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Sample records for clostridium perfringens epsilon

  1. Accumulation of Clostridium perfringens Epsilon-Toxin in the Mouse Kidney and Its Possible Biological Significance

    PubMed Central

    Tamai, Eiji; Ishida, Tetsuya; Miyata, Shigeru; Matsushita, Osamu; Suda, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Shoji; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Okabe, Akinobu

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we show that Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin accumulates predominantly in the mouse kidney, where it is distributed mainly in glomeruli, capillaries, and collecting ducts. Although some pycnotic and exfoliated epithelial cells were observed in distal tubuli and collecting ducts, there were no findings indicative of severe renal injury. Bilateral nephrectomy increased the mouse lethality of the toxin, suggesting that the kidney contributes to the host defense against the lethal toxicity of epsilon-toxin. PMID:12933886

  2. Clostridium perfringens Epsilon Toxin: A Malevolent Molecule for Animals and Man?

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Bradley G.; Barth, Gillian; Barth, Holger; Popoff, Michel R.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a prolific, toxin-producing anaerobe causing multiple diseases in humans and animals. One of these toxins is epsilon, a 33 kDa protein produced by Clostridium perfringens (types B and D) that induces fatal enteric disease of goats, sheep and cattle. Epsilon toxin (Etx) belongs to the aerolysin-like toxin family. It contains three distinct domains, is proteolytically-activated and forms oligomeric pores on cell surfaces via a lipid raft-associated protein(s). Vaccination controls Etx-induced disease in the field. However, therapeutic measures are currently lacking. This review initially introduces C. perfringens toxins, subsequently focusing upon the Etx and its biochemistry, disease characteristics in various animals that include laboratory models (in vitro and in vivo), and finally control mechanisms (vaccines and therapeutics). PMID:24284826

  3. Clostridium Perfringens Epsilon Toxin Binds to Membrane Lipids and Its Cytotoxic Action Depends on Sulfatide

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Carles; Dorca-Arévalo, Jonatan; Blasi, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon toxin (Etx) is one of the major lethal toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, being the causal agent of fatal enterotoxemia in animals, mainly sheep and goats. Etx is synthesized as a non-active prototoxin form (proEtx) that becomes active upon proteolytic activation. Etx exhibits a cytotoxic effect through the formation of a pore in the plasma membrane of selected cell targets where Etx specifically binds due to the presence of specific receptors. However, the identity and nature of host receptors of Etx remain a matter of controversy. In the present study, the interactions between Etx and membrane lipids from the synaptosome-enriched fraction from rat brain (P2 fraction) and MDCK cell plasma membrane preparations were analyzed. Our findings show that both Etx and proEtx bind to lipids extracted from lipid rafts from the two different models as assessed by protein-lipid overlay assay. Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Binding of proEtx to sulfatide, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol (3)-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol (5)-phosphate was detected. Removal of the sulphate groups via sulfatase treatment led to a dramatic decrease in Etx-induced cytotoxicity, but not in proEtx-GFP binding to MDCK cells or a significant shift in oligomer formation, pointing to a role of sulfatide in pore formation in rafts but not in toxin binding to the target cell membrane. These results show for the first time the interaction between Etx and membrane lipids from host tissue and point to a major role for sulfatides in C. perfringens epsilon toxin pathophysiology. PMID:26452234

  4. Molecular cloning and expression of epsilon toxin from Clostridium perfringens type D and tests of animal immunization.

    PubMed

    Souza, A M; Reis, J K P; Assis, R A; Horta, C C; Siqueira, F F; Facchin, S; Alvarenga, E R; Castro, C S; Salvarani, F M; Silva, R O S; Pires, P S; Contigli, C; Lobato, F C F; Kalapothakis, E

    2010-01-01

    Epsilon toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D causes enterotoxemia in sheep, goats and calves. Enterotoxemia can cause acute or superacute disease, with sudden death of the affected animal. It provokes huge economic losses when large numbers of livestock are affected. Therapeutic intervention is challenging, because the disease progresses very rapidly. However, it can be prevented by immunization with specific immunogenic vaccines. We cloned the etx gene, encoding epsilon toxin, into vector pET-11a; recombinant epsilon toxin (rec-epsilon) was expressed in inclusion bodies and was used for animal immunization. Serum protection was evaluated and cross-serum neutralization tests were used to characterize the recombinant toxin. To analyze the potency of the toxin (as an antigen), rabbits were immunized with 50, 100 or 200 microg recombinant toxin, using aluminum hydroxide gel as an adjuvant. Titers of 10, 30 and 40 IU/mL were obtained, respectively. These titers were higher than the minimum level required by the European Pharmacopoeia (5 IU/mL) and by the USA Code of Federal Regulation (2 IU/mL). This rec-epsilon is a good candidate for vaccine production against enterotoxemia caused by epsilon toxin of C. perfringens type D. PMID:20198582

  5. Proteolytic Processing and Activation of Clostridium perfringens Epsilon Toxin by Caprine Small Intestinal Contents

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John C.; Li, Jihong; Uzal, Francisco A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epsilon toxin (ETX), a pore-forming toxin produced by type B and D strains of Clostridium perfringens, mediates severe enterotoxemia in livestock and possibly plays a role in human disease. During enterotoxemia, the nearly inactive ETX prototoxin is produced in the intestines but then must be activated by proteolytic processing. The current study sought to examine ETX prototoxin processing and activation ex vivo using the intestinal contents of a goat, a natural host species for ETX-mediated disease. First, this study showed that the prototoxin has a KEIS N-terminal sequence with a molecular mass of 33,054 Da. When the activation of ETX prototoxin ex vivo by goat small intestinal contents was assessed by SDS-PAGE, the prototoxin was processed in a stepwise fashion into an ~27-kDa band or higher-molecular-mass material that could be toxin oligomers. Purified ETX corresponding to the ~27-kDa band was cytotoxic. When it was biochemically characterized by mass spectrometry, the copresence of three ETX species, each with different C-terminal residues, was identified in the purified ~27-kDa ETX preparation. Cytotoxicity of each of the three ETX species was then demonstrated using recombinant DNA approaches. Serine protease inhibitors blocked the initial proteotoxin processing, while carboxypeptidase inhibitors blocked further processing events. Taken together, this study provides important new insights indicating that, in the intestinal lumen, serine protease (including trypsin and possibly chymotrypsin) initiates the processing of the prototoxin but other proteases, including carboxypeptidases, then process the prototoxin into multiple active and stable species. PMID:25336460

  6. A tripartite cocktail of chimeric monoclonal antibodies passively protects mice against ricin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B and Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin.

    PubMed

    Sully, Erin K; Whaley, Kevin; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Pauly, Michael; Velasco, Jesus; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Stavale, Eric; Aman, M Javad; Tangudu, Chandra; Uzal, Francisco A; Mantis, Nicholas J; Zeitlin, Larry

    2014-12-15

    Due to the fast-acting nature of ricin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), and Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), it is necessary that therapeutic interventions following a bioterrorism incident by one of these toxins occur as soon as possible after intoxication. Moreover, because the clinical manifestations of intoxication by these agents are likely to be indistinguishable from each other, especially following aerosol exposure, we have developed a cocktail of chimeric monoclonal antibodies that is capable of neutralizing all three toxins. The efficacy of this cocktail was demonstrated in mouse models of lethal dose toxin challenge. PMID:25260254

  7. Immunogenicity of a Trivalent Recombinant Vaccine Against Clostridium perfringens Alpha, Beta, and Epsilon Toxins in Farm Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Gustavo Marçal Schmidt Garcia; Salvarani, Felipe Masiero; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo Pouey; Mendonça, Marcelo; Moreira, Ângela Nunes; Gonçalves, Luciana Aramuni; Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria; Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic bacterium that produces several toxins. Of these, the alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins are responsible for causing the most severe C. perfringens-related diseases in farm animals. The best way to control these diseases is through vaccination. However, commercially available vaccines are based on inactivated toxins and have many production drawbacks, which can be overcome through the use of recombinant antigens. In this study, we produced recombinant alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins in Escherichia coli to formulate a trivalent vaccine. Its effectiveness was evaluated through a potency test in rabbits, in which the vaccine generated 9.6, 24.4, and 25.0 IU/mL of neutralizing antibodies against the respective toxins. Following this, cattle, sheep, and goats received the same formulation, generating, respectively, 5.19 ± 0.48, 4.34 ± 0.43, and 4.70 ± 0.58 IU/mL against alpha toxin, 13.71 ± 1.17 IU/mL (for all three species) against beta toxin, and 12.74 ± 1.70, 7.66 ± 1.69, and 8.91 ± 2.14 IU/mL against epsilon toxin. These levels were above the minimum recommended by international protocols. As such, our vaccine was effective in generating protective antibodies and, thus, may represent an interesting alternative for the prevention of C. perfringens-related intoxications in farm animals. PMID:27004612

  8. Immunogenicity of a Trivalent Recombinant Vaccine Against Clostridium perfringens Alpha, Beta, and Epsilon Toxins in Farm Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Gustavo Marçal Schmidt Garcia; Salvarani, Felipe Masiero; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo Pouey; Mendonça, Marcelo; Moreira, Ângela Nunes; Gonçalves, Luciana Aramuni; Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria; Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic bacterium that produces several toxins. Of these, the alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins are responsible for causing the most severe C. perfringens-related diseases in farm animals. The best way to control these diseases is through vaccination. However, commercially available vaccines are based on inactivated toxins and have many production drawbacks, which can be overcome through the use of recombinant antigens. In this study, we produced recombinant alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins in Escherichia coli to formulate a trivalent vaccine. Its effectiveness was evaluated through a potency test in rabbits, in which the vaccine generated 9.6, 24.4, and 25.0 IU/mL of neutralizing antibodies against the respective toxins. Following this, cattle, sheep, and goats received the same formulation, generating, respectively, 5.19 ± 0.48, 4.34 ± 0.43, and 4.70 ± 0.58 IU/mL against alpha toxin, 13.71 ± 1.17 IU/mL (for all three species) against beta toxin, and 12.74 ± 1.70, 7.66 ± 1.69, and 8.91 ± 2.14 IU/mL against epsilon toxin. These levels were above the minimum recommended by international protocols. As such, our vaccine was effective in generating protective antibodies and, thus, may represent an interesting alternative for the prevention of C. perfringens-related intoxications in farm animals. PMID:27004612

  9. CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence of C. perfringens food-poisoning is quite common and costly. Although somewhat fastidious in growth characteristics using synthetic laboratory media, the microorganism is very prolific when found in food products. Despite the pathogen’s ubiquity in the natural environment, foodborne i...

  10. Oral immunization of mice against Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin with a Lactobacillus casei vector vaccine expressing epsilon toxoid.

    PubMed

    Alimolaei, Mojtaba; Golchin, Mehdi; Daneshvar, Hamid

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D infects ruminants and causes the enterotoxemia disease by ε-toxin. A mutated ε-toxin gene lacking toxicity was designed, synthesized, and cloned into the pT1NX vector and electroporated into Lactobacillus casei competent cells to yield LC-pT1NX-ε recombinant strain. BALB/c mice, immunized orally with this strain, highly induced mucosal, humoral, and cell-mediated immune responses and developed a protection against 200 MLD/ml of the activated ε-toxin. This study showed that the LC-pT1NX-ε could be a promising vaccine candidate against the enterotoxemia disease. PMID:27012151

  11. ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO EPSILON TOXIN OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN CAPTIVE RED DEER (CERVUS ELAPHUS) OVER A 13-MONTH PERIOD.

    PubMed

    Scala, Christopher; Duffard, Nicolas; Beauchamp, Guy; Boullier, Séverine; Locatelli, Yann

    2016-03-01

    Deer are sensitive to clostridial diseases, and vaccination with clostridial toxoids is the method of choice to prevent these infections in ruminants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the serologic responses in red deer (Cervus elaphus) over a 13-mo period after vaccination with a multivalent clostridial vaccine, containing an aluminium hydroxide adjuvant. Antibody production to the Clostridium perfringens type D epsilon toxin component of the vaccine was measured using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Animals from group 1 (9 mo old; n = 6) were naïve and received an initial vaccination with a booster vaccine 4 wk apart and one annual booster. Animals from group 2 (21 mo old; n = 10) had been previously vaccinated 12 mo prior and received a first annual booster at the beginning of this study and a second annual booster 12 mo later. The multivalent clostridial vaccine induced a high antibody response that peaked after each injection and then slowly decreased with time. In group 1, a booster vaccine was required to obtain an initial high humoral response. The annual booster injection induced a strong, rapid, and consistent anamnestic response in both groups. The serologic responses persisted significantly over the baseline value for 9-12 mo in group 1, but more than 12 mo in group 2. It is unknown whether the measured humoral immune responses would have been protective as no challenge studies were performed. Further investigation is needed to determine the protective antibody titers to challenge and how long this immunity might persist after vaccination. PMID:27010263

  12. The enteric toxins of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Smedley, J G; Fisher, D J; Sayeed, S; Chakrabarti, G; McClane, B A

    2004-01-01

    The Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens is a major cause of human and veterinary enteric disease largely because this bacterium can produce several toxins when present inside the gastrointestinal tract. The enteric toxins of C. perfringens share two common features: (1) they are all single polypeptides of modest (approximately 25-35 kDa) size, although lacking in sequence homology, and (2) they generally act by forming pores or channels in plasma membranes of host cells. These enteric toxins include C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), which is responsible for the symptoms of a common human food poisoning and acts by forming pores after interacting with intestinal tight junction proteins. Two other C. perfringens enteric toxins, epsilon-toxin (a bioterrorism select agent) and beta-toxin, cause veterinary enterotoxemias when absorbed from the intestines; beta- and epsilon-toxins then apparently act by forming oligomeric pores in intestinal or extra-intestinal target tissues. The action of a newly discovered C. perfringens enteric toxin, beta2 toxin, has not yet been defined but precedent suggests it might also be a pore-former. Experience with other clostridial toxins certainly warrants continued research on these C. perfringens enteric toxins to develop their potential as therapeutic agents and tools for cellular biology. PMID:15517462

  13. Prevention and treatment of Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin intoxication in mice with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (c4D7) produced in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J P; Beingesser, J; Bohorov, O; Bohorova, N; Goodman, C; Kim, D; Pauly, M; Velasco, J; Whaley, K; Zeitlin, L; Roy, C J; Uzal, F A

    2014-09-01

    Epsilon toxin (ETX), produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, is among the most lethal toxins known. ETX is a potential bioterrorism threat that was listed as a Category B agent by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control until 2012 and it still remains a toxin of interest for several government agencies. We produced a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against ETX (ETX MAb c4D7) in Nicotiana benthamiana and characterized its preventive and therapeutic efficacy in mice. The ETX preparation used was highly lethal for mice (LD50 = 1.6 μg/kg) and resulted in a mean time from inoculation to death of 18 and 180 min when administered intravenously or intraperitoneally, respectively. High lethal challenge resulted in dramatic increases of a variety of pro-inflammatory cytokines in serum, while lower, but still lethal doses, did not elicit such responses. ETX MAb c4D7 was highly effective prophylactically (ED50 = 0.3 mg/kg; ED100 = 0.8 mg/kg) and also provided protection when delivered 15-30 min post-ETX intoxication. These data suggest that ETX MAb c4D7 may have use as a pre- and post-exposure treatment for ETX intoxication. PMID:24950050

  14. Immunization with a novel Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin mutant rETXY196E-C confers strong protection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wenwu; Kang, Jingjing; Kang, Lin; Gao, Shan; Yang, Hao; Ji, Bin; Li, Ping; Liu, Jing; Xin, Wenwen; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Epsilon toxin (ETX) is produced by toxinotypes B and D of Clostridium perfringens. It can induce lethal enterotoxemia in domestic animals, mainly in sheep, goats and cattle, causing serious economic losses to global animal husbandry. In this study, a novel and stable epsilon toxin mutant rETXY196E-C, obtained by substituting the 196th tyrosine (Y196) with glutamic acid (E) and introducing of 23 amino acids long C-terminal peptide, was determined as a promising recombinant vaccine candidate against enterotoxemia. After the third vaccination, the antibody titers against recombinant wild type (rETX) could reach 1:105 in each immunized group, and the mice were completely protected from 100 × LD50 (50% lethal dose) of rETX challenge. The mice in 15 μg subcutaneously immunized group fully survived at the dose of 500 × LD50 of rETX challenge and 80% of mice survived at 180 μg (1000 × LD50) of rETX administration. In vitro, immune sera from 15 μg subcutaneously immunized group could completely protect MDCK cells from 16 × CT50 (50% lethal dose of cells) of rETX challenge and protect against 10 × LD50 dose (1.8 μg) of rETX challenge in mice. These data suggest that recombinant protein rETXY196E-C is a potential vaccine candidate for future applied researches. PMID:27048879

  15. Immunization with a novel Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin mutant rETX(Y196E)-C confers strong protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wenwu; Kang, Jingjing; Kang, Lin; Gao, Shan; Yang, Hao; Ji, Bin; Li, Ping; Liu, Jing; Xin, Wenwen; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Epsilon toxin (ETX) is produced by toxinotypes B and D of Clostridium perfringens. It can induce lethal enterotoxemia in domestic animals, mainly in sheep, goats and cattle, causing serious economic losses to global animal husbandry. In this study, a novel and stable epsilon toxin mutant rETX(Y196E)-C, obtained by substituting the 196th tyrosine (Y196) with glutamic acid (E) and introducing of 23 amino acids long C-terminal peptide, was determined as a promising recombinant vaccine candidate against enterotoxemia. After the third vaccination, the antibody titers against recombinant wild type (rETX) could reach 1:10(5) in each immunized group, and the mice were completely protected from 100 × LD50 (50% lethal dose) of rETX challenge. The mice in 15 μg subcutaneously immunized group fully survived at the dose of 500 × LD50 of rETX challenge and 80% of mice survived at 180 μg (1000 × LD50) of rETX administration. In vitro, immune sera from 15 μg subcutaneously immunized group could completely protect MDCK cells from 16 × CT50 (50% lethal dose of cells) of rETX challenge and protect against 10 × LD50 dose (1.8 μg) of rETX challenge in mice. These data suggest that recombinant protein rETX(Y196E)-C is a potential vaccine candidate for future applied researches. PMID:27048879

  16. NanI Sialidase, CcpA, and CodY Work Together To Regulate Epsilon Toxin Production by Clostridium perfringens Type D Strain CN3718

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Freedman, John C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens type D strains are usually associated with diseases of livestock, and their virulence requires the production of epsilon toxin (ETX). We previously showed (J. Li, S. Sayeed, S. Robertson, J. Chen, and B. A. McClane, PLoS Pathog 7:e1002429, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1002429) that BMC202, a nanI null mutant of type D strain CN3718, produces less ETX than wild-type CN3718 does. The current study proved that the lower ETX production by strain BMC202 is due to nanI gene disruption, since both genetic and physical (NanI or sialic acid) complementation increased ETX production by BMC202. Furthermore, a sialidase inhibitor that interfered with NanI activity also reduced ETX production by wild-type CN3718. The NanI effect on ETX production was shown to involve reductions in codY and ccpA gene transcription levels in BMC202 versus wild-type CN3718. Similar to CodY, CcpA was found to positively control ETX production. A double codY ccpA null mutant produced even less ETX than a codY or ccpA single null mutant. CcpA bound directly to sequences upstream of the etx or codY start codon, and bioinformatics identified putative CcpA-binding cre sites immediately upstream of both the codY and etx start codons, suggesting possible direct CcpA regulatory effects. A ccpA mutation also decreased codY transcription, suggesting that CcpA effects on ETX production can be both direct and indirect, including effects on codY transcription. Collectively, these results suggest that NanI, CcpA, and CodY work together to regulate ETX production, with NanI-generated sialic acid from the intestines possibly signaling type D strains to upregulate their ETX production and induce disease. IMPORTANCE Clostridium perfringens NanI was previously shown to increase ETX binding to, and cytotoxicity for, MDCK host cells. The current study demonstrates that NanI also regulates ETX production via increased transcription of genes encoding the CodY and CcpA global regulators. Results obtained using single ccpA or codY null mutants and a ccpA codY double null mutant showed that codY and ccpA regulate ETX production independently of one another but that ccpA also affects codY transcription. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and bioinformatic analyses suggest that both CodY and CcpA may directly regulate etx transcription. Collectively, results of this study suggest that sialic acid generated by NanI from intestinal sources signals ETX-producing C. perfringens strains, via CcpA and CodY, to upregulate ETX production and cause disease. PMID:26260460

  17. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  18. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type D. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial...

  19. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type C. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial...

  20. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type D. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial...

  1. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type C. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial...

  2. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type D. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial...

  3. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type C. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial...

  4. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type D. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial...

  5. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type C. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial...

  6. Clostridium perfringens Type C Enterotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Niilo, Leo

    1988-01-01

    Forms of enteric disease caused by Clostridium perfringens type C are critically reviewed with emphasis on practical aspects and recent research findings. Available data indicate that more animal species may be fatally infected by type C of this organism than by any other type of C. perfringens. Fatal cases have been recorded in pigs, cattle, sheep, horses and humans. Newborn animals are typically the most susceptible, possibly related to aspects of bacterial colonization, intestinal digestive functions, and to some other, unexplained, factors. Both beta toxin and the bacterial cells are required to initiate pathogenesis at the tips of jejunal villi, and subsequent massive adherence of these cells to necrotic mucosa is a characteristic feature. Although major lesions occur in the intestine, death is due to toxemia. The disease can be effectively controlled by vaccination of the dam. Epizootiology of this disease is a possible area for further studies. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3. PMID:17423103

  7. Lytic Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage 39-O Genomic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening for bacteriophages lytic for Clostridium perfringens was completed utilizing filtered samples obtained from poultry (intestinal material), soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water. Following limit dilution cloning and three rounds of plaque purification lytic phage preparations ...

  8. [Toxins of Clostridium perfringens as a natural and bioterroristic threats].

    PubMed

    Omernik, Andrzej; Płusa, Tadeusz

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is absolutely anaerobic rod-shaped, sporeforming bacterium. The morbidity is connected with producing toxins. Depending on the type of toxin produced Clostridium perfringens can be divided into five serotypes:A-E. Under natural conditions, this bacterium is responsible for local outbreaks of food poisoning associated with eating contaminated food which which was improperly heat treated. Some countries with lower economic level are endemic foci of necrotizing enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens. The bacterium is also a major cause of gas gangrene. It is a disease, associated with wound infection, with potentially fatal prognosis in the case of treatment's delays. In the absence of early radical surgery, antibiotic therapy and (if available) hyperbaric treatment leads to the spread of toxins in the body causing shock, coma and death. Due to the force of produced toxins is a pathogen that poses a substrate for the production of biological weapons. It could potentially be used to induce outbreaks of food poisoning and by missiles contamination by spore lead to increased morbidity of gas gangrene in injured soldiers. C. perfringens types B and D produce epsilon toxin considered to be the third most powerful bacterial toxin. Because of the ability to disperse the toxin as an aerosol and a lack of methods of treatment and prevention of poisoning possible factors it is a potential tool for bioterrorism It is advisable to continue research into vaccines and treatments for poisoning toxins of C. perfringens. PMID:26449576

  9. Clostridium perfringens in the Environment1

    PubMed Central

    Matches, Jack R.; Liston, John; Curran, Donald

    1974-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens was isolated from samples collected in Puget Sound in the state of Washington and areas considered as possible sources of these organisms to Puget Sound. The distribution of C. perfringens in the total Clostridium population was determined for fish gut contents and sediments collected in highly polluted and less polluted areas, sewage samples, freshwater sediments, and soils. The greatest numbers of C. perfringens were obtained from marine sediments collected near the sewage outfall at West Point. Fewer isolates were made from fish collected from less polluted stations, although the number of C. perfringens remained high in sediments from other Puget Sound stations. The proportion of C. perfringens in the total Clostridium populations varied between 56 and 71% for sewage samples and only 0.4 to 4.1% for freshwater sediments and soil samples. Only 25 C. perfringens isolates out of 137 from fish guts, or 18%, were identifiable serologically and these fell into 12 groups. C. perfringens were fed to fish and the fish were sacrificed after varying lengths of time. The number of C. perfringens increased slightly in the gut during the first 24 h and then the numbers decreased rapidly for the next 120 h. PMID:4371684

  10. Comparative Analysis of Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens are Gram-positive bacteria that are a major bacterial cause of food-borne disease among humans. These anaerobic bacteria are also the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Pathogenesis and symptoms of a necrotic enteritis infection among chickens ...

  11. Comparative Analysis of Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Clostridium perfringens are Gram-positive bacteria that are a major bacterial cause of food-borne disease and gas gangrene among humans. These anaerobic bacteria are also the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Pathogenesis and symptoms of a necrotic enterit...

  12. Clostridium perfringens sepsis following a molar pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brandi N; Lekovic, Jovana P; Robinson, Suzzette

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens sepsis is rare since the legalization of abortion in 1973. This is a 49 year old female who developed clostridial sepsis after suction dilation and curettage for a molar pregnancy. A hysterectomy was performed after prompt recognition, and the patient survived. PMID:24096275

  13. Lumbar Discitis Caused by Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, M. R.; Degand, Nicolas; Lotte, Laurene; Bouvet, Philippe; Baudin, Guillaume; Cua, Eric; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Ruimy, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    We report here a rare case of chronic lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens in an elderly patient that was treated with a combination of β-lactams and clindamycin. Molecular analysis performed on the strain revealed an unusual toxin gene pattern. PMID:25056327

  14. Molecular genetics and pathogenesis of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed Central

    Rood, J I; Cole, S T

    1991-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the causative agent of a number of human diseases, such as gas gangrene and food poisoning, and many diseases of animals. Recently significant advances have been made in the development of C. perfringens genetics. Studies on bacteriocin plasmids and conjugative R plasmids have led to the cloning and analysis of many C. perfringens genes and the construction of shuttle plasmids. The relationship of antibiotic resistance genes to similar genes from other bacteria has been elucidated. A detailed physical map of the C. perfringens chromosome has been prepared, and numerous genes have been located on that map. Reproducible transformation methods for the introduction of plasmids into C. perfringens have been developed, and several genes coding for the production of extracellular toxins and enzymes have been cloned. Now that it is possible to freely move genetic information back and forth between C. perfringens and Escherichia coli, it will be possible to apply modern molecular methods to studies on the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infections. PMID:1779929

  15. Clostridium Perfringens Toxins Involved in Mammalian Veterinary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Uzal, F. A.; Vidal, J. E.; McClane, B. A.; Gurjar, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a gram-positive anaerobic rod that is classified into 5 toxinotypes (A, B, C, D, and E) according to the production of 4 major toxins, namely alpha (CPA), beta (CPB), epsilon (ETX) and iota (ITX). However, this microorganism can produce up to 16 toxins in various combinations, including lethal toxins such as perfringolysin O (PFO), enterotoxin (CPE), and beta2 toxin (CPB2). Most diseases caused by this microorganism are mediated by one or more of these toxins. The role of CPA in intestinal disease of mammals is controversial and poorly documented, but there is no doubt that this toxin is essential in the production of gas gangrene of humans and several animal species. CPB produced by C. perfringens types B and C is responsible for necrotizing enteritis and enterotoxemia mainly in neonatal individuals of several animal species. ETX produced by C. perfringens type D is responsible for clinical signs and lesions of enterotoxemia, a predominantly neurological disease of sheep and goats. The role of ITX in disease of animals is poorly understood, although it is usually assumed that the pathogenesis of intestinal diseases produced by C. perfringens type E is mediated by this toxin. CPB2, a necrotizing and lethal toxin that can be produced by all types of C. perfringens, has been blamed for disease in many animal species, but little information is currently available to sustain or rule out this claim. CPE is an important virulence factor for C. perfringens type A gastrointestinal disease in humans and dogs; however, the data implicating CPE in other animal diseases remains ambiguous. PFO does not seem to play a direct role as the main virulence factor for animal diseases, but it may have a synergistic role with CPA-mediated gangrene and ETX-mediated enterotoxemia. The recent improvement of animal models for C. perfringens infection and the use of toxin gene knock-out mutants have demonstrated the specific pathogenic role of several toxins of C. perfringens in animal disease. These research tools are helping us to establish the role of each C. perfringens toxin in animal disease, to investigate the in vivo mechanism of action of these toxins, and to develop more effective vaccines against diseases produced by these microorganisms. PMID:24511335

  16. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.111 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Clostridium Perfringens Type...

  17. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.112 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Clostridium Perfringens Type...

  18. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.111 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Clostridium Perfringens Type...

  19. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.112 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Clostridium Perfringens Type...

  20. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.112 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Clostridium Perfringens Type...

  1. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.111 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Clostridium Perfringens Type...

  2. Perfringolysin O: The Underrated Clostridium perfringens Toxin?

    PubMed Central

    Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Goossens, Evy; Valgaeren, Bonnie; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet; Wade, Kristin R.; Tweten, Rodney; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as θ toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250–300 Å in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis. PMID:26008232

  3. Towards an understanding of the role of Clostridium perfringens toxins in human and animal disease

    PubMed Central

    Uzal, Francisco A; Freedman, John C; Shrestha, Archana; Theoret, James R; Garcia, Jorge; Awad, Milena M; Adams, Vicki; Moore, Robert J; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens uses its arsenal of >16 toxins to cause histotoxic and intestinal infections in humans and animals. It has been unclear why this bacterium produces so many different toxins, especially since many target the plasma membrane of host cells. However, it is now established that C. perfringens uses chromosomally encoded alpha toxin (a phospholipase C) and perfringolysin O (a pore-forming toxin) during histotoxic infections. In contrast, this bacterium causes intestinal disease by employing toxins encoded by mobile genetic elements, including C. perfringens enterotoxin, necrotic enteritis toxin B-like, epsilon toxin and beta toxin. Like perfringolysin O, the toxins with established roles in intestinal disease form membrane pores. However, the intestinal disease-associated toxins vary in their target specificity, when they are produced (sporulation vs vegetative growth), and in their sensitivity to intestinal proteases. Producing many toxins with diverse characteristics likely imparts virulence flexibility to C. perfringens so it can cause an array of diseases. PMID:24762309

  4. Animal models to study the pathogenesis of human and animal Clostridium perfringens infections.

    PubMed

    Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A; Cheung, Jackie K; Theoret, James; Garcia, Jorge P; Moore, Robert J; Rood, Julian I

    2015-08-31

    The most common animal models used to study Clostridium perfringens infections in humans and animals are reviewed here. The classical C. perfringens-mediated histotoxic disease of humans is clostridial myonecrosis or gas gangrene and the use of a mouse myonecrosis model coupled with genetic studies has contributed greatly to our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Similarly, the use of a chicken model has enhanced our understanding of type A-mediated necrotic enteritis in poultry and has led to the identification of NetB as the primary toxin involved in disease. C. perfringens type A food poisoning is a highly prevalent bacterial illness in the USA and elsewhere. Rabbits and mice are the species most commonly used to study the action of enterotoxin, the causative toxin. Other animal models used to study the effect of this toxin are rats, non-human primates, sheep and cattle. In rabbits and mice, CPE produces severe necrosis of the small intestinal epithelium along with fluid accumulation. C. perfringens type D infection has been studied by inoculating epsilon toxin (ETX) intravenously into mice, rats, sheep, goats and cattle, and by intraduodenal inoculation of whole cultures of this microorganism in mice, sheep, goats and cattle. Molecular Koch's postulates have been fulfilled for enterotoxigenic C. perfringens type A in rabbits and mice, for C. perfringens type A necrotic enteritis and gas gangrene in chickens and mice, respectively, for C. perfringens type C in mice, rabbits and goats, and for C. perfringens type D in mice, sheep and goats. PMID:25770894

  5. Presence of Clostridium perfringens in retail chicken livers.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Kerry K; Bueschel, Dawn M; Songer, J Glenn

    2013-06-01

    Chicken livers sold at grocery stores in Tucson, AZ, USA were examined for the presence of Clostridium perfringens. Results showed that 69.6% of sampled retail chicken livers were culture positive for C. perfringens. Genotyping of the isolates showed that all the isolates were type A, but were negative for the enterotoxin gene (cpe). PMID:23583538

  6. Clostridium perfringens endophthalmitis following perforating eye injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Helena; Idrees, Zubair; Kinsella, Frank

    2009-01-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with endophthalmitis, following a perforating eye injury from pulling out a wire that was embedded in the ground. On presentation, his vision was perception of light (PL). Tetanus toxoid was given, and he was commenced on ciprofloxacin. A primary repair was performed. Conjunctival swabs, discharge from wound site and anterior chamber aspirate were sent for culture. The eye was tense and the anterior chamber was full of a gelatinous brown substance which precluded performance of vitrectomy. Intravitreal vancomycin and ceftazidime was given. Hourly topical fortified vancomycin and ceftazidime was given. Postoperatively, the patient’s vision remained PL with no evidence of improvement. On day 2, Clostridium perfringens was cultured. The patient was commenced on intravenous benzylpenicillin and clindamycin. Intravitreal clindamycin and vancomycin was administered. The patient was NPL on day 3. There was no evidence of response to treatment and an evisceration was performed on day 6. PMID:21747903

  7. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens in the feces of adult horses and foals with acute enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Gohari, Iman Mehdizadeh; Arroyo, Luis; Macinnes, Janet I; Timoney, John F; Parreira, Valeria R; Prescott, John F

    2014-01-01

    Up to 60% of cases of equine colitis have no known cause. To improve understanding of the causes of acute colitis in horses, we hypothesized that Clostridium perfringens producing enterotoxin (CPE) and/or beta2 toxin (CPB2) are common and important causes of severe colitis in horses and/or that C. perfringens producing an as-yet-undescribed cytotoxin may also cause colitis in horses. Fecal samples from 55 horses (43 adults, 12 foals) with clinical evidence of colitis were evaluated by culture for the presence of Clostridium difficile, C. perfringens, and Salmonella. Feces were also examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for C. difficile A/B toxins and C. perfringens alpha toxin (CPA), beta2 toxin (CPB2), and enterotoxin (CPE). Five C. perfringens isolates per sample were genotyped for the following genes: cpa, cpb, cpb2 consensus, cpb2 atypical, cpe (enterotoxin), etx (epsilon toxin), itx (iota toxin), netB (necrotic enteritis toxin B), and tpeL (large C. perfringens cytotoxin). The supernatants of these isolates were also evaluated for toxicity for an equine cell line. All fecal samples were negative for Salmonella. Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile were isolated from 40% and 5.4% of samples, respectively. All fecal samples were negative for CPE. Clostridium perfringens CPA and CPB2 toxins were detected in 14.5% and 7.2% of fecal samples, respectively, all of which were culture-positive for C. perfringens. No isolates were cpe, etx, netB, or tpeL gene-positive. Atypical cpb2 and consensus cpb2 genes were identified in 15 (13.6%) and 4 (3.6%) of 110 isolates, respectively. All equine C. perfringens isolates showed far milder cytotoxicity effects than a CPB-producing positive control, although cpb2-positive isolates were slightly but significantly more cytotoxic than negative isolates. Based on this studied population, we were unable to confirm our hypothesis that CPE and CPB2-producing C. perfringens are common in horses with colitis in Ontario and we failed to identify cytotoxic activity in vitro in the type A isolates recovered. PMID:24396174

  8. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens in the feces of adult horses and foals with acute enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Gohari, Iman Mehdizadeh; Arroyo, Luis; MacInnes, Janet I.; Timoney, John F.; Parreira, Valeria R.; Prescott, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Up to 60% of cases of equine colitis have no known cause. To improve understanding of the causes of acute colitis in horses, we hypothesized that Clostridium perfringens producing enterotoxin (CPE) and/or beta2 toxin (CPB2) are common and important causes of severe colitis in horses and/or that C. perfringens producing an as-yet-undescribed cytotoxin may also cause colitis in horses. Fecal samples from 55 horses (43 adults, 12 foals) with clinical evidence of colitis were evaluated by culture for the presence of Clostridium difficile, C. perfringens, and Salmonella. Feces were also examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for C. difficile A/B toxins and C. perfringens alpha toxin (CPA), beta2 toxin (CPB2), and enterotoxin (CPE). Five C. perfringens isolates per sample were genotyped for the following genes: cpa, cpb, cpb2 consensus, cpb2 atypical, cpe (enterotoxin), etx (epsilon toxin), itx (iota toxin), netB (necrotic enteritis toxin B), and tpeL (large C. perfringens cytotoxin). The supernatants of these isolates were also evaluated for toxicity for an equine cell line. All fecal samples were negative for Salmonella. Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile were isolated from 40% and 5.4% of samples, respectively. All fecal samples were negative for CPE. Clostridium perfringens CPA and CPB2 toxins were detected in 14.5% and 7.2% of fecal samples, respectively, all of which were culture-positive for C. perfringens. No isolates were cpe, etx, netB, or tpeL gene-positive. Atypical cpb2 and consensus cpb2 genes were identified in 15 (13.6%) and 4 (3.6%) of 110 isolates, respectively. All equine C. perfringens isolates showed far milder cytotoxicity effects than a CPB-producing positive control, although cpb2-positive isolates were slightly but significantly more cytotoxic than negative isolates. Based on this studied population, we were unable to confirm our hypothesis that CPE and CPB2-producing C. perfringens are common in horses with colitis in Ontario and we failed to identify cytotoxic activity in vitro in the type A isolates recovered. PMID:24396174

  9. Clostridium perfringens and other anaerobes isolated from bile.

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Y; Murata, K; Kimura, M

    1983-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens was isolated from bile in 13 cases of 150 patients examined. The serotypes of C perfringens strains isolated from bile and faeces were investigated using antisera to Hobbs' type 1-17. Two or more serological types were often found in a single specimen, but in the same patient the serotypes of C perfringens strains isolated from the bile were identical with those from the faeces. Beta-glucuronidase production in these C perfringens serotypes was tested with the API-Strep system. Strains agglutinated with Hobbs' antisera produced beta-glucuronidase, but non-agglutinated strains did not. PMID:6298284

  10. Clostridium perfringens in Animal Disease: A Review of Current Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Niilo, L.

    1980-01-01

    The diseases caused by various types of Clostridium perfringens are critically reviewed in the light of current knowledge. Particular emphasis is placed on information concerning these diseases in Canadian livestock. There are two etiologically clearly-defined acute C. perfringens diseases recognized in Canada: hemorrhagic enteritis of the new born calf, caused by C. perfringens type C, and enterotoxemia of sheep, caused by type D. Clostridium perfringens type A may play a role as a secondary pathological agent in various disease conditions, such as necrotic enteritis of chickens. It may also cause wound infections and may provide a source for human food poisoning outbreaks. There appears to be a considerable lack of knowledge regarding the distribution of C. perfringens types, their pathogenesis, diagnosis and the incidence of diseases caused by this organism. PMID:6253040

  11. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN COOKED BEEF

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work was to study the growth kinetics of Clostridium perfringens spores in thermally processed ground beef and compare the suitability of the Gompertz, logistic, and Baranyi models used to describe the isothermal bacterial growth. Ground beef samples inoculated with the spores ...

  12. Tips to Prevent Illness from Clostridium Perfringens

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that is often found on raw meat and poultry, and is one of the most common causes ... are common food sources of C. perfringens ? Beef, poultry, gravies, and dried or precooked foods are common ...

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R. O. S.; Salvarani, F.M.; Assis, R.A.; Martins, N.R.S.; Pires, P.S.; Lobato, F.C.F.

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a normal inhabitant of the intestinal tract of chickens as well as a potential pathogen that causes necrotic enteritis and colangio hepatitis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of seven different compounds used for therapy, growth promotion or prevention of coccidiosis was determined by agar dilution method for 55 C. perfringens strains isolated from the intestines of broiler chickens. All strains showed high susceptibility to penicillin, avilamycin, monensin and narasin. Only 7.3% of the strains showed an intermediated sensitivity to lincomycin, and 49 (89.1%) were considered susceptible. For tetracycline and bacitracin, 41.8% and 47.3% of strains, respectively, were considered resistant. PMID:24031355

  14. Clostridium perfringens type A–E toxin plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John C.; Theoret, James R.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell. PMID:25283728

  15. Genomic analyses of Clostridium perfringens isolates from five toxinotypes.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Karl A; Elbourne, Liam D H; Tetu, Sasha G; Melville, Stephen B; Rood, Julian I; Paulsen, Ian T

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens can be isolated from a range of environments, including soil, marine and fresh water sediments, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals and humans. Some C. perfringens strains have attractive industrial applications, e.g., in the degradation of waste products or the production of useful chemicals. However, C. perfringens has been most studied as the causative agent of a range of enteric and soft tissue infections of varying severities in humans and animals. Host preference and disease type in C. perfringens are intimately linked to the production of key extracellular toxins and on this basis toxigenic C. perfringens strains have been classified into five toxinotypes (A-E). To date, twelve genome sequences have been generated for a diverse collection of C. perfringens isolates, including strains associated with human and animal infections, a human commensal strain, and a strain with potential industrial utility. Most of the sequenced strains are classified as toxinotype A. However, genome sequences of representative strains from each of the other four toxinotypes have also been determined. Analysis of this collection of sequences has highlighted a lack of features differentiating toxinotype A strains from the other isolates, indicating that the primary defining characteristic of toxinotype A strains is their lack of key plasmid-encoded extracellular toxin genes associated with toxinotype B to E strains. The representative B-E strains sequenced to date each harbour many unique genes. Additional genome sequences are needed to determine if these genes are characteristic of their respective toxinotypes. PMID:25445567

  16. Hazard analysis of Clostridium perfringens in the Skylab Food System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourland, C. T.; Huber, C. S.; Kiser, P. R.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rowley, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Food System presented unique microbiological problems because food was warmed in null-gravity and because the heat source was limited to 69.4 C (to prevent boiling in null-gravity). For these reasons, the foods were manufactured using critical control point techniques of quality control coupled with appropriate hazard analyses. One of these hazard analyses evaluated the threat from Clostridium perfringens. Samples of food were inoculated with C. perfringens and incubated for 2 h at temperatures ranging from 25 to 55 C. Generation times were determined for the foods at various temperatures. Results of these tests were evaluated taking into consideration: food-borne disease epidemiology, the Skylab food manufacturing procedures, and the performance requirements of the Skylab Food System. Based on this hazard analysis, a limit for C. perfringens of 100/g was established for Skylab foods.

  17. Modeling growth of Clostridium perfringens in pea soup during cooling.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Aarieke E I; Beumer, Rijkel R; Zwietering, Marcel H

    2005-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a pathogen that mainly causes food poisoning outbreaks when large quantities of food are prepared. Therefore, a model was developed to predict the effect of different cooling procedures on the growth of this pathogen during cooling of food: Dutch pea soup. First, a growth rate model based on interpretable parameters was used to predict growth during linear cooling of pea soup. Second, a temperature model for cooling pea soup was constructed by fitting the model to experimental data published earlier. This cooling model was used to estimate the effect of various cooling environments on average cooling times, taking into account the effect of stirring and product volume. The growth model systematically overestimated growth of C. perfringens during cooling in air, but this effect was limited to less than 0.5 log N/ml and this was considered to be acceptable for practical purposes. It was demonstrated that the growth model for C. perfringens combined with the cooling model for pea soup could be used to sufficiently predict growth of C. perfringens in different volume sizes of pea soup during cooling in air as well as the effect of stirring, different cooling temperatures, and various cooling environments on the growth of C. perfringens in pea soup. Although fine-tuning may be needed to eliminate inaccuracies, it was concluded that the combined model could be a useful tool for designing good manufacturing practices (GMP) procedures. PMID:15787757

  18. Expression and delivery of an endolysin to combat Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Teresa; Horn, Nikki; Wegmann, Udo; Dugo, Giacomo; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J

    2014-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a cause for increasing concern due to its responsibility for severe infections both in humans and animals, especially poultry. To find new control strategies to treat C. perfringens infection, we investigated the activity and delivery of a bacteriophage endolysin. We identified a new endolysin, designated CP25L, which shows similarity to an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase domain and is distinct from other C. perfringens endolysins whose activity has been demonstrated in vitro. The cp25l gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product demonstrated lytic activity against all 25 C. perfringens strains tested. The probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785 was engineered to deliver the endolysin to the gastrointestinal tract. The integration of the nisRK two-component regulatory system from the Lactococcus lactis nisin A biosynthesis operon into the chromosome of L. johnsonii allowed constitutive expression of the endolysin under the control of the nisA promoter (P nisA ), while the use of a signal peptide (SLPmod) led to successful secretion of the active endolysin to the surrounding media. The high specificity and activity of the endolysin suggest that it may be developed as an effective tool to enhance the control of C. perfringens by L. johnsonii in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23942878

  19. Method for estimating the presence of Clostridium perfringens in food.

    PubMed

    Harmon, S M; Kautter, D A

    1970-12-01

    The methods currently used for the enumeration of Clostridium perfringens in food are often inadequate because of the rapid loss of viability of this organism when the sample is frozen or refrigerated. A method for estimating the presence of C. perfringens in food which utilizes the hemolytic and lecithinase activities of alpha toxin was developed. The hemolytic activity was measured in hemolysin indicator plates. Lecithinase activity of the extract was determined by the lecithovitellin test. Of 34 strains of C. perfringens associated with foodborne disease outbreaks, 32 produced sufficient alpha toxin in roast beef with gravy and in chicken broth to permit a reliable estimate of growth in these foods. Alpha toxin was extracted from food with 0.4 m saline buffered (at pH 8.0) with 0.05 mN-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid and concentrated by dialysis against 30% polyethylene glycol. A detectable quantity of alpha toxin was produced by approximately 10(6)C. perfringens cells per g of substrate, and the amount increased in proportion to the cell population. Results obtained with food samples responsible for gastroenteritis in humans indicate that a correlation can be made between the amount of alpha toxin present and previous growth of C. perfringens in food regardless of whether the organisms are viable when the examination is performed. PMID:4321712

  20. Detection and molecular typing of Clostridium perfringens isolates from beef, chicken and turkey meats.

    PubMed

    Aras, Zeki; Hadimli, Hasan Hüseyin

    2015-04-01

    Here we describe a study investigating the presence of Clostridium perfringens strains in meat samples and the toxin genes in the isolates by PCR. This study, for the first time, demonstrated the presence of C. perfringens type E in turkey meats, while C. perfringens type C strains isolated from chicken meats. PMID:25460196

  1. Clinico-pathological findings of Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxaemia in goats and its hemolytic activity in different erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ali Nasir, A.; Younus, M.; Rashid, A.; Abdul Khaliq, S.; Khan, E.; Shah, S. H.; Aslam, A.; Ghumman, M. A.; Joiya, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted to study the effects of experimental Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxaemia in teddy goats. Clinical signs started to appear after 30 min of experimental infection like anorexia, diarrhea, dehydration, frothing and dyspnea. Gross lesions consisted of severe congestion in tissues of varying intensity with enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes while histological examination revealed edema of lungs, kidney, and lymph nodes and to some extent in brain along with hemorrhages in lungs and intestines. Clostridium perfringens type D carrying alpha and epsilon toxin genes were amplified with amplicon size about 247 bp and 665 bp, respectively. Human erythrocytes showed the highest hemolysis, 68%, followed by mice, 57%, against culture supernatants. The percentage of hemolysis was significantly higher at 37°C as compared to 25°C except for rabbit and dog.

  2. Hydrolyzable and condensed tannins resistance in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Redondo, L M; Dominguez, J E; Rabinovitz, B C; Redondo, E A; Fernández Miyakawa, M E

    2015-08-01

    Tannins added in the diet are being used to improve nutrition and health in farm animals as an alternative to antibiotic growth promoters and to control enteric clostridial diseases. However, the capacity of Clostridium perfringens to develop resistance under the selective pressure of tannins is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if C. perfringens possess the ability to develop resistance against tannins in comparison with antimicrobial agents. Susceptibility for 7 AGPs (antimicrobial growth promoters), 9 therapeutic antimicrobials and 2 tannin based extracts was determined for 30 C. perfringens strains isolated from poultry and cattle. Two susceptible strains were selected and cultured in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of tannins and AGPs for resistant sub-populations selection. Tannin resistance of C. perfringens isolates from both animal species revealed no statistically significant differences in MICs (minimum inhibitory concentration). Poultry isolates showed higher MICs to several AGPs compared with cattle isolates. All isolates were susceptible to the therapeutic antimicrobials tested, but avian isolates showed a significantly lower susceptibility to these antimicrobials which was highly correlated with an increased resistance to bacitracin and others AGPs. In-vitro selection of resistant clones suggests that C. perfringens was unable to develop resistance against tannins at least compared to AGPs like bacitracin and avilamycin. Avian origin strains, which were previously exposed to antibiotics showed higher resistance, compared to cattle origin strains. These results suggest that the evolution of resistance against tannins in C. perfringens would be more difficult and slower than to the determined AGPs. PMID:26037239

  3. Intravascular Hemolysis and Septicemia due to Clostridium perfringens Emphysematous Cholecystitis and Hepatic Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Justin; Bland, Lacie; Noble, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Context. Clostridium perfringens septicemia is often associated with translocation from the gastrointestinal or gastrourinary tract and occurs in patients who have malignancy or are immunocompromised. Clostridium perfringens septicemia is usually fatal without early identification, source control, and antibiotics. Case. We present a case of a 65-year-old female with Clostridium perfringens septicemia secondary to emphysematous cholecystitis, with progression to hepatic abscesses. Conclusion. Septicemia secondary to Clostridium perfringens is generally fatal if not detected early. Source control with surgery or percutaneous drainage and early antibiotic therapy is imperative. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may reduce mortality. Clinicians caring for patients with sepsis and intravascular hemolysis must have Clostridium perfringens septicemia on their differential diagnosis with a low threshold for starting antibiotics and pursuing source of infection. PMID:26229537

  4. Detection of Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin gene in lambs by loop mediated isothermal amplification

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, B.; Kumar, N. Vinod; Sreenivasulu, D.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was standardized for rapid detection of Clostridium perfringens. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 fecal samples were collected from enterotoxemia suspected lambs were used for screening of C. perfringens cpa gene by LAMP. The specificity of the LAMP amplified products was tested by digesting with restriction enzyme XmnI for alpha toxin gene. Results: Out of 120 samples screened 112 (93.3%) samples were positive by both LAMP and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of cpa gene which indicated the equal sensitivity of both the tests. The enzyme produced single cut in 162 base pair amplified product of alpha toxin gene at 81 base pair resulting in a single band in gel electrophoresis. Conclusion: Both LAMP and PCR for detection of cpa gene indicated the equal sensitivity of both the tests. Standardization of LAMP reaction for amplification of epsilon and beta toxin genes will help to identify the C. perfringens toxin types from the clinical samples. The test could be a suitable alternative to the PCR in detection of toxin types without the help of sophisticated machinery like thermal cycler. Considering its simplicity in operation and high sensitivity, there is the potential use of this technique in clinical diagnosis and surveillance of infectious diseases. PMID:27051186

  5. Toxinotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens isolates from mutton, beef and chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha; Nazir, Jawad; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Ahmad, Mansur-Ud-Din; Nawaz, Muhammad; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair

    2015-08-01

    A total of 300 meat samples comprising mutton, beef, and chicken meat (n = 100) collected from either local butcher shops or large meat outlets situated at various areas of Lahore City located in Punjab province of Pakistan were tested for the isolation of Clostridium perfringens. Prevalence of the organism was highest in the chicken (6 %) followed by mutton (5 %) and beef (1 %). Contamination level was high (10/150) in the samples collected from local butcher shops in comparison to the samples collected from large meat outlets (2/150). All of the raw meat samples were negative for the presence of alpha, beta and epsilon toxins of C. perfringens as detected through ELISA. Out of a total number of 12 isolates only half were capable of producing enterotoxins when cultured in trypticase glucose yeast (TGY) broth. Toxinotyping of the isolates showed that 3 were of type A while one each of the remaining three belonged to type B, C, and D. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of the toxin producing isolates revealed that C. perfringens were susceptible to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and ceftriaxone. All of the other drugs were relatively less effective with a least activity of amoxicillin against the isolates. PMID:26243960

  6. Clostridium perfringens type C and Clostridium difficile co-infection in foals.

    PubMed

    Uzal, F A; Diab, S S; Blanchard, P; Moore, J; Anthenill, L; Shahriar, F; Garcia, J P; Songer, J G

    2012-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C is one of the most important agents of enteric disease in newborn foals. Clostridium difficile is now recognized as an important cause of enterocolitis in horses of all ages. While infections by C. perfringens type C or C. difficile are frequently seen, we are not aware of any report describing combined infection by these two microorganisms in foals. We present here five cases of foal enterocolitis associated with C. difficile and C. perfringens type C infection. Five foals between one and seven days of age were submitted for necropsy examination to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory. The five animals had a clinical history of acute hemorrhagic diarrhea followed by death and none had received antimicrobials or been hospitalized. Postmortem examination revealed hemorrhagic and necrotizing entero-typhlo-colitis. Histologically, the mucosa of the small intestine and colon presented diffuse necrosis and hemorrhage and it was often covered by a pseudomembrane. Thrombosis was observed in submucosal and/or mucosal vessels. Immunohistochemistry of intestinal sections of all foals showed that many large bacilli in the sections were C. perfringens. C. perfringens beta toxin was detected by ELISA in intestinal content of all animals and C. difficile toxin A/B was detected in intestinal content of three animals. C. perfringens (identified as type C by PCR) was isolated from the intestinal content of three foals. C. difficile (typed as A(+)/B(+) by PCR) was isolated from the intestinal content in 3 out of the 5 cases. This report suggests a possible synergism of C. perfringens type C and C. difficile in foal enterocolitis. Because none of the foals had received antibiotic therapy, the predisposing factor, if any, for the C. difficile infection remains undetermined; it is possible that the C. perfringens infection acted as a predisposing factor for C. difficile and/or vice versa. This report also stresses the need to perform a complete diagnostic workup in all cases of foal digestive disease. PMID:22177970

  7. Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin: Action, Genetics, and Translational Applications.

    PubMed

    Freedman, John C; Shrestha, Archana; McClane, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) is responsible for causing the gastrointestinal symptoms of several C. perfringens food- and nonfood-borne human gastrointestinal diseases. The enterotoxin gene (cpe) is located on either the chromosome (for most C. perfringens type A food poisoning strains) or large conjugative plasmids (for the remaining type A food poisoning and most, if not all, other CPE-producing strains). In all CPE-positive strains, the cpe gene is strongly associated with insertion sequences that may help to assist its mobilization and spread. During disease, CPE is produced when C. perfringens sporulates in the intestines, a process involving several sporulation-specific alternative sigma factors. The action of CPE starts with its binding to claudin receptors to form a small complex; those small complexes then oligomerize to create a hexameric prepore on the membrane surface. Beta hairpin loops from the CPE molecules in the prepore assemble into a beta barrel that inserts into the membrane to form an active pore that enhances calcium influx, causing cell death. This cell death results in intestinal damage that causes fluid and electrolyte loss. CPE is now being explored for translational applications including cancer therapy/diagnosis, drug delivery, and vaccination. PMID:26999202

  8. Beneficial effect of catalase treatment on growth of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Harmon, S M; Kautter, D A

    1976-09-01

    Several common plating media were tested for their ability to support growth of Clostridium perfringens after storage of the plates for 1 to 10 days at 4 and 25 degrees C with and without subsequent addition of catalase. Liver-veal (LV) agar and brain heart infusion (BHI) agar quickly become incapable of supporting growth after storage without added catalase, whereas Shahidi Ferguson perfringens (SFP) agar and Brewer anaerobic (BA) agar were less affected. Plate counts of C. perfringens on untreated LV and BHI agars stored 3 days at 25 degrees C showed a reduction of 98.2%, whereas counts on SFP and BA agars were reduced by 13.6% and 46.2%, respectively. Addition of 1,500 U of beef liver catalase to the surface of the 3-day-old agars before incubation resulted in substantial restoration of their growth-promoting ability. Counts of colonies on LV, GHI, SFP, and BA agars with added catalase were usually 20 to 90% higher than untreated controls. Similar results were obtained using purified catalase, fungal catalase, and horseradish peroxidase. These results suggest that inhibition may be due to peroxide formed during storage and incubation and that additon of catalase provides near optimum conditions for growth of C. perfringens on these media. PMID:185958

  9. Lytic enzyme discovery through multigenomic sequence analysis in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Ossiprandi, Maria Cristina; Rumah, Kareem R.; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2013-01-01

    With their ability to lyse Gram-positive bacteria, phage lytic enzymes (or lysins) have received a great deal of attention as novel anti-infective agents. The number of known genes encoding these peptidoglycan hydrolases has increased markedly in recent years, due in large part to advances in DNA sequencing technology. As the genomes of more and more bacterial species/strains are sequenced, lysin-encoding open reading frames (ORFs) can be readily identified in lysogenized prophage regions. In the current study, we sought to assess lysin diversity for the medically relevant pathogen Clostridium perfringens. The sequenced genomes of nine C. perfringens strains were computationally mined for prophage lysins and lysin-like ORFs, revealing several dozen proteins of various enzymatic classes. Of these lysins, a muramidase from strain ATCC 13124 (termed PlyCM) was chosen for recombinant analysis based on its dissimilarity to previously characterized C. perfringens lysins. Following expression and purification, various biochemical properties of PlyCM were determined in vitro, including pH/salt-dependence and temperature stability. The enzyme exhibited activity at low µg/ml concentrations, a typical value for phage lysins. It was active against 23 of 24 strains of C. perfringens tested, with virtually no activity against other clostridial or nonclostridial species. Overall, PlyCM shows potential for development as an enzybiotic agent, demonstrating how expanding genomic databases can serve as rich pools for biotechnologically relevant proteins. PMID:21085950

  10. Intestinal Strangulation in Clostridium perfringens-Monocontaminated Rats.

    PubMed

    Yale, C E; Balish, E

    1971-03-01

    Ischemic and hemorrhagic strangulation of closed intestinal segments was studied in germ-free rats individually contaminated with one of seven separate strains of Clostridium perfringens type A. The principal findings were that (i) the monocontaminated rats with ischemic or hemorrhagic intestinal strangulation died at the same rapid rate; (ii) intraintestinal blood did not augment the action of C. perfringens in the presence of ischemic strangulation; (iii) although some strains were more toxic than others, several food-poisoning strains were as rapidly fatal as the classical strains; and (iv) the massive amounts of gas produced by some of these strains probably led to the early rupture of the closed segments and rapid death of the animals. The secondary findings were that (i) the injection of C. perfringens into the lumen of the distal small intestine of the germ-free rat produced the typical lesions of pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis; and (ii) most of the strains of C. perfringens established themselves throughout the gastrointestinal tract of the unoperated germ-free rat. PMID:16557999

  11. Pathology of Clostridium perfringens type C enterotoxemia in horses.

    PubMed

    Diab, S S; Kinde, H; Moore, J; Shahriar, M F; Odani, J; Anthenill, L; Songer, G; Uzal, F A

    2012-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C is an important cause of enteritis and enterocolitis in foals and occasionally in adult horses. The disease is a classic enterotoxemia, and the enteric lesions and systemic effects are caused primarily by beta toxin, 1 of 2 major toxins produced by C. perfringens type C. Until now, only sporadic cases of C. perfringens type C equine enterotoxemia have been reported. We present a comprehensive description of the lesions in 8 confirmed cases of type C enterotoxemia in foals and adult horses. Grossly, multifocal to segmental hemorrhage and thickening of the intestinal wall were most common in the small intestine, although the colon and cecum were also frequently affected. All horses had variable amounts of fluid, often hemorrhagic intestinal contents. The most characteristic microscopic lesion was necrotizing or necrohemorrhagic enteritis, with mucosal and/or submucosal thrombosis. Numerous gram-positive rods were occasionally seen in affected mucosa. A definitive diagnosis of C. perfringens type C enterotoxemia in all 8 cases was based on the clinical history, gross and histologic lesions, and detection of the beta toxin in intestinal contents. PMID:21502373

  12. Experimental Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxemia in goats.

    PubMed

    Uzal, F A; Kelly, W R

    1998-03-01

    The effects of intraduodenal administration of Clostridium perfringens cultures and culture products in goats were evaluated to develop a reliable experimental model of enterotoxemia in this species. Five conventionally reared, 11-16-week-old Angora goat kids were dosed intraduodenally with whole cultures of C. perfringens type D; five similar animals were dosed with C. perfringens type D filtered culture supernatant; and a third group of five kids was dosed with C. perfringens type D washed cells. Two kids were used as controls and received sterile, nontoxic culture medium intraduodenally. All animals received starch solution into the abomasum. All five kids inoculated with whole culture and three of five dosed with culture supernatant and with washed cells developed central nervous system signs. Diarrhea was observed in two of five kids inoculated with whole culture, in all five of those dosed with culture supernatant, and in three of five of those that received washed cells. The most striking postmortem findings consisted of lung edema, necrotizing pseudomembranous colitis, and cerebral vasogenic edema. The protocol thus provided a reasonable model of naturally occurring enterotoxemia in goats, producing a range of clinical signs and postmortem changes similar to those observed in the natural disease. PMID:9539367

  13. Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin: Action, Genetics, and Translational Applications

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John C.; Shrestha, Archana; McClane, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) is responsible for causing the gastrointestinal symptoms of several C. perfringens food- and nonfood-borne human gastrointestinal diseases. The enterotoxin gene (cpe) is located on either the chromosome (for most C. perfringens type A food poisoning strains) or large conjugative plasmids (for the remaining type A food poisoning and most, if not all, other CPE-producing strains). In all CPE-positive strains, the cpe gene is strongly associated with insertion sequences that may help to assist its mobilization and spread. During disease, CPE is produced when C. perfringens sporulates in the intestines, a process involving several sporulation-specific alternative sigma factors. The action of CPE starts with its binding to claudin receptors to form a small complex; those small complexes then oligomerize to create a hexameric prepore on the membrane surface. Beta hairpin loops from the CPE molecules in the prepore assemble into a beta barrel that inserts into the membrane to form an active pore that enhances calcium influx, causing cell death. This cell death results in intestinal damage that causes fluid and electrolyte loss. CPE is now being explored for translational applications including cancer therapy/diagnosis, drug delivery, and vaccination. PMID:26999202

  14. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase of C. perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium-related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by react...

  15. Recent Insights into Clostridium perfringens Beta-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Ochi, Sadayuki; Oda, Masataka; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Takehara, Masaya; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens beta-toxin is a key mediator of necrotizing enterocolitis and enterotoxemia. It is a pore-forming toxin (PFT) that exerts cytotoxic effect. Experimental investigation using piglet and rabbit intestinal loop models and a mouse infection model apparently showed that beta-toxin is the important pathogenic factor of the organisms. The toxin caused the swelling and disruption of HL-60 cells and formed a functional pore in the lipid raft microdomains of sensitive cells. These findings represent significant progress in the characterization of the toxin with knowledge on its biological features, mechanism of action and structure-function having been accumulated. Our aims here are to review the current progresses in our comprehension of the virulence of C. perfringens type C and the character, biological feature and structure-function of beta-toxin. PMID:25654787

  16. [Massive intravascular hemolysis secondary to sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens].

    PubMed

    Pita Zapata, E; Sarmiento Penide, A; Bautista Guillén, A; González Cabano, M; Agulla Budiño, J A; Camba Rodríguez, M A

    2010-05-01

    Massive hemolysis secondary to sepsis caused by Clostridium perfringens is a rare entity but appears fairly often in the literature. In nearly all published reports, the clinical course is rapid and fatal. We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman with diabetes who was admitted with symptoms consistent with acute cholecystitis. Deteriorating hemodynamics and laboratory findings were consistent with intravascular hemolysis, coagulation disorder, and renal failure. Gram-positive bacilli of the Clostridium species were detected in blood along with worsening indicators of hemolysis. In spite of antibiotic and surgical treatment, hemodynamic support and infusion of blood products, the patient continued to decline and died in the postoperative recovery unit 14 hours after admission. Mortality ranges from 70% to 100% in sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens, and risk of death is greater if massive hemolysis is present, as in the case we report. Only a high degree of clinical suspicion leading to early diagnosis and treatment can improve the prognosis. This bacterium should therefore be considered whenever severe sepsis and hemolysis coincide. PMID:20527348

  17. Presence and molecular characterization of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens in intestinal compartments of healthy horses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens are commonly associated with colitis in equids, but healthy carriers exist. Scarce information is available on the prevalence of Clostridium spp. in gastrointestinal compartments other than faeces in healthy horses, and it is unknown whether faecal samples are representative of proximal compartments. The objectives were to investigate the prevalence of C. difficile and C. perfringens in different intestinal compartments of healthy adult horses and to determine whether faecal samples are representative of colonization in proximal sites and overall carrier status. Results Toxigenic C. difficile was isolated from 14/135 (10.3%) samples from 8/15 (53.3%) horses. Between zero and three sites were positive per horse, and multiple sites were positive in four horses. Isolates were recovered from duodenum, jejunum, ileum, right dorsal colon, small colon and rectum. When multiple compartments were positive in a single horse, two different C. difficile ribotypes were always present. Clostridium perfringens Type A (CPE, β2 toxin gene negative) was recovered from the left ventral colon of one horse (0.74%, 1/135 samples). Agreement between faeces and overall C. difficile carrier status was good. Conclusions Clostridium difficile can be found in different compartments of the gastrointestinal tract of healthy horses, and multiple strains can be present in an individual horse. The prevalence of C. perfringens in healthy adult hoses was low, consistent with previous reports. Faecal samples were representative for presence of C. difficile in proximal compartments in 5/8 horses (63%) but were not representative for the specific strain. PMID:22748233

  18. Clostridium perfringens Type E Virulence Traits Involved in Gut Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Leandro M.; Carrasco, Juan M. Díaz; Redondo, Enzo A.; Delgado, Fernando; Miyakawa, Mariano E. Fernández

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type E disease in ruminants has been characterized by hemorrhagic enteritis or sudden death. Although type E isolates are defined by the production of alpha and iota toxin, little is known about the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type E infections. Thus far, the role of iota toxin as a virulence factor is unknown. In this report, iota toxin showed positive effects on adherence and colonization of C. perfringens type E while having negative effect on the adherence of type A cells. In-vitro and in-vivo models suggest that toxinotype E would be particularly adapted to exploit the changes induced by iota toxin in the surface of epithelial cells. In addition, type E strains produce metabolites that affected the growth of potential intra-specific competitors. These results suggest that the alteration of the enterocyte morphology induced by iota toxin concomitantly with the specific increase of type E cell adhesion and the strong intra-specific growth inhibition of other strains could be competitive traits inherent to type E isolates that improve its fitness within the bovine gut environment. PMID:25799452

  19. Effect of cooling on Clostridium perfringens in pea soup.

    PubMed

    de Jong, A E I; Rombouts, F M; Beumer, R R

    2004-02-01

    Foods associated with Clostridium perfringens outbreaks are usually abused after cooking. Because of their short generation times, C. perfringens spores and cells can grow out to high levels during improper cooling. Therefore, the potential of C. perfringens to multiply in Dutch pea soup during different cooling times was investigated. Tubes of preheated pea soup (50 degrees C) were inoculated with cocktails of cells or heat-activated spores of this pathogen. The tubes were linearly cooled to 15 degrees C in time spans of 3, 5, 7.5, and 10 h and were subsequently stored in a refrigerator at 3 or 7 degrees C for up to 84 h. Cell numbers increased by 1-log cycle during the 3-h cooling period and reached their maximum after 10 h of cooling. Subsequent refrigeration hardly reduced cell numbers. Cooling of 3.75 liters of pea soup in an open pan showed that this amount of pea soup cooled from 50 to 15 degrees C in 5 h, which will allow a more than 10-fold increase in cell numbers. These findings emphasize the need of good hygienic practices and quick cooling of heated foods after preparation. PMID:14968969

  20. Molecular typing and epidemiological survey of prevalence of Clostridium perfringens types by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, H S; Lee, S U; Park, K Y; Park, Y H

    1997-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens has been classified into five toxigenic types (A through E) on the basis of its capability to produce major lethal toxins (alpha, beta, epsilon, and iota toxins). Seroneutralization with mice or guinea pigs has been used to type each toxin, but this conventional method has some disadvantages. Therefore, we used a molecular biological technique to type the bacterium in the present study. A multiplex PCR was developed for this purpose. This method has several advantages in comparison with seroneutralization with mice or guinea pigs. By this method, we also investigated the most prevalent type(s) of the organism in Korean calves, piglets, and chickens showing clinical symptoms such as diarrhea, enterotoxemia, and necrotic enteritis. Only type A was isolated from calves and chickens, while type C (2 of 14 isolates), in addition to type A, was isolated from piglets. These results suggested that seroneutralization could be replaced by our new method and that type A of C. perfringens is the most prevalent type in livestock in Korea. PMID:8968913

  1. EFFECT OF OZONE STRESS ON CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS VIABILITY FOLLOWING THE AQUEOUS TREATMENT OF BEEF SURFACES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antimicrobial efficacy of ozone on the food-borne pathogen, Clostridium perfringens, was evaluated on London Broil top round cut beef surfaces using an aqueous wash system. Current food processing methods do not assure elimination of spores of C. perfringens, thus there is a high likelihood of ...

  2. THE GENOME SEQUENCE OF BACTERIOPHAGE CpV1 LYTIC FOR CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of bacteriophages and their lytic enzymes to control Clostri-dium perfringens is one potential approach to reduce the pathogen on poultry farms and in poultry-processing facilities. We have established a collection of 30 bacteriophages lytic for C. perfringens. These were isolated from s...

  3. Comparison of two bacteriophage derived enzymes that lyse strains of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming bacterium that is the third leading cause of food-borne bacterial disease among humans while in chickens C. perfringens is the presumptive etiology of necrotic enteritis. Although the organism can be controlled by antibiotics, there ...

  4. Incidence and tracking of Clostridium perfringens through an integrated broiler chicken operation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens has been shown to be widespread in the broiler chicken hatchery, grow-out, and processing operations. In a previous study, ribotypes of certain strains of C. perfringens isolated from processed chicken carcasses were shown to match ribotypes isolated from paper pad lining tra...

  5. The Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage CPV1 Virulent for Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of bacteriophages and their lytic enzymes to control Clostridium perfringens is one potential approach to reduce the pathogen on poultry farms and in poultry-processing facilities. Bacteriophages lytic for C. perfringens were isolated from sewage, feces and broiler intestinal contents. P...

  6. Potential for growth of Clostridium perfringens from spores in pork scrapple during cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted stabilization studies to determine the ability of Clostridium perfringens spores to germinate and grow during exponential cooling of a commercial formulation of pork scrapple. Scrapple was inoculated with a mixture of three strains of C. perfringens spores (NTCC 8238, NCTC 8239, and AT...

  7. Clostridium perfringens in Long Island Sound sediments: An urban sedimentary record

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchholtz ten Brink, M. R.; Mecray, E.L.; Galvin, E.L.

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a conservative tracer and an indicator of sewage-derived pollution in the marine environment. The distribution of Clostridium perfringens spores was measured in sediments from Long Island Sound, USA, as part of a regional study designed to: (1) map the distribution of contaminated sediments; (2) determine transport and dispersal paths; (3) identify the locations of sediment and contaminant focusing; and (4) constrain predictive models. In 1996, sediment cores were collected at 58 stations, and surface sediments were collected at 219 locations throughout the Sound. Elevated concentrations of Clostridium perfringens in the sediments indicate that sewage pollution is present throughout Long Island Sound and has persisted for more than a century. Concentrations range from undetectable amounts to 15,000 spores/g dry sediment and are above background levels in the upper 30 cm at nearly all core locations. Sediment focusing strongly impacts the accumulation of Clostridium perfringens spores. Inventories in the cores range from 28 to 70,000 spores/cm2, and elevated concentrations can extend to depths of 50 cm. The steep gradients in Clostridium perfringens profiles in muddier cores contrast with concentrations that are generally constant with depth in sandier cores. Clostridium perfringens concentrations rarely decrease in the uppermost sediment, unlike those reported for metal contaminants. Concentrations in surface sediments are highest in the western end of the Sound, very low in the eastern region, and intermediate in the central part. This pattern reflects winnowing and focusing of Clostridium perfringens spores and fine-grained sediment by the hydrodynamic regime; however, the proximity of sewage sources to the westernmost Sound locally enhances the Clostridium perfringens signals.

  8. Characterization of toxin plasmids in Clostridium perfringens type C isolates.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Abhijit; Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A

    2010-11-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C isolates cause enteritis necroticans in humans or necrotizing enteritis and enterotoxemia in domestic animals. Type C isolates always produce alpha toxin and beta toxin but often produce additional toxins, e.g., beta2 toxin or enterotoxin. Since plasmid carriage of toxin-encoding genes has not been systematically investigated for type C isolates, the current study used Southern blot hybridization of pulsed-field gels to test whether several toxin genes are plasmid borne among a collection of type C isolates. Those analyses revealed that the surveyed type C isolates carry their beta toxin-encoding gene (cpb) on plasmids ranging in size from ∼65 to ∼110 kb. When present in these type C isolates, the beta2 toxin gene localized to plasmids distinct from the cpb plasmid. However, some enterotoxin-positive type C isolates appeared to carry their enterotoxin-encoding cpe gene on a cpb plasmid. The tpeL gene encoding the large clostridial cytotoxin was localized to the cpb plasmids of some cpe-negative type C isolates. The cpb plasmids in most surveyed isolates were found to carry both IS1151 sequences and the tcp genes, which can mediate conjugative C. perfringens plasmid transfer. A dcm gene, which is often present near C. perfringens plasmid-borne toxin genes, was identified upstream of the cpb gene in many type C isolates. Overlapping PCR analyses suggested that the toxin-encoding plasmids of the surveyed type C isolates differ from the cpe plasmids of type A isolates. These findings provide new insight into plasmids of proven or potential importance for type C virulence. PMID:20823204

  9. Cytology of Spore Formation in Clostridium perfringens1

    PubMed Central

    Hoeniger, Judith F. M.; Stuart, Philip F.; Holt, Stanley C.

    1968-01-01

    The sequential morphological events in spore formation by Clostridium perfringens type D were observed in Ellner's medium where 80 to 100% of the cells formed spores. Gross structural changes were studied with the light microscope under phase-contrast, and in fixed cells by the use of both nigrosin and Giemsa preparations. Fine structure was examined with the electron microscope in both thin sections and frozen-etched preparations. During the first 3 hr of incubation, the original rod-shaped cells became ellipsoid to ovoid in shape; by 5 to 6 hr, subterminal spores had developed within these enlarged cells. The fine structural sequence was in most respects identical to that in other Bacillaceae, although some stages were illustrated with particular clarity. A unique feature was the development of a convoluted, membranous exosporium which adhered to the outer surface of the two coats and had an unusual fine structure resembling a rectangular array of subunits. Images PMID:4302300

  10. The physiological function of nitrate reduction in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S M; Hall, J B

    1975-03-01

    Fermentation-balance studies have been carried out on Clostridium perfringens grown in the presence and absence of nitrate in the medium. Nitrate is able to serve as an electron acceptor for these bacteria, permitting increased growth yields over those obtained in its absence. This increase is due to an increase in the proportion of metabolite molecules which can participate in substrate-level phosphorylation reactions when an inorganic acceptor is available. The nitrate reduction can be regarded as a primitive form of anaerobic respiration in these bacteria, since it is clearly coupled to their energy metabolism and is not assimilative in function. We believe that the existence of this kind of energy metabolism in these bacteria has significant evolutionary implications. PMID:166143

  11. Rabbit Ileal Loop Response to Strains of Clostridium perfringens1

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Charles L.; Sugiyama, H.; Strong, Dorothy H.

    1968-01-01

    The ligated loop of the rabbit intestine was investigated as a possible experimental model for the study of Clostridium perfringens food poisoning. The method of preparation of the challenge inoculum was important in determining whether a given strain would provoke a response. When cultures were grown for 4 hr at 37 C in Skim Milk (Difco), 14 of 29 type A strains isolated from food-poisoning outbreaks consistently produced exudation of fluid and consequent dilation of the ileal segments. In contrast, 15 of the 18 strains derived from other sources failed to elicit a response. By use of different inoculum preparations, nearly all strains could be made to give at least an occasional positive loop reaction. Diarrhea was not obtained in rabbits by intraluminal injection into the normal ileum or by per os administration of the cultures. Lecithinase, purified and in concentrated culture supernatant fractions, failed to produce a response in the isolated ileal loops. Images PMID:4297020

  12. Effect of tannins on the in vitro growth of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Elizondo, Ana M; Mercado, Elsa C; Rabinovitz, Bettina C; Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2010-10-26

    Vegetable tannins are water-soluble polyphenolic compounds of varying molecular weights that occur abundantly in nature. The diet of many free-ranging wild animals contains significant amounts of tannins. Also, commercial tannins are used in animal industry as food additives to improve animal performance. In order to further determine the capacity of tannins to inhibit the development of intestinal diseases produced by Clostridium pefringens, we evaluated here the effect of tannins from quebracho, chestnut or combinations of both on C. perfringens and their toxins. The C. perfringens (types A, B, C, D and E) growth obtained from the intestine of healthy and diseased animals was reduced in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of quebracho tannins, chestnut tannins, combinations of both or a commercial formula based in these tannins. Although the minimal inhibitory concentration of both tannins varied between isolates, no statistically significant differences were observed between isolates from healthy or sick animals. Comparative analysis showed that the concentrations of quebracho tannin inhibiting the growth of C. perfringens were higher than chestnut tannin. In fact, antibacterial effect of quebracho tannin was increased up to 20 times with the addition of 25% of chestnut tannin and 85 times with 75% of chestnut tannin. Antibacterial activity of the commercial product was up to ~50 times higher than quebracho tannin alone. Quebracho tannin showed partial bactericidal activity, whereas chestnut tannin activity was stronger. Both tannins were able to reduce the alpha toxin lecithinase activity and epsilon toxin cytotoxicity in MDCK cells. These results suggest that tannin-supplemented diet could be useful to prevent some clostridial diseases. PMID:20471759

  13. Structural Basis of Clostridium perfringens Toxin Complex Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Adams,J.; Gregg, K.; Bayer, E.; Boraston, A.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    The virulent properties of the common human and livestock pathogen Clostridium perfringens are attributable to a formidable battery of toxins. Among these are a number of large and highly modular carbohydrate-active enzymes, including the {mu}-toxin and sialidases, whose catalytic properties are consistent with degradation of the mucosal layer of the human gut, glycosaminoglycans, and other cellular glycans found throughout the body. The conservation of noncatalytic ancillary modules among these enzymes suggests they make significant contributions to the overall functionality of the toxins. Here, we describe the structural basis of an ultra-tight interaction (Ka = 1.44 x 1011 M-1) between the X82 and dockerin modules, which are found throughout numerous C. perfringens carbohydrate-active enzymes. Extensive hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals contacts between the X82 and dockerin modules give rise to the observed high affinity. The {mu}-toxin dockerin module in this complex is positioned {approx}180 relative to the orientation of the dockerin modules on the cohesin module surface within cellulolytic complexes. These observations represent a unique property of these clostridial toxins whereby they can associate into large, noncovalent multitoxin complexes that allow potentiation of the activities of the individual toxins by combining complementary toxin specificities.

  14. Clostridium perfringens Delta-Toxin Induces Rapid Cell Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Seike, Soshi; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Takehara, Masaya; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens delta-toxin is a β-pore-forming toxin and a putative pathogenic agent of C. perfringens types B and C. However, the mechanism of cytotoxicity of delta-toxin remains unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of cell death induced by delta-toxin in five cell lines (A549, A431, MDCK, Vero, and Caco-2). All cell lines were susceptible to delta-toxin. The toxin caused rapid ATP depletion and swelling of the cells. Delta-toxin bound and formed oligomers predominantly in plasma membrane lipid rafts. Destruction of the lipid rafts with methyl β-cyclodextrin inhibited delta-toxin-induced cytotoxicity and ATP depletion. Delta-toxin caused the release of carboxyfluorescein from sphingomyelin-cholesterol liposomes and formed oligomers; toxin binding to the liposomes declined with decreasing cholesterol content in the liposomes. Flow cytometric assays with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that delta-toxin treatment induced an elevation in the population of annexin V-negative and propidium iodide-positive cells. Delta-toxin did not cause the fragmentation of DNA or caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, delta-toxin caused damage to mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytochrome c release. In the present study, we demonstrate that delta-toxin produces cytotoxic activity through necrosis. PMID:26807591

  15. Membrane-Binding Mechanism of Clostridium perfringens Alpha-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Masataka; Terao, Yutaka; Sakurai, Jun; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin is a key mediator of gas gangrene, which is a life-threatening infection that manifests as fever, pain, edema, myonecrosis, and gas production. Alpha-toxin possesses phospholipase C and sphingomyelinase activities. The toxin is composed of an N-terminal domain (1–250 aa, N-domain), which is the catalytic site, and a C-terminal domain (251–370 aa, C-domain), which is the membrane-binding site. Immunization of mice with the C-domain of alpha-toxin prevents the gas gangrene caused by C. perfringens, whereas immunization with the N-domain has no effect. The central loop domain (55–93 aa), especially H….SW84Y85….G, plays an important role in the interaction with ganglioside GM1a. The toxin binds to lipid rafts in the presence of a GM1a/TrkA complex, and metabolites from phosphatidylcholine to diacylglycerol through the enzymatic activity of alpha-toxin itself. These membrane dynamics leads to the activation of endogenous PLCγ-1 via TrkA. In addition, treatment with alpha-toxin leads to the formation of diacylglycerol at membrane rafts in ganglioside-deficient DonQ cells; this in turn triggers endocytosis and cell death. This article summarizes the current the membrane-binding mechanism of alpha-toxin in detail. PMID:26633512

  16. Enumeration of Fecal Clostridium perfringens Spores in Egg Yolk-Free Tryptose-Sulfite-Cycloserine Agar

    PubMed Central

    Hauschild, A. H. W.; Hilsheimer, R.; Griffith, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    The Shahidi-Ferguson perfringens, tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine (TSC), and egg yolk-free TSC agars have been tested for their suitability to enumerate fecal spores of Clostridium perfringens. When these spores comprised at least 20% of the total anaerobe spores, equally accurate counts were obtained in the three media. With lower ratios of C. perfringens spores, the most accurate counts were obtained in egg yolk-free TSC agar. The median C. perfringens spore count of 60 normal fecal specimens was log 3.4/g. A nonmotile, sulfite- and nitrate-reducing Clostridium, not identifiable with any known clostridial species, was isolated from 14 out of 60 fecal specimans. It was not differentiated from C. perfringens in the nitrite motility test, but could be distinguished by its inability to liquefy gelatin. PMID:4363369

  17. Enumeration and Isolation of cpe-Positive Clostridium perfringens Spores from Feces

    PubMed Central

    Heikinheimo, Annamari; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2004-01-01

    A hydrophobic grid membrane filter-colony hybridization (HGMF-CH) method for the enumeration and isolation of cpe gene-carrying (cpe-positive) Clostridium perfringens spores from feces was developed. A 425-bp DNA probe specific for the cpe gene was sensitive and specific when tested with bacterial DNA and pure cultures. The enumeration of cpe-positive C. perfringens by the HGMF-CH method proved to be as sensitive as nested PCR combined with the most-probable number technique when tested with fecal samples from healthy individuals. With the aid of the HGMF-CH method, positive hybridization signals were detected from two out of seven fecal samples obtained from healthy individuals. Furthermore, cpe-positive C. perfringens was successfully isolated from both of these samples. The detection of cpe-positive C. perfringens by the HGMF-CH method is dependent on the ratio of cpe-positive C. perfringens colonies to total C. perfringens colonies growing on the HGMF-tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine plate. cpe-positive C. perfringens could be isolated if the ratio of cpe-positive C. perfringens spores to total C. perfringens spores was 6 × 10−5 or higher. The HGMF-CH method provides an aid in the investigation of fecal samples of patients suffering from food poisoning or other diseases caused by cpe-positive C. perfringens. The method also offers a new approach in the investigation of the epidemiology of cpe-positive C. perfringens strains. PMID:15364981

  18. Clostridium Perfringens Infection in a Febrile Patient with Severe Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hashiba, Masamitsu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Tomonori; Kano, Hideki; Tsuda, Masanobu; Takeyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) can cause various infections, including gas gangrene, crepitant cellulitis, and fasciitis. While C. perfringens sepsis is uncommon, it is often rapidly fatal because the alpha toxin of this bacterium induces massive intravascular hemolysis by disrupting red blood cell membranes. CASE REPORT We present the case of a male patient with diabetes who developed a fatal liver abscess with massive intravascular hemolysis and septic shock caused by toxigenic C. perfringens. The peripheral blood smear showed loss of central pallor, with numerous spherocytes. Multiplex PCR only detected expression of the cpa gene, indicating that the pathogen was C. perfringens type A. CONCLUSIONS C. perfringens infection should be considered in a febrile patient who has severe hemolytic anemia with a very low MCV, hemolyzed blood sample, and negative Coombs test. The characteristic peripheral blood smear findings may facilitate rapid diagnosis. PMID:27049736

  19. Evaluation of CP Chromo Select Agar for the enumeration of Clostridium perfringens from water.

    PubMed

    Manafi, Mammad; Waldherr, Kerstin; Kundi, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The European Directive on drinking water quality has included mCP agar as the reference method for recovering Clostridium perfringens from drinking waters. In the present study, three media (mCP, TSCF and CP Chromo Select Agar) were evaluated for recovery of C. perfringens in different surface water samples. Out of 139 water samples, using a membrane filtration technique, 131 samples (94.2%) were found to be presumptively positive for C. perfringens in at least one of the culture media. Green colored colonies on CP Chromo Select Agar (CCP agar) were counted as presumptive C. perfringens isolates. Out of 483 green colonies on CCP agar, 96.3% (465 strains, indole negative) were identified as C. perfringens, and 15 strains (3.1%) were indole positive and were identified as Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium bifermentans or Clostridium tetani. Only 3 strains (0.6%) gave false positive results and were identified as Clostridium fallax, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tertium. Variance analysis of the data obtained shows statistically no significant differences in the counts obtained between media employed in this work. The mCP method is very onerous for routine screening and bacterial colonies could not be used for further biochemical testing. The colonies on CCP and TSCF were easy to count and subculture for confirmation tests. TSCF detects sulfite-reducing clostridia, including species other than C. perfringens, and in some cases excessive blackening of the agar frustrated counting of the colonies. If the contamination was too high, TSCF did not consistently produce black colonies and as a consequence, the colonies were white and gave false negative results. On the other hand, the identification of typical and atypical colonies isolated from all media demonstrated that CCP agar was the most useful medium for C. perfringens recovery in water samples. PMID:23816139

  20. Four Foodborne Disease Outbreaks Caused by a New Type of Enterotoxin-Producing Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Kaoru; Obata, Hiromi; Yokoyama, Keiko; Konishi, Noriko; Itoh, Takeshi; Kai, Akemi

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiological and bacteriological investigations on four foodborne outbreaks caused by a new type of enterotoxin-producing Clostridium perfringens are described. C. perfringens isolated from patients of these outbreaks did not produce any known enterotoxin and did not carry the C. perfringens enterotoxin gene. However, the culture filtrates of these isolates induced the accumulation of fluid in rabbit ileal loop tests. The molecular weight of the new enterotoxin may be between 50,000 and 100,000, although the known C. perfringens enterotoxin is ca. 35,000. This new enterotoxin was heat labile, and its biological activities were inactivated by heating for 5 min at 60°C. The new enterotoxin was sensitive to pH values higher than 11.0 and protease treatment but was resistant to trypsin treatment. These results suggest that the new enterotoxin may be a protein. Although C. perfringens enterotoxin induced morphological changes in Vero cells, the changes induced by the new enterotoxin differed from those by the known C. perfringens enterotoxin. The new enterotoxin also induced morphological changes in L929 cells, whereas the known C. perfringens enterotoxin did not, because L929 cells lacked an appropriate enterotoxin receptor. Although C. perfringens enterotoxin is recognized as the only diarrheagenic toxin responsible for C. perfringens foodborne outbreaks, the results of the present study indicate that C. perfringens isolated from these four outbreaks produced a new type of enterotoxin. PMID:25568432

  1. Detection and Toxin Typing of Clostridium perfringens in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Samples by PCR?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Josephine; Zhang, Wandi; Xie, Boxun; Wu, Maoxin; Tong, Xiaodi; Kalpoe, Jayant; Zhang, David

    2009-01-01

    Since current microbiology methods are not suitable to detect Clostridium perfringens in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples, we developed a PCR assay to detect toxin-encoding genes and the 16S rRNA gene of C. perfringens. We successfully detected and genotyped C. perfringens in tissue sections from two autopsy cases. PMID:19109478

  2. Genotyping of Clostridium perfringens isolated from broiler meat in northeastern of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Afshari, Asma; Jamshidi, Abdollah; Razmyar, Jamshid; Rad, Mehrnaz

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is an important cause of bacterial food poisoning worldwide. The disease is caused by C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) encoded by cpe gene. The aim of this research was to identify the different types of C. perfringens and the presence of cpe gene in isolated bacteria from broilers’ meat marketed in retail meat shops of Mashhad city in Northeastern of Iran. After isolation of C. perfringens using conventional culture method and confirmation by specific 16S rDNA gene, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay with specific primers, were performed for toxin typing of isolates. Clostridium perfringens was isolated from 31 broilers’ meat samples (15.50%) out of 200 samples and for toxin typing the results showed 9 isolates as type A (29.03%) and 22 isolates as type C (70.96%). In this study, cpe-positive C. perfringens were detected in eight isolates of type C (25.00%). Our results indicated that C. perfringens type C is the most common type in broiler chicken carcasses. PMID:26973762

  3. Clostridium perfringens type A netF and netE positive and Clostridium difficile co-infection in two adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Amanda Nádia; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Oliveira Junior, Carlos Augusto; Pierezan, Felipe; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to report two cases of Clostridium perfringens type A and Clostridium difficile co-infection in adult dogs. Both animals were positive for A/B toxin. Toxigenic C. difficile and C. perfringens type A positive for NetE and NetF-encoding genes were isolated. This report reinforces the necessity of studying a possible synergism of C. difficile and C. perfringens in enteric disorders. PMID:26762654

  4. Partial purification and properties of phosphatidylserine synthase from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed Central

    Cousminer, J J; Fischl, A S; Carman, G M

    1982-01-01

    The membrane-associated phospholipid biosynthetic enzyme cytidine 5'-diphospho-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase (phosphatidylserine synthase; EC 2.7.8.8) was partially purified 337-fold from a cell-free extract of the gram-positive pathogenic anaerobe Clostridium perfringens (ATCC 3624). The purification procedure included extraction from the cell envelope with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100, followed by affinity chromatography on cytidine 5'-diphosphate-diacylglycerol-Sepharose. When the partially purified enzyme was subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate, two major bands were evident with apparent minimum molecular weights of 39,000 and 31,000. Activity of phosphatidylserine synthase was dependent on the addition of manganese ions (3 mM) and Triton X-100 (2.7 mM) for maximum activity. The rate of catalysis was maximal at 40 degrees C (with rapid thermal inactivation above this temperature), and the pH optimum was 8.5. The apparent Km values for cytidine 5'-diphosphate-diacylglycerol and L-serine were 0.24 and 0.26 mM, respectively. The synthetic (forward) reaction was favored, as indicated by an equilibrium constant of 82, and the energy of activation was found to be 18 kcal/mol (75,362 J/mol). Images PMID:6286597

  5. Sporulation and Enterotoxin Production by Mutants of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Charles L.; Strong, Dorothy H.; Sebald, Madeleine

    1972-01-01

    The ability of Clostridium perfringens type A to produce an enterotoxin active in human food poisoning has been shown to be directly related to the ability of the organism to sporulate. Enterotoxin was produced only in a sporulation medium and not in a growth medium in which sporulation was repressed. Mutants with an altered ability to sporulate were isolated from an sp+ ent+ strain either as spontaneous mutants or after mutagenesis with acridine orange or nitrosoguanidine. All sp0− mutants were ent−. Except for one isolate, these mutants were not disturbed in other toxic functions characteristic of the wild type and unrelated to sporulation. A total of four of seven osp0 mutants retained the ability to produce detectable levels of enterotoxin. None of the ent− mutants produced gene products serologically homologous to enterotoxin. A total of three sp− mutants, blocked at intermediate stages of sporulation, produced enterotoxin. Of these mutants, one was blocked at stage III, one probably at late stage IV, and one probably at stage V. A total of three sp+ revertants isolated from an sp− ent− mutant regained not only the ability to sporulate but also the ability to produce enterotoxin. The enterotoxin appears to be a sporulation-specific gene product; however, the function of the enterotoxin in sporulation is unknown. Images PMID:4336110

  6. Mechanistic Investigations of Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens*

    PubMed Central

    Jongkees, Seino A. K.; Yoo, Hayoung; Withers, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to probe the details of the hydration-initiated hydrolysis catalyzed by the Clostridium perfringens unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase of glycoside hydrolase family 88 in the CAZy classification system. Direct 1H NMR monitoring of the enzymatic reaction detected no accumulated reaction intermediates in solution, suggesting that rearrangement of the initial hydration product occurs on-enzyme. An attempt at mechanism-based trapping of on-enzyme intermediates using a 1,1-difluoro-substrate was unsuccessful because the probe was too deactivated to be turned over by the enzyme. Kinetic isotope effects arising from deuterium-for-hydrogen substitution at carbons 1 and 4 provide evidence for separate first-irreversible and overall rate-determining steps in the hydration reaction, with two potential mechanisms proposed to explain these results. Based on the positioning of catalytic residues in the enzyme active site, the lack of efficient turnover of a 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-substrate, and several unsuccessful attempts at confirmation of a simpler mechanism involving a covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, the most plausible mechanism is one involving an intermediate bearing an epoxide on carbons 1 and 2. PMID:24573682

  7. The interaction of Clostridium perfringens and its toxins in the production of necrotic enteritis of chickens.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Al-Sheikhly F; Truscott RB

    1977-04-01

    The intraduodenal administration of large numbers of Clostridium perfringens cells harvested from broth cultures and resuspended in PBS or fresh sterile thioglycollate broth produced a very mild form of necrotic enteritis. Administering an appropriate number of cells in culture supernatant, however, produced typical field-type disease. Alpha toxin was shown to be the significant toxin recoverable from broth-culture supernatant fluids. Requirements to produce the disease are minor intestinal damage and sufficient numbers of toxigenic C. perfringens in the intestine.

  8. Reversal of radiation-dependent heat sensitization of Clostridium perfringens spores

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, R.F.; Gombas, D.E.; Herrero, A.

    1980-03-01

    The effect of solute concentration on the sensitization of Clostridium perfringens spores to heat by ionizing radiation was investigated. Spores of C. perfringens treated with gamma radiation are more sensitive to subsequent heat treatments than are spores that receive no radiation treatment. When gamma-irradiated spores were heated in the presence of increasing concentrations of glycerol or sucrose, the heat sensitivity induced by irradiation was progressively decreased.

  9. Clinical and antibody responses to Clostridium perfringens type A enterotoxin in experimental sheep and calves.

    PubMed Central

    Niilo, L; Cho, H J

    1985-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A live cultures or sonicated sporulating cells, all containing enterotoxin, were repeatedly inoculated into sheep and calves by the intraduodenal route over periods of 30 to 35 days. Serum antibody to C. perfringens enterotoxin, tested by ELISA, developed in four of seven sheep and in two of four calves. The titers ranged from 400 to 1600. The live organism introduced into the duodenum did not become established in the bacterial flora of the intestinal tract. PMID:4016579

  10. NetB, a Pore-Forming Toxin from Necrotic Enteritis Strains of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Keyburn, Anthony L.; Bannam, Trudi L.; Moore, Robert J.; Rood, Julian I.

    2010-01-01

    The Clostridium perfringens necrotic enteritis B-like toxin (NetB) is a recently discovered member of the β-barrel pore-forming toxin family and is produced by a subset of avian C. perfringens type A strains. NetB is cytotoxic for avian cells and is associated with avian necrotic enteritis. This review examines the current state of knowledge of NetB: its role in pathogenesis, its distribution and expression in C. perfringens and its vaccine potential. PMID:22069665

  11. Clostridium Perfringens Infection in a Febrile Patient with Severe Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hashiba, Masamitsu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Tomonori; Kano, Hideki; Tsuda, Masanobu; Takeyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 82 Final Diagnosis: Clostridium perfringens infection Symptoms: Anemia • fever • shock Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Antimicrobial chemotherapy Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) can cause various infections, including gas gangrene, crepitant cellulitis, and fasciitis. While C. perfringens sepsis is uncommon, it is often rapidly fatal because the alpha toxin of this bacterium induces massive intravascular hemolysis by disrupting red blood cell membranes. Case Report: We present the case of a male patient with diabetes who developed a fatal liver abscess with massive intravascular hemolysis and septic shock caused by toxigenic C. perfringens. The peripheral blood smear showed loss of central pallor, with numerous spherocytes. Multiplex PCR only detected expression of the cpa gene, indicating that the pathogen was C. perfringens type A. Conclusions: C. perfringens infection should be considered in a febrile patient who has severe hemolytic anemia with a very low MCV, hemolyzed blood sample, and negative Coombs test. The characteristic peripheral blood smear findings may facilitate rapid diagnosis. PMID:27049736

  12. Clostridium perfringens type A enteritis in blue and yellow macaw (Ara ararauna).

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Marta Brito; Torres, Luciana Neves; Mesquita, Ramon Gomes; Ampuero, Fernanda; Cunha, Marcos Paulo Vieira; Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana Porfida; Ferreira, Antonio José Piantino; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Moreno, Andrea Micke; Knöbl, Terezinha

    2014-12-01

    This study describes an outbreak of necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens type A in captive macaws (Ara ararauna). Two psittacine birds presented a history of prostration and died 18 hr after manifestation of clinical signs. The necropsy findings and histopathologic lesions were indicative of necrotic enteritis. Microbiologic assays resulted in the growth of large gram-positive bacilli that were identified as C. perfringens. PCR was used to identify clostridium toxinotypes and confirmed the identification of isolated strains as C pefringens type A, positive to gene codifying beta 2 toxin. The infection source and predisposing factors could not be ascertained. PMID:25619013

  13. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R.; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  14. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  15. Enterotoxin formation by different toxigenic types of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed Central

    Skjelkvålé, R; Duncan, C L

    1975-01-01

    Sixty-nine strains of Clostridium perfringens of different toxigenic types were investigated for enterotoxin production. Enterotoxin was definitively detected only in strains of types A and C. This is the first report where enterotoxin production has been demonstrated in a toxigenic type other than type A. The exterotoxin-positive type C strains were isolated from cases of enteritis necroticans ("pig bel+) in New Guinea. The major enterotoxin from type C showed a reaction of complete identity with enterotoxin from type A in immunodiffusion using anti-enterotoxin serum prepared against the latter; it induced erythema when injected intradermally into depilated guinea pigs and caused fluid accumulation in the rabbit ileal loop. The results indicate that the major enterotoxin from type C was serologically and biologically similar to enterotoxin from type A. In some C was serologically and biologically similar to enterotoxin from type A. In some type C strains, an enterotoxin was detected that showed a reaction of partial serological identity. Spore coat proteins were extracted from 14-strains by alkaline dithiothreitol, and the extracts were assayed for enterotoxin-like spore protein. Enterotoxin could be extracted from type A and type C spores, and all positive strains showed a reaction of complete identity in immunodiffusion with enterotoxin obtained from cell extracts of type A. Disc immunoelectrophoresis demonstrated that two distinct components that reacted serologically with anti-enterotoxin serum were present in both the cell extract and in extracted spore protein from one type C strain. These distinct components differed in molecular weight. Images PMID:163799

  16. Influence of Water Activity on the Growth of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Dorothy H.; Foster, Edith F.; Duncan, Charles L.

    1970-01-01

    Each of four strains of Clostridium perfringens was grown in modified fluid thioglycolate medium which was adjusted to yield selected water activity (aw) levels. The adjustments to secure the desired aw levels were made with NaCl, KCl, or glucose. At each aw level, further modification was effected to produce four pH values. Cultures were incubated at either 37 or 46 C. The solute used to achieve the reduced aw levels appeared to have a definite effect on the magnitude of growth achieved, the rate of growth, and the limiting aw at which growth would occur. Use of glucose as the controlling solute permitted growth at the lowest aw level tested, 0.960, and yielded the greatest magnitude of growth as measured by turbidity values, at all of the aw levels investigated. Cultures grown in the medium with added KCl generally demonstrated the longest lag times and the least amount of growth. Regardless of specific solute used, as the aw level was lowered and the pH value decreased within each aw level, the rate and amount of growth were lessened. It appeared, however, that low pH values had less effect on inhibiting growth at low aw levels than at higher aw levels. Those cultures incubated at 46 C generally exhibited shorter lag periods than those at 37 C, although the maximal growth attained was somewhat less than that achieved at 37 C. The response to all of the investigated conditions was similar for each of the four strains tested. PMID:4318452

  17. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) of C. perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium-related diseases such as gangrenous dermatitis (GD) and necrotic enteritis (NE) are increasingly emerging as major diseases in recent years with high economic loss around the world. In this report, we characterized two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens (CP) proteins (e.g., elongation f...

  18. ISOLATION AND GENOTYPING OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS FROM FREE-LIVING SOUTH AMERICAN COATI (NASUA NASUA).

    PubMed

    Silva, Rodrigo O S; Almeida, Lara R; Oliveira Junior, Carlos A; Lima, Paula C S; Soares, Danielle F M; Pereira, Pedro L L; Silva, Israel J; Lobato, Francisco C F

    2016-03-01

    The importance of Clostridium perfringens for most wild animal species remains unclear. This study aimed to isolate and genotype C. perfringens in stool samples from free-living South American coati (Nasua nasua) in Brazil. Forty-six free-living N. nasua were trapped and stool samples were collected. Two different protocols for C. perfringens isolation were tested: direct plating onto selective agar and pre-enrichment in broth followed by plating in selective agar. Clostridium perfringens type A was isolated from 15 (32.6%) animals by direct plating and 36 (78.3%) animals by broth PE, and the rate of isolation was significantly different between these two methods (P < 0.01). Twelve of the 36 (33.3%) isolated strains by the PE protocol were positive for the β-2 toxin-encoding gene (cpb2) whereas the enterotoxin-encoding gene (cpe) and necrotic enteritis like-B toxin gene (netb) were not found. These results suggest that C. perfringens is commonly part of the microbiota of free-living coatis. Additionally, the use of a PE protocol appears to be essential for studies on C. perfringens in this species. PMID:27010297

  19. Molecular Characterization of Podoviridae Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Comparison of Their Predicted Lytic Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control ba...

  20. Complete genome sequence of the podoviral bacteriophage CP24R virulent for Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophage 'CP24R was isolated from raw sewage of a waste treatment plant and lytic activity was observed against a type C Clostridium perfringens isolate. Electron microscopy revealed a small virion (44nm diameter icosahedral capsid) with a short, non-contractile tail, indicative of the family ...

  1. Innate immune response to Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima in necrotic enteritis model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have investigated various aspects of host immune responses using a disease model for necrotic enteritis (NE) in which the severity of lesions produced by Clostridium perfringens was increased, and the growth performance of broiler chickens was decreased by prior infection with Eimeria maxima. Qu...

  2. INHIBITION OF QUORUM SENSING IN CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS AS A MEANS TOWARD FOOD SAFETY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell density-dependent signaling through the use of autoinducers, classified as quorum sensing, may play a role in the survival and virulence of Clostridium perfringens in foods. The natural 2-(5H)-furanone, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), was chosen for evaluation as a quorum sensing analogue due to it...

  3. ESTIMATATION OF GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN COOKED BEEF UNDER FLUCTUATING TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new concept for estimating the bacterial growth under temperature fluctuations was hypothesized and validated using Clostridium perfringens as a test organism. This new methodology was based on the Gompertz models to calculate the equivalent growth times under different temperatures, and estimate...

  4. BACTERIOPHAGES OF THE FAMILY SIPHOVIRIDAE CONTAIN AMIDASE ENZYMES THAT LYSE CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In chickens Clostridium perfringens (Cp) is the etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis and causes gas gangrene along with being the third leading cause of bacterial food-borne gastroenteritis in humans. While the disease in poultry can be controlled by antibiotics, there is increasing pressure to ban...

  5. CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS: STATUS OF A FOOD-BORNE SPORE-FORMER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is responsible for the third most common cause of food-borne illness in the U.S. today, resulting in an estimated 0.25 million cases annually and an associated economic loss of 12.5 billion dollars. The increased production of minimally-processed, extended shelf-life, refrig...

  6. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. 113.111 Section 113.111 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS...

  7. Comparison of two bacteriophage derived enzymes with lytic activity against strains of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming bacterium capable of producing four major toxins which are responsible for disease symptoms and pathogenesis in a variety of animals, humans and poultry. The organism is the third leading cause of food-borne bacterial disease among ...

  8. Control of Clostridium perfringens spores by plant-derived antimicrobials during cooling of cooked ground beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, thymol, oregano oil and two green tea extracts with low (green tea leaf powder (GTL); 141 mg of total catechins/g of green tea extract) and high (green tea leaf extract (GTE); 697 mg of total catechin...

  9. Bacteriophages of the family siphoviridae contain amidase enzymes that lyse Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    *Agtech-Danisco, current address In chickens Clostridium perfringens (Cp) is the etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis and causes gas gangrene along with being the third leading cause of bacterial food-borne gastroenteritis in humans. While the disease in poultry can be controlled by antibiotics, th...

  10. Characterization of anti-Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages isolated on poultry farms in Central Russia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a main food-borne pathogen causing human diseases. Besides, these Gram-positive anaerobes are responsible for the development of avian necrotic enteritidis, the wide-spread disease in countries engaged in the poultry breeding. For minimization followed by complete exclu...

  11. BEC, a Novel Enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens Found in Human Clinical Isolates from Acute Gastroenteritis Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Yonogi, Shinya; Matsuda, Shigeaki; Kawai, Takao; Yoda, Tomoko; Harada, Tetsuya; Kumeda, Yuko; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Hiyoshi, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Shota; Kodama, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a causative agent of food-borne gastroenteritis for which C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) has been considered an essential factor. Recently, we experienced two outbreaks of food-borne gastroenteritis in which non-CPE producers of C. perfringens were strongly suspected to be the cause. Here, we report a novel enterotoxin produced by C. perfringens isolates, BEC (binary enterotoxin of C. perfringens). Culture supernatants of the C. perfringens strains showed fluid-accumulating activity in rabbit ileal loop and suckling mouse assays. Purification of the enterotoxic substance in the supernatants and high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA of the strains revealed BEC, composed of BECa and BECb. BECa and BECb displayed limited amino acid sequence similarity to other binary toxin family members, such as the C. perfringens iota toxin. The becAB genes were located on 54.5-kb pCP13-like plasmids. Recombinant BECb (rBECb) alone had fluid-accumulating activity in the suckling mouse assay. Although rBECa alone did not show enterotoxic activity, rBECa enhanced the enterotoxicity of rBECb when simultaneously administered in suckling mice. The entertoxicity of the mutant in which the becB gene was disrupted was dramatically decreased compared to that of the parental strain. rBECa showed an ADP-ribosylating activity on purified actin. Although we have not directly evaluated whether BECb delivers BECa into cells, rounding of Vero cells occurred only when cells were treated with both rBECa and rBECb. These results suggest that BEC is a novel enterotoxin of C. perfringens distinct from CPE, and that BEC-producing C. perfringens strains can be causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in humans. Additionally, the presence of becAB on nearly identical plasmids in distinct lineages of C. perfringens isolates suggests the involvement of horizontal gene transfer in the acquisition of the toxin genes. PMID:24664508

  12. Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile in cooked beef sold in Côte d'Ivoire and their antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Kouassi, Kra Athanase; Dadie, Adjéhi Thomas; N'Guessan, Kouadio Florent; Dje, Koffi Marcellin; Loukou, Yao Guillaume

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens in cooked beef sold in the streets in Côte d'Ivoire and their antimicrobial susceptibility. A total of 395 kidney and flesh samples of cooked beef were collected from vendors at Abidjan and subjected to C. difficile and C. perfringens isolation and identification by using biochemical tests, API 20A system and PCR detection. Subsequently, the antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed for confirmed isolates. Our results showed the prevalence of 12.4% for C. difficile (11.04% in kidney and 13.45% in flesh) and 5.06% for C. perfringens (2.32% in kidney and 7.17% in flesh). Metronidazole and vancomycin remained the most potent antimicrobial agents against C. difficile while metronidazole and penicillin G were the most potent agents against C. perfringens. The resistance rates to tetracycline, doxycycline, chloramphenicol and erythromycin against C. difficile and C. perfringens isolates ranged from 2.05% to 8.16% and from 20% to 50%, respectively. Among all antimicrobial agents tested against C. difficile, percentages of resistance to quinolones ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and nalidixic acid as well as to gentamicin and cefotaxime were the highest. Eight resistant phenotypes were defined for C. difficile isolates and eleven resistant phenotypes for C. perfringens isolates. Clindamycin/gentamicin/cefotaxime/ciprofloxacin/norfloxacin/nalidixic acid resistance was the most common phenotype for C. difficile (55.10% of isolates) while norfloxacin/nalidixic acid resistance was the most common phenotype for C. perfringens (20% of isolates). PMID:24944124

  13. A thermophilic phage endolysin fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-specific cell wall binding domain creates an anti-clostridium antimicrobial with improved thermostability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of Necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Man...

  14. Fusion of a thermophilic phage endolysin to a Clostridium perfringens-specific cell wall binding domain creates an anti-clostridium antimicrobial with improved thermostability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of Necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Man...

  15. [Clostridium perfringens in the oral saliva in galvanism].

    PubMed

    Freĭdin, L I; Shepelev, A A

    1991-01-01

    Clostridia perfringens are much more frequently isolated from galvanism patients than other microorganisms. This fact should be not omitted by physicians, for these bacteria may induce a specific infectious process. PMID:1798982

  16. Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages FCP39O and FCP26F: genomic organization and proteomic analysis of the virions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Initial screening for bacteriophages lytic for Clostridium perfringens was performed utilizing filtered samples obtained from poultry (intestinal material), soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water. Lytic phage preparations were initially characterized by transmission electron microscopy ...

  17. Comparative genomics of four closely related Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages reveals variable rates of evolution within a core genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Biotechnological uses of bacteriophage gene products as alternatives to conventional antibiotics will require a thorough understanding of their genomic context. We sequenced and analyzed the genomes of four closely related phages isolated from Clostridium perfringens, an important agricu...

  18. Quantitative Detection of Clostridium perfringens in the Broiler Fowl Gastrointestinal Tract by Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Mark G.; Siragusa, Gregory R.

    2005-01-01

    Strains of Clostridium perfringens are a frequent cause of food-borne disease and gas gangrene and are also associated with necrotic enteritis in chickens. To detect and quantify the levels of C. perfringens in the chicken gastrointestinal tract, a quantitative real-time PCR assay utilizing a fluorogenic, hydrolysis-type probe was developed and utilized to assay material retrieved from the broiler chicken cecum and ileum. Primers and probe were selected following an alignment of 16S rDNA sequences from members of cluster I of the genus Clostridium, and proved to be specific for C. perfringens. The assay could detect approximately 50 fg of C. perfringens genomic DNA and approximately 20 cells in pure culture. Measurements of the analytical sensitivity determined with spiked intestinal contents indicated that the consistent limit of detection with ileal samples was approximately 102 CFU/g of ileal material, but only about 104 CFU/g of cecal samples. The decreased sensitivity with the cecal samples was due to the presence of an unidentified chemical PCR inhibitor(s) in the cecal DNA purifications. The assay was utilized to rapidly detect and quantify C. perfringens levels in the gut tract of broiler chickens reared without supplementary growth-promoting antibiotics that manifested symptoms of necrotic enteritis. The results illustrated that quantitative real-time PCR correlates well with quantification via standard plate counts in samples taken from the ileal region of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:16000804

  19. Predictive model for growth of Clostridium perfringens at temperatures applicable to cooling of cooked uncured beef and chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and validate a model for predicting the relative growth of Clostridium perfringens from spore inocula in uncured chicken and beef meat during cooling. Isothermal growth curves of C. perfringens at various temperatures from 10-48.9C were evaluated, ...

  20. The molecular-genetic analysis of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from broilers on farms in Central Russia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the research was to perform phenotypic and molecular-genetic typing of Clostridium perfringens strains commonly spread on poultry farms in Central Russia. Samples of homogenized iliac and cecal contents from 760 broilers were assayed and 325 C. perfringens strains (42.8 %) were isol...

  1. BACTERIOCIN E1073 PRODUCED BY ENTEROCOCCUS FAECIUM LWP1073 IS EFFECTIVE FOR TREATING COMMENSAL CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS INFECTION IN BROILERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterotoxin-producing Clostridium perfringens type A bacteria occupy a significant place in the etiological structure of food-borne infections in humans. One potential approach to minimize infections associated with food-borne pathogens is to control the carriage of C. perfringens in broilers. For ...

  2. Selection for pro-inflammatory mediators produces chickens more resistant to Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is the fourth leading cause of bacterial-induced foodborne illnesses with an estimated economic burden of $342M USD per year. In addition to being a foodborne pathogen, C. perfringens is also an economically important poultry pathogen and is one of the known etiologic agents...

  3. The interaction of Clostridium perfringens and its toxins in the production of necrotic enteritis of chickens.

    PubMed

    Al-Sheikhly, F; Truscott, R B

    1977-01-01

    The intraduodenal administration of large numbers of Clostridium perfringens cells harvested from broth cultures and resuspended in PBS or fresh sterile thioglycollate broth produced a very mild form of necrotic enteritis. Administering an appropriate number of cells in culture supernatant, however, produced typical field-type disease. Alpha toxin was shown to be the significant toxin recoverable from broth-culture supernatant fluids. Requirements to produce the disease are minor intestinal damage and sufficient numbers of toxigenic C. perfringens in the intestine. PMID:194572

  4. Mechanism of action of a novel recombinant peptide, MP1102, against Clostridium perfringens type C.

    PubMed

    Zong, Lifen; Teng, Da; Wang, Xiumin; Mao, Ruoyu; Yang, Na; Hao, Ya; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-06-01

    This work is the first to report the antibacterial characteristics and antibacterial mechanisms of MP1102, which is a variant of NZ2114, against pathogenic Clostridium perfringens. MP1102 exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against C. perfringens strains CVCC 61, CVCC 1163, and CVCC 2032 at a low minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.91 μM. MP1102 showed anti-C. perfringens activity over a wide pH range of 2.0 and 10.0, high thermal stability from 20 to 80 °C, and remarkable resistance to pepsin. The fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) indicated an additive or synergic effect between MP1102 and bacitracin zinc, nisin, vancomycin, virginiamycin, aureomycin, and ampicillin against C. perfringens (FICI = 0.3125-1.0). To further elucidate the antibacterial mechanism of MP1102, its effect on the C. perfringens CVCC 61 cell membrane and intracellular DNA was studied. Flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that MP1102 treatment resulted in the release of cellular contents by damaging the membrane. A DNA gel retardation and circular dichroism analysis demonstrated that MP1102 interacted with DNA and intercalated into the DNA base pairs. A cell cycle assay demonstrated that MP1102 affected cellular functions, such as DNA synthesis. These results suggested that MP1102 exhibited potential as a new antimicrobial agent against C. perfringens infections. PMID:26921181

  5. Growth of Clostridium perfringens in food proteins previously exposed to proteolytic bacilli.

    PubMed

    Schroder, D J; Busta, F F

    1973-11-01

    Proteolytic sporeforming bacteria capable of surviving processing heat treatments in synthetic or fabricated protein foods exhibited no antagonistic effects on growth of Clostridium perfringens, but instead shortened the lag of subsequent growth of C. perfringens in sodium caseinate and isolated soy protein. Bacillus subtilis A cells were cultured in 3% sodium caseinate or isolated soy protein solutions. The subsequent effect on the lag time and growth of C. perfringens type A (strain S40) at 45 C was measured by colony count or absorbance at 650 nm, or both. B. subtilis incubation for 12 h or more in sodium caseinate reduced the C. perfringens lag by 3 h. Incubation of 8 h or more in isolated soy protein reduced the lag time by 1.5 h. Molecular sieving of the B. subtilis-treated sodium caseinate revealed that all molecular sizes yielded a similar reduced lag time. Diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex ion exchange fractionation and subsequent amino acid analysis indicated that the lag time reduction caused by B. subtilis incubation was not related to charge of the peptides nor to their amino acid composition. Apparently the shortened C. perfringens lag in these B. subtilis-hydrolyzed food proteins was a result of the protein being more readily available for utilization by C. perfringens. PMID:4357650

  6. The inhibitory effects of sorbate and benzoate against Clostridium perfringens type A isolates.

    PubMed

    Alnoman, Maryam; Udompijitkul, Pathima; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the inhibitory effects of sorbate and benzoate against Clostridium perfringens type A food poisoning (FP) and non-food-borne (NFB) disease isolates. No significant inhibition of germination of spores of both FP and NFB isolates was observed in rich medium (pH 7.0) supplemented with permissive level of sodium sorbate (0.3% ≈ 0.13 mM undissociated sorbic acid) or sodium benzoate (0.1% ≈ 0.01 mM undissociated benzoic acid) used in foods. However, these levels of sorbate and benzoate effectively arrested outgrowth of germinated C. perfringens spores in rich medium. Lowering the pH of the medium increases the inhibitory effects of sorbate and benzoate against germination of spores of NFB isolates, and outgrowth of spores of both FP and NFB isolates. Furthermore, sorbate and benzoate inhibited vegetative growth of C. perfringens isolates. However, the permissible levels of these organic salts could not control the growth of C. perfringens spores in chicken meat stored under extremely abusive conditions. In summary, although sorbate and benzoate showed inhibitory activities against C. perfringens in the rich medium, no such effect was observed in cooked chicken meat. Therefore, caution should be taken when applying these organic salts into meat products to reduce or eliminate C. perfringens spores. PMID:25790996

  7. Incidence and tracking of Clostridium perfringens through an integrated broiler chicken operation.

    PubMed

    Craven, S E; Cox, N A; Bailey, J S; Cosby, D E

    2003-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens has been shown to be widespread in the broiler chicken hatchery, grow-out, and processing operations. In a previous study, ribotypes of certain strains of C. perfringens isolated from processed chicken carcasses were shown to match ribotypes isolated from paper pad lining trays used to transport commercial chicks from the hatchery to the grow-out facility on the farm. These results suggest that C. perfringens contaminating the processed product could originate from facilities in the integrated poultry operation prior to grow out. In this study, samples were collected from the breeder farm, hatchery, previous grow-out flock, during grow out and after processing. In the first trial, C. perfringens was recovered from the breeder farms, the hatchery, previous grow-out flock, grow-out flock at 3 weeks of age, grow-out flock at 5 weeks of age, from processed carcasses, and from the breeder farm after processing in 4%, 30%, 4%, 0%, 2% and 16%, and 4% of the samples, respectively. In the second trial, the incidence of C. perfringens in samples collected from breeder farms, the hatchery, previous grow-out flock, grow-out flock at 3 weeks of age, grow-out flock at 5 weeks of age, and fromprocessed carcasses was 38%, 30%, 32%, 8%, 4%, and 8%, respectively. The genetic relatedness of the isolated strains as determined by ribotyping suggests that C. perfringens may be transmitted between facilities within the integrated broiler chicken operation. PMID:14562900

  8. Multidrug resistance in Clostridium perfringens isolated from diarrheal neonatal piglets in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ngamwongsatit, Bhinyada; Tanomsridachchai, Wimonrat; Suthienkul, Orasa; Urairong, Supanee; Navasakuljinda, Wichian; Janvilisri, Tavan

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes diarrhea in neonatal piglets, thereby affecting commercial swine farming. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and characterize antimicrobial resistance in C. perfringens isolated from diarrheal neonatal piglets in Thailand. A total of 260 rectal swab samples were collected from 13 farms and were subjected to C. perfringens isolation. A total of 148 samples were PCR-positive for C. perfringens toxin genes, from which 122 were recovered. All isolates were cpb2-encoding C. perfringens type A and enterotoxin gene negative. Most of the isolates were susceptible to ampicillin, bacitracin, chlorotetracycline, doxycycline, and oxytetracycline with MIC50 values ranging from 0.32 to 8 μg/ml. The high resistance rates were observed for ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, erythromycin, lincomycin, and tylosin. Among resistant isolates, 82% were resistant to more than one type of antibiotics. The distinct pattern of multiple drug resistance in C. perfringens was observed in different regions, potentially reflecting the farm specific usage of these agents. PMID:26752714

  9. CodY Is a Global Regulator of Virulence-Associated Properties for Clostridium perfringens Type D Strain CN3718

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Ma, Menglin; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT CodY is known to regulate various virulence properties in several Gram-positive bacteria but has not yet been studied in the important histotoxic and intestinal pathogen Clostridium perfringens. The present study prepared an isogenic codY-null mutant in C. perfringens type D strain CN3718 by insertional mutagenesis using the Targetron system. Western blot analysis indicated that, relative to wild-type CN3718 or a complementing strain, this isogenic codY mutant produces reduced levels of epsilon toxin (ETX). Using supernatants from cultures of the wild-type, codY-null mutant, and complementing strains, CodY regulation of ETX production was shown to have cytotoxic consequences for MDCK cells. The CodY regulatory effect on ETX production was specific, since the codY-null mutant still made wild-type levels of alpha-toxin and perfringolysin O. Sialidase activity measurements and sialidase Western blot analysis of supernatants from CN3718 and its isogenic derivatives showed that CodY represses overall exosialidase activity due to a reduced presence of NanH in culture supernatants. Inactivation of the codY gene significantly decreased the adherence of CN3718 vegetative cells or spores to host Caco-2 cells. Finally, the codY mutant showed increased spore formation under vegetative growth conditions, although germination of these spores was impaired. Overall, these results identify CodY as a global regulator of many C. perfringens virulence-associated properties. Furthermore, they establish that, via CodY, CN3718 coordinately regulates many virulence-associated properties likely needed for intestinal infection. PMID:24105766

  10. Antibiotic Sensitivity of Clostridium perfringens Isolated From Faeces in Tabriz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Bidar Asl, Saeid; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Naghili, Behruz; Yeganeh, Fatemeh; Memar, Yousef; Mohammadzadeh, Yalda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clostridium perfringens, a Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium that produces at least 16 virulence factors including 12 toxins (α-ν), enterotoxin, hemolysin and neuraminidase, can create variable pathogenic condition, ranging from a food poisoning to life-threatening myonecrosis. Among C. perfringens strains, resistance to the drug choices such as penicillin as well as to alternatives of penicillin like metronidazole and clindamycin has also been observed. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the resistance of isolated toxigenic and non-toxigenic C. perfringens strains against common antimicrobial agents. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, a total of 136 stool specimens were collected. At first, cooked meat medium enrichment method was performed on samples at 45°C. Thereafter, a loopful of the enriched culture was transferred to blood agar and incubated anaerobically at 37°C for 24-72 hours. Colonies with double zone of hemolysis were identified by different biochemical tests such as phospholipase C (lecithinase) test, indole and urease production. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) for common antibiotics was determined by Etests (Epsilometer) and duplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) reaction was performed with specific primers for amplification of cpe (426 bp) and plc (283 bp) Genes. Results: Of 136 stool samples including diarrhea [48] and non-diarrhea [88] ones, 83 (61.02%) C. perfringens were cultured. Of these 83, 79 C. perfringens isolates showed the alpha-toxin (phospholipase C) production gene by PCR. Respectively, 3 (9.09%) and 2 (4.34%) cpe genes were present in diarrhea and non-diarrhea samples. Of 79 isolates of C. perfringens, 34 (43.03%) cases showed no resistance, 18 (22.78%) had one resistance and 27 (34.17%) isolates had multiple resistance to imipenem, metronidazole, ceftriaxone, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, and penicillin. Conclusions: Periodic evaluation of antimicrobial susceptibility for C. perfringens should be performed. Harboring of enterotoxigenic C. perfringens in individuals not necessarily results in diarrhea. PMID:26421135

  11. Characterization of a parasporal inclusion body from sporulating, enterotoxin-positive Clostridium perfringens type A.

    PubMed Central

    Löffler, A; Labbé, R

    1986-01-01

    Inclusion bodies (IB) synthesized during sporulation and enterotoxin formation by Clostridium perfringens NCTC 8239 and 8798 were isolated and characterized. IB were isolated by disruption of sporangia by sonication in the presence of tetrasodium EDTA and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. Fractionation was carried out in a linear gradient of sodium bromide, sucrose, or diatrizoate sodium. Denaturing and reducing agents were necessary to solubilize the IB. An alkylating agent was required to prevent reaggregation of the subunits. Molecular weight, compositional, and serological analyses and peptide mapping revealed strong similarities between the IB subunits and the enterotoxin synthesized during sporulation by C. perfringens. IB appear to represent the structural component where overproduced enterotoxin accumulates intracellularly. Enterotoxin-like subunits in the IB appeared to be held together by noncovalent and disulfide bonds, which were generally resistant to the action of intracellular proteases of C. perfringens, trypsin, or trypsin plus bile salts. Images PMID:2867991

  12. Clostridium perfringens type A toxin production in 3 commonly used culture media.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E; Marcellino, Romanella; Uzal, Francisco A

    2007-03-01

    In vitro toxin production is an important tool not only for diagnostic purposes but also for the study of pathogenesis of Clostridium perfringens infections. The present study was carried out to compare the level of toxin production by several strains of C. perfringens type A, isolated from the intestine of animals, when cultured in 3 different conventional culture media. Six strains of C. perfringens type A isolated from the small intestine of healthy sheep were cultured in commercial cooked meat medium (CMM), brain heart infusion (BHI), and tryptone glucose yeast (TGY). Intravenous lethality in mice and phospholipase C (PLC) activity were measured in filtered culture supernatants. Lethality of culture supernatants was highest for all isolates when grown in BHI, followed by CMM. No supernatants from any isolates grown in TGY produced lethality in mice. Phospholipase C activity was highest when the isolates were grown in BHI and CMM and significantly lower when grown in TGY. PMID:17402614

  13. Use of allicin as feed additive to enhance vaccination capacity of Clostridium perfringens toxoid in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Abu El Hammed, Waleed; Soufy, Hamdy; El-Shemy, Ahmed; Nasr, Soad M; Dessouky, Mohamed I

    2016-04-12

    The present study assessed the efficacy of Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) toxoid and/or allicin - as feed additive - in rabbits for preventing or minimizing the severity of infection with locally isolated strain of C. perfringens type A. Serum biochemical, immunological and pathological investigations were also done. One hundred rabbits of 6 weeks of age were divided into five equal groups (G1-G5). G1 were kept as normal control. G2 was allocated for C. perfringens type A infection. G3 was vaccinated with C. perfringens toxoid at zero time and then with a booster dose at the 3rd week of the experimental period. G4 was treated with allicin 20% added to the ration (200mg/kg ration) all over the experimental period. G5 was vaccinated with C. perfringens toxoid at the zero time then with a booster dose at the 3rd week of the experiment period, and treated with allicin 20% from the zero time till the end of the experiment. At the 4th week, G2, G3, G4 and G5 were challenged orally (5ml) and subcutaneously (2ml) with 24h cooked meat broth containing 1×10(7)colony-forming units/ml of C. perfringens type A strain. Blood and tissue samples were collected from all groups post-vaccination then post-challenge for biochemical analysis, serum neutralization test and histopathological examinations. Results revealed that rabbits treated with both allicin and toxoid vaccine demonstrated high level of antitoxin titre post-challenge, improved liver and kidney functions, and reduced morbidity and mortality rates and the severity of histopathological changes associated with challenge of rabbits with C. perfringens type A strain. In conclusion, vaccination of rabbits with C. perfringens toxoid combined with allicin 20% gave better protection, enhanced immune response and had no adverse effects on the general health conditions against C. perfringens type A infection compared to rabbits vaccinated with C. perfringens toxoid only. PMID:26973070

  14. Effect of 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid in a broiler Clostridium perfringens infection model.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Mussarat; Rempel, Heidi; Kuang, Xiaomei Tallie; Allen, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M; Malouin, François; Diarra, Moussa S

    2013-10-01

    In an effort to explore strategies to control Clostridium perfringens, we investigated the synergistic effect of a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) with penicillin G in a broiler challenge model. All chicks were inoculated in the crop by gavage on d 14, 15, and 16 with a mixture of 4 C. perfringens strains. Birds were treated with saline (control group) or 20 nmol of c-di-GMP by gavage or intramuscularly (IM) on d 24, all in conjunction with penicillin G in water for 5 d. Weekly samplings of ceca and ileum were performed on d 21 to 35 for C. perfringens and Lactobacillus enumeration. On d 35 of age, the IM treatment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced C. perfringens in the ceca, suggesting possible synergistic activity between penicillin G and c-di-GMP against C. perfringens in broiler ceca. Moreover, analysis of ceca DNA for the presence of a series of C. perfringens virulence genes showed a prevalence of 30% for the Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin gene (cpa) from d 21 to 35 in the IM-treated group, whereas the occurrence of the cpa gene increased from 10 to 60% in the other 2 groups (control and gavage) from d 21 to 35. Detection of β-lactamase genes (blaCMY-2, blaSHV, and blaTEM) indicative of gram-negative bacteria in the same samples from d 21 to 35 did not show significant treatment effects. Amplified fragment-length polymorphism showed a predominant 92% similarity between the ceca of 21-d-old control birds and the 35-d-old IM-treated c-di-GMP group. This suggests that c-di-GMP IM treatment might be effective at restoring the normal microflora of the host on d 35 after being challenged by C. perfringens. Our results suggest that c-di-GMP can reduce the colonization of C. perfringens in the gut without increasing the selection pressure for some β-lactamase genes or altering the commensal bacterial population. PMID:24046411

  15. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of recombinant Clostridium perfringens β2-toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Gurjar, Abhijit A.; Yennawar, Neela H.; Yennawar, Hemant P.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Hegde, Narasimha V.; Jayarao, Bhushan M.

    2007-06-01

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant Clostridium perfringens β2-toxin is described. The crystals diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution. Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive sporulating anaerobic bacterium that is responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases in animals, birds and humans. The virulence of C. perfringens is associated with the production of several enterotoxins and exotoxins. β2-toxin is a 28 kDa exotoxin produced by C. perfringens. It is implicated in necrotic enteritis in animals and humans, a disease characterized by a sudden acute onset with lethal hemorrhagic mucosal ulceration. The recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of β2-toxin using the batch-under-oil technique are reported here. Native X-ray diffraction data were obtained to 2.9 Å resolution on a synchrotron beamline at the F2 station at Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) using an ADSC Quantum-210 CCD detector. The crystals belong to space group R3, with a dimer in the asymmetric unit; the unit-cell parameters are a = b = 103.71, c = 193.48 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120° using the hexagonal axis setting. A self-rotation function shows that the two molecules are related by a noncrystallographic twofold axis with polar angles ω = 90.0, ϕ = 210.3°.

  16. Subcutaneous abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens and osteomyelitis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Cattin, I; Liehmann, L; Ammon, P; Dupre, G

    2008-04-01

    A case of a subcutaneous abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens infection in a five-month-old dog is reported in this study. Clinical examination, radiological findings and cytological analysis of abscess fluid were consistent with Clostridium induced disease. Treatment including drainage of the abscess and antibiotic therapy led to rapid clinical improvement. However, despite aggressive medical therapy and proper wound care, the deep soft tissue infection led to osteomyelitis with premature closure of the growth plates of the tibia and secondary bone shortening. Prolonged treatment with metronidazole and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid resulted in an excellent outcome with normal weight bearing. PMID:18086156

  17. Time of Enterotoxin Formation and Release During Sporulation of Clostridium perfringens Type A

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Charles L.

    1973-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin was detected intracellularly about 3 hr after the inoculation of vegetative cells into sporulation medium. The subsequent increase in intracellular enterotoxin concentration roughly paralleled but followed by 2.5 to 5 hr the increase in number of heat-resistant spores. The increase in biologically active toxin coincided with the increase in enterotoxin antigen. Enterotoxin was released from the sporangium with its lysis, concomitantly with the mature spore release. Images PMID:4347930

  18. Severe Sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia of Urinary Origin: A Case Report and Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Millard, Michael A; McManus, Kathleen A; Wispelwey, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is an uncommon yet serious clinical syndrome that typically arises from a gastrointestinal source. However, clinicians should consider nongastrointestinal sources as well. We present a rare case of C. perfringens bacteremia of urinary origin that required surgical intervention for definitive treatment. A 61-year-old male presented with acute nausea and vomiting, altered mental status, and chronic diarrhea. His physical exam revealed right costovertebral tenderness and his laboratory work-up revealed acute renal failure. Percutaneous blood cultures grew C. perfringens. Cross-sectional imaging revealed a right-sided ureteral stone with hydronephrosis, which required nephrostomy placement. On placement of the nephrostomy tube, purulent drainage was identified and Gram stain of the drainage revealed Gram-variable rods. A urinary source of C. perfringens was clinically supported. Although it is not a common presentation, nongastrointestinal sources such as a urinary source should be considered in C. perfringens bacteremia because failure to recognize a nongastrointestinal source can delay appropriate treatment, which may include surgical intervention. PMID:26998370

  19. Benthic distribution of sewage sludge indicated by clostridium perfringens at a deep-ocean dump site

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R.T.; Knight, I.T.; Anikis, M.S.; Colwell, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens in sediment samples collected at the Deep Water Municipal Sewage Sludge Disposal Site (also called the 106-Mile Site), off the coast of New Jersey, was enumerated. The counts of C. perfringens found in sediment samples collected within and to the southwest of the 106-Mile Site were significantly elevated (P. < 0.01) compared with counts of samples from reference stations of similar depth (2,400 to 2,700 m), topography, and distance from the continental shelf, indicating that the benthic environment was contaminated by sewage dumping at the site. Low counts of C. perfringens in sediment samples collected at stations between the base of the continental shelf and the 106-Mile Site indicated that coastal runoff was not a significant source of contamination. Elevated counts were observed for samples up to 92 km to the southwest, whereas low counts were obtained for samples from stations to the east of the 106-Mile Site. The distribution is consistent with previous model predictions of sludge deposition. In areas heavily impacted by sludge dumping, C. perfringens counts were generally highest in the top 1 cm of sediment and exceeded 9,000 CFU g (dry weight) of sediment. The patterns of C. perfringens dispersal observed in the study have proved useful for selection of heavily impacted areas and control stations for further ecological evaluation by a multidisciplinary research team.

  20. Evaluation of fluorogenic TSC agar for recovering Clostridium perfringens in groundwater samples.

    PubMed

    Araujo, M; Sueiro, R A; Gmez, M J; Garrido, M J

    2001-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is widely recognised as a reliable water pollution indicator. Since several media can be employed for the membrane filtration enumeration of this microorganism, the main aim of this work was to investigate the ability of fluorocult-supplemented TSC-agar (Merck) for recovering Cl. perfringens from public springs used for direct human consumption. Cl. perfringens recovery was also performed on mCP agar (Cultimed) according to Directive 98/83 as well as on TSC-Agar (Merck), TSN-Agar (Merck) and SPS-Agar (BBL) media. Variance analysis of data obtained showed no statistically significant differences in the counts obtained among all media employed in this work. However, the Cl. perfringens recovery efficiencies with TSC and fluorogenic TSC agars were significantly greater (P = < 0.05) than the corresponding values of mCP and TSN media. On the other hand, the identification of typical and atypical colonies isolated from all media demonstrated that fluorogenic TSC agar was the most specific medium for Cl. perfringens recovery in groundwater samples (85.3% of typical colonies and 82.8% of atypical colonies confirmed). In summary, the membrane filtration technique with fluorogenic TSC agar showed the best performance characteristics of all the media tested as judged by their recovery efficiency and specificity in these water samples. PMID:11464756

  1. Enumeration of Clostridium perfringens spores in groundwater samples: comparison of six culture media.

    PubMed

    Araujo, M; Sueiro, R A; Gmez, M J; Garrido, M J

    2004-05-01

    In order to investigate the ability of Fluorocult-supplemented TSC agar (TSCF (Fluorocult supplemented TSC-agar): prepared from Tryptose Sulfite Cycloserine Agar Base (Merck), D-cycloserine (Fluka Chemika, USA), and fluorocult TSC-Agar supplement (Merck)) for detecting spores of Clostridium perfringens in water, we analyzed groundwater samples, pretreated by heating to 80 degrees C/5 min, using this fluorogenic medium together with five other media: mCP agar (Panreac; Cultimed), TSC agar (Merck, Germany), TSN agar (Merck), and SPS agar (BBL, USA) by the membrane filtration technique, and Wilson-Blair agar (WB) following the still-in-force Spanish official method. Variance analysis of the data obtained shows statistically significant differences in the counts obtained between media employed in this work. The C. perfringens spore counts on mCP agar were significantly lower (P<0.05) than the corresponding values of TSC, TSCF, SPS, and WB media. No statistically significant differences were found between C. perfringens spore counts on TSCF compared with those of other methods used. On the other hand, the identification of typical and atypical colonies isolated from all media demonstrated that fluorogenic TSC agar was the most specific medium for C. perfringens spore recovery in groundwater samples. Additionally, the results obtained indicate that mCP agar, which is the reference method in the European Union, is not suitable medium for recovering C. perfringens spores from groundwater samples. PMID:15063057

  2. Benthic Distribution of Sewage Sludge Indicated by Clostridium perfringens at a Deep-Ocean Dump Site.

    PubMed

    Hill, R T; Knight, I T; Anikis, M S; Colwell, R R

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens in sediment samples collected at the Deep Water Municipal Sewage Sludge Disposal Site (also called the 106-Mile Site), off the coast of New Jersey, was enumerated. The counts of C. perfringens found in sediment samples collected within and to the southwest of the 106-Mile Site were significantly elevated (P < 0.01) compared with counts of samples from reference stations of similar depth (2,400 to 2,700 m), topography, and distance from the continental shelf, indicating that the benthic environment was contaminated by sewage dumping at this site. Low counts of C. perfringens in sediment samples collected at stations between the base of the continental shelf and the 106-Mile Site indicated that coastal runoff was not a significant source of contamination. Elevated counts were observed for samples up to 92 km to the southwest, whereas low counts were obtained for samples from stations to the east of the 106-Mile Site. This distribution is consistent with previous model predictions of sludge deposition. In areas heavily impacted by sludge dumping, C. perfringens counts were generally highest in the top 1 cm of sediment and exceeded 9,000 CFU g (dry weight) of sediment. The patterns of C. perfringens dispersal observed in this study have proved useful for selection of heavily impacted areas and control stations for further ecological evaluation by a multidisciplinary research team. PMID:16348859

  3. Severe Sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia of Urinary Origin: A Case Report and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Michael A.; McManus, Kathleen A.; Wispelwey, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is an uncommon yet serious clinical syndrome that typically arises from a gastrointestinal source. However, clinicians should consider nongastrointestinal sources as well. We present a rare case of C. perfringens bacteremia of urinary origin that required surgical intervention for definitive treatment. A 61-year-old male presented with acute nausea and vomiting, altered mental status, and chronic diarrhea. His physical exam revealed right costovertebral tenderness and his laboratory work-up revealed acute renal failure. Percutaneous blood cultures grew C. perfringens. Cross-sectional imaging revealed a right-sided ureteral stone with hydronephrosis, which required nephrostomy placement. On placement of the nephrostomy tube, purulent drainage was identified and Gram stain of the drainage revealed Gram-variable rods. A urinary source of C. perfringens was clinically supported. Although it is not a common presentation, nongastrointestinal sources such as a urinary source should be considered in C. perfringens bacteremia because failure to recognize a nongastrointestinal source can delay appropriate treatment, which may include surgical intervention. PMID:26998370

  4. Clinicopathologic features of experimental Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxemia in cattle.

    PubMed

    Filho, E J F; Carvalho, A U; Assis, R A; Lobato, F F; Rachid, M A; Carvalho, A A; Ferreira, P M; Nascimento, R A; Fernandes, A A; Vidal, J E; Uzal, F A

    2009-11-01

    This study was designed to experimentally reproduce enterotoxemia by Clostridium perfringens type D in cattle and to characterize the clinicopathologic findings of this disease. Fourteen 9-month-old calves were inoculated intraduodenally according to the following schedule: group 1 (n = 4), C. perfringens type D whole culture; group 2 (n = 3), C. perfringens type D washed cells; group 3 (n = 5), C. perfringens type D filtered and concentrated supernatant; group 4 (n = 2), sterile, nontoxic culture medium. In addition, all animals received a 20% starch solution in the abomasum. Ten animals from groups 1 (4/4), 2 (3/3), and 3 (3/5) showed severe respiratory and neurologic signs. Gross findings were observed in these 10 animals and consisted of acute pulmonary edema, excessive protein-rich pericardial fluid, watery contents in the small intestine, and multifocal petechial hemorrhages on the jejunal mucosa. The brain of one animal of group 2 that survived for 8 days showed multifocal, bilateral, and symmetric encephalomalacia in the corpus striatum. The most striking histologic changes consisted of perivascular high protein edema in the brain, and alveolar and interstitial proteinaceous pulmonary edema. The animal that survived for 8 days and that had gross lesions in the corpus striatum showed histologically severe, focal necrosis of this area, cerebellar peduncles, and thalamus. Koch's postulates have been met and these results show that experimental enterotoxemia by C. perfringens type D in cattle has similar clinical and pathologic characteristics to the natural and experimental disease in sheep. PMID:19605912

  5. Membrane vesicles of Clostridium perfringens type A strains induce innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-05-01

    Vesicle shedding from bacteria is a universal process in most Gram-negative bacteria and a few Gram-positive bacteria. In this report, we isolate extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs) from the supernatants of Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens). We demonstrated vesicle production in a variety of virulent and nonvirulent type A strains. MVs did not contain alpha-toxin and NetB toxin demonstrated by negative reaction to specific antibody and absence of specific proteins identified by LC-MS/MS. C. perfringens MVs contained DNA components such as 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA), alpha-toxin gene (plc) and the perfringolysin O gene (pfoA) demonstrated by PCR. We also identified a total of 431 proteins in vesicles by 1-D gel separation and LC-MS/MS analysis. In vitro studies demonstrated that vesicles could be internalized into murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells without direct cytotoxicity effects, causing release of inflammation cytokines including granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) and interleukin-1 (IL-1), which could also be detected in mice injected with MVs through intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. Mice immunized with C. perfringens MVs produced high titer IgG, especially IgG1, antibodies against C. perfringens membrane proteins. However, this kind of antibody could not provide protection in mice following challenge, though it could slightly postpone the time of death. Our results indicate that release of MVs from C. perfringens could provide a previously unknown mechanism to induce release of inflammatory cytokines, especially TNF-?, these findings may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infection. PMID:24631214

  6. Membrane vesicles of Clostridium perfringens Type A strains induce innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L.; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle shedding from bacteria is a universal process in most Gram-negative bacteria and a few Gram-positive bacteria. In this report, we isolate extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs) from the supernatants of Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens). We demonstrated vesicle production in a variety of virulent and nonvirulent type A strains. MVs did not contain alpha-toxin and NetB toxin demonstrated by negative reaction to specific antibody and absence of specific proteins identified by LC-MS/MS. C. perfringens MVs contained DNA components such as 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA), alpha-toxin gene (plc) and the perfringolysin O gene (pfoA) demonstrated by PCR. We also identified a total of 431 proteins in vesicles by 1-D gel separation and LC-MS/MS analysis. In vitro studies demonstrated that vesicles could be internalized into murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells without direct cytotoxicity effects, causing release of inflammation cytokines including granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1), which could also be detected in mice injected with MVs through intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. Mice immunized with C. perfringens MVs produced high titer IgG, especially IgG1, antibodies against C. perfringens membrane proteins. However, this kind of antibody could not provide protection in mice following challenge, though it could slightly postpone the time of death. Our results indicate that release of MVs from C. perfringens could provide a previously unknown mechanism to induce release of inflammatory cytokines, especially TNF-α, these findings may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infection. PMID:24631214

  7. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by reaction with...

  8. Diversity of Clostridium perfringens isolates from various sources and prevalence of conjugative plasmids.

    PubMed

    Park, Miseon; Deck, Joanna; Foley, Steven L; Nayak, Rajesh; Songer, J Glenn; Seibel, Janice R; Khan, Saeed A; Rooney, Alejandro P; Hecht, David W; Rafii, Fatemeh

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an important pathogen, causing food poisoning and other mild to severe infections in humans and animals. Some strains of C. perfringens contain conjugative plasmids, which may carry antimicrobial resistance and toxin genes. We studied genomic and plasmid diversity of 145 C. perfringens type A strains isolated from soils, foods, chickens, clinical samples, and domestic animals (porcine, bovine and canine), from different geographic areas in the United States between 1994 and 2006, using multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and/or pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). MLVA detected the genetic diversity in a majority of the isolates. PFGE, using SmaI and KspI, confirmed the MLVA results but also detected differences among the strains that could not be differentiated by MLVA. All of the PFGE profiles of the strains were different, except for a few of the epidemiologically related strains, which were identical. The PFGE profiles of strains isolated from the same domestic animal species were clustered more closely with each other than with other strains. However, a variety of C. perfringens strains with distinct genetic backgrounds were found among the clinical isolates. Variation was also observed in the size and number of plasmids in the strains. Primers for the internal fragment of a conjugative tcpH gene of C. perfringens plasmid pCPF4969 amplified identical size fragments from a majority of strains tested; and this gene hybridized to the various-sized plasmids of these strains. The sequences of the PCR-amplified tcpH genes from 12 strains showed diversity among the tcpH genes. Regardless of the sources of the isolates, the genetic diversity of C. perfringens extended to the plasmids carrying conjugative genes. PMID:26608548

  9. Multilocus Sequence Typing Subtypes of Poultry Clostridium perfringens Isolates Demonstrate Disease Niche Partitioning▿

    PubMed Central

    Hibberd, M. C.; Neumann, A. P.; Rehberger, T. G.; Siragusa, G. R.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a ubiquitous and versatile pathogenic bacterium and is implicated in the etiology of the poultry diseases necrotic enteritis (NE) and poultry gangrene (PG). In this study, multilocus sequence typing was used to investigate genotypic relationships among 139 C. perfringens isolates from 74 flocks. These isolates had multiple disease, host, and environmental origins. The results indicated a polymorphic yet highly clonal population, with 79.6% of all isolates partitioning into one of six clonal complexes or two dominant sequence types, ST-9 and ST-31. The most prolific clonal complex, CC-1, contained 27.3% of all isolates and was not clearly associated with one particular disease. The subtypes CC-4 and ST-31 were highly associated with NE and represented 9.4% and 7.2% of the total isolates, respectively. No PG-associated and NE-associated C. perfringens isolates shared the same sequence type or clonal complex. NE-associated subtypes were more clonal and appeared more evolutionarily divergent than PG-associated subtypes, which tended to cluster in the more ancestral lineages alongside isolates from asymptomatic chickens and turkeys. Toxin gene screening identified cpb2 throughout these isolates and correlated the presence of netB with NE pathology. Previous investigations into the genetic basis of C. perfringens pathogenicity have focused on toxins and other variable genetic elements. This study presents the first sequence-based comparison of C. perfringens isolates recovered in clinical cases of PG and NE and demonstrates that niche specialization is observable in the core genomes of poultry-associated C. perfringens isolates, a concept with both epidemiological and evolutionary significance. PMID:21270221

  10. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Archambault, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277). Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin, and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta-1,4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials. PMID:24795711

  11. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Archambault, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277). Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin, and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta-1,4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials. PMID:24795711

  12. Immunization of Broiler Chickens against Clostridium perfringens-Induced Necrotic Enteritis▿

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, R. R.; Parreira, V. R.; Sharif, S.; Prescott, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) in broiler chickens is caused by Clostridium perfringens. Currently, no vaccine against NE is available and immunity to NE is not well characterized. Our previous studies showed that immunity to NE followed oral infection by virulent rather than avirulent C. perfringens strains and identified immunogenic secreted proteins apparently uniquely produced by virulent C. perfringens isolates. These proteins were alpha-toxin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), fructose 1,6-biphosphate aldolase, and a hypothetical protein (HP). The current study investigated the role of each of these proteins in conferring protection to broiler chickens against oral infection challenges of different severities with virulent C. perfringens. The genes encoding these proteins were cloned and purified as histidine-tagged recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli and were used to immunize broiler chickens intramuscularly. Serum and intestinal antibody responses were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All proteins significantly protected broiler chickens against a relatively mild challenge. In addition, immunization with alpha-toxin, HP, and PFOR also offered significant protection against a more severe challenge. When the birds were primed with alpha-toxoid and boosted with active toxin, birds immunized with alpha-toxin were provided with the greatest protection against a severe challenge. The serum and intestinal washings from protected birds had high antigen-specific antibody titers. Thus, we conclude that there are certain secreted proteins, in addition to alpha-toxin, that are involved in immunity to NE in broiler chickens. PMID:17634510

  13. Screening of Bacteriocin-producing Enterococcus faecalis Strains for Antagonistic Activities against Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Han, Sun-Kyung; Shin, Myeong-Su; Park, Ho-Eun; Kim, So-Young; Lee, Wan-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate and characterize bacteriocin-producing bacteria against Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) from domestic animals to determine their usefulness as probiotics. Bacteriocin-producing bacteria were isolated from pig feces by the spot-on-lawn method. A total of 1,370 bacterial stains were isolated, and six were tentatively selected after identifying the inhibitory activity against the pathogenic indicator C. perfringens KCTC 3269 and KCTC 5100. The selected strains were identified as Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) by 16s rRNA sequencing. Most of the isolated bacterial strains were resistant to 0.5% bile salts for 48 h and remained viable after 2 h at pH 3.0. Some E. faecalis also showed strong inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes KCTC 3569, KCTC 3586 and KCTC 3710. In the present study, we finally selected E. faecalis AP 216 and AP 45 strain based on probiotic selection criteria such as antimicrobial activity against C. perfringens and tolerance to acid and bile salts. The bacteriocins of E. faecalis AP 216 and AP 45 strains were highly thermostable, showing anticlostridial activities even after incubation at 121℃ for 15 min. These bacteriocinproducing bacteria and/or bacteriocins could be used in feed manufacturing as probiotics as an alternative to antibiotics in the livestock industry. PMID:26761495

  14. Screening of Bacteriocin-producing Enterococcus faecalis Strains for Antagonistic Activities against Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So-Young

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate and characterize bacteriocin-producing bacteria against Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) from domestic animals to determine their usefulness as probiotics. Bacteriocin-producing bacteria were isolated from pig feces by the spot-on-lawn method. A total of 1,370 bacterial stains were isolated, and six were tentatively selected after identifying the inhibitory activity against the pathogenic indicator C. perfringens KCTC 3269 and KCTC 5100. The selected strains were identified as Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) by 16s rRNA sequencing. Most of the isolated bacterial strains were resistant to 0.5% bile salts for 48 h and remained viable after 2 h at pH 3.0. Some E. faecalis also showed strong inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes KCTC 3569, KCTC 3586 and KCTC 3710. In the present study, we finally selected E. faecalis AP 216 and AP 45 strain based on probiotic selection criteria such as antimicrobial activity against C. perfringens and tolerance to acid and bile salts. The bacteriocins of E. faecalis AP 216 and AP 45 strains were highly thermostable, showing anticlostridial activities even after incubation at 121℃ for 15 min. These bacteriocinproducing bacteria and/or bacteriocins could be used in feed manufacturing as probiotics as an alternative to antibiotics in the livestock industry. PMID:26761495

  15. Use of power ultrasound to enhance the thermal inactivation of Clostridium perfringens spores in beef slurry.

    PubMed

    Evelyn; Silva, Filipa V M

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a pathogen of concern in pasteurised foods. The main objective of this study was to use power ultrasound to enhance the thermal inactivation of C. perfringens spores in beef slurry. The effect of simultaneous ultrasound and heat (TS, thermosonication) on the spore inactivation in beef slurry was first investigated. At 75 °C, a 60 min TS process (24 kHz, 0.33 W/g) resulted in a less than 1.5 log reduction for both C. perfringens NZRM 898 and NZRM 2621 spores. Then, the thermal inactivation first order kinetic parameters of C. perfringens spores in beef slurry were estimated for the two strains. The D105 °C- and z-values were 2.5 min and 10.6 °C for NZRM 898 and 1.8 min and 10.9 °C for NZRM 2621. After, the effect of a spore heat shock followed by ultrasound on its thermal inactivation in beef slurry was investigated. This heat shock+ultrasound pretreatment was able to double the spore thermal inactivation rate in beef slurry. For example at 95 °C D-value of 20.2 min decreased to 9.8 min, demonstrating that spore exposure to heat shock followed by ultrasonication enhanced its thermal inactivation. PMID:25912313

  16. Comparative in vitro bactericidal activity of 24 antimicrobial drugs against Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Traub, W H

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four antimicrobial drugs were examined for rapidity of onset and magnitude of bactericidal activity against selected strains of Clostridium perfringens. Ceftriaxone, imipenem, metronidazole, mezlocillin, penicillin G, piperacillin, and teicoplanin reduced colony counts by at least 3 log10 units within 2-4 h after exposure. Clindamycin, fluoroquinolones, josamycin, and tetracycline caused delayed kill (greater than or equal to 99.9% reduction of viable counts at 4-22 h after exposure). Chloramphenicol and rifampin lacked bactericidal activity against 2 of 4 strains, whereas erythromycin, fusidic acid, and fosfomycin (with added glucose-6-phosphate) were merely inhibitory for all 4 strains. Imipenem and penicillin G were combined with 9 and 12 antimicrobial drugs, respectively. Essentially all drug combinations yielded indifferent effects; only penicillin G plus doxycycline resulted in an antagonistic effect against C. perfringens. PMID:2311441

  17. Survival trends of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Clostridium perfringens in a sandy South Florida beach.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, R L; Echeverry, A; Stinson, C M; Green, M; Bonilla, T D; Hartz, A; McCorquodale, D S; Rogerson, A; Esiobu, N

    2012-06-01

    The search for alternative indicators of disease-risk from non-enteric pathogens at the beach revealed high densities of targeted bacteria. To explain the high numbers of potential non-enteric pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in beach sand, we investigated factors affecting their survival and distribution, as well as those of a potential fecal indicator, Clostridium perfringens. Results indicated greater S. aureus and P. aeruginosa survival and proliferation in sterile beach sand, than seawater, with diminished numbers upon exposure to natural micro-predators. C. perfringens remained relatively consistent with initial numbers. Intermediate sand particles (850 ?m-2 mm) constituted the major micro-niche; creating implications for beach classification programs. Colonization of sterile sand boxes at the beach by S. aureus and P. aeruginosa confirmed the filtering action (>100) of beach sand. The use of these potential pathogens in periodic sanitary evaluation of beach sand quality is indicated, regardless of the factors influencing their abundance. PMID:22516512

  18. Binding of Clostridium perfringens to collagen correlates with the ability to cause necrotic enteritis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Wade, B; Keyburn, A L; Seemann, T; Rood, J I; Moore, R J

    2015-11-18

    This study investigated the ability of Clostridium perfringens isolates derived from chickens to bind to collagen types I-V and gelatin. In total 21 strains from three distinct backgrounds were studied: (i) virulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis, (ii) avirulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis and (iii) strains isolated from healthy birds. All strains isolated from diseased birds had been assessed for virulence in a disease induction model. The virulent isolates all displayed collagen binding ability. However, most strains in the other two classes showed negligible binding to collagen. The prevalence of a previously described C. perfringens putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene was investigated by PCR screening. It was found that five of the strains carried the putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene and that all of these strains were virulent isolates. Based on these studies it is postulated that collagen adhesion may play a role in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis. PMID:26455806

  19. Clostridium perfringens: Comparative effects of heat and osmotic stress on non-enterotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic strains.

    PubMed

    Abbona, Cinthia Carolina; Stagnitta, Patricia Virginia

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens isolates associated with food poisoning carries a chromosomal cpe gene, while non-foodborne human gastrointestinal disease isolates carry a plasmid cpe gene. The enterotoxigenic strains tested produced vegetative cells and spores with significantly higher resistance than non-enterotoxigenic strains. These results suggest that the vegetative cells and spores have a competitive advantage over non-enterotoxigenic strains. However, no explanation has been provided for the significant associations between chromosomal cpe genotypes with the high resistance, which could explain the strong relationship between chromosomal cpe isolates and C. perfringens type A food poisoning. Here, we analyse the action of physical and chemical agent on non-enterotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic regional strains. And this study tested the relationship between the sensitivities of spores and their levels SASPs (small acid soluble proteins) production in the same strains examined. PMID:27012900

  20. Clostridium perfringens alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase blood group A2-degrading activity.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hsin-Yeh; Smith, Daniel

    2003-04-01

    Enzymic modification of type A(2) erythrocyte membranes with Clostridium perfringens alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase was investigated. An ELISA demonstrated hydrolysis of type A(2) epitopes under conditions of red-blood-cell collection and storage. The enzyme hydrolysed the terminal N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosamine from the blood type A(2) antigen, producing H antigen, blood group O, which is universally compatible in the ABO system. The enzyme was active in common red-cell preservative solutions at pH 6.4-7.0, at 4 degrees C, at ionic strengths found in stored red cell units and in the presence of type A plasma. These data imply that the C. perfringens alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase might be added directly to packed A(2) red-blood-cell units for enzymic conversion to blood type O. Further studies are warranted. PMID:12630904

  1. Identification and Characterization of a New Enterotoxin Produced by Clostridium perfringens Isolated from Food Poisoning Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasunori; Nakama, Akiko; Kai, Akemi; Fukui-Miyazaki, Aya; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kamata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    There is a strain of Clostridium perfringens, W5052, which does not produce a known enterotoxin. We herein report that the strain W5052 expressed a homologue of the iota-like toxin components sa and sb of C. spiroforme, named Clostridium perfringens iota-like enterotoxin, CPILE-a and CPILE-b, respectively, based on the results of a genome sequencing analysis and a systematic protein screening. In the nicotinamide glyco-hydrolase (NADase) assay the hydrolysis activity was dose-dependently increased by the concentration of rCPILE-a, as judged by the mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the actin monomer of the lysates of Vero and L929 cells were radiolabeled in the presence of [32P]NAD and rCPILE-a. These findings indicated that CPILE-a possesses ADP-ribosylation activity. The culture supernatant of W5052 facilitated the rounding and killing of Vero and L929 cells, but the rCPILE-a or a non-proteolyzed rCPILE-b did not. However, a trypsin-treated rCPILE-b did. Moreover, a mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b enhanced the cell rounding and killing activities, compared with that induced by the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b alone. The injection of the mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b into an ileum loop of rabbits evoked the swelling of the loop and accumulation of the fluid dose-dependently, suggesting that CPILE possesses enterotoxic activity. The evidence presented in this communication will facilitate the epidemiological, etiological, and toxicological studies of C. perfringens food poisoning, and also stimulate studies on the transfer of the toxins’ gene(s) among the Genus Clostridium. PMID:26584048

  2. Characterization of Genes Encoding for Acquired Bacitracin Resistance in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jalbert, Louis-Alexandre; Harel, Josée; Masson, Luke; Archambault, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic bacitracin resistance has been reported in Clostridium perfringens. However, the genes responsible for the resistance have not yet been characterized. Ninety-nine C. perfringens isolates recovered from broilers and turkeys were tested for phenotypic bacitracin resistance. Bacitracin MIC90 (>256 µg/ml) was identical for both turkey and chicken isolates; whereas MIC50 was higher in turkey isolates (6 µg/ml) than in chicken isolates (3 µg/ml). Twenty-four of the 99 isolates showed high-level bacitracin resistance (MIC breakpoint >256 µg/ml) and the genes encoding for this resistance were characterized in C. perfringens c1261_A strain using primer walking. Sequence analysis and percentages of amino acid identity revealed putative genes encoding for both an ABC transporter and an overproduced undecaprenol kinase in C. perfringens c1261_A strain. These two mechanisms were shown to be both encoded by the putative bcrABD operon under the control of a regulatory gene, bcrR. Efflux pump inhibitor thioridazine was shown to increase significantly the susceptibility of strain c1261_A to bacitracin. Upstream and downstream from the bcr cluster was an IS1216-like element, which may play a role in the dissemination of this resistance determinant. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with prior double digestion with I-CeuI/MluI enzymes followed by hybridization analyses revealed that the bacitracin resistance genes bcrABDR were located on the chromosome. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that this gene cluster is expressed under bacitracin stress. Microarray analysis revealed the presence of these genes in all bacitracin resistant strains. This study reports the discovery of genes encoding for a putative ABC transporter and an overproduced undecaprenol kinase associated with high-level bacitracin resistance in C. perfringens isolates from turkeys and broiler chickens. PMID:22970221

  3. Epidemiology of Foodborne Disease Outbreaks Caused by Clostridium perfringens, United States, 1998–2010

    PubMed Central

    Grass, Julian E.; Gould, L. Hannah; Mahon, Barbara E.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is estimated to be the second most common bacterial cause of foodborne illness in the United States, causing one million illnesses each year. Local, state, and territorial health departments voluntarily report C. perfringens outbreaks to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System. Our analysis included outbreaks confirmed by laboratory evidence during 1998–2010. A food item was implicated if C. perfringens was isolated from food or based on epidemiologic evidence. Implicated foods were classified into one of 17 standard food commodities when possible. From 1998 to 2010, 289 confirmed outbreaks of C. perfringens illness were reported with 15,208 illnesses, 83 hospitalizations, and eight deaths. The number of outbreaks reported each year ranged from 16 to 31 with no apparent trend over time. The annual number of outbreak-associated illnesses ranged from 359 to 2,173, and the median outbreak size was 24 illnesses. Outbreaks occurred year round, with the largest number in November and December. Restaurants (43%) were the most common setting of food preparation. Other settings included catering facility (19%), private home (16%), prison or jail (11%), and other (10%). Among the 144 (50%) outbreaks attributed to a single food commodity, beef was the most common commodity (66 outbreaks, 46%), followed by poultry (43 outbreaks, 30%), and pork (23 outbreaks, 16%). Meat and poultry outbreaks accounted for 92% of outbreaks with an identified single food commodity. Outbreaks caused by C. perfringens occur regularly, are often large, and can cause substantial morbidity yet are preventable if contamination of raw meat and poultry products is prevented at the farm or slaughterhouse or, after contamination, if these products are properly handled and prepared, particularly in restaurants and catering facilities. PMID:23379281

  4. Sequence of two plasmids from Clostridium perfringens chicken necrotic enteritis isolates and comparison with C. perfringens conjugative plasmids.

    PubMed

    Parreira, Valeria R; Costa, Marcio; Eikmeyer, Felix; Blom, Jochen; Prescott, John F

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-six isolates of Clostridium perfringens of different MLST types from chickens with necrotic enteritis (NE) (15 netB-positive) or from healthy chickens (6 netB-positive, 5 netB-negative) were found to contain 1-4 large plasmids, with most netB-positive isolates containing 3 large and variably sized plasmids which were more numerous and larger than plasmids in netB-negative isolates. NetB and cpb2 were found on different plasmids consistent with previous studies. The pathogenicity locus NELoc1, which includes netB, was largely conserved in these plasmids whereas NeLoc3, present in the cpb2 containing plasmids, was less well conserved. A netB-positive and a cpb2-positive plasmid were likely to be conjugative, and the plasmids were completely sequenced. Both plasmids possessed the intact tcp conjugative region characteristic of C. perfringens conjugative plasmids. Comparative genomic analysis of nine CpCPs, including the two plasmids described here, showed extensive gene rearrangements including pathogenicity locus and accessory gene insertions around rather than within the backbone region. The pattern that emerges from this analysis is that the major toxin-containing regions of the variety of virulence-associated CpCPs are organized as complex pathogenicity loci. How these different but related CpCPs can co-exist in the same host has been an unanswered question. Analysis of the replication-partition region of these plasmids suggests that this region controls plasmid incompatibility, and that CpCPs can be grouped into at least four incompatibility groups. PMID:23189158

  5. Sequence of Two Plasmids from Clostridium perfringens Chicken Necrotic Enteritis Isolates and Comparison with C. perfringens Conjugative Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, Valeria R.; Costa, Marcio; Eikmeyer, Felix; Blom, Jochen; Prescott, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-six isolates of Clostridium perfringens of different MLST types from chickens with necrotic enteritis (NE) (15 netB-positive) or from healthy chickens (6 netB-positive, 5 netB-negative) were found to contain 1–4 large plasmids, with most netB-positive isolates containing 3 large and variably sized plasmids which were more numerous and larger than plasmids in netB-negative isolates. NetB and cpb2 were found on different plasmids consistent with previous studies. The pathogenicity locus NELoc1, which includes netB, was largely conserved in these plasmids whereas NeLoc3, present in the cpb2 containing plasmids, was less well conserved. A netB-positive and a cpb2-positive plasmid were likely to be conjugative, and the plasmids were completely sequenced. Both plasmids possessed the intact tcp conjugative region characteristic of C. perfringens conjugative plasmids. Comparative genomic analysis of nine CpCPs, including the two plasmids described here, showed extensive gene rearrangements including pathogenicity locus and accessory gene insertions around rather than within the backbone region. The pattern that emerges from this analysis is that the major toxin-containing regions of the variety of virulence-associated CpCPs are organized as complex pathogenicity loci. How these different but related CpCPs can co-exist in the same host has been an unanswered question. Analysis of the replication-partition region of these plasmids suggests that this region controls plasmid incompatibility, and that CpCPs can be grouped into at least four incompatibility groups. PMID:23189158

  6. Clostridium perfringens: a flesh-eating bacterium living in your garden.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Ann

    2010-10-01

    Gas gangrene is a painful, rapidly developing and potentially fatal infection despite antibiotic treatment. During the First World War thousands of soldiers died from this disease. Dr Alexis Carrel pioneered a controversial method of irrigating wounds with Dakin's solution to destroy Clostridium perfringens, a bacterium found in heavily fertilised soils that causes gas gangrene. Although this method is no longer used due to the discovery of antibiotics, many of his other ideas, such as scientifically determining the type and number of bacteria and delaying the closure of a wound until the bacteria had been eradicated, are still used today. PMID:21049805

  7. Correlations Between Virulence and Other Characters of Clostridium perfringens Type A

    PubMed Central

    Forget, A.; Paquette, G.; Roy, A.; Fredette, V.

    1969-01-01

    The correlation analysis which has already proved its value in ecology has not yet been applied to the determination of virulence indicators. Its application to a group of Clostridium perfringens type A strains has brought out some characters that may be considered as virulence indicators. This study suggests that the toxicity of the culture supernatant fluids for mice is significantly correlated with the virulence for mice and guinea pigs. A significant correlation was found between the virulence of the fluid cultures for mice or guinea pigs and the coagulation of milk, production of gas (in deep agar), hydrogen sulfide production, and fermentation of glucose, sucrose, maltose, and levulose. PMID:4312926

  8. Investigating the role of small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASPs) in the resistance of Clostridium perfringens spores to heat

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Deepa; Waters, Michael; Setlow, Peter; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2006-01-01

    Background Clostridium perfringens type A food poisoning is caused by enterotoxigenic C. perfringens type A isolates that typically possess high spore heat-resistance. The molecular basis for C. perfringens spore heat-resistance remains unknown. In the current study, we investigated the role of small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASPs) in heat-resistance of spores produced by C. perfringens food poisoning isolates. Results Our current study demonstrated the presence of all three SASP-encoding genes (ssp1, 2 and 3) in five surveyed C. perfringens clinical food poisoning isolates. β-Glucuronidase assay showed that these ssp genes are expressed specifically during sporulation. Consistent with these expression results, our study also demonstrated the production of SASPs by C. perfringens food poisoning isolates. When the heat sensitivities of spores produced by a ssp3 knock-out mutant of a C. perfringens food poisoning isolate was compared with that of spores of the wild-type strain, spores of the ssp3 mutant were found to exhibit a lower decimal reduction value (D value) at 100°C than exhibited by the spores of wild-type strain. This effect was restored by complementing the ssp3 mutant with a recombinant plasmid carrying wild-type ssp3, suggesting that the observed differences in D values between spores of wild-type versus ssp3 mutant was due to the specific inactivation of ssp3. Furthermore, our DNA protection assay demonstrated that C. perfringens SASPs can protect DNA from DNase I digestion. Conclusion The results from our current study provide evidences that SASPs produced by C. perfringens food poisoning isolates play a role in protecting their spores from heat-damage, which is highly significant and relevant from a food safety perspective. Further detailed studies on mechanism of action of SASPs from C. perfringens should help in understanding the mechanism of protection of C. perfringens spores from heat-damage. PMID:16759397

  9. Detection of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens in food and fecal samples with a duplex PCR and the slide latex agglutination test.

    PubMed Central

    Fach, P; Popoff, M R

    1997-01-01

    A duplex PCR procedure was evaluated for the detection of Clostridium perfringens in food and biological samples and for the identification of enterotoxigenic strains. This method uses two sets of primers which amplify in the same reaction two different DNA fragments simultaneously: the 283-bp C. perfringens phospholipase C gene fragment and the 426-bp enterotoxin gene fragment. Internal primers within the two primer sets confirmed the specificity of the method by DNA-DNA hybridization with the PCR products. No cross-reaction was observed with other Clostridium species or with other bacteria routinely found in food. The detection level was approximately 10(5) C. perfringens cells per g of stool or food sample. When overnight enrichment culture was used, 10 C. perfringens cells per g was detected in 57 artificially contaminated food samples. The duplex PCR is a rapid, sensitive, and reliable method for the detection and identification of enterotoxigenic C. perfringens strains in food samples. A slide latex agglutination test was also evaluated as a rapid, simple technique for the detection of C. perfringens enterotoxin in stool samples. PMID:9361409

  10. Immunization with recombinant alpha toxin partially protects broiler chicks against experimental challenge with Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Cooper, K K; Trinh, H T; Songer, J Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) in poultry has re-emerged as a concern for poultry producers, due in part to banning, by many countries, of the use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feeds. This re-emergence has led to a search for alternative methods for control of the disease, particularly vaccination. The objective of this work was to determine if vaccination of broiler chicks with recombinant alpha toxin protected against experimental challenge. Broiler chicks were vaccinated subcutaneously at 5 and 15 days of age, followed 10 days later by challenge with Clostridium perfringens. Birds were challenged twice daily on 4 consecutive days by mixing C. perfringens cultures with feed (three parts culture: four parts feed). Non-vaccinated birds challenged with C. perfringens developed NE at the rate of 87.8%, while only 54.9% of vaccinated birds developed lesions. In addition, non-vaccinated birds had lesion scores averaging 2.37, while average scores in vaccinated birds were 1.35. Vaccination produced an antibody response, with post-vaccination anti-alpha toxin IgG (IgY) titers in vaccinated birds more than 5-fold greater than in non-vaccinated birds. After challenge, vaccinated birds had average IgG (IgY) titers>15-fold higher than those in non-vaccinated birds. These results suggest that alpha toxin may serve as an effective immunogen, and, as such, may play a role in pathogenesis. PMID:18635321

  11. Cloning, characterization, and production of three α-l-fucosidases from Clostridium perfringens ATCC 13124.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shuquan; Zhang, Huaqin; Chen, Xiaodi; Lu, Lili; Xu, Li; Xiao, Min

    2016-04-01

    α-l-Fucosidases are key enzymes for the degradation of intestinal glycans by gut microbes. In this work, three putative α-l-fucosidases (Afc1, Afc2, and Afc3) genes from Clostridium perfringens ATCC 13124 were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Afc1 had the α-l-fucosidase domain of glycoside hydrolase (GH) 29 family but showed no enzyme activity toward all the substrates examined. The putative acid/base residue of Afc1, Ser205, was replaced by a glutamic acid which is conserved in GH29-B α-l-fucosidases. However, the mutant Afc1-S205E still failed to show enzyme activity. Afc2 and Afc3 were determined to be 1,3-1,4-α-l-fucosidase of GH29-B subfamily and 1,2-α-l-fucosidase of GH95 family, respectively, and both of them could release fucose from porcine gastric mucin (PGM). When C. perfringens ATCC 13124 grew with the presence of PGM, the transcription of afc1 decreased slightly, while those of afc2 and afc3 increased to 2.2-fold and 1.4-fold, respectively, and the enzyme activities of Afc2 and Afc3 in the culture increased to 2.2-fold and 2.6-fold, respectively. These results suggest that Afc2 and Afc3 are involved in the degradation of intestinal fucosyl glycans by C. perfringens ATCC 13124. PMID:26663202

  12. Benthic distribution of sewage sludge indicated by Clostridium perfringens at a deep-ocean dump site

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R.T.; Anikis, M.S.; Colwell, R.R. ); Knight, I.T. )

    1993-01-01

    Since 1986, sewage sludge from New York and northern New Jersey has been dumped 196 km off the coast of New Jersey at the Deep Water Municipal Sewage Sludge Disposal Site. This study determines the distribution of sludge contamination of the benthic environment in the area, by using Clostridium perfringens as an indicator. The counts of C. perfringens confirm a previous report that sewage sludge is reaching the ocean floor at the disposal site as a result of the sludge dumping. C. perfringes counts within the dump site and to the south and west of the dump site are considerably elevated compared to counts east of the site. The distribution pattern of C. perfringes is broadly consistent with the estimates of the sea floor area impacted in the most recent computer model. However, the area of maximum desposition of sludge may be slightly further north than predicted. Use of C. perfringens has proven to be an efficient and reliable method for tracing sewage contamination of deep ocean sediments. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Beta Lactamase Producing Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia in an Elderly Man with Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rashmi; Sinha, Nupur; Duncalf, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is associated with adverse outcomes. Known risk factors include chronic kidney disease, malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal disease. We present a 74-year-old man admitted with confusion, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Exam revealed tachycardia, hypotension, lethargy, distended abdomen, and cold extremities. He required intubation and aggressive resuscitation for septic shock. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis, metabolic acidosis, acute kidney injury, and elevated lipase. CT scan of abdomen revealed acute pancreatitis and small bowel ileus. He was started on vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam. Initial blood cultures were positive for C. perfringens on day five. Metronidazole and clindamycin were added to the regimen. Repeat CT (day 7) revealed pancreatic necrosis. The patient developed profound circulatory shock requiring multiple vasopressors, renal failure requiring dialysis, and bacteremia with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Hemodynamic instability precluded surgical intervention and he succumbed to multiorgan failure. Interestingly, our isolate was beta lactamase producing. We review the epidemiology, risk factors, presentation, and management of C. perfringens bacteremia. This case indicates a need for high clinical suspicion for clostridial sepsis and that extended spectrum beta lactam antibiotic coverage may be inadequate and should be supplemented with use of clindamycin or metronidazole if culture is positive, until sensitivities are known. PMID:26904307

  14. Beta Lactamase Producing Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia in an Elderly Man with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rashmi; Duncalf, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is associated with adverse outcomes. Known risk factors include chronic kidney disease, malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal disease. We present a 74-year-old man admitted with confusion, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Exam revealed tachycardia, hypotension, lethargy, distended abdomen, and cold extremities. He required intubation and aggressive resuscitation for septic shock. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis, metabolic acidosis, acute kidney injury, and elevated lipase. CT scan of abdomen revealed acute pancreatitis and small bowel ileus. He was started on vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam. Initial blood cultures were positive for C. perfringens on day five. Metronidazole and clindamycin were added to the regimen. Repeat CT (day 7) revealed pancreatic necrosis. The patient developed profound circulatory shock requiring multiple vasopressors, renal failure requiring dialysis, and bacteremia with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Hemodynamic instability precluded surgical intervention and he succumbed to multiorgan failure. Interestingly, our isolate was beta lactamase producing. We review the epidemiology, risk factors, presentation, and management of C. perfringens bacteremia. This case indicates a need for high clinical suspicion for clostridial sepsis and that extended spectrum beta lactam antibiotic coverage may be inadequate and should be supplemented with use of clindamycin or metronidazole if culture is positive, until sensitivities are known. PMID:26904307

  15. Antibiotic resistance of Clostridium perfringens isolates from broiler chickens in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Osman, K M; Elhariri, M

    2013-12-01

    The use of antibiotic feed additives in broiler chickens results in a high prevalence of resistance among their enteric bacteria, with a consequent emergence of antibiotic resistance in zoonotic enteropathogens. Despite growing concerns about the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, which show varying prevalences in different geographic regions, little work has been done to investigate this issue in the Middle East. This study provides insight into one of the world's most common and financially crippling poultry diseases, necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens. The study was designed to determine the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in C. perfringens isolates from clinical cases of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens in Egypt. A total of 125 isolates were obtained from broiler flocks in 35 chicken coops on 17 farms and were tested using the disc diffusion method. All 125 isolates were resistant to gentamicin, streptomycin, oxolinic acid, lincomycin, erythromycin and spiramycin. The prevalence of resistance to other antibiotics was also high: rifampicin (34%), chloramphenicol (46%), spectinomycin (50%), tylosin-fosfomycin (52%), ciprofloxacin (58%), norfloxacin (67%), oxytetracycline (71%), flumequine (78%), enrofloxacin (82%), neomycin (93%), colistin (94%), pefloxacin (94%), doxycycline (98%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (98%). It is recommended that C. perfringens infections in Egypt should be treated with antibiotics for which resistant isolates are rare at present; namely, amoxicillin, ampicillin, cephradine, fosfomycin and florfenicol. PMID:24761735

  16. Impedance Analysis of Ovarian Cancer Cells upon Challenge with C-terminal Clostridium Perfringens Enterotoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Geoffrey; Lo, Chun-Min

    2007-03-01

    Both in vitro and animal studies in breast, prostate, and ovarian cancers have shown that clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), which binds to CLDN4, may have an important therapeutic benefit, as it is rapidly cytotoxic in tissues overexpressing CLDN4. This study sought to evaluate the ability of C-terminal clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE), a CLDN4-targetting molecule, to disrupt tight junction barrier function. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) was used to measure both junctional resistance and average cell-substrate separation of ovarian cancer cell lines after exposure to C-CPE. A total of 14 ovarian cancer cell lines were used, and included cell lines derived from serous, mucinous, and clear cells. Our results showed that junctional resistance increases as CLDN4 expression increases. In addition, C-CPE is non-cytotoxic in ovarian cancer cells expressing CLDN4. However, exposure to C-CPE results in a significant (p<0.05) dose- and CLDN4-dependent decrease in junctional resistance and an increase in cell-substrate separation. Treatment of ovarian cancer cell lines with C-CPE disrupts tight junction barrier function.

  17. TRANSLOCATION OF CAMPYLOBACTER, SALMONELLA AND CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS TO SEVERAL LYMPHOID ORGANS FOLLOWING ORAL OR INTRACLOACAL INOCULATION OF BROILER CHICKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Day old broiler chicks were either orally or intracloacally inoculated with a 100ul suspension containing 106-109 cells of one of three marker strains of either Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella spp. or Clostridium perfringens. At one hour, one day and one week following inoculation, five birds from...

  18. CONTROL OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS GERMINATION AND OUTGROWTH BY BUFFERED SODIUM CITRATE DURING CHILLING OF ROAST BEEF AND INJECTED PORK.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens germination and outgrowth by buffered sodium citrate and buffered sodium citrate supplemented with sodium diacetate was evaluated during abusive chilling of roast beef and injected pork. Beef top rounds and pork loins were injected with a brine containing NaCl (...

  19. Control of Clostridium perfringens Spores by Green Tea Leaf Extracts During Cooling of Cooked Ground Beef, Chicken, and Pork

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by two green tea extracts with low (GTL; 141 mg total catechins/g of green tea extract) and high (GTE; 697 mg total catechins/g of extract) catechin levels during abusive chilling of retail cooked ground beef, ...

  20. AN EVALUATION OF ASCORBIC ACID AS A QUORUM SENSING ANALOGUE TO CONTROL GROWTH, SPORULATION, AND ENTEROTOXIN PRODUCTION IN CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of quorum sensing by enterotoxin-producing strains of Clostridium perfringens was investigated. Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) activity was measured in the presence and absence of ascorbic acid (vitamin C; concentrations ranging from 10 to 300 mM), an AI-2 analogue. Subsequent effects on AI-2 pro...

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium perfringens Strain JJC, a Highly Efficient Hydrogen Producer Isolated from Landfill Leachate Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Y. M.; Gan, H. M.; Austin, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens strain JJC is an effective biohydrogen and biochemical producer that was isolated from landfill leachate sludge. Here, we present the assembly and annotation of its genome, which may provide further insights into the gene interactions involved in efficient biohydrogen production. PMID:24604637

  2. CONTROL OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS GERMINATION AND OUTGROWTH BY BUFFERED SODIUM CITRATE DURING CHILLING OF ROAST BEEF AND INJECTED PORK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens germination and outgrowth by buffered sodium citrate and buffered sodium citrate supplemented with sodium diacetate was evaluated during abusive chilling of roast beef and injected pork. Beef top rounds and pork loins were injected with a brine containing NaCl (...

  3. CARVACROL, CINNAMALDEHYDE, OREGANO OIL, AND THYMOL INHIBIT CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS SPORE GERMINATION AND OUTGROWTH IN GROUND TURKEY DURING CHILLING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens by plant-derived carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, thymol, and oregano oil was evaluated during abusive chilling of cooked ground turkey (75% lean) obtained from a local grocery store. Test substances were mixed into thawed turkey product at concentrations of 0.1, 0.5...

  4. Necrotizing enterocolitis and death in a goat kid associated with enterotoxin (CPE)-producing Clostridium perfringens type A

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez Miyakawa, Mariano E.; Saputo, Julian; St. Leger, Judy; Puschner, Birgit; Fisher, Derek J.; McClane, Bruce A.; Uzal, Francisco A.

    2007-01-01

    A goat kid died after being depressed for several days. No significant gross abnormalities were observed at postmortem examination, while histopathological analysis revealed diffuse necrotizing enterocolitis. Isolation of Clostridium perfringens type A secreting enterotoxin (CPE) and presence of CPE in the small intestine suggest that CPE contributed to the death of this kid. PMID:18189049

  5. Effect of phosphate and meat (pork) types on the germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores during abusive chilling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of blends of phosphates and the pork meat type (pale, soft and exudative, PSE; normal; and dark, firm and dry, DFD) on the germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens during abusive exponential chilling times was evaluated. Two different phosphates, tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSP...

  6. Molecular Characterization of Podoviral Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Their Comparison with Members of the Picovirinae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal, and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control b...

  7. Differential proteomic analysis of Clostridium perfringens ATCC13124; identification of dominant, surface and structure associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Clostridium perfringens is a medically important clostridial pathogen causing diseases in man and animals. To invade, multiply and colonize tissues of the host, a pathogen must be able to evade host immune system, and obtain nutrients essential for growth. The factors involved in these complex processes are largely unknown and of crucial importance to understanding microbial pathogenesis. Many of the virulence determinants and putative vaccine candidates for bacterial pathogens are known to be surface localized. Results Using 2-DE mass spectrometry strategy, we identified major surface (22) and cell envelope (10) proteins from Clostridium perfringens ATCC13124 and those differentially expressed (11) in cells grown on cooked meat medium (CMM) in comparison with cells grown in reference state (tryptose-yeast extract-glucose medium). Riboflavin biosynthesis protein, ornithine carbamoyltransferase, cystathionine beta-lyase, and threonine dehydratase were the predominant proteins that exhibited 2.19 to 8.5 fold increase in the expression level in cells growing on CMM. Conclusion Ornithine carbamoyltransferase and cystathionine beta-lyase were over-expressed in cells grown on cooked meat medium and also identified in the surface protein fraction and the former was immunogenic; making them potential vaccine candidates. Based upon bioinformatic analysis; choloylglycine hydrolase family protein, cell wall-associated serine proteinase, and rhomboid family protein were predicted as surface protein markers for specific detection of C. perfringens from the environment and food. Most of the proteins over-expressed in CMM were shown to have putative function in metabolism, of which seven were involved in amino acid transport and metabolism or lipid metabolism. PMID:19664283

  8. Epidemiological and pathobiological profiles of Clostridium perfringens infections: review of consecutive series of 33 cases over a 13-year period

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Yuji; Dobashi, Yoh; Sakai, Toshiyasu; Monma, Chie; Miyatani, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is well known as the causative agent of several forms of enteric disease, precise epidemiological and pathobiological aspects are still unknown. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the culture results of samples collected in our hospital from 2001 through 2013. In addition, for the detection and toxinogenic typing of C. perfringens, polymerase-chain-reaction amplification (PCR)-based rapid analysis was performed in 6 cases using DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded tissues. Results: A total of 35 samples from 33 cases were positive for C. perfringens, representing an incidence of 0.017% (35/205, 114). Among 33 patients, 21 patients manifested sepsis and 7 patients had bacteremia. One of the septic cases was complicated by fatal intravascular hemolysis and thus, the prevalence was estimated at 3.0% among C. perfringens infections (1/33). The direct causative disease or state for C. perfringens infection was identified in 18 patients: surgery or intervention for cancers, 8 patients; chemotherapy for cancer, 2 patients; surgery or intervention for non-neoplastic disease, 6 patients; liver cirrhosis, 3 patients, etc. PCR-based toxinogenic typing of C. perfringens detected the alpha-toxin gene only in tissue from a patient who died of massive hemolysis; none of the toxin genes could be amplified in the other 5 cases examined. Conclusions: The prevalence of overt C. perfringens infection is low, but upon detection, infected patients should be carefully monitored for fatal acute hemolysis caused by type A C. perfringens. Furthermore, PCR-based rapid detection of C. perfringens and toxinogenic typing by archival pathological material is applicable as a diagnostic tool. PMID:25755747

  9. Association between avian necrotic enteritis and Clostridium perfringens strains expressing NetB toxin

    PubMed Central

    Keyburn, Anthony L.; Yan, Xu-Xia; Bannam, Trudi L.; Van Immerseel, Filip; Rood, Julian I.; Moore, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    A novel toxin, NetB, has recently been identified in virulent avian Clostridium perfringens isolates and shown to be an essential virulence factor in a clinical necrotic enteritis isolate. To assess whether NetB is more generally associated with avian necrotic enteritis isolates we have screened a range of C. perfringens strains from geographically diverse locations for both the presence and expression of the netB gene. Forty-four isolates were derived from necrotic enteritis disease cases from Australia, Belgium, Denmark and Canada and 55 isolates from healthy chickens from Australia and Belgium. The majority of strains isolated from necrotic enteritis-affected birds were netB positive (70%) and there was an absolute correlation between the presence of netB and in vitro expression of the NetB protein. Only two of the C. perfringens isolates from healthy chickens carried netB. Sequencing of the netB gene from 23 positive isolates showed that NetB is highly conserved, with only one predicted amino acid (A168T) difference, in six isolates, compared to the published sequence. This change did not alter the in vitro activity of the NetB toxin. The gene encoding the recently discovered TpeL toxin was also screened using PCR and only found in a small proportion of NetB-positive isolates from diseased birds. A selection of NetB-negative isolates, originating from diseased birds, was unable to cause disease in a necrotic enteritis induction model. This study provides further evidence that NetB is important in pathogenesis and advances our current understanding of C. perfringens virulence factors in avian necrotic enteritis. PMID:19931005

  10. Structural and biochemical analyses of a Clostridium perfringens sortase D transpeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Suryadinata, Randy Seabrook, Shane A.; Adams, Timothy E.; Nuttall, Stewart D.; Peat, Thomas S.

    2015-06-30

    The structure of C. perfringens sortase D was determined at 1.99 Å resolution. Comparative biochemical and structural analyses revealed that this transpeptidase may represent a new subclass of the sortase D family. The assembly and anchorage of various pathogenic proteins on the surface of Gram-positive bacteria is mediated by the sortase family of enzymes. These cysteine transpeptidases catalyze a unique sorting signal motif located at the C-terminus of their target substrate and promote the covalent attachment of these proteins onto an amino nucleophile located on another protein or on the bacterial cell wall. Each of the six distinct classes of sortases displays a unique biological role, with sequential activation of multiple sortases often observed in many Gram-positive bacteria to decorate their peptidoglycans. Less is known about the members of the class D family of sortases (SrtD), but they have a suggested role in spore formation in an oxygen-limiting environment. Here, the crystal structure of the SrtD enzyme from Clostridium perfringens was determined at 1.99 Å resolution. Comparative analysis of the C. perfringens SrtD structure reveals the typical eight-stranded β-barrel fold observed in all other known sortases, along with the conserved catalytic triad consisting of cysteine, histidine and arginine residues. Biochemical approaches further reveal the specifics of the SrtD catalytic activity in vitro, with a significant preference for the LPQTGS sorting motif. Additionally, the catalytic activity of SrtD is most efficient at 316 K and can be further improved in the presence of magnesium cations. Since C. perfringens spores are heat-resistant and lead to foodborne illnesses, characterization of the spore-promoting sortase SrtD may lead to the development of new antimicrobial agents.

  11. A Five Site Clostridium Perfringens Food-Borne Outbreak: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    FAFANGEL, Mario; UČAKAR, Veronika; VUDRAG, Marko; BERCE, Ingrid; KRAIGHER, Alenka

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In May of 2012, we investigated a food-borne Clostridium perfringens outbreak in Slovenia involving a single kitchen and five venues, with 477 exposed persons. Methods In order to identify the causative agent, vehicle of infection and source of contamination, we conducted microbiological and environmental investigations and an analytical cohort study (n = 138). Results The case definition in the outbreak was met by 104 persons. Predominant symptoms were diarrhoea, nausea and abdominal cramps. Median incubation time and duration of illness were 12 and 22.5 hours respectively. Stool samples were collected from 18 persons and in 13 C. perfringens spores were present; enterotoxin was detected in 9 persons. PCR and PFGE analysis of isolates from a cook with earlier onset time, who did not consume the implicated food, and cases from four venues showed the same strain of C. perfringens type A (with cpe-gene), indistinguishable by PFGE analysis. No food samples could be obtained. An analytical study showed that one food item (French salad) was the most likely vehicle of infection (RR: 6.35; 95% CI: 1.62–24.90). Conclusions This was the largest C. perfringens outbreak in Slovenia to date. Proper analytical study in combination with detailed laboratory investigation with genotypisation enabled us to identify a causative agent, vehicle of infection and possible source of contamination. Fast response and interdisciplinary collaboration led to timely implementation of control measures. These have led to the kitchen acquiring new equipment and improving staff knowledge of risks and processes, thus reducing the likelihood of future reoccurrences.

  12. Regulation of Sialidase Production in Clostridium perfringens by the Orphan Sensor Histidine Kinase ReeS

    PubMed Central

    Hiscox, Thomas J.; Harrison, Paul F.; Chakravorty, Anjana; Choo, Jocelyn M.; Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is ubiquitous in nature and is often found as a commensal of the human and animal gastrointestinal tract. It is the primary etiological agent of clostridial myonecrosis, or gas gangrene, a serious infection that results in extensive tissue necrosis due to the action of one or more potent extracellular toxins. ?-toxin and perfringolysin O are the major extracellular toxins involved in the pathogenesis of gas gangrene, but histotoxic strains of C. perfringens, such as strain 13, also produce many degradative enzymes such as collagenases, hyaluronidases, sialidases and the cysteine protease, ?-clostripain. The production of many of these toxins is regulated either directly or indirectly by the global VirSR two-component signal transduction system. By isolating a chromosomal mutant and carrying out microarray analysis we have identified an orphan sensor histidine kinase, which we have named ReeS (regulator of extracellular enzymes sensor). Expression of the sialidase genes nanI and nanJ was down-regulated in a reeS mutant. Since complementation with the wild-type reeS gene restored nanI and nanJ expression to wild-type levels, as shown by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and sialidase assays we concluded that ReeS positively regulates the expression of these sialidase genes. However, mutation of the reeS gene had no significant effect on virulence in the mouse myonecrosis model. Sialidase production in C. perfringens has been previously shown to be regulated by both the VirSR system and RevR. In this report, we have analyzed a previously unknown sensor histidine kinase, ReeS, and have shown that it also is involved in controlling the expression of sialidase genes, adding further complexity to the regulatory network that controls sialidase production in C. perfringens. PMID:24023881

  13. Comparative genomics of VirR regulons in Clostridium perfringens strains

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium causing severe diseases such as gas gangrene and pseudomembranosus colitis, that are generally due to the secretion of powerful extracellular toxins. The expression of toxin genes is mainly regulated by VirR, the response regulator of a two-component system. Up to now few targets only are known for this regulator and mainly in one strain (Strain 13). Due to the high genomic and phenotypic variability in toxin production by different strains, the development of effective strategies to counteract C. perfringens infections requires methodologies to reconstruct the VirR regulon from genome sequences. Results We implemented a two step computational strategy allowing to consider available information concerning VirR binding sites in a few species to scan all genomes of the same species, assuming the VirR targets are at least partially conserved across these strains. Results obtained are in agreement with previous works where experimental validation of the promoters have been performed and showed the presence of a core and an accessory regulon of VirR in C. perfringens strains with three target genes also located on plasmids. Moreover, the type E strain JGS1987 has the largest predicted regulon with as many as 10 VirR targets not found in the other genomes. Conclusions In this work we exploited available experimental information concerning the targets of the VirR toxin regulator in one C. perfringens strain to obtain plausible predictions concerning target genes in genomes and plasmids of nearby strains. Our predictions are available for wet-lab researchers working on less characterized C. perfringens strains that can thus design focused experiments reducing the search space of their experiments and increasing the probability of characterizing positive targets with less efforts. Main result was that the VirR regulon is variable in different C. perfringens strains with 4 genes controlled in all but one strains and most genes controlled in one or two strains only. PMID:20184757

  14. Production of a bacteriocin by a poultry derived Campylobacter jejuni isolate with antimicrobial activity against Clostridium perfringens and other Gram positive bacteria.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have purified a bacteriocin peptide (termed CUV-3), produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni (strain CUV-3) with inhibitory activity against Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Listeria mon...

  15. Expression of a Clostridium perfringens genome-encoded putative N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase as a potential antimicrobial to control the bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a substantial role in non-foodborne human, animal and avian diseases as well as human foodborne disease. Previously discovered C. perfringens bacteriophage lytic enzyme amino acid sequences were utilized to iden...

  16. Mucin gene mRNA levels in broilers challenged with eimeria and/or Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Kitessa, Soressa M; Nattrass, Gregory S; Forder, Rebecca E A; McGrice, Hayley A; Wu, Shu-Biao; Hughes, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    The effects of Eimeria (EM) and Clostridium perfringens (CP) challenges on the mRNA levels of genes involved in mucin (Muc) synthesis (Muc2, Muc5ac, Muc13, and trefoil family factor-2 [TFF2]), inflammation (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha] and interleukin-18 [IL-18]), and metabolic processes (cluster of differentiation [CD]36) in the jejunum of broilers were investigated. Two parallel experiments involving 1) EM challenge and 2) EM and CP challenges were conducted. The first experiment was a 2 X 2 study with 12 birds per treatment (N = 48) involving fishmeal substitution (25%) in the diet (FM) and EM challenge. The treatments were: Control (FM-, EM-), Fishmeal (FM+, EM-), EM challenge (FM-, EM+), and fishmeal substitution and EM challenge (FM+, EM+). The second experiment was a 2 X 2 X 2 experiment with six birds per treatment (N = 48) involving fishmeal (FM-, FM+), Eimeria (EM-, EM+), and C perfringens (CP-, CP+). In both arms of the study, male broilers were given a starter diet for the whole period of 16 days, except those assigned to FM+, where 25% of the starter ration was replaced with fishmeal from days 8 to 14. EM inoculation was performed on day 9 and CP inoculation on days 14 and 15. The EM challenge birds were euthanatized for sampling on day 13; postmortem examination and sampling for the Eimeria plus C perfringens challenge arm of the study were on day 16. In the Eimeria challenge arm of the study, fishmeal supplementation significantly suppressed the mRNA levels of TNF-alpha, TFF2, and IL-18 pre-CP inoculation but simultaneously increased the levels of Muc13 and CD36 mRNAs. Birds challenged with Eimeria exhibited increased mRNA levels of Muc13, Muc5ac, TNF-alpha, and IL-18. In the Eimeria and C. perfringens challenge arm, birds exposed to EM challenge exhibited significantly lower mRNA levels of Muc2 and CD36. The mRNA levels of CD36 were also significantly suppressed by CP challenge. Our results showed that the transcription of mucin synthesis genes in the jejunum of broilers is modulated by fishmeal inclusion in the diet. Furthermore, we show for the first time suppression of CD36 mRNA levels in the intestine of broilers challenged with Eimeria or C. perfringens. PMID:25518436

  17. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Clostridium perfringens ?-Toxin Cytotoxicity Using a Cell-Based High-Throughput Screen

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michelle; Weaver, Charles David; McClain, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    The Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin, a select agent, is responsible for a severe, often fatal enterotoxemia characterized by edema in the heart, lungs, kidney, and brain. The toxin is believed to be an oligomeric pore-forming toxin. Currently, there is no effective therapy for countering the cytotoxic activity of the toxin in exposed individuals. Using a robust cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay, we screened a 151,616-compound library for the ability to inhibit ?-toxin-induced cytotoxicity. Survival of MDCK cells exposed to the toxin was assessed by addition of resazurin to detect metabolic activity in surviving cells. The hit rate for this screen was 0.6%. Following a secondary screen of each hit in triplicate and assays to eliminate false positives, we focused on three structurally-distinct compounds: an N-cycloalkylbenzamide, a furo[2,3-b]quinoline, and a 6H-anthra[1,9-cd]isoxazol. None of the three compounds appeared to inhibit toxin binding to cells or the ability of the toxin to form oligomeric complexes. Additional assays demonstrated that two of the inhibitory compounds inhibited ?-toxin-induced permeabilization of MDCK cells to propidium iodide. Furthermore, the two compounds exhibited inhibitory effects on cells pre-treated with toxin. Structural analogs of one of the inhibitors identified through the high-throughput screen were analyzed and provided initial structure-activity data. These compounds should serve as the basis for further structure-activity refinement that may lead to the development of effective anti-?-toxin therapeutics. PMID:20721308

  18. Growth and physiology of Clostridium perfringens wild-type and ΔazoC knockout: an azo dye exposure study.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens, a strictly anaerobic micro-organism and inhabitant of the human intestine, has been shown to produce the azoreductase enzyme AzoC, an NAD(P)H-dependent flavin oxidoreductase. This enzyme reduces azo dyes to aromatic amines, which are carcinogenic in nature. A significant amount of work has been completed that focuses on the activity of this enzyme; however, few studies have been completed that focus on the physiology of azo dye reduction. Dye reduction studies coupled with C. perfringens growth studies in the presence of ten different azo dyes and in media of varying complexities were completed to compare the growth rates and dye-reducing activity of C. perfringens WT cells, a C. perfringens ΔazoC knockout, and Bifidobacterium infantis, a non-azoreductase-producing control bacterium. The presence of azo dyes significantly increased the generation time of C. perfringens in rich medium, an effect that was not seen in minimal medium. In addition, azo dye reduction studies with the ΔazoC knockout suggested the presence of additional functional azoreductases in this medically important bacterium. Overall, this study addresses a major gap in the literature by providing the first look, to our knowledge, at the complex physiology of C. perfringens upon azo dye exposure and the effect that both azo dyes and the azoreductase enzyme have on growth. PMID:26566621

  19. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens TpeL Toxin Gene Carriage, Production, Cytotoxic Contributions, and Trypsin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Large clostridial toxins (LCTs) are produced by at least four pathogenic clostridial species, and several LCTs are proven pivotal virulence factors for both human and veterinary diseases. TpeL is a recently identified LCT produced by Clostridium perfringens that has received relatively limited study. In response, the current study surveyed carriage of the tpeL gene among different C. perfringens strains, detecting this toxin gene in some type A, B, and C strains but not in any type D or E strains. This study also determined that all tested strains maximally produce, and extracellularly release, TpeL at the late-log or early-stationary growth stage during in vitro culture, which is different from the maximal late-stationary-phase production reported previously for other LCTs and for TpeL production by C. perfringens strain JIR12688. In addition, the present study found that TpeL levels in culture supernatants can be repressed by either glucose or sucrose. It was also shown that, at natural production levels, TpeL is a significant contributor to the cytotoxic activity of supernatants from cultures of tpeL-positive strain CN3685. Lastly, this study identified TpeL, which presumably is produced in the intestines during diseases caused by TpeL-positive type B and C strains, as a toxin whose cytotoxicity decreases after treatment with trypsin; this finding may have pathophysiologic relevance by suggesting that, like beta toxin, TpeL contributes to type B and C infections in hosts with decreased trypsin levels due to disease, diet, or age. PMID:25824828

  20. Identification of Novel Pathogenicity Loci in Clostridium perfringens Strains That Cause Avian Necrotic Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, Valeria R.; Marri, Pradeep R.; Rosey, Everett L.; Gong, Joshua; Songer, J. Glenn; Vedantam, Gayatri; Prescott, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Type A Clostridium perfringens causes poultry necrotic enteritis (NE), an enteric disease of considerable economic importance, yet can also exist as a member of the normal intestinal microbiota. A recently discovered pore-forming toxin, NetB, is associated with pathogenesis in most, but not all, NE isolates. This finding suggested that NE-causing strains may possess other virulence gene(s) not present in commensal type A isolates. We used high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies to generate draft genome sequences of seven unrelated C. perfringens poultry NE isolates and one isolate from a healthy bird, and identified additional novel NE-associated genes by comparison with nine publicly available reference genomes. Thirty-one open reading frames (ORFs) were unique to all NE strains and formed the basis for three highly conserved NE-associated loci that we designated NELoc-1 (42 kb), NELoc-2 (11.2 kb) and NELoc-3 (5.6 kb). The largest locus, NELoc-1, consisted of netB and 36 additional genes, including those predicted to encode two leukocidins, an internalin-like protein and a ricin-domain protein. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Southern blotting revealed that the NE strains each carried 2 to 5 large plasmids, and that NELoc-1 and -3 were localized on distinct plasmids of sizes ∼85 and ∼70 kb, respectively. Sequencing of the regions flanking these loci revealed similarity to previously characterized conjugative plasmids of C. perfringens. These results provide significant insight into the pathogenetic basis of poultry NE and are the first to demonstrate that netB resides in a large, plasmid-encoded locus. Our findings strongly suggest that poultry NE is caused by several novel virulence factors, whose genes are clustered on discrete pathogenicity loci, some of which are plasmid-borne. PMID:20532244

  1. Structural and biochemical analyses of a Clostridium perfringens sortase D transpeptidase.

    PubMed

    Suryadinata, Randy; Seabrook, Shane A; Adams, Timothy E; Nuttall, Stewart D; Peat, Thomas S

    2015-07-01

    The assembly and anchorage of various pathogenic proteins on the surface of Gram-positive bacteria is mediated by the sortase family of enzymes. These cysteine transpeptidases catalyze a unique sorting signal motif located at the C-terminus of their target substrate and promote the covalent attachment of these proteins onto an amino nucleophile located on another protein or on the bacterial cell wall. Each of the six distinct classes of sortases displays a unique biological role, with sequential activation of multiple sortases often observed in many Gram-positive bacteria to decorate their peptidoglycans. Less is known about the members of the class D family of sortases (SrtD), but they have a suggested role in spore formation in an oxygen-limiting environment. Here, the crystal structure of the SrtD enzyme from Clostridium perfringens was determined at 1.99 Å resolution. Comparative analysis of the C. perfringens SrtD structure reveals the typical eight-stranded β-barrel fold observed in all other known sortases, along with the conserved catalytic triad consisting of cysteine, histidine and arginine residues. Biochemical approaches further reveal the specifics of the SrtD catalytic activity in vitro, with a significant preference for the LPQTGS sorting motif. Additionally, the catalytic activity of SrtD is most efficient at 316 K and can be further improved in the presence of magnesium cations. Since C. perfringens spores are heat-resistant and lead to foodborne illnesses, characterization of the spore-promoting sortase SrtD may lead to the development of new antimicrobial agents. PMID:26143922

  2. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens TpeL toxin gene carriage, production, cytotoxic contributions, and trypsin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianming; McClane, Bruce A

    2015-06-01

    Large clostridial toxins (LCTs) are produced by at least four pathogenic clostridial species, and several LCTs are proven pivotal virulence factors for both human and veterinary diseases. TpeL is a recently identified LCT produced by Clostridium perfringens that has received relatively limited study. In response, the current study surveyed carriage of the tpeL gene among different C. perfringens strains, detecting this toxin gene in some type A, B, and C strains but not in any type D or E strains. This study also determined that all tested strains maximally produce, and extracellularly release, TpeL at the late-log or early-stationary growth stage during in vitro culture, which is different from the maximal late-stationary-phase production reported previously for other LCTs and for TpeL production by C. perfringens strain JIR12688. In addition, the present study found that TpeL levels in culture supernatants can be repressed by either glucose or sucrose. It was also shown that, at natural production levels, TpeL is a significant contributor to the cytotoxic activity of supernatants from cultures of tpeL-positive strain CN3685. Lastly, this study identified TpeL, which presumably is produced in the intestines during diseases caused by TpeL-positive type B and C strains, as a toxin whose cytotoxicity decreases after treatment with trypsin; this finding may have pathophysiologic relevance by suggesting that, like beta toxin, TpeL contributes to type B and C infections in hosts with decreased trypsin levels due to disease, diet, or age. PMID:25824828

  3. Specificity of Interaction between Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin and Claudin-Family Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Leslie A.; Koval, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), a major cause of food poisoning, forms physical pores in the plasma membrane of intestinal epithelial cells. The ability of CPE to recognize the epithelium is due to the C-terminal binding domain, which binds to a specific motif on the second extracellular loop of tight junction proteins known as claudins. The interaction between claudins and CPE plays a key role in mediating CPE toxicity by facilitating pore formation and by promoting tight junction disassembly. Recently, the ability of CPE to distinguish between specific claudins has been used to develop tools for studying roles for claudins in epithelial barrier function. Moreover, the high affinity of CPE to selected claudins makes CPE a useful platform for targeted drug delivery to tumors expressing these claudins. PMID:22069652

  4. Claudins Overexpression in Ovarian Cancer: Potential Targets for Clostridium Perfringens Enterotoxin (CPE) Based Diagnosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    English, Diana P.; Santin, Alessandro D.

    2013-01-01

    Claudins are a family of tight junction proteins regulating paracellular permeability and cell polarity with different patterns of expression in benign and malignant human tissues. There are approximately 27 members of the claudin family identified to date with varying cell and tissue-specific expression. Claudins-3, -4 and -7 represent the most highly differentially expressed claudins in ovarian cancer. While their exact role in ovarian tumors is still being elucidated, these proteins are thought to be critical for ovarian cancer cell invasion/dissemination and resistance to chemotherapy. Claudin-3 and claudin-4 are the natural receptors for the Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), a potent cytolytic toxin. These surface proteins may therefore represent attractive targets for the detection and treatment of chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer and other aggressive solid tumors overexpressing claudin-3 and -4 using CPE-based theranostic agents. PMID:23685873

  5. Antimicrobial activities of six essential oils commonly used as condiments in Brazil against Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, Marcela; da Silva, Bárbara Parraga; Weidlich, Luciana; Hoehne, Lucélia; Flach, Adriana; da Costa, Luiz Antonio Mendonça Alves; Ethur, Eduardo Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in food production technology, food-borne diseases (FBD) remain a challenging public health concern. In several countries, including Brazil, Clostridium perfringens is among the five main causative agents of food-borne diseases. The present study determines antimicrobial activities of essential oils of six condiments commonly used in Brazil, viz., Ocimum basilicum L. (basil), Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary), Origanum majorana L. (marjoram), Mentha × piperita L. var. Piperita (peppermint), Thymus vulgaris L. (thyme) and Pimpinella anisum L. (anise) against C. perfringens strain A. Chemical compositions of the oils were determined by GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). The identities of the isolated compounds were established from the respective Kováts indices, and a comparison of mass spectral data was made with those reported earlier. The antibacterial activity was assessed from minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) using the microdilution method. Minimum inhibitory concentration values were 1.25mgmL(-1) for thyme, 5.0mgmL(-1) for basil and marjoram, and 10mgmL(-1) for rosemary, peppermint and anise. All oils showed bactericidal activity at their minimum inhibitory concentration, except anise oil, which was only bacteriostatic. The use of essential oils from these common spices might serve as an alternative to the use of chemical preservatives in the control and inactivation of pathogens in commercially produced food systems. PMID:26991289

  6. Clostridium perfringens beta2-toxin in an African elephant (Loxodonta africana) with ulcerative enteritis.

    PubMed

    Bacciarini, L N; Pagan, O; Frey, J; Grne, A

    2001-11-17

    A 22-year-old female African elephant (Loxodonta africana) developed diarrhoea of unknown cause which lasted for two days. The animal was euthanased after it remained recumbent and refused to get up. Gross pathological changes were present mainly in the gastrointestinal tract. The intestinal contents were watery and dark brown. Several areas of the mucosa of the small intestine were covered minimally to moderately with fibrin and had a few 0.1 x 10 to 15 cm linear ulcerations. Microscopical lesions consisted of discrete areas of necrosis of the surface and crypt epithelium without overt inflammatory infiltrates. Culture of the small intestinal contents resulted in a moderate growth of Clostridium perfringens. No salmonella were found in the small or large intestine. PCR of the isolate of C. perfringens revealed the presence of the beta2-toxin gene cpb2 and the alpha-toxin gene cpa but no other known toxin genes. The expression of the beta2-toxin gene in vivo was demonstrated by the immunohistochemical localisation of the beta2-toxin to the microscopical lesions in the small intestine. PMID:11761293

  7. Biochemistry and Physiology of the ? Class Carbonic Anhydrase (Cpb) from Clostridium perfringens Strain 13

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R. Siva Sai; Hendrick, William; Correll, Jared B.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Melville, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    The carbonic anhydrase (Cpb) from Clostridium perfringens strain 13, the only carbonic anhydrase encoded in the genome, was characterized both biochemically and physiologically. Heterologously produced and purified Cpb was shown to belong to the type I subclass of the ? class, the first ? class enzyme investigated from a strictly anaerobic species of the domain Bacteria. Kinetic analyses revealed a two-step, ping-pong, zinc-hydroxide mechanism of catalysis with Km and kcat/Km values of 3.1 mM CO2 and 4.8 106 s?1 M?1, respectively. Analyses of a cpb deletion mutant of C. perfringens strain HN13 showed that Cpb is strictly required for growth when cultured in semidefined medium and an atmosphere without CO2. The growth of the mutant was the same as that of the parent wild-type strain when cultured in nutrient-rich media with or without CO2 in the atmosphere, although elimination of glucose resulted in decreased production of acetate, propionate, and butyrate. The results suggest a role for Cpb in anaplerotic CO2 fixation reactions by supplying bicarbonate to carboxylases. Potential roles in competitive fitness are discussed. PMID:23475974

  8. Recovery of Heated Clostridium perfringens Type A Spores on Selective Media1

    PubMed Central

    Barach, J. T.; Adams, D. M.; Speck, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    The enumeration of Clostridium perfringens spores on sulfite-polymyxin-sulfadiazine agar (SPS), tryptone-sulfite-neomycin agar (TSN), Shahidi-Ferguson-perfringens agar (SFP), tryptone-sulfite-cycloserine agar (TSC), and TSN lacking antibiotics (BASE) was studied. The spores were heated at 105 to 120 C by the capillary-tube method. The media were about equally efficient for the enumeration of heat-activated spores. Efficiency of the media for the recovery of spores surviving heat treatments at ultrahigh temperatures varied as follows: TSC ≥ SFP > BASE > SPS > TSN. Greater recovery when survivors were enumerated on TSC or SFP was attributed to germination of injured spores by the lysozyme present in the egg yolk emulsion used in these media. Low recovery of survivors on TSN and SPS was due to both the absence of lysozyme and inhibition of injured spores by the selective agents of these media. Recovery of heated spores was reduced greatly by polymyxin, neomycin, and kanamycin, and slightly by sulfadiazine and D-cycloserine. The addition of lysozyme to SPS or TSN did not improve the percentage of heat-injured spores recovered because the selective agents of these media interfered with the action of lysozyme. The suitability of the selective media for the enumeration of survivors was greatly affected by the presence of certain foods. PMID:4374120

  9. Identification of galacto-N-biose phosphorylase from Clostridium perfringens ATCC13124.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masahiro; Nihira, Takanori; Nishimoto, Mamoru; Kitaoka, Motomitsu

    2008-03-01

    Lacto-N-biose phosphorylase (LNBP) from bifidobacteria is involved in the metabolism of lacto-N-biose I (Galbeta1-->3GlcNAc, LNB) and galacto-N-biose (Galbeta1-->3GalNAc, GNB). A homologous gene of LNBP (CPF0553 protein) was identified in the genome of Clostridium perfringens ATCC13124, which is a gram-positive anaerobic intestinal bacterium. In the present study, we cloned the gene and compared the substrate specificity of the CPF0553 protein with LNBP from Bifidobacterium longum JCM1217 (LNBPBl). In the presence of alpha-galactose 1-phosphate (Gal 1-P) as a donor, the CPF0553 protein acted only on GlcNAc and GalNAc, and GalNAc was a more effective acceptor than GlcNAc. The reaction product from GlcNAc/GalNAc and Gal 1-P was identified as LNB or GNB. The CPF0553 protein also phosphorolyzed GNB much faster than LNB, which suggests that the protein should be named galacto-N-biose phosphorylase (GNBP). GNBP showed a kcat/Km value for GNB that was approximately 50 times higher than that for LNB, whereas LNBPBl showed similar kcat/Km values for both GNB and LNB. Because C. perfringens possesses a gene coding endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, GNBP may play a role in the intestinal residence by metabolizing GNB that is available as a mucin core sugar. PMID:18183385

  10. Purification and characterization of a recombinant alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hsin-Yeh; Calcutt, Michael J; Chapman, Linda F; Mitra, Moonmoon; Smith, Daniel S

    2003-12-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alphaNAG) hydrolyzed the terminal N-acetyl-alpha-d-galactosamine from the blood type A(2) antigen producing H antigen, blood type O. Blood type O is universally compatible in the ABO system. Purification of the native enzyme is difficult with very low yields. To obtain the enzyme in satisfactory yield, the gene encoding the clostridial enzyme was cloned in an Escherichia coli T7 expression system. A highly purified preparation of recombinant alphaNAG was obtained from cell lysates by ion-exchange chromatography and high-pressure liquid chromatography. The final preparation was homogeneous by SDS-PAGE with a molecular mass of 71.96kDa and the native molecular weight of 72.42kDa. The enzyme was highly selective for terminal N-acetylgalactosamine residues. No other significant exoglycosidase activities, particularly neuraminidase, were detected. The pH optimum of the enzyme was between 6.5 and 7.0 and activity was relatively unaffected by ionic strength. ELISA experiments demonstrated activity against blood type A(2) epitope. These characteristics were similar to those of native alphaNAG from C. perfringens. With adequate expression in E. coli, sufficient recombinant alphaNAG enzyme mass can be obtained for potential use in enzymatic conversion of human blood type A(2) red blood cells to universally transfusable type O red blood cells. PMID:14965778

  11. The Structure of Clostridium perfringens NanI Sialidase and Its Catalytic Intermediates*

    PubMed Central

    Newstead, Simon L.; Potter, Jane A.; Wilson, Jennifer C.; Xu, Guogang; Chien, Chin-Hsiang; Watts, Andrew G.; Withers, Stephen G.; Taylor, Garry L.

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive bacterium responsible for bacteremia, gas gangrene, and occasionally food poisoning. Its genome encodes three sialidases, nanH, nanI, and nanJ, that are involved in the removal of sialic acids from a variety of glycoconjugates and that play a role in bacterial nutrition and pathogenesis. Recent studies on trypanosomal (trans-) sialidases have suggested that catalysis in all sialidases may proceed via a covalent intermediate similar to that of other retaining glycosidases. Here we provide further evidence to support this suggestion by reporting the 0.97Å resolution atomic structure of the catalytic domain of the C. perfringens NanI sialidase, and complexes with its substrate sialic acid (N-acetylneuramic acid) also to 0.97Å resolution, with a transition-state analogue (2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid) to 1.5Å resolution, and with a covalent intermediate formed using a fluorinated sialic acid analogue to 1.2Å resolution. Together, these structures provide high resolution snapshots along the catalytic pathway. The crystal structures suggested that NanI is able to hydrate 2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid to N-acetylneuramic acid. This was confirmed by NMR, and a mechanism for this activity is suggested. PMID:18218621

  12. Structure-Function Analysis of Peptide Signaling in the Clostridium perfringens Agr-Like Quorum Sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Menglin; Li, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The accessory growth regulator (Agr)-like quorum sensing (QS) system of Clostridium perfringens controls the production of many toxins, including beta toxin (CPB). We previously showed (J. E. Vidal, M. Ma, J. Saputo, J. Garcia, F. A. Uzal, and B. A. McClane, Mol Microbiol 83:179–194, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2011.07925.x) that an 8-amino-acid, AgrD-derived peptide named 8-R upregulates CPB production by this QS system. The current study synthesized a series of small signaling peptides corresponding to sequences within the C. perfringens AgrD polypeptide to investigate the C. perfringens autoinducing peptide (AIP) structure-function relationship. When both linear and cyclic ring forms of these peptides were added to agrB null mutants of type B strain CN1795 or type C strain CN3685, the 5-amino-acid peptides, whether in a linear or ring (thiolactone or lactone) form, induced better signaling (more CPB production) than peptide 8-R for both C. perfringens strains. The 5-mer thiolactone ring peptide induced faster signaling than the 5-mer linear peptide. Strain-related variations in sensing these peptides were detected, with CN3685 sensing the synthetic peptides more strongly than CN1795. Consistent with those synthetic peptide results, Transwell coculture experiments showed that CN3685 exquisitely senses native AIP signals from other isolates (types A, B, C, and D), while CN1795 barely senses even its own AIP. Finally, a C. perfringens AgrD sequence-based peptide with a 6-amino-acid thiolactone ring interfered with CPB production by several C. perfringens strains, suggesting potential therapeutic applications. These results indicate that AIP signaling sensitivity and responsiveness vary among C. perfringens strains and suggest C. perfringens prefers a 5-mer AIP to initiate Agr signaling. IMPORTANCE Clostridium perfringens possesses an Agr-like quorum sensing (QS) system that regulates virulence, sporulation, and toxin production. The current study used synthetic peptides to identify the structure-function relationship for the signaling peptide that activates this QS system. We found that a 5-mer peptide induces optimal signaling. Unlike other Agr systems, a linear version of this peptide (in addition to thiolactone and lactone versions) could induce signaling. Two C. perfringens strains were found to vary in sensitivity to these peptides. We also found that a 6-mer peptide can inhibit toxin production by some strains, suggesting therapeutic applications. PMID:25777675

  13. Inducible Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages ΦS9 and ΦS63

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Born, Yannick; Lurz, Rudi; Eichenseher, Fritz; Zimmer, Markus; Loessner, Martin J.; Klumpp, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Two inducible temperate bacteriophages ΦS9 and ΦS63 from Clostridium perfringens were sequenced and analyzed. Isometric heads and long non-contractile tails classify ΦS9 and ΦS63 in the Siphoviridae family, and their genomes consist of 39,457 bp (ΦS9) and 33,609 bp (ΦS63) linear dsDNA, respectively. ΦS63 has 3′-overlapping cohesive genome ends, whereas ΦS9 is the first Clostridium phage featuring an experimentally proven terminally redundant and circularly permuted genome. A total of 50 and 43 coding sequences were predicted for ΦS9 and ΦS63, respectively, organized into 6 distinct lifestyle-associated modules typical for temperate Siphoviruses. Putative functions could be assigned to 26 gene products of ΦS9, and to 25 of ΦS63. The ΦS9 attB attachment and insertion site is located in a non-coding region upstream of a putative phosphorylase gene. Interestingly, ΦS63 integrates into the 3′ part of sigK in C. perfringens, and represents the first functional skin-element-like phage described for this genus. With respect to possible effects of lysogeny, we did not obtain evidence that ΦS9 may influence sporulation of a lysogenized host. In contrast, interruption of sigK, a sporulation associated gene in various bacteria, by the ΦS63 prophage insertion is more likely to affect sporulation of its carrier. PMID:23050219

  14. Genome sequencing and analysis of a type A Clostridium perfringens isolate from a case of bovine clostridial abomasitis.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Victoria J; Kropinski, Andrew M; Songer, J Glenn; MacInnes, Janet I; Parreira, Valeria R; Prescott, John F

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a common inhabitant of the avian and mammalian gastrointestinal tracts and can behave commensally or pathogenically. Some enteric diseases caused by type A C. perfringens, including bovine clostridial abomasitis, remain poorly understood. To investigate the potential basis of virulence in strains causing this disease, we sequenced the genome of a type A C. perfringens isolate (strain F262) from a case of bovine clostridial abomasitis. The ∼3.34 Mbp chromosome of C. perfringens F262 is predicted to contain 3163 protein-coding genes, 76 tRNA genes, and an integrated plasmid sequence, Cfrag (∼18 kb). In addition, sequences of two complete circular plasmids, pF262C (4.8 kb) and pF262D (9.1 kb), and two incomplete plasmid fragments, pF262A (48.5 kb) and pF262B (50.0 kb), were identified. Comparison of the chromosome sequence of C. perfringens F262 to complete C. perfringens chromosomes, plasmids and phages revealed 261 unique genes. No novel toxin genes related to previously described clostridial toxins were identified: 60% of the 261 unique genes were hypothetical proteins. There was a two base pair deletion in virS, a gene reported to encode the main sensor kinase involved in virulence gene activation. Despite this frameshift mutation, C. perfringens F262 expressed perfringolysin O, alpha-toxin and the beta2-toxin, suggesting that another regulation system might contribute to the pathogenicity of this strain. Two complete plasmids, pF262C (4.8 kb) and pF262D (9.1 kb), unique to this strain of C. perfringens were identified. PMID:22412860

  15. Genome Sequencing and Analysis of a Type A Clostridium perfringens Isolate from a Case of Bovine Clostridial Abomasitis

    PubMed Central

    Nowell, Victoria J.; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Songer, J. Glenn; MacInnes, Janet I.; Parreira, Valeria R.; Prescott, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a common inhabitant of the avian and mammalian gastrointestinal tracts and can behave commensally or pathogenically. Some enteric diseases caused by type A C. perfringens, including bovine clostridial abomasitis, remain poorly understood. To investigate the potential basis of virulence in strains causing this disease, we sequenced the genome of a type A C. perfringens isolate (strain F262) from a case of bovine clostridial abomasitis. The ∼3.34 Mbp chromosome of C. perfringens F262 is predicted to contain 3163 protein-coding genes, 76 tRNA genes, and an integrated plasmid sequence, Cfrag (∼18 kb). In addition, sequences of two complete circular plasmids, pF262C (4.8 kb) and pF262D (9.1 kb), and two incomplete plasmid fragments, pF262A (48.5 kb) and pF262B (50.0 kb), were identified. Comparison of the chromosome sequence of C. perfringens F262 to complete C. perfringens chromosomes, plasmids and phages revealed 261 unique genes. No novel toxin genes related to previously described clostridial toxins were identified: 60% of the 261 unique genes were hypothetical proteins. There was a two base pair deletion in virS, a gene reported to encode the main sensor kinase involved in virulence gene activation. Despite this frameshift mutation, C. perfringens F262 expressed perfringolysin O, alpha-toxin and the beta2-toxin, suggesting that another regulation system might contribute to the pathogenicity of this strain. Two complete plasmids, pF262C (4.8 kb) and pF262D (9.1 kb), unique to this strain of C. perfringens were identified. PMID:22412860

  16. NetB, a New Toxin That Is Associated with Avian Necrotic Enteritis Caused by Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Keyburn, Anthony L; Boyce, John D; Vaz, Paola; Bannam, Trudi L; Ford, Mark E; Parker, Dane; Di Rubbo, Antonio; Rood, Julian I; Moore, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    For over 30 years a phospholipase C enzyme called alpha-toxin was thought to be the key virulence factor in necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens. However, using a gene knockout mutant we have recently shown that alpha-toxin is not essential for pathogenesis. We have now discovered a key virulence determinant. A novel toxin (NetB) was identified in a C. perfringens strain isolated from a chicken suffering from necrotic enteritis (NE). The toxin displayed limited amino acid sequence similarity to several pore forming toxins including beta-toxin from C. perfringens (38% identity) and alpha-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus (31% identity). NetB was only identified in C. perfringens type A strains isolated from chickens suffering NE. Both purified native NetB and recombinant NetB displayed cytotoxic activity against the chicken leghorn male hepatoma cell line LMH; inducing cell rounding and lysis. To determine the role of NetB in NE a netB mutant of a virulent C. perfringens chicken isolate was constructed by homologous recombination, and its virulence assessed in a chicken disease model. The netB mutant was unable to cause disease whereas the wild-type parent strain and the netB mutant complemented with a wild-type netB gene caused significant levels of NE. These data show unequivocally that in this isolate a functional NetB toxin is critical for the ability of C. perfringens to cause NE in chickens. This novel toxin is the first definitive virulence factor to be identified in avian C. perfringens strains capable of causing NE. Furthermore, the netB mutant is the first rationally attenuated strain obtained in an NE-causing isolate of C. perfringens; as such it has considerable vaccine potential. PMID:18266469

  17. Structural and functional analysis of the pore-forming toxin NetB from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xu-Xia; Porter, Corrine J; Hardy, Simon P; Steer, David; Smith, A Ian; Quinsey, Noelene S; Hughes, Victoria; Cheung, Jackie K; Keyburn, Anthony L; Kaldhusdal, Magne; Moore, Robert J; Bannam, Trudi L; Whisstock, James C; Rood, Julian I

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic bacterium that causes numerous important human and animal diseases, primarily as a result of its ability to produce many different protein toxins. In chickens, C. perfringens causes necrotic enteritis, a disease of economic importance to the worldwide poultry industry. The secreted pore-forming toxin NetB is a key virulence factor in the pathogenesis of avian necrotic enteritis and is similar to alpha-hemolysin, a β-barrel pore-forming toxin from Staphylococcus aureus. To address the molecular mechanisms underlying NetB-mediated tissue damage, we determined the crystal structure of the monomeric form of NetB to 1.8 Å. Structural comparisons with other members of the alpha-hemolysin family revealed significant differences in the conformation of the membrane binding domain. These data suggested that NetB may recognize different membrane receptors or use a different mechanism for membrane-protein interactions. Consistent with this idea, electrophysiological experiments with planar lipid bilayers revealed that NetB formed pores with much larger single-channel conductance than alpha-hemolysin. Channel conductance varied with phospholipid net charge. Furthermore, NetB differed in its ion selectivity, preferring cations over anions. Using hemolysis as a screen, we carried out a random-mutagenesis study that identified several residues that are critical for NetB-induced cell lysis. Mapping of these residues onto the crystal structure revealed that they were clustered in regions predicted to be required for oligomerization or membrane binding. Together these data provide an insight into the mechanism of NetB-mediated pore formation and will contribute to our understanding of the mode of action of this important toxin. IMPORTANCE Necrotic enteritis is an economically important disease of the worldwide poultry industry and is mediated by Clostridium perfringens strains that produce NetB, a β-pore-forming toxin. We carried out structural and functional studies of NetB to provide a mechanistic insight into its mode of action and to assist in the development of a necrotic enteritis vaccine. We determined the structure of the monomeric form of NetB to 1.8 Å, used both site-directed and random mutagenesis to identify key residues that are required for its biological activity, and analyzed pore formation by NetB and its substitution-containing derivatives in planar lipid bilayers. PMID:23386432

  18. Application of serological typing to the investigation of outbreaks of Clostridium perfringens food poisoning, 1970-1978.

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, M. F.; Turnbull, P. C.; Gilbert, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Serological typing was used as an epidemiological tool in the investigation of 524 outbreaks of Clostridium perfringens food poisoning in the United Kingdom and 37 outbreaks in other countries. Five thousand five hundred and fifty-four (77%) of 7245 strains of C. perfringens associated with the 561 outbreaks were typable with the 75 Food Hygiene Laboratory antisera; in 354 (63%) of these outbreaks a specific serotype was established as being responsible for the outbreak. An assessment is made of the ability of two additional sets of antisera, prepared against 34 American and 34 Japanese strains of C. perfringens, to increase the number of strains which can be typed. The extent of cross-reaction between the three sets of antisera was determined and the results are discussed in relation to the source and history of the type strains. PMID:6300225

  19. Assessing the Performance of Clostridium perfringens Cooling Models for Cooked, Uncured Meat and Poultry Products.

    PubMed

    Mohr, T B; Juneja, V K; Thippareddi, H H; Schaffner, D W; Bronstein, P A; Silverman, M; Cook, L V

    2015-08-01

    Heat-resistant spores of Clostridium perfringens may germinate and multiply in cooked meat and poultry products when the rate and extent of cooling does not occur in a timely manner. Therefore, six cooling models (PMP 7.0 broth model; PMIP uncured beef, chicken, and pork models; Smith-Schaffner version 3; and UK IFR ComBase Perfringens Predictor) were evaluated for relative performance in predicting growth of C. perfringens under dynamic temperature conditions encountered during cooling of cooked, uncured meat and poultry products. The predicted growth responses from the models were extensively compared with those observed in food. Data from 188 time-temperature cooling profiles (176 for single-rate exponential cooling and 12 for dual-rate exponential cooling) were collected from 17 independent sources (16 peer-reviewed publications and one report) for model evaluation. Data were obtained for a variety of cooked products, including meat and poultry slurries, ground meat and poultry products with and without added ingredients (e.g., potato starch, sodium triphosphate, and potassium tetrapyrophosphate), and processed products such as ham and roast beef. Performance of the models was evaluated using three sets of criteria, and accuracy was defined within a 1- to 2-log range. The percentages of accurate, fail-safe, or fail-dangerous predictions for each cooling model differed depending on which criterion was used to evaluate the data set. Nevertheless, the combined percentages of accurate and fail-safe predictions based on the three performance criteria were 34.66 to 42.61% for the PMP 7.0 beef broth model, 100% for the PMIP cooling models for uncured beef, uncured pork and uncured chicken, 80.11 to 93.18% for the Smith-Schaffner cooling model, and 74.43 to 85.23% for the UK IFR ComBase Perfringens Predictor model during single-rate exponential chilling. Except for the PMP 7.0 broth model, the other five cooling models (PMIP, Smith-Schaffner, and UK IFR ComBase) are useful and reliable tools that food processors and regulatory agencies can use to evaluate the safety of cooked or heat-treated uncured meat and poultry products exposed to cooling deviations or to develop customized cooling schedules. PMID:26219365

  20. Lyophilized Clostridium perfringens 3 alpha- and Clostridium bifermentans 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases: two new stable enzyme preparations for routine bile acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, J D; Hutchison, D M; Williams, C N

    1988-09-01

    Preparations of 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.50) from Clostridium perfringens were successfully lyophilized into a stable powder form. Purification of the enzyme was achieved using triazine dye affinity chromatography. C. perfringens 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase was purified 24-fold using Reactive Red 120 (Procion Red) -cross-linked agarose (70% yield). Quantitative measurement of bile acids with the purified enzymes, 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.159) from Clostridium bifermentans (strain F-6), was achieved spectrophotometrically. Standard curves with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDC) and cholic acid were linear within a concentration range of 20-100 microM. Analysis of mixtures of ursodeoxycholic acid and CDC showed the additive nature of the 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and showed also that 7 alpha-hydroxyl groups were independently quantified by the 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Bile acids in Folch extracts of human bile samples were measured using purified preparations of Pseudomonas testosteroni 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, C. perfringens 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, Escherichia coli 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and C. bifermentans (strain F-6) 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Statistical comparison validated the use of C. perfringens 3 alpha- and C. bifermentans 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases for the quantification of bile acids in bile. PMID:2901274

  1. The Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Predisposes for the Development of Clostridium perfringens-Induced Necrotic Enteritis in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Antonissen, Gunther; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Timbermont, Leen; Verlinden, Marc; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (P<0.001). DON significantly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance in duodenal segments (P<0.001) and decreased duodenal villus height (P = 0.014) indicating intestinal barrier disruption and intestinal epithelial damage, respectively. This may lead to an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and decreased absorption of dietary proteins. Protein analysis of duodenal content indeed showed that DON contamination resulted in a significant increase in total protein concentration (P = 0.023). Furthermore, DON had no effect on in vitro growth, alpha toxin production and netB toxin transcription of Clostridium perfringens. In conclusion, feed contamination with DON at concentrations below the European maximum guidance level of 5,000 µg/kg feed, is a predisposing factor for the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens. PMID:25268498

  2. INFLUENCE OF NACL CONTENT AND COOLING RATE ON OUTGROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS SPORES IN COOKED HAM AND BEEF

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of Clostridium perfringens to grow from spore inocula was studied during cooling of ham and beef. Sufficient NaCl was added to ground commercially obtained cooked ham to contain 2.4, 3.1, 3.6 and 4.1% (w/w) and to raw ground beef to contain 0, 1, 2, and 3% (w/w). The samples were inocu...

  3. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol predisposes for the development of Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Antonissen, Gunther; Van Immerseel, Filip; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Timbermont, Leen; Verlinden, Marc; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (P<0.001). DON significantly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance in duodenal segments (P<0.001) and decreased duodenal villus height (P = 0.014) indicating intestinal barrier disruption and intestinal epithelial damage, respectively. This may lead to an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and decreased absorption of dietary proteins. Protein analysis of duodenal content indeed showed that DON contamination resulted in a significant increase in total protein concentration (P = 0.023). Furthermore, DON had no effect on in vitro growth, alpha toxin production and netB toxin transcription of Clostridium perfringens. In conclusion, feed contamination with DON at concentrations below the European maximum guidance level of 5,000 µg/kg feed, is a predisposing factor for the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens. PMID:25268498

  4. Clostridium perfringens TpeL Glycosylates the Rac and Ras Subfamily Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Ohkubo, Akiko; Oda, Masataka; Kobayashi, Keiko; Amimoto, Katsuhiko; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Sakurai, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens TpeL belongs to a family of large clostridial cytotoxins that encompasses Clostridium difficile toxin A (TcdA) and B (TcdB) and Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL). We report here the identification of the TpeL-catalyzed modification of small GTPases. A recombinant protein (TpeL1-525) derived from the TpeL N-terminal catalytic domain in the presence of streptolysin O (SLO) induced the rounding of Vero cells and the glycosylation of cellular Rac1. Among several hexoses tested, UDP-N-acetyl-glucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) and UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc) served as cosubstrates for TpeL1-525-catalyzed modifications. TpeL1-525 catalyzed the incorporation of UDP-Glc into Ha-Ras, Rap1B, and RalA and of UDP-GlcNAc into Rac1, Ha-Ras, Rap1B, and RalA. In Rac1, TpeL and TcdB share the same acceptor amino acid for glycosylation, Thr-35. In Vero cells treated with TpeL1-525 in the presence of SLO, glycosylation leads to a translocation of the majority of Rac1 and Ha-Ras to the membrane. We demonstrate for first time that TpeL uses both UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-Glc as donor cosubstrates and modifies the Rac1 and Ras subfamily by glycosylation to mediate its cytotoxic effects. PMID:21098103

  5. Distribution of sewage indicated by Clostridium perfringens at a deep-water disposal site after cessation of sewage disposal.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, R T; Straube, W L; Palmisano, A C; Gibson, S L; Colwell, R R

    1996-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens, a marker of domestic sewage contamination, was enumerated in sediment samples obtained from the vicinity of the 106-Mile Site 1 month and 1 year after cessation of sewage disposal at this site. C. perfringens counts in sediments collected at the disposal site and from stations 26 nautical miles (ca. 48 km) and 50 nautical miles (ca. 92 km) to the southwest of the site were, in general, more than 10-fold higher than counts from an uncontaminated reference site. C. perfringens counts at the disposal site were not significantly different between 1992 and 1993, suggesting that sewage sludge had remained in the benthic environment at this site. At stations where C. perfringens counts were elevated (i.e., stations other than the reference station), counts were generally higher in the top 1 cm and decreased down to 5 cm. In some cases, C. perfringens counts in the bottom 4 or 5 cm showed a trend of higher counts in 1993 than in 1992, suggesting bioturbation. We conclude that widespread sludge contamination of the benthic environment has persisted for at least 1 year after cessation of ocean sewage disposal at the 106-Mile Site. PMID:8633872

  6. The C-terminal domain of Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin as a vaccine candidate against bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Evy; Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Valgaeren, Bonnie R; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Schauvliege, Stijn; Rodrigo-Mocholí, Diego; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet R; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis is caused by Clostridium perfringens and leads to sudden death. Alpha toxin, together with perfringolysin O, has been identified as the principal toxin involved in the pathogenesis. We assessed the potential of alpha toxin as a vaccine antigen. Using an intestinal loop model in calves, we investigated the protection afforded by antisera raised against native alpha toxin or its non-toxic C-terminal fragment against C. perfringens-induced intestinal necrosis. Immunization of calves with either of the vaccine preparations induced a strong antibody response. The resulting antisera were able to neutralize the alpha toxin activity and the C. perfringens-induced endothelial cytotoxicity in vitro. The antisera raised against the native toxin had a stronger neutralizing activity than those against the C-terminal fragment. However, antibodies against alpha toxin alone were not sufficient to completely neutralize the C. perfringens-induced necrosis in the intestinal loop model. The development of a multivalent vaccine combining the C-terminal fragment of alpha toxin with other C. perfringens virulence factors might be necessary for complete protection against bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis. PMID:27121298

  7. Determination of the effect of single abomasal or jejunal inoculation of Clostridium perfringens Type A in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract A randomized study was conducted to determine if inoculation of the abomasum or jejunum with Clostridium perfringens Type A would induce jejunal hemorrhage syndrome in healthy cows. Twelve adult nonlactating dairy cows were inoculated with 10 mL of pure culture broth of C. perfringens type A (beta2 toxin positive) into the abomasum (n = 6) or jejunum (n = 6). On day 6, the cows were euthanized and samples for culture were taken from the abomasum, jejunum, and feces. No cows developed clinical signs of jejunal hemorrhage syndrome during the course of the study. Five of 6 abomasal samples and 1 of 6 jejunal samples were positive for C. perfringens Type A (beta2 negative) prior to inoculation. Eight of 12 abomasal samples, 11 of 12 fecal samples, and 10 of 12 jejunal samples were positive for C. perfringens Type A (beta2 negative) after inoculation. Intraluminal inoculation of C. perfringens Type A alone at this dose and under these conditions did not induce clinical signs of jejunal hemorrhage syndrome in adult dairy cows. The multifactorial nature of the disease likely contributed to our inability to reproduce the disease in this study. PMID:16231652

  8. Perfrin, a novel bacteriocin associated with netB positive Clostridium perfringens strains from broilers with necrotic enteritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens is associated with netB positive Clostridium perfringens type A strains. It is known that C. perfringens strains isolated from outbreaks of necrotic enteritis are more capable of secreting factors inhibiting growth of other C. perfringens strains than strains isolated from the gut of healthy chickens. This characteristic could lead to extensive and selective presence of a strain that contains the genetic make-up enabling to secrete toxins that cause gut lesions. This report describes the discovery, purification, characterization and recombinant expression of a novel bacteriocin, referred to as perfrin, produced by a necrotic enteritis-associated netB-positive C. perfringens strain. Perfrin is a 11.5 kDa C-terminal fragment of a 22.9 kDa protein and showed no sequence homology to any currently known bacteriocin. The 11.5 kDa fragment can be cloned into Escherichia coli, and expression yielded an active peptide. PCR detection of the gene showed its presence in 10 netB-positive C. perfringens strains of broiler origin, and not in other C. perfringens strains tested (isolated from broilers, cattle, sheep, pigs, and humans). Perfrin and NetB are not located on the same genetic element since NetB is plasmid-encoded and perfrin is not. The bacteriocin has bactericidal activity over a wide pH-range but is thermolabile and sensitive to proteolytic digestion (trypsin, proteinase K). C. perfringens bacteriocins, such as perfrin, can be considered as an additional factor involved in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis in broilers. PMID:24708344

  9. Differential Responses of Cecal Microbiota to Fishmeal, Eimeria and Clostridium perfringens in a Necrotic Enteritis Challenge Model in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Nicholas; Swick, Robert A.; Moore, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes enteric diseases in animals and humans. In poultry, avian-specific C. perfringens strains cause necrotic enteritis, an economically significant poultry disease that costs the global industry over $2 billion annually in losses and control measures. With removal of antibiotic growth promoters in some countries this disease appears to be on the rise. In experimental conditions used to study disease pathogenesis and potential control measures, reproduction of the disease relies on the use of predisposing factors such as Eimeria infection and the use of high protein diets, indicating complex mechanisms involved in the onset of necrotic enteritis. The mechanisms by which the predisposing factors contribute to disease progression are not well understood but it has been suggested that they may cause perturbations in the microbiota within the gastrointestinal tract. We inspected changes in cecal microbiota and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) induced by Eimeria and fishmeal, in birds challenged or not challenged with C. perfringens. C. perfringens challenge in the absence of predisposing factors did not cause significant changes in either the alpha or beta diversity of the microbiota nor in concentrations of SCFA. Moreover, there was no C. perfringens detected in the cecal microbiota 2 days post-challenge without the presence of predisposing factors. In contrast, both fishmeal and Eimeria caused significant changes in microbiota, seen in both alpha and beta diversity and also enabled C. perfringens to establish itself post challenge. Eimeria had its strongest influence on intestinal microbiota and SCFA when combined with fishmeal. Out of 6 SCFAs measured, including butyric acid, none were significantly influenced by C. perfringens, but their levels were strongly modified following the use of both predisposing factors. There was little overlap in the changes caused following Eimeria and fishmeal treatments, possibly indicating multiple routes for progressing towards clinical symptoms of necrotic enteritis. PMID:25167074

  10. Implications of Decreased Nitrite Concentrations on Clostridium perfringens Outgrowth during Cooling of Ready-to-Eat Meats.

    PubMed

    Myers, Megan I; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S; Shaw, Angela M; Tarté, Rodrigo; Adams, Kristin R; Neibuhr, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Increased popularity of natural and organic processed meats can be attributed to the growing consumer demand for preservative-free foods, including processed meats. To meet this consumer demand, meat processors have begun using celery juice concentrate in place of sodium nitrite to create products labeled as no-nitrate or no-nitrite-added meat products while maintaining the characteristics unique to conventionally cured processed meats. Because of flavor limitations, natural cures with celery concentrate typically provide lower ingoing nitrite concentrations for ready-to-eat processed meats than do conventional cures, which could allow for increased growth of pathogens, such as Clostridium perfringens, during cooked product cooling such as that required by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The objective of this study was to investigate the implications associated with reduced nitrite concentrations for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth during a typical cooling cycle used for cooked products. Nitrite treatments of 0, 50, and 100 ppm were tested in a broth system inoculated with a three-strain C. perfringens cocktail and heated with a simulated product thermal process followed by a typical cooling-stabilization process. The nitrite concentration of 50 ppm was more effective for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth than was 0 ppm but was not as effective as 100 ppm. The interaction between nitrite and temperature significantly affected (P < 0.05) C. perfringens outgrowth in both total population and number of vegetative cells. Both temperature and nitrite concentration significantly affected (P < 0.05) C. perfringens spore survival, but the interaction between nitrite and temperature did not have a significant effect (P > 0.05) on spore outgrowth. Results indicate that decreased nitrite concentrations (50 ppm) have increased potential for total C. perfringens population outgrowth during cooling and may require additional protective measures, such as faster chilling rates. PMID:26735043

  11. Perfrin, a novel bacteriocin associated with netB positive Clostridium perfringens strains from broilers with necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Timbermont, Leen; De Smet, Lina; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Parreira, Valeria R; Van Driessche, Gonzalez; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Prescott, John; Deforce, Dieter; Devreese, Bart; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens is associated with netB positive Clostridium perfringens type A strains. It is known that C. perfringens strains isolated from outbreaks of necrotic enteritis are more capable of secreting factors inhibiting growth of other C. perfringens strains than strains isolated from the gut of healthy chickens. This characteristic could lead to extensive and selective presence of a strain that contains the genetic make-up enabling to secrete toxins that cause gut lesions. This report describes the discovery, purification, characterization and recombinant expression of a novel bacteriocin, referred to as perfrin, produced by a necrotic enteritis-associated netB-positive C. perfringens strain. Perfrin is a 11.5 kDa C-terminal fragment of a 22.9 kDa protein and showed no sequence homology to any currently known bacteriocin. The 11.5 kDa fragment can be cloned into Escherichia coli, and expression yielded an active peptide. PCR detection of the gene showed its presence in 10 netB-positive C. perfringens strains of broiler origin, and not in other C. perfringens strains tested (isolated from broilers, cattle, sheep, pigs, and humans). Perfrin and NetB are not located on the same genetic element since NetB is plasmid-encoded and perfrin is not. The bacteriocin has bactericidal activity over a wide pH-range but is thermolabile and sensitive to proteolytic digestion (trypsin, proteinase K). C. perfringens bacteriocins, such as perfrin, can be considered as an additional factor involved in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis in broilers. PMID:24708344

  12. Differential responses of cecal microbiota to fishmeal, Eimeria and Clostridium perfringens in a necrotic enteritis challenge model in chickens.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Dragana; Wu, Shu-Biao; Rodgers, Nicholas; Swick, Robert A; Moore, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes enteric diseases in animals and humans. In poultry, avian-specific C. perfringens strains cause necrotic enteritis, an economically significant poultry disease that costs the global industry over $2 billion annually in losses and control measures. With removal of antibiotic growth promoters in some countries this disease appears to be on the rise. In experimental conditions used to study disease pathogenesis and potential control measures, reproduction of the disease relies on the use of predisposing factors such as Eimeria infection and the use of high protein diets, indicating complex mechanisms involved in the onset of necrotic enteritis. The mechanisms by which the predisposing factors contribute to disease progression are not well understood but it has been suggested that they may cause perturbations in the microbiota within the gastrointestinal tract. We inspected changes in cecal microbiota and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) induced by Eimeria and fishmeal, in birds challenged or not challenged with C. perfringens. C. perfringens challenge in the absence of predisposing factors did not cause significant changes in either the alpha or beta diversity of the microbiota nor in concentrations of SCFA. Moreover, there was no C. perfringens detected in the cecal microbiota 2 days post-challenge without the presence of predisposing factors. In contrast, both fishmeal and Eimeria caused significant changes in microbiota, seen in both alpha and beta diversity and also enabled C. perfringens to establish itself post challenge. Eimeria had its strongest influence on intestinal microbiota and SCFA when combined with fishmeal. Out of 6 SCFAs measured, including butyric acid, none were significantly influenced by C. perfringens, but their levels were strongly modified following the use of both predisposing factors. There was little overlap in the changes caused following Eimeria and fishmeal treatments, possibly indicating multiple routes for progressing towards clinical symptoms of necrotic enteritis. PMID:25167074

  13. Structural and Functional Analysis of the Pore-Forming Toxin NetB from Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xu-Xia; Porter, Corrine J.; Hardy, Simon P.; Steer, David; Smith, A. Ian; Quinsey, Noelene S.; Hughes, Victoria; Cheung, Jackie K.; Keyburn, Anthony L.; Kaldhusdal, Magne; Moore, Robert J.; Bannam, Trudi L.; Whisstock, James C.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic bacterium that causes numerous important human and animal diseases, primarily as a result of its ability to produce many different protein toxins. In chickens, C. perfringens causes necrotic enteritis, a disease of economic importance to the worldwide poultry industry. The secreted pore-forming toxin NetB is a key virulence factor in the pathogenesis of avian necrotic enteritis and is similar to alpha-hemolysin, a β-barrel pore-forming toxin from Staphylococcus aureus. To address the molecular mechanisms underlying NetB-mediated tissue damage, we determined the crystal structure of the monomeric form of NetB to 1.8 Å. Structural comparisons with other members of the alpha-hemolysin family revealed significant differences in the conformation of the membrane binding domain. These data suggested that NetB may recognize different membrane receptors or use a different mechanism for membrane-protein interactions. Consistent with this idea, electrophysiological experiments with planar lipid bilayers revealed that NetB formed pores with much larger single-channel conductance than alpha-hemolysin. Channel conductance varied with phospholipid net charge. Furthermore, NetB differed in its ion selectivity, preferring cations over anions. Using hemolysis as a screen, we carried out a random-mutagenesis study that identified several residues that are critical for NetB-induced cell lysis. Mapping of these residues onto the crystal structure revealed that they were clustered in regions predicted to be required for oligomerization or membrane binding. Together these data provide an insight into the mechanism of NetB-mediated pore formation and will contribute to our understanding of the mode of action of this important toxin. PMID:23386432

  14. Enterotoxigenicity and Genetic Relatedness of Clostridium perfringens Isolates from Retail Foods in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuan-Tong; Labbe, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a leading cause of bacterial food-borne illness in countries where consumption of meat and poultry is high. For example, each year in the United States, this organism is the second or third most common cause of confirmed cases of food-borne illness. Surveys of the incidence of this organism in retail foods were done in the 1960s without regard to whether isolates were enterotoxigenic. It is now known that not all strains of this organism possess the enterotoxin gene responsible for illness. We examined the incidence of this organism in 131 food samples from retail food stores in an area of the northeastern United States. Forty isolates were obtained by using the iron milk method at 45C, with confirmation by use of motility nitrate and lactose gelatin media. The presence of the C. perfringens enterotoxin (cpe) and alpha toxin (cpa) genes was determined by PCR using previously published primer sequences. All isolates possessed cpa. None of the isolates were identified as carrying the cpe gene by this method or by another method using a digoxigenin-labeled gene probe. Consistent with these results, none of the sporulating-cell extracts contained enterotoxin as determined by reverse passive latex hemagglutination. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to determine the genetic relatedness of the isolates. About 5% of the isolates were considered to be closely related (2- to 3-band difference). The others were considered to be unrelated to one another. The results demonstrate the rarity of cpe+ strains in retail foods and the genetic diversity among nonoutbreak strains. PMID:12620854

  15. Regulation of Virulence by the RevR Response Regulator in Clostridium perfringens ?

    PubMed Central

    Hiscox, Thomas J.; Chakravorty, Anjana; Choo, Jocelyn M.; Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru; Cheung, Jackie K.; Rood, Julian I.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes clostridial myonecrosis or gas gangrene and produces several extracellular hydrolytic enzymes and toxins, many of which are regulated by the VirSR signal transduction system. The revR gene encodes a putative orphan response regulator that has similarity to the YycF (WalR), VicR, PhoB, and PhoP proteins from other Gram-positive bacteria. RevR appears to be a classical response regulator, with an N-terminal receiver domain and a C-terminal domain with a putative winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding region. To determine its functional role, a revR mutant was constructed by allelic exchange and compared to the wild type by microarray analysis. The results showed that more than 100 genes were differentially expressed in the mutant, including several genes involved in cell wall metabolism. The revR mutant had an altered cellular morphology; unlike the short rods observed with the wild type, the mutant cells formed long filaments. These changes were reversed upon complementation with a plasmid that carried the wild-type revR gene. Several genes encoding extracellular hydrolytic enzymes (sialidase, hyaluronidase, and ?-clostripain) were differentially expressed in the revR mutant. Quantitative enzyme assays confirmed that these changes led to altered enzyme activity and that complementation restored the wild-type phenotype. Most importantly, the revR mutant was attenuated for virulence in the mouse myonecrosis model compared to the wild type and the complemented strains. These results provide evidence that RevR regulates virulence in C. perfringens; it is the first response regulator other than VirR to be shown to regulate virulence in this important pathogen. PMID:21402758

  16. The successful experimental induction of necrotic enteritis in chickens by Clostridium perfringens: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is one of the most important enteric diseases in poultry and is a high cost to the industry worldwide. It is caused by avian-specific, Necrotic Enteritis Beta toxin (NetB)-producing, strains of Clostridium perfringens that also possess in common other virulence-associated genes. In Europe the disease incidence has increased since the ban on in-feed “growth promoting” antibiotics. Because of this, many recent studies of NE have focused on finding different ways to control the disease, and on understanding its pathogenesis. Frustratingly, reproduction of the disease has proven impossible for some researchers. This review describes and discusses factors known to be important in reproducing the disease experimentally, as well as other considerations in reproducing the disease. The critical bacterial factor is the use of virulent, netB-positive, strains; virulence can be enhanced by using tpeL- positive strains and by the use of young rather than old broth cultures to increase toxin expression. Intestinal damaging factors, notably the use of concurrent or preceding coccidial infection, or administration of coccidial vaccines, combined with netB-positive C. perfringens administration, can also be used to induce NE. Nutritional factors, particularly feeding high percentage of cereals containing non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) (wheat, rye, and barley) enhance disease by increasing digesta viscosity, mucus production and bacterial growth. Animal proteins, especially fish meal, enhance C. perfringens proliferation and toxin production. Other factors are discussed that may affect outcome but for which evidence of their importance is lacking. The review compares the different challenge approaches; depending on the aim of particular studies, the different critical factors can be adjusted to affect the severity of the lesions induced. A standardized scoring system is proposed for international adoption based on gross rather than histopathological lesions; if universally adopted this will allow better comparison between studies done by different researchers. Also a scoring system is provided to assist decisions on humane euthanasia of sick birds. PMID:23101966

  17. Effects of Tylosin on Bacterial Mucolysis, Clostridium perfringens Colonization, and Intestinal Barrier Function in a Chick Model of Necrotic Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Collier, C. T.; van der Klis, J. D.; Deplancke, B.; Anderson, D. B.; Gaskins, H. R.

    2003-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is a worldwide poultry disease caused by the alpha toxin-producing bacterium Clostridium perfringens. Disease risk factors include concurrent coccidial infection and the dietary use of cereal grains high in nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP), such as wheat, barley, rye, and oats. Outbreaks of NE can be prevented or treated by the use of in-feed antibiotics. However, the current debate regarding the prophylactic use of antibiotics in animal diets necessitates a better understanding of factors that influence intestinal colonization by C. perfringens as well as the pathophysiological consequences of its growth. We report a study with a chick model of NE, which used molecular (16S rRNA gene [16S rDNA]) and culture-based microbiological techniques to investigate the impact of the macrolide antibiotic tylosin phosphate (100 ppm) and a dietary NSP (pectin) on the community structure of the small intestinal microbiota relative to colonization by C. perfringens. The effects of tylosin and pectin on mucolytic activity of the microbiota and C. perfringens colonization and their relationship to pathological indices of NE were of particular interest. The data demonstrate that tylosin reduced the percentage of mucolytic bacteria in general and the concentration of C. perfringens in particular, and these responses correlated in a temporal fashion with a reduction in the occurrence of NE lesions and an improvement in barrier function. The presence of pectin did not significantly affect the variables measured. Thus, it appears that tylosin can control NE through its modulation of C. perfringens colonization and the mucolytic activity of the intestinal microbiota. PMID:14506046

  18. Effect of phosphate and meat (pork) types on the germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores during abusive chilling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aikansh; Korasapati, Nageswara Rao; Juneja, Vijay K; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan

    2010-05-01

    The effect of phosphate blends and pork meat type (pale, soft, and exudative [PSE]; normal; and dark, firm, and dry [DFD]) on the germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens during abusive exponential chilling times was evaluated. Two phosphates were used: tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSPP) and sodium acid pyrophosphate (SAPP; from two different sources, SAPP(1) and SAPP(2)). The pork loins representing each meat type were ground (1/8-in. [0.3-cm] plate), and one of the three phosphate blends (SAPP(1)+SAPP(2), TSPP+SAPP(1), or TSPP+SAPP(2)) was added (0.3% total, equal proportions of 0.15% each type) with salt (1.0%). The pork was then mixed with a three-strain C. perfringens spore cocktail to obtain a final concentration of ca. 2.0 to 2.5 log spores per g. The inoculated product was heat shocked for 20 min at 75 degrees C and chilled exponentially from 54.4 to 4 degrees C in a period of 6.5, 9, 12, 15, 18, or 21 h. In control samples (PSE, normal, and DFD), the increase in C. perfringens population was <1 log CFU/g within the 6.5-h chilling period, and longer chilling times resulted in greater increases. C. perfringens population increases of 5.95, 4.73, and 5.95 log CFU/g of meat were observed in normal, PSE, and DFD pork, respectively, during the 21-h abusive chilling period. The combination of SAPP(1)+SAPP(2) was more effective than the other treatments for inhibiting C. perfringens. The types of phosphate and their blends and the meat type affected the germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens spores in cooked pork during abusive chilling periods. PMID:20501039

  19. Clostridium perfringens growth from spore inocula in sous-vide processed pork-based Mexican entrée.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Garcia, Denise Y; Juneja, Vijay K; Valenzuela-Melendrez, Martin; Díaz-Cinco, Martha E; Thippareddi, H; Aida Peña-Ramos, E

    2009-01-01

    The combined effect of Citricidal wih irradiation on Clostridium perfringens growth from spores in a sous-vide processed marinated pork meat Mexican entrée was investigated. Citricidal was added at 200 or 800 ppm after mixing pork meat with tomatillo sauce and inoculated with 3 log(10) CFU/g of C. perfringens spores. Samples were irradiated at either 0 or 2 kGy, heated to an internal temperature of 71 degrees C, and stored at 4 degrees C for 28 d, 15 degrees C for 45 d, and 25 degrees C for 26 h. To simulate the conditions that may occur during transportation, distribution, storage, or handling in supermarkets or by consumers, the effect of static temperature abuse on C. perfringens growth was assessed by transferring samples stored at 4 to 25 degrees C for 13 and 15 h. Total C. perfringens populations were determined by plating diluted samples on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar. Growth was not observed up to 45 d of storage at 15 degrees C in samples supplemented with 800 ppm of Citricidal. At 25 degrees C, no significant differences (P > 0.05) on the lag phase duration due to antimicrobial treatments was observed. The temperature abuse of refrigerated products for up to 15 h did not lead to C. perfringens growth to high infective dose levels of 1 million cells required to cause food poisoning. The results suggest that 800 ppm Citricidal can have significant bacteriostatic activity against C. perfringens and may provide a degree of protection against this pathogen in sous-vide processed marinated pork meat Mexican entrée, under mild temperature abuse (

  20. Structural basis of actin recognition and arginine ADP-ribosylation by Clostridium perfringens ι-toxin

    PubMed Central

    Tsuge, Hideaki; Nagahama, Masahiro; Oda, Masataka; Iwamoto, Shinobu; Utsunomiya, Hiroko; Marquez, Victor E.; Katunuma, Nobuhiko; Nishizawa, Mugio; Sakurai, Jun

    2008-01-01

    The ADP-ribosylating toxins (ADPRTs) produced by pathogenic bacteria modify intracellular protein and affect eukaryotic cell function. Actin-specific ADPRTs (including Clostridium perfringens ι-toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin) ADP-ribosylate G-actin at Arg-177, leading to disorganization of the cytoskeleton and cell death. Although the structures of many actin-specific ADPRTs are available, the mechanisms underlying actin recognition and selective ADP-ribosylation of Arg-177 remain unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of actin-Ia in complex with the nonhydrolyzable NAD analog βTAD at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure indicates that Ia recognizes actin via five loops around NAD: loop I (Tyr-60–Tyr-62 in the N domain), loop II (active-site loop), loop III, loop IV (PN loop), and loop V (ADP-ribosylating turn–turn loop). We used site-directed mutagenesis to confirm that loop I on the N domain and loop II are essential for the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Furthermore, we revealed that Glu-378 on the EXE loop is in close proximity to Arg-177 in actin, and we proposed that the ADP-ribosylation of Arg-177 proceeds by an SN1 reaction via first an oxocarbenium ion intermediate and second a cationic intermediate by alleviating the strained conformation of the first oxocarbenium ion. Our results suggest a common reaction mechanism for ADPRTs. Moreover, the structure might be of use in rational drug design to block toxin-substrate recognition. PMID:18490658

  1. A Thermophilic Phage Endolysin Fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-Specific Cell Wall Binding Domain Creates an Anti-Clostridium Antimicrobial with Improved Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Steven M.; Seal, Bruce S.; Garrish, Johnna K.; Oakley, Brian B.; Hiett, Kelli; Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Woolsey, Rebekah; Schegg, Kathleen M.; Line, John Eric; Donovan, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Many enzymes are added to animal feed during production and are subjected to high-heat stress during feed processing. To produce a thermostabile endolysin for treating poultry, an E. coli codon-optimized gene was synthesized that fused the N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase domain from the endolysin of the thermophilic bacteriophage ΦGVE2 to the cell-wall binding domain (CWB) from the endolysin of the C. perfringens-specific bacteriophage ΦCP26F. The resulting protein, PlyGVE2CpCWB, lysed C. perfringens in liquid and solid cultures. PlyGVE2CpCWB was most active at pH 8, had peak activity at 10 mM NaCl, 40% activity at 150 mM NaCl and was still 16% active at 600 mM NaCl. The protein was able to withstand temperatures up to 50 °C and still lyse C. perfringens. Herein, we report the construction and characterization of a thermostable chimeric endolysin that could potentially be utilized as a feed additive to control the bacterium during poultry production. PMID:26075507

  2. A Thermophilic Phage Endolysin Fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-Specific Cell Wall Binding Domain Creates an Anti-Clostridium Antimicrobial with Improved Thermostability.

    PubMed

    Swift, Steven M; Seal, Bruce S; Garrish, Johnna K; Oakley, Brian B; Hiett, Kelli; Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Woolsey, Rebekah; Schegg, Kathleen M; Line, John Eric; Donovan, David M

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Many enzymes are added to animal feed during production and are subjected to high-heat stress during feed processing. To produce a thermostabile endolysin for treating poultry, an E. coli codon-optimized gene was synthesized that fused the N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase domain from the endolysin of the thermophilic bacteriophage ɸGVE2 to the cell-wall binding domain (CWB) from the endolysin of the C. perfringens-specific bacteriophage ɸCP26F. The resulting protein, PlyGVE2CpCWB, lysed C. perfringens in liquid and solid cultures. PlyGVE2CpCWB was most active at pH 8, had peak activity at 10 mM NaCl, 40% activity at 150 mM NaCl and was still 16% active at 600 mM NaCl. The protein was able to withstand temperatures up to 50° C and still lyse C. perfringens. Herein, we report the construction and characterization of a thermostable chimeric endolysin that could potentially be utilized as a feed additive to control the bacterium during poultry production. PMID:26075507

  3. Clostridium perfringens infection among inmates at a county jail--Wisconsin, August 2008.

    PubMed

    2009-02-20

    On August 8, 2008, employees at a Wisconsin county jail noted nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea among more than 100 inmates during the early morning inspection. Seven inmates were seen by the jail nurse that morning. Following jail protocol, guards gave at least 60 inmates bismuth subsalicylate to relieve symptoms, and the jail nurse notified local health department staff members, who suspected a foodborne outbreak at the jail and initiated an investigation. This report summarizes the findings of an investigation by the Wisconsin Division of Public Health (WDPH) and the local health department, which determined the outbreak was caused by eating casserole containing ground turkey and beef (relative risk [RR] = 25.1) that was served during the evening meal on August 7. Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin was detected in stool samples collected from six ill inmates, and 43,000 CFU/g of the organism were isolated from a remaining sample of casserole. An environmental investigation determined the casserole was made with food items that were prepared and stored improperly. Proper food preparation and storage methods are especially important in large institutions such as jails and prisons, where large amounts of foods are prepared and served at one time. PMID:19229165

  4. TcpM: a novel relaxase that mediates transfer of large conjugative plasmids from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Jessica A; Traore, Daouda A; Bannam, Trudi L; Lyras, Dena; Whisstock, James C; Rood, Julian I

    2016-03-01

    Conjugative transfer of toxin and antibiotic resistance plasmids in Clostridium perfringens is mediated by the tcp conjugation locus. Surprisingly, neither a relaxase gene nor an origin of transfer (oriT) has been identified on these plasmids, which are typified by the 47 kb tetracycline resistance plasmid pCW3. The tcpM gene (previously called intP) encodes a potential tyrosine recombinase that was postulated to be an atypical relaxase. Mutagenesis and complementation studies showed that TcpM was required for wild-type transfer of pCW3 and that a tyrosine residue, Y259, was essential for TcpM activity, which was consistent with the need for a relaxase-mediated hydrophilic attack at the oriT site. Other catalytic residues conserved in tyrosine recombinases were not required for TcpM activity, suggesting that TcpM was not a site-specific recombinase. Mobilization studies led to the identification of the oriT site, which was located in the 391 bp intergenic region upstream of tcpM. The oriT site was localized to a 150 bp region, and gel mobility shift studies showed that TcpM could bind to this region. Based on these studies we postulate that conjugative transfer of pCW3 involves the atypical relaxase TcpM binding to and processing the oriT site to initiate plasmid transfer. PMID:26560080

  5. Excitatory effect of Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin on the rat isolated aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Y.; Nomura, S.; Oshita, Y.; Sakurai, J.

    1986-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin caused contraction of the isolated aorta of the rat in a dose-dependent manner. The contractile action caused by the toxin was inhibited or abolished by calcium antagonists such as nifedipine, verapamil and cinnarizine, or a Ca-free medium, but was not affected by phentolamine, chlorpheniramine, atropine, tetrodotoxin or a low Na medium. The toxin stimulated Ca uptake into the aorta in a dose-dependent manner. 8-N,N'-diethylaminooctyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate (TMB-8) blocked significantly both the toxin- and noradrenaline (NA)-induced contractions. Trifluoperazine (TFP) and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphtharene sulphonamide (W-7) did not affect the contractile activity of the toxin but blocked the NA-induced contraction. The toxin also stimulated the 32P phosphate labelling of phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in the preparation. These results indicate that the toxin-induced contraction, which is different from that induced by NA, is the result of a direct action of the toxin on the aorta and is due to an increased Ca2+ permeability across the smooth muscle membrane. It is suggested that the contractile response to the toxin is associated with activation of phospholipid metabolism and enhanced entry of Ca into the aorta. Images Figure 1 PMID:3742149

  6. Intestinal events and nutritional dynamics predispose Clostridium perfringens virulence in broilers.

    PubMed

    Moran, Edwin T

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium perfringensA (CPA) entering the gastrointestinal system depends on favorable conditions to develop and subsequently extend pathogenicity. Reduction in digestive dynamics progressing from the duodenum decreases lumen oxygen, leading to anaerobic conditions in the distal lumen that favor CPA. When nutritional support is concurrently provided, an expanding population threatens the mucosa. Dietary nonstarch polysaccharides that increase viscosity further impair oxygen transfer from the mucosa, improving the ability of CPA to thrive. Incompletion of feed digestion early in the small intestine along with endogenous N provide additional support for population expansion. Glucosidase versatility with mucin elicited by distal CPA concurrently erodes the villus unstirred water layer at the apex, providing access to underlying binding sites for colonization. Proteolytic destruction within the lamina propria supports colonization to create subclinical necrotic enteritis. Eventual vascular entry of CPA and toxins provides a portal path for instituting cholangiohepatitis. Liver condemnations from inspection detect acute flock infection compared with preceding marginal losses in nutrient absorption that decrease feed efficiency. Enterocyte lysis by coccidia enable CPA access to binding sites, thereby extending villus necrosis and further impairing feed conversion. Loss of BW and increased mortality follow as mucosa involvement proceeds. In practice, supplemental feed hemicellulases that reduce digesta viscosity minimize a favorable environment for CPA, while superimposing a combination of amylase, phytase, and protease avoids nutritional support. Physical dynamics of the small intestine together with characteristics of feed that modify digesta viscosity and nutritional availability are central to establishing transient CPA as a pathogen. PMID:25260526

  7. C-Terminal Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin-Mediated Antigen Delivery for Nasal Pneumococcal Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hidehiko; Watari, Akihiro; Hashimoto, Eri; Yonemitsu, Miki; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo; Kunisawa, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Efficient vaccine delivery to mucosal tissues including mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues is essential for the development of mucosal vaccine. We previously reported that claudin-4 was highly expressed on the epithelium of nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) and thus claudin-4-targeting using C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE) effectively delivered fused antigen to NALT and consequently induced antigen-specific immune responses. In this study, we applied the C-CPE-based vaccine delivery system to develop a nasal pneumococcal vaccine. We fused C-CPE with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), an important antigen for the induction of protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, (PspA-C-CPE). PspA-C-CPE binds to claudin-4 and thus efficiently attaches to NALT epithelium, including antigen-sampling M cells. Nasal immunization with PspA-C-CPE induced PspA-specific IgG in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as IgA in the nasal wash and BALF. These immune responses were sufficient to protect against pneumococcal infection. These results suggest that C-CPE is an efficient vaccine delivery system for the development of nasal vaccines against pneumococcal infection. PMID:26018248

  8. Necrotic enteritis in chickens: a paradigm of enteric infection by Clostridium perfringens type A.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Kerry K; Songer, J Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Withdrawal of antimicrobial growth promoters and ionophore coccidiostats has been accompanied by a resurgence in incidence of necrotic enteritis (NE), a severe Clostridium perfringens-induced disease which some consider the most clinically dramatic bacterial enteric disease of poultry. Lesions, in jejunum and ileum, are focal-to-confluent, often with a tightly adhered pseudomembrane, and hemorrhage is uncommon. The key risk factor for development of NE is an intestinal environment that favors growth of the organism. Birds on high energy, protein-rich, wheat- or barley-based diets experience NE at a rate up to ten times greater than do birds on maize-based diets. Specific strains of type A cause NE, although only a few specific virulence attributes are known. The role of alpha toxin (CPA) has been called into question by the finding that an engineered CPA mutant retained full virulence in vivo, although the counterpoint to this is the finding that immunization with CPA toxoids provides substantial protection against NE. A recently described toxin, NetB, seems likely to be involved in pathogenesis of infection by most NE strains. Immunization with CPA, NetB, or other proteins, delivered by conventional means or vectored by recombinant attenuated Salmonella vectors may help the industry deal with NE. Future progress may be based in large part on genomic and proteomic analyses. PMID:19186215

  9. Necrotic enteritis in chickens: a paradigm of enteric infection by Clostridium perfringens type A.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Cooper KK; Songer JG

    2009-02-01

    Withdrawal of antimicrobial growth promoters and ionophore coccidiostats has been accompanied by a resurgence in incidence of necrotic enteritis (NE), a severe Clostridium perfringens-induced disease which some consider the most clinically dramatic bacterial enteric disease of poultry. Lesions, in jejunum and ileum, are focal-to-confluent, often with a tightly adhered pseudomembrane, and hemorrhage is uncommon. The key risk factor for development of NE is an intestinal environment that favors growth of the organism. Birds on high energy, protein-rich, wheat- or barley-based diets experience NE at a rate up to ten times greater than do birds on maize-based diets. Specific strains of type A cause NE, although only a few specific virulence attributes are known. The role of alpha toxin (CPA) has been called into question by the finding that an engineered CPA mutant retained full virulence in vivo, although the counterpoint to this is the finding that immunization with CPA toxoids provides substantial protection against NE. A recently described toxin, NetB, seems likely to be involved in pathogenesis of infection by most NE strains. Immunization with CPA, NetB, or other proteins, delivered by conventional means or vectored by recombinant attenuated Salmonella vectors may help the industry deal with NE. Future progress may be based in large part on genomic and proteomic analyses.

  10. [Acute intravasal hemolysis in Clostridium perfringens sepsis. Differential diagnosis of hemolytic episodes].

    PubMed

    Strobel, E; Nathrath, M; Peters, J; Abele-Horn, M; Wllenweber, J

    1994-03-18

    A 19-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia developed fever, general deterioration and somnolence 3 days after a cycle of cytostatic treatment. He had anaemia (haemoglobin 6.6 g/dl), leukopenia (100/microliters) and thrombocytopenia (7,000/microliters). As an acute septicaemia was suspected he received broad spectrum antibiotic therapy, together with two units of red cell and platelet concentrates. However, his condition worsened rapidly over the next 5 hours (meningism, seizures, fever to 41.1 degrees C, dyspnoea). Another blood count revealed severe haemolysis. Computed tomography of the skull demonstrated multilocular intraparenchymal gas formation. Although the antibiotic treatment was extended the patient died several hours later. Retrospective examination for suspected transfusion mismatch provided no evidence for erythrocyte incompatibility. But there was liberation of T-antigen as sign of a bacterial cause of erythrocyte damage. An anaerobic blood culture grew Clostridium perfringens. This case demonstrates that acute intravascular haemolysis in septicaemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of transfusion mismatch. PMID:8131716

  11. Effect of Cookery and Holding on Hams and Turkey Rolls Contaminated with Clostridium perfringens1

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Dorothy H.; Ripp, Nancy M.

    1967-01-01

    Canned hams, turkey rolls, and ground-beef casseroles were inoculated with a mixture of vegetative cells and spores of selected strains of Clostridium perfringens, in approximately known numbers. After cooking and holding at different temperatures for various times, samples of the food were plated directly on sulfadiazine-polymixin-sulfite-agar. In all cases, small but measurable percentages of the organisms survived cookery. The number of cells viable after cookery of the ham or turkey was influenced by the position of the slice of meat in the roast as well as by the final temperature to which the product was heated. Plate counts for turkey or beef casserole held at temperatures in the range of 5 to 10 C for 48 hr indicated stabilization of the population or a tendency to decrease. At 24 C, the multiplication of cells was apparent in 4 hr and rapid in 6 hr. When the food was maintained at 68 C, populations remained viable for 6 hr and the counts did not change markedly. In turkey maintained at 37 C, the number of cells increased sharply within 4 hr. PMID:4294821

  12. Low Prevalence of netB and tpeL in Historical Clostridium perfringens Isolates from Broiler Farms in Alabama.

    PubMed

    Bailey, M A; Macklin, K S; Krehling, J T

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of novel Clostridium perfringens toxins NetB and TpeL has initiated questions regarding their role in the pathogenesis of disease. However, data showing the prevalence of these genes in C. perfringens populations are limited to certain geographical areas. If netB and tpeL are important virulence factors for disease worldwide, one would expect to find these genes in isolates from other regions as well. To address this hypothesis, C. perfringens isolates collected from Alabama broiler farms over 15 yr ago were toxin genotyped using PCR. Each isolate was screened for netB and tpeL; the major lethal toxin genes cpa, cpb, etx, and ia; and the enterotoxin gene cpe. Results of the assay showed all isolates presumed to be C. perfringens were genotypically type A, cpe negative except for one broiler litter isolate, which was genotypically type C. Only two isolates were positive for netB. Similarly, only two isolates were positive for tpeL, one of which was also netB positive. The low incidence observed for netB and tpeL indicates that these genes are not significant virulence factors for the sampled population. PMID:26292533

  13. Expression Profiles of Genes in Toll-Like Receptor-Mediated Signaling of Broilers Infected with Clostridium perfringens?

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Sarson, Aimie J.; Gong, Joshua; Zhou, Huaijun; Zhu, Weiyun; Kang, Zhumei; Yu, Hai; Sharif, Shayan; Han, Yanming

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) participate in detecting microbial pattern molecules for activation of the host immune response. We investigated possible roles of TLRs in the chicken response to Clostridium perfringens infection by examining the expression of TLR genes and other genes involved in TLR-mediated signaling within the spleens and ilea of C. perfringens-challenged broilers. Upregulation of a tumor necrosis factor alpha-inducing factor homolog in challenged chickens compared to nave chickens was observed, regardless of the incidence of necrotic enteritis. In addition, the members of the TLR2 subfamily were found to be most strongly involved in the host response to C. perfringens challenge, although the expression of TLR4 and TLR7 was also upregulated in spleen tissues. While the combination of TLR1.2, TLR2.1, and TLR15 appeared to play a major role in the splenic response, the expression of TLR2.2 and TLR1.1 was positively correlated to the expression of adaptor molecules MyD88, TRAF6, TRIF, and receptor interacting protein 1 in the ileal tissues, demonstrating a dynamic spatial and temporal innate host response to C. perfringens. PMID:19776194

  14. Clostridium perfringens Is Not Suitable for the Indication of Fecal Pollution from Ruminant Wildlife but Is Associated with Excreta from Nonherbivorous Animals and Human Sewage

    PubMed Central

    Vierheilig, J.; Frick, C.; Mayer, R. E.; Kirschner, A. K. T.; Reischer, G. H.; Derx, J.; Mach, R. L.; Farnleitner, A. H.

    2013-01-01

    During a 3-year study, Clostridium perfringens was investigated in defined fecal sources from a temperate alluvial backwater area of a large river system. The results reveal that using C. perfringens as a conservative water quality indicator for total fecal pollution monitoring is no longer justified but suggest that it can be used as a tracer for excreta from nonherbivorous wildlife and human sewage. PMID:23747707

  15. Clostridium perfringens is not suitable for the indication of fecal pollution from ruminant wildlife but is associated with excreta from nonherbivorous animals and human sewage.

    PubMed

    Vierheilig, J; Frick, C; Mayer, R E; Kirschner, A K T; Reischer, G H; Derx, J; Mach, R L; Sommer, R; Farnleitner, A H

    2013-08-01

    During a 3-year study, Clostridium perfringens was investigated in defined fecal sources from a temperate alluvial backwater area of a large river system. The results reveal that using C. perfringens as a conservative water quality indicator for total fecal pollution monitoring is no longer justified but suggest that it can be used as a tracer for excreta from nonherbivorous wildlife and human sewage. PMID:23747707

  16. Multiple effects of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 on growth, biofilm formation and inflammation cytokines profile of Clostridium perfringens type A strain CP4

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L.; Wolf, Amanda; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an important Gram-positive pathogen responsible for food poisoning, necrotic enteritis, gas gangrene, and even death. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a well-characterized probiotic strain with demonstrated benefits. In this study we evaluated the effects of EcN on growth, toxin production, biofilm formation and inflammatory cytokine responses of C. perfringens. In vitro co-culture experiments demonstrated that EcN inhibited growth, gas production and toxin production (α-toxin and NetB) of C. perfringens in a dose dependent manner. The growth inhibition effect was not observed when C. perfringens was incubated with EcN cell free supernatants (CFSE), suggesting that growth inhibition was caused by nutrition competition during co-incubation. In vitro studies demonstrated that pre-incubation with EcN did not inhibit C. perfringens attachment to Caco-2 cells, but did reduce C. perfringens total number, toxin production and cytotoxicity after 24 h. The similar growth inhibition results were also observed during the formation of C. perfringens biofilm. Finally, pre-incubation of EcN with RAW264.7 cells significantly decreased the production of inflammatory cytokines caused by introduction of C. perfringens. Our results indicate that EcN can inhibit many of the pathological effects of C. perfringens in vitro conditions. PMID:24532573

  17. Multiple effects of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 on growth, biofilm formation, and inflammation cytokines profile of Clostridium perfringens type A strain CP4.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L; Wolf, Amanda; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an important Gram-positive pathogen responsible for food poisoning, necrotic enteritis, gas gangrene, and even death. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a well-characterized probiotic strain with demonstrated benefits. In this study, we evaluated the effects of EcN on growth, toxin production, biofilm formation, and inflammatory cytokine responses of C. perfringens. In vitro co-culture experiments demonstrated that EcN inhibited growth, gas production, and toxin production (α-toxin and NetB) of C. perfringens in a dose-dependent manner. The growth inhibition effect was not observed when C. perfringens was incubated with EcN cell-free supernatants (CFSE), suggesting that growth inhibition was caused by nutrition competition during co-incubation. In vitro studies demonstrated that pre-incubation with EcN did not inhibit C. perfringens attachment to Caco-2 cells, but did reduce C. perfringens total number, toxin production, and cytotoxicity after 24 h. The similar growth inhibition results were also observed during the formation of C. perfringens biofilm. Finally, pre-incubation of EcN with RAW264.7 cells significantly decreased the production of inflammatory cytokines caused by the introduction of C. perfringens. Our results indicate that EcN can inhibit many of the pathological effects of C. perfringens in vitro conditions. PMID:24532573

  18. The epidemiology of Clostridium perfringens type A on Ontario swine farms, with special reference to cpb2-positive isolates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is poor understanding of most aspects of Clostridium perfringens type A as a possible cause of neonatal diarrhea in piglets, and the prevalence and types of C. perfringens present on Ontario swine farms is unknown. To study the prevalence of fecal C. perfringens and selected toxin genes, 48 Ontario swine farms were visited between August 2010 and May 2011, and 354 fecal samples were collected from suckling pigs, lactating sows, weanling pigs, grower-finisher pigs, and gestating sows, as well as from manure pits. The fecal samples were cultured quantitatively, and toxin genes were detected by real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results In mixed multivariable linear analysis, log10C. perfringens in fecal samples from suckling pigs were higher than that of weanling pigs, grower-finisher pigs, and manure pit samples (P <0.05). In mixed multivariable logistic analysis, the C. perfringens isolates recovered from lactating sows (OR = 0.069, P <0.001), gestating sows (OR = 0.020, P <0.001), grower-finishers (OR = 0.017, P <0.001), and manure pits (OR = 0.11, P <0.001) were less likely to be positive for the consensus beta2 toxin gene cpb2 compared to the isolates from suckling pigs. The prevalence of cpb2 in the isolates recovered from weanlings did not differ significantly from suckling pigs. C. perfringens isolates that were positive for cpb2 were more likely to carry the atypical cpb2 gene (atyp-cpb2) (OR = 19, P <0.001) compared to isolates that were negative for cpb2. Multivariable analysis did not identify farm factors affecting the presence of consensus cpb2 and atyp-cpb2 genes. Conclusions This study provides baseline data on the prevalence of C. perfringens and associated toxin genes in healthy pigs at different stages of production on Ontario swine farms. The study suggests that if C. perfringens type A are involved in neonatal enteritis, there may be strains with specific characteristics that cannot be identified by the existing genotyping system. PMID:22947389

  19. Hemorrhagic enterocolitis and death in two felines (Panthera tigris altaica and Panthera leo) associated with Clostridium perfringens type A.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanlong; Hou, Zhijun; Ma, Jianzhang

    2012-06-01

    Severe hemorrhagic enterocolitis was observed in a Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) and a lion (Panthera leo). Both animals developed acute depression, anorexia, and bloody diarrhea several days before death. Small and large intestines were diffusely congested, edematous, necrotic, and filled with hemorrhagic fluid, and mesenteric lymph nodes were enlarged and congested. Pure and abundant growth of gram-positive bacilli was obtained in culture under anaerobic conditions from the livers of both felines. Identification of highly virulent Clostridium perfringens Type A was based on pathologic lesions, hemolytic patterns, morphologic structure, and polymerase chain reaction. Animal inoculation assays indicated that C. perfringens Type A played an important role in the pathogenesis of both felines. PMID:22779248

  20. Sialidase production and genetic diversity in Clostridium perfringens type A isolated from chicken with necrotic enteritis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Llanco, Luis A; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario J

    2015-03-01

    The sialidase activity and genetic diversity of 22 Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from chickens with necrotic enteritis were determined. Sialidase activity was detected in 86.4 % of the strains. All C. perfringens showed a high value of similarity (>96 %), and they were grouped into seven clusters clearly separated from the other reference bacterial strains. From these clusters four patterns were defined in accordance with their phenotypic (sialidase production and antibiotic resistance profile) and genotypic (presence of nanI and nanJ genes) characteristics. Our results showed heterogeneity among strains, but they were genotypically similar, and it is suggested further studies are needed to better understand the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis. PMID:25373329

  1. Abilities of the mCP Agar Method and CRENAME Alpha Toxin-Specific Real-Time PCR Assay To Detect Clostridium perfringens Spores in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, Andrée F.; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K.; Villéger, Romain; Cantin, Philippe; Boissinot, Maurice; Bissonnette, Luc

    2013-01-01

    We first determined the analytical specificity and ubiquity (i.e., the ability to detect all or most strains) of a Clostridium perfringens-specific real-time PCR (rtPCR) assay based on the cpa gene (cpa rtPCR) by using a bacterial strain panel composed of C. perfringens and non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains. All non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains tested negative, whereas all C. perfringens strains tested positive with the cpa rtPCR, for an analytical specificity and ubiquity of 100%. The cpa rtPCR assay was then used to confirm the identity of 116 putative C. perfringens isolates recovered after filtration of water samples and culture on mCP agar. Colonies presenting discordant results between the phenotype on mCP agar and cpa rtPCR were identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA and cpa genes. Four mCP−/rtPCR+ colonies were identified as C. perfringens, whereas 3 mCP+/rtPCR− colonies were identified as non-C. perfringens. The cpa rtPCR was negative with all 51 non-C. perfringens strains and positive with 64 of 65 C. perfringens strains. Finally, we compared mCP agar and a CRENAME (concentration and recovery of microbial particles, extraction of nucleic acids, and molecular enrichment) procedure plus cpa rtPCR (CRENAME + cpa rtPCR) for their abilities to detect C. perfringens spores in drinking water. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR detected as few as one C. perfringens CFU per 100 ml of drinking water sample in less than 5 h, whereas mCP agar took at least 25 h to deliver results. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR also allows the simultaneous and sensitive detection of Escherichia coli and C. perfringens from the same potable water sample. In itself, it could be used to assess the public health risk posed by drinking water potentially contaminated with pathogens more resistant to disinfection. PMID:24077714

  2. Characterization of polymorphisms and isoforms of the Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C gene (plc) reveals high genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Flávia F; Almeida, Marcelle O; Barroca, Tatiana M; Horta, Carolina C R; Carmo, Anderson O; Silva, Rodrigo O S; Pires, Prhiscylla S; Lobato, Francisco C F; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes

    2012-10-12

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (Cp-PLC), also called alpha-toxin, is encoded by the plc gene and has been implicated in several diseases; however, only a few studies have described polymorphisms in this gene. The aim of this study was to analyze polymorphisms in the Cp-PLC nucleotide and amino acid sequences obtained from isolates from different regions and to compare them to Clostridium phospholipase C sequences deposited in the NCBI database. Environmental samples (sediment, poultry feed, sawdust) and stool samples (from poultry, bovine, swine, horse, caprine, bird, dog, rabbit, toucan) were collected from healthy and sick animals. A total of 73 isolates were analyzed with the majority of samples belonging to the toxin type A subtype and possessing the gene encoding for the beta-2 toxin. Comparison of plc gene sequences from respective isolates revealed a high genetic diversity in the nucleotide sequences of mature Cp-PLC. Sequence comparisons identified 30 amino acid substitutions and 34 isoforms including some isoforms with substitutions in amino acids critical to toxin function. Comparison of sequences obtained in this study to Cp-PLC sequences obtained from the NCBI database resulted in the identification of 11 common haplotypes and 22 new isoforms. Phylogenetic analysis of phospholipase C sequences obtained from other Clostridium species identified relationships previously described. This report describes a broad characterization of the genetic diversity in the C. perfringens plc gene resulting in the identification of various isoforms. A better understanding of sequences encoding phospholipase C isoforms may reveal changes associated with protein function and C. perfringens virulence. PMID:22560738

  3. Embryonated chicken eggs as an alternative model for mixed Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria tenella infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Alnassan, Alaa Aldin; Shehata, Awad Ali; Kotsch, Marianne; Lendner, Matthias; Daugschies, Arwid; Bangoura, Berit

    2013-06-01

    The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryo eggs is a suitable model for viral and bacterial infections. In the present study, a new approach for testing the pathogenesis and virulence of Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria tenella dual infections as a model using the CAM of embryonated chicken eggs was developed. For this purpose, 24 specific pathogen-free (SPF) embryonated chicken eggs were divided into four groups (n = 6) and designated group E, group CP, group CPE, and NC. Sporozoites of E. tenella (20,000 sporozoites) were inoculated into 10-day-old embryonated SPF chicken eggs (groups E and CPE) via allantoic sac route. At 15-day-old, eggs of groups CP and CPE were infected with 10 (4)  cfu C. perfringens via the same route. Assessment of pathogenicity was assessed using gross and histopathological lesions. Embryo mortality reached 17 % after mono-infection with C. perfringens and/or E. tenella and 50 % in the mixed-infected group. Lesions in the CAMs were most numerous and most severe in co-infected eggs (group CPE), reaching the maximum score of 3 in 50 % of the inoculated eggs (P < 0.01). In Eimeria spp.-infected eggs (group E), lesions of score were between 1 and 2. Mono-infection with C. perfringens did not lead to a significant occurrence of lesions. Histopathological investigations of the CAM revealed clusters of Gram-positive bacteria, infiltration with leukocytes, lymphocytes, and developmental stages of E. tenella in the co-infected group. These data suggest that embryonated eggs could be an in ovo model for studying the pathogenesis of mixed infection with Eimeria and C. perfringens. PMID:23515571

  4. Control of Clostridium perfringens spores by green tea leaf extracts during cooling of cooked ground beef, chicken, and pork.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Vijay K; Bari, M L; Inatsu, Y; Kawamoto, S; Friedman, Mendel

    2007-06-01

    We investigated the inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by two green tea extracts with low (green tea leaf powder [GTL]; 141 mg of total catechins per g of green tea extract) and high (green tea leaf extract [GTE]; 697 mg of total catechins per g of extract) catechin levels during abusive chilling of retail cooked ground beef, chicken, and pork. Green tea extracts were mixed into the thawed beef, chicken, and pork at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0% (wt/ wt), along with a heat-activated (75 degrees C for 20 min) three-strain spore cocktail to obtain a final concentration of approximately 3 log spores per g. Samples (5 g) of the ground beef, chicken, and pork were then vacuum packaged and cooked to 71 degrees C for 1 h in a temperature-controlled water bath. Thereafter, the products were cooled from 54.4 to 7.2 degrees C in 12, 15, 18, or 21 h, resulting in significant increases (P < 0.05) in the germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens populations in the ground beef, chicken, and pork control samples without GTL or GTE. Supplementation with 0.5 to 2% levels of GTL did not inhibit C. perfringens growth from spores. In contrast, the addition of 0.5 to 2% levels of GTE to beef, chicken, and pork resulted in a concentration-and time-dependent inhibition of C. perfringens growth from spores. At a 2% level of GTE, a significant (P < 0.05) inhibition of growth occurred at all chill rates for cooked ground beef, chicken, and pork. These results suggest that widely consumed catechins from green tea can reduce the potential risk of C. perfringens spore germination and outgrowth during abusive cooling from 54.4 to 7.2 degrees C in 12, 15, 18, or 21 h of cooling for ground beef, chicken, and pork. PMID:17612073

  5. Multiplex PCR assay for detection of Clostridium perfringens in feces and intestinal contents of pigs and in swine feed.

    PubMed

    Kanakaraj, R; Harris, D L; Songer, J G; Bosworth, B

    1998-08-28

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, developed to detect the alpha-toxin and enterotoxin genes (cpa and cpe, respectively) of Clostridium perfringens, was used to identify enterotoxigenic isolates of this organism from feces and intestinal contents of pigs and from feed samples from pig farms in Iowa. The organism was grown on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine (TSC) agar, TSC agar without egg-yolk, sheep blood agar, or in brain heart infusion broth or cooked meat medium. DNA was extracted by boiling and the PCR assay was carried out using reagents from a commercial kit. The 319 bp amplification product of cpa and the 364 bp product of cpe were visualized under UV light after electrophoresis in a 2% agarose gel containing ethidium bromide. The average sensitivity of the assay, determined on artificially contaminated feces, was 9.2 x 10(4) colony forming units per gram. Assay of 97 isolates from feces and intestinal contents revealed cpa in 89, but all were negative for cpe. While 28% of the 442 total samples cultured yielded C. perfringens, only 5% of 298 fecal or intestinal contents samples were positive upon direct examination by the PCR assay. Ninety-one and eight-tenths % of isolates with the phenotype of C. perfringens were cpa positive by PCR. Forty-three percent of feed samples were culture positive, while 48.3% were PCR positive for cpa. None of these were cpe positive. We conclude that PCR is a useful assay for rapid detection of C. perfringens in feed, and for confirmation of the identity of isolates presumed to be C. perfringens. PMID:9810619

  6. Clostridium perfringens and somatic coliphages as indicators of the efficiency of drinking water treatment for viruses and protozoan cysts.

    PubMed Central

    Payment, P; Franco, E

    1993-01-01

    To find the most suitable indicator of viral and parasitic contamination of drinking water, large-volume samples were collected and analyzed for the presence of pathogens (cultivable human enteric viruses, Giardia lamblia cysts, and Cryptosporidium oocysts) and potential indicators (somatic and male-specific coliphages, Clostridium perfringens). The samples were obtained from three water treatment plants by using conventional or better treatments (ozonation, biological filtration). All samples of river water contained the microorganisms sought, and only C. perfringens counts were correlated with human enteric viruses, cysts, or oocysts. For settled and filtered water samples, all indicators were statistically correlated with human enteric viruses but not with cysts or oocysts. By using multiple regression, the somatic coliphage counts were the only explanatory variable for the human enteric virus counts in settled water, while in filtered water samples it was C. perfringens counts. Finished water samples of 1,000 liters each were free of all microorganisms, except for a single sample that contained low levels of cysts and oocysts of undetermined viability. Three of nine finished water samples of 20,000 liters each revealed residual levels of somatic coliphages at 0.03, 0.10, and 0.26 per 100 liters. Measured virus removal was more than 4 to 5 log10, and cyst removal was more than 4 log10. Coliphage and C. perfringens counts suggested that the total removal and inactivation was more than 7 log10 viable microorganisms. C. perfringens counts appear to be the most suitable indicator for the inactivation and removal of viruses in drinking water treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8368831

  7. The Oncopathic Potency of Clostridium perfringens Is Independent of Its α-Toxin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiyu; Fallon, John; Mandeli, John; Wetmur, James

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Hypoxia in solid tumors is a major obstacle in conventional treatment because of inefficient delivery of therapeutic agents to the lesions, but offers the potential for anaerobic bacterial colonization that can lead to tumor destruction. We have previously reported a recombinant Clostridium perfringens (Cp) strain constructed by deletion of the superoxide dismutase (sod) gene and insertion of the Panton–Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene, Cp/sod−/PVL, which showed elevated oxygen sensitivity, tumor selectivity, and oncopathic potency in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer in immune-competent and syngeneic mice, and that led to substantial prolongation of animal survival. A major limitation to Cp/sod−/PVL in clinical applications is that it expresses phospholipase C (plc), the α-toxin and the major virulence determinant in Cp that is causative in the development of gas gangrene. In this study, the plc gene in Cp/sod−/PVL was knocked out to create Cp/plc−/sod−/PVL, which was shown to be incapable of inducing gas gangrene in mice. Intravenous injection of Cp/plc−/sod−/PVL spores led to a significant survival advantage in tumor-bearing mice with the same efficacy as Cp/sod−/PVL, indicating that the oncopathic potency of Cp is independent of a functional plc gene. The treatment also did not lead to an attenuated immune response to a subsequent pathogen challenge, indicating that a systemic immune-suppressive effect in the host is absent. Consequently, Cp/plc−/sod−/PVL is a novel oncopathic bacterial agent for the effective treatment of pancreatic cancer and other poorly vascularized tumors, with a substantially enhanced safety profile, which is essential for the development of translational studies in the future. PMID:19298132

  8. Biological activities and pore formation of Clostridium perfringens beta toxin in HL 60 cells.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Hayashi, Shinya; Morimitsu, Shinsuke; Sakurai, Jun

    2003-09-19

    Clostridium perfringens beta toxin is an important agent of necrotic enteritis. Of the 10 cell lines tested, only the HL 60 cell line was susceptible to beta toxin. The toxin induced swelling and lysis of the cell. Treatment of the cells with the toxin resulted in K+ efflux from the cells and Ca2+, Na+, and Cl- influxes. These events reached a maximum just before the cells were lysed by the toxin. Incubation of the cells with the toxin showed the formation of toxin complexes of about 191 and 228 kDa, which were localized in the domains that fulfilled the criteria of lipid rafts. The complex of 228 kDa was observed until 30 min after incubation, and only the complex of 191 kDa was remained after 60 min. Treatment of the cells with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin or cholesterol oxidase blocked binding of the toxin to the rafts and the toxin-induced K+ efflux and swelling. The toxin-induced Ca2+ influx and morphological changes were inhibited by an increase in the hydrodynamic diameter of polyethylene glycols from 200 to 400 and markedly or completely inhibited by polyethylene glycol 600 and 1000. However, these polyethylene glycols had no effect on the toxin-induced K+ efflux. The toxin induced carboxyfluorescein release from phosphatidyl-choline-cholesterol liposomes containing carboxyfluorescein and formed an oligomer with 228 kDa in a dose-dependent manner but did not form an oligomer with the 191-kDa complex. We conclude that the toxin acts on HL 60 cells by binding to lipid rafts and forming a functional oligomer with 228 kDa. PMID:12851396

  9. Directed structural modification of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin to enhance binding to claudin-5.

    PubMed

    Protze, Jonas; Eichner, Miriam; Piontek, Anna; Dinter, Stefan; Rossa, Jan; Blecharz, Kinga Grażyna; Vajkoczy, Peter; Piontek, Joerg; Krause, Gerd

    2015-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) binds to distinct claudins (Clds), which regulate paracellular barrier functions in endo- and epithelia. The C-terminal domain (cCPE) has the potential for selective claudin modulation, since it only binds to a subset of claudins, e.g., Cld3 and Cld4 (cCPE receptors). Cld5 (non-CPE receptor) is a main constituent in tight junctions (TJ) of the blood-brain barrier. We aimed to reveal claudin recognition mechanisms of cCPE and to create a basis for a Cld5-binder. By utilizing structure-based interaction models, mutagenesis and assays of cCPE-binding to the TJ-free cell line HEK293, transfected with human Cld1 and murine Cld5, we showed how cCPE-binding to Cld1 and Cld5 is prevented by two residues in extracellular loop 2 of Cld1 (Asn(150) and Thr(153)) and Cld5 (Asp(149) and Thr(151)). Binding to Cld5 is especially attenuated by the lack of a bulky hydrophobic residue like leucine at position 151. By downsizing the binding pocket and compensating for the lack of this leucine residue, we created a novel cCPE-variant; cCPEY306W/S313H binds Cld5 with nanomolar affinity (K d 33 ± 10 nM). Finally, the effective binding to endogenously Cld5-expressing blood-brain barrier model cells (murine microvascular endothelial cEND cell line) suggests cCPEY306W/S313H as basis for Cld5-specific modulation to improve paracellular drug delivery, or to target claudin overexpressing tumors. PMID:25342221

  10. Identification of Accessory Genome Regions in Poultry Clostridium perfringens Isolates Carrying the netB Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Lepp, D.; Songer, J. G.; Boerlin, P.; Parreira, V. R.

    2013-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is an economically important disease of poultry caused by certain Clostridium perfringens type A strains. NE pathogenesis involves the NetB toxin, which is encoded on a large conjugative plasmid within a 42-kb pathogenicity locus. Recent multilocus sequence type (MLST) studies have identified two predominant NE-associated clonal groups, suggesting that host genes are also involved in NE pathogenesis. We used microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to assess the gene content of 54 poultry isolates from birds that were healthy or that suffered from NE. A total of 400 genes were variably present among the poultry isolates and nine nonpoultry strains, many of which had putative functions related to nutrient uptake and metabolism and cell wall and capsule biosynthesis. The variable genes were organized into 142 genomic regions, 49 of which contained genes significantly associated with netB-positive isolates. These regions included three previously identified NE-associated loci as well as several apparent fitness-related loci, such as a carbohydrate ABC transporter, a ferric-iron siderophore uptake system, and an adhesion locus. Additional loci were related to plasmid maintenance. Cluster analysis of the CGH data grouped all of the netB-positive poultry isolates into two major groups, separated according to two prevalent clonal groups based on MLST analysis. This study identifies chromosomal loci associated with netB-positive poultry strains, suggesting that the chromosomal background can confer a selective advantage to NE-causing strains, possibly through mechanisms involving iron acquisition, carbohydrate metabolism, and plasmid maintenance. PMID:23292780

  11. Binding and Internalization of Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin in Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Akiwo; Hagiyama, Tohko; Ohkubo, Noriko; Kobayashi, Keiko; Sakurai, Jun

    2004-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin is a binary toxin composed of an enzymatic component (Ia) and a binding component (Ib). The oligomer of Ib formed in membranes induces endocytosis. We examined the binding and internalization of Ib by using Cy3-labeled Ib. Labeled Ib was retained at the membranes of MDCK cells for 60 min of incubation at 37°C, and later it was detected in cytoplasmic vesicles. To determine whether Ib associates with lipid rafts, we incubated MDCK cells with Ib at 4 or 37°C and fractionated the Triton-insoluble membranes. An Ib complex of 500 kDa was localized at 37°C to the insoluble fractions that fulfilled the criteria of lipid rafts, but it did not form at 4°C. The amount of complex in the raft fraction reached a maximum after 60 min of incubation at 37°C. When the cells that were preincubated with Ib at 4°C were incubated at 37°C, the complex was detected in the raft fraction. The treatment of MDCK cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced the localization of the Ib complex to the rafts and the rounding of the cells induced by Ia plus Ib. When 125I-labeled Ia was incubated with the cells in the presence of Ib at 37°C, it was localized in the raft fraction. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that Ia binds to the oligomer of Ib. We conclude that Ib binds to a receptor in membranes and then moves to rafts and that Ia bound to the oligomer of Ib formed in the rafts is internalized. PMID:15155629

  12. Effects of Clostridium perfringens Alpha-Toxin (PLC) and Perfringolysin O (PFO) on Cytotoxicity to Macrophages, on Escape from the Phagosomes of Macrophages, and on Persistence of C. perfringens in Host Tissues

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, David K.; Melville, Stephen B.

    2004-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the most common cause of clostridial myonecrosis (gas gangrene). Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) appear to play only a minor role in preventing the onset of myonecrosis in a mouse animal model of the disease (unpublished results). However, the importance of macrophages in the host defense against C. perfringens infections is still unknown. Two membrane-active toxins produced by the anaerobic C. perfringens, alpha-toxin (PLC) and perfringolysin O (PFO), are thought to be important in the pathogenesis of gas gangrene and the lack of phagocytic cells at the site of infection. Therefore, C. perfringens mutants lacking PFO and PLC were examined for their relative cytotoxic effects on macrophages, their ability to escape the phagosome of macrophages, and their persistence in mouse tissues. C. perfringens survival in the presence of mouse peritoneal macrophages was dependent on both PFO and PLC. PFO was shown to be the primary mediator of C. perfringens-dependent cytotoxicity to macrophages. Escape of C. perfringens cells from phagosomes of macrophage-like J774-33 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages was mediated by either PFO or PLC, although PFO seemed to play a more important role in escape from the phagosome in peritoneal macrophages. At lethal doses (109) of bacteria only PLC was necessary for the onset of myonecrosis, while at sublethal doses (106) both PFO and PLC were necessary for survival of C. perfringens in mouse muscle tissue. These results suggest PFO-mediated cytotoxicity toward macrophages and the ability to escape macrophage phagosomes may be important factors in the ability of C. perfringens to survive in host tissues when bacterial numbers are low relative to those of phagocytic cells, e.g., early in an infection. PMID:15322015

  13. Tetracycline and penicillin resistant Clostridium perfringens isolated from the fangs and venom glands of Loxosceles laeta: its implications in loxoscelism treatment.

    PubMed

    Catalán, A; Espoz, M C; Cortés, W; Sagua, H; González, J; Araya, J E

    2010-11-01

    The venom of Loxosceles spiders produces severe dermonecrotic damage, intravascular hemolysis, systemic alterations and risk of death. Clostridium perfringens is present in the microbial flora of the fangs and venom glands of Loxosceles intermedia. Its inoculation with the venom may infect the wound site and exacerbate the dermonecrotic damage. This anaerobic bacterium is widely distributed in nature and capable of damage with similar characteristics and severity to the spider venom. In this study we isolated and characterized species of Clostridium from the fangs and venom glands of Loxosceles laeta, including C. perfringens. The sensitivity patterns of different isolates of C. perfringens were evaluated by minimum inhibitory concentration against penicillin, ampicillin, erythromycin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin and tetracycline, under anaerobic conditions, using the method of microdilution in broth. Strain C. perfringens H28 showed resistance to penicillin, ampicillin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. Resistance to penicillin and ampicillin was mediated by beta-lactamase. In vivo evaluation of dermonecrosis in rabbits using L. laeta venom co-inoculated with isolate C. perfringens H28 produced an increase in the area of dermonecrotic lesions in the presence of penicillin and tetracycline, but not with gentamicin. Antibiotic therapy Loxosceles poisoning should be re-evaluated, considering the existence of multi-resistant strains of C. perfringens. PMID:20600224

  14. The synergistic necrohemorrhagic action of Clostridium perfringens perfringolysin and alpha toxin in the bovine intestine and against bovine endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis is a major cause of mortality in veal calves. Clostridium perfringens is considered as the causative agent, but there has been controversy on the toxins responsible for the disease. Recently, it has been demonstrated that a variety of C. perfringens type A strains can induce necrohemorrhagic lesions in a calf intestinal loop assay. These results put forward alpha toxin and perfringolysin as potential causative toxins, since both are produced by all C. perfringens type A strains. The importance of perfringolysin in the pathogenesis of bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis has not been studied before. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to evaluate the role of perfringolysin in the development of necrohemorrhagic enteritis lesions in calves and its synergism with alpha toxin. A perfringolysin-deficient mutant, an alpha toxin-deficient mutant and a perfringolysin alpha toxin double mutant were less able to induce necrosis in a calf intestinal loop assay as compared to the wild-type strain. Only complementation with both toxins could restore the activity to that of the wild-type. In addition, perfringolysin and alpha toxin had a synergistic cytotoxic effect on bovine endothelial cells. This endothelial cell damage potentially explains why capillary hemorrhages are an initial step in the development of bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis. Taken together, our results show that perfringolysin acts synergistically with alpha toxin in the development of necrohemorrhagic enteritis in a calf intestinal loop model and we hypothesize that both toxins act by targeting the endothelial cells. PMID:23782465

  15. The Cysteine Protease α-Clostripain is Not Essential for the Pathogenesis of Clostridium perfringens-Mediated Myonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chakravorty, Anjana; Awad, Milena M.; Hiscox, Thomas J.; Cheung, Jackie K.; Carter, Glen P.; Choo, Jocelyn M.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the causative agent of clostridial myonecrosis or gas gangrene and produces many different extracellular toxins and enzymes, including the cysteine protease α-clostripain. Mutation of the α-clostripain structural gene, ccp, alters the turnover of secreted extracellular proteins in C. perfringens, but the role of α-clostripain in disease pathogenesis is not known. We insertionally inactivated the ccp gene C. perfringens strain 13 using TargeTron technology, constructing a strain that was no longer proteolytic on skim milk agar. Quantitative protease assays confirmed the absence of extracellular protease activity, which was restored by complementation with the wild-type ccp gene. The role of α-clostripain in virulence was assessed by analysing the isogenic wild-type, mutant and complemented strains in a mouse myonecrosis model. The results showed that although α-clostripain was the major extracellular protease, mutation of the ccp gene did not alter either the progression or the development of disease. These results do not rule out the possibility that this extracellular enzyme may still have a role in the early stages of the disease process. PMID:21829506

  16. Cloning, recombinant production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a family 84 glycoside hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens

    SciTech Connect

    Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2005-09-01

    Crystallization of a family 84 glycoside hydrolase, a putative virulence factor, secreted by C. perfringens is reported. Clostridium perfringens is a ubiquitous environmental organism that is capable of causing a variety of diseases in mammals, including gas gangrene and necrotic enteritis in humans. The activity of a secreted hyaluronidase, attributed to the NagH protein, contributes to the pathogenicity of this organism. The family 84 catalytic module of one of the three homologues of NagH found in C. perfringens (ATCC 13124) has been cloned. The 69 kDa catalytic module of NagJ, here called GH84C, was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). Crystals belonging to space group I222 or I2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} with unit-cell parameters a = 130.39, b = 150.05, c = 155.43 Å were obtained that diffracted to 2.1 Å. Selenomethionyl crystals have also been produced, leading to the possibility of solving the phase problem by MAD using synchrotron radiation.

  17. Clostridium perfringens septicemia in a long-beaked common dolphin Delphinus capensis: an etiology of gas bubble accumulation in cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Danil, Kerri; St Leger, Judy A; Dennison, Sophie; Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; Scadeng, Miriam; Nilson, Erika; Beaulieu, Nicole

    2014-10-16

    An adult female long-beaked common dolphin Delphinus capensis live-stranded in La Jolla, California, USA, on July 30, 2012 and subsequently died on the beach. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed gas bubble accumulation in the vasculature, organ parenchyma, mandibular fat pads, and subdermal sheath as well as a gas-filled cavity within the liver, mild caudal abdominal effusion, and fluid in the uterus. Gross examination confirmed these findings and also identified mild ulcerations on the palate, ventral skin, and flukes, uterine necrosis, and multifocal parenchymal cavitations in the brain. Histological review demonstrated necrosis and round clear spaces interpreted as gas bubbles with associated bacterial rods within the brain, liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Anaerobic cultures of the lung, spleen, liver, bone marrow, and abdominal fluid yielded Clostridium perfringens, which was further identified as type A via a multiplex PCR assay. The gas composition of sampled bubbles was typical of putrefaction gases, which is consistent with the by-products of C. perfringens, a gas-producing bacterium. Gas bubble formation in marine mammals due to barotrauma, and peri- or postmortem off-gassing of supersaturated tissues and blood has been previously described. This case study concluded that a systemic infection of C. perfringens likely resulted in production of gas and toxins, causing tissue necrosis. PMID:25320031

  18. Acid phosphatase test proves superior to standard phenotypic identification procedure for Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from water

    PubMed Central

    Ryzinska-Paier, G.; Sommer, R.; Haider, J.M.; Knetsch, S.; Frick, C.; Kirschner, A.K.T.; Farnleitner, A.H.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is used as an indicator for persistent faecal pollution as well as to monitor the efficacy of water treatment processes. For these purposes, differentiation between C. perfringens and other Clostridia is essential and is routinely carried out by phenotypic standard tests as proposed in the ISO/CD 6461-2:2002 (ISO_LGMN: lactose fermentation, gelatine liquidation, motility and nitrate reduction). Because the ISO_LGMN procedure is time consuming and labour intensive, the acid phosphatase test was investigated as a possible and much more rapid alternative method for confirmation. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare confirmation results obtained by these two phenotypic methods using genotypically identified strains, what to our knowledge has not been accomplished before. For this purpose, a species specific PCR method was selected based on the results received for type strains and genotypically characterised environmental strains. For the comparative investigation type strains as well as presumptive C. perfringens isolates from water and faeces samples were used. The acid phosphatase test revealed higher percentage (92%) of correctly identified environmental strains (n = 127) than the ISO_LGMN procedure (83%) and proved to be a sensitive and reliable confirmation method. PMID:21872622

  19. Portrait of an Enzyme, a Complete Structural Analysis of a Multimodular beta-N-Acetylglucosaminidase from Clostridium perfringens

    SciTech Connect

    Ficko-Blean, E.; Gregg, K; Adams, J; Hehemann, J; Czjzek, M; Smith, S; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    Common features of the extracellular carbohydrate-active virulence factors involved in host-pathogen interactions are their large sizes and modular complexities. This has made them recalcitrant to structural analysis, and therefore our understanding of the significance of modularity in these important proteins is lagging. Clostridium perfringens is a prevalent human pathogen that harbors a wide array of large, extracellular carbohydrate-active enzymes and is an excellent and relevant model system to approach this problem. Here we describe the complete structure of C. perfringens GH84C (NagJ), a 1001-amino acid multimodular homolog of the C. perfringens ?-toxin, which was determined using a combination of small angle x-ray scattering and x-ray crystallography. The resulting structure reveals unprecedented insight into how catalysis, carbohydrate-specific adherence, and the formation of molecular complexes with other enzymes via an ultra-tight protein-protein interaction are spatially coordinated in an enzyme involved in a host-pathogen interaction.

  20. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens isolates obtained from 2010 to 2012 from chickens with necrotic enteritis in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Young; Kim, Sara; Oh, Jae Young; Kim, Hye Ryoung; Jang, Il; Lee, Hee Soo; Kwon, Yong Kuk

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens produces diverse virulent toxins that cause necrotic enteritis in poultry, resulting in a great negative impact on the poultry industry. To study the characteristics of C. perfringens in chickens, we isolated 88 strains from chickens (1 strain per flock) with necrotic enteritis. The isolated bacterial strains were screened for toxin type and antimicrobial susceptibility. Necropsy of 17 chickens that died from necrotic enteritis revealed that their intestines were dilated with inflammatory exudates and characterized by mucosal necrosis. All the isolated strains were identified as toxin type A using multiplex PCR for toxin typing. We found that the rate of netB-positive strains isolated from dead chickens was significantly higher (8 of 17) than the rate among healthy chickens (2 of 50). We performed antimicrobial susceptibility test with 20 selected antimicrobial agents using the disk diffusion test and found that 30 tested strains were completely resistant to 5 antibiotics and partially resistant to 6 antibiotics whereas all the strains were susceptible to 9 antimicrobial agents. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis, the 17 strains were divided into 13 genetic clusters showing high genetic diversity. In conclusion, C. perfringens strains isolated from Korean poultry showed a high resistance to antimicrobial drugs and high genetic diversity, suggesting that continuous monitoring is essential to prevent outbreaks of necrotic enteritis in chickens. PMID:25840962

  1. DYNAMIC COMPUTER SIMULATION OF THE MULTIPLICATION OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN COOKED GROUND BEEF

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop a computer simulation algorithm to dynamically estimate and predict the growth of C. perfringens spores in cooked ground beef. The computational algorithm was based on the implicit form of the Gompertz model, the growth kinetics of C. perfringens in cooed ...

  2. Predictive model for growth of Clostridium perfringens during cooling of cooked uncured meat and poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparison of C. perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in cooked uncured products during cooling for different meat species is presented. Cooked, uncured product was inoculated with C. perfringens spores and vacuum packaged. For the isothermal experiments, all samples were incubated in a wat...

  3. Predictive model for growth of Clostridium perfringens during cooling of cooked ground pork

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A predictive dynamic model for C. perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in cooked pork products during cooling is presented. Cooked, ground pork was inoculated with C. perfringens spores and vacuum packaged. For the isothermal experiments, all samples were incubated in a water bath stabilize...

  4. Immunization against Clostridium perfringens cells elicits protection against Clostridium tetani in mouse model: identification of cross-reactive proteins using proteomic methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Bansod, Sunita; Singh, Lokendra

    2008-01-01

    Background Clostridium tetani and Clostridium perfringens are among the medically important clostridial pathogens causing diseases in man and animals. Several homologous open reading frames (ORFs) have been identified in the genomes of the two pathogens by comparative genomic analysis. We tested a likelihood of extensive sharing of common epitopes between homologous proteins of these two medically important pathogens and the possibility of cross-protection using active immunization. Results Eight predominant cross-reactive spots were identified by mass spectrometry and had hits in the C. tetani E88 proteome with significant MOWSE scores. Most of the cross-reactive proteins of C. tetani shared 65–78% sequence similarity with their closest homologues in C. perfringens ATCC13124. Electron transfer flavoprotein beta-subunit (CT3) was the most abundant protein (43.3%), followed by methylaspartate ammonia-lyase (36.8%) and 2-phosphoglycerate dehydratase (35.6%). All the proteins were predicted to be cytoplasmic by PSORT protein localization algorithm. Active immunization with C. perfringens whole cells elicited cross-protective immunity against C. tetani infection in a mouse model. Conclusion Most of the dominant cross-reactive proteins of C. tetani belonged to the cluster of orthologous group (COG) functional category, either of posttranslational modification, protein turnover, and chaperones (O) or energy production and conversion (C). The homologs of the identified proteins have been shown to play role in pathogenesis in other Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. Our findings provide basis for the search of potential vaccine candidates with broader coverage, encompassing more than one pathogenic clostridial species. PMID:19000325

  5. VIABILITY OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS, ESCHERICHIA COLI, AND LISTERIA MONOCYTOGNES SURVIVING MILD HEAT OR AQUEOUS OZONE TREATMENT ON BEEF FOLLOWED BY HEAT, ALKALI, OR SALT STRESS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The threat of pathogen survival following ozone treatment of meat necessitates careful evaluation of the surviving microorganisms for tolerance to subsequent heat, pH, and NaCl stress. Log reductions in CFU/g of 3-strain cocktails of Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria m...

  6. INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF ORGANIC ACID SALTS ON GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS FROM SPORE INOCULA DURING CHILLING OF MARINATED GROUND TURKEY BREAST

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens germination and outgrowth by salts of organic acids such as sodium lactate, sodium acetate, buffered sodium citrate and buffered sodium citrate supplemented with sodium diacetate was evaluated during continuous chilling of ground turkey. Turkey breast meat was ...

  7. Clostridium Perfringens a-Toxin and NetB Toxin Antibodies and their possible role in protection against Necrotic Enteritis and Gangrenous Dermatitis in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) are important infectious diseases of poultry. Although NE and GD share a common pathogen, Clostridium perfringens, they differ in other important aspects, such as clinical signs, pathologic symptoms, and age of onset. The primary virulence facto...

  8. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently utilized antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne d...

  9. A poultry-intestinal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni produces a bacteriocin (CUV-3) active against a range of Gram positive bacterial pathogens including Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly isolated bacteriocin, CUV-3, produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni strain CUV-3 had inhibitory activity against several Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staph.epidermidis and Listeria monocytogenes. The pept...

  10. Effect of meat ingredients (sodium nitrite and erythorbate) and processing (vacuum storage and packaging atmosphere) on germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores in ham during abusive cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of nitrite and erythorbate on Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ham during abusive cooling (15 h) was evaluated. Ham was formulated with ground pork, NaNO2 (0, 50, 100, 150 or 200 ppm) and sodium erythorbate (0 or 547 ppm). Ten grams of meat (stored at 5C for 3 or...

  11. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently utilized antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne di...

  12. Immunopathology and Cytokine Responses in Broiler Chickens Coinfected with Eimeria maxima and Clostridium perfringens Using an Animal Model of Necrotic Enteritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence of necrotic enteritis (NE) due to Clostridium perfringens (CP) infection in commercial poultry has been increasing at an alarming rate. While pre-exposure of chickens to coccidia infections is believed to be one of the major risk factors leading to NE, the underlying mechanisms of CP ...

  13. Vaccination with Clostridium perfringens recombinant proteins in combination with Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant increases protection against experimental necrotic enteritis in commercial broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was performed to compare four Clostridium perfringens recombinant proteins as vaccine candidates using the Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant in an experimental model of necrotic enteritis. Broiler chickens were immunized with clostridial recombinant proteins with ISA 71 VG, and intestinal le...

  14. ATTEMPTS TO ISOLATE NATURALLY OCCURRING CAMPYLOBACTER, SALMONELLA AND CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS FROM THE DUCTUS DEFERENS, TESTES AND CECA OF COMMERCIAL BROILER BREEDER ROOSTERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have shown a significant presence of Campylobacter in the semen of mid-life and late-life roosters. The present study was done to determine if several foodborne pathogens (Campylobacter, Salmonella, Clostridium perfringens) could be isolated from the ductus deferens, testes and ceca ...

  15. Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by lemon juice and vinegar product in reduced NaCl roast beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in reduced sodium roast beef by a blend of buffered lemon juice concentrate and vinegar (MoStatin LV) during abusive exponential cooling was evaluated. Roast beef containing salt (NaCl; 1, 1.5, or 2%, wt/wt), blend of sodium pyro-...

  16. Inhibition of clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by buffered vinegar and lemon juice concentrate during chilling.....of ground turkey road containing minimal ingredients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ground turkey roast containing minimal ingredients (salt and sugar), by buffered vinegar (MoStatin V) and a blend (buffered) of lemon juice concentrate and vinegar (MoStatin LV) was evaluated. Ground turkey roast was formulat...

  17. Expression of Two Bacteriophage Enzymes that Lyse Clostridium perfringens which Share Sequences in the Cell Binding Domain of the Molecules but are Dissimilar in their Catalytic Enzymatic Domain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming bacterium capable of producing four major toxins which are responsible for disease symptoms and pathogenesis in a variety of animals, humans and poultry. The organism is the third leading cause of food-borne bacterial disease among ...

  18. Characterization of Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Identification of Phage Lytic Enzymes as Alternatives to Antibiotics for Potential Control of the Bacterium.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal, and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control b...

  19. Characterization of Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Identification of Phage Lytic Enzymes as Alternatives to Antibiotics for Potential Control of the Bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal, and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control b...

  20. High-level production and purification of clostripain expressed in a virulence-attenuated strain of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Nariya, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Motoo; Houchi, Hitoshi; Tamai, Eiji; Miyata, Shigeru; Okabe, Akinobu

    2011-03-01

    Clostripain (CLO) produced by Clostridium histolyticum is an arginine-specific endopeptidase with the potential for applicability to diverse medical and industrial uses. In this study, we developed an expression system allowing high-level production and efficient purification of recombinant CLO (rCLO). Our expression system comprises pCLO, an rCLO expressing vector, and Clostridium perfringens 13Δ6, an in-frame deletion strain as to six genes encoding major virulence factors and secretory proteins. rCLO was purified from the culture supernatant of C. perfringens 13Δ6/pCLO by ammonium sulfate precipitation, hydroxyapatite chromatography, and affinity chromatography on benzamidine-Sepharose. From 200 ml of culture supernatant 4.5 mg of purified rCLO was obtained. N-Terminal amino acid sequencing and molecular mass determination of the purified rCLO and commercially available CLO revealed that the two enzymes have identical subunits, a 38.1-kDa heavy chain and a 15.0-kDa light chain, indicating that rCLO is processed in the same manner as CLO. Analysis of the enzymatic activities toward N-benzoyl-L-arginine p-nitroanilide and acyl-L-lysine p-nitroanilide showed that rCLO and CLO exhibit strict specificity for arginine at the P1 position, and that the specific activity of the former is approximately 2-fold higher than that of the latter. These results indicate that the new method involving a virulence-attenuated C. perfringens strain is useful for preparing large amounts of high-grade rCLO. PMID:20940055

  1. The CpAL Quorum Sensing System Regulates Production of Hemolysins CPA and PFO To Build Clostridium perfringens Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Shak, Joshua R.; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens strains produce severe diseases, including myonecrosis and enteritis necroticans, in humans and animals. Diseases are mediated by the production of potent toxins that often damage the site of infection, e.g., skin epithelium during myonecrosis. In planktonic cultures, the regulation of important toxins, such as CPA, CPB, and PFO, is controlled by the C. perfringens Agr-like (CpAL) quorum sensing (QS) system. Strains also encode a functional LuxS/AI-2 system. Although C. perfringens strains form biofilm-like structures, the regulation of biofilm formation is poorly understood. Therefore, our studies investigated the role of CpAL and LuxS/AI-2 QS systems and of QS-regulated factors in controlling the formation of biofilms. We first demonstrate that biofilm production by reference strains differs depending on the culture medium. Increased biomass correlated with the presence of extracellular DNA in the supernatant, which was released by lysis of a fraction of the biofilm population and planktonic cells. Whereas ΔagrB mutant strains were not able to produce biofilms, a ΔluxS mutant produced wild-type levels. The transcript levels of CpAL-regulated cpa and pfoA genes, but not cpb, were upregulated in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. Accordingly, Δcpa and ΔpfoA mutants, in type A (S13) or type C (CN3685) backgrounds, were unable to produce biofilms, whereas CN3685Δcpb made wild-type levels. Biofilm formation was restored in complemented Δcpa/cpa and ΔpfoA/pfoA strains. Confocal microscopy studies further detected CPA partially colocalizing with eDNA on the biofilm structure. Thus, CpAL regulates biofilm formation in C. perfringens by increasing levels of certain toxins required to build biofilms. PMID:25824838

  2. A sporulation factor is involved in the morphological change of Clostridium perfringens biofilms in response to temperature.

    PubMed

    Obana, Nozomu; Nakamura, Kouji; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2014-04-01

    Biofilm formation has been associated with bacterial pathogenesis, such as nosocomial and chronic infections, as the resistance of biofilms to environmental stresses has increased. Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive spore-forming anaerobic pathogen. This organism survives antibiotic treatment through the formation of biofilms or spores, but the environmental and regulatory factors involved in the biofilm formation remain unclear. Here, we observed that temperature regulates C. perfringens biofilm morphology. At 37°C, C. perfringens adhered to the substrate surface and formed a flat, thin biofilm, herein referred to as adhered biofilm. However, at 25°C, this bacterium did not adhere and produced a threadlike extracellular matrix, forming a viscous, thick biofilm, herein referred to as pellicle biofilm. Pellicle biofilm formation requires the sporulation master regulator, Spo0A, and the toxin regulator, CtrAB, and is enhanced in the absence of the global repressor, AbrB. These transcriptional regulator genes are regulated by each other and temperature. Adhered-biofilm formation requires AbrB and pilA2, which encodes a component of type IV pili (TFP). TFP expression was activated at 37°C and regulated through Spo0A, AbrB, and CtrAB. These results indicate that the morphology of C. perfringens biofilm is dependent on temperature through the differential production of extracellular matrix and the activity of TFP. Moreover, pellicle biofilm formation is involved in sporulation and toxin production. Here, we demonstrated that clostridial biofilm formation is closely associated with sporulation and that the morphological change of the biofilms could play an important role in the pathogenesis of this organism. PMID:24509316

  3. The CpAL quorum sensing system regulates production of hemolysins CPA and PFO to build Clostridium perfringens biofilms.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Jorge E; Shak, Joshua R; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens strains produce severe diseases, including myonecrosis and enteritis necroticans, in humans and animals. Diseases are mediated by the production of potent toxins that often damage the site of infection, e.g., skin epithelium during myonecrosis. In planktonic cultures, the regulation of important toxins, such as CPA, CPB, and PFO, is controlled by the C. perfringens Agr-like (CpAL) quorum sensing (QS) system. Strains also encode a functional LuxS/AI-2 system. Although C. perfringens strains form biofilm-like structures, the regulation of biofilm formation is poorly understood. Therefore, our studies investigated the role of CpAL and LuxS/AI-2 QS systems and of QS-regulated factors in controlling the formation of biofilms. We first demonstrate that biofilm production by reference strains differs depending on the culture medium. Increased biomass correlated with the presence of extracellular DNA in the supernatant, which was released by lysis of a fraction of the biofilm population and planktonic cells. Whereas ΔagrB mutant strains were not able to produce biofilms, a ΔluxS mutant produced wild-type levels. The transcript levels of CpAL-regulated cpa and pfoA genes, but not cpb, were upregulated in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. Accordingly, Δcpa and ΔpfoA mutants, in type A (S13) or type C (CN3685) backgrounds, were unable to produce biofilms, whereas CN3685Δcpb made wild-type levels. Biofilm formation was restored in complemented Δcpa/cpa and ΔpfoA/pfoA strains. Confocal microscopy studies further detected CPA partially colocalizing with eDNA on the biofilm structure. Thus, CpAL regulates biofilm formation in C. perfringens by increasing levels of certain toxins required to build biofilms. PMID:25824838

  4. Clostridium perfringens challenge and dietary fat type affect broiler chicken performance and fermentation in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Józefiak, D; Kierończyk, B; Rawski, M; Hejdysz, M; Rutkowski, A; Engberg, R M; Højberg, O

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to examine how different fats commonly used in the feed industry affect broiler performance, nutrient digestibility and microbial fermentation in the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens challenged with virulent Clostridium perfringens strains. Two experiments were carried out, each including 480-day-old male broilers (Ross 308), which were randomly distributed to eight experimental groups using six replicate pens per treatment and 10 birds per pen. In Experiment 1, birds were fed diets containing soybean oil, palm kernel fatty acid distillers, rendered pork fat and lard. In Experiment 2, birds were fed diets containing rapeseed oil, coconut oil, beef tallow and palm oil. In both experiments, the birds were either not challenged or challenged with a mixture of three C. perfringens type A strains. Irrespective of the fat type present in the diet, C. perfringens did not affect broiler chicken body weight gain (BWG) and mortality in either of the two experiments. The BWG was affected by dietary fat type in both experiments, indicating that the fatty acid composition of the fat source affects broiler growth performance. In particular, the inclusion of animal fats tended to improve final BW to a greater extent compared with the inclusion of unsaturated vegetable oils. In Experiment 2, irrespective of the dietary fat type present in the diet, C. perfringens challenge significantly impaired feed conversion ratio in the period from 14 to 28 days (1.63 v. 1.69) and at 42 days (1.65 v. 1.68). In both experiments apparent metabolizable energy values were affected by dietary fat type. Irrespective of the fat type present in the diet, C. perfringens challenge decreased the digesta pH in the crop and ileum, but had no effect in cecal contents. Moreover, in Experiment 1, total organic acid concentration in the ileum was two to three times lower on soybean oil diets as compared with other treatments, indicating that C. perfringens as well as dietary fat type significantly affects microbiota activity in the broiler chicken gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24674938

  5. A Wide Variety of Clostridium perfringens Type A Food-Borne Isolates That Carry a Chromosomal cpe Gene Belong to One Multilocus Sequence Typing Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinghua; Wagendorp, Arjen; Moezelaar, Roy; Abee, Tjakko

    2012-01-01

    Of 98 suspected food-borne Clostridium perfringens isolates obtained from a nationwide survey by the Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority in The Netherlands, 59 strains were identified as C. perfringens type A. Using PCR-based techniques, the cpe gene encoding enterotoxin was detected in eight isolates, showing a chromosomal location for seven isolates and a plasmid location for one isolate. Further characterization of these strains by using (GTG)5 fingerprint repetitive sequence-based PCR analysis distinguished C. perfringens from other sulfite-reducing clostridia but did not allow for differentiation between various types of C. perfringens strains. To characterize the C. perfringens strains further, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis was performed on eight housekeeping genes of both enterotoxic and non-cpe isolates, and the data were combined with a previous global survey covering strains associated with food poisoning, gas gangrene, and isolates from food or healthy individuals. This revealed that the chromosomal cpe strains (food strains and isolates from food poisoning cases) belong to a distinct cluster that is significantly distant from all the other cpe plasmid-carrying and cpe-negative strains. These results suggest that different groups of C. perfringens have undergone niche specialization and that a distinct group of food isolates has specific core genome sequences. Such findings have epidemiological and evolutionary significance. Better understanding of the origin and reservoir of enterotoxic C. perfringens may allow for improved control of this organism in foods. PMID:22865060

  6. Purification and characterization of N-acetylneuraminate lyase from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Nees, S; Schauer, R; Mayer, F

    1976-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens cells were cultivated on a large scale using an automatic system. 2) N-Acetylneuraminate lyase, which is a cytosolic enzyme, was liberated from the bacteria by cell lysis using lysozyme in hypotonic solution. The enzyme was purified 770-fold by precepitation with ammonium sulfate, filtration on Sephadex A-50 and final preparative electrophoresis in a 7.5% polyacrylamide gel. Yield: 12 mg from 1 kg wet cell paste; specific activity: 167 nkat/mg protein. 3) The enzyme preparation appeared homogeneous in analytical disc electrophoresis, in gel electrophroesis in 0.1% sodium dodecylsulfate or 8m urea and in immunoelectrophoresis. Contaminating enzyme activities were not detected. 4) The isoelectric point of pH 4.7 was found for the enzyme. At 278 nm a molar extinction coefficient of 6.4 x 10(4)M-1 Xcm-1 was determined. The enzyme exhibited a Km value for N-acetylneuraminic acid of 2.8mM at its pH optimum of pH 7.2. The pH dependence of the Km value gives evidence that an ionizing guoup in the active center of the enzyme with a pKe value of 6.4 may be involved in the catalytic reaction. Pyruvate inhibited the cleavage reaction of N-acetylneuraminic acid competitively; Ki = 2.9mM. 5) An average molecular weight of 99200 was determined for the native enzyme using different methods. After denaturation in sokium dodecylsulfate or urea, a mean molecular weight of only 50000 could be demonstrated, indicating the existence of two enzyme subunits. The lyase molecule was shown by electron microscopy, using a negative staining technique, to consist of two hemispherical parts. 6) Two active sites per native enzyme molecule, probably corresponding to one active site per subunit, were found by incubation of the enzyme with radioactive pyruvate followed by borohydride reduction. The results obtained from chemical modification of the lyase with 5-diazonium-1H-tetrazole and iodocaetamide under various conditionsare interpreted as evidence for the presence of two reactive histidine residues in the enzyme molecule. It is probable that one residue per subunit forms the nucleophilic group participating in enzyme catalysis. A model suggesting the mechanism of reversible cleavage of N-acylneuraminic acids by the lyase is presented. PMID:182637

  7. Selection for pro-inflammatory mediators produces chickens more resistant to Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Swaggerty, C L; McReynolds, J L; Byrd, J A; Pevzner, I Y; Duke, S E; Genovese, K J; He, H; Kogut, M H

    2016-02-01

    We developed a novel selection method based on an inherently high and low phenotype of pro-inflammatory mediators and produced "high" and "low" line chickens. We have shown high line birds are more resistant to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and Eimeria tenella compared to the low line. Clostridium perfringens is the fourth leading cause of bacterial-induced foodborne illness, and is also an economically important poultry pathogen and known etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis (NE). The objective of this study was to determine if high line birds were also more resistant to NE than low line birds using an established model. Birds were reared in floor pens and challenges were conducted twice (high line = 25/trial, 50 birds total; low line = 26/trial, 52 birds total). Day-old chicks were provided a 55% wheat-corn-based un-medicated starter diet. A bursal disease vaccine was administered at 10× the recommended dose via the ocular route at 14-d-of-age. Birds were challenged daily for 3 d beginning at 16-d-of-age by oral gavage (3 mL) with 10(7) colony forming units (cfu) of C. perfringens/mL then necropsied at 21-d-of-age. All birds had sections of the intestine examined and scored for lesions while the first 10 necropsied also had gut content collected for C. perfringens enumeration. Chickens from the high line were more resistant to C. perfringens-induced NE pathology compared to the low line, as indicated by reduced lesion scores. Ninety percent of the high line birds had lesions of zero or one compared to 67% of the low line birds. Wilcoxon rank sum test showed significantly higher lesion scores in the low line birds compared to the high line (P < 0.0001). There were no differences in the C. perfringens recovered (P = 0.83). These data provide additional validation and support selection based on elevated levels of pro-inflammatory mediators produces chickens with increased resistance against foodborne and poultry pathogens. PMID:26706357

  8. Association of Beta2-Positive Clostridium perfringens Type A With Focal Duodenal Necrosis in Egg-Laying Chickens in the United States.

    PubMed

    França, M; Barrios, M A; Stabler, L; Zavala, Guillermo; Shivaprasad, H L; Lee, M D; Villegas, A M; Uzal, Francisco A

    2016-03-01

    Focal duodenal necrosis (FDN) is a poorly understood intestinal disease of egg layers, and has been associated with drops in egg production and decreased egg weights. The etiology of this disease is still unknown, but the condition has been associated with Clostridium colinum and Clostridium perfringens. In order to investigate the etiology, duodenal samples were taken from hens with FDN. The hens originated from table egg layer farms in three states. The samples were examined by histopathology, bacteriology, and immunohistochemistry. Macroscopically, all samples contained focal to multifocal, variably sized, reddened or brownish gray areas of mucosal erosion. Histopathology revealed mild to severe heterophilic and lymphoplasmacytic enteritis with loss of enterocytes at the villous tips, luminal fibrinonecrotic exudate, and variable numbers of Gram-positive and Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria within the lesions in 16/30 samples. Clostridium perfringens was isolated by anaerobic bacteriology from 4/13 samples that had characteristic microscopic lesions of FDN. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) revealed that all four isolates were Type A C. perfringens, positive for beta2 gene and negative for necrotic enteritis toxin B and enterotoxin genes. PCR for Clostridium colinum applied to DNA extracted from frozen intestinal samples yielded negative results in 14/14 duodenal samples. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for 7C. perfringens, alpha and beta2 toxins stained a few to numerous long rod-shaped bacteria present in the lesions. IHC for alpha and beta2 toxins also stained enterocytes at the villous tips, inflammatory cells in the lamina propria, as well as degenerated and sloughed enterocytes present within the luminal exudate. These findings suggest that C. perfringens may play a role in the development of FDN. Experimental challenge studies with these isolates still need to be performed in order to reproduce the disease and fulfill Koch's postulates. PMID:26953942

  9. Molecular Characterization of Podoviral Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Their Comparison with Members of the Picovirinae

    PubMed Central

    Volozhantsev, Nikolay V.; Oakley, Brian B.; Morales, Cesar A.; Verevkin, Vladimir V.; Bannov, Vasily A.; Krasilnikova, Valentina M.; Popova, Anastasia V.; Zhilenkov, Eugeni L.; Garrish, Johnna K.; Schegg, Kathleen M.; Woolsey, Rebekah; Quilici, David R.; Line, J. Eric; Hiett, Kelli L.; Siragusa, Gregory R.; Svetoch, Edward A.; Seal, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium responsible for human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal and poultry diseases. Because bacteriophages or their gene products could be applied to control bacterial diseases in a species-specific manner, they are potential important alternatives to antibiotics. Consequently, poultry intestinal material, soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water were screened for virulent bacteriophages that lysed C. perfringens. Two bacteriophages, designated ΦCPV4 and ΦZP2, were isolated in the Moscow Region of the Russian Federation while another closely related virus, named ΦCP7R, was isolated in the southeastern USA. The viruses were identified as members of the order Caudovirales in the family Podoviridae with short, non-contractile tails of the C1 morphotype. The genomes of the three bacteriophages were 17.972, 18.078 and 18.397 kbp respectively; encoding twenty-six to twenty-eight ORF's with inverted terminal repeats and an average GC content of 34.6%. Structural proteins identified by mass spectrometry in the purified ΦCP7R virion included a pre-neck/appendage with putative lyase activity, major head, tail, connector/upper collar, lower collar and a structural protein with putative lysozyme-peptidase activity. All three podoviral bacteriophage genomes encoded a predicted N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and a putative stage V sporulation protein. Each putative amidase contained a predicted bacterial SH3 domain at the C-terminal end of the protein, presumably involved with binding the C. perfringens cell wall. The predicted DNA polymerase type B protein sequences were closely related to other members of the Podoviridae including Bacillus phage Φ29. Whole-genome comparisons supported this relationship, but also indicated that the Russian and USA viruses may be unique members of the sub-family Picovirinae. PMID:22666499

  10. Direct Dynamic Kinetic Analysis and Computer Simulation of Growth of Clostridium perfringens in Cooked Turkey during Cooling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihan; Vinyard, Bryan T

    2016-03-01

    This research applied a new 1-step methodology to directly construct a tertiary model that describes the growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked turkey meat under dynamically cooling conditions. The kinetic parameters of the growth models were determined by numerical analysis and optimization using multiple dynamic growth curves. The models and kinetic parameters were validated using independent growth curves obtained under various cooling conditions. The results showed that the residual errors (ε) of the predictions followed a Laplace distribution that is symmetric with respect to ε = 0. For residual errors, 90.6% are within ±0.5 Log CFU/g and 73.4% are ±0.25 Log CFU/g for all growth curves used for validation. For relative growth <1.0 Log CFU/g, 88.9% of the residual errors are within ±0.5 Log CFU/g, and 63.0% are within ±0.25 Log CFU/g. For relative growth of <2.0 Log CFU/g, 92.7% of the residual errors are within ±0.5 Log CFU/g, and 70.3% are within ±0.25 Log CFU/g. The scale and distribution of residual errors clearly suggests that the models and estimated kinetic parameters are reasonably accurate in predicting the growth of C. perfringens. Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the probabilities of >1.0 and 2.0 Log CFU/g relative growth of C. perfringens in the final products at the end of cooling. This probabilistic process analysis approach provides a new alternative for estimating and managing the risk of a product and can help the food industry and regulatory agencies assess the safety of cooked meat in the event of cooling deviation. PMID:26801359

  11. An unusual necrotic myositis by Clostridium perfringens in a German Shepherd dog: A clinical report, bacteriological and molecular identification.

    PubMed

    Salari Sedigh, Hamideh; Rajabioun, Masoud; Razmyar, Jamshid; Kazemi Mehrjerdi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Clostridial myositis, considered to be rare in pet animals, is an acutely fatal toxaemic condition. Some species of clostridia are responsible for necrotic myositis. A 2-year-old male German shepherd dog was admitted with non-weight bearing lameness and massive swelling of the left hind limb. Clostridium perfringens type A with alpha toxin was diagnosed as a pathogenic agent. Based on the history, the bacteria were introduced inside the tissue via contaminated needle following intramuscular injection. Urgent medical therapy followed by surgical intervention was performed. The dog was discharged completely healthy after hospitalization for four weeks. The objective of this report was to describe necrotic myositis in a dog with an emphasis on clinical signs and treatment as well as bacteriological and molecular identification of the micro-organism. Because of the fatal entity of the disease, prompt diagnosis as well as proper and urgent treatment is very important for successful therapy. PMID:26973773

  12. An unusual necrotic myositis by Clostridium perfringens in a German Shepherd dog: A clinical report, bacteriological and molecular identification

    PubMed Central

    Salari Sedigh, Hamideh; Rajabioun, Masoud; Razmyar, Jamshid; Kazemi Mehrjerdi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Clostridial myositis, considered to be rare in pet animals, is an acutely fatal toxaemic condition. Some species of clostridia are responsible for necrotic myositis. A 2-year-old male German shepherd dog was admitted with non-weight bearing lameness and massive swelling of the left hind limb. Clostridium perfringens type A with alpha toxin was diagnosed as a pathogenic agent. Based on the history, the bacteria were introduced inside the tissue via contaminated needle following intramuscular injection. Urgent medical therapy followed by surgical intervention was performed. The dog was discharged completely healthy after hospitalization for four weeks. The objective of this report was to describe necrotic myositis in a dog with an emphasis on clinical signs and treatment as well as bacteriological and molecular identification of the micro-organism. Because of the fatal entity of the disease, prompt diagnosis as well as proper and urgent treatment is very important for successful therapy. PMID:26973773

  13. Standardized Antimicrobial Disc Susceptibility Testing of Anaerobic Bacteria: In Vitro Susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens to Nine Antibiotics1

    PubMed Central

    Sapico, Francisco L.; Kwok, Yung-Yuan; Sutter, Vera L.; Finegold, Sydney M.

    1972-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of 43 strains of Clostridium perfringens to nine antibiotics was determined by a standardized test for rapid-growing anaerobes. Good correlation was established between the agar dilution susceptibility and the disc diffusion susceptibility results. The inhibition zone diameters around the antibiotic discs, however, were generally much smaller than those of gram-negative anaerobes previously studied. All of the strains tested were susceptible in vitro to chloramphenicol, clindamycin, doxycycline, minocycline, penicillin, and vancomycin. Erythromycin showed poor in vitro activity against this organism, with only 7% of the strains susceptible, 72% intermediate in susceptibility, and 21% resistant. In tests of the 43 strains against lincomycin, 58% were susceptible, 32.5% were intermediate in susceptibility, and 9.5% were resistant. Against tetracycline, 37% of the strains were intermediate in susceptibility and the rest were susceptible. PMID:4363787

  14. A serotyping system for Clostridium welchii (C. perfringens) type A, and studies on the type-specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J A; Turnbull, P C; Stringer, M F

    1976-11-01

    A serotyping scheme for Clostridium welchii (C. perfringens) type A employing 57 antisera has been used to investigate the epidemiology of 153 food-poisoning outbreaks and 32 cases of gas gangrene and other clinical infections. Respectively 65% and 59% of the isolates were typable, and in 55% of the food-poisoning outbreaks the causative serotypes were established. Isolation and reporting methods that would render the typing scheme of even greater epidemiological value are described. The type-specific antigen was shown to reside in the capsule and to be lost from strains that had become rough. Development of roughness and its prevention are described. A great range of antisera and an internationally acceptable serotyping scheme is expected after integration of this set with those developed independently in America and Japan. PMID:63553

  15. Identification of a key residue for oligomerisation and pore-formation of Clostridium perfringens NetB.

    PubMed

    Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P; Savva, Christos G; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Naylor, Claire E; Moss, David S; Basak, Ajit K; Titball, Richard W

    2014-03-01

    Necrotic enteritis toxin B (NetB) is a β-pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens and has been identified as a key virulence factor in the pathogenesis of avian necrotic enteritis, a disease causing significant economic damage to the poultry industry worldwide. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was used to identify amino acids that play a role in NetB oligomerisation and pore-formation. NetB K41H showed significantly reduced toxicity towards LMH cells and human red blood cells relative to wild type toxin. NetB K41H was unable to oligomerise and form pores in liposomes. These findings suggest that NetB K41H could be developed as a genetic toxoid vaccine to protect against necrotic enteritis. PMID:24625763

  16. A novel Hsp70 inhibitor prevents cell intoxication with the actin ADP-ribosylating Clostridium perfringens iota toxin.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Katharina; Liebscher, Markus; Mathea, Sebastian; Granzhan, Anton; Schmid, Johannes; Popoff, Michel R; Ihmels, Heiko; Barth, Holger; Schiene-Fischer, Cordelia

    2016-01-01

    Hsp70 family proteins are folding helper proteins involved in a wide variety of cellular pathways. Members of this family interact with key factors in signal transduction, transcription, cell-cycle control, and stress response. Here, we developed the first Hsp70 low molecular weight inhibitor specifically targeting the peptide binding site of human Hsp70. After demonstrating that the inhibitor modulates the Hsp70 function in the cell, we used the inhibitor to show for the first time that the stress-inducible chaperone Hsp70 functions as molecular component for entry of a bacterial protein toxin into mammalian cells. Pharmacological inhibition of Hsp70 protected cells from intoxication with the binary actin ADP-ribosylating iota toxin from Clostridium perfringens, the prototype of a family of enterotoxins from pathogenic Clostridia and inhibited translocation of its enzyme component across cell membranes into the cytosol. This finding offers a starting point for novel therapeutic strategies against certain bacterial toxins. PMID:26839186

  17. A novel Hsp70 inhibitor prevents cell intoxication with the actin ADP-ribosylating Clostridium perfringens iota toxin

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Katharina; Liebscher, Markus; Mathea, Sebastian; Granzhan, Anton; Schmid, Johannes; Popoff, Michel R.; Ihmels, Heiko; Barth, Holger; Schiene-Fischer, Cordelia

    2016-01-01

    Hsp70 family proteins are folding helper proteins involved in a wide variety of cellular pathways. Members of this family interact with key factors in signal transduction, transcription, cell-cycle control, and stress response. Here, we developed the first Hsp70 low molecular weight inhibitor specifically targeting the peptide binding site of human Hsp70. After demonstrating that the inhibitor modulates the Hsp70 function in the cell, we used the inhibitor to show for the first time that the stress-inducible chaperone Hsp70 functions as molecular component for entry of a bacterial protein toxin into mammalian cells. Pharmacological inhibition of Hsp70 protected cells from intoxication with the binary actin ADP-ribosylating iota toxin from Clostridium perfringens, the prototype of a family of enterotoxins from pathogenic Clostridia and inhibited translocation of its enzyme component across cell membranes into the cytosol. This finding offers a starting point for novel therapeutic strategies against certain bacterial toxins. PMID:26839186

  18. [Tryptose sulphite cycloserine agar for the recovery of Clostridium perfringens in surface waters: a study of different modes of utilization].

    PubMed

    Nusca, A; Orefice, L; Paradiso, R

    2007-01-01

    In the recent European Drinking Water Directive, Clostridium perfringens has assumed increasing importance so as to be considered a primary contamination indicator. Therefore it emerged the necessity to make culture methods, aimed at its recovery, more specific and sensitive. In this study we have verified the ability of Tryptose Sulphite Cycloserine Agar plates (TSC Agar), prepared and stored before the use at refrigeration temperature (+4 degrees) for different times, to show typical colonies, using both, the single layer and double layer techniques. Results show that storage of the prepared medium, even for a few days, decrease the recovery of typical colonies although such negative effect is minimized by using the double layer technique. PMID:17405507

  19. Opening of the active site of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin may be triggered by membrane binding.

    PubMed

    Titball, R W; Naylor, C E; Miller, J; Moss, D S; Basak, A K

    2000-10-01

    On the basis of amino acid sequence homologies with other phospholipases C, the alpha-toxin of Clostridium perfringens was predicted to be a two-domain protein. Using truncated forms of alpha-toxin the phospholipase C active site was shown to be located in the amino-terminal domain. Crystallographic studies have confirmed this organisation and have also revealed that the carboxy-terminal domain is structurally similar to the phospholipid-binding domains in eukaryotic proteins. This information has been used to devise a model predicting how alpha-toxin interacts with membranes via calcium-mediated recognition of phospholipid head groups and the interaction of hydrophobic amino acids with the phospholipid tail group. The binding of alpha-toxin to membranes appears to result in the opening of the active site allowing hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids. PMID:11111911

  20. Opening of the active site of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin may be triggered by membrane binding.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Titball RW; Naylor CE; Miller J; Moss DS; Basak AK

    2000-10-01

    On the basis of amino acid sequence homologies with other phospholipases C, the alpha-toxin of Clostridium perfringens was predicted to be a two-domain protein. Using truncated forms of alpha-toxin the phospholipase C active site was shown to be located in the amino-terminal domain. Crystallographic studies have confirmed this organisation and have also revealed that the carboxy-terminal domain is structurally similar to the phospholipid-binding domains in eukaryotic proteins. This information has been used to devise a model predicting how alpha-toxin interacts with membranes via calcium-mediated recognition of phospholipid head groups and the interaction of hydrophobic amino acids with the phospholipid tail group. The binding of alpha-toxin to membranes appears to result in the opening of the active site allowing hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids.

  1. [Determination of clostridium perfringens in pork sausages from the Metropolitan area of Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Morera, J; Rodríguez, E; Gamboa, M M

    1999-09-01

    The presence of C. perfringens was analyzed in 75 samples of pork sausages (chorizo, salchichon and bologna), obtained from five processing plants located in the Metropolitan Area of Costa Rica. Previously and after the biochemical identification of the strains, the most probable number (MPN) of C. perfringens per gram of food was determined and it varied from less than 3 to more than 2.4 x 10(5). There were significant statistical differences (p < 0.005) that support the need of employing biochemical tests for confirming C. perfringens in a given food. C. perfringens was present in 92% of the chorizos, in 28% of the bolognas and in 12% of the salchichon. Every positive sample was tested looking for at least one enterotoxigenic strain, using the reverse passive agglutination latex test; 8% of the tested strains were enterotoxigenic and corresponded to chorizo and bologna from one processing plant and chorizo from another plant. The results obtained in this study show that pork sausages, and not just not processed meats, are important as risk factors for food intoxication by C. perfringens. PMID:10667270

  2. Global Phenotypic Characterization of Effects of Fluoroquinolone Resistance Selection on the Metabolic Activities and Drug Susceptibilities of Clostridium perfringens Strains

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miseon

    2014-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance affects toxin production of Clostridium perfringens strains differently. To investigate the effect of fluoroquinolone resistance selection on global changes in metabolic activities and drug susceptibilities, four C. perfringens strains and their norfloxacin-, ciprofloxacin-, and gatifloxacin-resistant mutants were compared in nearly 2000 assays, using phenotype microarray plates. Variations among mutant strains resulting from resistance selection were observed in all aspects of metabolism. Carbon utilization, pH range, osmotic tolerance, and chemical sensitivity of resistant strains were affected differently in the resistant mutants depending on both the bacterial genotype and the fluoroquinolone to which the bacterium was resistant. The susceptibilities to gentamicin and erythromycin of all resistant mutants except one increased, but some resistant strains were less susceptible to amoxicillin, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, and metronidazole than their wild types. Sensitivity to ethidium bromide decreased in some resistant mutants and increased in others. Microarray analysis of two gatifloxacin-resistant mutants showed changes in metabolic activities that were correlated with altered expression of various genes. Both the chemical structures of fluoroquinolones and the genomic makeup of the wild types influenced the changes found in resistant mutants, which may explain some inconsistent reports of the effects of therapeutic use of fluoroquinolones on clinical isolates of bacteria. PMID:25587280

  3. Global Phenotypic Characterization of Effects of Fluoroquinolone Resistance Selection on the Metabolic Activities and Drug Susceptibilities of Clostridium perfringens Strains.

    PubMed

    Park, Miseon; Rafii, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance affects toxin production of Clostridium perfringens strains differently. To investigate the effect of fluoroquinolone resistance selection on global changes in metabolic activities and drug susceptibilities, four C. perfringens strains and their norfloxacin-, ciprofloxacin-, and gatifloxacin-resistant mutants were compared in nearly 2000 assays, using phenotype microarray plates. Variations among mutant strains resulting from resistance selection were observed in all aspects of metabolism. Carbon utilization, pH range, osmotic tolerance, and chemical sensitivity of resistant strains were affected differently in the resistant mutants depending on both the bacterial genotype and the fluoroquinolone to which the bacterium was resistant. The susceptibilities to gentamicin and erythromycin of all resistant mutants except one increased, but some resistant strains were less susceptible to amoxicillin, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, and metronidazole than their wild types. Sensitivity to ethidium bromide decreased in some resistant mutants and increased in others. Microarray analysis of two gatifloxacin-resistant mutants showed changes in metabolic activities that were correlated with altered expression of various genes. Both the chemical structures of fluoroquinolones and the genomic makeup of the wild types influenced the changes found in resistant mutants, which may explain some inconsistent reports of the effects of therapeutic use of fluoroquinolones on clinical isolates of bacteria. PMID:25587280

  4. Association of beta2 toxin production with Clostridium perfringens type A human gastrointestinal disease isolates carrying a plasmid enterotoxin gene.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Derek J; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Harrison, Benjamin; Akimoto, Shigero; Sarker, Mahfuzur R; McClane, Bruce A

    2005-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A isolates carrying an enterotoxin (cpe) gene are an important cause of human gastrointestinal diseases, including food poisoning, antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (AAD) and sporadic diarrhoea (SD). Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the current study determined that the cpb2 gene encoding the recently discovered beta2 toxin is present in <15% of food poisoning isolates, which typically carry a chromosomal cpe gene. However, >75% of AAD/SD isolates, which usually carry a plasmid cpe gene, tested cpb2(+) by PCR. Western blot analysis demonstrated that >97% of those cpb2(+)/cpe(+) AAD/SD isolates can produce CPB2. Additional PCR analyses, sequencing studies and pulsed field gel electrophoresis experiments determined that AAD/SD isolates carry cpb2 and cpe on the same plasmid when IS1151 sequences are present downstream of cpe, but cpb2 and cpe are located on different plasmids in AAD/SD isolates where IS1470-like sequences are present downstream of cpe. Those analyses also demonstrated that two different CPB2 variants (named CPB2h1 or CPB2h2) can be produced by AAD/SD isolates, dependent on whether IS1470-like or IS1151 sequences are present downstream of their cpe gene. CPB2h1 is approximately 10-fold more cytotoxic for CaCo-2 cells than is CPB2h2. Collectively, these results suggest that CPB2 could be an accessory toxin in C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE)-associated AAD/SD. PMID:15819629

  5. Germination of Heat- and Alkali-Altered Spores of Clostridium perfringens Type A by Lysozyme and an Initiation Protein

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Charles L.; Labbe, Ronald G.; Reich, Robert R.

    1972-01-01

    The normal system functioning in the utilization of metabolizable germinants by both heat-sensitive and heat-resistant spores of Clostridium perfringens was inactivated by heat or by treatment of the spores with alkali to remove a soluble coat protein layer. Altered spores were incapable of germination (less than 1%) and outgrowth (less than 0.0005%) in complex media without the addition of either lysozyme or an initiation protein produced by C. perfringens. The addition of either of these agents permitted, in the case of alkali-treated spores, both 90 to 95% germination and outgrowth, as measured by colony formation. In the case of heat-damaged spores, only 50% germination and 2% outgrowth resulted from addition of the initiation protein, whereas lysozyme permitted 85% germination and 8% outgrowth. Alteration of the spores by heat or alkali apparently inactivated the normal lytic system responsible for cortical degradation during germination. Kinetics of production of the initiation protein and conditions affecting both its activity and that of lysozyme on altered spores are described. PMID:4333607

  6. What problems does the food industry have with the spore-forming pathogens Bacillus cereus and Clostridium perfringens?

    PubMed

    Andersson, A; Ronner, U; Granum, P E

    1995-12-01

    Spore-forming bacteria are special problems for the food industry. It is not always possible to apply enough heat during food processing to kill spores, thus we have to take advantage of knowledge of the spore-formers to control them. For the meat industry Clostridium perfringens might become a special problem, although this bacterium mainly causes food poisoning through food served in restaurants, hospitals or homes for elderly people (Cliver, 1987; Reynolds, 1987; Gondrosen et al., 1990). The reason for the food poisoning is always the same: meat-containing dishes stored after cooking with insufficient cooling and reheating (Granum, 1990). Even though it should be relatively easy to control this kind of food poisoning, C. perfringens is still one of the most common sources of foodborne diseases. Proper disinfection is necessary to control this type of food poisoning, as it is now clear that only kitchen strains of C. perfringens are able to produce the large amounts of enterotoxin necessary to cause food poisoning (Granum, 1990; Cornillot et al., 1995). Bacillus cereus is more difficult to control, specifically in the dairy industry, where it is now causing the main problems. Insufficient heating of rice-containing dishes has been known to cause B. cereus food poisoning of the emetic kind for a long time (Kramer and Gilbert, 1989), but will not be dealt with in this paper. There are several reasons for the problems in the dairy industry. First of all it seems to be impossible to completely avoid the presence of B. cereus in all milk samples. Secondly the spores are very hydrophobic (Husmark, 1993), and will attach to the surfaces of the pipelines of the dairy industry, where they might multiply and resporulate. A third problem is that pasteurisation heating is insufficient to kill the spores, while competition from other vegetative bacteria is eliminated. It seems that several B. cereus strains have become psychrotrophic over the years, making possible growth at temperatures as low as 4-6 degrees C (Granum et al., 1993a). None of the methods used to control hygiene in the dairy industry so far are able to control B. cereus. This is a continuously increasing problem for the industry but, with emerging knowledge, we should be able to control it. In this paper we will discuss the problems the food industry is facing with C. perfringens and B. cereus, and how these problems might be solved. We will also give our view on how research might ease these problems in the future. PMID:8750663

  7. Plasmid Characterization and Chromosome Analysis of Two netF+ Clostridium perfringens Isolates Associated with Foal and Canine Necrotizing Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Mehdizadeh Gohari, Iman; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Weese, Scott J.; Parreira, Valeria R.; Whitehead, Ashley E.; Boerlin, Patrick; Prescott, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of a novel beta-pore-forming toxin, NetF, which is strongly associated with canine and foal necrotizing enteritis should improve our understanding of the role of type A Clostridium perfringens associated disease in these animals. The current study presents the complete genome sequence of two netF-positive strains, JFP55 and JFP838, which were recovered from cases of foal necrotizing enteritis and canine hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, respectively. Genome sequencing was done using Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) technology-PacBio and Illumina Hiseq2000. The JFP55 and JFP838 genomes include a single 3.34 Mb and 3.53 Mb chromosome, respectively, and both genomes include five circular plasmids. Plasmid annotation revealed that three plasmids were shared by the two newly sequenced genomes, including a NetF/NetE toxins-encoding tcp-conjugative plasmid, a CPE/CPB2 toxins-encoding tcp-conjugative plasmid and a putative bacteriocin-encoding plasmid. The putative beta-pore-forming toxin genes, netF, netE and netG, were located in unique pathogenicity loci on tcp-conjugative plasmids. The C. perfringens JFP55 chromosome carries 2,825 protein-coding genes whereas the chromosome of JFP838 contains 3,014 protein-encoding genes. Comparison of these two chromosomes with three available reference C. perfringens chromosome sequences identified 48 (~247 kb) and 81 (~430 kb) regions unique to JFP55 and JFP838, respectively. Some of these divergent genomic regions in both chromosomes are phage- and plasmid-related segments. Sixteen of these unique chromosomal regions (~69 kb) were shared between the two isolates. Five of these shared regions formed a mosaic of plasmid-integrated segments, suggesting that these elements were acquired early in a clonal lineage of netF-positive C. perfringens strains. These results provide significant insight into the basis of canine and foal necrotizing enteritis and are the first to demonstrate that netF resides on a large and unique plasmid-encoded locus. PMID:26859667

  8. Evidence of chitinase activity within necrotic enteritis-associated subtypes of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    C. perfringens (Cp) is associated with the necrotic gastrointestinal condition known as necrotic enteritis (NE) in the chicken. rep-PCR subtyping identified subtypes of Cp from the gastrointestinal tracts of broiler chickens afflicted with NE that were distinguished from strains from environmental,...

  9. PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS DURING COOLING OF COOKED UNCURED BEEF

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper considers two models that have been used for modeling growth of C. perfringens during cooling. Using a common approach or methodology for constructing models, there was no appreciable difference between the model predictions when the population of cells was within the lag or exponential ...

  10. Dynamic determination of kinetic parameters and computer simulation of growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to develop a new one-step methodology that uses a dynamic approach to directly construct a tertiary model for prediction of the growth of C. perfringens in cooked beef. This methodology was based on numerical analysis and optimization of both primary and secondary...

  11. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF THE GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN COOKED BEEF UNDER ISOTHERMAL AND DYNAMIC CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop a mathematical methodology to estimate the growth of C. perfringens in cooked beef under dynamic temperature conditions. Two differential equations governing the lag phase development and cell multiplication were proposed and solved using a 4th-order Runge...

  12. Growth potential of Clostridium perfringens from spores in acidified beef, pork and poultry products during chilling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of C. perfringens to germinate and grow in acidified ground beef as well as in ten commercially prepared acidified beef, pork and poultry products was assessed. The pH of ground beef was adjusted using organic vinegar to achieve various pH values between 5.0 and 5.6; the pH of the commer...

  13. Assessing the performance of Clostridium perfringens cooling models for cooked, uncured meat and poultry products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat-resistant spores of C. perfringens may germinate and multiply in cooked meat and poultry products if the rate and extent of cooling does not occur in a timely manner. Therefore, six cooling models (PMP 7.0 broth model; PMIP Uncured Beef, Chicken, and Pork Models; Smith-Schaffner (version 3); a...

  14. Entérite nécrotique chez le poulet de gril II. Caractères des souches de Clostridium perfringens isolées

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, G.; Filion, R.; Malo, R.; Phaneuf, J.-B.

    1974-01-01

    A Gram positive bacillus, strictly anaerobic, was isolated from the viscera of all diseased birds showing lesions of necrotic enteritis. Its morphology and biochemical reactions, the presence of alpha and thêta hemolysins and the production of a lecithinase-C in vitro, all these characteristics indicated a similarity to those belonging to the group of Clostridium perfringens. The two hemolysins were neutralized in vitro only by the antitoxin A. Broiler chickens injected I.V. with a Viande-Foie (VF) broth culture of Clostridium perfringens together with the antitoxin A survived, whereas those receiving antitoxin C died. These results seem to indicate that this organism belongs to the type A. This bacillus was sensitive to a great variety of antibiotics, except neomycin. PMID:4368193

  15. Impact of a drug-free program on broiler chicken growth performances, gut health, Clostridium perfringens and Campylobacter jejuni occurrences at the farm level.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, M-L; Quessy, S; Letellier, A; Arsenault, J; Boulianne, M

    2015-08-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents as feed additives in poultry production is a public health concern due to the overall increase in antimicrobial resistance. Although some alternative products are commercially available, little is known on their potential impact on flock health and productivity. A prospective study involving 1.55 million birds was conducted on eight commercial broiler farms in Québec, Canada, to evaluate the impact of replacing antibiotic growth promoters and anticoccidial drugs by a drug-free program including improved brooding conditions, anticoccidial vaccination, essential oil-based feed additives, and water acidification. Various productivity and health parameters were compared between barns allocated to the conventional and the drug-free program. Zootechnical performances were monitored as productivity criteria. Clinical necrotic enteritis and subclinical enteritis occurrences, litter and fecal moistures content were measured, and microscopic gut health was evaluated. Clostridium perfringens and Campylobacter spp. strains were recovered from fecal samples collected during farm visits. Clostridium perfringens counts were used as poultry health indicators and Campylobacter prevalence was noted as well. The drug-free program was associated with a significant increase in feed conversion ratio and a decrease in mean live weight at slaughter and in daily weight gain. An increased incidence of necrotic enteritis outbreaks and subclinical enteritis cases, as well as an increase in litter moisture content at the end of the rearing period were also observed for this program. Mean microscopic intestinal lesion scores and prevalence of Campylobacter colonization were not statistically different between the two groups but the drug-free program was associated with higher Clostridium perfringens isolation rates. According to the current study design, the results suggest that substitution of antibiotic growth promoters and anticoccidial drugs by a drug-free program impacts various broiler chicken production parameters and Clostridium perfringens carriage levels. PMID:26047674

  16. Effect of rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) on growth control of Clostridium perfringens and lipid oxidation of ready-to-eat Jokbal (pig's trotters).

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Jin; Park, Keun-Cheol; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the antimicrobial effects of rooibos (tea extract), potassium lactate (PL) and sodium diacetate (SDA) mixture alone or in combinations on the growth of Clostridium perfringens vegetative cell and spore in ready-to-eat (RTE) Jokbal (pig's trotters). Addition of a combination of 10% rooibos and 4% PL + SDA inhibit growth of C. perfringens vegetative cell in Jokbal at 24 °C and 36 °C. The significant inhibition on germination and growth of C. perfringens spores was also observed in Jokbal with a combination of 10% rooibos and 4% PL + SDA (PL: 2.24%, SDA: 0.16%) at 24 °C. The Jokbal treated with 10% rooibos and 4% PL + SDA mixture had significantly (P < 0.05) lower TBARS values than the control at 10 and 24 °C. The lipid oxidation inhibition effect was the highest (P < 0.05) in anaerobic packed Jokbal with 10% rooibos. The addition of a combination of 10% rooibos and 4% PL + SDA during the processing of Jokbal prevented the growth of C. perfringens and the germination and growth of C. perfringens spores at room temperature. This study shows rooibos tea as a valuable natural food preservative in meat products. PMID:25394229

  17. Effect of meat ingredients (sodium nitrite and erythorbate) and processing (vacuum storage and packaging atmosphere) on germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores in ham during abusive cooling.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Solano, Mauricio; Valenzuela-Martinez, Carol; Cassada, David A; Snow, Daniel D; Juneja, Vijay K; Burson, Dennis E; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan

    2013-09-01

    The effect of nitrite and erythorbate on Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ham during abusive cooling (15 h) was evaluated. Ham was formulated with ground pork, NaNO2 (0, 50, 100, 150 or 200 ppm) and sodium erythorbate (0 or 547 ppm). Ten grams of meat (stored at 5 C for 3 or 24 h after preparation) were transferred to a vacuum bag and inoculated with a three-strain C. perfringens spore cocktail to obtain an inoculum of ca. 2.5 log spores/g. The bags were vacuum-sealed, and the meat was heat treated (75 C, 20 min) and cooled within 15 h from 54.4 to 7.2 C. Residual nitrite was determined before and after heat treatment using ion chromatography with colorimetric detection. Cooling of ham (control) stored for 3 and 24 h, resulted in C. perfringens population increases of 1.46 and 4.20 log CFU/g, respectively. For samples that contained low NaNO2 concentrations and were stored for 3 h, C. perfringens populations of 5.22 and 2.83 log CFU/g were observed with or without sodium erythorbate, respectively. Residual nitrite was stable (p > 0.05) for both storage times. Meat processing ingredients (sodium nitrite and sodium erythorbate) and their concentrations, and storage time subsequent to preparation of meat (oxygen content) affect C. perfringens spore germination and outgrowth during abusive cooling of ham. PMID:23664261

  18. Generation and characterization of recombinant bivalent fusion protein r-Cpib for immunotherapy against Clostridium perfringens beta and iota toxemia.

    PubMed

    Das, Shreya; Majumder, Saugata; Kingston, Joseph J; Batra, Harsh V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens beta (CPB) and iota (CPI) toxaemias result in some of the most lethal forms of haemorrhagic and necrotic enteritis and sudden death syndrome affecting especially neonates. While CPB enterotoxemia is one of the most common forms of clostridial enterotoxemia, CPI enterotoxemia though putatively considered to be rare is an emerging cause of concern. The similarities in clinical manifestation, gross and histopathology findings of both types of toxaemias coupled to the infrequency of CPI toxaemia might lead to symptomatic misidentification with Type C resulting in therapeutic failure due to habitual administration of CPB anti-toxin which is ineffective against CPI. Therefore in the present study, to generate a composite anti-toxin capable of neutralizing both toxaemias, a novel bivalent chimera r-Cpib was constructed by splicing the non-toxic C terminal binding regions of CPB and CPI, via a flexible glycine linker (G4S) by overlap-extension PCR. The fusion protein was characterized for its therapeutic abilities toward CPI and CPB toxin neutralizations. The r-Cpib was found to be non-toxic and could competitively inhibit binding of CPB to host cell receptors thereby reducing its cytotoxicity. Immunization of mice with r-Cpib generated specific antibodies capable of neutralizing the above toxaemias both in vitro and in vivo. Caco-2 cells exposed to a mixture of anti-r-Cpib sera and native CPI or CPB, displayed significantly superior protection against the respective toxins while passive challenge of mice with a similar mixture resulted in 83 and 91% protection against CPI and CPB respectively. Alternatively, mice exposed to a mixture of sham sera and native toxins died within 2-3 days. This work thus demonstrates r-Cpib as a novel bivalent fusion protein capable of efficient immunotherapy against C. perfringens CPI and CPB toxaemia. PMID:26774054

  19. Dissecting the Contributions of Clostridium perfringens Type C Toxins to Lethality in the Mouse Intravenous Injection Model

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Derek J.; Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E.; Sayeed, Sameera; Poon, Rachael; Adams, Victoria; Rood, Julian I.; Uzal, Francisco A.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2006-01-01

    The gram-positive anaerobe Clostridium perfringens produces a large arsenal of toxins that are responsible for histotoxic and enteric infections, including enterotoxemias, in humans and domestic animals. C. perfringens type C isolates, which cause rapidly fatal diseases in domestic animals and enteritis necroticans in humans, contain the genes for alpha toxin (plc), perfringolysin O (pfoA), beta toxin (cpb), and sometimes beta2 toxin (cpb2) and/or enterotoxin (cpe). Due to the economic impact of type C-induced diseases, domestic animals are commonly vaccinated with crude type C toxoid (prepared from inactivated culture supernatants) or bacterin/toxoid vaccines, and it is not clear which toxin(s) present in these vaccines actually elicits the protective immune response. To improve type C vaccines, it would be helpful to assess the contribution of each toxin present in type C supernatants to lethality. To address this issue, we surveyed a large collection of type C isolates to determine their toxin-producing abilities. When late-log-phase vegetative culture supernatants were analyzed by quantitative Western blotting or activity assays, most type C isolates produced at least three lethal toxins, alpha toxin, beta toxin, and perfringolysin O, and several isolates also produced beta2 toxin. In the mouse intravenous injection model, beta toxin was identified as the main lethal factor present in type C late-log-phase culture supernatants. This conclusion was based on monoclonal antibody neutralization studies and regression analyses in which the levels of alpha toxin, beta toxin, perfringolysin O, and beta2 toxin production were compared with lethality. Collectively, our results highlight the importance of beta toxin for type C-induced toxemia. PMID:16926413

  20. Identification and Characterization of Clostridium perfringens Beta Toxin Variants with Differing Trypsin Sensitivity and In Vitro Cytotoxicity Activity

    PubMed Central

    Theoret, James R.; Uzal, Francisco A.

    2015-01-01

    By producing toxins, Clostridium perfringens causes devastating diseases of both humans and animals. C. perfringens beta toxin (CPB) is the major virulence determinant for type C infections and is also implicated in type B infections, but little is known about the CPB structure-function relationship. Amino acid sequence comparisons of the CPBs made by 8 randomly selected isolates identified two natural variant toxins with four conserved amino acid changes, including a switch of E to K at position 168 (E168K) that introduces a potential trypsin cleavage site into the CPB protein of strain JGS1076. To investigate whether this potential trypsin cleavage site affects sensitivity to trypsin, a primary host defense against this toxin, the two CPB variants were assayed for their trypsin sensitivity. The results demonstrated a significant difference in trypsin sensitivity, which was linked to the E168K switch by using site-directed recombinant CPB (rCPB) mutants. The natural CPB variants also displayed significant differences in their cytotoxicity to human endothelial cells. This cytotoxicity difference was mainly attributable to increased host cell binding rather than the ability to oligomerize or form functional pores. Using rCPB site-directed mutants, differences in cytotoxicity and host cell binding were linked to an A300V amino acid substitution in the strain JGS1076 CPB variant that possessed more cytotoxic activity. Mapping of sequence variations on a CPB structure modeled using related toxins suggests that the E168K substitution is surface localized and so can interact with trypsin and that the A300V substitution is located in a putative binding domain of the CPB toxin. PMID:25643999

  1. Necrotic Enteritis-Derived Clostridium perfringens Strain with Three Closely Related Independently Conjugative Toxin and Antibiotic Resistance Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Bannam, Trudi L.; Yan, Xu-Xia; Harrison, Paul F.; Seemann, Torsten; Keyburn, Anthony L.; Stubenrauch, Christopher; Weeramantri, Lakmini H.; Cheung, Jackie K.; McClane, Bruce A.; Boyce, John D.; Moore, Robert J.; Rood, Julian I.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pathogenesis of avian necrotic enteritis involves NetB, a pore-forming toxin produced by virulent avian isolates of Clostridium perfringens type A. To determine the location and mobility of the netB structural gene, we examined a derivative of the tetracycline-resistant necrotic enteritis strain EHE-NE18, in which netB was insertionally inactivated by the chloramphenicol and thiamphenicol resistance gene catP. Both tetracycline and thiamphenicol resistance could be transferred either together or separately to a recipient strain in plate matings. The separate transconjugants could act as donors in subsequent matings, which demonstrated that the tetracycline resistance determinant and the netB gene were present on different conjugative elements. Large plasmids were isolated from the transconjugants and analyzed by high-throughput sequencing. Analysis of the resultant data indicated that there were actually three large conjugative plasmids present in the original strain, each with its own toxin or antibiotic resistance locus. Each plasmid contained a highly conserved 40-kb region that included plasmid replication and transfer regions that were closely related to the 47-kb conjugative tetracycline resistance plasmid pCW3 from C. perfringens. The plasmids were as follows: (i) a conjugative 49-kb tetracycline resistance plasmid that was very similar to pCW3, (ii) a conjugative 82-kb plasmid that contained the netB gene and other potential virulence genes, and (iii) a 70-kb plasmid that carried the cpb2 gene, which encodes a different pore-forming toxin, beta2 toxin. PMID:21954306

  2. The NanI and NanJ Sialidases of Clostridium perfringens Are Not Essential for Virulence▿

    PubMed Central

    Chiarezza, Martina; Lyras, Dena; Pidot, Sacha J.; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Awad, Milena M.; Kennedy, Catherine L.; Cordner, Leanne M.; Phumoonna, Tongted; Poon, Rachael; Hughes, Meredith L.; Emmins, John J.; Alape-Girón, Alberto; Rood, Julian I.

    2009-01-01

    The essential toxin in Clostridium perfringens-mediated gas gangrene or clostridial myonecrosis is alpha-toxin, although other toxins and extracellular enzymes may also be involved. In many bacterial pathogens extracellular sialidases are important virulence factors, and it has been suggested that sialidases may play a role in gas gangrene. C. perfringens strains have combinations of three different sialidase genes, two of which, nanI and nanJ, encode secreted sialidases. The nanI and nanJ genes were insertionally inactivated by homologous recombination in derivatives of sequenced strain 13 and were shown to encode two functional secreted sialidases, NanI and NanJ. Analysis of these derivatives showed that NanI was the major sialidase in this organism. Mutation of nanI resulted in loss of most of the secreted sialidase activity, and the residual activity was eliminated by subsequent mutation of the nanJ gene. Only a slight reduction in the total sialidase activity was observed in a nanJ mutant. Cytotoxicity assays using the B16 melanoma cell line showed that supernatants containing NanI or overexpressing NanJ enhanced alpha-toxin-mediated cytotoxicity. Finally, the ability of nanI, nanJ, and nanIJ mutants to cause disease was assessed in a mouse myonecrosis model. No attenuation of virulence was observed for any of these strains, providing evidence that neither the NanI sialidase nor the NanJ sialidase is essential for virulence. PMID:19651873

  3. Clostridium perfringens beta-toxin induces necrostatin-inhibitable, calpain-dependent necrosis in primary porcine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Autheman, Delphine; Wyder, Marianne; Popoff, Michel; D'Herde, Katharina; Christen, Stephan; Posthaus, Horst

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens ?-toxin (CPB) is a ?-barrel pore-forming toxin and an essential virulence factor of C. perfringens type C strains, which cause fatal hemorrhagic enteritis in animals and humans. We have previously shown that CPB is bound to endothelial cells within the intestine of affected pigs and humans, and that CPB is highly toxic to primary porcine endothelial cells (pEC) in vitro. The objective of the present study was to investigate the type of cell death induced by CPB in these cells, and to study potential host cell mechanisms involved in this process. CPB rapidly induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, propidium iodide uptake, ATP depletion, potassium efflux, a marked rise in intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)]i, release of high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1), and caused ultrastructural changes characteristic of necrotic cell death. Despite a certain level of caspase-3 activation, no appreciable DNA fragmentation was detected. CPB-induced LDH release and propidium iodide uptake were inhibited by necrostatin-1 and the two dissimilar calpain inhibitors PD150606 and calpeptin. Likewise, inhibition of potassium efflux, chelation of intracellular calcium and treatment of pEC with cyclosporin A also significantly inhibited CPB-induced LDH release. Our results demonstrate that rCPB primarily induces necrotic cell death in pEC, and that necrotic cell death is not merely a passive event caused by toxin-induced membrane disruption, but is propagated by host cell-dependent biochemical pathways activated by the rise in intracellular calcium and inhibitable by necrostatin-1, consistent with the emerging concept of programmed necrosis ("necroptosis"). PMID:23734212

  4. Human Claudin-8 and -14 Are Receptors Capable of Conveying the Cytotoxic Effects of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Archana; McClane, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) contributes to several important human gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. This toxin and its derivatives are also being explored for translational applications, i.e., cancer therapy or drug delivery. Some, but not all, members of the 24-member claudin (Cldn) family of mammalian tight junction proteins can serve as CPE receptors. Among the human Cldns (hCldns), hCldn-3 and -4 are known to convey CPE sensitivity when expressed by fibroblast transfectants. However, other Cldns are also reportedly expressed in the intestines, where they might contribute to natural CPE-mediated GI disease, and in other organs, where they might react with CPE-based therapeutics. Therefore, the current study assessed whether two additional hCldns beside hCldn-3 and -4 are also functional CPE receptors. Using Cldn-expressing transfectants, hCldn-8 and -14 were shown to convey CPE-mediated cytotoxicity at pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of this toxin, although ~2-to-10-fold less efficiently than hCldn-4. Site-directed mutagenesis then demonstrated that the N146 residue in hCldn-14 and the S151 residue in hCldn-8 are largely responsible for modulating the weaker CPE binding properties of hCldn-8 and -14 versus hCldn-4, which broadens understanding of Cldn:CPE binding interactions. Since Cldn-8 and -14 are reportedly expressed in mammalian intestines, the current results support the possibility that these two hCldns contribute to natural CPE-mediated gastrointestinal disease and could be CPE-based therapeutic targets for cancers overexpressing those claudins. However, these results also suggest caution during therapeutic use of CPE, which might trigger toxic side effects in normal human tissues producing hCldn-8 or -14, as well as in those producing hCldn-3 or -4. IMPORTANCE Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) is responsible for the gastrointestinal symptoms of the second-most-common bacterial food-borne illness and is also being explored for use as a cancer therapeutic or for increasing drug delivery. Until now, the only known human CPE receptors were claudin-3 and -4. This work shows that human claudin-8 and -14 can also bind CPE and convey cytotoxicity, although slightly less efficiently than claudin-3 and -4. The claudin-8 and -14 residues responsible for this weaker CPE binding were identified, shedding new light on CPE:claudin interactions. PMID:23322640

  5. Detection of a group II intron without an open reading frame in the alpha-toxin gene of Clostridium perfringens isolated from a broiler chicken.

    PubMed

    Ma, Menglin; Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru; Misawa, Naoaki

    2007-03-01

    A DNA insertion of 834 bp, designated CPF-G2Im, was identified within the alpha toxin gene (cpa) of Clostridium perfringens strain CPBC16ML, isolated from a broiler chicken. Sequence analysis of CPF-G2Im indicated that it was integrated 340 nucleotides downstream of the start codon of cpa. However, the insertion did not abolish the phospholipase C and hemolytic activities of CPBC16ML. To investigate the expression of its alpha toxin, the intact copy of cpa was cloned into an expression vector and transformed into Escherichia coli M15 cells. Immunoblotting analysis showed that the protein expressed from the transformant as well as in the culture supernatant of C. perfringens strain CPBC16ML had the expected molecular weight detected in reference strains of C. perfringens. Northern hybridization and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that the entire CPF-G2Im insertion was completely spliced from the cpa precursor mRNA transcripts. The sequence of the insertion fragment has 95% and 97% identity to two noncoding regions corresponding to sequences that flank a predicted group II RT gene present in the pCPF4969 plasmid of C. perfringens. However, an RT was not encoded by the CPF-G2Im fragment. Based on the secondary structure prediction analysis, CPF-G2Im revealed typical features of group II introns. The present study shows that CPF-G2Im is capable of splicing in both C. perfringens and E. coli. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a group II intron without an open reading frame (ORF) is located in the cpa ORF of C. perfringens. PMID:17158682

  6. Clostridium perfringens Delta Toxin Is Sequence Related to Beta Toxin, NetB, and Staphylococcus Pore-Forming Toxins, but Shows Functional Differences

    PubMed Central

    Manich, Maria; Knapp, Oliver; Gibert, Maryse; Maier, Elke; Jolivet-Reynaud, Colette; Geny, Blandine; Benz, Roland; Popoff, Michel R.

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens produces numerous toxins, which are responsible for severe diseases in man and animals. Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysins released by a number of C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. Delta toxin was characterized to be cytotoxic for cells expressing the ganglioside GM2 in their membrane. Here we report the genetic characterization of Delta toxin and its pore forming activity in lipid bilayers. Delta toxin consists of 318 amino acids, its 28 N-terminal amino acids corresponding to a signal peptide. The secreted Delta toxin (290 amino acids; 32619 Da) is a basic protein (pI 9.1) which shows a significant homology with C. perfringens Beta toxin (43% identity), with C. perfringens NetB (40% identity) and, to a lesser extent, with Staphylococcus aureus alpha toxin and leukotoxins. Recombinant Delta toxin showed a preference for binding to GM2, in contrast to Beta toxin, which did not bind to gangliosides. It is hemolytic for sheep red blood cells and cytotoxic for HeLa cells. In artificial diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine membranes, Delta and Beta toxin formed channels. Conductance of the channels formed by Delta toxin, with a value of about 100 pS to more than 1 nS in 1 M KCl and a membrane potential of 20 mV, was higher than those formed by Beta toxin and their distribution was broader. The results of zero-current membrane potential measurements and single channel experiments suggest that Delta toxin forms slightly anion-selective channels, whereas the Beta toxin channels showed a preference for cations under the same conditions. C. perfringens Delta toxin shows a significant sequence homolgy with C. perfringens Beta and NetB toxins, as well as with S. aureus alpha hemolysin and leukotoxins, but exhibits different channel properties in lipid bilayers. In contrast to Beta toxin, Delta toxin recognizes GM2 as receptor and forms anion-selective channels. PMID:19018299

  7. The CpAL system regulates changes of the trans-epithelial resistance of human enterocytes during Clostridium perfringens type C infection.

    PubMed

    Nava, Porfirio; Vidal, Jorge E

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C strains produce severe disease in humans and animals including enterotoxaemia and hemorrhagic diarrhea. Type C disease is mediated by production of toxins that damage the site of infection inducing loss of bloody fluids. Production of type C toxins, such as CPA, PFO, and, CPB is regulated by the C. perfringens Agr-like (CpAL) quorum sensing (QS) system. The CpAL system is also required to recapitulate, in vivo, intestinal signs of C. perfringens type C-induced disease, including hemorrhagic diarrhea and accumulation of fluids. The intestinal epithelium forms a physical barrier, made up of a series of intercellular junctions including tight junctions (TJs), adherens junctions (AJs) and desmosomes (DMs). This selective barrier regulates important physiological processes, including paracellular movement of ions and solutes, which, if altered, results in loss of fluids into the intestinal lumen. In this work, the effects of C. perfringens infection on the barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells was evaluated by measuring trans-epithelial resistance (TEER). Our studies demonstrate that infection of human enterocytes with C. perfringens type C strain CN3685 induced a significant drop on TEER. Changes in TEER were mediated by the CpAL system as a CN3685ΔagrB mutant did not induce such a drop. Physical contact between bacteria and enterocytes produced more pronounced changes in TEER and this phenomenon appeared also to be mediated by the CpAL system. Finally, immunofluorescence studies demonstrate that C. perfringens type C infection redistribute TJs protein occludin, and Claudin-3, and DMs protein desmoglein-2, but did not affect the AJs protein E-cadherin. PMID:27063897

  8. Expression of a Clostridium perfringens genome-encoded putative N-acetylmuramoyl–l-alanine amidase as a potential antimicrobial to control the bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Tillman, Glenn E.; Simmons, Mustafa; Garrish, Johnna K.; Seal, Bruce S.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a substantial role in non-foodborne human, animal, and avian diseases as well as human foodborne disease. Previously discovered C. perfringens bacteriophage lytic enzyme amino acid sequences were utilized to identify putative prophage lysins or autolysins by BLAST analyses encoded by the genomes of C. perfringens isolates. A predicted N-acetylmuramoyl–l-alanine amidase or MurnAc–lAA (also known as peptidoglycan aminohydrolase, NAMLA amidase, NAMLAA, amidase 3, and peptidoglycan amidase; EC 3.5.1.28) was identified that would hydrolyze the amide bond between N-acetylmuramoyl and l-amino acids in certain cell wall glycopeptides. The gene encoding this protein was subsequently cloned from genomic DNA of a C. perfringens isolate by polymerase chain reaction, and the gene product (PlyCpAmi) was expressed to determine if it could be utilized as an antimicrobial to control the bacterium. By spot assay, lytic zones were observed for the purified amidase and the E. coli expression host cellular lysate containing the amidase gene. Turbidity reduction and plate counts of C. perfringens cultures were significantly reduced by the expressed protein and observed morphologies for cells treated with the amidase appeared vacuolated, non-intact, and injured compared to the untreated cells. Among a variety of C. perfringens strains, there was little gene sequence heterogeneity that varied from 1 to 21 nucleotide differences. The results further demonstrate that it is possible to discover lytic proteins encoded in the genomes of bacteria that could be utilized to control bacterial pathogens. PMID:23934074

  9. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii... Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Epsilon... temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white...

  10. Influence of starch source on sporulation and enterotoxin production by Clostridium perfringens type A.

    PubMed

    Labbe, R; Somers, E; Duncan, C

    1976-03-01

    Of 16 different starch preparations tested, Clostridium perfringes NCTC 8798 yielded maximum sporulation and enterotoxin formation when ICN-soluble starch was included in Duncan and Strong sporulation medium. In general soluble starches were better than potato, corn, or arrowroot starch with regard to these two parameters. PMID:180885

  11. Molecular Architecture and Functional Analysis of NetB, a Pore-forming Toxin from Clostridium perfringens*

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Christos G.; Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P.; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Naylor, Claire E.; Cole, Ambrose R.; Moss, David S.; Titball, Richard W.; Basak, Ajit K.

    2013-01-01

    NetB is a pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens and has been reported to play a major role in the pathogenesis of avian necrotic enteritis, a disease that has emerged due to the removal of antibiotics in animal feedstuffs. Here we present the crystal structure of the pore form of NetB solved to 3.9 Å. The heptameric assembly shares structural homology to the staphylococcal α-hemolysin. However, the rim domain, a region that is thought to interact with the target cell membrane, shows sequence and structural divergence leading to the alteration of a phosphocholine binding pocket found in the staphylococcal toxins. Consistent with the structure we show that NetB does not bind phosphocholine efficiently but instead interacts directly with cholesterol leading to enhanced oligomerization and pore formation. Finally we have identified conserved and non-conserved amino acid positions within the rim loops that significantly affect binding and toxicity of NetB. These findings present new insights into the mode of action of these pore-forming toxins, enabling the design of more effective control measures against necrotic enteritis and providing potential new tools to the field of bionanotechnology. PMID:23239883

  12. Clostridium perfringens Phospholipase C Induced ROS Production and Cytotoxicity Require PKC, MEK1 and NFκB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Pineda-Padilla, Maria Jose; Castro-Castro, Ana Cristina; Alape-Giron, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (CpPLC), also called α-toxin, is the most toxic extracellular enzyme produced by this bacteria and is essential for virulence in gas gangrene. At lytic concentrations, CpPLC causes membrane disruption, whereas at sublytic concentrations this toxin causes oxidative stress and activates the MEK/ERK pathway, which contributes to its cytotoxic and myotoxic effects. In the present work, the role of PKC, ERK 1/2 and NFκB signalling pathways in ROS generation induced by CpPLC and their contribution to CpPLC-induced cytotoxicity was evaluated. The results demonstrate that CpPLC induces ROS production through PKC, MEK/ERK and NFκB pathways, the latter being activated by the MEK/ERK signalling cascade. Inhibition of either of these signalling pathways prevents CpPLC's cytotoxic effect. In addition, it was demonstrated that NFκB inhibition leads to a significant reduction in the myotoxicity induced by intramuscular injection of CpPLC in mice. Understanding the role of these signalling pathways could lead towards developing rational therapeutic strategies aimed to reduce cell death during a clostridialmyonecrosis. PMID:24466113

  13. [Cloning and expression of ScFv gene against alpha-toxin of Clostridium perfringens type A].

    PubMed

    Zhao, B H; Xu, C B

    2001-09-01

    The VH and VL genes from a hybridoma cell line producing mouse McAb against alpha-toxin of Clostridium perfringens type A were amplified by RT-PCR. The VH and VL genes were connected thought a flexible linker (Gly4Ser)3 and the VH-linker-VL (ScFv) gene was cloned into a vector pGEM-T. The ScFv gene consists of 726 bp encoding 242 amino acid residues. Both VH and VL genes were confirmed as functionally rearranged mouse immunoglobulin variable region. According to kabat classed method, the VH and VL gene segments belong to mouse Ig heavy chain subgroup II (B) and kappa light chain subgroup III respectively. The ScFv gene was amplified inserted the expression vector pHOG21 and transformed into E coli XL1-BLUE. The ScFv protein was highly expressed in recombinant strain XL1-BLUE (pHOG-2E3) and the expression level of the ScFv was about 25% of total bacteria protein by SDS-PAGE. The neutralization assay showed that the expressed ScFv protein could neutralize the phospholipase C activities of alpha-toxin. PMID:11797218

  14. Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C induced ROS production and cytotoxicity require PKC, MEK1 and NFκB activation.

    PubMed

    Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Pineda-Padilla, Maria Jose; Castro-Castro, Ana Cristina; Alape-Giron, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (CpPLC), also called α-toxin, is the most toxic extracellular enzyme produced by this bacteria and is essential for virulence in gas gangrene. At lytic concentrations, CpPLC causes membrane disruption, whereas at sublytic concentrations this toxin causes oxidative stress and activates the MEK/ERK pathway, which contributes to its cytotoxic and myotoxic effects. In the present work, the role of PKC, ERK 1/2 and NFκB signalling pathways in ROS generation induced by CpPLC and their contribution to CpPLC-induced cytotoxicity was evaluated. The results demonstrate that CpPLC induces ROS production through PKC, MEK/ERK and NFκB pathways, the latter being activated by the MEK/ERK signalling cascade. Inhibition of either of these signalling pathways prevents CpPLC's cytotoxic effect. In addition, it was demonstrated that NFκB inhibition leads to a significant reduction in the myotoxicity induced by intramuscular injection of CpPLC in mice. Understanding the role of these signalling pathways could lead towards developing rational therapeutic strategies aimed to reduce cell death during a clostridialmyonecrosis. PMID:24466113

  15. Specific binding of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin fragment to Claudin-b and modulation of zebrafish epidermal barrier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Ni, Chen; Yang, Zhenguo; Piontek, Anna; Chen, Huapu; Wang, Sijie; Fan, Yiming; Qin, Zhihai; Piontek, Joerg

    2015-08-01

    Claudins (Cldn) are the major components of tight junctions (TJs) sealing the paracellular cleft in tissue barriers of various organs. Zebrafish Cldnb, the homolog of mammalian Cldn4, is expressed at epithelial cell-cell contacts and is important for regulating epidermal permeability. The bacterial toxin Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) has been shown to bind to a subset of mammalian Cldns. In this study, we used the Cldn-binding C-terminal domain of CPE (194-319 amino acids, cCPE 194-319 ) to investigate its functional role in modulating zebrafish larval epidermal barriers. In vitro analyses show that cCPE 194-319 removed Cldn4 from epithelial cells and disrupted the monolayer tightness, which could be rescued by the removal of cCPE 194-319. Incubation of zebrafish larvae with cCPE 194-319 removed Cldnb specifically from the epidermal cell membrane. Dye diffusion analysis with 4-kDa fluorescent dextran indicated that the permeability of the epidermal barrier increased due to cCPE 194-319 incubation. Electron microscopic investigation revealed reversible loss of TJ integrity by Cldnb removal. Collectively, these results suggest that cCPE 194-319 could be used as a Cldnb modulator to transiently open the epidermal barrier in zebrafish. In addition, zebrafish might be used as an in vivo system to investigate the capability of cCPE to enhance drug delivery across tissue barriers. PMID:25869230

  16. Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin is produced in the intestines of broiler chicks inoculated with an alpha toxin mutant.

    PubMed

    Coursodon, Christine F; Trinh, Hien T; Mallozzi, Michael; Vedantam, Gayatri; Glock, R D; Songer, J G

    2010-12-01

    Poultry necrotic enteritis (NE) is caused by specific strains of Clostridium perfringens, most of which are type A. The role of alpha toxin (CPA) in NE has been called into question by the finding that an engineered cpa mutant retains full virulence in vivo[9]. This is in contrast to the finding that immunization with CPA toxoids protects against NE. We confirmed the earlier findings, in that 14-day-old Cornish × Rock broiler chicks challenged with a cpa mutant developed lesions compatible with NE in >90% of birds inoculated with the mutant. However, CPA was detected in amounts ranging from 10 to >100 ng per g of gut contents and mucosa in birds inoculated with the cpa mutant, the wildtype strain from which the mutant was constructed, and our positive control strain. There was a direct relationship between lesion severity and amount of CPA detected (R = 0.89-0.99). These findings suggest that the role of CPA in pathogenesis of NE requires further investigation. PMID:20934524

  17. Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin is produced in the intestines of broiler chicks inoculated with an alpha toxin mutant.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Coursodon CF; Trinh HT; Mallozzi M; Vedantam G; Glock RD; Songer JG

    2010-12-01

    Poultry necrotic enteritis (NE) is caused by specific strains of Clostridium perfringens, most of which are type A. The role of alpha toxin (CPA) in NE has been called into question by the finding that an engineered cpa mutant retains full virulence in vivo[9]. This is in contrast to the finding that immunization with CPA toxoids protects against NE. We confirmed the earlier findings, in that 14-day-old Cornish × Rock broiler chicks challenged with a cpa mutant developed lesions compatible with NE in >90% of birds inoculated with the mutant. However, CPA was detected in amounts ranging from 10 to >100 ng per g of gut contents and mucosa in birds inoculated with the cpa mutant, the wildtype strain from which the mutant was constructed, and our positive control strain. There was a direct relationship between lesion severity and amount of CPA detected (R = 0.89-0.99). These findings suggest that the role of CPA in pathogenesis of NE requires further investigation.

  18. Factors affecting the incidence of necrotic enteritis, caecal carriage of Clostridium perfringens and bird performance in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Elwinger, K; Schneitz, C; Berndtson, E; Fossum, O; Teglf, B; Engstm, B

    1992-01-01

    Two trials were conducted to study the effects of a competitive exclusion (CE) product BROILACT and the anticoccidial narasin on the incidence of necrotic enteritis (NE), the numbers of Clostridium perfringens (CP) in the caeca of broiler chicks and the performance of the birds. In trial 1 the effects of type of protein and partial replacement of a narasin containing diet with whole wheat were also studied. All groups of chicks were studied up to the point of slaughter at 43 days of age and after evisceration in a processing plant to determine slaughter yield. In trial 1, statistically significant results included the following: CE-treatment reduced total mortality, and incidence of NE, on diet containing animal but not vegetable protein. Caecal carriage of CP was also reduced, while slaughter yield increased. Narasin reduced caecal carriage of CP and increased both growth rate and slaughter yield in both trials. Whole wheat replacement improved feed conversion but reduced bird growth rate. In trial 2, both CE-treatment and narasin influenced feed intake, CE-treatment significantly only at days 22 and 44. Narasin improved feed conversion until 5 weeks of age and CE-treatment did so until 22 days of age. In both trials, there was also an interaction effect indicating that CE-treatment increased slaughter yield for birds that were not fed narasin. PMID:1488953

  19. Roles of Asp179 and Glu270 in ADP-Ribosylation of Actin by Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Tabakova, Irina; Lang, Alexander E.; Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota toxin is a binary toxin composed of the enzymatically active component Ia and receptor binding component Ib. Ia is an ADP-ribosyltransferase, which modifies Arg177 of actin. The previously determined crystal structure of the actin-Ia complex suggested involvement of Asp179 of actin in the ADP-ribosylation reaction. To gain more insights into the structural requirements of actin to serve as a substrate for toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, we engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, in which wild type actin was replaced by actin variants with substitutions in residues located on the Ia-actin interface. Expression of the actin mutant Arg177Lys resulted in complete resistance towards Ia. Actin mutation of Asp179 did not change Ia-induced ADP-ribosylation and growth inhibition of S. cerevisiae. By contrast, substitution of Glu270 of actin inhibited the toxic action of Ia and the ADP-ribosylation of actin. In vitro transcribed/translated human β-actin confirmed the crucial role of Glu270 in ADP-ribosylation of actin by Ia. PMID:26713879

  20. Inhibitory effects of organic acid salts on growth of Clostridium perfringens from spore inocula during chilling of marinated ground turkey breast.

    PubMed

    Juneja, V K; Thippareddi, H

    2004-06-01

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens germination and outgrowth by salts of organic acids such as sodium lactate, sodium acetate, buffered sodium citrate and buffered sodium citrate supplemented with sodium diacetate was evaluated during continuous chilling of ground turkey. Turkey breast meat was injected with a brine-containing NaCl, potato starch and potassium tetra pyrophosphate to yield final in-product concentrations of 0.85%, 0.25% and 0.20%, respectively. The meat was ground, mixed with either sodium lactate (1%, 2%, 3% or 4%), sodium acetate (1% or 2%), buffered sodium citrate (Ional, 1%) or buffered sodium citrate supplemented with sodium diacetate (Ional Plus trade mark, 1%), in addition to a control that did not contain added antimicrobials. Each product was mixed with a three-strain C. perfringens spore cocktail to obtain final spore concentrations of ca. 2.8 log10 spores/g. Inoculated products (10 g) were packaged into cook-in-bags (2 x 3 in.), vacuum sealed, cooked at 60 degrees C for 1 h, and subsequently chilled from 54.4 to 7.2 degrees C in 15, 18 and 21 h following exponential chilling rates. Products were sampled immediately after cooking and then after chilling. Chilling of cooked turkey following 15, 18 and 21 h chill rates resulted in germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens spores to 6.6, 7.58 and 7.95 log10 CFU/g populations, respectively, from initial spore populations of ca. 2.80 log10 CFU/g. Incorporation of sodium lactate (1%), sodium acetate (1%), Ional or Ional Plus (1%) substantially inhibited germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens spores compared to controls. Final C. perfringens total populations of 3.12, 3.10, 2.38 and 2.92 log10 CFU/g, respectively, were observed following a 15-h exponential chill rate. Similar inhibitory effects were observed for 18 and 21 chill rates with the antimicrobials at 1% concentrations. While sodium lactate and sodium acetate concentrations of 1% were sufficient to control C. perfringens germination and outgrowth (<1.0 log10 CFU/g growth) following 15 h chill rates, higher concentrations were required for 18 and 21 h chill rates. Ional at 1% concentration was effective in inhibiting germination and outgrowth to <1.0 log10 CFU/g of C. perfringens for all three chill rates (15, 18 and 21 h) tested. Use of sodium salts of organic acids in formulation of ready-to-eat meat products can reduce the risk of C. perfringens spore germination and outgrowth during chilling. PMID:15135954

  1. The Interaction of a Carbohydrate-Binding Module from a Clostridium perfringens N-Acetyl-beta-hexosaminidase with its Carbohydrate Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ficko-Blean,E.; Boraston, A.

    2006-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a notable colonizer of the human gastrointestinal tract. This bacterium is quite remarkable for a human pathogen by the number of glycoside hydrolases found in its genome. The modularity of these enzymes is striking as is the frequent occurrence of modules having amino acid sequence identity with family 32 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), often referred to as F5/8 domains. Here we report the properties of family 32 CBMs from a C. perfringens N-acetyl-{beta}-hexosaminidase. Macroarray, UV difference, and isothermal titration calorimetry binding studies indicate a preference for the disaccharide LacNAc ({beta}-d-galactosyl-1,4-{beta}-d-N-acetylglucosamine). The molecular details of the interaction of this CBM with galactose, LacNAc, and the type II blood group H-trisaccharide are revealed by x-ray crystallographic studies at resolutions of 1.49, 2.4, and 2.3 Angstroms, respectively.

  2. Distribution of Clostridium perfringens and Fecal Sterols in a Benthic Coastal Marine Environment Influenced by the Sewage Outfall from McMurdo Station, Antarctica†

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Diane D.; McFeters, Gordon A.; Venkatesan, M. Indira

    1998-01-01

    The spatial distribution, movement, and impact of the untreated wastewater outfall from McMurdo Station, Antarctica, were investigated under early austral summer conditions. The benthic environment was examined to determine the distribution of Clostridium perfringens in sediment cores and the intestinal contents of native invertebrates and fish along a transect of stations. These stations extended ca. 411 m south of the outfall. The findings revealed that the concentration of C. perfringens decreased with depth in the sediment and distance from the outfall. High percentages of tunicates and sea urchins were colonized with this bacterium along the transect. Coprostanol concentrations were also measured in sediment samples taken from each of the transect stations, and a similar trend was observed. These results are in agreement with the findings of previous studies performed with the water column and collectively provide evidence that the disposal of domestic wastes deserves special consideration in polar marine environments. PMID:9647835

  3. Xylanase supplementation of a wheat-based diet improved nutrient digestion and mRNA expression of intestinal nutrient transporters in broiler chickens infected with Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuangshuang; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Xu; Li, Changwu; Guo, Yuming

    2014-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens has become prevalent in the European Union due to the withdrawal of antibiotics in poultry feed. In an experiment with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement, 336 one-day-old male broiler chicks (Ross 308) were assigned to 4 groups with or without C. perfringens challenge and fed wheat-based diets supplemented with or without xylanase at 5,500 U/kg of diet. The study aimed to investigate effects of xylanase addition on growth performance as well as nutrient digestion and absorption of C. perfringens-infected broilers. Before challenge (d 0-14), xylanase-supplemented birds had greater ADG and lower feed conversion ratio (FCR; P < 0.05). During infection (d 14-21), challenge tended to decrease ADG (P = 0.063) and significantly increased FCR (P < 0.05), whereas xylanase addition greatly reduced FCR (P < 0.05). Clostridium perfringens infection decreased AME values and apparent ileal digestibility of DM of diets (P < 0.05). Xylanase supplementation increased AME values regardless of infection and apparent ileal digestibility of CP in challenged birds (P < 0.05). Activities of duodenal α-amylase and chymotrypsin and pancreatic trypsin were decreased by C. perfringens infection (P < 0.05). Xylanase supplementation elevated pancreatic chymotrypsin activity and reduced duodenal α-amylase and trypsin activities (P < 0.05). It also decreased jejunal α-amylase activity and increased pancreatic α-amylase as well as jejunal sucrase activities in uninfected birds (P < 0.05). The duodenal mRNA expression of sodium glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1), H(+)-dependent peptide transporter 1 (PepT1), and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) were downregulated (P < 0.05), but ileal SGLT1 gene expression was increased by infection (P < 0.05). Xylanase addition upregulated expression of jejunal SGLT1, PepT1, and L-FABP genes as well as ileal PepT1 and L-FABP genes in challenged broilers (P < 0.05). In conclusion, xylanase supplementation of wheat-based diets improved FCR and AME in birds irrespective of C. perfringens infection and elevated apparent ileal digestibility of CP and mRNA expression of nutrient transporters in challenged birds. PMID:24570428

  4. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium1

    PubMed Central

    Seal, Bruce S.

    2014-01-01

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently used antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human foodborne disease as well as nonfoodborne human, animal, and avian diseases. Countries that have complied with the ban on antimicrobial growth promoters in feeds have reported increased incidences of C. perfringens-associated diseases in poultry. To address these issues, new antimicrobial agents, putative lysins encoded by the genomes of bacteriophages, are being identified in our laboratory. Poultry intestinal material, soil, sewage, and poultry processing drainage water were screened for virulent bacteriophages that could lyse C. perfringens and produce clear plaques in spot assays. Bacteriophages were isolated that had long noncontractile tails, members of the family Siphoviridae, and with short noncontractile tails, members of the family Podoviridae. Several bacteriophage genes were identified that encoded N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases, lysozyme-endopeptidases, and a zinc carboxypeptidase domain that has not been previously reported in viral genomes. Putative phage lysin genes (ply) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant lysins were amidases capable of lysing both parental phage host strains of C. perfringens as well as other strains of the bacterium in spot and turbidity reduction assays, but did not lyse any clostridia beyond the species. Consequently, bacteriophage gene products could eventually be used to target bacterial pathogens, such as C. perfringens via a species-specific strategy, to control animal and human diseases without having deleterious effects on beneficial probiotic bacteria. PMID:23300321

  5. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiling of Clostridium perfringens SM101 during Sporulation Extends the Core of Putative Sporulation Genes and Genes Determining Spore Properties and Germination Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinghua; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Abee, Tjakko; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of bacterial spores is a highly regulated process and the ultimate properties of the spores are determined during sporulation and subsequent maturation. A wide variety of genes that are expressed during sporulation determine spore properties such as resistance to heat and other adverse environmental conditions, dormancy and germination responses. In this study we characterized the sporulation phases of C. perfringens enterotoxic strain SM101 based on morphological characteristics, biomass accumulation (OD600), the total viable counts of cells plus spores, the viable count of heat resistant spores alone, the pH of the supernatant, enterotoxin production and dipicolinic acid accumulation. Subsequently, whole-genome expression profiling during key phases of the sporulation process was performed using DNA microarrays, and genes were clustered based on their time-course expression profiles during sporulation. The majority of previously characterized C. perfringens germination genes showed upregulated expression profiles in time during sporulation and belonged to two main clusters of genes. These clusters with up-regulated genes contained a large number of C. perfringens genes which are homologs of Bacillus genes with roles in sporulation and germination; this study therefore suggests that those homologs are functional in C. perfringens. A comprehensive homology search revealed that approximately half of the upregulated genes in the two clusters are conserved within a broad range of sporeforming Firmicutes. Another 30% of upregulated genes in the two clusters were found only in Clostridium species, while the remaining 20% appeared to be specific for C. perfringens. These newly identified genes may add to the repertoire of genes with roles in sporulation and determining spore properties including germination behavior. Their exact roles remain to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:25978838

  6. Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by buffered vinegar and lemon juice concentrate during chilling of ground turkey roast containing minimal ingredients.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Martinez, Carol; Pena-Ramos, Aida; Juneja, Vijay K; Korasapati, Nageswara Rao; Burson, Dennis E; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan

    2010-03-01

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ground turkey roast containing minimal ingredients (salt and sugar), by buffered vinegar (MOstatin V) and a blend (buffered) of lemon juice concentrate and vinegar (MOstatin LV) was evaluated. Ground turkey roast was formulated to contain sea salt (1.5%), turbinado sugar (0.5%), and various concentrations of MOstatin V (0.75, 1.25, or 2.5%) or MOstatin LV (1.5, 2.5, or 3.5%), along with a control (without MOstatins). The product was inoculated with a three-strain spore cocktail of C. perfringens to obtain initial spore levels of ca. 2.0 to 0.5 log CFU/g. Inoculated products were vacuum packaged, heat shocked for 20 min at 75 degrees C, and cooled exponentially from 54.4 to 4.0 degrees C in 6.5, 9, 12, 15, 18, or 21 h. In control samples without MOstatin V or MOstatin LV, C. perfringens populations reached 2.98, 4.50, 5.78, 7.05, 7.88, and 8.19 log CFU/g (corresponding increases of 0.51, 2.29, 3.51, 4.79, 5.55, and 5.93 log CFU/g) in 6.5, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 21 h of chilling, respectively. MOstatin V (2.5%) and MOstatin LV (3.5%) were effective in inhibiting C. perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ground turkey roast to <1.0 log CFU/g during abusive chilling of the product within 21 h. Buffered vinegar and a blend (buffered) of lemon juice concentrate and vinegar were effective in controlling germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens spores in turkey roast containing minimal ingredients. PMID:20202331

  7. Influence of enrichment broths on multiplex PCR detection of total coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens, in spiked water samples.

    PubMed

    Worakhunpiset, S; Tharnpoophasiam, P

    2009-07-01

    Although multiplex PCR amplification condition for simultaneous detection of total coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens in water sample has been developed, results with high sensitivity are obtained when amplifying purified DNA, but the sensitivity is low when applied to spiked water samples. An enrichment broth culture prior PCR analysis increases sensitivity of the test but the specific nature of enrichment broth can affect the PCR results. Three enrichment broths, lactose broth, reinforced clostridial medium and fluid thioglycollate broth, were compared for their influence on sensitivity and on time required with multiplex PCR assay. Fluid thioglycollate broth was the most effective with shortest enrichment time and lowest detection limit. PMID:19842417

  8. Predictive model for Clostridium perfringens growth in roast beef during cooling and inhibition of spore germination and outgrowth by organic acid salts.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Plata, Marcos X; Amézquita, Alejandro; Blankenship, Erin; Burson, Dennis E; Juneja, Vijay; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan

    2005-12-01

    Spores of foodborne pathogens can survive traditional thermal processing schedules used in the manufacturing of processed meat products. Heat-activated spores can germinate and grow to hazardous levels when these products are improperly chilled. Germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores in roast beef during chilling was studied following simulated cooling schedules normally used in the processed-meat industry. Inhibitory effects of organic acid salts on germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens spores during chilling and the survival of vegetative cells and spores under abusive refrigerated storage was also evaluated. Beef top rounds were formulated to contain a marinade (finished product concentrations: 1% salt, 0.2% potassium tetrapyrophosphate, and 0.2% starch) and then ground and mixed with antimicrobials (sodium lactate and sodium lactate plus 2.5% sodium diacetate and buffered sodium citrate and buffered sodium citrate plus 1.3% sodium diacetate). The ground product was inoculated with a three-strain cocktail of C. perfringens spores (NCTC 8238, NCTC 8239, and ATCC 10388), mixed, vacuum packaged, heat shocked for 20 min at 75 degrees C, and chilled exponentially from 54.5 to 7.2 degrees C in 9, 12, 15, 18, or 21 h. C. perfringens populations (total and spore) were enumerated after heat shock, during chilling, and during storage for up to 60 days at 10 degrees C using tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar. C. perfringens spores were able to germinate and grow in roast beef (control, without any antimicrobials) from an initial population of ca. 3.1 log CFU/g by 2.00, 3.44, 4.04, 4.86, and 5.72 log CFU/g after 9, 12, 15, 18, and 21 h of exponential chilling. A predictive model was developed to describe sigmoidal C. perfringens growth curves during cooling of roast beef from 54.5 to 7.2 degrees C within 9, 12, 15, 18, and 21 h. Addition of antimicrobials prevented germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens regardless of the chill times. C. perfringens spores could be recovered from samples containing organic acid salts that were stored up to 60 days at 10 degrees C. Extension of chilling time to > or =9 h resulted in >1 log CFU/g growth of C. perfringens under anaerobic conditions in roast beef. Organic acid salts inhibited outgrowth of C. perfringens spores during chilling of roast beef when extended chill rates were followed. Although C. perfringens spore germination is inhibited by the antimicrobials, this inhibition may represent a hazard when such products are incorporated into new products, such as soups and chili, that do not contain these antimicrobials, thus allowing spore germination and outgrowth under conditions of temperature abuse. PMID:16355831

  9. Comparison of the Effect of Curing Ingredients Derived from Purified and Natural Sources on Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens Outgrowth during Cooling of Deli-Style Turkey Breast.

    PubMed

    King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2015-08-01

    The antimicrobial impact of purified and natural sources of both nitrite and ascorbate were evaluated against Clostridium perfringens during the postthermal processing cooling period of deli-style turkey breast. The objective of phase I was to assess comparable concentrations of nitrite (0 or 100 ppm) and ascorbate (0 or 547 ppm) from both purified and natural sources. Phase II was conducted to investigate concentrations of nitrite (50, 75, or 100 ppm) from cultured celery juice powder and ascorbate (0, 250, or 500 ppm) from cherry powder to simulate alternative curing formulations. Ground turkey breast (75% moisture, 1.2% salt, pH 6.2) treatments were inoculated with C. perfringens spores (three-strain mixture) to yield 2.5 log CFU/g. Individual 50-g portions were vacuum packaged, cooked to 71.1°C, and chilled from 54.4 to 26.7°C in 5 h and from 26.7 to 7.2°C in 10 additional hours. Triplicate samples were assayed for growth of C. perfringens at predetermined intervals by plating on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar; experiments were replicated three times. In phase I, uncured, purified nitrite, and natural nitrite treatments without ascorbate had 5.3-, 4.2-, and 4.4-log increases in C. perfringens, respectively, at 15 h, but <1-log increase was observed at the end of chilling in treatments containing 100 ppm of nitrite and 547 ppm of ascorbate from either source. In phase II, 0, 50, 75, and 100 ppm of nitrite and 50 ppm of nitrite plus 250 ppm of ascorbate supported 4.5-, 3.9-, 3.5-, 2.2-, and 1.5-log increases in C. perfringens, respectively. In contrast, <1-log increase was observed after 15 h in the remaining phase II treatments supplemented with 50 ppm of nitrite and 500 ppm of ascorbate or ≥75 ppm of nitrite and ≥250 ppm of ascorbate. These results confirm that equivalent concentrations of nitrite, regardless of the source, provide similar inhibition of C. perfringens during chilling and that ascorbate enhances the antimicrobial effect of nitrite on C. perfringens at concentrations commonly used in alternative cured meats. PMID:26219366

  10. Clostridium perfringens Alpha-Toxin Induces Gm1a Clustering and Trka Phosphorylation in the Host Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Takagishi, Teruhisa; Oda, Masataka; Kabura, Michiko; Kurosawa, Mie; Tominaga, Kaori; Urano, Shiori; Ueda, Yoshibumi; Kobayashi, Keiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Sakurai, Jun; Terao, Yutaka; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin elicits various immune responses such as the release of cytokines, chemokines, and superoxide via the GM1a/TrkA complex. Alpha-toxin possesses phospholipase C (PLC) hydrolytic activity that contributes to signal transduction in the pathogenesis of gas gangrene. Little is known about the relationship between lipid metabolism and TrkA activation by alpha-toxin. Using live-cell fluorescence microscopy, we monitored transbilayer movement of diacylglycerol (DAG) with the yellow fluorescent protein-tagged C1AB domain of protein kinase C-γ (EYFP-C1AB). DAG accumulated at the marginal region of the plasma membrane in alpha toxin-treated A549 cells, which also exhibited GM1a clustering and TrkA phosphorylation. Annexin V binding assays showed that alpha-toxin induced the exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. However, H148G, a variant toxin which binds cell membrane and has no enzymatic activity, did not induce DAG translocation, GM1a clustering, or TrkA phosphorylation. Alpha-toxin also specifically activated endogenous phospholipase Cγ-1 (PLCγ-1), a TrkA adaptor protein, via phosphorylation. U73122, an endogenous PLC inhibitor, and siRNA for PLCγ-1 inhibited the formation of DAG and release of IL-8. GM1a accumulation and TrkA phosphorylation in A549 cells treated with alpha-toxin were also inhibited by U73122. These results suggest that the flip-flop motion of hydrophobic lipids such as DAG leads to the accumulation of GM1a and TrkA. We conclude that the formation of DAG by alpha-toxin itself (first step) and activation of endogenous PLCγ-1 (second step) leads to alterations in membrane dynamics, followed by strong phosphorylation of TrkA. PMID:25910247

  11. Comparative genomics of four closely related Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages reveals variable evolution among core genes with therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Because biotechnological uses of bacteriophage gene products as alternatives to conventional antibiotics will require a thorough understanding of their genomic context, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of four closely related phages isolated from Clostridium perfringens, an important agricultural and human pathogen. Results Phage whole-genome tetra-nucleotide signatures and proteomic tree topologies correlated closely with host phylogeny. Comparisons of our phage genomes to 26 others revealed three shared COGs; of particular interest within this core genome was an endolysin (PF01520, an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase) and a holin (PF04531). Comparative analyses of the evolutionary history and genomic context of these common phage proteins revealed two important results: 1) strongly significant host-specific sequence variation within the endolysin, and 2) a protein domain architecture apparently unique to our phage genomes in which the endolysin is located upstream of its associated holin. Endolysin sequences from our phages were one of two very distinct genotypes distinguished by variability within the putative enzymatically-active domain. The shared or core genome was comprised of genes with multiple sequence types belonging to five pfam families, and genes belonging to 12 pfam families, including the holin genes, which were nearly identical. Conclusions Significant genomic diversity exists even among closely-related bacteriophages. Holins and endolysins represent conserved functions across divergent phage genomes and, as we demonstrate here, endolysins can have significant variability and host-specificity even among closely-related genomes. Endolysins in our phage genomes may be subject to different selective pressures than the rest of the genome. These findings may have important implications for potential biotechnological applications of phage gene products. PMID:21631945

  12. The virR/virS locus regulates the transcription of genes encoding extracellular toxin production in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed Central

    Ba-Thein, W; Lyristis, M; Ohtani, K; Nisbet, I T; Hayashi, H; Rood, J I; Shimizu, T

    1996-01-01

    Extracellular toxin production in Clostridium perfringens is positively regulated by the two-component regulatory genes virR and virS. Northern (RNA) blots carried out with RNA preparations from the wild-type strain 13 and the isogenic virR and virS mutants TS133 and JIR4000 showed that the virR and virS genes composed an operon and were transcribed as a single 2.1-kb mRNA molecule. Primer extension analysis led to the identification of two promoters upstream of virR. Hybridization analysis of the mutants and their complemented derivatives showed that the virR/virS system positively regulated the production of alpha-toxin (or phospholipase C, theta-toxin (perfringolysin O), and kappa-toxin (collagenase) at the transcriptional level. However, the modes of regulation of these genes were shown to differ. The theta-toxin structural gene, pfoA, had both a major and a very minor promoter, with the major promoter being virR/virS dependent. The colA gene, which encodes the kappa-toxin, had two major promoters, only one of which was virR/virS-dependent. In contrast, the alpha-toxin structural gene, p1c, had only one promoter, which was shown to be partially regulated by the virR and virS genes. Comparative analysis of the virR/virS-dependent promoters did not reveal any common sequence motifs that could represent VirR-binding sites. It was concluded that either the virR/virS system modulates its effects via secondary regulatory genes that are specific for each toxin structural gene or the VirR protein does not have a single consensus binding sequence. PMID:8626316

  13. The Myelin and Lymphocyte Protein MAL Is Required for Binding and Activity of Clostridium perfringens ε-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Oo, Myat Lin; Anrather, Josef; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Alonso, Miguel A.; Fischetti, Vincent A.; McClain, Mark S.; Vartanian, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens ε-toxin (ETX) is a potent pore-forming toxin responsible for a central nervous system (CNS) disease in ruminant animals with characteristics of blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction and white matter injury. ETX has been proposed as a potential causative agent for Multiple Sclerosis (MS), a human disease that begins with BBB breakdown and injury to myelin forming cells of the CNS. The receptor for ETX is unknown. Here we show that both binding of ETX to mammalian cells and cytotoxicity requires the tetraspan proteolipid Myelin and Lymphocyte protein (MAL). While native Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells are resistant to ETX, exogenous expression of MAL in CHO cells confers both ETX binding and susceptibility to ETX-mediated cell death. Cells expressing rat MAL are ~100 times more sensitive to ETX than cells expressing similar levels of human MAL. Insertion of the FLAG sequence into the second extracellular loop of MAL abolishes ETX binding and cytotoxicity. ETX is known to bind specifically and with high affinity to intestinal epithelium, renal tubules, brain endothelial cells and myelin. We identify specific binding of ETX to these structures and additionally show binding to retinal microvasculature and the squamous epithelial cells of the sclera in wild-type mice. In contrast, there is a complete absence of ETX binding to tissues from MAL knockout (MAL-/-) mice. Furthermore, MAL-/- mice exhibit complete resistance to ETX at doses in excess of 1000 times the symptomatic dose for wild-type mice. We conclude that MAL is required for both ETX binding and cytotoxicity. PMID:25993478

  14. Characterization of two different endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidases from probiotic and pathogenic enterobacteria, Bifidobacterium longum and Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Hisashi; Maki, Riichi; Ozawa, Hayato; Tani, Yasushi; Kiyohara, Masashi; Fujita, Masaya; Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2008-09-01

    Endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (endo-alpha-GalNAc-ase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic bond between alpha-GalNAc at the reducing end of mucin-type sugar chains and serine/threonine of proteins to release oligosaccharides. Previously, we identified the gene engBF encoding endo-alpha-GalNAc-ase from Bifidobacterium longum, which specifically released the disaccharide Gal beta 1-3GalNAc (Fujita K, Oura F, Nagamine N, Katayama T, Hiratake J, Sakata K, Kumagai H, Yamamoto K. 2005. Identification and molecular cloning of a novel glycoside hydrolase family of core 1 type O-glycan-specific endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase from Bifidobacterium longum. J Biol Chem. 280:37415-37422). Here we cloned a similar gene named engCP from Clostridium perfringens, a pathogenic enterobacterium, and characterized the gene product EngCP. Detailed analyses on substrate specificities of EngCP and EngBF using a series of p-nitrophenyl-alpha-glycosides chemically synthesized by the di-tert-butylsilylene-directed method revealed that both enzymes released Hex/HexNAc beta 1-3GalNAc (Hex = Gal or Glc). EngCP could also release the core 2 trisaccharide Gal beta 1-3(GlcNAc beta 1-6)GalNAc, core 8 disaccharide Gal alpha 1-3GalNAc, and monosaccharide GalNAc. Our results suggest that EngCP possesses broader substrate specificity than EngBF. Actions of the two enzymes on native glycoproteins and cell surface glycoproteins were also investigated. PMID:18559962

  15. In vivo antimicrobial potentials of garlic against Clostridium perfringens and its promotant effects on performance of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Jimoh, A A; Ibitoye, E B; Dabai, Y U; Garba, S

    2013-12-15

    This study was conducted to investigate in vivo antimicrobial potential of garlic against Clostridium perferinges and resultant promotant effects on performance of the broiler chickens. Garlic powder was used as an alternative to GPAs (Growth Promotant Antibiotics) to prevent subclinical Necrotic Enteritis (NE) due to C. perferinges. 120 day-old broiler chicks were randomly distributed to six treatment groups of 20 chicks each (2 replicates(-10) chicks). Six isonutrient diets supplemented with garlic at graded levels of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 g kg(-1) were fed to the birds for seven weeks. Data were collected weekly on performance parameters including feed intake, weight gain and feed conversion ratio (FCR). Also, on the 21 35 and 49th days of the study, two birds per group were randomly selected, slaughtered and dissected. 1 g of caecal contents per each bird were sampled into labelled sterile sample bottles. The samples were subjected to culturing, bacterial identification and colony counting. All data were subjected to analysis of variance. Results showed that garlic significantly (p > 0.05) depressed feed intake (3310 g feed/bird at 1.0 g kg(-1) supplementation) but improved FCR. The supplement has no significant effect on weight gain but C. perfringens colony counts in the treated groups, were numerically reduced (lowest count, 0.93 x 10(5) cfu g(-1) at 1.0 g kg(-1) supplementation), as compared to the control. It is therefore concluded that diets could be supplemented with garlic at dose range of 1.0 to 1.5 g kg(-1) to prevent subclinical NE and achieve improved performance in birds. PMID:24517015

  16. Relative disease susceptibility and clostridial toxin antibody responses in three commercial broiler lines co-infected with Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Necrotic enteritis is an enteric disease of poultry resulting from infection by Clostridium perfringens with co-infection by Eimeria spp. constituting a major risk factor for disease pathogenesis. This study compared three commercial broiler chicken lines using an experimental model of necrotic ente...

  17. Recombinant expression of two bacteriophage proteins that lyse clostridium perfringens and share identical sequences in the C-terminal cell wall binding domain of the molecules but are dissimilar in their N-terminal domain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming bacterium capable of producing four major toxins that are responsible for disease symptoms and pathogenesis in a variety of animals, humans and poultry. The organism is the third leading cause of human food-borne bacterial disease a...

  18. Differential outgrowth potential of Clostridium perfringens food-borne isolates with various cpe-genotypes in vacuum-packed ground beef during storage at 12C.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yinghua; Wagendorp, Arjen; Abee, Tjakko; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J

    2015-02-01

    In the current study, the outgrowth of spores of 15 different food isolates of Clostridium perfringens was evaluated in vacuum-packed ground beef during storage at 12C and 25C. This included enterotoxic strains carrying the gene encoding the CPE enterotoxin on the chromosome (C-cpe), on a plasmid (P-cpe) and cpe-negative strains. The 15 strains were selected from a larger group of strains that were first evaluated for their ability to sporulate in modified Duncan-Strong sporulating medium. Sporulation ability varied greatly between strains but was not associated with a particular cpe genotype. In line with previous studies, the tested C-cpe strains produced spores with significantly higher heat resistance than the cpe-negative and P-cpe strains (both IS1151 and IS1470-like) with the exception of strain VWA009. Following inoculation of vacuum-packed cooked ground beef with spores, the heat-resistant C-cpe strains showed lower outgrowth potential in this model food stored at 12C than the P-cpe and cpe-negative strains, while no significant differences were observed at 25C. These results suggest that the latter strains may have a competitive advantage over C-cpe strains at reduced temperatures during storage of foods that support the growth of C. perfringens. While spores of P-cpe strains are readily inactivated by heat processing, post-processing contamination by food handlers who may carry P-cpe strains that have a better growth potential at lower temperatures must be avoided. The varying responses of C. perfringens spores to heat and the differences in outgrowth capacity at different temperatures are factors to be considered in strain selection for challenge tests, and for predictive modelling of C. perfringens. PMID:25461607

  19. Functional analysis of a bacitracin resistance determinant located on ICECp1, a novel Tn916-like element from a conjugative plasmid in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaoyan; Du, Xiang-Dang; Southey, Luke; Bulach, Dieter M; Seemann, Torsten; Yan, Xu-Xia; Bannam, Trudi L; Rood, Julian I

    2015-11-01

    Bacitracins are mixtures of structurally related cyclic polypeptides with antibiotic properties. They act by interfering with the biosynthesis of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, we analyzed an avian necrotic enteritis strain of Clostridium perfringens that was resistant to bacitracin and produced NetB toxin. We identified a bacitracin resistance locus that resembled a bacitracin resistance determinant from Enterococcus faecalis. It contained the structural genes bcrABD and a putative regulatory gene, bcrR. Mutagenesis studies provided evidence that both bcrA and bcrB are essential for bacitracin resistance, and that evidence was supported by the results of experiments in which the introduction of both the bcrA and bcrB genes into a bacitracin-susceptible C. perfringens strain was required to confer bacitracin resistance. The wild-type strain was shown to contain at least three large, putatively conjugative plasmids, and the bcrRABD locus was localized to an 89.7-kb plasmid, pJIR4150. This plasmid was experimentally shown to be conjugative and was sequenced. The sequence revealed that it also carries a tpeL toxin gene and is related to the pCW3 family of conjugative antibiotic resistance and toxin plasmids from C. perfringens. The bcr genes were located on a genetic element, ICECp1, which is related to the Tn916 family of integrative conjugative elements (ICEs). ICECp1 appears to be the first Tn916-like element shown to confer bacitracin resistance. In summary, we identified in a toxin-producing C. perfringens strain a novel mobile bacitracin resistance element which was experimentally shown to be essential for bacitracin resistance and is carried by a putative ICE located on a conjugative plasmid. PMID:26282424

  20. Functional Analysis of a Bacitracin Resistance Determinant Located on ICECp1, a Novel Tn916-Like Element from a Conjugative Plasmid in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaoyan; Du, Xiang-Dang; Southey, Luke; Bulach, Dieter M.; Seemann, Torsten; Yan, Xu-Xia; Bannam, Trudi L.

    2015-01-01

    Bacitracins are mixtures of structurally related cyclic polypeptides with antibiotic properties. They act by interfering with the biosynthesis of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, we analyzed an avian necrotic enteritis strain of Clostridium perfringens that was resistant to bacitracin and produced NetB toxin. We identified a bacitracin resistance locus that resembled a bacitracin resistance determinant from Enterococcus faecalis. It contained the structural genes bcrABD and a putative regulatory gene, bcrR. Mutagenesis studies provided evidence that both bcrA and bcrB are essential for bacitracin resistance, and that evidence was supported by the results of experiments in which the introduction of both the bcrA and bcrB genes into a bacitracin-susceptible C. perfringens strain was required to confer bacitracin resistance. The wild-type strain was shown to contain at least three large, putatively conjugative plasmids, and the bcrRABD locus was localized to an 89.7-kb plasmid, pJIR4150. This plasmid was experimentally shown to be conjugative and was sequenced. The sequence revealed that it also carries a tpeL toxin gene and is related to the pCW3 family of conjugative antibiotic resistance and toxin plasmids from C. perfringens. The bcr genes were located on a genetic element, ICECp1, which is related to the Tn916 family of integrative conjugative elements (ICEs). ICECp1 appears to be the first Tn916-like element shown to confer bacitracin resistance. In summary, we identified in a toxin-producing C. perfringens strain a novel mobile bacitracin resistance element which was experimentally shown to be essential for bacitracin resistance and is carried by a putative ICE located on a conjugative plasmid. PMID:26282424

  1. Effects of heat stress on the formation of splenic germinal centres and immunoglobulins in broilers infected by Clostridium perfringens type A.

    PubMed

    Calefi, Atílio Sersun; de Siqueira, Adriana; Namazu, Lilian Bernadete; Costola-de-Souza, Carolina; Honda, Bruno Bueno Takashi; Ferreira, Antonio José Piantino; Quinteiro-Filho, Wanderley Moreno; da Silva Fonseca, Juliana Garcia; Palermo-Neto, João

    2016-03-01

    Avian necrotic enteritis (NE) induced by Clostridium perfringens is a disease that affects mainly the first weeks of poultry's life. The pathogenesis of NE is complex and involves the combination of several factors, such as co-infection with different species of coccidia, immunosuppression and stress. Stress is one of the main limiting factors in poultry production. Although several studies emphasized the effects of stress on immunity, few works analyzed these effects on immunoglobulins and on germinal centres (GCs), which are specialized microenvironments, responsible for generating immune cells with high affinity antibodies and memory B-lymphocytes. Thus, the effects of heat stress associated or not with thioglycolate broth culture medium intake and/or C. perfringens infection on corticosterone serum levels, spleen GCs development and immunoglobulin production in broilers were evaluated. Results showed that heat stress, thioglycolate and C. perfringens per se increased corticosterone serum levels, although this was not observed in heat stressed and thioglycolate and C. perfringens-treated chickens. The serum levels of IgA, IgM and IgY were differently affected by heat stress and/or infection/thioglycolate. Heat stress decreased the duodenal concentrations of sIgA, which was accompanied by a reduction in GCs number in the duodenal lamina propria; a trend to similar findings of sIgA concentrations was observed in the chickens' jejunum. Changes in spleen and Bursa of Fabricius relative weights as well as in spleen morphometry were also noted in heat stressed animals, infected or not. Together, these data suggest that heat stress change GCs formation in chickens infected or not, which that may lead to failures in vaccination protocols as well as in the poultries' host resistance to infectious diseases during periods of exposure to heat stress. PMID:26964716

  2. Development of an integrated model for heat transfer and dynamic growth of Clostridium perfringens during the cooling of cooked boneless ham.

    PubMed

    Amézquita, A; Weller, C L; Wang, L; Thippareddi, H; Burson, D E

    2005-05-25

    Numerous small meat processors in the United States have difficulties complying with the stabilization performance standards for preventing growth of Clostridium perfringens by 1 log10 cycle during cooling of ready-to-eat (RTE) products. These standards were established by the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the US Department of Agriculture in 1999. In recent years, several attempts have been made to develop predictive models for growth of C. perfringens within the range of cooling temperatures included in the FSIS standards. Those studies mainly focused on microbiological aspects, using hypothesized cooling rates. Conversely, studies dealing with heat transfer models to predict cooling rates in meat products do not address microbial growth. Integration of heat transfer relationships with C. perfringens growth relationships during cooling of meat products has been very limited. Therefore, a computer simulation scheme was developed to analyze heat transfer phenomena and temperature-dependent C. perfringens growth during cooling of cooked boneless cured ham. The temperature history of ham was predicted using a finite element heat diffusion model. Validation of heat transfer predictions used experimental data collected in commercial meat-processing facilities. For C. perfringens growth, a dynamic model was developed using Baranyi's nonautonomous differential equation. The bacterium's growth model was integrated into the computer program using predicted temperature histories as input values. For cooling cooked hams from 66.6 degrees C to 4.4 degrees C using forced air, the maximum deviation between predicted and experimental core temperature data was 2.54 degrees C. Predicted C. perfringens growth curves obtained from dynamic modeling showed good agreement with validated results for three different cooling scenarios. Mean absolute values of relative errors were below 6%, and deviations between predicted and experimental cell counts were within 0.37 log10 CFU/g. For a cooling process which was in exact compliance with the FSIS stabilization performance standards, a mean net growth of 1.37 log10 CFU/g was predicted. This study introduced the combination of engineering modeling and microbiological modeling as a useful quantitative tool for general food safety applications, such as risk assessment and hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) plans. PMID:15862875

  3. Ex vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship of valnemulin against Clostridium perfringens in plasma, the small intestinal and caecal contents of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Feng; Yu, Yang; Sun, Jian; Tao, Meng-Ting; Zhou, Wen-Jie; Li, Xiao; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) and ex vivo pharmacodynamic (PD) of valnemulin against Clostridium perfringens were investigated in plasma, the small intestinal and caecal contents of rabbits following intravenous (IV) or oral administration at 3 mg/kg bodyweight (BW). The postantibiotic effect (PAE) and postantibiotic sub-MIC effect (PA-SME) of valnemulin against C. perfringens ATCC13124 were also determined. The time-kill curves were established in vitro and ex vivo to evaluate the antibacterial activity of valnemulin against C. perfringens. The elimination half-lives (T1/2λz) of valnemulin in the jejunal fluids (7.82 h) or caecal contents (14.8 h) of rabbits was significantly longer than that in plasma (2.94 h). The MIC values of valnemulin against C. perfringens ATCC13124 were both 0.063 μg/mL in the artificial medium and jejunal fluids. The PAEs of valnemulin against C. perfringens were 2.9 h (1 × MIC) and 5.03 h (4 × MIC), and the PA-SMEs ranged from 7.9 h to 11.1 h. Valnemulin exhibited rapid, time-dependent killing feature, and the ex vivo dose-response profile was closely fitted to sigmoid Emax model (r(2) = 0.9985). The surrogate index of AUC24 h/MIC ratios required to achieve the bactericidal and virtual bacterial elimination effects were 57.5 and 90.1 h, respectively. Accordingly, the calculated daily dosage regimens of valnemulin for the bactericidal activity (1.96 mg/kg) and bacterial elimination (3.08 mg/kg) would be therapeutically effective in rabbits against C. perfringens with MIC ≤0.5 μg/mL. PMID:27060276

  4. A Live Oral Recombinant Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Vaccine Expressing Clostridium perfringens Antigens Confers Protection against Necrotic Enteritis in Broiler Chickens▿

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, R. R.; Parreira, V. R.; Jiang, Y.-F.; Prescott, J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) in broiler chickens is caused by Clostridium perfringens, and there is currently no effective vaccine for NE. We previously showed that in broiler chickens protection against NE can be achieved through intramuscular immunization with alpha toxin (AT) and hypothetical protein (HP), and we subsequently identified B-cell epitopes in HP. In the present study, we identified B-cell epitopes in AT recognized by chickens immune to NE. The gene fragments encoding immunodominant epitopes of AT as well as those of HP were codon optimized for Salmonella and cloned into pYA3493, and the resultant plasmid constructs were introduced into an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium χ9352 vaccine vehicle. The expression of these Clostridium perfringens proteins, alpha toxoid (ATd) and truncated HP (HPt), was confirmed by immunoblotting. The protection of broiler chickens against experimentally induced NE was assessed at both the moderate and the severe levels of challenge. Birds immunized orally with Salmonella expressing ATd were significantly protected against moderate NE, and there was a nonsignificant trend for protection against severe challenge, whereas HPt-immunized birds were significantly protected against both severities of challenge. Immunized birds developed serum IgY and mucosal IgA and IgY antibody responses against Clostridium and Salmonella antigens. In conclusion, this study identified, for the first time, the B-cell epitopes in AT from an NE isolate recognized by chickens and showed the partial protective ability of codon-optimized ATd and HPt against NE in broiler chickens when they were delivered orally by using a Salmonella vaccine vehicle. PMID:20007363

  5. Effect of Clostridium perfringens infection and antibiotic administration on microbiota in the small intestine of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Fasina, Yewande O; Newman, Molli M; Stough, Joshua M; Liles, Mark R

    2016-02-01

    The etiological agent of necrotic enteritis (NE) is Clostridium perfringens (CP), which is an economically significant problem for broiler chicken producers worldwide. Traditional use of in-feed antibiotic growth promoters to control NE disease have resulted in the emergence of antibiotic resistance in CP strains. Identification of probiotic bacteria strains as an alternative to antibiotics for the control of intestinal CP colonization is crucial. Two experiments were conducted to determine changes in intestinal bacterial assemblages in response to CP infection and in-feed bacitracin methylene disalicylate (BMD) in broiler chickens. In each experiment conducted in battery-cage or floor-pen housing, chicks were randomly assigned to the following treatment groups: 1) BMD-supplemented diet with no CP challenge (CM), 2) BMD-free control diet with no CP challenge (CX), 3) BMD-supplemented diet with CP challenge (PCM), or 4) BMD-free control diet with CP challenge (PCX). The establishment of CP infection was confirmed, with the treatment groups exposed to CP having a 1.5- to 2-fold higher CP levels (P < 0.05) compared to the non-exposed groups. Next-generation sequencing of PCR amplified 16S rRNA genes, was used to perform intestinal bacterial diversity analyses pre-challenge, and at 1, 7, and 21 d post-challenge. The results indicated that the intestinal bacterial assemblage was dominated by members of the phylum Firmicutes in all treatments before and after CP challenge, especially the Lactobacillaceae and Clostridiales families. In addition, we observed post-challenge emergence of members of the Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcaceae in the non-medicated PCX treatment, and emergence of the Enterococcaceae in the medicated PCM treatment. This study highlights the bacterial interactions that could be important in suppressing or eliminating CP infection within the chicken intestine. Future studies should explore the potential to use commensal strains of unknown Clostridiales, Lactobacillaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, Streptococcaceae, and Enterococcaceae in effective probiotic formulations for the control of CP and NE disease. PMID:26567176

  6. Occurrence of microbial indicators and Clostridium perfringens in wastewater, water column samples, sediments, drinking water, and Weddell seal feces collected at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisle, J.T.; Smith, J.J.; Edwards, D.D.; McFeters, G.A.

    2004-01-01

    McMurdo Station, Antarctica, has discharged untreated sewage into McMurdo Sound for decades. Previous studies delineated the impacted area, which included the drinking water intake, by using total coliform and Clostridium perfringens concentrations. The estimation of risk to humans in contact with the impacted and potable waters may be greater than presumed, as these microbial indicators may not be the most appropriate for this environment. To address these concerns, concentrations of these and additional indicators (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, coliphage, and enteroviruses) in the untreated wastewater, water column, and sediments of the impacted area and drinking water treatment facility and distribution system at McMurdo Station were determined. Fecal samples from Weddell seals in this area were also collected and analyzed for indicators. All drinking water samples were negative for indicators except for a single total coliform-positive sample. Total coliforms were present in water column samples at higher concentrations than other indicators. Fecal coliform and enterococcus concentrations were similar to each other and greater than those of other indicators in sediment samples closer to the discharge site. C. perfringens concentrations were higher in sediments at greater distances from the discharge site. Seal fecal samples contained concentrations of fecal coliforms, E. coli, enterococci, and C. perfringens similar to those found in untreated sewage. All samples were negative for enteroviruses. A wastewater treatment facility at McMurdo Station has started operation, and these data provide a baseline data set for monitoring the recovery of the impacted area. The contribution of seal feces to indicator concentrations in this area should be considered.

  7. Effects of Dietary Additives and Early Feeding on Performance, Gut Development and Immune Status of Broiler Chickens Challenged with Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Z.; Kocher, A.; Choct, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of dietary additives and holding time on resistance and resilience of broiler chickens to Clostridium perfringens challenge were investigated by offering four dietary treatments. These were a negative control (basal), a positive control (Zn-bacitracin) and two dietary additives, mannanoligosaccharides (MOS), and acidifier. Two holding times included (a) immediate access to feed and water post hatch (FED) and (b) access to both feed and water 48 h post hatch (HELD). Chicks fed Zn-bacitracin had no intestinal lesions attributed to necrotic enteritis (NE), whereas chicks fed both MOS or acidifier showed signs of NE related lesions. All dietary treatments were effective in reducing the numbers of C. perfringens in the ileum post challenge. The FED chicks had heavier body weight and numerically lower mortality. The FED chicks also showed stronger immune responses to NE challenge, showing enhanced (p<0.05) proliferation of T-cells. Early feeding of the MOS supplemented diet increased (p<0.05) IL-6 production. The relative bursa weight of the FED chicks was heavier at d 21 (p<0.05). All the additives increased the relative spleen weight of the HELD chicks at d 14 (p<0.05). The FED chicks had increased villus height and reduced crypt depth, and hence an increased villus/crypt ratio, especially in the jejunum at d 14 (p<0.05). The same was true for the HELD chicks given dietary additives (p<0.05). It may be concluded that the chicks with early access to dietary additives showed enhanced immune response and gut development, under C. perfringens challenge. The findings of this study shed light on managerial and nutritional strategies that could be used to prevent NE in the broiler industry without the use of in-feed antibiotics. PMID:25049595

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of θ-toxin (perfringolysin O), a pore-forming cytolysin of Clostridium perfringens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugahara, Mitsuaki; Sekino-Suzuki, Naoko; Ohno-Iwashita, Yoshiko; Miki, Kunio

    1996-10-01

    θ-Toxin (perfringolysin O), a cholesterol-binding, pore-forming cytolysin of Clostridium perfringens type A was crystallized by the vapor diffusion procedure using polyethyleneglycol 4000 and sodium chloride as precipitants in 2-(cyclohexylamino)ethanesulfonic acid (CHES) buffer at pH 9.5. The diffraction patterns of precession photographs indicated that the crystals belong to the orthorhombic system and the space group C222 1 with unit-cell dimensions of a = 47.7 Å, b = 182.0 Å and c = 175.8 Å. Assuming that the asymmetric unit contains one or two molecules (Mw 52 700), the Vm value is calculated as 3.6 or 1.8 Å 3/dalton, respectively. The crystals diffract X-rays to at least 3 Å resolution and are suitable for high resolution X-ray crystal structure determination.

  9. Hydrogen production at high Faradaic efficiency by a bio-electrode based on TiO2 adsorption of a new [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Morra, Simone; Valetti, Francesca; Sarasso, Veronica; Castrignan, Silvia; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2015-12-01

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenase CpHydA from Clostridium perfringens was immobilized by adsorption on anatase TiO2 electrodes for clean hydrogen production. The immobilized enzyme proved to perform direct electron transfer to and from the electrode surface and catalyses both H2 oxidation (H2 uptake) and H2 production (H2 evolution) with a current density for H2 evolution of about 2 mA cm(-1). The TiO2/CpHydA bioelectrode remained active for several days upon storage and when a reducing potential was set, H2 evolution occurred with a mean Faradaic efficiency of 98%. The high turnover frequency of H2 production and the tight coupling of electron transfer, resulting in a Faradaic efficiency close to 100%, support the exploitation of the novel TiO2/CpHydA stationary electrode as a powerful device for H2 production. PMID:26278509

  10. Relative disease susceptibility and clostridial toxin antibody responses in three commercial broiler lines coinfected with Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seung I; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Lee, Sung-Hyen; Lee, Kyung Woo; Lillehoj, Erik P; Hong, Yeong Ho; An, Dong-Jun; Jeoung, D Hye-Young; Chun, Ji-Eun

    2013-09-01

    Necrotic enteritis is an enteric disease of poultry resulting from infection by Clostridium perfringens with coinfection by Eimeria spp. constituting a major risk factor for disease pathogenesis. This study compared three commercial broiler chicken lines using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis. Day-old male Cobb, Ross, and Hubbard broilers were orally infected with viable C. perfringens and E. maxima and fed a high-protein diet to promote the development of experimental disease. Body weight loss, intestinal lesions, and serum antibody levels against alpha-toxin and necrotic enteritis B-like (NetB) toxin were measured as parameters of disease susceptibility and host immune response. Cobb chickens exhibited increased body weight loss compared with Ross and Hubbard breeds and greater gut lesion severity compared with Ross chickens. NetB antibody levels were greater in Cobb chickens compared with the Ross or Hubbard groups. These results suggest that Cobb chickens may be more susceptible to necrotic enteritis in the field compared with the Ross and Hubbard lines. PMID:24283139

  11. Modeling of Clostridium perfringens vegetative cell inactivation in beef-in-sauce products: a meta-analysis using mixed linear models.

    PubMed

    Jaloustre, S; Guillier, L; Morelli, E; Noël, V; Delignette-Muller, M L

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to predict Clostridium perfringens vegetative cell inactivation during the final reheating step of two beef-in-sauce products prepared and distributed in a French hospital for exposure in risk assessment. In order to account for variability according to experts and international organization recommendations, published data were used to estimate the thermal inactivation parameters of a probabilistic model. Mixed effects models were proposed to describe variability on D(ref) the decimal reduction time at temperature T(ref). Many models differing by their description of variability on D(ref) were tested. Based on goodness-of-fit and parsimony of the model, the one including three random effects was chosen. That model describes random effects of vegetative cell culture conditions, strains and other uncontrolled experimental factors. In order to check the ability of the model to predict inactivation under dynamic thermal conditions, model validation was carried out on published non isothermal data. This model was then used to predict C. perfringens vegetative cell inactivation using temperature profiles inside beef-in-sauce products registered in a French hospital and to explore control measures easier to apply than French regulations. PMID:22236760

  12. Impact of Clean-Label Antimicrobials and Nitrite Derived from Natural Sources on the Outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens during Cooling of Deli-Style Turkey Breast.

    PubMed

    King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2015-05-01

    Organic acids and sodium nitrite have long been shown to provide antimicrobial activity during chilling of cured meat products. However, neither purified organic acids nor NaNO2 is permitted in products labeled natural and both are generally avoided in clean-label formulations; efficacy of their replacement is not well understood. Natural and clean-label antimicrobial alternatives were evaluated in both uncured and in alternative cured (a process that uses natural sources of nitrite) deli-style turkey breast to determine inhibition of Clostridium perfringens outgrowth during 15 h of chilling. Ten treatments of ground turkey breast (76% moisture, 1.2% salt) included a control and four antimicrobials: 1.0% tropical fruit extract, 0.7% dried vinegar, 1.0% cultured sugar-vinegar blend, and 2.0% lemon-vinegar blend. Each treatment was formulated without (uncured) and with nitrite (PCN; 50 ppm of NaNO2 from cultured celery juice powder). Treatments were inoculated with C. perfringens spores (three-strain mixture) to yield 2.5 log CFU/g. Individual 50-g portions were vacuum packaged, cooked to 71.1°C, and chilled from 54.4 to 26.7°C in 5 h and from 26.7 to 7.2°C in an additional 10 h. Triplicate samples were assayed for growth of C. perfringens at predetermined intervals by plating on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar. Uncured control and PCN-only treatments allowed for 4.6- and 4.2-log increases at 15 h, respectively, and although all antimicrobial treatments allowed less outgrowth than uncured and PCN, the degree of inhibition varied. The 1.0% fruit extract and 1.0% cultured sugar-vinegar blend were effective at controlling populations at or below initial levels, whether or not PCN was included. Without PCN, 0.7% dried vinegar and 2.0% lemon-vinegar blend allowed for 2.0- and 2.5-log increases, respectively, and ∼1.5-log increases with PCN. Results suggest using clean-label antimicrobials can provide for safe cooling following the study parameters, and greater inhibition of C. perfringens may exist when antimicrobials are used with nitrite. PMID:25951389

  13. Genome wide transcriptomic analysis identifies pathways affected by the infusion of Clostridium perfringens culture supernatant in the duodenum of broilers in situ.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadou, S; Russell, K M; Kaiser, P; Kanellos, T; Burgess, S T G; Mitchell, M; Clutton, E; Naylor, S W; Low, C J; Hutchings, M R; Sparks, N

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A is the main etiological factor for necrotic enteritis, a multifactorial enteric disease that penalizes performance, health, and welfare of poultry. Lack of knowledge of host responses and disease pathogenesis is slowing down progress on developing therapies for disease control. A combined genomewide and targeted gene approach was used to investigate pathways and biological functions affected by the infusion of C. perfringens culture supernatant in the duodenum of broilers in 2 experiments. An in situ isolated loop of duodenum was prepared in anesthetized broilers of 3 wk of age (Exp. 1) and was infused either with crude C. perfringens culture supernatant (n = 7; treated), positive for necrotic enteritis B-like toxin (NetB) as determined by a cytotoxicity assay, or with a control preparation (n = 6; control). Birds were maintained alive for 1 h and then euthanized for tissue recovery. The use of the Affymetrix chicken genome array on RNA samples from loop tissue showed top biological functions affected by culture supernatant infusion included cell morphology, immune cell trafficking, and cell death; pathways affected included death receptor signaling, inflammatory response, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling. In a second in situ study (Exp. 2), broilers were maintained alive for 4 h to monitor temporal expression patterns of targeted genes. Duodenal tissue was removed at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h post-infusion with culture supernatant (n = 9) or a control preparation (n = 5) for histology and gene expression analysis. Genes encoding proinflammatory cytokines, such as interferon γ (IFNγ), cell trafficking, such as neuroblastoma 1 (NBL1) and B cell CLL/Lymphoma 6 (BCL6), and cell death, such as Fas cell surface death receptor (FAS) and GTPase IMAP family member 8 (GIMAP8), were differentially expressed in the duodenum of treated and control broilers (P < 0.05). We have demonstrated that C. perfringens culture supernatant (NetB positive) infusion resulted in histological and gene expression changes consistent with necrotic enteritis in the duodenum of broilers. In the absence of live bacteria, crude culture supernatant resulted in early immunomodulation, inflammation, and cell death in the duodenum. The pathways identified here can be targeted for the development of new drugs, vaccines, and novel therapies for necrotic enteritis in broilers. PMID:26115301

  14. Recombinant Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Expressing the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Alpha Toxin from Clostridium perfringens Induces Protective Responses against Necrotic Enteritis in Chickens▿

    PubMed Central

    Zekarias, Bereket; Mo, Hua; Curtiss, Roy

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis (NE) is a widespread disease in chickens that causes high mortality and reduced growth performance. Traditionally, NE was controlled by the routine application of antimicrobials in the feed, a practice that currently is unpopular. Consequently, there has been an increase in the occurrence of NE, and it has become a threat to the current objective of antimicrobial-free farming. The pathogenesis of NE is associated with the proliferation of C. perfringens in the small intestine and the secretion of large amounts of alpha toxin, the major virulence factor. Since there is no vaccine for NE, we have developed a candidate live oral recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine (RASV) that delivers a nontoxic fragment of alpha toxin. The 3′ end of the plc gene, encoding the C-terminal domain of alpha toxin (PlcC), was cloned into plasmids that enable the expression and secretion of PlcC fused to a signal peptide. Plasmids were inserted into Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium host strain χ8914, which has attenuating pabA and pabB deletion mutations. Three-day-old broiler chicks were orally immunized with 109 CFU of the vaccine strain and developed alpha toxin-neutralizing serum antibodies. When serum from these chickens was added into C. perfringens broth cultures, bacterial growth was suppressed. In addition, immunofluorescent microscopy showed that serum antibodies bind to the bacterial surface. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA titers in RASV-immunized chickens were low; however, when the chickens were given a parenteral boost injection with a purified recombinant PlcC protein (rPlcC), the RASV-immunized chickens mounted rapid high serum IgG and bile IgA titers exceeding those primed by rPlcC injection. RASV-immunized chickens had reduced intestinal mucosal pathology after challenge with virulent C. perfringens. These results indicate that oral RASV expressing an alpha toxin C-terminal peptide induces protective immunity against NE. PMID:18337376

  15. Direct dynamic kinetic analysis and computer simulation of growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked turkey during cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research applied a new one-step methodology to directly construct a tertiary model for describing the growth of C. perfringens in cooked turkey meat under dynamically cooling conditions. The kinetic parameters of the growth models were determined by numerical analysis and optimization using mu...

  16. A proposed sero-grouping scheme for epidemiological investigation of food poisoning due to Clostridium perfringens type A.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, A K; Narayan, K G

    1979-10-01

    Serological studies with soluble and particulate antigens of Cl. perfringens type A revealed that enterotoxin and spore antigens could be used as a suitable marker for epidemiological studies. 94% of the food poisoning strains of Cl. perfringens type A could be grouped into 3 groups with the help of 2 enterotoxin-specific sera and 90% in 4 groups with antispore sera. Heat-sensitive strains were found to be antigenically more homogenous than the heat-resistant ones. Sera raised against spores of heat-resistant strains could not agglutinate spore of any of the heat-sensitive strains. Similarly no spores of heat-resistant strains were agglutinable by serum raised against spores of heat-sensitive strains. On the basis of typing efficiency the two antigen, viz enterotoxin and spore antigens were used in the serogrouping scheme proposed for the epidemiological investigation of food poisoning with Cl. perfringens type A. Used together, enterotoxin and spore agglutinogen form an antigenic formula for each strain showing the serogroup to which it belongs. PMID:44603

  17. NanR, a Transcriptional Regulator That Binds to the Promoters of Genes Involved in Sialic Acid Metabolism in the Anaerobic Pathogen Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Therit, Blair; Cheung, Jackie K.; Rood, Julian I.; Melville, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Among many other virulence factors, Clostridium perfringens produces three sialidases NanH, NanI and NanJ. NanH lacks a secretion signal peptide and is predicted to be an intracellular enzyme, while NanI and NanJ are secreted. Previously, we had identified part of an operon encoding NanE (epimerase) and NanA (sialic acid lyase) enzymes. Further analysis of the entire operon suggests that it encodes a complete pathway for the transport and metabolism of sialic acid along with a putative transcriptional regulator, NanR. The addition of 30 mM N-acetyl neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) to a semi-defined medium significantly enhanced the growth yield of strain 13, suggesting that Neu5Ac can be used as a nutrient. C. perfringens strain 13 lacks a nanH gene, but has NanI- and NanJ-encoding genes. Analysis of nanI, nanJ, and nanInanJ mutants constructed by homologous recombination revealed that the expression of the major sialidase, NanI, was induced by the addition of Neu5Ac to the medium, and that in separate experiments, the same was true of a nanI-gusA transcriptional fusion. For the nanI and nanJ genes, primer extension identified three and two putative transcription start sites, respectively. Gel mobility shift assays using purified NanR and DNA from the promoter regions of the nanI and nanE genes showed high affinity, specific binding by NanR. We propose that NanR is a global regulator of sialic acid-associated genes and that it responds, in a positive feedback loop, to the concentration of sialic acid in the cell. PMID:26197388

  18. The effect of Artemisia annua on broiler performance, on intestinal microbiota and on the course of a Clostridium perfringens infection applying a necrotic enteritis disease model.

    PubMed

    Engberg, Ricarda Margarete; Grevsen, Kai; Ivarsen, Elise; Fretté, Xavier; Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Højberg, Ole; Jensen, Bent Borg; Canibe, Nuria

    2012-01-01

    The aerial parts of the plant Artemisia annua contain essential oils having antimicrobial properties against Clostridium perfringens Type A, the causal agent for necrotic enteritis in broilers. In two experiments, the influence of increasing dietary concentrations of dried A. annua leaves (0, 5, 10 and 20 g/kg) and n-hexane extract from fresh A. annua leaves (0, 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) on broiler performance was investigated. Dried plant material decreased feed intake and body weight in a dose-dependent manner, and 10 and 20 g/kg diet tended to improve the feed conversion ratio. The n-hexane extract also reduced feed intake, but broiler weight tended to decrease only at the highest dietary concentration. The feed conversion ratio tended to improve when birds received 250 and 500 mg/kg n-hexane extract. In a third experiment, a necrotic enteritis disease model was applied to investigate the effect of the dietary addition of dried A. annua leaves (10 g/kg on top) or n-hexane extract of A. annua (250 mg/kg) on the severity of the disease in broilers. The addition of n-hexane extract reduced the intestinal C. perfringens numbers and the severity of the disease-related small intestinal lesions. Over the infection period from day 17 to day 27, birds supplemented with the n-hexane extract gained more weight than both the challenged control birds and birds receiving dried plant material. The results indicate that n-hexane extracts derived from A. annua can modulate the course of necrotic enteritis and compensate to a certain extent for the disease-associated weight losses. PMID:22834551

  19. Ruminococcin C, a new anti-Clostridium perfringens bacteriocin produced in the gut by the commensal bacterium Ruminococcus gnavus E1.

    PubMed

    Crost, E H; Ajandouz, E H; Villard, C; Geraert, P A; Puigserver, A; Fons, M

    2011-09-01

    When colonizing the digestive tract of mono-associated rats, Ruminococcus gnavus E1 - a bacterium isolated from human faeces - produced a trypsin-dependent anti-Clostridium perfringens substance collectively named Ruminococcin C (RumC). RumC was isolated from the caecal contents of E1-monocontaminated rats and found to consist of two antimicrobial fractions: a single peptide (RumCsp) of 4235 Da, and a mixture of two other peptides (RumCdp) with distinct molecular masses of 4324 Da and 4456 Da. Both RumCsp and RumCdp were as effective as metronidazole in combating C. perfringens and their activity spectra against different pathogens were established. Even if devoid of synergistic activity, the combination of RumCsp and RumCdp was observed to be much more resistant to acidic pH and high temperature than each fraction tested individually. N-terminal sequence analysis showed that the primary structures of these three peptides shared a high degree of homology, but were clearly distinct from previously reported amino acid sequences. Amino acid composition of the three RumC peptides did not highlight the presence of any Lanthionine residue. However, Edman degradation could not run beyond the 11th amino acid residue. Five genes encoding putative pre-RumC-like peptides were identified in the genome of strain E1, confirming that RumC was a bacteriocin. This is the first time that a bacteriocin produced in vivo by a human commensal bacterium was purified and characterized. PMID:21586310

  20. A Novel Pore-Forming Toxin in Type A Clostridium perfringens Is Associated with Both Fatal Canine Hemorrhagic Gastroenteritis and Fatal Foal Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Nowell, Victoria J.; Nicholson, Vivian M.; Oliphant, Kaitlyn; Prescott, John F.

    2015-01-01

    A role for type A Clostridium perfringens in acute hemorrhagic and necrotizing gastroenteritis in dogs and in necrotizing enterocolitis of neonatal foals has long been suspected but incompletely characterized. The supernatants of an isolate made from a dog and from a foal that died from these diseases were both found to be highly cytotoxic for an equine ovarian (EO) cell line. Partial genome sequencing of the canine isolate revealed three novel putative toxin genes encoding proteins related to the pore-forming Leukocidin/Hemolysin Superfamily; these were designated netE, netF, and netG. netE and netF were located on one large conjugative plasmid, and netG was located with a cpe enterotoxin gene on a second large conjugative plasmid. Mutation and complementation showed that only netF was associated with the cytotoxicity. Although netE and netG were not associated with cytotoxicity, immunoblotting with specific antisera showed these proteins to be expressed in vitro. There was a highly significant association between the presence of netF with type A strains isolated from cases of canine acute hemorrhagic gastroenteritis and foal necrotizing enterocolitis. netE and netF were found in all cytotoxic isolates, as was cpe, but netG was less consistently present. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that netF-positive isolates belonged to a clonal population; some canine and equine netF-positive isolates were genetically indistinguishable. Equine antisera to recombinant Net proteins showed that only antiserum to rNetF had high supernatant cytotoxin neutralizing activity. The identifica-tion of this novel necrotizing toxin is an important advance in understanding the virulence of type A C. perfringens in specific enteric disease of animals. PMID:25853427

  1. Immunization with recombinant bivalent chimera r-Cpae confers protection against alpha toxin and enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens type A in murine model.

    PubMed

    Shreya, Das; Uppalapati, Siva R; Kingston, Joseph J; Sripathy, Murali H; Batra, Harsh V

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A, an anaerobic pathogen is the most potent cause of soft tissue infections like gas gangrene and enteric diseases like food poisoning and enteritis. The disease manifestations are mediated via two important exotoxins, viz. myonecrotic alpha toxin (αC) and enterotoxin (CPE). In the present study, we synthesized a bivalent chimeric protein r-Cpae comprising C-terminal binding regions of αC and CPE using structural vaccinology rationale and assessed its protective efficacy against both alpha toxin (αC) and enterotoxin (CPE) respectively, in murine model. Active immunization of mice with r-Cpae generated high circulating serum IgG (systemic), significantly increased intestinal mucosal s-IgA antibody titres and resulted in substantial protection to the immunized animals (100% and 75% survival) with reduced tissue morbidity when administered with 5×LD(100) doses of αC (intramuscular) and CPE (intra-gastric gavage) respectively. Mouse RBCs and Caco-2 cells incubated with a mixture of anti-r-Cpae antibodies and αC and CPE respectively, illustrated significantly higher protection against the respective toxins. Passive immunization of mice with a similar mixture resulted in 91-100% survival at the end of the 15 days observation period while mice immunized with a concoction of sham sera and respective toxins died within 2-3 days. This work demonstrates the efficacy of the rationally designed r-Cpae chimeric protein as a potential sub unit vaccine candidate against αC and CPE of C. perfringens type A toxemia. PMID:25645504

  2. Contributions of NanI sialidase to Caco-2 cell adherence by Clostridium perfringens type A and C strains causing human intestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies showed that Clostridium perfringens type D animal disease strain CN3718 uses NanI sialidase for adhering to enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. The current study analyzed whether NanI is similarly important when type A and C human intestinal disease strains attach to Caco-2 cells. A PCR survey determined that the nanI gene was absent from typical type A food poisoning (FP) strains carrying a chromosomal enterotoxin (CPE) gene or the genetically related type C Darmbrand (Db) strains. However, the nanI gene was present in type A strains from healthy humans, type A strains causing CPE-associated antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) or sporadic diarrhea (SD), and type C Pig-Bel strains. Consistent with NanI sialidase being the major C. perfringens sialidase when produced, FP and Db strains had little supernatant sialidase activity compared to other type A or C human intestinal strains. All type A and C human intestinal strains bound to Caco-2 cells, but NanI-producing strains had higher attachment levels. When produced, NanI can contribute to host cell attachment of human intestinal disease strains, since a nanI null mutant constructed in type A SD strain F4969 had lower Caco-2 cell adhesion than wild-type F4969 or a complemented strain. Further supporting a role for NanI in host cell attachment, sialidase inhibitors reduced F4969 adhesion to Caco-2 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that NanI may contribute to the intestinal attachment and colonization needed for the chronic diarrhea of CPE-associated AAD and SD, but this sialidase appears to be dispensable for the acute pathogenesis of type A FP or type C enteritis necroticans. PMID:25135687

  3. The Agr-like quorum-sensing system regulates sporulation and production of enterotoxin and beta2 toxin by Clostridium perfringens type A non-food-borne human gastrointestinal disease strain F5603.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; Chen, Jianming; Vidal, Jorge E; McClane, Bruce A

    2011-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A strains producing enterotoxin (CPE) cause one of the most common bacterial food-borne illnesses, as well as many cases of non-food-borne human gastrointestinal disease. Recent studies have shown that an Agr-like quorum-sensing system controls production of chromosomally encoded alpha-toxin and perfringolysin O by C. perfringens, as well as sporulation by Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium sporogenes. The current study explored whether the Agr-like quorum-sensing system also regulates sporulation and production of two plasmid-encoded toxins (CPE and beta2 toxin) that may contribute to the pathogenesis of non-food-borne human gastrointestinal disease strain F5603. An isogenic agrB null mutant was inhibited for production of beta2 toxin during vegetative growth and in sporulating culture, providing the first evidence that, in C. perfringens, this system can control production of plasmid-encoded toxins as well as chromosomally encoded toxins. This mutant also showed reduced production of alpha-toxin and perfringolysin O during vegetative growth. Importantly, when cultured in sporulation medium, the mutant failed to efficiently form spores and was blocked for CPE production. Complementation partially or fully reversed all phenotypic changes in the mutant, confirming that they were specifically due to inactivation of the agr locus. Western blots suggest that this loss of sporulation and sporulation-specific CPE production for the agrB null mutant involves, at least in part, Agr-mediated regulation of production of Spo0A and alternative sigma factors, which are essential for C. perfringens sporulation. PMID:21464088

  4. An epidemiological review of gastrointestinal outbreaks associated with Clostridium perfringens, North East of England, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Dolan, G P; Foster, K; Lawler, J; Amar, C; Swift, C; Aird, H; Gorton, R

    2016-05-01

    An anecdotal increase in C. perfringens outbreaks was observed in the North East of England during 2012-2014. We describe findings of investigations in order to further understanding of the epidemiology of these outbreaks and inform control measures. All culture-positive (>105 c.f.u./g) outbreaks reported to the North East Health Protection Team from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014 were included. Epidemiological (attack rate, symptom profile and positive associations with a suspected vehicle of infection), environmental (deficiencies in food preparation or hygiene practices and suspected vehicle of infection) and microbiological investigations are described. Forty-six outbreaks were included (83% reported from care homes). Enterotoxin (cpe) gene-bearer C. perfringens were detected by PCR in 20/46 (43%) and enterotoxin (by ELISA) and/or enterotoxigenic faecal/food isolates with indistinguishable molecular profiles in 12/46 (26%) outbreaks. Concerns about temperature control of foods were documented in 20/46 (43%) outbreaks. A suspected vehicle of infection was documented in 21/46 (46%) of outbreaks (meat-containing vehicle in 20/21). In 15/21 (71%) identification of the suspected vehicle was based on descriptive evidence alone, in 5/21 (24%) with supporting evidence from an epidemiological study and in 2/21 (10%) with supporting microbiological evidence. C. perfringens-associated illness is preventable and although identification of foodborne outbreaks is challenging, a risk mitigation approach should be taken, particularly in vulnerable populations such as care homes for the elderly. PMID:26567801

  5. LRP1 is a receptor for Clostridium perfringens TpeL toxin indicating a two-receptor model of clostridial glycosylating toxins

    PubMed Central

    Schorch, Björn; Song, Shuo; van Diemen, Ferdy R.; Bock, Hans H.; May, Petra; Herz, Joachim; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Aktories, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Large glycosylating toxins are major virulence factors of various species of pathogenic Clostridia. Prototypes are Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, which cause antibiotics-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. The current model of the toxins’ action suggests that receptor binding is mediated by a C-terminal domain of combined repetitive oligopeptides (CROP). This model is challenged by the glycosylating Clostridium perfringens large cytotoxin (TpeL toxin) that is devoid of the CROP domain but still intoxicates cells. Using a haploid genetic screen, we identified LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) as a host cell receptor for the TpeL toxin. LRP1-deficient cells are not able to take up TpeL and are not intoxicated. Expression of cluster IV of LRP1 is sufficient to rescue toxin uptake in these cells. By plasmon resonance spectroscopy, a KD value of 23 nM was determined for binding of TpeL to LRP1 cluster IV. The C terminus of TpeL (residues 1335–1779) represents the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the toxin. RBD-like regions are conserved in all other clostridial glycosylating toxins preceding their CROP domain. CROP-deficient C. difficile toxin B is toxic to cells, depending on the RBD-like region (residues 1349–1811) but does not interact with LRP1. Our data indicate the presence of a second, CROP-independent receptor-binding domain in clostridial glycosylating toxins and suggest a two-receptor model for the cellular uptake of clostridial glycosylating toxins. PMID:24737893

  6. Structural and Functional Characterization of the Clostridium perfringens N-Acetylmannosamine-6-phosphate 2-Epimerase Essential for the Sialic Acid Salvage Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Pélissier, Marie-Cécile; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Guerlesquin, Françoise; Brannigan, James A.; Bourne, Yves; Vincent, Florence

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria are endowed with an arsenal of specialized enzymes to convert nutrient compounds from their cell hosts. The essential N-acetylmannosamine-6-phosphate 2-epimerase (NanE) belongs to a convergent glycolytic pathway for utilization of the three amino sugars, GlcNAc, ManNAc, and sialic acid. The crystal structure of ligand-free NanE from Clostridium perfringens reveals a modified triose-phosphate isomerase (β/α)8 barrel in which a stable dimer is formed by exchanging the C-terminal helix. By retaining catalytic activity in the crystalline state, the structure of the enzyme bound to the GlcNAc-6P product identifies the topology of the active site pocket and points to invariant residues Lys66 as a putative single catalyst, supported by the structure of the catalytically inactive K66A mutant in complex with substrate ManNAc-6P. 1H NMR-based time course assays of native NanE and mutated variants demonstrate the essential role of Lys66 for the epimerization reaction with participation of neighboring Arg43, Asp126, and Glu180 residues. These findings unveil a one-base catalytic mechanism of C2 deprotonation/reprotonation via an enolate intermediate and provide the structural basis for the development of new antimicrobial agents against this family of bacterial 2-epimerases. PMID:25320079

  7. Release of Glycoprotein (GP1) from the Tegumental Surface of Taenia solium by Phospholipase C from Clostridium perfringens Suggests a Novel Protein-Anchor to Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Landa, Abraham; Willms, Kaethe; Laclette, Juan Pedro

    2010-01-01

    In order to explore how molecules are linked to the membrane surface in larval Taenia solium, whole cysticerci were incubated in the presence of phospholipase C from Clostridium perfringens (PLC). Released material was collected and analyzed in polyacrylamide gels with sodium dodecyl sulfate. Two major bands with apparent molecular weights of 180 and 43?kDa were observed. Western blot of released material and localization assays in cysticerci tissue sections using antibodies against five known surface glycoproteins of T. solium cysticerci indicated that only one, previously called GP1, was released. Similar localization studies using the lectins wheat-germ-agglutinin and Concanavalin A showed that N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetylneuraminic, sialic acid, ?methyl-D-mannoside, D-manose/glucose, and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues are abundantly present on the surface. On the other hand, we find that treatment with PLC releases molecules from the surface; they do not reveal Cross Reacting Determinant (CRD), suggesting a novel anchor to the membrane for the glycoprotein GP1. PMID:20130782

  8. Clostridium perfringens strains from bovine enterotoxemia cases are not superior in in vitro production of alpha toxin, perfringolysin O and proteolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine enterotoxemia is a major cause of mortality in veal calves. Predominantly veal calves of beef cattle breeds are affected and losses due to enterotoxemia may account for up to 20% of total mortality. Clostridium perfringens type A is considered to be the causative agent. Recently, alpha toxin and perfringolysin O have been proposed to play an essential role in the development of disease. However, other potential virulence factors also may play a role in the pathogenesis of bovine enterotoxemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether strains originating from bovine enterotoxemia cases were superior in in vitro production of virulence factors (alpha toxin, perfringolysin O, mucinase, collagenase) that are potentially involved in enterotoxemia. To approach this, a collection of strains originating from enterotoxemia cases was compared to bovine strains isolated from healthy animals and to strains isolated from other animal species. Results Strains originating from bovine enterotoxemia cases produced variable levels of alpha toxin and perfringolysin O that were not significantly different from levels produced by strains isolated from healthy calves and other animal species. All tested strains exhibited similar mucinolytic activity independent of the isolation source. A high variability in collagenase activity between strains could be observed, and no higher collagenase levels were produced in vitro by strains isolated from enterotoxemia cases. Conclusions Bovine enterotoxemia strains do not produce higher levels of alpha toxin, perfringolysin O, mucinase and collagenase, as compared to strains derived from healthy calves and other animal species in vitro. PMID:24479821

  9. Recombinant expression of two bacteriophage proteins that lyse clostridium perfringens and share identical sequences in the C-terminal cell wall binding domain of the molecules but are dissimilar in their N-terminal active domains.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Mustafa; Donovan, David M; Siragusa, Gregory R; Seal, Bruce S

    2010-10-13

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming bacterium capable of producing four major toxins that are responsible for disease symptoms and pathogenesis in a variety of animals, humans, and poultry. The organism is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease, and C. perfringens is the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens, which in the acute form can cause increased mortality among broiler flocks. Countries that have complied with the ban on antimicrobial growth promoters (AGP) in feeds have had increased incidences of C. perfringens-associated necrotic enteritis in poultry. To address this issue, new antimicrobial agents, putative lysins from the genomes of bacteriophages, are identified. Two putative phage lysin genes (ply) from the clostridial phages phiCP39O and phiCP26F were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli , and the resultant proteins were purified to near homogeneity. Gene and protein sequencing revealed that the predicted and chemically determined amino acid sequences of the two recombinant proteins were homologous to N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases. The proteins were identical in the C-terminal putative cell-wall binding domain, but only 55% identical to each other in the presumptive N-terminal catalytic domain. Both recombinant lysins were capable of lysing both parental phage host strains of C. perfringens as well as other strains of the bacterium in spot and turbidity reduction assays. The observed reduction in turbidity was correlated with up to a 3 log cfu/mL reduction in viable C. perfringens on brain-heart infusion agar plates. However, other member species of the clostridia were resistant to the lytic activity by both assays. PMID:20825156

  10. Selection of Bacillus spp. for Cellulase and Xylanase Production as Direct-Fed Microbials to Reduce Digesta Viscosity and Clostridium perfringens Proliferation Using an in vitro Digestive Model in Different Poultry Diets

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Juan D.; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Kuttappan, Vivek A.; Wolfenden, Ross E.; Vicente, Jose L.; Wolfenden, Amanda D.; Bielke, Lisa R.; Prado-Rebolledo, Omar F.; Morales, Eduardo; Hargis, Billy M.; Tellez, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Previously, our laboratory has screened and identified Bacillus spp. isolates as direct-fed microbials (DFM). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the cellulase and xylanase production of these isolates and select the most appropriate Bacillus spp. candidates for DFM. Furthermore, an in vitro digestive model, simulating different compartments of the gastrointestinal tract, was used to determine the effect of these selected candidates on digesta viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation in different poultry diets. Production of cellulase and xylanase were based on their relative enzyme activity. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequence classified two strains as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and one of the strains as Bacillus subtilis. The DFM was included at a concentration of 108 spores/g of feed in five different sterile soybean-based diets containing corn, wheat, rye, barley, or oat. After digestion time, supernatants from different diets were collected to measure viscosity, and C. perfringens proliferation. Additionally, from each in vitro simulated compartment, samples were taken to enumerate viable Bacillus spores using a plate count method after heat-treatment. Significant (P < 0.05) DFM-associated reductions in supernatant viscosity and C. perfringens proliferation were observed for all non-corn diets. These results suggest that antinutritional factors, such as non-starch polysaccharides from different cereals, can enhance viscosity and C. perfringens growth. Remarkably, dietary inclusion of the DFM that produce cellulase and xylanase reduced both viscosity and C. perfringens proliferation compared with control diets. Regardless of diet composition, 90% of the DFM spores germinated during the first 30 min in the crop compartment of the digestion model, followed by a noteworthy increased in the intestine compartment by ~2log10, suggesting a full-life cycle development. Further studies to evaluate in vivo necrotic enteritis effects are in progress. PMID:26664954

  11. Selection of Bacillus spp. for Cellulase and Xylanase Production as Direct-Fed Microbials to Reduce Digesta Viscosity and Clostridium perfringens Proliferation Using an in vitro Digestive Model in Different Poultry Diets.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Juan D; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Kuttappan, Vivek A; Wolfenden, Ross E; Vicente, Jose L; Wolfenden, Amanda D; Bielke, Lisa R; Prado-Rebolledo, Omar F; Morales, Eduardo; Hargis, Billy M; Tellez, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Previously, our laboratory has screened and identified Bacillus spp. isolates as direct-fed microbials (DFM). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the cellulase and xylanase production of these isolates and select the most appropriate Bacillus spp. candidates for DFM. Furthermore, an in vitro digestive model, simulating different compartments of the gastrointestinal tract, was used to determine the effect of these selected candidates on digesta viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation in different poultry diets. Production of cellulase and xylanase were based on their relative enzyme activity. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequence classified two strains as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and one of the strains as Bacillus subtilis. The DFM was included at a concentration of 10(8) spores/g of feed in five different sterile soybean-based diets containing corn, wheat, rye, barley, or oat. After digestion time, supernatants from different diets were collected to measure viscosity, and C. perfringens proliferation. Additionally, from each in vitro simulated compartment, samples were taken to enumerate viable Bacillus spores using a plate count method after heat-treatment. Significant (P < 0.05) DFM-associated reductions in supernatant viscosity and C. perfringens proliferation were observed for all non-corn diets. These results suggest that antinutritional factors, such as non-starch polysaccharides from different cereals, can enhance viscosity and C. perfringens growth. Remarkably, dietary inclusion of the DFM that produce cellulase and xylanase reduced both viscosity and C. perfringens proliferation compared with control diets. Regardless of diet composition, 90% of the DFM spores germinated during the first 30 min in the crop compartment of the digestion model, followed by a noteworthy increased in the intestine compartment by ~2log10, suggesting a full-life cycle development. Further studies to evaluate in vivo necrotic enteritis effects are in progress. PMID:26664954

  12. Recombinant Expression of Two Bacteriophage Proteins That Lyse Clostridium perfringens and Share Identical Sequences in the C-Terminal Cell Wall Binding Domain of the Molecules but Are Dissimilar in Their N-Terminal Active Domains

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Mustafa; Donovan, David M.; Siragusa, Gregory R.; Seal, Bruce S.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming bacterium capable of producing four major toxins that are responsible for disease symptoms and pathogenesis in a variety of animals, humans, and poultry. The organism is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease, and C. perfringens is the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens, which in the acute form can cause increased mortality among broiler flocks. Countries that have complied with the ban on antimicrobial growth promoters (AGP) in feeds have had increased incidences of C. perfringens-associated necrotic enteritis in poultry. To address this issue, new antimicrobial agents, putative lysins from the genomes of bacteriophages, are identified. Two putative phage lysin genes (ply) from the clostridial phages phiCP39O and phiCP26F were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resultant proteins were purified to near homogeneity. Gene and protein sequencing revealed that the predicted and chemically determined amino acid sequences of the two recombinant proteins were homologous to N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidases. The proteins were identical in the C-terminal putative cell-wall binding domain, but only 55% identical to each other in the presumptive N-terminal catalytic domain. Both recombinant lysins were capable of lysing both parental phage host strains of C. perfringens as well as other strains of the bacterium in spot and turbidity reduction assays. The observed reduction in turbidity was correlated with up to a 3 log cfu/mL reduction in viable C. perfringens on brain–heart infusion agar plates. However, other member species of the clostridia were resistant to the lytic activity by both assays. PMID:20825156

  13. Gene expression profiling within the spleen of Clostridium perfringens-challenged Broilers fed antibiotic-medicated and non-medicated diets

    PubMed Central

    Sarson, Aimie J; Wang, Ying; Kang, Zhumei; Dowd, Scot E; Lu, Yang; Yu, Hai; Han, Yanming; Zhou, Huaijun; Gong, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Background Clostridium perfringens (Cp) is a Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium that causes necrotic enteritis (NE) in poultry when it overgrows in the small intestine. NE disease has previously been controlled through the use of growth-promoting antibiotics. This practice was recently banned in European countries, leading to significantly increased incidence of NE threatening the poultry industry. Control strategies and technology as substitutes to dietary antibiotics are therefore urgently required. To develop the substitutes, it is important to understand host immune responses to Cp infection. However, the knowledge is still lacking. We therefore investigated gene expression profiles within immunologically-relevant tissue, the spleen, in order to identify factors that are involved in immunity to NE and have potential as therapeutic targets. Results Use of a 44 K Agilent chicken genome microarray revealed significant up-regulation of many immune-associated genes in Cp-challenged chickens, including galectin 3, IFNAR1, IgY-receptor, TCRγ, granzyme A, and mannose-6-P-R, which were subsequently validated by quantitative PCR assays. Functional annotation of differentially expressed genes was conducted using the High Throughput Gene Ontology Functional Annotation database. Medicated and Non-medicated chickens had similar annotation profiles with cell activities and regulation being the most dominant biological processes following Cp infection. Conclusion Broiler chickens demonstrated an intricate and holistic magnitude of host response to Cp challenge and the development of NE. Although the influence of dietary antibiotics appeared to be less significant than the disease process, both had a considerable impact on the host response. Markers previously identified in intestinal inflammatory diseases of other species, including humans, and indicators of enhanced antibody responses, appeared to be involved in the chicken response to Cp challenge. The significance in host immune responses of immune mediators identified from the present study warrants further studies to verify their functions during NE development and to determine their potential application to control NE disease. PMID:19500416

  14. Challenging the roles of CD44 and lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor in conveying Clostridium perfringens iota toxin cytotoxicity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Translational exploration of bacterial toxins has come to the forefront of research given their potential as a chemotherapeutic tool. Studies in select tissues have demonstrated that Clostridium perfringens iota toxin binds to CD44 and lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) cell-surface proteins. We recently demonstrated that LSR expression correlates with estrogen receptor positive breast cancers and that LSR signaling directs aggressive, tumor-initiating cell behaviors. Herein, we identify the mechanisms of iota toxin cytotoxicity in a tissue-specific, breast cancer model with the ultimate goal of laying the foundation for using iota toxin as a targeted breast cancer therapy. Methods In vitro model systems were used to determine the cytotoxic effect of iota toxin on breast cancer intrinsic subtypes. The use of overexpression and knockdown technologies confirmed the roles of LSR and CD44 in regulating iota toxin endocytosis and induction of cell death. Lastly, cytotoxicity assays were used to demonstrate the effect of iota toxin on a validated set of tamoxifen resistant breast cancer cell lines. Results Treatment of 14 breast cancer cell lines revealed that LSR+/CD44- lines were highly sensitive, LSR+/CD44+ lines were slightly sensitive, and LSR-/CD44+ lines were resistant to iota cytotoxicity. Reduction in LSR expression resulted in a significant decrease in toxin sensitivity; however, overexpression of CD44 conveyed toxin resistance. CD44 overexpression was correlated with decreased toxin-stimulated lysosome formation and decreased cytosolic levels of iota toxin. These findings indicated that expression of CD44 drives iota toxin resistance through inhibition of endocytosis in breast cancer cells, a role not previously defined for CD44. Moreover, tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells exhibited robust expression of LSR and were highly sensitive to iota-induced cytotoxicity. Conclusions Collectively, these data are the first to show that iota toxin has the potential to be an effective, targeted therapy for breast cancer. PMID:24990559

  15. Structural Requirement in Clostridium perfringens Collagenase mRNA 5′ Leader Sequence for Translational Induction through Small RNA-mRNA Base Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Kouji

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens is pathogenic to humans and animals, and the production of its toxins is strictly regulated during the exponential phase. We recently found that the 5′ leader sequence of the colA transcript encoding collagenase, which is a major toxin of this organism, is processed and stabilized in the presence of the small RNA VR-RNA. The primary colA 5′-untranslated region (5′UTR) forms a long stem-loop structure containing an internal bulge and masks its own ribosomal binding site. Here we found that VR-RNA directly regulates colA expression through base pairing with colA mRNA in vivo. However, when the internal bulge structure was closed by point mutations in colA mRNA, translation ceased despite the presence of VR-RNA. In addition, a mutation disrupting the colA stem-loop structure induced mRNA processing and ColA-FLAG translational activation in the absence of VR-RNA, indicating that the stem-loop and internal bulge structure of the colA 5′ leader sequence is important for regulation by VR-RNA. On the other hand, processing was required for maximal ColA expression but was not essential for VR-RNA-dependent colA regulation. Finally, colA processing and translational activation were induced at a high temperature without VR-RNA. These results suggest that inhibition of the colA 5′ leader structure through base pairing is the primary role of VR-RNA in colA regulation and that the colA 5′ leader structure is a possible thermosensor. PMID:23585542

  16. Transport of MS2 phage, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Giardia intestinalis in a gravel and a sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Hijnen, Wim A M; Brouwer-Hanzens, Anke J; Charles, Katrina J; Medema, Gertjan J

    2005-10-15

    To define protection zones around groundwater abstraction wells and safe setback distances for artificial recharge systems in watertreatment, quantitative information is needed about the removal of microorganisms during soil passage. Column experiments were conducted using natural soil and water from an infiltration site with fine sandy soil and a river bank infiltration site with gravel soil. The removal of phages, bacteria, bacterial spores, and protozoan (oo)-cysts was determined at two velocities and compared with field data from the same sites. The microbial elimination rate (MER) in both soils was generally >2 log, but MER in the gravel soil was higher than that in the fine sandy soil. This was attributed to enhanced attachment, related to higher metal-hydroxides content. From the high sticking efficiencies (>1) and the low influence of flow rate on MER it was deduced that straining played a significant role in the removal of Escherichia coli and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in the gravel soil. Lower removal of oocysts than the 4-5 times smaller E. coli and spores in the fine sand indicates that the contribution of straining is variable and needs further attention in transport models. Thus, simple extrapolation of grain size and particle size to the extent of microbial transport underground is inappropriate. Finally, the low MER of indigenous E. coli and Clostridium perfringens observed in the soil columns as well as under field conditions and the second breakthrough peak found for Cryptosporidium and spores in the fine sandy soil upon a change in the feedwater pH indicate a significant role of detachment and retardation to microbial transport and the difficulty of extrapolation of quantitative column test results to field conditions. PMID:16295848

  17. Immunopathology and cytokine responses in broiler chickens coinfected with Eimeria maxima and Clostridium perfringens with the use of an animal model of necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Soon S; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Allen, Patricia C; Park, Dong Woon; FitzCoy, Steve; Bautista, Daniel A; Lillehoje, Erik P

    2008-03-01

    The incidence of necrotic enteritis (NE) due to Clostridium perfringens (CP) infection in commercial poultry has been increasing at an alarming rate. Although pre-exposure of chickens to coccidia infections is believed to be one of the major risk factors leading to NE, the underlying mechanisms of CP virulence remain undefined. The objectives of this study were to utilize an experimental model of NE produced by Eimeria maxima (EM) and CP coinfection to investigate the pathologic and immunologic parameters of the disease. Broilers coinfected with EM plus CP exhibited more severe gut pathology compared with animals given EM or CP alone. Additionally, EM/CP coinfection increased the numbers of intestinal CP bacteria compared with chickens exposed to an identical challenge of CP alone. Coinfection with EM and CP repressed nitric oxide synthase gene expression that was induced by EM alone, leading to lower plasma NO levels. Intestinal expression of a panel of cytokine and chemokine genes following EM/CP coinfection showed a mixed response depending on the transcript analyzed and the time following infection. In general, IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, and TGF-beta4 were repressed, whereas IL-8, IL-10, IL-15, and LITAF were increased during coinfection compared with challenge by EM or CP alone. These results are discussed in the context of EM and CP to act synergistically to create a more severe disease phenotype leading to an altered cytokine/chemokine response than that produced by infection with the individual pathogens. PMID:18459290

  18. Discrimination Efficacy of Fecal Pollution Detection in Different Aquatic Habitats of a High-Altitude Tropical Country, Using Presumptive Coliforms, Escherichia coli, and Clostridium perfringens Spores

    PubMed Central

    Byamukama, Denis; Mach, Robert L.; Kansiime, Frank; Manafi, Mohamad; Farnleitner, Andreas H.

    2005-01-01

    The performance of rapid and practicable techniques that presumptively identify total coliforms (TC), fecal coliforms (FC), Escherichia coli, and Clostridium perfringens spores (CP) by testing them on a pollution gradient in differing aquatic habitats in a high-altitude tropical country was evaluated during a 12-month period. Site selection was based on high and low anthropogenic influence criteria of paired sites including six spring, six stream, and four lakeshore sites spread over central and eastern parts of Uganda. Unlike the chemophysical water quality, which was water source type dependent (i.e., spring, lake, or stream), fecal indicators were associated with the anthropogenic influence status of the respective sites. A total of 79% of the total variability, including all the determined four bacteriological and five chemophysical parameters, could be assigned to either a pollution, a habitat, or a metabolic activity component by principal-component analysis. Bacteriological indicators revealed significant correlations to the pollution component, reflecting that anthropogenic contamination gradients were followed. Discrimination sensitivity analysis revealed high ability of E. coli to differentiate between high and low levels of anthropogenic influence. CP also showed a reasonable level of discrimination, although FC and TC were found to have worse discrimination efficacy. Nonpoint influence by soil erosion could not be detected during the study period by correlation analysis, although a theoretical contamination potential existed, as investigated soils in the immediate surroundings often contained relevant concentrations of fecal indicators. The outcome of this study indicates that rapid techniques for presumptive E. coli and CP determination may be reliable for fecal pollution monitoring in high-altitude tropical developing countries such as those of Eastern Africa. PMID:15640171

  19. Specific binding of a mutated fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin to endothelial claudin-5 and its modulation of cerebral vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhuangbin; Yang, Zhenguo; Piontek, Anna; Eichner, Miriam; Krause, Gerd; Li, Longxuan; Piontek, Joerg; Zhang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The vertebrate blood-brain barrier (BBB) creates an obstacle for central nervous system-related drug delivery. Claudin-5 (Cldn5), expressed in large quantities in BBB, plays a vital role in restricting BBB permeability. The C-terminal domain of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (cCPE) has been verified as binding to a subset of claudins (Cldns). The Cldn5-binding cCPE194-319 variant cCPEY306W/S313H was applied in this study to investigate its ability to modulate the permeability of zebrafish larval BBB. In vitro results showed that cCPEY306W/S313H is able to bind specifically to Cldn5 in murine brain vascular endothelial (bEnd.3) cells, and is transported along with Cldn5 from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm, which in turn results in a reduction in transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER). Conversely, this effect can be reversed by removal of cCPEY306W/S313H. In an in vivo experiment, this study estimates the capability of cCPEY306W/S313H to modulate Cldn5 using a rhodamine B-Dextran dye diffusion assay in zebrafish larval BBB. The results show that cCPEY306W/S313H co-localized with Cldn5 in zebrafish cerebral vascular cells and modulated BBB permeability, resulting in dye leakage. Taken together, this study suggests that cCPEY306W/S313H has the capability - both in vitro and in vivo - to modulate BBB permeability temporarily by specific binding to Cldn5. PMID:27095710

  20. In Silico, In Vitro and In Vivo Analysis of Binding Affinity between N and C-Domains of Clostridium perfringens Alpha Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Uppalapati, Siva Ramakrishna; Kingston, Joseph Jeyabalaji; Qureshi, Insaf Ahmed; Murali, Harishchandra Sripathy; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin/phospholipase C (CP-PLC) is one of the most potent bacterial toxins known to cause soft tissue infections like gas gangrene in humans and animals. It is the first bacterial toxin demonstrated to be an enzyme with phospholipase, sphingomyelinase and lecithinase activities. The toxin is comprised of an enzymatic N-domain and a binding C-domain interconnected by a flexible linker. The N-domain alone is non-toxic to mammalian cells, but incubation with C-domain restores the toxicity, the mechanism of which is still not elucidated. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the formation of a stable N and C-domain complex, to determine possible interactions between the two domains in silico and to characterize the in vitro and in vivo correlates of the interaction. To establish the existence of a stable N and C-domain hybrid, in vitro pull down assay and dot-Far Western blotting assays were employed, where it was clearly revealed that the two domains bound to each other to form an intermediate. Using bioinformatics tools like MetaPPISP, PatchDock and FireDock, we predicted that the two domains may interact with each other through electrostatic interactions between at least six pairs of amino acids. This N and C-domains interacted with each other in 1:1 ratio and the hybrid lysed mouse erythrocytes in a slower kinetics when compared with wild type native Cp-PLC. BALB/c mice when challenged with N and C-domain hybrid demonstrated severe myonecrosis at the site of injection while no death was observed. Our results provide further insight into better understanding the mechanism for the toxicity of Cp-PLC N and C-domain mixture. PMID:24349173

  1. EFFECT OF SPICES AND ORGANIC ACIDS ON THE GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS FROM SPORE INOCULA DURING COOLING OF SOUS-VIDE COOKED GROUND BEEF PRODUCTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat treatments given to minimally processed food products are not sufficient to kill C. perfringens spores when present. Thus, the heat resistant spores may survive, germinate, outgrow and multiply into high numbers of vegetative cells if the rate and extent of cooling is inadequate. There is a ...

  2. A Possible Route for Foodborne Transmission of Clostridium difficile?

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spores of toxigenic Clostridium difficile and spores of food-poisoning strains of Clostridium perfringens show a similar prevalence in meats. Spores of both species are heat resistant and can survive cooking of foods. C. perfringens is a major cause of foodborne illness; studies are needed to determine whether C. difficile transmission by a similar route is a cause of infection. PMID:25599421

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial Assessing Infectious Disease Risks from Bathing in Fresh Recreational Waters in Relation to the Concentration of Escherichia coli, Intestinal Enterococci, Clostridium perfringens, and Somatic Coliphages

    PubMed Central

    Wiedenmann, Albrecht; Krüger, Petra; Dietz, Klaus; López-Pila, Juan M.; Szewzyk, Regine; Botzenhart, Konrad

    2006-01-01

    We performed epidemiologic studies at public freshwater bathing sites in Germany to provide a better scientific basis for the definition of recreational water quality standards. A total of 2,196 participants were recruited from the local population and randomized into bathers and non-bathers. Bathers were exposed for 10 min and had to immerse their head at least three times. Water samples for microbiological analysis were collected at 20-min intervals. Unbiased concentration–response effects with no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) were demonstrated for three different definitions of gastroenteritis and four fecal indicator organisms. Relative risks for bathing in waters with levels above NOAELs compared with nonbathing ranged from 1.8 (95% CI, 1.2–2.6) to 4.6 (95% CI, 2.1–10.1), depending on the definition of gastroenteritis. The effect of swallowing water provided additional evidence for true dose–response relationships. Based on the NOAELs, the following guide values for water quality are suggested: 100 Escherichia coli, 25 intestinal enterococci, 10 somatic coliphages, or 10 Clostridium perfringens per 100 mL. Recreational water quality standards are intended to protect the health of those consumers who are not already immune or resistant to pathogens that may be associated with indicator organisms. In contrast to current World Health Organization recommendations, we concluded that standards should be based on rates of compliance with NOAELs rather than on attributable risks determined above NOAELs, because these risks depend mainly on the unpredictable susceptibility of the cohorts. Although in theory there is no threshold in real concentration–response relationships, we demonstrated that a NOAEL approach would be a more robust and practical solution to the complex problem of setting standards. PMID:16451859

  4. epsilon. prime /. epsilon. : Review and recent progress

    SciTech Connect

    Franzini, P.J.

    1991-04-19

    The evolution of the theoretical perspective on {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} is reviewed. The introduction of the Z{sup O} penguin and the effects of high M{sub t} are discussed, in particular the possibility for {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} to be identically zero. Recent calculations of {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} based on current estimates and bounds on the input parameters are presented. 41 refs., 13 figs.

  5. In vitro inhibition of growth of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Clostridia perfringens using Probiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens are pathogenic organisms found in horses [1] and they cause disease in animals or humans [2]. Due to concern over pathogens such as these, there is increasing interest in antimicrobial alternatives to prevent or reduce the prevalen...

  6. epsilon-Hexachlorocyclohexane (epsilon-HC)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    epsilon - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( epsilon - HC ) ; CASRN 6108 - 10 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard

  7. Monitoring of anti-C. perfringens bacteriophage CpV1 persistence in gastrointestinal tracts of broilers.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A factor limiting promotion of poultry products to the world market is any contamination of birds with pathogens, including Clostridium perfringens. The latter is often accountable for significant economical losses in production of commercial birds because of a possibility of the development of necr...

  8. How to measure epsilon'/epsilon with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1987-04-01

    A pedagogical discussion is given of a lattice calculation of epsilon'. The method is outlined, and preliminary results are presented. They suggest that epsilon'/epsilon may be reduced from previous estimates by 60-70%.

  9. Epsilon ring of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Voyager 2 acquired this high-resolution image of the epsilon ring of Uranus on Jan. 23, 1986, from a distance of 1.12 million kilometers (690,000 miles). This clear-filter image from Voyager's narrow-angle camera has a resolution of about 10 km (6 mi). The epsilon ring, approximately 100 km (60 mi) wide at this location, clearly shows a structural variation. Visible here are a broad, bright outer component about 40 km (25 mi) wide; a darker middle region of comparable width; and a narrow, bright inner strip about 15 km (9 mi) wide. The epsilon-ring structure seen by Voyager is similar to that observed from the ground with stellar-occultation techniques. This frame represents the first Voyager image that resolves these features within the epsilon ring. The occasional fuzzy splotches on the outer and inner parts of the ring are artifacts left by the removal of reseau marks (used for making measurements on the image). The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  10. 42 CFR 73.3 - HHS select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... virus Monkeypox virus Reconstructed replication competent forms of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus... Clostridium Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 (Herpes B virus) Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin Coccidioides posadasii/Coccidioides immitis Conotoxins Coxiella burnetii Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever...

  11. 42 CFR 73.3 - HHS select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... virus Monkeypox virus Reconstructed replication competent forms of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus... Clostridium Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1 (Herpes B virus) Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin Coccidioides posadasii/Coccidioides immitis Conotoxins Coxiella burnetii Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever...

  12. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L + dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice... until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall...

  13. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L + dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard... of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for...

  14. Latest experimental information on {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}

    SciTech Connect

    Yee B. Hsiung

    2000-08-17

    The authors review the latest experimental results in search for direct CP-violation by measuring the CP-violating parameters Re({epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}) in neutral kaon decays. The recent result from Fermilab-KTeV Re({epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}) = (28.0 {+-} 4.1) x 10{sup {minus}4}, and the new preliminary result from CERN-NA48 Re({epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}) = (14.0 {+-} 4.3) x 10{sup {minus}4}, are presented. Both experiments, though using very different techniques, have now performed very well by collecting millions of events for all four relevant decay modes of K{sub L,S} to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} and {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} simultaneously. The current world average on this important measurement is Re({epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}) = 19.3 {+-} 10{sup {minus}4} with a {chi}{sup 2}/ndf = 11.1/5, establishing the existence of direct CP-violation. The experimental status of such crucial measurements and the future prospects are also discussed here.

  15. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for identification of Clostridium species isolated from Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    AlMogbel, Mohammed Suliman

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify different Clostridium spp. isolated from currency notes from the Ha'il region of Saudi Arabia in September 2014 using MALDI-TOF-MS. Clostridium spp. were identified by Bruker MALDI-TOF-MS and compared with VITEK 2. The confirmation of the presence of different Clostridium spp. was performed by determining the sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. In this study, 144 Clostridium spp. were isolated. Among these specimens, MALDI-TOF-MS could identify 88.8% (128/144) of the isolates to the species level and 92.3% (133/144) to the genus level, whereas, VITEK 2 identified 77.7% of the (112/144) isolates. The correct identification of the 144 isolates was performed by sequence analysis of the 500bp 16S rRNA gene. The most common Clostridium spp. identified were Clostridium perfringens (67.36%), Clostridium subterminale (14.58%), Clostridium sordellii (9%) and Clostridium sporogenes (9%). The results of this study demonstrate that MALDI-TOF-MS is a rapid, accurate and user friendly technique for the identification of Clostridium spp. Additionally, MALDI-TOF-MS has advantages over VITEK 2 in the identification of fastidious micro-organisms, such as Clostridium spp. Incorporating this technique into routine microbiology would lead to more successful and rapid identification of pathogenic and difficult to identify micro-organisms. PMID:26991272

  16. Antibacterial activity against Clostridium genus and antiradical activity of the essential oils from different origin.

    PubMed

    Kačániová, Miroslava; Vukovič, Nenad; Horská, Elena; Salamon, Ivan; Bobková, Alica; Hleba, Lukáš; Fiskelová, Martina; Vatľák, Alexander; Petrová, Jana; Bobko, Marek

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the antimicrobial and antiradical activities of 15 essential oils were investigated. The antimicrobial activities were determined by using agar disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods against Clostridium genus and antioxidant properties of essential oils by testing their scavenging effect on DPPH radicals activities. We determined the antibacterial activity of Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium hystoliticum, Clostridium intestinale, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium ramosum. We obtained the original commercial essential oils samples of Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus montana, Mentha piperita, Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia montana, Origanum vulgare L. (2 samples), Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abies alba Mill., Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch and Thymus vulgaris L. produced in Slovakia (Calendula a.s., Nova Lubovna, Slovakia). The results of the disk diffusion method showed very high essential oils activity against all tested strains of microorganisms. The best antimicrobial activity against C. butyricum was found at Pimpinella anisum, against C. hystoliticum was found at Pinus sylvestris, against C. intestinale was found at Satureia hortensis L., against C. perfringens was found at Origanum vulgare L. and against C. ramosum was found at Pinus sylvestris. The results of broth microdilution assay showed that none of the essential oils was active against C. hystoliticum. The best antimicrobial activity against C. butyricum was found at Abies alba Mill., against C. intestinale was found at Abies alba Mill., against C. perfringens was found at Satureia montana and against C. ramosum was found at Abius alba and Carum carvi. Antioxidant DPPH radical scavenging activity was determined at several solutions of oil samples (50 μL.mL(-1)-0.39 μL.mL(-1)) and the best scavenging effect for the highest concentration (50 μL.mL(-1)) was observed. The antioxidant properties were different in particular plant species. The highest% of inhibition after 30 min. of reaction was observed at Origanum vulgare (93%), Satureia montana (90.66%) and Lavandula augustifolia (90.22%). PMID:24813985

  17. Clostridium and Bacillus Binary Enterotoxins: Bad for the Bowels, and Eukaryotic Being

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Bradley G.; Pradhan, Kisha; Fleming, Jodie M.; Samy, Ramar Perumal; Barth, Holger; Popoff, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    Some pathogenic spore-forming bacilli employ a binary protein mechanism for intoxicating the intestinal tracts of insects, animals, and humans. These Gram-positive bacteria and their toxins include Clostridium botulinum (C2 toxin), Clostridium difficile (C. difficile toxin or CDT), Clostridium perfringens (ι-toxin and binary enterotoxin, or BEC), Clostridium spiroforme (C. spiroforme toxin or CST), as well as Bacillus cereus (vegetative insecticidal protein or VIP). These gut-acting proteins form an AB complex composed of ADP-ribosyl transferase (A) and cell-binding (B) components that intoxicate cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and endosomal trafficking. Once inside the cytosol, the A components inhibit normal cell functions by mono-ADP-ribosylation of globular actin, which induces cytoskeletal disarray and death. Important aspects of each bacterium and binary enterotoxin will be highlighted in this review, with particular focus upon the disease process involving the biochemistry and modes of action for each toxin. PMID:25198129

  18. The Clostridium Sporulation Programs: Diversity and Preservation of Endospore Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A.; Jones, Shawn W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacillus and Clostridium organisms initiate the sporulation process when unfavorable conditions are detected. The sporulation process is a carefully orchestrated cascade of events at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels involving a multitude of sigma factors, transcription factors, proteases, and phosphatases. Like Bacillus genomes, sequenced Clostridium genomes contain genes for all major sporulation-specific transcription and sigma factors (spo0A, sigH, sigF, sigE, sigG, and sigK) that orchestrate the sporulation program. However, recent studies have shown that there are substantial differences in the sporulation programs between the two genera as well as among different Clostridium species. First, in the absence of a Bacillus-like phosphorelay system, activation of Spo0A in Clostridium organisms is carried out by a number of orphan histidine kinases. Second, downstream of Spo0A, the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of the canonical set of four sporulation-specific sigma factors (σF, σE, σG, and σK) display different patterns, not only compared to Bacillus but also among Clostridium organisms. Finally, recent studies demonstrated that σK, the last sigma factor to be activated according to the Bacillus subtilis model, is involved in the very early stages of sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. perfringens, and C. botulinum as well as in the very late stages of spore maturation in C. acetobutylicum. Despite profound differences in initiation, propagation, and orchestration of expression of spore morphogenetic components, these findings demonstrate not only the robustness of the endospore sporulation program but also the plasticity of the program to generate different complex phenotypes, some apparently regulated at the epigenetic level. PMID:25631287

  19. Myonecrosis by Clostridium septicum in a dog, diagnosed by a new multiplex-PCR.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Martinho, Anna Paula Vitirito; Lucas, Thays Mizuki; Teixeira, Ana Izabel Passarela; Paes, Antonio Carlos; Barros, Claudenice Batista; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2012-10-01

    Clostridial myositis is an acute, generally fatal toxemia that is considered to be rare in pet animals. The present report describes an unusual canine clostridial myositis that was diagnosed by a new multiplex-PCR (mPCR) designed for simultaneous identification of Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium septicum, Clostridium perfringens type A, Clostridium chauvoei, and Clostridium novyi type A. A ten-month-old male Rottweiler dog, that had displayed lameness and swelling of the left limb for 12 h, was admitted to a veterinary hospital. The animal was weak, dyspneic and hyperthermic, and a clinical examination indicated the presence of gas and edema in the limb. Despite emergency treatment, the animal died in only a few minutes. Samples of muscular tissue from the necrotic area were aseptically collected and plated onto defibrinated sheep blood agar (5%) in anaerobic conditions. Colonies suggestive of Clostridium spp. were submitted to testing by multiplex-PCR. Impression smears of the tissues, visualized with Gram and also with panoptic stains, revealed long rod-shaped organisms, and specimens also tested positive using the fluorescent antibody technique (FAT). The FAT and mPCR tests enabled a diagnosis of C. septicum myonecrosis in the dog. PMID:22975141

  20. Motility in the epsilon-proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Beeby, Morgan

    2015-12-01

    The epsilon-proteobacteria are a widespread group of flagellated bacteria frequently associated with either animal digestive tracts or hydrothermal vents, with well-studied examples in the human pathogens of Helicobacter and Campylobacter genera. Flagellated motility is important to both pathogens and hydrothermal vent members, and a number of curious differences between the epsilon-proteobacterial and enteric bacterial motility paradigms make them worthy of further study. The epsilon-proteobacteria have evolved to swim at high speed and through viscous media that immobilize enterics, a phenotype that may be accounted for by the molecular architecture of the unusually large epsilon-proteobacterial flagellar motor. This review summarizes what is known about epsilon-proteobacterial motility and focuses on a number of recent discoveries that rationalize the differences with enteric flagellar motility. PMID:26590774

  1. Necrotic Enteritis in Chickens Associated with Clostridium sordellii.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Guillermo; Uzal, Francisco; Chin, R P; Palombo, Enzo A; Awad, Milena; Lyras, Dena; Shivaprasad, H L

    2015-09-01

    Three outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordelii were diagnosed in commercial broiler chicken flocks with 18,000 to 31,000 birds between 18 and 26 days old. Clinical signs in the affected flocks included high mortality up to 2% a day, depression, and diarrhea. The main gross changes included segmental dilation of the small intestine with watery contents, gas, mucoid exudate, and roughened and uneven mucosa, occasionally covered with a pseudomembrane. Microscopic lesions in the small intestine were characterized by extensive areas of coagulative necrosis of the villi, fibrinous exudate in the lumen, and high numbers of large, Gram-positive rods, occasionally containing subterminal spores, seen in the necrotic tissue and lumen. These rods were identified as C. sordellii by immunohistochemistry. Clostridium sordellii was isolated in an almost pure culture from the intestine of affected birds. A retrospective study of commercial broiler chicken and turkey submissions to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System revealed that C. sordellii had been isolated from intestinal lesions in outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease in 8 of 39 cases, 5 times together with Clostridium perfringens and 3 times alone. The latter three cases are reported here. PMID:26478166

  2. The nucleotide sequence of the mouse immunoglobulin epsilon gene: comparison with the human epsilon gene sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, N; Ueda, S; Hayashida, H; Miyata, T; Honjo, T

    1982-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the immunoglobulin epsilon gene cloned from newborn mouse DNA. The epsilon gene sequence allows prediction of the amino acid sequence of the constant region of the epsilon chain and comparison of it with sequences of the human epsilon and other mouse immunoglobulin genes. The epsilon gene was shown to be under the weakest selection pressure at the protein level among the immunoglobulin genes although the divergence at the synonymous position is similar. Our results suggest that the epsilon gene may be dispensable, which is in accord with the fact that IgE has only obscure roles in the immune defense system but has an undesirable role as a mediator of hypersensitivity. The sequence data suggest that the human and murine epsilon genes were derived from different ancestors duplicated a long time ago. The amino acid sequence of the epsilon chain is more homologous to those of the gamma chains than the other mouse heavy chains. Two membrane exons, separated by an 80-base intron, were identified 1.7 kb 3' to the CH4 domain of the epsilon gene and shown to conserve a hydrophobic portion similar to those of other heavy chain genes. RNA blot hybridization showed that the epsilon membrane exons are transcribed into two species of mRNA in an IgE hybridoma. Images Fig. 4. PMID:6329728

  3. Clostridium botulinum type E occurs and grows in the alga Cladophora glomerata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, M.N.; Whitman, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, massive avian die-offs from Clostridium botulinum type E infection have occurred in the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) area of Lake Michigan. These outbreaks have been coincidental with massive blooms of the green algae Cladophora, mostly Cladophora glomerata. We tested the hypothesis that Clostridium botulinum type E can grow under suitable conditions in these algal mats. In a lab mesocosm study, Cladophora from four outbreak-impacted beaches from SLBE were compared with four unimpacted beaches in the Milwaukee–Racine area for bontE gene of Clostridium botulinum. Frequency of the bontE gene was higher after incubation (25 °C for up to 6 weeks) of Cladophora from impacted vs. the unimpacted area. Since no type E gene was detected initially in Cladophora from any of the eight locations, we infer that the increased occurrence of type E gene arose from spore germination or vegetative Clostridium growth within the existing algal mats of SLBE. Moreover, we found that the congener Clostridium perfringens readily grows in mesocosms containing Cladophora.

  4. Gas discharge plasmas are effective in inactivating Bacillus and Clostridium spores.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shawn; Abramzon, Nina; Jackson, James O; Lin, Wei-Jen

    2012-03-01

    Bacterial spores are the most resistant form of life and have been a major threat to public health and food safety. Nonthermal atmospheric gas discharge plasma is a novel sterilization method that leaves no chemical residue. In our study, a helium radio-frequency cold plasma jet was used to examine its sporicidal effect on selected strains of Bacillus and Clostridium. The species tested included Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, and Clostridium botulinum type A and type E. The plasmas were effective in inactivating selected Bacillus and Clostridia spores with D values (decimal reduction time) ranging from 2 to 8 min. Among all spores tested, C. botulinum type A and C. sporogenes were significantly more resistant to plasma inactivation than other species. Observations by phase contrast microscopy showed that B. subtilis spores were severely damaged by plasmas and the majority of the treated spores were unable to initiate the germination process. There was no detectable fragmentation of the DNA when the spores were treated for up to 20 min. The release of dipicolinic acid was observed almost immediately after the plasma treatment, indicating the spore envelope damage could occur quickly resulting in dipicolinic acid release and the reduction of spore resistance. PMID:22075631

  5. Lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is the host receptor for the binary toxin Clostridium difficile transferase (CDT)

    PubMed Central

    Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Carette, Jan E.; Bell, George W.; Schwan, Carsten; Guttenberg, Gregor; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.; Aktories, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. Hypervirulent strains of the pathogen, which are responsible for increased morbidity and mortality of CDI, produce the binary actin-ADP ribosylating toxin Clostridium difficile transferase (CDT) in addition to the Rho-glucosylating toxins A and B. CDT depolymerizes the actin cytoskeleton, increases adherence and colonization of Clostridia by induction of microtubule-based cell protrusions and, eventually, causes death of target cells. Using a haploid genetic screen, we identified the lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor as the membrane receptor for CDT uptake by target cells. Moreover, we show that Clostridium perfringens iota toxin, which is a related binary actin-ADP ribosylating toxin, enters target cells via the lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor. Identification of the toxin receptors is essential for understanding of the toxin uptake and provides a most valuable basis for antitoxin strategies. PMID:21930894

  6. Systematic effects of the quenched approximation on the strong penguin contribution to epsilon-prime / epsilon

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Christ, N.H.; Dawson, C.; Laiho, J.W.; Noaki, J.; Li, S.; Soni, A.; /Brookhaven

    2006-03-01

    We discuss the implementation and properties of the quenched approximation in the calculation of the left-right, strong penguin contributions (i.e. Q{sub 6}) to {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}. The coefficient of the new chiral logarithm, discovered by Golterman and Pallante, which appears at leading order in quenched chiral perturbation theory is evaluated using both the method proposed by those authors and by an improved approach which is free of power divergent corrections. The result implies a large quenching artifact in the contribution of Q{sub 6} to {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}. This failure of the quenched approximation affects only the strong penguin operators and so does not affect the Q8 contribution to {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} nor ReA{sub 0}, ReAP{sub 2} and thus, the {Delta}I = 1/2 rule at tree level in chiral perturbation theory.

  7. Systematic effects of the quenched approximation on the strong penguin contribution to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Christ, N. H.; Li, S.; Dawson, C.; Noaki, J.; Laiho, J. W.; Soni, A.

    2006-08-01

    We discuss the implementation and properties of the quenched approximation in the calculation of the left-right, strong penguin contributions (i.e. Q{sub 6}) to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon}. The coefficient of the new chiral logarithm, discovered by Golterman and Pallante, which appears at leading order in quenched chiral perturbation theory is evaluated using both the method proposed by those authors and by an improved approach which is free of power divergent corrections. The result implies a large quenching artifact in the contribution of Q{sub 6} to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon}. This failure of the quenched approximation affects only the strong penguin operators and so does not affect the Q{sub 8} contribution to {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon} nor ReA{sub 0}, ReA{sub 2} and thus, the {delta}I=1/2 rule at tree level in chiral perturbation theory.

  8. Clostridium Difficile Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a bacterium that causes diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions such as colitis. Symptoms include Watery ... Nausea Abdominal pain or tenderness You might get C. difficile disease if you have an illness that ...

  9. Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease (a thickening of tissue [plaque] inside the penis that causes the penis to curve). Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is in ... the plaque of thickened tissue and allows the penis to be straightened.

  10. Nosocomial Diarrhea: Evaluation and Treatment of Causes Other Than Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Polage, Christopher R.; Solnick, Jay V.; Cohen, Stuart H.

    2012-01-01

    Diarrhea is common among hospitalized patients but the causes are distinct from those of diarrhea in the community. We review existing data about the epidemiology of nosocomial diarrhea and summarize recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of diarrhea. Clinicians should recognize that most cases of nosocomial diarrhea have a noninfectious etiology, including medications, underlying illness, and enteral feeding. Apart from Clostridium difficile, the frequency of infectious causes such as norovirus and toxigenic strains of Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella oxytoca, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacteroides fragilis remains largely undefined and test availability is limited. Here we provide a practical approach to the evaluation and management of nosocomial diarrhea when tests for C. difficile are negative. PMID:22700831

  11. Nosocomial diarrhea: evaluation and treatment of causes other than Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Polage, Christopher R; Solnick, Jay V; Cohen, Stuart H

    2012-10-01

    Diarrhea is common among hospitalized patients but the causes are distinct from those of diarrhea in the community. We review existing data about the epidemiology of nosocomial diarrhea and summarize recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of diarrhea. Clinicians should recognize that most cases of nosocomial diarrhea have a noninfectious etiology, including medications, underlying illness, and enteral feeding. Apart from Clostridium difficile, the frequency of infectious causes such as norovirus and toxigenic strains of Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella oxytoca, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacteroides fragilis remains largely undefined and test availability is limited. Here we provide a practical approach to the evaluation and management of nosocomial diarrhea when tests for C. difficile are negative. PMID:22700831

  12. Characterization of a Unique Class C Acid Phosphatase from Clostridium perfringens▿

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Thomas J.; Chance, Deborah L.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.; Felts, Richard L.; Waller, Stephen C.; Henzl, Michael T.; Mawhinney, Thomas P.; Ganjam, Irene K.; Fales, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a gram-positive anaerobe and a pathogen of medical importance. The detection of acid phosphatase activity is a powerful diagnostic indicator of the presence of C. perfringens among anaerobic isolates; however, characterization of the enzyme has not previously been reported. Provided here are details of the characterization of a soluble recombinant form of this cell-associated enzyme. The denatured enzyme was ∼31 kDa and a homodimer in solution. It catalyzed the hydrolysis of several substrates, including para-nitrophenyl phosphate, 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate, and 3′ and 5′ nucleoside monophosphates at pH 6. Calculated Kms ranged from 0.2 to 0.6 mM with maximum velocity ranging from 0.8 to 1.6 μmol of Pi/s/mg. Activity was enhanced in the presence of some divalent cations but diminished in the presence of others. Wild-type enzyme was detected in all clinical C. perfringens isolates tested and found to be cell associated. The described enzyme belongs to nonspecific acid phosphatase class C but is devoid of lipid modification commonly attributed to this class. PMID:19363079

  13. A Mysterious Twin of Epsilon-Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Sumin; Grindlay, J. E.; Bildsten, L.; collaborators, many

    2013-07-01

    We present our recent discovery of a mysterious twin of Epsilon-Aurigae from DASCH. It showed a 4 mag decline which lasted for 3 years in 1940s, and now, 68 years later, is at decline phase again. The magnitude changes in optical and NIR bands are comparable, indicating opaque bodies are blocking the light. We suggest that it is an eclipsing binary system, similar to Epsilon-Aurigae, probably caught in a short stage in binary evolution. We will describe the DASCH discovery data, our current follow-up observations, and a model for the system and its evolution.

  14. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L... death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Beta Antitoxin preparation... toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of...

  15. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of Standard Toxin to contain 10 Lo doses per ml and make a second dilution of Standard Toxin to contain 10 L+ doses per ml. (iii) Combine 1 International Unit of Standard Antitoxin with 10 Lo doses of... 10 Lo doses of diluted Standard Toxin. (v) Neutralize all toxin-antitoxin mixtures at...

  16. PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS DURING COOLING OF COOKED GROUND CHICKEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional methodologies for development of microbial growth models under dynamic temperature conditions do not take adequate account for the organism’s history. Such models were shown to be inadequate in predicting growth of the organisms under dynamic conditions commonly encountered in the food i...

  17. Predictive model for growth of Clostridium perfringens during cooling of cooked ground chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional methodologies for development of microbial growth models under dynamic temperature conditions do not take into account the organism’s prior history. Such models were shown to be inadequate in predicting growth of the organisms under dynamic conditions commonly encountered in the food ind...

  18. Enteritis associated with Clostridium perfringens type A in 9-month-old calves

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Bozidar; Prodanovic, Radisa; Ivetic, Vojin; Radanovic, Oliver; Bojkovski, Jovan

    2012-01-01

    Four 9-month-old Simmental male calves were presented with a history of sudden death. The necropsy and microscopic findings allowed a diagnosis of enteritis and severe intraluminal hemorrhage with blood clots in the jejunum, suggestive of jejunal hemorrhage syndrome. PMID:22851779

  19. Potential for growth of Clostridium perfringens from spores in scrapple during cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scrapple is an ethnic food produced/consumed almost exclusively in the Middle Atlantic states of the U.S. It is typically made from ground pork trimmings, seasonings, cornmeal, and flour. This mixture is cooked and then shaped into loaves that are cooled and subsequently stored refrigerated until sl...

  20. Clostridium tetani bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Hallit, Rabih Riad; Afridi, Muhammad; Sison, Raymund; Salem, Elie; Boghossian, Jack; Slim, Jihad

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus is a neuromuscular disease in which Clostridium tetani exotoxin (tetanospasmin) produces muscle spasms, incapacitating its host. To our knowledge, C. tetani bacteraemia has never been reported in the literature. The ideal management of this entity remains unresolved given that there is no literature to guide the therapy. PMID:22977074

  1. Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, VK; Mallozzi, MJ

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the primary cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and is a significant nosocomial disease. In the past ten years, variant toxin-producing strains of C. difficile have emerged, that have been associated with severe disease as well as outbreaks worldwide. This review summarizes current information on C. difficile pathogenesis and disease, and highlights interventions used to combat single and recurrent episodes of CDI. PMID:21327030

  2. Susceptibility of primary human endothelial cells to C. perfringens beta-toxin suggesting similar pathogenesis in human and porcine necrotizing enteritis.

    PubMed

    Popescu, F; Wyder, M; Gurtner, C; Frey, J; Cooke, R A; Greenhill, A R; Posthaus, H

    2011-11-21

    Clostridium perfringens type C causes fatal necrotizing enteritis in different mammalian hosts, most commonly in newborn piglets. Human cases are rare, but the disease, also called pigbel, was endemic in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Lesions in piglets and humans are very similar and characterized by segmental necro-hemorrhagic enteritis in acute cases and fibrino-necrotizing enteritis in subacute cases. Histologically, deep mucosal necrosis accompanied by vascular thrombosis and necrosis was consistently reported in naturally affected pigs and humans. This suggests common pathogenetic mechanisms. Previous in vitro studies using primary porcine aortic endothelial cells suggested that beta-toxin (CPB) induced endothelial damage contributes to the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type C enteritis in pigs. In the present study we investigated toxic effects of CPB on cultured primary human macro- and microvascular endothelial cells. In vitro, these cells were highly sensitive to CPB and reacted with similar cytopathic and cytotoxic effects as porcine endothelial cells. Our results indicate that porcine and human cell culture based in vitro models represent valuable tools to investigate the pathogenesis of this bacterial disease in animals and humans. PMID:21411248

  3. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A; Leang, C; Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2014-03-25

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis.

  4. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis. PMID:24509933

  5. Threonine requirement of broiler chickens during subclinical intestinal Clostridium infection.

    PubMed

    Star, L; Rovers, M; Corrent, E; van der Klis, J D

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the threonine requirement of broilers during a subclinical Clostridium infection. Three experiments were performed: experiments 1 and 2 to investigate the dose-response of threonine supplementation during infection and experiment 3 to validate the threonine requirement during infection. In each experiment, 1-d-old Ross 308 male broilers were used. An infection model was used with inoculation of Eimeria maxima and Clostridium perfringens at d 9 and 14 of age, respectively. Control birds were inoculated with saline and liver broth at d 9 and 14 of age, respectively. From d 9 of age, infected birds were fed diets differing in the standardized digestible threonine-to-lysine ratio (realized ratios experiment 1: 0.55, 0.58, 0.63, 0.69, and 0.72; realized ratios experiment 2: 0.64, 0.65, 0.67, 0.69, and 0.72; and realized ratios experiment 3: 0.63 and 0.67). Uninfected birds were fed diets with a realized Thr:Lys ratio of 0.63 in experiments 1 and 2 and of 0.63 or 0.67 in experiment 3. The incidence of lesions, lesion severity, and mortality rate of infected birds was not affected by the Thr:Lys ratio. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that the decrease in BW gain and feed intake was less severe in infected birds fed a diet with a Thr:Lys ratio of 0.69 and 0.67, respectively (not significant). Validation of the Thr:Lys ratio in experiment 3 showed that the BW gain and feed intake were higher for infected birds with a Thr:Lys ratio of 0.67 compared with infected birds with a Thr:Lys ratio of 0.63. This resulted in an increased BW gain and feed intake of 129 and 148 g, respectively, with a higher Thr:Lys ratio over a production period of 37 d. This indicates that a higher Thr:Lys ratio in infected birds improved production performance during infection with C. perfringens, although intestinal damage (incidence and lesion severity) was not affected. PMID:22334739

  6. The genome sequence of Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of tetanus disease.

    PubMed

    Bruggemann, Holger; Baumer, Sebastian; Fricke, Wolfgang Florian; Wiezer, Arnim; Liesegang, Heiko; Decker, Iwona; Herzberg, Christina; Martinez-Arias, Rosa; Merkl, Rainer; Henne, Anke; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    2003-02-01

    Tetanus disease is one of the most dramatic and globally prevalent diseases of humans and vertebrate animals, and has been reported for over 24 centuries. The manifestation of the disease, spastic paralysis, is caused by the second most poisonous substance known, the tetanus toxin, with a human lethal dose of approximately 1 ng/kg. Fortunately, this disease is successfully controlled through immunization with tetanus toxoid; nevertheless, according to the World Health Organization, an estimated 400,000 cases still occur each year, mainly of neonatal tetanus. The causative agent of tetanus disease is Clostridium tetani, an anaerobic spore-forming bacterium, whose natural habitat is soil, dust, and intestinal tracts of various animals. Here we report the complete genome sequence of toxigenic C. tetani E88, a variant of strain Massachusetts. The genome consists of a 2,799,250-bp chromosome encoding 2,372 ORFs. The tetanus toxin and a collagenase are encoded on a 74,082-bp plasmid, containing 61 ORFs. Additional virulence-related factors could be identified, such as an array of surface-layer and adhesion proteins (35 ORFs), some of them unique to C. tetani. Comparative genomics with the genomes of Clostridium perfringens, the causative agent of gas gangrene, and Clostridium acetobutylicum, a nonpathogenic solvent producer, revealed a remarkable capacity of C. tetani: The organism can rely on an extensive sodium ion bioenergetics. Additional candidate genes involved in the establishment and maintenance of a pathogenic lifestyle of C. tetani are presented. PMID:12552129

  7. Comparative In Vitro Activities of LFF571 against Clostridium difficile and 630 Other Intestinal Strains of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, Kerin L.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Goldstein, Ellie J. C.

    2012-01-01

    The in vitro activities of LFF571, a novel analog of GE2270A that inhibits bacterial growth by binding with high affinity for protein synthesis elongation factor Tu, fidaxomicin, and 10 other antimicrobial agents were determined against 50 strains of Clostridium difficile and 630 other anaerobic and aerobic organisms of intestinal origin. LFF571 possesses potent activity against C. difficile and most other Gram-positive anaerobes (MIC90, ≤0.25 μg/ml), with the exception of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. The MIC90s for aerobes, including enterococci, Staphylococcus aureus (as well as methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA] isolates), Streptococcus pyogenes, and other streptococci were 0.06, 0.125, 2, and 8 μg/ml, respectively. Comparatively, fidaxomicin showed variable activity against Gram-positive organisms: MIC90s against C. difficile, Clostridium perfringens, and Bifidobacterium spp. were 0.5, ≤0.015, and 0.125 μg/ml, respectively, but >32 μg/ml against Clostridium ramosum and Clostridium innocuum. MIC90 for S. pyogenes and other streptococci was 16 and >32 μg/ml, respectively. LFF571 and fidaxomicin were generally less active against Gram-negative anaerobes. PMID:22290948

  8. Epsilon Aur monitoring during predicted pulsation phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.; Templeton, Matthew R.

    2014-09-01

    Dr. Robert Stencel (University of Denver Astronomy Program) has requested that AAVSO observers monitor epsilon Aurigae from now through the end of the observing season. "Studies of the long-term, out-of-eclipse photometry of this enigmatic binary suggest that intervals of coherent pulsation occur at roughly 1/3 of the 27.1-year orbital period. Kloppenborg, et al. noted that stable variation patterns develop at 3,200-day intervals' implying that 'the next span of dates when such events might happen are circa JD ~2457000 (2014 December)'. "These out-of-eclipse light variations often have amplitudes of ~0.1 magnitude in U, and ~0.05 in V, with characteristic timescales of 60-100 days. The AAVSO light curve data to the present may indicate that this coherent phenomenon has begun, but we encourage renewed efforts by observers...to help deduce whether these events are internal to the F star, or externally-driven by tidal interaction with the companion star." Nightly observations or one observation every few days (CCD/PEP/DSLR, VUBR (amplitude too small for visual)) are requested. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. Epsilon Aur was the subject of major international campaigns and the AAVSO's Citizen Sky project as it went through its 27.1-year eclipse in 2009-2011. Over 700 observers worldwide submitted over 20,000 multicolor observations to the AAVSO International Database for this project. Much information on eps Aur is available from the AAVSO, including material on the Citizen Sky website (http://www.aavso.org/epsilon-aurigae and http://www.citizensky.org/content/star-our-project). The Journal of the AAVSO, Volume 40, No. 2 (2012) was devoted to discussion of and research results from this event. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  9. New atmospheric model of Epsilon Eridani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieytes, Mariela; Fontenla, Juan; Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    We present a new semi-empirical model of the atmosphere of the widely studied K-dwarf Epsilon Eridani (HD 22049). The model is build to reproduce the visible spectral observations from 3800 to 6800 Angstrom and the h and k Mg II lines profiles. The computations were carried out using the Solar-Stellar Radiation Physical Modeling (SSRPM) tools, which calculate non-LTE population for the most important species in the stellar atmosphere. We show a comparison between the synthetic and observed spectrum, obtaining a good agreement in all the studied spectral range.

  10. Epsilon Aurigae at the End of Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoard, Donald; Stencel, R.; Howell, S.

    2011-05-01

    We request a small investment of 24 minutes of Spitzer time, to obtain four IRAC observations of epsilon Aurigae. A naked eye object located near Capella, epsilon Aurigae is the eclipsing binary star with the longest known orbital period, showing a single long duration (~2 yr) eclipse every 27.1 yr. For much of the last 150 years, the nature of the eclipsing object defied explanation. We recently demonstrated that epsilon Aurigae consists of a high luminosity F0 post-AGB star in orbit with a B5 V star surrounded by a solar system sized (~8 AU diameter) disk of cool, dust-dominated material. The eclipse of epsilon Aurigae is a rare event; moreover, it is a unique astrophysical opportunity, since the backlighting of the disk by the high luminosity eclipsed star reveals details that cannot be detected in similar dusty disks around single stars. The current eclipse started in August 2009 and is expected to reach its photometric conclusion in May 2011 (with the spectroscopic conclusion as late as December 2011). The goals for these observations include: (1) extend our ongoing IRAC monitoring campaign covering the current eclipse to late-phase and post-eclipse visits; (2) provide a consistent, well-calibrated space-based set of IR photometry for comparison with ongoing ground-based work; and (3) use the composite results to constrain the thermal profile of the disk. A key expectation of these particular observations is to reveal the irradiation-heated portion of the disk, which will be visible on its trailing side following eclipse. Observations of this side of the disk will be crucial to test and constrain new models of disk structure. As part of our overall monitoring campaign with Spitzer, Hubble, Herschel, and numerous ground-based facilities, these proposed observations will make an important contribution to the understanding of stellar evolution in binary stars, including mass transfer and evolution studies, along with new insights into astrophysical disks and post-AGB star evolution.

  11. Revealing the Hot Side of Epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoard, Donald; Stencel, Robert; Howell, Steve

    2012-12-01

    We request a small investment of 24 minutes of Spitzer time, to obtain four IRAC observations of epsilon Aurigae. A naked eye object located near Capella, epsilon Aurigae is the eclipsing binary star with the longest known orbital period, showing a single long duration (~2 yr) eclipse every 27.1 yr. For much of the last 200 years, the nature of the eclipsing object defied explanation. We recently demonstrated that epsilon Aurigae consists of a high luminosity F0 post-AGB star in orbit with a B5 V star surrounded by a solar system sized (~8 AU diameter) disk of cool, dust-dominated material. The eclipse of epsilon Aurigae is a rare event; moreover, it is a unique astrophysical opportunity, since the backlighting of the disk by the high luminosity eclipsed star reveals details that cannot be detected in similar dusty disks around single stars. The current eclipse started in August 2009 and ended in July 2011; we are now in the post-eclipse phase, when the irradiation-heated side of the disk will begin rotating into view. The goals for these observations include: (1) extend our ongoing IRAC monitoring campaign covering the current eclipse to post-eclipse visits; (2) provide a consistent, well-calibrated space-based set of IR photometry for comparison with ongoing ground-based work; and (3) use the composite results to constrain the thermal profile of the disk. A key expectation of these particular observations is to reveal the irradiation-heated portion of the disk, which will be visible on its trailing side following eclipse. Observations of this side of the disk will be crucial to test and constrain new models of disk structure. As part of our overall monitoring campaign with Spitzer, Hubble, Herschel, and numerous ground-based facilities, these proposed observations will make an important contribution to the understanding of stellar evolution in binary stars, including mass transfer and evolution studies, along with new insights into astrophysical disks and post-AGB star evolution.

  12. Classical closure theory and Lam's interpretation of epsilon-RNG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    Lam's phenomenological epsilon-renormalization group (RNG) model is quite different from the other members of that group. It does not make use of the correspondence principle and the epsilon-expansion procedure. We demonstrate that Lam's epsilon-RNG model is essentially the physical space version of the classical closure theory in spectral space and consider the corresponding treatment of the eddy viscosity and energy backscatter.

  13. The Final Measurement of Epsilon'/Epsilon from KTeV

    SciTech Connect

    Worcester, E.T.

    2009-09-01

    We present precise measurements of CP and CPT symmetry based on the full dataset of K {yields} {pi}{pi} decays collected by the KTeV experiment at FNAL. We measure the direct CP violation parameter Re({epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}) = (19.2 {+-} 2.1) x 10{sup -4}. We find the KL-KS mass difference {Delta}m = (5265 {+-} 10) x 10{sup 6} hs{sup -1} and the K{sub S} lifetime {tau}{sub S} = (89.62 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -12} s. We test CPT symmetry by finding the phase of the indirect CP violation parameter {epsilon}, {phi}{sub {epsilon}} = (44.09 {+-} 1.00){sup o}, and the difference of the relative phases between the CP violating and CP conserving decay amplitudes for K {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} ({phi}{sub {+-}}) and for K {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} ({phi}{sub 00}), {Delta}{phi} = (0.29 {+-} 0.31){sup o}. These results are consistent with other experimental results and with CPT symmetry.

  14. The Final Measurement of Epsilon'/Epsilon from KTeV

    SciTech Connect

    Worcester, E.T.

    2009-10-01

    The authors present precise measurements of CP and CPT symmetry based on the full dataset of K {yields} {pi}{pi} decays collected by the KTeV experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory during 1996, 1997, and 1999. This dataset contains about 15 million K {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} and 70 million K {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays. They measure the direct CP violation parameter Re({epsilon}'/{epsilon}) = (19.2 {+-} 2.1) x 10{sup -4}. they find the K{sub L}-K{sub S} mass difference {Delta}m = (5265 {+-} 10) x 10{sup 6} {bar h}s{sup -1} and the K{sub S} lifetime {tau}{sub S} = (89.62 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -12} s. They test CPT symmetry by finding the phase of the indirect CP violation parameter {epsilon}, {phi}{sub {epsilon}} = (44.09 {+-} 1.00){sup o}, and the difference of the relative phases between the CP violating and CP conserving decay amplitudes for K {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} ({phi}{sub +-}) and for K {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} ({phi}{sub 00}), {Delta}{phi} = (0.29 {+-} 0.31){sup o}. these results are consistent with other experimental results and with CPT symmetry.

  15. Comparison of 3 agar media in Fung double tubes and Petri plates to detect and enumerate Clostridium spp. in broiler chicken intestines.

    PubMed

    Barrios, M A; Saini, J K; Rude, C M; Beyer, R S; Fung, D Y C; Crozier-Dodson, B A

    2013-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that may lead to necrotic enteritis, resulting in poor feed efficiency and increased mortality in chickens. It is estimated that C. perfringens infects almost 1 million people in the United States every year. The objective of this research was to compare the Fung double tube (FDT) and conventional Petri plates using 3 different media to detect and enumerate Clostridium spp. in chicken intestines. Nine Cobb 500 broilers were randomly selected and euthanized at 21 and 42 d of age for a total of 18 samples. The jejunum and ileum from each broiler were harvested and studied in 2 methods and 3 media combinations, utilizing a 2 × 3 factorial totaling 6 treatments. The 2 methods were FDT and conventional Petri plates, and the 3 media were Shahidi-Ferguson Perfringens (SFP) with egg yolk supplement, polymyxin B, and kanamycin (E); SFP with polymyxin B and kanamycin (P); and SFP with d-cycloserine (C). Enumerations were performed after 24 h of incubation at 37°C. At 21 d, counts using medium C with FDT (4.51 log10 cfu/g) and plates (2.38 log10 cfu/g) were higher (P < 0.05) than using media E or P. On d 42, there were no differences among plate treatments and medium E had the highest counts (0.98 log10 cfu/g). Of all the FDT, medium C (5.35 log10 cfu/g) had the highest counts (P < 0.05), followed by medium P (3.54 log10 cfu/g). This study illustrates that the FDT method is able to enumerate Clostridium spp. at higher levels (P < 0.001) than the conventional Petri plate method; therefore, the FDT should be implemented and further explored. PMID:23687145

  16. Epsilon Metal Summary Report FY 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, Denis M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Windisch, Charles F.; Riley, Brian J.

    2011-09-30

    The Epsilon-metal ({var_epsilon}-metal) phase was selected in FY 2009 as a potential waste form to for immobilizing the noble metals found in the undissolved solids + aqueous stream, and the soluble Tc from ion-exchange process, each resulting from proposed aqueous reprocessing. {var_epsilon}-metal phase is observed in used nuclear fuel and the natural reactors of Oklobono in Gabon, where the long-term corrosion behavior was demonstrated. This makes {var_epsilon}-metal a very attractive waste form. Last fiscal year, {var_epsilon}-metal was successfully fabricated by combining the five-metals, Mo, Ru, Rh, Pd and Re (surrogate for Tc), into pellets followed by consolidation with an arc melter. The arc melter produced fully dense samples with the epsilon structure. However, some chemistry differences were observed in the microstructure that resulted in regions rich in Re and Mo, and others rich in Pd, while Ru and Rh remained fairly constant throughout. This year, thermal stability (air), and corrosion testing of the samples fabricated by arc melting were the main focus for experimental work. Thermal stability was measured with a differential scanning calorimeter - thermogravimetric analyzer, by both ramp heating as well as step heating. There is clear evidence during the ramp heating experiment of an exothermic event + a weight loss peak both beginning at {approx}700 C. Step heating showed an oxidation event at {approx}690 C with minimal weight gain that occurs just before the weight loss event at 700 C. The conclusion being that the e-metal begins to oxidize and then become volatile. These findings are useful for considering the effects of voloxidation process. Three different pellets were subjected to electrochemical testing to study the corrosion behavior of the epsilon-metal phase in various conditions, namely acidic, basic, saline, and inert. Test was done according to an interim procedure developed for the alloy metal waste form. First an open circuit potential was measured, followed by linear polarization sweeps. The linear polarization sweep range was the Tafel equation was fit to the linear polarization sweep data to determine the corrosion rate of each pellet in each test solution. The average calculated corrosion rates of the three pellets according to solution conditions were: -1.91 x 10{sup -4} mm/yr (0.001 M NaOH), -1.48 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.01 M NaCl), -8.77 x 10{sup -4} mm/yr (0.001 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), -2.09 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.001 M NaOH + 0.01 M NaCl), and -1.54 x 10{sup -3} mm/yr (0.001 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.01 M NaCl). Three single-pass flow through (SPFT) test were conducted at a flow rate of 10 ml/day, at 90 C, and pH of 2.5, 7.0, and 9.0 for up to 322 days. Results of the tests indicate that dissolution rates were 5 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup 2} d{sup -1} at pH 9.0, 1.2 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at pH 7.0, and 2 x 10{sup -4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at pH 2.5. The sample used for the pH 7.0 SPFT test contains extra Re compared to samples used for the other two SPFT test, which came from a single pellet. The corrosion data measured this year indicate that the {var_epsilon}-metal phase is chemically durable. The two chemically different phases, but structurally the same, behave differently during dissolution according to the microstructure changes observed in both the electrochemical and in SPFT test. Characterization of the test specimens after testing suggests that the dissolution is complex and involves oxidative dissolution followed by precipitation of both oxide and metallic phases. These data suggest that the dissolution in the electrochemical and SPFT tests is different; a process that needs further investigation.

  17. Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Vedantam, Gayatri; Clark, Andrew; Chu, Michele; McQuade, Rebecca; Mallozzi, Michael; Viswanathan, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of antibiotic- and healthcare-associated diarrhea, and its containment and treatment imposes a significant financial burden, estimated to be over $3 billion in the USA alone. Since the year 2000, CDI epidemics/outbreaks have occurred in North America, Europe and Asia. These outbreaks have been variously associated with, or attributed to, the emergence of Clostridium difficile strains with increased virulence, an increase in resistance to commonly used antimicrobials such as the fluoroquinolones, or host susceptibilities, including the use of gastric acid suppressants, to name a few. Efforts to elucidate C. difficile pathogenic mechanisms have been hampered by a lack of molecular tools, manipulatable animal models, and genetic intractability of clinical C. difficile isolates. However, in the past 5 y, painstaking efforts have resulted in the unraveling of multiple C. difficile virulence-associated pathways and mechanisms. We have recently reviewed the disease, its associated risk factors, transmission and interventions (Viswanathan, Gut Microbes 2010). This article summarizes genetics, non-toxin virulence factors, and host-cell biology associated with C. difficile pathogenesis as of 2011, and highlights those findings/factors that may be of interest as future intervention targets. PMID:22555464

  18. Biosynthesis of daunorubicin glycosides: role of epsilon-rhodomycinone.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, J C; Thomas, M C; Stroshane, R M; Hamilton, B K; White, R J

    1980-01-01

    Daunorubicin (daunomycin; NSC 82151) is a fermentation-derived anthracycline antibiotic that is clinically useful in the treatment of human leukemias. Daunorubicin itself is found rarely in microbial fermentations, but is present normally in the form of glycoside derivatives that yield the free drug on simple acid hydrolysis. A major by-product of daunorubicin fermentations is usually the structurally related anthracyclinone epsilon-rhodomycinone. We have used mutants of a daunorubicin-producing Streptomyces species to study the biosynthetic relationship between epsilon-rhodomycinone and daunorubicin. We found that exogenously added epsilon-rhodomycinone can be converted to daunorubicin glycosides by a nonproducing mutant and by a mutant that produces daunorubicin glycosides but not epsilon-rhoeomycinone. Molar conversion efficiences were in the 15 to 30% range. The latter mutant was also shown to convert exogenous 14C-labeled epsilon-rhodomycinone to 14C-labeled daunorubicin glycosides, again at conversion efficiencies of about 25%. The same biotransformation was observed with daunorubicin production strain C5, which normally accumulates both epsilon-rhodomycinone and daunorubicin glycosides. A significant percentage (16 to 37%) of exogenously added epsilon-[14C]rhodomycinone was metabolized by strain C5, and 22 to 32% of the metabolized radioactivity could be recovered as daunorubicin glycosides. A mathematical model of epsilon-rhodomycinone metabolism was constructed based on plausible assumptions concerning the kinetics of epsilon-rhodomycinone accumulation and catabolsim. When analyzed according to this model, our data indicate that most (63 to 73%), but not all, of the daunorubicin glycosides accumulated in the experiments with production strain C5 derived from epsilon-rhodomycinone. A pathway network for the biosynthesis of daunorubicin glycosides is proposed that is in agreement with these data. In this proposed pathway network, epsilon-rhodomycinone is an intermediate in one of at least two pathways which yield daunorubicin glycosides. Images PMID:7425613

  19. CDP-diacylglycerol synthase activity in Clostridium perfingens

    SciTech Connect

    Carmen, G.M.; Zaniewski, R.L.; Cousminer, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    CTP: phosphatidate cytidylyltransferase (CDP-diacylglycerol synthase; EC 2.7.7.41) was identified in the cell envelope fraction of the gram-positive anaerobe Clostridium perfringens. The association of this enzyme with the cell envelope fraction of cell extracts was demonstrated by glycerol density gradient centrifugation and by activity sedimenting with the 100,000 x g pellet. The enzyme exhibited a broad pH optimium between pH 6.5 and pH 7.5. Enzyme activity was dependent on magnesium (5 mM) or manganese (1 mM) ions. Activity was also dependent on the addition on the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 (5 mM). The apparent Km values for CTP and phosphatidic acid were 0.18 mM and 0.22 mM respectively. Thioreactive agents inhibited activity, indicating that a sulfhydryl group is essential for activity. Maximal enzyme activity was observed at 50 degrees C. (Refs. 24).

  20. Epsilon Aurigae - Two-year Totality Transpiring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloppenborg, Brian K.; Stencel, R. E.; Hopkins, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    The 27 year period eclipsing binary, epsilon Aurigae, exhibits the hallmarks of a classical Algol system, except that the companion to the F supergiant primary star is surprisingly under-luminous for its mass. Eclipse ingress appears to have begun shortly after the predicted time in August 2009, near JD 2,455,065. At the University of Denver, we have focused on near-infrared interferometry, spectroscopy, and photometry with the superior instrumentation available today, compared to that of the 1983 eclipse. Previously obtained interferometry indicates that the source is asymmetric (Stencel, et. al. 2009 APLJ) and initial CHARA+MIRC closure-phase imaging shows hints of resolved structures. In parallel, we have pursued SPEX near-IR spectra at NASA IRTF in order to confirm whether CO molecules only seen during the second half of the 1983 eclipse will reappear on schedule. Additionally, we have obtained J and H band photometry using an Optec SSP-4 photometer with a newly written control and analysis suite. Our goal is to refine daytime photometric methods in order to provide coverage of the anticipated mid-eclipse brightening during summer 2010, from our high-altitude observatory atop Mt. Evans, Colorado. Also, many parallel observations are ongoing as part of the epsilon Aurigae international campaign (http://www.hposoft.com/Campaign09.html). In this report, we describe the progress of the eclipse and ongoing observations. We invite interested parties to get involved with the campaign for coverage of the 2009-2011 eclipse via the campaign websites: http://www.hposoft.com/Campaign09.html - and - http://www.du.edu/ rstencel/epsaur.htm - and - http://www.citizensky.org . This research is supported in part by the bequest of William Herschel Womble to the University of Denver. We are grateful to the participants in the observing campaign and invite interested parties to join us in monitoring the star for the balance of the eclipse.