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Sample records for close-spaced sublimation deposition

  1. Induced Recrystallization of CdTe Thin Films Deposited by Close-Spaced Sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Levi, D. H.; Kazmerski, L. L.; Mayo, B.

    1998-10-29

    We have deposited CdTe thin films by close-spaced sublimation at two different temperature ranges. The films deposited at the lower temperature partially recrystallized after CdCl{sub 2} treatment at 350 C and completely recrystallized after the same treatment at 400 C. The films deposited at higher temperature did not recrystallize at these two temperatures. These results confirmed that the mechanisms responsible for changes in physical properties of CdTe films treated with CdCl{sub 2} are recrystallization and grain growth, and provided an alternative method to deposit CSS films using lower temperatures.

  2. Induced Recrystallization of CdTe Thin Films Deposited by Close-Spaced Sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Levi, D. H.; Kazmerski, L. L.; Mayo, B.

    1998-10-26

    We have deposited CdTe thin films by close-spaced sublimation at two different temperature ranges. The films deposited at the lower temperature partially recrystallized after CdCl2 treatment at 350 C and completely recrystallized after the same treatment at 400 C. The films deposited at higher temperature did not recrystallize at these two temperatures. These results confirmed that the mechanisms responsible for changes in physical properties of CdTe films treated with CdCl2 are recrystallization and grain growth, and provided an alternative method to deposit CSS films using lower temperatures.

  3. Induced recrystallization of CdTe thin films deposited by close-spaced sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H.R.; Dhere, R.G.; Al-Jassim, M.M.; Levi, D.H.; Kazmerski, L.L.; Mayo, B.

    1999-03-01

    We have deposited CdTe thin films by close-spaced sublimation at two different temperature ranges. The films deposited at the lower temperature partially recrystallized after CdCl{sub 2} treatment at 350&hthinsp;{degree}C and completely recrystallized after the same treatment at 400&hthinsp;{degree}C. The films deposited at higher temperature did not recrystallize at these two temperatures. These results confirmed that the mechanisms responsible for changes in physical properties of CdTe films treated with CdCl{sub 2} are recrystallization and grain growth, and provided an alternative method to deposit CSS films using lower temperatures. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. The role of oxygen in CdS/CdTe solar cells deposited by close-spaced sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D.H.; Levi, D.H.; Matson, R.J.

    1996-05-01

    The presence of oxygen during close-spaced sublimation (CSS) of CdTe has been previously reported to be essential for high-efficiency CdS/CdTe solar cells because it increases the acceptor density in the absorber. The authors find that the presence of oxygen during CSS increases the nucleation site density of CdTe, thus decreasing pinhole density and grain size. Photoluminescence showed that oxygen decreases material quality in the bulk of the CdTe film, but positively impacts the critical CdS/CdTe interface. Through device characterization the authors were unable to verify an increase in acceptor density with increased oxygen. These results, along with the achievement of high-efficiency cells (13% AM1.5) without the use of oxygen, led the authors to conclude that the use of oxygen during CSS deposition of CdTe can be useful but is not essential.

  5. Characterization of CdMnTe films deposited from polycrystalline powder source using closed-space sublimation method

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Jianming; Wang, Junnan; Wang, Lin; Ji, Huanhuan; Xu, Run; Zhang, Jijun; Huang, Jian; Shen, Yue; Min, Jiahua; Wang, Linjun Xia, Yiben

    2015-09-15

    CdMnTe films were prepared on quartz substrates by closed-space sublimation of polycrystalline Cd{sub 0.74}Mn{sub 0.26}Te powders. This was performed at different substrate temperatures (T{sub s} = 200, 300, 350, and 400 °C). The interfacial adhesion strength between the films and substrates, when fabricated from polycrystalline powders, was greater than that of films grown using a bulk source. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the as-deposited films had a zinc blende structure with a preferential (111) orientation. Precipitation of Te occurred in the films deposited at T{sub s} = 200 °C, as confirmed using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. The growth mode and re-evaporation dependence on the value of T{sub s} of the films were investigated. Our results suggested that materials suitable for radiation detection can be grown from a powder source at lower substrate temperatures then when grown from a bulk source.

  6. Cadmium sulfide thin films deposited by close spaced sublimation and cadmium sulfide/cadmium telluride solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinskiy, Dmitriy Nikolaevich

    1998-12-01

    One of the applications of CdS films is as a window layer in CdTe and Cu(In,Ga)Sesb2 solar cells. The study of the optical and structural properties of CdS films deposited by close spaced sublimation as well as their influence on CdS/CdTe solar cell performance is part of the CdTe solar cell program at the University of South Florida. CdS films have been deposited by the close-spaced sublimation technique. The influence of the main process parameters, the substrate and source temperatures, and the ambient in the deposition chamber has been investigated. As-deposited films have been subjected to heat treatments in Hsb2 ambient, in CdClsb2 atmosphere, and in atmosphere with small amounts of oxygen. A special annealing chamber was built to carry out the annealing experiments in the presence of CdClsb2 vapor and oxygen. Several CSS chambers were assembled to study the influence of various process parameters simultaneously and validate the results. Results of scanning electron microscopy and photoluminescence measurements have been used as the primary characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, and transmission measurements have also been carried out. It was found that as deposited CdS films have a hexagonal structure independent of the process parameters used. The presence of a CdO phase was detected in the samples grown with the highest oxygen concentration in the ambient. The resistivity of CdS films is controlled by intergrain barriers. Photoluminescence measurements showed the presence of oxygen-acceptor transition and a wide variation in the intensity of deep emission bands. The variation in the intensities was correlated with the variation in the deposition and annealing conditions. However, no correlation was found between the PL intensities of defect bands and cell performance. CdS/CdTe junctions have been fabricated using standard deposition and postgrowth techniques developed in the USF solar cells laboratory. All cells have

  7. Enhanced performance of CdS/CdTe thin-film devices through temperature profiling techniques applied to close-spaced sublimation deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaonan Li; Sheldon, P.; Moutinho, H.; Matson, R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe a methodology developed and applied to the close-spaced sublimation technique for thin-film CdTe deposition. The developed temperature profiles consisted of three discrete temperature segments, which the authors called the nucleation, plugging, and annealing temperatures. They have demonstrated that these temperature profiles can be used to grow large-grain material, plug pinholes, and improve CdS/CdTe photovoltaic device performance by about 15%. The improved material and device properties have been obtained while maintaining deposition temperatures compatible with commercially available substrates. This temperature profiling technique can be easily applied to a manufacturing environment by adjusting the temperature as a function of substrate position instead of time.

  8. Influence of substrate temperature on structural and optical properties of bismuth oxide thin films deposited by close-spaced vacuum sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, M. M.; Buryk, I. P.; Latyshev, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. O.; Levchenko, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bi2O3 thin films were deposited on ultrasonically-cleaned glass and mica substrates by close-spaced vacuum sublimation technique. Films surface morphology was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Structural study based on the transmission-electron microscopy (TEM) and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) analysis has been shown that deposited films were polycrystalline with face-centered cubic structure. Optical study was carried out by spectral photometry analysis in the wavelengths range λ = 320-900 nm using the optical transmittance and absorbance measurements. For determination optical band gap Eg the Tauc plot was used and the band gap energy Eg is determined in the range of 3.50-3.62 eV, respectively. Fourier-transform infra-red (FTIR) analysis shown that obtained films are well-crystalline and have a good optical quality.

  9. Transport phenomena in the close-spaced sublimation deposition process for manufacture of large-area cadmium telluride photovoltaic panels: Modeling and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, C. P.

    With increasing national and global demand for energy and concerns about the effect of fossil fuels on global climate change, there is an increasing emphasis on the development and use of renewable sources of energy. Solar cells or photovoltaics constitute an important renewable energy technology but the major impediment to their widespread adoption has been their high initial cost. Although thin-film photovoltaic semiconductors such as cadmium sulfide-cadmium telluride (CdS/CdTe) can potentially be inexpensively manufactured using large area deposition techniques such as close-spaced sublimation (CSS), their low stability has prevented them from becoming an alternative to traditional polycrystalline silicon solar cells. A key factor affecting the stability of CdS/CdTe cells is the uniformity of deposition of the thin films. Currently no models exist that can relate the processing parameters in a CSS setup with the film deposition uniformity. Central to the development of these models is a fundamental understanding of the complex transport phenomena which constitute the deposition process which include coupled conduction and radiation as well as transition regime rarefied gas flow. This thesis is aimed at filling these knowledge gaps and thereby leading to the development of the relevant models. The specific process under consideration is the CSS setup developed by the Materials Engineering Group at the Colorado State University (CSU). Initially, a 3-D radiation-conduction model of a single processing station was developed using the commercial finite-element software ABAQUS and validated against data from steady-state experiments carried out at CSU. A simplified model was then optimized for maximizing the steady-state thermal uniformity within the substrate. It was inferred that contrary to traditional top and bottom infrared lamp heating, a lamp configuration that directs heat from the periphery of the sources towards the center results in the minimum temperature

  10. Possibility of graphene growth by close space sublimation.

    PubMed

    Sopinskyy, Mykola V; Khomchenko, Viktoriya S; Strelchuk, Viktor V; Nikolenko, Andrii S; Olchovyk, Genadiy P; Vishnyak, Volodymyr V; Stonis, Viktor V

    2014-01-01

    Carbon films on the Si/SiO2 substrate are fabricated using modified method of close space sublimation at atmospheric pressure. The film properties have been characterized by micro-Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and monochromatic ellipsometry methods. Ellipsometrical measurements demonstrated an increase of the silicon oxide film thickness in the course of manufacturing process. The XPS survey spectra of the as-prepared samples indicate that the main elements in the near-surface region are carbon, silicon, and oxygen. The narrow-scan spectra of C1s, Si2p, O1s regions indicate that silicon and oxygen are mainly in the SiOx (x ≈ 2) oxide form, whereas the main component of C1s spectrum at 284.4 eV comes from the sp2-hybridized carbon phase. Micro-Raman spectra confirmed the formation of graphene films with the number of layers that depended on the distance between the graphite source and substrate. PMID:24731549

  11. Selective Growth of CdTe on Nano-patterned CdS via Close-Space Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Brandon A.; Zubia, David; Ordonez, Rafael; Anwar, Farhana; Prieto, Heber; Sanchez, Carlos A.; Salazar, Maria T.; Pimentel, Alejandro. A.; Michael, Joseph R.; Zhou, Xiaowang; Mcclure, John C.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Cruz-Campa, Jose L.

    2014-07-01

    Selective-area deposition of CdTe on CdS via close-space sublimation is used to study the effect of window size (2 μm and 300 nm) on grain growth. The basic fabrication procedures for each of the layers (CdS, SiO2, and CdTe) and for achieving selective-area growth are presented. Selective-area growth of both micro- and nano-scale CdTe islands on CdS substrates using close-spaced sublimation is demonstrated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction microstructure analysis show that the micro-scale CdTe islands remain polycrystalline. However, when the island size is reduced to 300 nm, single crystal CdTe can be achieved within the windows. The CdTe grains were most often in the (101) orientation for both the micro- and nano-sized CdTe islands.

  12. CdZnS thin films sublimated by closed space using mechanical mixing: A new approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Waqar; Shah, Nazar Abbas

    2014-06-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) is a prominent material for its tunable band gap used as a window layer in II-VI semiconductor solar cells. The light trapping capability of window layer is one of the powerful tools to enhance the efficiency of the cell. CdS and zinc (Zn) powders were mixed mechanically with different weight percents to make CdZnS (CZS) powder. CZS was deposited onto an ultrasonically cleaned glass substrate using close spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. CZS as-deposited thin films were characterized for structural, surface morphology with energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) and optical properties for the use of window layer in CdS/CdTe based solar cells. The different Zn concentrations in CZS played a vital role on crystallite size in structural analysis and optical properties e.g. transmission, absorption coefficient and energy band gap, etc. The crystallite size of as-deposited CZS thin films were increased as Zn concentration was increased up to certain value. The energy band gap varies from 2.42 eV to 2.57 eV for as-deposited CZS thin films with increasing Zn concentrations and surface morphology changes also. These changes were occurred due to zinc diffusion in CdS thin films. An angle resolved transmission data was taken to check the behavior of CdS and CZS thin film at different angles. A comparative study was carried out between CdS thin films and CZS thin films for the use of good window layer material.

  13. Time-resolved photoluminescence of polycrystalline CdTe grown by close-spaced sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B.; Dhere, R.; Ramanathan, K. )

    1994-06-30

    Polycrystalline CdTe has shown great promise as a low-cost material for thin-film, terrestrial photovoltaic applications, with efficiencies approaching 16% achieved with close-spaced sublimation (CSS)-grown CdTe. Due to the inherent complexities of polycrystalline material, much of the progress in this area has occurred through a slow trial-and-error process. This report uses time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) to characterize the CdTe material quality as a function of one basic growth parameter---substrate temperature. This characterization is done for two different glass substrate materials, soda-lime silicate and borosilicate.

  14. Growth of CdTe thin films on graphene by close-spaced sublimation method

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Younghun; Yang, Gwangseok; Kim, Jihyun; Chun, Seungju; Kim, Donghwan

    2013-12-02

    CdTe thin films grown on bi-layer graphene were demonstrated by using the close-spaced sublimation method, where CdTe was selectively grown on the graphene. The density of the CdTe domains was increased with increasing the number of the defective sites in the graphene, which was controlled by the duration of UV exposure. The CdTe growth rate on the bi-layer graphene electrodes was 400 nm/min with a bandgap energy of 1.45–1.49 eV. Scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, micro-photoluminescence, and X-ray diffraction technique were used to confirm the high quality of the CdTe thin films grown on the graphene electrodes.

  15. Native Defect Control of CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells by Close-Spaced Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Tamotsu; Kitamoto, Shinji; Yamada, Akira; Konagai, Makoto

    2001-05-01

    The control of native defects in the CdTe thin film solar cells was investigated using a novel source for close-spaced sublimation (CSS) process which was prepared by vacuum evaporation with elemental Cd and Te (evaporated source). The evaporated sources were prepared on glass substrates at room temperature, and the Cd/Te ratio was controlled by varying the Cd and Te beam equivalent pressures. In the cells using the Te-rich source, the conversion efficiency was less than 0.2% because of the extremely low shunt resistance. On the other hand, a conversion efficiency above 15% was obtained by using the Cd-rich source. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics revealed that the acceptor concentration in the CdTe layer increased with increasing Cd/Te ratio of the evaporated source. Furthermore, photoluminescence spectra implied that the formation of the Cd vacancies in the CdTe layer was suppressed using the Cd-rich source.

  16. Investigation of induced recrystallization and stress in close-spaced sublimated and radio-frequency magnetron sputtered CdTe thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H.R.; Dhere, R.G.; Al-Jassim, M.M.; Levi, D.H.; Kazmerski, L.L.

    1999-07-01

    We have induced recrystallization of small grain CdTe thin films deposited at low temperatures by close-spaced sublimation (CSS), using a standard CdCl{sub 2} annealing treatment. We also studied the changes in the physical properties of CdTe films deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering after the same post-deposition processing. We demonstrated that the effects of CdCl{sub 2} on the physical properties of CdTe films are similar, and independent of the deposition method. The recrystallization process is linked directly to the grain size and stress in the films. These studies indicated the feasibility of using lower-temperature processes in fabricating efficient CSS CdTe solar cells. We believe that, after the optimization of the parameters of the chemical treatment, these films can attain a quality similar to CSS films grown using current standard conditions. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  17. Epitaxial Growth of High-Resistivity CdTe Thick Films Grown Using a Modified Close Space Sublimation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Quanzhong; Brinkman, Andy W.; Veeramani, Perumal; Sellin, Paul. J.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports the growth of high-resistivity CdTe thick epitaxial films of single crystal nature using a modified close space sublimation method (MCSS) in a Te-rich environment. We propose that the high Te2 partial pressure results in an increased concentration of TeCd antisites acting as deep donors to produce the high-resistivity CdTe, as well as improved quality of thick films. This is in agreement with the deep-donor model introduced by Fiderele et al. [Cryst. Res. Technol. 38 (2003) 588]. The thick films have a µeτe value in the order 10-4 cm2 V-1 and as expected, the TeCd antisites appeared not to act as electron traps.

  18. Optical and electrical characterizations of highly efficient CdTe thin film solar cells prepared by close-spaced sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, T.; Yamada, A.; Konagai, M.

    2000-06-01

    The effects of the Cu diffusion on the optical and electrical properties of CdTe thin film solar cells prepared by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) were investigated by capacitance-voltage ( C- V) measurement and low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement. C- V measurement revealed that the net acceptor concentration in the CdTe layer was independent of the heat treatment after screen printing of the Cu-doped graphite electrode for Cu diffusion into the CdTe layer, although it greatly affected the solar cell performance. Furthermore, the depth profile of PL spectrum of CdTe layer implies that the heat treatment for Cu diffusion facilitates the formation of low-resistance contact to CdTe through the formation of a heavily doped (p +) region in the CdTe adjacent to the back electrode, but Cu atoms do not act as effective acceptors in the CdTe layer except the region near the back electrode.

  19. [Spectral analyzing effects of atmosphere states on the structure and characteristics of CdTe polycrystalline thin films made by close-spaced sublimation].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hua-jing; Zheng, Jia-gui; Feng, Liang-huan; Zhang, Jing-quan; Xie, Er-qing

    2005-07-01

    The structure and characteristics of CdTe thin films are dependent on the working atmosphere states in close-spaced sublimation. In the present paper, CdTe polycrystalline thin films were deposited by CSS in mixture atmosphere of argon and oxygen. The physical mechanism of CSS was analyzed, and the temperature distribution in CSS system was measured. The dependence of preliminary nucleus creation on the atmosphere states (involving component and pressure) was studied. Transparencies were measured and optic energy gaps were calculated. The results show that: (1) The CdTe films deposited in different atmospheres are cubic structure. With increasing oxygen concentration, a increases and reaches the maximum at 6% oxygen concentration, then reduces, and increases again after passing the point at 12% oxygen concentration. Among them, the sample depositing at 9% oxygen concentration is the best. The optic energy gaps are 1.50-1.51 eV for all CdTe films. (2) The samples depositing at different pressures at 9% oxygen concentration are all cubical structure of CdTe, and the diffraction peaks of CdS and SnO2:F still appear. With the gas pressure increasing, the crystal size of CdTe minishes, the transparency of the thin film goes down, and the absorption side shifts to the short-wave direction. (3) The polycrystalline thin films with high quality deposit in 4 minutes under the depositing condition that the substrate temperature is 550 degrees C, and source temperature is 620 degrees C at 9% oxygen concentration. PMID:16241058

  20. A close-space sublimation driven pathway for the manipulation of substrate-supported micro- and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Aarthi

    The ability to fabricate structures and engineer materials on the nanoscale leads to the development of new devices and the study of exciting phenomena. Nanostructures attached to the surface of a substrate, in a manner that renders them immobile, have numerous potential applications in a diverse number of areas. Substrate-supported nanostructures can be fabricated using numerous modalities; however the easiest and most inexpensive technique to create a large area of randomly distributed particles is by the technique of thermal dewetting. In this process a metastable thin film is deposited at room temperature and heated, causing the film to lower its surface energy by agglomerating into droplet-like nanostructures. The main drawbacks of nanostructure fabrication via this technique are the substantial size distributions realized and the lack of control over nanostructure placement. In this doctoral dissertation, a new pathway for imposing order onto the thermal dewetting process and for manipulating the size, placement, shape and composition of preformed templates is described. It sees the confinement of substrate-supported thin films or nanostructure templates by the free surface of a metal film or a second substrate surface. Confining the templates in this manner and heating them to elevated temperatures leads to changes in the characteristics of the nanostructures formed. Three different modalities are demonstrated which alters the preformed structures by: (i) subtracting atoms from the templates, (ii) adding atoms to the template or (iii) simultaneously adding and subtracting atoms. The ability to carry out such processes depends on the choice of the confining surface and the nanostructured templates used. A subtractive process occurs when an electroformed nickel mesh is placed in conformal contact with a continuous gold film while it dewets, resulting in the formation of a periodic array of gold microstructures on an oxide substrate surface. When heated the

  1. Structural and optical properties of AgAlTe{sub 2} layers grown on sapphire substrates by closed space sublimation method

    SciTech Connect

    Uruno, A. Usui, A.; Kobayashi, M.

    2014-11-14

    AgAlTe{sub 2} layers were grown on a- and c-plane sapphire substrates using a closed space sublimation method. Grown layers were confirmed to be single phase layers of AgAlTe{sub 2} by X-ray diffraction. AgAlTe{sub 2} layers were grown to have a strong preference for the (112) orientation on both kinds of substrates. The variation in the orientation of grown layers was analyzed in detail using the X-ray diffraction pole figure measurement, which revealed that the AgAlTe{sub 2} had a preferential epitaxial relationship with the c-plane sapphire substrate. The atomic arrangement between the (112) AgAlTe{sub 2} layer and sapphire substrates was compared. It was considered that the high order of the lattice arrangement symmetry probably effectively accommodated the lattice mismatch. The optical properties of the grown layer were also evaluated by transmittance measurements. The bandgap energy was found to be around 2.3 eV, which was in agreement with the theoretical bandgap energy of AgAlTe{sub 2}.

  2. A new apparatus for multilayer growth by chemical vapor deposition: The sliding-boat close-spaced technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Akihiko; Yoshihara, Seiji; Kasai, Haruo; Nishimaki, Masao

    1980-10-01

    A new apparatus for multilayer growth by chemical vapor deposition, the sliding-boat close-spaced tecnique (SBCST), is presented. The structure of the SBCST growth apparatus is quite similar to that of the conventional liquid phase epitaxy sliding-boat. The possibility of obtaining thin multilayer films by SBCST is shown. Preliminary experimental results for its application to the growth of n-CdS/p-InP heterojunction solar cells are also shown.

  3. Ice sublimation and rheology - Implications for the Martian polar layered deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofstadter, Mark D.; Murray, Bruce C.

    1990-01-01

    If the sublimation and creep of water ice are important processes in the Martian polar layered deposits, ice-rich scenario formation and evolution schemes must invoke a mechanism for the inhibition of sublimation, such as a dust layer derived from the residue of the sublimating deposits. This layer could be of the order of 1 m in thickness. If the deposits are ice-rich, flows of more than 1 km should have occurred. It is noted that the dust particles in question may be cemented by such ice that may be present, but that impurities may also have served to cement dust particles together even in the absence of ice.

  4. Growth, surface treatment and characterization of polycrystalline lead iodide thick films prepared using close space deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xinghua; Sun, Hui; Yang, Dingyu; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2012-11-01

    Lead iodide (PbI2) polycrystalline thick films were fabricated on glass substrates with a conductive indium-tin-oxide layer using a close space deposition technique. The morphology of the as-deposited PbI2 films is typically and highly oriented polycrystalline structure, made up of microcrystal platelets upright on the substrate plane. Two techniques including the surface mechanical cutting and after-growth cadmium telluride coating were employed to improve the films' surface properties. It was shown that both of the film surface treatment methods markedly decreased the dark current of PbI2 films. The photo-to-dark current ratio of about 2.05 under 241Am γ-ray source with activity of 2.78 μCi irradiation was obtained from the film treated using both surface cutting and after-growth CdTe coating. Charge transport characteristics of these films were measured and the hole mobility 7.7×10-2-1.67×10-1 cm2/V s was estimated.

  5. Core-shell-like Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS heterostructure synthesized by super-close-space sublimation for broadband down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaojie; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Meng, Fanzhi; Yu, Yingning; Han, Lin; Liu, Xiaojuan; Meng, Jian

    2014-04-01

    Combination with semiconductors is a promising approach to the realization of broadband excitation of light conversion materials based on rare earth compounds, to boost the energy efficiency of silicon solar cells. Cd1-xZnxS is a wide bandgap semiconductor with large exciton binding energy. By changing its composition, the bandgap of Cd1-xZnxS can be tuned to match the absorption of trivalent lanthanide (Ln) ions, which makes it a competent energy donor for the Ln3+-Yb3+ couple. In this work, we designed a clean route to a broadband down-converter based on a core-shell-like Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/Cd0.81Zn0.19S (CdZnS) heterostructure. By hot-pressing and subsequent annealing of a Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS mixture, highly pure CdZnS was sublimated and deposited on the Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+] grains while maintaining the original composition of the precursor. The CdZnS shell acted as a light absorber and energy donor for the Tb3+-Yb3+ quantum cutting couple. Because the use of solvents was avoided during the formation of the heterostructures, few impurities were incorporated into the samples, and the non-radiative transition was therefore markedly suppressed. The Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS heterostructures possess strong near-infrared (NIR) luminescence from Yb3+. Broadband down-conversion to the Yb3+ NIR emission was obtained in a wide range of 250-650 nm.

  6. Martian circumpolar sulfate-rich deposits: sublimation tills derived from the North Polar Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, M.; Bourgeois, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Verpoorter, C.; Le Deit, L.

    2009-12-01

    The North Polar Cap of Mars is an accumulation of ice layers with various amounts of interstratified dust particles. A dune field surrounds this polar cap. On one of the densest part of this dune field, Olympia Undae, Langevin et al. (Science, 2005) have detected calcium-rich sulfates (gypsum). To constrain the origin of these gypsum deposits, we performed an integrated morphological, structural and compositional analyses of a key area where it is possible to see the circum-polar dune field, the surface of the ice cap and a cross-section through the ice cap. The mineralogical composition of this area is investigated by applying a spectral derivative method to data acquired by OMEGA and CRISM hyperspectral imaging spectrometers. These are compared to laboratory spectra of ice-gypsum mixtures in simulated martian pressure and temperature conditions. We find that dunes of the circumpolar field and dust interstratified in the ice cap have the same composition. Both contain gypsum. Landforms produced by sublimation of ice are also visible on dust-rich layers of the ice cap. We therefore infer that the superficial circumpolar dust deposits correspond to a sublimation till produced by the ice cap. Circumpolar gypsum-rich deposits thus derive directly from the ice cap. Gypsum crystals are released at the surface of the cap as the ice sublimes. This material is then reworked by winds and forms the circumpolar dunes. There are two hypotheses for the ultimate origin of the gypsum crystals. (1) Pre-existing gypsum crystals might have been deposited together with ice crystals during the formation of the ice cap. (2) Authigenic gypsum crystals might have grown within the ice cap by weathering of dust trapped in the ice. The second hypothesis is consistent with the existence of authigenic sulfate inclusions in terrestrial polar ice (Ohno et al., GRL, 2006) and with the formation process suggested by Niles et al. (Nature, 2009) for martian equatorial sulfates.

  7. Martian polar and circum-polar sulfate-bearing deposits: Sublimation tills derived from the North Polar Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massé, M.; Bourgeois, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Verpoorter, C.; Le Deit, L.; Bibring, J. P.

    2010-10-01

    Previous spectroscopic studies have shown the presence of hydrated minerals in various kinds of sedimentary accumulations covering and encircling the martian North Polar Cap. More specifically, gypsum, a hydrated calcium sulfate, has been detected on Olympia Planum, a restricted part of the Circum-Polar Dune Field. To further constrain the geographical distribution and the process of formation and accumulation of these hydrated minerals, we performed an integrated morphological, structural and compositional analysis of a key area where hydrated minerals were detected and where the main polar landforms are present. By the development of a spectral processing method based on spectral derivation and by the acquisition of laboratory spectra of gypsum-ice mixtures we find that gypsum-bearing sediment is not restricted to the Olympia Planum dunes but is also present in all kinds of superficial sediment covering the surface of the North Polar Cap and the Circum-Polar Dune Field. Spectral signatures consistent with perchlorates are also detected on these deposits. The interpretation of landforms reveals that this gypsum-bearing sediment was released from the ice cap by sublimation. We thus infer that gypsum crystals that are now present in the Circum-Polar Dune Field derive from the interior of the North Polar Cap. Gypsum crystals that were initially trapped in the ice cap have been released by sublimation of the ice and have accumulated in the form of ablation tills at the surface of the ice cap. These gypsum-bearing sublimation tills are reworked by winds and are transported towards the Circum-Polar Dune Field. Comparison with sulfates found in terrestrial glaciers suggests that gypsum crystals in the martian North Polar Cap have formed by weathering of dust particles, either in the atmosphere prior to their deposition during the formation of the ice cap, and/or in the ice cap after their deposition.

  8. Method of fabricating conducting oxide-silicon solar cells utilizing electron beam sublimation and deposition of the oxide

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1979-01-01

    In preparing tin oxide and indium tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells by electron beam sublimation of the oxide and subsequent deposition thereof on the silicon, the engineering efficiency of the resultant cell is enhanced by depositing the oxide at a predetermined favorable angle of incidence. Typically the angle of incidence is between 40.degree. and 70.degree. and preferably between 55.degree. and 65.degree. when the oxide is tin oxide and between 40.degree. and 70.degree. when the oxide deposited is indium tin oxide. gi The Government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Department of Energy Contract No. EY-76-C-03-1283.

  9. The Sublime and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Jamin

    2006-01-01

    The sublime is a theory of aesthetics that reached its highest popularity in British literature during the Romantic period (c. 1785-1832). This article (1) explicates philosophers' different meanings of the sublime; (2) show how the sublime is relevant to education; and (3) show how the sublime "works" in literature by analyzing William Blake's…

  10. Qualification of a sublimation tool applied to the case of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of In2O3 from In(tmhd)3 as a solid precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkutnik, P. D.; Angélidès, L.; Todorova, V.; Jiménez, C.

    2016-02-01

    A solid delivery system consisting of a source canister, a gas management, and temperature controlled enclosure designed and manufactured by Air Liquide Electronics Systems was tested in the context of gas-phase delivery of the In(tmhd)3 solid precursor. The precursor stream was delivered to a thermal metalorganic chemical vapor deposition reactor to quantify deposition yield under various conditions of carrier gas flow and sublimation temperature. The data collected allowed the determination of characteristic parameters such as the maximum precursor flow rate (18.2 mg min-1 in specified conditions) and the critical mass (defined as the minimum amount of precursor able to attain the maximum flow rate) found to be about 2.4 g, as well as an understanding of the influence of powder distribution inside the canister. Furthermore, this qualification enabled the determination of optimal delivery conditions which allowed for stable and reproducible precursor flow rates over long deposition times (equivalent to more than 47 h of experiment). The resulting In2O3 layers was compared with those elaborated via pulsed liquid injection obtained in the same chemical vapor deposition chamber and under the same deposition conditions.

  11. Research of boron films deposited on different substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Wang, Linjun; Huang, Jian; Tang, Ke; Ren, Bing; Yao, Beiling; Xia, Yiben

    2013-09-01

    Semiconductor detector that incorporate neutron reactive material within the same detector demonstrates a new method for neutron dosimetry and boron neutron reactive therapy seems to be a promising treatment. Boron films were deposited on single crystalline silicon, glass, and CVD diamond film by magnetron sputtering, close-space sublimation and vacuum evaporation. The properties of the samples were characterized by SEM, which shows vacuum evaporation method is suitable for depositing high quality boron films.

  12. Controlled Microbial Cenoses in Closed Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somova, Lydia; Mikheeva, Galina

    Controlled microbial cenoses have good prospects in closed spaces: for air treatment in LSS and cellars industrial premises; for sewage treatment in LSS; for increase of productivity and protect of plants from infections in LSS. Possible methods of formation of microbiocenoses are: selection, autoselection, artificial formation taking into account their biochemical properties and metabolic interactions. Experimental microbiocenoses, has been produced on the basis of natural association of microorganisms by long cultivation on specially developed medium. Dominating groups are bacteria of genera: Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Leuconostoc, Bidobac-terium, Rhodopseudomonas and yeast of genera: Kluyveromyces, Saccharomyces and Torulop-sis. Microbiocenoses do not contain pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic microorganisms, they possess opposing and probiotic properties. Different examples of microbial cenoses actions are to be presented in the paper.

  13. Heat rejection sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingell, Charles W. (Inventor); Quintana, Clemente E. (Inventor); Le, Suy (Inventor); Clark, Michael R. (Inventor); Cloutier, Robert E. (Inventor); Hafermalz, David Scott (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A sublimator includes a sublimation plate having a thermal element disposed adjacent to a feed water channel and a control point disposed between at least a portion of the thermal element and a large pore substrate. The control point includes a sintered metal material. A method of dissipating heat using a sublimator includes a sublimation plate having a thermal element and a control point. The thermal element is disposed adjacent to a feed water channel and the control point is disposed between at least a portion of the thermal element and a large pore substrate. The method includes controlling a flow rate of feed water to the large pore substrate at the control point and supplying heated coolant to the thermal element. Sublimation occurs in the large pore substrate and the controlling of the flow rate of feed water is independent of time. A sublimator includes a sublimation plate having a thermal element disposed adjacent to a feed water channel and a control point disposed between at least a portion of the thermal element and a large pore substrate. The control point restricts a flow rate of feed water from the feed water channel to the large pore substrate independent of time.

  14. Near-equilibrium growth of thick, high quality beta-SiC by sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B.; Fekade, Konjit; Spencer, Michael G.

    1993-01-01

    A close spaced near-equilibrium growth technique was used to produce thick, high quality epitaxial layers of beta-silicon carbide. The process utilized a sublimation method to grow morphologically smooth layers. The beta silicon carbide growth layers varied from about 200 to 750 microns in thickness. Chemical vapor deposition grown, 2-10 microns, beta silicon carbide films were used as seeds at 1860 and 1910 C growth temperatures. The respective average growth rates were 20 and 30 microns per hour. The layers are p-type with a 3.1 x 10 exp 17/cu cm carrier concentration. Electrical measurements indicate considerable improvement in the breakdown voltage of Schottky barriers on growth samples. Breakdown values ranged from 25 to 60 V. These measurements represent the highest values reported for 3C-SiC.

  15. Close-spaced vapor transport of II-VI semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Gerard

    1991-12-01

    The close spaced vapor transport (CSVT) is an efficient and cost-effective technique that allows the growth of polycrystalline as well as epitaxial thin layers of semiconductors. It has been applied to II-VI materials, especially to zinc and cadmium chalcogenides. A summary table including the deposition parameters, i.e., the nature of the ambient gas, the temperature of the source, the temperature difference between source and substrate, and the values of the growth rates measured on various substrates is presented for ZnS, ZnSe, ZnTe, CdS, CdSe, and CdTe. Experimental results concerning the growth of ZnSe on GaAs substrates are also reported. The CSVT system uses an Ar atmosphere and the working temperature is ca. 825 degree(s)C. The temperatures of source and substrate are measured during deposition and growth rates of the ZnSe films are studied as a function of the reciprocal temperature of the substrate surface for GaAs and quartz (inert) substrates. The measured values of the growth rate are compared to the theoretical ones given by the reaction-limited model and the diffusion-limited model. The validity of the models is discussed in terms of the nature of the molecules participating in the transport.

  16. 46 CFR 190.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 190.15-10 Section 190.15... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces... chemical laboratories, scientific laboratories, chemical storerooms, and machinery spaces and for...

  17. 46 CFR 72.15-15 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 72.15-15 Section 72.15-15... ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 72.15-15 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces within the vessel... spaces and for closing all doorways, ventilators and annular spaces around funnels and other openings...

  18. 46 CFR 92.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 92.15-10 Section 92.15-10... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 92.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (c) of this section, all enclosed spaces within the vessel shall be properly vented or...

  19. 46 CFR 190.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 190.15-10 Section 190.15... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces... chemical laboratories, scientific laboratories, chemical storerooms, and machinery spaces and for...

  20. 46 CFR 72.15-15 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 72.15-15 Section 72.15-15... ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 72.15-15 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces within the vessel... spaces and for closing all doorways, ventilators and annular spaces around funnels and other openings...

  1. 46 CFR 92.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 92.15-10 Section 92.15-10... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 92.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (c) of this section, all enclosed spaces within the vessel shall be properly vented or...

  2. 46 CFR 72.15-15 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 72.15-15 Section 72.15-15... ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 72.15-15 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces within the vessel... spaces and for closing all doorways, ventilators and annular spaces around funnels and other openings...

  3. 46 CFR 92.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 92.15-10 Section 92.15-10... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 92.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (c) of this section, all enclosed spaces within the vessel shall be properly vented or...

  4. 46 CFR 92.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 92.15-10 Section 92.15-10... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 92.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (c) of this section, all enclosed spaces within the vessel shall be properly vented or...

  5. 46 CFR 190.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 190.15-10 Section 190.15... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces... chemical laboratories, scientific laboratories, chemical storerooms, and machinery spaces and for...

  6. 46 CFR 72.15-15 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 72.15-15 Section 72.15-15... ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 72.15-15 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces within the vessel... spaces and for closing all doorways, ventilators and annular spaces around funnels and other openings...

  7. 46 CFR 190.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 190.15-10 Section 190.15... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces... chemical laboratories, scientific laboratories, chemical storerooms, and machinery spaces and for...

  8. 46 CFR 72.15-15 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 72.15-15 Section 72.15-15... ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 72.15-15 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces within the vessel... spaces and for closing all doorways, ventilators and annular spaces around funnels and other openings...

  9. 46 CFR 92.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 92.15-10 Section 92.15-10... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 92.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (c) of this section, all enclosed spaces within the vessel shall be properly vented or...

  10. 46 CFR 190.15-10 - Ventilation for closed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation for closed spaces. 190.15-10 Section 190.15... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 190.15-10 Ventilation for closed spaces. (a) All enclosed spaces... chemical laboratories, scientific laboratories, chemical storerooms, and machinery spaces and for...

  11. Insulators and Materials for Closed-Spaced Thermoelectric Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Donald P. Snowden

    2003-07-20

    The primary goal of this Phase I program has been accomplished: to demonstrate a ceramic, injection-molded eggcrate which will form the support structure for a close-spaced thermoelectric module which can operate at significantly higher temperatures than presently possible with such modules. It has been shown that yttria-stabilized zirconia is compatible at high temperatures with typical thermoelectric materials (TAGS, SnTE and PbTe) and that it can serve as a barrier between them to preclude cross-contamination and doping of the constituents of one leg type by those from the other. Using a 2 x 2 ceramic eggcrate, thermally sprayed molybdenum electrodes have been deposited on a test module which effectively seal each pocket, further reducing the possibility of migration of elements. Based on these results the next tasks are to refine the design of the injection tool and the injection parameters to produce consistent results and to allow increase in the size of the module to that on which commercial, high-temperature thermoelectric modules can be based. In addition, development of the fabrication techniques for segmented thermoelectric legs for use with these ceramic eggcrates at high temperatures must be continued.

  12. Sublimation, culture, and creativity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Emily; Zeppenfeld, Veronika; Cohen, Dov

    2013-10-01

    Combining insights from Freud and Weber, this article explores whether Protestants (vs. Catholics and Jews) are more likely to sublimate their taboo feelings and desires toward productive ends. In the Terman sample (Study 1), Protestant men and women who had sexual problems related to anxieties about taboos and depravity had greater creative accomplishments, as compared to those with sexual problems unrelated to such concerns and to those reporting no sexual problems. Two laboratory experiments (Studies 2 and 3) found that Protestants produced more creative artwork (sculptures, poems, collages, cartoon captions) when they were (a) primed with damnation-related words, (b) induced to feel unacceptable sexual desires, or (c) forced to suppress their anger. Activating anger or sexual attraction was not enough; it was the forbidden or suppressed nature of the emotion that gave the emotion its creative power. The studies provide possibly the first experimental evidence for sublimation and suggest a cultural psychological approach to defense mechanisms. PMID:23834638

  13. A sublimation heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Gary G.; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; McHale, Glen; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-03-01

    Heat engines are based on the physical realization of a thermodynamic cycle, most famously the liquid-vapour Rankine cycle used for steam engines. Here we present a sublimation heat engine, which can convert temperature differences into mechanical work via the Leidenfrost effect. Through controlled experiments, quantified by a hydrodynamic model, we show that levitating dry-ice blocks rotate on hot turbine-like surfaces at a rate controlled by the turbine geometry, temperature difference and solid material properties. The rotational motion of the dry-ice loads is converted into electric power by coupling to a magnetic coil system. We extend our concept to liquid loads, generalizing the realization of the new engine to both sublimation and the instantaneous vapourization of liquids. Our results support the feasibility of low-friction in situ energy harvesting from both liquids and ices. Our concept is potentially relevant in challenging situations such as deep drilling, outer space exploration or micro-mechanical manipulation.

  14. X-38 Advanced Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingell, Chuck; Quintana, Clemente; Le, Suy; Hafemalz, David S.; Clark, Mike; Cloutier, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses a heat rejection device for transferring heat from a space vehicle by venting water into space through the use of a novel, two-stage water distribution system. The system consists of two different, porous media that stop water-borne contaminants from clogging the system and causing operational failures. Feedwater passes through a small nozzle, then into a porous disk made of sintered stainless steel, and then finally into large-pore aluminum foam. The smaller pore layer of the steel disk controls the pressure drop of the feedwater. The ice forms in the foam layer, and then sublimates, leaving any contaminants behind. The pore-size of the foam is two orders of magnitude larger than the current porous plate sublimators, allowing for a greater tolerance for contaminants. Using metallic fibers in the foam also negates problems with compression seen in the use of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) felt.

  15. Modal vector estimation for closely spaced frequency modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. R., Jr.; Chung, Y. T.; Blair, M.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques for obtaining improved modal vector estimates for systems with closely spaced frequency modes are discussed. In describing the dynamical behavior of a complex structure modal parameters are often analyzed: undamped natural frequency, mode shape, modal mass, modal stiffness and modal damping. From both an analytical standpoint and an experimental standpoint, identification of modal parameters is more difficult if the system has repeated frequencies or even closely spaced frequencies. The more complex the structure, the more likely it is to have closely spaced frequencies. This makes it difficult to determine valid mode shapes using single shaker test methods. By employing band selectable analysis (zoom) techniques and by employing Kennedy-Pancu circle fitting or some multiple degree of freedom (MDOF) curve fit procedure, the usefulness of the single shaker approach can be extended.

  16. The formation of filamentary sublimate residues (FSR) from mineral grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storrs, A. D.; Fanale, F. P.; Saunders, R. S.; Stephens, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    The significant interparticle forces observed between solar system dust grains upon desorption or sublimation of excess volatiles in simulated Martian or cometary environments are presently investigated, in order to more precisely define these mechanisms and to simulate the types of deposits thereby formed. Some classes of phyllosilicate mineral grains are noted to bond together to form a highly porous filamentary sublimate residue (FSR) exhibiting an exceptionally high tensile strength for its density; this may be important in its control of erosion and sublimation in Martian and cometary environments. It is concluded that FSR formation from clean mineral grains in water ice may be important in the formation of the Martian polar layered terrain.

  17. A hybrid genetic algorithm for resolving closely spaced objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, R. J.; Lillo, W. E.; Schulenburg, N.

    1995-01-01

    A hybrid genetic algorithm is described for performing the difficult optimization task of resolving closely spaced objects appearing in space based and ground based surveillance data. This application of genetic algorithms is unusual in that it uses a powerful domain-specific operation as a genetic operator. Results of applying the algorithm to real data from telescopic observations of a star field are presented.

  18. Glycosylation of closely spaced acceptor sites in human glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Shrimal, Shiteshu; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    Summary Asparagine-linked glycosylation of proteins by the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) occurs when acceptor sites or sequons (N-x≠P-T/S) on nascent polypeptides enter the lumen of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Metazoan organisms assemble two isoforms of the OST that have different catalytic subunits (STT3A or STT3B) and partially non-overlapping cellular roles. Potential glycosylation sites move past the STT3A complex, which is associated with the translocation channel, at the protein synthesis elongation rate. Here, we investigated whether close spacing between acceptor sites in a nascent protein promotes site skipping by the STT3A complex. Biosynthetic analysis of four human glycoproteins revealed that closely spaced sites are efficiently glycosylated by an STT3B-independent process unless the sequons contain non-optimal sequence features, including extreme close spacing between sequons (e.g. NxTNxT) or the presence of paired NxS sequons (e.g. NxSANxS). Many, but not all, glycosylation sites that are skipped by the STT3A complex can be glycosylated by the STT3B complex. Analysis of a murine glycoprotein database revealed that closely spaced sequons are surprisingly common, and are enriched for paired NxT sites when the gap between sequons is less than three residues. PMID:24105266

  19. A sublimation heat engine

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Gary G.; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; McHale, Glen; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-01-01

    Heat engines are based on the physical realization of a thermodynamic cycle, most famously the liquid–vapour Rankine cycle used for steam engines. Here we present a sublimation heat engine, which can convert temperature differences into mechanical work via the Leidenfrost effect. Through controlled experiments, quantified by a hydrodynamic model, we show that levitating dry-ice blocks rotate on hot turbine-like surfaces at a rate controlled by the turbine geometry, temperature difference and solid material properties. The rotational motion of the dry-ice loads is converted into electric power by coupling to a magnetic coil system. We extend our concept to liquid loads, generalizing the realization of the new engine to both sublimation and the instantaneous vapourization of liquids. Our results support the feasibility of low-friction in situ energy harvesting from both liquids and ices. Our concept is potentially relevant in challenging situations such as deep drilling, outer space exploration or micro-mechanical manipulation. PMID:25731669

  20. A sublimation heat engine.

    PubMed

    Wells, Gary G; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; McHale, Glen; Sefiane, Khellil

    2015-01-01

    Heat engines are based on the physical realization of a thermodynamic cycle, most famously the liquid-vapour Rankine cycle used for steam engines. Here we present a sublimation heat engine, which can convert temperature differences into mechanical work via the Leidenfrost effect. Through controlled experiments, quantified by a hydrodynamic model, we show that levitating dry-ice blocks rotate on hot turbine-like surfaces at a rate controlled by the turbine geometry, temperature difference and solid material properties. The rotational motion of the dry-ice loads is converted into electric power by coupling to a magnetic coil system. We extend our concept to liquid loads, generalizing the realization of the new engine to both sublimation and the instantaneous vapourization of liquids. Our results support the feasibility of low-friction in situ energy harvesting from both liquids and ices. Our concept is potentially relevant in challenging situations such as deep drilling, outer space exploration or micro-mechanical manipulation. PMID:25731669

  1. Modelling Sublimation of Carbon Dioxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author reports results in their efforts to model sublimation of carbon dioxide and the associated kinetics order and parameter estimation issues in their model. They have offered the reader two sets of data and several approaches to determine the rate of sublimation of a piece of solid dry ice. They presented several models…

  2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the nucleation processes and chemistry of CdS thin films deposited by sublimation on different solar cell substrate materials

    SciTech Connect

    Espinos, J.P.; Martin-Concepcion, A.I.; Mansilla, C.; Yubero, F.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.

    2006-07-15

    Cadmium sulfide has been deposited by evaporation on five different substrates: CdTe, ZnO, Ag, TiO{sub 2}, and partially reduced titanium oxide (i.e., TiO{sub 1.73}). The deposition rate and the evolution of the Cd/S ratio on the different substrates have been determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The growth mode of the films has been also studied by analyzing the shape of the backgrounds behind the photoemission peaks (peak shape analysis). It has been found that, under completely equivalent conditions, the deposition efficiency (i.e., sticking coefficient) is large on CdTe and TiO{sub 1.73}, but very small on ZnO and TiO{sub 2}. Silver constitutes an intermediate situation characterized by a long induction period where the deposition rate is small and a later increase in deposition efficiency comparable to that on CdTe. For the initial stages of deposition, below an equivalent monolayer, it has been also found that the Cd/S ratio is smaller than unity on TiO{sub 1.73} and ZnO but larger than unity on CdTe and Ag substrates. For sufficiently long deposition times the Cd/S ratio on the surface reaches unity. Except for silver substrate, cadmium appears as Cd{sup 2+} and sulfur as S{sup -2} species at the initial stages of deposition. On the silver surface, cadmium adsorbs as Cd{sup 0} at low coverage. Peak shape analysis has shown that cadmium sulfide grows according to layer-by-layer mechanism (Frank-van de Merwe model) when the substrates are CdTe and TiO{sub 1.73}, but large particles are formed that do not cover the surface for ZnO and Ag substrates (Volmer-Weber growth model). These results are consistent with the different chemical affinities of the substrate towards the atoms of cadmium and sulfur produced during the evaporation of the cadmium sulfide.

  3. HiRISE observations of gas sublimation-driven activity in Mars’ southern polar regions: II. Surficial deposits and their origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, N.; Hansen, C. J.; Portyankina, G.; Russell, P. S.

    2010-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has been used to monitor the seasonal evolution of several regions at high southern latitudes and, in particular, the jet-like activity which may result from the process described by Kieffer (JGR, 112, E08005, doi:10.1029/2006JE002816, 2007) involving translucent CO 2 ice. In this work, we mostly concentrate on observations of the Inca City (81°S, 296°E) and Manhattan (86°S, 99°E) regions in the southern spring of 2007. Two companion papers, [Hansen et al. this issue] and [Portyankina et al. this issue], discuss the surface features in these regions and specific models of the behaviour of CO 2 slab ice, respectively. The observations indicate rapid on-set of activity in late winter initiating before HiRISE can obtain adequately illuminated images (Ls < 174° at Inca City). Most sources become active within the subsequent 8 weeks. Activity is indicated by the production of dark deposits surrounded by brighter bluer deposits which probably arise from the freezing out of vented CO 2 [ Titus et al., 2007. AGU (abstract P41A-0188)]. These deposits originate from araneiform structures (spiders), boulders on ridges, cracks on slopes, and along linear cracks in the slab ice on flatter surfaces. The type of activity observed can often be explained qualitatively by considering the local topography. Some dark fans are observed to shorten enormously in length on a timescale of 18 days. We consider this to be strong evidence that outgassing was in progress at the time of HiRISE image acquisition and estimate a total particulate emission rate of >30 g s -1 from a single typical jet feature. Brighter deposits at Inca City become increasingly hard to detect after Ls = 210°. In the Inca City region, the orientations of surficial deposits are topographically controlled. The deposition of dark material also appears to be influenced by local topography suggesting that the ejection

  4. Sublimation systems and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D.; McKellar, Michael G.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2016-02-09

    A system for vaporizing and sublimating a slurry comprising a fluid including solid particles therein. The system includes a first heat exchanger configured to receive the fluid including solid particles and vaporize the fluid and a second heat exchanger configured to receive the vaporized fluid and solid particles and sublimate the solid particles. A method for vaporizing and sublimating a fluid including solid particles therein is also disclosed. The method includes feeding the fluid including solid particles to a first heat exchanger, vaporizing the fluid, feeding the vaporized fluid and solid particles to a second heat exchanger and sublimating the solid particles. In some embodiments the fluid including solid particles is liquid natural gas or methane including solid carbon dioxide particles.

  5. Accumulation of Raman gain between closely spaced pulse pairs.

    PubMed

    Marshall, L R; Piper, J A

    1990-12-01

    The short-pulse conversion efficiency of stimulated Raman scattering in Pb vapor is increased from 15% to 35% by using a novel technique that employs a closely spaced pair of pump pulses. The second pulse scatters off the coherent excitation induced in the medium by the first pulse, with a resultant enhancement in efficiency. To our knowledge these results give the first observation of such long-lived cooperative phenomena in stimulated Raman scattering. We have also observed this phenomenon in H(2) and show that this technique is readily applicable to other Raman-active media. PMID:19771085

  6. Underwater acoustic source localization using closely spaced hydrophone pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Min Seop; Choi, Bok-Kyoung; Kim, Byoung-Nam; Lee, Kyun Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Underwater sound source position is determined using a line array. However, performance degradation occurs owing to a multipath environment, which generates incoherent signals. In this paper, a hydrophone array is proposed for underwater source position estimation robust to a multipath environment. The array is composed of three pairs of sensors placed on the same line. The source position is estimated by performing generalized cross-correlation (GCC). The proposed system is not affected by a multipath time delay because of the close distance between closely spaced sensors. The validity of the array is confirmed by simulation using acoustic signals synthesized by eigenrays.

  7. CFD simulation of boundary effects on closely spaced jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Ishita; Adams, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In coastal areas characterized by shallow water depth, industrial effluents are often diluted using multiple closely spaced jets. Examples of such effluents include brine from desalination plants, treated wastewater from sewage treatment plants and heated water from thermal power plants. These jets are arranged in various orientations, such as unidirectional diffusers and rosette groups, to maximize mixing with ambient water. Due to effects of dynamic pressure, the jets interact with each other leading to mixing characteristics which are quite different from those of individual jets. The effect of mutual interaction is exaggerated under confinement, when a large number of closely spaced jets discharge into shallow depth. Dilution through an outfall, consisting of multiple jets, depends on various outfall and ambient parameters. Here we observe the effects of shoreline proximity, in relation to diffuser length and water depth, on the performance of unidirectional diffusers discharging to quiescent water. For diffusers located closer to shore, less dilution is observed due to the limited availability of ambient water for dilution. We report on the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and compare the results with experimental observations.

  8. Approximating the Generalized Voronoi Diagram of Closely Spaced Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, John; Daniel, Eric; Pascucci, Valerio; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2015-06-22

    We present an algorithm to compute an approximation of the generalized Voronoi diagram (GVD) on arbitrary collections of 2D or 3D geometric objects. In particular, we focus on datasets with closely spaced objects; GVD approximation is expensive and sometimes intractable on these datasets using previous algorithms. With our approach, the GVD can be computed using commodity hardware even on datasets with many, extremely tightly packed objects. Our approach is to subdivide the space with an octree that is represented with an adjacency structure. We then use a novel adaptive distance transform to compute the distance function on octree vertices. The computed distance field is sampled more densely in areas of close object spacing, enabling robust and parallelizable GVD surface generation. We demonstrate our method on a variety of data and show example applications of the GVD in 2D and 3D.

  9. NASA Research For Instrument Approaches To Closely Spaced Parallel Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Dawn M.; Perry, R. Brad

    2000-01-01

    Within the NASA Aviation Systems Capacity Program, the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Project is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological condition (IMC). The Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) research within TAP has focused on an airborne centered approach for independent instrument approaches to closely spaced parallel runways using Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) technologies. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), working in partnership with Honeywell, Inc., completed in AILS simulation study, flight test, and demonstration in 1999 examining normal approaches and potential collision scenarios to runways with separation distances of 3,400 and 2,500 feet. The results of the flight test and demonstration validate the simulation study.

  10. Approximating the Generalized Voronoi Diagram of Closely Spaced Objects

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John; Daniel, Eric; Pascucci, Valerio; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2016-01-01

    We present an algorithm to compute an approximation of the generalized Voronoi diagram (GVD) on arbitrary collections of 2D or 3D geometric objects. In particular, we focus on datasets with closely spaced objects; GVD approximation is expensive and sometimes intractable on these datasets using previous algorithms. With our approach, the GVD can be computed using commodity hardware even on datasets with many, extremely tightly packed objects. Our approach is to subdivide the space with an octree that is represented with an adjacency structure. We then use a novel adaptive distance transform to compute the distance function on octree vertices. The computed distance field is sampled more densely in areas of close object spacing, enabling robust and parallelizable GVD surface generation. We demonstrate our method on a variety of data and show example applications of the GVD in 2D and 3D. PMID:27540272

  11. Close-spaced vapor transport and photoelectrochemistry of gallium arsenide for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritenour, Andrew J.

    The high balance-of-system costs of photovoltaic installations indicate that reductions in absorber cost alone are likely insufficient for photovoltaic electricity to reach grid parity unless energy conversion efficiency is also increased. Technologies which both yield high-efficiency cells (>25%) and maintain low costs are needed. GaAs and related III--V semiconductors are used in the highest-efficiency single- and multi-junction photovoltaics, but the technology is too expensive for non-concentrated terrestrial applications. This is due in part to the limited scalability of traditional syntheses, which rely on expensive reactors and employ toxic and pyrophoric gas-phase precursors such as arsine and trimethyl gallium. This work describes GaAs films made by close-spaced vapor transport, a potentially scalable technique which is carried out at atmospheric pressure and requires only bulk GaAs, water vapor, and a temperature gradient to deposit crystalline films with similar electronic properties to GaAs prepared using traditional syntheses. Although close-spaced vapor transport of GaAs was first developed in 1963, there were few examples of GaAs photovoltaic devices made using this method in the literature at the onset of this project. Furthermore, it was unclear whether close-spaced vapor transport could produce GaAs films appropriate for use in photovoltaics. The goal of this project was to create and study GaAs devices made using close-spaced vapor transport and determine whether the technique could be used for production of grid-connected GaAs photovoltaics. In Chapter I the design of the vapor transport reactor, the chemistry of crystal growth, and optoelectronic characterization techniques are discussed. Chapter II focuses on compositional measurements, doping, and improved electronic quality in CSVT GaAs. Chapter III describes several aspects of the interplay between structure and electronic properties of photoelectrochemical devices. Chapter IV addresses

  12. Sublimation Growth of Titanium Nitride Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Li; Edgar, J H; Kenik, Edward A; Meyer III, Harry M

    2009-01-01

    The sublimation-recondensation growth of titanium nitride crystal with N/Ti ratio of 0.99 on tungsten substrate is reported. The growth rate dependence on temperature and pressure was determined, and the calculated activation energy is 775.8 29.8kJ/mol. The lateral and vertical growth rates changed with the time of growth and the fraction of the tungsten substrate surface covered. The orientation relationship of TiN (001) || W (001) with TiN [100] || W [110], a 45o angle between TiN [100] and W [100], occurs not only for TiN crystals deposited on W (001) textured tungsten but also for TiN crystals deposited on randomly orientated tungsten. This study demonstrates that this preferred orientational relationship minimizes the lattice mismatch between the TiN and tungsten.

  13. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of CdTe—reactor design considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Peter V.; Kee, Robert J.; Raja, Laxminarayan; Wolden, Colin A.; Aire, Michael

    1999-03-01

    Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (APCVD) of polycrystalline thin-film CdTe appears to offer several practical advantages over state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques. APCVD employs the same reaction chemistry utilized to produce 16% efficient CdTe cells (i.e., same reaction chemistry as Close Spaced Sublimation), avoids use of vacuum equipment, allows for physical separation of the source and substrate, and employs forced convection to ensure uniform delivery of source material over large-area substrates. Reactor design considerations and preliminary numerical simulations of mass transport are presented.

  14. Displacement, Substitution, Sublimation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Sigmund Freund worked with the mechanisms of displacement, substitution, and sublimation. These mechanisms have many similarities and have been studied diagnostically and therapeutically. Displacement and substitution seem to fit in well with phobias, hysterias, somatiyations, prejudices, and scapegoating. Phobias, prejudices, and scapegoating…

  15. Eisenhower and the American Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Gorman, Ned

    2008-01-01

    This essay presents Dwight D. Eisenhower's presidential rhetoric as an iteration of an American synecdochal sublime. Eisenhower's rhetoric sought to re-aim civic sight beyond corporeal objects to the nation's transcendental essence. This rhetoric is intimately connected to prevailing political anxieties and exigencies, especially the problem of…

  16. Membrane evaporator/sublimator investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, J.; Ruder, J.; Strumpf, H.

    1974-01-01

    Data are presented on a new evaporator/sublimator concept using a hollow fiber membrane unit with a high permeability to liquid water. The aim of the program was to obtain a more reliable, lightweight and simpler Extra Vehicular Life Support System (EVLSS) cooling concept than is currently being used.

  17. Heat transfer from cylinders having closely spaced fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, Arnold E

    1937-01-01

    The heat-transfer coefficients have been determined for five steel cylinders having fins 1.22 inches wide and the spacing between the fins ranging from 0.022 to 0.131 inch. The cylinders were tested with and without baffles in a wind tunnel; they were also tested enclosed in jackets with the cooling air supplied by a blower. A maximum heat transfer was reached at a fin space of about 0.45 inch for the cylinders tested with each of the three methods of cooling investigated. The rise in temperature of the air passing between the fins and the change in flow pattern were found to be important factors limiting the heat transfer that may be obtained by decreasing the fin space. The use of baffles for directing the air around the cylinders with closely spaced fins proved very effective in increasing the over-all heat-transfer coefficient, provided that the spacing was not appreciably less than that for maximum heat transfer.

  18. Optimizing surface-enhanced Raman scattering by template guided assembling of closely spaced silver nanocluster arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. H.; Xie, B.; Liu, Y. J.; He, L. B.; Han, M.

    2009-04-01

    We present an easy approach to synthesize closely spaced regular arrays of silver nanoclusters, which are self-assembled by depositing gas-phase synthesized metal nanoclusters onto pre-patterned triblock copolymer templates. The array has a high particle density of about 2 ×103 particles per μm2, and an average interparticle space of about 20 nm. The surface plasmon resonance wavelength of the array is tuned due to the interparticle plasmon coupling. High SERS sensitivity for less than one layer trans-1,2-bi-(4-pyridyl) ethylene (BPE) molecule detection, with an enhancement factor of 2.6 ×106, has been demonstrated for a substrate with this array. The enhanced Raman signal was found to be 5 times higher than that measured from the substrate with randomly distributed silver nanoparticles.

  19. APPARATUS FOR CONDENSATION AND SUBLIMATION

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, R.J.; Fuis, F. Jr.

    1958-10-01

    An apparatus is presented for the sublimation and condensation of uranium compounds in order to obtain an improved crystalline structure of this material. The apparatus comprises a vaporizing chamber and condensing structure connected thereto. There condenser is fitted with a removable liner having a demountable baffle attached to the liner by means of brackets and a removable pin. The baffle is of spiral cross-section and is provided with cooling coils disposed between the surfaces of the baffle for circulation of a temperature controlling liquid within the baffle. The cooling coll provides for controlllng the temperature of the baffle to insure formatlon of a satisfactory condensate, and the removable liner facilitates the removal of condensate formed during tbe sublimation process.

  20. Advances in sublimation studies for particles of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Nguyen, Viet; Fischer, Thomas; Abrishami, Tara; Papantonakis, Michael; Kendziora, Chris; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2015-05-01

    When handling explosives, or related surfaces, the hands routinely become contaminated with particles of explosives and related materials. Subsequent contact with a solid surface results in particle crushing and deposition. These particles provide an evidentiary trail which is useful for security applications. As such, the opto-physico-chemical characteristics of these particles are critical to trace explosives detection applications in DOD or DHS arenas. As the persistence of these particles is vital to their forensic exploitation, it is important to understand which factors influence their persistence. The longevity or stability of explosives particles on a substrate is a function of several environmental parameters or particle properties including: Vapor pressure, particle geometry, airflow, particle field size, substrate topography, humidity, reactivity, adlayers, admixtures, particle areal density, and temperature. In this work we deposited particles of 2,4-dinitrotoluene on standard microscopy glass slides by particle sieving and studied their sublimation as a function of airflow velocity, areal particle density and particle field size. Analysis of 2D microscopic images was used to compute and track particle size and geometrical characteristics. The humidity, temperature and substrate type were kept constant for each experiment. A custom airflow cell, using standard microscopy glass slide, allowed in-situ photomicroscopy. Areal particle densities and airflow velocities were selected to provide relevant loadings and flow velocities for a range of potential applications. For a chemical of interest, we define the radial sublimation velocity (RSV) for the equivalent sphere of a particle as the parameter to characterize the sublimation rate. The RSV is a useful parameter because it is independent of particle size. The sublimation rate for an ensemble of particles was found to significantly depend on airflow velocity, the areal density of the particles, and the

  1. Experimental Investigation of Transient Sublimator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephen, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. Sublimators can be used as a topper during mission phases such as low lunar or low earth orbit. In these mission phases, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will investigate the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization during various feedwater timing scenarios. The X-38 sublimator and Contamination Insensitive Sublimator (CIS) were tested in a ground vacuum chamber to understand this behavior and to quantify the feedwater performance. Data from various scenarios will be analyzed to investigate feedwater utilization under the cyclical conditions. This paper will also provide recommendations for future sublimator designs and/or feedwater control.

  2. Low-Cost Growth of III-V Layers on Si Using Close-Spaced Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, Jason W.; Greenaway, Ann L.; Ritenour, Andrew J.; Davis, Allison L.; Bachman, Benjamin F.; Aloni, Shaul; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2015-06-14

    Close-spaced vapor transport (CSVT) uses solid precursors to deposit material at high rates and with high precursor utilization. The use of solid precursors could significantly reduce the costs associated with III-V photovoltaics, particularly if growth on Si substrates can be demonstrated. We present preliminary results of the growth of GaAs1-xPx with x ≈ 0.3 and 0.6, showing that CSVT can be used to produce III-V-V’ alloys with band gaps suitable for tandem devices. Additionally, we have grown GaAs on Si by first thermally depositing films of Ge and subsequently depositing GaAs by CSVT. Patterning the Ge into islands prevents cracking due to thermal mismatch and is useful for potential tandem structures.

  3. Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and the Aesthetically Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenabeele, Bart

    2003-01-01

    Much has been written on the relationship between Arthur Schopenhauer and Friedrich Nietzsche. Much remains to be said, however, concerning their respective theories of the sublime. In this article, the author first argues against the traditional, dialectical view of Schopenhauer's theory of the sublime that stresses the crucial role the sublime…

  4. Investigation of Transient Performance for a Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Sheth, Rubik; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode during low lunar orbit for Altair and possibly Orion, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. In this mission phase, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will investigate the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization during various feedwater timing scenarios. The X-38 sublimator, which represents the state of the art in sublimator technology, was used to understand this behavior and to quantify the feedwater performance. Data from various scenarios will be analyzed to investigate feedwater utilization under the cyclical conditions. This paper will also provide recommendations for future sublimator designs and/or feedwater control.

  5. Investigation of Transient Performance for a Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. Sublimators can be used as a topper during mission phases such as low lunar or low earth orbit. In these mission phases, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will investigate the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization during various feedwater timing scenarios. The X-38 sublimator and Contamination Insensitive Sublimator (CIS) were tested in a ground vacuum chamber to understand this behavior and to quantify the feedwater performance. Data from various scenarios will be analyzed to investigate feedwater utilization under the cyclical conditions

  6. Cooling-Trough Condenser for Sublimation Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenbraun, E. J.; Lucas, J. M.

    1995-11-01

    A wrap-around, trough condenser for use with large diameter (2.5") sublimation tubes is described. The design permits attachment of the condenser to the sublimation tube without removing the tube from the heater. It also permits the use of a variety of liquid (tap water, Dry Ice, and alcohol or acetone) or solid (ice or Dry Ice) coolants.

  7. Investigation of Transient Performance for a Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100 %. However, Sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode during low lunar orbit for Altair and possibly Orion. The cyclical topping mode represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. In this operational mode, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will investigate the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization for various feedwater timing scenarios.

  8. Matrix sublimation method for the formation of high-density amorphous ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouchi, A.; Hama, T.; Kimura, Y.; Hidaka, H.; Escribano, R.; Watanabe, N.

    2016-08-01

    A novel method for the formation of amorphous ice involving matrix sublimation has been developed. A CO-rich CO:H2O mixed ice was deposited at 8-10 K under ultra-high vacuum condition, which was then allowed to warm. After the sublimation of matrix CO at 35 K, amorphous ice remained. The amorphous ice formed exhibits a highly porous microscale texture; however, it also rather exhibits a density similar to that of high-density amorphous ice formed under high pressure. Furthermore, unlike conventional vapor-deposited amorphous ice, the amorphous ice is stable up to 140 K, where it transforms directly to cubic ice Ic.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Transient Sublimator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2012-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered for operations in a cyclical topping mode, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. Sublimators can be used as a supplemental heat rejection device during mission phases where the environmental temperature or heat rejection requirement changes rapidly. This scenario may occur during low lunar orbit, low earth orbit, or other planetary orbits. In these mission phases, the need for supplemental heat rejection will vary between zero and some fraction of the overall heat load. In particular, supplemental heat rejection is required for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will describe the effects of these transient starts and stops on the feedwater utilization during various feedwater timing scenarios. Experimental data from various scenarios is analyzed to investigate feedwater consumption efficiency under the cyclical conditions. Start up utilization tests were conducted to better understand the transient performance. This paper also provides recommendations for future sublimator design and transient operation.

  10. Potential Sedimentary Evidence of Two Closely Spaced Tsunamis on the West Coast of Aceh, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, Katrin; Meilianda, Ella; Rushdy, Ibnu; Moena, Abudzar; Yolanda, Irvan P.

    2016-04-01

    Recent research in the coastal regions of Aceh, Indonesia, an area that was largely affected by the 2004 Sumatra Andaman earthquake and ensuing Indian Ocean tsunami, suggests the possibility that two closely spaced tsunamis occurred at the turn of the 14th to 15th century (Meltzner et al., 2010; Sieh et al., 2015). Here, we present evidence of two buried sand layers in the coastal marshes of West Aceh, possibly representing these penultimate predecessors of the 2004 tsunami. We discovered the sand layers in an until recently inaccessible area of a previously studied beach ridge plain about 15 km North of Meulaboh, West Aceh. Here, the 2004 tsunami left a continuous, typically a few cm thick sand sheet in the coastal hinterland in low-lying swales that accumulate organic-rich deposits and separate the sandy beach ridges. In keeping with the long-term progradation of the coastline, older deposits have to be sought after further inland. Using a hand auger, the buried sand layers were discovered in 3 cores in a flooded and highly vegetated swale in about 1 km distance to the shoreline. The pair of sand layers occurs in 70-100 cm depth and overlies 40-60 cm of dark-brown peat that rests on the basal sand of the beach ridge plain. The lower sand layer is only 1-6 cm thick, whereas the upper layer is consistently thicker, measuring 11-17 cm, with 8-14 cm of peat in between sand sheets. Both layers consist of massive, grey, medium sand and include plant fragments. They show very sharp upper and lower boundaries clearly distinguishing them from the surrounding peat and indicating an abrupt depositional event. A previously developed age model for sediments of this beach ridge plain suggest that this pair of layers could indeed correlate to a nearby buried sand sheet interpreted as tsunamigenic and deposited soon after 1290-1400AD (Monecke et al., 2008). The superb preservation at this new site allows the clear distinction of two depositional events, which, based on a first

  11. Coating Thermoelectric Devices To Suppress Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Caillat, Thierry; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    A technique for suppressing sublimation of key elements from skutterudite compounds in advanced thermoelectric devices has been demonstrated. The essence of the technique is to cover what would otherwise be the exposed skutterudite surface of such a device with a thin, continuous film of a chemically and physically compatible metal. Although similar to other sublimation-suppression techniques, this technique has been specifically tailored for application to skutterudite antimonides. The primary cause of deterioration of most thermoelectric materials is thermal decomposition or sublimation - one or more elements sublime from the hot side of a thermoelectric couple, changing the stoichiometry of the device. Examples of elements that sublime from their respective thermoelectric materials are Ge from SiGe, Te from Pb/Te, and now Sb from skutterudite antimonides. The skutterudite antimonides of primary interest are CoSb3 [electron-donor (n) type] and CeFe(3-x)Co(x)Sb12 [electron-acceptor (p) type]. When these compounds are subjected to typical operating conditions [temperature of 700 C and pressure <10(exp -5) torr (0.0013 Pa)], Sb sublimes from their surfaces, with the result that Sb depletion layers form and advance toward their interiors. As the depletion layer advances in a given device, the change in stoichiometry diminishes the thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency of the device. The problem, then, is to prevent sublimation, or at least reduce it to an acceptably low level. In preparation for an experiment on suppression of sublimation, a specimen of CoSb3 was tightly wrapped in a foil of niobium, which was selected for its chemical stability. In the experiment, the wrapped specimen was heated to a temperature of 700 C in a vacuum of residual pressure <10(exp -5) torr (0.0013 Pa), then cooled and sectioned. Examination of the sectioned specimen revealed that no depletion layer had formed, indicating the niobium foil prevented sublimation of antimony at 700 C

  12. Experimental determination of ice sublimation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, R.; Canto, J.; Satorre, M. A.; Domingo, M.

    2011-11-01

    In Astrophysics, the study of ices is important due to the wide range of scenarios in which they are present. Their physical and chemical characteristics play an important role in the study of the interstellar medium (ISM). The assessment of the energy of sublimation allows us to improve our understanding of physical and/or chemical processes that take place where ices are present. The energy of sublimation E_sub is defined as the change of energy between solid and gas phase of certain molecule. This value is important to determinate other thermodynamical parameters such as the reticular energy of ionic compounds, the energy of formation in gas phase from the energy of formation in condensed phase, or to estimate the sublimation rate, which is very important in determining the evolution of surfaces of astrophysical objects.

  13. Pilot Non-Conformance to Alerting System Commands During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Hansman, R. John

    1997-01-01

    Pilot non-conformance to alerting system commands has been noted in general and to a TCAS-like collision avoidance system in a previous experiment. This paper details two experiments studying collision avoidance during closely-spaced parallel approaches in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), and specifically examining possible causal factors of, and design solutions to, pilot non-conformance.

  14. The Effect of CO2 Ice Cap Sublimation on Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterson, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Sublimation of the polar CO2 ice caps on Mars is an ongoing phenomenon that may be contributing to secular climate change on Mars. The transfer of CO2 between the surface and atmosphere via sublimation and deposition may alter atmospheric mass such that net atmospheric mass is increasing despite seasonal variations in CO2 transfer. My study builds on previous studies by Kahre and Haberle that analyze and compare data from the Phoenix and Viking Landers 1 and 2 to determine whether secular climate change is happening on Mars. In this project, I use two years worth of temperature, pressure, and elevation data from the MSL Curiosity rover to create a program that allows for successful comparison of Curiosity pressure data to Viking Lander pressure data so a conclusion can be drawn regarding whether CO2 ice cap sublimation is causing a net increase in atmospheric mass and is thus contributing to secular climate change on Mars.

  15. Application of ion beam analysis to the selective sublimation processing of thin films for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vomiero, A.; Scian, C.; Della Mea, G.; Guidi, V.; Martinelli, G.; Schiffrer, G.; Comini, E.; Ferroni, M.; Sberveglieri, G.

    2006-08-01

    Ion beam analysis was successfully applied to a novel technique, named selective sublimation process (SSP), for deposition of nanostructured gas-sensing films through reactive sputtering. The method consists of the co-deposition of a mixed oxide, one of which has a relatively low sublimation temperature. Annealing at suitable temperature causes the sublimation of the most volatile compound, leaving a layer with adjustable composition. The appropriate choice of thermal treatments and the consequent tailoring of the composition play a crucial role in the determination of the microstructural properties. We developed a model based on diffusion equations that provides a useful guide to control the deposition and processing parameters and we applied the model on the systems TiO2-WO3 and TiO2-MoO3. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) was demonstrated to be effective for the characterization of the diffusion and sublimation processes during SSP. Experimental results fully agree with theoretical prediction, and allowed the calculation of all the parameters involved in SSP.

  16. The Sublimation Rate of CO2 Under Simulated Mars Conditions and the Possible Climatic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Kathryn; Chevrier, V.; Roe, L.; White, K.; Blackburn, D.

    2008-09-01

    In order to understand the behavior of CO2 on Mars, we have studied the sublimation of dry ice under simulated martian conditions. Our experiments resulted in an average sublimation rate for CO2 ice of 1.20 ± 0.27 mm h-1. These results are very close to those observed of the martian polar caps retreat, and suggest a common process for the sublimation mechanism on Mars and in our chamber. Based on these results we created a model where irradiance from the sun is the primary source of heat on the martian polar surface. Our model predicts a 32 cm offset between the amount of CO2 ice sublimated and deposited in the southern polar region. The eccentricity of the martian orbit causes the southern hemisphere to sublimate more then it deposits back during one martian year. We have compared MOC and HiRISE images from approximately the same season (Ls 285.57º and 289.5º, respectively) from three martian years apart. These images indicate an average sublimation rate of 0.43 ± 0.04 m y-1, very close to the 0.32 m y-1 predicted by our model. Due to the length of Mars’ precession cycle, 93,000 martian years, it will take an extensive amount of time for the equinoxes to change. Therefore, we predict that the CO2 of the south polar cap will migrate entirely to the northern polar cap before such changes could occur. If the CO2 ice is only a thin layer above a much thicker water ice layer, this could expose large amounts of water ice, having a drastic climactic affect.

  17. Heat of Sublimation of I-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Giles; Robarts, Ronald A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive double-beam laser photometry experiment to determine the molar heat of sublimation of I-2. The experiment employs common laboratory materials and components and gives results with a two percent to three percent accuracy. (Author/GA)

  18. Energy dissipation during sublimation from porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, H. U.; Skorov, Yu. V.

    2002-09-01

    Several physical processes during the sublimation from and inside porous media have been investigated in detail in a series our papers (Skorov et al., 1999, Icarus 140, 173, Skorov et al., 2001, Icarus 153, 180, Davidsson and Skorov, 2002, Icarus 156, 223, Davidsson and Skorov, 2002, Icarus, in press) in order to analyse the gas production of cometary nuclei . New features are the absorption of the irradiation within the uppermost layers of the pores (rather than on the surface), taking into account the gas pressure of the coma, and temperature dependent condensation and sublimation coefficients. Detailed kinetic calculations revealed deviations from the canonical gasdynamic models. We will summarize the impact of these new calculations on the physics of sublimation from a cometary nucleus. The absorption of the irradiation below the surface leads to a decrease of sublimation flux near the subsolar point but to an increase near the evening terminator and nightside of a rotating nucleus. More absorbed energy is available to be transferred into the interior of the nucleus. This effect and consequences for the development of cometary nuclei will be discussed.

  19. No reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with NHCO into a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  20. NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  1. Probabilistic Analysis of Impact of Wake Vortices on Closely-Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Gordon H.; Rossow, Vernon J.; Meyn, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the primary constraints on the capacity of the nation's air transportation system is the landing capacity of its largest airports. Many airports with closely spaced parallel runways suffer a severe runway acceptance rate when the weather conditions do not allow full utilization of these parallel runways. The present requirement for simultaneous independent landings in Instrument Meteorological Conditions, IMC, is at least 4300 feet of lateral runway spacing (as close as 3000 feet for runways with a Precision Runway Monitor). Operations in Visual Meteorological Conditions, VMC, to Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches only require a lateral runway spacing greater than 750 feet. A study by Hardy and Lewis integrated and extended earlier studies and concepts in lateral traffic separation, longitudinal station keeping, wake prediction, wake display, and the concepts of R N P into a preliminary system concept for Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches in IMC. This system allows IMC airport acceptance rates to approach those for VMC. The system concept that was developed, presented traffic and wake information on the NAVigation Display, NAV, and developed operational procedures for a mix of conventional and Runway Independent Aircraft with different approach speeds to Closely Spaced Parallel Runways. This paper first describes some improvements made on the technology needed to better predict and formulate a probabilistic representation for the time-dependent motion and spreading of the hazardous region associated with the lift-generated vortex wakes of preceding aircraft. In this way, the time at which the vortex wakes of leading aircraft intrude into the airspace of adjacent flight-corridor/runway combinations can be more reliably predicted. Such a prediction is needed because it determines restraints to be placed on in-trail separation distances; or, the allowable time intervals between aircraft executing nearly simultaneous landings or takeoffs on very closely-spaced

  2. System and method for suppressing sublimation using opacified aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeff S. (Inventor); Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Calliat, Thierry (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Jones, Steven M. (Inventor); Palk, Jong-Ah (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a castable, aerogel-based, ultra-low thermal conductivity opacified insulation to suppress sublimation. More specifically, the present invention relates to an aerogel opacified with various opacifying or reflecting constituents to suppress sublimation and provide thermal insulation in thermoelectric modules. The opacifying constituent can be graded within the aerogel for increased sublimation suppression, and the density of the aerogel can similarly be graded to achieve optimal thermal insulation and sublimation suppression.

  3. Using Mass Transport to Guide the Purification of Small Molecule Organic Semiconductors via Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Nathan T.; Zhang, Yi; Grandbois, Matthew L.; Bell, Bruce M.; Holmes, Russell J.; Cussler, E. L.

    2015-03-01

    Organic electronic materials have garnered considerable commercial attention for next generation display and solid-state lighting applications. Widespread adoption of these technologies is slowed by considerable production costs, partially due to an expensive purification step. This work explores the current method of industrial purification, thermal gradient sublimation, in order to isolate the fundamental mechanisms limiting sublimation rate and controlling product deposition. For the archetypical hole transport materials, N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)-benzidine (NPD) and 4,4',4''-tris(carbazol-9-yl) triphenylamine (TCTA), a combination of viscous flow and physical vapor deposition are shown to be rate-limiting at constant sublimation temperature. Surprisingly, diffusion within the solid feed, reaction at the feed particle surface, and mass transfer within the bed of feed particles are not rate limiting in the case. This mechanism is different from that which is observed in many industrial sublimation systems. These results can be used to guide the design and operation of future large-scale purification systems, which are critical for the widespread adoption of organic optoelectronic devices.

  4. Numerical simulation of drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoqing; Huang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Snow sublimation is an important hydrological process and one of the main causes of the temporal and spatial variation of snow distribution. Compared with surface sublimation, drifting snow sublimation is more effective due to the greater surface exposure area of snow particles in the air. Previous studies of drifting snow sublimation have focused on suspended snow, and few have considered saltating snow, which is the main form of drifting snow. In this study, a numerical model is established to simulate the process of drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer. The simulated results show 1) the average sublimation rate of drifting snow particles increases linearly with the friction velocity; 2) the sublimation rate gradient with the friction velocity increases with increases in the environmental temperature and the undersaturation of air; 3) when the friction velocity is less than 0.525 m/s, the snowdrift sublimation of saltating particles is greater than that of suspended particles; and 4) the snowdrift sublimation in the saltation layer is less than that of the suspended particles only when the friction velocity is greater than 0.625 m/s. Therefore, the drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer constitutes a significant portion of the total snow sublimation. PMID:25312383

  5. Sublimed C60 films for tribology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Gupta, B. K.; Van Cleef, Garrett W.; Capp, Cindy; Coe, James V.

    1993-06-01

    Fullerenes take the form of hollow, geodesic domes, which are formed from a network of pentagons and hexagons. The C60 molecule has the highest possible symmetry (icosahedral) and assumes the shape of a soccer ball. At room temperature, fullerene molecules pack in a face-centered-cubic lattice bonded with weak van der Waals attractions. Fullerenes can be dissolved in solvents such as toluene and benzene and easily sublimed. The resilience, high load bearing capacity, low surface energy, high chemical stability, and spherical shape of C60 molecules and weak intermolecular bonding offer great potential for various mechanical and tribological applications. Sublimed films of C60 have been produced and friction and wear performance of these films in various operating environments are the subject of this letter.

  6. Psychotherapy. Sublimation and the psychodynamics of birding.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Norman A

    2012-07-01

    An adventure in extreme birding prompted the psychoanalyst author to reflect on "why do people do this?" Like myriad human interests, vocations, and avocations, the activity of bird watching is a socially acceptable activity that is the final pathway for multiple motivations that are likely to have a long history in the individual's development. It may have origins in basic survival skills. Various psychological defense mechanisms may be involved, the most mature and successful one being sublimation. Success of a defense-like sublimation may be viewed in terms of freedom from anxiety or from obsessive extremes that interfere with the individual's wellbeing, important relationships, or physical or financial health. The author considers whether the characters in the film The Big Year exemplify such success or the lack of it. PMID:22805903

  7. No reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid and CO or other H-atom generating species is also present or added to the gas stream.

  8. Sublimation of ice-tholins mixtures: A morphological and spectro-photometric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, Olivier; Pommerol, Antoine; Jost, Bernhard; Carrasco, Nathalie; Szopa, Cyril; Thomas, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Sublimation, the direct transition from solid to gas phase, is a process responsible for shaping and changing the reflectance properties of many Solar System surfaces. In this study, we have characterized the evolution of the structure/texture and of the visible and near-infrared (VIS-NIR) spectral reflectance of surfaces made of water ice mixed with analogues of complex extraterrestrial organic matter, named tholins, under low temperature (<-70 °C) and pressure (10-5 mbar) conditions. The experiments were carried out in the SCITEAS simulation setup recently built as part of the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern (Pommerol, A. et al. [2015a]. Planet. Space Sci. 109-110, 106-122). As the water ice sublimated, we observed in situ the formation of a sublimation lag deposit made of a water-free porous (>90% porosity) network of organic filaments on top of the ice. The temporal evolution of the tholins and water ice spectral features (reflectance at the absorption bands wavelengths, red slope, from 0.40 to 1.90 μm) are analyzed throughout the sublimation of the samples. We studied how different mixtures of tholins with water (0.1 wt.% tholins as coating or inclusions within the water particles), and different ice particle sizes (4.5 ± 2.5 or 67 ± 31 μm) influence the morphological and spectral evolutions of the samples. The sublimation of the ice below the mantle produces a gas flow responsible for the ejection of mm to cm-sized fragments of the deposit in outbursts-like events. The results show remarkable differences between these samples in term of mantle structure, speed of mantle building, rates and surface area of mantle ejections. These data provide useful references for interpreting remote-sensing observations of icy Solar System surfaces, in particular the activity of comet nuclei where sublimation of organic-rich ices and deposition of organic-dust particles likely play a major role. Consequently, the

  9. Issues in Airborne Systems for Closely-Spaced Parallel Runway Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, A.; Carpenter, B.; Asari, K.; Kuchar, J.; Hansman, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Efforts to increase airport capacity include studies of aircraft systems that would enable simultaneous approaches to closely spaced parallel runways in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). The time-critical nature of a parallel approach results in key design issues for current and future collision avoidance systems. These issues are being studied in two ways. First, a part-task flight simulator study has examined the procedural and display issues inherent in such a time-critical task. Second, a prototype collision avoidance logic capable of generating this maneuver guidance has been designed using a recently developed methodology.

  10. Evaluating Nextgen Closely Spaced Parallel Operations Concepts with Validated Human Performance Models: Flight Deck Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooey, Becky Lee; Gore, Brian Francis; Mahlstedt, Eric; Foyle, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the current research were to develop valid human performance models (HPMs) of approach and land operations; use these models to evaluate the impact of NextGen Closely Spaced Parallel Operations (CSPO) on pilot performance; and draw conclusions regarding flight deck display design and pilot-ATC roles and responsibilities for NextGen CSPO concepts. This document presents guidelines and implications for flight deck display designs and candidate roles and responsibilities. A companion document (Gore, Hooey, Mahlstedt, & Foyle, 2013) provides complete scenario descriptions and results including predictions of pilot workload, visual attention and time to detect off-nominal events.

  11. Experimental Studies Of Pilot Performance At Collision Avoidance During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Hansman, R. John

    1997-01-01

    Efforts to increase airport capacity include studies of aircraft systems that would enable simultaneous approaches to closely spaced parallel runway in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). The time-critical nature of a parallel approach results in key design issues for current and future collision avoidance systems. Two part-task flight simulator studies have examined the procedural and display issues inherent in such a time-critical task, the interaction of the pilot with a collision avoidance system, and the alerting criteria and avoidance maneuvers preferred by subjects.

  12. Wake Encounter Analysis for a Closely Spaced Parallel Runway Paired Approach Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckissick,Burnell T.; Rico-Cusi, Fernando J.; Murdoch, Jennifer; Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Stough, Harry P, III; O'Connor, Cornelius J.; Syed, Hazari I.

    2009-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of simultaneous approaches performed by two transport category aircraft from the final approach fix to a pair of closely spaced parallel runways was conducted to explore the aft boundary of the safe zone in which separation assurance and wake avoidance are provided. The simulation included variations in runway centerline separation, initial longitudinal spacing of the aircraft, crosswind speed, and aircraft speed during the approach. The data from the simulation showed that the majority of the wake encounters occurred near or over the runway and the aft boundaries of the safe zones were identified for all simulation conditions.

  13. Properties of closely spaced independently addressable lasers fabricated by impurity-induced disordering

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, R.L.; Mosby, W.J.; Donaldson, R.M.; Paoli, T.L. )

    1990-04-23

    We describe the fabrication and characteristics of closely spaced (10 {mu}m) dual-beam laser sources by the process of impurity-induced disordering. We present data demonstrating that these devices are capable of high efficiency and reliable operation when operated in a {ital p}-side up configuration. We also show that these devices can be placed in close proximity with a minimal amount of thermal and electrical interaction between devices. These features have significant implications for the realization of high-density arrays of independently addressable lasers for optical interconnection of integrated circuits and optical imaging systems.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Sublimator Performance at Transient Heat Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephen, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    Sublimators have been used as heat rejection devices for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Sublimators typically operate with steady-state feedwater utilization at or near 100%. However, sublimators are currently being considered to operate in a cyclical topping mode, which represents a new mode of operation for sublimators. Sublimators can be used as a topper during mission phases such as low lunar or low earth orbit. In these mission phases, the sublimator will be repeatedly started and stopped during each orbit to provide supplemental heat rejection for the portion of the orbit where the radiative sink temperature exceeds the system setpoint temperature. This paper will summarize the effort put into understanding sublimator response under a transient heat load. The performance will be assessed by detailing the changes in feedwater utilization due to transient starts and stops during various feedwater timing scenarios. Sublimator start up utilization will be assessed as a possible relationship to transient performance of a sublimator. This paper will also provide recommendations for future sublimator designs and/or feedwater control.

  15. An investigation on the mechanism of sublimed DHB matrix on molecular ion yields in SIMS imaging of brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Dowlatshahi Pour, Masoumeh; Malmberg, Per; Ewing, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    We have characterized the use of sublimation to deposit matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) matrices in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis, i.e. matrix-enhanced SIMS (ME-SIMS), a common surface modification method to enhance sensitivity for larger molecules and to increase the production of intact molecular ions. We use sublimation to apply a thin layer of a conventional MALDI matrix, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), onto rat brain cerebellum tissue to show how this technique can be used to enhance molecular yields in SIMS while still retaining a lateral resolution around 2 μm and also to investigate the mechanism of this enhancement. The results here illustrate that cholesterol, which is a dominant lipid species in the brain, is decreased on the tissue surface after deposition of matrix, particularly in white matter. The decrease of cholesterol is followed by an increased ion yield of several other lipid species. Depth profiling of the sublimed rat brain reveals that the lipid species are de facto extracted by the DHB matrix and concentrated in the top most layers of the sublimed matrix. This extraction/concentration of lipids directly leads to an increase of higher mass lipid ion yield. It is also possible that the decrease of cholesterol decreases the potential suppression of ion yield caused by cholesterol migration to the tissue surface. This result provides us with significant insights into the possible mechanisms involved when using sublimation to deposit this matrix in ME-SIMS. Graphical Abstract Schematic representation of the enhancement on the molecular ion yields in SIMS by deposition of DHB matrix on the brain tissue using sublimation. PMID:26922337

  16. Synthesis of Ga 2O 3 chains with closely spaced knots connected by nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, L.; You, L. P.; Duan, X. F.; Lian, W. C.; Qin, G. G.

    2004-07-01

    Chains of closely spaced metal or semiconductor particles have potential applications in optoelectronics and single electron devices. We report, for the first time, the synthesis of Ga 2O 3 chains with closely spaced knots connected by nanowires using the thermal evaporation method with a specially designed quartz boat. The Ga 2O 3 chains grew only on the Si substrates where Au catalyst or Ga droplets were coated. The average diameter of the knots is about 450 nm and that of the nanowires is about 50 nm. The selected area electron diffraction of either a knot or a connecting nanowire includes two sets of overlapped single crystal electron diffraction patterns which belong to the [1 0 2] and [1 0 1¯] crystal zone axes of the monoclinic β-Ga 2O 3 phase, respectively. The knot and its neighbor nanowire have the common ( 2¯ 0 1) growth planes at their interface. A mechanism model for the Ga 2O 3 chains synthesis based on the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism is discussed.

  17. Multiport well design for sampling of ground water at closely spaced vertical intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Delin, G.N.; Landon, M.K.

    1996-11-01

    Detailed vertical sampling is useful in aquifers where vertical mixing is limited and steep vertical gradients in chemical concentrations are expected. Samples can be collected at closely spaced vertical intervals from nested wells with short screened intervals. However, this approach may not be appropriate in all situations. An easy-to-construct and easy-to-install multiport sampling well to collect ground-water samples from closely spaced vertical intervals was developed and tested. The multiport sampling well was designed to sample ground water from surficial sand-and-gravel aquifers. The device consists of multiple stainless-steel tubes within a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) protective casing. The tubes protrude through the wall of the PVC casing at the desired sampling depths. A peristaltic pump is used to collect ground-water samples form the sampling ports. The difference in hydraulic head between any two sampling ports can be measured with a vacuum pump and a modified manometer. The usefulness and versatility of this multiport well design was demonstrated at an agricultural research site near Princeton, Minnesota where sampling ports were installed to a maximum depth of about 12 m below land surface. Trace experiments were conducted using potassium bromide to document the degree to which short-circuiting occurred between sampling ports. Samples were successfully collected for analysis of major cations and anions, nutrients, selected herbicides, isotopes, dissolved gases, and chlorofluorocarbon concentrations.

  18. Multiport well design for sampling of ground water at closely spaced vertical intervals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delin, G.N.; Landon, M.K.

    1996-01-01

    Detailed vertical sampling is useful in aquifers where vertical mixing is limited and steep vertical gradients in chemical concentrations are expected. Samples can be collected at closely spaced vertical intervals from nested wells with short screened intervals. However, this approach may not be appropriate in all situations. An easy-to-construct and easy-to-install multiport sampling well to collect ground-water samples from closely spaced vertical intervals was developed and tested. The multiport sampling well was designed to sample ground water from surficial sand-and-gravel aquifers. The device consists of multiple stainless-steel tubes within a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) protective casing. The tubes protrude through the wall of the PVC casing at the desired sampling depths. A peristaltic pump is used to collect ground-water samples from the sampling ports. The difference in hydraulic head between any two sampling ports can be measured with a vacuum pump and a modified manometer. The usefulness and versatility of this multiport well design was demonstrated at an agricultural research site near Princeton, Minnesota where sampling ports were installed to a maximum depth of about 12 m below land surface. Tracer experiments were conducted using potassium bromide to document the degree to which short-circuiting occurred between sampling ports. Samples were successfully collected for analysis of major cations and anions, nutrients, selected herbicides, isotopes, dissolved gases, and chlorofluorcarbon concentrations.

  19. Sublimating grains model of cometary coma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Tozzi, G. P.; Brucato, J. R.

    Billion years of space weathering produces a crust of organic matter (see e.g. Kanuchova et al. 2012) that will be released when a comet enter for the first time in the inner Solar System. New comets, coming form the Oort Colud at their first passage close to the Sun, are particularly important because they are not differentiated by the Solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of ice organic matter close to the surface. When a comet approach to the Sun, its activity is driven by the sublimation of these nucleus ices: if the heliocentric distances, R_H , is greater than 3 AU the sublimation of CO and CO_2 ices is the main source of comet activity, otherwise at shorter distances, the sublimation of water become the most important mechanism of activity. These gases, escaping from the nucleus, drag in the coma grains that can be refractory dust (silicates, carbon), water ice and/or organic ices. Oort comets at their first passage in the inner Solar System, should produce an halo of organic or water icy particles. Our group has been monitoring new, inbound, bright Oort comets (C/2011 F1, C/2012 S1, C/2012 K1, C/2013 V5, C/2012 F3, C/2013 US10, C/2013 X1) to search for these icy grains. The method consists in detecting the cloud of sublimating grains in the inner coma by using the Sigma Af function (Tozzi et al. 2007) directly from images. However this over-population of grains, beside the sublimation, can be also due to short time activity (outburst) or too big grains expanding at very slow velocity, as it has been found in comet 67P/C-G (Tozzi eta al, 2011, A&A, 531, 54). To disentangle between the phenomena it is necessary to monitor the comet both at short timescale, for the outbursts (by repeating the observations after few nights), and at long term (weeks-months). If the cloud does not expand with the decreasing of the heliocentric distance there is high probability that we are in presence of organic and/or water ice grains. We can disentangle

  20. Science Sublime: The Philosophy of the Sublime, Dewey's Aesthetics, and Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Feelings of awe, wonder, and appreciation have been largely ignored in the working lives of scientists and, in turn, science education has not accurately portrayed science to students. In an effort to bring the affective qualities of science into the classroom, this work draws on the writings of the sublime by Burke, Kant, Emerson, and Wordsworth…

  1. Comparison of Procedures for Dual and Triple Closely Spaced Parallel Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, Savita; Ballinger, Deborah; Subramanian Shobana; Kozon, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A human-in-the-loop high fidelity flight simulation experiment was conducted, which investigated and compared breakout procedures for Very Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches (VCSPA) with two and three runways. To understand the feasibility, usability and human factors of two and three runway VCSPA, data were collected and analyzed on the dependent variables of breakout cross track error and pilot workload. Independent variables included number of runways, cause of breakout and location of breakout. Results indicated larger cross track error and higher workload using three runways as compared to 2-runway operations. Significant interaction effects involving breakout cause and breakout location were also observed. Across all conditions, cross track error values showed high levels of breakout trajectory accuracy and pilot workload remained manageable. Results suggest possible avenues of future adaptation for adopting these procedures (e.g., pilot training), while also showing potential promise of the concept.

  2. Visualizing plasmon coupling in closely spaced chains of Ag nanoparticles by electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Fengqi; Wang, Tingyu; Wang, Xuefeng; Xu, Changhui; He, Longbing; Wan, Jianguo; Van Haesendonck, Christian; Ringer, Simon P; Han, Min; Liu, Zongwen; Wang, Guanghou

    2010-02-01

    Anisotropic plasmon coupling in closely spaced chains of Ag nanoparticles is visualized using electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope. For dimers as the simplest chain, mapping the plasmon excitations with nanometer spatial resolution and an energy resolution of 0.27 eV intuitively identifies two coupling plasmons. The in-phase mode redshifts from the ultraviolet region as the interparticle spacing is reduced, reaching the visible range at 2.7 eV. Calculations based on the discrete-dipole approximation confirm its optical activeness, where the longitudinal direction is constructed as the path for light transportation. Two coupling paths are then observed in an inflexed four-particle chain. PMID:20077517

  3. Homojunction GaAs solar cells grown by close space vapor transport

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, Jason W.; Ritenour, Andrew J.; Greenaway, Ann L.; Aloni, Shaul; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2014-06-08

    We report on the first pn junction solar cells grown by homoepitaxy of GaAs using close space vapor transport (CSVT). Cells were grown both on commercial wafer substrates and on a CSVT absorber film, and had efficiencies reaching 8.1%, open circuit voltages reaching 909 mV, and internal quantum efficiency of 90%. The performance of these cells is partly limited by the electron diffusion lengths in the wafer substrates, as evidenced by the improved peak internal quantum efficiency in devices fabricated on a CSVT absorber film. Unoptimized highly-doped n-type emitters also limit the photocurrent, indicating that thinner emitters with reduced doping, and ultimately wider band gap window or surface passivation layers, are required to increase the efficiency.

  4. Principles for RNA metabolism and alternative transcription initiation within closely spaced promoters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Pai, Athma A; Herudek, Jan; Lubas, Michal; Meola, Nicola; Järvelin, Aino I; Andersson, Robin; Pelechano, Vicent; Steinmetz, Lars M; Jensen, Torben Heick; Sandelin, Albin

    2016-09-01

    Mammalian transcriptomes are complex and formed by extensive promoter activity. In addition, gene promoters are largely divergent and initiate transcription of reverse-oriented promoter upstream transcripts (PROMPTs). Although PROMPTs are commonly terminated early, influenced by polyadenylation sites, promoters often cluster so that the divergent activity of one might impact another. Here we found that the distance between promoters strongly correlates with the expression, stability and length of their associated PROMPTs. Adjacent promoters driving divergent mRNA transcription support PROMPT formation, but owing to polyadenylation site constraints, these transcripts tend to spread into the neighboring mRNA on the same strand. This mechanism to derive new alternative mRNA transcription start sites (TSSs) is also evident at closely spaced promoters supporting convergent mRNA transcription. We suggest that basic building blocks of divergently transcribed core promoter pairs, in combination with the wealth of TSSs in mammalian genomes, provide a framework with which evolution shapes transcriptomes. PMID:27455346

  5. Information for Lateral Aircraft Spacing Enabling Closely-Spaced Runway Operations During Instrument-Weather Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrush, Trent; Pritchett, Amy; Johnson, Eric; Hansman, R. John; Shafto, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to increase airport capacity, the U.S. plans on investing nearly $6 billion a year to properly maintain and improve the nation's major airports. Current FAA standards however, require a reduction in terminal operations during instrument-weather conditions at many airports, causing delays and reducing airport capacity. NASA, in cooperation with the FAA, has developed the Terminal Area Productivity Program to achieve clear-weather capacity in instrument- weather conditions for all phases of flight. This paper describes a series of experiments planned to investigate the conceptual design of different systems that provide information to flight crews regarding nearby traffic during the approach phase of flight. The purpose of this investigation is to identify and evaluate different display and auditory interfaces to the crew for use in closely-spaced parallel runway operations. Three separate experiments are planned for the investigation. The first two experiments will be conducted using part-task flight simulators located at the MIT Aeronautical Systems Laboratory and at NASA Ames. The third experiment will be conducted in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator, a generic "glass-cockpit" simulator at NASA Ames. Subjects for each experiment will be current glass-cockpit pilots from major U.S. air carriers. Subject crews will fly several experimental scenarios in which pseudo-aircraft are "blundered" into the subject aircraft simulation. Runway spacing, longitudinal aircraft separation, aircraft performance and traffic information will be varied. Analyses of the subject reaction times in evading the blundering aircraft and the resulting closest points of approach will be conducted. This paper presents a preliminary examination of the data recorded during the part-task experiments. The impact of traffic information on closely-spaced parallel runway operations is discussed, cockpit displays to aid these operations are examined, and topics for future research

  6. Sublimation TiN Coating of RF Power Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorkiewicz, J.; Kula, J.; Pszona, S.; Sobczak, J.; Bilinski, A.

    2008-03-01

    Titanium evaporation in a reactive atmosphere of ammonia has been chosen to deposit thin (up to 10 nm) protective surface layers containing titanium nitride and titanium oxinitrides which suppress secondary electron emission. The coating procedure, applied by the author in DESY (Hamburg) for TESLA couplers anti-multipactor protection, has been recently implemented in The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ) where a new coating device is used, equipped with a special titanium sublimation setup in a 100 1 vacuum chamber. Several arrays of cylindrical and coaxial RF coupler windows have been coated so far after optimizing the processing parameters. A check of the obtained surface layers ability to attenuate secondary electron emission has been performed; measurements of the secondary electron yield from TiN layers deposited on alumina samples were done in IPJ on as-delivered coated samples, then after vacuum bake-out and finally after additional electron bombardment of their surfaces. Also chemical composition of the surface layers has been studied using XPS in the Institute of Physical Chemistry (IChF).

  7. Reassessing Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature in the Kantian Sublime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The sublime has been a relatively neglected topic in recent work in philosophical aesthetics, with existing discussions confined mainly to problems in Kant's theory. Given the revival of interest in his aesthetic theory and the influence of the Kantian sublime compared to other eighteenth-century accounts, this focus is not surprising. Kant's…

  8. Doping and electronic properties of GaAs grown by close-spaced vapor transport from powder sources for scalable III–V photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Ritenour, Andrew J.; Boucher, Jason W.; DeLancey, Robert; Greenaway, Ann L.; Aloni, Shaul; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2014-09-01

    We report the use of a simple close-spaced vapor transport technique for the growth of high-quality epitaxial GaAs films using potentially inexpensive GaAs powders as precursors. The free carrier type and density (1016 to 1019 cm–3) of the films were adjusted by addition of Te or Zn powder to the GaAs source powder. We show using photoelectrochemical and electron beam-induced current analyses that the minority carrier diffusion lengths of the n- and p-GaAs films reached ~3 μm and ~8 μm, respectively. Hall mobilities approach those achieved for GaAs grown by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition, 1000–4200 cm2 V–1 s–1 for n-GaAs and 50–240 cm V–1 s–1 for p-GaAs depending on doping level. We conclude that the electronic quality of GaAs grown by close-spaced vapor transport is similar to that of GaAs made using conventional techniques and is thus sufficient for high-performance photovoltaic applications.

  9. Doping and electronic properties of GaAs grown by close-spaced vapor transport from powder sources for scalable III–V photovoltaics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ritenour, Andrew J.; Boucher, Jason W.; DeLancey, Robert; Greenaway, Ann L.; Aloni, Shaul; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2014-09-01

    We report the use of a simple close-spaced vapor transport technique for the growth of high-quality epitaxial GaAs films using potentially inexpensive GaAs powders as precursors. The free carrier type and density (1016 to 1019 cm–3) of the films were adjusted by addition of Te or Zn powder to the GaAs source powder. We show using photoelectrochemical and electron beam-induced current analyses that the minority carrier diffusion lengths of the n- and p-GaAs films reached ~3 μm and ~8 μm, respectively. Hall mobilities approach those achieved for GaAs grown by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition, 1000–4200 cm2 V–1 s–1 for n-GaAsmore » and 50–240 cm V–1 s–1 for p-GaAs depending on doping level. We conclude that the electronic quality of GaAs grown by close-spaced vapor transport is similar to that of GaAs made using conventional techniques and is thus sufficient for high-performance photovoltaic applications.« less

  10. Sublime science: Teaching for scientific sublime experiences in middle school classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanaugh, Shane

    Due to a historical separation of cognition and emotion, the affective aspects of learning are often seen as trivial in comparison to the more 'essential' cognitive qualities - particularly in the domain of science. As a result of this disconnect, feelings of awe, wonder, and astonishment as well as appreciation have been largely ignored in the working lives of scientists. In turn, I believe that science education has not accurately portrayed the world of science to our students. In an effort to bring the affective qualities of science into the science classroom, I have drawn on past research in the field of aesthetic science teaching and learning as well as works by, Burke, Kant, and Dewey to explore a new construct I have called the "scientific sublime". Scientific sublime experiences represent a sophisticated treatment of the cognitive as well as affective qualities of science learning. The scientific sublime represents feelings of awe, wonder, and appreciation that come from a deep understanding. It is only through this understanding of a phenomenon that we can appreciate its true complexity and intricacies, and these understandings when mixed with the emotions of awe and reverence, are sublime. Scientific sublime experiences are an attempt at the re-integration of cognition and feeling. The goal of this research was twofold: to create and teach a curriculum that fosters scientific sublime experiences in middle school science classes, and to better understand how these experiences are manifested in students. In order to create an approach to teaching for scientific sublime experiences, it was first necessary for me to identify key characteristics of such an experience and a then to create a pedagogical approach, both of which are described in detail in the dissertation. This research was conducted as two studies in two different middle schools. My pedagogical approach was used to create and teach two five-week 7 th grade science units---one on weather

  11. Prediction of Sublimation Pressures of Low Volatility Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Bruce Douglas

    Sublimation pressures are required for solid-vapor phase equilibrium models in design of processes such as supercritical fluid extraction, sublimation purification and vapor epitaxy. The objective of this work is to identify and compare alternative methods for predicting sublimation pressures. A bibliography of recent sublimation data is included. Corresponding states methods based on the triple point (rather than critical point) are examined. A modified Trouton's rule is the preferred method for estimating triple point pressure in the absence of any sublimation data. Only boiling and melting temperatures are required. Typical error in log_{10} P _{rm triple} is 0.3. For lower temperature estimates, the slope of the sublimation curve is predicted by a correlation based on molar volume. Typical error is 10% of slope. Molecular dynamics methods for surface modeling are tested as estimators of vapor pressure. The time constants of the vapor and solid phases are too different to allow the vapor to come to thermal equilibrium with the solid. The method shows no advantages in prediction of sublimation pressure but provides insight into appropriate models and experimental methods for sublimation. Density-dependent augmented van der Waals equations of state based on hard-sphere distribution functions are examined. The perturbation term is almost linear and is well fit by a simple quadratic. Use of the equation provides reasonable fitting of sublimation pressures from one data point. Order-of-magnitude estimation is possible from melting temperature and solid molar volume. The inverse -12 fluid is used to develop an additional equation of state. Sublimation pressure results, including quality of pressure predictions, are similar to the hard-sphere results. Three-body (Axilrod -Teller) interactions are used to improve results.

  12. Closely Spaced MEG Source Localization and Functional Connectivity Analysis Using a New Prewhitening Invariance of Noise Space Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junpeng; Cui, Yuan; Deng, Lihua; He, Ling; Zhang, Junran; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Qun; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed a prewhitening invariance of noise space (PW-INN) as a new magnetoencephalography (MEG) source analysis method, which is particularly suitable for localizing closely spaced and highly correlated cortical sources under real MEG noise. Conventional source localization methods, such as sLORETA and beamformer, cannot distinguish closely spaced cortical sources, especially under strong intersource correlation. Our previous work proposed an invariance of noise space (INN) method to resolve closely spaced sources, but its performance is seriously degraded under correlated noise between MEG sensors. The proposed PW-INN method largely mitigates the adverse influence of correlated MEG noise by projecting MEG data to a new space defined by the orthogonal complement of dominant eigenvectors of correlated MEG noise. Simulation results showed that PW-INN is superior to INN, sLORETA, and beamformer in terms of localization accuracy for closely spaced and highly correlated sources. Lastly, source connectivity between closely spaced sources can be satisfactorily constructed from source time courses estimated by PW-INN but not from results of other conventional methods. Therefore, the proposed PW-INN method is a promising MEG source analysis to provide a high spatial-temporal characterization of cortical activity and connectivity, which is crucial for basic and clinical research of neural plasticity. PMID:26819768

  13. Graphite Sublimation Tests for the Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory Target Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, JR

    2002-02-07

    A passively cooled graphite target was proposed for a 1.5 MW neutrino production research facility because of its simplicity and favorable performance as a target material for neutrino production (Ref. 1). The conceptual design for the target in the Reference 1 study was a graphite rod 15 mm in diameter by 800 mm long. Figure 1 shows the graphite target rod supported by graphite spokes, which are mounted to a water-cooled stainless steel support tube. The target is radiatively cooled to the water-cooled surface of the support tube. Based on nuclear analysis results (Ref. 2), the time-averaged power deposition in the target is 35 kW. If this power is deposited uniformly along the axial length of the target, the volumetric power deposition in the target is about 250 MW/m{sup 3}. The target surface temperature required to radiate the deposited power to a water-cooled tube is estimated to be about 1850 C, and the temperature at the center of the target is about 75 C hotter. The sublimation erosion rate (e), estimated assuming that the graphite is submersed in a perfect vacuum environment, can be derived from kinetic theory and is given by: e = p{sub sat} (m/2{pi} kT){sup 1/2} where p{sub sat} is the saturation pressure, m is the molecular weight, k is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the surface temperature. The saturation pressure given in Ref. 3 can be approximated by: p{sub sat} = exp(-A/T + B) where A = 9.47 x 10{sup 3}, B = 24.2, and the units of p{sub sat} and T are atmospheres and K, respectively. Using these equations, the saturation pressure and sublimation erosion rate are plotted in Fig. 2 as a function of temperature. The surface recession rate shown with units of mm/s in Fig. 2 assumes one-sided erosion. At the average power deposition value of 250 MW/m{sup 3}, the surface temperature is 1850 C resulting in a sublimation erosion rate of only 2.2 mm/day. However, if the actual power deposition were peaked by a factor of two in the axial direction, then the

  14. Importance of closely spaced vertical sampling in delineating chemical and microbiological gradients in groundwater studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Harvey, R.W.; LeBlanc, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Vertical gradients of selected chemical constituents, bacterial populations, bacterial activity and electron acceptors were investigated for an unconfined aquifer contaminated with nitrate and organic compounds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, U.S.A. Fifteen-port multilevel sampling devices (MLS's) were installed within the contaminant plume at the source of the contamination, and at 250 and 2100 m downgradient from the source. Depth profiles of specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at the downgradient sites exhibited vertical gradients that were both steep and inversely related. Narrow zones (2-4 m thick) of high N2O and NH4+ concentrations were also detected within the contaminant plume. A 27-fold change in bacterial abundance; a 35-fold change in frequency of dividing cells (FDC), an indicator of bacterial growth; a 23-fold change in 3H-glucose uptake, a measure of heterotrophic activity; and substantial changes in overall cell morphology were evident within a 9-m vertical interval at 250 m downgradient. The existence of these gradients argues for the need for closely spaced vertical sampling in groundwater studies because small differences in the vertical placement of a well screen can lead to incorrect conclusions about the chemical and microbiological processes within an aquifer.Vertical gradients of selected chemical constituents, bacterial populations, bacterial activity and electron acceptors were investigated for an unconfined aquifer contaminated with nitrate and organic compounds on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. Fifteen-port multilevel sampling devices (MLS's) were installed within the contaminant plume at the source of the contamination, and at 250 and 2100 m downgradient from the source. Depth profiles of specific conductance and dissolved oxygen at the downgradient sites exhibited vertical gradients that were both steep and inversely related. Narrow zones (2-4 m thick) of high N2O and NH4+ concentrations were also detected within the contaminant plume

  15. Heat transport through plasmonic interactions in closely spaced metallic nanoparticle chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Joulain, Karl; Drevillon, Jérémie; Le Goff, Clément

    2008-02-01

    We report a numerical investigation on the heat transfer through one-dimensional arrays of metallic nanoparticles closely spaced in a host material. Our simulations show that the multipolar interactions play a crucial role in the heat transport via collective plasmons. Calculations of the plasmonic thermal conductance and of the thermal conductivity in ballistic and diffusive regimes, respectively, have been carried out. (a) Using the Landauer-Buttiker formalism, we have found that, when the host material dielectric constant takes positive values, the multipolar interactions drastically enhance by several orders of magnitude the ballistic thermal conductance of collective plasmons compared with that of a classical dipolar chain. On the contrary, when the host material dielectric constant takes negative values, we have demonstrated the existence of nonballistic multipolar modes which annihilate the heat transfer through the chains. (b) Using the kinetic theory, we have also examined the thermal behavior of chains in the diffusion approximation. We have shown that the plasmonic thermal conductivity of metallic nanoparticle chains can reach 1% of the bulk metal thermal conductivity. This result could explain the anomalously high thermal conductivity observed in many colloidal suspensions, the so-called nanofluids.

  16. Tunneling spectroscopy of close-spaced dangling-bond pairs in Si(001):H

    PubMed Central

    Engelund, Mads; Zuzak, Rafał; Godlewski, Szymon; Kolmer, Marek; Frederiksen, Thomas; García-Lekue, Aran; Sánchez-Portal, Daniel; Szymonski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the electronic properties of close-spaced dangling-bond (DB) pairs in a hydrogen-passivated Si(001):H p-doped surface. Two types of DB pairs are considered, called “cross” and “line” structures. Our scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) data show that, although the spectra taken over different DBs in each pair exhibit a remarkable resemblance, they appear shifted by a constant energy that depends on the DB-pair type. This spontaneous asymmetry persists after repeated STS measurements. By comparison with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we demonstrate that the magnitude of this shift and the relative position of the STS peaks can be explained by distinct charge states for each DB in the pair. We also explain how the charge state is modified by the presence of the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip and the applied bias. Our results indicate that, using the STM tip, it is possible to control the charge state of individual DBs in complex structures, even if they are in close proximity. This observation might have important consequences for the design of electronic circuits and logic gates based on DBs in passivated silicon surfaces. PMID:26404520

  17. Aeroelastic dynamics of mistuned blade assemblies with closely spaced blade modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierre, Christophe; Murthy, Durbha V.

    1993-01-01

    The aeroelastic characteristics of tuned and randomly mistuned blade assemblies which possess two blade-alone natural modes with close frequencies are studied. Modal interactions among the two blade modes are shown to be come extremely significant for small frequency separation. The two distinct loci of the aeroelastic eigenvalues, which characterize an assembly with well separated modes, fully merge into a single root locus as the blade-mode frequency separation vanishes. Also, while in the case of well separated blade modes the introduction of random mistuning into one blade mode affects only the assembly modes which are predominantly of that blade-mode type, mistuning results in the localization of all the assembly modes when the blade-alone natural frequencies are close. Results indicate that in the case of closely-spaced blade modes a single-degree of freedom blade model yields qualitatively erroneous results and that an N-blade assembly with two close blade modes behaves like an equivalent 2Nb-blade assembly with a single blade mode.

  18. Parallel Operation of Multiple Closely Spaced Small Aspect Ratio Rod Pinches

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor J.; Leckbee, Joshua; Bennett, Nichelle; Madrid, Elizabeth A.; Rose, David V.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale R.; Lake, Patrick W.; McCourt, Andrew L.

    2014-12-10

    A series of simulations and experiments to resolve questions about the operation of arrays of closely spaced small aspect ratio rod pinches has been performed. Design and post-shot analysis of the experimental results are supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Both simulations and experiments support these conclusions. Penetration of current to the interior of the array appears to be efficient, as the current on the center rods is essentially equal to the current on the outer rods. Current loss in the feed due to the formation of magnetic nulls was avoided in these experiments by design of the feed surface ofmore » the cathode and control of the gap to keep the electric fields on the cathode below the emission threshold. Some asymmetry in the electron flow to the rod was observed, but the flow appeared to symmetrize as it reached the end of the rod. Interaction between the rod pinches can be controlled to allow the stable and consistent operation of arrays of rod pinches.« less

  19. Simulated Wake Characteristics Data for Closely Spaced Parallel Runway Operations Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Neitzke, Kurt W.

    2012-01-01

    A simulation experiment was performed to generate and compile wake characteristics data relevant to the evaluation and feasibility analysis of closely spaced parallel runway (CSPR) operational concepts. While the experiment in this work is not tailored to any particular operational concept, the generated data applies to the broader class of CSPR concepts, where a trailing aircraft on a CSPR approach is required to stay ahead of the wake vortices generated by a lead aircraft on an adjacent CSPR. Data for wake age, circulation strength, and wake altitude change, at various lateral offset distances from the wake-generating lead aircraft approach path were compiled for a set of nine aircraft spanning the full range of FAA and ICAO wake classifications. A total of 54 scenarios were simulated to generate data related to key parameters that determine wake behavior. Of particular interest are wake age characteristics that can be used to evaluate both time- and distance- based in-trail separation concepts for all aircraft wake-class combinations. A simple first-order difference model was developed to enable the computation of wake parameter estimates for aircraft models having weight, wingspan and speed characteristics similar to those of the nine aircraft modeled in this work.

  20. Parallel Operation of Multiple Closely Spaced Small Aspect Ratio Rod Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor J.; Leckbee, Joshua; Bennett, Nichelle; Madrid, Elizabeth A.; Rose, David V.; Thoma, Carsten; Welch, Dale R.; Lake, Patrick W.; McCourt, Andrew L.

    2014-12-10

    A series of simulations and experiments to resolve questions about the operation of arrays of closely spaced small aspect ratio rod pinches has been performed. Design and post-shot analysis of the experimental results are supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Both simulations and experiments support these conclusions. Penetration of current to the interior of the array appears to be efficient, as the current on the center rods is essentially equal to the current on the outer rods. Current loss in the feed due to the formation of magnetic nulls was avoided in these experiments by design of the feed surface of the cathode and control of the gap to keep the electric fields on the cathode below the emission threshold. Some asymmetry in the electron flow to the rod was observed, but the flow appeared to symmetrize as it reached the end of the rod. Interaction between the rod pinches can be controlled to allow the stable and consistent operation of arrays of rod pinches.

  1. Laboratory experiments to explore the sediment transport capacity of carbon dioxide sublimation under martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvest, Matthew; Conway, Susan; Patel, Manish; Dixon, John; Barnes, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Every spring, the solid carbon dioxide deposited over the martian high latitudes sublimates. Several, unusual surface features, including dark spots and flows on sand dunes, as well as recent activity in martian gullies, have been associated with this CO2 sublimation. Water and/or brines have also been proposed as potential agents for these events, but the timing of these phenomena suggest CO2 sublimation is more likely. However, the exact mechanism by which CO2 sublimation moves sediment is not fully understood, and this understanding is required to validate the CO2 hypothesis. Here we present the results of the first ever laboratory simulations of this process under martian conditions, and show that significant quantities of loose sediment can be transported. The centrepiece of the apparatus is a 1m diameter, 2m long Mars simulation chamber, housed at The Open University, UK. JSC Mars-1A regolith simulant was formed into a slope, inside a box, ~30 cm long, 23 cm wide by 12 cm deep. The box is constructed of coiled, copper tubing to allow cooling of the regolith by liquid nitrogen. The experimental procedure consists of four stages: 1) establishment of a dry atmosphere in the chamber, 2) cooling the regolith sufficiently to support condensation of CO2 frost at reduced pressure, 3) introduction of cooled CO2 gas above the regolith to deposit as frost, and 4) video recording the surface evolution under radiant heating (~100 mins). Two High Definition digital video cameras were mounted above the box and image pairs taken from the videos were then used to create digital elevation models (DEMs) in Agisoft Photoscan at regular intervals. In our initial experiments we performed four experimental runs where the slope was set at or near the angle of repose (~30°). In each case we observed mass wasting events triggered by the sublimation of the deposited CO2 over the whole duration of the insolation. The highest levels of activity occurred in the first third of the run

  2. Titanium Nitride Epitaxy on Tungsten (100) by Sublimation Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mercurio, Lisa; Du, Li; Edgar, J H; Kenik, Edward A

    2007-01-01

    Titanium nitride crystals were grown from titanium nitride powder on tungsten by the sublimation-recondensation technique. The bright golden TiN crystals displayed a variety of shapes including cubes, truncated tetrahedrons, truncated octahedrons, and tetrahedrons bounded by (111) and (100) crystal planes. The TiN crystals formed regular, repeated patterns within individual W grains that suggested epitaxy. X-ray diffraction and electron backscattering diffraction revealed that the tungsten foil was highly textured with a preferred foil normal of (100) and confirmed that the TiN particles deposited epitaxially with the orientation TiN(100)/W(100) and TiN[100]/W[110], that is, the unit cells of the TiN crystals were rotated 45{sup o} with respect to the tungsten. Because of its larger coefficient of thermal expansion compared to W, upon cooling from the growth temperature, the TiN crystals were under in-plane tensile strain, causing many of the TiN crystals to crack.

  3. TacSat-2: Path finder for a Close Space Support Asset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhopale, A.; Finley, C.

    2008-08-01

    that mak e it eff ectiv e and su itable for a Tactical Operator emp loying it as a Close Space Support asset. The TacSat-2 story was tru ly a story of survival in the low-budget, high-expectation spacecraft world . The mission su ccesses w ere signif icant and ground- breaking, but they w ere, almost w ithou t exception, compromised successes. Most importan tly, you w ill see an asset th at was unquestionably bo th effective and suitable for military operators, but only worth the investmen t if curren t responsiveness deficiencies dr ive leadership towards a so lution where Close Space Support platforms are a pursued alternativ e. This p aper w ill present the objective positive and negative r esults of the TacSat-2 system' s space/ground components and CONO PS and w ill use these resu lts to project th e co mplexion of an OpSat-X that could best fulfill the role of a Close Sp ace Support p latform directly employed by a front-lin e tactical oper ator to responsively return a product that meets an immediate need.

  4. Pilot Non-Conformance to Alerting System Commands During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy Ruth; Hansman, R. John; Corker, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Cockpit alerting systems monitor potentially hazardous situations, both inside and outside the aircraft. When a hazard is projected to occur, the alerting system displays alerts and/or command decisions to the pilot. However, pilots have been observed to not conform to alerting system commands by delaying their response or by not following the automatic commands exactly. This non-conformance to the automatic alerting system can reduce its benefit. Therefore, a need exists to understand the causes and effects of pilot non-conformance in order to develop automatic alerting systems whose commands the pilots are more likely to follow. These considerations were examined through flight simulator evaluations of the collision avoidance task during closely spaced parallel approaches. This task provided a useful case-study because the effects of non-conformance can be significant, given the time-critical nature of the task. A preliminary evaluation of alerting systems identified non-conformance in over 40% of the cases and a corresponding drop in collision avoidance performance. A follow-on experiment found subjects' alerting and maneuver selection criteria were consistent with different strategies than those used by automatic systems, indicating the pilot may potentially disagree with the alerting system if the pilot attempts to verify automatic alerts and commanded avoidance maneuvers. A final experiment found supporting automatic alerts with the explicit display of its underlying criteria resulted in more consistent subject reactions. In light of these experimental results, a general discussion of pilot non-conformance is provided. Contributing factors in pilot non-conformance include a lack of confidence in the automatic system and mismatches between the alerting system's commands and the pilots' own decisions based on the information available to them. The effects of non-conformance on system performance are discussed. Possible methods of reconciling mismatches are

  5. Kinematic Modeling of Separation Compression for Paired Approaches to Closely-Spaced Parallel Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    In a simultaneous paired approach to closely-spaced parallel runways, a pair of aircraft flies in close proximity on parallel approach paths. The longitudinal separation between the aircraft must be maintained within a range that avoids wake encounters and, if one of the aircraft blunders, avoids collision. To increase operational availability, the approach procedure must accommodate a mixture of aircraft sizes and, consequently, approach speeds. In these procedures, the slower aircraft is placed in the lead position. The faster aircraft maintains separation from the slow aircraft in a dependent operation until final approach and flies independently afterward. Due to the higher approach speed of the fast aircraft, longitudinal separation will decrease during final approach. Therefore, the fast aircraft must position itself before the final approach so that it will remain within the safe range of separation as separation decreases. Given the approach geometry and speed schedule for each aircraft, one can use kinematics to estimate the separation loss between a pair of aircraft. A kinematic model can complement fast-time Monte-Carlo simulations of the approach by enabling a tailored reduction in the variation of starting position for the fast aircraft. One could also implement the kinematic model in ground-based or on-board decision support tools to compute the optimal initial separation for a given pair of aircraft. To better match the auto-coupled flight of real aircraft, the paper derives a kinematic model where the speed schedule is flown using equivalent airspeed. The predicted time of flight using the equivalent airspeed kinematic model compares well against a high-fidelity aircraft simulation performing the same approach. This model also demonstrates a modest increase in the predicted loss of separation when contrasted against a kinematic model that assumes the scheduled speed is true airspeed.

  6. Experimental Study of Collision Detection Schema Used by Pilots During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Hansman, R. John

    1996-01-01

    An experimental flight simulator study was conducted to examine the mental alerting logic and thresholds used by subjects to issue an alert and execute an avoidance maneuver. Subjects flew a series of autopilot landing approaches with traffic on a closely-spaced parallel approach; during some runs, the traffic would deviate towards the subject and the subject was to indicate the point when they recognized the potential traffic conflict, and then indicate a direction of flight for an avoidance maneuver. A variety of subjects, including graduate students, general aviation pilots and airline pilots, were tested. Five traffic displays were evaluated, with a moving map TCAS-type traffic display as a baseline. A side-task created both high and low workload situations. Subjects appeared to use the lateral deviation of the intruder aircraft from its approach path as the criteria for an alert regardless of the display available. However, with displays showing heading and/or trend information, their alerting thresholds were significantly lowered. This type of range-only schema still resulted in many near misses, as a high convergence rate was often established by the time of the subject's alert. Therefore, the properties of the intruder's trajectory had the greatest effect on the resultant near miss rate; no display system reliably caused alerts timely enough for certain collision avoidance. Subjects' performance dropped significantly on a side-task while they analyzed the need for an alert, showing alert generation can be a high workload situation at critical times. No variation was found between subjects with and with out piloting experience. These results suggest the design of automatic alerting systems should take into account the range-type alerting schema used by the human, such that the rationale for the automatic alert should be obvious to, and trusted by, the operator. Although careful display design may help generate pilot/automation trust, issues such as user non

  7. Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathues, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schaefer, M.; Le Corre, L.; Reddy, V.; Platz, T.; Cloutis, E. A.; Christensen, U.; Kneissl, T.; Li, J.-Y.; Mengel, K.; Schmedemann, N.; Schaefer, T.; Russell, C. T.; Applin, D. M.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Keller, H. U.; O'Brien, D. P.; Pieters, C. M.; Raymond, C. A.; Ripken, J.; Schenk, P. M.; Schmidt, B. E.; Sierks, H.; Sykes, M. V.; Thangjam, G. S.; Vincent, J.-B.

    2015-12-01

    The dwarf planet (1) Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt with a mean diameter of about 950 kilometres, is located at a mean distance from the Sun of about 2.8 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Thermal evolution models suggest that it is a differentiated body with potential geological activity. Unlike on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where tidal forces are responsible for spewing briny water into space, no tidal forces are acting on Ceres. In the absence of such forces, most objects in the main asteroid belt are expected to be geologically inert. The recent discovery of water vapour absorption near Ceres and previous detection of bound water and OH near and on Ceres (refs 5, 6, 7) have raised interest in the possible presence of surface ice. Here we report the presence of localized bright areas on Ceres from an orbiting imager. These unusual areas are consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material, although other compositions are possible. Of particular interest is a bright pit on the floor of crater Occator that exhibits probable sublimation of water ice, producing haze clouds inside the crater that appear and disappear with a diurnal rhythm. Slow-moving condensed-ice or dust particles may explain this haze. We conclude that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the ‘snow line’, which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense.

  8. Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres.

    PubMed

    Nathues, A; Hoffmann, M; Schaefer, M; Le Corre, L; Reddy, V; Platz, T; Cloutis, E A; Christensen, U; Kneissl, T; Li, J-Y; Mengel, K; Schmedemann, N; Schaefer, T; Russell, C T; Applin, D M; Buczkowski, D L; Izawa, M R M; Keller, H U; O'Brien, D P; Pieters, C M; Raymond, C A; Ripken, J; Schenk, P M; Schmidt, B E; Sierks, H; Sykes, M V; Thangjam, G S; Vincent, J-B

    2015-12-10

    The dwarf planet (1) Ceres, the largest object in the main asteroid belt with a mean diameter of about 950 kilometres, is located at a mean distance from the Sun of about 2.8 astronomical units (one astronomical unit is the Earth-Sun distance). Thermal evolution models suggest that it is a differentiated body with potential geological activity. Unlike on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where tidal forces are responsible for spewing briny water into space, no tidal forces are acting on Ceres. In the absence of such forces, most objects in the main asteroid belt are expected to be geologically inert. The recent discovery of water vapour absorption near Ceres and previous detection of bound water and OH near and on Ceres (refs 5-7) have raised interest in the possible presence of surface ice. Here we report the presence of localized bright areas on Ceres from an orbiting imager. These unusual areas are consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material, although other compositions are possible. Of particular interest is a bright pit on the floor of crater Occator that exhibits probable sublimation of water ice, producing haze clouds inside the crater that appear and disappear with a diurnal rhythm. Slow-moving condensed-ice or dust particles may explain this haze. We conclude that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the 'snow line', which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense. PMID:26659183

  9. Sulfur "Concrete" for Lunar Applications - Sublimation Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Toutanji, Houssam

    2006-01-01

    Melting sulfur and mixing it with an aggregate to form "concrete" is commercially well established and constitutes a material that is particularly well-suited for use in corrosive environments. Discovery of the mineral troilite (FeS) on the moon poses the question of extracting the sulfur for use as a lunar construction material. This would be an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. However, the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. Here it is assumed that the lunar ore can be mined, refined, and the raw sulfur melded with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. This study evaluates pure sulfur and two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar stimulant and SiO2 powder as aggregate additions. Each set was subjected to extended periods in a vacuum environment to evaluate sublimation issues. Results from these experiments are presented and discussed within the context of the lunar environment.

  10. Carbon-Sublimation Production of Fullerenes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker, Frank Albert

    1995-01-01

    Carbon-sublimation production of fullerenes enjoys wide use in both experimental and industrial application worldwide. Although it has been nearly five years since the inception of the technique, little is known about the roles various parameters play in the production process. This work attempts to shed light, both experimentally and theoretically, on the basic processes at work in this type of fullerene production. Experimental results herein show that a functional relationship exists among the C_{60 }, C_{70}, C_{76}, C_ {78}, and C_{84} fullerenes produced in carbon arcs. This result is interpreted to mean that an equilibrium description of the production process may be valid. Theoretical calculations are then offered in support of such a view. The theory goes on to show details of an equilibrium description that reproduce essential features of fullerene mass-spectra. It is shown that equilibrium abundances of n-atom -sized clusters are highly dependent on the stoichiometric equation chosen to describe the system. However, common traits of the investigated equilibrium descriptions lead to useful conclusions.

  11. Nietzsche's View of Sublimation in the Educational Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Ann Margaret

    1975-01-01

    Article outlined Nietzsche's beliefs on the primary aim of education, the conscious production of the free man through the process of sublimation, the active redirecting of one's life energy in the service of creativity. (Editor/RK)

  12. Mass spectrometry study of the sublimation of aliphatic dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badelin, V. G.; Tyunina, E. Yu.; Krasnov, A. V.; Tyunina, V. V.; Giricheva, N. I.; Girichev, A. V.

    2012-03-01

    The sublimation of glycyl-L-α-alanine (Gly-Ala), L-α-alanyl-L-α-alanine (Ala-Ala), and DL-α-alanyl-DL-α-valine (Ala-Val) aliphatic dipeptides is studied by electron ionization mass spectrometry in combination with Knudsen effusion. The temperature range in which substances sublime as monomer molecular forms is determined. Enthalpies of sublimation Δs H°( T) are determined for Gly-Ala, Ala-Ala, and Ala-Val. It is shown that the enthalpy of sublimation of dipeptides increases with an increase in the side hydrocarbon radical. The unknown Δs H°(298) values for 17 amino acids and nine dipeptides are estimated using the proposed "structure-property" correlation model, in which the geometry and electron characteristics of molecules are used as structural descriptors.

  13. Dynamics and Mechanisms of Exfoliated Black Phosphorus Sublimation.

    PubMed

    Fortin-Deschênes, Matthieu; Levesque, Pierre L; Martel, Richard; Moutanabbir, Oussama

    2016-05-01

    We report on real time observations of the sublimation of exfoliated black phosphorus layers throughout annealing using in situ low energy electron microscopy. We found that sublimation manifests itself above 375 ± 20 °C through the nucleation and expansion of asymmetric, faceted holes with the long axis aligned along the [100] direction and sharp tips defined by edges consisting of alternating (10) and (11) steps. This thermally activated process repeats itself via successive sublimation of individual layers. Calculations and simulations using density functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo allowed to determine the involved atomic pathways. Sublimation is found to occur via detachments of phosphorus dimers rather than single atoms. This behavior and the role of defects is described using an analytical model that captures all essential features. This work establishes an atomistic-level understanding of the thermal stability of exfoliated black phosphorus and defines the temperature window available for material and device processing. PMID:27097073

  14. Scanning electron microscope observations of sublimates from Merapi Volcano, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.

    1993-01-01

    Sublimates were sampled from high-temperature (up to 800??C) fumaroles at Merapi volcano in January 1984. Sampling is accomplished by inserting silica tubes into high-temperature vents. Volcanic glass flows through the tubes and sublimates precipitate on the inner walls in response to the temperature gradient. With decreasing temperature (800-500??C) in the tubes, there are five sublimate zones. Texturally, the sublimate phases grade from large, well-formed crystals at their highest-temperature occurrence to more numerous, smaller crystals that are less perfect at lower temperatures. These changes imply that the crystal nucleation and growth rates increase and decrease, respectively, as temperature decreases. Overall, the textural data suggest that the gas is saturated or slightly super-saturated with the phases at their hottest occurrence, but that the gas becomes increasingly super-saturated with the phases at lower temperatures. -from Author

  15. Development and Testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2007-01-01

    Sublimators have been used for heat rejection for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Some of the attractive features of sublimators are that they are compact, lightweight, and self-regulating. One of the drawbacks of previous designs has been sensitivity to non-volatile contamination in the feedwater, which can clog relatively small pores (approx. 3-6 micrometers) in the porous plates where ice forms and sublimates. A new design that is less sensitive to contaminants is being developed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator (CIS) Engineering Development Unit (EDU).

  16. Development and Testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Westheimer, David T.

    2006-01-01

    Sublimators have been used for heat rejection for a variety of space applications including the Apollo Lunar Module and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Some of the attractive features of sublimators are that they are compact, lightweight, and self-regulating. One of the drawbacks of previous designs has been sensitivity to non-volatile contamination in the feedwater, which can clog relatively small pores (approx.3-6 microns) in the porous plates where ice forms and sublimates. A new design that is less sensitive to contaminants is being developed at the Johnson Space Center. This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator (CIS) Engineering Development Unit (EDU).

  17. Sublimation of water ice mixed with silicates and tholins: Evolution of surface texture and reflectance spectra, with implications for comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, Olivier; Pommerol, Antoine; Jost, Bernhard; Carrasco, Nathalie; Szopa, Cyril; Thomas, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    The surfaces of many objects in the Solar System comprise substantial quantities of water ice sometimes mixed with minerals and/or organic molecules. The sublimation of the ice changes the structural and optical properties of these objects. We present laboratory data on the evolution of the structure and the visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance of icy surface analogues of cometary ices, made of water ice, complex organic matter (tholins) and silicates, as they undergo sublimation under low temperature (<-70 °C) and pressure (10-5 mbar) conditions inside the SCITEAS simulation chamber. As the water ice sublimated, we observed in situ the formation of a porous sublimation lag deposit, or sublimation mantle, at the top of the ice. This mantle is a network of filaments made of the non-volatile particles. Organics or phyllosilicates grains, able to interact via stronger inter-particulate forces than olivine grains, can form a foam-like structure having internal cohesiveness, holding olivine grains together. As this mantle builds-up, the band depths of the sub-surface water ice are attenuated until complete extinction under only few millimeters of mantle. Optically thick sublimation mantles are mainly featureless in the near infrared. The absorption bands of the minerals present in the mantle are weak, or even totally absent if minerals are mixed with organics which largely dominate the VIS-NIR reflectance spectrum. During sublimation, ejections of large fragments of mantle, triggered by the gas flow, expose ice particles to the surface. The contrast of brightness between mantled and ice-exposed areas depends on the wavelength range and the dust/ice ratio considered. We describe how the chemical nature of the non-volatiles, the size of their particles, the way they are mixed with the ice and the dust/ice mass ratio influence the texture, activity and spectro-photometric properties of the sublimation mantles. These data provide useful references for

  18. Natural convection mass transfer at a vertical array of closely-spaced horizontal cylinders with special reference to electrochemical reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Sedahmed, G.H.; Nirdosh, I.

    1995-06-01

    Many industrial electrochemical processes such as electrowinning of metals, electrochemical pollution control, and electroorganic and electroinorganic syntheses are diffusion-controlled processes whose rates depend on the geometry of the working electrode as well as the prevailing hydrodynamic conditions. Recently much work has been done to develop new electrochemical reactors which are more efficient than the traditional parallel plate electrochemical reactor used in conducting such processes. In line with this, the object of the present work was to study the natural convection mass transfer behavior of a new electrode geometry, namely an array of closely-spaced horizontal tubes. Natural convection mass transfer at a vertical array of closely-spaced horizontal cylinders was studied by an electrochemical technique involving the measurement of the limiting current of the cathodic deposition of copper from acidified copper sulfate solution. Various combinations of solution concentration, cylinder diameter, and number of cylinders per array were used including experiments on single cylinders. The mass transfer coefficient at the array was found to decrease with increasing number of cylinders, pass through a minimum, and then increase with further increase in the number of cylinders per array; the mass transfer coefficient increased with increasing cylinder diameter in the array. Mass transfer data for different arrays were correlated for the range 6.3 {times} 10{sup 9} < ScGr < 3.63 {times} 10{sup 10} by the equation Sh = 0.455(ScGr){sup 0.25} and for the range 6.3 {times} 10{sup 10} < ScGr < 3.63 {times} 10{sup 12} by the equation Sh = 0.0064(ScGr){sup 0.42}. The characteristic length used in the above correlations was obtained by dividing the array area by the perimeter projected onto a horizontal plane. Practical implications of the present results in designing electrochemical reactors with heat transfer facilities are highlighted.

  19. Piezoelectric crystal microbalance measurements of enthalpy of sublimation of C2-C9 dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirri, F.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Zampetti, E.

    2015-07-01

    We present here a novel experimental setup able to measure the enthalpy of sublimation of a given compound by means of Piezoelectric Crystal Microbalances (PCM). This experiment was performed in the TG-Lab facility in IAPS-INAF, dedicated to the development of TGA sensors for space measurements, such as detection of organic and non-organic volatile species and refractory materials in planetary environments. In order to study physical-chemical processes concerning the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) present in atmospheric environments, the setup has been tested on Dicarboxylic acids. Acids with low molecular weight are among the components of organic fraction of particulate matter in the atmosphere, coming from different sources (biogenic and anthropogenic). Considering their relative abundance, it is useful to consider Dicarboxylic acid as "markers" to define the biogenic or anthropogenic origin of the aerosol, thus obtaining some information of the emission sources. In this work, a temperature controlled effusion cell was used to sublimate VOC, creating a molecular flux that was collimated onto a cold PCM. The VOC re-condensed onto the PCM quartz crystal allowing the determination of the deposition rate. From the measurements of deposition rates, it was possible to infer the enthalpy of sublimation of Adipic acid, i.e. Δ Hsub: 141.6 ± 0.8 kJ mol-1, Succinic acid, i.e. 113.3 ± 1.3 kJ mol-1, Oxalic acid, i.e. 62.5 ± 3.1 kJ mol-1 and Azelaic acid, i.e. 124.2 ± 1.2 kJ mol-1 (weight average values). The results obtained are in very good agreement with literature within 10 % for the Adipic, Succinic and Oxalic acid.

  20. Piezoelectric crystal microbalance measurements of enthalpy of sublimation of C2-C9 dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirri, F.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Zampetti, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present here a novel experimental set-up that is able to measure the enthalpy of sublimation of a given compound by means of piezoelectric crystal microbalances (PCMs). The PCM sensors have already been used for space measurements, such as for the detection of organic and non-organic volatile species and refractory materials in planetary environments. In Earth atmospherics applications, PCMs can be also used to obtain some physical-chemical processes concerning the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in atmospheric environments. The experimental set-up has been developed and tested on dicarboxylic acids. In this work, a temperature-controlled effusion cell was used to sublimate VOC, creating a molecular flux that was collimated onto a cold PCM. The VOC recondensed onto the PCM quartz crystal, allowing the determination of the deposition rate. From the measurements of deposition rates, it has been possible to infer the enthalpy of sublimation of adipic acid, i.e. ΔHsub : 141.6 ± 0.8 kJ mol-1, succinic acid, i.e. 113.3 ± 1.3 kJ mol-1, oxalic acid, i.e. 62.5 ± 3.1 kJ mol-1, and azelaic acid, i.e. 124.2 ± 1.2 kJ mol-1. The results obtained show an accuracy of 1 % for succinic, adipic, and azelaic acid and within 5 % for oxalic acid and are in very good agreement with previous works (within 6 % for adipic, succinic, and oxalic acid and within 11 % or larger for azelaic acid).

  1. Graphite Sublimation Tests for the Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory Target Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, JR

    2002-03-25

    A passively cooled graphite target was proposed for a 1.5 MW neutrino production research facility because of its simplicity and favorable performance as a target material for neutrino production. The conceptual design for the target in the Reference 1 study was a graphite rod 15 mm in diameter by 800 mm long. Figure 1 shows the graphite target rod supported by graphite spokes, which are mounted to a water-cooled stainless steel support tube. The target is radiatively cooled to the water-cooled surface of the support tube. Based on nuclear analysis results, the time-averaged power deposition in the target is 35 kW. If this power is deposited uniformly along the axial length of the target, the volumetric power deposition in the target is about 250 MW/m{sup 3}. The target surface temperature required to radiate the deposited power to a water-cooled tube is estimated to be about 1850 C, and the temperature at the center of the target is about 75 C hotter. The sublimation erosion rate (e), estimated assuming that the graphite is submersed in a perfect vacuum environment, can be derived from kinetic theory and is given by: e = p{sub sat}(m/2{pi} kT){sup 1/2} where p{sub sat} is the saturation pressure, m is the molecular weight, k is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the surface temperature. The saturation pressure given in Ref. 3 can be approximated by: p{sub sat} =exp(-A/T + B) where A = 9.47 x 10{sup 3}, B = 24.2, and the units of p{sub sat} and T are atmospheres and K, respectively. Using these equations, the saturation pressure and sublimation erosion rate are plotted in Fig. 2 as a function of temperature. The surface recession rate shown with units of mm/s in Fig. 2 assumes one-sided erosion. At the average power deposition value of 250 MW/m{sup 3}, the surface temperature is 1850 C resulting in a sublimation erosion rate of only 2.2 {micro}m/day. However, if the actual power deposition were peaked by a factor of two in the axial direction, then the surface

  2. Sublimation of a crystal slowed by sorption of foreign molecules from a gaseous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, A. A.; Polyakova, V. I.

    2014-07-01

    Numerical simulation of the sublimation of the surface of an ice crystal has shown that the presence of a non-condensable gas substantially reduces the sublimation rate. It has been found that the slowing of the sublimation due to the adsorption of gas molecules on the crystal surface that fill the vacancies during sublimation prevents the formation of vacancy islands on the surface of the crystal required for evaporation of the surface molecular layer. The available results of studies that explain the slowing of the sublimation by the presence of a diffusion layer formed in the vapor medium near the sublimating surface are supplemented with new data showing that molecular processes on the crystal surface play an equally important role as the diffusion layer. Cases have been found where crystal sublimation is accelerated by the sorption of gas molecules. The obtained results refining the theory of sublimation can be used to develop methods for controlling sublimation.

  3. Sublimation rates of explosive materials : method development and initial results.

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, James M.; Patton, Robert Thomas

    2004-08-01

    Vapor detection of explosives continues to be a technological basis for security applications. This study began experimental work to measure the chemical emanation rates of pure explosive materials as a basis for determining emanation rates of security threats containing explosives. Sublimation rates for TNT were determined with thermo gravimetric analysis using two different techniques. Data were compared with other literature values to provide sublimation rates from 25 to 70 C. The enthalpy of sublimation for the combined data was found to be 115 kJ/mol, which corresponds well with previously reported data from vapor pressure determinations. A simple Gaussian atmospheric dispersion model was used to estimate downrange concentrations based on continuous, steady-state conditions at 20, 45 and 62 C for a nominal exposed block of TNT under low wind conditions. Recommendations are made for extension of the experimental vapor emanation rate determinations and development of turbulent flow computational fluid dynamics based atmospheric dispersion estimates of standoff vapor concentrations.

  4. Sublimation of Ices Containing Organics and/or Minerals and Implications for Icy Bodies Surface Structure and Spectral Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Jost, B.; Yoldi, Z.; Carrasco, N.; Szopa, C.; Thomas, N.

    2015-12-01

    The surfaces of many objects in the Solar System comprise substantial quantities of water ice either in pure form or mixed with minerals and/or organic molecules. Sublimation is a process responsible for shaping and changing the reflectance properties of these objects. We present laboratory data on the evolution of the structure and the visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance of icy surfaces made of mixtures of water ice and non-volatile components (complex organic matter and silicates), as they undergo sublimation of the water ice under low temperature and pressure conditions (Poch et al., under review). We prepared icy surfaces which are potential analogues of ices found on comets, icy satellites or trans-neptunian objects (TNOs). The experiments were carried out in the SCITEAS simulation setup recently built as part of the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern (Pommerol et al., 2015a). As the water ice sublimated, we observed in situ the formation of a sublimation lag deposit, or sublimation mantle, made of the non-volatiles at the top of the samples. The texture (porosity, internal cohesiveness etc.), the activity (outbursts and ejection of mantle fragments) and the spectro-photometric properties of this mantle are found to differ strongly depending on the chemical nature of the non-volatiles, the size of their particles, the way they are mixed with the volatile component and the dust/ice mass ratio. The results also indicate how the band depths of the sub-surface water ice evolve during the build-up of the sublimation mantle. These data provide useful references for interpreting remote-sensing observations of Rosetta (see Pommerol et al., 2015b), and also New Horizons. Poch, O., et al., under review in IcarusPommerol, A., et al., 2015a, Planet. Space Sci. 109-110, 106-122. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pss.2015.02.004Pommerol, A., et al., 2015b, Astronomy and Astrophysics, in press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201525977

  5. Enthalpy of sublimation as measured using a silicon oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Hamza; Pomeroy, J. M.

    In this study, we report the enthalpy of sublimation of common gases (nitrogen, oxygen, argon, carbon dioxide, neon, krypton, xenon, and water vapor) using a large area silicon oscillator with a sub-ng (~0.027 ng/cm2) mass sensitivity. The double paddle oscillator design enables high frequency stability (17 ppb) at cryogenic temperatures and provides a consistent technique for enthalpy measurements. The enthalpies of sublimation are derived from the rate of mass loss during programmed thermal desorption and are detected as a change in the resonance frequency of the self-tracking oscillator. These measured enthalpy values show excellent agreement with the accepted literature values.

  6. Alumina Paste Sublimation Suppression Barrier for Thermoelectric Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah (Inventor); Caillat, Thierry (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Alumina as a sublimation suppression barrier for a Zintl thermoelectric material in a thermoelectric power generation device operating at high temperature, e.g. at or above 1000K, is disclosed. The Zintl thermoelectric material may comprise Yb.sub.14MnSb.sub.11. The alumina may be applied as an adhesive paste dried and cured on a substantially oxide free surface of the Zintl thermoelectric material and polished to a final thickness. The sublimation suppression barrier may be finalized by baking out the alumina layer on the Zintl thermoelectric material until it becomes substantially clogged with ytterbia.

  7. Contactless prompt tumbling rebound of drops from a sublimating slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Carlo; Jung, Stefan; Wetzel, Andreas; Heer, Emmanuel; Schoch, Philippe; Moqaddam, Ali Mazloomi; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Ilya; Marengo, Marco; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2016-05-01

    We have uncovered a drop rebound regime, characteristic of highly viscous liquids impacting tilted sublimating surfaces. Here the drops, rather than showing a slide, spread, recoil, and rebound behavior, exhibit a prompt tumbling rebound. As a result, glycerol surprisingly rebounds faster than three orders of magnitude less viscous water. When a viscous drop impacts a sublimating surface, part of its initial linear momentum is converted into angular momentum: Lattice Boltzmann simulations confirmed that tumbling owes its appearance to the rapid transition of the internal angular velocity prior to rebound to a constant value, as in a tumbling solid body.

  8. Origin of Sublimation Polygons in the Antarctic Western Dry Valleys: Implications for Patterned Ground Development on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, D. R.; Head, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    Two hypotheses have been developed in order to address the age, origin, and evolution of surface polygons in the western Dry Valleys region of southern Victoria Land. Resolution of this debate has direct relevance and implications for patterned ground in ice-rich terrain on Mars. One hypothesis, the dynamic hypothesis, states that growth of sand-wedges pervasively deforms sediment across polygonal terrain, recycling sediment from troughs to polygon centers and back again over time scales of thousands of years. A second hypothesis, the stability hypothesis, states that deformation associated with sand-wedge polygons, particularly those that form over buried ice, is restricted to polygon troughs; the implication is that polygon centers may contain undisturbed soils >1 million years old. Evidence comes from field data that show that the age, origin, and morphology of polygons that form over buried ice in the western Dry Valleys region is tied collectively to the location and rate of sublimation of underlying ice. In Beacon Valley, sublimation of debris-rich ice produces a dry surface lag that insulates and slows loss of remaining ice. Sub-zero temperature cycling of near-surface ice and soil creates tensile stresses that result in a network of hexagonal cracks, extending upward from buried ice toward the ground surface. Where fines sift downward into open thermal-contraction cracks, a coarse-grained lag deposit forms on top of the ice. Owing to spatial variations in till texture, rates of sublimation vary across the ice surface. High rates occur below coarse-grained lags that cap contraction cracks; low rates are found at polygon centers beneath fine-grained low porosity/permeability debris. Measured concentrations of in-situ produced cosmogenic 3He in two depth profiles through sublimation till show a steady decrease with depth, indicating negligible recycling of surface materials on million-year time scales. These data suggest that once polygon troughs deepen

  9. VTOL in ground effect flows for closely spaced jets. [to predict pressure and upwash forces on aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Migdal, D.; Hill, W. G., Jr.; Jenkins, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Results of a series of in ground effect twin jet tests are presented along with flow models for closely spaced jets to help predict pressure and upwash forces on simulated aircraft surfaces. The isolated twin jet tests revealed unstable fountains over a range of spacings and jet heights, regions of below ambient pressure on the ground, and negative pressure differential in the upwash flow field. A separate computer code was developed for vertically oriented, incompressible jets. This model more accurately reflects fountain behavior without fully formed wall jets, and adequately predicts ground isobars, upwash dynamic pressure decay, and fountain lift force variation with height above ground.

  10. Effects of oxygen partial pressure, deposition temperature, and annealing on the optical response of CdS:O thin films as studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junda, Maxwell M.; Grice, Corey R.; Subedi, Indra; Yan, Yanfa; Podraza, Nikolas J.

    2016-07-01

    Ex-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements are made on radio frequency magnetron sputtered oxygenated cadmium sulfide (CdS:O) thin films. Films are deposited onto glass substrates at room temperature and at 270 °C with varying oxygen to total gas flow ratios in the sputtering ambient. Ellipsometric spectra from 0.74 to 5.89 eV are collected before and after annealing at 607 °C to simulate the thermal processes during close-space sublimation of overlying cadmium telluride in that solar cell configuration. Complex dielectric function (ɛ = ɛ1 + iɛ2) spectra are extracted for films as a function of oxygen gas flow ratio, deposition temperature, and post-deposition annealing using a parametric model accounting for critical point transitions and an Urbach tail for sub-band gap absorption. The results suggest an inverse relationship between degree of crystallinity and oxygen gas flow ratio, whereas annealing is shown to increase crystallinity in all samples. Direct band gap energies are determined from the parametric modeling of ɛ and linear extrapolations of the square of the absorption coefficient. As-deposited samples feature a range of band gap energies whereas annealing is shown to result in gap energies ranging only from 2.40 to 2.45 eV, which is close to typical band gaps for pure cadmium sulfide.

  11. Modeling the development of martian sublimation thermokarst landforms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dundas, Colin M.; Byrne, Shane; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    Sublimation-thermokarst landforms result from collapse of the surface when ice is lost from the subsurface. On Mars, scalloped landforms with scales of decameters to kilometers are observed in the mid-latitudes and considered likely thermokarst features. We describe a landscape evolution model that couples diffusive mass movement and subsurface ice loss due to sublimation. Over periods of tens of thousands of Mars years under conditions similar to the present, the model produces scallop-like features similar to those on the Martian surface, starting from much smaller initial disturbances. The model also indicates crater expansion when impacts occur in surfaces underlain by excess ice to some depth, with morphologies similar to observed landforms on the Martian northern plains. In order to produce these landforms by sublimation, substantial quantities of excess ice are required, at least comparable to the vertical extent of the landform, and such ice must remain in adjacent terrain to support the non-deflated surface. We suggest that Martian thermokarst features are consistent with formation by sublimation, without melting, and that significant thicknesses of very clean excess ice (up to many tens of meters, the depth of some scalloped depressions) are locally present in the Martian mid-latitudes. Climate conditions leading to melting at significant depth are not required.

  12. Modeling the development of martian sublimation thermokarst landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dundas, Colin M.; Byrne, Shane; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-12-01

    Sublimation-thermokarst landforms result from collapse of the surface when ice is lost from the subsurface. On Mars, scalloped landforms with scales of decameters to kilometers are observed in the mid-latitudes and considered likely thermokarst features. We describe a landscape evolution model that couples diffusive mass movement and subsurface ice loss due to sublimation. Over periods of tens of thousands of Mars years under conditions similar to the present, the model produces scallop-like features similar to those on the martian surface, starting from much smaller initial disturbances. The model also indicates crater expansion when impacts occur in surfaces underlain by excess ice to some depth, with morphologies similar to observed landforms on the martian northern plains. In order to produce these landforms by sublimation, substantial quantities of excess ice are required, at least comparable to the vertical extent of the landform, and such ice must remain in adjacent terrain to support the non-deflated surface. We suggest that martian thermokarst features are consistent with formation by sublimation, without melting, and that significant thicknesses of very clean excess ice (up to many tens of meters, the depth of some scalloped depressions) are locally present in the martian mid-latitudes. Climate conditions leading to melting at significant depth are not required.

  13. Literary Study, Measurement, and the Sublime: Disciplinary Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiland, Donna, Ed.; Rosenthal, Laura J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This collection of essays, "Literary Study, Measurement, and the Sublime: Disciplinary Assessment," edited by Donna Heiland and Laura J. Rosenthal, represents an important new venture in the Foundation's communication program. The book is the product of many authors, including the editors, both of whom have written essays for it. But it is the…

  14. Isotopic Fractionation of Water-Ice from Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, E.; Boyer, C.; Park, M.; Gormally, J.; Benitez, E.; Dominguez, G.

    2015-12-01

    Elizabeth Christensen, Charisa Boyer, Manesseh Park, Ezra Benitez, Gerardo Dominguez Understanding the multi-isotopic fractionation of water-ice that results from its sublimation may be important for understanding the isotopic composition of cometary ices. Here we describe an experimental setup whose purpose is to understand the effects of various astrophysical processes on the δD and δ18O and δ17O composition of water-ices. Our setup consists of an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber with oil free pumping, a closed cycle He cryostat to achieve low temperatures (capable of reaching 6K), and a vacuum line connected to the chamber via a UHV feed-through. Water isotopologues H216O, H218O, H217O, and HD16O samples can be measured after sublimation of water-ice with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (Picarro L2120-i) that is connected to the vacuum line. To perform these experiments, ambient water vapor was introduced into, frozen, and purified inside the UHV chamber (T< 150 K). Water-ice samples were sublimated for varying amounts of time to collect various fractions of the original reservoir. We will present the first results on the oxygen and deuterium isotopic fractionation of water-ice sublimation and discuss their implications for interpreting the isotopic compositions of cometary ices.

  15. The Digital Sublime: Lessons from Kelli Connell's "Double Life"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yi-hui

    2012-01-01

    The digital sublime refers to digital-composite photography that presents "the existence of something unpresentable" and that renders a matchless look a sophisticated fabrication, a perfect and clean composition, a maximum color saturation, a multiple-point perspective, and stunning or newfangled content. Abandoning the traditional one-shot mode…

  16. System for NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, R.A.

    1989-01-24

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid. 1 fig.

  17. Optimization of fast dissolving etoricoxib tablets prepared by sublimation technique.

    PubMed

    Patel, D M; Patel, M M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop fast dissolving tablets of etoricoxib. Granules containing etoricoxib, menthol, crospovidone, aspartame and mannitol were prepared by wet granulation technique. Menthol was sublimed from the granules by exposing the granules to vacuum. The porous granules were then compressed in to tablets. Alternatively, tablets were first prepared and later exposed to vacuum. The tablets were evaluated for percentage friability and disintegration time. A 3(2) full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of 2 formulation variables: amount of menthol and crospovidone. The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that for obtaining fast dissolving tablets; optimum amount of menthol and higher percentage of crospovidone should be used. A surface response plots are also presented to graphically represent the effect of the independent variables on the percentage friability and disintegration time. The validity of a generated mathematical model was tested by preparing a checkpoint batch. Sublimation of menthol from tablets resulted in rapid disintegration as compared with the tablets prepared from granules that were exposed to vacuum. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional marketed tablets for percentage drug dissolved in 30 min (Q(30)) and dissolution efficiency after 30 min (DE(30)). From the results, it was concluded that fast dissolving tablets with improved etoricoxib dissolution could be prepared by sublimation of tablets containing suitable subliming agent. PMID:20390084

  18. Optimization of Fast Dissolving Etoricoxib Tablets Prepared by Sublimation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Patel, D. M.; Patel, M. M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop fast dissolving tablets of etoricoxib. Granules containing etoricoxib, menthol, crospovidone, aspartame and mannitol were prepared by wet granulation technique. Menthol was sublimed from the granules by exposing the granules to vacuum. The porous granules were then compressed in to tablets. Alternatively, tablets were first prepared and later exposed to vacuum. The tablets were evaluated for percentage friability and disintegration time. A 32 full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of 2 formulation variables: amount of menthol and crospovidone. The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that for obtaining fast dissolving tablets; optimum amount of menthol and higher percentage of crospovidone should be used. A surface response plots are also presented to graphically represent the effect of the independent variables on the percentage friability and disintegration time. The validity of a generated mathematical model was tested by preparing a checkpoint batch. Sublimation of menthol from tablets resulted in rapid disintegration as compared with the tablets prepared from granules that were exposed to vacuum. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional marketed tablets for percentage drug dissolved in 30 min (Q30) and dissolution efficiency after 30 min (DE30). From the results, it was concluded that fast dissolving tablets with improved etoricoxib dissolution could be prepared by sublimation of tablets containing suitable subliming agent. PMID:20390084

  19. System for NO reduction using sublimation of cyanuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for reducing the NO content of a gas stream comprises contacting the gas stream with HNCO at a temperature effective for heat induced decomposition of HNCO and for resultant lowering of the NO content of the gas stream. Preferably, the HNCO is generated by sublimation of cyanuric acid.

  20. Alumina Paste Layer as a Sublimation Suppression Barrier for Yb14MnSb11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah; Caillat, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Sublimation is a major cause of degradation of thermoelectric power generation systems. Most thermoelectric materials tend to have peak values at the temperature where sublimation occurs. A sublimation barrier is needed that is stable at operating temperatures, inert against thermoelectric materials, and able to withstand thermal cycling stress. A porous alumina paste layer is suitable as a sublimation barrier for Yb14MnSb11. It can accommodate stress generated by the thermal expansion discrepancy between the suppression layer and thermoelectric materials. Sublimation suppression is achieved by filling pores naturally with YbO2, a natural byproduct of sublimation. YbO2 generated during the sublimation of Yb14MnSb11 fills the porous structure of the alumina paste, causing sublimation to decrease with time as the pores become filled.

  1. Modular Porous Plate Sublimator /MPPS/ requires only water supply for coolant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathbun, R. J.

    1966-01-01

    Modular porous plate sublimators, provided for each location where heat must be dissipated, conserve the battery power of a space vehicle by eliminating the coolant pump. The sublimator requires only a water supply for coolant.

  2. Modeling of Sublimation-Driven Erosion and Ice Pinnacle Formation on Callisto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Oliver; Umurhan, Orkan M.; Howard, Alan D.; Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2014-11-01

    Most of the areas observed at high resolution on the Galilean satellite Callisto have a morphology that implies sublimation-driven landform modification and mass wasting is at work [Moore et al., 1999]. These areas comprise rolling dark plains with interspersed bright pinnacles. Howard and Moore [2008], using the MARSSIM landform evolution model, simulated evolution of this landscape as a combination of bedrock volatile sublimation, mass wasting of the dark, non-coherent residue, and redeposition of ice at high-elevation cold traps sheltered from thermal re-radiation to form the pinnacles.The goal of our study is to further investigate the details of pinnacle formation by refining this model, and by constraining values for the variable environmental parameters within the model such that they are consistent with the current understanding of Callisto’s surface environment. We present the results of the updated model and our experimentation with varying key parameters.Our refinement of the model has caused us to revise the result of Howard and Moore [2008] that the pinnacles represent an ice cover of several tens to hundreds of meters. Instead, our results indicate an ice coverage reaching several meters at most, a figure that is consistent with the prediction of Moore et al. [2004]. We have also modified the model such that ice contained within the pinnacles is now subject to sublimation itself.Using Fick’s Law to solve for the diffusive transport rate between a volatile table and an atmosphere [Moore et al., 1996], we have determined that the loss rate of H2O ice from the volatile-refractory bedrock through sublimation is too slow 10-20 kg m-2 s-1) to account for the formation of the ice pinnacles, and that a volatile mixture that contains H2O ice is necessary to facilitate its loss. We find that CO2 hydrate fulfills this role well: loss rates of CO2●6H2O 10-10 kg m-2 s-1) are sufficient to produce deposited ice thicknesses reaching several meters, with the

  3. An echolocation model for range discrimination of multiple closely spaced objects: Transformation of spectrogram into the reflected intensity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Ikuo; Kunugiyama, Kenji; Yano, Masafumi

    2004-02-01

    Using frequency-modulated echolocation, bats can discriminate the range of objects with an accuracy of less than a millimeter. However, bats' echolocation mechanism is not well understood. The delay separation of three or more closely spaced objects can be determined through analysis of the echo spectrum. However, delay times cannot be properly correlated with objects using only the echo spectrum because the sequence of delay separations cannot be determined without information on temporal changes in the interference pattern of the echoes. To illustrate this, Gaussian chirplets with a carrier frequency compatible with bat emission sweep rates were used. The delay time for object 1, T1, can be estimated from the echo spectrum around the onset time. The delay time for object 2 is obtained by adding T1 to the delay separation between objects 1 and 2 (extracted from the first appearance of interference effects). Further objects can be located in sequence by this same procedure. This model can determine delay times for three or more closely spaced objects with an accuracy of about 1 μs, when all the objects are located within 30 μs of delay separation. This model is applicable for the range discrimination of objects having different reflected intensities and in a noisy environment (0-dB signal-to-noise ratio) while the cross-correlation method is hard to apply to these problems.

  4. Tunable Lattice Coupling of Multipole Plasmon Modes and Near-Field Enhancement in Closely Spaced Gold Nanorod Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Zhang, Xian; Ringe, Emilie; Hou, Mengjing; Ma, Lingwei; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2016-03-01

    Considering the nanogap and lattice effects, there is an attractive structure in plasmonics: closely spaced metallic nanoarrays. In this work, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the lattice coupling of multipole plasmon modes for closely spaced gold nanorod arrays, offering a new insight into the higher order cavity modes coupled with each other in the lattice. The resonances can be greatly tuned by changes in inter-rod gaps and nanorod heights while the influence of the nanorod diameter is relatively insignificant. Experimentally, pronounced suppressions of the reflectance are observed. Meanwhile, the near-field enhancement can be further enhanced, as demonstrated through surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We then confirm the correlation between the near-field and far-field plasmonic responses, which is significantly important for maximizing the near-field enhancement at a specific excitation wavelength. This lattice coupling of multipole plasmon modes is of broad interest not only for SERS but also for other plasmonic applications, such as subwavelength imaging or metamaterials.

  5. Tunable Lattice Coupling of Multipole Plasmon Modes and Near-Field Enhancement in Closely Spaced Gold Nanorod Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Zhang, Xian; Ringe, Emilie; Hou, Mengjing; Ma, Lingwei; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Considering the nanogap and lattice effects, there is an attractive structure in plasmonics: closely spaced metallic nanoarrays. In this work, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the lattice coupling of multipole plasmon modes for closely spaced gold nanorod arrays, offering a new insight into the higher order cavity modes coupled with each other in the lattice. The resonances can be greatly tuned by changes in inter-rod gaps and nanorod heights while the influence of the nanorod diameter is relatively insignificant. Experimentally, pronounced suppressions of the reflectance are observed. Meanwhile, the near-field enhancement can be further enhanced, as demonstrated through surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We then confirm the correlation between the near-field and far-field plasmonic responses, which is significantly important for maximizing the near-field enhancement at a specific excitation wavelength. This lattice coupling of multipole plasmon modes is of broad interest not only for SERS but also for other plasmonic applications, such as subwavelength imaging or metamaterials. PMID:26983501

  6. Tunable Lattice Coupling of Multipole Plasmon Modes and Near-Field Enhancement in Closely Spaced Gold Nanorod Arrays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Zhang, Xian; Ringe, Emilie; Hou, Mengjing; Ma, Lingwei; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Considering the nanogap and lattice effects, there is an attractive structure in plasmonics: closely spaced metallic nanoarrays. In this work, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the lattice coupling of multipole plasmon modes for closely spaced gold nanorod arrays, offering a new insight into the higher order cavity modes coupled with each other in the lattice. The resonances can be greatly tuned by changes in inter-rod gaps and nanorod heights while the influence of the nanorod diameter is relatively insignificant. Experimentally, pronounced suppressions of the reflectance are observed. Meanwhile, the near-field enhancement can be further enhanced, as demonstrated through surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We then confirm the correlation between the near-field and far-field plasmonic responses, which is significantly important for maximizing the near-field enhancement at a specific excitation wavelength. This lattice coupling of multipole plasmon modes is of broad interest not only for SERS but also for other plasmonic applications, such as subwavelength imaging or metamaterials. PMID:26983501

  7. Relationship between molecular descriptors and the enthalpies of sublimation of natural amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badelin, V. G.; Tyunina, V. V.; Girichev, G. V.; Tyunina, E. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    A multiparameter correlation between the enthalpies of sublimation and molecular descriptors of natural amino acids is proposed, based on generalized experimental and literature data on the heat effects of sublimation. The contributions from Van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bond formation, and electrostatic effects into enthalpy of sublimation has been evaluated using regression coefficients.

  8. Influence of snow surface sublimation on stable isotope and chemical records and on surface energy balance over a Bolivian glacier, Illimani.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagnon, P.; Vimeux, F.; Bonnaveira, H.; Berthier, E.; de Angelis, M.; Petit, J.

    2001-12-01

    Post deposition processes like sublimation of surface snow are on primary importance in cold high latitude glaciers in the tropical Andes. Such a process modifies surface energy balance, isotopic and chemical composition of deposited snow. This is a real problem for interpretation of isotopic and chemical profiles from tropical ice cores. A sublimation experiment has been carried out during May 2001 where a 137 m ice core has been drilled down to the bedrock in June 1999 (Illimani, 17oS, 68oW, 6340 m). Variations of surface snow composition (both water stable isotopes and chemistry) have been monitoring over one week, twice a day while measurements of surface enegy balance were made with an automatic weather station. We present here the combination of these results. Main result from energy balance surface study is that sublimation rate is very hight. Chemical and isotopic compositions of surface snow, show also that sublimation probably affects climate signal recorded in the ice. Thus, interpretation of stable isotopes and chemical records from ice cores have to be carefully done under a certain temporal resolution.

  9. Sublimator Driven Coldplate Engineering Development Unit Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a traditional thermal control scheme. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially increasing reliability and reducing complexity while saving both mass and power. Because the SDC requires a consumable feedwater, it can only be used for short mission durations. Additionally, the SDC is ideal for a vehicle with small transport distances and low heat rejection requirements. An SDC Engineering Development Unit was designed and fabricated. Performance tests were performed in a vacuum chamber to quantify and assess the performance of the SDC. The test data was then used to develop correlated thermal math models. Nonetheless, an Integrated Sublimator Driven Coldplate (ISDC) concept is being developed. The ISDC couples a coolant loop with the previously described SDC hardware. This combination allows the SDC to be used as a traditional coldplate during long mission phases and provides for dissimilar system redundancy

  10. Robust Magnetic Properties of a Sublimable Single-Molecule Magnet.

    PubMed

    Kiefl, Evan; Mannini, Matteo; Bernot, Kevin; Yi, Xiaohui; Amato, Alex; Leviant, Tom; Magnani, Agnese; Prokscha, Thomas; Suter, Andreas; Sessoli, Roberta; Salman, Zaher

    2016-06-28

    The organization of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) on surfaces via thermal sublimation is a prerequisite for the development of future devices for spintronics exploiting the richness of properties offered by these magnetic molecules. However, a change in the SMM properties due to the interaction with specific surfaces is usually observed. Here we present a rare example of an SMM system that can be thermally sublimated on gold surfaces while maintaining its intact chemical structure and magnetic properties. Muon spin relaxation and ac susceptibility measurements are used to demonstrate that, unlike other SMMs, the magnetic properties of this system in thin films are very similar to those in the bulk, throughout the full volume of the film, including regions near the metal and vacuum interfaces. These results exhibit the robustness of chemical and magnetic properties of this complex and provide important clues for the development of nanostructures based on SMMs. PMID:27139335

  11. Trust: the sublime duty in health care leadership.

    PubMed

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2010-01-01

    Trust is the essence of human social existence. From the moment of birth, trust is the basic component in any human relationship and interaction. Trust is the Holy Grail for human confidence in others. From human survival to organizational survival, trust is the primordial bond. No organization is more dependent on trust than health care. This article views trust as the most basic fundamental quality for leadership. Trust is a sublime duty of a leader and the leadership of an organization. Leadership sets the culture of trust. Trust is the one quality that is essential for guiding an organization toward serving others. This article addresses trust from many perspectives. Trust is viewed from our subordinates, our peers, our superiors, and the public we serve. This article postulates how trust in an organization is the sublime duty of leadership that unites all human understanding and without it destroys all human relationships. PMID:20145465

  12. Heat transfer from combustion gases to a single row of closely spaced tubes in a swirl crossflow Stirling engine heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, C. P.; Back, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental program to determine the heat-transfer characteristics of a combustor and heat-exchanger system in a hybrid solar receiver which utilizes a Stirling engine. The system consists of a swirl combustor with a crossflow heat exchanger composed of a single row of 48 closely spaced curved tubes. In the present study, heat-transfer characteristics of the combustor/heat-exchanger system without a Stirling engine have been studied over a range of operating conditions and output levels using water as the working fluid. Nondimensional heat-transfer coefficients based on total heat transfer have been obtained and are compared with available literature data. The results show significantly enhanced heat transfer for the present geometry and test conditions. Also, heat transfer along the length of the tubes is found to vary, the effect depending upon test condition.

  13. Differential tolerance to biological and subjective effects of four closely spaced doses of N,N-dimethyltryptamine in humans.

    PubMed

    Strassman, R J; Qualls, C R; Berg, L M

    1996-05-01

    Tolerance of the behavioral effects of the short-acting, endogenous hallucinogen, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is seen inconsistently in animals, and has not been produced in humans. The nature and time course of responses to repetitive, closely spaced administrations of an hallucinogenic dose of DMT were characterized. Thirteen experienced hallucinogen users received intravenous 0.3 mg/kg DMT fumarate, or saline placebo, four times, at 30 min intervals, on 2 separate days, in a randomized, double-blind, design. Tolerance to "psychedelic" subjective effects did not occur according to either clinical interview or Hallucinogen Rating Scale scores. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), prolactin, cortisol, and heart rate responses decreased with repeated DMT administration, although blood pressure did not. These data demonstrate the unique properties of DMT relative to other hallucinogens and underscore the differential regulation of the multiple processes mediating the effects of DMT. PMID:8731519

  14. Evaluation of explosive sublimation as the mechanism of nanosecond laser ablation of tungsten under vacuum conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oderji, Hassan Yousefi; Farid, Nazar; Sun, Liying; Fu, Cailong; Ding, Hongbin

    2016-08-01

    A non-equilibrium mechanism for nanosecond laser ablation is suggested herein, and its predictions are compared to the results of W experiments performed under vacuum conditions. A mechanism of particle formation is explained via this model, with partial sublimation of the superheated irradiated zone of the target considered to be the mechanism of laser ablation. In this study, a mixture of vapor and particles was explosively generated and subsequently prevented the rest of a laser pulse from reaching its intended target. This mechanism was found to play an essential role in the ablation of W under vacuum conditions, and it provides a theoretical justification for particle formation. Moreover, special considerations were taken into account for the expansion of plasma into a vacuum. The model was evaluated by measuring the mass of ablated particles using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The results of this model were found to be in good agreement with experimental values.

  15. The effect of plasma heating on sublimation-driven flow in Io's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Mau C.; Johnson, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    The atmospheric flow on Io is numerically computed in a flat 2-D axisymmetric geometry for a sublimation atmosphere on the trailing hemisphere subjected to plasma bombardment, UV heating, and IR cooling. Calculations are performed for subsolar vapor pressures of approximately 6.5 x 10(exp -3) Pa (approximately 3 x 10(exp 18) SO2/sq cm) and 6.8 x 10(exp -4) Pa (approximately 4 x 10(exp 17) SO2/sq cm); the latter approximates the vapor pressure of F. P. Fanale et al. (1982). The amount of plasma energy deposited in the atmosphere is 20% of the plasma flow energy due to corotation (J. A. Linker et al., 1988). It is found that plasma heating significantly inflates the upper atmosphere, increasing both the exobase altitude and the amount of surface covered by more than an exospheric column of gas. This in turn controls the supply of the Io plasma torus (M. A. McGrath and R. E. Johnson, 1987). The horizontal flow of mass and energy is also important in determining the exobase altitude; and it is shown that IR cooling can be important, although our use of the equilibrium, cool-to-space approximation for a pure SO2 gas (E. Lellouch et al., 1992) may overestimate this effect. The calculated exobase altitudes are somewhat lower than those suggested by McGrath and Johnson (1987) for supplying the torus, indicating the details of the plasma energy deposition and sputter ejection rate near the exobase, as well as the IR emission from this region need to be examined. In addition, the molecules sublimed (or sputtered) from the surface are transported to the exobase in times short compared to the molecular photodissociation time. Therefore, the exobase is dominated by molecular species and the exobase is supplied by a small region of the surface.

  16. Age and stability of sublimation till over buried glacier ice, inferred from 21Ne measurements, Ong Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibby, T.; Putkonen, J.; Morgan, D. J.; Balco, G.

    2014-12-01

    Ong Valley, in the Central Transantarctic Mountains, contains three distinct glacial drifts deposited by past advances of the Argosy glacier into the valley. Massive ice occurs below two of the till deposits. Potentially, such buried ice under shallow regolith cover could provide access to past climate and biological records more easily than deep ice coring. We measured cosmic-ray produced 21Ne in these tills as a means of constraining the age and stability of the three drifts, as well as the ice below them. We collected samples in vertical profiles from two hand-dug sections through each drift. The pits from two drifts overlying buried ice extended to the buried ice surface. The hypothesis that these are sublimation tills implies that 21Ne concentrations are a function of i) any inheritance from prior exposure; ii) the age since emplacement of the ice and till; iii) the sublimation rate of the ice; and iv) the surface erosion rate of the till. 21Ne concentrations in the youngest drift are ca. 10 M atoms/g and invariant with depth, indicating that they are predominantly due to inheritance, and provide only a weak maximum age constraint of ca. 0.1 Mya. The two older drifts have surface 21Ne concentrations of 200-250 M atoms/ g and depth concentration profiles consistent with a sublimation till origin. Given that 21Ne concentrations in the deepest samples in each of the two older drifts provide an upper limit on the inherited 21Ne concentration, these imply minimum ages of 1 Mya for the middle drift and 1.6 Mya for the oldest. This implies a 1 Mya minimum age for the ice underlying the middle drift.

  17. ZFP57 recognizes multiple and closely spaced sequence motif variants to maintain repressive epigenetic marks in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Anvar, Zahra; Cammisa, Marco; Riso, Vincenzo; Baglivo, Ilaria; Kukreja, Harpreet; Sparago, Angela; Girardot, Michael; Lad, Shraddha; De Feis, Italia; Cerrato, Flavia; Angelini, Claudia; Feil, Robert; Pedone, Paolo V.; Grimaldi, Giovanna; Riccio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) need to maintain their parental allele-specific DNA methylation during early embryogenesis despite genome-wide demethylation and subsequent de novo methylation. ZFP57 and KAP1 are both required for maintaining the repressive DNA methylation and H3-lysine-9-trimethylation (H3K9me3) at ICRs. In vitro, ZFP57 binds a specific hexanucleotide motif that is enriched at its genomic binding sites. We now demonstrate in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that SNPs disrupting closely-spaced hexanucleotide motifs are associated with lack of ZFP57 binding and H3K9me3 enrichment. Through a transgenic approach in mouse ESCs, we further demonstrate that an ICR fragment containing three ZFP57 motif sequences recapitulates the original methylated or unmethylated status when integrated into the genome at an ectopic position. Mutation of Zfp57 or the hexanucleotide motifs led to loss of ZFP57 binding and DNA methylation of the transgene. Finally, we identified a sequence variant of the hexanucleotide motif that interacts with ZFP57 both in vivo and in vitro. The presence of multiple and closely located copies of ZFP57 motif variants emerges as a distinct characteristic that is required for the faithful maintenance of repressive epigenetic marks at ICRs and other ZFP57 binding sites. PMID:26481358

  18. Level sequence and splitting identification of closely spaced energy levels by angle-resolved analysis of fluorescence light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. W.; Volotka, A. V.; Surzhykov, A.; Dong, C. Z.; Fritzsche, S.

    2016-06-01

    The angular distribution and linear polarization of the fluorescence light following the resonant photoexcitation is investigated within the framework of density matrix and second-order perturbation theory. Emphasis has been placed on "signatures" for determining the level sequence and splitting of intermediate (partially) overlapping resonances, if analyzed as a function of photon energy of incident light. Detailed computations within the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method have been performed, especially for the 1 s22 s22 p63 s ,Ji=1 /2 +γ1→(1s22 s 2 p63 s ) 13 p3 /2,J =1 /2 ,3 /2 →1 s22 s22 p63 s ,Jf=1 /2 +γ2 photoexcitation and subsequent fluorescence emission of atomic sodium. A remarkably strong dependence of the angular distribution and linear polarization of the γ2 fluorescence emission is found upon the level sequence and splitting of the intermediate (1s22 s 2 p63 s ) 13 p3 /2,J =1 /2 ,3 /2 overlapping resonances owing to their finite lifetime (linewidth). We therefore suggest that accurate measurements of the angular distribution and linear polarization might help identify the sequence and small splittings of closely spaced energy levels, even if they cannot be spectroscopically resolved.

  19. Tracking a large number of closely spaced objects based on the particle probability hypothesis density filter via optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangkui; Xu, Hui; An, Wei; Sheng, Weidong; Xu, Dan

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to tracking a large number of closely spaced objects (CSO) in image sequences that is based on the particle probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter and multiassignment data association. First, the particle PHD filter is adopted to eliminate most of the clutters and to estimate multitarget states. In the particle PHD filter, a noniterative multitarget estimation technique is introduced to reliably estimate multitarget states, and an improved birth particle sampling scheme is present to effectively acquire targets among clutters. Then, an integrated track management method is proposed to realize multitarget track continuity. The core of the track management is the track-to-estimation multiassignment association, which relaxes the traditional one-to-one data association restriction due to the unresolved focal plane CSO measurements. Meanwhile, a unified technique of multiple consecutive misses for track deletion is used jointly to cope with the sensitivity of the PHD filter to the missed detections and to eliminate false alarms further, as well as to initiate tracks of large numbers of CSO. Finally, results of two simulations and one experiment show that the proposed approach is feasible and efficient.

  20. Sublimation measurements and analysis of high temperature thermoelectric materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, V.; Noon, L.

    1983-01-01

    High temperature thermoelectric device sublimation effects are compared for rare earth sulfides, selenides, and state-of-the-art Si-Ge alloys. Although rare earth calcogenides can potentially exhibit superior sublimation characteristics, the state-of-the-art Si-Ge alloy with silicon nitride sublimation-inhibitive coating has been tested to 1000 C. Attention is given to the ceramic electrolyte cells, forming within electrical and thermal insulation, which affect leakage conductance measurements in Si-Ge thermoelectric generators.

  1. Adhesive coated electrical apparatus having sublimable protective covering and an assembly method

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, R.E.

    1982-08-10

    Electrical apparatus including an enclosure, an electrode disposed within the enclosure, and supports for insulatably supporting the electrode within the enclosure has a permanently sticky adhesive material which is disposed on the interior surface of the outer enclosure. A high-vapor-pressure sublimable material is disposed on the permanently sticky adhesive material, with the sublimable material capable of subliming away in the presence of a vacuum. The presence of the sublimable material enables the apparatus to be non-sticky during assembly and handling operations, while being rendered sticky upon commissioning of the apparatus.

  2. Cerium Tetrafluoride: Sublimation, Thermolysis, and Atomic Fluorine Migration.

    PubMed

    Chilingarov, N S; Knot'ko, A V; Shlyapnikov, I M; Mazej, Z; Kristl, M; Sidorov, L N

    2015-08-01

    Saturated vapor pressure p° and enthalpy of sublimation (ΔsH°) of cerium tetrafluoride CeF4 were determined by means of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry in the range of 750-920 K. It was discovered that sublimation of cerium tetrafluoride from a platinum effusion cell competes with thermal decomposition to CeF3 in the solid phase, but no accompanying release of fluorine to the gas phase occurs. Thus, fluorine atoms migrate within the surface layer of CeF4(s) to the regions of their irreversible drain. We used scanning electron microscopy to study the distribution of the residual CeF3(s) across the inner surface of the effusion cell after complete evaporation of CeF4(s). It was observed that CeF3 accumulates near the edge of the effusion orifice and near the junction of the lid and the body of the cell, that is, in those regions where the fluorine atoms can migrate to a free platinum surface and thus be depleted from the system. Distribution of CeF3(s) solid particles indicates the ways of fluorine atoms migration providing CeF3(s) formation inside the CeF4(s) surface layer. PMID:26165149

  3. Dynamic sublimation pressure and the catastrophic breakup of Comet ISON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckloff, Jordan K.; Johnson, Brandon C.; Bowling, Timothy; Jay Melosh, H.; Minton, David; Lisse, Carey M.; Battams, Karl

    2015-09-01

    Previously proposed mechanisms have difficulty explaining the disruption of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) as it approached the Sun. We describe a novel cometary disruption mechanism whereby comet nuclei fragment and disperse through dynamic sublimation pressure, which induces differential stresses within the interior of the nucleus. When these differential stresses exceed its material strength, the nucleus breaks into fragments. We model the sublimation process thermodynamically and propose that it is responsible for the disruption of Comet ISON. We estimate the bulk unconfined crushing strength of Comet ISON's nucleus and the resulting fragments to be 0.5 Pa and 1-9 Pa, respectively, assuming typical Jupiter Family Comet (JFC) albedos. However, if Comet ISON has an albedo similar to Pluto, this strength estimate drops to 0.2 Pa for the intact nucleus and 0.6-4 Pa for its fragments. Regardless of assumed albedo, these are similar to previous strength estimates of JFCs. This suggests that, if Comet ISON is representative of dynamically new comets, then low bulk strength is a primordial property of some comet nuclei, and not due to thermal processing during migration into the Jupiter Family.

  4. The thermal sublimation process and atmosphere of Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, I. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Ip, W. H.

    Iapetus one of the outer icy satellites of Saturn is characterized by a large albedo asymmetry 0 04 vs 0 5 between the leading and trailing hemispheres The origin of this color dichotomy is still a puzzle A related question is whether the long-term surface icy material transport driven by thermal sublimation might be effective in modifying or shaping some of the observed features We have made used the preliminary results reported by the CIRS observations on Cassini to construct a surface temperature map The peak temperature on the dark side reaches 130K and the corresponding value on the bright side is about 100K If the dark material is composed mainly of water ice the related sublimation process - in addition to ion sputtering and photo-sputtering - could support the formation of a thin atmosphere This surface-bound atmosphere is of exospheric nature and the surface transport of the water molecules is characterized by ballistic motion from low latitude region to the poles We will present our simulation results on the short-term and long-term mass transport and atmospheric processes

  5. Volatilization, transport and sublimation of metallic and non-metallic elements in high temperature gases at Merapi Volcano, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.B.; Rose, William I., Jr.; Reed, M.H.; Lichte, F.E.; Finnegan, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Condensates, silica tube sublimates and incrustations were sampled from 500-800??C fumaroles and lava samples were collected at Merapi Volcano, Indonesia in Jan.-Feb., 1984. With respect to the magma, Merapi gases are enriched by factors greater than 105 in Se, Re, Bi and Cd; 104-105 in Au, Br, In, Pb and W; 103-104 in Mo, Cl, Cs, S, Sn and Ag; 102-103 in As, Zn, F and Rb; and 1-102 in Cu, K, Na, Sb, Ni, Ga, V, Fe, Mn and Li. The fumaroles are transporting more than 106 grams/day ( g d) of S, Cl and F; 104-106 g/d of Al, Br, Zn, Fe, K and Mg; 103-104 g d of Pb, As, Mo, Mn, V, W and Sr; and less than 103 g d of Ni, Cu, Cr, Ga, Sb, Bi, Cd, Li, Co and U. With decreasing temperature (800-500??C) there were five sublimate zones found in silica tubes: 1) cristobalite and magnetite (first deposition of Si, Fe and Al); 2) K-Ca sulfate, acmite, halite, sylvite and pyrite (maximum deposition of Cl, Na, K, Si, S, Fe, Mo, Br, Al, Rb, Cs, Mn, W, P, Ca, Re, Ag, Au and Co); 3) aphthitalite (K-Na sulfate), sphalerite, galena and Cs-K. sulfate (maximum deposition of Zn, Bi, Cd, Se and In; higher deposition of Pb and Sn); 4) Pb-K chloride and Na-K-Fe sulfate (maximum deposition of Pb, Sn and Cu); and 5) Zn, Cu and K-Pb sulfates (maximum deposition of Pb, Sn, Ti, As and Sb). The incrustations surrounding the fumaroles are also chemically zoned. Bi, Cd, Pb, W, Mo, Zn, Cu, K, Na, V, Fe and Mn are concentrated most in or very close to the vent as expected with cooling, atmospheric contamination and dispersion. The highly volatile elements Br, Cl, As and Sb are transported primarily away from high temperature vents. Ba, Si, P, Al, Ca and Cr are derived from wall rock reactions. Incomplete degassing of shallow magma at 915??C is the origin of most of the elements in the Merapi volcanic gas, although it is partly contaminated by particles or wall rock reactions. The metals are transported predominantly as chloride species. As the gas cools in the fumarolic environment, it becomes saturated

  6. The SCITEAS experiment: Optical characterizations of sublimating icy planetary analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Jost, B.; Poch, O.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Vuitel, B.; Thomas, N.

    2015-05-01

    We have designed and built a laboratory facility to investigate the spectro-photometric and morphologic properties of different types of ice-bearing planetary surface analogs and follow their evolution upon exposure to a low pressure and low temperature environment. The results obtained with this experiment are used to verify and improve our interpretations of current optical remote-sensing datasets. They also provide valuable information for the development and operation of future optical instruments. The Simulation Chamber for Imaging the Temporal Evolution of Analogue Samples (SCITEAS) is a small thermal vacuum chamber equipped with a variety of ports and feedthroughs that permit both in-situ and remote characterizations as well as interacting with the sample. A large quartz window located directly above the sample is used to observe its surface from outside with a set of visible and near-infrared cameras. The sample holder can be easily and quickly inserted and removed from the chamber and is compatible with the other measurement facilities of the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy) at the University of Bern. We report here on the results of two of the first experiments performed in the SCITEAS chamber. In the first experiment, fine-grained water ice mixed with dark organic and mineral matter was left to sublime in vacuum and at low temperature, simulating the evolution of the surface of a comet nucleus approaching the Sun. We observed and characterized the formation and evolution of a crust of refractory organic and mineral matter at the surface of the sample and linked the evolution of its structure and texture to its spectro-photometric properties. In the second experiment, a frozen soil was prepared by freezing a mixture of smectite mineral and water. The sample was then left to sublime for 6 h to simulate the loss of volatiles from icy soil at high latitudes on Mars. Colour images were produced using the definitions of the

  7. Matrix isolation sublimation: An apparatus for producing cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sacramento, R. L.; Alves, B. X.; Silva, B. A.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.; Oliveira, A. N.; Li, M. S.

    2015-07-15

    We describe the apparatus to generate cryogenic beams of atoms and molecules based on matrix isolation sublimation. Isolation matrices of Ne and H{sub 2} are hosts for atomic and molecular species which are sublimated into vacuum at cryogenic temperatures. The resulting cryogenic beams are used for high-resolution laser spectroscopy. The technique also aims at loading atomic and molecular traps.

  8. A Validated Set of MIDAS V5 Task Network Model Scenarios to Evaluate Nextgen Closely Spaced Parallel Operations Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Brian Francis; Hooey, Becky Lee; Haan, Nancy; Socash, Connie; Mahlstedt, Eric; Foyle, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The Closely Spaced Parallel Operations (CSPO) scenario is a complex, human performance model scenario that tested alternate operator roles and responsibilities to a series of off-nominal operations on approach and landing (see Gore, Hooey, Mahlstedt, Foyle, 2013). The model links together the procedures, equipment, crewstation, and external environment to produce predictions of operator performance in response to Next Generation system designs, like those expected in the National Airspaces NextGen concepts. The task analysis that is contained in the present report comes from the task analysis window in the MIDAS software. These tasks link definitions and states for equipment components, environmental features as well as operational contexts. The current task analysis culminated in 3300 tasks that included over 1000 Subject Matter Expert (SME)-vetted, re-usable procedural sets for three critical phases of flight; the Descent, Approach, and Land procedural sets (see Gore et al., 2011 for a description of the development of the tasks included in the model; Gore, Hooey, Mahlstedt, Foyle, 2013 for a description of the model, and its results; Hooey, Gore, Mahlstedt, Foyle, 2013 for a description of the guidelines that were generated from the models results; Gore, Hooey, Foyle, 2012 for a description of the models implementation and its settings). The rollout, after landing checks, taxi to gate and arrive at gate illustrated in Figure 1 were not used in the approach and divert scenarios exercised. The other networks in Figure 1 set up appropriate context settings for the flight deck.The current report presents the models task decomposition from the tophighest level and decomposes it to finer-grained levels. The first task that is completed by the model is to set all of the initial settings for the scenario runs included in the model (network 75 in Figure 1). This initialization process also resets the CAD graphic files contained with MIDAS, as well as the embedded

  9. Diverse lavas from closely spaced volcanoes drawing from a common parent: Emmons Lake Volcanic Center, Eastern Aleutian Arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.; Miller, T.; Waythomas, C.; Trusdell, F.; Calvert, A.; Layer, P.

    2009-01-01

    Emmons Lake Volcanic Center (ELVC) on the lower Alaskan Peninsula is one of the largest and most diverse volcanic centers in the Aleutian Arc. Since the Middle Pleistocene, eruption of ~ 350 km3 of basalt through rhyolite has produced a 30 km, arc front chain of nested calderas and overlapping stratovolcanoes. ELVC has experienced as many as five major caldera-forming eruptions, the most recent, at ~ 27 ka, produced ~ 50 km3 of rhyolitic ignimbrite and ash fall. These violent silicic events were interspersed with less energetic, but prodigious, outpourings of basalt through dacite. Holocene eruptions are mostly basaltic andesite to andesite and historically recorded activity includes over 40 eruptions within the last 200 yr, all from Pavlof volcano, the most active site in the Aleutian Arc. Geochemical and geophysical observations suggest that although all ELVC eruptions derive from a common clinopyroxene + spinel + plagioclase fractionating high-aluminum basalt parent in the lower crust, magma follows one of two closely spaced, but distinct paths to the surface. Under the eastern end of the chain, magma moves rapidly and cleanly through a relatively young (~ 28 ka), hydraulically connected dike plexus. Steady supply, short magma residence times, and limited interaction with crustal rocks preserve the geochemistry of deep crustal processes. Below the western part of the chain, magma moves haltingly through a long-lived (~ 500 ka) and complex intrusive column in which many generations of basaltic to andesitic melts have mingled and fractionated. Buoyant, silicic melts periodically separate from the lower parts of the column to feed voluminous eruptions of dacite and rhyolite. Mafic lavas record a complicated passage through cumulate zones and hydrous silicic residues as manifested by disequilibrium phenocryst textures, incompatible element enrichments, and decoupling of REEs and HFSEs ratios. Such features are absent in mafic lavas from the younger part of the chain

  10. Unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes simulation of the post-critical flow around a closely spaced group of silos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillewaere, J.; Dooms, D.; Van Quekelberghe, B.; Degroote, J.; Vierendeels, J.; De Roeck, G.; Lombaert, G.; Degrande, G.

    2012-04-01

    During a storm in October 2002, wind induced ovalling vibrations were observed on several empty silos of a closely spaced group (pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.05) consisting of 8 by 5 silos in the port of Antwerp (Belgium). Numerical simulations of the turbulent wind flow are performed to clarify the occurrence of the observed ovalling vibrations near the lee side corner of the group by studying the dynamic wind pressures on the silo surfaces and linking to the dynamic properties of the silo structures. As the orientation of the group largely affects the pressure distribution around the cylinders of the group, the influence of the angle of incidence of the wind flow on these ovalling vibrations is examined while other parameters, such as spacing ratio and Reynolds number are unchanged. To achieve results within a reasonable computation time, 2D unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations using Menter's shear stress transport turbulence model were performed. In order to elucidate the influence of the applied turbulence model and to qualitatively validate the spatial and temporal discretization of the 2D highly turbulent post-critical (Re=1.24×107) flow simulations for the silo group, single cylinder simulations were used. The geometric resemblance of the group arrangement with rectangular cylinders on the one hand and of the interstitial spaces with tube arrays (e.g. heat exchangers) on the other hand is used to qualitatively compare the observed flow phenomena. The simulations show that the silo group can be treated neither as a tube array nor as a solid bluff body. Subsequent linking of dynamic wind pressures to dynamic properties of the silo structures reveals strong narrow band frequency peaks in the turbulent pressure coefficient spectra of the silos near the lee side corners of the group that match the structural natural frequencies of the third and fourth ovalling mode shape of the silos. This match indicates a forced, resonant response which

  11. Direct Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from Nucleic Acids Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Schubert, Michael; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    A sublimation technique was developed to isolate purines and pyrimidines directly from lambda-deoxyribonucleic acid (lambda-DNA) and Escherichia coli cells. The sublimation of adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine from lambda-DNA was tested under reduced pressure (approx. 0.5 Torr) at temperatures of >150 C. With the exception of guanine, approximately 60 -75% of each base was sublimed directly from the lambda-DNA and recovered on a coldfinger of the sublimation apparatus after heating to 450 C. Several nucleobases including adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil were also recovered from E. coli bacteria after heating the cells to the same temperature, although some thermal decomposition of the bases also occurred. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from native E. coli DNA and RNA without any chemical treatment of the cells.

  12. Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.

    1993-02-01

    Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF{sub 6} in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % {sup 235}U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

  13. Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.

    1993-02-01

    Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF[sub 6] in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % [sup 235]U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

  14. Testing and Model Correlation of Sublimator Driven Coldplate Coupons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik; Stephan, Ryan; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2008-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a traditional thermal control scheme. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially saving mass, power, and complexity. Because this concept relies on evaporative heat rejection techniques, it is primarily useful for short mission durations. Additionally, the concept requires a conductive path between the heat-generating component and the heat rejection device. Therefore, it is mostly a relevant solution for a vehicle with a relatively low heat rejection requirement. Coupon level tests were performed at NASA's Johnson Space Center to better understand the basic operational principles and to validate the analytical methods being used for the SDC development. This paper outlines the results of the SDC coupon tests, the subsequent thermal model correlation, and a description of the SDC Engineering Development Unit design.

  15. Methods of conveying fluids and methods of sublimating solid particles

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-10-01

    A heat exchanger and associated methods for sublimating solid particles therein, for conveying fluids therethrough, or both. The heat exchanger includes a chamber and a porous member having a porous wall having pores in communication with the chamber and with an interior of the porous member. A first fluid is conveyed into the porous member while a second fluid is conveyed into the porous member through the porous wall. The second fluid may form a positive flow boundary layer along the porous wall to reduce or eliminate substantial contact between the first fluid and the interior of the porous wall. The combined first and second fluids are conveyed out of the porous member. Additionally, the first fluid and the second fluid may each be conveyed into the porous member at different temperatures and may exit the porous member at substantially the same temperature.

  16. Sublimation Model for Formation of Martian Residual Cap Depressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, S.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2000-10-01

    In an effort for explain the formation of the 'Swiss-cheese' terrain visible on the southern residual cap of Mars, we have developed a radiative model to follow the growth/decay of an initial depression due to sublimation/condensation of carbon dioxide. The pits making up this terrain have many distinctive features, they are shallow ( 10m deep), with steep walls and flat floors and contain an interior moat which runs along the bottom of the walls. They have lateral sizes ranging from a few 10's of meters to a kilometer and are quasi-circular. The model accounts for incident sunlight, emitted thermal radiation, and scattered short and long wave radiation. We have investigated many cases involving pure dry-ice with constant albedo, albedo as a function of insolation, and differing albedo for fresh and residual frost (the latter has lower albedo). The last case mentioned shows the most promising results to date. With these conditions it is possible for the depressions to grow and develop flat central portions although they still lack the observed steep walls of the pits. In the other cases mentioned the initial depressions heal themselves and disappear into the surrounding terrain. Other processes or materials could be responsible for the remainder of the observed features. Water ice stored a few meters under a carbon dioxide covering would have dramatic effects on the growth of any depression which encounters it, both due to its low sublimation rate and its ability to store heat. We will extend the current model to include a water ice layer and account for the subsequent heat storage which could possibly follow. For water ice models, a challenge is to reproduce the low brightness temperatures that persist throughout the summer at the residual south polar cap.

  17. Estimating surface sublimation losses from snowpacks in a mountain catchment using eddy covariance and turbulent transfer calculations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sublimation is a critical component of the snow cover mass balance. While sublimation can be directly measured using eddy covariance (EC), such measurements are relatively uncommon in complex mountainous environments. EC measurements of surface snowpack sublimation from three consecutive winter sea...

  18. Basal sublimation and venting of the north seasonal cap of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    Spots, fans and dark polygonal patterns form during the spring on the southern seasonal cap of Mars as a consequence of 1) the basal sublimation of the translucent and impermeable slab of carbon dioxide and 2) the venting of the CO2 gas loaded with dust and sand size material scoured from the surface of the polar layered deposits. The dark polygons on the cap have a similar formation process as the spots but the dust and sand erupt from elongated vents rather than point sources. In the summer, spiders and etched polygons remain on the southern polar layered deposits. The spiders are shaped by the scouring action of confined CO2 gas flowing between the cap and the basement and converging toward point sources, whereas the etched polygons result form the forced migration of the CO2 gas over longer distances. Comparable observations during the spring near the north pole on the seasonal cap indicate that similar processes occur in both polar regions and that the venting model developed for the south seasonal cap also operates near the north pole. However, spider and etched polygonal features are extremely uncommon on the north substrate, indicating that the conditions for their formation (e.g. mechanical strength of the slab and the substrate, transparency of the seasonal cap) are not met. The continual erosion and re-sedimentation occurring at the surface of the polar layered deposits by the seasonal degassing is a major geomorphological agent shaping the polar regions. The polar layered deposits have been proposed to contain the stratigraphic record of climatic changes and catastrophic events of very high interest for future missions. Our observations suggest that both polar regions deposits may have been locally disrupted by the seasonal sub-ice gas flow and that the stratigraphic record may have been partially lost. The Phoenix landing site might have been affected in the past and the stratigraphic information associated with the original deposition of the polar

  19. A neurobiological enquiry into the origins of our experience of the sublime and beautiful.

    PubMed

    Ishizu, Tomohiro; Zeki, Semir

    2014-01-01

    Philosophies of aesthetics have posited that experience of the sublime-commonly but not exclusively derived from scenes of natural grandeur-is distinct from that of beauty and is a counterpoint to it. We wanted to chart the pattern of brain activity which correlates with the declared intensity of experience of the sublime, and to learn whether it differs from the pattern that correlates with the experience of beauty, reported in our previous studies (e.g., Ishizu and Zeki, 2011). 21 subjects participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Prior to the experiment, they viewed pictures of landscapes, which they rated on a scale of 1-5, with 5 being the most sublime and 1 being the least. This allowed us to select, for each subject, five sets of stimuli-from ones experienced as very sublime to those experienced as not at all sublime-which subjects viewed and re-rated in the scanner while their brain activity was imaged. The results revealed a distinctly different pattern of brain activity from that obtained with the experience of beauty, with none of the areas active with the latter experience also active during experience of the sublime. Sublime and beautiful experiences thus appear to engage separate and distinct brain systems. PMID:25426046

  20. In Situ Observation on Dislocation-Controlled Sublimation of Mg Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Mao, Min-Min; Li, Qing-Jie; Fu, Xiao-Qian; Tian, He; Li, Ji-Xue; Mao, Scott X; Zhang, Ze

    2016-02-10

    Sublimation is an important endothermic phase transition in which the atoms break away from their neighbors in the crystal lattice and are removed into the gas phase. Such debonding process may be significantly influenced by dislocations, the crystal defect that changes the bonding environment of local atoms. By performing systematic defects characterization and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tests on a core--shell MgO-Mg system, which enables us to "modulate" the internal dislocation density, we investigated the role of dislocations on materials' sublimation with particular focus on the sublimation kinetics and mechanism. It was observed that the sublimation rate increases significantly with dislocation density. As the density of screw dislocations is high, the intersection of screw dislocation spirals creates a large number of monatomic ledges, resulting in a "liquid-like" motion of solid-gas interface, which significantly deviates from the theoretically predicted sublimation plane. Our calculation based on density functional theory demonstrated that the remarkable change of sublimation rate with dislocation density is due to the dramatic reduction in binding energy of the monatomic ledges. This study provides direct observation to improve our understanding on this fundamental phase transition as well as to shed light on tuning materials' sublimation by "engineering" dislocation density in applications. PMID:26799861

  1. Increase of SiC sublimation growth rate by optimizing of powder packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Cai, Dang; Zhang, Hui

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive model for silicon carbide (SiC) sublimation crystal growth considering powder packaging is presented. This model is based on heat and mass transfer of porous powder charge with different sizes of the particle and accounts for induction heating, powder charge sublimation, vapor transport, and porosity evolution in a SiC sublimation crystal growth system. The mechanism of vapor transport is proposed by introducing a driving force arising from temperature difference between powder charge and seed in the growth system. Powder porosity evolution and sublimation rate variations are predicted based on vapor transport mechanism. Effects of powder geometry, such as particle sizes, volume and size ratios of different particles, and driving forces on the sublimation rate are studied. In addition, simulation results for powder sublimation with and without a central hole are presented. The results indicate that the sublimation rate can be increased by optimizing the powder packaging, or by creating a hole in the center of packed powder.

  2. Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Drosophila Brain Using Matrix Sublimation versus Modification with Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Phan, Nhu T N; Mohammadi, Amir Saeid; Dowlatshahi Pour, Masoumeh; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-02-01

    Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is used to image brain lipids in the fruit fly, Drosophila, a common invertebrate model organism in biological and neurological studies. Three different sample preparation methods, including sublimation with two common organic matrixes for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) using gold nanoparticles, are examined for sample profiling and imaging the fly brain. Recrystallization with trifluoroacetic acid following matrix deposition in MALDI is shown to increase the incorporation of biomolecules with one matrix, resulting in more efficient ionization, but not for the other matrix. The key finding here is that the mass fragments observed for the fly brain slices with different surface modifications are significantly different. Thus, these approaches can be combined to provide complementary analysis of chemical composition, particularly for the small metabolites, diacylglycerides, phosphatidylcholines, and triacylglycerides, in the fly brain. Furthermore, imaging appears to be beneficial using modification with gold nanoparticles in place of matrix in this application showing its potential for cellular and subcellular imaging. The imaging protocol developed here with both MALDI and SALDI provides the best and most diverse lipid chemical images of the fly brain to date with LDI. PMID:26705612

  3. Sublimation characterization and vapor pressure estimation of an HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor using thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Minli; Ziemba, Theresa M; Maurin, Michael B

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the sublimation process of DPC 963, a second-generation nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor for HIV-1 retrovirus, and to better understand the effect of sublimation during active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) manufacture and formulation development, especially the drying processes. Sublimation of DPC 963 at 150 degrees C and above was determined by thermogravimetric analysis-Fourier transform infrared (TGA-FTIR). The rates of sublimation at different temperatures were measured using isothermal TGA. Condensed material was collected and analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and infrared (IR) spectrometry. Benzoic acid was used as a reference standard to derive a linear logarithmic relationship between sublimation/evaporation rate and vapor pressure specific to the TGA system used in this study. Sublimation and evaporation of DPC 963 were found to follow apparent zero-order kinetics. Using the Eyring equation, the enthalpy and entropy of the sublimation and evaporation processes were obtained. The enthalpies of sublimation and evaporation were found to be 29 and 22 kcal/mol, respectively. The condensed material from the vapor phase was found to exist in 2 physical forms, amorphous and crystalline. Using benzoic acid as a reference standard, vapor pressure of DPC 963 at different temperatures was calculated using the linear logarithmic relationship obtained. DPC 963 undergoes sublimation at appreciable rates at 150 degrees C and above but this is not likely to pose a serious issue during the manufacturing process. Vapor pressure estimation using thermogravimetric analysis provided sufficient accuracy to be used as a fast, simple, and safe alternative to the traditional methods of vapor pressure determination. PMID:12916905

  4. Technological possibilities of processing the sublimates of electron-beam remelting of niobium to form ferroniobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumarev, V. M.; Leont'ev, L. I.; Potapov, V. I.; Udoeva, L. Yu.; Upolovnikova, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of melting of ferroniobium from the sublimates of electron-beam remelting of niobium ingots is studied using thermodynamic analysis and a "hot" simulation. The basic requirements for the conditions of processing of sublimates with various (Nb/Al)met ratios are evaluated and determined. A ferroalloy the contents of controlled impurities in which correspond to certain ferroniobium grades of Russian and foreign standards is produced by melting of charges containing the sublimates, a deoxidizer (Fe2O3), and a flux (CaO, CaF2) in an electroslag furnace.

  5. Sublimation rates of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from comets at large heliocentric distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1992-01-01

    Using a simple model for outgassing from a small flat surface area, the sublimation rates of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, two species more volatile than water ice that are known to be present in comets, are calculated for a suddenly activated discrete source on the rotating nucleus. The instantaneous sublimation rate depends upon the comet's heliocentric distance and the Sun's zenith angle at the location of the source. The values are derived for the constants of CO and CO2 in an expression that yields the local rotation-averaged sublimation rate as a function of the comet's spin parameters and the source's cometocentric latitude.

  6. HiRISE observations of gas sublimation-driven activity in Mars' southern polar regions: III. Models of processes involving translucent ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Portyankina, G.; Markiewicz, W.J.; Thomas, N.; Hansen, C.J.; Milazzo, M.

    2010-01-01

    Enigmatic surface features, known as 'spiders', found at high southern martian latitudes, are probably caused by sublimation-driven erosion under the seasonal carbon dioxide ice cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) has imaged this terrain in unprecedented details throughout southern spring. It has been postulated [Kieffer, H.H., Titus, T.N., Mullins, K.F., Christensen, P.R., 2000. J. Geophys. Res. 105, 9653-9700] that translucent CO2 slab ice traps gas sublimating at the ice surface boundary. Wherever the pressure is released the escaping gas jet entrains loose surface material and carries it to the top of the ice where it is carried downslope and/or downwind and deposited in a fan shape. Here we model two stages of this scenario: first, the cleaning of CO2 slab ice from dust, and then, the breaking of the slab ice plate under the pressure built below it by subliming ice. Our modeling results and analysis of HiRISE images support the gas jet hypothesis and show that outbursts happen very early in spring. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Transformation of Polar Ice Sublimate Residue into Martian Circumpolar Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. S.; Parker, T. J.; Stephens, J. B.; Laue, E. G.; Fanale, F. P.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental demonstration that a credible Martian sand may be formed from dust-bearing ice provides a new set of possible explanations for some of the observed Martian aeolian landforms. It is hypothesized that a light-weight fluffy rind is formed on the polar caps. This could provide material easily entrainable by Martian winds, which generally blow equatorward from the poles. These winds would peel the fluffy rind from the surface of the sublimating summer polar caps and from the equatorward slopes of the polar troughs. These pieces of material would then be rolled into lumps (of high sailarea/mass ratio) by the wind. They would become pigmented as they saltate across the surface, perhaps gathering carbonaceous meteoritic dust or other impurities on their surfaces, or through chemical reactions with the ice-free environment away from their point of origin. Once they became trapped in topographic wind shadows, they would form dune structures because they are hydraulically equivalent to sand particles.

  8. Imaging the dust sublimation front of a circumbinary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillen, M.; Kluska, J.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Van Winckel, H.; Berger, J.-P.; Kamath, D.; Bujarrabal, V.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We present the first near-IR milli-arcsecond-scale image of a post-AGB binary that is surrounded by hot circumbinary dust. Methods: A very rich interferometric data set in six spectral channels was acquired of IRAS 08544-4431 with the new RAPID camera on the PIONIER beam combiner at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). A broadband image in the H-band was reconstructed by combining the data of all spectral channels using the SPARCO method. Results: We spatially separate all the building blocks of the IRAS 08544-4431 system in our milliarcsecond-resolution image. Our dissection reveals a dust sublimation front that is strikingly similar to that expected in early-stage protoplanetary disks, as well as an unexpected flux signal of ~4% from the secondary star. The energy output from this companion indicates the presence of a compact circum-companion accretion disk, which is likely the origin of the fast outflow detected in Hα. Conclusions: Our image provides the most detailed view into the heart of a dusty circumstellar disk to date. Our results demonstrate that binary evolution processes and circumstellar disk evolution can be studied in detail in space and over time. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 094.D-0865.

  9. Generalized Orbital Projections of a Sublimating Ice Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menkin, Evgeny; Bacon, Jack

    2006-01-01

    The issue of orbital debris resulting from human activities in space is a growing concern for the space users' community. Waste generated in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) can stay in orbit for a long time, creating significant hazards for other spacecraft flying at lower intercepting orbits. Many spacecraft, especially crewed vehicles, are required to vent fluids into space. These fluids include propellant, wastewater, excess condensate, and others. It is important to analyze the behavior of particles that result from these activities, since each individual particle is capable of damaging or destroying a spacecraft in a lower, crossing orbit, and such particles are invisible to tracking radar systems on the ground. The deorbit trajectory of an ice particle is complex. It depends on factors including attitude of the vehicle during vent, initial velocities of particles, altitude at which the vent occurred, and numerous evaporation and sublimation factors. These include contamination within the vented water, evolution of bubbles within the clear water, and sun flux factors such as time of the year and current beta angle. The purpose of this study is to examine the influences of these factors on the trajectories of ice particles resulting from condensate water dumps, and to bound the safe trajectories of spacecraft that lie below the venting spacecraft.

  10. Climatological observations and predicted sublimation rates at Lake Hoare, Antarctica.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, G.D.; McKay, C.P.; Simmons, G.M., Jr.; Wharton, R.A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In December 1985, an automated meteorological station was established at Lake Hoare in the dry valley region of Antarctica. Here, we report on the first year-round observations available for any site in Taylor Valley. This dataset augments the year-round data obtained at Lake Vanda (Wright Valley) by winter-over crews during the late 1960s and early 1970s. The mean annual solar flux at Lake Hoare was 92 W m-2 during 1986, the mean air temperature -17.3 degrees C, and the mean 3-m wind speed 3.3 m s-1. The local climate is controlled by the wind regime during the 4-month sunless winter and by seasonal and diurnal variations in the incident solar flux during the remainder of the year. Temperature increases of 20 degrees-30 degrees C are frequently observed during the winter due to strong fo??hn winds descending from the Polar Plateau. A model incorporating nonsteady molecular diffusion into Kolmogorov-scale eddies in the interfacial layer and similarity-theory flux-profiles in the surface sublayer, is used to determine the rate of ice sublimation from the acquired meteorological data. Despite the frequent occurrence of strong winter fo??hns, the bulk of the annual ablation occurs during the summer due to elevated temperatures and persistent moderate winds. The annual ablation from Lake Hoare is estimated to have been 35.0 +/- 6.3 cm for 1986.

  11. Bion and the sublime: the origins of an aesthetic paradigm.

    PubMed

    Civitarese, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    In constructing his theory Bion drew on a number of symbolic matrices: psychoanalysis, philosophy, mathematics, literature, aesthetics. The least investigated of these is the last. True, we know that Bion cites many authors of the Romantic period, such as Coleridge, Keats, Blake and Wordsworth, as well as others who were held in high esteem in the Romantic period, such as Milton. However, less is known about the influence exerted on him by the aesthetics of the sublime, which while chronologically preceding Romanticism is in fact one of its components. My working hypothesis is that tracing a number of Bion's concepts back to this secret model can serve several purposes: firstly, it contributes to the study of the sources, and, secondly, it makes these concepts appear much less occasional and idiosyncratic than we might believe, being as they are mostly those less immediately understandable but not less important (O, negative capability, nameless dread, the infinite, the language of achievement, unison etc.). Finally, connecting these notions to a matrix, that is, disclosing the meaning of elements that are not simply juxtaposed but dynamically interrelated, in my view significantly increases not only their theoretical intelligibility but also their usefulness in clinical practice. In conclusion, one could legitimately argue that Bion gradually subsumed all the other paradigms he drew on within the aesthetic paradigm. PMID:25388282

  12. Schiller Goes to the Movies: Locating the Sublime in "Thelma and Louise."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyng, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Endeavors to make students aware of similarities between today's movie culture and the theater of the 18th century; parallels between a traditional drama and a movie script; and Schiller's understanding of the sublime. (36 references) (Author/CK)

  13. Experimental Results on Isotopic Fractionation of Dusty Deuterated Water Ice During Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, J. E.; Smith, P. H.; Brown, R. H.; Lauretta, D. S.; Boynton, W. V.; Drake, M. J.

    2008-03-01

    Observed heavy fractionation of HDO during sublimation of water ice when mixed with or overlain by (regolith) fine particulate dust is described. Results from two sets of apparatus simulating comets and the Mars polar environment will be presented.

  14. Collection-efficient, axisymmetric vacuum sublimation module for the purification of solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Michael; Paul, Elizabeth; Katovic, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    A vacuum sublimation module of axisymmetric geometry was developed and employed to purify solid-phase materials. The module provides certain practical advantages and it comprises: a metering valve, glass collector, glass lower body, main seal, threaded bushing, and glass internal cartridge (the latter to contain starting material). A complementary process was developed to de-solvate, sublime, weigh, and collect solid chemical materials exemplified by oxalic acid, ferrocene, pentachlorobenzene, chrysene, and urea. The oxalic acid sublimate was analyzed by titration, melting range, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and its (aqueous phase) electrolytically generated gas. The analytical data were consistent with a high-purity, anhydrous oxalic acid sublimate. Cyclic voltammograms of 0.11 mol. % oxalic acid in water displayed a 2.1 V window on glassy carbon electrode beyond which electrolytic decomposition occurs. During module testing, fifteen relatively pure materials were sublimed with (energy efficient) passive cooling and the solid-phase recovery averaged 95 mass %. Key module design features include: compact vertical geometry, low-angle conical collector, uniformly compressed main seal, modest power consumption, transparency, glovebox compatibility, cooling options, and preferential conductive heat transfer. To help evaluate the structural (module) heat transfer, vertical temperature profiles along the dynamically evacuated lower body were measured versus electric heater power: for example, an input of 18.6 W generated a temperature 443-K at the bottom. Experimental results and engineering calculations indicate that during sublimation, solid conduction is the primary mode of heat transfer to the starting material.

  15. Comet 67P/CG: Influence of the sublimation coefficient on the temperature and outgassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossacki, Konrad J.; Markiewicz, Wojciech J.

    2013-05-01

    The sublimation rate of ice is commonly calculated using simple Hertz-Knudsen formula. This formula is derived from the kinetic theory of gases and ignores microphysical processes determining the actual sublimation rate. The microphysical processes can be accounted for by including in the Herz-Knudsen equation a temperature dependent sublimation coefficient (Kossacki, K.J., Markiewicz, W.J., Skorov, Y., Koemle, N.I. [1999]. Planet. Space Sci. 47, 1521-1530; Gundlach, B., Skorov, Y.V., Blum, J. [2011]. Icarus, 213, 710-719). Here we address the question to what extent inaccuracy of the simple Hertz-Knudsen equation affects the calculated temperature of a cometary nucleus and the emission rate of water vapor to space. We performed numerical simulations dealing with evolution of a model comet of the orbit the same as Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, target comet of the Rosetta mission (Glassmeier, K.H., Boehnardt, H., Koshny, D., Kuhrt, E., Richter, I. [2007]. Space Sci. Rev. 128, 1-21). We have found, that the temperature below dust mantle is most sensitive to the value of the sublimation coefficient when the mantle is coarse grained, while the sublimation rate is most affected when the mantle is fine grained. We also conclude that derivation of the temperature below the mantle from the measured water production rate ignoring temperature dependence of the sublimation coefficient leads to an underestimate of the temperature by more than 10 K when the nucleus is fine grained.

  16. Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    an additional high temperature peak at 910 °C with E{sub d} = 370 ± 10 kJ/mol that is consistent with both the dehydrogenation of surface AlOH species and H{sub 2} assisted sublimation of AlN. Similarly, N{sub 2} exhibited a similar higher temperature desorption peak with E{sub d} = 535 ± 40 kJ/mol that is consistent with the activation energy for direct sublimation of AlN.

  17. The large-area CdTe thin film for CdS/CdTe solar cell prepared by physical vapor deposition in medium pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Run; Liu, Bo; Yang, Xiaoyan; Bao, Zheng; Li, Bing; Zhang, Jingquan; Li, Wei; Wu, Lili; Feng, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    The Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin film has been prepared by physical vapor deposition (PVD), the Ar + O2 pressure is about 0.9 kPa. This method is a newer technique to deposit CdTe thin film in large area, and the size of the film is 30 × 40 cm2. This method is much different from the close-spaced sublimation (CSS), as the relevance between the source temperature and the substrate temperature is weak, and the gas phase of CdTe is transferred to the substrate by Ar + O2 flow. Through this method, the compact and uniform CdTe film (30 × 40 cm2) has been achieved, and the performances of the CdTe thin film have been determined by transmission spectrum, SEM and XRD. The film is observed to be compact with a good crystallinity, the CdTe is polycrystalline with a cubic structure and a strongly preferred (1 1 1) orientation. Using the CdTe thin film (3 × 5 cm2) which is taken from the deposited large-area film, the 14.6% efficiency CdS/CdTe thin film solar cell has been prepared successfully. The structure of the cell is glass/FTO/CdS/CdTe/graphite slurry/Au, short circuit current density (Jsc) of the cell is 26.9 mA/cm2, open circuit voltage (Voc) is 823 mV, and filling factor (FF) is 66.05%. This technique can be a quite promising method to apply in the industrial production, as it has great prospects in the fabricating of large-area CdTe film.

  18. Annealing effects on the chemical deposited CdS films and the electrical properties of CdS/CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Junfeng; Liao, Cheng; Jiang, Tao; Fu, Ganhua; Krishnakumar, V.; Spanheimer, C.; Haindl, G.; Zhao, Kui; Klein, A.; Jaegermann, W.

    2011-02-15

    Graphical abstract: From XPS core level spectras, compared with as-depositing CdS (sample A), the Fermi level is shifting closer to the conduction band after annealing treatment in the oxygen (sample B) while it is shifting closer to the valence band after annealing treatment in the argon-hydrogen (sample C). That might be the main reason of the different performance of the final devices. The open circuit voltage of the CdS/CdTe solar cell increases when the CBD CdS is annealed with oxygen, while the performance of the solar cell decreases when the CBD CdS is annealed with argon-hydrogen. Research highlights: {yields} Two different methods (oxidation and reduction) were used to anneal CdS films for CdTe solar cells. {yields} Electrical properties were analyzed by XPS (Fermi levels of CdS films). {yields} Annealing treatment in oxidation atmosphere could shift Fermi level of CdS film to higher position and consequently improve the CdS/CdTe junction and performance of solar cells. -- Abstract: CdS layers grown by chemical bath deposition (CBD) are annealed in the oxygen and argon-hydrogen atmosphere respectively. It has been found that the open circuit voltage of the CdS/CdTe solar cell increases when the CBD CdS is annealed with oxygen before the deposition of CdTe by close spaced sublimation (CSS), while the performance of the solar cell decreases when the CBD CdS is annealed with argon-hydrogen. Electronic properties of the CdS films are investigated using X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which indicates that the Fermi level is shifting closer to the conduction band after annealing in the oxygen and consequently a higher open circuit voltage of the solar cell can be obtained.

  19. A computational model of echolocation: Transformation of spectrogram into the reflected intensity distribution for range discrimination of multiple closely spaced objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Ikuo; Kunugiyama, Kenji; Yano, Masafumi

    2001-05-01

    Using frequency-modulated echolocation, bats can discriminate the range of objects with an accuracy of less than a millimeter. However, the echolocation mechanism is not well understood. The delay separation of three or more closely spaced objects can be determined through analysis of the echo spectrum. However, delay times cannot be properly correlated with objects using only the echo spectrum because the sequence of delay separations cannot be determined without information on temporal changes in the interference pattern of the echoes. To illustrate this, Gaussian chirplets with a carrier frequency compatible with bat emission sweep rates were used. The delay time for object 1, T1, can be estimated from the echo spectrum around the onset time. The delay time for object 2 is obtained by adding T1 to the delay separation between objects 1 and 2 (extracted from the first appearance of interference effects). Further objects can be located in sequence by this same procedure. This model can determine delay times for multiple closely spaced objects with an accuracy of about 1 microsecond, when all the objects are located within 30 microseconds of delay separation. This accuracy is possible even with objects having different reflected intensities and in a noisy environment.

  20. Rapid, Single-Molecule Assays in Nano/Micro-Fluidic Chips with Arrays of Closely Spaced Parallel Channels Fabricated by Femtosecond Laser Machining

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, Brian K.; King, Jason K.; Robinson, William N.; Hofmeister, William H.; Davis, Lloyd M.

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective pharmaceutical drug discovery depends on increasing assay throughput while reducing reagent needs. To this end, we are developing an ultrasensitive, fluorescence-based platform that incorporates a nano/micro-fluidic chip with an array of closely spaced channels for parallelized optical readout of single-molecule assays. Here we describe the use of direct femtosecond laser machining to fabricate several hundred closely spaced channels on the surfaces of fused silica substrates. The channels are sealed by bonding to a microscope cover slip spin-coated with a thin film of poly(dimethylsiloxane). Single-molecule detection experiments are conducted using a custom-built, wide-field microscope. The array of channels is epi-illuminated by a line-generating red diode laser, resulting in a line focus just a few microns thick across a 500 micron field of view. A dilute aqueous solution of fluorescently labeled biomolecules is loaded into the device and fluorescence is detected with an electron-multiplying CCD camera, allowing acquisition rates up to 7 kHz for each microchannel. Matched digital filtering based on experimental parameters is used to perform an initial, rapid assessment of detected fluorescence. More detailed analysis is obtained through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Simulated fluorescence data is shown to agree well with experimental values. PMID:25140634

  1. Structural-acoustic optimum design of shell structures in open/closed space based on a free-form optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoda, Masatoshi; Shimoide, Kensuke; Shi, Jin-Xing

    2016-03-01

    Noise reduction by structural geometry optimization has attracted much attention among designers. In the present work, we propose a free-form optimization method for the structural-acoustic design optimization of shell structures to reduce the noise of a targeted frequency or frequency range in an open or closed space. The objective of the design optimization is to minimize the average structural vibration-induced sound pressure at the evaluation points in the acoustic field under a volume constraint. For the shape design optimization, we carry out structural-acoustic coupling analysis and adjoint analysis to calculate the shape gradient functions. Then, we use the shape gradient functions in velocity analysis to update the shape of shell structures. We repeat this process until convergence is confirmed to obtain the optimum shape of the shell structures in a structural-acoustic coupling system. The numerical results for the considered examples showed that the proposed design optimization process can significantly reduce the noise in both open and closed spaces.

  2. Rapid, single-molecule assays in nano/micro-fluidic chips with arrays of closely spaced parallel channels fabricated by femtosecond laser machining.

    PubMed

    Canfield, Brian K; King, Jason K; Robinson, William N; Hofmeister, William H; Davis, Lloyd M

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective pharmaceutical drug discovery depends on increasing assay throughput while reducing reagent needs. To this end, we are developing an ultrasensitive, fluorescence-based platform that incorporates a nano/micro-fluidic chip with an array of closely spaced channels for parallelized optical readout of single-molecule assays. Here we describe the use of direct femtosecond laser machining to fabricate several hundred closely spaced channels on the surfaces of fused silica substrates. The channels are sealed by bonding to a microscope cover slip spin-coated with a thin film of poly(dimethylsiloxane). Single-molecule detection experiments are conducted using a custom-built, wide-field microscope. The array of channels is epi-illuminated by a line-generating red diode laser, resulting in a line focus just a few microns thick across a 500 micron field of view. A dilute aqueous solution of fluorescently labeled biomolecules is loaded into the device and fluorescence is detected with an electron-multiplying CCD camera, allowing acquisition rates up to 7 kHz for each microchannel. Matched digital filtering based on experimental parameters is used to perform an initial, rapid assessment of detected fluorescence. More detailed analysis is obtained through fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Simulated fluorescence data is shown to agree well with experimental values. PMID:25140634

  3. The sublimation coefficient of water ice: influence on the temperature and outgassing of Comet 67P/C-G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossacki, K. J.; Markiewicz, W. J.

    2013-09-01

    In most published works dealing with evolution of cometary nuclei, the sublimation rate of ices is calculated with simple Hertz-Knudsen equation. This formulation, derived from the kinetic theory of gases, ignores microphysical processes which determine the sublimation rate. To correctly account for these processes the modified Herz-Knudsen equation must include temperature dependent sublimation coefficient. Including this temperature dependence we find, that the temperature below dust mantle is most sensitive to the value of the sublimation coefficient when the mantle is coarse grained, while the sublimation rate is most affected when the mantle is fine grained. Most importantly, we also find that derivation of the temperature below the dust mantle from the measured water production rate ignoring temperature dependence of the sublimation coefficient can lead to an underestimate of the sub-dust temperature by more than 10 K.

  4. Advanced Research Deposition System (ARDS) for processing CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barricklow, Keegan Corey

    CdTe solar cells have been commercialized at the Gigawatt/year level. The development of volume manufacturing processes for next generation CdTe photovoltaics (PV) with higher efficiencies requires research systems with flexibility, scalability, repeatability and automation. The Advanced Research Deposition Systems (ARDS) developed by the Materials Engineering Laboratory (MEL) provides such a platform for the investigation of materials and manufacturing processes necessary to produce the next generation of CdTe PV. Limited by previous research systems, the ARDS was developed to provide process and hardware flexibility, accommodating advanced processing techniques, and capable of producing device quality films. The ARDS is a unique, in-line process tool with nine processing stations. The system was designed, built and assembled at the Materials Engineering Laboratory. Final assembly, startup, characterization and process development are the focus of this research. Many technical challenges encountered during the startup of the ARDS were addressed in this research. In this study, several hardware modifications needed for the reliable operation of the ARDS were designed, constructed and successfully incorporated into the ARDS. The effect of process condition on film properties for each process step was quantified. Process development to achieve 12% efficient baseline solar cell required investigation of discrete processing steps, troubleshooting process variation, and developing performance correlations. Subsequent to this research, many advances have been demonstrated with the ARDS. The ARDS consistently produces devices of 12% +/-.5% by the process of record (POR). The champion cell produced to date utilizing the ARDS has an efficiency of 16.2% on low cost commercial sodalime glass and utilizes advanced films. The ARDS has enabled investigation of advanced concepts for processing CdTe devices including, Plasma Cleaning, Plasma Enhanced Closed Space Sublimation

  5. Mechanism and kinetics for ammonium dinitramide (ADN) sublimation: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, R S; Chen, Hui-Lung; Lin, M C

    2012-11-01

    The mechanism for sublimation of NH(4)N(NO(2))(2) (ADN) has been investigated quantum-mechanically with generalized gradient approximation plane-wave density functional theory calculations; the solid surface is represented by a slab model and the periodic boundary conditions are applied. The calculated lattice constants for the bulk ADN, which were found to consist of NH(4)(+)[ON(O)NNO(2)](-) units, instead of NH(4)(+)[N(NO(2))(2)](-), agree quite well with experimental values. Results show that three steps are involved in the sublimation/decomposition of ADN. The first step is the relaxation of the surface layer with 1.6 kcal/mol energy per NH(4)ON(O)NNO(2) unit; the second step is the sublimation of the surface layer to form a molecular [NH(3)]-[HON(O)NNO(2)] complex with a 29.4 kcal/mol sublimation energy, consistent with the experimental observation of Korobeinichev et al. (10) The last step is the dissociation of the [H(3)N]-[HON(O)NNO(2)] complex to give NH(3) and HON(O)NNO(2) with the dissociation energy of 13.9 kcal/mol. Direct formation of NO(2) (g) from solid ADN costs a much higher energy, 58.3 kcal/mol. Our calculated total sublimation enthalpy for ADN(s) → NH(3)(g) + HON(O)NNO(2)) (g), 44.9 kcal/mol via three steps, is in good agreement with the value, 42.1 kcal/mol predicted for the one-step sublimation process in this work and the value 44.0 kcal/mol computed by Politzer et al. (11) using experimental thermochemical data. The sublimation rate constant for the rate-controlling step 2 can be represented as k(sub) = 2.18 × 10(12) exp (-30.5 kcal/mol/RT) s(-1), which agrees well with available experimental data within the temperature range studied. The high pressure limit decomposition rate constant for the molecular complex H(3)N···HON(O)NNO(2) can be expressed by k(dec) = 3.18 × 10(13) exp (-15.09 kcal/mol/RT) s(-1). In addition, water molecules were found to increase the sublimation enthalpy of ADN, contrary to that found in the ammonium

  6. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, C.J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-01-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels (“araneiform” terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  7. In situ observation of graphene sublimation and multi-layer edge reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian Yu; Ding, Feng; Yakobson, Boris I.; Lu, Ping; Qi, Liang; Li, Ju

    2009-01-01

    We induced sublimation of suspended few-layer graphene by in situ Joule-heating inside a transmission electron microscope. The graphene sublimation fronts consisted of mostly {1100} zigzag edges. Under appropriate conditions, a fractal-like “coastline” morphology was observed. Extensive multiple-layer reconstructions at the graphene edges led to the formation of unique carbon nanostructures, such as sp2-bonded bilayer edges (BLEs) and nanotubes connected to BLEs. Flat fullerenes/nanopods and nanotubes tunneling multiple layers of graphene sheets were also observed. Remarkably, >99% of the graphene edges observed during sublimation are BLEs rather than monolayer edges (MLEs), indicating that BLEs are the stable edges in graphene at high temperatures. We reproduced the “coastline” sublimation morphologies by kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulations. The simulation revealed geometrical and topological features unique to quasi-2-dimensional (2D) graphene sublimation and reconstructions. These reconstructions were enabled by bending, which cannot occur in first-order phase transformations of 3D bulk materials. These results indicate that substrate of multiple-layer graphene can offer unique opportunities for tailoring carbon-based nanostructures and engineering novel nano-devices with complex topologies. PMID:19515820

  8. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-08-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels ("araneiform" terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  9. A New Method for Estimating Bacterial Abundances in Natural Samples using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Cleaves, H. James; Schubert, Michael; Aubrey, Andrew; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new method based on the sublimation of adenine from Escherichia coli to estimate bacterial cell counts in natural samples. To demonstrate this technique, several types of natural samples including beach sand, seawater, deep-sea sediment, and two soil samples from the Atacama Desert were heated to a temperature of 500 C for several seconds under reduced pressure. The sublimate was collected on a cold finger and the amount of adenine released from the samples then determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV absorbance detection. Based on the total amount of adenine recovered from DNA and RNA in these samples, we estimated bacterial cell counts ranging from approx. l0(exp 5) to l0(exp 9) E. coli cell equivalents per gram. For most of these samples, the sublimation based cell counts were in agreement with total bacterial counts obtained by traditional DAPI staining. The simplicity and robustness of the sublimation technique compared to the DAPI staining method makes this approach particularly attractive for use by spacecraft instrumentation. NASA is currently planning to send a lander to Mars in 2009 in order to assess whether or not organic compounds, especially those that might be associated with life, are present in Martian surface samples. Based on our analyses of the Atacama Desert soil samples, several million bacterial cells per gam of Martian soil should be detectable using this sublimation technique.

  10. Distributed modelling of climate change impacts on snow sublimation in Northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, F.; Schlaffer, S.; Aus der Beek, T.; Menzel, L.

    2009-08-01

    Sublimation of snow is an important factor of the hydrological cycle in Mongolia and is likely to increase according to future climate projections. In this study the hydrological model TRAIN was used to assess spatially distributed current and future sublimation rates based on interpolated daily data of precipitation, air temperature, air humidity, wind speed and solar radiation. An automated procedure for the interpolation of the input data is provided. Depending on the meteorological parameter and the data availability for the individual days, the most appropriate interpolation method is chosen automatically from inverse distance weighting, Ordinary Least Squares interpolation, Ordinary or Universal Kriging. Depending on elevation simulated annual sublimation in the period 1986-2006 was 23 to 35 mm, i.e. approximately 80% of total snowfall. Moreover, future climate projections for 2071-2100 of ECHAM5 and HadCM3, based on the A1B emission scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, were analysed with TRAIN. In the case of ECHAM5 simulated sublimation increases by up to 17% (26...41 mm) while it remains at the same level for HadCM3 (24...34 mm). The differences are mainly due to a distinct increase in winter precipitation for ECHAM5. Simulated changes of the all-season hydrological conditions, e.g. the sublimation-to-precipitation ratio, were ambiguous due to diverse precipitation patterns derived by the global circulation models.