Science.gov

Sample records for cloud motion vector

  1. A sample computation of kinematic properties from cloud motion vectors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viezee, W.; Serebreny, S. M.; Mancuso, R. L.; Shenk, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    Distributions of relative vorticity and balanced height have been computed from the cloud velocities associated with the cloud structure of an extratropical cyclone over the continental United States during a three-day period in March 1970. Cloud motions are assigned either to a 'mid-level,' or to a 'high level.' Derived vorticity and balanced height are compared with concurrent National Meteorological Center (NMC) analyses and also with similar kinematic quantities obtained from rawins at three constant-pressure levels. The computations of relative vorticity using mid-level cloud motion vectors show encouraging results. Patterns of computed cyclonic vorticity are related to the development, location, and movement of the surface cyclone. The analyses suggest that the 'mid-level' corresponds best to the 700-mb level. The vorticity analysis from the 'high-level' motion vectors presented difficulties.

  2. Cloud Motion Vectors from MISR using Sub-pixel Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Roger; Horvath, Akos; Moroney, Catherine; Zhang, Banglin; Zhu, Yanqiu

    2007-01-01

    The operational retrieval of height-resolved cloud motion vectors by the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer on the Terra satellite has been significantly improved by using sub-pixel approaches to co-registration and disparity assessment, and by imposing stronger quality control based on the agreement between independent forward and aft triplet retrievals. Analysis of the fore-aft differences indicates that CMVs pass the basic operational quality control 67% of the time, with rms differences - in speed of 2.4 m/s, in direction of 17 deg, and in height assignment of 290 m. The use of enhanced quality control thresholds reduces these rms values to 1.5 m/s, 17 deg and 165 m, respectively, at the cost of reduced coverage to 45%. Use of the enhanced thresholds also eliminates a tendency for the rms differences to increase with height. Comparison of CMVs from an earlier operational version that had slightly weaker quality control, with 6-hour forecast winds from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office yielded very low bias values and an rms vector difference that ranged from 5 m/s for low clouds to 10 m/s for high clouds.

  3. A novel approach for the extraction of cloud motion vectors using airglow imager measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheesh Kumar, S.; Narayana Rao, T.; Taori, A.

    2015-09-01

    The paper explores the possibility of implementing an advanced photogrammetric technique, generally employed for satellite measurements, on airglow imager, a ground-based remote sensing instrument primarily used for upper atmospheric studies, measurements of clouds for the extraction of cloud motion vectors (CMVs). The major steps involved in the algorithm remain the same, including image processing for better visualization of target elements and noise removal, identification of target cloud, setting a proper search window for target cloud tracking, estimation of cloud height, and employing 2-D cross-correlation to estimate the CMVs. Nevertheless, the implementation strategy at each step differs from that of satellite, mainly to suit airglow imager measurements. For instance, climatology of horizontal winds at the measured site has been used to fix the search window for target cloud tracking. The cloud height is estimated very accurately, as required by the algorithm, using simultaneous collocated lidar measurements. High-resolution, both in space and time (4 min), cloud imageries are employed to minimize the errors in retrieved CMVs. The derived winds are evaluated against MST radar-derived winds by considering it as a reference. A very good correspondence is seen between these two wind measurements, both showing similar wind variation. The agreement is also found to be good in both the zonal and meridional wind velocities with RMSEs < 2.4 m s-1. Finally, the strengths and limitations of the algorithm are discussed, with possible solutions, wherever required.

  4. Recent Progress on the Second Generation CMORPH: LEO-IR Based Precipitation Estimates and Cloud Motion Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Pingping; Joyce, Robert; Wu, Shaorong

    2015-04-01

    As reported at the EGU General Assembly of 2014, a prototype system was developed for the second generation CMORPH to produce global analyses of 30-min precipitation on a 0.05olat/lon grid over the entire globe from pole to pole through integration of information from satellite observations as well as numerical model simulations. The second generation CMORPH is built upon the Kalman Filter based CMORPH algorithm of Joyce and Xie (2011). Inputs to the system include rainfall and snowfall rate retrievals from passive microwave (PMW) measurements aboard all available low earth orbit (LEO) satellites, precipitation estimates derived from infrared (IR) observations of geostationary (GEO) as well as LEO platforms, and precipitation simulations from numerical global models. Key to the success of the 2nd generation CMORPH, among a couple of other elements, are the development of a LEO-IR based precipitation estimation to fill in the polar gaps and objectively analyzed cloud motion vectors to capture the cloud movements of various spatial scales over the entire globe. In this presentation, we report our recent work on the refinement for these two important algorithm components. The prototype algorithm for the LEO IR precipitation estimation is refined to achieve improved quantitative accuracy and consistency with PMW retrievals. AVHRR IR TBB data from all LEO satellites are first remapped to a 0.05olat/lon grid over the entire globe and in a 30-min interval. Temporally and spatially co-located data pairs of the LEO TBB and inter-calibrated combined satellite PMW retrievals (MWCOMB) are then collected to construct tables. Precipitation at a grid box is derived from the TBB through matching the PDF tables for the TBB and the MWCOMB. This procedure is implemented for different season, latitude band and underlying surface types to account for the variations in the cloud - precipitation relationship. At the meantime, a sub-system is developed to construct analyzed fields of cloud motion vectors from the GEO/LEO IR based precipitation estimates and the CFS Reanalysis (CFSR) precipitation fields. Motion vectors are first derived separately from the satellite IR based precipitation estimates and the CFSR precipitation fields. These individually derived motion vectors are then combined through a 2D-VAR technique to form an analyzed field of cloud motion vectors over the entire globe. Error function is experimented to best reflect the performance of the satellite IR based estimates and the CFSR in capturing the movements of precipitating cloud systems over different regions and for different seasons. Quantitative experiments are conducted to optimize the LEO IR based precipitation estimation technique and the 2D-VAR based motion vector analysis system. Detailed results will be reported at the EGU.

  5. Scalable motion vector coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarien, Joeri; Munteanu, Adrian; Verdicchio, Fabio; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Cornelis, Jan P.; Schelkens, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Modern video coding applications require transmission of video data over variable-bandwidth channels to a variety of terminals with different screen resolutions and available computational power. Scalable video coding is needed to optimally support these applications. Recently proposed wavelet-based video codecs employing spatial domain motion compensated temporal filtering (SDMCTF) provide quality, resolution and frame-rate scalability while delivering compression performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art non-scalable H.264-codec. These codecs require scalable coding of the motion vectors in order to support a large range of bit-rates with optimal compression efficiency. Scalable motion vector coding algorithms based on the integer wavelet transform followed by embedded coding of the wavelet coefficients were recently proposed. In this paper, a new and fundamentally different scalable motion vector codec (MVC) using median-based motion vector prediction is proposed. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed MVC systematically outperforms the wavelet-based state-of-the-art solutions. To be able to take advantage of the proposed scalable MVC, a rate allocation mechanism capable of optimally dividing the available rate among texture and motion information is required. Two rate allocation strategies are proposed and compared. The proposed MVC and rate allocation schemes are incorporated into an SDMCTF-based video codec and the benefits of scalable motion vector coding are experimentally demonstrated.

  6. The effect of the arbitrary level assignment of satellite cloud motion wind vectors on wind analyses in the pre-thunderstorm environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslen, C. A.; Koch, S. E.; Uccellini, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The impact of satellite-derived cloud motion vectors on SESAME rawinsonde wind fields was studied in two separate cases. The effect of wind and moisture gradients on the arbitrary assignment of the satellite data is assessed to coordinate surfaces in a severe storm environment marked by strong vertical wind shear. Objective analyses of SESAME rawinsonde winds and combined winds are produced and differences between these two analyzed fields are used to make an assessment of coordinate level choice. It is shown that the standard method of arbitrarily assigning wind vectors to a low level coordinate surface yields systematic differences between the rawinsonde and combined wind analyses. Arbitrary assignment of cloud motions to the 0.9 sigma surface produces smaller differences than assignment to the 825 mb pressure surface. Systematic differences occur near moisture discontinuities and in regions of horizontal and vertical wind shears. The differences between the combined and SESAME wind fields are made smallest by vertically interpolating cloud motions to either a pressure or sigma surface.

  7. The effect of the arbitrary level assignment of satellite cloud motion wind vectors on wind analyses in the pre-thunderstorm environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslen, C. A.; Koch, S. E.; Uccellini, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    The impact of satellite-derived cloud motion vectors on SESAME rawinsonde wind fields was studied in two separate cases. The effect of wind and moisture gradients on the arbitrary assignment of the satellite data is assessed to coordinate surfaces in a severe storm environment marked by strong vertical wind shear. Objective analyses of SESAME rawinsonde winds and combined winds are produced and differences between these two analyzed fields are used to make an assessment of coordinate level choice. It is shown that the standard method of arbitrarily assigning wind vectors to a low level coordinate surface yields systematic differences between the rawinsonde and combined wind analyses. Arbitrary assignment of cloud motions to the 0.9 sigma surface produces smaller differences than assignment to the 825 mb pressure surface. Systematic differences occur near moisture discontinuities and in regions of horizontal and vertical wind shears. The differences between the combined and SESAME wind fields are made smallest by vertically interpolating cloud motions to either a pressure or sigma surface.

  8. Study to determine cloud motion from meteorological satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. B.

    1972-01-01

    Processing techniques were tested for deducing cloud motion vectors from overlapped portions of pairs of pictures made from meteorological satellites. This was accomplished by programming and testing techniques for estimating pattern motion by means of cross correlation analysis with emphasis placed upon identifying and reducing errors resulting from various factors. Techniques were then selected and incorporated into a cloud motion determination program which included a routine which would select and prepare sample array pairs from the preprocessed test data. The program was then subjected to limited testing with data samples selected from the Nimbus 4 THIR data provided by the 11.5 micron channel.

  9. Motion blur detecting by support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai-Chieh; Guest, Clark C.; Das, Pankaj

    2005-08-01

    Among various factors degrading captured image quality, motion blur is the most common. The user becomes aware of the blur only after viewing pictures on a higher resolution display. The causes of motion blur are object movement, camera shake, or any relative speed between the object and the camera. To avoid this problem, many anti-shaking or image stabilization techniques have been developed. However, a detecting mechanism for motion blur is still lacking. Hence, this paper will address some possible solutions and evaluate their performance. The purpose of a motion blur detector is to classify the digital image as blurred or clear and inform users. This function can supply information for users to decide to retake the picture immediately instead of turning the camera to playback mode to check. For achieving higher error tolerance and adaptation to different image capturing circumstances, a machine learning technique is employed. Different digital image processing schemes are explored to find the most discriminative features. Among the many machine techniques, Support Vector Machine (SVM) has been implemented. To achieve the best performance for SVM, inherent information extraction from motion blurred images is extremely important. Thus, several signal transformations including discrete Fourier, discrete cosine, and Radon transformation have been explored. A comparison of the performance of different feature vectors, kernel function, and parameters will also been addressed in this paper.

  10. Image segmentation via motion vector estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Malek, Aiman A.; Hasekioglu, Orkun; Bloomer, John J.

    1990-07-01

    In the visual world moving edges in the periphery represent vital pieces of information that directs the human foveation mechanism to selectively gather information around these specific locations. This computationally efficient approach of allocating resources at key locations has inspired computer visionists to develop new target detection and hacking algorithms based on motion detection in image sequences. In this study we implemented a recursive algorithm for estimating motion vector fields for each pixel in a sequence of Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) images. Velocity information is used to segment the image and perform linear quadratic and acceleration-based frame interpolation to produce an apparent frame rate increase. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of low-rate digital fluoroscopy hence less exposure risks while preserving image quality. Furthermore the technique can be useful in the medical Picture Archival and Communication Systems (PACS) where image data can be compressed by storing and transmiting only the motion fields associated with the moving pixels. 1.

  11. Thunderstorm-associated cloud motions as computed from 5-minute SMS pictures. [Synchronous Meteorological Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tecson, J. J.; Umenhofer, T. A.; Fujita, T. T.

    1977-01-01

    The five-minute rapid-scan imagery from the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite is employed to study cloud motions associated with the Omaha tornado of May 6, 1975. Cloud-motion vectors derived from automated and man-machine interactive systems provide an account of the mesoscale phenomena. In addition to the geostationary satellite data, aerial photography obtained during a cloud-truth mission is used in the severe storm investigation. For tracking overland cumuli with short half-lives, a three-minute scan interval appears necessary for the satellite imagery.

  12. Motion/imagery secure cloud enterprise architecture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLay, John L.

    2012-06-01

    Cloud computing with storage virtualization and new service-oriented architectures brings a new perspective to the aspect of a distributed motion imagery and persistent surveillance enterprise. Our existing research is focused mainly on content management, distributed analytics, WAN distributed cloud networking performance issues of cloud based technologies. The potential of leveraging cloud based technologies for hosting motion imagery, imagery and analytics workflows for DOD and security applications is relatively unexplored. This paper will examine technologies for managing, storing, processing and disseminating motion imagery and imagery within a distributed network environment. Finally, we propose areas for future research in the area of distributed cloud content management enterprises.

  13. Photogrammetry and photo interpretation applied to analyses of cloud cover, cloud type, and cloud motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    A determination was made of the areal extent of terrain obscured by clouds and cloud shadows on a portion of an Apollo 9 photograph at the instant of exposure. This photogrammetrically determined area was then compared to the cloud coverage reported by surface weather observers at approximately the same time and location, as a check on result quality. Stereograms prepared from Apollo 9 vertical photographs, illustrating various percentages of cloud coverage, are presented to help provide a quantitative appreciation of the degradation of terrain photography by clouds and their attendant shadows. A scheme, developed for the U.S. Navy, utilizing pattern recognition techniques for determining cloud motion from sequences of satellite photographs, is summarized. Clouds, turbulence, haze, and solar altitude, four elements of our natural environment which affect aerial photographic missions, are each discussed in terms of their effects on imagery obtained by aerial photography. Data of a type useful to aerial photographic mission planners, expressing photographic ground coverage in terms of flying height above terrain and camera focal length, for a standard aerial photograph format, are provided. Two oblique orbital photographs taken during the Apollo 9 flight are shown, and photo-interpretations, discussing the cloud types imaged and certain visible geographical features, are provided.

  14. Volcanic explosion clouds - Density, temperature, and particle content estimates from cloud motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.; Self, S.

    1980-01-01

    Photographic records of 10 vulcanian eruption clouds produced during the 1978 eruption of Fuego Volcano in Guatemala have been analyzed to determine cloud velocity and acceleration at successive stages of expansion. Cloud motion is controlled by air drag (dominant during early, high-speed motion) and buoyancy (dominant during late motion when the cloud is convecting slowly). Cloud densities in the range 0.6 to 1.2 times that of the surrounding atmosphere were obtained by fitting equations of motion for two common cloud shapes (spheres and vertical cylinders) to the observed motions. Analysis of the heat budget of a cloud permits an estimate of cloud temperature and particle weight fraction to be made from the density. Model results suggest that clouds generally reached temperatures within 10 K of that of the surrounding air within 10 seconds of formation and that dense particle weight fractions were less than 2% by this time. The maximum sizes of dense particles supported by motion in the convecting clouds range from 140 to 1700 microns.

  15. Clouds on Neptune: Motions, Evolution, and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sromovsky, Larry A.; Morgan, Thomas (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The aims of our original proposal were these: (1) improving measurements of Neptune's circulation, (2) understanding the spatial distribution of cloud features, (3) discovery of new cloud features and understanding their evolutionary process, (4) understanding the vertical structure of zonal cloud patterns, (5) defining the structure of discrete cloud features, and (6) defining the near IR albedo and light curve of Triton. Towards these aims we proposed analysis of existing 1996 groundbased NSFCAM/IRTF observations and nearly simultaneous WFPC2 observations from the Hubble Space Telescope. We also proposed to acquire new observations from both HST and the IRTF.

  16. Rapid ray motions in barium plasma clouds and auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Swift, D. W.; Wallis, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    On two evenings in 1968, anomalous field-aligned brightenings or emission enhancements of up to 3X were observed to move rapidly through three different Ba(+) clouds over Andoya, Norway. Similar effects were observed in Ba(+) clouds released from rockets launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, on March 21, 1973 and on March 22, 1980. On these occasions, auroras on or near the Ba(+) L shell also exhibited active rapid ray motions, which prompts the assumption that the two phenomena are related and the expectation that an explanation of the rapid ray motions in the Ba(+) clouds would lead to a better understanding of the physics of auroral ray motions and the auroral atmosphere. Seven possible mechanisms to produce the observed moving emission enhancements are discussed. The observations provide strong evidence for the existence of transient electric fields of order 100 mV/m at altitudes as low as 200 km during active aurora with rapid ray motions.

  17. An R-D optimized transcoding resilient motion vector selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminlou, Alireza; Semsarzadeh, Mehdi; Fatemi, Omid

    2014-12-01

    Selection of motion vector (MV) has a significant impact on the quality of an encoded, and particularly a transcoded video, in terms of rate-distortion (R-D) performance. The conventional motion estimation process, in most existing video encoders, ignores the rate of residuals by utilizing rate and distortion of motion compensation step. This approach implies that the selected MV depends on the quantization parameter. Hence, the same MV that has been selected for high bit rate compression may not be suitable for low bit rate ones when transcoding the video with motion information reuse technique, resulting in R-D performance degradation. In this paper, we propose an R-D optimized motion selection criterion that takes into account the effect of residual rate in MV selection process. Based on the proposed criterion, a new two-piece Lagrange multiplier selection is introduced for motion estimation process. Analytical evaluations indicate that our proposed scheme results in MVs that are less sensitive to changes in bit rate or quantization parameter. As a result, MVs in the encoded bitstream may be used even after the encoded sequence has been transcoded to a lower bit rate one using re-quantization. Simulation results indicate that the proposed technique improves the quality performance of coding and transcoding without any computational overhead.

  18. The motion of uneven structure of convective clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Takaya, Yoshimasa )

    1993-02-14

    An observational study on the motion of the uneven structure on the surface of convective clouds is carried out using a time-lapse video recorder. The development of the uneven structure shows that the mixing near the cloud-environmental interface occurs through outward motion of the projected part (turret) and inward motion of the depressed part, which are quite different from the winding billowlike motion. The theory presented here predicts the growth direction of the turret in its growing stage. Namely, two angles, one between a vertical line and the growing direction of the turret (=[alpha]) and the other between the normal to the mean cloud surface at the place of the turret and the growing direction of the turret are equal ([alpha] = [beta]). Nine turrets are selected from three cumuli to compare the observation with the prediction, and a reasonable result was obtained. Average values of 2[alpha]/([alpha]+[beta]) and 2[beta]/([alpha]+[beta]) over the nine samples are 1.11 and 0.89, respectively, with the standard deviation 0.26.

  19. The effect of wind and moisture gradients on the arbitrary assignment of cloud motions to a vertical coordinate system in two Sesame cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslen, C. A.; Koch, S. E.; Uccellini, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Satellite-derived cloud motion 'wind' vectors (CMV) are increasingly used in mesoscale and in global analyses, and questions have been raised regarding the uncertainty of the level assignment for the CMV. One of two major problems in selecting a level for the CMV is related to uncertainties in assigning the motion vector to either the cloud top or base. The second problem is related to the inability to transfer the 'wind' derived from the CMV at individually specified heights to a standard coordinated surface. The present investigation has the objective to determine if the arbitrary level assignment represents a serious obstacle to the use of cloud motion wind vectors in the mesoscale analysis of a severe storm environment.

  20. Rapid ray motions in barium plasma clouds and auroras

    SciTech Connect

    Wescott, E.M.; Hallinan, T.J.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.C.; Swift, D.W.; Wallis, D.D. )

    1993-03-01

    Barium plasma clouds released at high latitudes characteristically become striated with many field-aligned rays. The rays which often resemble auroral features usually drift as a whole with the E [times] B/B[sup 2] drift of the cloud and alter position only slowly (order or tens of seconds). On two evenings in 1968, in releases from Andoya, Norway, anomalous field-aligned brightenings or emission enhancements of up to 3X were observed to move rapidly (10-20 km/s) through three different Ba[sup +] clouds. Similar effects were observed in Ba[sup +] clouds released from rockets launched from Poker Flat, Alaska: On March 21, 1973, in two Ba thermite releases and on March 22, 1980, in the Ba-shaped charge experiment Miss Peggy.' On these occasions, auroras on or near the Ba[sup +] L shell, also exhibited active rapid ray motions. This leads to the assumption that the two phenomena are related and the expectation that an explanation of the rapid ray motions in the Ba[sup +] clouds would lead to a better understanding of the physics of auroral ray motions and the auroral ionosphere. Seven possible mechanisms to produce the observed moving emission enhancements are discussed. Direct motion of an isolated Ba[sup +] ray past the other rays by E [times] B/B[sup 2] motion seems very unlikely due to the observed variations in the enhancements and the large E field required (> 500 mV/m). Compressional waves do not seem to be of sufficient amplitude or velocity. Absorption or radiation of Doppler shifted Ba[sup +] emissions by ions gyrating or moving at a few kilometers per second seems to be the most promising mechanism for producing the enhancements. The observations provide compelling evidence for the existence of transient electric fields of order 100 mV/m at altitudes as low as 200 km during active aurora with rapid ray motions. The affected regions have dimensions of order a few kilometers across B and move eastward at 10-20 km/s. 36 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A MISR cloud-type classifier using reduced Support Vector Machines

    E-print Network

    A MISR cloud-type classifier using reduced Support Vector Machines Dominic Mazzoni1 , ´Akos Horv-level cloud-type classifier for the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), an in- strument used to study clouds and aerosols from NASA's Terra satellite. To augment MISR's existing high-level products

  2. Generation and utilisation of quality indicators for satellite-derived atmospheric motion vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmlund, Kenneth

    The extraction of Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMVs) from cloud and moisture features from successive geostationary satellite images is an established and important part of the global observing system. One of the main problems in the utilisation of this data is the variable quality of the derived displacement vectors. Furthermore the AMVs are still currently used as single point measurements, even though they are generally based on targets that represent large areas and the height that is assigned to the vectors often represents a layer mean. In the early AMV derivation schemes the derived vector fields were quality controlled by experienced meteorologists and poor vectors were removed. Furthermore any suspect vector showing any kind of deviations in time and space was rejected and hence only about 17% of all possible vectors were disseminated. Today the high production frequency and the increased resolution make manual quality control unfeasible. Furthermore the new assimilation schemes utilised in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) require qualitative information on the errors of the individual AMVs. This Thesis describes an Automatic Quality Control (AQC) scheme that is based on the statistical properties of the derived AMVs. The properties of the AMVs, i.e. their consistency in time and space, are interpreted with a number of tests. The outcome of each test is normalised such that they can be combined to a Quality Indicator (QI) that gives an estimation of the expected quality of every individual vector as is shown by statistics against radiosondes and verified by the positive impact in data assimilation schemes. The QIs are currently derived and disseminated together with the derived AMVs by several operational AMV derivation centres. Only a small number of vectors are now removed before dissemination. The QIs are used operationally for data selection at various NWT centres and have alleviated some of the problems related to the assimilation of this data in NWT. QIs can also be used in other application in order to provide a better determination of the atmospheric flow facilitating a more efficient use of the AMVs e.g. for climate studies and nowcasting applications.

  3. Texture video-assisted motion vector predictor for depth map coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoxian; Chang, Yilin; Li, Zhibin; Huo, Junyan

    2011-08-01

    A texture video-assisted motion vector predictor for depth map coding is proposed in this letter. Based on the analyses of motion similarity between texture videos and their corresponding depth maps, the proposed approach uses the motion vectors of texture videos and the median predictor jointly to determine the optimal predicted motion vector for depth map coding by employing a rate-distortion (R-D) criterion. Experimental results demonstrate that compared with the median predictor utilized in H.264/AVC, the proposed method can save the maximum and average bit rate as high as 4.89% and 3.68%, respectively, while guaranteeing the quality of synthesized virtual views.

  4. Self-powered thin-film motion vector sensor.

    PubMed

    Jing, Qingshen; Xie, Yannan; Zhu, Guang; Han, Ray P S; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing random micromeso-scale ambient energy is not only clean and sustainable, but it also enables self-powered sensors and devices to be realized. Here we report a robust and self-powered kinematic vector sensor fabricated using highly pliable organic films that can be bent to spread over curved and uneven surfaces. The device derives its operational energy from a close-proximity triboelectrification of two surfaces: a polytetrafluoroethylene film coated with a two-column array of copper electrodes that constitutes the mover and a polyimide film with the top and bottom surfaces coated with a two-column aligned array of copper electrodes that comprises the stator. During relative reciprocations, the electrodes in the mover generate electric signals of ±5?V to attain a peak power density of ?65?mW?m(-2) at a speed of 0.3?ms(-1). From our 86,000 sliding motion tests of kinematic measurements, the sensor exhibits excellent stability, repeatability and strong signal durability. PMID:26271603

  5. Self-powered thin-film motion vector sensor

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Qingshen; Xie, Yannan; Zhu, Guang; Han, Ray P. S.; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing random micromeso-scale ambient energy is not only clean and sustainable, but it also enables self-powered sensors and devices to be realized. Here we report a robust and self-powered kinematic vector sensor fabricated using highly pliable organic films that can be bent to spread over curved and uneven surfaces. The device derives its operational energy from a close-proximity triboelectrification of two surfaces: a polytetrafluoroethylene film coated with a two-column array of copper electrodes that constitutes the mover and a polyimide film with the top and bottom surfaces coated with a two-column aligned array of copper electrodes that comprises the stator. During relative reciprocations, the electrodes in the mover generate electric signals of ±5?V to attain a peak power density of ?65?mW?m?2 at a speed of 0.3?ms?1. From our 86,000 sliding motion tests of kinematic measurements, the sensor exhibits excellent stability, repeatability and strong signal durability. PMID:26271603

  6. Self-powered thin-film motion vector sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Qingshen; Xie, Yannan; Zhu, Guang; Han, Ray P. S.; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-08-01

    Harnessing random micromeso-scale ambient energy is not only clean and sustainable, but it also enables self-powered sensors and devices to be realized. Here we report a robust and self-powered kinematic vector sensor fabricated using highly pliable organic films that can be bent to spread over curved and uneven surfaces. The device derives its operational energy from a close-proximity triboelectrification of two surfaces: a polytetrafluoroethylene film coated with a two-column array of copper electrodes that constitutes the mover and a polyimide film with the top and bottom surfaces coated with a two-column aligned array of copper electrodes that comprises the stator. During relative reciprocations, the electrodes in the mover generate electric signals of +/-5 V to attain a peak power density of >=65 mW m-2 at a speed of 0.3 ms-1. From our 86,000 sliding motion tests of kinematic measurements, the sensor exhibits excellent stability, repeatability and strong signal durability.

  7. Vector constants of motion for time-dependent Kepler and isotropic harmonic oscillator potentials

    E-print Network

    O. M. Ritter; F. C. Santos; A. C. Tort

    2000-03-29

    A method of obtaining vector constants of motion for time-independent as well as time-dependent central fields is discussed. Some well-established results are rederived in this alternative way and new ones obtained.

  8. Effect of GOES-R Image Navigation and Registration Errors on Atmospheric Motion Vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary

    2008-01-01

    High temporal frequency imagery from geostationary satellites allows for the continuous monitoring of rapidly changing atmospheric constituents such as smoke, dust, water vapor and clouds. The image sequences are often used to quantify the displacement of image features such as water vapor and clouds to produce atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) which are used as diagnostic tools and also assimilated into numerical weather forecast models. The basic principle behind the determination of AMVs is the calculation of the physical displacement of features from one image (time) to the next. This process assumes that the features being tracked do not change as a function of time, usually requiring the use of short time interval imagery to minimize substantial change in size and shape of the features being tracked. High spatial resolution imagery also is required for reliable feature identification. While these image resolution and temporal sampling requirements often provide major drivers for space-based instrument design requirements, accurate image navigation and registration, INn (between a sequence of images), is also critical to the derivation of useful AMVs. In this paper and poster to be presented at the conference, the image navigation and registration (INR) accuracy expected for the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) on the GOES-R series of satellites will be discussed in light of its impact on AMV accuracy. Significant satellite platform and modeling enhancements are planned which should significantly improve INn performance of the GOES-R instruments. Some of these improvements have been demonstrated for the GOES-13 satellite which was launched in summer of 2006. An analysis of GOES-13 INR data, from the special satellite check out period, will be used in the assessment.

  9. Landsat 7 Reveals Large-scale Fractal Motion of Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Landsat 7 image of clouds off the Chilean coast near the Juan Fernandez Islands (also known as the Robinson Crusoe Islands) on September 15, 1999, shows a unique pattern called a 'von Karman vortex street.' This pattern has long been studied in the laboratory, where the vortices are created by oil flowing past a cylindrical obstacle, making a string of vortices only several tens of centimeters long. Study of this classic 'flow past a circular cylinder' has been very important in the understanding of laminar and turbulent fluid flow that controls a wide variety of phenomena, from the lift under an aircraft wing to Earth's weather. Here, the cylinder is replaced by Alejandro Selkirk Island (named after the true 'Robinson Crusoe,' who was stranded here for many months in the early 1700s). The island is about 1.5 km in diameter, and rises 1.6 km into a layer of marine stratocumulus clouds. This type of cloud is important for its strong cooling of the Earth's surface, partially counteracting the Greenhouse warming. An extended, steady equatorward wind creates vortices with clockwise flow off the eastern edge and counterclockwise flow off the western edge of the island. The vortices grow as they advect hundreds of kilometers downwind, making a street 10,000 times longer than those made in the laboratory. Observing the same phenomenon extended over such a wide range of sizes dramatizes the 'fractal' nature of atmospheric convection and clouds. Fractals are characteristic of fluid flow and other dynamic systems that exhibit 'chaotic' motions. Both clockwise and counter-clockwise vortices are generated by flow around the island. As the flow separates from the island's leeward (away from the source of the wind) side, the vortices 'swallow' some of the clear air over the island. (Much of the island air is cloudless due to a local 'land breeze' circulation set up by the larger heat capacity of the waters surrounding the island.) The 'swallowed' gulps of clear island air get carried along within the vortices, but these are soon mixed into the surrounding clouds. Landsat is unique in its ability to image both the small-scale eddies that mix clear and cloudy air, down to the 30 meter pixel size of Landsat, but also having a wide enough field-of-view, 180 km, to reveal the connection of the turbulence to large-scale flows such as the subtropical oceanic gyres. Landsat 7, with its new onboard digital recorder, has extended this capability away from the few Landsat ground stations to remote areas such as Alejandro Island, and thus is gradually providing a global dynamic picture of evolving human-scale phenomena. (For more details on von Karman vortices, refer to http://climate.gsfc.nasa.gov/cahalan) Image and caption courtesy Bob Cahalan, NASA GSFC

  10. MOTION in SPACE One important application of vector calculus is to motion in space -in fact, much of the application of mathematics to science

    E-print Network

    Knopf, Dan

    calculus to express the results analytically! Newton's Laws of Motion and the Theory of Gravitation of the application of mathematics to science can be traced back to Kepler's Laws describing the motion of the planetsMOTION in SPACE One important application of vector calculus is to motion in space - in fact, much

  11. MOTION in SPACE One important application of vector calculus is to motion in space -in fact, much of the application of mathematics to

    E-print Network

    Knopf, Dan

    the results analytically! Newton's Laws of Motion and the Theory of Gravitation followed to Kepler's Laws describing the motion of the planets in terms of conic sections. ShortlyMOTION in SPACE One important application of vector calculus is to motion

  12. Steady-State Pursuit Is Driven by Object Motion Rather Than the Vector Average of Local Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Beutter, B. R.; Lorenceau, J. D.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that humans can pursue the motion of objects whose trajectories can be recovered only by spatio-temporal integration of local motion signals. We now explore the integration rule used to derive the target-motion signal driving pursuit. We measured the pursuit response of 4 observers (2 naive) to the motion of a line-figure diamond viewed through two vertical bar apertures (0.2 cd/square m). The comers were always occluded so that only four line segments (93 cd/square m) were visible behind the occluding foreground (38 cd/square m). The diamond was flattened (40 & 140 degree vertex angles) such that vector averaging of the local normal motions and vertical integration (e.g. IOC) yield very I or different predictions, analogous to using a Type II plaid. The diamond moved along Lissajous-figure trajectories (Ax = Ay = 2 degrees; TFx = 0.8 Hz; TFy = 0.4 Hz). We presented only 1.25 cycles and used 6 different randomly interleaved initial relative phases to minimize the role of predictive strategies. Observers were instructed to track the diamond and reported that its motion was always coherent (unlike type II plaids). Saccade-free portions of the horizontal and vertical eye-position traces sampled at 240 Hz were fit by separate sinusoids. Pursuit gain with respect to the diamond averaged 0.7 across subjects and directions. The ratio of the mean vertical to horizontal amplitude of the pursuit response was 1.7 +/- 0.7 averaged across subjects (1SD). This is close to the prediction of 1.0 from vertical motion-integration rules, but far from 7.7 predicted by vector averaging and infinity predicted by segment- or terminator-tracking strategies. Because there is no retinal motion which directly corresponds to the diamond's motion, steady-state pursuit of our "virtual" diamond is not closed-loop in the traditional sense. Thus, accurate pursuit is unlikely to result simply from local retinal negative feedback. We conclude that the signal driving steady-state pursuit is not the vector average of local motion signals, but rather a more vertical estimate of object motion, derived in extrastriate cortical areas beyond V1, perhaps NIT or MST.

  13. Turbulent fluid motion 2: Scalars, vectors, and tensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    The author shows that the sum or difference of two vectors is a vector. Similarly the sum of any two tensors of the same order is a tensor of that order. No meaning is attached to the sum of tensors of different orders, say u(sub i) + u(sub ij); that is not a tensor. In general, an equation containing tensors has meaning only if all the terms in the equation are tensors of the same order, and if the same unrepeated subscripts appear in all the terms. These facts will be used in obtaining appropriate equations for fluid turbulence. With the foregoing background, the derivation of appropriate continuum equations for turbulence should be straightforward.

  14. Video analysis based on motion vectors and its application to image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watabe, Akihiko; Yamada, Koichi; Komiya, Kazumi

    2001-11-01

    Digitalized terrestrial broadcast can offer many programs to the TV viewer like communication satellite broadcasting. And it will spread in Japan. And image retrieval is necessary for us to watch many programs. Thereupon, we proposed method that particular scene is retrieved from video image. That retrieval method is to use the motion vector contained in MPEG-2 stream. Concretely, the movement of image is defined as the characteristics from information of motion vector. And the characteristic of a retrieval object and retrieval query scene are compared. In this way, target scene is retrieved. And we examined about efficacy of this retrieval method by using a television image.

  15. Cloud morphology and motions from Pioneer Venus images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, W. B.; Del Genio, A. D.; Limaye, S. S.; Travis, L. D.; Stone, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    The horizontal and vertical cloud structures, atmospheric waves, and wind velocities at the cloud top level were determined by the Pioneer Venus photopolarimeter images in the UV from January through March 1979. The images indicate long-term evolution of cloud characteristics, the atmospheric dynamics, and rapid small changes in cloud morphology. The clouds show a globally coordinated oscillation relative to latitude circles; retrograde zonal winds of 100 m/s near the equator are determined from the tracking of small-scale cloud properties, but two hemispheres show important variations. The zonal wind velocity in the southern hemisphere is reduced toward the poles at a rate similar to solid body rotation; the midlatitude jet stream noted by Mariner 10 is not observed.

  16. Compressed domain video indexing techniques using DCT and motion vector information in MPEG video \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Lin, King-Ip "David"

    Compressed domain video indexing techniques using DCT and motion vector information in MPEG video, and retrieval techniques. Given that video is typically stored efficiently in a compressed format, if we can and operating at the pixel level. Compressed domain parsing of video has been presented in earlier work where

  17. Using Haptic Vector Fields for Animation Motion Control Technical Report PCS-TR99-353

    E-print Network

    Using Haptic Vector Fields for Animation Motion Control Technical Report PCS-TR99-353 Bruce Randall, 1999 Abstract We are exploring techniques for animation authoring and editing using a haptic force-feedback device. In our system, a family of animations is encoded by a bundle of trajectories. This bundle in turn

  18. Arctic PBL Cloud Height and Motion Retrievals from MISR and MINX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.

    2012-01-01

    How Arctic clouds respond and feedback to sea ice loss is key to understanding of the rapid climate change seen in the polar region. As more open water becomes available in the Arctic Ocean, cold air outbreaks (aka. off-ice flow from polar lows) produce a vast sheet of roll clouds in the planetary boundary layer (PBl). The cold air temperature and wind velocity are the critical parameters to determine and understand the PBl structure formed under these roll clouds. It has been challenging for nadir visible/IR sensors to detect Arctic clouds due to lack of contrast between clouds and snowy/icy surfaces. In addition) PBl temperature inversion creates a further problem for IR sensors to relate cloud top temperature to cloud top height. Here we explore a new method with the Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) instrument to measure cloud height and motion over the Arctic Ocean. Employing a stereoscopic-technique, MISR is able to measure cloud top height accurately and distinguish between clouds and snowy/icy surfaces with the measured height. We will use the MISR INteractive eXplorer (MINX) to quantify roll cloud dynamics during cold-air outbreak events and characterize PBl structures over water and over sea ice.

  19. Stratiform clouds and their interaction with atmospheric motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John H. E.; Shirer, Hampton N.

    1993-01-01

    The spatial patterns of stratocumulus cloud frequency for the continental United States and adjacent oceans were routinely obtained from surface cloud observations every six hours. These frequencies were correlated with upper air patterns at 850, 700, and 500 mb. Significant frequency maxima were found near trough axes over marine areas during relatively stationary large-scale wave patterns. These maxima tended to occur to the east of trough axes. Over continental regions, there was little relationship between stratocumulus and synoptic-scale flows patterns, probably because of the short lifetime of cloud over land. A summary of these findings is included.

  20. PROPER-MOTION STUDY OF THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS USING SPM MATERIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, Katherine; Girard, Terrence M.; Van Altena, William F.; Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I.; Korchagin, Vladimir I.; Herrera, David E-mail: terry.girard@yale.ed

    2010-12-15

    Absolute proper motions are determined for stars and galaxies to V = 17.5 over a 450 deg{sup 2} area that encloses both Magellanic Clouds. The proper motions are based on photographic and CCD observations of the Yale/San Juan Southern Proper Motion program, which span a baseline of 40 years. Multiple, local relative proper-motion measures are combined in an overlap solution using photometrically selected Galactic disk stars to define a global relative system that is then transformed to absolute using external galaxies and Hipparcos stars to tie into the ICRS. The resulting catalog of 1.4 million objects is used to derive the mean absolute proper motions of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC); ({mu}{sub {alpha}}cos {delta}, {mu}{sub {delta}}){sub LMC} = (1.89, + 0.39) {+-} (0.27, 0.27) masyr{sup -1} and ({mu}{sub {alpha}}cos {delta}, {mu}{sub {delta}}){sub SMC} = (0.98, - 1.01) {+-} (0.30, 0.29) masyr{sup -1}. These mean motions are based on best-measured samples of 3822 LMC stars and 964 SMC stars. A dominant portion (0.25 mas yr{sup -1}) of the formal errors is due to the estimated uncertainty in the inertial system of the Hipparcos Catalog stars used to anchor the bright end of our proper motion measures. A more precise determination can be made for the proper motion of the SMC relative to the LMC; ({mu}{sub {alpha}cos {delta}}, {mu}{sub {delta}}){sub SMC-LMC} = (-0.91, - 1.49) {+-} (0.16, 0.15) masyr{sup -1}. This differential value is combined with measurements of the proper motion of the LMC taken from the literature to produce new absolute proper-motion determinations for the SMC, as well as an estimate of the total velocity difference of the two clouds to within {+-}54 km s{sup -1}. The absolute proper-motion results are consistent with the Clouds' orbits being marginally bound to the Milky Way, albeit on an elongated orbit. The inferred relative velocity between the Clouds places them near their binding energy limit and, thus, no definitive conclusion can be made as to whether or not the Clouds are bound to one another.

  1. Fast subpel motion estimation for H.264/advanced video coding with an adaptive motion vector accuracy decision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoyoung; Jung, Bongsoo; Jung, Jooyoung; Jeon, Byeungwoo

    2012-11-01

    The quarter-pel motion vector accuracy supported by H.264/advanced video coding (AVC) in motion estimation (ME) and compensation (MC) provides high compression efficiency. However, it also increases the computational complexity. While various well-known fast integer-pel ME methods are already available, lack of a good, fast subpel ME method results in problems associated with relatively high computational complexity. This paper presents one way of solving the complexity problem of subpel ME by making adaptive motion vector (MV) accuracy decisions in inter-mode selection. The proposed MV accuracy decision is made using inter-mode selection of a macroblock with two decision criteria. Pixels are classified as stationary (and/or homogeneous) or nonstationary (and/or nonhomogeneous). In order to avoid unnecessary interpolation and processing, a proper subpel ME level is chosen among four different combinations, each of which has a different MV accuracy and number of subpel ME iterations based on the classification. Simulation results using an open source x264 software encoder show that without any noticeable degradation (by -0.07 dB on average), the proposed method reduces total encoding time and subpel ME time, respectively, by 51.78% and by 76.49% on average, as compared to the conventional full-pel pixel search.

  2. A diffuse interstellar cloud explored from within: internal motions, abundance gradients and external interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gry, Cecile; Jenkins, Edward

    2015-08-01

    The local cloud surrounding the Sun turns out to be a great laboratory to explore the details of the warm diffuse medium without the confusion from piling up absorptions from different regions. UV absorption lines observed by HST in the spectra of nearby stars permit us to construct a comprehensive picture of a diffuse interstellar cloud and reveals that it departs from homogeneity in a number of aspects and physical properties:- This local cloud undergoes a deformation related to a compression in the direction of motion and an expansion in perpendicular directions, much like a squashed balloon.- The cloud average HI density varies from 0.03 to 0.1 cm-3. The cloud outer boundary inferred from the average density and column densities is very irregular with an average distance away from the Sun of 9 +/- 7 pc.- The metal abundances decrease steadily from the rear to the head of the cloud, and this phenomenon appears not to be related to ionization effects but rather to changes in the amounts of depletion due to dust formation.- Most of the sight-lines on one hemisphere evidence the presence of gas at a uniform differential velocity of -7 km/s relative to the cloud, which may be the manifestation of a shock progressing toward the cloud interior on one half of the cloud, possibly created by a surge in the thermal pressure in the much lower density medium that surrounds the cloud.

  3. Earthquake slip vectors and estimates of present-day plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Two alternative models for present-day global plate motions are derived from subsets of the NUVEL-1 data in order to investigate the degree to which earthquake slip vectors affect the NUVEL-1 model and to provide estimates of present-day plate velocities that are independent of earthquake slip vectors. The data set used to derive the first model excludes subduction zone slip vectors. The primary purpose of this model is to demonstrate that the 240 subduction zone slip vectors in the NUVEL-1 data set do not greatly affect the plate velocities predicted by NUVEL-1. A data set that excludes all of the 724 earthquake slip vectors used to derive NUVEL-1 is used to derive the second model. This model is suitable as a reference model for kinematic studies that require plate velocity estimates unaffected by earthquake slip vectors. The slip-dependent slip vector bias along transform faults is investigated using the second model, and evidence is sought for biases in slip directions along spreading centers.

  4. Interactions between spacecraft motions and the atmospheric cloud physics laboratory experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    In evaluating the effects of spacecraft motions on atmospheric cloud physics laboratory (ACPL) experimentation, the motions of concern are those which will result in the movement of the fluid or cloud particles within the experiment chambers. Of the various vehicle motions and residual forces which can and will occur, three types appear most likely to damage the experimental results: non-steady rotations through a large angle, long-duration accelerations in a constant direction, and vibrations. During the ACPL ice crystal growth experiments, the crystals are suspended near the end of a long fiber (20 cm long by 200 micron diameter) of glass or similar material. Small vibrations of the supported end of the fiber could cause extensive motions of the ice crystal, if care is not taken to avoid this problem.

  5. A Convective Vorticity Vector Associated With Tropical Convection: A 2D Cloud-Resolving Modeling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Shou-Ting; Ping, Fan; Li, Xiao-Fan; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    Although dry/moist potential vorticity is a useful physical quantity for meteorological analysis, it cannot be applied to the analysis of 2D simulations. A convective vorticity vector (CVV) is introduced in this study to analyze 2D cloud-resolving simulation data associated with 2D tropical convection. The cloud model is forced by the vertical velocity, zonal wind, horizontal advection, and sea surface temperature obtained from the TOGA COARE, and is integrated for a selected 10-day period. The CVV has zonal and vertical components in the 2D x-z frame. Analysis of zonally-averaged and mass-integrated quantities shows that the correlation coefficient between the vertical component of the CVV and the sum of the cloud hydrometeor mixing ratios is 0.81, whereas the correlation coefficient between the zonal component and the sum of the mixing ratios is only 0.18. This indicates that the vertical component of the CVV is closely associated with tropical convection. The tendency equation for the vertical component of the CVV is derived and the zonally-averaged and mass-integrated tendency budgets are analyzed. The tendency of the vertical component of the CVV is determined by the interaction between the vorticity and the zonal gradient of cloud heating. The results demonstrate that the vertical component of the CVV is a cloud-linked parameter and can be used to study tropical convection.

  6. Multihypothesis prediction using decoder side-motion vector derivation in inter-frame video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamp, Steffen; Ballé, Johannes; Wien, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a multihypothesis prediction scheme for inter frame video coding is proposed. Using a template matching algorithm, motion vectors are derived at the decoder side instead of explicitly coding the motion vectors into the bitstream. Therefore, higher numbers of hypotheses can be used in the averaging process at no additional coding cost. The proposed scheme has been implemented into the H.264/AVC reference software. Simulation results show bitrate reductions compared to H.264/AVC of 7.7% on average for the tested video sequences. It is shown that part of the performance gain is due to rounding effects in H.264/AVC sub-pixel interpolation which can be exploited in the averaging calculation of the proposed multihypothesis prediction. Experiments with an improved interpolation filter for both reference scheme and the proposed scheme still yield bitrate reductions of 4.7% on average.

  7. A proper motion study of the Lupus clouds using Virtual Observatory tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Martí, B.; Jiménez-Esteban, F.; Solano, E.

    2011-05-01

    Context. The Lupus dark cloud complex is a well-known, nearby low-mass star-forming region, probably associated with the Gould Belt. In recent years, the number of stellar and substellar Lupus candidate members has been remarkably increased thanks to the Cores to Disks (c2d) Spitzer Legacy Program and other studies. However, most of these newly discovered objects still lack confirmation that they belong to the dark clouds. Aims: By using available kinematical information, we test the membership of the new Lupus candidate members proposed by the c2d program and by a complementary optical survey. We also investigate the relationship between the proper motions and other properties of the objects, in order to get some clues about their formation and early evolution. Methods: We compiled a list of members and possible members of Lupus 1, 3, and 4, together with all available information on their spectral types, disks, and physical parameters. Using Virtual Observatory tools, we cross-matched this list with the available astrometric catalogues to get proper motions for our objects. Our final sample contains sources with magnitudes I < 16 mag and estimated masses ? 0.1 M?. Results: According to the kinematic information, our sources can be divided into two main groups. The first one contains sources with higher proper motions in agreement with other Gould Belt populations and with spatial distribution, optical and near-infrared colours, and disk composition consistent with these objects belonging to the Lupus clouds. In the second group, sources have lower proper motions with random orientations, and they are mostly located outside the cloud cores, making their association with the Lupus complex more doubtful. We investigate the properties of the higher proper motion group, but cannot find any correlations with spatial location, binarity, the presence of a circumstellar disk, or with physical properties such as effective temperature, luminosity, mass, or age. Conclusions: We conclude that the lower proper motion group probably represents a background population or mixture of populations unrelated to the Lupus clouds. The higher proper motion group, on the other hand, has properties consistent with it being a genuine population of the Lupus star-forming region. More accurate proper motions and/or radial velocity information are required for a more detailed study of the kinematic properties of the Lupus stellar members. Tables 2-6 and Appendix are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Transverse motion of high-speed barium clouds in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, H. G., Jr.; Fedder, J. A.; Huba, J. D.; Zalesak, S. T.

    1985-01-01

    Simulation results, based on a field-line-integrated, two-dimensional, electrostatic model, are presented for the motion of a barium cloud injected transverse to the geomagnetic field in the ionosphere at high speeds. It is found that the gross evaluation of injected plasma clouds depends on the initial conditions, as well as the nature of the background coupling. For a massive (mass of about 10 kg), orbital (velocity of about 5 km/s) release in the F region (350-450 km), it is found that plasma clouds can drift tens of kilometers across the magnetic field in tens of seconds after ionization. This type of release is similar to those which are planned for the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite mission.

  9. Characterizing uncertainty in the motion, future location and ash concentrations of volcanic plumes and ash clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webley, P.; Patra, A. K.; Bursik, M. I.; Pitman, E. B.; Dehn, J.; Singh, T.; Singla, P.; Stefanescu, E. R.; Madankan, R.; Pouget, S.; Jones, M.; Morton, D.; Pavolonis, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Forecasting the location and airborne concentrations of volcanic ash plumes and their dispersing clouds is complex and knowledge of the uncertainty in these forecasts is critical to assess and mitigate the hazards that could exist. We show the results from an interdisciplinary project that brings together scientists drawn from the atmospheric sciences, computer science, engineering, mathematics, and geology. The project provides a novel integration of computational and statistical modeling with a widely-used volcanic particle dispersion code, to provide quantitative measures of confidence in predictions of the motion of ash clouds caused by volcanic eruptions. We combine high performance computing and stochastic analysis, resulting in real time predictions of ash cloud motion that account for varying wind conditions and a range of model variables. We show how coupling a real-time model for ash dispersal, PUFF, with a volcanic eruption model, BENT, allows for the definition of the variability in the dispersal model inputs and hence classify the uncertainty that can then propagate for the ash cloud location and downwind concentrations. We additionally analyze the uncertainty in the numerical weather prediction forecast data used by the dispersal model by using ensemble forecasts and assess how this affects the downwind concentrations. These are all coupled together and by combining polynomical chaos quadrature with stochastic integration techniques, we provide a quantitative measure of the reliability (i.e. error) of those predictions. We show comparisons of the downwind height calculations and mass loadings with observations of ash clouds available from satellite remote sensing data. The aim is to provide a probabilistic forecast of location and ash concentration that can be generated in real-time and used by those end users in the operational ash cloud hazard assessment environment.

  10. The primer vector in linear, relative-motion equations. [spacecraft trajectory optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Primer vector theory is used in analyzing a set of linear, relative-motion equations - the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations - to determine the criteria and necessary conditions for an optimal, N-impulse trajectory. Since the state vector for these equations is defined in terms of a linear system of ordinary differential equations, all fundamental relations defining the solution of the state and costate equations, and the necessary conditions for optimality, can be expressed in terms of elementary functions. The analysis develops the analytical criteria for improving a solution by (1) moving any dependent or independent variable in the initial and/or final orbit, and (2) adding intermediate impulses. If these criteria are violated, the theory establishes a sufficient number of analytical equations. The subsequent satisfaction of these equations will result in the optimal position vectors and times of an N-impulse trajectory. The solution is examined for the specific boundary conditions of (1) fixed-end conditions, two-impulse, and time-open transfer; (2) an orbit-to-orbit transfer; and (3) a generalized rendezvous problem. A sequence of rendezvous problems is solved to illustrate the analysis and the computational procedure.

  11. A vector-dyadic development of the equations of motion for N-coupled rigid bodies and point masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    The equations of motion are derived, in vector-dyadic format, for a topological tree of coupled rigid bodies, point masses, and symmetrical momentum wheels. These equations were programmed, and form the basis for the general-purpose digital computer program N-BOD. A complete derivation of the equations of motion is included along with a description of the methods used for kinematics, constraint elimination, and for the inclusion of nongyroscope forces and torques acting external or internal to the system.

  12. Motion of the angular momentum vector in body coordinates for torque-free dual-spin spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, J. V.

    1981-01-01

    The motion of the angular momentum vector in body coordinates for torque free, asymmetric dual spin spacecraft without and, for a special case, with energy dissipation on the main spacecraft is investigated. Without energy dissipation, two integrals can be obtained from the Euler equations of motion. Using the classical method of elimination of variable, the motion about the equilibrium points (six for the general case) are derived with these integrals. For small nutation angle, theta, the trajectories about the theta = 0 deg and theta = 180 deg points readily show the requirements for stable motion about these points. Also the conditions needed to eliminate stable motion about the theta = 180 deg point as well as the other undesireable equilibrium points follow directly from these equations. For the special case where the angular momentum vector moves about the principal axis which contains the momentum wheel, the notion of 'free variable' azimuth angle is used. Physically this angle must vary from 0 to 2 pi in a circular periodic fashion. Expressions are thus obtained for the nutation angle in terms of the free variable and other spacecraft parameters. Results show that in general there are two separate trajectory expressions that govern the motion of the angular momentum vector in body coordinates.

  13. GPS determined eastward Sundaland motion with respect to Eurasia confirmed by earthquakes slip vectors at Sunda and Philippine trenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamot-Rooke, N.; Le Pichon, X.

    1999-12-01

    GPS measurements acquired over Southeast Asia in 1994 and 1996 in the framework of the GEODYSSEA program revealed that a large piece of continental lithosphere comprising the Indochina Peninsula, Sunda shelf and part of Indonesia behaves as a rigid `Sundaland' platelet. A direct adjustment of velocity vectors obtained in a Eurasian frame of reference shows that Sundaland block is rotating clockwise with respect to Eurasia around a pole of rotation located south of Australia. We present here an additional check of Sundaland motion that uses earthquakes slip vectors at Sunda and Philippine trenches. Seven sites of the GEODYSSEA network are close to the trenches and not separated from them by large active faults (two at Sumatra Trench, three at Java Trench and two at the Philippine Trench). The difference between the vector at the station and the adjacent subducting plate vector defines the relative subduction motion and should thus be aligned with the subduction earthquake slip vectors. We first derive a frame-free solution that minimizes the upper plate (or Sundaland) motion. When corrected for Australia-Eurasia and Philippines-Eurasia NUVEL1-A motion, the misfit between GPS and slip vectors azimuths is significant at 95% confidence, indicating that the upper plate does not belong to Eurasia. We then examine the range of solutions compatible with the slip vectors azimuths and conclude that the minimum velocity of Sundaland is a uniform 7-10 mm/a eastward velocity. However, introducing the additional constraint of the fit of the GEODYSSEA sites with the Australian IGS reference ones, or tie with the NTUS Singapore station, leads to a much narrower range of solutions. We conclude that Sundaland has an eastward velocity of about 10 mm/a on its southern boundary increasing to 16-18 mm/a on its northern boundary.

  14. Evidence of radial-axial motion couplings in an rf stored ion cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedel, M.; Rocher, J.; Knoop, M.; Vedel, F.

    1998-02-01

    The dynamics of an rf stored ion cloud is a demonstrative experimental illustration of non-linear equations such as those which are obtained when additional terms are considered in the Mathieu equation. One manifestation of the non-linearity is frequency locking leading to rational ratios between the frequencies of the ion motion. Macro-micro motion coupling modes were often observed during the last few years. We report here on radial-axial coupling modes, which were investigated from the variation of the number of stored ions, in absence of a buffer gas, as a function of the working point in the stability diagram. A pseudopotential built to take into account the additional terms permits the ion trajectory to be modeled with forced Duffing equations, whose spectral properties allow an understanding of the experimental results.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Lupus clouds proper motion study with VO (Lopez Marti+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Marti, B.; Jimenez-Esteban, F.; Solano, E.

    2011-08-01

    The Lupus dark cloud complex is a well-known, nearby low-mass star-forming region, probably associated with the Gould Belt. In recent years, the number of stellar and substellar Lupus candidate members has been remarkably increased thanks to the Cores to Disks (c2d) Spitzer Legacy Program and other studies. However, most of these newly discovered objects still lack confirmation that they belong to the dark clouds. By using available kinematical information, we test the membership of the new Lupus candidate members proposed by the c2d program and by a complementary optical survey. We also investigate the relationship between the proper motions and other properties of the objects, in order to get some clues about their formation and early evolution. We compiled a list of members and possible members of Lupus 1, 3, and 4, together with all available information on their spectral types, disks, and physical parameters. Using Virtual Observatory tools, we cross-matched this list with the available astrometric catalogues to get proper motions for our objects. Our final sample contains sources with magnitudes I<16mag and estimated masses >~0.1M?. (5 data files).

  16. Parallel algorithm for determining motion vectors in ice floe images by matching edge features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohar, M.; Ramapriyan, H. K.; Strong, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    A parallel algorithm is described to determine motion vectors of ice floes using time sequences of images of the Arctic ocean obtained from the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instrument flown on-board the SEASAT spacecraft. Researchers describe a parallel algorithm which is implemented on the MPP for locating corresponding objects based on their translationally and rotationally invariant features. The algorithm first approximates the edges in the images by polygons or sets of connected straight-line segments. Each such edge structure is then reduced to a seed point. Associated with each seed point are the descriptions (lengths, orientations and sequence numbers) of the lines constituting the corresponding edge structure. A parallel matching algorithm is used to match packed arrays of such descriptions to identify corresponding seed points in the two images. The matching algorithm is designed such that fragmentation and merging of ice floes are taken into account by accepting partial matches. The technique has been demonstrated to work on synthetic test patterns and real image pairs from SEASAT in times ranging from .5 to 0.7 seconds for 128 x 128 images.

  17. MISR Level 2 TOA/Cloud Versioning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-06-26

    ... CloudMotionSource field updated to provide correct information as to the source of each individual wind vector. The individual ... which ~5% of domains contained unusable cloud height data. Manage occurrences of large, anomalous values in the 4 stereo domain parameters ...

  18. ON THE INTERPRETATION OF RECENT PROPER MOTION DATA FOR THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, Kenji

    2011-03-20

    Recent observational studies using the Hubble Space Telescope have derived the center-of-mass proper motion (CMPM) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Although these studies carefully treated both rotation and perspective effects in deriving the proper motion (PM) for each of the sampled fields, they did not consider the effects of local random motion in the derivation. This means that the average PM of the fields (i.e., the observed CMPM) could significantly deviate from the true CMPM, because the effect of local random motion cannot be close to zero in making the average PM for the small number of fields ({approx}10). We discuss how significantly the observationally derived CMPM can deviate from the true CMPM by applying the same method as used in the observations for a dynamical model of the LMC with a known true CMPM. We find that the deviation can be as large as {approx}50 km s{sup -1} ({approx}0.21 mas yr{sup -1}), if the LMC has a thick disk and a maximum circular velocity of {approx}120 km s{sup -1}. We also find that the deviation depends both on the total number of sampled fields and on the structure and kinematics of the LMC. We therefore suggest that there is a possibility that the observed CMPM of the LMC deviates from the true one to some extent. We also show that a simple mean of PM for a large number of LMC fields ({approx}1000) can be much closer to the true CMPM.

  19. The Impact of Satellite Atmospheric Motion Vectors in the GMAO GEOS-5 Global Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelaro, R. D.; Merkova, D.; Tai, King-Sheng; McCarty, W.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of satellite-derived atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) on numerical weather forecasts is examined using the GEOS-5 global atmospheric data assimilation system. Cycling data assimilation experiments, including twice-daily 5-day forecasts, are conducted for two 6-week periods during the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season and 2010-2011Northern Hemisphere winter season. Results from a control experiment that includes all AMVs and other data types assimilated operationally in GEOS-5 are compared with those from an experiment in which the GEOS-5 AMVs (only) are replaced by ones produced by the U. S. Navy?s NAVDAS-AR atmospheric data assimilation system. The Navy AMVs are assimilated in their entirety as well as in various subset combinations. The primary objective of these experiments is to determine whether aspects of the NAVDAS-AR data selection and quality control procedure, especially the use of carefully averaged ("super-ob?) wind vectors and large volume of AMVs, explain the typically larger beneficial impact of these data in the Navy system as compared with most other forecast systems. Adjoint-based observation impact calculations are assessed and compared with traditional metrics such as forecast geopotential height anomaly correlations and observation-minus-forecast departures. Results so far indicate that that the greater number of NRL AMVs is primarily responsible for their larger impact, although superobing also appears to be beneficial. Map views show that the impact obtained from assimilation of the NRL AMVs is more uniformly beneficial, perhaps due to the averaging of individual observations in creating the super-obs. While the NRL AMVs have a much larger impact in GEOS-5 than do the control AMVs, their impact is still smaller than in the Navy forecast system, suggesting that the mix of observations may play an important role in modulating the impact of any one data type. At the same time, reducing the number of satellite radiances assimilated in GEOS-5 does not significantly alter the impact of the AMVs

  20. Laser filamentation induced air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Cheng; Ju, Jingjing; Wang, Zhanxin; Wang, Wentao; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Chuang; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-04-22

    We numerically simulated the air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber induced by femtosecond laser filaments for different chopping rates. A two dimensional model was employed, where the laser filaments were treated as a heat flux source. The simulated patterns of flow fields and maximum velocity of updraft compare well with the experimental results for the chopping rates of 1, 5, 15 and 150 Hz. A quantitative inconsistency appears between simulated and experimental maximum velocity of updraft for 1 kHz repetition rate although a similar pattern of flow field is obtained, and the possible reasons were analyzed. Based on the present simulated results, the experimental observation of more water condensation/snow at higher chopping rate can be explained. These results indicate that the specific way of laser filament heating plays a significant role in the laser-induced motion of air flow, and at the same time, our previous conclusion of air flow having an important effect on water condensation/snow is confirmed. PMID:23609636

  1. Assessing geoaccuracy of structure from motion point clouds from long-range image collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilosek, David; Walvoord, Derek J.; Salvaggio, Carl

    2014-11-01

    Automatically extracted and accurate scene structure generated from airborne platforms is a goal of many applications in the photogrammetry, remote sensing, and computer vision fields. This structure has traditionally been extracted automatically through the structure-from-motion (SfM) workflows. Although this process is very powerful, the analysis of error in accuracy can prove difficult. Our work presents a method of analyzing the georegistration error from SfM derived point clouds that have been transformed to a fixed Earth-based coordinate system. The error analysis is performed using synthetic airborne imagery which provides absolute truth for the ray-surface intersection of every pixel in every image. Three methods of georegistration are assessed; (1) using global positioning system (GPS) camera centers, (2) using pose information directly from on-board navigational instrumentation, and (3) using a recently developed method that utilizes the forward projection function and SfM-derived camera pose estimates. It was found that the georegistration derived from GPS camera centers and the direct use of pose information from on-board navigational instruments is very sensitive to noise from both the SfM process and instrumentation. The georegistration transform computed using the forward projection function and the derived pose estimates prove to be far more robust to these errors.

  2. A proper motion study of the Lupus clouds using VO tools

    E-print Network

    Martí, Belén López; Solano, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Aims: By using kinematical information, we test the membership of the new Lupus candidate members proposed by the Cores to Disks (c2d) Spitzer Legacy Program program and by a complementary optical survey. We also investigate the relationship between the proper motions (pm) and other properties, in order to get some clues about their formation and early evolution. Methods: We compiled a list of members and possible members of Lupus 1, 3, and 4, together with all information on their spectral types, disks, and physical parameters. Using VO-tools, we cross-matched this list with the astrometric catalogues to get pm. Our final sample contains sources with magnitudes I~0.1Msun. Results: According to the kinematic information, our sources can be divided into two main groups. The first one contains sources with higher pm in agreement with other Gould Belt populations and with spatial distribution, optical and near-infrared colours, and disk composition consistent with these objects belonging to the Lupus clouds. In ...

  3. A collaborative computing framework of cloud network and WBSN applied to fall detection and 3-D motion reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chin-Feng; Chen, Min; Pan, Jeng-Shyang; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Chao, Han-Chieh

    2014-03-01

    As cloud computing and wireless body sensor network technologies become gradually developed, ubiquitous healthcare services prevent accidents instantly and effectively, as well as provides relevant information to reduce related processing time and cost. This study proposes a co-processing intermediary framework integrated cloud and wireless body sensor networks, which is mainly applied to fall detection and 3-D motion reconstruction. In this study, the main focuses includes distributed computing and resource allocation of processing sensing data over the computing architecture, network conditions and performance evaluation. Through this framework, the transmissions and computing time of sensing data are reduced to enhance overall performance for the services of fall events detection and 3-D motion reconstruction. PMID:24608051

  4. Influence of broken cloud fields on reflectance retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, Robert; Richtsmeier, Steven; Adler-Golden, Steven

    2014-10-01

    Surface solar radiation forecasting permits to predict photovoltaic plant production for a massive and safe integration of solar energy into the electric network. For short-term forecasts (intra-day), methods using images from meteorological geostationary satellites are more suitable than numerical weather prediction models. Forecast schemes consist in assessing cloud motion vectors and in extrapolating cloud patterns from a given satellite image in order to predict cloud cover state above a PV plant. Atmospheric motion vectors retrieval techniques have been studied for several decades in order to improve weather forecasts. However, solar energy forecasting requires the extraction of cloud motion vectors on a finer spatial- and time-resolution than those provided for weather forecast applications. Even if motion vector retrieval is a wide research field in image processing related topics, only block-matching techniques are operationally used for solar energy forecasts via satellite images. In this paper, we propose two motion vectors extraction methods originating from video compression techniques (correlation phase and optical flow methods). We implemented them on a 6-day dataset of Meteosat-10 satellite diurnal images. We proceeded to cloud pattern extrapolation and compared predicted cloud maps against actual ones at different time horizons from 15 minutes to 4 hours ahead. Forecast scores were compared to the state-of-the-art (block matching) method. Correlation phase methods do not outperform block-matching but their computation time is about 25 times shorter. Optical flow based method outperforms all the methods with a satisfactory time computing.

  5. Clouds 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Uncertainties associated with the microphysical and radiative properties of ice clouds remain an active research area because of the importance these clouds have in atmospheric radiative transfer problems and the energy balance of the Earth...

  6. Large-scale Environmental Variables and Transition to Deep Convection in Cloud Resolving Model Simulations: A Vector Representation

    SciTech Connect

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2012-11-01

    Cloud resolving model simulations and vector analysis are used to develop a quantitative method of assessing regional variations in the relationships between various large-scale environmental variables and the transition to deep convection. Results of the CRM simulations from three tropical regions are used to cluster environmental conditions under which transition to deep convection does and does not take place. Projections of the large-scale environmental variables on the difference between these two clusters are used to quantify the roles of these variables in the transition to deep convection. While the transition to deep convection is most sensitive to moisture and vertical velocity perturbations, the details of the profiles of the anomalies vary from region to region. In comparison, the transition to deep convection is found to be much less sensitive to temperature anomalies over all three regions. The vector formulation presented in this study represents a simple general framework for quantifying various aspects of how the transition to deep convection is sensitive to environmental conditions.

  7. HST astrometry in the 30 Doradus region: measuring proper motions of individual stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-print Network

    Platais, I; Lennon, D J; Anderson, J; Bellini, A; Sabbi, E; Sana, H; Bedin, L R

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of positions and relative proper motions in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We detail the construction of a single-epoch astrometric reference frame, based on specially-designed observations obtained with the two main imaging instruments ACS/WFC and WFC3/UVIS onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Internal comparisons indicate a sub milli-arc-second (mas) precision in the positions and the presence of semi-periodic systematics with a mean amplitude of ~0.8 mas. We combined these observations with numerous archival images taken with WFPC2 and spanning 17 years. The precision of the resulting proper motions for well-measured stars around the massive cluster R 136 can be as good as ~20 microarcsec/yr, although the true accuracy of proper motions is generally lower due to the residual systematic errors. The observed proper-motion dispersion for our highest-quality measurements is ~0.1 mas/yr. Our catalog of positions and proper motions contains 86,590 stars do...

  8. Influence of the cosmic repulsion on the MOND model of the Magellanic Cloud motion in the field of Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Schee, J.; Stuchlík, Z.; Petrásek, M. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@fpf.slu.cz

    2013-12-01

    It has been recently shown that the cosmic repulsion can have a highly significant influence on the motion of Magellanic Clouds (MC) in the gravitational field of Milky Way, treated in the framework of the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) halo model. However, there is an alternative to the CDM halo explanation of the rotation curves in the periphery of spiral galaxies, based on MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). Therefore, we study the role of the cosmic repulsion in the framework of the MOND theory applied to determine the MC motion. Our results demonstrate that in the MOND framework the influence of the cosmic repulsion on the motion of both Small and Large MC is also highly significant, but it is of a different character than in the framework of the CDM halo model. Moreover, we demonstrate that the MC motion in the framework of the CDM halo and MOND models is subtantially different and can serve as a test of these fundamentally different approaches to the explanation of the phenomena related to galaxies and the motion of satellite galaxies.

  9. On Deriving Vertical Air Motions from Cloud Radar Doppler Spectra MATTHEW D. SHUPE

    E-print Network

    the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) of autumn 2004. Comparisons of the retrievals to cloud volumes containing small particles, in this case liquid droplets, which are assumed to trace on a statistical comparison of four cases comprising nearly 6 h of data. Turbulent dissipation rate comparisons

  10. THIRD-EPOCH MAGELLANIC CLOUD PROPER MOTIONS. I. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/WFC3 DATA AND ORBIT IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kallivayalil, Nitya; Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Anderson, Jay; Besla, Gurtina; Alcock, Charles

    2013-02-20

    We present proper motions for the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) based on three epochs of Hubble Space Telescope data, spanning a {approx}7 yr baseline, and centered on fields with background QSOs. The first two epochs, the subject of past analyses, were obtained with ACS/HRC, and have been reanalyzed here. The new third epoch with WFC3/UVIS increases the time baseline and provides better control of systematics. The three-epoch data yield proper-motion random errors of only 1%-2% per field. For the LMC this is sufficient to constrain the internal proper-motion dynamics, as will be discussed in a separate paper. Here we focus on the implied center-of-mass proper motions: {mu} {sub W,LMC} = -1.910 {+-} 0.020 mas yr{sup -1}, {mu} {sub N,LMC} = 0.229 {+-} 0.047 mas yr{sup -1}, and {mu} {sub W,SMC} = -0.772 {+-} 0.063 mas yr{sup -1}, {mu} {sub N,SMC} = -1.117 {+-} 0.061 mas yr{sup -1}. We combine the results with a revised understanding of the solar motion in the Milky Way to derive Galactocentric velocities: v {sub tot,LMC} = 321 {+-} 24 km s{sup -1} and v {sub tot,SMC} = 217 {+-} 26 km s{sup -1}. Our proper-motion uncertainties are now dominated by limitations in our understanding of the internal kinematics and geometry of the Clouds, and our velocity uncertainties are dominated by distance errors. Orbit calculations for the Clouds around the Milky Way allow a range of orbital periods, depending on the uncertain masses of the Milky Way and LMC. Periods {approx}< 4 Gyr are ruled out, which poses a challenge for traditional Magellanic Stream models. First-infall orbits are preferred (as supported by other arguments as well) if one imposes the requirement that the LMC and SMC must have been a bound pair for at least several Gyr.

  11. Vector constraints on western U.S. deformation from space geodesy, neotectonics, and plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minster, J. Bernard; Jordan, Thomas H.

    1987-01-01

    The rate-of-slip vector on the San Andreas fault in central California estimated from geodetic and Holocene geological data is inconsistent with the prediction of rigid plate models such as RM2. This well-known 'San Andreas discrepancy' is diagnostic of plate deformation distributed both east of the fault in the Basin and Range and west of the fault along the California continental margin. Constraints on the integrated deformation rates across these two regions consistent with: (1) the kinematical boundary conditions imposed by the rigid plate model; (2) neotectonic and paleoseismic estimates of deformation rates; (3) ground-based geodetic measurements; and (4) rates of change observed by very long baseline interferometry along seven baselines to western U.S. sites are constructed. The space-geodetic data on Basin and Range extension taken over a 4-year interval are compatible with geological observations averaged over the Holocene; the best estimate of its integrated deformation rate, provided by the joint inversion of both data types, is 9.7 + or - 2.1 mm/yr, N 56 deg W + or - 10 deg, too small and in the wrong direction to account entirely for the San Andreas discrepancy. The integral of this deformation, estimated by subtracting the Basin and Range contribution from the discrepancy vector, requires significant right-lateral shear parallel to the San Andreas (13 + or - 5 mm/yr) and some compression perpendicular to it (9 + or - 3 mm/yr).

  12. Vertical air motions over the Tropical Western Pacific for validating cloud resolving and regional models

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christopher R.

    2015-03-16

    The objective of this project was to estimate the vertical air motion using Doppler velocity spectra from two side-by-side vertically pointing radars. The retrieval technique was applied to two different sets of radars. This first set was 50- and 920-MHz vertically pointing radars near Darwin, Australia. The second set was 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz vertically pointing radars deployed at SGP for MC3E. The retrieval technique uses the longer wavelength radar (50 or 449 MHz) to observe both the vertical air motion and precipitation motion while the shorter wavelength radar (920 MHz or 2.8 GHz) observes just the precipitation motion. By analyzing their Doppler velocity spectra, the precipitation signal in the 920 MHz or 2.8 GHz radar is used to mask-out the precipitation signal in the 50 or 449 MHz radar spectra, leaving just the vertical air motion signal.

  13. THE M31 VELOCITY VECTOR. I. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PROPER-MOTION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Anderson, Jay; Van der Marel, Roeland P.

    2012-07-01

    We present the first proper-motion (PM) measurements for the galaxy M31. We obtained new V-band imaging data with the Hubble Space Telescope ACS/WFC and the WFC3/UVIS instruments of three fields: a spheroid field near the minor axis, an outer disk field along the major axis, and a field on the Giant Southern Stream. The data provide five to seven year time baselines with respect to pre-existing deep first-epoch observations of the same fields. We measure the positions of thousands of M31 stars and hundreds of compact background galaxies in each field. High accuracy and robustness is achieved by building and fitting a unique template for each individual object. The average PM for each field is obtained from the average motion of the M31 stars between the epochs with respect to the background galaxies. For the three fields, the observed PMs ({mu}{sub W}, {mu}{sub N}) are, in units of mas yr{sup -1}, (- 0.0458, -0.0376) {+-} (0.0165, 0.0154), (- 0.0533, -0.0104) {+-} (0.0246, 0.0244), and (- 0.0179, -0.0357) {+-} (0.0278, 0.0272), respectively. The ability to average over large numbers of objects and over the three fields yields a final displacement accuracy of a few thousandths of a pixel, corresponding to only 12 {mu}as yr{sup -1}. This is comparable to what has been achieved for other Local Group galaxies using Very Long Baseline Array observations of water masers. Potential systematic errors are controlled by an analysis strategy that corrects for detector charge transfer inefficiency, spatially and time-dependent geometric distortion, and point-spread function variations. The robustness of the PM measurements and uncertainties are supported by the fact that data from different instruments, taken at different times and with different telescope orientations, as well as measurements of different fields, all yield statistically consistent results. Papers II and III of this series explore the implications of the new measurements for our understanding of the history, future, and mass of the Local Group.

  14. On the orbital motion of cold clouds in broad-line regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadmehri, Mohsen

    2015-08-01

    We study the orbit of a pressure-confined cloud in the broad-line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei when the combined effects of the central gravity and anisotropic radiation pressure and the drag force are considered. The physical properties of the intercloud gas, such as its pressure and dynamic viscosity, are defined as power-law functions of the radial distance. For a drag force proportional to the relative velocity of a cloud and the background gas, a detailed analysis of the orbits is performed for different values of the input parameters. We also present analytical solutions for when the intercloud pressure is uniform and the viscosity is proportional to the inverse square of the radial distance. Our analytical and numerical solutions demonstrate decay of the orbits due to the drag force, so that a cloud will eventually fall on to the central region after the so-called time-of-flight. We found that the time-of-flight of a BLR cloud is proportional to the inverse of the dimensionless drag coefficient. If the time-of-flight becomes shorter than the lifetime of the whole system, then mechanisms for continually forming BLR clouds are needed.

  15. Cloud pattern prediction from geostationary meteorological satellite images for solar energy forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, S.; Sébastien, N.; Liandrat, O.; Schmutz, N.

    2014-10-01

    Surface solar radiation forecasting permits to predict photovoltaic plant production for a massive and safe integration of solar energy into the electric network. For short-term forecasts (intra-day), methods using images from meteorological geostationary satellites are more suitable than numerical weather prediction models. Forecast schemes consist in assessing cloud motion vectors and in extrapolating cloud patterns from a given satellite image in order to predict cloud cover state above a PV plant. Atmospheric motion vectors retrieval techniques have been studied for several decades in order to improve weather forecasts. However, solar energy forecasting requires the extraction of cloud motion vectors on a finer spatial- and time-resolution than those provided for weather forecast applications. Even if motion vector retrieval is a wide research field in image processing related topics, only block-matching techniques are operationally used for solar energy forecasts via satellite images. In this paper, we propose two motion vectors extraction methods originating from video compression techniques (correlation phase and optical flow methods). We implemented them on a 6-day dataset of Meteosat-10 satellite diurnal images. We proceeded to cloud pattern extrapolation and compared predicted cloud maps against actual ones at different time horizons from 15 minutes to 4 hours ahead. Forecast scores were compared to the state-of-the-art (block matching) method. Correlation phase methods do not outperform block-matching but their computation time is about 25 times shorter. Optical flow based method outperforms all the methods with a satisfactory time computing.

  16. Third-epoch Magellanic Cloud proper motions. II. The large Magellanic Cloud rotation field in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Kallivayalil, Nitya

    2014-02-01

    We present the first detailed assessment of the large-scale rotation of any galaxy based on full three-dimensional velocity measurements. We do this for the LMC by combining our Hubble Space Telescope average proper motion (PM) measurements for stars in 22 fields, with existing line-of-sight (LOS) velocity measurements for 6790 individual stars. We interpret these data with a model of circular rotation in a flat disk. The PM and LOS data paint a consistent picture of the LMC rotation, and their combination yields several new insights. The PM data imply a stellar dynamical center that coincides with the H I dynamical center, and a rotation curve amplitude consistent with that inferred from LOS velocity studies. The implied disk viewing angles agree with the range of values found in the literature, but continue to indicate variations with stellar population and/or radius. Young (red supergiant) stars rotate faster than old (red and asymptotic giant branch) stars due to asymmetric drift. Outside the central region, the circular velocity is approximately flat at V {sub circ} = 91.7 ± 18.8 km s{sup –1}. This is consistent with the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation and implies an enclosed mass M(8.7 kpc) = (1.7 ± 0.7) × 10{sup 10} M {sub ?}. The virial mass is larger, depending on the full extent of the LMC's dark halo. The tidal radius is 22.3 ± 5.2 kpc (24.°0 ± 5.°6). Combination of the PM and LOS data yields kinematic distance estimates for the LMC, but these are not yet competitive with other methods.

  17. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhart, James B.; Nussbaum, Rudi H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for use in an introductory course in college physics. It consists of an extensive qualitative discussion of motion followed by a detailed development of the quantitative methods needed to…

  18. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  19. ULTRAVIOLET INDUCED MOTION OF A FLUORESCENT DUST CLOUD IN AN ARGON DIRECT CURRENT GLOW DISCHARGE PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Hvasta, M.G.; and Zwicker, A.

    2008-01-01

    Dusty plasmas consist of electrons, ions, neutrals and nm-?m sized particles commonly referred to as dust. In man-made plasmas this dust may represent impurities in a tokamak or plasma etching processing. In astrophysical plasmas this dust forms structures such as planetary rings and comet tails. To study dusty plasma dynamics an experiment was designed in which a 3:1 silica (<5 ?m diameter) and fl uorescent dust mixture was added to an argon DC glow discharge plasma and exposed to UV radiation. This fl uorescent lighting technique offers an advantage over laser scattering (which only allows two-dimensional slices of the cloud to be observed) and is simpler than scanning mirror techniques or particle image velocimetry. Under typical parameters (P=150 mTorr, V anode= 100 V, Vcathode= -400 V, Itotal < 2mA) when the cloud is exposed to the UV light (100W, ? = 365 nm) the mixture fl uoresces, moves ~2mm towards the light source and begins rotating in a clockwise manner (as seen from the cathode). By calibrating a UV lamp and adjusting the relative intensity of the UV with a variable transformer it was found that both translational and rotational velocities are a function of UV intensity. Additionally, it was determined that bulk cloud rotation is not seen when the dust tray is not grounded while bulk translation is. This ongoing experiment represents a novel way to control contamination in man-made plasmas and a path to a better understanding of UV-bathed plasma systems in space..

  20. Last developments of the EUMETSAT Atmospheric Motion Vector product derived from MSG images for assimilation in NWP models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borde, Regis; Bertil Gustafsson, Jörgen; de Smet, Arthur; Dew, Greg

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMVs) are one of the most important products derived from all geostationary satellites, because they constitute a very important part of the observation data provided to Numerical Weather Prediction models. The Height Assignment (HA) is currently the most difficult task in the AMV extraction scheme. Several sources of error can be introduced at the height assignment step, but one of the main difficulties is to clearly identify the pixels that lead the tracking process in the tracer box, in order to select them for the HA calculation. A good pixel selection process should ensure to keep a direct link between the feature really tracked and the calculation of the height. The most common method sorts the coldest pixels in the target box and uses them to calculate the AMV height. However, recent work showed that some of the coldest pixels can have very small and/or negative contribution to the cross correlation process. Following these findings, it is then proposed to use individual pixel contribution to the cross correlation coefficient information in the pixel selection process, in order to get a closer link between the tracked feature tracked and the HA. This method has been tested on a parallel chain at EUMETSAT for two separated periods of one month. This presentation summarizes the main results of these operational tests, which show some improvements of the new scheme on the AMV product for both the VIS0.8, HRV and IR10.8 channels, increasing the total amount of good AMVs (Quality Index QI>80) and also the amount of good AMV/radiosonde collocations. Speed biases and RMS against radiosonde observations are generally a bit larger, especially the known slow bias observed at high levels for IR10.8 AMVs, but are calculated on a bigger amount of data.

  1. Aerosol-cloud interactions in ship tracks using Terra MODIS/MISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Christensen, Matthew W.; Diner, David J.; Garay, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    Simultaneous ship track observations from Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) have been compiled to investigate how ship-injected aerosols affect marine warm boundary layer clouds for different cloud types and environmental conditions. By taking advantage of the high spatial resolution multiangle observations available from MISR, we utilized the retrieved cloud albedo, cloud top height, and cloud motion vectors to examine cloud property responses in ship-polluted and nearby unpolluted clouds. The strength of the cloud albedo response to increased aerosol level is primarily dependent on cloud cell structure, dryness of the free troposphere, and boundary layer depth, corroborating a previous study by Chen et al. (2012) where A-Train satellite data were utilized. Under open cell cloud structure the cloud properties are more susceptible to aerosol perturbations as compared to closed cells. Aerosol plumes caused an increase in liquid water amount (+38%), cloud top height (+13%), and cloud albedo (+49%) for open cell clouds, whereas for closed cell clouds, little change in cloud properties was observed. Further capitalizing on MISR's unique capabilities, the MISR cross-track cloud speed was used to derive cloud top divergence. Statistically averaging the results from the identified plume segments to reduce random noise, we found evidence of cloud top divergence in the ship-polluted clouds, whereas the nearby unpolluted clouds showed cloud top convergence, providing observational evidence of a change in local mesoscale circulation associated with enhanced aerosols. Furthermore, open cell polluted clouds revealed stronger cloud top divergence as compared to closed cell clouds, consistent with different dynamical mechanisms driving their responses. These results suggest that detailed cloud responses, classified by cloud type and environmental conditions, must be accounted for in global climate modeling studies to reduce uncertainties in calculations of aerosol indirect forcing.

  2. Preliminary results of fluid dynamic model calculation of convective motion induced by solar heating at the Venus cloud top level.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yeon Joo; Imamura, Takeshi; Maejima, Yasumitsu; Sugiyama, Ko-ichiro

    The thick cloud layer of Venus reflects solar radiation effectively, resulting in a Bond albedo of 76% (Moroz et al., 1985). Most of the incoming solar flux is absorbed in the upper cloud layer at 60-70 km altitude. An unknown UV absorber is a major sink of the solar energy at the cloud top level. It produces about 40-60% of the total solar heating near the cloud tops, depending on its vertical structure (Crisp et al., 1986; Lee et al., in preparation). UV images of Venus show a clear difference in morphology between laminar flow shaped clouds on the morning side and convective-like cells on the afternoon side of the planet in the equatorial region (Titov et al., 2012). This difference is probably related to strong solar heating at the cloud tops at the sub-solar point, rather than the influence from deeper level convection in the low and middle cloud layers (Imamura et al., 2014). Also, small difference in cloud top structures may trigger horizontal convection at this altitude, because various cloud top structures can significantly alter the solar heating and thermal cooling rates at the cloud tops (Lee et al., in preparation). Performing radiative forcing calculations for various cloud top structures using a radiative transfer model (SHDOM), we investigate the effect of solar heating at the cloud tops on atmospheric dynamics. We use CReSS (Cloud Resolving Storm Simulator), and consider the altitude range from 35 km to 90 km, covering a full cloud deck.

  3. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  4. Influence of the cosmological constant on the motion of Magellanic Clouds in the gravitational field of Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchlík, Zden?k; Schee, Jan

    2011-09-01

    Using the pseudo-Newtonian (PN) potential reflecting properties of the Schwarz-schild-de Sitter spacetime, we estimate the influence of the repulsive cosmological constant ? ~ 1.3 × 10-56cm-2 implied by recent cosmological tests onto the motion of both Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC) in the gravitational field of the Milky Way. Considering detailed modelling of the gravitational field of the Galaxy disc, bulge and cold dark matter halo, the trajectories of SMC and LMC constructed for the PN potential with the cosmological constant are confronted to those given for ? = 0. In the realistic model of the extended cold dark matter halo its edge and related total mass are taken at typical values reflecting recent diversity in the total Galaxy mass estimates. In all cases, strong influence of the cosmological constant, on 10% level or higher, has been found for motion of both SMC and LMC. Inside the halo, the Newtonian part of the PN potential is exact enough, while outside the halo the PN potential can give relevant relativistic corrections. The role of the cosmological constant is most conspicuous when binding mass is estimated for the satellite galaxies. We have found a strong influence of cosmic repulsion on the total binding mass for both galaxies. For SMC there is the binding mass MSMC? = 0 = 7.07 × 1011M? and MSMC? > 0 = 8.61 × 1011M?, while even much higher increase is found for LMC, where MLMC? = 0 = 1.50 × 1012M? and MLMC? > 0 = 2.21 × 1012M?, putting serious doubts on the possibility that the LMC is bounded by the Milky Way. However, the estimates of binding masses are strongly influenced by initial velocity of SMC and LMC; we took the values inferred for the IAU MW rotation velocity ~ 220 km/s. Our results indicate very important role of the cosmic repulsion in the motion of interacting galaxies, clearly demonstrated in the case of the satellite SMC and LMC galaxies moving in the field of Milky Way. In some cases, the effect of the cosmic repulsion can be even comparable to the effects of the dynamical friction and the Andromeda Galaxy.

  5. Influence of the cosmological constant on the motion of Magellanic Clouds in the gravitational field of Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Stuchlík, Zden?k; Schee, Jan E-mail: jan.schee@fpf.slu.cz

    2011-09-01

    Using the pseudo-Newtonian (PN) potential reflecting properties of the Schwarz-schild-de Sitter spacetime, we estimate the influence of the repulsive cosmological constant ? ? 1.3 × 10{sup ?56}cm{sup ?2} implied by recent cosmological tests onto the motion of both Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC) in the gravitational field of the Milky Way. Considering detailed modelling of the gravitational field of the Galaxy disc, bulge and cold dark matter halo, the trajectories of SMC and LMC constructed for the PN potential with the cosmological constant are confronted to those given for ? = 0. In the realistic model of the extended cold dark matter halo its edge and related total mass are taken at typical values reflecting recent diversity in the total Galaxy mass estimates. In all cases, strong influence of the cosmological constant, on 10% level or higher, has been found for motion of both SMC and LMC. Inside the halo, the Newtonian part of the PN potential is exact enough, while outside the halo the PN potential can give relevant relativistic corrections. The role of the cosmological constant is most conspicuous when binding mass is estimated for the satellite galaxies. We have found a strong influence of cosmic repulsion on the total binding mass for both galaxies. For SMC there is the binding mass M{sub SMC}{sup ?=0} = 7.07 × 10{sup 11}M{sub ?} and M{sub SMC}{sup ?>0} = 8.61 × 10{sup 11}M{sub ?}, while even much higher increase is found for LMC, where M{sub LMC}{sup ?=0} = 1.50 × 10{sup 12}M{sub ?} and M{sub LMC}{sup ?} {sup >0} = 2.21 × 10{sup 12}M{sub ?}, putting serious doubts on the possibility that the LMC is bounded by the Milky Way. However, the estimates of binding masses are strongly influenced by initial velocity of SMC and LMC; we took the values inferred for the IAU MW rotation velocity ? 220 km/s. Our results indicate very important role of the cosmic repulsion in the motion of interacting galaxies, clearly demonstrated in the case of the satellite SMC and LMC galaxies moving in the field of Milky Way. In some cases, the effect of the cosmic repulsion can be even comparable to the effects of the dynamical friction and the Andromeda Galaxy.

  6. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in Ship Tracks Using Terra MODIS/MISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. C.; Christensen, M.; Diner, D. J.; Garay, M. J.; Nelson, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Simultaneous ship track observations from Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) have been compiled to investigate how ship-injected aerosols affect marine warm boundary layer clouds under different cloud types and environmental conditions. Taking advantage of the high spatial resolution multiangle observations uniquely available from MISR, we utilized the retrieved cloud albedo, cloud top height, and cloud motion vectors to examine the cloud property responses in ship-polluted and nearby unpolluted clouds. The strength of cloud albedo response to increased aerosol level is primarily dependent on cloud cell structure, dryness of the free troposphere, and boundary layer depth, corroborating a previous study by Chen et al. (2012) where A-Train satellite data were applied. Under open cell cloud structure, the cloud properties are more susceptible to aerosol perturbations as compared to closed cells. Aerosol plumes caused an increase in liquid water amount (+27%), cloud top height (+11%), and cloud albedo (+40%) for open cell clouds, whereas under closed cell clouds, little changes in cloud properties were observed. Further capitalizing on MISR's unique capabilities, the MISR cross-track cloud speed has been used to derive cloud top divergence. Statistically averaging the results from many plume segments to reduce random noise, we have found that in ship-polluted clouds there is stronger cloud top divergence, and in nearby unpolluted clouds, convergence occurs and leads to downdrafts, providing observational evidence for cloud top entrainment feedback. These results suggest that detailed cloud responses, classified by cloud type and environmental conditions, must be accounted for in global climate modeling studies to reduce uncertainties of aerosol indirect forcing. Reference: Chen, Y.-C. et al. Occurrence of lower cloud albedo in ship tracks, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 8223-8235, doi:10.5194/acp-12-8223-2012, 2012.

  7. The VMC survey - XVII. The proper motion of the Small Magellanic Cloud and of the Milky Way globular cluster 47 Tucanae

    E-print Network

    Cioni, Maria-Rosa L; Girardi, Leo; de Grijs, Richard; Irwin, Mike J; Ivanov, Valentin D; Marconi, Marcella; Oliveira, Joana M; Piatti, Andres E; Ripepi, Vincenzo; van Loon, Jacco Th

    2015-01-01

    In this study we use multi-epoch near-infrared observations from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Cloud system (VMC) to measure the proper motion of different stellar populations in a tile of 1.5 deg sq. in size in the direction of the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tuc. We obtain the proper motion of the cluster itself, of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), and of the field Milky Way stars. Stars of the three main stellar components are selected from their spatial distribution and their distribution in colour-magnitude diagrams. Their average coordinate displacement is computed from the difference between multiple Ks-band observations for stars as faint as Ks=19 mag. Proper motions are derived from the slope of the best-fitting line among 10 VMC epochs over a time baseline of ~1 yr. Background galaxies are used to calibrate the absolute astrometric reference frame. The resulting absolute proper motion of 47 Tuc is (mu_alpha cos(delta), mu_delta)=(+7.26+/-0.03, -1.25+/-0.03) mas/yr. This measurement refers to ...

  8. Implementation of a state of the art automated system for the production of cloud/water vapor motion winds from geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velden, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    The research objectives in this proposal were part of a continuing program at UW-CIMSS to develop and refine an automated geostationary satellite winds processing system which can be utilized in both research and operational environments. The majority of the originally proposed tasks were successfully accomplished, and in some cases the progress exceeded the original goals. Much of the research and development supported by this grant resulted in upgrades and modifications to the existing automated satellite winds tracking algorithm. These modifications were put to the test through case study demonstrations and numerical model impact studies. After being successfully demonstrated, the modifications and upgrades were implemented into the NESDIS algorithms in Washington DC, and have become part of the operational support. A major focus of the research supported under this grant attended to the continued development of water vapor tracked winds from geostationary observations. The fully automated UW-CIMSS tracking algorithm has been tuned to provide complete upper-tropospheric coverage from this data source, with data set quality close to that of operational cloud motion winds. Multispectral water vapor observations were collected and processed from several different geostationary satellites. The tracking and quality control algorithms were tuned and refined based on ground-truth comparisons and case studies involving impact on numerical model analyses and forecasts. The results have shown the water vapor motion winds are of good quality, complement the cloud motion wind data, and can have a positive impact in NWP on many meteorological scales.

  9. Implementation of a state of the art automated system for the production of cloud/water vapor motion winds from geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velden, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    The thrust of the proposed effort under this contract is aimed at improving techniques to track water vapor data in sequences of imagery from geostationary satellites. In regards to this task, significant testing, evaluation, and progress was accomplished during this period. Sets of winds derived from Meteosat data were routinely produced during Atlantic hurricane events in the 1993 season. These wind sets were delivered via Internet in real time to the Hurricane Research Division in Miami for their evaluation in a track forecast model. For eighteen cases in which 72-hour forecasts were produced, thirteen resulted in track forecast improvements (some quite significant). In addition, quality-controlled Meteosat water vapor winds produced by NESDIS were validated against rawinsondes, yielding an 8 m/s RMS. This figure is comparable to upper-level cloud drift wind accuracies. Given the complementary horizontal coverage in cloud-free areas, we believe that water vapor vectors can supplement cloud-drift wind information to provide good full-disk coverage of the upper tropospheric flow. The impact of these winds on numerical analysis and forecasts will be tested in the next reporting period.

  10. The background suppression algorithm based on the two-dimensional velocity vector histogram and the estimated risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jian; Chen, Qian; Qian, Weixian

    2011-08-01

    The small-target detection in infrared image is a difficult task in remote sensing fields. First of all, the reason of the increased false alarm rate under the cloud cluster background is analyzed. In order to avoid this kind of the false alarm, the background suppression algorithm based on the two-dimensional velocity vector histogram and the estimated risk is presented. The image sequence is filtered firstly under the higher false alarm rate to extract the further more interference points in the cloud region. Then the velocity vectors of all the detected points including the interference points are computed by the means of date association. And the two-dimensional velocity vector histogram is calculated with the velocity vector of all the detected points. It is found that the most of the detected points are the interference points in the cloud and the velocity and the direction of the cloud are identical in a certain field of view for some time. According to the characteristic of the cloud, the range of the cloud velocity vector is obtained based on the velocity vector histogram by means of the statistics. The false alarm points in the motional cloud are filtered out according to the velocity range. But a few false alarm points in the cloud may also exit. So the concept of estimated risk is presented to evaluate the possibility of false alarm point. The threshold of each part of the image is adaptively adjusted based the estimated risk evaluated by the complex level of background. Then the false alarm points in the complex cloud are filtered out based the threshold. The experimental results with the real image show that the proposed method can reduce the false alarm of the target detection under the cloud background and detect target successfully.

  11. Cloud Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Moncrieff, Mitchell; Einaud, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerical cloud models have been developed and applied extensively to study cloud-scale and mesoscale processes during the past four decades. The distinctive aspect of these cloud models is their ability to treat explicitly (or resolve) cloud-scale dynamics. This requires the cloud models to be formulated from the non-hydrostatic equations of motion that explicitly include the vertical acceleration terms since the vertical and horizontal scales of convection are similar. Such models are also necessary in order to allow gravity waves, such as those triggered by clouds, to be resolved explicitly. In contrast, the hydrostatic approximation, usually applied in global or regional models, does allow the presence of gravity waves. In addition, the availability of exponentially increasing computer capabilities has resulted in time integrations increasing from hours to days, domain grids boxes (points) increasing from less than 2000 to more than 2,500,000 grid points with 500 to 1000 m resolution, and 3-D models becoming increasingly prevalent. The cloud resolving model is now at a stage where it can provide reasonably accurate statistical information of the sub-grid, cloud-resolving processes poorly parameterized in climate models and numerical prediction models.

  12. Automatic cloud tracking applied to GOES and Meteosat observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endlich, R. M.; Wolf, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    An improved automatic processing method for the tracking of cloud motions as revealed by satellite imagery is presented and applications of the method to GOES observations of Hurricane Eloise and Meteosat water vapor and infrared data are presented. The method is shown to involve steps of picture smoothing, target selection and the calculation of cloud motion vectors by the matching of a group at a given time with its best likeness at a later time, or by a cross-correlation computation. Cloud motion computations can be made in as many as four separate layers simultaneously. For data of 4 and 8 km resolution in the eye of Hurricane Eloise, the automatic system is found to provide results comparable in accuracy and coverage to those obtained by NASA analysts using the Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System, with results obtained by the pattern recognition and cross correlation computations differing by only fractions of a pixel. For Meteosat water vapor data from the tropics and midlatitudes, the automatic motion computations are found to be reliable only in areas where the water vapor fields contained small-scale structure, although excellent results are obtained using Meteosat IR data in the same regions. The automatic method thus appears to be competitive in accuracy and coverage with motion determination by human analysts.

  13. Interactive Motion Segmentation Claudia Nieuwenhuis1

    E-print Network

    Rumpf, Martin

    -Nuremberg). motion vectors (Figure 1 shows a water vortex with motion vectors pointing in all directions alongInteractive Motion Segmentation Claudia Nieuwenhuis1 , Benjamin Berkels2 , Martin Rumpf2 , Daniel, Germany {berkels,rumpf}@ins.uni-bonn.de Abstract. Interactive motion segmentation is an important task

  14. Introducing Vectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    1997-01-01

    Suggests an approach to teaching vectors that promotes active learning through challenging questions addressed to the class, as opposed to subtle explanations. Promotes introducing vector graphics with concrete examples, beginning with an explanation of the displacement vector. Also discusses artificial vectors, vector algebra, and unit vectors.…

  15. Horizontal structure of planetary-scale waves at the cloud top of Venus deduced from Galileo SSI images with an improved cloud-tracking technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouyama, Toru; Imamura, Takeshi; Nakamura, Masato; Satoh, Takehiko; Futaana, Yoshihumi

    2012-01-01

    An improved cloud tracking method for deriving wind velocities from successive planetary images was developed. The new method incorporates into the traditional cross-correlation method an algorithm that corrects for erroneous cloud motion vectors by re-determining the most plausible correlation peak among all of the local maxima on the correlation surface by comparing each vector with its neighboring vectors. The newly developed method was applied to the Venusian violet images obtained by the Solid State Imaging system (SSI) onboard the Galileo spacecraft during its Venus flyby. Although the results may be biased by the choice of spatial scale of atmospheric features, the cloud tracking is the most practical mean of estimating the wind velocities with extensive spatial and temporal coverage. The two-dimensional distribution of the horizontal wind vector field over 5 days was obtained. It was found from these wind maps that the solar-fixed component in 1990 was similar to that in 1982 obtained by the Pioneer Venus orbiter. The deviation of the instantaneous zonal wind field from the solar-fixed component shows a distinct wavenumber-1 structure in the equatorial region. On the assumption that this structure is a manifestation of an equatorial Kelvin wave, the phase relationship between the zonal wind and the cloud brightness suggests a short photochemical lifetime of the violet absorber. The momentum deposition by this Kelvin wave, which is subject to radiative damping, would induce a westward mean-wind acceleration of ?0.3 m s-1 per Earth day.

  16. MISR Level 2 Cloud Product Versioning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-08-22

    ...  Resolution-corrected Cloud Fractions, Support Vector Machine (SVM) Scene Classifiers Beta:  SVM Cirrus Fraction ... Specification Rev N  (PDF). Implemented Support Vector Machine (SVM) Scene Classifiers and Cirrus Mask. New seasonal thresholds ...

  17. Mesoscale cloud phenomena observed by LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Examples of certain mesoscale cloud features - jet cirrus, eddies/vortices, cloud banding, and wave clouds - were collected from LANDSAT imagery and placed into Mason's four groups of causes of cloud formation based on the mechanism of vertical motion which produces condensation. These groups are as follows: (1) layer clouds formed by widespread regular ascent; (2) layer clouds caused by irregular stirring motions; (3) convective clouds; and (4) clouds formed by orographic disturbances. These mechanisms explain general cloud formation. Once formed, other forces may play a role in the deformation of a cloud or cloud mass into unusual and unique meso- and microscale patterns. Each example presented is followed by a brief discussion describing the synoptic situation, and some inference into the formation and occurrence of the more salient features. No major attempt was made to discuss in detail the meteorological and topographic interplay producing these mesoscale features.

  18. Vector Addition and the Speeding Ticket.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Nathan

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the teaching of vectors and the inadequate and inappropriate examples given in many textbooks. Suggests using the motion of a sailboat or the motion of a car moving on the Earth's surface as possible examples. Details a proper vector teaching example. (MVL)

  19. Search Cloud

    MedlinePLUS

    ... www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/cloud.html Search Cloud To use the sharing features on this page, ... of Top 110 zoloft Share the MedlinePlus search cloud with your users by embedding our search cloud ...

  20. A vector-dyadic development of the equations of motion for N-coupled flexible bodies and point masses. [spacecraft trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1975-01-01

    The equations of motion for a system of coupled flexible bodies, rigid bodies, point masses, and symmetric wheels were derived. The equations were cast into a partitioned matrix form in which certain partitions became nontrivial when the effects of flexibility were treated. The equations are shown to contract to the coupled rigid body equations or expand to the coupled flexible body equations all within the same basic framework. Furthermore, the coefficient matrix always has the computationally desirable property of symmetry. Making use of the derived equations, a comparison was made between the equations which described a flexible body model and those which described a rigid body model of the same elastic appendage attached to an arbitrary coupled body system. From the comparison, equivalence relations were developed which defined how the two modeling approaches described identical dynamic effects.

  1. Vector Inflation

    E-print Network

    Golovnev, Alexey; Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2008-01-01

    We propose a scenario where inflation is driven by non-minimally coupled massive vector fields. In an isotropic homogeneous universe these fields behave in presicely the same way as a massive minimally coupled scalar field. Therefore our model is very similar to the model of chaotic inflation with scalar field. For vector fields the isotropy of expansion is achived either by considering a triplet of orthogonal vector fields or for the expense of $N$ randomly oriented vector fields. In this last case the substantial anisotropy of the expansion of order $1/\\sqrt{N}$ survives after inflation. The lightest vector fields might also force the late time acceleration of the Universe.

  2. Optimal Exploitation of the Temporal and Spatial Resolution of SEVIRI for the Nowcasting of Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirch, Tobias; Bugliaro, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Optimal Exploitation of the Temporal and Spatial Resolution of SEVIRI for the Nowcasting of Clouds An algorithm was developed to forecast the development of water and ice clouds for the successive 5-120 minutes separately using satellite data from SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) aboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). In order to derive cloud cover, optical thickness and cloud top height of high ice clouds "The Cirrus Optical properties derived from CALIOP and SEVIRI during day and night" (COCS, Kox et al. [2014]) algorithm is applied. For the determination of the liquid water clouds the APICS ("Algorithm for the Physical Investigation of Clouds with SEVIRI", Bugliaro e al. [2011]) cloud algorithm is used, which provides cloud cover, optical thickness and effective radius. The forecast rests upon an optical flow method determining a motion vector field from two satellite images [Zinner et al., 2008.] With the aim of determining the ideal time separation of the satellite images that are used for the determination of the cloud motion vector field for every forecast horizon time the potential of the better temporal resolution of the Meteosat Rapid Scan Service (5 instead of 15 minutes repetition rate) has been investigated. Therefore for the period from March to June 2013 forecasts up to 4 hours in time steps of 5 min based on images separated by a time interval of 5 min, 10 min, 15 min, 30 min have been created. The results show that Rapid Scan data produces a small reduction of errors for a forecast horizon up to 30 minutes. For the following time steps forecasts generated with a time interval of 15 min should be used and for forecasts up to several hours computations with a time interval of 30 min provide the best results. For a better spatial resolution the HRV channel (High Resolution Visible, 1km instead of 3km maximum spatial resolution at the subsatellite point) has been integrated into the forecast. To detect clouds the difference of the measured albedo from SEVIRI and the clear-sky albedo provided by MODIS has been used and additionally the temporal development of this quantity. A pre-requisite for this work was an adjustment of the geolocation accuracy for MSG and MODIS by shifting the MODIS data and quantifying the correlation between both data sets.

  3. Robust vector sensor array processing and performance analysis

    E-print Network

    Poulsen, Andrew Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensors, which measure scalar pressure along with particle motion (a vector quantity), feature many advantages over omnidirectional hydrophone sensors. A sizable literature exists on the theory of processing ...

  4. Cloud Spirals and Outflow in Tropical Storm Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    On Tuesday, August 30, 2005, NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer retrieved cloud-top heights and cloud-tracked wind velocities for Tropical Storm Katrina, as the center of the storm was situated over the Tennessee valley. At this time Katrina was weakening and no longer classified as a hurricane, and would soon become an extratropical depression. Measurements such as these can help atmospheric scientists compare results of computer-generated hurricane simulations with observed conditions, ultimately allowing them to better represent and understand physical processes occurring in hurricanes.

    Because air currents are influenced by the Coriolis force (caused by the rotation of the Earth), Northern Hemisphere hurricanes are characterized by an inward counterclockwise (cyclonic) rotation towards the center. It is less widely known that, at high altitudes, outward-spreading bands of cloud rotate in a clockwise (anticyclonic) direction. The image on the left shows the retrieved cloud-tracked winds as red arrows superimposed across the natural color view from MISR's nadir (vertical-viewing) camera. Both the counter-clockwise motion for the lower-level storm clouds and the clockwise motion for the upper clouds are apparent in these images. The speeds for the clockwise upper level winds have typical values between 40 and 45 m/s (144-162 km/hr). The low level counterclockwise winds have typical values between 7 and 24 m/s (25-86 km/hr), weakening with distance from the storm center. The image on the right displays the cloud-top height retrievals. Areas where cloud heights could not be retrieved are shown in dark gray. Both the wind velocity vectors and the cloud-top height field were produced by automated computer recognition of displacements in spatial features within successive MISR images acquired at different view angles and at slightly different times.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously, viewing the entire globe between 82o north and 82o south latitude every nine days. This image covers an area of about 380 kilometers by 1970 kilometers. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbit 30324 and utilize data from blocks 55-68 within World Reference System-2 path 22.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is managed for NASA by the California Institute of Technology.

  5. Vector Inflation

    E-print Network

    Alexey Golovnev; Viatcheslav Mukhanov; Vitaly Vanchurin

    2008-06-10

    We propose a scenario where inflation is driven by non-minimally coupled massive vector fields. In an isotropic homogeneous universe these fields behave in presicely the same way as a massive minimally coupled scalar field. Therefore our model is very similar to the model of chaotic inflation with scalar field. For vector fields the isotropy of expansion is achived either by considering a triplet of orthogonal vector fields or for the expense of $N$ randomly oriented vector fields. In the last case the substantial anisotropy of the expansion of order $1/\\sqrt{N}$ survives until the end of inflation. The lightest vector fields might also force the late time acceleration of the Universe.

  6. TURBULENCE DECAY AND CLOUD CORE RELAXATION IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yang; Law, Chung K.; Xu, Haitao

    2015-02-01

    The turbulent motion within molecular clouds is a key factor controlling star formation. Turbulence supports molecular cloud cores from evolving to gravitational collapse and hence sets a lower bound on the size of molecular cloud cores in which star formation can occur. On the other hand, without a continuous external energy source maintaining the turbulence, such as in molecular clouds, the turbulence decays with an energy dissipation time comparable to the dynamic timescale of clouds, which could change the size limits obtained from Jean's criterion by assuming constant turbulence intensities. Here we adopt scaling relations of physical variables in decaying turbulence to analyze its specific effects on the formation of stars. We find that the decay of turbulence provides an additional approach for Jeans' criterion to be achieved, after which gravitational infall governs the motion of the cloud core. This epoch of turbulence decay is defined as cloud core relaxation. The existence of cloud core relaxation provides a more complete understanding of the effect of the competition between turbulence and gravity on the dynamics of molecular cloud cores and star formation.

  7. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A. (Madison, WI); Smith, Lloyd M. (Madison, WI)

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  8. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  9. Equivalent Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The cross-product is a mathematical operation that is performed between two 3-dimensional vectors. The result is a vector that is orthogonal or perpendicular to both of them. Learning about this for the first time while taking Calculus-III, the class was taught that if AxB = AxC, it does not necessarily follow that B = C. This seemed baffling. The…

  10. Vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    During the past ten years Vector Quantization (VQ) has developed from a theoretical possibility promised by Shannon's source coding theorems into a powerful and competitive technique for speech and image coding and compression at medium to low bit rates. In this survey, the basic ideas behind the design of vector quantizers are sketched and some comments made on the state-of-the-art and current research efforts.

  11. Analysis and forecast experiments incorporating satellite soundings and cloud and water vapor drift wind information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Brian M.; Diak, George R.; Mills, Graham A.

    1986-01-01

    A system for assimilating conventional meteorological data and satellite-derived data in order to produce four-dimensional gridded data sets of the primary atmospheric variables used for updating limited area forecast models is described. The basic principles of a data assimilation scheme as proposed by Lorenc (1984) are discussed. The design of the system and its incremental assimilation cycles are schematically presented. The assimilation system was tested using radiosonde, buoy, VAS temperature, dew point, gradient wind data, cloud drift, and water vapor motion data. The rms vector errors for the data are analyzed.

  12. The relationship between mesoscale circulation and cloud morphology at the upper cloud level of Venus from VMC/Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsaeva, M. V.; Khatuntsev, I. V.; Patsaev, D. V.; Titov, D. V.; Ignatiev, N. I.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Rodin, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    The Venus Monitoring Camera (VMC) acquired a set of ultraviolet (UV) images during the Venus Express mission unprecedented in its duration from May 2006 to September 2013. Here we present the results of digital tracking of the cloud features in the upper cloud layer at latitudes 25-75°S using images from 257 orbits with the best spatial coverage. The method relies on analysis of correlations between pairs of UV images separated in time. The bulk of data processed allows us to clarify the reasons why the mid-latitude jet is not always present in latitudinal wind profiles. Comparing VMC images with wind velocity fields we found a relationship between cloud morphology at middle latitudes and the circulation. The vector field in middle latitudes depends on the presence of a contrast global streak in the cloud morphology tilted with respect to latitude circles. The angle of the flow deflection (the angle between the wind velocity and latitudinal circles) and the difference of the zonal velocity on the opposite sides of the streak are in direct relationship to the angle between the streak and latitude circles. During such orbits the jet bulge does not appear in the latitudinal profile of the zonal wind component. Otherwise a zonal flow with small changes of the meridional velocity dominates in middle latitudes and manifests itself as a jet bulge. The relationship between the cloud cover morphology and circulation peculiarities can be attributed to the motion of global cloud features, like the Y-feature. We prepared plots of zonal and meridional velocities averaged with respect to the entire observation period. The average zonal velocity has a diurnal maximum at 15:00 local solar time and at 40°S. The meridional velocity reaches its maximum between 13:00 and 16:00 and at 50°S. The velocities obtained by the digital method are in good agreement with results of the visual method in the middle latitudes published earlier by Khatuntsev et al. (2013).

  13. An Inexpensive Mechanical Model for Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, David

    2011-01-01

    As experienced physicists, we see the beauty and simplicity of projectile motion. It is merely the superposition of uniform linear motion along the direction of the initial velocity vector and the downward motion due to the constant acceleration of gravity. We see the kinematic equations as just the mathematical machinery to perform the…

  14. Motion Sickness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... people traveling by car, train, airplanes and especially boats. Motion sickness can start suddenly, with a queasy ... motion sickness. For example, down below on a boat, your inner ear senses motion, but your eyes ...

  15. Classifying Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duzen, Carl; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a series of activities that utilizes a leveling device to classify constant and accelerated motion. Applies this classification system to uniform circular motion and motion produced by gravitational force. (MDH)

  16. Cloud Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

    2009-12-04

    Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

  17. A Catalog of HI Clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-print Network

    S. Kim; E. Rosolowsky; Y. Lee; Y. Kim; Y. C. Jung; M. A. Dopita; B. G. Elmegreen; K. C. Freeman; R. J. Sault; M. J. Kesteven; D. McConnell; Y. -H. Chu

    2007-06-28

    A 21 cm neutral hydrogen interferometric survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) combined with the Parkes multi-beam HI single-dish survey clearly shows that the HI gas is distributed in the form of clumps or clouds. The HI clouds and clumps have been identified using a thresholding method with three separate brightness temperature thresholds ($T_b$). Each catalog of HI cloud candidates shows a power law relationship between the sizes and the velocity dispersions of the clouds roughly following the Larson Law scaling $\\sigma_v \\propto R^{0.5}$, with steeper indices associated with dynamically hot regions. The clouds in each catalog have roughly constant virial parameters as a function mass suggesting that that the clouds are all in roughly the same dynamical state, but the values of the virial parameter are significantly larger than unity showing that turbulent motions dominate gravity in these clouds. The mass distribution of the clouds is a power law with differential indices between -1.6 and -2.0 for the three catalogs. In contrast, the distribution of mean surface densities is a log-normal distribution.

  18. Efficient Cost Measures for Motion Compensation at Low Bit Rates

    E-print Network

    Hoang, Dzung T.; Long, Philip M.; Vitter, Jeffrey Scott

    1996-01-01

    We present and compare methods for choosing motion vectors for block-based motion-compensated video coding. The primary focus is on videophone and video- conferencing applications, where low bit rates are neces- sary, where ...

  19. Beyond pixels : exploring new representations and applications for motion analysis

    E-print Network

    Liu, Ce, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    The focus of motion analysis has been on estimating a flow vector for every pixel by matching intensities. In my thesis, I will explore motion representations beyond the pixel level and new applications to which these ...

  20. Mesoscale wake clouds in Skylab pictures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.; Tecson, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    The recognition of cloud patterns formed in the wake of orographic obstacles was investigated using pictures from Skylab, for the purpose of estimating atmospheric motions. The existence of ship-wake-type wave clouds in contrast to vortex sheets were revealed during examination of the pictures, and an attempt was made to characterize the pattern of waves as well as the transition between waves and vortices. Examples of mesoscale cloud patterns which were analyzed photogrammetrically and meteorologically are presented.

  1. Shapes of Bubbles and Drops in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, James

    2000-01-01

    Explains the shape distortions that take place in fluid packets (bubbles or drops) with steady flow motion by using the laws of Archimedes, Pascal, and Bernoulli rather than advanced vector calculus. (WRM)

  2. Simulations of Midlatitude Frontal Clouds by Single-Column and Cloud-Resolving Models during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement March 2000 Cloud Intensive Operational Period

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Minghua; Branson, Mark; Cederwall, Richard T.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Eitzen, Zachary A.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iacobellis, Sam F.; Johnson, Karen L.; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Klein, Stephen A.; Krueger, Steven K.; Lin, Wuyin; Lohmann, Ulrike; Miller, Mark A.; Randall, David A.; Somerville, Richard C.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Walker, Gregory K.; Wolf, Audrey; Wu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yio, J. John; Zhang, Guang J.; Zhang, Junhua

    2005-03-25

    This study quantitatively evaluates the overall performance of 9 single column models (SCMs) and 4 cloud resolving models (CRMs) in simulating a strong midlatitude frontal cloud system taken from the Spring 2000 Cloud Intensive Observational Period at the ARM Southern Great Plains site. The evaluation data are an analysis product of Constrained Variational Analysis of the ARM-Observations and the cloud data collected from the ARM ground active remote sensors (i.e., cloud radar, lidar, and laser ceilometers) and satellite retrievals. Both the selected SCMs and CRMs can typically capture the bulk characteristics of the frontal system and the frontal precipitation. However, there are significant differences in detailed structures of the frontal clouds. Both CRMs and SCMs overestimate high thin cirrus clouds before the main frontal passage. This is likely caused by the application of grid-scale upward motion in the upper troposphere when in reality only cloud streaks exist in narrow region s of upward sub-grid scale motion. During the passage of a front with strong upward motion, CRMs underestimate middle and low clouds while SCMs overestimate clouds at the levels above 765 hPa. The underestimation in the CRMs is presumably due to the lack of organized stratiform processes that are replaced by convections in the models under strong forcing. The overestimation in the SCMs is likely related to the uniform application of grid-averaged cooling and moistening associated with strong upward motion. All CRMs and some SCMs also underestimated the middle clouds after the frontal passage. This could be related to the lack of organized mesoscale cyclonic advection of hydrometeors behind the moving cyclone. Some of the SCMs simulated more middle clouds after frontal passage due to the long lifetime of cloud ice or prognostic cloud amount in the models. There are also large differences in the model simulations of cloud condensates due to differences in parameterizations, however, the differences among inter-compared models are smaller in the CRMs than the SCMs. While the CRM-produced clouds are highly correlated to the simulated cloud liquid and ice water contents, the SCM-simulated clouds are closely associated with their relative humidity fields. The CRM-simulated cloud water and ice are comparable with observations, while most SCMs underestimated cloud water. SCMs show huge biases varying from large overestimates to equally large underestimates of cloud ice. The partitions between cloud water and cloud ice in the SCMs are also very different when they are compared with observations and CRM simulations. The results point out the need to find ways to improve both the treatment of subgrid scale dynamics and cloud microphysical parameterizations in cloud parameterizations for climate models.

  3. Diurnal polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, P.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical theory is developed to describe diurnal polar motion in the earth which arises as a forced response due to lunisolar torques and tidal deformation. Doodson's expansion of the tide generating potential is used to represent the lunisolar torques. Both the magnitudes and the rates of change of perturbations in the earth's inertia tensor are included in the dynamical equations for the polar motion so as to account for rotational and tidal deformation. It is found that in a deformable earth with Love's number k = 0.29, the angular momentum vector departs by as much as 20 cm from the rotation axis rather than remaining within 1 or 2 cm as it would in a rigid earth. This 20 cm separation is significant in the interpretation of submeter polar motion observations because it necessitates an additional coordinate transformation in order to remove what would otherwise be a 20 cm error source in the conversion between inertial and terrestrial reference systems.

  4. Dynamics of Finite Dust Clouds in a Magnetized Anodic Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Piel, A.; Pilch, I.; Trottenberg, T.; Koepke, M. E.

    2008-09-07

    The response to an external modulation voltage of small dust clouds confined in an anodic plasma is studied. Dust density waves are excited when the cloud is larger than a wavelength, whereas a sloshing and stretching motion is found for smaller clouds. The wave dispersion shows similarities with waveguide modes.

  5. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cloud Physics FOCUS ON CLOUD PHYSICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkovich, Gregory; Malinowski, Szymon P.

    2008-07-01

    Cloud physics has for a long time been an important segment of atmospheric science. It is common knowledge that clouds are crucial for our understanding of weather and climate. Clouds are also interesting by themselves (not to mention that they are beautiful). Complexity is hidden behind the common picture of these beautiful and interesting objects. The typical school textbook definition that a cloud is 'a set of droplets or particles suspended in the atmosphere' is not adequate. Clouds are complicated phenomena in which dynamics, turbulence, microphysics, thermodynamics and radiative transfer interact on a wide range of scales, from sub-micron to kilometres. Some of these interactions are subtle and others are more straightforward. Large and small-scale motions lead to activation of cloud condensation nuclei, condensational growth and collisions; small changes in composition and concentration of atmospheric aerosol lead to significant differences in radiative properties of the clouds and influence rainfall formation. It is justified to look at a cloud as a composite, nonlinear system which involves many interactions and feedback. This system is actively linked into a web of atmospheric, oceanic and even cosmic interactions. Due to the complexity of the cloud system, present-day descriptions of clouds suffer from simplifications, inadequate parameterizations, and omissions. Sometimes the most fundamental physics hidden behind these simplifications and parameterizations is not known, and a wide scope of view can sometimes prevent a 'microscopic', deep insight into the detail. Only the expertise offered by scientists focused on particular elementary processes involved in this complicated pattern of interactions allows us to shape elements of the puzzle from which a general picture of clouds can be created. To be useful, every element of the puzzle must be shaped precisely. This often creates problems in communication between the sciences responsible for shaping elements of the puzzle, and those which combine them. Scales, assumptions and the conditions used in order to describe a particular single process of interest must be consistent with the conditions in clouds. The papers in this focus issue of New Journal of Physics collectively demonstrate (i) the variation in scientific approaches towards investigating cloud processes, (ii) the various stages of shaping elements of the puzzle, and (iii) some attempts to put the pieces together. These papers present just a small subset of loosely arranged elements in an initial stage of puzzle creation. Addressed by this issue is one of the important problems in our understanding of cloud processes—the interaction between cloud particles and turbulence. There is currently a gap between the cloud physics community and scientists working in wind tunnels, on turbulence theory and particle interactions. This collection is intended to narrow this gap by bringing together work by theoreticians, modelers, laboratory experimentalists and those who measure and observe actual processes in clouds. It forms a collage of contributions showing various approaches to cloud processes including: • theoretical works with possible applications to clouds (Bistagnino and Boffetta, Gustavsson et al), • an attempt to construct a phenomenological description of clouds and rain (Lovejoy and Schertzer), • simplified models designed to parameterize turbulence micro- and macro-effects (Celani et al, Derevyanko et al), • focused theoretical research aimed at particular cloud processes (Ayala et al, parts I and II, Wang et al), • laboratory and modeling studies of complex cloud processes (Malinowski et al). This collage is far from being complete but, hopefully, should give the reader a representative impression of the current state of knowledge in the field. We hope it will be useful to all scientists whose work is inspired by cloud processes. Focus on Cloud Physics Contents The development of ice in a cumulus cloud over southwest England Yahui Huang, Alan M Blyth, Philip R A Brown, Tom W Choularton,

  6. ARM Data for Cloud Parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2006-10-02

    The PI's ARM investigation (DE-IA02-02ER633 18) developed a physically-based subgrid-scale saturation representation that fully considers the direct interactions of the parameterized subgrid-scale motions with subgrid-scale cloud microphysical and radiative processes. Major accomplishments under the support of that interagency agreement are summarized in this paper.

  7. Operational implications of a cloud model simulation of space shuttle exhaust clouds in different atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional cloud model was used to characterize the dominant influence of the environment on the Space Shuttle exhaust cloud. The model was modified to accept the actual heat and moisture from rocket exhausts and deluge water as initial conditions. An upper-air sounding determined the ambient atmosphere in which the cloud would grow. The model was validated by comparing simulated clouds with observed clouds from four actual Shuttle launches. Results are discussed with operational weather forecasters in mind. The model successfully produced clouds with dimensions, rise, decay, liquid water contents, and vertical motion fields very similar to observed clouds whose dimensions were calculated from 16 mm film frames. Once validated, the model was used in a number of different atmospheric conditions ranging from very unstable to very stable. Wind shear strongly affected the appearance of both the ground cloud and vertical column cloud. The ambient low-level atmospheric moisture governed the amount of cloud water in model clouds. Some dry atmospheres produced little or no cloud water. An empirical forecast technique for Shuttle cloud rise is presented and differences between natural atmospheric convection and exhaust clouds are discussed.

  8. Investigation of arc cloud lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, J. F. W.; Sinclair, P. C.

    1984-01-01

    The natural mechanisms that lead to the development of deep convective storms through the integration of radio scan satellite data with research aircraft observations is discussed. The aircraft measurements are designed to provide detailed air motion and thermodynamic data near and in the arc cloud line region at the same time GOES rapid scan data is taken. Inspection of the data indicates: (1) Arc cloud lines are important in both the production of convergence and vorticity, and in the interaction with intense thunderstorms which may act to trigger tornado activity. (2) The lateral extent of the vertical motion field compared to the cloud scale indicates that the main driving force for the initial cloud development along the arc-line is controlled by the thunderstorm outflow(s) interacting with the convectively unstable air of the environment. (3) Arc cloud lines and their associated DSL region can pose extreme hazards to aircraft operations. (4) An arc cloud line's major threat to space shuttle operations lie in its ability to generate new thunderstorm activity along the shuttle glide path.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamics of HI Clouds: A New Scenario in the Dynamics of Galactic Cloud Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, F.; Ryu, D.; Jones, T.; Ferrara, A.

    1997-12-01

    We have investigated the role of magnetic fields in supersonic interstellar cloud collisions through 2D MHD numerical simulations of head-on collisions between clouds of equal mass. We consider two limiting field geometries; parallel (aligned) and perpendicular (transverse) to the motion of the colliding clouds. We also compare with analogous hydrodynamic (HD) calculations of Miniati et al (1997). We explore both adiabatic and radiative cases as well as clouds colliding promptly and after significant individual evolution. For some collisions the clouds are evolved to different ages to break the interaction symmetry. The presence of the magnetic field significantly alters the collision outcomes. However, results vary strongly with the field geometry. Adiabatic collisions are very disruptive when the field is aligned or absent, independent of the collision symmetry. Radiative cooling leads to partial coalescence, producing a new, bigger cloud mass about 10% greater than either initial cloud mass. No such coalescence was observed in our HD simulations. The role of the magnetic field is most dramatic for a transverse geometry. Also, then the initial conditions play a much bigger role. For this geometry the outcomes are remarkably different for the unevolved and evolved cloud collisions. The former case is almost unaffected by the the magnetic field. However, prior propagation through the ISM generates an important new field structure; that is, field lines in front of the cloud are strongly stretched, creating a region of very high magnetic energy. This region acts like a bumper preventing direct contact between the clouds. During the virtual impact, cloud kinetic energy is temporarily stored in the bumper to stop the cloud motions. Afterwards the field relaxes and returns some of that energy to the clouds, whose motion has been reversed. The ``elasticity'', defined as the ratio of the final to the initial kinetic energy of each cloud, is about 0.6 during this collision. This work is supported at the University of Minnesota by the NSF and by the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  10. A cloud model simulation of space shuttle exhaust clouds in different atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.; Zak, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional cloud model was used to characterize the dominant influence of the environment on the Space Shuttle exhaust cloud. The model was modified to accept the actual heat and moisture from rocket exhausts and deluge water as initial conditions. An upper-air sounding determined the ambient atmosphere in which the cloud could grow. The model was validated by comparing simulated clouds with observed clouds from four actual Shuttle launches. The model successfully produced clouds with dimensions, rise, decay, liquid water contents and vertical motion fields very similar to observed clouds whose dimensions were calculated from 16 mm film frames. Once validated, the model was used in a number of different atmospheric conditions ranging from very unstable to very stable. In moist, unstable atmospheres simulated clouds rose to about 3.5 km in the first 4 to 8 minutes then decayed. Liquid water contents ranged from 0.3 to 1.0 g kg-1 mixing ratios and vertical motions were from 2 to 10 ms-1. An inversion served both to reduce entrainment (and erosion) at the top and to prevent continued cloud rise. Even in the most unstable atmospheres, the ground cloud did not rise beyond 4 km and in stable atmospheres with strong low level inversions the cloud could be trapped below 500 m. Wind shear strongly affected the appearance of both the ground cloud and vertical column cloud. The ambient low-level atmospheric moisture governed the amount of cloud water in model clouds. Some dry atmospheres produced little or no cloud water. One case of a simulated TITAN rocket explosion is also discussed.

  11. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  12. Conformal motions in plane symmetric static spacetimes

    E-print Network

    K. Saifullah; Shair-e-Yazdan

    2009-04-22

    In this paper, conformal motions are studied in plane symmetric static spacetimes. The general solution of conformal Killing equations and the general form of the conformal Killing vector for these spacetimes are presented. All possibilities for the existence of conformal motions in these spacetimes are exhausted.

  13. Project Physics Tests 1, Concepts of Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Test items relating to Project Physics Unit 1 are presented in this booklet, consisting of 70 multiple-choice and 20 problem-and-essay questions. Concepts of motion are examined with respect to velocities, acceleration, forces, vectors, Newton's laws, and circular motion. Suggestions are made for time consumption in answering some items. Besides…

  14. Dynamic visual attention: motion direction versus motion magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bur, A.; Wurtz, P.; Müri, R. M.; Hügli, H.

    2008-02-01

    Defined as an attentive process in the context of visual sequences, dynamic visual attention refers to the selection of the most informative parts of video sequence. This paper investigates the contribution of motion in dynamic visual attention, and specifically compares computer models designed with the motion component expressed either as the speed magnitude or as the speed vector. Several computer models, including static features (color, intensity and orientation) and motion features (magnitude and vector) are considered. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations are performed by comparing the computer model output with human saliency maps obtained experimentally from eye movement recordings. The model suitability is evaluated in various situations (synthetic and real sequences, acquired with fixed and moving camera perspective), showing advantages and inconveniences of each method as well as preferred domain of application.

  15. Arctic Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... a stereo anaglyph enables observation of multiple cloud layers. The images are centered at about 75 degrees north latitude, near ... cold, stable air causes the clouds to persist in stratified layers, and this layering is evident in the stereo view. Near the top center, a ...

  16. Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    This article features a major statewide initiative in North Carolina that is showing how a consortium model can minimize risks for districts and help them exploit the advantages of cloud computing. Edgecombe County Public Schools in Tarboro, North Carolina, intends to exploit a major cloud initiative being refined in the state and involving every…

  17. Cloud Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Rama; Raths, David; Schaffhauser, Dian; Skelly, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    For many IT shops, the cloud offers an opportunity not only to improve operations but also to align themselves more closely with their schools' strategic goals. The cloud is not a plug-and-play proposition, however--it is a complex, evolving landscape that demands one's full attention. Security, privacy, contracts, and contingency planning are all…

  18. Cloud Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2012-01-01

    Your learning curriculum needs a new technological platform, but you don't have the expertise or IT equipment to pull it off in-house. The answer is a learning system that exists online, "in the cloud," where learners can access it anywhere, anytime. For trainers, cloud-based coursework often means greater ease of instruction resulting in greater…

  19. Ionization and expansion of barium clouds in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, T.-Z.; Schunk, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    A recently envelope 3D model is used here to study the motion of the barium clouds released in the ionosphere, including the ionization stage. The ionization and the expansion of the barium clouds and the interaction between the clouds and the background ions are investigated using three simulations: a cloud without a directional velocity, a cloud with an initial velocity of 5 km/s across the B field, and a cloud with initial velocity components of 2 km/s both along and across the B field.

  20. A generalized nonlocal vector calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alali, Bacim; Liu, Kuo; Gunzburger, Max

    2015-10-01

    A nonlocal vector calculus was introduced in Du et al. (Math Model Meth Appl Sci 23:493-540, 2013) that has proved useful for the analysis of the peridynamics model of nonlocal mechanics and nonlocal diffusion models. A formulation is developed that provides a more general setting for the nonlocal vector calculus that is independent of particular nonlocal models. It is shown that general nonlocal calculus operators are integral operators with specific integral kernels. General nonlocal calculus properties are developed, including nonlocal integration by parts formula and Green's identities. The nonlocal vector calculus introduced in Du et al. (Math Model Meth Appl Sci 23:493-540, 2013) is shown to be recoverable from the general formulation as a special example. This special nonlocal vector calculus is used to reformulate the peridynamics equation of motion in terms of the nonlocal gradient operator and its adjoint. A new example of nonlocal vector calculus operators is introduced, which shows the potential use of the general formulation for general nonlocal models.

  1. Vector Color Transparency

    E-print Network

    W. R. Greenberg; G. A. Miller

    1993-09-20

    Color transparency (CT) in high momentum transfer $(e,e' \\vec p)$ reactions is explored. The spin of the proton and photon are treated explicitly, hence the name ``Vector CT". The Dirac distorted wave impulse approximation is used as a starting point; then CT effects are embedded. A hadronic basis is used to describe the struck proton as a wavepacket of physical baryon resonances. The effects of the wavepacket expansion on the normal component of the ejectile polarization, which vanishes in the limit of full CT, are investigated. This formalism is also applied to study CT effects in total cross sections, individual separated nuclear response functions, Fermi motion of the initial nucleon, non-zero size of the initial wavepacket and the effects of relativistic lower components. We show that including CT reduces the violations of current conservation (CC), a typical problem in calculations of this kind. The energy dependence of the normal polarization in $(e,e' \\vec p)$ reactions is found to be slow. However, a measurement of the normal transverse response in a heavy nucleus, such as $^{208}Pb$ seems to afford the opportunity to see CT at quite low momentum transfers. The effects of Fermi motion are investigated, and choosing the momentum of the struck nucleon to be large leads to significant violations of CC.

  2. The mean-square error optimal linear discriminant function and its application to incomplete data vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    In many pattern recognition problems, data vectors are classified although one or more of the data vector elements are missing. This problem occurs in remote sensing when the ground is obscured by clouds. Optimal linear discrimination procedures for classifying imcomplete data vectors are discussed.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of broad line region clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Martin; Schartmann, Marc; Burkert, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Hydrodynamic stability has been a longstanding issue for the cloud model of the broad line region in active galactic nuclei. We argue that the clouds may be gravitationally bound to the supermassive black hole. If true, stabilization by thermal pressure alone becomes even more difficult. We further argue that if magnetic fields are present in such clouds at a level that could affect the stability properties, they need to be strong enough to compete with the radiation pressure on the cloud. This would imply magnetic field values of a few gauss for a sample of active galactic nuclei we draw from the literature. We then investigate the effect of several magnetic configurations on cloud stability in axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations. For a purely azimuthal magnetic field which provides the dominant pressure support, the cloud first gets compressed by the opposing radiative and gravitational forces. The pressure inside the cloud then increases, and it expands vertically. Kelvin-Helmholtz and column density instabilities lead to a filamentary fragmentation of the cloud. This radiative dispersion continues until the cloud is shredded down to the resolution level. For a helical magnetic field configuration, a much more stable cloud core survives with a stationary density histogram which takes the form of a power law. Our simulated clouds develop sub-Alfvénic internal motions on the level of a few hundred km s-1.

  4. Entrainment instability and vertical motion as causes of stratocumulus breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, C. J.; Pearson, R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Entrainment instability is thought to be a cause of stratocumulus breakup. At the interface between the cloud and the overlying air, mixtures may form which are negatively buoyant because of cloud droplet evaporation. Quantities devised to predict breakup are obtained from aircraft observations and are tested against cloud observations from satellite. Often, the parameters indicate that breakup should occur but the clouds remain, sometimes for several days. One possible explanation for breakup is vertical motion from passing synoptic cyclones. Several cases suggest that breakup is associated with the downward vertical motion from the cold air advected behind an eastward moving cyclone.

  5. Ice in Volcanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Few, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    It is widely recognized that lightning activity in thunderstorm clouds is associated with ice in the clouds. In volcanic plumes the lower electrical discharges near the vent are clearly not associated with ice; however, the electrical discharges from the upper volcanic clouds very likely are associated with ice. There is ample water in volcanic plumes and clouds. The explosive volcanic eruption is produced by volatile components in the rising magma. Researchers estimate that the water content of the volatiles is up to 99% by mole; other gases are mainly sulfur and chlorine species. These volatiles carry with them a wide range of hot magma melts and solids, importantly silicate particles and tephra. The more massive components fall out near the vent carrying with them much of the heat from the plume; these large components are not in thermodynamic equilibrium with the gases, ash, and lapilli; thus the heat removed does not lower the temperature of the materials carried aloft in the plume. Upward motion is initially provided by the thrust from the volcanic eruption, then by buoyancy of the hot plume. The rising plume is cooled by entrainment of environmental air, which contains water, and by adiabatic expansion; the plume transitions into a volcanic cloud. Further lifting and cooling produces supercooled water droplets (T ~ -5 C) in a limited zone (z ~ 9 km) before the fast updraft (~ 60 m/s) rapidly transforms them into ice. Computer models of volcanic clouds that include water and ice microphysics indicate that the latent heat of condensation is not significant in cloud dynamics because it occurs in a region where buoyancy is provided by the original hot plume material. The latent heat of ice formation occurs at higher and colder levels and seems to contribute to the final lifting of the cloud top by ~1.5km. Laboratory results indicate that the fine silicate ash particles, which are abundant, are good ice nuclei, IN. Because of the abundance of the silicate ash, modelers conclude that there are many small ice particles in a volcanic clouds compared to thunderstorm clouds where the scarcity of IN produce fewer but larger ice particles. Another microphysical difference is that in the water phase (drops or ice surface) adsorption of sulfur and chlorine gases is enhanced and the freezing temperature lowered. During diffusion growth of ice particles sulfur dioxide can be incorporated in the ice. The sulfur dioxide sequestered by the ice can be converted to sulfate and transported into the stratosphere and released when the ice sublimates. Do these microphysical differences significantly alter the electrical charging mechanisms that exist in thunderstorm clouds? Observations of the lightning discharges associated with the upper regions of volcanic clouds seem to indicate that the charging mechanisms are essentially the same.

  6. Interstellar Gas Flow Vector and Temperature Determination over 5 Years of IBEX Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möbius, E.; Bzowski, M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Heirtzler, D.; Kubiak, M. A.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; Leonard, T.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N.; Sokó?, J. M.; Wurz, P.

    2015-01-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes the interstellar neutral gas flow trajectories at their perihelion in Earth's orbit every year from December through early April, when the Earth's orbital motion is into the oncoming flow. These observations have defined a narrow region of possible, but very tightly coupled interstellar neutral flow parameters, with inflow speed, latitude, and temperature as well-defined functions of inflow longitude. The best- fit flow vector is different by ? 3° and lower by ? 3 km/s than obtained previously with Ulysses GAS, but the temperature is comparable. The possible coupled parameter space reaches to the previous flow vector, but only for a substantially higher temperature (by ? 2000 K). Along with recent pickup ion observations and including historical observations of the interstellar gas, these findings have led to a discussion, whether the interstellar gas flow into the solar system has been stable or variable over time. These intriguing possibilities call for more detailed analysis and a longer database. IBEX has accumulated observations over six interstellar flow seasons. We review key observations and refinements in the analysis, in particular, towards narrowing the uncertainties in the temperature determination. We also address ongoing attempts to optimize the flow vector determination through varying the IBEX spacecraft pointing and discuss related implications for the local interstellar cloud and its interaction with the heliosphere.

  7. A Flexible Turbulent Vector Field Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassi, A.; Davis, A.

    2004-12-01

    Analysis and generation of turbulent vector fields is a necessity in many areas, such as Atmospheric Science. A candidate model of vector field must be flexible enough to tune some features, such as the spacial distribution of vortices, sinks and sources, according to physical measures. To achieve that goal, we propose a model that depends upon a given matricial function called "topolet" and a law of random vectors family. This model has a hierarchical structure. Its spinal column is a tree: the encoding tree of the domain where the vector field lives. The sets of vortices, sinks and sources are driven by some Bernouilli subtrees, directly giving their fractal dimension. At each node of the tree is attached a rate of energy loose giving the spectral slope. All those quantities are independantly identifiable on the base of mathematical proofs. A primitive version of this model have been proposed for generating clouds.

  8. Complex Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... title:  Multi-layer Clouds Over the South Indian Ocean     View Larger Image ... a noticeable cyclonic circulation over the Southern Indian Ocean, to the north of Enderbyland, East Antarctica. The image at left was ...

  9. Thin Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... of this montage is a natural-color view of the Caribbean Sea east of the Yucatan Peninsula as seen by MISR's most steeply ... - Thin, feathery clouds of ice crystals over the Caribbean Sea. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  10. Interaction of a neutral cloud moving through a magnetized plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Lu, G.

    1990-01-01

    Current collection by outgassing probes in motion relative to a magnetized plasma may be significantly affected by plasma processes that cause electron heating and cross field transport. Simulations of a neutral gas cloud moving across a static magnetic field are discussed. The authors treat a low-Beta plasma and use a 2-1/2 D electrostatic code linked with the authors' Plasma and Neutral Interaction Code (PANIC). This study emphasizes the understanding of the interface between the neutral gas cloud and the surrounding plasma where electrons are heated and can diffuse across field lines. When ionization or charge exchange collisions occur a sheath-like structure is formed at the surface of the neutral gas. In that region the crossfield component of the electric field causes the electron to E times B drift with a velocity of the order of the neutral gas velocity times the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. In addition a diamagnetic drift of the electron occurs due to the number density and temperature inhomogeneity in the front. These drift currents excite the lower-hybrid waves with the wave k-vectors almost perpendicular to the neutral flow and magnetic field again resulting in electron heating. The thermal electron current is significantly enhanced due to this heating.

  11. Lidar cloud studies for FIRE and ECLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Grund, Christian J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Hardesty, Michael; Alvarez, James

    1990-01-01

    Optical remote sensing measurements of cirrus cloud properties were collected by one airborne and four ground-based lidar systems over a 32 h period during this case study from the First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program) Regional Experiment (FIRE) Intensive Field Observation (IFO) program. The lidar systems were variously equipped to collect linear depolarization, intrinsically calibrated backscatter, and Doppler velocity information. Data presented describe the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of cirrus clouds over an area encompassing southern and central Wisconsin. The cirrus cloud types include: dissipating subvisual and thin fibrous cirrus cloud bands, an isolated mesoscale uncinus complex (MUC), a large-scale deep cloud that developed into an organized cirrus structure within the lidar array, and a series of intensifying mesoscale cirrus cloud masses. Although the cirrus frequently developed in the vertical from particle fall-streaks emanating from generating regions at or near cloud tops, glaciating supercooled (-30 to -35 C) altocumulus clouds contributed to the production of ice mass at the base of the deep cirrus cloud, apparently even through riming, and other mechanisms involving evaporation, wave motions, and radiative effects are indicated. The generating regions ranged in scale from approximately 1.0 km cirrus uncinus cells, to organized MUC structures up to approximately 120 km across.

  12. Cloud level winds from the Venus Express Monitoring Camera imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatuntsev, I. V.; Patsaeva, M. V.; Titov, D. V.; Ignatiev, N. I.; Turin, A. V.; Limaye, S. S.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Almeida, M.; Roatsch, Th.; Moissl, R.

    2013-09-01

    Six years of continuous monitoring of Venus by European Space Agency’s Venus Express orbiter provides an opportunity to study dynamics of the atmosphere our neighbor planet. Venus Monitoring Camera (VMC) on-board the orbiter has acquired the longest and the most complete so far set of ultra violet images of Venus. These images enable a study the cloud level circulation by tracking motion of the cloud features. The highly elliptical polar orbit of Venus Express provides optimal conditions for observations of the Southern hemisphere at varying spatial resolution. Out of the 2300 orbits of Venus Express over which the images used in the study cover about 10 Venus years. Out of these, we tracked cloud features in images obtained in 127 orbits by a manual cloud tracking technique and by a digital correlation method in 576 orbits. Total number of wind vectors derived in this work is 45,600 for the manual tracking and 391,600 for the digital method. This allowed us to determine the mean circulation, its long-term and diurnal trends, orbit-to-orbit variations and periodicities. We also present the first results of tracking features in the VMC near-IR images. In low latitudes the mean zonal wind at cloud tops (67 ± 2 km following: Rossow, W.B., Del Genio, A.T., Eichler, T. [1990]. J. Atmos. Sci. 47, 2053-2084) is about 90 m/s with a maximum of about 100 m/s at 40-50°S. Poleward of 50°S the average zonal wind speed decreases with latitude. The corresponding atmospheric rotation period at cloud tops has a maximum of about 5 days at equator, decreases to approximately 3 days in middle latitudes and stays almost constant poleward from 50°S. The mean poleward meridional wind slowly increases from zero value at the equator to about 10 m/s at 50°S and then decreases to zero at the pole. The error of an individual measurement is 7.5-30 m/s. Wind speeds of 70-80 m/s were derived from near-IR images at low latitudes. The VMC observations indicate a long term trend for the zonal wind speed at low latitudes to increase from 85 m/s in the beginning of the mission to 110 m/s by the middle of 2012. VMC UV observations also showed significant short term variations of the mean flow. The velocity difference between consecutive orbits in the region of mid-latitude jet could reach 30 m/s that likely indicates vacillation of the mean flow between jet-like regime and quasi-solid body rotation at mid-latitudes. Fourier analysis revealed periodicities in the zonal circulation at low latitudes. Within the equatorial region, up to 35°S, the zonal wind show an oscillation with a period of 4.1-5 days (4.83 days on average) that is close to the super-rotation period at the equator. The wave amplitude is 4-17 m/s and decreases with latitude, a feature of the Kelvin wave. The VMC observations showed a clear diurnal signature. A minimum in the zonal speed was found close to the noon (11-14 h) and maxima in the morning (8-9 h) and in the evening (16-17 h). The meridional component peaks in the early afternoon (13-15 h) at around 50°S latitude. The minimum of the meridional component is located at low latitudes in the morning (8-11 h). The horizontal divergence of the mean cloud motions associated with the diurnal pattern suggests upwelling motions in the morning at low latitudes and downwelling flow in the afternoon in the cold collar region.

  13. Gravitational contraction versus Supernova driving and the origin of the velocity dispersion-size relation in molecular clouds

    E-print Network

    Ibáñez-Mejía, Juan C; Klessen, Ralf S; Baczynski, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Molecular cloud observations show that clouds have non-thermal velocity dispersions that scale with the cloud size as $\\sigma\\propto R^{1/2}$ at constant surface density, and for varying surface density scale with both the cloud`s size and surface density, $\\sigma^2 \\propto R \\Sigma$. The energy source driving these chaotic motions remains poorly understood. We describe the velocity dispersions observed in a cloud population formed in a kiloparsec-scale numerical simulation of a magnetized, supernova-driven, self-gravitating, interstellar medium, including diffuse heating and radiative cooling. We compare the relationships between velocity dispersion, size, and surface density measured in the simulated cloud population to those found in observations of Galactic molecular clouds. We find that external supernova explosions can not drive turbulent motions of the observed magnitudes within dense clouds. On the other hand, self-gravity also induces non-thermal motions as gravitationally bound clouds begin to colla...

  14. CLOUD CONDENSATION NUCLEI MEASUREMENTS WITHIN CLOUDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of the spectra of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) within and near the boundaries of clouds are presented. Some of the in-cloud measurements excluded the nuclei within cloud droplets (interstitial CCN) while others included all nuclei inside the cloud (total CCN). The...

  15. Cloud Arcs

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... (MISR) have formed a distinctive series of quasi-circular arcs. Clues regarding the formation of these arcs can be found by ... examples of the continuity of air, in which every rising air motion must be compensated by a sinking motion elsewhere, are very common, the ...

  16. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  17. Circular Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Paul D.

    1995-01-01

    Provides a period-long activity using battery powered cars rolling in a circular motion on a tile floor. Students measure the time and distance as the car moves to derive the equation for centripetal acceleration. (MVL)

  18. Image transfer through cirrus clouds. II. Wave-front segmentation and imaging.

    PubMed

    Landesman, Barbara T; Matson, Charles L

    2002-12-20

    A hybrid technique to simulate the imaging of space-based objects through cirrus clouds is presented. The method makes use of standard Huygens-Fresnel propagation beyond the cloud boundary and a novel vector trace approach within the cloud. At the top of the cloud, the wave front is divided into an array of input gradient vectors, which are in turn transmitted through the cloud model by use of the Coherent Illumination Ray Trace and Imaging Software for Cirrus. At the bottom of the cloud, the output vector distribution is used to reconstruct a wave front that continues propagating to the ground receiver. Images of the object as seen through cirrus clouds with different optical depths are compared with a diffraction-limited image. Turbulence effects from the atmospheric propagation are not included. PMID:12510928

  19. CLOUD CHEMISTRY.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWARTZ,S.E.

    2001-03-01

    Clouds present substantial concentrations of liquid-phase water, which can potentially serve as a medium for dissolution and reaction of atmospheric gases. The important precursors of acid deposition, SO{sub 2} and nitrogen oxides NO and NO{sub 2} are only sparingly soluble in clouds without further oxidation to sulfuric and nitric acids. In the case of SO{sub 2} aqueous-phase reaction with hydrogen peroxide, and to lesser extent ozone, are identified as important processes leading to this oxidation, and methods have been described by which to evaluate the rates of these reactions. The limited solubility of the nitrogen oxides precludes significant aqueous-phase reaction of these species, but gas-phase reactions in clouds can be important especially at night.

  20. Neptune's clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The bright cirrus-like clouds of Neptune change rapidly, often forming and dissipating over periods of several to tens of hours. In this sequence Voyager 2 observed cloud evolution in the region around the Great Dark Spot (GDS). The surprisingly rapid changes which occur separating each panel shows that in this region Neptune's weather is perhaps as dynamic and variable as that of the Earth. However, the scale is immense by our standards -- the Earth and the GDS are of similar size -- and in Neptune's frigid atmosphere, where temperatures are as low as 55 degrees Kelvin (-360 F), the cirrus clouds are composed of frozen methane rather than Earth's crystals of water ice. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications

  1. Gravity, Turbulence and the scaling "laws" in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-08-01

    The so-called Larson scaling laws found empirically in molecular clouds have been generally interpreted as evidence that the clouds are turbulent, and hence fractal. However, recent observations and models of cloud formation suggest that a) these relations are the result of strong observational biases, and thus should be replaced by a single, more general one, and b) that the actual source of the non-thermal motions is gravitational collapse of the clouds, so that the turbulent, chaotic component of the motions is only a by-product of the collapse, with no significant "support" role for the clouds, and that the scale-free nature of the motions is of gravitational, rather than turbulent, origin.

  2. Cloud radiative properties and aerosol - cloud interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viviana Vladutescu, Daniela; Gross, Barry; Li, Clement; Han, Zaw

    2015-04-01

    The presented research discusses different techniques for improvement of cloud properties measurements and analysis. The need for these measurements and analysis arises from the high errors noticed in existing methods that are currently used in retrieving cloud properties and implicitly cloud radiative forcing. The properties investigated are cloud fraction (cf) and cloud optical thickness (COT) measured with a suite of collocated remote sensing instruments. The novel approach makes use of a ground based "poor man's camera" to detect cloud and sky radiation in red, green, and blue with a high spatial resolution of 30 mm at 1km. The surface-based high resolution photography provides a new and interesting view of clouds. As the cloud fraction cannot be uniquely defined or measured, it depends on threshold and resolution. However as resolution decreases, cloud fraction tends to increase if the threshold is below the mean, and vice versa. Additionally cloud fractal dimension also depends on threshold. Therefore these findings raise concerns over the ability to characterize clouds by cloud fraction or fractal dimension. Our analysis indicate that Principal Component analysis may lead to a robust means of quantifying cloud contribution to radiance. The cloud images are analyzed in conjunction with a collocated CIMEL sky radiometer, Microwave Radiometer and LIDAR to determine homogeneity and heterogeneity. Additionally, MFRSR measurements are used to determine the cloud radiative properties as a validation tool to the results obtained from the other instruments and methods. The cloud properties to be further studied are aerosol- cloud interaction, cloud particle radii, and vertical homogeneity.

  3. Stellar Encounters with the Oort Cloud Based on Hipparcos Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Sanchez, J.; Preston, R. A.; Jones, D. L.; Weissman, P. R.; Lestrade, J. F.; Latham, D. W.; Stefanik, R. P.

    1998-01-01

    We have combined Hipparcos proper motion and parallax data for nearby stars with ground-based radial velocity measurements to find stars which may have passed (or will pass) close enough to the Sun to perturb the Oort cloud.

  4. Cloud Thickness from Diffusion of Lidar Pulses in Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Davis, A.; McGill, Matthew

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of the distribution of reflected light from a laser beam incident on an aqueous suspension of particles or "cloud" with known thickness and particle size distribution are reported. The distribution is referred to as the "cloud radiative Green's function", G. In the diffusion domain, G is sensitive to cloud thickness, allowing that important quantity to be retrieved. The goal of the laboratory simulation is to provide preliminary estimates of sensitivity of G to cloud thickness,for use in the optimal design of an offbeam Lidar instrument for remote sensing of cloud thickness (THOR, Thickness from Offbeam Returns). These clouds of polystyrene microspheres suspended in water are analogous to real clouds of water droplets suspended in air. The microsphere size distribution is roughly lognormal, from 0.5 microns to 25 microns, similar to real clouds. Density of suspended spheres is adjusted so mean-free-path of visible photons is about 10 cm, approximately 1000 times smaller than in real clouds. The light source is a ND:YAG laser at 530 nm. Detectors are flux and photon-counting Photomultiplier Tube (PMTS), with a glass probe for precise positioning. A Labview 5 VI controls positioning, and data acquisition, via an NI Motion Control board connected to a stepper motor driving an Edmund linear slider, and a 16-channel 16-bit NI-DAQ board. The stepper motor is accurate to 10 microns, and step size is selectable from the VI software. Far from the incident beam, the rate of exponential increase as the direction of the incident beam is approached scales as expected from diffusion theory, linearly with the cloud thickness, and inversely as the square root of the reduced optical thickness, and is independent of particle size. Near the beam the signal begins to increase faster than exponential, due to single and low-order scattering near the backward direction, and here the distribution depends on particle size. Results are being used to verify 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations, used to estimate signal-to-noise ratios for remotely sensed off beam returns, for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds. Signal-to-noise estimates show that unfiltered observations are straight forward at night, while narrow band pass filters are being studied for day.

  5. Present-day plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minster, J. B.; Jordan, T. H.

    1977-01-01

    A data set comprising 110 spreading rates, 78 transform fault azimuths and 142 earthquake slip vectors was inverted to yield a new instantaneous plate motion model, designated RM2. The mean averaging interval for the relative motion data was reduced to less than 3 My. A detailed comparison of RM2 with angular velocity vectors which best fit the data along individual plate boundaries indicates that RM2 performs close to optimally in most regions, with several notable exceptions. On the other hand, a previous estimate (RM1) failed to satisfy an extensive set of new data collected in the South Atlantic Ocean. It is shown that RM1 incorrectly predicts the plate kinematics in the South Atlantic because the presently available data are inconsistent with the plate geometry assumed in deriving RM1. It is demonstrated that this inconsistency can be remedied by postulating the existence of internal deformation with the Indian plate, although alternate explanations are possible.

  6. Cloud Computing Adam Barker

    E-print Network

    St Andrews, University of

    Cloud Computing 1 Adam Barker #12;Overview · Introduction to Cloud computing · Enabling technologies · Di erent types of cloud: IaaS, PaaS and SaaS · Cloud terminology · Interacting with a cloud: management consoles · Launching an instance · Connecting to an instance · Running your application · Clouds

  7. Perceiving Motion and Events Image motion vs. Object Motion

    E-print Network

    Majumder, Aditi

    Perceiving Motion and Events #12;2 Image motion vs. Object Motion Image Motion ­ Caused by eye ­ sensitivity = roughly 1/6 ­ 1/3 visual angle/second A light spot against a texture background = sensitivity = roughly 1/60 visual angle/second Conclusion ­ Much more sensitive to motion relative to another object vs

  8. Torus-Shaped Dust Clouds in Magnetized Anodic Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, I.; Reichstein, T.; Greiner, F.; Piel, A.

    2008-09-07

    The generation of a torus-shaped dust cloud in an anodic plasma is decribed. The confined dust particles perfom a rotational motion around the torus major axis. The structure of the cloud in dependence of the external parameters are observed and the rotation velocity of the particles was measured and compared with a simple estimate.

  9. Neutral cold gas (H atoms): HI clouds, 50% MISM

    E-print Network

    Estalella, Robert

    Neutral cold gas (H atoms): HI clouds, 50% MISM Tk = 100 K, n = 102 cm-3 observation: hyperfine transition of the fundamental level, F = 1-0 = 21 cm, = 1 420 405 751.786 Hz Interstellar Medium: HI clouds & Hindman (Sidney) Prediction and discovery of the HI 21 cm line #12;Radiative processes: thermal motion

  10. Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models

    E-print Network

    Plant, Robert

    Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models RMetS Conference 4th September 2007 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations What is the distribution of cloud lifetimes? What factors determine the lifetime of an individual

  11. Seasonal variation and physical properties of the cloud system over southeastern China derived from CloudSat products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhun; Zhou, Tianjun

    2015-05-01

    Based on the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) data and CloudSat products, the seasonal variations of the cloud properties, vertical occurrence frequency, and ice water content of clouds over southeastern China were investigated in this study. In the CloudSat data, a significant alternation in high or low cloud patterns was observed from winter to summer over southeastern China. It was found that the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) circulation and its transport of moisture leads to a conditional instability, which benefits the local upward motion in summer, and thereby results in an increased amount of high cloud. The deep convective cloud centers were found to coincide well with the northward march of the EASM, while cirrus lagged slightly behind the convection center and coincided well with the outflow and meridional wind divergence of the EASM. Analysis of the radiative heating rates revealed that both the plentiful summer moisture and higher clouds are effective in destabilizing the atmosphere. Moreover, clouds heat the mid-troposphere and the cloud radiative heating is balanced by adiabatic cooling through upward motion, which causes meridional wind by the Sverdrup balance. The cloud heating-forced circulation was observed to coincide well with the EASM circulation, serving as a positive effect on EASM circulation.

  12. The vector ruling protractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    The theory, structure and working of a vector slide rule is presented in this report. This instrument is used for determining a vector in magnitude and position when given its components and its moment about a point in their plane.

  13. Understanding Singular Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Botteron, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    matrix yields a surprisingly simple, heuristical approximation to its singular vectors. There are correspondingly good approximations to the singular values. Such rules of thumb provide an intuitive interpretation of the singular vectors that helps explain why the SVD is so…

  14. Method and system for non-linear motion estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ligang (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method and system for extrapolating and interpolating a visual signal including determining a first motion vector between a first pixel position in a first image to a second pixel position in a second image, determining a second motion vector between the second pixel position in the second image and a third pixel position in a third image, determining a third motion vector between one of the first pixel position in the first image and the second pixel position in the second image, and the second pixel position in the second image and the third pixel position in the third image using a non-linear model, determining a position of the fourth pixel in a fourth image based upon the third motion vector.

  15. Brownian Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenda, Bernard H.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the phenomenon of Brownian motion, which serves as a mathematical model for random processes. Topics addressed include kinetic theory, Einstein's theory, particle displacement, and others. Points out that observations of the random course of a particle suspended in fluid led to the first accurate measurement of atomic mass. (DH)

  16. Point Cloud Server (pcs) : Point Clouds In-Base Management and Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cura, R.; Perret, J.; Paparoditis, N.

    2015-08-01

    In addition to the traditional Geographic Information System (GIS) data such as images and vectors, point cloud data has become more available. It is appreciated for its precision and true three-Dimensional (3D) nature. However, managing the point cloud can be difficult due to scaling problems and specificities of this data type. Several methods exist but are usually fairly specialised and solve only one aspect of the management problem. In this work, we propose a complete and efficient point cloud management system based on a database server that works on groups of points rather than individual points. This system is specifically designed to solve all the needs of point cloud users: fast loading, compressed storage, powerful filtering, easy data access and exporting, and integrated processing. Moreover, the system fully integrates metadata (like sensor position) and can conjointly use point clouds with images, vectors, and other point clouds. The system also offers in-base processing for easy prototyping and parallel processing and can scale well. Lastly, the system is built on open source technologies; therefore it can be easily extended and customised. We test the system will several billion points of point clouds from Lidar (aerial and terrestrial ) and stereo-vision. We demonstrate ~ 400 million pts/h loading speed, user-transparent greater than 2 to 4:1 compression ratio, filtering in the approximately 50 ms range, and output of about a million pts/s, along with classical processing, such as object detection.

  17. Cloud Security by Max Garvey

    E-print Network

    Tolmach, Andrew

    Cloud Security Survey by Max Garvey #12;Cloudy Cloud is Cloudy What is the cloud? On Demand Service Network access Resource pooling Elasticity of Resources Measured Service #12;Cloud Types/Variants Iaa Cloud Public Cloud Hybrid Cloud combination. Private cloud with overflow going to public cloud. #12

  18. Rhotrix Vector Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminu, Abdulhadi

    2010-01-01

    By rhotrix we understand an object that lies in some way between (n x n)-dimensional matrices and (2n - 1) x (2n - 1)-dimensional matrices. Representation of vectors in rhotrices is different from the representation of vectors in matrices. A number of vector spaces in matrices and their properties are known. On the other hand, little seems to be…

  19. The Advancement of Intraplate Tectonic Motion Detection by the Use of Atmospherically Corrected InSAR Time-series and its Decomposition into a 3D Field Vector in South-East Sicily, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, A.; Bekaert, D. P.; Bonforte, A.; Guglielmino, F.; Hooper, A. J.; Stramondo, S.; Zucca, F.

    2014-12-01

    This study provides insights into the advancements gained by applying a tropospheric correction to a time-series InSAR small baseline network processed using the StaMPS software for the Hyblean Plateau in south-east Sicily, Italy. The contribution of the atmosphere is one of the major error sources in repeat-pass InSAR in general. For time-series analysis spatial and temporal "filtering" of the interferometric phase can be used to address atmospheric signals. This however might be at the cost of smoothing and removal of the "tectonic deformation". We applied a tropospheric correction to each interferogram based on estimates of the ERA-Interim weather model, provided by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). This approach is part of the InSAR Atmospheric Correction Toolbox (Bekaert et al, in prep) and converts the tropospheric water vapor content into the phase-delay of the radar line-of-sight. For the analysis we used 49 descending and 58 ascending Envisat SAR images, which cover the time period from 2003 until 2010. In addition, we have processed 30 SAR images of RADARSAT-2 for the period between 2010-2012. Furthermore, we used the different viewing geometries and the integration of GPS data to decompose the single line-of-sight velocities into a 3-dimensional field vector by applying the SISTEM approach (Guglielmino et al. 2011). First results reveal that the atmospherically corrected data retain the deformation signal along geological structures like the Scicli-Ragusa fault whilst the standard filtering approach is canceling out these very slow deformation patterns. Simultaneously, the variability of the signal in space is diminished and thus gives more confidence on the deformation patterns observed by the SAR. Consequently, the decomposition of the line-of-sight velocities and the integration with the GPS data allows us to retrieve a more realistic deformation field.

  20. The Structure of the Local Interstellar Medium. IV. Dynamics, Morphology, Physical Properties, and Implications of Cloud-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, Seth; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    2008-01-01

    We present an empirical dynamical model of the LISM based on 270 radial velocity measurements for 157 sight lines toward nearby stars. Physical parameter measurements (i.e., temperature, turbulent velocity, depletions) are available for 90 components, or one-third of the sample, enabling initial characterizations of the physical properties of LISM clouds. The model includes 15 warm clouds located within 15 pc of the Sun, each with a different velocity vector. We derive projected morphologies of all clouds and estimate the volume filling factor of warm partially ionized material in the LISM to be between ~5.5% and 19%. Relative velocities of potentially interacting clouds are often supersonic, consistent with heating, turbulent, and metal depletion properties. Cloud-cloud collisions may be responsible for the filamentary morphologies found in ~1/3 of LISM clouds, the distribution of clouds along the boundaries of the two nearest clouds (LIC and G), the detailed shape and heating of the Mic Cloud, the location of nearby radio scintillation screens, and the location of an LISM cold cloud. Contrary to previous claims, the Sun appears to be located in the transition zone between the LIC and G Cloud. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs 9525 and 10236.

  1. The Structure of the Local Interstellar Medium IV: Dynamics, Morphology, Physical Properties, and Implications of Cloud-Cloud Interactions

    E-print Network

    Seth Redfield; Jeffrey L. Linsky

    2007-09-27

    We present an empirical dynamical model of the local interstellar medium based on 270 radial-velocity measurements for 157 sight lines toward nearby stars. Physical-parameter measurements (i.e., temperature, turbulent velocity, depletions) are available for 90 components, or one-third of the sample, enabling initial characterizations of the physical properties of LISM clouds. The model includes 15 warm clouds located within 15 pc of the Sun, each with a different velocity vector. We derive projected morphologies of all clouds and estimate the volume filling factor of warm partially ionized material in the LISM to be between ~5.5% and 19%. Relative velocities of potentially interacting clouds are often supersonic, consistent with heating, turbulent, and metal-depletion properties. Cloud-cloud collisions may be responsible for the filamentary morphologies found in ~1/3 of LISM clouds, the distribution of clouds along the boundaries of the two nearest clouds (LIC and G), the detailed shape and heating of the Mic Cloud, the location of nearby radio scintillation screens, and the location of a LISM cold cloud. Contrary to previous claims, the Sun appears to be located in the transition zone between the LIC and G Clouds.

  2. Toward Securing Sensor Clouds

    E-print Network

    Computer Mini Computer External Storage External Storage Router Router Router Router Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Tower-mount Antenna Tower-mount Antenna Wireless Bridge Our model of a "sensor Mini Computer External Storage External Storage Router Router Router Router Cloud Computing Cloud

  3. Estimating Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this activity was to help students understand the percentage of cloud cover and make more accurate cloud cover observations. Students estimated the percentage of cloud cover represented by simulated clouds and assigned a cloud cover classification to those simulations. (Contains 2 notes and 3 tables.)

  4. Multivariate respiratory motion prediction.

    PubMed

    Dürichen, R; Wissel, T; Ernst, F; Schlaefer, A; Schweikard, A

    2014-10-21

    In extracranial robotic radiotherapy, tumour motion is compensated by tracking external and internal surrogates. To compensate system specific time delays, time series prediction of the external optical surrogates is used. We investigate whether the prediction accuracy can be increased by expanding the current clinical setup by an accelerometer, a strain belt and a flow sensor. Four previously published prediction algorithms are adapted to multivariate inputs-normalized least mean squares (nLMS), wavelet-based least mean squares (wLMS), support vector regression (SVR) and relevance vector machines (RVM)-and evaluated for three different prediction horizons. The measurement involves 18 subjects and consists of two phases, focusing on long term trends (M1) and breathing artefacts (M2). To select the most relevant and least redundant sensors, a sequential forward selection (SFS) method is proposed. Using a multivariate setting, the results show that the clinically used nLMS algorithm is susceptible to large outliers. In the case of irregular breathing (M2), the mean root mean square error (RMSE) of a univariate nLMS algorithm is 0.66 mm and can be decreased to 0.46 mm by a multivariate RVM model (best algorithm on average). To investigate the full potential of this approach, the optimal sensor combination was also estimated on the complete test set. The results indicate that a further decrease in RMSE is possible for RVM (to 0.42 mm). This motivates further research about sensor selection methods. Besides the optical surrogates, the sensors most frequently selected by the algorithms are the accelerometer and the strain belt. These sensors could be easily integrated in the current clinical setup and would allow a more precise motion compensation. PMID:25254327

  5. Optimum instantaneous impulsive orbital injection to attain a specified asymptotic velocity vector.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    A nalysis of the necessary conditions of Battin for instantaneous orbital injection, with consideration of the uniqueness of his solution, and of the further problem which arises in the degenerate case when radius vector and asymptotic vector are separated by 180 deg. It is shown that when the angular separation between radius vector and asymptotic velocity vector satisfies theta not equal to 180 deg, there are precisely two insertion-velocity vectors which permit attainment of the target asymptotic velocity vector, one yielding posigrade, the other retrograde motion. When theta equals to 180 deg, there is a family of insertion-velocity vectors which permit attainment of a specified asymptotic velocity vector with a unique insertion-velocity vector for every arbitrary orientation of a target unit angular momentum vector.

  6. Covariantised Vector Galileons

    E-print Network

    Hull, Matthew; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2015-01-01

    Vector galileons are ghost-free systems containing higher derivative interactions of vector fields. They break the vector gauge symmetry, and the dynamics of the longitudinal vector polarizations acquire a Galileon symmetry in an appropriate decoupling limit in Minkowski space. Using an ADM approach, we carefully reconsider the coupling with gravity of vector galileons, with the aim of studying the necessary conditions to avoid the propagation of ghosts. We develop arguments that put on a more solid footing the results previously obtained in the literature. Moreover, working in analogy with the scalar counterpart, we find indications for the existence of a `beyond Horndeski' theory involving vector degrees of freedom, that avoids the propagation of ghosts thanks to secondary constraints. In addition, we analyse a Higgs mechanism for generating vector galileons through spontaneous symmetry breaking, and we present its consistent covariantisation.

  7. Demonstrating the Direction of Angular Velocity in Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demircioglu, Salih; Yurumezoglu, Kemal; Isik, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Rotational motion is ubiquitous in nature, from astronomical systems to household devices in everyday life to elementary models of atoms. Unlike the tangential velocity vector that represents the instantaneous linear velocity (magnitude and direction), an angular velocity vector is conceptually more challenging for students to grasp. In physics…

  8. Reference-Frame Selection in Motion Perception.

    PubMed

    Ogmen, Haluk; Agaoglu, Mehmet; Herzog, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Motion is often perceived according to non-retinotopic reference-frames (e.g., Duncker's wheel; biological motion); however, how reference-frames are selected remains to be established. The stimulus consisted of two concentric arcs undergoing circular motion, with the same average angular-velocity, around the center of the display. The outer arc's (target) velocity was modulated by a sine-wave whereas the inner arc (reference) moved at a constant velocity, except in Experiment 4. Observers' task was to report (yes/no) whether the target reversed its direction of rotation at any point during its motion. The minimum velocity of the target at "50% yes" gave the point of subjective stationarity (PSS). PSS=0 indicates a retinotopic/spatiotopic reference-frame while a PSS equal to the average velocity indicates a motion-based reference-frame with perfect vector-decomposition. In four experiments, we varied the radial and the angular contour distances between the two arcs, the relative radial size of the arcs and the velocity modulation of the reference arc. The perception of motion was neither retinotopic/spatiotopic nor based on perfect vector-decomposition. The effect of the reference arc's motion on the perception of target arc's motion ("reference-frame effect") decreased with increasing radial and angular contour distances, while it was independent of the size-ratio and the absolute-level of velocity modulation. In assessing which metric would unify all of our findings, we considered (i) object-centered, (ii) object-nearest-contour, (iii) motion-centered, and (iv) motion-nearest-vector reference-frames. Our results reject the first three and strongly support the last one. In fact, when the data from all experiments were plotted against this metric, we found a simple linear relationship between the reference-frame effect and the distance defined by this metric. The selection of a reference-frame for motion perception can be explained by a field whose strength decreases linearly as a function of the distance between the nearest motion vectors. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26325972

  9. Dust cloud manipulation in microgravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, Andrei; Blum, Jurgen; Ingo Von Borstel, Olaf; Schraepler, Rainer; Balapanov, Daniyar; Cecere, Anselmo

    The European Space Agency’s scientific program Interactions in Cosmic and Atmospheric Particle Systems (ICAPS) [1] attributed for the International Space Station is aimed at increasing our knowledge about dust agglomeration in astrophysical processes mostly related to proto-planetary matter formation. These processes are simulated experimentally in clouds initially composed of about micrometre-sized solid particles. Relatively low gas pressure provides intensive enough particle Brownian motion but considerably reduces the experimentation time at normal gravity. Microgravity removes this problem but long duration experiments result in cloud depletion due to grain diffusion to the chamber walls and particle number density decrease due to agglomeration. The main problem comes from the fact that residual forces quickly sweep away the cloud from the observation volume thus drastically reducing the experiment duration. We developed different cloud manipulation systems that solve these problems and provide additional research opportunities in investigation of dust clouds. Particularly, they counterbalance external perturbations and solve the most challenging task of the increase of particle number concentration (cloud squeezing). There are several driving forces that may be used separately or in combination. Thermophoresis and gas flows induced by thermal creep are most favourable for cloud manipulation because they are nearly independent from particle properties. Electrostatic force allows detect charged particles, while photophoresis is sensitive to particle dimensions. The system provides two main regimes - 1) cloud positioning or displacement and 2) dynamic trapping. In absence of repulsive forces between particles the latter regime leads to cloud squeezing and intensive forced particle agglomeration. The cloud manipulation system additionally provides temperature stabilization or, on the contrary, high temperature variation in the observation volume; formation of controlled temperature gradients, intensive three-dimensional periodic shear flow or three-dimensional gas density pulsations of the contraction-expansion type. In short duration microgravity conditions of the Bremen drop tower we observed controlled cloud displacement, trapping, rapid growth of extended agglomerates, formation of complex three-dimensional cloud patterns, and motion of charged particles. The results may be applied in other projects dealing with dust clouds in microgravity. ESA PRODEX program and the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office are greatly acknowledged. [1] Blum, J. et al. (2008). Europhysicsnews, 39/3, 27-29.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamics of Cloud Collisions in a Multiphase Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco; Ryu, Dongsu; Ferrara, Andrea; Jones, T. W.

    1999-01-01

    We extend previous studies of the physics of interstellar cloud collisions by beginning an investigation of the role of magnetic fields through two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) numerical simulations. In particular, we study head-on collisions between equal mass, mildly supersonic, diffuse clouds similar to those in our previous study. Here we include a moderate magnetic field, corresponding to ?=pg/pb=4, and two limiting field geometries, with the field lines parallel (aligned) and perpendicular (transverse) to the colliding cloud motion. We explore both adiabatic and radiative (?=?rad/?coll~=0.38) cases, and we simulate collisions between clouds evolved through prior motion in the intercloud medium. In addition to the collision of evolved identical clouds (symmetric cases), we also study collisions of clouds that are initially identical but have different evolutionary ages (asymmetric cases). Depending on their geometry, magnetic fields can significantly alter the outcome of the collisions compared to the hydrodynamic (HD) case. (1) In the aligned case, adiabatic collisions, like their HD counterparts, are very disruptive independently of the symmetry. However, when radiative processes are taken into account, partial coalescence takes place even in the asymmetric case, unlike the HD calculations. (2) In the transverse case, the effects of the magnetic field are even more dramatic, with remarkable differences between unevolved and evolved clouds. Collisions between (initially adjacent) unevolved clouds are almost unaffected by magnetic fields. However, the interaction with the magnetized intercloud gas during precollision evolution produces a region of very high magnetic energy in front of the cloud. In collisions between evolved clouds with transverse field geometry, this region acts like a bumper, preventing direct contact between the clouds and eventually reversing their motion. The elasticity, defined as the ratio of the final to the initial kinetic energy of each cloud, is about 0.5-0.6 in the cases we considered. This behavior is found in both adiabatic and radiative cases.

  11. Ad hoc cloud computing 

    E-print Network

    McGilvary, Gary Andrew

    2014-11-27

    Commercial and private cloud providers offer virtualized resources via a set of co-located and dedicated hosts that are exclusively reserved for the purpose of offering a cloud service. While both cloud models appeal to ...

  12. Cloud Computing og availability

    E-print Network

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    Cloud Computing og availability Projekt i pålidelighed Henrik Lavdal - 20010210 Søren Bardino Kaa - 20011654 Gruppe 8 19-03-2010 #12;Cloud Computing og availability Side 2 af 28 Indholdsfortegnelse ...........................................................................................5 Cloud computing

  13. Uranus at equinox: Cloud morphology and dynamics

    E-print Network

    Sromovsky, Lawrence; Hammel, Heidi; Ahue, William; de Pater, Imke; Rages, Kathy; Showalter, Mark; van Dam, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    As the 7 December 2007 equinox of Uranus approached, ring and atmosphere observers produced a substantial collection of observations using the 10-m Keck telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope. Those spanning the period from 7 June 2007 through 9 September 2007 we used to identify and track cloud features, determine atmospheric motions, characterize cloud morphology and dynamics, and define changes in atmospheric band structure. We confirmed the existence of the suspected northern hemisphere prograde jet, locating its peak near 58 N, and extended wind speed measurements to 73 N. For 28 cloud features we obtained extremely high wind-speed accuracy through extended tracking times. The new results confirm a small N-S asymmetry in the zonal wind profile, and the lack of any change in the southern hemisphere between 1986 (near solstice) and 2007 (near equinox) suggests that the asymmetry may be permanent rather than seasonally reversing. In the 2007 images we found two prominent groups of discrete cloud features ...

  14. Cloud Infrastructure & Applications - CloudIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulistio, Anthony; Reich, Christoph; Doelitzscher, Frank

    The idea behind Cloud Computing is to deliver Infrastructure-as-a-Services and Software-as-a-Service over the Internet on an easy pay-per-use business model. To harness the potentials of Cloud Computing for e-Learning and research purposes, and to small- and medium-sized enterprises, the Hochschule Furtwangen University establishes a new project, called Cloud Infrastructure & Applications (CloudIA). The CloudIA project is a market-oriented cloud infrastructure that leverages different virtualization technologies, by supporting Service-Level Agreements for various service offerings. This paper describes the CloudIA project in details and mentions our early experiences in building a private cloud using an existing infrastructure.

  15. Evaluation of Three Sensor Types for Particle Motion Measurement.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bruce; Zeddies, David G; Gaudet, Briand; Richard, Joel

    2016-01-01

    All fish sense acoustic particle motion; some species also sense pressure. Concern over the effects of anthropogenic sounds is increasing the need to monitor acoustic particle motion. Particle motion can be measured directly using vector sensors or calculated from pressure gradients. This article compares three devices that measure particle motion: a three-axis accelerometer, a three-axis velocity sensor, and two 4-element hydrophone arrays. A series of sounds (constant-wave tones, white noise, and Ricker wavelets) were played from a fixed-position projector. The particle motion of sounds from imploding light bulbs was also measured. PMID:26611019

  16. FIRE_AX_CMS_CLOUD

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-24

    FIRE_AX_CMS_CLOUD Project Title:  FIRE II ASTEX Discipline:  ... Order: Earthdata Search Parameters:  Cloud Amount Order Data:  Search and Order: Earthdata Search ... Sets Guide Readme Files:  Readme CMS_CLOUD (PS) CMS Cloud Info CMS Cloud Data ...

  17. Investigation of water vapor motion winds from geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velden, Christopher S.; Nieman, Steven J.; Wanzong, Steven

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor imagery from geostationary satellites has been available for over a decade. These data are used extensively by operational analysts and forecasters, mainly in a qualitative mode (Weldon and Holmes 1991). In addition to qualitative applications, motions deduced in animated water vapor imagery can be used to infer wind fields in cloudless regimes, thereby augmenting the information provided by cloud-drift wind vectors. Early attempts at quantifying the data by tracking features in water vapor imagery met with modest success (Stewart et al. 1985; Hayden and Stewart 1987). More recently, automated techniques have been developed and refined, and have resulted in upper-level wind observations comparable in quality to current operational cloud-tracked winds (Laurent 1993). In a recent study by Velden et al. (1993) it was demonstrated that wind sets derived from Meteosat-3 (M-3) water vapor imagery can provide important environmental wind information in data void areas surrounding tropical cyclones, and can positively impact objective track forecasts. M-3 was repositioned to 75W by the European Space Agency in 1992 in order to provide complete coverage of the Atlantic Ocean. Data from this satellite are being transmitted to the U.S. for operational use. Compared with the current GOES-7 (G-7) satellite (positioned near 112W), the M-3 water vapor channel contains a superior horizontal resolution (5 km vs. 16 km ). In this paper, we examine wind sets derived using automated procedures from both GOES-7 and Meteosat-3 full disk water vapor imagery in order to assess this data as a potentially important source of large-scale wind information. As part of a product demonstration wind sets were produced twice a day at CIMSS during a six-week period in March and April (1994). These data sets are assessed in terms of geographic coverage, statistical accuracy, and meteorological impact through preliminary results of numerical model forecast studies.

  18. Ice Clouds in Martian Arctic (Accelerated Movie)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Clouds scoot across the Martian sky in a movie clip consisting of 10 frames taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    This clip accelerates the motion. The camera took these 10 frames over a 10-minute period from 2:52 p.m. to 3:02 p.m. local solar time at the Phoenix site during Sol 94 (Aug. 29), the 94th Martian day since landing.

    Particles of water-ice make up these clouds, like ice-crystal cirrus clouds on Earth. Ice hazes have been common at the Phoenix site in recent days.

    The camera took these images as part of a campaign by the Phoenix team to see clouds and track winds. The view is toward slightly west of due south, so the clouds are moving westward or west-northwestward.

    The clouds are a dramatic visualization of the Martian water cycle. The water vapor comes off the north pole during the peak of summer. The northern-Mars summer has just passed its peak water-vapor abundance at the Phoenix site. The atmospheric water is available to form into clouds, fog and frost, such as the lander has been observing recently.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Simulations of midlatitude frontal clouds by single-column and cloud-resolving models during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement March 2000 cloud intensive operational period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Minghua; Branson, Mark; Cederwall, Richard T.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Eitzen, Zachary A.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iacobellis, Sam F.; Johnson, Karen L.; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Klein, Stephen A.; Krueger, Steven K.; Lin, Wuyin; Lohmann, Ulrike; Miller, Mark A.; Randall, David A.; Somerville, Richard C. J.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Walker, Gregory K.; Wolf, Audrey; Wu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yio, J. John; Zhang, Guang; Zhang, Junhua

    2005-08-01

    This study quantitatively evaluates the overall performance of nine single-column models (SCMs) and four cloud-resolving models (CRMs) in simulating a strong midlatitude frontal cloud system taken from the spring 2000 Cloud Intensive Observational Period at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site. The evaluation data are an analysis product of constrained variational analysis of the ARM observations and the cloud data collected from the ARM ground active remote sensors (i.e., cloud radar, lidar, and laser ceilometers) and satellite retrievals. Both the selected SCMs and CRMs can typically capture the bulk characteristics of the frontal system and the frontal precipitation. However, there are significant differences in detailed structures of the frontal clouds. Both CRMs and SCMs overestimate high thin cirrus clouds before the main frontal passage. During the passage of a front with strong upward motion, CRMs underestimate middle and low clouds while SCMs overestimate clouds at the levels above 765 hPa. All CRMs and some SCMs also underestimated the middle clouds after the frontal passage. There are also large differences in the model simulations of cloud condensates owing to differences in parameterizations; however, the differences among intercompared models are smaller in the CRMs than the SCMs. In general, the CRM-simulated cloud water and ice are comparable with observations, while most SCMs underestimated cloud water. SCMs show huge biases varying from large overestimates to equally large underestimates of cloud ice. Many of these model biases could be traced to the lack of subgrid-scale dynamical structure in the applied forcing fields and the lack of organized mesoscale hydrometeor advections. Other potential reasons for these model errors are also discussed in the paper.

  20. Stability of Horndeski vector-tensor interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez, Jose Beltrán; Durrer, Ruth; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Thorsrud, Mikjel E-mail: ruth.durrer@unige.ch E-mail: mikjel.thorsrud@astro.uio.no

    2013-10-01

    We study the Horndeski vector-tensor theory that leads to second order equations of motion and contains a non-minimally coupled abelian gauge vector field. This theory is remarkably simple and consists of only 2 terms for the vector field, namely: the standard Maxwell kinetic term and a coupling to the dual Riemann tensor. Furthermore, the vector sector respects the U(1) gauge symmetry and the theory contains only one free parameter, M{sup 2}, that controls the strength of the non-minimal coupling. We explore the theory in a de Sitter spacetime and study the presence of instabilities and show that it corresponds to an attractor solution in the presence of the vector field. We also investigate the cosmological evolution and stability of perturbations in a general FLRW spacetime. We find that a sufficient condition for the absence of ghosts is M{sup 2} > 0. Moreover, we study further constraints coming from imposing the absence of Laplacian instabilities. Finally, we study the stability of the theory in static and spherically symmetric backgrounds (in particular, Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter). We find that the theory, quite generally, do have ghosts or Laplacian instabilities in regions of spacetime where the non-minimal interaction dominates over the Maxwell term. We also calculate the propagation speed in these spacetimes and show that superluminality is a quite generic phenomenon in this theory.

  1. Cloud Spectrum Measurements

    E-print Network

    Delene, David J.

    Cloud Seed Techniques (Mali, Saudi Arabia) Basic Cloud Parameter (MPACE) Icing Studies (WISP04` Cloud Spectrum Measurements By David Delene #12;Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP The ¶amount of liquid water for a given volume of air may be determined through mass integration of the cloud

  2. Vector Relations Michael Kaneshige

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    Vector Relations Michael Kaneshige January 14, 1995 1 Vector Calculus in Cartesian Coordinates ~ r = â?? i @ @x + â?? j @ @y + â?? k @ @z Gradient : ~ r\\Phi = @ \\Phi @x â?? i + @ \\Phi @y â?? j + @ \\Phi @z â?? k Divergence : ~ r \\Delta ~ A = @A 1 @x + @A 2 @y + @A 3 @z Curl : ~ r \\Theta ~ A = ( @A 3 @y \\Gamma @A 2 @z

  3. Hunting the Vector Hybrid

    E-print Network

    A Donnachie; Yu S Kalashnikova

    1999-02-01

    The current state of analysis of e+e- annihilation below 2.0 GeV and of the vector component of tau decay is reviewed. The evidence for and against the presence of hybrid vectors is discussed. It is concluded that the data strongly favour their inclusion, and the consequences of this are outlined.

  4. Dissipative force on an external quark in heavy quark cloud

    E-print Network

    Shankhadeep Chakrabortty

    2011-10-01

    Within the finite temperature N = 4 strongly coupled super Yang- Mills, we compute the dissipative force on an external quark in the presence of evenly distributed heavy quark cloud. This is computed holographically by constructing the corresponding gravity dual. We study the behaviour of this force as a function of the cloud density. Along the way we also analyze the stability of the gravity dual for vector and tensor perturbations.

  5. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M. (Livermore, CA); Leighton, James F. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  6. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  7. Viral Vector Production: Adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Julius W; Morshed, Ramin A; Kane, J Robert; Auffinger, Brenda; Qiao, Jian; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have proven to be valuable resources in the development of novel therapies aimed at targeting pathological conditions of the central nervous system, including Alzheimer's disease and neoplastic brain lesions. Not only can some genetically engineered adenoviral vectors achieve remarkably efficient and specific gene delivery to target cells, but they also may act as anticancer agents by selectively replicating within cancer cells.Due to the great interest in using adenoviral vectors for various purposes, the need for a comprehensive protocol for viral vector production is especially apparent. Here, we describe the process of generating an adenoviral vector in its entirety, including the more complex process of adenoviral fiber modification to restrict viral tropism in order to achieve more efficient and specific gene delivery. PMID:26611583

  8. Line Integral of a Vector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman

    This programed booklet is designed for the engineering student who understands and can use vector and unit vector notation, components of a vector, parallel law of vector addition, and the dot product of two vectors. Content begins with work done by a force in moving a body a certain distance along some path. For each of the examples and problem…

  9. On the stability and causality of scalar-vector theories

    SciTech Connect

    Fleury, Pierre; Pitrou, Cyril; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Almeida, Juan P. Beltrán E-mail: juanpbeltran@uan.edu.co E-mail: uzan@iap.fr

    2014-11-01

    Various extensions of standard inflationary models have been proposed recently by adding vector fields. Because they are generally motivated by large-scale anomalies, and the possibility of statistical anisotropy of primordial fluctuations, such models require to introduce non-standard couplings between vector fields on the one hand, and either gravity or scalar fields on the other hand. In this article, we study models involving a vector field coupled to a scalar field. We derive restrictive necessary conditions for these models to be both stable (Hamiltonian bounded by below) and causal (hyperbolic equations of motion)

  10. Auditory motion capturing ambiguous visual motion.

    PubMed

    Alink, Arjen; Euler, Felix; Galeano, Elena; Krugliak, Alexandra; Singer, Wolf; Kohler, Axel

    2012-01-01

    In this study, it is demonstrated that moving sounds have an effect on the direction in which one sees visual stimuli move. During the main experiment sounds were presented consecutively at four speaker locations inducing left or rightward auditory apparent motion. On the path of auditory apparent motion, visual apparent motion stimuli were presented with a high degree of directional ambiguity. The main outcome of this experiment is that our participants perceived visual apparent motion stimuli that were ambiguous (equally likely to be perceived as moving left or rightward) more often as moving in the same direction than in the opposite direction of auditory apparent motion. During the control experiment we replicated this finding and found no effect of sound motion direction on eye movements. This indicates that auditory motion can capture our visual motion percept when visual motion direction is insufficiently determinate without affecting eye movements. PMID:22232613

  11. CLOUD CHEMISTRY STEPHEN E. SCHWARTZ

    E-print Network

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    in cirrus clouds and in polar stratospheric clouds. For condensed-phase amounts substantially exceeding I gBNL-68172 CHAPTER 17 CLOUD CHEMISTRY STEPHEN E. SCHWARTZ 1 INTRODUCTION Tbe term cloud chemistry is considered bere to comprise both cloud composition and reactions that take place in clouds. Clouds are a very

  12. Diffuse Reflection of Laser Light From Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Davis, A.; McGill, M.

    1999-01-01

    Laser light reflected from an aqueous suspension of particles or "cloud" with known thickness and particle size distribution defines the "cloud radiative Green's function", G. G is sensitive to cloud thickness, allowing retrieval of that important quantity. We describe a laboratory simulation of G, useful in design of an offbeam Lidar instrument for remote sensing of cloud thickness. Clouds of polystyrene microspheres suspended in water are analogous to real clouds of water droplets suspended in air. The size distribution extends from 0.5 microns to 25 microns, roughly lognormal, similar to real clouds. Density of suspended spheres is adjusted so photon mean-free-path is about 10 cm, 1000 times smaller than in real clouds. The light source is a Nd:YAG laser at 530 nm. Detectors are flux and photon-counting PMTs, with a glass probe for precise positioning. A Labview 5 VI controls position and data acquisition, via an NI Motion Control board connected to a stepper motor driving an Edmund linear slider,and a 16-channel 16-bit NI-DAQ board. The stepper motor is accurate to 10 microns. Step size is selectable. Far from the beam, the rate of exponential increase in the beam direction scales as expected from diffusion theory, linearly with cloud thickness, and inversely as the square root of the reduced optical thickness, independent of particle size. Nearer the beam the signal increases faster than exponential and depends on particle size. Results verify 3D Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate detectability of remotely sensed offbeam returns, without filters at night, with narrow bandpass filter in day.

  13. Airborne observations of electric fields around growing and decaying cumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giori, K. L.; Nanevicz, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Airborne electric field data were gathered in an atmospheric electrification study near Cape Canaveral, FL. A Learjet 36A was instrumented with eight electric field meters (mills) and five different particle probes. The local electric field enhancements at each field mill site were determined under lab conditions and verified using in-flight data. The overdetermined system of eight equations (one for each field mill) was solved using a weighted least squares algorithm to compute the magnitude and direction of the ambient electric field. The signal processing system allowed the measured data to be expressed in terms of earth coordinates, regardless of the attitude of the aircraft. Thus, it was possible to take maximum advantage of the Learjet's speed and maneuverability in studying the electric field structure in the vicinity of the clouds. Data gathered while circling just outside the boundary of a growing cumulus cloud show a nonsymmetric pattern of electric field strength. Field intensity grew rapidly over a period of less than 10 minutes. The observed direction of the ambient electric field vector can be explained by an ascending motion of the charge centers of a classic tripole model of a thunderstorm.

  14. Vegetation forcing and convective motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Leach, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1995-04-01

    A large irrigated vegetation area in a semiarid or relatively dry location is a strong surface forcing of thermal circulations. Several observational studies have found that such thermally induced mesoscale circulation may contribute to the triggering and development of convective clouds. In the western United States, extensive areas of irrigated farmland are surrounded by hot, dry surfaces, such as a steppe. Substantial gradients of sensible heating in the horizontal direction lead to a {open_quotes}farm breeze{close_quotes} circulation from the cooler agricultural area to the warmer steppes found at Boardman, Oregon. These thermally forced circulations may trigger convection by the related convergence and updraft motion under favorable atmospheric conditions. The role of vegetative covering in convective motion is investigated using a mesoscale numerical model. Two- and three-dimensional simulations are described. The effects of atmospheric stability, moisture in the lower atmosphere, moisture in the upper atmosphere, and horizontal heating scale on thermally induced clouds are studied. The horizontal scale of inhomogeneity is also studied using the two-dimensional model. Finally, a realistic vegetation distribution similar to that of the Boardman Regional Flux Experiment is used in the three-dimensional simulations.

  15. Role of Gravity Waves in Determining Cirrus Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OCStarr, David; Singleton, Tamara; Lin, Ruei-Fong

    2008-01-01

    Cirrus clouds are important in the Earth's radiation budget. They typically exhibit variable physical properties within a given cloud system and from system to system. Ambient vertical motion is a key factor in determining the cloud properties in most cases. The obvious exception is convectively generated cirrus (anvils), but even in this case, the subsequent cloud evolution is strongly influenced by the ambient vertical motion field. It is well know that gravity waves are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and occur over a wide range of scales and amplitudes. Moreover, researchers have found that inclusion of statistical account of gravity wave effects can markedly improve the realism of simulations of persisting large-scale cirrus cloud features. Here, we use a 1 -dimensional (z) cirrus cloud model, to systematically examine the effects of gravity waves on cirrus cloud properties. The model includes a detailed representation of cloud microphysical processes (bin microphysics and aerosols) and is run at relatively fine vertical resolution so as to adequately resolve nucleation events, and over an extended time span so as to incorporate the passage of multiple gravity waves. The prescribed gravity waves "propagate" at 15 m s (sup -1), with wavelengths from 5 to 100 km, amplitudes range up to 1 m s (sup -1)'. Despite the fact that the net gravity wave vertical motion forcing is zero, it will be shown that the bulk cloud properties, e.g., vertically-integrated ice water path, can differ quite significantly from simulations without gravity waves and that the effects do depend on the wave characteristics. We conclude that account of gravity wave effects is important if large-scale models are to generate realistic cirrus cloud property climatology (statistics).

  16. Quantifying biomechanical motion using Procrustes motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Adams, Dean C; Cerney, Melinda M

    2007-01-01

    The ability to quantify and compare the movements of organisms is a central focus of many studies in biology, anthropology, biomechanics, and ergonomics. However, while the importance of functional motion analysis has long been acknowledged, quantitative methods for identifying differences in motion have not been widely developed. In this article, we present an approach to the functional analysis of motion and quantification of motion types. Our approach, Procrustes Motion Analysis (PMA) can be used to distinguish differences in cyclical, repeated, or goal-directed motions. PMA exploits the fact that any motion can be represented by an ordered sequence of postures exhibited throughout the course of a motion. Changes in posture from time step to time step form a trajectory through a multivariate data space, representing a specific motion. By evaluating the size, shape, and orientation of these motion trajectories, it is possible to examine variation in motion type within and among groups or even with respect to continuous variables. This represents a significant analytical advance over current approaches. Using simulated and digitized data representing cyclical, repeated and goal-directed motions, we show that PMA correctly identifies distinct motion tasks in these data sets. PMID:16448654

  17. Tvashtar in Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This five-frame sequence of New Horizons images captures the giant plume from Io's Tvashtar volcano. Snapped by the probe's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter earlier this year, this first-ever 'movie' of an Io plume clearly shows motion in the cloud of volcanic debris, which extends 330 kilometers (200 miles) above the moon's surface. Only the upper part of the plume is visible from this vantage point -- the plume's source is 130 kilometers (80 miles) below the edge of Io's disk, on the far side of the moon.

    The appearance and motion of the plume is remarkably similar to an ornamental fountain on Earth, replicated on a gigantic scale. The knots and filaments that allow us to track the plume's motion are still mysterious, but this movie is likely to help scientists understand their origin, as well as provide unique information on the plume dynamics.

    Io's hyperactive nature is emphasized by the fact that two other volcanic plumes are also visible off the edge of Io's disk: Masubi at the 7 o'clock position, and a very faint plume, possibly from the volcano Zal, at the 10 o'clock position. Jupiter illuminates the night side of Io, and the most prominent feature visible on the disk is the dark horseshoe shape of the volcano Loki, likely an enormous lava lake. Boosaule Mons, which at 18 kilometers (11 miles) is the highest mountain on Io and one of the highest mountains in the solar system, pokes above the edge of the disk on the right side.

    The five images were obtained over an 8-minute span, with two minutes between frames, from 23:50 to 23:58 Universal Time on March 1, 2007. Io was 3.8 million kilometers (2.4 million miles) from New Horizons; the image is centered at Io coordinates 0 degrees north, 342 degrees west.

    The pictures were part of a sequence designed to look at Jupiter's rings, but planners included Io in the sequence because the moon was passing behind Jupiter's rings at the time.

  18. Fast image interpolation for motion estimation using graphics hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Francis; Kokaram, Anil

    2004-05-01

    Motion estimation and compensation is the key to high quality video coding. Block matching motion estimation is used in most video codecs, including MPEG-2, MPEG-4, H.263 and H.26L. Motion estimation is also a key component in the digital restoration of archived video and for post-production and special effects in the movie industry. Sub-pixel accurate motion vectors can improve the quality of the vector field and lead to more efficient video coding. However sub-pixel accuracy requires interpolation of the image data. Image interpolation is a key requirement of many image processing algorithms. Often interpolation can be a bottleneck in these applications, especially in motion estimation due to the large number pixels involved. In this paper we propose using commodity computer graphics hardware for fast image interpolation. We use the full search block matching algorithm to illustrate the problems and limitations of using graphics hardware in this way.

  19. 'Striated Delta' Clouds As Tracers Of Inertia-Gravity Wave Emission From Upper Jets And Extratropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, A. L.; Reeder, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    'Striated Delta' cloud formations are frequently tracers of upper-tropospheric inertia-gravity wave disturbances near the jet stream, coincident with rapid extratropical cyclogenesis (Feren, 1995). The investigation of source mechanisms in this context is important for better understanding of how and where large-amplitude inertia-gravity waves are generated, which propagate energy throughout the atmosphere and transfer it to the mean flow through breaking or attenuation processes. A seasonal study of twenty-eight Striated Delta events in the Australia/New Zealand region during May to September 2009 is analysed in the high-resolution ECMWF YOTC dataset. Mean composite analyses show that Striated Deltas occur in an upper-tropospheric environment of strong horizontal divergence, strong parcel accelerations, strong vertical motion and geostrophic imbalance. Synoptically, the Striated Delta cases occur in the poleward jet exit region near the axis of inflexion between an upstream upper trough and a downstream upper ridge. This is consistent with findings of previous studies regarding the synoptic environment characteristic of gravity wave generation. A Q-vector partitioning analysis suggests that flow curvature and advection of shear are the two greatest components to synoptic scale vertical motion forcing. The Q-Vector analysis also explains the characteristic triangular shape of the Striated Delta cloud formation. It is hypothesised that strong parcel accelerations due to curvature of the flow, as well as air parcel deceleration in the jet streak exit region, are responsible for the generation of inertia-gravity waves evident in the banding of Striated Delta clouds. Furthermore, deep convection is favoured in the poleward jet exit region by the ageostrophic circulation and is also thought to play a role in the generation of waves and the modulation of wavelengths. A distinct and interesting Striated Delta and extratropical cyclogenesis event from September 2009 is simulated in high-resolution in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model, and the wave source dynamics investigated further. Feren, G., 1995: The "Striated Delta" Cloud System - A satellite imagery precursor to major cyclogenesis in the Eastern Australian-Western Tasman Sea region. Wea. Forecasting, 10, 286-309.

  20. Inline motion in flapping foils for improved force vectoring performance

    E-print Network

    Izraelevitz, Jacob (Jacob Samuel)

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, I study the effect of adding in-line oscillation to heaving and pitching foils using a power downstroke. I show that far from being a limitation imposed by the muscular structure of certain animals, in-line ...

  1. Cloud CCN feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.G.

    1992-12-31

    Cloud microphysics affects cloud albedo precipitation efficiency and the extent of cloud feedback in response to global warming. Compared to other cloud parameters, microphysics is unique in its large range of variability and the fact that much of the variability is anthropogenic. Probably the most important determinant of cloud microphysics is the spectra of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) which display considerable variability and have a large anthropogenic component. When analyzed in combination three field observation projects display the interrelationship between CCN and cloud microphysics. CCN were measured with the Desert Research Institute (DRI) instantaneous CCN spectrometer. Cloud microphysical measurements were obtained with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Lockheed Electra. Since CCN and cloud microphysics each affect the other a positive feedback mechanism can result.

  2. Light Vector Mesons

    E-print Network

    Alexander Milov

    2008-12-21

    This article reviews the current status of experimental results obtained in the measurement of light vector mesons produced in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions at different energies. The review is focused on two phenomena related to the light vector mesons; the modification of the spectral shape in search of Chiral symmetry restoration and suppression of the meson production in heavy ion collisions. The experimental results show that the spectral shape of light vector mesons are modified compared to the parameters measured in vacuum. The nature and the magnitude of the modification depends on the energy density of the media in which they are produced. The suppression patterns of light vector mesons are different from the measurements of other mesons and baryons. The mechanisms responsible for the suppression of the mesons are not yet understood. Systematic comparison of existing experimental results points to the missing data which may help to resolve the problem.

  3. Self Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    The studies conducted in this research project examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  4. Poynting-vector filter

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R. (Tracy, CA)

    2011-08-02

    A determination is made of frequency components associated with a particular bearing or location resulting from sources emitting electromagnetic-wave energy for which a Poynting-Vector can be defined. The broadband frequency components associated with a specific direction or location of interest are isolated from other components in the power spectrum that are not associated with the direction or location of interest. The collection of pointing vectors can be used to characterize the source.

  5. Aircraft penetrations of arc cloud lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, P. C.; Purdom, J. F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Results of a NOAA/NASA research field program (1982-1983) which focused on dynamic and thermodynamic characterization of arc cloud lines are discussed. The program combines research aircraft flights with rapid-scan (3-minute interval) GOES imagery and covers the subcloud layer above and below the density surge line. Strong differences in the dynamic characteristics of air are noted to exist within and above the density surge line (DSL); air motions within the DSL are much more turbulent, with stronger upward and downward motions, than in the subcloud layer above the DSL. The arc cloud lines and the associated DSL regions are concluded to pose an extreme potential hazard to aircraft and Space Shuttle operations.

  6. "Electrostructural Phase Changes" In Charged Particulate Clouds: Planetary and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-09-01

    There is empirical evidence that freely-suspended triboelectrostatically charged particulate clouds of dielectric materials undergo rapid conversion from (nominally) monodispersed "aerosols" to a system of well-defined grain aggregates after grain motion or fluid turbulence ceases within the cloud. In United States Microgravity Laboratory Space Shuttle experiments USML-1 and USML-2, it was found that ballistically-energized grain dispersions would rapidly convert into populations of filamentary aggregates after natural fluid (air) damping of grain motion. Unless continuously disrupted mechanically, it was impossible to maintain a non-aggregated state for the grain clouds of sand-size materials. Similarly, ground- based experiments with very fine dust-size material produced the same results: rapid, impulsive "collapse" of the dispersed grains into well-defined filamentary structures. In both ground-based and microgravity experiments, the chains or filaments were created by long-range dipole electrostatic forces and dipole-induced dielectric interactions, not by monopole interactions. Maintenance of the structures was assisted by short-range static boundary adhesion forces and van der Waals interactions. When the aggregate containers in the USML experiments were disturbed after aggregate formation, the quiescently disposed filaments would rearrange themselves into fractal bundles and tighter clusters as a result of enforced encounters with one another. The long-range dipole interactions that bring the grains together into aggregates are a product of randomly-distributed monopole charges on the grain surfaces. In computer simulations, it has been shown that when the force vectors of all the random charges (of both sign) on a grain are resolved mathematically by assuming Coulombic interaction between them, the net result is a dipole moment on individual grains, even though the grains are electrically neutral insofar as there is no predominance, on their surface, of one charge sign over another. The random charges of both sign derive from natural grain-to-grain interactions that produce triboelectrification via charge exchange every time grain surfaces make contact with one another. The conversion from a random distribution of grains (upon which there are randomly distributed charges) into an organization of electrostatically-ordered aggregates, can be regarded (within the framework of granular-material science) as an "electrical or Coulombic phase change" of the particulate cloud. It is not totally dissimilar from the more normal phase-change concept in which, for example, a gas with long free-path-molecules suddenly becomes a solid as a result of structural ordering of the molecules (notably, also the result of electronic forces, albeit at a different scale). In both the gas-to-solid case, and the aerosol-to-aggregate case, the same materials and charges are present before and after the phase change, but their arrangement now has a higher degree of order and a lower-energy configuration. An input of energy into the system is required to reverse the situation. The aggregates in the USML experiments were observed to undergo at least two phase changes as noted above. The point about phase changes, and by implication, the "electrostructural" reorganizations in particulate clouds, is the following: (a) they can occur very rapidly, almost spontaneously, above a critical cloud density, (b) in going from a higher energy state to a lower energy state, they convert to a denser system, (c) energy must be required to reverse the situation, implying that energy is released during the high-to-low energy phase change. In applying this information to natural particulate clouds, some inferences can be made (it is stressed that reference is still to dielectric materials attracted by dipole forces). There are several natural settings to which the USML observations apply, and to which the phase-change implications likewise apply. Dense clouds of triboelectrically-charged, kinetically-energized grains are

  7. Speed tuning of motion segmentation and discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, G. S.; Mestre, D. R.; Stone, L. S.

    1999-01-01

    Motion transparency requires that the visual system distinguish different motion vectors and selectively integrate similar motion vectors over space into the perception of multiple surfaces moving through or over each other. Using large-field (7 degrees x 7 degrees) displays containing two populations of random-dots moving in the same (horizontal) direction but at different speeds, we examined speed-based segmentation by measuring the speed difference above which observers can perceive two moving surfaces. We systematically investigated this 'speed-segmentation' threshold as a function of speed and stimulus duration, and found that it increases sharply for speeds above approximately 8 degrees/s. In addition, speed-segmentation thresholds decrease with stimulus duration out to approximately 200 ms. In contrast, under matched conditions, speed-discrimination thresholds stay low at least out to 16 degrees/s and decrease with increasing stimulus duration at a faster rate than for speed segmentation. Thus, motion segmentation and motion discrimination exhibit different speed selectivity and different temporal integration characteristics. Results are discussed in terms of the speed preferences of different neuronal populations within the primate visual cortex.

  8. Adaptation state of the local-motion-pooling units determines the nature of the motion aftereffect to transparent motion.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Mark; Cassanello, Carlos R; Kalia, Kanupriya

    2012-07-01

    When observers adapt to a transparent-motion stimulus, the resulting motion aftereffect (MAE) is typically in the direction opposite to the vector average of the component directions. It has been proposed that the reason for this is that it is the adaptation state at the local-level (i.e. of the local-motion-pooling units) that determines the nature of the MAE (Vidnyanszky et al. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 6(4), 157-161). The adapting stimuli used in these experiments typically consisted of random-dot kinematograms, with each dot being able to move over the entire viewing aperture. Here we used spatially-localised global-plaid stimuli which enabled us, over the course of adaptation, to present either one of both motion directions at each local region. A unidirectional MAE was perceived when two motion directions were presented at each location and a transparent MAE was perceived when a single direction was presented. These results support the notion that it is the adaptation state at the local-motion-pooling level that determines the nature of the MAE to transparent motion stimuli. PMID:22595745

  9. PC Creative Cloud (Windows) PC Creative Cloud (Windows)

    E-print Network

    Furui, Sadaoki

    PC Creative Cloud (Windows) 1 PC Creative Cloud (Windows) 2015-11-06 1 Web Creative Cloud PC | Creative Cloud https://helpx.adobe.com/jp/creative-cloud/system-requirements.html 2 PC PC Cloud 5.1 Web TTInstaller(Windows )() http://www.officesoft.gsic.titech.ac

  10. PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud

    E-print Network

    PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud 1 PC Windows Adobe Creative Cloud 2015-05-25 1 Web Windows Adobe Creative Cloud PC | Creative Cloud https://helpx.adobe.com/jp/creative-cloud Adobe Creative Cloud 5.1 Web TTInstaller(Windows )() http://www.officesoft.gsic.titech.ac

  11. PC Creative Cloud (Mac) PC Creative Cloud (Mac)

    E-print Network

    Furui, Sadaoki

    PC Creative Cloud (Mac) 1 PC Creative Cloud (Mac) 2015-11-12 1 Web Creative Cloud PC | Creative Cloud https://helpx.adobe.com/jp/creative-cloud/system-requirements.html 2 PC PC http://www.officesoft.gsic.titech.ac.jp/pdf/How_to_download_TTInstaller_for_Mac_OS_X.pdf 5 Mac OS Adobe Creative Cloud

  12. Self-Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Motion sickness typically is considered a bothersome artifact of exposure to passive motion in vehicles of conveyance. This condition seldom has significant impact on the health of individuals because it is of brief duration, it usually can be prevented by simply avoiding the eliciting condition and, when the conditions that produce it are unavoidable, sickness dissipates with continued exposure. The studies conducted examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  13. The role of vector fields in modified gravity scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Koyama, Kazuya; Khosravi, Nima E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk

    2013-11-01

    Gravitational vector degrees of freedom typically arise in many examples of modified gravity models. We start to systematically explore their role in these scenarios, studying the effects of coupling gravitational vector and scalar degrees of freedom. We focus on set-ups that enjoy a Galilean symmetry in the scalar sector and an Abelian gauge symmetry in the vector sector. These symmetries, together with the requirement that the equations of motion contain at most two space-time derivatives, only allow for a small number of operators in the Lagrangian for the gravitational fields. We investigate the role of gravitational vector fields for two broad classes of phenomena that characterize modified gravity scenarios. The first is self-acceleration: we analyze in general terms the behavior of vector fluctuations around self-accelerating solutions, and show that vanishing kinetic terms of vector fluctuations lead to instabilities on cosmological backgrounds. The second phenomenon is the screening of long range fifth forces by means of Vainshtein mechanism. We show that if gravitational vector fields are appropriately coupled to a spherically symmetric source, they can play an important role for defining the features of the background solution and the scale of the Vainshtein radius. Our general results can be applied to any concrete model of modified gravity, whose low-energy vector and scalar degrees of freedom satisfy the symmetry requirements that we impose.

  14. Cloud Computing for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Kharat, Amit T; Safvi, Amjad; Thind, Ss; Singh, Amarjit

    2012-07-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future. PMID:23599560

  15. RISK ASSESSMENT CLOUD COMPUTING

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    SECURITY RESEARCH PRIVACY RISK ASSESSMENT AMC DATA FISMA CLOUD COMPUTING MOBILE DEVICES OPERATIONS application hosted in the cloud · Alaska DHHS fined $1.7M ­ Portable device stolen from vehicle · Mass Eye

  16. Above the Clouds 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    This dissertation investigates three topics concerning high clouds: 1) convectively coupled equatorial wave (CCEW) signals derived from cloud top temperature (CTT) and cirrus optical thickness retrieved from satellite observations; 2) investigation...

  17. Cloud Computing for radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Kharat, Amit T; Safvi, Amjad; Thind, SS; Singh, Amarjit

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future. PMID:23599560

  18. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kalesse, Heike

    2013-06-27

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  19. Diagnosing the severe thunderstorm environment by mesoscale cloud tracking - A new approach and new information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, J. F. W.; Vonder Haar, T. H.; Stewart, J. K.; Leary, N. E.

    1984-01-01

    A new method for cloud tracking and observing storm development using satellite imagery in a cloud relative mode is presented. This method changes the analyst's function to one of monitoring cloud growth and changes over a finite time period and identifying portions of the cloud that are suitable for use as trackers. It is shown how many problems previously encountered by meteorologists in mesoscale cloud tracking can be overcome by using the cloud relative technique to determine mesoscale flow fields whose heights are determined using stereographic techniques. By separating growth and decay from cloud motion in a cumulus field using the method and accurately defining cloud heights, vertical wind shears within mesoscale domains may be defined. When this information is used to study the relative velocity of flows at different levels with respect to a developing or mature storm, improved insight into storm behavior can be achieved.

  20. Conference on Cloud Physics, Tucson, Ariz., October 21-24, 1974, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Condensation and ice nucleation processes are considered, taking into account measurements of cloud nuclei and aerosol size spectra in the semiarid Southwest, the formation of sulfates and the enhancement of cloud condensation nuclei in clouds, biogenic sources of atmospheric ice nuclei, and the experimental determination of the deposition coefficient of water vapor onto ice. Other topics discussed are related to precipitation growth processes, the role of ice in cloud systems, cloud modeling, measurements in Colorado hailstorms during the national hail research experiment, cloud measurements, and measurement techniques. Attention is also given to cloud electrification, zero-gravity experiments, and the control of cloud development by larger scale motions. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  1. Jovian Lightning and Moonlit Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Jovian lightning and moonlit clouds. These two images, taken 75 minutes apart, show lightning storms on the night side of Jupiter along with clouds dimly lit by moonlight from Io, Jupiter's closest moon. The images were taken in visible light and are displayed in shades of red. The images used an exposure time of about one minute, and were taken when the spacecraft was on the opposite side of Jupiter from the Earth and Sun. Bright storms are present at two latitudes in the left image, and at three latitudes in the right image. Each storm was made visible by multiple lightning strikes during the exposure. Other Galileo images were deliberately scanned from east to west in order to separate individual flashes. The images show that Jovian and terrestrial lightning storms have similar flash rates, but that Jovian lightning strikes are a few orders of magnitude brighter in visible light.

    The moonlight from Io allows the lightning storms to be correlated with visible cloud features. The latitude bands where the storms are seen seem to coincide with the 'disturbed regions' in daylight images, where short-lived chaotic motions push clouds to high altitudes, much like thunderstorms on Earth. The storms in these images are roughly one to two thousand kilometers across, while individual flashes appear hundreds of kilometer across. The lightning probably originates from the deep water cloud layer and illuminates a large region of the visible ammonia cloud layer from 100 kilometers below it.

    There are several small light and dark patches that are artifacts of data compression. North is at the top of the picture. The images span approximately 50 degrees in latitude and longitude. The lower edges of the images are aligned with the equator. The images were taken on October 5th and 6th, 1997 at a range of 6.6 million kilometers by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  2. Computer animation of clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.

    1994-01-28

    Computer animation of outdoor scenes is enhanced by realistic clouds. I will discuss several different modeling and rendering schemes for clouds, and show how they evolved in my animation work. These include transparency-textured clouds on a 2-D plane, smooth shaded or textured 3-D clouds surfaces, and 3-D volume rendering. For the volume rendering, I will present various illumination schemes, including the density emitter, single scattering, and multiple scattering models.

  3. CONTRIBUTED Green Cloud Computing

    E-print Network

    Tucker, Rod

    CONTRIBUTED P A P E R Green Cloud Computing: Balancing Energy in Processing, Storage, and Transport to energy consumption and cloud computing seems to be an alternative to office-based computing. By Jayant computing is rapidly expanding as an alternative to conventional office-based computing. As cloud computing

  4. Cloud optimize your business

    E-print Network

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    do business, rendering many traditional management approaches and methodologies obsolete. Several keyCloud optimize your business Windows Server 2012 R2 Published: October 7, 2013 #12;Cloud optimize your business with Windows Server 2012 R2 Contents 1 Trends 3 Windows Server: cloud optimize your

  5. Some cloud population statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, J. William

    1985-01-01

    Photographs of cloud scenes taken from the orbiting space shuttle are being used to assess the overestimation in the amount of cloud cover sensed by satellites at angles other than nadir. Also these photographs and Landsat images indicate that the frequency distributions of clear and of cloudy intervals, at least in simple tropical cloud scenes, may be approximated by common distribution functions.

  6. Cloud Computing Explained

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Rosalyn

    2010-01-01

    While many talk about the cloud, few actually understand it. Three organizations' definitions come to the forefront when defining the cloud: Gartner, Forrester, and the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST). Although both Gartner and Forrester provide definitions of cloud computing, the NIST definition is concise and uses…

  7. Research Cloud Computing Recommendations

    E-print Network

    Qian, Ning

    Research Cloud Computing Recommendations SRCPAC December 3, 2014 #12;Mandate and Membership SRCPAC convened this committee in Sept 2014 to investigate the role that cloud computing should play in our & Academic Affairs (Social Work) #12;Questions discussed · What cloud resources are available? · Which kinds

  8. Cloud fraction comparisons

    E-print Network

    Oxford, University of

    for a `mean March' using data from the GRAPE project (1997-2000) and the operational cloud retrieval forward-view data from ATSR-2 The operational version of the GRAPE cloud retrieval scheme uses only nadir AND TEMPORAL PATTERNS IN CLOUD PROPERTIES IN THE ATSR-2 GRAPE DATASET C.ARNOLD1 , A. M. SAYER1, R. G. GRAINGER1

  9. New techniques in 3D scalar and vector field visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Becker, B.

    1993-05-05

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have recently developed several techniques for volume visualization of scalar and vector fields, all of which use back-to-front compositing. The first renders volume density clouds by compositing polyhedral volume cells or their faces. The second is a ``splatting`` scheme which composites textures used to reconstruct the scalar or vector fields. One version calculates the necessary texture values in software, and another takes advantage of hardware texture mapping. The next technique renders contour surface polygons using semi-transparent textures, which adjust appropriately when the surfaces deform in a flow, or change topology. The final one renders the ``flow volume`` of smoke or dye tracer swept out by a fluid flowing through a small generating polygon. All of these techniques are applied to a climate model data set, to visualize cloud density and wind velocity.

  10. Cloud Arcs in the Western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Small cumulus clouds in this natural-color view from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer have formed a distinctive series of quasi-circular arcs. Clues regarding the formation of these arcs can be found by noting that larger clouds exist in the interior of each arc.

    The interior clouds are thicker and likely to be more convectively active than the other clouds, causing much of the air near the centers of the arcs to rise. This air spreads out horizontally in all directions as it rises and continues to spread out as it begins to sink back to the surface. This pushes any existing small cumulus clouds away from the central region of convection.

    As the air sinks, it also warms, preventing other small clouds from forming, so that the regions just inside the arcs are kept clear. At the arcs, the horizontal flow of sinking air is now quite weak and on meeting the undisturbed air it can rise again slightly -- possibly assisting in the formation of new small cumulus clouds. Although examples of the continuity of air, in which every rising air motion must be compensated by a sinking motion elsewhere, are very common, the degree of organization exhibited here is relatively rare, as the wind field at different altitudes usually disrupts such patterns. The degree of self organization of this cloud image, whereby three or four such circular events form a quasi-periodic pattern, probably also requires a relatively uncommon combination of wind, temperature and humidity conditions for it to occur.

    The image was acquired by MISR's nadir camera on March 11, 2002, and is centered west of the Marshall Islands. Enewetak Atoll is discernible through thin cloud as the turquoise band near the right-hand edge of the image.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously from pole to pole, and views almost the entire globe every 9 days. This image is a portion of the data acquired during Terra orbit 11863, and covers an area of about 380 kilometers x 345 kilometers. It utilizes data from blocks 80 to 82 within World Reference System-2 path 90.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  11. LABORATORY IV CIRCULAR MOTION

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab IV - 1 LABORATORY IV CIRCULAR MOTION The problems in this laboratory will help you investigate objects moving in uniform circular motion. This is the same motion that describes satellites in orbit around the earth, or objects whirled around on a rope. Circular motion can be explained with the same

  12. A motion picture presentation of magnetic pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, A.; Kim, J. S.; Sugura, M.; Nagano, H.

    1981-01-01

    Using the data obtained from the IMS North American magnetometer network stations at high latitudes, a motion picture was made by a computer technique, describing time changes of Pc5 and Pi3 magnetic pulsation vectors. Examples of pulsation characteristics derived from this presentation are regional polarization changes including shifts of polarization demarcation lines, changes in the extent of an active region and its movement with time.

  13. Motion Estimation in Static Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    E-print Network

    Popel, Elena

    2009-12-09

    ???????????..??????.. ?.. 49 5.2 Error Analysis ? ?????????????????????.. ?.. 5 0 Chapter 6. Results and Discussion ???????.???????????... . 51 6.1 Simple Translational Motion ..?????????????.. ???.? 5 1 6.2 Inclusion with Cylindrical Geometry... in Case of Diagonal Translation by 2 Pixels ?????? ?????????????... 56 6.4 Error Analysis of the Estimated Flow Vectors from Noisy Images with the Stiff 2- D Cylindrical Inclusion in Case of Uniform Compression ?. ???.. ?????. 6 0 1 Chapter 1...

  14. Demonstrating the Direction of Angular Velocity in Circular Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demircioglu, Salih; Yurumezoglu, Kemal; Isik, Hakan

    2015-09-01

    Rotational motion is ubiquitous in nature, from astronomical systems to household devices in everyday life to elementary models of atoms. Unlike the tangential velocity vector that represents the instantaneous linear velocity (magnitude and direction), an angular velocity vector is conceptually more challenging for students to grasp. In physics classrooms, the direction of an angular velocity vector is taught by the right-hand rule, a mnemonic tool intended to aid memory. A setup constructed for instructional purposes may provide students with a more easily understood and concrete method to observe the direction of the angular velocity. This article attempts to demonstrate the angular velocity vector using the observable motion of a screw mounted to a remotely operated toy car.

  15. Mixed-phase cloud phase partitioning using millimeter wavelength cloud radar Doppler velocity spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, G.; Verlinde, J.; Clothiaux, E. E.; Chen, Y.-S.

    2014-06-01

    Retrieving and quantifying cloud liquid drop contributions to radar returns from mixed-phase clouds remains a challenge because the radar signal is frequently dominated by the returns from the ice particles within the radar sample volume. We present a technique that extracts the weak cloud liquid drop contributions from the total radar returns in profiling cloud radar Doppler velocity spectra. Individual spectra are first decomposed using a continuous wavelet transform, the resulting coefficients of which are used to identify the region in the spectra where cloud liquid drops contribute. By assuming that the liquid contribution to each Doppler spectrum is Gaussian shaped and centered on an appropriate peak in the wavelet coefficients, the cloud liquid drop contribution may be estimated by fitting a Gaussian distribution centered on the velocity of this peak to the original Doppler spectrum. The cloud liquid drop contribution to reflectivity, the volume mean vertical air motion, subvolume vertical velocity variance, and ice particle mean fall speed can be estimated based on the separation of the liquid contribution to the radar Doppler spectrum. The algorithm is evaluated using synthetic spectra produced from output of a state-of-the-art large eddy simulation model study of an Arctic mixed-phase cloud. The retrievals of cloud liquid drop mode reflectivities were generally consistent with the original model values with errors less than a factor of 2. The retrieved volume mean vertical air velocities reproduced the updraft and downdraft structures, but with an overall bias of approximately -0.06 m s-1. Retrievals based on Ka-band Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Zenith Radar observations from Barrow, Alaska, during October 2011 are also presented.

  16. Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part I: Cloud Radiative Kernels

    E-print Network

    Hartmann, Dennis

    Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part I: Cloud Radiative 2011) ABSTRACT This study proposes a novel technique for computing cloud feedbacks using histograms integrated cloud feedbacks computed in this manner agree remarkably well with the adjusted change in cloud

  17. Vector WIMP Miracle

    E-print Network

    Tomohiro Abe; Mitsuru Kakizaki; Shigeki Matsumoto; Osamu Seto

    2012-05-25

    Weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) is well known to be a good candidate for dark matter, and it is also predicted by many new physics models beyond the standard model at the TeV scale. We found that, if the WIMP is a vector particle (spin one particle) which is associated with some gauge symmetry broken at the TeV scale, the higgs mass is often predicted to be 120--125 GeV, which is very consistent with the result of higgs searches recently reported by ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider experiment. In this letter, we consider the vector WIMP using a non-linear sigma model in order to confirm this result as general as possible in a bottom-up approach. Near-future prospects to detect the vector WIMP at both direct and indirect detection experiments of dark matter are also discussed.

  18. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  19. Cloud microstructure studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blau, H. H., Jr.; Fowler, M. G.; Chang, D. T.; Ryan, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    Over two thousand individual cloud droplet size distributions were measured with an optical cloud particle spectrometer flown on the NASA Convair 990 aircraft. Representative droplet spectra and liquid water content, L (gm/cu m) were obtained for oceanic stratiform and cumuliform clouds. For non-precipitating clouds, values of L range from 0.1 gm/cu m to 0.5 gm/cu m; with precipitation, L is often greater than 1 gm/cu m. Measurements were also made in a newly formed contrail and in cirrus clouds.

  20. Intergalactic HI Clouds

    E-print Network

    F. H. Briggs

    2005-02-16

    Neutral intergalactic clouds are so greatly out numbered by galaxies that their integral HI content is negligible in comparison to that contained in optically luminous galaxies. In fact, no HI cloud that is not associated with a galaxy or grouping of galaxies has yet been identified. This points to a causal relationship that relies on gravitational potentials that bind galaxies also being responsible for confining HI clouds to sufficient density that they can become self-shielding to the ionizing background radiation. Unconfined clouds of low density become ionized, but confined clouds find themselves vulnerable to instability and collapse, leading to star formation.

  1. Bunyavirus-Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Kate McElroy; Vanlandingham, Dana L.

    2014-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family. PMID:25402172

  2. Bunyavirus-vector interactions.

    PubMed

    Horne, Kate McElroy; Vanlandingham, Dana L

    2014-11-01

    The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family. PMID:25402172

  3. A Hierarchical Modeling Study of the Interactions Among Turbulence, Cloud Microphysics, and Radiative Transfer in the Evolution of Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Judith; Khvorostyanov, V. I.

    2005-01-01

    This project used a hierarchy of cloud resolving models to address the following science issues of relevance to CRYSTAL-FACE: What ice crystal nucleation mechanisms are active in the different types of cirrus clouds in the Florida area and how do these different nucleation processes influence the evolution of the cloud system and the upper tropospheric humidity? How does the feedback between supersaturation and nucleation impact the evolution of the cloud? What is the relative importance of the large-scale vertical motion and the turbulent motions in the evolution of the crystal size spectra? How does the size spectra impact the life-cycle of the cloud, stratospheric dehydration, and cloud radiative forcing? What is the nature of the turbulence and waves in the upper troposphere generated by precipitating deep convective cloud systems? How do cirrus microphysical and optical properties vary with the small-scale dynamics? How do turbulence and waves in the upper troposphere influence the cross-tropopause mixing and stratospheric and upper tropospheric humidity? The models used in this study were: 2-D hydrostatic model with explicit microphysics that can account for 30 size bins for both the droplet and crystal size spectra. Notably, a new ice crystal nucleation scheme has been incorporated into the model. Parcel model with explicit microphysics, for developing and evaluating microphysical parameterizations. Single column model for testing bulk microphysics parameterizations

  4. Mab's orbital motion explained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, K.; de Pater, I.; Showalter, M. R.

    2015-07-01

    We explored the hypothesis that Mab's anomalous orbital motion, as deduced from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data (Showalter, M.R., Lissauer, J.J. [2006]. Science (New York, NY) 311, 973-977), is the result of gravitational interactions with a putative suite of large bodies in the ?-ring. We conducted simulations to compute the gravitational effect of Mab (a recently discovered Uranian moon) on a cloud of test particles. Subsequently, by employing the data extracted from the test particle simulations, we executed random walk simulations to compute the back-reaction of nearby perturbers on Mab. By generating simulated observation metrics, we compared our results to the data retrieved from the HST. Our results indicate that the longitude residual change noted in the HST data (??r,Mab ? 1 deg) is well matched by our simulations. The eccentricity variations (?eMab ?10-3) are however typically two orders of magnitude too small. We present a variety of reasons that could account for this discrepancy. The nominal scenario that we investigated assumes a perturber ring mass (mring) of 1 mMab (Mab's mass) and a perturber ring number density (?n,ring) of 10 perturbers per 3 RHill,Mab (Mab's Hill radius). This effectively translates to a few tens of perturbers with radii of approximately 2-3 km, depending on the albedo assumed. The results obtained also include an interesting litmus test: variations of Mab's inclination on the order of the eccentricity changes should be observable. Our work provides clues for further investigation into the tantalizing prospect that the Mab/?-ring system is undergoing re-accretion after a recent catastrophic disruption.

  5. Clouds Over 'Endurance'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Clouds in the martian sky above 'Endurance Crater' in this image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity can remind the viewer that Mars, our celestial neighbor, is subject to weather. On Earth, clouds like these would be referred to as 'cirrus' or theaptly nicknamed 'mares' tails.' These clouds occur in a region of strong vertical shear. The cloud particles (ice in this martiancase) fall out, and get dragged along away from the location where they originally condensed, forming characteristic streamers. Opportunity took this picture with its navigation camera during the rover's 282nd martian day (Nov. 8, 2004).

    The mission's atmospheric science team is studying cloud observations to deduce seasonal and time-of-day behavior of the clouds. This helps them gain a better understanding of processes that control cloud formation.

  6. Movie of High Clouds on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jupiter's high-altitude clouds are seen in this brief movie made from seven frames taken by the narrow-angle camera of NASA's Cassini spacecraft. This is the first time a movie sequence of Jupiter has been made that illustrates the motions of the high-altitude clouds on a global scale.

    The images were taken at a wavelength that is absorbed by methane, one chemical in Jupiter's lower clouds. So, dark areas are relatively free of high clouds, and the camera sees through to the methane in a lower level. Bright areas are places with high, thick clouds that shield the methane below.

    Jupiter's equator and Great Red Spot are covered with high-altitude, hazy clouds.

    The movie covers the time period between Oct. 1 and Oct. 5, 2000, latitudes from 50 degrees north to 50 degrees south, and a 100-degree sweep of longitude. Those factors were the same for a Cassini movie of cloud motions previously released (PIA02829), but that movie used frames taken through a blue filter, which showed deeper cloud levels and sharper detail. Features in this methane-filter movie appear more diffuse.

    Among the nearly stationary features are the Red Spot and some bright ovals at mid-latitudes in both hemispheres. These are anticyclonic (counter-clockwise rotating) storms. They are bright in the methane band because of their high clouds associated with rising gas. They behave differently from terrestrial cyclones, which swirl in the opposite direction. The mechanism making the Red Spot and similar spots stable apparently has no similarity to the mechanism which feeds terrestrial cyclones.

    Some small-scale features are fascinating because of their brightness fluctuations. Such fluctuations observed in the methane band are probably caused by strong vertical motions, which form clouds rapidly, as in Earth's thunderstorms. Near the upper left corner in this movie, a number of smaller clouds appear to circulate counterclockwise around a dark spot, and these clouds fluctuate in brightness, so they may be candidates for lightning storms.

    A pattern of lighter areas between darker patches can be seen in the darkest band a little north of the bright equatorial region. This may be tied to a wave-like temperature variation across the planet. If confirmed, this would be the first time such large-scale stratospheric temperature waves have been visibly linked to variations in haze thickness.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  7. The barberplaid illusion: plaid motion is biased by elongated apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, B. R.; Mulligan, J. B.; Stone, L. S.

    1996-01-01

    The perceived direction of motion of plaids windowed by elongated spatial Gaussians is biased toward the window's long axis. The bias increases as the relative angle between the plaid motion and the long axis of the window increases, peaks at a relative angle of approximately 45 deg, and then decreases. The bias increases as the window is made narrower (at fixed height) and decreases as the component spatial frequency increases (at fixed aperture size). We examine several models of human motion processing (cross-correlation, motion-energy, intersection-of-constraints, and vector-sum), and show that none of these standard models can predict our data. We conclude that spatial integration of motion signals plays a crucial role in plaid motion perception and that current models must be explicitly expanded to include such spatial interactions.

  8. Vector wind gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a vector wind gust model through statistical analysis is described. Wind perturbation statistics which include location, altitude, season, and wavelength range are used in the synthesis of detailed wing profiles. These profiles provide the basis for the establishment of improved discrete gust design criteria guidelines for ascending launch vehicles.

  9. Vector potential methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M.

    1989-01-01

    Vector potential and related methods, for the simulation of both inviscid and viscous flows over aerodynamic configurations, are briefly reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of several formulations are discussed and alternate strategies are recommended. Scalar potential, modified potential, alternate formulations of Euler equations, least-squares formulation, variational principles, iterative techniques and related methods, and viscous flow simulation are discussed.

  10. CALCULUS III Vector Calculus

    E-print Network

    Sutherland, Scott

    Calculus: concepts and contexts, by James Stewart, Brooks/Cole, 1998. RECITATIONS: Fr 12:40-1:35, ROOM SBMAT 205 CALCULUS III Vector Calculus SPRING 2000 This course represents the third semester in the standard Calculus sequence. We will develop the theory and practice of di#11;erentiation and integration

  11. Support vector machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garay, Michael J.; Mazzoni, Dominic; Davies, Roger; Wagstaff, Kiri

    2004-01-01

    Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are a type of supervised learning algorith,, other examples of which are Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Decision Trees, and Naive Bayesian Classifiers. Supervised learning algorithms are used to classify objects labled by a 'supervisor' - typically a human 'expert.'.

  12. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    E-print Network

    J. P. Krisch; E. N. Glass

    2009-08-03

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  13. Impact of the ice phase on a mesoscale convective system: Implication of cloud parameterization and cloud radiative properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, H.N.S.; Bradley, M.M.; Molenkamp, C.R.; Grant, K.E.; Chuang, C.

    1991-08-01

    This study attempts to provide further understanding of the effect of the ice phase on cloud ensemble features which are useful for improving GCM cumulus parameterization. In addition, cloud model results are used to diagnose the radiative properties of anvils in order to assess cloud/radiation interaction and its feedback on the larger-scale climate for the future work. The heat, moisture and mass budget analyses of a simulated squall line system indicate that, at least for this type of system, the inclusion of the ice phase in the microphysics does not considerably change the net cloud heating and drying effects and the feedback on the large-scale motion. Nonetheless, its impact on the radiative properties of clouds significantly influences not only the squall line system itself, but also the larger-scale circulation due to the favorable stratification for long-lasting anvil clouds. The water budget suggests a simple methodology to parameterize the microphysical effect without considering it as a model physics module. Further application of the water budget might also be used to parameterize the cloud transport of condensates in the anvil cloud region, which allows the GCM columns to interact with each other. The findings of this study suggest that the ice phase could be ignored in the cloud parameterization in order to save significant amounts of computational resources and to simplify the model physics. More scientific effort should, however, be focused on the effect of the ice phase to further explore cloud feedback on the large-scale climate through the radiative process. The cloud/radiation interaction and its feedback on the larger-scale climate will be addressed in a companion study by coupling the radiative transfer model with the cloud model. 19 refs., 13 figs.

  14. Continuum dynamics on a vector bundle for a directed medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, Hidetaka; Adachi, Taiji

    2010-08-01

    We develop a dynamics on a vector bundle that accurately describes the mechanical behavior of a directed medium. The directed medium is a continuum with microstructures, which is described by a deformable vector, called a director. In geometric continuum mechanics, an elastic body is viewed as a differentiable manifold, while a directed medium is viewed as a vector bundle whose fiber denotes a collection of the deformable directors. In this study, we begin with geometrical settings of the continuum dynamics on a tangent bundle of a vector bundle, and derive a weak form and equations of motion for the directed medium. Moreover, we apply our resultant equations to a Cosserat rod, as an example, and find that the derived equations of motion coincide with the balance laws of large deformable rods. Additionally, the equations of motion for the Cosserat rod are reduced to those for the special case of the Cosserat rod under undeformed cross-sectional conditions. Finally, we discuss an application of our Cosserat rod results to biopolymers and comment on the analyses of their smaller microstructures. This is important for future development because the microstructural changes of the biopolymers are deeply related to their macro conformations and, eventually, to the biological functions depending on both the macro and micro conformations.

  15. Redundancy, Self-Motion, and Motor Control

    PubMed Central

    Martin, V.; Scholz, J. P.; Schöner, G.

    2011-01-01

    Outside the laboratory, human movement typically involves redundant effector systems. How the nervous system selects among the task-equivalent solutions may provide insights into how movement is controlled. We propose a process model of movement generation that accounts for the kinematics of goal-directed pointing movements performed with a redundant arm. The key element is a neuronal dynamics that generates a virtual joint trajectory. This dynamics receives input from a neuronal timer that paces end-effector motion along its path. Within this dynamics, virtual joint velocity vectors that move the end effector are dynamically decoupled from velocity vectors that do not. Moreover, the sensed real joint configuration is coupled back into this neuronal dynamics, updating the virtual trajectory so that it yields to task-equivalent deviations from the dynamic movement plan. Experimental data from participants who perform in the same task setting as the model are compared in detail to the model predictions. We discover that joint velocities contain a substantial amount of self-motion that does not move the end effector. This is caused by the low impedance of muscle joint systems and by coupling among muscle joint systems due to multiarticulatory muscles. Back-coupling amplifies the induced control errors. We establish a link between the amount of self-motion and how curved the end-effector path is. We show that models in which an inverse dynamics cancels interaction torques predict too little self-motion and too straight end-effector paths. PMID:19718817

  16. On the Kinematics of Undulator Girder Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J; ,

    2011-08-18

    The theory of rigid body kinematics is used to derive equations that govern the control and measurement of the position and orientation of undulator girders. The equations form the basis of the girder matlab software on the LCLS control system. The equations are linear for small motion and easily inverted as desired. For reference, some relevant girder geometrical data is also given. Equations 6-8 relate the linear potentiometer readings to the motion of the girder. Equations 9-11 relate the cam shaft angles to the motion of the girder. Both sets are easily inverted to either obtain the girder motion from the angles or readings, or, to find the angles and readings that would give a desired motion. The motion of any point on the girder can be calculated by applying either sets of equations to the two cam-planes and extrapolating in the z coordinate using equation 19. The formulation of the equations is quite general and easily coded via matrix and vector methods. They form the basis of the girder matlab software on the LCLS control system.

  17. Inhomogeneous cirrus clouds during the AIRTOSS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Matthias; Spichtinger, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The aircraft campaign AIRTOSS-ICE in May and September 2013 provided measurement data of cirrus clouds over North Sea and Baltic Sea in various meteorological situations. The measurements were carried out with a Learjet and a towed sensor shuttle below the aircraft [2]. This configuration allows us to obtain almost horizontally collocated measurements at different vertical levels (inside and outside clouds). Microphysical properties of cirrus clouds, as ice water content, ice crystal number concentrations, diameter and shape of ice crystals were measured. In this study we concentrate on the comparison of in situ measurements with model simulations. For these case studies, the issue about the main formation mechanism (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous or both) will be addressed. In a first step the meteorological conditions leading to the cirrus formation are analyzed using meteorological analyses as obtained from the European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts (ECMWF). The ECMWF wind fields are then used to calculate backward trajectories with the Lagrangian analysis tool LAGRANTO [4]. From these investigations the large-scale/mesoscale motions are derived and analyzed. Finally, the meteorological analyses and measurements (temperature, wind, humidity) are used as initial conditions for cirrus cloud simulations where the small scale motions are derived and analyzed. We used EULAG as LES model, including a state-of-the-art ice microphysics scheme [3] for 2D and 3D idealized and quasi-realistic simulations. In order to address the impact of dynamics vs. microphysics (i.e. heterogeneous nucleation [1]), we investigated different environmental conditions. The microphysical and macrophysical properties of the simulated cloud are finally compared to the measurements, in order to get some information about the most probable scenarios. References [1] D. J. Cziczo, K. D. Froyd, C. Hoose, E. J. Jensen, M. H. Diao, M. A. Zondlo, J. B. Smith, C. H. Twohy, and D. M. Murphy. Clarifying the dominant sources and mechanisms of cirrus cloud formation. Science, 340(6138):1320-1324, June 2013. [2] W. Frey, H. Eichler, M. de Reus, R. Maser, M. Wendisch, and S. Borrmann. A new airborne tandem platform for collocated measurements of microphysical cloud and radiation properties. Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, 2(1):147-158, 2009. [3] P. Spichtinger and K. M. Gierens. Modelling of cirrus clouds part 1a: Model description and validation. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9(2):685-706, 2009. [4] H. Wernli and H. C. Davies. A lagrangian-based analysis of extratropical cyclones .1. the method and some applications. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 123(538):467-489, January 1997.

  18. Above the Clouds: A Berkeley View of Cloud Michael Armbrust

    E-print Network

    Akella, Aditya

    a premium for large scale, is unprecedented in the history of IT. Cloud Computing refers to bothAbove the Clouds: A Berkeley View of Cloud Computing Michael Armbrust Armando Fox Rean Griffith-10240; and by the National Science Foundation (grant #CNS-0509559). #12;Above the Clouds: A Berkeley View of Cloud Computing

  19. The proposed connection between clouds and cosmic rays: Cloud

    E-print Network

    The proposed connection between clouds and cosmic rays: Cloud behaviour during the past 50 of cloud factors using both satellite and ground­based data. In particular, we search for evidence for the low cloud decrease predicted by the rising levels of solar activity and the low cloud­cosmic ray flux

  20. Chemical cloud tracking systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, Larry B.; Gruber, Thomas C., Jr.; Marshall, Martin; Rowland, Brad

    2002-02-01

    This paper describes the Chemical Cloud Tracking System (CCTS) which has been installed at Dugway Proving Ground. The CCTS allows mapping of chemical clouds in real time from a safe standoff distance. The instruments used are passive standoff chemical agent detectors (FTIRs). Each instrument individually can only measure the total of all the chemical in its line-of-site; the distance to the cloud is unknown. By merging data from multiple vantage points (either one instrument moving past the cloud or two or more instruments spaced so as to view the cloud from different directions) a map of the cloud locations can be generated using tomography. To improve the sensitivity and accuracy of the cloud map, chemical point sensors can be added to the sensor array being used. The equipment required for the CCTS is commercially available. Also, the data fusion techniques (tomography) have been demonstrated previously in the medical field. The Chemical Cloud Tracking System can monitor the movement of many chemical clouds of either military or industrial origin. Since the technique is standoff, the personnel are not exposed to toxic hazards while they follow the cloud. Also, the equipment works on-the-move which allows rapid response to emergency situations (plant explosions, tanker car accidents, chemical terrorism, etc.).

  1. Silicon photonics cloud (SiCloud)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Peter T. S.; Jiang, Yunshan; Lynch, Michael; Miyatake, Taira; Carmona, Christopher; Chan, Andrew C.; Muniam, Kuhan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-02-01

    We present SiCloud (Silicon Photonics Cloud), the first free, instructional web-based research and education tool for silicon photonics. SiCloud's vision is to provide a host of instructional and research web-based tools. Such interactive learning tools enhance traditional teaching methods by extending access to a very large audience, resulting in very high impact. Interactive tools engage the brain in a way different from merely reading, and so enhance and reinforce the learning experience. Understanding silicon photonics is challenging as the topic involves a wide range of disciplines, including material science, semiconductor physics, electronics and waveguide optics. This web-based calculator is an interactive analysis tool for optical properties of silicon and related material (SiO2, Si3N4, Al2O3, etc.). It is designed to be a one stop resource for students, researchers and design engineers. The first and most basic aspect of Silicon Photonics is the Material Parameters, which provides the foundation for the Device, Sub-System and System levels. SiCloud includes the common dielectrics and semiconductors for waveguide core, cladding, and photodetection, as well as metals for electrical contacts. SiCloud is a work in progress and its capability is being expanded. SiCloud is being developed at UCLA with funding from the National Science Foundation's Center for Integrated Access Networks (CIAN) Engineering Research Center.

  2. Motion vector processing in compressed video and its applications to motion compensated frame interpolation

    E-print Network

    Huang, Ai-Mei

    2009-01-01

    ghost artifacts are then generated because incorrect MVs have impacts on the smoothing process such as the areas around the face.face areas. By adopting the proposed adaptive frame in- terpolation scheme, these ghost

  3. Scanning Cloud Radar Observations at the ARM sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollias, P.; Clothiaux, E. E.; Shupe, M.; Widener, K.; Bharadwaj, N.; Miller, M. A.; Verlinde, H.; Luke, E. P.; Johnson, K. L.; Jo, I.; Tatarevic, A.; Lamer, K.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program upgraded its fixed and mobile facilities with the acquisition of state-of-the-art scanning, dual-wavelength, polarimetric, Doppler cloud radars. The scanning ARM cloud radars (SACR's) are the most expensive and significant radar systems at all ARM sites and eight SACR systems will be operational at ARM sites by the end of 2013. The SACR's are the primary instruments for the detection of 3D cloud properties (boundaries, volume cloud fractional coverage, liquid water content, dynamics, etc.) beyond the soda-straw (profiling) limited view. Having scanning capabilities with two frequencies and polarization allows more accurate probing of a variety of cloud systems (e.g., drizzle and shallow, warm rain), better correction for attenuation, use of attenuation for liquid water content retrievals, and polarimetric and dual-wavelength ratio characterization of non-spherical particles for improved ice crystal habit identification. Examples of SACR observations from four ARM sites are presented here: the fixed sites at Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA), and the mobile facility deployments at Graciosa Island, Azores and Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The 3D cloud structure is investigated both at the macro-scale (20-50 km) and cloud-scale (100-500 m). Doppler velocity measurements are corrected for velocity folding and are used either to describe the in-cloud horizontal wind profile or the 3D vertical air motions.

  4. Deuteration in infrared dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackington, Matias; Fuller, Gary A.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Garay, Guido; Peretto, Nicolas; Traficante, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Much of the dense gas in molecular clouds has a filamentary structure but the detailed structure and evolution of this gas is poorly known. We have observed 54 cores in infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) using N2H+ (1-0) and (3-2) to determine the kinematics of the densest material, where stars will form. We also observed N2D+ (3-2) towards 29 of the brightest peaks to analyse the level of deuteration which is an excellent probe of the quiescent of the early stages of star formation. There were 13 detections of N2D+ (3-2). This is one of the largest samples of IRDCs yet observed in these species. The deuteration ratio in these sources ranges between 0.003 and 0.14. For most of the sources the material traced by N2D+ and N2H+ (3-2) still has significant turbulent motions, however three objects show subthermal N2D+ velocity dispersion. Surprisingly the presence or absence of an embedded 70?m source shows no correlation with the detection of N2D+ (3-2), nor does it correlate with any change in velocity dispersion or excitation temperature. Comparison with recent models of deuteration suggest evolutionary time-scales of these regions of several free-fall times or less.

  5. An Autonomous Reliabilit Cloud Comput

    E-print Network

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    An Autonomous Reliabilit Ami Cloud Comput Department of Computing and Informa Abstract--Cloud computing paradigm allo based access to computing and storages s Internet. Since with advances of Cloud. Keywords- Cloud computing; SLA negotiat I. INTRODUCTION Cloud computing has transferred the services

  6. AN ALGORITHM FOR PROJECTING RADAR RAINFALL RATE Nazario D. Ramirez-Beltran1

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    , and Joan M. Castro3 1 Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 9030 for identifying the rainy cloud cells and determines the cloud motion vector in each cell. The motion vector on a projected pixel. The cloud motion vector (direction and speed) is used to determine which pixels advected

  7. Thermal vector potential theory of magnon-driven magnetization dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatara, Gen

    2015-08-01

    Thermal vector potential formulation is applied to study the thermal dynamics of magnetic structures for insulating ferromagnets. By separating the variables of the magnetic structure and the magnons, the equation of motion for the structure, including spin-transfer effect because of thermal magnons, is derived for the cases of a domain wall and a vortex. The magnon current is evaluated based on the linear response theory with the thermal vector potential representing the temperature gradient. The velocity of a domain wall when driven by thermal magnons exhibits a strong temperature dependence unlike the case of an electrically driven domain wall in metals.

  8. Representation of microphysical processes in cloud-resolving models: Spectral (bin) microphysics versus bulk parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, A. P.; Beheng, K. D.; Heymsfield, A.; Korolev, A.; Krichak, S. O.; Levin, Z.; Pinsky, M.; Phillips, V.; Prabhakaran, T.; Teller, A.; den Heever, S. C.; Yano, J.-I.

    2015-06-01

    Most atmospheric motions of different spatial scales and precipitation are closely related to phase transitions in clouds. The continuously increasing resolution of large-scale and mesoscale atmospheric models makes it feasible to treat the evolution of individual clouds. The explicit treatment of clouds requires the simulation of cloud microphysics. Two main approaches describing cloud microphysical properties and processes have been developed in the past four and a half decades: bulk microphysics parameterization and spectral (bin) microphysics (SBM). The development and utilization of both represent an important step forward in cloud modeling. This study presents a detailed survey of the physical basis and the applications of both bulk microphysics parameterization and SBM. The results obtained from simulations of a wide range of atmospheric phenomena, from tropical cyclones through Arctic clouds using these two approaches are compared. Advantages and disadvantages, as well as lines of future development for these methods are discussed.

  9. A comparative study of surface EMG classification by fuzzy relevance vector machine and fuzzy support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong-Bo; Huang, Hu; Wu, Jianhua; Liu, Lei

    2015-02-01

    We present a multiclass fuzzy relevance vector machine (FRVM) learning mechanism and evaluate its performance to classify multiple hand motions using surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals. The relevance vector machine (RVM) is a sparse Bayesian kernel method which avoids some limitations of the support vector machine (SVM). However, RVM still suffers the difficulty of possible unclassifiable regions in multiclass problems. We propose two fuzzy membership function-based FRVM algorithms to solve such problems, based on experiments conducted on seven healthy subjects and two amputees with six hand motions. Two feature sets, namely, AR model coefficients and room mean square value (AR-RMS), and wavelet transform (WT) features, are extracted from the recorded sEMG signals. Fuzzy support vector machine (FSVM) analysis was also conducted for wide comparison in terms of accuracy, sparsity, training and testing time, as well as the effect of training sample sizes. FRVM yielded comparable classification accuracy with dramatically fewer support vectors in comparison with FSVM. Furthermore, the processing delay of FRVM was much less than that of FSVM, whilst training time of FSVM much faster than FRVM. The results indicate that FRVM classifier trained using sufficient samples can achieve comparable generalization capability as FSVM with significant sparsity in multi-channel sEMG classification, which is more suitable for sEMG-based real-time control applications. PMID:25571959

  10. Repetitive Motion Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Repetitive Motion Disorders Information Page Synonym(s): Cumulative Trauma Disorders, Repetitive Stress Injuries, Overuse Syndrome Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What are Repetitive Motion Disorders? Is there any treatment? What ...

  11. Essay on Gyroscopic Motions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tea, Peter L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Explains gyroscopic motions to college freshman or high school seniors who have learned about centripetal acceleration and the transformations of a couple. Contains several figures showing the direction of forces and motion. (YP)

  12. Isentropic Analysis of Convective Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauluis, Olivier M.; Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the convective mass transport by sorting air parcels in terms of their equivalent potential temperature to determine an isentropic streamfunction. By averaging the vertical mass flux at a constant value of the equivalent potential temperature, one can compute an isentropic mass transport that filters out reversible oscillatory motions such as gravity waves. This novel approach emphasizes the fact that the vertical energy and entropy transports by convection are due to the combination of ascending air parcels with high energy and entropy and subsiding air parcels with lower energy and entropy. Such conditional averaging can be extended to other dynamic and thermodynamic variables such as vertical velocity, temperature, or relative humidity to obtain a comprehensive description of convective motions. It is also shown how this approach can be used to determine the mean diabatic tendencies from the three-dimensional dynamic and thermodynamic fields. A two-stream approximation that partitions the isentropic circulation into a mean updraft and a mean downdraft is also introduced. This offers a straightforward way to identify the mean properties of rising and subsiding air parcels. The results from the two-stream approximation are compared with two other definitions of the cloud mass flux. It is argued that the isentropic analysis offers a robust definition of the convective mass transport that is not tainted by the need to arbitrarily distinguish between convection and its environment, and that separates the irreversible convective overturning fromoscillations associated with gravity waves.

  13. Ammonia Clouds on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Ammonia Ice Clouds on Jupiter

    In this movie, put together from false-color images taken by the New Horizons Ralph instrument as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in early 2007, show ammonia clouds (appearing as bright blue areas) as they form and disperse over five successive Jupiter 'days.' Scientists noted how the larger cloud travels along with a small, local deep hole.

  14. Guiding Center Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, H.J. de

    2004-03-15

    The motion of charged particles in slowly varying electromagnetic fields is analyzed. The strength of the magnetic field is such that the gyro-period and the gyro-radius of the particle motion around field lines are the shortest time and length scales of the system. The particle motion is described as the sum of a fast gyro-motion and a slow drift velocity.

  15. Compensation of Target Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bert, Christoph; Rietzel, Eike

    In ion beam therapy (IBT), organ motion requires special procedures. Of general concern is the impact on the dose distribution as a result of motion-related changes in the beam's range. In addition, interplay effects can arise for scanned beam application which cannot be addressed by the so-called margins to increase the treated volume. Dedicated motion mitigation techniques and/or 4D treatment planning are required. This chapter introduces the main concepts for management of respiratory motion in IBT.

  16. Vector Magnetograph Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    1996-01-01

    This report covers work performed during the period of November 1994 through March 1996 on the design of a Space-borne Solar Vector Magnetograph. This work has been performed as part of a design team under the supervision of Dr. Mona Hagyard and Dr. Alan Gary of the Space Science Laboratory. Many tasks were performed and this report documents the results from some of those tasks, each contained in the corresponding appendix. Appendices are organized in chronological order.

  17. An independent effect of spatial frequency on motion integration reveals orientation resolution

    E-print Network

    Nottingham, University of

    form 25 March 2010 Keywords: Plaid Motion Spatial frequency Orientation resolution IOC Vector average at the second stage are the intersection of constraints (IOC) (Adelson & Movshon, 1982; Bowns, 2002-components of each vector. The IOC rule re- quires velocity constraint lines to be drawn perpendicular to each

  18. Circular motion Isaac Newtona)

    E-print Network

    Circular motion Isaac Newtona) and Richard Conn Henryb) Received 20 October 1999; accepted 30 that occurs in uniform circular motion is presented, and is advocated for use in high school and college for the acceleration that occurs in uniform circular motion, a v2 r , 1 may be, today, a staple of freshman physics

  19. Bibliography 1. Motion Perception

    E-print Network

    Rheingans, Penny

    parallax as an indepent cue for depth perception, Perception, vol. 8, ppl 1225-134. 2. Some MotionBibliography 1. Motion Perception E. H. Adelson and J. R. Bergen. Spatiotemporal energy models for the perception of motion. Journal of the Optical Society of America, A, 2:284-299, February 1985. O. Braddick

  20. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  1. Detecting Dance Motion Structure Using Motion Capture and Musical Information

    E-print Network

    Tokyo, University of

    Detecting Dance Motion Structure Using Motion Capture and Musical Information Takaaki SHIRATORI describes a dance motion analysis method considering music rhythm. In these days, many important intangible digital archiving project of cultural intangible heritages. Our goal for archiving dance motions

  2. Photonic equation of motion with application to the Lamb shift

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, A B

    2006-12-21

    A photonic equation of motion is proposed which is the scalar product of four-vectors and therefore a Lorentz invariant. A photonic equation of motion, which has not been heretofore established in quantum electrodynamics (QED), would capture the quantum nature of light but yet not have the standard field-operator form, thereby making practical calculations easier to perform. The equation of motion proposed here is applied to the Lamb shift. No divergences exist, and the result agrees with the observed Lamb shift for the 1S{sub 1/2} state of hydrogen within experimental error.

  3. Vector representation of tourmaline compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Donald M.

    1989-01-01

    The vector method for representing mineral compositions of amphibole and mica groups is applied to the tourmaline group. Consideration is given to the methods for drawing the relevant vector diagrams, relating the exchange vectors to one another, and contouring the diagrams for constant values of Na, Ca, Li, Fe, Mg, Al, Si, and OH. The method is used to depict a wide range of possible tourmaline end-member compositions and solid solutions, starting from a single point. In addition to vector depictions of multicomponent natural tourmalines, vectors are presented for simpler systems such as (Na,Al)-tourmalines, alkali-free tourmalines, and elbaites.

  4. Lost in Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Shetye, Sandeep D.; Chilukuri, Sri; Sturken, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing can reduce cost significantly because businesses can share computing resources. In recent years Small and Medium Businesses (SMB) have used Cloud effectively for cost saving and for sharing IT expenses. With the success of SMBs, many perceive that the larger enterprises ought to move into Cloud environment as well. Government agency s stove-piped environments are being considered as candidates for potential use of Cloud either as an enterprise entity or pockets of small communities. Cloud Computing is the delivery of computing as a service rather than as a product, whereby shared resources, software, and information are provided to computers and other devices as a utility over a network. Underneath the offered services, there exists a modern infrastructure cost of which is often spread across its services or its investors. As NASA is considered as an Enterprise class organization, like other enterprises, a shift has been occurring in perceiving its IT services as candidates for Cloud services. This paper discusses market trends in cloud computing from an enterprise angle and then addresses the topic of Cloud Computing for NASA in two possible forms. First, in the form of a public Cloud to support it as an enterprise, as well as to share it with the commercial and public at large. Second, as a private Cloud wherein the infrastructure is operated solely for NASA, whether managed internally or by a third-party and hosted internally or externally. The paper addresses the strengths and weaknesses of both paradigms of public and private Clouds, in both internally and externally operated settings. The content of the paper is from a NASA perspective but is applicable to any large enterprise with thousands of employees and contractors.

  5. Motion coherence affects human perception and pursuit similarly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, B. R.; Stone, L. S.

    2000-01-01

    Pursuit and perception both require accurate information about the motion of objects. Recovering the motion of objects by integrating the motion of their components is a difficult visual task. Successful integration produces coherent global object motion, while a failure to integrate leaves the incoherent local motions of the components unlinked. We compared the ability of perception and pursuit to perform motion integration by measuring direction judgments and the concomitant eye-movement responses to line-figure parallelograms moving behind stationary rectangular apertures. The apertures were constructed such that only the line segments corresponding to the parallelogram's sides were visible; thus, recovering global motion required the integration of the local segment motion. We investigated several potential motion-integration rules by using stimuli with different object, vector-average, and line-segment terminator-motion directions. We used an oculometric decision rule to directly compare direction discrimination for pursuit and perception. For visible apertures, the percept was a coherent object, and both the pursuit and perceptual performance were close to the object-motion prediction. For invisible apertures, the percept was incoherently moving segments, and both the pursuit and perceptual performance were close to the terminator-motion prediction. Furthermore, both psychometric and oculometric direction thresholds were much higher for invisible apertures than for visible apertures. We constructed a model in which both perception and pursuit are driven by a shared motion-processing stage, with perception having an additional input from an independent static-processing stage. Model simulations were consistent with our perceptual and oculomotor data. Based on these results, we propose the use of pursuit as an objective and continuous measure of perceptual coherence. Our results support the view that pursuit and perception share a common motion-integration stage, perhaps within areas MT or MST.

  6. Rigid Body Motion in Stereo 3D Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the difficulties experienced by first-grade students studying rigid body motion at Sofia University. Most quantities describing the rigid body are in relations that the students find hard to visualize and understand. They also lose the notion of cause-result relations between vector quantities, such as the relation between…

  7. Motion of Air Bubbles in Water Subjected to Microgravity Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Kelly, Eric M.; Hrovat, Kenneth; Nelson, Emily S.; Pettit, Donald R.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) serves as a platform for microgravity research for the foreseeable future. A microgravity environment is one in which the effects of gravity are drastically reduced which then allows physical experiments to be conducted without the over powering effects of gravity. During his 6-month stay on the ISS, astronaut Donald R. Pettit performed many informal/impromptu science experiments with available equipment. One such experiment focused on the motion of air bubbles in a rectangular container nearly filled with de-ionized water. Bubbles were introduced by shaking and then the container was secured in place for several hours while motion of the bubbles was recorded using time-lapse photography. This paper shows correlation between bubble motion and quasi-steady acceleration levels during one such experiment operation. The quasi-steady acceleration vectors were measured by the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS). Essentially linear motion was observed in the condition considered here. Dr. Pettit also created other conditions which produced linear and circulating motion, which are the subjects of further study. Initial observations of this bubble motion agree with calculations from many microgravity physical science experiments conducted on shuttle microgravity science missions. Many crystal-growth furnaces involve heavy metals and high temperatures in which undesired acceleration-driven convection during solidification can adversely affect the crystal. Presented in this paper will be results showing correlation between bubble motion and the quasi-steady acceleration vector.

  8. Motion of Air Bubbles in Water Subjected to Microgravity Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Kelly, Eric M.; Hrovar, Kenneth; Nelson, Emily S.; Pettit, Donald R.

    2004-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) serves as a platform for microgravity research for the foreseeable future. A microgravity environment is one in which the effects of gravity are drastically reduced which then allows physical experiments to be conducted without the overpowering effects of gravity. During his six month stay on the ISS, astronaut Donald R Pettit performed many informal/impromptu science experiments with available equipment. One such experiment focused on the motion of air bubbles in a rectangular container nearly filled with de-ionized water. Bubbles were introduced by shaking and the container was secured in place for several hours while motion of the bubbles were recorded using time-lapse photography. This paper shows correlation between bubble motion and quasi-steady acceleration levels during one such experiment operation. The quasi-steady acceleration vectors were measured by the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System. Essentially linear motion was observed in the condition considered here. Dr. Pettit also created other conditions which produced linear and circulating motion, which are the subjects of further study. Initial observations of this bubble motion agree with calculations from many microgravity physical science experiments conducted on Shuttle microgravity science missions. Many crystal-growth furnaces involve heavy metals and high temperatures in which undesired acceleration-driven convection during solidification can adversely affect the crystal. Presented in this paper will be results showing correlation between bubble motion and the quasi-steady acceleration vector.

  9. On the origin of the Orion and Monoceros molecular cloud complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, J.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Rozyczka, M.; Mirabel, I. F.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed model for the origin of the Orion and Monoceros cloud complexes is presented, showing that a single high-velocity H I cloud-galaxy collision can explain their main observed features. The collision generates massive shocked layers, and self-gravity can then provide the conditions for the transformation of these layers into molecular clouds. The clouds formed by the collision maintain the motion of their parental shocked gas and reach positions located far away from the plane. According to this model, both the Orion and Monoceros complexes were formed some 60 million yr ago, when the original shocked layer was fragmented by Galactic tidal forces.

  10. Formation and spread of aircraft-induced holes in clouds.

    PubMed

    Heymsfield, Andrew J; Thompson, Gregory; Morrison, Hugh; Bansemer, Aaron; Rasmussen, Roy M; Minnis, Patrick; Wang, Zhien; Zhang, Damao

    2011-07-01

    Hole-punch and canal clouds have been observed for more than 50 years, but the mechanisms of formation, development, duration, and thus the extent of their effect have largely been ignored. The holes have been associated with inadvertent seeding of clouds with ice particles generated by aircraft, produced through spontaneous freezing of cloud droplets in air cooled as it flows around aircraft propeller tips or over jet aircraft wings. Model simulations indicate that the growth of the ice particles can induce vertical motions with a duration of 1 hour or more, a process that expands the holes and canals in clouds. Global effects are minimal, but regionally near major airports, additional precipitation can be induced. PMID:21719676

  11. Stellar streams around the Magellanic Clouds

    E-print Network

    Belokurov, Vasily

    2015-01-01

    Using Blue Horizontal Branch stars identified in the Dark Energy Survey Year 1 data, we report the detection of an extended and lumpy stellar debris distribution around the Magellanic Clouds. At the heliocentric distance of the Clouds, overdensities of BHBs are seen to reach at least to ~30 degrees, and perhaps as far as ~50 degrees from the LMC. In 3D, the stellar halo is traceable to between 25 and 50 kpc from the LMC. We catalogue the most significant of the stellar sub-structures revealed, and announce the discovery of a number of narrow streams and diffuse debris clouds. Two narrow streams appear approximately aligned with the Magellanic Clouds' proper motion. Moreover, one of these overlaps with the gaseous Magellanic Stream on the sky. Curiously, two diffuse BHB agglomerations seem coincident with several of the recently discovered DES satellites. Given the enormous size and the conspicuous lumpiness of the LMC's stellar halo, we speculate that the dwarf could easily have been more massive than previou...

  12. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-07-01

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  13. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-07-21

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  14. Breathing motion compensated reconstruction for C-arm cone beam CT imaging: initial experience based on animal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, D.; Lin, M.; Rao, P. P.; Loffroy, R.; Liapi, E.; Noordhoek, N.; Eshuis, P.; Radaelli, A.; Grass, M.; Geschwind, J.-F. H.

    2012-03-01

    C-arm based tomographic 3D imaging is applied in an increasing number of minimal invasive procedures. Due to the limited acquisition speed for a complete projection data set required for tomographic reconstruction, breathing motion is a potential source of artifacts. This is the case for patients who cannot comply breathing commands (e.g. due to anesthesia). Intra-scan motion estimation and compensation is required. Here, a scheme for projection based local breathing motion estimation is combined with an anatomy adapted interpolation strategy and subsequent motion compensated filtered back projection. The breathing motion vector is measured as a displacement vector on the projections of a tomographic short scan acquisition using the diaphragm as a landmark. Scaling of the displacement to the acquisition iso-center and anatomy adapted volumetric motion vector field interpolation delivers a 3D motion vector per voxel. Motion compensated filtered back projection incorporates this motion vector field in the image reconstruction process. This approach is applied in animal experiments on a flat panel C-arm system delivering improved image quality (lower artifact levels, improved tumor delineation) in 3D liver tumor imaging.

  15. INTERNAL PROPER MOTIONS IN THE ESKIMO NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    García-Díaz, Ma. T.; Gutiérrez, L.; Steffen, W.; López, J. A.; Beckman, J. E-mail: leonel@astro.unam.mx E-mail: jal@astro.unam.mx

    2015-01-10

    We present measurements of internal proper motions at more than 500 positions of NGC 2392, the Eskimo Nebula, based on images acquired with WFPC2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope at two epochs separated by 7.695 yr. Comparisons of the two observations clearly show the expansion of the nebula. We measured the amplitude and direction of the motion of local structures in the nebula by determining their relative shift during that interval. In order to assess the potential uncertainties in the determination of proper motions in this object, in general, the measurements were performed using two different methods, used previously in the literature. We compare the results from the two methods, and to perform the scientific analysis of the results we choose one, the cross-correlation method, because it is more reliable. We go on to perform a ''criss-cross'' mapping analysis on the proper motion vectors, which helps in the interpretation of the velocity pattern. By combining our results of the proper motions with radial velocity measurements obtained from high resolution spectroscopic observations, and employing an existing 3D model, we estimate the distance to the nebula to be 1.3 kpc.

  16. Geometrical Invariants of Matter Motion in Physics

    E-print Network

    Xiao Jianuha

    2005-11-09

    This paper defines the spacetime geometry attached with observor as vacuum geometry (it defines the idea physical measurement geometry) and the spacetime geometry attached with matter as spacetime geometry. The initial spacetime geometry attached with matter is taken as refference geometry (named as initial co-moving coordinator system), and the current spacetime geometry attached with matter (named as current co-moving coordinator system) is determined by the four-dimensional displacement field measured in initial spacetime geometry. Matter motion is expressed by the motion transformation of basic vectors of four-dimensional co-moving coordinator system. The transformation of motion expressed by displacement describes the transient geometry form of matter motion. In general relativity theory and in gauge field theory, the geometrical invariant of word-line distance is used to define the geometry of space-time continuum. However, based on this research, this is only true when the time-shift is in special form. For more complicated matter motion, the gauge field theory and general relativity will be failed. The paper shows that traditional physical conservation laws and the geometrical invariant introduced by the gauge field theory and general relativity are included in the finite geometrical field theory as simple special cases.

  17. Human action recognition using motion energy template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yanhua; Guo, Yongcai; Gao, Chao

    2015-06-01

    Human action recognition is an active and interesting research topic in computer vision and pattern recognition field that is widely used in the real world. We proposed an approach for human activity analysis based on motion energy template (MET), a new high-level representation of video. The main idea for the MET model is that human actions could be expressed as the composition of motion energy acquired in a three-dimensional (3-D) space-time volume by using a filter bank. The motion energies were directly computed from raw video sequences, thus some problems, such as object location and segmentation, etc., are definitely avoided. Another important competitive merit of this MET method is its insensitivity to gender, hair, and clothing. We extract MET features by using the Bhattacharyya coefficient to measure the motion energy similarity between the action template video and the tested video, and then the 3-D max-pooling. Using these features as input to the support vector machine, extensive experiments on two benchmark datasets, Weizmann and KTH, were carried out. Compared with other state-of-the-art approaches, such as variation energy image, dynamic templates and local motion pattern descriptors, the experimental results demonstrate that our MET model is competitive and promising.

  18. Cloud Resolving Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to test the representation of cloud processes used in climate models is to use observations together with cloud-resolving models (CRMs). CRMs use more sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes, and they can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems (with sizes ranging from about 2-200 km). CRMs also allow for explicit interaction between clouds, outgoing longwave (cooling) and incoming solar (heating) radiation, and ocean and land surface processes. Observations are required to initialize CRMs and to validate their results. This paper provides a brief discussion and review of the main characteristics of CRMs as well as some of their major applications. These include the use of CRMs to improve our understanding of: (1) convective organization, (2) cloud temperature and water vapor budgets, and convective momentum transport, (3) diurnal variation of precipitation processes, (4) radiative-convective quasi-equilibrium states, (5) cloud-chemistry interaction, (6) aerosol-precipitation interaction, and (7) improving moist processes in large-scale models. In addition, current and future developments and applications of CRMs will be presented.

  19. Weather Fundamentals: Clouds. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) discusses how clouds form, the different types of clouds, and the important role they play in…

  20. Clouds over Open Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The heavy concentration of these cirrocumulus and nimbostratus clouds over open ocean - location unknown, indicate that a heavy downpouring of rain is occuring on the Earth's surface below. Towering anvils, rising above the base cloud cover, also indicate high winds and possible tornado activity.

  1. Clouds over Open Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The heavy concentration of these cirrocumulus and nimbostratus clouds over open ocean - location unknown, indicate that a heavy downpouring of rain is occuring on the Earth's surface below. Towering anvils, seen rising high above the base cloud cover and casting long shadows, also indicate high winds and possible tornado activity.

  2. Kernel structures for Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spafford, Eugene H.; Mckendry, Martin S.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the internal structure of the Clouds kernel was presented. An indication of how these structures will interact in the prototype Clouds implementation is given. Many specific details have yet to be determined and await experimentation with an actual working system.

  3. Learning in the Clouds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan W.

    2013-01-01

    Engaged learning--the type that happens outside textbooks and beyond the four walls of the classroom--moves beyond right and wrong answers to grappling with the uncertainties and contradictions of a complex world. iPhones back up to the "cloud." GoogleDocs is all about "cloud computing." Facebook is as ubiquitous as the sky.…

  4. On Cloud Nine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrea, Bridget; Weil, Marty

    2011-01-01

    Across the U.S., innovative collaboration practices are happening in the cloud: Sixth-graders participate in literary salons. Fourth-graders mentor kindergarteners. And teachers use virtual Post-it notes to advise students as they create their own television shows. In other words, cloud computing is no longer just used to manage administrative…

  5. Programmable IP core for motion estimation: comparison of FPGA and ASIC based implementations

    E-print Network

    Sousa, Leonel

    Programmable IP core for motion estimation: comparison of FPGA and ASIC based implementations Tiago distinct implementation technologies: a high performance FPGA device, from Xilinx Virtex-II Pro family of motion vectors in real-time. Nevertheless, the reconfigurability properties of the FPGA implementation

  6. 4.7 Equations of Motion in Moving Coordi-nate Systems

    E-print Network

    Chicone, Carmen

    system is a coordinate system in which Newton's laws of motion are valid; in particular, a free particle transported inertial frame are the components of the vector AT V + Q. By Newton's second law, the equation330 Fluids 4.7 Equations of Motion in Moving Coordi- nate Systems Moving coordinate systems

  7. Cloud to ground lightning in tropical cyclone: a study of 34 West Atlantic tropical cyclones from 1986-1996 

    E-print Network

    Coyne, John Michael

    2001-01-01

    Cloud to ground (CG) lightning characteristics and patterns were investigated for 34 tropical cyclones for the time period 1986 to 1996. Spatial analysis of CG lightning relative to both compass directions and the direction of motion were compiled...

  8. Semicircular canals as a primary etiological factor in motion sickness.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. F., II; Graybiel, A.

    1972-01-01

    Data are presented which support the view that the semicircular canals of humans can act as the essential factor for the production of motion sickness and the evocation of symptoms characteristic of this malady in the absence of 'motion.' Quantitative grading of acute symptoms demonstrated that motion sickness can be evoked by stimuli which are adequately provocative and unique for the canals. These results are compared with those of two provocative rotational tests that introduce Coriolis (cross-coupled angular acceleration) forces or generate a rotating linear acceleration vector. Wide interindividual differences but only slight intraindividual differences among the six provocative test conditions are revealed, indicating that individuals usually possess an overall susceptibility to motion which is relatively independent of its type. The fact that typical symptoms of motion sickness were also produced by bithermal irrigation of several subjects who represented a wide range of susceptibility adds to the evidence that semicircular canals can act as the primary etiological factor in this malady.

  9. Anisotropic responses to motion toward and away from the eye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrone, John A.

    1986-01-01

    When a rigid object moves toward the eye, it is usually perceived as being rigid. However, in the case of motion away from the eye, the motion and structure of the object are perceived nonveridically, with the percept tending to reflect the nonrigid transformations that are present in the retinal image. This difference in response to motion to and from the observer was quantified in an experiment using wire-frame computer-generated boxes which moved toward and away from the eye. Two theoretical systems are developed by which uniform three-dimensional velocity can be recovered from an expansion pattern of nonuniform velocity vectors. It is proposed that the human visual system uses two similar systems for processing motion in depth. The mechanism used for motion away from the eye produces perceptual errors because it is not suited to objects with a depth component.

  10. Cloud computing security.

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dongwan; Claycomb, William R.; Urias, Vincent E.

    2010-10-01

    Cloud computing is a paradigm rapidly being embraced by government and industry as a solution for cost-savings, scalability, and collaboration. While a multitude of applications and services are available commercially for cloud-based solutions, research in this area has yet to fully embrace the full spectrum of potential challenges facing cloud computing. This tutorial aims to provide researchers with a fundamental understanding of cloud computing, with the goals of identifying a broad range of potential research topics, and inspiring a new surge in research to address current issues. We will also discuss real implementations of research-oriented cloud computing systems for both academia and government, including configuration options, hardware issues, challenges, and solutions.

  11. SMILES ice cloud products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MilláN, L.; Read, W.; Kasai, Y.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N.; Mendrok, J.; Sagawa, H.; Sano, T.; Shiotani, M.; Wu, D. L.

    2013-06-01

    Upper tropospheric water vapor and clouds play an important role in Earth's climate, but knowledge of them, in particular diurnal variation in deep convective clouds, is limited. An essential variable to understand them is cloud ice water content. The Japanese Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station (ISS) samples the atmosphere at different local times allowing the study of diurnal variability of atmospheric parameters. We describe a new ice cloud data set consisting of partial Ice Water Path and Ice Water Content. Preliminary comparisons with EOS-MLS, CloudSat-CPR and CALIOP-CALIPSO are presented. Then, the diurnal variation over land and over open ocean for partial ice water path is reported. Over land, a pronounced diurnal variation peaking strongly in the afternoon/early evening was found. Over the open ocean, little temporal dependence was encountered. This data set is publicly available for download in HDF5 format.

  12. O VI absorption in interstellar cloud surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, L. L.; Jenkins, E. B.; Songaila, A.; York, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    The velocity profiles of O VI absorption lines of 24 stars, observed in early Copernicus surveys, have been compared with the line profiles of Si III (1206.51 A) and N II (1083.99 A). The velocity structures of the O VI lines appear to be correlated with those of the material in the lower ionization stages. It is argued that the O VI absorption arises in the coronal gas of the conductive interface between hot gas, responsible for extended, soft X-ray emission, and cooler interstellar clouds. The velocity broadening of both sets of lines is attributed to motions of the cloud surfaces induced by pressure fluctuations in the interstellar medium.

  13. A new automated approach to cloud population

    E-print Network

    Tam, Hoki

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents vCloud Populator, a new approach to automating the cloud population process on VMware vCloud Director. Cloud population is the process during which a cloud instance is populated with entities to reflect ...

  14. Probabilistic seismic demand analysis using advanced ground motion intensity measures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tothong, P.; Luco, N.

    2007-01-01

    One of the objectives in performance-based earthquake engineering is to quantify the seismic reliability of a structure at a site. For that purpose, probabilistic seismic demand analysis (PSDA) is used as a tool to estimate the mean annual frequency of exceeding a specified value of a structural demand parameter (e.g. interstorey drift). This paper compares and contrasts the use, in PSDA, of certain advanced scalar versus vector and conventional scalar ground motion intensity measures (IMs). One of the benefits of using a well-chosen IM is that more accurate evaluations of seismic performance are achieved without the need to perform detailed ground motion record selection for the nonlinear dynamic structural analyses involved in PSDA (e.g. record selection with respect to seismic parameters such as earthquake magnitude, source-to-site distance, and ground motion epsilon). For structural demands that are dominated by a first mode of vibration, using inelastic spectral displacement (Sdi) can be advantageous relative to the conventionally used elastic spectral acceleration (Sa) and the vector IM consisting of Sa and epsilon (??). This paper demonstrates that this is true for ordinary and for near-source pulse-like earthquake records. The latter ground motions cannot be adequately characterized by either Sa alone or the vector of Sa and ??. For structural demands with significant higher-mode contributions (under either of the two types of ground motions), even Sdi (alone) is not sufficient, so an advanced scalar IM that additionally incorporates higher modes is used.

  15. Lifted transformations on the tangent bundle, and symmetries of particle motion

    SciTech Connect

    Maartens, R.; Taylor, D.R. )

    1993-01-01

    We define affine transport lifts on the tangent bundle by associating a transport rule for tangent vectors with a vector field on the base manifold. Our aim is to develop tools for the study of kinetic/dynamic symmetries in particle motion. The new lift unifies and generalizes all the various existing lifted vector fields, with clear geometric interpretations. In particular, this includes the important but little-known matter symmetries of relativistic kinetic theory. We find the affine dynamical symmetries of general relativistic charged particle motion, and we compare this to previous results and to the alternative concept of matter symmetry.

  16. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism.We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star...

  17. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-02-01

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surfaced-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. A decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedo set is further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo are examined using the three decade-long data sets on collected at SGP site since 1997.

  18. Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota

    E-print Network

    Delene, David J.

    accuracy #12;POLCAST4 Polarimetric Cloud Analysis and Seeding Test 4 Field campaign held in the summerCloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota · Mariusz Starzec #12;Motivation Compare University of Wyoming (UWyo) and Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT) cloud condensation nuclei

  19. CloudSafetyNet: Detecting Data Leakage between Cloud Tenants

    E-print Network

    Pietzuch, Peter

    or bugs in the cloud platform. Especially in Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) clouds, which rely on weaker Cloud computing enables organisations to deploy scalable web applications with little upfront investment or software bugs in cloud platforms are a real threat to tenant data. It is challenging for tenants, however

  20. Eliminating malaria vectors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Malaria vectors which predominantly feed indoors upon humans have been locally eliminated from several settings with insecticide treated nets (ITNs), indoor residual spraying or larval source management. Recent dramatic declines of An. gambiae in east Africa with imperfect ITN coverage suggest mosquito populations can rapidly collapse when forced below realistically achievable, non-zero thresholds of density and supporting resource availability. Here we explain why insecticide-based mosquito elimination strategies are feasible, desirable and can be extended to a wider variety of species by expanding the vector control arsenal to cover a broader spectrum of the resources they need to survive. The greatest advantage of eliminating mosquitoes, rather than merely controlling them, is that this precludes local selection for behavioural or physiological resistance traits. The greatest challenges are therefore to achieve high biological coverage of targeted resources rapidly enough to prevent local emergence of resistance and to then continually exclude, monitor for and respond to re-invasion from external populations. PMID:23758937

  1. Estimation of multiple motions: regularization and performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuke, Ingo; Aach, Til; Mota, Cicero; Barth, Erhardt

    2003-05-01

    This paper deals with the problem of estimating multiple transparent motions that can occur in computer vision applications, e.g. in the case of semi-transparencies and occlusions, and also in medical imaging when different layers of tissue move independently. Methods based on the known optical-flow equation for two motions are extended in three ways. Firstly, we include a regularization term to cope with sparse flow fields. We obtain an Euler-Lagrange system of differential equations that becomes linear due to the use of the mixed motion parameters. The system of equations is solved for the mixed-motion parameters in analogy to the case of only one motion. To extract the motion parameters, the velocity vectors are treated as complex numbers and are obtained as the roots of a complex polynomial of a degree that is equal to the number of overlaid motions. Secondly, we extend a Fourier-Transform based method proposed by Vernon such as to obtain analytic solutions for more than two motions. Thirdly, we not only solve for the overlaid motions but also separate the moving layers. Performance is demonstrated by using synthetic and real sequences.

  2. On steady motions of isotropic, elastic Cosserat points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordenholz, T. R.; O'Reilly, O. M.

    1998-02-01

    In this paper, a certain class of steady motions of compressible and incompressible isotropic, elastic Cosserat points are examined. We define such a motion as a triad of deformed vectors undergoing a fixed axis rotation at constant angular velocity. We strengthen and extend the results of Cohen, Lewis, Mac Sithigh, Muncaster and Simo, which employ the related theory of a pseudo-rigid body, by proving that the motions they studied encompass the entire class of steady motions which we define. Several new results are established for the steady motions of incompressible Cosserat points which include criteria for the existence of steady motions for all possible values of either an ancular momentum or an angular velocity. In the context of neo-Hookean and ,Mooney-Rivlin Cosserat points, we present and compare the results of two distinct parametrizations (one based on angular velocity, the other based on angular momentum) of the steady motions, and show that these motions are non-existent for a range of angular velocities. Furthermore, the qualitative similarity between the steady motions of certain compressible and incompressible Cosserat points is discussed. The results of this paper can be interpreted in the context of the theory of a pseudo-rigid body.

  3. Nighttime Clouds in Martian Arctic (Accelerated Movie)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    An angry looking sky is captured in a movie clip consisting of 10 frames taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    The clip accelerates the motion. The images were take around 3 a.m. local solar time at the Phoenix site during Sol 95 (Aug. 30), the 95th Martian day since landing.

    The swirling clouds may be moving generally in a westward direction over the lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Extended field observations of cirrus clouds using a ground-based cloud observing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of synoptic-scale dynamics associated with a middle and upper tropospheric cloud event that occurred on 26 November 1991 is examined. The case under consideration occurred during the FIRE CIRRUS-II Intensive Field Observing Period held in Coffeyville, KS during Nov. and Dec., 1991. Using data from the wind profiler demonstration network and a temporally and spatially augmented radiosonde array, emphasis is given to explaining the evolution of the kinematically-derived ageostrophic vertical circulations and correlating the circulation with the forcing of an extensively sampled cloud field. This is facilitated by decomposing the horizontal divergence into its component parts through a natural coordinate representation of the flow. Ageostrophic vertical circulations are inferred and compared to the circulation forcing arising from geostrophic confluence and shearing deformation derived from the Sawyer-Eliassen Equation. It is found that a thermodynamically indirect vertical circulation existed in association with a jet streak exit region. The circulation was displaced to the cyclonic side of the jet axis due to the orientation of the jet exit between a deepening diffluent trough and building ridge. The cloud line formed in the ascending branch of the vertical circulation with the most concentrated cloud development occurring in conjunction with the maximum large-scale vertical motion. The relationship between the large scale dynamics and the parameterization of middle and upper tropospheric clouds in large-scale models is discussed and an example of ice water contents derived from a parameterization forced by the diagnosed vertical motions and observed water vapor contents is presented.

  5. Diagnosing AIRS Sampling with CloudSat Cloud Classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric; Yue, Qing; Guillaume, Alexandre; Kahn, Brian

    2011-01-01

    AIRS yield and sampling vary with cloud state. Careful utilization of collocated multiple satellite sensors is necessary. Profile differences between AIRS and ECMWF model analyses indicate that AIRS has high sampling and excellent accuracy for certain meteorological conditions. Cloud-dependent sampling biases may have large impact on AIRS L2 and L3 data in climate research. MBL clouds / lower tropospheric stability relationship is one example. AIRS and CloudSat reveal a reasonable climatology in the MBL cloud regime despite limited sampling in stratocumulus. Thermodynamic parameters such as EIS derived from AIRS data map these cloud conditions successfully. We are working on characterizing AIRS scenes with mixed cloud types.

  6. Motion Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Integrated Sensors, Inc. (ISI), under NASA contract, developed a sensor system for controlling robot vehicles. This technology would enable a robot supply vehicle to automatically dock with Earth-orbiting satellites or the International Space Station. During the docking phase the ISI-developed sensor must sense the satellite's relative motion, then spin so the robot vehicle can adjust its motion to align with the satellite and slowly close until docking is completed. ISI used the sensing/tracking technology as the basis of its OPAD system, which simultaneously tracks an object's movement in six degrees of freedom. Applications include human limb motion analysis, assembly line position analysis and auto crash dummy motion analysis. The NASA technology is also the basis for Motion Analysis Workstation software, a package to simplify the video motion analysis process.

  7. Community Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinos, Alexandros; Briscoe, Gerard

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns over privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Our response is an alternative model for the Cloud conceptualisation, providing a paradigm for Clouds in the community, utilising networked personal computers for liberation from the centralised vendor model. Community Cloud Computing (C3) offers an alternative architecture, created by combing the Cloud with paradigms from Grid Computing, principles from Digital Ecosystems, and sustainability from Green Computing, while remaining true to the original vision of the Internet. It is more technically challenging than Cloud Computing, having to deal with distributed computing issues, including heterogeneous nodes, varying quality of service, and additional security constraints. However, these are not insurmountable challenges, and with the need to retain control over our digital lives and the potential environmental consequences, it is a challenge we must pursue.

  8. The collective gyration of a heavy ion cloud in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenning, N.; Swenson, C.; Kelley, M. C.; Providakes, J.; Torbert, R.

    1990-01-01

    In both the ionospheric barium injection experiments CRIT 1 and CRIT 2, a long duration oscillation was seen with a frequency close to the gyro frequency of barium and a time duration of about one second. A model for the phenomena which was proposed for the CRIT 1 experiment is compared to the results from CRIT 2 which made a much more complete set of measurements. The model follows the motion of a low Beta ion cloud through a larger ambient plasma. The internal field of the model is close to antiparallel to the injection direction v sub i but slightly tilted towards the self polarization direction E sub p = -V sub i by B. As the ions move across the magnetic field, the space charge is continuously neutralized by magnetic field aligned electron currents from the ambient ionosphere, drawn by the divergence in the perpendicular electric field. These currents give a perturbation of the magnetic field related to the electric field perturbation by Delta E/Delta B approximately equal to V sub A. The model predictions agree quite well with the observed vector directions, field strengths, and decay times of the electric and magnetic fields in CRIT 2. The possibility to extend the model to the active region, where the ions are produces in this type of self-ionizing injection experiments, is discussed.

  9. Biview learning for human posture segmentation from 3D points cloud.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Maoying; Cheng, Jun; Bian, Wei; Tao, Dacheng

    2014-01-01

    Posture segmentation plays an essential role in human motion analysis. The state-of-the-art method extracts sufficiently high-dimensional features from 3D depth images for each 3D point and learns an efficient body part classifier. However, high-dimensional features are memory-consuming and difficult to handle on large-scale training dataset. In this paper, we propose an efficient two-stage dimension reduction scheme, termed biview learning, to encode two independent views which are depth-difference features (DDF) and relative position features (RPF). Biview learning explores the complementary property of DDF and RPF, and uses two stages to learn a compact yet comprehensive low-dimensional feature space for posture segmentation. In the first stage, discriminative locality alignment (DLA) is applied to the high-dimensional DDF to learn a discriminative low-dimensional representation. In the second stage, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is used to explore the complementary property of RPF and the dimensionality reduced DDF. Finally, we train a support vector machine (SVM) over the output of CCA. We carefully validate the effectiveness of DLA and CCA utilized in the two-stage scheme on our 3D human points cloud dataset. Experimental results show that the proposed biview learning scheme significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art method for human posture segmentation. PMID:24465721

  10. Motion in Quantum Gravity

    E-print Network

    Karim Noui

    2010-03-31

    We tackle the question of motion in Quantum Gravity: what does motion mean at the Planck scale? Although we are still far from a complete answer we consider here a toy model in which the problem can be formulated and resolved precisely. The setting of the toy model is three dimensional Euclidean gravity. Before studying the model in detail, we argue that Loop Quantum Gravity may provide a very useful approach when discussing the question of motion in Quantum Gravity.

  11. Molecular clouds toward the super star cluster NGC 3603; possible evidence for a cloud-cloud collision in triggering the cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Y.; Ohama, A.; Hanaoka, N.; Furukawa, N.; Torii, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Fukuda, T.; Soga, S.; Moribe, N.; Kuroda, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Kuwahara, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Okuda, T.; Dawson, J. R.; Mizuno, N.; Kawamura, A.; Onishi, T.; Maezawa, H.; Mizuno, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present new large field observations of molecular clouds with NANTEN2 toward the super star cluster NGC 3603 in the transitions {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0) and {sup 13}CO(J = 2-1, J = 1-0). We suggest that two molecular clouds at 13 km s{sup –1} and 28 km s{sup –1} are associated with NGC 3603 as evidenced by higher temperatures toward the H II region, as well as morphological correspondence. The mass of the clouds is too small to gravitationally bind them, given their relative motion of ?20 km s{sup –1}. We suggest that the two clouds collided with each other 1 Myr ago to trigger the formation of the super star cluster. This scenario is able to explain the origin of the highest mass stellar population in the cluster, which is as young as 1 Myr and is segregated within the central sub-pc of the cluster. This is the second super star cluster along with Westerlund 2 where formation may have been triggered by a cloud-cloud collision.

  12. Vector Theory of Gravity with Substratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1988-04-01

    A vector theory of gravity with substratum is proposed, which reproduces all the empirically verified linear and nonlinear predictions of Einstein's gravitational field equations, but unlike Einstein's theory, it does not lead to the unphysical singularities and causality-violating solutions permitting travel back in time. In the proposed alternative theory, a substratum or ether is the cause of all relativistic effects, and for this reason is assumed to obey a nonrelativistic equation of motion, an assumption which allows the substratum to consist of densely packed positive and negative Planck mass particles. A substratum of this kind can produce the vacuum fluctuations, needed to be in agreement with the empirical evidence, but avoids the paradox of infinite gravitationl forces, predicted by a divergent zero point energy, the only one possible under the strict adherence to the kinematic interpretation of special relativity.

  13. The Personal Motion Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Brian Vandellyn

    1993-01-01

    The Neutral Body Posture experienced in microgravity creates a biomechanical equilibrium by enabling the internal forces within the body to find their own balance. A patented reclining chair based on this posture provides a minimal stress environment for interfacing with computer systems for extended periods. When the chair is mounted on a 3 or 6 axis motion platform, a generic motion simulator for simulated digital environments is created. The Personal Motion Platform provides motional feedback to the occupant in synchronization with their movements inside the digital world which enhances the simulation experience. Existing HMD based simulation systems can be integrated to the turnkey system. Future developments are discussed.

  14. Cloud computing basics for librarians.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    "Cloud computing" is the name for the recent trend of moving software and computing resources to an online, shared-service model. This article briefly defines cloud computing, discusses different models, explores the advantages and disadvantages, and describes some of the ways cloud computing can be used in libraries. Examples of cloud services are included at the end of the article. PMID:22289098

  15. Dynamics of Clouds Spring 2015

    E-print Network

    van den Heever, Susan C.

    : This class focuses on the general dynamics of cloud systems. Conceptual models of fog, stratocumuli, cumuli of clouds · Cloud time scales, vertical velocities, and liquid water contents 1 3 Fogs and Stratocumulus Clouds · Types of fog and formation mechanisms · Radiation fog and physics and dynamics · Valley fog

  16. Cloud Seeding By: Julie Walter

    E-print Network

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Cloud Seeding By: Julie Walter Air Chem and Pollution #12;History · In Kurt Vonnegut's 1963 novel nuclei catalyst. #12;Cloud Seeding is... · a process that uses a product such as Silver Iodide or dry ice the freezing process of the ice nuclei in clouds. static seeding- involves cumulus clouds traveling west

  17. Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar

    E-print Network

    Plant, Robert

    Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar 19th May 2009 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations Why Conclusions Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.1/3 #12;Why bother? Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.2/3 #12;Some

  18. Attribution Analysis of Cloud Feedback 

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Chen

    2014-07-15

    the magnitude of long-term cloud feedback predicted by models. Observations suggest that there are more low clouds in the planetary boundary layer in response to inter-annual surface warming, contributing a strong negative cloud feedback. The overall cloud...

  19. Vertical Air Motion Estimates from W-band Radar Doppler Spectra Observed during DYNAMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. R.; Gibson, J. S.; Fairall, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    During the DYNAMO field campaign, a vertically pointing NOAA W-band (94 GHz) radar was mounted on the R/V Revelle to sample a wide range of clouds from shallow warm clouds to high cirrus clouds. The Doppler velocity spectra often contained multiple peak structures. In warm clouds, multiple peaks were due to cloud droplets and drizzle droplets in the same radar pulse volume. And in rainfall beneath well-defined reflectivity dim-bands near the melting layer, the multiple peaks were due to Mie scattering signatures from raindrops larger than 1.6 mm. This presentation will describe a method of identifying multiple peaks in Doppler spectra and then determining if the multiple peaks were due to cloud and drizzle droplets or due to large raindrops exciting a Mie scattering signature. In both cases, the multiple peak structure provides a signature to estimate vertical air motion. For spectra containing cloud droplets, the symmetric peak is a tracer used to estimate the air motion. For spectra with asymmetric shapes and large downward Doppler velocities, the Mie scattering notch is used to estimate the air motion. Examples of the retrieval procedure will be provided at the conference.

  20. An adaptive vector quantization scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, K.-M.

    1990-01-01

    Vector quantization is known to be an effective compression scheme to achieve a low bit rate so as to minimize communication channel bandwidth and also to reduce digital memory storage while maintaining the necessary fidelity of the data. However, the large number of computations required in vector quantizers has been a handicap in using vector quantization for low-rate source coding. An adaptive vector quantization algorithm is introduced that is inherently suitable for simple hardware implementation because it has a simple architecture. It allows fast encoding and decoding because it requires only addition and subtraction operations.

  1. VLSI Processor For Vector Quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1995-01-01

    Pixel intensities in each kernel compared simultaneously with all code vectors. Prototype high-performance, low-power, very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit designed to perform compression of image data by vector-quantization method. Contains relatively simple analog computational cells operating on direct or buffered outputs of photodetectors grouped into blocks in imaging array, yielding vector-quantization code word for each such block in sequence. Scheme exploits parallel-processing nature of vector-quantization architecture, with consequent increase in speed.

  2. Localization and vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brecht, James H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper establishes the following localization property for vector spherical harmonics: a wide class of non-local, vector-valued operators reduce to local, multiplication-type operations when applied to a vector spherical harmonic. As localization occurs in a very precise, quantifiable and explicitly computable fashion, the localization property provides a set of useful formulae for analyzing vector-valued fractional diffusion and non-local differential equations defined on S d - 1. As such analyses require a detailed understanding of operators for which localization occurs, we provide several applications of the result in the context of non-local differential equations.

  3. Magnetic nanoparticle motion in external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usov, N. A.; Liubimov, B. Ya

    2015-07-01

    A set of equations describing the motion of a free magnetic nanoparticle in an external magnetic field in a vacuum, or in a medium with negligibly small friction forces is postulated. The conservation of the total particle momentum, i.e. the sum of the mechanical and the total spin momentum of the nanoparticle is taken into account explicitly. It is shown that for the motion of a nanoparticle in uniform magnetic field there are three different modes of precession of the unit magnetization vector and the director that is parallel the particle easy anisotropy axis. These modes differ significantly in the precession frequency. For the high-frequency mode the director points approximately along the external magnetic field, whereas the frequency and the characteristic relaxation time of the precession of the unit magnetization vector are close to the corresponding values for conventional ferromagnetic resonance. On the other hand, for the low-frequency modes the unit magnetization vector and the director are nearly parallel and rotate in unison around the external magnetic field. The characteristic relaxation time for the low-frequency modes is remarkably long. This means that in a rare assembly of magnetic nanoparticles there is a possibility of additional resonant absorption of the energy of alternating magnetic field at a frequency that is much smaller compared to conventional ferromagnetic resonance frequency. The scattering of a beam of magnetic nanoparticles in a vacuum in a non-uniform external magnetic field is also considered taking into account the precession of the unit magnetization vector and director.

  4. Cloud Structure Anomalies Over the Tropical Pacific During the 1997/98 El Nino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, Robert D.; Zhang, Minghua; Wang, Pi-Huan; Wielicki, Bruce A.

    2001-01-01

    Satellite measurements of both cloud vertical structure and cloud-radiative forcing have been used to show that during the strong 1997/98 El Nino there was a substantial change in cloud vertical structure over the tropical Pacific Ocean. Relative to normal years, cloud altitudes were lower in the western portion of the Pacific and higher in the eastern portion. The reason for these redistributions was a collapse of the Walker circulation and enhanced large-scale upward motion over the eastern Pacific, both caused by the lack of a zonal sea surface temperature gradient during El Nino. It is proposed that these cloud structure changes, which significantly impact satellite measurements of the tropical Pacific's radiation budget, would serve as one useful means of testing cloud-climate interactions in climate models.

  5. The equations of relative motion in the orbital reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casotto, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    The analysis of relative motion of two spacecraft in Earth-bound orbits is usually carried out on the basis of simplifying assumptions. In particular, the reference spacecraft is assumed to follow a circular orbit, in which case the equations of relative motion are governed by the well-known Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations. Circular motion is not, however, a solution when the Earth's flattening is accounted for, except for equatorial orbits, where in any case the acceleration term is not Newtonian. Several attempts have been made to account for the J_2 effects, either by ingeniously taking advantage of their differential effects, or by cleverly introducing ad-hoc terms in the equations of motion on the basis of geometrical analysis of the J_2 perturbing effects. Analysis of relative motion about an unperturbed elliptical orbit is the next step in complexity. Relative motion about a J_2 -perturbed elliptic reference trajectory is clearly a challenging problem, which has received little attention. All these problems are based on either the Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations for circular reference motion, or the de Vries/Tschauner-Hempel equations for elliptical reference motion, which are both approximate versions of the exact equations of relative motion. The main difference between the exact and approximate forms of these equations consists in the expression for the angular velocity and the angular acceleration of the rotating reference frame with respect to an inertial reference frame. The rotating reference frame is invariably taken as the local orbital frame, i.e., the RTN frame generated by the radial, the transverse, and the normal directions along the primary spacecraft orbit. Some authors have tried to account for the non-constant nature of the angular velocity vector, but have limited their correction to a mean motion value consistent with the J_2 perturbation terms. However, the angular velocity vector is also affected in direction, which causes precession of the node and the argument of perigee, i.e., of the entire orbital plane. Here we provide a derivation of the exact equations of relative motion by expressing the angular velocity of the RTN frame in terms of the state vector of the reference spacecraft. As such, these equations are completely general, in the sense that the orbit of the reference spacecraft need only be known through its ephemeris, and therefore subject to any force field whatever. It is also shown that these equations reduce to either the Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire, or the Tschauner-Hempel equations, depending on the level of approximation. The explicit form of the equations of relative motion with respect to a J_2 -perturbed reference orbit is also introduced.

  6. Ulysses observations of electron and proton components in a magnetic cloud and related wave activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to a smooth rotation of the magnetic field vector, magnetic clouds have a low proton temperature T(sub p). Their expansion in the solar wind leads to depletion and therefore the ion component cools down. It has been shown recently that the electron component in magnetic clouds behaves differently: when the cloud expands, electron temperature Te anti correlates with density and therefore Te increases in the cloud, creating favorable conditions for the rise of ion-acoustic waves. For the magnetic cloud observed by Ulysses on June 10 - 12, 1993 at 4.64 AU at S 32.5 deg, we present observations for both electron and proton components and related plasma wave activity. Our results confirm the anti correlation between T(sub e) and electron density and also exhibit a high ratio of T(sub e)/T(sub P) in the cloud. Since Landau damping is not effective for T(sub e)/T(sub p) much greater than 1, Doppler shifted ion acoustic waves are expected in the cloud. Calculation of ion acoustic wave frequencies in the cloud and comparison with observed wave activity confirm this expectation. As in our previous work, we show that the electron component in the cloud obeys a polytropic law with gamma is less than 1 (gamma approximately equals 0.3-0.4). The dynamics of the magnetic cloud are determined to a large degree by the dominating electron pressure.

  7. A Cloud Mask for AIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brubaker, N.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    With the preliminary release of AIRS Level 1 and 2 data to the scientific community, there is a growing need for an accurate AIRS cloud mask for data assimilation studies and in producing products derived from cloud free radiances. Current cloud information provided with the AIRS data are limited or based on simplified threshold tests. A multispectral cloud detection approach has been developed for AIRS that utilizes the hyper-spectral capabilities to detect clouds based on specific cloud signatures across the short wave and long wave infrared window regions. This new AIRS cloud mask has been validated against the existing AIRS Level 2 cloud product and cloud information derived from MODIS. Preliminary results for both day and night applications over the continental U.S. are encouraging. Details of the cloud detection approach and validation results will be presented at the conference.

  8. Cliffordtori and unbiased vectors

    E-print Network

    Ole Andersson; Ingemar Bengtsson

    2015-06-30

    The existence problem for mutually unbiased bases is an unsolved problem in quantum information theory. A related question is whether every pair of bases admits vectors that are unbiased to both. Mathematically this translates to the question whether two Lagrangian Clifford tori intersect, and a body of results exists concerning it. These (deep!) results are however rather weak when viewed from the point of view of the first problem. We make a detailed study of how the intersections behave in the simplest non-trivial case, that of complex projective 2-space (the qutrit), for which the set of Clifford tori can be usefully parametrized by the unistochastic subset of Birkhoff's polytope. An interesting picture emerges. A foray into higher dimensions is included.

  9. Chameleon Vector Bosons

    E-print Network

    A. E. Nelson; J. Walsh

    2008-02-06

    We show that for a force mediated by a vector particle coupled to a conserved U(1) charge, the apparent range and strength can depend on the size and density of the source, and the proximity to other sources. This "chameleon" effect is due to screening from a light charged scalar. Such screening can weaken astrophysical constraints on new gauge bosons. As an example we consider the constraints on chameleonic gauged B-L. We show that although Casimir measurements greatly constrain any B-L force much stronger than gravity with range longer than 0.1 microns, there remains an experimental window for a long range chameleonic B-L force. Such a force could be much stronger than gravity, and long or infinite range in vacuum, but have an effective range near the surface of the earth which is less than a micron.

  10. Chameleon vector bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ann E.

    2008-05-01

    We show that for a force mediated by a vector particle coupled to a conserved U(1) charge, the apparent range and strength can depend on the size and density of the source, and the proximity to other sources. This chameleon effect is due to screening from a light charged scalar. Such screening can weaken astrophysical constraints on new gauge bosons. As an example we consider the constraints on chameleonic gauged B-L. We show that although Casimir measurements greatly constrain any B-L force much stronger than gravity with range longer than 0.1 {mu}m, there remains an experimental window for a long-range chameleonic B-L force. Such a force could be much stronger than gravity, and long or infinite range in vacuum, but have an effective range near the surface of the earth which is less than a micron.

  11. Multistage vector (MSV) therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Joy; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-12-10

    One of the greatest challenges in the field of medicine is obtaining controlled distribution of systemically administered therapeutic agents within the body. Indeed, biological barriers such as physical compartmentalization, pressure gradients, and excretion pathways adversely affect localized delivery of drugs to pathological tissue. The diverse nature of these barriers requires the use of multifunctional drug delivery vehicles that can overcome a wide range of sequential obstacles. In this review, we explore the role of multifunctionality in nanomedicine by primarily focusing on multistage vectors (MSVs). The MSV is an example of a promising therapeutic platform that incorporates several components, including a microparticle, nanoparticles, and small molecules. In particular, these components are activated in a sequential manner in order to successively address transport barriers. PMID:26264836

  12. Solar imaging vector magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an instrument which has been constructed at the University of Hawaii to make observations of the magnetic field in solar active regions. Detailed knowledge of active region magnetic structures is crucial to understanding many solar phenomena, because the magnetic field both defines the morphology of structures seen in the solar atmosphere and is the apparent energy source for solar flares. The new vector magnetograph was conceived in response to a perceived discrepancy between the capabilities of X ray imaging telescopes to be operating during the current solar maximum and those of existing magnetographs. There were no space-based magnetographs planned for this period; the existing ground-based instruments variously suffered from lack of sensitivity, poor time resolution, inadequate spatial resolution or unreliable sites. Yet the studies of flares and their relationship to the solar corona planned for the 1991-1994 maximum absolutely required high quality vector magnetic field measurements. By 'vector' measurements we mean that the observation attempts to deduce the complete strength and direction of the field at the measurement site, rather than just the line of sight component as obtained by a traditional longitudinal magnetograph. Knowledge of the vector field permits one to calculate photospheric electric currents, which might play a part in heating the corona, and to calculate energy stored in coronal magnetic fields as the result of such currents. Information about the strength and direction of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere can be obtained in a number of ways, but quantitative data is best obtained by observing Zeeman-effect polarization in solar spectral lines. The technique requires measuring the complete state of polarization at one or more wavelengths within a magnetically sensitive line of the solar spectrum. This measurement must be done for each independent spatial point for which one wants magnetic field data. All the measurements need to be done in a time short compared to the time scale for changes of the solar features being observed. Were it possible, one would want to record all the needed data simultaneously, since temporal variation of atmospheric seeing degrades both the image and the polarization sensitivity. Since the measurements must span four dimensions, two spatial plus polarization and wavelength, we had some freedom to design the instrument to favor some dimensions over others in terms of simultaneity. Our earlier instrument, the Haleakala Stokes Polarimeter, records a range of wavelengths spanning two spectral lines in each reading, but requires two seconds to determine the polarization state and obtains spatial information only by assembling a long sequence of measurements at single locations on the sun. The new instrument sacrifices spectral detail and accuracy in favor of greatly improved imaging characteristics. The scientific goals for this instrument were to measure surface magnetic fields with enough accuracy to permit calculations of photospheric currents, but with a field of view covering an entire typical active region, high spatial resolution, and a fast enough temporal cadence for detecting flare-associated changes in magnetic structures.

  13. Full-motion video analysis for improved gender classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flora, Jeffrey B.; Lochtefeld, Darrell F.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2014-06-01

    The ability of computer systems to perform gender classification using the dynamic motion of the human subject has important applications in medicine, human factors, and human-computer interface systems. Previous works in motion analysis have used data from sensors (including gyroscopes, accelerometers, and force plates), radar signatures, and video. However, full-motion video, motion capture, range data provides a higher resolution time and spatial dataset for the analysis of dynamic motion. Works using motion capture data have been limited by small datasets in a controlled environment. In this paper, we explore machine learning techniques to a new dataset that has a larger number of subjects. Additionally, these subjects move unrestricted through a capture volume, representing a more realistic, less controlled environment. We conclude that existing linear classification methods are insufficient for the gender classification for larger dataset captured in relatively uncontrolled environment. A method based on a nonlinear support vector machine classifier is proposed to obtain gender classification for the larger dataset. In experimental testing with a dataset consisting of 98 trials (49 subjects, 2 trials per subject), classification rates using leave-one-out cross-validation are improved from 73% using linear discriminant analysis to 88% using the nonlinear support vector machine classifier.

  14. Pictures and equations of motion in Lagrangian quantum field theory

    E-print Network

    Bozhidar Z. Iliev

    2003-02-01

    The Heisenberg, interaction, and Schr\\"odinger pictures of motion are considered in Lagrangian (canonical) quantum field theory. The equations of motion (for state vectors and field operators) are derived for arbitrary Lagrangians which are polynomial or convergent power series in field operators and their first derivatives. The general links between different time-dependent pictures of motion are derived. It is pointed that all of them admit covariant formulation, similar to the one of interaction picture. A new picture, called the momentum picture, is proposed. It is a 4-dimensional analogue of the Schr\\"odinger picture of quantum mechanics as in it the state vectors are spacetime-dependent, while the field operators are constant relative to the spacetime. The equations of motion in momentum picture are derived and partially discussed. In particular, the ones for the field operators turn to be of algebraic type. The general idea of covariant pictures of motion is presented. The equations of motion in these pictures are derived.

  15. The role of induced entrainment in past stratiform cloud seeding experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walcek, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    In the late 1940s, probably the most effective and visually-obvious cloud seeding demonstrations showed that supercooled stratiform clouds could be cleared by seeding with dry ice, dropped from aircraft flying above a cloud deck. Numerous well-documents photos show areas 1-2 miles wide cleared along a flight track. The accepted mechanism of cloud clearing assumed that dry ice induced ice formation in the supercooled liquid cloud, followed by growth of ice at the expense of water, with the larger ice particles ultimately falling as snow. The mechanism was amplified by dynamic feedbacks induced by latent heat release (warming) as liquid water froze, thus propagating the dynamic and freezing/precipitation cycle laterally away from the flight track. Here we show that probably a more important effect is the entrainment and EVAPORATION of cloud water induced by turbulent mixing in the aircraft wake. Under many conditions, evaporation induced by turbulence can generate mixtures of air that are COLDER than the cloudy air or the air above the cloud, thus initiating unstable DOWNWARD (negatively-buoyant) motions, which will self-propagate laterally away from a turbulent flight track. We present here the range of environmental conditions where entrainment/evaporation would be most likely to occur in terms of the temperature difference between cloudy air and air just above cloud top, and the relative humidity of air above cloud top at different temperatures and altitudes in the atmosphere. It is suggested here that past cloud seeding experiments had little to do with glaciation, and more likely resulted from induced entrainment followed by evaporation and downward motions of negatively buoyant air resulting from cloud-top entrainment instability. Buoyancy and condensed water content of mixtures of cloudy air and cloud-free air immediately above cloud top vs. the mixing proportions. A supercooled cloud containing 0.1 g/kg liquid water at 600 mb, -20 degrees C is mixed with air above cloud top that is 0.1 C warmer and drier (70% Rh). For these conditions, over 75% of mixtures that might be created by aircraft-induced turbulence are negatively buoyant, inducing unstable downward motions initiated by evaporative cooling. Maximum cooling occurs at the mixing fraction that precisely evaporates all the initial water content of the cloud.

  16. Execution of vector operations for Intel 860

    SciTech Connect

    Khaletskii, D.A.

    1995-03-01

    When designing a portable setup compiler from the C[] language, the compiler setup problem is solved for various SIMD computers. A vector and vector operations are defined in C[]. A map of vector operations is trivial for computers with vector registers. Some problems appear when mapping them to computers without vector registers. It is shown how to effectively perform vector operations for the 1860 microcomputer as an example of one without vector registers.

  17. Toward the correspondence between Q-clouds and sphalerons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugaev, E.; Shkerin, A.

    2015-07-01

    Non-linear classical equations of motion may admit degenerate solutions at fixed charges. Whereas the solutions with lower energies are classically stable, those with larger energies are unstable and are referred to as Q-clouds. We consider a theory in which a homogeneous charged condensate is classically stable and argue that Q-clouds correspond to sphalerons between the stable Q-balls and the condensate. For a model with an analytical solution, we present the Arrhenius formula for the quantum production of Q-balls from a condensate at high temperatures.

  18. Ignition temperature of magnesium powder clouds: a theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Chunmiao, Yuan; Chang, Li; Gang, Li; Peihong, Zhang

    2012-11-15

    Minimum ignition temperature of dust clouds (MIT-DC) is an important consideration when adopting explosion prevention measures. This paper presents a model for determining minimum ignition temperature for a magnesium powder cloud under conditions simulating a Godbert-Greenwald (GG) furnace. The model is based on heterogeneous oxidation of metal particles and Newton's law of motion, while correlating particle size, dust concentration, and dust dispersion pressure with MIT-DC. The model predicted values in close agreement with experimental data and is especially useful in predicting temperature and velocity change as particles pass through the furnace tube. PMID:23022411

  19. Images from Galileo of the Venus cloud deck

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belton, M.J.S.; Gierasch, P.J.; Smith, M.D.; Helfenstein, P.; Schinder, P.J.; Pollack, James B.; Rages, K.A.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Klaasen, K.P.; Veverka, J.; Anger, C.D.; Carr, M.H.; Chapman, C.R.; Davies, M.E.; Fanale, F.P.; Greeley, R.; Greenberg, R.; Head, J. W., III; Morrison, D.; Neukum, G.; Pilcher, C.B.

    1991-01-01

    Images of Venus taken at 418 (violet) and 986 [near-infrared (NIR)] nanometers show that the morphology and motions of large-scale features change with depth in the cloud deck. Poleward meridional velocities, seen in both spectral regions, are much reduced in the NIR. In the south polar region the markings in the two wavelength bands are strongly anticorrelated. The images follow the changing state of the upper cloud layer downwind of the subsolar point, and the zonal flow field shows a longitudinal periodicity that may be coupled to the formation of large-scale planetary waves. No optical lightning was detected.

  20. Images from Galileo of the Venus cloud deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Smith, Michael D.; Helfenstein, Paul; Schinder, Paul J.; Pollack, James B.; Rages, Kathy A.; Morrison, David; Klaasen, Kenneth P.; Pilcher, Carl B.

    1991-01-01

    Images of Venus taken at 418 and 986 nm show that the morphology and motions of large-scale features change with depth in the cloud deck. Poleward meridional velocities, seen in both spectral regions, are much reduced in the NIR. In the south polar region the markings in the two wavelength bands are strongly anticorrelated. The images follow the changing state of the upper cloud layer downwind of the subsolar point, and the zonal flowfield shows a longitudinal periodicity that may be coupled to the formation of large-scale planetary waves. No optical lightning was detected.

  1. Particle Cloud Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlad, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Preparation of flight experiment designs is supported by experimental studies of acoustically induced mixing process, optical transmissivities of particle cloud distributions, wall saturation effects and their control through the use of electrically neutral flame tube materials and surfaces, and the pyrolysis-vaporization kinetics of selected organic particulates. Drop tower tests of stabilized particle cloud flames have allowed valuable comparison of g = 0 and g = 1 (upwards and downwards) stabilized flame propagation. These stabilized flame data will be valuable assists in dealing with the freely propagating particle cloud flame data anticipated through Space Shuttle experimentation. Supporting theoretical studies emphasize comprehensive flame propagation and extinction relations among premixed single phase (gaseous) flames and premixed particle cloud flames, for both stabilized and freely propagating flames.

  2. Cloud Computing For Microfinances

    E-print Network

    V, Suma; M, Vaidehi; Nair, T R Gopalakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Evolution of Science and Engineering has led to the growth of several commercial applications. The wide spread implementation of commercial based applications has in turn directed the emergence of advanced technologies such as cloud computing. India has well proven itself as a potential hub for advanced technologies including cloud based industrial market. Microfinance system has emerged out as a panacea to Indian economy since the population encompasses of people who come under poverty and below poverty index. However, one of the key challenges in successful operation of microfinance system in India has given rise to integration of financial services using sophisticated cloud computing model. This paper, therefore propose a fundamental cloud-based microfinance model in order to reduce high transaction risks involved during microfinance operations in an inexpensive and efficient manner.

  3. Forces and Motion: Newton's Newton's laws of motion

    E-print Network

    Glashausser, Charles

    CHAPTER 4 Forces and Motion: Newton's Framework Newton's laws of motion When forces add up to zero developed the framework that we still use today. 4.1 Newton's laws of motion When the forces add up to zero's third law One more motion that is everywhere: rotation Uniform circular motion Angular momentum

  4. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  5. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  6. Imitating Human Dance Motions through Motion Structure Analysis

    E-print Network

    Ikeuchi, Katsushi

    Imitating Human Dance Motions through Motion Structure Analysis Atsushi Nakazawa Shinichiro Nakaoka and Technology Abstract This paper presents the method for importing human dance motion into humanoid robots these segments as 'motion primitives'. New dance mo- tions are generated by concatenating these motion primi

  7. Light Vector Mesons in the Nuclear Medium

    E-print Network

    M. H. Wood; R. Nasseripour; D. P. Weygand; C. Djalali; C. Tur; U. Mosel; P. Muehlich; CLAS Collaboration

    2008-03-04

    The light vector mesons ($\\rho$, $\\omega$, and $\\phi$) were produced in deuterium, carbon, titanium, and iron targets in a search for possible in-medium modifications to the properties of the $\\rho$ meson at normal nuclear densities and zero temperature. The vector mesons were detected with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) via their decays to $e^{+}e^{-}$. The rare leptonic decay was chosen to reduce final-state interactions. A combinatorial background was subtracted from the invariant mass spectra using a well-established event-mixing technique. The $\\rho$ meson mass spectrum was extracted after the $\\omega$ and $\\phi$ signals were removed in a nearly model-independent way. Comparisons were made between the $\\rho$ mass spectra from the heavy targets ($A > 2$) with the mass spectrum extracted from the deuterium target. With respect to the $\\rho$-meson mass, we obtain a small shift compatible with zero. Also, we measure widths consistent with standard nuclear many-body effects such as collisional broadening and Fermi motion.

  8. DAVID: A new video motion sensor for outdoor perimeter applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    To be effective, a perimeter intrusion detection system must comprise both sensor and rapid assessment components. The use of closed circuit television (CCTV) to provide the rapid assessment capability, makes possible the use of video motion detection (VMD) processing as a system sensor component. Despite it's conceptual appeal, video motion detection has not been widely used in outdoor perimeter systems because of an inability to discriminate between genuine intrusions and numerous environmental effects such as cloud shadows, wind motion, reflections, precipitation, etc. The result has been an unacceptably high false alarm rate and operator work-load. DAVID (Digital Automatic Video Intrusion Detector) utilizes new digital signal processing techniques to achieve a dramatic improvement in discrimination performance thereby making video motion detection practical for outdoor applications. This paper begins with a discussion of the key considerations in implementing an outdoor video intrusion detection system, followed by a description of the DAVID design in light of these considerations.

  9. Morphable Word Clouds for Time-Varying Text Data Visualization.

    PubMed

    Chi, Ming-Te; Lin, Shih-Syun; Chen, Shiang-Yi; Lin, Chao-Hung; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2015-12-01

    A word cloud is a visual representation of a collection of text documents that uses various font sizes, colors, and spaces to arrange and depict significant words. The majority of previous studies on time-varying word clouds focuses on layout optimization and temporal trend visualization. However, they do not fully consider the spatial shapes and temporal motions of word clouds, which are important factors for attracting people's attention and are also important cues for human visual systems in capturing information from time-varying text data. This paper presents a novel method that uses rigid body dynamics to arrange multi-temporal word-tags in a specific shape sequence under various constraints. Each word-tag is regarded as a rigid body in dynamics. With the aid of geometric, aesthetic, and temporal coherence constraints, the proposed method can generate a temporally morphable word cloud that not only arranges word-tags in their corresponding shapes but also smoothly transforms the shapes of word clouds over time, thus yielding a pleasing time-varying visualization. Using the proposed frame-by-frame and morphable word clouds, people can observe the overall story of a time-varying text data from the shape transition, and people can also observe the details from the word clouds in frames. Experimental results on various data demonstrate the feasibility and flexibility of the proposed method in morphable word cloud generation. In addition, an application that uses the proposed word clouds in a simulated exhibition demonstrates the usefulness of the proposed method. PMID:26529462

  10. Mesoscale Convective System Anvil Cloud Response to Aerosol Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleeby, S. M.; van den Heever, S. C.; Marinescu, P. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; DeMott, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mid-latitude mesoscale convective systems (MCS) are large convective engines that redistribute heat and moisture throughout the atmosphere. Upper level divergence and detrainment above the level of maximum vertical motion and below the vicinity of the tropopause leads to the formation of horizontally and vertically expansive anvil clouds. These are composed largely of weakly precipitating ice species and potentially supercooled liquid water that may homogeneously freeze at higher anvil altitudes. Because of the tremendous horizontal expanse of anvil cloud decks they can impact the radiation budget by reflecting incoming shortwave and outgoing longwave radiation, and potential changes to anvil extent or characteristics are thus important factors in climate change scenarios. Increasing the number concentration of cloud droplet nucleating aerosols within various cloud systems has been shown to alter cloud droplet size distributions which leads to changes in warm rain formation, vertical distributions of cloud water, latent heating profiles, riming rates, and precipitation rates. If additional cloud water is generated and lofted higher within MCSs under scenarios of high aerosol concentration, then there is the potential for modification of anvil cloud microphysical and radiative properties and anvil dynamics. Results will be presented from cloud resolving numerical simulations of an MCS that occurred May 23 during the MC3E field project based in Oklahoma in 2011. Aerosol effects on MCS anvil characteristics will be contrasted within the range of observed clean and polluted aerosol conditions. The focus will be to address the range of response in anvil ice distributions, ice microphysical processes, anvil areal coverage, and local changes in short and longwave radiation to variations in aerosol number concentration.

  11. Cloud Inhomogeneity from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Two full months (July 2003 and January 2004) of MODIS Atmosphere Level-3 data from the Terra and Aqua satellites are analyzed in order to characterize the horizontal variability of cloud optical thickness and water path at global scales. Various options to derive cloud variability parameters are discussed. The climatology of cloud inhomogeneity is built by first calculating daily parameter values at spatial scales of l degree x 1 degree, and then at zonal and global scales, followed by averaging over monthly time scales. Geographical, diurnal, and seasonal changes of inhomogeneity parameters are examined separately for the two cloud phases, and separately over land and ocean. We find that cloud inhomogeneity is weaker in summer than in winter, weaker over land than ocean for liquid clouds, weaker for local morning than local afternoon, about the same for liquid and ice clouds on a global scale, but with wider probability distribution functions (PDFs) and larger latitudinal variations for ice, and relatively insensitive to whether water path or optical thickness products are used. Typical mean values at hemispheric and global scales of the inhomogeneity parameter nu (roughly the mean over the standard deviation of water path or optical thickness), range from approximately 2.5 to 3, while for the inhomogeneity parameter chi (the ratio of the logarithmic to linear mean) from approximately 0.7 to 0.8. Values of chi for zonal averages can occasionally fall below 0.6 and for individual gridpoints below 0.5. Our results demonstrate that MODIS is capable of revealing significant fluctuations in cloud horizontal inhomogenity and stress the need to model their global radiative effect in future studies.

  12. Marine cloud brightening.

    PubMed

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, Hugh; Connolly, Paul; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Phillip; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Rob

    2012-09-13

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could-subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein-have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seed-particle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud-albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100×100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action. PMID:22869798

  13. Marine Cloud Brightening

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, H.; Connolly, P.; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Philip J.; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Robert

    2012-09-07

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could - subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein - have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seedparticle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud-albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action.

  14. Mesospheric cloud formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Formation of mesospheric clouds as a result of deposition of large amounts of H2O by the heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) of the solar power satellite system is discussed. The conditions which must be met in order to form and maintain clouds near the mesopause are described. The frequency and magnitude of H2O injections from the HLLV rocket exhaust are considered.

  15. Marine cloud brightening

    PubMed Central

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, Hugh; Connolly, Paul; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Phillip; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could—subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein—have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seed-particle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud–albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100×100?km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action. PMID:22869798

  16. Aristotle, Motion, and Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jane

    Aristotle rejects a world vision of changing reality as neither useful nor beneficial to human life, and instead he reaffirms both change and eternal reality, fuses motion and rest, and ends up with "well-behaved" changes. This concept of motion is foundational to his world view, and from it emerges his theory of knowledge, philosophy of nature,…

  17. Object motion analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of optical data processing (ODP) techniques for motion analysis in two-dimensional imagery was studied. The basic feasibility of this approach was demonstrated, but inconsistent performance of the photoplastic used for recording spatial filters prevented totally automatic operation. Promising solutions to the problems encountered are discussed, and it is concluded that ODP techniques could be quite useful for motion analysis.

  18. Measuring mandibular motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Rositano, S.; Taylor, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Mandibular motion along three axes is measured by three motion transducers on floating yoke that rests against mandible. System includes electronics to provide variety of outputs for data display and processing. Head frame is strapped to test subject's skull to provide fixed point of reference for transducers.

  19. Making Sense of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    When watching a small child with a toy car, it is seen that interest in motion comes early. Children often suggest speed through sounds such as "RRRrrrRRRooooommMMMmmmm" as the toy car is made to speed up, slow down, or accelerate through a turn. Older children start to consider force and motion studies in more detail, and experiences in school…

  20. Motion Texture Harriet Pashley

    E-print Network

    capture data is often used in movies and video games because it is able to realistically depict human motion. One of its greatest limitations is the inflexibility for reuse in different projects. To get of it or be able to modify it slightly to suit our needs. Motion capture databases such as Carnegie Mellon's [http://graphics

  1. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    Objects in motion attract children. The following activity helps children explore the motion of bodies riding in a vehicle and safely demonstrates the answer to their questions, "Why do I need a seatbelt?" Children will enjoy moving the cup around, even if all they "see" is a cup rather than understanding it represents a car. They will understand…

  2. Naive Theories of Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Michael

    Everyday life provides individuals with countless opportunities for observing and interacting with objects in motion. Although everyone presumably has some sort of knowledge about motion, it is by no means clear what form(s) this knowledge may take. The research described in this paper determined what sorts of knowledge are in fact acquired…

  3. Motion through Syntactic Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feist, Michele I.

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of (Talmy, 1985), (Talmy, 1985) and (Talmy, 2000) typology sparked significant interest in linguistic relativity in the arena of motion language. Through careful analysis of the conflation patterns evident in the language of motion events, Talmy noted that one class of languages, V-languages, tends to encode path along with the…

  4. 70 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS FOR VIDEO TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 9, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1999 Long-Term Memory Motion-Compensated Prediction

    E-print Network

    Girod, Bernd

    Long-Term Memory Motion-Compensated Prediction Thomas Wiegand, Xiaozheng Zhang, and Bernd Girod, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--Long-term memory motion-compensated prediction extends the spatial displacement vector the previously decoded one for motion- compensated prediction. The long-term memory covers several seconds

  5. FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, J. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; King, M. D.; Randall, D. A.; Minnis, P.; Issac, G. A.; Pinto, J. O.; Uttal, T.; Bucholtz, A.; Cripe, D. G.; Gerber, H.; Fairall, C. W.; Garrett, T. J.; Hudson, J.; Intrieri, J. M.; Jakob, C.; Jensen, T.; Lawson, P.; Marcotte, D.; Nguyen, L.

    1998-01-01

    An overview is given of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Arctic Clouds Experiment that was conducted in the Arctic during April through July, 1998. The principal goal of the field experiment was to gather the data needed to examine the impact of arctic clouds on the radiation exchange between the surface, atmosphere, and space, and to study how the surface influences the evolution of boundary layer clouds. The observations will be used to evaluate and improve climate model parameterizations of cloud and radiation processes, satellite remote sensing of cloud and surface characteristics, and understanding of cloud-radiation feedbacks in the Arctic. The experiment utilized four research aircraft that flew over surface-based observational sites in the Arctic Ocean and Barrow, Alaska. In this paper we describe the programmatic and science objectives of the project, the experimental design (including research platforms and instrumentation), conditions that were encountered during the field experiment, and some highlights of preliminary observations, modelling, and satellite remote sensing studies.

  6. Impact of Short Interval SMS Digital Data on Wind Vector Determination for a Severe Local Storms Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslen, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    The impact of 5 minute interval SMS-2 visible digital image data in analyzing severe local storms is examined using wind vectors derived from cloud tracking on time lapsed sequence of geosynchronous satellite images. The cloud tracking areas are located in the Central Plains, where on 6 May 1975, hail-producing thunderstorms occurred ahead of a well defined dry line. The results demonstrate that satellite-derived wind vectors and their associated divergence fields complement conventional meteorological analyses in describing the conditions preceding severe local storm development.

  7. Motion of the Scotia sea plates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, C.; Livermore, R.; Pollitz, F.

    2003-01-01

    Earthquake data from the Scotia Arc to early 2002 are reviewed in the light of satellite gravity and other data in order to derive a model for the motion of plates in the Scotia Sea region. Events with magnitude ???5, which occurred on or near the boundaries of the Scotia and Sandwich plates, and for which Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) solutions are available, are examined. The newer data fill some of the previous sampling gaps along the boundaries of the Scotia and Sandwich plates, and provide tighter constraints on relative motions. Variations in the width of the Brunhes anomaly on evenly spaced marine magnetic profiles over the East Scotia Ridge provide new estimates of Scotia-Sandwich plate spreading rates. Since there are no stable fracture zones in the east Scotia Sea, the mean azimuth of sea floor fabric mapped by sidescan is used to constrain the direction of spreading. 18 new rate estimates and four azimuths from the East Scotia Ridge are combined with 68 selected earthquake slip vectors from the boundaries of the Scotia Sea in a least-squares inversion for the best-fitting set of Euler poles and angular rotation rates describing the 'present-day' motions of the Scotia and Sandwich plates relative to South America and Antarctica. Our preferred model (TLP2003) gives poles that are similar to previous estimates, except for Scotia Plate motion with respect to South America, which is significantly different from earlier estimates; predicted rates of motion also differ slightly. Our results are much more robust than earlier work. We examine the implications of the model for motion and deformation along the various plate boundaries, with particular reference to the North and South Scotia Ridges, where rates are obtained by closure.

  8. FORMATION OF MASSIVE MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES BY CLOUD-CLOUD COLLISION

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Fukui, Yasuo

    2013-09-10

    Recent observations of molecular clouds around rich massive star clusters including NGC 3603, Westerlund 2, and M20 revealed that the formation of massive stars could be triggered by a cloud-cloud collision. By using three-dimensional, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamics simulations with the effect of self-gravity, we demonstrate that massive, gravitationally unstable, molecular cloud cores are formed behind the strong shock waves induced by cloud-cloud collision. We find that the massive molecular cloud cores have large effective Jeans mass owing to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength by shock compression and turbulence in the compressed layer. Our results predict that massive molecular cloud cores formed by the cloud-cloud collision are filamentary and threaded by magnetic fields perpendicular to the filament.

  9. Brownian motion goes ballistic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2012-02-01

    It is the randomness that is considered the hallmark of Brownian motion, but already in Einstein's seminal 1905 paper on Brownian motion it is implied that this randomness must break down at short time scales when the inertia of the particle kicks in. As a result, the particle's trajectories should lose its randomness and become smooth. The characteristic time scale for this transition is given by the ratio of the particle's mass to its viscous drag coefficient. For a 1 ?m glass particle in water and at room temperature, this timescale is on the order of 100 ns. Early calculations, however, neglected the inertia of the liquid surrounding the particle which induces a transition from random diffusive to non-diffusive Brownian motion already at much larger timescales. In this first non-diffusive regime, particles of the same size but with different densities still move at almost the same rate as a result of hydrodynamic correlations. To observe Brownian motion that is dominated by the inertia of the particle, i.e. ballistic motion, one has to observe the particle at significantly shorter time scales on the order of nanoseconds. Due to the lack of sufficiently fast and precise detectors, such experiments were so far not possible on individual particles. I will describe how we were able to observe the transition from hydrodynamically dominated Brownian motion to ballistic Brownian motion in a liquid. I will compare our data with current theories for Brownian motion on fast timescales that take into account the inertia of both the liquid and the particle. The newly gained ability to measure the fast Brownian motion of an individual particle paves the way for detailed studies of confined Brownian motion and Brownian motion in heterogeneous media. [4pt] [1] Einstein, A. "Uber die von der molekularkinetischen Theorie der W"arme geforderte Bewegung von in ruhenden Fl"ussigkeiten suspendierten Teilchen. Ann. Phys. 322, 549--560 (1905). [0pt] [2] Lukic, B., S. Jeney, C. Tischer, A. J. Kulik, L. Forro, and E.-L. Florin, 2005, Direct observation of nondiffusive motion of a Brownian particle, Physical Review Letters 95, 160601 (2005). [0pt] [3] Huang, R., Lukic, B., Jeney, S., and E.-L. Florin, Direct observation of ballistic Brownian motion on a single particle, arXiv:1003.1980v1 (2010). [0pt] [4] Huang, R., I. Chavez, K.M. Taute, B. Lukic, S. Jeney, M.G. Raizen, and E.-L. Florin, 2011, Direct observation of the full transition from ballistic to diffusive Brownian motion in a liquid, Nature Physics 7, 576--580 (2011).

  10. Scaffolding vector representations for student learning inside a physics game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Cynthia

    Vectors and vector addition are difficult concepts for many introductory physics students and traditional instruction does not usually sufficiently address these difficulties. Vectors play a major role in most topics in introductory physics and without a complete understanding of them many students are unable to make sense of the physics topics covered in their classes. Video games present a unique opportunity to help students develop an intuitive understanding of motion, forces, and vectors while immersed in an enjoyable and interactive environment. This study examines two dimensions of design decisions to help students learn while playing a physics-based game. The representational complexity dimension looked at two ways of presenting dynamic information about the velocity of the game object on the screen. The scaffolding context dimension looked at two different contexts for presenting vector addition problems that were related to the game. While all students made significant learning games from the pre to the post test, there were virtually no differences between students along the representational complexity dimension and small differences between students along the scaffolding context dimension. A context that directly connects to students' game playing experience was in most cases more productive to learning than an abstract context.

  11. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud fieldmore »and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.« less

  12. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  13. Arctic Cloud-driven Mixed Layers and Surface Coupling State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupe, M.; Persson, O. P.; Solomon, A.; de Boer, G.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic low-level clouds interact with the atmosphere and underlying surface via many inter-related processes. The balance of cloud radiative warming and cooling effects imparts a strong control on the net surface energy budget. Cloud-driven atmospheric circulations can impact surface turbulent heat fluxes and influence the vertical mixing of atmospheric state parameters and aerosols. Large-scale advection of heat and moisture provides the background context within which these local interactions unfold. Importantly, these radiative, dynamical, and advective processes also contribute to a complex web of self-sustaining cloud processes that can promote cloud maintenance over long periods of time. We examine many of these processes, with a specific focus on the dynamical linkages between Arctic clouds and the surface that influence low-level atmospheric structure and mixing. Comprehensive, ground-based observations from meteorological towers, remote-sensors, and radiosondes are used to simultaneously characterize surface fluxes, atmospheric structure, cloud properties, in-cloud motions, and the depth of the cloud-driven mixed layer in multiple Arctic environments. Relationships among these parameters are explored to elucidate the properties of the system that determine the degree of vertical atmospheric mixing and the coupling state between cloud and surface. The influence of temperature and moisture inversions on this system is also explored. Transitions in the coupling state are utilized to illustrate the relative roles of different processes. Cases from a coastal Arctic site at Barrow, Alaska and a station embedded in the Arctic sea-ice pack are used to contrast conditional influences related to season and surface type. It is found that over sea-ice, where surface turbulent fluxes are weak, the coupling of cloud-level processes to the surface layer is largely due to proximity of the cloud-driven mixed layer to the surface, which appears to be primarily influenced by the larger-scale, advective environment. In contrast, surface-forced turbulence can also play a significant role in vertical atmospheric mixing and cloud maintenance in the presence of open ocean or land processes.

  14. Hubble Tracks Clouds on Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Taking its first peek at Uranus, NASA Hubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) has detected six distinct clouds in images taken July 28,1997.

    The image on the right, taken 90 minutes after the left-hand image, shows the planet's rotation. Each image is a composite of three near-infrared images. They are called false-color images because the human eye cannot detect infrared light. Therefore, colors corresponding to visible light were assigned to the images. (The wavelengths for the 'blue,' 'green,' and 'red' exposures are 1.1, 1.6, and 1.9 micrometers, respectively.)

    At visible and near-infrared light, sunlight is reflected from hazes and clouds in the atmosphere of Uranus. However, at near-infrared light, absorption by gases in the Uranian atmosphere limits the view to different altitudes, causing intense contrasts and colors.

    In these images, the blue exposure probes the deepest atmospheric levels. A blue color indicates clear atmospheric conditions, prevalent at mid-latitudes near the center of the disk. The green exposure is sensitive to absorption by methane gas, indicating a clear atmosphere; but in hazy atmospheric regions, the green color is seen because sunlight is reflected back before it is absorbed. The green color around the south pole (marked by '+') shows a strong local haze. The red exposure reveals absorption by hydrogen, the most abundant gas in the atmosphere of Uranus. Most sunlight shows patches of haze high in the atmosphere. A red color near the limb (edge) of the disk indicates the presence of a high-altitude haze. The purple color to the right of the equator also suggests haze high in the atmosphere with a clear atmosphere below.

    The five clouds visible near the right limb rotated counterclockwise during the time between both images. They reach high into the atmosphere, as indicated by their red color. Features of such high contrast have never been seen before on Uranus. The clouds are almost as large as continents on Earth, such as Europe. Another cloud (which barely can be seen) rotated along the path shown by the black arrow. It is located at lower altitudes, as indicated by its green color.

    The rings of Uranus are extremely faint in visible light but quite prominent in the near infrared. The brightest ring, the epsilon ring, has a variable width around its circumference. Its widest and thus brightest part is at the top in this image. Two fainter, inner rings are visible next to the epsilon ring.

    Eight of the 10 small Uranian satellites, discovered by Voyager 2, can be seen in both images. Their sizes range from about 25 miles (40 kilometers) for Bianca to 100 miles (150 kilometers) for Puck. The smallest of these satellites have not been detected since the departure of Voyager 2 from Uranus in 1986. These eight satellites revolve around Uranus in less than a day. The inner ones are faster than the outer ones. Their motion in the 90 minutes between both images is marked in the right panel. The area outside the rings was slightly enhanced in brightness to improve the visibility of these faint satellites.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  15. HUBBLE TRACKS CLOUDS ON URANUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Taking its first peek at Uranus, NASA Hubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) has detected six distinct clouds in images taken July 28,1997. The image on the right, taken 90 minutes after the left-hand image, shows the planet's rotation. Each image is a composite of three near-infrared images. They are called false-color images because the human eye cannot detect infrared light. Therefore, colors corresponding to visible light were assigned to the images. (The wavelengths for the 'blue,' 'green,' and 'red' exposures are 1.1, 1.6, and 1.9 micrometers, respectively.) At visible and near-infrared light, sunlight is reflected from hazes and clouds in the atmosphere of Uranus. However, at near-infrared light, absorption by gases in the Uranian atmosphere limits the view to different altitudes, causing intense contrasts and colors. In these images, the blue exposure probes the deepest atmospheric levels. A blue color indicates clear atmospheric conditions, prevalent at mid-latitudes near the center of the disk. The green exposure is sensitive to absorption by methane gas, indicating a clear atmosphere; but in hazy atmospheric regions, the green color is seen because sunlight is reflected back before it is absorbed. The green color around the south pole (marked by '+') shows a strong local haze. The red exposure reveals absorption by hydrogen, the most abundant gas in the atmosphere of Uranus. Most sunlight shows patches of haze high in the atmosphere. A red color near the limb (edge) of the disk indicates the presence of a high-altitude haze. The purple color to the right of the equator also suggests haze high in the atmosphere with a clear atmosphere below. The five clouds visible near the right limb rotated counterclockwise during the time between both images. They reach high into the atmosphere, as indicated by their red color. Features of such high contrast have never been seen before on Uranus. The clouds are almost as large as continents on Earth, such as Europe. Another cloud (which barely can be seen) rotated along the path shown by the black arrow. It is located at lower altitudes, as indicated by its green color. The rings of Uranus are extremely faint in visible light but quite prominent in the near infrared. The brightest ring, the epsilon ring, has a variable width around its circumference. Its widest and thus brightest part is at the top in this image. Two fainter, inner rings are visible next to the epsilon ring. Eight of the 10 small Uranian satellites, discovered by Voyager 2, can be seen in both images. Their sizes range from about 25 miles (40 kilometers) for Bianca to 100 miles (150 kilometers) for Puck. The smallest of these satellites have not been detected since the departure of Voyager 2 from Uranus in 1986. These eight satellites revolve around Uranus in less than a day. The inner ones are faster than the outer ones. Their motion in the 90 minutes between both images is marked in the right panel. The area outside the rings was slightly enhanced in brightness to improve the visibility of these faint satellites. Credits: Erich Karkoschka (University of Arizona), and NASA.

  16. Vectors on the Basketball Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An Idea Bank published in the April/May 2009 issue of "The Science Teacher" describes an experiential physics lesson on vectors and vector addition (Brown 2009). Like its football predecessor, the basketball-based investigation presented in this Idea Bank addresses National Science Education Standards Content B, Physical Science, 9-12 (NRC 1996)…

  17. Segmentation of discrete vector fields.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Chen, Wenbin; Shen, I-Fan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach for 2D discrete vector field segmentation based on the Green function and normalized cut. The method is inspired by discrete Hodge Decomposition such that a discrete vector field can be broken down into three simpler components, namely, curl-free, divergence-free, and harmonic components. We show that the Green Function Method (GFM) can be used to approximate the curl-free and the divergence-free components to achieve our goal of the vector field segmentation. The final segmentation curves that represent the boundaries of the influence region of singularities are obtained from the optimal vector field segmentations. These curves are composed of piecewise smooth contours or streamlines. Our method is applicable to both linear and nonlinear discrete vector fields. Experiments show that the segmentations obtained using our approach essentially agree with human perceptual judgement. PMID:16640243

  18. A neural support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Jändel, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Support vector machines are state-of-the-art pattern recognition algorithms that are well founded in optimization and generalization theory but not obviously applicable to the brain. This paper presents Bio-SVM, a biologically feasible support vector machine. An unstable associative memory oscillates between support vectors and interacts with a feed-forward classification pathway. Kernel neurons blend support vectors and sensory input. Downstream temporal integration generates the classification. Instant learning of surprising events and off-line tuning of support vector weights trains the system. Emotion-based learning, forgetting trivia, sleep and brain oscillations are phenomena that agree with the Bio-SVM model. A mapping to the olfactory system is suggested. PMID:20092978

  19. UNIVERSITY COUNCIL GUIDELINES FOR MOTIONS TypesofMotions1

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    . Motion to approve in principle [or to endorse]: Such a motion indicates that Council is in agreement consideration by members of Council require only 10 days' written notice of motion. Where there is uncertainty

  20. Automated cloud classification with a fuzzy logic expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tovinkere, Vasanth; Baum, Bryan A.

    1993-01-01

    An unresolved problem in current cloud retrieval algorithms concerns the analysis of scenes containing overlapping cloud layers. Cloud parameterizations are very important both in global climate models and in studies of the Earth's radiation budget. Most cloud retrieval schemes, such as the bispectral method used by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), have no way of determining whether overlapping cloud layers exist in any group of satellite pixels. One promising method uses fuzzy logic to determine whether mixed cloud and/or surface types exist within a group of pixels, such as cirrus, land, and water, or cirrus and stratus. When two or more class types are present, fuzzy logic uses membership values to assign the group of pixels partially to the different class types. The strength of fuzzy logic lies in its ability to work with patterns that may include more than one class, facilitating greater information extraction from satellite radiometric data. The development of the fuzzy logic rule-based expert system involves training the fuzzy classifier with spectral and textural features calculated from accurately labeled 32x32 regions of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) 1.1-km data. The spectral data consists of AVHRR channels 1 (0.55-0.68 mu m), 2 (0.725-1.1 mu m), 3 (3.55-3.93 mu m), 4 (10.5-11.5 mu m), and 5 (11.5-12.5 mu m), which include visible, near-infrared, and infrared window regions. The textural features are based on the gray level difference vector (GLDV) method. A sophisticated new interactive visual image Classification System (IVICS) is used to label samples chosen from scenes collected during the FIRE IFO II. The training samples are chosen from predefined classes, chosen to be ocean, land, unbroken stratiform, broken stratiform, and cirrus. The November 28, 1991 NOAA overpasses contain complex multilevel cloud situations ideal for training and validating the fuzzy logic expert system.

  1. Cloud Detection Method Based on Feature Extraction in Remote Sensing Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changhui, Y.; Yuan, Y.; Minjing, M.; Menglu, Z.

    2013-05-01

    In remote sensing images, the existence of the clouds has a great impact on the image quality and subsequent image processing, as the images covered with clouds contain little useful information. Therefore, the detection and recognition of clouds is one of the major problems in the application of remote sensing images. Present there are two categories of method to cloud detection. One is setting spectrum thresholds based on the characteristics of the clouds to distinguish them. However, the instability and uncertainty of the practical clouds makes this kind of method complexity and weak adaptability. The other method adopts the features in the images to identify the clouds. Since there will be significant overlaps in some features of the clouds and grounds, the detection result is highly dependent on the effectiveness of the features. This paper presented a cloud detection method based on feature extraction for remote sensing images. At first, find out effective features through training pattern, the features are selected from gray, frequency and texture domains. The different features in the three domains of the training samples are calculated. Through the result of statistical analysis of all the features, the useful features are picked up to form a feature set. In concrete, the set includes three feature vectors, respectively, the gray feature vector constituted of average gray, variance, first-order difference, entropy and histogram, the frequency feature vector constituted of DCT high frequency coefficient and wavelet high frequency coefficient, and the texture feature vector constituted of the hybrid entropy and difference of the gray-gradient co-occurrence matrix and the image fractal dimension. Secondly, a thumbnail will be obtained by down sampling the original image and its features of gray, frequency and texture are computed. Last but not least, the cloud region will be judged by the comparison between the actual feature values and the thresholds determined by the sample training process. Experimental results show that the clouds and ground objects can be separated efficiently, and our method can implement rapid clouds detection and cloudiness calculation.

  2. Novel Assessment of Renal Motion in Children as Measured via Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S.; Sharma, Shelly; Naik, Mihir H.; Wu, Shengjie; Hua, Chiaho; Beltran, Chris; Krasin, Matthew J.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: Abdominal intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy require quantification of target and organ motion to optimize localization and treatment. Although addressed in adults, there is no available literature on this issue in pediatric patients. We assessed physiologic renal motion in pediatric patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty free-breathing pediatric patients at a median age of 8 years (range, 2-18 years) with intra-abdominal tumors underwent computed tomography simulation and four-dimensional computed tomography acquisition (slice thickness, 3 mm). Kidneys and diaphragms were contoured during eight phases of respiration to estimate center-of-mass motion. We quantified center of kidney mass mobility vectors in three dimensions: anteroposterior (AP), mediolateral (ML), and superoinferior (SI). Results: Kidney motion decreases linearly with decreasing age and height. The 95% confidence interval for the averaged minima and maxima of renal motion in children younger than 9 years was 5-9 mm in the ML direction, 4-11 mm in the AP direction, and 12-25 mm in the SI dimension for both kidneys. In children older than 9 years, the same confidence interval reveals a widening range of motion that was 5-16 mm in the ML direction, 6-17 mm in the AP direction, and 21-52 mm in the SI direction. Although not statistically significant, renal motion correlated with diaphragm motion in older patients. The correlation between diaphragm motion and body mass index was borderline (r = 0.52, p = 0.0816) in younger patients. Conclusions: Renal motion is age and height dependent. Measuring diaphragmatic motion alone does not reliably quantify pediatric renal motion. Renal motion in young children ranges from 5 to 25 mm in orientation-specific directions. The vectors of motion range from 5 to 52 mm in older children. These preliminary data represent novel analyses of pediatric intra-abdominal organ motion.

  3. The correlation of tissue motion within the lung: implications on fiducial based treatments

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan L.; Yang, Deshan; Lee, Andrew; Mayse, Martin L.; Low, Dan A.; Parikh, Parag J.

    2011-01-01

    In radiation therapy many motion management and alignment techniques rely on the accuracy of an internal fiducial acting as a surrogate for target motion within the lung. Although fiducials are routinely used as surrogates for tumor motion, the extent to which varying spatial locations in the lung move similarly to other locations has yet to be quantitatively analyzed. In an attempt to analyze the motion correlation throughout the lung, ten primary lung cancer patients underwent IRB-approved 4DCT scans in the supine position. Deformable registration produced motion vectors for each voxel between exhalation and inhalation. Modeling was performed for each vector and all surrounding vectors within the lung in order to determine the mean 3D Euclidean distance necessary for an implanted fiducial to correlate with surrounding tissue motion to within 3 mm (left lower: 1.7 cm, left upper: 2.1 cm, right lower 1.6 cm, and right upper 2.9 cm). No general implantation rule of where to position a fiducial with respect to the tumor was found as the motion is highly patient and lobe specific. Correlation maps are presented showcasing spatial anisotropy of the motion of tissue surrounding the tumor. PMID:22047363

  4. The correlation of tissue motion within the lung: implications on fiducial based treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ryan L.; Yang Deshan; Lee, Andrew; Mayse, Martin L.; Low, Dan A.; Parikh, Parag J.

    2011-11-15

    In radiation therapy many motion management and alignment techniques rely on the accuracy of an internal fiducial acting as a surrogate for target motion within the lung. Although fiducials are routinely used as surrogates for tumor motion, the extent to which varying spatial locations in the lung move similarly to other locations has yet to be quantitatively analyzed. In an attempt to analyze the motion correlation throughout the lung, ten primary lung cancer patients underwent IRB-approved 4DCT scans in the supine position. Deformable registration produced motion vectors for each voxel between exhalation and inhalation. Modeling was performed for each vector and all surrounding vectors within the lung in order to determine the mean 3D Euclidean distance necessary for an implanted fiducial to correlate with surrounding tissue motion to within 3 mm (left lower: 1.7 cm, left upper: 2.1 cm, right lower 1.6 cm, and right upper 2.9 cm). No general implantation rule of where to position a fiducial with respect to the tumor was found as the motion is highly patient and lobe specific. Correlation maps are presented showcasing spatial anisotropy of the motion of tissue surrounding the tumor.

  5. Filtering method for 3D laser scanning point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da; Wang, Li; Hao, Yuncai; Zhang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of the hardware and software of the three-dimensional model acquisition, three-dimensional laser scanning technology is utilized in various aspects, especially in space exploration. The point cloud filter is very important before using the data. In the paper, considering both the processing quality and computing speed, an improved mean-shift point cloud filter method is proposed. Firstly, by analyze the relevance of the normal vector between the upcoming processing point and the near points, the iterative neighborhood of the mean-shift is selected dynamically, then the high frequency noise is constrained. Secondly, considering the normal vector of the processing point, the normal vector is updated. Finally, updated position is calculated for each point, then each point is moved in the normal vector according to the updated position. The experimental results show that the large features are retained, at the same time, the small sharp features are also existed for different size and shape of objects, so the target feature information is protected precisely. The computational complexity of the proposed method is not high, it can bring high precision results with fast speed, so it is very suitable for space application. It can also be utilized in civil, such as large object measurement, industrial measurement, car navigation etc. In the future, filter with the help of point strength will be further exploited.

  6. Vector Network Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-10-20

    Vector network analyzers are a convenient way to measure scattering parameters of a variety of microwave devices. However, these instruments, unlike oscilloscopes for example, require a relatively high degree of user knowledge and expertise. Due to the complexity of the instrument and of the calibration process, there are many ways in which an incorrect measurement may be produced. The Microwave Project, which is part of Sandia National Laboratories Primary Standards Laboratory, routinely uses check standardsmore »to verify that the network analyzer is operating properly. In the past, these measurements were recorded manually and, sometimes, interpretation of the results was problematic. To aid our measurement assurance process, a software program was developed to automatically measure a check standard and compare the new measurements with an historical database of measurements of the same device. The program acquires new measurement data from selected check standards, plots the new data against the mean and standard deviation of prior data for the same check standard, and updates the database files for the check standard. The program is entirely menu-driven requiring little additional work by the user.« less

  7. Thin Cloud Length Scales Using CALIPSO and CloudSat Data 

    E-print Network

    Solbrig, Jeremy E.

    2010-10-12

    Thin clouds are the most difficult cloud type to observe. The recent availability of joint cloud products from the active remote sensing instruments aboard CloudSat and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO) facilitates...

  8. Slip vector analysis with high resolution t-LiDAR scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiatr, Thomas; Reicherter, Klaus; Papanikolaou, Ioannis; Fernández-Steeger, Tomás; Mason, Jack

    2013-11-01

    A palaeostress analysis of an active bedrock normal fault scarp based on kinematic indicators is reconstructed using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). For this purpose, three key elements are necessary for a defined region: (i) the orientation of the fault plane, (ii) the orientation of the slickenside lineation or other kinematic indicators, and (iii) the sense of motion of the hanging wall. The paper specifies a workflow in order to obtain stress data from point cloud data using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in an active tectonic environment. The entire analysis was performed on a continuous limestone bedrock normal fault scarp on the island of Crete, Greece, at four different locations along the WNW-ESE striking Spili Fault. At each location we collected data with the terrestrial light detection and ranging system (t-LiDAR). We then validated the calculated three-dimensional stress results at three of the locations by comparison with conventional methods using data obtained manually with a compass clinometer. Numerous kinematic indicators for normal faulting were discovered on the fault plane surface using t-LiDAR data. When comparing all reconstructed stress data obtained from t-LiDAR to that obtained through manual compass measurements, the degree of fault plane orientation divergence is ± 005/03 for dip direction and dip. The degree of slickenside lineation divergence is ± 003/03 for dip direction and dip. Therefore, the percentage threshold error of the individual vector angle at each investigation site is lower than 3% for the dip direction and dip for planes, and lower than 6% for the strike. The maximum mean variation of the complete calculated stress tensors is ± 005/03.

  9. Generalized compliant motion primitive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G. (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a general primitive for controlling a telerobot with a set of input parameters. The primitive includes a trajectory generator; a teleoperation sensor; a joint limit generator; a force setpoint generator; a dither function generator, which produces telerobot motion inputs in a common coordinate frame for simultaneous combination in sensor summers. Virtual return spring motion input is provided by a restoration spring subsystem. The novel features of this invention include use of a single general motion primitive at a remote site to permit the shared and supervisory control of the robot manipulator to perform tasks via a remotely transferred input parameter set.

  10. Chikungunya virus-vector interactions.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Lark L; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Weaver, Scott C

    2014-11-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed. PMID:25421891

  11. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Lark L.; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed. PMID:25421891

  12. Relativistic Motion in a Constant Electromagnetic Field

    E-print Network

    Siu A. Chin

    2008-09-04

    For a relativistic charged particle moving in a constant electromagnetic field, its velocity 4-vector has been well studied. However, despite the fact that both the electromagnetic field and the equations of motion are purely real, the resulting 4-velocity is seemingly due to a complex electromagnetic field. This work shows that this is not due to some complex formalism used (such as Clifford algebra) but is intrinsically due to the fact that the $o(3,1)$ Lie algebra of the Lorentz group is equivalent to two commuting complex $su(2)$ algebras. Expressing the complex $su(2)$ generators in terms of the boost and rotation operators then naturally introduces a complex electromagnetic field. This work solves the equation of motion not as a matrix equation, but as an operator evolution equation in terms of the generators of the Lorentz group. The factorization of the real evolution operator into two commuting complex evolution operators then directly gives the time evolution of the velocity 4-vector without any reference to an intermediate field.

  13. Matrix Methods for Plane In general, the equations of motion for a plane wave in laterally homogeneous

    E-print Network

    Shearer, Peter

    Chapter 5 Matrix Methods for Plane Waves In general, the equations of motion for a plane wave problem in which case f is a 2-vector and A is a 2x2 matrix, (2) the SH-wave problem for which f is also a 2-vector and A is 2x2, (3) the P-SV problem for which f is a 4-vector and A is a 4x4 matrix, (4

  14. Microphysics of Pyrocumulonimbus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The intense heat from forest fires can generate explosive deep convective cloud systems that inject pollutants to high altitudes. Both satellite and high-altitude aircraft measurements have documented cases in which these pyrocumulonimbus clouds inject large amounts of smoke well into the stratosphere (Fromm and Servranckx 2003; Jost et al. 2004). This smoke can remain in the stratosphere, be transported large distances, and affect lower stratospheric chemistry. In addition recent in situ measurements in pyrocumulus updrafts have shown that the high concentrations of smoke particles have significant impacts on cloud microphysical properties. Very high droplet number densities result in delayed precipitation and may enhance lightning (Andrew et al. 2004). Presumably, the smoke particles will also lead to changes in the properties of anvil cirrus produces by the deep convection, with resulting influences on cloud radiative forcing. In situ sampling near the tops of mature pyrocumulonimbus is difficult due to the high altitude and violence of the storms. In this study, we use large eddy simulations (LES) with size-resolved microphysics to elucidate physical processes in pyrocumulonimbus clouds.

  15. Vector volume and black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballik, William; Lake, Kayll

    2013-11-01

    By examining the rate of growth of an invariant volume V of some spacetime region along a divergence-free vector field v?, we introduce the concept of a “vector volume” Vv. This volume can be defined in various equivalent ways. For example, it can be given as dV(?)/d?, where v???=d/d? and ? is a parameter distance along the integral curve of v. Equivalently, it can be defined as ?v?d??, where d?? is the directed surface element. We find that this volume is especially useful for the description of black holes, but it can be used in other contexts as well. Moreover, this volume has several properties of interest. Among these is the fact that the vector volume is linear with respect to the the choice of vector v?. As a result, for example, in stationary axially symmetric spacetimes with timelike Killing vectors t? and axially symmetric Killing vectors ??, the vector volume of an axially symmetric region with respect to the vector t?+??? is equal for any value of ?, a consequence of the additional result that ?? does not contribute to Vv. Perhaps of most interest is the fact that in Kerr-Schild spacetimes the volume element for the full spacetime is equal to that of the background spacetime. We discuss different ways of using the vector volume to define volumes for black holes. Finally, we relate our work to the recent widespread thermodynamically motivated study of the “volumes” of black holes associated with nonzero values of the cosmological constant ?.

  16. Dynamics of three-dimensional plasma clouds with coupling to the background ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, T.-Z.; Schunk, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time-dependent model with a two-grid system was developed to study the expansion of a plasma cloud in the F region and topside ionosphere. The model maintains an adequate resolution for the released cloud motion and its interaction with the immediate environment, and it includes the effect due to the coupling with the distant part of the ionosphere (i.e., E region). Simulations were performed using realistic background ionospheric density profiles in both the E and F regions. The results show that the cloud coupling to the underlying E region affects the perpendicular cloud motion the most. The distant coupling acts to reduce the perturbation potential and perpendicular velocity and delays or eliminates the striations. These simulation results are consistent with simple analytical approximations. The simulation results also show that the distant coupling has a very small effect on 'localized' phenomena, such as the cloud expansion along the B RIGHT ARROW field and the electrostatic snowplow. The cloud-induced electric potential is attenuated in the lower E region. The electrons flow along the B RIGHT ARROW field, carrying the current to the E region and back to the cloud. The current closure is demonstrated in three dimensions for the first time for such a problem. The perpendicular current flowing through the plasma cloud is closed by the field-aligned electron current and the background perpendicular (mainly Pedersen) current in both the E and F regions. The 'image cloud' formation in t he E region is also clearly demonstrated. The variation of the density change in the 'image cloud' along the B RIGHT ARROW field and the features of the image cloud are shown.

  17. Emerging Vector-Borne Diseases – Incidence through Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Savi?, Sara; Vidi?, Branka; Grgi?, Zivoslav; Potkonjak, Aleksandar; Spasojevic, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases use to be a major public health concern only in tropical and subtropical areas, but today they are an emerging threat for the continental and developed countries also. Nowadays, in intercontinental countries, there is a struggle with emerging diseases, which have found their way to appear through vectors. Vector-borne zoonotic diseases occur when vectors, animal hosts, climate conditions, pathogens, and susceptible human population exist at the same time, at the same place. Global climate change is predicted to lead to an increase in vector-borne infectious diseases and disease outbreaks. It could affect the range and population of pathogens, host and vectors, transmission season, etc. Reliable surveillance for diseases that are most likely to emerge is required. Canine vector-borne diseases represent a complex group of diseases including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, borreliosis, dirofilariosis, ehrlichiosis, and leishmaniosis. Some of these diseases cause serious clinical symptoms in dogs and some of them have a zoonotic potential with an effect to public health. It is expected from veterinarians in coordination with medical doctors to play a fundamental role at primarily prevention and then treatment of vector-borne diseases in dogs. The One Health concept has to be integrated into the struggle against emerging diseases. During a 4-year period, from 2009 to 2013, a total number of 551 dog samples were analyzed for vector-borne diseases (borreliosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis) in routine laboratory work. The analysis was done by serological tests – ELISA for borreliosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis, modified Knott test for dirofilariosis, and blood smear for babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, and anaplasmosis. This number of samples represented 75% of total number of samples that were sent for analysis for different diseases in dogs. Annually, on average more then half of the samples brought to the laboratory to analysis for different infectious diseases are analyzed for vector-borne diseases. In the region of Vojvodina (northern part of Serbia), the following vector-borne infectious diseases have been found in dogs so far borreliosis, babesiosis, dirofilariosis, leishmaniasis, and anaplasmosis. PMID:25520951

  18. Limited range of motion

    MedlinePLUS

    ... loss of motion. Some of these disorders include: Cerebral palsy Congenital torticollis Muscular dystrophy Stroke or brain injury ... Rheumatology and musculoskeletal problems. In: Rakel RE, Rakel DP, eds. Textbook of Family Medicine . 8th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  19. Vision and Motion Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambo, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities on persistence of vision that involve students in a hands-on approach to the study of early methods of creating motion pictures. Students construct flip books, a Zoetrope, and an early movie machine. (DDR)

  20. A Projectile Motion Bullseye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Explains a projectile motion experiment involving a bow and arrow. Procedures to measure "muzzle" velocity, bow elastic potential energy, range, flight time, wind resistance, and masses are considered. (DH)

  1. Toying with Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a variety of activities that support the development of an understanding of Newton's laws of motion. Activities use toy cars, mobile roads, and a seat-of-nails. Includes a scoring rubric. (DDR)

  2. 2012 IBM Corporation Cloud Computing and

    E-print Network

    Chen, Wei

    © 2012 IBM Corporation Cloud Computing and Standards Heather Kreger CTO International Standards of product & service innovation. Leveraging the Transformational Power of Cloud Computing ... Lowers, open reference platform for Cloud Computing Driven by collaboration among users, Cloud standards

  3. Special Publication 500-307 Cloud Computing

    E-print Network

    Special Publication 500-307 Cloud Computing Service Metrics Description NIST Cloud Computing Reference Architecture and Taxonomy Working Group NIST Cloud Computing Program Information Technology Computing Service Metrics Description NIST Cloud Computing Reference Architecture and Taxonomy Working Group

  4. Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2014-05-15

    Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

  5. Tharsis Limb Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated image of Tharsis Limb Cloud

    7 September 2005 This composite of red and blue Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images acquired on 6 July 2005 shows an isolated water ice cloud extending more than 30 kilometers (more than 18 miles) above the martian surface. Clouds such as this are common in late spring over the terrain located southwest of the Arsia Mons volcano. Arsia Mons is the dark, oval feature near the limb, just to the left of the 'T' in the 'Tharsis Montes' label. The dark, nearly circular feature above the 'S' in 'Tharsis' is the volcano, Pavonis Mons, and the other dark circular feature, above and to the right of 's' in 'Montes,' is Ascraeus Mons. Illumination is from the left/lower left.

    Season: Northern Autumn/Southern Spring

  6. Making clouds in Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C.

    1978-01-01

    Improvements in the accuracy of weather predictions and possibilities for changing the weather might depend on a better understanding of the microphysical processes which take place within clouds. A study of these processes on the surface of the earth is difficult in connection with gravitational disturbances. An Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL), which is currently being developed, is to be carried into space in the Spacelab in the early 1980's. This facility will provide scientists, for the first time, with the opportunity to study cloud physics without the disturbing gravitational effects. In the ACPL facility, a microscopic element can be suspended without support. The processes of freezing, thawing, collision, electric charging, and temperature changes can be observed and photographed as many times and for as long as necessary.

  7. Cloud Computing for Astronomers on Top of EGI Federated Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taffoni, G.; Vuerli, C.; Pasian, F.

    2015-09-01

    EGI Federated Cloud offers a general academic Cloud Infrastructure. We exploit EGI functionalities to address the needs of representative Astronomy and Astrophysics communities through clouds and gateways while respecting commonly used standards. The vision is to offer a novel environment empowering scientists to focus more on experimenting and pitching new ideas to service their needs for scientific discovery.

  8. CloudMan: A Platform for Portable Cloud Manufacturing Services

    E-print Network

    Dustdar, Schahram

    CloudMan: A Platform for Portable Cloud Manufacturing Services Soheil Qanbari, Samira Mahdi Zadeh Education (BIHE), Iran soroush.vedaeei@bihe.org Abstract--Cloud manufacturing refers to "as a Service" pro- duction model that exploits an on-demand access to a distributed pool of diversified manufacturing

  9. Wireless Network Aware Cloud Scheduler for Scalable Cloud Mobile Gaming

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    , Sujit Dey Mobile Systems Design Lab, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering UniversityWireless Network Aware Cloud Scheduler for Scalable Cloud Mobile Gaming Shaoxuan Wang, Yao Liu of California, San Diego shaoxuan@ece.ucsd.edu, yal019@ucsd.edu, dey@ece.ucsd.edu Abstract -- Cloud Mobile

  10. Cloud thermodynamic phase detection with polarimetrically sensitive passive sky radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobelspiesse, K.; van Diedenhoven, B.; Marshak, A.; Dunagan, S.; Holben, B.; Slutsker, I.

    2014-12-01

    The primary goal of this project has been to investigate if ground-based visible and near-infrared passive radiometers that have polarization sensitivity can determine the thermodynamic phase of overlying clouds, i.e. if they are comprised of liquid droplets or ice particles. While this knowledge is important by itself for our understanding of the global climate, it can also help improve cloud property retrieval algorithms that use total (unpolarized) radiance to determine Cloud Optical Depth (COD). This is a potentially unexploited capability of some instruments in the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), which, if practical, could expand the products of that global instrument network at minimal additional cost. We performed simulations that found, for zenith observations, cloud thermodynamic phase is often expressed in the sign of the Q component of the Stokes polarization vector. We chose our reference frame as the plane containing solar and observation vectors, so the sign of Q indicates the polarization direction, parallel (positive) or perpendicular (negative) to that plane. Since the quantity of polarization is inversely proportional to COD, optically thin clouds are most likely to create a signal greater than instrument noise. Besides COD and instrument accuracy, other important factors for the determination of cloud thermodynamic phase are the solar and observation geometry (scattering angles between 40 and 60° are best), and the properties of ice particles (pristine particles may have halos or other features that make them difficult to distinguish from water droplets at specific scattering angles, while extreme ice crystal aspect ratios polarize more than compact particles). We tested the conclusions of our simulations using data from polarimetrically sensitive versions of the Cimel 318 sun photometer/radiometer that comprise AERONET. Most algorithms that exploit Cimel polarized observations use the Degree of Linear Polarization (DoLP), not the individual Stokes vector elements (such as Q). For this reason, we had no information about the accuracy of Cimel observed Q and the potential for cloud phase determination. Indeed, comparisons to ceilometer observations with a single polarized spectral channel version of the Cimel at a site in the Netherlands showed little correlation. Comparisons to Lidar observations with a more recently developed, multi-wavelength polarized Cimel in Maryland, USA, show more promise. The lack of well characterized observations has prompted us to begin the development of a small test instrument called the Sky Polarization Radiometric Instrument for Test and Evaluation (SPRITE). This instrument is specifically devoted to the accurate observation of Q, and the testing of calibration and uncertainty assessment techniques, with the ultimate goal of understanding the practical feasibility of these measurements.

  11. Reference equations of motion for automatic rendezvous and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, David M.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis presented in this paper defines the reference coordinate frames, equations of motion, and control parameters necessary to model the relative motion and attitude of spacecraft in close proximity with another space system during the Automatic Rendezvous and Capture phase of an on-orbit operation. The relative docking port target position vector and the attitude control matrix are defined based upon an arbitrary spacecraft design. These translation and rotation control parameters could be used to drive the error signal input to the vehicle flight control system. Measurements for these control parameters would become the bases for an autopilot or feedback control system (FCS) design for a specific spacecraft.

  12. Ash cloud aviation advisories

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S.; Schalk, W.W.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1992-06-25

    During the recent (12--22 June 1991) Mount Pinatubo volcano eruptions, the US Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) requested assistance of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in creating volcanic ash cloud aviation advisories for the region of the Philippine Islands. Through application of its three-dimensional material transport and diffusion models using AFGWC meteorological analysis and forecast wind fields ARAC developed extensive analysis and 12-hourly forecast ash cloud position advisories extending to 48 hours for a period of five days. The advisories consisted of ``relative`` ash cloud concentrations in ten layers (surface-5,000 feet, 5,000--10,000 feet and every 10,000 feet to 90,000 feet). The ash was represented as a log-normal size distribution of 10--200 {mu}m diameter solid particles. Size-dependent ``ashfall`` was simulated over time as the eruption clouds dispersed. Except for an internal experimental attempt to model one of the Mount Redoubt, Alaska, eruptions (12/89), ARAC had no prior experience in modeling volcanic eruption ash hazards. For the cataclysmic eruption of 15--16 June, the complex three-dimensional atmospheric structure of the region produced dramatically divergent ash cloud patterns. The large eruptions (> 7--10 km) produced ash plume clouds with strong westward transport over the South China Sea, Southeast Asia, India and beyond. The low-level eruptions (< 7 km) and quasi-steady-state venting produced a plume which generally dispersed to the north and east throughout the support period. Modeling the sequence of eruptions presented a unique challenge. Although the initial approach proved viable, further refinement is necessary and possible. A distinct need exists to quantify eruptions consistently such that ``relative`` ash concentrations relate to specific aviation hazard categories.

  13. Diagnosing Warm Frontal Cloud Formation in a GCM: A Novel Approach Using Conditional Subsetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, James F.; Naud, Catherine M.; DelGenio, Anthony D.

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes characteristics of clouds and vertical motion across extratropical cyclone warm fronts in the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model. The validity of the modeled clouds is assessed using a combination of satellite observations from CloudSat, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), and the NASA Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis. The analysis focuses on developing cyclones, to test the model's ability to generate their initial structure. To begin, the extratropical cyclones and their warm fronts are objectively identified and cyclone-local fields are mapped into a vertical transect centered on the surface warm front. To further isolate specific physics, the cyclones are separated using conditional subsetting based on additional cyclone-local variables, and the differences between the subset means are analyzed. Conditional subsets are created based on 1) the transect clouds and 2) vertical motion; 3) the strength of the temperature gradient along the warm front, as well as the storm-local 4) wind speed and 5) precipitable water (PW). The analysis shows that the model does not generate enough frontal cloud, especially at low altitude. The subsetting results reveal that, compared to the observations, the model exhibits a decoupling between cloud formation at high and low altitudes across warm fronts and a weak sensitivity to moisture. These issues are caused in part by the parameterized convection and assumptions in the stratiform cloud scheme that are valid in the subtropics. On the other hand, the model generates proper covariability of low-altitude vertical motion and cloud at the warm front and a joint dependence of cloudiness on wind and PW.

  14. Trusting the Cloud Christian Cachin

    E-print Network

    Keidar, Idit

    , Nirvanix CloudNAS, or Microsoft SkyDrive. Some cloud providers utilize the fact that online storage can of maintaining such resources locally. Finally, online collaboration tools, such as Google Apps or versioning

  15. Physical View of Cloud Seeding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tribus, Myron

    1970-01-01

    Reviews experimental data on various aspects of climate control. Includes a discussion of (1) the physics of cloud seeding, (2) the applications of cloud seeding, and (3) the role of statistics in the field of weather modification. Bibliography. (LC)

  16. Rosa cv. Fragrant Cloud (Cultivated) 

    E-print Network

    Beverly Thompson

    2011-08-10

    This dissertation reports on three different yet related topics in light scattering computation, radiative transfer simulation, and remote sensing implementation, regarding the cloud properties and the retrieval of cloud properties from satellite...

  17. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  18. Opaque cloud detection

    DOEpatents

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-01-20

    A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

  19. Support Vector Machines in Bioinformatics

    E-print Network

    Spang, Rainer

    Support Vector Machines 29 4 Linear Classi#12;ers 31 4.1 The Optimal Separating Hyperplane (OSH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 4.2 OSH for Linear Non-Separable Datasets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 4.3 Adaption

  20. Support Vector Machines in Bioinformatics

    E-print Network

    Spang, Rainer

    Support Vector Machines 29 4 Linear Classifiers 31 4.1 The Optimal Separating Hyperplane (OSH) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 4.2 OSH for Linear Non-Separable Datasets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 4.3 Adaption

  1. Uncertainty principles and vector quantization

    E-print Network

    Vershynin, Roman

    1 Uncertainty principles and vector quantization Yurii Lyubarskii and Roman Vershynin Abstract of the state-of-the-art of quantization prior to 1998 as well as outline of its nu- merous applications can

  2. Structure and Motion Estimation from Apparent Contours under Circular Motion

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Structure and Motion Estimation from Apparent Contours under Circular Motion Kwan-Yee K. Wong a the appar- ent contours of a smooth surface. Fixed image features under circular motion circular motion and more widely spaced images. Existing techniques for model reconstruction from apparent

  3. Reconstruction and Motion Estimation from Apparent Contours under Circular Motion

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Reconstruction and Motion Estimation from Apparent Contours under Circular Motion K-Y. K. Wong, P, where a novel technique, based on properties of the affine epipolar geometry under circular motion structure and motion from the contours of a smooth-curved surface. A novel and simpler technique

  4. UNCORRECTED 2 Illusory rebound motion and the motion continuity heuristic

    E-print Network

    Bucci, David J.

    UNCORRECTED PROOF 2 Illusory rebound motion and the motion continuity heuristic 3 P.-J. Hsieh, G, a motion aftereffect (MAE) model, and a heuristic 13 model. Results imply that IRM arises because of a heuristic about how objects move in the environment: In the absence of coun- 14 tervailing evidence, motion

  5. Computer image processing of up-draft flow motion and severe storm formation observed from satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Smith, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Special rapid-scan satellite visible and infrared observations have been used to study the life cycle of the clouds from the initiation of updraft flow motion in the atmosphere, the condensation of humid air, the formation of clouds, the development of towering cumulus, the penetration of the tropopause, the collapsing of an overshooting turret, and the dissipation of cloud. The infrared image provides an indication of the equivalent blackbody temperature of the observed cloud tops. By referencing the temperature, height and humidity profiles from rawinsonde observations as the background meteorological data for the instability of the air mass to the satellite infrared data sets at different time periods, the development of convective clouds can be studied in detail.

  6. Restriction of motions in wide pairs in the Galactic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, A. S.; Orlov, V. V.

    2015-06-01

    The motions of the components of wide binary stars in the solar neighborhood in the regular Galactic gravitational field on time scales ˜1010 yr have been studied numerically. The regions of restricted motions of the components in wide pairs have been found depending on the initial conditions: the magnitude of the relative velocity of the components, their mutual distance, and the inclination of the relative velocity vector to the Galactic plane. The size of the main part of the region of restricted motions is approximately equal to the tidal radius. Profound changes in the eccentricity of the binary orbit occur at inclinations close to 90°, which can lead to close approaches of the stars with a pericenter distance less than 1 AU. In the case of retrograde motions (the binary rotates in a direction opposite to the Galactic rotation), there is a region of restricted motions extending at least to 10 pc. Examples of the trajectories of relative motion of the stars and the change in osculating orbital elements are given for systems with restricted motions.

  7. Integrating Network Management for Cloud

    E-print Network

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    for consumer service · Amazon Web Services · Microsoft Azure · ... 2 #12;Cloud Services are Growing · Public cloud for consumer service · Amazon Web Services · Microsoft Azure · ... · Enterprises out of Cloud Service Depends on Network Quality 3 OS App Servers ISP Hardware Routing Network Devices ISP ISP

  8. Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction

    E-print Network

    Estalella, Robert

    Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

  9. The Basics of Cloud Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaestner, Rich

    2012-01-01

    Most school business officials have heard the term "cloud computing" bandied about and may have some idea of what the term means. In fact, they likely already leverage a cloud-computing solution somewhere within their district. But what does cloud computing really mean? This brief article puts a bit of definition behind the term and helps one…

  10. A View from the Clouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudnov, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is definitely a thing now, but it's not new and it's not even novel. Back when people were first learning about the Internet in the 1990s, every diagram that one saw showing how the Internet worked had a big cloud in the middle. That cloud represented the diverse links, routers, gateways, and protocols that passed traffic around in…

  11. AceCloud: Molecular Dynamics Simulations in the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Harvey, M J; De Fabritiis, G

    2015-05-26

    We present AceCloud, an on-demand service for molecular dynamics simulations. AceCloud is designed to facilitate the secure execution of large ensembles of simulations on an external cloud computing service (currently Amazon Web Services). The AceCloud client, integrated into the ACEMD molecular dynamics package, provides an easy-to-use interface that abstracts all aspects of interaction with the cloud services. This gives the user the experience that all simulations are running on their local machine, minimizing the learning curve typically associated with the transition to using high performance computing services. PMID:25849093

  12. Cloud water chemistry and the production of sulfates in clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, D. A.; Hobbs, P. V.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the pH and ionic content of water collected in clouds over western Washington and the Los Angeles Basin. Evidence for sulfate production in some of the clouds is presented. Not all of the sulfur in the cloud water was in the form of sulfate. However, the measurements indicate that the production of sulfate in clouds is of considerable significance in the atmosphere. Comparison of field measurements with model results show reasonable agreement and suggest that the production of sulfate in cloud water is a consequence of more than one conversion mechanism.

  13. Space-time properties of Gram-Schmidt vectors in classical Hamiltonian evolution Jason R. Green,1,2,3,* Julius Jellinek,2,

    E-print Network

    Berry, R. Stephen

    Space-time properties of Gram-Schmidt vectors in classical Hamiltonian evolution Jason R. Green,1 tangent space directions play equivalent roles in the local chaotic motions of classical Hamiltonian many vectors, whose statistical properties may depend on the chosen phase space-time domain of a trajec- tory

  14. A Self-Alignment Algorithm for SINS Based on Gravitational Apparent Motion and Sensor Data Denoising

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiting; Xu, Xiaosu; Liu, Xixiang; Yao, Yiqing; Wu, Liang; Sun, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Initial alignment is always a key topic and difficult to achieve in an inertial navigation system (INS). In this paper a novel self-initial alignment algorithm is proposed using gravitational apparent motion vectors at three different moments and vector-operation. Simulation and analysis showed that this method easily suffers from the random noise contained in accelerometer measurements which are used to construct apparent motion directly. Aiming to resolve this problem, an online sensor data denoising method based on a Kalman filter is proposed and a novel reconstruction method for apparent motion is designed to avoid the collinearity among vectors participating in the alignment solution. Simulation, turntable tests and vehicle tests indicate that the proposed alignment algorithm can fulfill initial alignment of strapdown INS (SINS) under both static and swinging conditions. The accuracy can either reach or approach the theoretical values determined by sensor precision under static or swinging conditions. PMID:25923932

  15. Effect of gas drag on the dynamics of protostellar clumps in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorti, U.; Bhatt, H. C.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular clouds are observed to have substructure within them, and to consist of dense condensations or clumps which are surrounded by a less-dense interclump medium. The interclump gas could retard the motion of the clumps in the cloud through a drag force caused by dynamical friction. The effect of such a drag force on the dynamics of protostellar clumps in a molecular cloud is numerically analysed in this paper. As the dynamical drag acting on a clump is dependent on its mass, clumps of different masses have, in general, different retardations. It is found that the most massive objects suffer the maximum decelerating effects and settle to the centre in a shorter time than do the lower mass clumps. Thus there is a clustering of the clumps towards the centre of the cloud, and a radial segregation of mass is established in the cloud. The time-scale of the process is governed by the cloud parameters, and is shorter for denser clouds. The most massive protostellar clumps in the cloud are thus expected to lie at the centre of the cloud. The mass segregation observed in many young clusters of pre-main-sequence stars could be a result of dynamical drag.

  16. Interstellar cloud shapes - A minimum-hypothesis account involving a purely gravitational effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleck, Robert C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The effect produced by the anisotropic gravitational field on the shape of a nonspherical, self-gravitating interstellar cloud is examined. The projected axial ratios observed for molecular clouds can be accounted for if clouds are not generally in a state of strict dynamical equilibrium. For clouds having spectral line widths dominated by supersonic turbulent motions, this purely gravitational effect predicts a mean true axial ratio q about 0.3 for both oblate and prolate cloud geometries. Clouds having p less than about 0.3 are likely to be prolate and quite elongated. The observational data on molecular cloud cores, which have essentially thermal line widths, can be fitted equally well to either oblate or prolate spheroids having q between 0.1 and 0.4 with q about 0.2 providing the best match: highly elongated cores are again more likely to be prolate. While other processes certainly operate throughout the Galaxy to influence cloud shape, it appears plausible that at least some clouds may be shaped principally by their anisotropic gravitational field.

  17. Examinations of cloud variability and future change in the coupled model intercomparison project phase 3 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sun-Hee; Lee, Myong-In; Kim, Ok-Yeon

    2014-08-01

    Low-level cloud variability is critical to the radiation balance of Earth due to its wide spatial coverage. Using the adjusted International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) observations of Clement et al. (2009), and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 3 (CMIP3) model simulations, this study examines the observed and the simulated low-cloud variations and their relationships with large-scale environmental variables. From the observational analysis, significant correlations are found between low clouds and those of sea surface temperature (SST), lower tropospheric stability (LTS), and sea level pressure (SLP) over tropical marine areas of low cloud prevailing regions during most of the year. Increase of SST coincides with the reduction of LTS and increased vertical motion, which tends to reduce low-level clouds in subtropical oceans. Among the 14 models investigated, CGCM3 and HadGEM1 exhibit more realistic representation of the observed relationship between low-level clouds and large-scale environments. In future climate projection, these two models show a good agreement in the reduction of low-cloud throughout much of the global oceans in response to greenhouse gas forcing, suggesting a positive low-cloud feedback in a climate change context.

  18. Simultaneous adaptation to non-collinear retinal motion and smooth pursuit eye movement.

    PubMed

    Davies, J Rhys; Freeman, Tom C A

    2011-07-15

    Simultaneously adapting to retinal motion and non-collinear pursuit eye movement produces a motion aftereffect (MAE) that moves in a different direction to either of the individual adapting motions. Mack, Hill and Kahn (1989, Perception, 18, 649-655) suggested that the MAE was determined by the perceived motion experienced during adaptation. We tested the perceived-motion hypothesis by having observers report perceived direction during simultaneous adaptation. For both central and peripheral retinal motion adaptation, perceived direction did not predict the direction of subsequent MAE. To explain the findings we propose that the MAE is based on the vector sum of two components, one corresponding to a retinal MAE opposite to the adapting retinal motion and the other corresponding to an extra-retina MAE opposite to the eye movement. A vector model of this component hypothesis showed that the MAE directions reported in our experiments were the result of an extra-retinal component that was substantially larger in magnitude than the retinal component when the adapting retinal motion was positioned centrally. However, when retinal adaptation was peripheral, the model suggested the magnitude of the components should be about the same. These predictions were tested in a final experiment that used a magnitude estimation technique. Contrary to the predictions, the results showed no interaction between type of adaptation (retinal or pursuit) and the location of adapting retinal motion. Possible reasons for the failure of component hypothesis to fully explain the data are discussed. PMID:21605588

  19. The Particle--Motion Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demana, Franklin; Waits, Bert K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses solutions to real-world linear particle-motion problems using graphing calculators to simulate the motion and traditional analytic methods of calculus. Applications include (1) changing circular or curvilinear motion into linear motion and (2) linear particle accelerators in physics. (MDH)

  20. MOTION DETECTION MECHANISMS Bart Krekelberg

    E-print Network

    Krekelberg, Bart

    to the development of neural mechanisms sensitive to motion. However, the combined effect of evolutionary, and humans. These schemes provide a basic understanding of the organization of many neural motion detection and color, motion is in the eye of the beholder. 1 INTRODUCTION The physical phenomenon `motion' can easily

  1. Epilepsy analytic system with cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chia-Ping; Zhou, Weizhi; Lin, Feng-Seng; Sung, Hsiao-Ya; Lam, Yan-Yu; Chen, Wei; Lin, Jeng-Wei; Pan, Ming-Kai; Chiu, Ming-Jang; Lai, Feipei

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical data analytic system has played an important role in doing the clinical diagnosis for several decades. Today, it is an emerging research area of analyzing these big data to make decision support for physicians. This paper presents a parallelized web-based tool with cloud computing service architecture to analyze the epilepsy. There are many modern analytic functions which are wavelet transform, genetic algorithm (GA), and support vector machine (SVM) cascaded in the system. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the system, it has been verified by two kinds of electroencephalography (EEG) data, which are short term EEG and long term EEG. The results reveal that our approach achieves the total classification accuracy higher than 90%. In addition, the entire training time accelerate about 4.66 times and prediction time is also meet requirements in real time. PMID:24110019

  2. A vectorized algorithm for 3D dynamics of a tethered satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Howard B.

    1989-01-01

    Equations of motion characterizing the three dimensional motion of a tethered satellite during the retrieval phase are studied. The mathematical model involves an arbitrary number of point masses connected by weightless cords. Motion occurs in a gravity gradient field. The formulation presented accounts for general functions describing support point motion, rate of tether retrieval, and arbitrary forces applied to the point masses. The matrix oriented program language MATLAB is used to produce an efficient vectorized formulation for computing natural frequencies and mode shapes for small oscillations about the static equilibrium configuration; and for integrating the nonlinear differential equations governing large amplitude motions. An example of time response pertaining to the skip rope effect is investigated.

  3. Clouds over Open Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    These cirrocumulus clouds photographed over open ocean - location unknown, seem to be in a state of agitation as in the early stages of storm development. The window frame at the top of this scene obscures almost half of the image and the panel seen in the middle of the scene is a corner of one of the payload bay closure doors.

  4. Invisible Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer's (MODIS') cloud detection capability is so sensitive that it can detect clouds that would be indistinguishable to the human eye. This pair of images highlights MODIS' ability to detect what scientists call 'sub-visible cirrus.' The image on top shows the scene using data collected in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum-the part our eyes can see. Clouds are apparent in the center and lower right of the image, while the rest of the image appears to be relatively clear. However, data collected at 1.38um (lower image) show that a thick layer of previously undetected cirrus clouds obscures the entire scene. These kinds of cirrus are called 'sub-visible' because they can't be detected using only visible light. MODIS' 1.38um channel detects electromagnetic radiation in the infrared region of the spectrum. These images were made from data collected on April 4, 2000. Image courtesy Mark Gray, MODIS Atmosphere Team

  5. Living under a Cloud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gursky, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    This article examines the efforts of three high school teachers at Richland High School in Richland (Washington) to change the school logo from a mushroom cloud, the symbol for a nuclear explosion. Opposition to these teachers' efforts has come from school administrators and fellow teachers, students, alumnae, and community residents. (IAH)

  6. Training in the Clouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretlow, Cassi; Jayroe, Tina

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors share how cloud-based applications, such as Google Calendar, Wikidot, Google Docs, Google Sites, YouTube, and Craigslist, played a big part in the success of their plan of implementing a technology training program for customers and employees. A few years ago the Denver Public Library, where the authors work, developed…

  7. Interstellar molecular clouds.

    PubMed

    Bally, J

    1986-04-11

    The interstellar medium in our galaxy contains matter in a variety of states ranging from hot plasma to cold and dusty molecular gas. The molecular phase consists of giant clouds, which are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the galaxy, the primary reservoir of material for the ongoing birth of new stars, and the medium regulating the evolution of galactic disks. PMID:17780804

  8. Computing in the Clouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Doug

    2010-01-01

    Web-based applications offer teachers, students, and school districts a convenient way to accomplish a wide range of tasks, from accounting to word processing, for free. Cloud computing has the potential to offer staff and students better services at a lower cost than the technology deployment models they're using now. Saving money and improving…

  9. Seeding the Cloud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2013-01-01

    For any institution looking to shift enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems to the cloud, big savings can be achieved--but only if the school has properly prepped "before" negotiations begin. These three steps can help: (1) Mop up the mess first; (2) Understand the true costs for services; and (3) Calculate the cost of transition.

  10. Data in the Cloud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen; Garofalo, Joe

    2010-01-01

    The ability to move from one representation of data to another is one of the key characteristics of expert mathematicians and scientists. Cloud computing will offer more opportunities to create and display multiple representations of data, making this skill even more important in the future. The advent of the Internet led to widespread…

  11. Data Products on Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Vuong T.; Mandl, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation lays out the data processing products that exist and are planned for the Matsu cloud for Earth Observing 1. The presentation focuses on a new feature called co-registration of Earth Observing 1 with Landsat Global Land Survey chips.

  12. Closed Large Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... patterns within marine stratocumulus cloud layers can change dramatically with the prevailing meteorological conditions. These views ... and is displayed at a resolution of 1.1 kilometers per pixel. The right-hand panel highlights part of this scene at a resolution of ...

  13. Theory of the Motion of Ball Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handel, Peter

    2008-04-01

    The Maser-Soliton Theory of BL predicts the dynamics of each of the harmonic waves in the wave packet that feeds and in fact defines the Langmuir plasma soliton that is observed as BL. The frequencies in the wave packet are in a narrow window f that corresponds in the case of open air BL to the diameter of the area in which the damage caused by the final explosion of the BL is observed. This is usually of the order of ?x=30 m roughly, in rms. The corresponding wave vector interval is ?k=(1/2)(1/30m)=0.017/m in rms. At the same time, k is of the order of 6/m, yielding k/?k=360. This pronounced line-narrowing is obtained due to the large gain of the atmospheric maser when it generates the Kapitsa standing wave. Phase differences between the waves that make up the electromagnetic field that couples with the electrostatic field of the soliton are determined by the frequency dependence of gain and dissipation. They are influenced less by the motion of the air, than by the maser dynamics and by the boundary conditions shaping the electromagnetic field, i.e. the individual photonic wave-packet. The paper presents the equations that determine the phase dynamics and therefore also the observed motion of BL. A similar phase dynamics is expected to be applicable to the special case of UFO motions.

  14. Overlap Properties of Clouds Generated by a Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Khairoutdinov, M.

    2002-01-01

    In order for General Circulation Models (GCMs), one of our most important tools to predict future climate, to correctly describe the propagation of solar and thermal radiation through the cloudy atmosphere a realistic description of the vertical distribution of cloud amount is needed. Actually, one needs not only the cloud amounts at different levels of the atmosphere, but also how these cloud amounts are related, in other words, how they overlap. Currently GCMs make some idealized assumptions about cloud overlap, for example that contiguous cloud layers overlap maximally and non-contiguous cloud layers overlap in a random fashion. Since there are difficulties in obtaining the vertical profile of cloud amount from observations, the realism of the overlap assumptions made in GCMs has not been yet rigorously investigated. Recently however, cloud observations from a relatively new type of ground radar have been used to examine the vertical distribution of cloudiness. These observations suggest that the GCM overlap assumptions are dubious. Our study uses cloud fields from sophisticated models dedicated to simulate cloud formation, maintenance, and dissipation called Cloud Resolving Models . These models are generally considered capable of producing realistic three-dimensional representation of cloudiness. Using numerous cloud fields produced by such a CRM we show that the degree of overlap between cloud layers is a function of their separation distance, and is in general described by a combination of the maximum and random overlap assumption, with random overlap dominating as separation distances increase. We show that it is possible to parameterize this behavior in a way that can eventually be incorporated in GCMs. Our results seem to have a significant resemblance to the results from the radar observations despite the completely different nature of the datasets. This consistency is encouraging and will promote development of new radiative transfer codes that will estimate the radiation effects of multi-layer cloud fields more accurately.

  15. Arsia Mons Spiral Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    One of the benefits of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) Extended Mission is the opportunity to observe how the planet's weather changes during a second full martian year. This picture of Arsia Mons was taken June 19, 2001; southern spring equinox occurred the same day. Arsia Mons is a volcano nearly large enough to cover the state of New Mexico. On this particular day (the first day of Spring), the MOC wide angle cameras documented an unusual spiral-shaped cloud within the 110 km (68 mi) diameter caldera--the summit crater--of the giant volcano. Because the cloud is bright both in the red and blue images acquired by the wide angle cameras, it probably consisted mostly of fine dust grains. The cloud's spin may have been induced by winds off the inner slopes of the volcano's caldera walls resulting from the temperature differences between the walls and the caldera floor, or by a vortex as winds blew up and over the caldera. Similar spiral clouds were seen inside the caldera for several days; we don't know if this was a single cloud that persisted throughout that time or one that regenerated each afternoon. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the left/upper left.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  16. Formation of giant molecular clouds in global spiral structures: The role of orbital dynamics and cloud-cloud collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. W., Jr.; Stewart, G. R.

    1987-01-01

    The different roles played by orbital dynamics and dissipative cloud-cloud collisions in the formation of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in a global spiral structure are investigated. The interstellar medium (ISM) is simulated by a system of particles, representing clouds, which orbit in a spiral-perturbed, galactic gravitational field. The overall magnitude and width of the global cloud density distribution in spiral arms is very similar in the collisional and collisionless simulations. The results suggest that the assumed number density and size distribution of clouds and the details of individual cloud-cloud collisions have relatively little effect on these features. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions play an important steadying role for the cloud system's global spiral structure. Dissipative cloud-cloud collisions also damp the relative velocity dispersion of clouds in massive associations and thereby aid in the effective assembling of GMC-like complexes.

  17. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  18. Motion detector and analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Unruh, W.P.

    1987-03-23

    Method and apparatus are provided for deriving positive and negative Doppler spectrum to enable analysis of objects in motion, and particularly, objects having rotary motion. First and second returned radar signals are mixed with internal signals to obtain an in-phase process signal and a quadrature process signal. A broad-band phase shifter shifts the quadrature signal through 90/degree/ relative to the in-phase signal over a predetermined frequency range. A pair of signals is output from the broad-band phase shifter which are then combined to provide a first side band signal which is functionally related to a negative Doppler shift spectrum. The distinct positive and negative Doppler spectra may then be analyzed for the motion characteristics of the object being examined.

  19. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over time can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.

  20. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over timemore »can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.« less