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Sample records for clostridium perfringens epsilon

  1. Clostridium perfringens Epsilon Toxin: A Malevolent Molecule for Animals and Man?

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Bradley G.; Barth, Gillian; Barth, Holger; Popoff, Michel R.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a prolific, toxin-producing anaerobe causing multiple diseases in humans and animals. One of these toxins is epsilon, a 33 kDa protein produced by Clostridium perfringens (types B and D) that induces fatal enteric disease of goats, sheep and cattle. Epsilon toxin (Etx) belongs to the aerolysin-like toxin family. It contains three distinct domains, is proteolytically-activated and forms oligomeric pores on cell surfaces via a lipid raft-associated protein(s). Vaccination controls Etx-induced disease in the field. However, therapeutic measures are currently lacking. This review initially introduces C. perfringens toxins, subsequently focusing upon the Etx and its biochemistry, disease characteristics in various animals that include laboratory models (in vitro and in vivo), and finally control mechanisms (vaccines and therapeutics). PMID:24284826

  2. Clostridium Perfringens Epsilon Toxin Binds to Membrane Lipids and Its Cytotoxic Action Depends on Sulfatide

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Carles; Dorca-Arévalo, Jonatan; Blasi, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon toxin (Etx) is one of the major lethal toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, being the causal agent of fatal enterotoxemia in animals, mainly sheep and goats. Etx is synthesized as a non-active prototoxin form (proEtx) that becomes active upon proteolytic activation. Etx exhibits a cytotoxic effect through the formation of a pore in the plasma membrane of selected cell targets where Etx specifically binds due to the presence of specific receptors. However, the identity and nature of host receptors of Etx remain a matter of controversy. In the present study, the interactions between Etx and membrane lipids from the synaptosome-enriched fraction from rat brain (P2 fraction) and MDCK cell plasma membrane preparations were analyzed. Our findings show that both Etx and proEtx bind to lipids extracted from lipid rafts from the two different models as assessed by protein-lipid overlay assay. Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Binding of proEtx to sulfatide, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol (3)-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol (5)-phosphate was detected. Removal of the sulphate groups via sulfatase treatment led to a dramatic decrease in Etx-induced cytotoxicity, but not in proEtx-GFP binding to MDCK cells or a significant shift in oligomer formation, pointing to a role of sulfatide in pore formation in rafts but not in toxin binding to the target cell membrane. These results show for the first time the interaction between Etx and membrane lipids from host tissue and point to a major role for sulfatides in C. perfringens epsilon toxin pathophysiology. PMID:26452234

  3. Clostridium perfringens Epsilon Toxin Causes Selective Death of Mature Oligodendrocytes and Central Nervous System Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Jennifer R.; Ma, Yinghua; Zhao, Baohua; Harris, Jason Michael; Rumah, Kareem Rashid; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (?-toxin) is responsible for a devastating multifocal central nervous system (CNS) white matter disease in ruminant animals. The mechanism by which ?-toxin causes white matter damage is poorly understood. In this study, we sought to determine the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which ?-toxin causes pathological changes to white matter. In primary CNS cultures, ?-toxin binds to and kills oligodendrocytes but not astrocytes, microglia, or neurons. In cerebellar organotypic culture, ?-toxin induces demyelination, which occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, while preserving neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. ?-Toxin specificity for oligodendrocytes was confirmed using enriched glial culture. Sensitivity to ?-toxin is developmentally regulated, as only mature oligodendrocytes are susceptible to ?-toxin; oligodendrocyte progenitor cells are not. ?-Toxin sensitivity is also dependent on oligodendrocyte expression of the proteolipid myelin and lymphocyte protein (MAL), as MAL-deficient oligodendrocytes are insensitive to ?-toxin. In addition, ?-toxin binding to white matter follows the spatial and temporal pattern of MAL expression. A neutralizing antibody against ?-toxin inhibits oligodendrocyte death and demyelination. This study provides several novel insights into the action of ?-toxin in the CNS. (i) ?-Toxin causes selective oligodendrocyte death while preserving all other neural elements. (ii) ?-Toxin-mediated oligodendrocyte death is a cell autonomous effect. (iii) The effects of ?-toxin on the oligodendrocyte lineage are restricted to mature oligodendrocytes. (iv) Expression of the developmentally regulated proteolipid MAL is required for the cytotoxic effects. (v) The cytotoxic effects of ?-toxin can be abrogated by an ?-toxin neutralizing antibody. PMID:26081637

  4. CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence of C. perfringens food-poisoning is quite common and costly. Although somewhat fastidious in growth characteristics using synthetic laboratory media, the microorganism is very prolific when found in food products. Despite the pathogen’s ubiquity in the natural environment, foodborne i...

  5. Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin H149A mutant as a platform for receptor binding studies

    PubMed Central

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Kokkinidou, Maria C; Savva, Christos G; Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio; Naylor, Claire E; Cole, Ambrose R; Moss, David S; Basak, Ajit K; Titball, Richard W

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (Etx) is a pore-forming toxin responsible for a severe and rapidly fatal enterotoxemia of ruminants. The toxin is classified as a category B bioterrorism agent by the U.S. Government Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), making work with recombinant toxin difficult. To reduce the hazard posed by work with recombinant Etx, we have used a variant of Etx that contains a H149A mutation (Etx-H149A), previously reported to have reduced, but not abolished, toxicity. The three-dimensional structure of H149A prototoxin shows that the H149A mutation in domain III does not affect organisation of the putative receptor binding loops in domain I of the toxin. Surface exposed tyrosine residues in domain I of Etx-H149A (Y16, Y20, Y29, Y30, Y36 and Y196) were mutated to alanine and mutants Y30A and Y196A showed significantly reduced binding to MDCK.2 cells relative to Etx-H149A that correlated with their reduced cytotoxic activity. Thus, our study confirms the role of surface exposed tyrosine residues in domain I of Etx in binding to MDCK cells and the suitability of Etx-H149A for further receptor binding studies. In contrast, binding of all of the tyrosine mutants to ACHN cells was similar to that of Etx-H149A, suggesting that Etx can recognise different cell surface receptors. In support of this, the crystal structure of Etx-H149A identified a glycan (?-octyl-glucoside) binding site in domain III of Etx-H149A, which may be a second receptor binding site. These findings have important implications for developing strategies designed to neutralise toxin activity. PMID:23504825

  6. A Tripartite Cocktail of Chimeric Monoclonal Antibodies Passively Protects Mice against Ricin, Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B and Clostridium perfringens Epsilon Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Sully, Erin K.; Whaley, Kevin; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Pauly, Michael; Velasco, Jesus; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Stavale, Eric; Aman, M. Javad; Tangudu, Chandra; Uzal, Francisco A.; Mantis, Nicholas J.; Zeitlin, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Due to the fast-acting nature of ricin, staphylococcal enterotoxin (SEB), and Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), it is necessary that therapeutic interventions following a bioterrorism incident by one of these toxins occur as soon as possible after intoxication. Moreover, because the clinical manifestations of intoxication by these toxins are likely to be indistinguishable from each other, especially following aerosol exposure, we have developed a cocktail of chimeric monoclonal antibodies that is capable of neutralizing all three toxins. The efficacy of this cocktail was demonstrated in mouse models of lethal dose toxin challenge. PMID:25260254

  7. Epsilon Toxin Is Essential for the Virulence of Clostridium perfringens Type D Infection in Sheep, Goats, and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J. P.; Adams, V.; Beingesser, J.; Hughes, M. L.; Poon, R.; Lyras, D.; Hill, A.; McClane, B. A.; Rood, J. I.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D causes disease in sheep, goats, and other ruminants. Type D isolates produce, at minimum, alpha and epsilon (ETX) toxins, but some express up to five different toxins, raising questions about which toxins are necessary for the virulence of these bacteria. We evaluated the contribution of ETX to C. perfringens type D pathogenicity in an intraduodenal challenge model in sheep, goats, and mice using a virulent C. perfringens type D wild-type strain (WT), an isogenic ETX null mutant (etx mutant), and a strain where the etx mutation has been reversed (etx complemented). All sheep and goats, and most mice, challenged with the WT isolate developed acute clinical disease followed by death in most cases. Sheep developed various gross and/or histological changes that included edema of brain, lungs, and heart as well as hydropericardium. Goats developed various effects, including necrotizing colitis, pulmonary edema, and hydropericardium. No significant gross or histological abnormalities were observed in any mice infected with the WT strain. All sheep, goats, and mice challenged with the isogenic etx mutant remained clinically healthy for ?24 h, and no gross or histological abnormalities were observed in those animals. Complementation of etx knockout restored virulence; most goats, sheep, and mice receiving this complemented mutant developed clinical and pathological changes similar to those observed in WT-infected animals. These results indicate that ETX is necessary for type D isolates to induce disease, supporting a key role for this toxin in type D disease pathogenesis. PMID:23630957

  8. Clostridium perfringens in the environment.

    PubMed

    Matches, J R; Liston, J; Curran, D

    1974-10-01

    Clostridium perfringens was isolated from samples collected in Puget Sound in the state of Washington and areas considered as possible sources of these organisms to Puget Sound. The distribution of C. perfringens in the total Clostridium population was determined for fish gut contents and sediments collected in highly polluted and less polluted areas, sewage samples, freshwater sediments, and soils. The greatest numbers of C. perfringens were obtained from marine sediments collected near the sewage outfall at West Point. Fewer isolates were made from fish collected from less polluted stations, although the number of C. perfringens remained high in sediments from other Puget Sound stations. The proportion of C. perfringens in the total Clostridium populations varied between 56 and 71% for sewage samples and only 0.4 to 4.1% for freshwater sediments and soil samples. Only 25 C. perfringens isolates out of 137 from fish guts, or 18%, were identifiable serologically and these fell into 12 groups. C. perfringens were fed to fish and the fish were sacrificed after varying lengths of time. The number of C. perfringens increased slightly in the gut during the first 24 h and then the numbers decreased rapidly for the next 120 h. PMID:4371684

  9. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ?16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ?45 kb to ?140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ?35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  10. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against the toxin...

  11. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against the toxin...

  12. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against the toxin...

  13. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against the toxin...

  14. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against the toxin...

  15. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against the toxin...

  16. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against the toxin...

  17. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against the toxin...

  18. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against the toxin...

  19. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against the toxin...

  20. Lytic Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage 39-O Genomic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening for bacteriophages lytic for Clostridium perfringens was completed utilizing filtered samples obtained from poultry (intestinal material), soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water. Following limit dilution cloning and three rounds of plaque purification lytic phage preparations ...

  1. [Toxins of Clostridium perfringens as a natural and bioterroristic threats].

    PubMed

    Omernik, Andrzej; P?usa, Tadeusz

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is absolutely anaerobic rod-shaped, sporeforming bacterium. The morbidity is connected with producing toxins. Depending on the type of toxin produced Clostridium perfringens can be divided into five serotypes:A-E. Under natural conditions, this bacterium is responsible for local outbreaks of food poisoning associated with eating contaminated food which which was improperly heat treated. Some countries with lower economic level are endemic foci of necrotizing enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens. The bacterium is also a major cause of gas gangrene. It is a disease, associated with wound infection, with potentially fatal prognosis in the case of treatment's delays. In the absence of early radical surgery, antibiotic therapy and (if available) hyperbaric treatment leads to the spread of toxins in the body causing shock, coma and death. Due to the force of produced toxins is a pathogen that poses a substrate for the production of biological weapons. It could potentially be used to induce outbreaks of food poisoning and by missiles contamination by spore lead to increased morbidity of gas gangrene in injured soldiers. C. perfringens types B and D produce epsilon toxin considered to be the third most powerful bacterial toxin. Because of the ability to disperse the toxin as an aerosol and a lack of methods of treatment and prevention of poisoning possible factors it is a potential tool for bioterrorism It is advisable to continue research into vaccines and treatments for poisoning toxins of C. perfringens. PMID:26449576

  2. Comparative Analysis of Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Clostridium perfringens are Gram-positive bacteria that are a major bacterial cause of food-borne disease and gas gangrene among humans. These anaerobic bacteria are also the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Pathogenesis and symptoms of a necrotic enterit...

  3. Comparative Analysis of Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens are Gram-positive bacteria that are a major bacterial cause of food-borne disease among humans. These anaerobic bacteria are also the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Pathogenesis and symptoms of a necrotic enteritis infection among chickens ...

  4. Clostridium perfringens septicemia following cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Mariona, F G; Ismail, M A

    1980-10-01

    A Clostridium perfringens infection is described in an 18-year-old primigravida following cesarean section at 43 weeks' gestation. Despite the ubiquitous distribution of these organisms, such infections are rarely encountered in obstetrics. Characteristics of these bacteria and appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are presented. Despite the infrequency of this potentially lethal complication, survival depends on early diagnosis and aggressive treatment. PMID:7422200

  5. Lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Lotte, Romain; Popoff, M R; Degand, Nicolas; Lotte, Laurene; Bouvet, Philippe; Baudin, Guillaume; Cua, Eric; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Ruimy, Raymond

    2014-10-01

    We report here a rare case of chronic lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens in an elderly patient that was treated with a combination of ?-lactams and clindamycin. Molecular analysis performed on the strain revealed an unusual toxin gene pattern. PMID:25056327

  6. Quantitation of Clostridium perfringens in Foods

    PubMed Central

    Angelotti, Robert; Hall, Herbert E.; Foter, Milton J.; Lewis, Keith H.

    1962-01-01

    A procedure is described for identifying and enumerating Clostridium perfringens in foods by means of a simplified agar plating method, followed by confirmation of black colonies in tubes of motility-nitrate medium and sporulation broth. The test is routinely completed within 48 hr. Under experimental conditions, the procedure has been used to quantitatively recover various levels of C. perfringens contamination in a variety of foods and has recovered as few as ten C. perfringens per g without interference from food constituents and associated flora. Under practical conditions of field application, the method has been used to investigate five food-poisoning outbreaks, and C. perfringens was implicated as the etiological agent in two of these outbreaks. PMID:13861594

  7. Perfringolysin O: The Underrated Clostridium perfringens Toxin?

    PubMed

    Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Goossens, Evy; Valgaeren, Bonnie; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet; Wade, Kristin R; Tweten, Rodney; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-05-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as ? toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250-300 Å in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis. PMID:26008232

  8. Perfringolysin O: The Underrated Clostridium perfringens Toxin?

    PubMed Central

    Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Goossens, Evy; Valgaeren, Bonnie; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet; Wade, Kristin R.; Tweten, Rodney; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as ? toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250–300 Å in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis. PMID:26008232

  9. Towards an understanding of the role of Clostridium perfringens toxins in human and animal disease.

    PubMed

    Uzal, Francisco A; Freedman, John C; Shrestha, Archana; Theoret, James R; Garcia, Jorge; Awad, Milena M; Adams, Vicki; Moore, Robert J; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens uses its arsenal of >16 toxins to cause histotoxic and intestinal infections in humans and animals. It has been unclear why this bacterium produces so many different toxins, especially since many target the plasma membrane of host cells. However, it is now established that C. perfringens uses chromosomally encoded alpha toxin (a phospholipase C) and perfringolysin O (a pore-forming toxin) during histotoxic infections. In contrast, this bacterium causes intestinal disease by employing toxins encoded by mobile genetic elements, including C. perfringens enterotoxin, necrotic enteritis toxin B-like, epsilon toxin and beta toxin. Like perfringolysin O, the toxins with established roles in intestinal disease form membrane pores. However, the intestinal disease-associated toxins vary in their target specificity, when they are produced (sporulation vs vegetative growth), and in their sensitivity to intestinal proteases. Producing many toxins with diverse characteristics likely imparts virulence flexibility to C. perfringens so it can cause an array of diseases. PMID:24762309

  10. Animal models to study the pathogenesis of human and animal Clostridium perfringens infections.

    PubMed

    Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A; Cheung, Jackie K; Theoret, James; Garcia, Jorge P; Moore, Robert J; Rood, Julian I

    2015-08-31

    The most common animal models used to study Clostridium perfringens infections in humans and animals are reviewed here. The classical C. perfringens-mediated histotoxic disease of humans is clostridial myonecrosis or gas gangrene and the use of a mouse myonecrosis model coupled with genetic studies has contributed greatly to our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Similarly, the use of a chicken model has enhanced our understanding of type A-mediated necrotic enteritis in poultry and has led to the identification of NetB as the primary toxin involved in disease. C. perfringens type A food poisoning is a highly prevalent bacterial illness in the USA and elsewhere. Rabbits and mice are the species most commonly used to study the action of enterotoxin, the causative toxin. Other animal models used to study the effect of this toxin are rats, non-human primates, sheep and cattle. In rabbits and mice, CPE produces severe necrosis of the small intestinal epithelium along with fluid accumulation. C. perfringens type D infection has been studied by inoculating epsilon toxin (ETX) intravenously into mice, rats, sheep, goats and cattle, and by intraduodenal inoculation of whole cultures of this microorganism in mice, sheep, goats and cattle. Molecular Koch's postulates have been fulfilled for enterotoxigenic C. perfringens type A in rabbits and mice, for C. perfringens type A necrotic enteritis and gas gangrene in chickens and mice, respectively, for C. perfringens type C in mice, rabbits and goats, and for C. perfringens type D in mice, sheep and goats. PMID:25770894

  11. Clostridium perfringens in Animal Disease: A Review of Current Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Niilo, L.

    1980-01-01

    The diseases caused by various types of Clostridium perfringens are critically reviewed in the light of current knowledge. Particular emphasis is placed on information concerning these diseases in Canadian livestock. There are two etiologically clearly-defined acute C. perfringens diseases recognized in Canada: hemorrhagic enteritis of the new born calf, caused by C. perfringens type C, and enterotoxemia of sheep, caused by type D. Clostridium perfringens type A may play a role as a secondary pathological agent in various disease conditions, such as necrotic enteritis of chickens. It may also cause wound infections and may provide a source for human food poisoning outbreaks. There appears to be a considerable lack of knowledge regarding the distribution of C. perfringens types, their pathogenesis, diagnosis and the incidence of diseases caused by this organism. PMID:6253040

  12. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN COOKED BEEF

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work was to study the growth kinetics of Clostridium perfringens spores in thermally processed ground beef and compare the suitability of the Gompertz, logistic, and Baranyi models used to describe the isothermal bacterial growth. Ground beef samples inoculated with the spores ...

  13. Tips to Prevent Illness from Clostridium Perfringens

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that is often found on raw meat and poultry, and is one of the most common causes ... are common food sources of C. perfringens ? Beef, poultry, gravies, and dried or precooked foods are common ...

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Silva, R O S; Salvarani, F M; Assis, R A; Martins, N R S; Pires, P S; Lobato, F C F

    2009-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a normal inhabitant of the intestinal tract of chickens as well as a potential pathogen that causes necrotic enteritis and colangio hepatitis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of seven different compounds used for therapy, growth promotion or prevention of coccidiosis was determined by agar dilution method for 55 C. perfringens strains isolated from the intestines of broiler chickens. All strains showed high susceptibility to penicillin, avilamycin, monensin and narasin. Only 7.3% of the strains showed an intermediated sensitivity to lincomycin, and 49 (89.1%) were considered susceptible. For tetracycline and bacitracin, 41.8% and 47.3% of strains, respectively, were considered resistant. PMID:24031355

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R. O. S.; Salvarani, F.M.; Assis, R.A.; Martins, N.R.S.; Pires, P.S.; Lobato, F.C.F.

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a normal inhabitant of the intestinal tract of chickens as well as a potential pathogen that causes necrotic enteritis and colangio hepatitis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of seven different compounds used for therapy, growth promotion or prevention of coccidiosis was determined by agar dilution method for 55 C. perfringens strains isolated from the intestines of broiler chickens. All strains showed high susceptibility to penicillin, avilamycin, monensin and narasin. Only 7.3% of the strains showed an intermediated sensitivity to lincomycin, and 49 (89.1%) were considered susceptible. For tetracycline and bacitracin, 41.8% and 47.3% of strains, respectively, were considered resistant. PMID:24031355

  16. Hazard analysis of Clostridium perfringens in the Skylab Food System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourland, C. T.; Huber, C. S.; Kiser, P. R.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rowley, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Food System presented unique microbiological problems because food was warmed in null-gravity and because the heat source was limited to 69.4 C (to prevent boiling in null-gravity). For these reasons, the foods were manufactured using critical control point techniques of quality control coupled with appropriate hazard analyses. One of these hazard analyses evaluated the threat from Clostridium perfringens. Samples of food were inoculated with C. perfringens and incubated for 2 h at temperatures ranging from 25 to 55 C. Generation times were determined for the foods at various temperatures. Results of these tests were evaluated taking into consideration: food-borne disease epidemiology, the Skylab food manufacturing procedures, and the performance requirements of the Skylab Food System. Based on this hazard analysis, a limit for C. perfringens of 100/g was established for Skylab foods.

  17. Detection and molecular typing of Clostridium perfringens isolates from beef, chicken and turkey meats.

    PubMed

    Aras, Zeki; Hadimli, Hasan Hüseyin

    2015-04-01

    Here we describe a study investigating the presence of Clostridium perfringens strains in meat samples and the toxin genes in the isolates by PCR. This study, for the first time, demonstrated the presence of C. perfringens type E in turkey meats, while C. perfringens type C strains isolated from chicken meats. PMID:25460196

  18. Characterization of Virulence Plasmid Diversity among Clostridium perfringens Type B Isolates?

    PubMed Central

    Sayeed, Sameera; Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    The important veterinary pathogen Clostridium perfringens type B is unique for producing the two most lethal C. perfringens toxins, i.e., epsilon-toxin and beta-toxin. Our recent study (K. Miyamoto, J. Li, S. Sayeed, S. Akimoto, and B. A. McClane, J. Bacteriol. 190:7178-7188, 2008) showed that most, if not all, type B isolates carry a 65-kb epsilon-toxin-encoding plasmid. However, this epsilon-toxin plasmid did not possess the cpb gene encoding beta-toxin, suggesting that type B isolates carry at least one additional virulence plasmid. Therefore, the current study used Southern blotting of pulsed-field gels to localize the cpb gene to ?90-kb plasmids in most type B isolates, although a few isolates carried a ?65-kb cpb plasmid distinct from their etx plasmid. Overlapping PCR analysis then showed that the gene encoding the recently discovered TpeL toxin is located ?3 kb downstream of the plasmid-borne cpb gene. As shown earlier for their epsilon-toxin-encoding plasmids, the beta-toxin-encoding plasmids of type B isolates were found to carry a tcp locus, suggesting that they are conjugative. Additionally, IS1151-like sequences were identified upstream of the cpb gene in type B isolates. These IS1151-like sequences may mobilize the cpb gene based upon detection of possible cpb-containing circular transposition intermediates. Most type B isolates also possessed a third virulence plasmid that carries genes encoding urease and lambda-toxin. Collectively, these findings suggest that type B isolates are among the most plasmid dependent of all C. perfringens isolates for virulence, as they usually carry three potential virulence plasmids. PMID:19858300

  19. Hydrolyzable and condensed tannins resistance in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Redondo, L M; Dominguez, J E; Rabinovitz, B C; Redondo, E A; Fernández Miyakawa, M E

    2015-08-01

    Tannins added in the diet are being used to improve nutrition and health in farm animals as an alternative to antibiotic growth promoters and to control enteric clostridial diseases. However, the capacity of Clostridium perfringens to develop resistance under the selective pressure of tannins is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if C. perfringens possess the ability to develop resistance against tannins in comparison with antimicrobial agents. Susceptibility for 7 AGPs (antimicrobial growth promoters), 9 therapeutic antimicrobials and 2 tannin based extracts was determined for 30 C. perfringens strains isolated from poultry and cattle. Two susceptible strains were selected and cultured in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of tannins and AGPs for resistant sub-populations selection. Tannin resistance of C. perfringens isolates from both animal species revealed no statistically significant differences in MICs (minimum inhibitory concentration). Poultry isolates showed higher MICs to several AGPs compared with cattle isolates. All isolates were susceptible to the therapeutic antimicrobials tested, but avian isolates showed a significantly lower susceptibility to these antimicrobials which was highly correlated with an increased resistance to bacitracin and others AGPs. In-vitro selection of resistant clones suggests that C. perfringens was unable to develop resistance against tannins at least compared to AGPs like bacitracin and avilamycin. Avian origin strains, which were previously exposed to antibiotics showed higher resistance, compared to cattle origin strains. These results suggest that the evolution of resistance against tannins in C. perfringens would be more difficult and slower than to the determined AGPs. PMID:26037239

  20. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase of C. perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium-related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by react...

  1. Clostridium perfringens gas gangrene at a wrist intravenous line insertion.

    PubMed

    Determann, Catherine; Walker, Craig Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A patient admitted to the intensive care unit for management of hypotension following a multiple medications overdose subsequently deteriorated rapidly with sepsis. A cannula site was noted to be bruised, swollen and erythematous and the X-ray demonstrated gas sitting within the tissues surrounding the metacarpal bones. The patient was referred to the orthopaedic surgeons and quickly taken for debridement of the affected area and fasciotomies of the forearm. Microbiological investigation confirmed Clostridium perfringens to be present in multiple fluid samples taken from the affected site. PMID:24108766

  2. Complication of Invasive Molar Pregnancy with Clostridium perfringens Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanmeet; Angra, Kunal; Davis, Bonnie; Shokrani, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens (CP) is an anaerobic, Gram-positive bacillus associated with malignant diseases and near-term pregnancies. The necrotic tissue that results from these disease processes fuels the proliferation of CP, leading to gas gangrene and subsequently sepsis. Herein, we report a case of a 41-year-old female patient with a history of invasive molar pregnancy that was further complicated with a CP infection. Although past research has shown a link between Clostridium infection and choriocarcinoma (Chern-Horng and Hsieh, 1999), no previous cases of CP infection have been associated with invasive molar pregnancy. We also report complete resolution of the CP sepsis and its associated symptoms following the hysterectomy. PMID:24716030

  3. Isolation of Clostridium perfringens Type B in an Individual at First Clinical Presentation of Multiple Sclerosis Provides Clues for Environmental Triggers of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rumah, Kareem Rashid; Linden, Jennifer; Fischetti, Vincent A.; Vartanian, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    We have isolated Clostridium perfringens type B, an epsilon toxin-secreting bacillus, from a young woman at clinical presentation of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) with actively enhancing lesions on brain MRI. This finding represents the first time that C. perfringens type B has been detected in a human. Epsilon toxin’s tropism for the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and binding to oligodendrocytes/myelin makes it a provocative candidate for nascent lesion formation in MS. We examined a well-characterized population of MS patients and healthy controls for carriage of C. perfringens toxinotypes in the gastrointestinal tract. The human commensal Clostridium perfringens type A was present in approximately 50% of healthy human controls compared to only 23% in MS patients. We examined sera and CSF obtained from two tissue banks and found that immunoreactivity to ETX is 10 times more prevalent in people with MS than in healthy controls, indicating prior exposure to ETX in the MS population. C. perfringens epsilon toxin fits mechanistically with nascent MS lesion formation since these lesions are characterized by BBB permeability and oligodendrocyte cell death in the absence of an adaptive immune infiltrate. PMID:24146858

  4. Regulation of toxin gene expression in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru

    2015-05-01

    The Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming, rod-shaped Clostridium perfringens is widely distributed in nature, especially in soil and the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals. C. perfringens causes clostridial myonecrosis (or gas gangrene), enteritis and enterotoxemia in humans and livestock by producing numerous extracellular toxins and enzymes. The toxin gene expression is regulated by a two-component regulatory system and regulatory RNA VirR/VirS-VR-RNA cascade. The VirR/VirS system was originally found in a type A strain, but a recent report showed that it is also important for the toxin gene regulation in other types of strains. Two types of cell-cell signaling, i.e., agr-system and AI-2 signaling, are also important for the regulation of toxin genes. Several regulatory systems independent from the VirR/VirS system, including virX, the orphan histidine kinase ReeS and orphan response regulator RevR, are also involved in the regulation of toxin genes. In addition, the expression of toxin genes is upregulated after contact with Caco-2 cells. C. perfringens has a complex regulatory network for toxin gene expression and thus the coordination of toxin gene expression is important for the process of infection. PMID:25303832

  5. Clostridium perfringens Type E Virulence Traits Involved in Gut Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Leandro M.; Carrasco, Juan M. Díaz; Redondo, Enzo A.; Delgado, Fernando; Miyakawa, Mariano E. Fernández

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type E disease in ruminants has been characterized by hemorrhagic enteritis or sudden death. Although type E isolates are defined by the production of alpha and iota toxin, little is known about the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type E infections. Thus far, the role of iota toxin as a virulence factor is unknown. In this report, iota toxin showed positive effects on adherence and colonization of C. perfringens type E while having negative effect on the adherence of type A cells. In-vitro and in-vivo models suggest that toxinotype E would be particularly adapted to exploit the changes induced by iota toxin in the surface of epithelial cells. In addition, type E strains produce metabolites that affected the growth of potential intra-specific competitors. These results suggest that the alteration of the enterocyte morphology induced by iota toxin concomitantly with the specific increase of type E cell adhesion and the strong intra-specific growth inhibition of other strains could be competitive traits inherent to type E isolates that improve its fitness within the bovine gut environment. PMID:25799452

  6. Host cell-induced signaling causes Clostridium perfringens to upregulate production of toxins important for intestinal infections

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianming; Ma, Menglin; Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes enteritis and enterotoxemia in humans and livestock due to prolific toxin production. In broth culture, C. perfringens uses the Agr-like quorum sensing (QS) system to regulate production of toxins important for enteritis/enterotoxemia, including beta toxin (CPB), enterotoxin, and epsilon toxin (ETX). The VirS/VirR two-component regulatory system (TCRS) also controls CPB production in broth cultures. Both the Agr-like QS and VirS/VirR systems are important when C. perfringens senses enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and responds by upregulating CPB production; however, only the Agr-like QS system is needed for host cell-induced ETX production. These in vitro observations have pathophysiologic relevance since both the VirS/VirR and Agr-like QS signaling systems are required for C. perfringens strain CN3685 to produce CPB in vivo and to cause enteritis or enterotoxemia. Thus, apparently upon sensing its presence in the intestines, C. perfringens utilizes QS and TCRS signaling to produce toxins necessary for intestinal virulence. PMID:24061146

  7. Regulated expression of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin in naturally cpe-negative type A, B, and C isolates of C. perfringens.

    PubMed Central

    Czeczulin, J R; Collie, R E; McClane, B A

    1996-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), the virulence factor responsible for symptoms associated with C. perfringens type A food poisoning, is produced by enterotoxigenic C. perfringens type A isolates when these bacteria sporulate in the gastrointestinal tract. Less than 5% of the global C. perfringens population apparently carries the cpe gene. To assess the distribution of cpe-regulatory factors, we investigated whether the cpe gene of a C. perfringens food poisoning isolate can be expressed and properly regulated (i.e., expressed in a sporulation-associated manner) when transformed into naturally cpe-negative C. perfringens isolates. Sporulation-associated CPE expression was observed when low-copy-number plasmids carrying either a 5.7-kb DNA insert, containing the cpe open reading frame plus >1 kb each of upstream and downstream flanking sequences from C. perfringens food poisoning isolate NCTC 8239, or a 1.6-kb insert, containing only the cpe open reading frame of NCTC 8239, were electroporated into cpe-negative C. perfringens type A, B, and C isolates. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrated that the sizes of the cpe message in the transformants and the naturally enterotoxigenic C. perfringens NCTC 8239 were similar and that this message was detectable only in sporulating cultures of the transformants or NCTC 8239. These studies strongly suggest that many, if not all, cpe-negative C. perfringens isolates (including type B isolates, which are not known to naturally express CPE) produce a factor(s) involved in normal (i.e., sporulation-associated) transcriptional regulation of CPE expression by C. perfringens food poisoning isolates. These findings are consistent with this CPE-regulatory factor(s) also regulating the expression of other genes in C. perfringens. PMID:8757868

  8. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of tetracycline and minocycline resistance in Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of tetracycline resistance and the prevalence of tetracycline-resistance genes in strains of Clostridium perfringens isolated from different sources between 1994 and 2005. Susceptibility to tetracycline and minocycline in C. perfringens isolates ...

  9. The Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage CPV1 Virulent for Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of bacteriophages and their lytic enzymes to control Clostridium perfringens is one potential approach to reduce the pathogen on poultry farms and in poultry-processing facilities. Bacteriophages lytic for C. perfringens were isolated from sewage, feces and broiler intestinal contents. P...

  10. EFFECT OF OZONE STRESS ON CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS VIABILITY FOLLOWING THE AQUEOUS TREATMENT OF BEEF SURFACES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antimicrobial efficacy of ozone on the food-borne pathogen, Clostridium perfringens, was evaluated on London Broil top round cut beef surfaces using an aqueous wash system. Current food processing methods do not assure elimination of spores of C. perfringens, thus there is a high likelihood of ...

  11. Comparison of two bacteriophage derived enzymes that lyse strains of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming bacterium that is the third leading cause of food-borne bacterial disease among humans while in chickens C. perfringens is the presumptive etiology of necrotic enteritis. Although the organism can be controlled by antibiotics, there ...

  12. Potential for growth of Clostridium perfringens from spores in pork scrapple during cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted stabilization studies to determine the ability of Clostridium perfringens spores to germinate and grow during exponential cooling of a commercial formulation of pork scrapple. Scrapple was inoculated with a mixture of three strains of C. perfringens spores (NTCC 8238, NCTC 8239, and AT...

  13. THE GENOME SEQUENCE OF BACTERIOPHAGE CpV1 LYTIC FOR CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of bacteriophages and their lytic enzymes to control Clostri-dium perfringens is one potential approach to reduce the pathogen on poultry farms and in poultry-processing facilities. We have established a collection of 30 bacteriophages lytic for C. perfringens. These were isolated from s...

  14. Clostridium perfringens in Long Island Sound sediments: An urban sedimentary record

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchholtz ten Brink, M. R.; Mecray, E.L.; Galvin, E.L.

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a conservative tracer and an indicator of sewage-derived pollution in the marine environment. The distribution of Clostridium perfringens spores was measured in sediments from Long Island Sound, USA, as part of a regional study designed to: (1) map the distribution of contaminated sediments; (2) determine transport and dispersal paths; (3) identify the locations of sediment and contaminant focusing; and (4) constrain predictive models. In 1996, sediment cores were collected at 58 stations, and surface sediments were collected at 219 locations throughout the Sound. Elevated concentrations of Clostridium perfringens in the sediments indicate that sewage pollution is present throughout Long Island Sound and has persisted for more than a century. Concentrations range from undetectable amounts to 15,000 spores/g dry sediment and are above background levels in the upper 30 cm at nearly all core locations. Sediment focusing strongly impacts the accumulation of Clostridium perfringens spores. Inventories in the cores range from 28 to 70,000 spores/cm2, and elevated concentrations can extend to depths of 50 cm. The steep gradients in Clostridium perfringens profiles in muddier cores contrast with concentrations that are generally constant with depth in sandier cores. Clostridium perfringens concentrations rarely decrease in the uppermost sediment, unlike those reported for metal contaminants. Concentrations in surface sediments are highest in the western end of the Sound, very low in the eastern region, and intermediate in the central part. This pattern reflects winnowing and focusing of Clostridium perfringens spores and fine-grained sediment by the hydrodynamic regime; however, the proximity of sewage sources to the westernmost Sound locally enhances the Clostridium perfringens signals.

  15. Membrane-Binding Mechanism of Clostridium perfringens Alpha-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Masataka; Terao, Yutaka; Sakurai, Jun; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin is a key mediator of gas gangrene, which is a life-threatening infection that manifests as fever, pain, edema, myonecrosis, and gas production. Alpha-toxin possesses phospholipase C and sphingomyelinase activities. The toxin is composed of an N-terminal domain (1–250 aa, N-domain), which is the catalytic site, and a C-terminal domain (251–370 aa, C-domain), which is the membrane-binding site. Immunization of mice with the C-domain of alpha-toxin prevents the gas gangrene caused by C. perfringens, whereas immunization with the N-domain has no effect. The central loop domain (55–93 aa), especially H….SW84Y85….G, plays an important role in the interaction with ganglioside GM1a. The toxin binds to lipid rafts in the presence of a GM1a/TrkA complex, and metabolites from phosphatidylcholine to diacylglycerol through the enzymatic activity of alpha-toxin itself. These membrane dynamics leads to the activation of endogenous PLC?-1 via TrkA. In addition, treatment with alpha-toxin leads to the formation of diacylglycerol at membrane rafts in ganglioside-deficient DonQ cells; this in turn triggers endocytosis and cell death. This article summarizes the current the membrane-binding mechanism of alpha-toxin in detail. PMID:26633512

  16. Structural Basis of Clostridium perfringens Toxin Complex Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Adams,J.; Gregg, K.; Bayer, E.; Boraston, A.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    The virulent properties of the common human and livestock pathogen Clostridium perfringens are attributable to a formidable battery of toxins. Among these are a number of large and highly modular carbohydrate-active enzymes, including the {mu}-toxin and sialidases, whose catalytic properties are consistent with degradation of the mucosal layer of the human gut, glycosaminoglycans, and other cellular glycans found throughout the body. The conservation of noncatalytic ancillary modules among these enzymes suggests they make significant contributions to the overall functionality of the toxins. Here, we describe the structural basis of an ultra-tight interaction (Ka = 1.44 x 1011 M-1) between the X82 and dockerin modules, which are found throughout numerous C. perfringens carbohydrate-active enzymes. Extensive hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals contacts between the X82 and dockerin modules give rise to the observed high affinity. The {mu}-toxin dockerin module in this complex is positioned {approx}180 relative to the orientation of the dockerin modules on the cohesin module surface within cellulolytic complexes. These observations represent a unique property of these clostridial toxins whereby they can associate into large, noncovalent multitoxin complexes that allow potentiation of the activities of the individual toxins by combining complementary toxin specificities.

  17. Membrane-Binding Mechanism of Clostridium perfringens Alpha-Toxin.

    PubMed

    Oda, Masataka; Terao, Yutaka; Sakurai, Jun; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin is a key mediator of gas gangrene, which is a life-threatening infection that manifests as fever, pain, edema, myonecrosis, and gas production. Alpha-toxin possesses phospholipase C and sphingomyelinase activities. The toxin is composed of an N-terminal domain (1-250 aa, N-domain), which is the catalytic site, and a C-terminal domain (251-370 aa, C-domain), which is the membrane-binding site. Immunization of mice with the C-domain of alpha-toxin prevents the gas gangrene caused by C. perfringens, whereas immunization with the N-domain has no effect. The central loop domain (55-93 aa), especially H….SW(84)Y(85)….G, plays an important role in the interaction with ganglioside GM1a. The toxin binds to lipid rafts in the presence of a GM1a/TrkA complex, and metabolites from phosphatidylcholine to diacylglycerol through the enzymatic activity of alpha-toxin itself. These membrane dynamics leads to the activation of endogenous PLC?-1 via TrkA. In addition, treatment with alpha-toxin leads to the formation of diacylglycerol at membrane rafts in ganglioside-deficient DonQ cells; this in turn triggers endocytosis and cell death. This article summarizes the current the membrane-binding mechanism of alpha-toxin in detail. PMID:26633512

  18. Clinical and antibody responses to Clostridium perfringens type A enterotoxin in experimental sheep and calves.

    PubMed Central

    Niilo, L; Cho, H J

    1985-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A live cultures or sonicated sporulating cells, all containing enterotoxin, were repeatedly inoculated into sheep and calves by the intraduodenal route over periods of 30 to 35 days. Serum antibody to C. perfringens enterotoxin, tested by ELISA, developed in four of seven sheep and in two of four calves. The titers ranged from 400 to 1600. The live organism introduced into the duodenum did not become established in the bacterial flora of the intestinal tract. PMID:4016579

  19. Comparison of methods for the enumeration of Clostridium perfringens spores in water.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Valéria Christina Amstalden; Neto, Romeu Cantúsio; da Silva, Neusely; Terra, Juliana Hirata

    2012-01-01

    Four methods for enumerating Clostridium perfringens spores in water were evaluated: (1) the IMM (Iron Milk Medium) method (MPN); (2) the LS (Lactose Sulfite Broth) method (MPN); (3) the m-CP (membrane filtration Clostridium perfringens Agar) method (membrane filtration); and (4) the TSC (Tryptose Sulfite Cycloserine Agar) method (membrane filtration). The performance of these methods was compared with that of the DRCM (Differential Reinforced Clostridium Medium) method (MPN) as adopted by CETESB (Brazil's Environmental Sanitation Technology Company) for the analysis of C. perfringens spores in water. Statistical analysis was performed according to ISO 17994:2004 (Water Quality - Criteria for Establishing Equivalence between Microbiological Methods). The LS, m-CP, and TSC methods were considered not equivalent to the DRCM method, as they gave significantly lower results. The IMM showed inconclusive results and, according to ISO 17994:2004, analysis of a greater number of samples is needed to draw definitive conclusions comparing IMM and DRCM. PMID:22233899

  20. Purification and characterization of Clostridium perfringens delta-toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Alouf, J E; Jolivet-Reynaud, C

    1981-01-01

    Delta-toxin, an extracellular hemolysin released by Clostridium perfringens type C, was purified from culture supernatant fluid by sequential ammonium sulfate precipitation, thiol-Sepharose gel chromatography, isoelectric focusing, and Sephadex G-75 gel filtration. The purified preparation had a specific activity of 320,000 hemolytic units per mg of protein and was homogeneous, as determined by immunochemical and electrophoretic tests. This toxin was characterized as a single polypeptide chain composed of 391 amino acid residues, 30% of which were hydrophobic. The molecular weight was found to be 42,000, and the isoelectric point was pH 9.1. Delta-toxin appeared to be amphiphilic by charge shift electrophoresis in a three-detergent system. It was immunogenic in rabbits and lethal to mice at a dose of 0.12 micrograms. The lytic activity of delta-toxin was restricted to erythrocytes of even-toed ungulates (sheep, goats, and pigs). This activity was inhibited by GM2 ganglioside but not by other gangliosides, cholesterol, lecithin, or sphingomyelin. Images PMID:6260669

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens isolated from piglets with or without diarrhea in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Salvarani, Felipe Masiero; Silveira Silva, Rodrigo Otávio; Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; da Costa Cruz Júnior, Eduardo Coulaud; Albefaro, Isabella Silva; de Carvalho Guedes, Roberto Maurício; Faria Lobato, Francisco Carlos

    2012-07-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for 13 antibiotics against Clostridium perfringens isolated from Brazilian piglets. The collection of isolates was performed in June to October 2010. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin and ceftiofur, whereas most were resistant to tetracycline and lincomycin. Avilamycin and narasin were more effective against isolates from non-diarrheic than from diarrheic piglets. The other antimicrobials were less active in need of high concentrations to inhibit the growth of the C. perfringens type A. These results suggest the need for further studies evaluating molecular factors related to the antimicrobial resistance of C. perfringens. PMID:24031924

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens isolated from piglets with or without diarrhea in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Salvarani, Felipe Masiero; Silveira Silva, Rodrigo Otávio; Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; da Costa Cruz Júnior, Eduardo Coulaud; Albefaro, Isabella Silva; de Carvalho Guedes, Roberto Maurício; Faria Lobato, Francisco Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for 13 antibiotics against Clostridium perfringens isolated from Brazilian piglets. The collection of isolates was performed in June to October 2010. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin and ceftiofur, whereas most were resistant to tetracycline and lincomycin. Avilamycin and narasin were more effective against isolates from non-diarrheic than from diarrheic piglets. The other antimicrobials were less active in need of high concentrations to inhibit the growth of the C. perfringens type A. These results suggest the need for further studies evaluating molecular factors related to the antimicrobial resistance of C. perfringens. PMID:24031924

  3. Clostridium perfringens type A enteritis in blue and yellow macaw (Ara ararauna).

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Marta Brito; Torres, Luciana Neves; Mesquita, Ramon Gomes; Ampuero, Fernanda; Cunha, Marcos Paulo Vieira; Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana Porfida; Ferreira, Antonio José Piantino; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Moreno, Andrea Micke; Knöbl, Terezinha

    2014-12-01

    This study describes an outbreak of necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens type A in captive macaws (Ara ararauna). Two psittacine birds presented a history of prostration and died 18 hr after manifestation of clinical signs. The necropsy findings and histopathologic lesions were indicative of necrotic enteritis. Microbiologic assays resulted in the growth of large gram-positive bacilli that were identified as C. perfringens. PCR was used to identify clostridium toxinotypes and confirmed the identification of isolated strains as C pefringens type A, positive to gene codifying beta 2 toxin. The infection source and predisposing factors could not be ascertained. PMID:25619013

  4. Comparison of Virulence Plasmids among Clostridium perfringens Type E Isolates? †

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; McClane, Bruce A.

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type E isolates produce iota-toxin, which is encoded by iap and ibp genes. Using Southern blot analyses, the current study identified iap/ibp plasmids of ?97 or ?135 kb among eight type E isolates. For most of these isolates, their iap/ibp plasmid also encoded urease and lambda-toxin. However, the beta2-toxin gene, if present, was on a different plasmid from the iap/ibp plasmid. For all isolates, the iap/ibp plasmid carried a tcp locus, strongly suggesting that these plasmids are conjugative. Overlapping PCR analyses demonstrated some similarity between the iap/ibp plasmids and enterotoxin-encoding plasmids of type A isolates. Additional PCR analyses demonstrated that the iap/ibp locus is located near dcm sequences, an apparent plasmid hot spot for toxin gene insertion, and that two IS1151-related sequences are present in the iap/ibp locus. To begin testing whether those IS1151-like sequences can mobilize iap/ibp genes, a PCR assay was performed that amplifies a product only from circular DNA forms that could represent transposition intermediates. This PCR assay detected circular forms containing iap/ibp genes and silent enterotoxin gene sequences, with or without an IS1151-like sequence. Collectively, these results suggest that a mobile genetic element carrying iap/ibp has inserted onto a tcp-carrying enterotoxin plasmid in a type A isolate, creating a progenitor iap/ibp plasmid. That plasmid then spread via conjugation to other isolates, converting them to type E. Further iap/ibp plasmid diversity occurred when either the iap/ibp genes later remobilized and inserted onto other conjugative plasmids or some iap/ibp plasmids acquired additional DNA sequences. PMID:17261608

  5. Anti-idiotypic antibody-induced protection against Clostridium perfringens type D.

    PubMed Central

    Percival, D A; Shuttleworth, A D; Williamson, E D; Kelly, D C

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (BALB/c mouse) with specificity for a neutralizing epitope on the epsilon-toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens type D was used to raise anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id) in different strains of mice and rabbits. These were purified and used in cross-immunization studies to induce anti-(anti-idiotype). All strains of mice and rabbits immunized with BALB/c-derived anti-Id showed a high-titer antibody response directed towards the active site of the toxin. This protected the animals against toxin challenge and against an oral dose of the vegetative organisms. Animals immunized with other anti-Id preparations showed no specific antibody response and were not protected. Guinea pig peritoneal macrophages have a cell surface receptor for the toxin, and incubation of these cells with BALB/c anti-Id allowed them to survive toxin challenge, indicating that occupation of the receptors by the anti-Id prevented binding by the toxin. In conclusion, we have shown that an internal-image anti-Id preparation will induce protective immunity in syngeneic and xenogeneic animals and furthermore that immunity to a single epitope on the exotoxin is sufficient to protect against the toxin and clinical sequelae evoked by the disease-causing organism itself. PMID:1695203

  6. INHIBITION OF QUORUM SENSING IN CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS AS A MEANS TOWARD FOOD SAFETY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell density-dependent signaling through the use of autoinducers, classified as quorum sensing, may play a role in the survival and virulence of Clostridium perfringens in foods. The natural 2-(5H)-furanone, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), was chosen for evaluation as a quorum sensing analogue due to it...

  7. CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS: STATUS OF A FOOD-BORNE SPORE-FORMER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is responsible for the third most common cause of food-borne illness in the U.S. today, resulting in an estimated 0.25 million cases annually and an associated economic loss of 12.5 billion dollars. The increased production of minimally-processed, extended shelf-life, refrig...

  8. BACTERIOPHAGES OF THE FAMILY SIPHOVIRIDAE CONTAIN AMIDASE ENZYMES THAT LYSE CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In chickens Clostridium perfringens (Cp) is the etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis and causes gas gangrene along with being the third leading cause of bacterial food-borne gastroenteritis in humans. While the disease in poultry can be controlled by antibiotics, there is increasing pressure to ban...

  9. Comparison of two bacteriophage derived enzymes with lytic activity against strains of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming bacterium capable of producing four major toxins which are responsible for disease symptoms and pathogenesis in a variety of animals, humans and poultry. The organism is the third leading cause of food-borne bacterial disease among ...

  10. ESTIMATATION OF GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN COOKED BEEF UNDER FLUCTUATING TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new concept for estimating the bacterial growth under temperature fluctuations was hypothesized and validated using Clostridium perfringens as a test organism. This new methodology was based on the Gompertz models to calculate the equivalent growth times under different temperatures, and estimate...

  11. CHITOSAN PROTECTS COOKED GROUND BEEF AND TURKEY AGAINST CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS SPORES DURING CHILLING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by the biopolymer chitosan during abusive chilling of cooked ground beef (25% fat) and turkey (7% fat) obtained from a retail store. Chitosan was mixed into the thawed beef or turkey at concentrations of 0.5, ...

  12. Bacteriophages of the family siphoviridae contain amidase enzymes that lyse Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    *Agtech-Danisco, current address In chickens Clostridium perfringens (Cp) is the etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis and causes gas gangrene along with being the third leading cause of bacterial food-borne gastroenteritis in humans. While the disease in poultry can be controlled by antibiotics, th...

  13. Molecular Characterization of Podoviridae Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Comparison of Their Predicted Lytic Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control ba...

  14. Control of Clostridium perfringens spores by plant-derived antimicrobials during cooling of cooked ground beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, thymol, oregano oil and two green tea extracts with low (green tea leaf powder (GTL); 141 mg of total catechins/g of green tea extract) and high (green tea leaf extract (GTE); 697 mg of total catechin...

  15. A thermophilic phage endolysin fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-specific cell wall binding domain creates an anti-clostridium antimicrobial with improved thermostability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of Necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Man...

  16. Heat resistance and outgrowth of clostridium perfringens spores as affected by the type of heating medium, and heating and cooling rates in ground pork 

    E-print Network

    Marquez Gonzalez, Mayra

    2009-05-15

    The survival and germination of Clostridium perfringens spores in different heating media and at different heating rates was studied to determine the fate of C. perfringens spores during abusive cooking and cooling of pork products. The heat...

  17. Comparative genomics of four closely related Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages reveals variable rates of evolution within a core genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Biotechnological uses of bacteriophage gene products as alternatives to conventional antibiotics will require a thorough understanding of their genomic context. We sequenced and analyzed the genomes of four closely related phages isolated from Clostridium perfringens, an important agricu...

  18. The molecular-genetic analysis of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from broilers on farms in Central Russia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the research was to perform phenotypic and molecular-genetic typing of Clostridium perfringens strains commonly spread on poultry farms in Central Russia. Samples of homogenized iliac and cecal contents from 760 broilers were assayed and 325 C. perfringens strains (42.8 %) were isol...

  19. Predictive model for growth of Clostridium perfringens at temperatures applicable to cooling of cooked uncured beef and chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and validate a model for predicting the relative growth of Clostridium perfringens from spore inocula in uncured chicken and beef meat during cooling. Isothermal growth curves of C. perfringens at various temperatures from 10-48.9C were evaluated, ...

  20. BACTERIOCIN E1073 PRODUCED BY ENTEROCOCCUS FAECIUM LWP1073 IS EFFECTIVE FOR TREATING COMMENSAL CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS INFECTION IN BROILERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterotoxin-producing Clostridium perfringens type A bacteria occupy a significant place in the etiological structure of food-borne infections in humans. One potential approach to minimize infections associated with food-borne pathogens is to control the carriage of C. perfringens in broilers. For ...

  1. Toxinotyping of Clostridium perfringens fecal isolates of reintroduced Père David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus) in China.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Huiling; Chen, Fu; Leng, Xinyan; Fei, Rongmei; Wang, Libo

    2014-10-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an important pathogen causing sudden death syndrome, necrotic enteritis, and gas gangrene in ruminants, especially some deer species. Père David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus) is one of the world's rare species and is an endangered and protected species in China. Some Père David's deer in the Chinese Shishou Père David's Deer Preserve died due to C. perfringens infection. We investigated the toxin types and C. perfringens enterotoxin-positive (cpe(+)) strains of isolated C. perfringens in Père David's deer in China. We collected 155 fecal samples from the Beijing Nanhaizi Père David's Deer Park and the Jiangsu Dafeng Père David's Deer National Nature Reserve between July 2010 and July 2011. Bacteria isolated using blood agar and mannitol agar plates were identified by Gram staining and nested PCR for 16S rRNA. We isolated C. perfringens from 41 fecal samples and used PCR amplification of five toxin genes to identify the toxinotypes and the cpe(+) strains of C. perfringens. Twenty-one isolates were type A, 15 were type E, and five were type D. Fifteen isolates were cpe(+) strains, including eight that were type A and seven that were type E. PMID:25050802

  2. Antibiotic Sensitivity of Clostridium perfringens Isolated From Faeces in Tabriz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Bidar Asl, Saeid; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Naghili, Behruz; Yeganeh, Fatemeh; Memar, Yousef; Mohammadzadeh, Yalda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clostridium perfringens, a Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium that produces at least 16 virulence factors including 12 toxins (?-?), enterotoxin, hemolysin and neuraminidase, can create variable pathogenic condition, ranging from a food poisoning to life-threatening myonecrosis. Among C. perfringens strains, resistance to the drug choices such as penicillin as well as to alternatives of penicillin like metronidazole and clindamycin has also been observed. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the resistance of isolated toxigenic and non-toxigenic C. perfringens strains against common antimicrobial agents. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, a total of 136 stool specimens were collected. At first, cooked meat medium enrichment method was performed on samples at 45°C. Thereafter, a loopful of the enriched culture was transferred to blood agar and incubated anaerobically at 37°C for 24-72 hours. Colonies with double zone of hemolysis were identified by different biochemical tests such as phospholipase C (lecithinase) test, indole and urease production. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) for common antibiotics was determined by Etests (Epsilometer) and duplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) reaction was performed with specific primers for amplification of cpe (426 bp) and plc (283 bp) Genes. Results: Of 136 stool samples including diarrhea [48] and non-diarrhea [88] ones, 83 (61.02%) C. perfringens were cultured. Of these 83, 79 C. perfringens isolates showed the alpha-toxin (phospholipase C) production gene by PCR. Respectively, 3 (9.09%) and 2 (4.34%) cpe genes were present in diarrhea and non-diarrhea samples. Of 79 isolates of C. perfringens, 34 (43.03%) cases showed no resistance, 18 (22.78%) had one resistance and 27 (34.17%) isolates had multiple resistance to imipenem, metronidazole, ceftriaxone, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, and penicillin. Conclusions: Periodic evaluation of antimicrobial susceptibility for C. perfringens should be performed. Harboring of enterotoxigenic C. perfringens in individuals not necessarily results in diarrhea. PMID:26421135

  3. Residues involved in the pore-forming activity of the Clostridium perfringens iota toxin.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Oliver; Maier, Elke; Waltenberger, Eva; Mazuet, Christelle; Benz, Roland; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota toxin is a binary toxin that is organized into enzyme (Ia) and binding (Ib) components. Ib forms channels in lipid bilayers and mediates the transport of Ia into the target cells. Here we show that Ib residues 334-359 contain a conserved pattern of alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues forming two amphipathic ?-strands involved in membrane insertion and channel formation. This stretch of amino acids shows remarkable structural and functional analogies with the ?-pore-forming domain of C. perfringens epsilon toxin. Several mutations within the two amphipathic ?-strands affected pore formation, single-channel conductance and ion selectivity (S339E-S341E, Q345H N346E) confirming their involvement in channel formation. F454 of Ib corresponds to the ?-clamp F427 of anthrax protective antigen and F428 of C2II binary toxins. The mutation F454A resulted in a loss of cytotoxicity and strong increase in single-channel conductance (500 pS as compared with 85?pS in 1 M KCl) with a slight decrease in cation selectivity, indicating that the ?-clamp is highly conserved and crucial for binary toxin activity. In contrast, the mutants Q367D, N430D, L443E had no or only minor effects on Ib properties, while T360I, T360A and T360W caused a dramatic effect on ion selectivity and single-channel conductance, indicating gross disturbance of the oligomer structure. This suggests that, at least in the iota toxin family, T360 has a structural role in the pore organization. Moreover, introduction of charged residues within the channel (S339E-S341E) or in the vestibule (Q367D, N430D and L443E) had virtually no effect on chloroquine or Ia binding, whereas F454A, T360I, T360A and T360W strongly decreased the chloroquine and Ia affinity to Ib. These results support that distinct residues within the vestibule interact with chloroquine and Ia or are responsible for channel structure, while the channel lining amino acids play a less important role. PMID:25266274

  4. [The diagnostic of anaerobic infection induced by Clostridium perfringens in patient with post-traumatic phlegmon: a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Zhevlakova, Iu A; Khokhlova, O I; Semenikhina, V M; Ust'iantseva, I M

    2013-06-01

    The article presents uncommon clinical case of anaerobic gas-producing infection induced by Clostridium perfringens. The disease resulted in lethal outcome at fourth day after admission of patient into hospital. The successful treatment requires timely diagnostic of clostridium infection based on complex of microbiologic, clinical and laboratory data. The early diagnostic is possible in case of bacteriologic analysis of native material. PMID:24340950

  5. Entérite nécrotique chez le poulet de gril II. Caractères des souches de Clostridium perfringens isolées

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, G.; Filion, R.; Malo, R.; Phaneuf, J.-B.

    1974-01-01

    A Gram positive bacillus, strictly anaerobic, was isolated from the viscera of all diseased birds showing lesions of necrotic enteritis. Its morphology and biochemical reactions, the presence of alpha and thêta hemolysins and the production of a lecithinase-C in vitro, all these characteristics indicated a similarity to those belonging to the group of Clostridium perfringens. The two hemolysins were neutralized in vitro only by the antitoxin A. Broiler chickens injected I.V. with a Viande-Foie (VF) broth culture of Clostridium perfringens together with the antitoxin A survived, whereas those receiving antitoxin C died. These results seem to indicate that this organism belongs to the type A. This bacillus was sensitive to a great variety of antibiotics, except neomycin. PMID:4368193

  6. Unique regulatory mechanism of sporulation and enterotoxin production in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Kaori; Hirakawa, Hideki; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Sarker, Mahfuzur R; Shimizu, Tohru

    2013-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes gas gangrene and gastrointestinal (GI) diseases in humans. The most common cause of C. perfringens-associated food poisoning is the consumption of C. perfringens vegetative cells followed by sporulation and production of enterotoxin in the gut. Despite the importance of spore formation in C. perfringens pathogenesis, the details of the regulation of sporulation have not yet been defined fully. In this study, microarray and bioinformatic analyses identified a candidate gene (the RNA regulator virX) for the repression of genes encoding positive regulators (Spo0A and sigma factors) of C. perfringens sporulation. A virX mutant constructed in the food poisoning strain SM101 had a much higher sporulation efficiency than that of the wild type. The transcription of sigE, sigF, and sigK was strongly induced at 2.5 h of culture of the virX mutant. Moreover, the transcription of the enterotoxin gene was also strongly induced in the virX mutant. Western blotting confirmed that the levels of enterotoxin production were higher in the virX mutant than in the wild type. These observations indicated that the higher levels of sporulation and enterotoxin production in the virX mutant were specifically due to inactivation of the virX gene. Since virX homologues were not found in any Bacillus species but were present in other clostridial species, our findings identify further differences in the regulation of sporulation between Bacillus and certain Clostridium species. The virX RNA regulator plays a key role in the drastic shift in lifestyle of the anaerobic flesh eater C. perfringens between the vegetative state (for gas gangrene) and the sporulating state (for food poisoning). PMID:23585540

  7. Spoilage of an acid food product by Clostridium perfringens, C. barati and C. butyricum.

    PubMed

    de Jong, J

    1989-05-01

    Spoilage of canned pasteurized brined mung bean sprouts, acidified with citric acid to pH 4.0-4.5, was found to be caused by acid tolerant Clostridium spp. including the species barati, perfringens and butyricum. The pH limit for growth in the brine used were estimated 3.7, 3.7 and 4.0 respectively. Some of the isolated C. perfringens strains produced enterotoxins in sporulation media. The spores of the isolated anaerobes appeared to originate from mung beans, but C. barati and C. perfringens strains freshly isolated from dry beans, were unable to grow in acidified brine. During germination and sprouting of mung beans, the oxygen concentration decreased, while carbon dioxide concentration increased considerably, due to respiration of the sprouts and actively growing Enterobacteriaceae and lactobacilli. It was assumed that this allowed C. barati and C. perfringens strains to grow and acquire the observed unusual acid tolerance. After increasing aerobicity during sprouting, no growth of Clostridium spp. was observed, substantiating the assumption. PMID:2561952

  8. Non-classical azoreductase secretion in Clostridium perfringens in response to sulfonated azo dye exposure.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens, a strictly anaerobic microorganism and inhabitant of the human intestine, has been shown to produce an azoreductase enzyme (AzoC), an NADH-dependent flavin oxidoreductase. This enzyme reduces azo dyes into aromatic amines, which can be carcinogenic. A significant amount of work has been completed on the activity of AzoC. Despite this, much is still unknown, including whether azoreduction of these dyes occurs intracellularly or extracellulary. A physiological study of C. perfringens involving the effect of azo dye exposure was completed to answer this question. Through exposure studies, azo dyes were found to cause cytoplasmic protein release, including AzoC, from C. perfringens in dividing and non-dividing cells. Sulfonation (negative charge) of azo dyes proved to be the key to facilitating protein release of AzoC and was found to be azo-dye-concentration-dependent. Additionally, AzoC was found to localize to the Gram-positive periplasmic region. Using a ?azoC knockout mutant, the presence of additional azoreductases in C. perfringens was suggested. These results support the notion that the azoreduction of these dyes may occur extracellularly for the commensal C. perfringens in the intestine. PMID:25881497

  9. Coccidia-induced mucogenesis promotes the onset of necrotic enteritis by supporting Clostridium perfringens growth.

    PubMed

    Collier, C T; Hofacre, C L; Payne, A M; Anderson, D B; Kaiser, P; Mackie, R I; Gaskins, H R

    2008-03-15

    This study tested the hypothesis that a host mucogenic response to an intestinal coccidial infection promotes the onset of necrotic enteritis (NE). A chick NE model was used in which birds were inoculated with Eimeria acervulina and E. maxima and subsequently with Clostridium perfringens (EAM/CP). A second group of EAM/CP-infected birds was treated with the ionophore narasin (NAR/EAM/CP). These groups were compared to birds that were either non-infected (NIF), or infected only with E. acervulina and E. maxima (EAM), or C. perfringens (CP). The impact of intestinal coccidial infection and anti-coccidial treatment on host immune responses and microbial community structure were evaluated with histochemical-, cultivation- and molecular-based techniques. Barrier function was compromised in EAM/CP-infected birds as indicated by elevated CFUs for anaerobic bacteria and C. perfringens in the spleen when compared to NIF controls at day 20, with a subsequent increase in intestinal NE lesions and mortality at day 22. These results correlate positively with a host inflammatory response as evidenced by increased ileal interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IFN-gamma RNA expression. Concurrent increases in chicken intestinal mucin RNA expression, and goblet cell number and theca size indicate that EAM/CP induced an intestinal mucogenic response. Correspondingly, the growth of mucolytic bacteria and C. perfringens as well as alpha toxin production was greatest in EAM/CP-infected birds. The ionophore narasin, which directly eliminates coccidia, reduced goblet cell theca size, IL-10 and IFN-gamma expression, the growth of mucolytic bacteria including C. perfringens, coccidial and NE lesions and mortality in birds that were co-infected with coccidia and C. perfringens. Collectively the data support the hypothesis that coccidial infection induces a host mucogenic response providing a growth advantage to C. perfringens, the causative agent of NE. PMID:18068809

  10. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by reaction with...

  11. Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and Clostridium perfringens spores by a mixed-oxidant disinfectant and by free chlorine.

    PubMed Central

    Venczel, L V; Arrowood, M; Hurd, M; Sobsey, M D

    1997-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and Clostridium perfringens spores are very resistant to chlorine and other drinking-water disinfectants. Clostridium perfringens spores have been suggested as a surrogate indicator of disinfectant activity against Cryptosporidium parvum and other hardy pathogens in water. In this study, an alternative disinfectant system consisting of an electrochemically produced mixed-oxidant solution (MIOX; LATA Inc.) was evaluated for inactivation of both Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and Clostridium perfringens spores. The disinfection efficacy of the mixed-oxidant solution was compared to that of free chlorine on the basis of equal weight per volume concentrations of total oxidants. Batch inactivation experiments were done on purified oocysts and spores in buffered, oxidant demand-free water at pH 7 an 25 degrees C by using a disinfectant dose of 5 mg/liter and contact times of up to 24 h. The mixed-oxidant solution was considerably more effective than free chlorine in activating both microorganisms. A 5-mg/liter dose of mixed oxidants produced a > 3-log10-unit (> 99.9%) inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and Clostridium perfringens spores in 4 h. Free chlorine produce no measurable inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by 4 or 24 h, although Clostridium perfringens spores were inactivated by 1.4 log10 units after 4 h. The on-site generation of mixed oxidants may be a practical and cost-effective system of drinking water disinfection protecting against even the most resistant pathogens, including Cryptosporidium oocysts. PMID:9097455

  12. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Archambault, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277). Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin, and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta-1,4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials. PMID:24795711

  13. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Archambault, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277). Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin, and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta-1,4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials. PMID:24795711

  14. Levels and enterotoxigenicity of Clostridium perfringens in pozole, tamales, and birria.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Hidalgo, V; Cabrera-Díaz, E; Zepeda, H; Mota de la Garza, L; Castillo, A; Torres-Vitela, R

    2005-02-01

    A quantitative survey of Clostridium perfringens in typical foods served at local restaurants was conducted for 18 months in Guadalajara, Mexico. A total of 151 samples, including goat's birria (50), pozole (50), and beef tamales (51), were collected from small restaurants in Guadalajara. Samples were tested for C. perfringens by the most probable number (MPN) method and for mesophilic aerobic plate counts (MAPCs) and coliform, yeast, and mold counts by plate count methods. Isolates confirmed as C. perfringens were further sporulated and tested for cytotoxic or cytotonic effect against Vero cells as an indication of enterotoxin production. C. perfringens was detected in 78 (52%) of all samples at concentrations that ranged from 2.3 to 5.4 log MPN/g. Average MAPCs were 1.3 to 2.7 log CFU/g, depending on the type of dish. Coliform counts ranged from less than 1.0 to 1.5 CFU/g, and yeast and mold counts were less than 1.0 log CFU/g in all cases. A total of 118 isolates of C. perfringens were tested for enterotoxic effect on Vero cells; 82 (70%) showed activity against Vero cells. Of them, 31 isolates induced cell lysis, indicating cytotoxic effect; 41 induced cell elongation, indicating cytotonic effect; and 10 produced both cytotoxic and cytotonic effect. Dilution of the bacterial filtrates that were still producing an effect on Vero cells ranged from 1:80 to 1:5,120. These results underscore the importance of determining enterotoxigenicity when testing for C. perfringens in foods. PMID:15726977

  15. A recombinant carboxy-terminal domain of alpha-toxin protects mice against Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Oda, Masataka; Kobayashi, Keiko; Ochi, Sadayuki; Takagishi, Teruhisa; Shibutani, Masahiro; Sakurai, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin (CP, 370 residues) is one of the main agents involved in the development of gas gangrene. In this study, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the C-terminal domain (CP251-370) of the toxin and phospholipase C (PLC; CB, 372 residues) of Clostridum bifermentans isolated from cases of clostridium necrosis were examined. The recombinant proteins were expressed as glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins. Antibodies that cross-reacted with alpha-toxin were produced after immunization with recombinant proteins including GST-CP251-370, GST-CP281-370, GST-CP311-370, CB1-372 and GST-CB251-372. Anti-GST-CP251-370, anti-GST-CP281-370 and anti-GST-CP311-370 sera neutralized both the PLC and hemolytic activities of alpha-toxin, whereas anti-CB1-372 and anti-GST-CB251-372 weakly neutralized these activities. Immunization with GST-CP251-370 and GST-CP281-370 provided protection against the lethal effects of the toxin and C. perfringens type A NCTC8237. Partial protection from the toxin and C. perfringens was elicited by immunization with GST-CP311-370 and CB1-372. GST-CP251-370 and GST-CP281-370 are promising candidates for vaccines for clostridial-induced gas gangrene. PMID:23668605

  16. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Potency test. Bulk or final container samples of completed product from each serial shall be tested using the toxin-neutralization test for Epsilon Antitoxin provided in this section. Dried products shall be rehydrated according to label...

  17. Lipoproteins from Clostridium perfringens and their protective efficacy in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Pratistha; Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Kumar, Om; Kumar, Ravi Bhushan

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an obligately anaerobic rod-shaped bacterium and etiological agent for several diseases in humans and animals. The pathogen has been listed as Validated Biological Agent and warrants development of medical countermeasures. The homologs of some of the lipoproteins identified from various fractions of C. perfringens in our previous studies were observed to be virulence determinants in other pathogenic bacteria. Three putative virulence associated lipoproteins; polysaccharide deacetylase family protein, probable ion-uptake ABC transporter, and a putative lipoprotein of no known function are reported here with respect to their immuno-protective potentials. The three proteins were over expressed and purified to near homogeneity. The lipoproteins were shown to be exposed on the C. perfringens surface and, hence, accessible to antibodies and potentially visible to the host immune system. Immunization of mice with purified recombinant proteins elicited protective immunity against challenge with C. perfringens in mouse gas gangrene model. Distribution and relationship of orthologous proteins across other bacterial select agents especially among the members of Firmicutes, was carried out to look for conserved antigenic determinants. PMID:26027922

  18. TpeL-producing strains of Clostridium perfringens type A are highly virulent for broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Coursodon, C F; Glock, R D; Moore, K L; Cooper, K K; Songer, J G

    2012-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A and type C are causative agents of necrotic enteritis (NE) in poultry. TpeL, a recently-described novel member of the family of large clostridial cytotoxins, was found in C. perfringens type C. Others have since reported TpeL in type A isolates from NE outbreaks, suggesting that it may contribute to the pathogenesis of NE. The virulence of TpeL-positive and -negative C. perfringens strains from cases of NE was examined by challenge of broiler chicks. Gross lesions typical of NE were observed in all challenged birds, and those inoculated with TpeL(pos) strains had higher average macroscopic lesion scores than those inoculated with a TpeL(neg) strain. Infection with TpeL(pos) strains may yield disease with a more rapid course and higher case fatality rate. Thus, TpeL may potentiate the effect of other virulence attributes of NE strains of C. perfringens. However, TpeL(pos) and Tpel(neg) strains compared here were not isogenic, and definitive results await the production and testing of specific TpeL mutants. PMID:22019986

  19. Immunization of Broiler Chickens against Clostridium perfringens-Induced Necrotic Enteritis?

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, R. R.; Parreira, V. R.; Sharif, S.; Prescott, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) in broiler chickens is caused by Clostridium perfringens. Currently, no vaccine against NE is available and immunity to NE is not well characterized. Our previous studies showed that immunity to NE followed oral infection by virulent rather than avirulent C. perfringens strains and identified immunogenic secreted proteins apparently uniquely produced by virulent C. perfringens isolates. These proteins were alpha-toxin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), fructose 1,6-biphosphate aldolase, and a hypothetical protein (HP). The current study investigated the role of each of these proteins in conferring protection to broiler chickens against oral infection challenges of different severities with virulent C. perfringens. The genes encoding these proteins were cloned and purified as histidine-tagged recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli and were used to immunize broiler chickens intramuscularly. Serum and intestinal antibody responses were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All proteins significantly protected broiler chickens against a relatively mild challenge. In addition, immunization with alpha-toxin, HP, and PFOR also offered significant protection against a more severe challenge. When the birds were primed with alpha-toxoid and boosted with active toxin, birds immunized with alpha-toxin were provided with the greatest protection against a severe challenge. The serum and intestinal washings from protected birds had high antigen-specific antibody titers. Thus, we conclude that there are certain secreted proteins, in addition to alpha-toxin, that are involved in immunity to NE in broiler chickens. PMID:17634510

  20. Screening of Bacteriocin-producing Enterococcus faecalis Strains for Antagonistic Activities against Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So-Young

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate and characterize bacteriocin-producing bacteria against Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) from domestic animals to determine their usefulness as probiotics. Bacteriocin-producing bacteria were isolated from pig feces by the spot-on-lawn method. A total of 1,370 bacterial stains were isolated, and six were tentatively selected after identifying the inhibitory activity against the pathogenic indicator C. perfringens KCTC 3269 and KCTC 5100. The selected strains were identified as Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) by 16s rRNA sequencing. Most of the isolated bacterial strains were resistant to 0.5% bile salts for 48 h and remained viable after 2 h at pH 3.0. Some E. faecalis also showed strong inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes KCTC 3569, KCTC 3586 and KCTC 3710. In the present study, we finally selected E. faecalis AP 216 and AP 45 strain based on probiotic selection criteria such as antimicrobial activity against C. perfringens and tolerance to acid and bile salts. The bacteriocins of E. faecalis AP 216 and AP 45 strains were highly thermostable, showing anticlostridial activities even after incubation at 121? for 15 min. These bacteriocinproducing bacteria and/or bacteriocins could be used in feed manufacturing as probiotics as an alternative to antibiotics in the livestock industry.

  1. Binding of Clostridium perfringens to collagen correlates with the ability to cause necrotic enteritis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Wade, B; Keyburn, A L; Seemann, T; Rood, J I; Moore, R J

    2015-11-18

    This study investigated the ability of Clostridium perfringens isolates derived from chickens to bind to collagen types I-V and gelatin. In total 21 strains from three distinct backgrounds were studied: (i) virulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis, (ii) avirulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis and (iii) strains isolated from healthy birds. All strains isolated from diseased birds had been assessed for virulence in a disease induction model. The virulent isolates all displayed collagen binding ability. However, most strains in the other two classes showed negligible binding to collagen. The prevalence of a previously described C. perfringens putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene was investigated by PCR screening. It was found that five of the strains carried the putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene and that all of these strains were virulent isolates. Based on these studies it is postulated that collagen adhesion may play a role in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis. PMID:26455806

  2. Survival trends of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Clostridium perfringens in a sandy South Florida beach.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, R L; Echeverry, A; Stinson, C M; Green, M; Bonilla, T D; Hartz, A; McCorquodale, D S; Rogerson, A; Esiobu, N

    2012-06-01

    The search for alternative indicators of disease-risk from non-enteric pathogens at the beach revealed high densities of targeted bacteria. To explain the high numbers of potential non-enteric pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in beach sand, we investigated factors affecting their survival and distribution, as well as those of a potential fecal indicator, Clostridium perfringens. Results indicated greater S. aureus and P. aeruginosa survival and proliferation in sterile beach sand, than seawater, with diminished numbers upon exposure to natural micro-predators. C. perfringens remained relatively consistent with initial numbers. Intermediate sand particles (850 ?m-2 mm) constituted the major micro-niche; creating implications for beach classification programs. Colonization of sterile sand boxes at the beach by S. aureus and P. aeruginosa confirmed the filtering action (>100×) of beach sand. The use of these potential pathogens in periodic sanitary evaluation of beach sand quality is indicated, regardless of the factors influencing their abundance. PMID:22516512

  3. [Studies of necrotizing enteritis of suckling piglets (Clostridium perfringens type C enterotoxemia) in industrialized sow breeding units. 4. Epizootiology].

    PubMed

    Köhler, B; Zabke, J; Sondermann, R; Pulst, H; Rummler, H J

    1979-01-01

    Necrotising enteritis had been the cause of death of 4.9 per cent in 5,177 nursed piglets, which was established by pathological examination. The number of piglets, in that context, which had come from industrialised sow breeding units was equivalent to 92 per cent. The nursed piglet held the third position, next to smaller ruminants (19.4 per cent) and fowl (6.0 per cent), with regard to the occurrence of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxemia or necrotising enteritis in 112,218 animals which were pathologically examined after death. Necrotising enteritis so far has been rare in the GDR. No regional accumulation has been observed. Several outbreaks on industrialised sow breeding units actually remained stationary. The occurrence of the disease may be favoured by a number of factors which are conducive to accumulation of Clostridium perfringens Type C in a given stock. Group keeping of pregnant sows, simultaneous farrowing of larger groups of sows, group treatment of nursed piglets, using neomycin, chloramphenicol, oxytetracycline, and other antibiotics to which Clostridium perfringens is primarily resistant or has acquired resistance in the course of time are some of those contributive factors. Transmission of Clostridium perfringens Type C through feedstuff is possible, though it would lead to a real outbreak only by high intensity of the contamination, and it played a minor role in proliferation of the disease. 3479 Clostridium perfringens strains were isolated from 9,481 animals, both clinically intact and after death, with 30 species being included. Type classification revealed 2454 strains of Type A (70 per cent), 204 of Type D (5.88 per cent), 164 of Type C (four per cent), and 48 of Type B (1.34 per cent). There were 688 atoxic strains (17 per cent). Swine is the major carrier of Clostridium perfringens Type C, with 87 per cent of all Clostridium perfringens Type C strains having been isolated from swine. Swine was followed by fowl (four per cent), sheep (four per cent), cattle, rabbit, and dog (1.27 per cent each). Clostridium perfringens Type C was obtained from the faeces of clinically intact sows in seven instances, including two cases with sows (0.46 per cent) from farms with no previous record of necrotising enteritis. PMID:232840

  4. Identification and Characterization of a New Enterotoxin Produced by Clostridium perfringens Isolated from Food Poisoning Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasunori; Nakama, Akiko; Kai, Akemi; Fukui-Miyazaki, Aya; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kamata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    There is a strain of Clostridium perfringens, W5052, which does not produce a known enterotoxin. We herein report that the strain W5052 expressed a homologue of the iota-like toxin components sa and sb of C. spiroforme, named Clostridium perfringens iota-like enterotoxin, CPILE-a and CPILE-b, respectively, based on the results of a genome sequencing analysis and a systematic protein screening. In the nicotinamide glyco-hydrolase (NADase) assay the hydrolysis activity was dose-dependently increased by the concentration of rCPILE-a, as judged by the mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the actin monomer of the lysates of Vero and L929 cells were radiolabeled in the presence of [32P]NAD and rCPILE-a. These findings indicated that CPILE-a possesses ADP-ribosylation activity. The culture supernatant of W5052 facilitated the rounding and killing of Vero and L929 cells, but the rCPILE-a or a non-proteolyzed rCPILE-b did not. However, a trypsin-treated rCPILE-b did. Moreover, a mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b enhanced the cell rounding and killing activities, compared with that induced by the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b alone. The injection of the mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b into an ileum loop of rabbits evoked the swelling of the loop and accumulation of the fluid dose-dependently, suggesting that CPILE possesses enterotoxic activity. The evidence presented in this communication will facilitate the epidemiological, etiological, and toxicological studies of C. perfringens food poisoning, and also stimulate studies on the transfer of the toxins’ gene(s) among the Genus Clostridium. PMID:26584048

  5. Multilocus Sequence Typing Analysis of Clostridium perfringens Isolates from Necrotic Enteritis Outbreaks in Broiler Chicken Populations?

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, G.; Bruce, H. L.; Hunter, D. B.; Parreira, V. R.; Kulkarni, R. R.; Jiang, Y.-F.; Prescott, J. F.; Boerlin, P.

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an important pathogen of animals and humans and is the causative agent of necrotic enteritis (NE) in poultry. This study focuses on the typing of intestinal C. perfringens isolates (n = 61) from outbreaks of NE collected from several areas of Southern Ontario, using a recently developed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) technique. For comparison, C. perfringens isolates from healthy birds were also obtained and typed. An additional locus, the pfoS locus, was included in our analysis, in an attempt to increase the discriminatory ability of the method previously published. Birds were collected from two major poultry processors in Canada, and isolates from processor 2 formed a distinct MLST cluster. Isolates from healthy birds also collected from the outbreak flocks clustered together with isolates from the birds with NE. Although isolates from eight outbreaks clustered together, MLST types were also occasionally different between outbreaks. Strong linkage disequilibrium was observed between loci, suggesting a clonal C. perfringens population structure. Detection assays for toxin genes cpb2 (beta-2 toxin), tpeL, and the newly described netB (NetB toxin) were also performed. netB was almost always found in outbreak isolates, whereas cpb2 was found exclusively in healthy bird isolates. The toxin gene tpeL, which has not been previously identified in C. perfringens type A strains, was also found, but only in the presence of netB. Resistance to bacitracin was found in 34% of isolates from antimicrobial agent-free birds and in 100% of isolates from conventionally raised birds. PMID:18945840

  6. Epidemiology of foodborne disease outbreaks caused by Clostridium perfringens, United States, 1998-2010.

    PubMed

    Grass, Julian E; Gould, L Hannah; Mahon, Barbara E

    2013-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens is estimated to be the second most common bacterial cause of foodborne illness in the United States, causing one million illnesses each year. Local, state, and territorial health departments voluntarily report C. perfringens outbreaks to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System. Our analysis included outbreaks confirmed by laboratory evidence during 1998-2010. A food item was implicated if C. perfringens was isolated from food or based on epidemiologic evidence. Implicated foods were classified into one of 17 standard food commodities when possible. From 1998 to 2010, 289 confirmed outbreaks of C. perfringens illness were reported with 15,208 illnesses, 83 hospitalizations, and eight deaths. The number of outbreaks reported each year ranged from 16 to 31 with no apparent trend over time. The annual number of outbreak-associated illnesses ranged from 359 to 2,173, and the median outbreak size was 24 illnesses. Outbreaks occurred year round, with the largest number in November and December. Restaurants (43%) were the most common setting of food preparation. Other settings included catering facility (19%), private home (16%), prison or jail (11%), and other (10%). Among the 144 (50%) outbreaks attributed to a single food commodity, beef was the most common commodity (66 outbreaks, 46%), followed by poultry (43 outbreaks, 30%), and pork (23 outbreaks, 16%). Meat and poultry outbreaks accounted for 92% of outbreaks with an identified single food commodity. Outbreaks caused by C. perfringens occur regularly, are often large, and can cause substantial morbidity yet are preventable if contamination of raw meat and poultry products is prevented at the farm or slaughterhouse or, after contamination, if these products are properly handled and prepared, particularly in restaurants and catering facilities. PMID:23379281

  7. [A case of freeze-dried gas gangrene antitoxin for the treatment of Clostridium perfringens sepsis].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Juichiro; Nakamura, Hideki; Yamada, Shinya; Sekoguchi, Satoru; Suzuki, Takahiro; Tomatsuri, Naoya; Sato, Hideki; Okuyama, Yusuke; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Norimasa

    2015-02-01

    A 66-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with high fever. We diagnosed a gas-containing liver abscess and performed percutaneous abscess drainage. However, 15 hours after admission, he developed massive intravascular hemolysis and acidosis. Sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens was suspected and we treated the patient intensively with multidisciplinary approaches, including antibiotics, mechanical ventilation, and renal replacement therapy. Furthermore, we administered freeze-dried gas gangrene antitoxin. Despite intensive care, the patient died 43 hours after admission. PMID:25748160

  8. Clostridium perfringens: a flesh-eating bacterium living in your garden.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Ann

    2010-10-01

    Gas gangrene is a painful, rapidly developing and potentially fatal infection despite antibiotic treatment. During the First World War thousands of soldiers died from this disease. Dr Alexis Carrel pioneered a controversial method of irrigating wounds with Dakin's solution to destroy Clostridium perfringens, a bacterium found in heavily fertilised soils that causes gas gangrene. Although this method is no longer used due to the discovery of antibiotics, many of his other ideas, such as scientifically determining the type and number of bacteria and delaying the closure of a wound until the bacteria had been eradicated, are still used today. PMID:21049805

  9. Effect of phosphate and meat (pork) types on the germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores during abusive chilling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of blends of phosphates and the pork meat type (pale, soft and exudative, PSE; normal; and dark, firm and dry, DFD) on the germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens during abusive exponential chilling times was evaluated. Two different phosphates, tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSP...

  10. CONTROL OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS GERMINATION AND OUTGROWTH BY BUFFERED SODIUM CITRATE DURING CHILLING OF ROAST BEEF AND INJECTED PORK.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens germination and outgrowth by buffered sodium citrate and buffered sodium citrate supplemented with sodium diacetate was evaluated during abusive chilling of roast beef and injected pork. Beef top rounds and pork loins were injected with a brine containing NaCl (...

  11. Massive pneumatosis without necrosis: A case report of Clostridium perfringens sepsis in an extremely low birth weight infant.

    PubMed

    Nicolau, Y; Bany-Mohammed, F; Carpenter, P M; Uy, C

    2015-10-24

    Pneumatosis intestinalis and free intraperitoneal air on abdominal radiographs are considered pathognomonic signs of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We report a unique case of late-onset fulminant sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens presenting with shock, extensive pneumatosis intestinalis and free intraperitoneal air in an extremely low birth weight infant without histopathological evidence of bowel necrosis or NEC. PMID:26485548

  12. CARVACROL, CINNAMALDEHYDE, OREGANO OIL, AND THYMOL INHIBIT CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS SPORE GERMINATION AND OUTGROWTH IN GROUND TURKEY DURING CHILLING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens by plant-derived carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, thymol, and oregano oil was evaluated during abusive chilling of cooked ground turkey (75% lean) obtained from a local grocery store. Test substances were mixed into thawed turkey product at concentrations of 0.1, 0.5...

  13. Molecular Characterization of Podoviral Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Their Comparison with Members of the Picovirinae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal, and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control b...

  14. TRANSLOCATION OF CAMPYLOBACTER, SALMONELLA AND CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS TO SEVERAL LYMPHOID ORGANS FOLLOWING ORAL OR INTRACLOACAL INOCULATION OF BROILER CHICKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Day old broiler chicks were either orally or intracloacally inoculated with a 100ul suspension containing 106-109 cells of one of three marker strains of either Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella spp. or Clostridium perfringens. At one hour, one day and one week following inoculation, five birds from...

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium perfringens Strain JJC, a Highly Efficient Hydrogen Producer Isolated from Landfill Leachate Sludge.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y M; Juan, J C; Gan, H M; Austin, C M

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens strain JJC is an effective biohydrogen and biochemical producer that was isolated from landfill leachate sludge. Here, we present the assembly and annotation of its genome, which may provide further insights into the gene interactions involved in efficient biohydrogen production. PMID:24604637

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium perfringens Strain JJC, a Highly Efficient Hydrogen Producer Isolated from Landfill Leachate Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Y. M.; Gan, H. M.; Austin, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens strain JJC is an effective biohydrogen and biochemical producer that was isolated from landfill leachate sludge. Here, we present the assembly and annotation of its genome, which may provide further insights into the gene interactions involved in efficient biohydrogen production. PMID:24604637

  17. CONTROL OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS GERMINATION AND OUTGROWTH BY BUFFERED SODIUM CITRATE DURING CHILLING OF ROAST BEEF AND INJECTED PORK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens germination and outgrowth by buffered sodium citrate and buffered sodium citrate supplemented with sodium diacetate was evaluated during abusive chilling of roast beef and injected pork. Beef top rounds and pork loins were injected with a brine containing NaCl (...

  18. Control of Clostridium perfringens Spores by Green Tea Leaf Extracts During Cooling of Cooked Ground Beef, Chicken, and Pork

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by two green tea extracts with low (GTL; 141 mg total catechins/g of green tea extract) and high (GTE; 697 mg total catechins/g of extract) catechin levels during abusive chilling of retail cooked ground beef, ...

  19. INHIBITION OF GERMINATION AND OUTGROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS SPORES BY LACTIC ACID SALTS DURING COOLING OF COOKED GROUND TURKEY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by lactic acid salts during exponential cooling of cooked ground turkey products was evaluated. Injected turkey containing either calcium lactate, potassium lactate, or sodium lactate (1.0, 2.0, 3.0 or 4.8% w/w) along with a cont...

  20. [Uterine gas gangrene through clostridium perfringens sepsis after uterus rupture postpartum].

    PubMed

    Montavon, C; Krause, E; Holzgreve, W; Hösli, I

    2005-10-01

    Anaerobic infections with Clostridium perfringens (CP) occur rarely but are associated with considerable maternal mortality. We report the case of a patient who developed uterine gas gangrene postpartum and discuss the management of this infection. A 28-year-old patient, GII, PII with history of Caesarean in 2002, delivered a healthy girl per vacuum extraction. Postpartally she presented with an acute abdomen and a laparotomy was performed. The uterotomy suture was intact but a parametrane tear had to be resutured. 36 hours later the patient's condition worsened quickly. Cellulitis was diagnosed and after receiving the results of the wound swabs (CP positive) from the uterus and haematoma, tazobactam and clindamycin were administered. Her condition continued to deteriorate and gaseous gangrene was seen with unilateral extension to the abdomen reaching as far as the axilla cranially and to the thigh caudally. Due to the extensive infection it was necessary to perform a hysterectomy, necrosis removal and splitting of the fascia followed by several debridements and leaving the wound open in order to avoid anaerobic conditions. The patient was discharged after 21 days. She developed a post-traumatic syndrome with severe depression. Clostridium perfringens is ubiquitous and is found vaginally in ca. 1 - 10 % of healthy women and usually does not cause a serious infection. Under the right conditions it can cause an endometritis leading to sepsis. Early recognition and interdisciplinary treatment are of extreme importance. In this case the surgical treatment through hysterectomy combined with targeted antibiotic therapy, ultimately saved the patient's life. PMID:16317627

  1. Genetic diversity of Clostridium perfringens isolated from healthy broiler chickens at a commercial farm.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, G; Martin, S W; Hunter, D B; Prescott, J F; Weber, L J; Boerlin, P

    2008-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an important commensal and bacterial pathogen of many animal species. It has particular significance in poultry, where it may cause necrotic enteritis. Our objective was to characterize the population diversity of C. perfringens colonizing healthy birds, and to observe how diversity changed over time. Isolates were obtained from broiler chicken cecal samples in two barns on a single farm, on days 7, 14, 22, 27, 30 and 34 of a single 42-day rearing cycle. Bacitracin was used as a feed additive in one of the barns and withdrawn from the second barn for the duration of the experiment. Each isolate was typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using SmaI restriction endonuclease. A total of 205 cecal isolates from 49 birds were typed, as well as 93 isolates from the barn environment (bedding, drinking water and feces). Eight major PFGE types and 17 subtypes were found in the 298 total isolates. The results show that an optimal sampling strategy would involve a large number of birds, with only a few isolates sampled per bird. The diversity of C. perfringens in this study appears to be low within a single bird, and increases as the bird matures. There was no significant difference in genetic diversity between the two barns. In addition, isolates from fresh fecal samples appear to represent the cecal C. perfringens population accurately, although this was not proven statistically. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on selected isolates (n=41) representing a cross-section of PFGE types. Based on minimum inhibitory concentration distributions, 95% of the isolates tested were deemed resistant to bacitracin, with a 16 microg/mL breakpoint. Three new cpb2 (beta2 toxin gene) variants were found in the study. PMID:17888591

  2. Clostridium perfringens type A enterotoxin (CPE): more than just explosive diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, J A

    1996-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Clostridium perfringens is the most prolific toxin-producing species within the clostridial group. The toxins are responsible for a wide variety of human and veterinary diseases, many of which are lethal. C. perfringens type A strains are also associated with one of the most common forms of food-borne illness (FBI). The toxicosis results from the production and gastrointestinal absorption of a protein-enterotoxin known as CPE. The regulation, expression, and mechanism of action of CPE has been of considerable interest as the protein is unique. CPE expression is sporulation associated, although the mechanism of cpe-gene regulation is not fully elucidated. Cloning studies suggest the involvement of global regulators, but these have not been identified. Although very few type A strains are naturally enterotoxigenic, the cpe gene appears highly conserved. In FBI strains, cpe is chromosomally encoded; whereas in veterinary strains, cpe may be plasmid-encoded. Variation in cpe location suggests the involvement of transposable genetic element(s). CPE-like proteins are produced by some C. perfringens types C and D; and silent remnants of the cpe gene can be found in C. perfringens type E strains associated with the iota toxin gene. CPE has received attention for its biomedical importance. The toxin has been implicated in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) because of its superantigenic nature. CPE can destroy a wide variety of cell types both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that it could have potential in the construction of immunotoxins to neoplastic cells. It is obvious that CPE is an interesting protein that deserves continued attention. PMID:8989513

  3. Structural and biochemical analyses of a Clostridium perfringens sortase D transpeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Suryadinata, Randy Seabrook, Shane A.; Adams, Timothy E.; Nuttall, Stewart D.; Peat, Thomas S.

    2015-06-30

    The structure of C. perfringens sortase D was determined at 1.99 Å resolution. Comparative biochemical and structural analyses revealed that this transpeptidase may represent a new subclass of the sortase D family. The assembly and anchorage of various pathogenic proteins on the surface of Gram-positive bacteria is mediated by the sortase family of enzymes. These cysteine transpeptidases catalyze a unique sorting signal motif located at the C-terminus of their target substrate and promote the covalent attachment of these proteins onto an amino nucleophile located on another protein or on the bacterial cell wall. Each of the six distinct classes of sortases displays a unique biological role, with sequential activation of multiple sortases often observed in many Gram-positive bacteria to decorate their peptidoglycans. Less is known about the members of the class D family of sortases (SrtD), but they have a suggested role in spore formation in an oxygen-limiting environment. Here, the crystal structure of the SrtD enzyme from Clostridium perfringens was determined at 1.99 Å resolution. Comparative analysis of the C. perfringens SrtD structure reveals the typical eight-stranded ?-barrel fold observed in all other known sortases, along with the conserved catalytic triad consisting of cysteine, histidine and arginine residues. Biochemical approaches further reveal the specifics of the SrtD catalytic activity in vitro, with a significant preference for the LPQTGS sorting motif. Additionally, the catalytic activity of SrtD is most efficient at 316 K and can be further improved in the presence of magnesium cations. Since C. perfringens spores are heat-resistant and lead to foodborne illnesses, characterization of the spore-promoting sortase SrtD may lead to the development of new antimicrobial agents.

  4. Regulation of Sialidase Production in Clostridium perfringens by the Orphan Sensor Histidine Kinase ReeS

    PubMed Central

    Hiscox, Thomas J.; Harrison, Paul F.; Chakravorty, Anjana; Choo, Jocelyn M.; Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is ubiquitous in nature and is often found as a commensal of the human and animal gastrointestinal tract. It is the primary etiological agent of clostridial myonecrosis, or gas gangrene, a serious infection that results in extensive tissue necrosis due to the action of one or more potent extracellular toxins. ?-toxin and perfringolysin O are the major extracellular toxins involved in the pathogenesis of gas gangrene, but histotoxic strains of C. perfringens, such as strain 13, also produce many degradative enzymes such as collagenases, hyaluronidases, sialidases and the cysteine protease, ?-clostripain. The production of many of these toxins is regulated either directly or indirectly by the global VirSR two-component signal transduction system. By isolating a chromosomal mutant and carrying out microarray analysis we have identified an orphan sensor histidine kinase, which we have named ReeS (regulator of extracellular enzymes sensor). Expression of the sialidase genes nanI and nanJ was down-regulated in a reeS mutant. Since complementation with the wild-type reeS gene restored nanI and nanJ expression to wild-type levels, as shown by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and sialidase assays we concluded that ReeS positively regulates the expression of these sialidase genes. However, mutation of the reeS gene had no significant effect on virulence in the mouse myonecrosis model. Sialidase production in C. perfringens has been previously shown to be regulated by both the VirSR system and RevR. In this report, we have analyzed a previously unknown sensor histidine kinase, ReeS, and have shown that it also is involved in controlling the expression of sialidase genes, adding further complexity to the regulatory network that controls sialidase production in C. perfringens. PMID:24023881

  5. Growth potential of Clostridium perfringens from spores in acidified beef, pork, and poultry products during chilling.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Vijay K; Baker, David A; Thippareddi, H; Snyder, O Peter; Mohr, Tim B

    2013-01-01

    The ability of Clostridium perfringens to germinate and grow in acidified ground beef as well as in 10 commercially prepared acidified beef, pork, and poultry products was assessed. The pH of ground beef was adjusted with organic vinegar to achieve various pH values between 5.0 and 5.6; the pH of the commercial products ranged from 4.74 to 6.35. Products were inoculated with a three-strain cocktail of C. perfringens spores to achieve ca. 2-log (low) or 4-log (high) inoculum levels, vacuum packaged, and cooled exponentially from 54.4 to 7.2°C for 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, or 21 h to simulate abusive cooling; the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) recommends a cooling time of 6.5 h. Total germinated C. perfringens populations were determined after plating on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar and incubating the plates anaerobically at 37°C for 48 h. In addition, C. perfringens growth from spores was assessed at an isothermal temperature of 44°C. Growth from spores was inhibited in ground beef with a pH of 5.5 or below, even during extended cooling from 54.4 to 7.2°C in 21 h. In ground beef with a pH of 5.6, the growth was >1 log after 18 h of cooling from 54.4 to 7.2°C. However, 15 h of cooling controlled the growth to <1 log, regardless of the inoculum level. In addition, no growth was observed in any product with a pH ranging from 4.74 to 5.17, both during exponential abusive cooling periods of up to 21 h and during storage for 21 h at 44°C. While <1-log growth of C. perfringens from spores was observed in the pH 5.63 product cooled exponentially from 54.4 to 7.2°C in 15 h or less, the pH 6.35 product supported growth, even after 6 h of cooling from 54.4 to 7.2°C. These challenge tests demonstrate that adjustment of ground beef to pH of 5.5 or less and of barbeque products to pH of 5.63 or less inhibits C. perfringens spore germination and outgrowth during extended cooling periods from 54.4 to 7.2°C up to 15 h. Therefore, safe cooling periods for products with homogeneous, lower pHs can be substantially longer. PMID:23317858

  6. Production of a bacteriocin by a poultry derived Campylobacter jejuni isolate with antimicrobial activity against Clostridium perfringens and other Gram positive bacteria.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have purified a bacteriocin peptide (termed CUV-3), produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni (strain CUV-3) with inhibitory activity against Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Listeria mon...

  7. Endogenous radiolabeling of enterotoxin from Clostridium perfringens type A on a defined medium.

    PubMed Central

    Granum, P E; Skjelkvåle, R

    1981-01-01

    Four enterotoxin-positive strains of Clostridium perfringens were tested for sporulation and enterotoxin production on defined media. The medium described by Sacks and Thompson (Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 35:405-409, 1978) gave the highest enterotoxin production and was selected for the production of endogenously labeled enterotoxin. The specific radioactivity of the enterotoxin was 16,000 dpm/microgram when the tritiated amino acids were added to the growth medium just before the inoculum. Addition of the radioactive amino acids during the growth period gave consistently lower specific radioactivity. When the enterotoxin was produced on the medium described by Duncan and Strong (Appl. Microbiol. 16:82-89, 1968), the highest specific radioactivity of the enterotoxin was found when the radioactive amino acids were added to the growth medium 4 h after inoculation. In this case, the specific activity of the enterotoxin was 10,000 dpm/microgram. PMID:6279031

  8. Carriage of Clostridium perfringens by benthic crabs in a sewage-polluted estuary.

    PubMed

    La Sala, Luciano F; Redondo, Leandro M; Díaz Carrasco, Juan M; Pereyra, Ana María; Farber, Marisa; Jost, Helen; Fernández-Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2015-08-15

    The Estuary of Bahía Blanca (EBB), Argentina, is an important wetland under intense sewage pollution. We investigated the occurrence of Clostridium perfringens (CP) in populations of two benthic crabs (Neohelice granulata and Cyrtograpsus angulatus) and in sediment from the EBB. CP was found in 49.1% of the crabs and all of the isolates were identified as type A. The alpha (cpa) and enterotoxin (cpe) encoding genes were identified. Genetic analyses identified 13 novel sequence types, and found no clustering among isolates, suggesting that CP is not part of the crabs' commensal flora. CP carriage was 51 times more likely in crabs from the area nearest sewage outfalls compared with crabs from a reference site. Our in vitro experiments suggest that the carriage of CP in crabs is transient. The use of these benthic crabs as monitoring organisms of sewage pollution in coastal habitats is proposed. PMID:26130524

  9. The successful experimental induction of necrotic enteritis in chickens by Clostridium perfringens: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Shojadoost, Bahram; Vince, Andrew R; Prescott, John F

    2012-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is one of the most important enteric diseases in poultry and is a high cost to the industry worldwide. It is caused by avian-specific, Necrotic Enteritis Beta toxin (NetB)-producing, strains of Clostridium perfringens that also possess in common other virulence-associated genes. In Europe the disease incidence has increased since the ban on in-feed "growth promoting" antibiotics. Because of this, many recent studies of NE have focused on finding different ways to control the disease, and on understanding its pathogenesis. Frustratingly, reproduction of the disease has proven impossible for some researchers. This review describes and discusses factors known to be important in reproducing the disease experimentally, as well as other considerations in reproducing the disease. The critical bacterial factor is the use of virulent, netB-positive, strains; virulence can be enhanced by using tpeL- positive strains and by the use of young rather than old broth cultures to increase toxin expression. Intestinal damaging factors, notably the use of concurrent or preceding coccidial infection, or administration of coccidial vaccines, combined with netB-positive C. perfringens administration, can also be used to induce NE. Nutritional factors, particularly feeding high percentage of cereals containing non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) (wheat, rye, and barley) enhance disease by increasing digesta viscosity, mucus production and bacterial growth. Animal proteins, especially fish meal, enhance C. perfringens proliferation and toxin production. Other factors are discussed that may affect outcome but for which evidence of their importance is lacking. The review compares the different challenge approaches; depending on the aim of particular studies, the different critical factors can be adjusted to affect the severity of the lesions induced. A standardized scoring system is proposed for international adoption based on gross rather than histopathological lesions; if universally adopted this will allow better comparison between studies done by different researchers. Also a scoring system is provided to assist decisions on humane euthanasia of sick birds. PMID:23101966

  10. The successful experimental induction of necrotic enteritis in chickens by Clostridium perfringens: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is one of the most important enteric diseases in poultry and is a high cost to the industry worldwide. It is caused by avian-specific, Necrotic Enteritis Beta toxin (NetB)-producing, strains of Clostridium perfringens that also possess in common other virulence-associated genes. In Europe the disease incidence has increased since the ban on in-feed “growth promoting” antibiotics. Because of this, many recent studies of NE have focused on finding different ways to control the disease, and on understanding its pathogenesis. Frustratingly, reproduction of the disease has proven impossible for some researchers. This review describes and discusses factors known to be important in reproducing the disease experimentally, as well as other considerations in reproducing the disease. The critical bacterial factor is the use of virulent, netB-positive, strains; virulence can be enhanced by using tpeL- positive strains and by the use of young rather than old broth cultures to increase toxin expression. Intestinal damaging factors, notably the use of concurrent or preceding coccidial infection, or administration of coccidial vaccines, combined with netB-positive C. perfringens administration, can also be used to induce NE. Nutritional factors, particularly feeding high percentage of cereals containing non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) (wheat, rye, and barley) enhance disease by increasing digesta viscosity, mucus production and bacterial growth. Animal proteins, especially fish meal, enhance C. perfringens proliferation and toxin production. Other factors are discussed that may affect outcome but for which evidence of their importance is lacking. The review compares the different challenge approaches; depending on the aim of particular studies, the different critical factors can be adjusted to affect the severity of the lesions induced. A standardized scoring system is proposed for international adoption based on gross rather than histopathological lesions; if universally adopted this will allow better comparison between studies done by different researchers. Also a scoring system is provided to assist decisions on humane euthanasia of sick birds. PMID:23101966

  11. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens TpeL Toxin Gene Carriage, Production, Cytotoxic Contributions, and Trypsin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Large clostridial toxins (LCTs) are produced by at least four pathogenic clostridial species, and several LCTs are proven pivotal virulence factors for both human and veterinary diseases. TpeL is a recently identified LCT produced by Clostridium perfringens that has received relatively limited study. In response, the current study surveyed carriage of the tpeL gene among different C. perfringens strains, detecting this toxin gene in some type A, B, and C strains but not in any type D or E strains. This study also determined that all tested strains maximally produce, and extracellularly release, TpeL at the late-log or early-stationary growth stage during in vitro culture, which is different from the maximal late-stationary-phase production reported previously for other LCTs and for TpeL production by C. perfringens strain JIR12688. In addition, the present study found that TpeL levels in culture supernatants can be repressed by either glucose or sucrose. It was also shown that, at natural production levels, TpeL is a significant contributor to the cytotoxic activity of supernatants from cultures of tpeL-positive strain CN3685. Lastly, this study identified TpeL, which presumably is produced in the intestines during diseases caused by TpeL-positive type B and C strains, as a toxin whose cytotoxicity decreases after treatment with trypsin; this finding may have pathophysiologic relevance by suggesting that, like beta toxin, TpeL contributes to type B and C infections in hosts with decreased trypsin levels due to disease, diet, or age. PMID:25824828

  12. Structural and biochemical analyses of a Clostridium perfringens sortase D transpeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Suryadinata, Randy; Seabrook, Shane A.; Adams, Timothy E.; Nuttall, Stewart D.; Peat, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The assembly and anchorage of various pathogenic proteins on the surface of Gram-positive bacteria is mediated by the sortase family of enzymes. These cysteine transpeptidases catalyze a unique sorting signal motif located at the C-terminus of their target substrate and promote the covalent attachment of these proteins onto an amino nucleophile located on another protein or on the bacterial cell wall. Each of the six distinct classes of sortases displays a unique biological role, with sequential activation of multiple sortases often observed in many Gram-positive bacteria to decorate their peptidoglycans. Less is known about the members of the class D family of sortases (SrtD), but they have a suggested role in spore formation in an oxygen-limiting environment. Here, the crystal structure of the SrtD enzyme from Clostridium perfringens was determined at 1.99?Å resolution. Comparative analysis of the C. perfringens SrtD structure reveals the typical eight-stranded ?-barrel fold observed in all other known sortases, along with the conserved catalytic triad consisting of cysteine, histidine and arginine residues. Biochemical approaches further reveal the specifics of the SrtD catalytic activity in vitro, with a significant preference for the LPQTGS sorting motif. Additionally, the catalytic activity of SrtD is most efficient at 316?K and can be further improved in the presence of magnesium cations. Since C. perfringens spores are heat-resistant and lead to foodborne illnesses, characterization of the spore-promoting sortase SrtD may lead to the development of new antimicrobial agents. PMID:26143922

  13. Structural and biochemical analyses of a Clostridium perfringens sortase D transpeptidase.

    PubMed

    Suryadinata, Randy; Seabrook, Shane A; Adams, Timothy E; Nuttall, Stewart D; Peat, Thomas S

    2015-07-01

    The assembly and anchorage of various pathogenic proteins on the surface of Gram-positive bacteria is mediated by the sortase family of enzymes. These cysteine transpeptidases catalyze a unique sorting signal motif located at the C-terminus of their target substrate and promote the covalent attachment of these proteins onto an amino nucleophile located on another protein or on the bacterial cell wall. Each of the six distinct classes of sortases displays a unique biological role, with sequential activation of multiple sortases often observed in many Gram-positive bacteria to decorate their peptidoglycans. Less is known about the members of the class D family of sortases (SrtD), but they have a suggested role in spore formation in an oxygen-limiting environment. Here, the crystal structure of the SrtD enzyme from Clostridium perfringens was determined at 1.99?Å resolution. Comparative analysis of the C. perfringens SrtD structure reveals the typical eight-stranded ?-barrel fold observed in all other known sortases, along with the conserved catalytic triad consisting of cysteine, histidine and arginine residues. Biochemical approaches further reveal the specifics of the SrtD catalytic activity in vitro, with a significant preference for the LPQTGS sorting motif. Additionally, the catalytic activity of SrtD is most efficient at 316?K and can be further improved in the presence of magnesium cations. Since C. perfringens spores are heat-resistant and lead to foodborne illnesses, characterization of the spore-promoting sortase SrtD may lead to the development of new antimicrobial agents. PMID:26143922

  14. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens TpeL toxin gene carriage, production, cytotoxic contributions, and trypsin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianming; McClane, Bruce A

    2015-06-01

    Large clostridial toxins (LCTs) are produced by at least four pathogenic clostridial species, and several LCTs are proven pivotal virulence factors for both human and veterinary diseases. TpeL is a recently identified LCT produced by Clostridium perfringens that has received relatively limited study. In response, the current study surveyed carriage of the tpeL gene among different C. perfringens strains, detecting this toxin gene in some type A, B, and C strains but not in any type D or E strains. This study also determined that all tested strains maximally produce, and extracellularly release, TpeL at the late-log or early-stationary growth stage during in vitro culture, which is different from the maximal late-stationary-phase production reported previously for other LCTs and for TpeL production by C. perfringens strain JIR12688. In addition, the present study found that TpeL levels in culture supernatants can be repressed by either glucose or sucrose. It was also shown that, at natural production levels, TpeL is a significant contributor to the cytotoxic activity of supernatants from cultures of tpeL-positive strain CN3685. Lastly, this study identified TpeL, which presumably is produced in the intestines during diseases caused by TpeL-positive type B and C strains, as a toxin whose cytotoxicity decreases after treatment with trypsin; this finding may have pathophysiologic relevance by suggesting that, like beta toxin, TpeL contributes to type B and C infections in hosts with decreased trypsin levels due to disease, diet, or age. PMID:25824828

  15. Structure-Function Analysis of Peptide Signaling in the Clostridium perfringens Agr-Like Quorum Sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Menglin; Li, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The accessory growth regulator (Agr)-like quorum sensing (QS) system of Clostridium perfringens controls the production of many toxins, including beta toxin (CPB). We previously showed (J. E. Vidal, M. Ma, J. Saputo, J. Garcia, F. A. Uzal, and B. A. McClane, Mol Microbiol 83:179–194, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2011.07925.x) that an 8-amino-acid, AgrD-derived peptide named 8-R upregulates CPB production by this QS system. The current study synthesized a series of small signaling peptides corresponding to sequences within the C. perfringens AgrD polypeptide to investigate the C. perfringens autoinducing peptide (AIP) structure-function relationship. When both linear and cyclic ring forms of these peptides were added to agrB null mutants of type B strain CN1795 or type C strain CN3685, the 5-amino-acid peptides, whether in a linear or ring (thiolactone or lactone) form, induced better signaling (more CPB production) than peptide 8-R for both C. perfringens strains. The 5-mer thiolactone ring peptide induced faster signaling than the 5-mer linear peptide. Strain-related variations in sensing these peptides were detected, with CN3685 sensing the synthetic peptides more strongly than CN1795. Consistent with those synthetic peptide results, Transwell coculture experiments showed that CN3685 exquisitely senses native AIP signals from other isolates (types A, B, C, and D), while CN1795 barely senses even its own AIP. Finally, a C. perfringens AgrD sequence-based peptide with a 6-amino-acid thiolactone ring interfered with CPB production by several C. perfringens strains, suggesting potential therapeutic applications. These results indicate that AIP signaling sensitivity and responsiveness vary among C. perfringens strains and suggest C. perfringens prefers a 5-mer AIP to initiate Agr signaling. IMPORTANCE Clostridium perfringens possesses an Agr-like quorum sensing (QS) system that regulates virulence, sporulation, and toxin production. The current study used synthetic peptides to identify the structure-function relationship for the signaling peptide that activates this QS system. We found that a 5-mer peptide induces optimal signaling. Unlike other Agr systems, a linear version of this peptide (in addition to thiolactone and lactone versions) could induce signaling. Two C. perfringens strains were found to vary in sensitivity to these peptides. We also found that a 6-mer peptide can inhibit toxin production by some strains, suggesting therapeutic applications. PMID:25777675

  16. A Paracrystalline Inclusion Formed During Sporulation of Enterotoxin-Producing Strains of Clostridium perfringens Type A

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Charles L.; King, Gretchen J.; Frieben, William R.

    1973-01-01

    A large paracrystalline inclusion is formed by certain strains of Clostridium perfringens type A during spore morphogenesis. In most cell thin sections, the inclusion appeared rod-shaped when sectioned at an angle perpendicular to its longer axis, and circular or oval-shaped when sectioned at an angle parallel to its longer axis. Measurements performed on electron micrographs of inclusions sectioned to reveal the rod shape indicated a fairly consistent thickness (width) of 192 ± 23 nm. The length of the inclusions varied considerably with a maximum of approximately 2,120 nm being observed. Ultrastructurally, the inclusion was composed of closely packed, periodically spaced, parallel layers. Usually a single inclusion was randomly located in the cytoplasm of the cell. Two inclusions per cell were rarely observed. The inclusion was formed only by ent+ strains of C. perfringens. Mutants of the ent+ strain NCTC 8798 that were altered in their sporulating and enterotoxin-producing capacities and revertants of these mutants were tested for inclusion formation. The results indicate that, as with the ent+ trait, a direct relationship exists between inclusion formation and spore formation. The synthesis of enterotoxin, formation of a morphologically distinct inclusion, and the initial deposition of discontinuous coat fragments around the forespore appear to be events closely related in time during spore morphogenesis. Images PMID:4350345

  17. Theta-toxin of Clostridium perfringens. I. Purification and some properties.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Y; Ito, A; Sato, H

    1977-10-26

    Theta-Toxin, an oxygen-labile hemolysin produced by Clostridium perfringens, was purified 3300 fold from culture filtrate by successive chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50 and Sephadex G-150. The purified toxin gave two distinct bands in disc electrophoresis, while the same material, after mild reduction with dithiothreitol, yielded a single band, indicating that the purified theta-toxin contained, as well as a reduced, active form, an oxidized, inactive form of toxin. These two forms of the toxin had a similar, if not identical molecular size. The purified preparation gave a single band in a sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and formed a single precipitin line with National Standard gas gangrene (C. perfringens) antitoxin. By sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the molecular weight of theta-toxin was estimated to be 51 000, the value being in exact accordance with that obtained by amino acid analysis. The amino acid composition of theta-toxin was very close to that of cereolysin, an oxygen-labile hemolysin produced by Bacillus cereus. The amino-terminal residue of theta-toxin was lysine as determined by the Dansyl method. PMID:199270

  18. Fatal Clostridium perfringens septicemia suggested by postmortem computed tomography: A medico-legal autopsy case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rutsuko; Makino, Yohsuke; Chiba, Fumiko; Motomura, Ayumi; Inokuchi, Go; Yajima, Daisuke; Iwase, Hirotatro

    2015-08-01

    We report a fatal case of suspected Clostridium (Cl.) perfringens septicemia in a previously healthy woman in her eighties. At first, she presented at the hospital complaining of upper abdominal discomfort and vomiting, and was discharged the next day after ruling out any fatal conditions. However, her condition deteriorated approximately 10h after discharge and she died shortly after. The postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) performed 29h postmortem revealed an excessive systemic gas accumulation compared with the postmortem external appearance and time elapsed since her death, which suggested the presence of a gas-forming infection. Histopathological examination showed diffuse proliferation of Gram-positive bacilli in almost all the organ tissues, especially in blood vessels. Along with these findings, hyperthermia 3h postmortem, and severe anemia and thrombocytopenia without an obvious site of hemorrhage suggested hemolysis due to Cl. perfringens septicemia. These findings suggested the diagnosis before performing the conventional autopsy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report to describe PMCT findings of gas-forming infection and septicemia in contrast with the external appearance and histopathological findings in a medico-legal autopsy setting. PMID:26048862

  19. Biochemistry and Physiology of the ? Class Carbonic Anhydrase (Cpb) from Clostridium perfringens Strain 13

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R. Siva Sai; Hendrick, William; Correll, Jared B.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Melville, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    The carbonic anhydrase (Cpb) from Clostridium perfringens strain 13, the only carbonic anhydrase encoded in the genome, was characterized both biochemically and physiologically. Heterologously produced and purified Cpb was shown to belong to the type I subclass of the ? class, the first ? class enzyme investigated from a strictly anaerobic species of the domain Bacteria. Kinetic analyses revealed a two-step, ping-pong, zinc-hydroxide mechanism of catalysis with Km and kcat/Km values of 3.1 mM CO2 and 4.8 × 106 s?1 M?1, respectively. Analyses of a cpb deletion mutant of C. perfringens strain HN13 showed that Cpb is strictly required for growth when cultured in semidefined medium and an atmosphere without CO2. The growth of the mutant was the same as that of the parent wild-type strain when cultured in nutrient-rich media with or without CO2 in the atmosphere, although elimination of glucose resulted in decreased production of acetate, propionate, and butyrate. The results suggest a role for Cpb in anaplerotic CO2 fixation reactions by supplying bicarbonate to carboxylases. Potential roles in competitive fitness are discussed. PMID:23475974

  20. Assessing the Performance of Clostridium perfringens Cooling Models for Cooked, Uncured Meat and Poultry Products.

    PubMed

    Mohr, T B; Juneja, V K; Thippareddi, H H; Schaffner, D W; Bronstein, P A; Silverman, M; Cook, L V

    2015-08-01

    Heat-resistant spores of Clostridium perfringens may germinate and multiply in cooked meat and poultry products when the rate and extent of cooling does not occur in a timely manner. Therefore, six cooling models (PMP 7.0 broth model; PMIP uncured beef, chicken, and pork models; Smith-Schaffner version 3; and UK IFR ComBase Perfringens Predictor) were evaluated for relative performance in predicting growth of C. perfringens under dynamic temperature conditions encountered during cooling of cooked, uncured meat and poultry products. The predicted growth responses from the models were extensively compared with those observed in food. Data from 188 time-temperature cooling profiles (176 for single-rate exponential cooling and 12 for dual-rate exponential cooling) were collected from 17 independent sources (16 peer-reviewed publications and one report) for model evaluation. Data were obtained for a variety of cooked products, including meat and poultry slurries, ground meat and poultry products with and without added ingredients (e.g., potato starch, sodium triphosphate, and potassium tetrapyrophosphate), and processed products such as ham and roast beef. Performance of the models was evaluated using three sets of criteria, and accuracy was defined within a 1- to 2-log range. The percentages of accurate, fail-safe, or fail-dangerous predictions for each cooling model differed depending on which criterion was used to evaluate the data set. Nevertheless, the combined percentages of accurate and fail-safe predictions based on the three performance criteria were 34.66 to 42.61% for the PMP 7.0 beef broth model, 100% for the PMIP cooling models for uncured beef, uncured pork and uncured chicken, 80.11 to 93.18% for the Smith-Schaffner cooling model, and 74.43 to 85.23% for the UK IFR ComBase Perfringens Predictor model during single-rate exponential chilling. Except for the PMP 7.0 broth model, the other five cooling models (PMIP, Smith-Schaffner, and UK IFR ComBase) are useful and reliable tools that food processors and regulatory agencies can use to evaluate the safety of cooked or heat-treated uncured meat and poultry products exposed to cooling deviations or to develop customized cooling schedules. PMID:26219365

  1. Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens growth by potassium lactate during an extended cooling of cooked uncured ground turkey breasts.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Katherine M; Milkowski, Andrew L; Glass, Kathleen A

    2013-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service compliance guideline known as Appendix B specifies chilling time and temperature limits for cured and uncured meat products to inhibit growth of spore-forming bacteria, particularly Clostridium perfringens. Sodium lactate and potassium lactate inhibit toxigenic growth of Clostridium botulinum, and inhibition of C. perfringens has been reported. In this study, a cocktail of spores of three C. perfringens strains (ATCC 13124, ATCC 12915, and ATCC 12916) were inoculated into 100-g samples of ground skinless, boneless turkey breast formulated to represent deli-style turkey breast. Three treatment groups were supplemented with 0 (control), 1, or 2% potassium lactate (pure basis), cooked to 71 °C, and assayed for C. perfringens growth during 10 or 12 h of linear cooling to 4 °C. In control samples, populations of C. perfringens increased 3.8 to 4.7 log CFU/g during the two chilling protocols. The 1% potassium lactate treatment supported only a 2.5- to 2.7-log increase, and the 2% potassium lactate treatment limited growth to a 0.56- to 0.70-log increase. When compared with the control, 2% potassium lactate retarded growth by 2.65 and 4.21 log CFU/g for the 10- and 12-h cooling protocols, respectively. These results confirm that the addition of 2% potassium lactate inhibits growth of C. perfringens and that potassium lactate can be used as an alternative to sodium nitrite for safe extended cooling of uncured meats. PMID:24215704

  2. The Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Predisposes for the Development of Clostridium perfringens-Induced Necrotic Enteritis in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Antonissen, Gunther; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Timbermont, Leen; Verlinden, Marc; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (P<0.001). DON significantly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance in duodenal segments (P<0.001) and decreased duodenal villus height (P?=?0.014) indicating intestinal barrier disruption and intestinal epithelial damage, respectively. This may lead to an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and decreased absorption of dietary proteins. Protein analysis of duodenal content indeed showed that DON contamination resulted in a significant increase in total protein concentration (P?=?0.023). Furthermore, DON had no effect on in vitro growth, alpha toxin production and netB toxin transcription of Clostridium perfringens. In conclusion, feed contamination with DON at concentrations below the European maximum guidance level of 5,000 µg/kg feed, is a predisposing factor for the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens. PMID:25268498

  3. Comparative neuropathology of ovine enterotoxemia produced by clostridium perfringens type D wild-type strain CN1020 and its genetically modified derivatives.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J P; Giannitti, F; Finnie, J W; Manavis, J; Beingesser, J; Adams, V; Rood, J I; Uzal, F A

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D causes enterotoxemia in sheep and goats. The disease is mediated by epsilon toxin (ETX), which affects the cerebrovascular endothelium, increasing vascular permeability and leading to cerebral edema. In the present study, we compared the distribution and severity of the cerebrovascular changes induced in lambs by C. perfringens type D strain CN1020, its isogenic etx null mutant, and the ETX-producing complemented mutant. We also applied histochemical and immunohistochemical markers to further characterize the brain lesions induced by ETX. Both ETX-producing strains induced extensive cerebrovascular damage that did not differ significantly between each other in nature, neuroanatomic distribution, or severity. By contrast, lambs inoculated with the etx mutant or sterile, nontoxic culture medium did not develop detectable brain lesions, confirming that the neuropathologic effects observed in these infections are dependent on ETX production. Lambs treated with the wild-type and complemented strains showed perivascular and mural vascular edema, as well as serum albumin extravasation, particularly severe in the cerebral white matter, midbrain, medulla oblongata, and cerebellum. Brains of animals inoculated with the ETX-producing strains showed decreased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and increased expression of aquaporin-4 in the end-feet processes of the astrocytes around blood vessels. Early axonal injury was demonstrated with anti-amyloid precursor protein immunohistochemistry. Perivascular accumulation of macrophages/microglia with intracytoplasmic albumin globules was also observed in these animals. This study demonstrates that ETX is responsible for the major cerebrovascular changes in C. perfringens type D-induced disease. PMID:24964921

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Swedish, Norwegian and Danish isolates of Clostridium perfringens from poultry, and distribution of tetracycline resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Johansson, A; Greko, C; Engström, B E; Karlsson, M

    2004-04-19

    This study was undertaken to determine the in vitro susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens, isolated from poultry to antimicrobials used in poultry production. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of eight antimicrobials, including the ionophoric coccidiostat narasin, was determined for 102 C. perfringens isolates, 58 from Sweden, 24 from Norway and 20 from Denmark. Susceptibility to each antimicrobial compound was determined by broth microdilution. The isolates were obtained from broilers (89), laying hens (9) and turkeys (4), affected by necrotic enteritis (NE) or by C. perfringens associated hepatitis (CPH), and from healthy broilers. All strains, regardless of origin, proved inherently susceptible to ampicillin, narasin, avilamycin, erythromycin and vancomycin. A low frequency of resistance to virginiamycin and bacitracin was also found. Resistance to tetracycline was found in strains isolated in all three countries; Sweden (76%), Denmark (10%) and Norway (29%). In 80% of the tetracycline-resistant isolates, the two resistance genes tetA(P) and tetB(P) were amplified by PCR whereas in 20% only the tetA(P) gene was detected. No tetM gene amplicon was obtained from any of the tetracycline-resistant isolates. The uniform susceptibility to narasin revealed in this study shows that the substance can still be used to control clostridiosis. In this study, C. perfringens also showed a low degree of resistance to most other antimicrobials tested. Despite the small amounts of tetracycline used in poultry, a considerable degree of resistance to tetracycline was found in C. perfringens isolates from Swedish broilers. PMID:15066727

  5. Implications of Decreased Nitrite Concentrations on Clostridium perfringens Outgrowth during Cooling of Ready-to-Eat Meats.

    PubMed

    Myers, Megan I; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S; Shaw, Angela M; Tarté, Rodrigo; Adams, Kristin R; Neibuhr, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Increased popularity of natural and organic processed meats can be attributed to the growing consumer demand for preservative-free foods, including processed meats. To meet this consumer demand, meat processors have begun using celery juice concentrate in place of sodium nitrite to create products labeled as no-nitrate or no-nitrite-added meat products while maintaining the characteristics unique to conventionally cured processed meats. Because of flavor limitations, natural cures with celery concentrate typically provide lower ingoing nitrite concentrations for ready-to-eat processed meats than do conventional cures, which could allow for increased growth of pathogens, such as Clostridium perfringens, during cooked product cooling such as that required by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The objective of this study was to investigate the implications associated with reduced nitrite concentrations for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth during a typical cooling cycle used for cooked products. Nitrite treatments of 0, 50, and 100 ppm were tested in a broth system inoculated with a three-strain C. perfringens cocktail and heated with a simulated product thermal process followed by a typical cooling-stabilization process. The nitrite concentration of 50 ppm was more effective for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth than was 0 ppm but was not as effective as 100 ppm. The interaction between nitrite and temperature significantly affected (P < 0.05) C. perfringens outgrowth in both total population and number of vegetative cells. Both temperature and nitrite concentration significantly affected (P < 0.05) C. perfringens spore survival, but the interaction between nitrite and temperature did not have a significant effect (P > 0.05) on spore outgrowth. Results indicate that decreased nitrite concentrations (50 ppm) have increased potential for total C. perfringens population outgrowth during cooling and may require additional protective measures, such as faster chilling rates. PMID:26735043

  6. Perfrin, a novel bacteriocin associated with netB positive Clostridium perfringens strains from broilers with necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Timbermont, Leen; De Smet, Lina; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Parreira, Valeria R; Van Driessche, Gonzalez; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Prescott, John; Deforce, Dieter; Devreese, Bart; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens is associated with netB positive Clostridium perfringens type A strains. It is known that C. perfringens strains isolated from outbreaks of necrotic enteritis are more capable of secreting factors inhibiting growth of other C. perfringens strains than strains isolated from the gut of healthy chickens. This characteristic could lead to extensive and selective presence of a strain that contains the genetic make-up enabling to secrete toxins that cause gut lesions. This report describes the discovery, purification, characterization and recombinant expression of a novel bacteriocin, referred to as perfrin, produced by a necrotic enteritis-associated netB-positive C. perfringens strain. Perfrin is a 11.5 kDa C-terminal fragment of a 22.9 kDa protein and showed no sequence homology to any currently known bacteriocin. The 11.5 kDa fragment can be cloned into Escherichia coli, and expression yielded an active peptide. PCR detection of the gene showed its presence in 10 netB-positive C. perfringens strains of broiler origin, and not in other C. perfringens strains tested (isolated from broilers, cattle, sheep, pigs, and humans). Perfrin and NetB are not located on the same genetic element since NetB is plasmid-encoded and perfrin is not. The bacteriocin has bactericidal activity over a wide pH-range but is thermolabile and sensitive to proteolytic digestion (trypsin, proteinase K). C. perfringens bacteriocins, such as perfrin, can be considered as an additional factor involved in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis in broilers. PMID:24708344

  7. Differential Responses of Cecal Microbiota to Fishmeal, Eimeria and Clostridium perfringens in a Necrotic Enteritis Challenge Model in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Nicholas; Swick, Robert A.; Moore, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes enteric diseases in animals and humans. In poultry, avian-specific C. perfringens strains cause necrotic enteritis, an economically significant poultry disease that costs the global industry over $2 billion annually in losses and control measures. With removal of antibiotic growth promoters in some countries this disease appears to be on the rise. In experimental conditions used to study disease pathogenesis and potential control measures, reproduction of the disease relies on the use of predisposing factors such as Eimeria infection and the use of high protein diets, indicating complex mechanisms involved in the onset of necrotic enteritis. The mechanisms by which the predisposing factors contribute to disease progression are not well understood but it has been suggested that they may cause perturbations in the microbiota within the gastrointestinal tract. We inspected changes in cecal microbiota and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) induced by Eimeria and fishmeal, in birds challenged or not challenged with C. perfringens. C. perfringens challenge in the absence of predisposing factors did not cause significant changes in either the alpha or beta diversity of the microbiota nor in concentrations of SCFA. Moreover, there was no C. perfringens detected in the cecal microbiota 2 days post-challenge without the presence of predisposing factors. In contrast, both fishmeal and Eimeria caused significant changes in microbiota, seen in both alpha and beta diversity and also enabled C. perfringens to establish itself post challenge. Eimeria had its strongest influence on intestinal microbiota and SCFA when combined with fishmeal. Out of 6 SCFAs measured, including butyric acid, none were significantly influenced by C. perfringens, but their levels were strongly modified following the use of both predisposing factors. There was little overlap in the changes caused following Eimeria and fishmeal treatments, possibly indicating multiple routes for progressing towards clinical symptoms of necrotic enteritis. PMID:25167074

  8. Virulence for chickens of Clostridium perfringens isolated from poultry and other sources.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Kerry K; Theoret, James R; Stewart, Bernard A; Trinh, Hien T; Glock, Robert D; Songer, J Glenn

    2010-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A is the most common cause of poultry necrotic enteritis (NE). Of the four "major" toxins, type A strains produce only alpha toxin (CPA), which has long been considered a major factor in pathogenesis of NE. We investigated the virulence for poultry of type A strains from a variety of enteric sources. Newly-hatched CornishxRock chicks were fed a low protein diet for one week, a high protein diet for a second week, and then challenged with log-phase cultures of C. perfringens, mixed 3:4 (v/v) with high protein feed. Strain JGS4143 [genotype A, beta2 positive (cpb2(pos)), from a field case of NE] produced gross lesions compatible with NE in >85% of challenged birds. However, strains JGS1714 (enterotoxigenic genotype A, cpb2(pos), human food poisoning), JGS1936 (genotype A, cpb2(neg), bovine neonatal enteritis), JGS4142 (genotype A, cpb2(pos), bovine jejunal hemorrhage syndrome), JGS1473 (genotype A, cpb2(pos), chicken normal flora), JGS1070 (genotype C, cpb2(pos), porcine hemorrhagic enteritis), JGS1882 (genotype A, cpb2(pos), porcine neonatal enteritis), JGS1120 (ATCC 13124, genotype A, cpb2(neg), gas gangrene), JGS4151 (strain 13, genotype A, cpb2(pos), canine), and JGS4303 (SM101, enterotoxigenic genotype A, cpb2(neg), human food poisoning) failed to produce disease. In vivo passage failed to increase virulence of the non-NE strains. NE strains must have specific poultry-associated virulence attributes, such as the recently identified NetB and other factors, which allow for the development of disease. PMID:20193771

  9. Structural and Functional Analysis of the Pore-Forming Toxin NetB from Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xu-Xia; Porter, Corrine J.; Hardy, Simon P.; Steer, David; Smith, A. Ian; Quinsey, Noelene S.; Hughes, Victoria; Cheung, Jackie K.; Keyburn, Anthony L.; Kaldhusdal, Magne; Moore, Robert J.; Bannam, Trudi L.; Whisstock, James C.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic bacterium that causes numerous important human and animal diseases, primarily as a result of its ability to produce many different protein toxins. In chickens, C. perfringens causes necrotic enteritis, a disease of economic importance to the worldwide poultry industry. The secreted pore-forming toxin NetB is a key virulence factor in the pathogenesis of avian necrotic enteritis and is similar to alpha-hemolysin, a ?-barrel pore-forming toxin from Staphylococcus aureus. To address the molecular mechanisms underlying NetB-mediated tissue damage, we determined the crystal structure of the monomeric form of NetB to 1.8 Å. Structural comparisons with other members of the alpha-hemolysin family revealed significant differences in the conformation of the membrane binding domain. These data suggested that NetB may recognize different membrane receptors or use a different mechanism for membrane-protein interactions. Consistent with this idea, electrophysiological experiments with planar lipid bilayers revealed that NetB formed pores with much larger single-channel conductance than alpha-hemolysin. Channel conductance varied with phospholipid net charge. Furthermore, NetB differed in its ion selectivity, preferring cations over anions. Using hemolysis as a screen, we carried out a random-mutagenesis study that identified several residues that are critical for NetB-induced cell lysis. Mapping of these residues onto the crystal structure revealed that they were clustered in regions predicted to be required for oligomerization or membrane binding. Together these data provide an insight into the mechanism of NetB-mediated pore formation and will contribute to our understanding of the mode of action of this important toxin. PMID:23386432

  10. Organization of the cpe Locus in CPE-Positive Clostridium perfringens Type C and D Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Sayeed, Sameera; McClane, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (encoded by the cpe gene) contributes to several important human, and possibly veterinary, enteric diseases. The current study investigated whether cpe locus organization in type C or D isolates resembles one of the three (one chromosomal and two plasmid-borne) cpe loci commonly found amongst type A isolates. Multiplex PCR assays capable of detecting sequences in those type A cpe loci failed to amplify products from cpe-positive type C and D isolates, indicating these isolates possess different cpe locus arrangements. Therefore, restriction fragments containing the cpe gene were cloned and sequenced from two type C isolates and one type D isolate. The obtained cpe locus sequences were then used to construct an overlapping PCR assay to assess cpe locus diversity amongst other cpe-positive type C and D isolates. All seven surveyed cpe-positive type C isolates had a plasmid-borne cpe locus partially resembling the cpe locus of type A isolates carrying a chromosomal cpe gene. In contrast, all eight type D isolates shared the same plasmid-borne cpe locus, which differed substantially from the cpe locus present in other C. perfringens by containing two copies of an ORF with 67% identity to a transposase gene (COG4644) found in Tn1546, but not previously associated with the cpe gene. These results identify greater diversity amongst cpe locus organization than previously appreciated, providing new insights into cpe locus evolution. Finally, evidence for cpe gene mobilization was found for both type C and D isolates, which could explain their cpe plasmid diversity. PMID:20532170

  11. The effect of Clostridium perfringens type C strain CN3685 and its isogenic beta toxin null mutant in goats

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J. P.; Beingesser, J.; Fisher, D. J.; Sayeed, S.; McClane, B. A.; Posthaus, H.; Uzal, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C is an important cause of enteritis and/or enterocolitis in several animal species, including pigs, sheep, goats, horses and humans. The disease is a classic enterotoxemia and the enteric lesions and associated systemic effects are thought to be caused primarily by beta toxin (CPB), one of two typing toxins produced by C. perfringens type C. This has been demonstrated recently by fulfilling molecular Koch’s postulates in rabbits and mice. We present here an experimental study to fulfill these postulates in goats, a natural host of C. perfringens type C disease. Nine healthy male or female Anglo Nubian goat kids were inoculated with the virulent C. perfringens type C wild-type strain CN3685, an isogenic CPB null mutant or a strain where the cpb null mutation had been reversed. Three goats inoculated with the wild-type strain presented abdominal pain, hemorrhagic diarrhea, necrotizing enterocolitis, pulmonary edema, hydropericardium and death within 24 h of inoculation. Two goats inoculated with the CPB null mutant and two goats inoculated with sterile culture media (negative controls) remained clinically healthy during 24 h after inoculation and no gross or histological abnormalities were observed in the tissues of any of them. Reversal of the null mutation to partially restore CPB production also increased virulence; 2 goats inoculated with this reversed mutant presented clinical and pathological changes similar to those observed in goats inoculated with the wild-type strain, except that spontaneous death was not observed. These results indicate that CPB is required for C. perfringens type C to induce disease in goats, supporting a key role for this toxin in natural C. perfringens type C disease pathogenesis. PMID:22296994

  12. Inflammatory responses to a Clostridium perfringens type A strain and ?-toxin in primary intestinal epithelial cells of chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuangshuang; Li, Changwu; Liu, Dan; Guo, Yuming

    2015-01-01

    The causative pathogen of necrotic enteritis is the Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium perfringens. Its main cell wall component, peptidoglycan (PGN), can be recognized by Toll-like receptor 2 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD). Consequently, the immune response is initiated via activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) signalling pathway. An in vitro study was conducted to investigate chicken intestinal inflammatory responses to C. perfringens type A and one of its virulence factors, ?-toxin. In primary intestinal epithelial cells, C. perfringens as well as commercially available PGN and ?-toxin challenge upregulated mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) with a dosage-dependent manner at 3 h post infection (p.i.; P ? 0.001). Time-course effects of three stimulators at high concentration were further examined. C. perfringens infection elevated IL-6, IL-8 and iNOS levels from 1 h to 9 h p.i., while PGN treatment increased IL-6 and IL-8 expression at 1 h and 3 h p.i. (P < 0.05). Bacterial and PGN treatments induced NOD1 expression at 6 h p.i. and only bacterial infection boosted NF-?B p65 expression at 6 h and 9 h p.i. (P < 0.05). ?-Toxin treatment upregulated IL-6 and IL-8 expression throughout infection, as well as iNOS, TNF-? and NF-?B p65 expression at later hours p.i. (P < 0.05). In conclusion, both C. perfringens and ?-toxin challenge induced intense cytokine expression associated with NF-?B activation in chicken intestinal epithelial cells. The receptors for the recognition of PGN component of C. perfringens need further investigation. PMID:25584964

  13. A Thermophilic Phage Endolysin Fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-Specific Cell Wall Binding Domain Creates an Anti-Clostridium Antimicrobial with Improved Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Steven M.; Seal, Bruce S.; Garrish, Johnna K.; Oakley, Brian B.; Hiett, Kelli; Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Woolsey, Rebekah; Schegg, Kathleen M.; Line, John Eric; Donovan, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Many enzymes are added to animal feed during production and are subjected to high-heat stress during feed processing. To produce a thermostabile endolysin for treating poultry, an E. coli codon-optimized gene was synthesized that fused the N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase domain from the endolysin of the thermophilic bacteriophage ?GVE2 to the cell-wall binding domain (CWB) from the endolysin of the C. perfringens-specific bacteriophage ?CP26F. The resulting protein, PlyGVE2CpCWB, lysed C. perfringens in liquid and solid cultures. PlyGVE2CpCWB was most active at pH 8, had peak activity at 10 mM NaCl, 40% activity at 150 mM NaCl and was still 16% active at 600 mM NaCl. The protein was able to withstand temperatures up to 50 °C and still lyse C. perfringens. Herein, we report the construction and characterization of a thermostable chimeric endolysin that could potentially be utilized as a feed additive to control the bacterium during poultry production. PMID:26075507

  14. Clostridium perfringens Is Not Suitable for the Indication of Fecal Pollution from Ruminant Wildlife but Is Associated with Excreta from Nonherbivorous Animals and Human Sewage

    PubMed Central

    Vierheilig, J.; Frick, C.; Mayer, R. E.; Kirschner, A. K. T.; Reischer, G. H.; Derx, J.; Mach, R. L.; Farnleitner, A. H.

    2013-01-01

    During a 3-year study, Clostridium perfringens was investigated in defined fecal sources from a temperate alluvial backwater area of a large river system. The results reveal that using C. perfringens as a conservative water quality indicator for total fecal pollution monitoring is no longer justified but suggest that it can be used as a tracer for excreta from nonherbivorous wildlife and human sewage. PMID:23747707

  15. Multi-Organ Failure Secondary to a Clostridium Perfringens Gaseous Liver Abscess following a Self-Limited Episode of Acute Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Eltawansy, Sherif Ali; Merchant, Chandni; Atluri, Paavani; Dwivedi, Sukrut

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 81 Final Diagnosis: Liver absces Symptoms: Diarrhea • jaundice • vomiting • weakness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: CT scan guided drainage Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Clostridium perfringens is an unusual pathogen responsible for the development of a gas-forming pyogenic liver abscess. Progression to septicemia with this infection has amplified case fatality rates. Case Report: We report a case of an 81-year-old lady with pyogenic liver abscess with gas formation that was preceded by an acute gastroenteritis. The most common precipitating factors are invasive procedures and immunosuppression. Clostridium perfringens was unexpectedly isolated in the drained abscess, as well as blood. It is a normal inhabitant of the human bowel and a common cause of food poisoning, notoriously leading to tissue necrosis and gas gangrene. Conclusions: We report a case of gas-forming pyogenic liver abscess and bacteremia progressing to fatal septic shock, caused by an uncommon Clostridium perfringens isolate. PMID:25807198

  16. Multiple effects of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 on growth, biofilm formation, and inflammation cytokines profile of Clostridium perfringens type A strain CP4.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L; Wolf, Amanda; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an important Gram-positive pathogen responsible for food poisoning, necrotic enteritis, gas gangrene, and even death. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a well-characterized probiotic strain with demonstrated benefits. In this study, we evaluated the effects of EcN on growth, toxin production, biofilm formation, and inflammatory cytokine responses of C. perfringens. In vitro co-culture experiments demonstrated that EcN inhibited growth, gas production, and toxin production (?-toxin and NetB) of C. perfringens in a dose-dependent manner. The growth inhibition effect was not observed when C. perfringens was incubated with EcN cell-free supernatants (CFSE), suggesting that growth inhibition was caused by nutrition competition during co-incubation. In vitro studies demonstrated that pre-incubation with EcN did not inhibit C. perfringens attachment to Caco-2 cells, but did reduce C. perfringens total number, toxin production, and cytotoxicity after 24 h. The similar growth inhibition results were also observed during the formation of C. perfringens biofilm. Finally, pre-incubation of EcN with RAW264.7 cells significantly decreased the production of inflammatory cytokines caused by the introduction of C. perfringens. Our results indicate that EcN can inhibit many of the pathological effects of C. perfringens in vitro conditions. PMID:24532573

  17. Effects of chilling rate on outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores in vacuum-packaged cooked beef and pork.

    PubMed

    Danler, Robert J; Boyle, Elizabeth A E; Kastner, Curtis L; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan; Fung, Daniel Y C; Phebus, Randall K

    2003-03-01

    Cooked, chilled beef and cooked, chilled pork were inoculated with three strains of Clostridium perfringens (NCTC 8238 [Hobbs serotype 2], NCTC 8239 [Hobbs serotype 3], and NCTC 10240). Inoculated products were heated to 75 degrees C, held for 10 min in a circulating water bath to heat activate the spores, and then chilled by circulating chilled brine through the water bath. Samples were chilled from 54.4 to 26.6 degrees C in 2 h and from 26.6 to 4.4 degrees C in 5 h. Differences in initial C. perfringens log counts and log counts after chilling were determined and compared with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) stabilization guidelines requiring that the chilling process allow no more than 1 log total growth of C. perfringens in the finished product. This chilling method resulted in average C. perfringens increases of 0.52 and 0.68 log units in cooked beef and cooked pork, respectively. These log increases were well within the maximum 1-log increase permitted by the USDA, thus meeting the USDA compliance guidelines for the cooling of heat-treated meat and poultry products. PMID:12636309

  18. C-Terminal Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin-Mediated Antigen Delivery for Nasal Pneumococcal Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hidehiko; Watari, Akihiro; Hashimoto, Eri; Yonemitsu, Miki; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo; Kunisawa, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Efficient vaccine delivery to mucosal tissues including mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues is essential for the development of mucosal vaccine. We previously reported that claudin-4 was highly expressed on the epithelium of nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) and thus claudin-4-targeting using C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE) effectively delivered fused antigen to NALT and consequently induced antigen-specific immune responses. In this study, we applied the C-CPE-based vaccine delivery system to develop a nasal pneumococcal vaccine. We fused C-CPE with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), an important antigen for the induction of protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, (PspA-C-CPE). PspA-C-CPE binds to claudin-4 and thus efficiently attaches to NALT epithelium, including antigen-sampling M cells. Nasal immunization with PspA-C-CPE induced PspA-specific IgG in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as IgA in the nasal wash and BALF. These immune responses were sufficient to protect against pneumococcal infection. These results suggest that C-CPE is an efficient vaccine delivery system for the development of nasal vaccines against pneumococcal infection. PMID:26018248

  19. Internalization of Clostridium perfringens ?-toxin leads to ERK activation and is involved on its cytotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Campos-Rodríguez, Diana; Mora, Rodrigo; Rodríguez-Vega, Mariela; Marks, David L; Alape-Girón, Alberto

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (CpPLC), also called ?-toxin, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of gas gangrene. CpPLC may lead to cell lysis at concentrations that cause extensive degradation of plasma membrane phospholipids. However, at sublytic concentrations it induces cytotoxicity without inducing evident membrane damage. The results of this work demonstrate that CpPLC becomes internalized in cells by a dynamin-dependent mechanism and in a time progressive process: first, CpPLC colocalizes with caveolin both at the plasma membrane and in vesicles, and later it colocalizes with early and late endosomes and lysosomes. Lysosomal damage in the target cells is evident 9?h after CpPLC exposure. Our previous work demonstrated that CpPLCinduces ERK1/2 activation, which is involved in its cytotoxic effect. In this work we found that cholesterol sequestration, dynamin inhibition, as well as inhibition of actin polymerization, prevent CpPLC internalization and ERK1/2 activation, involving endocytosis in the signalling events required for CpPLC cytotoxic effect at sublytic concentrations. These results provide new insights about the mode of action of this bacterial phospholipase C, previously considered to act only locally on cell membrane. PMID:24245664

  20. Nitrergic response to Clostridium perfringens infection in the rat brain regions: effect of red light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Movsesyan, H A; Alchujyan, N Kh; Movsesyan, N H; Guevorkian, A G; Hairapetyan, H L; Barsegyan, K A; Kevorkian, G A

    2012-06-01

    A single intraperitoneal injection of a gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens (Cp) causes a remarkable down-regulation the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) with a simultaneous increase in the activity of inducible NOS (iNOS) and the level of reactive nitrogen species in the rat brain major regions (cortex, striatum, hippocampus and hypothalamus) at 48 h post-administration of Cp. Treatment by both a semiconductor laser (SCL) and/or a light-emitting diode (LED) with same wavelength, energy density and time exposure (continuous wave, ?=654 nm, fluence=1.27 J/cm(2), time exposure=600 s) could modulate brain nitrergic response following Cp-infection. Besides, unlike the LED, the SCL-irradiation prevents the cNOS inhibition in all the studied brain regions and might be useful in restoring its function in neurotransmission and cerebral blood flow, along with providing a protective effect against nitrosative stress-induced iNOS-mediated injury in the brain regions. PMID:22533509

  1. Susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens strains from broiler chickens to antibiotics and anticoccidials.

    PubMed

    Martel, A; Devriese, L A; Cauwerts, K; De Gussem, K; Decostere, A; Haesebrouck, F

    2004-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens strains isolated in 2002 from the intestines of broiler chickens from 31 different farms located in Belgium were tested for susceptibility to 12 antibiotics used for therapy, growth promotion or prevention of coccidiosis. All strains were uniformly sensitive to the ionophore antibiotics monensin, lasalocid, salinomycin, maduramycin and narasin. All were sensitive to avilamycin, tylosin and amoxicillin, while flavomycin (bambermycin) showed low or no activity. Chlortetracycline and oxytetracycline were active at very low concentrations, but low-level acquired resistance was detected in 66% of the strains investigated. Fifty percent of these strains carried the tetP(B) resistance gene, while the tet(Q) gene was detected in only one strain. One strain with high-level resistance against tetracyclines carried the tet(M) gene. Sixty-three percent of the strains showed low-level resistance to lincomycin. The lnu(A) and lnu(B) genes were each only found in one strain. Compared with a similar investigation carried out in 1980, an increase was seen in resistance percentages with lincomycin (63% against 49%) and a slight decrease with tetracycline (66% against 74%). PMID:14681061

  2. C-Terminal Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin-Mediated Antigen Delivery for Nasal Pneumococcal Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidehiko; Watari, Akihiro; Hashimoto, Eri; Yonemitsu, Miki; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo; Kunisawa, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Efficient vaccine delivery to mucosal tissues including mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues is essential for the development of mucosal vaccine. We previously reported that claudin-4 was highly expressed on the epithelium of nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) and thus claudin-4-targeting using C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE) effectively delivered fused antigen to NALT and consequently induced antigen-specific immune responses. In this study, we applied the C-CPE-based vaccine delivery system to develop a nasal pneumococcal vaccine. We fused C-CPE with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), an important antigen for the induction of protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, (PspA-C-CPE). PspA-C-CPE binds to claudin-4 and thus efficiently attaches to NALT epithelium, including antigen-sampling M cells. Nasal immunization with PspA-C-CPE induced PspA-specific IgG in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as IgA in the nasal wash and BALF. These immune responses were sufficient to protect against pneumococcal infection. These results suggest that C-CPE is an efficient vaccine delivery system for the development of nasal vaccines against pneumococcal infection. PMID:26018248

  3. Inactivation and ultrastructure analysis of Bacillus spp. and Clostridium perfringens spores.

    PubMed

    Brantner, Christine A; Hannah, Ryan M; Burans, James P; Pope, Robert K

    2014-02-01

    Bacterial endospores are resistant to many environmental factors from temperature extremes to ultraviolet irradiation and are generally more difficult to inactivate or kill than vegetative bacterial cells. It is often considered necessary to treat spores or samples containing spores with chemical fixative solutions for prolonged periods of time (e.g., 1-21 days) to achieve fixation/inactivation to enable electron microscopy (EM) examination outside of containment laboratories. Prolonged exposure to chemical fixatives, however, can alter the ultrastructure of spores for EM analyses. This study was undertaken to determine the minimum amount of time required to inactivate/sterilize and fix spore preparations from several bacterial species using a universal fixative solution for EM that maintains the ultrastructural integrity of the spores. We show that a solution of 4% paraformaldehyde with 1% glutaraldehyde inactivated spore preparations of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Clostridium perfringens in 30 min, and Bacillus subtilis in 240 min. These results suggest that this fixative solution can be used to inactivate and fix spores from several major groups of bacterial spore formers after 240 min, enabling the fixed preparations to be removed from biocontainment and safely analyzed by EM outside of biocontainment. PMID:24503289

  4. Clostridium perfringens?-toxin interaction with red cells and model membranes.

    PubMed

    Jewell, S A; Titball, R W; Huyet, J; Naylor, C E; Basak, A K; Gologan, P; Winlove, C P; Petrov, P G

    2015-10-21

    The effects of Clostridium perfringens?-toxin on host cells have previously been studied extensively but the biophysical processes associated with toxicity are poorly understood. The work reported here shows that the initial interaction between the toxin and lipid membrane leads to measurable changes in the physical properties and morphology of the membrane. A Langmuir monolayer technique was used to assess the response of different lipid species to toxin. Sphingomyelin and unsaturated phosphatidylcholine showed the highest susceptibility to toxin lypolitic action, with a two stage response to the toxin (an initial, rapid hydrolysis stage followed by the insertion and/or reorganisation of material in the monolayer). Fluorescence confocal microscopy on unsaturated phosphatidylcholine vesicles shows that the toxin initially aggregates at discrete sites followed by the formation of localised "droplets" accumulating the hydrolysis products. This process is accompanied by local increases in the membrane dipole potential by about 50 (±42) mV. In contrast, red blood cells incubated with the toxin suffered a decrease of the membrane dipole potential by 50 (±40) mV in areas of high toxin activity (equivalent to a change in electric field strength of 10(7) V m(-1)) which is sufficient to affect the functioning of the cell membrane. Changes in erythrocyte morphology caused by the toxin are presented, and the early stages of interaction between toxin and membrane are characterised using thermal shape fluctuation analysis of red cells which revealed two distinct regimes of membrane-toxin interaction. PMID:26303814

  5. Sialidase production and genetic diversity in Clostridium perfringens type A isolated from chicken with necrotic enteritis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Llanco, Luis A; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario J

    2015-03-01

    The sialidase activity and genetic diversity of 22 Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from chickens with necrotic enteritis were determined. Sialidase activity was detected in 86.4 % of the strains. All C. perfringens showed a high value of similarity (>96 %), and they were grouped into seven clusters clearly separated from the other reference bacterial strains. From these clusters four patterns were defined in accordance with their phenotypic (sialidase production and antibiotic resistance profile) and genotypic (presence of nanI and nanJ genes) characteristics. Our results showed heterogeneity among strains, but they were genotypically similar, and it is suggested further studies are needed to better understand the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis. PMID:25373329

  6. Hemorrhagic enterocolitis and death in two felines (Panthera tigris altaica and Panthera leo) associated with Clostridium perfringens type A.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanlong; Hou, Zhijun; Ma, Jianzhang

    2012-06-01

    Severe hemorrhagic enterocolitis was observed in a Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) and a lion (Panthera leo). Both animals developed acute depression, anorexia, and bloody diarrhea several days before death. Small and large intestines were diffusely congested, edematous, necrotic, and filled with hemorrhagic fluid, and mesenteric lymph nodes were enlarged and congested. Pure and abundant growth of gram-positive bacilli was obtained in culture under anaerobic conditions from the livers of both felines. Identification of highly virulent Clostridium perfringens Type A was based on pathologic lesions, hemolytic patterns, morphologic structure, and polymerase chain reaction. Animal inoculation assays indicated that C. perfringens Type A played an important role in the pathogenesis of both felines. PMID:22779248

  7. Abilities of the mCP Agar Method and CRENAME Alpha Toxin-Specific Real-Time PCR Assay To Detect Clostridium perfringens Spores in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, Andrée F.; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K.; Villéger, Romain; Cantin, Philippe; Boissinot, Maurice; Bissonnette, Luc

    2013-01-01

    We first determined the analytical specificity and ubiquity (i.e., the ability to detect all or most strains) of a Clostridium perfringens-specific real-time PCR (rtPCR) assay based on the cpa gene (cpa rtPCR) by using a bacterial strain panel composed of C. perfringens and non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains. All non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains tested negative, whereas all C. perfringens strains tested positive with the cpa rtPCR, for an analytical specificity and ubiquity of 100%. The cpa rtPCR assay was then used to confirm the identity of 116 putative C. perfringens isolates recovered after filtration of water samples and culture on mCP agar. Colonies presenting discordant results between the phenotype on mCP agar and cpa rtPCR were identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA and cpa genes. Four mCP?/rtPCR+ colonies were identified as C. perfringens, whereas 3 mCP+/rtPCR? colonies were identified as non-C. perfringens. The cpa rtPCR was negative with all 51 non-C. perfringens strains and positive with 64 of 65 C. perfringens strains. Finally, we compared mCP agar and a CRENAME (concentration and recovery of microbial particles, extraction of nucleic acids, and molecular enrichment) procedure plus cpa rtPCR (CRENAME + cpa rtPCR) for their abilities to detect C. perfringens spores in drinking water. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR detected as few as one C. perfringens CFU per 100 ml of drinking water sample in less than 5 h, whereas mCP agar took at least 25 h to deliver results. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR also allows the simultaneous and sensitive detection of Escherichia coli and C. perfringens from the same potable water sample. In itself, it could be used to assess the public health risk posed by drinking water potentially contaminated with pathogens more resistant to disinfection. PMID:24077714

  8. Predictive model for growth of Clostridium perfringens during cooling of cooked uncured meat and poultry.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Vijay K; Marks, Harry; Huang, Lihan; Thippareddi, H

    2011-06-01

    Comparison of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in cooked uncured products during cooling for different meat species is presented. Cooked, uncured product was inoculated with C. perfringens spores and vacuum packaged. For the isothermal experiments, all samples were incubated in a water bath stabilized at selected temperatures between 10 and 51°C and sampled periodically. For dynamic experiments, the samples were cooled from 54.4 to 27°C and subsequently from 27 to 4°C for different time periods, designated as x and y hours, respectively. The growth models used were based on a model developed by Baranyi and Roberts (1994. A dynamic approach to predicting bacterial growth in food. Int. J. Food Micro. 23, 277-294), which incorporates a constant, referred to as the physiological state constant, q(0). The value of this constant captures the cells' history before the cooling begins. To estimate specific growth rates, data from isothermal experiments were used, from which a secondary model was developed, based on a form of Ratkowsky's 4-parameter equation. The estimated growth kinetics associated with pork and chicken were similar, but growth appeared to be slightly greater in beef; for beef, the maximum specific growth rates estimated from the Ratkowsky curve was about 2.7 log(10) cfu/h, while for the other two species, chicken and pork, the estimate was about 2.2 log(10) cfu/h. Physiological state constants were estimated by minimizing the mean square error of predictions of the log(10) of the relative increase versus the corresponding observed quantities for the dynamic experiments: for beef the estimate was 0.007, while those for pork and chicken the estimates were about 0.014 and 0.011, respectively. For a hypothetical 1.5h cooling from 54°C to 27° and 5h to 4°C, corresponding to USDA-FSIS cooling compliance guidelines, the predicted growth (log(10) of the relative increase) for each species was: 1.29 for beef; 1.07 for chicken and 0.95 log(10) for pork. However, it was noticed that for pork in particular, the model using the derived q(0) had a tendency to over-predict relative growth when the observed amount of relative growth was small, and under-predict the relative growth when the observed amount of relative growth was large. To provide more fail-safe estimate, rather than using the derived value of q(0), a value of 0.04 is recommended for pork. PMID:21511140

  9. [Presence of Clostridium perfringens in meat-based preparations in public food services in central San Jose, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, A; Gamboa, M M; Rodríguez, E; Arias, M L

    1999-09-01

    In Costa Rica there are a large number of public food services distributed along the country, where a considerable number of people eat daily. Clostridium perfringens is a bacteria associated with foodborne illness related, especially, to meat products kept for long time at temperatures under 70 degrees C. The aim of this study was to evaluate the public food services that use water baths for keeping food hot in order to establish the presence of C. perfringens in cooked bovine meat dishes and to evaluate the enterotoxigenic capacity of the strains isolated. 81 samples of cooked bovine meat plates coming from 27 public food services, located in the Central County of San José were analyzed. The methodology described by Labbe & Harmon for the isolation of C. perfringens was used in 10 g of sample. Also, the enterotoxigenic capacity of the strains was evaluated using the passive-reverse-latex-agglutination assay from Oxoid. From the 27 public food services analyzed, eight (30%) were positive in the three samplings done, nine (33%) were positive in one or two occasions, and ten (37%) were negative all times. This implies that in 17 (63%) of the establishments studied, the bacteria was isolated at least once. From the 81 preparations studied, 37 (46%) were positive for the bacteria. The temperatures at which food was kept varied from 56 to 82 degrees C, with an average of 68.7 degrees C. From the 37 strains identified as C. perfringens, 12 (32%) were positive for enterotoxin. In conclusion, the presence of C. perfringens in bovine meat dishes, maintained in water baths, represents an important risk for public health, and the temperature at which the preparation is kept is critical for the multiplication of the bacteria. PMID:10667269

  10. Control of Clostridium perfringens spores by green tea leaf extracts during cooling of cooked ground beef, chicken, and pork.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Vijay K; Bari, M L; Inatsu, Y; Kawamoto, S; Friedman, Mendel

    2007-06-01

    We investigated the inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by two green tea extracts with low (green tea leaf powder [GTL]; 141 mg of total catechins per g of green tea extract) and high (green tea leaf extract [GTE]; 697 mg of total catechins per g of extract) catechin levels during abusive chilling of retail cooked ground beef, chicken, and pork. Green tea extracts were mixed into the thawed beef, chicken, and pork at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0% (wt/ wt), along with a heat-activated (75 degrees C for 20 min) three-strain spore cocktail to obtain a final concentration of approximately 3 log spores per g. Samples (5 g) of the ground beef, chicken, and pork were then vacuum packaged and cooked to 71 degrees C for 1 h in a temperature-controlled water bath. Thereafter, the products were cooled from 54.4 to 7.2 degrees C in 12, 15, 18, or 21 h, resulting in significant increases (P < 0.05) in the germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens populations in the ground beef, chicken, and pork control samples without GTL or GTE. Supplementation with 0.5 to 2% levels of GTL did not inhibit C. perfringens growth from spores. In contrast, the addition of 0.5 to 2% levels of GTE to beef, chicken, and pork resulted in a concentration-and time-dependent inhibition of C. perfringens growth from spores. At a 2% level of GTE, a significant (P < 0.05) inhibition of growth occurred at all chill rates for cooked ground beef, chicken, and pork. These results suggest that widely consumed catechins from green tea can reduce the potential risk of C. perfringens spore germination and outgrowth during abusive cooling from 54.4 to 7.2 degrees C in 12, 15, 18, or 21 h of cooling for ground beef, chicken, and pork. PMID:17612073

  11. The CcpA Protein Is Necessary for Efficient Sporulation and Enterotoxin Gene (cpe) Regulation in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Varga, John; Stirewalt, Veronica L.; Melville, Stephen B.

    2004-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the cause of several human diseases, including gas gangrene (clostridial myonecrosis), enteritis necroticans, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, and acute food poisoning. The symptoms of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and acute food poisoning are due to sporulation-dependent production of C. perfringens enterotoxin encoded by the cpe gene. Glucose is a catabolite repressor of sporulation by C. perfringens. In order to identify the mechanism of catabolite repression by glucose, a mutation was introduced into the ccpA gene of C. perfringens by conjugational transfer of a nonreplicating plasmid into C. perfringens, which led to inactivation of the ccpA gene by homologous recombination. CcpA is a transcriptional regulator known to mediate catabolite repression in a number of low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria, of which C. perfringens is a member. The ccpA mutant strain sporulated at a 60-fold lower efficiency than the wild-type strain in the absence of glucose. In the presence of 5 mM glucose, sporulation was repressed about 2,000-fold in the wild-type strain and 800-fold in the ccpA mutant strain compared to sporulation levels for the same strains grown in the absence of glucose. Therefore, while CcpA is necessary for efficient sporulation in C. perfringens, glucose-mediated catabolite repression of sporulation is not due to the activity of CcpA. Transcription of the cpe gene was measured in the wild-type and ccpA mutant strains grown in sporulation medium by using a cpe-gusA fusion (gusA is an Escherichia coli gene encoding the enzyme ?-glucuronidase). In the exponential growth phase, cpe transcription was two times higher in the ccpA mutant strain than in the wild-type strain. Transcription of cpe was highly induced during the entry into stationary phase in wild-type cells but was not induced in the ccpA mutant strain. Glucose repressed cpe transcription in both the wild-type and ccpA mutant strain. Therefore, CcpA appears to act as a repressor of cpe transcription in exponential growth but is required for efficient sporulation and cpe transcription upon entry into stationary phase. CcpA was also required for maximum synthesis of collagenase (kappa toxin) and acted as a repressor of polysaccharide capsule synthesis in the presence of glucose, but it did not regulate synthesis of the phospholipase PLC (alpha toxin). PMID:15292123

  12. The Myelin and Lymphocyte Protein MAL Is Required for Binding and Activity of Clostridium perfringens ?-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Oo, Myat Lin; Anrather, Josef; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Alonso, Miguel A.; Fischetti, Vincent A.; McClain, Mark S.; Vartanian, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens ?-toxin (ETX) is a potent pore-forming toxin responsible for a central nervous system (CNS) disease in ruminant animals with characteristics of blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction and white matter injury. ETX has been proposed as a potential causative agent for Multiple Sclerosis (MS), a human disease that begins with BBB breakdown and injury to myelin forming cells of the CNS. The receptor for ETX is unknown. Here we show that both binding of ETX to mammalian cells and cytotoxicity requires the tetraspan proteolipid Myelin and Lymphocyte protein (MAL). While native Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells are resistant to ETX, exogenous expression of MAL in CHO cells confers both ETX binding and susceptibility to ETX-mediated cell death. Cells expressing rat MAL are ~100 times more sensitive to ETX than cells expressing similar levels of human MAL. Insertion of the FLAG sequence into the second extracellular loop of MAL abolishes ETX binding and cytotoxicity. ETX is known to bind specifically and with high affinity to intestinal epithelium, renal tubules, brain endothelial cells and myelin. We identify specific binding of ETX to these structures and additionally show binding to retinal microvasculature and the squamous epithelial cells of the sclera in wild-type mice. In contrast, there is a complete absence of ETX binding to tissues from MAL knockout (MAL-/-) mice. Furthermore, MAL-/- mice exhibit complete resistance to ETX at doses in excess of 1000 times the symptomatic dose for wild-type mice. We conclude that MAL is required for both ETX binding and cytotoxicity. PMID:25993478

  13. Clostridium perfringens septicemia in a long-beaked common dolphin Delphinus capensis: an etiology of gas bubble accumulation in cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Danil, Kerri; St Leger, Judy A; Dennison, Sophie; Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; Scadeng, Miriam; Nilson, Erika; Beaulieu, Nicole

    2014-10-16

    An adult female long-beaked common dolphin Delphinus capensis live-stranded in La Jolla, California, USA, on July 30, 2012 and subsequently died on the beach. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed gas bubble accumulation in the vasculature, organ parenchyma, mandibular fat pads, and subdermal sheath as well as a gas-filled cavity within the liver, mild caudal abdominal effusion, and fluid in the uterus. Gross examination confirmed these findings and also identified mild ulcerations on the palate, ventral skin, and flukes, uterine necrosis, and multifocal parenchymal cavitations in the brain. Histological review demonstrated necrosis and round clear spaces interpreted as gas bubbles with associated bacterial rods within the brain, liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Anaerobic cultures of the lung, spleen, liver, bone marrow, and abdominal fluid yielded Clostridium perfringens, which was further identified as type A via a multiplex PCR assay. The gas composition of sampled bubbles was typical of putrefaction gases, which is consistent with the by-products of C. perfringens, a gas-producing bacterium. Gas bubble formation in marine mammals due to barotrauma, and peri- or postmortem off-gassing of supersaturated tissues and blood has been previously described. This case study concluded that a systemic infection of C. perfringens likely resulted in production of gas and toxins, causing tissue necrosis. PMID:25320031

  14. Cloning, recombinant production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a family 84 glycoside hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens

    SciTech Connect

    Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2005-09-01

    Crystallization of a family 84 glycoside hydrolase, a putative virulence factor, secreted by C. perfringens is reported. Clostridium perfringens is a ubiquitous environmental organism that is capable of causing a variety of diseases in mammals, including gas gangrene and necrotic enteritis in humans. The activity of a secreted hyaluronidase, attributed to the NagH protein, contributes to the pathogenicity of this organism. The family 84 catalytic module of one of the three homologues of NagH found in C. perfringens (ATCC 13124) has been cloned. The 69 kDa catalytic module of NagJ, here called GH84C, was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). Crystals belonging to space group I222 or I2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} with unit-cell parameters a = 130.39, b = 150.05, c = 155.43 Å were obtained that diffracted to 2.1 Å. Selenomethionyl crystals have also been produced, leading to the possibility of solving the phase problem by MAD using synchrotron radiation.

  15. Portrait of an Enzyme, a Complete Structural Analysis of a Multimodular beta-N-Acetylglucosaminidase from Clostridium perfringens

    SciTech Connect

    Ficko-Blean, E.; Gregg, K; Adams, J; Hehemann, J; Czjzek, M; Smith, S; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    Common features of the extracellular carbohydrate-active virulence factors involved in host-pathogen interactions are their large sizes and modular complexities. This has made them recalcitrant to structural analysis, and therefore our understanding of the significance of modularity in these important proteins is lagging. Clostridium perfringens is a prevalent human pathogen that harbors a wide array of large, extracellular carbohydrate-active enzymes and is an excellent and relevant model system to approach this problem. Here we describe the complete structure of C. perfringens GH84C (NagJ), a 1001-amino acid multimodular homolog of the C. perfringens ?-toxin, which was determined using a combination of small angle x-ray scattering and x-ray crystallography. The resulting structure reveals unprecedented insight into how catalysis, carbohydrate-specific adherence, and the formation of molecular complexes with other enzymes via an ultra-tight protein-protein interaction are spatially coordinated in an enzyme involved in a host-pathogen interaction.

  16. Characterization of a bacteriocinogenic plasmid from Clostridium perfringens and molecular genetic analysis of the bacteriocin-encoding gene.

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, T; Cole, S T

    1986-01-01

    The bacteriocinogenic plasmid pIP404 from Clostridium perfringens was isolated and cloned in Escherichia coli, and its physical map was deduced. Expression of the bcn gene, encoding bacteriocin BCN5, is inducible by UV irradiation of C. perfringens and thus resembles the SOS-regulated bacteriocin genes of enteric bacteria. The location of bcn on pIP404 was established by a dot-blot procedure, using specific hybridization probes to analyze mRNA samples from induced and uninduced cultures. From the nucleotide sequence of its gene, the molecular weight of BCN5 was deduced to be 96,591, and a protein of this size was secreted by bacteriocin-producing cultures of C. perfringens. The primary structure of the protein suggests that it may function as an ionophore, since a hydrophobic domain, resembling those of the ionophoric colicins, is present at the COOH terminus. No bacteriocin activity could be detected in E. coli harboring plasmids bearing the bcn gene, even when the transcriptional and translational signals were replaced by those of lacZ. A possible explanation may be found in the unusual codon usage of the adenine-thymine-rich bcn gene, as this shows a preference for codons with a high adenine-plus-thymine content, especially in the wobble position. Many of the frequently used codons correspond to those recognized by minor tRNA species in E. coli. Consequently, bcn expression might be limited by tRNA availability in this bacterium. Images PMID:2877971

  17. Vaccination with Clostridium perfringens recombinant proteins in combination with Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant increases protection against experimental necrotic enteritis in commercial broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was performed to compare four Clostridium perfringens recombinant proteins as vaccine candidates using the Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant in an experimental model of necrotic enteritis. Broiler chickens were immunized with clostridial recombinant proteins with ISA 71 VG, and intestinal le...

  18. Immunopathology and Cytokine Responses in Broiler Chickens Coinfected with Eimeria maxima and Clostridium perfringens Using an Animal Model of Necrotic Enteritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence of necrotic enteritis (NE) due to Clostridium perfringens (CP) infection in commercial poultry has been increasing at an alarming rate. While pre-exposure of chickens to coccidia infections is believed to be one of the major risk factors leading to NE, the underlying mechanisms of CP ...

  19. INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF ORGANIC ACID SALTS ON GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS FROM SPORE INOCULA DURING CHILLING OF MARINATED GROUND TURKEY BREAST

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens germination and outgrowth by salts of organic acids such as sodium lactate, sodium acetate, buffered sodium citrate and buffered sodium citrate supplemented with sodium diacetate was evaluated during continuous chilling of ground turkey. Turkey breast meat was ...

  20. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently utilized antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne d...

  1. Inhibition of clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by buffered vinegar and lemon juice concentrate during chilling.....of ground turkey road containing minimal ingredients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ground turkey roast containing minimal ingredients (salt and sugar), by buffered vinegar (MoStatin V) and a blend (buffered) of lemon juice concentrate and vinegar (MoStatin LV) was evaluated. Ground turkey roast was formulat...

  2. Effect of meat ingredients (sodium nitrite and erythorbate) and processing (vacuum storage and packaging atmosphere) on germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores in ham during abusive cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of nitrite and erythorbate on Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ham during abusive cooling (15 h) was evaluated. Ham was formulated with ground pork, NaNO2 (0, 50, 100, 150 or 200 ppm) and sodium erythorbate (0 or 547 ppm). Ten grams of meat (stored at 5C for 3 or...

  3. Characterization of Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Identification of Phage Lytic Enzymes as Alternatives to Antibiotics for Potential Control of the Bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal, and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control b...

  4. Characterization of Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Identification of Phage Lytic Enzymes as Alternatives to Antibiotics for Potential Control of the Bacterium.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal, and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control b...

  5. Expression of Two Bacteriophage Enzymes that Lyse Clostridium perfringens which Share Sequences in the Cell Binding Domain of the Molecules but are Dissimilar in their Catalytic Enzymatic Domain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming bacterium capable of producing four major toxins which are responsible for disease symptoms and pathogenesis in a variety of animals, humans and poultry. The organism is the third leading cause of food-borne bacterial disease among ...

  6. Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by lemon juice and vinegar product in reduced NaCl roast beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in reduced sodium roast beef by a blend of buffered lemon juice concentrate and vinegar (MoStatin LV) during abusive exponential cooling was evaluated. Roast beef containing salt (NaCl; 1, 1.5, or 2%, wt/wt), blend of sodium pyro-...

  7. A poultry-intestinal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni produces a bacteriocin (CUV-3) active against a range of Gram positive bacterial pathogens including Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly isolated bacteriocin, CUV-3, produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni strain CUV-3 had inhibitory activity against several Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staph.epidermidis and Listeria monocytogenes. The pept...

  8. Predictive model for growth of Clostridium perfringens during cooling of cooked uncured meat and poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparison of C. perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in cooked uncured products during cooling for different meat species is presented. Cooked, uncured product was inoculated with C. perfringens spores and vacuum packaged. For the isothermal experiments, all samples were incubated in a wat...

  9. Necrotic enteritis-producing strains of Clostridium perfringens displace non-necrotic enteritis strains from the gut of chicks.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Angelique J; Trinh, Hien T; Glock, Robert D; Glenn Songer, J

    2008-01-25

    We inoculated broiler chicks with mixtures of Clostridium perfringens strains to investigate the single strain dominance observed in natural cases of necrotic enteritis (NE) [Nauerby, B., Pedersen, K., Madsen, M., 2003. Analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the genetic diversity among Clostridium perfringens isolates from chickens. Vet. Microbiol. 94, 257-266]. Pre-inoculation bacteriologic culture of chick intestines yielded up to six pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types of C. perfringens. Birds developed typical NE lesions in response to administration (2x per day for 4 days) of a combined inoculum comprising one NE strain (JGS4143, PFGE pattern 8) and four non-NE strains (from piglet necrotizing enteritis, chicken normal flora, human gas gangrene, and bovine neonatal enteritis). After inoculation commenced, only the NE strain was recovered through the first post-inoculation day, in spite of intense efforts to recover pre-challenge flora strains and the other challenge strains. Thereafter, pre-inoculation and previously undetected PFGE types were found, and JGS4143 became undetectable. Birds inoculated simultaneously with five NE strains (from disease in chickens or turkeys, and including JGS4143) also developed lesions, but again only JGS4143 was recovered through the 1st day post-challenge. At that time, birds began to be repopulated with pre-challenge PFGE types. Two NE strains (JGS4143 and JGS4064) produced bacteriocins, which inhibited each other and normal flora strains (n=17), while normal flora strains inhibited neither NE strains nor each other. Thus, it appears that naturally occurring dominance of the gut by NE strains can be reproduced experimentally. Bacteriocins directed against normal flora could possibly provide the necessary advantage, although inhibition of one NE strain by another suggests that other factors may be partially or completely responsible for the dominance. PMID:17850994

  10. Use of a mariner-based transposon mutagenesis system to isolate Clostridium perfringens mutants deficient in gliding motility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hualan; Bouillaut, Laurent; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Melville, Stephen B

    2013-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic Gram-positive pathogen that causes many human and animal diseases, including food poisoning and gas gangrene. C. perfringens lacks flagella but possesses type IV pili (TFP). We have previously shown that C. perfringens can glide across an agar surface in long filaments composed of individual bacteria attached end to end and that two TFP-associated proteins, PilT and PilC, are needed for this. To discover additional gene products that play a role in gliding, we developed a plasmid-based mariner transposon mutagenesis system that works effectively in C. perfringens. More than 10,000 clones were screened for mutants that lacked the ability to move away from the edge of a colony. Twenty-four mutants (0.24%) were identified that fit the criteria. The genes containing insertions that affected gliding motility fell into nine different categories. One gene, CPE0278, which encodes a homolog of the SagA cell wall-dependent endopeptidase, acquired distinct transposon insertions in two independent mutants. sagA mutants were unable to form filaments due to a complete lack of end-to-end connections essential for gliding motility. Complementation of the sagA mutants with a wild-type copy of the gene restored gliding motility. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutation in the sagA gene and found that this mutant had a phenotype similar to those of the transposon mutants. We hypothesize that the sagA mutant strains are unable to form the molecular complexes which are needed to keep the cells in an end-to-end orientation, leading to separation of daughter cells and the inability to carry out gliding motility. PMID:23204460

  11. Three-dimensional structure of a putative non-cellulosomal cohesin module from a Clostridium perfringens family 84 glycoside hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Chitayat, Seth; Gregg, Katie; Adams, Jarrett J; Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth; Bayer, Edward A; Boraston, Alisdair B; Smith, Steven P

    2008-01-01

    The genomes of myonecrotic strains of Clostridium perfringens encode a large number of secreted glycoside hydrolases. The activities of these enzymes are consistent with degradation of the mucosal layer of the human gastrointestinal tract, glycosaminoglycans and other cellular glycans found throughout the body. In many cases this is thought to aid in the propagation of the major toxins produced by C. perfringens. One such example is the family 84 glycoside hydrolases, which contains five C. perfringens members (CpGH84A-E), each displaying a unique modular architecture. The smallest and most extensively studied member, CpGH84C, comprises an N-terminal catalytic domain with beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase activity, a family 32 carbohydrate-binding module, a family 82 X-module (X82) of unknown function, and a fibronectin type-III-like module. Here we present the structure of the X82 module from CpGH84C, determined by both NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. CpGH84C X82 adopts a jell-roll fold comprising two beta-sheets formed by nine beta-strands. CpGH84C X82 displays distant amino acid sequence identity yet close structural similarity to the cohesin modules of cellulolytic anaerobic bacteria. Cohesin modules are responsible for the assembly of numerous hydrolytic enzymes in a cellulose-degrading multi-enzyme complex, termed the cellulosome, through a high-affinity interaction with the calcium-binding dockerin module. A planar surface is located on the face of the CpGH84 X82 structure that corresponds to the dockerin-binding region of cellulolytic cohesin modules and has the approximate dimensions to accommodate a dockerin module. The presence of cohesin-like X82 modules in glycoside hydrolases of C. perfringens is an indication that the formation of novel X82-dockerin mediated multi-enzyme complexes, with potential roles in pathogenesis, is possible. PMID:17999932

  12. The CpAL Quorum Sensing System Regulates Production of Hemolysins CPA and PFO To Build Clostridium perfringens Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Shak, Joshua R.; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens strains produce severe diseases, including myonecrosis and enteritis necroticans, in humans and animals. Diseases are mediated by the production of potent toxins that often damage the site of infection, e.g., skin epithelium during myonecrosis. In planktonic cultures, the regulation of important toxins, such as CPA, CPB, and PFO, is controlled by the C. perfringens Agr-like (CpAL) quorum sensing (QS) system. Strains also encode a functional LuxS/AI-2 system. Although C. perfringens strains form biofilm-like structures, the regulation of biofilm formation is poorly understood. Therefore, our studies investigated the role of CpAL and LuxS/AI-2 QS systems and of QS-regulated factors in controlling the formation of biofilms. We first demonstrate that biofilm production by reference strains differs depending on the culture medium. Increased biomass correlated with the presence of extracellular DNA in the supernatant, which was released by lysis of a fraction of the biofilm population and planktonic cells. Whereas ?agrB mutant strains were not able to produce biofilms, a ?luxS mutant produced wild-type levels. The transcript levels of CpAL-regulated cpa and pfoA genes, but not cpb, were upregulated in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. Accordingly, ?cpa and ?pfoA mutants, in type A (S13) or type C (CN3685) backgrounds, were unable to produce biofilms, whereas CN3685?cpb made wild-type levels. Biofilm formation was restored in complemented ?cpa/cpa and ?pfoA/pfoA strains. Confocal microscopy studies further detected CPA partially colocalizing with eDNA on the biofilm structure. Thus, CpAL regulates biofilm formation in C. perfringens by increasing levels of certain toxins required to build biofilms. PMID:25824838

  13. [Tryptose sulphite cycloserine agar for the recovery of Clostridium perfringens in surface waters: a study of different modes of utilization].

    PubMed

    Nusca, A; Orefice, L; Paradiso, R

    2007-01-01

    In the recent European Drinking Water Directive, Clostridium perfringens has assumed increasing importance so as to be considered a primary contamination indicator. Therefore it emerged the necessity to make culture methods, aimed at its recovery, more specific and sensitive. In this study we have verified the ability of Tryptose Sulphite Cycloserine Agar plates (TSC Agar), prepared and stored before the use at refrigeration temperature (+4 degrees) for different times, to show typical colonies, using both, the single layer and double layer techniques. Results show that storage of the prepared medium, even for a few days, decrease the recovery of typical colonies although such negative effect is minimized by using the double layer technique. PMID:17405507

  14. Sporulation and Enterotoxin (CPE) Synthesis Are Controlled by the Sporulation-Specific Sigma Factors SigE and SigK in Clostridium perfringens? ‡

    PubMed Central

    Harry, Kathryn H.; Zhou, Ruanbao; Kroos, Lee; Melville, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the third most frequent cause of bacterial food poisoning annually in the United States. Ingested C. perfringens vegetative cells sporulate in the intestinal tract and produce an enterotoxin (CPE) that is responsible for the symptoms of acute food poisoning. Studies of Bacillus subtilis have shown that gene expression during sporulation is compartmentalized, with different genes expressed in the mother cell and the forespore. The cell-specific RNA polymerase sigma factors ?F, ?E, ?G, and ?K coordinate much of the developmental process. The C. perfringens cpe gene, encoding CPE, is transcribed from three promoters, where P1 was proposed to be ?K dependent, while P2 and P3 were proposed to be ?E dependent based on consensus promoter recognition sequences. In this study, mutations were introduced into the sigE and sigK genes of C. perfringens. With the sigE and sigK mutants, gusA fusion assays indicated that there was no expression of cpe in either mutant. Results from gusA fusion assays and immunoblotting experiments indicate that ?E-associated RNA polymerase and ?K-associated RNA polymerase coregulate each other's expression. Transcription and translation of the spoIIID gene in C. perfringens were not affected by mutations in sigE and sigK, which differs from B. subtilis, in which spoIIID transcription requires ?E-associated RNA polymerase. The results presented here show that the regulation of developmental events in the mother cell compartment of C. perfringens is not the same as that in B. subtilis and Clostridium acetobutylicum. PMID:19201796

  15. Enhancing Chicken Mucosal IgA Response Against Clostridium Perfringens a-toxin 

    E-print Network

    Chen, Chang-Hsin 1977-

    2012-07-27

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is an economically important enteric disease of broiler chicken primarily caused by a-toxin (Cpa) secreted by C. perfringens type A. Mice immunized with recombinant C-terminal domain of Cpa (CpaCD) had transient and fewer...

  16. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF THE GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN COOKED BEEF UNDER ISOTHERMAL AND DYNAMIC CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop a mathematical methodology to estimate the growth of C. perfringens in cooked beef under dynamic temperature conditions. Two differential equations governing the lag phase development and cell multiplication were proposed and solved using a 4th-order Runge...

  17. Growth potential of Clostridium perfringens from spores in acidified beef, pork and poultry products during chilling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of C. perfringens to germinate and grow in acidified ground beef as well as in ten commercially prepared acidified beef, pork and poultry products was assessed. The pH of ground beef was adjusted using organic vinegar to achieve various pH values between 5.0 and 5.6; the pH of the commer...

  18. Assessing the performance of Clostridium perfringens cooling models for cooked, uncured meat and poultry products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat-resistant spores of C. perfringens may germinate and multiply in cooked meat and poultry products if the rate and extent of cooling does not occur in a timely manner. Therefore, six cooling models (PMP 7.0 broth model; PMIP Uncured Beef, Chicken, and Pork Models; Smith-Schaffner (version 3); a...

  19. Dynamic determination of kinetic parameters and computer simulation of growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to develop a new one-step methodology that uses a dynamic approach to directly construct a tertiary model for prediction of the growth of C. perfringens in cooked beef. This methodology was based on numerical analysis and optimization of both primary and secondary...

  20. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the pH to 7.2; autoclaving at 250 °F for 25 minutes; and storing at 4 °C until used. (2) Each of at... and Bacterin-Toxoid. 113.111 Section 113.111 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... perfringens Beta Antitoxin Standard and which is either supplied by or acceptable to Animal and Plant...

  1. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the pH to 7.2; autoclaving at 250 °F for 25 minutes; and storing at 4 °C until used. (2) Each of at... and Bacterin-Toxoid. 113.111 Section 113.111 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... perfringens Beta Antitoxin Standard and which is either supplied by or acceptable to Animal and Plant...

  2. Evidence of chitinase activity within necrotic enteritis-associated subtypes of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    C. perfringens (Cp) is associated with the necrotic gastrointestinal condition known as necrotic enteritis (NE) in the chicken. rep-PCR subtyping identified subtypes of Cp from the gastrointestinal tracts of broiler chickens afflicted with NE that were distinguished from strains from environmental,...

  3. Gas gangrene caused by clostridium perfringens involving the liver, spleen, and heart in a man 20 years after an orthotopic liver transplant: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kitterer, Daniel; Braun, Niko; Jehs, Margit C; Schulte, Bernhard; Alscher, M Dominik; Latus, Joerg

    2014-04-01

    Despite advances in immunosuppression and liver transplant in the past, mortality and morbidity caused by infections remain major problems. We present a 71-year-old man who was admitted to our internal intensive care unit with septicemia. Upon admission, he had poorly localized epigastric pain and fever of 2 days ' duration. Twenty years earlier, he had undergone an orthotopic liver transplant. Testing revealed a high C-reactive protein level, elevated liver enzymes, and an acute kidney injury. A computer tomography scan showed 2 circular, non--rim-enhancing, totally emphysematous intrahepatic lesions. Additionally, gas could be seen in the portal veins mainly, as well as in the biliary system, in the right auricle, and the splenic veins. To the best of our knowledge, he showed no malignant lesion or predisposing trauma. Empirically, treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was begun, and the patient was transferred to the operating suite. When surgery began, blood cultures revealed the presence of gram-positive bacilli, which were identified as Clostridium perfringens. Seven hours after the surgery, the patient developed asystole and died. In septic patients presenting with severe hemolysis, Clostridium perfringens infection must be considered in the absence of a malignant lesion or a predisposing trauma; a previous episode of gastroenteritis might be a predisposing trauma by impairing the barrier of the intestinal flora, leading to Clostridium perfringens infection. PMID:23962047

  4. Effect of rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) on growth control of Clostridium perfringens and lipid oxidation of ready-to-eat Jokbal (pig's trotters).

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Jin; Park, Keun-Cheol; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the antimicrobial effects of rooibos (tea extract), potassium lactate (PL) and sodium diacetate (SDA) mixture alone or in combinations on the growth of Clostridium perfringens vegetative cell and spore in ready-to-eat (RTE) Jokbal (pig's trotters). Addition of a combination of 10% rooibos and 4% PL + SDA inhibit growth of C. perfringens vegetative cell in Jokbal at 24 °C and 36 °C. The significant inhibition on germination and growth of C. perfringens spores was also observed in Jokbal with a combination of 10% rooibos and 4% PL + SDA (PL: 2.24%, SDA: 0.16%) at 24 °C. The Jokbal treated with 10% rooibos and 4% PL + SDA mixture had significantly (P < 0.05) lower TBARS values than the control at 10 and 24 °C. The lipid oxidation inhibition effect was the highest (P < 0.05) in anaerobic packed Jokbal with 10% rooibos. The addition of a combination of 10% rooibos and 4% PL + SDA during the processing of Jokbal prevented the growth of C. perfringens and the germination and growth of C. perfringens spores at room temperature. This study shows rooibos tea as a valuable natural food preservative in meat products. PMID:25394229

  5. Identification and Characterization of Clostridium perfringens Beta Toxin Variants with Differing Trypsin Sensitivity and In Vitro Cytotoxicity Activity

    PubMed Central

    Theoret, James R.; Uzal, Francisco A.

    2015-01-01

    By producing toxins, Clostridium perfringens causes devastating diseases of both humans and animals. C. perfringens beta toxin (CPB) is the major virulence determinant for type C infections and is also implicated in type B infections, but little is known about the CPB structure-function relationship. Amino acid sequence comparisons of the CPBs made by 8 randomly selected isolates identified two natural variant toxins with four conserved amino acid changes, including a switch of E to K at position 168 (E168K) that introduces a potential trypsin cleavage site into the CPB protein of strain JGS1076. To investigate whether this potential trypsin cleavage site affects sensitivity to trypsin, a primary host defense against this toxin, the two CPB variants were assayed for their trypsin sensitivity. The results demonstrated a significant difference in trypsin sensitivity, which was linked to the E168K switch by using site-directed recombinant CPB (rCPB) mutants. The natural CPB variants also displayed significant differences in their cytotoxicity to human endothelial cells. This cytotoxicity difference was mainly attributable to increased host cell binding rather than the ability to oligomerize or form functional pores. Using rCPB site-directed mutants, differences in cytotoxicity and host cell binding were linked to an A300V amino acid substitution in the strain JGS1076 CPB variant that possessed more cytotoxic activity. Mapping of sequence variations on a CPB structure modeled using related toxins suggests that the E168K substitution is surface localized and so can interact with trypsin and that the A300V substitution is located in a putative binding domain of the CPB toxin. PMID:25643999

  6. Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C induced ROS production and cytotoxicity require PKC, MEK1 and NF?B activation.

    PubMed

    Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Pineda-Padilla, Maria Jose; Castro-Castro, Ana Cristina; Alape-Giron, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (CpPLC), also called ?-toxin, is the most toxic extracellular enzyme produced by this bacteria and is essential for virulence in gas gangrene. At lytic concentrations, CpPLC causes membrane disruption, whereas at sublytic concentrations this toxin causes oxidative stress and activates the MEK/ERK pathway, which contributes to its cytotoxic and myotoxic effects. In the present work, the role of PKC, ERK 1/2 and NF?B signalling pathways in ROS generation induced by CpPLC and their contribution to CpPLC-induced cytotoxicity was evaluated. The results demonstrate that CpPLC induces ROS production through PKC, MEK/ERK and NF?B pathways, the latter being activated by the MEK/ERK signalling cascade. Inhibition of either of these signalling pathways prevents CpPLC's cytotoxic effect. In addition, it was demonstrated that NF?B inhibition leads to a significant reduction in the myotoxicity induced by intramuscular injection of CpPLC in mice. Understanding the role of these signalling pathways could lead towards developing rational therapeutic strategies aimed to reduce cell death during a clostridialmyonecrosis. PMID:24466113

  7. Crystal structure of the phosphate-binding protein (PBP-1) of an ABC-type phosphate transporter from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Richez, Magali; Bergonzi, Celine; Chabriere, Eric; Elias, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate limitation is an important environmental stress that affects the metabolism of various organisms and, in particular, can trigger the virulence of numerous bacterial pathogens. Clostridium perfringens, a human pathogen, is one of the most common causes of enteritis necroticans, gas gangrene and food poisoning. Here, we focused on the high affinity phosphate-binding protein (PBP-1) of an ABC-type transporter, responsible for cellular phosphate uptake. We report the crystal structure (1.65 Å resolution) of the protein in complex with phosphate. Interestingly, PBP-1 does not form the short, low-barrier hydrogen bond with phosphate that is typical of previously characterized phosphate-binding proteins, but rather a canonical hydrogen bond. In its unique binding configuration, PBP-1 forms an unusually high number of hydrogen bonds (14) with the phosphate anion. Discrimination experiments reveal that PBP-1 is the least selective PBP characterised so far and is able to discriminate phosphate from its close competing anion, arsenate, by ~150-fold. PMID:25338617

  8. Molecular Architecture and Functional Analysis of NetB, a Pore-forming Toxin from Clostridium perfringens*

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Christos G.; Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P.; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Naylor, Claire E.; Cole, Ambrose R.; Moss, David S.; Titball, Richard W.; Basak, Ajit K.

    2013-01-01

    NetB is a pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens and has been reported to play a major role in the pathogenesis of avian necrotic enteritis, a disease that has emerged due to the removal of antibiotics in animal feedstuffs. Here we present the crystal structure of the pore form of NetB solved to 3.9 ?. The heptameric assembly shares structural homology to the staphylococcal ?-hemolysin. However, the rim domain, a region that is thought to interact with the target cell membrane, shows sequence and structural divergence leading to the alteration of a phosphocholine binding pocket found in the staphylococcal toxins. Consistent with the structure we show that NetB does not bind phosphocholine efficiently but instead interacts directly with cholesterol leading to enhanced oligomerization and pore formation. Finally we have identified conserved and non-conserved amino acid positions within the rim loops that significantly affect binding and toxicity of NetB. These findings present new insights into the mode of action of these pore-forming toxins, enabling the design of more effective control measures against necrotic enteritis and providing potential new tools to the field of bionanotechnology. PMID:23239883

  9. Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin is produced in the intestines of broiler chicks inoculated with an alpha toxin mutant.

    PubMed

    Coursodon, Christine F; Trinh, Hien T; Mallozzi, Michael; Vedantam, Gayatri; Glock, R D; Songer, J G

    2010-12-01

    Poultry necrotic enteritis (NE) is caused by specific strains of Clostridium perfringens, most of which are type A. The role of alpha toxin (CPA) in NE has been called into question by the finding that an engineered cpa mutant retains full virulence in vivo[9]. This is in contrast to the finding that immunization with CPA toxoids protects against NE. We confirmed the earlier findings, in that 14-day-old Cornish × Rock broiler chicks challenged with a cpa mutant developed lesions compatible with NE in >90% of birds inoculated with the mutant. However, CPA was detected in amounts ranging from 10 to >100 ng per g of gut contents and mucosa in birds inoculated with the cpa mutant, the wildtype strain from which the mutant was constructed, and our positive control strain. There was a direct relationship between lesion severity and amount of CPA detected (R = 0.89-0.99). These findings suggest that the role of CPA in pathogenesis of NE requires further investigation. PMID:20934524

  10. Clostridium perfringens Phospholipase C Induced ROS Production and Cytotoxicity Require PKC, MEK1 and NF?B Activation

    PubMed Central

    Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Pineda-Padilla, Maria Jose; Castro-Castro, Ana Cristina; Alape-Giron, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (CpPLC), also called ?-toxin, is the most toxic extracellular enzyme produced by this bacteria and is essential for virulence in gas gangrene. At lytic concentrations, CpPLC causes membrane disruption, whereas at sublytic concentrations this toxin causes oxidative stress and activates the MEK/ERK pathway, which contributes to its cytotoxic and myotoxic effects. In the present work, the role of PKC, ERK 1/2 and NF?B signalling pathways in ROS generation induced by CpPLC and their contribution to CpPLC-induced cytotoxicity was evaluated. The results demonstrate that CpPLC induces ROS production through PKC, MEK/ERK and NF?B pathways, the latter being activated by the MEK/ERK signalling cascade. Inhibition of either of these signalling pathways prevents CpPLC's cytotoxic effect. In addition, it was demonstrated that NF?B inhibition leads to a significant reduction in the myotoxicity induced by intramuscular injection of CpPLC in mice. Understanding the role of these signalling pathways could lead towards developing rational therapeutic strategies aimed to reduce cell death during a clostridialmyonecrosis. PMID:24466113

  11. Influence of starch source on sporulation and enterotoxin production by Clostridium perfringens type A.

    PubMed

    Labbe, R; Somers, E; Duncan, C

    1976-03-01

    Of 16 different starch preparations tested, Clostridium perfringes NCTC 8798 yielded maximum sporulation and enterotoxin formation when ICN-soluble starch was included in Duncan and Strong sporulation medium. In general soluble starches were better than potato, corn, or arrowroot starch with regard to these two parameters. PMID:180885

  12. Distribution of Clostridium perfringens and Fecal Sterols in a Benthic Coastal Marine Environment Influenced by the Sewage Outfall from McMurdo Station, Antarctica†

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Diane D.; McFeters, Gordon A.; Venkatesan, M. Indira

    1998-01-01

    The spatial distribution, movement, and impact of the untreated wastewater outfall from McMurdo Station, Antarctica, were investigated under early austral summer conditions. The benthic environment was examined to determine the distribution of Clostridium perfringens in sediment cores and the intestinal contents of native invertebrates and fish along a transect of stations. These stations extended ca. 411 m south of the outfall. The findings revealed that the concentration of C. perfringens decreased with depth in the sediment and distance from the outfall. High percentages of tunicates and sea urchins were colonized with this bacterium along the transect. Coprostanol concentrations were also measured in sediment samples taken from each of the transect stations, and a similar trend was observed. These results are in agreement with the findings of previous studies performed with the water column and collectively provide evidence that the disposal of domestic wastes deserves special consideration in polar marine environments. PMID:9647835

  13. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiling of Clostridium perfringens SM101 during Sporulation Extends the Core of Putative Sporulation Genes and Genes Determining Spore Properties and Germination Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinghua; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Abee, Tjakko; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of bacterial spores is a highly regulated process and the ultimate properties of the spores are determined during sporulation and subsequent maturation. A wide variety of genes that are expressed during sporulation determine spore properties such as resistance to heat and other adverse environmental conditions, dormancy and germination responses. In this study we characterized the sporulation phases of C. perfringens enterotoxic strain SM101 based on morphological characteristics, biomass accumulation (OD600), the total viable counts of cells plus spores, the viable count of heat resistant spores alone, the pH of the supernatant, enterotoxin production and dipicolinic acid accumulation. Subsequently, whole-genome expression profiling during key phases of the sporulation process was performed using DNA microarrays, and genes were clustered based on their time-course expression profiles during sporulation. The majority of previously characterized C. perfringens germination genes showed upregulated expression profiles in time during sporulation and belonged to two main clusters of genes. These clusters with up-regulated genes contained a large number of C. perfringens genes which are homologs of Bacillus genes with roles in sporulation and germination; this study therefore suggests that those homologs are functional in C. perfringens. A comprehensive homology search revealed that approximately half of the upregulated genes in the two clusters are conserved within a broad range of sporeforming Firmicutes. Another 30% of upregulated genes in the two clusters were found only in Clostridium species, while the remaining 20% appeared to be specific for C. perfringens. These newly identified genes may add to the repertoire of genes with roles in sporulation and determining spore properties including germination behavior. Their exact roles remain to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:25978838

  14. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium1

    PubMed Central

    Seal, Bruce S.

    2014-01-01

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently used antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human foodborne disease as well as nonfoodborne human, animal, and avian diseases. Countries that have complied with the ban on antimicrobial growth promoters in feeds have reported increased incidences of C. perfringens-associated diseases in poultry. To address these issues, new antimicrobial agents, putative lysins encoded by the genomes of bacteriophages, are being identified in our laboratory. Poultry intestinal material, soil, sewage, and poultry processing drainage water were screened for virulent bacteriophages that could lyse C. perfringens and produce clear plaques in spot assays. Bacteriophages were isolated that had long noncontractile tails, members of the family Siphoviridae, and with short noncontractile tails, members of the family Podoviridae. Several bacteriophage genes were identified that encoded N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases, lysozyme-endopeptidases, and a zinc carboxypeptidase domain that has not been previously reported in viral genomes. Putative phage lysin genes (ply) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant lysins were amidases capable of lysing both parental phage host strains of C. perfringens as well as other strains of the bacterium in spot and turbidity reduction assays, but did not lyse any clostridia beyond the species. Consequently, bacteriophage gene products could eventually be used to target bacterial pathogens, such as C. perfringens via a species-specific strategy, to control animal and human diseases without having deleterious effects on beneficial probiotic bacteria. PMID:23300321

  15. Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by buffered vinegar and lemon juice concentrate during chilling of ground turkey roast containing minimal ingredients.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Martinez, Carol; Pena-Ramos, Aida; Juneja, Vijay K; Korasapati, Nageswara Rao; Burson, Dennis E; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan

    2010-03-01

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ground turkey roast containing minimal ingredients (salt and sugar), by buffered vinegar (MOstatin V) and a blend (buffered) of lemon juice concentrate and vinegar (MOstatin LV) was evaluated. Ground turkey roast was formulated to contain sea salt (1.5%), turbinado sugar (0.5%), and various concentrations of MOstatin V (0.75, 1.25, or 2.5%) or MOstatin LV (1.5, 2.5, or 3.5%), along with a control (without MOstatins). The product was inoculated with a three-strain spore cocktail of C. perfringens to obtain initial spore levels of ca. 2.0 to 0.5 log CFU/g. Inoculated products were vacuum packaged, heat shocked for 20 min at 75 degrees C, and cooled exponentially from 54.4 to 4.0 degrees C in 6.5, 9, 12, 15, 18, or 21 h. In control samples without MOstatin V or MOstatin LV, C. perfringens populations reached 2.98, 4.50, 5.78, 7.05, 7.88, and 8.19 log CFU/g (corresponding increases of 0.51, 2.29, 3.51, 4.79, 5.55, and 5.93 log CFU/g) in 6.5, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 21 h of chilling, respectively. MOstatin V (2.5%) and MOstatin LV (3.5%) were effective in inhibiting C. perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ground turkey roast to <1.0 log CFU/g during abusive chilling of the product within 21 h. Buffered vinegar and a blend (buffered) of lemon juice concentrate and vinegar were effective in controlling germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens spores in turkey roast containing minimal ingredients. PMID:20202331

  16. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii... Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Epsilon... temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white...

  17. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii... Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Epsilon... temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white...

  18. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii... Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Epsilon... temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white...

  19. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Bulk or final container samples of completed product from each serial shall be tested for potency using the Epsilon toxin-neutralization test provided in this paragraph. (1) When used in this test, the following words and terms shall mean: (i)...

  20. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Bulk or final container samples of completed product from each serial shall be tested for potency using the Epsilon toxin-neutralization test provided in this paragraph. (1) When used in this test, the following words and terms shall mean: (i)...

  1. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Bulk or final container samples of completed product from each serial shall be tested for potency using the Epsilon toxin-neutralization test provided in this paragraph. (1) When used in this test, the following words and terms shall mean: (i)...

  2. Comparison of the Effect of Curing Ingredients Derived from Purified and Natural Sources on Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens Outgrowth during Cooling of Deli-Style Turkey Breast.

    PubMed

    King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2015-08-01

    The antimicrobial impact of purified and natural sources of both nitrite and ascorbate were evaluated against Clostridium perfringens during the postthermal processing cooling period of deli-style turkey breast. The objective of phase I was to assess comparable concentrations of nitrite (0 or 100 ppm) and ascorbate (0 or 547 ppm) from both purified and natural sources. Phase II was conducted to investigate concentrations of nitrite (50, 75, or 100 ppm) from cultured celery juice powder and ascorbate (0, 250, or 500 ppm) from cherry powder to simulate alternative curing formulations. Ground turkey breast (75% moisture, 1.2% salt, pH 6.2) treatments were inoculated with C. perfringens spores (three-strain mixture) to yield 2.5 log CFU/g. Individual 50-g portions were vacuum packaged, cooked to 71.1°C, and chilled from 54.4 to 26.7°C in 5 h and from 26.7 to 7.2°C in 10 additional hours. Triplicate samples were assayed for growth of C. perfringens at predetermined intervals by plating on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar; experiments were replicated three times. In phase I, uncured, purified nitrite, and natural nitrite treatments without ascorbate had 5.3-, 4.2-, and 4.4-log increases in C. perfringens, respectively, at 15 h, but <1-log increase was observed at the end of chilling in treatments containing 100 ppm of nitrite and 547 ppm of ascorbate from either source. In phase II, 0, 50, 75, and 100 ppm of nitrite and 50 ppm of nitrite plus 250 ppm of ascorbate supported 4.5-, 3.9-, 3.5-, 2.2-, and 1.5-log increases in C. perfringens, respectively. In contrast, <1-log increase was observed after 15 h in the remaining phase II treatments supplemented with 50 ppm of nitrite and 500 ppm of ascorbate or ?75 ppm of nitrite and ?250 ppm of ascorbate. These results confirm that equivalent concentrations of nitrite, regardless of the source, provide similar inhibition of C. perfringens during chilling and that ascorbate enhances the antimicrobial effect of nitrite on C. perfringens at concentrations commonly used in alternative cured meats. PMID:26219366

  3. A Fatal Spontaneous Gas Gangrene due to Clostridium perfringens during Neutropenia of Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Lim; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Lee, Dong-Gun; Ko, Yumi; Hyun, Ji In; Kim, Bo Kyoung; Seo, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jung Woo; Lee, Seok

    2014-09-01

    Most cases of gas gangrene caused by Clostridium species begin with trauma-related injuries but in rare cases, spontaneous gas gangrene (SGG) can occur when patients have conditions such as advanced malignancy, diabetes, or immunosuppression. Clostridium perfringens, a rare cause of SGG, exists as normal flora of skin and intestines of human. Adequate antibiotics with surgical debridement of infected tissue is the only curative therapeutic management. Mortality rate among adults is reported range of 67-100% and majority of deaths are occurred within 24 hours of onset. We experienced a case of SGG on the trunk, buttock and thigh in a neutropenic patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. His clinical course was rapid and fatal during pre-engraftment neutropenic period of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25298910

  4. Clostridium perfringens Alpha-Toxin Induces Gm1a Clustering and Trka Phosphorylation in the Host Cell Membrane.

    PubMed

    Takagishi, Teruhisa; Oda, Masataka; Kabura, Michiko; Kurosawa, Mie; Tominaga, Kaori; Urano, Shiori; Ueda, Yoshibumi; Kobayashi, Keiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Sakurai, Jun; Terao, Yutaka; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin elicits various immune responses such as the release of cytokines, chemokines, and superoxide via the GM1a/TrkA complex. Alpha-toxin possesses phospholipase C (PLC) hydrolytic activity that contributes to signal transduction in the pathogenesis of gas gangrene. Little is known about the relationship between lipid metabolism and TrkA activation by alpha-toxin. Using live-cell fluorescence microscopy, we monitored transbilayer movement of diacylglycerol (DAG) with the yellow fluorescent protein-tagged C1AB domain of protein kinase C-? (EYFP-C1AB). DAG accumulated at the marginal region of the plasma membrane in alpha toxin-treated A549 cells, which also exhibited GM1a clustering and TrkA phosphorylation. Annexin V binding assays showed that alpha-toxin induced the exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. However, H148G, a variant toxin which binds cell membrane and has no enzymatic activity, did not induce DAG translocation, GM1a clustering, or TrkA phosphorylation. Alpha-toxin also specifically activated endogenous phospholipase C?-1 (PLC?-1), a TrkA adaptor protein, via phosphorylation. U73122, an endogenous PLC inhibitor, and siRNA for PLC?-1 inhibited the formation of DAG and release of IL-8. GM1a accumulation and TrkA phosphorylation in A549 cells treated with alpha-toxin were also inhibited by U73122. These results suggest that the flip-flop motion of hydrophobic lipids such as DAG leads to the accumulation of GM1a and TrkA. We conclude that the formation of DAG by alpha-toxin itself (first step) and activation of endogenous PLC?-1 (second step) leads to alterations in membrane dynamics, followed by strong phosphorylation of TrkA. PMID:25910247

  5. Clostridium perfringens Alpha-Toxin Induces Gm1a Clustering and Trka Phosphorylation in the Host Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Takagishi, Teruhisa; Oda, Masataka; Kabura, Michiko; Kurosawa, Mie; Tominaga, Kaori; Urano, Shiori; Ueda, Yoshibumi; Kobayashi, Keiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Sakurai, Jun; Terao, Yutaka; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin elicits various immune responses such as the release of cytokines, chemokines, and superoxide via the GM1a/TrkA complex. Alpha-toxin possesses phospholipase C (PLC) hydrolytic activity that contributes to signal transduction in the pathogenesis of gas gangrene. Little is known about the relationship between lipid metabolism and TrkA activation by alpha-toxin. Using live-cell fluorescence microscopy, we monitored transbilayer movement of diacylglycerol (DAG) with the yellow fluorescent protein-tagged C1AB domain of protein kinase C-? (EYFP-C1AB). DAG accumulated at the marginal region of the plasma membrane in alpha toxin-treated A549 cells, which also exhibited GM1a clustering and TrkA phosphorylation. Annexin V binding assays showed that alpha-toxin induced the exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. However, H148G, a variant toxin which binds cell membrane and has no enzymatic activity, did not induce DAG translocation, GM1a clustering, or TrkA phosphorylation. Alpha-toxin also specifically activated endogenous phospholipase C?-1 (PLC?-1), a TrkA adaptor protein, via phosphorylation. U73122, an endogenous PLC inhibitor, and siRNA for PLC?-1 inhibited the formation of DAG and release of IL-8. GM1a accumulation and TrkA phosphorylation in A549 cells treated with alpha-toxin were also inhibited by U73122. These results suggest that the flip-flop motion of hydrophobic lipids such as DAG leads to the accumulation of GM1a and TrkA. We conclude that the formation of DAG by alpha-toxin itself (first step) and activation of endogenous PLC?-1 (second step) leads to alterations in membrane dynamics, followed by strong phosphorylation of TrkA. PMID:25910247

  6. In vivo antimicrobial potentials of garlic against Clostridium perfringens and its promotant effects on performance of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Jimoh, A A; Ibitoye, E B; Dabai, Y U; Garba, S

    2013-12-15

    This study was conducted to investigate in vivo antimicrobial potential of garlic against Clostridium perferinges and resultant promotant effects on performance of the broiler chickens. Garlic powder was used as an alternative to GPAs (Growth Promotant Antibiotics) to prevent subclinical Necrotic Enteritis (NE) due to C. perferinges. 120 day-old broiler chicks were randomly distributed to six treatment groups of 20 chicks each (2 replicates(-10) chicks). Six isonutrient diets supplemented with garlic at graded levels of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 g kg(-1) were fed to the birds for seven weeks. Data were collected weekly on performance parameters including feed intake, weight gain and feed conversion ratio (FCR). Also, on the 21 35 and 49th days of the study, two birds per group were randomly selected, slaughtered and dissected. 1 g of caecal contents per each bird were sampled into labelled sterile sample bottles. The samples were subjected to culturing, bacterial identification and colony counting. All data were subjected to analysis of variance. Results showed that garlic significantly (p > 0.05) depressed feed intake (3310 g feed/bird at 1.0 g kg(-1) supplementation) but improved FCR. The supplement has no significant effect on weight gain but C. perfringens colony counts in the treated groups, were numerically reduced (lowest count, 0.93 x 10(5) cfu g(-1) at 1.0 g kg(-1) supplementation), as compared to the control. It is therefore concluded that diets could be supplemented with garlic at dose range of 1.0 to 1.5 g kg(-1) to prevent subclinical NE and achieve improved performance in birds. PMID:24517015

  7. Recombinant expression of two bacteriophage proteins that lyse clostridium perfringens and share identical sequences in the C-terminal cell wall binding domain of the molecules but are dissimilar in their N-terminal domain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming bacterium capable of producing four major toxins that are responsible for disease symptoms and pathogenesis in a variety of animals, humans and poultry. The organism is the third leading cause of human food-borne bacterial disease a...

  8. Relative disease susceptibility and clostridial toxin antibody responses in three commercial broiler lines co-infected with Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Necrotic enteritis is an enteric disease of poultry resulting from infection by Clostridium perfringens with co-infection by Eimeria spp. constituting a major risk factor for disease pathogenesis. This study compared three commercial broiler chicken lines using an experimental model of necrotic ente...

  9. Analysis of genetic similarities between Clostridium perfringens isolates isolated from patients with gas gangrene and from hospital environment conducted with the use of the PFGE method.

    PubMed

    Brzychczy-W?och, Monika; Bulanda, Ma?gorzata

    2014-03-01

    The objective of the study was to perform a comparative analysis of genetic similarity, with the use of pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), of Clostridium perfringens isolates originating from patients with gas gangrene and from the hospital environment. The study encompassed two patients with a clinical and microbiological diagnosis of gas gangrene, who were hospitalized in one of the hospitals of the Ma?opolska province in the time period between 31st March 2012 and 18th May 2012. Clostridium perfringens isolates genotyping indicated that the isolates originating from the two studied patients did not display genetic similarity and represented two different PFGE types, which corresponded to two different clones (clone A and B). Whereas the strains isolated from the hospital environment were genetically identical with the strain coming from the second patient and represented one PFGE type, which corresponded to one clone (clone A). As a result of the study, it is possible to conclude that both patients developed endogenous infection. Even so, the examination of the hospital environment indicates the possibility of the appearance of exogenous infections. It prompts recommending and following the exact regulations of sanitary regime in the ward and the operating theater if a patient is diagnosed with gas gangrene. PMID:24791817

  10. Functional Analysis of a Bacitracin Resistance Determinant Located on ICECp1, a Novel Tn916-Like Element from a Conjugative Plasmid in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaoyan; Du, Xiang-Dang; Southey, Luke; Bulach, Dieter M; Seemann, Torsten; Yan, Xu-Xia; Bannam, Trudi L; Rood, Julian I

    2015-11-01

    Bacitracins are mixtures of structurally related cyclic polypeptides with antibiotic properties. They act by interfering with the biosynthesis of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, we analyzed an avian necrotic enteritis strain of Clostridium perfringens that was resistant to bacitracin and produced NetB toxin. We identified a bacitracin resistance locus that resembled a bacitracin resistance determinant from Enterococcus faecalis. It contained the structural genes bcrABD and a putative regulatory gene, bcrR. Mutagenesis studies provided evidence that both bcrA and bcrB are essential for bacitracin resistance, and that evidence was supported by the results of experiments in which the introduction of both the bcrA and bcrB genes into a bacitracin-susceptible C. perfringens strain was required to confer bacitracin resistance. The wild-type strain was shown to contain at least three large, putatively conjugative plasmids, and the bcrRABD locus was localized to an 89.7-kb plasmid, pJIR4150. This plasmid was experimentally shown to be conjugative and was sequenced. The sequence revealed that it also carries a tpeL toxin gene and is related to the pCW3 family of conjugative antibiotic resistance and toxin plasmids from C. perfringens. The bcr genes were located on a genetic element, ICECp1, which is related to the Tn916 family of integrative conjugative elements (ICEs). ICECp1 appears to be the first Tn916-like element shown to confer bacitracin resistance. In summary, we identified in a toxin-producing C. perfringens strain a novel mobile bacitracin resistance element which was experimentally shown to be essential for bacitracin resistance and is carried by a putative ICE located on a conjugative plasmid. PMID:26282424

  11. Molecular Characterization of Clostridium perfringens Isolates from Humans with Sporadic Diarrhea: Evidence for Transcriptional Regulation of the Beta2-Toxin-Encoding Gene

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Ben; Raju, Deepa; Garmory, Helen S.; Brett, Moira M.; Titball, Richard W.; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.

    2005-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A food poisoning is caused by C. perfringens isolates carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin gene (cpe), while non-food-borne gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and sporadic diarrhea (SD), are caused by C. perfringens plasmid cpe isolates. A recent study reported the association of beta2 toxin (CPB2) with human GI diseases, and particularly AAD/SD, by demonstrating that a large percentage of AAD/SD isolates, in contrast to a small percentage of food poisoning isolates, carry the beta2-toxin gene (cpb2). This putative relationship was further tested in the current study by characterizing 14 cpe+ C. perfringens fecal isolates associated with recent cases of human SD in England (referred to hereafter as SD isolates). These SD isolates were all classified as cpe+ type A, and 12 of the 14 cpe+ isolates carry their cpe gene on the plasmid and 2 carry it on the chromosome. Interestingly, cpb2 is present in only 12 plasmid cpe isolates; 11 isolates carry cpe and cpb2 on different plasmids, but cpe and cpb2 are located on the same plasmid in one isolate. C. perfringens enterotoxin is produced by all 14 cpe+ SD isolates. However, only 10 of the 12 cpe+/cpb2+ SD isolates produced CPB2, with significant variation in amounts. The levels of cpb2 mRNA in low- to high-CPB2-producing SD isolates differed to such an extent (30-fold) that this difference could be considered a major cause of the differential level of CPB2 production in vitro by SD isolates. Furthermore, no silent or atypical cpb2 was found in a CPB2 Western blot-negative isolate, 5422/94, suggesting that the lack of CPB2 production in 5422/94 was due to low expression of cpb2 mRNA. This received support from our observation that the recombinant plasmid carrying 5422/94 cpb2, which overexpressed cpb2 mRNA, restored CPB2 production in F4969 (a cpb2-negative isolate). Collectively, our present results suggest that CPB2 merits further study as an accessory toxin in C. perfringens-associated SD. PMID:16332823

  12. Effects of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin via claudin-4 on normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Kojima, Takashi; Ito, Tatsuya; Kyuno, Daisuke; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Imamura, Masafumi; Hirata, Koichi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2011-09-01

    The tight junction protein claudin-4 is frequently overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and is also a receptor for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE). The cytotoxic effects of CPE are thought to be useful as a novel therapeutic tool for pancreatic cancer. However, the responses to CPE via claudin-4 remain unknown in normal human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells. We introduced the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene into HPDE cells in primary culture as a model of normal HPDE cells in vitro. hTERT-HPDE cells treated with or without 10% FBS and pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1, BXPC3, HPAF-II and HPAC were treated with CPE. In Western blotting, the expression of claudin-4 protein in hTERT-HPDE cells treated with 10% FBS was as high as it was in all of the pancreatic cancer cell lines. In hTERT-HPDE cells with or without 10% FBS, cytotoxicity was not observed at any concentration of CPE, whereas in all pancreatic cancer cell lines, CPE had a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect. In hTERT-HPDE cells with 10% FBS, claudin-4 was localized in the apical-most regions, where there are tight junction areas, in which in all pancreatic cancer cell lines claudin-4 was found not only in the apical-most regions but also at basolateral membranes. In hTERT-HPDE cells with 10% FBS after treatment with CPE, downregulation of barrier function and claudin-4 expression at the membranes was observed. In HPAC cells, the sensitivity to CPE was significantly decreased by knockdown of claudin-4 expression using siRNA compared to the control. These findings suggest that, in normal HPDE cells, the lack of toxicity of CPE was probably due to the localization of claudin-4, which is different from that of pancreatic cancer cells. hTERT-HPDE cells in this culture system may be a useful model of normal HPDE cells not only for physiological regulation of claudin-4 expression but also for developing safer and more effective therapeutic methods targeting claudin-4 in pancreatic cancer. PMID:21573709

  13. Hydrogen production at high Faradaic efficiency by a bio-electrode based on TiO2 adsorption of a new [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Morra, Simone; Valetti, Francesca; Sarasso, Veronica; Castrignanò, Silvia; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2015-12-01

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenase CpHydA from Clostridium perfringens was immobilized by adsorption on anatase TiO2 electrodes for clean hydrogen production. The immobilized enzyme proved to perform direct electron transfer to and from the electrode surface and catalyses both H2 oxidation (H2 uptake) and H2 production (H2 evolution) with a current density for H2 evolution of about 2 mA cm(-1). The TiO2/CpHydA bioelectrode remained active for several days upon storage and when a reducing potential was set, H2 evolution occurred with a mean Faradaic efficiency of 98%. The high turnover frequency of H2 production and the tight coupling of electron transfer, resulting in a Faradaic efficiency close to 100%, support the exploitation of the novel TiO2/CpHydA stationary electrode as a powerful device for H2 production. PMID:26278509

  14. Immunization with recombinant bivalent chimera r-Cpae confers protection against alpha toxin and enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens type A in murine model.

    PubMed

    Shreya, Das; Uppalapati, Siva R; Kingston, Joseph J; Sripathy, Murali H; Batra, Harsh V

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A, an anaerobic pathogen is the most potent cause of soft tissue infections like gas gangrene and enteric diseases like food poisoning and enteritis. The disease manifestations are mediated via two important exotoxins, viz. myonecrotic alpha toxin (?C) and enterotoxin (CPE). In the present study, we synthesized a bivalent chimeric protein r-Cpae comprising C-terminal binding regions of ?C and CPE using structural vaccinology rationale and assessed its protective efficacy against both alpha toxin (?C) and enterotoxin (CPE) respectively, in murine model. Active immunization of mice with r-Cpae generated high circulating serum IgG (systemic), significantly increased intestinal mucosal s-IgA antibody titres and resulted in substantial protection to the immunized animals (100% and 75% survival) with reduced tissue morbidity when administered with 5×LD(100) doses of ?C (intramuscular) and CPE (intra-gastric gavage) respectively. Mouse RBCs and Caco-2 cells incubated with a mixture of anti-r-Cpae antibodies and ?C and CPE respectively, illustrated significantly higher protection against the respective toxins. Passive immunization of mice with a similar mixture resulted in 91-100% survival at the end of the 15 days observation period while mice immunized with a concoction of sham sera and respective toxins died within 2-3 days. This work demonstrates the efficacy of the rationally designed r-Cpae chimeric protein as a potential sub unit vaccine candidate against ?C and CPE of C. perfringens type A toxemia. PMID:25645504

  15. Molecular cloning of the 3' half of the Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin gene and demonstration that this region encodes receptor-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, P C; Wnek, A P; McClane, B A

    1989-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A enterotoxin (CPE) causes the symptoms associated with C. perfringens food poisoning. To determine whether the C-terminal half of CPE contains receptor-binding activity, the 3' half of the cpe structural gene was cloned with an Escherichia coli expression vector system. E. coli lysates containing the expressed C-terminal CPE fragment (CPEfrag) were then assayed for CPE-like serologic, receptor-binding, and cytotoxic activities. CPEfrag was shown to contain an epitope located at or near the receptor-binding domain of the CPE molecule. Competitive-binding studies showed specific competition for CPE receptors between CPE and CPEfrag lysates. CPEfrag lysates did not cause cytotoxicity in Vero (African green monkey kidney) cells. However, preincubation with CPEfrag lysates specifically protected Vero cells from subsequent CPE challenge. This indicates that CPEfrag recognizes the physiologic receptor which mediates CPE cytotoxicity. Collectively, these studies indicate that the C-terminal half of CPE contains a receptor-binding domain but additional amino acid sequences appear to be required for CPE cytotoxicity. Images PMID:2556374

  16. [Studies of necrotizing enteritis of suckling piglets (Clostridium perfringens type C enterotoxemia) in industrialized sow breeding units. 5. Control of the disease].

    PubMed

    Köhler, B; Zabke, J; Reiher, K; Rummler, H J

    1979-01-01

    Recent methods used and experience obtained in the control of necrotising enteritis are reported in this paper, with reference being made to both the pathogenesis and epizootiology of the disease. Two inoculations of the sows, using "Enterotoxämievakzine Dessau bivalent" five and three weeks before parturition, have worked well for prophylaxis. Oral treatment was applied to nursed piglets, using 40,000 I.U. of "Aviapen" and "V-Tablopen" penicillin per animal and day over periods between two and four days, helped to minimise piglet loss, particularly in the period between a fresh outbreak and full effectiveness of immunoprophylactic action. Such treatment was conducted metaphylactically and therapeutically. The first metaphylactic treatment was given within 24 hours from parturition. Combination of mother animal vaccination with the above therapeutic use of those two penicillin preparations worked extremely well in enzootically contaminated stocks and proved to be the most effective approach, for the time being, to controlling necrotising enteritis of nursed piglets. Yet, all those control measures failed to bring about full stock sanitation on industrialised units. Sow trading was not permitted until at least four weeks had elapsed from full effectiveness of mother animal vaccination, with the view to reducing the proliferation of Clostridium perfringens Type C via sales of breeding animals. All sows were given two "Enterotoxämievakzine Dessau bivalent" vaccinations, prior to sale. The animals were sold only to smaller farms (less than 500 sows for breeding) with concentional keeping patterns which were kept under constant diagnostic supervision. Neomycin, oxytetracycline, chloramphenicol, and other antibiotics against which Clostridium perfringens was resistant or in a position to assume resistance were used on endangered stocks only in conjunction with penicillin or not at all. This programme of control has proved to be efficient through a period of more than three years. PMID:232841

  17. Impact of Clean-Label Antimicrobials and Nitrite Derived from Natural Sources on the Outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens during Cooling of Deli-Style Turkey Breast.

    PubMed

    King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2015-05-01

    Organic acids and sodium nitrite have long been shown to provide antimicrobial activity during chilling of cured meat products. However, neither purified organic acids nor NaNO2 is permitted in products labeled natural and both are generally avoided in clean-label formulations; efficacy of their replacement is not well understood. Natural and clean-label antimicrobial alternatives were evaluated in both uncured and in alternative cured (a process that uses natural sources of nitrite) deli-style turkey breast to determine inhibition of Clostridium perfringens outgrowth during 15 h of chilling. Ten treatments of ground turkey breast (76% moisture, 1.2% salt) included a control and four antimicrobials: 1.0% tropical fruit extract, 0.7% dried vinegar, 1.0% cultured sugar-vinegar blend, and 2.0% lemon-vinegar blend. Each treatment was formulated without (uncured) and with nitrite (PCN; 50 ppm of NaNO2 from cultured celery juice powder). Treatments were inoculated with C. perfringens spores (three-strain mixture) to yield 2.5 log CFU/g. Individual 50-g portions were vacuum packaged, cooked to 71.1°C, and chilled from 54.4 to 26.7°C in 5 h and from 26.7 to 7.2°C in an additional 10 h. Triplicate samples were assayed for growth of C. perfringens at predetermined intervals by plating on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar. Uncured control and PCN-only treatments allowed for 4.6- and 4.2-log increases at 15 h, respectively, and although all antimicrobial treatments allowed less outgrowth than uncured and PCN, the degree of inhibition varied. The 1.0% fruit extract and 1.0% cultured sugar-vinegar blend were effective at controlling populations at or below initial levels, whether or not PCN was included. Without PCN, 0.7% dried vinegar and 2.0% lemon-vinegar blend allowed for 2.0- and 2.5-log increases, respectively, and ?1.5-log increases with PCN. Results suggest using clean-label antimicrobials can provide for safe cooling following the study parameters, and greater inhibition of C. perfringens may exist when antimicrobials are used with nitrite. PMID:25951389

  18. Recombinant Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Expressing the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Alpha Toxin from Clostridium perfringens Induces Protective Responses against Necrotic Enteritis in Chickens?

    PubMed Central

    Zekarias, Bereket; Mo, Hua; Curtiss, Roy

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis (NE) is a widespread disease in chickens that causes high mortality and reduced growth performance. Traditionally, NE was controlled by the routine application of antimicrobials in the feed, a practice that currently is unpopular. Consequently, there has been an increase in the occurrence of NE, and it has become a threat to the current objective of antimicrobial-free farming. The pathogenesis of NE is associated with the proliferation of C. perfringens in the small intestine and the secretion of large amounts of alpha toxin, the major virulence factor. Since there is no vaccine for NE, we have developed a candidate live oral recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine (RASV) that delivers a nontoxic fragment of alpha toxin. The 3? end of the plc gene, encoding the C-terminal domain of alpha toxin (PlcC), was cloned into plasmids that enable the expression and secretion of PlcC fused to a signal peptide. Plasmids were inserted into Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium host strain ?8914, which has attenuating pabA and pabB deletion mutations. Three-day-old broiler chicks were orally immunized with 109 CFU of the vaccine strain and developed alpha toxin-neutralizing serum antibodies. When serum from these chickens was added into C. perfringens broth cultures, bacterial growth was suppressed. In addition, immunofluorescent microscopy showed that serum antibodies bind to the bacterial surface. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA titers in RASV-immunized chickens were low; however, when the chickens were given a parenteral boost injection with a purified recombinant PlcC protein (rPlcC), the RASV-immunized chickens mounted rapid high serum IgG and bile IgA titers exceeding those primed by rPlcC injection. RASV-immunized chickens had reduced intestinal mucosal pathology after challenge with virulent C. perfringens. These results indicate that oral RASV expressing an alpha toxin C-terminal peptide induces protective immunity against NE. PMID:18337376

  19. Direct dynamic kinetic analysis and computer simulation of growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked turkey during cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research applied a new one-step methodology to directly construct a tertiary model for describing the growth of C. perfringens in cooked turkey meat under dynamically cooling conditions. The kinetic parameters of the growth models were determined by numerical analysis and optimization using mu...

  20. NanR, a Transcriptional Regulator That Binds to the Promoters of Genes Involved in Sialic Acid Metabolism in the Anaerobic Pathogen Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Therit, Blair; Cheung, Jackie K.; Rood, Julian I.; Melville, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Among many other virulence factors, Clostridium perfringens produces three sialidases NanH, NanI and NanJ. NanH lacks a secretion signal peptide and is predicted to be an intracellular enzyme, while NanI and NanJ are secreted. Previously, we had identified part of an operon encoding NanE (epimerase) and NanA (sialic acid lyase) enzymes. Further analysis of the entire operon suggests that it encodes a complete pathway for the transport and metabolism of sialic acid along with a putative transcriptional regulator, NanR. The addition of 30 mM N-acetyl neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) to a semi-defined medium significantly enhanced the growth yield of strain 13, suggesting that Neu5Ac can be used as a nutrient. C. perfringens strain 13 lacks a nanH gene, but has NanI- and NanJ-encoding genes. Analysis of nanI, nanJ, and nanInanJ mutants constructed by homologous recombination revealed that the expression of the major sialidase, NanI, was induced by the addition of Neu5Ac to the medium, and that in separate experiments, the same was true of a nanI-gusA transcriptional fusion. For the nanI and nanJ genes, primer extension identified three and two putative transcription start sites, respectively. Gel mobility shift assays using purified NanR and DNA from the promoter regions of the nanI and nanE genes showed high affinity, specific binding by NanR. We propose that NanR is a global regulator of sialic acid-associated genes and that it responds, in a positive feedback loop, to the concentration of sialic acid in the cell. PMID:26197388

  1. A Novel Pore-Forming Toxin in Type A Clostridium perfringens Is Associated with Both Fatal Canine Hemorrhagic Gastroenteritis and Fatal Foal Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Nowell, Victoria J.; Nicholson, Vivian M.; Oliphant, Kaitlyn; Prescott, John F.

    2015-01-01

    A role for type A Clostridium perfringens in acute hemorrhagic and necrotizing gastroenteritis in dogs and in necrotizing enterocolitis of neonatal foals has long been suspected but incompletely characterized. The supernatants of an isolate made from a dog and from a foal that died from these diseases were both found to be highly cytotoxic for an equine ovarian (EO) cell line. Partial genome sequencing of the canine isolate revealed three novel putative toxin genes encoding proteins related to the pore-forming Leukocidin/Hemolysin Superfamily; these were designated netE, netF, and netG. netE and netF were located on one large conjugative plasmid, and netG was located with a cpe enterotoxin gene on a second large conjugative plasmid. Mutation and complementation showed that only netF was associated with the cytotoxicity. Although netE and netG were not associated with cytotoxicity, immunoblotting with specific antisera showed these proteins to be expressed in vitro. There was a highly significant association between the presence of netF with type A strains isolated from cases of canine acute hemorrhagic gastroenteritis and foal necrotizing enterocolitis. netE and netF were found in all cytotoxic isolates, as was cpe, but netG was less consistently present. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that netF-positive isolates belonged to a clonal population; some canine and equine netF-positive isolates were genetically indistinguishable. Equine antisera to recombinant Net proteins showed that only antiserum to rNetF had high supernatant cytotoxin neutralizing activity. The identifica-tion of this novel necrotizing toxin is an important advance in understanding the virulence of type A C. perfringens in specific enteric disease of animals. PMID:25853427

  2. Contributions of NanI sialidase to Caco-2 cell adherence by Clostridium perfringens type A and C strains causing human intestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies showed that Clostridium perfringens type D animal disease strain CN3718 uses NanI sialidase for adhering to enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. The current study analyzed whether NanI is similarly important when type A and C human intestinal disease strains attach to Caco-2 cells. A PCR survey determined that the nanI gene was absent from typical type A food poisoning (FP) strains carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin (CPE) gene or the genetically related type C Darmbrand (Db) strains. However, the nanI gene was present in type A strains from healthy humans, type A strains causing CPE-associated antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) or sporadic diarrhea (SD), and type C Pig-Bel strains. Consistent with NanI sialidase being the major C. perfringens sialidase when produced, FP and Db strains had little supernatant sialidase activity compared to other type A or C human intestinal strains. All type A and C human intestinal strains bound to Caco-2 cells, but NanI-producing strains had higher attachment levels. When produced, NanI can contribute to host cell attachment of human intestinal disease strains, since a nanI null mutant constructed in type A SD strain F4969 had lower Caco-2 cell adhesion than wild-type F4969 or a complemented strain. Further supporting a role for NanI in host cell attachment, sialidase inhibitors reduced F4969 adhesion to Caco-2 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that NanI may contribute to the intestinal attachment and colonization needed for the chronic diarrhea of CPE-associated AAD and SD, but this sialidase appears to be dispensable for the acute pathogenesis of type A FP or type C enteritis necroticans. PMID:25135687

  3. Molecular characterization of a germination-specific muramidase from Clostridium perfringens S40 spores and nucleotide sequence of the corresponding gene.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Miyata, S; Makino, S; Moriyama, R

    1997-01-01

    The exudate of fully germinated spores of Clostridium perfringens S40 in 0.15 M KCI-50 mM potassium phosphate (pH 7.0) was found to contain another spore-lytic enzyme in addition to the germination-specific amidase previously characterized (S. Miyata, R. Moriyama, N. Miyahara, and S. Makino, Microbiology 141:2643-2650, 1995). The lytic enzyme was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography and shown to be a muramidase which requires divalent cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, or Mn2+) for its activity. The enzyme was inactivated by sulfhydryl reagents, and sodium thioglycolate reversed the inactivation by Hg2+. The muramidase hydrolyzed isolated spore cortical fragments from a variety of wild-type organisms but had minimal activity on decoated spores and isolated cell walls. However, the enzyme was not capable of digesting isolated cortical fragments from spores of Bacillus subtilis ADD1, which lacks muramic acid delta-lactam in its cortical peptidoglycan. This indicates that the enzyme recognizes the delta-lactam residue peculiar to spore peptidoglycan, suggesting an involvement of the enzyme in spore germination. Immunochemical studies indicated that the muramidase in its mature form is localized on the exterior of the cortex layer in the dormant spore. A gene encoding the muramidase, sleM, was cloned into Escherichia coli, and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene encoded a protein of 321 amino acids with a deduced molecular weight of 36,358. The deduced amino acid sequence of the sleM gene indicated that the enzyme is produced in a mature form. It was suggested that the muramidase belongs to a separate group within the lysozyme family typified by the fungus Chalaropsis lysozyme. A possible mechanism for cortex degradation in C. perfringens S40 spores is discussed. PMID:9150212

  4. Complete Sequencing and Diversity Analysis of the Enterotoxin-Encoding Plasmids in Clostridium perfringens Type A Non-Food-Borne Human Gastrointestinal Disease Isolates†

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Fisher, Derek J.; Li, Jihong; Sayeed, Sameera; Akimoto, Shigeru; McClane, Bruce A.

    2006-01-01

    Enterotoxin-producing Clostridium perfringens type A isolates are an important cause of food poisoning and non-food-borne human gastrointestinal diseases, e.g., sporadic diarrhea (SPOR) and antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). The enterotoxin gene (cpe) is usually chromosomal in food poisoning isolates but plasmid-borne in AAD/SPOR isolates. Previous studies determined that type A SPOR isolate F5603 has a plasmid (pCPF5603) carrying cpe, IS1151, and the beta2 toxin gene (cpb2), while type A SPOR isolate F4969 has a plasmid (pCPF4969) lacking cpb2 and IS1151 but carrying cpe and IS1470-like sequences. By completely sequencing these two cpe plasmids, the current study identified pCPF5603 as a 75.3-kb plasmid carrying 73 open reading frames (ORFs) and pCPF4969 as a 70.5-kb plasmid carrying 62 ORFs. These plasmids share an ?35-kb conserved region that potentially encodes virulence factors and carries ORFs found on the conjugative transposon Tn916. The 34.5-kb pCPF4969 variable region contains ORFs that putatively encode two bacteriocins and a two-component regulator similar to VirR/VirS, while the ?43.6-kb pCPF5603 variable region contains a functional cpb2 gene and several metabolic genes. Diversity studies indicated that other type A plasmid cpe+/IS1151 SPOR/AAD isolates carry a pCPF5603-like plasmid, while other type A plasmid cpe+/IS1470-like SPOR/AAD isolates carry a pCPF4969-like plasmid. Tn916-related ORFs similar to those in pCPF4969 (known to transfer conjugatively) were detected in the cpe plasmids of other type A SPOR/AAD isolates, as well as in representative C. perfringens type B to D isolates carrying other virulence plasmids, possibly suggesting that most or all C. perfringens virulence plasmids transfer conjugatively. PMID:16452442

  5. Structural and Functional Characterization of the Clostridium perfringens N-Acetylmannosamine-6-phosphate 2-Epimerase Essential for the Sialic Acid Salvage Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Pélissier, Marie-Cécile; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Guerlesquin, Françoise; Brannigan, James A.; Bourne, Yves; Vincent, Florence

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria are endowed with an arsenal of specialized enzymes to convert nutrient compounds from their cell hosts. The essential N-acetylmannosamine-6-phosphate 2-epimerase (NanE) belongs to a convergent glycolytic pathway for utilization of the three amino sugars, GlcNAc, ManNAc, and sialic acid. The crystal structure of ligand-free NanE from Clostridium perfringens reveals a modified triose-phosphate isomerase (?/?)8 barrel in which a stable dimer is formed by exchanging the C-terminal helix. By retaining catalytic activity in the crystalline state, the structure of the enzyme bound to the GlcNAc-6P product identifies the topology of the active site pocket and points to invariant residues Lys66 as a putative single catalyst, supported by the structure of the catalytically inactive K66A mutant in complex with substrate ManNAc-6P. 1H NMR-based time course assays of native NanE and mutated variants demonstrate the essential role of Lys66 for the epimerization reaction with participation of neighboring Arg43, Asp126, and Glu180 residues. These findings unveil a one-base catalytic mechanism of C2 deprotonation/reprotonation via an enolate intermediate and provide the structural basis for the development of new antimicrobial agents against this family of bacterial 2-epimerases. PMID:25320079

  6. Structural and functional characterization of the Clostridium perfringens N-acetylmannosamine-6-phosphate 2-epimerase essential for the sialic acid salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Pélissier, Marie-Cécile; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Guerlesquin, Françoise; Brannigan, James A; Bourne, Yves; Vincent, Florence

    2014-12-19

    Pathogenic bacteria are endowed with an arsenal of specialized enzymes to convert nutrient compounds from their cell hosts. The essential N-acetylmannosamine-6-phosphate 2-epimerase (NanE) belongs to a convergent glycolytic pathway for utilization of the three amino sugars, GlcNAc, ManNAc, and sialic acid. The crystal structure of ligand-free NanE from Clostridium perfringens reveals a modified triose-phosphate isomerase (?/?)8 barrel in which a stable dimer is formed by exchanging the C-terminal helix. By retaining catalytic activity in the crystalline state, the structure of the enzyme bound to the GlcNAc-6P product identifies the topology of the active site pocket and points to invariant residues Lys(66) as a putative single catalyst, supported by the structure of the catalytically inactive K66A mutant in complex with substrate ManNAc-6P. (1)H NMR-based time course assays of native NanE and mutated variants demonstrate the essential role of Lys(66) for the epimerization reaction with participation of neighboring Arg(43), Asp(126), and Glu(180) residues. These findings unveil a one-base catalytic mechanism of C2 deprotonation/reprotonation via an enolate intermediate and provide the structural basis for the development of new antimicrobial agents against this family of bacterial 2-epimerases. PMID:25320079

  7. Selection of Bacillus spp. for Cellulase and Xylanase Production as Direct-Fed Microbials to Reduce Digesta Viscosity and Clostridium perfringens Proliferation Using an in vitro Digestive Model in Different Poultry Diets

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Juan D.; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Kuttappan, Vivek A.; Wolfenden, Ross E.; Vicente, Jose L.; Wolfenden, Amanda D.; Bielke, Lisa R.; Prado-Rebolledo, Omar F.; Morales, Eduardo; Hargis, Billy M.; Tellez, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Previously, our laboratory has screened and identified Bacillus spp. isolates as direct-fed microbials (DFM). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the cellulase and xylanase production of these isolates and select the most appropriate Bacillus spp. candidates for DFM. Furthermore, an in vitro digestive model, simulating different compartments of the gastrointestinal tract, was used to determine the effect of these selected candidates on digesta viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation in different poultry diets. Production of cellulase and xylanase were based on their relative enzyme activity. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequence classified two strains as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and one of the strains as Bacillus subtilis. The DFM was included at a concentration of 108 spores/g of feed in five different sterile soybean-based diets containing corn, wheat, rye, barley, or oat. After digestion time, supernatants from different diets were collected to measure viscosity, and C. perfringens proliferation. Additionally, from each in vitro simulated compartment, samples were taken to enumerate viable Bacillus spores using a plate count method after heat-treatment. Significant (P?perfringens proliferation were observed for all non-corn diets. These results suggest that antinutritional factors, such as non-starch polysaccharides from different cereals, can enhance viscosity and C. perfringens growth. Remarkably, dietary inclusion of the DFM that produce cellulase and xylanase reduced both viscosity and C. perfringens proliferation compared with control diets. Regardless of diet composition, 90% of the DFM spores germinated during the first 30?min in the crop compartment of the digestion model, followed by a noteworthy increased in the intestine compartment by ~2log10, suggesting a full-life cycle development. Further studies to evaluate in vivo necrotic enteritis effects are in progress. PMID:26664954

  8. Genetic relatedness and netB prevalence among environmental Clostridium perfringens strains associated with a broiler flock affected by mild necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Engström, Björn E; Johansson, Anders; Aspan, Anna; Kaldhusdal, Magne

    2012-09-14

    In a previous study we investigated pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) genotype diversity and prevalence of the netB toxin gene in Clostridium perfringens (CP) isolates recovered from a broiler flock (flock 1) affected by necrotic enteritis (NE). In this follow-up work, we examined samples collected before placement of flock 1, to see if NE during rearing could be traced back to the cleaned and empty building or the day-old chicks. Litter from the next flock in the same building (flock 2) was also examined. We detected 25 different PFGE genotypes, five of which were found only in litter from flock 2. Six genotypes which had been found in flock 1 during rearing were detected in samples collected before placement. NetB positive isolates belonging to two of these genotypes had been recovered from NE lesions during rearing, suggesting that virulent strains were transmitted from the cleaned and disinfected broiler house. NetB frequency among isolates from the empty building was 45%, indicating that netB positive strains were prevalent in a building that previously had housed a healthy flock offered in-feed narasin (flock 0). NetB frequency among isolates from litter used by flock 2 was 22%, indicating that netB positive strains were present in the environment of a 14-days-old healthy flock offered in-feed narasin. Two prevalent genotypes were consistently either netB negative or netB positive. However, the presence of genotypes represented by both negative and positive isolates may suggest that the gene can spread horizontally among different CP strains. PMID:22516191

  9. Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin C-terminal domain labeled to fluorescent dyes for in vivo visualization of micrometastatic chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Emiliano; Shapiro, Erik M; Gasparrini, Sara; Lopez, Salvatore; Schwab, Carlton L; Bellone, Stefania; Bortolomai, Ileana; Sumi, Natalia J; Bonazzoli, Elena; Nicoletti, Roberta; Deng, Yang; Saltzman, W Mark; Zeiss, Caroline J; Centritto, Floriana; Black, Jonathan D; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Ratner, Elena; Azodi, Masoud; Rutherford, Thomas J; Schwartz, Peter E; Pecorelli, Sergio; Santin, Alessandro D

    2015-12-01

    Identification of micrometastatic disease at the time of surgery remains extremely challenging in ovarian cancer patients. We used fluorescence microscopy, an in vivo imaging system and a fluorescence stereo microscope to evaluate fluorescence distribution in Claudin-3- and -4-overexpressing ovarian tumors, floating tumor clumps isolated from ascites and healthy organs. To do so, mice harboring chemotherapy-naïve and chemotherapy-resistant human ovarian cancer xenografts or patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) were treated with the carboxyl-terminal binding domain of the Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (c-CPE) conjugated to FITC (FITC-c-CPE) or the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent tag IRDye CW800 (CW800-c-CPE) either intraperitoneally (IP) or intravenously (IV). We found tumor fluorescence to plateau at 30 min after IP injection of both the FITC-c-CPE and the CW800-c-CPE peptides and to be significantly higher than in healthy organs (p < 0.01). After IV injection of CW800-c-CPE, tumor fluorescence plateaued at 6 hr while the most favorable tumor-to-background fluorescence ratio (TBR) was found at 48 hr in both mouse models. Importantly, fluorescent c-CPE was highly sensitive for the in vivo visualization of peritoneal micrometastatic tumor implants and the identification of ovarian tumor spheroids floating in malignant ascites that were otherwise not detectable by conventional visual observation. The use of the fluorescent c-CPE peptide may represent a novel and effective optical approach at the time of primary debulking surgery for the real-time detection of micrometastatic ovarian disease overexpressing the Claudin-3 and -4 receptors or the identification of residual disease at the time of interval debulking surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment. PMID:26060989

  10. Discrimination efficacy of fecal pollution detection in different aquatic habitats of a high-altitude tropical country, using presumptive coliforms, Escherichia coli, and Clostridium perfringens spores.

    PubMed

    Byamukama, Denis; Mach, Robert L; Kansiime, Frank; Manafi, Mohamad; Farnleitner, Andreas H

    2005-01-01

    The performance of rapid and practicable techniques that presumptively identify total coliforms (TC), fecal coliforms (FC), Escherichia coli, and Clostridium perfringens spores (CP) by testing them on a pollution gradient in differing aquatic habitats in a high-altitude tropical country was evaluated during a 12-month period. Site selection was based on high and low anthropogenic influence criteria of paired sites including six spring, six stream, and four lakeshore sites spread over central and eastern parts of Uganda. Unlike the chemophysical water quality, which was water source type dependent (i.e., spring, lake, or stream), fecal indicators were associated with the anthropogenic influence status of the respective sites. A total of 79% of the total variability, including all the determined four bacteriological and five chemophysical parameters, could be assigned to either a pollution, a habitat, or a metabolic activity component by principal-component analysis. Bacteriological indicators revealed significant correlations to the pollution component, reflecting that anthropogenic contamination gradients were followed. Discrimination sensitivity analysis revealed high ability of E. coli to differentiate between high and low levels of anthropogenic influence. CP also showed a reasonable level of discrimination, although FC and TC were found to have worse discrimination efficacy. Nonpoint influence by soil erosion could not be detected during the study period by correlation analysis, although a theoretical contamination potential existed, as investigated soils in the immediate surroundings often contained relevant concentrations of fecal indicators. The outcome of this study indicates that rapid techniques for presumptive E. coli and CP determination may be reliable for fecal pollution monitoring in high-altitude tropical developing countries such as those of Eastern Africa. PMID:15640171

  11. Raw beef, pork and chicken in Japan contaminated with Salmonella sp., Campylobacter sp., Yersinia enterocolitica, and Clostridium perfringens--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, H; Hoshina, K; Nakamura, R; Ito, Y

    1987-04-01

    One hundred and twenty samples each of raw ground beef, pork and chicken from ten local grocery stores in Shimane Prefecture, Japan, were examined for the presence of Salmonella sp. (Sal), Campylobacter jejuni (Cj), Campylobacter coli (Cc), Yersinia enterocolitica (Ye), and Clostridium perfringens (Cp) from April 1984 to March 1985. A total of 205 isolates of Sal (112 strains), Cj (64 strains), Cc (one strain), Ye (7 strains) and Cp (21 strains) were recovered from 17 beef (14.2%), 31 pork (25.8%) and 94 chicken (78.3%) of 120 samples each. Sal biogroup 1 was found in 8.3% of beef, 13.3% of pork and 35.0% of chicken, Sal biogroup 2 in 0.8% of beef, 4.2% of pork and 14.2% of chicken, Cj in 1.7% of beef and pork and 50.0% of chicken, Cc in 0.8% of pork, Ye serotype 03 was found in 5.0% of pork, and Cp in 1.7% of beef and pork and 10.8% of chicken. These enteropathogens were recovered concomitantly from two pork and 31 chicken samples, especially Sal and Cj. Sal was counted at less than or equal to 10(2)/100 g of beef and pork and at less than or equal to 10(3)/100 g of chicken, Cj was counted at less than or equal to 10(1)/g of beef and pork and at less than or equal to 10(2)/g of chicken, Ye serotype 03 was counted at less than or equal to 10(3)/g of pork, Cp was counted at less than or equal to 10(2)/g of pork and at less than or equal to 10(2)g of chicken, and Cc from pork and Cp from beef were recovered by using enrichment culture. This investigation showed that a second-contamination of Sal and Cj from chicken to beef and pork frequently occurred during the warm months of the year. It was suggested that chicken may become a source of infection with plural organisms of enteric pathogens, especially Sal and Cj, at the same time all the year round, and that pork may be an important source of infection with Ye during the cold months. PMID:2887078

  12. EFFECT OF SPICES AND ORGANIC ACIDS ON THE GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS FROM SPORE INOCULA DURING COOLING OF SOUS-VIDE COOKED GROUND BEEF PRODUCTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat treatments given to minimally processed food products are not sufficient to kill C. perfringens spores when present. Thus, the heat resistant spores may survive, germinate, outgrow and multiply into high numbers of vegetative cells if the rate and extent of cooling is inadequate. There is a ...

  13. A Possible Route for Foodborne Transmission of Clostridium difficile?

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spores of toxigenic Clostridium difficile and spores of food-poisoning strains of Clostridium perfringens show a similar prevalence in meats. Spores of both species are heat resistant and can survive cooking of foods. C. perfringens is a major cause of foodborne illness; studies are needed to determine whether C. difficile transmission by a similar route is a cause of infection. PMID:25599421

  14. Inhibition of Fc epsilon-RI-mediated activation of rat basophilic leukemia cells by Clostridium difficile toxin B (monoglucosyltransferase)

    PubMed

    Prepens, U; Just, I; von Eichel-Streiber, C; Aktories, K

    1996-03-29

    Treatment of rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) 2H3-hm1 cells with Clostridium difficile toxin B (2 ng/ml), which reportedly depolymerizes the actin cytoskeleton, blocked [3H]serotonin release induced by 2,4-dinitrophenyl-bovine serum albumin, carbachol, mastoparan, and reduced ionophore A23187-stimulated degranulation by about 55-60%. In lysates of RBL cells, toxin B 14C-glucosylated two major and one minor protein. By using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting, RhoA and Cdc42 were identified as protein substrates of toxin B. In contrast to toxin B, Clostridium botulinum transferase C3 that selectively inactivates RhoA by ADP-ribosylation did not inhibit degranulation up to a concentration of 150 microg/ml. Antigen-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of a 110-kDa protein was inhibited by toxin B as well as by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. Depolymerization of the microfilament cytoskeleton of RBL cells by C. botulinum C2 toxin or cytochalasin D resulted in an increased [3H]serotonin release induced by antigen, carbachol, mastoparan, or by calcium ionophore A23187, but without affecting toxin B-induced inhibition of degranulation. The data indicate that toxin B inhibits activation of RBL cells by glucosylation of low molecular mass GTP-binding proteins of the Rho subfamily (most likely Cdc42) by a mechanism not involving the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:8631752

  15. A Randomized Controlled Trial Assessing Infectious Disease Risks from Bathing in Fresh Recreational Waters in Relation to the Concentration of Escherichia coli, Intestinal Enterococci, Clostridium perfringens, and Somatic Coliphages

    PubMed Central

    Wiedenmann, Albrecht; Krüger, Petra; Dietz, Klaus; López-Pila, Juan M.; Szewzyk, Regine; Botzenhart, Konrad

    2006-01-01

    We performed epidemiologic studies at public freshwater bathing sites in Germany to provide a better scientific basis for the definition of recreational water quality standards. A total of 2,196 participants were recruited from the local population and randomized into bathers and non-bathers. Bathers were exposed for 10 min and had to immerse their head at least three times. Water samples for microbiological analysis were collected at 20-min intervals. Unbiased concentration–response effects with no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) were demonstrated for three different definitions of gastroenteritis and four fecal indicator organisms. Relative risks for bathing in waters with levels above NOAELs compared with nonbathing ranged from 1.8 (95% CI, 1.2–2.6) to 4.6 (95% CI, 2.1–10.1), depending on the definition of gastroenteritis. The effect of swallowing water provided additional evidence for true dose–response relationships. Based on the NOAELs, the following guide values for water quality are suggested: 100 Escherichia coli, 25 intestinal enterococci, 10 somatic coliphages, or 10 Clostridium perfringens per 100 mL. Recreational water quality standards are intended to protect the health of those consumers who are not already immune or resistant to pathogens that may be associated with indicator organisms. In contrast to current World Health Organization recommendations, we concluded that standards should be based on rates of compliance with NOAELs rather than on attributable risks determined above NOAELs, because these risks depend mainly on the unpredictable susceptibility of the cohorts. Although in theory there is no threshold in real concentration–response relationships, we demonstrated that a NOAEL approach would be a more robust and practical solution to the complex problem of setting standards. PMID:16451859

  16. PATHOGEN SAFETY DATA SHEET Clostridium perfringens

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    pain. Gas Gangrene; breakdown of muscle tissue. Severe pain, edema, tenderness and pallor, followed's Biosafety Officer (406- 994-6998) or Safety and Risk Management (406-994- 2711). EXPOSURE PROCEDURES Mucous of injury report, and submit to Safety and Risk Management. Medical Follow-up During business hours: Montana

  17. In vitro inhibition of growth of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Clostridia perfringens using Probiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens are pathogenic organisms found in horses [1] and they cause disease in animals or humans [2]. Due to concern over pathogens such as these, there is increasing interest in antimicrobial alternatives to prevent or reduce the prevalen...

  18. Monitoring of anti-C. perfringens bacteriophage CpV1 persistence in gastrointestinal tracts of broilers.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A factor limiting promotion of poultry products to the world market is any contamination of birds with pathogens, including Clostridium perfringens. The latter is often accountable for significant economical losses in production of commercial birds because of a possibility of the development of necr...

  19. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for each toxin-antitoxin mixture. A dose of 0.2 ml shall be...

  20. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for each toxin-antitoxin mixture. A dose of 0.2 ml shall be...

  1. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour, and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for each toxin-antitoxin mixture. A dose of 0.2 ml shall be...

  2. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for each toxin-antitoxin mixture. A dose of 0.2 ml shall be...

  3. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for each toxin-antitoxin mixture. A dose of 0.2 ml shall be...

  4. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour, and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for each toxin-antitoxin mixture. A dose of 0.2 ml shall be...

  5. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour, and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for each toxin-antitoxin mixture. A dose of 0.2 ml shall be...

  6. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Potency test. Bulk or final container samples of completed product from each serial shall be tested using the toxin-neutralization test for Beta Antitoxin provided in this section. Dried products shall be rehydrated according to label directions....

  7. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...proper dilutions prescribed in this test. Such solution shall be made by dissolving 1 gram of peptone and 0.25 gram of sodium chloride in each 100 ml of distilled water; adjusting the pH to 7.2; autoclaving at 250 °F. for 25 minutes; and...

  8. epsilon-Hexachlorocyclohexane (epsilon-HC)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    epsilon - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( epsilon - HC ) ; CASRN 6108 - 10 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard

  9. Antibacterial activity against Clostridium genus and antiradical activity of the essential oils from different origin.

    PubMed

    Ka?ániová, Miroslava; Vukovi?, Nenad; Horská, Elena; Salamon, Ivan; Bobková, Alica; Hleba, Lukáš; Fiskelová, Martina; Vat?ák, Alexander; Petrová, Jana; Bobko, Marek

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the antimicrobial and antiradical activities of 15 essential oils were investigated. The antimicrobial activities were determined by using agar disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods against Clostridium genus and antioxidant properties of essential oils by testing their scavenging effect on DPPH radicals activities. We determined the antibacterial activity of Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium hystoliticum, Clostridium intestinale, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium ramosum. We obtained the original commercial essential oils samples of Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus montana, Mentha piperita, Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia montana, Origanum vulgare L. (2 samples), Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abies alba Mill., Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch and Thymus vulgaris L. produced in Slovakia (Calendula a.s., Nova Lubovna, Slovakia). The results of the disk diffusion method showed very high essential oils activity against all tested strains of microorganisms. The best antimicrobial activity against C. butyricum was found at Pimpinella anisum, against C. hystoliticum was found at Pinus sylvestris, against C. intestinale was found at Satureia hortensis L., against C. perfringens was found at Origanum vulgare L. and against C. ramosum was found at Pinus sylvestris. The results of broth microdilution assay showed that none of the essential oils was active against C. hystoliticum. The best antimicrobial activity against C. butyricum was found at Abies alba Mill., against C. intestinale was found at Abies alba Mill., against C. perfringens was found at Satureia montana and against C. ramosum was found at Abius alba and Carum carvi. Antioxidant DPPH radical scavenging activity was determined at several solutions of oil samples (50 ?L.mL(-1)-0.39 ?L.mL(-1)) and the best scavenging effect for the highest concentration (50 ?L.mL(-1)) was observed. The antioxidant properties were different in particular plant species. The highest% of inhibition after 30 min. of reaction was observed at Origanum vulgare (93%), Satureia montana (90.66%) and Lavandula augustifolia (90.22%). PMID:24813985

  10. Clostridium and Bacillus Binary Enterotoxins: Bad for the Bowels, and Eukaryotic Being

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Bradley G.; Pradhan, Kisha; Fleming, Jodie M.; Samy, Ramar Perumal; Barth, Holger; Popoff, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    Some pathogenic spore-forming bacilli employ a binary protein mechanism for intoxicating the intestinal tracts of insects, animals, and humans. These Gram-positive bacteria and their toxins include Clostridium botulinum (C2 toxin), Clostridium difficile (C. difficile toxin or CDT), Clostridium perfringens (?-toxin and binary enterotoxin, or BEC), Clostridium spiroforme (C. spiroforme toxin or CST), as well as Bacillus cereus (vegetative insecticidal protein or VIP). These gut-acting proteins form an AB complex composed of ADP-ribosyl transferase (A) and cell-binding (B) components that intoxicate cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and endosomal trafficking. Once inside the cytosol, the A components inhibit normal cell functions by mono-ADP-ribosylation of globular actin, which induces cytoskeletal disarray and death. Important aspects of each bacterium and binary enterotoxin will be highlighted in this review, with particular focus upon the disease process involving the biochemistry and modes of action for each toxin. PMID:25198129

  11. How to measure epsilon'/epsilon with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1987-04-01

    A pedagogical discussion is given of a lattice calculation of epsilon'. The method is outlined, and preliminary results are presented. They suggest that epsilon'/epsilon may be reduced from previous estimates by 60-70%.

  12. Necrotic Enteritis in Chickens Associated with Clostridium sordellii.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Guillermo; Uzal, Francisco; Chin, R P; Palombo, Enzo A; Awad, Milena; Lyras, Dena; Shivaprasad, H L

    2015-09-01

    Three outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordelii were diagnosed in commercial broiler chicken flocks with 18,000 to 31,000 birds between 18 and 26 days old. Clinical signs in the affected flocks included high mortality up to 2% a day, depression, and diarrhea. The main gross changes included segmental dilation of the small intestine with watery contents, gas, mucoid exudate, and roughened and uneven mucosa, occasionally covered with a pseudomembrane. Microscopic lesions in the small intestine were characterized by extensive areas of coagulative necrosis of the villi, fibrinous exudate in the lumen, and high numbers of large, Gram-positive rods, occasionally containing subterminal spores, seen in the necrotic tissue and lumen. These rods were identified as C. sordellii by immunohistochemistry. Clostridium sordellii was isolated in an almost pure culture from the intestine of affected birds. A retrospective study of commercial broiler chicken and turkey submissions to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System revealed that C. sordellii had been isolated from intestinal lesions in outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease in 8 of 39 cases, 5 times together with Clostridium perfringens and 3 times alone. The latter three cases are reported here. PMID:26478166

  13. Gas discharge plasmas are effective in inactivating Bacillus and Clostridium spores.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shawn; Abramzon, Nina; Jackson, James O; Lin, Wei-Jen

    2012-03-01

    Bacterial spores are the most resistant form of life and have been a major threat to public health and food safety. Nonthermal atmospheric gas discharge plasma is a novel sterilization method that leaves no chemical residue. In our study, a helium radio-frequency cold plasma jet was used to examine its sporicidal effect on selected strains of Bacillus and Clostridium. The species tested included Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, and Clostridium botulinum type A and type E. The plasmas were effective in inactivating selected Bacillus and Clostridia spores with D values (decimal reduction time) ranging from 2 to 8 min. Among all spores tested, C. botulinum type A and C. sporogenes were significantly more resistant to plasma inactivation than other species. Observations by phase contrast microscopy showed that B. subtilis spores were severely damaged by plasmas and the majority of the treated spores were unable to initiate the germination process. There was no detectable fragmentation of the DNA when the spores were treated for up to 20 min. The release of dipicolinic acid was observed almost immediately after the plasma treatment, indicating the spore envelope damage could occur quickly resulting in dipicolinic acid release and the reduction of spore resistance. PMID:22075631

  14. Clostridium botulinum type E occurs and grows in the alga Cladophora glomerata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, M.N.; Whitman, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, massive avian die-offs from Clostridium botulinum type E infection have occurred in the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) area of Lake Michigan. These outbreaks have been coincidental with massive blooms of the green algae Cladophora, mostly Cladophora glomerata. We tested the hypothesis that Clostridium botulinum type E can grow under suitable conditions in these algal mats. In a lab mesocosm study, Cladophora from four outbreak-impacted beaches from SLBE were compared with four unimpacted beaches in the Milwaukee–Racine area for bontE gene of Clostridium botulinum. Frequency of the bontE gene was higher after incubation (25 °C for up to 6 weeks) of Cladophora from impacted vs. the unimpacted area. Since no type E gene was detected initially in Cladophora from any of the eight locations, we infer that the increased occurrence of type E gene arose from spore germination or vegetative Clostridium growth within the existing algal mats of SLBE. Moreover, we found that the congener Clostridium perfringens readily grows in mesocosms containing Cladophora.

  15. Lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is the host receptor for the binary toxin Clostridium difficile transferase (CDT)

    PubMed Central

    Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Carette, Jan E.; Bell, George W.; Schwan, Carsten; Guttenberg, Gregor; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.; Aktories, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. Hypervirulent strains of the pathogen, which are responsible for increased morbidity and mortality of CDI, produce the binary actin-ADP ribosylating toxin Clostridium difficile transferase (CDT) in addition to the Rho-glucosylating toxins A and B. CDT depolymerizes the actin cytoskeleton, increases adherence and colonization of Clostridia by induction of microtubule-based cell protrusions and, eventually, causes death of target cells. Using a haploid genetic screen, we identified the lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor as the membrane receptor for CDT uptake by target cells. Moreover, we show that Clostridium perfringens iota toxin, which is a related binary actin-ADP ribosylating toxin, enters target cells via the lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor. Identification of the toxin receptors is essential for understanding of the toxin uptake and provides a most valuable basis for antitoxin strategies. PMID:21930894

  16. Clostridium Difficile Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a bacterium that causes diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions such as colitis. Symptoms include Watery ... Nausea Abdominal pain or tenderness You might get C. difficile disease if you have an illness that ...

  17. Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease (a thickening of tissue [plaque] inside the penis that causes the penis to curve). Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is in ... the plaque of thickened tissue and allows the penis to be straightened.

  18. Noncommutative epsilon-graded connections

    E-print Network

    Axel de Goursac; Thierry Masson; Jean-Christophe Wallet

    2010-07-20

    We introduce the new notion of epsilon-graded associative algebras which takes its root into the notion of commutation factors introduced in the context of Lie algebras. We define and study the associated notion of epsilon-derivation-based differential calculus, which generalizes the derivation-based differential calculus on associative algebras. A corresponding notion of noncommutative connection is also defined. We illustrate these considerations with various examples of epsilon-graded algebras, in particular some graded matrix algebras and the Moyal algebra. This last example permits also to interpret mathematically a noncommutative gauge field theory.

  19. 40 CFR 725.421 - Introduced genetic material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... perfringens Beta-toxin; Delta-toxin Escherichia coli & other Enterobacteriaceae spp. Heat-labile enterotoxins... difficile Cytotoxin (toxin B) Clostridium perfringens Beta-toxin; Epsilon-toxin; Kappa-toxin Escherichia coli & other Enterobacteriaceae spp. Cytotoxin (Shiga-like toxin, Vero cell toxin)...

  20. 40 CFR 725.421 - Introduced genetic material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... perfringens Beta-toxin; Delta-toxin Escherichia coli & other Enterobacteriaceae spp. Heat-labile enterotoxins... difficile Cytotoxin (toxin B) Clostridium perfringens Beta-toxin; Epsilon-toxin; Kappa-toxin Escherichia coli & other Enterobacteriaceae spp. Cytotoxin (Shiga-like toxin, Vero cell toxin)...

  1. 40 CFR 725.421 - Introduced genetic material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... perfringens Beta-toxin; Delta-toxin Escherichia coli & other Enterobacteriaceae spp. Heat-labile enterotoxins... difficile Cytotoxin (toxin B) Clostridium perfringens Beta-toxin; Epsilon-toxin; Kappa-toxin Escherichia coli & other Enterobacteriaceae spp. Cytotoxin (Shiga-like toxin, Vero cell toxin)...

  2. 40 CFR 725.421 - Introduced genetic material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... perfringens Beta-toxin; Delta-toxin Escherichia coli & other Enterobacteriaceae spp. Heat-labile enterotoxins... difficile Cytotoxin (toxin B) Clostridium perfringens Beta-toxin; Epsilon-toxin; Kappa-toxin Escherichia coli & other Enterobacteriaceae spp. Cytotoxin (Shiga-like toxin, Vero cell toxin)...

  3. Improved anatomy of epsilon'/epsilon in the Standard Model

    E-print Network

    Buras, Andrzej J; Jäger, Sebastian; Jamin, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the ratio epsilon'/epsilon within the Standard Model (SM) using a formalism that is manifestly independent of the values of leading (V-A)x(V-A) QCD penguin, and EW penguin hadronic matrix elements of the operators Q_4, Q_9, and Q_10, and applies to the SM as well as extensions with the same operator structure. It is valid under the assumption that the SM exactly describes the data on CP-conserving K -> pi pi amplitudes. As a result of this and the high precision now available for CKM and quark mass parameters, to high accuracy epsilon'/epsilon depends only on two non-perturbative parameters, B_6^(1/2) and B_8^(3/2), and perturbatively calculable Wilson coefficients. Within the SM, we are separately able to determine the hadronic matrix element _0 from CP-conserving data, significantly more precisely than presently possible with lattice QCD. Employing B_6^(1/2) = 0.57+-0.15 and B_8^(3/2) = 0.76+-0.05, extracted from recent results by the RBC-UKQCD collaboration, we obtain epsilon'/...

  4. Improved anatomy of epsilon'/epsilon in the Standard Model

    E-print Network

    Andrzej J. Buras; Martin Gorbahn; Sebastian Jäger; Matthias Jamin

    2015-11-17

    We present a new analysis of the ratio epsilon'/epsilon within the Standard Model (SM) using a formalism that is manifestly independent of the values of leading (V-A)x(V-A) QCD penguin, and EW penguin hadronic matrix elements of the operators Q_4, Q_9, and Q_10, and applies to the SM as well as extensions with the same operator structure. It is valid under the assumption that the SM exactly describes the data on CP-conserving K -> pi pi amplitudes. As a result of this and the high precision now available for CKM and quark mass parameters, to high accuracy epsilon'/epsilon depends only on two non-perturbative parameters, B_6^(1/2) and B_8^(3/2), and perturbatively calculable Wilson coefficients. Within the SM, we are separately able to determine the hadronic matrix element _0 from CP-conserving data, significantly more precisely than presently possible with lattice QCD. Employing B_6^(1/2) = 0.57+-0.19 and B_8^(3/2) = 0.76+-0.05, extracted from recent results by the RBC-UKQCD collaboration, we obtain epsilon'/epsilon = (1.9+-4.5) 10^-4, substantially more precise than the recent RBC-UKQCD prediction and 2.9 sigma below the experimental value (16.6+-2.3) 10^-4, with the error being fully dominated by that on B_6^(1/2). Even discarding lattice input completely, but employing the recently obtained bound B_6^(1/2) anatomy of the various SM uncertainties, including all sub-leading hadronic matrix elements, briefly commenting on the possibility of underestimated SM contributions as well as on the impact of our results on new physics models.

  5. FERREDOXIN OF CLOSTRIDIUM THERMOSACCHAROLYTICUM

    PubMed Central

    Wilder, Martin; Valentine, R. C.; Akagi, J. M.

    1963-01-01

    Wilder, Martin (University of Kansas, Lawrence), R. C. Valentine, and J. M. Akagi. Ferredoxin of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum. J. Bacteriol. 86:861–865. 1963.—An electron-transferring agent has been isolated from Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum. This factor was found to participate as an electron carrier in the phosphoroclastic reaction of pyruvate, with the subsequent formation of acetyl phosphate and molecular hydrogen. It can be employed interchangeably with the ferredoxin of C. pasteurianum in various reactions. Thermal-stability studies indicated that this factor from C. thermosaccharolyticum was comparatively more heat-resistant than the carrier obtained from C. pasteurianum. It was concluded that this carrier was ferredoxin or a ferredoxin-like substance. PMID:14066486

  6. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L... death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Beta Antitoxin preparation... toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of...

  7. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L... death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Beta Antitoxin preparation... toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of...

  8. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L... death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Beta Antitoxin preparation... toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of...

  9. Potential for growth of Clostridium perfringens from spores in scrapple during cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scrapple is an ethnic food produced/consumed almost exclusively in the Middle Atlantic states of the U.S. It is typically made from ground pork trimmings, seasonings, cornmeal, and flour. This mixture is cooked and then shaped into loaves that are cooled and subsequently stored refrigerated until sl...

  10. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for each toxin-antitoxin mixture. A dose of 0.2 ml shall be...

  11. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for each toxin-antitoxin mixture. A dose of 0.2 ml shall be...

  12. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for each toxin-antitoxin mixture. A dose of 0.2 ml shall be...

  13. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distilled water; adjusting the pH to 7.2; autoclaving at 250 °F for 25 minutes; and storing at 4 °C until... and Bacterin-Toxoid. 113.112 Section 113.112 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... Plant Health Inspection Service. The antitoxin unit value shall be stated on the label. (v)...

  14. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distilled water; adjusting the pH to 7.2; autoclaving at 250 °F for 25 minutes; and storing at 4 °C until... and Bacterin-Toxoid. 113.112 Section 113.112 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... Plant Health Inspection Service. The antitoxin unit value shall be stated on the label. (v)...

  15. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Bulk or final container samples of completed product from each serial shall be tested for potency using the Beta toxin-neutralization test provided in this paragraph. (1) When used in this test, the following words and terms shall mean: (i)...

  16. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Bulk or final container samples of completed product from each serial shall be tested for potency using the Beta toxin-neutralization test provided in this paragraph. (1) When used in this test, the following words and terms shall mean: (i)...

  17. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Bulk or final container samples of completed product from each serial shall be tested for potency using the Beta toxin-neutralization test provided in this paragraph. (1) When used in this test, the following words and terms shall mean: (i)...

  18. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Bulk or final container samples of completed product from each serial shall be tested for potency using the Beta toxin-neutralization test provided in this paragraph. (1) When used in this test, the following words and terms shall mean: (i)...

  19. Predictive model for growth of Clostridium perfringens during cooling of cooked ground chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional methodologies for development of microbial growth models under dynamic temperature conditions do not take into account the organism’s prior history. Such models were shown to be inadequate in predicting growth of the organisms under dynamic conditions commonly encountered in the food ind...

  20. PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS DURING COOLING OF COOKED GROUND CHICKEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional methodologies for development of microbial growth models under dynamic temperature conditions do not take adequate account for the organism’s history. Such models were shown to be inadequate in predicting growth of the organisms under dynamic conditions commonly encountered in the food i...

  1. Facteurs Epsilon p-adiques Adriano Marmora

    E-print Network

    Franchi, Jacques

    : overconvergent F-isocrystals, epsilon factors, product formula, de Rh* *am representations, norms oeld theory Marmora Abstract We develop and study the epsilon factor the epsilon factor of an * *overconvergent F -isocrystal over Spec(K), using the p-adic monodromy theorem

  2. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A; Leang, C; Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2014-03-25

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis.

  3. Serotyping of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed Central

    Toma, S; Lesiak, G; Magus, M; Lo, H L; Delmée, M

    1988-01-01

    A total of 246 live Clostridium difficile cultures were serotyped by a slide agglutination technique. Fifteen grouping antisera were produced which serotyped 98% of the cultures (241 of 246). Our results indicated that certain serogroups may have specific pathogenicity. Strains of serogroups A, G, H, K, S1, and S4 were cytotoxigenic and were isolated mainly from adult patients with pseudomembranous colitis or antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Nontoxigenic strains of serogroups D and Cd-5 were isolated mainly from asymptomatic neonates and small children. Some cross-reactions occurred among some strains of serogroups A, Cd-5, G, and K. These strains were further examined by analysis of protein profiles and restriction endonuclease patterns to elucidate their serology. Typing of C. difficile by using slide agglutination is a simple technique suitable for routine examination. Serogrouping may be a useful epidemiological marker and could help in elucidating the medical relevance of some C. difficile isolates. PMID:2833528

  4. Clostridium difficile and C. difficile Toxin Testing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sites Search Help? Clostridium difficile and C. difficile Toxin Testing Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... GDH Formal name: Clostridium difficile Culture; C. difficile Toxin, A and B; C. difficile Cytotoxin Assay; Glutamate ...

  5. Measurement of the [ital CP]-violation parameter Re([var epsilon][prime]/[var epsilon])

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, L.K.; Barker, A.R.; Briere, R.A.; Makoff, G.; Papadimitriou, V.; Patterson, J.R.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Somalwar, S.V.; Wah, Y.W.; Winstein, B.; Winston, R.; Woods, M.; Yamamoto, H. ); Swallow, E.C. The Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 ); Bock, G.J.; Coleman, R.; Enagonio, J.; Hsiung, Y.B.; Ramberg, E.; Stanfield, K.; Tschirhart, R.; Yamanaka, T. ); Gollin, G.D.; Karlsson, M.; Okamitsu, J.K. ); Debu, P.; Peyaud, B.; Turlay, R.; Vallage, B. (Departement de Physique des Particules Elementaires, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvet

    1993-03-01

    A measurement of the [ital CP]-violation parameter Re([var epsilon][prime]/[var epsilon]) has been made using the full E731 data set. We find Re([var epsilon][prime]/[var epsilon])=(7.4[plus minus]5.2[plus minus]2.9)[times]10[sup [minus]4] where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  6. Motility in the epsilon-proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Beeby, Morgan

    2015-12-01

    The epsilon-proteobacteria are a widespread group of flagellated bacteria frequently associated with either animal digestive tracts or hydrothermal vents, with well-studied examples in the human pathogens of Helicobacter and Campylobacter genera. Flagellated motility is important to both pathogens and hydrothermal vent members, and a number of curious differences between the epsilon-proteobacterial and enteric bacterial motility paradigms make them worthy of further study. The epsilon-proteobacteria have evolved to swim at high speed and through viscous media that immobilize enterics, a phenotype that may be accounted for by the molecular architecture of the unusually large epsilon-proteobacterial flagellar motor. This review summarizes what is known about epsilon-proteobacterial motility and focuses on a number of recent discoveries that rationalize the differences with enteric flagellar motility. PMID:26590774

  7. Distribution of Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed Central

    Huss, H H

    1980-01-01

    The distribution of Clostridium botulinum in the natural environments of Denmark, The Faroe Islands, Iceland, Greenland, and Bangladesh was examined. A total of 684 samples were tested. Type E was found in 90% of samples from the aquatic environment of Denmark, including sediments from young artificial lakes, and in 86% of samples from the marine environment of Greenland. Type E was not found in Danish cultivated soil and woodlands, including cultivated soil from reclaimed sea beds, but type B was frequently demonstrated in these environments. C. botulinum types A, B, or E were found in 2.6% of samples from the environments of the Faroe Islands and Iceland, whereas types C or D were demonstrated in 42% of samples from Bangladesh. The incidence of type E in aquatic sediments was not related to general industrial pollution or a high content of rotting vegetation. Fish or a rich aquatic fauna, on the other hand, appeared to contribute to a high incidence of type E. Based on these findings, it is suggested that type E is a true aquatic organism, because this environment offers the best conditions for survival of the spore in nature. It is further suggested that its presence in aquatic bottom deposits is based on sedimentation after proliferation in the carrion of the aquatic fauna and dissemination by water currents and migrating fish. PMID:6990867

  8. Isolation of Clostridium thermocellum auxotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, B.S.; Gomez, R.F.

    1982-02-01

    The conversion of biomass of fuels and chemical feedstocks by microbial fermentation offers the potential of solving two of today's important problems: waste accumulation and exhaustion of fossil fuels. Microorganisms with the capabilities of converting biomass components such as cellulos and hemicellulose to chemicals and fuels in a single step are of particular interest. One such microorganism is Clostridium thermocellum, a thermophilic anaerobe which degrades cellulose to ethanol and organic acids. For efficient industrial use, the cellulolytic capacity of this strain must be improved by genetic means. Spontaneous and UV irradiation-induced auxotrophic mutants of Clostridium thermocellum, an anaerobic cellulolytic thermophile, were isolated after penicillin enrichment in a chemically defined medium.

  9. Systematic effects of the quenched approximation on the strong penguin contribution to epsilon-prime / epsilon

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Christ, N.H.; Dawson, C.; Laiho, J.W.; Noaki, J.; Li, S.; Soni, A.; /Brookhaven

    2006-03-01

    We discuss the implementation and properties of the quenched approximation in the calculation of the left-right, strong penguin contributions (i.e. Q{sub 6}) to {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}. The coefficient of the new chiral logarithm, discovered by Golterman and Pallante, which appears at leading order in quenched chiral perturbation theory is evaluated using both the method proposed by those authors and by an improved approach which is free of power divergent corrections. The result implies a large quenching artifact in the contribution of Q{sub 6} to {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}. This failure of the quenched approximation affects only the strong penguin operators and so does not affect the Q8 contribution to {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} nor ReA{sub 0}, ReAP{sub 2} and thus, the {Delta}I = 1/2 rule at tree level in chiral perturbation theory.

  10. Systematic effects of the quenched approximation on the strong penguin contribution to epsilon'/epsilon

    E-print Network

    C. Aubin; N. H. Christ; C. Dawson; J. Laiho; J. Noaki; S. Li; A. Soni

    2006-05-02

    We discuss the implementation and properties of the quenched approximation in the calculation of the left-right, strong penguin contributions (i.e. Q_6) to epsilon'/epsilon. The coefficient of the new chiral logarithm, discovered by Golterman and Pallante, which appears at leading order in quenched chiral perturbation theory is evaluated using both the method proposed by those authors and by an improved approach which is free of power divergent corrections. The result implies a large quenching artifact in the contribution of Q_6 to epsilon'/epsilon. This failure of the quenched approximation affects only the strong penguin operators and so does not affect the Q_8 contribution to epsilon'/epsilon nor Re A_0, Re A_2 and thus the Delta I=1/2 rule at tree level in chiral perturbation theory.

  11. Systematic effects of the quenched approximation on the strong penguin contribution to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Christ, N. H.; Li, S.; Dawson, C.; Noaki, J.; Laiho, J. W.; Soni, A.

    2006-08-01

    We discuss the implementation and properties of the quenched approximation in the calculation of the left-right, strong penguin contributions (i.e. Q{sub 6}) to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon}. The coefficient of the new chiral logarithm, discovered by Golterman and Pallante, which appears at leading order in quenched chiral perturbation theory is evaluated using both the method proposed by those authors and by an improved approach which is free of power divergent corrections. The result implies a large quenching artifact in the contribution of Q{sub 6} to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon}. This failure of the quenched approximation affects only the strong penguin operators and so does not affect the Q{sub 8} contribution to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon} nor ReA{sub 0}, ReA{sub 2} and thus, the {delta}I=1/2 rule at tree level in chiral perturbation theory.

  12. First result on a new measurement of epsilon'/epsilon in the neutral-kaon system

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Patterson, J.R.; Wah, Y.W.; Winstein, B.; Winston, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Swallow, E.C.; Bock, G.J.; Coleman, R.; and others

    1988-04-25

    A new beam line and detector were constructed to increase statistical precision and greatly reduce systematic uncertainty on the ratio of the CP-nonconserving parameters epsilon'/epsilon. Major improve- ments are discussed together with a result from a first run: epsilon'/epsilon = 0.0032 +- 0.0028 (statistical) +- 0.0012 (systematic). The precision is better than earlier measurements yet the result is still consistent with the superweak mechanism (which predicts zero) and that due to Kobayashi and Maskawa. Significantly more data are being collected.

  13. Synergistic hemolysis phenomenon shown by an alpha-toxin-producing Clostridium perfingens and streptococcal CAMP factor in presumptive streptococcal grouping.

    PubMed Central

    Gubash, S M

    1978-01-01

    A new phenomenon of synergistic hemolysis by Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin and the streptococcal CAMP factor on human and guinea pig erythrocytes is described. A possible mode of action of the CAMP factors is suggested. On human blood agar all of the tested isolates of group B streptococci gave an arrowhead-shaped zone of hemolysis; 74% of group A gave a crescent-shaped lytic zone, whereas all isolates of groups C and G and the remaining 26% of group A streptococci gave a bullet-shaped lytic zone. By comparison, in the CAMP test incubated aerobically and anaerobically, 70 and 91%, respectively, of streptococci other than group B gave positive, arrowhead-shaped lytic zones. If all intermediate positive reactions in the CAMP tests were read as negative after aerobic incubation, only 89% of group B streptococci would be properly identified. The synergistic hemolysis phenomenon, using an alpha-toxin-producing C. perfringens and human blood agar, provided a reliable test for presumptive identification of group B streptococci, with promising potential to differentiate in the same test group A streptococci from other groups. Images PMID:215600

  14. Treatment of Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Melinda M; Johnson, Stuart

    2015-03-01

    Vancomycin and metronidazole were historically considered equivalent therapies for the management of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI); however, recent data confirm more favorable outcomes with vancomycin. Fidaxomicin is a narrow spectrum antibiotic that has an advantage in reducing recurrence rates compared with vancomycin, possibly owing to its sparing effect on normal colonic microbiota. Data are limited for guiding management of CDI recurrences, particularly multiple recurrences. Several empiric approaches to manage these cases are reviewed. PMID:25573676

  15. Tadpole diagram,. delta. /ital I/=1/2 enhancement and EPSILON'/EPSILON

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bo; Zhu Zhong-yuan

    1989-04-01

    The contributions of tadpole diagrams including /ital t/ and /ital c/ quark intermediate states to the amplitude of /ital K//r arrow/2..pi.. and EPSILON'/EPSILON are analyzed. The result shows that it is quite possible that their contributions are the most important ones. They may give enough ..delta../ital I/=1/2 enhancement for a reasonable quark relative-momentum cutoff value which depends on the /ital K/ wave function. However, the calculated value of /vert bar/EPSILON'/EPSILON/vert bar/ is too large if we suppose all CP violation effects to come from the Kobayashi-Maskawa phase delta. Perhaps one approach to solve this difficulty is to assume that EPSILON comes mainly from superweak CP violation.

  16. Clostridium difficile-associated colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Mark W.; Beck, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the basic microbiology, pathogenesis of disease, and diagnosis of the nosocomial pathogen Clostridium difficile and to examine therapies recommended by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE: was searched using MeSH headings. Controlled trials for therapy were sought, but case-control studies and observational reviews were included. MAIN MESSAGE: Clostridium difficile causes approximately 20% of cases of diarrhea associated with antibiotics, including clindamycin and the second- and third-generation cephalosporins. Diarrhea is usually mild, but can be severe; extreme cases develop toxic megacolon. Diagnosis is dependent on demonstrating presence of clostridial toxin in stool specimens or of pseudomembranes through sigmoidoscopy. First-line therapy for C. difficile diarrhea is restricted to metronidazole. Second-line therapy for treatment failure is vancomycin. For relapse, a second course of metronidazole is recommended; tapering courses of vancomycin and probiotics are used for multiple recurrences. CONCLUSION: Clostridium difficile is an important nosocomial pathogen requiring prudent use of antibiotics and strict infection-control policies to prevent large health care costs. PMID:15597970

  17. Fisher Exponent from Pseudo-$\\epsilon$ Expansion

    E-print Network

    Sokolov, A I

    2014-01-01

    Critical exponent $\\eta$ for three-dimensional systems with $n$-vector order parameter is evaluated in the frame of pseudo-$\\epsilon$ expansion approach. Pseudo-$\\epsilon$ expansion ($\\tau$-series) for $\\eta$ found up to $\\tau^7$ term for $n$ = 0, 1, 2, 3 and within $\\tau^6$ order for general $n$ is shown to have a structure rather favorable for getting numerical estimates. Use of Pad\\'e approximants and direct summation of $\\tau$-series result in iteration procedures rapidly converging to the asymptotic values that are very close to most reliable numerical estimates of $\\eta$ known today. The origin of this fortune is discussed and shown to lie in general properties of the pseudo-$\\epsilon$ expansion machinery interfering with some peculiarities of the renormalization group expansion of $\\eta$.

  18. Clostridium hastiforme is a later synonym of Tissierella praeacuta

    E-print Network

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    argentinense, Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium sporogenes, C. subterminale and C. hastiforme. A correspondingClostridium hastiforme is a later synonym of Tissierella praeacuta Jin-Woo Bae,1 Ja Ryeong Park,1 species Clostridium hastiforme and Tissierella praeacuta appear to be similar from their published

  19. Precession of the epsilon ring of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.

    1979-01-01

    It is noted that the outer and inner boundaries of the epsilon ring of Uranus can be fitted by aligned Keplerian ellipses. Four possible mechanisms for maintaining uniform precession in the epsilon ring are considered: the ring's self-gravity, precession due to a satellite, smooth pressure gradients, and shocklike phenomena. It is proposed that apse alignment is maintained by the self-gravity of the ring. In this case, a ring mass of approximately 5 x 10 to the 18th g and a mean surface density at quadrature of about 25 g/sq cm are estimated.

  20. Implementation of the topological epsilon-algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, R.C.E.

    1988-09-01

    A recent survey paper found the topological epsilon-algorithm (TEA) to compare very unfavourably with certain other methods for the acceleration of vector sequences. It is suggested that this poor performance of the TEA is due to an error in implementation. When this error is removed the method is found to perform at least as well as the other methods in most situations.

  1. Cloning and nucleotide sequence analysis of the colH gene from Clostridium histolyticum encoding a collagenase and a gelatinase.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, K; Matsushita, O; Minami, J; Okabe, A

    1994-01-01

    The colH gene encoding a collagenase was cloned from Clostridium histolyticum JCM 1403. Nucleotide sequencing showed a major open reading frame encoding a 116-kDa protein of 1,021 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence and a zinc metalloprotease consensus sequence, HEXXH. A 116-kDa collagenase and a 98-kDa gelatinase were copurified from culture supernatants of C. histolyticum. While the former degraded both native and denatured collagen, the latter degraded only denatured collagen. Peptide mapping with V8 protease showed that all peptide fragments, except a few minor ones, liberated from the two enzymes coincided with each other. Analysis of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the two enzymes revealed that their first 24 amino acid residues were identical and coincided with those deduced from the nucleotide sequence. These results indicate that the 98-kDa gelatinase is generated from the 116-kDa collagenase by cleaving off the C-terminal region, which could be responsible for binding or increasing the accessibility of the collagenase to native collagen fibers. The role of the C-terminal region in the functional and evolutional aspects of the collagenase was further studied by comparing the amino acid sequence of the C. histolyticum collagenase with those of three homologous enzymes: the collagenases from Clostridium perfringens and Vibrio alginolyticus and Achromobacter lyticus protease I. Images PMID:7961400

  2. Clostridium difficile MazF Toxin Exhibits Selective, Not Global, mRNA Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Rothenbacher, Francesca P.; Suzuki, Motoo; Hurley, Jennifer M.; Montville, Thomas J.; Kirn, Thomas J.; Ouyang, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important, emerging nosocomial pathogen. The transition from harmless colonization to disease is typically preceded by antimicrobial therapy, which alters the balance of the intestinal flora, enabling C. difficile to proliferate in the colon. One of the most perplexing aspects of the C. difficile infectious cycle is its ability to survive antimicrobial therapy and transition from inert colonization to active infection. Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems have been implicated in facilitating persistence after antibiotic treatment. We identified only one TA system in C. difficile strain 630 (epidemic type X), designated MazE-cd and MazF-cd, a counterpart of the well-characterized Escherichia coli MazEF TA system. This E. coli MazF toxin cleaves mRNA at ACA sequences, leading to global mRNA degradation, growth arrest, and death. Likewise, MazF-cd expression in E. coli or Clostridium perfringens resulted in growth arrest. Primer extension analysis revealed that MazF-cd cleaved RNA at the five-base consensus sequence UACAU, suggesting that the mRNAs susceptible to cleavage comprise a subset of total mRNAs. In agreement, we observed differential cleavage of several mRNAs by MazF-cd in vivo, revealing a direct correlation between the number of cleavage recognition sites within a given transcript and its susceptibility to degradation by MazF-cd. Interestingly, upon detailed statistical analyses of the C. difficile transcriptome, the major C. difficile virulence factor toxin B (TcdB) and CwpV, a cell wall protein involved in aggregation, were predicted to be significantly resistant to MazF-cd cleavage. PMID:22544268

  3. Binary Bacterial Toxins: Biochemistry, Biology, and Applications of Common Clostridium and Bacillus Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Holger; Aktories, Klaus; Popoff, Michel R.; Stiles, Bradley G.

    2004-01-01

    Certain pathogenic species of Bacillus and Clostridium have developed unique methods for intoxicating cells that employ the classic enzymatic “A-B” paradigm for protein toxins. The binary toxins produced by B. anthracis, B. cereus, C. botulinum, C. difficile, C. perfringens, and C. spiroforme consist of components not physically associated in solution that are linked to various diseases in humans, animals, or insects. The “B” components are synthesized as precursors that are subsequently activated by serine-type proteases on the targeted cell surface and/or in solution. Following release of a 20-kDa N-terminal peptide, the activated “B” components form homoheptameric rings that subsequently dock with an “A” component(s) on the cell surface. By following an acidified endosomal route and translocation into the cytosol, “A” molecules disable a cell (and host organism) via disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, increasing intracellular levels of cyclic AMP, or inactivation of signaling pathways linked to mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases. Recently, B. anthracis has gleaned much notoriety as a biowarfare/bioterrorism agent, and of primary interest has been the edema and lethal toxins, their role in anthrax, as well as the development of efficacious vaccines and therapeutics targeting these virulence factors and ultimately B. anthracis. This review comprehensively surveys the literature and discusses the similarities, as well as distinct differences, between each Clostridium and Bacillus binary toxin in terms of their biochemistry, biology, genetics, structure, and applications in science and medicine. The information may foster future studies that aid novel vaccine and drug development, as well as a better understanding of a conserved intoxication process utilized by various gram-positive, spore-forming bacteria. PMID:15353562

  4. Comparative proteomic analysis of Clostridium difficile 

    E-print Network

    Chilton, Caroline Hazel

    2011-11-25

    The recent increase in availability of next generation sequencing methodologies has led to extensive analysis of the genome of Clostridium difficile. In contrast, protein expression analysis, crucial to the elucidation ...

  5. Epsilon near zero based phenomena in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basharin, Alexey A.; Mavidis, Charalampos; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N.; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2013-04-01

    We present and analyze unique phenomena of enhanced transmission through systems of subwavelength dielectric cylinders embedded in an epsilon near zero host. Our analysis shows that these phenomena are due to Mie-resonance modes arisen in the dielectric cylinders. Subwavelength waveguides and lenses are proposed based on coupling of these modes between neighboring cylinders. Finally, the proposed phenomena and their possible applications are numerically demonstrated in the THz regime in a realistic polaritonic material of LiF rods in KCl.

  6. Clostridium Difficile Infections - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Are Here: Home ? Multiple Languages ? All Health Topics ? Clostridium Difficile Infections URL of this page: https://www.nlm. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Clostridium Difficile Infections - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features ...

  7. A new process using a strain of Clostridium bacteria can

    E-print Network

    Langendoen, Koen

    A new process using a strain of Clostridium bacteria can successfully convert biomass into butyl pipelines, facilitating transport and storage. Clostridium bacteria On the production side biobutanol has several disadvantages. It can be produced by fermentation using Clostridium bacteria, but this process

  8. Epsilon Aur monitoring during predicted pulsation phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.; Templeton, Matthew R.

    2014-09-01

    Dr. Robert Stencel (University of Denver Astronomy Program) has requested that AAVSO observers monitor epsilon Aurigae from now through the end of the observing season. "Studies of the long-term, out-of-eclipse photometry of this enigmatic binary suggest that intervals of coherent pulsation occur at roughly 1/3 of the 27.1-year orbital period. Kloppenborg, et al. noted that stable variation patterns develop at 3,200-day intervals' implying that 'the next span of dates when such events might happen are circa JD ~2457000 (2014 December)'. "These out-of-eclipse light variations often have amplitudes of ~0.1 magnitude in U, and ~0.05 in V, with characteristic timescales of 60-100 days. The AAVSO light curve data to the present may indicate that this coherent phenomenon has begun, but we encourage renewed efforts by observers...to help deduce whether these events are internal to the F star, or externally-driven by tidal interaction with the companion star." Nightly observations or one observation every few days (CCD/PEP/DSLR, VUBR (amplitude too small for visual)) are requested. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. Epsilon Aur was the subject of major international campaigns and the AAVSO's Citizen Sky project as it went through its 27.1-year eclipse in 2009-2011. Over 700 observers worldwide submitted over 20,000 multicolor observations to the AAVSO International Database for this project. Much information on eps Aur is available from the AAVSO, including material on the Citizen Sky website (http://www.aavso.org/epsilon-aurigae and http://www.citizensky.org/content/star-our-project). The Journal of the AAVSO, Volume 40, No. 2 (2012) was devoted to discussion of and research results from this event. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  9. Nonlinear models in 2 + epsilon dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Friedan, D.H.

    1980-08-01

    The general nonlinear scalar model is studied at asymptotically low temperature near two dimensions. The low-temperature expansion is renormalized, and effective algorithms are derived for calculation to all orders in the renormalized expansion. The renormalization group coefficients are calculated in the two-loop approximation, and topological properties of the renormalization group equations are investigated. Special attention is paid to the infrared instabilities of the fixed points, since they provide the continuum limits of the model. The model consists of a scalar field phi on Euclidean 2 + epsilon space whose values phi(x) lie in a finite-dimensional differentiable manifold. 4 figures.

  10. The Final Measurement of Epsilon'/Epsilon from KTeV

    SciTech Connect

    Worcester, E.T.

    2009-10-01

    The authors present precise measurements of CP and CPT symmetry based on the full dataset of K {yields} {pi}{pi} decays collected by the KTeV experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory during 1996, 1997, and 1999. This dataset contains about 15 million K {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} and 70 million K {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays. They measure the direct CP violation parameter Re({epsilon}'/{epsilon}) = (19.2 {+-} 2.1) x 10{sup -4}. they find the K{sub L}-K{sub S} mass difference {Delta}m = (5265 {+-} 10) x 10{sup 6} {bar h}s{sup -1} and the K{sub S} lifetime {tau}{sub S} = (89.62 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -12} s. They test CPT symmetry by finding the phase of the indirect CP violation parameter {epsilon}, {phi}{sub {epsilon}} = (44.09 {+-} 1.00){sup o}, and the difference of the relative phases between the CP violating and CP conserving decay amplitudes for K {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} ({phi}{sub +-}) and for K {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} ({phi}{sub 00}), {Delta}{phi} = (0.29 {+-} 0.31){sup o}. these results are consistent with other experimental results and with CPT symmetry.

  11. Classical closure theory and Lam's interpretation of epsilon-RNG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    Lam's phenomenological epsilon-renormalization group (RNG) model is quite different from the other members of that group. It does not make use of the correspondence principle and the epsilon-expansion procedure. We demonstrate that Lam's epsilon-RNG model is essentially the physical space version of the classical closure theory in spectral space and consider the corresponding treatment of the eddy viscosity and energy backscatter.

  12. Epsilon Metal Summary Report FY 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, Denis M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Windisch, Charles F.; Riley, Brian J.

    2011-09-30

    The Epsilon-metal ({var_epsilon}-metal) phase was selected in FY 2009 as a potential waste form to for immobilizing the noble metals found in the undissolved solids + aqueous stream, and the soluble Tc from ion-exchange process, each resulting from proposed aqueous reprocessing. {var_epsilon}-metal phase is observed in used nuclear fuel and the natural reactors of Oklobono in Gabon, where the long-term corrosion behavior was demonstrated. This makes {var_epsilon}-metal a very attractive waste form. Last fiscal year, {var_epsilon}-metal was successfully fabricated by combining the five-metals, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd and Re (surrogate for Tc), into pellets followed by consolidation with an arc melter. The arc melter produced fully dense samples with the epsilon structure. However, some chemistry differences were observed in the microstructure that resulted in regions rich in Re and Mo, and others rich in Pd, while Ru and Rh remained fairly constant throughout. This year, thermal stability (air), and corrosion testing of the samples fabricated by arc melting were the main focus for experimental work. Thermal stability was measured with a differential scanning calorimeter - thermogravimetric analyzer, by both ramp heating as well as step heating. There is clear evidence during the ramp heating experiment of an exothermic event + a weight loss peak both beginning at {approx}700 C. Step heating showed an oxidation event at {approx}690 C with minimal weight gain that occurs just before the weight loss event at 700 C. The conclusion being that the e-metal begins to oxidize and then become volatile. These findings are useful for considering the effects of voloxidation process. Three different pellets were subjected to electrochemical testing to study the corrosion behavior of the epsilon-metal phase in various conditions, namely acidic, basic, saline, and inert. Test was done according to an interim procedure developed for the alloy metal waste form. First an open circuit potential was measured, followed by linear polarization sweeps. The linear polarization sweep range was the Tafel equation was fit to the linear polarization sweep data to determine the corrosion rate of each pellet in each test solution. The average calculated corrosion rates of the three pellets according to solution conditions were: -1.91 x 10{sup -4} mm/yr (0.001 M NaOH), -1.48 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.01 M NaCl), -8.77 x 10{sup -4} mm/yr (0.001 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), -2.09 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.001 M NaOH + 0.01 M NaCl), and -1.54 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.001 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.01 M NaCl). Three single-pass flow through (SPFT) test were conducted at a flow rate of 10 ml/day, at 90 C, and pH of 2.5, 7.0, and 9.0 for up to 322 days. Results of the tests indicate that dissolution rates were 5 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup 2} d{sup -1} at pH 9.0, 1.2 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at pH 7.0, and 2 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at pH 2.5. The sample used for the pH 7.0 SPFT test contains extra Re compared to samples used for the other two SPFT test, which came from a single pellet. The corrosion data measured this year indicate that the {var_epsilon}-metal phase is chemically durable. The two chemically different phases, but structurally the same, behave differently during dissolution according to the microstructure changes observed in both the electrochemical and in SPFT test. Characterization of the test specimens after testing suggests that the dissolution is complex and involves oxidative dissolution followed by precipitation of both oxide and metallic phases. These data suggest that the dissolution in the electrochemical and SPFT tests is different; a process that needs further investigation.

  13. Formate dehydrogenase of Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C L; Mortenson, L E

    1984-01-01

    Formate dehydrogenase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from N2-fixing cells of Clostridium pasteurianum W5. The purified enzyme has a minimal Mr of 117,000 with two nonidentical subunits with molecular weights of 76,000 and 34,000, respectively. It contains 2 mol of molybdenum, 24 mol of nonheme iron, and 28 mol of acid-labile sulfide per mol of enzyme; no other metal ions were detected. Analysis of its iron-sulfur centers by ligand exchange techniques showed that 20 iron atoms of formate dehydrogenase can be extruded as Fe4S4 centers. Fluorescence analysis of its isolated molybdenum centers suggests it is a molybdopterin. The clostridial formate dehydrogenase has a pH optimum between 8.3 and 8.5 and a temperature optimum of 52 degrees C. The Km for formate is 1.72 mM with a Vmax of 551 mumol of methyl viologen reduced per min per mg of protein. Sodium azide competes competitively with formate (K1 = 3.57 microM), whereas the inactivation by cyanide follows pseudo-first-order kinetics with K = 5 X 10(2) M-1 s-1. PMID:6547435

  14. Butanol Production from Crystalline Cellulose by Cocultured Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 ?

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Shunichi; Kiyoshi, Keiji; Kadokura, Toshimori; Nakazato, Atsumi

    2011-01-01

    We investigated butanol production from crystalline cellulose by cocultured cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum and the butanol-producing strain, Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum (strain N1-4). Butanol was produced from Avicel cellulose after it was incubated with C. thermocellum for at least 24 h at 60°C before the addition of strain N1-4. Butanol produced by strain N1-4 on 4% Avicel cellulose peaked (7.9 g/liter) after 9 days of incubation at 30°C, and acetone was undetectable in this coculture system. Less butanol was produced by cocultured Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii than by strain N1-4, indicating that strain N1-4 was the optimal strain for producing butanol from crystalline cellulose in this coculture system. PMID:21764954

  15. 2006 Nature Publishing Group Structure of epsilon15 bacteriophage reveals

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Wen

    #12;© 2006 Nature Publishing Group Structure of epsilon15 bacteriophage reveals genome organization bacteriophage epsilon15 (ref. 1) determined from single-particle cryo-electron microscopy, without icosahedralDNA) bacteriophages are vectors for gene transfer among enteric bacteria, including important human pathogens7

  16. Perturbative matching of the staggered four-fermion operators for {epsilon}'/{epsilon}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Weonjong

    2001-09-01

    Using staggered fermions, we calculate the perturbative corrections to the bilinear and four-fermion operators that are used in the numerical study of weak matrix elements for {epsilon}'/{epsilon}. We present results for one-loop matching coefficients between continuum operators, calculated in the naive dimensional regularization (NDR) scheme, and gauge invariant staggered fermion operators. In particular, we concentrate on Feynman diagrams of the current-current insertion type. We also present results for the tadpole improved operators. These results, combined with existing results for penguin diagrams, provide a complete one-loop renormalization of the staggered four-fermion operators. Therefore, using our results, it is possible to match a lattice calculation of K{sup 0}-{bar K}{sup 0} mixing and K{yields}{pi}{pi} decays to the continuum NDR results with all corrections of O(g{sup 2}) included.

  17. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Katherine R.; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however, developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarize the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics. Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage–host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution. No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using “whole-phages” are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem-free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen. PMID:24808893

  18. Clostridium difficile in poultry and poultry meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer t...

  19. Coculture Production of Butanol by Clostridium Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, S. L.; Foutch, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Production of butanol by anaerobic fermentation of sugars enhanced by use of two Clostridium species, one of which feeds on metabolic product of other. Renewed interest in fermentation process for making butanol stimulated by potential use of butanol as surfactant in enhanced oil recovery. Butanol also used as fuel or as chemical feedstock and currently produced synthetically from petroleum.

  20. Optical Characterization of Epsilon-Near-Zero, Epsilon-Near-Pole and Hyperbolic Response in Nanowire Metamaterials

    E-print Network

    Starko-Bowes, Ryan; Newman, Ward; Hu, Huan; Kallos, Themos; Palikaras, George; Fedosejevs, Robert; Pramanik, Sandipan; Jacob, Zubin

    2015-01-01

    We report on the optical and physical characterization of metallic nanowire (NW) metamaterials fabricated by electrodeposition of ~30 nm diameter gold nanowires in nano-porous anodic aluminum oxide. We observe a uniaxial anisotropic dielectric response for the NW metamaterials that displays both epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) and epsilon-near-pole (ENP) resonances. We show that a fundamental difference in the behavior of NW-metamaterials from metal-dielectric multilayer (ML) metamaterials is the differing directions of the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) and epsilon-near-pole (ENP) dielectric responses relative to the optical axis of the effective dielectric tensor. In contrast to multilayer metamaterials, nanowire metamaterials exhibit an omnidirectional ENP and an angularly dependent ENZ. Also in contrast to ML metamaterials, the NW metamaterials exhibit ENP and ENZ resonances that are highly absorptive and can be effectively excited from free space. Our fabrication allows a large tunability of the epsilon-near-zero reson...

  1. Clostridium Sacroiliitis (Gas Gangrene) Following Sacroiliac Joint Injection--Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Kurnutala, Lakshmi N; Ghatol, Dipti; Upadhyay, Aman

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old woman presented with chronic lumbosacral pain since her laminectomy and instrumentation 10 years ago. Examination was consistent with left sacroiliitis, and the patient underwent an elective left sacroiliac joint injection. Two days following her procedure she fell and landed on her left hip and on the next day, she presented to the emergency room with acutely worsening left gluteal pain. On evaluation in the emergency department, she was found to be suffering from a fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, and dysuria. A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed and this showed extensive foci of gas throughout the posterior aspect of the left iliopsoas muscle, sacrum, and ileum surrounding the left sacroiliac joint. The patient underwent emergent surgical debridement. The microbiology report of blood culture revealed clostridium perfringens, while her pathology showed necrosis and acute inflammation of fibroadipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and fat. The patient's hospital course resulted in multi-organ failure and the family elected for comfort care measures only. Unfortunately, she passed away 36 hours later. Septic arthritis is a potential catastrophic complication following intra-articular steroid therapy. The cause of the septic joint can be multifactorial but is likely caused by one of the following processes: direct inoculation of bacteria by the injection, hematogenous seeding of the percutaneous injection tract, or due to activation of a quiescent infection by the injected steroid. Clostridial spores are very resistant to standard aseptic skin preparations, including chlorhexidine and betadine solutions. The only effective methods to eliminate the spores is to heat them at a temperature greater than 100 degrees Celsius for 10 minutes or with use of a 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution. We hypothesize that clostridium spores were present on the patient's skin from previous stool soiling, and that these were introduced directly into the soft tissue by needle trauma. Rare complications such as this one are scarcely reported in the literature and thus it becomes difficult to adequately identify risk factors or to formulate strategies to improve practice management. PMID:26218953

  2. VARIABILITY IN OPTICAL SPECTRA OF {epsilon} ORIONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Gregory B.; Morrison, Nancy D. E-mail: nmorris@utnet.utoledo.edu

    2013-04-15

    We present the results of a time series analysis of 130 echelle spectra of {epsilon} Ori (B0 Ia), acquired over seven observing seasons between 1998 and 2006 at Ritter Observatory. The equivalent widths of H{alpha} (net) and He I {lambda}5876 were measured and radial velocities were obtained from the central absorption of He I {lambda}5876. Temporal variance spectra (TVS) revealed significant wind variability in both H{alpha} and He I {lambda}5876. The He I TVS have a double-peaked profile consistent with radial velocity oscillations. A periodicity search was carried out on the equivalent width and radial velocity data, as well as on wavelength-binned spectra. This analysis has revealed several periods in the variability with timescales of two to seven days. Many of these periods exhibit sinusoidal modulation in the associated phase diagrams. Several of these periods were present in both H{alpha} and He I, indicating a possible connection between the wind and the photosphere. Due to the harmonic nature of these periods, stellar pulsations may be the origin of some of the observed variability. Periods on the order of the rotational period were also detected in the He I line in the 1998-1999 season and in both lines during the 2004-2005 season. These periods may indicate rotational modulation due to structure in the wind.

  3. EPSILON AURIGAE: AN IMPROVED SPECTROSCOPIC ORBITAL SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanik, Robert P.; Torres, Guillermo; Lovegrove, Justin; Latham, David W.; Zajac, Joseph; Pera, Vivian E.; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2010-03-15

    A rare eclipse of the mysterious object {epsilon} Aurigae will occur in 2009-2011. We report an updated single-lined spectroscopic solution for the orbit of the primary star based on 20 years of monitoring at the CfA, combined with historical velocity observations dating back to 1897. There are 518 new CfA observations obtained between 1989 and 2009. Two solutions are presented. One uses the velocities outside the eclipse phases together with mid-times of previous eclipses, from photometry dating back to 1842, which provide the strongest constraint on the ephemeris. This yields a period of 9896.0 {+-} 1.6 days (27.0938 {+-} 0.0044 years) with a velocity semi-amplitude of 13.84 {+-} 0.23 km s{sup -1} and an eccentricity of 0.227 {+-} 0.011. The middle of the current ongoing eclipse predicted by this combined fit is JD 2,455,413.8 {+-} 4.8, corresponding to 2010 August 5. If we use only the radial velocities, we find that the predicted middle of the current eclipse is nine months earlier. This would imply that the gravitating companion is not the same as the eclipsing object. Alternatively, the purely spectroscopic solution may be biased by perturbations in the velocities due to the short-period oscillations of the supergiant.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium clariflavum DSM 19732

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Lynne A.; Davenport, Karen W.; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Amy; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Liolios, Konstantinos; Woyke, Tanja; Lynd, Lee R

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium clariflavum is a Cluster III Clostridium within the family Clostridiaceae isolated from thermophilic anaerobic sludge (Shiratori et al, 2009). This species is of interest because of its similarity to the model cellulolytic organism Clostridium thermocellum and for the ability of environmental isolates to break down cellulose and hemicellulose. Here we describe features of the 4,897,678 bp long genome and its annotation, consisting of 4,131 proteincoding and 98 RNA genes, for the type strain DSM 19732.

  5. Quenched penguins, the Delta I=1/2 rule, and epsilon'/epsilon

    E-print Network

    Maarten Golterman; Elisabetta Pallante

    2006-09-30

    The transformation properties of strong penguin operators under the action of the flavor group change when they are considered as operators in (partially) quenched QCD instead of the unquenched theory. An ambiguity arises, which is parameterized by new low-energy constants in the effective theory describing non-leptonic kaon decays in the (partially) quenched setting. Here we summarize results of the analysis for the complete set of three-flavor strong penguin operators, consisting of products of two left-handed flavor currents, or a left- and a right-handed current. Our results imply that (partially) quenched lattice computations of the Delta I=1/2 rule and epsilon'/epsilon are both affected by ambiguities intrinsic to the use of the quenched approximation at leading order in the chiral expansion. The only exception is the partially quenched case with three light sea quarks, consistent with general expectations. We also address the issue of quenched ambiguities in the case of an active charm, correcting and extending that in Phys. Rev. D 74, 014509 (2006).

  6. Environmental interventions to control Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Loo, Vivian G

    2015-03-01

    The control of Clostridium difficile infection is paramount. C difficile spores are difficult to eradicate and can survive on surfaces for prolonged periods of time. Hand washing with either plain or antimicrobial soap is effective in removing C difficile spores from hands. Patients should be placed in private rooms and under contact precautions to prevent transmission to other patients. Regular hospital germicides are not sporicidal and hypochlorite solutions are required for surface disinfection. In outbreak situations, a multifaceted approach is required. PMID:25573675

  7. Author's personal copy Hydrogen production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC

    E-print Network

    Author's personal copy Hydrogen production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and megaplasmid September 2009 Available online 21 October 2009 Keywords: Fermentative hydrogen production Clostridium acetobutylicum a b s t r a c t Biohydrogen production is measured using a variety of techniques, ranging from low

  8. Plasmidome interchange between Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum converts strains of independent lineages into distinctly different pathogens.

    PubMed

    Skarin, Hanna; Segerman, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum (group III), Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum are well-known pathogens causing animal botulism, gas gangrene/black disease, and bacillary hemoglobinuria, respectively. A close genetic relationship exists between the species, which has resulted in the collective term C. novyi sensu lato. The pathogenic traits in these species, e.g., the botulinum neurotoxin and the novyi alpha toxin, are mainly linked to a large plasmidome consisting of plasmids and circular prophages. The plasmidome of C. novyi sensu lato has so far been poorly characterized. In this study we explored the genomic relationship of a wide range of strains of C. novyi sensu lato with a special focus on the dynamics of the plasmidome. Twenty-four genomes were sequenced from strains selected to represent as much as possible the genetic diversity in C. novyi sensu lato. Sixty-one plasmids were identified in these genomes and 28 of them were completed. The genomic comparisons revealed four separate lineages, which did not strictly correlate with the species designations. The plasmids were categorized into 13 different plasmid groups on the basis of their similarity and conservation of plasmid replication or partitioning genes. The plasmid groups, lineages and species were to a large extent entwined because plasmids and toxin genes had moved across the lineage boundaries. This dynamic process appears to be primarily driven by phages. We here present a comprehensive characterization of the complex species group C. novyi sensu lato, explaining the intermixed genetic properties. This study also provides examples how the reorganization of the botulinum toxin and the novyi alpha toxin genes within the plasmidome has affected the pathogenesis of the strains. PMID:25254374

  9. Annotation of the Clostridium Acetobutylicum Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, M. J.

    2004-06-09

    The genome sequence of the solvent producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC824, has been determined by the shotgun approach. The genome consists of a 3.94 Mb chromosome and a 192 kb megaplasmid that contains the majority of genes responsible for solvent production. Comparison of C. acetobutylicum to Bacillus subtilis reveals significant local conservation of gene order, which has not been seen in comparisons of other genomes with similar, or, in some cases, closer, phylogenetic proximity. This conservation allows the prediction of many previously undetected operons in both bacteria.

  10. An Update on Clostridium difficile Toxinotyping.

    PubMed

    Rupnik, Maja; Janezic, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Toxinotyping is a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based method for differentiation of Clostridium difficile strains according to the changes in the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc), a region coding for toxins A and B. Toxinotypes are a heterogenous group of strains that are important in the development of molecular diagnostic tests and vaccines and are a good basis for C. difficile phylogenetic studies. Here we describe an overview of the 34 currently known toxinotypes (I to XXXIV) and some changes in nomenclature. PMID:26511734

  11. Clostridium difficile infection and fecal bacteriotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Indya; Shropshire, Kasheena; Ruel, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, also called "C. diff," is a gram-positive bacillus associated with nosocomial infections involving diarrhea, most often seen in developing countries. The severity of C. diff-associated diarrhea varies tremendously from mild and self-limiting to fulminant and life-threatening. C. diff has become an extremely important pathogen in community health but can be minimized with attention to proper hygiene. This article presents a case study regarding the treatment and management options of C. diff infection using a recent update of clinical guidelines for patient management. PMID:23364365

  12. Secretion of clostridium cellulase by E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Ida Kuo (1885 California St., #62, Mountain View, CA 94041)

    1998-01-01

    A gene, encoding an endocellulase from a newly isolated mesophilic Clostridium strain IY-2 which can digest bamboo fibers, cellulose, rice straw, and sawdust, was isolated by shotgun cloning in an E. coli expression plasmid pLC2833. E. coli positive clones were selected based on their ability to hydrolyze milled bamboo fibers and cellulose present in agar plates. One clone contained a 2.8 kb DNA fragment that was responsible for cellulase activity. Western blot analyses indicated that the positive clone produced a secreted cellulase with a mass of about 58,000 daltons that was identical in size to the subunit of one of the three major Clostridium cellulases. The products of cellulose digestion by this cloned cellulase were cellotetraose and soluble higher polymers. The cloned DNA contained signal sequences capable of directing the secretion of heterologous proteins from an E. coli host. The invention describes a bioprocess for the treatment of cellulosic plant materials to produce cellular growth substrates and fermentation end products suitable for production of liquid fuels, solvents, and acids.

  13. EPSILON SURGERY THEORY STEVE FERRY AND ERIK KJR PEDERSEN

    E-print Network

    Pedersen, Erik Kjær

    EPSILON SURGERY THEORY STEVE FERRY AND ERIK KJ�R PEDERSEN Contents 1. Introduction 2 2. Algebraic preliminaries 4 3. Bounded Poincar´e complexes 8 4. Spivak normal fibre space 9 5. Surgery below the middle. The surgery groups 22 10. Ranicki-Rothenberg sequences, and L- 26 11. The surgery exact sequence 29 12

  14. Pseudo-$\\epsilon$ Expansion and Renormalized Coupling Constants at Criticality

    E-print Network

    Sokolov, A I

    2014-01-01

    Dimensionless effective coupling constants $g_{2k}$ which determine nonlinear susceptibilities and enter the scaling equation of state possess universal values at the Curie point. They are calculated on the base of $n$-vector field model within the frame of pseudo-$\\epsilon$ expansion approach. Pseudo-$\\epsilon$ expansions for $g_6$ and $g_8$ originating from 4-loop and 3-loop renormalization group (RG) series respectively are derived for arbitrary $n$. The series for ratios $R_6 = g_6/g_4^2$ and $R_8 = g_8/g_4^3$ are also found and the pseudo-$\\epsilon$ expansion for Wilson fixed point location $g_{4}^*$ that descends from 6-loop RG expansion for $\\beta$-function is reported. Numerical results are presented for $0 \\le n \\le 64$, with particular attention paid to the cases $n = 0, 1, 2, 3$ that are of prime physical importance. Pseudo-$\\epsilon$ expansions for quartic and sextic couplings have rapidly diminishing coefficients, so simple Pad\\'e resummation is sufficient to yield precise numerical estimates. Mo...

  15. Critical Exponents of Superfluid Helium and Pseudo-$\\epsilon$ Expansion

    E-print Network

    Sokolov, A I

    2014-01-01

    Pseudo-$\\epsilon$ expansions ($\\tau$-series) for critical exponents of 3D XY model describing $\\lambda$-transition in liquid helium are derived up to $\\tau^6$ terms. Numerical estimates extracted from $\\tau$-series using Pad\\'e approximants, scaling relations and seven-loop ($\\tau^7$) estimate for the Fisher exponent $\\eta$ are presented including those for exponents $\\alpha$ and $\

  16. Infinite Bottles of Beer Mathematical Concepts with Epsilon Pain

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    1 Infinite Bottles of Beer Mathematical Concepts with Epsilon Pain Or: A cantorial approach--for really long trips!--occurred to me: Infinite bottles of beer on the wall, infinite bottles of beer; If one of those bottles should happen to fall, infinite bottles of beer on the wall. Infinite bottles

  17. Observations of Epsilon Lyrae by the Video Drift Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, Rick; Nelson, Nancy; Nelson, Eric; Buehlman, William; Wilson, Earl; Zapata, Deanna

    2015-01-01

    The major components of the famous "double-double" star Epsilon Lyrae, STF2382AB and STF2383CD, were measured by the Video Team at the Apple Valley Double Star Workshop in 2013, using the Video Drift Method. The results are in reasonable agreement with other recent measures and predictions of the latest orbital solutions.

  18. Density Versions of Plunnecke Inequality Epsilon-Delta Approach

    E-print Network

    Jin, Renling

    Density Versions of Pl¨unnecke Inequality ­ Epsilon-Delta Approach Renling Jin Abstract We discuss whether Pl¨unnecke's inequality for Shnirel'man density with respect to Shnirel'man basis can be generalized to other densities with respect to other con- cepts of basis. We show behavioral disparities

  19. Humulus lupus Beta-acids Administered Through Water Reduce Clostridium perfringens Challenge Strains in the Chicken Intestinal Tract Midgut and Ceca.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antimicrobial activity activity of extracts of the hop plant Humulus lupus was studied in chickens fed diets without antibiotic growth promotants. Beta-acid resins of the hop plant were administered by water to 13 day old chickens subsequently challenged per so with necrotic enteritis-associate...

  20. Validated near-atomic resolution structure of bacteriophage epsilon15 derived from cryo-EM

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Wen

    Validated near-atomic resolution structure of bacteriophage epsilon15 derived from cryo important contribu- tions to modern structural biology. Bacteriophages, the most diverse and abundant previous electron cryomicroscopy structure of Salmonella bacteriophage epsilon15, achieving a resolution

  1. Association of apolipoprotein E allele {epsilon}4 with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lucotte, G.; David, F.; Berriche, S.

    1994-09-15

    Apolipoprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE {epsilon}4), is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD) in French patients. The association is highly significant (0.45 AD versus 0.12 controls for {epsilon}4 allele frequencies). These data support the involvement of ApoE {epsilon}4 allele as a very important risk factor for the clinical expression of AD. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. Optical characterization of epsilon-near-zero, epsilon-near-pole, and hyperbolic response in nanowire metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starko-Bowes, R.; Atkinson, J.; Newman, W.; Hu, H.; Kallos, T.; Palikaras, G.; Fedosejevs, R.; Pramanik, S.; Jacob, Z.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the optical and physical characterization of metallic nanowire (NW) metamaterials fabricated by electrodeposition of ~30 nm diameter gold nanowires in nano-porous anodic aluminum oxide. We observe a uniaxial anisotropic dielectric response for the NW metamaterials that displays both epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) and epsilon-near-pole (ENP) resonances. We show that a fundamental difference in the behavior of NW-metamaterials from metal-dielectric multilayer (ML) metamaterials is the differing directions of the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) and epsilon-near-pole (ENP) dielectric responses relative to the optical axis of the effective dielectric tensor. In contrast to multilayer metamaterials, nanowire metamaterials exhibit an omnidirectional ENP and an angularly dependent ENZ. Also in contrast to ML metamaterials, the NW metamaterials exhibit ENP and ENZ resonances that are highly absorptive and can be effectively excited from free space. Our fabrication allows a large tunability of the epsilon-near-zero resonance in the visible and near IR spectrum from 583 nm to 805 nm as the gold nanorod fill fraction changes from 26% to 10.5%. We support our fabrication process flow at each step with rigorous physical and optical characterization. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses are used to ascertain the quality of electrochemically deposited Au nanowires prior to and after annealing. Our experimental results are in agreement with simulations of the periodic plasmonic crystal and also analytical calculations in the effective medium metamaterial limit. We also experimentally characterize the role of spatial dispersion at the ENZ resonance and show that the effect does not occur for the ENP resonance. The application of these materials to the fields of biosensing, quantum optics and thermal devices shows considerable promise.

  3. Biotechnological potential of Clostridium butyricum bacteria.

    PubMed

    Szymanowska-Powa?owska, Daria; Orczyk, Dorota; Leja, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    In response to demand from industry for microorganisms with auspicious biotechnological potential, a worldwide interest has developed in bacteria and fungi isolation. Microorganisms of interesting metabolic properties include non-pathogenic bacteria of the genus Clostridium, particularly C. acetobutylicum, C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum. A well-known property of C. butyricum is their ability to produce butyric acid, as well as effectively convert glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (38.2 g/L). A conversion rate of 0.66 mol 1,3-propanediol/mol of glycerol has been obtained. Results of the studies described in the present paper broaden our knowledge of characteristic features of C. butyricum specific isolates in terms of their phylogenetic affiliation, fermentation capacity and antibacterial properties. PMID:25477923

  4. Immune responses to Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Rajat; Petri, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the causal agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections in the US. C. difficile has been known to cause severe diarrhea and colitis for more than 30 years, but the emergence of a newer, hypervirulent strain of C. difficile (BI/NAP1) has further compounded the problem, and recently both number of cases and mortality associated with C. difficile-associated diarrhea has been increasing. One of the major drivers of disease pathogenesis is believed to be an excessive host inflammatory response. A better understanding of the host inflammation and immune mechanisms that modulate the course of disease and control host susceptibility to C. difficile could lead to novel (host-targeted) strategies for combating the challenges posed by this deadly infection. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the host inflammatory response during C. difficile infection. PMID:23084763

  5. Clostridium difficile infection and intestinal microbiota interactions.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, C; Taminiau, B; Van Broeck, J; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile remains the leading cause of healthcare-associated diarrhoea and outbreaks continue to occur worldwide. Aside from nosocomial C. difficile infection, the bacterium is also increasingly important as a community pathogen. Furthermore, asymptomatic carriage of C. difficile in neonates, adults and animals is also well recognised. The investigation of the gut's microbial communities, in both healthy subjects and patients suffering C. difficile infection (CDI), provides findings and information relevant for developing new successful approaches for its treatment, such as faecal microbiota transplantation, or for the prophylaxis of the infection by modification of the gut microbiota using functional foods and beverages. The analysis of all available data shows new insights into the role of intestinal microbiota in health and disease. PMID:26549493

  6. Update on antimicrobial resistance in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Qiong, Gao; Haihui, Huang

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea. Since 2002, the morbidity and mortality rates of C. difficile infection have increased dramatically in Europe and North America. The emergence of C. difficile strains that are resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents can complicate prevention programs and potential treatment. Although most clinical isolates are still susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin, heteroresistance to metronidazole and increasing vancomycin MICs (minimum inhibitory concentrations) have been reported. The prevalence of resistance to other antimicrobial agents, including erythromycin and moxifloxacin, is highly variable in different countries and regions. The exact mechanism of reduced susceptibility to metronidazole or vancomycin is still not clear. The principal mechanism of erythromycin, fluoroquinolones and rifamycins resistance in C. difficile is determined by target alterations. This review will focus primarily on the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and resistance mechanisms of C. difficile in order to provide an up-to-date review on the topic. PMID:25998434

  7. Biotechnological potential of Clostridium butyricum bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Szymanowska-Powa?owska, Daria; Orczyk, Dorota; Leja, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    In response to demand from industry for microorganisms with auspicious biotechnological potential, a worldwide interest has developed in bacteria and fungi isolation. Microorganisms of interesting metabolic properties include non-pathogenic bacteria of the genus Clostridium, particularly C. acetobutylicum, C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum. A well-known property of C. butyricum is their ability to produce butyric acid, as well as effectively convert glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (38.2 g/L). A conversion rate of 0.66 mol 1,3-propanediol/mol of glycerol has been obtained. Results of the studies described in the present paper broaden our knowledge of characteristic features of C. butyricum specific isolates in terms of their phylogenetic affiliation, fermentation capacity and antibacterial properties. PMID:25477923

  8. Clostridium difficile: clinical disease and diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, F C; Owens, M; Crocker, I C

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a spectrum of disease ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis. Although the disease was first described in 1893, the etiologic agent was not isolated and identified until 1978. Since clinical and pathological features of C. difficile-associated disease are not easily distinguished from those of other gastrointestinal diseases, including ulcerative colitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, and Crohn's disease, diagnostic methods have relied on either isolation and identification of the microorganism or direct detection of bacterial antigens or toxins in stool specimens. The current review focuses on the sensitivity, specificity, and practical use of several diagnostic tests, including methods for culture of the etiologic agent, cellular cytotoxicity assays, latex agglutination tests, enzyme immunoassay systems, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, fluorescent-antibody assays, and polymerase chain reactions. PMID:8358706

  9. Compressive Epsilon Photography for Post-Capture Control in Digital Imaging Atsushi Ito1

    E-print Network

    Sankaranarayanan, Aswin C.

    Compressive Epsilon Photography for Post-Capture Control in Digital Imaging Atsushi Ito1 , Salil Rice University 3 Carnegie Mellon University Figure 1: Compressive epsilon photography enables post. In this paper, we propose "compres- sive epsilon photography," a technique for achieving complete post- capture

  10. Determination of Re(. var epsilon. prime /. var epsilon. ) by the simultaneous detection of the four K sub L , S r arrow. pi. pi. decay modes

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.R.; Barker, A.; Briere, R.A.; Gibbons, L.K.; Makoff, G.; Papadimitriou, V.; Somalwar, S.; Wah, Y.W.; Winstein, B.; Winston, R.; Woods, M.; Yamamoto, H. The Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 ); Swallow, E. Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 ); Bock, G.J.; Coleman, R.; Enagonio, J.; Hsiung, Y.B.; Stanfield, K.; Stefanski, R.; Yamanaka, T. ); Blair, G.; Gollin, G.D.; Karlsson, M.; Okamitsu, J.K.; Tschirhart, R. ); Brisson, J.C.; Debu, P.; Peyaud, B.; Turlay, R.; Vallage, B. (Department de Physique des Particules Elementaires, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX,

    1990-03-26

    The E731 experiment at Fermilab has searched for direct {ital CP} violation in {ital K}{sup 0}{r arrow}{pi}{pi}, which is parametrized by {var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}. For the first time all four of the {ital K}{sub {ital L},}{ital S}{r arrow}{pi}{pi} modes were collected simultaneously, which greatly facilitated studies of systematic uncertainty. We find Re({var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon})={minus}0.0004{plus minus}0.0014(stat){plus minus}0.0006(syst). The result provides no evidence for direct {ital CP} violation.

  11. The embedded objects in epsilon Cha I cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prusti, Timo; Assendorp, R.; Wesselius, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    A study was made of the embedded objects in the epsilon Cha I cloud. General shapes of the spectra were constructed for the members in the cloud. The near infrared data were compiled from the literature and combined with the IRAS Point Source Catalog information. Pointed observations by the IRAS were used in the regions of high source density where the Point Source Catalog is confused. Member objects near the late B star HD 97300 were measured recently in the 3 to 10 micron bands using the ESO 2.2 m telescope in order to study the effects of disks seen in other young stellar objects. A picture is presented of the complete initial luminosity function in the epsilon Cha I cloud. The observations were compared with the theoretical views on low mass star formation.

  12. Structure of the Martian atmosphere from Epsilon Gem occultation observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    Information has been collected on Martian atmospheric scale heights derived from observations of the occultation of Epsilon Gem by Mars on Apr. 8, 1976; the observations give data in the altitude range of approximately 50-80 km. A rough, unweighted average of results so far available yields a temperature of approximately 165 K. Excursions of plus or minus 40 K about this mean may be present as a function of both altitude and areographic coordinates.

  13. Structure of the Martian atmosphere from Epsilon Gem occultation observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Information about Martian atmospheric scale heights derived from observations of the occultation of Epsilon Gem by Mars on April 8, 1976 has been collected. The observations give data in the altitude range of about 50 to 80 km. A rough, unweighted average of results so far available yields a temperatue of approximately 165 K. Excursions of about + or - 4 K about this mean may be present as a function of both altitude and areographic coordinates.

  14. Topological Entropy and epsilon-Entropy for Damped Hyperbolic Equations

    E-print Network

    Pierre Collet; Jean-Pierre Eckmann

    1999-08-16

    We study damped hyperbolic equations on the infinite line. We show that on the global attracting set $G$ the $\\epsilon$-entropy (per unit length) exists in the topology of $W^{1,\\infty}$. We also show that the topological entropy per unit length of $G$ exists. These results are shown using two main techniques: Bounds in bounded domains in position space and for large momenta, and a novel submultiplicativity argument in $W^{1,\\infty}$.

  15. Theory of epsilon-near-zero modes in ultrathin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campione, Salvatore; Brener, Igal; Marquier, Francois

    2015-03-01

    The physics of the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) mode, which is supported by a nanolayer at the frequency where the dielectric permittivity vanishes, has recently been a subject of debate. In this Rapid Communication, we thoroughly investigate and clarify the physics of this mode, providing its main characteristics and its domain of existence. This understanding will benefit all the applications that rely on ENZ modes in semiconductor nanolayers, including directional perfect absorption, voltage-tunable devices, and ultrafast thermal emission.

  16. Advanced k-epsilon modeling of heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, Okey; Ames, Forrest E.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes two approaches to low Reynolds-number k-epsilon turbulence modeling which formulate the eddy viscosity on the wall-normal component of turbulence and a length scale. The wall-normal component of turbulence is computed via integration of the energy spectrum based on the local dissipation rate and is bounded by the isotropic condition. The models account for the anisotropy of the dissipation and the reduced mixing length due to the high strain rates present in the near-wall region. The turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate were computed from the k and epsilon transport equations of Durbin. The models were tested for a wide range of turbulent flows and proved to be superior to other k-epsilon models, especially for nonequilibrium anisotropic flows. For the prediction of airfoil heat transfer, the models included a set of empirical correlations for predicting laminar-turbulent transition and laminar heat transfer augmentation due to the presence of freestream turbulence. The predictions of surface heat transfer were generally satisfactory.

  17. Detecting the elusive low mass companion around epsilon Indi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endl, Michael

    2004-07-01

    We propose coronagraphic NICMOS observations of the nearby {d = 3.6 pc} K5V star epsilon Indi {HD 209100} to search for the unknown companion which causes a low amplitude radial velocity {RV} trend in our 11 years of precise Doppler measurements. This RV data set places a lower limit of 4.5 AU for the orbital semimajor axis of this companion. Moreover, the fact that the RV trend is lacking any sign of curvature over this long time period clearly points towards a much larger orbital separation. Epsilon Indi also has a T dwarf {binary} companion at a separation of 1400 AU. However, these brown dwarf companions are too distant from the primary to induce the observed RV variation. It is also unlikely that this nearby star has an unknown stellar {M dwarf} companion. The RV signal is thus most probably caused by a yet unknown giant planetary or brown dwarf companion at a separation of more than 5 AU. Because epsilon Indi is so near to the Sun, it constitutes an ideal target for high contrast imaging with NICMOS in its coronagraphic mode. Indeed, NICMOS coronagraphy is capable of detecting objects down to 15 Jupiter masses at separations greater than 2.3 arcseconds {S/N=25} - precisely the separation and mass range indicated by our Doppler spectroscopy. Only 2 orbits of HST/NICMOS observations could directly image the coolest and lowest mass companion ever found around a solar-type star.

  18. MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Petrucci, R.; Brown, B. P.; Soderblom, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Hall, J. C.; Basu, S.

    2013-02-01

    The active K2 dwarf {epsilon} Eri has been extensively characterized both as a young solar analog and more recently as an exoplanet host star. As one of the nearest and brightest stars in the sky, it provides an unparalleled opportunity to constrain stellar dynamo theory beyond the Sun. We confirm and document the 3-year magnetic activity cycle in {epsilon} Eri originally reported by Hatzes and coworkers, and we examine the archival data from previous observations spanning 45 years. The data show coexisting 3-year and 13-year periods leading into a broad activity minimum that resembles a Maunder minimum-like state, followed by the resurgence of a coherent 3-year cycle. The nearly continuous activity record suggests the simultaneous operation of two stellar dynamos with cycle periods of 2.95 {+-} 0.03 years and 12.7 {+-} 0.3 years, which, by analogy with the solar case, suggests a revised identification of the dynamo mechanisms that are responsible for the so-called 'active' and 'inactive' sequences as proposed by Boehm-Vitense. Finally, based on the observed properties of {epsilon} Eri, we argue that the rotational history of the Sun is what makes it an outlier in the context of magnetic cycles observed in other stars (as also suggested by its Li depletion), and that a Jovian-mass companion cannot be the universal explanation for the solar peculiarities.

  19. Phylogeny of the ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, and Clostridium aminophilum sp. nov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paster, B. J.; Russell, J. B.; Yang, C. M.; Chow, J. M.; Woese, C. R.; Tanner, R.

    1993-01-01

    In previous studies, gram-positive bacteria which grew rapidly with peptides or an amino acid as the sole energy source were isolated from bovine rumina. Three isolates, strains C, FT (T = type strain), and SR, were considered to be ecologically important since they produced up to 20-fold more ammonia than other ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria. On the basis of phenotypic criteria, the taxonomic position of these new isolates was uncertain. In this study, the 16S rRNA sequences of these isolates and related bacteria were determined to establish the phylogenetic positions of the organisms. The sequences of strains C, FT, and SR and reference strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, Clostridium coccoides, Clostridium aminovalericum, Acetomaculum ruminis, Clostridium leptum, Clostridium lituseburense, Clostridium acidiurici, and Clostridium barkeri were determined by using a modified Sanger dideoxy chain termination method. Strain C, a large coccus purported to belong to the genus Peptostreptococcus, was closely related to P. anaerobius, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.6%. Strain SR, a heat-resistant, short, rod-shaped organism, was closely related to C. sticklandii, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.9%. However, strain FT, a heat-resistant, pleomorphic, rod-shaped organism, was only distantly related to some clostridial species and P. anaerobius. On the basis of the sequence data, it was clear that strain FT warranted designation as a separate species. The closest known relative of strain FT was C. coccoides (level of similarity, only 90.6%). Additional strains that are phenotypically similar to strain FT were isolated in this study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  20. Functional Consequences of Deletions of the N Terminus of the [epsilon] Subunit of the Chloroplast ATP Synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, J. A.; Radkowski, C. A.; McCarty, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    The [epsilon] subunit of the chloroplast ATP synthase functions in part to prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis by the enzyme. In addition, [epsilon] together with the remainder of the catalytic portion of the synthase (CF1) is required to block the nonproductive leak of protons through the membrane-embedded component of the synthase (CFO). Mutant [epsilon] subunits of the spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplast ATP synthase that lack 5, 11, or 20 amino acids from their N termini ([epsilon]-[delta]5N, [epsilon]-[delta]11N, and [epsilon]-[delta]20N, respectively), were overexpressed as inclusion bodies. Using a procedure that resulted in the folding of full-length, recombinant [epsilon] in a biologically active form, none of these truncated forms resulted in [epsilon] that inhibited the ATPase activity of CF1 deficient in [epsilon], CF1(-[epsilon]). Yet, the [epsilon]-[delta]5N and [epsilon]-[delta]11N peptides significantly inhibited the ATPase activity of CF1(-[epsilon]) bound to CFO in NaBr-treated thylakoids. Although full-length [epsilon] rapidly inhibited the ATPase activity of CF1(-[epsilon]) in solution or bound to CFO, an extended period was required for the truncated forms to inhibit membrane-bound CF1(-[epsilon]). Despite the fact that [epsilon]-[delta]5N significantly inhibited the ATPase activity of CF1(-[epsilon]) bound to CFO, it did not block the proton conductance through CFO in NaBr-treated thylakoids reconstituted with CF1(-[epsilon]). Based on selective proteolysis and the binding of 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid, each of the truncated peptides gained significant secondary structure after folding. These results strongly suggest (a) that the N terminus of [epsilon] is important in its binding to CF1, (b) that CF0 stabilizes [epsilon] binding to the entire ATP synthase, and (c) that the N terminus may play some role in the regulation of proton flux through CFO. PMID:12223668

  1. An Attempt to Derive the epsilon Equation from a Two-Point Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to derive the equation for the turbulence dissipation rate epsilon for a shear-driven flow. In 1961, Davydov used a one-point closure model to derive the epsilon equation from first principles but the final result contained undetermined terms and thus lacked predictive power. Both in 1987 and in 2001, attempts were made to derive the epsilon equation from first principles using a two-point closure, but their methods relied on a phenomenological assumption. The standard practice has thus been to employ a heuristic form of the equation that contains three empirical ingredients: two constants, c(sub 1 epsilon), and c(sub 2 epsilon), and a diffusion term D(sub epsilon) In this work, a two-point closure is employed, yielding the following results: 1) the empirical constants get replaced by c(sub 1), c(sub 2), which are now functions of Kappa and epsilon; 2) c(sub 1) and c(sub 2) are not independent because a general relation between the two that are valid for any Kappa and epsilon are derived; 3) c(sub 1), c(sub 2) become constant with values close to the empirical values c(sub 1 epsilon), c(sub epsilon 2), (i.e., homogenous flows); and 4) the empirical form of the diffusion term D(sub epsilon) is no longer needed because it gets substituted by the Kappa-epsilon dependence of c(sub 1), c(sub 2), which plays the role of the diffusion, together with the diffusion of the turbulent kinetic energy D(sub Kappa), which now enters the new equation (i.e., inhomogeneous flows). Thus, the three empirical ingredients c(sub 1 epsilon), c(sub epsilon 2), D (sub epsilon)are replaced by a single function c(sub 1)(Kappa, epsilon ) or c(sub 2)(Kappa, epsilon ), plus a D(sub Kappa)term. Three tests of the new equation for epsilon are presented: one concerning channel flow and two concerning the shear-driven planetary boundary layer (PBL).

  2. Promoters and proteins from Clostridium thermocellum and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Wu, J. H. David; Newcomb, Michael

    2012-11-13

    The present invention relates to an inducible and a high expression nucleic acid promoter isolated from Clostridium thermocellum. These promoters are useful for directing expression of a protein or polypeptide encoded by a nucleic acid molecule operably associated with the nucleic acid promoters. The present invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs including the C. thermocellum promoters, and expression vectors and hosts containing such nucleic acid constructs. The present invention also relates to protein isolated from Clostridium thermocellum, including a repressor protein. The present invention also provides methods of using the isolated promoters and proteins from Clostridium thermocellum, including methods for directing inducible in vitro and in vivo expression of a protein or polypeptide in a host, and methods of producing ethanol from a cellulosic biomass.

  3. Clostridium difficile: its disease and toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Lyerly, D M; Krivan, H C; Wilkins, T D

    1988-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis, a severe, sometimes fatal disease that occurs in adults undergoing antimicrobial therapy. The disease, ironically, has been most effectively treated with antibiotics, although some of the newer methods of treatment such as the replacement of the bowel flora may prove more beneficial for patients who continue to relapse with pseudomembranous colitis. The organism produces two potent exotoxins designated toxin A and toxin B. Toxin A is an enterotoxin believed to be responsible for the diarrhea and mucosal tissue damage which occur during the disease. Toxin B is an extremely potent cytotoxin, but its role in the disease has not been as well studied. There appears to be a cascade of events which result in the expression of the activity of these toxins, and these events, ranging from the recognition of a trisaccharide receptor by toxin A to the synergistic action of the toxins and their possible dissemination in the body, are discussed in this review. The advantages and disadvantages of the various assays, including tissue culture assay, enzyme immunoassay, and latex agglutination, currently used in the clinical diagnosis of the disease also are discussed. PMID:3144429

  4. Surface Layers of Clostridium difficile Endospores?†

    PubMed Central

    Permpoonpattana, Patima; Tolls, Elisabeth H.; Nadem, Ramez; Tan, Sisareuth; Brisson, Alain; Cutting, Simon M.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important human pathogen and one where the primary cause of disease is due to the transmission of spores. We have investigated the proteins found in the outer coat layers of C. difficile spores of pathogenic strain 630 (CD630). Five coat proteins, CotA, CotB, CotCB, CotD, and CotE, were shown to be expressed on the outer coat layers of the spore. We demonstrate that purified spores carry catalase, peroxiredoxin, and chitinase activity and that this activity correlates with the predicted functions of three spore coat proteins identified here, CotCB, CotD, and CotE. CotCB and CotD are putative manganese catalases, and CotE is a novel bifunctional protein with peroxiredoxin activity at its amino terminus and chitinase activity at its carboxy terminus. These enzymes could play an important role in coat assembly by polymerizing protein monomers in the coat. CotE, in addition to a role in macromolecular degradation, could play an important role in inflammation, and this may be of direct relevance to the development of the gastrointestinal symptoms that accompany C. difficile infection. Although specific enzyme activity has not yet been assigned to the proteins identified here, this work provides the first detailed study of the C. difficile spore coat. PMID:21949071

  5. Metabolism of adenylylated nucleotides in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed Central

    Balodimos, I A; Kashket, E R; Rapaport, E

    1988-01-01

    In response to the stresses imposed by temperature upshift or addition of butanol, Clostridium acetobutylicum cultures accumulated diadenosine-5',5'''-P1,P4-tetraphosphate (Ap4A) and adenosine 5'-P1,P4-tetraphospho-5'-guanosine (Ap4G) to high levels. The two adenylylated nucleotides were also accumulated in batch culture in the absence of imposed stresses when the clostridia switched from the acidogenic phase of growth to the solventogenic phase. Most of the adenylylated nucleotides were extracellular. The intracellular concentrations of these compounds were low throughout batch growth and in cells stressed by added butanol. In contrast to other procaryotes, these clostridia did not possess enzymes to degrade the dinucleotides, as shown with both intact cells and cell-free preparations. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that endogenously produced solvents are stressful to the cells, stimulating the synthesis of adenylylated nucleotides. The nucleotides accumulate extracellularly because they cannot be degraded and because the cell membranes are permeabilized by the solvents produced. PMID:3360745

  6. Transport of molybdate by Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, B B; Mortenson, L E

    1975-01-01

    The transport of 99MoO42- into dinitrogen-fixing cells of Clostridium pasteurianum was investigated. Transport of molybdate in this organism is energy dependent; sucrose is required in the minimal media, and the system is inhibited by the glycolysis inhibitors, NaF, iodoacetic acid, and arsenate. The cells accumulate molybdate against a concentration gradient, and the uptake shows a marked dependence on temperature (optimum 37 C) and pH (optimum 6.0). The rate of molybdate uptake with increasing molybdate concentrations shows saturation kinetics with an apparent Km and Vmax of 4.8 X 10(-5) M and 55 nmol/g of dry cells per min, respectively. Inhibition studies with the anions SO42-, S2O32-, WO42-, and VO32- show that SO42- and WO42- competitively inhibit MoO42- uptake (apparent Ki [SO42-] is 3.0 X 10(-5) M; apparent Ki [WO42-] is 2.4 X 10(-5), whereas S2O32- and VO32- have no inhibitory effect. Exchange experiments with MoO42- show that only a small percentage of the 99MoO42- taken up by the cells is exchangeable. Exchange experiments with WO42- and SO42- indicate that once inside the cells WO42- and SO42- cannot substitute for MoO42-. PMID:364

  7. Parameters affecting solvent production by Clostridium pasteurianum

    SciTech Connect

    Dabrock, B.; Bahl, H.; Gottschalk, G. )

    1992-04-01

    The effect of pH, growth rate, phosphate and iron limitation, carbon monoxide, and carbon source on product formation by Clostridium pasteurianum was determined. Under phosphate limitation, glucose was fermented almost exclusively to acetate and butyrate independently of the pH and growth rate. Iron limitation caused lactate production (38 mol/100 mol) from glucose in batch and continuous culture. At 15% (vol/vol) carbon monoxide in the atmosphere, glucose was fermented to ethanol (24 mol/100 mol), lactate (32 mol/100 mol), and butanol (36 mol/100 mol) in addition to the usual products, acetate (38 mol/100 mol) and butyrate (17 mol/100 mol). During glycerol fermentation, a completely different product pattern was found. In continuous culture under phosphate limitation, acetate and butyrate were produced only in trace amounts, whereas ethanol (30 mol/10 mol), butanol (18 mol/100 mol), and 1,3-propanediol (18 mol/100 mol) were the major products. Under iron limitation, the ratio of these products could be changed in favor of 1,3-propanediol (34 mol/100 mol). In addition, lactate was produced in significant amounts (25 mol/100 mol). The tolerance of C. pasteurianum to glycerol was remarkably high; growth was not inhibited by glycerol concentrations up to 17% (wt/vol). Increasing glycerol concentrations favored the production of 1,3-propanediol.

  8. Genomics of Clostridium botulinum group III strains.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Oguma, Keiji

    2015-05-01

    In Clostridium botulinum, the characteristics of type C and D strains are quite different from other types, and they are classified as group III. They produce C2 binary toxin and C3 exoenzyme in addition to type C and D neurotoxins. Two different phages and many plasmids are identified in the organisms. The genes of neurotoxin and C3 exoenzyme are converted from toxigenic strains to non-toxigenic strains by the specific bacteriophages (phages), whereas, the C2 toxin gene is carried by large or small plasmids. Classification of type C and D strains has been in confusion because 1) antigenicity of type C and D neurotoxins is complex, 2) the cells produce two types of toxins, neurotoxin and C2 toxin, and 3) some non-toxigenic strains can be converted to produce C or D neurotoxin by the infection with phages. Until now, entire nucleotide sequences of cell chromosomes, phages, and plasmids have been determined. Since both genetic and protein-chemical analyses have been clarifying the above confusions, these data are reviewed historically. PMID:25111022

  9. The Changing Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, J.; Bauer, M. P.; Baines, S. D.; Corver, J.; Fawley, W. N.; Goorhuis, B.; Kuijper, E. J.; Wilcox, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed dramatically during this millennium. Infection rates have increased markedly in most countries with detailed surveillance data. There have been clear changes in the clinical presentation, response to treatment, and outcome of CDI. These changes have been driven to a major degree by the emergence and epidemic spread of a novel strain, known as PCR ribotype 027 (sometimes referred to as BI/NAP1/027). We review the evidence for the changing epidemiology, clinical virulence and outcome of treatment of CDI, and the similarities and differences between data from various countries and continents. Community-acquired CDI has also emerged, although the evidence for this as a distinct new entity is less clear. There are new data on the etiology of and potential risk factors for CDI; controversial issues include specific antimicrobial agents, gastric acid suppressants, potential animal and food sources of C. difficile, and the effect of the use of alcohol-based hand hygiene agents. PMID:20610822

  10. Clostridium difficile Is an Autotrophic Bacterial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Köpke, Michael; Straub, Melanie; Dürre, Peter

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection showed a dramatic increase in incidence and virulence in the Northern hemisphere. This incessantly challenging disease is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea and became life-threatening especially among elderly people. It is generally assumed that all human bacterial pathogens are heterotrophic organisms, being either saccharolytic or proteolytic. So far, this has not been questioned as colonization of the human gut gives access to an environment, rich in organic nutrients. Here, we present data that C. difficile (both clinical and rumen isolates) is also able to grow on CO2+H2 as sole carbon and energy source, thus representing the first identified autotrophic bacterial pathogen. Comparison of several different strains revealed high conservation of genes for autotrophic growth and showed that the ability to use gas mixtures for growth decreases or is lost upon prolonged culturing under heterotrophic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of C. difficile (heterotrophic growth on various substrates as well as autotrophy) could allow the organism in the gut to avoid competition by niche differentiation and contribute to its survival when stressed or in unfavorable conditions that cause death to other bacteria. This may be an important trait for the pathogenicity of C. difficile. PMID:23626782

  11. Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection and the microbiome.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Rowena; Gerbaba, Teklu; Petrof, Elaine O

    2016-01-01

    The diverse and densely populated gastrointestinal microbiota is essential for the regulation of host physiology and immune function. As our knowledge of the composition and function of the intestinal microbiota continues to expand, there is new interest in using these developments to tailor fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) and microbial ecosystem therapeutics (MET) for a variety of diseases. The potential role of FMT and MET in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI)-currently the leading nosocomial gastrointestinal infection-has proven highly effective for recurrent CDI, and has emerged as a paradigm shift in the treatment of this disease. The current review will serve as a summary of the key aspects of CDI, and will introduce the essential framework and challenges of FMT, as is currently practiced. MET represents the progression of conventional bacteriotherapy that fundamentally capitalizes on the restorative properties of intestinal bacterial communities and may be viewed as the culmination of a rationally designed therapeutic modality. As our understanding of the composition and function of the intestinal microbiota evolves, it will likely drive next-generation microbiota therapies for a range of medical conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. PMID:26153514

  12. Action of nitroheterocyclic drugs against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Adhikari, Sudip; Hurdle, Julian G

    2014-10-01

    The nitroheterocyclic classes of drugs have a long history of use in treating anaerobic infections, as exemplified by metronidazole as a first-line treatment for mild-to-moderate Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Since direct comparisons of the three major classes of nitroheterocyclic drugs (i.e. nitroimidazole, nitazoxanide and nitrofurans) and nitrosating agents against C. difficile are under-examined, in this study their actions against C. difficile were compared. Results show that whilst transient resistance occurs to metronidazole and nitazoxanide, stable resistance arises to nitrofurans upon serial passage. All compounds killed C. difficile at high concentrations in addition to the host defence nitrosating agent S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). This suggests that GSNO killing of C. difficile contributes to its efficacy in murine CDI. Although nitric oxide production could not be detected for the nitroheterocyclic drugs, the cellular response to metronidazole and nitrofurans has some overlap with the response to GSNO, causing significant upregulation of the hybrid-cluster protein Hcp that responds to nitrosative stress. These findings provide new insights into the action of nitroheterocyclic drugs against C. difficile. PMID:25129314

  13. The economic burden of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    McGlone, S. M.; Bailey, R. R.; Zimmer, S. M.; Popovich, M. J.; Tian, Y.; Ufberg, P.; Muder, R. R.; Lee, B. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Although Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is the leading cause of infectious diarrhoea in hospitalized patients, the economic burden of this major nosocomial pathogen for hospitals, third-party payers and society remains unclear. We developed an economic computer simulation model to determine the costs attributable to healthcare-acquired C. difficile infection (CDI) from the hospital, third-party payer and societal perspectives. Sensitivity analyses explored the effects of varying the cost of hospitalization, C. difficile-attributable length of stay, and the probability of initial and secondary recurrences. The median cost of a case ranged from $9179 to $11 456 from the hospital perspective, $8932 to $11 679 from the third-party payor perspective, and $13 310 to $16 464 from the societal perspective. Most of the costs incurred were accrued during a patient’s primary CDI episode. Hospitals with an incidence of 4.1 CDI cases per 100 000 discharges would incur costs ?$3.2 million (hospital perspective); an incidence of 10.5 would lead to costs ?$30.6 million. Our model suggests that the annual US economic burden of CDI would be ?$496 million (hospital perspective), ?$547 million (third-party payer perspective) and ?$796 million (societal perspective). Our results show that C. difficile infection is indeed costly, not only to third-party payers and the hospital, but to society as well. These results are consistent with current literature citing C. difficile as a costly disease. PMID:21668576

  14. Secretome analysis of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Boetzkes, Alexander; Felkel, Katharina Wiebke; Zeiser, Johannes; Jochim, Nelli; Just, Ingo; Pich, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile causes infections ranging from mild C. difficile-associated diarrhea to severe pseudomembranous colitis. Since 2003 new hypervirulent C. difficile strains (PCR ribotype 027) emerged characterized by a dramatically increased mortality. The secretomes of the three C. difficile strains CDR20291, CD196, and CD630 were analyzed and compared. Proteins were separated and analyzed by means of SDS--PAGE and LC-MS. MS data were analyzed using Mascot and proteins were checked for export signals with SecretomeP and SignalP. LC-MS analysis revealed 158 different proteins in the supernatant of C. difficile. Most of the identified proteins originate from the cytoplasm. Thirty-two proteins in CDR20291, 36 in CD196 and 26 in CD630 were identified to be secreted by C. difficile strains. Those were mainly S-layer proteins, substrate-binding proteins of ABC-transporters, cell wall hydrolases, pilin and unknown hypothetical proteins. Toxin A and toxin B were identified after growth in brain heart infusion medium using immunological techniques. The ADP-ribosyltransferase-binding component protein, which is a part of the binary toxin CDT, was only identified in the hypervirulent ribotype 027 strains. Further proteins that are secreted specifically by hypervirulent strains were identified. PMID:22398929

  15. Regulation of protease production in Clostridium sporogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, C; Macfarlane, G T

    1990-01-01

    The physiological and nutritional factors that regulate protease synthesis in Clostridium sporogenes C25 were studied in batch and continuous cultures. Formation of extracellular proteases occurred at the end of active growth and during the stationary phase in batch cultures. Protease production was inversely related to growth rate in glucose-excess and glucose-limited chemostats over the range D = 0.05 to 0.70 h-1. In pulse experiments, glucose, ammonia, phosphate, and some amino acids (tryptophan, proline, tyrosine, and isoleucine) strongly repressed protease synthesis. This repression was not relieved by addition of 4 mM cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Protease formation was markedly inhibited by 4 mM ATP and ADP, but GTP and GDP had little effect on the process. It is concluded that protease production by C. sporogenes is strongly influenced by the amount of energy available to the cells, with the highest levels of protease synthesis occurring under energy-limiting conditions. PMID:2268158

  16. Thermolabile triose phosphate isomerase in a psychrophilic Clostridium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. W.; Akagi, J. M.; Himes, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    It was found that a psychrophilic Clostridium contains a triose phosphate isomerase which is very labile at moderate temperatures. An investigation showed that the optimal growth temperature of the psychrophile was between 15 and 20 deg C. No growth occurred at 25 deg C. The thermostability of the glycolytic enzymes in the cell-free extracts of Clostridium sp. strain 69 was studied. The data obtained show that the triose phosphate isomerase is quite labile at moderate temperatures. The instability of the enzyme is sufficient to explain the low maximum growth temperature of the psychrophile.

  17. Epsilon Canis Majoris and the ionization of the local cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Welsh, B. Y.

    1995-01-01

    The Lyman continuum radiation from the brightest extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source, the B2 II star epsilon Canis Majoris (Adara), is so intense that it dominates the local stellar EUV radiation field at wavelengths longer than 450 A and therefore sets a lower limit to the ionization of hydrogen in the Local Cloud. Using the EUV (70-730 A) spectrum of epsilon CMa taken with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite (EUVE) and simple models that extrapolate this spectrum to the Lyman edge at 912 A, we have determined the local interstellar hydrogen photionizatin parameter Gamma solely from epsilon CMa to be 1.1 x 10(exp -15)/s. This fiugre is a factor of 7 greater than previous estimates of Gamma calculated for all nearby stars combined (Bruhweiler & Cheng 1988). Using measured values of the density and temperature of neutral interstellar hydrogen gas in the Local Cloud, we derive a particle density of ionized hydrogen n(H(+)) and electrons n(sub e) of 0.015-0.019/cu cm assuming ionization equilibrium and a helium ionization fraction of less than 20%. These values correspond to a hydrogen ionizatin fraction, chi(sub H) from 19% to 15%, respectively. The range of these derived quantities is due to the uncertainties in the local values of the neutral hydrogen and helium interstellar densities derived from both (1) solar backscatter measurements of Ly alpha lines of hydrogen and helium (1216 and 584 A), and (2) the average neutral densities along the line of sight to nearby stars. The local proton density produced by epsilon CMa is enough to allow the ionization mechanism of Ripken & Fahr (1983) to work at the heliopause and explain the discrepancy between the neutral hydrogen density derived from solar backscatter measurements and line-of-sight averages to nearby stars. A large value of electron density in the Local Cloud of n(sub e) is approximately 0.3-0.7/cu cm (T = 7000 K) has recently been reported by Lallement et al. (1994) using observations of Mg II and Mg I toward Sirius A. We show that if such a high value exists, it cannot result from the EUV stellar radiation field and, therefore, must be due to a strong diffuse source of EUV radiation.

  18. Light focusing using epsilon-near-zero metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Weiren Premaratne, Malin; Si, Li-Ming

    2013-11-15

    We present a strategy of focusing light using epsilon-near-zero metamaterials with embedded dielectric cylinder. The focusing mechanism is analytically investigated, and its accuracy is substantiated by rigorous full-wave simulations. It is found that the focusing intensity is highly depend on the embedded medium and its size, and the magnetic field amplitude of the focused beam itself can reach as high as 98.2 times the incident field. Owing to its versatility, the proposed light focusing system is sure to find applications in fields such as bio-sensing and in nonlinear optics.

  19. The 1982-1984 Eclipse of Epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E. (editor)

    1985-01-01

    A workshop proceedings concerned with the new data collected during the 1982-1984 eclipse period of the 27-year system Epsilon Aurigae is presented. This binary star has been a classic problem in astrophysics because the opaque eclipsing object is nonstellar, and probably disk shaped. Invited papers concerning the history of the system, optical, infrared and ultraviolet photometry, optical polarimetry and ultraviolet spectroscopy are included. An invited paper concerning comprehensive theoretical interpretation in the context of stellar evolution also is included. The information collected herein is unparalleled in scope and will remain a standard reference until the next eclipse cycle in the year 2009 A.D., in all probability.

  20. The epsilon regime with twisted mass Wilson fermions

    E-print Network

    Bar, Oliver; Shindler, Andrea; 10.1007/JHEP04(2010)053

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the leading lattice spacing effects in mesonic two-point correlators computed with twisted mass Wilson fermions in the epsilon-regime. By generalizing the procedure already introduced for the untwisted Wilson chiral effective theory, we extend the continuum chiral epsilon expansion to twisted mass WChPT. We define different regimes, depending on the relative power counting for the quark masses and the lattice spacing. We explicitly compute, for arbitrary twist angle, the leading O(a^2) corrections appearing at NLO in the so-called GSM^* regime. As in untwisted WChPT, we find that in this situation the impact of explicit chiral symmetry breaking due to lattice artefacts is strongly suppressed. Of particular interest is the case of maximal twist, which corresponds to the setup usually adopted in lattice simulations with twisted mass Wilson fermions. The formulae we obtain can be matched to lattice data to extract physical low energy couplings, and to estimate systematic uncertainties coming from ...

  1. Generalized $F$-Theorem and the $\\epsilon$ Expansion

    E-print Network

    Fei, Lin; Klebanov, Igor R; Tarnopolsky, Grigory

    2015-01-01

    Some known constraints on Renormalization Group flow take the form of inequalities: in even dimensions they refer to the coefficient $a$ of the Weyl anomaly, while in odd dimensions to the sphere free energy $F$. In recent work arXiv:1409.1937 it was suggested that the $a$- and $F$-theorems may be viewed as special cases of a Generalized $F$-Theorem valid in continuous dimension. This conjecture states that, for any RG flow from one conformal fixed point to another, $\\tilde F_{\\rm UV} > \\tilde F_{\\rm IR}$, where $\\tilde F=\\sin (\\pi d/2)\\log Z_{S^d}$. Here we provide additional evidence in favor of the Generalized $F$-Theorem. We show that it holds in conformal perturbation theory, i.e. for RG flows produced by weakly relevant operators. We also study a specific example of the Wilson-Fisher $O(N)$ model and define this CFT on the sphere $S^{4-\\epsilon}$, paying careful attention to the beta functions for the coefficients of curvature terms. This allows us to develop the $\\epsilon$ expansion of $\\tilde F$ up to...

  2. High Precision Polarimetry of the Epsilon Aurigae Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktorowicz, Sloane

    2013-07-01

    Polarimetry of the epsilon Aurigae eclipse has the potential to discern the stellar latitude occulted by the companion's dusty disk, which may directly test interferometric results. In addition, the limb polarization of the primary star may be measured, which is an effect predicted by S. Chandrasekhar and verified by spatially resolved observations of the Sun. I will present B band, polarimetric observations of epsilon Aurigae taken over six nights in September and October 2009 using the POLISH high precision polarimeter at the Lick 3-m telescope. Polarimetric precision achieved during each night is of order 1 part in 10^5. Extensive post-eclipse observations have been taken with the significantly upgraded POLISH2 polarimeter at Lick Observatory. This instrument simultaneously measures all four Stokes parameters (I, Q, U, and V) and achieves precision within 2.0 times the photon shot noise limit over an entire observing run. This work is supported by a NExScI Sagan Fellowship, UC Lab Fees Research Grant, and UCO/Lick Observatory.

  3. Form and Function of Clostridium thermocellum Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrache, Alexandru; Allen, Grant; Liss, Steven N.; Lynd, Lee R.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of bacterial adherence has been acknowledged in microbial lignocellulose conversion studies; however, few reports have described the function and structure of biofilms supported by cellulosic substrates. We investigated the organization, dynamic formation, and carbon flow associated with biofilms of the obligately anaerobic cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum 27405. Using noninvasive, in situ fluorescence imaging, we showed biofilms capable of near complete substrate conversion with a characteristic monolayered cell structure without an extracellular polymeric matrix typically seen in biofilms. Cell division at the interface and terminal endospores appeared throughout all stages of biofilm growth. Using continuous-flow reactors with a rate of dilution (2 h?1) 12-fold higher than the bacterium's maximum growth rate, we compared biofilm activity under low (44 g/liter) and high (202 g/liter) initial cellulose loading. The average hydrolysis rate was over 3-fold higher in the latter case, while the proportions of oligomeric cellulose hydrolysis products lost from the biofilm were 13.7% and 29.1% of the total substrate carbon hydrolyzed, respectively. Fermentative catabolism was comparable between the two cellulose loadings, with ca. 4% of metabolized sugar carbon being utilized for cell production, while 75.4% and 66.7% of the two cellulose loadings, respectively, were converted to primary carbon metabolites (ethanol, acetic acid, lactic acid, carbon dioxide). However, there was a notable difference in the ethanol-to-acetic acid ratio (g/g), measured to be 0.91 for the low cellulose loading and 0.41 for the high cellulose loading. The results suggest that substrate availability for cell attachment rather than biofilm colonization rates govern the efficiency of cellulose conversion. PMID:23087042

  4. Form and function of Clostridium thermocellum biofilms.

    PubMed

    Dumitrache, Alexandru; Wolfaardt, Gideon; Allen, Grant; Liss, Steven N; Lynd, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    The importance of bacterial adherence has been acknowledged in microbial lignocellulose conversion studies; however, few reports have described the function and structure of biofilms supported by cellulosic substrates. We investigated the organization, dynamic formation, and carbon flow associated with biofilms of the obligately anaerobic cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum 27405. Using noninvasive, in situ fluorescence imaging, we showed biofilms capable of near complete substrate conversion with a characteristic monolayered cell structure without an extracellular polymeric matrix typically seen in biofilms. Cell division at the interface and terminal endospores appeared throughout all stages of biofilm growth. Using continuous-flow reactors with a rate of dilution (2 h(-1)) 12-fold higher than the bacterium's maximum growth rate, we compared biofilm activity under low (44 g/liter) and high (202 g/liter) initial cellulose loading. The average hydrolysis rate was over 3-fold higher in the latter case, while the proportions of oligomeric cellulose hydrolysis products lost from the biofilm were 13.7% and 29.1% of the total substrate carbon hydrolyzed, respectively. Fermentative catabolism was comparable between the two cellulose loadings, with ca. 4% of metabolized sugar carbon being utilized for cell production, while 75.4% and 66.7% of the two cellulose loadings, respectively, were converted to primary carbon metabolites (ethanol, acetic acid, lactic acid, carbon dioxide). However, there was a notable difference in the ethanol-to-acetic acid ratio (g/g), measured to be 0.91 for the low cellulose loading and 0.41 for the high cellulose loading. The results suggest that substrate availability for cell attachment rather than biofilm colonization rates govern the efficiency of cellulose conversion. PMID:23087042

  5. Adherence of Clostridium thermocellum to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, E A; Kenig, R; Lamed, R

    1983-01-01

    The adherence of Clostridium thermocellum, a cellulolytic, thermophilic anaerobe, to its insoluble substrate (cellulose) was studied. The adherence phenomenon was determined to be selective for cellulose. The observed adherence was not significantly affected by various parameters, including salts, pH, temperature, detergents, or soluble sugars. A spontaneous adherence-defective mutant strain (AD2) was isolated from the wild-type strain YS. Antibodies were prepared against the bacterial cell surface and rendered specific to the cellulose-binding factor (CBF) by adsorption to mutant AD2 cells. By using these CBF-specific antibodies, crossed immunoelectrophoresis of cell extracts revealed a single discrete precipitation peak in the parent strain which was absent in the mutant. This difference was accompanied by an alteration in the polypeptide profile whereby sonicates of strain YS contained a 210,000-molecular-weight band which was missing in strain AD2. The CBF antigen could be removed from cell extracts by adsorption to cellulose. A combined gel-overlay--immunoelectrophoretic technique demonstrated that the cellulose-binding properties of the CBF were accompanied by carboxymethylcellulase activity. During the exponential phase of growth, a large part of the CBF antigen and related carboxymethylcellulase activity was associated with the cells of wild-type strain YS. However, the amounts decreased in stationary-phase cells. Cellobiose-grown mutant AD2 cells lacked the cell-associated CBF, but the latter was detected in the extracellular fluid. Increased levels of CBF were observed when cells were grown on cellulose. In addition, mutant AD2 regained cell-associated CBF together with the property of cellulose adherence. The presence of the CBF antigen and related adherence characteristics appeared to be a phenomenon common to other naturally occurring strains of this species. Images PMID:6630152

  6. Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile Colonisation and Onward Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, David W.; Griffiths, David; Vaughan, Alison; Golubchik, Tanya; Acharya, Milind; O’Connor, Lily; Crook, Derrick W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Combined genotyping/whole genome sequencing and epidemiological data suggest that in endemic settings only a minority of Clostridium difficile infection, CDI, is acquired from other cases. Asymptomatic patients are a potential source for many unexplained cases. Methods We prospectively screened a cohort of medical inpatients in a UK teaching hospital for asymptomatic C. difficile carriage using stool culture. Electronic and questionnaire data were used to determine risk factors for asymptomatic carriage by logistic regression. Carriage isolates were compared with all hospital/community CDI cases from the same geographic region, from 12 months before the study to 3 months after, using whole genome sequencing and hospital admission data, assessing particularly for evidence of onward transmission from asymptomatic cases. Results Of 227 participants recruited, 132 provided ?1 stool samples for testing. 18 participants were culture-positive for C. difficile, 14/132(11%) on their first sample. Independent risk factors for asymptomatic carriage were patient reported loose/frequent stool (but not meeting CDI criteria of ?3 unformed stools in 24 hours), previous overnight hospital stay within 6 months, and steroid/immunosuppressant medication in the last 6 months (all p?0.02). Surprisingly antibiotic exposure in the last 6 months was independently associated with decreased risk of carriage (p?=?0.005). The same risk factors were identified excluding participants reporting frequent/loose stool. 13/18(72%) asymptomatically colonised patients carried toxigenic strains from common disease-causing lineages found in cases. Several plausible transmission events to asymptomatic carriers were identified, but in this relatively small study no clear evidence of onward transmission from an asymptomatic case was seen. Conclusions Transmission events from any one asymptomatic carrier are likely to be relatively rare, but as asymptomatic carriage is common, it may still be an important source of CDI, which could be quantified in larger studies. Risk factors established for asymptomatic carriage may help identify patients for inclusion in such studies. PMID:24265690

  7. Production of 1,3-propanediol from glycerol by Clostridium acetobutylicum and other Clostridium species

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1987-04-01

    Glycerol was fermented with the production of 1,3-propanediol as the major fermentation product by four strains of Clostridium acetobutylicum, six of C. butylicum, two of C. beijerinckii, one of C. kainantoi, and three of C. butylicum. 1,3-Propanediol was identified by its retention times in gas chromatography and high-pressure liquid chromatography and by its mass spectrum. During growth of C. butylicum B593 in a chemostat culture at pH 6.5, 61% of the glycerol fermented was converted to 1,3-propanediol. When the pH was decreased to 4.9, growth and 1,3-propanediol production were substantially reduced.

  8. Clostridium difficile from healthy food animals: Optimized isolation and prevalence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two isolation methods were compared for isolation of Clostridium difficile from food animal feces. The single alcohol shock method (SS) used selective enrichment in cycloserine-cefoxitin fructose broth supplemented with 0.1% sodium taurocholate (TCCFB) followed by alcohol shock and isolation on tryp...

  9. Isolation of Clostridium difficile from healthy food animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Clostridium difficile-associated disease is increasingly reported and studies indicate that food animals may be sources of human infections. Methods: The presence of C. difficile in 345 swine fecal, 1,325 dairy cattle fecal, and 371 dairy environmental samples were examined. Two isolati...

  10. Clostridium difficile in mixed populations of animals and humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: Since 2003, there has been an emergence of BI/NAP1 strain of Clostridium difficile (Cd) in North American hospitals. The origins of this epidemic strain have yet to be determined. However, PFGE analysis has shown ~80% similarity between this strain and some swine isolates. The objecti...

  11. Closed Genome Sequence of Clostridium pasteurianum ATCC 6013.

    PubMed

    Rotta, Carlo; Poehlein, Anja; Schwarz, Katrin; McClure, Peter; Daniel, Rolf; Minton, Nigel P

    2015-01-01

    We report here the closed genome of Clostridium pasteurianum ATCC 6013, a saccharolytic, nitrogen-fixing, and spore-forming Gram-positive obligate anaerobe. The organism is of biotechnological interest due to the production of solvents (butanol and 1,3-propanediol) but can be associated with food spoilage. The genome comprises a total of 4,351,223 bp. PMID:25700419

  12. Closed Genome Sequence of Clostridium pasteurianum ATCC 6013

    PubMed Central

    Rotta, Carlo; Poehlein, Anja; Schwarz, Katrin; McClure, Peter; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    We report here the closed genome of Clostridium pasteurianum ATCC 6013, a saccharolytic, nitrogen-fixing, and spore-forming Gram-positive obligate anaerobe. The organism is of biotechnological interest due to the production of solvents (butanol and 1,3-propanediol) but can be associated with food spoilage. The genome comprises a total of 4,351,223 bp. PMID:25700419

  13. BUTANOL PRODUCTION FROM WHEAT STRAW HYDROLYSATE USING CLOSTRIDIUM BEIJERINCKII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In these studies, butanol (acetone butanol ethanol or ABE) was produced from wheat straw hydrolysate (WSH) in batch cultures using Clostridium beijerinckii P260. In control fermentation, 48.9 gL**-1 glucose was used to produce 20.1 gL**-1 ABE with a productivity and yield of 0.28 gL**-1h**-1 and 0....

  14. Ceftolozane-Tazobactam Activity against Phylogenetically Diverse Clostridium difficile Strains.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Mark D; Wallace, Meghan A; Hink, Tiffany; Dubberke, Erik R; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2015-11-01

    Ceftolozane-tazobactam (C/T) is approved for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal and urinary tract infections and has varied activity against anaerobic bacteria. Here, we evaluate the activity of C/T against a phylogenetically diverse collection of Clostridium difficile isolates and report uniformly high MICs (?256 ?g/ml) to C/T. PMID:26282409

  15. Clostridium difficile in retail meat and processing plants in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile (Cd) have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains of Cd. Toxigenic Cd has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer ...

  16. Varied prevalence of Clostridium difficile in an integrated swine operation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006 and to compare our isolates to other animal and human isolates. Preliminary results are based on 131 C. d...

  17. Clostridium difficile prevalence in an integrated swine operation in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently there has been an epidemic of human disease in North America caused by the bacterium Clostridium difficile (Cd). It appears to be a new strain that is more virulent than previous strains, produces more toxins, and causes more severe disease (McDonald et al., 2005). The origin of the new s...

  18. PREVALENCE OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE IN AN INTEGRATED SWINE OPERATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006 and to compare our isolates to other animal and human isolates. Isolation of C. difficile was performed u...

  19. Characterization of CRISPR RNA processing in Clostridium thermocellum and Methanococcus

    E-print Network

    Will, Sebastian

    Characterization of CRISPR RNA processing in Clostridium thermocellum and Methanococcus maripaludis The CRISPR arrays found in many bacteria and most archaea are transcribed into a long precursor RNA that is processed into small clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) RNAs (cr

  20. 3-Methylindole production is regulated in Clostridium scatologenes ATCC 25775

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: 3-Methylindole (3-MI) is a degradation product of L-tryptophan and is both an animal waste malodorant and threat to ruminant health. Culture conditions which influence 3-MI production in Clostridium scatologenes ATCC 25775 were investigated. Methods and Results: Cells cultured in anaerobic ...

  1. Structural insights into the mechanisms of membrane binding and oligomerization of a bacterial pore-forming toxin 

    E-print Network

    Ramachandran, Rajesh

    2006-04-12

    . In fact, debilitating diseases caused by Vibrio cholerae (cholera), Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), Bordetella pertussis (whooping cough), Clostridium perfringens (gas gangrene), Clostridium botulinum (botulism) and Clostridium tetani (tetanus) were all...

  2. Veal Calves Produce Less Antibodies against C. Perfringens Alpha Toxin Compared to Beef Calves.

    PubMed

    Valgaeren, Bonnie R; Pardon, Bart; Goossens, Evy; Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Roelandt, Sophie; Timbermont, Leen; Van Der Vekens, Nicky; Stuyvaert, Sabrina; Gille, Linde; Van Driessche, Laura; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip; Deprez, Piet

    2015-07-01

    Enterotoxaemia is a disease with a high associated mortality rate, affecting beef and veal calves worldwide, caused by C. perfringens alpha toxin and perfringolysin. A longitudinal study was conducted to determine the dynamics of antibodies against these toxins in 528 calves on 4 beef and 15 veal farms. The second study aimed to determine the effect of solid feed intake on the production of antibodies against alpha toxin and perfringolysin. The control group only received milk replacer, whereas in the test group solid feed was provided. Maternal antibodies for alpha toxin were present in 45% of the veal calves and 66% of the beef calves. In beef calves a fluent transition from maternal to active immunity was observed for alpha toxin, whereas almost no veal calves developed active immunity. Perfringolysin antibodies significantly declined both in veal and beef calves. In the second study all calves were seropositive for alpha toxin throughout the experiment and solid feed intake did not alter the dynamics of alpha and perfringolysin antibodies. In conclusion, the present study showed that veal calves on a traditional milk replacer diet had significantly lower alpha toxin antibodies compared to beef calves in the risk period for enterotoxaemia, whereas no differences were noticed for perfringolysin. PMID:26184311

  3. The ClosTron: Mutagenesis in Clostridium refined and streamlined.

    PubMed

    Heap, John T; Kuehne, Sarah A; Ehsaan, Muhammad; Cartman, Stephen T; Cooksley, Clare M; Scott, Jamie C; Minton, Nigel P

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of the ClosTron Group II intron directed mutagenesis tool for Clostridium has advanced genetics in this genus, and here we present several significant improvements. We have shown how marker re-cycling can be used to construct strains with multiple mutations, demonstrated using FLP/FRT in Clostridium acetobutylicum; tested the capacity of the system for the delivery of transgenes to the chromosome of Clostridium sporogenes, which proved feasible for 1.0kbp transgenes in addition to a marker; and extended the host range of the system, constructing mutants in Clostridium beijerinckii and, for the first time, in a B1/NAP1/027 'epidemic' strain of Clostridium difficile. Automated intron design bioinformatics are now available free-of-charge at our website http://clostron.com; the out-sourced construction of re-targeted intron plasmids has become cost-effective as well as rapid; and the combination of constitutive intron expression with direct selection for intron insertions has made mutant isolation trivial. These developments mean mutants can now be constructed with very little time and effort for the researcher. Those who prefer to construct plasmids in-house are no longer reliant on a commercial kit, as a mixture of two new plasmids provides unlimited template for intron re-targeting by Splicing by Overlap Extension (SOE) PCR. The new ClosTron plasmids also offer blue-white screening and other options for identification of recombinant plasmids. The improved ClosTron system supersedes the prototype plasmid pMTL007 and the original method, and exploits the potential of Group II introns more fully. PMID:19891996

  4. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium beijerinckii sequential culture: effect of feedstock particle size on gas production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fermentation of cellulosic biomass can be done in a single step with cellulolytic, solventogenic bacteria, such as Clostridium thermocellum. However, the suite of products is limited in consolidated bioprocessing. Fortunately, the thermophilic nature of C. thermocellum can be exploited in sequenti...

  5. The strong isospin-breaking correction for the gluonic penguin contribution to {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} at next-to-leading order in the chiral expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Carl E.; Maltman, Kim

    2001-01-01

    The strong isospin-breaking correction {Omega}{sub st}, which appears in estimates of the standard model value for the direct CP-violating ratio {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}, is evaluated to next-to-leading order (NLO) in the chiral expansion using chiral perturbation theory. The relevant linear combinations of the unknown NLO CP-odd weak low-energy constants (LEC's) which, in combination with one-loop and strong LEC contributions, are required for a complete determination at this order, are estimated using two different models. It is found that, to NLO, {Omega}{sub st}=0.08{+-}0.05, significantly reduced from the ''standard'' value, 0.25{+-}0.08, employed in recent analyses. The potentially significant numerical impact of this decrease on standard model predictions for {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}, associated with the decreased cancellation between gluonic penguin and electroweak penguin contributions, is also discussed.

  6. Regulation of molybdate transport by Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, B B; Mortenson, L E

    1976-01-01

    The regulation of the molybdate (MoO42-) transport activity of Clostridium pasteurianum has been studied by observing the effects of NH3, carbamyl phosphate, MoO42-, and chloramphenicol on the ability of cells to take up MoO42-. Compared with cells fixing N2, cells grown in the presence of 1 mM NH3 are greater than 95% repressed for MoO42- transport. Uptake activity begins to increase just before NH exhaustion (under Ar or N2) and continues to increase throughout the lag period as cells shift from NH3-growing to N2-fixing conditions. When cells are shifted from N2-fixing to NH3-growing conditions the transport activity per fixed number of cells decreases by increase of bells in absence of transport synthesis. Carbamyl phosphate (greater than or equal to 15 mM) but not NH3 inhibits 58% of the in vitro uptake activity. When 1 mM carbamyl phosphate is added just before the exhaustion of NH3, the transport activity, measured 2 h later, is 100% repressed. Cells grown in the presence of high MoO42- (1mM) are 80% repressed for MoO42- transport. Synthesis of the MoO42- transport system is also completely stopped when chloramphenicol (300 mug/ml) is added just before the exhaustion oNH 3 from the medium. These findings demonstrate that the ability of cells to transport MoO42- is dependent upon new protein synthesis and can be repressed by high levels of substrate. The regulation of MoO42- uptake by NH3 or carbamyl phosphate closely parallels the regulation of nitrogenase activity. Activity of neither nitrogenase component (Fe protein or MoFe protein) was detected even 3 h after the exhaustion of the NH3 if either MoO42- was absent or if WO42- was present in place of MoO42-. The duration of the diauxic lag increases with decreasing concentration of MoO42- in the medium. If no MoO42- is present the lag continues indefinitely. If MoO42- is added late in the lag period, growth under N2-fixing conditions resumes but only after a normal induction period. PMID:956118

  7. Clostridium difficile associated infection, diarrhea and colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hookman, Perry; Barkin, Jamie S

    2009-01-01

    A new, hypervirulent strain of Clostridium difficile, called NAP1/BI/027, has been implicated in C. difficile outbreaks associated with increased morbidity and mortality since the early 2000s. The epidemic strain is resistant to fluoroquinolones in vitro, which was infrequent prior to 2001. The name of this strain reflects its characteristics, demonstrated by different typing methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (NAP1), restriction endonuclease analysis (BI) and polymerase chain reaction (027). In 2004 and 2005, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) emphasized that the risk of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is increased, not only by the usual factors, including antibiotic exposure, but also gastrointestinal surgery/manipulation, prolonged length of stay in a healthcare setting, serious underlying illness, immune-compromising conditions, and aging. Patients on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have an elevated risk, as do peripartum women and heart transplant recipients. Before 2002, toxic megacolon in C. difficile-associated colitis (CDAC), was rare, but its incidence has increased dramatically. Up to two-thirds of hospitalized patients may be infected with C. difficile. Asymptomatic carriers admitted to healthcare facilities can transmit the organism to other susceptible patients, thereby becoming vectors. Fulminant colitis is reported more frequently during outbreaks of C. difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). C. difficile infection with IBD carries a higher mortality than without underlying IBD. This article reviews the latest information on C. difficile infection, including presentation, vulnerable hosts and choice of antibiotics, alternative therapies, and probiotics and immunotherapy. We review contact precautions for patients with known or suspected C. difficile-associated disease. Healthcare institutions require accurate and rapid diagnosis for early detection of possible outbreaks, to initiate specific therapy and implement effective control measures. A comprehensive C. difficile infection control management rapid response team (RRT) is recommended for each health care facility. A communication network between RRTs is recommended, in coordination with each country’s department of health. Our aim is to convey a comprehensive source of information and to guide healthcare professionals in the difficult decisions that they face when caring for these oftentimes very ill patients. PMID:19340897

  8. Electrically Tunable Epsilon-Near-Zero (ENZ) Metafilm Absorbers.

    PubMed

    Park, Junghyun; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Liu, Xiaoge; Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing and spectrally controlling light absorption is of great practical and fundamental importance. In optoelectronic devices consisting of layered semiconductors and metals, absorption has traditionally been manipulated with the help of Fabry-Pérot resonances. Even further control over the spectral light absorption properties of thin films has been achieved by patterning them into dense arrays of subwavelength resonant structures to form metafilms. As the next logical step, we demonstrate electrical control over light absorption in metafilms constructed from dense arrays of actively tunable plasmonic cavities. This control is achieved by embedding indium tin oxide (ITO) into these cavities. ITO affords significant tuning of its optical properties by means of electrically-induced carrier depletion and accumulation. We demonstrate that particularly large changes in the reflectance from such metafilms (up to 15%?P) can be achieved by operating the ITO in the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) frequency regime where its electrical permittivity changes sign from negative to positive values. PMID:26549615

  9. Goos-Hänchen effect in epsilon-near-zero metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yadong; Chan, C. T.; Chen, Huanyang

    2015-01-01

    Light reflection and refraction at an interface between two homogeneous media is analytically described by Snell's law. For a beam with a finite waist, it turns out that the reflected wave experiences a lateral displacement from its position predicted by geometric optics. Such Goos-Hänchen (G-H) effect has been extensively investigated among all kinds of optical media, such as dielectrics, metals, photonic crystals and metamaterials. As a fundamental physics phenomenon, the G-H effect has been extended to acoustics and quantum mechanics. Here we report the unusual G-H effect in zero index metamaterials. We show that when linearly polarized light is obliquely incident from air to epsilon-near-zero metamaterials, no G-H effect could be observed for p polarized light. While for s polarization, the G-H shift is a constant value for any incident angle. PMID:25731726

  10. Shock initiation of an {epsilon}-CL-20-estane formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C.M.; Simpson, R.L.; Urtiew, P.A.

    1995-07-19

    The shock sensitivity of a pressed solid explosive formulation, LX-19, containing 95.2% by weight epsilon phase 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (HNIW) and 4.8% Estane binder, was determined using the wedge test and embedded manganin pressure gauge techniques. This formulation was shown to be slightly more sensitive than LX-14, which contains 95.5% HMX and 4.5% Estane binder. The measured pressure histories for LX-19 were very similar to those obtained using several HMX-inert binder formulations. An Ignition and Growth reactive model for LX-19 was developed which differed from those for HMX-inert binder formulations only by a 25% higher hot spot growth rate.

  11. Data Evaluation for 56Co epsilon + beta+ Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Baglin, Coral M.; MacMahon, T. Desmond

    2005-02-28

    Recommended values for nuclear and atomic data pertaining to the {var_epsilon} + {beta}{sup +} decay of {sup 56}Co are provided here, followed by comments on evaluation procedures and a summary of all available experimental data. {sup 56}Co is a radionuclide which is potentially very useful for Ge detector efficiency calibration because it is readily produced via the {sup 56}Fe(p,n) reaction, its half-life of 77.24 days is conveniently long, and it provides a number of relatively strong {gamma} rays with energies up to {approx}3500 keV. The transition intensities recommended here for the strongest lines will be included in the forthcoming International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Programme document ''Update of X- and Gamma-ray Decay Data Standards for Detector Calibration and Other Applications'', and the analysis for all transitions along with relevant atomic data have been provided to the Decay Data Evaluation Project.

  12. Critical $O(N)$ Models in $6-\\epsilon$ Dimensions

    E-print Network

    Fei, Lin; Klebanov, Igor R

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the classic $O(N)$ symmetric scalar field theories in $d$ dimensions with interaction $(\\phi^i \\phi^i)^2$. For $21038$. We show that the $1/N$ expansions of various operator scaling dimensions match the known results for the critical $O(N)$ theory continued to $d=6-\\epsilon$. These results suggest that, for sufficiently large $N$, there are 5-dimensional unitary $O(N)$ symmetric interacting CFT's; they should be dual to the Vasiliev higher-spin theory in AdS$_6$ with alternate boundary conditions for the bulk scalar. Using these CFT's we provide a new test of the 5-dimensional $F$-theorem, and also find a new counterexample for the $C_T$ theorem.

  13. Gearing Up for Epsilon Aurigae's First Eclipse of the Millennium

    E-print Network

    J. L. Hopkins; L. Schanne; R. E. Stencel

    2008-07-17

    The mysterious 3rd magnitude long period eclipsing binary star system epsilon Aurigae is predicted to be starting its 2 year eclipse in the late summer of 2009. While this is when the real excitement starts, much is to be learned before first contact. This paper discusses current observational results that have accumulated thus far, using photometric monitoring, H-alpha spectroscopy and with other data sources. Key among the findings are that (1) the low amplitude light variation quasi-period has decreased significantly over the past 20 years, and (2) that the duration of egress, eclipse-to-eclipse has been decreasing, while the duration of total eclipse has been increasing. The website for the observing campaign is: www.du.edu/~rstencel/epsaur.htm .

  14. Electrically Tunable Epsilon-Near-Zero (ENZ) Metafilm Absorbers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Junghyun; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Liu, Xiaoge; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing and spectrally controlling light absorption is of great practical and fundamental importance. In optoelectronic devices consisting of layered semiconductors and metals, absorption has traditionally been manipulated with the help of Fabry-Pérot resonances. Even further control over the spectral light absorption properties of thin films has been achieved by patterning them into dense arrays of subwavelength resonant structures to form metafilms. As the next logical step, we demonstrate electrical control over light absorption in metafilms constructed from dense arrays of actively tunable plasmonic cavities. This control is achieved by embedding indium tin oxide (ITO) into these cavities. ITO affords significant tuning of its optical properties by means of electrically-induced carrier depletion and accumulation. We demonstrate that particularly large changes in the reflectance from such metafilms (up to 15%?P) can be achieved by operating the ITO in the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) frequency regime where its electrical permittivity changes sign from negative to positive values. PMID:26549615

  15. CONSTRAINTS FROM ASYMMETRIC HEATING: INVESTIGATING THE EPSILON AURIGAE DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Richard L. III; Stencel, Robert E. E-mail: robert.stencel@du.edu

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon Aurigae is a long-period eclipsing binary that likely contains an F0Ia star and a circumstellar disk enshrouding a hidden companion, assumed to be a main-sequence B star. High uncertainty in its parallax has kept the evolutionary status of the system in question and, hence, the true nature of each component. This unknown, as well as the absence of solid state spectral features in the infrared, requires an investigation of a wide parameter space by means of both analytic and Monte Carlo radiative transfer (MCRT) methods. The first MCRT models of epsilon Aurigae that include all three system components are presented here. We seek additional system parameter constraints by melding analytic approximations with MCRT outputs (e.g., dust temperatures) on a first-order level. The MCRT models investigate the effects of various parameters on the disk-edge temperatures; these include two distances, three particle size distributions, three compositions, and two disk masses, resulting in 36 independent models. Specifically, the MCRT temperatures permit analytic calculations of effective heating and cooling curves along the disk edge. These are used to calculate representative observed fluxes and corresponding temperatures. This novel application of thermal properties provides the basis for utilization of other binary systems containing disks. We find degeneracies in the model fits for the various parameter sets. However, the results show a preference for a carbon disk with particle size distributions ?10 ?m. Additionally, a linear correlation between the MCRT noon and basal temperatures serves as a tool for effectively eliminating portions of the parameter space.

  16. One-loop pentagon integral in $d$ dimensions from differential equations in $\\epsilon$-form

    E-print Network

    Kozlov, Mikhail G

    2015-01-01

    We apply differential equations technique to the calculation of the one-loop massless diagram with five onshell legs. Using reduction to $\\epsilon$-form, we manage to obtain a simple one-fold integral representation exact in space-time dimensionality. Expansion of the obtained result in $\\epsilon$ and analytical continuation to physical regions are discussed.

  17. Further studies on T*{sub {epsilon}} integral for curved crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.W.; Kobayashi, A.S.; Atluri, S.N.; Tan, P.W.

    1999-07-01

    T*{sub {epsilon}} integral values associated with stable, curved crack growth in biaxially loaded, fatigued precracked, 2024-T3 single edge notched (SEN) specimens were determined. The SEN specimens were loaded under combined Modes 1 and 2 and mimicked the flapping of a failed lap splice joint of a pressurized airplane fuselage. Most specimens were provided with a tear strap, which was either bonded, bonded and riveted, or integrally machined (machined pad-up) in the specimen. The stably growing crack curved and either penetrated or curved again upon hitting the tear strap. The displacement field, which was determined by Moire interferometry as well as with finite element analysis, was used to directly determine the T*{sub 2{epsilon}} and T*{sub 2{epsilon}} integral values. These T*{sub {epsilon}} values agreed reasonably well with those determined by an elastic-plastic finite element modeling of the experiments. T*{sub 1{epsilon}} was identical to that obtained previously for pure Mode I crack extension while the T*{sub 2{epsilon}} integral oscillated about its null value. The results of this study suggest that T*{sub 1{epsilon}} could represent the resistance for locally self-similar crack growth and that a crack will curve in the direction of vanishing T*{sub 2{epsilon}}.

  18. Ultrafast plasmonics using transparent conductive oxide hybrids in the epsilon-near-zero regime

    E-print Network

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    Ultrafast plasmonics using transparent conductive oxide hybrids in the epsilon-near-zero regime plasmonics using transparent conductive oxide hybrids in the epsilon-near-zero regime Daniel Traviss,1 Roman March 2013) The dielectric response of transparent conductive oxides near the bulk plasmon frequency

  19. epsilon-N-trimethyllysine availability regulates the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat

    SciTech Connect

    Rebouche, C.J.; Lehman, L.J.; Olson, L.

    1986-05-01

    Rates of carnitine biosynthesis in mammals depend on the availability of substrates and the activity of enzymes subserving the pathway. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that the availability of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine is rate-limiting for synthesis of carnitine in the growing rat and to evaluate diet as a source of this precursor for carnitine biosynthesis. Rats apparently absorbed greater than 90% of a tracer dose of (methyl-/sup 3/H)epsilon-N-trimethyllysine, and approximately 30% of that was incorporated into tissues as (/sup 3/H)carnitine. Rats given oral supplements of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine (0.5-20 mg/d), but no dietary carnitine, excreted more carnitine than control animals receiving no dietary epsilon-N-trimethyllysine or carnitine. Rates of carnitine excretion increased in a dose-dependent manner. Tissue and serum levels of carnitine also increased with dietary epsilon-N-trimethyllysine supplementation. There was no evidence that the capacity for carnitine biosynthesis was saturated even at the highest level of oral epsilon-N-trimethyllysine supplementation. Common dietary proteins (casein, soy protein and wheat gluten) were found to be poor sources of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine for carnitine biosynthesis. The results of this study indicate that the availability of epsilon-N-trimethyllysine limits the rate of carnitine biosynthesis in the growing rat.

  20. Asymptotic behavior of solutions of the renormalization group K-epsilon turbulence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakhot, A.; Staroselsky, I.; Orszag, S. A.

    1994-05-01

    The renormalization group (RNG) K-epsilon turbulence model, derived directly from the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, is analyzed in this paper. To avoid singularities, a = 1, 80 gamma(sub v) must be smaller than 23.62 in the form of the RNG K-epsilon model, that avoids the use of explicit wall functions.

  1. The catalytic domains of Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin and related large clostridial glucosylating toxins specifically recognize the negatively charged phospholipids phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Varela Chavez, Carolina; Hoos, Sylviane; Haustant, Georges Michel; Chenal, Alexandre; England, Patrick; Blondel, Arnaud; Pauillac, Serge; Lacy, D Borden; Popoff, Michel Robert

    2015-10-01

    Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL) is a potent virulence factor belonging to the large clostridial glucosylating toxin family. TcsL enters target cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the N-terminal catalytic domain (TcsL-cat) into the cytosol upon an autoproteolytic process. TcsL-cat inactivates small GTPases including Rac and Ras by glucosylation with uridine-diphosphate (UDP)-glucose as cofactor leading to drastic changes in cytoskeleton and cell viability. TcsL-cat was found to preferentially bind to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes and to increase the glucosylation of Rac anchored to lipid membrane. We here report binding affinity measurements of TcsL-cat for brain PS-containing membranes by surface plasmon resonance and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, TcsL-cat bound to phosphatidic acid (PA) and, to a lesser extent, to other anionic lipids, but not to neutral lipids, sphingolipids or sterol. We further show that the lipid unsaturation status influenced TcsL-cat binding to phospholipids, PS with unsaturated acyl chains and PA with saturated acyl chains being the preferred bindingsubstrates. Phospholipid binding site is localized at the N-terminal four helical bundle structure (1-93 domain). However, TcsL-1-93 bound to a broad range of substrates, whereas TcsL-cat, which is the active domain physiologically delivered into the cytosol, selectively bound to PS and PA. Similar findings were observed with the other large clostridial glucosylating toxins from C.?difficile, C.?novyi and C.?perfringens. PMID:25882477

  2. A neutralizing antibody against human DNA polymerase epsilon inhibits cellular but not SV40 DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Pospiech, H; Kursula, I; Abdel-Aziz, W; Malkas, L; Uitto, L; Kastelli, M; Vihinen-Ranta, M; Eskelinen, S; Syväoja, J E

    1999-10-01

    The contribution of human DNA polymerase epsilon to nuclear DNA replication was studied. Antibody K18 that specifically inhibits DNA polymerase activity of human DNA polymerase epsilon in vitro significantly inhibits DNA synthesis both when microinjected into nuclei of exponentially growing human fibroblasts and in isolated HeLa cell nuclei. The capability of this neutralizing antibody to inhibit DNA synthesis in cells is comparable to that of monoclonal antibody SJK-132-20 against DNA polymerase alpha. Contrary to the antibody against DNA polymerase alpha, antibody K18 against DNA polymerase epsilon did not inhibit SV40 DNA replication in vitro. These results indicate that DNA polymerase epsilon plays a role in replicative DNA synthesis in proliferating human cells like DNA polymerase alpha, and that this role for DNA polymerase epsilon cannot be modeled by SV40 DNA replication. PMID:10481018

  3. A neutralizing antibody against human DNA polymerase epsilon inhibits cellular but not SV40 DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Pospiech, H; Kursula, I; Abdel-Aziz, W; Malkas, L; Uitto, L; Kastelli, M; Vihinen-Ranta, M; Eskelinen, S; Syväoja, J E

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of human DNA polymerase epsilon to nuclear DNA replication was studied. Antibody K18 that specifically inhibits DNA polymerase activity of human DNA polymerase epsilon in vitro significantly inhibits DNA synthesis both when microinjected into nuclei of exponentially growing human fibroblasts and in isolated HeLa cell nuclei. The capability of this neutralizing antibody to inhibit DNA synthesis in cells is comparable to that of monoclonal antibody SJK-132-20 against DNA polymerase alpha. Contrary to the antibody against DNA polymerase alpha, antibody K18 against DNA polymerase epsilon did not inhibit SV40 DNA replication in vitro. These results indicate that DNA polymerase epsilon plays a role in replicative DNA synthesis in proliferating human cells like DNA polymerase alpha, and that this role for DNA polymerase epsilon cannot be modeled by SV40 DNA replication. PMID:10481018

  4. Effect of epsilon subunit on the rotation of thermophilic Bacillus F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Tsumuraya, Masato; Furuike, Shou; Adachi, Kengo; Kinosita, Kazuhiko; Yoshida, Masasuke

    2009-04-01

    F(1)-ATPase is an ATP-driven motor in which gammaepsilon rotates in the alpha(3)beta(3)-cylinder. It is attenuated by MgADP inhibition and by the epsilon subunit in an inhibitory form. The non-inhibitory form of epsilon subunit of thermophilic Bacillus PS3 F(1)-ATPase is stabilized by ATP-binding with micromolar K(d) at 25 degrees C. Here, we show that at [ATP]>2 microM, epsilon does not affect rotation of PS3 F(1)-ATPase but, at 200 nM ATP, epsilon prolongs the pause of rotation caused by MgADP inhibition while the frequency of the pause is unchanged. It appears that epsilon undergoes reversible transition to the inhibitory form at [ATP] below K(d). PMID:19265694

  5. FT-IR spectroscopic analysis for studying Clostridium cell response to conversion of enzymatically hydrolyzed hay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grube, Mara; Gavare, Marita; Nescerecka, Alina; Tihomirova, Kristina; Mezule, Linda; Juhna, Talis

    2013-07-01

    Grass hay is one of assailable cellulose containing non-food agricultural wastes that can be used as a carbohydrate source by microorganisms producing biofuels. In this study three Clostridium strains Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium tetanomorphum, capable of producing acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) were adapted to convert enzymatically hydrolyzed hay used as a growth media additive. The results of growth curves, substrate degradation kinetics and FT-IR analyses of bacterial biomass macromolecular composition showed diverse strain-specific cell response to the growth medium composition.

  6. Discrimination of clostridium species using a magnetic bead based hybridization assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlow, Susanne; Seise, Barbara; Pollok, Sibyll; Seyboldt, Christian; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the causative agent of blackleg, which is an endogenous bacterial infection. Mainly cattle and other ruminants are affected. The symptoms of blackleg are very similar to those of malignant edema, an infection caused by Clostridium septicum. [1, 2] Therefore a reliable differentiation of Clostridium chauvoei from other Clostridium species is required. Traditional microbiological detection methods are time consuming and laborious. Additionally, the unique identification is hindered by the overgrowing tendency of swarming Clostridium septicum colonies when both species are present. [1, 3, 4] Thus, there is a crucial need to improve and simplify the specific detection of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum. Here we present an easy and fast Clostridium species discrimination method combining magnetic beads and fluorescence spectroscopy. Functionalized magnetic particles exhibit plentiful advantages, like their simple manipulation in combination with a large binding capacity of biomolecules. A specific region of the pathogenic DNA is amplified and labelled with biotin by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These PCR products were then immobilized on magnetic beads exploiting the strong biotin-streptavidin interaction. The specific detection of different Clostridium species is achieved by using fluorescence dye labeled probe DNA for the hybridization with the immobilized PCR products. Finally, the samples were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. [5

  7. Differential regulation of alternative 3{prime} splicing of {epsilon} messenger RNA variants

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Sanchez, D.; Zhang, K.; Saxon, A.

    1995-08-15

    Alternative 3{prime} splicing of the one active human {epsilon} heavy chain gene results in variants of {epsilon} mRNA encoding distinct IgE proteins. The same relative amounts of these {epsilon} mRNA variants were produced by non-atopic donor B cells when driven in a variety of T-dependent or T-independent systems. The most abundant variants were those for classic secreted {epsilon} and a novel secreted form (CH4-M2{double_prime}). In contrast, cells from subjects with high levels of serum IgE secondary to parasitic infection or atopy spontaneously produced higher relative levels of the CH4-M2{prime} {epsilon} mRNA variant, lower relative amounts of both the membrane and CH4-M2{double_prime} secreted variants, and very low levels of the CH4{prime}-CH5 variant. The existence of and corresponding changes in levels of the CH4-M2{prime}-enclosed secreted protein were demonstrated. IL-10 induced this same differential expression of {epsilon} splice variants in vitro when used to costimulate IL-4 plus CD40-driven B cells and could differentially enhance the production of CH4-M2{prime} protein by established IgE-secreting cell lines. Inhibition of IgE by cross-linking the low affinity IgE receptor (CD23) decreased the levels of {epsilon} mRNA and resulted in a distinct pattern of {epsilon} mRNA characterized by a dramatic decrease in CH4-M2{prime} splice variant. IL-6, IL-2, or IFN-{gamma} did not change the {epsilon} mRNA pattern. Overall, the absolute and relative amounts of the different {epsilon} mRNA splice variants produced appear to be controlled in a differentiation-related fashion.

  8. Apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele increases risk for psychotic symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zdanys, Kristina F; Kleiman, Timothy G; MacAvoy, Martha G; Black, Benjamin T; Rightmer, Tracy E; Grey, Monique; Garman, Katherine S; Tampi, Rajesh R; Gelernter, Joel; van Dyck, Christopher H

    2007-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E (ApoE) epsilon4 allele is a well-documented genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Its association with psychopathology among AD patients has been the subject of discrepant reports. We aimed to determine whether ApoE epsilon4+ and epsilon4- AD patients exhibit a different risk profile for psychotic symptoms and other behavioral disturbances. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) was administered to determine the frequency and severity of psychotic and other behavioral symptoms in a sample of n=266 AD patients who had been genotyped for ApoE. Multiple logistic regression models were used to calculate the association between the ApoE epsilon4 allele and the presence of psychotic symptoms (delusions or hallucinations). Exploratory analyses were also conducted to determine the impact of disease severity on epsilon4 effects and to examine the association between epsilon4 and other behavioral symptoms. ApoE epsilon4 was significantly associated with psychotic symptoms (odds ratio (OR)=1.87, 95% CI=1.07-3.29, P=0.029), adjusting for age, sex, education, and MMSE score. More stringent definitions of clinically significant psychosis yielded similar results. Exploratory analyses suggested that this effect accrued specifically from patients with severe-stage AD and primarily from an association between epsilon4 and delusions. The epsilon4 allele did not appear to influence the development of most other behavioral symptoms in our sample. In conclusion, AD patients who carry the ApoE epsilon4 allele are at greater risk than noncarriers for developing psychotic symptoms, particularly as the severity of their dementia progresses. PMID:16841077

  9. Polymerase Epsilon Mutations Accelerate Mutation Rates in Colorectal and Endometrial Cancer - David Wheeler, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2012

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Polymerase Epsilon Mutations in Colorectal and Endometrial Cancer - David Wheeler Polymerase Epsilon Mutations Accelerate Mutation Rates in Colorectal and Endometrial Cancer - David Wheeler, TCGA Scientific

  10. Nosocomial outbreak of Clostridium difficile diarrhea in a pediatric service.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, A; Merckx, J; Ancelle, T; Pron, B; Abachin, E; Barbut, F; Larzul, J; Rigault, P; Berche, P; Gaillard, J L

    1997-12-01

    An outbreak of nosocomial diarrhea that occurred in a pediatric orthopedic service between 1 December 1993 and 15 April 1994 is reported. A total of 37 patients (mean age, 9.6 years; range, 2 months-19.3 years) were involved in the outbreak, including six patients with bacteriologically documented Clostridium difficile infection. A multivariate analysis identified lincomycin treatment for at least three days as the only significant risk factor. Stool samples from four asymptomatic patients were also positive for Clostridium difficile and its cytotoxins. Isolates from all patients belonged to serogroup C, were highly resistant to lincomycin, and exhibited the same restriction pattern by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The outbreak ended after treatment with lincomycin was discontinued and hygiene control measures were implemented. PMID:9495676

  11. Isolation process of industrially useful Clostridium bifermentans from natural samples.

    PubMed

    Myszka, Kamila; Leja, Katarzyna; Olejnik-Schmidt, Agnieszka K; Czaczyk, Katarzyna

    2012-05-01

    A selective isolation procedure of clostridial strains from natural samples able to convert glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) and organic acids was investigated. The modified PY medium of high concentration of NaHCO(3) was shown to be highly selective for Clostridium bifermentans. Obtained isolates produced mainly 1,3-PD, lactic, acetic, and formic acids from glycerol. PMID:22300717

  12. Comparative characterization of extracellular and intracellular hydrocarbons of Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed

    Bagaeva, T V; Zinurova, E E

    2004-04-01

    Extracellular and intracellular hydrocarbons produced by Clostridium pasteurianum VKM 1774 during cultivation on glucose-containing media in an argon atmosphere or in the presence of carbon dioxide and molecular hydrogen were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. Intracellular hydrocarbons were 50-55% (C25-C35) n-alkanes. Carbon dioxide and molecular hydrogen stimulated synthesis of extracellular hydrocarbons, which comprised 90-95% (C11-C24) n-alkanes. PMID:15170379

  13. Historical and current perspectives on Clostridium botulinum diversity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Theresa J; Hill, Karen K; Raphael, Brian H

    2015-05-01

    For nearly one hundred years, researchers have attempted to categorize botulinum neurotoxin-producing clostridia and the toxins that they produce according to biochemical characterizations, serological comparisons, and genetic analyses. Throughout this period the bacteria and their toxins have defied such attempts at categorization. Below is a description of both historic and current Clostridium botulinum strain and neurotoxin information that illustrates how each new finding has significantly added to the knowledge of the botulinum neurotoxin-containing clostridia and their diversity. PMID:25312020

  14. Inoculum optimization of Clostridium beijerinckii for reproducible growth.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Espinola, Walter J; Chinn, Mari; Bruno-Barcena, Jose M

    2015-10-01

    Spore-forming solventogenic Clostridium spp. are receiving renewed attention due to their butanol production abilities. However, there is an absence of literature describing the preparation of dense, vigorous and homogeneous seed cultures of Clostridium spp., guaranteeing reproducibility during fermentation. Therefore, we performed a series of growth experiments of Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 and its offspring SA-1 to evaluate the influence of inoculum age (harvest time) on the subsequent population's maximum specific growth rate, as a signal of population homogeneity. The organisms were cultivated in Reinforced Clostridial Medium and supplemented sweet sorghum juice. The best inoculum ages coincided with the late-exponential growth phase: between 9 and 11 h in the conditions tested. Additionally, the harvest time was delayed up to 4 h by pre-adapting the seed culture with 0.75 g L(-1) butyric acid. These findings were validated by performing a series of bench-top batch fermentations showcasing reproducibility in growth kinetics with 95% confidence limits. Overall, these experiments allowed us to understand the transient nature of seed cultures of C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 and SA-1, while enabling reproducibility and consistent culture performance. PMID:26363015

  15. Clostridium tertium Bacteremia in a Patient with Glyphosate Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    You, Myung-Jo; Shin, Gee-Wook; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 44 Final Diagnosis: Clostridium tertium bacteremia Symptoms: Fever Medication: Ertapenem • Metronidazole Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Disease Objective: Unknown etiology Background: Clostridium tertium is distributed in the soil and in animal and human gastrointestinal tracts. C. tertium has been isolated from patients with blood diseases, immune disorders, and abdominal surgeries. Glyphosate is toxic, causing cause eye and skin irritation, gastrointestinal pain, and vomiting. Ingestion of herbicides modifies the gastrointestinal environment, which stresses the living organisms. However, there has been little attention to cases of bacteremia in patients recovering from suicide attempt by ingesting herbicide. Case Report: Clostridium tertium was identified in a 44-year-old female who attempted suicide by glyphosate (a herbicide) ingestion. The 16S rRNA sequences from all colonies were 99% identical with that of C. tertium (AB618789) found on a BLAST search of the NCBI database. The bacterium was cultured on TSA under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests performed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions showed that the bacterium was susceptible to penicillin, a combination of ?-lactamase inhibitor and piperacillin or amoxicillin, and first- and second- generation cephalosporins. However, it was resistant to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins. Conclusions: Glyphosate herbicide might be a predisposing factor responsible for the pathogenesis of C. tertium. The results highlight the need for careful diagnosis and selection of antibiotics in the treatment of this organism. PMID:25577783

  16. Conformational transitions of subunit epsilon in ATP synthase from thermophilic Bacillus PS3.

    PubMed

    Feniouk, Boris A; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Masasuke; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2010-02-01

    Subunit epsilon of bacterial and chloroplast F(O)F(1)-ATP synthase is responsible for inhibition of ATPase activity. In Bacillus PS3 enzyme, subunit epsilon can adopt two conformations. In the "extended", inhibitory conformation, its two C-terminal alpha-helices are stretched along subunit gamma. In the "contracted", noninhibitory conformation, these helices form a hairpin. The transition of subunit epsilon from an extended to a contracted state was studied in ATP synthase incorporated in Bacillus PS3 membranes at 59 degrees C. Fluorescence energy resonance transfer between fluorophores introduced in the C-terminus of subunit epsilon and in the N-terminus of subunit gamma was used to follow the conformational transition in real time. It was found that ATP induced the conformational transition from the extended to the contracted state (half-maximum transition extent at 140 microM ATP). ADP could neither prevent nor reverse the ATP-induced conformational change, but it did slow it down. Acid residues in the DELSEED region of subunit beta were found to stabilize the extended conformation of epsilon. Binding of ATP directly to epsilon was not essential for the ATP-induced conformational change. The ATP concentration necessary for the half-maximal transition (140 microM) suggests that subunit epsilon probably adopts the extended state and strongly inhibits ATP hydrolysis only when the intracellular ATP level drops significantly below the normal value. PMID:20141757

  17. Picosecond to Second Dynamics Reveals a Structural Transition in Clostridium botulinum NO-Sensor Triggered by the Activator BAY-41-

    E-print Network

    Picosecond to Second Dynamics Reveals a Structural Transition in Clostridium botulinum NOGC, to the isolated sGC heme domain 1(200) and to the homologous bacterial NO-sensor from Clostridium botulinum and is the same in sGC and in the NO-sensor from Clostridium botulinum. The soluble guanylate cyclase (s

  18. Development of Clostridium septicum gas gangrene as an adverse effect of clindamycin-induced Clostridium difficile infection in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Kiser, Casey J; Urish, Kenneth L; Boateng, Henry A

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium myonecrosis or gas gangrene is a life-threatening infection characterized by either traumatic or atraumatic etiology. It has been widely described in patients with traumatic open wounds and in immunocompromised patients, including malignancy. A third source can result from natural flora in the gastrointestinal tract after bowel ischemia. This is a rare occurrence and is even less commonly described in the pediatric population. We present a pediatric patient who developed Clostridium septicum myonecrosis as an iatrogenic complication from clindamycin-induced Clostridium difficile ischemic colitis. PMID:24590337

  19. Polarimetry of Epsilon Aurigae from Mid Eclipse to Third Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Gary M.; Stencel, Robert E.

    2011-05-01

    In a previous paper, the author discussed the construction of an automated dual beam imaging polarimeter and of observations made in the November 2009 to February 2010 period. Here, we discuss observations and instrumental improvements that span the period from late August 2010 through third and into fourth contacts in Spring 2011. Approximately 930 linear polarization measurements of the target star in BVR bands were obtained during 99 nights of observation. Additional measurements were made of both known polarization standards and zero polarization stars to verify instrument calibration. The polarization of Epsilon Aurigae was observed to vary by nearly 0.4% peak to valley during this period. These variations occurred in several major cycles of varying duration. Measurement error is estimated to be on the order of +/-0.05%. The observed variations resemble excess polarization seen during the 1984 eclipse egress, but may show some differences in detail. During this project, a new optical rotator was developed in conjunction with Optec, Inc., and used for the last two months of observations. This project was initiated at the suggestion of Dr. Robert Stencel at the May 2009 SAS meeting to extend measurements done during the 1984 eclipse by Dr. Jack Kemp and followed up by his student, Dr. Gary Henson thereafter.

  20. Mathematical modeling and growth kinetics of Clostridium sporogenes in cooked beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 is a common surrogate for proteolytic Clostridium botulinum for thermal process development and validation. However, little information is available concerning the growth kinetics of C. sporogenes in food. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the...

  1. Clostridium septicum gas gangrene in a previously healthy 8-year-old female with survival.

    PubMed

    Pinzon-Guzman, Carolina; Bashir, Dalia; McSherry, George; Beck, Michael J; Rocourt, Dorothy V

    2013-04-01

    We present the only reported case of an immunocompetent pediatric patient in the literature to have fulminate gas gangrene of the lower extremity and concomitant gastrointestinal tract infection due to Clostridium septicum coinfected with Clostridium difficile colitis respectively. The patient survived with aggressive medical and surgical treatment. PMID:23583163

  2. Foot Infection by Clostridium sordellii: Case Report and Review of 15 Cases in France

    PubMed Central

    Sautereau, Jean; Le Coustumier, Alain; Mory, Francine; Bouchier, Christiane; Popoff, Michel-R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of foot infection by Clostridium sordellii and review 15 human infections registered at a Reference Center in France during the period 1998 to 2011. All strains were found nontoxigenic, lacking the lethal toxin gene coding for TcsL. Like Clostridium septicum, several C. sordellii infections were associated with intestinal neoplasms. PMID:25609723

  3. Modulation of nucleotide binding to the catalytic sites of thermophilic F(1)-ATPase by the epsilon subunit: implication for the role of the epsilon subunit in ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Yasuno, Taichi; Muneyuki, Eiro; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki

    2009-12-11

    Effect of epsilon subunit on the nucleotide binding to the catalytic sites of F(1)-ATPase from the thermophilic Bacillus PS3 (TF(1)) has been tested by using alpha(3)beta(3)gamma and alpha(3)beta(3)gammaepsilon complexes of TF(1) containing betaTyr341 to Trp substitution. The nucleotide binding was assessed with fluorescence quenching of the introduced Trp. The presence of the epsilon subunit weakened ADP binding to each catalytic site, especially to the highest affinity site. This effect was also observed when GDP or IDP was used. The ratio of the affinity of the lowest to the highest nucleotide binding sites had changed two orders of magnitude by the epsilon subunit. The differences may relate to the energy required for the binding change in the ATP synthesis reaction and contribute to the efficient ATP synthesis. PMID:19785990

  4. Characterization of a symbiotic coculture of Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum YM3 and clostridium thermocellum YM4

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yutaka )

    1990-01-01

    Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum YM3 and C. thermocellum YM4 were isolated from a coculture which was obtained from an enrichment culture inoculated with volcanic soil in Izu Peninsula, Japan. Strain YM3 had advantages over reported C. thermohydrosulfuricum strains in that it fermented inulin and could accumulate ethanol up to 1.3% (wt/vol). The highest ethanol yield obtained was 1.96 mol/mol of anhydroglucose unit in cellobiose. Strain YM4 had features different from those reported in C. thermocellum strains: it formed spores rarely (at a frequency of <10{sup {minus}5}), it required CO{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} for growth, and it fermented sucrose. Strain YM4 completely decomposed 1% Avicel within 25 h when the inoculum constituted 2 % of the culture medium volume, and it produced 0.22 U of Avicelase and 2.21 U of carboxymethylcellulase per ml of the medium. The doubling times on Avicel, cellobiose, and glucose were 2.7, 1.1, and 1.6 h, respectively. Reconstructed cocultures of strains YM3 and YM4 were very stable and degraded Avicel more rapidly than did strain YM4 monoculture. Without yeast extract, neither microorganism was able to grow. However, the coculture grew on cellulose without yeast extract and produced ethanol in high yield. Moreover, cell-free spent culture broth of strain YM3 could replace yeast extract in supporting the growth of strain YM4. The symbiotic relationship of the two bacteria in cellulose fermentation is probably a case of mutualism.

  5. Electrochemical detoxification of phenolic compounds in lignocellulosic hydrolysate for Clostridium fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Min; Min, Kyoungseon; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Ki-Yeon; Woo, Han Min; Kim, Yunje; Han, Sung Ok; Um, Youngsoon

    2015-07-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is being preferred as a feedstock in the biorefinery, but lignocellulosic hydrolysate usually contains inhibitors against microbial fermentation. Among these inhibitors, phenolics are highly toxic to butyric acid-producing and butanol-producing Clostridium even at a low concentration. Herein, we developed an electrochemical polymerization method to detoxify phenolic compounds in lignocellulosic hydrolysate for efficient Clostridium fermentation. After the electrochemical detoxification for 10h, 78%, 77%, 82%, and 94% of p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, vanillin, and syringaldehyde were removed, respectively. Furthermore, 71% of total phenolics in rice straw hydrolysate were removed without any sugar-loss. Whereas the cell growth and metabolite production of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and Clostridium beijerinckii were completely inhibited in un-detoxified hydrolysate, those in detoxifying rice straw hydrolysate were recovered to 70-100% of the control cultures. The electrochemical detoxification method described herein provides an efficient strategy for producing butanol and butyric acid through Clostridium fermentation with lignocellulosic hydrolysate. PMID:25863199

  6. Calculations of Diffuser Flows with an Anisotropic K-Epsilon Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T.-H.

    1995-01-01

    A newly developed anisotropic K-epsilon model is applied to calculate three axisymmetric diffuser flows with or without separation. The new model uses a quadratic stress-strain relation and satisfies the realizability conditions, i.e., it ensures both the positivity of the turbulent normal stresses and the Schwarz' inequality between any fluctuating velocities. Calculations are carried out with a finite-element method. A second-order accurate, bounded convection scheme and sufficiently fine grids are used to ensure numerical credibility of the solutions. The standard K-epsilon model is also used in order to highlight the performance of the new model. Comparison with the experimental data shows that the anisotropic K-epsilon model performs consistently better than does the standard K-epsilon model in all of the three test cases.

  7. Low Reynolds number k-epsilon modelling with the aid of direct simulation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodi, W.; Mansour, N. N.

    1993-01-01

    The constant C sub mu and the near-wall damping function f sub mu in the eddy-viscosity relation of the k-epsilon model are evaluated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) data for developed channel and boundary layer flow at two Reynolds numbers each. Various existing f sub mu model functions are compared with the DNS data, and a new function is fitted to the high-Reynolds-number channel flow data. The epsilon-budget is computed for the fully developed channel flow. The relative magnitude of the terms in the epsilon-equation is analyzed with the aid of scaling arguments, and the parameter governing this magnitude is established. Models for the sum of all source and sink terms in the epsilon-equation are tested against the DNS data, and an improved model is proposed.

  8. First Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium sporogenes DSM 795T, a Nontoxigenic Surrogate for Clostridium botulinum, Determined Using PacBio Single-Molecule Real-Time Technology.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Kazuma; Terabayashi, Yasunobu; Shiroma, Akino; Shimoji, Makiko; Tamotsu, Hinako; Ashimine, Noriko; Ohki, Shun; Shinzato, Misuzu; Teruya, Kuniko; Satou, Kazuhito; Hirano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of Clostridium sporogenes DSM 795(T), a nontoxigenic surrogate for Clostridium botulinum, was determined in a single contig using the PacBio single-molecule real-time technology. The genome (4,142,990 bp; G+C content, 27.98%) included 86 sets of >1,000-bp identical sequence pairs and 380 tandem repeats. PMID:26227598

  9. First Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium sporogenes DSM 795T, a Nontoxigenic Surrogate for Clostridium botulinum, Determined Using PacBio Single-Molecule Real-Time Technology

    PubMed Central

    Terabayashi, Yasunobu; Shiroma, Akino; Shimoji, Makiko; Tamotsu, Hinako; Ashimine, Noriko; Ohki, Shun; Shinzato, Misuzu; Teruya, Kuniko; Satou, Kazuhito; Hirano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of Clostridium sporogenes DSM 795T, a nontoxigenic surrogate for Clostridium botulinum, was determined in a single contig using the PacBio single-molecule real-time technology. The genome (4,142,990 bp; G+C content, 27.98%) included 86 sets of >1,000-bp identical sequence pairs and 380 tandem repeats. PMID:26227598

  10. Attenuation of epsilon(sub eff) of coplanar waveguide transmission lines on silicon substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taub, Susan R.; Young, Paul G.

    1993-01-01

    Attenuation and epsilon(sub eff) of Coplanar Waveguide (CPW) transmission lines were measured on Silicon substrates with resistivities ranging from 400 to greater than 30,000 ohm-cm, that have a 1000 angstrom coating of SiO2. Both attenuation and epsilon(sub eff) are given over the frequency range 5 to 40 GHz for various strip and slot widths. These measured values are also compared to the theoretical values.

  11. Finite $\\epsilon_2$-corrections to the $\\mathcal{N}=2$ SYM prepotential

    E-print Network

    Bourgine, Jean-Emile

    2015-01-01

    We derive the first $\\epsilon_2$-correction to the instanton partition functions of $\\mathcal{N}=2$ Super Yang-Mills (SYM) in four dimensions in the Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit $\\epsilon_2\\rightarrow 0$. In the latter we recall the emergence of the famous Thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz-like equation which has been found by Mayer expansion techniques. Here we combine efficiently these to field theory arguments. In a nutshell, we find natural and resolutive the introduction of a new operator $\

  12. The apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele and incident Alzheimer's disease in persons with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Neelum T; Wilson, Robert S; Beck, Todd L; Bienias, Julia L; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Bennett, David A

    2005-02-01

    Possession of one or more copies of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon4 allele is a known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), but it is uncertain whether the epsilon4 allele is associated with disease incidence among persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We addressed this issue with data from the Religious Orders Study. Participants were 181 older Catholic clergy members who met criteria for MCI based on a uniform structured clinical evaluation; 56 (30.9%) had at least one epsilon4 allele. Clinical evaluations, which included clinical classification of dementia and AD, were repeated annually. During a mean of 5.7 years of observation, 79 persons (43.6%) developed AD. In a proportional hazards model that controlled for age, sex, and education, possession of an epsilon4 allele was associated with a 93% increase in the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (95% CI; 1.02, 2.63). There was a marginally significant reduction in the effect of epsilon4 in older compared to younger participants (p=.053). The results suggest that possession of an epsilon4 allele does increase risk of AD in persons with MCI. PMID:15804918

  13. Deep L' and M-band Imaging for Planets Around Vega and epsilon Eridani

    E-print Network

    A. N. Heinze; Philip M. Hinz; Matthew Kenworthy; Douglas Miller; Suresh Sivanandam

    2008-07-24

    We have obtained deep Adaptive Optics (AO) images of Vega and epsilon Eri to search for planetary-mass companions. We observed at the MMT in the L' (3.8 micron) and M (4.8 micron) bands using Clio, a recently commissioned imager optimized for these wavelengths. Observing at these long wavelengths represents a departure from the H band (1.65 microns) more commonly used for AO imaging searches for extrasolar planets. The long wavelengths offer better predicted planet/star flux ratios and cleaner (higher Strehl) AO images, at the cost of lower diffraction limited resolution and higher sky background. We have not detected any planets or planet candidates around Vega or epsilon Eri. We report the sensitivities obtained around both stars, which correspond to upper limits on any planetary companions which may exist. The sensitivities of our L' and M band observations are comparable to those of the best H-regime observations of these stars. For epsilon Eri our M band observations deliver considerably better sensitivity to close-in planets than any previously published results, and we show that the M band is by far the best wavelength choice for attempts at ground-based AO imaging of the known planet epsilon Eri b. The Clio camera itself with MMTAO may be capable of detecting epsilon Eri b at its 2010 apastron, given a multi-night observing campaign. Clio appears to be the only currently existing AO imager that has a realistic possibility of detecting epsilon Eri b.

  14. Phase stability of {epsilon} and {gamma} HNIW (CL-20) at high-pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gump, Jared C.; Stoltz, Chad A.; Peiris, Suhithi M.

    2007-12-12

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is one of the few ingredients developed since World War II to be considered for transition to military use. Five polymorphs have been identified for CL-20 by FTIR measurements ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, {epsilon}, {zeta}). As CL-20 is transitioned into munitions it will become necessary to predict its response under conditions of detonation, for performance evaluation. Such predictive modeling requires a phase diagram and basic thermodynamic properties of the various phases at high pressure and temperature. Therefore, the epsilon and gamma phases of CL-20 at static high-pressure and temperature were investigated using synchrotron angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments. The samples were compressed and heated using diamond anvil cells (DAC). Pressures and temperatures achieved were around 5 GPa and 240 deg. C, respectively. The epsilon phase was stable to 6.3 GPa at ambient temperature. When heated at ambient pressure the epsilon phase was sustained to a temperature of 120 deg. C then underwent a transition to the gamma phase above 125 deg. C and then thermal decomposition occurred above 150 deg. C. Upon compression, the gamma phase underwent a phase transition at both ambient temperature and 140 deg. C. Pressure--volume data for the epsilon and gamma phase at ambient temperature and the epsilon phase at 75 deg. C were fit to the Birch-Murnaghan formalism to obtain isothermal equations of state.

  15. Hospital Clostridium difficile outbreak linked to laundry machine malfunction.

    PubMed

    Sooklal, Shelini; Khan, Ayesha; Kannangara, Saman

    2014-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is a gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacillus that is associated with diarrheal disease. C difficile is shed in the feces of affected individuals and its spores can survive on surfaces for prolonged periods of time. These spores can contaminate a hospital environment by spread through health care workers and suboptimal environmental cleaning practices. We report an outbreak of health care facility-onset C difficile infection that was eventually linked to contaminated mop pads after a laundry machine malfunction. PMID:24837118

  16. Clostridium septicum gas gangrene in the orbit: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fejes, I; Dégi, R; Végh, M

    2013-02-01

    Our report presents a case of Clostridium septicum gas gangrene in an unusual, orbital localization. The predisposing factors are typical: colon tumour and lymphatic malignancy. Most probably bacteria from the intestinal flora entered the bloodstream through the compromised intestinal wall and settled in the orbit resulting in the development of an abscess containing gas. At the site of the gas gangrene, an indolent B cell lymphoma was present. After surgery and antibiotic treatment, the patient healed from the C. septicum infection; but subsequently died as a consequence of the tumour. PMID:23203898

  17. Outbreak of Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 in a residential home.

    PubMed

    Clayton, J J; McHale-Owen, J

    2014-12-01

    This article reports a significant outbreak of Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 infection in a residential care home in the UK. Five of six affected residents died within one month of diagnosis. Investigation of the facility revealed problems with hand hygiene and environmental cleaning. Affected residents had received a mean of 2.7 antibiotic courses in the two months preceding diagnosis. It is important to recognize that C. difficile outbreaks can occur in residential homes. There is a need for health- and social-care systems to work closely together to assure the safety of people in their care. PMID:25447200

  18. Hand hygiene is crucial to combat Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    Patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can contaminate the environment with spores that are able to survive for months. A previous room occupant with CDI is a significant risk factor for developing the infection. Room cleaning with commonly used disinfectants will not kill spores. Sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide are effective but correct concentration and contact time are important. Hand hygiene is a crucial element in preventing infection. In the UK, there is a clear recommendation for handwashing, rather than alcohol-based hand rub, when caring for patients with CDI. PMID:25258234

  19. Treatment of Clostridium difficile infection: recent trial results

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Sarah S; Anderson, Deverick J

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of infection worldwide and is associated with increasing morbidity and mortality in vulnerable patient populations. Metronidazole and oral vancomycin are the currently recommended therapies for the treatment of C. difficile infection (CDI) but are associated with unacceptably high rates of disease recurrence. Novel therapies for the treatment of CDI and prevention of recurrent CDI are urgently needed. Important developments in the treatment of CDI are currently underway and include: novel antibacterial agents with narrower antimicrobial spectra of activity, manipulation of the gut microbiota and enhancement of the host antibody immune response. PMID:25525499

  20. Probiotics and Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea and Clostridium difficile Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surawicz, Christina M.

    Diarrhea is a common side effect of antibiotics. Antibiotics can cause diarrhea in 5-25% of individuals who take them but its occurrence is unpredictable. Diarrhea due to antibiotics is called antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Diarrhea may be mild and resolve when antibiotics are discontinued, or it may be more severe. The most severe form of AAD is caused by overgrowth of Clostridium difficile which can cause severe diarrhea, colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, or even fatal toxic megacolon. Rates of diarrhea vary with the specific antibiotic as well as with the individual susceptibility.

  1. Murine models to study Clostridium difficile infection and transmission.

    PubMed

    Lawley, Trevor D; Young, Vincent B

    2013-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in healthcare facilities worldwide. C. difficile infections are difficult to treat because of the high rate of disease recurrence after antibiotic therapy, leaving few treatment options for patients. C. difficile is also difficult to contain within a healthcare setting due to a highly-transmissible, resistant spore form that challenges standard infection control measures. The recent development of murine infection models to study the interactions between C. difficile, the host and the microbiota are providing novel insight into the mechanisms of pathogenesis and transmission that should guide the development of therapies and intervention measures. PMID:24076318

  2. Role of chemotaxis in solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, N.A.; Maddox, I.S.

    1987-08-01

    The motility of Clostridium acetobutylicum has been investigated during a typical batch fermentation process for solvent production. The motility is characterized by runs during the early phase of sugar utilization and acid production, but this changes to tumbles during the onset of solventogenesis. Sugars and undissociated acetic and butyric acids have been shown to be attractants for the bacterium, while acetone, butanol, ethanol, and dissociated acetate and butyrate are repellents. It is suggested that chemotactic responses explain why highly motile cells are strongly solventogenic.

  3. Structure, Function and Regulation of the Clostridium cellulovorans Cellulosome

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Roy H

    2008-06-01

    Our major goal for this project (2004-2008) was to obtain an understanding ofthe structure, function, and regulation of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulosomes. Our specific goals were to select genes for cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal enzymes and characterize their products, to study the synergistic action between cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal enzymes, to study the composition of cellulosomes when cells were grown with different carbon sources, continue our studies on the scaffolding protein and examine heterologous expression of cellulosomal genes in Bacillus subtilis. We fulfilled the specific goals of our proposal.

  4. Predictive values of models of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Chilton, Caroline H; Freeman, Jane

    2015-03-01

    In vivo and in vitro models are widely used to simulate Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). They have made considerable contributions in the study of C difficile pathogenesis, antibiotic predisposition to CDI, and population dynamics as well as the evaluation of new antimicrobial and immunologic therapeutics. Although CDI models have greatly increased understanding of this complicated pathogen, all have limitations in reproducing human disease, notably their inability to generate a truly reflective immune response. This review summarizes the most commonly used models of CDI and discusses their pros and cons and their predictive values in terms of clinical outcomes. PMID:25582644

  5. Protein kinase C epsilon is localized to the Golgi via its zinc-finger domain and modulates Golgi function.

    PubMed Central

    Lehel, C; Olah, Z; Jakab, G; Anderson, W B

    1995-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a multigene family of serine/threonine kinases that are central to many signal transduction pathways. Among the PKC isozymes, only PKC epsilon has been reported to exhibit full oncogenic potential. PKC epsilon also displays unique substrate specificity and intracellular localization. To examine the interrelationship between the biological effects and domain structure of PKC epsilon, NIH 3T3 cells were stably transfected to overexpress different epitope-tagged fragments of PKC epsilon. The overexpressed proteins each contain the epsilon-tag peptide at the C terminus to allow ready detection with an antibody specific for the tag. The holo-PKC epsilon was found to localize with the Golgi network and other compartments, whereas the zinc-finger domain localized exclusively at the Golgi. Golgi-specific glycosaminoglycan sulfation was strongly inhibited in cells overexpressing either holo-PKC epsilon or its zinc-finger domain, while the secretion of sulfated glycosaminoglycans into the medium was impaired in cells expressing the PKC epsilon zinc-finger domain. Thus, these results suggest that PKC epsilon may be involved in specifically regulating Golgi-related processes. Further, the results indicate that PKC epsilon domains other than the kinase domain may also have biological activity and that the zinc-finger domain may function as a subcellular localization signal. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7877991

  6. Functional identification of a novel 14-3-3 epsilon splicing variant suggests dimerization is not necessary for 14-3-3 epsilon to inhibit UV-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Dingding; Ye, Guangming; Liu, Tingting; Chen, Cong; Yang, Xianmei; Wan, Bo; Pan, Yuanwang; Yu, Long

    2010-05-28

    14-3-3 proteins function as a dimer and have been identified to involve in diverse signaling pathways. Here we reported the identification of a novel splicing variant of human 14-3-3 epsilon (14-3-3 epsilon sv), which is derived from a novel exon 1' insertion. The insertion contains a stop codon and leads to a truncated splicing variant of 14-3-3 epsilon. The splicing variant is translated from the exon 2 and results in the deletion of an N-terminal {alpha}-helix which is crucial for the dimerization. Therefore, the 14-3-3 epsilon sv could not form a dimer with 14-3-3 zeta. However, after UV irradiation 14-3-3 epsilon sv could also support cell survival, suggesting monomer of 14-3-3 epsilon is sufficient to protect cell from apoptosis.

  7. Fluorescent-antibody reagents for the identification of Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Glasby, C; Hatheway, C L

    1983-12-01

    Fluorescent-antibody reagents were prepared against vegetative cells of representative strains of each physiological group and toxin type of Clostridium botulinum known to have caused botulism in humans. A fluorescent-antibody reagent was also prepared for C. botulinum type G, which has been isolated from autopsy specimens but which has not clearly been implicated in botulism. These fluorescent-antibody reagents were evaluated against 200 strains of C. botulinum and 64 strains of other clostridia. Each reagent reacted with at least a 2+ intensity with all of the strains in its same toxin type and physiological group. Ninety-seven percent of the strains gave at least a 3+ reaction with the homologous group or toxin type reagent. Some cross-reactions occurred with reagents against different toxin type strains within a physiological group; there was less cross-reaction between physiological groups and very little reactivity of C. botulinum reagents with nontoxigenic organisms. Absorption of cross-reacting antibodies was not successful. Certain reagents could be used for presumptive laboratory identification of C. botulinum strains causing botulism, especially in infants. The type G reagent provided a good means of identifying C. botulinum type G, which lacks the lipase marker and whose toxigenicity may be more difficult to demonstrate in mixed cultures. There was a serological relationship between C. botulinum type G and some strains of Clostridium subterminale. This relationship provided evidence of differences between strains of C. botulinum type G isolated in two different countries. PMID:6361053

  8. Conserved Oligopeptide Permeases Modulate Sporulation Initiation in Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Adrianne N.; Nawrocki, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic gastrointestinal pathogen Clostridium difficile must form a metabolically dormant spore to survive in oxygenic environments and be transmitted from host to host. The regulatory factors by which C. difficile initiates and controls the early stages of sporulation in C. difficile are not highly conserved in other Clostridium or Bacillus species. Here, we investigated the role of two conserved oligopeptide permeases, Opp and App, in the regulation of sporulation in C. difficile. These permeases are known to positively affect sporulation in Bacillus species through the import of sporulation-specific quorum-sensing peptides. In contrast to other spore-forming bacteria, we discovered that inactivating these permeases in C. difficile resulted in the earlier expression of early sporulation genes and increased sporulation in vitro. Furthermore, disruption of opp and app resulted in greater virulence and increased the amounts of spores recovered from feces in the hamster model of C. difficile infection. Our data suggest that Opp and App indirectly inhibit sporulation, likely through the activities of the transcriptional regulator SinR and its inhibitor, SinI. Taken together, these results indicate that the Opp and App transporters serve a different function in controlling sporulation and virulence in C. difficile than in Bacillus subtilis and suggest that nutrient availability plays a significant role in pathogenesis and sporulation in vivo. This study suggests a link between the nutritional status of the environment and sporulation initiation in C. difficile. PMID:25069979

  9. The polar lipids of Clostridium psychrophilum, an anaerobic psychrophile

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ziqiang; Tian, Bing; Perfumo, Amedea; Goldfine, Howard

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the polar lipids of Clostridium psychrophilum, a recently characterized psychrophilic Clostridium isolated from an Antarctic microbial mat. Lipids were extracted from cells grown near the optimal growth temperature (+5 °C) and at ?5 °C, and analyzed by two-dimensional thin layer chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The major phospholipids of this species are: cardiolipin, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylglycerol. Phosphatidylserine and lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine were found as minor components. The most abundant glycolipids are a monoglycosyldiradylglycerol (MGDRG) and a diglycosyldiradylglycerol (DGDRG). The latter was only seen in cells grown at ?5 °C. An ethanolamine-phosphate derivative of N-acetylglucosaminyldiradylglycerol was seen in cells grown at ?5 °C and an ethanolamine-phosphate derivative of MGDRG was found in cells grown at +5 °C. All lipids were present in both the all acyl and plasmalogen (alk-1?-enyl acyl) forms with the exception of PS and MGDRG, which were predominantly in the diacyl form. The significance of lipid changes at the two growth temperatures is discussed. PMID:23454375

  10. Effective Sequestration of Clostridium difficile Protein Toxins by Calcium Aluminosilicate.

    PubMed

    Sturino, Joseph M; Pokusaeva, Karina; Carpenter, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the etiologic agent responsible for C. difficile infection. Toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB) are nearly indispensable virulence factors for Clostridium difficile pathogenesis. Given the toxin-centric mechanism by which C. difficile pathogenesis occurs, the selective sequestration with neutralization of TcdA and TcdB by nonantibiotic agents represents a novel mode of action to prevent or treat C. difficile-associated disease. In this preclinical study, we used quantitative enzyme immunoassays to determine the extent by which a novel drug, calcium aluminosilicate uniform particle size nonswelling M-1 (CAS UPSN M-1), is capable of sequestering TcdA and TcdB in vitro. The following major findings were derived from the present study. First, we show that CAS UPSN M-1 efficiently sequestered both TcdA and TcdB to undetectable levels. Second, we show that CAS UPSN M-1's affinity for TcdA is greater than its affinity for TcdB. Last, we show that CAS UPSN M-1 exhibited limited binding affinity for nontarget proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that ingestion of calcium aluminosilicate might protect gastrointestinal tissues from antibiotic- or chemotherapy-induced C. difficile infection by neutralizing the cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of luminal TcdA and TcdB. PMID:26149988

  11. Effective Sequestration of Clostridium difficile Protein Toxins by Calcium Aluminosilicate

    PubMed Central

    Pokusaeva, Karina; Carpenter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the etiologic agent responsible for C. difficile infection. Toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB) are nearly indispensable virulence factors for Clostridium difficile pathogenesis. Given the toxin-centric mechanism by which C. difficile pathogenesis occurs, the selective sequestration with neutralization of TcdA and TcdB by nonantibiotic agents represents a novel mode of action to prevent or treat C. difficile-associated disease. In this preclinical study, we used quantitative enzyme immunoassays to determine the extent by which a novel drug, calcium aluminosilicate uniform particle size nonswelling M-1 (CAS UPSN M-1), is capable of sequestering TcdA and TcdB in vitro. The following major findings were derived from the present study. First, we show that CAS UPSN M-1 efficiently sequestered both TcdA and TcdB to undetectable levels. Second, we show that CAS UPSN M-1's affinity for TcdA is greater than its affinity for TcdB. Last, we show that CAS UPSN M-1 exhibited limited binding affinity for nontarget proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that ingestion of calcium aluminosilicate might protect gastrointestinal tissues from antibiotic- or chemotherapy-induced C. difficile infection by neutralizing the cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of luminal TcdA and TcdB. PMID:26149988

  12. Clostridium difficile colitis: review of the therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Josmi; Singhal, Shashideep; Patel, Gia M; Anand, Sury

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea. Presenting as clostridium difficile colitis, it is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Metronidazole is regarded as the agent of choice for CDl therapy and also for the first recurrence in most patients with mild to moderate CDI. Vancomycin is recommended as an initial therapy for patients with severe CDI. With recent Food and Drug Administration-approval fidaxomicin is available for clinical use and is as effective as vancomycin with lower relapse rates. Rifaximin and fecal bacteriotherapy are alternative approaches in patients with severe or refractory CDI, before surgical intervention. Antibiotic research is ongoing to add potential new drugs such as teicoplanin, ramoplanin, fusidic acid, nitazoxanide, rifampin, bacitracin to our armamentarium. Role of toxin-binding agents is still questionable. Monoclonal antibody and intravenous immunoglobulin are still investigational therapies that could be promising options. The ongoing challenges in the treatment of CDI include management of recurrence and presence of resistance strains such as NAP1/BI/027, but early recognition of surgical candidates can potentially decrease mortality in CDI. PMID:22990077

  13. Tequila vinasses acidogenesis in a UASB reactor with Clostridium predominance.

    PubMed

    Marino-Marmolejo, E N; Corbalá-Robles, L; Cortez-Aguilar, R C; Contreras-Ramos, S M; Bolaños-Rosales, R E; Davila-Vazquez, G

    2015-01-01

    Tequila vinasses represent an acidic, highly concentrated pollutant effluent generated during the distillation step of Tequila production. Although acidogenesis of Tequila vinasses has been reported for some reactor configurations, a characterization of the bacteria present during this metabolic process is lacking in the literature. Hydraulic retention times (HRT) between 36 and 6 h and organic loading rates (OLR) from 5 to 30 g COD L(-1) d(-1) were assessed in a UASB reactor fed with Tequila vinasses. Results showed that OLR excerted a stronger effect (p ? 0.0001) on parameters such as gas production rate, pH, and acidity than HRT. While it was clear that shorter HRT were related to higher volatile fatty acid production levels. Figures above 2 Lgas Lreactor (-1) d(-1) (where "gas" could be a mixture of methane and hydrogen) were attained only with an OLR as high as 30 g COD L(-1) d(-1). Bacterial identification of a sludge sample at the end of the experiment revealed that acid-tolerant microorganisms that remained in the reactor were exclusively affiliated to the Clostridium genera, being the first report of organisms identification for Tequila vinasses acidogenesis. These findings are relevant to the field of biotechnology since acidogenesis of Tequila vinasses using identified and studied microorganism abilities (i.e. Clostridium strains) presents the opportunity of optimizing processes intended for different metabolites production (butanol, volatile fatty acids, hydrogen, solvents). PMID:26301166

  14. Role of collagenase clostridium histolyticum in Peyronie’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Peak, Taylor C; Mitchell, Gregory C; Yafi, Faysal A; Hellstrom, Wayne J

    2015-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease is a localized connective tissue disease characterized by an active, inflammatory phase and a stable, quiescent phase, with the eventual development of collagenous plaques within the tunica albuginea of the penis. Risk factors primarily associated with Peyronie’s disease include Dupuytren’s contracture, penile trauma, and family history. A variety of treatment strategies have been utilized, including oral and topical agents, electromotive drug administration, intralesional injections, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, penile traction, and surgery. However, most of these strategies are ineffective, with surgery being the only definitive treatment. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum is a newly US Food and Drug Administration-approved agent for intralesional injection. It is thought to downregulate many of the disease-related genes, cytokines, and growth factors and degrade collagen fibers. It also suppresses cell attachment, spreading, and proliferation. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum has been clinically proven to be a safe and effective therapeutic option, demonstrating decreases in penile curvature and plaque consistency, as well as increases in patient satisfaction. During clinical evaluation, the Peyronie’s Disease Questionnaire was validated as an effective tool for assessing treatment outcomes. PMID:26491251

  15. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN SEROTYPE B.

    SciTech Connect

    SWAMINATHAN,S.; ESWARAMOORTHY,S.

    2001-11-19

    The toxigenic strains of Clostridium botulinum produce seven serologically distinct types of neurotoxins labeled A - G (EC 3.4.24.69), while Clostridium tetani produces tetanus neurotoxin (EC 3.4.24.68). Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins (BoNTs and TeNT) are produced as single inactive chains of molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Most of these neurotoxins are released after being cleaved into two chains, a heavy chain (HI) of 100 kDa and a light chain (L) of 50 kDa held together by an interchain disulfide bond, by tissue proteinases. BoNT/E is released as a single chain but cleaved by host proteinases [1]. Clostvidium botulinum neurotoxins are extremely poisonous proteins with their LD{sub 50} for humans in the range of 0.1 - 1 ng kg{sup -1} [2]. Botulinum neurotoxins are responsible for neuroparalytic syndromes of botulism characterized by serious neurological disorders and flaccid paralysis. BoNTs block the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction causing flaccid paralysis while TeNT blocks the release of neurotransmitters like glycine and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the inhibitory interneurons of the spinal cord resulting in spastic paralysis. In spite of different clinical symptoms, their aetiological agents intoxicate neuronal cells in the same way and these toxins have similar structural organization [3].

  16. Precision measurement of the direct CP violation parameter. var epsilon. prime /. var epsilon. via the four K yields 2. pi. decay modes and a high sensitivity search for CP violating rare K sub L decays, Task J

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Yau W.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the progress on the measurement of the direct CP violation parameter {var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon} and the rare KL decay. The progress has been as follows: (A) results from the complete E731 data set which was collected in the 1987/88 fixed target run; preparations for and the taking of the data for (B) E773 (CPT symmetry test) and (C) E799 (rare decay study); and finally (D) R D for a new detector to further study {var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon} and rate decays.

  17. Allele doses of apolipoprotein E type {epsilon}4 in sporadic late-onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lucotte, G.; Aouizerate, A.; Gerard, N.

    1995-12-18

    Apoliprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE-{epsilon}4) is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD). We have found that the cumulative probability of remaining unaffected over time decreases for each dose of ApoE-{epsilon}4 in sporadic, late-onset French AD. The effect of genotypes on age at onset of AD was analyzed using the product limit method, to compare unaffected groups during aging. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Simultaneous and enhanced production of thermostable amylases and ethanol from starch by cocultures of Clostridium thermosulfurogenes and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, H.H.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1985-05-01

    Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum and Clostridium thermosulfurogenes produced ethanol and amylases with different components as primary metabolites of starch fermentation. Starch fermentation parameters were compared in mono- and cocultures of these two thermoanaerobes to show that the fermentation was dramatically improved as a consequence of coordinate action of amylolytic enzymes and synergistic metabolic interactions between the two species. Under given monoculture fermentation conditions, neither species completely degraded starch during the time course of the study, whereas in coculture, starch was completely degraded. In monoculture starch fermentation, C. thermohydrosulfuricum produced lower levels of pullulanase and glucoamylase, whereas C. thermosulfurogenes produced lower levels of ..beta..-amylase and glucoamylase. In coculture fermentation, improvement of starch metabolism by each species was noted in terms of increased amounts and rates of increased starch consumption, amylase production, and ethanol formation. The single-step coculture fermentation completely degraded 2.5% starch in 30 h at 60/sup 0/C and produced 9 U of ..beta..-amylase per ml, 1.3 U of pullulanase per ml, 0.3 U of glucoamylase per ml, and > 120 mM ethanol with a yield of 1.7 mol/mol of glucose in starch. The potential industrial applications of the coculture fermentation and the physiological basis for the interspecies metabolic interactions are discussed.

  19. Clostridium paraputrificum Bacteremia Associated with Colonic Necrosis in a Patient with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Shinha, Takashi; Hadi, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium species are anaerobic Gram-positive rods that can cause a broad range of invasive infections in humans, including myonecrosis and bacteremia. Importantly, clostridial bacteremia is frequently associated with underlying medical conditions, such as colonic malignancy. Characterizing Clostridium spp. and understanding their associated clinical disease spectrum are paramount to provide optimal treatment, thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality especially in those with underlying debilitating comorbidities. Clostridium paraputrificum is an infrequently isolated Clostridium species and its clinical significance has not been well described. We herein report a case of bacteremia due to C. paraputrificum in a 65-year-old man with AIDS who developed acute colonic necrosis complicated by septic shock. We then review other cases of bacteremia associated with C. paraputrificum in the literature in addition to discussing the clinical significance of anaerobic bacteremia in general. To our knowledge, our report is the second case of C. paraputrificum bacteremia in a patient with AIDS. PMID:25692054

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium pasteurianum NRRL B-598, a Potential Butanol or Hydrogen Producer

    PubMed Central

    Kolek, Jan; Sedlá?, Karel; Provazník, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    We present a draft genome sequence of Clostridium pasteurianum NRRL B-598. This strain ferments saccharides by two-stage acetone-butanol (AB) fermentation, is oxygen tolerant, and has high hydrogen yields. PMID:24652980