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Sample records for clostridium sordellii infection

  1. Foot infection by Clostridium sordellii: case report and review of 15 cases in France.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Philippe; Sautereau, Jean; Le Coustumier, Alain; Mory, Francine; Bouchier, Christiane; Popoff, Michel-R

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of foot infection by Clostridium sordellii and review 15 human infections registered at a Reference Center in France during the period 1998 to 2011. All strains were found nontoxigenic, lacking the lethal toxin gene coding for TcsL. Like Clostridium septicum, several C. sordellii infections were associated with intestinal neoplasms. PMID:25609723

  2. Foot Infection by Clostridium sordellii: Case Report and Review of 15 Cases in France

    PubMed Central

    Sautereau, Jean; Le Coustumier, Alain; Mory, Francine; Bouchier, Christiane; Popoff, Michel-R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of foot infection by Clostridium sordellii and review 15 human infections registered at a Reference Center in France during the period 1998 to 2011. All strains were found nontoxigenic, lacking the lethal toxin gene coding for TcsL. Like Clostridium septicum, several C. sordellii infections were associated with intestinal neoplasms. PMID:25609723

  3. Identification and Characterization of Clostridium sordellii Toxin Gene Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Sirigi Reddy, Apoorva Reddy; Girinathan, Brintha Parasumanna; Zapotocny, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Toxigenic Clostridium sordellii causes uncommon but highly lethal infections in humans and animals. Recently, an increased incidence of C. sordellii infections has been reported in women undergoing obstetric interventions. Pathogenic strains of C. sordellii produce numerous virulence factors, including sordellilysin, phospholipase, neuraminidase, and two large clostridial glucosylating toxins, TcsL and TcsH. Recent studies have demonstrated that TcsL toxin is an essential virulence factor for the pathogenicity of C. sordellii. In this study, we identified and characterized TcsR as the toxin gene (tcsL) regulator in C. sordellii. High-throughput sequencing of two C. sordellii strains revealed that tcsR lies within a genomic region that encodes TcsL, TcsH, and TcsE, a putative holin. By using ClosTron technology, we inactivated the tcsR gene in strain ATCC 9714. Toxin production and tcsL transcription were decreased in the tcsR mutant strain. However, the complemented tcsR mutant produced large amounts of toxins, similar to the parental strain. Expression of the Clostridium difficile toxin gene regulator tcdR also restored toxin production to the C. sordellii tcsR mutant, showing that these sigma factors are functionally interchangeable. PMID:23873908

  4. A fatal postpartum Clostridium sordellii associated toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bitti, A; Mastrantonio, P; Spigaglia, P; Urru, G; Spano, A I; Moretti, G; Cherchi, G B

    1997-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii is an infrequent human pathogen. It has been demonstrated to be occasionally responsible for myonecrosis or gas gangrene. Interestingly, in the obstetric literature, some cases of postpartum maternal deaths have been associated with C sordellii infection causing a rapidly lethal toxin mediated syndrome. This is the first reported case of postpartum death in a 29 year old woman, in which a toxigenic C sordellii was isolated from the patient's blood antemortem during the fatal toxic shock, strongly indicating its role in this rare syndrome. PMID:9155682

  5. Clostridium sordellii in a brown bear (Ursus arctos) from Spain.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, Ana; Oleaga, Álvaro; Polledo, Laura; Aduriz, Gorka; Atxaerandio, Raquel; Kortabarria, Nekane; Marín, Juan F García

    2013-10-01

    Clostridium sordellii is found in the environment and occasionally in animal (including human) intestines and may cause myonecrosis and large outbreaks of enterotoxemia. A few cases of fatal clostridial infection in bears (Ursus spp.) have been described worldwide but none attributed to C. sordellii. We describe a fatal case of septicemia caused by C. sordellii in an illegally trapped brown bear (Ursus arctos). At necropsy, acute gangrenous myositis was the primary lesion. Serohemorrhagic edema was observed in the abdominal cavity, thorax, pericardium, and skeletal muscle, mostly affecting femoral, humeral, and scapular muscles. Hemorrhage was observed in the heart, skeletal muscles, stomach, and intestine. Liver, spleen, and kidney appeared with loss of consistency, hemorrhages, and edema. Microscopically, primary lesions were in skeletal muscle, stomach, and small intestine, with gram-positive, clostridial-like bacilli. Biochemical and molecular tests identified C. sordellii in cultures from liver, muscle, and intestine. Sequences showed a homology of >99% with the 16S rRNA gene sequence of C. sordellii. The severity of effects of the C. sordellii infection reveal the importance of this pathogen as a wildlife health risk with conservation concerns, as well as the need to consider possible infection with this pathogen in management actions involving immobilization, stress, or severe muscular activity of wild brown bears. PMID:24502739

  6. Clostridium novyi, sordellii, and tetani: mechanisms of disease.

    PubMed

    Aronoff, David M

    2013-12-01

    Clostridia represent a diverse group of spore-forming gram positive anaerobes that include several pathogenic species. In general, diseases caused by clostridia are a result of intoxication of the infected host. Thus, clostridial toxins have been targeted for diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive strategies against infection. Studying the mechanisms of action of clostridial toxins has not only shed light on the pathogenesis of infection but has provided important new insights into cell biology and immunology. A primary purpose of this manuscript is to provide a succinct review on the mechanisms of disease caused by intoxication by the pathogens Clostridium tetani, Clostridium novyi, and Clostridium sordellii. PMID:24036420

  7. Non-lethal Clostridium sordellii bacteraemia in an immunocompromised patient with pleomorphic sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Bonnecaze, Alex K; Stephens, Sarah Ellen Elza; Miller, Peter John

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii is a spore-forming anaerobic Gram-positive rod that has rarely been reported to cause disease in humans. Resultant mortality from infection is estimated at nearly 70% and is most often correlated with gynaecological procedures, intravenous drug abuse or trauma. C. sordellii infection often presents similarly to toxic shock syndrome (TSS); notable features of infection include refractory hypotension, haemoconcentration and marked leucocytosis. Although clinically similar to TSS, a notable difference is C. sordellii infections rarely involve fever. The organism's major toxins include haemorrhagic (TcsH) and lethal factor (TcsL), which function to disrupt cytoskeletal integrity. Current literature suggests treating C. sordelli infection with a broad-spectrum penicillin, metronidazole and clindamycin. We present a case of C. sordellii bacteraemia and septic shock in an immunocompromised patient who was recently diagnosed with pleomorphic gluteal sarcoma. Despite presenting in critical condition, the patient improved after aggressive hemodynamic resuscitation, source control and intravenous antibiotic therapy. PMID:27489063

  8. Misoprostol Impairs Female Reproductive Tract Innate Immunity against Clostridium sordellii1

    PubMed Central

    Aronoff, David M.; Hao, Yibai; Chung, Jooho; Coleman, Nicole; Lewis, Casey; Peres, Camila M.; Serezani, Carlos H.; Chen, Gwo-Hsiao; Flamand, Nicolas; Brock, Thomas G.; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Fatal cases of acute shock complicating Clostridium sordellii endometritis following medical abortion with mifepristone (also known as RU-486) used with misoprostol were reported. The pathogenesis of this unexpected complication remains enigmatic. Misoprostol is a pharmacomimetic of PGE2, an endogenous suppressor of innate immunity. Clinical C. sordellii infections were associated with intravaginal misoprostol administration, suggesting that high misoprostol concentrations within the uterus impair immune responses against C. sordellii. We modeled C. sordellii endometritis in rats to test this hypothesis. The intrauterine but not the intragastric delivery of misoprostol significantly worsened mortality from C. sordellii uterine infection, and impaired bacterial clearance in vivo. Misoprostol also reduced TNF-α production within the uterus during infection. The intrauterine injection of misoprostol did not enhance mortality from infection by the vaginal commensal bacterium Lactobacillus crispatus. In vitro, misoprostol suppressed macrophage TNF-α and chemokine generation following C. sordellii or peptidoglycan challenge, impaired leukocyte phagocytosis of C. sordellii, and inhibited uterine epithelial cell human β-defensin expression. These immunosuppressive effects of misoprostol, which were not shared by mifepristone, correlated with the activation of the Gs protein-coupled E prostanoid (EP) receptors EP2 and EP4 (macrophages) or EP4 alone (uterine epithelial cells). Our data provide a novel explanation for postabortion sepsis leading to death and also suggest that PGE2, in which production is exaggerated within the reproductive tract during pregnancy, might be an important causal determinant in the pathogenesis of more common infections of the gravid uterus. PMID:18523288

  9. Clostridium sordellii as a Cause of Fatal Septic Shock in a Child with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beyers, Rebekah; Baldwin, Michael; Dalabih, Sevilay; Dalabih, Abdallah

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii is a toxin producing ubiquitous gram-positive anaerobe, mainly associated with trauma, soft tissue skin infections, and gynecologic infection. We report a unique case of a new strain of Clostridium sordellii (not present in the Center for Disease Control (CDC) database) infection induced toxic shock syndrome in a previously healthy two-year-old male with colitis-related hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The patient presented with dehydration, vomiting, and bloody diarrhea. He was transferred to the pediatric critical care unit (PICU) for initiation of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Due to increased edema and intolerance of PD, he was transitioned to hemodialysis through a femoral vascular catheter. He subsequently developed severe septic shock with persistent leukocytosis and hypotension, resulting in subsequent death. Stool culture confirmed Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli 0157:H7. A blood culture was positively identified for Clostridium sordellii. Clostridium sordelli is rarely reported in children; to our knowledge this is the first case described in a pediatric patient with HUS. PMID:24891968

  10. Rapid, Simultaneous Detection of Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium perfringens in Archived Tissues by a Novel PCR-Based Microsphere Assay: Diagnostic Implications for Pregnancy-Associated Toxic Shock Syndrome Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Julu; DeLeon-Carnes, Marlene; Kellar, Kathryn L.; Bandyopadhyay, Kakali; Antoniadou, Zoi-Anna; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Paddock, Christopher D.; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium perfringens are infrequent human pathogens; however, the case-fatality rates for the infections are very high, particularly in obstetric C. sordellii infections (>90%). Deaths from Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium perfringens toxic shock (CTS) are sudden, and diagnosis is often challenging. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues usually are the only specimens available for sudden fatal cases, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for Clostridia is generally performed but it cannot identify species. A clear need exists for a rapid, species-specific diagnostic assay for FFPE tissues. We developed a duplex PCR-based microsphere assay for simultaneous detection of C. sordellii and C. perfringens and evaluated DNA extracted from 42 Clostridium isolates and FFPE tissues of 28 patients with toxic shock/endometritis (20 CTS, 8 non-CTS, as confirmed by PCR and sequencing). The microsphere assay correctly identified C. sordellii and C. perfringens in all known isolates and in all CTS patients (10 C. sordellii, 8 C. perfringens, 2 both) and showed 100% concordance with PCR and sequencing results. The microsphere assay is a rapid, specific, and cost-effective method for the diagnosis of CTS and offers the advantage of simultaneous testing for C. sordellii and C. perfringens in FFPE tissues using a limited amount of DNA. PMID:22536012

  11. A novel murine model of Clostridium sordellii myonecrosis: Insights into the pathogenesis of disease.

    PubMed

    Aldape, Michael J; Bayer, Clifford R; Bryant, Amy E; Stevens, Dennis L

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium sordellii infections have been reported in women following natural childbirth and spontaneous or medically-induced abortion, injection drug users and patients with trauma. Death is rapid and mortality ranges from 70 to 100%. Clinical features include an extreme leukemoid reaction, the absence of fever, and only minimal pain or erythema at the infected site. In the current study, we developed a murine model of C. sordellii soft tissue infection to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms. Mice received 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 × 10(6) CFU C. sordellii (ATCC 9714 type strain) in the right thigh muscle. All doses caused fatal infection characterized by intense swelling of the infected limb but no erythema or visible perfusion deficits. Survival rates and time to death were inoculum dose-dependent. Mice developed a granulocytic leukocytosis with left shift, the onset of which directly correlated with disease severity. Histopathology of infected tissue showed widespread edema, moderate muscle damage and minimal neutrophil infiltration. Circulating levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor I (sTNF-RI) and interlukin-6 (IL-6) were significantly increased in infected animals, while TNF-α, and IL-1β levels were only mildly elevated, suggesting these host factors likely mediate the leukocytosis and innate immune dysfunction characteristic of this infection. Thus, this model mimics many of the salient features of this infection in humans and has allowed us to identify novel targets for intervention. PMID:26805011

  12. Clostridium sordellii Lethal-Toxin Autoprocessing and Membrane Localization Activities Drive GTPase Glucosylation Profiles in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium sordellii infections cause gangrene and edema in humans and gastrointestinal infections in livestock. One of the principle virulence factors is TcsL, a large protein toxin which glucosylates host GTPases to cause cytopathic and cytotoxic effects. TcsL has two enzymatic domains, an N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain (GTD) and an autoprocessing domain responsible for release of the GTD within the cell. The GTD can then use its N-terminal membrane localization domain (MLD) for orientation on membranes and modification of GTPases. This study describes the use of conditionally immortalized murine pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells as a model for the study of TcsL functional activities. Point mutations that disrupt the glucosyltransferase, autoprocessing, or membrane localization activities were introduced into a recombinant version of TcsL, and the activities of these mutants were compared to those of wild-type toxin. We observed that all mutants are defective or impaired in cytotoxicity but differ in their modification of Rac1 and Ras. The data suggest a model where differences in GTPase localization dictate cellular responses to intoxication and highlight the importance of autoprocessing in the function of TcsL. IMPORTANCE Clostridium sordellii is a bacterium that can infect humans and cause serious disease and death. The principle virulence factor associated with clinical symptoms is a large protein toxin known as lethal toxin. The mechanism of lethal-toxin intoxication is assumed to be similar to that of the homologous toxins from C. difficile, but very few studies have been done in the context of endothelial cells, a relevant target in C. sordellii infections. This study was designed to test the role of the lethal-toxin enzymatic activities and membrane localization in endothelial cell toxicity and host substrate modification. PMID:27303685

  13. The Sialidase NanS Enhances Non-TcsL Mediated Cytotoxicity of Clostridium sordellii

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Milena M.; Singleton, Julie; Lyras, Dena

    2016-01-01

    The clostridia produce an arsenal of toxins to facilitate their survival within the host environment. TcsL is one of two major toxins produced by Clostridium sordellii, a human and animal pathogen, and is essential for disease pathogenesis of this bacterium. C. sordellii produces many other toxins, but the role that they play in disease is not known, although previous work has suggested that the sialidase enzyme NanS may be involved in the characteristic leukemoid reaction that occurs during severe disease. In this study we investigated the role of NanS in C. sordellii disease pathogenesis. We constructed a nanS mutant and showed that NanS is the only sialidase produced from C. sordellii strain ATCC9714 since sialidase activity could not be detected from the nanS mutant. Complementation with the wild-type gene restored sialidase production to the nanS mutant strain. Cytotoxicity assays using sialidase-enriched culture supernatants applied to gut (Caco2), vaginal (VK2), and cervical cell lines (End1/E6E7 and Ect1/E6E7) showed that NanS was not cytotoxic to these cells. However, the cytotoxic capacity of a toxin-enriched supernatant to the vaginal and cervical cell lines was substantially enhanced in the presence of NanS. TcsL was not the mediator of the observed cytotoxicity since supernatants harvested from a TcsL-deficient strain displayed similar cytotoxicity levels to TcsL-containing supernatants. This study suggests that NanS works synergistically with an unknown toxin or toxins to exacerbate C. sordellii-mediated tissue damage in the host. PMID:27322322

  14. The Sialidase NanS Enhances Non-TcsL Mediated Cytotoxicity of Clostridium sordellii.

    PubMed

    Awad, Milena M; Singleton, Julie; Lyras, Dena

    2016-01-01

    The clostridia produce an arsenal of toxins to facilitate their survival within the host environment. TcsL is one of two major toxins produced by Clostridium sordellii, a human and animal pathogen, and is essential for disease pathogenesis of this bacterium. C. sordellii produces many other toxins, but the role that they play in disease is not known, although previous work has suggested that the sialidase enzyme NanS may be involved in the characteristic leukemoid reaction that occurs during severe disease. In this study we investigated the role of NanS in C. sordellii disease pathogenesis. We constructed a nanS mutant and showed that NanS is the only sialidase produced from C. sordellii strain ATCC9714 since sialidase activity could not be detected from the nanS mutant. Complementation with the wild-type gene restored sialidase production to the nanS mutant strain. Cytotoxicity assays using sialidase-enriched culture supernatants applied to gut (Caco2), vaginal (VK2), and cervical cell lines (End1/E6E7 and Ect1/E6E7) showed that NanS was not cytotoxic to these cells. However, the cytotoxic capacity of a toxin-enriched supernatant to the vaginal and cervical cell lines was substantially enhanced in the presence of NanS. TcsL was not the mediator of the observed cytotoxicity since supernatants harvested from a TcsL-deficient strain displayed similar cytotoxicity levels to TcsL-containing supernatants. This study suggests that NanS works synergistically with an unknown toxin or toxins to exacerbate C. sordellii-mediated tissue damage in the host. PMID:27322322

  15. Clostridium Sordellii as an Uncommon Cause of Fatal Toxic Shock Syndrome in a Postpartum 33-Year-Old Asian Woman, and the Need for Antepartum Screening for This Clostridia Species in the General Female Population.

    PubMed

    Guzzetta, Melissa; Williamson, Alex; Duong, Scott

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium sordellii (C. sordellii) is an anaerobic gram-positive rod most commonly found in the soil and sewage but also as part of the normal flora of the gastrointestinal tract and vagina of a small percentage of healthy individuals. C. sordellii infection is considered to result from childbirth, abortion, and/or gynecological procedures. Although many strains of C. sordellii are nonpathogenic, virulent toxin-producing strains exist. Infection with this organism typically manifests as a patient experiencing septic shock rapidly followed by end-organ failure. Identification of C. sordelli has been successful by traditional culture, mass spectrometry methods, and via molecular methods. Herein, we present a fatal case of C. sordellii infection of a postpartum 33-year-old Asian woman. The organism was isolated by culture and identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) technology. With the advent of rapid detection methods, antepartum screening for the fatal Clostridium species should be implemented in the general female population. PMID:27371657

  16. Metal Ion Activation of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium difficile Toxin B

    PubMed Central

    Genth, Harald; Schelle, Ilona; Just, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Lethal Toxin from Clostridium sordellii (TcsL) and Toxin B from Clostridium difficile (TcdB) belong to the family of the “Large clostridial glycosylating toxins.” These toxins mono-O-glucosylate low molecular weight GTPases of the Rho and Ras families by exploiting UDP-glucose as a hexose donor. TcsL is casually involved in the toxic shock syndrome and the gas gangrene. TcdB—together with Toxin A (TcdA)—is causative for the pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). Here, we present evidence for the in vitro metal ion activation of the glucosyltransferase and the UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity of TcsL and TcdB. The following rating is found for activation by divalent metal ions: Mn2+ > Co2+ > Mg2+ >> Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+. TcsL and TcdB thus require divalent metal ions providing an octahedral coordination sphere. The EC50 values for TcsL were estimated at about 28 µM for Mn2+ and 180 µM for Mg2+. TcsL and TcdB further require co-stimulation by monovalent K+ (not by Na+). Finally, prebound divalent metal ions were dispensible for the cytopathic effects of TcsL and TcdB, leading to the conclusion that TcsL and TcdB recruit intracellular metal ions for activation of the glucosyltransferase activity. With regard to the intracellular metal ion concentrations, TcsL and TcdB are most likely activated by K+ and Mg2+ (rather than Mn2+) in mammalian target cells. PMID:27089365

  17. Metal Ion Activation of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium difficile Toxin B.

    PubMed

    Genth, Harald; Schelle, Ilona; Just, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Lethal Toxin from Clostridium sordellii (TcsL) and Toxin B from Clostridium difficile (TcdB) belong to the family of the "Large clostridial glycosylating toxins." These toxins mono-O-glucosylate low molecular weight GTPases of the Rho and Ras families by exploiting UDP-glucose as a hexose donor. TcsL is casually involved in the toxic shock syndrome and the gas gangrene. TcdB-together with Toxin A (TcdA)-is causative for the pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). Here, we present evidence for the in vitro metal ion activation of the glucosyltransferase and the UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity of TcsL and TcdB. The following rating is found for activation by divalent metal ions: Mn(2+) > Co(2+) > Mg(2+) > Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+). TcsL and TcdB thus require divalent metal ions providing an octahedral coordination sphere. The EC50 values for TcsL were estimated at about 28 µM for Mn(2+) and 180 µM for Mg(2+). TcsL and TcdB further require co-stimulation by monovalent K⁺ (not by Na⁺). Finally, prebound divalent metal ions were dispensible for the cytopathic effects of TcsL and TcdB, leading to the conclusion that TcsL and TcdB recruit intracellular metal ions for activation of the glucosyltransferase activity. With regard to the intracellular metal ion concentrations, TcsL and TcdB are most likely activated by K⁺ and Mg(2+) (rather than Mn(2+)) in mammalian target cells. PMID:27089365

  18. Rac1 inactivation by lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii modifies focal adhesions upstream of actin depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Geny, Blandine; Grassart, Alexandre; Manich, Maria; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Payrastre, Bernard; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Popoff, Michel R

    2010-02-01

    Inactivation of different small GTPases upon their glucosylation by lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii strain IP82 (LT-82) is already known to lead to cell rounding, adherens junction (AJ) disorganization and actin depolymerization. In the present work, we observed that LT-82 induces a rapid dephosphorylation of paxillin, a protein regulating focal adhesion (FA), independently of inactivation of paxillin kinases such as Src, Fak and Pyk2. Among the small GTPases inactivated by this toxin, including Rac, Ras, Rap and Ral, we identified Rac1, as responsible for paxillin dephosphorylation using cells overexpressing Rac1(V12). Rac1 inactivation by LT-82 modifies interactions between proteins from AJ and FA complexes as shown by pull-down assays. We showed that in Triton X-100-insoluble membrane proteins from these complexes, namely E-cadherin, beta-catenin, p120-catenin and talin, are decreased upon LT-82 intoxication, a treatment that also induces a rapid decrease in cell phosphoinositide content. Therefore, we proposed that Rac inactivation by LT-82 alters phosphoinositide metabolism leading to FA and AJ complex disorganization and actin depolymerization. PMID:19840028

  19. Antibodies against recombinant catalytic domain of lethal toxin of Clostridium sordellii neutralize lethal toxin toxicity in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Arya, Preetika; Ponmariappan, S; Singh, Lokendra; Prasad, G B K S

    2013-02-01

    Lethal toxin of Clostridium sordellii (MLD 150 ng/kg) is one of the most potent Clostridial toxins and is responsible for most of the diseases including sudden death syndrome in cattle, sheep and toxic shock syndrome, necrotizing faciitis, neonatal omphalitis and gangrene in humans. Lethal toxin (TcsL) is a single chain protein of about 270 kDa. In the present study, 1.6 kb DNA fragment encoding for the catalytic domain of TcsL was PCR amplified, cloned in pQE30 UA vector and expressed in E. coli SG 13009. The expression of recombinant lethal toxin protein (rTcsL) was optimized and it was purified under native conditions using a single step Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The purified recombinant protein was used for the production of polyclonal antibodies in mice and rabbit. The raised antibodies reacted specifically with the purified rTcsL and intact native lethal toxin on Western blot. The biological activity of the recombinant protein was tested in HeLa cells where it showed the cytotoxicity. Further, the polyclonal antibodies were used for in-vitro neutralization of purified rTcsL, acid precipitated C. sordellii and C. difficile native toxins in HeLa cells. Mice and rabbit anti-rTcsL sera effectively neutralized the cytotoxicity of rTcsL and C. sordellii native toxin but it did not neutralize the cytotoxicity of C. difficile toxin in HeLa cells. PMID:22894159

  20. Characterization and regulation of the NADP-linked 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene from Clostridium sordellii.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, J P; Hudson, L L; Adams, M J

    1994-01-01

    A bile acid-inducible NADP-linked 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (7 alpha-HSDH) from Clostridium sordellii ATCC 9714 was purified 310-fold by ion-exchange, gel filtration, and dye-ligand affinity chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the purified enzyme showed one predominant peptide band (30,000 Da). The N-terminal sequence was determined, and the corresponding oligonucleotides were synthesized and used to screen EcoRI and HindIII genomic digests of C. sordellii. Two separate fragments (4,500 bp, EcoRI; 3,200 bp, HindIII) were subsequently cloned by ligation to pUC19 and transformation into Escherichia coli DH5 alpha-MCR. The EcoRI fragment was shown to contain a truncated 7 alpha-HSDH gene, while the HindIII fragment contained the entire coding region. E. coli clones containing the HindIII insert expressed high levels of an NADP-linked 7 alpha-HSDH. Nucleotide sequence analyses suggest that the 7 alpha-HSDH is encoded by a monocistronic transcriptional unit, with DNA sequence elements resembling rho-independent terminators located in both the upstream and downstream flanking regions. The transcriptional start site was located by primer extension analysis. Northern (RNA) blot analysis indicated that induction is mediated at the transcriptional level in response to the presence of bile acid in the growth medium. In addition, growth-phase-dependent expression is observed in uninduced cultures. Analysis of the predicted protein sequence indicates that the enzyme can be classified in the short-chain dehydrogenase group. Images PMID:8050999

  1. Inhibition of small G proteins by clostridium sordellii lethal toxin activates cdc2 and MAP kinase in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Rime, H; Talbi, N; Popoff, M R; Suziedelis, K; Jessus, C; Ozon, R

    1998-12-15

    The lethal toxin (LT) from Clostridium sordellii is a glucosyltransferase that modifies and inhibits small G proteins of the Ras family, Ras and Rap, as well as Rac proteins. LT induces cdc2 kinase activation and germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) when microinjected into full-grown Xenopus oocytes. Toxin B from Clostridium difficile, that glucosylates and inactivates Rac proteins, does not induce cdc2 activation, indicating that proteins of the Ras family, Ras and/or Rap, negatively regulate cdc2 kinase activation in Xenopus oocyte. In oocyte extracts, LT catalyzes the incorporation of [14C]glucose into a group of proteins of 23 kDa and into one protein of 27 kDa. The 23-kDa proteins are recognized by anti-Rap1 and anti-Rap2 antibodies, whereas the 27-kDa protein is recognized by several anti-Ras antibodies and probably corresponds to K-Ras. Microinjection of LT into oocytes together with UDP-[14C]glucose results in a glucosylation pattern similar to the in vitro glucosylation, indicating that the 23- and 27-kDa proteins are in vivo substrates of LT. In vivo time-course analysis reveals that the 27-kDa protein glucosylation is completed within 2 h, well before cdc2 kinase activation, whereas the 23-kDa proteins are partially glucosylated at GVBD. This observation suggests that the 27-kDa Ras protein could be the in vivo target of LT allowing cdc2 kinase activation. Interestingly, inactivation of Ras proteins does not prevent the phosphorylation of c-Raf1 and the activation of MAP kinase that occurs normally around GVBD. PMID:9882492

  2. Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, VK; Mallozzi, MJ

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the primary cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and is a significant nosocomial disease. In the past ten years, variant toxin-producing strains of C. difficile have emerged, that have been associated with severe disease as well as outbreaks worldwide. This review summarizes current information on C. difficile pathogenesis and disease, and highlights interventions used to combat single and recurrent episodes of CDI. PMID:21327030

  3. Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Smits, Wiep Klaas; Lyras, Dena; Lacy, D Borden; Wilcox, Mark H; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-01-01

    Infection of the colon with the Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium difficile is potentially life threatening, especially in elderly people and in patients who have dysbiosis of the gut microbiota following antimicrobial drug exposure. C. difficile is the leading cause of health-care-associated infective diarrhoea. The life cycle of C. difficile is influenced by antimicrobial agents, the host immune system, and the host microbiota and its associated metabolites. The primary mediators of inflammation in C. difficile infection (CDI) are large clostridial toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), and, in some bacterial strains, the binary toxin CDT. The toxins trigger a complex cascade of host cellular responses to cause diarrhoea, inflammation and tissue necrosis - the major symptoms of CDI. The factors responsible for the epidemic of some C. difficile strains are poorly understood. Recurrent infections are common and can be debilitating. Toxin detection for diagnosis is important for accurate epidemiological study, and for optimal management and prevention strategies. Infections are commonly treated with specific antimicrobial agents, but faecal microbiota transplants have shown promise for recurrent infections. Future biotherapies for C. difficile infections are likely to involve defined combinations of key gut microbiota. PMID:27158839

  4. Clostridium Difficile Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a bacterium that causes diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions such as colitis. Symptoms include Watery ... Nausea Abdominal pain or tenderness You might get C. difficile disease if you have an illness that ...

  5. The Tip of the Four N-Terminal α-Helices of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin Contains the Interaction Site with Membrane Phosphatidylserine Facilitating Small GTPases Glucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Varela Chavez, Carolina; Haustant, Georges Michel; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Chenal, Alexandre; Pauillac, Serge; Blondel, Arnaud; Popoff, Michel-Robert

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL) is a powerful virulence factor responsible for severe toxic shock in man and animals. TcsL belongs to the large clostridial glucosylating toxin (LCGT) family which inactivates small GTPases by glucosylation with uridine-diphosphate (UDP)-glucose as a cofactor. Notably, TcsL modifies Rac and Ras GTPases, leading to drastic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton and cell viability. TcsL enters cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the N-terminal glucosylating domain (TcsL-cat) into the cytosol. TcsL-cat was found to preferentially bind to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes and to increase the glucosylation of Rac anchored to the lipid membrane. We have previously reported that the N-terminal four helical bundle structure (1–93 domain) recognizes a broad range of lipids, but that TcsL-cat specifically binds to PS and phosphatidic acid. Here, we show using mutagenesis that the PS binding site is localized on the tip of the four-helix bundle which is rich in positively-charged amino acids. Residues Y14, V15, F17, and R18 on loop 1, between helices 1 and 2, in coordination with R68 from loop 3, between helices 3 and 4, form a pocket which accommodates L-serine. The functional PS-binding site is required for TcsL-cat binding to the plasma membrane and subsequent cytotoxicity. TcsL-cat binding to PS facilitates a high enzymatic activity towards membrane-anchored Ras by about three orders of magnitude as compared to Ras in solution. The PS-binding site is conserved in LCGTs, which likely retain a common mechanism of binding to the membrane for their full activity towards membrane-bound GTPases. PMID:27023605

  6. Clostridium difficile infections in China.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ke; Wang, Shixia; Huang, Zuhu; Lu, Shan

    2010-11-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection has become one of the major hospital-associated infections in Western countries in the last two decades. However, there is limited information on the status of C. difficile infection in Chinese healthcare settings. Given the large and increasing elderly population and the well-recognized problem of over-prescribing of broad spectrum antibiotics in China, it is critical to understand the epidemiology and potential risk factors that may contribute to C. difficile infection in China. A literature review of available published studies, including those in Chinese language-based journals, was conducted. A review of the currently available literature suggested the presence of C. difficile infections in China, but also suggested that these infections were not particularly endemic. This finding should lead to better designed and greatly expanded studies to provide a more reliable epidemiologically-based conclusion on the actual status of C. difficile infection in China, including the identification of any associated risk factors. Such information is ultimately valuable to develop appropriate strategies to prevent C. difficile infection and the vast negative impact of such infections in China and other developing countries. PMID:23554657

  7. Clostridium difficile infection in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Putsathit, Papanin; Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Ngamwongsatit, Puriya; Riley, Thomas V

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the aetiological agent in ca. 20% of cases of antimicrobial-associated diarrhoea in hospitalised adults. Diseases caused by this organism range from mild diarrhoea to occasional fatal pseudomembranous colitis. The epidemiology of C. difficile infection (CDI) has changed notably in the past decade, following epidemics in the early 2000s of PCR ribotype (RT) 027 infection in North America and Europe, where there was an increase in disease severity and mortality. Another major event has been the emergence of RT 078, initially as the predominant ribotype in production animals in the USA and Europe, and then in humans in Europe. Although there have been numerous investigations of the epidemiology of CDI in North America and Europe, limited studies have been undertaken elsewhere, particularly in Asia. Antimicrobial exposure remains the major risk factor for CDI. Given the high prevalence of indiscriminate and inappropriate use of antimicrobials in Asia, it is conceivable that CDI is relatively common among humans and animals. This review describes the level of knowledge in Thailand regarding C. difficile detection methods, prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profile, as well as the clinical features of, treatment options for and outcomes of the disease. In addition, antimicrobial usage in livestock in Thailand will be reviewed. A literature search yielded 18 studies mentioning C. difficile in Thailand, a greater number than from any other Asian country. It is possible that the situation in Thailand in relation to CDI may mirror the situation in other developing Asians countries. PMID:25537687

  8. Clostridium difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Biesiada, Grażyna; Perucki, William; Mach, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium widely distributed in the human environment. In the last decade the incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection has grown, particularly in Europe and North America, making it one of the more common nosocomial infections. A group particularly susceptible to Clostridium difficile infection are patients with inflammatory bowel disease, especially those with involvement of the colon. This paper presents relevant data on Clostridium difficile infections in inflammatory bowel disease patients, including epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25097707

  9. Clostridium difficile Infection: A Worldwide Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Kristin E.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, an anaerobic toxigenic bacterium, causes a severe infectious colitis that leads to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Both enhanced bacterial toxins and diminished host immune response contribute to symptomatic disease. C. difficile has been a well-established pathogen in North America and Europe for decades, but is just emerging in Asia. This article reviews the epidemiology, microbiology, pathophysiology, and clinical management of C. difficile. Prompt recognition of C. difficile is necessary to implement appropriate infection control practices. PMID:24516694

  10. Blastocystis sp. Infection Mimicking Clostridium Difficile Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Gaby S.; Chaudhari, Shobhana; Shady, Ahmed; Caballes, Ana; Hong, Joe

    2016-01-01

    We report an unusual case of severe diarrhea related to Blastocystis sp. infection in a patient with end stage renal disease on hemodialysis. The patient was admitted due to profuse diarrhea associated with fever and leukocytosis. Pertinent stool work-up such as leukocytes in stool, stool culture, clostridium difficile toxin B PCR, and serology for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C and cytomegalovirus screening were all negative. Ova and parasite stool examination revealed Blastocystis sp. The patient was given intravenous metronidazole with clinical improvement by day three and total resolution of symptoms by day ten. PMID:27247810

  11. Novel Risk Factors for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection in Children

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Maribeth R.; Thomsen, Isaac P.; Slaughter, James C.; Creech, C. Buddy; Edwards, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Clostridium difficile, a common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, has been reported to recur in high rates in adults. The rates and risk factors for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI) in children have not been well established. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 186 pediatric patients seen at a tertiary care referral center over a 5-year period diagnosed with a primary infection with Clostridium difficile. Children with recurrent disease, defined as return of symptoms of Clostridium difficile infection and positive testing ≤60 days after the completion of therapy, were compared to children who did not experience an episode of recurrence. Results Of the 186 pediatric patients included in this study, 41 (22%) experienced recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. On univariable analysis, factors significantly associated with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection included malignancy, recent hospitalization, recent surgery, antibiotic use, number of antibiotic exposures by class, acid blocker use, immunosuppressant use, and hospital acquired disease. On multivariable analysis, malignancy (OR=3.39, 95% CI=1.52–7.85), recent surgery (OR=2.40, 95% CI=1.05–5.52), and the number of antibiotic exposures by class (OR=1.33, 95% CI=1.01–1.75) were significantly associated with recurrent disease in children. Conclusions The rate of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in children was 22%. Recurrence was significantly associated with the risk factors of malignancy, recent surgery, and the number of antibiotic exposures by class. PMID:25199038

  12. [New aspects on Clostridium difficile infection].

    PubMed

    von Müller, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a frequent and complex disease which is influenced by the repertoire of bacterial virulence factors, by host immunity and by the intestinal microbiome. These complex interaction opens a number of options which may be used for treatment in the future. One example for new treatment options is fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). Driven by C. difficile related research activities the knowledge of protective microorganism is increasing and it may be assumed that bacteriotherapy by next-generation probiotics may be used very soon also for other diseases. Very often, CDI reflects to the clinician that antibiotic therapy is associated with side effects. Therefore, C. difficile is the guilty conscience which helps to implement targeted and restrictive antibiotic use in the daily practice. PMID:27509341

  13. Flooding and Clostridium difficile infection: a case-crossover analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospttalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community­ associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more ...

  14. Clostridium perfringens infection after transarterial chemoembolization for large hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Huan; Yao, Rong-Rong; Shen, Hu-Jia; Zhang, Lan; Xie, Xiao-Ying; Chen, Rong-Xin; Wang, Yan-Hong; Ren, Zheng-Gang

    2015-04-14

    We report an unusual case of Clostridium perfringens liver abscess formation after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for large hepatocellular carcinoma. Severe deterioration in liver and renal function accompanied with hemocytolysis was found on the 2(nd) day after TACE. Blood culture found Clostridium perfringens and abdominal computed tomography revealed a gas-containing abscess in the liver. Following antibiotics administration and support care, the infection was controlled and the liver and renal function turned normal. The 2(nd) TACE procedure was performed 1.5 mo later and no recurrent Clostridium perfringens infection was found. PMID:25892893

  15. Clostridium perfringens infection after transarterial chemoembolization for large hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Huan; Yao, Rong-Rong; Shen, Hu-Jia; Zhang, Lan; Xie, Xiao-Ying; Chen, Rong-Xin; Wang, Yan-Hong; Ren, Zheng-Gang

    2015-01-01

    We report an unusual case of Clostridium perfringens liver abscess formation after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for large hepatocellular carcinoma. Severe deterioration in liver and renal function accompanied with hemocytolysis was found on the 2nd day after TACE. Blood culture found Clostridium perfringens and abdominal computed tomography revealed a gas-containing abscess in the liver. Following antibiotics administration and support care, the infection was controlled and the liver and renal function turned normal. The 2nd TACE procedure was performed 1.5 mo later and no recurrent Clostridium perfringens infection was found. PMID:25892893

  16. Laboratory Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tenover, Fred C.; Baron, Ellen Jo; Peterson, Lance R.; Persing, David H.

    2011-01-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) continues to be challenging. Recent guidelines from professional societies in the United States note that enzyme immunoassays for toxins A and B do not have adequate sensitivity to be used alone for detecting CDI, yet the optimal method for diagnosing this infection remains unclear. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) that target chromosomal toxin genes (usually the toxin B gene, tcdB) show high sensitivity and specificity, provide rapid results, and are amenable to both batch and on-demand testing, but these tests were not universally recommended for routine use in the recent guidelines. Rather, two-step algorithms that use glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) assays to screen for C. difficile in stool specimens, followed by either direct cytotoxin testing or culture to identify toxin-producing C. difficile isolates, were recommended in one guideline and either GDH algorithms or NAATs were recommended in another guideline. Unfortunately, neither culture nor direct cytotoxin testing is widely available. In addition, this two-step approach requires 48 to 92 hours to complete, which may delay the initiation of therapy and critical infection control measures. Recent studies also show the sensitivity of several GDH assays to be <90%. This review considers the role of NAATs for diagnosing CDI and explores their potential advantages over two-step algorithms, including shorter time to results, while providing comparable, if not superior, accuracy. PMID:21854871

  17. The Changing Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, J.; Bauer, M. P.; Baines, S. D.; Corver, J.; Fawley, W. N.; Goorhuis, B.; Kuijper, E. J.; Wilcox, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed dramatically during this millennium. Infection rates have increased markedly in most countries with detailed surveillance data. There have been clear changes in the clinical presentation, response to treatment, and outcome of CDI. These changes have been driven to a major degree by the emergence and epidemic spread of a novel strain, known as PCR ribotype 027 (sometimes referred to as BI/NAP1/027). We review the evidence for the changing epidemiology, clinical virulence and outcome of treatment of CDI, and the similarities and differences between data from various countries and continents. Community-acquired CDI has also emerged, although the evidence for this as a distinct new entity is less clear. There are new data on the etiology of and potential risk factors for CDI; controversial issues include specific antimicrobial agents, gastric acid suppressants, potential animal and food sources of C. difficile, and the effect of the use of alcohol-based hand hygiene agents. PMID:20610822

  18. Current status of Clostridium difficile infection epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Lessa, Fernanda C; Gould, Carolyn V; McDonald, L Clifford

    2012-08-01

    The dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) during recent years, with increases in incidence and severity of disease in several countries, have made CDI a global public health challenge. Increases in CDI incidence have been largely attributed to the emergence of a previously rare and more virulent strain, BI/NAP1/027. Increased toxin production and high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones have made this strain a very successful pathogen in healthcare settings. In addition, populations previously thought to be at low risk are now being identified as having severe CDI. Recent genetic analysis suggests that C. difficile has a highly fluid genome with multiple mechanisms to modify its content and functionality, which can make C. difficile adaptable to environmental changes and potentially lead to the emergence of more virulent strains. In the face of these changes in the epidemiology and microbiology of CDI, surveillance systems are necessary to monitor trends and inform public health actions. PMID:22752867

  19. [Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in Spain].

    PubMed

    Asensio, Angel; Monge, Diana

    2012-06-01

    There has been increasing interest in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) due its association with healthcare and its impact on morbidity and mortality in the elderly. During the last few years there has been a growing increase in the number of published studies on the incidence, changes on the clinical presentation and on the epidemiology, with the description of new risk factors. The frequency of CDI in Spain is not sufficiently characterised. The available data indicates that incidence is within the range of that of surrounding countries but increasing. Furthermore, the high and growing use of broad spectrum antibiotics, both in our hospitals and in the community setting, are factors that favour the increase of the disease. The hyper-virulent ribotype 027 has not spread in our hospitals. We need to know with enhanced validity and accuracy the incidence of CDI, both community and healthcare-associated, the information on outbreaks, the incidence on certain population groups, the characterisation of circulating ribotypes and the impact of the disease in terms of mortality and health costs. We need to implement programs for the improvement of antibiotic therapy in the hospital, as well as in the community. Furthermore, the knowledge and the performance of standard precautions need to be improved, particularly hand hygiene, and the specific measures to limit the transmission of C. difficile among the healthcare institutions. PMID:22136747

  20. Clostridium difficile associated infection, diarrhea and colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hookman, Perry; Barkin, Jamie S

    2009-01-01

    A new, hypervirulent strain of Clostridium difficile, called NAP1/BI/027, has been implicated in C. difficile outbreaks associated with increased morbidity and mortality since the early 2000s. The epidemic strain is resistant to fluoroquinolones in vitro, which was infrequent prior to 2001. The name of this strain reflects its characteristics, demonstrated by different typing methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (NAP1), restriction endonuclease analysis (BI) and polymerase chain reaction (027). In 2004 and 2005, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) emphasized that the risk of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is increased, not only by the usual factors, including antibiotic exposure, but also gastrointestinal surgery/manipulation, prolonged length of stay in a healthcare setting, serious underlying illness, immune-compromising conditions, and aging. Patients on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have an elevated risk, as do peripartum women and heart transplant recipients. Before 2002, toxic megacolon in C. difficile-associated colitis (CDAC), was rare, but its incidence has increased dramatically. Up to two-thirds of hospitalized patients may be infected with C. difficile. Asymptomatic carriers admitted to healthcare facilities can transmit the organism to other susceptible patients, thereby becoming vectors. Fulminant colitis is reported more frequently during outbreaks of C. difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). C. difficile infection with IBD carries a higher mortality than without underlying IBD. This article reviews the latest information on C. difficile infection, including presentation, vulnerable hosts and choice of antibiotics, alternative therapies, and probiotics and immunotherapy. We review contact precautions for patients with known or suspected C. difficile-associated disease. Healthcare institutions require accurate and rapid diagnosis for early detection of possible outbreaks, to initiate

  1. Colonic Immunopathogenesis of Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Turnwald, Bradley P.; Koo, Hoonmo L.; Garey, Kevin W.; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Aitken, Samuel L.; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2014-01-01

    There are major gaps in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs). In this study, 36 different biomarkers were examined in the stools of CDI and non-CDI patients using the Proteome Profiler human cytokine array assay and quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Diarrheal stools from patients with CDI (CDI-positive diarrheal stools) showed higher relative amounts of the following inflammatory markers than the diarrheal stools from CDI-negative patients (CDI-negative diarrheal stools): C5a, CD40L, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, I-309, interleukin-13 (IL-13), IL-16, IL-27, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-8. IL-8 and IL-23 were present in a larger number of CDI-positive diarrheal stools than CDI-negative diarrheal stools. Th1 and Th2 cytokines were not significantly different between the CDI-positive and CDI-negative diarrheal stools. Lactoferrin and calprotectin concentrations were also higher in the CDI-positive diarrheal stools. Our results demonstrate that CDI elicits a proinflammatory host response, and we report for the first time that IL-23 is a major marker in CDI-positive diarrheal stools. IL-23 may explain the lack of a robust immunological response exhibited by a proportion of CDI patients and may relate to recurrence; the IL-23 levels induced during CDI in these patients may be inadequate to sustain the cellular immunity conferred by this cytokine in promoting the induction and proliferation of effector memory T cells. PMID:24477852

  2. Clostridium difficile strains from community-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Limbago, Brandi M; Long, Cherie M; Thompson, Angela D; Killgore, George E; Hannett, George E; Havill, Nancy L; Mickelson, Stephanie; Lathrop, Sarah; Jones, Timothy F; Park, Mahin M; Harriman, Kathleen H; Gould, L Hannah; McDonald, L Clifford; Angulo, Frederick J

    2009-09-01

    Clostridium difficile isolates from presumed community-associated infections (n = 92) were characterized by toxinotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, tcdC and cdtB PCR, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Nine toxinotypes (TOX) and 31 PFGE patterns were identified. TOX 0 (48, 52%), TOX III (18, 20%), and TOX V (9, 10%) were the most common; three isolates were nontoxigenic. PMID:19571021

  3. Clostridium difficile Infection: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Risk Factors, and Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Goudarzi, Hossein; Mehdizadeh Aghdam, Elnaz; Nazeri, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The incidence and mortality rate of Clostridium difficile infection have increased remarkably in both hospital and community settings during the last two decades. The growth of infection may be caused by multiple factors including inappropriate antibiotic usage, poor standards of environmental cleanliness, changes in infection control practices, large outbreaks of C. difficile infection in hospitals, alteration of circulating strains of C. difficile, and spread of hypervirulent strains. Detection of high-risk populations could be helpful for prompt diagnosis and consequent treatment of patients suffering from C. difficile infection. Metronidazole and oral vancomycin are recommended antibiotics for the treatment of initial infection. Current treatments for C. difficile infection consist of supportive care, discontinuing the unnecessary antibiotic, and specific antimicrobial therapy. Moreover, novel approaches include fidaxomicin therapy, monoclonal antibodies, and fecal microbiota transplantation mediated therapy. Fecal microbiota transplantation has shown relevant efficacy to overcome C. difficile infection and reduce its recurrence. PMID:24991448

  4. Models for the study of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Best, Emma L.; Freeman, Jane; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Models of Clostridium difficile infection (C. difficile) have been used extensively for Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) research. The hamster model of C. difficile infection has been most extensively employed for the study of C. difficile and this has been used in many different areas of research, including the induction of C. difficile, the testing of new treatments, population dynamics and characterization of virulence. Investigations using in vitro models for C. difficile introduced the concept of colonization resistance, evaluated the role of antibiotics in C. difficile development, explored population dynamics and have been useful in the evaluation of C. difficile treatments. Experiments using models have major advantages over clinical studies and have been indispensible in furthering C. difficile research. It is important for future study programs to carefully consider the approach to use and therefore be better placed to inform the design and interpretation of clinical studies. PMID:22555466

  5. Community-Acquired Clostridium Difficile Infection: Awareness and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Juneau, Cheryl; Mendias, Elnora (Nonie) P.; Wagal, Nihas; Loeffelholz, Michael; Savidge, Tor; Croisant, Sharon; Dann, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is changing. CDI, usually depicted as a nosocomial infection in the elderly, is now occurring in community-dwelling persons who are younger and otherwise dissimilar. A more virulent isolate (North American Pulsed Field type 1 (NAP1) associated with increased morbidity and mortality, has been identified. In 2005, similar strains were associated with severe disease in community-dwelling patients at a rate of 7.6/100,000. Screening patients with potential CDI symptoms and implementing preventative measures, including judicious use of antibiotics, can reduce disease burden. PMID:23814528

  6. Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, Nancy; Wong, Titus

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is now the leading cause of nosocomial infection. There has been an upsurge of CDI in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD patients with CDI have increased morbidity and mortality. The establishment, proliferation, and recurrence of CDI in IBD patients form a complex interplay of microbial, environmental, and host-susceptibility factors. Different risk factors have been found predisposing IBD patients to CDI. Vancomycin performs better than metronidazole in treating IBD patients with CDI. Fecal microbiota transplantation continues to be a very effective therapy. New therapeutic modalities such as vaccinations and bile salts are currently being investigated. PMID:27137789

  7. Clostridium difficile infection in the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Chandrabali

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming gram-positive bacillus, and the leading cause of antibiotic-associated nosocomial diarrhea and colitis in the industrialized world. With the emergence of a hypervirulent strain of C. difficile (BI/NAP1/027), the epidemiology of C. difficile infection has rapidly changed in the last decade. C. difficile infection, once thought to be an easy to treat bacterial infection, has evolved into an epidemic that is associated with a high rate of mortality, causing disease in patients thought to be low-risk. In this review, we discuss the changing face of C .difficile infection and the novel treatment and prevention strategies needed to halt this ever growing epidemic. PMID:26038491

  8. Two Serious Cases of Infection with Clostridium celatum after 40 Years in Hiding?

    PubMed Central

    Hoegh, Silje Vermedal; Holt, Hanne Marie; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium celatum [ce.la'tum. L. adj. celatum hidden] has been known since 1974, when it was isolated from human feces. In 40 years, no association with human infection has been reported. In this work, we present two serious cases of infection with the anaerobic Gram-positive rod Clostridium celatum. PMID:26560535

  9. Pneumatosis intestinalis in a patient with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Duc; Tsai, Chung-Jyi

    2012-01-01

    A 65-year-old man with long-standing diarrhoea, recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the previous 5 months presented to the gastroenterology clinic with recurrent diarrhoea and abdominal cramping. Physical examination was negative for signs of acute abdomen. Stool C difficile PCR was positive. Abdominal imaging demonstrated an extensive pneumatosis intestinalis involving the small bowel and a dilated small bowel loop. He was treated conservatively with oral vancomycin for recurrent CDI with resolution of diarrhoea and abdominal cramping on 1-month follow-up visit. PMID:23112256

  10. New advances in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI)

    PubMed Central

    Hedge, Dennis D; Strain, Joe D; Heins, Jodi R; Farver, Debra K

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) have increased in frequency throughout the world. In addition to an increase in frequency, recent CDI epidemics have been linked to a hypervirulent C. difficile strain resulting in greater severity of disease. Although most mild to moderate cases of CDI continue to respond to metronidazole or vancomycin, refractory and recurrent cases of CDI may require alternative therapies. This review provides a brief overview of CDI and summarizes studies involving alternative antibiotics, toxin binders, probiotics, and immunological therapies that can be considered for treatment of acute and recurrent CDI in severe and refractory situations. PMID:19209277

  11. [New treatment options for infections with Clostridium difficile].

    PubMed

    van Nood, Els; Keller, Josbert J; Kuijper, Ed J; Speelman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Currently available broad spectrum antibiotics are not sufficiently effective against recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). Donor faecal microbiota transplantation is a very effective treatment for second and recurrent infection but is time-consuming and requires careful screening of donors. The new narrow spectrum antibiotic fidaxomicin is a good alternative in a first CDI or a first recurrence, but treatment is expensive and there are no data on its effectiveness in a second or later recurrence. Fidaxomicin is less effective against infections caused by the Ribotype 027 strain, a virulent strain that is regularly encountered in the Netherlands. The effectiveness of various other promising narrow spectrum antibiotics is currently being investigated. Medications that support the gut flora or the immune system seem to offer new perspectives. Expectations for the currently available probiotic preparations and toxin binders are not high. PMID:24279951

  12. Flooding and Clostridium difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cynthia J; Wade, Timothy J; Hilborn, Elizabeth D

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospitalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community-associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more commonly reported. A case-crossover study was used to assess emergency room (ER) and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection following flood events in Massachusetts from 2003 through 2007. Exposure status was based on whether or not a flood occurred prior to the case/control date during the following risk periods: 0-6 days, 7-13 days, 14-20 days, and 21-27 days. Fixed-effects logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of diagnosis with C. difficile infection following a flood. There were 129 flood events and 1575 diagnoses of C. difficile infection. Among working age adults (19-64 years), ER and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection were elevated during the 7-13 days following a flood (Odds Ratio, OR = 1.69; 95% Confidence Interval, CI: 0.84, 3.37). This association was more substantial among males (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.01-10.19). Associations during other risk periods were not observed (p < 0.05). Although we were unable to differentiate community-associated versus nosocomial infections, a potential increase in C. difficile infections should be considered as more flooding is projected due to climate change. PMID:26090609

  13. Flooding and Clostridium difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cynthia J.; Wade, Timothy J.; Hilborn, Elizabeth D.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospitalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community-associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more commonly reported. A case-crossover study was used to assess emergency room (ER) and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection following flood events in Massachusetts from 2003 through 2007. Exposure status was based on whether or not a flood occurred prior to the case/control date during the following risk periods: 0–6 days, 7–13 days, 14–20 days, and 21–27 days. Fixed-effects logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of diagnosis with C. difficile infection following a flood. There were 129 flood events and 1575 diagnoses of C. difficile infection. Among working age adults (19–64 years), ER and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection were elevated during the 7–13 days following a flood (Odds Ratio, OR = 1.69; 95% Confidence Interval, CI: 0.84, 3.37). This association was more substantial among males (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.01–10.19). Associations during other risk periods were not observed (p < 0.05). Although we were unable to differentiate community-associated versus nosocomial infections, a potential increase in C. difficile infections should be considered as more flooding is projected due to climate change. PMID:26090609

  14. Contributions to the taxonomy and biology of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Bittner, J; Macovei, A; Lemeni, D; Arboreanu, D; Potorac, E

    1992-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was incriminated by Hughes and Jarvis (1987) as a cause of intestinal infections in USA in the 1980-1984 period in 45 p. 100 of cases, whereas Salmonellae only in 12 p. 100. Four strains of this organism are studied in this paper in comparison with ten strains of C. bifermentans and six of C. sordellii, because the three species share a common antigen and have other common characteristics, as well. However, spores of C. difficile swell the bacteria and those of other bacteria (C. bifermentans and C. sordellii) do not; C. difficile does not produce indole, whereas the other species produce it. We confirmed the selective capacity of the medium of George et al. (1979) using the "alcohol shock" and as selective agents cycloserine D and cefoxitin. C. difficile proved to be most susceptible to metronidazole and rifampin. Whereas the former antibiotic was considered as a cause of post-antibiotic intestinal infections by different authors, the second was not, to our knowledge. The strain 10463 has a considerable toxicity (1000 DLM/ml for the white mouse, and pathogenicity--2000--5000 DCL for the white mouse, as compared to 25 DCL of the other three strains). Using this toxin an antitoxic serum was obtained in horse, with a capacity of neutralizing the action of the toxin up to a dilution of 1 p. 1000. PMID:1304829

  15. Treatment of Clostridium difficile infection in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Umbrello, Giulia; Castellazzi, Luca; Principi, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile causes infections that can either remain asymptomatic or manifest as clinical disease. In this report, problems, possible solutions, and future perspectives on the treatment of C. difficile infections (CDIs) in pediatric patients are discussed. CDI, despite increasing as a consequence of the overuse and misuse of antibiotics, remains relatively uncommon in pediatrics mainly because younger children are poorly susceptible to the action of C. difficile toxins. In most such cases, C. difficile disease is mild to moderate and discontinuation of the administered antibiotics in patients receiving these drugs when CDI develops, or administration of metronidazole, is sufficient to solve this problem. In severe or frequently relapsing cases, vancomycin is the drug of choice. Probiotics do not seem to add significant advantages. Other treatment options must be reserved for severe cases and be considered as a salvage treatment, although potential advantages in pediatric patients remain unclear. PMID:25912469

  16. Recurrent Clostridium difficile infections: The importance of the intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Zanella Terrier, Marie Céline; Simonet, Martine Louis; Bichard, Philippe; Frossard, Jean Louis

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are a leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial diarrhea. Despite effective antibiotic treatments, recurrent infections are common. With the recent emergence of hypervirulent isolates of C. difficile, CDI is a growing epidemic with higher rates of recurrence, increasing severity and mortality. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an alternative treatment for recurrent CDI. A better understanding of intestinal microbiota and its role in CDI has opened the door to this promising therapeutic approach. FMT is thought to resolve dysbiosis by restoring gut microbiota diversity thereby breaking the cycle of recurrent CDI. Since the first reported use of FMT for recurrent CDI in 1958, systematic reviews of case series and case report have shown its effectiveness with high resolution rates compared to standard antibiotic treatment. This article focuses on current guidelines for CDI treatment, the role of intestinal microbiota in CDI recurrence and current evidence about FMT efficacy, adverse effects and acceptability. PMID:24966611

  17. Clostridium difficile infection: molecular pathogenesis and novel therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Rineh, Ardeshir; Kelso, Michael J; Vatansever, Fatma; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium Clostridium difficile produces toxins A and B, which can cause a spectrum of diseases from pseudomembranous colitis to C. difficile-associated diarrhea. A limited number of C. difficile strains also produce a binary toxin that exhibits ADP ribosyltransferase activity. Here, the structure and the mechanism of action of these toxins as well as their role in disease are reviewed. Nosocomial C. difficile infection is often contracted in hospital when patients treated with antibiotics suffer a disturbance in normal gut microflora. C. difficile spores can persist on dry, inanimate surface for months. Metronidazole and oral vancomycin are clinically used for treatment of C. difficile infection but clinical failure and concern about promotion of resistance are motivating the search for novel non-antibiotic therapeutics. Methods for controlling both toxins and spores, replacing gut microflora by probiotics or fecal transplant, and killing bacteria in the anaerobic gut by photodynamic therapy are discussed. PMID:24410618

  18. Fidaxomicin in Clostridium difficile infection: latest evidence and clinical guidance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has risen 400% in the last decade. It currently ranks as the third most common nosocomial infection. CDI has now crossed over as a community-acquired infection. The major failing of current therapeutic options for the management of CDI is recurrence of disease after the completion of treatment. Fidaxomicin has been proven to be superior to vancomycin in successful sustained clinical response to therapy. Improved outcomes may be due to reduced collateral damage to the gut microflora by fidaxomicin, bactericidal activity, inhibition of Clostridial toxin formation and inhibition of new sporulation. This superiority is maintained in groups previously reported as being at high risk for CDI recurrence including those: with relapsed infection after a single treatment course; on concomitant antibiotic therapy; aged >65 years; with cancer; and with chronic renal insufficiency. Because the acquisition cost of fidaxomicin far exceeds that of metronidazole or vancomycin, in order to rationally utilize this agent, it should be targeted to those populations who are at high risk for relapse and in whom the drug has demonstrated superiority. In this manuscript is reviewed the changing epidemiology of CDI, current treatment options for this infection, proposed benefits of fidaxomicin over currently available antimicrobial options, available analysis of cost effectiveness of the drug, and is given recommendations for judicious use of the drug based upon the available published literature. PMID:24587892

  19. Clostridium difficile infections among Jordanian adult hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Nasereddin, Lina M; Bakri, Fares G; Shehabi, Asem A

    2009-12-01

    This prospective study investigated the important epidemiologic aspects of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) among Jordanian adult hospitalized patients. A total of 300 stool specimens were investigated using culture and polymerase chain reaction methods for detection of C difficile, its toxins, and fluoroquinolone resistance. C difficile-positive cultures were found in 13.7% of the patients, and 73% of the isolates carried tcdA and/or tcdB toxin genes, and all C difficile isolates were negative for binary toxin. The isolates showed moderate level of resistance to both ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, whereas metronidazole and vancomycin were highly susceptible. This study indicates the need for early detection of CDIs and prevention of its severe disease in hospitalized patients. PMID:19712999

  20. Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection: From colonization to cure.

    PubMed

    Shields, Kelsey; Araujo-Castillo, Roger V; Theethira, Thimmaiah G; Alonso, Carolyn D; Kelly, Ciaran P

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is increasingly prevalent, dangerous and challenging to prevent and manage. Despite intense national and international attention the incidence of primary and of recurrent CDI (PCDI and RCDI, respectively) have risen rapidly throughout the past decade. Of major concern is the increase in cases of RCDI resulting in substantial morbidity, morality and economic burden. RCDI management remains challenging as there is no uniformly effective therapy, no firm consensus on optimal treatment, and reliable data regarding RCDI-specific treatment options is scant. Novel therapeutic strategies are critically needed to rapidly, accurately, and effectively identify and treat patients with, or at-risk for, RCDI. In this review we consider the factors implicated in the epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of RCDI, evaluate current management options for RCDI and explore novel and emerging therapies. PMID:25930686

  1. Prevalence of diverticulosis in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Lipp, Michael J; Pagovich, Odelya E; Rabin, David; Min, Albert D; Bernstein, Brett B

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To re-evaluate the theory that colonic diverticulosis is associated with relapse of Clostridium difficile associated disease (CDAD) in light of data suggesting increasing rates of CDAD infection and relapse. METHODS: Charts were reviewed for patients with recurrent CDAD who had also had a prior colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy. An age and gender matched control group was used to compare the prevalence of diverticulosis. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients met the study criteria, and the prevalence of diverticulosis in patients with CDAD relapse was 23% compared to 32% in age and sex matched controls (P = 0.44). A significant proportion of patients with CDAD relapse had co-morbidities associated with immune suppression. CONCLUSION: Diverticulosis does not appear to be associated with CDAD relapse. PMID:20082480

  2. Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection: From Colonization to Cure

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Kelsey; Araujo-Castillo, Roger V.; Theethira, Thimmaiah G.; Alonso, Carolyn D.; Kelly, Ciaran

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is increasingly prevalent, dangerous and challenging to prevent and manage. Despite intense national and international attention the incidence of primary and of recurrent CDI (PCDI and RCDI, respectively) have risen rapidly throughout the past decade. Of major concern is the increase in cases of RCDI resulting in substantial morbidity, morality and economic burden. RCDI management remains challenging as there is no uniformly effective therapy, no firm consensus on optimal treatment, and reliable data regarding RCDI-specific treatment options is scant. Novel therapeutic strategies are critically needed to rapidly, accurately, and effectively identify and treat patients with, or at-risk for, RCDI. In this review we consider the factors implicated in the epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of RCDI, evaluate current management options for RCDI and explore novel and emerging therapies. PMID:25930686

  3. Clostridium difficile infection: New insights into therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Kachrimanidou, Melina; Sarmourli, Theopisti; Skoura, Lemonia; Metallidis, Symeon; Malisiovas, Nikolaos

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in healthcare settings and represents a major social and economic burden. The major virulence determinants are large clostridial toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), encoded within the pathogenicity locus. Traditional therapies, such as metronidazole and vancomycin, frequently lead to a vicious circle of recurrences due to their action against normal human microbiome. New disease management strategies together with the development of novel therapeutic and containment approaches are needed in order to better control outbreaks and treat patients. This article provides an overview of currently available CDI treatment options and discusses the most promising therapies under development. PMID:25955884

  4. Clostridium difficile infection: management strategies for a difficult disease

    PubMed Central

    Pardi, Darrell S.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was first described as a cause of diarrhea in 1978 and in the last three decades has reached an epidemic state with increasing incidence and severity in both healthcare and community settings. There also has been a rise in severe outcomes from C. difficile infection (CDI). There have been tremendous advancements in the field of CDI with the identification of newer risk factors, recognition of CDI in populations previously thought not at risk and development of better diagnostic modalities. Several treatment options are available for CDI apart from metronidazole and vancomycin, and include new drugs such as fidaxomicin and other options such as fecal microbiota transplantation. This review discusses the epidemiology, risk factors and outcomes from CDI, and focuses primarily on existing and evolving treatment modalities. PMID:24587820

  5. Clostridium Difficile Infection and Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: Is There a Relation?

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Inayat, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Context: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) mimics acute coronary syndrome and is accompanied by reversible left ventricular apical ballooning in the absence of angiographically significant coronary artery stenosis. It is a transient condition that typically precedes physical or emotional triggers. Case Report: We describe the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented to our institution with symptomatic Clostridium difficile infection. 24 hours after admission, the patient complained of severe, retrosternal chest pain. Electrocardiogram showed diffuse elevation of ST-segment in the chest leads; however, coronary angiography demonstrated normal coronary arteries. Therein, an echocardiography was performed, which revealed apical ballooning and hypercontractile base with global left ventricular hypokinesis. These features were consistent with TCM. The patient was managed conservatively. Repeat echocardiogram 2 weeks later showed resolution of heart failure. Conclusion: To our research, this is the first report of TCM caused by C. difficile infection. Clinicians involved in the care of patients with C. difficile infection must be aware of this complication and should consider TCM in those who develop atypical chest pain. PMID:27583241

  6. Immune-based treatment and prevention of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Song; Ghose-Paul, Chandrabali; Zhang, Keshan; Tzipori, Saul; Sun, Xingmin

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) causes over 500,000 infections per year in the US, with an estimated 15,000 deaths and an estimated cost of $1–3 billion. Moreover, a continual rise in the incidence of severe C. difficile infection (CDI) has been observed worldwide. Currently, standard treatment for CDI is the administration of antibiotics. While effective, these treatments do not prevent and may contribute to a disease recurrence rate of 15–35%. Prevention of recurrence is one of the most challenging aspects in the field. A better knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the disease, the host immune response and identification of key virulence factors of C. difficilenow permits the development of immune-based therapies. Antibodies specific for C. difficile toxins have been shown to effectively treat CDI and prevent disease relapse in animal models and in humans. Vaccination has been recognized as the most cost-effective treatment/prevention for CDI. This review will summarize CDI transmission, epidemiology, major virulent factors and highlights the rational and the development of immune-based approaches against this remerging threat. PMID:25668664

  7. Clostridium difficile infection: a review of current and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ofosu, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) is the most common cause of ­healthcare-associated infections in US hospitals. The epidemic strain NAP1/BI/ribotype 027 accounts for outbreaks worldwide, with increasing mortality and severity. CDI is acquired from an endogenous source or from spores in the environment, most easily acquired during the hospital stay. The use of antimicrobials disrupts the intestinal microflora enabling C. difficile to proliferate in the colon and produce toxins. Clinical diagnosis in symptomatic patients requires toxin detection from stool specimens and rarely in combination with stool culture to increase sensitivity. However, stool culture is essential for epidemiological studies. Oral metronidazole is the recommended therapy for milder cases of CDI and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for more severe cases. Treatment of first recurrence involves the use of the same therapy used in the initial CDI. In the event of a second recurrence oral vancomycin often given in a tapered dose or intermittently, or fidaxomicin may be used. Fecal transplantation is playing an immense role in therapy of recurrent CDI with remarkable results. Fulminant colitis and toxic megacolon warrant surgical intervention. Novel approaches including new antibiotics and immunotherapy against CDI or its toxins appear to be of potential value. PMID:27065726

  8. The Systemic Inflammatory Response to Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Krishna; Erb-Downward, John R.; Walk, Seth T.; Micic, Dejan; Falkowski, Nicole; Santhosh, Kavitha; Mogle, Jill A.; Ring, Cathrin; Young, Vincent B.; Huffnagle, Gary B.; Aronoff, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The systemic inflammatory response to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is incompletely defined, particularly for patients with severe disease. Methods Analysis of 315 blood samples from 78 inpatients with CDI (cases), 100 inpatients with diarrhea without CDI (inpatient controls), and 137 asymptomatic outpatient controls without CDI was performed. Serum or plasma was obtained from subjects at the time of CDI testing or shortly thereafter. Severe cases had intensive care unit admission, colectomy, or death due to CDI within 30 days after diagnosis. Thirty different circulating inflammatory mediators were quantified using an antibody-linked bead array. Principal component analysis (PCA), multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), and logistic regression were used for analysis. Results Based on MANOVA, cases had a significantly different inflammatory profile from outpatient controls but not from inpatient controls. In logistic regression, only chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5) levels were associated with cases vs. inpatient controls. Several mediators were associated with cases vs. outpatient controls, especially hepatocyte growth factor, CCL5, and epithelial growth factor (inversely associated). Eight cases were severe and associated with elevations in IL-8, IL-6, and eotaxin. Conclusions A broad systemic inflammatory response occurs during CDI and severe cases appear to differ from non-severe infections. PMID:24643077

  9. Emerging therapies for Clostridium difficile infection – focus on fidaxomicin

    PubMed Central

    Chaparro-Rojas, Fredy; Mullane, Kathleen M

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) has evolved during the last decades, with an increase in the reported incidence, severity of cases, and rate of mortality and relapses. These increases have primarily affected some special populations including the elderly, patients requiring concomitant antibiotic therapy, patients with renal failure, and patients with cancer. Until recently, the treatment of CDI was limited to either metronidazole or vancomycin. New therapeutic options have emerged to address the shortcomings of current antibiotic therapy. Fidaxomicin stands out as the first-in-class oral macrocyclic antibiotic with targeted activity against C. difficile and minimal collateral damage on the normal colonic flora. Fidaxomicin has demonstrated performance not inferior to what is considered the “gold standard” available therapy for CDI, vancomycin, in two separate Phase III clinical trials, but with significant advantages, including fewer recurrences and higher rates of sustained clinical cures. Fidaxomicin constitutes an important development in targeted antibiotic therapy for CDI and must be considered as a first-line agent for patients with risk factors known to portend relapse and severe infection. PMID:23843696

  10. Clostridium difficile infection: epidemiology, diagnosis and understanding transmission.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica S H; Monaghan, Tanya M; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) continues to affect patients in hospitals and communities worldwide. The spectrum of clinical disease ranges from mild diarrhoea to toxic megacolon, colonic perforation and death. However, this bacterium might also be carried asymptomatically in the gut, potentially leading to 'silent' onward transmission. Modern technologies, such as whole-genome sequencing and multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis, are helping to track C. difficile transmission across health-care facilities, countries and continents, offering the potential to illuminate previously under-recognized sources of infection. These typing strategies have also demonstrated heterogeneity in terms of CDI incidence and strain types reflecting different stages of epidemic spread. However, comparison of CDI epidemiology, particularly between countries, is challenging due to wide-ranging approaches to sampling and testing. Diagnostic strategies for C. difficile are complicated both by the wide range of bacterial targets and tests available and the need to differentiate between toxin-producing and non-toxigenic strains. Multistep diagnostic algorithms have been recommended to improve sensitivity and specificity. In this Review, we describe the latest advances in the understanding of C. difficile epidemiology, transmission and diagnosis, and discuss the effect of these developments on the clinical management of CDI. PMID:26956066

  11. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for the Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Krishna; Safdar, Nasia

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, a major cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea due to perturbation of the normal gastrointestinal microbiome, is responsible for significant morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditures. The incidence and severity of C. difficile infection (CDI) is increasing and recurrent disease is common. Recurrent infection can be difficult to manage with conventional antibiotic therapy. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), which involves instillation of stool from a healthy donor into the gastrointestinal tract of the patient, restores the gut microbiome to a healthy state. FMT has emerged as a promising new treatment for CDI. There are limited data on FMT for treatment of primary CDI, but FMT appears safe and effective for recurrent CDI. The safety and efficacy of FMT in patients with severe primary or recurrent CDI has not been established. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who undergo FMT for CDI may be at increased risk of IBD flare and caution should be exercised with use of FMT in that population. The long-term safety of FMT is unknown; thus, rigorously conducted prospective studies are needed. PMID:26344412

  12. Using a Novel Lysin To Help Control Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiong; Euler, Chad W.; Delaune, Aurelia

    2015-01-01

    As a consequence of excessive antibiotic therapies in hospitalized patients, Clostridium difficile, a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming intestinal pathogen, is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea and colitis. Drug treatments for these diseases are often complicated by antibiotic-resistant strains and a high frequency of treatment failures and relapse; therefore, novel nonantibiotic approaches may prove to be more effective. In this study, we recombinantly expressed a prophage lysin identified from a C. difficile strain, CD630, which we named PlyCD. PlyCD was found to have lytic activity against specific C. difficile strains. However, the recombinantly expressed catalytic domain of this protein, PlyCD1–174, displayed significantly greater lytic activity (>4-log kill) and a broader lytic spectrum against C. difficile strains while still retaining a high degree of specificity toward C. difficile versus commensal clostridia and other bacterial species. Our data also indicated that noneffective doses of vancomycin and PlyCD1–174 when combined in vitro could be significantly more bactericidal against C. difficile. In an ex vivo treatment model of mouse colon infection, we found that PlyCD1–174 functioned in the presence of intestinal contents, significantly decreasing colonizing C. difficile compared to controls. Together, these data suggest that PlyCD1–174 has potential as a novel therapeutic for clinical application against C. difficile infection, either alone or in combination with other preexisting treatments to improve their efficacy. PMID:26392484

  13. Effect of a Clostridium difficile Infection Prevention Initiative in Veterans Affairs Acute Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Evans, Martin E; Kralovic, Stephen M; Simbartl, Loretta A; Jain, Rajiv; Roselle, Gary A

    2016-06-01

    Rates of clinically confirmed hospital-onset healthcare facility-associated Clostridium difficile infections from July 1, 2012, through March 31, 2015, in 127 acute care Veterans Affairs facilities were evaluated. Quarterly pooled national standardized infection ratios decreased 15% from baseline by the final quarter of the analysis period (P=.01, linear regression). Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:720-722. PMID:26864803

  14. Procalcitonin Levels Associate with Severity of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Krishna; Walk, Seth T.; Micic, Dejan; Chenoweth, Elizabeth; Deng, Lili; Galecki, Andrzej T.; Jain, Ruchika; Trivedi, Itishree; Yu, Marie; Santhosh, Kavitha; Ring, Cathrin; Young, Vincent B.; Huffnagle, Gary B.; Aronoff, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major cause of morbidity and biomarkers that predict severity of illness are needed. Procalcitonin (PCT), a serum biomarker with specificity for bacterial infections, has been little studied in CDI. We hypothesized that PCT associated with CDI severity. Design Serum PCT levels were measured for 69 cases of CDI. Chart review was performed to evaluate the presence of severity markers and concurrent acute bacterial infection (CABI). We defined the binary variables clinical score as having fever (T >38°C), acute organ dysfunction (AOD), and/or WBC >15,000 cells/mm3 and expanded score, which included the clinical score plus the following: ICU admission, no response to therapy, colectomy, and/or death. Results In univariate analysis log10 PCT associated with clinical score (OR 3.13, 95% CI 1.69–5.81, P<.001) and expanded score (OR 3.33, 95% CI 1.77–6.23, P<.001). In a multivariable model including the covariates log10 PCT, enzyme immunoassay for toxin A/B, ribotype 027, age, weighted Charlson-Deyo comorbidity index, CABI, and extended care facility residence, log10 PCT associated with clinical score (OR 3.09, 95% CI 1.5–6.35, P = .002) and expanded score (OR 3.06, 95% CI 1.49–6.26, P = .002). PCT >0.2 ng/mL was 81% sensitive/73% specific for a positive clinical score and had a negative predictive value of 90%. Conclusion An elevated PCT level associated with the presence of CDI severity markers and CDI was unlikely to be severe with a serum PCT level below 0.2 ng/mL. The extent to which PCT changes during CDI therapy or predicts recurrent CDI remains to be quantified. PMID:23505476

  15. Characteristics of patients with Clostridium difficile infection in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y-C; Huang, Y-T; Lee, T-F; Lee, N-Y; Liao, C-H; Lin, S-Y; Ko, W-C; Hsueh, P-R

    2013-10-01

    The medical records of 84 patients with stool cultures positive for Clostridium difficile during the period August 2007 to June 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. A case of confirmed (toxigenic)C. difficile infection (CDI) was defined by the presence of symptoms (fever, diarrhoea, abdominal discomfort or distension, ileus) and the presence of toxigenic C. difficile. Patients with compatible clinical symptoms and stool cultures positive for non-toxigenic C. difficile isolates were defined as probable (non-toxigenic) CDI cases. Of these 84 patients, 50 (59.5%) were diagnosed as confirmed CDI and 34 (40.5%) as probable CDI. Thirteen (15.5%) of the 84 patients died during their hospital stay. Usage of proton pump inhibitors was a significant independent risk factor for CDI (OR 3.21, P=0.014). Of the 50 isolates associated with confirmed CDI, seven (8.3%) carried binary toxin genes (cdtAB), and six (7.1%) had a deletion in the tcdC gene. The mortality rate in confirmed CDI patients with isolates exhibiting deletion in the tcdC gene (2/6, 33.3%), those with isolates harbouring binary toxin genes (2/7, 28.6%), and those with isolates containing mutations in gyrA (2/7, 28.6%) and gyrB (1/2, 50%) was higher than the overall mortality rate (10/50, 20%) in patients with confirmed CDI. PMID:23218131

  16. Survey of Clostridium difficile infection surveillance systems in Europe, 2011.

    PubMed

    Kola, Axel; Wiuff, Camilla; Akerlund, Thomas; van Benthem, Birgit H; Coignard, Bruno; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Weitzel-Kage, Doris; Suetens, Carl; Wilcox, Mark H; Kuijper, Ed J; Gastmeier, Petra

    2016-07-21

    To develop a European surveillance protocol for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), existing national CDI surveillance systems were assessed in 2011. A web-based electronic form was provided for all national coordinators of the European CDI Surveillance Network (ECDIS-Net). Of 35 national coordinators approached, 33 from 31 European countries replied. Surveillance of CDI was in place in 14 of the 31 countries, comprising 18 different nationwide systems. Three of 14 countries with CDI surveillance used public health notification of cases as the route of reporting, and in another three, reporting was limited to public health notification of cases of severe CDI. The CDI definitions published by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) were widely used, but there were differing definitions to distinguish between community- and healthcare-associated cases. All CDI surveillance systems except one reported annual national CDI rates (calculated as number of cases per patient-days). Only four surveillance systems regularly integrated microbiological data (typing and susceptibility testing results). Surveillance methods varied considerably between countries, which emphasises the need for a harmonised European protocol to allow consistent monitoring of the CDI epidemiology at European level. The results of this survey were used to develop a harmonised EU-wide hospital-based CDI surveillance protocol. PMID:27469420

  17. Clostridium difficile infection in a French university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Khanafer, Nagham; Oltra, Luc; Hulin, Monique; Dauwalder, Olivier; Vandenesch, Francois; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed with an increase in incidence and severity. Prospective surveillance was therefore implemented in a French university hospital to monitor the characteristics of patients at risk and to recognize local trends. Between 2007 and 2014, all hospitalized patients (≥18 years) with CDI were included. During the survey, the mean incidence rate of CDI was 2.9 per 10,000 hospital-days. In all, 590 patients were included. Most of the episodes were healthcare-associated (76.1%). The remaining cases were community-acquired (18.1%) and unknown (5.9%). The comparison with healthcare-associated cases showed that the community-acquired group had a lower rate of antimicrobial exposure (P < 0.001), proton pump inhibitor (P < 0.001), and immunosuppressive drugs (P = 0.02). Over the study period, death occurred in 61 patients (10.3%), with 18 (29.5%) being related to CDI according to the physician in charge of the patient. Active surveillance of CDI is required to obtain an accurate picture of the real dimensions of CDI. PMID:27281101

  18. Fidaxomicin - the new drug for Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Vaishnavi, Chetana

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is one of the many aetiological agents of antibiotic associated diarrhoea and is implicated in 15-25 per cent of the cases. The organism is also involved in the exacearbation of inflammatory bowel disease and extracolonic manifestations. Due to increase in the incidence of C. difficile infection (CDI), emergence of hypervirulent strains, and increased frequency of recurrence, the clinical management of the disease has become important. The management of CDI is based on disease severity, and current antibiotic treatment options are limited to vancomycin or metronidazole in the developing countries. this review article briefly describes important aspects of CDI, and the new drug, fidaxomicin, for its treatment. Fidaxomicin is particularly active against C. difficile and acts by inhibition of RNA synthesis. Clinical trials done to compare the efficacy and safety of fidaxomicin with that of vancomycin in treating CDI concluded that fidaxomicin was non-inferior to vancomycin for treatment of CDI and that there was a significant reduction in recurrences. The bactericidal properties of fidaxomicin make it an ideal alternative for CDI treatment. However, fidaxomicin use should be considered taking into account the potential benefits of the drug, along with the medical requirements of the patient, the risks of treatment and the high cost of fidaxomicin compared to other treatment regimens. PMID:26112840

  19. The potential for emerging therapeutic options for Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Harsh; Rea, Mary C; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is mainly a nosocomial pathogen and is a significant cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. It is also implicated in the majority of cases of pseudomembranous colitis. Recently, advancements in next generation sequencing technology (NGS) have highlighted the extent of damage to the gut microbiota caused by broad-spectrum antibiotics, often resulting in C. difficile infection (CDI). Currently the treatment of choice for CDI involves the use of metronidazole and vancomycin. However, recurrence and relapse of CDI, even after rounds of metronidazole/vancomycin administration is a problem that must be addressed. The efficacy of alternative antibiotics such as fidaxomicin, rifaximin, nitazoxanide, ramoplanin and tigecycline, as well as faecal microbiota transplantation has been assessed and some have yielded positive outcomes against C. difficile. Some bacteriocins have also shown promising effects against C. difficile in recent years. In light of this, the potential for emerging treatment options and efficacy of anti-C. difficile vaccines are discussed in this review. PMID:25564777

  20. Fecal microbiota transplant for Clostridium difficile infection in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Tauxe, William M.; Haydek, John P.; Rebolledo, Paulina A.; Neish, Emma; Newman, Kira L.; Ward, Angela; Dhere, Tanvi; Kraft, Colleen S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to describe the safety of fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) among older adults. Methods: We performed a case review of all FMT recipients aged 65 or older treated at Emory University Hospital, a tertiary care and referral center for Georgia and surrounding states. Results: CDI resolved in 27 (87%) of 31 respondents, including three individuals who received multiple FMTs. Among four whose CDI was not resolved at follow up, three respondents did well initially before CDI recurred, and one individual never eradicated his CDI despite repeating FMT. During the study, five deaths and eight serious adverse events requiring hospitalization were reported within the study group during the follow-up period. Fecal transplant was not a causative factor in these events. The most common adverse event reported in 4 (13%) of 31 respondents was subjective worsening of arthritis. Conclusion: FMT is a generally safe and effective treatment option for older adults with CDI. PMID:27134658

  1. Fecal Transplantation for the Treatment of Recurrent Clostridium Difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Karadsheh, Zeid; Sule, Sachin

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is currently a leading cause of antibiotic and health care-related diarrhea. The incidence and the severity of CDI-related diarrhea have increased dramatically in the USA and Europe in the past few decades. The emergence of multidrug-resistant hypervirulent strains of C. difficile has led to an increase in mortality. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) (also known as fecal bacteriotherapy) has been utilized sporadically since the 1950s; and currently, the interest in using FMT has grown again in the past few years for the treatment of CDI and other chronic gastrointestinal diseases. FMT has shown to be effective, cheap, and has very few side effects. It is believed to manipulate and restore the gut microbiota, and therefore enhances the growth of “healthy” bacteria that break the cycle of recurrent CDI. This article focus on the recent case reports on FMT, and general approach to patients undergoing this therapy. Data were obtained through a literature search via PubMed and Google. PMID:23923106

  2. Ridinilazole: a novel therapy for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Richard J; Tillotson, Glenn; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Garey, Kevin W; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of infectious healthcare-associated diarrhoea. Recurrent CDI increases disease morbidity and mortality, posing a high burden to patients and a growing economic burden to the healthcare system. Thus, there exists a significant unmet and increasing medical need for new therapies for CDI. This review aims to provide a concise summary of CDI in general and a specific update on ridinilazole (formerly SMT19969), a novel antibacterial currently under development for the treatment of CDI. Owing to its highly targeted spectrum of activity and ability to spare the normal gut microbiota, ridinilazole provides significant advantages over metronidazole and vancomycin, the mainstay antibiotics for CDI. Ridinilazole is bactericidal against C. difficile and exhibits a prolonged post-antibiotic effect. Furthermore, treatment with ridinilazole results in decreased toxin production. A phase 1 trial demonstrated that oral ridinilazole is well tolerated and specifically targets clostridia whilst sparing other faecal bacteria. Phase 2 and 3 trials will hopefully further our understanding of the clinical utility of ridinilazole for the treatment of CDI. PMID:27283730

  3. Human Clostridium difficile infection: altered mucus production and composition

    PubMed Central

    Engevik, Melinda A.; Yacyshyn, Mary Beth; Engevik, Kristen A.; Wang, Jiang; Darien, Benjamin; Hassett, Daniel J.; Yacyshyn, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of antibiotic-induced diarrhea is caused by Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). Hospitalizations for C. difficile infection (CDI) have tripled in the last decade, emphasizing the need to better understand how the organism colonizes the intestine and maintain infection. The mucus provides an interface for bacterial-host interactions and changes in intestinal mucus have been linked host health. To assess mucus production and composition in healthy and CDI patients, the main mucins MUC1 and MUC2 and mucus oligosaccharides were examined. Compared with healthy subjects, CDI patients demonstrated decreased MUC2 with no changes in surface MUC1. Although MUC1 did not change at the level of the epithelia, MUC1 was the primary constituent of secreted mucus in CDI patients. CDI mucus also exhibited decreased N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), increased N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), and increased terminal galactose residues. Increased galactose in CDI specimens is of particular interest since terminal galactose sugars are known as C. difficile toxin A receptor in animals. In vitro, C. difficile is capable of metabolizing fucose, mannose, galactose, GlcNAc, and GalNAc for growth under healthy stool conditions (low Na+ concentration, pH 6.0). Injection of C. difficile into human intestinal organoids (HIOs) demonstrated that C. difficile alone is sufficient to reduce MUC2 production but is not capable of altering host mucus oligosaccharide composition. We also demonstrate that C. difficile binds preferentially to mucus extracted from CDI patients compared with healthy subjects. Our results provide insight into a mechanism of C. difficile colonization and may provide novel target(s) for the development of alternative therapeutic agents. PMID:25552581

  4. NAP1 Strain Type Predicts Outcomes from Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    See, Isaac; Mu, Yi; Cohen, Jessica; Beldavs, Zintars G.; Winston, Lisa G.; Dumyati, Ghinwa; Holzbauer, Stacy; Dunn, John; Farley, Monica M.; Lyons, Carol; Johnston, Helen; Phipps, Erin; Perlmutter, Rebecca; Anderson, Lydia; Gerding, Dale N.; Lessa, Fernanda C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies conflict regarding the importance of the fluoroquinolone-resistant North American pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type 1 (NAP1) strain in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) outcome. We describe strain types causing CDI and evaluate their association with patient outcomes. Methods CDI cases were identified from population-based surveillance. Multivariate regression models were used to evaluate the associations of strain type with severe disease (ileus, toxic megacolon, or pseudomembranous colitis within 5 days; or white blood cell count ≥15,000/mm3 within one day of positive test), severe outcome (intensive care unit admission after positive test, colectomy for C. difficile infection, or death within 30 days of positive test), and death within 14 days of positive test. Results Strain typing results were available for 2,057 cases. Severe disease occurred in 363 (17.7%) cases, severe outcome in 100 (4.9%), and death within 14 days in 56 (2.7%). The most common strain types were NAP1 (28.4%), NAP4 (10.2%) and NAP11 (9.1%). In unadjusted analysis, NAP1 was associated with greater odds of severe disease than other strains. After controlling for patient risk factors, healthcare exposure, and antibiotic use, NAP1 was associated with severe disease (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.74, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36–2.22), severe outcome (aOR 1.66, 95% CI, 1.09–2.54), and death within 14 days (aOR 2.12, 95% CI, 1.22–3.68). Conclusion NAP1 was the most prevalent strain and a predictor of severe disease, severe outcome, and death. Strategies to reduce NAP1 prevalence, such as antibiotic stewardship to reduce fluoroquinolone use, might reduce CDI morbidity. PMID:24604900

  5. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Clostridium difficile Infection: The Ochsner Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arnab; Smith, Robert; Breaux, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) accounts for 20%-30% of cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and is the most commonly recognized cause of infectious diarrhea in healthcare settings. The incidence of CDI is rising, while the effectiveness of antibiotics for treatment decreases with recurrent episodes. The use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for cure of CDI has been reported since 1958, and the worldwide cure rate is reported to be 93%. We report our experience with FMT for the treatment of CDI. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of patients undergoing FMT for CDI at Ochsner Clinic Foundation from August 2012 to November 2013. FMT was administered via colonoscopy for patients with recurrent or severe CDI. Stool donors were screened for infections in the majority of cases. Results FMT was performed in 20 CDI patients. The 16 female and 4 male patients ranged in age from 27 to 89 years (mean 62 years). The average duration of illness from diagnosis to treatment was 49.6 weeks, based on available data. Only 3 donors were unscreened for infectious pathogens. Nine donors were related to the recipients by blood; most of the other donors were spouses. The average length of follow-up after FMT was 3 months. No recurrences of CDI after treatment have been documented. Adverse events reported after treatment included abdominal cramping, bloating, flatulence, and nausea that resolved. Conclusion Although the US Food and Drug Administration currently considers FMT an experimental therapy, we demonstrate that FMT is safe, well tolerated, and effective for recurrent and severe CDI. PMID:25598718

  6. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... death in injected mice. (iii) L+ dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard... until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall...

  7. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... death in injected mice. (iii) L+ dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard... until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall...

  8. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... death in injected mice. (iii) L+ dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard... until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall...

  9. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... death in injected mice. (iii) L+ dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard... until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall...

  10. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... death in injected mice. (iii) L+ dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard... until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall...

  11. Clostridium infection (jisizheng) in yaks in Qinghai, China.

    PubMed

    Changqing, Q; Xueli, Y

    2001-10-01

    Since the mid-1980s, outbreaks of a disease characterized by a sudden onset, acute deaths and extensive haemorrhages in the viscera and digestive tract of yaks have been prevalent in Qilian, Qinghai, China. The disease is known as jisiheng by local people. Virulent Clostridium perfringens type A and Clostridium haemolytica were isolated from yaks that had died of jisizheng. In 1996 and 1997, yaks were immunized with a polyvalent inactivated vaccine against C. perfringens and with an inactivated vaccine against C. haemolyticum, and this prevented the occurrence of jisizheng. PMID:11583378

  12. Depression, antidepressant medications, and risk of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An ancillary finding in previous research has suggested that the use of antidepressant medications increases the risk of developing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Our objective was to evaluate whether depression or the use of anti-depressants altered the risk of developing CDI, using two distinct datasets and study designs. Methods In Study 1, we conducted a longitudinal investigation of a nationally representative sample of older Americans (n = 16,781), linking data from biennial interviews to physician and emergency department visits, stays in hospital and skilled nursing facilities, home health visits, and other outpatient visits. In Study 2, we completed a clinical investigation of hospitalized adults who were tested for C. difficile (n = 4047), with cases testing positive and controls testing negative. Antidepressant medication use prior to testing was ascertained. Results The population-based rate of CDI in older Americans was 282.9/100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI)) 226.3 to 339.5) for individuals with depression and 197.1/100,000 person-years for those without depression (95% CI 168.0 to 226.1). The odds of CDI were 36% greater in persons with major depression (95% CI 1.06 to 1.74), 35% greater in individuals with depressive disorders (95% CI 1.05 to 1.73), 54% greater in those who were widowed (95% CI 1.21 to 1.95), and 25% lower in adults who did not live alone (95% CI 0.62 to 0.92). Self-reports of feeling sad or having emotional, nervous or psychiatric problems at baseline were also associated with the later development of CDI. Use of certain antidepressant medications during hospitalization was associated with altered risk of CDI. Conclusions Adults with depression and who take specific anti-depressants seem to be more likely to develop CDI. Older adults who are widowed or who live alone are also at greater risk of CDI. PMID:23647647

  13. Outcome of ICU patients with Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction As data from Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in intensive care unit (ICU) are still scarce, our objectives were to assess the morbidity and mortality of ICU-acquired CDI. Methods We compared patients with ICU-acquired CDI (watery or unformed stools occurring ≥ 72 hours after ICU admission with a stool sample positive for C. difficile toxin A or B) with two groups of controls hospitalized at the same time in the same unit. The first control group comprised patients with ICU-acquired diarrhea occurring ≥ 72 hours after ICU admission with a stool sample negative for C. difficile and for toxin A or B. The second group comprised patients without any diarrhea. Results Among 5,260 patients, 512 patients developed one episode of diarrhea. Among them, 69 (13.5%) had a CDI; 10 (14.5%) of them were community-acquired, contrasting with 12 (17.4%) that were hospital-acquired and 47 (68%) that were ICU-acquired. A pseudomembranous colitis was associated in 24/47 (51%) ICU patients. The median delay between diagnosis and metronidazole administration was one day (25th Quartile; 75th Quartile (0; 2) days). The case-fatality rate for patients with ICU-acquired CDI was 10/47 (21.5%), as compared to 112/443 (25.3%) for patients with negative tests. Neither the crude mortality (cause specific hazard ratio; CSHR = 0.70, 95% confidence interval; CI 0.36 to 1.35, P = 0.3) nor the adjusted mortality to confounding variables (CSHR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.4 to 1.64, P = 0.6) were significantly different between CDI patients and diarrheic patients without CDI. Compared to the general ICU population, neither the crude mortality (SHR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.34 to 1.21, P = 0.17), nor the mortality adjusted to confounding variables (CSHR = 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38 to 1.35, P = 0.3), were significantly different between the two groups. The estimated increase in the duration of stay due to CDI was 8.0 days ± 9.3 days, (P = 0.4) in comparison to the diarrheic population

  14. Considering the antimicrobial sensitivity of the intestinal botulism agent Clostridium butyricum when treating concomitant infections.

    PubMed

    Fenicia, Lucia; Ferrini, Anna Maria; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Mannoni, Veruscka; Aureli, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    In Italy, neurotoxigenic Clostridium butyricum has been reported as a new agent of intestinal toxemia botulism, and most of the cases have been associated with enterocolitis. Although infections concomitant with botulism must be treated with antibiotics, this can increase the severity of botulism. We discuss the sensitivity of this agent to certain antibiotics, compared to findings on the sensitivity of C. botulinum. PMID:14758873

  15. State law mandates for reporting of healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infections in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Julie; Herzig, Carolyn T A; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Dick, Andrew W; Stone, Patricia W; Divya Srinath, Jd

    2015-03-01

    US state and territorial laws were reviewed to identify Clostridium difficile infection reporting mandates. Twenty states require reporting either under state law or by incorporating federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' reporting requirements. Although state law mandates are more common, the incorporation of federal reporting requirements has been increasing. PMID:25695178

  16. Overdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection in the Molecular Test Era

    PubMed Central

    Polage, Christopher R.; Gyorke, Clare E.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Leslie, Jhansi L.; Chin, David L.; Wang, Susan; Nguyen, Hien H.; Huang, Bin; Tang, Yi-Wei; Lee, Lenora W.; Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra; Romano, Patrick S.; Panacek, Edward A.; Goodell, Parker B.; Solnick, Jay V.; Cohen, Stuart H.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Clostridium difficile is a major cause of health care–associated infection, but disagreement between diagnostic tests is an ongoing barrier to clinical decision making and public health reporting. Molecular tests are increasingly used to diagnose C difficile infection (CDI), but many molecular test-positive patients lack toxins that historically defined disease, making it unclear if they need treatment. OBJECTIVE To determine the natural history and need for treatment of patients who are toxin immunoassay negative and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive (Tox−/PCR+) for CDI. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective observational cohort study at a single academic medical center among 1416 hospitalized adults tested for C difficile toxins 72 hours or longer after admission between December 1, 2010, and October 20, 2012. The analysis was conducted in stages with revisions from April 27, 2013, to January 13, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Patients undergoing C difficile testing were grouped by US Food and Drug Administration–approved toxin and PCR tests as Tox+/PCR+, Tox−/PCR+, or Tox−/PCR−. Toxin results were reported clinically. Polymerase chain reaction results were not reported. The main study outcomes were duration of diarrhea during up to 14 days of treatment, rate of CDI-related complications (ie, colectomy, megacolon, or intensive care unit care) and CDI-related death within 30 days. RESULTS Twenty-one percent (293 of 1416) of hospitalized adults tested for C difficile were positive by PCR, but 44.7% (131 of 293) had toxins detected by the clinical toxin test. At baseline, Tox−/PCR+ patients had lower C difficile bacterial load and less antibiotic exposure, fecal inflammation, and diarrhea than Tox+/PCR+ patients (P < .001 for all). The median duration of diarrhea was shorter in Tox−/PCR+ patients (2 days; interquartile range, 1-4 days) than in Tox+/PCR+ patients (3 days; interquartile range, 1-6 days) (P = .003) and was

  17. A Review of Management of Clostridium difficile Infection: Primary and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Yasmeen; Manji, Arif; Gregory-Miller, Kathleen; Lee, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a potentially fatal illness, especially in the elderly and hospitalized individuals. The recurrence and rates of CDI are increasing. In addition, some cases of CDI are refractory to the currently available antibiotics. The search for improved modalities for the management of primary and recurrent CDI is underway. This review discusses the current antibiotics, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) and other options such as immunotherapy and administration of non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile (CD) for the management of both primary and recurrent CDI. PMID:27025632

  18. Complications of Hospital-Onset Healthcare Facility-Associated Clostridium difficile Infections Among Veterans.

    PubMed

    Evans, Martin E; Kralovic, Stephen M; Simbartl, Loretta A; Whitlock, Judith L; Jain, Rajiv; Roselle, Gary A

    2016-06-01

    Complications within 30 days of a clinically confirmed hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection diagnosis from July 1, 2012, through June 30, 2015, in 127 acute care Veterans Health Administration facilities were evaluated. Pooled rates for attributable intensive care unit admissions, colectomies, and deaths were 2.7%, 0.5%, and 0.4%, respectively. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:717-719. PMID:26880482

  19. [Recent epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in Japan].

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a major pathogen for diarrhea in hospitalized patients and because of outbreak of highly virulent strain in EU and US, increased length of hospital stay and increased numbers of severe patients and deaths have become major challenges. In recent years, transmissions through community-acquired or food-borne infections are reported. National surveillance has been already performed overseas. Guidelines for preventing C. difficile infection (CDI) is available, and education activities are promoted for preventing the infection spread. Meanwhile, in Japan, medical hospitals are reporting individual CDI incidence, however, a large-scale research has not been conducted up to the present date and therefore the entire status of CDI including infection of the highly virulent strain has yet to be revealed. This time, we performed a questionnaire-based survey at 2,537 hospitals nationwide between April 15, 2013 and May 31, 2013 to investigate CDI incidence, diagnosis and treatment. Valid responses were obtained from 321 hospitals. Regarding the annual number of CDI patients at all the hospitals, the highest group of hospitals responding "1 to 5 patients a year" was 17.8%, and the second highest group of hospitals responding "no patients a year" was 13.1%. In contrast, there was a group of hospitals with "more than 101 patients a year", which was 3.1%. This indicates that there was the difference in the CDI incidences among hospitals. According to the questionnaire results, a highest group of hospitals responding "0-20%" for CDI patients with serious complication such as toxic megacolon, gastrointestinal perforation, ileus paralytic, bacteremia, sepsis, crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis was 62.6%, and for CDI patients with recurrence more than one, a group of hospitals answering "0 to 20%" was 56.4%, which was the highest. This suggested that there was only a small number of serious CDI patients and recurrence CDI patients in Japan

  20. Antibiotic therapy and Clostridium difficile infection - primum non nocere - first do no harm.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Grace S; Wilcox, Mark H

    2015-01-01

    Treatment options for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remain limited despite this usually nosocomial infection posing an urgent threat to public health. A major paradox of the management of CDI is the use of antimicrobial agents to treat infection, which runs the risk of prolonged gut microbiota perturbation and so recurrence of infection. Here, we explore alternative CDI treatment and prevention options currently available or in development. Notably, strategies that aim to reduce the negative effects of antibiotics on gut microbiota offer the potential to alter current antimicrobial stewardship approaches to preventing CDI. PMID:26396535

  1. Controversies Surrounding Clostridium difficile Infection in Infants and Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Maribeth R.; Thomsen, Isaac P.; Edwards, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a frequent cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in adults and older children. However, as many as 80% of infants can be asymptomatically colonized. The reasons for this have not been well established but are believed to be due to differences in toxin receptors or toxin internalization. Determining which children who test positive for C. difficile warrant treatment is exceedingly difficult, especially in the setting of increased rates of detection and the rising risk of disease in children lacking classic risk factors for C. difficile.

  2. Probiotics and Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea and Clostridium difficile Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surawicz, Christina M.

    Diarrhea is a common side effect of antibiotics. Antibiotics can cause diarrhea in 5-25% of individuals who take them but its occurrence is unpredictable. Diarrhea due to antibiotics is called antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Diarrhea may be mild and resolve when antibiotics are discontinued, or it may be more severe. The most severe form of AAD is caused by overgrowth of Clostridium difficile which can cause severe diarrhea, colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, or even fatal toxic megacolon. Rates of diarrhea vary with the specific antibiotic as well as with the individual susceptibility.

  3. Risk Factors and Outcomes for Bloodstream Infections Secondary to Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Alessandro; Iraci, Federica; Carfagna, Paolo; Goldoni, Paola; Vullo, Vincenzo; Venditti, Mario

    2015-01-01

    We determined the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of bloodstream infections (BSI) subsequent to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We performed a retrospective study of all patients with definite diagnosis of CDI admitted from January 2014 to December 2014 in two large hospitals in Rome. Two groups of patients were analyzed: those with CDI and subsequent BSI (CDI/BSI+) and those with CDI and no evidence of primary BSI (CDI/BSI−). Data about clinical features, microbiology, treatments, and mortality were obtained. Overall, 393 cases of CDI were included in the final analysis: 72 developed a primary nosocomial BSI, while 321 had CDI without microbiological and clinical evidence of BSI. Etiologic agents of BSI were Candida species (47.3%), Enterobacteriaceae (19.4%), enterococci (13.9%), and mixed infections (19.4%). In multivariate analysis, ribotype 027 status (odds ratio [OR], 6.5), CDI recurrence (OR, 5.5), severe CDI infection (OR, 8.3), and oral vancomycin at >500 mg/day (OR, 3.1) were recognized as factors independently associated with the development of nosocomial BSI. Thirty-day mortality from CDI diagnosis was higher for patients of the CDI/BSI+ group than for the controls (38.9 versus 13.1%; P < 0.001). Among patients of the CDI/BSI+ group, mortality attributable to primary BSI was as high as 57%. Our findings suggest that severe CDI is complicated by the development of nosocomial BSI. Candida species and enteric bacteria appear to be the leading causative pathogens and are associated with poor outcomes. PMID:26482315

  4. Faecal microbiota transplantation for severe Clostridium difficile infection in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Trubiano, Jason A; Gardiner, Bradley; Kwong, Jason C; Ward, Peter; Testro, Adam G; Charles, Patrick G P

    2013-02-01

    We describe a case of faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) used for severe binary toxin-positive Clostridium difficile infection in an intensive care setting. The patient was admitted to the ICU of a tertiary hospital and failed traditional maximal pharmacological management. Adjunctive therapy with FMT given through gastroscopy resulted in resolution of the C. difficile-related symptoms. Although there is a growing experience with FMT for recurrent C. difficile infection, published evidence in severe disease is very limited. In a landscape of increasingly severe C. difficile infection, adjunctive FMT may be considered a useful early treatment option. PMID:23117471

  5. Coxofemoral luxation in a border collie as a complication of a Clostridium tetani infection.

    PubMed

    Goldhammer, M A; Chapman, P S; Grierson, J M

    2008-03-01

    A four-month-old male, entire, border collie was presented to the Queen Mother Hospital for Animals with a two day history of muscular spasms and "Risus sardonicus". Tetanus was diagnosed, and the dog was treated with tetanus antitoxin, antibiotics and supportive therapy. Coxofemoral luxation resulted as a complication of the tetanus and was successfully managed by performing a femoral head and neck excision. This is the first report of joint luxation associated with Clostridium tetani infection in a dog. PMID:18005106

  6. Administration of probiotic kefir to mice with Clostridium difficile infection exacerbates disease.

    PubMed

    Spinler, Jennifer K; Brown, Aaron; Ross, Caná L; Boonma, Prapaporn; Conner, Margaret E; Savidge, Tor C

    2016-08-01

    Lifeway(®) kefir, a fermented milk product containing 12 probiotic organisms, is reported to show promise as an alternative to fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We employed a murine CDI model to study the probiotic protective mechanisms and unexpectedly determined that kefir drastically increased disease severity. Our results emphasize the need for further independent clinical testing of kefir as alternative therapy in recurrent CDI. PMID:27180007

  7. Evaluation of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Lalande, Valérie; Barrault, Laurence; Wadel, Sophie; Eckert, Catherine; Petit, Jean-Claude; Barbut, Frédéric

    2011-07-01

    A new assay (illumigene C. difficile; Meridian Bioscience), based on the original loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, was evaluated with 472 unformed stools from patients suspected of Clostridium difficile infection. Compared to the toxigenic culture, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 91.8, 99.1, 91.8, and 99.1% for the illumigene C. difficile assay and 69.4, 100, 100, and 96.6% for the cytotoxicity assay, respectively. PMID:21525213

  8. Clostridium glycolicum Wound Infections: Case Reports and Review of the Literature▿

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Abrar, Sahibzada; Romagnoli, Mark; Carroll, Karen C.

    2009-01-01

    We describe two cases of Clostridium glycolicum wound infections in immunocompetent adults. The bacterium was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This is the third published report of the recovery of this organism from human clinical material and highlights the importance of the organism as a potential human pathogen. Our report extends the spectrum of the diseases caused by C. glycolicum. PMID:19261780

  9. WSES guidelines for management of Clostridium difficile infection in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Sartelli, Massimo; Malangoni, Mark A; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Griffiths, Ewen A; Di Bella, Stefano; McFarland, Lynne V; Eltringham, Ian; Shelat, Vishal G; Velmahos, George C; Kelly, Ciarán P; Khanna, Sahil; Abdelsattar, Zaid M; Alrahmani, Layan; Ansaloni, Luca; Augustin, Goran; Bala, Miklosh; Barbut, Frédéric; Ben-Ishay, Offir; Bhangu, Aneel; Biffl, Walter L; Brecher, Stephen M; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Caínzos, Miguel A; Canterbury, Laura A; Catena, Fausto; Chan, Shirley; Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill R; Clanton, Jesse; Coccolini, Federico; Cocuz, Maria Elena; Coimbra, Raul; Cook, Charles H; Cui, Yunfeng; Czepiel, Jacek; Das, Koray; Demetrashvili, Zaza; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Di Saverio, Salomone; Dumitru, Irina Magdalena; Eckert, Catherine; Eckmann, Christian; Eiland, Edward H; Enani, Mushira Abdulaziz; Faro, Mario; Ferrada, Paula; Forrester, Joseph Derek; Fraga, Gustavo P; Frossard, Jean Louis; Galeiras, Rita; Ghnnam, Wagih; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Gorrepati, Venkata; Ahmed, Mohamed Hassan; Herzog, Torsten; Humphrey, Felicia; Kim, Jae Il; Isik, Arda; Ivatury, Rao; Lee, Yeong Yeh; Juang, Paul; Furuya-Kanamori, Luis; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Kim, Peter K; Kluger, Yoram; Ko, Wen Chien; LaBarbera, Francis D; Lee, Jae Gil; Leppaniemi, Ari; Lohsiriwat, Varut; Marwah, Sanjay; Mazuski, John E; Metan, Gokhan; Moore, Ernest E; Moore, Frederick Alan; Nord, Carl Erik; Ordoñez, Carlos A; Júnior, Gerson Alves Pereira; Petrosillo, Nicola; Portela, Francisco; Puri, Basant K; Ray, Arnab; Raza, Mansoor; Rems, Miran; Sakakushev, Boris E; Sganga, Gabriele; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Stewart, David B; Tattevin, Pierre; Timsit, Jean Francois; To, Kathleen B; Tranà, Cristian; Uhl, Waldemar; Urbánek, Libor; van Goor, Harry; Vassallo, Angela; Zahar, Jean Ralph; Caproli, Emanuele; Viale, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades there have been dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), with increases in incidence and severity of disease in many countries worldwide. The incidence of CDI has also increased in surgical patients. Optimization of management of C difficile, has therefore become increasingly urgent. An international multidisciplinary panel of experts prepared evidenced-based World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) guidelines for management of CDI in surgical patients. PMID:26300956

  10. Clostridium welchii and Bacillus cereus infection and intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Betty C.

    1974-01-01

    Clostridium welchii type A is a common agent of food poisoning when allowed to proliferate to large numbers in cooked foods, usually meat and poultry. The main factors of importance are survival of the spores, frequently found on raw products, through the cooking process, and possible contamination of cooked meats transferred to unclean containers; subsequent germination of spores and rapid multiplication of the vegetative cells during long slow cooling and non-refrigerated storage lead to heavy contamination. The toxin responsible is different from the soluble antigens, and its formation in the intestine is associated with sporulation. Large numbers of Cl. welchii of the same serological types in food and faeces is the main diagnostic factor. Important preventive measures are rapid cooling and cold storage to prevent growth. Bacillus cereus is an aerobic sporulating organism commonly found in cereals. Outbreaks described from Europe have a different aetiology with regard to food vehicles, incubation period and symptoms from those that have been reported recently in the U.K. from fried and boiled rice. The spores survive through cooking procedures and grow out to cells which sporulate readily in the cooked food and which are assumed to produce toxin in the food. Large numbers of B. cereus are found in foods causing illness and, as with Cl. welchii, the main preventive measure is inhibition of growth by quick cooling and cold storage of foods cooked ahead of requirements. A comparative table of the characteristics and clinical symptoms of Cl. welchii and B. cereus is given. PMID:4377580

  11. Diagnosis of Clostridium perfringens intestinal infections in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Uzal, Francisco A; Songer, J Glenn

    2008-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens produces enteric diseases, generically called enterotoxemias, in sheep, goats, and other animals. This microorganism can be a normal inhabitant of the intestine of most animal species, including humans, but when the intestinal environment is altered by sudden changes in diet or other factors, C. perfringens proliferates and produces potent toxins that act locally or are absorbed into the general circulation with usually devastating effects on the host. History, clinical signs, and gross postmortem findings are useful tools for establishing a presumptive diagnosis of clostridial enterotoxemia in sheep and goats. Definitive diagnosis requires laboratory confirmation. Isolation of some types of C. perfringens (e.g., B and C) can be of diagnostic value, but other types (e.g., A) are so commonly found in the intestine of normal animals that isolation is meaningless from a diagnostic point of view. The most accepted criterion in establishing a definitive diagnosis of enterotoxemia is detection of C. perfringens toxins in intestinal contents. Also, histopathological examination of brain is very useful for diagnosis of type D disease, as lesions produced by epsilon toxin in the brains of sheep and goats are pathognomonic for type D enterotoxemia. Ancillary tests, such as measuring urine glucose or observing Gram-stained smears of intestinal mucosa, can be used. However, although such tests have a presumptive diagnostic value when positive, they cannot be used to rule out a diagnosis of enterotoxemia when negative. PMID:18460610

  12. Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Clostridium Difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Meera B.; Avila, Nathaniel P.; Dupont, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has become the most frequently reported health care-associated infection in the United States [1]. As the incidence of CDI rises, so too does the burden it produces on health care and society. In an attempt to decrease the burden of CDI and provide the best outcomes for patients affected by CDI, there have been many recent advancements in the understanding, diagnosis, and management of CDI. In this article, we review the current recommendations regarding CDI testing and treatment strategies. PMID:26918176

  13. Clostridium difficile infection: Early history, diagnosis and molecular strain typing methods.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, C; Van Broeck, J; Taminiau, B; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2016-08-01

    Recognised as the leading cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains high despite efforts to improve prevention and reduce the spread of the bacterium in healthcare settings. In the last decade, many studies have focused on the epidemiology and rapid diagnosis of CDI. In addition, different typing methods have been developed for epidemiological studies. This review explores the history of C. difficile and the current scope of the infection. The variety of available laboratory tests for CDI diagnosis and strain typing methods are also examined. PMID:27238460

  14. Implementation of a Clinical Decision Support Alert for the Management of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Revolinski, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are common in hospitalized patients and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. It is imperative to optimize the management of C. difficile infections to help minimize disease complications. Antimicrobial stewardship techniques including guidelines, order sets and other clinical decision support functionalities may be utilized to assist with therapy optimization. We implemented a novel alert within our electronic medical record to direct providers to the C. difficile order set in order to assist with initiating therapy consistent with institutional guideline recommendations. The alert succeeded in significantly increasing order set utilization, but guideline compliance was unchanged. PMID:27025646

  15. Fecal Transplantation using a Nasoenteric Tube during an Initial Episode of Severe Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Namki; Kim, Jung Ho; Park, Se Hee; Kim, Sung Bae; Song, In Ji; Ann, Hea Won; Ahn, Jin Young; Kim, Sun Bean; Ku, Nam Su; Lee, Kyungwon; Yong, Dongeun; Kim, June Myung

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection is increasing worldwide, and its severity and resulting mortality are also on the rise. Metronidazole and oral vancomycin remain the treatments of choice, but there are concerns about treatment failure and the appearance of resistant strains. Furthermore, antibiotic therapy results in recurrence rates of at least 20%. Fecal transplantation may be a feasible treatment option for recurrent C. difficile infection; moreover, it may be an early treatment option for severe C. difficile infection. We report a case of severe C. difficile infection treated with fecal transplantation using a nasoenteric tube during an initial episode. This is the first reported case of fecal transplantation using a nasoenteric tube during an initial episode of C. difficile infection in Korea. PMID:27104013

  16. [Treatment of a severe Clostridium difficile infection with colonic lavages. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Quezada, Felipe; Castillo, Richard; Villalón, Constanza; Zúñiga, José Miguel; Manterola, Carla; Molina, María Elena; Bellolio, Felipe; Urrejola, Gonzalo

    2015-05-01

    A loop ileostomy with intraoperative anterograde colonic lavage has been described as an alternative to colectomy in the management of cases of Clostridium difficile infection refractory to medical treatment. We report a 69 years old diabetic women admitted with a septic shock. An abdominal CAT scan showed a pan-colitis that seemed to be infectious. A polymerase chain reaction was positive for Clostridium Difficile. Due to the failure to improve after full medical treatment, a derivative loop ileostomy and intra-operatory colonic lavage were performed, leaving a Foley catheter in the proximal colon. In the postoperative period, anterograde colonic instillations of Vancomycin flushes through the catheter were performed every 6 hours. Forty eight hours after surgery, the patient improved. A colonoscopy prior to discharge showed resolution of the pseudomembranous colitis. PMID:26203580

  17. BACTERIOCIN E1073 PRODUCED BY ENTEROCOCCUS FAECIUM LWP1073 IS EFFECTIVE FOR TREATING COMMENSAL CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS INFECTION IN BROILERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterotoxin-producing Clostridium perfringens type A bacteria occupy a significant place in the etiological structure of food-borne infections in humans. One potential approach to minimize infections associated with food-borne pathogens is to control the carriage of C. perfringens in broilers. For ...

  18. Efficacy of Oral Vancomycin in Preventing Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients Treated With Systemic Antimicrobial Agents.

    PubMed

    Van Hise, Nicholas W; Bryant, Alex M; Hennessey, Erin K; Crannage, Andrew J; Khoury, Jad A; Manian, Farrin A

    2016-09-01

    We compared rates of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in patients receiving or not receiving oral vancomycin prophylaxis with systemic antimicrobial therapy. The incidence of C. difficile infection was significantly lower in patients receiving prophylaxis (4.2% vs 26.6% in those without prophylaxis; odds ratio, 0.12; 95% confidence interval, .04-.4; P < .001). PMID:27318333

  19. Role of obesity and adipose tissue-derived cytokine leptin during Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Madan, Rajat; Petri, William A

    2015-08-01

    Obesity is among the most pressing health concerns in the world since it is increasingly common even in the developing world, and is clearly associated with increased risk for chronic debilitating diseases and death. Furthermore, obesity can influence the pathogenesis of infectious diseases by affecting the balance of pathogen clearance and pathological inflammation. The mechanisms that result in enhanced inflammation in obese individuals are poorly understood. Clostridium difficile is a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Recent studies have shown that obesity is associated with increased risk of C. difficile infections. In this review, we will discuss our current knowledge of the role of obesity in determining risk of C. difficile infections, and focus on the role of the adipose tissue-derived cytokine leptin in C. difficile infections. PMID:25638400

  20. Role of obesity and adipose tissue-derived cytokine leptin during Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Rajat; Petri, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is among the most pressing health concerns in the world since it is increasingly common even in the developing world, and is clearly associated with increased risk for chronic debilitating diseases and death. Furthermore, obesity can influence the pathogenesis of infectious diseases by affecting the balance of pathogen clearance and pathological inflammation. The mechanisms that result in enhanced inflammation in obese individuals are poorly understood. Clostridium difficile is a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Recent studies have shown that obesity is associated with increased risk of C. difficile infections. In this review, we will discuss our current knowledge of the role of obesity in determining risk of C. difficile infections, and focus on the role of the adipose tissue-derived cytokine leptin in C. difficile infections. PMID:25638400

  1. Ultrasensitive Detection and Quantification of Toxins for Optimized Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recently developed ultrasensitive and quantitative methods for detection of Clostridium difficile toxins provide new tools for diagnosis and, potentially, for management of C. difficile infection (CDI). Compared to methods that detect toxigenic organism, ultrasensitive toxin detection may allow diagnosis of CDI with increased clinical specificity, without sacrificing clinical sensitivity; measurement of toxin levels may also provide information relevant to disease prognosis. This minireview provides an overview of these new toxin detection technologies and considers what these new tools might add to the field. PMID:26659205

  2. Evolution of Testing Algorithms at a University Hospital for Detection of Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Culbreath, Karissa; Ager, Edward; Nemeyer, Ronald J.; Kerr, Alan

    2012-01-01

    We present the evolution of testing algorithms at our institution in which the C. Diff Quik Chek Complete immunochromatographic cartridge assay determines the presence of both glutamate dehydrogenase and Clostridium difficile toxins A and B as a primary screen for C. difficile infection and indeterminate results (glutamate dehydrogenase positive, toxin A and B negative) are confirmed by the GeneXpert C. difficile PCR assay. This two-step algorithm is a cost-effective method for highly sensitive detection of toxigenic C. difficile. PMID:22718938

  3. Microbiome manipulation with faecal microbiome transplantation as a therapeutic strategy in Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Marchesi, J.R.; Thursz, M.R.; Williams, H.R.T.

    2015-01-01

    Faecal microbiome transplantation (FMT) has generated huge recent interest as it presents a potential solution to a significant clinical problem—the increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). In the short term, however, there remain many practical questions regarding its use, including the optimal selection of donors, material preparation and the mechanics of delivery. In the longer term, enhanced understanding of the mechanisms of action of FMT may potentiate novel therapies, such as targeted manipulation of the microbiome in CDI and beyond. PMID:25193538

  4. An In Vitro Model of the Human Colon: Studies of Intestinal Biofilms and Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Grace S; Wilcox, Mark H; Chilton, Caroline H

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro gut model is an invaluable research tool to study indigenous gut microbiota communities, the behavior of pathogenic organisms, and the therapeutic and adverse effect of antimicrobial administration on these communities. The model has been validated against the intestinal contents of sudden death victims to reflect the physicochemical and microbiological conditions of the proximal to distal colon, and has been extensively used to investigate the interplay between gut microbiota populations, antibiotic exposure, and Clostridium difficile infection. More recently the gut model has been adapted to additionally model intestinal biofilm. Here we describe the structure, assembly, and application of the biofilm gut model. PMID:27507345

  5. Clostridium Perfringens Infection in a Febrile Patient with Severe Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hashiba, Masamitsu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Tomonori; Kano, Hideki; Tsuda, Masanobu; Takeyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 82 Final Diagnosis: Clostridium perfringens infection Symptoms: Anemia • fever • shock Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Antimicrobial chemotherapy Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) can cause various infections, including gas gangrene, crepitant cellulitis, and fasciitis. While C. perfringens sepsis is uncommon, it is often rapidly fatal because the alpha toxin of this bacterium induces massive intravascular hemolysis by disrupting red blood cell membranes. Case Report: We present the case of a male patient with diabetes who developed a fatal liver abscess with massive intravascular hemolysis and septic shock caused by toxigenic C. perfringens. The peripheral blood smear showed loss of central pallor, with numerous spherocytes. Multiplex PCR only detected expression of the cpa gene, indicating that the pathogen was C. perfringens type A. Conclusions: C. perfringens infection should be considered in a febrile patient who has severe hemolytic anemia with a very low MCV, hemolyzed blood sample, and negative Coombs test. The characteristic peripheral blood smear findings may facilitate rapid diagnosis. PMID:27049736

  6. Community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection: an increasing public health threat

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arjun; Khanna, Sahil

    2014-01-01

    There has been a startling shift in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection over the last decade worldwide, and it is now increasingly recognized as a cause of diarrhea in the community. Classically considered a hospital-acquired infection, it has now emerged in populations previously considered to be low-risk and lacking the traditional risk factors for C. difficile infection, such as increased age, hospitalization, and antibiotic exposure. Recent studies have demonstrated great genetic diversity for C. difficile, pointing toward diverse sources and a fluid genome. Environmental sources like food, water, and animals may play an important role in these infections, apart from the role symptomatic patients and asymptomatic carriers play in spore dispersal. Prospective strain typing using highly discriminatory techniques is a possible way to explore the suspected diverse sources of C. difficile infection in the community. Patients with community-acquired C. difficile infection do not necessarily have a good outcome and clinicians should be aware of factors that predict worse outcomes in order to prevent them. This article summarizes the emerging epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes for community-acquired C. difficile infection. PMID:24669194

  7. Rifaximin therapy for metronidazole-unresponsive Clostridium difficile infection: a prospective pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Patrick Basu, P.; Dinani, Amreen; Rayapudi, Krishna; Pacana, Tommy; Shah, Niraj James; Hampole, Hemant; Krishnaswamy, N. V.; Mohan, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a recent epidemic in the United States, particularly in the hospital setting. Oral metronidazole is standard therapy for C. difficile infection, but resistance to metronidazole is becoming a clinical challenge. Methods: We evaluated the efficacy of the nonsystemic oral antibiotic rifaximin for the treatment of metronidazole-resistant C. difficile infection. Twenty-five patients with C. difficile infection were enrolled in the study. All had mild-to-moderate C. difficile infection (5–10 bowel movements a day without sepsis) unresponsive to metronidazole (i.e. stools positive for toxins A and B after oral metronidazole 500 mg three times daily [t.i.d.] for 5 days). After discontinuation of metronidazole, rifaximin 400 mg t.i.d. for 14 days was prescribed. Patients were followed for 56 days and stool was tested for C. difficile using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess the effect of treatment. A negative PCR test result was interpreted as a favorable response to rifaximin. Results: Sixteen of 22 patients (73%) were eligible for study inclusion and completed rifaximin therapy experienced eradication of infection (stool negative for C. difficile) immediately after rifaximin therapy and 56 days post-treatment. Three patients (12%) discontinued therapy because of abdominal distention. Rifaximin was generally well tolerated. Conclusions: In conclusion, rifaximin may be considered for treatment of mild-to-moderate C. difficile infection that is resistant to metronidazole. Larger randomized trials are needed to confirm these positive findings. PMID:21180604

  8. Therapeutic Success of Rifaximin for Clostridium difficile Infection Refractory to Metronidazole and Vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, George; Neff, Guy; Kemmer, Nyingi

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 46-year-old white male with confirmed Clostridium difficile infection for >4 weeks after fluoroquinolone therapy. The patient received two courses of metronidazole 500 mg three times daily (t.i.d.) during which time diarrhea resolved; however, symptoms recurred 14–15 days after treatment termination. He received a 2-week course of vancomycin 125 mg four times daily, with symptoms recurring 10 days after treatment conclusion. The patient then received a pulsed tapering schedule of vancomycin with adjunctive Saccharomyces boulardii. Diarrhea recurred 12 days after treatment completion. He received rifaximin 400 mg t.i.d. while hospitalized for diarrhea-associated complications. Symptoms resolved within 24 h. The patient received a 4-week regimen of rifaximin 400 mg orally t.i.d. after discharge. No further episodes of diarrhea were reported within 6 months after treatment termination. The present case supports the potential benefit of rifaximin for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. PMID:21060709

  9. Disruption of the Gut Microbiome: Clostridium difficile Infection and the Threat of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Johanesen, Priscilla A.; Mackin, Kate E.; Hutton, Melanie L.; Awad, Milena M.; Larcombe, Sarah; Amy, Jacob M.; Lyras, Dena

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is well recognized as the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, having a significant impact in both health-care and community settings. Central to predisposition to C. difficile infection is disruption of the gut microbiome by antibiotics. Being a Gram-positive anaerobe, C. difficile is intrinsically resistant to a number of antibiotics. Mobile elements encoding antibiotic resistance determinants have also been characterized in this pathogen. While resistance to antibiotics currently used to treat C. difficile infection has not yet been detected, it may be only a matter of time before this occurs, as has been seen with other bacterial pathogens. This review will discuss C. difficile disease pathogenesis, the impact of antibiotic use on inducing disease susceptibility, and the role of antibiotic resistance and mobile elements in C. difficile epidemiology. PMID:26703737

  10. [Ulcerous colitis and infection with cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus and clostridium difficile].

    PubMed

    Arnold, C; von Sanden, S; Theilacker, C; Blum, H E

    2008-08-01

    The treatment of severe flares of ulcerative colitis is based on systemic corticosteroids, immunomodulators such as cyclosporine and azathioprine and in some cases TNF-alpha-antagonists, respectively. These immunosuppressed patients are susceptible for infectious pathogens. Here we report the case of a patient with a severe flare of ulcerative colitis that was first treated with systemic corticosteroids combined with immunomodulators and subsequent with infliximab. The patient then experienced an infection with Clostridium difficile and cytomegalovirus of the colon and a Herpes simplex esophagitis, respectively. After specific treatment the patient responded well to the immunosuppressive therapy. This case illustrates that infections have to be considered before systemic treatment of an acute flare of ulcerative colitis is instituted especially in the case of disease activation during immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:18759202

  11. Clinical and Laboratory Characteristics of Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Discordant Diagnostic Test Results

    PubMed Central

    Kaltsas, Anna; Simon, Matt; Unruh, Larissa H.; Son, Crystal; Wroblewski, Danielle; Musser, Kimberlee A.; Sepkowitz, Kent; Kamboj, Mini

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and laboratory characteristics of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients with discordant test results for the cytotoxin assay (CYT) and PCR assays. A retrospective study from May to August 2008 and March to May 2010 was performed. CDI was diagnosed in 128 patients. PCR increased the yield of C. difficile cases by 2-fold compared to that of the CYT assay. Fifty-six cases (44%) were detected by PCR only (CYT negative). Forty-nine percent of patients with non-NAP1 strains were detected by PCR only, compared to 28% of those infected with NAP1 strains (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found in the clinical severity of illness and outcome among patients that tested positive for CDI by both tests (CYT and PCR) compared to those that tested positive by PCR only. PMID:22238444

  12. Clinical update for the diagnosis and treatment of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    IV, Edward C Oldfield; III, Edward C Oldfield; Johnson, David A

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) presents a rapidly evolving challenge in the battle against hospital-acquired infections. Recent advances in CDI diagnosis and management include rapid changes in diagnostic approach with the introduction of newer tests, such as detection of glutamate dehydrogenase in stool and polymerase chain reaction to detect the gene for toxin production, which will soon revolutionize the diagnostic approach to CDI. New medications and multiple medical society guidelines have introduced changing concepts in the definitions of severity of CDI and the choice of therapeutic agents, while rapid expansion of data on the efficacy of fecal microbiota transplantation heralds a revolutionary change in the management of patients suffering multiple relapses of CDI. Through a comprehensive review of current medical literature, this article aims to offer an intensive review of the current state of CDI diagnosis, discuss the strengths and limitations of available laboratory tests, compare both current and future treatments options and offer recommendations for best practice strategies. PMID:24729930

  13. An update on antibody-based immunotherapies for Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Hussack, Greg; Tanha, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile continues to be one of the most prevalent hospital-acquired bacterial infections in the developed world, despite the recent introduction of a novel and effective antibiotic agent (fidaxomicin). Alternative approaches under investigation to combat the anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria include fecal transplantation therapy, vaccines, and antibody-based immunotherapies. In this review, we catalog the recent advances in antibody-based approaches under development and in the clinic for the treatment of C. difficile infection. By and large, inhibitory antibodies that recognize the primary C. difficile virulence factors, toxin A and toxin B, are the most popular passive immunotherapies under investigation. We provide a detailed summary of the toxin epitopes recognized by various antitoxin antibodies and discuss general trends on toxin inhibition efficacy. In addition, antibodies to other C. difficile targets, such as surface-layer proteins, binary toxin, motility factors, and adherence and colonization factors, are introduced in this review. PMID:27536153

  14. Antimicrobial Use, Human Gut Microbiota and Clostridium difficile Colonization and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Caroline; Manges, Amee R.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Broad-spectrum antimicrobials have profound detrimental effects on the structure and diversity of the indigenous intestinal microbiota. These alterations often impair colonization resistance, allowing the establishment and proliferation of C. difficile in the gut. Studies involving animal models have begun to decipher the precise mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota mediates colonization resistance against C. difficile and numerous investigations have described gut microbiota alterations associated with C. difficile colonization or infection in human subjects. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective approach for the treatment of recurrent CDI that allows the restoration of a healthy intestinal ecosystem via infusion of fecal material from a healthy donor. The recovery of the intestinal microbiota after FMT has been examined in a few reports and work is being done to develop custom bacterial community preparations that could be used as a replacement for fecal material. PMID:27025623

  15. Bacteriotherapy for the treatment of intestinal dysbiosis caused by Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Adamu, Blessing O; Lawley, Trevor D

    2013-10-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been used for more than five decades to treat a variety of intestinal diseases associated with pathological imbalances within the resident microbiota, termed dysbiosis. FMT has been particularly effective for treating patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection who are left with few clinical options other than continued antibiotic therapy. Our increasing knowledge of the structure and function of the human intestinal microbiota and C. difficile pathogenesis has led to the understanding that FMT promotes intestinal ecological restoration and highlights the microbiota as a viable therapeutic target. However, the use of undefined faecal samples creates a barrier for widespread clinical use because of safety and aesthetic issues. An emerging concept of bacteriotherapy, the therapeutic use of a defined mixture of harmless, health-associated bacteria, holds promise for the treatment of patients with severe C. difficile infection, and possibly represents a paradigm shift for the treatment of diseases linked to intestinal dysbiosis. PMID:23866975

  16. Epidemiology and factors associated with candidaemia following Clostridium difficile infection in adults within metropolitan Atlanta, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Vallabhaneni, S; Almendares, O; Farley, M M; Reno, J; Smith, Z T; Stein, B; Magill, S S; Smith, R M; Cleveland, A A; Lessa, F C

    2016-05-01

    We assessed prevalence of and risk factors for candidaemia following Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) using longitudinal population-based surveillance. Of 13 615 adults with CDI, 113 (0·8%) developed candidaemia in the 120 days following CDI. In a matched case-control analysis, severe CDI and CDI treatment with vancomycin + metronidazole were associated with development of candidaemia following CDI. PMID:26608090

  17. Clostridium difficile ribotype 033 colitis in a patient following broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment for KPCproducing Klebsiella pneumoniae infection, Italy.

    PubMed

    Grandesso, Stefano; Arena, Fabio; Eseme, Franklin Esoka; Panese, Sandro; Henrici De Angelis, Lucia; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2016-09-01

    This report describes a case of Clostridium difficile ribotype 033 colitis in a patient treated with multiple antibiotics for KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae pancreatitis. Diagnostic, clinical and therapeutic features are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of C. difficile ribotype 033 clinical infection reported from Italy. PMID:27602425

  18. Hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection among solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, J P; Wang, H E; Locke, J E; Mannon, R B; Safford, M M; Baddley, J W

    2015-11-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a considerable health issue in the United States and represents the most common healthcare-associated infection. Solid organ transplant recipients are at increased risk of CDI, which can affect both graft and patient survival. However, little is known about the impact of CDI on health services utilization posttransplantation. We examined hospital-onset CDI from 2012 to 2014 among transplant recipients in the University HealthSystem Consortium, which includes academic medical center-affiliated hospitals in the United States. Infection was five times more common among transplant recipients than among general medicine inpatients (209 vs 40 per 10 000 discharges), and factors associated with CDI among transplant recipients included transplant type, risk of mortality, comorbidities, and inpatient complications. Institutional risk-standardized CDI varied more than 3-fold across high-volume hospitals (infection ratio 0.54-1.82, median 1.04, interquartile range 0.78-1.28). CDI was associated with increased 30-day readmission, transplant organ complications, cytomegalovirus infection, inpatient costs, and lengths of stay. Total observed inpatient days and direct costs for those with CDI were substantially higher than risk-standardized expected values (40 094 vs 22 843 days, costs $198 728 368 vs $154 020 528). Further efforts to detect, prevent, and manage CDI among solid organ transplant recipients are warranted. PMID:26484839

  19. Discovery of LFF571: An Investigational Agent for Clostridium difficile Infection

    SciTech Connect

    LaMarche, Matthew J.; Leeds, Jennifer A.; Amaral, Adam; Brewer, Jason T.; Bushell, Simon M.; Deng, Gejing; Dewhurst, Janetta M.; Ding, Jian; Dzink-Fox, JoAnne; Gamber, Gabriel; Jain, Akash; Lee, Kwangho; Lee, Lac; Lister, Troy; McKenney, David; Mullin, Steve; Osborne, Colin; Palestrant, Deborah; Patane, Michael A.; Rann, Elin M.; Sachdeva, Meena; Shao, Jian; Tiamfook, Stacey; Trzasko, Anna; Whitehead, Lewis; Yifru, Aregahegn; Yu, Donghui; Yan, Wanlin; Zhu, Qingming

    2012-11-09

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a Gram positive, anaerobic bacterium that infects the lumen of the large intestine and produces toxins. This results in a range of syndromes from mild diarrhea to severe toxic megacolon and death. Alarmingly, the prevalence and severity of C. difficile infection are increasing; thus, associated morbidity and mortality rates are rising. 4-Aminothiazolyl analogues of the antibiotic natural product GE2270 A (1) were designed, synthesized, and optimized for the treatment of C. difficile infection. The medicinal chemistry effort focused on enhancing aqueous solubility relative to that of the natural product and previous development candidates (2, 3) and improving antibacterial activity. Structure-activity relationships, cocrystallographic interactions, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy in animal models of infection were characterized. These studies identified a series of dicarboxylic acid derivatives, which enhanced solubility/efficacy profile by several orders of magnitude compared to previously studied compounds and led to the selection of LFF571 (4) as an investigational new drug for treating C. difficile infection.

  20. Clostridium Difficile Infection Worsen Outcome of Hospitalized Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Lin, Qian-Yun; Fei, Jia-Xi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Min-Yi; Jiang, Shuang-Hong; Wang, Pu; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased rapidly over the past several decades in North America and Europe. However, the exact global epidemiology remains unclear because of insufficient data from developing countries. A total of 646 hospitalized adult IBD patients were enrolled; and their fresh stool specimens were obtained and used for Clostridium difficile detection. The incidence of CDI in Crohn's disease (CD) patients (12.7%) was significantly lower than that in Ulcerative disease (UC) patients (19.3%). Among the toxin types, A(+)B(+) strain was the most common. Length of stay, hospitalization frequency and bowel surgery rate were significantly higher in the CDI than in the non-CDI group in CD or UC patients. More patients in CDI-CD group were still in active and even clinical moderate or severe CD stage than non-CDI-CD group after 2 years of following-up. Fistula, antibiotics and infliximab usage likely increased the CDI rate in CD patients, Infliximab treatment was considered a risk factor in UC patients. CDI is an exacerbating public health issue that may influence IBD course, increase expenditures, and delay the remission of IBD patients. IBD patients with CDI require urgent attention. PMID:27417996

  1. Recent epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Teena; Chandrasekar, Pranatharthi; Salimnia, Hossein; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Smith, Daryn; Alangaden, George J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the limited information on Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), we examined the recent epidemiology of CDI in HSCT recipients at our institution. During the two-yr retrospective study period (2005–2006), 361 transplants were performed: 60% allogeneic and 40% autologous. Among all hospitalized patients in a non-outbreak setting, CDI rates in HSCT recipients were ninefold higher than those in general patients and 1.4-fold higher than those in patients with cancer (24.0 vs. 2.6 vs. 16.8/10 000 patient-days respectively). Sixty-two episodes of CDI occurred in 51 (14%) HSCT recipients: 39 (18%) allogeneic vs. 12 (8%) autologous (p = 0.01). Almost half of CDI episodes occurred within 30 d post-HSCT and 22% before HSCT. Clostridium difficile toxin assay was initially positive in 28% of the first, 31% of the second and 27% of the third stool samples tested. All but one patient responded to therapy with metronidazole or vancomycin. Severe CDI occurred in one patient and recurrent CDI in two patients. CDI is common during HSCT especially in allogeneic transplants during the peri-HSCT period. Prospective studies to better define the epidemiology and identify unique risk factors for CDI and more accurate tests to confirm the diagnosis in this population are needed. PMID:20973823

  2. Clostridium Difficile Infection Worsen Outcome of Hospitalized Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Lin, Qian-Yun; Fei, Jia-Xi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Min-Yi; Jiang, Shuang-Hong; Wang, Pu; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased rapidly over the past several decades in North America and Europe. However, the exact global epidemiology remains unclear because of insufficient data from developing countries. A total of 646 hospitalized adult IBD patients were enrolled; and their fresh stool specimens were obtained and used for Clostridium difficile detection. The incidence of CDI in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients (12.7%) was significantly lower than that in Ulcerative disease (UC) patients (19.3%). Among the toxin types, A+B+ strain was the most common. Length of stay, hospitalization frequency and bowel surgery rate were significantly higher in the CDI than in the non-CDI group in CD or UC patients. More patients in CDI-CD group were still in active and even clinical moderate or severe CD stage than non-CDI-CD group after 2 years of following-up. Fistula, antibiotics and infliximab usage likely increased the CDI rate in CD patients, Infliximab treatment was considered a risk factor in UC patients. CDI is an exacerbating public health issue that may influence IBD course, increase expenditures, and delay the remission of IBD patients. IBD patients with CDI require urgent attention. PMID:27417996

  3. Clostridium difficile infection in Chilean patients submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pilcante, Javier; Rojas, Patricio; Ernst, Daniel; Sarmiento, Mauricio; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Bertin, Pablo; García, Maria; Rodriguez, Maria; Jara, Veronica; Ajenjo, Maria; Ramirez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have an increased risk of Clostridium difficile infection and multiple risk factors have been identified. Published reports have indicated an incidence from 9% to 30% of transplant patients however to date there is no information about infection in these patients in Chile. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of patients who developed C. difficile infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantations from 2000 to 2013. Statistical analysis used the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Results Two hundred and fifty patients were studied (mean age: 39 years; range: 17–69), with 147 (59%) receiving allogeneic transplants and 103 (41%) receiving autologous transplants. One hundred and ninety-two (77%) patients had diarrhea, with 25 (10%) cases of C. difficile infection being confirmed. Twenty infected patients had undergone allogeneic transplants, of which ten had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, three had acute myeloid leukemia and seven had other diseases (myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, severe aplastic anemia). In the autologous transplant group, five patients had C. difficile infection; two had multiple myeloma, one had amyloidosis, one had acute myeloid leukemia and one had germinal carcinoma. The overall incidence of C. difficile infection was 4% within the first week, 6.4% in the first month and 10% in one year, with no difference in overall survival between infected and non-infected groups (72.0% vs. 67.6%, respectively; p-value = 0.56). Patients infected after allogeneic transplants had a slower time to neutrophil engraftment compared to non-infected patients (17.5 vs. 14.9 days, respectively; p-value = 0.008). In the autologous transplant group there was no significant difference in the neutrophil engraftment time between infected and non-infected patients (12.5 days vs. 11.8 days, respectively; p-value = 0.71). In the allogeneic

  4. Uterine Perforation with Intra-Abdominal Clostridium perfringens Gas Gangrene: A Rare and Fatal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kashan, David; Muthu, Nagarajan; Davalos, Fidencio; Bernstein, Michael; Chendrasekhar, Akella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Clostridium perfringens gas gangrene is an extremely rare and fatal infection. Necrosis of the myometrium is rarely seen and has only been recorded in 18 cases to date. Of these 18 reported cases, only 5 have occurred in nonpregnant women. This article presents the 6th case of myometrium necrosis from C. perfringens. Case: A 72-year-old woman, gravida 2, para 2, presented with abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. After examinations, laboratory testing, and several surgical interventions, she was found to have C. perfringens infection and advanced high-grade serous adenocarcinoma of the endometrium with >50% invasion into the myometrium. Results: Despite the surgical interventions and use of several antibiotics, this patient did not improve. She was weaned from treatment per her advance directive and died after weaning. Conclusions: Awareness of the many etiologies for peritonitis is of great importance when a fatal infection may be the cause of the condition. Correct diagnosis and proper treatment is essential for the survival of patients infected with C. perfringens. (J GYNECOL SURG 32:182) PMID:27274183

  5. The Ecology and Pathobiology of Clostridium difficile Infections: An Interdisciplinary Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dubberke, Erik R.; Haslam, David B.; Lanzas, Cristina; Bobo, Linda D.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Gröhn, Yrjö T.; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Clostridium difficile is a well recognized pathogen of humans and animals. Although C. difficile was first identified over 70 years ago, much remains unknown in regards to the primary source of human acquisition and its pathobiology. These deficits in our knowledge have been intensified by dramatic increases in both the frequency and severity of disease in humans over the last decade. The changes in C. difficile epidemiology might be due to the emergence of a hypervirulent stain of C. difficile, aging of the population, altered risk of developing infection with newer medications, and/or increased exposure to C. difficile outside of hospitals. In recent years there have been numerous reports documenting C. difficile contamination of various foods, and reports of similarities between strains that infect animals and strains that infect humans as well. The purposes of this review are to highlight the many challenges to diagnosing, treating, and preventing C. difficile infection in humans, and to stress that collaboration between human and veterinary researchers is needed to control this pathogen. PMID:21223531

  6. [Life-threatening infections with a new strain of Clostridium difficile].

    PubMed

    Krausz, S; Bessems, M; Boermeester, M A; Kuijper, E J; Visser, C E; Speelman, P

    2005-09-17

    Three men, aged 39, 73, and 66 years, respectively, developed an infection with a new strain ofClostridium difficile, ribotype 027.C.difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD) occurred in two patients after multiple abdominal surgery and in the third patient one week after autologous haematopoietic cell transplantation. Within a few days, despite antibiotic therapy, all three patients developed severe (pseudomembranous) colitis with sepsis for which admission to the Intensive Care Unit was required. Two patients underwent (sub)total colectomy and received an intensive course of oral and/or rectal vancomycin. In all patients who develop diarrhoea in hospital, especially during or after treatment with antibiotics or chemotherapeutic agents, an infection with C. difficile ribotype 027 should be suspected. Recent outbreaks of this hypervirulent strain of C. difficile have been reported in Canada, the United States, United Kingdom, and The Netherlands. Demonstration of C. difficile toxin in faeces confirms the clinical suspicion of CDAD and ribotyping of the strain may reveal whether the 027 strain is present. For treatment of these 027 infections, vancomycin is preferred to metronidazole. After a severe course of colitis or in case of recurrence a 'tapering and pulse' course ofvancomycin can be prescribed; alternatively, treatment with bovine antibody-enriched whey may be considered. The introduction of this hypervirulent strain has led to reinforcement of the hygienic measures in accordance with the recommendations of the Dutch Working Party on Infection Prevention and a policy to deter the use of fluoroquinolones. PMID:16201595

  7. Microbiota-Regulated IL-25 Increases Eosinophil Number to Provide Protection during Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, Erica L; Cowardin, Carrie A; Wilson, Madeline G; Saleh, Mahmoud M; Pramoonjago, Patcharin; Petri, William A

    2016-07-12

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of hospital-acquired infection in the United States. Host susceptibility and the severity of infection are influenced by disruption of the microbiota and the immune response. However, how the microbiota regulate immune responses to mediate CDI outcome remains unclear. Here, we have investigated the role of the microbiota-linked cytokine IL-25 during infection. Intestinal IL-25 was suppressed during CDI in humans and mice. Restoration of IL-25 reduced CDI-associated mortality and tissue pathology even though equivalent levels of C. difficile bacteria and toxin remained in the gut. IL-25 protection was mediated by gut eosinophils, as demonstrated by an increase in intestinal eosinophils and a loss of IL-25 protection upon eosinophil depletion. These findings support a mechanism whereby the induction of IL-25-mediated eosinophilia can reduce host mortality during active CDI. This work may provide targets for future development of microbial or immune-based therapies. PMID:27346351

  8. The challenge of Clostridium difficile infection: Overview of clinical manifestations, diagnostic tools and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Postma, Nynke; Kiers, Dorien; Pickkers, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The most important infectious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and colitis is Clostridium difficile, which is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming, toxin-producing bacillus. In this overview we will discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients presenting with suspected or proven C. difficile infection (CDI). The clinical spectrum varies from asymptomatic C. difficile carriers to fulminant colitis with multi-organ failure. The onset of symptoms is usually within 2 weeks after initiation of antibiotic treatment. Diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical symptoms and either a positive stool test for C. difficile toxins or endoscopic or histological findings of pseudomembranous colitis. There is no indication for treatment of asymptomatic carriers, but patients with proven CDI should be treated. Treatment consists of cessation of the provoking antibiotic treatment, secondary prevention by infection control strategies, and treatment with metronidazole or vancomycin. Treatment of recurring CDI, severe infection, the need for surgery, and novel alternative potential treatment strategies will be discussed. The concurrent increase in multiresistant colonisation and increasing numbers of asymptomatic carriers of C. difficile will lead to an increase of the situation in which patients with severe infections, treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics, will develop concurrent severe CDI. We will discuss possible therapy strategies for these patients. PMID:26612229

  9. Gut solutions to a gut problem: bacteriocins, probiotics and bacteriophage for control of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Rea, Mary C; Alemayehu, Debebe; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients and imposes a considerable financial burden on health service providers in both Europe and the USA. The incidence of CDI has dramatically increased in recent years, partly due to the emergence of a number of hypervirulent strains. The most commonly documented risk factors associated with CDIs are antibiotic usage leading to alterations of the gut microbiota, age >65 years and long-term hospital stay. Since standard therapies for antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and CDI have limited efficacy, there is now an urgent need for alternative therapeutics. In this review, we outline the current state of play with regard to the potential of gut-derived bacteriocins, probiotics and phage to act as antimicrobial agents against CDI in the human gut. PMID:23699066

  10. Efficacy of a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Marukawa, Yohei; Komura, Takuya; Kagaya, Takashi; Ohta, Hajime; Unoura, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    In July 2012, metronidazole was approved for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). To clarify the selection criteria for the drug in terms of CDI severity, we established a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm with reference to the SHEA-IDSA Clinical Practice Guidelines. We compared patients whose treatments were guided by the algorithm (29 cases, October 2012-September 2013) with patients treated prior to the development of the algorithm (37 cases, October 2011-September 2012). All cases treated with reference to the algorithm were diagnosed using enzyme immunoassay of C. difficile toxins A and B and glutamate dehydrogenase;an appropriate drug was prescribed in 93.1% of the cases. We found no significant between-group differences in the cure, recurrence, or complication rates. However, drug costs in cases wherein treatments were guided by the algorithm were markedly reduced. We have, thus, shown that algorithm-guided treatment is efficacious and cost-effective. PMID:27498935

  11. Peri-transplant clostridium difficile infections in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Agha, Aya; Sehgal, Alison; Lim, Matthew J; Weber, David; Hou, Jing-Zhou; Farah, Rafic; Raptis, Anastasios; Im, Annie; Dorritie, Kathleen; Marks, Stanley; Agha, Mounzer; Lim, Seah H

    2016-03-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) remain the leading cause of infectious diarrhea among hospitalized patients in this country. Patients with hematologic malignancies, especially those who undergo hematopoietic progenitor cell transplants are particularly at risk for developing CDI. One hundred and forty seven consecutive allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplants were analyzed for peri-transplant Clostridium difficile infections (PT-CDI). Sixteen patients (11%) developed PT-CDI (Median time = 7 days after transplant). The probability for developing PT-CDI during the peri-transplant period was 12.3%. History of CDI was strongly associated with the development of PT-CDI (P = 0.008) (OR = 5.48) (P = 0.017). These patients also developed PT-CDI much earlier than in those without a history (median 1 day vs. 8 days, P = 0.03). The probability for developing PT-CDI for those with a history was 39%. There was a trend toward significance (P = 0.065) between matched related donor grafts and the development of PT-CDI (OR = 0.245) (P = 0.08). Age, sex, diagnosis, transplant preparative regimens, Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, grade 3/4 acute GVHD, or use of antimicrobials within 8 weeks of transplant were not associated with PT-CDI. Non-CDI-related deaths occurred in one patient in the PT-CDI group and nine in the group without PT-CDI. In the remaining 139 patients, the length of hospital stay for those with PT-CDI was significantly longer than those without (mean 27 days vs. 22 days; P = 0.02). PMID:26661725

  12. Older Is Not Wiser, Immunologically Speaking: Effect of Aging on Host Response to Clostridium difficile Infections.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Hyun; High, Kevin P; Warren, Cirle A

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and a significant burden on the health care system. Aging has been identified in the literature as a risk factor for CDI as well as adverse outcome from CDI. Although this effect of advanced age on CDI could be partially explained by clinical factors associated with aging, biologic factors are important. Innate immune system, responsible for immediate response to acute infections, plays a major role in CDI pathogenesis. Impairment in function of innate immunity with aging, demonstrated in other infection models, may lead to worse outcome with CDI. C. difficile toxin-specific antibody response protects the host against initial and recurrent infections as shown in observational studies and clinical trial. Effect of aging on antibody response to CDI has not been demonstrated, but the results from vaccine studies in other infections suggest a negative effect on humoral immunity from aging. Although intestinal microbiota from healthy people confers resistance to CDI by preventing C. difficile colonization, changes in composition of microbiota with aging may affect that resistance and increase risk for CDI. There are also age-associated changes in physiology, especially of the gastrointestinal tract, that may play a role in CDI risk and outcomes. In this review, we will first discuss the epidemiology of CDI in the elderly people, then the alteration in innate immunity, humoral response, and microbiota that increases susceptibility to CDI and severe disease and lastly, the physiological and functional changes that may modify outcomes of infection. PMID:26809495

  13. Genome-Based Infection Tracking Reveals Dynamics of Clostridium difficile Transmission and Disease Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nitin; Miyajima, Fabio; He, Miao; Roberts, Paul; Swale, Andrew; Ellison, Louise; Pickard, Derek; Smith, Godfrey; Molyneux, Rebecca; Dougan, Gordon; Parkhill, Julian; Wren, Brendan W.; Parry, Christopher M.; Pirmohamed, Munir; Lawley, Trevor D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Accurate tracking of Clostridium difficile transmission within healthcare settings is key to its containment but is hindered by the lack of discriminatory power of standard genotyping methods. We describe a whole-genome phylogenetic-based method to track the transmission of individual clones in infected hospital patients from the epidemic C. difficile 027/ST1 lineage, and to distinguish between the 2 causes of recurrent disease, relapse (same strain), or reinfection (different strain). Methods. We monitored patients with C. difficile infection in a UK hospital over a 2-year period. We performed whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 108 strains isolated from symptomatic patients. High-resolution phylogeny was integrated with in-hospital transfers and contact data to create an infection network linking individual patients and specific hospital wards. Results. Epidemic C. difficile 027/ST1 caused the majority of infections during our sampling period. Integration of whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) phylogenetic analysis, which accurately discriminated between 27 distinct SNP genotypes, with patient movement and contact data identified 32 plausible transmission events, including ward-based contamination (66%) or direct donor–recipient contact (34%). Highly contagious donors were identified who contributed to the persistence of clones within distinct hospital wards and the spread of clones between wards, especially in areas of intense turnover. Recurrent cases were identified between 4 and 26 weeks, highlighting the limitation of the standard <8-week cutoff used for patient diagnosis and management. Conclusions. Genome-based infection tracking to monitor the persistence and spread of C. difficile within healthcare facilities could inform infection control and patient management. PMID:26683317

  14. Systems Modeling of Interactions between Mucosal Immunity and the Gut Microbiome during Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leber, Andrew; Viladomiu, Monica; Hontecillas, Raquel; Abedi, Vida; Philipson, Casandra; Hoops, Stefan; Howard, Brad; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are associated with the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and result in an exuberant inflammatory response, leading to nosocomial diarrhea, colitis and even death. To better understand the dynamics of mucosal immunity during C. difficile infection from initiation through expansion to resolution, we built a computational model of the mucosal immune response to the bacterium. The model was calibrated using data from a mouse model of C. difficile infection. The model demonstrates a crucial role of T helper 17 (Th17) effector responses in the colonic lamina propria and luminal commensal bacteria populations in the clearance of C. difficile and colonic pathology, whereas regulatory T (Treg) cells responses are associated with the recovery phase. In addition, the production of anti-microbial peptides by inflamed epithelial cells and activated neutrophils in response to C. difficile infection inhibit the re-growth of beneficial commensal bacterial species. Computational simulations suggest that the removal of neutrophil and epithelial cell derived anti-microbial inhibitions, separately and together, on commensal bacterial regrowth promote recovery and minimize colonic inflammatory pathology. Simulation results predict a decrease in colonic inflammatory markers, such as neutrophilic influx and Th17 cells in the colonic lamina propria, and length of infection with accelerated commensal bacteria re-growth through altered anti-microbial inhibition. Computational modeling provides novel insights on the therapeutic value of repopulating the colonic microbiome and inducing regulatory mucosal immune responses during C. difficile infection. Thus, modeling mucosal immunity-gut microbiota interactions has the potential to guide the development of targeted fecal transplantation therapies in the context of precision medicine interventions. PMID:26230099

  15. Clostridium difficile Infection: A Rarity in Patients Receiving Chronic Antibiotic Treatment for Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Abhik; Lichtiger, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background Prolonged antibiotic use is limited by several adverse effects, one of which is Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of CDI in patients receiving chronic antibiotic treatment for Crohn’s disease (CD). Methods We conducted a retrospective review of 100 patients with CD for which ≥6 months of outpatient antibiotic therapy was prescribed. Data were collected regarding demographics, CD phenotype, treatment history, and CDI. The incidence of CDI in our patient population was calculated and compared with historical controls. Results 100 patients were studied—60% of men, mean age 23.9 years at CD diagnosis. Eighty-two percent had disease involving the ileum, and 33% had disease involving the colon. The mean duration of antibiotic therapy was 39.6 months (range, 6–217 months). The most commonly prescribed classes of antibiotics were fluoroquinolones (84%), penicillins (57%), and cephalosporins (32%). Forty-nine percent of patients were treated with concomitant thiopurines, 45% with budesonide, and 41% with biologics. The overall incidence of CDI was 2%. This incidence of CDI was lower than previously reported for non-CD patients receiving chronic antibiotics for continuous-flow left ventricular assist device infections (12.5%) and orthopedic prosthesis infections (22.2%). Conclusions The incidence of CDI is rare in patients receiving chronic antibiotic treatment for CD, and it seems significantly lower than for non-CD populations reported in the literature. PMID:26650148

  16. Clostridium difficile Infections amongst Patients with Haematological Malignancies: A Data Linkage Study

    PubMed Central

    Slimings, Claudia; Joske, David J. L.; Riley, Thomas V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Identify risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and assess CDI outcomes among Australian patients with a haematological malignancy. Methods A retrospective cohort study involving all patients admitted to hospitals in Western Australia with a haematological malignancy from July 2011 to June 2012. Hospital admission data were linked with all hospital investigated CDI case data. Potential risk factors were assessed by logistic regression. The risk of death within 60 and 90 days of CDI was assessed by Cox Proportional Hazards regression. Results There were 2085 patients of whom 65 had at least one CDI. Twenty percent of CDI cases were either community-acquired, indeterminate source or had only single-day admissions in the 28 days prior to CDI. Using logistic regression, having acute lymphocytic leukaemia, neutropenia and having had bacterial pneumonia or another bacterial infection were associated with CDI. CDI was associated with an increased risk of death within 60 and 90 days post CDI, but only two deaths had CDI recorded as an antecedent factor. Ribotyping information was available for 33 of the 65 CDIs. There were 19 different ribotypes identified. Conclusions Neutropenia was strongly associated with CDI. While having CDI is a risk factor for death, in many cases it may not be a direct contributor to death but may reflect patients having higher morbidity. A wide variety of C. difficile ribotypes were found and community-acquired infection may be under-estimated in these patients. PMID:27314498

  17. Struggling with recurrent Clostridium difficile infections: is donor faeces the solution?

    PubMed

    van Nood, E; Speelman, P; Kuijper, E J; Keller, J J

    2009-01-01

    Patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in hospitals and the community constitute an increasing treatment problem. While most patients with a first infection respond to either metronidazole or oral vancomycin, therapy in recurrent C. difficile infections tends to fail repeatedly. Lack of alternative treatment options can be a tremendous burden, both to patients and their treating physicians. Most guidelines recommend prolonged oral vancomycin pulse and or tapering schedules, but evidence-based treatment strategies are lacking. The role of immunoglobulins, whey prepared from vaccinated cows, probiotics or other antibiotics is unclear. Since 1958 several case series and case reports describe a treatment strategy where faecal infusions are successfully given for the treatment of recurrent CDI. Restoring intestinal flora has been historically thought of as the mechanism responsible for cure in these patients. In the literature, more than 150 patients have received faeces from a healthy donor, either infused through an enema, or through a nasoduodenal or nasogastric tube. We summarise the literature regarding treatment with donor faeces for recurrent CDI, and introduce the FECAL trial, currently open for inclusion. PMID:19712646

  18. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection: an Ongoing Conundrum for Clinicians and for Clinical Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Karen C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Clostridium difficile is a formidable nosocomial and community-acquired pathogen, causing clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic colonization to self-limiting diarrhea to toxic megacolon and fulminant colitis. Since the early 2000s, the incidence of C. difficile disease has increased dramatically, and this is thought to be due to the emergence of new strain types. For many years, the mainstay of C. difficile disease diagnosis was enzyme immunoassays for detection of the C. difficile toxin(s), although it is now generally accepted that these assays lack sensitivity. A number of molecular assays are commercially available for the detection of C. difficile. This review covers the history and biology of C. difficile and provides an in-depth discussion of the laboratory methods used for the diagnosis of C. difficile infection (CDI). In addition, strain typing methods for C. difficile and the evolving epidemiology of colonization and infection with this organism are discussed. Finally, considerations for diagnosing C. difficile disease in special patient populations, such as children, oncology patients, transplant patients, and patients with inflammatory bowel disease, are described. As detection of C. difficile in clinical specimens does not always equate with disease, the diagnosis of C. difficile infection continues to be a challenge for both laboratories and clinicians. PMID:23824374

  19. Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection: results of a hospital-based study in Krakow, Poland.

    PubMed

    Czepiel, J; Kędzierska, J; Biesiada, G; Birczyńska, M; Perucki, W; Nowak, P; Garlicki, A

    2015-11-01

    Over the past two decades Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has appeared as a major public health threat. We performed a retrospective study based on the records of patients hospitalized for CDI at the University Hospital in Krakow, Poland, between 2008 and 2014. In the study period, CDI occurred in 1009 individuals. There were 790 (78%) individuals who developed infection only once, whereas 219 (22%) developed infection more than once. The percentage of deaths within 14 days of CDI confirmation was 2·4%, with a mean age of 74·2 ± 15·9 years. Crude mortality was 12·9% in medical wards, 5·6% for surgical wards and 27·7% in the ICU setting. The time span between diagnosis and death was 5·1 days on average. Between 2008 and 2012 a 6·5-fold increase of CDI frequency with a posterior stabilization and even reduction in 2013 and 2014 was observed. According to the data analysed, 2/3 patients in our population developed CDI during their hospitalization even though they were admitted for different reasons. Medical wards pose a significantly higher risk of CDI than the surgical ones. Age is a risk factor for CDI recurrence. In the case of patients who died, death occurred shortly after diagnosis. The first CDI episode poses much higher risk of mortality than the consecutive ones. PMID:25858553

  20. Use of gas-liquid chromatography as a screening test for toxigenic Clostridium difficile in diarrhoeal stools.

    PubMed Central

    Pepersack, F; Labbe, M; Nonhoff, C; Schoutens, E

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine if gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) on concentrated stool extracts could be substituted to cell culture assay for cytotoxicity, we prospectively studied 154 diarrhoeal stools submitted for detection of Clostridium difficile toxin. Isocaproic-positive samples were cultured on egg yolk agar supplemented with cycloserine, cefoxitin and fructose for isolation of C difficile, and on egg yolk agar plus kanamycin for isolation of other clostridium species. Of the 154 samples, 129 were GLC-negative (height of the isocaproic peak less than 1.2 cm) and were toxin-negative. Twenty-five stools yielded isocaproic acid; C difficile isolated from 13 of them, six of which were also toxin-positive. Four other isocaproic-positive samples yielded C bifermentans and C sordellii; all were toxin-negative. These results indicate that a negative GLC is an excellent screening test for excluding C difficile infection; positive results must be checked by toxin testing and culture since they are not necessarily associated with the presence of C difficile or its toxin. PMID:6630574

  1. Tests for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection: the next generation.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Karen C

    2011-08-01

    impact of molecular tests on treatment and nosocomial spread of Clostridium difficile infections. PMID:21376826

  2. Reset of a critically disturbed microbial ecosystem: faecal transplant in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Susana; van Nood, Els; Tims, Sebastian; Heikamp-de Jong, Ineke; ter Braak, Cajo JF; Keller, Josbert J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can be effectively treated by infusion of a healthy donor faeces suspension. However, it is unclear what factors determine treatment efficacy. By using a phylogenetic microarray platform, we assessed composition, diversity and dynamics of faecal microbiota before, after and during follow-up of the transplantation from a healthy donor to different patients, to elucidate the mechanism of action of faecal infusion. Global composition and network analysis of the microbiota was performed in faecal samples from nine patients with recurrent CDI. Analyses were performed before and after duodenal donor faeces infusion, and during a follow-up of 10 weeks. The microbiota data were compared with that of the healthy donors. All patients successfully recovered. Their intestinal microbiota changed from a low-diversity diseased state, dominated by Proteobacteria and Bacilli, to a more diverse ecosystem resembling that of healthy donors, dominated by Bacteroidetes and Clostridium groups, including butyrate-producing bacteria. We identified specific multi-species networks and signature microbial groups that were either depleted or restored as a result of the treatment. The changes persisted over time. Comprehensive and deep analyses of the microbiota of patients before and after treatment exposed a therapeutic reset from a diseased state towards a healthy profile. The identification of microbial groups that constitute a niche for C. difficile overgrowth, as well as those driving the reinstallation of a healthy intestinal microbiota, could contribute to the development of biomarkers predicting recurrence and treatment outcome, identifying an optimal microbiota composition that could lead to targeted treatment strategies. PMID:24577353

  3. Reset of a critically disturbed microbial ecosystem: faecal transplant in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Susana; van Nood, Els; Tims, Sebastian; Heikamp-de Jong, Ineke; ter Braak, Cajo J F; Keller, Josbert J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-08-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can be effectively treated by infusion of a healthy donor faeces suspension. However, it is unclear what factors determine treatment efficacy. By using a phylogenetic microarray platform, we assessed composition, diversity and dynamics of faecal microbiota before, after and during follow-up of the transplantation from a healthy donor to different patients, to elucidate the mechanism of action of faecal infusion. Global composition and network analysis of the microbiota was performed in faecal samples from nine patients with recurrent CDI. Analyses were performed before and after duodenal donor faeces infusion, and during a follow-up of 10 weeks. The microbiota data were compared with that of the healthy donors. All patients successfully recovered. Their intestinal microbiota changed from a low-diversity diseased state, dominated by Proteobacteria and Bacilli, to a more diverse ecosystem resembling that of healthy donors, dominated by Bacteroidetes and Clostridium groups, including butyrate-producing bacteria. We identified specific multi-species networks and signature microbial groups that were either depleted or restored as a result of the treatment. The changes persisted over time. Comprehensive and deep analyses of the microbiota of patients before and after treatment exposed a therapeutic reset from a diseased state towards a healthy profile. The identification of microbial groups that constitute a niche for C. difficile overgrowth, as well as those driving the reinstallation of a healthy intestinal microbiota, could contribute to the development of biomarkers predicting recurrence and treatment outcome, identifying an optimal microbiota composition that could lead to targeted treatment strategies. PMID:24577353

  4. Faecal microbiota transplantation in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection: Recommendations from the French Group of Faecal microbiota Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Harry; Galperine, Tatiana; Kapel, Nathalie; Bourlioux, Pierre; Seksik, Philippe; Barbut, Frederic; Scanzi, Julien; Chast, François; Batista, Rui; Joly, Francisca; Joly, Anne-Christine; Collignon, Anne; Guery, Benoit; Beaugerie, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation is effective for treating recurrent forms of Clostridium difficile infection and its use in this indication is recommended in the most recent European and North American guidelines. In this context, faecal microbiota transplantation is beginning to be performed in France in clinical practice, while the rules governing this procedure have been defined in France only for clinical trials. To unify, secure, and evaluate practice in this field in France, the French Group of Faecal microbiota Transplantation (FGFT) was created in October 2014 with the support of the French National Society of Gastroenterology, the French Infectious Disease Society, and the National Academy of Pharmacy. We present here the deliberations of this group regarding the use of faecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. The issues addressed are the indications, therapeutic sequence, delivery procedures, donor selection, methods and conditions of specimen preparation, and traceability. PMID:26433619

  5. Active and Secretory IgA-Coated Bacterial Fractions Elucidate Dysbiosis in Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Andrés; Vázquez-Castellanos, Jorge F.; Artacho, Alejandro; Chen, Xinhua; Kelly, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The onset of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been associated with treatment with wide-spectrum antibiotics. Antibiotic treatment alters the activity of gut commensals and may result in modified patterns of immune responses to pathogens. To study these mechanisms during CDI, we separated bacteria with high cellular RNA content (the active bacteria) and their inactive counterparts by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of the fecal bacterial suspension. The gut dysbiosis due to the antibiotic treatment may result in modification of immune recognition of intestinal bacteria. The immune recognition patterns were assessed by FACS of bacterial fractions either coated or not with intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA). We described the taxonomic distributions of these four bacterial fractions (active versus inactive and SIgA coated versus non-SIgA coated) by massive 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and quantified the proportion of C. difficile toxin genes in the samples. The overall gut microbiome composition was more robustly influenced by antibiotics than by the C. difficile toxins. Bayesian networks revealed that the C. difficile cluster was preferentially SIgA coated during CDI. In contrast, in the CDI-negative group Fusobacterium was the characteristic genus of the SIgA-opsonized fraction. Lactobacillales and Clostridium cluster IV were mostly inactive in CDI-positive patients. In conclusion, although the proportion of C. difficile in the gut is very low, it is able to initiate infection during the gut dysbiosis caused by environmental stress (antibiotic treatment) as a consequence of decreased activity of the protective bacteria. IMPORTANCE C. difficile is a major enteric pathogen with worldwide distribution. Its expansion is associated with broad-spectrum antibiotics which disturb the normal gut microbiome. In this study, the DNA sequencing of highly active bacteria and bacteria opsonized by intestinal secretory immunoglobulin

  6. Active and Secretory IgA-Coated Bacterial Fractions Elucidate Dysbiosis in Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Džunková, Mária; Moya, Andrés; Vázquez-Castellanos, Jorge F; Artacho, Alejandro; Chen, Xinhua; Kelly, Ciaran; D'Auria, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The onset of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been associated with treatment with wide-spectrum antibiotics. Antibiotic treatment alters the activity of gut commensals and may result in modified patterns of immune responses to pathogens. To study these mechanisms during CDI, we separated bacteria with high cellular RNA content (the active bacteria) and their inactive counterparts by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of the fecal bacterial suspension. The gut dysbiosis due to the antibiotic treatment may result in modification of immune recognition of intestinal bacteria. The immune recognition patterns were assessed by FACS of bacterial fractions either coated or not with intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA). We described the taxonomic distributions of these four bacterial fractions (active versus inactive and SIgA coated versus non-SIgA coated) by massive 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and quantified the proportion of C. difficile toxin genes in the samples. The overall gut microbiome composition was more robustly influenced by antibiotics than by the C. difficile toxins. Bayesian networks revealed that the C. difficile cluster was preferentially SIgA coated during CDI. In contrast, in the CDI-negative group Fusobacterium was the characteristic genus of the SIgA-opsonized fraction. Lactobacillales and Clostridium cluster IV were mostly inactive in CDI-positive patients. In conclusion, although the proportion of C. difficile in the gut is very low, it is able to initiate infection during the gut dysbiosis caused by environmental stress (antibiotic treatment) as a consequence of decreased activity of the protective bacteria. IMPORTANCE C. difficile is a major enteric pathogen with worldwide distribution. Its expansion is associated with broad-spectrum antibiotics which disturb the normal gut microbiome. In this study, the DNA sequencing of highly active bacteria and bacteria opsonized by intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIg

  7. Is the interleukin 8 promoter polymorphism rs4073/-251T >A associated with Clostridium difficile infection?

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Fabio; Swale, Andrew; Zhang, J Eunice; Alfirevic, Ana; Little, Margaret; Beeching, Nicholas J; Smith, Godfrey; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2014-06-01

    The interleukin 8 gene single-nucleotide polymorphism rs4073/-251T >A predisposes to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), but this association has not been independently validated. In this study, we were unable to replicate this association in either a white cohort or by meta-analysis, suggesting that rs4073/-251T >A is unlikely to constitute a major risk factor for CDI. PMID:24633688

  8. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Management of Clostridium difficile Infection in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Rao, Krishna; Higgins, Peter D R

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major source of morbidity and mortality for the U.S. health care system and frequently complicates the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients with IBD are more likely to be colonized with C. difficile and develop active infection than the general population. They are also more likely to have severe CDI and develop subsequent complications such as IBD flare, colectomy, or death. Even after successful initial treatment and recovery, recurrent CDI is common. Management of CDI in IBD is fraught with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges because the clinical presentations of CDI and IBD flare have considerable overlap. Fecal microbiota transplantation can be successful in curing recurrent CDI when other treatments have failed, but may also trigger IBD flare and this warrants caution. New experimental treatments including vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and nontoxigenic strains of C. difficile offer promise but are not yet available for clinicians. A better understanding of the complex relationship between the gut microbiota, CDI, and IBD is needed. PMID:27120571

  9. Fidaxomicin versus Vancomycin in the Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infection: Canadian Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christine; Louie, Thomas J.; Weiss, Karl; Valiquette, Louis; Gerson, Marvin; Arnott, Wendy; Gorbach, Sherwood L.

    2016-01-01

    Background. This analysis examined the efficacy of fidaxomicin versus vancomycin in 406 Canadian patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), based on data from 2 randomized, clinical trials. Methods. Patients received fidaxomicin or vancomycin 1. Patients were assessed for clinical response recurrence of infection and sustained clinical response for 28 days after treatment completion. Patients at increased risk of recurrence were subjected to subgroup analyses. Results. Clinical response rates for fidaxomicin (90.0%) were noninferior to those with vancomycin (92.2%; 95% confidence interval for difference: −7.7, 3.5). However, fidaxomicin-treated patients had lower recurrence (14.4% versus 28.0%, p = 0.001) and higher sustained clinical response (77.1% versus 66.3%, p = 0.016). Compared with vancomycin, fidaxomicin was associated with lower recurrence rates in all subgroups, reaching statistical significance in patients with age ≥ 65 years (16.0% versus 30.9%, p = 0.026), concomitant antibiotic use (16.2% versus 38.7%, p = 0.036), and non-BI strains (11.8% versus 28.3%, p = 0.004). Higher sustained clinical response rates were observed for fidaxomicin compared with vancomycin in all subgroups; this was statistically significant in the non-BI subgroup (82.8% versus 69.1%, p = 0.021). Conclusions. In Canadian patients, fidaxomicin was superior to vancomycin in sustaining clinical response and reducing CDI recurrence. PMID:27366179

  10. Advanced chronic kidney disease: a strong risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Chul; Seo, Min Young; Lee, Jun Yong; Kim, Ki Tae; Cho, Eunjung; Kim, Myung-Gyu; Jo, Sang-Kyung; Cho, Won-Yong; Kim, Hyoung-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: It has been suggested that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and is associated with increased mortality among patients infected with C. difficile. However, recent studies of the clinical impact of CKD on CDI in Asians are still insufficient. We sought to determine the relationship between CKD and CDI in a Korean population. Methods: This was a single-center, retrospective case-control study. In total, 171 patients with CDI were included as cases and 342 age- and gender-matched patients without CDI were used as controls. We compared the prevalence of CKD in the study sample and identified independent risk factors that could predict the development or prognosis of CDI. Results: Independent risk factors for CDI included stage IV to V CKD not requiring dialysis (odds ratio [OR], 2.90) and end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis (OR, 3.34). Patients with more advanced CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 30) and CDI showed higher in-hospital mortality and poorer responses to the initial metronidazole therapy. Conclusions: More advanced CKD is an independent risk factor for CDI and is associated with higher in-hospital mortality and poor treatment responses in CDI patients. Thus, in CKD patients, careful attention should be paid to the occurrence of CDI and its management to improve the outcome of CDI. PMID:26767866

  11. Risk factors for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Mani, S; Rybicki, L; Jagadeesh, D; Mossad, S B

    2016-05-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections in recent times. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) confers increased risk for CDI because of prolonged hospital stay, immunosuppression, the need to use broad-spectrum antibiotics and a complex interplay of preparative regimen and GvHD-induced gut mucosal damage. Our study evaluated risk factors (RF) for recurrent CDI in HSCT recipients given the ubiquity of traditional RF for CDI in this population. Of the 499 allogeneic HSCT recipients transplanted between 2005 and 2012, 61 (12%) developed CDI within 6 months before transplant or 2 years after transplant and were included in the analysis. Recurrent CDI occurred in 20 (33%) patients. One year incidence of CDI recurrence was 31%. Multivariable analyses identified the number of antecedent antibiotics other than those used to treat CDI as the only significant RF for recurrence (hazard ratio 1.96, 95% confidence interval 1.09-3.52, P=0.025). Most recurrences occurred within 6 months of the first CDI, and the recurrence of CDI was associated with a trend for increased risk of mortality. This prompts the need for further investigation into secondary prophylaxis to prevent recurrent CDI. PMID:26726944

  12. Survey of diagnostic and typing capacity for Clostridium difficile infection in Europe, 2011 and 2014.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Sofie M; Notermans, Daan W; Alblas, Jeroen; Gastmeier, Petra; Mentula, Silja; Nagy, Elisabeth; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Ivanova, Katiusha; Fitzpatrick, Fidelma; Barbut, Frédéric; Morris, Trefor; Wilcox, Mark H; Kinross, Pete; Suetens, Carl; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-07-21

    Suboptimal laboratory diagnostics for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) impedes its surveillance and control across Europe. We evaluated changes in local laboratory CDI diagnostics and changes in national diagnostic and typing capacity for CDI during the European C. difficile Infection Surveillance Network (ECDIS-Net) project, through cross-sectional surveys in 33 European countries in 2011 and 2014. In 2011, 126 (61%) of a convenience sample of 206 laboratories in 31 countries completed a survey on local diagnostics. In 2014, 84 (67%) of these 126 laboratories in 26 countries completed a follow-up survey. Among laboratories that participated in both surveys, use of CDI diagnostics deemed 'optimal' or 'acceptable' increased from 19% to 46% and from 10% to 15%, respectively (p  < 0.001). The survey of national capacity was completed by national coordinators of 31 and 32 countries in 2011 and 2014, respectively. Capacity for any C. difficile typing method increased from 22/31 countries in 2011 to 26/32 countries in 2014; for PCR ribotyping from 20/31 countries to 23/32 countries, and specifically for capillary PCR ribotyping from 7/31 countries to 16/32 countries. While our study indicates improved diagnostic capability and national capacity for capillary PCR ribotyping across European laboratories between 2011 and 2014, increased use of 'optimal' diagnostics should be promoted. PMID:27469624

  13. [Fecal microbiota transplantation in recurrent Clostridium difficile infections. Framework and pharmaceutical preparation aspects].

    PubMed

    Batista, R; Kapel, N; Megerlin, F; Chaumeil, J-C; Barbut, F; Bourlioux, P; Chast, F

    2015-09-01

    The fecal microbiota transplantation consists in introducing a preparation constituted by a dilution of stools of a healthy donor in the digestive tract of a patient recipient, to restore his intestinal physiological balance. This therapeutic approach was the subject of numerous studies showing its efficiency in the treatment of the recurrent infections with Clostridium difficile. The fecal microbiota transplantation has now a high level of clinical evidence, which explains that it appears in various international recommendations. In France, the fecal microbiota transplantation responds to the definition of a medication and can be executed as a pharmaceutical preparation or as an experimental drug for clinical trials under the responsibility of a hospital pharmacy. The objective of this paper is to propose a definition of a framework and to describe the methods of preparation of the fecal microbiota transplantation in the treatment of the recurrent infections with C. difficile and the interactions to consider for hospital pharmacies that do not have technical means to operate this technique. PMID:25825054

  14. Clostridium difficile Infection in Long-term Care Facilities: A Call to Action for Antimicrobial Stewardship.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Teena; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2015-05-15

    Across the United States, the baby boomers are entering into their elderly years. As they are America's largest generation to do so to date, their need for care will greatly affect nursing homes, long-term care facilities, and long-term acute-care hospitals (LTACHs). Unfortunately, the rise of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), particularly in extended-care facilities, might become the biggest obstacle in their care. Elderly extended-care-facility residents are at an elevated risk of CDI simply due to their advanced age and the fact that they are receiving care in an extended-care facility. LTACHs experience a high incidence rate of CDI, and these infections can lead to major complications for a patient's health. Other factors that contribute to higher risk for CDI include receiving multiple courses of antibiotics, longer length of antibiotic treatment, and previous CDI. Although this obstacle to proper care is great, some simple solutions are available to healthcare providers. Probiotics may help improve natural immunity in patients, and strict adherence to antimicrobial stewardship standards could help reduce this serious bacterial threat. PMID:25922404

  15. Recent advances in the understanding of antibiotic resistance in Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile epidemiology has changed in recent years, with the emergence of highly virulent types associated with severe infections, high rates of recurrences and mortality. Antibiotic resistance plays an important role in driving these epidemiological changes and the emergence of new types. While clindamycin resistance was driving historical endemic types, new types are associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones. Furthermore, resistance to multiple antibiotics is a common feature of the newly emergent strains and, in general, of many epidemic isolates. A reduced susceptibility to antibiotics used for C. difficile infection (CDI) treatment, in particular to metronidazole, has recently been described in several studies. Furthermore, an increased number of strains show resistance to rifamycins, used for the treatment of relapsing CDI. Several mechanisms of resistance have been identified in C. difficile, including acquisition of genetic elements and alterations of the antibiotic target sites. The C. difficile genome contains a plethora of mobile genetic elements, many of them involved in antibiotic resistance. Transfer of genetic elements among C. difficile strains or between C. difficile and other bacterial species can occur through different mechanisms that facilitate their spread. Investigations of the fitness cost in C. difficile indicate that both genetic elements and mutations in the molecular targets of antibiotics can be maintained regardless of the burden imposed on fitness, suggesting that resistances may persist in the C. difficile population also in absence of antibiotic selective pressure. The rapid evolution of antibiotic resistance and its composite nature complicate strategies in the treatment and prevention of CDI. The rapid identification of new phenotypic and genotypic traits, the implementation of effective antimicrobial stewardship and infection control programs, and the development of alternative therapies are needed to prevent and

  16. Clostridium difficile infection caused by the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Jennifer R; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale N

    2009-05-01

    Rates and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hospitals in North America and Europe have increased since 2000 and correlate with dissemination of an epidemic strain characterized by higher than usual toxin A and B production, the presence of a third toxin, binary toxin, and high-level resistance to fluoroquinolone antibiotics. The strain, which is restriction endonuclease analysis group BI, pulse-field gel electrophoresis type NAP1, and polymerase chain reaction ribotype 027, is designated BI/NAP1/027. How this strain has become so widely distributed geographically and produces such severe CDI is the subject of active investigation. The deletion at position 117 of the tcdC gene, a repressor of toxin A and B production, is one possible contributor to increased levels of the toxins. The role of binary toxin is unknown. Recent isolates of BI/NAP1/027 were found to be resistant to fluoroquinolones, which is likely to contribute to the dissemination of this strain. Other virulence factors such as increased sporulation and surface layer protein adherence are also under investigation. Infections caused by this organism are particularly frequent among elderly hospitalized patients, in whom the attributable 30-day mortality is greater than 5%. Major risk factors for BI/NAP1/027 infection include advanced age, hospitalization, and exposure to specific antimicrobials, especially fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins. When CDI is severe, vancomycin treatment is more effective than metronidazole; for mild disease either agent can be used. Control of hospital outbreaks caused by BI/NAP1/027 is difficult but possible through a combination of barrier precautions, environmental cleaning, and antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:19457419

  17. Mechanisms of Protection against Clostridium difficile Infection by the Monoclonal Antitoxin Antibodies Actoxumab and Bezlotoxumab

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Ramsey, Jeremy; Hamza, Therwa; Zhang, Yongrong; Li, Shan; Yfantis, Harris G.; Lee, Dong; Hernandez, Lorraine D.; Seghezzi, Wolfgang; Furneisen, Jamie M.; Davis, Nicole M.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) represents the most prevalent cause of antibiotic-associated gastrointestinal infections in health care facilities in the developed world. Disease symptoms are caused by the two homologous exotoxins, TcdA and TcdB. Standard therapy for CDI involves administration of antibiotics that are associated with a high rate of disease recurrence, highlighting the need for novel treatment paradigms that target the toxins rather than the organism itself. A combination of human monoclonal antibodies, actoxumab and bezlotoxumab, directed against TcdA and TcdB, respectively, has been shown to decrease the rate of recurrence in patients treated with standard-of-care antibiotics. However, the exact mechanism of antibody-mediated protection is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the antitoxin antibodies are protective in multiple murine models of CDI, including systemic and local (gut) toxin challenge models, as well as primary and recurrent models of infection in mice. Systemically administered actoxumab-bezlotoxumab prevents both the damage to the gut wall and the inflammatory response, which are associated with C. difficile in these models, including in mice challenged with a strain of the hypervirulent ribotype 027. Furthermore, mutant antibodies (N297Q) that do not bind to Fcγ receptors provide a level of protection similar to that of wild-type antibodies, demonstrating that the mechanism of protection is through direct neutralization of the toxins and does not involve host effector functions. These data provide a mechanistic basis for the prevention of recurrent disease observed in CDI patients in clinical trials. PMID:25486992

  18. Racial Differences in Clostridium difficile Infection Rates Are Attributable to Disparities in Health Care Access.

    PubMed

    Mao, Eric J; Kelly, Colleen R; Machan, Jason T

    2015-10-01

    This study confirms previously reported racial differences in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) rates in the United States and explores the nature of those differences. We conducted a retrospective study using the 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, the largest all-payer database of hospital discharges in the United States. We identified hospital stays most likely to include antibiotic treatment for infections, based on hospital discharge diagnoses, and we examined how CDI rates varied, in an attempt to distinguish between genotypic and environmental racial differences. Logistic regressions for the survey design were used to test hypotheses. Among patients likely to have received antibiotics, white patients had higher CDI rates than black, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American patients (P < 0.0001). CDI rates increased with higher income levels and were higher for hospitalizations paid by private insurance versus those paid by Medicaid or classified as self-pay or free care (P < 0.0001). Among patients admitted from skilled nursing facilities, where racial bias in health care access is less, racial differences in CDI rates disappeared (P = 1.0). Infected patients did not show racial differences in rates of complicated CDI or death (P = 1.0). Although white patients had greater CDI rates than nonwhite patients, racial differences in CDI rates disappeared in a population for which health care access was presumed to be less racially biased. This provides evidence that apparent racial differences in CDI risks may represent health care access disparities, rather than genotypic differences. CDI represents a deviation from the paradigm that increased health care access is associated with less morbidity. PMID:26248363

  19. Clostridium difficile infection, a descriptive analysis of solid organ transplant recipients at a single center.

    PubMed

    Tsapepas, Demetra S; Martin, Spencer T; Miao, Jennifer; Shah, Shreya A; Scheffert, Jenna; Fester, Keith; Ma, Karlene; Lat, Asma; Egan, Ron; McKeen, Jaclyn T

    2015-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterial enteric pathogen, which causes clinical disease among solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. This large, single-center, retrospective study describes incidence, demographics, and impact of C. difficile infection (CDI) among adult SOT recipients, cardiac (n=5), lung (n=14), liver (n=9), renal (n=26), and multiorgan (n=9) patients transplanted and diagnosed with CDI (geneB PCR) between 9/2009 and 12/2012. The overall incidence of CDI in our population during the 40-month period of study was 4%. CDI incidence among cardiac, lung, liver, and renal transplant recipients was 1.9%, 7%, 2.7%, and 3.2%, respectively (P=0.03 between organ-types). Median time from transplant to CDI for all was 51 (14-249) days, with liver recipients having the shortest time to infection, median 36 (15-101) days, and lung recipients having a longer time to infection, median 136 (29-611) days. Antibiotic exposure within 3 months of CDI was evident in 45 of the 63 (71%) patients in this study, 80%, 79%, 100%, 58%, and 67% of cardiac, lung, liver, renal, and multiorgan transplant recipients, respectively. Most patients (83%) were hospitalized within the 3 months preceding CDI. Recipients were followed for a median time of 23 (16-31) months; at the time of last follow-up, 83% of allografts were functioning, and 86% of patients were alive. One death and 1 graft failure were causally related to CDI. CDI had an overall incidence of 4%; clinicians should have heightened awareness for CDI, especially among patients receiving antibiotics, with increased monitoring and aggressive management of CDI. PMID:25586932

  20. Analysis of Bacterial Communities during Clostridium difficile Infection in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Semenyuk, Ekaterina G.; Poroyko, Valeriy A.; Johnston, Pehga F.; Jones, Sara E.; Knight, Katherine L.; Gerding, Dale N.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major cause of health care-associated disease. CDI initiates with ingestion of C. difficile spores, germination in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and then colonization of the large intestine. The interactions between C. difficile cells and other bacteria and with host mucosa during CDI remain poorly understood. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that, in a mouse model of CDI, C. difficile resides in multicellular communities (biofilms) in association with host mucosa. To do this, we paraffin embedded and then sectioned the GI tracts of infected mice at various days postinfection (p.i.). We then used fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 16S rRNA probes targeting most bacteria as well as C. difficile specifically. The results revealed that C. difficile is present as a minority member of communities in the outer (loose) mucus layer, in the cecum and colon, starting at day 1 p.i. To generate FISH probes that identify bacteria within mucus-associated communities harboring C. difficile, we characterized bacterial populations in the infected mouse GI tract using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of bacterial DNA prepared from intestinal content. This analysis revealed the presence of genera of several families belonging to Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. These data suggest that formation of multispecies communities associated with the mucus of the cecum and colon is an important early step in GI tract colonization. They raise the possibility that other bacterial species in these communities modulate the ability of C. difficile to successfully colonize and, thereby, cause disease. PMID:26324536

  1. Excretion of Host DNA in Feces Is Associated with Risk of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Vivian G.; Dewar, Ken; Manges, Amee R.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is intricately linked to the health of the gastrointestinal tract and its indigenous microbiota. In this study, we assessed whether fecal excretion of host DNA is associated with CDI development. Assuming that shedding of epithelial cell increases in the inflamed intestine, we used human DNA excretion as a marker of intestinal insult. Whole-genome shotgun sequencing was employed to quantify host DNA excretion and evaluate bacterial content in fecal samples collected from patients with incipient CDI, hospitalized controls, and healthy subjects. Human DNA excretion was significantly increased in patients admitted to the hospital for a gastrointestinal ailment, as well as prior to an episode of CDI. In multivariable analyses, human read abundance was independently associated with CDI development. Host DNA proportions were negatively correlated with intestinal microbiota diversity. Enterococcus and Escherichia were enriched in patients excreting high quantities of human DNA, while Ruminococcus and Odoribacter were depleted. These findings suggest that intestinal inflammation can occur prior to CDI development and may influence patient susceptibility to CDI. The quantification of human DNA in feces could serve as a simple and noninvasive approach to assess bowel inflammation and identify patients at risk of CDI. PMID:26090486

  2. Gut microbiota composition and Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized elderly individuals: a metagenomic study.

    PubMed

    Milani, Christian; Ticinesi, Andrea; Gerritsen, Jacoline; Nouvenne, Antonio; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Turroni, Francesca; Duranti, Sabrina; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Ferrario, Chiara; Maggio, Marcello; Lauretani, Fulvio; De Vos, Willem; van Sinderen, Douwe; Meschi, Tiziana; Ventura, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota composition of elderly hospitalized patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) exposed to previous antibiotic treatment is still poorly investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the microbiota composition by means of 16S rRNA microbial profiling among three groups of hospitalized elderly patients (age ≥ 65) under standard diet including 25 CDI-positive (CDI group), 29 CDI-negative exposed to antibiotic treatment (AB+ group) and 30 CDI-negative subjects not on antibiotic treatment (AB- group). The functional properties of the gut microbiomes of CDI-positive vs CDI-negative subjects were also assessed by shotgun metagenomics. A significantly lower microbial diversity was detected in CDI samples, whose microbiomes clustered separately from CDI-negative specimens. CDI was associated with a significant under-representation of gut commensals with putative protective functionalities, including Bacteroides, Alistipes, Lachnospira and Barnesiella, and over-representation of opportunistic pathogens. These findings were confirmed by functional shotgun metagenomics analyses, including an in-depth profiling of the Peptostreptococcaceae family. In CDI-negative patients, antibiotic treatment was associated with significant depletion of few commensals like Alistipes, but not with a reduction in species richness. A better understanding of the correlations between CDI and the microbiota in high-risk elderly subjects may contribute to identify therapeutic targets for CDI. PMID:27166072

  3. Impacts of infection with different toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains on faecal microbiota in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Jia, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Yiwen; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhao, Chunna; Guo, Shu; Li, Lanjuan; Xu, Xiwei; Xiang, Charlie

    2014-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that altered intestinal microbial composition and function result in an increased risk of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD); however, the specific changes of intestinal microbiota in children suffering from CDAD and their associations with C. difficile strain toxigenicity are poorly understood. High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that reduced faecal bacterial diversity and dramatic shifts of microbial composition were found in children with CDAD. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased significantly in patients with CDAD, which indicated that dysbiosis of faecal microbiota was closely associated with CDAD. C. difficile infection resulted in an increase in lactate-producing phylotypes, with a corresponding decrease in butyrate-producing bacteria. The decrease in butyrate and lactate buildup impaired intestinal colonisation resistance, which increased the susceptibility to C. difficile colonisation. Strains of C. difficile which were positive for both toxin A and toxin B reduced faecal bacterial diversity to a greater degree than strains that were only toxin B-positive, and were associated with unusually abundant Enterococcus, which implies that the C. difficile toxins have different impacts on the faecal microbiota of children. Greater understanding of the relationships between disruption of the normal faecal microbiota and colonisation with C. difficile that produces different toxins might lead to improved treatment.

  4. Decreasing Clostridium difficile Infections by an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program That Reduces Moxifloxacin Use

    PubMed Central

    Equiluz-Bruck, Susanne; Fudel, Marta; Reiter, Ingun; Schmid, Andrea; Singer, Erna; Chott, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in hospitalized patients are known to be closely related to antibiotic exposure. Although several substances can cause CDI, the risk differs between individual agents. In Vienna and other eastern parts of Austria, CDI ribotype 027 is currently highly prevalent. This ribotype has the characteristic of intrinsic moxifloxacin resistance. Therefore, we hypothesized that moxifloxacin restriction can decrease the number of CDI cases in hospitalized patients. Our antibiotic stewardship (ABS) group applied an information campaign on CDI and formal restriction of moxifloxacin in Wilhelminenspital (Vienna, Austria), a 1,000- bed tertiary care hospital. The preintervention period (period 1) was January through May 2013, and the intervention period (period 2) was June through December 2013. We recorded the defined daily doses (DDD) of moxifloxacin and the number of CDI patients/month. Moxifloxacin use was reduced from a mean (± standard error of the mean [SEM]) of 1,038 ± 109 DDD per month (period 1) to 42 ± 10 DDD per month (period 2) (P = 0.0045). Total antibiotic use was not affected. The mean (±SEM) numbers of CDI cases in period 1 were 59 ± 3 per month and in period 2 were 32 ± 3 per month (46% reduction; P = 0.0044). Reducing moxifloxacin use in combination with providing structured information on CDI was associated with an immediate decrease in CDI rates in this large community teaching hospital. PMID:24936597

  5. Clostridium difficile infections in a Shanghai hospital: antimicrobial resistance, toxin profiles and ribotypes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haihui; Wu, Shi; Wang, Minggui; Zhang, Yingyuan; Fang, Hong; Palmgren, Ann-Chatrin; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2009-04-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has risen markedly since 2003, however data from China are limited. A 1-year study was conducted at the University Hospital Huashan to characterise clinical isolates of C. difficile. Of 74 isolates, 56 were from the first episode of CDI (43 A(+)B(+) and 13 A(-)B(+)), 5 were from recurrences and 13 were toxin-negative. No binary toxin or TcdC deletion was detected. All strains were susceptible to metronidazole, vancomycin, meropenem and piperacillin/tazobactam. Resistance to moxifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, rifampicin and fusidic acid was found in 46.4%, 100%, 60.7%, 71.4%, 71.4%, 35.7%, 25.0% and 17.9% of the isolates, respectively. All moxifloxacin-resistant isolates carried a mutation in either gyrA, gyrB or both. Fourteen different polymerase chain reaction ribotypes were identified, with a specific clone (SH II) accounting for 25% of isolates. No isolates belonged to ribotype 027. The present study is the first systematic survey of clinical C. difficile isolates in China. Further surveillance is required to detect clustering of cases and to monitor the emergence of specific highly virulent clones and resistance. PMID:19097757

  6. Impacts of infection with different toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains on faecal microbiota in children

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Jia, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Yiwen; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhao, Chunna; Guo, Shu; Li, Lanjuan; Xu, Xiwei; Xiang, Charlie

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that altered intestinal microbial composition and function result in an increased risk of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD); however, the specific changes of intestinal microbiota in children suffering from CDAD and their associations with C. difficile strain toxigenicity are poorly understood. High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that reduced faecal bacterial diversity and dramatic shifts of microbial composition were found in children with CDAD. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased significantly in patients with CDAD, which indicated that dysbiosis of faecal microbiota was closely associated with CDAD. C. difficile infection resulted in an increase in lactate-producing phylotypes, with a corresponding decrease in butyrate-producing bacteria. The decrease in butyrate and lactate buildup impaired intestinal colonisation resistance, which increased the susceptibility to C. difficile colonisation. Strains of C. difficile which were positive for both toxin A and toxin B reduced faecal bacterial diversity to a greater degree than strains that were only toxin B-positive, and were associated with unusually abundant Enterococcus, which implies that the C. difficile toxins have different impacts on the faecal microbiota of children. Greater understanding of the relationships between disruption of the normal faecal microbiota and colonisation with C. difficile that produces different toxins might lead to improved treatment. PMID:25501371

  7. Delirium and other clinical factors with Clostridium difficile infection that predict mortality in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Archbald-Pannone, Laurie R.; McMurry, Timothy L.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Warren, Cirle A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) severity has increased, especially among hospitalized elderly. We evaluated clinical factors to predict mortality following CDI. Methods We collected data from inpatients diagnosed with CDI at US academic medical center (HSR-IRB# 13630). We evaluated age, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), admission from a long-term care facility (LTCF), intensive care unit (ICU) at time of diagnosis, white blood cell count (WBC), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), low body mass index (BMI), and delirium as possible predictors. A parsimonious predictive model was chosen using Akaike information criterion (AIC) and a best subsets model selection algorithm. Area under the ROC curve was used to assess the model’s comparative; with AIC as selection criterion for all subsets to measure fit and control for over-fitting. Results From 362 subjects, the selected model included CCI, WBC, BUN, ICU, and delirium. The logistic regression coefficients were converted to a points scale and calibrated so that each unit on the CCI contributed 2 points, ICU contributed 5, unit of WBC (natural log scale) contributed 3, unit of BUN contributed 5, and delirium contributed 11. Discussion Our model shows substantial ability to predict short term mortality in patients hospitalized with CDI. Conclusion Patients who were diagnosed in the ICU and developed delirium are at highest risk for dying within 30 days of CDI diagnosis. PMID:25920706

  8. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels are not Associated with Adverse Outcomes in Clostridium Difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Micic, Dejan; Rao, Krishna; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; Walk, Seth T.; Chenoweth, Elizabeth; Jain, Ruchika; Trivedi, Itishree; Santhosh, Kavitha; Young, Vincent B.; Aronoff, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a significant source of healthcare-associated morbidity and mortality. This study investigated whether serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with adverse outcomes from CDI. Patients with CDI were prospectively enrolled. Charts were reviewed and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured. The primary outcome was a composite definition of severe disease: fever (temperature >38°C), acute organ dysfunction, or serum white blood cell count >15,000 cells/µL within 24-48 hours of diagnosis; lack of response to therapy by day 5; and intensive care unit admission; colectomy; or death within 30 days. Sixty-seven patients were included in the final analysis. Mean (±SD) serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was 26.1 (±18.54) ng/mL. Severe disease, which occurred in 26 (39%) participants, was not associated with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [odds ratio (OR) 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96-1.04]. In the adjusted model for severe disease only serum albumin (OR 0.12; 95%CI 0.02-0.64) and diagnosis by detection of stool toxin (OR 5.87; 95%CI 1.09-31.7) remained independent predictors. We conclude that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is not associated with the development of severe disease in patients with CDI. PMID:26500740

  9. Healthcare Resource Utilization for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection in a Large University Hospital in Houston, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Samuel L.; Joseph, Tiby B.; Shah, Dhara N.; Lasco, Todd M.; Palmer, Hannah R.; DuPont, Herbert L.; Xie, Yang; Garey, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Background There are limited data examining healthcare resource utilization in patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Methods Patients with CDI at a tertiary-care hospital in Houston, TX, were prospectively enrolled into an observational cohort study. Recurrence was assessed via follow-up phone calls. Patients with one or more recurrence were included in this study. The location at which healthcare was obtained by patients with recurrent CDI was identified along with hospital length of stay. CDI-attributable readmissions, defined as a positive toxin test within 48 hours of admission and a primary CDI diagnosis, were also assessed. Results 372 primary cases of CDI were identified of whom 64 (17.2%) experienced at least one CDI recurrence. Twelve of 64 patients experienced 18 further episodes of CDI recurrence. Of these 64 patients, 33 (50.8%) patients with recurrent CDI were readmitted of which 6 (18.2%) required ICU care, 29 (45.3%) had outpatient care only, and 2 (3.1%) had an ED visit. Nineteen (55.9%) readmissions were defined as CDI-attributable. For patients with CDI-attributable readmission, the average length of stay was 6±6 days. Conclusion Recurrent CDI leads to significant healthcare resource utilization. Methods of reducing the burden of recurrent CDI should be further studied. PMID:25057871

  10. Standardised surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection in European acute care hospitals: a pilot study, 2013.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Sofie M; Kinross, Pete; Gastmeier, Petra; Behnke, Michael; Kola, Axel; Delmée, Michel; Pavelkovich, Anastasia; Mentula, Silja; Barbut, Frédéric; Hajdu, Agnes; Ingebretsen, André; Pituch, Hanna; Macovei, Ioana S; Jovanović, Milica; Wiuff, Camilla; Schmid, Daniela; Olsen, Katharina Ep; Wilcox, Mark H; Suetens, Carl; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains poorly controlled in many European countries, of which several have not yet implemented national CDI surveillance. In 2013, experts from the European CDI Surveillance Network project and from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control developed a protocol with three options of CDI surveillance for acute care hospitals: a 'minimal' option (aggregated hospital data), a 'light' option (including patient data for CDI cases) and an 'enhanced' option (including microbiological data on the first 10 CDI episodes per hospital). A total of 37 hospitals in 14 European countries tested these options for a three-month period (between 13 May and 1 November 2013). All 37 hospitals successfully completed the minimal surveillance option (for 1,152 patients). Clinical data were submitted for 94% (1,078/1,152) of the patients in the light option; information on CDI origin and outcome was complete for 94% (1,016/1,078) and 98% (294/300) of the patients in the light and enhanced options, respectively. The workload of the options was 1.1, 2.0 and 3.0 person-days per 10,000 hospital discharges, respectively. Enhanced surveillance was tested and was successful in 32 of the hospitals, showing that C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 was predominant (30% (79/267)). This study showed that standardised multicountry surveillance, with the option of integrating clinical and molecular data, is a feasible strategy for monitoring CDI in Europe. PMID:27472820

  11. Gastrointestinal dysbiosis and the use of fecal microbial transplantation in Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, L Patrick; Beck, Paul L; MacDonald, Justin A

    2015-01-01

    The impact of antibiotics on the human gut microbiota is a significant concern. Antibiotic-associated diarrhea has been on the rise for the past few decades with the increasing usage of antibiotics. Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) have become one of the most prominent types of infectious diarrheal disease, with dramatically increased incidence in both the hospital and community setting worldwide. Studies show that variability in the innate host response may in part impact upon CDI severity in patients. That being said, CDI is a disease that shows the most prominent links to alterations to the gut microbiota, in both cause and treatment. With recurrence rates still relatively high, it is important to explore alternative therapies to CDI. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) and other types of bacteriotherapy have become exciting avenues of treatment for CDI. Recent clinical trials have generated excitement for the use of FMT as a therapeutic option for CDI; however, the exact components of the human gut microbiota needed for protection against CDI have remained elusive. Additional investigations on the effects of antibiotics on the human gut microbiota and subsequent CDI will help reduce the socioeconomic burden of CDI and potentially lead to new therapeutic modalities. PMID:26600975

  12. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation: Expanding Horizons for Clostridium difficile Infections and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Borody, Thomas J.; Peattie, Debra; Mitchell, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) methodology has been progressively refined over the past several years. The procedure has an extensive track record of success curing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) with remarkably few adverse effects. It achieves similar levels of success whether the CDI occurs in the young or elderly, previously normal or profoundly ill patients, or those with CDI in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). While using FMT to treat CDI, however, we learned that using the procedure in other gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, such as IBD without CDI, generally fails to effect cure. To improve results in treating other non-CDI diseases, innovatively designed Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) will be required to address questions about mechanisms operating within particular diseases. Availability of orally deliverable FMT products, such as capsules containing lyophilised fecal microbiota, will simplify CDI treatment and open the door to convenient, prolonged FMT delivery to the GI tract and will likely deliver improved results in both CDI and non-CDI diseases. PMID:27025624

  13. DNA detection of Clostridium difficile infection based on real-time resistance measurement.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Jiang, D N; Xiang, G M; Luo, F K; Liu, L L; Yu, J C; Pu, X Y

    2013-01-01

    We used a newly developed electrochemical method, real-time resistance measurement, based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), with real-time resistance monitoring and derivative analysis. DNA extracted from specimens was amplified through LAMP reaction. The 2 products of LAMP, DNA and pyrophosphate, both are negative ions; they combine with positive dye (crystal violet) and positive ions (Mg(2+)), which leads to an increase in the resistivity of the reaction liquid. The changes of resistivity were measured in real-time with a specially designed resistance electrode, to detect Clostridium difficile DNA. We found that electrochemical detection of C. difficile could be completed in 0.5-1 h, with a detection limit of 10(2) CFU/mL, with high accuracy (95.0%), sensitivity (91.1%), and specificity (97.3%) compared to PCR methods. C. difficile is commonly associated with antibiotic-induced diarrhea. Due to the difficulty in performing anaerobic culture and cytotoxicity neutralization assays, a simple, rapid, sensitive, and accurate method is preferred. We conclude that real-time resistance measurement is a rapid, sensitive, and stable method for the diagnosis of C. difficile infection that could be applied to gene chips and pocket instruments. PMID:24065671

  14. Development and application of an oral challenge mouse model for studying Clostridium perfringens type D infection.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E; Sayeed, Sameera; Fisher, Derek J; Poon, Rachael; Adams, Vicki; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A; Saputo, Julian; Uzal, Francisco A

    2007-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D isolates cause enterotoxemia in sheep, goats, and probably cattle. While the major disease signs and lesions of type D animal disease are usually attributed to epsilon toxin, a class B select agent, these bacteria typically produce several lethal toxins. Understanding of disease pathogenesis and development of improved vaccines are hindered by the lack of a small-animal model mimicking natural disease caused by type D isolates. Addressing this need, we developed an oral challenge mouse model of C. perfringens type D enterotoxemia. When BALB/c mice with a sealed anus were inoculated by intragastric gavage with type D isolates, 7 of 10 type D isolates were lethal, as defined by spontaneous death or severe clinical signs necessitating euthanasia. The lethalities of the seven type D isolates varied between 14 and 100%. Clinical signs in the lethally challenged mice included seizures, convulsions, hyperexcitability, and/or depression. Mild intestinal gas distention and brain edema were observed at necropsy in a few mice, while histology showed multifocal acute tubular necrosis of the kidney and edema in the lungs of most challenged mice that developed a clinical response. When the lethality of type D isolates in this model was compared with in vitro toxin production, only a limited correlation was observed. However, mice could be protected against lethality by intravenous passive immunization with an epsilon toxin antibody prior to oral challenge. This study provides an economical new model for studying the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type D infections. PMID:17562765

  15. Recent progress in understanding the pathogenesis of Clostridium perfringens type C infections

    PubMed Central

    McClane, B. A.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C causes necrotizing enteritis in humans and several other animal species. Type C isolates must produce at least beta toxin (CPB) and alpha toxin (CPA) and most strains produce several other toxins including perfringolysin O (PFO) and TpeL. However, current evidence indicates that CPB is the main virulence factor for type C infections. Most of this evidence is based upon the loss of virulence shown by isogenic type C CPB knock out mutants on cells, and also in rabbit intestinal loops and in mouse models. This virulence is regained when these mutants are complemented with the wild-type cpb gene. Many type C isolates respond to close contact with enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells by producing all toxins, except TpeL, much more rapidly than occurs during in vitro growth. This in vivo effect involves rapid transcriptional upregulation of the cpb, cpb2, pfoA and plc toxin genes. Rapid Caco-2 cell-induced upregulation of CPB and PFO production involves the VirS/VirR two-component system, since upregulated in vivo transcription of the pfoA and cpb genes was blocked by inactivating the virR gene and was reversible by complementation to restore VirR expression. PMID:21420802

  16. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation: Expanding Horizons for Clostridium difficile Infections and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Borody, Thomas J; Peattie, Debra; Mitchell, Scott W

    2015-01-01

    Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) methodology has been progressively refined over the past several years. The procedure has an extensive track record of success curing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) with remarkably few adverse effects. It achieves similar levels of success whether the CDI occurs in the young or elderly, previously normal or profoundly ill patients, or those with CDI in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). While using FMT to treat CDI, however, we learned that using the procedure in other gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, such as IBD without CDI, generally fails to effect cure. To improve results in treating other non-CDI diseases, innovatively designed Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) will be required to address questions about mechanisms operating within particular diseases. Availability of orally deliverable FMT products, such as capsules containing lyophilised fecal microbiota, will simplify CDI treatment and open the door to convenient, prolonged FMT delivery to the GI tract and will likely deliver improved results in both CDI and non-CDI diseases. PMID:27025624

  17. Rapid diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection by multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Barbut, F; Monot, M; Rousseau, A; Cavelot, S; Simon, T; Burghoffer, B; Lalande, V; Tankovic, J; Petit, J-C; Dupuy, B; Eckert, C

    2011-10-01

    The gold standards for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) are the cytotoxicity assay and the toxigenic culture. However, both methods are time-consuming and the results are not available before 24-48 h. We developed and evaluated a multiplex in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the simultaneous detection of toxigenic strains of C. difficile and the presumptive identification of the epidemic NAP1/027/BI strain from stools. Amplifications were performed using specific primers for tcdB and tcdC on an ABI Prism 7300 (Applied Biosystems). The detection of amplicons was done using TaqMan probes. The analytical sensitivity of the multiplex real-time PCR for detecting tcdB was estimated to 10 CFU/g of stools. This assay was assessed from 881 consecutive unformed stools from patients suspected of having CDI. The gold standard was the toxigenic culture for the diagnosis of CDI and PCR ribotyping for the identification of the NAP1/027/BI strain. The prevalence of positive toxigenic culture was 9.31%. Compared to the toxigenic culture, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 86.59%, 97.43%, 78.02%, and 98.57%, respectively, for the real-time PCR and 70.73%, 100%, 100%, and 97.08%, respectively, for the cytotoxicity assay. PMID:21487764

  18. Clostridium difficile infection in a French university hospital: Eight years of prospective surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Khanafer, Nagham; Oltra, Luc; Hulin, Monique; Dauwalder, Olivier; Vandenesch, Francois; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed with an increase in incidence and severity. Prospective surveillance was therefore implemented in a French university hospital to monitor the characteristics of patients at risk and to recognize local trends. Between 2007 and 2014, all hospitalized patients (≥18 years) with CDI were included. During the survey, the mean incidence rate of CDI was 2.9 per 10,000 hospital-days. In all, 590 patients were included. Most of the episodes were healthcare-associated (76.1%). The remaining cases were community-acquired (18.1%) and unknown (5.9%). The comparison with healthcare-associated cases showed that the community-acquired group had a lower rate of antimicrobial exposure (P < 0.001), proton pump inhibitor (P < 0.001), and immunosuppressive drugs (P = 0.02). Over the study period, death occurred in 61 patients (10.3%), with 18 (29.5%) being related to CDI according to the physician in charge of the patient. Active surveillance of CDI is required to obtain an accurate picture of the real dimensions of CDI. PMID:27281101

  19. Prospects for flavonoid and related phytochemicals as nature-inspired treatments for Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoqian; Alam, Zahidul; Feng, Li; Tsutsumi, Lissa S.; Sun, Dianqing; Hurdle, Julian G.

    2013-01-01

    Aims There is a need for novel treatments for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Antibacterial flavonoids are part of a large family of polyphenol phytochemicals with a long history of use in ethnomedicine, but are unexamined against C. difficile. We explored their anti-difficile properties. Methods and Results Anti-difficile activities were determined for several naturally occurring flavonoids, olympicin A and synthetic 4-chromanone and chalcone analogs. With the exception of olympicin A, most naturally occurring phytochemicals tested were poorly active. Diversified synthetic flavonoids resembling olympicin A retained anti-difficile activity, suggesting olympicin A could act as a pharmacophore to obtain novel agents. They also demonstrated concentration dependent killing of logarithmic and stationary phase cultures and reduced sporulation and toxin production. Olympicin A and some synthetic flavonoids dissipated the bacterial transmembrane potential. Interestingly, mutants could only be selected with the analog 207 at a frequency of 10-9. Conclusions Based on the potent anti-difficile properties of olympicin A and modified flavonoids, further exploration of this class of phytochemicals is warranted. Significance and Impact of the Study CDI is a major problem in developed countries. These studies point to there being an avenue for optimizing plant-derived flavonoids, and related antibacterial phytochemicals, as nature-inspired approaches to treat CDI. PMID:24479135

  20. Gut microbiota composition and Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized elderly individuals: a metagenomic study

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Christian; Ticinesi, Andrea; Gerritsen, Jacoline; Nouvenne, Antonio; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Turroni, Francesca; Duranti, Sabrina; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Ferrario, Chiara; Maggio, Marcello; Lauretani, Fulvio; De Vos, Willem; van Sinderen, Douwe; Meschi, Tiziana; Ventura, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota composition of elderly hospitalized patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) exposed to previous antibiotic treatment is still poorly investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the microbiota composition by means of 16S rRNA microbial profiling among three groups of hospitalized elderly patients (age ≥ 65) under standard diet including 25 CDI-positive (CDI group), 29 CDI-negative exposed to antibiotic treatment (AB+ group) and 30 CDI-negative subjects not on antibiotic treatment (AB− group). The functional properties of the gut microbiomes of CDI-positive vs CDI-negative subjects were also assessed by shotgun metagenomics. A significantly lower microbial diversity was detected in CDI samples, whose microbiomes clustered separately from CDI-negative specimens. CDI was associated with a significant under-representation of gut commensals with putative protective functionalities, including Bacteroides, Alistipes, Lachnospira and Barnesiella, and over-representation of opportunistic pathogens. These findings were confirmed by functional shotgun metagenomics analyses, including an in-depth profiling of the Peptostreptococcaceae family. In CDI-negative patients, antibiotic treatment was associated with significant depletion of few commensals like Alistipes, but not with a reduction in species richness. A better understanding of the correlations between CDI and the microbiota in high-risk elderly subjects may contribute to identify therapeutic targets for CDI. PMID:27166072

  1. Probiotics in Clostridium difficile infection: reviewing the need for a multistrain probiotic.

    PubMed

    Hell, M; Bernhofer, C; Stalzer, P; Kern, J M; Claassen, E

    2013-03-01

    In the past two years an enormous amount of molecular, genetic, metabolomic and mechanistic data on the host-bacterium interaction, a healthy gut microbiota and a possible role for probiotics in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been accumulated. Also, new hypervirulent strains of C. difficile have emerged. Yet, clinical trials in CDI have been less promising than in antibiotic associated diarrhoea in general, with more meta-analysis than primary papers on CDI-clinical-trials. The fact that C. difficile is a spore former, producing at least three different toxins has not yet been incorporated in the rational design of probiotics for (recurrent) CDI. Here we postulate that the plethora of effects of C. difficile and the vast amount of data on the role of commensal gut residents and probiotics point towards a multistrain mixture of probiotics to reduce CDI, but also to limit (nosocomial) transmission and/or endogenous reinfection. On the basis of a retrospective chart review of a series of ten CDI patients where recurrence was expected, all patients on adjunctive probiotic therapy with multistrain cocktail (Ecologic®AAD/OMNiBiOTiC® 10) showed complete clinical resolution. This result, and recent success in faecal transplants in CDI treatment, are supportive for the rational design of multistrain probiotics for CDI. PMID:23434948

  2. View from the front lines: an emergency medicine perspective on clostridial infections in injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Gonzales y Tucker, Richard Diego; Frazee, Bradley

    2014-12-01

    Injection drug use (IDU), specifically non-intravenous "skin-popping" of heroin, seems to provide optimal conditions for Clostridial infection and toxin production. IDU is therefore a major risk factor for wound botulism and Clostridial necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI) and continues to be linked to cases of tetanus. Case clusters of all 3 diseases have occurred among IDUs in Western U.S. and Europe. Medical personnel who care for the IDU population must be thoroughly familiar with the clinical presentation and management of these diseases. Wound botulism presents with bulbar symptoms and signs that are easily overlooked; rapid acquisition and administration of antitoxin can prevent neuromuscular respiratory failure. In addition to Clostridium perfringens, IDU-related NSTIs can be caused by Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium novyi, which may share a distinct clinical presentation. Early definitive NSTI management, which decreases mortality, requires a low index of suspicion on the part of emergency physicians and low threshold for surgical exploration and debridement on the part of the surgeon. Tetanus should be preventable in the IDU population through careful attention to vaccination status. PMID:25230330

  3. Enhanced surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection occurring outside hospital, England, 2011 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Fawley, Warren N; Davies, Kerrie A; Morris, Trefor; Parnell, Peter; Howe, Robin; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-07-21

    There are limited national epidemiological data for community-associated (CA)-Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs). Between March 2011 and March 2013, laboratories in England submitted to the Clostridium difficile Ribotyping Network (CDRN) up to 10 diarrhoeal faecal samples from successive patients with CA-CDI, defined here as C. difficile toxin-positive diarrhoea commencing outside hospital (or less than 48 hours after hospital admission), including those cases associated with community-based residential care, with no discharge from hospital within the previous 12 weeks. Patient demographics and C. difficile PCR ribotypes were compared for CA-CDIs in our study and presumed healthcare-associated (HA) CDIs via CDRN. Ribotype diversity indices, ranking and relative prevalences were very similar in CA- vs HA-CDIs, although ribotypes 002 (p ≤ 0.0001),020 (p = 0.009) and 056 (p < 0.0001) predominated in CA-CDIs; ribotype 027 (p = 0.01) predominated in HA-CDIs. Epidemic ribotypes 027 and 078 predominated in institutional residents with CDI (including care/nursing homes) compared with people with CDI living at home. Ribotype diversity decreased with increasing age in HA-CDIs, but not in CA-CDIs. Ribotype 078 CA-CDIs were significantly more common in elderly people (3.4% (6/174) vs 8.7% (45/519) in those aged < 65 and ≥ 65 years, respectively; p = 0.019). No antibiotics were prescribed in the previous four weeks in about twofold more CA-CDI vs HAs (38.6% (129/334) vs 20.3% (1,226/6,028); p < 0.0001). We found very similar ribotype distributions in CA- and HA-CDIs, although a few ribotypes significantly predominated in one setting. These national data emphasise the close interplay between, and likely common reservoirs for, CDIs, particularly when epidemic strains are not dominant. PMID:27487436

  4. Prospective study of Clostridium difficile infections in Europe with phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of the isolates.

    PubMed

    Barbut, F; Mastrantonio, P; Delmée, M; Brazier, J; Kuijper, E; Poxton, I

    2007-11-01

    A 2-month prospective study of Clostridium difficile infections was conducted in 38 hospitals from 14 different European countries in order to obtain an overview of the phenotypic and genotypic features of clinical isolates of C. difficile during 2005. Of 411 isolates from diarrhoeagenic patients with suspected C. difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD), 354 were toxigenic, of which 86 (24.3%) were toxin-variant strains. Major toxinotypes included toxinotypes 0 (n = 268), V (n = 28), VIII (n = 22) and III (n = 25). MICs of metronidazole, vancomycin, erythromycin, clindamycin, moxifloxacin and tetracycline were determined using the Etest method. All the toxigenic strains were fully-susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. Resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline and moxifloxacin was found in 44.4%, 46.1%, 9.2% and 37.5% of the isolates, respectively. Sixty-six different PCR ribotypes were characterised, with the 027 epidemic strain accounting for 6.2% of isolates. This strain was positive for binary toxin genes, had an 18-bp deletion in the tcdC gene, and was resistant to both erythromycin and moxifloxacin. The mean incidence of CDAD was 2.45 cases/10 000 patient-days, but this figure varied widely among the participating hospitals. Patients infected with the 027 strain were more likely to have a severe disease (OR 3.29, 95% CI 1.19-9.16, p 0.008) and to have been specifically treated with metronidazole or vancomycin (OR 7.46, 95% CI 1.02-154, p 0.02). Ongoing epidemiological surveillance of cases of CDAD, with periodic characterisation of the strains involved, is required to detect clustering of cases in time and space and to monitor the emergence of specific highly virulent clones. PMID:17850341

  5. Clostridium difficile infection diagnosis in a paediatric population: comparison of methodologies.

    PubMed

    Hart, J; Putsathit, P; Knight, D R; Sammels, L; Riley, T V; Keil, A

    2014-09-01

    The increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in paediatric hospitalised populations, combined with the emergence of hypervirulent strains, community-acquired CDI and the need for prompt treatment and infection control, makes the rapid, accurate diagnosis of CDI crucial. We validated commonly used C. difficile diagnostic tests in a paediatric hospital population. From October 2011 to January 2012, 150 consecutive stools were collected from 75 patients at a tertiary paediatric hospital in Perth, Western Australia. Stools were tested using: C. Diff Quik Chek Complete, Illumigene C. difficile, GeneOhm Cdiff, cycloserine cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA) culture, and cell culture cytotoxin neutralisation assay (CCNA). The reference standard was growth on CCFA or Cdiff Chromagar and PCR on isolates to detect tcdA, tcdB, cdtA, and cdtB. Isolates were PCR ribotyped. The prevalence of CDI was high (43 % of patients). Quik Chek Complete glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) demonstrated a low negative predictive value (NPV) (93 %). Both CCNA and Quik Chek Complete toxin A/B had poor sensitivity (33 % and 29 % respectively). Molecular methods both had 89 % sensitivity. Algorithms using GDH + Illumigene or GeneOhm reduced the sensitivity to 85 % and 83 % respectively. Ribotype UK014/20 predominated. GDH NPV and GeneOhm and Illumigene sensitivities were reduced compared with adult studies. Quik Chek Complete and CCNA cannot reliably detect toxigenic CDI. A GDH first algorithm showed reduced sensitivity. In a high prevalence paediatric population, molecular methods alone are recommended over the use of GDH algorithm or culture and CCNA, as they demonstrate the best test performance characteristics. PMID:24781004

  6. Association Between Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Practices and Community-Associated Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dantes, Raymund; Mu, Yi; Hicks, Lauri A.; Cohen, Jessica; Bamberg, Wendy; Beldavs, Zintars G.; Dumyati, Ghinwa; Farley, Monica M.; Holzbauer, Stacy; Meek, James; Phipps, Erin; Wilson, Lucy; Winston, Lisa G.; McDonald, L. Clifford; Lessa, Fernanda C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Antibiotic use predisposes patients to Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), and approximately 32% of these infections are community-associated (CA) CDI. The population-level impact of antibiotic use on adult CA-CDI rates is not well described. Methods. We used 2011 active population- and laboratory-based surveillance data from 9 US geographic locations to identify adult CA-CDI cases, defined as C difficile-positive stool specimens (by toxin or molecular assay) collected from outpatients or from patients ≤3 days after hospital admission. All patients were surveillance area residents and aged ≥20 years with no positive test ≤8 weeks prior and no overnight stay in a healthcare facility ≤12 weeks prior. Outpatient oral antibiotic prescriptions dispensed in 2010 were obtained from the IMS Health Xponent database. Regression models examined the association between outpatient antibiotic prescribing and adult CA-CDI rates. Methods. Healthcare providers prescribed 5.2 million courses of antibiotics among adults in the surveillance population in 2010, for an average of 0.73 per person. Across surveillance sites, antibiotic prescription rates (0.50–0.88 prescriptions per capita) and unadjusted CA-CDI rates (40.7–139.3 cases per 100 000 persons) varied. In regression modeling, reducing antibiotic prescribing rates by 10% among persons ≥20 years old was associated with a 17% (95% confidence interval, 6.0%–26.3%; P = .032) decrease in CA-CDI rates after adjusting for age, gender, race, and type of diagnostic assay. Reductions in prescribing penicillins and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were associated with the greatest decreases in CA-CDI rates. Conclusions and Relevance. Community-associated CDI prevention should include reducing unnecessary outpatient antibiotic use. A modest reduction of 10% in outpatient antibiotic prescribing can have a disproportionate impact on reducing CA-CDI rates. PMID:26509182

  7. Storage Duration of Red Blood Cell Transfusion and Clostridium difficile Infection: A Within Person Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Mary A. M.; Micic, Dejan; Blumberg, Neil; Young, Vincent B.; Aronoff, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Randomized controlled trials demonstrated that red blood cell (RBC) transfusion elevates the risk of infection, and trials are underway to evaluate whether RBC storage affects outcomes. We previously reported that transfusion predicts Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and, therefore, planned an investigation to examine this further using a more robust design. Design Within-person case-crossover study. Hospitalizations in which CDI developed (n = 406) were compared to hospitalizations for the same individuals in which CDI did not occur (n = 949). Transfusion volume and storage duration were assessed prior to the onset of CDI. Setting University of Michigan Health System. Patients Participants were individuals with a diagnosis of CDI from July 2009 through June 2012. Measurements and Main Results During the hospitalizations when CDI occurred, 34.7% of the patients received allogeneic RBC transfusions (mean volume, 688 ml) compared to 19.0% of patients in hospitalizations without CDI (mean volume, 180 ml). The odds of healthcare-associated CDI increased by 76% (95% CI 1.39–2.23) for every liter of RBCs transfused and was elevated in both nonsurgical (OR = 1.90) and surgical (OR = 1.86) hospitalizations. In patients who received RBC transfusions, the odds of developing CDI increased by 6% for every additional day of RBC stored and by 53% for every week of additional storage (P = 0.002). Conclusions Hospitalizations in which a patient received a greater volume of RBC transfusions were more likely to be associated with the development of CDI. RBC units stored for a longer duration were associated with the development of healthcare-associated CDI after adjustment for RBC volume. PMID:24586694

  8. Decreased Functional Status as a Risk Factor for Severe Clostridium difficile Infection among Hospitalized Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Krishna; Micic, Dejan; Chenoweth, Elizabeth; Deng, Lili; Galecki, Andrzej T.; Ring, Cathrin; Young, Vincent B.; Aronoff, David M.; Malani, Preeti N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized older adults, who are among the patients at highest risk of severe infection. The role of impaired functional status as a risk factor for severe CDI remains poorly understood. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting The University of Michigan Health System, a 930-bed tertiary care hospital. Participants Hospitalized patients with CDI, age ≥50 years. Measurements Included demographics; clinical characteristics; and a composite outcome, the CDI severity score: fever [T >38°C]; acute organ dysfunction; white blood cell count >15 000/mm3; lack of response to therapy; intensive care unit admission, need for colectomy, or death due to CDI. Pre-admission functional status was assessed by ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs); patients were assigned to an ADL Class (independent, some assistance, or full assistance). Secondary outcomes included length of stay; 90-day mortality and readmission; and CDI recurrence. Results We identified 90 hospitalized patients with CDI (mean age 66.6 [± SD 10.2]). Fifty-eight patients (64.4%) had severe CDI as measured by a positive severity score. At baseline, 25 (27.8%) required assistance with ADLs. On univariate analysis, an ADL Class of “full assistance” was associated with severity score (OR 7, CI 95 1.83–26.79, P = .004). In a multivariable model which included age, ADL Class, congestive heart failure, diabetes mellitus, depression, weighted Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score, immunosuppression, prior CDI, and PPI use, an ADL Class of “full assistance” retained its association with severity score (OR 8.1, CI 95 1.24–52.95, P = .029). ADL Class was not associated with secondary outcomes. Conclusion Among this cohort of hospitalized older adults, impaired functional status was an independent risk factor for severe CDI. PMID:24083842

  9. Fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Webb, B J; Brunner, A; Ford, C D; Gazdik, M A; Petersen, F B; Hoda, D

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a consequence of intestinal dysbiosis and is particularly common following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective method of treating CDI by correcting intestinal dysbiosis by passive transfer of healthy donor microflora. FMT has not been widely used in immunocompromised patients, including HSCT recipients, owing to concern for donor-derived infection. Here, we describe initial results of an FMT program for CDI at a US HSCT center. Seven HSCT recipients underwent FMT between February 2015 and February 2016. Mean time post HSCT was 635 days (25-75 interquartile range [IQR] 38-791). Five of the patients (71.4%) were on immunosuppressive therapy at FMT; 4 had required long-term suppressive oral vancomycin therapy because of immediate recurrence after antibiotic cessation. Stool donors underwent comprehensive health and behavioral screening and laboratory testing of serum and stool for 32 potential pathogens. FMT was administered via the naso-jejunal route in 6 of the 7 patients. Mean follow-up was 265 days (IQR 51-288). Minor post-FMT adverse effects included self-limited bloating and urgency. One patient was suspected of having post-FMT small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. No serious adverse events were noted and all-cause mortality was 0%. Six of 7 (85.7%) patients had no recurrence; 1 patient recurred at day 156 post FMT after taking an oral antibiotic and required repeat FMT, after which no recurrence has occurred. Diarrhea was improved in all patients and 1 patient with gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease was able to taper off systemic immunosuppression after FMT. With careful donor selection and laboratory screening, FMT appears to be a safe and effective therapy for CDI in HSCT patients and may confer additional benefits. Larger studies are necessary to confirm safety and efficacy and explore other possible effects. PMID:27214585

  10. Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection: A Systematic Survey of Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lytvyn, Lyubov; Mertz, Dominik; Sadeghirad, Behnam; Alaklobi, Faisal; Selva, Anna; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Johnston, Bradley C

    2016-08-01

    BACKGROUND Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of hospital-acquired infectious diarrhea. OBJECTIVE To analyze the methodological quality, content, and supporting evidence among clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) on CDI prevention. DESIGN AND SETTING We searched medical databases and gray literature for CPGs on CDI prevention published January 2004-January 2015. Three reviewers independently screened articles and rated CPG quality using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) instrument, composed of 23 items, rated 1-7, within 6 domains. We reported each domain score as a percentage of its maximum possible score and standardized range. We summarized recommendations, extracted their supporting articles, and rated individually the level of evidence using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. RESULTS Of 2,578 articles screened, 5 guidelines met inclusion criteria. Median AGREE II scores and interquartile ranges were: clarity of presentation, 75.9% (75.9%-79.6%); scope and purpose, 74.1% (68.5%-85.2%); editorial independence, 63.9% (47.2%-66.7%); applicability, 43.1% (19.4%-55.6%); stakeholder involvement, 40.7% (38.9%-44.4%); and rigor of development, 18.1% (17.4%-35.4%). CPGs addressed several common strategies for CDI prevention, including antibiotic stewardship, hypochlorite solutions, probiotic prophylaxis, and bundle strategies. Recommendations were often not consistent with evidence, and most were based on low-level studies. CONCLUSION CPGs did not adhere well to AGREE II reporting standards. Furthermore, there was limited transparency in moving from evidence to recommendations. CDI prevention CPGs need to better adhere to AGREE-II and be transparent in moving from evidence to recommendations, and recommendations need to be consistent with available evidence. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:901-908. PMID:27267201

  11. Environmental Contamination in Households of Patients with Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Megan K; Bobr, Aleh; Kuskowski, Michael A; Johnston, Brian D; Sadowsky, Michael J; Khoruts, Alexander; Johnson, James R

    2016-05-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (R-CDI) is common and difficult to treat, potentially necessitating fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). Although C. difficilespores persist in the hospital environment and cause infection, little is known about their potential presence or importance in the household environment. Households of R-CDI subjects in the peri-FMT period and of geographically matched and age-matched controls were analyzed for the presence ofC. difficile Household environmental surfaces and fecal samples from humans and pets in the household were examined. Households of post-FMT subjects were also examined (environmental surfaces only). Participants were surveyed regarding their personal history and household cleaning habits. Species identity and molecular characteristics of presumptive C. difficile isolates from environmental and fecal samples were determined by using the Pro kit (Remel, USA), Gram staining, PCR, toxinotyping, tcdC gene sequencing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Environmental cultures detected C. difficile on ≥1 surface in 8/8 (100%) peri-FMT households, versus 3/8 (38%) post-FMT households and 3/8 (38%) control households (P= 0.025). The most common C. difficile-positive sites were the vacuum (11/27; 41%), toilet (8/30; 27%), and bathroom sink (5/29; 17%).C. difficile was detected in 3/36 (8%) fecal samples (two R-CDI subjects and one household member). Nine (90%) of 10 households with multiple C. difficile-positive samples had a single genotype present each. In conclusion,C. difficile was found in the household environment of R-CDI patients, but whether it was found as a cause or consequence of R-CDI is unknown. If household contamination leads to R-CDI, effective decontamination may be protective. PMID:26921425

  12. Risk Factors for Recurrence, Complications and Mortality in Clostridium difficile Infection: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Abou Chakra, Claire Nour; Pepin, Jacques; Sirard, Stephanie; Valiquette, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can lead to complications, recurrence, and death. Numerous studies have assessed risk factors for these unfavourable outcomes, but systematic reviews or meta-analyses published so far were limited in scope or in quality. Methods A systematic review was completed according to PRISMA guidelines. An electronic search in five databases was performed. Studies published until October 2013 were included if risk factors for at least one CDI outcome were assessed with multivariate analyses. Results 68 studies were included: 24 assessed risk factors for recurrence, 18 for complicated CDI, 8 for treatment failure, and 30 for mortality. Most studies accounted for mortality in the definition of complicated CDI. Important variables were inconsistently reported, such as previous episodes and use of antibiotics. Substantial heterogeneity and methodological limitations were noted, mainly in the sample size, the definition of the outcomes and periods of follow-up, precluding a meta-analysis. Older age, use of antibiotics after diagnosis, use of proton pump inhibitors, and strain type were the most frequent risk factors for recurrence. Older age, leucocytosis, renal failure and co-morbidities were frequent risk factors for complicated CDI. When considered alone, mortality was associated with age, co-morbidities, hypo-albuminemia, leucocytosis, acute renal failure, and infection with ribotype 027. Conclusion Laboratory parameters currently used in European and American guidelines to define patients at risk of a complicated CDI are adequate. Strategies for the management of CDI should be tailored according to the age of the patient, biological markers of severity, and underlying co-morbidities. PMID:24897375

  13. Microbiota Dynamics in Patients Treated with Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Garg, Shashank; Girotra, Mohit; Maddox, Cynthia; von Rosenvinge, Erik C.; Dutta, Anand; Dutta, Sudhir; Fricke, W. Florian

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembraneous colitis and is responsible for a large and increasing fraction of hospital-acquired infections. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an alternate treatment option for recurrent C. difficile infection (RCDI) refractory to antibiotic therapy. It has recently been discussed favorably in the clinical and scientific communities and is receiving increasing public attention. However, short- and long-term health consequences of FMT remain a concern, as the effects of the transplanted microbiota on the patient remain unknown. To shed light on microbial events associated with RCDI and treatment by FMT, we performed fecal microbiota analysis by 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing of 14 pairs of healthy donors and RCDI patients treated successfully by FMT. Post-FMT patient and healthy donor samples collected up to one year after FMT were studied longitudinally, including one post-FMT patient with antibiotic-associated relapse three months after FMT. This analysis allowed us not only to confirm prior reports that RCDI is associated with reduced diversity and compositional changes in the fecal microbiota, but also to characterize previously undocumented post-FMT microbiota dynamics. Members of the Streptococcaceae, Enterococcaceae, or Enterobacteriaceae were significantly increased and putative butyrate producers, such as Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae were significantly reduced in samples from RCDI patients before FMT as compared to post-FMT patient and healthy donor samples. RCDI patient samples showed more case-specific variations than post-FMT patient and healthy donor samples. However, none of the bacterial groups were invariably associated with RCDI or successful treatment by FMT. Overall microbiota compositions in post-FMT patients, specifically abundances of the above-mentioned Firmicutes, continued to change for at least 16 weeks after FMT, suggesting that full microbiota

  14. Clostridium difficile Infections in Veterans Health Administration Long-Term Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Jeffrey S; Evans, Martin E; Simbartl, Loretta A; Kralovic, Stephen M; Kelly, Allison A; Jain, Rajiv; Roselle, Gary A

    2016-03-01

    OBJECTIVE A nationwide initiative was implemented in February 2014 to decrease Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in Veterans Affairs (VA) long-term care facilities. We report a baseline of national CDI data collected during the 2 years before the Initiative. METHODS Personnel at each of 122 reporting sites entered monthly retrospective CDI case data from February 2012 through January 2014 into a national database using case definitions similar to those used in the National Healthcare Safety Network Multidrug-Resistant Organism/CDI module. The data were evaluated using Poisson regression models to examine infection occurrences over time while accounting for admission prevalence and type of diagnostic test. RESULTS During the 24-month analysis period, there were 100,800 admissions, 6,976,121 resident days, and 1,558 CDI cases. The pooled CDI admission prevalence rate (including recurrent cases) was 0.38 per 100 admissions, and the pooled nonduplicate/nonrecurrent community-onset rate was 0.17 per 100 admissions. The pooled long-term care facility-onset rate and the clinically confirmed (ie, diarrhea or evidence of pseudomembranous colitis) long-term care facility-onset rate were 1.98 and 1.78 per 10,000 resident days, respectively. Accounting for diagnostic test type, the long-term care facility-onset rate declined significantly (P=.05), but the clinically confirmed long-term care facility-onset rate did not. CONCLUSIONS VA long-term care facility CDI rates were comparable to those in recent reports from other long-term care facilities. The significant decline in the long-term care facility-onset rate but not in the clinically confirmed long-term care facility-onset rate may have been due to less testing of asymptomatic patients. Efforts to decrease CDI rates in long-term care facilities are necessary as part of a coordinated approach to decrease healthcare-associated infections. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(3):295-300. PMID:26686361

  15. Performance management of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitals - The carrot or stick approach?

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Fidelma; Riordan, Mary O

    2016-02-01

    Public and political pressure for healthcare quality indicator monitoring, specifically healthcare-associated infection (HAI) has intensified the debate regarding the merits of public reporting and target setting as policy approaches. This paper reviews the evidence for these approaches with a focus on HAI, including Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Healthcare key performance indicators (KPIs) and associated targets have been used widely with little evaluation. While targets are associated with some HAI reductions including CDI, as their control is multi-factorial, it is likely that reductions are due to numerous, concurrent control measures. Targets may help tackle organizational-wide issues that require high level management engagement and have contributed to the increased access and influence of infection control teams. HAI public reporting has also gained traction and is mandatory in many countries despite little scientific evaluation. CDI is one of the KPIs used but there is little consensus as to the best KPI for public reporting. Countries without public reporting have also seen improvements. Using indicator-based strategies rather than evidence-based ones risk improving the KPI but not necessarily quality of care. 'Bottom-up' approaches focussing on quality improvement and innovation generated by front line staff are seen as a lever for sustainable change. Positive deviance, where the resourcefulness and problem solving abilities of staff is harnessed, enables 'bottom-up' changes with process and outcome improvements. As implementation of best practice in healthcare is dependent on behavioural and cultural change, it is most likely that a combination of 'top-down' and 'bottom-up' approaches are required for sustainable improvement. This combined approach was used to improve staff influenza vaccination rates. Regulation may initially direct the spot-light onto infection control needs but true sustainable HAI reduction will only be fostered with

  16. Hospital Clostridium difficile Infection Rates and Prediction of Length of Stay in Patients Without C. difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Miller, Aaron C; Polgreen, Linnea A; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Polgreen, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    BACKGROUND Inpatient length of stay (LOS) has been used as a measure of hospital quality and efficiency. Patients with Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) have longer LOS. OBJECTIVE To describe the relationship between hospital CDI incidence and the LOS of patients without CDI. DESIGN Retrospective cohort analysis. METHODS We predicted average LOS for patients without CDI at both the hospital and patient level using hospital CDI incidence. We also controlled for hospital characteristics (eg, bed size) and patient characteristics (eg, comorbidities, age). SETTING Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 2009-2011. PATIENTS The Nationwide Inpatient Sample includes patients from a 20% sample of all nonfederal US hospitals. RESULTS Inpatient LOS was significantly longer (P<.001) at hospitals with greater CDI incidence at both the hospital and individual level. At a hospital level, a percentage point increase in the CDI incidence rate was associated with more than an additional day's stay (between 1.19 and 1.61 days). At the individual level, controlling for all observable variables, a percentage point increase in the CDI incidence rate at their hospital was also associated with longer LOS (between 0.6 and 1.05 additional days). Hospital CDI incidence had a larger impact on LOS than many other commonly used predictors of LOS. CONCLUSION CDI rates are a predictor of LOS in patients without CDI at an individual and institutional level. CDI rates are easy to measure and report and thus may provide an important marker for hospital efficiency and/or quality. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(4):404-410. PMID:26858126

  17. Antimicrobial Resistance and Reduced Susceptibility in Clostridium difficile: Potential Consequences for Induction, Treatment, and Recurrence of C. difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Simon D.; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains a substantial burden on healthcare systems and is likely to remain so given our reliance on antimicrobial therapies to treat bacterial infections, especially in an aging population in whom multiple co-morbidities are common. Antimicrobial agents are a key component in the aetiology of CDI, both in the establishment of the infection and also in its treatment. The purpose of this review is to summarise the role of antimicrobial agents in primary and recurrent CDI; assessing why certain antimicrobial classes may predispose to the induction of CDI according to a balance between antimicrobial activity against the gut microflora and C. difficile. Considering these aspects of CDI is important in both the prevention of the infection and in the development of new antimicrobial treatments. PMID:27025625

  18. Fidaxomicin: A novel agent for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhanel, George G; Walkty, Andrew J; Karlowsky, James A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Due to the limitations of existing treatment options for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), new therapies are needed. OBJECTIVE: To review the available data on fidaxomicin regarding chemistry, mechanisms of action and resistance, in vitro activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, efficacy and safety in clinical trials, and place in therapy. METHODS: A search of PubMed using the terms “fidaxomicin”, “OPT-80”, “PAR-101”, “OP-1118”, “difimicin”, “tiacumicin” and “lipiarmycin” was performed. All English-language articles from January 1983 to November 2014 were reviewed, as well as bibliographies of all articles. RESULTS: Fidaxomicin is the first macrocyclic lactone antibiotic with activity versus C difficile. It inhibits RNA polymerase, therefore, preventing transcription. Fidaxomicin (and its active metabolite OP-1118) is bactericidal against C difficile and exhibits a prolonged postantibiotic effect (approximately 10 h). Other than for C difficile, fidaxomicin demonstrated only moderate inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria and was a poor inhibitor of normal colonic flora, including anaerobes and enteric Gram-negative bacilli. After oral administration (200 mg two times per day for 10 days), fidaxomicin achieved low serum concentration levels but high fecal concentration levels (mean approximately 1400 μg/g stool). Phase 3 clinical trials involving adults with CDI demonstrated that 200 mg fidaxomicin twice daily for 10 days was noninferior to 125 mg oral vancomycin four times daily for 10 days in regard to clinical response at the end of therapy. Fidaxomicin was, however, reported to be superior to oral vancomycin in reducing recurrent CDI and achieving a sustained clinical response (assessed at day 28) for patients infected with non-BI/NAP1/027 strains. CONCLUSION: Fidaxomicin was noninferior to oral vancomycin with regard to clinical response at the end of CDI therapy. Fidaxomicin has been

  19. [Oncologic aspects of Clostridium difficile].

    PubMed

    Telekes, András

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most frequent among cancer patients. Its diagnosis is complicated by the fact that the symptoms of the infection and the side effects of the anticancer treatments could be similar. Chemotherapy itself might facilitate Clostridium difficile infection. Several risk factors are known but Clostridium difficile infection can develop in the absence of these. Neutreopenia is a risk factor for fatal Clostridium difficile infection and also the side effect of chemotherapy. Therefore, if symptoms of the potential infection develop (eg. diarrhoea more than three times a day, fever above 38.5 °C, colitis, rapid increase of serum creatinin) Clostridium difficile infection should be excluded. If the infection is confirmed it should be managed in the most efficient way. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(28), 1110-1116. PMID:27397423

  20. Fecal Microbial Transplants Reduce Antibiotic-resistant Genes in Patients With Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Millan, Braden; Park, Heekuk; Hotte, Naomi; Mathieu, Olivier; Burguiere, Pierre; Tompkins, Thomas A.; Kao, Dina; Madsen, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI) is associated with repeated antibiotic treatment and the enhanced growth of antibiotic-resistant microbes. This study tested the hypothesis that patients with RCDI would harbor large numbers of antibiotic-resistant microbes and that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) would reduce the number of antibiotic-resistant genes. Methods. In a single center study, patients with RCDI (n = 20) received FMT from universal donors via colonoscopy. Stool samples were collected from donors (n = 3) and patients prior to and following FMT. DNA was extracted and shotgun metagenomics performed. Results as well as assembled libraries from a healthy cohort (n = 87) obtained from the Human Microbiome Project were aligned against the NCBI bacterial taxonomy database and the Comprehensive Antibiotic Resistance Database. Results were corroborated through a DNA microarray containing 354 antibiotic resistance (ABR) genes. Results. RCDI patients had a greater number and diversity of ABR genes compared with donors and healthy controls. Beta-lactam, multidrug efflux pumps, fluoroquinolone, and antibiotic inactivation ABR genes were increased in RCDI patients, although donors primarily had tetracycline resistance. RCDI patients were dominated by Proteobacteria with Escherichia coli and Klebsiella most prevalent. FMT resulted in a resolution of symptoms that correlated directly with a decreased number and diversity of ABR genes and increased Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes with reduced Proteobacteria. ABR gene profiles were maintained in recipients for up to a year following FMT. Conclusions. RCDI patients have increased numbers of antibiotic-resistant organisms. FMT is effective in the eradication of pathogenic antibiotic-resistant organisms and elimination of ABR genes. PMID:27025836

  1. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Six Strategies to Treat Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lapointe-Shaw, Lauren; Tran, Kim L.; Coyte, Peter C.; Hancock-Howard, Rebecca L.; Powis, Jeff; Poutanen, Susan M.; Hota, Susy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of six treatment strategies for patients diagnosed with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Canada: 1. oral metronidazole; 2. oral vancomycin; 3.oral fidaxomicin; 4. fecal transplantation by enema; 5. fecal transplantation by nasogastric tube; and 6. fecal transplantation by colonoscopy. Perspective Public insurer for all hospital and physician services. Setting Ontario, Canada. Methods A decision analytic model was used to model costs and lifetime health effects of each strategy for a typical patient experiencing up to three recurrences, over 18 weeks. Recurrence data and utilities were obtained from published sources. Cost data was obtained from published sources and hospitals in Toronto, Canada. The willingness-to-pay threshold was $50,000/QALY gained. Results Fecal transplantation by colonoscopy dominated all other strategies in the base case, as it was less costly and more effective than all alternatives. After accounting for uncertainty in all model parameters, there was an 87% probability that fecal transplantation by colonoscopy was the most beneficial strategy. If colonoscopy was not available, fecal transplantation by enema was cost-effective at $1,708 per QALY gained, compared to metronidazole. In addition, fecal transplantation by enema was the preferred strategy if the probability of recurrence following this strategy was below 8.7%. If fecal transplantation by any means was unavailable, fidaxomicin was cost-effective at an additional cost of $25,968 per QALY gained, compared to metronidazole. Conclusion Fecal transplantation by colonoscopy (or enema, if colonoscopy is unavailable) is cost-effective for treating recurrent CDI in Canada. Where fecal transplantation is not available, fidaxomicin is also cost-effective. PMID:26901316

  2. Comparison of real-time PCR techniques to cytotoxigenic culture methods for diagnosing Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Knetsch, C W; Bakker, D; de Boer, R F; Sanders, I; Hofs, S; Kooistra-Smid, A M D; Corver, J; Eastwood, K; Wilcox, M H; Kuijper, E J

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, the incidence of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) with a more severe course has increased in Europe and North America. Assays that are capable of rapidly diagnosing CDI are essential. Two real-time PCRs (LUMC and LvI) targeting C. difficile toxin genes (tcdB, and tcdA and tcdB, respectively) were compared with the BD GeneOhm PCR (targeting the tcdB gene), using cytotoxigenic culture as a gold standard. In addition, a real-time PCR targeting the tcdC frameshift mutation at position 117 (Δ117 PCR) was evaluated for detecting toxigenic C. difficile and the presence of PCR ribotype 027 in stool samples. In total, 526 diarrheal samples were prospectively collected and included in the study. Compared with those for cytotoxigenic culture, sensitivity, specificity, positive predicted value (PPV), and negative predicted value (NPV) were for PCR LUMC 96.0%, 88.0%, 66.0%, and 98.9%, for PCR LvI 100.0%, 89.4%, 69.7%, and 100.0%, for PCR Δ117 98.0%, 90.7%, 71.9%, and 99.5%, and for PCR BD GeneOhm 88.3%, 96.9%, 86.5%, and 97.4%. Compared to those with feces samples cultured positive for C. difficile type 027, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the Δ117 PCR were 95.2%, 96.2%, 87.0%, and 98.7%. We conclude that all real-time PCRs can be applied as a first screening test in an algorithm for diagnosing CDI. However, the low PPVs hinder the use of the assays as stand-alone tests. Furthermore, the Δ117 PCR may provide valuable information for minimizing the spread of the epidemic C. difficile PCR ribotype 027. PMID:20980562

  3. Epidemiology, outcomes, and predictors of mortality in hospitalized adults with Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Sahil; Gupta, Arjun; Baddour, Larry M; Pardi, Darrell S

    2016-08-01

    Studies have demonstrated an increasing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) incidence in hospitals and the community, with increasing morbidity and mortality. In this study, we analyzed data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) to evaluate CDI epidemiology, outcomes, and predictors of mortality in hospitalized adults. We identified cases of CDI (and associated comorbid conditions) from NHDS data from 2005 through 2009 using ICD-9 codes. Weighted univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to ascertain CDI incidence, associations between CDI and outcomes [length of stay (LOS), colectomy, all-cause in-hospital mortality, and discharge to a care facility], and predictors of all-cause in-hospital mortality. Of an estimated 162 million adult inpatients, 1.26 million (0.8 %) had CDI. The overall CDI incidence is 77.8/10,000 hospitalizations, with no statistically significant change over the study period. On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age, gender, and comorbid conditions, CDI is an independent predictor of longer LOS (mean difference, 2.35 days), all-cause mortality [odds ratio (OR) 1.45], colectomy (OR 1.41), and discharge to a care facility (OR 2.12) (all P < 0.001). Elderly patients have a higher CDI incidence and worse outcomes than younger adults. The strongest predictors of all-cause mortality in patients with CDI include age 65 years or older, colectomy, and coagulation abnormalities. Despite stable CDI incidence and advances in management, CDI is associated with increased LOS, colectomy, all-cause in-hospital mortality, and discharge to a care facility in hospitalized, especially elderly, adults. Age older than 65 years should be added to the severity criteria for CDI. PMID:26694494

  4. Calprotectin and lactoferrin faecal levels in patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI): a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Swale, Andrew; Miyajima, Fabio; Roberts, Paul; Hall, Amanda; Little, Margaret; Beadsworth, Mike B J; Beeching, Nick J; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi; Parry, Chris M; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of both calprotectin and lactoferrin in faeces has successfully been used to discriminate between functional and inflammatory bowel conditions, but evidence is limited for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We prospectively recruited a cohort of 164 CDI cases and 52 controls with antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (AAD). Information on disease severity, duration of symptoms, 30-day mortality and 90-day recurrence as markers of complicated CDI were recorded. Specimens were subject to microbiological culture and PCR-ribotyping. Levels of faecal calprotectin (FC) and lactoferrin (FL) were measured by ELISA. Statistical analysis was conducted using percentile categorisation. ROC curve analysis was employed to determine optimal cut-off values. Both markers were highly correlated with each other (r2 = 0.74) and elevated in cases compared to controls (p<0.0001; ROC>0.85), although we observed a large amount of variability across both groups. The optimal case-control cut-off point was 148 mg/kg for FC and 8.1 ng/µl for FL. Median values for FL in CDI cases were significantly greater in patients suffering from severe disease compared to non-severe disease (104.6 vs. 40.1 ng/µl, p = 0.02), but were not significant for FC (969.3 vs. 512.7 mg/kg, p = 0.09). Neither marker was associated with 90-day recurrence, prolonged CDI symptoms, positive culture results and colonisation by ribotype 027. Both FC and FL distinguished between CDI cases and AAD controls. Although FL was associated with disease severity in CDI patients, this showed high inter-individual variability and was an isolated finding. Thus, FC and FL are unlikely to be useful as biomarkers of complicated CDI disease. PMID:25170963

  5. Epidemiology and Outcomes of Clostridium difficile Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Carolyn D.; Treadway, Suzanne B.; Hanna, David B.; Huff, Carol Ann; Neofytos, Dionissios; Carroll, Karen C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of infectious diarrhea among hospitalized patients and is a major concern for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Risk factors and the natural history of C. difficile infection (CDI) are poorly understood in this population. Methods. We performed a retrospective nested case-control study to describe the epidemiology, timing, and risk factors for CDI among adult patients who received HSCTs at our center from January 2003 through December 2008. Results. The overall 1-year incidence of CDI was 9.2% among HSCTs performed (n = 999). The median time to diagnosis of CDI was short among both autologous and allogeneic HSCT recipients (6.5 days and 33 days, respectively). Risk factors for CDI in allogeneic HSCT recipients included receipt of chemotherapy prior to conditioning for HSCT, broad-spectrum antimicrobial use, and acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD; adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 4.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54–12.84; P = .006). There was a strong relationship between early CDI and subsequent development of gastrointestinal tract GVHD in the year following allogeneic HSCT (P < .001). Gastrointestinal GVHD was also strongly associated with an increased risk for recurrent CDI (AOR, 4.23 [95% CI, 1.20–14.86]; P = .02). Conclusions. These results highlight the high incidence and early timing of CDI after HSCT. Early timing, coupled with the noted risk of pretransplant chemotherapy, suggests that the natural history of disease in some patients may involve colonization prior to HSCT. A potentially important interplay between CDI and GVHD involving the gastrointestinal tract was observed. PMID:22412059

  6. Association between Clostridium difficile infection and antimicrobial usage in a large group of English hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Joao B; Farragher, Tracey M; Tully, Mary P; Cooke, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to determine the association between the reduction in the number of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) cases reported by the English National Health Service (NHS) hospitals and concurrent antimicrobial use. Methods A retrospective ecological study for January 2005 to December 2008 was conducted using data from 26 of the 29 NHS trusts (i.e. a trust manages one or more hospitals) located in the North West Strategic Health Authority of England. Antimicrobial use data, for patients of all ages, were provided by IMS Health, and CDI case data for patients aged ≥65 years were provided by the Health Protection Agency. Antimicrobial use was converted into defined daily doses (DDDs). The overall association between antimicrobial use and CDI for the trusts was investigated using multilevel models. Results Our study shows a positive significant association between the CDI cases and the use of the following antimicrobials: ‘third-generation cephalosporins’ [11.62 CDI cases per 1000 DDDs; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.92–17.31]; ‘fluoroquinolones’ (4.79 CDI cases per 1000 DDDs; 95% CI, 2.83–6.74); and ‘second-generation cephalosporins’ (4.25 CDI cases per 1000 DDDs; 95% CI, 1.66–6.83). The strength of this association was not significantly different (95% CI) among the antimicrobial groups. Conclusions This study shows that the reduction in the number of CDI cases reported by the English NHS hospitals is associated with concurrent reductions in antimicrobial use. This means that the number of CDI cases over time decreased in a similar fashion to the usage of various antimicrobials. PMID:24868578

  7. The effect of polydextrose and probiotic lactobacilli in a Clostridium difficile–infected human colonic model

    PubMed Central

    Forssten, Sofia D.; Röytiö, Henna; Hibberd, Ashley A.; Ouwehand, Arthur C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is a natural resident of the intestinal microbiota; however, it becomes harmful when the normal intestinal microbiota is disrupted, and overgrowth and toxin production occurs. The toxins can cause bloating and diarrhoea, which may cause severe disease and have the potential to cause outbreaks in hospitals and other healthcare settings. Normally, antibiotic agents are used for treatment, although for some of the patients, these treatments provide only a temporary relief with a recurrence of C. difficile–associated diarrhoea. Objective The effects of polydextrose (PDX), Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, and L. paracasei Lpc-37 on the growth of C. difficile were investigated in an in vitro model of infected human large intestine. Design The semi-continuous colonic model is composed of four connected vessels inoculated with human faecal microbes and spiked with pathogenic C. difficile (DSM 1296). PDX in two concentrations (2 and 4%), NCFM, and Lpc-37 were fed to the system during the 2-day simulation, and the growth of C. difficile and several other microbial groups were monitored using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and 16S rDNA sequencing. Results The microbial community structure of the simulation samples was closely grouped according to treatment, and the largest shifts in the microbial composition were seen with PDX. The microbial diversity decreased significantly with 4% PDX, and the OTU containing C. difficile was significantly (p<0.01) decreased when compared to control and lactobacilli treatments. The mean numbers of C. difficile also decreased as detected by qPCR, although the reduction did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions The treatments influenced the colonic microbiota, and a trend for reduced numbers of C. difficile as well as alterations of several microbial groups could be detected. This suggests that PDX may be able to modulate the composition and/or function of the colonic microbiota in

  8. Minimal systemic and high faecal exposure to cadazolid in patients with severe Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Gehin, Martine; Desnica, Boško; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2015-11-01

    Cadazolid is under development as an oral treatment for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), which is the most common infectious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Low systemic cadazolid exposures were previously reported in healthy subjects following both single and multiple oral dosing. The main objective of this study was to investigate systemic cadazolid exposure in patients with severe CDI with potential disrupted lining of the gastrointestinal tract. A single 3000 mg oral dose of cadazolid was administered to six patients with microbiologically-confirmed severe CDI. Plasma and faeces were collected up to 144 h post-dose for determination of cadazolid concentrations. Safety assessments were conducted over the 144-h investigational period. Cadazolid was well tolerated in patients with severe CDI, with no reported drug-related adverse events. Cadazolid systemic exposure following a single 3000 mg oral dose was very low, with a peak plasma concentration (C(max)) of 2.64 ng/mL and an area under the concentration-time curve (AUC(0-144)) of 125 ng×h/mL. The median peak daily faecal cadazolid concentration was 5675 times the C. difficile MIC(90) of 0.25 mg/L. In subjects with severe CDI, cadazolid systemic exposure was very low following a single high oral dose. Cadazolid plasma concentrations were similar in magnitude to those previously reported for healthy subjects, whereas total systemic exposure was ca. 5-6 times higher, but was still low. Peak daily faecal cadazolid concentrations were 5675 times the 0.25 mg/L C. difficile MIC(90), and on Day 4 five of the six patients presented a daily faecal cadazolid concentration ≥1651 times the MIC(90) [ClinicalTrial.gov ID: NCT02053181]. PMID:26419191

  9. Clostridium difficile Infection in Hospitalized Liver Transplant Patients: A Nationwide Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Ahmad, Shahryar; Kumar, Nilay; Kumar, Gagan; Saeian, Kia

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is increasing among hospitalized patients. Liver transplant patients are at higher risk for acquiring CDI. Small, single-center studies, but no nation-wide analyses, have assessed this association. Methods We used the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project- Nationwide Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS) from years 2004–2008 for this retrospective cross sectional study. Patients with any discharge diagnosis of liver transplant comprised the study population and were identified using ICD-9-CM codes. Those with a discharge diagnosis of CDI were considered cases. Our primary outcomes were prevalence of CDI and effect of CDI on inpatient mortality. Our secondary outcomes included length of stay and hospitalization charges. Regression analysis was used to derive odds ratios adjusted for potential confounders. Results There were 193,714 discharges with a diagnosis of liver transplant from 2004–2008. Prevalence of CDI was 2.7% in liver transplant population compared to 0.9% in non liver transplant population (p <0.001). Most of the liver transplant patients were in the 50–64 age group. Liver transplant patients were at higher odds of developing CDI (OR 2.88, 95% CI 2.68–3.10). Increasing age, increasing comorbidity, IBD and NG tube placement were also independent risk factors for CDI. CDI in liver transplant was associated with a higher mortality, 5.5% as compared to 2.3% in liver transplant only population (adjusted OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.3–2.2). Conclusions Liver transplant patients have a higher prevalence of CDI as compared to non liver transplant patients (2.7% vs. 0.9%).CDI was an independent risk factor for mortality in liver transplant population. PMID:22505356

  10. Impact of clinical awareness and diagnostic tests on the underdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, L; Reigadas, E; Marín, M; Martín, A; Catalán, P; Bouza, E

    2015-08-01

    A multicenter study of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) performed during 2008 in Spain revealed that two of every three episodes went undiagnosed or were misdiagnosed owing to nonsensitive diagnostic tests or lack of clinical suspicion and request. Since then, efforts have been made to improve the diagnostic tests used by laboratories and to increase the awareness of this disease among both clinicians and microbiologists. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of these efforts by assessing the current magnitude of underdiagnosis of CDI in Spain using two point-prevalence studies performed on one day each in January and July of 2013. A total of 111 Spanish laboratories selected all unformed stool specimens received for microbiological diagnosis on these days, and toxigenic culture was performed at a central reference laboratory. Toxigenic isolates were characterized both pheno- and genotypically. The reference laboratory detected 103 episodes of CDI in patients aged 2 years or more. Half (50.5 %) of the episodes were not diagnosed in the participating laboratories, owing to insensitive diagnostic tests (15.5 %) or the lack of clinical suspicion and request (35.0 %). The main ribotypes were 014, 078/126, 001/072, and 106. Ribotype 027 caused 2.9 % of all cases. Despite all the interventions undertaken, CDI remains a highly neglected disease because of the lack of sensitive diagnostic tests in some institutions and, especially, the absence of clinical suspicion, mainly in patients with community-associated CDI. Toxigenic C. difficile should be routinely sought in unformed stools sent for microbiological diagnosis, regardless of their origin. PMID:25904126

  11. Potential of lactoferrin to prevent antibiotic-induced Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Chilton, C. H.; Crowther, G. S.; Śpiewak, K.; Brindell, M.; Singh, G.; Wilcox, M. H.; Monaghan, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a global healthcare problem. Recent evidence suggests that the availability of iron may be important for C. difficile growth. This study evaluated the comparative effects of iron-depleted (1% Fe3+ saturated) bovine apo-lactoferrin (apo-bLf) and iron-saturated (85% Fe3+ saturated) bovine holo-lactoferrin (holo-bLf) in a human in vitro gut model that simulates CDI. Methods Two parallel triple-stage chemostat gut models were inoculated with pooled human faeces and spiked with C. difficile spores (strain 027 210, PCR ribotype 027). Holo- or apo-bLf was instilled (5 mg/mL, once daily) for 35 days. After 7 days, clindamycin was instilled (33.9 mg/L, four times daily) to induce simulated CDI. Indigenous microflora populations, C. difficile total counts and spores, cytotoxin titres, short chain fatty acid concentrations, biometal concentrations, lactoferrin concentration and iron content of lactoferrin were monitored daily. Results In the apo-bLf model, germination of C. difficile spores occurred 6 days post instillation of clindamycin, followed by rapid vegetative cell proliferation and detectable toxin production. By contrast, in the holo-bLf model, only a modest vegetative cell population was observed until 16 days post antibiotic administration. Notably, no toxin was detected in this model. In separate batch culture experiments, holo-bLf prevented C. difficile vegetative cell growth and toxin production, whereas apo-bLf and iron alone did not. Conclusions Holo-bLf, but not apo-bLf, delayed C. difficile growth and prevented toxin production in a human gut model of CDI. This inhibitory effect may be iron independent. These observations suggest that bLf in its iron-saturated state could be used as a novel preventative or treatment strategy for CDI. PMID:26759363

  12. Development of a recombinant toxin fragment vaccine for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Karczewski, Jerzy; Zorman, Julie; Wang, Su; Miezeiewski, Matthew; Xie, Jinfu; Soring, Keri; Petrescu, Ioan; Rogers, Irene; Thiriot, David S; Cook, James C; Chamberlin, Mihaela; Xoconostle, Rachel F; Nahas, Debbie D; Joyce, Joseph G; Bodmer, Jean-Luc; Heinrichs, Jon H; Secore, Susan

    2014-05-19

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis, a disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The disease is mostly of nosocomial origin, with elderly patients undergoing anti-microbial therapy being particularly at risk. C. difficile produces two large toxins: Toxin A (TcdA) and Toxin B (TcdB). The two toxins act synergistically to damage and impair the colonic epithelium, and are primarily responsible for the pathogenesis associated with CDI. The feasibility of toxin-based vaccination against C. difficile is being vigorously investigated. A vaccine based on formaldehyde-inactivated Toxin A and Toxin B (toxoids) was reported to be safe and immunogenic in healthy volunteers and is now undergoing evaluation in clinical efficacy trials. In order to eliminate cytotoxic effects, a chemical inactivation step must be included in the manufacturing process of this toxin-based vaccine. In addition, the large-scale production of highly toxic antigens could be a challenging and costly process. Vaccines based on non-toxic fragments of genetically engineered versions of the toxins alleviate most of these limitations. We have evaluated a vaccine assembled from two recombinant fragments of TcdB and explored their potential as components of a novel experimental vaccine against CDI. Golden Syrian hamsters vaccinated with recombinant fragments of TcdB combined with full length TcdA (Toxoid A) developed high titer IgG responses and potent neutralizing antibody titers. We also show here that the recombinant vaccine protected animals against lethal challenge with C. difficile spores, with efficacy equivalent to the toxoid vaccine. The development of a two-segment recombinant vaccine could provide several advantages over toxoid TcdA/TcdB such as improvements in manufacturability. PMID:24662701

  13. Persistence of Clostridium difficile RT 237 infection in a Western Australian piggery.

    PubMed

    Moono, Peter; Putsathit, Papanin; Knight, Daniel R; Squire, Michele M; Hampson, David J; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is commonly associated with healthcare-related infections in humans, and is an emerging pathogen in food animal species. There is potential for transmission of C. difficile from animals or animal products to humans. This study aimed to determine if C. difficile RT 237 had persisted in a Western Australian piggery or if there had been a temporal change in C. difficile diversity. C. difficile carriage in litters with and without diarrhea was investigated, as was the acquisition of C. difficile over time using cohort surveys. Rectal swabs were obtained from piglets aged 1-10 days to determine prevalence of C. difficile carriage and samples were obtained from 20 piglets on days 1, 7, 13, 20, and 42 of life to determine duration of shedding. Isolation of C. difficile from feces was achieved by selective enrichment culture. All isolates were characterized by standard molecular typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on selected isolates (n = 29). Diarrheic piglets were more likely to shed C. difficile than the non-diseased (p = 0.0124, χ2). In the cohort study, C. difficile was isolated from 40% samples on day 1, 50% on day 7, 20% on day 13, and 0% on days 20 and 42. All isolates were RT 237 and no antimicrobial resistance was detected. The decline of shedding of C. difficile to zero has public health implications because slaughter age pigs have a low likelihood of spreading C. difficile to consumers via pig meat. PMID:26679487

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile Infection in a Large Teaching Hospital in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Ngamskulrungroj, Popchai; Sanmee, Sittinee; Pusathit, Papanin; Piewngam, Pipat; Elliott, Briony; Riley, Thomas V.; Kiratisin, Pattarachai

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a leading cause of healthcare-associated morbidity and mortality worldwide. In Thailand, CDI exhibits low recurrence and mortality and its molecular epidemiology is unknown. CDI surveillance was conducted in a tertiary facility (Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok). A total of 53 toxigenic C. difficile strains from Thai patients were analyzed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), PCR ribotyping, and pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The mean age of the cohort was 64 years and 62.3% were female; 37.7% of patients were exposed to > two antibiotics prior to a diagnosis of CDI, with beta-lactams the most commonly used drug (56.3%). Metronidazole was used most commonly (77.5%; success rate 83.9%), and non-responders were treated with vancomycin (success rate 100%). None of the isolates carried binary toxin genes. Most isolates (98.2–100%) were susceptible to metronidazole, vancomycin, tigecycline and daptomycin. There were 11 sequence types (STs), 13 ribotypes (RTs) and four PFGE types. Six previously identified STs (ST12, ST13, ST14, ST33, ST41 and ST45) and five novel STs unique to Thailand (ST66, ST67, ST68, ST69 and ST70) were identified. PCR RTs UK 017 (ST45) (45.3%) and UK 014/020 (ST33) (24.5%) were the most common. High concordance was observed between the MLST and ribotyping results (p<0.001). C. difficile isolates from Thai patients were highly susceptible to standard antimicrobial agents. In conclusion, the five STs indicate the high genetic diversity and unique polymorphisms in Thailand. Moreover, the emergence of antimicrobial resistance to vancomycin warranted continuous surveillance to prevent further spread of the toxigenic C. difficile isolates. PMID:26000789

  15. A Detrimental Role of Immunosuppressive Drug, Dexamethasone, During Clostridium difficile Infection in Association with a Gastrointestinal Microbial Shift

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeun Bum; Wang, Yuankai; Sun, Xingmin

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the increased risk of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) caused by the combined use of antibiotics and an immunosuppressive drug in a mouse model. Our data showed that an approximate return to pretreatment conditions of gut microbiota occurred within days after cessation of the antibiotic treatment, whereas the recovery of gut microbiota was delayed with the combined treatment of antibiotics and dexamethasone, leading to an increased severity of CDI. An alteration of gut microbiota is a key player in CDI. Therefore, our data implied that immunosuppressive drugs can increase the risk of CDI through the delayed recovery of altered gut microbiota. PMID:26809802

  16. A Detrimental Role of Immunosuppressive Drug, Dexamethasone, During Clostridium difficile Infection in Association with a Gastrointestinal Microbial Shift.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeun Bum; Wang, Yuankai; Sun, Xingmin

    2016-03-28

    We investigated the increased risk of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) caused by the combined use of antibiotics and an immunosuppressive drug in a mouse model. Our data showed that an approximate return to pretreatment conditions of gut microbiota occurred within days after cessation of the antibiotic treatment, whereas the recovery of gut microbiota was delayed with the combined treatment of antibiotics and dexamethasone, leading to an increased severity of CDI. An alteration of gut microbiota is a key player in CDI. Therefore, our data implied that immunosuppressive drugs can increase the risk of CDI through the delayed recovery of altered gut microbiota. PMID:26809802

  17. Fecal Microbiota Therapy for Clostridium difficile Infection: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Fecal microbiota therapy is increasingly being used to treat patients with Clostridium difficile infection. This health technology assessment primarily evaluated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of fecal microbiota therapy compared with the usual treatment (antibiotic therapy). Methods We performed a literature search using Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, CRD Health Technology Assessment Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and NHS Economic Evaluation Database. For the economic review, we applied economic filters to these search results. We also searched the websites of agencies for other health technology assessments. We conducted a meta-analysis to analyze effectiveness. The quality of the body of evidence for each outcome was examined according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. Using a step-wise, structural methodology, we determined the overall quality to be high, moderate, low, or very low. We used a survey to examine physicians’ perception of patients’ lived experience, and a modified grounded theory method to analyze information from the survey. Results For the review of clinical effectiveness, 16 of 1,173 citations met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis of two randomized controlled trials found that fecal microbiota therapy significantly improved diarrhea associated with recurrent C. difficile infection versus treatment with vancomycin (relative risk 3.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.85–5.68) (GRADE: moderate). While fecal microbiota therapy is not associated with a significant decrease in mortality compared with antibiotic therapy (relative risk 0.69, 95% CI 0.14–3.39) (GRADE: low), it is associated with a significant increase in adverse events (e.g., short-term diarrhea, relative risk 30.76, 95% CI 4.46–212.44; abdominal cramping, relative risk 14

  18. A Tetraspecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Antibody Modifies Disease Outcome in Three Animal Models of Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Diane J; Beamer, Gillian; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Steele, Jennifer A; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Wang, Yaunkai; Debatis, Michele; Sun, Xingmin; Kashentseva, Elena A; Dmitriev, Igor P; Curiel, David T; Shoemaker, Charles B; Tzipori, Saul

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), a leading cause of nosocomial infection, is a serious disease in North America, Europe, and Asia. CDI varies greatly from asymptomatic carriage to life-threatening diarrhea, toxic megacolon, and toxemia. The incidence of community-acquired infection has increased due to the emergence of hypervirulent antibiotic-resistant strains. These new strains contribute to the frequent occurrence of disease relapse, complicating treatment, increasing hospital stays, and increasing morbidity and mortality among patients. Therefore, it is critical to develop new therapeutic approaches that bypass the development of antimicrobial resistance and avoid disruption of gut microflora. Here, we describe the construction of a single heteromultimeric VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA) that targets the two primary virulence factors of Clostridium difficile, toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). Designated VNA2-Tcd, this agent has subnanomolar toxin neutralization potencies for both C. difficile toxins in cell assays. When given systemically by parenteral administration, VNA2-Tcd protected against CDI in gnotobiotic piglets and mice and to a lesser extent in hamsters. Protection from CDI was also observed in gnotobiotic piglets treated by gene therapy with an adenovirus that promoted the expression of VNA2-Tcd. PMID:27413067

  19. Understanding the Current State of Infection Prevention to Prevent Clostridium difficile Infection: A Human Factors and Systems Engineering Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yanke, Eric; Zellmer, Caroline; Van Hoof, Sarah; Moriarty, Helene; Carayon, Pascale; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-01-01

    Background Achieving and sustaining high levels of healthcare worker (HCW) compliance with contact isolation precautions is challenging. The aim of this study was to determine HCW work system barriers to, and facilitators of, adherence to contact isolation for patients with suspected or confirmed Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) using a human factors and systems engineering approach. Methods Prospective cohort study from September 2013 to November 2013 at a large academic medical center (hospital A) and an affiliated Veterans Administration (VA) hospital (hospital B). A human factors engineering (HFE) model for patient safety – the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) model – was used to guide work system analysis and direct observation data collection. 288 observations were conducted. HCWs and visitors were assessed for compliance with all components of contact isolation precautions (hand hygiene, gowning, and gloving) before and after patient contact. Time required to complete contact isolation precautions was measured and adequacy of contact isolation supplies was assessed. Results Full compliance with contact isolation precautions was low at both hospitals: hospital A, 7%; hospital B, 22%. Lack of appropriate hand hygiene prior to room entry (Compliance: hospital A, 18%; hospital B, 29%) was the most common reason for lack of full compliance. More time was required for full compliance as compared to compliance with no components of contact isolation precautions before patient room entry, inside patient room, and after patient room exit (59.9 sec vs. 3.2 sec; P < .001; 507.3 sec vs. 149.7 sec; P = .006; 15.2 sec vs. 1.3 sec; P < .001). Compliance was lower when contact isolation supplies were inadequate (4% vs. 16%; P = .005). Conclusions Adherence to contact isolation precautions for CDI is a complex, time-consuming process. HFE analysis indicates multiple work system components serve as barriers and facilitators to full compliance

  20. Excess Mortality Attributable to Clostridium difficile and Risk Factors for Infection in an Historic Cohort of Hospitalised Patients Followed Up in the United Kingdom Death Register

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Methods We compared time from hospital admission to death in a probability sample of 100 Clostridium difficile infected cases and a probability sample of 98 non-cases admitted to an English teaching hospital between 2005 and 2007 with follow up in the UK national death register using survival analysis. Results Clostridium difficile infection was associated with a 50% increased risk of death (Hazard Ratio 1.51 (95% CI: 1.05–2.19 p = 0.03) at between five to eight years in Cox Regression analysis adjusting for age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index, diagnosis of a malignant condition and insertion of a nasogastric tube during admission. Acquisition of Clostridium difficile infection was independently associated with an almost six fold higher odds of being admitted with a diagnosis of infection of any other type (OR 5.79 (2.19, 15.25) p<0.001). Conclusions Our results strongly support continued priority being given to improve prevention and treatment of Clostridium difficile infection in the English National Health Service particularly in patients admitted with an infection. Our results may be applicable to other health systems. PMID:26999613

  1. Outbreak of Clostridium difficile 027 infection in Vienna, Austria 2008-2009.

    PubMed

    Indra, A; Huhulescu, S; Fiedler, A; Kernbichler, S; Blaschitz, M; Allerberger, F

    2009-04-30

    From November 2008 to 15 April 2009, 36 isolates of CD027 identified in Austria, all originating from four hospitals in Vienna. All isolates were positive for toxin A, toxin B and the binary toxin, and showed a characteristic 18 bp deletion in the tcdC gene. Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic spore-forming bacterium. Some strains may cause diarrhoea due to formation of toxins. Symptomatic C. difficile infection (CDI) is primarily linked with hospital admission and antibiotic treatment, although antibiotic exposure is neither necessary nor sufficient for CDI [1,2]. In Belgium, for instance, one third of CDI cases reported in the hospital surveillance system are not hospital-associated [3]. Symptoms range from mild diarrhoea to serious manifestations such as pseudomembranous colitis, toxic megacolon or perforation of the colon. C. difficile challenges hygiene standards as it is forms spores. The risk of infection rises with increasing age, underlying disease and immunodeficiency [4]. In recent years, a particularly virulent strain, ribotype 027 (CD027), has emerged in a number of countries, particularly in connection with hospital outbreaks, but also in community-acquired diarrhoea cases [5]. The risk of serious disease and death associated with CD027 exceeds that of other C. difficile strains. The classical CD027 is characterised - among other things - by an increased production of toxins A and B, production of a binary toxin and resistance to newer fluoroquinolones such as moxifloxacin. The first three Austrian cases of CD027 occurred in 2006 and in March 2008 [6,7]. Since August 2006, the Austrian National Reference Centre for C. difficile has ribotyped approximately 2,700 human C. difficile isolates received from all nine Austrian provinces. In recent months, a drastic increase in CD027 cases has been noted, all originating from four hospitals in Vienna. From November 2008 to 15 April 2009, 36 isolates of CD027 were received at the National Reference Centre

  2. An exploratory study to evaluate Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction ribotypes and infection outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Thabit, Abrar K; Nicolau, David P

    2016-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection ranges from mild to severe prolonged diarrhea with systemic symptoms. Previous studies have assessed the correlation of some disease severity parameters to C. difficile ribotypes. However, certain clinical parameters of interest have not yet been evaluated. Aim We conducted an exploratory study to evaluate the correlation of C. difficile ribotypes to parameters not assessed previously, notably days to diarrhea resolution (in terms of days to formed stools and days to less than three stools per day), length of hospital stay, 30-day recurrence rates, and 30-day readmission rates. Additional severity parameters evaluated include leukocytosis, serum creatinine, fever, and nausea/vomiting. Methods Polymerase chain reaction ribotyping was performed on C. difficile isolates from baseline stool samples of 29 patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted to assess the parameters of interest. Results The most common ribotypes were 027 (38%), 014/020 (21%), and 106/174 (21%). Numerically, 027 ribotype patients required more days to less than three stools per day versus 014/020 and 106/174 ribotype patients (P=0.2). The three ribotypes were similar regarding time to formed stools, duration of hospitalization, and 30-day readmission rate (P=0.2, 0.6, and 0.8, respectively). Recurrence within 30 days occurred in two patients with 027 and two patients with 014/020 (P=0.6). Leukocytosis and fever were more prominent with 027 than with 014/020 and 106/174 (P=0.04 for both parameters), although the degree of nausea/vomiting did not differ between the three groups (P=0.3). A serum creatinine level ≥1.5 times the premorbid level was seen in only three patients, each infected with a different ribotype. Conclusion Although these data provide a baseline assessment of outcomes to aid in the design of future studies, the diversity of C. difficile ribotypes within the population must be considered, and additional work with other ribotypes

  3. Non-Clostridium perfringens infectious agents producing necrotic enteritis-like lesions in poultry.

    PubMed

    Uzal, F A; Sentíes-Cué, C G; Rimoldi, G; Shivaprasad, H L

    2016-06-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) produced by Clostridium perfringens is amongst the most prevalent enteric diseases of chickens and turkeys. However, several other bacterial, parasitic and viral agents can cause clinical signs, gross and microscopic lesions in poultry very similar to those of NE and the diseases produced by those agents need to be differentiated from NE. The main differential diagnoses for C. perfringens NE include bacterial (Clostridium colinum, Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium difficile, Pasteurella multocida, Brachyspira spp.), parasitic (Eimeria spp., Histomonas meleagridis) and viral (Duck Herpesvirus type 1, Avian Paramyxovirus type 1) diseases. Confirmation of the diagnosis of these diseases requires identification of the aetiological agents by morphological, cultural and/or molecular methods. PMID:27009483

  4. The evolution of Clostridium difficile infection in cancer patients: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and guidelines for prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Khan, Areej; Raza, Shahzad; Batul, Syeda A; Khan, Monis; Aksoy, Tulay; Baig, Mahadi A; Berger, Barbara J

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has emerged as a significant challenge to the healthcare system. The availability of anti-cancer chemotherapeutic regimens has contemporaneously resulted in a larger population of patients who are susceptible to CDI. The outbreak of a novel, hypervirulent, resistant strain, NAP-1/027 as well as resistance to antibiotic therapy have further contributed to an increase in prevalence as well as in disease severity. Recent data show high fatality rates in cancer patients with CDI. In this review, we have discussed the incidence, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical signs and symptoms and therapeutic guidelines for patients who are on chemotherapy and present with CDI and highlighted clinical reports documenting severe CDI associated with chemotherapeutic agents such as methotrexate, 5FU, cisplatin, carboplatin, paclitaxel, vinorelbine and cyclophosphamide. The review article also has the discussion of patents pertaining to infections caused by Clostridium difficile in cancer patients. We underscore the urgent need for early recognition and diagnosis of CDI in cancer patients and for the design and implementation of randomized clinical trials of new treatment modalities in the management of chemotherapy- associated CDI. PMID:22792862

  5. Relationship Between Bacterial Strain Type, Host Biomarkers, and Mortality in Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A. Sarah; Eyre, David W.; Wyllie, David H.; Dingle, Kate E.; Griffiths, David; Shine, Brian; Oakley, Sarah; O'Connor, Lily; Finney, John; Vaughan, Alison; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilcox, Mark H.; Peto, Tim E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Despite substantial interest in biomarkers, their impact on clinical outcomes and variation with bacterial strain has rarely been explored using integrated databases. Methods. From September 2006 to May 2011, strains isolated from Clostridium difficile toxin enzyme immunoassay (EIA)–positive fecal samples from Oxfordshire, United Kingdom (approximately 600 000 people) underwent multilocus sequence typing. Fourteen-day mortality and levels of 15 baseline biomarkers were compared between consecutive C. difficile infections (CDIs) from different clades/sequence types (STs) and EIA-negative controls using Cox and normal regression adjusted for demographic/clinical factors. Results. Fourteen-day mortality was 13% in 2222 adults with 2745 EIA-positive samples (median, 78 years) vs 5% in 20 722 adults with 27 550 EIA-negative samples (median, 74 years) (absolute attributable mortality, 7.7%; 95% CI, 6.4%–9.0%). Mortality was highest in clade 5 CDIs (25% [16 of 63]; polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotype 078/ST 11), then clade 2 (20% [111 of 560]; 99% PCR ribotype 027/ST 1) versus clade 1 (12% [137 of 1168]; adjusted P < .0001). Within clade 1, 14-day mortality was only 4% (3 of 84) in ST 44 (PCR ribotype 015) (adjusted P = .05 vs other clade 1). Mean baseline neutrophil counts also varied significantly by genotype: 12.4, 11.6, and 9.5 × 109 neutrophils/L for clades 5, 2 and 1, respectively, vs 7.0 × 109 neutrophils/L in EIA-negative controls (P < .0001) and 7.9 × 109 neutrophils/L in ST 44 (P = .08). There were strong associations between C. difficile-type-specific effects on mortality and neutrophil/white cell counts (rho = 0.48), C-reactive-protein (rho = 0.43), eosinophil counts (rho = −0.45), and serum albumin (rho = −0.47). Biomarkers predicted 30%–40% of clade-specific mortality differences. Conclusions. C. difficile genotype predicts mortality, and excess mortality correlates with genotype-specific changes in biomarkers, strongly

  6. Sentinel community Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) surveillance in Scotland, April 2013 to March 2014.

    PubMed

    Banks, A; Brown, Derek J; Mather, Henry; Coia, John E; Wiuff, Camilla

    2016-02-01

    Surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Scotland does not currently distinguish between CDI cases from hospitals and the community. Therefore, the incidence of CDI in the community is unknown, and the burden of disease and the relationship with the hospital/healthcare setting is not well understood. A one-year sentinel community surveillance programme was initiated in collaboration with five Scottish health boards in 2013 (representing 36% of all CDI cases reported in Scotland). Inclusion criteria were all cases aged ≥15 years with a CDI diagnosis in the community or within 48 h following admission to hospital. CDI cases were categorised according to definitions used by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. 256 CDI cases met the inclusion criteria, of which 158 (62%) were community-associated cases (CA-CDI). This represented 26% of all cases reported during the surveillance period by the participating health boards (n = 614). The overall CA-CDI incidence rate was 9.9 per 100 000 population per year. CA-CDI cases were more likely to be female and younger, compared to hospital acquired cases (HA-CDI). The total proportion of cases that had onset in the community was 27%. Ribotypes 015, 002, 078 and 005 were the most common types isolated from both CA-CDI and HA-CDI cases. There were no statistically significant differences between the proportion of types that were either CA-CDI or HA-CDI. Of the CA-CDI cases, 37% had not received antibiotics in the 12 weeks preceding CDI diagnosis, 4% were resident in care homes, and the case-fatality rate for CA-CDI cases was 5.6% (with a 30-day mortality rate for CA-CDI of 0.44 per 100 000 population per year). This study has shown that a substantial proportion of CDI cases reported in Scotland are community associated and that there are close links between the community and healthcare settings. It is therefore essential to monitor the trends in CDI in the community at a national level. The

  7. The interplay between microbiome dynamics and pathogen dynamics in a murine model of Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Angela E; Theriot, Casey M; Bergin, Ingrid L; Huffnagle, Gary B; Schloss, Patrick D; Young, Vincent B

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) arises in the setting of antibiotic administration where disruption of the normal indigenous gut microbiota leads to susceptibility to C. difficile colonization and colitis. Using a murine model of CDI, we demonstrate that changes in the community structure of the indigenous gut microbiota are associated with the loss of colonization resistance against C. difficile. Several antibiotic regimens were tested in combination for the ability to overcome colonization resistance, including a five antibiotic cocktail consisting of kanamycin, gentamicin, colistin, metronidazole, and vancomycin administered in drinking water for three days, a single intraperitoneal dose of clindamycin or 10 days of cefoperazone in drinking water. Following antibiotic treatment animals were challenged with 105 colony forming units of C. difficile strain VPI 10463 via oral gavage. Animals that received the antibiotic cocktail and clindamycin prior to C. difficile challenge followed one of two clinical courses, either becoming clinically ill and moribund within 2-4 days post challenge, or remaining clinically well. Animals that became clinically ill developed histologically severe colitis. These histopathologic findings were significantly less severe in animals that remained clinically well. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from gut tissue at necropsy demonstrated that Proteobacteria dominated the gut microbiota in clinically ill animals. In contrast, the gut microbial community of clinically well animals more closely resembled untreated animals, which were dominated by members of the Firmicutes. All animals that received cefoperazone treatment prior to C. difficile challenge were clinically ill and moribund by 2-5 days post challenge in a dose dependent manner. The gut communities in these animals were dominated by C.difficile suggesting that cefoperazone treatment resulted in a greater loss in colonization resistance. Thus, the severity of

  8. Flooding and Health Care Visits for Clostridium Difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Floods can contaminate potable water and other resources, thus increasing the potential for fecal-oral transmission of pathogens. Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water and cause acute gastrointestinal illness. It often affects older adults who are hospital...

  9. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for identification of Clostridium species isolated from Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    AlMogbel, Mohammed Suliman

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify different Clostridium spp. isolated from currency notes from the Ha'il region of Saudi Arabia in September 2014 using MALDI-TOF-MS. Clostridium spp. were identified by Bruker MALDI-TOF-MS and compared with VITEK 2. The confirmation of the presence of different Clostridium spp. was performed by determining the sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. In this study, 144 Clostridium spp. were isolated. Among these specimens, MALDI-TOF-MS could identify 88.8% (128/144) of the isolates to the species level and 92.3% (133/144) to the genus level, whereas, VITEK 2 identified 77.7% of the (112/144) isolates. The correct identification of the 144 isolates was performed by sequence analysis of the 500bp 16S rRNA gene. The most common Clostridium spp. identified were Clostridium perfringens (67.36%), Clostridium subterminale (14.58%), Clostridium sordellii (9%) and Clostridium sporogenes (9%). The results of this study demonstrate that MALDI-TOF-MS is a rapid, accurate and user friendly technique for the identification of Clostridium spp. Additionally, MALDI-TOF-MS has advantages over VITEK 2 in the identification of fastidious micro-organisms, such as Clostridium spp. Incorporating this technique into routine microbiology would lead to more successful and rapid identification of pathogenic and difficult to identify micro-organisms. PMID:26991272

  10. Deciphering Adaptation Strategies of the Epidemic Clostridium difficile 027 Strain during Infection through In Vivo Transcriptional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kansau, Imad; Barketi-Klai, Amira; Monot, Marc; Hoys, Sandra; Dupuy, Bruno; Janoir, Claire; Collignon, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is responsible for a wide spectrum of infection from asymptomatic carriage to severe, relapsing colitis. Since 2003, C. difficile infections have increased with a higher morbidity and mortality due to the emergence of epidemic and hypervirulent C. difficile strains such as those of the epidemic lineage 027/BI/NAP1. To decipher the hypervirulence and epidemicity of 027 strains, we analyzed gene expression profiles of the R20291 027 strain using a monoxenic mouse model during the first 38h of infection. A total of 741 genes were differentially expressed during the course of infection. They are mainly distributed in functional categories involved in host adaptation. Several genes of PTS and ABC transporters were significantly regulated during the infection, underlying the ability of strain R20291 to adapt its metabolism according to nutrient availability in the digestive tract. In this animal model, despite the early sporulation process, sporulation efficiency seems to indicate that growth of R20291 vegetative cells versus spores were favored during infection. The bacterial mechanisms associated to adaptability and flexibility within the gut environment, in addition to the virulence factor expression and antibiotic resistance, should contribute to the epidemicity and hypervirulence of the C. difficile 027 strains. PMID:27351947

  11. Intravenous Tigecycline Facilitates Cure of Severe Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI) After Failure of Standard Therapy: A Case Report and Literature Review of Tigecycline Use in CDI

    PubMed Central

    Navalkele, Bhagyashri D.; Lerner, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Standard treatment for severe Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is oral vancomycin with metronidazole. After failure of this standard regimen, treatment becomes challenging. A young woman treated for septic shock developed CDI. Standard treatment failed and she was ineligible for fecal transplant. Addition of tigecycline to her regimen resulted in cure. PMID:27419166

  12. Clinical features of Clostridium difficile infection and molecular characterization of the isolated strains in a cohort of Danish hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Søes, L M; Brock, I; Persson, S; Simonsen, J; Pribil Olsen, K E; Kemp, M

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare clinical features of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) to toxin gene profiles of the strains isolated from Danish hospitalized patients. C. difficile isolates were characterized by PCR based molecular typing methods including toxin gene profiling and analysis of deletions and truncating mutations in the toxin regulating gene tcdC. Clinical features were obtained by questionnaire. Thirty percent of the CDI cases were classified as community-acquired. Infection by C. difficile with genes encoding both toxin A, toxin B and the binary toxin was significantly associated with hospital-acquired/healthcare-associated CDI compared to community-acquired CDI. Significantly higher leukocyte counts and more severe clinical manifestations were observed in patients infected by C. difficile containing genes also encoding the binary toxin together with toxin A and B compared to patients infected by C. difficile harbouring only toxin A and B. In conclusion, infection by C. difficile harbouring genes encoding both toxin A, toxin B and the binary toxin were associated with hospital acquisition, higher leukocyte counts and severe clinical disease. PMID:21744281

  13. Evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert Clostridium difficile Epi assay for diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection and typing of the NAP1 strain at a cancer hospital.

    PubMed

    Babady, N Esther; Stiles, Jeffrey; Ruggiero, Phyllis; Khosa, Perminder; Huang, David; Shuptar, Susan; Kamboj, Mini; Kiehn, Timothy E

    2010-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of health care-associated diarrhea. Accurate and rapid diagnosis is essential to improve patient outcome and prevent disease spread. We compared our two-step diagnostic algorithm, an enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) followed by the cytotoxin neutralization test (CYT) with a turnaround time of 24 to 48 h, versus the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile Epi assay, a PCR-based assay with a turnaround time of <1 h. In the first phase of the study, only GDH-positive stool samples were tested by both CYT and Xpert PCR. Discordant results were resolved by toxigenic culture. In the second phase, all stool samples were tested by GDH and Xpert PCR. Only GDH-positive stools were further tested by CYT. Genotypic characterization of 45 Xpert PCR-positive stools was performed by sequencing of the tcdC gene and PCR ribotyping. In phase 1, the agreement between the GDH-CYT and the GDH-Xpert PCR was 72%. The sensitivities and specificities of GDH-CYT and GDH-Xpert PCR were 57% and 97% and 100% and 97%, respectively. In phase 2, the agreement between GDH-CYT and Xpert PCR alone was 95%. As in phase 1, sensitivity of the Xpert PCR was higher than that of the GDH-CYT. The correlation between PCR-ribotyping, sequencing, and Xpert PCR for detection of NAP1 strains was excellent (>90%). The excellent sensitivity and specificity and the rapid turnaround time of the Xpert PCR assay as well as its strain-typing capability make it an attractive option for diagnosis of C. difficile infection. PMID:20943860

  14. Evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert Clostridium difficile Epi Assay for Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection and Typing of the NAP1 Strain at a Cancer Hospital ▿

    PubMed Central

    Babady, N. Esther; Stiles, Jeffrey; Ruggiero, Phyllis; Khosa, Perminder; Huang, David; Shuptar, Susan; Kamboj, Mini; Kiehn, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of health care-associated diarrhea. Accurate and rapid diagnosis is essential to improve patient outcome and prevent disease spread. We compared our two-step diagnostic algorithm, an enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) followed by the cytotoxin neutralization test (CYT) with a turnaround time of 24 to 48 h, versus the Cepheid Xpert C. difficile Epi assay, a PCR-based assay with a turnaround time of <1 h. In the first phase of the study, only GDH-positive stool samples were tested by both CYT and Xpert PCR. Discordant results were resolved by toxigenic culture. In the second phase, all stool samples were tested by GDH and Xpert PCR. Only GDH-positive stools were further tested by CYT. Genotypic characterization of 45 Xpert PCR-positive stools was performed by sequencing of the tcdC gene and PCR ribotyping. In phase 1, the agreement between the GDH-CYT and the GDH-Xpert PCR was 72%. The sensitivities and specificities of GDH-CYT and GDH-Xpert PCR were 57% and 97% and 100% and 97%, respectively. In phase 2, the agreement between GDH-CYT and Xpert PCR alone was 95%. As in phase 1, sensitivity of the Xpert PCR was higher than that of the GDH-CYT. The correlation between PCR-ribotyping, sequencing, and Xpert PCR for detection of NAP1 strains was excellent (>90%). The excellent sensitivity and specificity and the rapid turnaround time of the Xpert PCR assay as well as its strain-typing capability make it an attractive option for diagnosis of C. difficile infection. PMID:20943860

  15. The roles of host and pathogen factors and the innate immune response in the pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xingmin; Hirota, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is the most common cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis. The clinical manifestation of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is highly variable, from asymptomatic carriage, to mild self-limiting diarrhea, to the more severe pseudomembranous colitis. Furthermore, in extreme cases, colonic inflammation and tissue damage can lead to toxic megacolon, a condition requiring surgical intervention. C. difficile expresses two key virulence factors; the exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which are glucosyltransferases that target host-cell monomeric GTPases. In addition, some hypervirulent strains produce a third toxin, binary toxin or C. difficile transferase (CDT), which may contribute to the pathogenesis of CDI. More recently, other factors such as surface layer proteins (SLPs) and flagellin have also been linked to the inflammatory responses observed in CDI. Although the adaptive immune response can influence the severity of CDI, the innate immune responses to C. difficile and its toxins play crucial roles in CDI onset, progression, and overall prognosis. Despite this, the innate immune responses in CDI have drawn relatively little attention from clinical researchers. Targeting these responses may prove useful clinically as adjuvant therapies, especially in refractory and/or recurrent CDI. This review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of how C. difficile and its toxins modulate innate immune responses that contribute to CDI pathogenesis. PMID:25242213

  16. Refractory Clostridium difficile Infection Successfully Treated with Tigecycline, Rifaximin, and Vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Dominador; Chiang, Tom; Gomez, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of Clostridium difficile colitis is on the rise and has become more difficult to manage with standard therapy. Thus, the need for alternative treatments is essential. Tigecycline is a glycylcycline antibiotic that has been shown to be effective against C. difficile through several published case reports and in in vitro studies. We present a case of C. difficile colitis that failed to respond to metronidazole and oral vancomycin therapy, but improved on a combination of rifaximin, tigecycline, and vancomycin. PMID:22829841

  17. Refractory Clostridium difficile Infection Successfully Treated with Tigecycline, Rifaximin, and Vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Lao, Dominador; Chiang, Tom; Gomez, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of Clostridium difficile colitis is on the rise and has become more difficult to manage with standard therapy. Thus, the need for alternative treatments is essential. Tigecycline is a glycylcycline antibiotic that has been shown to be effective against C. difficile through several published case reports and in in vitro studies. We present a case of C. difficile colitis that failed to respond to metronidazole and oral vancomycin therapy, but improved on a combination of rifaximin, tigecycline, and vancomycin. PMID:22829841

  18. Loss of Microbiota-Mediated Colonization Resistance to Clostridium difficile Infection With Oral Vancomycin Compared With Metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brittany B; Buffie, Charlie G; Carter, Rebecca A; Leiner, Ingrid; Toussaint, Nora C; Miller, Liza C; Gobourne, Asia; Ling, Lilan; Pamer, Eric G

    2015-11-15

    Antibiotic administration disrupts the intestinal microbiota, increasing susceptibility to pathogens such as Clostridium difficile. Metronidazole or oral vancomycin can cure C. difficile infection, and administration of these agents to prevent C. difficile infection in high-risk patients, although not sanctioned by Infectious Disease Society of America guidelines, has been considered. The relative impacts of metronidazole and vancomycin on the intestinal microbiota and colonization resistance are unknown. We investigated the effect of brief treatment with metronidazole and/or oral vancomycin on susceptibility to C. difficile, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli infection in mice. Although metronidazole resulted in transient loss of colonization resistance, oral vancomycin markedly disrupted the microbiota, leading to prolonged loss of colonization resistance to C. difficile infection and dense colonization by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, K. pneumoniae, and E. coli. Our results demonstrate that vancomycin, and to a lesser extent metronidazole, are associated with marked intestinal microbiota destruction and greater risk of colonization by nosocomial pathogens. PMID:25920320

  19. Comparison of Illumigene, Simplexa, and AmpliVue Clostridium difficile Molecular Assays for Diagnosis of C. difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S. A.; Humphries, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    We compared the performance of the Simplexa Universal Direct (Focus Diagnostics) and AmpliVue (Quidel Corporation) assays to that of the Illumigene assay (Meridian Bioscience, Inc.) for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection. Two hundred deidentified remnant diarrheal stool specimens were tested by the Simplexa, AmpliVue, and Illumigene methods. Specimens with discrepant results among the three assays and a representative number of concordant specimens were further evaluated by toxigenic culture. The sensitivity and specificity were 98 and 100% and 96 and 100% for the Simplexa Universal Direct and AmpliVue assays, respectively. Both assays are easy to perform, with rapid turn-around-times, supporting their utility in the clinical laboratory as routine diagnostic platforms. PMID:24352999

  20. Antibiotic-induced shifts in the mouse gut microbiome and metabolome increase susceptibility to Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Theriot, Casey M.; Koenigsknecht, Mark J.; Carlson, Paul E.; Hatton, Gabrielle E.; Nelson, Adam M.; Li, Bo; Huffnagle, Gary B.; Li, Jun; Young, Vincent B.

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics can have significant and long lasting effects on the gastrointestinal tract microbiota, reducing colonization resistance against pathogens including Clostridium difficile. Here we show that antibiotic treatment induces substantial changes in the gut microbial community and in the metabolome of mice susceptible to C. difficile infection. Levels of secondary bile acids, glucose, free fatty acids, and dipeptides decrease, whereas those of primary bile acids and sugar alcohols increase, reflecting the modified metabolic activity of the altered gut microbiome. In vitro and ex vivo analyses demonstrate that C. difficile can exploit specific metabolites that become more abundant in the mouse gut after antibiotics, including primary bile acid taurocholate for germination, and carbon sources mannitol, fructose, sorbitol, raffinose and stachyose for growth. Our results indicate that antibiotic-mediated alteration of the gut microbiome converts the global metabolic profile to one that favors C. difficile germination and growth. PMID:24445449

  1. Protective role of Commensals against Clostridium difficile Infection via an IL-1β-Mediated Positive Feedback Loop

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Mizuho; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Jiao, Yizu; Liu, Meng Zhen; Núñez, Gabriel; Inohara, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (Cd) is a Gram-positive obligate anaerobic pathogen that causes pseudomembranous colitis in antibiotic-treated individuals. Commensal bacteria are known to have a significant role in the intestinal accumulation of Cd after antibiotic treatment, but little is known about how they affect host immunity during Cd infection. Here we report that Cd infection results in translocation of commensals across the intestinal epithelial barrier that is critical for neutrophil recruitment through the induction of an IL-1β-mediated positive feedback loop. Mice lacking ASC, an essential mediator of IL-1β and IL-18 processing and secretion, were highly susceptible to Cd infection. ASC−/− mice exhibited enhanced translocation of commensals to multiple organs after Cd infection. Notably, ASC−/− mice exhibited impaired CXCL1 production and neutrophil influx into intestinal tissues in response to Cd infection. The impairment in neutrophil recruitment resulted in reduced production of IL-1β and CXCL1, but not IL-18. Importantly, translocated commensals were required for ASC/Nlrp3-dependent IL-1β secretion by neutrophils. Mice lacking IL-1β were deficient in inducing CXCL1 secretion, suggesting that IL-1β is the dominant inducer of ASC-mediated CXCL1 production during Cd infection. These results indicate that translocated commensals play a crucial role in CXCL1-dependent recruitment of neutrophils to the intestine through an IL-1β/NLRP3/ASC-mediated positive feedback mechanism that is important for host survival and clearance of translocated commensals during Cd infection. PMID:22888139

  2. An Integrated Metabolomic and Microbiome Analysis Identified Specific Gut Microbiota Associated with Fecal Cholesterol and Coprostanol in Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Antharam, Vijay C.; McEwen, Daniel C.; Garrett, Timothy J.; Dossey, Aaron T.; Li, Eric C.; Kozlov, Andrew N.; Mesbah, Zhubene; Wang, Gary P.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is characterized by dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota and a profound derangement in the fecal metabolome. However, the contribution of specific gut microbes to fecal metabolites in C. difficile-associated gut microbiome remains poorly understood. Using gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and 16S rRNA deep sequencing, we analyzed the metabolome and microbiome of fecal samples obtained longitudinally from subjects with Clostridium difficile infection (n = 7) and healthy controls (n = 6). From 155 fecal metabolites, we identified two sterol metabolites at >95% match to cholesterol and coprostanol that significantly discriminated C. difficile-associated gut microbiome from healthy microbiota. By correlating the levels of cholesterol and coprostanol in fecal extracts with 2,395 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined by 16S rRNA sequencing, we identified 63 OTUs associated with high levels of coprostanol and 2 OTUs correlated with low coprostanol levels. Using indicator species analysis (ISA), 31 of the 63 coprostanol-associated bacteria correlated with health, and two Veillonella species were associated with low coprostanol levels that correlated strongly with CDI. These 65 bacterial taxa could be clustered into 12 sub-communities, with each community containing a consortium of organisms that co-occurred with one another. Our studies identified 63 human gut microbes associated with cholesterol-reducing activities. Given the importance of gut bacteria in reducing and eliminating cholesterol from the GI tract, these results support the recent finding that gut microbiome may play an important role in host lipid metabolism. PMID:26871580

  3. An Integrated Metabolomic and Microbiome Analysis Identified Specific Gut Microbiota Associated with Fecal Cholesterol and Coprostanol in Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Antharam, Vijay C; McEwen, Daniel C; Garrett, Timothy J; Dossey, Aaron T; Li, Eric C; Kozlov, Andrew N; Mesbah, Zhubene; Wang, Gary P

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is characterized by dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota and a profound derangement in the fecal metabolome. However, the contribution of specific gut microbes to fecal metabolites in C. difficile-associated gut microbiome remains poorly understood. Using gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and 16S rRNA deep sequencing, we analyzed the metabolome and microbiome of fecal samples obtained longitudinally from subjects with Clostridium difficile infection (n = 7) and healthy controls (n = 6). From 155 fecal metabolites, we identified two sterol metabolites at >95% match to cholesterol and coprostanol that significantly discriminated C. difficile-associated gut microbiome from healthy microbiota. By correlating the levels of cholesterol and coprostanol in fecal extracts with 2,395 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined by 16S rRNA sequencing, we identified 63 OTUs associated with high levels of coprostanol and 2 OTUs correlated with low coprostanol levels. Using indicator species analysis (ISA), 31 of the 63 coprostanol-associated bacteria correlated with health, and two Veillonella species were associated with low coprostanol levels that correlated strongly with CDI. These 65 bacterial taxa could be clustered into 12 sub-communities, with each community containing a consortium of organisms that co-occurred with one another. Our studies identified 63 human gut microbes associated with cholesterol-reducing activities. Given the importance of gut bacteria in reducing and eliminating cholesterol from the GI tract, these results support the recent finding that gut microbiome may play an important role in host lipid metabolism. PMID:26871580

  4. Equine colitis X associated with infection by Clostridium difficile NAP1/027.

    PubMed

    Songer, J Glenn; Trinh, H T; Dial, Sharon M; Brazier, Jon S; Glock, Robert D

    2009-05-01

    A 14-year-old Quarter Horse with a 48-hr history of colic was euthanized after failure to respond to treatment. At necropsy, cecal and colonic mucosae were congested throughout, and there was segmental edema and significant thickening of the intestinal wall. Excessive numbers of mononuclear cells were found in mucosal lamina propria. Submucosal hemorrhage was diffuse and extensive, and Clostridium difficile toxins A and B were detected. Large numbers of C. difficile were isolated, and genetic characterization revealed them to be North American pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type 1, polymerase chain reaction ribotype 027, and toxinotype III. Genes for the binary toxin were present, and toxin negative-regulator tcdC contained an 18-bp deletion. This genotype comprises the current human "epidemic strain," which is associated with human C. difficile-associated disease of greater than historical severity. The diagnosis was peracute typhlocolitis, with lesions and history typical of those attributed to colitis X. PMID:19407094

  5. Association between Key-Gaskell syndrome and infection by Clostridium botulinum type C/D.

    PubMed

    Nunn, F; Cave, T A; Knottenbelt, C; Poxton, I R

    2004-07-24

    There is growing evidence that equine dysautonomia is a toxicoinfection with Clostridium botulinum type C. The possibility that feline dysautonomia has the same aetiology was investigated by attempting to detect botulinum type C neurotoxin in the food, faeces and the contents of the ileum of affected cats, and by serology. The toxin was detected directly in four of eight affected cats and after enrichment in seven of them, and in their dried food. No toxin was detected in healthy control cats or in their tinned food. Recent exposure to the organism was assessed by the detection of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in the faeces of healthy control cats and affected cats. The levels of IgA antibodies to the toxin and to surface antigens of C. botulinum type C in the faeces of the affected cats 14 weeks after the outbreak were significantly higher than in the faeces of the control cats. PMID:15328740

  6. Infection with Toxin A-Negative, Toxin B-Negative, Binary Toxin-Positive Clostridium difficile in a Young Patient with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Androga, Grace O.; Hart, Julie; Foster, Niki F.; Charles, Adrian; Forbes, David

    2015-01-01

    Large clostridial toxin-negative, binary toxin-positive (A− B− CDT+) strains of Clostridium difficile are almost never associated with clinically significant C. difficile infection (CDI), possibly because such strains are not detected by most diagnostic methods. We report the isolation of an A− B− CDT+ ribotype 033 (RT033) strain of C. difficile from a young patient with ulcerative colitis and severe diarrhea. PMID:26354812

  7. Clostridium Difficile Infection in Hospitalized Patients at University Clinical Center Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina: a 4 Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetagic, Sead; Salkic, Nermin; Ahmetagic, Aldina; Custovic, Amer; Tihic, Nijaz; Smajlovic, Jasmina; Porobic-Jahic, Humera

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is currently the leading cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea, but almost nothing is known about the extent of C. difficile infection (CDI) in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Goal: We aimed to retrospectively analyze CDI in hospitalized patients at University Clinical Center (UCC) Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina from January 2009 through June 2012. Methods: We analyzed all patients (except children ages 0-2), diagnosed with CDI based on anamnestic and epidemiological, clinical picture and microbiological tests (proof of toxins in the stool by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Results: From a total of 989 patients tested for C. difficile toxin (60.2 per 10,000 inpatient days) 347 (35.08%) were positives. The mean incidence rate of CDI was 2.23 per 10,000 inpatient days (range 1.32-2.87). Annual rates of hospitalization were 15.68 per 10,000 admissions (range 8.99-20.35). Most patients had a previously identified risk profile of old age, comorbidity and recent use of antibiotics. 41/276 (14.86%) patients had died, and 11/41 (26.82%) were CDI-associated deaths. Complicated CDI were registered in 53/276 (19.21%) patients, and recurrent infections in 65/276 (23.55%). Conclusion: Our data suggest that CDI is largely present in our setting which represents a serious problem and points to the importance of international surveillance, detection and control of CDI. PMID:24167425

  8. Clostridium difficile infection after adult autologous stem cell transplantation: A multicenter study of epidemiology and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Dufresne, Simon F.; Hanna, David B.; Labbé, Annie-Claude; Treadway, Suzanne B.; Neofytos, Dionissios; Bélanger, Sylvie; Huff, Carol Ann; Laverdière, Michel; Marr, Kieren A.

    2013-01-01

    We sought to describe the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) among adult recipients of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto HSCT) within the first year after HSCT in centers with variable epidemiology of hyper-toxigenic strains. A multicenter, retrospective nested case-control study was conducted among 873 auto HSCT recipients at Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH, Baltimore, MD) and Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont (HMR, Montreal, Canada) between 1/2003-12/2008. Despite center differences in the prevalence of NAP-1 strains over the time period (21-43% JHH; 80-84% HMR), the 1-year incidence of CDI was similar (6.2% JHH; 5.7% HMR). The median time to infection was 11 days (interquartile range [IQR] 1 to 27). In case control analysis, the following were predictors for CDI: grade 2 or higher mucositis (odds ratio [OR]: 3.00, P=0.02) and receipt of a 4th generation cephalosporin (OR: 2.76, P=0.04). Mucositis was the strongest predictor of risk for CDI in multivariate analysis (adjusted OR [AOR]: 2.77; P=0.03). CDI is a common and early complication of auto HSCT. Treatment-related gastrointestinal mucosal damage, in addition to the potentially modifiable risk of antimicrobial exposure, influence risk for CDI early post-auto HSCT. PMID:23916741

  9. Clostridium difficile ribotypes 001, 017, and 027 are associated with lethal C. difficile infection in Hesse, Germany.

    PubMed

    Arvand, M; Hauri, A M; Zaiss, N H; Witte, W; Bettge-Weller, G

    2009-01-01

    From January 2008 to April 2009, 72 cases of severe Clostridium difficile infection were reported from 18 different districts in the state of Hesse, Germany. A total of 41 C. difficile isolates from 41 patients were subjected to PCR ribotyping. PCR ribotype (RT) 027 was the most prevalent strain accounting for 24 of 41 (59%) of typed isolates, followed by RT 001 (eight isolates, 20%), RT 017 and 042 (two isolates each), and RT 003, 066, 078, 081, and RKI-034 (one isolate each). Eighteen patients had died within 30 days after admission. C. difficile was reported as underlying cause of or contributing to death in 14 patients, indicating a case fatality rate of 19%. The patients with lethal outcome attributable to C. difficile were 59-89 years-old (median 78 years). Ribotyping results were available for seven isolates associated with lethal outcome, which were identified as RT 027 in three and as RT 001 and 017 in two cases each. Our data suggest that C. difficile RT 027 is prevalent in some hospitals in Hesse and that, in addition to the possibly more virulent RT 027, other toxigenic C. difficile strains like RT 001 and 017 are associated with lethal C. difficile infections in this region. PMID:19941785

  10. Epsilon Toxin Is Essential for the Virulence of Clostridium perfringens Type D Infection in Sheep, Goats, and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J. P.; Adams, V.; Beingesser, J.; Hughes, M. L.; Poon, R.; Lyras, D.; Hill, A.; McClane, B. A.; Rood, J. I.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D causes disease in sheep, goats, and other ruminants. Type D isolates produce, at minimum, alpha and epsilon (ETX) toxins, but some express up to five different toxins, raising questions about which toxins are necessary for the virulence of these bacteria. We evaluated the contribution of ETX to C. perfringens type D pathogenicity in an intraduodenal challenge model in sheep, goats, and mice using a virulent C. perfringens type D wild-type strain (WT), an isogenic ETX null mutant (etx mutant), and a strain where the etx mutation has been reversed (etx complemented). All sheep and goats, and most mice, challenged with the WT isolate developed acute clinical disease followed by death in most cases. Sheep developed various gross and/or histological changes that included edema of brain, lungs, and heart as well as hydropericardium. Goats developed various effects, including necrotizing colitis, pulmonary edema, and hydropericardium. No significant gross or histological abnormalities were observed in any mice infected with the WT strain. All sheep, goats, and mice challenged with the isogenic etx mutant remained clinically healthy for ≥24 h, and no gross or histological abnormalities were observed in those animals. Complementation of etx knockout restored virulence; most goats, sheep, and mice receiving this complemented mutant developed clinical and pathological changes similar to those observed in WT-infected animals. These results indicate that ETX is necessary for type D isolates to induce disease, supporting a key role for this toxin in type D disease pathogenesis. PMID:23630957

  11. Microbial composition analysis of Clostridium difficile infections in an ulcerative colitis patient treated with multiple fecal microbiota transplantations.

    PubMed

    Brace, Chantalle; Gloor, Gregory B; Ropeleski, Mark; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Petrof, Elaine O

    2014-09-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a promising therapy for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). However, questions remain regarding efficacy and safety in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, as well as longitudinal stability of donor stool composition. This report describes an IBD patient with two CDIs 18 months apart, each successfully treated with FMT with no IBD flares or complications. Microbiome composition analysis of patient samples during each infection revealed low-diversity microbiota patterns similar to those previously described in non-IBD patients with CDI and active IBD alone. Samples taken after each transplant demonstrated quick remodeling towards the donor's sample composition coinciding with symptom resolution. Of note, samples taken from the same donor 18 months apart reflected marked differences in microbiota abundances, suggesting that the use of single donors in FMT programs offers little benefit in ensuring predictability of donor stool composition over time. This report describes similar microbial composition patterns during CDI in IBD patients to those described previously in non-IBD patients, and supports FMT as safe and effective treatment for recurring CDI in this patient population. PMID:24529606

  12. Epidemiological and pathobiological profiles of Clostridium perfringens infections: review of consecutive series of 33 cases over a 13-year period

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Yuji; Dobashi, Yoh; Sakai, Toshiyasu; Monma, Chie; Miyatani, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is well known as the causative agent of several forms of enteric disease, precise epidemiological and pathobiological aspects are still unknown. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the culture results of samples collected in our hospital from 2001 through 2013. In addition, for the detection and toxinogenic typing of C. perfringens, polymerase-chain-reaction amplification (PCR)-based rapid analysis was performed in 6 cases using DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded tissues. Results: A total of 35 samples from 33 cases were positive for C. perfringens, representing an incidence of 0.017% (35/205, 114). Among 33 patients, 21 patients manifested sepsis and 7 patients had bacteremia. One of the septic cases was complicated by fatal intravascular hemolysis and thus, the prevalence was estimated at 3.0% among C. perfringens infections (1/33). The direct causative disease or state for C. perfringens infection was identified in 18 patients: surgery or intervention for cancers, 8 patients; chemotherapy for cancer, 2 patients; surgery or intervention for non-neoplastic disease, 6 patients; liver cirrhosis, 3 patients, etc. PCR-based toxinogenic typing of C. perfringens detected the alpha-toxin gene only in tissue from a patient who died of massive hemolysis; none of the toxin genes could be amplified in the other 5 cases examined. Conclusions: The prevalence of overt C. perfringens infection is low, but upon detection, infected patients should be carefully monitored for fatal acute hemolysis caused by type A C. perfringens. Furthermore, PCR-based rapid detection of C. perfringens and toxinogenic typing by archival pathological material is applicable as a diagnostic tool. PMID:25755747

  13. Identification of Medicare Recipients at Highest Risk for Clostridium difficile Infection in the US by Population Attributable Risk Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dubberke, Erik R.; Olsen, Margaret A.; Stwalley, Dustin; Kelly, Ciarán P.; Gerding, Dale N.; Young-Xu, Yinong; Mahé, Cedric

    2016-01-01

    Background Population attributable risk percent (PAR%) is an epidemiological tool that provides an estimate of the percent reduction in total disease burden if that disease could be entirely eliminated among a subpopulation. As such, PAR% is used to efficiently target prevention interventions. Due to significant limitations in current Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI) prevention practices and the development of new approaches to prevent CDI, such as vaccination, we determined the PAR% for CDI in various subpopulations in the Medicare 5% random sample. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study using the 2009 Medicare 5% random sample. Comorbidities, infections, and healthcare exposures during the 12 months prior to CDI were identified. CDI incidence and PAR% were calculated for each condition/exposure. Easy to identify subpopulations that could be targeted from prevention interventions were identified based on PAR%. Findings There were 1,465,927 Medicare beneficiaries with 9,401 CDI cases for an incidence of 677/100,000 persons. Subpopulations representing less than 15% of the entire population and with a PAR% ≥ 30% were identified. These included deficiency anemia (PAR% = 37.9%), congestive heart failure (PAR% = 30.2%), fluid and electrolyte disorders (PAR% = 29.6%), urinary tract infections (PAR% = 40.5%), pneumonia (PAR% = 35.2%), emergent hospitalization (PAR% = 48.5%) and invasive procedures (PAR% = 38.9%). Stratification by age and hospital exposures indicates hospital exposures are more strongly associated with CDI than age. Significance Small and identifiable subpopulations that account for relatively large proportions of CDI cases in the elderly were identified. These data can be used to target specific subpopulations for CDI prevention interventions. PMID:26859403

  14. Pathology and diagnostic criteria of Clostridium difficile enteric infection in horses.

    PubMed

    Diab, S S; Rodriguez-Bertos, A; Uzal, F A

    2013-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is commonly associated with diarrhea and colitis in humans and other mammals, including horses. To this date, the epidemiologic, microbiologic, clinical, and diagnostic aspects of C. difficile-associated disease (CDAD) in horses have been thoroughly described. However, reports describing the enteric pathology of this disease in horses are limited. This study presents a comprehensive description of the pathologic characteristics of CDAD in 21 horses and discusses the criteria for the diagnosis of the disease. Case selection was based on C. difficile A/B toxins detection (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) in intestinal content samples accompanied by compatible gross and microscopic enteric lesions. Grossly, multifocal, segmental, or diffuse hemorrhage; congestion; and/or marked gelatinous edema of the intestinal wall with abundant bloody or green watery contents were observed. Histologically, the most common lesion was severe necrotizing or necrohemorrhagic enteritis, colitis, or typhlocolitis, with mucosal and/or submucosal thrombosis and marked submucosal edema. The pathology of CDAD in horses is similar to that caused by other equine enteric pathogens; therefore, a definitive diagnosis requires detection of C. difficile A/B toxins in the intestinal contents. PMID:23686768

  15. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in hemato-oncological patients: A case control study in 144 patients

    PubMed Central

    Fuereder, Thorsten; Koni, Danjel; Gleiss, Andreas; Kundi, Michael; Makristathis, Athanasios; Zielinski, Christoph; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hemato-oncologic patients is conflicting. We studied risk factors for CDI in a large, well-characterized cohort of hemato-oncological patients. 144 hemato-oncological patients were identified in this retrospective, single center study with a microbiologically confirmed CDI-associated diarrhea. Patients were compared with 144 age and sex matched hemato-oncologic patients with CDI negative diarrhea. Risk factors such as prior antimicrobial therapy, type of disease, chemotherapy and survival were evaluated. CDI-positive patients received more frequently any antimicrobial agent and antimicrobial combination therapy than CDI-negative patients (79% vs. 67%; OR = 2.26, p = 0.038 and OR = 2.62, p = 0.003, respectively). CDI positive patients were treated more frequently with antimicrobial agents active against C. difficile than CDI negative ones (25% vs. 13%; OR = 2.2, p = 0.039). The interval between last chemotherapy and onset of diarrhea was significantly shorter in patients without CDI (median, 17 days vs 36 days; p < 0.001). Our study demonstrates that chemotherapy is not a significant risk factor for CDI but for early onset CDI negative diarrhea. The predominant modifiable risk factor for CDI is in hemato-oncological patients antimicrobial treatment. These findings should be taken into account in the daily clinical practice to avoid CDI associated complications and excess health care costs. PMID:27510591

  16. Easily Modified Factors Contribute to Delays in Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection: a Cohort Study and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kundrapu, Sirisha; Jury, Lucy A.; Sitzlar, Brett; Sunkesula, Venkata C. K.; Sethi, Ajay K.

    2013-01-01

    Although rapid laboratory tests are available for diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), delays in completion of CDI testing are common in clinical practice. We conducted a cohort study of 242 inpatients tested for CDI to determine the timing of different steps involved in diagnostic testing and to identify modifiable factors contributing to delays in diagnosis. The average time from test order to test result was 1.8 days (range, 0.2 to 10.6), with time from order to stool collection accounting for most of the delay (mean, 1.0 day; range, 0 to 10). Several modifiable factors contributed to delays, including not providing stool collection supplies to patients in a timely fashion, rejection of specimens due to incorrect labeling or leaking from the container, and holding samples in the laboratory for batch processing. Delays in testing contributed to delays in initiation of treatment for patients diagnosed with CDI and to frequent prescription of empirical CDI therapy for patients with mild to moderate symptoms whose testing was ultimately negative. An intervention that addressed several easily modified factors contributing to delays resulted in a significant decrease in the time required to complete CDI testing. These findings suggest that health care facilities may benefit from a review of their processes for CDI testing to identify and address modifiable factors that contribute to delays in diagnosis and treatment of CDI. PMID:23678072

  17. Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes 001 and 176 - the common denominator of C. difficile infection epidemiology in the Czech Republic, 2014.

    PubMed

    Krutova, Marcela; Matejkova, Jana; Kuijper, Ed J; Drevinek, Pavel; Nyc, Otakar

    2016-07-21

    In 2014, 18 hospitals in the Czech Republic participated in a survey of the incidence of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in the country. The mean CDI incidence was 6.1 (standard deviation (SD):7.2) cases per 10,000 patient bed-days and 37.8 cases (SD: 41.4) per 10,000 admissions. The mean CDI testing frequency was 39.5 tests (SD: 25.4) per 10,000 patient bed-days and 255.8 tests (SD: 164.0) per 10,000 admissions. A total of 774 C. difficile isolates were investigated, of which 225 (29%) belonged to PCR ribotype 176, and 184 isolates (24%) belonged to PCR ribotype 001. Multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) revealed 27 clonal complexes formed by 84% (190/225) of PCR ribotype 176 isolates, and 14 clonal complexes formed by 77% (141/184) of PCR ribotype 001 isolates. Clonal clusters of PCR ribotypes 176 and 001 were observed in 11 and 7 hospitals, respectively. Our data demonstrate the spread of two C. difficile PCR ribotypes within 18 hospitals in the Czech Republic, stressing the importance of standardising CDI testing protocols and implementing mandatory CDI surveillance in the country. PMID:27484171

  18. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in hemato-oncological patients: A case control study in 144 patients.

    PubMed

    Fuereder, Thorsten; Koni, Danjel; Gleiss, Andreas; Kundi, Michael; Makristathis, Athanasios; Zielinski, Christoph; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hemato-oncologic patients is conflicting. We studied risk factors for CDI in a large, well-characterized cohort of hemato-oncological patients. 144 hemato-oncological patients were identified in this retrospective, single center study with a microbiologically confirmed CDI-associated diarrhea. Patients were compared with 144 age and sex matched hemato-oncologic patients with CDI negative diarrhea. Risk factors such as prior antimicrobial therapy, type of disease, chemotherapy and survival were evaluated. CDI-positive patients received more frequently any antimicrobial agent and antimicrobial combination therapy than CDI-negative patients (79% vs. 67%; OR = 2.26, p = 0.038 and OR = 2.62, p = 0.003, respectively). CDI positive patients were treated more frequently with antimicrobial agents active against C. difficile than CDI negative ones (25% vs. 13%; OR = 2.2, p = 0.039). The interval between last chemotherapy and onset of diarrhea was significantly shorter in patients without CDI (median, 17 days vs 36 days; p < 0.001). Our study demonstrates that chemotherapy is not a significant risk factor for CDI but for early onset CDI negative diarrhea. The predominant modifiable risk factor for CDI is in hemato-oncological patients antimicrobial treatment. These findings should be taken into account in the daily clinical practice to avoid CDI associated complications and excess health care costs. PMID:27510591

  19. Diversity of Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes in Europe: results from the European, multicentre, prospective, biannual, point-prevalence study of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalised patients with diarrhoea (EUCLID), 2012 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kerrie A; Ashwin, Helen; Longshaw, Christopher M; Burns, David A; Davis, Georgina L; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the major cause of infective diarrhoea in healthcare environments. As part of the European, multicentre, prospective, biannual, point-prevalence study of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalised patients with diarrhoea (EUCLID), the largest C. difficile epidemiological study of its type, PCR ribotype distribution of C. difficile isolates in Europe was investigated. PCR ribotyping was performed on 1,196 C. difficile isolates from diarrhoeal samples sent to the European coordinating laboratory in 2012-13 and 2013 (from two sampling days) by 482 participating hospitals from 19 European countries. A total of 125 ribotypes were identified, of which ribotypes 027 (19%, n =222), 001/072 (11%, n = 134) and 014/020 (10%, n = 119) were the most prevalent. Distinct regional patterns of ribotype distribution were noted. Of 596 isolates from patients with toxin-positive stools (CDI cases), ribotype 027 accounted for 22% (32/144) of infections in cases aged from 18 to less than 65 years, but the prevalence decreased in those aged ≥ 65 years (14% (59/412)) and further decreased in those aged ≥ 81 years (9% (18/195)). The prevalence of ribotype 027 and 176, but not other epidemic strains, was inversely proportional to overall ribotype diversity (R(2) = 0.717). This study highlights an increased diversity of C. difficile ribotypes across Europe compared with previous studies, with considerable intercountry variation in ribotype distribution. Continuous surveillance programmes are necessary to monitor the changing epidemiology of C. difficile. PMID:27470194

  20. Fulminant colitis from Clostridium difficile infection, the epidemic strain ribotype 027, in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Itaru; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Tsukimori, Ayaka; Sato, Akihiro; Fukushima, Shinji; Mizuno, Yasutaka; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2014-06-01

    In December 2012, a 32-year-old woman with no previous medical history and no previous antibiotic treatment had a fever and diarrhea 2 days after a cesarean section in which cefazolin was used as a prophylactic antimicrobial agent. She was transferred to our hospital 5 days after the cesarean for severe colitis. A rapid test of stool for Clostridium difficile toxin A and B was positive. Although oral vancomycin (0.5-2.0 g/day) and intravenous immunoglobulin (5 g/day) were administered after her transfer, 7 days after admission emergency exploratory surgery was performed because of poor response to therapy. Bowel perforation was noted and a temporary colostomy was created without colectomy. Vancomycin (2.0 g/day) was administered via the colostomy, in addition to a vancomycin enema (2.0 g/day), oral metronidazole (1500 mg/day), and oral vancomycin (2.0 g/day). Three days after the operation, linezolid (1200 mg/day IV) was added. She was treated with antibiotics against C. difficile for a total of 18 days after the operation. The same strain was not isolated from other patients in the same ward. Microbiological analysis of the isolate revealed housekeeping gene (tpi), toxin A gene (tcdA), toxin B gene (tcdB), and binary toxin gene (cdtA and cdtB). DNA sequencing of tcdC revealed a base 117 deletion and contained an 18-bp tcdC deletion. PCR ribotyping showed ribotype 027 patterns. The MIC of moxifloxacin was >32 μg/ml, indicating resistance to fluoroquinolones. This isolate was considered as the epidemic strain. Our case of fulminant colitis is apparently the first case involving the epidemic strain ribotype 027 in Japan. PMID:24726377

  1. Burden of Nursing Home-Onset Clostridium difficile Infection in the United States: Estimates of Incidence and Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jennifer C.; Mu, Yi; Dumyati, Ghinwa K.; Farley, Monica M.; Winston, Lisa G.; Johnston, Helen L.; Meek, James I.; Perlmutter, Rebecca; Holzbauer, Stacy M.; Beldavs, Zintars G.; Phipps, Erin C.; Dunn, John R.; Cohen, Jessica A.; Avillan, Johannetsy; Stone, Nimalie D.; Gerding, Dale N.; McDonald, L. Clifford; Lessa, Fernanda C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Approximately 4 million Americans receive nursing home (NH) care annually. Nursing home residents commonly have risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), including advanced age and antibiotic exposures. We estimated national incidence of NH-onset (NHO) CDI and patient outcomes. Methods. We identified NHO-CDI cases from population-based surveillance of 10 geographic areas in the United States. Cases were defined by C difficile-positive stool collected in an NH (or from NH residents in outpatient settings or ≤3 days after hospital admission) without a positive stool in the prior 8 weeks. Medical records were reviewed on a sample of cases. Incidence was estimated using regression models accounting for age and laboratory testing method; sampling weights were applied to estimate hospitalizations, recurrences, and deaths. Results. A total of 3503 NHO-CDI cases were identified. Among 262 sampled cases, median age was 82 years, 76% received antibiotics in the 12 weeks prior to the C difficile-positive specimen, and 57% were discharged from a hospital in the month before specimen collection. After adjusting for age and testing method, the 2012 national estimate for NHO-CDI incidence was 112 800 cases (95% confidence interval [CI], 93 400–131 800); 31 400 (28%) were hospitalized within 7 days after a positive specimen (95% CI, 25 500–37 300), 20 900 (19%) recurred within 14–60 days (95% CI, 14 600–27 100), and 8700 (8%) died within 30 days (95% CI, 6600–10 700). Conclusions. Nursing home onset CDI is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Strategies focused on infection prevention in NHs and appropriate antibiotic use in both NHs and acute care settings may decrease the burden of NHO CDI. PMID:26798767

  2. Impact of Change to Molecular Testing for Clostridium difficile Infection on Healthcare Facility–Associated Incidence Rates

    PubMed Central

    Moehring, Rebekah W.; Lofgren, Eric T.; Anderson, Deverick J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Change from nonmolecular to molecular testing techniques is thought to contribute to the increasing trend in incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI); however the degree of effect attributed to this versus other time-related epidemiologic factors is unclear. METHODS We compared the relative change in incidence rate (IRR) of healthcare facility–associated (HCFA) CDI among hospitals in the Duke Infection Control Outreach Network before and after the date of switch from nonmolecular tests to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using prospectively collected surveillance data from July 2009 to December 2011. Data from 10 hospitals that switched and 22 control hospitals were included. Individual hospital estimates were determined using Poisson regression. We used an interrupted time series approach to develop a Poisson mixed-effects model. Additional regression adjustments were made for clustering and proportion of intensive care unit patient-days. The variable for PCR was treated as a fixed effect; other modeled variables were random effects. RESULTS For those hospitals that switched to PCR, mean incidence rate of HCFA CDI before the switch was 6.0 CDIs per 10,000 patient-days compared with 9.6 CDIs per 10,000 patient-days after the switch. Estimates of hospital-specific IRR that compared after the switch with before the switch ranged from 0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.32–2.44) to 6.91 (95% CI, 1.12–42.54). After adjustment in the mixed-effects model, the overall IRR comparing CDI incidence after the switch to before the switch was 1.56 (95% CI, 1.28–1.90). Time-trend variables did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSION Hospitals that switched from nonmolecular to molecular tests experienced an approximate 56% increase in the rate of HCFA CDI after testing change. PMID:24018922

  3. Developing a Clinical Prediction Rule for First Hospital-Onset Clostridium difficile Infections: A Retrospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Press, Anne; Ku, Benson; McCullagh, Lauren; Rosen, Lisa; Richardson, Safiya; McGinn, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    BACKGROUND The healthcare burden of hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) demands attention and calls for a solution. Identifying patients' risk of developing a primary nosocomial CDI is a critical first step in reducing the development of new cases of CDI. OBJECTIVE To derive a clinical prediction rule that can predict a patient's risk of acquiring a primary CDI. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING Large tertiary healthcare center. PATIENTS Total of 61,482 subjects aged at least 18 admitted over a 1-year period (2013). INTERVENTION None. METHODS Patient demographic characteristics, evidence of CDI, and other risk factors were retrospectively collected. To derive the CDI clinical prediction rule the patient population was divided into a derivation and validation cohort. A multivariable analysis was performed in the derivation cohort to identify risk factors individually associated with nosocomial CDI and was validated on the validation sample. RESULTS Among 61,482 subjects, CDI occurred in 0.46%. CDI outcome was significantly associated with age, admission in the past 60 days, mechanical ventilation, dialysis, history of congestive heart failure, and use of antibiotic medications. The sensitivity and specificity of the score, in the validation set, were 82.0% and 75.7%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.85. CONCLUSION This study successfully derived a clinical prediction rule that will help identify patients at high risk for primary CDI. This tool will allow physicians to systematically recognize those at risk for CDI and will allow for early interventional strategies. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:896-900. PMID:27123975

  4. Novel Riboswitch-Binding Flavin Analog That Protects Mice against Clostridium difficile Infection without Inhibiting Cecal Flora

    PubMed Central

    Megyola, Cynthia; Plummer, Mark; Osterman, David; O'Connell, Tim; Aristoff, Paul; Quinn, Cheryl; Chrusciel, R. Alan; Poel, Toni J.; Schostarez, Heinrich J.; Stewart, Catherine A.; Walker, Daniel P.; Wuts, Peter G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Novel mechanisms of action and new chemical scaffolds are needed to rejuvenate antibacterial drug discovery, and riboswitch regulators of bacterial gene expression are a promising class of targets for the discovery of new leads. Herein, we report the characterization of 5-(3-(4-fluorophenyl)butyl)-7,8-dimethylpyrido[3,4-b]quinoxaline-1,3(2H,5H)-dione (5FDQD)—an analog of riboflavin that was designed to bind riboswitches that naturally recognize the essential coenzyme flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and regulate FMN and riboflavin homeostasis. In vitro, 5FDQD and FMN bind to and trigger the function of an FMN riboswitch with equipotent activity. MIC and time-kill studies demonstrated that 5FDQD has potent and rapidly bactericidal activity against Clostridium difficile. In C57BL/6 mice, 5FDQD completely prevented the onset of lethal antibiotic-induced C. difficile infection (CDI). Against a panel of bacteria representative of healthy bowel flora, the antibacterial selectivity of 5FDQD was superior to currently marketed CDI therapeutics, with very little activity against representative strains from the Bacteroides, Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Actinomyces, and Prevotella genera. Accordingly, a single oral dose of 5FDQD caused less alteration of culturable cecal flora in mice than the comparators. Collectively, these data suggest that 5FDQD or closely related analogs could potentially provide a high rate of CDI cure with a low likelihood of infection recurrence. Future studies will seek to assess the role of FMN riboswitch binding to the mechanism of 5FDQD antibacterial action. In aggregate, our results indicate that riboswitch-binding antibacterial compounds can be discovered and optimized to exhibit activity profiles that merit preclinical and clinical development as potential antibacterial therapeutic agents. PMID:26169403

  5. Serum Mannose-Binding Lectin Concentration, but Not Genotype, Is Associated With Clostridium difficile Infection Recurrence: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Swale, Andrew; Miyajima, Fabio; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi; Roberts, Paul; Little, Margaret; Beeching, Nicholas J.; Beadsworth, Mike B. J.; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2014-01-01

    Background. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays a key role in the activation of the lectin-complement pathway of innate immunity, and its deficiency has been linked with several acute infections. However, its role in predisposing to, or modulating disease severity in, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has not been investigated. Methods. We prospectively recruited 308 CDI case patients and 145 control patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). CDI outcome measures were disease severity, duration of symptoms, 30-day mortality, and 90-day recurrence. Serum concentrations of MBL were determined using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay transferred to an electrochemiluminescence–based platform. MBL2 polymorphisms were typed using a combination of pyrosequencing and TaqMan genotyping assays. Results. The frequency of the MBL2 genetic variants was similar to that reported in other white populations. MBL serum concentrations in CDI and AAD subjects were determined by MBL2 exonic variants B, C, and D and the haplotypes (LYPB, LYQC, and HYPD). There was no difference in either MBL concentrations or genotypes between cases and controls. MBL concentration, but not genotype, was a determinant of CDI recurrence (odds ratios, 3.18 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.40–7.24] and 2.61 [95% CI, 1.35–5.04] at the <50 ng/mL and <100 ng/mL cutoff points, respectively; P < .001). However, neither MBL concentration nor MBL2 genotype was linked with the other CDI outcomes. Conclusions. Serum MBL concentration did not differentiate between CDI cases and AAD controls, but among CDI cases, MBL concentration, but not genotype, was associated with CDI recurrence, indicating that MBL acts as a modulator of disease, rather than a predisposing factor. PMID:25170052

  6. Relative disease susceptibility and clostridial toxin antibody responses in three commercial broiler lines co-infected with Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Necrotic enteritis is an enteric disease of poultry resulting from infection by Clostridium perfringens with co-infection by Eimeria spp. constituting a major risk factor for disease pathogenesis. This study compared three commercial broiler chicken lines using an experimental model of necrotic ente...

  7. Burden of Clostridium difficile infection between 2010 and 2013: Trends and outcomes from an academic center in Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kurti, Zsuzsanna; Lovasz, Barbara D; Mandel, Michael D; Csima, Zoltan; Golovics, Petra A; Csako, Bence D; Mohas, Anna; Gönczi, Lorant; Gecse, Krisztina B; Kiss, Lajos S; Szathmari, Miklos; Lakatos, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the incidence and possible risk factors in hospitalized patients treated with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). METHODS: A total of 11751 patients were admitted to our clinic between 1 January 2010 and 1 May 2013. Two hundred and forty-seven inpatients were prospectively diagnosed with CDI. For the risk analysis a 1:3 matching was used. Data of 732 patients matched for age, sex, and inpatient care period and unit were compared to those of the CDI population. Inpatient records were collected from an electronic hospital database and comprehensively reviewed. RESULTS: Incidence of CDI was 21.0/1000 admissions (2.1% of all-cause hospitalizations and 4.45% of total inpatient days). The incidence of severe CDI was 12.6% (2.63/1000 of all-cause hospitalizations). Distribution of CDI cases was different according to the unit type, with highest incidence rates in hematology, gastroenterology and nephrology units (32.9, 25 and 24.6/1000 admissions, respectively) and lowest rates in 1.4% (33/2312) in endocrinology and general internal medicine (14.2 and 16.9/1000 admissions) units. Recurrence of CDI was 11.3% within 12 wk after discharge. Duration of hospital stay was longer in patients with CDI compared to controls (17.6 ± 10.8 d vs 12.4 ± 7.71 d). CDI accounted for 6.3% of all-inpatient deaths, and 30-d mortality rate was 21.9% (54/247 cases). Risk factors for CDI were antibiotic therapy [including third-generation cephalosporins or fluoroquinolones, odds ratio (OR) = 4.559; P < 0.001], use of proton pump inhibitors (OR = 2.082, P < 0.001), previous hospitalization within 12 mo (OR = 3.167, P < 0.001), previous CDI (OR = 15.32; P < 0.001), while presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with a decreased risk for CDI (OR = 0.484; P < 0.001). Treatment of recurrent cases was significantly different from primary infections with more frequent use of vancomycin alone or in combination (P < 0.001), and antibiotic therapy duration was longer (P < 0

  8. The flagellin FliC of Clostridium difficile is responsible for pleiotropic gene regulation during in vivo infection.

    PubMed

    Barketi-Klai, Amira; Monot, Marc; Hoys, Sandra; Lambert-Bordes, Sylvie; Kuehne, Sarah A; Minton, Nigel; Collignon, Anne; Dupuy, Bruno; Kansau, Imad

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the main agent responsible for hospital acquired antibiotic associated diarrhoea. In recent years, epidemic strains have emerged causing more severe infections. Whilst C. difficile has two major virulence factors, toxins TcdA and TcdB, it is generally accepted that other virulence components of the bacterium contribute to disease. Previously, it has been suggested that flagella expression from pathogenic bacteria might be implicated in virulence. In a recent study, we observed an increased mortality in a gnotobiotic mouse model when animals were colonized with an isogenic fliC mutant constructed in the PCR-ribotype 027 (B1/NAP1) strain R20291, while animals survived when colonized by the parental strain or after colonization by other high-toxin-producing C. difficile strains. To understand the reasons for this increased virulence, we compared the global gene expression profiles between the fliC-R20291 mutant and its parental strain using an in vitro and in vivo transcriptomic approach. The latter made use of the gnotobiotic mouse model. Interestingly, in the fliC mutant, we observed considerable up-regulation of genes involved in mobility, membrane transport systems (PTS, ABC transporters), carbon metabolism, known virulence factors and sporulation. A smaller but significant up-regulation of genes involved in cell growth, fermentation, metabolism, stress and antibiotic resistance was also apparent. All of these genes may be associated with the increased virulence of the fliC-R20921 mutant. We confirmed that the fliC mutation is solely responsible for the observed changes in gene expression in the mutant strain since expression profiles were restored to that of the wild-type strain in the fliC-complemented strain. Thus, the absence of FliC is directly or indirectly involved in the high mortality observed in the fliC mutant infected animals. Therefore, we provide the first evidence that when the major structural component of the flagellum is

  9. The Flagellin FliC of Clostridium difficile Is Responsible for Pleiotropic Gene Regulation during In Vivo Infection

    PubMed Central

    Barketi-Klai, Amira; Monot, Marc; Hoys, Sandra; Lambert-Bordes, Sylvie; Kuehne, Sarah A.; Minton, Nigel; Collignon, Anne; Dupuy, Bruno; Kansau, Imad

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the main agent responsible for hospital acquired antibiotic associated diarrhoea. In recent years, epidemic strains have emerged causing more severe infections. Whilst C. difficile has two major virulence factors, toxins TcdA and TcdB, it is generally accepted that other virulence components of the bacterium contribute to disease. Previously, it has been suggested that flagella expression from pathogenic bacteria might be implicated in virulence. In a recent study, we observed an increased mortality in a gnotobiotic mouse model when animals were colonized with an isogenic fliC mutant constructed in the PCR-ribotype 027 (B1/NAP1) strain R20291, while animals survived when colonized by the parental strain or after colonization by other high-toxin-producing C. difficile strains. To understand the reasons for this increased virulence, we compared the global gene expression profiles between the fliC-R20291 mutant and its parental strain using an in vitro and in vivo transcriptomic approach. The latter made use of the gnotobiotic mouse model. Interestingly, in the fliC mutant, we observed considerable up-regulation of genes involved in mobility, membrane transport systems (PTS, ABC transporters), carbon metabolism, known virulence factors and sporulation. A smaller but significant up-regulation of genes involved in cell growth, fermentation, metabolism, stress and antibiotic resistance was also apparent. All of these genes may be associated with the increased virulence of the fliC-R20921 mutant. We confirmed that the fliC mutation is solely responsible for the observed changes in gene expression in the mutant strain since expression profiles were restored to that of the wild-type strain in the fliC-complemented strain. Thus, the absence of FliC is directly or indirectly involved in the high mortality observed in the fliC mutant infected animals. Therefore, we provide the first evidence that when the major structural component of the flagellum is

  10. Effect of Clostridium perfringens infection and antibiotic administration on microbiota in the small intestine of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Fasina, Yewande O; Newman, Molli M; Stough, Joshua M; Liles, Mark R

    2016-02-01

    The etiological agent of necrotic enteritis (NE) is Clostridium perfringens (CP), which is an economically significant problem for broiler chicken producers worldwide. Traditional use of in-feed antibiotic growth promoters to control NE disease have resulted in the emergence of antibiotic resistance in CP strains. Identification of probiotic bacteria strains as an alternative to antibiotics for the control of intestinal CP colonization is crucial. Two experiments were conducted to determine changes in intestinal bacterial assemblages in response to CP infection and in-feed bacitracin methylene disalicylate (BMD) in broiler chickens. In each experiment conducted in battery-cage or floor-pen housing, chicks were randomly assigned to the following treatment groups: 1) BMD-supplemented diet with no CP challenge (CM), 2) BMD-free control diet with no CP challenge (CX), 3) BMD-supplemented diet with CP challenge (PCM), or 4) BMD-free control diet with CP challenge (PCX). The establishment of CP infection was confirmed, with the treatment groups exposed to CP having a 1.5- to 2-fold higher CP levels (P < 0.05) compared to the non-exposed groups. Next-generation sequencing of PCR amplified 16S rRNA genes, was used to perform intestinal bacterial diversity analyses pre-challenge, and at 1, 7, and 21 d post-challenge. The results indicated that the intestinal bacterial assemblage was dominated by members of the phylum Firmicutes in all treatments before and after CP challenge, especially the Lactobacillaceae and Clostridiales families. In addition, we observed post-challenge emergence of members of the Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcaceae in the non-medicated PCX treatment, and emergence of the Enterococcaceae in the medicated PCM treatment. This study highlights the bacterial interactions that could be important in suppressing or eliminating CP infection within the chicken intestine. Future studies should explore the potential to use commensal strains of unknown

  11. Predicting the Risk of Clostridium difficile Infection upon Admission: A Score to Identify Patients for Antimicrobial Stewardship Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, Jennifer L; Smith, David H; Petrik, Amanda F; Yang, Xiuhai; Thorp, Micah L; Barton, Tracy; Barton, Karen; Labreche, Matthew; Spindel, Steven J; Johnson, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing morbidity and health care costs related to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have heightened interest in methods to identify patients who would most benefit from interventions to mitigate the likelihood of CDI. Objective: To develop a risk score that can be calculated upon hospital admission and used by antimicrobial stewards, including pharmacists and clinicians, to identify patients at risk for CDI who would benefit from enhanced antibiotic review and patient education. Methods: We assembled a cohort of Kaiser Permanente Northwest patients with a hospital admission from July 1, 2005, through December 30, 2012, and identified CDI in the six months following hospital admission. Using Cox regression, we constructed a score to identify patients at high risk for CDI on the basis of preadmission characteristics. We calculated and plotted the observed six-month CDI risk for each decile of predicted risk. Results: We identified 721 CDIs following 54,186 hospital admissions—a 6-month incidence of 13.3 CDIs/1000 patient admissions. Patients with the highest predicted risk of CDI had an observed incidence of 53 CDIs/1000 patient admissions. The score differentiated between patients who do and do not develop CDI, with values for the extended C-statistic of 0.75. Predicted risk for CDI agreed closely with observed risk. Conclusion: Our risk score accurately predicted six-month risk for CDI using preadmission characteristics. Accurate predictions among the highest-risk patient subgroups allow for the identification of patients who could be targeted for and who would likely benefit from review of inpatient antibiotic use or enhanced educational efforts at the time of discharge planning. PMID:26845084

  12. The Magnitude and Duration of Clostridium difficile Infection Risk Associated with Antibiotic Therapy: A Hospital Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kevin A.; Fisman, David N.; Moineddin, Rahim; Daneman, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic therapy is the principal risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), but little is known about how risks cumulate over the course of therapy and abate after cessation. We prospectively identified CDI cases among adults hospitalized at a tertiary hospital between June 2010 and May 2012. Poisson regression models included covariates for time since admission, age, hospitalization history, disease pressure, and intensive care unit stay. Impacts of antibiotic use through time were modeled using 4 measures: current antibiotic receipt, time since most recent receipt, time since first receipt during a hospitalization, and duration of receipt. Over the 24-month study period, we identified 127 patients with new onset nosocomial CDI (incidence rate per 10,000 patient days [IR] = 5.86). Of the 4 measures, time since most recent receipt was the strongest independent predictor of CDI incidence. Relative to patients with no prior receipt of antibiotics in the last 30 days (IR = 2.95), the incidence rate of CDI was 2.41 times higher (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41, 4.13) during antibiotic receipt and 2.16 times higher when patients had receipt in the prior 1–5 days (CI 1.17, 4.00). The incidence rates of CDI following 1–3, 4–6 and 7–11 days of antibiotic exposure were 1.60 (CI 0.85, 3.03), 2.27 (CI 1.24, 4.16) and 2.10 (CI 1.12, 3.94) times higher compared to no prior receipt. These findings are consistent with studies showing higher risk associated with longer antibiotic use in hospitalized patients, but suggest that the duration of increased risk is shorter than previously thought. PMID:25157757

  13. Lack of association between clinical outcome of Clostridium difficile infections, strain type, and virulence-associated phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Sirard, Stéphanie; Valiquette, Louis; Fortier, Louis-Charles

    2011-12-01

    Clostridium difficile strain NAP1/027 (North American pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE] type 1 and PCR ribotype 027 [R027]) has been associated with recent outbreaks in North America and Europe. It has been associated with more severe disease symptoms, higher mortality rates, and greater risk of relapse. This strain is thought to produce more toxins and sporulate to higher levels. However, recent studies suggest that this may not always be the case. The objective of our study was to assess, in a nonoutbreak situation, whether specific strains, such as NAP1/027, were associated with more severe disease symptoms, higher toxin production, and/or greater sporulation in vitro. We isolated and characterized C. difficile strains from 21 patients with mild to moderate, severe, or complicated symptoms of C. difficile infection (CDI). The isolates were characterized by different molecular typing methods, including PCR ribotyping, tandem repeat sequence typing (TRST), and sequencing of the tcdC gene. Fourteen isolates were of PCR ribotype 027 with deletions in tcdC, but no association with severity or clinical outcome was found. We show by immunodot blot detection of toxins with monoclonal antibodies that all R027 isolates produced more TcdA and TcdB than other strains. On the other hand, they consistently produced fewer spores than non-R027 isolates. Taken together, our data suggest that NAP1/027 isolates are not always associated with more severe disease, even though they may produce larger amounts of toxins. Our study also suggests that current assertions regarding the NAP1/027 may not apply to all isolates and that other factors may come into play. PMID:21956985

  14. Surveillance snapshot of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitals across Queensland detects binary toxin producing ribotype UK 244.

    PubMed

    Huber, Charlotte A; Hall, Lisa; Foster, Nikki F; Gray, Mareeka; Allen, Michelle; Richardson, Leisha J; Robson, Jennifer; Vohra, Renu; Schlebusch, Sanmarie; George, Narelle; Nimmo, Graeme R; Riley, Thomas V; Paterson, David L

    2014-12-01

    In North America and Europe, the binary toxin positive Clostridium difficile strains of the ribotypes 027 and 078 have been associated with death, toxic megacolon and other adverse outcomes. Following an increase in C. difficile infections (CDIs) in Queensland, a prevalence study involving 175 hospitals was undertaken in early 2012, identifying 168 cases of CDI over a 2 month period. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were recorded, and C. difficile isolates were ribotyped and tested for the presence of binary toxin genes. Most patients (106/168, 63.1%) were aged over 60 years. Overall, 98 (58.3%) developed symptoms after hospitalisation; 89 cases (53.0%) developed symptoms more than 48 hours after admission. Furthermore, 27 of the 62 (67.7%) patients who developed symptoms in the community ad been hospitalised within the last 3 months. Thirteen of the 168 (7.7%) cases identified had severe disease, resulting in admission to the Intensive Care Unit or death within 30 days of the onset of symptoms. The 3 most common ribotypes isolated were UK 002 (22.9%), UK 014 (13.3%) and the binary toxin-positive ribotype UK 244 (8.4%). The only other binary toxin positive ribotype isolated was UK 078 (n = 1). Of concern was the detection of the binary toxin positive ribotype UK 244, which has recently been described in other parts of Australia and New Zealand. No isolates were of the international epidemic clone of ribotype UK 027, although ribotype UK 244 is genetically related to this clone. Further studies are required to track the epidemiology of ribotype UK 244 in Australia and New Zealand. PMID:25631588

  15. Comparison of Real-Time PCR Techniques to Cytotoxigenic Culture Methods for Diagnosing Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Knetsch, C. W.; Bakker, D.; de Boer, R. F.; Sanders, I.; Hofs, S.; Kooistra-Smid, A. M. D.; Corver, J.; Eastwood, K.; Wilcox, M. H.; Kuijper, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, the incidence of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) with a more severe course has increased in Europe and North America. Assays that are capable of rapidly diagnosing CDI are essential. Two real-time PCRs (LUMC and LvI) targeting C. difficile toxin genes (tcdB, and tcdA and tcdB, respectively) were compared with the BD GeneOhm PCR (targeting the tcdB gene), using cytotoxigenic culture as a gold standard. In addition, a real-time PCR targeting the tcdC frameshift mutation at position 117 (Δ117 PCR) was evaluated for detecting toxigenic C. difficile and the presence of PCR ribotype 027 in stool samples. In total, 526 diarrheal samples were prospectively collected and included in the study. Compared with those for cytotoxigenic culture, sensitivity, specificity, positive predicted value (PPV), and negative predicted value (NPV) were for PCR LUMC 96.0%, 88.0%, 66.0%, and 98.9%, for PCR LvI 100.0%, 89.4%, 69.7%, and 100.0%, for PCR Δ117 98.0%, 90.7%, 71.9%, and 99.5%, and for PCR BD GeneOhm 88.3%, 96.9%, 86.5%, and 97.4%. Compared to those with feces samples cultured positive for C. difficile type 027, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the Δ117 PCR were 95.2%, 96.2%, 87.0%, and 98.7%. We conclude that all real-time PCRs can be applied as a first screening test in an algorithm for diagnosing CDI. However, the low PPVs hinder the use of the assays as stand-alone tests. Furthermore, the Δ117 PCR may provide valuable information for minimizing the spread of the epidemic C. difficile PCR ribotype 027. PMID:20980562

  16. Immunoglobulin A Vasculitis Complicated with Clostridium difficile Infection: a Rare Case Report and Brief Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Cojocariu, Camelia; Stanciu, Carol; Ancuta, Codrina; Danciu, Mihai; Chiriac, Stefan; Trifan, Anca

    2016-06-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) vasculitis, formerly called Henoch-Schönlein purpura, is a leukocytoclastic type of vasculitis affecting small vessels with a deposition of immune IgA complexes, clinically characterized by the classic tetrad of nonthrombocytopenic palpable purpura, arthralgia (or arthritis), and gastrointestinal and renal involvement. Although the cause of the disease remains unknown, immune complexes of IgA and unidentified antigens seem to play a central pathogenic role. The diagnosis is easily established in the presence of purpura, but may be challenging in its absence, especially when colicky abdominal pain precedes the cutaneous lesions. IgA vasculitis is usually a self-limited disease with a benign course and symptomatic treatment is sufficient for most; in severe cases, however, corticosteroids are necessary. We describe the case of a young adult male presenting with severe abdominal pain, vomiting and fever (38.4ºC). Clinical examination, abdominal ultrasound and plain abdominal radiography excluded an acute abdomen. The occurrence of arthralgia involving both knees and erosive duodenitis at endoscopy, 48 hours upon admission, suggested the diagnosis of IgA vasculitis, confirmed on the following day by the presence of typical purpuric rash on the lower extremities. Corticosteroid therapy led to the resolution of all gastrointestinal and joint manifestations as well as to a significant improvement of cutaneous purpura. However, during the 3rd week of corticosteroid treatment, the patient developed watery diarrhea and the clinical suspicion of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was confirmed. The treatment with metronidazole led to the resolution of diarrhea.The peculiarity of this case resides in several aspects: the gastrointestinal and joint manifestations preceded purpura, making diagnosis more difficult; CDI is an extremely rare complication of IgA vasculitis, being, in fact, the second case reported in adults in the literature. PMID

  17. Prevalence and impact of Clostridium difficile infection in elderly residents of long-term care facilities, 2011: A nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Joyce, Nina; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M; Zervou, Fainareti N; Besdine, Richard W; Mor, Vincent; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-08-01

    The elderly population is particularly vulnerable to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), but the epidemiology of CDI in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) is unknown.We performed a retrospective cohort study and used US 2011 LTCF resident data from the Minimum Data Set 3.0 linked to Medicare claims. We extracted CDI cases based on International Classification of Diseases-9 coding, and compared residents with the diagnosis of CDI to those who did not have a CDI diagnosis during their LTCF stay. We estimated CDI prevalence rates and calculated 3-month mortality rates.The study population consisted of 2,190,613 admissions (median age 82 years; interquartile range 76-88; female to male ratio 2:1; >80% whites), 45,500 of whom had a CDI diagnosis. The nationwide CDI prevalence rate was 1.85 per 100 LTCF admissions (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83-1.87). The CDI rate was lower in the South (1.54%; 95% CI 1.51-1.57) and higher in the Northeast (2.29%; 95% CI 2.25-2.33). Older age, white race, presence of a feeding tube, unhealed pressure ulcers, end-stage renal disease, cirrhosis, bowel incontinence, prior tracheostomy, chemotherapy, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were independently related to "high risk" for CDI. Residents with a CDI diagnosis were more likely to be admitted to an acute care hospital (40% vs 31%, P < 0.001) and less likely to be discharged to the community (46% vs 54%, P < 0.001) than those not reported with CDI during stay. Importantly, CDI was associated with higher mortality (24.7% vs 18.1%, P = 0.001).CDI is common among the elderly residents of LTCFs and is associated with significant increase in 3-month mortality. The prevalence is higher in the Northeast and risk stratification can be used in CDI prevention policies. PMID:27495022

  18. Prevalence and Clinical Outcomes of Clostridium difficile Infection in the Intensive Care Unit: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karanika, Styliani; Paudel, Suresh; Zervou, Fainareti N.; Grigoras, Christos; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intensive care unit (ICU) patients are at higher risk for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Methods. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies from 1983 to 2015 using the PubMed, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases to study the prevalence and outcomes of CDI in this patient population. Among the 9146 articles retrieved from the studies, 22 articles, which included a total of 80 835 ICU patients, were included in our final analysis. Results. The prevalence of CDI among ICU patients was 2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1%–2%), and among diarrheic ICU patients the prevalence was 11% (95% CI, 6%–17%). Among CDI patients, 25% (95% CI, 5%–51%) were diagnosed with pseudomembranous colitis, and the estimated length of ICU stay before CDI acquisition was 10.74 days (95% CI, 5%–51%). The overall hospital mortality among ICU patients with CDI was 32% (95% CI, 26%–39%), compared with 24% (95% CI, 14%–36%) among those without CDI presenting a statistically significant difference in mortality risk (P = .030). It is worth noting that the length of ICU and hospital stay among CDI patients was significantly longer, compared with non-CDI patients (standardized mean of difference [SMD] = 0.49, 95% CI, .39%–.6%, P = .00 and SMD = 1.15, 95% CI, .44%–1.91%, P = .003, respectively). It is noteworthy that the morbidity score at ICU admission (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [APACHE II]) was not statistically different between the 2 groups (P = .911), implying that the differences in outcomes can be attributed to CDI. Conclusions. The ICU setting is associated with higher prevalence of CDI. In this setting, CDI is associated with increased hospital mortality and prolonged ICU and overall hospital stay. These findings highlight the need for additional prevention and treatment studies in this setting. PMID:26788544

  19. Clostridium difficile infection following systemic antibiotic administration in randomised controlled trials: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Trigkidis, Kyriakos K; Boukouvala, Eleni; Falagas, Matthew E

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotics have been the most important risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). However, only data from non-randomised studies have been reviewed. We sought to evaluate the risk for development of CDI associated with the major antibiotic classes by analysing data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The PubMed, Cochrane and Scopus databases were searched and the references of selected RCTs were also hand-searched. Eligible studies should have compared only one antibiotic versus another administered systemically. Inclusion of studies comparing combinations of antibiotics was allowed only if the second antibiotic was the same or from the same class or if it was administered in a subset of the enrolled patients who were equally distributed in the two arms. Only a minority of the selected RCTs (79/1332; 5.9%) reported CDI episodes. Carbapenems were associated with more CDI episodes than fluoroquinolones [risk ratio (RR) = 2.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32-4.49] and cephalosporins (RR = 2.24, 95% CI 1.46-3.42), but not penicillins (RR = 2.53, 95% CI 0.87-7.41). Cephalosporins were associated with more CDIs than penicillins (RR = 2.36, 95% CI 1.32-4.23) and fluoroquinolones (RR = 2.84, 95% CI 1.60-5.06). There was no difference in CDI frequency between fluoroquinolones and penicillins (RR = 1.34, 95% CI 0.55-3.25). Finally, clindamycin was associated with more CDI episodes than cephalosporins and penicillins (RR = 3.92, 95% CI 1.15-13.43). In conclusion, data from RCTs showed that clindamycin and carbapenems were associated with more CDIs than other antibiotics. PMID:27216385

  20. Clostridium difficile Infections in Medical Intensive Care Units of a Medical Center in Southern Taiwan: Variable Seasonality and Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2016-01-01

    Critical patients are susceptible to Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs), which cause significant morbidity and mortality in the hospital. In Taiwan, the epidemiology of CDI in intensive care units (ICUs) is not well understood. This study was aimed to describe the incidence and the characteristics of CDI in the ICUs of a medical center in southern Taiwan. Adult patients with diarrhea but without colostomy/colectomy or laxative use were enrolled. Stool samples were collected with or without 5 ml alcohol and were plated on cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar. C. difficile identification was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. There were 1,551 patients admitted to ICUs, 1,488 screened, and 145 with diarrhea. A total of 75 patients were excluded due either to laxative use, a lack of stool samples, or refusal. Overall, 70 patients were included, and 14 (20%) were diagnosed with CDI, with an incidence of 8.8 cases per 10,000 patient-days. The incidence of CDI was found to be highest in March 2013 and lowest in the last quarter of 2013. The cases were categorized as the following: 5 severe, complicated, 5 severe, and 4 mild or moderate diseases. Among the 14 cases of CDI, the median patient age was 74 (range: 47–94) years, and the median time from admission to diarrhea onset was 16.5 (4–53) days. Eight cases received antimicrobial treatment (primarily metronidazole), and the time to diarrheal resolution was 11.5 days. Though 6 cases were left untreated, no patients died of CDI. The in-hospital mortality of CDI cases was 50%, similar to that of patients without CDI (46.4%; P = 1.0). We concluded that the overall incidence of CDI in our medical ICUs was low and there were variable seasonal incidences and disease severities of CDI. PMID:27509051

  1. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection among solid organ transplant recipients: a meta-analysis of published studies.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Suresh; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M; Zervou, Fainareti N; Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Several factors including antibiotic use, immunosuppression and frequent hospitalizations make solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients vulnerable to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We conducted a meta-analysis of published studies from 1991-2014 to estimate the prevalence of CDI in this patient population. We searched PubMed, EMBASE and Google Scholar databases. Among the 75,940 retrieved citations, we found 30 studies coded from 35 articles that were relevant to our study. Based on these studies, we estimated the prevalence of CDI among 21,683 patients who underwent transplantation of kidney, liver, lungs, heart, pancreas, intestine or more than one organ and stratified each study based on the type of transplanted organ, place of the study conduction, and size of patient population. The overall estimated prevalence in SOT recipients was 7.4% [95%CI, (5.6-9.5%)] and it varied based on the type of organ transplant. The prevalence was 12.7% [95%CI, (6.4%-20.9%)] among patients who underwent transplantation for more than one organ. The prevalence among other SOT recipients was: lung 10.8% [95% CI, (5.5%-17.7%)], liver 9.1 % [95%CI, (5.8%-13.2%)], intestine 8% [95% CI, (2.6%-15.9%)], heart 5.2% [95%CI, (1.8%-10.2%)], kidney 4.7% [95% CI, (2.6%-7.3%)], and pancreas 3.2% [95% CI, (0.5%-7.9%)]. Among the studies that reported relevant data, the estimated prevalence of severe CDI was 5.3% [95% CI (2.3%-9.3%)] and the overall recurrence rate was 19.7% [95% CI, (13.7%-26.6%)]. In summary, CDI is a significant complication after SOT and preventive strategies are important in order to reduce the CDI related morbidity and mortality. PMID:25886133

  2. Berberine Blocks the Relapse of Clostridium difficile Infection in C57BL/6 Mice after Standard Vancomycin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhi; Peng, Guoli; Liu, Weihua; Xu, Hufeng

    2015-01-01

    Vancomycin is a preferred antibiotic for treating Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and has been associated with a rate of recurrence of CDI of as high as 20% in treated patients. Recent studies have suggested that berberine, an alternative medical therapy for gastroenteritis and diarrhea, exhibits several beneficial effects, including induction of anti-inflammatory responses and restoration of the intestinal barrier function. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of berberine on preventing CDI relapse and restoring the gut microbiota in a mouse model. Berberine was administered through gavage to C57BL/6 mice with established CDI-induced intestinal injury and colitis. The disease activity index (DAI), mean relative weight, histopathology scores, and levels of toxins A and B in fecal samples were measured. An Illumina sequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA genes was used to determine the overall structural change in the microbiota in the mouse ileocecum. Berberine administration significantly promoted the restoration of the intestinal microbiota by inhibiting the expansion of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and counteracting the side effects of vancomycin treatment. Therapy consisting of vancomycin and berberine combined prevented weight loss, improved the DAI and the histopathology scores, and effectively decreased the mortality rate. Berberine prevented CDIs from relapsing and significantly improved survival in the mouse model of CDI. Our data indicate that a combination of berberine and vancomycin is more effective than vancomycin alone for treating CDI. One of the possible mechanisms by which berberine prevents a CDI relapse is through modulation of the gut microbiota. Although this conclusion was generated in the case of the mouse model, use of the combination of vancomycin and berberine and represent a novel therapeutic approach targeting CDI. PMID:25824219

  3. Clinical characteristics of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea in a university hospital in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, F. F.; Wu, S.; Klena, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify clinical characteristics of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). A prospective study was conducted among patients hospitalized in Fudan University Hospital Huashan from August 1, 2012 to July 31, 2013. Toxigenic C. difficile isolates were characterized by PCR ribotyping and multilocus sequence typing. AAD developed in 1.0 % (206/20437) of the antibiotic-treated hospitalized patients and toxigenic C. difficile was isolated from 30.6 % (63/206) of patients with AAD. The frequency of AAD was highest in the intensive care unit (10.7 %); however the proportion of CDI in AAD was highest in the Geriatric Unit (38 %). AAD ranged in severity from mild to moderate. One case with pseudomembranous colitis was identified. Use of carbapenems was found to significantly increase the risk of CDI (OR, 2.31; 95 % CI, 1.22–4.38; p= 0.011). Patient demographics, presumed risk factors, clinical manifestations and laboratory findings revealed no significant difference between patients with CDI and non-C. difficile AAD. Over 90 % of the patients with CDI or non-C. difficile AAD were cured. Two patients had CDI recurrence. Ribotype H was the dominant (18.8 %) genotype, followed by ribotype 012 and ribotype 017. C. difficile plays a significant role in AAD in our setting in China. Because the severity of diarrhea ranges from mild to moderate, it is difficult for Chinese clinicians to identify CDI from AAD patients, therefore CDI should be included in the routine differential diagnoses for hospitalized patients presenting with AAD. PMID:24820293

  4. The emergence of community-onset Clostridium difficile infection in a tertiary hospital in Singapore: a cause for concern.

    PubMed

    Tan, X Q; Verrall, A J; Jureen, R; Riley, T V; Collins, D A; Lin, R T; Balm, M N; Chan, D; Tambyah, P A

    2014-01-01

    Increasing rates of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) among those without traditional risk factors have been reported mainly in Europe and North America. Here we describe the epidemiology, clinical features and ribotypes of CDI at National University Hospital (NUH), a 1000-bed tertiary care hospital in Singapore, from December 2011 to May 2012. All laboratory-confirmed CDI cases ≥21 years old who gave informed consent were included. Clinical data were collected prospectively and participants underwent an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Cases were classified by healthcare facility exposure and severity according to the SHEA guidelines. Included cases were also subjected to PCR and were classified by ribotype. In total, 66 patients participated in the study, of which 33 (50.0%) were healthcare-facility-associated hospital onset (HCFA-HO). Of the 33 community-onset (CO) cases, 14 (42.4%) were HCFA-CO, 10 (30.3%) were indeterminate and 9 (27.3%) were community-associated (CA). Of the CA cases, a majority (90.9%) had prior exposure to a healthcare facility within the last 12 weeks. Clinical characteristics, exposures and outcomes were not different between HO-CDI and CO-CDI. Diagnosis was delayed in CO-CDI compared with HO-CDI (4 days vs. 1 day; P=0.014). There was no difference in distribution of ribotypes between CO-CDI and HO-CDI, with 053 being most prevalent in both groups. CO-CDI increasingly contributes to the burden of CDI in NUH. This may reflect a trend in other parts of Asia. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the possible role of outpatient healthcare environments to CDI risk and thus extend control measures to outpatient settings. PMID:24290727

  5. [Clostridium difficile spores and its relevance in the persistence and transmission of the infection].

    PubMed

    Barra-Carrasco, Jonathan; Hernández-Rocha, Cristian; Ibáñez, Patricio; Guzmán-Durán, Ana M; Álvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    C. difficile is an anaerobic spore former pathogen and the most important etiologic agent of nosocomial and community acquired antibiotics associated diarrheas. C. difficile infections (CDI) are responsible for an elevated rate of morbidity in developed and developing countries. Although the major virulence factors responsible for clinical symptoms of CDI are the two toxins TcdA and TcdB, C. difficile spores are the main vehicle of infection, persistence and transmission of CDI. Recent work has unrevealed unique properties of C. difficile spores that make them remarkable morphotypes of persistence and transmission in the host, including their resistance to antibiotics, the host immune response and disinfectants. The present review summarizes relevant aspects of C. difficile spore biology that have major implications from a clinical and medical perspective. PMID:25679927

  6. The discovery of a novel antibiotic for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections: a story of an effective academic–industrial partnership

    PubMed Central

    Mann, John; Taylor, Peter W.; Dorgan, Colin R.; Johnson, Peter D.; Wilson, Francis X.; Vickers, Richard; Dale, Aaron G

    2015-01-01

    Academic drug discovery is playing an increasingly important role in the identification of new therapies for a wide range of diseases. There is no one model that guarantees success. We describe here a drug discovery story where chance, the ability to capitalise on chance, and the assembling of a range of expertise, have all played important roles in the discovery and subsequent development of an antibiotic chemotype based on the bis-benzimidazole scaffold, with potency against a number of current therapeutically challenging diseases. One compound in this class, SMT19969, has recently entered Phase 2 human clinical trials for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections. PMID:26949507

  7. Comparison of GenomEra C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile as Confirmatory Tests in a Multistep Algorithm for Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Reigadas, Elena; Marín, Mercedes; Fernández-Chico, Antonia; Catalán, Pilar; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    We compared two multistep diagnostic algorithms based on C. Diff Quik Chek Complete and, as confirmatory tests, GenomEra C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 87.2%, 99.7%, 97.1%, and 98.3%, respectively, for the GenomEra-based algorithm and 89.7%, 99.4%, 95.5%, and 98.6%, respectively, for the Xpert-based algorithm. GenomEra represents an alternative to Xpert as a confirmatory test of a multistep algorithm for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) diagnosis. PMID:25392360

  8. Australasian Society of Infectious Diseases updated guidelines for the management of Clostridium difficile infection in adults and children in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Trubiano, J A; Cheng, A C; Korman, T M; Roder, C; Campbell, A; May, M L A; Blyth, C C; Ferguson, J K; Blackmore, T K; Riley, T V; Athan, E

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) continues to rise, whilst treatment remains problematic due to recurrent, refractory and potentially severe nature of disease. The treatment of C. difficile is a challenge for community and hospital-based clinicians. With the advent of an expanding therapeutic arsenal against C. difficile since the last published Australasian guidelines, an update on CDI treatment recommendations for Australasian clinicians was required. On behalf of the Australasian Society of Infectious Diseases, we present the updated guidelines for the management of CDI in adults and children. PMID:27062204

  9. Hyperimmune bovine colostrum for treatment of GI infections: a review and update on Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Steele, Jennifer; Sponseller, Jerlyn; Schmidt, Diane; Cohen, Ocean; Tzipori, Saul

    2013-07-01

    Hyperimmune bovine colostrum (HBC), produced by vaccination of a cow during gestation, is rich in targeted immunoglobulins, and can be used to treat a variety of diseases. The published history of HBC use for treating gastrointestinal infections in humans has developed over the past several decades and demonstrates the promise of this type of therapeutic for GI infectious disease. HBC, or purified derivative products, have been used successfully for treatment or prevention of cryptosporidiosis, shigellosis, rotavirus, enterotoxigenic E. coli, and C. difficile infection (CDI). Given the positive results of previous studies using HBC for treatment of CDI, we have produced HBC with antibodies against the two most important virulence factors of C. difficile, TcdA and TcdB, using a novel recombinant vaccine. Our preliminary results demonstrate efficacy of the HBC product for treatment of CDI in the gnotobiotic piglet model, and warrant more thorough investigation. HBC may provide an effective treatment alternative to antibiotics, which can spare the normal gut microflora, and reduce rates of recurrence and antibiotic resistance. PMID:23435084

  10. Comparison of pediatric and adult antibiotic-associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infections

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Lynne Vernice; Ozen, Metehan; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Goh, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and Clostridum difficile infections (CDI) have been well studied for adult cases, but not as well in the pediatric population. Whether the disease process or response to treatments differs between pediatric and adult patients is an important clinical concern when following global guidelines based largely on adult patients. A systematic review of the literature using databases PubMed (June 3, 1978-2015) was conducted to compare AAD and CDI in pediatric and adult populations and determine significant differences and similarities that might impact clinical decisions. In general, pediatric AAD and CDI have a more rapid onset of symptoms, a shorter duration of disease and fewer CDI complications (required surgeries and extended hospitalizations) than in adults. Children experience more community-associated CDI and are associated with smaller outbreaks than adult cases of CDI. The ribotype NAP1/027/BI is more common in adults than children. Children and adults share some similar risk factors, but adults have more complex risk factor profiles associated with more co-morbidities, types of disruptive factors and a wider range of exposures to C. difficile in the healthcare environment. The treatment of pediatric and adult AAD is similar (discontinuing or switching the inciting antibiotic), but other treatment strategies for AAD have not been established. Pediatric CDI responds better to metronidazole, while adult CDI responds better to vancomycin. Recurrent CDI is not commonly reported for children. Prevention for both pediatric and adult AAD and CDI relies upon integrated infection control programs, antibiotic stewardship and may include the use of adjunctive probiotics. Clinical presentation of pediatric AAD and CDI are different than adult AAD and CDI symptoms. These differences should be taken into account when rating severity of disease and prescribing antibiotics. PMID:27003987

  11. Comparison of pediatric and adult antibiotic-associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Lynne Vernice; Ozen, Metehan; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Goh, Shan

    2016-03-21

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and Clostridum difficile infections (CDI) have been well studied for adult cases, but not as well in the pediatric population. Whether the disease process or response to treatments differs between pediatric and adult patients is an important clinical concern when following global guidelines based largely on adult patients. A systematic review of the literature using databases PubMed (June 3, 1978-2015) was conducted to compare AAD and CDI in pediatric and adult populations and determine significant differences and similarities that might impact clinical decisions. In general, pediatric AAD and CDI have a more rapid onset of symptoms, a shorter duration of disease and fewer CDI complications (required surgeries and extended hospitalizations) than in adults. Children experience more community-associated CDI and are associated with smaller outbreaks than adult cases of CDI. The ribotype NAP1/027/BI is more common in adults than children. Children and adults share some similar risk factors, but adults have more complex risk factor profiles associated with more co-morbidities, types of disruptive factors and a wider range of exposures to C. difficile in the healthcare environment. The treatment of pediatric and adult AAD is similar (discontinuing or switching the inciting antibiotic), but other treatment strategies for AAD have not been established. Pediatric CDI responds better to metronidazole, while adult CDI responds better to vancomycin. Recurrent CDI is not commonly reported for children. Prevention for both pediatric and adult AAD and CDI relies upon integrated infection control programs, antibiotic stewardship and may include the use of adjunctive probiotics. Clinical presentation of pediatric AAD and CDI are different than adult AAD and CDI symptoms. These differences should be taken into account when rating severity of disease and prescribing antibiotics. PMID:27003987

  12. OUTCOMES OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE INFECTION IN RECIPIENTS OF SOLID ABDOMINAL ORGAN TRANSPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jennifer L.; Enser, James J.; McKown, Trevor; Leverson, Glen E.; Pirsch, John D.; Hess, Timothy M.; Safdar, Nasia

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of outcomes of C. difficile infection (CDI) in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients is limited. To evaluate this population, we undertook a retrospective cohort study of all recipients of kidney and liver transplants diagnosed with CDI at a single center over 14 years. Data pertaining to all episodes of CDI were collected. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression was performed to determine independent predictors of clinical cure. Overall, 170 patients developed 215 episodes of CDI. Among these patients, 162 episodes (75%) were cured, and in 103 episodes (48%), patients were cured within 14 days. In a multivariate analysis, lack of clinical cure at 14 days was predicted by: recurrent episode (0.21, 95% CI 0.06-0.72, p=0.0128), treatment with vancomycin (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.1-0.74, p=0.011), vasopressor support (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.07-0.76, p=0.0161), and CDI before the year 2004 (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.2-0.98, p=0.0446.) The latter three factors are likely markers for severity of illness. In this cohort, 13 patients (8%) died during hospitalization and 49 patients (29%) died within one year. No deaths were attributed to CDI. Recurrent episode was a major predictor of treatment failure, suggesting that research into development of therapeutic options for recurrent disease is needed. PMID:24476412

  13. An Economic Analysis of Strategies to Control Clostridium Difficile Transmission and Infection Using an Agent-Based Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Richard E.; Jones, Makoto; Leecaster, Molly; Samore, Matthew H.; Ray, William; Huttner, Angela; Huttner, Benedikt; Khader, Karim; Stevens, Vanessa W.; Gerding, Dale; Schweizer, Marin L.; Rubin, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Background A number of strategies exist to reduce Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) transmission. We conducted an economic evaluation of “bundling” these strategies together. Methods We constructed an agent-based computer simulation of nosocomial C. difficile transmission and infection in a hospital setting. This model included the following components: interactions between patients and health care workers; room contamination via C. difficile shedding; C. difficile hand carriage and removal via hand hygiene; patient acquisition of C. difficile via contact with contaminated rooms or health care workers; and patient antimicrobial use. Six interventions were introduced alone and "bundled" together: (a) aggressive C. difficile testing; (b) empiric isolation and treatment of symptomatic patients; (c) improved adherence to hand hygiene and (d) contact precautions; (e) improved use of soap and water for hand hygiene; and (f) improved environmental cleaning. Our analysis compared these interventions using values representing 3 different scenarios: (1) base-case (BASE) values that reflect typical hospital practice, (2) intervention (INT) values that represent implementation of hospital-wide efforts to reduce C. diff transmission, and (3) optimal (OPT) values representing the highest expected results from strong adherence to the interventions. Cost parameters for each intervention were obtained from published literature. We performed our analyses assuming low, normal, and high C. difficile importation prevalence and transmissibility of C. difficile. Results INT levels of the “bundled” intervention were cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/quality-adjusted life-year in all importation prevalence and transmissibility scenarios. OPT levels of intervention were cost-effective for normal and high importation prevalence and transmissibility scenarios. When analyzed separately, hand hygiene compliance, environmental decontamination, and empiric

  14. Prevalence and impact of Clostridium difficile infection in elderly residents of long-term care facilities, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, Panayiotis D.; Joyce, Nina; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M.; Zervou, Fainareti N.; Besdine, Richard W.; Mor, Vincent; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The elderly population is particularly vulnerable to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), but the epidemiology of CDI in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) is unknown. We performed a retrospective cohort study and used US 2011 LTCF resident data from the Minimum Data Set 3.0 linked to Medicare claims. We extracted CDI cases based on International Classification of Diseases-9 coding, and compared residents with the diagnosis of CDI to those who did not have a CDI diagnosis during their LTCF stay. We estimated CDI prevalence rates and calculated 3-month mortality rates. The study population consisted of 2,190,613 admissions (median age 82 years; interquartile range 76–88; female to male ratio 2:1; >80% whites), 45,500 of whom had a CDI diagnosis. The nationwide CDI prevalence rate was 1.85 per 100 LTCF admissions (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83–1.87). The CDI rate was lower in the South (1.54%; 95% CI 1.51–1.57) and higher in the Northeast (2.29%; 95% CI 2.25–2.33). Older age, white race, presence of a feeding tube, unhealed pressure ulcers, end-stage renal disease, cirrhosis, bowel incontinence, prior tracheostomy, chemotherapy, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were independently related to “high risk” for CDI. Residents with a CDI diagnosis were more likely to be admitted to an acute care hospital (40% vs 31%, P < 0.001) and less likely to be discharged to the community (46% vs 54%, P < 0.001) than those not reported with CDI during stay. Importantly, CDI was associated with higher mortality (24.7% vs 18.1%, P = 0.001). CDI is common among the elderly residents of LTCFs and is associated with significant increase in 3-month mortality. The prevalence is higher in the Northeast and risk stratification can be used in CDI prevention policies. PMID:27495022

  15. Multicenter, Double-Blind, Randomized, Phase 2 Study Evaluating the Novel Antibiotic Cadazolid in Patients with Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Carl Erik; Talbot, George H.; Wilcox, Mark; Gerding, Dale N.; Buitrago, Martha; Kracker, Hilke; Charef, Pascal; Cornely, Oliver A.

    2015-01-01

    Cadazolid, a novel fluoroquinolone-oxazolidinone antibiotic, exhibits potent in vitro activity against Clostridium difficile, including the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, active reference group, phase 2 study evaluated the efficacy and safety of oral cadazolid in treatment of adult patients with C. difficile infection (CDI). Eligible patients with first occurrence/first recurrence of CDI were randomized 1:1:1:1 to 250, 500, or 1,000 mg cadazolid twice daily (BID) or oral 125 mg vancomycin four times daily (QID) for 10 days. The primary endpoint was clinical cure at test of cure (48 ± 24 h after the end of treatment; modified intent-to-treat population), defined as resolution of diarrhea with no further CDI treatment required. Secondary endpoints included recurrence rate, sustained clinical response (clinical cure without recurrence), and time to diarrhea resolution. Of 84 patients enrolled, 20, 22, 20, and 22 received 250, 500, or 1,000 mg cadazolid BID or 125 mg vancomycin QID, respectively. The primary endpoint was achieved in 76.5% (80% confidence interval [CI], 58.4, 89.3), 80.0% (63.9, 91.0), 68.4% (51.1, 82.5), and 68.2% (52.3, 81.3) of patients, respectively. There was no evidence of a cadazolid dosage-dependent response. Each dosage of cadazolid resulted in a lower recurrence rate than with vancomycin (18.2 to 25.0% versus 50%). Consequently, higher sustained clinical response rates were observed with cadazolid (46.7 to 60.0%) than with vancomycin (33.3%). The times to diarrhea resolution were similar for cadazolid and vancomycin. Cadazolid was well tolerated, with no safety signal observed. The results of this phase 2 study support further clinical development of cadazolid. (This study has been registered in the United States at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01222702 and in Europe with the European Medicines Agency under registration no. EUDRA-CT 2010-020941-29.) PMID:26248357

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium butyricum Strain NOR 33234, Isolated from an Elderly Patient with Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Jamie S. L.; Ip, Margaret; Chan, Ting-Fung; Lam, Wai-Yip

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium butyricum is one of the species frequently present in patients’ stool samples. However, the identification of this species is sometimes difficult. Here, we present the draft genome of Clostridium butyricum NOR 33234, which was isolated from a patient with suspected Clostridium difficile infection-associated diarrhea and resembles Clostridium clostridioforme in biochemical tests. PMID:25540356

  17. Fidaxomicin preserves the intestinal microbiome during and after treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and reduces both toxin reexpression and recurrence of CDI.

    PubMed

    Louie, Thomas J; Cannon, Kris; Byrne, Brendan; Emery, Judy; Ward, Linda; Eyben, Melissa; Krulicki, Walter

    2012-08-01

    The microflora-sparing properties of fidaxomicin were examined during the conduct of a randomized clinical trial comparing vancomycin 125 mg 4 times per day versus fidaxomicin 200 mg twice per day for 10 days as treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Fecal samples were obtained from 89 patients (45 received fidaxomicin, and 44 received vancomycin) at study entry and on days 4, 10, 14, 21, 28, and 38 for quantitative cultures for C. difficile and cytotoxin B fecal filtrate concentrations. Additionally, samples from 10 patients, each receiving vancomycin or fidaxomicin, and 10 samples from healthy controls were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction with multiple group-specific primers to evaluate the impact of antibiotic treatment on the microbiome. Compared with controls, patients with CDI at study entry had counts of major microbiome components that were 2-3-log(10) colony-forming units (CFU)/g lower. In patients with CDI, fidaxomicin allowed the major components to persist, whereas vancomycin was associated with a further 2-4-log(10) CFU reduction of Bacteroides/Prevotella group organisms, which persisted to day 28 of the study, and shorter term and temporary suppression of both Clostridium coccoides and Clostridium leptum group organisms. In the posttreatment period, C. difficile counts similarly persisted in both study populations, but reappearance of toxin in fecal filtrates was observed in 28% of vancomycin-treated patient samples (29 of 94), compared with 14% of fidaxomicin-treated patient samples (13 of 91; P = .03). Similarly, 23% of vancomycin-treated patients (10 of 44) and 11% of fidaxomicin-treated patients (5 of 44) had recurrence of CDI. Whereas vancomycin and fidaxomicin are equally effective in resolving CDI symptoms, preservation of the microflora by fidaxomicin is associated with a lower likelihood of CDI recurrence. PMID:22752862

  18. Derivation and validation of a simple, accurate and robust prediction rule for risk of mortality in patients with Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection poses a significant healthcare burden. However, the derivation of a simple, evidence based prediction rule to assist patient management has not yet been described. This study aimed to identify such a prediction rule to stratify hospital inpatients according to risk of all-cause mortality, at initial diagnosis of infection. Method Univariate, multivariate and decision tree procedures were used to deduce a prediction rule from over 186 variables; retrospectively collated from clinical data for 213 patients. The resulting prediction rule was validated on independent data from a cohort of 158 patients described by Bhangu et al. (Colorectal Disease, 12(3):241-246, 2010). Results Serum albumin levels (g/L) (P = 0.001), respiratory rate (resps /min) (P = 0.002), C-reactive protein (mg/L) (P = 0.034) and white cell count (mcL) (P = 0.049) were predictors of all-cause mortality. Threshold levels of serum albumin ≤ 24.5 g/L, C- reactive protein >228 mg/L, respiratory rate >17 resps/min and white cell count >12 × 103 mcL were associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality. A simple four variable prediction rule was devised based on these threshold levels and when tested on the initial data, yield an area under the curve score of 0.754 (P < 0.001) using receiver operating characteristics. The prediction rule was then evaluated using independent data, and yield an area under the curve score of 0.653 (P = 0.001). Conclusions Four easily measurable clinical variables can be used to assess the risk of mortality of patients with Clostridium difficile infection and remains robust with respect to independent data. PMID:23849267

  19. Clostridium difficile Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... for someone who may have C. diff. Use chlorine bleach-based products to disinfect surfaces or items ... may be soiled with stool with detergent and chlorine bleach. If you are visiting someone in a ...

  20. Evaluation of CP Chromo Select Agar for the enumeration of Clostridium perfringens from water.

    PubMed

    Manafi, Mammad; Waldherr, Kerstin; Kundi, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The European Directive on drinking water quality has included mCP agar as the reference method for recovering Clostridium perfringens from drinking waters. In the present study, three media (mCP, TSCF and CP Chromo Select Agar) were evaluated for recovery of C. perfringens in different surface water samples. Out of 139 water samples, using a membrane filtration technique, 131 samples (94.2%) were found to be presumptively positive for C. perfringens in at least one of the culture media. Green colored colonies on CP Chromo Select Agar (CCP agar) were counted as presumptive C. perfringens isolates. Out of 483 green colonies on CCP agar, 96.3% (465 strains, indole negative) were identified as C. perfringens, and 15 strains (3.1%) were indole positive and were identified as Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium bifermentans or Clostridium tetani. Only 3 strains (0.6%) gave false positive results and were identified as Clostridium fallax, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tertium. Variance analysis of the data obtained shows statistically no significant differences in the counts obtained between media employed in this work. The mCP method is very onerous for routine screening and bacterial colonies could not be used for further biochemical testing. The colonies on CCP and TSCF were easy to count and subculture for confirmation tests. TSCF detects sulfite-reducing clostridia, including species other than C. perfringens, and in some cases excessive blackening of the agar frustrated counting of the colonies. If the contamination was too high, TSCF did not consistently produce black colonies and as a consequence, the colonies were white and gave false negative results. On the other hand, the identification of typical and atypical colonies isolated from all media demonstrated that CCP agar was the most useful medium for C. perfringens recovery in water samples. PMID:23816139

  1. Clostridium difficile infections among adults and children in Mwanza/Tanzania: is it an underappreciated pathogen among immunocompromised patients in sub-Saharan Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Seugendo, M.; Mshana, S.E.; Hokororo, A.; Okamo, B.; Mirambo, M.M.; von Müller, L.; Gunka, K.; Zimmermann, O.; Groß, U.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known regarding the epidemiology Clostridium difficile in developing countries. Fresh stool samples from patients with diarrhoea were cultured anaerobically. C. difficile was detected in nine (6.4%) of 141 (95% confidence interval 4.2–13.1), of which seven (77.8%) were from children. HIV infection, prolonged hospitalization and antibiotic use were independent factors associated with the occurrence of C. difficile in the gastrointestinal tract. Two of the toxigenic isolates were typed as ribotype 045, and the other two had unknown ribotype. All C. difficile isolates were susceptible to metronidazole, moxifloxacin and clarithromycin, while three isolates were resistant to clarithromycin. C. difficile may be an important pathogen causing diarrhoea in sub-Saharan Africa among immunocompromised patients. PMID:26649183

  2. Soft tissue infections caused by spore-forming bacteria in injecting drug users in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Brett, M. M.; Hood, J.; Brazier, J. S.; Duerden, B. I.; Hahné, S. J. M.

    2005-01-01

    From 2000 to May 2004 there has been a marked increase in illness resulting from spore-forming bacteria in injecting heroin users in the United Kingdom. Clostridium novyi caused 63 cases of severe illness in 2000 and seven further cases from 2001. Wound botulism first occurred in 2000 (six cases) with 51 further cases to March 2004. Tetanus occurred in 20 cases between late 2003 and March 2004. Infections with C. histolyticum (nine cases), C. sordellii (one case) and Bacillus cereus (one case) were also reported. The reasons for the increase in illness are unclear. The major risk factor was skin- or muscle-popping. The problem appears to be here to stay. This review describes the causative organisms, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, epidemiology and treatment of cases. Clinical vigilance and a high standard of anaerobic microbiology are essential. Clinicians and laboratories must report such cases (or likely cases) rapidly so that clusters can be rapidly identified, in order to control disease. Prevention relies on tetanus immunization. PMID:16050501

  3. Pilin Vaccination Stimulates Weak Antibody Responses and Provides No Protection in a C57Bl/6 Murine Model of Acute Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Maldarelli, Grace A; Matz, Hanover; Gao, Si; Chen, Kevin; Hamza, Therwa; Yfantis, Harris G; Feng, Hanping; Donnenberg, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomial infections in the United States, adding billions of dollars per year to health care costs. A vaccine targeted against the bacterium would be extremely beneficial in decreasing the morbidity and mortality caused by C. difficile-associated disease; a vaccine directed against a colonization factor would hinder the spread of the bacterium as well as prevent disease. Type IV pili (T4Ps) are extracellular appendages composed of protein monomers called pilins. They are involved in adhesion and colonization in a wide variety of bacteria and archaea, and are putative colonization factors in C. difficile. We hypothesized that vaccinating mice with pilins would lead to generation of anti-pilin antibodies, and would protect against C. difficile challenge. We found that immunizing C57Bl/6 mice with various pilins, whether combined or as individual proteins, led to low anti-pilin antibody titers and no protection upon C. difficile challenge. Passive transfer of anti-pilin antibodies led to high serum anti-pilin IgG titers, but to undetectable fecal anti-pilin IgG titers and did not protect against challenge. The low antibody titers observed in these experiments may be due to the particular strain of mice used. Further experiments, possibly with a different animal model of C. difficile infection, are needed to determine if an anti-T4P vaccine would be protective against C. difficile infection. PMID:27375958

  4. The Effect of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v on the Incidence of Clostridium difficile Infection in High Risk Patients Treated with Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Kujawa-Szewieczek, Agata; Adamczak, Marcin; Kwiecień, Katarzyna; Dudzicz, Sylwia; Gazda, Magdalena; Więcek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lactobacillus plantarum 299v (LP299v) has been used in order to reduce gastrointestinal symptoms during antibiotic exposure. However, it remains controversial whether or not probiotics are effective in the prevention of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) among patients receiving antibiotics. The aim of this study was to analyze the CDI among patients receiving antibiotics and hospitalized in the period before and after starting routine use of LP299v as a prevention of this infection. Methods: Among 3533 patients hospitalized in the nephrology and transplantation ward during a two-year period, 23 patients with CDI were diagnosed and enrolled in this retrospective study. Since November 2013, prevention of CDI with oral use of LP299v was performed in all patients treated with antibiotics and who were at a high risk of developing CDI. The observation period was divided into two twelve-month intervals before and after initiation of the use of LP299v as a prophylactic against CDI. Results: A significant (p = 0.0001) reduction of the number of cases of CDI was found after routinely using LP299v (n = 2; 0.11% of all hospitalized patients) compared with the previous twelve-month period of observation (n = 21; 1.21% of all hospitalized patients). Conclusions: Routine use of LP299v during treatment with antibiotics may prevent C. difficile infection in the nephrology and transplantation ward. PMID:26690209

  5. The association of hospital prevention processes and patient risk factors with the risk of Clostridium difficile infection: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Daneman, N; Guttmann, A; Wang, X; Ma, X; Gibson, D; Stukel, TA

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of healthcare-acquired infection; the real-world impacts of some proposed C. difficile prevention processes are unknown. Methods We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study of all patients admitted to acute care hospitals between April 2011 and March 2012 in Ontario, Canada. Hospital prevention practices were determined by survey of infection control programmes; responses were linked to patient-level risk factors and C. difficile outcomes in Ontario administrative databases. Multivariable generalised estimating equation (GEE) regression models were used to assess the impact of selected understudied hospital prevention processes on the patient-level risk of C. difficile infection, accounting for patient risk factors, baseline C. difficile rates and structural hospital characteristics. Results C. difficile infections complicated 2341 of 653 896 admissions (3.6 per 1000 admissions). Implementation of the selected C. difficile prevention practices was variable across the 159 hospitals with isolation of all patients at onset of diarrhoea reported by 43 (27%), auditing of antibiotic stewardship compliance by 26 (16%), auditing of cleaning practices by 115 (72%), on-site diagnostic testing by 74 (47%), vancomycin as first-line treatment by 24 (15%) and reporting rates to senior leadership by 52 (33%). None of these processes were associated with a significantly reduced risk of C. difficile after adjustment for baseline C. difficile rates, structural hospital characteristics and patient-level factors. Patient-level factors were strongly associated with C. difficile risk, including age, comorbidities, non-elective and medical admissions. Conclusions In the largest study to date, selected hospital prevention strategies were not associated with a statistically significant reduction in patients’ risk of C. difficile infection. These prevention strategies have either limited effectiveness or were

  6. Increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile infections: results from a 5-year retrospective study in a large teaching hospital in the Italian region with the oldest population.

    PubMed

    Alicino, C; Giacobbe, D R; Durando, P; Bellina, D; DI Bella, A M; Paganino, C; Del Bono, V; Viscoli, C; Icardi, G; Orsi, A

    2016-09-01

    Limited information is available on the incidence of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) in Italian hospitals. In this study, we assessed the changes in the incidence of CDI over a 5-year period in a teaching hospital in Liguria, the Italian region with the oldest population. Secondary endpoints were the development of severe CDI and 30-day mortality. The annual incidence of CDI/10000 patient-days significantly increased from 0·54 in 2010 to 3·04 in 2014 (χ 2 for trend, P < 0·001). The median age of patients with CDI was 81 years. As many as 81% and 89% of these patients had comorbid conditions and previous exposure to antibiotics, respectively. In the multivariate analysis of risk factors for severe CDI, previous therapy with histamine 2 blockers and low serum albumin were associated with severe CDI, while diabetes appeared to be protective. In the multivariate model of risk factors for 30-day mortality, high leukocyte count, low serum albumin, and increased serum creatinine were unfavourably associated with outcome. Strict adherence to infection control measures was of utmost importance to counteract the increasing incidence of CDI in our hospital, particularly because of the advanced age of the patients and their very high frequency of chronic conditions and use of antibiotics, which readily predispose them to the development of CDI. PMID:27193828

  7. Validation of the chronic disease score-infectious disease (CDS-ID) for the prediction of hospital-associated clostridium difficile infection (CDI) within a retrospective cohort

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aggregate comorbidity scores are useful for summarizing risk and confounder control in studies of hospital-associated infections. The Chronic Disease Score – Infectious Diseases (CDS-ID) was developed for this purpose, but it has not been validated for use in studies of Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI). The aim of this study was to assess the discrimination, calibration and potential for confounder control of CDS-ID compared to age alone or individual comorbid conditions. Methods Secondary analysis of a retrospective cohort study of adult inpatients with 2 or more days of antibiotic exposure at a tertiary care facility during 2005. Logistic regression models were used to predict the development of CDI up to 60 days post-discharge. Model discrimination and calibration were assessed using the c-statistic and Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL) tests, respectively. C-statistics were compared using chi-square tests. Results CDI developed in 185 out of 7,792 patients. The CDS-ID was a better standalone predictor of CDI than age (c-statistic 0.653 vs 0.609, P=0.04). The best discrimination was observed when CDS-ID and age were both used to predict CDI (c-statistic 0.680). All models had acceptable calibration (P>0.05). Conclusion The CDS-ID is a valid tool for summarizing risk of CDI associated with comorbid conditions. PMID:23530876

  8. A Novel Multivalent, Single-Domain Antibody Targeting TcdA and TcdB Prevents Fulminant Clostridium difficile Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Schmidt, Diane; Liu, Weilong; Li, Shan; Shi, Lianfa; Sheng, Jinliang; Chen, Kevin; Yu, Hua; Tremblay, Jacqueline M.; Chen, Xinhua; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Sundberg, Eric J.; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Bai, Guang; Shoemaker, Charles B.; Feng, Hanping

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and associated mortality have increased rapidly worldwide in recent years. Therefore, it is critical to develop new therapies for CDI. In this study, we generated a novel, potently neutralizing, tetravalent, and bispecific antibody composed of 2 heavy-chain-only VH (VHH) binding domains against both TcdA and TcdB (designated “ABA”) that reverses fulminant CDI in mice infected with an epidemic 027 strain after a single injection of the antibody. We demonstrated that ABA bound to both toxins simultaneously and displayed a significantly enhanced neutralizing activity both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, ABA was able to broadly neutralize toxins from clinical C. difficile isolates that express both TcdA and TcdB but failed to neutralize the toxin from TcdA−TcdB+ C. difficile strains. This study thus provides a rationale for the development of multivalent VHHs that target both toxins and are broadly neutralizing for treating severe CDI. PMID:24683195

  9. Transient fecal shedding and limited animal-to-animal transmission of Clostridium difficile by naturally infected finishing feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Palacios, Alexander; Pickworth, Carrie; Loerch, Steve; LeJeune, Jeffrey T

    2011-05-01

    To longitudinally assess fecal shedding and animal-to-animal transmission of Clostridium difficile among finishing feedlot cattle as a risk for beef carcass contamination, we tested 186 ± 12 steers (mean ± standard deviation; 1,369 samples) in an experimental feedlot facility during the finishing period and at harvest. Clostridium difficile was isolated from 12.9% of steers on arrival (24/186; 0 to 33% among five suppliers). Shedding decreased to undetectable levels a week later (0%; P < 0.001), and remained low (< 3.6%) until immediately prior to shipment for harvest (1.2%). Antimicrobial use did not increase fecal shedding, despite treatment of 53% of animals for signs of respiratory disease. Animals shedding C. difficile on arrival, however, had 4.6 times higher odds of receiving antimicrobials for respiratory signs than nonshedders (95% confidence interval for the odds ratio, 1.4 to 14.8; P = 0.01). Neither the toxin genes nor toxin A or B was detected in most (39/42) isolates based on two complementary multiplex PCRs and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing, respectively. Two linezolid- and clindamycin-resistant PCR ribotype 078 (tcdA+/tcdB+/cdtB+/39-bp-type deletion in tcdC) isolates were identified from two steers (at arrival and week 20), but these ribotypes did not become endemic. The other toxigenic isolate (tcdA+/tcdB+/cdtB+/classic tcdC; PCR ribotype 078-like) was identified in the cecum of one steer at harvest. Spatio-temporal analysis indicated transient shedding with no evidence of animal-to-animal transmission. The association between C. difficile shedding upon arrival and the subsequent need for antimicrobials for respiratory disease might indicate common predisposing factors. The isolation of toxigenic C. difficile from bovine intestines at harvest highlights the potential for food contamination in meat processing plants. PMID:21441320

  10. The CpAL system regulates changes of the trans-epithelial resistance of human enterocytes during Clostridium perfringens type C infection.

    PubMed

    Nava, Porfirio; Vidal, Jorge E

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C strains produce severe disease in humans and animals including enterotoxaemia and hemorrhagic diarrhea. Type C disease is mediated by production of toxins that damage the site of infection inducing loss of bloody fluids. Production of type C toxins, such as CPA, PFO, and, CPB is regulated by the C. perfringens Agr-like (CpAL) quorum sensing (QS) system. The CpAL system is also required to recapitulate, in vivo, intestinal signs of C. perfringens type C-induced disease, including hemorrhagic diarrhea and accumulation of fluids. The intestinal epithelium forms a physical barrier, made up of a series of intercellular junctions including tight junctions (TJs), adherens junctions (AJs) and desmosomes (DMs). This selective barrier regulates important physiological processes, including paracellular movement of ions and solutes, which, if altered, results in loss of fluids into the intestinal lumen. In this work, the effects of C. perfringens infection on the barrier function of intestinal epithelial cells was evaluated by measuring trans-epithelial resistance (TEER). Our studies demonstrate that infection of human enterocytes with C. perfringens type C strain CN3685 induced a significant drop on TEER. Changes in TEER were mediated by the CpAL system as a CN3685ΔagrB mutant did not induce such a drop. Physical contact between bacteria and enterocytes produced more pronounced changes in TEER and this phenomenon appeared also to be mediated by the CpAL system. Finally, immunofluorescence studies demonstrate that C. perfringens type C infection redistribute TJs protein occludin, and Claudin-3, and DMs protein desmoglein-2, but did not affect the AJs protein E-cadherin. PMID:27063897

  11. Preclinical studies of amixicile, a systemic therapeutic developed for treatment of Clostridium difficile infections that also shows efficacy against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Paul S; Bruce, Alexandra M; Olekhnovich, Igor; Warren, Cirle A; Burgess, Stacey L; Hontecillas, Raquel; Viladomiu, Monica; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guerrant, Richard L; Macdonald, Timothy L

    2014-08-01

    Amixicile shows efficacy in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in a mouse model, with no recurrence of CDI. Since amixicile selectively inhibits the action of a B vitamin (thiamine pyrophosphate) cofactor of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), it may both escape mutation-based drug resistance and spare beneficial probiotic gut bacteria that do not express this enzyme. Amixicile is a water-soluble derivative of nitazoxanide (NTZ), an antiparasitic therapeutic that also shows efficacy against CDI in humans. In comparative studies, amixicile showed no toxicity to hepatocytes at 200 μM (NTZ was toxic above 10 μM); was not metabolized by human, dog, or rat liver microsomes; showed equivalence or superiority to NTZ in cytochrome P450 assays; and did not activate efflux pumps (breast cancer resistance protein, P glycoprotein). A maximum dose (300 mg/kg) of amixicile given by the oral or intraperitoneal route was well tolerated by mice and rats. Plasma exposure (rats) based on the area under the plasma concentration-time curve was 79.3 h · μg/ml (30 mg/kg dose) to 328 h · μg/ml (100 mg/kg dose), the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 20 μg/ml, the time to the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 0.5 to 1 h, and the half-life was 5.6 h. Amixicile did not concentrate in mouse feces or adversely affect gut populations of Bacteroides species, Firmicutes, segmented filamentous bacteria, or Lactobacillus species. Systemic bioavailability was demonstrated through eradication of Helicobacter pylori in a mouse infection model. In summary, the efficacy of amixicile in treating CDI and other infections, together with low toxicity, an absence of mutation-based drug resistance, and excellent drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic metrics, suggests a potential for broad application in the treatment of infections caused by PFOR-expressing microbial pathogens in addition to CDI. PMID:24890599

  12. Utilizing Rapid Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis Typing To Aid Control of Hospital-Acquired Clostridium difficile Infection: a Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor, Susan; Marriott, Claire; Parsons, Helen; Waddington, Claire; Gossain, Savita; Szczepura, Ala; Stallard, Nigel; Hawkey, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The early identification of outbreaks is crucial for the control of Clostridium difficile infection. This study aimed to determine if the number of hospital-acquired C. difficile infections could be reduced by rapidly typing C. difficile strains using multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) compared to typing using PCR ribotyping. A total of 16 hospitals were recruited to the study, and all periods of increased incidence (PIIs) of C. difficile infection were identified. The hospitals were randomized into two study arms, the test and the control, with all isolates typed in the test using MLVA and in the control using PCR ribotyping. Following a PII, each hospital received a structured questionnaire regarding control measures implemented or stopped prior to or following the typing results. During the study period, there were a total of 1,682 hospital-apportioned C. difficile toxin-positive cases, with 868 in the control and 814 in the test, with modeling demonstrating no differences between the two arms. A total of 245 PIIs occurred, involving 785 patients. There was a significant difference in the mean turnaround time between the ribotyping and MLVA typing (13.6 and 5.3 days, respectively [P < 0.001]). The discriminatory ability of MLVA was greater than ribotyping, with 85 outbreaks being confirmed by ribotyping and 62 by MLVA. In the test arm, 40.6% of respondents strongly agreed that the typing result had aided their management of clusters, as opposed to 9.9% in the control. The study demonstrated the utility of rapidly typing C. difficile strains, demonstrating that it aided the management of clusters, enabling effective targeting of infection control resources. PMID:22837319

  13. Preclinical Studies of Amixicile, a Systemic Therapeutic Developed for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infections That Also Shows Efficacy against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Alexandra M.; Olekhnovich, Igor; Warren, Cirle A.; Burgess, Stacey L.; Hontecillas, Raquel; Viladomiu, Monica; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guerrant, Richard L.; Macdonald, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Amixicile shows efficacy in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in a mouse model, with no recurrence of CDI. Since amixicile selectively inhibits the action of a B vitamin (thiamine pyrophosphate) cofactor of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), it may both escape mutation-based drug resistance and spare beneficial probiotic gut bacteria that do not express this enzyme. Amixicile is a water-soluble derivative of nitazoxanide (NTZ), an antiparasitic therapeutic that also shows efficacy against CDI in humans. In comparative studies, amixicile showed no toxicity to hepatocytes at 200 μM (NTZ was toxic above 10 μM); was not metabolized by human, dog, or rat liver microsomes; showed equivalence or superiority to NTZ in cytochrome P450 assays; and did not activate efflux pumps (breast cancer resistance protein, P glycoprotein). A maximum dose (300 mg/kg) of amixicile given by the oral or intraperitoneal route was well tolerated by mice and rats. Plasma exposure (rats) based on the area under the plasma concentration-time curve was 79.3 h · μg/ml (30 mg/kg dose) to 328 h · μg/ml (100 mg/kg dose), the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 20 μg/ml, the time to the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 0.5 to 1 h, and the half-life was 5.6 h. Amixicile did not concentrate in mouse feces or adversely affect gut populations of Bacteroides species, Firmicutes, segmented filamentous bacteria, or Lactobacillus species. Systemic bioavailability was demonstrated through eradication of Helicobacter pylori in a mouse infection model. In summary, the efficacy of amixicile in treating CDI and other infections, together with low toxicity, an absence of mutation-based drug resistance, and excellent drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic metrics, suggests a potential for broad application in the treatment of infections caused by PFOR-expressing microbial pathogens in addition to CDI. PMID:24890599

  14. Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Walter J.; Anellis, Abe

    1971-01-01

    A biphasic culture medium suitable for cultivation and sporulation of Clostridium perfringens, C. botulinum, and C. sporogenes was devised. The medium designed for use in a disposable, compartmented, plastic film container contained peptones, yeast extract, minerals, an anion exchange resin, and glucose in 4% agar as the solid phase and (NH4)2SO4 and 0.1% agar as the liquid phase. With the biphasic system, it was not necessary to use active cultures as inocula. Growth was at least equal to that obtained in conventional media, and spore production of 9 out of 12 strains of C. perfringens equalled or usually exceeded that of conventional media. Images PMID:4332043

  15. Fluoroquinolone and Macrolide Exposure Predict Clostridium difficile Infection with the Highly Fluoroquinolone- and Macrolide-Resistant Epidemic C. difficile Strain BI/NAP1/027

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorkiewicz, Jeffrey T.; Lopansri, Bert K.; Cheknis, Adam; Osmolski, James R.; Hecht, David W.; Gerding, Dale N.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics have been shown to influence the risk of infection with specific Clostridium difficile strains as well as the risk of C. difficile infection (CDI). We performed a retrospective case-control study of patients infected with the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain in a U.S. hospital following recognition of increased CDI severity and culture of stools positive by C. difficile toxin immunoassay. Between 2005 and 2007, 72% (103/143) of patients with first-episode CDIs were infected with the BI strain by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) typing. Most patients received multiple antibiotics within 6 weeks of CDI onset (median of 3 antibiotic classes). By multivariate analysis, fluoroquinolone and macrolide exposure was more frequent among BI cases than among non-BI-infected controls (odds ratio [OR] for fluoroquinolones, 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 7.5; (P < 0.001; OR for macrolides, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 24.0; P = 0.04)). In contrast, clindamycin use was less frequent among the BI cases than among the controls (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.4; P = 0.001). High-level resistance to moxifloxacin and azithromycin was more frequent among BI strains (moxifloxacin, 49/102 [48%] BI versus 0/40 non-BI, P = 0.0001; azithromycin, 100/102 [98%] BI versus 22/40 [55%] non-BI, P = 0.0001). High-level resistance to clindamycin was more frequent among non-BI strains (22/40 [55%] non-BI versus 7/102 [7%] BI, P = 0.0001). Fluoroquinolone use, macrolide use, and C. difficile resistance to these antibiotic classes were associated with infection by the epidemic BI strain of C. difficile in a U.S. hospital during a time when CDI rates were increasing nationally due to the highly fluoroquinolone-resistant BI/NAP1/027 strain. PMID:26525793

  16. Host cell-induced signaling causes Clostridium perfringens to upregulate production of toxins important for intestinal infections

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianming; Ma, Menglin; Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes enteritis and enterotoxemia in humans and livestock due to prolific toxin production. In broth culture, C. perfringens uses the Agr-like quorum sensing (QS) system to regulate production of toxins important for enteritis/enterotoxemia, including beta toxin (CPB), enterotoxin, and epsilon toxin (ETX). The VirS/VirR two-component regulatory system (TCRS) also controls CPB production in broth cultures. Both the Agr-like QS and VirS/VirR systems are important when C. perfringens senses enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and responds by upregulating CPB production; however, only the Agr-like QS system is needed for host cell-induced ETX production. These in vitro observations have pathophysiologic relevance since both the VirS/VirR and Agr-like QS signaling systems are required for C. perfringens strain CN3685 to produce CPB in vivo and to cause enteritis or enterotoxemia. Thus, apparently upon sensing its presence in the intestines, C. perfringens utilizes QS and TCRS signaling to produce toxins necessary for intestinal virulence. PMID:24061146

  17. Host cell-induced signaling causes Clostridium perfringens to upregulate production of toxins important for intestinal infections.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianming; Ma, Menglin; Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes enteritis and enterotoxemia in humans and livestock due to prolific toxin production. In broth culture, C. perfringens uses the Agr-like quorum sensing (QS) system to regulate production of toxins important for enteritis/enterotoxemia, including beta toxin (CPB), enterotoxin, and epsilon toxin (ETX). The VirS/VirR two-component regulatory system (TCRS) also controls CPB production in broth cultures. Both the Agr-like QS and VirS/VirR systems are important when C. perfringens senses enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and responds by upregulating CPB production; however, only the Agr-like QS system is needed for host cell-induced ETX production. These in vitro observations have pathophysiologic relevance since both the VirS/VirR and Agr-like QS signaling systems are required for C. perfringens strain CN3685 to produce CPB in vivo and to cause enteritis or enterotoxemia. Thus, apparently upon sensing its presence in the intestines, C. perfringens utilizes QS and TCRS signaling to produce toxins necessary for intestinal virulence. PMID:24061146

  18. Trends in Oral Antibiotic, Proton Pump Inhibitor, and Histamine 2 Receptor Blocker Prescription Patterns for Children Compared With Adults: Implications for Clostridium difficile Infection in the Community.

    PubMed

    Faden, Howard S; Ma, Chan-Xing

    2016-07-01

    The use of antibiotics, proton pump inhibitor (PPI), and histamine 2 receptor blocker (H2B) was compared between children and adults in the community from 2005 through 2011. Antibiotic prescription rates remained stable for children, but increased significantly for adults, P = .03. PPI prescription rates increased for children, P = .02 and for adults, P = .009. H2B prescription rates increased for children, P = .03, but not for adults. Antibiotic prescription rates were significantly higher in children than adults in all 7 years, P < .0001. In contrast, PPI prescription rates were significantly higher in adults than children in all 7 years, P < .0001. H2B prescription rates were significantly higher in adults than children 1 to 18 years old P < .0001; however, H2B prescription rates were highest in children <1 year old, P = .0001. The high use of oral antibiotics, PPI, and H2B among outpatients may be a contributing factor to the rise of Clostridium difficile infection in the community. PMID:26350427

  19. Clostridium difficile Extracytoplasmic Function σ Factor σV Regulates Lysozyme Resistance and Is Necessary for Pathogenesis in the Hamster Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Theresa D.; Williams, Kyle B.; Chen, Yan; Helm, Richard F.; Popham, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a clinically important pathogen and the most common cause of hospital-acquired infectious diarrhea. Expression of the C. difficile gene csfV, which encodes σV, an extracytoplasmic function σ factor, is induced by lysozyme, which damages the peptidoglycan of bacteria. Here we show that σV is required for lysozyme resistance in C. difficile. Using microarray analysis, we identified the C. difficile genes whose expression is dependent upon σV and is induced by lysozyme. Although the peptidoglycan of wild-type C. difficile is intrinsically highly deacetylated, we have found that exposure to lysozyme leads to additional peptidoglycan deacetylation. This lysozyme-induced deacetylation is dependent upon σV. Expression of pdaV, which encodes a putative peptidoglycan deacetylase, was able to increase lysozyme resistance of a csfV mutant. The csfV mutant strain is severely attenuated compared to wild-type C. difficile in a hamster model of C. difficile-associated disease. We conclude that the σV signal transduction system, which senses the host innate immune defense enzyme lysozyme, is required for lysozyme resistance and is necessary during C. difficile infection. PMID:24664503

  20. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in the community: a case-control study in patients in general practice, Denmark, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Søes, L M; Holt, H M; Böttiger, B; Nielsen, H V; Andreasen, V; Kemp, M; Olsen, K E P; Ethelberg, S; Mølbak, K

    2014-07-01

    To identify risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Danish patients consulting general practice with gastrointestinal symptoms, a prospective matched case-control study was performed; cases (N = 259) had positive cultures for toxigenic C. difficile and controls (N = 455) negative cultures. Data were analysed by conditional logistic regression. In patients aged ⩾2 years (138 cases), hospitalization [odds ratio (OR) 8·4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3·1-23], consumption of beef (OR 5·5, 95% CI 2·0-15), phenoxymethylpenicillin (OR 15, 95% CI 2·7-82), dicloxacillin (OR 27, 95% CI 3·6-211), and extended spectrum penicillins (OR 9·2, 95% CI 1·9-45) were associated with CDI. In patients aged <2 years none of these were associated with CDI, but in a subgroup analysis contact with animals was associated with CDI (OR 8·1, 95% CI 1·0-64). This study emphasizes narrow-spectrum penicillins, and suggests beef consumption, as risk factors for CDI in adults, and indicates a different epidemiology of CDI in infants. PMID:24073613

  1. Adenosine A2A receptor activation reduces recurrence and mortality from Clostridium difficile infection in mice following vancomycin treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Activation of the A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR) decreases production of inflammatory cytokines, prevents C. difficile toxin A-induced enteritis and, in combination with antibiotics, increases survival from sepsis in mice. We investigated whether A2AAR activation improves and A2AAR deletion worsens outcomes in a murine model of C. difficile (strain VPI10463) infection (CDI). Methods C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with an antibiotic cocktail prior to infection and then treated with vancomycin with or without an A2AAR agonist. A2AAR-/- and littermate wild-type (WT) mice were similarly infected, and IFNγ and TNFα were measured at peak of and recovery from infection. Results Infected, untreated mice rapidly lost weight, developed diarrhea, and had mortality rates of 50-60%. Infected mice treated with vancomycin had less weight loss and diarrhea during antibiotic treatment but mortality increased to near 100% after discontinuation of antibiotics. Infected mice treated with both vancomycin and an A2AAR agonist, either ATL370 or ATL1222, had minimal weight loss and better long-term survival than mice treated with vancomycin alone. A2AAR KO mice were more susceptible than WT mice to death from CDI. Increases in cecal IFNγ and blood TNFα were pronounced in the absence of A2AARs. Conclusion In a murine model of CDI, vancomycin treatment resulted in reduced weight loss and diarrhea during acute infection, but high recurrence and late-onset death, with overall mortality being worse than untreated infected controls. The administration of vancomycin plus an A2AAR agonist reduced inflammation and improved survival rates, suggesting a possible benefit of A2AAR agonists in the management of CDI to prevent recurrent disease. PMID:23217055

  2. In vitro activity of cadazolid against Clostridium difficile strains isolated from primary and recurrent infections in Stockholm, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Lozano, Helena Martinez; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2013-04-01

    One hundred thirty-three Clostridium difficile strains were collected from 71 patients and analyzed for the presence of C. difficile toxin B by the cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay, genes for toxin A, toxin B, binary toxin and TcdC deletion by PCR. All strains were also PCR-ribotyped and analyzed for sporulation frequency. The MICs of the isolates were determined against cadazolid and seven other antimicrobial agents by the agar dilution method. All isolates were positive for toxin B by the cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay. One hundred fourteen isolates were positive for toxin A and B and 16 isolates were positive for toxin A, toxin B and binary toxin by PCR. Three isolates were negative for toxin A but positive for toxin B. Thirty-three different ribotypes were identified. No strain of ribotype 027 was found. No differences in sporulation were noticed between the primary and recurrent isolates. All 133 isolates were sensitive to cadazolid (0.064-0.5 mg/l), fidaxomicin (0.008-0.125 mg/l), metronidazole (0.125-2 mg/l), vancomycin (0.125-1 mg/l) and tigecycline (0.032-0.25 mg/l). Three isolates were resistant to linezolid (8 mg/l), 15 isolates were resistant to moxifloxacin (8-32 mg/l) and 103 isolates were resistant to clindamycin (8-256 mg/l). No association between toxins A, B and binary toxin, ribotypes or the sporulation and the sensitivity to cadazolid could be found. Cadazolid has a potent in vitro activity against C. difficile. PMID:23454525

  3. Rapid Stool-Based Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection by Real-Time PCR in a Children's Hospital▿†

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Ruth Ann; Boyanton, Bobby L.; Mehta, Seema; Courtney, Ebony M.; Webb, C. Renee; Revell, Paula A.; Versalovic, James

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated infectious diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. Detection of C. difficile by anaerobic bacterial culture and/or cytotoxicity assays has been largely replaced by rapid enzyme immunoassays (EIA). However, due to the lack of sensitivity of stool EIA, we developed a multiplex real-time PCR assay targeting the C. difficile toxin genes tcdA and tcdB. Stool samples from hospitalized pediatric patients suspected of having C. difficile-associated disease were prospectively cultured on cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar following alcohol shock. Six testing modalities were evaluated, including stool EIA, culture EIA, and real-time PCR (tcdA and tcdB) of cultured isolates and stool samples. Real-time PCR detection was performed with tcdA and tcdB gene-specific primers and hydrolysis probes using the LightCycler platforms (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN). A total of 157 samples from 96 pediatric patients were analyzed. The sensitivities of stool real-time PCR and stool EIA were 95% and 35%, respectively, with a specificity of 100% for both methods. The lower limit of detection of the stool real-time PCR was 30 CFU/ml of stool sample per reaction for tcdA and tcdB. This study highlights the poor performance of stool toxin EIAs in pediatric settings. Direct detection of C. difficile toxin genes in stool samples by real-time PCR showed sensitivity superior to that of stool and culture EIAs and performance comparable to that of real-time PCR assay of cultured isolates. Real-time PCR of DNA from stool samples is a rapid and cost-effective diagnostic modality for children that should facilitate appropriate patient management and halt the practice of serial testing by EIA. PMID:21209161

  4. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection: comparison of four methods on specimens collected in Cary-Blair transport medium and tcdB PCR on fresh versus frozen samples

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Noah A.; LeBar, William D.; Young, Carol L.; Hankerd, Rosemary E.; Newton, Duane W.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) caused by toxigenic strains of C. difficile is primarily a nosocomial infection with increasing prevalence. Stool specimens are typically collected in Cary-Blair transport medium to maximize culture-based detection of common stool pathogens. The goal of this study was to establish an analytically accurate and efficient algorithm for the detection of CDI in our patient population using samples collected in Cary-Blair transport medium. In addition, we wished to determine whether the sensitivity and specificity of PCR was affected by freezing samples before testing. Using 357 specimens, we compared four methods: enzyme immunoassay for the antigen glutamate dehydrogenase (Wampole™ C. DIFF CHEK-60 Assay, GDH), toxin A and B enzyme immunoassay (Remel ProSpecT™ C. difficile Toxin A/B Microplate Assay, Toxin EIA), cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (Bartels™ Cytotoxicity Assay, CT), and real-time PCR targeting the toxin B gene (BD GeneOhm™ Cdiff Assay, PCR). The analytic sensitivity and specificity of each as determined using a combined gold standard were as follows: GDH, 100% and 93.2%; Toxin EIA, 82.9% and 82.9%; CT, 100% and 100%; PCR (performed on frozen specimens) 74.3% and 96.6%; respectively. However, the sensitivity and specificity of PCR improved to 100% when performed on 50 fresh stool samples collected in Cary-Blair. While CT remains a sensitive method for the detection of CDI, GDH offers an excellent initial screening method to rule out CDI. While the performance of each assay did not appear to be affected by collection in Cary-Blair medium, PCR performed better using fresh specimens. PMID:24470904

  5. Increased hospital length of stay attributable to Clostridium difficile infection in patients with four co-morbidities: an analysis of hospital episode statistics in four European countries.

    PubMed

    Eckmann, Christian; Wasserman, Matthew; Latif, Faisal; Roberts, Graeme; Beriot-Mathiot, Axelle

    2013-10-01

    Hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) places a significant burden on health care systems throughout Europe, estimated at around €3 billion per annum. This burden is shared between national payers and hospitals that support additional bed days for patients diagnosed with CDI while in hospital or patients re-admitted from a previous hospitalisation. This study was performed to quantify additional hospital stay attributable to CDI in four countries, England, Germany, Spain, and The Netherlands, by analysing nationwide hospital-episode data. We focused upon patients at increased risk of CDI: with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease, and aged 50 years or over. Multivariate regression and propensity score matching models were developed to investigate the impact of CDI on additional length of hospital stay, controlling for confounding factors such as underlying disease severity. Patients in England had the longest additional hospital stay attributable to CDI at 16.09 days, followed by Germany at 15.47 days, Spain at 13.56 days, and The Netherlands at 12.58 days, derived using regression analysis. Propensity score matching indicated a higher attributable length of stay of 32.42 days in England, 15.31 days in Spain, and 18.64 days in The Netherlands. Outputs from this study consistently demonstrate that in European countries, for patients whose hospitalisation is complicated by CDI, the infection causes a statistically significant increase in hospital length of stay. This has implications for optimising resource allocation and budget setting at both the national and hospital level to ensure that levels of CDI-complicated hospitalisations are minimised. PMID:23797490

  6. Detection of cross-infection associated to a Brazilian PCR-ribotype of Clostridium difficile in a university hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Balassiano, Ilana T; dos Santos-Filho, Joaquim; Vital-Brazil, Juliana M; Nouér, Simone A; Souza, Claudia R C; Brazier, Jon S; Ferreira, Eliane de O; Domingues, Regina M C P

    2011-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important nosocomial enteric pathogen and is the etiological agent of pseudomembranous colites. Recently, the rates of C. difficile infection (CDI) have increased worldwide, but in Brazil few data about this situation and the incidence of clonal types of C. difficile exist. This study aimed to isolate and characterize C. difficile strains from samples obtained of a university hospital (HUCFF) in Rio de Janeiro city, Brazil. CDI was identified by ELISA in 27.1% of HUCFF-in-patients enrolled in the study, and the bacterium was recovered from eight of these fecal samples. All strains, except one, presented tcdA and tcdB genes and presented neither the cdtA and cdtB genes nor any significant deletions in the tcdC gene. All strains were sensitive to metronidazole, vancomycin and moxifloxacin, and resistant to clindamycin, ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. PCR-ribotyping and PFGE revealed four different clonal types among the isolates. The Brazilian PCR-ribotype 133 accounted for 50% of strains isolated, and PCR-ribotype 233 strains were obtained from 25% of the in-patients. The prevalence and resurgence of the Brazilian PCR-ribotype 133 among the hospitalized patients of HUCFF was established, and cross-infection of different patients associated to the same PCR-ribotypes was detected. Our results emphasize the importance of the diagnosis and control of CDI in order to prevent the emergence of specific clones that can lead to C. difficile-associated outbreaks in Brazilian hospitals. PMID:20623188

  7. Treatment of Clostridium difficile infection in mice with vancomycin alone is as effective as treatment with vancomycin and metronidazole in combination

    PubMed Central

    Erikstrup, Lise Tornvig; Aarup, Mie; Hagemann-Madsen, Rikke; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik; Kristensen, Brian; Olsen, Katharina Elisabeth Pribil; Fuursted, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clostridium difficile is a major cause of nosocomial infectious diarrhoea. Treatment of C. difficile infection (CDI) depends on disease severity. A combination of vancomycin and metronidazole is often recommended in severe cases. The aim of this study was to examine, in a murine model of CDI, if mice treated with a combination of vancomycin and metronidazole had a better clinical outcome than mice treated with vancomycin or metronidazole alone. Design C57BL/6J mice pretreated with an antimicrobial mixture were challenged with C. difficile VPI 10463 or phosphate-buffered saline by oral gavage. After the challenge, the mice were treated with placebo, vancomycin, metronidazole or a combination of vancomycin and metronidazole for 10 days. The mice were monitored for 20 days with weight and a clinical score. Stool samples were examined for C. difficile spore load and presence of C. difficile toxins. Results None of the mice in the vancomycin-treated group died during the treatment phase compared to a mortality of 17%, 33% and 55% in the combination, metronidazole and infected control group, respectively. Mice treated with vancomycin alone or in combination with metronidazole recovered from CDI faster than mice treated with metronidazole alone. However, after discontinuation of treatment, vancomycin-treated and combination-treated mice succumbed to clinical and bacteriological relapse. Conclusions Mice treated with vancomycin alone had a better clinical outcome in the treatment phase of CDI than mice treated with metronidazole alone. A combination of vancomycin and metronidazole did not improve the clinical outcome when compared to treatment with vancomycin alone. Trial registration number The trial registration number from the Danish Experimental Animal Inspectorate is J number 2012-15-2934-00422. PMID:26568840

  8. Impact of Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Colonization and Infection among Hospitalized Adults at a District Hospital in Southern Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yuan-Pin; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Hung, Kuei-Hsiang; Liu, Hsiu-Chuan; Lee, Chih-I; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Wu, Yi-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Background The impact of toxigenic Clostridium difficile colonization (tCDC) in hospitalized patients is not clear. Aim To study the significance of tCDC in hospitalized patients. Methods A prospective study in the medical wards of a regional hospital was performed from January to June 2011. Fecal samples collected from patients at the time of admission were tested for tcdB by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cultured for C. difficile. The patients were followed up weekly or when they developed diarrhea during hospitalization. If C. difficile was isolated, tcdA and tcdB would be tested by multiplex PCR. The primary outcome was the development of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). Findings Of 168 patients enrolled, females predominated (87, 51.8%), and the mean patient age was 75.4 years old. Approximately 70% of the patients were nursing home residents, and one third had a recent hospitalization within the prior three months. Twenty-eight (16.7%) patients had tCDC, including 16 (9.5%) patients with tCDC at the time of admission and 12 (7.2%) with tCDC during the follow-up period. With regard to the medications taken during hospitalization, the patients were more likely to have tCDC if they had received more than one class of antibiotics than if they had received monotherapy (odds ratio [OR] 6.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41–31.56, P = 0.01), particularly if they received a glycopeptide in combination with a cephalosporin or penicillin or a cephalosporin and a carbapenem. More patients with tCDC developed CDAD than those without tCDC (17.9%, 5/28 vs. 1.4%, 2/140, P = 0.002). Overall 7 (4.2%) of the 168 patients developed CDAD, and crude mortality rate of those with and without tCDC was similar (21.4%, 6/28 vs. 19.4%, 27/140, P = 0.79). Conclusion Recent use of glycopeptides and β-lactam antibiotics is associated with toxigenic C. difficile colonization, which is a risk factor for developing C. difficile-associated diarrhea

  9. 76 FR 6624 - Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ..., Inc., for the requested indication of treatment of adults with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), also known as Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), and prevention of recurrences....

  10. Multimorbidity in elderly hospitalised patients and risk of Clostridium difficile infection: a retrospective study with the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS)

    PubMed Central

    Ticinesi, Andrea; Nouvenne, Antonio; Folesani, Giuseppina; Prati, Beatrice; Morelli, Ilaria; Guida, Loredana; Turroni, Francesca; Ventura, Marco; Lauretani, Fulvio; Maggio, Marcello; Meschi, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the role of chronic comorbidities, considered together in a literature-validated index (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale, CIRS), and antibiotic or proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) treatments as risk factors for hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in elderly multimorbid hospitalised patients. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Subacute hospital geriatric care ward in Italy. Participants 505 (238 male (M), 268 female (F)) elderly (age ≥65) multimorbid patients. Main outcome measures The relationship between CDI and CIRS Comorbidity Score, number of comorbidities, antibiotic, antifungal and PPI treatments, and length of hospital stay was assessed through age-adjusted and sex-adjusted and multivariate logistic regression models. The CIRS Comorbidity Score was handled after categorisation in quartiles. Results Mean age was 80.7±11.3 years. 43 patients (22 M, 21 F) developed CDI. The prevalence of CDI increased among quartiles of CIRS Comorbidity Score (3.9% first quartile vs 11.1% fourth quartile, age-adjusted and sex-adjusted p=0.03). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, patients in the highest quartile of CIRS Comorbidity Score (≥17) carried a significantly higher risk of CDI (OR 5.07, 95% CI 1.28 to 20.14, p=0.02) than patients in the lowest quartile (<9). The only other variable significantly associated with CDI was antibiotic therapy (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.21 to 5.66, p=0.01). PPI treatment was not associated with CDI. Conclusions Multimorbidity, measured through CIRS Comorbidity Score, is independently associated with the risk of CDI in a population of elderly patients with prolonged hospital stay. PMID:26503394

  11. Clinical characteristics and risk factors for community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection: A retrospective, case-control study in a tertiary care hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mori, Nobuaki; Aoki, Yasuko

    2015-12-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed in the past decade. The incidence, prevalence, and severity of community-acquired CDI (CA-CDI) have increased. However, the epidemiology of CA-CDI in Japan has not been investigated. To evaluate the clinical characteristics and risk factors for CA-CDI in Japan, we conducted a retrospective, case-control study of CA-CDI at the National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center between January 2010 and December 2014. Two age- and sex-matched C. difficile toxin- and culture-negative controls were assigned for each case. A total of 26 patients were identified with CA-CDI were identified. The incidence rate for CA-CDI was 1.4 per 100,000 patient-years. Of the CA-CDI patients, 6 (23.1%) had no underlying comorbidity, 22 (84.6%) had prior exposure to antimicrobials, and 5 (19.2%) had prior exposure to antacids. Although 5 patients (19.2%) required hospitalization, none required intensive care or died. Recurrence was observed in 1 patient (3.8%). Patients with CA-CDI cases were more likely to have been recently exposed to antimicrobials compared to controls (odds ratio [OR]: 8.12, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.43-26.98). However, exposure to antacids was not associated with CA-CDI (OR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.19-1.85). Our findings indicate that the incidence rate for CA-CDI in Japan is relatively low compared to the US and Europe, and that CA-CDI is usually not severe. Previous antimicrobial exposure was the main risk factor for CA-CDI, suggesting that clinicians should consider CDI in patients presenting with diarrhea who have recently received antimicrobials. PMID:26482373

  12. Risk of Clostridium difficile Infection with the Use of a Proton Pump Inhibitor for Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Youngouk; Eun, Chang Soo; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Ji Yeoun; Byun, Young Jae; Yoo, Kyo-Sang; Han, Dong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) are commonly prescribed for stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) in critically ill patients. Several studies have suggested that the use of PPIs is a potential risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We compared the incidences of CDI in the PPI group and H2RA group for SUP in critically ill patients. Methods From August 2005 to July 2012, the incidences of CDI were retrospectively analyzed in patients who were admitted directly to intensive care units and stayed for more than 3 days. SUP-related CDI was defined as a CDI diagnosed during the SUP period. Patient clinical data were analyzed to identify potential risk factors for SUP-related CDI. Results Of the 1,005 patients enrolled (444 patients received PPI and 561 received H2RA), 38 (3.8%) were diagnosed with SUP-related CDI. The incidence of SUP-related CDI was considerably higher in patients who received PPI than in those who received H2RA (6.7% vs 1.8%). PPI use for SUP (odds ratio [OR], 3.3; confidence interval [CI], 1.5 to 7.1; p=0.003) and diabetes mellitus (OR, 2.3; CI, 1.2 to 4.7; p=0.019) were independent risk factors for SUP-related CDI. Conclusions PPI therapy is associated with a higher risk of SUP-related CDI than H2RA therapy in critically ill patients. PMID:27021503

  13. Vaccines against Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Leuzzi, Rosanna; Adamo, Roberto; Scarselli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is recognized as a major cause of nosocomial diseases ranging from antibiotic related diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Emergence during the last 2 decades of C. difficile strains associated with high incidence, severity and lethal outcomes has increased the challenges for CDI treatment. A limited number of drugs have proven to be effective against CDI and concerns about antibiotic resistance as well as recurring disease solicited the search for novel therapeutic strategies. Active vaccination provides the attractive opportunity to prevent CDI, and intense research in recent years led to development of experimental vaccines, 3 of which are currently under clinical evaluation. This review summarizes recent achievements and remaining challenges in the field of C. difficile vaccines, and discusses future perspectives in view of newly-identified candidate antigens. PMID:24637887

  14. New Method To Generate Enzymatically Deficient Clostridium difficile Toxin B as an Antigen for Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Genth, Harald; Selzer, Jörg; Busch, Christian; Dumbach, Jürgen; Hofmann, Fred; Aktories, Klaus; Just, Ingo

    2000-01-01

    The family of the large clostridial cytotoxins, encompassing Clostridium difficile toxins A and B as well as the lethal and hemorrhagic toxins from Clostridium sordellii, monoglucosylate the Rho GTPases by transferring a glucose moiety from the cosubstrate UDP-glucose. Here we present a new detoxification procedure to block the enzyme activity by treatment with the reactive UDP-2′,3′-dialdehyde to result in alkylation of toxin A and B. Alkylation is likely to occur in the catalytic domain, because the native cosubstrate UDP-glucose completely protected the toxins from inactivation and the alkylated toxin competes with the native toxin at the cell receptor. Alkylated toxins are good antigens resulting in antibodies recognizing only the C-terminally located receptor binding domain, whereas formaldehyde treatment resulted in antibodies recognizing both the receptor binding domain and the catalytic domain, indicating that the catalytic domain is concealed under native conditions. Antibodies against the native catalytic domain (amino acids 1 through 546) and those holotoxin antibodies recognizing the catalytic domain inhibited enzyme activity. However, only antibodies against the receptor binding domain protected intact cells from the cytotoxic activity of toxin B, whereas antibodies against the catalytic domain were protective only when inside the cell. PMID:10678912

  15. Rapid glutamic acid decarboxylase test for identification of Bacteroides and Clostridium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Jilly, B J; Schreckenberger, P C; LeBeau, L J

    1984-01-01

    A rapid 4-h test for glutamic acid decarboxylase is described for the identification of certain anaerobic bacteria. The test substrate consisted of 1.0 g of L-glutamic acid, 0.3 ml of Triton X-155, and 0.05 g of bromcresol green sodium salt in 1 liter of water. The substrate was dispensed in 0.5-ml amounts into test tubes, and a turbid suspension was made with the test organism. The test was then incubated aerobically at 35 degrees C for 4 h. The development of a blue color was considered positive. A total of 345 strains of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria were tested. All isolates of Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides uniformis. Clostridium perfringens, and Clostridium sordellii gave a positive reaction. Some isolates of Bacteroides distasonis and Bacteroides vulgatus were also positive. The use of this rapid test in conjunction with other rapid methods, such as the spot indol test, will enable laboratory workers to report these pathogens on the same day on which an inoculum of pure culture growth on agar is available. PMID:6376535

  16. Specific detection of toxigenic strains of Clostridium difficile in stool specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Gumerlock, P H; Tang, Y J; Weiss, J B; Silva, J

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the infectious agent responsible for antibiotic-associated colitis. We report the use of the polymerase chain reaction technique to identify toxigenic strains of C. difficile in human stool specimens. A set of primers based on the nucleotide sequence of the toxin B gene, which amplified a 399-bp fragment from isolates producing toxin B, was designed. We examined 28 known toxigenic strains, which were all positive by this assay. DNAs from the nontoxigenic strains examined and from strains of Clostridium sordellii and C. bifermentans were not amplified with these primers. The sensitivity of this assay allowed us to identify as little as 10% toxigenic C. difficile cells in the presence of 90% nontoxigenic cells and to detect the toxin B gene in 1 pg of DNA from a toxigenic strain. DNAs extracted from 18 clinical stool specimens that were positive for toxin B by the tissue culture cytotoxicity assay were also positive by this assay. In addition, we detected toxin B sequences in DNA from 2 of 18 stool specimens that were negative for toxin B by the cytotoxicity assay. These two stool specimens were from patients who had a clinical pattern of colitis that was compatible with C. difficile causation. This rapid, sensitive assay will be useful for specific identification of toxigenic C. difficile and for revealing cases that are undetected by analysis of fecal samples for toxin B alone. Images PMID:8458943

  17. Difficult case of Cronkhite-Canada syndrome with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, Clostridium difficile infection and polymyalgia rheumatica.

    PubMed

    Traussnigg, Stefan; Dolak, Werner; Trauner, Michael; Kazemi-Shirazi, Lili

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with heavy diarrhoea, nausea and weight loss accompanied by alopecia and dystrophic fingernails and toenails. The preceding diagnosis of an inflammatory bowel disease, a common pitfall, was excluded by endoscopic work up. Instead, Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS), a rare polyposis condition, was identified as the reason for this almost pathognomonic combination of diagnostic findings including various polyps throughout the entire intestine and ectodermal abnormalities. This case exemplifies common risks and complications in terms of gastrointestinal malabsorption, infections and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), including its treatment as well as a hereto unreported association with polymyalgia rheumatica. In CCS, long-term immunosuppressive therapy and close endoscopic cancer screening of the patient is essential. The treatment of vitamin deficiency and recurring SIBO helps to reduce symptoms. PMID:26818813

  18. Accuracy of loop-mediated isothermal amplification for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Aaron; Pasupuleti, Vinay; Thota, Priyaleela; Pant, Chaitanya; Rolston, David D K; Hernandez, Adrian V; Benites-Zapata, Vicente A; Fraser, Thomas G; Donskey, Curtis J; Deshpande, Abhishek

    2015-05-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (LAMP) is currently used as standalone diagnostic test for C. difficile infection (CDI). We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of LAMP for the diagnosis of CDI. We searched 5 databases to identify studies that compared LAMP with culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay or anaerobic toxigenic culture (TC) of C. difficile. We used the random-effects model to calculate pooled sensitivities, specificities, diagnostic odds ratios, and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The search of the databases yielded 16 studies (6979 samples) that met inclusion criteria. When TC was used as the gold standard (6572 samples), bivariate analysis yielded a mean sensitivity of 0.95 (95% CI, 0.93-0.97; I(2)=67.4) and a mean specificity of 0.99 (95% CI, 0.96-1.00; I(2)=97.0). LAMP is a useful diagnostic tool with high sensitivity and specificity for detecting CDI. The results should, however, be interpreted only in the presence of clinical suspicion and symptoms of CDI. PMID:25752201

  19. Clostridium septicum Empyema in an Immunocompetent Woman

    PubMed Central

    Granok, Alexander B.; Mahon, Patrick A.; Biesek, Genesio W.

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of a Clostridium septicum empyema in an immunocompetent woman following operation for an incarcerated internal hernia. The patient was successfully treated with pleural decortication and an extended course of postoperative antibiotics. This is the first report of such an infection in the medical literature. PMID:20490275

  20. Comparative Analysis of Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens are Gram-positive bacteria that are a major bacterial cause of food-borne disease among humans. These anaerobic bacteria are also the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Pathogenesis and symptoms of a necrotic enteritis infection among chickens ...

  1. Efficacy and Safety of Metronidazole Monotherapy versus Vancomycin Monotherapy or Combination Therapy in Patients with Clostridium difficile Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Lu, Laichun; Lin, Yu; Wang, Mingxia; Liu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has become a global epidemiological problem for both hospitalized patients and outpatients. The most commonly used drugs to treat CDI are metronidazole and vancomycin. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of metronidazole monotherapy with vancomycin monotherapy and combination therapy in CDI patients. Methods A comprehensive search without publication status or other restrictions was conducted. Studies comparing metronidazole monotherapy with vancomycin monotherapy or combination therapy in patients with CDI were considered eligible. Meta-analysis was performed using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effects model, and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated and reported. Results Of the 1910 records identified, seventeen studies from thirteen articles (n = 2501 patients) were included. No statistically significant difference in the rate of clinical cure was found between metronidazole and vancomycin for mild CDI (OR = 0.67, 95% CI (0.45, 1.00), p = 0.05) or between either monotherapy and combination therapy for CDI (OR = 1.07, 95% CI (0.58, 1.96), p = 0.83); however, the rate of clinical cure was lower for metronidazole than for vancomycin for severe CDI (OR = 0.46, 95% CI (0.26, 0.80), p = 0.006). No statistically significant difference in the rate of CDI recurrence was found between metronidazole and vancomycin for mild CDI (OR = 0.99, 95% CI (0.40, 2.45), p = 0.98) or severe CDI (OR = 0.98, 95% CI (0.63, 1.53), p = 0.94) or between either monotherapy and combination therapy for CDI (OR = 0.91, 95% CI (0.66, 1.26), p = 0.56). In addition, there was no significant difference in the rate of adverse events (AEs) between metronidazole and vancomycin (OR = 1.18, 95% CI (0.80, 1.74), p = 0.41). In contrast, the rate of AEs was significantly lower for either monotherapy than for combination therapy (OR = 0.30, 95% CI (0.17, 0.51), p<0.0001). Conclusions Metronidazole and

  2. Clostridium difficile and the microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Seekatz, Anna M.; Young, Vincent B.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading health care–associated illness. Both human and animal models have demonstrated the importance of the gut microbiota’s capability of providing colonization resistance against C. difficile. Risk factors for disease development include antibiotic use, which disrupts the gut microbiota, leading to the loss of colonization resistance and subsequent CDI. Identification of the specific microbes capable of restoring this function remains elusive. Future studies directed at how microbial communities influence the metabolic environment may help elucidate the role of the microbiota in disease development. These findings will improve current biotherapeutics for patients with CDI, particularly those with recurrent disease. PMID:25036699

  3. Persistent and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Shola A.; Stahl, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea. It has become a significant dilemma in the treatment of patients, and causes increasing morbidity that, in extreme cases, may result in death. Persistent and recurrent disease hamper attempts at eradication of this infection. Escalating levels of treatment and novel therapeutics are being utilized and developed to treat CDI. Further trials are warranted to definitively determine what protocols can be used to treat persistent and recurrent disease. PMID:26034401

  4. Clostridium perfringens TpeL Glycosylates the Rac and Ras Subfamily Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Ohkubo, Akiko; Oda, Masataka; Kobayashi, Keiko; Amimoto, Katsuhiko; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Sakurai, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens TpeL belongs to a family of large clostridial cytotoxins that encompasses Clostridium difficile toxin A (TcdA) and B (TcdB) and Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL). We report here the identification of the TpeL-catalyzed modification of small GTPases. A recombinant protein (TpeL1-525) derived from the TpeL N-terminal catalytic domain in the presence of streptolysin O (SLO) induced the rounding of Vero cells and the glycosylation of cellular Rac1. Among several hexoses tested, UDP-N-acetyl-glucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) and UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc) served as cosubstrates for TpeL1-525-catalyzed modifications. TpeL1-525 catalyzed the incorporation of UDP-Glc into Ha-Ras, Rap1B, and RalA and of UDP-GlcNAc into Rac1, Ha-Ras, Rap1B, and RalA. In Rac1, TpeL and TcdB share the same acceptor amino acid for glycosylation, Thr-35. In Vero cells treated with TpeL1-525 in the presence of SLO, glycosylation leads to a translocation of the majority of Rac1 and Ha-Ras to the membrane. We demonstrate for first time that TpeL uses both UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-Glc as donor cosubstrates and modifies the Rac1 and Ras subfamily by glycosylation to mediate its cytotoxic effects. PMID:21098103

  5. Autism and Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Bolte, E R

    1998-08-01

    Autism is a severe developmental disability believed to have multiple etiologies. This paper outlines the possibility of a subacute, chronic tetanus infection of the intestinal tract as the underlying cause for symptoms of autism observed in some individuals. A significant percentage of individuals with autism have a history of extensive antibiotic use. Oral antibiotics significantly disrupt protective intestinal microbiota, creating a favorable environment for colonization by opportunistic pathogens. Clostridium tetani is an ubiquitous anaerobic bacillus that produces a potent neurotoxin. Intestinal colonization by C. tetani, and subsequent neurotoxin release, have been demonstrated in laboratory animals which were fed vegetative cells. The vagus nerve is capable of transporting tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) and provides a route of ascent from the intestinal tract to the CNS. This route bypasses TeNT's normal preferential binding sites in the spinal cord, and therefore the symptoms of a typical tetanus infection are not evident. Once in the brain, TeNT disrupts the release of neurotransmitters by the proteolytic cleavage of synaptobrevin, a synaptic vesicle membrane protein. This inhibition of neurotransmitter release would explain a wide variety of behavioral deficits apparent in autism. Lab animals injected in the brain with TeNT have exhibited many of these behaviors. Some children with autism have also shown a significant reduction in stereotyped behaviors when treated with antimicrobials effective against intestinal clostridia. When viewed as sequelae to a subacute, chronic tetanus infection, many of the puzzling abnormalities of autism have a logical basis. A review of atypical tetanus cases, and strategies to test the validity of this paper's hypothesis, are included. PMID:9881820

  6. Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285, Lactobacillus casei LBC80R, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CLR2 (Bio-K+): Characterization, Manufacture, Mechanisms of Action, and Quality Control of a Specific Probiotic Combination for Primary Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Julie; Frappier, Martin; Millette, Mathieu

    2015-05-15

    A specific probiotic formulation composed of Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285, Lactobacillus casei LBC80R, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CLR2 (Bio-K+) has been marketed in North America since 1996. The strains and the commercial products have been evaluated for safety, identity, gastrointestinal survival, and stability throughout shelf life. The capacity of both the fermented beverages and the capsules to reduce incidences of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been demonstrated in human clinical trials. Individual strains and the finished products have shown antimicrobial activity against C. difficile and toxin A/B neutralization capacity in vitro. The use of this specific probiotic formulation as part of a bundle of preventive measures to control CDI in healthcare settings is discussed. PMID:25922399

  7. Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease (a thickening of tissue [plaque] inside the penis that causes the penis to curve). Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is in ... the plaque of thickened tissue and allows the penis to be straightened.

  8. Clostridium difficile colitis: pathogenesis and host defence.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; McKenney, Peter T; Pamer, Eric G

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of intestinal infection and diarrhoea in individuals following antibiotic treatment. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that induce spore formation and germination and have determined the roles of C. difficile toxins in disease pathogenesis. Exciting progress has also been made in defining the role of the microbiome, specific commensal bacterial species and host immunity in defence against infection with C. difficile. This Review will summarize the recent discoveries and developments in our understanding of C. difficile infection and pathogenesis. PMID:27573580

  9. Clostridium novyi causing necrotising fasciitis in an injecting drug user

    PubMed Central

    Noone, M; Tabaqchali, M; Spillane, J B

    2002-01-01

    Necrotising fasciitis with pronounced local oedema is described in an injecting drug user. Clostridium novyi was an unexpected single pathogen isolated from infected tissue. The patient was among a cluster of cases, all injecting drug users, presenting with toxaemia and soft tissue infection. The causal role and pathogenicity of C novyi is discussed. PMID:11865011

  10. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program on Reducing the Incidence Rate of Healthcare-Associated Clostridium difficile Infection: A Non-Randomized, Stepped Wedge, Single-Site, Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence rate of healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infection (HA-CDI) is estimated at 1 in 100 patients. Antibiotic exposure is the most consistently reported risk factor for HA-CDI. Strategies to reduce the risk of HA-CDI have focused on reducing antibiotic utilization. Prospective audit and feedback is a commonly used antimicrobial stewardship intervention (ASi). The impact of this ASi on risk of HA-CDI is equivocal. This study examines the effectiveness of a prospective audit and feedback ASi on reducing the risk of HA-CDI. Methods Single-site, 339 bed community-hospital in Barrie, Ontario, Canada. Primary outcome is HA-CDI incidence rate. Daily prospective and audit ASi is the exposure variable. ASi implemented across 6 wards in a non-randomized, stepped wedge design. Criteria for ASi; any intravenous antibiotic use for ≥ 48 hrs, any oral fluoroquinolone or oral second generation cephalosporin use for ≥ 48 hrs, or any antimicrobial use for ≥ 5 days. HA-CDI cases and model covariates were aggregated by ward, year and month starting September 2008 and ending February 2016. Multi-level mixed effect negative binomial regression analysis was used to model the primary outcome, with intercept and slope coefficients for ward-level random effects estimated. Other covariates tested for inclusion in the final model were derived from previously published risk factors. Deviance residuals were used to assess the model’s goodness-of-fit. Findings The dataset included 486 observation periods, of which 350 were control periods and 136 were intervention periods. After accounting for all other model covariates, the estimated overall ASi incidence rate ratio (IRR) was 0.48 (95% 0.30, 0.79). The ASi effect was independent of antimicrobial utilization. The ASi did not seem to reduce the risk of Clostridium difficile infection on the surgery wards (IRR 0.87, 95% CI 0.45, 1.69) compared to the medicine wards (IRR 0.42, 95% CI 0.28, 0.63). The ward

  11. Discrimination of clostridium species using a magnetic bead based hybridization assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlow, Susanne; Seise, Barbara; Pollok, Sibyll; Seyboldt, Christian; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the causative agent of blackleg, which is an endogenous bacterial infection. Mainly cattle and other ruminants are affected. The symptoms of blackleg are very similar to those of malignant edema, an infection caused by Clostridium septicum. [1, 2] Therefore a reliable differentiation of Clostridium chauvoei from other Clostridium species is required. Traditional microbiological detection methods are time consuming and laborious. Additionally, the unique identification is hindered by the overgrowing tendency of swarming Clostridium septicum colonies when both species are present. [1, 3, 4] Thus, there is a crucial need to improve and simplify the specific detection of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum. Here we present an easy and fast Clostridium species discrimination method combining magnetic beads and fluorescence spectroscopy. Functionalized magnetic particles exhibit plentiful advantages, like their simple manipulation in combination with a large binding capacity of biomolecules. A specific region of the pathogenic DNA is amplified and labelled with biotin by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These PCR products were then immobilized on magnetic beads exploiting the strong biotin-streptavidin interaction. The specific detection of different Clostridium species is achieved by using fluorescence dye labeled probe DNA for the hybridization with the immobilized PCR products. Finally, the samples were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. [5

  12. Candida sepsis originating from bulbar abscess of the penis.

    PubMed

    Huuskonen, J; Aaltomaa, S

    2006-01-01

    We describe a patient with a very unusual penile abscess. Antibiotic treatment for Clostridium sordellii and Candida albicans infection and drainage of pus was curative. We propose that the penile abscess may have been an unusual manifestation of a rectal fistula. PMID:16916779

  13. Clostridium difficile in paediatric populations

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Upton D

    2014-01-01

    An increase in Clostridium difficile infection incidence has been observed among hospitalized children in the United States. The present statement, targeted at clinicians caring for infants and children in community and institutional settings, summarizes the relevant information relating to the role of C difficile in childhood diarrhea and provides recommendations for diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Significant differences between adult and paediatric risk factors and disease are discussed, along with emerging therapies. The relationship between age and disease severity in children with a newly emergent and more fluoroqinolone-resistant strain of C difficile (North American Pulse-field type-1 [NAP1]) remains unknown. The importance of antimicrobial stewardship as a preventive strategy is highlighted. This statement replaces a previous Canadian Paediatric Society position statement on C difficile published in 2000. PMID:24627655

  14. Clostridium perfringens Type C Enterotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Niilo, L

    1988-08-01

    Forms of enteric disease caused by Clostridium perfringens type C are critically reviewed with emphasis on practical aspects and recent research findings. Available data indicate that more animal species may be fatally infected by type C of this organism than by any other type of C. perfringens. Fatal cases have been recorded in pigs, cattle, sheep, horses and humans. Newborn animals are typically the most susceptible, possibly related to aspects of bacterial colonization, intestinal digestive functions, and to some other, unexplained, factors. Both beta toxin and the bacterial cells are required to initiate pathogenesis at the tips of jejunal villi, and subsequent massive adherence of these cells to necrotic mucosa is a characteristic feature. Although major lesions occur in the intestine, death is due to toxemia. The disease can be effectively controlled by vaccination of the dam. Epizootiology of this disease is a possible area for further studies. PMID:17423103

  15. Isolation of C. difficile Carriers Alone and as Part of a Bundle Approach for the Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI): A Mathematical Model Based on Clinical Study Data

    PubMed Central

    Grigoras, Christos A.; Zervou, Fainareti N.; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M.; Siettos, Constantinos I.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the most common hospital-acquired infection. Besides infected patients, carriers have emerged as a key player in C. difficile epidemiology. In this study, we evaluated the impact of identifying and isolating carriers upon hospital admission on the incidence of CDI incidence and hospital-acquired C. difficile colonization, as a single policy and as part of bundle approaches. We simulated C. difficile transmission using a stochastic mathematical approach, considering the contribution of carriers based on published literature. In the baseline scenario, CDI incidence was 6.18/1,000 admissions (95% CI, 5.72–6.65), simulating reported estimates from U.S. hospital discharges. The acquisition rate of C. difficile carriage was 9.72/1,000 admissions (95% CI, 9.15–10.31). Screening and isolation of colonized patients on admission to the hospital decreased CDI incidence to 4.99/1,000 admissions (95% CI, 4.59–5.42; relative reduction (RR) = 19.1%) and led to 36.2% reduction in the rate of hospital-acquired colonization. Simulating an antimicrobial stewardship program reduced CDI rate to 2.35/1,000 admissions (95% CI, 2.07–2.65). In sensitivity analysis, CDI incidence was less than 2.32/1,000 admissions (RR = 62.4%) in 95% of 1,000 simulations. The combined bundle, focusing on reducing C. difficile transmission from colonized patients and the individual risk of these patients to develop CDI, decreased significantly the incidence of both CDI and hospital-acquired colonization. Implementation of this bundle to current practice is expected to have an important impact in containing CDI. PMID:27258068

  16. Clostridium difficile in Children: To Treat or Not to Treat?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection has been increasing since 2000 in children and in adults. Frequent antibiotics use, comorbidity, and the development of hypervirulent strains have increased the risk of infection. Despite the high carriage rates of C. difficile, infants rarely develop clinical infection. Discontinuing antibiotics and supportive management usually leads to resolution of disease. Antibiotics use should be stratified depending on the patient's age and severity of the disease. PMID:25061582

  17. Clostridium difficile infection among immunocompromised patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and detection of moxifloxacin resistance in a ribotype 014 strain.

    PubMed

    Secco, Danielle Angst; Balassiano, Ilana Teruszkin; Boente, Renata Ferreira; Miranda, Karla Rodrigues; Brazier, Jon; Hall, Val; dos Santos-Filho, Joaquim; Lobo, Leandro Araujo; Nouér, Simone Aranha; Domingues, Regina Maria Cavalcanti Pilotto

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive spore forming anaerobic bacterium, often associated with nosocomial diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. The acquisition of this organism occurs primarily in hospitals through accidental ingestion of spores, and its establishment and proliferation in the colon results from the removal of members of the normal intestinal flora during or after antibiotic therapy. In this study, stool samples from patients admitted to the University Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCCF/UFRJ) were screened for C. difficile toxins with an ELISA test and cultured with standard techniques for C. difficile isolation. A total of 74 stool samples were collected from patients undergoing antibiotic therapy between August 2009 and November 2010, only two (2.7%) were positive in the ELISA test and culture. A third isolate was obtained from a negative ELISA test sample. All cases of CDI were identified in patients with acute lymphoid or myeloid leukemia. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization showed that all strains carried toxins A and B genes, and belonged to PCR-ribotypes 014, 043 and 046. The isolated strains were sensitive to metronidazole and vancomycin, and resistant to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. Resistance to moxifloxacin, was present in the strain from PCR-ribotype 014, that showed an amino acid substitution in gyrB gene (Asp 426 → Asn). This is the first time that this mutation in a PCR-ribotype 014 strain has been described in Brazil. PMID:24907488

  18. Toxin plasmids of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P; Uzal, Francisco A; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2013-06-01

    In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  19. Infectious Diarrhea: Norovirus and Clostridium difficile in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    White, Mary B; Rajagopalan, Shobita; Yoshikawa, Thomas T

    2016-08-01

    Norovirus infection usually results in acute gastroenteritis, often with incapacitating nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It is highly contagious and resistant to eradication with alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Appropriate preventative and infection control measures can mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with norovirus infection. Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of health care-associated diarrhea in the United States. Antibiotic use is by far the most common risk factor for C difficile colonization and infection. Appropriate preventive measures and judicious use of antibiotics can help mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with C difficile infection. PMID:27394020

  20. Bacteriophages of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The specific aims of the book chapter are to: (1) Briefly review the nomenclature of bacteriophages and how these agents are classified. (2) Discuss the problems associated with addition/removal of antibiotics in commercial animal feeds. (3) Provide a brief overview of Clostridium perfringens biolog...

  1. Clostridium tetani bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Hallit, Rabih Riad; Afridi, Muhammad; Sison, Raymund; Salem, Elie; Boghossian, Jack; Slim, Jihad

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus is a neuromuscular disease in which Clostridium tetani exotoxin (tetanospasmin) produces muscle spasms, incapacitating its host. To our knowledge, C. tetani bacteraemia has never been reported in the literature. The ideal management of this entity remains unresolved given that there is no literature to guide the therapy. PMID:22977074

  2. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Using Upper Gastrointestinal Tract for the Treatment of Refractory or Severe Complicated Clostridium difficile Infection in Elderly Patients in Poor Medical Condition: The First Study in an Asian Country

    PubMed Central

    Gweon, Tae-Geun; Kim, Jinsu; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, Dong-Gun; Lee, In Seok; Cho, Young-Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective treatment option for refractory Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). FMT may be challenging in patients with a low performance status, because of their poor medical condition. The aims of this study were to describe our experience treating patients in poor medical condition with refractory or severe complicated CDI using FMT via the upper GI tract route. Methods. This study was a retrospective review of seven elderly patients with refractory or severe complicated CDI and a poor medical condition who were treated with FMT through the upper GI tract route from May 2012 through August 2013. The outcomes studied included the cure rate of CDI and adverse events. Results. Of these seven patients who received FMT via the upper GI tract route, all patients were cured. During the 11-month follow-up period, CDI recurrence was observed in two patients; rescue FMT was performed in these patients, which led to a full cure. Vomiting was observed in two patients. Conclusions. FMT via the upper gastrointestinal tract route may be effective for the treatment of refractory or severe complicated CDI in patients with a low performance status. Physicians should be aware of adverse events, especially vomiting. PMID:27127501

  3. Comparison of real-time PCR for detection of the tcdC gene with four toxin immunoassays and culture in diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Lynne M; Duresko, Brian J; Gustafson, Daniel R; Rosenblatt, Jon E

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a rapid real-time PCR method using fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes and the LightCycler (Roche Diagnostics), which will detect the presence of the tcdC gene of Clostridium difficile in stool samples. Our PCR method also will identify the presence of base pair deletions, one of which (18 bp) has been associated with the "epidemic" toxin-hyperproducing strains. We compared the results of this PCR with those of three C. difficile toxin-detecting enzyme immunoassays (EIAs), an EIA for the detection of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), and culture of C. difficile. A total of 200 stool specimens were studied by the methods under comparison. C. difficile was isolated from 49 specimens by culture, and 44 of these were confirmed as containing one of the genes associated with toxin production ("toxigenic culture"). Using toxigenic culture as the "gold standard", the sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values, respectively, of the assays were 48%, 98%, 88%, and 87% for the Premier toxin A and B test; 48%, 99%, 91%, and 87% for the ImmunoCard toxin A & B test; 48%, 84%, 46%, and 85% for the Xpect C. difficile toxin A/B test; 32%, 100%, 100%, and 84% for the Triage C. difficile panel (for toxin A); and 86%, 97%, 90%, and 96% for the LightCycler PCR. Thus, in comparison to the sensitivity of toxigenic culture, the sensitivities of the toxin immunoassays were unacceptably low, while the LightCycler real-time PCR assay for the detection of the tcdC gene of C. difficile is sensitive and specific. PMID:18434563

  4. Comparison of Simplexa Universal Direct PCR with Cytotoxicity Assay for Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection: Performance, Cost, and Correlation with Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, David; Topal, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Simplexa Clostridium difficile universal direct PCR, a real-time PCR assay for the detection of the C. difficile toxin B (tcdB) gene using the 3M integrated cycler, was compared with a two-step algorithm which includes the C. Diff Chek-60 glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) antigen assay followed by cytotoxin neutralization. Three hundred forty-two liquid or semisolid stools submitted for diagnostic C. difficile testing, 171 GDH antigen positive and 171 GDH antigen negative, were selected for the study. All samples were tested by the C. Diff Chek-60 GDH antigen assay, cytotoxin neutralization, and Simplexa direct PCR. Of 171 GDH-positive samples, 4 were excluded (from patients on therapy or from whom duplicate samples were obtained) and 88 were determined to be true positives for toxigenic C. difficile. Of the 88, 67 (76.1%) were positive by the two-step method and 86 (97.7%) were positive by PCR. Seventy-nine were positive by the GDH antigen assay only. Of 171 GDH antigen-negative samples, none were positive by PCR. One antigen-negative sample positive by the cytotoxin assay only was deemed a false positive based on chart review. Simplexa C. difficile universal direct PCR was significantly more sensitive for detecting toxigenic C. difficile bacteria than cytotoxin neutralization (P = 0.0002). However, most PCR-positive/cytotoxin-negative patients did not have clear C. difficile disease. The estimated cost avoidance provided by a more rapid molecular diagnosis was outweighed by the cost of isolating and treating PCR-positive/cytotoxin-negative patients. The costs, clinical consequences, and impact on nosocomial transmission of treating and/or isolating patients positive for toxigenic C. difficile by PCR but negative for in vivo toxin production merit further study. PMID:24226924

  5. Clostridium glycolicum Isolated from a Patient with Otogenic Brain Abscesses▿

    PubMed Central

    Van Leer, C.; Wensing, A. M. J.; van Leeuwen, J. P.; Zandbergen, E. G. J.; Swanink, C. M. A.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a case of brain abscesses with gas formation following otitis media, for which the patient treated himself by placing clay in his ear. Several microorganisms, including Clostridium glycolicum, were cultured from material obtained from the patient. This is the first report of an infection in an immunocompetent patient associated with this microorganism. PMID:19109475

  6. Small Molecules Take A Big Step Against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Beilhartz, Greg L; Tam, John; Melnyk, Roman A

    2015-12-01

    Effective treatment of Clostridium difficile infections demands a shift away from antibiotics towards toxin-neutralizing agents. Work by Bender et al., using a drug that attenuates toxin action in vivo without affecting bacterial survival, demonstrates the exciting potential of small molecules as a new modality in the fight against C. difficile. PMID:26547239

  7. Isolation of Clostridium difficile from healthy food animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Clostridium difficile-associated disease is increasingly reported and studies indicate that food animals may be sources of human infections. Methods: The presence of C. difficile in 345 swine fecal, 1,325 dairy cattle fecal, and 371 dairy environmental samples were examined. Two isolati...

  8. Intravascular Hemolysis and Septicemia due to Clostridium perfringens Emphysematous Cholecystitis and Hepatic Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Justin; Bland, Lacie; Noble, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Context. Clostridium perfringens septicemia is often associated with translocation from the gastrointestinal or gastrourinary tract and occurs in patients who have malignancy or are immunocompromised. Clostridium perfringens septicemia is usually fatal without early identification, source control, and antibiotics. Case. We present a case of a 65-year-old female with Clostridium perfringens septicemia secondary to emphysematous cholecystitis, with progression to hepatic abscesses. Conclusion. Septicemia secondary to Clostridium perfringens is generally fatal if not detected early. Source control with surgery or percutaneous drainage and early antibiotic therapy is imperative. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may reduce mortality. Clinicians caring for patients with sepsis and intravascular hemolysis must have Clostridium perfringens septicemia on their differential diagnosis with a low threshold for starting antibiotics and pursuing source of infection. PMID:26229537

  9. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cappella, Michela; Pugliese, Fabrizio; Zucchini, Andrea; Marchetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered. PMID:27190666

  10. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Cappella, Michela; Pugliese, Fabrizio; Zucchini, Andrea; Marchetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered. PMID:27190666

  11. Impact on toxin production and cell morphology in Clostridium difficile by ridinilazole (SMT19969), a novel treatment for C. difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Bassères, Eugénie; Endres, Bradley T.; Khaleduzzaman, Mohammed; Miraftabi, Faranak; Alam, M. Jahangir; Vickers, Richard J.; Garey, Kevin W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Ridinilazole (SMT19969) is a narrow-spectrum, non-absorbable antimicrobial with activity against Clostridium difficile undergoing clinical trials. The purpose of this study was to assess the pharmacological activity of ridinilazole and assess the effects on cell morphology. Methods Antibiotic killing curves were performed using the epidemic C. difficile ribotype 027 strain, R20291, using supra-MIC (4× and 40×) and sub-MIC (0.125×, 0.25× and 0.5×) concentrations of ridinilazole. Following exposure, C. difficile cells were collected for cfu counts, toxin A and B production, and morphological changes using scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy. Human intestinal cells (Caco-2) were co-incubated with ridinilazole-treated C. difficile growth medium to determine the effects on host inflammatory response (IL-8). Results Treatment at supra-MIC concentrations (4× and 40× MIC) of ridinilazole resulted in a significant reduction in vegetative cells over 72 h (4 log difference, P < 0.01) compared with controls without inducing spore formation. These results correlated with a 75% decrease in toxin A production (P < 0.05) and a 96% decrease in toxin B production (P < 0.05). At sub-MIC levels (0.5× MIC), toxin A production was reduced by 91% (P < 0.01) and toxin B production was reduced by 100% (P < 0.001), which resulted in a 74% reduction in IL-8 release compared with controls (P < 0.05). Sub-MIC (0.5×)-treated cells formed filamentous structures ∼10-fold longer than control cells. Following fluorescence labelling, the cell septum was not forming in sub-MIC-treated cells, yet the DNA was dividing. Conclusions Ridinilazole had robust killing effects on C. difficile that significantly reduced toxin production and attenuated the inflammatory response. Ridinilazole also elicited significant cell division effects suggesting a potential mechanism of action. PMID:26895772

  12. Inducing and Quantifying Clostridium difficile Spore Formation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Aimee; Fimlaid, Kelly A; Pishdadian, Keyan

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive nosocomial pathogen Clostridium difficile induces sporulation during growth in the gastrointestinal tract. Sporulation is necessary for this obligate anaerobe to form metabolically dormant spores that can resist antibiotic treatment, survive exit from the mammalian host, and transmit C. difficile infections. In this chapter, we describe a method for inducing C. difficile sporulation in vitro. This method can be used to study sporulation and maximize spore purification yields for a number of C. difficile strain backgrounds. We also describe procedures for visualizing spore formation using phase-contrast microscopy and for quantifying the efficiency of sporulation using heat resistance as a measure of functional spore formation. PMID:27507338

  13. Clostridium difficile: from obscurity to superbug.

    PubMed

    Brazier, J S

    2008-01-01

    According to the UK media and popular press, Clostridium difficile is now a fully fledged member of that notorious but ill-defined group of microorganisms portrayed to the general public as superbugs. Following the trail blazed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), C. difficile has made the transition from being an obscure anaerobic bacterium, mainly of interest to specialist anaerobic microbiologists, to that of an infamous superbug responsible for outbreaks of hospital-acquired infection that commonly result in serious disease and death. This review tracks the rise in scientific knowledge and public awareness of this organism. PMID:18476496

  14. The Role of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) Testing Assay in the Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infections: A High Sensitive Screening Test and an Essential Step in the Proposed Laboratory Diagnosis Workflow for Developing Countries like China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-Wei; Xiao, Meng; Kudinha, Timothy; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Lin-Ying; Hou, Xin; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in North America and Europe has increased significantly since the 2000s. However, CDI is not widely recognized in China and other developing countries due to limited laboratory diagnostic capacity and low awareness. Most published studies on laboratory workflows for CDI diagnosis are from developed countries, and thus may not be suitable for most developing countries. Therefore, an alternative strategy for developing countries is needed. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) test and its associated workflow on 416 fecal specimens from suspected CDI cases. The assay exhibited excellent sensitivity (100.0%) and specificity (92.8%), compared to culture based method, and thus could be a good screening marker for C. difficile but not for indication of toxin production. The VIDAS CDAB assay, which can detect toxin A/B directly from fecal specimens, showed good specificity (99.7%) and positive predictive value (97.2%), but low sensitivity (45.0%) and negative predictive value (88.3%), compared with PCR-based toxin gene detection. Therefore, we propose a practical and efficient GDH test based workflow strategy for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI in developing countries like China. By applying this new workflow, the CDI laboratory diagnosis rate was notably improved in our center, yet the increasing cost was kept at a minimum level. Furthermore, to gain some insights into the genetic population structure of C. difficile isolates from our hospital, we performed MLST and PCR toxin gene typing. PMID:26659011

  15. The Role of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) Testing Assay in the Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infections: A High Sensitive Screening Test and an Essential Step in the Proposed Laboratory Diagnosis Workflow for Developing Countries like China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jing-Wei; Xiao, Meng; Kudinha, Timothy; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Lin-Ying; Hou, Xin; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in North America and Europe has increased significantly since the 2000s. However, CDI is not widely recognized in China and other developing countries due to limited laboratory diagnostic capacity and low awareness. Most published studies on laboratory workflows for CDI diagnosis are from developed countries, and thus may not be suitable for most developing countries. Therefore, an alternative strategy for developing countries is needed. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) test and its associated workflow on 416 fecal specimens from suspected CDI cases. The assay exhibited excellent sensitivity (100.0%) and specificity (92.8%), compared to culture based method, and thus could be a good screening marker for C. difficile but not for indication of toxin production. The VIDAS CDAB assay, which can detect toxin A/B directly from fecal specimens, showed good specificity (99.7%) and positive predictive value (97.2%), but low sensitivity (45.0%) and negative predictive value (88.3%), compared with PCR-based toxin gene detection. Therefore, we propose a practical and efficient GDH test based workflow strategy for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI in developing countries like China. By applying this new workflow, the CDI laboratory diagnosis rate was notably improved in our center, yet the increasing cost was kept at a minimum level. Furthermore, to gain some insights into the genetic population structure of C. difficile isolates from our hospital, we performed MLST and PCR toxin gene typing. PMID:26659011

  16. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  17. The potential economic value of screening hospital admissions for Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, S M; Curry, S R; Harrison, L H; Lee, B Y

    2012-11-01

    Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile carriage has a prevalence reported as high as 51-85 %; with up to 84 % of incident hospital-acquired infections linked to carriers. Accurately identifying carriers may limit the spread of Clostridium difficile. Since new technology adoption depends heavily on its economic value, we developed an analytic simulation model to determine the cost-effectiveness screening hospital admissions for Clostridium difficile from the hospital and third party payer perspectives. Isolation precautions were applied to patients testing positive, preventing transmission. Sensitivity analyses varied Clostridium difficile colonization rate, infection probability among secondary cases, contact isolation compliance, and screening cost. Screening was cost-effective (i.e., incremental cost-effectiveness ratio [ICER] ≤ $50,000/QALY) for every scenario tested; all ICER values were ≤ $256/QALY. Screening was economically dominant (i.e., saved costs and provided health benefits) with a ≥10.3 % colonization rate and ≥5.88 % infection probability when contact isolation compliance was ≥25 % (hospital perspective). Under some conditions screening led to cost savings per case averted (range, $53-272). Clostridium difficile screening, coupled with isolation precautions, may be a cost-effective intervention to hospitals and third party payers, based on prevalence. Limiting Clostridium difficile transmission can reduce the number of infections, thereby reducing its economic burden to the healthcare system. PMID:22752150

  18. Emended descriptions of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii, and descriptions of Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum sp. nov. and Clostridium saccharobutylicum sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Keis, S; Shaheen, R; Jones, D T

    2001-11-01

    On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing and DNA-DNA reassociation, industrial solvent-producing clostridia have been assigned to four species. In this study, the phenotypic characteristics of Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii, 'Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum', and an unnamed Clostridium sp. represented by the strains NCP 262T and NRRL B643 are compared. In addition, a further 40 strains of solvent-producing clostridia have been classified by biotyping, DNA fingerprinting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These included 14 C. beijerinckii strains, two strains currently designated as 'Clostridium kaneboi' and 'Clostridium butanologenum', and 24 production strains used in the commercial acetone-butanol fermentation. All of the C. beijerinckii strains were confirmed to have been classified correctly. The 'C. kaneboi' and 'C. butanologenum' strains require reclassification as C. acetobutylicum and C. beijerinckii, respectively. The commercial production strains were found to belong either to C. beijerinckii or to the unnamed Clostridium sp. For the comparative phenotypic studies of the four species, representative strains were selected from each of the DNA-fingerprint subgroups within each species. These strains were analysed for their ability to utilize different carbohydrates, hydrolyse gelatin or aesculin, and produce indole, and were tested for the presence of catalase and urease. On the basis of these results, several phenotypic traits were found to be useful for differentiating between the four species. The descriptions of C. acetobutylicum and C. beijerinckii have been emended. The names Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum sp. nov. [type strain = N1-4 (HMT) = ATCC 27021T] and Clostridium saccharobutylicum sp. nov. (type strain = DSM 13864T = ATCC BAA-117T) are proposed for the two new species. PMID:11760952

  19. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Katherine R.; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however, developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarize the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics. Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage–host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution. No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using “whole-phages” are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem-free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen. PMID:24808893

  20. Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs) Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... and 2014 13 percent decrease in hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia (bloodstream infections) between 2011 ... Clostridium difficile infections ( C. difficile ), and hospital-onset ... Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia (bloodstream infections). To read ...

  1. Fatal Spontaneous Clostridium bifermentans Necrotizing Endometritis: A Case Report and Literature Review of the Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Andrew; Kirby, James E.; Albrecht, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium bifermentans is a rare pathogen in humans. A fatal case of fulminant endometritis with toxic shock and capillary leak secondary to C bifermentans infection in a young woman is described, and this is compared to all 13 previously described cases of C bifermentans infection. PMID:27419167

  2. Isolation and characterization of Clostridium difficile associated with beef cattle and commercially produced ground beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection has recently increased in North American and European countries. This pathogen has been isolated from retail pork, turkey, and beef products and reported associated with human illness. This increase in infections has been attributed to the emergence o...

  3. FAQs about Clostridium Difficile

    MedlinePlus

    ... on contaminated equipment and on the hands of doctors, nurses, other healthcare providers and visitors. Can C. diff ... C. diff infections? To prevent C. diff. infections, doctors, nurses, and other healthcare providers: • Clean their hands with ...

  4. Clostridium chauvoei-associated meningoencephalitis in a calf.

    PubMed

    2016-01-16

    ·Meningoencephalitis in a calf associated with Clostridium chauvoei infection. ·Bovine papular stomatitis in calves. ·Otitis media due to Mycoplasma bovis in calves. ·Sporadic porcine abortion due to Nocardia species. ·Spotty liver disease in hens. These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for September 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:26769810

  5. Clostridium difficile recurrences in Stockholm.

    PubMed

    Sandell, Staffan; Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Jorup-Rönström, Christina; Ellström, Kristina; Nord, Carl Erik; Weintraub, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    Sixty-eight hospital-admitted patients with a first episode of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) were included and followed up during 1 year. Faeces samples were collected at 1, 2, 6 and 12 months after inclusion and analyzed for the presence of C. difficile toxin B, genes for toxin A, toxin B, binary toxin and TcdC deletion by PCR. All strains were also PCR-ribotyped and the MICs of the isolates were determined against eight antimicrobial agents. In 68 patients initially included, antibiotics, clinical signs and co-morbidities were analyzed and 56 were evaluable for recurrences. The mean number of different antibiotics given during 3 months prior to inclusion was 2.6 (range 0-6). Six patients had not received any antibiotics and three of them had diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease. Thirty-two patients (57%) had either a microbiological or clinical recurrence, 16 of whom had clinical recurrences that were confirmed microbiologically (13, 23%) or unconfirmed by culture (3, 5%). Twenty-nine patients were positive in at least one of the follow-up tests, 16 had the same ribotype in follow-up tests, i.e. relapse, and 13 a different ribotype, i.e., reinfection. Most common ribotypes were 078/126, 020, 023, 026, 014/077, 001 and 005. No strain of ribotype 027 was found. Strains ribotype 078/126 and 023 were positive for binary toxin and were the strains most prone to cause recurrence. All strains were sensitive to vancomycin and metronidazole. Patients with recurrences were significantly older (p = 0.02) and all patients had a high burden of comorbidities, which could explain the high fatality rate, 26 (38%) patients died during the 1-year follow-up. PMID:26802875

  6. Isolating and Purifying Clostridium difficile Spores.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Adrianne N; McBride, Shonna M

    2016-01-01

    The ability for the obligate anaerobe, Clostridium difficile to form a metabolically dormant spore is critical for the survival of this organism outside of the host. This spore form is resistant to a myriad of environmental stresses, including heat, desiccation, and exposure to disinfectants and antimicrobials. These intrinsic properties of spores allow C. difficile to survive long-term in an oxygenated environment, to be easily transmitted from host-to-host, and to persist within the host following antibiotic treatment. Because of the importance of the spore form to the C. difficile life cycle and treatment and prevention of C. difficile infection (CDI), the isolation and purification of spores are necessary to study the mechanisms of sporulation and germination, investigate spore properties and resistances, and for use in animal models of CDI. Here we provide basic protocols, in vitro growth conditions, and additional considerations for purifying C. difficile spores for a variety of downstream applications. PMID:27507337

  7. Current State of Clostridium difficile Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Anilrudh A.; Johnson, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports of reduced response to standard therapies for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and the risk for recurrent CDI that is common with all currently available treatment agents have posed a significant challenge to clinicians. Current recommendations include metronidazole for treatment of mild to moderate CDI and vancomycin for severe CDI. Results from small clinical trials suggest that nitazoxanide and teicoplanin may be alternative options to standard therapies, whereas rifaximin has demonstrated success in uncontrolled trials for the management of multiple recurrences. Anecdotal reports have also suggested that tigecycline might be useful as an adjunctive agent for the treatment of severe complicated CDI. Reports of resistance will likely limit the clinical use of fusidic acid and bacitracin and, possibly, rifaximin if resistance to this agent becomes widespread. Treatment of patients with multiple CDI recurrences and those with severe complicated CDI is based on limited clinical evidence, and new treatments or strategies are needed. PMID:22752868

  8. Genomics of Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Chapeton-Montes, Diana; Plourde, Lucile; Speck, Denis; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Genomic information about Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of the tetanus disease, is scarce. The genome of strain E88, a strain used in vaccine production, was sequenced about 10 years ago. One additional genome (strain 12124569) has recently been released. Here we report three new genomes of C. tetani and describe major differences among all five C. tetani genomes. They all harbor tetanus-toxin-encoding plasmids that contain highly conserved genes for TeNT (tetanus toxin), TetR (transcriptional regulator of TeNT) and ColT (collagenase), but substantially differ in other plasmid regions. The chromosomes share a large core genome that contains about 85% of all genes of a given chromosome. The non-core chromosome comprises mainly prophage-like genomic regions and genes encoding environmental interaction and defense functions (e.g. surface proteins, restriction-modification systems, toxin-antitoxin systems, CRISPR/Cas systems) and other fitness functions (e.g. transport systems, metabolic activities). This new genome information will help to assess the level of genome plasticity of the species C. tetani and provide the basis for detailed comparative studies. PMID:25638019

  9. [Toxins of Clostridium perfringens].

    PubMed

    Morris, W E; Fernández-Miyakawa, M E

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic gram-positive spore-forming bacillus. It is one of the pathogens with larger distribution in the environment; it can be isolated from soil and water samples, which also belongs to the intestinal flora of animals and humans. However, on some occasions it can act as an opportunistic pathogen, causing diseases such as gas gangrene, enterotoxemia in sheep and goats and lamb dysentery, among others. In human beings, it is associated to diseases such as food poisoning, necrotic enterocolitis of the infant and necrotic enteritis or pigbel in Papua-New Guinea tribes. The renewed interest existing nowadays in the study of C. perfringens as a veterinarian and human pathogen, together with the advance of molecular biology, had enabled science to have deeper knowledge of the biology and pathology of these bacteria. In this review, we discuss and update the principal aspects of C. perfringens intestinal pathology, in terms of the toxins with major medical relevance at present. PMID:20085190

  10. Isolation of Clostridium thermocellum auxotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, B.S.; Gomez, R.F.

    1982-02-01

    The conversion of biomass of fuels and chemical feedstocks by microbial fermentation offers the potential of solving two of today's important problems: waste accumulation and exhaustion of fossil fuels. Microorganisms with the capabilities of converting biomass components such as cellulos and hemicellulose to chemicals and fuels in a single step are of particular interest. One such microorganism is Clostridium thermocellum, a thermophilic anaerobe which degrades cellulose to ethanol and organic acids. For efficient industrial use, the cellulolytic capacity of this strain must be improved by genetic means. Spontaneous and UV irradiation-induced auxotrophic mutants of Clostridium thermocellum, an anaerobic cellulolytic thermophile, were isolated after penicillin enrichment in a chemically defined medium.

  11. Clostridium perfringens type A–E toxin plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John C.; Theoret, James R.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell. PMID:25283728

  12. [Characteristics of Clostridium tetani and laboratory diagnosis of tetanus].

    PubMed

    Smietańska, Karolina; Rokosz-Chudziak, Natalia; Rastawicki, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    The causative agent of tetanus is the obligate anaerobic bacterium--Clostridium tetani. These bacteria form endospores that are able to survive long periods of exposure to air and other adverse environmental conditions. Infection generally occurs through wound contamination. We can distinguish several forms of tetanus: generalized, local and neonatal. Diagnosis of tetanus is based primarily on the patient's clinical symptoms (muscle cramps, painful back muscle spasms, generalized contractions of the arcuate curvature of the body) as well as on microbiological diagnosis. This article is a brief review of C. tetani and diagnosis of infections caused by these organisms in humans. PMID:24730217

  13. Clostridium difficile spore biology: sporulation, germination, and spore structural proteins

    PubMed Central

    Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Shen, Aimee; Sorg, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, spore-forming obligate anaerobe and a major nosocomial pathogen of world-wide concern. Due to its strict anaerobic requirements, the infectious and transmissible morphotype is the dormant spore. In susceptible patients, C. difficile spores germinate in the colon to form the vegetative cells that initiate Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). During CDI, C. difficile induces a sporulation pathway that produces more spores; these spores are responsible for the persistence of C. difficile in patients and horizontal transmission between hospitalized patients. While important to the C. difficile lifecycle, the C. difficile spore proteome is poorly conserved when compared to members of the Bacillus genus. Further, recent studies have revealed significant differences between C. difficile and B. subtilis at the level of sporulation, germination and spore coat and exosporium morphogenesis. In this review, the regulation of the sporulation and germination pathways and the morphogenesis of the spore coat and exosporium will be discussed. PMID:24814671

  14. Clostridium perfringens in animal disease: a review of current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Niilo, L

    1980-05-01

    The diseases caused by various types of Clostridium perfringens are critically reviewed in the light of current knowledge. Particular emphasis is placed on information concerning these diseases in Canadian livestock. There are two etiologically clearly-defined acute C. perfringens diseases recognized in Canada: hemorrhagic enteritis of the new born calf, caused by C. perfringens type C, and enterotoxemia of sheep, caused by type D. Clostridium perfringens type A may play a role as a secondary pathological agent in various disease conditions, such as necrotic enteritis of chickens. It may also cause wound infections and may provide a source for human food poisoning outbreaks. There appears to be a considerable lack of knowledge regarding the distribution of C. perfringens types, their pathogenesis, diagnosis and the incidence of diseases caused by this organism. PMID:6253040

  15. Nosocomial outbreak of Clostridium difficile diarrhea in a pediatric service.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, A; Merckx, J; Ancelle, T; Pron, B; Abachin, E; Barbut, F; Larzul, J; Rigault, P; Berche, P; Gaillard, J L

    1997-12-01

    An outbreak of nosocomial diarrhea that occurred in a pediatric orthopedic service between 1 December 1993 and 15 April 1994 is reported. A total of 37 patients (mean age, 9.6 years; range, 2 months-19.3 years) were involved in the outbreak, including six patients with bacteriologically documented Clostridium difficile infection. A multivariate analysis identified lincomycin treatment for at least three days as the only significant risk factor. Stool samples from four asymptomatic patients were also positive for Clostridium difficile and its cytotoxins. Isolates from all patients belonged to serogroup C, were highly resistant to lincomycin, and exhibited the same restriction pattern by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The outbreak ended after treatment with lincomycin was discontinued and hygiene control measures were implemented. PMID:9495676

  16. Electrotransformation of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Tyurin, Michael V; Desai, Sunil G; Lynd, Lee R

    2004-02-01

    Electrotransformation of several strains of Clostridium thermocellum was achieved using plasmid pIKm1 with selection based on resistance to erythromycin and lincomycin. A custom-built pulse generator was used to apply a square 10-ms pulse to an electrotransformation cuvette consisting of a modified centrifuge tube. Transformation was verified by recovery of the shuttle plasmid pIKm1 from presumptive transformants of C. thermocellum with subsequent PCR specific to the mls gene on the plasmid, as well as by retransformation of Escherichia coli. Optimization carried out with strain DSM 1313 increased transformation efficiencies from <1 to (2.2 +/- 0.5) x 10(5) transformants per micro g of plasmid DNA. Factors conducive to achieving high transformation efficiencies included optimized periods of incubation both before and after electric pulse application, chilling during cell collection and washing, subculture in the presence of isoniacin prior to electric pulse application, a custom-built cuvette embedded in an ice block during pulse application, use of a high (25-kV/cm) field strength, and induction of the mls gene before plating the cells on selective medium. The protocol and preferred conditions developed for strain DSM 1313 resulted in transformation efficiencies of (5.0 +/- 1.8) x 10(4) transformants per micro g of plasmid DNA for strain ATCC 27405 and approximately 1 x 10(3) transformants per micro g of plasmid DNA for strains DSM 4150 and 7072. Cell viability under optimal conditions was approximately 50% of that of controls not exposed to an electrical pulse. Dam methylation had a beneficial but modest (7-fold for strain ATCC 27405; 40-fold for strain DSM 1313) effect on transformation efficiency. The effect of isoniacin was also strain specific. The results reported here provide for the first time a gene transfer method functional in C. thermocellum that is suitable for molecular manipulations involving either the introduction of genes associated with foreign

  17. Differential Immunodetection of Toxin B from Highly Virulent Clostridium difficile BI/NAP-1/027

    PubMed Central

    Song, Linan; Zhao, Mingwei; Duffy, David C.; Chen, Xinhua; Sambol, Susan P.; Gerding, Dale N.; Kelly, Ciarán P.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a simple immunoassay capable of differentially detecting toxin B from highly virulent strains of Clostridium difficile (BI/NAP-1/027) in stool. This assay can simultaneously confirm the presence of in vivo toxin production and provide strain-related information relevant to infection control epidemiology and disease prognosis. PMID:25716449

  18. Novel molecular type of Clostridium difficile in neonatal pigs, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Squire, Michele M; Carter, Glen P; Mackin, Kate E; Chakravorty, Anjana; Norén, Torbjörn; Elliott, Briony; Lyras, Dena; Riley, Thomas V

    2013-05-01

    Clostridium difficile causes neonatal enteritis in piglets; strains of PCR ribotype 078 are most commonly identified. We investigated C. difficile prevalence in piglets in Australia and isolated a novel strain with a unique pathogenicity locus. In a mouse infection model, this strain produced more weight loss than did a ribotype 078 strain. PMID:23697508

  19. Novel Molecular Type of Clostridium difficile in Neonatal Pigs, Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Squire, Michele M.; Carter, Glen P.; Mackin, Kate E.; Chakravorty, Anjana; Norén, Torbjörn; Elliott, Briony; Lyras, Dena

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile causes neonatal enteritis in piglets; strains of PCR ribotype 078 are most commonly identified. We investigated C. difficile prevalence in piglets in Australia and isolated a novel strain with a unique pathogenicity locus. In a mouse infection model, this strain produced more weight loss than did a ribotype 078 strain. PMID:23697508

  20. Modifications of Commercial Toxigenic Clostridium difficile PCR Resulting in Improved Economy and Workflow Efficiency▿

    PubMed Central

    Munson, Erik; Bilbo, Dorothy; Paul, Mary; Napierala, Maureen; Hryciuk, Jeanne E.

    2011-01-01

    Expense inherent to molecular diagnostics may prevent laboratories from utilizing real-time PCR for Clostridium difficile infection. Frozen master mix and overnight aliquot modifications of the BD GeneOhm Cdiff assay failed to impact performance indices compared to the package insert protocol (P ≥ 0.31), provided accurate results, and decreased reagent expenditure. PMID:21450967

  1. Innate immune response to Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima in necrotic enteritis model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have investigated various aspects of host immune responses using a disease model for necrotic enteritis (NE) in which the severity of lesions produced by Clostridium perfringens was increased, and the growth performance of broiler chickens was decreased by prior infection with Eimeria maxima. Qu...

  2. High colonization rate and prolonged shedding of Clostridium difficile in pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Samuel R; Dolan, Susan A; West, Kelly; Dantes, Raymund B; Epson, Erin; Friedman, Deborah; Littlehorn, Cynthia A; Arms, Lesley E; Walton, Karen; Servetar, Ellen; Frank, Daniel N; Kotter, Cassandra V; Dowell, Elaine; Gould, Carolyn V; Hilden, Joanne M; Todd, James K

    2014-08-01

    Surveillance testing for Clostridium difficile among pediatric oncology patients identified stool colonization in 29% of patients without gastrointestinal symptoms and in 55% of patients with prior C. difficile infection (CDI). A high prevalence of C. difficile colonization and diarrhea complicates the diagnosis of CDI in this population. PMID:24785235

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium difficile Belonging to Ribotype 018 and Sequence Type 17.

    PubMed

    Riccobono, E; Di Pilato, V; Della Malva, N; Meini, S; Ciraolo, F; Torricelli, F; Rossolini, G M

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, belonging to ribotype 018 (RT018), is one of the most prevalent genotypes circulating in hospital settings in Italy. Here, we report the draft genome of C. difficile CD8-15 belonging to RT018, isolated from a patient with fatal C. difficile-associated infection. PMID:27587821

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium difficile Belonging to Ribotype 018 and Sequence Type 17

    PubMed Central

    Riccobono, E.; Di Pilato, V.; Della Malva, N.; Meini, S.; Ciraolo, F.; Torricelli, F.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, belonging to ribotype 018 (RT018), is one of the most prevalent genotypes circulating in hospital settings in Italy. Here, we report the draft genome of C. difficile CD8-15 belonging to RT018, isolated from a patient with fatal C. difficile-associated infection. PMID:27587821

  5. Prevalence and genotypic characteristics of Clostridium difficle in a closed and integrated human and swine population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, increases in cases of community-acquired Clostridium difficile have led researchers to explore additional sources of infection. The objective of this study was to compare C. difficile isolated from a closed population of both humans and swine to investigate possible food safety and occupa...

  6. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis

    PubMed Central

    Essenmacher, Alex C.; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  7. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis.

    PubMed

    Essenmacher, Alex C; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  8. [Toxins of Clostridium perfringens as a natural and bioterroristic threats].

    PubMed

    Omernik, Andrzej; Płusa, Tadeusz

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is absolutely anaerobic rod-shaped, sporeforming bacterium. The morbidity is connected with producing toxins. Depending on the type of toxin produced Clostridium perfringens can be divided into five serotypes:A-E. Under natural conditions, this bacterium is responsible for local outbreaks of food poisoning associated with eating contaminated food which which was improperly heat treated. Some countries with lower economic level are endemic foci of necrotizing enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens. The bacterium is also a major cause of gas gangrene. It is a disease, associated with wound infection, with potentially fatal prognosis in the case of treatment's delays. In the absence of early radical surgery, antibiotic therapy and (if available) hyperbaric treatment leads to the spread of toxins in the body causing shock, coma and death. Due to the force of produced toxins is a pathogen that poses a substrate for the production of biological weapons. It could potentially be used to induce outbreaks of food poisoning and by missiles contamination by spore lead to increased morbidity of gas gangrene in injured soldiers. C. perfringens types B and D produce epsilon toxin considered to be the third most powerful bacterial toxin. Because of the ability to disperse the toxin as an aerosol and a lack of methods of treatment and prevention of poisoning possible factors it is a potential tool for bioterrorism It is advisable to continue research into vaccines and treatments for poisoning toxins of C. perfringens. PMID:26449576

  9. A prediction model for Clostridium difficile recurrence

    PubMed Central

    LaBarbera, Francis D.; Nikiforov, Ivan; Parvathenani, Arvin; Pramil, Varsha; Gorrepati, Subhash

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a growing problem in the community and hospital setting. Its incidence has been on the rise over the past two decades, and it is quickly becoming a major concern for the health care system. High rate of recurrence is one of the major hurdles in the successful treatment of C. difficile infection. There have been few studies that have looked at patterns of recurrence. The studies currently available have shown a number of risk factors associated with C. difficile recurrence (CDR); however, there is little consensus on the impact of most of the identified risk factors. Methods Our study was a retrospective chart review of 198 patients diagnosed with CDI via Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) from January 2009 to Jun 2013. In our study, we decided to use a machine learning algorithm called the Random Forest (RF) to analyze all of the factors proposed to be associated with CDR. This model is capable of making predictions based on a large number of variables, and has outperformed numerous other models and statistical methods. Results We came up with a model that was able to accurately predict the CDR with a sensitivity of 83.3%, specificity of 63.1%, and area under curve of 82.6%. Like other similar studies that have used the RF model, we also had very impressive results. Conclusions We hope that in the future, machine learning algorithms, such as the RF, will see a wider application. PMID:25656667

  10. Action of nitroheterocyclic drugs against Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Adhikari, Sudip; Hurdle, Julian G.

    2014-01-01

    The nitroheterocyclic classes of drugs have a long history of use in treating anaerobic infections, as exemplified by metronidazole as a first-line treatment for mild-to-moderate Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Since direct comparisons of the three major classes of nitroheterocyclic drugs (i.e. nitroimidazole, nitazoxanide and nitrofurans) and nitrosating agents against C. difficile are under-examined, in this study their actions against C. difficile were compared. Results show that whilst transient resistance occurs to metronidazole and nitazoxanide, stable resistance arises to nitrofurans upon serial passage. All compounds killed C. difficile at high concentrations in addition to the host defence nitrosating agent S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). This suggests that GSNO killing of C. difficile contributes to its efficacy in murine CDI. Although nitric oxide production could not be detected for the nitroheterocyclic drugs, the cellular response to metronidazole and nitrofurans has some overlap with the response to GSNO, causing significant upregulation of the hybrid-cluster protein Hcp that responds to nitrosative stress. These findings provide new insights into the action of nitroheterocyclic drugs against C. difficile. PMID:25129314

  11. Clostridium perfringens type A enteritis in blue and yellow macaw (Ara ararauna).

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Marta Brito; Torres, Luciana Neves; Mesquita, Ramon Gomes; Ampuero, Fernanda; Cunha, Marcos Paulo Vieira; Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana Porfida; Ferreira, Antonio José Piantino; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Moreno, Andrea Micke; Knöbl, Terezinha

    2014-12-01

    This study describes an outbreak of necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens type A in captive macaws (Ara ararauna). Two psittacine birds presented a history of prostration and died 18 hr after manifestation of clinical signs. The necropsy findings and histopathologic lesions were indicative of necrotic enteritis. Microbiologic assays resulted in the growth of large gram-positive bacilli that were identified as C. perfringens. PCR was used to identify clostridium toxinotypes and confirmed the identification of isolated strains as C pefringens type A, positive to gene codifying beta 2 toxin. The infection source and predisposing factors could not be ascertained. PMID:25619013

  12. Clostridium perfringens in retail chicken.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Victoria J; Poppe, Cornelis; Parreira, Valeria R; Jiang, Yan-Fen; Reid-Smith, Richard; Prescott, John F

    2010-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens isolates were recovered by enrichment from retail grocery chicken samples (n = 88) in Ontario, Canada, with one sample per site. The gene associated with necrotic enteritis in chickens, netB, was found in 21% of the isolates. The tpeL gene was found in 2% and the cpb2 gene in 68% (95% "atypical" genes) of isolates. This study suggests that netB-positive C. perfringens can reach people through retail chicken. PMID:19961943

  13. Challenges for standardization of Clostridium difficile typing methods.

    PubMed

    Huber, Charlotte A; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V; Paterson, David L

    2013-09-01

    Typing of Clostridium difficile facilitates understanding of the epidemiology of the infection. Some evaluations have shown that certain strain types (for example, ribotype 027) are more virulent than others and are associated with worse clinical outcomes. Although restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis have been widely used in the past, PCR ribotyping is the current method of choice for typing of C. difficile. However, global standardization of ribotyping results is urgently needed. Whole-genome sequencing of C. difficile has the potential to provide even greater epidemiologic information than ribotyping. PMID:23784128

  14. Clostridium difficile: the anaerobe that made the grade.

    PubMed

    Brazier, Jon S

    2012-04-01

    Unlike other anaerobic bacteria of clinical importance, Clostridium difficile has managed to enter into the realm of public awareness. Following the trail blazed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), C. difficile has made the transition from being an obscure anaerobic bacterium, mainly of interest to specialist anaerobic microbiologists, to that of an infamous "superbug" responsible for outbreaks of hospital-acquired infection that commonly result in serious disease and death. This report picks out key moments, particularly in the UK, which tracked the rise in both the public and political awareness of this organism. PMID:22293217

  15. Acute aortic dissection caused by Clostridium septicum aortitis.

    PubMed

    Eplinius, Franziska; Hädrich, Carsten

    2014-11-01

    Clostridium septicum aortitis is a rare cause of aortic dissection. So far, only 28 cases have been described in literature before. Most of these cases occurred in elderly patients and an association to colonic neoplasms and/or atherosclerosis has been witnessed frequently. Here we report the case of a 32-year-old man with fatal aortic dissection due to aortic infection with C. septicum. Beside a case of a 22-year-old man who died of aortic dissection due to C. septicum aortitis this is the second case of C. septicum aortitis in a young individual with no signs of colonic neoplasms or atherosclerosis. PMID:25242573

  16. First Australian isolation of epidemic Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027.

    PubMed

    Riley, Thomas V; Thean, Sarah; Hool, Graham; Golledge, Clayton L

    2009-06-15

    We report the first isolation in Australia of a hypervirulent epidemic strain of Clostridium difficile, PCR ribotype 027. It was isolated from a 43-year-old woman with a permanent ileostomy, who appears to have been infected while travelling in the United States. The isolate was positive for toxin A, toxin B and binary toxin, and resistant to fluoroquinolone antimicrobials, and had characteristic deletions in the tcdC gene. All diagnostic laboratories and health care facilities in Australia should now be on high alert for this organism. PMID:19527210

  17. Type IV pili promote early biofilm formation by Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Maldarelli, Grace A; Piepenbrink, Kurt H; Scott, Alison J; Freiberg, Jeffrey A; Song, Yang; Achermann, Yvonne; Ernst, Robert K; Shirtliff, Mark E; Sundberg, Eric J; Donnenberg, Michael S; von Rosenvinge, Erik C

    2016-08-01

    Increasing morbidity and mortality from Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) present an enormous challenge to healthcare systems. Clostridium difficile express type IV pili (T4P), but their function remains unclear. Many chronic and recurrent bacterial infections result from biofilms, surface-associated bacterial communities embedded in an extracellular matrix. CDI may be biofilm mediated; T4P are important for biofilm formation in a number of organisms. We evaluate the role of T4P in C. difficile biofilm formation using RNA sequencing, mutagenesis and complementation of the gene encoding the major pilin pilA1, and microscopy. RNA sequencing demonstrates that, in comparison to other growth phenotypes, C. difficile growing in a biofilm has a distinct RNA expression profile, with significant differences in T4P gene expression. Microscopy of T4P-expressing and T4P-deficient strains suggests that T4P play an important role in early biofilm formation. A non-piliated pilA1 mutant forms an initial biofilm of significantly reduced mass and thickness in comparison to the wild type. Complementation of the pilA1 mutant strain leads to formation of a biofilm which resembles the wild-type biofilm. These findings suggest that T4P play an important role in early biofilm formation. Novel strategies for confronting biofilm infections are emerging; our data suggest that similar strategies should be investigated in CDI. PMID:27369898

  18. Phylogenetic analysis and PCR detection of Clostridium chauvoei, Clostridium haemolyticum, Clostridium novyi types A and B, and Clostridium septicum based on the flagellin gene.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yoshimasa; Kojima, Akemi; Aoki, Hiroshi; Ogikubo, Yasuaki; Takikawa, Noriyasu; Tamura, Yutaka

    2002-05-01

    The flagellin genes (fliC) of Clostridium chauvoei, Clostridium haemolyticum, Clostridium novyi types A and B, and Clostridium septicum were analysed by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. The five Clostridium species have at least two copies of the flagellin gene (fliC) arranged in tandem on the chromosome. The deduced N- and C-terminal aminoacid sequences of the flagellin proteins (FliCs) of these clostridia are well conserved but their central region aminoacid sequences are not. Phylogenic analysis based on the N-terminal aminoacid sequence of the FliC protein revealed that these clostridia, which belong to Clostridium 16S rDNA phylogenic cluster I (), are more closely related to Bacillus subtilis than to Clostridium difficile, which belongs to the cluster XI. Moreover, a multiplex polymerase reaction (PCR) system based on the fliC sequence was developed to rapidly identify C. chauvoei, C. haemolyticum, C. novyi types A and B, and C. septicum. PCR of each Clostridium amplified a species-specific band. The multiplex PCR system may be useful for rapid identification of pathogenic clostridia. PMID:11900959

  19. Clostridium botulinum type E occurs and grows in the alga Cladophora glomerata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, M.N.; Whitman, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, massive avian die-offs from Clostridium botulinum type E infection have occurred in the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) area of Lake Michigan. These outbreaks have been coincidental with massive blooms of the green algae Cladophora, mostly Cladophora glomerata. We tested the hypothesis that Clostridium botulinum type E can grow under suitable conditions in these algal mats. In a lab mesocosm study, Cladophora from four outbreak-impacted beaches from SLBE were compared with four unimpacted beaches in the Milwaukee–Racine area for bontE gene of Clostridium botulinum. Frequency of the bontE gene was higher after incubation (25 °C for up to 6 weeks) of Cladophora from impacted vs. the unimpacted area. Since no type E gene was detected initially in Cladophora from any of the eight locations, we infer that the increased occurrence of type E gene arose from spore germination or vegetative Clostridium growth within the existing algal mats of SLBE. Moreover, we found that the congener Clostridium perfringens readily grows in mesocosms containing Cladophora.

  20. [Clostridium tetani isolated from patients with systemic tetanus].

    PubMed

    Onuki, Tomoyo; Nihonyanagi, Shin; Nakamura, Masaki; Ide, Toshimitsu; Hattori, Jun; Kanoh, Yuhsaku; Soma, Kazui

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium tetani is widely distributed in ground or mud, especially in field and pond-shore surface layers. C. tetani is rarely isolated from specimens of patients with tetanus, and is generally diagnosed based on clinical symptoms such as trismus or general tonic spasms. This means that positive C. tetani infection is rarely diagnosed bacterially. Using gram straing, we identified C. tetani in specimens from patients suspected of C. tetani infection brought to the Kitasato University Hospital emergency center. Rapid gram staining information in the bacteriology laboratory is expected to improve recovery from C. tetani infection. It is therefore necessary to ensure clinical specimen quality control, and to keep standard strains of rare bacteria for isolation and identification. PMID:23484376

  1. Clostridium perfringens Sepsis and Fetal Demise after Genetic Amniocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Nancy W.; Mackeen, A. Dhanya; Weiner, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a rare cause of intrauterine infection. There have been five case reports concerning infection associated with invasive procedures. We report a woman who underwent a genetic amniocentesis due to her history of chronic granulomatous disease. She presented to the hospital ∼38 hours after the amniocentesis complaining of fever and chills. Due to acute decompensation, she underwent an emergent dilatation and evacuation. During her stay, blood cultures came back positive for C. perfringens. Gradual improvement with intensive monitoring led to hospital discharge 4 days after the procedure. Uterine infection due to C. perfringens leading to maternal sepsis is associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. Our patient was able to survive without a hysterectomy due to the rapid administration of antibiotics and surgical intervention while being evaluated. PMID:23705080

  2. Infection.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Gaurav; Nagornaya, Natalya; Post, M Judith D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is useful in the diagnosis and management of infections of the central nervous system. Typically, imaging findings at the outset of the disease are subtle and nonspecific, but they often evolve to more definite imaging patterns in a few days, with less rapidity than for stroke but faster than for neoplastic lesions. This timing is similar to that of noninfectious inflammatory brain disease, such as multiple sclerosis. Fortunately, imaging patterns help to distinguish the two kinds of processes. Other than for sarcoidosis, the meninges are seldom involved in noninfectious inflammation; in contrast, many infectious processes involve the meninges, which then enhance with contrast on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, brain infection causes a vast array of imaging patterns. Although CT is useful when hemorrhage or calcification is suspected or bony detail needs to be determined, MRI is the imaging modality of choice in the investigation of intracranial infections. Imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging help in accurately depicting the location and characterizing pyogenic infections and are particularly useful in differentiating bacterial infections from other etiologies. Susceptibility-weighted imaging is extremely useful for the detection of hemorrhage. Although MR spectroscopy findings can frequently be nonspecific, certain conditions such as bacterial abscesses show a relatively specific spectral pattern and are useful in diagnosing and constituting immediate therapy. In this chapter we review first the imaging patterns associated with involvement of various brain structures, such as the epidural and subdural spaces, the meninges, the brain parenchyma, and the ventricles. Involvement of these regions is illustrated with bacterial infections. Next we illustrate the patterns associated with viral and prion diseases, followed by mycobacterial and fungal infections, to conclude with a review of imaging findings

  3. Clostridium difficile in the Long-Term Care Facility: Prevention and Management

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Robin L. P.; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2014-01-01

    Residents of long-term care facilities are at high risk for Clostridium difficile infection due to frequent antibiotic exposure in a population already rendered vulnerable to infection due to advanced age, multiple comorbid conditions and communal living conditions. Moreover, asymptomatic carriage of toxigenic C. difficile and recurrent infections are prevalent in this population. Here, we discuss epidemiology and management of C. difficile infection among residents of long-term care facilities. Also, recognizing that both the population and culture differs significantly from that of hospitals, we also address prevention strategies specific to LTCFs. PMID:25685657

  4. Secretome analysis of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Boetzkes, Alexander; Felkel, Katharina Wiebke; Zeiser, Johannes; Jochim, Nelli; Just, Ingo; Pich, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile causes infections ranging from mild C. difficile-associated diarrhea to severe pseudomembranous colitis. Since 2003 new hypervirulent C. difficile strains (PCR ribotype 027) emerged characterized by a dramatically increased mortality. The secretomes of the three C. difficile strains CDR20291, CD196, and CD630 were analyzed and compared. Proteins were separated and analyzed by means of SDS--PAGE and LC-MS. MS data were analyzed using Mascot and proteins were checked for export signals with SecretomeP and SignalP. LC-MS analysis revealed 158 different proteins in the supernatant of C. difficile. Most of the identified proteins originate from the cytoplasm. Thirty-two proteins in CDR20291, 36 in CD196 and 26 in CD630 were identified to be secreted by C. difficile strains. Those were mainly S-layer proteins, substrate-binding proteins of ABC-transporters, cell wall hydrolases, pilin and unknown hypothetical proteins. Toxin A and toxin B were identified after growth in brain heart infusion medium using immunological techniques. The ADP-ribosyltransferase-binding component protein, which is a part of the binary toxin CDT, was only identified in the hypervirulent ribotype 027 strains. Further proteins that are secreted specifically by hypervirulent strains were identified. PMID:22398929

  5. Characterization of Functional Prophages in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Sekulović, Ognjen; Fortier, Louis-Charles

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are present in almost, if not all ecosystems. Some of these bacterial viruses are present as latent "prophages," either integrated within the chromosome of their host, or as episomal DNAs. Since prophages are ubiquitous throughout the bacterial world, there has been a sustained interest in trying to understand their contribution to the biology of their host. Clostridium difficile is no exception to that rule and with the recent release of hundreds of bacterial genome sequences, there has been a growing interest in trying to identify and classify these prophages. Besides their identification in bacterial genomes, there is also growing interest in determining the functionality of C. difficile prophages, i.e., their capacity to escape their host and reinfect a different strain, thereby promoting genomic evolution and horizontal transfer of genes through transduction, for example of antibiotic resistance genes. There is also some interest in using therapeutic phages to fight C. difficile infections.The objective of this chapter is to share with the broader C. difficile research community the expertise we developed in the study of C. difficile temperate phages. In this chapter, we describe a general "pipeline" comprising a series of experiments that we use in our lab to identify, induce, isolate, propagate, and characterize prophages. Our aim is to provide readers with the necessary basic tools to start studying C. difficile phages. PMID:27507339

  6. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Nicole M; Rutherford, Stacey A; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A; Lisher, John P; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P; Spiller, Benjamin W; Melnyk, Roman A; Lacy, D Borden

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon(1,2). The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host(3,4). The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics. PMID:27571750

  7. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon1,2. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host3,4. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics. PMID:27512603

  8. Clostridium difficile Is an Autotrophic Bacterial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Köpke, Michael; Straub, Melanie; Dürre, Peter

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection showed a dramatic increase in incidence and virulence in the Northern hemisphere. This incessantly challenging disease is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea and became life-threatening especially among elderly people. It is generally assumed that all human bacterial pathogens are heterotrophic organisms, being either saccharolytic or proteolytic. So far, this has not been questioned as colonization of the human gut gives access to an environment, rich in organic nutrients. Here, we present data that C. difficile (both clinical and rumen isolates) is also able to grow on CO2+H2 as sole carbon and energy source, thus representing the first identified autotrophic bacterial pathogen. Comparison of several different strains revealed high conservation of genes for autotrophic growth and showed that the ability to use gas mixtures for growth decreases or is lost upon prolonged culturing under heterotrophic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of C. difficile (heterotrophic growth on various substrates as well as autotrophy) could allow the organism in the gut to avoid competition by niche differentiation and contribute to its survival when stressed or in unfavorable conditions that cause death to other bacteria. This may be an important trait for the pathogenicity of C. difficile. PMID:23626782

  9. Regulation of toxin synthesis in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Connan, Chloé; Denève, Cécile; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R

    2013-12-01

    Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins are structurally and functionally related proteins that are potent inhibitors of neuroexocytosis. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) associates with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs) to form complexes of various sizes, whereas tetanus toxin (TeNT) does not form any complex. The BoNT and ANTP genes are clustered in a DNA segment called the botulinum locus, which has different genomic localization (chromosome, plasmid, phage) in the various Clostridium botulinum types and subtypes. The botulinum locus genes are organized in two polycistronic operons (ntnh-bont and ha/orfX operons) transcribed in opposite orientations. A gene called botR lying between the two operons in C. botulinum type A encodes an alternative sigma factor which regulates positively the synthesis of BoNT and ANTPs at the late exponential growth phase and beginning of the stationary phase. In Clostridium tetani, the gene located immediately upstream of tent encodes a positive regulatory protein, TetR, which is related to BotR. C. botulinum and C. tetani genomes contain several two-component systems and predicted regulatory orphan genes. In C. botulinum type A, four two-component systems have been found that positively or negatively regulate the synthesis of BoNT and ANTPs independently of BotR/A. The synthesis of neurotoxin in Clostridia seems to be under the control of complex network of regulation. PMID:23769754

  10. Effective Sequestration of Clostridium difficile Protein Toxins by Calcium Aluminosilicate

    PubMed Central

    Pokusaeva, Karina; Carpenter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the etiologic agent responsible for C. difficile infection. Toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB) are nearly indispensable virulence factors for Clostridium difficile pathogenesis. Given the toxin-centric mechanism by which C. difficile pathogenesis occurs, the selective sequestration with neutralization of TcdA and TcdB by nonantibiotic agents represents a novel mode of action to prevent or treat C. difficile-associated disease. In this preclinical study, we used quantitative enzyme immunoassays to determine the extent by which a novel drug, calcium aluminosilicate uniform particle size nonswelling M-1 (CAS UPSN M-1), is capable of sequestering TcdA and TcdB in vitro. The following major findings were derived from the present study. First, we show that CAS UPSN M-1 efficiently sequestered both TcdA and TcdB to undetectable levels. Second, we show that CAS UPSN M-1's affinity for TcdA is greater than its affinity for TcdB. Last, we show that CAS UPSN M-1 exhibited limited binding affinity for nontarget proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that ingestion of calcium aluminosilicate might protect gastrointestinal tissues from antibiotic- or chemotherapy-induced C. difficile infection by neutralizing the cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of luminal TcdA and TcdB. PMID:26149988

  11. Prospects for a vaccine for Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Kyne, L; Kelly, C P

    1998-09-01

    Clostridium difficile diarrhoea and colitis is a new disease that is attributable to broad spectrum antibiotic therapy. During the past 2 decades C. difficile has become one of the most common nosocomial pathogens in the developed world. As changing demographics create an increasingly elderly population and the use of broad spectrum antimicrobials continues to expand, C. difficile is likely to become increasingly problematic. Disease caused by this organism is caused by the inflammatory actions of its 2 toxins, A and B, on the intestinal mucosa. Human antibody responses to these toxins are common in the general population and in patients with C. difficile-associated disease. There is substantial, albeit inconclusive, evidence to indicate that antitoxin antibodies provide protection against severe, prolonged or recurrent C. difficile diarrhoea. Immunity induced by oral or parenteral passive administration of antibody is protective in animal models of C. difficile infection. In humans, intravenous passive immunisation with pooled human immunoglobulin has been successful in the treatment of recurrent and severe C. difficile colitis. Human trials of oral passive immunotherapy with bovine immunoglobulin therapy are in progress. Formalin-inactivated culture filtrate from toxigenic C. difficile, as well as purified and inactivated toxins, have been used to successfully immunise animals. Similar preparations are under investigation as possible human vaccines. Antibiotic therapy is effective in treating most individual patients with C. difficile diarrhoea, but has proven ineffective in reducing the overall incidence of nosocomial infection. Active immunisation is probably the most promising approach to long term control of this difficult iatrogenic disease. PMID:18020593

  12. Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum strain deficient in acetate production

    SciTech Connect

    Rothstein, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    A mutant of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum that is blocked in acetate production was isolated after treatment with nitrosoguanidine and selection for fluoroacetate resistance. The mutant produced more ethanol than the parent strain did.

  13. Clostridium difficile and C. difficile Toxin Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... C diff antigen; GDH Formal name: Clostridium difficile Culture; C. difficile Toxin, A and B; C. difficile Cytotoxin Assay; Glutamate Dehydrogenase Test Related tests: Stool Culture ; O&P At a Glance Test Sample The ...

  14. Lytic Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage 39-O Genomic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening for bacteriophages lytic for Clostridium perfringens was completed utilizing filtered samples obtained from poultry (intestinal material), soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water. Following limit dilution cloning and three rounds of plaque purification lytic phage preparations ...

  15. Clostridium difficile Spore-Macrophage Interactions: Spore Survival

    PubMed Central

    Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Cofre-Araneda, Glenda; Brito-Silva, Christian; Pizarro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the main cause of nosocomial infections including antibiotic associated diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. During the course of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), C. difficile undergoes sporulation and releases spores to the colonic environment. The elevated relapse rates of CDI suggest that C. difficile spores has a mechanism(s) to efficiently persist in the host colonic environment. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we provide evidence that C. difficile spores are well suited to survive the host’s innate immune system. Electron microscopy results show that C. difficile spores are recognized by discrete patchy regions on the surface of macrophage Raw 264.7 cells, and phagocytosis was actin polymerization dependent. Fluorescence microscopy results show that >80% of Raw 264.7 cells had at least one C. difficile spore adhered, and that ∼60% of C. difficile spores were phagocytosed by Raw 264.7 cells. Strikingly, presence of complement decreased Raw 264.7 cells’ ability to phagocytose C. difficile spores. Due to the ability of C. difficile spores to remain dormant inside Raw 264.7 cells, they were able to survive up to 72 h of macrophage infection. Interestingly, transmission electron micrographs showed interactions between the surface proteins of C. difficile spores and the phagosome membrane of Raw 264.7 cells. In addition, infection of Raw 264.7 cells with C. difficile spores for 48 h produced significant Raw 264.7 cell death as demonstrated by trypan blue assay, and nuclei staining by ethidium homodimer-1. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that despite efficient recognition and phagocytosis of C. difficile spores by Raw 264.7 cells, spores remain dormant and are able to survive and produce cytotoxic effects on Raw 264.7 cells. PMID:22952726

  16. Comparison of antimicrobial susceptibility among Clostridium difficile isolated from an integrated human and swine population in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium difficile can be a major problem in hospitals because the bacterium primarily affects individuals with an altered gut flora, which largely occurs through prolonged antibiotic use. Proposed sources of increased community-acquired infections are food animals and retail meats. The objecti...

  17. Usefulness of Adjunctive Fecal Calprotectin and Serum Procalcitonin in Individuals Positive for Clostridium difficile Toxin Gene by PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Popiel, Kristin Y; Gheorghe, Romina; Eastmond, Jennifer; Miller, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    In 54/64 subjects with nosocomial diarrhea, fecal calprotectin levels correlated with the results of stool samples tested for Clostridium difficile toxin gene by PCR. Fecal calprotectin levels can be used as an adjunctive measure to PCR to support the diagnosis of C. difficile infection. PMID:26354814

  18. Usefulness of Adjunctive Fecal Calprotectin and Serum Procalcitonin in Individuals Positive for Clostridium difficile Toxin Gene by PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghe, Romina; Eastmond, Jennifer; Miller, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    In 54/64 subjects with nosocomial diarrhea, fecal calprotectin levels correlated with the results of stool samples tested for Clostridium difficile toxin gene by PCR. Fecal calprotectin levels can be used as an adjunctive measure to PCR to support the diagnosis of C. difficile infection. PMID:26354814

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium difficile Strain IT1118, an Epidemic Isolate Belonging to the Emerging PCR Ribotype 018

    PubMed Central

    Wasels, François; Barbanti, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 018 has emerged in Italy, South Korea, and Japan, causing severe infections and outbreaks. In this study, we sequenced the genome of IT1118, an Italian clinical isolate, to clarify the molecular features contributing to the success of this epidemic type. PMID:27445391

  20. A Novel, Sporicidal Formulation of Ethanol for Glove Decontamination to Prevent Clostridium difficile Hand Contamination During Glove Removal.

    PubMed

    Tomas, Myreen E; Nerandzic, Michelle M; Cadnum, Jennifer L; Mana, Thriveen S C; Jencson, Annette; Sunskesula, Venkata; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Wilson, Brigid M; Donskey, Curtis J

    2016-03-01

    Decontamination of gloves before removal could reduce the risk for contamination of hands of personnel caring for patients with Clostridium difficile infection. We demonstrated that a novel sporicidal formulation of ethanol rapidly reduced C. difficile spores on gloved hands without adverse odor, respiratory irritation, or staining of clothing. PMID:26679745

  1. Immunopathology and Cytokine Responses in Broiler Chickens Coinfected with Eimeria maxima and Clostridium perfringens Using an Animal Model of Necrotic Enteritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence of necrotic enteritis (NE) due to Clostridium perfringens (CP) infection in commercial poultry has been increasing at an alarming rate. While pre-exposure of chickens to coccidia infections is believed to be one of the major risk factors leading to NE, the underlying mechanisms of CP ...

  2. Phosphotransacetylase from Clostridium acidiurici1

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James R.; Sagers, Richard D.

    1972-01-01

    The phosphotransacetylase from Clostridium acidiurici has two properties not observed for this enzyme in other bacteria: (i) it requires a divalent metal for activity, and (ii) it is not subject to uncoupling by arsenate. The enzyme has been obtained in highly purified form, with a specific activity 500-fold higher than crude extracts. Ferrous or manganous ions are required for maximal activity, with Mn2+ being 50 to 75% as effective as Fe2+. The acetyl group can be transferred from acetyl phosphate to coenzyme A in 20 mm arsenate without a net decrease in high-energy acyl linkages. Likewise, H32PO42− will exchange with acetyl-PO42− in the presence of arsenate without loss of acetyl phosphate. This suggests that the active site on the enzyme is capable of discriminating between phosphate and arsenate while permitting the reversible transfer of acyl groups between CoA and phosphate. Images PMID:16559158

  3. Evaluation of a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Lalande, Valérie; Barrault, Laurence; Wadel, Sophie; Eckert, Catherine; Petit, Jean-Claude; Barbut, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    A new assay (illumigene C. difficile; Meridian Bioscience), based on the original loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, was evaluated with 472 unformed stools from patients suspected of Clostridium difficile infection. Compared to the toxigenic culture, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 91.8, 99.1, 91.8, and 99.1% for the illumigene C. difficile assay and 69.4, 100, 100, and 96.6% for the cytotoxicity assay, respectively. PMID:21525213

  4. The role of Clostridium difficile in the paediatric and neonatal gut - a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Lees, E A; Miyajima, F; Pirmohamed, M; Carrol, E D

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important nosocomial pathogen in adults. Its significance in children is less well defined, but cases of C. difficile infection (CDI) appear to be increasingly prevalent in paediatric patients. This review aims to summarize reported Clostridium difficile carriage rates across children of different age groups, appraise the relationship between CDI and factors such as method of delivery, type of infant feed, antibiotic use, and co-morbidities, and review factors affecting the gut microbiome in children and the host immune response to C. difficile. Searches of PubMed and Google Scholar using the terms 'Clostridium difficile neonates' and 'Clostridium difficile children' were completed, and reference lists of retrieved publications screened for further papers. In total, 88 papers containing relevant data were included. There was large inter-study variation in reported C. difficile carriage rates. There was an association between CDI and recent antibiotic use, and co-morbidities such as immunosuppression and inflammatory bowel disease. C. difficile was also found in stools of children with diarrhoea attributed to other pathogens (e.g. rotavirus). The role of C. difficile in the paediatric gut remains unclear; is it an innocent bystander in diarrhoeal disease caused by other organisms, or a pathogen causing subclinical to severe symptoms? Further investigation of the development of serological and local host response to C. difficile carriage may shed new light on disease mechanisms. Work is underway on defining a framework for diagnosis and management of paediatric CDI. PMID:27107991

  5. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) fermentation by sequential culture of Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium beijerinckii: effect of particle size on gas production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fuel alcohols can be produced by fermenting cellulosic biomass. Clostridium beijerinckii produces both ethanol and butanol, but it is non-cellulolytic. Cellulose requires saccharification prior to fermentation by C. beijerinckii. In contrast, the thermophile, Clostridium thermocellum, is highly ce...

  6. The Regulatory Networks That Control Clostridium difficile Toxin Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Peltier, Johann; Dupuy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic clostridia cause many human and animal diseases, which typically arise as a consequence of the production of potent exotoxins. Among the enterotoxic clostridia, Clostridium difficile is the main causative agent of nosocomial intestinal infections in adults with a compromised gut microbiota caused by antibiotic treatment. The symptoms of C. difficile infection are essentially caused by the production of two exotoxins: TcdA and TcdB. Moreover, for severe forms of disease, the spectrum of diseases caused by C. difficile has also been correlated to the levels of toxins that are produced during host infection. This observation strengthened the idea that the regulation of toxin synthesis is an important part of C. difficile pathogenesis. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the regulators and sigma factors that have been reported to control toxin gene expression in response to several environmental signals and stresses, including the availability of certain carbon sources and amino acids, or to signaling molecules, such as the autoinducing peptides of quorum sensing systems. The overlapping regulation of key metabolic pathways and toxin synthesis strongly suggests that toxin production is a complex response that is triggered by bacteria in response to particular states of nutrient availability during infection. PMID:27187475

  7. The Regulatory Networks That Control Clostridium difficile Toxin Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Peltier, Johann; Dupuy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic clostridia cause many human and animal diseases, which typically arise as a consequence of the production of potent exotoxins. Among the enterotoxic clostridia, Clostridium difficile is the main causative agent of nosocomial intestinal infections in adults with a compromised gut microbiota caused by antibiotic treatment. The symptoms of C. difficile infection are essentially caused by the production of two exotoxins: TcdA and TcdB. Moreover, for severe forms of disease, the spectrum of diseases caused by C. difficile has also been correlated to the levels of toxins that are produced during host infection. This observation strengthened the idea that the regulation of toxin synthesis is an important part of C. difficile pathogenesis. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the regulators and sigma factors that have been reported to control toxin gene expression in response to several environmental signals and stresses, including the availability of certain carbon sources and amino acids, or to signaling molecules, such as the autoinducing peptides of quorum sensing systems. The overlapping regulation of key metabolic pathways and toxin synthesis strongly suggests that toxin production is a complex response that is triggered by bacteria in response to particular states of nutrient availability during infection. PMID:27187475

  8. Interactions Between the Gastrointestinal Microbiome and Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Theriot, Casey M.; Young, Vincent B.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics have significant and long-lasting effects on the intestinal microbiota and consequently reduce colonization resistance against pathogens, including Clostridium difficile. By altering the community structure of the gut microbiome, antibiotics alter the intestinal metabolome, which includes both host- and microbe-derived metabolites. The mechanisms by which antibiotics reduce colonization resistance against C. difficile are unknown yet important for development of preventative and therapeutic approaches against this pathogen. This review focuses on how antibiotics alter the structure of the gut microbiota and how this alters microbial metabolism in the intestine. Interactions between gut microbial products and C. difficile spore germination, growth, and toxin production are discussed. New bacterial therapies to restore changes in bacteria-driven intestinal metabolism following antibiotics will have important applications for treatment and prevention of C. difficile infection. PMID:26488281

  9. Lipoprotein CD0873 is a novel adhesin of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Kovacs-Simon, Andrea; Leuzzi, Rosanna; Kasendra, Magdalena; Minton, Nigel; Titball, Richard W; Michell, Stephen L

    2014-07-15

    Clostridium difficile is a cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and colitis, a healthcare-associated intestinal disease. Colonization of the gut is a critical step in the course of infection. The C. difficile lipoprotein CD0873 was identified as a putative adhesin through a bioinformatics approach. Surface exposure of CD0873 was confirmed and a CD0873 mutant was generated. The CD0873 mutant showed a significant reduction in adherence to Caco-2 cells and wild-type bacteria preincubated with anti-CD0873 antibodies showed significantly decreased adherence to Caco-2 cells. In addition, we demonstrated that purified recombinant CD0873 protein alone associates with Caco-2 cells. This is the first definitive identification of a C. difficile adhesin, which now allows work to devise improved measures for preventing and treating disease. PMID:24482399

  10. Dentists, antibiotics and Clostridium difficile-associated disease.

    PubMed

    Beacher, N; Sweeney, M P; Bagg, J

    2015-09-25

    Dentists prescribe significant volumes of antimicrobial drugs within primary care settings. There is good evidence that many of the prescriptions are not justified by current clinical guidance and that that there is considerable misuse of these drugs in dentistry. One of the risks associated with antibiotic administration is Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD), an entity of which many healthcare workers, including dentists, have little knowledge or understanding. This review seeks to identify the extent and nature of the problem and provides an up to date summary of current views on CDAD, with particular reference to community acquired disease. As for all healthcare workers, scrupulous attention to standard infection control procedures and reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing are essential to reduce the risks of CDAD, prevent emergence of further resistant strains of microorganisms and maintain the value of the arsenal of antibiotics currently available to us. PMID:26404991

  11. Recent insights into Clostridium perfringens beta-toxin.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Ochi, Sadayuki; Oda, Masataka; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Takehara, Masaya; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2015-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens beta-toxin is a key mediator of necrotizing enterocolitis and enterotoxemia. It is a pore-forming toxin (PFT) that exerts cytotoxic effect. Experimental investigation using piglet and rabbit intestinal loop models and a mouse infection model apparently showed that beta-toxin is the important pathogenic factor of the organisms. The toxin caused the swelling and disruption of HL-60 cells and formed a functional pore in the lipid raft microdomains of sensitive cells. These findings represent significant progress in the characterization of the toxin with knowledge on its biological features, mechanism of action and structure-function having been accumulated. Our aims here are to review the current progresses in our comprehension of the virulence of C. perfringens type C and the character, biological feature and structure-function of beta-toxin. PMID:25654787

  12. Recent Insights into Clostridium perfringens Beta-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Ochi, Sadayuki; Oda, Masataka; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Takehara, Masaya; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens beta-toxin is a key mediator of necrotizing enterocolitis and enterotoxemia. It is a pore-forming toxin (PFT) that exerts cytotoxic effect. Experimental investigation using piglet and rabbit intestinal loop models and a mouse infection model apparently showed that beta-toxin is the important pathogenic factor of the organisms. The toxin caused the swelling and disruption of HL-60 cells and formed a functional pore in the lipid raft microdomains of sensitive cells. These findings represent significant progress in the characterization of the toxin with knowledge on its biological features, mechanism of action and structure-function having been accumulated. Our aims here are to review the current progresses in our comprehension of the virulence of C. perfringens type C and the character, biological feature and structure-function of beta-toxin. PMID:25654787

  13. Clostridium septicum aortitis with associated sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ge, Phillip S; de Virgilio, Christian

    2012-02-01

    We report an unusual case of Clostridium septicum aortitis with associated adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon. An 87-year-old man with multiple medical comorbidities presented with a 1-week history of severe abdominal pain in the left lower quadrant of his abdomen. Abdominal computed tomography showed, in addition to a mass in the sigmoid colon, a gas density within the wall of the abdominal aorta with extensive periaortic fat stranding and some additional gas densities in the proximal left common iliac artery. The patient refused surgery, and was treated with intravenous antibiotics. He died 5 weeks later. The development of Clostridiumsepticum aortitis, an extremely rare but life-threatening infection, is highly associated with an underlying colonic malignancy and demands immediate surgical intervention. PMID:22304871

  14. Faecal carriage of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, M. F.; Watson, G. N.; Gilbert, R. J.; Wallace, J. G.; Hassall, J. E.; Tanner, E. I.; Webber, P. P.

    1985-01-01

    The numbers and serotypes of Clostridium perfringens present in the faeces of three groups of hospital patients and young healthy laboratory workers were examined in studies lasting between 10 and 13 weeks. In one hospital some long-stay geriatric patients carried relatively high numbers of C. perfringens (greater than 10(7)/g) most of the time and it was not unusual in any one week for the majority of these patients to carry the same serotype(s). However, the numbers of C. perfringens in the faeces of young long-stay patients in the same hospital were in the range of 10(3)-10(4)/g and carriage of common serotypes was not observed. These results were similar to the findings with the young laboratory workers. This investigation indicates that two of the laboratory criteria often used in the investigation of C. perfringens food poisoning, i.e. faecal counts of greater than or equal to 10(5) C. perfringens/g and patients carrying the same serological type need to be interpreted with caution with suspected outbreaks involving some groups of geriatric long-stay hospital patients. PMID:2866214

  15. Carbon Monoxide Oxidation by Clostridium thermoaceticum and Clostridium formicoaceticum

    PubMed Central

    Diekert, Gabriele B.; Thauer, Rudolf K.

    1978-01-01

    Cultures of Clostridium formicoaceticum and C. thermoaceticum growing on fructose and glucose, respectively, were shown to rapidly oxidize CO to CO2. Rates up to 0.4 μmol min−1 mg of wet cells−1 were observed. Carbon monoxide oxidation by cell suspensions was found (i) to be dependent on pyruvate, (ii) to be inhibited by alkyl halides and arsenate, and (iii) to stimulate CO2 reduction to acetate. Cell extracts catalyzed the oxidation of carbon monoxide with methyl viologen at specific rates up to 10 μmol min−1 mg of protein−1 (35°C, pH 7.2). Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and ferredoxin from C. pasteurianum were ineffective as electron acceptors. The catalytic mechanism of carbon monoxide oxidation was “ping-pong,” indicating that the enzyme catalyzing carbon monoxide oxidation can be present in an oxidized and a reduced form. The oxidized form was shown to react reversibly with cyanide, and the reduced form was shown to react reversibly with alkyl halides: cyanide inactivated the enzyme only in the absence of carbon monoxide, and alkyl halides inactivated it only in the presence of carbon monoxide. Extracts inactivated by alkyl halides were reactivated by photolysis. The findings are interpreted to indicate that carbon monoxide oxidation in the two bacteria is catalyzed by a corrinoid enzyme and that in vivo the reaction is coupled with the reduction of CO2 to acetate. Cultures of C. acidi-urici and C. cylindrosporum growing on hypoxanthine were found not to oxidize CO, indicating that clostridia mediating a corrinoid-independent total synthesis of acetate from CO2 do not possess a CO-oxidizing system. PMID:711675

  16. A middle-aged lady with a pyogenic liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Law, Siu-Tong; Lee, Ming Kai

    2012-01-01

    The pyogenic liver abscess caused by Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is a rare, but rapidly fatal infection. It is usually associated with malignancy and immunosuppression. We report the case of 50-year-old lady with the secondary liver metastases from rectal cancer presented with fever and epigastric pain. The identification of Gram-positive bacilli septicaemia, the presence of gas-forming liver abscess and massive intravascular hemolysis should lead to the suspicion of C. perfringens infection. Here we review twenty cases published since 1990 and their clinical features are discussed. The importance of ”an aggressive treatment policy” with multidisciplinary team approach is emphasized. PMID:22993668

  17. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R.; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  18. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  19. A novel regulator controls Clostridium difficile sporulation, motility and toxin production.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Adrianne N; Tamayo, Rita; McBride, Shonna M

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic pathogen that forms spores which promote survival in the environment and transmission to new hosts. The regulatory pathways by which C. difficile initiates spore formation are poorly understood. We identified two factors with limited similarity to the Rap sporulation proteins of other spore-forming bacteria. In this study, we show that disruption of the gene CD3668 reduces sporulation and increases toxin production and motility. This mutant was more virulent and exhibited increased toxin gene expression in the hamster model of infection. Based on these phenotypes, we have renamed this locus rstA, for regulator of sporulation and toxins. Our data demonstrate that RstA is a bifunctional protein that upregulates sporulation through an unidentified pathway and represses motility and toxin production by influencing sigD transcription. Conserved RstA orthologs are present in other pathogenic and industrial Clostridium species and may represent a key regulatory protein controlling clostridial sporulation. PMID:26915493

  20. The Burden of Clostridium difficile after Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Javier Z; Skovrlj, Branko; Rothenberg, Edward S; Lu, Young; McAnany, Steven; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective database analysis. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate incidence, comorbidities, and impact on health care resources of Clostridium difficile infection after cervical spine surgery. Methods A total of 1,602,130 cervical spine surgeries from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2002 to 2011 were included. Patients were included for study based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedural codes for cervical spine surgery for degenerative spine diagnoses. Baseline patient characteristics were determined. Multivariable analyses assessed factors associated with increased incidence of C. difficile and risk of mortality. Results Incidence of C. difficile infection in postoperative cervical spine surgery hospitalizations is 0.08%, significantly increased since 2002 (p < 0.0001). The odds of postoperative C. difficile infection were significantly increased in patients with comorbidities such as congestive heart failure, renal failure, and perivascular disease. Circumferential cervical fusion (odds ratio [OR] = 2.93, p < 0.0001) increased the likelihood of developing C. difficile infection after degenerative cervical spine surgery. C. difficile infection after cervical spine surgery results in extended length of stay (p < 0.0001) and increased hospital costs (p < 0.0001). Mortality rate in patients who develop C. difficile after cervical spine surgery is nearly 8% versus 0.19% otherwise (p < 0.0001). Moreover, multivariate analysis revealed C. difficile to be a significant predictor of inpatient mortality (OR = 3.99, p < 0.0001). Conclusions C. difficile increases the risk of in-hospital mortality and costs approximately $6,830,695 per year to manage in patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery. Patients with comorbidities such as renal failure or congestive heart failure have increased probability of developing infection

  1. Cellulolytic Activity of Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Song F.; Forsberg, Cecil W.; Gibbins, L. N.

    1985-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum NRRL B527 and ATCC 824 exhibited extracellular and cell-bound endoglucanase and cellobiase activities during growth in a chemically defined medium with cellobiose as the sole source of carbohydrate. For both strains, the endoglucanase was found to be mainly extracellular (70 to 90%) during growth in continuous or batch cultures with the pH maintained at 5.2, whereas the cellobiase was mainly cell associated (60 to 90%). During continuous cultivation of strain B527 with cellobiose as the limiting nutrient, maximum production of the endoglucanase and cellobiase occurred at pH values of 5.2 and 4.8, respectively. In the carbon-limited continuous cultures, strain 824 produced similar levels of endoglucanase, cellobiosidase, and cellobiase activities regardless of the carbon source used. However, in ammonium- or phosphate-limited cultures, with an excess of glucose, only 1/10 of the endoglucanase was produced, and neither cellobiosidase nor cellobiase activities were detectable. A crude extracellular enzyme preparation from strain B527 hydrolyzed carboxymethylcellulose and phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose readily and microcrystalline cellulose (A vicel) to a lesser extent. Glucose accounted for more than 90% of the reducing sugar produced by the hydrolysis of acid-swollen cellulose and Avicel. Strain B527 did not grow in medium with acid-swollen cellulose as the sole source of carbohydrate, although it grew readily on the products obtained by hydrolyzing the cellulose in vitro with a preparation of extracellular cellulase derived from the same organism. PMID:16346847

  2. Precision microbiome restoration of bile acid-mediated resistance to Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Buffie, Charlie G.; Bucci, Vanni; Stein, Richard R.; McKenney, Peter T.; Ling, Lilan; Gobourne, Asia; No, Daniel; Liu, Hui; Kinnebrew, Melissa; Viale, Agnes; Littmann, Eric; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Jenq, Robert R.; Taur, Ying; Sander, Chris; Cross, Justin; Toussaint, Nora C.; Xavier, Joao B.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of mammals are colonized by hundreds of microbial species that contribute to health, including colonization resistance against intestinal pathogens1. Many antibiotics destroy intestinal microbial communities and increase susceptibility to intestinal pathogens2. Among these, Clostridium difficile, a major cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhea, greatly increases morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients3. Which intestinal bacteria provide resistance to C. difficile infection and their in vivo inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. By treating mice with different antibiotics that result in distinct microbiota changes and lead to varied susceptibility to C. difficile, we correlated loss of specific bacterial taxa with development of infection. Mathematical modeling augmented by microbiota analyses of hospitalized patients identified resistance-associated bacteria common to mice and humans. Using these platforms, we determined that Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium, is associated with resistance to C. difficile infection and, upon administration, enhances resistance to infection in a secondary bile acid-dependent fashion. Using a workflow involving mouse models, clinical studies, metagenomic analyses and mathematical modeling, we identified a probiotic candidate that corrects a clinically relevant microbiome deficiency. These findings have implications for rational design of targeted antimicrobials as well as microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for individuals at risk for C. difficile infection. PMID:25337874

  3. Precision microbiome reconstitution restores bile acid mediated resistance to Clostridium difficile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffie, Charlie G.; Bucci, Vanni; Stein, Richard R.; McKenney, Peter T.; Ling, Lilan; Gobourne, Asia; No, Daniel; Liu, Hui; Kinnebrew, Melissa; Viale, Agnes; Littmann, Eric; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Jenq, Robert R.; Taur, Ying; Sander, Chris; Cross, Justin R.; Toussaint, Nora C.; Xavier, Joao B.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of mammals are colonized by hundreds of microbial species that contribute to health, including colonization resistance against intestinal pathogens. Many antibiotics destroy intestinal microbial communities and increase susceptibility to intestinal pathogens. Among these, Clostridium difficile, a major cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhoea, greatly increases morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Which intestinal bacteria provide resistance to C. difficile infection and their in vivo inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. Here we correlate loss of specific bacterial taxa with development of infection, by treating mice with different antibiotics that result in distinct microbiota changes and lead to varied susceptibility to C. difficile. Mathematical modelling augmented by analyses of the microbiota of hospitalized patients identifies resistance-associated bacteria common to mice and humans. Using these platforms, we determine that Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium, is associated with resistance to C. difficile infection and, upon administration, enhances resistance to infection in a secondary bile acid dependent fashion. Using a workflow involving mouse models, clinical studies, metagenomic analyses, and mathematical modelling, we identify a probiotic candidate that corrects a clinically relevant microbiome deficiency. These findings have implications for the rational design of targeted antimicrobials as well as microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for individuals at risk of C. difficile infection.

  4. Colonization Resistance of the Gut Microbiota against Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cobas, Ana Elena; Moya, Andrés; Gosalbes, María José; Latorre, Amparo

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics strongly disrupt the human gut microbiota, which in consequence loses its colonization resistance capacity, allowing infection by opportunistic pathogens such as Clostridium difficile. This bacterium is the main cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and a current problem in developed countries, since its incidence and severity have increased during the last years. Furthermore, the emergence of antibiotic resistance strains has reduced the efficiency of the standard treatment with antibiotics, leading to a higher rate of relapses. Here, we review recent efforts focused on the impact of antibiotics in the gut microbiome and their relationship with C. difficile colonization, as well as, in the identification of bacteria and mechanisms involved in the protection against C. difficile infection. Since a healthy gut microbiota is able to avoid pathogen colonization, restoration of the gut microbiota seems to be the most promising approach to face C. difficile infection, especially for recurrent cases. Therefore, it would be possible to design probiotics for patients undergoing antimicrobial therapies in order to prevent or fight the expansion of the pathogen in the gut ecosystem. PMID:27025628

  5. Coculture Production of Butanol by Clostridium Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, S. L.; Foutch, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Production of butanol by anaerobic fermentation of sugars enhanced by use of two Clostridium species, one of which feeds on metabolic product of other. Renewed interest in fermentation process for making butanol stimulated by potential use of butanol as surfactant in enhanced oil recovery. Butanol also used as fuel or as chemical feedstock and currently produced synthetically from petroleum.

  6. Clostridium difficile in poultry and poultry meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer t...

  7. Comparative Analysis of Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Clostridium perfringens are Gram-positive bacteria that are a major bacterial cause of food-borne disease and gas gangrene among humans. These anaerobic bacteria are also the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Pathogenesis and symptoms of a necrotic enterit...

  8. Clostridium acidurici Electron-Bifurcating Formate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Kahnt, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Cell extracts of uric acid-grown Clostridium acidurici catalyzed the coupled reduction of NAD+ and ferredoxin with formate at a specific activity of 1.3 U/mg. The enzyme complex catalyzing the electron-bifurcating reaction was purified 130-fold and found to be composed of four subunits encoded by the gene cluster hylCBA-fdhF2. PMID:23872566

  9. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile Carriage

    PubMed Central

    Alasmari, Faisal; Seiler, Sondra M.; Hink, Tiffany; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Dubberke, Erik R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) incidence has increased dramatically over the last decade. Recent studies suggest that asymptomatic carriers may be an important reservoir of C. difficile in healthcare settings. We sought to identify the prevalence and risk factors for asymptomatic C. difficile carriage on admission to the hospital. Methods. Patients admitted to Barnes-Jewish Hospital without diarrhea were enrolled from June 2010 through October 2011. Demographic information and healthcare and medication exposures 90 days prior to admission were collected. Stool specimens or rectal swabs were collected within 48 hours of admission and stored at −30°C until cultured. Clostridium difficile isolates were typed and compared with isolates from patients with CDI. Results. A stool/swab specimen was obtained for 259 enrolled subjects on admission. Two hundred four (79%) were not colonized, 40 (15%) had toxigenic C. difficile (TCD), and 15 (6%) had nontoxigenic C. difficile. There were no differences between TCD-colonized and -uncolonized subjects for age (mean, 56 vs 58 years; P = .46), comorbidities, admission from another healthcare facility (33% vs 24%; P = .23), or recent hospitalization (50% vs 50%; P = .43). There were no differences in antimicrobial exposures in the 90 days prior to admission (55% vs 56%; P = .91). Asymptomatic carriers were colonized with strains similar to strains from patients with CDI, but the relative proportions were different. Conclusions. There was a high prevalence of TCD colonization on admission. In contrast to past studies, TCD colonization was not associated with recent antimicrobial or healthcare exposures. Additional investigation is needed to determine the role of asymptomatic TCD carriers on hospital-onset CDI incidence. PMID:24755858

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium clariflavum DSM 19732

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Lynne A.; Davenport, Karen W.; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Amy; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Liolios, Konstantinos; Woyke, Tanja; Lynd, Lee R

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium clariflavum is a Cluster III Clostridium within the family Clostridiaceae isolated from thermophilic anaerobic sludge (Shiratori et al, 2009). This species is of interest because of its similarity to the model cellulolytic organism Clostridium thermocellum and for the ability of environmental isolates to break down cellulose and hemicellulose. Here we describe features of the 4,897,678 bp long genome and its annotation, consisting of 4,131 proteincoding and 98 RNA genes, for the type strain DSM 19732.

  11. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea in primary joint arthroplasty in Aneurin Bevan University Health Board South.

    PubMed

    Blocker, O; Abdulkadir, U; Roberts, P

    2016-03-01

    Introduction The choice of perioperative antibiotics to reduce the prevalence of infection after joint arthroplasty should be considered carefully to minimise the risk of nosocomial infections. Dramatic increases in the incidence and severity of healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infection with Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD) have occurred since 2000. Methods A retrospective audit of patients who underwent total hip and total knee replacement between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2007 was undertaken in Aneurin Bevan University Health Board South (ABHBS). Stool samples from patients who had diarrhoea <12 months of surgery were recorded. Positive samples for CDAD <1 month of surgery were identified. After the change in practice in June 2010, a re-audit linked joint-replacement patients between 1 July 2010 and 26 June 2013 with infection control-records for CDAD-positive cases. Results In the first audit cycle, 1900 joint procedures were carried out in 1845 patients. There were 4 cases of CDAD <1 month of surgery (0.22%). In the re-audit period, 2591 joint procedures were undertaken in 2400 patients: no cases of CDAD <1 month of surgery were recorded. Fisher's exact test gave a two-tailed p=0.036. Conclusions The significant reduction in CDAD cases after the change in perioperative antibiotic regimen for primary joint arthroplasty mirrored a 66% reduction in overall CDAD cases in the ABUHBS between 2008 and 2012. This reduction was accompanied by financial savings in antibiotics and nursing hours. PMID:26836055

  12. Diarylacylhydrazones: Clostridium-Selective Antibacterials with Activity Against Stationary-Phase Cells

    PubMed Central

    Casadei, Gabriele; Bremner, John B.; Lewis, Kim; Kelso, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Current antibiotics for treating Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), i.e. metronidazole, vancomycin and more recently fidaxomicin, are mostly effective but treatment failure and disease relapse remain as significant clinical problems. The shortcomings of these agents are attributed to their low selectivity for C. difficile over normal gut microflora and their ineffectiveness against C. difficile spores. This paper reports that certain diarylacylhydrazones identified during a high-throughput screening/counter-screening campaign show selective activity against two Clostridium species (C. difficile and C. perfringens) over common gut commensals. Representative examples are shown to possess activity similar to vancomycin against clinical C. difficile strains and to kill stationary-phase C. difficile cells, which are responsible for spore production. Structure-activity relationships with additional synthesised analogues suggested a protonophoric mechanism may play a role in the observed activity/selectivity and this was supported by the well-known protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) showing selective anti-Clostridium effects and activity similar to diarylacylhydrazones against stationary-phase C. difficile cells. Two diarylacylhydrazones were shown to be non-toxic towards human FaDu and Hep G2 cells indicating that further studies with the class are warranted towards new drugs for CDI. PMID:24360560

  13. Development of Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) for Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Hayley; Kohoutova, Darina; Mosse, Charles A.; Yahioglu, Gokhan; Stamati, Ioanna; Deonarain, Mahendra; Battah, Sinan; Ready, Derren; Allan, Elaine; Mullany, Peter; Lovat, Laurence B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudo membranous colitis in the developed world. The aim of this study was to explore whether Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) could be used as a novel approach to treating C. difficile infections. Methods PACT utilises the ability of light-activated photosensitisers (PS) to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as free radical species and singlet oxygen, which are lethal to cells. We screened thirteen PS against C. difficile planktonic cells, biofilm and germinating spores in vitro, and cytotoxicity of effective compounds was tested on the colorectal adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29. Results Three PS were able to kill 99.9% of bacteria in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, both in the planktonic state and in a biofilm, after exposure to red laser light (0.2 J/cm2) without harming model colon cells. The applicability of PACT to eradicate C. difficile germinative spores indirectly was also shown, by first inducing germination with the bile salt taurocholate, followed by PACT. Conclusion This innovative and simple approach offers the prospect of a new antimicrobial therapy using light to treat C. difficile infection of the colon. PMID:26313448

  14. Protective Efficacy Induced by Recombinant Clostridium difficile Toxin Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Leuzzi, Rosanna; Spencer, Janice; Buckley, Anthony; Brettoni, Cecilia; Martinelli, Manuele; Tulli, Lorenza; Marchi, Sara; Luzzi, Enrico; Irvine, June; Candlish, Denise; Veggi, Daniele; Pansegrau, Werner; Fiaschi, Luigi; Savino, Silvana; Swennen, Erwin; Cakici, Osman; Oviedo-Orta, Ernesto; Giraldi, Monica; Baudner, Barbara; D'Urzo, Nunzia; Maione, Domenico; Soriani, Marco; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming bacterium that can reside in animals and humans. C. difficile infection causes a variety of clinical symptoms, ranging from diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Disease is mediated by TcdA and TcdB, two large enterotoxins released by C. difficile during colonization of the gut. In this study, we evaluated the ability of recombinant toxin fragments to induce neutralizing antibodies in mice. The protective efficacies of the most promising candidates were then evaluated in a hamster model of disease. While limited protection was observed with some combinations, coadministration of a cell binding domain fragment of TcdA (TcdA-B1) and the glucosyltransferase moiety of TcdB (TcdB-GT) induced systemic IgGs which neutralized both toxins and protected vaccinated animals from death following challenge with two strains of C. difficile. Further characterization revealed that despite high concentrations of toxin in the gut lumens of vaccinated animals during the acute phase of the disease, pathological damage was minimized. Assessment of gut contents revealed the presence of TcdA and TcdB antibodies, suggesting that systemic vaccination with this pair of recombinant polypeptides can limit the disease caused by toxin production during C. difficile infection. PMID:23716610

  15. Case of Clostridium perfringens bacteremia after routine colonoscopy and polypectomy.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Anjali N; Riera, Diana; Hickey, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    Bacteremia is an uncommon complication after polypectomy and colonoscopy. We report one of the first cases of Clostridium perfringens bacteremia after polypectomy. Our patient was a four years old boy with congenital polyposis, who underwent colonoscopy and polypectomy without complication. Approximately 12h later he developed a fever and tachycardia with no other clinical symptoms. His blood cultures grew out penicillin susceptible C. perfringens and Enterococcus faecalis. He responded to antibiotic therapy and remained clinically asymptomatic for the duration of his course. There are a few reports of bacteremia after routine polypectomy, but no reported cases of C. perfringens bacteremia in the pediatric population. Clostridial sp. bacteremia can be fatal with devastating consequences if appropriate antibiotics and/or surgical debridement are delayed. Polymicrobial infection, as illustrated in our patient, is also common and can be a poor prognostic risk factor. Therefore, for patients with a history of polypectomy and new onset fever, anaerobic infections should be considered and empiric antibiotic therapy should include coverage for these organisms. PMID:19324098

  16. Toxin Synthesis by Clostridium difficile Is Regulated through Quorum Signaling

    PubMed Central

    DuPont, Herbert L.; Norris, Steven J.; Kaplan, Heidi B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is dramatically increasing as a cause of antibiotic- and hospital-associated diarrhea worldwide. C. difficile, a multidrug-resistant pathogen, flourishes in the colon after the gut microbiota has been altered by antibiotic therapy. Consequently, it produces toxins A and B that directly cause disease. Despite the enormous public health problem posed by this pathogen, the molecular mechanisms that regulate production of the toxins, which are directly responsible for disease, remained largely unknown until now. Here, we show that C. difficile toxin synthesis is regulated by an accessory gene regulator quorum-signaling system, which is mediated through a small (<1,000-Da) thiolactone that can be detected directly in stools of CDI patients. These findings provide direct evidence of the mechanism of regulation of C. difficile toxin synthesis and offer exciting new avenues both for rapid detection of C. difficile infection and development of quorum-signaling-based non-antibiotic therapies to combat this life-threatening emerging pathogen. PMID:25714717

  17. Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotype 018, a Successful Epidemic Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Alberto; Bianchini, Valentina; Biancardi, Anna; Cichero, Paola; Mazzotti, Maria; Nizzero, Paola; Moro, Matteo; Ossi, Cristina; Scarpellini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) became a public health problem for the global spreading of the so-called hypervirulent PCR ribotypes (RTs) 027 and 078, associated with increases in the transmission and severity of the disease. However, especially in Europe, several RTs are prevalent, and the concept of hypervirulence is currently debated. We investigated the toxin and resistance profiles and the genetic relatedness of 312 C. difficile strains isolated in a large Italian teaching hospital during a 5-year period. We evaluated the role of CDI-related antibiotic consumption and infection control practices on the RT predominance in association with their molecular features and transmission capacity. Excluding secondary cases due to nosocomial transmission, RT018 was the predominant genotype (42.4%) followed by RT078 (13.6%), while RT027 accounted for 0.8% of the strains. RT078 was most frequently isolated from patients in intensive care units. Its prevalence significantly increased over time, but its transmission capacity was very low. In contrast, RT018 was highly transmissible and accounted for 95.7% of the secondary cases. Patients with the RT018 genotype were significantly older than those with RT078 and other RTs, indicating an association between epidemic RT and age. We provide here the first epidemiological evidence to consider RT018 as a successful epidemic genotype that deserves more attention in clinical practice. PMID:26041894

  18. Expression and delivery of an endolysin to combat Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Teresa; Horn, Nikki; Wegmann, Udo; Dugo, Giacomo; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J

    2014-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a cause for increasing concern due to its responsibility for severe infections both in humans and animals, especially poultry. To find new control strategies to treat C. perfringens infection, we investigated the activity and delivery of a bacteriophage endolysin. We identified a new endolysin, designated CP25L, which shows similarity to an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase domain and is distinct from other C. perfringens endolysins whose activity has been demonstrated in vitro. The cp25l gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product demonstrated lytic activity against all 25 C. perfringens strains tested. The probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785 was engineered to deliver the endolysin to the gastrointestinal tract. The integration of the nisRK two-component regulatory system from the Lactococcus lactis nisin A biosynthesis operon into the chromosome of L. johnsonii allowed constitutive expression of the endolysin under the control of the nisA promoter (P nisA ), while the use of a signal peptide (SLPmod) led to successful secretion of the active endolysin to the surrounding media. The high specificity and activity of the endolysin suggest that it may be developed as an effective tool to enhance the control of C. perfringens by L. johnsonii in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23942878

  19. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile colonization among healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased to epidemic proportions in recent years. The carriage of C. difficile among healthy adults and hospital inpatients has been established. We sought to determine whether C. difficile colonization exists among healthcare workers (HCWs) in our setting. Methods A point prevalence study of stool colonization with C. difficile among doctors, nurses and allied health staff at a large regional teaching hospital in Geelong, Victoria. All participants completed a short questionnaire and all stool specimens were tested by Techlab® C.diff Quik Check enzyme immunoassay followed by enrichment culture. Results Among 128 healthcare workers, 77% were female, of mean age 43 years, and the majority were nursing staff (73%). Nineteen HCWs (15%) reported diarrhoea, and 12 (9%) had taken antibiotics in the previous six weeks. Over 40% of participants reported having contact with a patient with known or suspected CDI in the 6 weeks before the stool was collected. C. difficile was not isolated from the stool of any participants. Conclusion Although HCWs are at risk of asymptomatic carriage and could act as a reservoir for transmission in the hospital environment, with the use of a screening test and culture we were unable to identify C. difficile in the stool of our participants in a non-outbreak setting. This may reflect potential colonization resistance of the gut microbiota, or the success of infection prevention strategies at our institution. PMID:24090343

  20. How to eradicate Clostridium difficile from the environment.

    PubMed

    Barbut, F

    2015-04-01

    During the last decade, Clostridium difficile has emerged as a major cause of healthcare-associated diarrhoea and death. Transmission of this spore-forming bacterium is thought to occur via the hands of healthcare providers or via the contaminated environment. Therefore, enhanced environmental cleaning/disinfection of the rooms housing C. difficile-infected patients is warranted. Guidelines from various scientific bodies have been published. They recommend performing environmental decontamination of rooms of patients with C. difficile infection (CDI) using hypochlorite (diluted 1/10) or a sporicidal product. Compliance with cleaning and disinfection is a critical point and is often suboptimal. Novel 'no-touch' methods for room disinfection have recently been introduced. Ultraviolet (UV) light or hydrogen peroxide systems are most widely used. In-vitro studies suggest that hydrogen peroxide vapour (from 30% hydrogen peroxide) methods achieve a >6 log10 reduction in C. difficile spores placed on carriers, and that aerosolized hydrogen peroxide systems (from 5% to 6% hydrogen peroxide) achieve ∼4 log10 reduction, whereas UV-based methods achieve ∼2 log10 reduction. Very few studies have assessed the impact of these devices on the transmission of C. difficile. Major limitations of these devices include the fact that they can only be used after the patient's discharge, because patients and staff must be removed from the room. The new no-touch methods for room disinfection supplement, but do not replace, daily cleaning. PMID:25638358