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Sample records for close spaced sublimation

  1. Possibility of graphene growth by close space sublimation.

    PubMed

    Sopinskyy, Mykola V; Khomchenko, Viktoriya S; Strelchuk, Viktor V; Nikolenko, Andrii S; Olchovyk, Genadiy P; Vishnyak, Volodymyr V; Stonis, Viktor V

    2014-01-01

    Carbon films on the Si/SiO2 substrate are fabricated using modified method of close space sublimation at atmospheric pressure. The film properties have been characterized by micro-Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and monochromatic ellipsometry methods. Ellipsometrical measurements demonstrated an increase of the silicon oxide film thickness in the course of manufacturing process. The XPS survey spectra of the as-prepared samples indicate that the main elements in the near-surface region are carbon, silicon, and oxygen. The narrow-scan spectra of C1s, Si2p, O1s regions indicate that silicon and oxygen are mainly in the SiOx (x ≈ 2) oxide form, whereas the main component of C1s spectrum at 284.4 eV comes from the sp2-hybridized carbon phase. Micro-Raman spectra confirmed the formation of graphene films with the number of layers that depended on the distance between the graphite source and substrate. PMID:24731549

  2. Induced Recrystallization of CdTe Thin Films Deposited by Close-Spaced Sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Levi, D. H.; Kazmerski, L. L.; Mayo, B.

    1998-10-29

    We have deposited CdTe thin films by close-spaced sublimation at two different temperature ranges. The films deposited at the lower temperature partially recrystallized after CdCl{sub 2} treatment at 350 C and completely recrystallized after the same treatment at 400 C. The films deposited at higher temperature did not recrystallize at these two temperatures. These results confirmed that the mechanisms responsible for changes in physical properties of CdTe films treated with CdCl{sub 2} are recrystallization and grain growth, and provided an alternative method to deposit CSS films using lower temperatures.

  3. Induced Recrystallization of CdTe Thin Films Deposited by Close-Spaced Sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Levi, D. H.; Kazmerski, L. L.; Mayo, B.

    1998-10-26

    We have deposited CdTe thin films by close-spaced sublimation at two different temperature ranges. The films deposited at the lower temperature partially recrystallized after CdCl2 treatment at 350 C and completely recrystallized after the same treatment at 400 C. The films deposited at higher temperature did not recrystallize at these two temperatures. These results confirmed that the mechanisms responsible for changes in physical properties of CdTe films treated with CdCl2 are recrystallization and grain growth, and provided an alternative method to deposit CSS films using lower temperatures.

  4. Time-resolved photoluminescence of polycrystalline CdTe grown by close-spaced sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B.; Dhere, R.; Ramanathan, K. )

    1994-06-30

    Polycrystalline CdTe has shown great promise as a low-cost material for thin-film, terrestrial photovoltaic applications, with efficiencies approaching 16% achieved with close-spaced sublimation (CSS)-grown CdTe. Due to the inherent complexities of polycrystalline material, much of the progress in this area has occurred through a slow trial-and-error process. This report uses time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) to characterize the CdTe material quality as a function of one basic growth parameter---substrate temperature. This characterization is done for two different glass substrate materials, soda-lime silicate and borosilicate.

  5. Growth of CdTe thin films on graphene by close-spaced sublimation method

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Younghun; Yang, Gwangseok; Kim, Jihyun; Chun, Seungju; Kim, Donghwan

    2013-12-02

    CdTe thin films grown on bi-layer graphene were demonstrated by using the close-spaced sublimation method, where CdTe was selectively grown on the graphene. The density of the CdTe domains was increased with increasing the number of the defective sites in the graphene, which was controlled by the duration of UV exposure. The CdTe growth rate on the bi-layer graphene electrodes was 400 nm/min with a bandgap energy of 1.45–1.49 eV. Scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, micro-photoluminescence, and X-ray diffraction technique were used to confirm the high quality of the CdTe thin films grown on the graphene electrodes.

  6. Induced recrystallization of CdTe thin films deposited by close-spaced sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H.R.; Dhere, R.G.; Al-Jassim, M.M.; Levi, D.H.; Kazmerski, L.L.; Mayo, B.

    1999-03-01

    We have deposited CdTe thin films by close-spaced sublimation at two different temperature ranges. The films deposited at the lower temperature partially recrystallized after CdCl{sub 2} treatment at 350&hthinsp;{degree}C and completely recrystallized after the same treatment at 400&hthinsp;{degree}C. The films deposited at higher temperature did not recrystallize at these two temperatures. These results confirmed that the mechanisms responsible for changes in physical properties of CdTe films treated with CdCl{sub 2} are recrystallization and grain growth, and provided an alternative method to deposit CSS films using lower temperatures. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Native Defect Control of CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells by Close-Spaced Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Tamotsu; Kitamoto, Shinji; Yamada, Akira; Konagai, Makoto

    2001-05-01

    The control of native defects in the CdTe thin film solar cells was investigated using a novel source for close-spaced sublimation (CSS) process which was prepared by vacuum evaporation with elemental Cd and Te (evaporated source). The evaporated sources were prepared on glass substrates at room temperature, and the Cd/Te ratio was controlled by varying the Cd and Te beam equivalent pressures. In the cells using the Te-rich source, the conversion efficiency was less than 0.2% because of the extremely low shunt resistance. On the other hand, a conversion efficiency above 15% was obtained by using the Cd-rich source. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics revealed that the acceptor concentration in the CdTe layer increased with increasing Cd/Te ratio of the evaporated source. Furthermore, photoluminescence spectra implied that the formation of the Cd vacancies in the CdTe layer was suppressed using the Cd-rich source.

  8. CdZnS thin films sublimated by closed space using mechanical mixing: A new approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Waqar; Shah, Nazar Abbas

    2014-06-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) is a prominent material for its tunable band gap used as a window layer in II-VI semiconductor solar cells. The light trapping capability of window layer is one of the powerful tools to enhance the efficiency of the cell. CdS and zinc (Zn) powders were mixed mechanically with different weight percents to make CdZnS (CZS) powder. CZS was deposited onto an ultrasonically cleaned glass substrate using close spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. CZS as-deposited thin films were characterized for structural, surface morphology with energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) and optical properties for the use of window layer in CdS/CdTe based solar cells. The different Zn concentrations in CZS played a vital role on crystallite size in structural analysis and optical properties e.g. transmission, absorption coefficient and energy band gap, etc. The crystallite size of as-deposited CZS thin films were increased as Zn concentration was increased up to certain value. The energy band gap varies from 2.42 eV to 2.57 eV for as-deposited CZS thin films with increasing Zn concentrations and surface morphology changes also. These changes were occurred due to zinc diffusion in CdS thin films. An angle resolved transmission data was taken to check the behavior of CdS and CZS thin film at different angles. A comparative study was carried out between CdS thin films and CZS thin films for the use of good window layer material.

  9. Selective Growth of CdTe on Nano-patterned CdS via Close-Space Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Brandon A.; Zubia, David; Ordonez, Rafael; Anwar, Farhana; Prieto, Heber; Sanchez, Carlos A.; Salazar, Maria T.; Pimentel, Alejandro. A.; Michael, Joseph R.; Zhou, Xiaowang; Mcclure, John C.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Cruz-Campa, Jose L.

    2014-07-01

    Selective-area deposition of CdTe on CdS via close-space sublimation is used to study the effect of window size (2 μm and 300 nm) on grain growth. The basic fabrication procedures for each of the layers (CdS, SiO2, and CdTe) and for achieving selective-area growth are presented. Selective-area growth of both micro- and nano-scale CdTe islands on CdS substrates using close-spaced sublimation is demonstrated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction microstructure analysis show that the micro-scale CdTe islands remain polycrystalline. However, when the island size is reduced to 300 nm, single crystal CdTe can be achieved within the windows. The CdTe grains were most often in the (101) orientation for both the micro- and nano-sized CdTe islands.

  10. The role of oxygen in CdS/CdTe solar cells deposited by close-spaced sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D.H.; Levi, D.H.; Matson, R.J.

    1996-05-01

    The presence of oxygen during close-spaced sublimation (CSS) of CdTe has been previously reported to be essential for high-efficiency CdS/CdTe solar cells because it increases the acceptor density in the absorber. The authors find that the presence of oxygen during CSS increases the nucleation site density of CdTe, thus decreasing pinhole density and grain size. Photoluminescence showed that oxygen decreases material quality in the bulk of the CdTe film, but positively impacts the critical CdS/CdTe interface. Through device characterization the authors were unable to verify an increase in acceptor density with increased oxygen. These results, along with the achievement of high-efficiency cells (13% AM1.5) without the use of oxygen, led the authors to conclude that the use of oxygen during CSS deposition of CdTe can be useful but is not essential.

  11. Epitaxial Growth of High-Resistivity CdTe Thick Films Grown Using a Modified Close Space Sublimation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Quanzhong; Brinkman, Andy W.; Veeramani, Perumal; Sellin, Paul. J.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports the growth of high-resistivity CdTe thick epitaxial films of single crystal nature using a modified close space sublimation method (MCSS) in a Te-rich environment. We propose that the high Te2 partial pressure results in an increased concentration of TeCd antisites acting as deep donors to produce the high-resistivity CdTe, as well as improved quality of thick films. This is in agreement with the deep-donor model introduced by Fiderele et al. [Cryst. Res. Technol. 38 (2003) 588]. The thick films have a µeτe value in the order 10-4 cm2 V-1 and as expected, the TeCd antisites appeared not to act as electron traps.

  12. Characterization of CdMnTe films deposited from polycrystalline powder source using closed-space sublimation method

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Jianming; Wang, Junnan; Wang, Lin; Ji, Huanhuan; Xu, Run; Zhang, Jijun; Huang, Jian; Shen, Yue; Min, Jiahua; Wang, Linjun Xia, Yiben

    2015-09-15

    CdMnTe films were prepared on quartz substrates by closed-space sublimation of polycrystalline Cd{sub 0.74}Mn{sub 0.26}Te powders. This was performed at different substrate temperatures (T{sub s} = 200, 300, 350, and 400 °C). The interfacial adhesion strength between the films and substrates, when fabricated from polycrystalline powders, was greater than that of films grown using a bulk source. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the as-deposited films had a zinc blende structure with a preferential (111) orientation. Precipitation of Te occurred in the films deposited at T{sub s} = 200 °C, as confirmed using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. The growth mode and re-evaporation dependence on the value of T{sub s} of the films were investigated. Our results suggested that materials suitable for radiation detection can be grown from a powder source at lower substrate temperatures then when grown from a bulk source.

  13. Optical and electrical characterizations of highly efficient CdTe thin film solar cells prepared by close-spaced sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, T.; Yamada, A.; Konagai, M.

    2000-06-01

    The effects of the Cu diffusion on the optical and electrical properties of CdTe thin film solar cells prepared by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) were investigated by capacitance-voltage ( C- V) measurement and low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement. C- V measurement revealed that the net acceptor concentration in the CdTe layer was independent of the heat treatment after screen printing of the Cu-doped graphite electrode for Cu diffusion into the CdTe layer, although it greatly affected the solar cell performance. Furthermore, the depth profile of PL spectrum of CdTe layer implies that the heat treatment for Cu diffusion facilitates the formation of low-resistance contact to CdTe through the formation of a heavily doped (p +) region in the CdTe adjacent to the back electrode, but Cu atoms do not act as effective acceptors in the CdTe layer except the region near the back electrode.

  14. Cadmium sulfide thin films deposited by close spaced sublimation and cadmium sulfide/cadmium telluride solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinskiy, Dmitriy Nikolaevich

    1998-12-01

    One of the applications of CdS films is as a window layer in CdTe and Cu(In,Ga)Sesb2 solar cells. The study of the optical and structural properties of CdS films deposited by close spaced sublimation as well as their influence on CdS/CdTe solar cell performance is part of the CdTe solar cell program at the University of South Florida. CdS films have been deposited by the close-spaced sublimation technique. The influence of the main process parameters, the substrate and source temperatures, and the ambient in the deposition chamber has been investigated. As-deposited films have been subjected to heat treatments in Hsb2 ambient, in CdClsb2 atmosphere, and in atmosphere with small amounts of oxygen. A special annealing chamber was built to carry out the annealing experiments in the presence of CdClsb2 vapor and oxygen. Several CSS chambers were assembled to study the influence of various process parameters simultaneously and validate the results. Results of scanning electron microscopy and photoluminescence measurements have been used as the primary characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, and transmission measurements have also been carried out. It was found that as deposited CdS films have a hexagonal structure independent of the process parameters used. The presence of a CdO phase was detected in the samples grown with the highest oxygen concentration in the ambient. The resistivity of CdS films is controlled by intergrain barriers. Photoluminescence measurements showed the presence of oxygen-acceptor transition and a wide variation in the intensity of deep emission bands. The variation in the intensities was correlated with the variation in the deposition and annealing conditions. However, no correlation was found between the PL intensities of defect bands and cell performance. CdS/CdTe junctions have been fabricated using standard deposition and postgrowth techniques developed in the USF solar cells laboratory. All cells have

  15. Enhanced performance of CdS/CdTe thin-film devices through temperature profiling techniques applied to close-spaced sublimation deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaonan Li; Sheldon, P.; Moutinho, H.; Matson, R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe a methodology developed and applied to the close-spaced sublimation technique for thin-film CdTe deposition. The developed temperature profiles consisted of three discrete temperature segments, which the authors called the nucleation, plugging, and annealing temperatures. They have demonstrated that these temperature profiles can be used to grow large-grain material, plug pinholes, and improve CdS/CdTe photovoltaic device performance by about 15%. The improved material and device properties have been obtained while maintaining deposition temperatures compatible with commercially available substrates. This temperature profiling technique can be easily applied to a manufacturing environment by adjusting the temperature as a function of substrate position instead of time.

  16. Investigation of induced recrystallization and stress in close-spaced sublimated and radio-frequency magnetron sputtered CdTe thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H.R.; Dhere, R.G.; Al-Jassim, M.M.; Levi, D.H.; Kazmerski, L.L.

    1999-07-01

    We have induced recrystallization of small grain CdTe thin films deposited at low temperatures by close-spaced sublimation (CSS), using a standard CdCl{sub 2} annealing treatment. We also studied the changes in the physical properties of CdTe films deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering after the same post-deposition processing. We demonstrated that the effects of CdCl{sub 2} on the physical properties of CdTe films are similar, and independent of the deposition method. The recrystallization process is linked directly to the grain size and stress in the films. These studies indicated the feasibility of using lower-temperature processes in fabricating efficient CSS CdTe solar cells. We believe that, after the optimization of the parameters of the chemical treatment, these films can attain a quality similar to CSS films grown using current standard conditions. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  17. Influence of substrate temperature on structural and optical properties of bismuth oxide thin films deposited by close-spaced vacuum sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, M. M.; Buryk, I. P.; Latyshev, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. O.; Levchenko, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bi2O3 thin films were deposited on ultrasonically-cleaned glass and mica substrates by close-spaced vacuum sublimation technique. Films surface morphology was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Structural study based on the transmission-electron microscopy (TEM) and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) analysis has been shown that deposited films were polycrystalline with face-centered cubic structure. Optical study was carried out by spectral photometry analysis in the wavelengths range λ = 320-900 nm using the optical transmittance and absorbance measurements. For determination optical band gap Eg the Tauc plot was used and the band gap energy Eg is determined in the range of 3.50-3.62 eV, respectively. Fourier-transform infra-red (FTIR) analysis shown that obtained films are well-crystalline and have a good optical quality.

  18. A close-space sublimation driven pathway for the manipulation of substrate-supported micro- and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Aarthi

    gold beneath the grid selectively attaches to it due to the surface energy gradient which drives gold from the low surface energy oxide surface to the higher surface energy nickel mesh. With this process being confined to areas adjacent to and in contact with the grid surface the film ruptures at well-defined locations to form isolated islands of gold and subsequently, a periodic array of microstructures. The process can be carried out on substrates of different crystallographic orientations leading to nanostructures which are formed epitaxially and have orientations based on underlying substrate orientations. The process can be extended by placing a metallic foil of Pt or Ni over preformed templates, in which case a reduction in the size of the initial structures is observed. Placing a foil on structures with random placement and a wide size distribution results, not only in a size reduction, but also a narrowed size distribution. Additive processes are carried out by using materials which possess high vapor pressures much below the sublimation temperature of the template materials. In this case a germanium substrate was used as a source of germanium adatoms while gold or silver nanostructures were used as heterogeneous nucleation sites. At elevated temperatures the adatoms collect in sufficient quantities to transform each site into a liquid alloy which, upon cooling, phase separates into elemental components sharing a common interface and, hence, resulting in the formation of heterodimers and hollowed metal nanocrescents upon etching away the Ge. A process which combined aspects of the additive and subtractive process was carried out by using a metallic foil with a high vapor pressure and higher surface energy than the substrate surface (in this case Pd foil). This process resulted in the initial preformed gold templates being annihilated and replaced by nanostructures of palladium, thereby altering their chemical composition. The assembly process relies on the

  19. Structural and optical properties of AgAlTe{sub 2} layers grown on sapphire substrates by closed space sublimation method

    SciTech Connect

    Uruno, A. Usui, A.; Kobayashi, M.

    2014-11-14

    AgAlTe{sub 2} layers were grown on a- and c-plane sapphire substrates using a closed space sublimation method. Grown layers were confirmed to be single phase layers of AgAlTe{sub 2} by X-ray diffraction. AgAlTe{sub 2} layers were grown to have a strong preference for the (112) orientation on both kinds of substrates. The variation in the orientation of grown layers was analyzed in detail using the X-ray diffraction pole figure measurement, which revealed that the AgAlTe{sub 2} had a preferential epitaxial relationship with the c-plane sapphire substrate. The atomic arrangement between the (112) AgAlTe{sub 2} layer and sapphire substrates was compared. It was considered that the high order of the lattice arrangement symmetry probably effectively accommodated the lattice mismatch. The optical properties of the grown layer were also evaluated by transmittance measurements. The bandgap energy was found to be around 2.3 eV, which was in agreement with the theoretical bandgap energy of AgAlTe{sub 2}.

  20. [Spectral analyzing effects of atmosphere states on the structure and characteristics of CdTe polycrystalline thin films made by close-spaced sublimation].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hua-jing; Zheng, Jia-gui; Feng, Liang-huan; Zhang, Jing-quan; Xie, Er-qing

    2005-07-01

    The structure and characteristics of CdTe thin films are dependent on the working atmosphere states in close-spaced sublimation. In the present paper, CdTe polycrystalline thin films were deposited by CSS in mixture atmosphere of argon and oxygen. The physical mechanism of CSS was analyzed, and the temperature distribution in CSS system was measured. The dependence of preliminary nucleus creation on the atmosphere states (involving component and pressure) was studied. Transparencies were measured and optic energy gaps were calculated. The results show that: (1) The CdTe films deposited in different atmospheres are cubic structure. With increasing oxygen concentration, a increases and reaches the maximum at 6% oxygen concentration, then reduces, and increases again after passing the point at 12% oxygen concentration. Among them, the sample depositing at 9% oxygen concentration is the best. The optic energy gaps are 1.50-1.51 eV for all CdTe films. (2) The samples depositing at different pressures at 9% oxygen concentration are all cubical structure of CdTe, and the diffraction peaks of CdS and SnO2:F still appear. With the gas pressure increasing, the crystal size of CdTe minishes, the transparency of the thin film goes down, and the absorption side shifts to the short-wave direction. (3) The polycrystalline thin films with high quality deposit in 4 minutes under the depositing condition that the substrate temperature is 550 degrees C, and source temperature is 620 degrees C at 9% oxygen concentration. PMID:16241058

  1. Transport phenomena in the close-spaced sublimation deposition process for manufacture of large-area cadmium telluride photovoltaic panels: Modeling and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, C. P.

    With increasing national and global demand for energy and concerns about the effect of fossil fuels on global climate change, there is an increasing emphasis on the development and use of renewable sources of energy. Solar cells or photovoltaics constitute an important renewable energy technology but the major impediment to their widespread adoption has been their high initial cost. Although thin-film photovoltaic semiconductors such as cadmium sulfide-cadmium telluride (CdS/CdTe) can potentially be inexpensively manufactured using large area deposition techniques such as close-spaced sublimation (CSS), their low stability has prevented them from becoming an alternative to traditional polycrystalline silicon solar cells. A key factor affecting the stability of CdS/CdTe cells is the uniformity of deposition of the thin films. Currently no models exist that can relate the processing parameters in a CSS setup with the film deposition uniformity. Central to the development of these models is a fundamental understanding of the complex transport phenomena which constitute the deposition process which include coupled conduction and radiation as well as transition regime rarefied gas flow. This thesis is aimed at filling these knowledge gaps and thereby leading to the development of the relevant models. The specific process under consideration is the CSS setup developed by the Materials Engineering Group at the Colorado State University (CSU). Initially, a 3-D radiation-conduction model of a single processing station was developed using the commercial finite-element software ABAQUS and validated against data from steady-state experiments carried out at CSU. A simplified model was then optimized for maximizing the steady-state thermal uniformity within the substrate. It was inferred that contrary to traditional top and bottom infrared lamp heating, a lamp configuration that directs heat from the periphery of the sources towards the center results in the minimum temperature

  2. Core-shell-like Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS heterostructure synthesized by super-close-space sublimation for broadband down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaojie; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Meng, Fanzhi; Yu, Yingning; Han, Lin; Liu, Xiaojuan; Meng, Jian

    2014-04-01

    Combination with semiconductors is a promising approach to the realization of broadband excitation of light conversion materials based on rare earth compounds, to boost the energy efficiency of silicon solar cells. Cd1-xZnxS is a wide bandgap semiconductor with large exciton binding energy. By changing its composition, the bandgap of Cd1-xZnxS can be tuned to match the absorption of trivalent lanthanide (Ln) ions, which makes it a competent energy donor for the Ln3+-Yb3+ couple. In this work, we designed a clean route to a broadband down-converter based on a core-shell-like Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/Cd0.81Zn0.19S (CdZnS) heterostructure. By hot-pressing and subsequent annealing of a Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS mixture, highly pure CdZnS was sublimated and deposited on the Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+] grains while maintaining the original composition of the precursor. The CdZnS shell acted as a light absorber and energy donor for the Tb3+-Yb3+ quantum cutting couple. Because the use of solvents was avoided during the formation of the heterostructures, few impurities were incorporated into the samples, and the non-radiative transition was therefore markedly suppressed. The Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS heterostructures possess strong near-infrared (NIR) luminescence from Yb3+. Broadband down-conversion to the Yb3+ NIR emission was obtained in a wide range of 250-650 nm.

  3. In-Situ Growth of Yb2O3 Layer for Sublimation Suppression for Yb14MnSb11 Thermoelectric Material for Space Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    The compound Yb14MnSb11 is a p-type thermoelectric material of interest to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a candidate replacement for the state-of-the-art Si-Ge used in current radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Ideally, the hot end of this leg would operate at 1000 C in the vacuum of space. Although Yb14MnSb11 shows the potential to double the value of the thermoelectric figure of merit (zT) over that of Si-Ge at 1000 C, it suffers from a high sublimation rate at elevated temperatures and would require a coating in order to survive the required RTG lifetime of 14 years. The purpose of the present work is to measure the sublimation rate of Yb14MnSb11 and to investigate sublimation suppression for this material. This paper reports on the sublimation rate of Yb14MnSb11 at 1000 C (approximately 3 x 10(exp -3) grams per square centimeter hour) and efforts to reduce the sublimation rate with an in situ grown Yb2O3 layer. Despite the success in forming thin, dense, continuous, and adherent oxide scales on Yb14MnSb11, the scales did not prove to be sublimation barriers.

  4. In Situ Growth of a Yb2O3 Layer for Sublimation Suppression for Yb14MnSb11 Thermoelectric Material for Space Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2012-06-01

    The compound Yb14MnSb11 is a p-type thermoelectric material of interest to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a candidate replacement for the state-of-the-art Si-Ge used in current radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Ideally, the hot end of this leg would operate at 1000°C in the vacuum of space. Although Yb14MnSb11 shows the potential to double the value of the thermoelectric figure of merit ( zT) over that of Si-Ge at 1000°C, it suffers from a high sublimation rate at elevated temperatures and would require a coating in order to survive the required RTG lifetime of 14 years. The purpose of the present work is to measure the sublimation rate of Yb14MnSb11 and to investigate sublimation suppression for this material. This paper reports on the sublimation rate of Yb14MnSb11 at 1000°C (˜3 × 10-3 g/cm2 h) and efforts to reduce the sublimation rate with an in situ grown Yb2O3 layer. Despite the success in forming thin, dense, continuous, and adherent oxide scales on Yb14MnSb11, the scales did not prove to be sublimation barriers.

  5. In-Space Propulsion Engine Architecture Based on Sublimation of Planetary Resources: From Exploration Robots to NED Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Mantovani, James G.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile solids occur naturally on most planetary bodies including the Moon, Mars, asteroids and comets. Examples of recent discoveries include water ice, frozen carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons. The ability to utilize readily available resources for in-space propulsion and for powering surface systems during a planetary mission will help minimize the overall cost and extend the op.erational life of a mission. The utilization of volatile solids to achieve these goals is attractive for its simplicity. We have investigated the potential of subliming in situ volatiles and silicate minerals to power propulsion engines for a wide range of in-space applications where environmental conditions are favorable. This paper addresses the' practicality of using planetary solid volatiles as a power source for propulsion and surface systems by presenting results of modeling involving thermodynamic and physical mechanics calculations, and laboratory testing to measure the thrust obtained from ,a volatile solid engine (VSE). Applications of a VSE for planetary exploration are discussed as a means for propulsion and for mechanical actuators and surface mobility platforms.

  6. X-38 Advanced Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingell, Chuck; Quintana, Clemente; Le, Suy; Hafemalz, David S.; Clark, Mike; Cloutier, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses a heat rejection device for transferring heat from a space vehicle by venting water into space through the use of a novel, two-stage water distribution system. The system consists of two different, porous media that stop water-borne contaminants from clogging the system and causing operational failures. Feedwater passes through a small nozzle, then into a porous disk made of sintered stainless steel, and then finally into large-pore aluminum foam. The smaller pore layer of the steel disk controls the pressure drop of the feedwater. The ice forms in the foam layer, and then sublimates, leaving any contaminants behind. The pore-size of the foam is two orders of magnitude larger than the current porous plate sublimators, allowing for a greater tolerance for contaminants. Using metallic fibers in the foam also negates problems with compression seen in the use of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) felt.

  7. A sublimation heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Gary G.; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; McHale, Glen; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-03-01

    Heat engines are based on the physical realization of a thermodynamic cycle, most famously the liquid-vapour Rankine cycle used for steam engines. Here we present a sublimation heat engine, which can convert temperature differences into mechanical work via the Leidenfrost effect. Through controlled experiments, quantified by a hydrodynamic model, we show that levitating dry-ice blocks rotate on hot turbine-like surfaces at a rate controlled by the turbine geometry, temperature difference and solid material properties. The rotational motion of the dry-ice loads is converted into electric power by coupling to a magnetic coil system. We extend our concept to liquid loads, generalizing the realization of the new engine to both sublimation and the instantaneous vapourization of liquids. Our results support the feasibility of low-friction in situ energy harvesting from both liquids and ices. Our concept is potentially relevant in challenging situations such as deep drilling, outer space exploration or micro-mechanical manipulation.

  8. The Sublime and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Jamin

    2006-01-01

    The sublime is a theory of aesthetics that reached its highest popularity in British literature during the Romantic period (c. 1785-1832). This article (1) explicates philosophers' different meanings of the sublime; (2) show how the sublime is relevant to education; and (3) show how the sublime "works" in literature by analyzing William Blake's…

  9. First-order feasibility analysis of a space suit radiator concept based on estimation of water mass sublimation using Apollo mission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metts, Jonathan G.; Klaus, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal control of a space suit during extravehicular activity (EVA) is typically accomplished by sublimating water to provide system cooling. Spacecraft, on the other hand, primarily rely on radiators to dissipate heat. Integrating a radiator into a space suit has been proposed as an alternative design that does not require mass consumption for heat transfer. While providing cooling without water loss offers potential benefits for EVA application, it is not currently practical to rely on a directional, fixed-emissivity radiator to maintain thermal equilibrium of a spacesuit where the radiator orientation, environmental temperature, and crew member metabolic heat load fluctuate unpredictably. One approach that might make this feasible, however, is the use of electrochromic devices that are capable of infrared emissivity modulation and can be actively controlled across the entire suit surface to regulate net heat flux for the system. Integrating these devices onto the irregular, compliant space suit material requires that they be fabricated on a flexible substrate, such as Kapton film. An initial assessment of whether or not this candidate technology presents a feasible design option was conducted by first characterizing the mass of water loss from sublimation that could theoretically be saved if an electrochromic suit radiator was employed for thermal control. This is particularly important for lunar surface exploration, where the expense of transporting water from Earth is excessive, but the technology is potentially beneficial for other space missions as well. In order to define a baseline for this analysis by comparison to actual data, historical documents from the Apollo missions were mined for comprehensive, detailed metabolic data from each lunar surface outing, and related data from NASA's more recent "Advanced Lunar Walkback" tests were also analyzed. This metabolic database was then used to validate estimates for sublimator water consumption during surface

  10. 46 CFR 72.15-15 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 72.15-15 Section 72.15-15... ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 72.15-15 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces within the vessel... spaces and for closing all doorways, ventilators and annular spaces around funnels and other openings...

  11. 46 CFR 72.15-15 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 72.15-15 Section 72.15-15... ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 72.15-15 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces within the vessel... spaces and for closing all doorways, ventilators and annular spaces around funnels and other openings...

  12. 46 CFR 72.15-15 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 72.15-15 Section 72.15-15... ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 72.15-15 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces within the vessel... spaces and for closing all doorways, ventilators and annular spaces around funnels and other openings...

  13. 46 CFR 72.15-15 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 72.15-15 Section 72.15-15... ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 72.15-15 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces within the vessel... spaces and for closing all doorways, ventilators and annular spaces around funnels and other openings...

  14. 46 CFR 72.15-15 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 72.15-15 Section 72.15-15... ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 72.15-15 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces within the vessel... spaces and for closing all doorways, ventilators and annular spaces around funnels and other openings...

  15. 78 FR 53497 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Closed Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Closed Session AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory... closed session of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The special...

  16. Experimental Investigation of Transient Sublimator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephen, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. Sublimators can be used as a topper during mission phases such as low lunar or low earth orbit. In these mission phases, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will investigate the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization during various feedwater timing scenarios. The X-38 sublimator and Contamination Insensitive Sublimator (CIS) were tested in a ground vacuum chamber to understand this behavior and to quantify the feedwater performance. Data from various scenarios will be analyzed to investigate feedwater utilization under the cyclical conditions. This paper will also provide recommendations for future sublimator designs and/or feedwater control.

  17. A sublimation heat engine

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Gary G.; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; McHale, Glen; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-01-01

    Heat engines are based on the physical realization of a thermodynamic cycle, most famously the liquid–vapour Rankine cycle used for steam engines. Here we present a sublimation heat engine, which can convert temperature differences into mechanical work via the Leidenfrost effect. Through controlled experiments, quantified by a hydrodynamic model, we show that levitating dry-ice blocks rotate on hot turbine-like surfaces at a rate controlled by the turbine geometry, temperature difference and solid material properties. The rotational motion of the dry-ice loads is converted into electric power by coupling to a magnetic coil system. We extend our concept to liquid loads, generalizing the realization of the new engine to both sublimation and the instantaneous vapourization of liquids. Our results support the feasibility of low-friction in situ energy harvesting from both liquids and ices. Our concept is potentially relevant in challenging situations such as deep drilling, outer space exploration or micro-mechanical manipulation. PMID:25731669

  18. A sublimation heat engine.

    PubMed

    Wells, Gary G; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; McHale, Glen; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-01-01

    Heat engines are based on the physical realization of a thermodynamic cycle, most famously the liquid-vapour Rankine cycle used for steam engines. Here we present a sublimation heat engine, which can convert temperature differences into mechanical work via the Leidenfrost effect. Through controlled experiments, quantified by a hydrodynamic model, we show that levitating dry-ice blocks rotate on hot turbine-like surfaces at a rate controlled by the turbine geometry, temperature difference and solid material properties. The rotational motion of the dry-ice loads is converted into electric power by coupling to a magnetic coil system. We extend our concept to liquid loads, generalizing the realization of the new engine to both sublimation and the instantaneous vapourization of liquids. Our results support the feasibility of low-friction in situ energy harvesting from both liquids and ices. Our concept is potentially relevant in challenging situations such as deep drilling, outer space exploration or micro-mechanical manipulation. PMID:25731669

  19. Controlled Microbial Cenoses in Closed Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somova, Lydia; Mikheeva, Galina

    Controlled microbial cenoses have good prospects in closed spaces: for air treatment in LSS and cellars industrial premises; for sewage treatment in LSS; for increase of productivity and protect of plants from infections in LSS. Possible methods of formation of microbiocenoses are: selection, autoselection, artificial formation taking into account their biochemical properties and metabolic interactions. Experimental microbiocenoses, has been produced on the basis of natural association of microorganisms by long cultivation on specially developed medium. Dominating groups are bacteria of genera: Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Leuconostoc, Bidobac-terium, Rhodopseudomonas and yeast of genera: Kluyveromyces, Saccharomyces and Torulop-sis. Microbiocenoses do not contain pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic microorganisms, they possess opposing and probiotic properties. Different examples of microbial cenoses actions are to be presented in the paper.

  20. Investigation of Transient Performance for a Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100 %. However, Sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode during low lunar orbit for Altair and possibly Orion. The cyclical topping mode represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. In this operational mode, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will investigate the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization for various feedwater timing scenarios.

  1. Investigation of Transient Performance for a Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Sheth, Rubik; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode during low lunar orbit for Altair and possibly Orion, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. In this mission phase, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will investigate the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization during various feedwater timing scenarios. The X-38 sublimator, which represents the state of the art in sublimator technology, was used to understand this behavior and to quantify the feedwater performance. Data from various scenarios will be analyzed to investigate feedwater utilization under the cyclical conditions. This paper will also provide recommendations for future sublimator designs and/or feedwater control.

  2. Investigation of Transient Performance for a Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. Sublimators can be used as a topper during mission phases such as low lunar or low earth orbit. In these mission phases, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will investigate the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization during various feedwater timing scenarios. The X-38 sublimator and Contamination Insensitive Sublimator (CIS) were tested in a ground vacuum chamber to understand this behavior and to quantify the feedwater performance. Data from various scenarios will be analyzed to investigate feedwater utilization under the cyclical conditions

  3. 46 CFR 190.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 190.15-10 Section 190.15... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces... chemical laboratories, scientific laboratories, chemical storerooms, and machinery spaces and for...

  4. 46 CFR 190.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 190.15-10 Section 190.15... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces... chemical laboratories, scientific laboratories, chemical storerooms, and machinery spaces and for...

  5. 46 CFR 190.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 190.15-10 Section 190.15... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces... chemical laboratories, scientific laboratories, chemical storerooms, and machinery spaces and for...

  6. 46 CFR 190.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 190.15-10 Section 190.15... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces... chemical laboratories, scientific laboratories, chemical storerooms, and machinery spaces and for...

  7. 46 CFR 190.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 190.15-10 Section 190.15... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces... chemical laboratories, scientific laboratories, chemical storerooms, and machinery spaces and for...

  8. Sublimating grains model of cometary coma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Tozzi, G. P.; Brucato, J. R.

    Billion years of space weathering produces a crust of organic matter (see e.g. Kanuchova et al. 2012) that will be released when a comet enter for the first time in the inner Solar System. New comets, coming form the Oort Colud at their first passage close to the Sun, are particularly important because they are not differentiated by the Solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of ice organic matter close to the surface. When a comet approach to the Sun, its activity is driven by the sublimation of these nucleus ices: if the heliocentric distances, R_H , is greater than 3 AU the sublimation of CO and CO_2 ices is the main source of comet activity, otherwise at shorter distances, the sublimation of water become the most important mechanism of activity. These gases, escaping from the nucleus, drag in the coma grains that can be refractory dust (silicates, carbon), water ice and/or organic ices. Oort comets at their first passage in the inner Solar System, should produce an halo of organic or water icy particles. Our group has been monitoring new, inbound, bright Oort comets (C/2011 F1, C/2012 S1, C/2012 K1, C/2013 V5, C/2012 F3, C/2013 US10, C/2013 X1) to search for these icy grains. The method consists in detecting the cloud of sublimating grains in the inner coma by using the Sigma Af function (Tozzi et al. 2007) directly from images. However this over-population of grains, beside the sublimation, can be also due to short time activity (outburst) or too big grains expanding at very slow velocity, as it has been found in comet 67P/C-G (Tozzi eta al, 2011, A&A, 531, 54). To disentangle between the phenomena it is necessary to monitor the comet both at short timescale, for the outbursts (by repeating the observations after few nights), and at long term (weeks-months). If the cloud does not expand with the decreasing of the heliocentric distance there is high probability that we are in presence of organic and/or water ice grains. We can disentangle

  9. 46 CFR 92.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 92.15-10 Section 92.15-10... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 92.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (c) of this section, all enclosed spaces within the vessel shall be properly vented or...

  10. 46 CFR 92.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 92.15-10 Section 92.15-10... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 92.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (c) of this section, all enclosed spaces within the vessel shall be properly vented or...

  11. 46 CFR 92.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 92.15-10 Section 92.15-10... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 92.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (c) of this section, all enclosed spaces within the vessel shall be properly vented or...

  12. 46 CFR 92.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 92.15-10 Section 92.15-10... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 92.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (c) of this section, all enclosed spaces within the vessel shall be properly vented or...

  13. 46 CFR 92.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 92.15-10 Section 92.15-10... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 92.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (c) of this section, all enclosed spaces within the vessel shall be properly vented or...

  14. Heat rejection sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingell, Charles W. (Inventor); Quintana, Clemente E. (Inventor); Le, Suy (Inventor); Clark, Michael R. (Inventor); Cloutier, Robert E. (Inventor); Hafermalz, David Scott (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A sublimator includes a sublimation plate having a thermal element disposed adjacent to a feed water channel and a control point disposed between at least a portion of the thermal element and a large pore substrate. The control point includes a sintered metal material. A method of dissipating heat using a sublimator includes a sublimation plate having a thermal element and a control point. The thermal element is disposed adjacent to a feed water channel and the control point is disposed between at least a portion of the thermal element and a large pore substrate. The method includes controlling a flow rate of feed water to the large pore substrate at the control point and supplying heated coolant to the thermal element. Sublimation occurs in the large pore substrate and the controlling of the flow rate of feed water is independent of time. A sublimator includes a sublimation plate having a thermal element disposed adjacent to a feed water channel and a control point disposed between at least a portion of the thermal element and a large pore substrate. The control point restricts a flow rate of feed water from the feed water channel to the large pore substrate independent of time.

  15. Hubble Space Telescope Close to Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), with its normal routine temporarily interrupted, is about to be captured by the Space Shuttle Columbia prior to a week of servicing and upgrading by the STS-109 crew. The telescope was captured by the shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm and secured on a work stand in Columbia's payload bay where 4 of the 7-member crew performed 5 space walks completing system upgrades to the HST. Included in those upgrades were: The replacement of the solar array panels; replacement of the power control unit (PCU); replacement of the Faint Object Camera (FOC) with a new advanced camera for Surveys (ACS); and installation of the experimental cooling system for the Hubble's Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-object Spectrometer (NICMOS), which had been dormant since January 1999 when its original coolant ran out. The Marshall Space Flight Center had the responsibility for the design, development, and construction of the the HST, which is the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. Launched March 1, 2002, the STS-109 HST servicing mission lasted 10 days, 22 hours, and 11 minutes. It was the 108th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle Program.

  16. A transformer of closely spaced pulsed waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, J.

    1970-01-01

    Passive circuit, using diodes, transistors, and magnetic cores, transforms the voltage of repetitive positive or negative pulses. It combines a pulse transformer with switching devices to effect a resonant flux reset and can transform various pulsed waveforms that have a nonzero average value and are relatively cosely spaced in time.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Transient Sublimator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2012-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered for operations in a cyclical topping mode, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. Sublimators can be used as a supplemental heat rejection device during mission phases where the environmental temperature or heat rejection requirement changes rapidly. This scenario may occur during low lunar orbit, low earth orbit, or other planetary orbits. In these mission phases, the need for supplemental heat rejection will vary between zero and some fraction of the overall heat load. In particular, supplemental heat rejection is required for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will describe the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization during various feedwater timing scenarios. Experimental data from various scenarios is analyzed to investigate feedwater consumption efficiency under the cyclical conditions. Start up utilization tests were conducted to better understand the transient performance. This paper also provides recommendations for future sublimator design and transient operation.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Sublimator Performance at Transient Heat Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephen, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. Sublimators can be used as a topper during mission phases such as low lunar or low earth orbit. In these mission phases, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will summarize the effort put into understanding sublimator response under a transient heat load. The performance will be assessed by detailing the changes in feedwater utilization due to transient starts and stops during various feedwater timing scenarios. Sublimator start up utilization will be assessed as a possible relationship to transient performance of a sublimator. This paper will also provide recommendations for future sublimator designs and/or feedwater control.

  19. In-Space Propulsion Engine Architecture Based on Sublimation of Planetary Resources: From Exploration Robots to NED Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Mantovani, James; Dominquez, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this NIAC study is to identify those volatile and mineral resources that are available on asteroids, comets, moons and planets in the solar system, and investigate methods to transform these resources into forms of power that will expand the capabilities of future robotic and human exploration missions to explore planetary bodies beyond the Moon and will mitigate hazards from NEOs. The sources of power used for deep space probe missions are usually derived from either solar panels for electrical energy, radioisotope thermal generators for thermal energy, or fuel cells and chemical reactions for chemical energy and propulsion.

  20. Modular Porous Plate Sublimator /MPPS/ requires only water supply for coolant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathbun, R. J.

    1966-01-01

    Modular porous plate sublimators, provided for each location where heat must be dissipated, conserve the battery power of a space vehicle by eliminating the coolant pump. The sublimator requires only a water supply for coolant.

  1. A hybrid genetic algorithm for resolving closely spaced objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, R. J.; Lillo, W. E.; Schulenburg, N.

    1995-01-01

    A hybrid genetic algorithm is described for performing the difficult optimization task of resolving closely spaced objects appearing in space based and ground based surveillance data. This application of genetic algorithms is unusual in that it uses a powerful domain-specific operation as a genetic operator. Results of applying the algorithm to real data from telescopic observations of a star field are presented.

  2. Heat Transfer Analysis of a Closed Brayton Cycle Space Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical analysis of the heat transfer processes taking place in a radiator for a closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT), also referred to as a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) space power system. The resulting equations and relationships have been incorporated into a radiator sub-routine of a numerical triple objective CCGT optimization program to determine operating conditions yielding maximum cycle efficiency, minimum radiator area and minimum overall systems mass. Study results should be of interest to numerical modeling of closed cycle Brayton space power systems and to the design of fluid cooled radiators in general.

  3. Sublimation, culture, and creativity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Emily; Zeppenfeld, Veronika; Cohen, Dov

    2013-10-01

    Combining insights from Freud and Weber, this article explores whether Protestants (vs. Catholics and Jews) are more likely to sublimate their taboo feelings and desires toward productive ends. In the Terman sample (Study 1), Protestant men and women who had sexual problems related to anxieties about taboos and depravity had greater creative accomplishments, as compared to those with sexual problems unrelated to such concerns and to those reporting no sexual problems. Two laboratory experiments (Studies 2 and 3) found that Protestants produced more creative artwork (sculptures, poems, collages, cartoon captions) when they were (a) primed with damnation-related words, (b) induced to feel unacceptable sexual desires, or (c) forced to suppress their anger. Activating anger or sexual attraction was not enough; it was the forbidden or suppressed nature of the emotion that gave the emotion its creative power. The studies provide possibly the first experimental evidence for sublimation and suggest a cultural psychological approach to defense mechanisms. PMID:23834638

  4. Modal vector estimation for closely spaced frequency modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. R., Jr.; Chung, Y. T.; Blair, M.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques for obtaining improved modal vector estimates for systems with closely spaced frequency modes are discussed. In describing the dynamical behavior of a complex structure modal parameters are often analyzed: undamped natural frequency, mode shape, modal mass, modal stiffness and modal damping. From both an analytical standpoint and an experimental standpoint, identification of modal parameters is more difficult if the system has repeated frequencies or even closely spaced frequencies. The more complex the structure, the more likely it is to have closely spaced frequencies. This makes it difficult to determine valid mode shapes using single shaker test methods. By employing band selectable analysis (zoom) techniques and by employing Kennedy-Pancu circle fitting or some multiple degree of freedom (MDOF) curve fit procedure, the usefulness of the single shaker approach can be extended.

  5. Rationale for evaluating a closed food chain for space habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modell, M.; Spurlock, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Closed food cycles for long duration space flight and space habitation are examined. Wash water for a crew of six is economically recyclable after a week, while a total closed loop water system is effective only if the stay exceeds six months' length. The stoichiometry of net plant growth is calculated and it is shown that the return of urine, feces, and inedible plant parts to the food chain, along with the addition of photosynthesis, closes the food chain loop. Scenarios are presented to explore the technical feasibility of achieving a closed loop system. An optimal choice of plants is followed by processing, waste conversion, equipment specifications, and control requirements, and finally, cost-effectiveness.

  6. Glycosylation of closely spaced acceptor sites in human glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Shrimal, Shiteshu; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    Summary Asparagine-linked glycosylation of proteins by the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) occurs when acceptor sites or sequons (N-x≠P-T/S) on nascent polypeptides enter the lumen of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Metazoan organisms assemble two isoforms of the OST that have different catalytic subunits (STT3A or STT3B) and partially non-overlapping cellular roles. Potential glycosylation sites move past the STT3A complex, which is associated with the translocation channel, at the protein synthesis elongation rate. Here, we investigated whether close spacing between acceptor sites in a nascent protein promotes site skipping by the STT3A complex. Biosynthetic analysis of four human glycoproteins revealed that closely spaced sites are efficiently glycosylated by an STT3B-independent process unless the sequons contain non-optimal sequence features, including extreme close spacing between sequons (e.g. NxTNxT) or the presence of paired NxS sequons (e.g. NxSANxS). Many, but not all, glycosylation sites that are skipped by the STT3A complex can be glycosylated by the STT3B complex. Analysis of a murine glycoprotein database revealed that closely spaced sequons are surprisingly common, and are enriched for paired NxT sites when the gap between sequons is less than three residues. PMID:24105266

  7. Developing closed life support systems for large space habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. M.; Harlan, A. D.; Krumhar, K. C.

    1978-01-01

    In anticipation of possible large-scale, long-duration space missions which may be conducted in the future, NASA has begun to investigate the research and technology development requirements to create life support systems for large space habitats. An analysis suggests the feasibility of a regeneration of food in missions which exceed four years duration. Regeneration of food in space may be justified for missions of shorter duration when large crews must be supported at remote sites such as lunar bases and space manufacturing facilities. It is thought that biological components consisting principally of traditional crop and livestock species will prove to be the most acceptable means of closing the food cycle. A description is presented of the preliminary results of a study of potential biological components for large space habitats. Attention is given to controlled ecosystems, Russian life support system research, controlled-environment agriculture, and the social aspects of the life-support system.

  8. Approximating the Generalized Voronoi Diagram of Closely Spaced Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, John; Daniel, Eric; Pascucci, Valerio; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2015-06-22

    We present an algorithm to compute an approximation of the generalized Voronoi diagram (GVD) on arbitrary collections of 2D or 3D geometric objects. In particular, we focus on datasets with closely spaced objects; GVD approximation is expensive and sometimes intractable on these datasets using previous algorithms. With our approach, the GVD can be computed using commodity hardware even on datasets with many, extremely tightly packed objects. Our approach is to subdivide the space with an octree that is represented with an adjacency structure. We then use a novel adaptive distance transform to compute the distance function on octree vertices. The computed distance field is sampled more densely in areas of close object spacing, enabling robust and parallelizable GVD surface generation. We demonstrate our method on a variety of data and show example applications of the GVD in 2D and 3D.

  9. Approximating the Generalized Voronoi Diagram of Closely Spaced Objects

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John; Daniel, Eric; Pascucci, Valerio; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2016-01-01

    We present an algorithm to compute an approximation of the generalized Voronoi diagram (GVD) on arbitrary collections of 2D or 3D geometric objects. In particular, we focus on datasets with closely spaced objects; GVD approximation is expensive and sometimes intractable on these datasets using previous algorithms. With our approach, the GVD can be computed using commodity hardware even on datasets with many, extremely tightly packed objects. Our approach is to subdivide the space with an octree that is represented with an adjacency structure. We then use a novel adaptive distance transform to compute the distance function on octree vertices. The computed distance field is sampled more densely in areas of close object spacing, enabling robust and parallelizable GVD surface generation. We demonstrate our method on a variety of data and show example applications of the GVD in 2D and 3D. PMID:27540272

  10. Hilbert-space localization in closed quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Doron; Yukalov, Vyacheslav I.; Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Quantum localization within an energy shell of a closed quantum system stands in contrast to the ergodic assumption of Boltzmann, and to the corresponding eigenstate thermalization hypothesis. The familiar case is the real-space Anderson localization and its many-body Fock-space version. We use the term Hilbert-space localization in order to emphasize the more general phase-space context. Specifically, we introduce a unifying picture that extends the semiclassical perspective of Heller, which relates the localization measure to the probability of return. We illustrate our approach by considering several systems of experimental interest, referring in particular to the bosonic Josephson tunneling junction. We explore the dependence of the localization measure on the initial state and on the strength of the many-body interactions using a recursive projection method.

  11. Underwater acoustic source localization using closely spaced hydrophone pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Min Seop; Choi, Bok-Kyoung; Kim, Byoung-Nam; Lee, Kyun Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Underwater sound source position is determined using a line array. However, performance degradation occurs owing to a multipath environment, which generates incoherent signals. In this paper, a hydrophone array is proposed for underwater source position estimation robust to a multipath environment. The array is composed of three pairs of sensors placed on the same line. The source position is estimated by performing generalized cross-correlation (GCC). The proposed system is not affected by a multipath time delay because of the close distance between closely spaced sensors. The validity of the array is confirmed by simulation using acoustic signals synthesized by eigenrays.

  12. Modelling Sublimation of Carbon Dioxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author reports results in their efforts to model sublimation of carbon dioxide and the associated kinetics order and parameter estimation issues in their model. They have offered the reader two sets of data and several approaches to determine the rate of sublimation of a piece of solid dry ice. They presented several models…

  13. Predicting Space Weather Effects on Close Approach Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, L.; Besser, R.; Hejduk, M.

    The NASA Robotic Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis (CARA) team sends ephemeris data to the Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) for screening against the high accuracy catalog, then assesses risk posed to protected assets from predicted close approaches. Since most spacecraft supported by the CARA team are located in LEO orbits, atmospheric drag is a primary source of state estimate uncertainty, and drag is directly governed by space weather. At present the actual effect of space weather on atmospheric density cannot be accurately predicted because most atmospheric density models are empirical in nature. The Jacchia-Bowman-HASDM 2009 atmospheric density model used at the JSpOC employs a solar storm active compensation feature that predicts storm sizes and arrival times, and thus the resulting neutral density alterations. With this feature, estimation errors can occur in either direction (i.e., over- or under-estimation of density and thus drag), giving rise to several questions. Does a change in space weather make a close approach safer or riskier? Might performing a maneuver make the approach worse due to uncertainty in predicted location at a given time? What if there are errors in the predicted timing or magnitude of the space weather event? Although the exact effect of a solar storm on atmospheric drag cannot be determined, one can explore the effects of drag perturbations on conjuncting objects' trajectories to determine if a conjunction can become riskier or less risky. The CARA team has constructed a Space Weather Trade-Space tool that systematically alters the drag coefficient of the conjuncting objects and recalculates the probability of collision for each case to determine the effect is likely to have on the collision risk. In addition to a review of the theory and the particulars of the tool, all of the observed output will be explained, along with statistics of their frequency.

  14. Development and Testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2007-01-01

    Sublimators have been used for heat rejection for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Some of the attractive features of sublimators are that they are compact, lightweight, and self-regulating. One of the drawbacks of previous designs has been sensitivity to non-volatile contamination in the feedwater, which can clog relatively small pores (approx. 3-6 micrometers) in the porous plates where ice forms and sublimates. A new design that is less sensitive to contaminants is being developed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator (CIS) Engineering Development Unit (EDU).

  15. Development and Testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Westheimer, David T.

    2006-01-01

    Sublimators have been used for heat rejection for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Some of the attractive features of sublimators are that they are compact, lightweight, and self-regulating. One of the drawbacks of previous designs has been sensitivity to non-volatile contamination in the feedwater, which can clog relatively small pores (approx.3-6 microns) in the porous plates where ice forms and sublimates. A new design that is less sensitive to contaminants is being developed at the Johnson Space Center. This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator (CIS) Engineering Development Unit (EDU).

  16. Close-up of Shuttle Thermal Tiles in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Launched on July 26, 2005 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-114 was classified as Logistics Flight 1. Among the Station-related activities of the mission were the delivery of new supplies and the replacement of one of the orbital outpost's Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs). STS-114 also carried the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module and the External Stowage Platform-2. A major focus of the mission was the testing and evaluation of new Space Shuttle flight safety, which included new inspection and repair techniques. Upon its approach to the International Space Station (ISS), the Space Shuttle Discovery underwent a photography session in order to assess any damages that may have occurred during its launch and/or journey through Space. The mission's third and final Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) included taking a close-up look and the repair of the damaged heat shield. Gap fillers were removed from between the orbiter's heat-shielding tiles located on the craft's underbelly. Never before had any repairs been done to an orbiter while still in space. This particular photo was taken by astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, whose shadow is visible on the thermal protection tiles, and a portion of the Canadian built Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm and the Nile River is visible at the bottom.

  17. Heat transfer from cylinders having closely spaced fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, Arnold E

    1937-01-01

    The heat-transfer coefficients have been determined for five steel cylinders having fins 1.22 inches wide and the spacing between the fins ranging from 0.022 to 0.131 inch. The cylinders were tested with and without baffles in a wind tunnel; they were also tested enclosed in jackets with the cooling air supplied by a blower. A maximum heat transfer was reached at a fin space of about 0.45 inch for the cylinders tested with each of the three methods of cooling investigated. The rise in temperature of the air passing between the fins and the change in flow pattern were found to be important factors limiting the heat transfer that may be obtained by decreasing the fin space. The use of baffles for directing the air around the cylinders with closely spaced fins proved very effective in increasing the over-all heat-transfer coefficient, provided that the spacing was not appreciably less than that for maximum heat transfer.

  18. 78 FR 70093 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Closed Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Closed Session AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation Advisory... closed session of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). The special...

  19. A closed life-support system for space colonies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. D.; Jebens, H. J.; Sweet, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    In 1975, a system design study was performed to examine a completely self-contained system for a permanent colony of 10,000 inhabitants in space. Fundamental to this design was the life support system. Since resupply from earth is prohibitive in transportation costs, it was decided to use a closed system with the initial supply of oxygen coming from processing of lunar ores, and the supply of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen from earth. The problem of life support was treated starting with the nutritional and metabolic requirements for the human population, creating a food and water chain sufficient to supply these demands, adding the additional requirements for the animal and plant sources in the food chain, feeding back useful waste products, supplying water as required from different sources, and closing the loop by processing organic wastes into CO2. This concept places the burden of the system upon plants for O2 generation and waste processing the CO2 generation.

  20. Accumulation of Raman gain between closely spaced pulse pairs.

    PubMed

    Marshall, L R; Piper, J A

    1990-12-01

    The short-pulse conversion efficiency of stimulated Raman scattering in Pb vapor is increased from 15% to 35% by using a novel technique that employs a closely spaced pair of pump pulses. The second pulse scatters off the coherent excitation induced in the medium by the first pulse, with a resultant enhancement in efficiency. To our knowledge these results give the first observation of such long-lived cooperative phenomena in stimulated Raman scattering. We have also observed this phenomenon in H(2) and show that this technique is readily applicable to other Raman-active media. PMID:19771085

  1. NASA Research For Instrument Approaches To Closely Spaced Parallel Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Dawn M.; Perry, R. Brad

    2000-01-01

    Within the NASA Aviation Systems Capacity Program, the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Project is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological condition (IMC). The Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) research within TAP has focused on an airborne centered approach for independent instrument approaches to closely spaced parallel runways using Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) technologies. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), working in partnership with Honeywell, Inc., completed in AILS simulation study, flight test, and demonstration in 1999 examining normal approaches and potential collision scenarios to runways with separation distances of 3,400 and 2,500 feet. The results of the flight test and demonstration validate the simulation study.

  2. Close Up of Space Shuttle External Tank's Intertank Flange Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, the Space Shuttle External Tank 120 is in position for its new foam application process on the liquid hydrogen tank-to-inter tank flange area, a tank structural connection point. This image is a close-up of the inter tank flange area. The foam will be applied with an enhanced finishing procedure that requires two technicians, one for a new mold-injection procedure to the intertank's ribbing and one for real-time videotaped surveillance of the process. The 120 tank is slated for launch on the Orbiter Discovery scheduled for next Spring. Marshall Space Flight Center played a significant role in the development of the new application process designed to replace the possible debris shedding source previously used. (Lockheed Martin/NASA Michoud)

  3. A Closed Ecological System in a Space Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, S. M.; Schuster, M.; Lebert, M.; Richter, P.; Schmittnagel, M.; Hader, D.-P.

    2008-06-01

    The Russian FOTON-M3 mission, a satellite for mid-length experiments in space and recovery afterwards, included a closed artificial ecosystem (OMEGAHAB for Oreochromis Mossambicus-Euglena Gracilis-Aquatic HABitat) with the photosynthetic flagellate Euglena gracilis as oxygen producer and larvae of Oreochromis mossambicus, a Tilapia species, as consumer. During the 12-day orbital flight the algae were observed 10 minutes per day by means of a miniaturized microscope to analyse their swimming behavior. The fishes were also filmed to monitor their development and movement. An identical experiment was carried out as ground control. A data downlink provided the measured temperature values of the space experiment every day to readjust the temperature of the ground reference in order to eliminate the influence of the different temperature on the velocity of the development of the fishes. The system worked very well and confirmed the design in principle. OMEGAHAB was the most successful German experiment of that kind as yet.

  4. Sublimation systems and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D.; McKellar, Michael G.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2016-02-09

    A system for vaporizing and sublimating a slurry comprising a fluid including solid particles therein. The system includes a first heat exchanger configured to receive the fluid including solid particles and vaporize the fluid and a second heat exchanger configured to receive the vaporized fluid and solid particles and sublimate the solid particles. A method for vaporizing and sublimating a fluid including solid particles therein is also disclosed. The method includes feeding the fluid including solid particles to a first heat exchanger, vaporizing the fluid, feeding the vaporized fluid and solid particles to a second heat exchanger and sublimating the solid particles. In some embodiments the fluid including solid particles is liquid natural gas or methane including solid carbon dioxide particles.

  5. CFD simulation of boundary effects on closely spaced jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Ishita; Adams, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In coastal areas characterized by shallow water depth, industrial effluents are often diluted using multiple closely spaced jets. Examples of such effluents include brine from desalination plants, treated wastewater from sewage treatment plants and heated water from thermal power plants. These jets are arranged in various orientations, such as unidirectional diffusers and rosette groups, to maximize mixing with ambient water. Due to effects of dynamic pressure, the jets interact with each other leading to mixing characteristics which are quite different from those of individual jets. The effect of mutual interaction is exaggerated under confinement, when a large number of closely spaced jets discharge into shallow depth. Dilution through an outfall, consisting of multiple jets, depends on various outfall and ambient parameters. Here we observe the effects of shoreline proximity, in relation to diffuser length and water depth, on the performance of unidirectional diffusers discharging to quiescent water. For diffusers located closer to shore, less dilution is observed due to the limited availability of ambient water for dilution. We report on the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and compare the results with experimental observations.

  6. Predicting Space Weather Effects on Close Approach Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, Matthew D.; Newman, Lauri K.; Besser, Rebecca L.; Pachura, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Robotic Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis (CARA) team sends ephemeris data to the Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) for conjunction assessment screening against the JSpOC high accuracy catalog and then assesses risk posed to protected assets from predicted close approaches. Since most spacecraft supported by the CARA team are located in LEO orbits, atmospheric drag is the primary source of state estimate uncertainty. Drag magnitude and uncertainty is directly governed by atmospheric density and thus space weather. At present the actual effect of space weather on atmospheric density cannot be accurately predicted because most atmospheric density models are empirical in nature, which do not perform well in prediction. The Jacchia-Bowman-HASDM 2009 (JBH09) atmospheric density model used at the JSpOC employs a solar storm active compensation feature that predicts storm sizes and arrival times and thus the resulting neutral density alterations. With this feature, estimation errors can occur in either direction (i.e., over- or under-estimation of density and thus drag). Although the exact effect of a solar storm on atmospheric drag cannot be determined, one can explore the effects of JBH09 model error on conjuncting objects' trajectories to determine if a conjunction is likely to become riskier, less risky, or pass unaffected. The CARA team has constructed a Space Weather Trade-Space tool that systematically alters the drag situation for the conjuncting objects and recalculates the probability of collision for each case to determine the range of possible effects on the collision risk. In addition to a review of the theory and the particulars of the tool, the different types of observed output will be explained, along with statistics of their frequency.

  7. Performance of a simple closed aquatic ecosystem (CAES) in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.-H.; Li, G.-B.; Hu, C.-X.; Liu, Y.-D.; Song, L.-R.; Tong, G.-H.; Liu, X.-M.; Cheng, E.-T.

    2004-01-01

    A simple Closed Aquatic Ecosystem (CAES) consisting of single-celled green algae ( Chlorella pyrenoidosa, producer), a spiral snail ( Bulinus australianus, consumer) and a data acquisition and control unit was flown on the Chinese Spacecraft SHENZHOU-II in January 2001 for 7 days. In order to study the effect of microgravity on the operation of CAES, a 1 g centrifuge reference group in space, a ground 1 g reference group and a ground 1 g centrifuge reference group (1.4 g group) were run concurrently. Real-time data about algae biomass (calculated from transmission light intensity), temperature, light and centrifugation of the CAES were logged at minute intervals. It was found that algae biomass of both the microgravity group and the ground 1 g centrifuge reference group (1.4 g) fluctuated during the experiment, but the algae biomass of the 1 g centrifuge reference group in space and the ground 1 g reference group increased during the experiment. The results may be attributable to influences of microgravity and 1.4 g gravity on the algae and snails metabolisms. Microgravity is the main factor to affect the operation of CAES in space and the contribution of microgravity to the effect was also estimated. These data may be valuable for the establishment of a complex CELSS in the future.

  8. 3. A Closed Aquatic System for Space and Earth Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slenzka, K.; Duenne, M.; Jastorff, B.; Ranke, J.; Schirmer, M.

    Increased durations in space travel as well as living in extreme environments are requiring reliable life support systems in general and bioregenerative ones in detail. Waste water management, air revitalization and food production are obviously center goals in this research, however, in addition a potential influence by chemicals, drugs etc. released to the closed environment must be considered. On this basis ecotoxicological data become more and more important for CELSS (Closed Ecological Life Support System) development and performance. The experiences gained during the last years in our research group lead to the development of an aquatic habitat, called AquaHab (formerly CBRU), which is a closed, self-sustaining system with a total water volume of 9 liters. In the frame program of a R&D project funded by the state of Bremen and OHB System, AquaHab is under adaptation to become an ecotoxicological research unit containing for example Japanese Medaka or Zebra Fish, amphipods, water snails and water plants. Test runs were standardized and analytical methods were developed. Beside general biological and water chemical parameters, activity measurements of biotransforming enzymes (G6PDH, CytP450-Oxidase, Peroxidase) and cell viability tests as well as residual analysis of the applied substance and respective metabolites were selected as evaluation criteria. In a first series of tests low doses effects of TBT (Tributyltin, 0.1 to 20 μgTBT/l nominal concentration) were analyzed. The AquaHab and data obtained for applied environmental risk assessment will be presented at the assembly.

  9. Close-spaced vapor transport of II-VI semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Gerard

    1991-12-01

    The close spaced vapor transport (CSVT) is an efficient and cost-effective technique that allows the growth of polycrystalline as well as epitaxial thin layers of semiconductors. It has been applied to II-VI materials, especially to zinc and cadmium chalcogenides. A summary table including the deposition parameters, i.e., the nature of the ambient gas, the temperature of the source, the temperature difference between source and substrate, and the values of the growth rates measured on various substrates is presented for ZnS, ZnSe, ZnTe, CdS, CdSe, and CdTe. Experimental results concerning the growth of ZnSe on GaAs substrates are also reported. The CSVT system uses an Ar atmosphere and the working temperature is ca. 825 degree(s)C. The temperatures of source and substrate are measured during deposition and growth rates of the ZnSe films are studied as a function of the reciprocal temperature of the substrate surface for GaAs and quartz (inert) substrates. The measured values of the growth rate are compared to the theoretical ones given by the reaction-limited model and the diffusion-limited model. The validity of the models is discussed in terms of the nature of the molecules participating in the transport.

  10. Insulators and Materials for Closed-Spaced Thermoelectric Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Donald P. Snowden

    2003-07-20

    The primary goal of this Phase I program has been accomplished: to demonstrate a ceramic, injection-molded eggcrate which will form the support structure for a close-spaced thermoelectric module which can operate at significantly higher temperatures than presently possible with such modules. It has been shown that yttria-stabilized zirconia is compatible at high temperatures with typical thermoelectric materials (TAGS, SnTE and PbTe) and that it can serve as a barrier between them to preclude cross-contamination and doping of the constituents of one leg type by those from the other. Using a 2 x 2 ceramic eggcrate, thermally sprayed molybdenum electrodes have been deposited on a test module which effectively seal each pocket, further reducing the possibility of migration of elements. Based on these results the next tasks are to refine the design of the injection tool and the injection parameters to produce consistent results and to allow increase in the size of the module to that on which commercial, high-temperature thermoelectric modules can be based. In addition, development of the fabrication techniques for segmented thermoelectric legs for use with these ceramic eggcrates at high temperatures must be continued.

  11. Displacement, Substitution, Sublimation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Sigmund Freund worked with the mechanisms of displacement, substitution, and sublimation. These mechanisms have many similarities and have been studied diagnostically and therapeutically. Displacement and substitution seem to fit in well with phobias, hysterias, somatiyations, prejudices, and scapegoating. Phobias, prejudices, and scapegoating…

  12. Eisenhower and the American Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Gorman, Ned

    2008-01-01

    This essay presents Dwight D. Eisenhower's presidential rhetoric as an iteration of an American synecdochal sublime. Eisenhower's rhetoric sought to re-aim civic sight beyond corporeal objects to the nation's transcendental essence. This rhetoric is intimately connected to prevailing political anxieties and exigencies, especially the problem of…

  13. Membrane evaporator/sublimator investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, J.; Ruder, J.; Strumpf, H.

    1974-01-01

    Data are presented on a new evaporator/sublimator concept using a hollow fiber membrane unit with a high permeability to liquid water. The aim of the program was to obtain a more reliable, lightweight and simpler Extra Vehicular Life Support System (EVLSS) cooling concept than is currently being used.

  14. 76 FR 4412 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee-Closed Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee--Closed Session AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... 102-3.160, notice is hereby given of a special closed session of the Commercial Space...

  15. APPARATUS FOR CONDENSATION AND SUBLIMATION

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, R.J.; Fuis, F. Jr.

    1958-10-01

    An apparatus is presented for the sublimation and condensation of uranium compounds in order to obtain an improved crystalline structure of this material. The apparatus comprises a vaporizing chamber and condensing structure connected thereto. There condenser is fitted with a removable liner having a demountable baffle attached to the liner by means of brackets and a removable pin. The baffle is of spiral cross-section and is provided with cooling coils disposed between the surfaces of the baffle for circulation of a temperature controlling liquid within the baffle. The cooling coll provides for controlllng the temperature of the baffle to insure formatlon of a satisfactory condensate, and the removable liner facilitates the removal of condensate formed during tbe sublimation process.

  16. Space ecosynthesis: An approach to the design of closed ecosystems for use in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Averner, M. M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of closed ecological systems for the regeneration of wastes, air, and water is discussed. It is concluded that such systems, if they are to be used for the support of humans in space, will require extensive mechanical and physico-chemical support. The reason for this is that the buffering capacity available in small systems is inadequate, and that natural biological and physical regulatory mechanisms rapidly become inoperative. It is proposed that mathematical models of the dynamics of a closed ecological system may provide the best means of studying the initial problems of ecosystem closure. A conceptual and mathematical model of a closed ecosystem is described which treats the biological components as a farm, calculates the rates of flow of elements through the system by mass-balance techniques and control theory postulates, and can evaluate the requirements for mechanical buffering activities. It is suggested that study of the closure of ecosystems can significantly aid in the establishment of general principles of ecological systems.

  17. Information for Lateral Aircraft Spacing Enabling Closely-Spaced Runway Operations During Instrument-Weather Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrush, Trent; Pritchett, Amy; Johnson, Eric; Hansman, R. John; Shafto, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to increase airport capacity, the U.S. plans on investing nearly $6 billion a year to properly maintain and improve the nation's major airports. Current FAA standards however, require a reduction in terminal operations during instrument-weather conditions at many airports, causing delays and reducing airport capacity. NASA, in cooperation with the FAA, has developed the Terminal Area Productivity Program to achieve clear-weather capacity in instrument- weather conditions for all phases of flight. This paper describes a series of experiments planned to investigate the conceptual design of different systems that provide information to flight crews regarding nearby traffic during the approach phase of flight. The purpose of this investigation is to identify and evaluate different display and auditory interfaces to the crew for use in closely-spaced parallel runway operations. Three separate experiments are planned for the investigation. The first two experiments will be conducted using part-task flight simulators located at the MIT Aeronautical Systems Laboratory and at NASA Ames. The third experiment will be conducted in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator, a generic "glass-cockpit" simulator at NASA Ames. Subjects for each experiment will be current glass-cockpit pilots from major U.S. air carriers. Subject crews will fly several experimental scenarios in which pseudo-aircraft are "blundered" into the subject aircraft simulation. Runway spacing, longitudinal aircraft separation, aircraft performance and traffic information will be varied. Analyses of the subject reaction times in evading the blundering aircraft and the resulting closest points of approach will be conducted. This paper presents a preliminary examination of the data recorded during the part-task experiments. The impact of traffic information on closely-spaced parallel runway operations is discussed, cockpit displays to aid these operations are examined, and topics for future research

  18. Plants for space plantations. [crops for closed life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikishanova, T. I.

    1978-01-01

    Criteria for selection of candidate crops for closed life support systems are presented and discussed, and desired characteristics of candidate higher plant crops are given. Carbohydrate crops, which are most suitable, grown worldwide are listed and discussed. The sweet potato, ipomoea batatas Poir., is shown to meet the criteria to the greatest degree, and the criteria are recommended as suitable for initial evaluation of candidate higher plant crops for such systems.

  19. Ultra Reliable Closed Loop Life Support for Long Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.; Ewert, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Spacecraft human life support systems can achieve ultra reliability by providing sufficient spares to replace all failed components. The additional mass of spares for ultra reliability is approximately equal to the original system mass, provided that the original system reliability is not too low. Acceptable reliability can be achieved for the Space Shuttle and Space Station by preventive maintenance and by replacing failed units. However, on-demand maintenance and repair requires a logistics supply chain in place to provide the needed spares. In contrast, a Mars or other long space mission must take along all the needed spares, since resupply is not possible. Long missions must achieve ultra reliability, a very low failure rate per hour, since they will take years rather than weeks and cannot be cut short if a failure occurs. Also, distant missions have a much higher mass launch cost per kilogram than near-Earth missions. Achieving ultra reliable spacecraft life support systems with acceptable mass will require a well-planned and extensive development effort. Analysis must determine the reliability requirement and allocate it to subsystems and components. Ultra reliability requires reducing the intrinsic failure causes, providing spares to replace failed components and having "graceful" failure modes. Technologies, components, and materials must be selected and designed for high reliability. Long duration testing is needed to confirm very low failure rates. Systems design should segregate the failure causes in the smallest, most easily replaceable parts. The system must be designed, developed, integrated, and tested with system reliability in mind. Maintenance and reparability of failed units must not add to the probability of failure. The overall system must be tested sufficiently to identify any design errors. A program to develop ultra reliable space life support systems with acceptable mass should start soon since it must be a long term effort.

  20. Noncontact Friction and Force Fluctuations between Closely Spaced Bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Stipe, B. C.; Mamin, H. J.; Stowe, T. D.; Kenny, T. W.; Rugar, D.

    2001-08-27

    Noncontact friction between a Au(111) surface and an ultrasensitive gold-coated cantilever was measured as a function of tip-sample spacing, temperature, and bias voltage using observations of cantilever damping and Brownian motion. The importance of the inhomogeneous contact potential is discussed and comparison is made to measurements over dielectric surfaces. Using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, the force fluctuations are interpreted in terms of near-surface fluctuating electric fields interacting with static surface charge.

  1. Isotopic Fractionation of Water-Ice from Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, E.; Boyer, C.; Park, M.; Gormally, J.; Benitez, E.; Dominguez, G.

    2015-12-01

    Elizabeth Christensen, Charisa Boyer, Manesseh Park, Ezra Benitez, Gerardo Dominguez Understanding the multi-isotopic fractionation of water-ice that results from its sublimation may be important for understanding the isotopic composition of cometary ices. Here we describe an experimental setup whose purpose is to understand the effects of various astrophysical processes on the δD and δ18O and δ17O composition of water-ices. Our setup consists of an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber with oil free pumping, a closed cycle He cryostat to achieve low temperatures (capable of reaching 6K), and a vacuum line connected to the chamber via a UHV feed-through. Water isotopologues H216O, H218O, H217O, and HD16O samples can be measured after sublimation of water-ice with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (Picarro L2120-i) that is connected to the vacuum line. To perform these experiments, ambient water vapor was introduced into, frozen, and purified inside the UHV chamber (T< 150 K). Water-ice samples were sublimated for varying amounts of time to collect various fractions of the original reservoir. We will present the first results on the oxygen and deuterium isotopic fractionation of water-ice sublimation and discuss their implications for interpreting the isotopic compositions of cometary ices.

  2. Closely Spaced MEG Source Localization and Functional Connectivity Analysis Using a New Prewhitening Invariance of Noise Space Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junpeng; Cui, Yuan; Deng, Lihua; He, Ling; Zhang, Junran; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Qun; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed a prewhitening invariance of noise space (PW-INN) as a new magnetoencephalography (MEG) source analysis method, which is particularly suitable for localizing closely spaced and highly correlated cortical sources under real MEG noise. Conventional source localization methods, such as sLORETA and beamformer, cannot distinguish closely spaced cortical sources, especially under strong intersource correlation. Our previous work proposed an invariance of noise space (INN) method to resolve closely spaced sources, but its performance is seriously degraded under correlated noise between MEG sensors. The proposed PW-INN method largely mitigates the adverse influence of correlated MEG noise by projecting MEG data to a new space defined by the orthogonal complement of dominant eigenvectors of correlated MEG noise. Simulation results showed that PW-INN is superior to INN, sLORETA, and beamformer in terms of localization accuracy for closely spaced and highly correlated sources. Lastly, source connectivity between closely spaced sources can be satisfactorily constructed from source time courses estimated by PW-INN but not from results of other conventional methods. Therefore, the proposed PW-INN method is a promising MEG source analysis to provide a high spatial-temporal characterization of cortical activity and connectivity, which is crucial for basic and clinical research of neural plasticity. PMID:26819768

  3. Quantum field theory in spaces with closed timelike curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulware, David G.

    1992-11-01

    Gott spacetime has closed timelike curves, but no locally anomalous stress energy. A complete orthonormal set of eigenfunctions of the wave operator is found in the special case of a spacetime in which the total deficit angle is 2π. A scalar quantum field theory is constructed using these eigenfunctions. The resultant interacting quantum field theory is not unitary because the field operators can create real, on-shell, particles in the noncausal region. These particles propagate for finite proper time accumulating an arbitrary phase before being annihilated at the same spacetime point as that at which they were created. As a result, the effective potential within the noncausal region is complex, and probability is not conserved. The stress tensor of the scalar field is evaluated in the neighborhood of the Cauchy horizon; in the case of a sufficiently small Compton wavelength of the field, the stress tensor is regular and cannot prevent the formation of the Cauchy horizon.

  4. Modelling of the sublimation of icy grains in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gicquel, A.; Vincent, J.-B.; Shi, X.; Sierks, H.; Rose, M.; Güttler, C.; Tubiana, C.

    2015-10-01

    The ESA (European Space Agency) Rosetta spacecraft was launched on 2 March 2004, to reach comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014. Since March 2014, images of the nucleus and the coma (gas and dust) of the comet have been acquired by the OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) camera system [1] using both, the wide angle camera (WAC) and the narrow angle camera (NAC). The orbiter will be maintained in the vicinity of the comet until perihelion (Rh=1.3 AU) or even until Rh=1.8 AU post-perihelion (December 2015). Nineteen months of uninterrupted, close-up observations of the gas and dust coma will be obtained and will help to characterize the evolution of comet gas and dust activity during its approach to the Sun. Indeed, for the first time, we will follow the development of a comet's coma from a close distance. Also the study of the dust-gas interaction in the coma will highlight the sublimation of icy grains. Even if the sublimation of icy grains is known, it is not yet integrated in a complete dust-gas model. We are using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to study the gas flow close to the nucleus. The code called PI-DSMC (www.pidsmc. com) can simulate millions of molecules for multiple species.When the gas flow is simulated, we inject the dust particle with a zero velocity and we take into account the 3 forces acting on the grains in a cometary environment (drag force, gravity and radiative pressure). We used the DLL (Dynamic Link Library) model to integrate the sublimation of icy grains in the gas flowand allow studying the effect of the additional gas on the dust particle trajectories. For a quantitative analysis of the sublimation of icy, outflowing grains we will consider an ensemble of grains of various radii with different compositions [2] The evolution of the grains, once they are ejected into the coma, depends on their initial size, their composition and the heliocentric distance (because the temperature of

  5. Nutritional criteria for closed-loop space food systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rambaut, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    The nutritional requirements for Skylab crews are summarized as a data base for long duration spaceflight nutrient requirements. Statistically significant increases in energy consumption were detected after three months, along with CO2/O2 exhalation during exercise and thyroxine level increases. Linoleic acid amounting to 3-4 g/day was found to fulfill all fat requirements, and carbohydrate and protein (amino acid) necessities are discussed, noting that vigorous exercise programs avoid deconditioning which enhances nitrogen loss. Urinary calcium losses continued at a rate 100% above a baseline figure, a condition which ingestion of vitamin D2 did not correct. Projections are given that spaceflights lasting more than eight years will necessitate recycling of human waste for nutrient growth, which can be processed into highly efficient space food with a variety of tastes.

  6. Nanoscale Engineering of Closely-Spaced Electronic Spins in Diamond.

    PubMed

    Scarabelli, Diego; Trusheim, Matt; Gaathon, Ophir; Englund, Dirk; Wind, Shalom J

    2016-08-10

    Numerous theoretical protocols have been developed for quantum information processing with dipole-coupled solid-state spins. Nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have many of the desired properties, but a central challenge has been the positioning of NV centers at the nanometer scale that would allow for efficient and consistent dipolar couplings. Here we demonstrate a method for chip-scale fabrication of arrays of single NV centers with record spatial localization of about 10 nm in all three dimensions and controllable inter-NV spacing as small as 40 nm, which approaches the length scale of strong dipolar coupling. Our approach uses masked implantation of nitrogen through nanoapertures in a thin gold film, patterned via electron-beam lithography and dry etching. We verified the position and spin properties of the resulting NVs through wide-field super-resolution optically detected magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27428077

  7. XMM-Newton closes in on space's exotic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    With ESA's space telescope XMM-Newton, they are now closer to testing this idea. For the first time, XMM-Newton has been able to measure the influence of the gravitational field of a neutron star on the light it emits. This measurement provides much better insight into these objects. Neutron stars are among the densest objects in the Universe. They pack the mass of the sun inside a sphere 10 kilometres across. A sugar cube-sized piece of neutron star weighs over a billion tonnes. Neutron stars are the remnants of exploding stars up to eight times more massive than our Sun. They end their life in a supernova explosion and then collapse under their own gravity. Their interiors may therefore contain a very exotic form of matter. Scientists believe that in a neutron star, the density and the temperatures are similar to those existing a fraction of a second after the Big Bang. They assume that when matter is tightly packed as it is in a neutron star, it goes through important changes. Protons, electrons, and neutrons - the components of atoms - fuse together. It is possible that even the building-blocks of protons and neutrons, the so-called quarks, get crushed together, giving rise to a kind of exotic plasma of 'dissolved' matter. How to find out? Scientists have spent decades trying to identify the nature of matter in neutron stars. To do this, they need to know some important parameters very precisely: if you know a star’s mass and radius, or the relationship between them, you can obtain its compactness. However,no instrument has been advanced enough to perform the measurements needed, until now. Thanks to ESA's XMM-Newton observatory, astronomers have been able for the first time to measure the mass-to-radius ratio of a neutron star and obtain the first clues to its composition. These suggest that the neutron star contains normal, non-exotic matter, although they are not conclusive. The authors say this is a “key first step” and they will keep on with the

  8. Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and the Aesthetically Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenabeele, Bart

    2003-01-01

    Much has been written on the relationship between Arthur Schopenhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche. Much remains to be said, however, concerning their respective theories of the sublime. In this article, the author first argues against the traditional, dialectical view of Schopenhauer's theory of the sublime that stresses the crucial role the sublime…

  9. Cooling-Trough Condenser for Sublimation Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenbraun, E. J.; Lucas, J. M.

    1995-11-01

    A wrap-around, trough condenser for use with large diameter (2.5") sublimation tubes is described. The design permits attachment of the condenser to the sublimation tube without removing the tube from the heater. It also permits the use of a variety of liquid (tap water, Dry Ice, and alcohol or acetone) or solid (ice or Dry Ice) coolants.

  10. Comet 67P/CG: Influence of the sublimation coefficient on the temperature and outgassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossacki, Konrad J.; Markiewicz, Wojciech J.

    2013-05-01

    The sublimation rate of ice is commonly calculated using simple Hertz-Knudsen formula. This formula is derived from the kinetic theory of gases and ignores microphysical processes determining the actual sublimation rate. The microphysical processes can be accounted for by including in the Herz-Knudsen equation a temperature dependent sublimation coefficient (Kossacki, K.J., Markiewicz, W.J., Skorov, Y., Koemle, N.I. [1999]. Planet. Space Sci. 47, 1521-1530; Gundlach, B., Skorov, Y.V., Blum, J. [2011]. Icarus, 213, 710-719). Here we address the question to what extent inaccuracy of the simple Hertz-Knudsen equation affects the calculated temperature of a cometary nucleus and the emission rate of water vapor to space. We performed numerical simulations dealing with evolution of a model comet of the orbit the same as Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, target comet of the Rosetta mission (Glassmeier, K.H., Boehnardt, H., Koshny, D., Kuhrt, E., Richter, I. [2007]. Space Sci. Rev. 128, 1-21). We have found, that the temperature below dust mantle is most sensitive to the value of the sublimation coefficient when the mantle is coarse grained, while the sublimation rate is most affected when the mantle is fine grained. We also conclude that derivation of the temperature below the mantle from the measured water production rate ignoring temperature dependence of the sublimation coefficient leads to an underestimate of the temperature by more than 10 K when the nucleus is fine grained.

  11. Near-equilibrium growth of thick, high quality beta-SiC by sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B.; Fekade, Konjit; Spencer, Michael G.

    1993-01-01

    A close spaced near-equilibrium growth technique was used to produce thick, high quality epitaxial layers of beta-silicon carbide. The process utilized a sublimation method to grow morphologically smooth layers. The beta silicon carbide growth layers varied from about 200 to 750 microns in thickness. Chemical vapor deposition grown, 2-10 microns, beta silicon carbide films were used as seeds at 1860 and 1910 C growth temperatures. The respective average growth rates were 20 and 30 microns per hour. The layers are p-type with a 3.1 x 10 exp 17/cu cm carrier concentration. Electrical measurements indicate considerable improvement in the breakdown voltage of Schottky barriers on growth samples. Breakdown values ranged from 25 to 60 V. These measurements represent the highest values reported for 3C-SiC.

  12. Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathues, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schaefer, M.; Le Corre, L.; Reddy, V.; Platz, T.; Cloutis, E. A.; Christensen, U.; Kneissl, T.; Li, J.-Y.; Mengel, K.; Schmedemann, N.; Schaefer, T.; Russell, C. T.; Applin, D. M.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Keller, H. U.; O'Brien, D. P.; Pieters, C. M.; Raymond, C. A.; Ripken, J.; Schenk, P. M.; Schmidt, B. E.; Sierks, H.; Sykes, M. V.; Thangjam, G. S.; Vincent, J.-B.

    2015-12-01

    The dwarf planet (1) Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt with a mean diameter of about 950 kilometres, is located at a mean distance from the Sun of about 2.8 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Thermal evolution models suggest that it is a differentiated body with potential geological activity. Unlike on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where tidal forces are responsible for spewing briny water into space, no tidal forces are acting on Ceres. In the absence of such forces, most objects in the main asteroid belt are expected to be geologically inert. The recent discovery of water vapour absorption near Ceres and previous detection of bound water and OH near and on Ceres (refs 5, 6, 7) have raised interest in the possible presence of surface ice. Here we report the presence of localized bright areas on Ceres from an orbiting imager. These unusual areas are consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material, although other compositions are possible. Of particular interest is a bright pit on the floor of crater Occator that exhibits probable sublimation of water ice, producing haze clouds inside the crater that appear and disappear with a diurnal rhythm. Slow-moving condensed-ice or dust particles may explain this haze. We conclude that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the ‘snow line’, which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense.

  13. Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres.

    PubMed

    Nathues, A; Hoffmann, M; Schaefer, M; Le Corre, L; Reddy, V; Platz, T; Cloutis, E A; Christensen, U; Kneissl, T; Li, J-Y; Mengel, K; Schmedemann, N; Schaefer, T; Russell, C T; Applin, D M; Buczkowski, D L; Izawa, M R M; Keller, H U; O'Brien, D P; Pieters, C M; Raymond, C A; Ripken, J; Schenk, P M; Schmidt, B E; Sierks, H; Sykes, M V; Thangjam, G S; Vincent, J-B

    2015-12-10

    The dwarf planet (1) Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt with a mean diameter of about 950 kilometres, is located at a mean distance from the Sun of about 2.8 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Thermal evolution models suggest that it is a differentiated body with potential geological activity. Unlike on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where tidal forces are responsible for spewing briny water into space, no tidal forces are acting on Ceres. In the absence of such forces, most objects in the main asteroid belt are expected to be geologically inert. The recent discovery of water vapour absorption near Ceres and previous detection of bound water and OH near and on Ceres (refs 5-7) have raised interest in the possible presence of surface ice. Here we report the presence of localized bright areas on Ceres from an orbiting imager. These unusual areas are consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material, although other compositions are possible. Of particular interest is a bright pit on the floor of crater Occator that exhibits probable sublimation of water ice, producing haze clouds inside the crater that appear and disappear with a diurnal rhythm. Slow-moving condensed-ice or dust particles may explain this haze. We conclude that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the 'snow line', which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense. PMID:26659183

  14. A state-space dynamical representation for multibody mechanical systems. II - Systems with closed loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwertassek, R.; Roberson, R. E.

    1984-05-01

    The dynamical equations of motion of a multibody system are reduced to state-space equations in the computer-oriented multibody formalism of Roberson and Wittenberg (1966), extending the analysis of Schwertassek and Roberson (1983) to systems with closed loops. The multibody spacecraft model of Kane and Levinson (1980) and Schiehlen and Kreuzer (1977) is analyzed as an example. The closed-loop equations permit the use of the MULTIBODY computer code (Schwertassek, 1978) to treat such more general systems.

  15. Coating Thermoelectric Devices To Suppress Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Caillat, Thierry; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    A technique for suppressing sublimation of key elements from skutterudite compounds in advanced thermoelectric devices has been demonstrated. The essence of the technique is to cover what would otherwise be the exposed skutterudite surface of such a device with a thin, continuous film of a chemically and physically compatible metal. Although similar to other sublimation-suppression techniques, this technique has been specifically tailored for application to skutterudite antimonides. The primary cause of deterioration of most thermoelectric materials is thermal decomposition or sublimation - one or more elements sublime from the hot side of a thermoelectric couple, changing the stoichiometry of the device. Examples of elements that sublime from their respective thermoelectric materials are Ge from SiGe, Te from Pb/Te, and now Sb from skutterudite antimonides. The skutterudite antimonides of primary interest are CoSb3 [electron-donor (n) type] and CeFe(3-x)Co(x)Sb12 [electron-acceptor (p) type]. When these compounds are subjected to typical operating conditions [temperature of 700 C and pressure <10(exp -5) torr (0.0013 Pa)], Sb sublimes from their surfaces, with the result that Sb depletion layers form and advance toward their interiors. As the depletion layer advances in a given device, the change in stoichiometry diminishes the thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency of the device. The problem, then, is to prevent sublimation, or at least reduce it to an acceptably low level. In preparation for an experiment on suppression of sublimation, a specimen of CoSb3 was tightly wrapped in a foil of niobium, which was selected for its chemical stability. In the experiment, the wrapped specimen was heated to a temperature of 700 C in a vacuum of residual pressure <10(exp -5) torr (0.0013 Pa), then cooled and sectioned. Examination of the sectioned specimen revealed that no depletion layer had formed, indicating the niobium foil prevented sublimation of antimony at 700 C

  16. Closed Crawl Space Performance: Proof of Concept in the Production Builder Marketplace

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin-Weber, Melissa; Dastur, Cyrus; Mauceri, Maria; Hannas, Benjamin

    2008-10-30

    This overview is intended to be a very concise, limited summary of the key project activities discussed in the detailed report that follows. Due to the large scope of this project, the detailed report is broken into three individually titled sections. Each section repeats key background information, with the goal that the sections will eventually stand alone as complete reports on the major activities of the project. The information presented herein comes from ongoing research, so please note that all observations, findings and recommendations presented are preliminary and subject to change in the future. We invite and welcome your comments and suggestions for improving the project. Advanced Energy completed its first jointly-funded crawl space research project with the Department of Energy in 2005. That project, funded under award number DE-FC26-00NT40995 and titled 'A Field Study Comparison of the Energy and Moisture Performance Characteristics of Ventilated Versus Sealed Crawl Spaces in the South' demonstrated the substantial energy efficiency and moisture management benefits that result from using properly closed crawl space foundations for residential construction instead of traditional wall vented crawl space foundations. Two activities of this first project included (1) an assessment of ten existing homes to document commonly observed energy and moisture failures associated with wall-vented crawl space foundations and (2) a detailed literature review that documented both the history of closed crawl space research and the historical lack of scientific justification for building code requirements for crawl space ventilation. The most valuable activity of the 2005 project proved to be the field demonstration of various closed crawl space techniques, which were implemented in a set of twelve small (1040 square feet), simply designed homes in eastern North Carolina. These homes had matched envelope, mechanical and architectural designs, and comparable performance

  17. Probabilistic Analysis of Impact of Wake Vortices on Closely-Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Gordon H.; Rossow, Vernon J.; Meyn, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the primary constraints on the capacity of the nation's air transportation system is the landing capacity of its largest airports. Many airports with closely spaced parallel runways suffer a severe runway acceptance rate when the weather conditions do not allow full utilization of these parallel runways. The present requirement for simultaneous independent landings in Instrument Meteorological Conditions, IMC, is at least 4300 feet of lateral runway spacing (as close as 3000 feet for runways with a Precision Runway Monitor). Operations in Visual Meteorological Conditions, VMC, to Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches only require a lateral runway spacing greater than 750 feet. A study by Hardy and Lewis integrated and extended earlier studies and concepts in lateral traffic separation, longitudinal station keeping, wake prediction, wake display, and the concepts of R N P into a preliminary system concept for Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches in IMC. This system allows IMC airport acceptance rates to approach those for VMC. The system concept that was developed, presented traffic and wake information on the NAVigation Display, NAV, and developed operational procedures for a mix of conventional and Runway Independent Aircraft with different approach speeds to Closely Spaced Parallel Runways. This paper first describes some improvements made on the technology needed to better predict and formulate a probabilistic representation for the time-dependent motion and spreading of the hazardous region associated with the lift-generated vortex wakes of preceding aircraft. In this way, the time at which the vortex wakes of leading aircraft intrude into the airspace of adjacent flight-corridor/runway combinations can be more reliably predicted. Such a prediction is needed because it determines restraints to be placed on in-trail separation distances; or, the allowable time intervals between aircraft executing nearly simultaneous landings or takeoffs on very closely-spaced

  18. Pilot Non-Conformance to Alerting System Commands During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Hansman, R. John

    1997-01-01

    Pilot non-conformance to alerting system commands has been noted in general and to a TCAS-like collision avoidance system in a previous experiment. This paper details two experiments studying collision avoidance during closely-spaced parallel approaches in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), and specifically examining possible causal factors of, and design solutions to, pilot non-conformance.

  19. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Closed Surgical Wounds With Dead Space

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Hyunsuk; Lee, A-Young; Park, Eun Jung; Hong, Joon Pio

    2016-01-01

    Background Closed incisional wound surgery frequently leaves dead space under the repaired skin, which results in delayed healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) on incisional wounds with dead space after primary closure by evaluating the fluid volume through the suction drain, blood flow of the skin, tensile strength, and histology of the wounds. Methods Bilateral 25-cm-long incisional wounds with dead space were created on the back of 6 pigs by partially removing the back muscle and then suturing the skin with nylon sutures. NPWT (experimental group) or gauze dressing (control group) was applied over the closed incision for 7 days. Analysis of the wound included monitoring the amount of closed suction drain, blood perfusion unit, tensile strength of the repaired skin, and histology of the incision site. Results The drainage amount was significantly reduced in the experimental group (49.8 mL) compared to the control group (86.2 mL) (P = 0.046). Skin perfusion was increased in the experimental group with statistical significance compared to the control group (P = 0.0175). Collagen staining was increased in the experimental group. The tensile strength of the incision site was significantly higher in the experimental group (24.6 N at 7 days, 61.67 N at 21 days) compared to the control group (18.26 N at 7 days, 50.05 N at 21 days) (P = 0.02). Conclusion This study explains some of the mechanism for using NPWT in closed incision wounds with dead space. It demonstrates that NPWT significantly reduces drainage amount, increases skin perfusion, increases tensile strength, and has the tendency to promote collagen synthesis for closed wound with dead space indicating enhanced healing. PMID:25003432

  20. Experimental determination of ice sublimation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, R.; Canto, J.; Satorre, M. A.; Domingo, M.

    2011-11-01

    In Astrophysics, the study of ices is important due to the wide range of scenarios in which they are present. Their physical and chemical characteristics play an important role in the study of the interstellar medium (ISM). The assessment of the energy of sublimation allows us to improve our understanding of physical and/or chemical processes that take place where ices are present. The energy of sublimation E_sub is defined as the change of energy between solid and gas phase of certain molecule. This value is important to determinate other thermodynamical parameters such as the reticular energy of ionic compounds, the energy of formation in gas phase from the energy of formation in condensed phase, or to estimate the sublimation rate, which is very important in determining the evolution of surfaces of astrophysical objects.

  1. Quantum field theory in spaces with closed time-like curves. [Gott space

    SciTech Connect

    Boulware, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Gott spacetime has closed timelike curves, but no locally anomalous stress-energy. A complete orthonormal set of eigenfunctions of the wave operator is found in the special case of a spacetime in which the total deficit angle is 27[pi]. A scalar quantum field theory is constructed using these eigenfunctions. The resultant interacting quantum field theory is not unitary because the field operators can create real, on-shell, particles in the acausal region. These particles propagate for finite proper time accumulating an arbitrary phase before being annihilated at the same spacetime point as that at which they were created. As a result, the effective potential within the acausal region is complex, and probability is not conserved. The stress tensor of the scalar field is evaluated in the neighborhood of the Cauchy horizon; in the case of a sufficiently small Compton wavelength of the field, the stress tensor is regular and cannot prevent the formation of the Cauchy horizon.

  2. The Combination Application of Space Filling and Closed Irrigation Suction in Reconstruction of Sacral Decubitus Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Weizhong, Liang; Zuojun, Zhao; Junling, Wu; Hongmei, Ai

    2014-01-01

    Dead space and poor drainage are the main reasons for intractable sacral decubitus ulcers. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of treatment for sacral decubitus ulcer using space filling through muscle flap and closed irrigation. A total of 22 patients with serious sacral decubitus ulcer were treated with space filling through muscle flap and closed irrigation. After debridement of the decubitus ulcer, the infected areas over the bony prominence and osseous prominences were debrided. We elevated biceps femoris long head or semitendinosus and semimembranosus muscle. Pedicled by proximal part of muscle, the muscle flap was elevated to cover the ischial tuberosity. Transfusion systems of inflow and outflow drainage were placed between the muscle flap and ischial tuberosity. Wound healing and complications were observed. One wound dehiscence healed after secondary suturing. One wound gradually healed by dressing change after 3 weeks. The other cases had good results. Space filling and closed irrigation were complementary. The use of these two methods simultaneously is useful for the management of sacral decubitus ulcers. PMID:25216432

  3. Embedded coupled microrings with high-finesse and close-spaced resonances for optical signal processing.

    PubMed

    Souza, Mario C M M; Barea, Luis A M; Vallini, Felipe; Rezende, Guilherme F M; Wiederhecker, Gustavo S; Frateschi, Newton C

    2014-05-01

    Single microring resonators have been used in applications such as wavelength multicasting and microwave photonics, but the dependence of the free spectral range with ring radius imposes a trade-off between the required GHz optical channel spacing, footprint and power consumption. We demonstrate four-channel all-optical wavelength multicasting using only 1 mW of control power, with converted channel spacing of 40-60 GHz. Our device is based on a compact embedded microring design fabricated on a scalable SOI platform. The coexistence of close resonance spacing and high finesse (205) in a compact footprint is possible due to enhanced quality factors (30,000) resulting from the embedded configuration and the coupling-strength dependence of resonance spacing, instead of ring size. In addition, we discuss the possibility of achieving continuously mode splitting from a single-notch resonance up to 40 GHz. PMID:24921744

  4. Properties of closely spaced independently addressable lasers fabricated by impurity-induced disordering

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, R.L.; Mosby, W.J.; Donaldson, R.M.; Paoli, T.L. )

    1990-04-23

    We describe the fabrication and characteristics of closely spaced (10 {mu}m) dual-beam laser sources by the process of impurity-induced disordering. We present data demonstrating that these devices are capable of high efficiency and reliable operation when operated in a {ital p}-side up configuration. We also show that these devices can be placed in close proximity with a minimal amount of thermal and electrical interaction between devices. These features have significant implications for the realization of high-density arrays of independently addressable lasers for optical interconnection of integrated circuits and optical imaging systems.

  5. Wake Encounter Analysis for a Closely Spaced Parallel Runway Paired Approach Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckissick,Burnell T.; Rico-Cusi, Fernando J.; Murdoch, Jennifer; Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Stough, Harry P, III; O'Connor, Cornelius J.; Syed, Hazari I.

    2009-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of simultaneous approaches performed by two transport category aircraft from the final approach fix to a pair of closely spaced parallel runways was conducted to explore the aft boundary of the safe zone in which separation assurance and wake avoidance are provided. The simulation included variations in runway centerline separation, initial longitudinal spacing of the aircraft, crosswind speed, and aircraft speed during the approach. The data from the simulation showed that the majority of the wake encounters occurred near or over the runway and the aft boundaries of the safe zones were identified for all simulation conditions.

  6. Heat of Sublimation of I-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Giles; Robarts, Ronald A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive double-beam laser photometry experiment to determine the molar heat of sublimation of I-2. The experiment employs common laboratory materials and components and gives results with a two percent to three percent accuracy. (Author/GA)

  7. No reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with NHCO into a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  8. NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  9. Energy dissipation during sublimation from porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, H. U.; Skorov, Yu. V.

    2002-09-01

    Several physical processes during the sublimation from and inside porous media have been investigated in detail in a series our papers (Skorov et al., 1999, Icarus 140, 173, Skorov et al., 2001, Icarus 153, 180, Davidsson and Skorov, 2002, Icarus 156, 223, Davidsson and Skorov, 2002, Icarus, in press) in order to analyse the gas production of cometary nuclei . New features are the absorption of the irradiation within the uppermost layers of the pores (rather than on the surface), taking into account the gas pressure of the coma, and temperature dependent condensation and sublimation coefficients. Detailed kinetic calculations revealed deviations from the canonical gasdynamic models. We will summarize the impact of these new calculations on the physics of sublimation from a cometary nucleus. The absorption of the irradiation below the surface leads to a decrease of sublimation flux near the subsolar point but to an increase near the evening terminator and nightside of a rotating nucleus. More absorbed energy is available to be transferred into the interior of the nucleus. This effect and consequences for the development of cometary nuclei will be discussed.

  10. How to Kill a Journalism School: The Digital Sublime in the Discourse of Discontinuance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, Michael; Sindorf, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    The authors argue that journalism's uncertain identity in academia has made it vulnerable to unreflective instrumentalism in the digital era. They show how instrumentalism intertwined with the digital sublime constitutes a rhetorically resonate rationale for closing a journalism school. Evidence comes from documents and testimony associated with…

  11. System and method for suppressing sublimation using opacified aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeff S. (Inventor); Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Calliat, Thierry (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Jones, Steven M. (Inventor); Palk, Jong-Ah (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a castable, aerogel-based, ultra-low thermal conductivity opacified insulation to suppress sublimation. More specifically, the present invention relates to an aerogel opacified with various opacifying or reflecting constituents to suppress sublimation and provide thermal insulation in thermoelectric modules. The opacifying constituent can be graded within the aerogel for increased sublimation suppression, and the density of the aerogel can similarly be graded to achieve optimal thermal insulation and sublimation suppression.

  12. The Sublimation Rate of CO2 Under Simulated Mars Conditions and the Possible Climatic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Kathryn; Chevrier, V.; Roe, L.; White, K.; Blackburn, D.

    2008-09-01

    In order to understand the behavior of CO2 on Mars, we have studied the sublimation of dry ice under simulated martian conditions. Our experiments resulted in an average sublimation rate for CO2 ice of 1.20 ± 0.27 mm h-1. These results are very close to those observed of the martian polar caps retreat, and suggest a common process for the sublimation mechanism on Mars and in our chamber. Based on these results we created a model where irradiance from the sun is the primary source of heat on the martian polar surface. Our model predicts a 32 cm offset between the amount of CO2 ice sublimated and deposited in the southern polar region. The eccentricity of the martian orbit causes the southern hemisphere to sublimate more then it deposits back during one martian year. We have compared MOC and HiRISE images from approximately the same season (Ls 285.57º and 289.5º, respectively) from three martian years apart. These images indicate an average sublimation rate of 0.43 ± 0.04 m y-1, very close to the 0.32 m y-1 predicted by our model. Due to the length of Mars’ precession cycle, 93,000 martian years, it will take an extensive amount of time for the equinoxes to change. Therefore, we predict that the CO2 of the south polar cap will migrate entirely to the northern polar cap before such changes could occur. If the CO2 ice is only a thin layer above a much thicker water ice layer, this could expose large amounts of water ice, having a drastic climactic affect.

  13. The Significant Incidents and Close Calls in Human Space Flight Chart: Lessons Learned Gone Viral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Bill; Pate, Dennis; Thelen, David

    2010-01-01

    This presentation will explore the surprising history and events that transformed a mundane spreadsheet of historical spaceflight incidents into a popular and widely distributed visual compendium of lessons learned. The Significant Incidents and Close Calls in Human Space Flight Chart (a.k.a. The Significant Incidents Chart) is a popular and visually captivating reference product that has arisen from the work of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) Flight Safety Office (FSO). It began as an internal tool intended to increase our team s awareness of historical and modern space flight incidents. Today, the chart is widely recognized across the agency as a reference tool. It appears in several training and education programs. It is used in familiarization training in the JSC Building 9 Mockup Facility and is seen by hundreds of center visitors each week. The chart visually summarizes injuries, fatalities, and close calls sustained during the continuing development of human space flight. The poster-sized chart displays over 100 total events that have direct connections to human space flight endeavors. The chart is updated periodically. The update process itself has become a collaborative effort. Many people, spanning multiple NASA organizations, have provided suggestions for additional entries. The FSO maintains a growing list of subscribers who have requested to receive updates. The presenters will discuss the origins and motivations behind the significant incidents chart. A review of the inclusion criteria used to select events will be offered. We will address how the chart is used today by S&MA and offer a vision of how it might be used by other organizations now and in the future. Particular emphasis will be placed on features of the chart that have met with broad acceptance and have helped spread awareness of the most important lessons in human spaceflight.

  14. Numerical simulation of drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoqing; Huang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Snow sublimation is an important hydrological process and one of the main causes of the temporal and spatial variation of snow distribution. Compared with surface sublimation, drifting snow sublimation is more effective due to the greater surface exposure area of snow particles in the air. Previous studies of drifting snow sublimation have focused on suspended snow, and few have considered saltating snow, which is the main form of drifting snow. In this study, a numerical model is established to simulate the process of drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer. The simulated results show 1) the average sublimation rate of drifting snow particles increases linearly with the friction velocity; 2) the sublimation rate gradient with the friction velocity increases with increases in the environmental temperature and the undersaturation of air; 3) when the friction velocity is less than 0.525 m/s, the snowdrift sublimation of saltating particles is greater than that of suspended particles; and 4) the snowdrift sublimation in the saltation layer is less than that of the suspended particles only when the friction velocity is greater than 0.625 m/s. Therefore, the drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer constitutes a significant portion of the total snow sublimation. PMID:25312383

  15. Sublimed C60 films for tribology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Gupta, B. K.; Van Cleef, Garrett W.; Capp, Cindy; Coe, James V.

    1993-06-01

    Fullerenes take the form of hollow, geodesic domes, which are formed from a network of pentagons and hexagons. The C60 molecule has the highest possible symmetry (icosahedral) and assumes the shape of a soccer ball. At room temperature, fullerene molecules pack in a face-centered-cubic lattice bonded with weak van der Waals attractions. Fullerenes can be dissolved in solvents such as toluene and benzene and easily sublimed. The resilience, high load bearing capacity, low surface energy, high chemical stability, and spherical shape of C60 molecules and weak intermolecular bonding offer great potential for various mechanical and tribological applications. Sublimed films of C60 have been produced and friction and wear performance of these films in various operating environments are the subject of this letter.

  16. Psychotherapy. Sublimation and the psychodynamics of birding.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Norman A

    2012-07-01

    An adventure in extreme birding prompted the psychoanalyst author to reflect on "why do people do this?" Like myriad human interests, vocations, and avocations, the activity of bird watching is a socially acceptable activity that is the final pathway for multiple motivations that are likely to have a long history in the individual's development. It may have origins in basic survival skills. Various psychological defense mechanisms may be involved, the most mature and successful one being sublimation. Success of a defense-like sublimation may be viewed in terms of freedom from anxiety or from obsessive extremes that interfere with the individual's wellbeing, important relationships, or physical or financial health. The author considers whether the characters in the film The Big Year exemplify such success or the lack of it. PMID:22805903

  17. Aeroelastic dynamics of mistuned blade assemblies with closely spaced blade modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierre, Christophe; Murthy, Durbha V.

    1993-01-01

    The aeroelastic characteristics of tuned and randomly mistuned blade assemblies which possess two blade-alone natural modes with close frequencies are studied. Modal interactions among the two blade modes are shown to be come extremely significant for small frequency separation. The two distinct loci of the aeroelastic eigenvalues, which characterize an assembly with well separated modes, fully merge into a single root locus as the blade-mode frequency separation vanishes. Also, while in the case of well separated blade modes the introduction of random mistuning into one blade mode affects only the assembly modes which are predominantly of that blade-mode type, mistuning results in the localization of all the assembly modes when the blade-alone natural frequencies are close. Results indicate that in the case of closely-spaced blade modes a single-degree of freedom blade model yields qualitatively erroneous results and that an N-blade assembly with two close blade modes behaves like an equivalent 2Nb-blade assembly with a single blade mode.

  18. Closed Cycle Magnetohydrodynamic Nuclear Space Power Generation Using Helium/Xenon Working Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Harada, N.

    2005-01-01

    A multimegawatt-class nuclear fission powered closed cycle magnetohydrodynamic space power plant using a helium/xenon working gas has been studied, to include a comprehensive system analysis. Total plant efficiency was expected to be 55.2 percent including pre-ionization power. The effects of compressor stage number, regenerator efficiency, and radiation cooler temperature on plant efficiency were investigated. The specific mass of the power generation plant was also examined. System specific mass was estimated to be 3 kg/kWe for a net electrical output power of 1 MWe, 2-3 kg/kWe at 2 MWe, and approx.2 kg/KWe at >3 MWe. Three phases of research and development plan were proposed: (1) Phase I-proof of principle, (2) Phase II-demonstration of power generation, and (3) Phase III-prototypical closed loop test.

  19. No reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid and CO or other H-atom generating species is also present or added to the gas stream.

  20. Evaluating Nextgen Closely Spaced Parallel Operations Concepts with Validated Human Performance Models: Flight Deck Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooey, Becky Lee; Gore, Brian Francis; Mahlstedt, Eric; Foyle, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the current research were to develop valid human performance models (HPMs) of approach and land operations; use these models to evaluate the impact of NextGen Closely Spaced Parallel Operations (CSPO) on pilot performance; and draw conclusions regarding flight deck display design and pilot-ATC roles and responsibilities for NextGen CSPO concepts. This document presents guidelines and implications for flight deck display designs and candidate roles and responsibilities. A companion document (Gore, Hooey, Mahlstedt, & Foyle, 2013) provides complete scenario descriptions and results including predictions of pilot workload, visual attention and time to detect off-nominal events.

  1. Experimental Studies Of Pilot Performance At Collision Avoidance During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Hansman, R. John

    1997-01-01

    Efforts to increase airport capacity include studies of aircraft systems that would enable simultaneous approaches to closely spaced parallel runway in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). The time-critical nature of a parallel approach results in key design issues for current and future collision avoidance systems. Two part-task flight simulator studies have examined the procedural and display issues inherent in such a time-critical task, the interaction of the pilot with a collision avoidance system, and the alerting criteria and avoidance maneuvers preferred by subjects.

  2. Close-spaced vapor transport and photoelectrochemistry of gallium arsenide for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritenour, Andrew J.

    The high balance-of-system costs of photovoltaic installations indicate that reductions in absorber cost alone are likely insufficient for photovoltaic electricity to reach grid parity unless energy conversion efficiency is also increased. Technologies which both yield high-efficiency cells (>25%) and maintain low costs are needed. GaAs and related III--V semiconductors are used in the highest-efficiency single- and multi-junction photovoltaics, but the technology is too expensive for non-concentrated terrestrial applications. This is due in part to the limited scalability of traditional syntheses, which rely on expensive reactors and employ toxic and pyrophoric gas-phase precursors such as arsine and trimethyl gallium. This work describes GaAs films made by close-spaced vapor transport, a potentially scalable technique which is carried out at atmospheric pressure and requires only bulk GaAs, water vapor, and a temperature gradient to deposit crystalline films with similar electronic properties to GaAs prepared using traditional syntheses. Although close-spaced vapor transport of GaAs was first developed in 1963, there were few examples of GaAs photovoltaic devices made using this method in the literature at the onset of this project. Furthermore, it was unclear whether close-spaced vapor transport could produce GaAs films appropriate for use in photovoltaics. The goal of this project was to create and study GaAs devices made using close-spaced vapor transport and determine whether the technique could be used for production of grid-connected GaAs photovoltaics. In Chapter I the design of the vapor transport reactor, the chemistry of crystal growth, and optoelectronic characterization techniques are discussed. Chapter II focuses on compositional measurements, doping, and improved electronic quality in CSVT GaAs. Chapter III describes several aspects of the interplay between structure and electronic properties of photoelectrochemical devices. Chapter IV addresses

  3. Issues in Airborne Systems for Closely-Spaced Parallel Runway Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, A.; Carpenter, B.; Asari, K.; Kuchar, J.; Hansman, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Efforts to increase airport capacity include studies of aircraft systems that would enable simultaneous approaches to closely spaced parallel runways in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). The time-critical nature of a parallel approach results in key design issues for current and future collision avoidance systems. These issues are being studied in two ways. First, a part-task flight simulator study has examined the procedural and display issues inherent in such a time-critical task. Second, a prototype collision avoidance logic capable of generating this maneuver guidance has been designed using a recently developed methodology.

  4. Carbon-Carbon Recuperators in Closed-Brayton-Cycle Nuclear Space Power Systems: A Feasibility Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Michael J.; Johnson, Paul K.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using carbon-carbon recuperators in closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) nuclear space power conversion systems (PCS) was assessed. Recuperator performance expectations were forecast based on projected thermodynamic cycle state values for a planetary mission. Resulting thermal performance, mass and volume for a plate-fin carbon-carbon recuperator were estimated and quantitatively compared with values for a conventional offset-strip-fin metallic design. Material compatibility issues regarding carbon-carbon surfaces exposed to the working fluid in the CBC PCS were also discussed.

  5. Visualizing plasmon coupling in closely spaced chains of Ag nanoparticles by electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Fengqi; Wang, Tingyu; Wang, Xuefeng; Xu, Changhui; He, Longbing; Wan, Jianguo; Van Haesendonck, Christian; Ringer, Simon P; Han, Min; Liu, Zongwen; Wang, Guanghou

    2010-02-01

    Anisotropic plasmon coupling in closely spaced chains of Ag nanoparticles is visualized using electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope. For dimers as the simplest chain, mapping the plasmon excitations with nanometer spatial resolution and an energy resolution of 0.27 eV intuitively identifies two coupling plasmons. The in-phase mode redshifts from the ultraviolet region as the interparticle spacing is reduced, reaching the visible range at 2.7 eV. Calculations based on the discrete-dipole approximation confirm its optical activeness, where the longitudinal direction is constructed as the path for light transportation. Two coupling paths are then observed in an inflexed four-particle chain. PMID:20077517

  6. Optimizing surface-enhanced Raman scattering by template guided assembling of closely spaced silver nanocluster arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. H.; Xie, B.; Liu, Y. J.; He, L. B.; Han, M.

    2009-04-01

    We present an easy approach to synthesize closely spaced regular arrays of silver nanoclusters, which are self-assembled by depositing gas-phase synthesized metal nanoclusters onto pre-patterned triblock copolymer templates. The array has a high particle density of about 2 ×103 particles per μm2, and an average interparticle space of about 20 nm. The surface plasmon resonance wavelength of the array is tuned due to the interparticle plasmon coupling. High SERS sensitivity for less than one layer trans-1,2-bi-(4-pyridyl) ethylene (BPE) molecule detection, with an enhancement factor of 2.6 ×106, has been demonstrated for a substrate with this array. The enhanced Raman signal was found to be 5 times higher than that measured from the substrate with randomly distributed silver nanoparticles.

  7. Advances in defining a closed Brayton conversion system for future ARIANE 5 space nuclear power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tilliette, Z.P.

    1987-01-01

    The present European ARIANE space program will expand into the large ARIANE 5 launch vehicle from 1995. It is assumed that important associated missions would require the generation of 200 kWe or more in space during several years at the very beginning of the next century. For this reason, in 1983, the French C.N.E.S. (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and C.E.A. (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) have initiated preliminary studies of a space nuclear power system. The currently selected conversion system is a closed Brayton cycle. Reasons for this choice are given: high efficiency of a dynamic system; monophasic, inert working fluid; extensive turbomachinery experience, etc. A key aspect of the project is the adaptation to heat rejection conditions, namely to the radiator geometry which depends upon the dimensions of the ARIANE 5 spacecraft. In addition to usual concepts already studied for space applications, another cycle arrangement is being investigated which could offer satisfactory compromises among many considerations, increase the efficiency of the system, and make it more attractive as far as the specific mass (kg/lWe), the specific radiator area (m/sup 2//kWe), and various technological aspects are concerned. Comparative details are presented.

  8. Multiport well design for sampling of ground water at closely spaced vertical intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Delin, G.N.; Landon, M.K.

    1996-11-01

    Detailed vertical sampling is useful in aquifers where vertical mixing is limited and steep vertical gradients in chemical concentrations are expected. Samples can be collected at closely spaced vertical intervals from nested wells with short screened intervals. However, this approach may not be appropriate in all situations. An easy-to-construct and easy-to-install multiport sampling well to collect ground-water samples from closely spaced vertical intervals was developed and tested. The multiport sampling well was designed to sample ground water from surficial sand-and-gravel aquifers. The device consists of multiple stainless-steel tubes within a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) protective casing. The tubes protrude through the wall of the PVC casing at the desired sampling depths. A peristaltic pump is used to collect ground-water samples form the sampling ports. The difference in hydraulic head between any two sampling ports can be measured with a vacuum pump and a modified manometer. The usefulness and versatility of this multiport well design was demonstrated at an agricultural research site near Princeton, Minnesota where sampling ports were installed to a maximum depth of about 12 m below land surface. Trace experiments were conducted using potassium bromide to document the degree to which short-circuiting occurred between sampling ports. Samples were successfully collected for analysis of major cations and anions, nutrients, selected herbicides, isotopes, dissolved gases, and chlorofluorocarbon concentrations.

  9. Synthesis of Ga 2O 3 chains with closely spaced knots connected by nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, L.; You, L. P.; Duan, X. F.; Lian, W. C.; Qin, G. G.

    2004-07-01

    Chains of closely spaced metal or semiconductor particles have potential applications in optoelectronics and single electron devices. We report, for the first time, the synthesis of Ga 2O 3 chains with closely spaced knots connected by nanowires using the thermal evaporation method with a specially designed quartz boat. The Ga 2O 3 chains grew only on the Si substrates where Au catalyst or Ga droplets were coated. The average diameter of the knots is about 450 nm and that of the nanowires is about 50 nm. The selected area electron diffraction of either a knot or a connecting nanowire includes two sets of overlapped single crystal electron diffraction patterns which belong to the [1 0 2] and [1 0 1¯] crystal zone axes of the monoclinic β-Ga 2O 3 phase, respectively. The knot and its neighbor nanowire have the common ( 2¯ 0 1) growth planes at their interface. A mechanism model for the Ga 2O 3 chains synthesis based on the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism is discussed.

  10. Multiport well design for sampling of ground water at closely spaced vertical intervals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delin, G.N.; Landon, M.K.

    1996-01-01

    Detailed vertical sampling is useful in aquifers where vertical mixing is limited and steep vertical gradients in chemical concentrations are expected. Samples can be collected at closely spaced vertical intervals from nested wells with short screened intervals. However, this approach may not be appropriate in all situations. An easy-to-construct and easy-to-install multiport sampling well to collect ground-water samples from closely spaced vertical intervals was developed and tested. The multiport sampling well was designed to sample ground water from surficial sand-and-gravel aquifers. The device consists of multiple stainless-steel tubes within a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) protective casing. The tubes protrude through the wall of the PVC casing at the desired sampling depths. A peristaltic pump is used to collect ground-water samples from the sampling ports. The difference in hydraulic head between any two sampling ports can be measured with a vacuum pump and a modified manometer. The usefulness and versatility of this multiport well design was demonstrated at an agricultural research site near Princeton, Minnesota where sampling ports were installed to a maximum depth of about 12 m below land surface. Tracer experiments were conducted using potassium bromide to document the degree to which short-circuiting occurred between sampling ports. Samples were successfully collected for analysis of major cations and anions, nutrients, selected herbicides, isotopes, dissolved gases, and chlorofluorcarbon concentrations.

  11. Detecting Space-Time Alternating Biological Signals Close to the Bifurcation Point

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhiheng; Bien, Harold; Entcheva, Emilia

    2011-01-01

    Time-alternating biological signals, i.e., alternans, arise in variety of physiological states marked by dynamic instabilities, e.g., period doubling. Normally, a sequence of large–small–large transients, they can exhibit variable patterns over time and space, including spatial discordance. Capture of the early formation of such alternating regions is challenging because of the spatiotemporal similarities between noise and the small-amplitude alternating signals close to the bifurcation point. We present a new approach for automatic detection of alternating signals in large noisy spatiotemporal datasets by exploiting quantitative measures of alternans evolution, e.g., temporal persistence, and by preserving phase information. The technique specifically targets low amplitude, relatively short alternating sequences and is validated by combinatorics-derived probabilities and empirical datasets with white noise. Using high-resolution optical mapping in live cardiomyocyte networks, exhibiting calcium alternans, we reveal for the first time early fine-scale alternans, close to the noise level, which are linked to the later formation of larger regions and evolution of spatially discordant alternans. This robust method aims at quantification and better understanding of the onset of cardiac arrhythmias and can be applied to general analysis of space-time alternating signals, including the vicinity of the bifurcation point. PMID:19695992

  12. Testing and Model Correlation of Sublimator Driven Coldplate Coupons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik; Stephan, Ryan; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2008-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a traditional thermal control scheme. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially saving mass, power, and complexity. Because this concept relies on evaporative heat rejection techniques, it is primarily useful for short mission durations. Additionally, the concept requires a conductive path between the heat-generating component and the heat rejection device. Therefore, it is mostly a relevant solution for a vehicle with a relatively low heat rejection requirement. Coupon level tests were performed at NASA's Johnson Space Center to better understand the basic operational principles and to validate the analytical methods being used for the SDC development. This paper outlines the results of the SDC coupon tests, the subsequent thermal model correlation, and a description of the SDC Engineering Development Unit design.

  13. A Closed Brayton Power Conversion Unit Concept for Nuclear Electric Propulsion for Deep Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyner, Claude Russell; Fowler, Bruce; Matthews, John

    2003-01-01

    In space, whether in a stable satellite orbit around a planetary body or traveling as a deep space exploration craft, power is just as important as the propulsion. The need for power is especially important for in-space vehicles that use Electric Propulsion. Using nuclear power with electric propulsion has the potential to provide increased payload fractions and reduced mission times to the outer planets. One of the critical engineering and design aspects of nuclear electric propulsion at required mission optimized power levels is the mechanism that is used to convert the thermal energy of the reactor to electrical power. The use of closed Brayton cycles has been studied over the past 30 or years and shown to be the optimum approach for power requirements that range from ten to hundreds of kilowatts of power. It also has been found to be scalable to higher power levels. The Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) engine power conversion unit (PCU) is the most flexible for a wide range of power conversion needs and uses state-of-the-art, demonstrated engineering approaches. It also is in use with many commercial power plants today. The long life requirements and need for uninterrupted operation for nuclear electric propulsion demands high reliability from a CBC engine. A CBC engine design for use with a Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system has been defined based on Pratt & Whitney's data from designing long-life turbo-machines such as the Space Shuttle turbopumps and military gas turbines and the use of proven integrated control/health management systems (EHMS). An integrated CBC and EHMS design that is focused on using low-risk and proven technologies will over come many of the life-related design issues. This paper will discuss the use of a CBC engine as the power conversion unit coupled to a gas-cooled nuclear reactor and the design trends relative to its use for powering electric thrusters in the 25 kWe to 100kWe power level.

  14. TacSat-2: Path finder for a Close Space Support Asset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhopale, A.; Finley, C.

    2008-08-01

    With th e launch of TacSat-2, the Oper ationally Responsive Sp ace (O RS) commun ity had its f irst on- orbit asset and opportunity to prove or disprove the premise that small, in expensiv e, and quickly constructed spacecraf t could perform useful operation al missions when needed and for as long as need ed. All of the components of the comp lex TacSat-2 system had to work together to answer the basic questions, "In a crisis, can a lab-developed spacecraf t and ground architecture competen tly p erform th e mission of systems that cost twen ty times the price and tak e four times as long to develop? Mor eover, can th is system actu ally improve on the responsiveness of Nation al Systems to a certain set of underserv ed Oper ational customers?" When all w as said and done, TacSat-2 was a sp acecraf t that h ad to: 1) Carry th irteen tactical and scientific payloads to orbit, many of which doubled as essen tial, non-redundant subsystems; 2) Launch from an unproven launch base on a last minute "rep lacement" launch vehicle; and 3) Fulfill about 140 on-orbit mission requirements. It had tactical sensors, two unproven communication links, numerous next-gen eration single- string componen ts (e.g., h igh-efficiency propulsion system, thin-film so lar arrays, low-power versatile star camera) , and autonomous softw are to mak e the system more friendly and familiar to Tactical, rather than Spacecraf t Op erators. However, the mission was as mu ch about the implementation as it w as about the components. TacSat-2 was designed for and emp loyed with a different concept of operations ( CONOPS) than tradition al N ational Operational Assets. It w as designed to be th e fir st-ev er Clo se Space Support platform and operated in a manner more analogous to Close Air Support aircraf t than to tr aditional spacecraft. Therefore, th e primary objective of the TacSat-2 mission was to use th e TacSat-2 system to id entify those parts of the spacecr aft, ground system, and CON OPS

  15. Homojunction GaAs solar cells grown by close space vapor transport

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, Jason W.; Ritenour, Andrew J.; Greenaway, Ann L.; Aloni, Shaul; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2014-06-08

    We report on the first pn junction solar cells grown by homoepitaxy of GaAs using close space vapor transport (CSVT). Cells were grown both on commercial wafer substrates and on a CSVT absorber film, and had efficiencies reaching 8.1%, open circuit voltages reaching 909 mV, and internal quantum efficiency of 90%. The performance of these cells is partly limited by the electron diffusion lengths in the wafer substrates, as evidenced by the improved peak internal quantum efficiency in devices fabricated on a CSVT absorber film. Unoptimized highly-doped n-type emitters also limit the photocurrent, indicating that thinner emitters with reduced doping, and ultimately wider band gap window or surface passivation layers, are required to increase the efficiency.

  16. Performance and Mass Modeling Subtleties in Closed-Brayton-Cycle Space Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Michael J.; Johnson, Paul K.

    2006-01-01

    A number of potential NASA missions could benefit from closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) power conversion systems. The human and robotic mission power applications include spacecraft, surface base, and rover scenarios. Modeling of CBC subsystems allows system engineers, mission planners and project managers to make informed decisions regarding power conversion system characteristics and capabilities. To promote thorough modeling efforts, a critical review of CBC modeling techniques is presented. Analysis of critical modeling elements, component influences and cycle sensitivities is conducted. The analysis leads to quantitative results addressing projections on converter efficiency and overall power conversion system mass. Even moderate modeling errors are shown to easily over-predict converter efficiencies by 30% and underestimate mass estimates by 20%. Both static and dynamic modeling regimes are evaluated. Key considerations in determining model fidelity requirements are discussed. Conclusions and recommendations are presented that directly address ongoing modeling efforts in solar and nuclear space power systems.

  17. Performance and Mass Modeling Subtleties in Closed-Brayton-Cycle Space Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Michael J.; Johnson, Paul K.

    2005-01-01

    A number of potential NASA missions could benefit from closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) power conversion systems. The human and robotic mission power applications include spacecraft, surface base, and rover scenarios. Modeling of CBC subsystems allows system engineers, mission planners and project managers to make informed decisions regarding power conversion system characteristics and capabilities. To promote thorough modeling efforts, a critical review of CBC modeling techniques is presented. Analysis of critical modeling elements, component influences and cycle sensitivities is conducted. The analysis leads to quantitative results addressing projections on converter efficiency and overall power conversion system mass. Even moderate modeling errors are shown to easily over-predict converter efficiencies by 30 percent and underestimate mass estimates by 20 percent. Both static and dynamic modeling regimes are evaluated. Key considerations in determining model fidelity requirements are discussed. Conclusions and recommendations are presented that directly address ongoing modeling efforts in solar and nuclear space power systems.

  18. Adaptive Filtering for Large Space Structures: A Closed-Form Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, H. E.; Schaechter, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    In a previous paper Schaechter proposes using an extended Kalman filter to estimate adaptively the (slowly varying) frequencies and damping ratios of a large space structure. The time varying gains for estimating the frequencies and damping ratios can be determined in closed form so it is not necessary to integrate the matrix Riccati equations. After certain approximations, the time varying adaptive gain can be written as the product of a constant matrix times a matrix derived from the components of the estimated state vector. This is an important savings of computer resources and allows the adaptive filter to be implemented with approximately the same effort as the nonadaptive filter. The success of this new approach for adaptive filtering was demonstrated using synthetic data from a two mode system.

  19. Carbon-Carbon Recuperators in Closed-Brayton-Cycle Space Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Michael J.; Johnson, Paul K.

    2006-01-01

    The use of carbon-carbon (C-C) recuperators in closed-Brayton-cycle space power conversion systems was assessed. Recuperator performance was forecast based on notional thermodynamic cycle state values for planetary missions. Resulting thermal performance, mass and volume for plate-fin C-C recuperators were estimated and quantitatively compared with values for conventional offset-strip-fin metallic designs. Mass savings of 40-55% were projected for C-C recuperators with effectiveness greater than 0.9 and thermal loads from 25-1400 kWt. The smaller thermal loads corresponded with lower mass savings; however, at least 50% savings were forecast for all loads above 300 kWt. System-related material challenges and compatibility issues were also discussed.

  20. Carbon-Carbon Recuperators in Closed-Brayton-Cycle Space Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Michael J.; Johnson, Paul K.; Naples, Andrew G.

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of using carbon-carbon (C-C) recuperators in conceptual closed-Brayton-cycle space power conversion systems was assessed. Recuperator performance expectations were forecast based on notional thermodynamic cycle state values for potential planetary missions. Resulting thermal performance, mass and volume for plate-fin C-C recuperators were estimated and quantitatively compared with values for conventional offset-strip-fin metallic designs. Mass savings of 30 to 60 percent were projected for C-C recuperators with effectiveness greater than 0.9 and thermal loads from 25 to 1400 kWt. The smaller thermal loads corresponded with lower mass savings; however, 60 percent savings were forecast for all loads above 300 kWt. System-related material challenges and compatibility issues were also discussed.

  1. Comparison of Procedures for Dual and Triple Closely Spaced Parallel Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Savita; Ballinger, Deborah; Subramanian Shobana; Kozon, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A human-in-the-loop high fidelity flight simulation experiment was conducted, which investigated and compared breakout procedures for Very Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches (VCSPA) with two and three runways. To understand the feasibility, usability and human factors of two and three runway VCSPA, data were collected and analyzed on the dependent variables of breakout cross track error and pilot workload. Independent variables included number of runways, cause of breakout and location of breakout. Results indicated larger cross track error and higher workload using three runways as compared to 2-runway operations. Significant interaction effects involving breakout cause and breakout location were also observed. Across all conditions, cross track error values showed high levels of breakout trajectory accuracy and pilot workload remained manageable. Results suggest possible avenues of future adaptation for adopting these procedures (e.g., pilot training), while also showing potential promise of the concept.

  2. Principles for RNA metabolism and alternative transcription initiation within closely spaced promoters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Pai, Athma A; Herudek, Jan; Lubas, Michal; Meola, Nicola; Järvelin, Aino I; Andersson, Robin; Pelechano, Vicent; Steinmetz, Lars M; Jensen, Torben Heick; Sandelin, Albin

    2016-09-01

    Mammalian transcriptomes are complex and formed by extensive promoter activity. In addition, gene promoters are largely divergent and initiate transcription of reverse-oriented promoter upstream transcripts (PROMPTs). Although PROMPTs are commonly terminated early, influenced by polyadenylation sites, promoters often cluster so that the divergent activity of one might impact another. Here we found that the distance between promoters strongly correlates with the expression, stability and length of their associated PROMPTs. Adjacent promoters driving divergent mRNA transcription support PROMPT formation, but owing to polyadenylation site constraints, these transcripts tend to spread into the neighboring mRNA on the same strand. This mechanism to derive new alternative mRNA transcription start sites (TSSs) is also evident at closely spaced promoters supporting convergent mRNA transcription. We suggest that basic building blocks of divergently transcribed core promoter pairs, in combination with the wealth of TSSs in mammalian genomes, provide a framework with which evolution shapes transcriptomes. PMID:27455346

  3. Science Sublime: The Philosophy of the Sublime, Dewey's Aesthetics, and Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Feelings of awe, wonder, and appreciation have been largely ignored in the working lives of scientists and, in turn, science education has not accurately portrayed science to students. In an effort to bring the affective qualities of science into the classroom, this work draws on the writings of the sublime by Burke, Kant, Emerson, and Wordsworth…

  4. Tunneling spectroscopy of close-spaced dangling-bond pairs in Si(001):H

    PubMed Central

    Engelund, Mads; Zuzak, Rafał; Godlewski, Szymon; Kolmer, Marek; Frederiksen, Thomas; García-Lekue, Aran; Sánchez-Portal, Daniel; Szymonski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the electronic properties of close-spaced dangling-bond (DB) pairs in a hydrogen-passivated Si(001):H p-doped surface. Two types of DB pairs are considered, called “cross” and “line” structures. Our scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) data show that, although the spectra taken over different DBs in each pair exhibit a remarkable resemblance, they appear shifted by a constant energy that depends on the DB-pair type. This spontaneous asymmetry persists after repeated STS measurements. By comparison with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we demonstrate that the magnitude of this shift and the relative position of the STS peaks can be explained by distinct charge states for each DB in the pair. We also explain how the charge state is modified by the presence of the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip and the applied bias. Our results indicate that, using the STM tip, it is possible to control the charge state of individual DBs in complex structures, even if they are in close proximity. This observation might have important consequences for the design of electronic circuits and logic gates based on DBs in passivated silicon surfaces. PMID:26404520

  5. Multi-MW Closed Cycle MHD Nuclear Space Power Via Nonequilibrium He/Xe Working Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Harada, Nobuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Prospects for a low specific mass multi-megawatt nuclear space power plant were examined assuming closed cycle coupling of a high-temperature fission reactor with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion and utilization of a nonequilibrium helium/xenon frozen inert plasma (FIP). Critical evaluation of performance attributes and specific mass characteristics was based on a comprehensive systems analysis assuming a reactor operating temperature of 1800 K for a range of subsystem mass properties. Total plant efficiency was expected to be 55.2% including plasma pre-ionization power, and the effects of compressor stage number, regenerator efficiency and radiation cooler temperature on plant efficiency were assessed. Optimal specific mass characteristics were found to be dependent on overall power plant scale with 3 kg/kWe being potentially achievable at a net electrical power output of 1-MWe. This figure drops to less than 2 kg/kWe when power output exceeds 3 MWe. Key technical issues include identification of effective methods for non-equilibrium pre-ionization and achievement of frozen inert plasma conditions within the MHD generator channel. A three-phase research and development strategy is proposed encompassing Phase-I Proof of Principle Experiments, a Phase-II Subscale Power Generation Experiment, and a Phase-III Closed-Loop Prototypical Laboratory Demonstration Test.

  6. Hubble Space Telescope View of Comet C/Siding Spring during its Close Encounter with Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. Y.; Samarasinha, N. H.; Kelley, M. S. P.; Farnham, T. L.; Bodewits, D.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Lisse, C. M.; Delamere, W. A.; Mutchler, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) is a dynamically new comet whose physical and chemical status should be the least evolved since the formation of cometesimals during the planetary system formation processes. Its close encounter with Mars on October 19, 2014 at a distance of 131,000 km allows for imaging its nucleus and inner coma by MRO/HiRISE at 140 m/pix resolution. Such an encounter offers us the opportunity to do cometary flyby science for a dynamically new comet for the first time ever. Those observations have the potential to advance our understanding of comets in ways similar to previous flyby missions to periodic comets. An extensive observing campaign from many ground- and space-based platforms is supporting the "flyby" observations from Mars spacecraft. We will monitor the comet with Hubble Space Telescope for >24 hrs total observing time around the encounter, to obtain images of the inner coma at ~46 km/pix at the comet. These observations will allow us to perform detailed studies of the morphology of the dust and gas coma of C/Siding Spring, and to connect the observations performed from various platforms at various spatial resolutions and over a long time baseline. The ultimate goal is to correlate large-scale coma behaviors to the nucleus as resolved by MRO/HiRISE. We will report the HST observations and the preliminary results.

  7. Theoretical analysis of surface-plasmon-polariton resonators in free space and close to an interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jesper; Søndergaard, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) resonators consisting of metal strips in free space, and gap plasmon polariton resonators consisting of a metal strip close to either a block of metal or a metal surface, are studied as optical resonators. The analysis is performed using the Green's function surface integral equation method. For strips in free space, we show how the scattering resonances can be understood, by thinking of the strips as optical resonators for short-range SPPs. The two gap resonator configurations, strip-block and strip-surface, have different structure terminations as the width of the strip and the block are identical whereas the surface is infinite. In the strip-surface configuration, the scattering resonances are broader and red-shifted, compared to the strip-block configuration. This is explained as a consequence of the effective length of the resonator being larger in the strip-surface configuration. By varying the gap size, we study the transition from a SPP resonator to a gap plasmon polariton resonator. In the strip-surface configuration, light can be scattered into both out-of-plane propagating waves and into SPPs that propagate along the surface. For small gaps of a few tens of nanometers, a large enhancement in the scattering cross section is seen due to strong scattering into SPPs.

  8. Phase space matching and finite lifetime effects for top-pair production close to threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Reisser, Christoph J.; Ruiz-Femenia, Pedro

    2010-07-01

    The top-pair tt production cross section close to threshold in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions is strongly affected by the small lifetime of the top quark. Since the cross section is defined through final states containing the top decay products, a consistent definition of the cross section depends on prescriptions of how these final states are accounted for the cross section. Experimentally, these prescriptions are implemented, for example, through cuts on kinematic quantities such as the reconstructed top quark invariant masses. As long as these cuts do not reject final states that can arise from the decay of a top and an antitop quark with a small off-shellness compatible with the nonrelativistic power counting, they can be implemented through imaginary phase space matching conditions in nonrelativistic QCD. The prescription-dependent cross section can then be determined from the optical theorem using the e{sup +}e{sup -} forward scattering amplitude. We compute the phase space matching conditions associated to cuts on the top and antitop invariant masses at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic order and partially at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic order in the nonrelativistic expansion accounting also for higher order QCD effects. Together with finite lifetime and electroweak effects known from previous work, we analyze their numerical impact on the tt cross section. We show that the phase space matching contributions are essential to make reliable nonrelativistic QCD predictions, particularly for energies below the peak region, where the cross section is small. We find that irreducible background contributions associated to final states that do not come from top decays are strongly suppressed and can be neglected for the theoretical predictions.

  9. 76 FR 51436 - Post Office Closing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... electronically should contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section as the source... Postal Service's determination to close the post office in Sublime, Texas. The petition was filed...

  10. Kinematic Modeling of Separation Compression for Paired Approaches to Closely-Spaced Parallel Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    In a simultaneous paired approach to closely-spaced parallel runways, a pair of aircraft flies in close proximity on parallel approach paths. The longitudinal separation between the aircraft must be maintained within a range that avoids wake encounters and, if one of the aircraft blunders, avoids collision. To increase operational availability, the approach procedure must accommodate a mixture of aircraft sizes and, consequently, approach speeds. In these procedures, the slower aircraft is placed in the lead position. The faster aircraft maintains separation from the slow aircraft in a dependent operation until final approach and flies independently afterward. Due to the higher approach speed of the fast aircraft, longitudinal separation will decrease during final approach. Therefore, the fast aircraft must position itself before the final approach so that it will remain within the safe range of separation as separation decreases. Given the approach geometry and speed schedule for each aircraft, one can use kinematics to estimate the separation loss between a pair of aircraft. A kinematic model can complement fast-time Monte-Carlo simulations of the approach by enabling a tailored reduction in the variation of starting position for the fast aircraft. One could also implement the kinematic model in ground-based or on-board decision support tools to compute the optimal initial separation for a given pair of aircraft. To better match the auto-coupled flight of real aircraft, the paper derives a kinematic model where the speed schedule is flown using equivalent airspeed. The predicted time of flight using the equivalent airspeed kinematic model compares well against a high-fidelity aircraft simulation performing the same approach. This model also demonstrates a modest increase in the predicted loss of separation when contrasted against a kinematic model that assumes the scheduled speed is true airspeed.

  11. Importance of closely spaced vertical sampling in delineating chemical and microbiological gradients in groundwater studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Harvey, R.W.; LeBlanc, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Vertical gradients of selected chemical constituents, bacterial populations, bacterial activity and electron acceptors were investigated for an unconfined aquifer contaminated with nitrate and organic compounds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, U.S.A. Fifteen-port multilevel sampling devices (MLS's) were installed within the contaminant plume at the source of the contamination, and at 250 and 2100 m downgradient from the source. Depth profiles of specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at the downgradient sites exhibited vertical gradients that were both steep and inversely related. Narrow zones (2-4 m thick) of high N2O and NH4+ concentrations were also detected within the contaminant plume. A 27-fold change in bacterial abundance; a 35-fold change in frequency of dividing cells (FDC), an indicator of bacterial growth; a 23-fold change in 3H-glucose uptake, a measure of heterotrophic activity; and substantial changes in overall cell morphology were evident within a 9-m vertical interval at 250 m downgradient. The existence of these gradients argues for the need for closely spaced vertical sampling in groundwater studies because small differences in the vertical placement of a well screen can lead to incorrect conclusions about the chemical and microbiological processes within an aquifer.Vertical gradients of selected chemical constituents, bacterial populations, bacterial activity and electron acceptors were investigated for an unconfined aquifer contaminated with nitrate and organic compounds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. Fifteen-port multilevel sampling devices (MLS's) were installed within the contaminant plume at the source of the contamination, and at 250 and 2100 m downgradient from the source. Depth profiles of specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at the downgradient sites exhibited vertical gradients that were both steep and inversely related. Narrow zones (2-4 m thick) of high N2O and NH4+ concentrations were also detected within the contaminant plume

  12. Reassessing Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature in the Kantian Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The sublime has been a relatively neglected topic in recent work in philosophical aesthetics, with existing discussions confined mainly to problems in Kant's theory. Given the revival of interest in his aesthetic theory and the influence of the Kantian sublime compared to other eighteenth-century accounts, this focus is not surprising. Kant's…

  13. Generalized Orbital Projections of a Sublimating Ice Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menkin, Evgeny; Bacon, Jack

    2006-01-01

    The issue of orbital debris resulting from human activities in space is a growing concern for the space users' community. Waste generated in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) can stay in orbit for a long time, creating significant hazards for other spacecraft flying at lower intercepting orbits. Many spacecraft, especially crewed vehicles, are required to vent fluids into space. These fluids include propellant, wastewater, excess condensate, and others. It is important to analyze the behavior of particles that result from these activities, since each individual particle is capable of damaging or destroying a spacecraft in a lower, crossing orbit, and such particles are invisible to tracking radar systems on the ground. The deorbit trajectory of an ice particle is complex. It depends on factors including attitude of the vehicle during vent, initial velocities of particles, altitude at which the vent occurred, and numerous evaporation and sublimation factors. These include contamination within the vented water, evolution of bubbles within the clear water, and sun flux factors such as time of the year and current beta angle. The purpose of this study is to examine the influences of these factors on the trajectories of ice particles resulting from condensate water dumps, and to bound the safe trajectories of spacecraft that lie below the venting spacecraft.

  14. Sublimation Growth of Titanium Nitride Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Li; Edgar, J H; Kenik, Edward A; Meyer III, Harry M

    2009-01-01

    The sublimation-recondensation growth of titanium nitride crystal with N/Ti ratio of 0.99 on tungsten substrate is reported. The growth rate dependence on temperature and pressure was determined, and the calculated activation energy is 775.8 29.8kJ/mol. The lateral and vertical growth rates changed with the time of growth and the fraction of the tungsten substrate surface covered. The orientation relationship of TiN (001) || W (001) with TiN [100] || W [110], a 45o angle between TiN [100] and W [100], occurs not only for TiN crystals deposited on W (001) textured tungsten but also for TiN crystals deposited on randomly orientated tungsten. This study demonstrates that this preferred orientational relationship minimizes the lattice mismatch between the TiN and tungsten.

  15. Sublimation of ice-tholins mixtures: A morphological and spectro-photometric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, Olivier; Pommerol, Antoine; Jost, Bernhard; Carrasco, Nathalie; Szopa, Cyril; Thomas, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Sublimation, the direct transition from solid to gas phase, is a process responsible for shaping and changing the reflectance properties of many Solar System surfaces. In this study, we have characterized the evolution of the structure/texture and of the visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR) spectral reflectance of surfaces made of water ice mixed with analogues of complex extraterrestrial organic matter, named tholins, under low temperature (<-70 °C) and pressure (10-5 mbar) conditions. The experiments were carried out in the SCITEAS simulation setup recently built as part of the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern (Pommerol, A. et al. [2015a]. Planet. Space Sci. 109-110, 106-122). As the water ice sublimated, we observed in situ the formation of a sublimation lag deposit made of a water-free porous (>90% porosity) network of organic filaments on top of the ice. The temporal evolution of the tholins and water ice spectral features (reflectance at the absorption bands wavelengths, red slope, from 0.40 to 1.90 μm) are analyzed throughout the sublimation of the samples. We studied how different mixtures of tholins with water (0.1 wt.% tholins as coating or inclusions within the water particles), and different ice particle sizes (4.5 ± 2.5 or 67 ± 31 μm) influence the morphological and spectral evolutions of the samples. The sublimation of the ice below the mantle produces a gas flow responsible for the ejection of mm to cm-sized fragments of the deposit in outbursts-like events. The results show remarkable differences between these samples in term of mantle structure, speed of mantle building, rates and surface area of mantle ejections. These data provide useful references for interpreting remote-sensing observations of icy Solar System surfaces, in particular the activity of comet nuclei where sublimation of organic-rich ices and deposition of organic-dust particles likely play a major role. Consequently, the

  16. Sublime science: Teaching for scientific sublime experiences in middle school classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanaugh, Shane

    Due to a historical separation of cognition and emotion, the affective aspects of learning are often seen as trivial in comparison to the more 'essential' cognitive qualities - particularly in the domain of science. As a result of this disconnect, feelings of awe, wonder, and astonishment as well as appreciation have been largely ignored in the working lives of scientists. In turn, I believe that science education has not accurately portrayed the world of science to our students. In an effort to bring the affective qualities of science into the science classroom, I have drawn on past research in the field of aesthetic science teaching and learning as well as works by, Burke, Kant, and Dewey to explore a new construct I have called the "scientific sublime". Scientific sublime experiences represent a sophisticated treatment of the cognitive as well as affective qualities of science learning. The scientific sublime represents feelings of awe, wonder, and appreciation that come from a deep understanding. It is only through this understanding of a phenomenon that we can appreciate its true complexity and intricacies, and these understandings when mixed with the emotions of awe and reverence, are sublime. Scientific sublime experiences are an attempt at the re-integration of cognition and feeling. The goal of this research was twofold: to create and teach a curriculum that fosters scientific sublime experiences in middle school science classes, and to better understand how these experiences are manifested in students. In order to create an approach to teaching for scientific sublime experiences, it was first necessary for me to identify key characteristics of such an experience and a then to create a pedagogical approach, both of which are described in detail in the dissertation. This research was conducted as two studies in two different middle schools. My pedagogical approach was used to create and teach two five-week 7 th grade science units---one on weather

  17. Heat transport through plasmonic interactions in closely spaced metallic nanoparticle chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Joulain, Karl; Drevillon, Jérémie; Le Goff, Clément

    2008-02-01

    We report a numerical investigation on the heat transfer through one-dimensional arrays of metallic nanoparticles closely spaced in a host material. Our simulations show that the multipolar interactions play a crucial role in the heat transport via collective plasmons. Calculations of the plasmonic thermal conductance and of the thermal conductivity in ballistic and diffusive regimes, respectively, have been carried out. (a) Using the Landauer-Buttiker formalism, we have found that, when the host material dielectric constant takes positive values, the multipolar interactions drastically enhance by several orders of magnitude the ballistic thermal conductance of collective plasmons compared with that of a classical dipolar chain. On the contrary, when the host material dielectric constant takes negative values, we have demonstrated the existence of nonballistic multipolar modes which annihilate the heat transfer through the chains. (b) Using the kinetic theory, we have also examined the thermal behavior of chains in the diffusion approximation. We have shown that the plasmonic thermal conductivity of metallic nanoparticle chains can reach 1% of the bulk metal thermal conductivity. This result could explain the anomalously high thermal conductivity observed in many colloidal suspensions, the so-called nanofluids.

  18. A Preliminary and Simplified Closed Brayton Cycle Modeling for a Space Reactor Application

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes, Lamartine Nogueira Frutuoso; Camillo, Giannino Ponchio

    2008-01-21

    The Nuclear Energy Division (ENU) of the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv) has started a preliminary design study for a Closed Brayton Cycle Loop (CBCL) aimed at a space reactor application. The main objectives of the study are: 1) to establish a starting concept for the CBCL components specifications, and 2) to build a demonstrative simulator of CBCL. This preliminary design study is developing the CBCL around the NOELLE 60290 turbo machine. The actual nuclear reactor study is being conducted independently. Because of that, a conventional heat source is being used for the CBCL, in this preliminary design phase. This paper describes the steady state simulator of the CBCL operating with NOELLE 60290 turbo machine. In principle, several gases are being considered as working fluid, as for instance: air, helium, nitrogen, CO{sub 2} and gas mixtures such as helium and xenon. However, for this first application pure helium will be used as working fluid. Simplified models of heat and mass transfer were developed to simulate thermal components. Future efforts will focus on implementing a graphical interface to display the thermal process variables in steady state and to keep track of the modifications being implemented at the NOELLE 60290 turbo machine in order to build the CBCL.

  19. Parallel Operation of Multiple Closely Spaced Small Aspect Ratio Rod Pinches

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor J.; Leckbee, Joshua; Bennett, Nichelle; Madrid, Elizabeth A.; Rose, David V.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale R.; Lake, Patrick W.; McCourt, Andrew L.

    2014-12-10

    A series of simulations and experiments to resolve questions about the operation of arrays of closely spaced small aspect ratio rod pinches has been performed. Design and post-shot analysis of the experimental results are supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Both simulations and experiments support these conclusions. Penetration of current to the interior of the array appears to be efficient, as the current on the center rods is essentially equal to the current on the outer rods. Current loss in the feed due to the formation of magnetic nulls was avoided in these experiments by design of the feed surface ofmore » the cathode and control of the gap to keep the electric fields on the cathode below the emission threshold. Some asymmetry in the electron flow to the rod was observed, but the flow appeared to symmetrize as it reached the end of the rod. Interaction between the rod pinches can be controlled to allow the stable and consistent operation of arrays of rod pinches.« less

  20. Parallel Operation of Multiple Closely Spaced Small Aspect Ratio Rod Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor J.; Leckbee, Joshua; Bennett, Nichelle; Madrid, Elizabeth A.; Rose, David V.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale R.; Lake, Patrick W.; McCourt, Andrew L.

    2014-12-10

    A series of simulations and experiments to resolve questions about the operation of arrays of closely spaced small aspect ratio rod pinches has been performed. Design and post-shot analysis of the experimental results are supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Both simulations and experiments support these conclusions. Penetration of current to the interior of the array appears to be efficient, as the current on the center rods is essentially equal to the current on the outer rods. Current loss in the feed due to the formation of magnetic nulls was avoided in these experiments by design of the feed surface of the cathode and control of the gap to keep the electric fields on the cathode below the emission threshold. Some asymmetry in the electron flow to the rod was observed, but the flow appeared to symmetrize as it reached the end of the rod. Interaction between the rod pinches can be controlled to allow the stable and consistent operation of arrays of rod pinches.

  1. Design of a Simplified Closed Brayton Cycle for a Space Reactor Application

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes, Lamartine N. F.; Camillo, Giannino Ponchio; Placco, Guilherme Moreira

    2009-03-16

    The Nuclear Energy Division (ENU) of the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv) has started a preliminary design study for a Closed Brayton Cycle Loop (CBCL) aimed at a space reactor application. The main objectives of the study are: 1) to establish a starting concept for the CBCL components specifications, and 2) to build a demonstrative simulator of CBCL. This preliminary design study is been developed around the NOELLE 60290 turbo machine. The actual nuclear reactor study is being conducted independently. Because of that, a conventional heat source is being used for the CBCL, in this preliminary design phase. This paper describes details of the CBCL mechanical design and the steady state simulator of the CBCL operating with NOELLE 60290 turbo machine. In principle, several gases are being considered as working fluid, as for instance: air, helium, nitrogen, CO2 and gas mixtures such as helium and xenon. However, for this first application pure helium will be used as working fluid. Simplified models of heat and mass transfer were developed to simulate thermal components. A new graphical interface was developed for the simulator to display the thermal process variables in steady state and to keep track of the modifications being implemented at the NOELLE 60290 turbo machine in order to build the CBCL. A set of new results are being produced. These new results help to establish the hot and cold source geometry allowing for price estimating costs for building the actual device. These fresh new results will be presented and discussed.

  2. Simulated Wake Characteristics Data for Closely Spaced Parallel Runway Operations Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Neitzke, Kurt W.

    2012-01-01

    A simulation experiment was performed to generate and compile wake characteristics data relevant to the evaluation and feasibility analysis of closely spaced parallel runway (CSPR) operational concepts. While the experiment in this work is not tailored to any particular operational concept, the generated data applies to the broader class of CSPR concepts, where a trailing aircraft on a CSPR approach is required to stay ahead of the wake vortices generated by a lead aircraft on an adjacent CSPR. Data for wake age, circulation strength, and wake altitude change, at various lateral offset distances from the wake-generating lead aircraft approach path were compiled for a set of nine aircraft spanning the full range of FAA and ICAO wake classifications. A total of 54 scenarios were simulated to generate data related to key parameters that determine wake behavior. Of particular interest are wake age characteristics that can be used to evaluate both time- and distance- based in-trail separation concepts for all aircraft wake-class combinations. A simple first-order difference model was developed to enable the computation of wake parameter estimates for aircraft models having weight, wingspan and speed characteristics similar to those of the nine aircraft modeled in this work.

  3. Prediction of Sublimation Pressures of Low Volatility Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Bruce Douglas

    Sublimation pressures are required for solid-vapor phase equilibrium models in design of processes such as supercritical fluid extraction, sublimation purification and vapor epitaxy. The objective of this work is to identify and compare alternative methods for predicting sublimation pressures. A bibliography of recent sublimation data is included. Corresponding states methods based on the triple point (rather than critical point) are examined. A modified Trouton's rule is the preferred method for estimating triple point pressure in the absence of any sublimation data. Only boiling and melting temperatures are required. Typical error in log_{10} P _{rm triple} is 0.3. For lower temperature estimates, the slope of the sublimation curve is predicted by a correlation based on molar volume. Typical error is 10% of slope. Molecular dynamics methods for surface modeling are tested as estimators of vapor pressure. The time constants of the vapor and solid phases are too different to allow the vapor to come to thermal equilibrium with the solid. The method shows no advantages in prediction of sublimation pressure but provides insight into appropriate models and experimental methods for sublimation. Density-dependent augmented van der Waals equations of state based on hard-sphere distribution functions are examined. The perturbation term is almost linear and is well fit by a simple quadratic. Use of the equation provides reasonable fitting of sublimation pressures from one data point. Order-of-magnitude estimation is possible from melting temperature and solid molar volume. The inverse -12 fluid is used to develop an additional equation of state. Sublimation pressure results, including quality of pressure predictions, are similar to the hard-sphere results. Three-body (Axilrod -Teller) interactions are used to improve results.

  4. Orbital stability of systems of closely-spaced planets, II: configurations with coorbital planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew W.; Lissauer, Jack J.

    2010-08-01

    We numerically investigate the stability of systems of 1 {M_{oplus}} planets orbiting a solar-mass star. The systems studied have either 2 or 42 planets per occupied semimajor axis, for a total of 6, 10, 126, or 210 planets, and the planets were started on coplanar, circular orbits with the semimajor axes of the innermost planets at 1 AU. For systems with two planets per occupied orbit, the longitudinal initial locations of planets on a given orbit were separated by either 60° (Trojan planets) or 180°. With 42 planets per semimajor axis, initial longitudes were uniformly spaced. The ratio of the semimajor axes of consecutive coorbital groups in each system was approximately uniform. The instability time for a system was taken to be the first time at which the orbits of two planets with different initial orbital distances crossed. Simulations spanned virtual times of up to 1 × 108, 5 × 105, and 2 × 105 years for the 6- and 10-planet, 126-planet, and 210-planet systems, respectively. Our results show that, for a given class of system (e.g., five pairs of Trojan planets orbiting in the same direction), the relationship between orbit crossing times and planetary spacing is well fit by the functional form log( t c / t 0) = b β + c, where t c is the crossing time, t 0 = 1 year, β is the separation in initial orbital semimajor axis (in terms of the mutual Hill radii of the planets), and b and c are fitting constants. The same functional form was observed in the previous studies of single planets on nested orbits (Smith and Lissauer 2009). Pairs of Trojan planets are more stable than pairs initially separated by 180°. Systems with retrograde planets (i.e., some planets orbiting in the opposite sense from others) can be packed substantially more closely than can systems with all planets orbiting in the same sense. To have the same characteristic lifetime, systems with 2 or 42 planets per orbit typically need to have about 1.5 or 2 times the orbital separation as

  5. Physiological Disorders in Closed Environment-Grown Crops for Space Life Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Raymond; Morrow, Robert

    Crop production for life support systems in space will require controlled environments where temperature, humidity, CO2, and light might differ from natural environments where plants evolved. Physiological disorders, i.e., abnormal plant growth and development, can occur under these controlled environments. Among the most common of these disorders are Ca deficiency injuries such as leaf tipburn (e.g., lettuce), blossom-end-rot in fruits (e.g., tomato and pepper), and internal tissue necrosis in fruits or tubers (e.g., cucumber and potato). Increased Ca nutrition to the plants typically has little effect on these disorders, but slowing overall growth or providing better air circulation to increase transpiration can be effective. A second common disorder is oedema or intumescence, which appears as callus-like growth or galls on leaves (e.g., sweetpotato, potato, pepper, and tomato). This disorder can be reduced by increasing the near UV radiation ( 300-400 nm) to the plants. Leaf injury and necrosis can occur under long photoperiods (e.g., tomato, potato, and pepper) and at super-elevated (i.e., ¿ than 4000 mol mol-1) CO2 concentrations (e.g., soybean, potato, and radish), and these can be managed by reducing the photoperiod and CO2 concentration, respectively. Lack of blue light in the spectrum (e.g., under red LEDs or LPS lamps) can result in leggy growth and/or leaves lacking in chlorophyll (e.g., wheat, bean, and radish). Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), most commonly ethylene, can accumulate in tightly closed systems and result in a variety of negative responses. Most of these disorders can be mitigated by altering the environmental set-points or by using more resistant cultivars.

  6. Pilot Non-Conformance to Alerting System Commands During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy Ruth; Hansman, R. John; Corker, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Cockpit alerting systems monitor potentially hazardous situations, both inside and outside the aircraft. When a hazard is projected to occur, the alerting system displays alerts and/or command decisions to the pilot. However, pilots have been observed to not conform to alerting system commands by delaying their response or by not following the automatic commands exactly. This non-conformance to the automatic alerting system can reduce its benefit. Therefore, a need exists to understand the causes and effects of pilot non-conformance in order to develop automatic alerting systems whose commands the pilots are more likely to follow. These considerations were examined through flight simulator evaluations of the collision avoidance task during closely spaced parallel approaches. This task provided a useful case-study because the effects of non-conformance can be significant, given the time-critical nature of the task. A preliminary evaluation of alerting systems identified non-conformance in over 40% of the cases and a corresponding drop in collision avoidance performance. A follow-on experiment found subjects' alerting and maneuver selection criteria were consistent with different strategies than those used by automatic systems, indicating the pilot may potentially disagree with the alerting system if the pilot attempts to verify automatic alerts and commanded avoidance maneuvers. A final experiment found supporting automatic alerts with the explicit display of its underlying criteria resulted in more consistent subject reactions. In light of these experimental results, a general discussion of pilot non-conformance is provided. Contributing factors in pilot non-conformance include a lack of confidence in the automatic system and mismatches between the alerting system's commands and the pilots' own decisions based on the information available to them. The effects of non-conformance on system performance are discussed. Possible methods of reconciling mismatches are

  7. Experimental Study of Collision Detection Schema Used by Pilots During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Hansman, R. John

    1996-01-01

    An experimental flight simulator study was conducted to examine the mental alerting logic and thresholds used by subjects to issue an alert and execute an avoidance maneuver. Subjects flew a series of autopilot landing approaches with traffic on a closely-spaced parallel approach; during some runs, the traffic would deviate towards the subject and the subject was to indicate the point when they recognized the potential traffic conflict, and then indicate a direction of flight for an avoidance maneuver. A variety of subjects, including graduate students, general aviation pilots and airline pilots, were tested. Five traffic displays were evaluated, with a moving map TCAS-type traffic display as a baseline. A side-task created both high and low workload situations. Subjects appeared to use the lateral deviation of the intruder aircraft from its approach path as the criteria for an alert regardless of the display available. However, with displays showing heading and/or trend information, their alerting thresholds were significantly lowered. This type of range-only schema still resulted in many near misses, as a high convergence rate was often established by the time of the subject's alert. Therefore, the properties of the intruder's trajectory had the greatest effect on the resultant near miss rate; no display system reliably caused alerts timely enough for certain collision avoidance. Subjects' performance dropped significantly on a side-task while they analyzed the need for an alert, showing alert generation can be a high workload situation at critical times. No variation was found between subjects with and with out piloting experience. These results suggest the design of automatic alerting systems should take into account the range-type alerting schema used by the human, such that the rationale for the automatic alert should be obvious to, and trusted by, the operator. Although careful display design may help generate pilot/automation trust, issues such as user non

  8. The formation of filamentary sublimate residues (FSR) from mineral grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storrs, A. D.; Fanale, F. P.; Saunders, R. S.; Stephens, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    The significant interparticle forces observed between solar system dust grains upon desorption or sublimation of excess volatiles in simulated Martian or cometary environments are presently investigated, in order to more precisely define these mechanisms and to simulate the types of deposits thereby formed. Some classes of phyllosilicate mineral grains are noted to bond together to form a highly porous filamentary sublimate residue (FSR) exhibiting an exceptionally high tensile strength for its density; this may be important in its control of erosion and sublimation in Martian and cometary environments. It is concluded that FSR formation from clean mineral grains in water ice may be important in the formation of the Martian polar layered terrain.

  9. Behind the Photos and the Tears: Media Images, Neoliberal Discourses, Racialized Constructions of Space and School Closings in Chicago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allweiss, Alexandra; Grant, Carl A.; Manning, Karla

    2015-01-01

    This critical article provides insights into how media frames influence our understandings of school reform in urban spaces by examining images of students during the 2013 school closings in Chicago. Using visual framing analysis and informed by framing theory and critiques of neoliberalism we seek to explore two questions: (1) What role do media…

  10. The ecology of microorganisms in a small closed system: Potential benefits and problems for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, E. B.

    1986-01-01

    The inevitble presence on the space station of microorganisms associated with crew members and their environment will have the potential for both benefits and a range of problems including illness and corrosion of materials. This report reviews the literature presenting information about microorganisms pertinent to Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) on the space station. The perspective of the report is ecological, viewing the space station as an ecosystem in which biological relationships are affected by factors such as zero gravity and by closure of a small volume of space. Potential sites and activities of microorganisms on the space station and their environmental limits, microbial standards for the space station, monitoring and control methods, effects of space factors on microorganisms, and extraterrestrial contamination are discussed.

  11. Sulfur "Concrete" for Lunar Applications - Sublimation Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Toutanji, Houssam

    2006-01-01

    Melting sulfur and mixing it with an aggregate to form "concrete" is commercially well established and constitutes a material that is particularly well-suited for use in corrosive environments. Discovery of the mineral troilite (FeS) on the moon poses the question of extracting the sulfur for use as a lunar construction material. This would be an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. However, the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. Here it is assumed that the lunar ore can be mined, refined, and the raw sulfur melded with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. This study evaluates pure sulfur and two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar stimulant and SiO2 powder as aggregate additions. Each set was subjected to extended periods in a vacuum environment to evaluate sublimation issues. Results from these experiments are presented and discussed within the context of the lunar environment.

  12. Carbon-Sublimation Production of Fullerenes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker, Frank Albert

    1995-01-01

    Carbon-sublimation production of fullerenes enjoys wide use in both experimental and industrial application worldwide. Although it has been nearly five years since the inception of the technique, little is known about the roles various parameters play in the production process. This work attempts to shed light, both experimentally and theoretically, on the basic processes at work in this type of fullerene production. Experimental results herein show that a functional relationship exists among the C_{60 }, C_{70}, C_{76}, C_ {78}, and C_{84} fullerenes produced in carbon arcs. This result is interpreted to mean that an equilibrium description of the production process may be valid. Theoretical calculations are then offered in support of such a view. The theory goes on to show details of an equilibrium description that reproduce essential features of fullerene mass-spectra. It is shown that equilibrium abundances of n-atom -sized clusters are highly dependent on the stoichiometric equation chosen to describe the system. However, common traits of the investigated equilibrium descriptions lead to useful conclusions.

  13. Mass spectrometry study of the sublimation of aliphatic dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badelin, V. G.; Tyunina, E. Yu.; Krasnov, A. V.; Tyunina, V. V.; Giricheva, N. I.; Girichev, A. V.

    2012-03-01

    The sublimation of glycyl-L-α-alanine (Gly-Ala), L-α-alanyl-L-α-alanine (Ala-Ala), and DL-α-alanyl-DL-α-valine (Ala-Val) aliphatic dipeptides is studied by electron ionization mass spectrometry in combination with Knudsen effusion. The temperature range in which substances sublime as monomer molecular forms is determined. Enthalpies of sublimation Δs H°( T) are determined for Gly-Ala, Ala-Ala, and Ala-Val. It is shown that the enthalpy of sublimation of dipeptides increases with an increase in the side hydrocarbon radical. The unknown Δs H°(298) values for 17 amino acids and nine dipeptides are estimated using the proposed "structure-property" correlation model, in which the geometry and electron characteristics of molecules are used as structural descriptors.

  14. Nietzsche's View of Sublimation in the Educational Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Ann Margaret

    1975-01-01

    Article outlined Nietzsche's beliefs on the primary aim of education, the conscious production of the free man through the process of sublimation, the active redirecting of one's life energy in the service of creativity. (Editor/RK)

  15. Scanning electron microscope observations of sublimates from Merapi Volcano, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.

    1993-01-01

    Sublimates were sampled from high-temperature (up to 800??C) fumaroles at Merapi volcano in January 1984. Sampling is accomplished by inserting silica tubes into high-temperature vents. Volcanic glass flows through the tubes and sublimates precipitate on the inner walls in response to the temperature gradient. With decreasing temperature (800-500??C) in the tubes, there are five sublimate zones. Texturally, the sublimate phases grade from large, well-formed crystals at their highest-temperature occurrence to more numerous, smaller crystals that are less perfect at lower temperatures. These changes imply that the crystal nucleation and growth rates increase and decrease, respectively, as temperature decreases. Overall, the textural data suggest that the gas is saturated or slightly super-saturated with the phases at their hottest occurrence, but that the gas becomes increasingly super-saturated with the phases at lower temperatures. -from Author

  16. Dynamics and Mechanisms of Exfoliated Black Phosphorus Sublimation.

    PubMed

    Fortin-Deschênes, Matthieu; Levesque, Pierre L; Martel, Richard; Moutanabbir, Oussama

    2016-05-01

    We report on real time observations of the sublimation of exfoliated black phosphorus layers throughout annealing using in situ low energy electron microscopy. We found that sublimation manifests itself above 375 ± 20 °C through the nucleation and expansion of asymmetric, faceted holes with the long axis aligned along the [100] direction and sharp tips defined by edges consisting of alternating (10) and (11) steps. This thermally activated process repeats itself via successive sublimation of individual layers. Calculations and simulations using density functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo allowed to determine the involved atomic pathways. Sublimation is found to occur via detachments of phosphorus dimers rather than single atoms. This behavior and the role of defects is described using an analytical model that captures all essential features. This work establishes an atomistic-level understanding of the thermal stability of exfoliated black phosphorus and defines the temperature window available for material and device processing. PMID:27097073

  17. Imaging the dust sublimation front of a circumbinary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillen, M.; Kluska, J.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Van Winckel, H.; Berger, J.-P.; Kamath, D.; Bujarrabal, V.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We present the first near-IR milli-arcsecond-scale image of a post-AGB binary that is surrounded by hot circumbinary dust. Methods: A very rich interferometric data set in six spectral channels was acquired of IRAS 08544-4431 with the new RAPID camera on the PIONIER beam combiner at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). A broadband image in the H-band was reconstructed by combining the data of all spectral channels using the SPARCO method. Results: We spatially separate all the building blocks of the IRAS 08544-4431 system in our milliarcsecond-resolution image. Our dissection reveals a dust sublimation front that is strikingly similar to that expected in early-stage protoplanetary disks, as well as an unexpected flux signal of ~4% from the secondary star. The energy output from this companion indicates the presence of a compact circum-companion accretion disk, which is likely the origin of the fast outflow detected in Hα. Conclusions: Our image provides the most detailed view into the heart of a dusty circumstellar disk to date. Our results demonstrate that binary evolution processes and circumstellar disk evolution can be studied in detail in space and over time. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 094.D-0865.

  18. Being a Closely Spaced Second Child Is Not So Bad. Child-Spacing Effects on Intelligence, Personality, and Social Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Ronald L.; Nuttall, Ena Vazquez

    This study focuses on the effects of family size and spacing on intellectual, social, and personality development of children. The sample consisted of 533 suburban, middle class, large family (five or more) and small two child family children. The children, 233 boys and 300 girls, were teenagers attending either junior or senior high school.…

  19. Potential Sedimentary Evidence of Two Closely Spaced Tsunamis on the West Coast of Aceh, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, Katrin; Meilianda, Ella; Rushdy, Ibnu; Moena, Abudzar; Yolanda, Irvan P.

    2016-04-01

    Recent research in the coastal regions of Aceh, Indonesia, an area that was largely affected by the 2004 Sumatra Andaman earthquake and ensuing Indian Ocean tsunami, suggests the possibility that two closely spaced tsunamis occurred at the turn of the 14th to 15th century (Meltzner et al., 2010; Sieh et al., 2015). Here, we present evidence of two buried sand layers in the coastal marshes of West Aceh, possibly representing these penultimate predecessors of the 2004 tsunami. We discovered the sand layers in an until recently inaccessible area of a previously studied beach ridge plain about 15 km North of Meulaboh, West Aceh. Here, the 2004 tsunami left a continuous, typically a few cm thick sand sheet in the coastal hinterland in low-lying swales that accumulate organic-rich deposits and separate the sandy beach ridges. In keeping with the long-term progradation of the coastline, older deposits have to be sought after further inland. Using a hand auger, the buried sand layers were discovered in 3 cores in a flooded and highly vegetated swale in about 1 km distance to the shoreline. The pair of sand layers occurs in 70-100 cm depth and overlies 40-60 cm of dark-brown peat that rests on the basal sand of the beach ridge plain. The lower sand layer is only 1-6 cm thick, whereas the upper layer is consistently thicker, measuring 11-17 cm, with 8-14 cm of peat in between sand sheets. Both layers consist of massive, grey, medium sand and include plant fragments. They show very sharp upper and lower boundaries clearly distinguishing them from the surrounding peat and indicating an abrupt depositional event. A previously developed age model for sediments of this beach ridge plain suggest that this pair of layers could indeed correlate to a nearby buried sand sheet interpreted as tsunamigenic and deposited soon after 1290-1400AD (Monecke et al., 2008). The superb preservation at this new site allows the clear distinction of two depositional events, which, based on a first

  20. Effects of a Closed Space Environment on Gene Expression in Hair Follicles of Astronauts in the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Terada, Masahiro; Seki, Masaya; Takahashi, Rika; Yamada, Shin; Higashibata, Akira; Majima, Hideyuki J; Sudoh, Masamichi; Mukai, Chiaki; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to the space environment can sometimes pose physiological problems to International Space Station (ISS) astronauts after their return to earth. Therefore, it is important to develop healthcare technologies for astronauts. In this study, we examined the feasibility of using hair follicles, a readily obtained sample, to assess gene expression changes in response to spaceflight adaptation. In order to investigate the gene expression changes in human hair follicles during spaceflight, hair follicles of 10 astronauts were analyzed by microarray and real time qPCR analyses. We found that spaceflight alters human hair follicle gene expression. The degree of changes in gene expression was found to vary among individuals. In some astronauts, genes related to hair growth such as FGF18, ANGPTL7 and COMP were upregulated during flight, suggesting that spaceflight inhibits cell proliferation in hair follicles. PMID:27029003

  1. Effects of a Closed Space Environment on Gene Expression in Hair Follicles of Astronauts in the International Space Station

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Masahiro; Seki, Masaya; Takahashi, Rika; Yamada, Shin; Higashibata, Akira; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Sudoh, Masamichi; Mukai, Chiaki; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to the space environment can sometimes pose physiological problems to International Space Station (ISS) astronauts after their return to earth. Therefore, it is important to develop healthcare technologies for astronauts. In this study, we examined the feasibility of using hair follicles, a readily obtained sample, to assess gene expression changes in response to spaceflight adaptation. In order to investigate the gene expression changes in human hair follicles during spaceflight, hair follicles of 10 astronauts were analyzed by microarray and real time qPCR analyses. We found that spaceflight alters human hair follicle gene expression. The degree of changes in gene expression was found to vary among individuals. In some astronauts, genes related to hair growth such as FGF18, ANGPTL7 and COMP were upregulated during flight, suggesting that spaceflight inhibits cell proliferation in hair follicles. PMID:27029003

  2. VTOL in ground effect flows for closely spaced jets. [to predict pressure and upwash forces on aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Migdal, D.; Hill, W. G., Jr.; Jenkins, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Results of a series of in ground effect twin jet tests are presented along with flow models for closely spaced jets to help predict pressure and upwash forces on simulated aircraft surfaces. The isolated twin jet tests revealed unstable fountains over a range of spacings and jet heights, regions of below ambient pressure on the ground, and negative pressure differential in the upwash flow field. A separate computer code was developed for vertically oriented, incompressible jets. This model more accurately reflects fountain behavior without fully formed wall jets, and adequately predicts ground isobars, upwash dynamic pressure decay, and fountain lift force variation with height above ground.

  3. Automation of closed environments in space for human comfort and safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The results of the second year of a three year design project on the automation of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) are presented. The results are applicable to other space missions that require long duration space habitats. A description of conceptual controls which are developed for the Water Recovery and Management (WRM) Subassembly is given. Mathematical modeling of the Air Revitalization (AR) Subassembly is presented. The work done by the Kansas State University NASA/USRA interdisciplinary student design team is concluded with a discussion of the expert system which was developed for the AR Subassembly.

  4. Differences in Ambient Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Concentrations between Streets and Alleys in New York City: Open Space vs. Semi-Closed Space

    PubMed Central

    Lovinsky-Desir, Stephanie; Miller, Rachel L.; Bautista, Joshua; Gil, Eric N.; Chillrud, Steven N.; Yan, Beizhan; Camann, David; Perera, Frederica P.; Jung, Kyung Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Outdoor ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations are variable throughout an urban environment. However, little is known about how variation in semivolatile and nonvolatile PAHs related to the built environment (open space vs. semi-closed space) contributes to differences in concentrations. Methods: We simultaneously collected 14, two-week samples of PAHs from the outside of windows facing the front (adjacent to the street) open side of a New York City apartment building and the alley, semi-closed side of the same apartment unit between 2007 and 2012. We also analyzed samples of PAHs measured from 35 homes across Northern Manhattan and the Bronx, 17 from street facing windows with a median floor level of 4 (range 2–26) and 18 from alley-facing windows with a median floor level of 4 (range 1–15). Results: Levels of nonvolatile ambient PAHs were significantly higher when measured from a window adjacent to a street (an open space), compared to a window 30 feet away, adjacent to an alley (a semi-closed space) (street geometric mean (GM) 1.32 ng/m3, arithmetic mean ± standard deviation (AM ± SD) 1.61 ± 1.04 ng/m3; alley GM 1.10 ng/m3, AM ± SD 1.37 ± 0.94 ng/m3). In the neighborhood-wide comparison, nonvolatile PAHs were also significantly higher when measured adjacent to streets compared with adjacent to alley sides of apartment buildings (street GM 1.10 ng/m3, AM ± SD 1.46 ± 1.24 ng/m3; alley GM 0.61 ng/m3, AM ± SD 0.81 ± 0.80 ng/m3), but not semivolatile PAHs. Conclusions: Ambient PAHs, nonvolatile PAHs in particular, are significantly higher when measured from a window adjacent to a street compared to a window adjacent to an alley, despite both locations being relatively close to street traffic. This study highlights small-scale spatial variations in ambient PAH concentrations that may be related to the built environment (open space vs. semi-closed space) from which the samples are measured, as well as the relative distance

  5. A new apparatus for multilayer growth by chemical vapor deposition: The sliding-boat close-spaced technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Akihiko; Yoshihara, Seiji; Kasai, Haruo; Nishimaki, Masao

    1980-10-01

    A new apparatus for multilayer growth by chemical vapor deposition, the sliding-boat close-spaced tecnique (SBCST), is presented. The structure of the SBCST growth apparatus is quite similar to that of the conventional liquid phase epitaxy sliding-boat. The possibility of obtaining thin multilayer films by SBCST is shown. Preliminary experimental results for its application to the growth of n-CdS/p-InP heterojunction solar cells are also shown.

  6. Performance and Mass Modeling Subtleties in Closed-Brayton-Cycle Space Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Michael J.; Johnson, Paul K.

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) thermal energy conversion is one available option for future spacecraft and surface systems. 2. Brayton system conceptual designs for milliwatt to megawatt power converters have been developed 3. Numerous features affect overall optimized power conversion system performance: Turbomachinery efficiency. Heat exchanger effectiveness. Working-fluid composition. Cycle temperatures and pressures.

  7. Opening and Closing Interactive Spaces: Shaping Four-Year-Old Children's Participation in Two English Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payler, Jane

    2007-01-01

    This paper draws on an ESRC-funded study (Payler, 2005) of the sociocultural influences on learning processes of 10 four-year-old children in their second year of the Foundation Stage in England (DfEE, 2000). The children, very close in age, were in one of two early years settings: a pre-school playgroup with a largely invisible pedagogy…

  8. Application of Closed Loop Optimal Guidance for a Constant Thrust Space Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Darestani, Mahdy; Abbasi Mahale, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    This research presents derivation and implementation of the explicit guidance problem to steer a space vehicle into exo atmospheric phase of flight to develop three-dimensional optimal trajectory. The proposed guidance algorithm is in association with continuous powered flight of the space vehicle in ascent manoeuvre. Stability, accuracy and simplicity of this approach are the improved developments in comparison with the IGM approach. This algorithm uses the calculus of variation method for the two boundary-value injection problem to generate an optimal trajectory of space vehicle with online generation of steering command to inject to any desired orbit. Here the end conditions have been determined as the orbital height, inclination and eccentricity where the initial conditions are fixed. The simulation results are considered which shows the accuracy and simplicity of this method to reach to the desired orbit in minimum fuel.

  9. Automation of closed environments in space for human comfort and safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented of the first year of a three year project on the automation of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) of the Space Station Freedom (SSF). The results are applicable to other future space mission. The work was done by the Kansas State University NASA/USRA interdisciplinary student design team. The six ECLSS subsystems and how they interact are discussed. Proposed control schemes and their rationale are discussed for the Atmosphere Revitalization (AR) subsystem. Finally, a description of the mathematical models for many components of the ECLSS control system is given.

  10. Tropospheric gravity waves observed by three closely-spaced ST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. A.; Eriddle, A. C. AFGARELLO, R.ly stable thro; Eriddle, A. C. AFGARELLO, R.ly stable thro

    1985-01-01

    During a 6 week period in 1982, 3 ST (Stratosphere-Troposphere) radars measured horizontal and vertical wavelengths of small scale tropospheric gravity waves. These 50 MHz, vertically-directed radars were located in a trianglar network with approximately 5 km spacing on the southern coast of France at the mouth of the Rhone River during the ALPEX (Alpine Experiment) program.

  11. How big and how close? Habitat patch size and spacing to conserve a threatened species

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present results of a spatially-explicit, individual-based stochastic dispersal model (HexSim) to evaluate effects of size and spacing of patches of habitat of Northern Spotted Owls (NSO; Strix occidentalis caurina) in Pacific Northwest, USA, to help advise USDI Fish and Wildli...

  12. Closely spaced nanomagnets by dual e-beam exposure for low-energy nanomagnet logic

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Faisal A.; Csaba, Gyorgy; Butler, Katherine; Bernstein, Gary H.

    2013-05-07

    The effect of nanomagnet spacing on required clock field has been studied by micromagnetic simulation for supermalloy (Ni{sub 79}Fe{sub 16}Mo{sub 5}) dots with dimensions 90 Multiplication-Sign 60 Multiplication-Sign 20 nm{sup 3} and 120 Multiplication-Sign 60 Multiplication-Sign 20 nm{sup 3}. Reduction of the inter-magnet spacing for both dimensions has resulted in reduction of the required clock field in the simulation. A dual e-beam exposure technique has been developed to allow fabrication of ultra dense features using conventional poly(methylmethacrylate) e-beam resist. Nanomagnet logic (NML) datalines of supermalloy dots with {approx}10 nm and {approx}15 nm spacing have been fabricated using dual e-beam exposure with a 3{sigma} overlay accuracy of {approx}4 nm. Fabricated NML datalines have been characterized using magnetic force microscopy for various clock fields. Datalines of both spacing have shown proper NML functionality with a clock field as low as 60 mT.

  13. Solving close-coupling equations in momentum space without singularities II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, A. W.; Abdurakhmanov, I. B.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.

    2016-06-01

    The implementation of the convergent close-coupling method, whereby the principal-value singularity is treated analytically (Bray et al., 2015), has been extended to non-zero angular momenta. Its utility is demonstrated through application to proton scattering on excited states of positronium at incident energies spanning six orders of magnitude. It is shown that the analytic treatment is necessary in the case of highly excited positronium states.

  14. Sublimation of a crystal slowed by sorption of foreign molecules from a gaseous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, A. A.; Polyakova, V. I.

    2014-07-01

    Numerical simulation of the sublimation of the surface of an ice crystal has shown that the presence of a non-condensable gas substantially reduces the sublimation rate. It has been found that the slowing of the sublimation due to the adsorption of gas molecules on the crystal surface that fill the vacancies during sublimation prevents the formation of vacancy islands on the surface of the crystal required for evaporation of the surface molecular layer. The available results of studies that explain the slowing of the sublimation by the presence of a diffusion layer formed in the vapor medium near the sublimating surface are supplemented with new data showing that molecular processes on the crystal surface play an equally important role as the diffusion layer. Cases have been found where crystal sublimation is accelerated by the sorption of gas molecules. The obtained results refining the theory of sublimation can be used to develop methods for controlling sublimation.

  15. Automation of closed environments in space for human comfort and safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogley, Allen C.; Tucker, Nathan P.

    1992-01-01

    For prolonged missions into space and colonization outside the Earth's atmosphere, development of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) are essential to provide astronauts with habitable environments. The Kansas State University Advanced Design Team have researched and designed a control system for an ECLSS like that on Space Station Freedom. The following milestones have been accomplished: (1) completed computer simulation of the CO2 Removal Assembly; (2) created a set of rules for the expert control system of the CO2 Removal Assembly; (3) created a classical controls system for the CO2 Removal Assembly; (4) established a means of communication between the mathematical model and the two controls systems; and (5) analyzed the dynamic response of the simulation and compared the two methods of control.

  16. Analysis of the enhancement of thermal radiation between closely-spaced surfaces due to microscale phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Whale, M.D.; Cravalho, E.G.

    1997-07-01

    In the past several decades, there have been numerous attempts to develop a general formalism that accounts for the effects of wave interference and radiation tunneling (far-field and near-field effects) on the net radiative transfer between surfaces. In their most general form, these approaches yield correct results, which are in agreement. However, the practical application to particular materials has required various simplifications, which are not generally applicable and cannot be compared directly. The authors explore the basis of the assumptions used to make these approximations, clarify their limitations, and offer a set of regimes delineating their applicability. They derive proximity functions (in the strongly-absorbing and weakly-absorbing limits) that incorporate all the transport-enhancing effects of the general formalism, but show the details of the spacing effect across all frequency and spacing regimes. These functions provide a simple and elegant means to account for the far- and near-field effects of thermal radiation.

  17. Closing the gap in systems engineering education for the space industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, R.

    1986-01-01

    The education of system engineers with emphasis on designing systems for space applications is discussed. System engineers determine the functional requirements, performance needs, and implementation procedures for proposed systems and their education is based on aeronautics and mathematics. Recommendations from industry for improving the curriculum of system engineers at the undergraduate and graduate levels are provided. The assistance provided by companies to the education of system engineers is examined.

  18. Sublimating grains in the coma of new comets originating from the Oort Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Tozzi, G.; Brucato, J.; Bruni, I.; Licandro, J.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Meech, K.; Mottola, S.

    2014-07-01

    It is expected that a billion of years of space weathering (see, e.g., Kanuchova et al., 2012, Icarus, 221, 12) produces a crust of organic matter that will be released when a comet enters, for the first time, in the inner Solar System. When approaching to the Sun, a comet is at heliocentric distances r_h greater than 3 au, the sublimation of CO and CO_2 is the main source of cometary activity. At shorter distances, the sublimation of water becomes the most important mechanism of activity. The gases escaping from the nucleus cause drag for the coma grains that can be refractory dust (silicates, carbon), water ice, and/or organic ices. Oort comets at their first passage in the inner Solar System, should produce an halo of organic or water ice particles. Recently, our group started to monitor new, inbound, bright Oort comets (C/2011 F1, C/2012 S1, C/2012 K1, C/2013 V5, C/2012 F3) to search for these grains. The method consists of detecting the cloud of sublimating grains in the inner coma by using the ΣAf(ρ) function (Tozzi et al., 2007, A&A, 476, 979). However, this over-population of grains, beside the sublimation, can be also due to short-time activity (outburst) or too large grains expanding at very slow velocity, as it has been found in comet 67P/C-G (Tozzi et al., 2011, A&A, 531, 54). To discriminate between the phenomena, it is necessary to monitor the comet both at short timescales for the outbursts (by repeating the observations after a few nights), and in a longer term (weeks to months). If the cloud does not expand with decreasing heliocentric distance, there is a high probability that organic and/or water-ice grains are present. We can discriminate between organic and water-ice grains by measuring their color and spectra. In this work, we will present the results obtained from the observations of C/2011 F1 (LINEAR) and C/2012 S1 (ISON). The comparison between data and theoretical simulations, obtained with a simple model assuming sublimating grains

  19. Parametric thermodynamic analysis of closed-cycle gas-laser operation in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Cycle efficiency and radiator area required were calculated for thermally and electrically pumped lasers operating in closed cycles with a compressor and the required heat exchangers. A thermally pumped laser included within a Brayton cycle was also analyzed. Performance of all components, including the laser, was parametrically varied. For the thermally pumped laser the cycle efficiencies range below 10 percent and are very sensitive to the high-pressure losses associated with the supersonic diffuser required at the laser cavity exit. The efficiencies predicted for the electrically pumped laser cycles range slightly higher, but radiator area also tends to be larger.

  20. Sublimation rates of explosive materials : method development and initial results.

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, James M.; Patton, Robert Thomas

    2004-08-01

    Vapor detection of explosives continues to be a technological basis for security applications. This study began experimental work to measure the chemical emanation rates of pure explosive materials as a basis for determining emanation rates of security threats containing explosives. Sublimation rates for TNT were determined with thermo gravimetric analysis using two different techniques. Data were compared with other literature values to provide sublimation rates from 25 to 70 C. The enthalpy of sublimation for the combined data was found to be 115 kJ/mol, which corresponds well with previously reported data from vapor pressure determinations. A simple Gaussian atmospheric dispersion model was used to estimate downrange concentrations based on continuous, steady-state conditions at 20, 45 and 62 C for a nominal exposed block of TNT under low wind conditions. Recommendations are made for extension of the experimental vapor emanation rate determinations and development of turbulent flow computational fluid dynamics based atmospheric dispersion estimates of standoff vapor concentrations.

  1. Automation of closed environments in space for human comfort and safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The development of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) for Space Station Freedom, future colonization of the Moon, and Mars missions presents new challenges for present technologies. ECLSS that operate during long-duration missions must be semi-autonomous to allow crew members environmental control without constant supervision. A control system for the ECLSS must address these issues as well as being reliable. The Kansas State University Advanced Design Team is in the process of researching and designing controls for the automation of the ECLSS for Space Station Freedom and beyond. The ECLSS for Freedom is composed of six subsystems. The temperature and humidity control (THC) subsystem maintains the cabin temperature and humidity at a comfortable level. The atmosphere control and supply (ACS) subsystem insures proper cabin pressure and partial pressures of oxygen and nitrogen. To protect the space station from fire damage, the fire detection and suppression (FDS) subsystem provides fire-sensing alarms and extinguishers. The waste management (WM) subsystem compacts solid wastes for return to Earth, and collects urine for water recovery. The atmosphere revitalization (AR) subsystem removes CO2 and other dangerous contaminants from the air. The water recovery and management (WRM) subsystem collects and filters condensate from the cabin to replenish potable water supplies, and processes urine and other waste waters to replenish hygiene water supplies. These subsystems are not fully automated at this time. Furthermore, the control of these subsystems is not presently integrated; they are largely independent of one another. A fully integrated and automated ECLSS would increase astronauts' productivity and contribute to their safety and comfort.

  2. Alumina Paste Sublimation Suppression Barrier for Thermoelectric Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah (Inventor); Caillat, Thierry (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Alumina as a sublimation suppression barrier for a Zintl thermoelectric material in a thermoelectric power generation device operating at high temperature, e.g. at or above 1000K, is disclosed. The Zintl thermoelectric material may comprise Yb.sub.14MnSb.sub.11. The alumina may be applied as an adhesive paste dried and cured on a substantially oxide free surface of the Zintl thermoelectric material and polished to a final thickness. The sublimation suppression barrier may be finalized by baking out the alumina layer on the Zintl thermoelectric material until it becomes substantially clogged with ytterbia.

  3. Enthalpy of sublimation as measured using a silicon oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Hamza; Pomeroy, J. M.

    In this study, we report the enthalpy of sublimation of common gases (nitrogen, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, neon, krypton, xenon, and water vapor) using a large area silicon oscillator with a sub-ng (~0.027 ng/cm2) mass sensitivity. The double paddle oscillator design enables high frequency stability (17 ppb) at cryogenic temperatures and provides a consistent technique for enthalpy measurements. The enthalpies of sublimation are derived from the rate of mass loss during programmed thermal desorption and are detected as a change in the resonance frequency of the self-tracking oscillator. These measured enthalpy values show excellent agreement with the accepted literature values.

  4. Contactless prompt tumbling rebound of drops from a sublimating slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Carlo; Jung, Stefan; Wetzel, Andreas; Heer, Emmanuel; Schoch, Philippe; Moqaddam, Ali Mazloomi; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Ilya; Marengo, Marco; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2016-05-01

    We have uncovered a drop rebound regime, characteristic of highly viscous liquids impacting tilted sublimating surfaces. Here the drops, rather than showing a slide, spread, recoil, and rebound behavior, exhibit a prompt tumbling rebound. As a result, glycerol surprisingly rebounds faster than three orders of magnitude less viscous water. When a viscous drop impacts a sublimating surface, part of its initial linear momentum is converted into angular momentum: Lattice Boltzmann simulations confirmed that tumbling owes its appearance to the rapid transition of the internal angular velocity prior to rebound to a constant value, as in a tumbling solid body.

  5. Automation of closed environments in space for human comfort and safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) for the Space Station Freedom and future colonization of the Moon and Mars presents new challenges for present technologies. Current plans call for a crew of 8 to live in a safe, shirt-sleeve environment for 90 days without ground support. Because of these requirements, all life support systems must be self-sufficient and reliable. The ECLSS is composed of six subsystems. The temperature and humidity control (THC) subsystem maintains the cabin temperature and humidity at a comfortable level. The atmosphere control and supply (ACS) subsystem insures proper cabin pressure and partial pressures of oxygen and nitrogen. To protect the space station from fire damage, the fire detection and suppression (FDS) subsystem provides fire sensing alarms and extinguishers. The waste management (WM) subsystem compacts solid wastes for return to Earth, and collects urine for water recovery. Because it is impractical, if not impossible, to supply the station with enough fresh air and water for the duration of the space station's extended mission, these elements are recycled. The atmosphere revitalization (AR) subsystem removes CO2 and other dangerous contaminants from the air. The water recovery and management (WRM) subsystem collects and filters condensate from the cabin to replenish potable water supplies, and processes urine and other waste waters to replenish hygiene water supplies. These subsystems are not fully automated at this time. Furthermore, the control of these subsystems is not presently integrated; they are largely independent of one another. A fully integrated and automated ECLSS would increase astronauts' productivity and contribute to their safety and comfort. The Kansas State University Advanced Design Team is in the process of researching and designing controls for the automation of the ECLSS for Space Station Freedom and beyond. The approach chosen to solve this problem is to divide the design into three

  6. Quantum field theory in spaces with closed time-like curves

    SciTech Connect

    Boulware, D.G.

    1992-12-31

    Gott spacetime has closed timelike curves, but no locally anomalous stress-energy. A complete orthonormal set of eigenfunctions of the wave operator is found in the special case of a spacetime in which the total deficit angle is 27{pi}. A scalar quantum field theory is constructed using these eigenfunctions. The resultant interacting quantum field theory is not unitary because the field operators can create real, on-shell, particles in the acausal region. These particles propagate for finite proper time accumulating an arbitrary phase before being annihilated at the same spacetime point as that at which they were created. As a result, the effective potential within the acausal region is complex, and probability is not conserved. The stress tensor of the scalar field is evaluated in the neighborhood of the Cauchy horizon; in the case of a sufficiently small Compton wavelength of the field, the stress tensor is regular and cannot prevent the formation of the Cauchy horizon.

  7. Quantum field theory in spaces with closed time-like curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulware, D. G.

    Gott spacetime has closed timelike curves, but no locally anomalous stress-energy. A complete orthonormal set of eigenfunctions of the wave operator is found in the special case of a spacetime in which the total deficit angle is 27(pi). A scalar quantum field theory is constructed using these eigenfunctions. The resultant interacting quantum field theory is not unitary because the field operators can create real, on-shell, particles in the acausal region. These particles propagate for finite proper time accumulating an arbitrary phase before being annihilated at the same spacetime point as that at which they were created. As a result, the effective potential within the acausal region is complex, and probability is not conserved. The stress tensor of the scalar field is evaluated in the neighborhood of the Cauchy horizon; in the case of a sufficiently small Compton wavelength of the field, the stress tensor is regular and cannot prevent the formation of the Cauchy horizon.

  8. Preliminary Human-in-the-Loop Assessment of Procedures for Very-Closely-Spaced Parallel Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Savita; Lozito, Sandra C.; Ballinger, Deborah S.; Trot, Greg; Hardy, Gordon H.; Panda, Ramesh C.; Lehmer, Ronald D.; Kozon, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Demand in the future air transportation system concept is expected to double or triple by 2025 [1]. Increasing airport arrival rates will help meet the growing demand that could be met with additional runways but the expansion airports is met with environmental challenges for the surrounding communities when using current standards and procedures. Therefore, changes to airport operations can improve airport capacity without adding runways. Building additional runways between current ones, or moving them closer, is a potential solution to meeting the increasing demand, as addressed by the Terminal Area Capacity Enhancing Concept (TACEC). TACEC requires robust technologies and procedures that need to be tested such that operations are not compromised under instrument meteorological conditions. The reduction of runway spacing for independent simultaneous operations dramatically exacerbates the criticality of wake vortex incursion and the calculation of a safe and proper breakout maneuver. The study presented here developed guidelines for such operations by performing a real-time, human-in-the-loop simulation using precision navigation, autopilot-flown approaches, with the pilot monitoring aircraft spacing and the wake vortex safe zone during the approach.

  9. Ozone concentration in leaf intercellular air spaces is close to zero

    SciTech Connect

    Laisk, A.; Moldau, H. ); Kull, O. )

    1989-07-01

    Transpiration and ozone uptake rates were measured simultaneously in sunflower leaves at different stomatal openings and various ozone concentrations. Ozone uptake rates were proportional to the ozone concentration up to 1500 nanoliters per liter. The leaf gas phase diffusion resistance (stomatal plus boundary layer) to water vapor was calculated and converted to the resistance to ozone multiplying it by the theoretical ratio of diffusion coefficients for water vapor and ozone in air (1.67). The ozone concentration in intercellular air spaces calculated from the ozone uptake rate and diffusion resistance to ozone scattered around zero. The ozone concentration in intercellular air spaces was measured directly bu supplying ozone to the leaf from one side and measuring the equilibrium concentration above the other side, and it was found to be zero. The total leaf resistance to ozone was proportional to the gas phase resistance to water vapor with a coefficient of 1.68. It is concluded that ozone enters the leaf by diffusion through the stomata, and is rapidly decomposed in cell walls and plasmalemma.

  10. Space-Bounded Church-Turing Thesis and Computational Tractability of Closed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Mark; Schneider, Jonathan; Rojas, Cristóbal

    2015-08-01

    We report a new limitation on the ability of physical systems to perform computation—one that is based on generalizing the notion of memory, or storage space, available to the system to perform the computation. Roughly, we define memory as the maximal amount of information that the evolving system can carry from one instant to the next. We show that memory is a limiting factor in computation even in lieu of any time limitations on the evolving system—such as when considering its equilibrium regime. We call this limitation the space-bounded Church-Turing thesis (SBCT). The SBCT is supported by a simulation assertion (SA), which states that predicting the long-term behavior of bounded-memory systems is computationally tractable. In particular, one corollary of SA is an explicit bound on the computational hardness of the long-term behavior of a discrete-time finite-dimensional dynamical system that is affected by noise. We prove such a bound explicitly.

  11. The Closed Aquatic System AquaHab® as part of a CELSS for Exploration, Space and Earth Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slenzka, Klaus

    AquaHab R is a small, self-sustaining closed microcosm, based on the former space shuttle payload C.E.B.A.S. (Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System). AquaHab R contains on laboratory scale within 8 liters of water volume different groups of organisms (fish, snails, amphipods, plants). During the last years, it was developed to a system for the risk assessment of chemicals as well as an early warning tool for air and water contamination, major concerns during long-term stays in closed habitats for example on Earth's subsurface (deep sea) or later on the Moon or Mars. AquaHab R is now enhanced developed for exploratory missions having implemented an algae reactor system for biomass production etc.. During first tests, the transport of oxygen from the algae reactor into the AquaHab R was demonstrated successfully. In the common AquaHab R - bioreactor system, the different subsystems will serve for several tasks. In the AquaHab R - tank, the removal of waste water (mainly nutrients) as well as the production of some higher plants and fish as food source will be most beneficial; additionally the AquaHab R -tank is supporting astronauts psychological health recovery (home aquaria effect, taking care for pets). The beneficially output of the algae reactors will e.g. be the increased delivery of oxygen and metabolic products with application potential for humans (as e.g. vitamins, drug like acting substances) as well as being a food source in general and also the removal of carbon dioxide. Furthermore, specialized algae can also serve as early warning tool, as all the organisms in the AquaHab R do, or producing energy equivalents. The different subsystems will interact with each other to treat the products of humans being in the closed habitat in the most effective way. This new life support subsystem will be bioregenerative and sustainable in the meaning, that no material transport into the system is needed, and non-usable and maybe toxic end products won‘t be

  12. Sublimation of Iodine at Various Pressures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, Ilya A.

    2005-01-01

    Various phenomena that are observed in the process of heating solid iodine in closed vessels at different pressures and temperatures are described. When solid iodine is heated in an evacuated ampoule where the pressure is less than 10(super -3), no noticeable color appears and immediate condensation of tiny iodine crystals is visible higher up on…

  13. Automation of closed environments in space for human comfort and safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This report culminates the work accomplished during a three year design project on the automation of an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) suitable for space travel and colonization. The system would provide a comfortable living environment in space that is fully functional with limited human supervision. A completely automated ECLSS would increase astronaut productivity while contributing to their safety and comfort. The first section of this report, section 1.0, briefly explains the project, its goals, and the scheduling used by the team in meeting these goals. Section 2.0 presents an in-depth look at each of the component subsystems. Each subsection describes the mathematical modeling and computer simulation used to represent that portion of the system. The individual models have been integrated into a complete computer simulation of the CO2 removal process. In section 3.0, the two simulation control schemes are described. The classical control approach uses traditional methods to control the mechanical equipment. The expert control system uses fuzzy logic and artificial intelligence to control the system. By integrating the two control systems with the mathematical computer simulation, the effectiveness of the two schemes can be compared. The results are then used as proof of concept in considering new control schemes for the entire ECLSS. Section 4.0 covers the results and trends observed when the model was subjected to different test situations. These results provide insight into the operating procedures of the model and the different control schemes. The appendix, section 5.0, contains summaries of lectures presented during the past year, homework assignments, and the completed source code used for the computer simulation and control system.

  14. Sublimation of Ices Containing Organics and/or Minerals and Implications for Icy Bodies Surface Structure and Spectral Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Jost, B.; Yoldi, Z.; Carrasco, N.; Szopa, C.; Thomas, N.

    2015-12-01

    The surfaces of many objects in the Solar System comprise substantial quantities of water ice either in pure form or mixed with minerals and/or organic molecules. Sublimation is a process responsible for shaping and changing the reflectance properties of these objects. We present laboratory data on the evolution of the structure and the visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance of icy surfaces made of mixtures of water ice and non-volatile components (complex organic matter and silicates), as they undergo sublimation of the water ice under low temperature and pressure conditions (Poch et al., under review). We prepared icy surfaces which are potential analogues of ices found on comets, icy satellites or trans-neptunian objects (TNOs). The experiments were carried out in the SCITEAS simulation setup recently built as part of the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern (Pommerol et al., 2015a). As the water ice sublimated, we observed in situ the formation of a sublimation lag deposit, or sublimation mantle, made of the non-volatiles at the top of the samples. The texture (porosity, internal cohesiveness etc.), the activity (outbursts and ejection of mantle fragments) and the spectro-photometric properties of this mantle are found to differ strongly depending on the chemical nature of the non-volatiles, the size of their particles, the way they are mixed with the volatile component and the dust/ice mass ratio. The results also indicate how the band depths of the sub-surface water ice evolve during the build-up of the sublimation mantle. These data provide useful references for interpreting remote-sensing observations of Rosetta (see Pommerol et al., 2015b), and also New Horizons. Poch, O., et al., under review in IcarusPommerol, A., et al., 2015a, Planet. Space Sci. 109-110, 106-122. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pss.2015.02.004Pommerol, A., et al., 2015b, Astronomy and Astrophysics, in press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201525977

  15. Tunable Lattice Coupling of Multipole Plasmon Modes and Near-Field Enhancement in Closely Spaced Gold Nanorod Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Zhang, Xian; Ringe, Emilie; Hou, Mengjing; Ma, Lingwei; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Considering the nanogap and lattice effects, there is an attractive structure in plasmonics: closely spaced metallic nanoarrays. In this work, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the lattice coupling of multipole plasmon modes for closely spaced gold nanorod arrays, offering a new insight into the higher order cavity modes coupled with each other in the lattice. The resonances can be greatly tuned by changes in inter-rod gaps and nanorod heights while the influence of the nanorod diameter is relatively insignificant. Experimentally, pronounced suppressions of the reflectance are observed. Meanwhile, the near-field enhancement can be further enhanced, as demonstrated through surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We then confirm the correlation between the near-field and far-field plasmonic responses, which is significantly important for maximizing the near-field enhancement at a specific excitation wavelength. This lattice coupling of multipole plasmon modes is of broad interest not only for SERS but also for other plasmonic applications, such as subwavelength imaging or metamaterials. PMID:26983501

  16. System Mass Variation and Entropy Generation in 100-kWe Closed-Brayton-Cycle Space Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Michael J.; Reid, Bryan M.

    2004-02-04

    State-of-the-art closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) space power systems were modeled to study performance trends in a trade space characteristic of interplanetary orbiters. For working-fluid molar masses of 48.6, 39.9 and 11.9 kg/kmol, peak system pressures of 1.38 and 3.0 MPa and compressor pressure ratios ranging from 1.6 to 2.4, total system masses were estimated. System mass increased as peak operating pressure increased for all compressor pressure ratios and molar mass values examined. Minimum mass point comparison between 72% He at 1.38 MPa peak and 94% He at 3.0 MPa peak showed an increase in system mass of 14%. Converter flow loop entropy generation rates were calculated for 1.38 and 3.0 MPa peak pressure cases. Physical system behavior was approximated using a pedigreed NASA-Glenn modeling code, Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP), which included realistic performance prediction for heat exchangers, radiators and turbomachinery.

  17. System Mass Variation and Entropy Generation in 100-kWe Closed-Brayton-Cycle Space Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Michael J.; Reid, Bryan M.

    2004-02-01

    State-of-the-art closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) space power systems were modeled to study performance trends in a trade space characteristic of interplanetary orbiters. For working-fluid molar masses of 48.6, 39.9 and 11.9 kg/kmol, peak system pressures of 1.38 and 3.0 MPa and compressor pressure ratios ranging from 1.6 to 2.4, total system masses were estimated. System mass increased as peak operating pressure increased for all compressor pressure ratios and molar mass values examined. Minimum mass point comparison between 72% He at 1.38 MPa peak and 94% He at 3.0 MPa peak showed an increase in system mass of 14%. Converter flow loop entropy generation rates were calculated for 1.38 and 3.0 MPa peak pressure cases. Physical system behavior was approximated using a pedigreed NASA-Glenn modeling code, Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP), which included realistic performance prediction for heat exchangers, radiators and turbomachinery.

  18. An echolocation model for range discrimination of multiple closely spaced objects: Transformation of spectrogram into the reflected intensity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Ikuo; Kunugiyama, Kenji; Yano, Masafumi

    2004-02-01

    Using frequency-modulated echolocation, bats can discriminate the range of objects with an accuracy of less than a millimeter. However, bats' echolocation mechanism is not well understood. The delay separation of three or more closely spaced objects can be determined through analysis of the echo spectrum. However, delay times cannot be properly correlated with objects using only the echo spectrum because the sequence of delay separations cannot be determined without information on temporal changes in the interference pattern of the echoes. To illustrate this, Gaussian chirplets with a carrier frequency compatible with bat emission sweep rates were used. The delay time for object 1, T1, can be estimated from the echo spectrum around the onset time. The delay time for object 2 is obtained by adding T1 to the delay separation between objects 1 and 2 (extracted from the first appearance of interference effects). Further objects can be located in sequence by this same procedure. This model can determine delay times for three or more closely spaced objects with an accuracy of about 1 μs, when all the objects are located within 30 μs of delay separation. This model is applicable for the range discrimination of objects having different reflected intensities and in a noisy environment (0-dB signal-to-noise ratio) while the cross-correlation method is hard to apply to these problems.

  19. Tunable Lattice Coupling of Multipole Plasmon Modes and Near-Field Enhancement in Closely Spaced Gold Nanorod Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Zhang, Xian; Ringe, Emilie; Hou, Mengjing; Ma, Lingwei; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2016-03-01

    Considering the nanogap and lattice effects, there is an attractive structure in plasmonics: closely spaced metallic nanoarrays. In this work, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the lattice coupling of multipole plasmon modes for closely spaced gold nanorod arrays, offering a new insight into the higher order cavity modes coupled with each other in the lattice. The resonances can be greatly tuned by changes in inter-rod gaps and nanorod heights while the influence of the nanorod diameter is relatively insignificant. Experimentally, pronounced suppressions of the reflectance are observed. Meanwhile, the near-field enhancement can be further enhanced, as demonstrated through surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We then confirm the correlation between the near-field and far-field plasmonic responses, which is significantly important for maximizing the near-field enhancement at a specific excitation wavelength. This lattice coupling of multipole plasmon modes is of broad interest not only for SERS but also for other plasmonic applications, such as subwavelength imaging or metamaterials.

  20. System Mass Variation and Entropy Generation in 100-kWe Closed-Brayton-Cycle Space Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Michael J.; Reid, Bryan M.

    2004-01-01

    State-of-the-art closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) space power systems were modeled to study performance trends in a trade space characteristic of interplanetary orbiters. For working-fluid molar masses of 48.6, 39.9, and 11.9 kg/kmol, peak system pressures of 1.38 and 3.0 MPa and compressor pressure ratios ranging from 1.6 to 2.4, total system masses were estimated. System mass increased as peak operating pressure increased for all compressor pressure ratios and molar mass values examined. Minimum mass point comparison between 72 percent He at 1.38 MPa peak and 94 percent He at 3.0 MPa peak showed an increase in system mass of 14 percent. Converter flow loop entropy generation rates were calculated for 1.38 and 3.0 MPa peak pressure cases. Physical system behavior was approximated using a pedigreed NASA Glenn modeling code, Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP), which included realistic performance prediction for heat exchangers, radiators and turbomachinery.

  1. System Mass Variation and Entropy Generation in 100k We Closed-Brayton-Cycle Space Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Michael J.; Reid, Bryan M.

    2004-01-01

    State-of-the-art closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) space power systems were modeled to study performance trends in a trade space characteristic of interplanetary orbiters. For working-fluid molar masses of 48.6, 39.9, and 11.9 kg/kmol, peak system pressures of 1.38 and 3.0 MPa and compressor pressure ratios ranging from 1.6 to 2.4, total system masses were estimated. System mass increased as peak operating pressure increased for all compressor pressure ratios and molar mass values examined. Minimum mass point comparison between 72 percent He at 1.38 MPa peak and 94 percent He at 3.0 MPa peak showed an increase in system mass of 14 percent. Converter flow loop entropy generation rates were calculated for 1.38 and 3.0 MPa peak pressure cases. Physical system behavior was approximated using a pedigreed NASA Glenn modeling code, Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP), which included realistic performance prediction for heat exchangers, radiators and turbomachinery.

  2. Tunable Lattice Coupling of Multipole Plasmon Modes and Near-Field Enhancement in Closely Spaced Gold Nanorod Arrays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Zhang, Xian; Ringe, Emilie; Hou, Mengjing; Ma, Lingwei; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Considering the nanogap and lattice effects, there is an attractive structure in plasmonics: closely spaced metallic nanoarrays. In this work, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the lattice coupling of multipole plasmon modes for closely spaced gold nanorod arrays, offering a new insight into the higher order cavity modes coupled with each other in the lattice. The resonances can be greatly tuned by changes in inter-rod gaps and nanorod heights while the influence of the nanorod diameter is relatively insignificant. Experimentally, pronounced suppressions of the reflectance are observed. Meanwhile, the near-field enhancement can be further enhanced, as demonstrated through surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We then confirm the correlation between the near-field and far-field plasmonic responses, which is significantly important for maximizing the near-field enhancement at a specific excitation wavelength. This lattice coupling of multipole plasmon modes is of broad interest not only for SERS but also for other plasmonic applications, such as subwavelength imaging or metamaterials. PMID:26983501

  3. Voltage breakdown between closely spaced electrodes over polymeric insulator surfaces in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Eoin W.; Harrington, Daniel J.

    1982-01-01

    Voltage breakdowns of some narrow gap electrodes [2-10 mil (0.05-0.25 mm)] on polymeric insulator surfaces (epoxy-glass and triazine) have been examined over the pressure range from atmospheric pressure to 127 Torr and are shown to be an air breakdown modified by the presence of the insulator. Breakdown values as a function of the number of the breakdown and discharge energy level were also examined. In the worst case the breakdown voltage was observed to decrease by approximately 1300 V after about five successive breakdowns. The breakdown voltage between narrowly spaced metallic contacts on dielectric surfaces has been assumed to exhibit a Gaussian distribution. Non-Gaussian, bimodal distributions have been observed in the present work. These bimodal distributions, found on fine line epoxy-glass and triazine printed wiring boards, and attempts for explanation in terms of the flashover discharge initiating mechanisms, including the effects of ultraviolet radiation and a negative-ion flux on breakdown, are described. Negative ions appear to reduce the standard deviation but do not reduce the breakdown voltage. Ultraviolet radiation reduces both the standard deviation and the breakdown voltage. Increasing the conductor overlap distance (line length) reduced the breakdown voltage.

  4. The Digital Sublime: Lessons from Kelli Connell's "Double Life"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yi-hui

    2012-01-01

    The digital sublime refers to digital-composite photography that presents "the existence of something unpresentable" and that renders a matchless look a sophisticated fabrication, a perfect and clean composition, a maximum color saturation, a multiple-point perspective, and stunning or newfangled content. Abandoning the traditional one-shot mode…

  5. System for NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, R.A.

    1989-01-24

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid. 1 fig.

  6. Optimization of fast dissolving etoricoxib tablets prepared by sublimation technique.

    PubMed

    Patel, D M; Patel, M M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop fast dissolving tablets of etoricoxib. Granules containing etoricoxib, menthol, crospovidone, aspartame and mannitol were prepared by wet granulation technique. Menthol was sublimed from the granules by exposing the granules to vacuum. The porous granules were then compressed in to tablets. Alternatively, tablets were first prepared and later exposed to vacuum. The tablets were evaluated for percentage friability and disintegration time. A 3(2) full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of 2 formulation variables: amount of menthol and crospovidone. The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that for obtaining fast dissolving tablets; optimum amount of menthol and higher percentage of crospovidone should be used. A surface response plots are also presented to graphically represent the effect of the independent variables on the percentage friability and disintegration time. The validity of a generated mathematical model was tested by preparing a checkpoint batch. Sublimation of menthol from tablets resulted in rapid disintegration as compared with the tablets prepared from granules that were exposed to vacuum. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional marketed tablets for percentage drug dissolved in 30 min (Q(30)) and dissolution efficiency after 30 min (DE(30)). From the results, it was concluded that fast dissolving tablets with improved etoricoxib dissolution could be prepared by sublimation of tablets containing suitable subliming agent. PMID:20390084

  7. Optimization of Fast Dissolving Etoricoxib Tablets Prepared by Sublimation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Patel, D. M.; Patel, M. M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop fast dissolving tablets of etoricoxib. Granules containing etoricoxib, menthol, crospovidone, aspartame and mannitol were prepared by wet granulation technique. Menthol was sublimed from the granules by exposing the granules to vacuum. The porous granules were then compressed in to tablets. Alternatively, tablets were first prepared and later exposed to vacuum. The tablets were evaluated for percentage friability and disintegration time. A 32 full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of 2 formulation variables: amount of menthol and crospovidone. The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that for obtaining fast dissolving tablets; optimum amount of menthol and higher percentage of crospovidone should be used. A surface response plots are also presented to graphically represent the effect of the independent variables on the percentage friability and disintegration time. The validity of a generated mathematical model was tested by preparing a checkpoint batch. Sublimation of menthol from tablets resulted in rapid disintegration as compared with the tablets prepared from granules that were exposed to vacuum. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional marketed tablets for percentage drug dissolved in 30 min (Q30) and dissolution efficiency after 30 min (DE30). From the results, it was concluded that fast dissolving tablets with improved etoricoxib dissolution could be prepared by sublimation of tablets containing suitable subliming agent. PMID:20390084

  8. Modeling the development of martian sublimation thermokarst landforms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dundas, Colin M.; Byrne, Shane; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    Sublimation-thermokarst landforms result from collapse of the surface when ice is lost from the subsurface. On Mars, scalloped landforms with scales of decameters to kilometers are observed in the mid-latitudes and considered likely thermokarst features. We describe a landscape evolution model that couples diffusive mass movement and subsurface ice loss due to sublimation. Over periods of tens of thousands of Mars years under conditions similar to the present, the model produces scallop-like features similar to those on the Martian surface, starting from much smaller initial disturbances. The model also indicates crater expansion when impacts occur in surfaces underlain by excess ice to some depth, with morphologies similar to observed landforms on the Martian northern plains. In order to produce these landforms by sublimation, substantial quantities of excess ice are required, at least comparable to the vertical extent of the landform, and such ice must remain in adjacent terrain to support the non-deflated surface. We suggest that Martian thermokarst features are consistent with formation by sublimation, without melting, and that significant thicknesses of very clean excess ice (up to many tens of meters, the depth of some scalloped depressions) are locally present in the Martian mid-latitudes. Climate conditions leading to melting at significant depth are not required.

  9. Modeling the development of martian sublimation thermokarst landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dundas, Colin M.; Byrne, Shane; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-12-01

    Sublimation-thermokarst landforms result from collapse of the surface when ice is lost from the subsurface. On Mars, scalloped landforms with scales of decameters to kilometers are observed in the mid-latitudes and considered likely thermokarst features. We describe a landscape evolution model that couples diffusive mass movement and subsurface ice loss due to sublimation. Over periods of tens of thousands of Mars years under conditions similar to the present, the model produces scallop-like features similar to those on the martian surface, starting from much smaller initial disturbances. The model also indicates crater expansion when impacts occur in surfaces underlain by excess ice to some depth, with morphologies similar to observed landforms on the martian northern plains. In order to produce these landforms by sublimation, substantial quantities of excess ice are required, at least comparable to the vertical extent of the landform, and such ice must remain in adjacent terrain to support the non-deflated surface. We suggest that martian thermokarst features are consistent with formation by sublimation, without melting, and that significant thicknesses of very clean excess ice (up to many tens of meters, the depth of some scalloped depressions) are locally present in the martian mid-latitudes. Climate conditions leading to melting at significant depth are not required.

  10. Literary Study, Measurement, and the Sublime: Disciplinary Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiland, Donna, Ed.; Rosenthal, Laura J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This collection of essays, "Literary Study, Measurement, and the Sublime: Disciplinary Assessment," edited by Donna Heiland and Laura J. Rosenthal, represents an important new venture in the Foundation's communication program. The book is the product of many authors, including the editors, both of whom have written essays for it. But it is the…

  11. System for NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  12. Alumina Paste Layer as a Sublimation Suppression Barrier for Yb14MnSb11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Caillat, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Sublimation is a major cause of degradation of thermoelectric power generation systems. Most thermoelectric materials tend to have peak values at the temperature where sublimation occurs. A sublimation barrier is needed that is stable at operating temperatures, inert against thermoelectric materials, and able to withstand thermal cycling stress. A porous alumina paste layer is suitable as a sublimation barrier for Yb14MnSb11. It can accommodate stress generated by the thermal expansion discrepancy between the suppression layer and thermoelectric materials. Sublimation suppression is achieved by filling pores naturally with YbO2, a natural byproduct of sublimation. YbO2 generated during the sublimation of Yb14MnSb11 fills the porous structure of the alumina paste, causing sublimation to decrease with time as the pores become filled.

  13. The Walk on Floor Eyes Closed Tandem Step Test as a Quantitative Measure of Ataxia After Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, E. A.; Reschke, M. F.; Kofman, I. S.; Cerisano, J. M.; Lawrence, E. L.; Peters, B. T.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Harm, D. L.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Posture and locomotion are among the functions most affected by space flight. Postflight ataxia can be quantified easily by using the walk on the floor line test with the eyes closed (WOFEC). Data from a modified WOFEC were obtained as part of an ongoing interdisciplinary pre- and postflight study (Functional Task Test, FTT) designed to evaluate both postflight functional performance of astronauts and related physiological changes. METHODS Five astronauts with flight durations of 12 to 16 days participated in this study. Performance measurements were obtained in 2 preflight sessions, on landing day, and 1, 6, and 30 days after landing. The WOFEC test consisted of walking with the feet placed heel to toe in tandem, arms folded across the chest and eyes closed, for 10 steps. A trial was initiated after the eyes were closed and the front foot was aligned with the rear foot. The performance metric was the average percentage of correct steps completed over 3 trials. A step was not counted as correct if the crewmember sidestepped, opened eyes, or paused for more than 3 seconds between steps. Step accuracy was scored independently by 3 examiners. RESULTS Immediately after landing subjects seemed to be unaware of their foot position relative to their body or the floor. The percentage of correct steps was significantly decreased on landing day. Partial recovery was observed the next day, and full recovery to baseline on the sixth day post landing. CONCLUSION These data clearly demonstrate the sensorimotor challenges facing crewmembers after they return from space flight. Although this simple test is intended to complement the FTT battery of tests, it has some stand-alone value as it provides investigators with a means to quantify vestibular ataxia as well as provide instant feedback on postural stability without the use of complex test equipment.

  14. Closely Spaced Pregnancies Are Associated With Increased Odds of Autism in California Sibling Births

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kayuet; Bearman, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the interpregnancy interval (IPI) is associated with the risk of autism in subsequent births. METHODS: Pairs of first- and second-born singleton full siblings were identified from all California births that occurred from 1992 to 2002 using birth records, and autism diagnoses were identified by using linked records of the California Department of Developmental Services. IPI was calculated as the time interval between birth dates minus the gestational age of the second sibling. In the primary analysis, logistic regression models were used to determine whether odds of autism in second-born children varied according to IPI. To address potential confounding by unmeasured family-level factors, a case-sibling control analysis determined whether affected sibling (first versus second) varied with IPI. RESULTS: An inverse association between IPI and odds of autism among 662 730 second-born children was observed. In particular, IPIs of <12, 12 to 23, and 24 to 35 months were associated with odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for autism of 3.39 (3.00–3.82), 1.86 (1.65–2.10), and 1.26 (1.10–1.45) relative to IPIs of ≥36 months. The association was not mediated by preterm birth or low birth weight and persisted across categories of sociodemographic characteristics, with some attenuation in the oldest and youngest parents. Second-born children were at increased risk of autism relative to their firstborn siblings only in pairs with short IPIs. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that children born after shorter intervals between pregnancies are at increased risk of developing autism; the highest risk was associated with pregnancies spaced <1 year apart. PMID:21220394

  15. Advances in sublimation studies for particles of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Nguyen, Viet; Fischer, Thomas; Abrishami, Tara; Papantonakis, Michael; Kendziora, Chris; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2015-05-01

    When handling explosives, or related surfaces, the hands routinely become contaminated with particles of explosives and related materials. Subsequent contact with a solid surface results in particle crushing and deposition. These particles provide an evidentiary trail which is useful for security applications. As such, the opto-physico-chemical characteristics of these particles are critical to trace explosives detection applications in DOD or DHS arenas. As the persistence of these particles is vital to their forensic exploitation, it is important to understand which factors influence their persistence. The longevity or stability of explosives particles on a substrate is a function of several environmental parameters or particle properties including: Vapor pressure, particle geometry, airflow, particle field size, substrate topography, humidity, reactivity, adlayers, admixtures, particle areal density, and temperature. In this work we deposited particles of 2,4-dinitrotoluene on standard microscopy glass slides by particle sieving and studied their sublimation as a function of airflow velocity, areal particle density and particle field size. Analysis of 2D microscopic images was used to compute and track particle size and geometrical characteristics. The humidity, temperature and substrate type were kept constant for each experiment. A custom airflow cell, using standard microscopy glass slide, allowed in-situ photomicroscopy. Areal particle densities and airflow velocities were selected to provide relevant loadings and flow velocities for a range of potential applications. For a chemical of interest, we define the radial sublimation velocity (RSV) for the equivalent sphere of a particle as the parameter to characterize the sublimation rate. The RSV is a useful parameter because it is independent of particle size. The sublimation rate for an ensemble of particles was found to significantly depend on airflow velocity, the areal density of the particles, and the

  16. Relationship between molecular descriptors and the enthalpies of sublimation of natural amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badelin, V. G.; Tyunina, V. V.; Girichev, G. V.; Tyunina, E. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    A multiparameter correlation between the enthalpies of sublimation and molecular descriptors of natural amino acids is proposed, based on generalized experimental and literature data on the heat effects of sublimation. The contributions from Van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bond formation, and electrostatic effects into enthalpy of sublimation has been evaluated using regression coefficients.

  17. Early close image of comet Borrelly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The solid nucleus of comet Borrelly is barely resolved in this image, enhanced to reveal the highly collimated dust extending towards the bottom left corner of the picture. The jet is attributed to dust carried outward by gas expanding outwards into a cone about 20 degrees across. The surface of Borrelly is composed of a mixture of dust and water ice, and as the comet approaches the Sun the water ice sublimes. The gases produced inside the comet by the Sun's heating race away from the surface into the vacuum of space, carrying the dust away with them. The jet was also seen in images acquired around 9 hours earlier. This suggests that the emission is coming from close to the rotation axis at the comet's constantly illuminated pole. The Sun is at the bottom of the image.

    Deep Space 1 completed its primary mission testing ion propulsion and 11 other advanced, high-risk technologies in September 1999. NASA extended the mission, taking advantage of the ion propulsion and other systems to undertake this chancy but exciting, and ultimately successful, encounter with the comet. More information can be found on the Deep Space 1 home page at http://nmp.jpl.nasa.gov/ds1/ .

    Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The California Institute of Technology manages JPL for NASA.

  18. Sublimation-driven erosion on Hyperion: Topographic analysis and landform simulation model tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Alan D.; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Schenk, Paul M.; White, Oliver L.; Spencer, John

    2012-07-01

    The unique appearance of Hyperion can be explained in part by the loss to space of ballistic ejecta during impact events, as was proposed by Thomas et al. (Thomas, P.C. et al. [2007a]. Icarus 190, 573-584). We conclude that such loss is a partial explanation, accounting for the lack of appreciable intercrater plains on a saturation-cratered surface. In order to create the smooth surfaces and the reticulate, honeycomb pattern of narrow divides between old craters, appreciable subsequent modification of crater morphology must occur through mass-wasting processes accompanied by sublimation, probably facilitated by the loss of CO2 as a component of the relief-supporting matrix of the bedrock. During early stages of crater degradation, steep, crenulate bedrock slopes occupy the upper crater walls with abrupt transitions downslope onto smooth slopes near the angle of repose mantled by mass wasting debris, as can be seen within young craters. Long-continued mass wasting eventually results in slopes totally mantled with particulate debris. This mass wasting effectively destroys small craters, at least in part accounting for the paucity of sub-kilometer craters on Hyperion. Surface temperatures measured by Cassini CIRS range from 58 K to 127 K and imply a surface thermal inertia of 11 ± 2 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2 and bolometric albedo ranging from 0.05 to 0.33. Resulting H2O sublimation rates are only tens of cm per billion years for most of the surface, so the evolution of the observed landforms is likely to require sublimation of more volatile species such as CO2.

  19. Piezoelectric crystal microbalance measurements of enthalpy of sublimation of C2-C9 dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirri, F.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Zampetti, E.

    2015-07-01

    We present here a novel experimental setup able to measure the enthalpy of sublimation of a given compound by means of Piezoelectric Crystal Microbalances (PCM). This experiment was performed in the TG-Lab facility in IAPS-INAF, dedicated to the development of TGA sensors for space measurements, such as detection of organic and non-organic volatile species and refractory materials in planetary environments. In order to study physical-chemical processes concerning the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) present in atmospheric environments, the setup has been tested on Dicarboxylic acids. Acids with low molecular weight are among the components of organic fraction of particulate matter in the atmosphere, coming from different sources (biogenic and anthropogenic). Considering their relative abundance, it is useful to consider Dicarboxylic acid as "markers" to define the biogenic or anthropogenic origin of the aerosol, thus obtaining some information of the emission sources. In this work, a temperature controlled effusion cell was used to sublimate VOC, creating a molecular flux that was collimated onto a cold PCM. The VOC re-condensed onto the PCM quartz crystal allowing the determination of the deposition rate. From the measurements of deposition rates, it was possible to infer the enthalpy of sublimation of Adipic acid, i.e. Δ Hsub: 141.6 ± 0.8 kJ mol-1, Succinic acid, i.e. 113.3 ± 1.3 kJ mol-1, Oxalic acid, i.e. 62.5 ± 3.1 kJ mol-1 and Azelaic acid, i.e. 124.2 ± 1.2 kJ mol-1 (weight average values). The results obtained are in very good agreement with literature within 10 % for the Adipic, Succinic and Oxalic acid.

  20. Piezoelectric crystal microbalance measurements of enthalpy of sublimation of C2-C9 dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirri, F.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Zampetti, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present here a novel experimental set-up that is able to measure the enthalpy of sublimation of a given compound by means of piezoelectric crystal microbalances (PCMs). The PCM sensors have already been used for space measurements, such as for the detection of organic and non-organic volatile species and refractory materials in planetary environments. In Earth atmospherics applications, PCMs can be also used to obtain some physical-chemical processes concerning the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in atmospheric environments. The experimental set-up has been developed and tested on dicarboxylic acids. In this work, a temperature-controlled effusion cell was used to sublimate VOC, creating a molecular flux that was collimated onto a cold PCM. The VOC recondensed onto the PCM quartz crystal, allowing the determination of the deposition rate. From the measurements of deposition rates, it has been possible to infer the enthalpy of sublimation of adipic acid, i.e. ΔHsub : 141.6 ± 0.8 kJ mol-1, succinic acid, i.e. 113.3 ± 1.3 kJ mol-1, oxalic acid, i.e. 62.5 ± 3.1 kJ mol-1, and azelaic acid, i.e. 124.2 ± 1.2 kJ mol-1. The results obtained show an accuracy of 1 % for succinic, adipic, and azelaic acid and within 5 % for oxalic acid and are in very good agreement with previous works (within 6 % for adipic, succinic, and oxalic acid and within 11 % or larger for azelaic acid).

  1. Differential tolerance to biological and subjective effects of four closely spaced doses of N,N-dimethyltryptamine in humans.

    PubMed

    Strassman, R J; Qualls, C R; Berg, L M

    1996-05-01

    Tolerance of the behavioral effects of the short-acting, endogenous hallucinogen, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is seen inconsistently in animals, and has not been produced in humans. The nature and time course of responses to repetitive, closely spaced administrations of an hallucinogenic dose of DMT were characterized. Thirteen experienced hallucinogen users received intravenous 0.3 mg/kg DMT fumarate, or saline placebo, four times, at 30 min intervals, on 2 separate days, in a randomized, double-blind, design. Tolerance to "psychedelic" subjective effects did not occur according to either clinical interview or Hallucinogen Rating Scale scores. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), prolactin, cortisol, and heart rate responses decreased with repeated DMT administration, although blood pressure did not. These data demonstrate the unique properties of DMT relative to other hallucinogens and underscore the differential regulation of the multiple processes mediating the effects of DMT. PMID:8731519

  2. Low-Cost Growth of III-V Layers on Si Using Close-Spaced Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, Jason W.; Greenaway, Ann L.; Ritenour, Andrew J.; Davis, Allison L.; Bachman, Benjamin F.; Aloni, Shaul; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2015-06-14

    Close-spaced vapor transport (CSVT) uses solid precursors to deposit material at high rates and with high precursor utilization. The use of solid precursors could significantly reduce the costs associated with III-V photovoltaics, particularly if growth on Si substrates can be demonstrated. We present preliminary results of the growth of GaAs1-xPx with x ≈ 0.3 and 0.6, showing that CSVT can be used to produce III-V-V’ alloys with band gaps suitable for tandem devices. Additionally, we have grown GaAs on Si by first thermally depositing films of Ge and subsequently depositing GaAs by CSVT. Patterning the Ge into islands prevents cracking due to thermal mismatch and is useful for potential tandem structures.

  3. Heat transfer from combustion gases to a single row of closely spaced tubes in a swirl crossflow Stirling engine heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, C. P.; Back, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental program to determine the heat-transfer characteristics of a combustor and heat-exchanger system in a hybrid solar receiver which utilizes a Stirling engine. The system consists of a swirl combustor with a crossflow heat exchanger composed of a single row of 48 closely spaced curved tubes. In the present study, heat-transfer characteristics of the combustor/heat-exchanger system without a Stirling engine have been studied over a range of operating conditions and output levels using water as the working fluid. Nondimensional heat-transfer coefficients based on total heat transfer have been obtained and are compared with available literature data. The results show significantly enhanced heat transfer for the present geometry and test conditions. Also, heat transfer along the length of the tubes is found to vary, the effect depending upon test condition.

  4. A three-dimensional phase space dynamical model of the Earth{close_quote}s radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Boscher, D.M.; Beutier, T.; Bourdarie, S.

    1996-07-01

    A three dimensional phase space model of the Earth{close_quote}s radiation belt is presented. We have taken into account the magnetic and electric radial diffusions, the pitch angle diffusions due to Coulomb interactions and interactions with the plasmaspheric hiss, and the Coulomb drag. First, a steady state of the belt is presented. Two main maxima are obtained, corresponding to the inner and outer parts of the belt. Then, we have modelled a simple injection at the external boundary. The particle transport seems like what was measured aboard satellites. A high energy particle loss is found, by comparing the model results and the measurements. It remains to be explained. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. ZFP57 recognizes multiple and closely spaced sequence motif variants to maintain repressive epigenetic marks in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Anvar, Zahra; Cammisa, Marco; Riso, Vincenzo; Baglivo, Ilaria; Kukreja, Harpreet; Sparago, Angela; Girardot, Michael; Lad, Shraddha; De Feis, Italia; Cerrato, Flavia; Angelini, Claudia; Feil, Robert; Pedone, Paolo V.; Grimaldi, Giovanna; Riccio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) need to maintain their parental allele-specific DNA methylation during early embryogenesis despite genome-wide demethylation and subsequent de novo methylation. ZFP57 and KAP1 are both required for maintaining the repressive DNA methylation and H3-lysine-9-trimethylation (H3K9me3) at ICRs. In vitro, ZFP57 binds a specific hexanucleotide motif that is enriched at its genomic binding sites. We now demonstrate in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that SNPs disrupting closely-spaced hexanucleotide motifs are associated with lack of ZFP57 binding and H3K9me3 enrichment. Through a transgenic approach in mouse ESCs, we further demonstrate that an ICR fragment containing three ZFP57 motif sequences recapitulates the original methylated or unmethylated status when integrated into the genome at an ectopic position. Mutation of Zfp57 or the hexanucleotide motifs led to loss of ZFP57 binding and DNA methylation of the transgene. Finally, we identified a sequence variant of the hexanucleotide motif that interacts with ZFP57 both in vivo and in vitro. The presence of multiple and closely located copies of ZFP57 motif variants emerges as a distinct characteristic that is required for the faithful maintenance of repressive epigenetic marks at ICRs and other ZFP57 binding sites. PMID:26481358

  6. Dynamics and adaptive control of a dual-arm space robot with closed-loop constraints and uncertain inertial parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ying-Hong; Hu, Quan; Xu, Shi-Jie

    2014-02-01

    A dynamics-based adaptive control approach is proposed for a planar dual-arm space robot in the presence of closed-loop constraints and uncertain inertial parameters of the payload. The controller is capable of controlling the position and attitude of both the satellite base and the payload grasped by the manipulator end effectors. The equations of motion in reduced-order form for the constrained system are derived by incorporating the constraint equations in terms of accelerations into Kane's equations of the unconstrained system. Model analysis shows that the resulting equations perfectly meet the requirement of adaptive controller design. Consequently, by using an indirect approach, an adaptive control scheme is proposed to accomplish position/attitude trajectory tracking control with the uncertain parameters being estimated on-line. The actuator redundancy due to the closed-loop constraints is utilized to minimize a weighted norm of the joint torques. Global asymptotic stability is proven by using Lyapunov's method, and simulation results are also presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Sublimation-Condensation of Multiscale Tellurium Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2013-03-11

    This paper presents a simple technique for making tellurium (Te) nano and microtubes of widely varying dimensions with Multi-Scale Processing (MSP). In this process, the Te metal is placed in a reaction vessel (e.g., borosilicate or fused quartz), the vessel is evacuated, and then sealed under vacuum with a torch. The vessel is heat-treated in a temperature gradient where a portion of the tube that can also contain an additional substrate, is under a decreasing temperature gradient. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies have shown that multifaceted crystalline tubes have been formed extending from nano- up to micron-scale with diameters ranging from 51.2 ± 5.9 to 1042 ± 134 nm between temperatures of 157 and 224 °C, respectively. One-dimensional tubular features are seen at lower temperatures, while three-dimensional features, at the higher temperatures. These features have been characterized with X-ray diffraction and found to be trigonal Te with space group P3121. Our results show that the MSP can adequately be described using a simple Arrhenius equation.

  8. Robust Magnetic Properties of a Sublimable Single-Molecule Magnet.

    PubMed

    Kiefl, Evan; Mannini, Matteo; Bernot, Kevin; Yi, Xiaohui; Amato, Alex; Leviant, Tom; Magnani, Agnese; Prokscha, Thomas; Suter, Andreas; Sessoli, Roberta; Salman, Zaher

    2016-06-28

    The organization of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) on surfaces via thermal sublimation is a prerequisite for the development of future devices for spintronics exploiting the richness of properties offered by these magnetic molecules. However, a change in the SMM properties due to the interaction with specific surfaces is usually observed. Here we present a rare example of an SMM system that can be thermally sublimated on gold surfaces while maintaining its intact chemical structure and magnetic properties. Muon spin relaxation and ac susceptibility measurements are used to demonstrate that, unlike other SMMs, the magnetic properties of this system in thin films are very similar to those in the bulk, throughout the full volume of the film, including regions near the metal and vacuum interfaces. These results exhibit the robustness of chemical and magnetic properties of this complex and provide important clues for the development of nanostructures based on SMMs. PMID:27139335

  9. Trust: the sublime duty in health care leadership.

    PubMed

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2010-01-01

    Trust is the essence of human social existence. From the moment of birth, trust is the basic component in any human relationship and interaction. Trust is the Holy Grail for human confidence in others. From human survival to organizational survival, trust is the primordial bond. No organization is more dependent on trust than health care. This article views trust as the most basic fundamental quality for leadership. Trust is a sublime duty of a leader and the leadership of an organization. Leadership sets the culture of trust. Trust is the one quality that is essential for guiding an organization toward serving others. This article addresses trust from many perspectives. Trust is viewed from our subordinates, our peers, our superiors, and the public we serve. This article postulates how trust in an organization is the sublime duty of leadership that unites all human understanding and without it destroys all human relationships. PMID:20145465

  10. Sublimator Driven Coldplate Engineering Development Unit Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a traditional thermal control scheme. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially increasing reliability and reducing complexity while saving both mass and power. Because the SDC requires a consumable feedwater, it can only be used for short mission durations. Additionally, the SDC is ideal for a vehicle with small transport distances and low heat rejection requirements. An SDC Engineering Development Unit was designed and fabricated. Performance tests were performed in a vacuum chamber to quantify and assess the performance of the SDC. The test data was then used to develop correlated thermal math models. Nonetheless, an Integrated Sublimator Driven Coldplate (ISDC) concept is being developed. The ISDC couples a coolant loop with the previously described SDC hardware. This combination allows the SDC to be used as a traditional coldplate during long mission phases and provides for dissimilar system redundancy

  11. Sublimator Driven Coldplate Engineering Development Unit Test Results and Development of Second Generation SDC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, Ryan A.; Sheth, Rubik B.

    2009-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a traditional thermal control scheme. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially increasing reliability and reducing complexity while saving both mass and power. Furthermore, the Integrated Sublimator Driven Coldplate (ISDC) concept couples a coolant loop with the previously described SDC hardware. This combination allows the SDC to be used as a traditional coldplate during long mission phases. The previously developed SDC technology cannot be used for long mission phases due to the fact that it requires a consumable feedwater for heat rejection. Adding a coolant loop also provides for dissimilar redundancy on the Altair Lander ascent module thermal control system, which is the target application for this technology. Tests were performed on an Engineering Development Unit at NASA s Johnson Space Center to quantify and assess the performance of the SDC. Correlated thermal math models were developed to help explain the test data. The paper also outlines the preliminary results of an ISDC concept being developed.

  12. Investigating the Persistence of a Snowpack Sublimation Stable Isotope Signal in Tree Xylem Water during the Growing Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, E. S.; Bowling, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Previous work identified a riparian meadow in the Rocky Mountains where streamside box elder (Acer negundo) trees did not use stream water, the most reliable and readily available source. A follow-up study showed that the water used by trees appears to be more evaporatively enriched than all available measured sources, including stream water, precipitation-derived soil water, and groundwater. While it is unlikely that there is a missing pool of water these trees are accessing, they may be tapping into a distinct subset of the bulk soil water available, possibly derived from much colder and older snowmelt. In this study, we investigated whether snowpack sublimation and subsequent melt water may impart an enriched isotopic signature that persists throughout the following growing season in less-mobile soil water pools. Profile samples of the snowpack, bulk melt water, and early season soil lysimeter water were collected throughout the winter and analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes. As snow began to melt in the spring, water samples for isotope analysis were taken from soil profiles, stream water, groundwater, and stems. Although sublimation likely occurred at the site, such processes did not impart an evaporative isotope enrichment on the snowpack throughout the season. Both snow pack and melt water remained closely tied to the local meteoric water line as they infiltrated soil. These findings suggest that snowpack sublimation processes preceding melt water infiltration are not the source of evaporative enrichment in tree water at our site.

  13. Properties of filamentary sublimation residues from dispersions of clay in ice. [on Martian poles, comet nuclei, and icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. S.; Parker, T. J.; Stephens, J. B.; Fanale, F. P.; Sutton, S.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from experimental studies of the formation of ice mixed with mineral particles in an effort to simulate similar processes on natural surfaces such as at the Martian poles, on comet nuclei and on icy satellites. The study consisted of low-pressure, low-temperature sublimations of water ice from dilutions of water-clay (montmorillonite and Cabosil) dispersions of various component ratios. Liquid dispersions were sprayed into liquid nitrogen to form droplets at about -50 C. Both clay-water dispersions left a filamentary residue on the bottom of the Dewar after the water ice had sublimated off. The residue was studied with optical and SEM microscopy, the latter method revealing a high electrical conductivity in the residue. The results suggest that the sublimation of the water ice can leave a surface crust, which may be analogous to processes at the Martian poles and on comet nuclei. The process could proceed by the attachment of water molecules to salt crystals during the hottest part of the Martian year. The residue remaining was found to remain stable up to 370 C, be porous, and remain resilient, which could allow it to insulate ice bodies such as comets in space.

  14. Coupled fluid-thermal analysis of low-pressure sublimation and condensation with application to freeze-drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Arnab

    Freeze-drying is a low-pressure, low-temperature condensation pumping process widely used in the manufacture of bio-pharmaceuticals for removal of solvents by sublimation. The goal of the process is to provide a stable dosage form by removing the solvent in such a way that the sensitive molecular structure of the active substance is least disturbed. The vacuum environment presents unique challenges for understanding and controlling heat and mass transfer in the process. As a result, the design of equipment and associated processes has been largely empirical, slow and inefficient. A comprehensive simulation framework to predict both, process and equipment performance is critical to improve current practice. A part of the dissertation is aimed at performing coupled fluid-thermal analysis of low-pressure sublimation-condensation processes typical of freeze-drying technologies. Both, experimental and computational models are used to first understand the key heat transfer modes during the process. A modeling and computational framework, validated with experiments for analysis of sublimation, water-vapor flow and condensation in application to pharmaceutical freeze-drying is developed. Augmented with computational fluid dynamics modeling, the simulation framework presented here allows to predict for the first time, dynamic product/process conditions taking into consideration specifics of equipment design. Moreover, by applying the modeling framework to process design based on a design-space approach, it has demonstrated that there is a viable alternative to empiricism.

  15. Unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes simulation of the post-critical flow around a closely spaced group of silos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillewaere, J.; Dooms, D.; Van Quekelberghe, B.; Degroote, J.; Vierendeels, J.; De Roeck, G.; Lombaert, G.; Degrande, G.

    2012-04-01

    During a storm in October 2002, wind induced ovalling vibrations were observed on several empty silos of a closely spaced group (pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.05) consisting of 8 by 5 silos in the port of Antwerp (Belgium). Numerical simulations of the turbulent wind flow are performed to clarify the occurrence of the observed ovalling vibrations near the lee side corner of the group by studying the dynamic wind pressures on the silo surfaces and linking to the dynamic properties of the silo structures. As the orientation of the group largely affects the pressure distribution around the cylinders of the group, the influence of the angle of incidence of the wind flow on these ovalling vibrations is examined while other parameters, such as spacing ratio and Reynolds number are unchanged. To achieve results within a reasonable computation time, 2D unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations using Menter's shear stress transport turbulence model were performed. In order to elucidate the influence of the applied turbulence model and to qualitatively validate the spatial and temporal discretization of the 2D highly turbulent post-critical (Re=1.24×107) flow simulations for the silo group, single cylinder simulations were used. The geometric resemblance of the group arrangement with rectangular cylinders on the one hand and of the interstitial spaces with tube arrays (e.g. heat exchangers) on the other hand is used to qualitatively compare the observed flow phenomena. The simulations show that the silo group can be treated neither as a tube array nor as a solid bluff body. Subsequent linking of dynamic wind pressures to dynamic properties of the silo structures reveals strong narrow band frequency peaks in the turbulent pressure coefficient spectra of the silos near the lee side corners of the group that match the structural natural frequencies of the third and fourth ovalling mode shape of the silos. This match indicates a forced, resonant response which

  16. Growth, surface treatment and characterization of polycrystalline lead iodide thick films prepared using close space deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xinghua; Sun, Hui; Yang, Dingyu; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2012-11-01

    Lead iodide (PbI2) polycrystalline thick films were fabricated on glass substrates with a conductive indium-tin-oxide layer using a close space deposition technique. The morphology of the as-deposited PbI2 films is typically and highly oriented polycrystalline structure, made up of microcrystal platelets upright on the substrate plane. Two techniques including the surface mechanical cutting and after-growth cadmium telluride coating were employed to improve the films' surface properties. It was shown that both of the film surface treatment methods markedly decreased the dark current of PbI2 films. The photo-to-dark current ratio of about 2.05 under 241Am γ-ray source with activity of 2.78 μCi irradiation was obtained from the film treated using both surface cutting and after-growth CdTe coating. Charge transport characteristics of these films were measured and the hole mobility 7.7×10-2-1.67×10-1 cm2/V s was estimated.

  17. The Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) and Closed-Loop Hardware Testing for Orion Rendezvous System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milenkovic, Zoran; DSouza, Christopher; Huish, David; Bendle, John; Kibler, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The exploration goals of Orion / MPCV Project will require a mature Rendezvous, Proximity Operations and Docking (RPOD) capability. Ground testing autonomous docking with a next-generation sensor such as the Vision Navigation Sensor (VNS) is a critical step along the path of ensuring successful execution of autonomous RPOD for Orion. This paper will discuss the testing rationale, the test configuration, the test limitations and the results obtained from tests that have been performed at the Lockheed Martin Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) to evaluate and mature the Orion RPOD system. We will show that these tests have greatly increased the confidence in the maturity of the Orion RPOD design, reduced some of the latent risks and in doing so validated the design philosophy of the Orion RPOD system. This paper is organized as follows: first, the objectives of the test are given. Descriptions of the SOSC facility, and the Orion RPOD system and associated components follow. The details of the test configuration of the components in question are presented prior to discussing preliminary results of the tests. The paper concludes with closing comments.

  18. Performance Expectations of Closed-Brayton-Cycle Heat Exchangers in 100-kWe Nuclear Space Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    Performance expectations of closed-Brayton-cycle heat exchangers to be used in 100-kWe nuclear space power systems were forecast. Proposed cycle state points for a system supporting a mission to three of Jupiter s moons required effectiveness values for the heat-source exchanger, recuperator and rejection exchanger (gas cooler) of 0.98,0.95 and 0.97, respectively. Performance parameters such as number of thermal units (Nm), equivalent thermal conductance (UA), and entropy generation numbers (Ns) varied from 11 to 19,23 to 39 kWK, and 0.019 to 0.023 for some standard heat exchanger configurations. Pressure-loss contributions to entropy generation were significant; the largest frictional contribution was 114% of the heat-transfer irreversibility. Using conventional recuperator designs, the 0.95 effectiveness proved difficult to achieve without exceeding other performance targets; a metallic, plate-fin counterflow solution called for 15% more mass and 33% higher pressure-loss than the target values. Two types of gas-coolers showed promise. Single-pass counterflow and multipass cross-counterflow arrangements both met the 0.97 effectiveness requirement. Potential reliability-related advantages of the cross-countefflow design were noted. Cycle modifications, enhanced heat transfer techniques and incorporation of advanced materials were suggested options to reduce system development risk. Carbon-carbon sheeting or foam proved an attractive option to improve overall performance.

  19. Level sequence and splitting identification of closely spaced energy levels by angle-resolved analysis of fluorescence light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. W.; Volotka, A. V.; Surzhykov, A.; Dong, C. Z.; Fritzsche, S.

    2016-06-01

    The angular distribution and linear polarization of the fluorescence light following the resonant photoexcitation is investigated within the framework of density matrix and second-order perturbation theory. Emphasis has been placed on "signatures" for determining the level sequence and splitting of intermediate (partially) overlapping resonances, if analyzed as a function of photon energy of incident light. Detailed computations within the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method have been performed, especially for the 1 s22 s22 p63 s ,Ji=1 /2 +γ1→(1s22 s 2 p63 s ) 13 p3 /2,J =1 /2 ,3 /2 →1 s22 s22 p63 s ,Jf=1 /2 +γ2 photoexcitation and subsequent fluorescence emission of atomic sodium. A remarkably strong dependence of the angular distribution and linear polarization of the γ2 fluorescence emission is found upon the level sequence and splitting of the intermediate (1s22 s 2 p63 s ) 13 p3 /2,J =1 /2 ,3 /2 overlapping resonances owing to their finite lifetime (linewidth). We therefore suggest that accurate measurements of the angular distribution and linear polarization might help identify the sequence and small splittings of closely spaced energy levels, even if they cannot be spectroscopically resolved.

  20. Analysis of targeting method for closed-loop guidance of a multi-stage space launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Eun-Jung; Cho, Sangbum; Roh, Woong-Rae

    2016-04-01

    This study considers the orbit insertion targeting problem for guidance of a multi-stage space launch vehicle. To design guidance algorithm for a particular mission target, the orbit designation method should be determined first, as the target orbit of closed-loop guidance during the upper stage flight is usually specified at the end of the final stage. We investigate some advantages of this single target approach over the one with intermediate targets in addition to the final target by comparing them in various flight conditions using an explicit guidance algorithm. We notice that in some cases application of the single targeting can be rather tricky and thus propose here an extended version of the single targeting algorithm that can be applied to problems where the target orbit plane has to be changed during the upper stages flight. We also demonstrate that this pseudo-single target method can be applied to these kinds of problems smoothly in contrast to the conventional single target algorithms by conducting numerical simulations for disturbed off-nominal conditions as well as for the nominal condition.

  1. Performance Expectations of Closed-Brayton-Cycle Heat Exchangers in 100-kWe Nuclear Space Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    Performance expectations of closed-Brayton-cycle heat exchangers to be used in 100-k We nuclear space power systems were forecast. Proposed cycle state points for a system supporting a mission to three of Jupiter's moons required effectiveness values for the heat-source exchanger, recuperator and rejection exchanger (gas cooler) of 0.98, 0.95, and 0.97, respectively. Performance parameters such as number of thermal units (Ntu), equivalent thermal conductance (UA), and entropy generation numbers (Ns) varied from 11 to 19, 23 to 39 kW/K, and 0.019 to 0.023 for some standard heat exchanger configurations. Pressure-loss contributions to entropy generation were significant; the largest frictional contribution was 114% of the heat transfer irreversibility. Using conventional recuperator designs, the 0.95 effectiveness proved difficult to achieve without exceeding other performance targets; a metallic, plate-fin counterflow solution called for 15% more mass and 33% higher pressure-loss than the target values. Two types of gas-coolers showed promise. Single-pass counterflow and multipass cross-counterflow arrangements both met the 0.97 effectiveness requirement. Potential reliability-related advantages of the cross-counterflow design were noted. Cycle modifications, enhanced heat transfer techniques and incorporation of advanced materials were suggested options to reduce system development risk. Carbon-carbon sheeting or foam proved an attractive option to improve overall performance.

  2. Tracking a large number of closely spaced objects based on the particle probability hypothesis density filter via optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangkui; Xu, Hui; An, Wei; Sheng, Weidong; Xu, Dan

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to tracking a large number of closely spaced objects (CSO) in image sequences that is based on the particle probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter and multiassignment data association. First, the particle PHD filter is adopted to eliminate most of the clutters and to estimate multitarget states. In the particle PHD filter, a noniterative multitarget estimation technique is introduced to reliably estimate multitarget states, and an improved birth particle sampling scheme is present to effectively acquire targets among clutters. Then, an integrated track management method is proposed to realize multitarget track continuity. The core of the track management is the track-to-estimation multiassignment association, which relaxes the traditional one-to-one data association restriction due to the unresolved focal plane CSO measurements. Meanwhile, a unified technique of multiple consecutive misses for track deletion is used jointly to cope with the sensitivity of the PHD filter to the missed detections and to eliminate false alarms further, as well as to initiate tracks of large numbers of CSO. Finally, results of two simulations and one experiment show that the proposed approach is feasible and efficient.

  3. Testing and Model Correlation of Sublimator Driven Coldplate Coupons and EDU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2009-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a more traditional thermal control system. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially saving mass, power, and complexity. Because this concept relies on evaporative heat rejection techniques, it is primarily useful for short mission durations. Additionally, the concept requires a conductive path between the heat-generating component and the heat rejection device. Therefore, it is mostly a relevant solution for a vehicle with a relatively low heat rejection requirement and/or short transport distances. Tests were performed on coupons and an Engineering Development Unit (EDU) at NASA s Johnson Space Center to better understand the basic operational principles and to validate the analytical methods being used for the SDC development. This paper outlines the results of the SDC tests, the subsequent thermal model correlation, and a description of the SDC Engineering Development Unit test results.

  4. Sublimation measurements and analysis of high temperature thermoelectric materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, V.; Noon, L.

    1983-01-01

    High temperature thermoelectric device sublimation effects are compared for rare earth sulfides, selenides, and state-of-the-art Si-Ge alloys. Although rare earth calcogenides can potentially exhibit superior sublimation characteristics, the state-of-the-art Si-Ge alloy with silicon nitride sublimation-inhibitive coating has been tested to 1000 C. Attention is given to the ceramic electrolyte cells, forming within electrical and thermal insulation, which affect leakage conductance measurements in Si-Ge thermoelectric generators.

  5. Adhesive coated electrical apparatus having sublimable protective covering and an assembly method

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, R.E.

    1982-08-10

    Electrical apparatus including an enclosure, an electrode disposed within the enclosure, and supports for insulatably supporting the electrode within the enclosure has a permanently sticky adhesive material which is disposed on the interior surface of the outer enclosure. A high-vapor-pressure sublimable material is disposed on the permanently sticky adhesive material, with the sublimable material capable of subliming away in the presence of a vacuum. The presence of the sublimable material enables the apparatus to be non-sticky during assembly and handling operations, while being rendered sticky upon commissioning of the apparatus.

  6. Dynamic sublimation pressure and the catastrophic breakup of Comet ISON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckloff, Jordan K.; Johnson, Brandon C.; Bowling, Timothy; Jay Melosh, H.; Minton, David; Lisse, Carey M.; Battams, Karl

    2015-09-01

    Previously proposed mechanisms have difficulty explaining the disruption of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) as it approached the Sun. We describe a novel cometary disruption mechanism whereby comet nuclei fragment and disperse through dynamic sublimation pressure, which induces differential stresses within the interior of the nucleus. When these differential stresses exceed its material strength, the nucleus breaks into fragments. We model the sublimation process thermodynamically and propose that it is responsible for the disruption of Comet ISON. We estimate the bulk unconfined crushing strength of Comet ISON's nucleus and the resulting fragments to be 0.5 Pa and 1-9 Pa, respectively, assuming typical Jupiter Family Comet (JFC) albedos. However, if Comet ISON has an albedo similar to Pluto, this strength estimate drops to 0.2 Pa for the intact nucleus and 0.6-4 Pa for its fragments. Regardless of assumed albedo, these are similar to previous strength estimates of JFCs. This suggests that, if Comet ISON is representative of dynamically new comets, then low bulk strength is a primordial property of some comet nuclei, and not due to thermal processing during migration into the Jupiter Family.

  7. The thermal sublimation process and atmosphere of Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, I. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Ip, W. H.

    Iapetus one of the outer icy satellites of Saturn is characterized by a large albedo asymmetry 0 04 vs 0 5 between the leading and trailing hemispheres The origin of this color dichotomy is still a puzzle A related question is whether the long-term surface icy material transport driven by thermal sublimation might be effective in modifying or shaping some of the observed features We have made used the preliminary results reported by the CIRS observations on Cassini to construct a surface temperature map The peak temperature on the dark side reaches 130K and the corresponding value on the bright side is about 100K If the dark material is composed mainly of water ice the related sublimation process - in addition to ion sputtering and photo-sputtering - could support the formation of a thin atmosphere This surface-bound atmosphere is of exospheric nature and the surface transport of the water molecules is characterized by ballistic motion from low latitude region to the poles We will present our simulation results on the short-term and long-term mass transport and atmospheric processes

  8. Cerium Tetrafluoride: Sublimation, Thermolysis, and Atomic Fluorine Migration.

    PubMed

    Chilingarov, N S; Knot'ko, A V; Shlyapnikov, I M; Mazej, Z; Kristl, M; Sidorov, L N

    2015-08-01

    Saturated vapor pressure p° and enthalpy of sublimation (ΔsH°) of cerium tetrafluoride CeF4 were determined by means of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry in the range of 750-920 K. It was discovered that sublimation of cerium tetrafluoride from a platinum effusion cell competes with thermal decomposition to CeF3 in the solid phase, but no accompanying release of fluorine to the gas phase occurs. Thus, fluorine atoms migrate within the surface layer of CeF4(s) to the regions of their irreversible drain. We used scanning electron microscopy to study the distribution of the residual CeF3(s) across the inner surface of the effusion cell after complete evaporation of CeF4(s). It was observed that CeF3 accumulates near the edge of the effusion orifice and near the junction of the lid and the body of the cell, that is, in those regions where the fluorine atoms can migrate to a free platinum surface and thus be depleted from the system. Distribution of CeF3(s) solid particles indicates the ways of fluorine atoms migration providing CeF3(s) formation inside the CeF4(s) surface layer. PMID:26165149

  9. Meteorological conditions associated to high sublimation amounts in semiarid high-elevation Andes decrease the performance of empirical melt models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alvaro; Pellicciotti, Francesca; MacDonell, Shelley; McPhee, James; Burlando, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Empirical melt (EM) models are often preferred to surface energy balance (SEB) models to calculate melt amounts of snow and ice in hydrological modelling of high-elevation catchments. The most common reasons to support this decision are that, in comparison to SEB models, EM models require lower levels of meteorological data, complexity and computational costs. However, EM models assume that melt can be characterized by means of a few index variables only, and their results strongly depend on the transferability in space and time of the calibrated empirical parameters. In addition, they are intrinsically limited in accounting for specific process components, the complexity of which cannot be easily reconciled with the empirical nature of the model. As an example of an EM model, in this study we use the Enhanced Temperature Index (ETI) model, which calculates melt amounts using air temperature and the shortwave radiation balance as index variables. We evaluate the performance of the ETI model on dry high-elevation sites where sublimation amounts - that are not explicitly accounted for the EM model - represent a relevant percentage of total ablation (1.1 to 8.7%). We analyse a data set of four Automatic Weather Stations (AWS), which were collected during the ablation season 2013-14, at elevations between 3466 and 4775 m asl, on the glaciers El Tapado, San Francisco, Bello and El Yeso, which are located in the semiarid Andes of central Chile. We complement our analysis using data from past studies in Juncal Norte Glacier (Chile) and Haut Glacier d'Arolla (Switzerland), during the ablation seasons 2008-09 and 2006, respectively. We use the results of a SEB model, applied to each study site, along the entire season, to calibrate the ETI model. The ETI model was not designed to calculate sublimation amounts, however, results show that their ability is low also to simulate melt amounts at sites where sublimation represents larger percentages of total ablation. In fact, we

  10. The effect of plasma heating on sublimation-driven flow in Io's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Mau C.; Johnson, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    The atmospheric flow on Io is numerically computed in a flat 2-D axisymmetric geometry for a sublimation atmosphere on the trailing hemisphere subjected to plasma bombardment, UV heating, and IR cooling. Calculations are performed for subsolar vapor pressures of approximately 6.5 x 10(exp -3) Pa (approximately 3 x 10(exp 18) SO2/sq cm) and 6.8 x 10(exp -4) Pa (approximately 4 x 10(exp 17) SO2/sq cm); the latter approximates the vapor pressure of F. P. Fanale et al. (1982). The amount of plasma energy deposited in the atmosphere is 20% of the plasma flow energy due to corotation (J. A. Linker et al., 1988). It is found that plasma heating significantly inflates the upper atmosphere, increasing both the exobase altitude and the amount of surface covered by more than an exospheric column of gas. This in turn controls the supply of the Io plasma torus (M. A. McGrath and R. E. Johnson, 1987). The horizontal flow of mass and energy is also important in determining the exobase altitude; and it is shown that IR cooling can be important, although our use of the equilibrium, cool-to-space approximation for a pure SO2 gas (E. Lellouch et al., 1992) may overestimate this effect. The calculated exobase altitudes are somewhat lower than those suggested by McGrath and Johnson (1987) for supplying the torus, indicating the details of the plasma energy deposition and sputter ejection rate near the exobase, as well as the IR emission from this region need to be examined. In addition, the molecules sublimed (or sputtered) from the surface are transported to the exobase in times short compared to the molecular photodissociation time. Therefore, the exobase is dominated by molecular species and the exobase is supplied by a small region of the surface.

  11. Diverse lavas from closely spaced volcanoes drawing from a common parent: Emmons Lake Volcanic Center, Eastern Aleutian Arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.; Miller, T.; Waythomas, C.; Trusdell, F.; Calvert, A.; Layer, P.

    2009-01-01

    Emmons Lake Volcanic Center (ELVC) on the lower Alaskan Peninsula is one of the largest and most diverse volcanic centers in the Aleutian Arc. Since the Middle Pleistocene, eruption of ~ 350 km3 of basalt through rhyolite has produced a 30 km, arc front chain of nested calderas and overlapping stratovolcanoes. ELVC has experienced as many as five major caldera-forming eruptions, the most recent, at ~ 27 ka, produced ~ 50 km3 of rhyolitic ignimbrite and ash fall. These violent silicic events were interspersed with less energetic, but prodigious, outpourings of basalt through dacite. Holocene eruptions are mostly basaltic andesite to andesite and historically recorded activity includes over 40 eruptions within the last 200 yr, all from Pavlof volcano, the most active site in the Aleutian Arc. Geochemical and geophysical observations suggest that although all ELVC eruptions derive from a common clinopyroxene + spinel + plagioclase fractionating high-aluminum basalt parent in the lower crust, magma follows one of two closely spaced, but distinct paths to the surface. Under the eastern end of the chain, magma moves rapidly and cleanly through a relatively young (~ 28 ka), hydraulically connected dike plexus. Steady supply, short magma residence times, and limited interaction with crustal rocks preserve the geochemistry of deep crustal processes. Below the western part of the chain, magma moves haltingly through a long-lived (~ 500 ka) and complex intrusive column in which many generations of basaltic to andesitic melts have mingled and fractionated. Buoyant, silicic melts periodically separate from the lower parts of the column to feed voluminous eruptions of dacite and rhyolite. Mafic lavas record a complicated passage through cumulate zones and hydrous silicic residues as manifested by disequilibrium phenocryst textures, incompatible element enrichments, and decoupling of REEs and HFSEs ratios. Such features are absent in mafic lavas from the younger part of the chain

  12. A Validated Set of MIDAS V5 Task Network Model Scenarios to Evaluate Nextgen Closely Spaced Parallel Operations Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Brian Francis; Hooey, Becky Lee; Haan, Nancy; Socash, Connie; Mahlstedt, Eric; Foyle, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The Closely Spaced Parallel Operations (CSPO) scenario is a complex, human performance model scenario that tested alternate operator roles and responsibilities to a series of off-nominal operations on approach and landing (see Gore, Hooey, Mahlstedt, Foyle, 2013). The model links together the procedures, equipment, crewstation, and external environment to produce predictions of operator performance in response to Next Generation system designs, like those expected in the National Airspaces NextGen concepts. The task analysis that is contained in the present report comes from the task analysis window in the MIDAS software. These tasks link definitions and states for equipment components, environmental features as well as operational contexts. The current task analysis culminated in 3300 tasks that included over 1000 Subject Matter Expert (SME)-vetted, re-usable procedural sets for three critical phases of flight; the Descent, Approach, and Land procedural sets (see Gore et al., 2011 for a description of the development of the tasks included in the model; Gore, Hooey, Mahlstedt, Foyle, 2013 for a description of the model, and its results; Hooey, Gore, Mahlstedt, Foyle, 2013 for a description of the guidelines that were generated from the models results; Gore, Hooey, Foyle, 2012 for a description of the models implementation and its settings). The rollout, after landing checks, taxi to gate and arrive at gate illustrated in Figure 1 were not used in the approach and divert scenarios exercised. The other networks in Figure 1 set up appropriate context settings for the flight deck.The current report presents the models task decomposition from the tophighest level and decomposes it to finer-grained levels. The first task that is completed by the model is to set all of the initial settings for the scenario runs included in the model (network 75 in Figure 1). This initialization process also resets the CAD graphic files contained with MIDAS, as well as the embedded

  13. The SCITEAS experiment: Optical characterizations of sublimating icy planetary analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Jost, B.; Poch, O.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Vuitel, B.; Thomas, N.

    2015-05-01

    We have designed and built a laboratory facility to investigate the spectro-photometric and morphologic properties of different types of ice-bearing planetary surface analogs and follow their evolution upon exposure to a low pressure and low temperature environment. The results obtained with this experiment are used to verify and improve our interpretations of current optical remote-sensing datasets. They also provide valuable information for the development and operation of future optical instruments. The Simulation Chamber for Imaging the Temporal Evolution of Analogue Samples (SCITEAS) is a small thermal vacuum chamber equipped with a variety of ports and feedthroughs that permit both in-situ and remote characterizations as well as interacting with the sample. A large quartz window located directly above the sample is used to observe its surface from outside with a set of visible and near-infrared cameras. The sample holder can be easily and quickly inserted and removed from the chamber and is compatible with the other measurement facilities of the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern. We report here on the results of two of the first experiments performed in the SCITEAS chamber. In the first experiment, fine-grained water ice mixed with dark organic and mineral matter was left to sublime in vacuum and at low temperature, simulating the evolution of the surface of a comet nucleus approaching the Sun. We observed and characterized the formation and evolution of a crust of refractory organic and mineral matter at the surface of the sample and linked the evolution of its structure and texture to its spectro-photometric properties. In the second experiment, a frozen soil was prepared by freezing a mixture of smectite mineral and water. The sample was then left to sublime for 6 h to simulate the loss of volatiles from icy soil at high latitudes on Mars. Colour images were produced using the definitions of the

  14. Matrix isolation sublimation: An apparatus for producing cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sacramento, R. L.; Alves, B. X.; Silva, B. A.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.; Oliveira, A. N.; Li, M. S.

    2015-07-15

    We describe the apparatus to generate cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules based on matrix isolation sublimation. Isolation matrices of Ne and H{sub 2} are hosts for atomic and molecular species which are sublimated into vacuum at cryogenic temperatures. The resulting cryogenic beams are used for high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The technique also aims at loading atomic and molecular traps.

  15. Direct Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from Nucleic Acids Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Schubert, Michael; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    A sublimation technique was developed to isolate purines and pyrimidines directly from lambda-deoxyribonucleic acid (lambda-DNA) and Escherichia coli cells. The sublimation of adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine from lambda-DNA was tested under reduced pressure (approx. 0.5 Torr) at temperatures of >150 C. With the exception of guanine, approximately 60 -75% of each base was sublimed directly from the lambda-DNA and recovered on a coldfinger of the sublimation apparatus after heating to 450 C. Several nucleobases including adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil were also recovered from E. coli bacteria after heating the cells to the same temperature, although some thermal decomposition of the bases also occurred. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from native E. coli DNA and RNA without any chemical treatment of the cells.

  16. Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.

    1993-02-01

    Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF{sub 6} in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % {sup 235}U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

  17. Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.

    1993-02-01

    Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF[sub 6] in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % [sup 235]U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

  18. HiRISE Images of the Sublimation of the Southern Seasonal Polar Cap of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; McEwen, A. S.; Okubo, C.; Byrne, S.; Becker, T.; Kieffer, H.; Mellon, M.; HiRISE Team

    2007-12-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has returned images with unprecedented resolution of Mars southern seasonal CO2 polar cap. Several high latitude sites were selected for systematic monitoring throughout the spring as the seasonal cap sublimed away. The capability of MRO to turn off-nadir enabled acquisition of stereo pairs to study the topography. HiRISE color capability distinguishes processes involving dust and frost. Color images show evidence of localized migration of frost as dark spots sublimate. Unique landforms are found in the cryptic terrain[1] region of Mars polar cap. These unusual landforms have narrow channels emanating radially, dubbed spiders[2]. Fans of dust blown by the prevailing wind are hypothesized to come from gas jets of CO2 subliming beneath translucent seasonal ice [3]. HiRISE images show a wide variety of morphologies of narrow channels. In some regions deep narrow channels converge radially, while in others the high channel density is more akin to lace. A smooth evolution of one form to another has been observed. Channels converge dendritically, often uphill, consistent with formation by flowing gas, not liquid. More dust fans are observed in regions of spiders than in lace, suggesting that the sublimating gas under the seasonal ice builds up more pressure and can entrain more dust in spidery areas. These differing terrain types are found within a single 6 x 10 km image, which has presumably homogeneous weather, thus a uniform layer of ice and exposure to atmospheric dust. HiRiSE images show that the dust fans tend to emerge from low spots, where the subsurface is accessed, then are blown up and out onto the surface of the seasonal ice. The fans evolve from a thin diffuse covering to thick blankets filling in the narrow channels. We hypothesize that dust collects in the channels, and that these relatively more permeable dust-filled channels form pathways for the next seasons

  19. Methods of conveying fluids and methods of sublimating solid particles

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-10-01

    A heat exchanger and associated methods for sublimating solid particles therein, for conveying fluids therethrough, or both. The heat exchanger includes a chamber and a porous member having a porous wall having pores in communication with the chamber and with an interior of the porous member. A first fluid is conveyed into the porous member while a second fluid is conveyed into the porous member through the porous wall. The second fluid may form a positive flow boundary layer along the porous wall to reduce or eliminate substantial contact between the first fluid and the interior of the porous wall. The combined first and second fluids are conveyed out of the porous member. Additionally, the first fluid and the second fluid may each be conveyed into the porous member at different temperatures and may exit the porous member at substantially the same temperature.

  20. Sublimation Model for Formation of Martian Residual Cap Depressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, S.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2000-10-01

    In an effort for explain the formation of the 'Swiss-cheese' terrain visible on the southern residual cap of Mars, we have developed a radiative model to follow the growth/decay of an initial depression due to sublimation/condensation of carbon dioxide. The pits making up this terrain have many distinctive features, they are shallow ( 10m deep), with steep walls and flat floors and contain an interior moat which runs along the bottom of the walls. They have lateral sizes ranging from a few 10's of meters to a kilometer and are quasi-circular. The model accounts for incident sunlight, emitted thermal radiation, and scattered short and long wave radiation. We have investigated many cases involving pure dry-ice with constant albedo, albedo as a function of insolation, and differing albedo for fresh and residual frost (the latter has lower albedo). The last case mentioned shows the most promising results to date. With these conditions it is possible for the depressions to grow and develop flat central portions although they still lack the observed steep walls of the pits. In the other cases mentioned the initial depressions heal themselves and disappear into the surrounding terrain. Other processes or materials could be responsible for the remainder of the observed features. Water ice stored a few meters under a carbon dioxide covering would have dramatic effects on the growth of any depression which encounters it, both due to its low sublimation rate and its ability to store heat. We will extend the current model to include a water ice layer and account for the subsequent heat storage which could possibly follow. For water ice models, a challenge is to reproduce the low brightness temperatures that persist throughout the summer at the residual south polar cap.

  1. Ecology of micro-organisms in a small closed system - Potential benefits and problems for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, E. B.; Seale, D. B.; Boraas, M. E.; Sommer, C. V.

    1989-01-01

    The probable sources and implications of microbial contamination on the proposed Space Station are discussed. Because of the limited availability of material, facilities and time on the Space Station, we are exploring the feasibility of replacing traditional incubation methods for assessing microbial contamination with rapid, automated methods. Some possibilities include: ATP measurement, microscopy and telecommunications, and molecular techniques such as DNA probes or monoclonal antibodies. Some of the important ecological factors that could alter microbes in space include microgravity, exposure to radiation, and antibiotic resistance.

  2. The use of cortical screw anchorage for closing a space resulting from the loss of a lower molar--a case report.

    PubMed

    Janiszewska-Olszowska, Joanna; Socha, Alina; Bińczak, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Orthodontic microscrews are temporary implants providing skeletal anchorage, which may be used for en-masse incisor retraction, as well as for the protraction of posterior segments in order to close spaces without retracting anterior teeth. A patient, aged 16 was reported in whom a miniscrew of 9.5 mm length and 2 mm dimension was inserted distal to the lower left second premolar 2 months after extracting the first molar with periapical bone lesion after failed endodontic treatment. The lower third molar was mesialised using direct anchorage and a power arm to minimize mesial tipping. The space closed within 20 months, followed by a spontaneous eruption of the adjacent third molar. This treatment method constitutes a good alternative to third molar autotransplantation, allowing the avoidance of the risk of surgical procedure. PMID:25026758

  3. Remarks of Ruth Bates Harris, Deputy Assistant Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration at summer institute closing activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Applications of experience and knowledge gained from aeronautical and space research and exploration are discussed briefly. Spinoffs are presented which improve the quality of life by contributing to advances in health, transportation, foods, communications, energy, safety, and manufacturing.

  4. A closed-cycle dilution refrigerator with free-space and fiber optical access for quantum optomechanics experiments at 25mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeblacher, Simon; Wieczorek, Witlef; Christ, Peter; Buehler, Matthias; Wernicke, Doreen; Hoehne, Jens; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2011-03-01

    We report on the operation of a closed-cycle dilution refrigerator for quantum optomechanics experiments at 25mK. The dilution fridge is accessible both via free-space as well as fiber coupling, allowing us to perform a variety of optical experiments at low temperatures. It is designed to vibrationally isolate the experiment allowing for stable operation of a high-finesse optical cavity. This enables us to perform cavity-optomechanics experiments at ultra-low temperatures.

  5. Estimating surface sublimation losses from snowpacks in a mountain catchment using eddy covariance and turbulent transfer calculations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sublimation is a critical component of the snow cover mass balance. While sublimation can be directly measured using eddy covariance (EC), such measurements are relatively uncommon in complex mountainous environments. EC measurements of surface snowpack sublimation from three consecutive winter sea...

  6. A neurobiological enquiry into the origins of our experience of the sublime and beautiful.

    PubMed

    Ishizu, Tomohiro; Zeki, Semir

    2014-01-01

    Philosophies of aesthetics have posited that experience of the sublime-commonly but not exclusively derived from scenes of natural grandeur-is distinct from that of beauty and is a counterpoint to it. We wanted to chart the pattern of brain activity which correlates with the declared intensity of experience of the sublime, and to learn whether it differs from the pattern that correlates with the experience of beauty, reported in our previous studies (e.g., Ishizu and Zeki, 2011). 21 subjects participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Prior to the experiment, they viewed pictures of landscapes, which they rated on a scale of 1-5, with 5 being the most sublime and 1 being the least. This allowed us to select, for each subject, five sets of stimuli-from ones experienced as very sublime to those experienced as not at all sublime-which subjects viewed and re-rated in the scanner while their brain activity was imaged. The results revealed a distinctly different pattern of brain activity from that obtained with the experience of beauty, with none of the areas active with the latter experience also active during experience of the sublime. Sublime and beautiful experiences thus appear to engage separate and distinct brain systems. PMID:25426046

  7. Increase of SiC sublimation growth rate by optimizing of powder packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Cai, Dang; Zhang, Hui

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive model for silicon carbide (SiC) sublimation crystal growth considering powder packaging is presented. This model is based on heat and mass transfer of porous powder charge with different sizes of the particle and accounts for induction heating, powder charge sublimation, vapor transport, and porosity evolution in a SiC sublimation crystal growth system. The mechanism of vapor transport is proposed by introducing a driving force arising from temperature difference between powder charge and seed in the growth system. Powder porosity evolution and sublimation rate variations are predicted based on vapor transport mechanism. Effects of powder geometry, such as particle sizes, volume and size ratios of different particles, and driving forces on the sublimation rate are studied. In addition, simulation results for powder sublimation with and without a central hole are presented. The results indicate that the sublimation rate can be increased by optimizing the powder packaging, or by creating a hole in the center of packed powder.

  8. In Situ Observation on Dislocation-Controlled Sublimation of Mg Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Mao, Min-Min; Li, Qing-Jie; Fu, Xiao-Qian; Tian, He; Li, Ji-Xue; Mao, Scott X; Zhang, Ze

    2016-02-10

    Sublimation is an important endothermic phase transition in which the atoms break away from their neighbors in the crystal lattice and are removed into the gas phase. Such debonding process may be significantly influenced by dislocations, the crystal defect that changes the bonding environment of local atoms. By performing systematic defects characterization and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tests on a core--shell MgO-Mg system, which enables us to "modulate" the internal dislocation density, we investigated the role of dislocations on materials' sublimation with particular focus on the sublimation kinetics and mechanism. It was observed that the sublimation rate increases significantly with dislocation density. As the density of screw dislocations is high, the intersection of screw dislocation spirals creates a large number of monatomic ledges, resulting in a "liquid-like" motion of solid-gas interface, which significantly deviates from the theoretically predicted sublimation plane. Our calculation based on density functional theory demonstrated that the remarkable change of sublimation rate with dislocation density is due to the dramatic reduction in binding energy of the monatomic ledges. This study provides direct observation to improve our understanding on this fundamental phase transition as well as to shed light on tuning materials' sublimation by "engineering" dislocation density in applications. PMID:26799861

  9. Sublimation characterization and vapor pressure estimation of an HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor using thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Minli; Ziemba, Theresa M; Maurin, Michael B

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the sublimation process of DPC 963, a second-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor for HIV-1 retrovirus, and to better understand the effect of sublimation during active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) manufacture and formulation development, especially the drying processes. Sublimation of DPC 963 at 150 degrees C and above was determined by thermogravimetric analysis-Fourier transform infrared (TGA-FTIR). The rates of sublimation at different temperatures were measured using isothermal TGA. Condensed material was collected and analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and infrared (IR) spectrometry. Benzoic acid was used as a reference standard to derive a linear logarithmic relationship between sublimation/evaporation rate and vapor pressure specific to the TGA system used in this study. Sublimation and evaporation of DPC 963 were found to follow apparent zero-order kinetics. Using the Eyring equation, the enthalpy and entropy of the sublimation and evaporation processes were obtained. The enthalpies of sublimation and evaporation were found to be 29 and 22 kcal/mol, respectively. The condensed material from the vapor phase was found to exist in 2 physical forms, amorphous and crystalline. Using benzoic acid as a reference standard, vapor pressure of DPC 963 at different temperatures was calculated using the linear logarithmic relationship obtained. DPC 963 undergoes sublimation at appreciable rates at 150 degrees C and above but this is not likely to pose a serious issue during the manufacturing process. Vapor pressure estimation using thermogravimetric analysis provided sufficient accuracy to be used as a fast, simple, and safe alternative to the traditional methods of vapor pressure determination. PMID:12916905

  10. Ice sublimation and rheology - Implications for the Martian polar layered deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofstadter, Mark D.; Murray, Bruce C.

    1990-01-01

    If the sublimation and creep of water ice are important processes in the Martian polar layered deposits, ice-rich scenario formation and evolution schemes must invoke a mechanism for the inhibition of sublimation, such as a dust layer derived from the residue of the sublimating deposits. This layer could be of the order of 1 m in thickness. If the deposits are ice-rich, flows of more than 1 km should have occurred. It is noted that the dust particles in question may be cemented by such ice that may be present, but that impurities may also have served to cement dust particles together even in the absence of ice.

  11. Sublimation rates of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from comets at large heliocentric distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1992-01-01

    Using a simple model for outgassing from a small flat surface area, the sublimation rates of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, two species more volatile than water ice that are known to be present in comets, are calculated for a suddenly activated discrete source on the rotating nucleus. The instantaneous sublimation rate depends upon the comet's heliocentric distance and the Sun's zenith angle at the location of the source. The values are derived for the constants of CO and CO2 in an expression that yields the local rotation-averaged sublimation rate as a function of the comet's spin parameters and the source's cometocentric latitude.

  12. Technological possibilities of processing the sublimates of electron-beam remelting of niobium to form ferroniobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumarev, V. M.; Leont'ev, L. I.; Potapov, V. I.; Udoeva, L. Yu.; Upolovnikova, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of melting of ferroniobium from the sublimates of electron-beam remelting of niobium ingots is studied using thermodynamic analysis and a "hot" simulation. The basic requirements for the conditions of processing of sublimates with various (Nb/Al)met ratios are evaluated and determined. A ferroalloy the contents of controlled impurities in which correspond to certain ferroniobium grades of Russian and foreign standards is produced by melting of charges containing the sublimates, a deoxidizer (Fe2O3), and a flux (CaO, CaF2) in an electroslag furnace.

  13. Close women, distant men: line bisection reveals sex-dimorphic patterns of visuomotor performance in near and far space.

    PubMed

    Stancey, Helen; Turner, Mark

    2010-05-01

    The mid-points of a series of lines which were positioned both within hand-reach (near space) and beyond hand-reach (far space) were estimated by 24 women and 24 men. When using a laser pointer to perform estimations, women were more accurate in the near condition than the far, whereas men were more accurate in the far condition than the near. When using a stick pointer for the far condition, women were more accurate than when using the laser, whereas men were more accurate using the laser pointer than the stick for the far condition. There was no difference between near and far accuracy scores for either sex using the stick. These results suggest that use of a tool which provides proprioceptive feedback causes the brain to remap far-space stimuli as if situated in near space. Possible origins and neural bases for these differences are considered. Finally, the study found evidence for pseudoneglect, but no evidence for pseudoneglect shift. PMID:19646327

  14. Shielding of longitudinal magnetic fields with thin, closely, spaced concentric cylindrical shells with applications to atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, S. A.; Gubser, D. U.; Cox, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    A general formula is given for the longitudinal shielding effectiveness of N closed concentric cylinders. The use of these equations is demonstrated by application to the design of magnetic shields for hydrogen maser atomic clocks. Examples of design tradeoffs such as size, weight, and material thickness are discussed. Experimental results on three sets of shields fabricated by three manufacturers are presented. Two of the sets were designed employing the techniques described. Agreement between the experimental results and the design calculations is then demonstrated.

  15. Joint-space adaptive control of a 6 DOF end-effector with closed-kinematic chain mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Zhou, Zhen-Lei

    1989-01-01

    The development is presented for a joint-space adaptive scheme that controls the joint position of a six-degree-of-freedom (DOF) robot end-effector performing fine and precise motion within a very limited workspace. The end-effector was built to study autonomous assembly of NASA hardware in space. The design of the adaptive controller is based on the concept of model reference adaptive control (MRAC) and Lyapunov direct method. In the development, it is assumed that the end-effector performs slowly varying motion. Computer simulation is performed to investigate the performance of the developed control scheme on position control of the end-effector. Simulation results manifest that the adaptive control scheme provides excellent tracking of several test paths.

  16. Titanium Nitride Epitaxy on Tungsten (100) by Sublimation Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mercurio, Lisa; Du, Li; Edgar, J H; Kenik, Edward A

    2007-01-01

    Titanium nitride crystals were grown from titanium nitride powder on tungsten by the sublimation-recondensation technique. The bright golden TiN crystals displayed a variety of shapes including cubes, truncated tetrahedrons, truncated octahedrons, and tetrahedrons bounded by (111) and (100) crystal planes. The TiN crystals formed regular, repeated patterns within individual W grains that suggested epitaxy. X-ray diffraction and electron backscattering diffraction revealed that the tungsten foil was highly textured with a preferred foil normal of (100) and confirmed that the TiN particles deposited epitaxially with the orientation TiN(100)/W(100) and TiN[100]/W[110], that is, the unit cells of the TiN crystals were rotated 45{sup o} with respect to the tungsten. Because of its larger coefficient of thermal expansion compared to W, upon cooling from the growth temperature, the TiN crystals were under in-plane tensile strain, causing many of the TiN crystals to crack.

  17. Transformation of Polar Ice Sublimate Residue into Martian Circumpolar Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. S.; Parker, T. J.; Stephens, J. B.; Laue, E. G.; Fanale, F. P.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental demonstration that a credible Martian sand may be formed from dust-bearing ice provides a new set of possible explanations for some of the observed Martian aeolian landforms. It is hypothesized that a light-weight fluffy rind is formed on the polar caps. This could provide material easily entrainable by Martian winds, which generally blow equatorward from the poles. These winds would peel the fluffy rind from the surface of the sublimating summer polar caps and from the equatorward slopes of the polar troughs. These pieces of material would then be rolled into lumps (of high sailarea/mass ratio) by the wind. They would become pigmented as they saltate across the surface, perhaps gathering carbonaceous meteoritic dust or other impurities on their surfaces, or through chemical reactions with the ice-free environment away from their point of origin. Once they became trapped in topographic wind shadows, they would form dune structures because they are hydraulically equivalent to sand particles.

  18. Climatological observations and predicted sublimation rates at Lake Hoare, Antarctica.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, G.D.; McKay, C.P.; Simmons, G.M., Jr.; Wharton, R.A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In December 1985, an automated meteorological station was established at Lake Hoare in the dry valley region of Antarctica. Here, we report on the first year-round observations available for any site in Taylor Valley. This dataset augments the year-round data obtained at Lake Vanda (Wright Valley) by winter-over crews during the late 1960s and early 1970s. The mean annual solar flux at Lake Hoare was 92 W m-2 during 1986, the mean air temperature -17.3 degrees C, and the mean 3-m wind speed 3.3 m s-1. The local climate is controlled by the wind regime during the 4-month sunless winter and by seasonal and diurnal variations in the incident solar flux during the remainder of the year. Temperature increases of 20 degrees-30 degrees C are frequently observed during the winter due to strong fo??hn winds descending from the Polar Plateau. A model incorporating nonsteady molecular diffusion into Kolmogorov-scale eddies in the interfacial layer and similarity-theory flux-profiles in the surface sublayer, is used to determine the rate of ice sublimation from the acquired meteorological data. Despite the frequent occurrence of strong winter fo??hns, the bulk of the annual ablation occurs during the summer due to elevated temperatures and persistent moderate winds. The annual ablation from Lake Hoare is estimated to have been 35.0 +/- 6.3 cm for 1986.

  19. Bion and the sublime: the origins of an aesthetic paradigm.

    PubMed

    Civitarese, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    In constructing his theory Bion drew on a number of symbolic matrices: psychoanalysis, philosophy, mathematics, literature, aesthetics. The least investigated of these is the last. True, we know that Bion cites many authors of the Romantic period, such as Coleridge, Keats, Blake and Wordsworth, as well as others who were held in high esteem in the Romantic period, such as Milton. However, less is known about the influence exerted on him by the aesthetics of the sublime, which while chronologically preceding Romanticism is in fact one of its components. My working hypothesis is that tracing a number of Bion's concepts back to this secret model can serve several purposes: firstly, it contributes to the study of the sources, and, secondly, it makes these concepts appear much less occasional and idiosyncratic than we might believe, being as they are mostly those less immediately understandable but not less important (O, negative capability, nameless dread, the infinite, the language of achievement, unison etc.). Finally, connecting these notions to a matrix, that is, disclosing the meaning of elements that are not simply juxtaposed but dynamically interrelated, in my view significantly increases not only their theoretical intelligibility but also their usefulness in clinical practice. In conclusion, one could legitimately argue that Bion gradually subsumed all the other paradigms he drew on within the aesthetic paradigm. PMID:25388282

  20. Sublimation TiN Coating of RF Power Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorkiewicz, J.; Kula, J.; Pszona, S.; Sobczak, J.; Bilinski, A.

    2008-03-01

    Titanium evaporation in a reactive atmosphere of ammonia has been chosen to deposit thin (up to 10 nm) protective surface layers containing titanium nitride and titanium oxinitrides which suppress secondary electron emission. The coating procedure, applied by the author in DESY (Hamburg) for TESLA couplers anti-multipactor protection, has been recently implemented in The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ) where a new coating device is used, equipped with a special titanium sublimation setup in a 100 1 vacuum chamber. Several arrays of cylindrical and coaxial RF coupler windows have been coated so far after optimizing the processing parameters. A check of the obtained surface layers ability to attenuate secondary electron emission has been performed; measurements of the secondary electron yield from TiN layers deposited on alumina samples were done in IPJ on as-delivered coated samples, then after vacuum bake-out and finally after additional electron bombardment of their surfaces. Also chemical composition of the surface layers has been studied using XPS in the Institute of Physical Chemistry (IChF).

  1. Closed-cell foams produced from sputter-deposited aluminum. [experiments on earth and in space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, J. W.; Greenwell, E. N.

    1977-01-01

    Sputter deposited aluminum containing argon was melted to produce foam, both in the earth's gravitational field and in a zero-gravity space environment. Experiments leading to trapping of up to 270 ppm argon sputtering gas in pure aluminum during high-rate dc triode sputter deposition are discussed. Conduct of the melting experiments and design of the furnace used are described. Metallography; an analysis of bubble size, distribution, and morphology; and a preliminary description of the kinetics are also presented.

  2. Experimental Results on Isotopic Fractionation of Dusty Deuterated Water Ice During Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, J. E.; Smith, P. H.; Brown, R. H.; Lauretta, D. S.; Boynton, W. V.; Drake, M. J.

    2008-03-01

    Observed heavy fractionation of HDO during sublimation of water ice when mixed with or overlain by (regolith) fine particulate dust is described. Results from two sets of apparatus simulating comets and the Mars polar environment will be presented.

  3. Schiller Goes to the Movies: Locating the Sublime in "Thelma and Louise."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyng, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Endeavors to make students aware of similarities between today's movie culture and the theater of the 18th century; parallels between a traditional drama and a movie script; and Schiller's understanding of the sublime. (36 references) (Author/CK)

  4. Biodiversity and Ecology of Amphibians and Reptiles of the Kennedy Space Center: 1998 Close-Out Report to NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigel, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1992, there have been researchers have been studying the population ecology and conservation biology of the amphibians and reptiles of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) This research is an outgrowth of my Master's work in the late 1970's under Lew Ehrhart at UCF. The primary emphasis of our studies are (1) examination of long-term changes in the abundance of amphibians and reptile populations, (2) occurrence and effects of Upper Respiratory Tract Disease (URTD) in gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus), and (3) ecological studies of selected species.

  5. Thermal alteration in carbonaceous chondrites and implications for sublimation in rock comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springmann, Alessondra; Lauretta, Dante S.; Steckloff, Jordan K.

    2015-11-01

    Rock comets are small solar system bodies in Sun-skirting orbits (perihelion q < ~0.15 AU) that form comae rich in mineral sublimation products, but lack typical cometary ice sublimation products (H2O, CO2, etc.). B-class asteroid (3200) Phaethon, considered to be the parent body of the Geminid meteor shower, is the only rock comet currently known to periodically eject dust and form a coma. Thermal fracturing or thermal decomposition of surface materials may be driving Phaethon’s cometary activity (Li & Jewitt, 2013). Phaethon-like asteroids have dynamically unstable orbits, and their perihelia can change rapidly over their ~10 Myr lifetimes (de León et al., 2010), raising the possibility that other asteroids may have been rock comets in the past. Here, we propose using spectroscopic observations of mercury (Hg) as a tracer of an asteroid’s thermal metamorphic history, and therefore as a constraint on its minimum achieved perihelion distance.B-class asteroids such as Phaethon have an initial composition similar to aqueously altered primitive meteorites such as CI- or CM-type meteorites (Clark et al., 2010). Laboratory heating experiments of ~mm sized samples of carbonaceous chondrite meteorites from 300K to 1200K at a rate of 15K/minute show mobilization and volatilization of various labile elements at temperatures that could be reached by Mercury-crossing asteroids. Samples became rapidly depleted in labile elements and, in particular, lost ~75% of their Hg content when heated from ~500-700 K, which corresponds to heliocentric distances of ~0.15-0.3 au, consistent with our thermal models. Mercury has strong emission lines in the UV (~ 185 nm) and thus its presence (or absence) relative to carbonaceous chondrite abundances would indicate if these bodies had perihelia in their dynamical histories inside of 0.15 AU, and therefore may have previously been Phaethon-like rock comets. Future space telescopes or balloon-borne observing platforms equipped with a UV

  6. Systems efficiency and specific mass estimates for direct and indirect solar-pumped closed-cycle high-energy lasers in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Based on expected advances in technology, the maximum system efficiency and minimum specific mass have been calculated for closed-cycle CO and CO2 electric-discharge lasers (EDL's) and a direct solar-pumped laser in space. The efficiency calculations take into account losses from excitation gas heating, ducting frictional and turning losses, and the compressor efficiency. The mass calculations include the power source, radiator, compressor, fluids, ducting, laser channel, optics, and heat exchanger for all of the systems; and in addition the power conditioner for the EDL's and a focusing mirror for the solar-pumped laser. The results show the major component masses in each system, show which is the lightest system, and provide the necessary criteria for solar-pumped lasers to be lighter than the EDL's. Finally, the masses are compared with results from other studies for a closed-cycle CO2 gasdynamic laser (GDL) and the proposed microwave satellite solar power station (SSPS).

  7. Indications and counterindications for applying different versions of closed ecosystems for space and terrestrial problems of life support.

    PubMed

    Mezhevikin, V V; Okhonin, V A; Bartsev, S I; Gitelson, J I

    1994-11-01

    Different versions of manned closed ecosystems (CES) based on photosynthesis of unicellular and/or higher plants and chemosynthesis or bacteria are considered. Different versions of CES have been compared for applying them on Earth, Moon, Mars and Venus orbital stations, for Mars missions and planetary stations as well as to provide high-quality life in extreme conditions on the Earth. In microgravity [correction of mycrogravity] we recommend CES with unicellular organisms based on photosynthesis or chemosynthesis (depending of the availability of the light or electric energy). For the planetary stations with Moon gravity and higher CES with higher plants are recommended. Improvement of indoor air quality by CES biotechnology is considered. PMID:11540175

  8. Collection-efficient, axisymmetric vacuum sublimation module for the purification of solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Michael; Paul, Elizabeth; Katovic, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    A vacuum sublimation module of axisymmetric geometry was developed and employed to purify solid-phase materials. The module provides certain practical advantages and it comprises: a metering valve, glass collector, glass lower body, main seal, threaded bushing, and glass internal cartridge (the latter to contain starting material). A complementary process was developed to de-solvate, sublime, weigh, and collect solid chemical materials exemplified by oxalic acid, ferrocene, pentachlorobenzene, chrysene, and urea. The oxalic acid sublimate was analyzed by titration, melting range, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and its (aqueous phase) electrolytically generated gas. The analytical data were consistent with a high-purity, anhydrous oxalic acid sublimate. Cyclic voltammograms of 0.11 mol. % oxalic acid in water displayed a 2.1 V window on glassy carbon electrode beyond which electrolytic decomposition occurs. During module testing, fifteen relatively pure materials were sublimed with (energy efficient) passive cooling and the solid-phase recovery averaged 95 mass %. Key module design features include: compact vertical geometry, low-angle conical collector, uniformly compressed main seal, modest power consumption, transparency, glovebox compatibility, cooling options, and preferential conductive heat transfer. To help evaluate the structural (module) heat transfer, vertical temperature profiles along the dynamically evacuated lower body were measured versus electric heater power: for example, an input of 18.6 W generated a temperature 443-K at the bottom. Experimental results and engineering calculations indicate that during sublimation, solid conduction is the primary mode of heat transfer to the starting material.

  9. Closed-form solution for the Wigner phase-space distribution function for diffuse reflection and small-angle scattering in a random medium.

    PubMed

    Yura, H T; Thrane, L; Andersen, P E

    2000-12-01

    Within the paraxial approximation, a closed-form solution for the Wigner phase-space distribution function is derived for diffuse reflection and small-angle scattering in a random medium. This solution is based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle for the optical field, which is widely used in studies of wave propagation through random media. The results are general in that they apply to both an arbitrary small-angle volume scattering function, and arbitrary (real) ABCD optical systems. Furthermore, they are valid in both the single- and multiple-scattering regimes. Some general features of the Wigner phase-space distribution function are discussed, and analytic results are obtained for various types of scattering functions in the asymptotic limit s > 1, where s is the optical depth. In particular, explicit results are presented for optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. On this basis, a novel way of creating OCT images based on measurements of the momentum width of the Wigner phase-space distribution is suggested, and the advantage over conventional OCT images is discussed. Because all previous published studies regarding the Wigner function are carried out in the transmission geometry, it is important to note that the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the ABCD matrix formalism may be used successfully to describe this geometry (within the paraxial approximation). Therefore for completeness we present in an appendix the general closed-form solution for the Wigner phase-space distribution function in ABCD paraxial optical systems for direct propagation through random media, and in a second appendix absorption effects are included. PMID:11140505

  10. Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    an additional high temperature peak at 910 °C with E{sub d} = 370 ± 10 kJ/mol that is consistent with both the dehydrogenation of surface AlOH species and H{sub 2} assisted sublimation of AlN. Similarly, N{sub 2} exhibited a similar higher temperature desorption peak with E{sub d} = 535 ± 40 kJ/mol that is consistent with the activation energy for direct sublimation of AlN.

  11. 3D Position and Velocity Vector Computations of Objects Jettisoned from the International Space Station Using Close-Range Photogrammetry Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanyan, Valeri; Oshle, Edward; Adamo, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of the jettisoned object departure trajectory and velocity vector in the International Space Station (ISS) reference frame is vitally important for prompt evaluation of the object s imminent orbit. We report on the first successful application of photogrammetric analysis of the ISS imagery for the prompt computation of the jettisoned object s position and velocity vectors. As post-EVA analyses examples, we present the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) and the Russian "Orlan" Space Suit jettisons, as well as the near-real-time (provided in several hours after the separation) computations of the Video Stanchion Support Assembly Flight Support Assembly (VSSA-FSA) and Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) jettisons during the US astronauts space-walk. Standard close-range photogrammetry analysis was used during this EVA to analyze two on-board camera image sequences down-linked from the ISS. In this approach the ISS camera orientations were computed from known coordinates of several reference points on the ISS hardware. Then the position of the jettisoned object for each time-frame was computed from its image in each frame of the video-clips. In another, "quick-look" approach used in near-real time, orientation of the cameras was computed from their position (from the ISS CAD model) and operational data (pan and tilt) then location of the jettisoned object was calculated only for several frames of the two synchronized movies. Keywords: Photogrammetry, International Space Station, jettisons, image analysis.

  12. Conceptual Design Study of a Closed Brayton Cycle Turbogenerator for Space Power Thermal-To-Electric Conversion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Jeff L.

    2000-01-01

    A conceptual design study was completed for a 360 kW Helium-Xenon closed Brayton cycle turbogenerator. The selected configuration is comprised of a single-shaft gas turbine engine coupled directly to a high-speed generator. The engine turbomachinery includes a 2.5:1 pressure ratio compression system with an inlet corrected flow of 0.44 kg/sec. The single centrifugal stage impeller discharges into a scroll via a vaned diffuser. The scroll routes the air into the cold side sector of the recuperator. The hot gas exits a nuclear reactor radiator at 1300 K and enters the turbine via a single-vaned scroll. The hot gases are expanded through the turbine and then diffused before entering the hot side sector of the recuperator. The single shaft design is supported by air bearings. The high efficiency shaft mounted permanent magnet generator produces an output of 370 kW at a speed of 60,000 rpm. The total weight of the turbogenerator is estimated to be only 123 kg (less than 5% of the total power plant) and has a volume of approximately 0.11 cubic meters. This turbogenerator is a key element in achieving the 40 to 45% overall power plant thermal efficiency.

  13. A computational model of echolocation: Transformation of spectrogram into the reflected intensity distribution for range discrimination of multiple closely spaced objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Ikuo; Kunugiyama, Kenji; Yano, Masafumi

    2001-05-01

    Using frequency-modulated echolocation, bats can discriminate the range of objects with an accuracy of less than a millimeter. However, the echolocation mechanism is not well understood. The delay separation of three or more closely spaced objects can be determined through analysis of the echo spectrum. However, delay times cannot be properly correlated with objects using only the echo spectrum because the sequence of delay separations cannot be determined without information on temporal changes in the interference pattern of the echoes. To illustrate this, Gaussian chirplets with a carrier frequency compatible with bat emission sweep rates were used. The delay time for object 1, T1, can be estimated from the echo spectrum around the onset time. The delay time for object 2 is obtained by adding T1 to the delay separation between objects 1 and 2 (extracted from the first appearance of interference effects). Further objects can be located in sequence by this same procedure. This model can determine delay times for multiple closely spaced objects with an accuracy of about 1 microsecond, when all the objects are located within 30 microseconds of delay separation. This accuracy is possible even with objects having different reflected intensities and in a noisy environment.

  14. Doping and electronic properties of GaAs grown by close-spaced vapor transport from powder sources for scalable III–V photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Ritenour, Andrew J.; Boucher, Jason W.; DeLancey, Robert; Greenaway, Ann L.; Aloni, Shaul; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2014-09-01

    We report the use of a simple close-spaced vapor transport technique for the growth of high-quality epitaxial GaAs films using potentially inexpensive GaAs powders as precursors. The free carrier type and density (1016 to 1019 cm–3) of the films were adjusted by addition of Te or Zn powder to the GaAs source powder. We show using photoelectrochemical and electron beam-induced current analyses that the minority carrier diffusion lengths of the n- and p-GaAs films reached ~3 μm and ~8 μm, respectively. Hall mobilities approach those achieved for GaAs grown by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition, 1000–4200 cm2 V–1 s–1 for n-GaAs and 50–240 cm V–1 s–1 for p-GaAs depending on doping level. We conclude that the electronic quality of GaAs grown by close-spaced vapor transport is similar to that of GaAs made using conventional techniques and is thus sufficient for high-performance photovoltaic applications.

  15. Doping and electronic properties of GaAs grown by close-spaced vapor transport from powder sources for scalable III–V photovoltaics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ritenour, Andrew J.; Boucher, Jason W.; DeLancey, Robert; Greenaway, Ann L.; Aloni, Shaul; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2014-09-01

    We report the use of a simple close-spaced vapor transport technique for the growth of high-quality epitaxial GaAs films using potentially inexpensive GaAs powders as precursors. The free carrier type and density (1016 to 1019 cm–3) of the films were adjusted by addition of Te or Zn powder to the GaAs source powder. We show using photoelectrochemical and electron beam-induced current analyses that the minority carrier diffusion lengths of the n- and p-GaAs films reached ~3 μm and ~8 μm, respectively. Hall mobilities approach those achieved for GaAs grown by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition, 1000–4200 cm2 V–1 s–1 for n-GaAsmore » and 50–240 cm V–1 s–1 for p-GaAs depending on doping level. We conclude that the electronic quality of GaAs grown by close-spaced vapor transport is similar to that of GaAs made using conventional techniques and is thus sufficient for high-performance photovoltaic applications.« less

  16. Rapid, Single-Molecule Assays in Nano/Micro-Fluidic Chips with Arrays of Closely Spaced Parallel Channels Fabricated by Femtosecond Laser Machining

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, Brian K.; King, Jason K.; Robinson, William N.; Hofmeister, William H.; Davis, Lloyd M.

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective pharmaceutical drug discovery depends on increasing assay throughput while reducing reagent needs. To this end, we are developing an ultrasensitive, fluorescence-based platform that incorporates a nano/micro-fluidic chip with an array of closely spaced channels for parallelized optical readout of single-molecule assays. Here we describe the use of direct femtosecond laser machining to fabricate several hundred closely spaced channels on the surfaces of fused silica substrates. The channels are sealed by bonding to a microscope cover slip spin-coated with a thin film of poly(dimethylsiloxane). Single-molecule detection experiments are conducted using a custom-built, wide-field microscope. The array of channels is epi-illuminated by a line-generating red diode laser, resulting in a line focus just a few microns thick across a 500 micron field of view. A dilute aqueous solution of fluorescently labeled biomolecules is loaded into the device and fluorescence is detected with an electron-multiplying CCD camera, allowing acquisition rates up to 7 kHz for each microchannel. Matched digital filtering based on experimental parameters is used to perform an initial, rapid assessment of detected fluorescence. More detailed analysis is obtained through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Simulated fluorescence data is shown to agree well with experimental values. PMID:25140634

  17. Rapid, single-molecule assays in nano/micro-fluidic chips with arrays of closely spaced parallel channels fabricated by femtosecond laser machining.

    PubMed

    Canfield, Brian K; King, Jason K; Robinson, William N; Hofmeister, William H; Davis, Lloyd M

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective pharmaceutical drug discovery depends on increasing assay throughput while reducing reagent needs. To this end, we are developing an ultrasensitive, fluorescence-based platform that incorporates a nano/micro-fluidic chip with an array of closely spaced channels for parallelized optical readout of single-molecule assays. Here we describe the use of direct femtosecond laser machining to fabricate several hundred closely spaced channels on the surfaces of fused silica substrates. The channels are sealed by bonding to a microscope cover slip spin-coated with a thin film of poly(dimethylsiloxane). Single-molecule detection experiments are conducted using a custom-built, wide-field microscope. The array of channels is epi-illuminated by a line-generating red diode laser, resulting in a line focus just a few microns thick across a 500 micron field of view. A dilute aqueous solution of fluorescently labeled biomolecules is loaded into the device and fluorescence is detected with an electron-multiplying CCD camera, allowing acquisition rates up to 7 kHz for each microchannel. Matched digital filtering based on experimental parameters is used to perform an initial, rapid assessment of detected fluorescence. More detailed analysis is obtained through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Simulated fluorescence data is shown to agree well with experimental values. PMID:25140634

  18. Structural-acoustic optimum design of shell structures in open/closed space based on a free-form optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoda, Masatoshi; Shimoide, Kensuke; Shi, Jin-Xing

    2016-03-01

    Noise reduction by structural geometry optimization has attracted much attention among designers. In the present work, we propose a free-form optimization method for the structural-acoustic design optimization of shell structures to reduce the noise of a targeted frequency or frequency range in an open or closed space. The objective of the design optimization is to minimize the average structural vibration-induced sound pressure at the evaluation points in the acoustic field under a volume constraint. For the shape design optimization, we carry out structural-acoustic coupling analysis and adjoint analysis to calculate the shape gradient functions. Then, we use the shape gradient functions in velocity analysis to update the shape of shell structures. We repeat this process until convergence is confirmed to obtain the optimum shape of the shell structures in a structural-acoustic coupling system. The numerical results for the considered examples showed that the proposed design optimization process can significantly reduce the noise in both open and closed spaces.

  19. The Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) and Closed-loop Hardware Testing for Orion Rendezvous System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Christopher; Milenkovich, Zoran; Wilson, Zachary; Huich, David; Bendle, John; Kibler, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) at the Lockheed Martin (LM) Waterton Campus in Littleton, Colorado is a dynamic test environment focused on Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) development testing and risk reduction activities. The SOSC supports multiple program pursuits and accommodates testing Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) algorithms for relative navigation, hardware testing and characterization, as well as software and test process development. The SOSC consists of a high bay (60 meters long by 15.2 meters wide by 15.2 meters tall) with dual six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) motion simulators and a single fixed base 6DOF robot. The large testing area (maximum sensor-to-target effective range of 60 meters) allows for large-scale, flight-like simulations of proximity maneuvers and docking events. The facility also has two apertures for access to external extended-range outdoor target test operations. In addition, the facility contains four Mission Operations Centers (MOCs) with connectivity to dual high bay control rooms and a data/video interface room. The high bay is rated at Class 300,000 (. 0.5 m maximum particles/m3) cleanliness and includes orbital lighting simulation capabilities.

  20. Closing the Confidence Gap in Aerosol Contributions to Direct Radiative Forcing Using Space-based and Suborbital Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    As expected, the aerosol data products from the NASA Earth Observing System’s MISR and MODIS instruments provide significant advances in regional and global aerosol optical depth (AOD) mapping, aerosol type measurement, and source plume characterization from space. Although these products have been and are being used for many applications, ranging from regional air quality assessment, to aerosol air mass type evolution, to aerosol injection height and aerosol transport model validation, uncertainties still limit the quantitative constraints these satellite data place on global-scale direct aerosol radiative forcing. Some further refinement of the current aerosol products is possible, but a major advance in this area seems to require a different paradigm, involving the integration of satellite and suborbital data with models. This presentation will briefly summarize where we stand, and what incremental advances we can expect, with the current aerosol products, and will then elaborate on some initial steps aimed at the necessary integration. Many other AGU presentations, covering parts of the community’s emerging efforts in this direction, will be referenced, and key points from the recently released CCSP-SAP (US Climate Change Program - Synthesis and Assessment Product) 2.3 - Atmospheric aerosols: Properties and Climate Impacts, will be included in the discussion.

  1. Unexpected spatial intensity distributions and onset timing of solar electron events observed by closely spaced STEREO spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, A.; Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.; Heber, B.; Müller-Mellin, R.

    2016-09-01

    We present multi-spacecraft observations of four solar electron events using measurements from the Solar Electron Proton Telescope (SEPT) and the Electron Proton Helium INstrument (EPHIN) on board the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, respectively, occurring between 11 October 2013 and 1 August 2014, during the approaching superior conjunction period of the two STEREO spacecraft. At this time the longitudinal separation angle between STEREO-A (STA) and STEREO-B (STB) was less than 72°. The parent particle sources (flares) of the four investigated events were situated close to, in between, or to the west of the STEREO's magnetic footpoints. The STEREO measurements revealed a strong difference in electron peak intensities (factor ≤12) showing unexpected intensity distributions at 1 AU, although the two spacecraft had nominally nearly the same angular magnetic footpoint separation from the flaring active region (AR) or their magnetic footpoints were both situated eastwards from the parent particle source. Furthermore, the events detected by the two STEREO imply a strongly unexpected onset timing with respect to each other: the spacecraft magnetically best connected to the flare detected a later arrival of electrons than the other one. This leads us to suggest the concept of a rippled peak intensity distribution at 1 AU formed by narrow peaks (fingers) superposed on a quasi-uniform Gaussian distribution. Additionally, two of the four investigated solar energetic particle (SEP) events show a so-called circumsolar distribution and their characteristics make it plausible to suggest a two-component particle injection scenario forming an unusual, non-uniform intensity distribution at 1 AU.

  2. Cowpeas and pinto beans: yields and light efficiency of candidate space crops in the Laboratory Biosphere closed ecological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, M.; Dempster, W. F.; Silverstone, S.; Alling, A.; Allen, J. P.; van Thillo, M.

    An experiment utilizing cowpeas Vigna unguiculata pinto beans Phaseolus vulgaris L and Apogee ultra-dwarf wheat was conducted in the soil-based closed ecological facility Laboratory Biosphere from February to May 2005 The lighting regime was 13 hours light 11 hours dark at a light intensity of 960 mu mol m -2 s -1 45 moles m -2 day -1 supplied by high-pressure sodium lamps The pinto beans and cowpeas were grown at two different plant densities The pinto bean produced 710 g m -2 total aboveground biomass and 341 g m -2 at 33 5 plants per m 2 and at 37 5 plants per m 2 produced 1092 g m -2 total biomass and 537 g m -2 of dry seed an increase of almost 50 Cowpeas at 28 plants m -2 yielded 1060 g m -2 of total biomass and 387 g seed m -2 outproducing the less dense planting by more than double 209 in biomass and 86 more seed as the planting of 21 plants m -2 produced 508 g m-2 of total biomass and 209 g m-2 of seed Edible yield rate EYR for the denser cowpea bean was 4 6 g m -2 day -1 vs 2 5 g m -2 day -1 for the less dense stand average yield was 3 5 g m -2 day -1 EYR for the denser pinto bean was 8 5 g m -2 day -1 vs 5 3 g m -2 day -1 average EYR for the pinto beans was 7 0 g m -2 day -1 Yield efficiency rate YER the ratio of edible to non-edible biomass was 0 97 for the dense pinto bean 0 92 for the less dense pinto bean and average 0 94 for the entire crop The cowpeas

  3. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance for the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Etter, David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, Robert; Vandezande, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with on-orbit ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post-Shuttle 6-year service life.

  4. AdS/QCD, Light-Front Holography, and Sublimated Gluons

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    The gauge/gravity duality leads to a simple analytical and phenomenologically compelling nonperturbative approximation to the full light-front QCD Hamiltonian - 'Light-Front Holography', which provides a Lorentz-invariant first-approximation to QCD, and successfully describes the spectroscopy of light-quark meson and baryons, their elastic and transition form factors, and other hadronic properties. The bound-state Schroedinger and Dirac equations of the soft-wall AdS/QCD model predict linear Regge trajectories which have the same slope in orbital angular momentum L and radial quantum number n for both mesons and baryons. Light-front holography connects the fifth-dimensional coordinate of AdS space z to an invariant impact separation variable {zeta} in 3+1 space at fixed light-front time. A key feature is the determination of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons - the relativistic analogs of the Schroedinger wavefunctions of atomic physics which allow one to compute form factors, transversity distributions, spin properties of the valence quarks, jet hadronization, and other hadronic observables. One thus obtains a one-parameter color-confining model for hadron physics at the amplitude level. AdS/QCD also predicts the form of the non-perturbative effective coupling {alpha}{sub s}{sup AdS} (Q) and its {beta}-function with an infrared fixed point which agrees with the effective coupling a{sub g1} (Q{sup 2}) extracted from measurements of the Bjorken sum rule below Q{sup 2} < 1 GeV{sup 2}. This is consistent with a flux-tube interpretation of QCD where soft gluons with virtualities Q{sup 2} < 1 GeV{sup 2} are sublimated into a color-confining potential for quarks. We discuss a number of phenomenological hadronic properties which support this picture.

  5. Low-Cost Blast Wave Generator for Studies of Hearing Loss and Brain Injury: Blast Wave Effects in Closed Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Andrew J.; Hayes, Sarah H.; Rao, Abhiram S.; Allman, Brian L.; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Ding, Dalian; Stolzberg, Daniel; Lobarinas, Edward; Mollendorf, Joseph C.; Salvi, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background Military personnel and civilians living in areas of armed conflict have increased risk of exposure to blast overpressures that can cause significant hearing loss and/or brain injury. The equipment used to simulate comparable blast overpressures in animal models within laboratory settings is typically very large and prohibitively expensive. New Method To overcome the fiscal and space limitations introduced by previously reported blast wave generators, we developed a compact, low-cost blast wave generator to investigate the effects of blast exposures on the auditory system and brain. Results The blast wave generator was constructed largely from off the shelf components, and reliably produced blasts with peak sound pressures of up to 198 dB SPL (159.3 kPa) that were qualitatively similar to those produced from muzzle blasts or explosions. Exposure of adult rats to 3 blasts of 188 dB peak SPL (50.4 kPa) resulted in significant loss of cochlear hair cells, reduced outer hair cell function and a decrease in neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Comparison to existing methods Existing blast wave generators are typically large, expensive, and are not commercially available. The blast wave generator reported here provides a low-cost method of generating blast waves in a typical laboratory setting. Conclusions This compact blast wave generator provides scientists with a low cost device for investigating the biological mechanisms involved in blast wave injury to the rodent cochlea and brain that may model many of the damaging effects sustained by military personnel and civilians exposed to intense blasts. PMID:25597910

  6. Some observations on colocated and closely spaced strong ground-motion records of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, G.-Q.; Boore, D.M.; Igel, H.; Zhou, X.-Y.

    2003-01-01

    information regarding the permanent displacements is lost. The causative mechanisms of the baseline offsets are unknown presently. Hence, it is very difficult to recover the permanent displacements from the modern digital records, although for records close to large earthquakes, the signal-to-noise ratio should theoretically be adequate to obtain ground motions with periods of hundreds of seconds. This study reinforces our conclusion from previous studies that the sources of baseline offsets occurring in digital strong-motion records are very complex and often unpredictable, and that, therefore, it is difficult to remove the baseline effects to maximize the information content of the record. The baseline offsets only affect very long period motions (e.g., >20 sec), however, and therefore are of little or no engineering concern.

  7. Vegetable production facility as a part of a closed life support system in a Russian Martian space flight scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovich, Yu. A.; Smolyanina, S. O.; Krivobok, N. M.; Erokhin, A. N.; Agureev, A. N.; Shanturin, N. A.

    2009-07-01

    A Manned Mars Mission scenario had been developed in frame of the Project 1172 supported International Science & Technology Center in Moscow. The Mars transit vehicle (MTV) supposed to have a crew of 4-6 with Pilot Laboratory compartment volume of 185 m 3 and with inner diameter of 4.1 m. A vegetable production facility with power consumption up to 10 kW is being considered as a component of the life support system to supply crew members by fresh vegetables during the mission. Proposed design of conveyor-type plant growth facility (PGF) comprised of 4-modules. Each module has a cylindrical planting surface and spiral cylindrical LED assembly to provide a high specific productivity relative to utilized onboard resources. Each module has a growth chamber that will be from 0.7 m to 1.5 m in length, and a crop illuminated area from 1.7 m 2 to 4.0 m 2. Leafy crops (cabbage, lettuce, spinach, chard, etc.) have been selected for module 1, primarily because of the highest specific productivity per consumed resources. Dietitians have recommended also carrot crop for module 2, pepper for module 3 and tomato for module 4. The maximal total PGF light energy estimated as 1.16 kW and total power consumption as about 7 kW. The module 1 characteristics have been calculated using own experimental data, information from the best on ground plant growth experiments with artificial light were used to predict crop productivity and biomass composition in the another modules. 4-module PGF could produce nearly 0.32 kg per crew member per day of fresh edible biomass, which would be about 50% of recommended daily vegetable supplement. An average crop harvest index is estimated as 0.75. The MTV food system could be entirely closed in terms of vitamins C and A with help of the PGF. In addition the system could provide 10-25% of essential minerals and vitamins of group B, and about 20% of food fibers. The present state of plant growth technology allows formulating of requirements specification

  8. Cowpeas and pinto beans: Performance and yields of candidate space crops in the laboratory biosphere closed ecological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, M.; Dempster, W. F.; Allen, J. P.; Silverstone, S.; Alling, A.; Thillo, M. van

    An experiment utilizing cowpeas ( Vigna unguiculata L.), pinto beans ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and Apogee ultra-dwarf wheat ( Triticum sativa L.) was conducted in the soil-based closed ecological facility, Laboratory Biosphere, from February to May 2005. The lighting regime was 13 h light/11 h dark at a light intensity of 960 μmol m -2 s -1, 45 mol m -2 day -1 supplied by high-pressure sodium lamps. The pinto beans and cowpeas were grown at two different planting densities. Pinto bean production was 341.5 g dry seed m -2 (5.42 g m -2 day -1) and 579.5 dry seed m -2 (9.20 g m -2 day -1) at planted densities of 32.5 plants m -2 and 37.5 plants m -2, respectively. Cowpea yielded 187.9 g dry seed m -2 (2.21 g m -2 day -1) and 348.8 dry seed m -2 (4.10 g m -2 day -1) at planted densities of 20.8 plants m -2 and 27.7 plants m -2, respectively. The crop was grown at elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, with levels ranging from 300-3000 ppm daily during the majority of the crop cycle. During early stages (first 10 days) of the crop, CO 2 was allowed to rise to 7860 ppm while soil respiration dominated, and then was brought down by plant photosynthesis. CO 2 was injected 27 times during days 29-71 to replenish CO 2 used by the crop during photosynthesis. Temperature regime was 24-28 °C day/deg 20-24 °C night. Pinto bean matured and was harvested 20 days earlier than is typical for this variety, while the cowpea, which had trouble establishing, took 25 days more for harvest than typical for this variety. Productivity and atmospheric dynamic results of these studies contribute toward the design of an envisioned ground-based test bed prototype Mars base.

  9. The sublimation coefficient of water ice: influence on the temperature and outgassing of Comet 67P/C-G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossacki, K. J.; Markiewicz, W. J.

    2013-09-01

    In most published works dealing with evolution of cometary nuclei, the sublimation rate of ices is calculated with simple Hertz-Knudsen equation. This formulation, derived from the kinetic theory of gases, ignores microphysical processes which determine the sublimation rate. To correctly account for these processes the modified Herz-Knudsen equation must include temperature dependent sublimation coefficient. Including this temperature dependence we find, that the temperature below dust mantle is most sensitive to the value of the sublimation coefficient when the mantle is coarse grained, while the sublimation rate is most affected when the mantle is fine grained. Most importantly, we also find that derivation of the temperature below the dust mantle from the measured water production rate ignoring temperature dependence of the sublimation coefficient can lead to an underestimate of the sub-dust temperature by more than 10 K.

  10. Identification of wind turbine testing practices and investigation of the performance benefits of closely-spaced lateral wind farm configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTavish, Sean

    -field blockage effect and is analogous to the increase in wind speed caused by blockage in a closed

  11. Mechanism and kinetics for ammonium dinitramide (ADN) sublimation: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, R S; Chen, Hui-Lung; Lin, M C

    2012-11-01

    The mechanism for sublimation of NH(4)N(NO(2))(2) (ADN) has been investigated quantum-mechanically with generalized gradient approximation plane-wave density functional theory calculations; the solid surface is represented by a slab model and the periodic boundary conditions are applied. The calculated lattice constants for the bulk ADN, which were found to consist of NH(4)(+)[ON(O)NNO(2)](-) units, instead of NH(4)(+)[N(NO(2))(2)](-), agree quite well with experimental values. Results show that three steps are involved in the sublimation/decomposition of ADN. The first step is the relaxation of the surface layer with 1.6 kcal/mol energy per NH(4)ON(O)NNO(2) unit; the second step is the sublimation of the surface layer to form a molecular [NH(3)]-[HON(O)NNO(2)] complex with a 29.4 kcal/mol sublimation energy, consistent with the experimental observation of Korobeinichev et al. (10) The last step is the dissociation of the [H(3)N]-[HON(O)NNO(2)] complex to give NH(3) and HON(O)NNO(2) with the dissociation energy of 13.9 kcal/mol. Direct formation of NO(2) (g) from solid ADN costs a much higher energy, 58.3 kcal/mol. Our calculated total sublimation enthalpy for ADN(s) → NH(3)(g) + HON(O)NNO(2)) (g), 44.9 kcal/mol via three steps, is in good agreement with the value, 42.1 kcal/mol predicted for the one-step sublimation process in this work and the value 44.0 kcal/mol computed by Politzer et al. (11) using experimental thermochemical data. The sublimation rate constant for the rate-controlling step 2 can be represented as k(sub) = 2.18 × 10(12) exp (-30.5 kcal/mol/RT) s(-1), which agrees well with available experimental data within the temperature range studied. The high pressure limit decomposition rate constant for the molecular complex H(3)N···HON(O)NNO(2) can be expressed by k(dec) = 3.18 × 10(13) exp (-15.09 kcal/mol/RT) s(-1). In addition, water molecules were found to increase the sublimation enthalpy of ADN, contrary to that found in the ammonium

  12. In situ observation of graphene sublimation and multi-layer edge reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian Yu; Ding, Feng; Yakobson, Boris I.; Lu, Ping; Qi, Liang; Li, Ju

    2009-01-01

    We induced sublimation of suspended few-layer graphene by in situ Joule-heating inside a transmission electron microscope. The graphene sublimation fronts consisted of mostly {1100} zigzag edges. Under appropriate conditions, a fractal-like “coastline” morphology was observed. Extensive multiple-layer reconstructions at the graphene edges led to the formation of unique carbon nanostructures, such as sp2-bonded bilayer edges (BLEs) and nanotubes connected to BLEs. Flat fullerenes/nanopods and nanotubes tunneling multiple layers of graphene sheets were also observed. Remarkably, >99% of the graphene edges observed during sublimation are BLEs rather than monolayer edges (MLEs), indicating that BLEs are the stable edges in graphene at high temperatures. We reproduced the “coastline” sublimation morphologies by kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulations. The simulation revealed geometrical and topological features unique to quasi-2-dimensional (2D) graphene sublimation and reconstructions. These reconstructions were enabled by bending, which cannot occur in first-order phase transformations of 3D bulk materials. These results indicate that substrate of multiple-layer graphene can offer unique opportunities for tailoring carbon-based nanostructures and engineering novel nano-devices with complex topologies. PMID:19515820

  13. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-08-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels ("araneiform" terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  14. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-01-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels (“araneiform” terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  15. A neurobiological enquiry into the origins of our experience of the sublime and beautiful

    PubMed Central

    Ishizu, Tomohiro; Zeki, Semir

    2014-01-01

    Philosophies of aesthetics have posited that experience of the sublime—commonly but not exclusively derived from scenes of natural grandeur—is distinct from that of beauty and is a counterpoint to it. We wanted to chart the pattern of brain activity which correlates with the declared intensity of experience of the sublime, and to learn whether it differs from the pattern that correlates with the experience of beauty, reported in our previous studies (e.g., Ishizu and Zeki, 2011). 21 subjects participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Prior to the experiment, they viewed pictures of landscapes, which they rated on a scale of 1–5, with 5 being the most sublime and 1 being the least. This allowed us to select, for each subject, five sets of stimuli—from ones experienced as very sublime to those experienced as not at all sublime—which subjects viewed and re-rated in the scanner while their brain activity was imaged. The results revealed a distinctly different pattern of brain activity from that obtained with the experience of beauty, with none of the areas active with the latter experience also active during experience of the sublime. Sublime and beautiful experiences thus appear to engage separate and distinct brain systems. PMID:25426046

  16. Distributed modelling of climate change impacts on snow sublimation in Northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, F.; Schlaffer, S.; Aus der Beek, T.; Menzel, L.

    2009-08-01

    Sublimation of snow is an important factor of the hydrological cycle in Mongolia and is likely to increase according to future climate projections. In this study the hydrological model TRAIN was used to assess spatially distributed current and future sublimation rates based on interpolated daily data of precipitation, air temperature, air humidity, wind speed and solar radiation. An automated procedure for the interpolation of the input data is provided. Depending on the meteorological parameter and the data availability for the individual days, the most appropriate interpolation method is chosen automatically from inverse distance weighting, Ordinary Least Squares interpolation, Ordinary or Universal Kriging. Depending on elevation simulated annual sublimation in the period 1986-2006 was 23 to 35 mm, i.e. approximately 80% of total snowfall. Moreover, future climate projections for 2071-2100 of ECHAM5 and HadCM3, based on the A1B emission scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, were analysed with TRAIN. In the case of ECHAM5 simulated sublimation increases by up to 17% (26...41 mm) while it remains at the same level for HadCM3 (24...34 mm). The differences are mainly due to a distinct increase in winter precipitation for ECHAM5. Simulated changes of the all-season hydrological conditions, e.g. the sublimation-to-precipitation ratio, were ambiguous due to diverse precipitation patterns derived by the global circulation models.

  17. A New Method for Estimating Bacterial Abundances in Natural Samples using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Cleaves, H. James; Schubert, Michael; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new method based on the sublimation of adenine from Escherichia coli to estimate bacterial cell counts in natural samples. To demonstrate this technique, several types of natural samples including beach sand, seawater, deep-sea sediment, and two soil samples from the Atacama Desert were heated to a temperature of 500 C for several seconds under reduced pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger and the amount of adenine released from the samples then determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV absorbance detection. Based on the total amount of adenine recovered from DNA and RNA in these samples, we estimated bacterial cell counts ranging from approx. l0(exp 5) to l0(exp 9) E. coli cell equivalents per gram. For most of these samples, the sublimation based cell counts were in agreement with total bacterial counts obtained by traditional DAPI staining. The simplicity and robustness of the sublimation technique compared to the DAPI staining method makes this approach particularly attractive for use by spacecraft instrumentation. NASA is currently planning to send a lander to Mars in 2009 in order to assess whether or not organic compounds, especially those that might be associated with life, are present in Martian surface samples. Based on our analyses of the Atacama Desert soil samples, several million bacterial cells per gam of Martian soil should be detectable using this sublimation technique.

  18. Material composition assessment and discovering sublimation activity on asteroids 145 Adeona, 704 Interamnia, 779 Nina, and 1474 Beira

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busarev, V. V.; Barabanov, S. I.; Puzin, V. B.

    2016-07-01

    Spectrophotometric observations of 145 Adeona, 704 Interamnia, 779 Nina, and 1474 Beira—asteroids of close primitive types—allowed us to detect similar mineralogical absorption bands in their reflectance spectra centered in the range 0.35 to 0.92 μm; the bands are at 0.38, 0.44, and 0.67-0.71 μm. On the same asteroids, the spectral signs of simultaneous sublimation activity were found for the first time. Namely, there are maxima at ˜0.35-0.60 μm in the reflectance spectra of Adeona, Interamnia, and Nina and at ˜0.55-075 μm in the spectra of Beira. We connect this activity with small heliocentric distances of the asteroids and, consequently, with a high insolation at their surfaces. Examination of the samples of probable analogues allowed us to identify Fe3+ and Fe2+ in the material of these asteroids through the mentioned absorption bands. For analogues, we took powdered samples of carbonaceous chondrites Orgueil (CI), Mighei (CM2), Murchison (CM2), and Boriskino (CM2), as well as hydrosilicates of the serpentine group. Laboratory spectral reflectance study of the samples of low-iron Mg serpentines (<2 wt % FeO) showed that the equivalent width of the absorption band centered at 0.44-0.46 μm strongly correlates with the content of Fe3+ in octahedral and tetrahedral coordinations. Our conclusion is that this absorption band can be used as a qualitative indicator of Fe3+ in the surface matter of asteroids and other solid celestial bodies. The comparison of the listed analog samples and the asteroids by parameters of the spectral features suggests that the silicate component of the asteroids' surface material is a mixture of hydrated and oxidized compounds, including oxides and hydroxides of bivalent and trivalent iron and carbonaceous-chondritic material. At the same time, the sublimation activity of Adeona, Interamnia, Nina, and Beira at high surface temperatures points to a substantial content of water ice in their material. This contradicts the

  19. Definition of the metric on the space clos{sub ∅}(X) of closed subsets of a metric space X and properties of mappings with values in clos{sub ∅}(R{sup n})

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukovskii, E S; Panasenko, E A

    2014-09-30

    The paper is concerned with the extension of tests for superpositional measurability, Filippov's implicit function lemma and the Scorza Dragoni property to set-valued (and, as a corollary, to single-valued) mappings that fail to satisfy the Carathéodory conditions (the upper Carathéodory conditions) and are not continuous (upper semicontinuous) in the phase variable. The corresponding results depend on the introduction of the space clos{sub ∅}(X) of all closed subsets (including the empty set) of an arbitrary metric space X; a metric on clos{sub ∅}(X) is proposed; the space clos{sub ∅}(X) is shown to be complete whenever the original space X is; a criterion for convergence of a sequence is put forward; mappings with values in clos{sub ∅}(X) are studied. Some results on set-valued mappings satisfying the Carathéodory conditions and having compact values in R{sup n} are shown to hold for mappings with values in clos{sub ∅}(R{sup n}), measurable in the first argument, and continuous in the proposed metric in the second argument. Bibliography: 22 titles.

  20. A redetermination of the ice/vapor ratio of Enceladus’ plumes: Implications for sublimation and the lack of a liquid water reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieffer, Susan W.; Lu, Xinli; McFarquhar, Greg; Wohletz, Kenneth H.

    2009-09-01

    The discovery of plumes of H 2O vapor and ice particles erupting from the south pole of Enceladus, the tiny frigid satellite of Saturn, sparked controversy over whether these plumes are produced by boiling, or by sublimation with subsequent recondensation of the sublimated vapor [Porco, C.C., Helfenstein, P., Thomas, P.C., Ingersoll, A.P., Wisdom, J., West, R., Neukum, G., Denk, T., Wagner, R., Roatsch, T., Kieffer, S., Turtle, E., McEwen, A., Johnson, T.V., Rathbun, J., Veverka, J., Wilson, D., Perry, J., Spitale, J., Brahic, A., Burns, J.A., DelGenio, A.D., Dones, L., Murray, C.D., Squyres, S., 2006. Science 311, 1393-1401]. Porco et al.'s analysis that the masses of ice (I) and vapor (V) in the plume were comparable was taken to argue against the occurrence of sublimation and recondensation, leading to the hypothesis that the reservoir was boiling water, possibly as close as 7 m to the surface. Thus, it has been advocated that Enceladus should be a target for astrobiology exploration. Here we show, with recalculations using the original data and methodologies, as well as with new sensitivity studies, that the mass of ice in the column is significantly less than the mass of water vapor, and that by considering three additional effects, I/V is likely to be <0.2-0.1. This means that the plume is dominated by vapor that the thermodynamics permits to be easily produced by sublimation with recondensation. The low I/V ratio provides no compelling criterion for consideration of a liquid water reservoir. The uncertainties on the I/V ratio have not previously been discussed in the literature. Although the I/V ratio is sensitive to particle sizes and size distributions, the masses of ice (I) and vapor (V) are not comparable in any scenario constrained by available observations. We thus discuss the implications of sublimation from a thermodynamic point of view in a context that has not been presented previously. Constraints on I/V ratio from future spacecraft measurements

  1. An Enhanced Vapor Transport and Sublimation Model using 10+ Years of Field Measurements of Earth's Oldest Ground Ice in Beacon Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Sletten, R. S.; Hagedorn, B.; Stone, J. O.; Hallet, B.; McKay, C. P.

    2011-12-01

    Ground ice in the Antarctic Dry Valleys is fundamentally important as a reservoir of water, proxy for climatic information, and a major component of the periglacial landscape. It is also one of Earth's closest analog for widespread, near-surface ice found in Martian soils. While the exact antiquity of the ground ice at Beacon Valley is still under discussion, considerable evidence suggests that it is the oldest known ice on Earth. Why this ice can persist for so long is still unclear since models based solely on water vapor fluxes predict drying of the soil to depths of several meters within only a few thousand years; however, ice persists in the ground at depths of only a few decimeters. Other independent data of a profile of cosmogenic isotopes of 10Be in the ice and quartz grains within the ice indicates that, on time scales of ~105 years or more, ice sublimates much more slowly. The interest in determining the age of relict ice in Beacon Valley, Antarctica, as well as the discrepancy between theoretical modeled and field sample-based ground ice sublimation rates are bringing renewed attention to this ice. Here we present an enhanced model of water vapor diffusion and corresponding sublimation using detailed climate and soil temperature data from 1999 to 2011 in Beacon Valley, where the massive ground ice is found as close as ~0.30 m below the surface. This is the first model to incorporate the effect of snow cover and snow melt on the soil vapor pressure that is based on actual field measurements using a camera and electrical conductivity probes. It suggests that water vapor condenses in the upper dry soil during the winter but is completely lost to the atmosphere during the austral summer. Episodic snowmelt events and snow cover in the summer temporarily reverses the vapor transport and reduces the annual ice loss. These episodic events slow down the sublimation rates by one-third; this effect is likely to be extended due to persistence of water in the top

  2. Aluminum Nitride-Silicon Carbide Alloy Crystals Grown on SiC Substrates by Sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Z; Du, Li; Edgar, J H; Payzant, E Andrew; Walker, Larry R; Liu, R; Engelhard, M H

    2005-01-01

    AlN-SiC alloy crystals, with a thickness greater than 500μm, were grown on 4H- and 6H-SiC substrates from a mixture of AlN and SiC powders by the sublimation-recondensation method at 1860-1990 C. On-axis SiC substrates produced a rough surface covered with hexagonal grains, while 6H- and 4H- off-axis SiC substrates with different miscut angles (8 or 3.68 ) formed a relatively smooth surface with terraces and steps. The substrate misorientation ensured that the AlNSiC alloy crystals grew two dimensionally as identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Xray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that the AlN-SiC alloys had the wurtzite structure. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) demonstrated that the resultant alloy crystals had non-stoichiometric ratios of Al:N and Si:C and a uniform composition throughout the alloy crystal from the interface to the surface. The composition ratio of Al:Si of the alloy crystals changed with the growth temperature, and differed from the original source composition, which was consistent with the results predicted by thermodynamic calculation of the solid-vapor distribution of each element. XPS detected the bonding between Si-C, Si-N, Si-O for the Si 2p spectra. The dislocation density decreased with the growth, which was lower than 10^6cm-2 at the alloy surface, more than two orders of magnitude lower compared to regions close to the crystal/substrate interface, as determined by TEM.

  3. Aluminum Nitride-Silicon Carbide Alloy Crystals Grown on SiC Substrates by Sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Zheng; Du, L; Edgar, James H.; Payzant, Edward A.; Walker, L. R.; Liu, R.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2005-12-20

    AlN-SiC alloy crystals, with a thickness greater than 500 m, were grown on 4H- and 6H-SiC substrates from a mixture of AlN and SiC powders by the sublimation-recondensation method at 1860-1990 C. On-axis SiC substrates produced a rough surface covered with hexagonal grains, while 6H- and 4H- off-axis SiC substrates with different miscut angles (8? or 3.68?) formed a relatively smooth surface with terraces and steps. The substrate misorientation ensured that the AlN-SiC alloy crystals grew two dimensionally as identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that the AlN-SiC alloys had the wurtzite structure. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) demonstrated that the resultant alloy crystals had non-stoichiometric ratios of Al:N and Si:C and a uniform composition throughout the alloy crystal from the interface to the surface. The composition ratio of Al:Si of the alloy crystals changed with the growth temperature, and differed from the original source composition, which was consistent with the results predicted by thermodynamic calculation of the solid-vapor distribution of each element. XPS detected the bonding between Si-C, Si-N, Si-O for the Si 2p spectra. The dislocation density decreased with the growth, which was lower than 106 cm-2 at the alloy surface, more than two orders of magnitude lower compared to regions close to the crystal/substrate interface, as determined by TEM.

  4. [Life support of the Mars exploration crew. Control of a zeolite system for carbon dioxide removal from space cabin air within a closed air regeneration cycle].

    PubMed

    Chekov, Iu F

    2009-01-01

    The author describes a zeolite system for carbon dioxide removal integrated into a closed air regeneration cycle aboard spacecraft. The continuous operation of a double-adsorbent regeneration system with pCO2-dependable productivity is maintained through programmable setting of adsorption (desorption) semicycle time. The optimal system regulation curve is presented within the space of statistical performance family obtained in quasi-steady operating modes with controlled parameters of the recurrent adsorption-desorption cycle. The automatically changing system productivity ensures continuous intake of concentrated CO2. Control of the adsorption-desorption process is based on calculation of the differential adsorption (desorption) heat from gradient of adsorbent and test inert substance temperatures. The adaptive algorithm of digital control is implemented through the standard spacecraft interface with the board computer system and programmable microprocessor-based controllers. PMID:19621802

  5. Natural convection mass transfer at a vertical array of closely-spaced horizontal cylinders with special reference to electrochemical reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Sedahmed, G.H.; Nirdosh, I.

    1995-06-01

    Many industrial electrochemical processes such as electrowinning of metals, electrochemical pollution control, and electroorganic and electroinorganic syntheses are diffusion-controlled processes whose rates depend on the geometry of the working electrode as well as the prevailing hydrodynamic conditions. Recently much work has been done to develop new electrochemical reactors which are more efficient than the traditional parallel plate electrochemical reactor used in conducting such processes. In line with this, the object of the present work was to study the natural convection mass transfer behavior of a new electrode geometry, namely an array of closely-spaced horizontal tubes. Natural convection mass transfer at a vertical array of closely-spaced horizontal cylinders was studied by an electrochemical technique involving the measurement of the limiting current of the cathodic deposition of copper from acidified copper sulfate solution. Various combinations of solution concentration, cylinder diameter, and number of cylinders per array were used including experiments on single cylinders. The mass transfer coefficient at the array was found to decrease with increasing number of cylinders, pass through a minimum, and then increase with further increase in the number of cylinders per array; the mass transfer coefficient increased with increasing cylinder diameter in the array. Mass transfer data for different arrays were correlated for the range 6.3 {times} 10{sup 9} < ScGr < 3.63 {times} 10{sup 10} by the equation Sh = 0.455(ScGr){sup 0.25} and for the range 6.3 {times} 10{sup 10} < ScGr < 3.63 {times} 10{sup 12} by the equation Sh = 0.0064(ScGr){sup 0.42}. The characteristic length used in the above correlations was obtained by dividing the array area by the perimeter projected onto a horizontal plane. Practical implications of the present results in designing electrochemical reactors with heat transfer facilities are highlighted.

  6. New method for estimating bacterial cell abundances in natural samples by use of sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Cleaves, H. James; Schubert, Michael; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new method based on the sublimation of adenine from Escherichia coli to estimate bacterial cell counts in natural samples. To demonstrate this technique, several types of natural samples, including beach sand, seawater, deep-sea sediment, and two soil samples from the Atacama Desert, were heated to a temperature of 500 degrees C for several seconds under reduced pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger, and the amount of adenine released from the samples was then determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection. Based on the total amount of adenine recovered from DNA and RNA in these samples, we estimated bacterial cell counts ranging from approximately 10(5) to 10(9) E. coli cell equivalents per gram. For most of these samples, the sublimation-based cell counts were in agreement with total bacterial counts obtained by traditional DAPI (4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining.

  7. The Effect of CO2 Ice Cap Sublimation on Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterson, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Sublimation of the polar CO2 ice caps on Mars is an ongoing phenomenon that may be contributing to secular climate change on Mars. The transfer of CO2 between the surface and atmosphere via sublimation and deposition may alter atmospheric mass such that net atmospheric mass is increasing despite seasonal variations in CO2 transfer. My study builds on previous studies by Kahre and Haberle that analyze and compare data from the Phoenix and Viking Landers 1 and 2 to determine whether secular climate change is happening on Mars. In this project, I use two years worth of temperature, pressure, and elevation data from the MSL Curiosity rover to create a program that allows for successful comparison of Curiosity pressure data to Viking Lander pressure data so a conclusion can be drawn regarding whether CO2 ice cap sublimation is causing a net increase in atmospheric mass and is thus contributing to secular climate change on Mars.

  8. Iridium-bearing sublimates at a hot-spot volcano (Piton de la Fournaise, Indian Ocean)

    SciTech Connect

    Toutain, J.P. ); Meyer, G.

    1989-12-01

    Sublimates and incrustations derived upon the cooling of volcanic gases have been collected on various sites (Piton de la Fournaise, Poas, Momotombo, Etna, Ardoukoba and Erta-Ale). They have been analyzed for Ir and other volatile elements (Se, As, Cu, Au, Ag, Pb, Tl) by means of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and proton induced X-Ray emission (PIXE). Among the investigated volcanoes, only Piton de la Fournaise is found to release detectable amounts of iridium. Ir in Piton de la Fournaise sublimates is associated with F-minerals. This confirms its gaseous transport as a volatile fluoride compound. Iridium seems to be preferentialy released by hot-spot type volcanoes, and its detection in Piton de la Fournaise sublimates provides a positive argument in favor of a volcanic hypothesis to explain the KTB events.

  9. Modifications of comet materials by the sublimation process: Results from simulation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruen, E.; Bar-Nun, Akiva; Lammerzahl, P.; Klinger, J.; Kochan, H.; Keller, H. U.; Neukum, G.; Roessler, K.; Stoeffler, D.; Spohn, T.

    1989-01-01

    An active comet like comet Halley loses by sublimation a surface layer of the order of 1 m thickness per perihelion passage. In situ measurements show that water ice is the main constituent which contributes to the gas emission although even more volatile species (CO, NH3, CH4, CO2 etc.) have been identified. Dust particles which were embedded in the ices are carried by the sublimating gases. Measurements of the chemical composition of cometary grains indicate that they are composed of silicates of approximate chondritic composition and refractory carbonaceous material. Comet simulation experiments show that significant modifications of cometary materials occur due to sublimation process in near surface layers which have to be taken into account in order to derive the original state of the material.

  10. Crystallization and sublimation of non-racemic mixtures of natural amino acids: a path towards homochirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2012-07-01

    Homochirality of biologically important molecules such as amino acids and sugars is a prerequisite for the origin of life. There are different forces or mechanisms in the Universe to trigger off the primary imbalance in the enantiomeric ratio. Very likely the initial bias of one type of enantiomers over the other on Earth was arisen from the inflow of extraterrestrial matter (carbonaceous meteorites). The phase transitions (crystallization, sublimation) of non-racemic mixtures of enantiomers are ones of the most probable mechanisms for the homochirogenesis[1]. The sublimation, almost uninvestigated subject and forgotten for 30 years, revealed recently a pathway to the enantioenrichment of natural amino acids[2]. Starting from a mixture with a low content of an enantiopure amino acid a partial sublimation gives a considerable enrichment. In our further experiments we combined two first-order phase transitions of amino acid(s) mixtures: crystallization and sublimation. The results show the possibility of the transfer of enantiopurity between different amino acids[3]. Subliming a crystallized mixture of racemic amino acids with an enantiopure one we found that the sublimate is a non-racemic mixture of the same handedness for all components. The significance of the studies can be realized taking into account that just 5 of 22 proteinogenic amino acids are able to homochiral self-organization. The relevance of these studies to the Prebiotic Earth and to the evolution of the single handedness of biological molecules will be discussed. [1] Blackmond, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 2011, 366, 2878. [2] Guillemin et al., Chem. Commun. 2010 , 46, 1482. [3] Tarasevych, Guillemin et al., submitted.

  11. Collection-efficient, axisymmetric vacuum sublimation module for the purification of solid materials.

    PubMed

    May, Michael; Paul, Elizabeth; Katovic, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    A vacuum sublimation module of axisymmetric geometry was developed and employed to purify solid-phase materials. The module provides certain practical advantages and it comprises: a metering valve, glass collector, glass lower body, main seal, threaded bushing, and glass internal cartridge (the latter to contain starting material). A complementary process was developed to de-solvate, sublime, weigh, and collect solid chemical materials exemplified by oxalic acid, ferrocene, pentachlorobenzene, chrysene, and urea. The oxalic acid sublimate was analyzed by titration, melting range, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and its (aqueous phase) electrolytically generated gas. The analytical data were consistent with a high-purity, anhydrous oxalic acid sublimate. Cyclic voltammograms of 0.11 mol. % oxalic acid in water displayed a 2.1 V window on glassy carbon electrode beyond which electrolytic decomposition occurs. During module testing, fifteen relatively pure materials were sublimed with (energy efficient) passive cooling and the solid-phase recovery averaged 95 mass %. Key module design features include: compact vertical geometry, low-angle conical collector, uniformly compressed main seal, modest power consumption, transparency, glovebox compatibility, cooling options, and preferential conductive heat transfer. To help evaluate the structural (module) heat transfer, vertical temperature profiles along the dynamically evacuated lower body were measured versus electric heater power: for example, an input of 18.6 W generated a temperature 443-K at the bottom. Experimental results and engineering calculations indicate that during sublimation, solid conduction is the primary mode of heat transfer to the starting material. PMID:26628150

  12. Thermal Stability and Anisotropic Sublimation of Two-Dimensional Colloidal Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Buha, Joka; Gaspari, Roberto; Del Rio Castillo, Antonio Esau; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Manna, Liberato

    2016-07-13

    The structural and compositional stabilities of two-dimensional (2D) Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 nanocrystals, produced by both colloidal synthesis and by liquid phase exfoliation, were studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) during annealing at temperatures between 350 and 500 °C. The sublimation process induced by annealing is structurally and chemically anisotropic and takes place through the preferential dismantling of the prismatic {011̅0} type planes, and through the preferential sublimation of Te (or Se). The observed anisotropic sublimation is independent of the method of nanocrystal's synthesis, their morphology, or the presence of surfactant molecules on the nanocrystals surface. A thickness-dependent depression in the sublimation point has been observed with nanocrystals thinner than about 15 nm. The Bi2Se3 nanocrystals were found to sublimate below 280 °C, while the Bi2Te3 ones sublimated at temperatures between 350 and 450 °C, depending on their thickness, under the vacuum conditions in the TEM column. Density functional theory calculations confirm that the sublimation of the prismatic {011̅0} facets is more energetically favorable. Within the level of modeling employed, the sublimation occurs at a rate about 700 times faster than the sublimation of the {0001} planes at the annealing temperatures used in this work. This supports the distinctly anisotropic mechanisms of both sublimation and growth of Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 nanocrystals, known to preferentially adopt a 2D morphology. The anisotropic sublimation behavior is in agreement with the intrinsic anisotropy in the surface free energy brought about by the crystal structure of Bi2Te3 or Bi2Se3. PMID:27231980

  13. Matrix sublimation method for the formation of high-density amorphous ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouchi, A.; Hama, T.; Kimura, Y.; Hidaka, H.; Escribano, R.; Watanabe, N.

    2016-08-01

    A novel method for the formation of amorphous ice involving matrix sublimation has been developed. A CO-rich CO:H2O mixed ice was deposited at 8-10 K under ultra-high vacuum condition, which was then allowed to warm. After the sublimation of matrix CO at 35 K, amorphous ice remained. The amorphous ice formed exhibits a highly porous microscale texture; however, it also rather exhibits a density similar to that of high-density amorphous ice formed under high pressure. Furthermore, unlike conventional vapor-deposited amorphous ice, the amorphous ice is stable up to 140 K, where it transforms directly to cubic ice Ic.

  14. Sulfur in vacuum - Sublimation effects on frozen melts, and applications to Io's surface and torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Douglas B.

    1987-01-01

    Vacuum sublimation effects on solid sulfur yield a form of the element that is white at room temperature, is fluffy in texture, and forms on frozen sulfur in vacuum through differential evaporation of molecular species in the solid. This vacuum sulfur should exist in large quantity on Io, if the solid free sulfur there has solidified from a melt; a sulfur volcanism model for Io is accordingly developed on this basis which implies that the color and spectra of different sulfur regions of Io could indicate their relative crystallization ages and cooling histories. The flux of sublimating hotspot sulfur appears consistent with estimated turnover rates of the Io surface.

  15. On the sublimation of blowing snow and of snow in canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. A.; Simon, K.; Gordon, M.; Weng, W.

    2003-04-01

    Tests have been made within the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) of various parameterizations of sublimation of blowing snow, and tested in the context of data from weather stations (Goose Bay and Resolute) in northern Canada. We will focus on parameterization schemes based on results obtained with the PIEKTUK model of blowing snow. In addition we will present preliminary results concerning the parameterization of sublimation of snow caught in tree canopies, using schemes similar to those for evaporation from wet canopies. This is considered to be a major factor in the water budgets of forested areas in northern Canada.

  16. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance Time in the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etter,David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, robert; Zande, Chris Vande

    2012-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR - Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post- Shuttle 6-year service life.

  17. Emerson's "Nature" as an Early Manifestation of the Biological Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindol, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Ralph Waldo Emerson's first essay, "Nature," has been viewed as a reconciliation of the world of nature with the world of mind. A close analysis shows that Emerson was in fact attempting to come to terms with human fragility in a unique way by delineating the point at which the worldly and the transcendental are demarcated. Because…

  18. Volatilization, transport and sublimation of metallic and non-metallic elements in high temperature gases at Merapi Volcano, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.B.; Rose, William I., Jr.; Reed, M.H.; Lichte, F.E.; Finnegan, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Condensates, silica tube sublimates and incrustations were sampled from 500-800??C fumaroles and lava samples were collected at Merapi Volcano, Indonesia in Jan.-Feb., 1984. With respect to the magma, Merapi gases are enriched by factors greater than 105 in Se, Re, Bi and Cd; 104-105 in Au, Br, In, Pb and W; 103-104 in Mo, Cl, Cs, S, Sn and Ag; 102-103 in As, Zn, F and Rb; and 1-102 in Cu, K, Na, Sb, Ni, Ga, V, Fe, Mn and Li. The fumaroles are transporting more than 106 grams/day ( g d) of S, Cl and F; 104-106 g/d of Al, Br, Zn, Fe, K and Mg; 103-104 g d of Pb, As, Mo, Mn, V, W and Sr; and less than 103 g d of Ni, Cu, Cr, Ga, Sb, Bi, Cd, Li, Co and U. With decreasing temperature (800-500??C) there were five sublimate zones found in silica tubes: 1) cristobalite and magnetite (first deposition of Si, Fe and Al); 2) K-Ca sulfate, acmite, halite, sylvite and pyrite (maximum deposition of Cl, Na, K, Si, S, Fe, Mo, Br, Al, Rb, Cs, Mn, W, P, Ca, Re, Ag, Au and Co); 3) aphthitalite (K-Na sulfate), sphalerite, galena and Cs-K. sulfate (maximum deposition of Zn, Bi, Cd, Se and In; higher deposition of Pb and Sn); 4) Pb-K chloride and Na-K-Fe sulfate (maximum deposition of Pb, Sn and Cu); and 5) Zn, Cu and K-Pb sulfates (maximum deposition of Pb, Sn, Ti, As and Sb). The incrustations surrounding the fumaroles are also chemically zoned. Bi, Cd, Pb, W, Mo, Zn, Cu, K, Na, V, Fe and Mn are concentrated most in or very close to the vent as expected with cooling, atmospheric contamination and dispersion. The highly volatile elements Br, Cl, As and Sb are transported primarily away from high temperature vents. Ba, Si, P, Al, Ca and Cr are derived from wall rock reactions. Incomplete degassing of shallow magma at 915??C is the origin of most of the elements in the Merapi volcanic gas, although it is partly contaminated by particles or wall rock reactions. The metals are transported predominantly as chloride species. As the gas cools in the fumarolic environment, it becomes saturated

  19. Role of Erosion on Closely-Spaced Fault Scarps: High-resolution Laser Scanning Data and Scarp Diffusion Modelling of the Rex Hills Flower Structure, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, R.; Guest, B.; Friedrich, A. M.

    2007-12-01

    Flower structures are often associated with strike-slip faults. Their subsurface geometry is well known but additional information about their geometry and kinematics is also contained in their surface expression, especially in surfaces exhibiting closely-spaced fault scarps. However, detailed surface descriptions of flower structures are rare. Here, we present for the first time topographic profiles extracted from high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) data using a ground-based laser scanner (Riegl company) to examine the surface expression of a flower structure in great detail. Our study site, the Rex Hills flower structure (40 m high, ~1 km long), is located on the transpressional left-bend between the Pahrump and Amargosa segments of the dextral Stateline fault system (Guest et al., 2007, GSAB). The southern Rex Hills slope exhibits three reverse fault- scarp generations related to three reverse fault branches, respectively. The basal scarp is the youngest and most continuous one. It exhibits five fault segments with an approximately constant displacement along the scarp. The upper two fault-scarp generations are less continuous, and older. The topography of the southern Rex Hills slope also is characterized by alternating valleys and ridges (each ~100 m long) extending perpendicular to the main ridge crest. Our analysis shows that fault scarp morphology varies laterally along this slope. Scarps exposed on ridge crests are typically more numerous (up to 4-5 scarps) and smaller (on average 5 m high), whereas adjacent valleys often exhibit single large (>10 m high) scarps. The larger valley-scarps did not result from the offset across a single fault branch, but resulted from merging of the three scarps mentioned above by enhanced scarp degradation. The preservation potential of small, individual scarps is therefore better on ridge crests relative to adjacent valleys. Assuming a known age of 2 kyrs (Menges et al., 2003, AGU), we examined the spatial

  20. DIRECT STELLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AT THE DUST SUBLIMATION FRONT IN MASSIVE STAR FORMATION: EFFECTS OF A DUST-FREE DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2011-10-01

    In massive star formation ({approx}> 40 M{sub sun}) by core accretion, the direct stellar radiation pressure acting on the dust particles exceeds the gravitational force and interferes with mass accretion at the dust sublimation front, the first absorption site. Ram pressure generated by high accretion rates of 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} is thought to be required to overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We investigate the direct stellar irradiation on the dust sublimation front, including the inner accretion disk structure. We show that the ram pressure of the accretion disk is lower than the stellar radiation pressure at the dust sublimation front. Thus, another mechanism must overcome the direct stellar radiation pressure. We suggest that the inner hot dust-free region is optically thick, shielding the dust sublimation front from direct stellar irradiation. Thus, accretion would not halt at the dust sublimation front, even at lower accretion rates.

  1. A Sense Sublime: Mapping the Journey, Engaging the Mess.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringer, Allison

    2000-01-01

    Definitions of spirituality do not fit in the standard packaging of science. Holistic education that acknowledges the interconnectedness of mind, body, and spirit is better suited for the exploration of spirituality. Experiential education needs to shift from trying to create spirituality for people, to providing the space and environment for…

  2. Structure-property relationships in halogenbenzoic acids: Thermodynamics of sublimation, fusion, vaporization and solubility.

    PubMed

    Zherikova, Kseniya V; Svetlov, Aleksey A; Kuratieva, Natalia V; Verevkin, Sergey P

    2016-10-01

    Temperature dependences of vapor pressures for 2-, 3-, and 4-bromobenzoic acid, as well as for five isomeric bromo-methylbenzoic acids were studied by the transpiration method. Melting temperatures and enthalpies of fusion for all isomeric bromo-methylbenzoic acids and 4-bromobenzoic acid were measured with a DSC. The molar enthalpies of sublimation and vaporization were derived. These data together with results available in the literature were collected and checked for internal consistency using a group-additivity procedure and results from X-ray structural diffraction studies. Specific (hydrogen bonding) interactions in the liquid and in the crystal phase of halogenbenzoic acids were quantified based on experimental values of vaporization and sublimation enthalpies. Structure-property correlations of solubilities of halogenobenzoic acids with sublimation pressures and sublimation enthalpies were developed and solubilities of bromo-benzoic acids were estimated. These new results resolve much of the ambiguity in the available thermochemical and solubility data on bromobenzoic acids. The approach based on structure property correlations can be applied for the assessment of water solubility of sparingly soluble drugs. PMID:27424058

  3. Using Mass Transport to Guide the Purification of Small Molecule Organic Semiconductors via Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Nathan T.; Zhang, Yi; Grandbois, Matthew L.; Bell, Bruce M.; Holmes, Russell J.; Cussler, E. L.

    2015-03-01

    Organic electronic materials have garnered considerable commercial attention for next generation display and solid-state lighting applications. Widespread adoption of these technologies is slowed by considerable production costs, partially due to an expensive purification step. This work explores the current method of industrial purification, thermal gradient sublimation, in order to isolate the fundamental mechanisms limiting sublimation rate and controlling product deposition. For the archetypical hole transport materials, N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)-benzidine (NPD) and 4,4',4''-tris(carbazol-9-yl) triphenylamine (TCTA), a combination of viscous flow and physical vapor deposition are shown to be rate-limiting at constant sublimation temperature. Surprisingly, diffusion within the solid feed, reaction at the feed particle surface, and mass transfer within the bed of feed particles are not rate limiting in the case. This mechanism is different from that which is observed in many industrial sublimation systems. These results can be used to guide the design and operation of future large-scale purification systems, which are critical for the widespread adoption of organic optoelectronic devices.

  4. Application of ion beam analysis to the selective sublimation processing of thin films for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vomiero, A.; Scian, C.; Della Mea, G.; Guidi, V.; Martinelli, G.; Schiffrer, G.; Comini, E.; Ferroni, M.; Sberveglieri, G.

    2006-08-01

    Ion beam analysis was successfully applied to a novel technique, named selective sublimation process (SSP), for deposition of nanostructured gas-sensing films through reactive sputtering. The method consists of the co-deposition of a mixed oxide, one of which has a relatively low sublimation temperature. Annealing at suitable temperature causes the sublimation of the most volatile compound, leaving a layer with adjustable composition. The appropriate choice of thermal treatments and the consequent tailoring of the composition play a crucial role in the determination of the microstructural properties. We developed a model based on diffusion equations that provides a useful guide to control the deposition and processing parameters and we applied the model on the systems TiO2-WO3 and TiO2-MoO3. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) was demonstrated to be effective for the characterization of the diffusion and sublimation processes during SSP. Experimental results fully agree with theoretical prediction, and allowed the calculation of all the parameters involved in SSP.

  5. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Facilitating Active Learning of Concepts in Transport Phenomena: Experiment with a Subliming Solid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utgikar, Vivek P.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment based on the sublimation of a solid was introduced in the undergraduate Transport Phenomena course. The experiment required the students to devise their own apparatus and measurement techniques. The theoretical basis, assignment of the experiment, experimental results, and student/instructor observations are described in this paper.…

  6. Sublimation-induced orbital perturbations of extrasolar active asteroids and comets: application to white dwarf systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri; Eggl, Siegfried; Gänsicke, Boris T.

    2015-09-01

    The metal budgets in some white dwarf (WD) atmospheres reveal that volatile-rich circumstellar bodies must both exist in extrasolar systems and survive the giant branch phases of stellar evolution. The resulting behaviour of these active asteroids or comets which orbit WDs is not well-understood, but may be strongly influenced by sublimation due to stellar radiation. Here we develop a model, generally applicable to any extrasolar system with a main-sequence or WD star, that traces sublimation-induced orbital element changes in approximately km-sized extrasolar minor planets and comets travelling within hundreds of au. We derive evolution equations on orbital time-scales and for arbitrarily steep power-law sublimation dependences on distance, and place our model in a Solar system context. We also demonstrate the importance of coupling sublimation and general relativity, and the orbital consequences of outgassing in arbitrary directions. We prove that non-gravitational accelerations alone cannot result in orbit crossing with the WD disruption radius, but may shrink or expand the orbit by up to several au after a single pericentre passage, potentially affecting subsequent interactions with remnant debris and planets. Our analysis suggests that extant planets must exist in polluted WD systems.

  7. Sublimation of natural amino acids and induction of asymmetry by meteoritic amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    It is believed that the homochirality of building blocks of life like amino acids (AAs) and sugars is a prerequisite requirement for the origin and evolution of life. Among different mechanisms that might have triggered the initial disparity in the enantiomeric ratio on the primitive Earth, the key roles were assigned to: (i) local chiral symmetry breaking and (ii) the inflow of extraterrestrial matter (eg the carbonaceous meteorites containing non-racemic AAs). Recently it has been revealed that sublimation, a subject almost completely neglected for a long time, gives a pathway to enantioenrichment of natural AAs (1,2 and references herein). Sublimation is however one of the key physical processes that occur on comets. Starting from a mixture with a low content of an enantiopure AA, a partial sublimation gives an important enrichment of the sublimate (1,2). The resulted disparity in the ratio between enantiomers of a partial sublimate is determined by the crystalline nature of the starting mixture: we observed a drastic difference in the behavior of (i) mixtures based on true racemic compounds and (ii) mechanical mixtures of two enantiopure solid phases. On the other hand, combination of crystallization and sublimation can lead to segregation of enantioenriched fractions starting from racemic composition of sublimable aliphatic AAs (Ala, Leu, Pro, Val) in mixtures with non-volatile enantiopure ones (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) (3). The resulted sense of chirality correlates with the handedness of the non-volatile AAs: the observed changes in enantiomeric ratios clearly demonstrate the preferential homochiral interactions and a tendency of natural amino acids to homochiral self-organization. It is noteworthy that just these 5 (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr) out of 22 proteinogenic amino acids are able to local symmetry breaking. On the other hand, recent data on the enantiomeric composition of the Tagish Lake, a C2-type carbonaceous meteorite, revealed a large L

  8. Static sublimation purification process and characterization of LiZnAs semiconductor material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montag, Benjamin W.; Reichenberger, Michael A.; Edwards, Nathaniel S.; Ugorowski, Philip B.; Sunder, Madhana; Weeks, Joseph; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2016-03-01

    Refinement of the class AIBIICV materials continue as a candidate for solid-state neutron detectors. Such a device would have greater efficiency, in a compact form, than present day gas-filled 3He and 10BF3 detectors. The 6Li(n,t)4He reaction yields a total Q value of 4.78 MeV, larger than 10B, and easily identified above background radiations. Hence, devices composed of either natural Li (nominally 7.5% 6Li) or enriched 6Li (usually 95% 6Li) may provide a semiconductor material for compact high efficiency neutron detectors. A sub-branch of the III-V semiconductors, the filled tetrahedral compounds, AIBIICV, known as Nowotny-Juza compounds, are known for their desirable cubic crystal structure. Starting material was synthesized by equimolar portions of Li, Zn, and As sealed under vacuum (10-6 Torr) in quartz ampoules with a boron nitride lining, and reacted in a compounding furnace [1]. The synthesized material showed signs of high impurity levels from material and electrical property characterization. In the present work, a static vacuum sublimation of synthesized LiZnAs loaded in a quartz vessel was performed to help purify the synthesized material. The chemical composition of the sublimed material and remains material was confirmed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Lithium was not detected in the sublimed material, however, near stoichiometric amounts of each constituent element were found in the remains material for LiZnAs. X-ray diffraction phase identification scans of the remains material and sublimed material were compared, and further indicated the impurity materials were removed from the synthesized materials. The remaining powder post the sublimation process showed characteristics of a higher purity ternary compound.

  9. Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and additional resources focuses on space and astronomy. Specifies age levels for resources that include Web sites, CD-ROMS and software, videos, books, audios, and magazines; offers professional resources; and presents a relevant class activity. (LRW)

  10. AgGaSe2 thin films grown by chemical close-spaced vapor transport for photovoltaic applications: structural, compositional and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merschjann, C.; Mews, M.; Mete, T.; Karkatzinou, A.; Rusu, M.; Korzun, B. V.; Schorr, S.; Schubert-Bischoff, P.; Seeger, S.; Schedel-Niedrig, Th; Lux-Steiner, M.-Ch

    2012-05-01

    Thin films of chalcopyrite AgGaSe2 have been successfully grown on glass and glass/molybdenum substrates using the technique of chemical close-spaced vapor transport. The high crystallinity of the samples is confirmed by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and optical transmission/reflection spectroscopy. Here, two of the three expected direct optical bandgaps are found at 1.77(2) and 1.88(6) eV at 300 K. The lowest bandgap energy at 4 K is estimated to be 1.82(3) eV. Photoluminescence spectroscopy has further revealed the nature of the point defects within the AgGaSe2, showing evidence for the existence of very shallow acceptor levels of 5(1) and 10(1) meV, and thus suggesting the AgGaSe2 phase itself to exhibit a p-type conductivity. At the same time, electrical characterization by Hall, Seebeck and four-point-probe measurements indicate properties of a compensated semiconductor. The electrical properties of the investigated thin films are mainly influenced by the presence of Ag2Se and Ga2O3 nanometer-scaled surface layers, as well as by Ag2Se inclusions in the bulk and Ag clusters at the layers’ rear side.

  11. AgGaSe2 thin films grown by chemical close-spaced vapor transport for photovoltaic applications: structural, compositional and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Merschjann, C; Mews, M; Mete, T; Karkatzinou, A; Rusu, M; Korzun, B V; Schorr, S; Schubert-Bischoff, P; Seeger, S; Schedel-Niedrig, Th; Lux-Steiner, M-Ch

    2012-05-01

    Thin films of chalcopyrite AgGaSe(2) have been successfully grown on glass and glass/molybdenum substrates using the technique of chemical close-spaced vapor transport. The high crystallinity of the samples is confirmed by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and optical transmission/reflection spectroscopy. Here, two of the three expected direct optical bandgaps are found at 1.77(2) and 1.88(6) eV at 300 K. The lowest bandgap energy at 4 K is estimated to be 1.82(3) eV. Photoluminescence spectroscopy has further revealed the nature of the point defects within the AgGaSe(2), showing evidence for the existence of very shallow acceptor levels of 5(1) and 10(1) meV, and thus suggesting the AgGaSe(2) phase itself to exhibit a p-type conductivity. At the same time, electrical characterization by Hall, Seebeck and four-point-probe measurements indicate properties of a compensated semiconductor. The electrical properties of the investigated thin films are mainly influenced by the presence of Ag(2)Se and Ga(2)O(3) nanometer-scaled surface layers, as well as by Ag(2)Se inclusions in the bulk and Ag clusters at the layers' rear side. PMID:22469870

  12. Spatial and temporal variation of sublimation on Antarctica: Results of a high-resolution general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    1997-12-01

    In this paper we use output of a high-resolution general circulation model (ECHAM-3 T106, resolution 1.1°×1.1°) to study the spatial and temporal variation of sublimation on Antarctica. First, we compare model results with available observations of sublimation rates. The yearly cycle, with small latent heat fluxes during the winter, is well reproduced, and the agreement with sparsely available spot observations is fair. The model results suggest that a significant 10-15% of the annual precipitation over Antarctica is lost through sublimation and that sublimation plays an important role in the formation of blue ice areas. A preliminary analysis of the atmospheric boundary layer moisture budget shows that the spatial variation of sublimation in the coastal zone of East Antarctica can be explained by variations of horizontal advection of dry air. Dry air advection, and thus surface sublimation, is enhanced in areas where katabatic winds are strong and have a large downslope component and where the Antarctic topography drops suddenly from the plateau to the coastal zone. In areas where horizontal advection is small, like the plateau and the large ice shelves, special conditions must be met to make significant sublimation at the surface possible.

  13. Effect of acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from a sublimating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, N.; Yarin, A. L.; Brenn, G.; Kastner, O.; Durst, F.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of the acoustic streaming on the mass transfer from the surface of a sphere positioned in an ultrasonic acoustic levitator is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Acoustic levitation using standing ultrasonic waves is an experimental tool for studying the heat and mass transfer from small solid or liquid samples, because it allows an almost steady positioning of a sample at a fixed location in space. However, the levitator introduces some difficulties. One of the main problems with acoustic levitation is that an acoustic streaming is induced near the sample surface, which affects the heat and mass transfer rates, as characterized by increased Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. The transfer rates are not uniform along the sample surface, and the aim of the present study is to quantify the spatial Sherwood number distribution over the surface of a sphere. The experiments are based on the measurement of the surface shape of a sphere layered with a solid substance as a function of time using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with backlighting. The sphere used in this research is a glass sphere layered with a volatile solid substance (naphthalene or camphor). The local mass transfer from the surface both with and without an ultrasonic acoustic field is investigated in order to evaluate the effect of the acoustic streaming. The experimental results are compared with predictions following from the theory outlined [A. L. Yarin, M. Pfaffenlehner, and C. Tropea, J. Fluid Mech. 356, 65 (1998); A. L. Yarin, G. Brenn, O. Kastner, D. Rensink, and C. Tropea, ibid. 399, 151 (1999)] which describes the acoustic field and the resulting acoustic streaming, and the mass transfer at the surface of particles and droplets located in an acoustic levitator. The results are also compared with the experimental data and with the theoretical predictions of Burdukov and Nakoryakov [J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 6, 51 (1965)], which are valid only in the case of spherical

  14. Growth, structure and optoelectronic characterizations of high quality Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films obtained by close spaced vapor transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagna, A.; Djessas, K.; Sene, C.; Belaqziz, M.; Chehouani, H.; Briot, O.; Moret, M.

    2015-09-01

    High quality Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films, as an absorber layer for thin films solar cell, were synthesized successfully using a simple and low cost technique, Close-Space Vapor Transport (CSVT). The films were grown on soda-lime glass substrates using a polycrystalline CZTS ingot as source of evaporation material. Influence of substrate temperature on chemical composition, morphological, structural, electrical and optical properties of the CZTS thin films was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer, Hall effect and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The results from XRD and Raman characterization confirmed the formation of kesterite CZTS thin films with a (1 1 2) plane preferred orientation and Raman shift of 338 cm-1, respectively. When the substrate temperature was increased from 460 to 540 °C, the composition of the thin films becomes Cu-, Sn-poor and Zn-rich, wherein the optical band gap values increased from 1.34 to 1.52 eV. PL spectra show the presence of broad emission band at 1.28 eV. All CZTS thin films exhibit p-type conductivity. With substrate temperature of 500 °C, the CZTS thin films show the best properties as an absorber layer in thin film solar cell (Eg = 1.48 eV, p = 3.4 × 1017 cm-3, ρ = 2.6 Ω/cm, μ = 6.4 cm/V s).

  15. Close-up of SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A close-up view of a Space Shuttle Main Engine during a test at the John C. Stennis Space Center shows how the engine is gimballed, or rotated, to evaluate the performance of its components under simulated flight conditions.

  16. Effects of Atmospheric and Surface Dust on the Sublimation Rates of CO2 on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonev, B. P.; James, P. B.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Hansen, G. B.; Wolff, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of our modeling work dedicated to study the effects of atmospheric dust on the sublimation of CO2 on Mars. The purpose of this study is to better understand the extent to which dust storm activity can be a root cause for interannual variability in the planetary CO2 seasonal cycle, through modifying the springtime regression rates of the south polar cap. We obtain calculations of the sublimation fluxes for various types of polar surfaces and different amounts of atmospheric dust. These calculations have been compared qualitatively with the regression patterns observed by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) in both visible and infrared wavelengths, for two years of very different dust histories (1999, and 2001).

  17. Controlling Gaussian and mean curvatures at microscale by sublimation and condensation of smectic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Seok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Kim, Mun Ho; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-01-01

    Soft materials with layered structure such as membranes, block copolymers and smectics exhibit intriguing morphologies with nontrivial curvatures. Here, we report restructuring the Gaussian and mean curvatures of smectic A films with free surface in the process of sintering, that is, reshaping at elevated temperatures. The pattern of alternating patches of negative, zero and positive mean curvature of the air-smectic interface has a profound effect on the rate of sublimation. As a result of sublimation, condensation and restructuring, initially equilibrium smectic films with negative and zero Gaussian curvature are transformed into structures with pronounced positive Gaussian curvature of layers packing, which are rare in the samples obtained by cooling from the isotropic melt. The observed relationship between the curvatures, bulk elastic behaviour and interfacial geometries in sintering of smectic liquid crystals might pave the way for new approaches to control soft morphologies at micron and submicron scales.

  18. Three-dimensional textures and defects of soft material layering revealed by thermal sublimation

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Dong Ki; Kim, Yun Ho; Kim, Dae Seok; Oh, Seong Dae; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Clark, Noel A.; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Layering is found and exploited in a variety of soft material systems, ranging from complex macromolecular self-assemblies to block copolymer and small-molecule liquid crystals. Because the control of layer structure is required for applications and characterization, and because defects reveal key features of the symmetries of layered phases, a variety of techniques have been developed for the study of soft-layer structure and defects, including X-ray diffraction and visualization using optical transmission and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and SEM and transmission electron microscopy, including freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy. Here, it is shown that thermal sublimation can be usefully combined with such techniques to enable visualization of the 3D structure of soft materials. Sequential sublimation removes material in a stepwise fashion, leaving a remnant layer structure largely unchanged and viewable using SEM, as demonstrated here using a lamellar smectic liquid crystal. PMID:24218602

  19. Controlling Gaussian and mean curvatures at microscale by sublimation and condensation of smectic liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Seok; Cha, Yun Jeong; Kim, Mun Ho; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-01-01

    Soft materials with layered structure such as membranes, block copolymers and smectics exhibit intriguing morphologies with nontrivial curvatures. Here, we report restructuring the Gaussian and mean curvatures of smectic A films with free surface in the process of sintering, that is, reshaping at elevated temperatures. The pattern of alternating patches of negative, zero and positive mean curvature of the air–smectic interface has a profound effect on the rate of sublimation. As a result of sublimation, condensation and restructuring, initially equilibrium smectic films with negative and zero Gaussian curvature are transformed into structures with pronounced positive Gaussian curvature of layers packing, which are rare in the samples obtained by cooling from the isotropic melt. The observed relationship between the curvatures, bulk elastic behaviour and interfacial geometries in sintering of smectic liquid crystals might pave the way for new approaches to control soft morphologies at micron and submicron scales. PMID:26725975

  20. Practical sublimation source for large-scale chromium gettering in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, J.E.; Emerson, L.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the technique of chromium gettering with a large-scale sublimation source which resembles in its design the VARIAN Ti-Ball. It consists of a hollow chromium sphere with a diameter of approximately 3 cm and an incandescent filament for radiation heating from inside the ball. While the fabrication of the source is described in a companion paper, we discuss here the gettering technique. The experimental arrangement consists of an UHV system instrumented for total- and partial-pressure measurements, a film-thickness monitor, thermocouples, an optical pyrometer, and appropriate instrumentation to measure the heating power. The results show the temperature and corresponding sublimation rate of the Cr-Ball as function of input power. In addition, an example of the total pumping speed of a gettered surface is shown.

  1. Adamantane derivatives of sulfonamides: sublimation, solubility, solvation and transfer processes in biologically relevant solvents.

    PubMed

    Perlovich, G L; Volkova, T V; Sharapova, A V; Kazachenko, V P; Strakhova, N N; Proshin, A N

    2016-04-01

    Eight adamantane derivatives of sulfonamides were synthesized and characterized. Temperature dependencies of saturation vapor pressure were obtained using the transpiration method and thermodynamic functions of the sublimation processes were calculated. Solubility values of the selected compounds in buffer (pH 7.4), 1-octanol and 1-hexane were determined at different temperatures using the isothermal saturation method. Thermophysical characteristics of fusion processes (melting points and fusion enthalpies) of the substances were studied using the DSC method. Transfer processes from buffer to 1-octanol, from buffer to 1-hexane and 1-hexane to 1-octanol were analyzed. The impact of the molecules' structural modification on sublimation, solubility and solvation/hydration processes in the solvents was studied. Correlation equations connecting the thermodynamic functions with physicochemical descriptors were obtained. PMID:26976747

  2. Sublimating icy planetesimals as the source of nucleation seeds for grain condensation in classical novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matese, John J.; Whitmire, D. P.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of grain nucleation during novae outbursts is a major obstacle to our understanding of dust formation in these systems. How nucleation seeds can form in the hostile post-outburst environment remains an unresolved matter. It is suggested that the material for seeding the condensation of ejecta outflow is stored in a primordial disk of icy planetesimals surrounding the system. Evidence is presented that the requisite number of nucleation seeds can be released by sublimation of the planetesimals during outbursts.

  3. Glaciers of the McMurdo dry valleys: Terrestrial analog for Martian polar sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacClune, Karen Lewis; Fountain, Andrew G.; Kargel, Jeffery S.; MacAyeal, Douglas R.

    2003-04-01

    The surfaces of the Martian north and south polar residual caps are marked by unusual ice features: Dark spiralesque troughs up to 1 km deep, 10 km wide, and 300 km long appear on both ice caps, and circular pits that make up the ``Swiss cheese'' terrain appear on the south polar cap. Both types of features are of interest to researchers as a potential means of understanding ice composition and flow rates. Some glaciers of the McMurdo dry valleys have surface features unknown elsewhere on terrestrial glaciers, including canyons over 6 km long, 100 m wide, and tens of meters deep and basins up to 100 m across. High sublimation, dust accumulation, and very little melting is key to their origin. These processes and ice landforms are suggested as terrestrial analogs for the sublimation behavior of Martian ice caps, where dust accumulation and sublimation are significant but surface melting is absent. We have developed a solar radiation model of canyon formation and have applied it to the Martian polar caps. The modeled processes do well to describe direct and reflected radiation within V grooves, a process that may be significant in the development of the spiral troughs and Swiss cheese terrain. The model fails to reproduce the low observed slopes of the Martian troughs. The grooves are too shallow, with opening angles of ~165° compared with model predictions of ~90°. The reason for the failure may be that we have not included creep closure, which should flatten their slopes.

  4. Properties of Filamentary Sublimation Residues from Dispersions of Clay in Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Parker, T. J.; Saunders, R. S.; Laue, E. G.; Fanale, F. P.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of sublimate residues are of considerable interest in studies of the thermal modeling of Martian and cometary ice surfaces. The study of the formation of sand grains from this mantle on Martian polar ice is also supported by these experiments. To understand these properties, a series of low temperature vacuum experiments were run during which dirty ices that might be expected to be found in Martian polar caps and in comet nuclei were made and then freeze dried. In addition to using particulate material of appropriate grain size and minerology, particle nucleated ices were simulated by dispersing the particulates in the ice so that they did not contact one another. This noncontact dispersion was the most difficult requirement to achieve but the most rewarding in that it produced a new filamentary sublimate residue that was not a relic of the frozen dispersion. If the siliceous particles are allowed to touch one another in the ice the structure of the contacting particles in the ice will remain as a relic after the ice is sublimed away.

  5. Inter-vial Variance of the Sublimation Rate in Shelf Freeze-dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masakazu; Harashima, Konomi; Ariyama, Hiroichi; Yao, Ai-Ru

    Significant inter-vial variance in the sublimation rate has been pointed out by several authors in relation to the placement of the vials on a well controlled shelf. All the previous reports have described the phenomena observed in the experiments or the production processes, and have made some suggestive remarks, but have not clearly proposed a solution to the problem. In the shelf freeze-drying of pharmaceuticals, one of the major ploblems is how to achieve inter-vial uniformity and batch to batch uniformity or consistency. In this study, We have developed a new model of laboratory-scale freeze-dryer which has temperature-controllable chamber walls, and using this new model we have analyzed causes of inter-vial variance in the sublimation rate. The higher sublimation rate for the vials placed on the shelf edge is due to additional heat input from the wall and also due to further additional heat from the shelf surface on which no kissing vial is placed. It is possible to cancel out the additional heat input from the shelf by maintaining an optimum wall temperature, which must be lower than the material temperature. This paper discusses a method for eliminating the inter-vail variance in drying conditions and shortening the drying time by means of chamber wall temperature control.

  6. Evidence for a Receding Dust Sublimation Region around a Supermassive Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Makoto; Hönig, Sebastian F.; Antonucci, Robert; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Barvainis, Richard; Millour, Florentin; Kotani, Takayuki; Tristram, Konrad R. W.; Weigelt, Gerd

    2013-10-01

    The near-IR emission in Type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is thought to be dominated by the thermal radiation from dust grains that are heated by the central engine in the UV/optical and are almost at the sublimation temperature. A brightening of the central source can thus further sublimate the innermost dust, leading to an increase in the radius of the near-IR emitting region. Such changes in radius have been indirectly probed by the measurements of the changes in the time lag between the near-IR and UV/optical light variation. Here we report direct evidence for such a receding sublimation region through the near-IR interferometry of the brightest Type 1 AGN in NGC 4151. The increase in radius follows a significant brightening of the central engine with a delay of at least a few years, which is thus the implied destruction timescale of the innermost dust distribution. Compiling historic flux variations and radius measurements, we also infer the reformation timescale for the inner dust distribution to be several years in this galactic nucleus. More specifically and quantitatively, we find that the radius at a given time seems to be correlated with a long-term average of the flux over the previous several (~6) years, instead of the instantaneous flux. Finally, we also report measurements of three more Type 1 AGNs newly observed with the Keck interferometer, as well as the second epoch measurements for three other AGNs.

  7. Formulation Design and Optimization of Orodispersible Tablets of Quetiapine Fumarate by Sublimation Method

    PubMed Central

    Kalyankar, P.; Panzade, P.; Lahoti, S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of present study was to formulate directly compressible orodispersible tablets of quetiapine fumarate by sublimation method with a view to enhance patient compliance. A full 32 factorial design was used to investigate the effect of two variables viz., concentration of Indion 414 and camphor. Indion 414 (3-5 % w/w) was used as superdisintegrant and camphor (5-15 % w/w) as subliming agent. The tablets were evaluated for thickness, weight variation, hardness, friability, content uniformity, wetting time, porosity, in vitro disintegration time and in vitro drug release. The formulation containing 5% w/w of Indion 414 and 5% w/w camphor was emerged as promising based on evaluation parameters. The disintegration time for optimized formulation was 18.66 s. The tablet surface was evaluated for presence of pores by scanning electron microscopy before and after sublimation. Differential scanning colorimetric study did not indicate any drug excipient incompatibility, either during mixing or after compression. The effect of independent variables on disintegration time, % drug release and friability is presented graphically by surface response plots. Short-term stability studies on the optimized formulation indicated no significant changes in drug content and in vitro disintegration time. The directly compressible orodispersible tablets of quetiapine fumarate with lower friability, greater drug release and shorter disintegration times were obtained using Indion 414 and camphor at optimum concentrations. PMID:26180271

  8. Formulation Design and Optimization of Orodispersible Tablets of Quetiapine Fumarate by Sublimation Method.

    PubMed

    Kalyankar, P; Panzade, P; Lahoti, S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of present study was to formulate directly compressible orodispersible tablets of quetiapine fumarate by sublimation method with a view to enhance patient compliance. A full 3(2) factorial design was used to investigate the effect of two variables viz., concentration of Indion 414 and camphor. Indion 414 (3-5 % w/w) was used as superdisintegrant and camphor (5-15 % w/w) as subliming agent. The tablets were evaluated for thickness, weight variation, hardness, friability, content uniformity, wetting time, porosity, in vitro disintegration time and in vitro drug release. The formulation containing 5% w/w of Indion 414 and 5% w/w camphor was emerged as promising based on evaluation parameters. The disintegration time for optimized formulation was 18.66 s. The tablet surface was evaluated for presence of pores by scanning electron microscopy before and after sublimation. Differential scanning colorimetric study did not indicate any drug excipient incompatibility, either during mixing or after compression. The effect of independent variables on disintegration time, % drug release and friability is presented graphically by surface response plots. Short-term stability studies on the optimized formulation indicated no significant changes in drug content and in vitro disintegration time. The directly compressible orodispersible tablets of quetiapine fumarate with lower friability, greater drug release and shorter disintegration times were obtained using Indion 414 and camphor at optimum concentrations. PMID:26180271

  9. A method to measure winter precipitation and sublimation under global warming conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndl, Markus; Slawitsch, Veronika; von Unold, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Winter precipitation and snow sublimation are fundamental components of the alpine moisture budget. Much work has been done in the study of these processes and its important contribution to the annual water balance. Due to the above-average sensitivity of the alpine region to climate change, a change in the importance and magnitude of these water balance parameters can be expected. To determine these effects, a lysimeter-facility enclosed in an open-field climate manipulation experiment was established in 2015 at AREC Raumberg-Gumpenstein which is able to measure winter precipitation and sublimation under global warming conditions. In this facility, six monolithic lysimeters are equipped with a snow cover monitoring system, which separates the snow cover above the lysimeter automatically from the surrounding snow cover. Three of those lysimeters were exposed to a +3°C scenario and three lysimeters to ambient conditions. Weight data are recorded every minute and therefore it is possible to get high-resolution information about the water balance parameter in winter. First results over two snow event periods showed that the system can measure very accurately winter precipitation and sublimation especially in comparison with other measurement systems and usually used models. Also first trends confirm that higher winter temperatures may affect snow water equivalent and snow cover duration. With more data during the next years using this method, it is possible to quantify the influence of global warming on water balance parameters during the winter periods.

  10. Ceres water regime: surface temperature, water sublimation and transient exo(atmo)sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formisano, M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Magni, G.; Federico, C.; Capria, M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations of water emission around Ceres suggest the presence of an ice layer on or beneath the surface of this asteroid. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain these plumes, among which cometary-like sublimation seems to be plausible, since there is a correlation between the magnitude of the emission and the change in the heliocentric distance along the orbit. In this work, we applied a comet sublimation model to study the plausible scenarios that match with Herschel observations of the water flux (1026 molecules s-1). Each scenario is characterized by a well-defined set of physical and orbital parameters. Moreover, a study of the dynamic evolution of the H2O plume has been performed, showing that an optically thin transient atmospheric envelope, with a typical timescale of some tens of days, can be maintained by the H2O surface emission. Our simulations could be useful theoretical support for the Dawn NASA mission by giving a better understanding of the physical conditions for water sublimation and ice stability.

  11. EVIDENCE FOR A RECEDING DUST SUBLIMATION REGION AROUND A SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Kishimoto, Makoto; Tristram, Konrad R. W.; Weigelt, Gerd; Hönig, Sebastian F.; Antonucci, Robert; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Barvainis, Richard; Millour, Florentin; Kotani, Takayuki

    2013-10-01

    The near-IR emission in Type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is thought to be dominated by the thermal radiation from dust grains that are heated by the central engine in the UV/optical and are almost at the sublimation temperature. A brightening of the central source can thus further sublimate the innermost dust, leading to an increase in the radius of the near-IR emitting region. Such changes in radius have been indirectly probed by the measurements of the changes in the time lag between the near-IR and UV/optical light variation. Here we report direct evidence for such a receding sublimation region through the near-IR interferometry of the brightest Type 1 AGN in NGC 4151. The increase in radius follows a significant brightening of the central engine with a delay of at least a few years, which is thus the implied destruction timescale of the innermost dust distribution. Compiling historic flux variations and radius measurements, we also infer the reformation timescale for the inner dust distribution to be several years in this galactic nucleus. More specifically and quantitatively, we find that the radius at a given time seems to be correlated with a long-term average of the flux over the previous several (∼6) years, instead of the instantaneous flux. Finally, we also report measurements of three more Type 1 AGNs newly observed with the Keck interferometer, as well as the second epoch measurements for three other AGNs.

  12. Enhancement of Sublimation of Single Graphene Layer by Interacting with Gas Molecules in Rarefied Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, Ramki; Park, Jae Hyun

    2014-11-01

    Graphene has excellent mechanical properties. One of them is the resistance to high temperature environment. Since the sublimation temperature of graphene is over 4500 K, it has been used for diverse high temperature applications in order to protect the system. In this study, using extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the sublimation of graphene could be enhanced (occurs at the lower temperature) by interacting with the gas molecules. With increase in temperature, the bonds in graphene becomes so sensitive to interact with the incoming gas molecules. When the temperature is low, the graphene is stable to the impingement of gas molecules: The light H2 gases are stick to the graphene surface and remains being attached while the heavy CO2 and H2O are bounced back from the surface. However, at high temperature H2 gases are absorbed on the graphene and destroy the C -C bonds by forming C -H bonds. The local breakage of bond at the impingement spot spreads the entire graphene soon, causing a complete sublimation. Even though the heavy CO2 and H2O molecules also break the C -C bonds at high temperature,but their impingement effect is localized and the breakage does not propagate over the entire surface. This research was supported by Agency for Defence Development (ADD).

  13. Sublimation kinetics and diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX in air by thermogravimetry.

    PubMed

    Hikal, Walid M; Weeks, Brandon L

    2014-07-01

    The diffusion coefficients of explosives are crucial in their trace detection and lifetime estimation. We report on the experimental values of diffusion coefficients of three of the most important explosives in both military and industry: TNT, PETN, and RDX. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to determine the sublimation rates of TNT, PETN, and RDX powders in the form of cylindrical billets. The TGA was calibrated using ferrocene as a standard material of well-characterized sublimation rates and vapor pressures to determine the vapor pressures of TNT, PETN, and RDX. The determined sublimation rates and vapor pressures were used to indirectly determine the diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX for the first time. A linear log-log dependence of the diffusion coefficients on temperature is observed for the three materials. The diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX at 273 K were determined to be 5.76×10(-6)m(2)/sec, 4.94×10(-6)m(2)/s, and 5.89×10(-6)m(2)/s, respectively. Values are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values in literature. PMID:24840410

  14. Formulation Development and Characterization of Meclizine Hydrochloride Sublimated Fast Dissolving Tablets.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Sateesh Kumar; Vangala, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    The intention of present research is to formulate and develop the meclizine hydrochloride fast dissolving tablets using sublimation method to enhance the dissolution rate. In this study an attempt was made to fasten the drug release from the oral tablets by incorporating the superdisintegrants and camphor as sublimating agent. The prepared fast dissolving tablets were subjected to precompression properties and characterized for hardness, weight variation, friability, wetting time, water absorption ratio, and disintegration time. From in vitro release studies, the formulation F9 exhibited fast release profile of about 98.61% in 30 min, and disintegration time 47 sec when compared with other formulations. The percent drug release in 30 min (Q 30) and initial dissolution rate for formulation F9 was 98.61 ± 0.25%, 3.29%/min. These were very much higher compared to marketed tablets (65.43 ± 0.57%, 2.18%/min). The dissolution efficiency was found to be 63.37 and it is increased by 1.4-fold with F9 FDT tablets compared to marketed tablets. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies revealed that there was no possibility of interactions. Thus the development of meclizine hydrochloride fast dissolving tablets by sublimation method is a suitable approach to improve the dissolution rate. PMID:27355021

  15. Formulation Development and Characterization of Meclizine Hydrochloride Sublimated Fast Dissolving Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Vangala, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    The intention of present research is to formulate and develop the meclizine hydrochloride fast dissolving tablets using sublimation method to enhance the dissolution rate. In this study an attempt was made to fasten the drug release from the oral tablets by incorporating the superdisintegrants and camphor as sublimating agent. The prepared fast dissolving tablets were subjected to precompression properties and characterized for hardness, weight variation, friability, wetting time, water absorption ratio, and disintegration time. From in vitro release studies, the formulation F9 exhibited fast release profile of about 98.61% in 30 min, and disintegration time 47 sec when compared with other formulations. The percent drug release in 30 min (Q30) and initial dissolution rate for formulation F9 was 98.61 ± 0.25%, 3.29%/min. These were very much higher compared to marketed tablets (65.43 ± 0.57%, 2.18%/min). The dissolution efficiency was found to be 63.37 and it is increased by 1.4-fold with F9 FDT tablets compared to marketed tablets. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies revealed that there was no possibility of interactions. Thus the development of meclizine hydrochloride fast dissolving tablets by sublimation method is a suitable approach to improve the dissolution rate. PMID:27355021

  16. A field study of the geomorphic effects of sublimating CO2 blocks on dune slopes at Coral Pink Dunes, Utah.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Mary; Nield, Jo; Diniega, Serina; Hansen, Candy; McElwaine, Jim

    2016-04-01

    , swiveled and bounced downslope). Distinctive pits with arcuate rims on their downslope edge were formed where blocks bounced on the surface. These pits are at an almost equidistant spacing. Despite a longer slope (16 m as opposed to 8m at Grand Falls), no depositional apron was formed. Levee development was less consistent compared to the Arizona site, but a pronounced unpaired-levee formed towards the base of the lee slope. These data show that sublimating blocks of CO2 ice leave signatures of transport paths and are capable of eroding and transporting sediment. Diniega,S. et al (2013) A new dry hypothesis for the formation of Martian linear gullies. Icarus. Vol. 225, 1, p. 526-537. Bourke, M.C. et al (2016) The geomorphic effect of sublimating CO2 blocks on dune lee slopes at Grand Falls, Arizona. LPSC

  17. Experimental Investigation of Sublimation of Ice at Subsonic and Supersonic Speeds and Its Relation to Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, Willard D.; Ruggeri, Robert S.

    1954-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in a 3.84- by 10-inch tunnel to determine the mass transfer by sublimation, heat transfer, and skin friction for an iced surface on a flat plate for Mach numbers of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 and pressure altitudes to 30,000 feet. Measurements of rates of sublimation were also made for a Mach number of 1.3 at a pressure altitude of 30,000 feet. The results show that the parameters of sublimation and heat transfer were 40 to 50 percent greater for an iced surface than was the bare-plate heat-transfer parameter. For iced surfaces of equivalent roughness, the ratio of sublimation to heat-transfer parameters was found to be 0.90. The sublimation data obtained at a Mach number of 1.3 showed no appreciable deviation from that obtained at subsonic speeds. The data obtained indicate that sublimation as a means of removing ice formations of appreciable thickness is usually too slow to be of mach value in the de-icing of aircraft at high altitudes.

  18. Impact of sublimation losses in the mass balance of glaciers in semi-arid mountain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alvaro; Pellicciotti, Francesca; Burlando, Paolo; MacDonell, Shelley; McPhee, James

    2016-04-01

    Glaciers in semiarid mountain regions may lose an important part of their winter snow accumulation through sublimation processes that are enhanced by the high-elevation, intense radiation and dry atmosphere of these environments. As glaciers in these regions secure freshwater resources to lower valleys during summer and drought periods, it is important to advance in a detailed quantification of their sublimation losses. However, logistical concerns and complex meteorological features make the measuring and modelling of glacier mass balances a difficult task. In this study, we estimated the spring-summer mass balances of Tapado and Juncal Norte glaciers in the semiarid Andes of north-central Chile by running a distributed energy balance model that accounts for melt, refreezing and sublimation from the surface and blowing snow. Meteorological input data were available from on-glacier Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) that were installed during the ablation season of years 2005-06, 2008-09, 2013-14 and 2014-15. Snow pits, ablation stakes and a time-lapse camera that provided surface albedo were also available. Distributed air temperature and wind speed were dynamically downscaled from NASA MERRA reanalysis using the software WINDSIM and validated against the data from the AWSs. The rest of the meteorological variables were distributed using statistical relations with air temperature derived from the AWSs data. Initial snow conditions were estimated using satellite images and distributed manual snow depth measurements. Preliminary results show that total ablation diminishes with elevation and that, during the early ablation season (October-November), melt is the main ablation component below 4500 m with sublimation dominating the ablation above this elevation. Above 4500 m an important fraction of meltwater refreezes during night. As the ablation season advances (December-February), melt extends to higher elevations, refreezing plays a smaller role and sublimation is

  19. Laboratory experiments to explore the sediment transport capacity of carbon dioxide sublimation under martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvest, Matthew; Conway, Susan; Patel, Manish; Dixon, John; Barnes, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Every spring, the solid carbon dioxide deposited over the martian high latitudes sublimates. Several, unusual surface features, including dark spots and flows on sand dunes, as well as recent activity in martian gullies, have been associated with this CO2 sublimation. Water and/or brines have also been proposed as potential agents for these events, but the timing of these phenomena suggest CO2 sublimation is more likely. However, the exact mechanism by which CO2 sublimation moves sediment is not fully understood, and this understanding is required to validate the CO2 hypothesis. Here we present the results of the first ever laboratory simulations of this process under martian conditions, and show that significant quantities of loose sediment can be transported. The centrepiece of the apparatus is a 1m diameter, 2m long Mars simulation chamber, housed at The Open University, UK. JSC Mars-1A regolith simulant was formed into a slope, inside a box, ~30 cm long, 23 cm wide by 12 cm deep. The box is constructed of coiled, copper tubing to allow cooling of the regolith by liquid nitrogen. The experimental procedure consists of four stages: 1) establishment of a dry atmosphere in the chamber, 2) cooling the regolith sufficiently to support condensation of CO2 frost at reduced pressure, 3) introduction of cooled CO2 gas above the regolith to deposit as frost, and 4) video recording the surface evolution under radiant heating (~100 mins). Two High Definition digital video cameras were mounted above the box and image pairs taken from the videos were then used to create digital elevation models (DEMs) in Agisoft Photoscan at regular intervals. In our initial experiments we performed four experimental runs where the slope was set at or near the angle of repose (~30°). In each case we observed mass wasting events triggered by the sublimation of the deposited CO2 over the whole duration of the insolation. The highest levels of activity occurred in the first third of the run

  20. Graphite Sublimation Tests for the Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory Target Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, JR

    2002-02-07

    A passively cooled graphite target was proposed for a 1.5 MW neutrino production research facility because of its simplicity and favorable performance as a target material for neutrino production (Ref. 1). The conceptual design for the target in the Reference 1 study was a graphite rod 15 mm in diameter by 800 mm long. Figure 1 shows the graphite target rod supported by graphite spokes, which are mounted to a water-cooled stainless steel support tube. The target is radiatively cooled to the water-cooled surface of the support tube. Based on nuclear analysis results (Ref. 2), the time-averaged power deposition in the target is 35 kW. If this power is deposited uniformly along the axial length of the target, the volumetric power deposition in the target is about 250 MW/m{sup 3}. The target surface temperature required to radiate the deposited power to a water-cooled tube is estimated to be about 1850 C, and the temperature at the center of the target is about 75 C hotter. The sublimation erosion rate (e), estimated assuming that the graphite is submersed in a perfect vacuum environment, can be derived from kinetic theory and is given by: e = p{sub sat} (m/2{pi} kT){sup 1/2} where p{sub sat} is the saturation pressure, m is the molecular weight, k is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the surface temperature. The saturation pressure given in Ref. 3 can be approximated by: p{sub sat} = exp(-A/T + B) where A = 9.47 x 10{sup 3}, B = 24.2, and the units of p{sub sat} and T are atmospheres and K, respectively. Using these equations, the saturation pressure and sublimation erosion rate are plotted in Fig. 2 as a function of temperature. The surface recession rate shown with units of mm/s in Fig. 2 assumes one-sided erosion. At the average power deposition value of 250 MW/m{sup 3}, the surface temperature is 1850 C resulting in a sublimation erosion rate of only 2.2 mm/day. However, if the actual power deposition were peaked by a factor of two in the axial direction, then the

  1. Determining satellite close approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfano, Salvatore; Negron, David, Jr.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical method to evaluate close approaches of two satellites. The algorithm is based on a space curve modeling technique originally developed by Overhauser, presented here as an independent derivation. The method to determine minimum spacing between two space objects is based on creating a relative distance waveform, delta(t), versus time. The waveform is produced from either uniform or arbitrarily spaced data points, from which intervals of close approach are obtained by extracting the real roots of a localized cubic polynomial. This method is free of both transcendental equations and the computation of acceleration terms of the two objects of interest. For this study, a close approach truth table is constructed using a 0.1 second sequential step along the orbits, then differencing the two position vectors. The close approach entrance and exit times for an ellipsoidal quadric surface are then located using a piecewise linear interpolator, and serve as a benchmark for comparison. The simulation results show this algorithm produces encounter times almost identical to those in the truth table, with a 99.84 percent reduction in computer runtime. The results, created from real orbital data, include solution sets for three operational uses of close-approach logic. For this study, satellite orbital motion is modeled using first-order secular perturbations caused by mass anomalies.

  2. Sublime Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girod, Mark

    2007-01-01

    One of the shortcomings in most efforts to integrate art and science is that many people have a shallow understanding of art, which inevitably leads to shallow connections between art and science. Coloring drawings of planets, building sculptures of volcanoes, and decorating scientific diagrams are fine activities, but they do not link science and…

  3. Martian circumpolar sulfate-rich deposits: sublimation tills derived from the North Polar Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, M.; Bourgeois, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Verpoorter, C.; Le Deit, L.

    2009-12-01

    The North Polar Cap of Mars is an accumulation of ice layers with various amounts of interstratified dust particles. A dune field surrounds this polar cap. On one of the densest part of this dune field, Olympia Undae, Langevin et al. (Science, 2005) have detected calcium-rich sulfates (gypsum). To constrain the origin of these gypsum deposits, we performed an integrated morphological, structural and compositional analyses of a key area where it is possible to see the circum-polar dune field, the surface of the ice cap and a cross-section through the ice cap. The mineralogical composition of this area is investigated by applying a spectral derivative method to data acquired by OMEGA and CRISM hyperspectral imaging spectrometers. These are compared to laboratory spectra of ice-gypsum mixtures in simulated martian pressure and temperature conditions. We find that dunes of the circumpolar field and dust interstratified in the ice cap have the same composition. Both contain gypsum. Landforms produced by sublimation of ice are also visible on dust-rich layers of the ice cap. We therefore infer that the superficial circumpolar dust deposits correspond to a sublimation till produced by the ice cap. Circumpolar gypsum-rich deposits thus derive directly from the ice cap. Gypsum crystals are released at the surface of the cap as the ice sublimes. This material is then reworked by winds and forms the circumpolar dunes. There are two hypotheses for the ultimate origin of the gypsum crystals. (1) Pre-existing gypsum crystals might have been deposited together with ice crystals during the formation of the ice cap. (2) Authigenic gypsum crystals might have grown within the ice cap by weathering of dust trapped in the ice. The second hypothesis is consistent with the existence of authigenic sulfate inclusions in terrestrial polar ice (Ohno et al., GRL, 2006) and with the formation process suggested by Niles et al. (Nature, 2009) for martian equatorial sulfates.

  4. Novel Strategy to Fabricate Floating Drug Delivery System Based on Sublimation Technique.

    PubMed

    Huanbutta, Kampanart; Limmatvapirat, Sontaya; Sungthongjeen, Srisagul; Sriamornsak, Pornsak

    2016-06-01

    The present study aims to develop floating drug delivery system by sublimation of ammonium carbonate (AMC). The core tablets contain a model drug, hydrochlorothiazide, and various levels (i.e., 0-50% w/w) of AMC. The tablets were then coated with different amounts of the polyacrylate polymers (i.e., Eudragit® RL100, Eudragit® RS100, and the mixture of Eudragit® RL100 and Eudragit® RS100 at 1:1 ratio). The coated tablets were kept at ambient temperature (25°C) or cured at 70°C for 12 h before further investigation. The floating and drug release behaviors of the tablets were performed in simulated gastric fluid USP without pepsin at 37°C. The results showed that high amount of AMC induced the floating of the tablets. The coated tablets containing 40 and 50% AMC floated longer than 8 h with a time-to-float of about 3 min. The sublimation of AMC from the core tablets decreased the density of system, causing floating of the tablets. The tablets coated with Eudragit® RL100 floated at a faster rate than those of Eudragit® RS100. Even the coating level of polymer did not influence the time-to-float and floating time of coated tablets containing the same amount of AMC, the drug release from the tablets coated with higher coating level of polymer showed slower drug release. The results suggested that the sublimation technique using AMC is promising for the development of floating drug delivery system. PMID:26314245

  5. Near-infrared Emission from Sublimating Dust in Collisionally Active Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lieshout, Rik; Dominik, Carsten; Kama, Mihkel; Michiel, Min

    2013-07-01

    Hot exozodiacal dust is thought to be responsible for excess near-infrared (NIR) emission emanating from the innermost parts of some debris disks. The origin of this dust, however, is still a matter of debate. We test whether hot exozodiacal dust can be supplied from an exterior parent belt by Poynting-Robertson (P-R) drag, paying special attention to the pile-up of dust that occurs due to the interplay of P-R drag and dust sublimation. Specifically, we investigate whether pile-ups still occur when collisions are taken into account, and if they can explain the observed NIR excess. We compute the steady-state distribution of dust in the inner disk by solving the continuity equation. First, we derive an analytic solution under a number of simplifying assumptions. Second, we develop a numerical debris disk model that for the first time treats the complex interaction of collisions, P-R drag, and sublimation in a self-consistent way. From the resulting dust distributions we generate simple emission spectra and compare these to observed excess NIR fluxes. We confirm that P-R drag always supplies a small amount of dust to the sublimation zone, but find that a fully consistent treatment yields a maximum amount of dust that is about 7 times lower than that given by analytical estimates. The NIR excess due this material is much smaller (<10^-3 for A-type stars with parent belts at >1 AU) than the values derived from interferometric observations (~10^-2). Furthermore, the pile-up of dust still occurs when collisions are considered, but its effect on the NIR flux is insignificant. Finally, the cross-section in the innermost regions is clearly dominated by barely bound grains.

  6. Near-infrared emission from sublimating dust in collisionally active debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lieshout, R.; Dominik, C.; Kama, M.; Min, M.

    2014-11-01

    Context. Hot exozodiacal dust is thought to be responsible for excess near-infrared (NIR) emission emanating from the innermost parts of some debris disks. The origin of this dust, however, is still a matter of debate. Aims: We test whether hot exozodiacal dust can be supplied from an exterior parent belt by Poynting-Robertson (P-R) drag, paying special attention to the pile-up of dust that occurs owing to the interplay of P-R drag and dust sublimation. Specifically, we investigate whether pile-ups still occur when collisions are taken into account, and if they can explain the observed NIR excess. Methods: We computed the steady-state distribution of dust in the inner disk by solving the continuity equation. First, we derived an analytical solution under a number of simplifying assumptions. Second, we developed a numerical debris disk model that for the first time treats the complex interaction of collisions, P-R drag, and sublimation in a self-consistent way. From the resulting dust distributions, we generated thermal emission spectra and compare these to observed excess NIR fluxes. Results: We confirm that P-R drag always supplies a small amount of dust to the sublimation zone, but find that a fully consistent treatment yields a maximum amount of dust that is about 7 times lower than that given by analytical estimates. The NIR excess due to this material is much less (≲10-3 for A-type stars with parent belts at ≳1 AU) than the values derived from interferometric observations (~10-2). Pile-up of dust still occurs when collisions are considered, but its effect on the NIR flux is insignificant. Finally, the cross-section in the innermost regions is clearly dominated by barely bound grains. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Dynamical screening of van der Waals interactions in nanostructured solids: Sublimation of fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jianmin; Yang, Jing; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2015-04-01

    Sublimation energy is one of the most important properties of molecular crystals, but it is difficult to study, because the attractive long-range van der Waals (vdW) interaction plays an important role. Here, we apply efficient semilocal density functional theory (DFT), corrected with the dynamically screened vdW interaction (DFT + vdW), the Rutgers-Chalmers nonlocal vdW-DF, and the pairwise-based dispersion-corrected DFT-D2 developed by Grimme and co-workers, to study the sublimation of fullerenes. We find that the short-range part, which accounts for the interaction due to the orbital overlap between fullerenes, is negligibly small. Our calculation shows that there exists a strong screening effect on the vdW interaction arising from the valence electrons of fullerenes. On the other hand, higher-order contributions can be as important as the leading-order term. The reasons are that (i) the surface of fullerene molecules is metallic and thus highly polarizable, (ii) the band gap of fullerene solids is small (less than 2 eV), and (iii) fullerene molecules in the solid phase are so densely packed, yielding the high valence electron density and small equilibrium intermolecular distances (the first nearest neighbor distance is only about 10 Å for C60). However, these two effects make opposite contributions, leading to significant error cancellation between these two contributions. We demonstrate that, by considering higher-order contributions and the dynamical screening, the DFT + vdW method can yield sublimation energies of fullerenes in good agreement with reference values, followed by vdW-DF and DFT-D2. The insights from this study are important for a better understanding of the long-range nature of vdW interactions in nanostructured solids.

  8. Dynamical screening of van der Waals interactions in nanostructured solids: Sublimation of fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Jianmin; Yang, Jing; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2015-04-28

    Sublimation energy is one of the most important properties of molecular crystals, but it is difficult to study, because the attractive long-range van der Waals (vdW) interaction plays an important role. Here, we apply efficient semilocal density functional theory (DFT), corrected with the dynamically screened vdW interaction (DFT + vdW), the Rutgers-Chalmers nonlocal vdW-DF, and the pairwise-based dispersion-corrected DFT-D2 developed by Grimme and co-workers, to study the sublimation of fullerenes. We find that the short-range part, which accounts for the interaction due to the orbital overlap between fullerenes, is negligibly small. Our calculation shows that there exists a strong screening effect on the vdW interaction arising from the valence electrons of fullerenes. On the other hand, higher-order contributions can be as important as the leading-order term. The reasons are that (i) the surface of fullerene molecules is metallic and thus highly polarizable, (ii) the band gap of fullerene solids is small (less than 2 eV), and (iii) fullerene molecules in the solid phase are so densely packed, yielding the high valence electron density and small equilibrium intermolecular distances (the first nearest neighbor distance is only about 10 Å for C{sub 60}). However, these two effects make opposite contributions, leading to significant error cancellation between these two contributions. We demonstrate that, by considering higher-order contributions and the dynamical screening, the DFT + vdW method can yield sublimation energies of fullerenes in good agreement with reference values, followed by vdW-DF and DFT-D2. The insights from this study are important for a better understanding of the long-range nature of vdW interactions in nanostructured solids.

  9. Formation of graphene layers by vacuum sublimation of silicon carbide using a scanning heat source

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, A. N.; Cherednichenko, D. I.

    2011-12-15

    The kinetics of surface graphitization during dissociative vacuum evaporation of silicon carbide, under the effect of a scanning heat source, is studied. A model of the process is developed. The model provides a means for theoretically treating the dynamics of formation and the number of residual carbon atomic layers. The vapor stoichiometric coefficient which ensures the minimization of the number of structural defects in graphene, is optimized at the sublimation temperature: {theta} = 1/{eta}(T{sub max}). The proposed method can be used as a basis for graphene production technology.

  10. The Anomalous Drift of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) due to Sublimating Volatiles near Perihelion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckloff, J. K.; Keane, J. V.; Milam, S.; Coulson, I.; Knight, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Prior to perihelion passage on 28 November 2013, the observed right ascension (RA) and declination (Dec) coordinates of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) significantly lagged the predicted JPL (# 53) ephemeris. We show that this "braking effect" is due to a dynamic pressure exerted by sublimating gases on the sunward side of the nucleus [1]. Comet ISON was observed November 23 through November 28 using the SCUBA-2 sub-millimeter camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Imaging is achieved simultaneously at wavelengths of 850 μm and 450 μm, with RA and Dec determined from the central peak in the coma brightness [2]. When comet ISON was first detected at 850 μm, the 1-mm-sized dust particles were tightly bound to the comet nucleus until at least November 23. Three days later, the dust was less tightly bound, elongated and diffuse, spread out over as much as 120 arc seconds (80,000 km) in the anti-solar direction, suggesting a fragmentation event. We compute the average braking velocity of the nucleus of comet ISON by first measuring the distance between the central RA position and the predicted JPL ephemeris. We then calculate the change in this distance between subsequent observations, and divide this value by the elapsed time between the two observations to yield an average drift velocity of the nucleus over this time interval. We assume that comet ISON, like a number of Jupiter Family Comets visited by spacecraft [3], has low thermal inertia. Thus, the sublimating gases are emitted predominantly on the sunward side of the nucleus. Additionally, we assume that water ice dominates the sublimating gases [4]. We then calculate the pressure on the surface of the nucleus due to the emitted gases using the procedure described in [1]. We match the average drift velocity of the nucleus due to this sublimation pressure with the observed average drift velocity from the JCMT observations, which is sensitive to the size of the body, allowing us to estimate the size of the

  11. Modeling of Sublimation-Driven Erosion and Ice Pinnacle Formation on Callisto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Oliver; Umurhan, Orkan M.; Howard, Alan D.; Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2014-11-01

    Most of the areas observed at high resolution on the Galilean satellite Callisto have a morphology that implies sublimation-driven landform modification and mass wasting is at work [Moore et al., 1999]. These areas comprise rolling dark plains with interspersed bright pinnacles. Howard and Moore [2008], using the MARSSIM landform evolution model, simulated evolution of this landscape as a combination of bedrock volatile sublimation, mass wasting of the dark, non-coherent residue, and redeposition of ice at high-elevation cold traps sheltered from thermal re-radiation to form the pinnacles.The goal of our study is to further investigate the details of pinnacle formation by refining this model, and by constraining values for the variable environmental parameters within the model such that they are consistent with the current understanding of Callisto’s surface environment. We present the results of the updated model and our experimentation with varying key parameters.Our refinement of the model has caused us to revise the result of Howard and Moore [2008] that the pinnacles represent an ice cover of several tens to hundreds of meters. Instead, our results indicate an ice coverage reaching several meters at most, a figure that is consistent with the prediction of Moore et al. [2004]. We have also modified the model such that ice contained within the pinnacles is now subject to sublimation itself.Using Fick’s Law to solve for the diffusive transport rate between a volatile table and an atmosphere [Moore et al., 1996], we have determined that the loss rate of H2O ice from the volatile-refractory bedrock through sublimation is too slow 10-20 kg m-2 s-1) to account for the formation of the ice pinnacles, and that a volatile mixture that contains H2O ice is necessary to facilitate its loss. We find that CO2 hydrate fulfills this role well: loss rates of CO2●6H2O 10-10 kg m-2 s-1) are sufficient to produce deposited ice thicknesses reaching several meters, with the

  12. Dust clouds around red giant stars - Evidence of sublimating comet disks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matese, J. J.; Whitmire, D. P.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1989-09-01

    The dust production by disk comets around intermediate mass stars evolving into red giants is studied, focusing on AGB supergiants. The model of Iben and Renzini (1983) is used to study the observed dust mass loss for AGB stars. An expression is obtained for the comet disk net dust production rate and values of the radius and black body temperature corresponding to peak sublimation are calculated for a range of stellar masses. Also, the fractional amount of dust released from a cometesimal disk during a classical nova outburst is estimated.

  13. The formation of striae within cometary dust tails by a sublimation-driven YORP-like effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckloff, Jordan K.; Jacobson, Seth A.

    2016-01-01

    Sublimating gas molecules scatter off of the surface of an icy body in the same manner as photons (Lambertian Scattering). This means that for every photon-driven body force, there should be a sublimation-driven analog that affects icy bodies. Thermal photons emitted from the surfaces of asymmetrically shaped bodies in the Solar System generate net torques that change the spin rates of these bodies over time. The long-term averaging of this torque is called the YORP effect. Here we propose a sublimation-driven analog to the YORP effect (Sublimation-YORP or SYORP), in which sublimating gas molecules emitted from the surfaces of icy bodies in the Solar System also generate net torques on the bodies. However, sublimating gas molecules carry ∼104-105 times more momentum away from the body than thermal photons, resulting in much greater body torques. Previous studies of sublimative torques focused on emissions from highly localized sources on the surfaces of Jupiter Family Comet nuclei, and have therefore required extensive empirical observations to predict the resulting behavior of the body. By contrast, SYORP applies to non-localized emissions across the entire body, which likely dominates sublimation-drive torques on small icy chunks and dynamically young comets outside the Jupiter Family, and can therefore be applied without high-resolution spacecraft observations of their surfaces. Instead, we repurpose the well-tested mathematical machinery of the YORP effect to account for sublimation-driven torques. We show how an SYORP-driven mechanism best matches observations of the rarely observed, Sun-oriented linear features (striae) in the tails of comets, whose formation mechanism has remained enigmatic for decades. The SYORP effect naturally explains why striae tend to be observed between near-perihelion and ∼1 AU from the Sun for comets with perihelia less than 0.6 AU, and solves longstanding problems with moving enough material into the cometary tail to form

  14. The growth of sublimation crystals and surface hoar on the Antarctic plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, J.-C.; Domine, F.; Savarino, J.; Dumont, M.; Brun, E.

    2013-12-01

    On the Antarctic plateau, the budget of water vapor and energy is in part determined by precipitation, but these are so low that the dynamic of snow crystal growth and sublimation at the surface can be important factors. At Dome C (75° S, 123° E), we have frequently observed the growth of crystals on the snow surface under calm sunny weather. Here, we present the time variations of specific surface area and density of these crystals. Using the detailed snow model Crocus, we conclude that these crystals were very likely due to the nighttime formation of surface hoar crystals and to the daytime formation of sublimation crystals. These latter crystals form by processes similar to those involved in the formation of frost flowers on young sea ice. The formation of these crystals impact the albedo, mass and energy budget of the Antarctic plateau. In particular, the specific surface area variations of the surface layer can induce an instantaneous forcing of up to -10 W m-2 at noon, resulting in a surface temperature drop of 0.45 K.

  15. Formation of gullies on Mars by debris flows triggered by CO2 sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilorget, C.; Forget, F.

    2016-01-01

    Martian gully landforms resemble terrestrial debris flows formed by the action of liquid water and have thus been interpreted as evidence for potential habitable environments on Mars within the past few millennia. However, ongoing gully formation has been detected under surface conditions much too cold for liquid water, but at times in the martian year when a thin layer of seasonal CO2 frost is present and defrosting above the regolith. These observations suggest that the CO2 condensation-sublimation cycle could play a role in gully formation. Here we use a thermo-physical numerical model of the martian regolith underlying a CO2 ice layer and atmosphere to show that the pores beneath the ice layer can be filled with CO2 ice and subjected to extreme pressure variations during the defrosting season. The subsequent gas fluxes can destabilize the regolith material and induce gas-lubricated debris flows with geomorphic characteristics similar to martian gullies. Moreover, we find that subsurface CO2 ice condensation, sublimation and pressurization occurs at conditions found at latitudes and slope orientations where gullies are observed. We conclude that martian gullies can result from geologic dry ice processes that have no terrestrial analogues and do not require liquid water. Such dry ice processes may have helped shape the evolution of landforms elsewhere on the martian surface.

  16. Formulation and evaluation of fast dissolving tablets of cinnarizine using superdisintegrant blends and subliming material.

    PubMed

    Basu, Biswajit; Bagadiya, Abhishek; Makwana, Sagar; Vipul, Vora; Batt, Devraj; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop fast dissolving tablet of cinnarizine. A combination of super disintegrants, i.e., sodium starch glycolate (SSG) and crosscarmellose sodium (CCS) were used along with camphor as a subliming material. An optimized concentration of camphor was added to aid the porosity of the tablet. A 3(2) full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of two formulation variables: Amount of SSG and CCS. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy was performed to identify the physicochemical interaction between drug and polymer. IR spectroscopy showed that there is no interaction of drug with polymer. In the present study, direct compression was used to prepare the tablets. The powder mixtures were compressed into tablet using flat face multi punch tablet machine. Camphor was sublimed from the tablet by exposing the tablet to vacuum drier at 60°C for 12 hours. All the formulations were evaluated for their characteristics such as average weight, hardness, wetting time, friability, content uniformity, dispersion time (DT), and dissolution rate. An optimized tablet formulation (F 9) was found to have good hardness of 3.30 ± 0.10 kg/cm(2), wetting time of 42.33 ± 4.04 seconds, DT of 34.67 ± 1.53 seconds, and cumulative drug release of not less than 99% in 16 minutes. PMID:22247895

  17. Vapor pressures and enthalpies of sublimation of D-glucose, D-xylose, cellobiose, and levoglucosan

    SciTech Connect

    Oja, V.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    The vapor pressures of {alpha}-D-glucose (or dextrose), D-xylose, D-cellobiose (or 4-{beta}-D-glucopyranosyl-D-glucopyranose), and levoglucosan (or 1,6-anhydro-{beta}-D-glucopyranose) have been measured using the Knudsen effusion technique, in the range of temperatures from 344 to 488 K. The measurements were all made in the solid sublimation regime, and enthalpies of sublimation were calculated from the Clausius-Claperon equation. The vapor pressures may be correlated by ln(P/Pa) = A {minus} B/(T/K), where A = 53.16, B = 23.382 ({+-}600) for D-glucose (395--406 K), A = 46.29 and B = 19,006 ({+-} 375) for D-xylose (370--395 K), and A = 70.30 and B = 36,264 ({+-} 5,220) for cellobiose (474--488 K). Levoglucosan displayed a solid phase transition at approximately 386 K, and its vapor pressure was affected accordingly. For this material, A = 38.96 and B = 15,049 ({+-} 123) in the temperature range 344--386 K and A = 31.19 and B = 12,066 ({+-} 709) in the temperature range 386--405 K.

  18. Computational analysis for dry-ice sublimation assisted CO2 jet impingement flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Songmi; Lee, Jaeseon

    2015-11-01

    The flow and heat transfer characteristics of the novel gas-solid two-phase jet impingement are investigated computationally. When the high pressure carbon dioxide (CO2) flow passes through a nozzle or orifice, it experiences the sudden expansion and the rapid temperature drop occurred by Joule-Thomson effect. This temperature drop causes the lower bulk jet fluid temperature than the CO2 sublimation line, so dry-ice becomes formed. By using CO2 gas-solid mixture as a working fluid of jet impingement, it is expected the heat transfer enhancement can be achieved due to the low bulk temperature and the additional phase change latent heat. In this study, 2D CFD model is created to predict the cooling effect of gas-solid CO2 jet. The gas-solid CO2 flow is considered by Euler-Lagrangian approach of mixed phase and the additional heat transfer module is embedded to account for the sublimation phenomena of the solid state CO2. The jet flow and heat transfer performance of gas-solid CO2 jet is investigated by the variance of flow parameter like Reynolds number, solid phase concentration and jet geometries.

  19. GaAs surface cleaning by thermal oxidation and sublimation in molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Junji; Nanbu, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Tomonori; Kondo, Kazuo

    1988-01-01

    GaAs surface cleaning by thermal oxidation and sublimation prior to molecular-beam-epitaxial growth has been investigated as a means of reducing the carrier depletion at the substrate and epitaxial layer interface. The carrier depletion between the substrate and epitaxial films, measured by a C-V carrier profiling technique, was shown to decrease significantly with an increase in the thickness of the thermal oxidation. The concentration of carbon contamination near the substrate-epitaxial interface was measured using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The carbon concentration correlated very well with the carrier depletion. Therefore, the main origin of the carrier depletion is believed to be the carbon concentration of the initial growth surface. Based on these results, the thermal oxidation and sublimation of a semi-insulating GaAs substrate was successfully applied to improve the mobility and sheet concentration of the two-dimensional electron gas in selectively doped GaAs/N-Al0.3Ga0.7As heterostructures with very thin GaAs buffer layers.

  20. [Sublimation-dried mare's milk and the possibility of its use in creating infant and dietary food products].

    PubMed

    Stoianova, L G; Abramova, L A; Ladodo, K S

    1988-01-01

    The main biological parameters were studied in sublimated mare's milk: protein fraction composition, amino-acid spectrum, fatty-acid composition of lipids and the content of vitamins and mineral substances. A high biological value of the sublimated mare's milk has been proved, as well as significant proximity of its composition to human milk. Preliminary data have evidenced expediency of mare's milk use for the development of adapted milk mixtures for baby foods. However, the fatty component of the mixtures needs certain correction by addition of vegetable oil. The sublimated mare's milk can be used for the production of kumiss, that would extend its application in dietotherapy by removing season and territory limitations. PMID:3388813

  1. An investigation on the mechanism of sublimed DHB matrix on molecular ion yields in SIMS imaging of brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Dowlatshahi Pour, Masoumeh; Malmberg, Per; Ewing, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    We have characterized the use of sublimation to deposit matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) matrices in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis, i.e. matrix-enhanced SIMS (ME-SIMS), a common surface modification method to enhance sensitivity for larger molecules and to increase the production of intact molecular ions. We use sublimation to apply a thin layer of a conventional MALDI matrix, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), onto rat brain cerebellum tissue to show how this technique can be used to enhance molecular yields in SIMS while still retaining a lateral resolution around 2 μm and also to investigate the mechanism of this enhancement. The results here illustrate that cholesterol, which is a dominant lipid species in the brain, is decreased on the tissue surface after deposition of matrix, particularly in white matter. The decrease of cholesterol is followed by an increased ion yield of several other lipid species. Depth profiling of the sublimed rat brain reveals that the lipid species are de facto extracted by the DHB matrix and concentrated in the top most layers of the sublimed matrix. This extraction/concentration of lipids directly leads to an increase of higher mass lipid ion yield. It is also possible that the decrease of cholesterol decreases the potential suppression of ion yield caused by cholesterol migration to the tissue surface. This result provides us with significant insights into the possible mechanisms involved when using sublimation to deposit this matrix in ME-SIMS. Graphical Abstract Schematic representation of the enhancement on the molecular ion yields in SIMS by deposition of DHB matrix on the brain tissue using sublimation. PMID:26922337

  2. Sublimation of water ice mixed with silicates and tholins: Evolution of surface texture and reflectance spectra, with implications for comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, Olivier; Pommerol, Antoine; Jost, Bernhard; Carrasco, Nathalie; Szopa, Cyril; Thomas, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    The surfaces of many objects in the Solar System comprise substantial quantities of water ice sometimes mixed with minerals and/or organic molecules. The sublimation of the ice changes the structural and optical properties of these objects. We present laboratory data on the evolution of the structure and the visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance of icy surface analogues of cometary ices, made of water ice, complex organic matter (tholins) and silicates, as they undergo sublimation under low temperature (<-70 °C) and pressure (10-5 mbar) conditions inside the SCITEAS simulation chamber. As the water ice sublimated, we observed in situ the formation of a porous sublimation lag deposit, or sublimation mantle, at the top of the ice. This mantle is a network of filaments made of the non-volatile particles. Organics or phyllosilicates grains, able to interact via stronger inter-particulate forces than olivine grains, can form a foam-like structure having internal cohesiveness, holding olivine grains together. As this mantle builds-up, the band depths of the sub-surface water ice are attenuated until complete extinction under only few millimeters of mantle. Optically thick sublimation mantles are mainly featureless in the near infrared. The absorption bands of the minerals present in the mantle are weak, or even totally absent if minerals are mixed with organics which largely dominate the VIS-NIR reflectance spectrum. During sublimation, ejections of large fragments of mantle, triggered by the gas flow, expose ice particles to the surface. The contrast of brightness between mantled and ice-exposed areas depends on the wavelength range and the dust/ice ratio considered. We describe how the chemical nature of the non-volatiles, the size of their particles, the way they are mixed with the ice and the dust/ice mass ratio influence the texture, activity and spectro-photometric properties of the sublimation mantles. These data provide useful references for

  3. Ion-specific nutrient management in closed systems: the necessity for ion-selective sensors in terrestrial and space-based agriculture and water management systems.

    PubMed

    Bamsey, Matthew; Graham, Thomas; Thompson, Cody; Berinstain, Alain; Scott, Alan; Dixon, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The ability to monitor and control plant nutrient ions in fertigation solutions, on an ion-specific basis, is critical to the future of controlled environment agriculture crop production, be it in traditional terrestrial settings (e.g., greenhouse crop production) or as a component of bioregenerative life support systems for long duration space exploration. Several technologies are currently available that can provide the required measurement of ion-specific activities in solution. The greenhouse sector has invested in research examining the potential of a number of these technologies to meet the industry's demanding requirements, and although no ideal solution yet exists for on-line measurement, growers do utilize technologies such as high-performance liquid chromatography to provide off-line measurements. An analogous situation exists on the International Space Station where, technological solutions are sought, but currently on-orbit water quality monitoring is considerably restricted. This paper examines the specific advantages that on-line ion-selective sensors could provide to plant production systems both terrestrially and when utilized in space-based biological life support systems and how similar technologies could be applied to nominal on-orbit water quality monitoring. A historical development and technical review of the various ion-selective monitoring technologies is provided. PMID:23201999

  4. Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information

    SciTech Connect

    M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

    2006-01-09

    Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

  5. Ion-Specific Nutrient Management in Closed Systems: The Necessity for Ion-Selective Sensors in Terrestrial and Space-Based Agriculture and Water Management Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bamsey, Matthew; Graham, Thomas; Thompson, Cody; Berinstain, Alain; Scott, Alan; Dixon, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The ability to monitor and control plant nutrient ions in fertigation solutions, on an ion-specific basis, is critical to the future of controlled environment agriculture crop production, be it in traditional terrestrial settings (e.g., greenhouse crop production) or as a component of bioregenerative life support systems for long duration space exploration. Several technologies are currently available that can provide the required measurement of ion-specific activities in solution. The greenhouse sector has invested in research examining the potential of a number of these technologies to meet the industry's demanding requirements, and although no ideal solution yet exists for on-line measurement, growers do utilize technologies such as high-performance liquid chromatography to provide off-line measurements. An analogous situation exists on the International Space Station where, technological solutions are sought, but currently on-orbit water quality monitoring is considerably restricted. This paper examines the specific advantages that on-line ion-selective sensors could provide to plant production systems both terrestrially and when utilized in space-based biological life support systems and how similar technologies could be applied to nominal on-orbit water quality monitoring. A historical development and technical review of the various ion-selective monitoring technologies is provided. PMID:23201999

  6. Graphite Sublimation Tests for the Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory Target Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, JR

    2002-03-25

    A passively cooled graphite target was proposed for a 1.5 MW neutrino production research facility because of its simplicity and favorable performance as a target material for neutrino production. The conceptual design for the target in the Reference 1 study was a graphite rod 15 mm in diameter by 800 mm long. Figure 1 shows the graphite target rod supported by graphite spokes, which are mounted to a water-cooled stainless steel support tube. The target is radiatively cooled to the water-cooled surface of the support tube. Based on nuclear analysis results, the time-averaged power deposition in the target is 35 kW. If this power is deposited uniformly along the axial length of the target, the volumetric power deposition in the target is about 250 MW/m{sup 3}. The target surface temperature required to radiate the deposited power to a water-cooled tube is estimated to be about 1850 C, and the temperature at the center of the target is about 75 C hotter. The sublimation erosion rate (e), estimated assuming that the graphite is submersed in a perfect vacuum environment, can be derived from kinetic theory and is given by: e = p{sub sat}(m/2{pi} kT){sup 1/2} where p{sub sat} is the saturation pressure, m is the molecular weight, k is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the surface temperature. The saturation pressure given in Ref. 3 can be approximated by: p{sub sat} =exp(-A/T + B) where A = 9.47 x 10{sup 3}, B = 24.2, and the units of p{sub sat} and T are atmospheres and K, respectively. Using these equations, the saturation pressure and sublimation erosion rate are plotted in Fig. 2 as a function of temperature. The surface recession rate shown with units of mm/s in Fig. 2 assumes one-sided erosion. At the average power deposition value of 250 MW/m{sup 3}, the surface temperature is 1850 C resulting in a sublimation erosion rate of only 2.2 {micro}m/day. However, if the actual power deposition were peaked by a factor of two in the axial direction, then the surface

  7. The potential value of employing a RLV-based {open_quotes}pop-up{close_quotes} trajectory approach for space access

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, E.; OLeary, R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the potential benefits of employing useful upper stages with planned reusable launch vehicle systems to increase payload performance to various earth orbits. It highlights these benefits through performance analysis on a generic vehicle/upper-stage combination (basing all estimates on realistic technology availability). A nominal 34,019 kg [75,000 lbm] dry mass RLV capable of orbiting 454 kg into a polar orbit by itself (SSTO) would be capable of orbiting 9500{endash}10,000 kg into a polar orbit using a nominal upper stage released from a suborbital trajectory. The paper also emphasizes the technical and operational issues associated with actually executing a {open_quotes}pop-up{close_quotes} trajectory launch and deployment. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Deracemization of Amino Acids by Partial Sublimation and via Homochiral Self-Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Sorochinsky, Alexander E.; Kukhar, Valery P.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2013-04-01

    Deracemization of a 50/50 mixture of enantiomers of aliphatic amino acids (Ala, Leu, Pro, Val) can be achieved by a simple sublimation of a pre-solubilized solid mixture of the racemates with a huge amount of a less-volatile optically active amino acid (Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, Thr). The choice of chirality correlates with the handedness of the enantiopure amino acids—Asn, Asp, Glu, Ser, and Thr. The deracemization, enantioenrichment and enantiodepletion observed in these experiments clearly demonstrate the preferential homochiral interactions and a tendency of natural amino acids to homochiral self-organization. These data may contribute toward an ultimate understanding of the pathways by which prebiological homochirality might have emerged.

  9. Homo-epitaxial growth of CdTe by sublimation under low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Yasushi; Yoda, Hiroki; Kasuga, Masanobu

    1991-12-01

    A new method to obtain a twin-free single crystal of CdTe on a CdTe substrate by sublimation is described. When CdTe(111)A substrates were employed for the homo-epitaxial growth of CdTe, twin crystals were frequently obtained. The substrate of CdTe(211)A and (211)B, however, gave no twins resulting in single crystals of high quality. The difference may come from the existence of many steps, sufficient to suppress two-dimensional nucleation and to promote step flow mechanism. To obtain twin-free films, therefore, a fairly large tilt angle of the substrate from a singular plane and a fairly low supersaturation are essential.

  10. The source of sublimates on the Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glass samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C., Jr.; Mckay, D. S.; Anderson, D. H.; Butler, P., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Elemental analyses of the thin film of micromounds which coat the surfaces of Apollo 15 green glass and Apollo 17 orange glass are reported. It is thought that Zn, Ga, Pb, Cu, Tl, S, F, and Cl condensed as a sublimate on the outside surface of these glass particles in lava fountains about 3.4 and 3.6 b.y. ago (Apollos 15 and 17, respectively). The heavy metals enriched in these samples may have been mobilized in a halide- and sulfide-rich vapor, while the source of these elements and of the glass may be a sulfide- and halide-rich pyroxenite inside the moon. The isotopic composition of lead on the surface of individual particles was determined, and the composition is considered with respect to the evolution of the source region. The lead on the surfaces is similar to lead that has been mixed into other soils and breccias at nearby sites.

  11. Evaluation of explosive sublimation as the mechanism of nanosecond laser ablation of tungsten under vacuum conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oderji, Hassan Yousefi; Farid, Nazar; Sun, Liying; Fu, Cailong; Ding, Hongbin

    2016-08-01

    A non-equilibrium mechanism for nanosecond laser ablation is suggested herein, and its predictions are compared to the results of W experiments performed under vacuum conditions. A mechanism of particle formation is explained via this model, with partial sublimation of the superheated irradiated zone of the target considered to be the mechanism of laser ablation. In this study, a mixture of vapor and particles was explosively generated and subsequently prevented the rest of a laser pulse from reaching its intended target. This mechanism was found to play an essential role in the ablation of W under vacuum conditions, and it provides a theoretical justification for particle formation. Moreover, special considerations were taken into account for the expansion of plasma into a vacuum. The model was evaluated by measuring the mass of ablated particles using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The results of this model were found to be in good agreement with experimental values.

  12. Growth of SiC single crystals on patterned seeds by a sublimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xianglong; Chen, Xiufang; Peng, Yan; Xu, Xiangang; Hu, Xiaobo

    2016-04-01

    Growth of 6H-SiC on patterned seeds with the vertical sidewalls composed of {11-20} and {1-100} faces by a sublimation method at 1700-2000 °C was studied. Anisotropy in lateral growth rates was observed, i.e the growth rate towards <11-20> was faster than that along <1-100>. It was found that free lateral growth on mesas was accompanied by a sharp decrease in the density of threading dislocation. The dependence of lateral growth rate on growth conditions such as reactor pressure and growth temperature was investigated. The factors governing the process of lateral growth of 6H-SiC on patterned seeds were discussed.

  13. Switchover software reliability estimate for Paducah Freezer/Sublimer computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, D.M.; Davis, J.N.

    1993-04-01

    K-25 Engineering Division purchased a series of redundant computer systems and developed software for the purpose of providing continuous process monitoring and control for the Freezer/Sublimer equipment in the gaseous diffusion process at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The application software is loaded on two central processing units (CPU) so that in the event of a failure of the primary unit, the processing can switch to the backup unit and continue processing without error. It is the purpose of this document to demonstrate the reliability of this system with respect to its ability to switch properly between redundant CPU. The total reliability estimation problem -- which considers the computer hardware, the operating system software, and the application software -- has been reduced to one that considers only the application software directly involved in the switchover process. Estimates are provided for software reliability and the testing coverage. Software and hardware reliability models and reliability growth models are considered in addition to Bayesian approaches.

  14. Formation of the molecular crystal structure during the vacuum sublimation of paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, A. P.; Rubets, V. P.; Antipov, V. V.; Bordei, N. S.

    2015-04-01

    The results from structural and thermal studies on the formation of molecular crystals during the vacuum sublimation of paracetamol from its vapor phase are given. It is established that the vapor-crystal phase transition proceeds in a complicated way as the superposition of two phase transitions: a first-order phase transition with a change in density, and a second-order phase transition with a change in ordering. It is shown that the latter is a smeared phase transition that proceeds with the formation of a pretransitional phase that is irreversibly dissipated during phase transformation, leading to the formation of crystals of the rhombic syngony. Data from differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction analysis are presented along with microphotographs.

  15. Main-belt comets: sublimation-driven activity in the asteroid belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Henry H.

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of main-belt comets (MBCs), which exhibit comet-like activity likely due to the sublimation of volatile ices, yet orbit in the main asteroid belt, has increased greatly since the discovery of the first known MBC, 133P/Elst-Pizarro, in 1996, and their recognition as a new class of solar system objects after the discovery of two more MBCs in 2005. I review work that has been done over the last 10 years to improve our understanding of these enigmatic objects, including the development of systematic discovery methods and diagnostics for distinguishing MBCs from disrupted asteroids (which exhibit comet-like activity due to physical disruptions such as impacts or rotational destabilization). I also discuss efforts to understand the dynamical and thermal properties of these objects.

  16. Formulation Design and Optimization of Fast Dissolving Clonazepam Tablets by Sublimation Method

    PubMed Central

    Shirsand, S. B.; Suresh, Sarasija; Kusumdevi, V.; Swamy, P. V.

    2011-01-01

    Fast dissolving tablets of clonazepam were prepared by sublimation method with a view to enhance patient compliance. A 32 full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of two formulation variables: amount of croscarmellose sodium and camphor. Croscarmellose sodium (2-8% w/w) was used as superdisintegrant and camphor (20-40% w/w) was used as subliming agent, to increase the porosity of the tablets, since it helps water to penetrate into the tablets, along with directly compressible mannitol to enhance mouth feel. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, thickness, drug content uniformity, in vitro dispersion time, wetting time and water absorption ratio. Based on in vitro dispersion time (approximately 11 s); the formulation containing 5% w/w croscarmellose sodium and 40% w/w camphor was found to be promising and tested for in vitro drug release pattern (in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer). Short-term stability (at 40°/75% relative humidity for 3 mo) and drug-excipient interaction. Surface response plots are presented to graphically represent the effect of independent variables on the in vitro dispersion time. The validity of the generated mathematical model was tested by preparing two extra-design checkpoints. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional commercial tablet formulation for drug release profiles. This formulation showed nearly nine-fold faster drug release (t50% 1.8 min) compared to the conventional commercial tablet formulation (t50% 16.4 min). Short-term stability studies on the formulation indicated that there are no significant changes in drug content and in vitro dispersion time (P<0.05). PMID:22923860

  17. Formulation design and optimization of fast dissolving clonazepam tablets by sublimation method.

    PubMed

    Shirsand, S B; Suresh, Sarasija; Kusumdevi, V; Swamy, P V

    2011-09-01

    Fast dissolving tablets of clonazepam were prepared by sublimation method with a view to enhance patient compliance. A 3(2) full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of two formulation variables: amount of croscarmellose sodium and camphor. Croscarmellose sodium (2-8% w/w) was used as superdisintegrant and camphor (20-40% w/w) was used as subliming agent, to increase the porosity of the tablets, since it helps water to penetrate into the tablets, along with directly compressible mannitol to enhance mouth feel. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, thickness, drug content uniformity, in vitro dispersion time, wetting time and water absorption ratio. Based on in vitro dispersion time (approximately 11 s); the formulation containing 5% w/w croscarmellose sodium and 40% w/w camphor was found to be promising and tested for in vitro drug release pattern (in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer). Short-term stability (at 40°/75% relative humidity for 3 mo) and drug-excipient interaction. Surface response plots are presented to graphically represent the effect of independent variables on the in vitro dispersion time. The validity of the generated mathematical model was tested by preparing two extra-design checkpoints. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional commercial tablet formulation for drug release profiles. This formulation showed nearly nine-fold faster drug release (t(50%) 1.8 min) compared to the conventional commercial tablet formulation (t(50%) 16.4 min). Short-term stability studies on the formulation indicated that there are no significant changes in drug content and in vitro dispersion time (P<0.05). PMID:22923860

  18. Fe embedded in ice: The impacts of sublimation and energetic particle bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankland, Victoria L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2015-05-01

    Icy particles containing a variety of Fe compounds are present in the upper atmospheres of planets such as the Earth and Saturn. In order to explore the role of ice sublimation and energetic ion bombardment in releasing Fe species into the gas phase, Fe-dosed ice films were prepared under UHV conditions in the laboratory. Temperature-programmed desorption studies of Fe/H2O films revealed that no Fe atoms or Fe-containing species co-desorbed along with the H2O molecules. This implies that when noctilucent ice cloud particles sublimate in the terrestrial mesosphere, the metallic species embedded in them will coalesce to form residual particles. Sputtering of the Fe-ice films by energetic Ar+ ions was shown to be an efficient mechanism for releasing Fe into the gas phase, with a yield of 0.08 (Ar+ energy=600 eV). Extrapolating with a semi-empirical sputtering model to the conditions of a proton aurora indicates that sputtering by energetic protons (>100 keV) should also be efficient. However, the proton flux in even an intense aurora will be too low for the resulting injection of Fe species into the gas phase to compete with that from meteoric ablation. In contrast, sputtering of the icy particles in the main rings of Saturn by energetic O+ ions may be the source of recently observed Fe+ in the Saturnian magnetosphere. Electron sputtering (9.5 keV) produced no detectable Fe atoms or Fe-containing species. Finally, it was observed that Fe(OH)2 was produced when Fe was dosed onto an ice film at 140 K (but not at 95 K). Electronic structure theory shows that the reaction which forms this hydroxide from adsorbed Fe has a large barrier of about 0.7 eV, from which we conclude that the reaction requires both translationally hot Fe atoms and mobile H2O molecules on the ice surface.

  19. Estimating snow sublimation using natural chemical and isotopic tracers across a gradient of solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafson, Joseph R.; Brooks, P. D.; Molotch, N. P.; Veatch, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    Changes in both climate and vegetation may dramatically impact the amount of water stored in seasonal snow cover and the timing of spring snowmelt. This study quantifies how spatial variability in solar radiation affects the spatial and temporal patterns in snow water equivalent (SWE), snow chemistry, and snow water isotopes in the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico. Depth, density, stratigraphy, temperature, and snow samples were collected approximately monthly from five locations between January and April 2007 to quantify the effects of solar forcing on snowpack water and chemical balance. Locations varied in solar forcing due to topography and vegetation, while minimizing variability in precipitation, elevation, aspect, interception, and wind redistribution. Snowfall (340 ± 5 mm) was similar across all sites, but peak SWE at maximum accumulation ranged from 187 to 340 mm. Solute concentrations were highest directly under canopies, intermediate in nonshaded forest openings, and lowest in shaded forest openings. Conservative solute concentrations (SO42-, R2 = 0.80), Cl- (R2 = 0.60), and isotope values (δ18O R2 = 0.96) were inversely related to SWE at maximum accumulation. Mass balance estimates of snowpack water balance using solute concentrations and isotopes indicated that sublimation ranged from <2% to ˜20% of winter precipitation, consistent with previous studies at the site. The strong relationships between solar forcing, SWE, and chemistry suggest that snow chemistry at maximum accumulation can be used to estimate overwinter sublimation. Furthermore, variability in solar forcing also can be used to refine spatial estimates of catchment solute and isotope input at melt.

  20. CURVED WALLS: GRAIN GROWTH, SETTLING, AND COMPOSITION PATTERNS IN T TAURI DISK DUST SUBLIMATION FRONTS

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L.; D'Alessio, P.; Espaillat, C.; Sargent, B.; Watson, D. M.; Hernández, J. E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu

    2013-10-01

    The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, two-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10{sup –8} to 10{sup –10} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from ∼3 to 0.5 μm. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and turbulent support for micron-sized grains with decreasing viscous heating. The atmosphere of these disks is depleted of dust with dust-gas mass ratios 1 × 10{sup –4} of the interstellar medium (ISM) value, while the midplane is enhanced to eight times the ISM value. For all accretion rates, the wall contributes at least half of the flux in the optically thin 10 μm silicate feature. Finally, we find evidence for an iron gradient in the disk, suggestive of that found in our solar system.

  1. On the calculation of complete dissociation curves of closed-shell pseudo-onedimensional systems via the complete active space method of increments

    SciTech Connect

    Fertitta, E.; Paulus, B.; Barcza, G.; Legeza, Ö.

    2015-09-21

    The method of increments (MoI) has been employed using the complete active space formalism in order to calculate the dissociation curve of beryllium ring-shaped clusters Be{sub n} of different sizes. Benchmarks obtained through different quantum chemical methods including the ab initio density matrix renormalization group were used to verify the validity of the MoI truncation which showed a reliable behavior for the whole dissociation curve. Moreover we investigated the size dependence of the correlation energy at different interatomic distances in order to extrapolate the values for the periodic chain and to discuss the transition from a metal-like to an insulator-like behavior of the wave function through quantum chemical considerations.

  2. On the calculation of complete dissociation curves of closed-shell pseudo-onedimensional systems via the complete active space method of increments.

    PubMed

    Fertitta, E; Paulus, B; Barcza, G; Legeza, Ö

    2015-09-21

    The method of increments (MoI) has been employed using the complete active space formalism in order to calculate the dissociation curve of beryllium ring-shaped clusters Be(n) of different sizes. Benchmarks obtained through different quantum chemical methods including the ab initio density matrix renormalization group were used to verify the validity of the MoI truncation which showed a reliable behavior for the whole dissociation curve. Moreover we investigated the size dependence of the correlation energy at different interatomic distances in order to extrapolate the values for the periodic chain and to discuss the transition from a metal-like to an insulator-like behavior of the wave function through quantum chemical considerations. PMID:26395688

  3. Apparatus for use in placing a submarine structure on the sea bed alongside an underwater well and method of drilling a plurality of closely spaced underwater wells

    SciTech Connect

    Shotbolt, K.

    1982-03-02

    A template for spacing a submarine structure such as an anchor block or a guide base for a second underwater well alongside an existing underwater well comprises a beam attached at one end, by means of a hinge, to a lowering guide which can be threaded over and be lowered along two guide wires of the first well, and at the other end by a remote-controlled release mechanism to the submarine structure such as the anchor block itself or a guide base for a second well. The beam, with such a submarine structure attached, is lowered down the guide wires while held in a vertical configuration, and is then swung into a generally horizontal configuration at the sea bed.

  4. The Sublime Corpse in Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda's Women's Journal "Album Cubano de lo Bueno y lo Bello" (1860)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaGreca, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This article examines Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda's choice to include articles depicting the advanced decay of cadavers, which are simultaneously horrible and awesome, in her women's periodical "Album Cubano de lo Bueno y lo Bello". Background on Avellaneda's biography, women's print culture, and theories of the sublime provide a frame for the…

  5. Sublimation on the glaciers of the upper Huasco valley, Chile, using eddy covariance data and energy balance modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonell, Shelley; Cullen, Nicolas; Nicholson, Lindsey; Mölg, Thomas; Kinnard, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    On the cold, arid glaciers of the Norte Chico region, Chile, sublimation plays an important role in mass loss from the glacier surface. The ratio of sublimation : melt on these glaciers dictates not only the amount of meltwater delivered to the watershed, but it also drives the development of morphological features on the glacier surface, such as penitentes. As the rate of sublimation is driven by the latent heat flux, understanding the behaviour of the turbulent heat flux across the glacier surface is key to quantifying the spatial and temporal patterns of ablation. We measured the turbulent heat fluxes at a point on the surface of the Guanaco Glacier during 23-31 January, 2008 using an open-path eddy covariance system. The eddy covariance system was installed adjacent to an existing automatic weather station operating at 5325 m on the glacier surface, in a region devoid of penitents and other surface deformities. The results from the eddy covariance measurements were subsequently used to assess the sublimation results calculated using a point energy balance model. Results showed that 0.5-3 mm w.e. of sublimation occurred per day during the study period, which corresponded well with the energy balance results. However to assess the total sublimation rate on this glacier, sublimation rates from penitentes, ablation cusps and debris-covered regions must also be calculated. Thus this paper will also take a first look at another set of eddy covariance measurements made in a penitente field on the Toro 1 Glacier between December 2009-January 2010 to quantify the importance of penitentes for producing ablation on these glaciers as well. The eddy covariance system was installed adjacent to an existing automatic weather station operating at 5200 m on the glacier surface, in a location with a 100 m fetch of penitentes. From these measurements we are able to ascertain the role that penitentes play in modifying turbulent heat fluxes in the main part of the ablation season

  6. Effect of recondensation of sublimed species on nanoparticle temperature evolution in time-resolved laser-induced incandescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memarian, F.; Liu, F.; Thomson, K. A.; Daun, K. J.; Snelling, D. R.; Smallwood, G. J.

    2015-03-01

    In high-fluence laser-induced incandescence (LII), current LII models significantly overpredict the soot nanoparticle temperature decay rate compared to that inferred from two-color pyrometry at the first 100 ns after the peak laser pulse in atmospheric pressure flames. One possible cause is the back flow of sublimed species, which to date has been neglected in LII modeling. In this study, the transient direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method has been used, for the first time, to calculate the temperature evolution of soot particles, taking into account recondensation of sublimed species. In this algorithm, the physical time is discretized into a number of time steps called ensemble time steps, and the heat flux is calculated by performing several DSMC runs in each ensemble time step before proceeding to the next ensemble time step until the variance reaches an acceptable value. This heat flux is then used to update the nanoparticle temperature over the ensemble time step. Using the new algorithm, the temperature evolution of the particle can be predicted by the DSMC code, which is an improvement to previous DSMC simulations in which predetermined temperature decay curves must be prescribed. The results show that recondensation of sublimed species on the originating nanoparticle is not significant. Although accounting for condensation of sublimed species originating from neighboring soot particles enhances the role of recondensation of sublimed species in slowing down the soot particle temperature decay, it is still not sufficient to be considered as a plausible cause for the discrepancy between modeled soot temperature and the two-color pyrometry measured one in high-fluence LII.

  7. Origin of Sublimation Polygons in the Antarctic Western Dry Valleys: Implications for Patterned Ground Development on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, D. R.; Head, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    Two hypotheses have been developed in order to address the age, origin, and evolution of surface polygons in the western Dry Valleys region of southern Victoria Land. Resolution of this debate has direct relevance and implications for patterned ground in ice-rich terrain on Mars. One hypothesis, the dynamic hypothesis, states that growth of sand-wedges pervasively deforms sediment across polygonal terrain, recycling sediment from troughs to polygon centers and back again over time scales of thousands of years. A second hypothesis, the stability hypothesis, states that deformation associated with sand-wedge polygons, particularly those that form over buried ice, is restricted to polygon troughs; the implication is that polygon centers may contain undisturbed soils >1 million years old. Evidence comes from field data that show that the age, origin, and morphology of polygons that form over buried ice in the western Dry Valleys region is tied collectively to the location and rate of sublimation of underlying ice. In Beacon Valley, sublimation of debris-rich ice produces a dry surface lag that insulates and slows loss of remaining ice. Sub-zero temperature cycling of near-surface ice and soil creates tensile stresses that result in a network of hexagonal cracks, extending upward from buried ice toward the ground surface. Where fines sift downward into open thermal-contraction cracks, a coarse-grained lag deposit forms on top of the ice. Owing to spatial variations in till texture, rates of sublimation vary across the ice surface. High rates occur below coarse-grained lags that cap contraction cracks; low rates are found at polygon centers beneath fine-grained low porosity/permeability debris. Measured concentrations of in-situ produced cosmogenic 3He in two depth profiles through sublimation till show a steady decrease with depth, indicating negligible recycling of surface materials on million-year time scales. These data suggest that once polygon troughs deepen

  8. The growth of sublimation crystals and surface hoar on the Antarctic plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, J.-C.; Domine, F.; Savarino, J.; Dumont, M.; Brun, E.

    2014-07-01

    On the Antarctic plateau, precipitation quantities are so low that the surface mass budget is for an important part determined by exchanges of water vapor between the snow surface and the atmosphere surface. At Dome C (75° S, 123° E), we have frequently observed the growth of crystals on the snow surface under calm sunny weather. Here we present the time variations of specific surface area (SSA) and density of these crystals. Using the detailed snow model Crocus, we conclude that the formation of these crystals was very likely due to the nighttime formation of surface hoar crystals and to the daytime formation of sublimation crystals. These latter crystals form by processes similar to those involved in the formation of frost flowers on young sea ice. The formation of these crystals impacts the albedo, mass and energy budget of the Antarctic plateau. In particular, the SSA variations of the surface layer can induce an instantaneous forcing at the snow surface up to -10 W m-2 at noon, resulting in a surface temperature drop of 0.45 K. This result confirms that snow SSA is a crucial variable to consider in the energy budget and climate of snow-covered surfaces.

  9. The impacts of moisture transport on drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ning; Dai, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Drifting snow sublimation (DSS) is an important physical process related to moisture and heat transfer that happens in the atmospheric boundary layer, which is of glaciological and hydrological importance. It is also essential in order to understand the mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheets and the global climate system. Previous studies mainly focused on the DSS of suspended snow and ignored that in the saltation layer. Here, a drifting snow model combined with balance equations for heat and moisture is established to simulate the physical DSS process in the saltation layer. The simulated results show that DSS can strongly increase humidity and cooling effects, which in turn can significantly reduce DSS in the saltation layer. However, effective moisture transport can dramatically weaken the feedback effects. Due to moisture advection, DSS rate in the saltation layer can be several orders of magnitude greater than that of the suspended particles. Thus, DSS in the saltation layer has an important influence on the distribution and mass-energy balance of snow cover.

  10. Conceptual design of a low-pressure micro-resistojet based on a sublimating solid propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervone, Angelo; Mancas, Alexandru; Zandbergen, Barry

    2015-03-01

    In the current and future trend towards smaller satellite missions, the development of a simple and reliable propulsion system with performance and characteristics in line with the typical requirements of nano-satellites and CubeSats plays a crucial role for enhancing the capabilities of this type of missions. This paper describes the design of a micro-resistojet using water stored in the frozen state (ice) as propellant, operating under sublimation conditions at low pressure. The low operating pressure allows for using the vapor pressure of ice as the only method of propellant feeding, thereby allowing for extremely low thrust and electric power usage. The results of an extensive set of numerical simulations for optimizing the thruster geometry in terms of power ratio and specific impulse produced are discussed. In addition, the design of the complete propulsion system is described. It makes use of a limited number of moving parts and two power sources, one in the thruster to increase the propellant temperature and one in the tank to maintain the propellant storage conditions. Results show that the proposed design represents an alternative option capable of meeting the typical requirements of small satellite missions by means of an intrinsically green propellant such as water, with the pressure inside the system never exceeding 600 Pa. Optimization results showed an optimum thrust to power ratio in range 0.2-1.2 mN/W for an expansion slot aspect ratio of 2.5.

  11. [Purification of PTCDA by Vacuum Sublimation and Spectral Test and Analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Jie; Yan, Zhao-wen; Zhou, Xing-yu; Zhang, Fu-jia

    2015-04-01

    The organic semiconductor 3, 4, 9, 10 perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) with the purity of 97.5% was purified by sublimation to 99.9%. The high-purity PTCDA material was measured by mass spectra, infrared spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed analysis revealed its molecular structure, the forming of chemical bond, the vibration modes of atoms in equilibrium lattice position, electronic configuration and the shift of binding energy of atoms. Based on the infrared spectrum analysis, the molecular structure of PTCDA is consisting of perylene core group with five C rings and two anhydrides located at both ends of perylene core, which is mainly bonded with covalent bond. The stretching vibration of C atoms in the crystal lattice dominates in their equilibrium positions. The PTCDA molecules have a large number of π electrons which can move freely; the intermolecular delocalized π bond overlap determines the conductivity of PTCDA. Based on XPS analysis, it can be found that there exist two kinds of C atoms with different binding energy: 285.3 and 288.7 eV, respectively, corresponding to the C atoms in the perylene ring and anhydride. In addition, there are two kinds of O atoms, i. e. C==0 and C--O--C, whose bonding energy is 531.3 and 533.1 eV, respectively. PMID:26197568

  12. Sublimation and combustion of coal particles in the erosion laser torch

    SciTech Connect

    Bulat, A.; Shumrikov, V.; Osenny, V.

    2005-07-01

    Rate of coal particles' combustion in low-temperature plasma is of interest both from application and scientific points of view. Necessity of knowing parameters of the process of coal particles' combustion in plasma torch with the temperature of 2500-3000 K is governed by arising a number of state-of-the-art technological tasks related to the problems of finding new methods of power production, generation of high-calorific synthetic gases and using carbon as a high temperature structural material in nuclear power engineering. The present work deals with a rate of combustion of the sorbed coal particles in the erosion laser torch formed by means of interaction of pulse laser radiation (wave length {lambda} = 1,06 {mu}m, power density j = 10{sup 5} - 10{sup 7} Wcm{sup 2} with coals of various grades (in the wide range of carbon concentrations (80-95 %)). Physical and mathematical modeling of the process of coal particles' sublimation and combustion in non-equilibrium plasma flows with weight-average temperature of 2500-3000 K showed a good convergence of results for the particles of 10-100 {mu}m diameter and satisfactory one for the particles of {gt} 250{mu}m diameter.

  13. Modeling Io's Sublimation-Driven Atmosphere: Gas Dynamics and Radiation Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Andrew C.; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.; Trafton, Laurence M.; Moore, Chris H.; Stewart, Benedicte; Gratiy, Sergey L.; Levin, Deborah A.

    2008-12-31

    Io's sublimation-driven atmosphere is modeled using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. These rarefied gas dynamics simulations improve upon earlier models by using a three-dimensional domain encompassing the entire planet computed in parallel. The effects of plasma impact heating, planetary rotation, and inhomogeneous surface frost are investigated. Circumplanetary flow is predicted to develop from the warm subsolar region toward the colder night-side. The non-equilibrium thermal structure of the atmosphere, including vibrational and rotational temperatures, is also presented. Io's rotation leads to an asymmetric surface temperature distribution which is found to strengthen circumplanetary flow near the dusk terminator. Plasma heating is found to significantly inflate the atmosphere on both day- and night-sides. The plasma energy flux also causes high temperatures at high altitudes but permits relatively cooler temperatures at low altitudes near the dense subsolar point due to plasma energy depletion. To validate the atmospheric model, a radiative transfer model was developed utilizing the backward Monte Carlo method. The model allows the calculation of the atmospheric radiation from emitting/absorbing and scattering gas using an arbitrary scattering law and an arbitrary surface reflectivity. The model calculates the spectra in the {nu}{sub 2} vibrational band of SO{sub 2} which are then compared to the observational data.

  14. Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Drosophila Brain Using Matrix Sublimation versus Modification with Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Phan, Nhu T N; Mohammadi, Amir Saeid; Dowlatshahi Pour, Masoumeh; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-02-01

    Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is used to image brain lipids in the fruit fly, Drosophila, a common invertebrate model organism in biological and neurological studies. Three different sample preparation methods, including sublimation with two common organic matrixes for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) using gold nanoparticles, are examined for sample profiling and imaging the fly brain. Recrystallization with trifluoroacetic acid following matrix deposition in MALDI is shown to increase the incorporation of biomolecules with one matrix, resulting in more efficient ionization, but not for the other matrix. The key finding here is that the mass fragments observed for the fly brain slices with different surface modifications are significantly different. Thus, these approaches can be combined to provide complementary analysis of chemical composition, particularly for the small metabolites, diacylglycerides, phosphatidylcholines, and triacylglycerides, in the fly brain. Furthermore, imaging appears to be beneficial using modification with gold nanoparticles in place of matrix in this application showing its potential for cellular and subcellular imaging. The imaging protocol developed here with both MALDI and SALDI provides the best and most diverse lipid chemical images of the fly brain to date with LDI. PMID:26705612

  15. Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from the Murchison Meteorite Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    The origin of life on Earth, and possibly on other planets such as Mars, would have required the presence of liquid water and a continuous supply of prebiotic organic compounds. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by asteroids, comets, and carbonaceous meteorites could have contributed to the early Earth s prebiotic inventory by seeding the planet with biologically important organic compounds. A wide variety of prebiotic organic compounds have previously been detected in the Murchison CM type carbonaceous chondrite including amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. These compounds dominate terrestrial biochemistry and are integral components of proteins, DNA and RNA. Several purines including adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine, as well as the pyrimidine uracil, have previously been detected in water or formic acid extracts of Murchison using ion-exclusion chromatography and ultraviolet spectroscopy. However, even after purification of these extracts, the accurate identification and quantification of nucleobases is difficult due to interfering UV absorbing compounds. In order to reduce these effects, we have developed an extraction technique using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from other non-volatile organic compounds in Murchison acid extracts.

  16. Sublimation studies of NpO sub 2 F sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinschmidt, P.D. ); Lau, K.H.; Hildenbrand, D.L. )

    1992-08-15

    Using Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry, we have identified the following reaction as the sublimation decomposition mechanism of NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}({ital s}): 2NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}({ital s})=NpO{sub 2}({ital s})+O{sub 2}({ital g})+NpF{sub 4}({ital g}). From second-law analysis of the measured pressures of NpF{sub 4}({ital g}) over the temperature range 820--985 K the derived enthalpy change at 298 K is 556.8{plus minus}12.2 kJ/mol and the entropy change is 342.4 {plus minus}13.8 J/K mol. From these values and enthalpies of formation and entropies reported in the literature for the other species we calculate the enthalpy of formation of NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}({ital s}) to be {minus}1608{plus minus}10 kJ/mol and the entropy to be 147{plus minus}9 J/K mol.

  17. Direct Observation of Sublimation Behaviors in One-Dimensional In2Se3/In2O3 Nanoheterostructures.

    PubMed

    Hsin, Cheng-Lun; Huang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Liao, Kuo-Cheng; Liu, Po-Liang; Wu, Wen-Wei; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2015-06-01

    Recently, in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has provided a route to analyze structural characterization and chemical evolution with its powerful and unique applications. In this paper, we disclose the detailed phenomenon of sublimation on the atomic scale. In2Se3/In2O3 nanowires were synthesized via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism and studied in an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) TEM at high temperature in real time. During in situ observation of the sublimation process of the nanowires, the evolution and reconstruction of the exposed In2Se3 surface progressed in different manners with time. The surface structure was decomposed by mass-desorption and stepwise-migration processes, which are also energetically favored processes in the ab initio calculation. This study developed a new concept and will be essential in the development of atomic kinetics. PMID:25942426

  18. Sublimation rate of ice under simulated Mars conditions and the effect of layers of mock regolith JSC Mars-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrier, Vincent; Sears, Derek W. G.; Chittenden, Julie D.; Roe, Larry A.; Ulrich, Richard; Bryson, Kathryn; Billingsley, Lisa; Hanley, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the sublimation of ice buried beneath ≤200 mm of JSC Mars-1 model regolith under simulated Mars conditions. As expected, even thin layers of regolith cause large decreases in sublimation rate, up to one order of magnitude at 50 mm. When the depth of the regolith was 50 to 200 mm we detected water desorbing from the overlying layers for which we were able to determine a desorption coefficient of 1.45 ± 0.5 × 10-3 h-1. After allowing for the effect of desorption, we found that the diffusion coefficient for water vapor through our regolith is 1.74 ± 0.70 × 10-4 m2 s-1, in excellent agreement with theoretical values. We thus find that a 1-m thick layer of ice buried below a meter of regolith resembling JSC Mars-1 on Mars at 235 K would last ˜800 years.

  19. Strong Near-Infrared Emission Interior to the Dust Sublimation Radius of Young Stellar Objects MWC 275 and AB Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannirkulam, A.; Monnier, J. D.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Harries, T. J.; Pedretti, E.; ten Brummelaar, T. A.; McAlister, H.; Turner, N.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.

    2008-04-01

    Using the longest optical-interferometeric baselines currently available, we have detected strong near-infrared (NIR) emission from inside the dust destruction radius of Herbig Ae stars MWC 275 and AB Aur. Our submilliarcsecond resolution observations unambiguously place the emission between the dust destruction radius and the magnetospheric corotation radius. We argue that this new component corresponds to hot gas inside the dust sublimation radius, confirming recent claims based on spectrally resolved interferometry and dust evaporation front modeling.

  20. Measurement of vapor pressures and heats of sublimation of dicarboxylic acids using atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Emily A; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2012-06-21

    Vapor pressures of low volatility compounds are important parameters in several atmospheric processes, including the formation of new particles and the partitioning of compounds between the gas phase and particles. Understanding these processes is critical for elucidating the impacts of aerosols on climate, visibility, and human health. Dicarboxylic acids are an important class of compounds in the atmosphere for which reported vapor pressures often vary by more than an order of magnitude. In this study, atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry (ASAP-MS), a relatively new atmospheric pressure ionization technique, is applied for the first time to the measurement of vapor pressures and heats of sublimation of a series of dicarboxylic acids. Pyrene was also studied because its vapor pressures and heat of sublimation are relatively well-known. The heats of sublimation measured using ASAP-MS were in good agreement with published values. The vapor pressures, assuming an evaporation coefficient of unity, were typically within a factor of ∼3 lower than published values made at similar temperatures for most of the acids. The underestimation may be due to diffusional constraints resulting from evaporation at atmospheric pressure. However, this study establishes that ASAP-MS is a promising new technique for such measurements. PMID:22432524

  1. Effects of interfacial interaction potential on the sublimation rates of TNT films on a silica surface examined by QCM and AFM techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, R.; Ueda, A.; Liu, Y. C.; Wu, M.; Henderson, D. O.; Lareau, R. T.; Chamberlain, R. T.

    2003-04-01

    The study of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) sublimation rates from the bulk surface and a substrate surface have been evaluated quantitatively with both atomic force microscopy and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) techniques. A first principle theoretical model is proposed, which allows obtaining three critical parameters, bulk sublimation rate, surface interaction potential, and the effective decay length, with no arbitrary parameters. The bulk sublimation rate predicted by the model is quantitatively confirmed by QCM experiments. The isothermal measurements with QCM showed that the sublimation activation energy of bulk TNT is 131 kJ/mol. More importantly, all results were obtained at one atmosphere and near room temperature. Thus, it should have direct impacts on explosive trace detection device applications.

  2. Toxicology of the air in closed spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wands, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Sources and identification of contaminants in artificial gas atmospheres are discussed. They include biological sources (microflora and man), materials, processes, aerosols, and malfunctions. Acute or chronic toxicity may result from spacecraft air contamination. Air quality standards are presented in tabular form.

  3. Sublimation extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: A new technique for future in situ analyses of purines and pyrimidines on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Cleaves, H. J.; Buch, A.; Schubert, M.; Aubrey, A.; Bada, J. L.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2006-12-01

    We have developed a sublimation technique coupled with chemical derivatization and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect nucleobases and other volatile organic compounds derived from bacteria in Mars analog materials. To demonstrate this technique, a sample of serpentine inoculated with Escherichia coli ( E. coli) cells was heated to 500 °C for several seconds under Martian ambient pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger, then derivatized and analyzed by GC-MS. We found that adenine, cytosine, thymine and uracil were the most abundant molecules detected in the sublimed E. coli extract by GC-MS. In addition, nucleobases were also detected in sublimed extracts of a deep-sea sediment sample, seawater, and soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile after heating the samples under the same conditions. Our results indicate that nucleobases can be easily isolated directly from natural samples using sublimation and then detected by GC-MS after chemical derivatization. The sublimation-based extraction technique is one approach that should be considered for use by future in situ instruments designed to detect organic compounds relevant to life in the Martian regolith.

  4. Characterization of the Sublimation and Vapor Pressure of 2-(2-Nitrovinyl) Furan (G-0) Using Thermogravimetric Analysis: Effects of Complexation with Cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Ruz, Vivian; González, Mirtha Mayra; Winant, Danny; Rodríguez, Zenaida; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the sublimation of crystalline solid 2-(2-nitrovinyl) furan (G-0) in the temperature range of 35 to 60 °C (below the melting point of the drug) was studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The sublimated product was characterized using Fourier-transformed-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thin layer chromatography (TLC). The sublimation rate at each temperature was obtained using the slope of the linear regression model and followed apparent zero-order kinetics. The sublimation enthalpy from 35 to 60 °C was obtained from the Eyring equation. The Gückel method was used to estimate the sublimation rate and vapor pressure at 25 °C. Physical mixtures, kneaded and freeze-dried complexes were prepared with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) and analyzed using isothermal TGA at 50 °C. The complexation contributed to reducing the sublimation process. The best results were achieved using freeze-dried complexes with both cyclodextrins. PMID:26295385

  5. Closed N=2 Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechtenfeld, Olaf; Popov, Alexander D.

    We study the action of picture-changing and spectral flow operators on a ground ring of ghost number zero operators in the chiral BRST cohomology of the closed N=2 string and describe an infinite set of symmetry charges acting on physical states. The transformations of physical string states are compared with symmetries of self-dual gravity which is the effective field theory of the closed N=2 string. We derive all infinitesimal symmetries of the self-dual gravity equations in (2+2)-dimensional space-time and introduce an infinite hierarchy of commuting flows on the moduli space of self-dual metrics. The dependence on moduli parameters can be recovered by solving the equations of the SDG hierarchy associated with an infinite set of Abelian symmetries generated recursively from translations. These nonlocal Abelian symmetries are shown to coincide with the hidden Abelian string symmetries responsible for the vanishing of most scattering amplitudes. Therefore, N=2 string theory ``predicts'' not only self-dual gravity but also the SDG hierarchy.

  6. Laterally closed lattice homomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumi, Mohamed Ali; Toumi, Nedra

    2006-12-01

    Let A and B be two Archimedean vector lattices and let be a lattice homomorphism. We call that T is laterally closed if T(D) is a maximal orthogonal system in the band generated by T(A) in B, for each maximal orthogonal system D of A. In this paper we prove that any laterally closed lattice homomorphism T of an Archimedean vector lattice A with universal completion Au into a universally complete vector lattice B can be extended to a lattice homomorphism of Au into B, which is an improvement of a result of M. Duhoux and M. Meyer [M. Duhoux and M. Meyer, Extended orthomorphisms and lateral completion of Archimedean Riesz spaces, Ann. Soc. Sci. Bruxelles 98 (1984) 3-18], who established it for the order continuous lattice homomorphism case. Moreover, if in addition Au and B are with point separating order duals (Au)' and B' respectively, then the laterally closedness property becomes a necessary and sufficient condition for any lattice homomorphism to have a similar extension to the whole Au. As an application, we give a new representation theorem for laterally closed d-algebras from which we infer the existence of d-algebra multiplications on the universal completions of d-algebras.

  7. Sublimation-Driven Activity in Main-Belt Comet 313p/Gibbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Hainaut, Olivier; Novaković, Bojan; Bolin, Bryce; Denneau, Larry; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Haghighipour, Nader; Kleyna, Jan; Kokotanekova, Rosita; Lacerda, Pedro; Meech, Karen J.; Micheli, Marco; Moskovitz, Nick; Schunova, Eva; Snodgrass, Colin; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Wasserman, Lawrence; Waszczak, Adam

    2015-02-01

    We present an observational and dynamical study of newly discovered main-belt comet 313P/Gibbs. We find that the object is clearly active both in observations obtained in 2014 and in precovery observations obtained in 2003 by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, strongly suggesting that its activity is sublimation-driven. This conclusion is supported by a photometric analysis showing an increase in the total brightness of the comet over the 2014 observing period, and dust modeling results showing that the dust emission persists over at least three months during both active periods, where we find start dates for emission no later than 2003 July 24 ± 10 for the 2003 active period and 2014 July 28 ± 10 for the 2014 active period. From serendipitous observations by the Subaru Telescope in 2004 when the object was apparently inactive, we estimate that the nucleus has an absolute R-band magnitude of HR = 17.1 ± 0.3, corresponding to an effective nucleus radius of re ∼ 1.00 ± 0.15 km. The object’s faintness at that time means we cannot rule out the presence of activity, and so this computed radius should be considered an upper limit. We find that 313P’s orbit is intrinsically chaotic, having a Lyapunov time of Tl = 12,000 yr and being located near two three-body mean-motion resonances with Jupiter and Saturn, 11J-1S-5A and 10J+12S-7A, yet appears stable over >50 Myr in an apparent example of stable chaos. We furthermore find that 313P is the second main-belt comet, after P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS), to belong to the ∼155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family.

  8. Vacuum sublimed α ,ω-dihexylsexithiophene thin films: Correlating electronic structure and molecular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhm, S.; Salzmann, I.; Koch, N.; Fukagawa, H.; Kataoka, T.; Hosoumi, S.; Nebashi, K.; Kera, S.; Ueno, N.

    2008-08-01

    In order to correlate the molecular orientation of organic thin films with charge injection barriers at organic/metal interfaces, the electronic structure and molecular orientation of vacuum sublimed thin films of α ,ω-dihexylsexithiophene (DH6T) on the substrates Ag(111), highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), and tetratetracontane (TTC) precovered Ag(111) were investigated. Results from metastable atom electron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction were used to derive growth models (including molecular orientation and conformation) of DH6T on the different substrates. On Ag(111), DH6T exhibits a transition from lying molecules in the monolayer/bilayer range to almost standing upright molecules in multilayers. This is accompanied by a shift of the molecular energy levels to a lower binding energy by 0.65 eV with respect to the vacuum level. The unit cell of standing DH6T on lying DH6T on Ag(111) is estimated to be similar to the DH6T bulk phase. On HOPG, DH6T grows in the bulk phase with lying orientation, starting already from the monolayer coverage. DH6T on TTC precovered Ag(111) grows in an almost lying orientation and a conformation that allows a strong overlap of the hexyl chains of DH6T with the alkyl chains of TTC. In all cases, the electronic structure and, particulary, the ionization energy of DH6T is dependent on the orientation of DH6T, i.e., lying DH6T has higher ionization energy than standing DH6T.

  9. SUBLIMATION-DRIVEN ACTIVITY IN MAIN-BELT COMET 313P/GIBBS

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Hainaut, Olivier; Novaković, Bojan; Bolin, Bryce; Denneau, Larry; Haghighipour, Nader; Kleyna, Jan; Meech, Karen J.; Schunova, Eva; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Kokotanekova, Rosita; Snodgrass, Colin; Lacerda, Pedro; Micheli, Marco; Moskovitz, Nick; Wasserman, Lawrence; Waszczak, Adam

    2015-02-10

    We present an observational and dynamical study of newly discovered main-belt comet 313P/Gibbs. We find that the object is clearly active both in observations obtained in 2014 and in precovery observations obtained in 2003 by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, strongly suggesting that its activity is sublimation-driven. This conclusion is supported by a photometric analysis showing an increase in the total brightness of the comet over the 2014 observing period, and dust modeling results showing that the dust emission persists over at least three months during both active periods, where we find start dates for emission no later than 2003 July 24 ± 10 for the 2003 active period and 2014 July 28 ± 10 for the 2014 active period. From serendipitous observations by the Subaru Telescope in 2004 when the object was apparently inactive, we estimate that the nucleus has an absolute R-band magnitude of H{sub R} = 17.1 ± 0.3, corresponding to an effective nucleus radius of r{sub e} ∼ 1.00 ± 0.15 km. The object’s faintness at that time means we cannot rule out the presence of activity, and so this computed radius should be considered an upper limit. We find that 313P’s orbit is intrinsically chaotic, having a Lyapunov time of T{sub l} = 12,000 yr and being located near two three-body mean-motion resonances with Jupiter and Saturn, 11J-1S-5A and 10J+12S-7A, yet appears stable over >50 Myr in an apparent example of stable chaos. We furthermore find that 313P is the second main-belt comet, after P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS), to belong to the ∼155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family.

  10. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health > The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Main Content Title: The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Description: The temporomandibular joint connects the lower ...

  11. Basal sublimation and venting of the north seasonal cap of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    Spots, fans and dark polygonal patterns form during the spring on the southern seasonal cap of Mars as a consequence of 1) the basal sublimation of the translucent and impermeable slab of carbon dioxide and 2) the venting of the CO2 gas loaded with dust and sand size material scoured from the surface of the polar layered deposits. The dark polygons on the cap have a similar formation process as the spots but the dust and sand erupt from elongated vents rather than point sources. In the summer, spiders and etched polygons remain on the southern polar layered deposits. The spiders are shaped by the scouring action of confined CO2 gas flowing between the cap and the basement and converging toward point sources, whereas the etched polygons result form the forced migration of the CO2 gas over longer distances. Comparable observations during the spring near the north pole on the seasonal cap indicate that similar processes occur in both polar regions and that the venting model developed for the south seasonal cap also operates near the north pole. However, spider and etched polygonal features are extremely uncommon on the north substrate, indicating that the conditions for their formation (e.g. mechanical strength of the slab and the substrate, transparency of the seasonal cap) are not met. The continual erosion and re-sedimentation occurring at the surface of the polar layered deposits by the seasonal degassing is a major geomorphological agent shaping the polar regions. The polar layered deposits have been proposed to contain the stratigraphic record of climatic changes and catastrophic events of very high interest for future missions. Our observations suggest that both polar regions deposits may have been locally disrupted by the seasonal sub-ice gas flow and that the stratigraphic record may have been partially lost. The Phoenix landing site might have been affected in the past and the stratigraphic information associated with the original deposition of the polar

  12. Martian polar and circum-polar sulfate-bearing deposits: Sublimation tills derived from the North Polar Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massé, M.; Bourgeois, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Verpoorter, C.; Le Deit, L.; Bibring, J. P.

    2010-10-01

    Previous spectroscopic studies have shown the presence of hydrated minerals in various kinds of sedimentary accumulations covering and encircling the martian North Polar Cap. More specifically, gypsum, a hydrated calcium sulfate, has been detected on Olympia Planum, a restricted part of the Circum-Polar Dune Field. To further constrain the geographical distribution and the process of formation and accumulation of these hydrated minerals, we performed an integrated morphological, structural and compositional analysis of a key area where hydrated minerals were detected and where the main polar landforms are present. By the development of a spectral processing method based on spectral derivation and by the acquisition of laboratory spectra of gypsum-ice mixtures we find that gypsum-bearing sediment is not restricted to the Olympia Planum dunes but is also present in all kinds of superficial sediment covering the surface of the North Polar Cap and the Circum-Polar Dune Field. Spectral signatures consistent with perchlorates are also detected on these deposits. The interpretation of landforms reveals that this gypsum-bearing sediment was released from the ice cap by sublimation. We thus infer that gypsum crystals that are now present in the Circum-Polar Dune Field derive from the interior of the North Polar Cap. Gypsum crystals that were initially trapped in the ice cap have been released by sublimation of the ice and have accumulated in the form of ablation tills at the surface of the ice cap. These gypsum-bearing sublimation tills are reworked by winds and are transported towards the Circum-Polar Dune Field. Comparison with sulfates found in terrestrial glaciers suggests that gypsum crystals in the martian North Polar Cap have formed by weathering of dust particles, either in the atmosphere prior to their deposition during the formation of the ice cap, and/or in the ice cap after their deposition.

  13. Physical chemistry of freeze-drying: measurement of sublimation rates for frozen aqueous solutions by a microbalance technique.

    PubMed

    Pikal, M J; Shah, S; Senior, D; Lang, J E

    1983-06-01

    The sublimation rate of frozen solutions was studied as a function of freezing rate, thickness of dried product (l), temperature, residual air pressure, and solute concentration. Data are presented for pure water, aqueous potassium chloride, aqueous povidone, and aqueous dobutamine hydrochloride-mannitol (System I). The resistance of the dried product to water vapor flow (Rp) was evaluated from the sublimation rate and the sample temperature. The primary experimental technique was based on freeze-drying a cylindrical microsample isothermally, with the sample suspended from one arm of a vacuum microbalance. Methodology to evaluate resistance data from vial freeze-drying experiments is also described. In separate experiments, samples in the form of a thin (15-microns) film were visually observed through a microscope during freeze-drying. Freeze-drying of most samples appeared to occur by water vapor escaping through open channels created by prior sublimation of ice. Contrary to the usual theoretical model, Rp is neither independent of temperature nor directly proportional to l. Rather, Rp decreases with increasing temperature and the l dependence is normally of the form Rp = (A0 + A1l)/(1 + A2l), where Ai (i = 0, 1, 2) are constants. In several cases, Rp is very large near l = 0, decreases sharply at l congruent to 0.1 cm, and obeys the above equation where l greater than 0.2 cm, a result suggesting an amorphous surface skin which cracks on desorption of water. The temperature dependence of Rp suggests that, as the sample temperature approaches the eutectic (or collapse) temperature, hydrodynamic surface flow of adsorbed water is an important flow mechanism. PMID:6875825

  14. Single Nanoparticle Mass Spectrometry as a High Temperature Kinetics Tool: Sublimation, Oxidation, and Emission Spectra of Hot Carbon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Howder, Collin R; Long, Bryan A; Gerlich, Dieter; Alley, Rex N; Anderson, Scott L

    2015-12-17

    In single nanoparticle mass spectrometry, individual charged nanoparticles (NPs) are trapped in a quadrupole ion trap and detected optically, allowing their mass, charge, and optical properties to be monitored continuously. Previous experiments of this type probed NPs that were either fluorescent or large enough to detect by light scattering. Alternatively, small NPs can be heated to temperatures where thermally excited emission is strong enough to allow detection, and this approach should provide a new tool for measurements of sublimation and surface reaction kinetics of materials at high temperatures. As an initial test, we report a study of carbon NPs in the 20-50 nm range, heated by 10.6 μm, 532 nm, or 445 nm lasers. The kinetics for sublimation and oxidation of individual carbon NPs were studied, and a model is presented for the factors that control the NP temperature, including laser heating, and cooling by sublimation, buffer gas collisions, and radiation. The estimated NP temperatures were in the 1700-2000 K range, and the NP absorption cross sections ranged from ∼0.8 to 0.2% of the geometric cross sections for 532 nm and 10.6 μm excitation, respectively. Emission spectra of single NPs and small NP ensembles show a feature in the IR that appears to be the high energy tail of the thermal (blackbody-like) emission expected from hot particles but also a discrete feature peaking around 750 nm. Both the IR tail and 750 nm peak are observed for all particles and for both IR and visible laser excitation. No significant difference was observed between graphite and amorphous carbon NPs. PMID:26513667

  15. Age and stability of sublimation till over buried glacier ice, inferred from 21Ne measurements, Ong Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibby, T.; Putkonen, J.; Morgan, D. J.; Balco, G.

    2014-12-01

    Ong Valley, in the Central Transantarctic Mountains, contains three distinct glacial drifts deposited by past advances of the Argosy glacier into the valley. Massive ice occurs below two of the till deposits. Potentially, such buried ice under shallow regolith cover could provide access to past climate and biological records more easily than deep ice coring. We measured cosmic-ray produced 21Ne in these tills as a means of constraining the age and stability of the three drifts, as well as the ice below them. We collected samples in vertical profiles from two hand-dug sections through each drift. The pits from two drifts overlying buried ice extended to the buried ice surface. The hypothesis that these are sublimation tills implies that 21Ne concentrations are a function of i) any inheritance from prior exposure; ii) the age since emplacement of the ice and till; iii) the sublimation rate of the ice; and iv) the surface erosion rate of the till. 21Ne concentrations in the youngest drift are ca. 10 M atoms/g and invariant with depth, indicating that they are predominantly due to inheritance, and provide only a weak maximum age constraint of ca. 0.1 Mya. The two older drifts have surface 21Ne concentrations of 200-250 M atoms/ g and depth concentration profiles consistent with a sublimation till origin. Given that 21Ne concentrations in the deepest samples in each of the two older drifts provide an upper limit on the inherited 21Ne concentration, these imply minimum ages of 1 Mya for the middle drift and 1.6 Mya for the oldest. This implies a 1 Mya minimum age for the ice underlying the middle drift.

  16. The role of sublimation and condensation on the development of ice sedimentation waves on the North Polar Cap of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herny, C.; Carpy, S.; Bourgeois, O.; Masse, M.; Spiga, A.; Le Mouélic, S.; Perret, L.; Smith, I. B.; Rodriguez, S.

    2015-10-01

    Mass and energy balance of ice sheets are driven by complex interactions between the atmosphere and the cryosphere. For instance, it has been demonstrated that feedbacks between katabatic winds and the cryosphere lead to the formation of sedimentation waves at the surface of Martian and terrestrial ice sheets [1, 2, 3 and 4]. Here we explore the role of sublimation and condensation of water vapor in the development of these sedimentation waves. We conduct this study by complementary observational and numerical investigations on the North Polar Cap of Mars.

  17. Sublimation rates of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from comet nuclei at large distances from the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1991-01-01

    One of the more attractive among the plausible scenarios for the major emission event recently observed on Comet Halley at a heliocentric distance of 14.3 AU is activation of a source of ejecta driven by an icy substance much more volatile than water. As prerequisite for the forthcoming detailed analysis of the imaging observations of this event, a simple model is proposed that yields the sublimation rate versus time at any location on the surface of a rotating cometary nucleus for two candidate ices: carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The model's variable parameters are the comet's heliocentric distance r and the Sun's instantaneous zenith angle z.

  18. Optimization of the design of a crucible for a SiC sublimation growth system using a global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. J.; Liu, L. J.; Tezuka, H.; Usuki, Y.; Kakimoto, K.

    2008-04-01

    Induction heating, temperature field and growth rate for a sublimation growth system of silicon carbide were calculated by using a global simulation model. The effects of shape of the crucible on temperature distribution and growth rate were investigated. It was found that thickness of the substrate holder, distance between the powder and substrate, and angle between the crucible wall and powder free surface are important for growth rate and crystal quality. Finally, a curved powder free surface was also studied. The results indicate that the use of a curved powder free surface is also an effective method for obtaining a higher growth rate.

  19. An atomic beam of 6Li — 7Li for high resolution spectroscopy from matrix isolation sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. N.; Sacramento, R. L.; Silva, B. A.; Uhlmann, F. O.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    We propose the Matrix Isolation Sublimation (MlSu) technique for generating cold lithium atoms for the measurement of the 6Li - 7Li isotope shift in D1 and D2 transitions. The technique is capable of generating cold 6Li and 7Li beams at 4 K with forward velocity of 125 m/s. Using this beam we offer a distinguished source of lithium atoms for transitions measurements, adding a new possibility to make high resolution spectroscopy towards improving the experimental checks of the theory.

  20. Single-crystal field-effect transistors of new Cl2-NDI polymorph processed by sublimation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tao; Stolte, Matthias; Burschka, Christian; Hansen, Nis Hauke; Musiol, Thomas; Kälblein, Daniel; Pflaum, Jens; Tao, Xutang; Brill, Jochen; Würthner, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Physical properties of active materials built up from small molecules are dictated by their molecular packing in the solid state. Here we demonstrate for the first time the growth of n-channel single-crystal field-effect transistors and organic thin-film transistors by sublimation of 2,6-dichloro-naphthalene diimide in air. Under these conditions, a new polymorph with two-dimensional brick-wall packing mode (β-phase) is obtained that is distinguished from the previously reported herringbone packing motif obtained from solution (α-phase). We are able to fabricate single-crystal field-effect transistors with electron mobilities in air of up to 8.6 cm2 V-1 s-1 (α-phase) and up to 3.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 (β-phase) on n-octadecyltriethoxysilane-modified substrates. On silicon dioxide, thin-film devices based on β-phase can be manufactured in air giving rise to electron mobilities of 0.37 cm2 V-1 s-1. The simple crystal and thin-film growth procedures by sublimation under ambient conditions avoid elaborate substrate modifications and costly vacuum equipment-based fabrication steps.