; Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Yavarahmadi, Mohammadhosein

    2016-06-01

    The risk of perioperative bleeding is high in patients who take aspirin and clopidogrel after a percutaneous coronary intervention, and whether to stop the drugs is a matter of concern for dentists. The aim of this study was to answer the specific question: should aspirin and clopidogrel bisulphate (Plavix®) be discontinued during a conventional forceps extraction? We studied 64 patients during the first year after percutaneous insertion of coronary stents who were taking aspirin (ASA) 80mg and clopidogrel (Plavix(®)) 75mg, and 50 healthy patients who were to have a conventional forceps extraction at this polyclinic in 2013-2014 and acted as controls. Clinical details (underlying diseases; number of roots; type of tooth; type of haemostasis; and bleeding immediately, 30minutes, and 48hours after intervention) were compared. We evaluated 114 patients with the mean (range) age of 56 (43-76) years, and there were no significant differences in demographic data, underlying diseases, type of tooth, number of roots, and dose of anaesthetic between the groups. There were also no significant differences in the number of bleeds immediately and 30minutes after intervention (P=0.310 and 0.205). The time that the last dose of aspirin had been taken correlated with 30-minute haemostasis (20 compared with 12hours, p=0.037). During the 48hours after the intervention, there were no uncontrolled bleeds or emergency referrals. We conclude that using aspirin and Plavix® simultaneously has no considerable effect on the risk of bleeding in patients having conventional forceps extraction of a single tooth. PMID:26975576

  8. Clopidogrel significantly lowers the development of atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Heim, Christian; Gebhardt, Julia; Ramsperger-Gleixner, Martina; Jacobi, Johannes; Weyand, Michael; Ensminger, Stephan M

    2016-05-01

    The anti-platelet drug clopidogrel has been shown to modulate adhesion molecule and cytokine expression, both playing an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of clopidogrel on the development and progression of atherosclerosis. ApoE(-/-) mice fed an atherogenic diet (cholesterol: 1 %) for 6 months received a daily dose of clopidogrel (1 mg/kg) by i.p. injection. Anti-platelet treatment was started immediately in one experimental group, and in another group clopidogrel was started 2 month after beginning of the atherogenic diet. Blood was analysed at days 30, 60 and 120 to monitor the lipid profile. After 6 months the aortic arch and brachiocephalic artery were analysed by Sudan IV staining for plaque size and by morphometry for luminal occlusion. Serum levels of various adhesion molecules were investigated by ELISA and the cellular infiltrate was analysed by immunofluorescence. After daily treatment with 1 mg/kg clopidogrel mice showed a significant reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in the thoracic aorta and within cross sections of the aortic arch [plaque formation 55.2 % (clopidogrel/start) vs. 76.5 % (untreated control) n = 8, P < 0.05]. After treatment with clopidogrel P-/E-selectin levels and cytokine levels of MCP-1 and PDGFβ were significantly reduced as compared to controls. The cellular infiltrate showed significantly reduced macrophage and T-cell infiltration in clopidogrel-treated animals. These results show that clopidogrel can effectively delay the development and progression of 'de-novo' atherosclerosis. However, once atherosclerotic lesions were already present, anti-platelet treatment alone did not result in reverse remodelling of these lesions. PMID:26062773

  9. The interaction between clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors (PPI): is there any clinical relevance?

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rakesh K; Reddy, Hanumanth K; Sharma, Rohit K; Moazazi, Mathilde; Elango, Lovett; Singh, Vibhuti N; Williams, D Keith; Voelker, Donald J

    2010-01-01

    The potential interaction between clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors (PPI) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) raises serious concerns for cardiologists. However, in patients on this combination of drugs, there is no conclusive evidence of an increase in adverse cardiovascular events. From pharmacologic and pharmacodynamic perspectives, there is a real interaction between clopidogrel and PPIs because of the competitive inhibition of CYP2C19 isoenzyme which is required for biotransformation of clopidogrel to its active metabolite. The consequent decrease in the availability of this active metabolite leads to attenuation of antiplatelet efficacy of clopidogrel. In several observational trials, it was shown that decreased antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel due to PPIs may translate into poor cardiovascular outcomes. However, an incomplete RCT (COGENT) and a post hoc analysis of two large trials (PRINCIPLE-TIMI 44 and TRITON-TIMI 38 trial) showed no significant adverse cardiovascular events with this combination. Caution is however needed in patients who are hypometabolizers of clopidogrel putting them at a higher risk of adverse coronary events. Since 3% of patients are likely to be hypometabolizers of clopidogrel, routine combination of clopidogrel and PPIs should be avoided. There is a heightened awareness of this interaction following multiple advisory warnings. At the same time, one should not withhold PPIs in patients who are at a high risk of developing gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. In these patients, selected choices of PPI such as pantoprazole may be helpful and for low risk patients, serious consideration should be given to H2 receptor antagonists or antacids. Therefore, while not compromising the cardioprotective effect of antiplatelet agents, the gastroprotective benefit of PPI should be strongly considered in patients who need both. Health care providers should remain alert to more outcome data. Future researchers will need to demonstrate

  10. [Clopidogrel--proton pump inhibitors drug interaction: implications to clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Fontes-Carvalho, Ricardo; Albuquerque, Aníbal

    2010-10-01

    Recent studies have raised the concern that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) could potentially interfere with clopidogrel antiplatelet effect. This association is frequent in clinical practice and is recommended by recent consensus guidelines in patients taking dual antiplatelet therapy to prevent gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Clopidogrel is a pro-drug which needs to be metabolized into its active metabolite, by cytochrome P450, especially by CYP2C19 isoenzyme. Various PPIs can inhibit CYP2C19, which could possibly decrease clopidogrel bioactivation process and, therefore, its antiplatelet effect. Various platelet function studies have shown that omeprazol can significantly decrease clopidogrel inhibitory effect on platelet P2Y12 receptor, leading to an increase in the number of patients who are "nonresponders" to clopidogrel. These pharmacokinetic studies also shown that this is not probably a class effect of PPIs, because they are metabolized to varying degrees by CYP2C19. The clinical impact of these observations remains uncertain, because various observational studies have shown conflicting results, and remains to demonstrate if PPIs can really increase the risk of cardiovascular events in patients taking clopidogrel. In this review we will discuss the pharmacokinetic basis underlying this drug interaction, the effect of different PPIs on platelet function tests and we will analyze in detail the potential clinical implications of using this association, both on cardiovascular and gastrointestinal events. Until further data is available, some clinical strategies can be recommended: (1) individual gastrointestinal risk assessment, with PPIs administration only to patients on dual anti-platelet therapy with additional GI risk factors; (2) preferential use of PPIs that have shown less interference with clopidogrel efficacy; (3) wide separation of PPI and clopidogrel dosing to minimize the risk of interaction (PPI may be given before breakfast and clopidogrel at

  11. Clopidogrel-Associated Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura following Endovascular Treatment of Spontaneous Carotid Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Rubano, Jerry A.; Chen, Kwan; Sullivan, Brianne; Vosswinkel, James A.; Jawa, Randeep S.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening multisystem disease secondary to platelet aggregation. We present a patient who developed profound thrombocytopenia and anemia 8 days following initiation of therapy with clopidogrel after stent placement for carotid artery dissection. She did not have a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin domain 13 (ADAMTS 13) deficiency. Management included steroids and therapeutic plasma exchange. Clopidogrel has rarely been associated with TTP. Unlike other causes of acquired TTP, the diagnosis of early clopidogrel-associated TTP is largely clinical given the infrequent reduction in ADAMTS 13 activity. PMID:26623244

  12. The evolution of dual antiplatelet therapy in the setting of acute coronary syndrome: ticagrelor versus clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Amico, Frank; Amico, Angela; Mazzoni, Jennifer; Moshiyakhov, Mark; Tamparo, William

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Wallentin L, Becker RC, Budaj A, et al. Ticagrelor versus clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes. N Eng J Med 2009; 361(11): 1045-1057. For acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a dual antiplatelet regimen comprised of treatment with aspirin and either P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonists, clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor is usually employed. This article compares clopidogrel with ticagrelor for the prevention of vascular events and death in broad population of ACS patients ranging from UA, NSTEMI to STEMI, utilizing planned strategies of medical or invasive treatment strategy. PMID:26560350

  13. [Health economic evaluation of AIDS response].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiangping

    2015-06-01

    During the past over 20 years of AIDS response in China, different fields from the international society and domestic sources provide significant amounts of resources for China's AIDS response. The investment, distribution and use of these resources and their effect has become the concern of the society. The health economic evaluation method is used to scientifically answer these questions, which is also the motivation of the evaluation studies. Based on several studies on health economic evaluation of AIDS response in this issue, concepts and issues related to this area are summarized. It is important for the readers to make a point of health economics evaluation, and it is also of great importance to know its limitations to provide the basis for future proper use of AIDS health economic evaluation results. PMID:26310326

  14. Use of Responsive Evaluation in Statewide Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Marjorie

    1976-01-01

    A summer school program stressing basic skills for migrant children in a rural Illinois community was assessed according to Stake's responsive evaluation model. Informal communication, program activities, audience needs, and participant values were emphasized in this case study. This evaluation method provided useful information for the state's…

  15. Use of Responsive Evaluation in Statewide Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Marjorie

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the utilization of Stake's theory of responsive evaluation by a unit in state government charged with the evaluation of the Illinois Migrant Program. Through interviews with state and local Title I staff, we were able to discover program purposes and concerns and to later conceptualize these concerns into…

  16. Platelet Factor XIIIa Release During Platelet Aggregation and Plasma Clot Strength Measured by Thrombelastography in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Treated with Clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Rolf P.; Owens, Janelle; Lu, Deshun; Nystrom, Perry; Jin, Yan; Kreutz, Yvonne; Desta, Zeruesenay; Flockhart, David A.

    2016-01-01

    It has been estimated that up to half of circulating Factor XIIIa (FXIIIa) is stored in platelets. The release of FXIIIa from platelets upon stimulation with ADP in patients with coronary artery disease treated with dual antiplatelet therapy has not been previously examined. Samples from 96 patients with established coronary artery disease treated with aspirin and clopidogrel were examined. Platelet aggregation was performed by light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) in platelet rich plasma (PRP) with platelet poor plasma (PPP) as reference and ADP 5μM as agonist. Kaolin activated TEG was performed in citrate PPP. PRP after aggregation was centrifuged and plasma supernatant (PSN) collected. FXIIIa was measured in PPP and PSN. Platelet aggregation after stimulation with ADP 5μM resulted in 24% additional FXIIIa release in PSN as compared to PPP (99.3 ± 27 vs. 80.3 ± 24 %, p<0.0001). FXIIIa concentration in PSN correlated with maximal plasma clot strength (TEG-G) (r=0.48, p<0.0001), but not in PPP (r=0.15, p=0.14). Increasing quartiles of platelet derived FXIIIa were associated with incrementally higher TEG-G (p=0.012). FXIIIa release was similar between clopidogrel responders and non-responders (p=0.18). In summary, platelets treated with aspirin and clopidogrel release a significant amount of FXIIIa upon aggregation by ADP. Platelet derived FXIIIa may contribute to differences in plasma TEG-G, and thus in part provide a mechanistic explanation for high clot strength observed as a consequence of platelet activation. Variability in clopidogrel response does not significantly influence FXIIIa release from platelets. PMID:24833046

  17. Platelet factor XIIIa release during platelet aggregation and plasma clot strength measured by thrombelastography in patients with coronary artery disease treated with clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Rolf P; Owens, Janelle; Lu, Deshun; Nystrom, Perry; Jin, Yan; Kreutz, Yvonne; Desta, Zeruesenay; Flockhart, David A

    2015-01-01

    It has been estimated that up to half of circulating factor XIIIa (FXIIIa) is stored in platelets. The release of FXIIIa from platelets upon stimulation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) in patients with coronary artery disease treated with dual antiplatelet therapy has not been previously examined. Samples from 96 patients with established coronary artery disease treated with aspirin and clopidogrel were examined. Platelet aggregation was performed by light transmittance aggregometry in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), with platelet-poor plasma (PPP) as reference, and ADP 5 µM as agonist. Kaolin-activated thrombelastography (TEG) was performed in citrate PPP. PRP after aggregation was centrifuged and plasma supernatant (PSN) collected. FXIIIa was measured in PPP and PSN. Platelet aggregation after stimulation with ADP 5 µM resulted in 24% additional FXIIIa release in PSN as compared to PPP (99.3 ± 27 vs. 80.3 ± 24%, p < 0.0001). FXIIIa concentration in PSN correlated with maximal plasma clot strength (TEG-G) (r = 0.48, p < 0.0001), but not in PPP (r = 0.15, p = 0.14). Increasing quartiles of platelet-derived FXIIIa were associated with incrementally higher TEG-G (p = 0.012). FXIIIa release was similar between clopidogrel responders and non-responders (p = 0.18). In summary, platelets treated with aspirin and clopidogrel release a significant amount of FXIIIa upon aggregation by ADP. Platelet-derived FXIIIa may contribute to differences in plasma TEG-G, and thus, in part, provide a mechanistic explanation for high clot strength observed as a consequence of platelet activation. Variability in clopidogrel response does not significantly influence FXIIIa release from platelets. PMID:24833046

  18. Evaluating alternative responses to safeguards alarms

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; McCord, R.K.

    1982-04-15

    This paper describes a quantitative approach to help evaluate and respond to safeguards alarms. These alarms may be generated internally by a facility's safeguards systems or externally by individuals claiming to have stolen special nuclear material (SNM). This approach can be used to identify the most likely cause of an alarm - theft, hoax, or error - and to evaluate alternative responses to alarms. Possible responses include conducting investigations, initiating measures to recover stolen SNM, and replying to external threats. Based on the results of each alarm investigation step, the evaluation revises the likelihoods of possible causes of an alarm, and uses this information to determine the optimal sequence of further responses. The choice of an optimal sequence of responses takes into consideration the costs and benefits of successful thefts or hoaxes. These results provide an analytical basis for setting priorities and developing contingency plans for responding to safeguards alarms.

  19. A Comparative Pharmacodynamic Study of Ticagrelor versus Clopidogrel and Ticagrelor in Patients Undergoing Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: The CAPITAL RELOAD Study

    PubMed Central

    Pourdjabbar, Ali; Simard, Trevor; Ramirez, F. Daniel; Moudgil, Rohit; Blondeau, Melissa; Labinaz, Marino; Dick, Alexander; Glover, Christopher; Froeschl, Michael; Marquis, Jean-François; So, Derek Y. F.; Le May, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    Background In patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) ticagrelor is superior to clopidogrel in reducing cardiovascular events. This study sought to evaluate the effect of clopidogrel pretreatment on the pharmacodynamics of ticagrelor in patients undergoing PPCI. Methods We measured platelet reactivity using the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay at baseline, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours following ticagrelor bolus in patients previously loaded with clopidogrel (C+T) and in thienopyridine-naive patients (T) referred to our centre for PPCI. Results In total, 52 consecutive eligible patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) were enrolled (27 C+T and 25 T). Baseline characteristics and mean baseline platelet reactivity units (PRUs) were similar between the groups. The primary endpoint, the proportion of patients achieving a PRU<208 at 2 hours, was more frequently achieved in the C+T group compared to T treatment (76.0% vs 44.4%, p = 0.026). Notably, C+T therapy resulted in fewer patients with high platelet reactivity at 1 hour (56.0% vs. 14.8%), 4 hours (100.0% vs. 61.5%) and 6 hours (100.0% vs. 64%, p<0.01 for all comparisons). Furthermore, C+T therapy was associated with lower PRU values from 2 to 48 hours. Conclusions In patients referred for PPCI, ticagrelor bolus following clopidogrel resulted in more rapid and profound platelet inhibition, demonstrating a positive pharmacodynamic interaction. Further study is needed to determine if this pharmacodynamic effect translates into reduced clinical events. PMID:24651043

  20. Trends in the coprescription of proton pump inhibitors with clopidogrel: an ecological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Juurlink, David N.; Gomes, Tara; Paterson, J. Michael; Hellings, Chelsea; Mamdani, Muhammad M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In early 2009, 2 observational studies and a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory addressed the drug interaction between proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and clopidogrel. One study suggested that pantoprazole could be used safely in this setting, whereas the other study and the FDA advisory did not distinguish among PPIs. We examined trends in PPI prescribing among clopidogrel recipients in the period following these events. Methods: We conducted a population-based time series analysis of Ontario residents aged 66 years or older for whom clopidogrel was prescribed between Apr. 1, 1999, and Sept. 30, 2013. We determined the proportion of clopidogrel recipients dispensed a PPI during each quarter and the proportions who received pantoprazole or other PPIs. The outcome of interest was change in the use of pantoprazole. Results: In the final quarter of 2008, pantoprazole represented 23.7% of all PPI prescriptions dispensed to patients receiving clopidogrel. Following the publications and FDA advisory in early 2009, pantoprazole use increased substantially. By the end of 2009, this medication accounted for 52.5% of all PPI prescriptions issued to patients receiving clopidogrel; by the end of the study period, it accounted for 71.0% of all PPI prescriptions dispensed to such patients (p < 0. 001). We also observed a modest drop in overall PPI use among clopidogrel recipients beginning in early 2009. Interpretation: In 2009, the prescribing of PPIs with clopidogrel changed substantially in Ontario, with pantoprazole rapidly becoming the most commonly prescribed agent in its class. However, a modest decline in overall PPI use also occurred that may reflect suboptimal translation of emerging drug safety information to clinical practice. PMID:26770965

  1. Successful Prasugrel Rescue Therapy in Clopidogrel Resistant Patients Who Had Recurrent Stent Thrombosis of Drug-Eluting-Stent: The Role of Prasugrel in Clopidogrel Nonresponders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Oh, Jaewon; Park, Jin Su; Lee, Dong-Jun; Lee, Han-Cheol; Kim, Jin Ho

    2013-01-01

    Stent thrombosis is a very serious problem after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation even though its incidence is about or less than 1%. As the clopidogrel resistance is expected to play an important role in the occurrence of stent thrombosis, new anti-platelet agents overcoming this issue can give us another choice. We experienced a case of a 58-year-old male with successful prasugrel rescue therapy in a patient with clopidogrel resistance who had recurrent stent thrombosis following DES implantation. PMID:23755082

  2. Reduced-Function CYP2C19 Genotype and Risk of Adverse Clinical Outcomes Among Patients Treated With Clopidogrel Predominantly for PCI: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mega, Jessica L.; Simon, Tabassome; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Antman, Elliott M.; Bliden, Kevin; Cannon, Christopher P.; Danchin, Nicolas; Giusti, Betti; Gurbel, Paul; Horne, Benjamin D.; Hulot, Jean-Sebastian; Kastrati, Adnan; Montalescot, Gilles; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Shen, Lei; Sibbing, Dirk; Steg, P. Gabriel; Trenk, Dietmar; Wiviott, Stephen D.; Sabatine, Marc S.

    2011-01-01

    Content Clopidogrel, one of the most commonly prescribed medications, is a pro-drug requiring CYP450 biotransformation. Data suggest its pharmacologic effect varies based on CYP2C19 genotype, but there is uncertainty regarding the clinical risk imparted by specific genotypes. Objective In patients treated with clopidogrel, to define the risk of major adverse cardiovascular outcomes among carriers of one (∼26% prevalence in whites) and carriers of two (∼2% prevalence in whites) reduced-function CYP2C19 variants. Data Sources and Study Selection A literature search was conducted (January 2000-August 2010) of the MEDLINE, Cochrane, and EMBASE databases. Genetic studies were included where clopidogrel was initiated in predominantly invasively managed patients in a manner consistent with the current guideline recommendations and where clinical outcomes were ascertained. Data Extraction Investigators from nine studies evaluating CYP2C19 genotype and clinical outcomes in patients treated with clopidogrel contributed the relevant hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for specific cardiovascular outcomes by genotype. Results Among 9685 patients [91.3% of whom underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and 54.5% of whom had an acute coronary syndrome (ACS)], 863 experienced the composite endpoint of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke; 84 patients had stent thrombosis among the 5894 evaluated for such. Overall, 71.5% were non-carriers, 26.3% had one, and 2.2% had two CYP2C19 reduced-function alleles. A significantly increased risk of the composite endpoint was evident in both carriers of one (HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.11-2.27, P=0.01) and two (HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.24-2.50, P=0.002) CYP2C19 reduced-function alleles. Similarly, there was a significantly increased risk of stent thrombosis in both carriers of one (HR 2.67, 95% CI 1.69-4.22, P<0.0001) and two (HR 3.97, 95% CI 1.75-9.02, P=0.001) CYP2C19 reduced-function alleles

  3. EVALUATION OF THIRTEEN SPILL RESPONSE TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirteen spill response devices, concepts, or prototypes, developed under previous contracts to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for detection, containment, and cleanup of chemicals, were evaluated by potential users and manufacturers. The main goal of the project was to ...

  4. How to test the effect of aspirin and clopidogrel in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy?

    PubMed

    Bagoly, Zsuzsa; Homoródi, Nóra; Kovács, Emese Gyöngyvér; Sarkady, Ferenc; Csiba, László; Édes, István; Muszbek, László

    2016-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin is frequently used for the prevention of recurrent ischemic events. Various laboratory methods are used to detect the effect of these drugs administered in monotherapy, however their value in dual therapy has not been explored. Here, we determined which methods used for testing the effect of clopidogrel or aspirin are influenced by the other antiplatelet agent. One arm of the study included 53 ischemic stroke patients being on clopidogrel monotherapy showing effective inhibition of the P2Y12 ADP receptor. Laboratory tests routinely used for the detection of aspirin resistance (arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation/secretion, AA-induced thromboxane B2 (TXB2) production in platelet-rich plasma and VerifyNow Aspirin assay) were carried out on samples obtained from these patients. The other arm of the study involved 52 patients with coronary artery disease being on aspirin monotherapy. Methods used for testing the effect of clopidogrel (ADP-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, flow cytometric analysis of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation and a newly developed P2Y12-specific platelet aggregation (ADP[PGE1] test)) were performed on samples obtained from these patients. Clopidogrel monotherapy significantly inhibited AA-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, moreover, AA-induced TXB2 production was also significantly decreased. VASP phosphorylation and AA-induced platelet aggregation showed fair correlation in patients taking clopidogrel only. Clopidogrel did not inhibit the VerifyNow Aspirin test significantly. Aspirin monotherapy influenced ADP-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, but did not have an effect on VASP phosphorylation and on the ADP[PGE1] platelet aggregation test. PMID:26083485

  5. Changes in Practice Patterns of Clopidogrel in Combination with Proton Pump Inhibitors after an FDA Safety Communication

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Annie; Mody, Reema; Carter, Valerie; Ayas, Charles; Patel, Haridarshan; Lasch, Karen; Wu, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In 2009, the FDA issued a warning that omeprazole–a proton pump inhibitor (PPI)–reduces the antithrombotic effect of clopidogrel by almost half when taken concomitantly. This study aims to analyze the impact of the FDA Safety Communications on prescribing clopidogrel together with PPIs. Methods This retrospective study identified clopidogrel users from the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Databases (01/2006–12/2012). Rates of clopidogrel-PPI combination therapy were estimated in 6-month intervals for patients with ≥1 clopidogrel prescription fill, then were analyzed pre- and post-safety communication (11/17/2009). Analyses were also conducted by grouping PPIs into CYP2C19 inhibitors (omeprazole and esomeprazole) and CYP2C19 non-inhibitors (pantoprazole, lansoprazole, dexlansoprazole, and rabeprazole). Results Overall, 483,074 patients met the selection criteria; of these, 157,248 used a clopidogrel-PPI combination. On average, 30.5% of patients in the pre- and 19.9% in the post-communication period used a clopidogrel-PPI combination therapy. Among clopidogrel users, the probability of using clopidogrel-PPI combinations fell by over 40% in the post-communication period (OR = 0.57; p<0.001); the proportion of patients using esomeprazole fell from 12.9% to 5.3%, and the proportion using omeprazole fell from 10.1% to 6.3%. Among combination therapy users, the probability of patients using a combination with a CYP2C19 inhibitor decreased by 53% (OR = 0.47; p<0.001); however, 31.5% of patients were still prescribed a clopidogrel-PPI combination therapy. Trends were similar for all and newly treated patients, regardless of clopidogrel indication and physician specialty. Conclusions The FDA Safety Communication resulted in a reduction in the number of patients undergoing combination therapy; however approximately one-third of patients still used combination therapy post-communication. PMID:26727382

  6. Evaluation of automated emergency response systems

    SciTech Connect

    Addis, R.P.

    1988-12-31

    Automated Emergency Response (ER) systems are playing a greater role in providing prompt and reliable predictions of the impact of inadvertent releases of hazardous materials to the environment. Observed and forecast environmental and accident source term data are input into environmental transport and dispersion models to provide dosimetry estimates used as decision making aids for responding to emergencies. Several automated ER systems have been developed for US Federal Government facilities and many are available commercially. For such systems to be useful, they must reliably and consistently deliver a timely product to the decision makers. Evaluation of the entire ER system is essential to determine the performance that can be expected from the system during an emergency. Unfortunately, seldom are ER systems evaluated as a whole. Usually Quality Assurance programs evaluate the performance of individual components of the system. Most atmospheric pollution model evaluation methods usually involve an evaluation of the predictive performance of the transport and dispersion model when compared either with experimental tracer results or results from other models. Rarely, however, is the ability of the ER system to provide timely, reliable and consistent information evaluated. Such an evaluation is vital to determine the system performance during an emergency and to provide valuable information to aid in improving the system.

  7. A study of aspirin and clopidogrel in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robbins, I M; Kawut, S M; Yung, D; Reilly, M P; Lloyd, W; Cunningham, G; Loscalzo, J; Kimmel, S E; Christman, B W; Barst, R J

    2006-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is characterised by in situ thrombosis and increased thromboxane (Tx) A2 synthesis; however, there are no studies of antiplatelet therapy in IPAH. The aim of the current study was to determine the biochemical effects of aspirin (ASA) and clopidogrel on platelet function and eicosanoid metabolism in patients with IPAH. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study of ASA 81 mg once daily and clopidogrel 75 mg once daily was performed. Plasma P-selectin levels and aggregometry were measured after exposure to adenosine diphosphate, arachidonic acid and collagen. Serum levels of TxB2 and urinary metabolites of TxA2 and prostaglandin I2 (Tx-M and PGI-M, respectively) were assessed. A total of 19 IPAH patients were enrolled, of whom nine were being treated with continuous intravenous epoprostenol. ASA and clopidogrel significantly reduced platelet aggregation to arachidonic acid and adenosine diphosphate, respectively. ASA significantly decreased serum TxB2, urinary Tx-M levels and the Tx-M/PGI-M ratio, whereas clopidogrel had no effect on eicosanoid levels. Neither drug significantly lowered plasma P-selectin levels. Epoprostenol use did not affect the results. In conclusion, aspirin and clopidogrel inhibited platelet aggregation, and aspirin reduced thromboxane metabolite production without affecting prostaglandin I2 metabolite synthesis. Further clinical trials of aspirin in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension should be performed. PMID:16507859

  8. A screening study of drug-drug interactions in cerivastatin users: an adverse effect of clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Floyd, J S; Kaspera, R; Marciante, K D; Weiss, N S; Heckbert, S R; Lumley, T; Wiggins, K L; Tamraz, B; Kwok, P-Y; Totah, R A; Psaty, B M

    2012-05-01

    An analysis of a case-control study of rhabdomyolysis was conducted to screen for previously unrecognized cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP) 2C8 inhibitors that may cause other clinically important drug-drug interactions. Medication use in cases of rhabdomyolysis using cerivastatin (n = 72) was compared with that in controls using atorvastatin (n = 287) for the period 1998-2001. The use of clopidogrel was strongly associated with rhabdomyolysis (odds ratio (OR) 29.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 6.1-143). In a replication effort that used the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS), it was found that clopidogrel was used more commonly in patients with rhabdomyolysis receiving cerivastatin (17%) than in those receiving atorvastatin (0%, OR infinity; 95% CI = 5.2-infinity). Several medications were tested in vitro for their potential to cause drug-drug interactions. Clopidogrel, rosiglitazone, and montelukast were the most potent inhibitors of cerivastatin metabolism. Clopidogrel and its metabolites also inhibited cerivastatin metabolism in human hepatocytes. These epidemiological and in vitro findings suggest that clopidogrel may cause clinically important, dose-dependent drug-drug interactions with other medications metabolized by CYP2C8. PMID:22419147

  9. Interaction between clopidogrel and proton-pump inhibitors and management strategies in patients with cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gurbel, Paul A; Tantry, Udaya S; Kereiakes, Dean J

    2010-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with clopidogrel and aspirin has been successful in reducing ischemic events in a wide range of patients with cardiovascular diseases. However, the anti-ischemic effects of DAPT may also be associated with gastrointestinal (GI) complications including ulceration and bleeding particularly in ‘high risk’ and elderly patients. Current guidelines recommend the use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) to reduce the risk of GI bleeding in patients treated with DAPT. However, pharmacodynamic studies suggest an effect of PPIs on clopidogrel metabolism with a resultant reduction in platelet inhibitory effects. Similarly, several observational studies have demonstrated reduced clopidogrel benefit in patients who coadministered PPIs. Although recent US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency statements discourage PPI (particularly omeprazole) and clopidogrel coadministration, the 2009 AHA/ACC/SCAI PCI guidelines do not support a change in current practice in the absence of adequately powered prospective randomized clinical trial data. The data regarding pharmacologic and clinical interactions between PPI and clopidogrel therapies are herein examined and treatment strategies are provided. PMID:21701635

  10. Peribulbar block in patients scheduled for eye procedures and treated with clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Calenda, Emile; Lamothe, Laure; Genevois, Olivier; Cardon, Annie; Muraine, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Our hypothesis was that the continuation of clopidogrel does not increase the risk of eye hemorrhage, compared to patients not treated with clopidogrel, when a peribulbar anesthesia is required. Our prospective case-control study enrolled two groups of 1,000 patients scheduled for intraocular eye surgery requiring a peribulbar block. Patients treated with clopidogrel were included in group A (1,000 patients). Patients who had never been treated with clopidogrel constituted the control group (group B, 1,000 patients). Hemorrhages were graded as follows: 1 = spot ecchymosis of eyelid and or subconjunctival hemorrhage; 2 = eyelid ecchymosis involving half the lid surface area; 3 = eyelid ecchymosis all around the eye, no increase in intraocular pressure; 4 = retrobulbar hemorrhage with increased intraocular pressure. Grade 1 hemorrhages were observed in 30 patients (3.0 %) in group A and in 20 patients (2.0 %) in group B. No grade 2, 3, or 4 hemorrhage was encountered. There was no significant difference in the grading of hemorrhage between the groups (p = 0.017). Clopidogrel was not associated with a significant increase in potentially sight-threatening local anesthetic complications. PMID:22581096

  11. Management of low-dose aspirin and clopidogrel in clinical practice: a gastrointestinal perspective.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Angel; Gargallo, Carla J

    2015-06-01

    Low-dose aspirin, alone or combined with other antiplatelet agents, is increasingly prescribed for cardiovascular prevention. However, the cardiovascular benefits should be evaluated together with the gastrointestinal risks. Low-dose aspirin is associated with upper and lower gastrointestinal injury, although lower gastrointestinal effects are poorly characterized. This gastrointestinal risk differs among antiplatelets drugs users. The most important risk factors are history of peptic ulcer, older age, and concomitant use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or dual antiplatelet therapy. Effective upper gastrointestinal prevention strategies are available and should be used in at-risk patients taking low-dose aspirin or clopidogrel. Proton pump inhibitors seem to be the best gastroprotective agents, whereas the benefits of Helicobacter pylori eradication are still unclear. Low-dose aspirin has additional effects in the gastrointestinal tract. A large body of evidence indicates that it can protect against different cancers, in particular colorectal cancer. This effect could modify the future indications for use of low-dose aspirin and the risk-benefit balance. PMID:25595209

  12. Simultaneous administration of high-dose atorvastatin and clopidogrel does not interfere with platelet inhibition during percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Rolf P; Breall, Jeffrey A; Sinha, Anjan; von der Lohe, Elisabeth; Kovacs, Richard J; Flockhart, David A

    2016-01-01

    Background Reloading with high-dose atorvastatin shortly before percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) has been proposed as a strategy to reduce periprocedural myonecrosis. There has been a concern that statins that are metabolized by cytochrome P450 3A4 may interfere with clopidogrel metabolism at high doses. The impact of simultaneous administration of high doses of atorvastatin and clopidogrel on the efficacy of platelet inhibition has not been established. Methods Subjects (n=60) were randomized to receive atorvastatin 80 mg together with clopidogrel 600 mg loading dose (n=28) versus clopidogrel 600 mg alone (n=32) at the time of PCI. Platelet aggregation was measured at baseline, 4 hours after clopidogrel loading dose, and 16–24 hours after clopidogrel loading dose by light transmittance aggregometry using adenosine diphosphate as agonist. Results Platelet aggregation was similar at baseline in both the atorvastatin and the control groups (adenosine diphosphate 10 µM: 57%±19% vs 61%±21%; P=0.52). There was no significant difference in platelet aggregation between the atorvastatin and the control groups at 4 hours (37%±18% vs 39%±21%; P=0.72) and 16–24 hours post-clopidogrel loading dose (35%±17% vs 37%±18%; P=0.75). No significant difference in incidence of periprocedural myonecrosis was observed between the atorvastatin and control groups (odds ratio: 1.02; 95% confidence interval 0.37–2.8). Conclusion High-dose atorvastatin given simultaneously with clopidogrel loading dose at the time of PCI does not significantly alter platelet inhibition by clopidogrel. Statin reloading with high doses of atorvastatin at the time of PCI appears to be safe without adverse effects on platelet inhibition by clopidogrel (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00979940). PMID:27350760

  13. [Cholestasic toxic hepatitis due to clopidogrel in a patient with multiple conditions].

    PubMed

    Etxeberria Lekuona, D; Méndez López, I; Mercado, M R; Oteiza, J; Arteaga, M; Jarne, V

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel is a thienopyridine-class antiplatelet drug commonly used in ischemic heart disease,cerebrovascular disease and peripheral artery disease.Liver toxicity due to this drug is very infrequent.We found 16 cases in the literature, and in only two of them liver biopsy was carried out. We report the case of a 78 year old patient with multiple conditions affected by severe toxic cholestatic hepatitis due to clopidogrel and the results of the liver biopsy performed. Hepatitis was resolved after discontinuing the drug.Based on the characteristics of this case and other previously published cases, we review the characteristics of toxic hepatitis due to clopidogrel and its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27125614

  14. Impact of concomitant treatment with proton pump inhibitors and clopidogrel on clinical outcome in patients after coronary stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Tentzeris, Ioannis; Jarai, Rudolf; Farhan, Serdar; Brozovic, Ivan; Smetana, Peter; Geppert, Alexander; Wojta, Johann; Siller-Matula, Jolanta; Huber, Kurt

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of the concomitant treatment with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) and clopidogrel on the incidence of stent thrombosis, acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and death in patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and stent implantation. In total, 1,210 patients under dual antiplatelet therapy, who underwent PCI and stent implantation, were included in a prospective registry from January 2003 until December 2006. The patients were divided retrospectively into those with or without long-term PPI treatment (for the duration of dual antiplatelet therapy). All-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, re-hospitalisation for re-ACS, stent thrombosis, as well as the combined endpoint all-cause death, re-ACS or stent thrombosis were evaluated over a mean follow-up period of 7.8 (± 3.63) months (range 1-12 months). Propensity score analysis was performed to reduce potential selection bias and exhibited no significant difference between the two study groups with respect to all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, re-ACS, stent thrombosis and the combined endpoint. In pre-specified subgroup analyses performed in patients presenting with ACS and referred for acute PCI or for stable patients referred for elective PCI, receiving drug-eluting stents or bare metal stents, in diabetics or non-diabetics, in males or females, and in patients older than 75 years or ≤75 years of age use of PPIs had no significant impact on clinical outcome. Our data suggest that a combined use of clopidogrel as part of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) after coronary stenting and PPIs does not significantly influence the clinical outcome. PMID:20941464

  15. CYP-independent inhibition of platelet aggregation in rabbits by a mixed disulfide conjugate of clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Lauver, D A; Hollenberg, P F

    2014-12-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin has been the standard of care in the United States for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). However, the effectiveness of clopidogrel varies significantly among different sub-populations due to inter-individual variability. In this study we examined the antiplatelet potential of a novel mixed disulfide conjugate of clopidogrel with the aim to overcome the inter-individual variability. In the metabolic studies using human liver microsomes and cDNA-expressed P450s, we confirmed that multiple P450s are involved in the bioactivation of 2-oxoclopidogrel to H4, one of the diastereomers of the pharmacologically active metabolite (AM) possessing antiplatelet activity. Results from kinetic studies demonstrated that 2C19 is the most active in converting 2-oxoclopidogrel to H4 with a catalytic efficiency of 0.027 µM⁻¹min⁻¹ in the reconstituted system. On the basis of this finding, we were able to biosynthesise the conjugate of clopidogrel with 3-nitropyridine-2-thiol, referred to as clopNPT, and examined its antiplatelet activity in male New Zealand white rabbits. After administration as intravenous bolus at 2 mg/kg, the clopNPT conjugate was rapidly converted to the AM leading to the inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA). Analyses of the blood samples drawn at various time points showed that intravenous administration of clopNPT led to ~70% IPA within 1 hour and the IPA persisted for more than 3 hours. Since the antiplatelet activity of clopNPT does not require bioactivation by P450s, the mixed disulfide conjugate of clopidogrel has the potential to overcome the inter-individual variability in clopidogrel therapy. PMID:25230737

  16. Current status of high on-treatment platelet reactivity in patients with coronary or peripheral arterial disease: Mechanisms, evaluation and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Pastromas, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy with aspirin or clopidogrel or both is the standard care for patients with proven coronary or peripheral arterial disease, especially those undergoing endovascular revascularization procedures. However, despite the administration of the antiplatelet regiments, some patients still experience recurrent cardiovascular ischemic events. So far, it is well documented by several studies that in vitro response of platelets may be extremely variable. Poor antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel or high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) is under investigation by numerous recent studies. This review article focuses on methods used for the ex vivo evaluation of HTPR, as well as on the possible underlying mechanisms and the clinical consequences of this entity. Alternative therapeutic options and future directions are also addressed. PMID:26730297

  17. CYP2C19 polymorphisms in acute coronary syndrome patients undergoing clopidogrel therapy in Zhengzhou population.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y M; Zhao, Z C; Zhang, L; Li, H Z; Li, Z; Sun, H L

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the polymorphisms of CYP2C19 (CYP2C19*2, CYP2C19*3) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on clopidogrel therapy in Zhengzhou city for guidance on clinical medication and reduction in the incidence of thromboembolic events. Two hundred and thirty-four ACS patients undergoing PCI were included in the study, including 171 males (average age = 64.13 ± 12 years) and 63 females (average age = 67.86 ± 10.20 years). Pyrosequencing analysis detected CYP2C19*2/*3 genotypes, which were divided into wild-type homozygous C/C, mutant heterozygous C/T, and mutant homozygous T/T. This study further explored the relationship between CYP2C19 polymorphisms and clopidogrel resistance in ACS patients. Gene frequencies of C/C, C/T, and T/T for CYP2C19*2 were 39.74, 50, and 10.26%, respectively, while the frequencies of C/C, C/T, and T/T for CYP2C19*3 were 94.02, 5.55, and 0.43%, respectively. According to platelet aggregation analysis, 203 cases normally responded to clopidogrel (86.8%) and 31 cases were clopidogrel resistant (13.2%). There was a correlation between gender and genotype distribution but none between age and genotype. In addition, patients with clopidogrel resistance were treated with ticagrelor antiplatelet therapy instead of clopidogrel, and only 1 case in all patients suffered thrombotic events during a 3-12 month follow-up. In conclusion, CYP2C19*2/*3 polymorphisms may be associated with clopidogrel resistance. Wild-type homozygote and single mutant heterozygote of CYP2C19*2/*3 can be given a normal dose of clopidogrel, while carriers with single mutant homozygote or double mutant heterozygote require ticagrelor antiplatelet therapy as an alternative. PMID:27323099

  18. Evaluation of allergic response using dynamic thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, E.; Rok, T.; Tatoń, G.

    2015-03-01

    Skin dynamic termography supplemented by a mathematical model is presented as an objective and sensitive indicator of the skin prick test result. Termographic measurements were performed simultaneously with routine skin prick tests. The IR images were acquired every 70 s up to 910 s after skin prick. In the model histamine is treated as the principal mediator of the allergic reaction. Histamine produces vasolidation and the engorged vessels are responsible for an increase in skin temperature. The model parameters were determined by fitting the analytical solutions to the spatio-temporal distributions of the differences between measured and baseline temperatures. The model reproduces experimental data very well (coefficient of determination = 0.805÷0.995). The method offers a set of parameters to describe separately skin allergic reaction and skin reactivity. The release of histamine after allergen injection is the best indicator of allergic response. The diagnostic parameter better correlates with the standard evaluation of a skin prick test (correlation coefficient = 0.98) than the result of the thermographic planimetric method based on temperature and heated area determination (0.81). The high sensitivity of the method allows for determination of the allergic response in patients with the reduced skin reactivity.

  19. Increased active metabolite formation explains the greater platelet inhibition with prasugrel compared to high-dose clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher D; Li, Ying Grace; Small, David S; Ernest, C Steven; Farid, Nagy A; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Brandt, John T; Salazar, Daniel E; Winters, Kenneth J

    2007-11-01

    Prasugrel pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics after a 60-mg loading dose (LD) and daily 10-mg maintenance doses (MD) were compared in a 3-way crossover study to clopidogrel 600-mg/75-mg and 300-mg/75-mg LD/MD in 41 healthy, aspirin-free subjects. Each LD was followed by 7 days of daily MD and a 14-day washout period. Inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) was assessed by turbidometric aggregometry (20 and 5 microM ADP). Prasugrel 60-mg achieved higher mean IPA (54%) 30 minutes post-LD than clopidogrel 300-mg (3%) or 600-mg (6%) (P < 0.001) and greater IPA by 1 hour (82%) and 2 hours (91%) than the 6-hour IPA for clopidogrel 300-mg (51%) or 600-mg (69%) (P < 0.01). During MD, IPA for prasugrel 10-mg (78%) exceeded that of clopidogrel (300-mg/75-mg, 56%; 600-mg/75-mg, 52%; P < 0.001). Active metabolite area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-tlast) after prasugrel 60-mg (594 ng.hr/mL) was 2.2 times that after clopidogrel 600-mg. Prasugrel active metabolite AUC0-tlast was consistent with dose-proportionality from 10-mg to 60-mg, while clopidogrel active metabolite AUC0-tlast exhibited saturable absorption and/or metabolism. In conclusion, greater exposure to prasugrel's active metabolite results in faster onset, higher levels, and less variability of platelet inhibition compared with high-dose clopidogrel in healthy subjects. PMID:18030066

  20. Antiplatelet Therapy of Cilostazol or Sarpogrelate with Aspirin and Clopidogrel after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A Retrospective Cohort Study Using the Korean National Health Insurance Claim Database

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Yoojin; Lee, Jimin; Shin, Sooyoung; Lim, Hong-Seok; Bae, Soo Kyung; Oh, Euichul; Kim, Grace Juyun; Kim, Ju Han; Lee, Sukhyang

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Addition of cilostazol or sarpogrelate to the standard dual antiplatelet therapy of aspirin and clopidogrel has been implemented in patients that underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stents in Korea. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of triple antiplatelet therapies. Methods This retrospective cohort study was performed using the Korean National Insurance Claim Data of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2014. The study cohort population consisted of patients with ischemic heart diseases and a history of PCI. They were treated with antiplatelet therapy of aspirin, clopidogrel (AC); aspirin, clopidogrel, cilostazol (ACCi); or aspirin, clopidogrel, sarpogrelate (ACSa) during the index period from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2011. During the follow-up period up to December 31, 2014, the major adverse cardiac or cerebral events (MACCE) including death, myocardial infarction, target lesion revascularization, and ischemic stroke were assessed. Bleeding complications were also evaluated as adverse drug events. Results Out of 93,876 patients with PCI during the index period, 69,491 patients started dual (AC) or triple therapy (ACSa or ACCi). The clinical outcomes of comparing ACSa and ACCi therapy showed beneficial effects in the ACSa group in the prevention of subsequent cardiac or cerebral events. After Propensity score-matching between ACSa and ACCi groups, there were significant differences in MI and revascularization, with corresponding HR of 0.38 (95% CI, 0.20–0.73) and 0.66 (95% CI, 0.53–0.82) in ACSa vs. ACCi at 12 months, respectively. At the 24-month follow-up, the triple therapy groups (ACS or ACC) had a higher incidence of MACCE compared to the dual therapy (AC) group; ACSa vs. AC HR of 1.69 (95% CI, 1.62–1.77); ACC vs. AC HR of 1.22 (95% CI, 1.06–1.41). There was no significant difference in severe or life-threatening bleeding risk among

  1. PROCLAIM: pilot study to examine the effects of clopidogrel on inflammatory markers in patients with metabolic syndrome receiving low-dose aspirin.

    PubMed

    Willerson, James T; Cable, Greg; Yeh, Edward T H

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with intravascular inflammation, as determined by increased levels of inflammatory biomarkers and an increased risk of ischemic atherothrombotic events. Evidence suggests that atherothrombosis and intravascular inflammation share predictive biomarkers, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, CD40 ligand, P-selectin, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. Patients who had metabolic syndrome were randomized to receive clopidogrel 75 mg/day plus aspirin 81 mg/day (n = 89) or placebo plus aspirin 81 mg/day (n = 92) for 9 weeks to assess the efficacy of each treatment in suppression of inflammatory markers. Change from baseline in the levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, CD40 ligand, P-selectin, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide at 6 weeks was assessed to evaluate each treatment. There was a significant difference at Week 6 in model-adjusted CD40-ligand levels in favor of clopidogrel plus aspirin compared with placebo plus aspirin in both the intent-to-treat population (difference between least-squares means = -186.5; 95% confidence interval, -342.3 to -30.8; P = 0.02) and the per-protocol population (P = 0.05). No significant differences were observed between the treatment arms for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, P-selectin, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. There were no deaths or serious adverse events in either treatment arm. Data from this study suggest that clopidogrel can decrease the expression of the CD40-ligand biomarker. PMID:20069077

  2. Switching from prasugrel to clopidogrel based on Cytochrome P450 2C19 genotyping in East Asian patients stabilized after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Ahn, Sung Gyun; Lee, Jun-Won; Youn, Young Jin; Ahn, Min-Soo; Kim, Jang-Young; Yoo, Byung-Su; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Junghan; Kim, Juwon; Choi, Eunhee; Yoo, Sang-Yong; Hung, Olivia Y; Samady, Habib

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the pharmacodynamic efficacy of de-escalating P2Y12 inhibition from prasugrel to clopidogrel based on cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C19 genotyping, we genotyped 50 Korean patients with AMI who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for CYP2C19 *2,*3, or *17 using real-time PCR. They were discharged on prasugrel 10 mg daily. A control group of 48 AMI patients who underwent PCI and were discharged on clopidogrel but did not undergo genotyping was identified retrospectively. Based on genotyping results available at 3 weeks, 12 patients found to have 2 copies of either CYP2C19 *2 or *3 loss of function alleles continued prasugrel while the remaining 38 patients switched to clopidogrel 75 mg daily. The rate of patients within the therapeutic window (TW) of on-treatment platelet reactivity (OPR), 85

  3. Analysis of the Interaction between Clopidogrel, Aspirin, and Proton Pump Inhibitors Using the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yukiya; Suzuki, Honami; Umetsu, Ryogo; Uranishi, Hiroaki; Abe, Junko; Nishibata, Yuri; Sekiya, Yasuaki; Miyamura, Nobuteru; Hara, Hideaki; Tsuchiya, Teruo; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Clopidogrel is an antiplatelet agent widely used in combination with aspirin to limit the occurrence of cardiovascular (embolic/thrombotic) events. Consensus guidelines recommend proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) as a gastrointestinal (GI) prophylactic measure for all patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of the simultaneous use of clopidogrel, aspirin, and PPIs on hemorrhagic and embolic/thrombotic events using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database. Reports of hemorrhagic and embolic/thrombotic events between 2004 and 2013 were analyzed with a reporting odds ratio (ROR) algorithm and logistic regression methods. The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Preferred Terms was used to identify such events. Regarding hemorrhagic events, the adjusted RORs of the concomitant use of aspirin and clopidogrel and those of PPIs prescribed with aspirin and clopidogrel were 4.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.02-4.81) and 3.40 (95% CI, 2.84-4.06), respectively. For embolic/thrombotic events, the adjusted RORs of the concomitant use of aspirin and clopidogrel and those of PPIs prescribed with aspirin and clopidogrel were 2.37 (95% CI, 2.16-2.59) and 2.38 (95% CI, 2.00-2.84), respectively. Among patients included in the FAERS database, the concurrent use of aspirin and clopidogrel with PPIs reduced the adjusted ROR of GI hemorrhagic events. PPIs had little influence on the adjusted ROR of embolic/thrombotic events. These results support the use of PPIs as a preventive measure against GI hemorrhagic events for patients receiving clopidogrel and aspirin. PMID:25947914

  4. Clopidogrel Use Is Associated With an Increased Prevalence of Cerebral Microbleeds in a Stroke‐Free Population: The Rotterdam Study

    PubMed Central

    Darweesh, Sirwan K.L.; Leening, Maarten J.G.; Akoudad, Saloua; Loth, Daan W.; Hofman, Albert; Arfan Ikram, M.; Vernooij, Meike W.; Stricker, Bruno H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although clopidogrel reduces the incidence of atherothrombotic events, its use is associated with an increased risk of major bleeding. Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are indicative of subclinical microangiopathy in the brain and may prelude symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. We examined the association between use of clopidogrel and CMBs in persons without a history of stroke. Methods and Results We performed a cross‐sectional analysis using data from the Rotterdam Study, a prospective population‐based cohort of persons aged 45 years and older. Among 4408 stroke‐free individuals who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of CMBs, we identified 121 ever‐users and 4287 never‐users of clopidogrel before magnetic resonance imaging. We used multiple logistic regression to analyze the association between clopidogrel and CMBs with adjustment for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and common cardiovascular medication. Users of clopidogrel had a higher prevalence of CMBs (odd ratio 1.55, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.37) than nonusers and more often had a high number (>4) of CMBs (odds ratio 3.19, 95% CI 1.52 to 6.72). Clopidogrel use was associated with a significantly higher prevalence of deep or infratentorial CMBs (odd ratio 1.90, 95% CI 1.05 to 3.45). Among clopidogrel users, we were unable to demonstrate differences in the prevalence of CMBs by indication of prescription, history of coronary heart disease, or common genetic variants in CYP2C19. Conclusions In stroke‐free individuals, clopidogrel use was associated with a higher prevalence and higher number of CMBs. Whether this association is causal requires confirmation in prospective studies, especially given the small number of participants taking clopidogrel and the possibility of residual confounding in this study. PMID:24072532

  5. Higher body weight patients on clopidogrel maintenance therapy have lower active metabolite concentrations, lower levels of platelet inhibition, and higher rates of poor responders than low body weight patients.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Henrik; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Ten Berg, Jurrien M; Bergmeijer, Thomas O; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Small, David S; Moser, Brian A; Zhou, Chunmei; Brown, Patricia; James, Stefan; Winters, Kenneth J; Erlinge, David

    2014-01-01

    Body weight is a predictor of clopidogrel response. However, no prospective studies have compared pharmacodynamic (PD) and pharmacokinetic (PK) data based on body weight. We compared PD and PK effects of clopidogrel 75 mg in low body weight (LBW, <60 kg) and higher body weight (HBW, ≥60 kg) patients with stable coronary artery disease. LBW (n = 34, 56.4 ± 3.7 kg) and HBW (n = 38, 84.7 ± 14.9 kg) aspirin-treated patients received clopidogrel 75 mg for 10-14 days. The area under the concentration-time curve of active metabolite (Clop-AM) calculated through the last quantifiable concentration up to 4 h postdose, AUC(0-tlast), was calculated by noncompartmental methods. Light transmission aggregometry (LTA) (maximum platelet aggregation and inhibition of platelet aggregation to 20 μM adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and residual platelet aggregation to 5 μM ADP), VerifyNow(®) P2Y12 reaction units (PRU), and vasodilator-associated stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation platelet reactivity index (VASP-PRI) were performed. Mean AUC(0-tlast) was lower in HBW than LBW patients: 12.8 versus 17.9 ng h/mL. HBW patients had higher platelet reactivity as measured by LTA (all p ≤ 0.01), PRU (207 ± 68 vs. 152 ± 57, p < 0.001), and VASP-PRI (56 ± 18 vs. 39 ± 17, p < 0.001). More HBW patients exhibited high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HPR) using PRU (35 vs. 9%) and VASP-PRI (65 vs. 27%). Body weight correlated with PRU and VASP-PRI (both p < 0.001), and inversely with log transformed AUC(0-tlast) (p < 0.001). In conclusion, HBW patients had lower levels of Clop-AM, and higher platelet reactivity and rates of HPR than LBW subjects, contributing to their suboptimal response to clopidogrel. PMID:24043374

  6. Clopidogrel discontinuation within the first year after coronary drug-eluting stent implantation: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of adherence to the recommended duration of dual antiplatelet therapy after first generation drug-eluting stent implantation is difficult to assess in real-world settings and limited data are available. Methods We followed 4,154 patients treated with coronary drug-eluting stents in Western Denmark for 1 year and obtained data on redeemed clopidogrel prescriptions and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE, i.e., cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or stent thrombosis) from medical databases. Results Discontinuation of clopidogrel within the first 3 months after stent implantation was associated with a significantly increased rate of MACE at 1-year follow-up (hazard ratio (HR) 2.06; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08-3.93). Discontinuation 3-6 months (HR 1.29; 95% CI: 0.70-2.41) and 6-12 months (HR 1.29; 95% CI: 0.54-3.07) after stent implantation were associated with smaller, not statistically significant, increases in MACE rates. Among patients who discontinued clopidogrel, MACE rates were highest within the first 2 months after discontinuation. Conclusions Discontinuation of clopidogrel was associated with an increased rate of MACE among patients treated with drug-eluting stents. The increase was statistically significant within the first 3 months after drug-eluting stent implantation but not after 3 to 12 months. PMID:25125079

  7. An Extraordinary Case Associated with an Allergic Reaction to Clopidogrel: Coronary Artery Spasm or Kounis Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Liping, Zhang; Bin, Hui; Qiming, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Kounis syndrome is the concurrence of acute coronary syndrome with allergic reactions, such as anaphylaxis or anaphylactoid reactions. Here, we describe a unique case: CASs (coronary artery spasms) with both non-hypersensitivity and hypersensitivity aetiology (associated with clopidogrel hypersensitivity) were observed in a 61 year-old patient. Herein, the mechanism and clinical implications of this association are discussed. PMID:26138623

  8. Identification of alcohol-dependent clopidogrel metabolites using conventional liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhe-Yi; Laizure, S. Casey; Herring, Vanessa L.; Parker, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE Clopidogrel (CLO) is a prodrug used to prevent ischemic events in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention or with myocardial infarction. A previous study found ethyl clopidogrel (ECLO) is formed by transesterification of CLO when incubated with alcohol in human liver microsomes. We hypothesize that ECLO will be subject to further metabolism and developed an assay to identify its metabolites. METHODS A liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed to identify metabolites of ECLO. According to the predicted metabolic pathway of ECLO, precursor–product ion pairs were used to screen the possible metabolites of ECLO in human liver S9 fractions. Subsequently, the detected metabolites were characterized by the results of product ion scan. RESULTS In the presence of alcohol, CLO was tranesterified to ECLO, which was further oxidized to form ethylated 2-oxo-clopidogrel and several ethylated thiol metabolites including the ethylated form of the H4 active metabolite. CONCLUSIONS The ECLO formed by transesterification with alcohol is subject to metabolism by CYP450 enzymes producing ethylated forms of 2-oxo-clopidogrel and the active H4 thiol metabolite. PMID:24760569

  9. Clopidogrel preserves whole kidney autoregulatory behavior in ANG II-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, David A.; Zhang, Shali; Pollock, Jennifer S.; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; De Miguel, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that P2Y12 receptor blockade with clopidogrel preserves renal autoregulatory ability during ANG II-induced hypertension. Clopidogrel was administered orally to male Sprague-Dawley rats chronically infused with ANG II. After 14 days of treatment, whole kidney autoregulation of renal blood flow was assessed in vivo in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats using an ultrasonic flow probe placed around the left renal artery. In ANG II-vehicle-treated rats, decreasing arterial pressure over a range from 160 to 100 mmHg resulted in a 25 ± 5% decrease in renal blood flow, demonstrating a significant loss of autoregulation with an autoregulatory index of 0.66 ± 0.15. However, clopidogrel treatment preserved autoregulatory behavior in ANG II-treated rats to levels indistinguishable from normotensive sham-operated (sham) rats (autoregulatory index: 0.04 ± 0.14). Compared with normotensive sham-vehicle-treated rats, ANG II infusion increased renal CD3-positive T cell infiltration by 66 ± 6%, induced significant thickening of the preglomerular vessels and glomerular basement membrane and increased glomerular collagen I deposition, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, damage to the proximal tubular brush border, and protein excretion. Clopidogrel significantly reduced renal infiltration of T cells by 39 ± 9% and prevented interstitial artery thickening, ANG II-induced damage to the glomerular basement membrane, deposition of collagen type I, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, despite the maintenance of hypertension. These data demonstrate that systemic P2Y12 receptor blockade with clopidogrel protects against impairment of autoregulatory behavior and renal vascular injury in ANG II-induced hypertension, possibly by reducing renal T cell infiltration. PMID:24477682

  10. Gambogic acid potentiates clopidogrel-induced apoptosis and attenuates irinotecan-induced apoptosis through down-regulating human carboxylesterase 1 and -2.

    PubMed

    Ning, Rui; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Zhan, Yun-Ran; Qi, Qi; Huang, Xue-Feng; Hu, Gang; Guo, Qing-Long; Liu, Wei; Yang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    1. In this study, we report that gambogic acid (GA), a promising anticancer agent, potentiates clopidogrel-induced apoptosis and attenuates CPT-11-induced apoptosis by down-regulating human carboxylesterase (CES) 1 and -2 via ERK and p38 MAPK pathway activation, which provides a molecular explanation linking the effect of drug combination directly to the decreased capacity of hydrolytic biotransformation. 2. The expression levels of CES1 and CES2 decreased significantly in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in response to GA in Huh7 and HepG2 cells; hydrolytic activity was also reduced. 3. The results showed that pretreatment with GA potentiated clopidogrel-induced apoptosis by down-regulating CES1. Moreover, the GA-mediated repression of CES2 attenuated CPT-11-induced apoptosis. 4. Furthermore, the ERK and p38 MAPK pathways were involved in the GA-mediated down-regulation of CES1 and CES2. 5. Taken together, our data suggest that GA is a potent repressor of CES1 and CES2 and that combination with GA will affect the metabolism of drugs containing ester bonds. PMID:26750665

  11. Efficacy and safety outcomes of ticagrelor compared with clopidogrel in elderly Chinese patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huidong; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to investigate the efficacy and safety outcomes of ticagrelor in comparison with clopidogrel on a background of aspirin in elderly Chinese patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Patients and methods A double-blinded, randomized controlled study was conducted, and 200 patients older than 65 years with the diagnosis of ACS were assigned 1:1 to take ticagrelor or clopidogrel. The course of treatment was required to continue for 12 months. Results The median age of the whole cohort was 79 years (range: 65–93 years), and females accounted for 32.5% (65 patients). Baseline characteristics and clinical diagnosis had no significant difference between patients taking ticagrelor and clopidogrel; they were also balanced with respect to other treatments (P>0.05 for all). The risk of cardiovascular death was significantly lower in patients taking ticagrelor compared with clopidogrel, as was the risk of myocardial infarction (P<0.05 for all); there was no difference in the risk of stroke (P>0.05). Ticagrelor was more effective than clopidogrel in decreasing the primary efficacy end point (cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stroke, P<0.05). The all-cause mortality was not significantly different between patients taking ticagrelor and clopidogrel (P>0.05). The difference in the risk of bleeding, platelet inhibition and patient outcomes major bleeding (life-threatening bleeding and others), and platelet inhibition and patient outcomes minor bleeding was not evident between patients taking ticagrelor and clopidogrel (P>0.05 for all). Conclusion The current study in elderly Chinese patients with ACS demonstrated that ticagrelor reduced the primary efficacy end point at no expense of increased bleeding risk compared with clopidogrel, suggesting that ticagrelor is a suitable alternative for use in elderly Chinese patients with ACS. PMID:27471389

  12. Premature Clopidogrel Discontinuation After Drug-Eluting Stent Placement in a Large Urban Safety-Net Hospital.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Houman; Singh, Rajeev; Wood, Michael; Edwards, Anthony; Cooper, Mark; Ayers, Colby; Moss, Elizabeth; Berry, Jarett D; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; de Lemos, James A; Das, Sandeep R

    2016-02-15

    Premature clopidogrel discontinuation is an important cause of stent thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and death after drug-eluting stent (DES) placement. Previous studies of clopidogrel nonadherence after DES placement have had short follow-up and have relied on self-reported adherence. All patients who underwent DES placement from January 2008 to December 2011 at a single safety-net hospital and received medications through the county-subsidized health plan were considered for inclusion; those with <1-year follow-up were excluded. We retrospectively collected 1-year refill data from a large, closed pharmacy system. Our primary outcome was time to failure to obtain a clopidogrel refill, allowing a 5-day grace period. Our study cohort (n = 369) was 34% female, 39% Hispanic, 26% white, and 26% African-American; 26% identified Spanish as their primary language. The time to failure to obtain a clopidogrel refill was 153 days. Cumulative failure to obtain at least 1 refill was 23% for the first refill, increasing to 52% at 6 months and 68% at 1 year. Examining the proportion of days covered (PDC), 21% of patients had 100% coverage, whereas 34% had PDC <80%. There were no independent predictors of nonadherence (PDC <80%). In conclusion, we identified a high rate of clopidogrel nonadherence in a multiethnic urban poor patient population where clopidogrel was provided at discharge and at nominal cost thereafter. In this cohort, prediction models of nonadherence performed poorly. Novel strategies are needed to address this important problem. PMID:26721655

  13. Aspirin and Extended-Release Dipyridamole versus Clopidogrel for Recurrent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Ralph L.; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Yusuf, Salim; Cotton, Daniel; Ôunpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A.; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P.L.; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recurrent stroke is a frequent, disabling event after ischemic stroke. This study compared the efficacy and safety of two antiplatelet regimens — aspirin plus extendedrelease dipyridamole (ASA–ERDP) versus clopidogrel. METHODS In this double-blind, 2-by-2 factorial trial, we randomly assigned patients to receive 25 mg of aspirin plus 200 mg of extended-release dipyridamole twice daily or to receive 75 mg of clopidogrel daily. The primary outcome was first recurrence of stroke. The secondary outcome was a composite of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death from vascular causes. Sequential statistical testing of noninferiority (margin of 1.075), followed by superiority testing, was planned. RESULTS A total of 20,332 patients were followed for a mean of 2.5 years. Recurrent stroke occurred in 916 patients (9.0%) receiving ASA–ERDP and in 898 patients (8.8%) receiving clopidogrel (hazard ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92 to 1.11). The secondary outcome occurred in 1333 patients (13.1%) in each group (hazard ratio for ASA–ERDP, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.07). There were more major hemorrhagic events among ASA–ERDP recipients (419 [4.1%]) than among clopidogrel recipients (365 [3.6%]) (hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.32), including intracranial hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.83). The net risk of recurrent stroke or major hemorrhagic event was similar in the two groups (1194 ASA–ERDP recipients [11.7%], vs. 1156 clopidogrel recipients [11.4%]; hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.11). CONCLUSIONS The trial did not meet the predefined criteria for noninferiority but showed similar rates of recurrent stroke with ASA–ERDP and with clopidogrel. There is no evidence that either of the two treatments was superior to the other in the prevention of recurrent stroke. PMID:18753638

  14. Glucuronidation converts clopidogrel to a strong time-dependent inhibitor of CYP2C8: a phase II metabolite as a perpetrator of drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Tornio, A; Filppula, A M; Kailari, O; Neuvonen, M; Nyrönen, T H; Tapaninen, T; Neuvonen, P J; Niemi, M; Backman, J T

    2014-10-01

    Cerivastatin and repaglinide are substrates of cytochrome P450 (CYP)2C8, CYP3A4, and organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP)1B1. A recent study revealed an increased risk of rhabdomyolysis in patients using cerivastatin with clopidogrel, warranting further studies on clopidogrel interactions. In healthy volunteers, repaglinide area under the concentration-time curve (AUC(0-∞)) was increased 5.1-fold by a 300-mg loading dose of clopidogrel and 3.9-fold by continued administration of 75 mg clopidogrel daily. In vitro, we identified clopidogrel acyl-β-D-glucuronide as a potent time-dependent inhibitor of CYP2C8. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model indicated that inactivation of CYP2C8 by clopidogrel acyl-β-D-glucuronide leads to uninterrupted 60-85% inhibition of CYP2C8 during daily clopidogrel treatment. Computational modeling resulted in docking of clopidogrel acyl-β-D-glucuronide at the CYP2C8 active site with its thiophene moiety close to heme. The results indicate that clopidogrel is a strong CYP2C8 inhibitor via its acyl-β-D-glucuronide and imply that glucuronide metabolites should be considered potential inhibitors of CYP enzymes. PMID:24971633

  15. Aspirin and clopidogrel resistance: possible mechanisms and clinical relevance. Part II: Potential causes and laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Vadász, Dávid; Sztriha, László K; Sas, Katalin; Vécsei, László

    2013-01-30

    Recent meta-analyses have indicated that patients with vascular disease demonstrated by laboratory tests to be aspirin or clopidogrel-resistant are at an increased risk of major vascular events. The suggested mechanisms of aspirin resistance include genetic polymorphism, alternative pathways of platelet activation, aspirin-insensitive thromboxane biosynthesis, drug interactions, or a low aspirin dose. Clopidogrel resistance is likely to develop as a result of a decreased bioavailability of the active metabolite, due to genetic variation or concomitant drug treatment. Additional work is required to improve and validate laboratory tests of platelet function, so that they may become useful tools for selection of the most appropriate antiplatelet therapy for an individual patient. Improvements in antiplatelet treatment strategies in the future should lead to a reduction in premature vascular events. PMID:23607225

  16. High on-treatment platelet reactivity by ADP and increased risk of MACE in good clopidogrel metabolizers.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, Rossella; Giusti, Betti; Paniccia, Rita; Gori, Anna Maria; Saracini, Claudia; Valente, Serafina; Giglioli, Cristina; Parodi, Guido; Antoniucci, David; Gensini, Gian Franco; Abbate, Rosanna

    2012-01-01

    High on-treatment platelet reactivity (HPR) by ADP, which primarily reflects the effect of thienopyridines, has been found to be an independent predictor of ischemic events in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) on dual antiplatelet therapy. CYP2C19*2 is associated with HPR by ADP. The aim of our study was to evaluate if high on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity (HPR) by ADP is associated with an increased risk of major adverse coronary events (MACE) after ACS independent of CYP2C19*2 allele, i.e. whether genotyping patients for CYP2C19*2 polymorphism is sufficient to identify those to be switched to novel antiplatelets. A total of 1187 patients were included (CYP2C19 *1/*1 n = 892; *1/*2 n = 264; *2/*2 n = 31); 76 MACE (CV death and non-fatal MI) were recorded in non-carriers of CYP2C19*2 (8.5%) and 39 in carriers of CYP2C19*2 (13.2%). At the landmark analysis in the first 6 months, HPR by ADP and CYP2C19*2 allele were both significantly and independently associated with MACE [HPR by ADP: HR = 2.0 (95% CI 1.2-3.4), p = 0.01; CYP2C19*2 allele: HR = 2.3 (95% CI 1.3-3.9), p = 0.003]. At the land mark analysis from 7 to 12 months, only HPR by ADP remained significantly associated with the risk of MACE [HPR by ADP: HR = 2.7 (95% CI 1.4-5.3), p = 0.003; CYP2C19*2: HR = 0.8 (95% CI 0.2-1.1), p = ns]. CYP2C19*2 allele and HPR by ADP are both independently associated with an increased risk of MACE in the first 6 months after ACS. HPR by ADP is associated with an increased risk until 12 months of follow-up. Therefore, both phenotype and genotype are clinically relevant for the evaluation of the antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel and for the prognostic stratification of ACS patients. PMID:22390861

  17. Timing of Coronary Bypass Surgery in Patients Receiving Clopidogrel: The Role of VerifyNow.

    PubMed

    Bedeir, Kareem; Bliden, Kevin; Tantry, Udaya; Gurbel, Paul A; Mahla, Elisabeth

    2016-06-01

    We briefly report for the first time the association between a point of care platelet recovery test and the timing of coronary artery bypass grafting after clopidogrel withdrawal. We observe an association between suggested wait days and platelet recovery unit values that might potentially allow for safe shorter wait times before coronary artery bypass grafting without increased bleeding. Our results represent an observation and should prompt further validation. PMID:27094125

  18. Overcoming Aspirin Resistance with Loading Clopidogrel Earlier in Elective Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Ozgur Ulas; Tutar, Eralp; Candemir, Basar; Ustun, Elif Ezgi; Erol, Cetin

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to analyze the clinical effect of clopidogrel loading time on adverse cardiovascular events among patients with aspirin resistance. Recurrent adverse events may still occur despite dual antiplatelet therapy after coronary stenting. Aspirin resistance is one of the possible reasons of this trouble. Optimal antiplatelet strategy for coronary stenting is unknown among patients with aspirin resistance. A total of 980 patients scheduled for elective coronary stenting were enrolled and allocated into two groups according to the loading time of clopidogrel more or less than 6 hours before coronary intervention (early- or late-loaded groups, respectively). Aspirin resistance was determined according to the urinary levels of 11-dehydrothromboxane B2. Overall 240 patients who were allocated to early- and late-loaded groups were identified as aspirin resistant according to the urinary levels of 11-dehydrothromboxane B2. After a follow-up period of 12 months major adverse cardiac events were observed among 16 patients (13.9%) in the early-loaded group and 30 patients (25.8%) in the late-loaded group (p = 0.02). Early loading of clopidogrel was an independent predictor of lower rate of cardiac events (hazard ratio = 0.46 [0.32–0.76, 95% confidence interval], p = 0.001). The rates of bleeding events and periprocedural myocardial infarction were similar in early- and late-loaded groups. The current study demonstrated that loading of clopidogrel earlier than 6 hours before elective coronary stenting among aspirin-resistant patients was associated with increased benefits for ischemic events with similar bleeding rates. PMID:25780324

  19. Politics in evaluation: Politically responsive evaluation in high stakes environments.

    PubMed

    Azzam, Tarek; Levine, Bret

    2015-12-01

    The role of politics has often been discussed in evaluation theory and practice. The political influence of the situation can have major effects on the evaluation design, approach and methods. Politics also has the potential to influence the decisions made from the evaluation findings. The current study focuses on the influence of the political context on stakeholder decision making. Utilizing a simulation scenario, this study compares stakeholder decision making in high and low stakes evaluation contexts. Findings suggest that high stakes political environments are more likely than low stakes environments to lead to reduced reliance on technically appropriate measures and increased dependence on measures better reflect the broader political environment. PMID:26283476

  20. Response Style Contamination of Student Evaluation Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolnicar, Sara; Grun, Bettina

    2009-01-01

    Student evaluation surveys provide instructors with feedback regarding development opportunities and they form the basis of promotion and tenure decisions. Student evaluations have been extensively studied, but one dimension hitherto neglected is the actual measurement aspect: which questions to ask, how to ask them, and what answer options to…

  1. Decision making on timing of surgery for hip fracture patients on clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, B; Webb, M; Weusten, A; Bonczek, S; Ramaskandhan, J; Nanu, A

    2016-02-01

    Patients taking clopidogrel who sustain a fractured neck of femur pose a challenge to orthopaedic surgeons. The aim of this study was to determine whether delay to theatre for these patients affects drop in haemoglobin levels, need for blood transfusion, length of hospital stay and 30-day mortality. A retrospective review of all neck of femur patients admitted at two centres in the North East of England over 3 years revealed 85 patients. Patients were divided into two groups depending on whether they were taking clopidogrel alone (C) or with aspirin (CA). Haemoglobin drop was significantly different in the CA group that was operated on early (CA1) versus the group for which surgery was delayed by over 48 hours (CA2): 3.3g/dl and 1.9g/dl respectively (p=0.01). The mean inpatient stay in group C was 35.9 days while in group CA it was 19.9 days (p=0.002). The mean length of stay in group CA2 (26.7 days) was significantly longer than for CA1 patients (14.1 days) (p=0.01). There were no significant differences in mortality or wound complications. Hip fracture patients on clopidogrel can be safely operated on early provided they are medically stable. Bleeding risk should be borne in mind in those patients on dual therapy with aspirin. PMID:26829666

  2. Development and validation of an HPLC-MS/MS method to determine clopidogrel in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gangyi; Dong, Chunxia; Shen, Weiwei; Lu, Xiaopei; Zhang, Mengqi; Gui, Yuzhou; Zhou, Qinyi; Yu, Chen

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative method for clopidogrel using online-SPE tandem LC-MS/MS was developed and fully validated according to the well-established FDA guidelines. The method achieves adequate sensitivity for pharmacokinetic studies, with lower limit of quantifications (LLOQs) as low as 10 pg/mL. Chromatographic separations were performed on reversed phase columns Kromasil Eternity-2.5-C18-UHPLC for both methods. Positive electrospray ionization in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode was employed for signal detection and a deuterated analogue (clopidogrel-d 4) was used as internal standard (IS). Adjustments in sample preparation, including introduction of an online-SPE system proved to be the most effective method to solve the analyte back-conversion in clinical samples. Pooled clinical samples (two levels) were prepared and successfully used as real-sample quality control (QC) in the validation of back-conversion testing under different conditions. The result showed that the real samples were stable in room temperature for 24 h. Linearity, precision, extraction recovery, matrix effect on spiked QC samples and stability tests on both spiked QCs and real sample QCs stored in different conditions met the acceptance criteria. This online-SPE method was successfully applied to a bioequivalence study of 75 mg single dose clopidogrel tablets in 48 healthy male subjects. PMID:26904399

  3. Aspirin and clopidogrel resistance using the cone and plate(let) analyser in Indian patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Sudeep Kurien; Salahuddin, Salman; Karunakaran, Bijoy; Nalakath, Sajid Yoonus; Bhaskaran, Jayesh; Haridas, Padinjare Veloor; Mandalay, Asishkumar; Faizal, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to antiplatelet drugs is a well-known entity. However, data for aspirin and clopidogrel resistance, and its clinical significance, in Indian patients are meagre. Aims and objectives We sought to determine the prevalence of resistance to aspirin and clopidogrel in Indian patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD), using the cone and plate(let) analyser (CPA) technology. Setting and design A single centre prospective study in a cohort of patients with stable CHD on chronic aspirin and clopidogrel therapy attending the cardiology outpatient clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Southern India. Methods Platelet function was measured using the Impact-R device (DiaMed, Cressier, Switzerland). Resistance to aspirin and clopidogrel was measured in a cohort of 100 patients with stable documented CHD. Relation of antiplatelet resistance to various clinical comorbidities was also assessed. Results Of the 100 patients, 85% were men, and 15% were above 65 years of age. 47% patients had diabetes, 29% of patients were hypertensive and 16% were smokers. Using the CPA, 12 patients (12%) were found to be resistant to aspirin and 19 patients (19%) were clopidogrel resistant. In addition, 10 patients (10%) were resistant to both aspirin and clopidogrel. There was no significant correlation between the presence of antiplatelet resistance and several baseline clinical variables, including age, sex, diabetes, hypertension and smoking. Conclusions Resistance to aspirin and clopidogrel and dual antiplatelet resistance are prevalent in Indian patients, comparable with the prevalence worldwide. The CPA is a feasible assay to determine antiplatelet resistance. PMID:27326196

  4. 40 CFR 265.93 - Preparation, evaluation, and response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preparation, evaluation, and response..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Ground-Water Monitoring § 265.93 Preparation, evaluation, and response... the arithmetic mean and variance, based on at least four replicate measurements on each sample,...

  5. On-Line IDCMS Evaluation of Different Categories of Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follettie, Joseph F.

    A manipulandum-referenced taxonomy for response categories appropriate to primary education is presented. The tenability of automatic on-line evaluation of the different types of response when processing equipment of the sort that probably will be available to Southwest Regional Laboratory is preliminarily evaluated. (Author/SK)

  6. Comparative Efficacy and Safety of Prasugrel, Ticagrelor, and Standard-Dose and High-Dose Clopidogrel in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A Network Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhchain; Singh, Mukesh; Grewal, Navsheen; Khosla, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Authors aimed to compare efficacy and safety of prasugrel, ticagrelor, and standard-dose (SD) and high-dose (HD) clopidogrel in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and clinicaltrials.gov were searched for studies comparing prasugrel, ticagrelor, SD and HD clopidogrel in patients undergoing PCI. Frequentist and Bayesian network meta-analyses were performed besides direct pairwise comparisons. Thirty trials, comprising 34,563 person-year data, were included. Prasugrel emerged as a best drug to prevent definite or probable stent thrombosis, followed by HD clopidogrel and ticagrelor, with SD clopidogrel being the worst. Myocardial infarction was least likely to be prevented by SD clopidogrel after PCI, and remaining 3 were superior to it with little difference among them. SD clopidogrel was least effective in preventing cardiovascular deaths after PCI. Prasugrel was most effective in preventing cardiovascular deaths, although having only small advantage over ticagrelor and HD clopidogrel. Ticagrelor reduced all-cause mortality by a small margin compared with rest of treatments. SD clopidogrel, followed by ticagrelor, resulted in significantly lower thrombolysis in myocardial infarction major bleeding complications compared with prasugrel. Analysis of any bleeding revealed similar trend. HD clopidogrel performed better than prasugrel in terms of bleeding complications. In conclusion, Prasugrel is likely most effective drug to prevent post-PCI ischemic events but at the expense of higher bleeding. Ticagrelor followed by HD clopidogrel seems to strike the right balance between efficacy and safety. HD clopidogrel can be considered as an alternative to newer P2Y12 inhibitors. PMID:26448337

  7. Genetics of response to antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mark R; Storey, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy has a major role in the management of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, significant variation in pharmacodynamic response to antiplatelet therapy has been demonstrated, especially to clopidogrel. Single nucleotide polymorphisms, particularly those affecting the metabolism of antiplatelet therapy, account for some, but not all, of this variability in response. Loss-of-function polymorphisms of CYP2C19, the gene encoding for the key enzyme in the metabolism of clopidogrel, are associated with reduced formation of the active metabolite of clopidogrel, a lower pharmacodynamic effect of the drug and a corresponding increase in adverse cardiovascular events. Conversely, gain-of-function polymorphisms of CYP2C19 are associated with an increased pharmacodynamic response to the drug and therefore an increase in bleeding. The clinical relevance of other polymorphisms that affect antiplatelet therapy has not been clearly established. PMID:24751429

  8. Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-08-01

    The recent electricity crisis in California and elsewhere has prompted new research to evaluate demand response strategies in large facilities. This paper describes an evaluation of fully automated demand response technologies (Auto-DR) in five large facilities. Auto-DR does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a facility through receipt of an external communications signal. This paper summarizes the measurement and evaluation of the performance of demand response technologies and strategies in five large facilities. All the sites have data trending systems such as energy management and control systems (EMCS) and/or energy information systems (EIS). Additional sub-metering was applied where necessary to evaluate the facility's demand response performance. This paper reviews the control responses during the test period, and analyzes demand savings achieved at each site. Occupant comfort issues are investigated where data are available. This paper discusses methods to estimate demand savings and results from demand response strategies at five large facilities.

  9. Effect of Clopidogrel on Early Failure of Arteriovenous Fistulas for Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Dember, Laura M.; Beck, Gerald J.; Allon, Michael; Delmez, James A.; Dixon, Bradley S.; Greenberg, Arthur; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Greene, Tom; Radeva, Milena K.; Braden, Gregory L.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Rocco, Michael V.; Davidson, Ingemar J.; Kaufman, James S.; Meyers, Catherine M.; Kusek, John W.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2016-01-01

    Context The arteriovenous fistula is the preferred type of vascular access for hemodialysis because of lower thrombosis and infection rates and lower health care expenditures compared with synthetic grafts or central venous catheters. Early failure of fistulas due to thrombosis or inadequate maturation is a barrier to increasing the prevalence of fistulas among patients treated with hemodialysis. Small, inconclusive trials have suggested that antiplatelet agents may reduce thrombosis of new fistulas. Objective To determine whether clopidogrel reduces early failure of hemodialysis fistulas. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted at 9 US centers composed of academic and community nephrology practices in 2003–2007. Eight hundred seventy-seven participants with end-stage renal disease or advanced chronic kidney disease were followed up until 150 to 180 days after fistula creation or 30 days after initiation of dialysis, whichever occurred later. Intervention Participants were randomly assigned to receive clopidogrel (300-mg loading dose followed by daily dose of 75 mg; n = 441) or placebo (n = 436) for 6 weeks starting within 1 day after fistula creation. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was fistula thrombosis, determined by physical examination at 6 weeks. The secondary outcome was failure of the fistula to become suitable for dialysis. Suitability was defined as use of the fistula at a dialysis machine blood pump rate of 300 mL/min or more during 8 of 12 dialysis sessions. Results Enrollment was stopped after 877 participants were randomized based on a stopping rule for intervention efficacy. Fistula thrombosis occurred in 53 (12.2%) participants assigned to clopidogrel compared with 84 (19.5%) participants assigned to placebo (relative risk, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.46–0.97; P = .018). Failure to attain suitability for dialysis did not differ between the clopidogrel and placebo groups (61

  10. Effects of Clopidogrel Therapy on Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, Vascular Function and Progenitor Cells in Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Ronnie; Dhawan, Saurabh S.; Syed, Hamid; Pohlel, F. Khan; Binongo, Jose Nilo G.; Ghazzal, Ziyad B.; Quyyumi, Arshed A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditional cardiovascular risk factors lead to endothelial injury and activation of leucocytes and platelets that initiate and propagate atherosclerosis. We proposed that clopidogrel therapy in patients with stable CAD imparts a pleiotropic effect that extends beyond anti-platelet aggregation to other athero-protective processes. Methods Forty-one subjects were randomized in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study to either clopidogrel 75 mg daily or placebo for 6-weeks, and then transitioned immediately to the other treatment for an additional 6 weeks. We assessed 1) endothelial function as flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery, 2) arterial stiffness and central augmentation index using applanation tonometry, 3) vascular function as fingertip reactive hyperemia index, 4) inflammation by measuring plasma CD40 ligand and serum high-sensitivity c-reactive protein levels, 5) oxidative stress by measuring plasma aminothiols, and 6) circulating progenitor cells, at baseline and at the end of each 6-week treatment period. Results Clopidogrel therapy resulted in a significant reduction in soluble CD40 ligand (p=0.03), a pro-thrombotic and pro-inflammatory molecule derived mainly from activated platelets. However, clopidogrel therapy had no effect on endothelial function, arterial stiffness, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, or progenitor cells. Conclusions Our findings suggest a solitary anti-platelet effect of clopidogrel therapy in patients with stable CAD, with no effect on other sub-clinical markers of cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:24336012

  11. Deciphering glycomics and neuroproteomic alterations in experimental traumatic brain injury: Comparative analysis of aspirin and clopidogrel treatment.

    PubMed

    Abou-Abbass, Hussein; Bahmad, Hisham; Abou-El-Hassan, Hadi; Zhu, Rui; Zhou, Shiyue; Dong, Xue; Hamade, Eva; Mallah, Khalil; Zebian, Abir; Ramadan, Naify; Mondello, Stefania; Fares, Jawad; Comair, Youssef; Atweh, Samir; Darwish, Hala; Zibara, Kazem; Mechref, Yehia; Kobeissy, Firas

    2016-06-01

    As populations age, the number of patients sustaining traumatic brain injury (TBI) and concomitantly receiving preinjury antiplatelet therapy such as aspirin (ASA) and clopidogrel (CLOP) is rising. These drugs have been linked with unfavorable clinical outcomes following TBI, where the exact mechanism(s) involved are still unknown. In this novel work, we aimed to identify and compare the altered proteome profile imposed by ASA and CLOP when administered alone or in combination, prior to experimental TBI. Furthermore, we assessed differential glycosylation PTM patterns following experimental controlled cortical impact model of TBI, ASA, CLOP, and ASA + CLOP. Ipsilateral cortical brain tissues were harvested 48 h postinjury and were analyzed using an advanced neuroproteomics LC-MS/MS platform to assess proteomic and glycoproteins alterations. Of interest, differential proteins pertaining to each group (22 in TBI, 41 in TBI + ASA, 44 in TBI + CLOP, and 34 in TBI + ASA + CLOP) were revealed. Advanced bioinformatics/systems biology and clustering analyses were performed to evaluate biological networks and protein interaction maps illustrating molecular pathways involved in the experimental conditions. Results have indicated that proteins involved in neuroprotective cellular pathways were upregulated in the ASA and CLOP groups when given separately. However, ASA + CLOP administration revealed enrichment in biological pathways relevant to inflammation and proinjury mechanisms. Moreover, results showed differential upregulation of glycoproteins levels in the sialylated N-glycans PTMs that can be implicated in pathological changes. Omics data obtained have provided molecular insights of the underlying mechanisms that can be translated into clinical bedside settings. PMID:27249377

  12. Evaluating Detection and Diagnostic Decision Support Systems for Bioterrorism Response

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Vandana; McDonald, Kathryn M.; Smith, Wendy M.; Szeto, Herbert; Schleinitz, Mark D.; Owens, Douglas K.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of detection systems and diagnostic decision support systems for bioterrorism response. We performed a systematic review by searching relevant databases (e.g., MEDLINE) and Web sites for reports of detection systems and diagnostic decision support systems that could be used during bioterrorism responses. We reviewed over 24,000 citations and identified 55 detection systems and 23 diagnostic decision support systems. Only 35 systems have been evaluated: 4 reported both sensitivity and specificity, 13 were compared to a reference standard, and 31 were evaluated for their timeliness. Most evaluations of detection systems and some evaluations of diagnostic systems for bioterrorism responses are critically deficient. Because false-positive and false-negative rates are unknown for most systems, decision making on the basis of these systems is seriously compromised. We describe a framework for the design of future evaluations of such systems. PMID:15078604

  13. High On-Aspirin Platelet Reactivity and Clinical Outcome in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease: Results From ASCET (Aspirin Nonresponsiveness and Clopidogrel Endpoint Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Pettersen, Alf-Åge R.; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Abdelnoor, Michael; Arnesen, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with stable coronary artery disease on single-antiplatelet therapy with aspirin are still at risk for atherothrombotic events, and high on-aspirin residual platelet reactivity (RPR) has been suggested as a risk factor. Methods and Results In this randomized trial, the association between platelet function determined by the PFA100 platelet function analyzer system (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Germany) and clinical outcome in 1001 patients, all on single-antiplatelet therapy with aspirin (160 mg/d) was studied. Patients were randomized to continue with aspirin 160 mg/d or change to clopidogrel 75 mg/d. A composite end point of death, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and unstable angina was used. At 2-year follow-up, 106 primary end points were registered. The prevalence of high RPR was 25.9%. High on-aspirin RPR did not significantly influence the primary end point in the aspirin group (13.3% versus 9.9%, P=0.31). However, in post hoc analysis, patients with von Willebrand factor levels or platelet count below median values and high on-aspirin RPR had a statistically significant higher end point rate than that of patients with low RPR (20% versus 7.5%, P=0.014, and 18.2% versus 10.8%, P=0.039, respectively). The composite end point rate in patients with high on-aspirin RPR treated with clopidogrel was not different from that of patients treated with aspirin (7.6% versus 13.3%, P=0.16). Conclusions In stable, aspirin-treated patients with coronary artery disease, high on-aspirin RPR did not relate to clinical outcome and did not identify a group responsive to clopidogrel. Post hoc subgroup analysis raised the possibility that high on-aspirin RPR might be predictive in patients with low von Willebrand factor or platelet count, but these findings will require confirmation in future studies. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT00222261. (J Am Heart Assoc. 2012;1:e000703 doi: 10.1161/JAHA.112

  14. Simultaneous Two-Vessel Subacute Stent Thrombosis Caused by Clopidogrel Resistance from CYP2C19 Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bimal; Patel, Neel; Sattur, Sudhakar; Patel, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel resistance from CYP2C19 polymorphism has been associated with stent thrombosis in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stents. We present a case of a 76-year-old male who received drug-eluting stents to the right coronary artery and left anterior descending artery for non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and was discharged on dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. He subsequently presented with chest pain from anterior, anteroseptal, and inferior ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. An emergent coronary angiogram revealed acute stent thrombosis with 100% occlusion of RCA and LAD that was successfully treated with thrombus aspiration and angioplasty. Although he was compliant with his dual antiplatelet therapy, he developed stent thrombosis, which was confirmed as clopidogrel resistance from homozygous CYP2C19 polymorphism.

  15. Simultaneous Two-Vessel Subacute Stent Thrombosis Caused by Clopidogrel Resistance from CYP2C19 Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Ashwad; Patel, Bimal; Patel, Neel; Sattur, Sudhakar; Patel, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel resistance from CYP2C19 polymorphism has been associated with stent thrombosis in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stents. We present a case of a 76-year-old male who received drug-eluting stents to the right coronary artery and left anterior descending artery for non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and was discharged on dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. He subsequently presented with chest pain from anterior, anteroseptal, and inferior ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. An emergent coronary angiogram revealed acute stent thrombosis with 100% occlusion of RCA and LAD that was successfully treated with thrombus aspiration and angioplasty. Although he was compliant with his dual antiplatelet therapy, he developed stent thrombosis, which was confirmed as clopidogrel resistance from homozygous CYP2C19 polymorphism. PMID:27555873

  16. Ticagrelor versus high dose clopidogrel in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients with high platelet reactivity post fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Perperis, Angelos; Koniari, Ioanna; Karvounis, Haralambos; Patsilinakos, Sotirios; Ziakas, Antonios; Barampoutis, Nikolaos; Panagiotidis, Theofilos; Akinosoglou, Karolina; Hahalis, George; Xanthopoulou, Ioanna

    2015-10-01

    Limited data are available on high platelet reactivity (HPR) rate early post fibrinolysis, while no effective way to overcome it has been proposed. In this context, we aimed to compare ticagrelor versus high dose clopidogrel in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who exhibit HPR post fibrinolysis. In a prospective, randomized, parallel design, 3-center study, 56 STEMI patients, out of 83 (67.5 %) screened, who presented with HPR (PRU ≥ 208 by VerifyNow) 3-48 h post fibrinolysis and prior to coronary angiography were allocated to ticagrelor 180 mg loading dose (LD)/90 mg bid maintenance dose (MD) or clopidogrel 600 mg LD/150 mg MD. Platelet reactivity was assessed at randomization (Hour 0), at Hour 2, Hour 24 and pre-discharge. The primary endpoint of platelet reactivity (in PRU) at Hour 2 was significantly lower for ticagrelor compared to clopidogrel with a least square mean difference (95 % confidence interval) of -141.7 (-173.4 to -109.9), p < 0.001. HPR rates at Hour 2 and 24 were significantly lower for ticagrelor versus clopidogrel (14.3 vs. 82.1 %, p < 0.001 and 0 vs. 25.0 %, p = 0.01 respectively), though not significantly different pre-discharge. In-hospital Bleeding Academic Research Consortium type ≥2 bleeding occurred in 1 and 2 clopidogrel and ticagrelor-treated patients, respectively. In STEMI patients, post fibrinolysis HPR is common. Ticagrelor treats HPR more effectively compared to high dose clopidogrel therapy. Although antiplatelet regimens tested in this study were well tolerated, this finding should be considered only exploratory. PMID:25680893

  17. Cardiovascular outcomes and mortality in patients using clopidogrel with proton pump inhibitors after percutaneous coronary intervention or acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rassen, Jeremy A.; Choudhry, Niteesh K.; Avorn, Jerry; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies have raised concerns about reduced efficacy of clopidogrel when used concurrently with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), but those studies may have overestimated the risk. Methods and Results We studied the potential for increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events among users of clopidogrel with concurrent use of PPIs versus without, in three large cohorts of patients ≥ 65 years treated between 2001-2005. All patients had undergone percutaneous coronary intervention or been hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, or British Columbia, and had subsequently initiated treatment with clopidogrel. We recorded myocardial infarction (MI) hospitalization, death, and revascularization among PPI users and non-users. We assessed our primary endpoint of MI or death using cohort-specific and pooled regression analyses. 18,565 clopidogrel users entered our analysis. On a pooled basis, 2.6% of those who also initiated a PPI versus 2.1% of PPI non-users had an MI hospitalization; 1.5% versus 0.9% died, and 3.4% versus 3.1% underwent revascularization. The propensity score-adjusted rate ratio for the primary endpoint of MI or death was 1.22 (95% confidence interval 0.99 to 1.51); for death 1.20 (0.84, 1.70); and for revascularization, 0.97 (0.79 to 1.21). Matched analyses generally yielded similar results. Conclusions Though point estimates indicated a slightly increased risk of MI or death in older patients initiating both clopidogrel and a PPI, we did not observe conclusive evidence of a clopidogrel/PPI interaction of major clinical relevance. Our data suggest that should this effect exist, is unlikely to exceed a 20% risk increase. PMID:19933932

  18. Comparison of a solid SMEDDS and solid dispersion for enhanced stability and bioavailability of clopidogrel napadisilate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wuk; Kwon, Min Seok; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Balakrishnan, Prabagar; Park, Jong Hyuck; Kim, Dong Shik; Lee, Beom-Jin; Park, Young Joon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2014-12-19

    The intention of this study was to compare the physicochemical properties, stability and bioavailability of a clopidogrel napadisilate (CN)-loaded solid dispersion (SD) and solid self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (solid SMEDDS). SD was prepared by a surface attached method using different ratios of Cremophor RH60 (surfactant) and HPMC (polymer), optimized based on their drug solubility. Liquid SMEDDS was composed of oil (peceol), a surfactant (Cremophor RH60) and a co-surfactant (Transcutol HP). A pseudo-ternary phase diagram was constructed to identify the emulsifying domain, and the optimized liquid SMEDDS was spray dried with an inert solid carrier (silicon dioxide), producing the solid SMEDDS. The physicochemical properties, solubility, dissolution, stability and pharmacokinetics were assessed and compared to clopidogrel napadisilate (CN) and bisulfate (CB) powders. In solid SMEDDS, liquid SMEDDS was absorbed or coated inside the pores of silicon dioxide. In SD, hydrophilic polymer and surfactants were adhered onto drug surface. The drug was in crystalline and molecularly dispersed form in SD and solid SMEDDS, respectively. Solid SMEDDS and SD greatly increased the solubility of CN but gave lower drug solubility compared to CB powder. These preparations significantly improved the dissolution of CN, but the latter more increased than the former. Stability under accelerated condition showed that they were more stable compared to CB powder, and SD was more stable than solid SMEDDS. They significantly increased the oral bioavailability of CN powder. Furthermore, SD showed significantly improved oral bioavailability compared to solid SMEDDS and CB powder. Thus, SD with excellent stability and bioavailability is recommended as an alternative for the clopidogrel-based oral formulation. PMID:25263903

  19. Evaluation Responsibility and Leadership in the Face of Failing Democracies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKegg, Kate

    2013-01-01

    In a world faced with unprecedented rising levels of inequality and injustice, is there a responsibility for our evaluation organizations to take on a leadership role in promoting inclusive, evaluative dialog and deliberation about the state of our democracies in relation to key democratic principles and ideals? In this forum, I question whether…

  20. Evaluating the Chief School Administrator: Fulfilling the Board's Governance Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey School Boards Association, Trenton.

    Evaluating the chief school administrator's performance is one of the most important responsibilities of a board of education. In New Jersey, established guidelines for board evaluations of superintendents range from legal to procedural in the attempt to meet school district goals and objectives and to assess whether the superintendency fulfilled…

  1. Dissociation of neuronal, electrodermal, and evaluative responses in disgust extinction.

    PubMed

    Klucken, Tim; Schweckendiek, Jan; Merz, Christian J; Vaitl, Dieter; Stark, Rudolf

    2013-06-01

    Disgust extinction is an important mechanism relevant for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. However, only a few studies have investigated disgust extinction. Moreover, because disgust sensitivity (DS) is considered as a relevant factor for learning processes, this study also investigated the potential relationship between DS and disgust extinction learning. The aim of this study was to explore the neuronal correlates of disgust extinction, as well as changes in skin conductance responses (SCRs) and evaluative conditioning. Twenty subjects were exposed to a differential extinction paradigm, in which a previous conditioned, and now unreinforced, stimulus (conditioned stimulus, CS+) was compared to a second stimulus (CS-), which was previously not associated with the unconditioned stimulus (UCS). Extinction learning was measured on three different response levels (BOLD responses, SCRs, and evaluative conditioning). Regarding evaluative conditioning, the CS+ was rated as more unpleasant than the CS-. Interestingly, significantly increased amygdala responses and SCRs toward to the CS- were observed. Finally, a (negative) trend was found between DS scores and BOLD responses of the prefrontal cortex. The present findings showed a dissociation of different response levels. The increased CS- responses could be explained by the assumption that the increased amygdala activity may reflect a safety learning signal during the first extinction trials and the subjective focus may therefore shift from the CS+ to the CS-. The correlation finding supports previous studies postulating that DS hampers extinction processes. The present results point toward dissociations between the response levels in context of extinction processes. PMID:23731074

  2. [Argatroban, Aspirin, and Clopidogrel Combination Therapy for Acute Penetrating Artery Infarction: A Pilot Study].

    PubMed

    Nishi, Ryoji; Mano, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Matsuo, Koji; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    Treatment to prevent progressive neurological deficits in acute penetrating artery infarction (API) is clinically important, but has not yet been established. This study aims to investigate the efficacy and safety of argatroban, aspirin, and clopidogrel combination therapy for API. Patients with API (lacunar infarcts or branch atheromatous disease) admitted within 48 hours after onset were enrolled. We assigned them to argatroban, aspirin, and clopidogrel (AAC) group or argatroban and aspirin (AA) group. In both groups, blood pressure was controlled to near or below 180/105 mmHg in the admission period. We defined progressing stroke as a worsening of two or more points in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score on the seventh day of admission. Fifty-four patients were enrolled. We assigned 28 patients to the AAC group, and 26 patients to the AA group. There were no significant differences in background factors between the two groups. The incidence of progressing stroke was significantly higher in the AA group (P<0.05). Intracranial hemorrhage or any other bleeding was not seen in the admission period in either group. Our findings suggest that the AAC combination therapy may positively affect progressive neurological deficits in API patients. PMID:26873239

  3. Routine Screening for CYP2C19 Polymorphisms for Patients being Treated with Clopidogrel is not Recommended

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Robert A; Khan, Zia R; Valentin, Mona R; Badawi, Ramy A

    2015-01-01

    Recent efforts directed at potential litigation in Hawai‘i have resulted in a renewed interest for genetic screening for cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) polymorphisms in patients treated with clopidogrel. Clopidogrel is an antiplatelet agent, frequently used in combination with aspirin, for the prevention of thrombotic complications with acute coronary syndrome and in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. Cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 2C19 is an enzyme involved in the bioactivation of clopidogrel from a pro-drug to an active inhibitor of platelet action. Patients of Asian and Pacific Island background have been reported to have an increase in CYP2C19 polymorphisms associated with loss-of-function of this enzyme when compared to other ethnicities. This has created an interest in genetic testing for CYP2C19 polymorphisms in Hawai‘i. Based upon our review of the current literature, we do not feel that there is support for the routine screening for CYP2C19 polymorphisms in patients being treated with clopidogrel; furthermore, the results of genetic testing may not be helpful in guiding therapeutic decisions. We recommend that decisions on the type of antiplatelet treatment be made based upon clinical evidence of potential differential outcomes associated with the use of these agents rather than on the basis of genetic testing. PMID:25628978

  4. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma response evaluation with MRI texture classification

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Lara CV; Luukkaala, Tiina; Pertovaara, Hannu; Saarinen, Tuomas O; Heinonen, Tomi T; Järvenpää, Ritva; Soimakallio, Seppo; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa I; Eskola, Hannu J; Dastidar, Prasun

    2009-01-01

    Background To show magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) texture appearance change in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) during treatment with response controlled by quantitative volume analysis. Methods A total of 19 patients having NHL with an evaluable lymphoma lesion were scanned at three imaging timepoints with 1.5T device during clinical treatment evaluation. Texture characteristics of images were analyzed and classified with MaZda application and statistical tests. Results NHL tissue MRI texture imaged before treatment and under chemotherapy was classified within several subgroups, showing best discrimination with 96% correct classification in non-linear discriminant analysis of T2-weighted images. Texture parameters of MRI data were successfully tested with statistical tests to assess the impact of the separability of the parameters in evaluating chemotherapy response in lymphoma tissue. Conclusion Texture characteristics of MRI data were classified successfully; this proved texture analysis to be potential quantitative means of representing lymphoma tissue changes during chemotherapy response monitoring. PMID:19545438

  5. Platelet inhibition with prasugrel (CS‐747) compared with clopidogrel in patients undergoing coronary stenting: the subset from the JUMBO study

    PubMed Central

    Serebruany, V L; Midei, M G; Meilman, H; Malinin, A I; Lowry, D R

    2006-01-01

    Background Based on the preclinical and phase 1 studies, prasugrel, a novel platelet ADP P2Y12 receptor blocker, may be a more potent platelet inhibitor than clopidogrel. This study compared the antiplatelet properties of prasugrel in a small subset of patients enrolled in the JUMBO trial, and compared with historic clopidogrel treated controls. Methods and results Nine patients undergoing coronary stenting were randomised to one of three arms of prasugrel (40 mg loading, and 7.5 mg maintenance, n = 1; 60/10 mg, n = 4; or 60/15 mg, n = 2), or clopidogrel (300/75 mg, n = 2). Aspirin and GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors were permitted. Platelet activity was assessed at baseline, at 4, and 24 hours, and at 30 days after stent implantation in substudy participants, and compared with 124 historic controls who received clopidogrel. Independent of the loading, or maintenance dose, patients treated with prasugrel exhibited significantly more potent platelet inhibition as determined by ADP, and collagen induced aggregation, Ultegra Analyser, and surface expression of PECAM‐1, GPIIb/IIIa antigen, and activity with PAC‐1 antibody, GPIb, P‐selectin, CD40‐ligand, GP37, and thrombospondin receptor expression when compared with those treated with clopidogrel. There were no differences between antiplatelet agents with regard to vitronectin, LAMP‐1, PAR‐1 (intact and cleaved epitopes) thrombin receptor expression, or formation of platelet‐monocyte microparticles. Expression of GPIIb antigen, vitronectin, and LAMP‐3 receptor were not affected by both agents. Two patients treated with prasugrel 10 mg/daily exhibited complete inhibition of collagen induced aggregation at 30 days. Conclusion At the dosing regimens chosen in the JUMBO trial, it seems that prasugrel is a more potent antiplatelet agent than clopidogrel. Two episodes of profound platelet inhibition, which are not seen with clopidogrel, raise the possibility of higher bleeding risks

  6. Evaluation of the Emergency Response Dose Assessment System(ERDAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Randolph J.; Lambert, Winifred C.; Manobianco, John T.; Taylor, Gregory E.; Wheeler, Mark M.; Yersavich, Ann M.

    1996-01-01

    The emergency response dose assessment system (ERDAS) is a protype software and hardware system configured to produce routine mesoscale meteorological forecasts and enhanced dispersion estimates on an operational basis for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)/Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) region. ERDAS provides emergency response guidance to operations at KSC/CCAS in the case of an accidental hazardous material release or an aborted vehicle launch. This report describes the evaluation of ERDAS including: evaluation of sea breeze predictions, comparison of launch plume location and concentration predictions, case study of a toxic release, evaluation of model sensitivity to varying input parameters, evaluation of the user interface, assessment of ERDA's operational capabilities, and a comparison of ERDAS models to the ocean breeze dry gultch diffusion model.

  7. MRI for evaluation of treatment response in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Blazic, Ivana M; Campbell, Naomi M; Gollub, Marc J

    2016-08-01

    MRI plays an increasingly pivotal role in the clinical staging of rectal cancer in the baseline and post-treatment settings. An accurate evaluation of response to neoadjuvant treatment is crucial because of its major influence on patient management and quality of life. However, evaluation of treatment response is challenging for both imaging and clinical assessments owing to treatment-related inflammation and fibrosis. At one end of the spectrum are clinical yT4 rectal cancers, wherein precise post-treatment MRI evaluation of tumour spread is particularly important for avoiding unnecessary exenterative surgery. At the other extreme, for tumours with clinical near-complete response or clinical complete response to neoadjuvant treatment, less invasive treatment may be suitable instead of the standard surgical approach such as, for example, a "Watch and Wait" approach or perhaps local excision. Ideally, the goal of post-treatment MRI evaluation would be to identify these subgroups of patients so that they might be spared unnecessary surgical intervention. It is known that post-chemoradiation therapy restaging using conventional MR sequences is less accurate than baseline staging, particularly in confirming T0 disease, largely owing to the difficulty in distinguishing fibrosis, oedema and normal mucosa from small foci of residual tumour. However, there is a growing utilization of multiparametric MRI, which has superseded other types of evaluations and requires review and periodic re-evaluation. This commentary discusses the current status of multiparametric MRI in the post-treatment setting and the challenges facing imaging in general in the accurate determination of treatment response. PMID:27331883

  8. Evaluation of the FWL Responsive Headstart Program 1970-1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Stephen

    This evaluation report of the Far West Laboratory Responsive Head Start Program, an inservice training program for preschool educators, discusses the effectiveness of the Laboratory's program and gives specific recommendations for improving it. The present report contains data that continue to support earlier findings indicating that the…

  9. 40 CFR 265.93 - Preparation, evaluation, and response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... additional ground-water samples from those downgradient wells where a significant difference was detected..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Ground-Water Monitoring § 265.93 Preparation, evaluation, and response... an outline of a ground-water quality assessment program. The outline must describe a...

  10. 40 CFR 265.93 - Preparation, evaluation, and response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... additional ground-water samples from those downgradient wells where a significant difference was detected..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Ground-Water Monitoring § 265.93 Preparation, evaluation, and response... an outline of a ground-water quality assessment program. The outline must describe a...

  11. 40 CFR 265.93 - Preparation, evaluation, and response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... additional ground-water samples from those downgradient wells where a significant difference was detected..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Ground-Water Monitoring § 265.93 Preparation, evaluation, and response... an outline of a ground-water quality assessment program. The outline must describe a...

  12. 40 CFR 265.93 - Preparation, evaluation, and response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... additional ground-water samples from those downgradient wells where a significant difference was detected..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Ground-Water Monitoring § 265.93 Preparation, evaluation, and response... an outline of a ground-water quality assessment program. The outline must describe a...

  13. Evaluating Item Fit for Multidimensional Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Bo; Stone, Clement A.

    2008-01-01

    This research examines the utility of the s-x[superscript 2] statistic proposed by Orlando and Thissen (2000) in evaluating item fit for multidimensional item response models. Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to investigate both the Type I error and statistical power of this fit statistic in analyzing two kinds of multidimensional test…

  14. An Evaluation of Response Prompts for Teaching Behavior Chains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaver, Jessica L.; Bourret, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals who have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders can have difficulty acquiring new skills, and teaching procedures found to be efficient with 1 individual may not be efficient with others. However, relatively little research has evaluated methods to identify efficient, individualized response-prompt and prompt-fading procedures.…

  15. Evaluating the Response of the Terrestrial Biosphere to Significant Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiach, I.; Baker, I. T.; Denning, A.

    2011-12-01

    The response of terrestrial fluxes of energy, water, and carbon to drought is evaluated. Major droughts should be clearly evident in reanalyzed precipitation data, although this is not always the case. With reduced precipitation we can expect a suppression in Gross Primary Photosynthesis (GPP) if physiological stress is sufficient, with atttendant changes in energy partitioning due to stomatal closure. There may also be a response in respiratory release of CO2 with temperature increase. This study aimed to investigate the behavior of the terrestrial biosphere using the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB3) during and following times of drought and to identify any model responses inconsistent with observational relationships. The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) was evaluated from 1983 to 2006 in order to evaluate historical drought maps, and to facilitate a qualitative analysis of modeled drought behavior. Standardized and raw anomaly maps were produced for modeled physiological variables (GPP, transpiration, respiration, heat fluxes, carbon flux, and stress factors) in order to determine general response patterns for comparison with observations. The SiB model was determined to be generally accurate in its representation of significant drought, with regard to perturbations in Bowen ratio, GPP, and CO2 respiration. However, model response was heterogeneous, and did not always respond in a manner consistent with published descriptions of drought.

  16. Clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor or vorapaxar in patients with renal impairment: do we have a winner?

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor L; Tomek, Ales; Pokov, Alex N; Kim, Moo Hyun

    2015-12-01

    The optimal utilization of antiplatelet therapy in patients with renal impairment (RI) following acute coronary syndromes (ACS) represents an urgent, unmet and yet unsolved need with regards to the choice of agents, duration of treatment and potential dose/regimen adjustment. The lack of any large randomized trials designed and powered specifically in such high-risk patients, absence of the uniformed efficacy and safety data reporting policy to the FDA and endless overoptimistic publications based on post hoc analyses of primary trials sometimes exaggerating benefits and hiding risks, clouds reality. In addition, triaging RI patients is problematic due to ongoing kidney deterioration and the fact that such patients are prone to both vascular occlusions and bleeding. The authors summarize available FDA-confirmed evidence from the latest trials with approved antiplatelet agents, namely clopidogrel (CAPRIE, CURE, CREDO, CLARITY, CHARISMA); prasugrel (TRITON, TRILOGY); ticagrelor (PLATO, and PEGASUS); and vorapaxar (TRACER and TRA2P) in RI patient cohorts on top of aspirin as part of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). We deliberately avoided any results unless they were verified by the FDA, with the exception of the recent PEGASUS, since Agency reviews are not yet available. Despite differences among the trials and DAPT choices, RI patients universally experience much higher (HR = 1.3-3.1) rates of primary endpoint events, and bleeding risks (HR = 1.7-3.6). However, only ticagrelor increases creatinine and uric acid levels above that of clopidogrel; has the worst incidence of serious adverse events, more adverse events, and inferior outcomes in patients with severe (eGFR <30 ml/min), especially in the lowest (eGFR <15 ml/min) RI subsets. Clopidogrel, prasugrel and vorapaxar appear safer. Moreover, less aggressive half dose (5 mg/daily) prasugrel and strict DAPT, are well justified in RI, but not predominantly triple strategies with vorapaxar as tested in TRA2P and

  17. Moral Knowledge and Responsibilities in Evaluation Implementation: When Critical Theory and Responsive Evaluation Collide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Melissa; Preissle, Judith; Havick, Steven

    2010-01-01

    An external evaluation documented what occurred in an inaugural summer camp to teach high school students how to preserve religious freedom by learning about and acting on the history and current state of church-state separation and other first amendment issues. Camp designers hoped to promote religious diversity values and civic engagement in…

  18. A sensitive and rapid ultra HPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous detection of clopidogrel and its derivatized active thiol metabolite in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Peer, Cody J; Spencer, Shawn D; VanDenBerg, Dustin A H; Pacanowski, Michael A; Horenstein, Richard B; Figg, William D

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive, selective, and rapid ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (uHPLC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous quantification of clopidogrel (Plavix(®)) and its derivatized active metabolite (CAMD) in human plasma. Derivatization of the active metabolite in blood with 2-bromo-3'-methoxy acetophenone (MPB) immediately after collection ensured metabolite stability during sample handling and storage. Following addition of ticlopidine as an internal standard and simple protein precipitation, the analytes were separated on a Waters Acquity UPLC™ sub-2 μm-C(18) column via gradient elution before detection on a triple-quadrupole MS with multiple-reaction-monitoring via electrospray ionization. The method was validated across the clinically relevant concentration range of 0.01-50 ng/mL for parent clopidogrel and 0.1-150 ng/mL (r(2)=0.99) for CAMD, with a fast run time of 1.5 min to support pharmacokinetic studies using 75, 150, or 300 mg oral doses of clopidogrel. The analytical method measured concentrations of clopidogrel and CAMD with accuracy (%DEV) <±12% and precision (%CV) of <±6%. The method was successfully applied to measure the plasma concentrations of clopidogrel and CAMD in three subjects administered single oral doses of 75, 150, and 300 mg clopidogrel. It was further demonstrated that the derivatizing agent (MPB) does not affect clopidogrel levels, thus from one aliquot of blood drawn clinically, this method can simultaneously quantify both clopidogrel and CAMD with sensitivity in the picogram per mL range. PMID:22169056

  19. Occurrence, causes, and outcome after switching from ticagrelor to clopidogrel in a real-life scenario: data from a prospective registry.

    PubMed

    Biscaglia, Simone; Campo, Gianluca; Pavasini, Rita; Tebaldi, Matteo; Tumscitz, Carlo; Ferrari, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    In randomized clinical trials, ticagrelor has been substituted in roughly one-third of the patients during follow-up. To date, there are no studies addressing safety and modalities of switching from ticagrelor to clopidogrel. The aim of our study is to describe the occurrence, causes, and outcome of the switch from ticagrelor to clopidogrel in a real-life scenario. From June 2013 to March 2015, 586 patients were treated with ticagrelor in our centre. Overall, 101 (17%) patients were switched to clopidogrel through a standardized protocol, and they were followed-up for 12 months. Ischemic and bleeding events were prospectively recorded. The switch from ticagrelor to clopidogrel occurred mostly after discharge (69 ± 40 days), and the most frequent cause was the need of oral anticoagulation treatment, followed by bleeding events. Patients requiring ticagrelor discontinuation were older, more frequently female, with lower body mass index and creatinine clearance if compared to the "non-switched" group. In the 10 days after the switch, we did not observe ischemic adverse events. No definite/probable stent thrombosis was recorded. Before the switch, there was a significant higher occurrence of BARC bleedings in the "switched" group, particularly BARC 1 and 2. Our data confirm that the switch from ticagrelor to clopidogrel is common, and it occurs for several reasons. Our analysis did not demonstrate a significant increase in adverse cardiovascular events in the days following the switch from ticagrelor to clopidogrel, although larger studies are needed to validate our findings. PMID:27050796

  20. Six Versus Twelve Months Clopidogrel Therapy After Drug-Eluting Stenting in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome: An ISAR-SAFE Study Subgroup Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lohaus, Raphaela; Michel, Jonathan; Mayer, Katharina; Lahmann, Anna Lena; Byrne, Robert A; Wolk, Annabelle; Ten Berg, Jurrien M; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Han, Yaling; Adriaenssens, Tom; Tölg, Ralph; Seyfarth, Melchior; Maeng, Michael; Zrenner, Bernhard; Jacobshagen, Claudius; Wöhrle, Jochen; Kufner, Sebastian; Morath, Tanja; Ibrahim, Tareq; Bernlochner, Isabell; Fischer, Marcus; Schunkert, Heribert; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Mehilli, Julinda; Kastrati, Adnan; Schulz-Schüpke, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    In patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) the optimal duration of dual-antiplatelet therapy after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation remains unclear. At 6 months after intervention, patients receiving clopidogrel were randomly assigned to either a further 6-month period of placebo or clopidogrel. The primary composite endpoint was death, myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, stroke, or major bleeding 9 months after randomization. The ISAR-SAFE trial was terminated early due to low event rates and slow recruitment. 1601/4000 (40.0%) patients presented with ACS and were randomized to 6 (n = 794) or 12 months (n = 807) clopidogrel. The primary endpoint occurred in 14 patients (1.8%) receiving 6 months of clopidogrel and 17 patients (2.2%) receiving 12 months; hazard ratio (HR) 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-1.68, P = 0.60. There were 2 (0.3%) cases of stent thrombosis in each group; HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.14-7.09, P = >0.99. Major bleeding occurred in 3 patients (0.4%) receiving 6 months clopidogrel and 5 (0.6%) receiving 12 months; HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.15-2.49, P = 0.49. There was no significant difference in net clinical outcomes after DES implantation in ACS patients treated with 6 versus 12 months clopidogrel. Ischaemic and bleeding events were low beyond 6-months. PMID:27624287

  1. In vitro evaluation of fluorescence glucose biosensor response.

    PubMed

    Aloraefy, Mamdouh; Pfefer, T Joshua; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Sapsford, Kim E

    2014-01-01

    Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive glucose biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance diabetes control. However, a standard set of in vitro approaches for evaluating optical glucose biosensor response under controlled conditions would facilitate technological innovation and clinical translation. Towards this end, we have identified key characteristics and response test methods, fabricated FRET-based glucose biosensors, and characterized biosensor performance using these test methods. The biosensors were based on competitive binding between dextran and glucose to concanavalin A and incorporated long-wavelength fluorescence dye pairs. Testing characteristics included spectral response, linearity, sensitivity, limit of detection, kinetic response, reversibility, stability, precision, and accuracy. The biosensor demonstrated a fluorescence change of 45% in the presence of 400 mg/dL glucose, a mean absolute relative difference of less than 11%, a limit of detection of 25 mg/dL, a response time of 15 min, and a decay in fluorescence intensity of 72% over 30 days. The battery of tests presented here for objective, quantitative in vitro evaluation of FRET glucose biosensors performance have the potential to form the basis of future consensus standards. By implementing these test methods for a long-visible-wavelength biosensor, we were able to demonstrate strengths and weaknesses with a new level of thoroughness and rigor. PMID:25006996

  2. Clopidogrel-induced refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura successfully treated with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Khodor, Sara; Castro, Miguel; McNamara, Colin; Chaulagain, Chakra P

    2016-06-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a multisystem disorder characterized by microvascular aggregation of platelets and fibrin strands causing thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and organ dysfunction. TTP can develop as a result of a deficiency in ADAMTS13 enzyme activity due to either a genetic defect or, more commonly, the development of anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies. TTP can also be associated with pregnancy, organ transplant, lupus, infections, and drugs. Here, we present a case of TTP that developed shortly after the start of clopidogrel treatment for acute ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarction, and describe the clinical presentation, refractory course of the disease, and successful induction of remission through the use of rituximab in a setting of pre-existing autoimmune diseases. PMID:26684918

  3. Evaluation of Piloted Inputs for Onboard Frequency Response Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Martos, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Frequency response estimation results are presented using piloted inputs and a real-time estimation method recently developed for multisine inputs. A nonlinear simulation of the F-16 and a Piper Saratoga research aircraft were subjected to different piloted test inputs while the short period stabilator/elevator to pitch rate frequency response was estimated. Results show that the method can produce accurate results using wide-band piloted inputs instead of multisines. A new metric is introduced for evaluating which data points to include in the analysis and recommendations are provided for applying this method with piloted inputs.

  4. Evaluation of the Response to the Fukushima Accident.

    PubMed

    Miska, Horst

    2016-08-01

    The cause for the severity of the Fukushima nuclear accident is explained, and the radiological consequences are assessed. Moreover, the non-radiological effects are critically evaluated and failures in onsite and offsite emergency response highlighted. In conclusion, disregarding the principle of justification, the evacuation of residents and hospital patients was implemented too rigorously, resulting in unnecessary fatalities due to the protective action. PMID:27356068

  5. Clopidogrel (Plavix)

    MedlinePlus

    ... RJ, Abrams J, Chatterjee K, Daley J et al. 2007 chronic angina focused update of the ACC/AHA ... King SB 3rd, Anderson JL, Antman EM, et al. 2009 Focused Updates: ACC/AHA ... and 2007 Focused Update) and ACC/AHA/SCAI Guidelines on ...

  6. Clopidogrel (Plavix)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2007;116:2762-2772. Kushner FG, Hand M, Smith SC Jr, King SB 3rd, Anderson JL, Antman ... Clinical Practice Guidelines. Chest . 2012;141:e601S-e36S. Smith SC Jr, Benjamin EJ, Bonow RO, Braun LT, ...

  7. Association of Medicare Part D Low-Income Cost Subsidy Program Enrollment with Increased Fill Adherence to Clopidogrel After Coronary Stent Placement

    PubMed Central

    Duru, O. Kenrik; Edgington, Sarah; Mangione, Carol; Turk, Norman; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Kimbro, Lindsay; Ettner, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective To determine the association between enrollment in the Medicare Part D low-income cost subsidy (LIS) program, which reduces out-of-pocket medication costs, and fill adherence to the antiplatelet drug, clopidogrel, after coronary stent placement. Design Retrospective cohort study. Data Source Pharmacy claims database of a large, national Medicare Part D insurer. Patients A total of 2967 beneficiaries of a national Medicare Part D plan who had a coronary stent placed between April and December 2006 and were prescribed clopidogrel but were not preexisting users of clopidogrel; of these patients, 504 were enrolled in the LIS program and 2463 were not enrolled in the LIS program. Measurements and Main Results We defined LIS status as being enrolled in the LIS program at any point during the 12 months after the procedure. We examined the association between LIS status and good medication fill adherence to clopidogrel, defined as proportion of days covered ≥ 80%, or discontinuation of clopidogrel over the 12-month window starting from the date of their stent placement. We also identified patients with claims-based diagnoses of major bleeding events while taking clopidogrel. For those patients, we calculated fill adherence only for the period between medication initiation and the onset of major bleeding and/or did not classify them as having inappropriately discontinued the medication. We created a propensity score predicting the propensity of being eligible for the LIS benefit and used inverse propensity score weighting with regression adjustment to generate estimates of the effect parameters. LIS enrollment was associated with a higher predicted likelihood of good clopidogrel fill adherence after stent placement (54.8% for LIS enrollees vs 47.6% for non-enrollees, p=0.008). No significant difference was noted between the two groups in predicted risk of discontinuing clopidogrel after stent placement (18.3% for LIS enrollees vs 21.0% for non-enrollees, p

  8. Clinical update on the therapeutic use of clopidogrel: treatment of acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Huyen; Mehta, Shamir R; Eikelboom, John W

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenesis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) involves plaque disruption, platelet aggregation and intracoronary artery thrombus formation. Aspirin is the cornerstone of antiplatelet therapy in patients with STEMI, reducing the risk of recurrent myocardial infarction or death during the acute phase and long term by about one-quarter. Recent large randomized trials have demonstrated that the addition of clopidogrel to aspirin reduces the risk of major ischemic events by up to a further one-third in patients with STEMI treated with fibrinolytic therapy and undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, with no significant increase in bleeding. Thus, dual antiplatelet therapy with the combination of clopidogrel and aspirin is becoming the new standard of care for the management of patients with STEMI. PMID:17323592

  9. Video methods for evaluating physiologic monitor alarms and alarm responses.

    PubMed

    Bonafide, Christopher P; Zander, Miriam; Graham, Christian Sarkis; Weirich Paine, Christine M; Rock, Whitney; Rich, Andrew; Roberts, Kathryn E; Fortino, Margaret; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Lin, Richard; Keren, Ron

    2014-01-01

    False physiologic monitor alarms are extremely common in the hospital environment. High false alarm rates have the potential to lead to alarm fatigue, leading nurses to delay their responses to alarms, ignore alarms, or disable them entirely. Recent evidence from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and The Joint Commission has demonstrated a link between alarm fatigue and patient deaths. Yet, very little scientific effort has focused on the rigorous quantitative measurement of alarms and responses in the hospital setting. We developed a system using multiple temporarily mounted, minimally obtrusive video cameras in hospitalized patients' rooms to characterize physiologic monitor alarms and nurse responses as a proxy for alarm fatigue. This allowed us to efficiently categorize each alarm's cause, technical validity, actionable characteristics, and determine the nurse's response time. We describe and illustrate the methods we used to acquire the video, synchronize and process the video, manage the large digital files, integrate the video with data from the physiologic monitor alarm network, archive the video to secure servers, and perform expert review and annotation using alarm "bookmarks." We discuss the technical and logistical challenges we encountered, including the root causes of hardware failures as well as issues with consent, confidentiality, protection of the video from litigation, and Hawthorne-like effects. The description of this video method may be useful to multidisciplinary teams interested in evaluating physiologic monitor alarms and alarm responses to better characterize alarm fatigue and other patient safety issues in clinical settings. PMID:24847936

  10. Acute Coronary Syndromes, Gastrointestinal Protection, and Recommendations Regarding Concomitant Administration of Proton-Pump Inhibitors (Omeprazol/Esomeprazole) and Clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Iñigo; Sanchez-Insa, Esther; de Leiras, Sergio Rodríguez; Carrillo, Pilar; Ruiz-Quevedo, Valeriano; Pinar, Eduardo; Gopar-Gopar, Silvia; Bayon, Jeremías; Mañas, Pilar; Lasa, Garikoitz; CruzGonzalez, Ignacio; Hernandez, Felipe; Fernandez-Portales, Javier; Fernandez-Fernandez, Javier; Pérez-Serradilla, Ana; de la Torre Hernandez, José M; Gomez-Jaume, Alfredo

    2016-02-01

    The Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency sent a warning in 2010 discouraging the concomitant use of clopidogrel with omeprazole or esomeprazole. The purpose is to know the gastroprotective approach in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and the level of follow-up of the alert. In 17 hospitals with catheterization laboratory in Spain, 1 per region, we studied 25 consecutive patients per hospital whose diagnosis of discharge since October 1, 2013, had been any type of ACS. We analyzed their baseline clinical profile, the gatroprotective agents at admission and discharge and the antiplatelet therapy at discharge. The number of patients included was 425: age 67.2 ± 12.5 years, women 29.8%, diabetes 36.5%. The patients presented unstable angina in 21.6%, non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction in 35.3% and ST-elevation myocardial infarction in 43.1%. Conservative approach was chosen in 17.9%, bare-metal stents 32.2%, ≥ 1 drug-eluting stent 48.5%, and surgery 1.4%. Aspirin was indicated in 1.9%, aspirin + clopidogrel 73.6%, aspirin + prasugrel 17.6%, and aspririn + ticagrelor 6.8%. Gastroprotective agents were present in 40.2% patients at admission and this percentage increased to 93.7% at discharge. Of the 313 (73.6%) on clopidogrel in 96 (30.6%) was combined with omeprazole and 3 (0.95%) with esomeprazole, whereas the most commonly used was pantoprazole with 190 patients (44.7%). In conclusion, almost the totality of the patients with an ACS receive gastroprotective agents at the moment of discharge, most of them with proton-pump inhibitors. In one every 3 cases of the patients who are on clopidogrel, the recommendation of the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency is not followed. PMID:26708640

  11. Simultaneous quantitation of acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel along with their metabolites in human plasma using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chhonker, Yashpal S; Pandey, Chandra P; Chandasana, Hardik; Laxman, Tulsankar Sachin; Prasad, Yarra Durga; Narain, V S; Dikshit, Madhu; Bhatta, Rabi S

    2016-03-01

    The interest in therapeutic drug monitoring has increased over the last few years. Inter- and intra-patient variability in pharmacokinetics, plasma concentration related toxicity and success of therapy have stressed the need of frequent therapeutic drug monitoring of the drugs. A sensitive, selective and rapid liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the simultaneous quantification of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), salicylic acid, clopidogrel and carboxylic acid metabolite of clopidogrel in human plasma. The chromatographic separations were achieved on Waters Symmetry Shield(TM) C18 column (150 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) using 3.5 mm ammonium acetate (pH 3.5)-acetonitrile (10:90, v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.75 mL/min. The present method was successfully applied for therapeutic drug monitoring of aspirin and clopidogrel in 67 patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:26230053

  12. Impact of concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors and clopidogrel or ticagrelor on clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Xiao; Fan, Jing-Yao; Nie, Shao-Ping; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Abu-Assi, Emad; Henriques, Jose P Simao; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Saucedo, Jorge; González-Juanatey, José R; Wilton, Stephen B; Kikkert, Wouter J; Nuñez-Gil, Iván; Ariza-Sole, Albert; Song, Xian-Tao; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Liebetrau, Christoph; Kawaji, Tetsuma; Moretti, Claudio; Huczek, Zenon; Fujii, Toshiharu; Correia, Luis C; Kawashiri, Masa-aki; Kedev, Sasko

    2016-01-01

    Background There is great debate on the possible adverse interaction between proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and clopidogrel. In addition, whether the use of PPIs affects the clinical efficacy of ticagrelor remains less known. We aimed to determine the impact of concomitant administration of PPIs and clopidogrel or ticagrelor on clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods We retrospectively analyzed data from a “real world”, international, multi-center registry between 2003 and 2014 (n = 15,401) and assessed the impact of concomitant administration of PPIs and clopidogrel or ticagrelor on 1-year composite primary endpoint (all-cause death, re-infarction, or severe bleeding) in patients with ACS after PCI. Results Of 9429 patients in the final cohort, 54.8% (n = 5165) was prescribed a PPI at discharge. Patients receiving a PPI were older, more often female, and were more likely to have comorbidities. No association was observed between PPI use and the primary endpoint for patients receiving clopidogrel (adjusted HR: 1.036; 95% CI: 0.903–1.189) or ticagrelor (adjusted HR: 2.320; 95% CI: 0.875–6.151) (Pinteraction = 0.2004). Similarly, use of a PPI was not associated with increased risk of all-cause death, re-infarction, or a decreased risk of severe bleeding for patients treated with either clopidogrel or ticagrelor. Conclusions In patients with ACS following PCI, concomitant use of PPIs was not associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes in patients receiving either clopidogrel or ticagrelor. Our findings indicate it is reasonable to use a PPI in combination with clopidogrel or ticagrelor, especially in patients with a higher risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:27103915

  13. Cancer Education Program Evaluation: A Responsive Approach to Planning an Evaluation and Initial Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearsol, James A.

    This paper describes evaluation planning for the Cancer Education Program (CEP) at Ohio State University (OSU). The three-year OSU CEP project was designed as a multidisciplinary cancer education program. A responsive method, which trades off some measurement precision in order to increase the usefulness of the findings, was employed in the…

  14. Probability effects on stimulus evaluation and response processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehring, W. J.; Gratton, G.; Coles, M. G.; Donchin, E.

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of probability information on response preparation and stimulus evaluation. Eight subjects responded with one hand to the target letter H and with the other to the target letter S. The target letter was surrounded by noise letters that were either the same as or different from the target letter. In 2 conditions, the targets were preceded by a warning stimulus unrelated to the target letter. In 2 other conditions, a warning letter predicted that the same letter or the opposite letter would appear as the imperative stimulus with .80 probability. Correct reaction times were faster and error rates were lower when imperative stimuli confirmed the predictions of the warning stimulus. Probability information affected (a) the preparation of motor responses during the foreperiod, (b) the development of expectancies for a particular target letter, and (c) a process sensitive to the identities of letter stimuli but not to their locations.

  15. Impact of Cytochrome P450 2C19* 2 and * 3 on Clopidogrel Loading Dose in Saudi Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Hassan; AlMeman, Ahmad AbdulRahman; Rasool, Seemab

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emerging evidence shows that clopidogrel is greatly affected by non-functioning alleles measured by P2Y12 or platelet reactivity units (PRU). Cardiac events during short in-hospital stays have been inconclusively suggested as the main causes of discrepancies. Objectives: Evaluate the impact of CYP2C19 allele * 2 and allele * 3 on PRU and the potential clinical consequences of such interaction. To establish a rough estimation for the safe PRU limits for short in-hospital stay following PCI. Method: A short-term experimental study was conducted with 90 patients who underwent coronary angioplasty with drug eluting stents at the Prince Sultan Cardiac Center, Buraidah. All the patients received an initial loading dose of 300 mg clopidogrel, followed by 75 mg daily. Blood samples were used for DNA extraction for cytochrome P450 (CYP) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for genotyping. PRU and inhibition rate were tested by Verifynow®. All in-hospital cardiac events were recorded until patients were discharged. Results: Genotypes 1/1, 2/2, and 1/2 were expressed by 60, 28, and two patients (67, 32, and 3%), respectively. The 
PRU of the female patients was significantly higher than that of the male patients was (255.6 ± 68.8 and 177.7 ± 66.6, 
p = 0.000, respectively). There was no significant difference in PRUs (193 ± 79 and 212 ±55.4, respectively, p = 0.349), nor inhibition (17.9 ± 18.80 and 13.88 ± 11.5, p = 0.135) in wild and resistant variants, respectively. We only reported one cardiac in-thrombosis events. Conclusion: Genotype differences may not explain variations in the PRU of patients during short-term in-hospital stays. Although it is difficult to confirm, 117–267 units may be a safe PRU range for such patients, with emphasis on attaining higher PRU values in females.

  16. Evaluating structural deterioration of ceramic candle filters using dynamic response

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.H.L.; Parthasarathy, B.

    1996-12-31

    Ceramic candle filters used in the recent demonstration plant have experienced degradation and fracturing. Preliminary examination of these ceramic filters indicated that damage of the filters may have resulted from strength degradation. This study proposes a nondestructive evaluation of the structural properties of the ceramic candle filters. A virgin Refraction filter and twelve Schumacher filters which were previously tested under high pressure and high temperature at the demonstration power plant were evaluated. The vibration signatures of the ceramic filters at different degradation levels are established using transient impact response technique. Results from this study indicate that the natural frequencies of the filters can be used as an index to quantify the damage condition of the filters. The results of this study also indicate the feasibility of using the vibration mode shapes to predict the damage location of the filters.

  17. Stress induced hypertensive response: should it be evaluated more carefully?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Various diagnostic methods have been used to evaluate hypertensive patients under physical and pharmacological stress. Several studies have shown that exercise hypertension has an independent, adverse impact on outcome; however, other prognostic studies have shown that exercise hypertension is a favorable prognostic indicator and associated with good outcome. Exercise hypertension may be encountered as a warning signal of hypertension at rest and future hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy. The results of diagnostic stress tests support that hypertensive response to exercise is frequently associated with high rate-pressure product in hypertensives. In addition to the observations on high rate-pressure product and enhanced ventricular contractility in patients with hypertension, evaluation of myocardial contractility by Doppler tissue imaging has shown hyperdynamic myocardial function under pharmacological stress. These recent quantitative data in hypertensives suggest that hyperdynamic myocardial function and high rate-pressure product response to stress may be related to exaggerated hypertension, which may have more importance than that it has been already given in clinical practice. PMID:21846346

  18. Development and validation of a liquid chromatographic method for purity control of clopidogrel-acetylsalicylic acid in combined oral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Kahsay, Getu; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2012-03-01

    A reversed phase liquid chromatographic method with UV detection for the simultaneous determination of clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid and their related substances in combined oral formulations was developed and validated. Good separation was achieved on a Luna C18 column (150 mm × 4.6 mm, 3 μm) using gradient elution at a flow rate of 1 mL/min and a column temperature of 35 °C. UV detection was performed at 220 nm. The validation was performed according to the ICH guidelines. The method proved to be specific, sensitive (LOQ=0.975 μg/mL and 0.0384 μg/mL for clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid, respectively), linear in the concentration range from LOQ to 325 μg/mL for clopidogrel and from LOQ to 650 μg/mL for acetylsalicylic acid, precise (RSD values for intermediate precision <1%) and accurate with mean recovery values of 100.7% and 100.2% for clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid, respectively. Moreover, the solution stability and method robustness were examined. The method gives satisfactory separation of impurities of clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid and so it is suitable for quantification of the related substances as well as for the assay of the actives. PMID:22226416

  19. CYP2C19 loss-of-function alleles are not associated with clinical outcome of clopidogrel therapy in patients treated with newer-generation drug-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ik Jun; Koh, Yoon-Seok; Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung Ho; Choi, Yun-Seok; Park, Chul-Soo; Park, Hun-Jun; Kim, Pum-Joon; Chung, Wook-Sung; Kim, Ho-Sook; Shin, Jae-Gook; Seung, Ki-Bae; Chang, Kiyuk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract CYP2C19 loss-of-function (LOF) alleles adversely affect clinical outcome of clopidogrel therapy. Recent introduction of a newer-generation drug-eluting stent (DES) has significantly reduced the occurrence of stent thrombosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of CYP2C19 LOF alleles on clinical outcome in patients treated with the newer-generation DES. The effects of CYP2C19 genotypes were evaluated on clinical outcome of clopidogrel therapy in 2062 patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention using either first-generation DES (sirolimus- and paclitaxel-eluting stent, n = 1349) or newer-generation DES (everolimus- and zotarolimus-eluting stent, n = 713). The primary clinical outcome was major cardiac and cerebrovascular event (MACCE) including cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, and stent thrombosis during 1 year of follow-up. CYP2C19 LOF alleles were significantly associated with a higher risk of MACCE in patients treated with first-generation DES (hazard ratio [HR] 2.599, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.047–6.453; P = 0.034). In contrast, CYP2C19 LOF alleles were not associated with primary outcome in newer-generation DES (HR 0.716, 95% CI 0.316–1.622; P = 0.522). In the further multivariate analysis, CYP2C19 LOF alleles were not associated with MACCE in patients receiving newer-generation DES (adjusted HR 0.540, 95% CI 0.226–1.291; P = 0.166), whereas they were demonstrated to be an independent risk factor for MACCE in those implanted with first-generation DES (adjusted HR 3.501, 95% CI 1.194–10.262; P = 0.022). In contradiction to their clinical impact in first-generation DES era, CYP2C19 LOF alleles may not affect clinical outcome of clopidogrel therapy in patients treated with newer-generation DES. PMID:27368038

  20. Treatment Response Evaluation and Follow-up in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Anil; Kumar, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of morbidity, mortality and healthcare expenditure in patients with chronic liver disease. The management of HCC is evolving because of recently introduced novel therapeutic approaches. Optimal outcome requires an early and accurate assessment of tumor response to therapy. Current imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; provide reliable and reproducible anatomical data in order to demonstrate tumor burden changes. However, in the setting of novel targeted therapies and liver directed treatments, simple tumor anatomical changes can be less informative and usually appear later than biological changes. There has been a growing interest to monitor the therapeutic response, at an early phase of treatment, by measuring tumor viability and/or perfusion. Therefore the importance of tumor viability assessment is increasingly being recognized. The tumor viability measurement guidelines have recently been amended to include the measurement of only the longest diameter of the enhancing tumors to formally amend RECIST to modified RECIST (mRECIST). Viable tumor should be defined as uptake of contrast agent in the arterial phase. In this review, we discuss criteria of response evaluation in HCC and further follow-up of patients receiving curative and palliative treatment. PMID:25755604

  1. Critical Evaluation of Ayurvedic Plants for Stimulating Intrinsic Antioxidant Response

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Sunil Dutt; Bhatnagar, Maheep; Khurana, Sukant

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative damage caused by free radicals plays an important role in the causation and progression of many diseases, including aging. Free-radical damage is countered by many mechanisms, including both active antioxidant enzymatic activity in our body and passive antioxidants. Antioxidant response of our body can accommodate increased oxidative damage in diseased states to a level but beyond that level, additional antioxidants are required to combat the increased stress. Apart from the regular dietary sources of antioxidants, many traditional herbal medicines demonstrate a potential to boost antioxidant activity. Rasayana chikitsa that deals with rejuvenation and revitalization is a branch of the Indian traditional medical system of ayurveda. We review some select herbs described in rasayana chikitsa that have been assessed by modern means for stimulating intrinsic antioxidant responses in humans. A critical evaluation of rasayana chikitsa will likely provide urgently needed, actual stimulants of our physiological antioxidant responses and not just more passive antioxidants to add to an already large catalog. PMID:22855669

  2. Visualization and quantification of deformation behavior of clopidogrel bisulfate polymorphs during tableting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xian-Zhen; Wu, Li; Li, Ying; Guo, Tao; Li, Hai-Yan; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; York, Peter; Nangia, Ashwini; Gui, Shuang-Ying; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2016-02-01

    The deformation behavior of particles under pressure dominates the mechanical properties of solid dosage forms. In this study, the in situ 3D deformation of two polymorphs (I and II) of clopidogrel bisulfate (CLP) was determined to illustrate pressure distribution profiles within the tablet by the deformation of the crystalline particles for the first time. Synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-μCT) was utilized to visualize and quantify the morphology of thousands crystalline particles of CLP I and CLP II before and after compression. As a result, the deformation was examined across scale dimensions from microns to the size of the final dosage form. Three dimensional parameters such as volume, sphericity, oblate and prolate of individual particle and distributions were computed and analyzed for quantitative comparison to CLP I and CLP II. The different degrees of deformation under the same compression conditions of CLP I and CLP II were observed and characterized quantitatively. The map of deformation degrees within the tablet illustrated the heterogeneous pressure distribution in various regions of the compacted tablet. In conclusion, the polymorph deformation behaviors demonstrated by SR-μCT quantitative structure analysis deepen understanding of tableting across dimensions from microns to millimeters for the macrostrcuture of tablet.

  3. Visualization and quantification of deformation behavior of clopidogrel bisulfate polymorphs during tableting

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xian-Zhen; Wu, Li; Li, Ying; Guo, Tao; Li, Hai-Yan; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; York, Peter; Nangia, Ashwini; Gui, Shuang-Ying; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The deformation behavior of particles under pressure dominates the mechanical properties of solid dosage forms. In this study, the in situ 3D deformation of two polymorphs (I and II) of clopidogrel bisulfate (CLP) was determined to illustrate pressure distribution profiles within the tablet by the deformation of the crystalline particles for the first time. Synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-μCT) was utilized to visualize and quantify the morphology of thousands crystalline particles of CLP I and CLP II before and after compression. As a result, the deformation was examined across scale dimensions from microns to the size of the final dosage form. Three dimensional parameters such as volume, sphericity, oblate and prolate of individual particle and distributions were computed and analyzed for quantitative comparison to CLP I and CLP II. The different degrees of deformation under the same compression conditions of CLP I and CLP II were observed and characterized quantitatively. The map of deformation degrees within the tablet illustrated the heterogeneous pressure distribution in various regions of the compacted tablet. In conclusion, the polymorph deformation behaviors demonstrated by SR-μCT quantitative structure analysis deepen understanding of tableting across dimensions from microns to millimeters for the macrostrcuture of tablet. PMID:26911359

  4. Impact of cytochrome P450 2C19*2 polymorphism on intra-stent thrombus assessed by follow-up optical coherence tomography in Chinese patients receiving clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Shi, Yang; Wang, Haijun; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C19*2 polymorphism is associated with poor responsiveness to clopidogrel in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Despite high frequency of this genetic variant in Chinese patients, its contribution to intra-stent thrombi assessed by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) remains unclear. A total of 198 patients who underwent follow-up OCT and simultaneous testing of CYP2C19 genotype by TaqMan assay and P2Y12 reaction unit (PRU) by VerifyNow P2Y12 assay were selected for the study. The patients were divided into three groups: non-carriers (*1/*1), carriers with one CYP2C19*2 allele (*1/*2), carriers with two CYP2C19*2 alleles (*2/*2). OCT data and MACE were compared among the three groups. The mean follow-up interval from coronary stent implantation to OCT was 360 ± 42 days, intra-stent thrombi were detected in 50 (25.2 %) patients (16.1 % for *1/*1, 27.8 % for *1/*2 and 43.8 % for *2/*2 carriers, p = 0.007). There were significantly increased PRU values among *1/*1, *1/*2 and *2/*2 carriers (200.4 ± 36.4 vs. 216.7 ± 44.6 vs. 242.8 ± 42.4, p < 0.001), as well as markedly decreased P2Y12 percent inhibition (38.6 ± 12.6 vs. 31.3 ± 13.1 vs. 23.8 ± 9.8 %, p < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of CYP2C19 *2/*2 was the only independent predictor for intra-stent thrombi on OCT (OR: 3.488, 95 % CI: 1.992-9.046; p = 0.001), although both *1/*2 and *2/*2 were independent predictors for high on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity. CYP2C19*2/*2 homozygous status is associated with subclinical intra-stent thrombi in clopidogrel-treated Chinese patients. PMID:25800884

  5. Fear of negative evaluation modulates electrocortical and behavioral responses when anticipating social evaluative feedback

    PubMed Central

    Van der Molen, Melle J. W.; Poppelaars, Eefje S.; Van Hartingsveldt, Caroline T. A.; Harrewijn, Anita; Gunther Moor, Bregtje; Westenberg, P. Michiel

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive models posit that the fear of negative evaluation (FNE) is a hallmark feature of social anxiety. As such, individuals with high FNE may show biased information processing when faced with social evaluation. The aim of the current study was to examine the neural underpinnings of anticipating and processing social-evaluative feedback, and its correlates with FNE. We used a social judgment paradigm in which female participants (N = 31) were asked to indicate whether they believed to be socially accepted or rejected by their peers. Anticipatory attention was indexed by the stimulus preceding negativity (SPN), while the feedback-related negativity and P3 were used to index the processing of social-evaluative feedback. Results provided evidence of an optimism bias in social peer evaluation, as participants more often predicted to be socially accepted than rejected. Participants with high levels of FNE needed more time to provide their judgments about the social-evaluative outcome. While anticipating social-evaluative feedback, SPN amplitudes were larger for anticipated social acceptance than for social rejection feedback. Interestingly, the SPN during anticipated social acceptance was larger in participants with high levels of FNE. None of the feedback-related brain potentials correlated with the FNE. Together, the results provided evidence of biased information processing in individuals with high levels of FNE when anticipating (rather than processing) social-evaluative feedback. The delayed response times in high FNE individuals were interpreted to reflect augmented vigilance imposed by the upcoming social-evaluative threat. Possibly, the SPN constitutes a neural marker of this vigilance in females with higher FNE levels, particularly when anticipating social acceptance feedback. PMID:24478667

  6. Blue gum gaming machine: an evaluation of responsible gambling features.

    PubMed

    Blaszczynski, Alexander; Gainsbury, Sally; Karlov, Lisa

    2014-09-01

    Structural characteristics of gaming machines contribute to persistence in play and excessive losses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of five proposed responsible gaming features: responsible gaming messages; a bank meter quarantining winnings until termination of play; alarm clock facilitating setting time-reminders; demo mode allowing play without money; and a charity donation feature where residual amounts can be donated rather than played to zero credits. A series of ten modified gaming machines were located in five Australian gambling venues. The sample comprised 300 patrons attending the venue and who played the gaming machines. Participants completed a structured interview eliciting gambling and socio-demographic data and information on their perceptions and experience of play on the index machines. Results showed that one-quarter of participants considered that these features would contribute to preventing recreational gamblers from developing problems. Just under half of the participants rated these effects to be at least moderate or significant. The promising results suggest that further refinements to several of these features could represent a modest but effective approach to minimising excessive gambling on gaming machines. PMID:23519553

  7. Psychometric evaluation and refinement of the Pain Response Preference Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Lachlan A; Kowal, John; Sharpe, Donald; Dick, Bruce D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Pain Response Preference Questionnaire (PRPQ) assesses preferences regarding pain-related social support. The initial factor analytical study of the PRPQ produced four empirically supported scales labelled Solicitude, Management, Encouragement and Suppression. A second study produced similar findings, but suggested that the Management and Encouragement scales be combined into a single scale labelled Activity Direction. OBJECTIVES: To use factor analytical methods to evaluate these competing configurations of the PRPQ (ie, three versus four scales) and to further refine the measure. The ability of the PRPQ scales to account for pain severity and disability ratings was also evaluated. METHODS: Chronic pain patients (n=201) completed the PRPQ along with the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and self-reports of pain severity and disability. RESULTS: Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that both models tested provided a poor fit to the data. A follow-up exploratory factor analysis was used to further refine the PRPQ scales and resulted in scales labelled Solicitude, Encouragement and Suppression. Supportive of the potential clinical utility of the PRPQ, Suppression was positively associated with pain severity and Solicitude was positively associated with disability. These two scales were also positively associated with the PCS. Supportive of the incremental validity of the PRPQ, a multiple regression analysis indicated that the Solicitude scale accounted for unique variance in disability ratings beyond that accounted for by demographic/clinical variables and the PCS. CONCLUSIONS: The PRPQ has promise as a clinical assessment measure and for advancing research examining the interpersonal context of pain. PMID:24205508

  8. Cost-effectiveness of ticagrelor versus clopidogrel for the prevention of atherothrombotic events in adult patients with acute coronary syndrome in Germany.

    PubMed

    Theidel, Ulrike; Asseburg, Christian; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Katus, Hugo

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this health economic analysis was to compare the cost-effectiveness of ticagrelor versus clopidogrel within the German health care system. A two-part decision model was adapted to compare treatment with ticagrelor or clopidogrel in a low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) cohort (≤150 mg) for all ACS patients and subtypes NSTEMI/IA and STEMI. A decision-tree approach was chosen for the first year after initial hospitalization based on trial observations from a subgroup of the PLATO study. Subsequent years were estimated by a Markov model. Following a macro-costing approach, costs were based on official tariffs and published literature. Extensive sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the model. One-year treatment with ticagrelor is associated with an estimated 0.1796 life-years gained (LYG) and gained 0.1570 quality-adjusted life-years (QALY), respectively, over the lifetime horizon. Overall average cost with ticagrelor is estimated to be EUR 11,815 vs. EUR 11,387 with generic clopidogrel over a lifetime horizon. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was EUR 2,385 per LYG (EUR 2,728 per QALY). Comparing ticagrelor with Plavix(®) or the lowest priced generic clopidogrel, ICER ranges from dominant to EUR 3,118 per LYG (EUR 3,567 per QALY). These findings are robust under various additional sensitivity analyses. Hence, 12 months of ACS treatment using ticagrelor/ASA instead of clopidogrel/ASA may offer a cost-effective therapeutic option, even when the generic price for clopidogrel is employed. PMID:23474908

  9. Ticagrelor vs clopidogrel followed by ticagrelor re-loading in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention: A randomized, pharmacodynamic comparison.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Kontoprias, Kosmas; Gkizas, Vasileios; Karanikas, Stavros; Ziakas, Antonios; Barampoutis, Nikolaos; Tsigkas, Grigorios; Koutsogiannis, Nikolaos; Davlouros, Periklis; Patsilinakos, Sotirios; Karvounis, Haralambos; Hahalis, George; Xanthopoulou, Ioanna

    2016-07-01

    Among patients allocated to ticagrelor in the primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) cohort of Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes (PLATO) trial, 40.7% had received pre-randomization 600 mg of clopidogrel. This scenario is frequently employed in real-world practice. In a prospective, three-center, single-blind, parallel design study, 74 P2Y12 inhibitor-naive patients undergoing primary PCI were randomized (Hour 0) to ticagrelor 180 mg loading dose (LD) vs clopidogrel 600 mg LD followed after 2 h by ticagrelor 180 mg re-LD. Platelet reactivity (VerifyNow, in PRU) was assessed at Hour 0, 2, 4, 6, and 24. The primary comparison was non-inferiority of ticagrelor to clopidogrel followed by ticagrelor re-LD regarding platelet reactivity at 24 h using a prespecified margin of <35 PRU for the upper bound of the one-sided 97.5% confidence interval (CI). Ticagrelor was proven non-inferior to clopidogrel followed by ticagrelor re-LD with a difference between arms of 13.5 PRU (28.8 upper 97.5% CI), p = 0.001. At Hour 2, platelet reactivity was lower in ticagrelor only vs clopidogrel followed by ticagrelor re-LD groups with least square estimate mean difference (95% CI) -105.7 (-140.6 to -70.8), p < 0.001, without significant difference thereafter. In conclusion, in patients undergoing primary PCI, a strategy of ticagrelor LD only was proven non-inferior to clopidogrel LD followed by ticagrelor re-LD, in terms of antiplatelet efficacy at 24 h post-randomization and provided an earlier onset of platelet inhibition. PMID:26763727

  10. Prasugrel Results in Higher Decrease in High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Level in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Comparing to Clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Chitsazan, Mandana; Chitsazan, Mitra; Salehi, Negar; Amin, Ahmad; Bidokhti, Arash Amin; Babaali, Nima; Bordbar, Armin; Hejrati, Maral; Moghadami, Samar

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES A growing body of clinical and laboratory evidence indicates that inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis. In the present study, we compared the effects of clopidogrel and prasugrel on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). METHODS The present randomized, double-blind clinical trial included 120 patients who underwent PCI. Eligible patients were randomly assigned 2:1 to one of the two groups: 80 patients in the first group received clopidogrel (Plavix®; loading dose and maintenance dose of 300 and 75 mg daily, respectively) and 40 patients in the second group received prasugrel (Effient®; loading dose and maintenance dose of 60 and 10 mg, respectively) for 12 weeks. The hs-CRP levels between baseline and 12th week were compared. RESULTS Of the 120 patients, 69 patients (57.5%) were male. Pretreatment hs-CRP level was statistically comparable in clopidogrel (median, 15.10 mg/dL; interquartile range [IQR], 9.62–23.75 mg/dL) and prasugrel groups (median, 18 mg/dL; IQR, 14.25–22 mg/dL; P = 0.06). Patients taking clopidogrel showed a significant reduction in hs-CRP level compared with the baseline values (P < 0.001). Prasugrel administration also resulted in a significant reduction in hs-CRP level (P < 0.001). A significant 73% overall reduction in the hs-CRP level was seen with prasugrel compared with 39% overall reduction in hs-CRP level with clopidogrel (P = 0.002). CONCLUSION Prasugrel seems to be superior to clopidogrel in the reduction of hs-CRP in patients undergoing PCI. PMID:27597810