Science.gov

Sample records for cloud radar lidar

  1. Cloud parameters from IR lidar and other instruments - CLARET design and preliminary results. [Cloud Lidar And Radar Exploratory Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Uttal, Taneil; Intrieri, Janet M.; Willis, Ron J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes the objectives and experimental design of the Cloud Lidar and Radar Exploratory Test (CLARET) project. Early results for some of the objectives are presented. Particular attention is given to polarization of IR lidar backscatter, cirrus size distribution, and cirrus emissivity. CLARET has produced a good data set for cloud/radiation research and evaluation of remote sensing methods and technologies.

  2. Ground-Based Lidar and Radar Remote Sensing of Tropical Cirrus Clouds at Nauru Island: Cloud Statistics and Radiative Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Mace, Gerald G.

    2002-12-12

    Ground based active and passive remote sensing instrumentation are combined to derive radiative and macrophysical properties of tropical cirrus clouds. Eight months of cirrus observations at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site located on Nauru Island provide independent retrieval of cloud height and visible optical depth using lidar and radar techniques. Comparisons reveal the millimeter cloud radar does not detect 13% of cirrus clouds with a cloud base higher than 15 km that are detected by the lidar. Lidar and radar cloud heights demonstrate good agreement when the cloud lies below 15 km. Radar and lidar retrievals of visible optical depth also compare well for all but the optically thinnest clouds. Cloud occurrence at Nauru as measured by lidar, reveal clear sky conditions occur on average 40%, low clouds 16%, and high clouds 44% of the time. Analysis of observed cirrus macrophysical and radiative properties suggests that two different types of cirrus exist in the tropical western Pacific: high, thin, laminar cirrus with cloud base higher than 15 km, and lower, physically thicker, more structured cirrus clouds. Differences in cirrus types are likely linked to their formation mechanisms. Radiosonde profiles of temperature and equivalent potential temperature near the tropical tropopause show a clear transition between neutrally stable and stable air at ~15 km, which may also explain the presence of two distinct cirrus types. Radiative heating rate and cloud forcing calculations for specific cirrus cases reveal the impact of tropical cirrus clouds on the earth?s radiation budget.

  3. Combined vertical-velocity observations with Doppler lidar, cloud radar and wind profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühl, J.; Leinweber, R.; Görsdorf, U.; Radenz, M.; Ansmann, A.; Lehmann, V.

    2015-01-01

    Case studies of combined vertical-velocity measurements of Doppler lidar, cloud radar and wind profiler are presented. The measurements were taken at the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg, Germany. Synergistic products are presented that are derived from the vertical-velocity measurements of the three instruments: A comprehensive classification mask of vertically moving atmospheric targets and the terminal fall velocity of water droplets and ice crystals corrected for vertical air motion. It is shown that the measurements of the Doppler lidar can extent the view of the cloud radar and the wind profiler, especially when observing clouds.

  4. Validation of SCIAMACHY O2 A band cloud heights using Cloudnet radar/lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Stammes, P.

    2013-10-01

    For the first time two SCIAMACHY O2 A band cloud height products are validated using ground-based radar/lidar measurements between January 2003 and December 2011. The products are the ESA Level 2 (L2) version 5.02 cloud top height and the FRESCO (Fast Retrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A band) version 6 cloud height. The radar/lidar profiles are obtained at the Cloudnet sites of Cabauw and Lindenberg, and are averaged for one hour centered at the SCIAMACHY overpass time to achieve an optimal temporal and spatial match. In total we have about 220 cases of single layer clouds and 200 cases of multi-layer clouds. The FRESCO cloud height and ESA L2 cloud top height are compared with the Cloudnet cloud top height and Cloudnet cloud middle height. We find that the ESA L2 cloud top height has a better agreement with the Cloudnet cloud top height than the Cloudnet cloud middle height. The ESA L2 cloud top height is on average 0.44 km higher than the Cloudnet cloud top height, with a standard deviation of 3.07 km. The FRESCO cloud height is closer to the Cloudnet cloud middle height than the Cloudnet cloud top height. The mean difference between the FRESCO cloud height and the Cloudnet cloud middle height is -0.14 km with a standard deviation of 1.88 km. The SCIAMACHY cloud height products are further compared to the Cloudnet cloud top height and the Cloudnet cloud middle height in 1 km bins. For single layer clouds, the difference between the ESA L2 cloud top height and the Cloudnet cloud top height is less than 1 km for each cloud bin at 3-7 km, which is 24 % percent of the data. The difference between the FRESCO cloud height and the Cloudnet cloud middle height is less than 1 km for each cloud bin at 0-6 km, which is 85 % percent of the data. The results are similar for multi-layer clouds, but the percentage of cases having a bias within 1 km is smaller than for single layer clouds. Since globally about 60 % of all clouds are low clouds and 42 % are single-layer low clouds, we expect that globally for a large percentage of cases the FRESCO cloud height would be close to the cloud middle height.

  5. Cloud Effects on Radiative Heating Rate Profiles over Darwin using ARM and A-train Radar/Lidar Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2013-06-11

    Observations of clouds from the ground-based U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) and satellite-based A-train are used to compute cloud radiative forcing profiles over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. Cloud properties are obtained from both radar (the ARM Millimeter Cloud Radar (MMCR) and the CloudSat satellite in the A-train) and lidar (the ARM Micropulse lidar (MPL) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite in the A-train) observations. Cloud microphysical properties are taken from combined radar and lidar retrievals for ice clouds and radar only or lidar only retrievals for liquid clouds. Large, statistically significant differences of up to 1.43 K/day exist between the mean ARM and A-train net cloud radiative forcing profiles. The majority of the difference in cloud radiative forcing profiles is shown to be due to a large difference in the cloud fraction above 12 km. Above this altitude the A-train cloud fraction is significantly larger because more clouds are detected by CALIPSO than by the ground-based MPL. It is shown that the MPL is unable to observe as many high clouds as CALIPSO due to being more frequently attenuated and a poorer sensitivity even in otherwise clear-sky conditions. After accounting for cloud fraction differences and instrument sampling differences due to viewing platform we determined that differences in cloud radiative forcing due to the retrieved ice cloud properties is relatively small. This study demonstrates that A-train observations are better suited for the calculation cloud radiative forcing profiles. In addition, we find that it is necessary to supplement CloudSat with CALIPSO observations to obtain accurate cloud radiative forcing profiles since a large portion of clouds at Darwin are detected by CALIPSO only.

  6. Comparison of cloud boundaries measured with 8.6 mm radar and 10.6 micrometer lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uttal, Taneil; Intrieri, Janet M.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most basic cloud properties is location; the height of cloud base and the height of cloud top. The glossary of meteorology defines cloud base (top) as follows: 'For a given cloud or cloud layer, that lowest (highest) level in the atmosphere at which the air contains a perceptible quantity of cloud particles.' Our studies show that for a 8.66 mm radar, and a 10.6 micrometer lidar, the level at which cloud hydrometers become 'perceptible' can vary significantly as a function of the different wavelengths, powers, beamwidths and sampling rates of the two remote sensors.

  7. Using Radar, Lidar, and Radiometer measurements to Classify Cloud Type and Study Middle-Level Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhien

    2010-06-29

    The project is mainly focused on the characterization of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties, especially for mixed-phased clouds and middle level ice clouds by combining radar, lidar, and radiometer measurements available from the ACRF sites. First, an advanced mixed-phase cloud retrieval algorithm will be developed to cover all mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF NSA site. The algorithm will be applied to the ACRF NSA observations to generate a long-term arctic mixed-phase cloud product for model validations and arctic mixed-phase cloud processes studies. To improve the representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds in GCMs, an advanced understanding of mixed-phase cloud processes is needed. By combining retrieved mixed-phase cloud microphysical properties with in situ data and large-scale meteorological data, the project aim to better understand the generations of ice crystals in supercooled water clouds, the maintenance mechanisms of the arctic mixed-phase clouds, and their connections with large-scale dynamics. The project will try to develop a new retrieval algorithm to study more complex mixed-phase clouds observed at the ACRF SGP site. Compared with optically thin ice clouds, optically thick middle level ice clouds are less studied because of limited available tools. The project will develop a new two wavelength radar technique for optically thick ice cloud study at SGP site by combining the MMCR with the W-band radar measurements. With this new algorithm, the SGP site will have a better capability to study all ice clouds. Another area of the proposal is to generate long-term cloud type classification product for the multiple ACRF sites. The cloud type classification product will not only facilitates the generation of the integrated cloud product by applying different retrieval algorithms to different types of clouds operationally, but will also support other research to better understand cloud properties and to validate model simulations. The ultimate goal is to improve our cloud classification algorithm into a VAP.

  8. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-07-01

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer clouds using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances under conditions when precipitation does not reach the surface. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievals using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulus under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m-2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the Northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent three-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10-20 g m-2.

  9. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-07-02

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer clouds using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances under conditions when precipitation does not reach the surface. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievalsmore » using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulus under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m-2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the Northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent three-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m-2.« less

  10. Joint retrievals of cloud and drizzle in marine boundary layer clouds using ground-based radar, lidar and zenith radiances

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fielding, M. D.; Chiu, J. C.; Hogan, R. J.; Feingold, G.; Eloranta, E.; O'Connor, E. J.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2015-02-16

    Active remote sensing of marine boundary-layer clouds is challenging as drizzle drops often dominate the observed radar reflectivity. We present a new method to simultaneously retrieve cloud and drizzle vertical profiles in drizzling boundary-layer cloud using surface-based observations of radar reflectivity, lidar attenuated backscatter, and zenith radiances. Specifically, the vertical structure of droplet size and water content of both cloud and drizzle is characterised throughout the cloud. An ensemble optimal estimation approach provides full error statistics given the uncertainty in the observations. To evaluate the new method, we first perform retrievals using synthetic measurements from large-eddy simulation snapshots of cumulusmore » under stratocumulus, where cloud water path is retrieved with an error of 31 g m−2. The method also performs well in non-drizzling clouds where no assumption of the cloud profile is required. We then apply the method to observations of marine stratocumulus obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MAGIC deployment in the northeast Pacific. Here, retrieved cloud water path agrees well with independent 3-channel microwave radiometer retrievals, with a root mean square difference of 10–20 g m−2.« less

  11. Combined vertical-velocity observations with Doppler lidar, cloud radar and wind profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühl, J.; Leinweber, R.; Görsdorf, U.; Radenz, M.; Ansmann, A.; Lehmann, V.

    2015-08-01

    Case studies of combined vertical-velocity measurements of Doppler lidar, cloud radar and wind profiler are presented. The measurements were taken at the Meteorological Observatory, Lindenberg, Germany. Synergistic products are presented that are derived from the vertical-velocity measurements of the three instruments: a comprehensive classification mask of vertically moving atmospheric targets and the terminal fall velocity of water droplets and ice crystals corrected for vertical air motion. It is shown that this combination of instruments can up-value the measurement values of each single instrument and may allow the simultaneous sensing of atmospheric targets and the motion of clear air.

  12. Using Radar, Lidar, and Radiometer measurements to Classify Cloud Type and Study Middle-Level Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhien

    2006-01-04

    The project is concerned with the characterization of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties by combining radar, lidar, and radiometer measurements available from the U.S. Department of Energy's ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF). To facilitate the production of integrated cloud product by applying different algorithms to the ARM data streams, an advanced cloud classification algorithm was developed to classified clouds into eight types at the SGP site based on ground-based active and passive measurements. Cloud type then can be used as a guidance to select an optimal retrieval algorithm for cloud microphysical property retrieval. The ultimate goal of the effort is to develop an operational cloud classification algorithm for ARM data streams. The vision 1 IDL code of the cloud classification algorithm based on the SGP ACRF site observations was delivered to the ARM cloud translator during 2004 ARM science team meeting. Another goal of the project is to study midlevel clouds, especially mixed-phase clouds, by developing new retrieval algorithms using integrated observations at the ACRF sites. Mixed-phase clouds play a particular role in the Arctic climate system. A multiple remote sensor based algorithm, which can provide ice water content and effective size profiles, liquid water path, and layer-mean effective radius of water droplet, was developed to study arctic mixed-phase clouds. The algorithm is applied to long-term ARM observations at the NSA ACRF site. Based on these retrieval results, we are studying seasonal and interannual variations of arctic mixed-phase cloud macro- and micro-physical properties.

  13. Relationship between Ice Cloud Microphysics and Supersaturation from Spaceborne Cloud Radar, Lidar and Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Okamoto, H.; Sato, K.; Ishimoto, H.

    2014-12-01

    We examined the relationship between ice cloud microphysics retrieved from cloud radar on CloudSat and CALIOP on CALIPSO and super saturation inferred from AIRS on AQUA. Ice microphysics such as ice water content (IWC) and effective radius was estimated by CloudSat and CALIPSO data. Unique features of the algorithm is that it has been designed to use depolarization ratio from CALIOP addition to radar reflectivity factor from CloudSat and attenuated backscattering coefficient from CALIOP in order to take into account the variation of ice particle shapes and their orientations [Okamoto et al., 2010]. Water vapor density and temperature were retrieved with much finer resolution by the application of Ishimoto's algorithm [2009] compared with standard AIRS products where horizontal resolution is 45km. The algorithm allows retrievals of water vapor density and temperature every 13.5km in horizontal direction with 1km in vertical. The retrievals are carried out when there is no cloud with its cloud top pressure <200hPa. That is, it is possible to report water vapor information above low-level clouds. Then we sampled the amount of water vapor and temperature estimated from AIRS data to match the CloudSat and CALIPSO foot-print and the data were interpolated to have the same space and time resolution of the merged data sets of CloudSat and CALIPSO, i.e., 1.1km and 240m for horizontal and vertical resolutions. In the new AIRS products, ice super saturation often reached 150% while standard AIRS products showed less frequent super saturation. The ECMWF results generally showed smaller fraction of ice super saturation compared with the new AIRS products. In order to quantitatively compare the water vapor amount and retrieved IWC, we estimated the excess of water amount respect to ice saturation by using ice super saturation. The occurrences of ice clouds inferred from CloudSat and CALIOP agreed with the occurrences of ice-supersaturation reported in the new AIRS products. The retrieved IWC were smaller compared with the estimated IWC from the new AIRS products. Similar analyses with ECMWF showed smaller estimated IWC compared with the values in the new products.

  14. Cirrus Clouds Optical, Microphysical and Radiative Properties Observed During Crystal-Face Experiment: I. A Radar-Lidar Retrieval System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitrescu, C.; Haynes, J. M.; Stephens, G. L.; Heymsfield, G. M.; McGill, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    A method of retrieving cloud microphysical properties using combined observations from both cloud radar and lidar is introduced. This retrieval makes use of an improvement to the traditional optimal estimation retrieval method, whereby a series of corrections are applied to the state vector during the search for an iterative solution. This allows faster convergence to a solution and is less processor intensive. The method is first applied to a synthetic cloud t o demonstrate its validity, and it is shown that the retrieval reliably reproduces vertical profiles of ice water content. The retrieval method is then applied to radar and lidar observations from the CRYSTAL-FACE experiment, and vertical profiles of ice crystal diameter, number concentration, and ice water content are retrieved for a cirrus cloud layers observed one day of that experiment. The validity of the relationship between visible extinction coefficient and radar reflectivity was examined. While synthetic tests showed such a functional relationship, the measured data only partially supported such a conclusion. This is due to errors in the forward model (as explained above) as well as errors in the data sets, including possible mismatch between lidar and radar profiles or errors in the optical depth. Empirical relationships between number concentrations and mean particle diameter were also examined. The results indicate that a distinct and robust relationship exists between these retrieved quantities and it is argued that such a relationship is more than an artifact of the retrieval process offering insight into the nature of the microphysical processes taking place in cirrus.

  15. The CloudSat radar-lidar geometrical profile product (RL-GeoProf): Updates, improvements, and selected results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Zhang, Qiuqing

    2014-08-01

    Derived by combining data from the CloudSat radar and the CALIPSO lidar, the so-called radar-lidar geometrical profile product (RL-GeoProf) allows for characterization of the vertical and spatial structure of hydrometeor layers. RL-GeoProf is one of the standard data products of the CloudSat Project. In this paper we describe updates to the RL-GeoProf algorithm. These improvements include a significant fix to the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask (VFM) that more accurately renders the occurrence frequencies of low-level clouds over the global oceans. Additionally, we now account for the navigational challenges associated with coordinated measurements of the two instruments by providing additional diagnostic information in the data files. We also document how the along-track averaging of the VFM influences the accuracy of RL-GeoProf. We find that the 5 km averaged VFM when merged with data from the CloudSat radar provides a global description of cloud occurrence that best matches an independently derived cloud mask from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MYD35) over daytime global oceans. Expanding on the comparison with MYD35, we demonstrate that RL-GeoProf and MYD35 closely track the monthly averaged cloud occurrence fraction during a 4 year span of measurements. A more detailed examination reveals latitudinal dependency in the comparison. Specifically, MYD35 tends to be significantly low biased relative to RL-GeoProf over the Polar Regions when cloud layers present low visible and thermal contrast with underlying surfaces. Additional analyses examine the geometrically defined hydrometeor layer occurrence climatologies over select regions of the Earth and the seasonal variations of low-based and low-topped cloud cover.

  16. Vertical Cloud Climatology During TC4 Derived from High-Altitude Aircraft Merged Lidar and Radar Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, Dennis; Tian, Lin; Hart, William; Li, Lihua; McGill, Matthew; Heymsfield, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Aircraft lidar works by shooting laser pulses toward the earth and recording the return time and intensity of any of the light returning to the aircraft after scattering off atmospheric particles and/or the Earth s surface. The scattered light signatures can be analyzed to tell the exact location of cloud and aerosol layers and, with the aid of a few optical assumptions, can be analyzed to retrieve estimates of optical properties such as atmospheric transparency. Radar works in a similar fashion except it sends pulses toward earth at a much larger wavelength than lidar. Radar records the return time and intensity of cloud or rain reflection returning to the aircraft. Lidar can measure scatter from optically thin cirrus and aerosol layers whose particles are too small for the radar to detect. Radar can provide reflection profiles through thick cloud layers of larger particles that lidar cannot penetrate. Only after merging the two instrument products can accurate measurements of the locations of all layers in the full atmospheric column be achieved. Accurate knowledge of the vertical distribution of clouds is important information for understanding the Earth/atmosphere radiative balance and for improving weather/climate forecast models. This paper describes one such merged data set developed from the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) experiment based in Costa Rica in July-August 2007 using the nadir viewing Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) and the Cloud Radar System (CRS) on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Statistics were developed concerning cloud probability through the atmospheric column and frequency of the number of cloud layers. These statistics were calculated for the full study area, four sub-regions, and over land compared to over ocean across all available flights. The results are valid for the TC4 experiment only, as preferred cloud patterns took priority during mission planning. The TC4 Study Area was a very cloudy region, with cloudy profiles occurring 94 percent of the time during the ER-2 flights. One to three cloud layers were common, with the average calculated at 2.03 layers per profile. The upper troposphere had a cloud frequency generally over 30%, reaching 42 percent near 13 km during the study. There were regional differences. The Caribbean was much clearer than the Pacific regions. Land had a much higher frequency of high clouds than ocean areas. One region just south and west of Panama had a high probability of clouds below 15 km altitude with the frequency never dropping below 25% and reaching a maximum of 60% at 11-13 km altitude. These cloud statistics will help characterize the cloud volume for TC4 scientists as they try to understand the complexities of the tropical atmosphere.

  17. The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at SIRTA Atmospheric Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Chiriaco, M.; Vautard, R.; Chepfer, H.; Haeffelin, M.; Wanherdrick, Y.; Morille, Y.; Protat, A.; Dudhia, J.

    2005-03-18

    Ice clouds play a major role in the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system (Liou 1986). Their radiative effect is governed primarily by the equilibrium between their albedo and greenhouse effects. Both macrophysical and microphysical properties of ice clouds regulate this equilibrium. For quantifying the effect of these clouds onto climate and weather systems, they must be properly characterized in atmospheric models. In this paper we use remote-sensing measurements from the SIRTA ground based atmospheric observatory (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Teledetection Atmospherique, http://sirta.lmd.polytechnique.fr). Lidar and radar observations taken over 18 months are used, in order to gain statistical confidence in the model evaluation. Along this period of time, 62 days are selected for study because they contain parts of ice clouds. We use the ''model to observations'' approach by simulating lidar and radar signals from MM5 outputs. Other more classical variables such as shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes are also used. Four microphysical schemes, among which that proposed by Reisner et al. (1998) with original or modified parameterizations of particle terminal fall velocities (Zurovac-Jevtic and Zhang 2003, Heymsfield and Donner 1990), and the simplified Dudhia (1989) scheme are evaluated in this study.

  18. The Cloud Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, Paul; Heymsfield, Gerald; Li, Lihua; Tian, Lin; Zenker, Ed

    2003-01-01

    Improvement in our understanding of the radiative impact of clouds on the climate system requires a comprehensive view of clouds including their physical dimensions, dynamical generation processes, and detailed microphysical properties. To this end, millimeter vave radar is a powerful tool by which clouds can be remotely sensed. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed the Cloud Radar System (CRS). CRS is a highly sensitive 94 GHz (W-band) pulsed-Doppler polarimetric radar that is designed to fly on board the NASA high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. The instrument is currently the only millimeter wave radar capable of cloud and precipitation measurements from above most all clouds. Because it operates from high-altitude, the CRS provides a unique measurement perspective for cirrus cloud studies. The CRS emulates a satellite view of clouds and precipitation systems thus providing valuable measurements for the implementation and algorithm validation for the upcoming NASA CloudSat mission that is designed to measure ice cloud distributions on the global scale using a spaceborne 94 GHz radar. This paper describes the CRS instrument and preliminary data from the recent Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE). The radar design is discussed. Characteristics of the radar are given. A block diagram illustrating functional components of the radar is shown. The performance of the CRS during the CRYSTAL-FACE campaign is discussed.

  19. Spaceborne lidar for cloud monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Christian; Krichbaumer, W.; Matvienko, Gennadii G.

    1994-12-01

    Results of laser cloud top measurements taken from space in 1982 (called PANTHER) are presented. Three sequences of land, water, and cloud data are selected. A comparison with airborne lidar data shows similarities. Using the single scattering lidar equation for these spaceborne lidar measurements one can misinterpret the data if one doesn't correct for multiple scattering.

  20. Using Radar, Lidar and Radiometer Data from NSA and SHEBA to Quantify Cloud Property Effects on the Surface Heat Budget in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Janet Intrieri; Mathhew Shupe

    2005-01-01

    Cloud and radiation data from two distinctly different Arctic areas are analyzed to study the differences between coastal Alaskan and open Arctic Ocean region clouds and their respective influence on the surface radiation budget. The cloud and radiation datasets were obtained from (1) the DOE North Slope of Alaska (NSA) facility in the coastal town of Barrow, Alaska, and (2) the SHEBA field program, which was conducted from an icebreaker frozen in, and drifting with, the sea-ice for one year in the Western Arctic Ocean. Radar, lidar, radiometer, and sounding measurements from both locations were used to produce annual cycles of cloud occurrence and height, atmospheric temperature and humidity, surface longwave and shortwave broadband fluxes, surface albedo, and cloud radiative forcing. In general, both regions revealed a similar annual trend of cloud occurrence fraction with minimum values in winter (60-75%) and maximum values during spring, summer and fall (80-90%). However, the annual average cloud occurrence fraction for SHEBA (76%) was lower than the 6-year average cloud occurrence at NSA (92%). Both Arctic areas also showed similar annual cycle trends of cloud forcing with clouds warming the surface through most of the year and a period of surface cooling during the summer, when cloud shading effects overwhelm cloud greenhouse effects. The greatest difference between the two regions was observed in the magnitude of the cloud cooling effect (i.e., shortwave cloud forcing), which was significantly stronger at NSA and lasted for a longer period of time than at SHEBA. This is predominantly due to the longer and stronger melt season at NSA (i.e., albedo values that are much lower coupled with Sun angles that are somewhat higher) than the melt season observed over the ice pack at SHEBA. Longwave cloud forcing values were comparable between the two sites indicating a general similarity in cloudiness and atmospheric temperature and humidity structure between the two regions.

  1. Weather Radars and Lidar for Observing the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Vivek) Vivekanandan, J.

    2010-05-01

    The Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado develops and deploys state-of-the-art ground-based radar, airborne radar and lidar instruments to advance scientific understanding of the earth system. The ground-based radar (S-Pol) is equipped with dual-wavelength capability (S-band and Ka-band). S-Pol is the only transportable radar in the world. In order to capture faster moving weather events such as tornadoes and record observations of clouds over rugged mountainous terrain and ocean, an airborne radar (ELDORA) is used. It is the only airborne Doppler meteorological radar that is able to detect motions in the clear air. The EOL is in the process of building the first phase of a three phase dual wavelength W/Ka-band airborne cloud radar to be called the HIAPER Cloud Radar (HCR). This phase is a pod based W-band radar system with scanning capability. The second phase will add pulse compression and polarimetric capability to the W-band system, while the third phase will add complementary Ka-band radar. The pod-based radar is primarily designed to fly on the Gulfstream V (GV) and C-130 aircraft. The envisioned capability of a millimeter wave radar system on GV is enhanced by coordination with microwave radiometer, in situ probes, and especially by the NCAR GV High-Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) which is also under construction. The presentation will describe the capabilities of current instruments and also planned instrumentation development.

  2. Combined High Spectral Resolution Lidar and Radar Measurement of Drizzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloranta, Edwin

    2015-04-01

    Marine stratus clouds are an important feature of the global climate system. Cloud lifetime is sensitive to drizzle rates. Drizzle not only removes water from the cloud but it's evaporation cools the sub-cloud layer acting to suppress convection. Accurate measurements of drizzle rates will improve our understanding of cloud maintenance. Simultaneous lidar measurements of extinction and radar backscatter allow determination of drizzle droplet particle size, liquid water content, fall velocity and water flux. However, drizzle measurements with conventional lidar are hampered by: 1)changes in the transmission of the output window caused by water accumulation on the lidar output window, 2)the difficulty of correcting the backscatter signal for atmospheric extinction and, 3)the effects of multiple scattering. High spectral resolution lidar avoids problems with window transmission and atmospheric attenuation because the backscatter is referenced to the known molecular scattering cross section at each point in the profile. Although multiple scattering degrades the direct measurement of extinction with the HSRL, it has little effect the HSRL measurement of backscatter cross section. We have developed an iterative solution that begins by estimating the extinction cross in drizzle using an assumed lidar ratio and the backscatter measurement. This is combined with the radar backscatter to make a first estimate of the particle size distribution. Mie scattering theory is then used to compute an improved lidar ratio for this particle size distribution and the new lidar ratio provides an improved extinction cross section. The calculation assumes a modified gamma distribution of sizes. The mode diameter of the distribution is fixed by the lidar-radar cross section ratio, while the width of the distribution is determined by matching the computed fall velocity of the drizzle with the observed radar Doppler velocity. The strengths and limitations of the this approach are examined using HSRL and millimeter radar acquired during the MAGIC deployment of the DOE ARM mobile facility on the 'Spirit Horizon' container ship. Marine stratus observations were acquired as the ship made repeated weekly trips between Long Beach CA and Honolulu, HI. This paper will compared derived precipitation rates with conventional rain gauge and distressed data. The sensitivity of the retrieval precipitation rates to assumptions will also be presented.

  3. Retrieving Stratocumulus Drizzle Parameters Using Doppler Radar and Lidar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Ewan J.; Hogan, Robin J.; Illingworth, Anthony J.

    2005-01-01

    Stratocumulus is one of the most common cloud types globally, with a profound effect on the earth's radiation budget, and the drizzle process is fundamental in understanding the evolution of these boundary layer clouds. In this paper a combination of 94-GHz Doppler radar and backscatter lidar is used to investigate the microphysical properties of drizzle falling below the base of stratocumulus clouds. The ratio of the radar to lidar backscatter power is proportional to the fourth power of mean size, and so potentially it can provide an accurate size estimate. Information about the shape of the drop size distribution is then inferred from the Doppler spectral width. The algorithm estimates vertical profiles of drizzle parameters such as liquid water content, liquid water flux, and vertical air velocity, assuming that the drizzle size spectrum may be represented by a gamma distribution. The depletion time scale of cloud liquid water through the drizzle process can be estimated when the liquid water path of the cloud is available from microwave radiometers, and observations suggest that this time scale varies from a few days in light drizzle to a few hours in strong drizzle events. Radar and lidar observations from Chilbolton (in southern England) and aircraft size spectra taken during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment have both been used to derive the following power-law relationship between liquid water flux (LWF) (g m-2 s-1) and radar reflectivity (Z) (mm6 m-3): LWF = 0.0093Z0.69. This relation is valid for frequencies up to 94 GHz and therefore would allow a forthcoming spaceborne radar to measure liquid water flux around the globe to within a factor of 2 for values of Z above -20 dBZ.

  4. Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    KB Widener; K Johnson

    2005-01-30

    The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

  5. Arctic multilayered, mixed-phase cloud processes revealed in millimeter-wave cloud radar Doppler spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlinde, Johannes; Rambukkange, Mahlon P.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Eloranta, Edwin W.

    2013-12-01

    radar Doppler velocity spectra, lidar backscattering coefficients and depolarization ratios, and aircraft in situ measurements are used to investigate microphysical processes occurring in a case of multilayered, mixed-phase clouds over the North Slope of Alaska. Some liquid-cloud layers were observed to exist in well-mixed atmospheric layers, but others were found in absolutely stable atmospheric layers. The observations suggest that strong cloud top cooling was necessary to produce the well-mixed cloud layers; clouds shielded from radiative cooling by overlaying clouds more frequently existed in absolutely stable layers. The in situ measurements revealed that most liquid layers contained drizzle, the production process of which was shown from the radar and lidar measurements to have been interrupted only during heavier ice-precipitation events. Different layers interacted with one another by changing the radiative heating profile and by precipitation which changed the growth paths available to cloud particles and even initiated new hydrometeor classes.

  6. Raman LIDAR Detection of Cloud Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoz, Belay; Starr, David; Whiteman, David; Evans, Keith; Hlavka, Dennis; Peravali, Ravindra

    1999-01-01

    Advantages introduced by Raman lidar systems for cloud base determination during precipitating periods are explored using two case studies of light rain and virga conditions. A combination of the Raman lidar derived profiles of water vapor mixing ratio and aerosol scattering ratio, together with the Raman scattered signals from liquid drops, can minimize or even eliminate some of the problems associated with cloud boundary detection using elastic backscatter lidars.

  7. Combined Lidar-Radar Remote Sensing: Initial Results from CRYSTAL-FACE and Implications for Future Spaceflight Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Matthew J.; Li, Li-Hua; Hart, William D.; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, David M.

    2003-01-01

    In the near future NASA plans to fly satellites carrying a multi-wavelength backscatter lidar and a 94-GHz cloud profiling radar in formation to provide complete global profiling of cloud and aerosol properties. The CRYSTAL-FACE field campaign, conducted during July 2002, provided the first high-altitude colocated measurements from lidar and cloud profiling radar to simulate these spaceborne sensors. The lidar and radar provide complementary measurements with varying degrees of measurement overlap. This paper presents initial results of the combined airborne lidar-radar measurements during CRYSTAL-FACE. The overlap of instrument sensitivity is presented, within the context of particular CRYSTAL-FACE conditions. Results are presented to quantify the portion of atmospheric profiles sensed independently by each instrument and the portion sensed simultaneously by the two instruments.

  8. THOR: Cloud Thickness from Off beam Lidar Returns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; McGill, Matthew; Kolasinski, John; Varnai, Tamas; Yetzer, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Conventional wisdom is that lidar pulses do not significantly penetrate clouds having optical thickness exceeding about tau = 2, and that no returns are detectable from more than a shallow skin depth. Yet optically thicker clouds of tau much greater than 2 reflect a larger fraction of visible photons, and account for much of Earth s global average albedo. As cloud layer thickness grows, an increasing fraction of reflected photons are scattered multiple times within the cloud, and return from a diffuse concentric halo that grows around the incident pulse, increasing in horizontal area with layer physical thickness. The reflected halo is largely undetected by narrow field-of-view (FoV) receivers commonly used in lidar applications. THOR - Thickness from Off-beam Returns - is an airborne wide-angle detection system with multiple FoVs, capable of observing the diffuse halo, detecting wide-angle signal from which physical thickness of optically thick clouds can be retrieved. In this paper we describe the THOR system, demonstrate that the halo signal is stronger for thicker clouds, and validate physical thickness retrievals for clouds having z > 20, from NASA P-3B flights over the Department of Energy/Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Southern Great Plains site, using the lidar, radar and other ancillary ground-based data.

  9. Cloud Thickness from Offbeam Returns - Thor Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R.; Kolasinski, J.; McGill, M.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Physical thickness of a cloud layer, and sometimes multiple cloud layers, can be estimated from the time delay of off-beam returns from a pulsed laser source illuminating one side of the cloud layer. In particular, the time delay of light returning from the outer diffuse halo of light surrounding the beam entry point, relative to the time delay at beam center, determines the cloud physical thickness. The delay combined with the pulse stretch gives the optical thickness. The halo method works best for thick cloud layers, typically optical thickness exceeding 2, and thus compliments conventional lidar which cannot penetrate thick clouds. Cloud layer top and base have been measured independently over the ARM/SGP site using conventional laser ranging (lidar) and the top minus base thickness are compared with a cloud top halo estimate obtained from the NASA/Goddard THOR System (THOR = THickness from Offbeam Returns). THOR flies on the NASA P3, and measures the halo timings from several km above cloud top, at the same time providing conventional lidar cloud top height. The ARM/SGP micropulse lidar provides cloud base height for validation.

  10. Drizzle Droplet Size Estimation Using High Spectral Resolution LIDAR and Millimeter Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloranta, E. W.; Bartholomew, M. J.; Bharadwaj, N.

    2013-12-01

    High spectral resolution lidar(HSRL) provides calibrated measurement of optical extinction that can be used with millimeter wavelength radar to provide a measure of drizzle droplet size. The strengths and limitations of the this approach are examined using a combination of HSRL, KAZR radar and disdrometer data acquired during the MAGIC deployment of the DOE AMF2 mobile facility. Data was collected on a ship during multiple trips between Long Beach, CA an Honolulu, HI. Lidar-radar particle size estimations are typically based on the assumption of a mono-modal size distribution. The multi-mode particle size distributions that exist in clouds where drizzle co-exists with cloud droplets yield lidar-radar size estimates that are not characteristic of either distribution. A similar problem is encountered in the sub-cloud layer where aerosol scattering co-exists with drizzle. This paper examines the possibility of using aerosol scattering measured outside the drizzle shafts to correct for aerosol contributions and compares the lidar-radar drizzle derived particle sizes with disdrometer measurements.

  11. An Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Value-Added Product to Retrieve Optically Thin Cloud Visible Optical Depth using Micropulse Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C; Comstock, JM; Flynn, C

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of the Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Value-Added Product (VAP) is to retrieve the visible (short-wave) cloud optical depth for optically thin clouds using MPL. The advantage of using the MPL to derive optical depth is that lidar is able to detect optically thin cloud layers that may not be detected by millimeter cloud radar or radiometric techniques. The disadvantage of using lidar to derive optical depth is that the lidar signal becomes attenuation limited when τ approaches 3 (this value can vary depending on instrument specifications). As a result, the lidar will not detect optically thin clouds if an optically thick cloud obstructs the lidar beam.

  12. Lidar and Radar Measurements of the melting layer in the frame of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Summa, Donato; Bhawar, Rohini; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Vaughan, Geraint; Norton, Emily; Peters, Gerhard

    2009-03-01

    During the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS), lidar dark bands were observed by the Univ. of BASILicata Raman lidar system (BASIL) on several IOPs and SOPs (among others, 23 July, 15 August, 17 August). Dark band signatures appear in the lidar measurements of particle backscattering at 355, 532 and 1064 nm and particle extinction at 355 and 532 nm, as well as in particle depolarization measurements. Lidar data are supported by measurements from the University of Hamburg cloud radar MIRA 36 (36 GHz), the University of Hamburg dual-polarization micro rain radars (24.1 GHz) and the University of Manchester Radio UHF clear air wind profiler (1.29 GHz). Results from BASIL and the radars are illustrated and discussed to support in the comprehension of the microphysical and scattering processes responsible for the appearance of the lidar dark band and radar bright band.

  13. Aircraft-protection radar for use with atmospheric lidars.

    PubMed

    Duck, Thomas J; Firanski, Bernard; Lind, Frank D; Sipler, Dwight

    2005-08-10

    A modified X-band radar system designed to detect aircraft during atmospheric lidar operations is described and characterized. The capability of the radar to identify aircraft approaching from a variety of directions was tested, and first detections were found to occur between the -10 and -3 dB perimeters of the gain horn's antenna pattern. A model based on the radar equation projects the performance of the radar for different sizes of aircraft and at different altitude levels. Risk analysis indicates that the probability of accidently illuminating an aircraft with the laser beam during joint lidar-radar operations is low. PMID:16114532

  14. Scanning ARM Cloud Radar Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-06-18

    The scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) is a polarimetric Doppler radar consisting of three different radar designs based on operating frequency. These are designated as follows: (1) X-band SACR (X-SACR); (2) Ka-band SACR (Ka-SACR); and (3) W-band SACR (W-SACR). There are two SACRs on a single pedestal at each site where SACRs are deployed. The selection of the operating frequencies at each deployed site is predominantly determined by atmospheric attenuation at the site. Because RF attenuation increases with atmospheric water vapor content, ARM's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites use the X-/Ka-band frequency pair. The Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites field the Ka-/W-band frequency pair. One ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) has a Ka/W-SACR and the other (AMF2) has a X/Ka-SACR.

  15. A Variational Method to Retrieve the Extinction Profile in Liquid Clouds Using Multiple Field-of-View Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pounder, Nicola L.; Hogan, Robin J.; Varnai, Tamas; Battaglia, Alessandro; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    While liquid clouds playa very important role in the global radiation budget, it's been very difficult to remotely determine their internal cloud structure. Ordinary lidar instruments (similar to radars but using visible light pulses) receive strong signals from such clouds, but the information is limited to a thin layer near the cloud boundary. Multiple field-of-view (FOV) lidars offer some new hope as they are able to isolate photons that were scattered many times by cloud droplets and penetrated deep into a cloud before returning to the instrument. Their data contains new information on cloud structure, although the lack of fast simulation methods made it challenging to interpret the observations. This paper describes a fast new technique that can simulate multiple-FOV lidar signals and can even estimate the way the signals would change in response to changes in cloud properties-an ability that allows quick refinements in our initial guesses of cloud structure. Results for a hypothetical airborne three-FOV lidar suggest that this approach can help determine cloud structure for a deeper layer in clouds, and can reliably determine the optical thickness of even fairly thick liquid clouds. The algorithm is also applied to stratocumulus observations by the 8-FOV airborne "THOR" lidar. These tests demonstrate that the new method can determine the depth to which a lidar provides useful information on vertical cloud structure. This work opens the way to exploit data from spaceborne lidar and radar more rigorously than has been possible up to now.

  16. Lidar cloud studies for FIRE and ECLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Grund, Christian J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Hardesty, Michael; Alvarez, James

    1990-01-01

    Optical remote sensing measurements of cirrus cloud properties were collected by one airborne and four ground-based lidar systems over a 32 h period during this case study from the First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program) Regional Experiment (FIRE) Intensive Field Observation (IFO) program. The lidar systems were variously equipped to collect linear depolarization, intrinsically calibrated backscatter, and Doppler velocity information. Data presented describe the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of cirrus clouds over an area encompassing southern and central Wisconsin. The cirrus cloud types include: dissipating subvisual and thin fibrous cirrus cloud bands, an isolated mesoscale uncinus complex (MUC), a large-scale deep cloud that developed into an organized cirrus structure within the lidar array, and a series of intensifying mesoscale cirrus cloud masses. Although the cirrus frequently developed in the vertical from particle fall-streaks emanating from generating regions at or near cloud tops, glaciating supercooled (-30 to -35 C) altocumulus clouds contributed to the production of ice mass at the base of the deep cirrus cloud, apparently even through riming, and other mechanisms involving evaporation, wave motions, and radiative effects are indicated. The generating regions ranged in scale from approximately 1.0 km cirrus uncinus cells, to organized MUC structures up to approximately 120 km across.

  17. Lidar and radar measurements of the melting layer: observations of dark and bright band phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.; Cacciani, M.; Norton, E. G.; Peters, G.; Dufournet, Y.

    2012-05-01

    Multi-wavelength lidar measurements in the melting layer revealing the presence of dark and bright bands have been performed by the University of BASILicata Raman lidar system (BASIL) during a stratiform rain event. Simultaneously radar measurements have been also performed from the same site by the University of Hamburg cloud radar MIRA 36 (35.5 GHz), the University of Hamburg dual-polarization micro rain radar (24.15 GHz) and the University of Manchester UHF wind profiler (1.29 GHz). Measurements from BASIL and the radars are illustrated and discussed in this paper for a specific case study on 23 July 2007 during the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Simulations of the lidar dark and bright band based on the application of concentric/eccentric sphere Lorentz-Mie codes and a melting layer model are also provided. Lidar and radar measurements and model results are also compared with measurements from a disdrometer on ground and a two-dimensional cloud (2DC) probe on-board the ATR42 SAFIRE. Measurements and model results are found to confirm and support the conceptual microphysical/scattering model elaborated by Sassen et al. (2005).

  18. Beyond Radar Backscatter: Estimating Forest Structure and Biomass with Radar Interferometry and Lidar Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalle, M.; Ahmed, R.

    2014-12-01

    Mapping forest structure and aboveground biomass globally is a major challenge that the remote sensing community has been facing for decades. Radar backscatter is sensitive to biomass only up to a certain amount (about 150 tons/ha at L-band and 300 tons/ha at P-band), whereas lidar remote sensing is strongly limited by poor spatial coverage. In recent years radar interferometry, including its extension to polarimetric radar interferometry (PolInSAR), has emerged as a new technique to overcome the limitations of radar backscatter. The idea of PolInSAR is to use jointly interferometric and polarimetric radar techniques to separate different scattering mechanisms and retrieve the vertical structure of forests. The advantage is to map ecosystem structure continuously over large areas and independently of cloud coverage. Experiments have shown that forest height - an important proxy for biomass - can be estimated using PolInSAR with accuracy between 15% and 20% at plot level. At AGU we will review the state-of-art of repeat-pass PolInSAR for biomass mapping, including its potential and limitations, and discuss how merging lidar data with PolInSAR data can be beneficial not only for product cross-validation but also for achieving better estimation of ecosystem properties over large areas. In particular, lidar data are expected to aid the inversion of PolInSAR models by providing (1) better identification of ground under the canopy, (2) approximate information of canopy structure in limited areas, and (3) maximum tree height useful for mapping PolInSAR temporal decorrelation. We will show our tree height and biomass maps using PolInSAR L-band JPL/UAVSAR data collected in tropical and temperate forests, and P-band ONERA/TROPISAR data acquired in French Guiana. LVIS lidar data will be used, as well as SRTM data, field measurements and inventory data to support our study. The use of two different radar frequencies and repeat-pass JPL UAVSAR data will offer also the opportunity to compare our results with the new airborne P-band ECOSAR and L-band DBSAR instruments developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  19. Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collis, R. T. H.

    1969-01-01

    Lidar is an optical radar technique employing laser energy. Variations in signal intensity as a function of range provide information on atmospheric constituents, even when these are too tenuous to be normally visible. The theoretical and technical basis of the technique is described and typical values of the atmospheric optical parameters given. The significance of these parameters to atmospheric and meteorological problems is discussed. While the basic technique can provide valuable information about clouds and other material in the atmosphere, it is not possible to determine particle size and number concentrations precisely. There are also inherent difficulties in evaluating lidar observations. Nevertheless, lidar can provide much useful information as is shown by illustrations. These include lidar observations of: cirrus cloud, showing mountain wave motions; stratification in clear air due to the thermal profile near the ground; determinations of low cloud and visibility along an air-field approach path; and finally the motion and internal structure of clouds of tracer materials (insecticide spray and explosion-caused dust) which demonstrate the use of lidar for studying transport and diffusion processes.

  20. Micropulse Lidar Cloud Mask Value-Added Product Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, C; Comstock, J

    2011-07-25

    Lidar backscattered signal is a useful tool for identifying vertical cloud structure in the atmosphere in optically thin clouds. Cloud boundaries derived from lidar signals are a necessary input for popular ARM data products, such as the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL) product. An operational cloud boundary algorithm (Wang and Sassen 2001) has been implemented for use with the ARM Micropulse Lidar (MPL) systems. In addition to retrieving cloud boundaries above 500 m, the value-added product (VAP) named Micropulse Lidar Cloud Mask (MPLCMASK) applies lidar-specific corrections (i.e., range-square, background, deadtime, and overlap) as described in Campbell et al. (2002) to the measured backscattered lidar. Depolarization ratio is computed using the methodology developed by Flynn et al. (2007) for polarization-capable MPL systems. The cloud boundaries output from MPLCMASK will be the primary lidar cloud mask for input to the ARSCL product and will be applied to all MPL systems, including historical data sets.

  1. LIDAR, Point Clouds, and their Archaeological Applications

    SciTech Connect

    White, Devin A

    2013-01-01

    It is common in contemporary archaeological literature, in papers at archaeological conferences, and in grant proposals to see heritage professionals use the term LIDAR to refer to high spatial resolution digital elevation models and the technology used to produce them. The goal of this chapter is to break that association and introduce archaeologists to the world of point clouds, in which LIDAR is only one member of a larger family of techniques to obtain, visualize, and analyze three-dimensional measurements of archaeological features. After describing how point clouds are constructed, there is a brief discussion on the currently available software and analytical techniques designed to make sense of them.

  2. Cloud properties derived from two lidars over the ARM SGP site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, Martial; Morille, Yohann; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Flynn, Connor; Long, Charles N.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Newson, Rob K.

    2011-04-01

    Active remote sensors such as lidars or radars can be used with other data to quantify the cloud properties at regional scale and at global scale. Relative to radar, lidar remote sensing is sensitive to very thin and high clouds but has a significant limitation due to signal attenuation in the ability to precisely quantify the properties of clouds with a cloud optical thickness larger than 3. The cloud properties for all levels of clouds are derived and distributions of cloud base height (CBH), top height (CTH), physical cloud thickness (CT), and optical thickness (COT) from local statistics are compared. The goal of this study is (1) to establish a climatology of macrophysical and optical properties for all levels of clouds observed over the ARM SGP site and (2) to estimate the discrepancies between the two remote sensing systems (pulse energy, sampling, resolution, etc.). Our first results tend to show that the MPL, which are the primary ARM lidars, have a distinctly limited range within which all of these cloud properties are detectable, especially cloud top and cloud thickness, but this can include cloud base particularly during summer daytime period. According to the comparisons between RL and MPL, almost 50% of situations show a signal to noise ratio too low (smaller than 3) for the MPL in order to detect clouds higher than 7km during daytime period in summer. Consequently, the MPL-derived annual cycle of cirrus cloud base (top) altitude is biased low, especially for daylight periods, compared with those derived from the RL data, which detects cloud base ranging from 7.5 km in winter to 9.5 km in summer (and tops ranging from 8.6 to 10.5 km). The optically thickest cirrus clouds (COT > 0.3) reach 50% of the total population for the Raman lidar and only 20% for the Micropulse lidar due to the difference of pulse energy and the effect of solar irradiance contamination. A complementary study using the cloud fraction derived from the Micropulse lidar for clouds below 5 km and from the Raman lidar for cloud above 5 km allows for better estimation of the total cloud fraction between the ground and the top of the atmosphere. This study presents the diurnal cycle of cloud fraction for each season in comparisons with Long et al.'s (2006) cloud fraction calculation derived from radiative flux analysis.

  3. Next-Generation Spaceborne Cloud Profiling Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Durden, Stephen L.; Im, Eastwood; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Racette, Paul; Starr, Dave O.

    2009-01-01

    One of the instruments recommended for deployment on the Aerosol/Cloud/Echosystems (ACE) mission is a new advanced Cloud Profiling Radar (ACE-CPR). The atmospheric sciences community has initiated the effort to define the scientific requirements for this instrument. Initial studies focusing on system configuration, performance and feasibility start from the successful experience of the Cloud Profiling Radar on CloudSat Mission (CS-CPR), the first 94-GHz nadir-looking spaceborne radar which has been acquiring global time series of vertical cloud structure since June 2, 2006. In this paper we address the significance of CloudSat's accomplishments in regards to the design and development of radars for future cloud profiling missions such as EarthCARE and ACE.

  4. The Earth Clouds and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) Mission: Cloud and Aerosol Lidar and Imager algorithms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, David; van Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan; Wandinger, Ulla; Hnerbein, Anjah; Fischer, Jurgen; von Bismarck, Jonas; Eisinger, Michael; Lajas, Dulce; Wehr, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    The value of multi-sensor remote sensing applied to clouds and aerosol has become clear in recent years. For example, combinations of instruments including passive radiometers, lidars and cloud radars have proved invaluable for their ability to retrieve profiles of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties. This is amply illustrated by various results from the US-DoE ARM (and similar) surface sites as well as results from data collected by sensors aboard the A-train satellites CloudSat, CALIPSO, and Terra. The Earth Clouds Aerosol and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) mission is a combined ESA/JAXA mission to be launched in 2018 which has been designed with sensor-synergy playing a key role. The mission consists of a cloud-profiling radar (CPR), a high-spectral resolution cloud/aerosol lidar (ATLID), a cloud/aerosol multi-spectral imager (MSI), and a three-view broad-band radiometer (BBR). The mission will deliver cloud, aerosol and radiation products focusing on horizontal scales ranging from 1 km to 10 km. EarthCARE data will be used in multiple ways ranging from model evaluation studies, to GCM-orientated cloud microphysical property parameterization development, to data assimilation activities. Recently a number of activities, funded by ESA, have kicked-off which will ultimately deliver operational algorithms for EarthCARE. One of these activities is the "Atmospheric Products from Imager and Lidar" (APRIL) project which focuses on the development of lidar, imager and combined lidar-imager cloud and aerosol algorithms. In this presentation an overview of the APRIL algorithms within the wider context of the planned EarthCARE processing chain will be given.

  5. Spaceborne lidar measurement accuracy - Simulation of aerosol, cloud, molecular density, and temperature retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Morley, B. M.; Browell, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with studies concerning the use of an orbiting optical radar (lidar) to conduct aerosol and cloud measurements, attention has been given to the accuracy with which lidar return signals could be measured. However, signal-measurement error is not the only source of error which can affect the accuracy of the derived information. Other error sources are the assumed molecular-density and atmospheric-transmission profiles, and the lidar calibration factor (which relates signal to backscatter coefficient). The present investigation has the objective to account for the effects of all these errors sources for several realistic combinations of lidar parameters, model atmospheres, and background lighting conditions. In addition, a procedure is tested and developed for measuring density and temperature profiles with the lidar, and for using the lidar-derived density profiles to improve aerosol retrievals.

  6. CloudSat: the Cloud Profiling Radar Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen L.; Tanelli, Simone

    2006-01-01

    The Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), the primary science instrument of the CloudSat Mission, is a 94-GHz nadir-looking radar that measures the power backscattered by clouds as a function of distance from the radar. This instrument will acquire a global time series of vertical cloud structure at 500-m vertical resolution and 1.4-km horizontal resolution. CPR will operate in a short-pulse mode and will yield measurements at a minimum detectable sensitivity of -28 dBZ.

  7. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  8. Development status of the cloud profiling radar for the CloudSat mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, E.; Durden, S. L.; Wu, C.

    2003-01-01

    The Cloud Profiling Radar, the primary science instrument of the CloudSat Mission, is a 94-GHz nadir-looking radar that measures the power backscattered by clouds as a function of distance from the radar.

  9. First radar echoes from cumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Charles A.; Miller, L. J.

    1993-01-01

    In attempting to use centimeter-wavelength radars to investigate the early stage of precipitation formation in clouds, 'mantle echoes' are rediscovered and shown to come mostly from scattering by small-scale variations in refractive index, a Bragg kind of scattering mechanism. This limits the usefulness of single-wavelength radar for studies of hydrometeor growth, according to data on summer cumulus clouds in North Dakota, Hawaii, and Florida, to values of reflectivity factor above about 10 dBZe with 10-cm radar, 0 dBZe with 5-cm radar, and -10 dBZe with 3-cm radar. These are limits at or above which the backscattered radar signal from the kinds of clouds observed can be assumed to be almost entirely from hydrometeors or (rarely) other particulate material such as insects. Dual-wavelength radar data can provide the desired information about hydrometeors at very low reflectivity levels if assumptions can be made about the inhomogeneities responsible for the Bragg scattering. The Bragg scattering signal itself probably will be a useful way to probe inhomogeneities one-half the radar wavelength in scale for studying cloud entrainment and mixing processes. However, this use is possible only before scattering from hydrometeors dominates the radar return.

  10. A Depolarisation lidar based method for the determination of liquid-cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, David; Klein Baltink, Henk; Henzing, Bas; de Roode, Stephen; Siebesma, Pier

    2015-04-01

    The fact that polarisation lidars measure a~depolarisation signal in liquid clouds due to the occurrence of multiple-scattering is well-known. The degree of measured depolarisation depends on the lidar characteristics (e.g. wavelength and receiver field-of-view) as well as the cloud macrophysical (e.g. cloud base altitude) and microphysical (e.g. effective radius, liquid water content) properties. Efforts seeking to use depolarisation information in a~quantitative manner to retrieve cloud properties have been undertaken with, arguably, limited practical success. In this work we present a~retrieval procedure applicable to clouds with (quasi-)linear liquid water content (LWC) profiles and (quasi-)constant cloud droplet number density in the cloud base region. Thus limiting the applicability of the procedure allows us to reduce the cloud variables to two parameters (namely the derivative of the liquid water content with height and the extinction at a~fixed distance above cloud-base). This simplification, in turn, allows us to employ a~fast and robust optimal-estimation inversion using pre-computed look-up-tables produced using extensive lidar Monte-Carlo multiple-scattering simulations. In this paper, we describe the theory behind the inversion procedure and successfully apply it to simulated observations based on large-eddy simulation model output. The inversion procedure is then applied to actual depolarisation lidar data corresponding to a~range of cases taken from the Cabauw measurement site in the central Netherlands. The lidar results were then used to predict the corresponding cloud-base region radar reflectivities. In non-drizzling condition, it was found that the lidar inversion results can be used to predict the observed radar reflectivities with an accuracy within the radar calibration uncertainty (2--3 dBZ). This result strongly supports the accuracy of the lidar inversion results. Results of a~comparison between ground-based aerosol number concentration and lidar-derived cloud droplet number densities are also presented and discussed. The observed relationship between the two quantities is seen to be consistent with the results of previous studies based on aircraft-based in situ measurements.

  11. A depolarisation lidar-based method for the determination of liquid-cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D. P.; Klein Baltink, H.; Henzing, J. S.; de Roode, S. R.; Siebesma, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    The fact that polarisation lidars measure a depolarisation signal in liquid clouds due to the occurrence of multiple scattering is well known. The degree of measured depolarisation depends on the lidar characteristics (e.g. wavelength and receiver field of view) as well as the cloud macrophysical (e.g. cloud-base altitude) and microphysical (e.g. effective radius, liquid water content) properties. Efforts seeking to use depolarisation information in a quantitative manner to retrieve cloud properties have been undertaken with, arguably, limited practical success. In this work we present a retrieval procedure applicable to clouds with (quasi-)linear liquid water content (LWC) profiles and (quasi-)constant cloud-droplet number density in the cloud-base region. Thus limiting the applicability of the procedure allows us to reduce the cloud variables to two parameters (namely the derivative of the liquid water content with height and the extinction at a fixed distance above cloud base). This simplification, in turn, allows us to employ a fast and robust optimal-estimation inversion using pre-computed look-up tables produced using extensive lidar Monte Carlo (MC) multiple-scattering simulations. In this paper, we describe the theory behind the inversion procedure and successfully apply it to simulated observations based on large-eddy simulation (LES) model output. The inversion procedure is then applied to actual depolarisation lidar data corresponding to a range of cases taken from the Cabauw measurement site in the central Netherlands. The lidar results were then used to predict the corresponding cloud-base region radar reflectivities. In non-drizzling condition, it was found that the lidar inversion results can be used to predict the observed radar reflectivities with an accuracy within the radar calibration uncertainty (2-3 dBZ). This result strongly supports the accuracy of the lidar inversion results. Results of a comparison between ground-based aerosol number concentration and lidar-derived cloud-droplet number densities are also presented and discussed. The observed relationship between the two quantities is seen to be consistent with the results of previous studies based on aircraft-based in situ measurements.

  12. Cloud properties derived from two lidars over the ARM SGP site

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, Martial; Morille, Y.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Flynn, Connor J.; Long, Charles N.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Newsom, Rob K.

    2011-02-16

    [1] Active remote sensors such as lidars or radars can be used with other data to quantify the cloud properties at regional scale and at global scale (Dupont et al., 2009). Relative to radar, lidar remote sensing is sensitive to very thin and high clouds but has a significant limitation due to signal attenuation in the ability to precisely quantify the properties of clouds with a 20 cloud optical thickness larger than 3. In this study, 10-years of backscatter lidar signal data are analysed by a unique algorithm called STRucture of ATmosphere (STRAT, Morille et al., 2007). We apply the STRAT algorithm to data from both the collocated Micropulse lidar (MPL) and a Raman lidar (RL) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site between 1998 and 2009. Raw backscatter lidar signal is processed and 25 corrections for detector deadtime, afterpulse, and overlap are applied. (Campbell et al.) The cloud properties for all levels of clouds are derived and distributions of cloud base height (CBH), top height (CTH), physical cloud thickness (CT), and optical thickness (COT) from local statistics are compared. The goal of this study is (1) to establish a climatology of macrophysical and optical properties for all levels of clouds observed over the ARM SGP site 30 and (2) to estimate the discrepancies induced by the two remote sensing systems (pulse energy, sampling, resolution, etc.). Our first results tend to show that the MPLs, which are the primary ARM lidars, have a distinctly limited range where all of these cloud properties are detectable, especially cloud top and cloud thickness, but even actual cloud base especially during summer daytime period. According to the comparisons between RL and MPL, almost 50% of situations show a signal to noise ratio too low (smaller than 3) for the MPL in order to detect clouds higher than 7km during daytime period in summer. Consequently, the MPLderived annual cycle of cirrus cloud base (top) altitude is biased low, especially for daylight periods, compared with those derived from the RL data, which detects 5 cloud base ranging from 7.5 km in winter to 9.5 km in summer (and tops ranging from 8.6 to 10.5 km). The optically thickest cirrus clouds (COT>0.3) reach 50% of the total population for the Raman lidar and only 20% for the Micropulse lidar due to the difference of pulse energy and the effect of solar irradiance contamination. A complementary study using the cloud fraction 10 derived from the Micropulse lidar for clouds below 5 km and from the Raman lidar for cloud above 5 km allows for better estimation of the total cloud fraction between the ground and the top of the atmosphere. This study presents the diurnal cycle of cloud fraction for each season in comparisons with the Long et al. (2006) cloud fraction calculation derived from radiative flux analysis.

  13. Forest Biomass Mapping From Lidar and Radar Synergies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Guoqing; Ranson, K. Jon; Guo, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Montesano, P.; Kimes, D.

    2011-01-01

    The use of lidar and radar instruments to measure forest structure attributes such as height and biomass at global scales is being considered for a future Earth Observation satellite mission, DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice). Large footprint lidar makes a direct measurement of the heights of scatterers in the illuminated footprint and can yield accurate information about the vertical profile of the canopy within lidar footprint samples. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is known to sense the canopy volume, especially at longer wavelengths and provides image data. Methods for biomass mapping by a combination of lidar sampling and radar mapping need to be developed. In this study, several issues in this respect were investigated using aircraft borne lidar and SAR data in Howland, Maine, USA. The stepwise regression selected the height indices rh50 and rh75 of the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) data for predicting field measured biomass with a R(exp 2) of 0.71 and RMSE of 31.33 Mg/ha. The above-ground biomass map generated from this regression model was considered to represent the true biomass of the area and used as a reference map since no better biomass map exists for the area. Random samples were taken from the biomass map and the correlation between the sampled biomass and co-located SAR signature was studied. The best models were used to extend the biomass from lidar samples into all forested areas in the study area, which mimics a procedure that could be used for the future DESDYnI Mission. It was found that depending on the data types used (quad-pol or dual-pol) the SAR data can predict the lidar biomass samples with R2 of 0.63-0.71, RMSE of 32.0-28.2 Mg/ha up to biomass levels of 200-250 Mg/ha. The mean biomass of the study area calculated from the biomass maps generated by lidar- SAR synergy 63 was within 10% of the reference biomass map derived from LVIS data. The results from this study are preliminary, but do show the potential of the combined use of lidar samples and radar imagery for forest biomass mapping. Various issues regarding lidar/radar data synergies for biomass mapping are discussed in the paper.

  14. A cloud masking algorithm for EARLINET lidar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binietoglou, Ioannis; Baars, Holger; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Nicolae, Doina

    2015-04-01

    Cloud masking is an important first step in any aerosol lidar processing chain as most data processing algorithms can only be applied on cloud free observations. Up to now, the selection of a cloud-free time interval for data processing is typically performed manually, and this is one of the outstanding problems for automatic processing of lidar data in networks such as EARLINET. In this contribution we present initial developments of a cloud masking algorithm that permits the selection of the appropriate time intervals for lidar data processing based on uncalibrated lidar signals. The algorithm is based on a signal normalization procedure using the range of observed values of lidar returns, designed to work with different lidar systems with minimal user input. This normalization procedure can be applied to measurement periods of only few hours, even if no suitable cloud-free interval exists, and thus can be used even when only a short period of lidar measurements is available. Clouds are detected based on a combination of criteria including the magnitude of the normalized lidar signal and time-space edge detection performed using the Sobel operator. In this way the algorithm avoids misclassification of strong aerosol layers as clouds. Cloud detection is performed using the highest available time and vertical resolution of the lidar signals, allowing the effective detection of low-level clouds (e.g. cumulus humilis). Special attention is given to suppress false cloud detection due to signal noise that can affect the algorithm's performance, especially during day-time. In this contribution we present the details of algorithm, the effect of lidar characteristics (space-time resolution, available wavelengths, signal-to-noise ratio) to detection performance, and highlight the current strengths and limitations of the algorithm using lidar scenes from different lidar systems in different locations across Europe.

  15. Building a 15-Year Cloud Climatology using Lidar in Space Observations: CALIOP and CloudSat now, EarthCARE next.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverdy, M.; Chepfer, H.; Donovan, D. P.; Noel, V.; Marchand, R.; Cesana, G.; Hoareau, C.; Chiriaco, M.; Bastin, S.

    2014-12-01

    Today, the CALIOP lidar and CloudSat radar have collected more than seven years of observations, and willhopefully still operate in 2016, after the EarthCARE-ATLID/CPR launch. Lidars and Radars in space providecutting edge information on the detailed vertical structure of clouds: a key element for both the evaluation ofthe description of clouds in climate models, and the survey of the clouds inter-annual evolution in variousclimatic conditions (El Nino, variation of North Atlantic Oscillations, polar regions, etc). For this purpose,the observations collected by CALIOP and by ATLID as well as CloudSat and EarthCARE CPR need to bemerged into a long-term (15 years) cloud climatology. Here, we examine the possibility of building such a climatology, with the aim of defining its accuracy andrelevance for cloud inter-annual studies. We examine the differences between the instruments (wavelengths,satellite's altitudes, telescope fields of view, multiple scattering processes, spatial resolutions) and theirability to detect the same clouds consistently. Then, we define a set of cloud detection thresholds for ATLID,CALIOP, CloudSat and EarthCARE-CPR and test against synthetic cloud scenes (cirrus and shallowcumulus) over small areas (about 200km) produced by a lidar and radar instrument simulator (ECSIM)running on Large Eddy Simulations. Doing so, we verify that the fourth instruments will be able to detect thesame clouds despite their differences (e.g. their sensitivities to noise). Finally, we use the COSP lidar andradar simulator to predict the global scale cloud cover that ATLID, CALIOP, CloudSat and EarthCARE CPRwould observe if they were overflying the same atmosphere predicted by a GCM. Our results suggest that amerged CALIOP/ATLID and CloudSat/CPR cloud climatology could be to be useful for clouds inter-annualstudies, if the post-launch sensitivity of EarthCARE instruments is in line with what is predicted today.

  16. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud fieldmore » and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.« less

  17. Observations of multi-layered clouds using K-band radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martner, Brooks E.; Kropfli, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    Rudimentary ground-based K-band radars were once used by the U.S. Air Force to monitor clouds over air bases. The NOAA wave Propagation Laboratory has developed a significantly advanced dual-polarization Doppler K-band system that provides remarkably detailed visualizations of the structure and kinematics of nonprecipitating and weakly precipitating clouds. Unlike lidar and infrared radiometer systems, K-band radar can penetrate liquid water cloud layers and obtain measurements through moderate rainfall and heavy snowfall to reveal intricate cloud features including multiple layers of cloud. This is accomplished at less cost than would be possible with traditional longer wavelength weather radars. The radar's capabilities have been demonstrated in several recent cloud research field projects. In combination with measurements by other remote sensors, the radar can help detect aircraft icing hazards and infer microphysical properties of clouds. An automated, unattended version of the radar could provide a continuous, detailed depiction of the cloud environment in the vicinity of airports.

  18. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals. PMID:12396200

  19. Investigation of clouds spatial distribution using ground-based lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolev, I. N.; Parvanov, O. P.; Kaprielov, B. K.; Ilev, I. K.

    1986-01-01

    Certain investigations of spatial distribution of clouds by employing ground based lidar are presented. The great changeability is one of the main properties of the clouds in the boundary layer. As a result, their optical properties change rapidly which complicates the modeling of cloud evolution. Suitable equipped lidars are widely used for diagnostics of the clouds via a number of scattering and absorption processes. In particular, lidar can provide information on the distribution of meteorological parameters and of the other important cloud characteristics both in vertical and horizontal directions. Herein the time and spatial distribution of the aerosol backscattering coefficient of S sub t and S sub c type clouds are investigated by means of a correlation analysis of the lidar obtained data provided from several arbitrary directions and heights.

  20. Remote Sensing of Turbulence Using Doppler LIDAR and Radar Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, Dennis Allen

    The idea of remotely sensing turbulence is not a new idea but has not been achieved to any level of reliability. Severe weather patterns are easy to spot with both Doppler and conventional radar systems. The clear air and otherwise undistinguishable turbulence is the type that has been receiving a lot of publicity lately due to the number of personal injuries suffered aboard aircraft. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the phenomenology and feasibility of remotely sensing and measuring small scale turbulence of this type. The remote sensing device of particular interest in this effort is the lidar (acronym derived from light detection and ranging). Data from two different field programs were used to research this effort. Some data was also reduced from a radar experiment conducted out west as a proof of concept. Wind fields were measured with ground based NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama, lidar; NOAA Wave Propagation Laboratory (NOAA/WPL), Boulder, Colorado, lidar; Stapleton International Airport, Denver, Colorado, Doppler radars; and with a NASA B-57B instrumented aircraft. The remotely sensed winds are compared in all cases with the in-situ aircraft measurements. It was found from this research that turbulence intensities measured by computing the lidar wind time history for each range gate and then calculating the rms value relative to the mean agree quite well with the aircraft intensities. The spectral width or second moment data from the lidar, however, does not correspond well with the aircraft measured intensities being consistently a factor of 2-3 or more higher. The radar data analyzed also showed promise with the results being very similar to the lidar. Overall, the results of the research show general agreement between winds measured with Doppler lidars/radars and the B-57 instrumented aircraft. Data from these field tests provided unique sets of data to examine the mean wind and turbulence measurements made by remote sensing instruments. It is hoped that the results from this study will prompt increased research into this area and hopefully make our skies safer to fly in.

  1. Lidar point cloud representation of canopy structure for biomass estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuenschwander, A. L.; Krofcheck, D. J.; Litvak, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Laser mapping systems (lidar) have become an essential remote sensing tool for determining local and regional estimates of biomass. Lidar data (possibly in conjunction with optical imagery) can be used to segment the landscape into either individual trees or clusters of trees. Canopy characteristics (i.e. max, mean height) for a segmented tree are typically derived from a rasterized canopy height model (CHM) and subsequently used in a regression model to estimate biomass. The process of rasterizing the lidar point cloud into a CHM, however, reduces the amount information about the tree structure. Here, we compute statistics for each segmented tree from the raw lidar point cloud rather than a rasterized CHM. Working directly from the lidar point cloud enables a more accurate representation of the canopy structure. Biomass estimates from the point cloud method are compared against biomass estimates derived from a CHM for a Juniper savanna in New Mexico.

  2. Retrieve Optically Thick Ice Cloud Microphysical Properties by Using Airborne Dual-Wavelength Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm to retrieve optically thick ice cloud microphysical property profiles is developed by using the GSFC 9.6 GHz ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP) and the 94 GHz Cloud Radar System (CRS) measurements aboard the high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. In situ size distribution and total water content data from the CRYSTAL-FACE field campaign are used for the algorithm development. To reduce uncertainty in calculated radar reflectivity factors (Ze) at these wavelengths, coincident radar measurements and size distribution data are used to guide the selection of mass-length relationships and to deal with the density and non-spherical effects of ice crystals on the Ze calculations. The algorithm is able to retrieve microphysical property profiles of optically thick ice clouds, such as, deep convective and anvil clouds, which are very challenging for single frequency radar and lidar. Examples of retrieved microphysical properties for a deep convective clouds are presented, which show that EDOP and CRS measurements provide rich information to study cloud structure and evolution. Good agreement between IWPs derived from an independent submillimeter-wave radiometer, CoSSIR, and dual-wavelength radar measurements indicates accuracy of the IWC retrieved from the two-frequency radar algorithm.

  3. Amplification of radar and lidar signatures using quantum sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2013-05-01

    One of the major scientific thrusts from recent years has been to try to harness quantum phenomena to dramat ically increase the performance of a wide variety of classical devices. These advances in quantum information science have had a considerable impact on the development of photonic-based quantum sensors. Even though quantum radar and quantum lidar remain theoretical proposals, preliminary results suggest that these sensors have the potential of becoming disruptive technologies able to revolutionize reconnaissance systems. In this paper we will discuss how quantum entanglement can be exploited to increase the radar and lidar signature of rectangular targets. In particular, we will show how the effective visibility of the target is increased if observed with an entangled multi-photon quantum sensor.

  4. Lidar simulation. [measurement of atmospheric water vapor via optical radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring atmospheric water vapor via orbital lidar is estimated. The calculation starts with laser radar equations representing backscatter with and without molecular line absorption; the magnitudes of off-line backscatter are demonstrated. Extensive prior data on water line strengths are summarized to indicate the available sensitivity to water vapor concentration. Several lidar situations are considered starting with uniform and perturbed atmospheres at 0, 3, 10 and 20 kM (stratosphere) altitudes. These simulations are indicative of results to be obtained in ground truth measurements (ground-based and airborne). An approximate treatment of polar observations is also given. Vertical atmospheric soundings from orbit and from ground stations are calculated. Errors are discussed as regards their propagation through the lidar equation to render the measured water vapor concentration imprecise; conclusions are given as to required laser energy and feasible altitude resolution.

  5. CloudSat as a Global Radar Calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Protat, Alain; Bouniol, Dominique; O'Connor, E. J.; Baltink, Henk K.; Verlinde, J.; Widener, Kevin B.

    2011-03-01

    The calibration of the CloudSat spaceborne cloud radar has been thoroughly assessed using very accurate internal link budgets before launch, comparisons with predicted ocean surface backscatter at 94 GHz, direct comparisons with airborne cloud radars, and statistical comparisons with ground-based cloud radars at different locations of the world. It is believed that the calibration of CloudSat is accurate to within 0.5 to 1 dB. In the present paper it is shown that an approach similar to that used for the statistical comparisons with ground-based radars can now be adopted the other way around to calibrate other ground-based or airborne radars against CloudSat and / or detect anomalies in long time series of ground-based radar measurements, provided that the calibration of CloudSat is followed up closely (which is the case). The power of using CloudSat as a Global Radar Calibrator is demonstrated using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement cloud radar data taken at Barrow, Alaska, the cloud radar data from the Cabauw site, The Netherlands, and airborne Doppler cloud radar measurements taken along the CloudSat track in the Arctic by the RASTA (Radar SysTem Airborne) cloud radar installed in the French ATR-42 aircraft for the first time. It is found that the Barrow radar data in 2008 are calibrated too high by 9.8 dB, while the Cabauw radar data in 2008 are calibrated too low by 8.0 dB. The calibration of the RASTA airborne cloud radar using direct comparisons with CloudSat agrees well with the expected gains and losses due to the change in configuration which required verification of the RASTA calibration.

  6. Cloud Thickness from Diffusion of Lidar Pulses in Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Davis, A.; McGill, Matthew

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of the distribution of reflected light from a laser beam incident on an aqueous suspension of particles or "cloud" with known thickness and particle size distribution are reported. The distribution is referred to as the "cloud radiative Green's function", G. In the diffusion domain, G is sensitive to cloud thickness, allowing that important quantity to be retrieved. The goal of the laboratory simulation is to provide preliminary estimates of sensitivity of G to cloud thickness,for use in the optimal design of an offbeam Lidar instrument for remote sensing of cloud thickness (THOR, Thickness from Offbeam Returns). These clouds of polystyrene microspheres suspended in water are analogous to real clouds of water droplets suspended in air. The microsphere size distribution is roughly lognormal, from 0.5 microns to 25 microns, similar to real clouds. Density of suspended spheres is adjusted so mean-free-path of visible photons is about 10 cm, approximately 1000 times smaller than in real clouds. The light source is a ND:YAG laser at 530 nm. Detectors are flux and photon-counting Photomultiplier Tube (PMTS), with a glass probe for precise positioning. A Labview 5 VI controls positioning, and data acquisition, via an NI Motion Control board connected to a stepper motor driving an Edmund linear slider, and a 16-channel 16-bit NI-DAQ board. The stepper motor is accurate to 10 microns, and step size is selectable from the VI software. Far from the incident beam, the rate of exponential increase as the direction of the incident beam is approached scales as expected from diffusion theory, linearly with the cloud thickness, and inversely as the square root of the reduced optical thickness, and is independent of particle size. Near the beam the signal begins to increase faster than exponential, due to single and low-order scattering near the backward direction, and here the distribution depends on particle size. Results are being used to verify 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations, used to estimate signal-to-noise ratios for remotely sensed off beam returns, for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds. Signal-to-noise estimates show that unfiltered observations are straight forward at night, while narrow band pass filters are being studied for day.

  7. Ice Cloud Content from Radar Reflectivity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    1987-08-01

    The ice equivalent radar reflectivity factor (Zi = 5.3Ze) is found from previous measurements to be related to the precipitation rate (R mm h1) and ice mass content (M, g m3) of ice crystal clouds by R = 0.067Zi0.804 and M = 0.037Zi0.696. Comparison with other empirical equations suggests that changes in the ice crystal size distribution accompanying the formation of precipitation particles begin to modify these relations within deep-ice clouds and lead to a different class of relations for snowfall. Accordingly, the above equations are considered valid for Zi 10 dBZ, and should be particularly appropriate for short-wavelength radar observations of cirrus clouds.

  8. Lidar and radar measurements of the melting layer in the frame of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study: observations of dark and bright band phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.; Bhawar, R.; di Iorio, T.; Norton, E. G.; Peters, G.; Dufournet, Y.

    2011-11-01

    During the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS), lidar dark and bright bands were observed by the University of BASILicata Raman lidar system (BASIL) during several intensive (IOPs) and special (SOPs) observation periods (among others, 23 July, 15 August, and 17 August 2007). Lidar data were supported by measurements from the University of Hamburg cloud radar MIRA 36 (36 GHz), the University of Hamburg dual-polarization micro rain radars (24.1 GHz) and the University of Manchester UHF wind profiler (1.29 GHz). Results from BASIL and the radars for 23 July 2007 are illustrated and discussed to support the comprehension of the microphysical and scattering processes responsible for the appearance of the lidar and radar dark and bright bands. Simulations of the lidar dark and bright band based on the application of concentric/eccentric sphere Lorentz-Mie codes and a melting layer model are also provided. Lidar and radar measurements and model results are also compared with measurements from a disdrometer on ground and a two-dimensional cloud (2DC) probe on-board the ATR42 SAFIRE.

  9. Comparison of millimeter-wave cloud radar measurements for the Fall 1997 Cloud IOP

    SciTech Connect

    Sekelsky, S.M.; Li, L.; Galloway, J.; McIntosh, R.E.; Miller, M.A.; Clothiaux, E.E.; Haimov, S.; Mace, G.; Sassen, K.

    1998-05-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Fall 1997 IOP was to intercompare Ka-band (350Hz) and W-band (95GHz) cloud radar observations and verify system calibrations. During September 1997, several cloud radars were deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SOP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site, including the full time operation 35 GHz CART Millimeter-wave Cloud Radar (MMCR), the University of Massachusetts (UMass) single antenna 33GHz/95 GHz Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS), the 95 GHz Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR) flown on the University of Wyoming King Air, the University of Utah 95 GHz radar and the dual-antenna Pennsylvania State University 94 GHz radar. In this paper the authors discuss several issues relevant to comparison of ground-based radars, including the detection and filtering of insect returns. Preliminary comparisons of ground-based Ka-band radar reflectivity data and comparisons with airborne radar reflectivity measurements are also presented.

  10. Snowfall measurements using a combination of high spectral resolution lidar and radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloranta, E.

    2009-04-01

    Aerodynamic flow around gauges and the horizontal transport of windblown snow along the surface produce errors in snowfall measurements. Comparisons between various snow gauges with and without wind shields show as much as as a factor of two difference between measurements(Yang et al., 1999). These problems are particularly significant in the high Arctic where snowfall amount are very low and blowing snow is frequent. This paper describes a lidar-radar based technique to measure the downward flux of snow at an altitude of ~100m. When particles are small compared to the wavelength, radar reflectivity is proportional to the number of snowflakes times the square of the mass of the average snowflake. For particles large compared to the wavelength, the lidar extinction cross section is equal to two times the number of snowflakes times the projected average area of the snowflakes. Donovan and Lammeren(2001) show that the ratio of radar to lidar cross sections can be used to define an effective-diameter-prime, which is proportional to the fourth root of the average mass-squared over the average projected area of the snowflakes. If one assumes a crystal shape this can be converted into an effective-diameter which is the average mass over the average area of the flakes. Multiplying the lidar measured projected area times the effective-diameter yields the mass of the particles. The product of this mass and the radar measured vertical velocity then provides the vertical flux of water. In past work we have tested this measurement approach with data acquired in the high Arctic at Eureka, Canada(80 N,90W). Measurements from the University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the NOAA 35 GHz cloud radar were used to compute the time-integrated flux of water at 100 m above the surface. This result was compared with Nipper gauge measurements of snowfall acquired as part of the Eureka weather station record. Best agreement was achieved when the crystals where assumed to be bullet-rosettes. However, because the conversion from effective-diameter-prime to effective-diameter is dependent on the ratio of crystal thickness to diameter, the results are strongly dependent on the assumed crystal morphology. In this paper we describe a lidar-radar measurement approach which derives the crystal aspect ratio through a comparison of the effective-diameter-prime and the radar measured fall velocity. This provides an aspect ratio measurement for each sample volume and removes the need to assume an ice crystal shape. Particle thickness is assumed to be related to particle diameter by a power law (Auer and Veal, 1970). For the purpose of computing radar and lidar cross sections and the particle fall velocity, our model represents snowflakes with an equivalent prolate spheroid having the same mass and cross sectional area as the equivalent snowflake. Fall velocities are related to particle projected area and particle mass using the power-law formulation due to Mitchell(1994). The lidar-radar results show reasonable agreement with the Eureka station record. Limitations of the method include inaccurate retrieval of particle sizes when the size distribution is bi-modal. This occurs when cloud water droplets are present along with snowflakes. Also vertical air motions produce errors in the radar measured fall velocity. This error can be somewhat reduced by time averaging. However, some of vertical motions occur on time scales too long to make this feasible. A technique using the radar spectrum to separate particle motion from air motion is described by Shupe et al.(2008). Initial attempts to apply this technique to our snowfall measurements will be presented. References: Yang, D., B. Goodison, J. Metcalfe, V. Golubev, R. Bates, T. Pangburn, and C. Hanson: 1998, Accuracy of the NWS 8" Standard Nonrecording precipitation Gauge: Results and application of WMO inter-comparison, J. Atmos. Tech., 15, 54-68. Donovan, D, and A. van Lammeren: 2001, Cloud effective particle size and water content profile retrievals using combined lidar and radar observa

  11. Polarization Lidar Liquid Cloud Detection Algorithm for Winter Mountain Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie

    1992-01-01

    We have collected an extensive polarization lidar dataset from elevated sites in the Tushar Mountains of Utah in support of winter storm cloud seeding research and experiments. Our truck-mounted ruby lidar collected zenith, dual-polarization lidar data through a roof window equipped with a wiper system to prevent snowfall accumulation. Lidar returns were collected at a rate of one shot every 1 to 5 min during declared storm periods over the 1985 and 1987 mid-Jan. to mid-Mar. Field seasons. The mid-barrier remote sensor field site was located at 2.57 km MSL. Of chief interest to weather modification efforts are the heights of supercooled liquid water (SLW) clouds, which must be known to assess their 'seedability' (i.e., temperature and height suitability for artificially increasing snowfall). We are currently re-examining out entire dataset to determine the climatological properties of SLW clouds in winter storms using an autonomous computer algorithm.

  12. Spaceborne Laser Rangefinder ``LORA'' Used as a Cloud Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Christian; Kokhanenko, Grigorii; Matvienko, Gennadii; Shamanaev, Vitalii; Grachjov, Yurii; Znamenskii, Igor; Oppel, Ulrich G.

    1995-06-01

    First, in this report an overview is given on the use of the Russian laser altimeter in space LORA as a lidar for cloud measurements. Secondly, the influence of multiple scattering is verified by analysis of the backscatter signals from clouds having the excellent range resolution of a rangefinder.

  13. Liquid Water Cloud Measurements Using the Raman Lidar Technique: Current Understanding and Future Research Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tetsu, Sakai; Whiteman, David N.; Russo, Felicita; Turner, David D.; Veselovskii, Igor; Melfi, S. Harvey; Nagai, Tomohiro; Mano, Yuzo

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes recent work in the Raman lidar liquid water cloud measurement technique. The range-resolved spectral measurements at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center indicate that the Raman backscattering spectra measured in and below low clouds agree well with theoretical spectra for vapor and liquid water. The calibration coefficients of the liquid water measurement for the Raman lidar at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains site of the U.S. Department of Energy were determined by comparison with the liquid water path (LWP) obtained with Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the liquid water content (LWC) obtained with the millimeter wavelength cloud radar and water vapor radiometer (MMCR-WVR) together. These comparisons were used to estimate the Raman liquid water cross-sectional value. The results indicate a bias consistent with an effective liquid water Raman cross-sectional value that is 28%-46% lower than published, which may be explained by the fact that the difference in the detectors' sensitivity has not been accounted for. The LWP of a thin altostratus cloud showed good qualitative agreement between lidar retrievals and AERI. However, the overall ensemble of comparisons of LWP showed considerable scatter, possibly because of the different fields of view of the instruments, the 350-m distance between the instruments, and the horizontal inhomogeneity of the clouds. The LWC profiles for a thick stratus cloud showed agreement between lidar retrievals andMMCR-WVR between the cloud base and 150m above that where the optical depth was less than 3. Areas requiring further research in this technique are discussed.

  14. Lidar-radar synergy for characterizing properties of ultragiant volcanic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, F.; Amodeo, A.; D'Amico, G.; Giunta, A.; Mona, L.; Pappalardo, G.

    2011-12-01

    The atmospheric aerosol has a relevant effect on our life influencing climate, aviation safety, air quality and natural hazards. The identification of aerosol layers through inspection of continuous measurements is strongly recommended for quantifying their contribution to natural hazards and air quality and to establish suitable alerting systems. In particular, the study of ultragiant aerosols may improve the knowledge of physical-chemical processes underlying the aerosol-cloud interactions and the effect of giant nuclei as a potential element to expedite the warm-rain process. Moreover, the identification and the characterization of ultragiant aerosols may strongly contribute to quantify their impact on human health and their role in airplane engine damages or in visibility problems, especially in case of extreme events as explosive volcanic eruptions. During spring 2010, volcanic aerosol layers coming from Eyjafjallajökull volcano were observed over most of the European countries, using lidar technique. From 19 April to 19 May 2010, they were also observed at CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory (CIAO) with the multi-wavelength Raman lidar systems of the Potenza EARLINET station (40.60N, 15.72E, 760 m a.s.l), Southern Italy. During this period, ultragiant aerosol were also observed at CIAO using a co-located Ka-band MIRA-36 Doppler microwave radar operating at 8.45 mm (35.5 GHz). The Ka-band radar observed in four separate days (19 April, 7, 10, 13 May) signatures consistent with the observations of non-spherical ultragiant aerosol characterized by anomalous values of linear depolarization ratio higher than -4 dB, probably related to the occurrence of multiple effects as particle alignment and presence of an ice coating. 7-days backward trajectory analysis shows that the air masses corresponding to the ultragiant aerosol observed by the radar were coming from the Eyjafjallajökull volcano area. Only in one case the trajectories do not come directly from Iceland, but from Central Europe where many lidar observations confirm the presence of volcanic aerosol in the previous days. Therefore, both CIAO lidar observations and the backtrajectory analysis suggests a volcanic origin of the ultragiant aerosol observed by the radar, revealing that these particles might have travelled for more than 4000 km after their injection into the atmosphere. The reported observation fostered a study, reported in this work, about the performances of multi-wavelength Raman lidars in the identification and the characterization of ultragiant aerosols layers in the troposphere. Results from simulations using Mie, T-Matrix and ray-tracing codes will be presented and compared with the observations performed in April-May 2010 during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption. Sensitivity ranges in detection of aerosol layer are pointed out in terms of experimental limits of both lidar and radar techniques and of aerosol optical depth. Moreover, recommendations for use of a combined lidar-radar approach for the aerosol typing and for the retrieval of their microphysical properties are reported.

  15. A dual frequency millimetre wave radar for cloud characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essen, H.; Sieger, S.

    2010-10-01

    For a long period of time FHR is developing millimetre wave radars for airborne remote sensing applications, namely at 35 GHz and 94 GHz. While for these applications generally a high bandwidth is used to allow an adequate range resolution, the requirements for cloud radars are more directed towards an ultimate sensitivity and long range. Based upon this expertise investigations were done to develop a cloud radar at 220 GHz, which should be used simultaneously with respective radars at 35 GHz and 94 GHz. To gain experience with this topic, a 94 GHz-radar, which was formerly used for propagation experiments over long range, was modified and measurements on clouds were conducted. The radar to be developed shall mainly be used for investigations on snow clouds over relatively short range, and is not intended to be able to characterize Cirrus type clouds at high altitude.

  16. Cloud Optical Depth Retrievals from Solar Background "signal" of Micropulse Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, J. Christine; Marshak, A.; Wiscombe, W.; Valencia, S.; Welton, E. J.

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed lidars are commonly used to retrieve vertical distributions of cloud and aerosol layers. It is widely believed that lidar cloud retrievals (other than cloud base altitude) are limited to optically thin clouds. Here we demonstrate that lidars can retrieve optical depths of thick clouds using solar background light as a signal, rather than (as now) merely a noise to be subtracted. Validations against other instruments show that retrieved cloud optical depths agree within 10-15% for overcast stratus and broken clouds. In fact, for broken cloud situations one can retrieve not only the aerosol properties in clear-sky periods using lidar signals, but also the optical depth of thick clouds in cloudy periods using solar background signals. This indicates that, in general, it may be possible to retrieve both aerosol and cloud properties using a single lidar. Thus, lidar observations have great untapped potential to study interactions between clouds and aerosols.

  17. First flight of the Cloud Detection Lidar Instrument Package

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.G.; Cameron, G.; Carter, P.; Hugenberger, R.E.; Kordas, J.F.; Nielsen, D.P.; Stratton, P.; Taylor, B.

    1996-03-01

    The Cloud Detection Lidar Instrument Package is composed of three instruments: the Cloud Detection Lidar (CDL) and two Wide Field of View (WFOV) cameras. The CDL can be rotated to operate in either a nadir-looking or zenith-looking mode. The WFOV cameras provide imagery to complement the CDL measurements. One camera is fixed at nadir looking and the other at zenith looking. Only one camera may be operational at a time. All instruments were successfully flown in September--November 1995.

  18. Report on the Radar/PIREP Cloud Top Discrepancy Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Mark M.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Applied Meteorology Unit's (AMU) investigation of inconsistencies between pilot reported cloud top heights and weather radar indicated echo top heights (assumed to be cloud tops) as identified by the 45 Weather Squadron (45WS). The objective for this study is to document and understand the differences in echo top characteristics as displayed on both the WSR-88D and WSR-74C radars and cloud top heights reported by the contract weather aircraft in support of space launch operations at Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), Florida. These inconsistencies are of operational concern since various Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) and Flight Rules (FR) in part describe safe and unsafe conditions as a function of cloud thickness. Some background radar information was presented. Scan strategies for the WSR-74C and WSR-88D were reviewed along with a description of normal radar beam propagation influenced by the Effective Earth Radius Model. Atmospheric conditions prior to and leading up to both launch operations were detailed. Through the analysis of rawinsonde and radar data, atmospheric refraction or bending of the radar beam was identified as the cause of the discrepancies between reported cloud top heights by the contract weather aircraft and those as identified by both radars. The atmospheric refraction caused the radar beam to be further bent toward the Earth than normal. This radar beam bending causes the radar target to be displayed erroneously, with higher cloud top heights and a very blocky or skewed appearance.

  19. Distinguishing cirrus cloud presence in autonomous lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. R.; Vaughan, M. A.; Oo, M.; Holz, R. E.; Lewis, J. R.; Welton, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    2012 Level-2 Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite-based cloud data sets are investigated for thresholds that distinguish the presence of cirrus clouds in autonomous lidar measurements, based on temperatures, heights, optical depth and phase. A thermal threshold, proposed by Sassen and Campbell (2001) for cloud top temperature Ttop ? -37 C, is evaluated versus CALIOP algorithms that identify ice-phase cloud layers using polarized backscatter measurements. Derived global mean cloud top heights (11.15 vs. 10.07 km above mean sea level; a.m.s.l.), base heights (8.76 km a.m.s.l. vs. 7.95 km a.m.s.l.), temperatures (-58.48 C vs. -52.18 C and -42.40 C vs. -38.13 C, respectively, for tops and bases) and optical depths (1.18 vs. 1.23) reflect the sensitivity to this constraint. Over 99 % of all Ttop ? -37 C clouds are classified as ice by CALIOP Level-2 algorithms. Over 81 % of all ice clouds correspond with Ttop ? -37 C. For instruments lacking polarized measurements, and thus practical estimates of phase, Ttop ? -37 C provides sufficient justification for distinguishing cirrus, as opposed to the risks of glaciated liquid-water cloud contamination occurring in a given sample from clouds identified at relatively "warm" (Ttop > -37 C) temperatures. Although accounting for uncertainties in temperatures collocated with lidar data (i.e., model reanalyses/sondes) may justifiably relax the threshold to include warmer cases, the ambiguity of "warm" ice clouds cannot be fully reconciled with available measurements, conspicuously including phase. Cloud top heights and optical depths are investigated, and global distributions and frequencies derived, as functions of CALIOP-retrieved phase. These data provide little additional information, compared with temperature alone, and may exacerbate classification uncertainties overall.

  20. Lidar remote sensing of cloud and fog properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissonnette, Luc R.; Hutt, Daniel L.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes a lidar technique for the remote sensing of microphysical and optical properties of fog and clouds. The technique is based on recovering the information contained in the multiple scattering contributions to the lidar signals. The multiple scattering contributions are measured via detection at three or more fields of view ranging from a value slightly greater than the laser beam divergence to a maximum less than the width of the forward peak of the phase function at the lidar wavelength. The inversion is performed by least squares fitting these measurements to a multiple scattering lidar equation obtained in analytic form from a phenomenological model of the scattering processes. The solutions are the scattering coefficient and the effective radius of the fog or cloud droplets. This is sufficient information to determine the parameters of an assumed gamma distribution for the droplet sizes from where cloud properties such as the liquid water content and the extinction coefficients at visible and infrared wavelengths can be calculated. Typical results on slant path optical depth, vertical extinction profiles and fluctuation statistics of clouds are compared with in situ data. The agreement is very satisfactory. Sample appliication results on monitoring the visual and infrared detection ranges through clouds are discussed.

  1. MU radar and lidar observations of clear-air turbulence and mammatus underneath cirrus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, H.; Nakamura, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.

    2009-04-01

    Mammatus are smooth hanging protuberances on the undersurface of a cloud (Glossary of Meteorology). Their mechanisms for formation and their role in the atmosphere are still not well-known. We obtained Rayleigh/Mie/Raman (RMR) lidar measurements of cirrus mammatus in the night of 07-08 June 2006 at Shigaraki Observatory (34.85°N, 136.10°E, Japan). Coincident observations from the VHF (46.5 MHz) MU radar in range imaging (FII) mode revealed the presence of downward developing turbulent layers and oscillatory vertical wind perturbations (+/-0.7 m/s) near the cirrus cloud base and in the mammatus environment. Moreover, simultaneous radiosonde data showed the presence of a dry and weakly stable layer underneath the cirrus. Our analysis suggests that turbulence and mammatus were generated by convective overturns due to evaporative cooling in the subcloud region. The cooling was likely the consequence of sublimation of ice crystals below the cloud base due to either precipitation or, more likely, spontaneous mixing of the saturated air and the dry air through the cloud-base detrainment instability (CDI) mechanism at the cloud base. Clear air downdrafts measured by the MU radar were associated with the descending mammatus lobes and clear air updrafts were observed between the lobes. Consequently, in addition to a possible negative buoyancy of the cloudy air, the cloudy air might have been pushed down by the downdrafts of the "upside-down" convective instability and pushed up by the updrafts to form mammatus lobes.

  2. W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Widener, KB; Johnson, K

    2005-01-05

    The W-band Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud Radar (WACR) systems are zenith pointing Doppler radars that probe the extent and composition of clouds at 95.04 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar reports estimates for the first three spectra moments for each range gate up to 15 km. The 0th moment is reflectivity, the 1st moment is radial velocity, and the 2nd moment is spectral width. Also available are the raw spectra files. Unlike the millimeter wavelength cloud radar (MMCR), the WACR does not use pulse coding and operates in only copolarization and cross-polarization modes.

  3. Frequency-agile dual-frequency lidar for integrated coherent radar-lidar architectures.

    PubMed

    Vercesi, Valeria; Onori, Daniel; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Bogoni, Antonella; Scaffardi, Mirco

    2015-04-01

    We propose a novel architecture for implementing a dual-frequency lidar (DFL) exploiting differential Doppler shift measurement. The two frequency tones, needed for target velocity measurements, are selected from the spectrum of a mode-locked laser operating in the C-band. The tones' separation is easily controlled by using a programmable wavelength selective switch, thus allowing for a dynamic trade-off among robustness to atmospheric turbulence and sensitivity. Speed measurements for different tone separations equal to 10, 40, 80, and 160 GHz are demonstrated, proving the system's capability of working in different configurations. Thanks to the acquisition system based on an analog-to-digital converter and digital-signal processing, real-time velocity measurements are demonstrated. The MLL-based proposed architecture enables the integration of the DFL with a photonic-based radar that exploits the same laser for generating and receiving radio-frequency signal with high performance, thus allowing for simultaneous or complementary target observations by exploiting the advantages of both radar and lidar. PMID:25831332

  4. Lidar sensing of clouds from under the water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanaev, V. S.

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of reconstructing the cloudiness parameters from measurements with a lidar immersed at depths of 10- 25 m is analyzed. Theoretical analysis is performed by the Monte Carlo method for lidars with realistic technical parameters, two optical types of ocean waters, different optical cloud models, and marine atmosphere in the presence of a fog. It is demonstrated that under typical conditions, cloudiness can reliably be detected up to altitudes of several hundred meters above the sea level. A change of the laser divergence angle and receiver field-of-view angle has a stronger effect on the character of lidar signal reflected from sea water than from cloudiness. A large contribution of multiply scattered radiation to lidar return signals calls for the development of mathematical methods that take it into account to increase the measurement accuracy.

  5. Diode - Pumped Nd:YAG Lidar for Airborne Cloud Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehnert, A.; Halldorsson, TH.; Herrmann, H.; Haering, R.; Krichbaumer, W.; Streicher, J.; Werner, CH.

    1992-01-01

    This work is concerned with the experimental method used to separate scattering and to use it for the determination of cloud microphysical parameters. It is also the first airborne test of a lidar version related to the ATLID Program - ESA's scheduled spaceborne lidar. The already tested DLR microlidar was modified with the new diode-pumped laser and a faster data recording system was added. The system was used during the CLEOPATRA campaign in the DLR research aircraft Falcon 20 to measure cloud parameters. The diode pumped Nd:YAG laser we developed for the microlidar is a modification of the laser we introduced at the Lidar Congress at 'Laser 1991' in Munich. Various aspects of this work are discussed.

  6. Cloud Physics Lidar Measurements During the SAFARI-2000 Field Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Matthew; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William; Spinhirne, James; Scott, Stan; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new remote sensing instrument, the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) has been built for use on the ER-2 aircraft. The first deployment for CPL was the SAFARI-2000 field campaign during August-September 2000. The CPL is a three-wavelength lidar designed for studies of cirrus, subvisual cirrus, and boundary layer aerosols. The CPL utilizes a high repetition rate, low pulse energy laser with photon counting detectors. A brief description of the CPL instrument will be given, followed by examples of CPL data products. In particular, examples of aerosol backscatter, including boundary layer smoke and cirrus clouds will be shown. Resulting optical depth estimates derived from the aerosol measurements will be shown. Comparisons of the CPL optical depth and optical depth derived from microPulse Lidar and the AATS-14 sunphotomer will be shown.

  7. A High Resolution Hydrometer Phase Classifier Based on Analysis of Cloud Radar Doppler Spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Luke,E.; Kollias, P.

    2007-08-06

    The lifecycle and radiative properties of clouds are highly sensitive to the phase of their hydrometeors (i.e., liquid or ice). Knowledge of cloud phase is essential for specifying the optical properties of clouds, or else, large errors can be introduced in the calculation of the cloud radiative fluxes. Current parameterizations of cloud water partition in liquid and ice based on temperature are characterized by large uncertainty (Curry et al., 1996; Hobbs and Rangno, 1998; Intriery et al., 2002). This is particularly important in high geographical latitudes and temperature ranges where both liquid droplets and ice crystal phases can exist (mixed-phase cloud). The mixture of phases has a large effect on cloud radiative properties, and the parameterization of mixed-phase clouds has a large impact on climate simulations (e.g., Gregory and Morris, 1996). Furthermore, the presence of both ice and liquid affects the macroscopic properties of clouds, including their propensity to precipitate. Despite their importance, mixed-phase clouds are severely understudied compared to the arguably simpler single-phase clouds. In-situ measurements in mixed-phase clouds are hindered due to aircraft icing, difficulties distinguishing hydrometeor phase, and discrepancies in methods for deriving physical quantities (Wendisch et al. 1996, Lawson et al. 2001). Satellite-based retrievals of cloud phase in high latitudes are often hindered by the highly reflecting ice-covered ground and persistent temperature inversions. From the ground, the retrieval of mixed-phase cloud properties has been the subject of extensive research over the past 20 years using polarization lidars (e.g., Sassen et al. 1990), dual radar wavelengths (e.g., Gosset and Sauvageot 1992; Sekelsky and McIntosh, 1996), and recently radar Doppler spectra (Shupe et al. 2004). Millimeter-wavelength radars have substantially improved our ability to observe non-precipitating clouds (Kollias et al., 2007) due to their excellent sensitivity that enables the detection of thin cloud layers and their ability to penetrate several non-precipitating cloud layers. However, in mixed-phase clouds conditions, the observed Doppler moments are dominated by the highly reflecting ice crystals and thus can not be used to identify the cloud phase. This limits our ability to identify the spatial distribution of cloud phase and our ability to identify the conditions under which mixed-phase clouds form.

  8. An investigation of cirrus cloud properties using airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, John Edward

    The impact of cirrus clouds on the Earth's radiation budget remains a key uncertainty in assessing global radiative balance and climate change. Composed of ice, and located in the cold upper troposphere, cirrus clouds can cause large warming effects because they are relatively transmissive to short-wave solar radiation, but absorptive of long wave radiation. Our ability to model radiative effects of cirrus clouds is inhibited by uncertainties in cloud optical properties. Studies of mid-latitude cirrus properties have revealed notable differences compared to tropical anvil cirrus, likely a consequence of varying dynamic formation mechanisms. Cloud-aerosol lidars provide critical information about the vertical structure of cirrus for climate studies. For this dissertation, I helped develop the Airborne Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (ACATS), a Doppler wind lidar system at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). ACATS is also a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL), uniquely capable of directly resolving backscatter and extinction properties of a particle from high-altitude aircraft. The first ACATS science flights were conducted out of Wallops Island, VA in September of 2012 and included coincident measurements with the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) instrument. In this dissertation, I provide an overview of the ACATS method and instrument design, describe the ACATS retrieval algorithms for cloud and aerosol properties, explain the ACATS HSRL retrieval errors due to the instrument calibration, and use the coincident CPL data to validate and evaluate ACATS cloud and aerosol retrievals. Both the ACATS HSRL and standard backscatter retrievals agree well with coincident CPL retrievals. Mean ACATS and CPL extinction profiles for three case studies demonstrate similar structure and agree to within 25 percent for cirrus clouds. The new HSRL retrieval algorithms developed for ACATS have direct application to future spaceborne missions. Furthermore, extinction and particle wind velocity retrieved from ACATS can be used for science applications such as dust transport and convective anvil outflow. The relationship between cirrus cloud properties and dynamic formation mechanism is examined through statistics of CPL cirrus observations from more than 100 aircraft flights. The CPL 532 nm lidar ratios (also referred to as the extinction to backscatter ratio) for cirrus clouds formed by synoptic-scale uplift over land are lower than convectively-generated cirrus over tropical oceans. Errors in assuming a constant lidar ratio can lead to errors of 50% in cloud optical extinction derived from space-borne lidar such as CALIOP. The 1064 nm depolarization ratios for synoptically-generated cirrus over land are lower than convectively-generated cirrus, formed due to rapid upward motions of tropical convection, as a consequence of differences in cloud temperatures and ice particle size and shape. Finally, the backscatter color ratio is directly proportional to depolarization ratio for synoptically-generated cirrus, but not for any other type of cirrus. The relationships between cirrus properties and formation mechanisms determined in this study can be used as part of a larger global climatology of cirrus clouds to improve parameterizations in global climate models and satellite retrievals to improve our understanding of the impact of clouds on weather and climate.

  9. The first observed cloud echoes and microphysical parameter retrievals by China's 94-GHz cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Juxiu; Wei, Ming; Hang, Xin; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Peichang; Li, Nan

    2014-06-01

    By using the cloud echoes first successfully observed by China's indigenous 94-GHz SKY cloud radar, the macrostructure and microphysical properties of drizzling stratocumulus clouds in Anhui Province on 8 June 2013 are analyzed, and the detection capability of this cloud radar is discussed. The results are as follows. (1) The cloud radar is able to observe the time-varying macroscopic and microphysical parameters of clouds, and it can reveal the microscopic structure and small-scale changes of clouds. (2) The velocity spectral width of cloud droplets is small, but the spectral width of the cloud containing both cloud droplets and drizzle is large. When the spectral width is more than 0.4 m s-1, the radar reflectivity factor is larger (over -10 dBZ). (3) The radar's sensitivity is comparatively higher because the minimum radar reflectivity factor is about -35 dBZ in this experiment, which exceeds the threshold for detecting the linear depolarized ratio (LDR) of stratocumulus (commonly -11 to -14 dBZ; decreases with increasing turbulence). (4) After distinguishing of cloud droplets from drizzle, cloud liquid water content and particle effective radius are retrieved. The liquid water content of drizzle is lower than that of cloud droplets at the same radar reflectivity factor.

  10. Seasonal and optical characterisation of cirrus clouds over Indian sub-continent using LIDAR

    SciTech Connect

    Jayeshlal, G. S. Satyanarayana, Malladi Dhaman, Reji K. Motty, G. S.

    2014-10-15

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) is an important remote sensing technique to study about the cirrus clouds. The subject of cirrus clouds and related climate is challenging one. The received scattered signal from Lidar contains information on the physical and optical properties of cirrus clouds. The Lidar profile of the cirrus cloud provides information on the optical characteristics like depolarisation ratio, lidar ratio and optical depth, which give knowledge about possible phase, structure and orientation of cloud particle that affect the radiative budgeting of cirrus clouds. The findings from the study are subjected to generate inputs for better climatic modelling.

  11. The use of an airborne lidar for mapping cirrus clouds in FIRE, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radke, Lawrence F.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    1990-01-01

    The Univ. of Washington (UW) and Georgia Tech have recently built a dual wavelength airborne lidar for operation on the UW's Convair C-131A research aircraft. This lidar was used in studying aerosols and clouds. These studies demonstrated the utility of airborne lidar in a variety of atmospheric research and prompt the suggestion that this facility be included in the next FIRE cirrus experiment. The vertically pointing airborne lidar would be used as a complement to ground based lidars. The airborne lidar would ensure extended coverage of IFO cases that develop upwind of the surface lidars or which miss the ground based lidars while still being the focus of satellite and aircraft in situ studies. The airborne lidar would help assure that cirrus clouds were simultaneously viewed by satellite, sampled by aircraft, and structurally characterized by lidar. System specifications are listed and a schematic is shown of the lidar system aboard the C-131A.

  12. Cloud Coverage and Height Distribution from the GLAS Polar Orbiting Lidar: Comparison to Passive Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhime, J. D.; Palm, S. P.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Mahesh, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) began full on orbit operations in September 2003. A main application of the two-wavelength GLAS lidar is highly accurate detection and profiling of global cloud cover. Initial analysis indicates that cloud and aerosol layers are consistently detected on a global basis to cross-sections down to 10(exp -6) per meter. Images of the lidar data dramatically and accurately show the vertical structure of cloud and aerosol to the limit of signal attenuation. The GLAS lidar has made the most accurate measurement of global cloud coverage and height to date. In addition to the calibrated lidar signal, GLAS data products include multi level boundaries and optical depth of all transmissive layers. Processing includes a multi-variable separation of cloud and aerosol layers. An initial application of the data results is to compare monthly cloud means from several months of GLAS observations in 2003 to existing cloud climatologies from other satellite measurement. In some cases direct comparison to passive cloud retrievals is possible. A limitation of the lidar measurements is nadir only sampling. However monthly means exhibit reasonably good global statistics and coverage results, at other than polar regions, compare well with other measurements but show significant differences in height distribution. For polar regions where passive cloud retrievals are problematic and where orbit track density is greatest, the GLAS results are particularly an advance in cloud cover information. Direct comparison to MODIS retrievals show a better than 90% agreement in cloud detection for daytime, but less than 60% at night. Height retrievals are in much less agreement. GLAS is a part of the NASA EOS project and data products are thus openly available to the science community (see http://glo.gsfc.nasa.gov).

  13. Lidar Measurements of Snow Falling from Martian Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Canadian-built lidar aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander produced this graphic of a profile of a Martian cloud on the 99th sol, or Martian day, of the mission (Sept. 3, 2008). The vertical streaks at the base of the cloud on the right of the image show ice crystals falling from the cloud, similar to snow. The streaks are curved as the winds are faster around 3 kilometers (almost 2 miles) than at higher altitudes. Scientists are able to determine that the snow is water-based and not carbon-dioxide snow, since temperatures on Mars are currently too warm to support the latter.

  14. ESTIMATION OF TROPICAL FOREST STRUCTURE AND BIOMASS FROM FUSION OF RADAR AND LIDAR MEASUREMENTS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saatchi, S. S.; Dubayah, R.; Clark, D. B.; Chazdon, R.

    2009-12-01

    Radar and Lidar instruments are active remote sensing sensors with the potential of measuring forest vertical and horizontal structure and the aboveground biomass (AGB). In this paper, we present the analysis of radar and lidar data acquired over the La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. Radar polarimetry at L-band (25 cm wavelength), P-band (70 cm wavelength) and interferometry at C-band (6 cm wavelength) and VV polarization were acquired by the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) system. Lidar images were provided by a large footprint airborne scanning Lidar known as the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). By including field measurements of structure and biomass over a variety of forest types, we examined: 1) sensitivity of radar and lidar measurements to forest structure and biomass, 2) accuracy of individual sensors for AGB estimation, and 3) synergism of radar imaging measurements with lidar imaging and sampling measurements for improving the estimation of 3-dimensional forest structure and AGB. The results showed that P-band radar combined with any interformteric measurement of forest height can capture approximately 85% of the variation of biomass in La Selva at spatial scales larger than 1 hectare. Similar analysis at L-band frequency captured only 70% of the variation. However, combination of lidar and radar measurements improved estimates of forest three-dimensional structure and biomass to above 90% for all forest types. We present a novel data fusion approach based on a Baysian estimation model with the capability of incorporating lidar samples and radar imagery. The model was used to simulate the potential of data fusion in future satellite mission scenarios as in BIOMASS (planned by ESA) at P-band and DESDynl (planned by NASA) at L-band. The estimation model was also able to quantify errors and uncertainties associated with the scale of measurements, spatial variability of forest structure, and differences in radar and lidar geometry and pixel locations. Keywords: Amazon, Biomass, Carbon, Forest Structure, Tropical forests, Radar, Polarimetry, Interferometry, Lidar This work is performed partially at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract from National Aeronautic and Space Administration.

  15. Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, P.; Luke, E.; Rémillard, J.; Szyrmer, W.

    2011-07-02

    Several aspects of spectral broadening and drizzle growth in shallow liquid clouds remain not well understood. Detailed, cloud-scale observations of microphysics and dynamics are essential to guide and evaluate corresponding modeling efforts. Profiling, millimeter-wavelength (cloud) radars can provide such observations. In particular, the first three moments of the recorded cloud radar Doppler spectra, the radar reflectivity, mean Doppler velocity, and spectrum width, are often used to retrieve cloud microphysical and dynamical properties. Such retrievals are subject to errors introduced by the assumptions made in the inversion process. Here, we introduce two additional morphological parameters of the radar Doppler spectrum, the skewness and kurtosis, in an effort to reduce the retrieval uncertainties. A forward model that emulates observed radar Doppler spectra is constructed and used to investigate these relationships. General, analytical relationships that relate the five radar observables to cloud and drizzle microphysical parameters and cloud turbulence are presented. The relationships are valid for cloud-only, cloud mixed with drizzle, and drizzle-only particles in the radar sampling volume and provide a seamless link between observations and cloud microphysics and dynamics. The sensitivity of the five observed parameters to the radar operational parameters such as signal-to-noise ratio and Doppler spectra velocity resolution are presented. The predicted values of the five observed radar parameters agree well with the output of the forward model. The novel use of the skewness of the radar Doppler spectrum as an early qualitative predictor of drizzle onset in clouds is introduced. It is found that skewness is a parameter very sensitive to early drizzle generation. In addition, the significance of the five parameters of the cloud radar Doppler spectrum for constraining drizzle microphysical retrievals is discussed.

  16. Study of Droplet Activation in Thin Clouds Using Ground-based Raman Lidar and Ancillary Remote Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio; Gumà Claramunt, Pilar; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Studies on global climate change show that the effects of aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) on the Earth's radiation balance and climate, also known as indirect aerosol effects, are the most uncertain among all the effects involving the atmospheric constituents and processes (Stocker et al., IPCC, 2013). Droplet activation is the most important and challenging process in the understanding of ACI. It represents the direct microphysical link between aerosols and clouds and it is probably the largest source of uncertainty in estimating indirect aerosol effects. An accurate estimation of aerosol-clouds microphysical and optical properties in proximity and within the cloud boundaries represents a good frame for the study of droplet activation. This can be obtained by using ground-based profiling remote sensing techniques. In this work, a methodology for the experimental investigation of droplet activation, based on ground-based multi-wavelength Raman lidar and Doppler radar technique, is presented. The study is focused on the observation of thin liquid water clouds, which are low or midlevel super-cooled clouds characterized by a liquid water path (LWP) lower than about 100 gm-2(Turner et al., 2007). These clouds are often optically thin, which means that ground-based Raman lidar allows the detection of the cloud top and of the cloud structure above. Broken clouds are primarily inspected to take advantage of their discontinuous structure using ground based remote sensing. Observations are performed simultaneously with multi-wavelength Raman lidars, a cloud Doppler radar and a microwave radiometer at CIAO (CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory: www.ciao.imaa.cnr.it), in Potenza, Southern Italy (40.60N, 15.72E, 760 m a.s.l.). A statistical study of the variability of optical properties and humidity in the transition from cloudy regions to cloud-free regions surrounding the clouds leads to the identification of threshold values for the optical properties, enabling the discrimination between clouds and cloudless regions. Furthermore, a statistical study of the Doppler radar moments allows to retrieve droplet size and vertical velocities close to the cloud base. First evidences of a correlation between updrafts and downdrafts and aerosol effective radius have been found.

  17. Scanning ARM Cloud Radars Part I. Operational Sampling Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, Pavlos; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin B.; Jo, Ieng; Johnson, Karen

    2013-12-03

    Probing clouds in three-dimensions has never been done with scanning millimeter-wavelength (cloud) radars in a continuous operating environment. The acquisition of scanning cloud radars by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and research institutions around the world generate the need for developing operational scan strategies for cloud radars. Here, the first generation of sampling strategies for the Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACRs) is discussed. These scan strategies are designed to address the scientific objectives of the ARM program, however, they introduce an initial framework for operational scanning cloud radars. While the weather community uses scan strategies that are based on a sequence of scans at constant elevations, the SACRs scan strategies are based on a sequence of scans at constant azimuth. This is attributed to the cloud properties that are vastly different for rain and snow shafts that are the primary target of precipitation radars. A “cloud surveillance” scan strategy is introduced (HS-RHI) based on a sequence of horizon-to-horizon Range Height Indicator (RHI) scans that sample the hemispherical sky (HS). The HS-RHI scan strategy is repeated every 30 min to provide a static view of the cloud conditions around the SACR location. Between HS-RHI scan strategies other scan strategies are introduced depending on the cloud conditions. The SACRs are pointing vertically in the case of measurable precipitation at the ground. The radar reflectivities are corrected for water vapor attenuation and non-meteorological detection are removed. A hydrometeor detection mask is introduced based on the difference of cloud and noise statistics is discussed.

  18. Objective Determination of Cloud Heights and Radar Reflectivities Using a Combination of Active Remote Sensors at the ARM CART Sites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Mace, Gerald G.; Moran, Kenneth P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Miller, Mark A.; Martner, Brooks E.

    2000-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is deploying sensitive, millimeter-wave cloud radars at its Cloud and Radiation Test Bed (CART) sites in Oklahoma, Alaska, and the tropical western Pacific Ocean. The radars complement optical devices, including a Belfort or Vaisala laser ceilometer and a micropulse lidar, in providing a comprehensive source of information on the vertical distribution of hydrometeors overhead at the sites. An algorithm is described that combines data from these active remote sensors to produce an objective determination of hydrometeor height distributions and estimates of their radar reflectivities, vertical velocities, and Doppler spectral widths, which are optimized for accuracy. These data provide fundamental information for retrieving cloud microphysical properties and assessing the radiative effects of clouds on climate. The algorithm is applied to nine months of data from the CART site in Oklahoma for initial evaluation. Much of the algorithm's calculations deal with merging and optimizing data from the radar's four sequential operating modes, which have differing advantages and limitations, including problems resulting from range sidelobes, range aliasing, and coherent averaging. Two of the modes use advanced phase-coded pulse compression techniques to yield approximately 10 and 15 dB more sensitivity than is available from the two conventional pulse modes. Comparison of cloud-base heights from the Belfort ceilometer and the micropulse lidar confirms small biases found in earlier studies, but recent information about the ceilometer brings the agreement to within 20-30 m. Merged data of the radar's modes were found to miss approximately 5.9% of the clouds detected by the laser systems. Using data from only the radar's two less-sensitive conventional pulse modes would increase the missed detections to 22%-34%. A significant remaining problem is that the radar's lower-altitude data are often contaminated with echoes from nonhydrometeor targets, such as insects.

  19. Use of equivalent spheres to model the relation between radar reflectivity and optical extinction of ice cloud particles.

    PubMed

    Donovan, David Patrick; Quante, Markus; Schlimme, Ingo; Macke, Andreas

    2004-09-01

    The effect of ice crystal size and shape on the relation between radar reflectivity and optical extinction is examined. Discrete-dipole approximation calculations of 95-GHz radar reflectivity and ray-tracing calculations are applied to ice crystals of various habits and sizes. Ray tracing was used primarily to calculate optical extinction and to provide approximate information on the lidar backscatter cross section. The results of the combined calculations are compared with Mie calculations applied to collections of different types of equivalent spheres. Various equivalent sphere formulations are considered, including equivalent radar-lidar spheres; equivalent maximum dimension spheres; equivalent area spheres, and equivalent volume and equivalent effective radius spheres. Marked differences are found with respect to the accuracy of different formulations, and certain types of equivalent spheres can be used for useful prediction of both the radar reflectivity at 95 GHz and the optical extinction (but not lidar backscatter cross section) over a wide range of particle sizes. The implications of these results on combined lidar-radar ice cloud remote sensing are discussed. PMID:15449480

  20. A Wing Pod-based Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar on HIAPER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, Jothiram; Tsai, Peisang; Ellis, Scott; Loew, Eric; Lee, Wen-Chau; Emmett, Joanthan

    2014-05-01

    One of the attractive features of a millimeter wave radar system is its ability to detect micron-sized particles that constitute clouds with lower than 0.1 g m-3 liquid or ice water content. Scanning or vertically-pointing ground-based millimeter wavelength radars are used to study stratocumulus (Vali et al. 1998; Kollias and Albrecht 2000) and fair-weather cumulus (Kollias et al. 2001). Airborne millimeter wavelength radars have been used for atmospheric remote sensing since the early 1990s (Pazmany et al. 1995). Airborne millimeter wavelength radar systems, such as the University of Wyoming King Air Cloud Radar (WCR) and the NASA ER-2 Cloud Radar System (CRS), have added mobility to observe clouds in remote regions and over oceans. Scientific requirements of millimeter wavelength radar are mainly driven by climate and cloud initiation studies. Survey results from the cloud radar user community indicated a common preference for a narrow beam W-band radar with polarimetric and Doppler capabilities for airborne remote sensing of clouds. For detecting small amounts of liquid and ice, it is desired to have -30 dBZ sensitivity at a 10 km range. Additional desired capabilities included a second wavelength and/or dual-Doppler winds. Modern radar technology offers various options (e.g., dual-polarization and dual-wavelength). Even though a basic fixed beam Doppler radar system with a sensitivity of -30 dBZ at 10 km is capable of satisfying cloud detection requirements, the above-mentioned additional options, namely dual-wavelength, and dual-polarization, significantly extend the measurement capabilities to further reduce any uncertainty in radar-based retrievals of cloud properties. This paper describes a novel, airborne pod-based millimeter wave radar, preliminary radar measurements and corresponding derived scientific products. Since some of the primary engineering requirements of this millimeter wave radar are that it should be deployable on an airborne platform, occupy minimum cabin space and maximize scan coverage, a pod-based configuration was adopted. Currently, the radar system is capable of collecting observations between zenith and nadir in a fixed scanning mode. Measurements are corrected for aircraft attitude changes. The near-nadir and zenith pointing observations minimize the cross-track Doppler contamination in the radial velocity measurements. An extensive engineering monitoring mechanism is built into the recording system status such as temperature, pressure, various electronic components' status and receiver characteristics. Status parameters are used for real-time system stability estimates and correcting radar system parameters. The pod based radar system is mounted on a modified Gulfstream V aircraft, which is operated and maintained by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) on behalf of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The aircraft is called the High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) (Laursen et al., 2006). It is also instrumented with high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and an array of in situ and remote sensors for atmospheric research. As part of the instrument suite for HIAPER, the NSF funded the development of the HIAPER Cloud Radar (HCR). The HCR is an airborne, millimeter-wavelength, dual-polarization, Doppler radar that serves the atmospheric science community by providing cloud remote sensing capabilities for the NSF/NCAR G-V (HIAPER) aircraft. An optimal radar configuration that is capable of maximizing the accuracy of both qualitative and quantitative estimated cloud microphysical and dynamical properties is the most attractive option to the research community. The Technical specifications of cloud radar are optimized for realizing the desired scientific performance for the pod-based configuration. The radar was both ground and flight tested and preliminary measurements of Doppler and polarization measurements were collected. HCR observed sensitivity as low as -37 dBZ at 1 km range and resolved linear depolarization ratio (LDR) signature better than -29 dB during its latest test flights. References: Kollias, P., and B. A. Albrecht, 2000: The turbulence structure in a continental stratocumulus cloud from millimeter wavelength radar observation. J. Atmos. Sci., 57, 2417-2434. Kollias, P., B.A. Albrecht, R. Lhermitte, and A. Savtchenko, 2001: Radar observations of updrafts, downdrafts, and turbulence in fair weather cumuli. J. Atmos. Sci. 58, 1750-1766. Laursen, K. K., D. P. Jorgensen, G. P. Brasseur, S. L. Ustin, and J. Hunning, 2006: HIAPER: The next generation NSF/NCAR research aircraft. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 87, 896-909. Pazmany, A. L., R. E. McIntosh, R. Kelly, and V. G., 1994: An airborne 95-GHz dual-polarized radar for cloud studies. IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens., 32, 731-739. Vali, G., Kelly, R.D., French, J., Haimov, S., Leon, D., McIntosh, R., Pazmany, A., 1998. Fine-scale structure and microphysics of coastal stratus. J. Atmos. Sci. 55, 3540-3564.

  1. Wave-measurement capabilities of the surface contour radar and the airborne oceanographic lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Edward J.; Hancock, David W., III; Hines, Donald E.; Swift, Robert N.; Scott, John F.

    1987-01-01

    The 36-gigahertz surface contour radar and the airborne oceanographic lidar were used in the SIR-B underflight mission off the coast of Chile in October 1984. The two systems and some of their wave-measurement capabilities are described. The surface contour radar can determine the directional wave spectrum and eliminate the 180-degree ambiguity in wave propagation direction that is inherent in some other techniques such as stereophotography and the radar ocean wave spectrometer. The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar can acquire profile data on the waves and produce a spectrum that is close to the nondirectional ocean-wave spectrum for ground tracks parallel to the wave propagation direction.

  2. High resolution retrieval of liquid water vertical distributions using collocated Ka-band and W-band cloud radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dong; Johnson, Karen; Liu, Yangang; Wiscombe, Warren

    2009-12-01

    The retrieval of cloud water content using dual-frequency radar attenuation is very sensitive to error in radar reflectivity. Either a long radar dwell time or an average over many range gates is needed to reduce random noise in radar data and thus to obtain accurate retrievals - but at the cost of poorer temporal and spatial resolution. In this letter we have shown that, by using advanced mathematical inversion techniques like total variation regularization, vertically resolved liquid water content can be retrieved at an accuracy of about 0.15 gm-3 at 40 m resolution. This is demonstrated using the co-located Ka-band and W-band cloud radars operated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program. The liquid water path calculated from the radars agrees closely with that from a microwave radiometer, with a mean difference of 70 gm-2. Comparison with lidar observations reveals that the dual-frequency retrieval also reasonably captures the cloud base height of drizzling clouds - something that is very difficult to determine from radar reflectivity alone.

  3. COMPARISON OF MILLIMETER-WAVE CLOUD RADAR MEASUREMENTS FOR THE FALL 1997 CLOUD IOP

    SciTech Connect

    SEKELSKY,S.M.; LI,L.; GALLOWAY,J.; MCINTOSH,R.E.; MILLER,M.A.; CLOTHIAUX,E.E.; HAIMOV,S.; MACE,G.; SASSEN,K.

    1998-03-23

    One of the primary objectives of the Fall 1997 IOP was to intercompare Ka-band (35GHz) and W-band (95GHz) cloud radar observations and verify system calibrations. During September 1997, several cloud radars were deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site, including the full time operation 35 GHz CART Millimeter-wave Cloud Radar (MMCR), (Moran, 1997), the University of Massachusetts (UMass) single antenna 33GHz/95 GHz Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS), (Sekelsky, 1996), the 95 GHz Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR) flown on the University of Wyoming King Air (Galloway, 1996), the University of Utah 95 GHz radar and the dual-antenna Pennsylvania State University 94 GHz radar (Clothiaux, 1995). In this paper the authors discuss several issues relevant to comparison of ground-based radars, including the detection and filtering of insect returns. Preliminary comparisons of ground-based Ka-band radar reflectivity data and comparisons with airborne radar reflectivity measurements are also presented.

  4. Cloud Characteristics by Using Doppler Radar over Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Pradhan, D.; Singh, H. A. K.; Gupta, M. M.; De, A. K.; Das, J.; Sarkar, S. K.

    2007-07-01

    In present days radio communication scenario, three issues are considered to be the most important. These are reliability, directivity and regulation of transmitted power. All such issues can be taken care provided the characterization of our tropospheric medium is done with good degree accuracy. The radio wave propagating above 10 GHz is affected severely by rain and cloud. In case of rain, the attenuation of radio wave is the main concerned but for cloud along with attenuation, noise temperature generated by cloud is also another issue. Cloud attenuation and cloud noise temperature can be deduced if cloud morphology in terms of cloud coverage, cloud height, cloud thickness, cloud liquid water content etc. is available. The meteorologists of India have studied cloud morphology as well as cloud dynamics for the weather forecasting purposes. But in this paper, an attempt has been made to deduce results on cloud parameters for radio wave propagation studies by utilizing the observations taken by the sophisticated computer controlled Doppler radar belonging to the India Meteorological Department over Kolkata. The Doppler radar operates in C-band at frequency ˜ 2700-2900 MHz with peak power 500 kW. Several cloud parameters viz. radar reflectivity, cloud thickness, cloud height, cloud vertical integrated liquid water content etc. have been studied in probability distribution scale. Based on cloud height, the temperature of the cloud has been determined. It is seen that over Kolkata, the cloud height ˜ 6.5 km occur for maximum percentage of time. The cloud temp has been estimated by using the lapse rate of the temperature with height, which is ˜ 6.5°c km. By using the cloud height, cloud temperature and cloud liquid water content, the attenuation of radio wave due to cloud at microwave and millimeter wave frequency bands, over Kolkata have been derived. It is seen that attenuation value varies from 0.2 dB / km to 30 dB / km over the frequency range from 10 GHz to 100 GHz. The noise temperature generated by cloud has been estimated and found to be from 8°K to 202°K at the frequency range from 10 GHz to 70 GHz with cloud thickness ˜ 1 km and at cloud temperature ˜ 260 °K. Such noise affects the signal to noise (S/N) ratio of the communication system.

  5. Validating Lidar Depolorization Calibration using Solar Radiation Scattered by Ice Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhao-Yang; McGill, Matthew; Hu, Yong-Xiang; Hostetter, Chris; Winker, David; Vaughan, Mark

    2004-01-01

    This letter proposes the use of solar background radiation scattered by ice clouds for validating space lidar depolarization calibration. The method takes advantage of the fact that the background light scattered by ice clouds is almost entirely unpolarized. The theory is examined with Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) background light measurements.

  6. Spaceborne precipitation radar simulation from a global cloud resolving model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinonen, J. S.; Lebsock, M. D.; Suzuki, K.; Yashiro, H.; Miyamoto, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The ability of spaceborne radars to detect and measure clouds and precipitation globally is affected by their inherent sensitivity limits, by attenuation of the microwave radiation in the atmosphere, and by variability of the precipitation over scales smaller than the radar footprint. Effective design of radars and the interpretation of their measurements require that the influence of these phenomena on their performance be quantified. Such quantification is hindered by the incompleteness of the existing reference measurements. Simulation of radar observations from atmospheric models can be used as an alternative to direct measurements, but most models either operate on a local scale and are thus not globally representative, or else are too coarse in their resolution to simulate sub-footprint scale phenomena. This gap is currently being bridged by global cloud resolving models, which simulate the entire atmosphere at scales approaching that of individual clouds. We have simulated spaceborne radar measurements globally from a run of the Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM) at a resolution of 800 m. A radar single scattering model was developed for each of the five NICAM cloud and precipitation particle classes: cloud ice, cloud water, rain, snow and graupel, retaining consistency with the model microphysics assumptions. Additionally, regions with melting snowflakes were considered separately, as they have a pronounced effect on radar observations. The results of the single scattering calculations were then used in a time-dependent radiative transfer model in order to simulate attenuation and multiple scattering effects. Finally, the simulated observations were spatially averaged to reproduce the effect of a radar footprint larger than a single grid point. Using this approach, we can estimate the performance of various radar configurations in current and future Earth observing satellite missions.

  7. New Cloud Science from the New ARM Cloud Radar Systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiscombe, W. J.

    2010-12-01

    The DOE ARM Program is deploying over $30M worth of scanning polarimetric Doppler radars at its four fixed and two mobile sites, with the object of advancing cloud lifecycle science, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interaction science, by a quantum leap. As of 2011, there will be 13 scanning radar systems to complement its existing array of profiling cloud radars: C-band for precipitation, X-band for drizzle and precipitation, and two-frequency radars for cloud droplets and drizzle. This will make ARM the world’s largest science user of, and largest provider of data from, ground-based cloud radars. The philosophy behind this leap is actually quite simple, to wit: dimensionality really does matter. Just as 2D turbulence is fundamentally different from 3D turbulence, so observing clouds only at zenith provides a dimensionally starved, and sometimes misleading, picture of real clouds. In particular, the zenith view can say little or nothing about cloud lifecycle and the second indirect effect, nor about aerosol-precipitation interactions. It is not even particularly good at retrieving the cloud fraction (no matter how that slippery quantity is defined). This talk will review the history that led to this development and then discuss the aspirations for how this will propel cloud-aerosol-precipitation science forward. The step by step plan for translating raw radar data into information that is useful to cloud and aerosol scientists and climate modelers will be laid out, with examples from ARM’s recent scanning cloud radar deployments in the Azores and Oklahoma . In the end, the new systems should allow cloud systems to be understood as 4D coherent entities rather than dimensionally crippled 2D or 3D entities such as observed by satellites and zenith-pointing radars.

  8. Raster Vs. Point Cloud LiDAR Data Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ashmawy, N.; Shaker, A.

    2014-09-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning systems with light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology is one of the fast and accurate 3D point data acquisition techniques. Generating accurate digital terrain and/or surface models (DTM/DSM) is the main application of collecting LiDAR range data. Recently, LiDAR range and intensity data have been used for land cover classification applications. Data range and Intensity, (strength of the backscattered signals measured by the LiDAR systems), are affected by the flying height, the ground elevation, scanning angle and the physical characteristics of the objects surface. These effects may lead to uneven distribution of point cloud or some gaps that may affect the classification process. Researchers have investigated the conversion of LiDAR range point data to raster image for terrain modelling. Interpolation techniques have been used to achieve the best representation of surfaces, and to fill the gaps between the LiDAR footprints. Interpolation methods are also investigated to generate LiDAR range and intensity image data for land cover classification applications. In this paper, different approach has been followed to classifying the LiDAR data (range and intensity) for land cover mapping. The methodology relies on the classification of the point cloud data based on their range and intensity and then converted the classified points into raster image. The gaps in the data are filled based on the classes of the nearest neighbour. Land cover maps are produced using two approaches using: (a) the conventional raster image data based on point interpolation; and (b) the proposed point data classification. A study area covering an urban district in Burnaby, British Colombia, Canada, is selected to compare the results of the two approaches. Five different land cover classes can be distinguished in that area: buildings, roads and parking areas, trees, low vegetation (grass), and bare soil. The results show that an improvement of around 10 % in the classification results can be achieved by using the proposed approach.

  9. Lidar Observations of the Optical Properties and 3-Dimensional Structure of Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, E. W.

    1996-01-01

    The scientific research conducted under this grant have been reported in a series of journal articles, dissertations, and conference proceedings. This report consists of a compilation of these publications in the following areas: development and operation of a High Spectral Resolution Lidar, cloud physics and cloud formation, mesoscale observations of cloud phenomena, ground-based and satellite cloud cover observations, impact of volcanic aerosols on cloud formation, visible and infrared radiative relationships as measured by satellites and lidar, and scattering cross sections.

  10. Doppler capable FMCW cloud detection radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşkun, Salih; Ćelik, Mert; Yilmaz, Ali Özgur; Koç, Sencer

    2015-10-01

    This study which was conducted as a Master's thesis, is a radar system working at X band. In this system, a 0.8 Watts continuous electromagnetic wave which is modulated with a frequency ramp of 30 MHz bandwidth is generated and radiated through transmit antenna. The scattered signal from the hydrometeors is multiplied with the transmitted one and the beat signal is obtained. By this deramping process the range information of the target is converted into frequency domain. Data is processed in Matlab after passing through analog to digital converters. The range and velocity information is obtained with signal processing algorithms in fast and slow time. Some special techniques such as clipping, windowing, coherent data integration, and slow time signal processing are performed to the captured beat signal. Verification of the system is performed by buildings and cars whose range and velocities are known. The range of cloud and the speed of wind are estimated by processing the return signal in fast and slow time.

  11. Balloonborne lidar for cloud physics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Donfrancesco, Guido; Cairo, Francesco; Buontempo, Carlo; Adriani, Alberto; Viterbini, Maurizio; Snels, Marcel; Morbidini, Roberto; Piccolo, Francesco; Cardillo, Francesco; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Garnier, Anne

    2006-08-01

    An innovative balloonborne microjoule lidar (MULID) has been developed within the framework of the HIBISCUS project to provide nighttime measurements of visible and subvisible cirrus and aerosols. MULID has been designed to be a low-cost and an ultralow consumption instrument, due to the remote possibilities of payload recovery and the necessity of a low-weight battery power supply. Ground tests have been performed at the Observatory of Haute Provence (France), and the first technical flight has been made from Trapani, Italy, on a stratospheric balloon; finally, the instrument has been scientifically deployed during the pre-HIBISCUS and HIBISCUS tropical campaigns in Bauru, Brazil, in February 2003 and February 2004, respectively. A description of the instrument is provided together with the results of the ground-based and flight tests as well as an overview and discussion of the first results.

  12. Tropical cirrus cloud macrophysical properties over Darwin from CALIPSO, the ARM MPL and the ARM Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsen, T. J.; Fu, Q.; Comstock, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Tropical cirrus clouds occur frequently and are important for regulating radiative heating in the tropical tropopause layer. From a remote sensing perspective, a significant number of tropical cirrus are sufficiently optical thin to be below the minimum threshold of passive imagers and contain small ice crystals making them undetectable by cloud radars. Detecting all tropical cirrus clouds requires the use of lidar observations. Thorsen et al. (JGR, 2011) compared CALIPSO and ARM MPL observations of cirrus clouds over the three ARM TWP sites. In general this study showed that statistics of cirrus properties agree well between the two sets of observations when comparisons where made with profiles transparent to the lidar. However differences exist between the MPL and CALIPSO observations. Specifically this study found that (1) the frequency of occurrence of cirrus in the MPL observations is significantly smaller, (2) the MPL is more frequently completely attenuated, particularly during the daytime (3) Transparent daytime MPL clouds boundaries are biased to lower altitudes relative to CALIPSO, presumably due to the poor sampling of transparent profiles and increased noise in the MPL observations. In the current study we intend to revisit these issues using the new ARM Raman lidar at Darwin. We will examine cloud occurrence profiles, cloud top height, base height and geometrical thicknesses from CALIPSO, the MPL and the Raman lidar to determine if the discrepancies between CALIPSO and the MPL are resolved by using the Raman lidar. In addition we'll examine the finding by Thorsen et al. (JGR, 2011) that both CALIPSO and the MPL show the same diurnal cycle of geometrical thickness with geometrically thicker cirrus clouds during the nighttime. It is not clear if this diurnal cycle is physical or an effect of improved single-to-noise at night, which allows for better detection of cloud top and base and therefore a thicker cloud. While CALIPSO and the MPL operate at wavelengths in the visible, the Raman lidar operates in the ultra-violet and therefore is subjected to less noise from the solar background making it a better tool for determining the diurnal cycle of cirrus geometrical thickness.

  13. Lidar observations of polar stratospheric clouds at Andoya, Norway, in January 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, H.J.; Scheuch, P.; Langer, M.; Fricke, K.H.; Zahn, U. von ); Knudsen, B.M. )

    1994-06-22

    This paper reports on lidar measurements of polar stratospheric clouds above Andoya, Norway (69[degrees]N) during January 1992. On one day the cloud seemed to be just forming. One two days the clouds showed characteristics of type 1a clouds. The fourth observation showed the cloud formed within the altitude band where significant aerosol products from the Pinatubo volcanic eruption were present.

  14. Airborne Doppler-lidar and ground-based Doppler radar observations of a thunderstorm in Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluestein, H. B.; Mccaul, E. W., Jr.; Fitzjarrald, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    The results of airborne Doppler-lidar and ground-based Doppler radar observations of multicellular storms, marked by heavy rainfall, strong surface outflow, and a gust-front tornado, on June 30, 1981 are analyzed. The airborne lidar comprised a CO2-laser operating in the IR region, which was discharged once each second at 20 deg fore and aft, alternatively, of the normal to the aircraft's heading, and a quarter-wave plate for registering the returning frequency-shifted beams. Wind fields are plotted taking into account the advection effects. The lidar data set is noted for its self-consistency, though limited to a range of 5 km by the high moisture levels. Fair agreement was found between the lidar-derived and radar-derived average ground-based radial wind fields, with discrepancies on the order of 1.5 m/s.

  15. Fusion of lidar and radar for detection of partially obscured objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, Jim; Kutscher, Brett; Close, Ryan

    2015-05-01

    The capability to detect partially obscured objects is of interest to many communities, including ground vehicle robotics. The ability to find partially obscured objects can aid in automated navigation and planning algorithms used by robots. Two sensors often used for this task are Lidar and Radar. Lidar and Radar systems provide complementary data about the environment. Both are active sensing modalities and provide direct range measurements. However, they operate in very different portions of the radio frequency spectrum. By exploiting properties associated with the different frequency spectra, the sensors are able to compensate for each other's shortcomings. This makes them excellent candidates for sensor processing and data fusion systems. The benefits associated with Lidar and Radar sensor fusion for a ground vehicle application, using economical variants of these sensors, are presented. Special consideration is given to detecting objects partially obscured by light to medium vegetation.

  16. The polarization lidar technique for cloud research - A review and current assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    The development of the polarization lidar technique is reviewed, and the current capabilities and limitations of the technique for the cloud research are discussed. At present, polarization lidar is a key component of climate-research programs designed to characterize the properties of cirrus clouds and is an integral part of multiple remote-sensor studies of mixed-phase cloud systems such as winter mountain storms, making it possible to discriminate between cloud phases and to identify some particle types and orientations. Recent theoretical approaches involving ice crystal ray-tracing and cloud microphysical-model simulations are expected to increase the utility of the polarization lidar technique.

  17. A self-directing elastic backscatter lidar system for debris cloud tracking and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Dighe, K.A.; Tunnell, T.W.

    1996-06-01

    An elastic backscatter lidar that utilizes the lidar signal itself to direct the system towards fast moving isolated aerosol clouds has been developed. However, detecting and tracking invisible transient effluents from unknown locations, though conceptually straightforward, has still remained experimentally challenging. Accurate cloud volume, cloud density distribution, and track information have been obtained on small, fast moving, subvisible debris clouds resulting from above ground tests in which conventional explosives were detonated.

  18. Scanning Cloud Radar Observations at the ARM sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollias, P.; Clothiaux, E. E.; Shupe, M.; Widener, K.; Bharadwaj, N.; Miller, M. A.; Verlinde, H.; Luke, E. P.; Johnson, K. L.; Jo, I.; Tatarevic, A.; Lamer, K.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program upgraded its fixed and mobile facilities with the acquisition of state-of-the-art scanning, dual-wavelength, polarimetric, Doppler cloud radars. The scanning ARM cloud radars (SACR's) are the most expensive and significant radar systems at all ARM sites and eight SACR systems will be operational at ARM sites by the end of 2013. The SACR's are the primary instruments for the detection of 3D cloud properties (boundaries, volume cloud fractional coverage, liquid water content, dynamics, etc.) beyond the soda-straw (profiling) limited view. Having scanning capabilities with two frequencies and polarization allows more accurate probing of a variety of cloud systems (e.g., drizzle and shallow, warm rain), better correction for attenuation, use of attenuation for liquid water content retrievals, and polarimetric and dual-wavelength ratio characterization of non-spherical particles for improved ice crystal habit identification. Examples of SACR observations from four ARM sites are presented here: the fixed sites at Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA), and the mobile facility deployments at Graciosa Island, Azores and Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The 3D cloud structure is investigated both at the macro-scale (20-50 km) and cloud-scale (100-500 m). Doppler velocity measurements are corrected for velocity folding and are used either to describe the in-cloud horizontal wind profile or the 3D vertical air motions.

  19. Lidar observations of cirrus clouds in Buenos Aires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakkis, S. Gabriela; Lavorato, Mario; Canziani, Pablo; Lacomi, Hector

    2015-08-01

    Characterization of cirrus clouds over Buenos Aires (34.6S, 58.5W) using a ground based lidar is presented. The study, carried out for the period 2010-2011, reveals that cirrus are usually found in the altitude region 8-11 km, with mid-cloud temperatures values varying between -75 C and 55 C. The clouds, whose bases altitudes display significant variability while their tops remains close to the tropopause, show geometrical thickness ranging from 1.2 to 5 km, with on average value 3.00.9 km. Most commonly observed cirri can be characterized as optically thin cirrus rather than dense ones, with a mean optical depth value of 0.260.11 and an applied multiple scattering factor ? of 0.850.07. In this region, the optical depth increases with increasing geometrical thickness with a partially linear correlation. Lidar ratios are also analyzed and on average the value is 3217 sr.

  20. Lidar beams in opposite directions for quality assessment of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization spaceborne measurements.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Juan; Flamant, Pierre H

    2010-04-20

    We present the "lidar beams in opposite directions" (LIBOD) technique and applications for quality assessment of spaceborne observations made by Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation satellite. LIBOD is applicable to standard total backscatter lidar because it does not require a priori knowledge of the particle extinction-to-backscatter ratio. In this paper, we present (i) an objective assessment of the lidar signal quality and representativity of correlative ground-based lidar and CALIOP measurements only using normalized range-corrected lidar signals and (ii) a numerical filtering and optimization technique for reducing the spurious oscillations induced by noisy signal differentiation as needed for retrieval of particle extinction coefficients and extinction-to-backscatter ratio profiles. Numerical simulations and Monte Carlo tests are conducted for assessing the performance of the LIBOD technique. The applications are illustrated with examples of actual correlative 532 nm lidar profiles from CALIOP and a ground-based lidar deployed in Tamanrasset in the heart of Sahara in 2006 and near Strasbourg, France, in 2007. PMID:20411002

  1. On the effect of cloud microstructure on the polarization characteristics of double scattering lidar return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, Anton A.; Bryukhanova, Valentina V.

    2015-11-01

    The work is devoted to remote sensing droplet clouds by coaxial lidar. The results of numerical modeling of the distribution of polarization ellipse parameters of lidar returns in the double-scattering approximation are discussed. It is shown that the polarization state of sounding radiation transforms from a linear (or circular) to the elliptical at the study droplet clouds.

  2. Cirrus cloud characteristics derived from volume imaging lidar, high spectral resolution lidar, HIS radiometer, and satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grund, Christian J.; Ackerman, Steven A.; Eloranta, Edwin W.; Knutsen, Robert O.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Smith, William L.; Wylie, Donald P.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary measurement results are presented from the Cirrus Remote Sensing Pilot Experiment which used a unique suite of instruments to simultaneously retrieve cirrus cloud visible and IR optical properties, while addressing the disparities between satellite volume averages and local point measurements. The experiment employed a ground-based high resolution interferometer sounder (HIS) and a second Fourier transform spectrometer to measure the spectral radiance in the 4-20 micron band, a correlated high spectral resolution lidar, a volume imaging lidar, a CLASS radiosonde system, the Scripps Whole Sky Imager, and multispectral VAS, HIRS, and AVHRR satellite data from polar orbiting and geostationary satellites. Data acquired during the month long experiment included continuous daytime monitoring with the Whole Sky Imager.

  3. The Cloud Physics Lidar: Instrument Description and Initial Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Matthew; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William; Spinhirne, James; Scott, V. Stanley; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The new Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) has been built for use on the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft. The purpose of the CPL is to provide multi-wavelength measurements of cirrus, subvisual cirrus, and aerosols with high temporal and spatial resolution. The CPL utilizes state-of-the-art technology with a high repetition rate, a low pulse energy laser, and photon-counting detection. The first deployment for the CPL was the SAFARI-2000 field campaign during August-September 2000. We provide here an overview of the instrument and initial data results to illustrate the measurement capability of the CPL.

  4. First detection of a noctilucent cloud by lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, G.; Serwazi, M.; von Zahn, U. )

    1989-12-01

    During the night of August 5/6, 1989 for the first time a noctilucent cloud (NLC) was detected and measured by a lidar instrument. The observations were made with ground-based narrow-band Na lidar located at Andenes, Norway (69{degree}N, 16{degree}E geographic coordinates). In wavelength the lidar was operated both at the Na D{sub 2} resonance line of 589 nm as well as 5 Doppler widths shifted away. The altitude resolution was 200 m. The NLC developed at about 22:20 UT, reached its maximum backscatter cross section at 23:05 UT and became unobservable at around 00:10 UT. During this period the NLC exhibited the following properties: (a) its altitude ranged between 83.4 and 82.2 km; (b) its full width at half maximum ranged between 1.4 and 0.3 km; (c) the ratio of measured backscatter intensity from the NLC to the calculated Rayleigh signal from 82.6 km reached 450; (d) its volume backscatter cross section maximized at 6.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} m{sup {minus}1} sr{sup {minus}1}.

  5. A wing pod-based millimeter wavelength airborne cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Ellis, S.; Tsai, P.; Loew, E.; Lee, W. C.; Emmett, J.; Dixon, M.; Burghart, C.; Rauenbuehler, S.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a novel, airborne pod-based millimeter wavelength radar. Its frequency of operation is 94 GHz (3 mm wavelength). The radar has been designed to fly on the NCAR Gulfstream V HIAPER aircraft; however, it could be deployed on other similarly equipped aircraft. The pod-based configuration occupies minimum cabin space and maximizes scan coverage. The radar system is capable of collecting observations in a staring mode between zenith and nadir or in a scanning mode. Standard pulse-pair estimates of moments and raw time series of backscattered signals are recorded. The radar system design and characteristics, as well as techniques for calibrating reflectivity and correcting Doppler velocity for aircraft attitude and motion are described. The radar can alternatively be deployed in a ground-based configuration, housed in the 20 ft shipping container it shares with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The radar was tested both on the ground and in flight. Preliminary measurements of Doppler and polarization measurements were collected and examples are presented.

  6. A wing pod-based millimeter wavelength airborne cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Ellis, S.; Tsai, P.; Loew, E.; Lee, W.-C.; Emmett, J.; Dixon, M.; Burghart, C.; Rauenbuehler, S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes a novel, airborne pod-based millimeter (mm) wavelength radar. Its frequency of operation is 94 GHz (3 mm wavelength). The radar has been designed to fly on the NCAR Gulfstream V HIAPER aircraft; however, it could be deployed on other similarly equipped aircraft. The pod-based configuration occupies minimum cabin space and maximizes scan coverage. The radar system is capable of collecting observations in a staring mode between zenith and nadir or in a scanning mode. Standard pulse-pair estimates of moments and raw time series of backscattered signals are recorded. The radar system design and characteristics as well as techniques for calibrating reflectivity and correcting Doppler velocity for aircraft attitude and motion are described. The radar can alternatively be deployed in a ground-based configuration, housed in the 20 ft shipping container it shares with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The radar was tested both on the ground and in flight. Preliminary measurements of Doppler and polarization measurements were collected and examples are presented.

  7. Mixed-phase cloud phase partitioning using millimeter wavelength cloud radar Doppler velocity spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, G.; Verlinde, J.; Clothiaux, E. E.; Chen, Y.-S.

    2014-06-01

    Retrieving and quantifying cloud liquid drop contributions to radar returns from mixed-phase clouds remains a challenge because the radar signal is frequently dominated by the returns from the ice particles within the radar sample volume. We present a technique that extracts the weak cloud liquid drop contributions from the total radar returns in profiling cloud radar Doppler velocity spectra. Individual spectra are first decomposed using a continuous wavelet transform, the resulting coefficients of which are used to identify the region in the spectra where cloud liquid drops contribute. By assuming that the liquid contribution to each Doppler spectrum is Gaussian shaped and centered on an appropriate peak in the wavelet coefficients, the cloud liquid drop contribution may be estimated by fitting a Gaussian distribution centered on the velocity of this peak to the original Doppler spectrum. The cloud liquid drop contribution to reflectivity, the volume mean vertical air motion, subvolume vertical velocity variance, and ice particle mean fall speed can be estimated based on the separation of the liquid contribution to the radar Doppler spectrum. The algorithm is evaluated using synthetic spectra produced from output of a state-of-the-art large eddy simulation model study of an Arctic mixed-phase cloud. The retrievals of cloud liquid drop mode reflectivities were generally consistent with the original model values with errors less than a factor of 2. The retrieved volume mean vertical air velocities reproduced the updraft and downdraft structures, but with an overall bias of approximately -0.06 m s-1. Retrievals based on Ka-band Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Zenith Radar observations from Barrow, Alaska, during October 2011 are also presented.

  8. A numerical technique for the calculation of cloud optical extinction from lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, J. M.; Vaughan, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    A simple numerical algorithm which calculates optical extinction from cloud lidar data is presented. The method assumes a two-component atmosphere consisting of 'clear air' and cloud particulates. 'Clear air' may consist of either molecules only or a mix of molecules and atmospheric aerosols. For certain clouds, the method may be utilized to provide an estimate of the cloud-atmospheric parameter defined as the ratio of the cloud volume backscatter coefficient to the cloud extinction coefficient divided by the atmospheric volume backscatter coefficient at a given altitude. The cloud-atmospheric parameter may be estimated only from cloud data from which the optical thickness may reliably be used as a constraint on the numerical solution. This constraint provides the additional information necessary to obtain the cloud-atmospheric parameter. Conversely, the method may be applied to obtain cloud extinction and optical thickness from lidar cloud soundings if an estimate of the cloud-atmospheric parameter is available.

  9. An Automated Cloud-edge Detection Algorithm Using Cloud Physics and Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Jennifer G.; Merceret, Francis J.; Grainger, Cedric A.

    2003-01-01

    An automated cloud edge detection algorithm was developed and extensively tested. The algorithm uses in-situ cloud physics data measured by a research aircraft coupled with ground-based weather radar measurements to determine whether the aircraft is in or out of cloud. Cloud edges are determined when the in/out state changes, subject to a hysteresis constraint. The hysteresis constraint prevents isolated transient cloud puffs or data dropouts from being identified as cloud boundaries. The algorithm was verified by detailed manual examination of the data set in comparison to the results from application of the automated algorithm.

  10. Determining in-Cloud Ice Particle Canting Distributions Using Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeyager, R. E.; Liu, G.

    2014-12-01

    With the advent of satellite-borne and ground-based radar and radiometers, it is now possible to observe ice cloud processes with unprecedented global coverage, simultaneously and at multiple frequencies. Unlike with liquid water, ice is nonspherical. Because of this asymmetry, in-cloud ice can sometimes have a preferred orientation. Instead of the particles orienting randomly, these particles may align roughly parallel to the horizon due to dynamical forcings. As such, this means that radar and radiometer observation angle relative to vertical / nadir must also be considered when recovering information from these instruments. To gain a preliminary understanding of these effects, angle-dependent single scattering properties (i.e. scattering and backscatter cross-section) are first determined using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). Several particle morphologies are considered, including bullet rosette aggregates [Nowell, Liu and Honeyager 2013], dendritic snowflakes, sector snowflakes and bullet rosettes [Liu 2008]. Early profiles are constructed, showing the change in backscatter and scattering cross-sections as a function of radar observation angle and degree of alignment in the ensemble. To make a more physical model, it is not assumed that all hydrometeors are either fully randomly oriented or fully aligned. It is expected that transition regions occur in clouds, with partial alignment. We use an ensemble von Mises-Fisher distribution to examine these alignment effects. Finally, the model is to be validated against dual-frequency radar retrievals (Ka and W-Band) using ARM scanning-mode radars. By examining clouds at multiple angles and multiple frequencies as they move over the radar site, it is possible to determine the hydrometeor canting distribution. Observations will be used to develop a model for where hydrometeor alignment effects are expected to occur, and to determine the impact hydrometeor alignment has on existing zenith and nadir-pointing radar.

  11. Cloud profiling radar for the CloudSat Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Wu, Chialin; Durden, Stephen L.

    2005-01-01

    The CloudSat Mission is a new satellite mission jointly developed by NASA, JPL, the Canadian Agency, Colorado State University, and the US AirForce to acquire a global data set of vertical cloud structure and its variability.

  12. Solid-State Cloud Radar System (CRS) Upgrade and Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLinden, Matt; Heymsfield, Gerald; Li, Lihua; Racette, Paul; Coon, Michael; Venkatesh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The recent decade has brought rapid development in solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) technology. This has enabled the use of solid-state precipitation radar in place of high-power and high-voltage systems such as those that use Klystron or Magnetron transmitters. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has recently completed a comprehensive redesign of the 94 gigahertz Cloud Radar System (CRS) to incorporate a solid-state transmitter. It is the first cloud radar to achieve sensitivity comparable to that of a high-voltage transmitter using solid-state. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Cloud Radar System (CRS) is a 94 gigahertz Doppler radar that flies on the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The upgraded CRS system utilizes a state-of-the-art solid-state 94 gigahertz power amplifier with a peak transmit power of 30 watts. The modernized CRS system is detailed here with data results from its deployment during the 2014 Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEX).

  13. Improved retrievals of the optical properties of cirrus clouds by a combination of lidar methods.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Bertrand; Giraud, Vincent; Haeffelin, Martial; Keckhut, Philippe; Rechou, Anne; Baldy, Serge

    2005-03-20

    We focus on improvement of the retrieval of optical properties of cirrus clouds by combining two lidar methods. We retrieve the cloud's optical depth by using independently the molecular backscattering profile below and above the cloud [molecular integration (MI) method] and the backscattering profile inside the cloud with an a priori effective lidar ratio [particle integration (PI) method]. When the MI method is reliable, the combined MI-PI method allows us to retrieve the optimal effective lidar ratio. We compare these results with Raman lidar retrievals. We then use the derived optimal effective lidar ratio for retrieval with the PI method for situations in which the MI method cannot be applied. PMID:15818860

  14. Lidar measurements of boundary layers, aerosol scattering and clouds during project FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, Edwin W. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A detailed account of progress achieved under this grant funding is contained in five journal papers. The titles of these papers are: The calculation of area-averaged vertical profiles of the horizontal wind velocity using volume imaging lidar data; Volume imaging lidar observation of the convective structure surrounding the flight path of an instrumented aircraft; Convective boundary layer mean depths, cloud base altitudes, cloud top altitudes, cloud coverages, and cloud shadows obtained from Volume Imaging Lidar data; An accuracy analysis of the wind profiles calculated from Volume Imaging Lidar data; and Calculation of divergence and vertical motion from volume-imaging lidar data. Copies of these papers form the body of this report.

  15. Categorizing precipitating clouds by using radar and geostationary satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetchayont, P.; Hayasaka, T.; Katagiri, S.; Satomura, T.

    2012-11-01

    The classification of precipitating cloud systems over Thailand was attempted by using radar reflectivity and Multifunctional Transport Satellites (MTSAT) infrared brightness temperature (TBB) data. The proposed method can classify the convective rain (CR) area, stratiform rain (SR) area and non-precipitation area such as cumulus and cirrus cloud by applying an integrating analysis of rain gauge, ground-based radar and geostationary satellite data. Since the present study focuses on precipitation, the classified results of precipitation area are used to estimate quantitative precipitation amount. To merge different rainfall products, the bias between the products should be removed. The bias correction method is used to estimate spatially varying multiplicative biases in hourly radar and satellite rainfall using a gauge and radar rainfall product, respectively. An extreme rain event was selected to obtain the multiplicative bias correction and to merge data set. Correlation coefficient (CC), root mean square error (RMSE) and mean bias are used to evaluate the performance of bias correction method. The combined radar-MTSAT method is a simple and useful method. This method has been successfully applied to merge radar and gauge rainfall for hydrological purpose.

  16. Studies of ice clouds using 95 GHz airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolde, Mengistu Yirdaw

    2000-12-01

    This study presents results from analyses of 95 GHz airborne polarimetric radar measurements and other in situ data in a variety of ice clouds. Measurements were made in winter clouds over Wyoming and Colorado. Radar parameters analyzed were the differential reflectivity factor (ZDR) and the linear depolarization ratio (LDR). Examination of the specific signatures for different crystal forms, and the dependence of the signatures on beam angle, led to a diagnostic matrix in terms ZDR and LDR values. Planar crystals, columnar crystals, and melting particles can be differentiated based on combined ZDR and LDR measurements at various radar elevation angles. Unique LDR signatures were also observed in Cu con. clouds containing large graupel particles and high concentrations of small particles. It is also shown that among planar crystals P1a and P1d types can be differentiated from P1e types. Overall, the frequencies of occurrence of significant polarimetric signatures were only few percent in the cloud volumes examined, but can approach near 100% in certain clouds. Polarimetric signatures were found to be most frequent in the temperature interval -10 to -18C due to plate-like crystals growing there. The presence of significant polarimetric signatures is associated with the absence of riming and provides a means of identifying cloud regions where diffusional crystal growth dominates. In the second part of the dissertation, cloud structure and crystal growth in Ns clouds sampled in Wyoming and Oregon are presented. In spite of differences in location and time, the two Ns data sets have shown similar features. In both cases, generating cells were present near cloud top and the melting layer was well defined in the radar images. Thin dry layers just above the melting layer were also observed in both cases. In accordance with earlier studies, particle spectra in these clouds are adequately described by exponential relationships. The slope and intercept parameters of the exponential fits have shown strong correlations and follow a power law relationship. The equivalent radar reflectivity, Ze near the nearest usable range gates shows that in general there is negative correlation between ? and Ze.

  17. Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical modeling of drizzle evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, P.; Luke, E.; Szyrmer, W.; Rémillard, J.

    2011-07-02

    In part I, the influence of cloud microphysics and dynamics on the shape of cloud radar Doppler spectra in warm stratiform clouds was discussed. The traditional analysis of radar Doppler moments was extended to include skewness and kurtosis as additional descriptors of the Doppler spectrum. Here, a short climatology of observed Doppler spectra moments as a function of the radar reflectivity at continental and maritime ARM sites is presented. The evolution of the Doppler spectra moments is consistent with the onset and growth of drizzle particles and can be used to assist modeling studies of drizzle onset and growth. Time-height radar observations are used to exhibit the coherency of the Doppler spectra shape parameters and demonstrate their potential to improve the interpretation and use of radar observations. In addition, a simplified microphysical approach to modeling the vertical evolution of the drizzle particle size distribution in warm stratiform clouds is described and used to analyze the observations. The formation rate of embryonic drizzle droplets due to the autoconversion process is not calculated explicitly; however, accretion and evaporation processes are explicitly modeled. The microphysical model is used as input to a radar Doppler spectrum forward model, and synthetic radar Doppler spectra moments are generated. Three areas of interest are studied in detail: early drizzle growth near the cloud top, growth by accretion of the well-developed drizzle, and drizzle depletion below the cloud base due to evaporation. The modeling results are in good agreement with the continental and maritime observations. This demonstrates that steady state one-dimensional explicit microphysical models coupled with a forward model and comprehensive radar Doppler spectra observations offer a powerful method to explore the vertical evolution of the drizzle particle size distribution.

  18. The Experimental Cloud Lidar Pilot Study (ECLIPS) for cloud-radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, C. M.; Young, S. A.; Carswell, A. I.; Pal, S. R.; Mccormick, M. P.; Winker, D. M.; Delguasta, M.; Stefanutti, L.; Eberhard, W. L.; Hardesty, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Experimental Cloud Lidar Pilot Study (ECLIPS) was initiated to obtain statistics on cloud-base height, extinction, optical depth, cloud brokenness, and surface fluxes. Two observational phases have taken place, in October-December 1989 and April-July 1991, with intensive 30-day periods being selected within the two time intervals. Data are being archived at NASA Langley Research Center and, once there, are readily available to the international scientific community. This article describes the scale of the study in terms of its international involvement and in the range of data being recorded. Lidar observations of cloud height and backscatter coefficient have been taken from a number of ground-based stations spread around the globe. Solar shortwave and infrared longwave fluxes and infrared beam radiance have been measured at the surface wherever possible. The observations have been tailored to occur around the overpass times of the NOAA weather satellites. This article describes in some detail the various retrieval methods used to obtain results on cloud-base height, extinction coefficient, and infrared emittance, paying particular attention to the uncertainties involved.

  19. Time Shifted PN Codes for CW Lidar, Radar, and Sonar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor); Prasad, Narasimha S. (Inventor); Harrison, Fenton W. (Inventor); Flood, Michael A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A continuous wave Light Detection and Ranging (CW LiDAR) system utilizes two or more laser frequencies and time or range shifted pseudorandom noise (PN) codes to discriminate between the laser frequencies. The performance of these codes can be improved by subtracting out the bias before processing. The CW LiDAR system may be mounted to an artificial satellite orbiting the earth, and the relative strength of the return signal for each frequency can be utilized to determine the concentration of selected gases or other substances in the atmosphere.

  20. Lidar measurements of cloud extinction coefficient distribution and its forward scattering phase function according to multiply scattered lidar returns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Jinhuan; Huang, Qirong

    1992-01-01

    The study of the inversion algorithm for the single scatter lidar equation, for quantitative determination of cloud (or aerosol) optical properties, has received much attention over the last thirty years. Some of the difficulties associated with the solution of this equation are not yet solved. One problem is that a single scatter lidar equation has two unknowns. Because of this, the determination of the far-end boundary value, in the case of Klett's algorithm, is a problem if the atmosphere is optically inhomogeneous. Another difficulty concerns multiple scattering. There is a large error in the extinction distribution solution, in many cases, if only the single scattering component is considered, while neglecting the multiple scattering component. However, the use of multiple scattering in the remote sensing of aerosol or cloud optical properties is promising. In our early study, an inversion method for simultaneous determination of the cloud (or aerosol) Extinction Coefficient Distribution (ECD) and its Forward Scattering Phase Function (FSPF) was proposed according to multiply scattered lidar returns with two fields of view for the receiver. The method is based on a parameterized multiple scatter lidar equation. This paper is devoted to further numerical tests and an experimental study of lidar measurements of cloud ECD and FSPF using this method.

  1. Building blocks for a two-frequency laser lidar-radar: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Morvan, Loc; Lai, Ngoc D; Dolfi, Daniel; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Brunel, Marc; Bretenaker, Fabien; Le Floch, Albert

    2002-09-20

    A new principle of lidar-radar is theoretically and experimentally investigated. The proposed architecture is based on the use of an rf modulation of the emitted light beam and a direct detection of the backscattered intensity. Use of a radar-processing chain allows one to obtain range and Doppler measurements with the advantages of lidar spatial resolution. We calculate the maximum range of this device, taking into account different possible improvements. In particular, we show that use of a pulsed two-frequency laser and a spatially multimode optical preamplification of the backscattered light leads to calculated ranges larger than 20 km, including the possibility of both range and Doppler measurements. The building blocks of this lidar-radar are tested experimentally: The radar processing of an rf-modulated backscattered cw laser beam is demonstrated at 532 nm, illustrating the Doppler and identification capabilities of the system. In addition, signal-to-noise ratio improvement by optical pre-amplification is demonstrated at 1.06 microm. Finally, a two-frequency passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is developed. This laser then permits two-frequency pulses with tunable pulse duration (from 18 to 240 ns) and beat frequency (from 0 to 2.65 GHz) to be obtained. PMID:12269571

  2. Distributed Dimensonality-Based Rendering of LIDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brédif, M.; Vallet, B.; Ferrand, B.

    2015-08-01

    Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS) are now commonly acquiring lidar scans of urban environments for an increasing number of applications such as 3D reconstruction and mapping, urban planning, urban furniture monitoring, practicability assessment for persons with reduced mobility (PRM)... MMS acquisitions are usually huge enough to incur a usability bottleneck for the increasing number of non-expert user that are not trained to process and visualize these huge datasets through specific softwares. A vast majority of their current need is for a simple 2D visualization that is both legible on screen and printable on a static 2D medium, while still conveying the understanding of the 3D scene and minimizing the disturbance of the lidar acquisition geometry (such as lidar shadows). The users that motivated this research are, by law, bound to precisely georeference underground networks for which they currently have schematics with no or poor absolute georeferencing. A solution that may fit their needs is thus a 2D visualization of the MMS dataset that they could easily interpret and on which they could accurately match features with their user datasets they would like to georeference. Our main contribution is two-fold. First, we propose a 3D point cloud stylization for 2D static visualization that leverages a Principal Component Analysis (PCA)-like local geometry analysis. By skipping the usual and error-prone estimation of a ground elevation, this rendering is thus robust to non-flat areas and has no hard-to-tune parameters such as height thresholds. Second, we implemented the corresponding rendering pipeline so that it can scale up to arbitrary large datasets by leveraging the Spark framework and its Resilient Distributed Dataset (RDD) and Dataframe abstractions.

  3. Smoke-Column Observations from Two Forest Fires Using Doppler Lidar and Doppler Radar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, R. M.; Olivier, L. D.; Holloway, E. T.; Kropfli, R. A.; Bartram, B. W.; Cupp, R. E.; Post, M. J.

    1992-11-01

    To demonstrate the usefulness of active remote-sensing systems in observing forest fire plume behavior, we studied two fires, one using a 3.2-cm-wavelength Doppler radar, and one more extensively, using Doppler lidar. Both instruments observed the kinematics of the convection column, including the presence of two different types of rotation in the columns, and monitored the behavior of the smoke plume.The first fire, a forest fire that burned out of control, was observed by the Doppler radar during late-morning and afternoon hours. Strong horizontal ambient winds produced a bent-over convection column, which the radar observed to have strong horizontal flow at its edges and weaker flow along the centerline of the plume. This velocity pattern implies that the column consisted of a pair of counterrotating horizontal vortices (rolls), with rising motion along the centerline and sinking along the edges. The radar tracked the smoke plume for over 30 km. It also provided circular depolarization ratio measurements, which gave information that the scattering particles were mostly flat or needle shaped as viewed by the radar, perhaps pine needles or possibly flat ash platelets being viewed edge on.The second fire, observed over a 5-h period by Doppler lidar, was a prescribed forest fire ignited in the afternoon. During the first hour of the fire the lidar observed many kinematic quantities of the convection column, including flow convergence and anticyclonic whole-column, rotation of the nearly vertical column, with a vorticity of approximately 102 s1 and an estimated peak vertical velocity w of 1 5 m s1. After the first hour ambient meteorological conditions changed, the whole-column rotation ceased, and the convection column and smoke plume bent over toward the lidar in stronger horizontal flow. At two times during this later stage, w was estimated to be 24 and 10 m s1. Lidar observations show that the smoke plume of this second fire initially went straight up in the convection column to heights of over 2 km, so most of the smoke was injected into the atmosphere above the unstable, afternoon, convective boundary layer, or mixed layer. Later, as the horizontal winds increased, a larger friction of the smoke remained in the mixed layer. Finally, very late in the afternoon, after ignitions had ceased and the fire was smoldering, almost all of the smoke remained within the mixed layer.These analyses show that lidar and radar can provide valuable three-dimensional datasets on kinematic quantities and smoke distribution in the vicinity of fires. This kind of information should be of great value in understanding and modeling convection-column dynamics and smoke-plume behavior.

  4. Arctic polar stratospheric cloud observations by airborne lidar

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, M.P.; Poole, L.R. ); Kent, G.S. ); Hunt, W.H. ); Osborn, M.T.; Pitts, M.C. )

    1990-03-01

    Lidar observations obtained from January 24 to February 2, 1989, during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) mission further support the existence of two distinct classes (Types 1 and 2) of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Most of the Type 1 PSCs observed were formed by rapid adiabatic cooling and exhibited very low depolarization ratios and low-to-intermediate scattering ratios. Type 2 PSCs were observed in regions of lowest temperature and showed much larger depolarization and scattering ratios, as would be expected from larger ice crystals. PSCs with low scattering ratios but moderate depolarization ratios were observed near the center of the vortex on one flight. These may have been either sparse Type 2 PSCs or Type 1 PSCs formed by less rapid cooling.

  5. Registration of vehicle based panoramic image and LiDAR point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changjun; Cao, Liang; Xie, Hong; Zhuo, Xiangyu

    2013-10-01

    Higher quality surface information would be got when data from optical images and LiDAR were integrated, owing to the fact that optical images and LiDAR point cloud have unique characteristics that make them preferable in many applications. While most previous works focus on registration of pinhole perspective cameras to 2D or 3D LiDAR data. In this paper, a method for the registration of vehicle based panoramic image and LiDAR point cloud is proposed. Using the translation among panoramic image, single CCD image, laser scanner and Position and Orientation System (POS) along with the GPS/IMU data, precise co-registration between the panoramic image and the LiDAR point cloud in the world system is achieved. Results are presented under a real world data set collected by a new developed Mobile Mapping System (MMS) integrated with a high resolution panoramic camera, two laser scanners and a POS.

  6. Estimation of canopy height using lidar and radar interferometry: an assessment of combination methods and sensitivity to instrument, terrain and canopy height profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, M.; Neumann, M.; Pinto, N.; Brolly, M.; Brigot, G.

    2014-12-01

    The combined use of Lidar and radar interferometry to estimate canopy height can be classified into 3 categories: cross-validation, simple combination and fusion methods. In this presentation, we investigate the potential of each category for local and regional scale applications, and assess their sensitivity to instrument configuration, terrain topography and variations in the vertical forest canopy profiles. In addition to field data, we use data from TanDEM-X, UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar), LVIS (Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor) and a commercial discrete lidar. TanDEM-X is a pair of X-band spaceborne radars flying in formation to provide a global digital surface model and can also be used to perform polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (polinSAR) inversion of canopy height. The UAVSAR is an airborne fully polarimetric radar enabling repeat-pass interferometry and has been used for polinsar. While LVIS records the full waveform within a 20m footprint, the discrete lidar collects a cloud of points. The lidar data can be used to validate the polinSAR results (validation), to obtain ground elevation (simple combination with radar surface models) or within the polinSAR inversion model through a common model framework. The data was collected over the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve, a managed territory covering 7861km2 which is located between Québec city and Saguenay. The variety of management practices offers the possibility for long term and comparative studies of natural forest dynamics as well as the impact of human, fires and insect disturbances. The large elevational gradient of the region (~1000m) allows study of variations in structure and type of forests. Depending on the method used, several factors may degrade the accuracy of canopy height estimates from the combined use of lidar and radar interferometry. Here we will consider misregistration of datasets, differences in spatial resolution and viewing geometry, geometric decorrelation and the vertical wavenumber. Finally we investigate the sensitivity of estimate to forest vertical profile and terrain topography.

  7. Polar Cirrus Cloud Properties Through Long-Term Lidar and Radiometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James; Campbell, James; Mahesh, Ashwin; Welton, Judd; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In comparison to mid latitude cloud cover, knowledge of polar cirrus and other cloud cover is limited. The interpretations of satellite-based cloud imaging and retrievals in polar regions have major problems due to factors such as darkness and extreme low temperatures. Beginning in 2002 a NASA orbiting lidar instrument, GLAS, (Geoscience Laser Altimeter System) will unambiguously define cloud type and fraction with good coverage of polar regions. Active laser sensing gives the spatial and temporal distribution of clouds and diamond dust. In preparation for, and supplementing the GLAS measurements are ground based MP (micro pulse) lidar experiments providing continuous profiling. MP lidar installations have been operating at the South Pole since December 1999 and at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program arctic site since 1996. Both at the ARM Barrow, Alaska site and at the South Pole station, Fourier-transform interferometers also observe clouds in the wavelength intervals between approximately 5 and 18 microns. Spectral instruments can yield cloud microphysical properties with additional information from lidar about the vertical extent of clouds being modeled. We examine the simultaneous lidar and spectral data from both Barrow and South Pole, to obtain cloud properties (optical depth, particle size) by the use of both instruments. The results have applications to interpretation of current satellite data, and GLAS measurements when available.

  8. A 3D Cloud-Construction Algorithm for the EarthCARE Satellite Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, H. W.; Jerg, M. P.; Wehr, T.; Kato, S.; Donovan, D. P.; Hogan, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents and assesses an algorithm that constructs 3D distributions of cloud from passive satellite imagery and collocated 2D nadir profiles of cloud properties inferred synergistically from lidar, cloud radar and imager data.

  9. Coherent Doppler Lidar for Wind and Cloud Measurements on Venus from an Orbiting or Floating/Flying Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra; Limaye, Sanjay; Emmitt, George; Kavaya, Michael; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta

    Abstract Given the presence of clouds and haze in the upper portion of the Venus atmosphere, it is reasonable to consider a Doppler wind lidar (DWL) for making remote measurements of the 3D winds within the tops of clouds and the overlying haze layer. Assuming an orbit altitude of 250 km and cloud tops at 60km (within the “upper cloud layer”), an initial performance assessment of an orbiting DWL was made using a numerical instrument and atmospheres model developed for both Earth and Mars. The threshold aerosol backscatter for 2-micron was taken to be 1.0*10-6 msr-1. This backscatter value is between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude lower than that expected for clouds with optical depths greater than 2.0. Cloud composition was assumed to be mixture of dust, frozen CO2 and sulfuric acid. Based on the DWL assessment and simulation, it is reasonable to expect vertical profiles of the 3D wind speed with 1 km vertical resolution and horizontal spacing of 25 km to several 100 kms depending upon the desired integration times. These profiles would begin somewhere just below the tops of the highest clouds and extend into the overlying haze layer to some TBD height. Getting multiple layers of cloud returns is also possible with no negative impact on velocity measurement accuracy. With support from the NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement in the Earth’s atmosphere [1-3]. The knowledge and expertise for developing coherent Doppler wind lidar technologies and techniques for Earth related mission at NASA LaRC is being leveraged to develop an appropriate system suitable for wind measurement around Venus. We are considering a fiber laser based lidar system of high efficiency and smaller size and advancing the technology level to meet the requirements for DWL system for Venus from an orbiting or floating/flying platform. This presentation will describe the concept, simulation and technology development plan for wind and cloud measurements on Venus. References [1] M.J. Kavaya, U.N. Singh, G.J. Koch, B.C. Trieu, M. Petros, and P.J. Petzar, "Development of a Compact, Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Doppler Wind Lidar Transceiver and Plans for Flights on NASA's DC-8 and WB-57 Aircraft," Coherent Laser Radar Conference, Toulouse, France, June 2009. [2] G.J. Koch, J.Y. Beyon, B.W. Barnes, M. Petros, J. Yu, F. Amzajerdian, M.J. Kavaya, and U.N. Singh, "High-Energy 2-micron Doppler Lidar for Wind Measurements," Optical Engineering 46(11), 116201-14 (2007). [3] J.Y. Beyon and G.J. Koch, "Novel Nonlinear Adaptive Doppler Shift Estimation Technique for the Coherent Doppler Validation Lidar," Optical Engineering 46(1), 0160021-9 (2007).

  10. Simulated polarization diversity lidar returns from water and precipitating mixed phase clouds.

    PubMed

    Sassen, K; Zhao, H; Dodd, G C

    1992-05-20

    The dependence of polarization lidar returns on basic microphysical and thermodynamic variables is assessed by using a cloud model to simulate the growth of water and mixed (water and ice) phase clouds. Cloud contents that evolve with height in updrafts are converted, by using Mie theory, into cloud droplet single and double backscattering and attenuation coefficients. The lidar equation includes forward multiple scattering attenuation corrections based on diffraction theory for droplets and ice crystals, whose relative scattering contributions are treated empirically. Lidar depolarization is computed from droplet and crystal single scattering and an analytical treatment of droplet double scattering. Water cloud results reveal the expected increases in linear depolarization ratios (delta) with increasing lidar field of view and distance to cloud but also show that depolarization is a function of cloud liquid water content, which depends primarily on temperature. Ice crystals modulate mixed phase cloud liquid water contents through water vapor competition effects, thereby affecting multiple scattering delta values as functions of updraft velocity, temperature, and crystal size and concentration. Although the minimum delta at cloud base increases with increasing ice content, the peak measurable delta in the cloud decreases. Comparison with field data demonstrate that this modeling approach is a valuable supplement to cloud measurements. PMID:20725225

  11. Validation of Cloud Radar Retrievals of Ice Cloud Microphysics in TWP-ICE and CC- VEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, R. T.; Stephens, G. L.

    2006-12-01

    The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) and the CALIPSO-CloudSat Validation Experiment (CC-VEx) have both provided valuable data sets for the validation of ice cloud microphysical retrievals (among other purposes). TWP-ICE was conducted in the region around Darwin and the Tiwi Islands in Australia's Northern Territory in January and February 2006. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne Cloud Radar (ACR) was mounted on a Twin Otter aircraft, observing cirrus cloud layers and anvils from an altitude of 10,000 feet. In-cloud sampling of ice water content and ice particle microphysical properties was performed by various cloud probes carried on the DoE Proteus and the ARA Egrett aircraft. CC-VEx was conducted over the southeastern United States and adjacent regions of the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico in July and August 2006. CC-VEx flights were planned to observe cirrus clouds and associated convection to provide validation data for CloudSat observations and algorithms; flight tracks were selected to coincide with satellite overpasses. The NASA ER-2 airplane carried the Cloud Radar System (CRS) and the MODIS Airborne Simulator, observing the cloud systems from an altitude of 65,000 feet, while the WMI Learjet flew within the cloud layers, making microphysical measurements with several cloud probes. In this presentation, we compare statistics of recent retrievals of ice microphysical properties to direct measurements of those properties as collected by cloud probes during both of these campaigns. We comment on the effect of recent variations on the retrieval and how the retrievals perform under varying cloud conditions.

  12. Dual Wavelength Lidar Observation of Tropical High-Altitude Cirrus Clouds During the ALBATROSS 1996 Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyerle, G.; Schafer, J.; Neuber, R.; Schrems, O.; McDermid, I. S.

    1998-01-01

    Dual wavelength aerosol lidar observations of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds were performed during the ALBATROSS 1996 campaign aboard the research vessel POLARSTERN on the Atlantic ocean in October-November 1996.

  13. Error analysis of Raman differential absorption lidar ozone measurements in ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, J

    2000-11-20

    A formalism for the error treatment of lidar ozone measurements with the Raman differential absorption lidar technique is presented. In the presence of clouds wavelength-dependent multiple scattering and cloud-particle extinction are the main sources of systematic errors in ozone measurements and necessitate a correction of the measured ozone profiles. Model calculations are performed to describe the influence of cirrus and polar stratospheric clouds on the ozone. It is found that it is sufficient to account for cloud-particle scattering and Rayleigh scattering in and above the cloud; boundary-layer aerosols and the atmospheric column below the cloud can be neglected for the ozone correction. Furthermore, if the extinction coefficient of the cloud is ?0.1 km(-1), the effect in the cloud is proportional to the effective particle extinction and to a particle correction function determined in the limit of negligible molecular scattering. The particle correction function depends on the scattering behavior of the cloud particles, the cloud geometric structure, and the lidar system parameters. Because of the differential extinction of light that has undergone one or more small-angle scattering processes within the cloud, the cloud effect on ozone extends to altitudes above the cloud. The various influencing parameters imply that the particle-related ozone correction has to be calculated for each individual measurement. Examples of ozone measurements in cirrus clouds are discussed. PMID:18354611

  14. Cloud Distribution Statistics from LITE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, David M.

    1998-01-01

    The Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) mission has demonstrated the utility of spaceborne lidar in observing multilayer clouds and has provided a dataset showing the distribution of tropospheric clouds and aerosols. These unambiguous observations of the vertical distribution of clouds will allow improved verification of current cloud climatologies and GCM cloud parameterizations. Although there is now great interest in cloud profiling radar, operating in the mm-wave region, for the spacebased observation of cloud heights the results of the LITE mission have shown that satellite lidars can also make significant contributions in this area.

  15. Lidar Studies on The Optical Characteristics of High Altitude Cirrus Clouds at A Low Latitiude Station, Gadanki (13.5°N , 79.2°E ) India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayeshlal, G. S.; Satyanarayana, M.; Motty, G. S.; Dhaman, R. K.; Krishnakumar, V.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.; Ramakrishnarao, D.; Sudhakar, P.; Kalavathi, P.

    2014-11-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) which is analogous to Radio Detection And Ranging (RADAR), has become an important and unique technology for atmospheric research and applications. The technology is widely used for the remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere, oceans, vegetation and the characteristics of Earth's topography. Remote sensing of atmosphere, for its structure, composition and dynamics, is one of the proven applications of the lidar systems. More importantly the lidar technique is applied for the study of clouds, aerosols and minor constituents in the atmosphere. It provides the information on the above with good spatial and temporal resolutions and accuracy. The high altitude cirrus clouds which play an important role in the Earth's radiative budget and global climate can be studied by using the LIDAR system. These clouds absorb long-wave outgoing radiation from Earth's surface while reflecting part of the incoming short-wave solar radiation. Lidar measurements are useful in deriving the altitude, top height, bottom height and the optical properties of cirrus clouds, which are essential in understanding the cloud-radiation effects. The optical depth, the effective lidar ratio and the depolarization of the clouds are also derived by inverting the lidar signals from the cirrus clouds. In this paper we present the results on the lidar derived optical and microphysical properties of the cirrus clouds at a tropical station Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) India during two year period from 2009 to210. The seasonal variations of the cloud properties during the observation period are presented and discussed with reference to earlier period.

  16. Analysis of polarization radar returns from ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, A.; Sturniolo, O.; Prodi, F.

    Using a modified T-matrix code, some polarimetric single-scattering radar parameters ( Zh,v, LDR h,v, ?hv, ZDR and ?hv) from populations of ice crystals in ice phase at 94 GHz, modeled with axisymmetric prolate and oblate spheroidal shapes for a ?-size distribution with different ? parameter ( ?=0, 1, 2) and characteristic dimension Lm varying from 0.1 to 1.8 mm, have been computed. Some of the results for different radar elevation angles and different orientation distribution for fixed water content are shown. Deeper analysis has been carried out for pure extensive radar polarimetric variables; all of them are strongly dependent on the shapes (characterised by the aspect ratio), the canting angle and the radar elevation angle. Quantities like ZDR or ?hv at side incidence or LDR h and ?hv at vertical incidence can be used to investigate the preferred orientation of the particles and, in some cases, their habits. We analyze scatterplots using couples of pure extensive variables. The scatterplots with the most evident clustering properties for the different habits seem to be those in the ( ZDR [ ?=0], ?hv [ ?=0]), in the ( ZDR [ ?=0], LDR h [ ?=90]) and in the ( ZDR [ ?=0], ?hv [ ?=90]) plane. Among these, the most appealing one seems to be that involving ZDR and ?hv variables. To avoid the problem of having simultaneous measurements with a side and a vertical-looking radar, we believe that measurements of these two extensive variables using a radar with an elevation angle around 45 can be an effective instrument to identify different habits. In particular, this general idea can be useful for future space-borne polarimetric radars involved in the studies of high ice clouds. It is also believed that these results can be used in next challenge of developing probabilistic and expert methods for identifying hydrometeor types by W-band radars.

  17. Role of updrafts in aerosol-cloud interactions: lidar observations of layered warm clouds over central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J.; Ansmann, A.; Bhl, J.; Wandinger, U.

    2014-12-01

    Twenty nine cases of layered liquid-water cloud systems were observed with dual-field-of-view (dual-FOV) Raman lidar over the polluted central European site of Leipzig, Germany, between September 2010 and September 2012. For the first time, a detailed lidar-based study of aerosol-cloud-dynamics relationship was conducted. A collocated Doppler lidar provided information on vertical velocity and thus on updraft and downdraft occurrence. The novel dual-FOV lidar permits the retrieval of the particle extinction coefficient (used as aerosol proxy just below cloud base) and cloud properties such as droplet effective radius and cloud droplet number concentration in the lower part of optically thin cloud layers. Here, we present the key results of our statistical analysis of the 2010-2012 observations. Besides a clear aerosol effect on cloud droplet number concentration in the lower part of the convectively weak cloud layers during updraft periods, meteorological effects (turbulent mixing, entrainment of dry air) were found to diminish the observable aerosol effect higher up in the clouds. The corresponding aerosol-cloud interaction (ACI) parameter based on changes in cloud droplet number concentration with aerosol loading was found to be close to 0.8 at 30-70 m above cloud base during updraft periods which points to values around 1 at cloud base (0-30 m above cloud base). Our findings are extensively compared with literature values and agree well with airborne observations. As a conclusion, ACI studies over continental sites should include vertical wind observations to avoid a~bias (too low values) in the obtained ACI results.

  18. Simulations of the observation of clouds and aerosols with the Experimental Lidar in Space Equipment system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Voelger, P; Sugimoto, N

    2000-06-20

    We carried out a simulation study for the observation of clouds and aerosols with the Japanese Experimental Lidar in Space Equipment (ELISE), which is a two-wavelength backscatter lidar with three detection channels. The National Space Development Agency of Japan plans to launch the ELISE on the Mission Demonstrate Satellite 2 (MDS-2). In the simulations, the lidar return signals for the ELISE are calculated for an artificial, two-dimensional atmospheric model including different types of clouds and aerosols. The signal detection processes are simulated realistically by inclusion of various sources of noise. The lidar signals that are generated are then used as input for simulations of data analysis with inversion algorithms to investigate retrieval of the optical properties of clouds and aerosols. The results demonstrate that the ELISE can provide global data on the structures and optical properties of clouds and aerosols. We also conducted an analysis of the effects of cloud inhomogeneity on retrievals from averaged lidar profiles. We show that the effects are significant for space lidar observations of optically thick broken clouds. PMID:18345243

  19. Compact airborne Raman lidar for profiling aerosol, water vapor and clouds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Zhien; Cai, Yong; Wechsler, Perry; Kuestner, William; Burkhart, Matthew; Welch, Wayne

    2014-08-25

    A compact airborne Raman lidar system, which can perform water vapor and aerosol measurements both during nighttime and daytime is described. The system design, setup and the data processing methods are described in the paper. The Raman lidar was tested on University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft (UWKA) during the Wyoming King Air PBL Exploratory Experiment (KAPEE) in 2010. An observation showing clouds, aerosols and a dry line is presented to illustrate the lidar detection capabilities. Comparisons of the water vapor and aerosol measurements using the Raman lidar and other in situ airborne instruments show good agreement. PMID:25321266

  20. Aerosol and cloud observations from the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Winker, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) is a backscatter lidar built by NASA Langley Research Center to fly on the Space Shuttle. The purpose of the program was to develop the engineering processes required for space lidar and to demonstrate applications of space lidar to remote sensing of the atmosphere. The instrument was flown on Discovery in September 1994. Global observations of clouds and aerosols were made between the latitudes of 57 deg N and 57 deg S during 10 days of the mission.

  1. A study on the use of radar and lidar for characterizing ultragiant aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, F.; Amodeo, A.; D'Amico, G.; Pappalardo, G.

    2013-09-01

    19 April to 19 May 2010, volcanic aerosol layers originating from the Eyjafjallajökull volcano were observed at the Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis of the National Research Council of Italy Atmospheric Observatory, named CIAO (40.60°N, 15.72°E, 760 m above sea level), in Southern Italy with a multiwavelength Raman lidar. During this period, ultragiant aerosols were also observed at CIAO using a colocated 8.45 mm wavelength Doppler radar. The Ka-band radar signatures observed in four separate days (19 April and 7, 10, and 13 May) are consistent with the observation of nonspherical ultragiant aerosols characterized by values of linear depolarization ratio (LDR) higher than -4 dB. Air mass back trajectory analysis suggests a volcanic origin of the ultragiant aerosols observed by the radar. The observed values of the radar reflectivity (Ze) are consistent with a particle effective radius (r) larger than 50-75 µm. Scattering simulations based on the T-matrix approach show that the high LDR values can be explained if the observed particles have an absolute aspect ratio larger than 3.0 and consist of an internal aerosol core and external ice shell, with a variable radius ratio ranging between 0.2 and 0.7 depending on the shape and aspect ratio. Comparisons between daytime vertical profiles of aerosol backscatter coefficient (β) as measured by lidar and radar LDR reveal a decrease of β where ultragiant particles are observed. Scattering simulations based on Mie theory show how the lidar capability in typing ultragiant aerosols could be limited by low number concentrations or by the presence of an external ice shell covering the aerosol particles. Preferential vertical alignment of the particles is discussed as another possible reason for the decrease of β.

  2. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): a New Lidar for Aerosol and Cloud Profiling from the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064, 532, 355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time data capability of the ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as air quality and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a summary of the science objectives and simulated data.

  3. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): a new lidar for aerosol and cloud profiling from the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, E. J.; McGill, M. J.; Yorks, J. E.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Palm, S. P.; Colarco, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064, 532, 355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time data capability of the ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as air quality and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a summary of the science objectives and simulated data.

  4. The structure and phase of cloud tops as observed by polarization lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, J. D.; Hansen, M. Z.; Simpson, J.

    1983-01-01

    High-resolution observations of the structure of cloud tops have been obtained with polarization lidar operated from a high altitude aircraft. Case studies of measurements acquired from cumuliform cloud systems are presented, two from September 1979 observations in the area of Florida and adjacent waters and a third during the May 1981 CCOPE experiment in southeast Montana. Accurate cloud top height structure and relative density of hydrometers are obtained from the lidar return signal intensity. Correlation between the signal return intensity and active updrafts was noted. Thin cirrus overlying developing turrets was observed in some cases. Typical values of the observed backscatter cross section were 0.1-5 (km/sr) for cumulonimbus tops. The depolarization ratio of the lidar signals was a function of the thermodynamic phase of cloud top areas. An increase of the cloud top depolarization with decreasing temperature was found for temperatures above and below -40 C.

  5. Verification and correction of cloud base and top height retrievals from Ka-band cloud radar in Boseong, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Su-Bin; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Kim, Ki-Hoon; Cho, Chun-Ho; Lim, Eunha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, cloud base height (CBH) and cloud top height (CTH) observed by the Ka-band (33.44 GHz) cloud radar at the Boseong National Center for Intensive Observation of Severe Weather during fall 2013 (September-November) were verified and corrected. For comparative verification, CBH and CTH were obtained using a ceilometer (CL51) and the Communication, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite (COMS). During rainfall, the CBH and CTH observed by the cloud radar were lower than observed by the ceilometer and COMS because of signal attenuation due to raindrops, and this difference increased with rainfall intensity. During dry periods, however, the CBH and CTH observed by the cloud radar, ceilometer, and COMS were similar. Thin and low-density clouds were observed more effectively by the cloud radar compared with the ceilometer and COMS. In cases of rainfall or missing cloud radar data, the ceilometer and COMS data were proven effective in correcting or compensating the cloud radar data. These corrected cloud data were used to classify cloud types, which revealed that low clouds occurred most frequently.

  6. Electric Field Magnitude and Radar Reflectivity as a Function of Distance from Cloud Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Jennifer G.; Merceret, Francis J.

    2004-01-01

    The results of analyses of data collected during a field investigation of thunderstorm anvil and debris clouds are reported. Statistics of the magnitude of the electric field are determined as a function of distance from cloud edge. Statistics of radar reflectivity near cloud edge are also determined. Both analyses use in-situ airborne field mill and cloud physics data coupled with ground-based radar measurements obtained in east-central Florida during the summer convective season. Electric fields outside of anvil and debris clouds averaged less than 3 kV/m. The average radar reflectivity at the cloud edge ranged between 0 and 5 dBZ.

  7. Retrieval of cloud optical parameters from space-based backscatter lidar data.

    PubMed

    Balin, Y S; Samoilova, S V; Krekova, M M; Winker, D M

    1999-10-20

    We present an approach to estimating the multiple-scattering (MS) contribution to lidar return signals from clouds recorded from space that enables us to describe in more detail the return formation at the depth where first orders of scattering dominate. Estimates made have enabled us to propose a method for correcting solutions of single-scattering lidar equations for the MS contribution. We also describe an algorithm for reconstructing the profiles of the cloud scattering coefficient and the optical thickness tau under conditions of a priori uncertainties. The approach proposed is illustrated with results for optical parameters of cirrus and stratiform clouds determined from return signals calculated by the Monte Carlo method as well as from return signals acquired with the American spaceborne lidar during the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE). PMID:18324166

  8. Scanning Cloud Radar Observations at Azores: Preliminary 3D Cloud Products

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, P.; Johnson, K.; Jo, I.; Tatarevic, A.; Giangrande, S.; Widener, K.; Bharadwaj, N.; Mead, J.

    2010-03-15

    The deployment of the Scanning W-Band ARM Cloud Radar (SWACR) during the AMF campaign at Azores signals the first deployment of an ARM Facility-owned scanning cloud radar and offers a prelude for the type of 3D cloud observations that ARM will have the capability to provide at all the ARM Climate Research Facility sites by the end of 2010. The primary objective of the deployment of Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACRs) at the ARM Facility sites is to map continuously (operationally) the 3D structure of clouds and shallow precipitation and to provide 3D microphysical and dynamical retrievals for cloud life cycle and cloud-scale process studies. This is a challenging task, never attempted before, and requires significant research and development efforts in order to understand the radar's capabilities and limitations. At the same time, we need to look beyond the radar meteorology aspects of the challenge and ensure that the hardware and software capabilities of the new systems are utilized for the development of 3D data products that address the scientific needs of the new Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program. The SWACR observations at Azores provide a first look at such observations and the challenges associated with their analysis and interpretation. The set of scan strategies applied during the SWACR deployment and their merit is discussed. The scan strategies were adjusted for the detection of marine stratocumulus and shallow cumulus that were frequently observed at the Azores deployment. Quality control procedures for the radar reflectivity and Doppler products are presented. Finally, preliminary 3D-Active Remote Sensing of Cloud Locations (3D-ARSCL) products on a regular grid will be presented, and the challenges associated with their development discussed. In addition to data from the Azores deployment, limited data from the follow-up deployment of the SWACR at the ARM SGP site will be presented. This effort provides a blueprint for the effort required for the development of 3D cloud products from all new SACRs that the program will deploy at all fixed and mobile sites by the end of 2010.

  9. Reducing Surface Clutter in Cloud Profiling Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Pak, Kyung; Durden, Stephen; Im, Eastwood

    2008-01-01

    An algorithm has been devised to reduce ground clutter in the data products of the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), which is a nadir-looking radar instrument, in orbit around the Earth, that measures power backscattered by clouds as a function of distance from the instrument. Ground clutter contaminates the CPR data in the lowest 1 km of the atmospheric profile, heretofore making it impossible to use CPR data to satisfy the scientific interest in studying clouds and light rainfall at low altitude. The algorithm is based partly on the fact that the CloudSat orbit is such that the geodetic altitude of the CPR varies continuously over a range of approximately 25 km. As the geodetic altitude changes, the radar timing parameters are changed at intervals defined by flight software in order to keep the troposphere inside a data-collection time window. However, within each interval, the surface of the Earth continuously "scans through" (that is, it moves across) a few range bins of the data time window. For each radar profile, only few samples [one for every range-bin increment ((Delta)r = 240 m)] of the surface-clutter signature are available around the range bin in which the peak of surface return is observed, but samples in consecutive radar profiles are offset slightly (by amounts much less than (Delta)r) with respect to each other according to the relative change in geodetic altitude. As a consequence, in a case in which the surface area under examination is homogenous (e.g., an ocean surface), a sequence of consecutive radar profiles of the surface in that area contains samples of the surface response with range resolution (Delta)p much finer than the range-bin increment ((Delta)p << r). Once the high-resolution surface response has thus become available, the profile of surface clutter can be accurately estimated by use of a conventional maximum-correlation scheme: A translated and scaled version of the high-resolution surface response is fitted to the observed low-resolution profile. The translation and scaling factors that optimize the fit in a maximum-correlation sense represent (1) the true position of the surface relative to the sampled surface peak and (2) the magnitude of the surface backscatter. The performance of this algorithm has been tested on CloudSat data acquired over an ocean surface. A preliminary analysis of the test data showed a surface-clutter-rejection ratio over flat surfaces of >10 dB and a reduction of the contaminated altitude over ocean from about 1 km to about 0.5 km (over the ocean). The algorithm has been embedded in CloudSat L1B processing as of Release 04 (July 2007), and the estimated flat surface clutter is removed in L2B-GEOPROF product from the observed profile of reflectivity (see CloudSat product documentation for details and performance at http://www.cloudsat.cira.colostate.edu/ dataSpecs.php?prodid=1).

  10. Aerosol and Cloud Interaction Observed From High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Wenying; Schuster, Gregory L.; Loeb, Norman G.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies utilizing satellite retrievals have shown a strong correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud cover. However, these retrievals from passive sensors are subject to many limitations, including cloud adjacency (or 3D) effects, possible cloud contamination, uncertainty in the AOD retrieval. Some of these limitations do not exist in High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) observations; for instance, HSRL observations are not a ected by cloud adjacency effects, are less prone to cloud contamination, and offer accurate aerosol property measurements (backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, backscatter Angstrom exponent,and aerosol optical depth) at a neospatial resolution (less than 100 m) in the vicinity of clouds. Hence, the HSRL provides an important dataset for studying aerosol and cloud interaction. In this study, we statistically analyze aircraft-based HSRL profiles according to their distance from the nearest cloud, assuring that all profile comparisons are subject to the same large-scale meteorological conditions. Our results indicate that AODs from HSRL are about 17% higher in the proximity of clouds (approximately 100 m) than far away from clouds (4.5 km), which is much smaller than the reported cloud 3D effect on AOD retrievals. The backscatter and extinction coefficients also systematically increase in the vicinity of clouds, which can be explained by aerosol swelling in the high relative humidity (RH) environment and/or aerosol growth through in cloud processing (albeit not conclusively). On the other hand, we do not observe a systematic trend in lidar ratio; we hypothesize that this is caused by the opposite effects of aerosol swelling and aerosol in-cloud processing on the lidar ratio. Finally, the observed backscatter Angstrom exponent (BAE) does not show a consistent trend because of the complicated relationship between BAE and RH. We demonstrate that BAE should not be used as a surrogate for Angstrom exponent, especially at high RH.

  11. Space-Based Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    An overview of space-based lidar systems is presented. from the first laser altimeter on APOLLO 15 mission in 1971 to the Mercury Laser Altimeter on MESSENGER mission currently in orbit, and those currently under development. Lidar, which stands for Light Detection And Ranging, is a powerful tool in remote sensing from space. Compared to radars, lidars operate at a much shorter wavelength with a much narrower beam and much smaller transmitter and receiver. Compared to passive remote sensing instruments. lidars carry their own light sources and can continue measuring day and night. and over polar regions. There are mainly two types of lidars depending on the types of measurements. lidars that are designed to measure the distance and properties of hard targets are often called laser rangers or laser altimeters. They are used to obtain the surface elevation and global shape of a planet from the laser pulse time-of-night and the spacecraft orbit position. lidars that are designed to measure the backscattering and absorption of a volume scatter, such as clouds and aerosols, are often just called lidars and categorized by their measurements. such as cloud and aerosol lidar, wind lidar, CO2 lidar, and so on. The advantages of space-based lidar systems over ground based lidars are the abilities of global coverage and continuous measurements.

  12. Strong aerosol-cloud interaction in altocumulus during updraft periods: lidar observations over central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J.; Ansmann, A.; Bhl, J.; Wandinger, U.

    2015-09-01

    For the first time, a liquid-water cloud study of the aerosol-cloud-dynamics relationship, solely based on lidar, was conducted. Twenty-nine cases of pure liquid-water altocumulus layers were observed with a novel dual-field-of-view Raman lidar over the polluted central European site of Leipzig, Germany, between September 2010 and September 2012. By means of the novel Raman lidar technique, cloud properties such as the droplet effective radius and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) in the lower part of altocumulus layers are obtained. The conventional aerosol Raman lidar technique provides the aerosol extinction coefficient (used as aerosol proxy) below cloud base. A collocated Doppler lidar measures the vertical velocity at cloud base and thus updraft and downdraft occurrence. Here, we present the key results of our statistical analysis of the 2010-2012 observations. Besides a clear aerosol effect on cloud droplet number concentration in the lower part of the altocumulus layers during updraft periods, turbulent mixing and entrainment of dry air is assumed to be the main reason for the found weak correlation between aerosol proxy and CDNC higher up in the cloud. The corresponding aerosol-cloud interaction parameter based on changes in cloud droplet number concentration with aerosol loading was found to be close to 0.8 at 30-70 m above cloud base during updraft periods and below 0.4 when ignoring vertical-wind information in the analysis. Our findings are extensively compared with literature values and agree well with airborne observations.

  13. Lidar Observations of Polar Stratospheric Clouds and Stratospheric Temperatures at the South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Richard L.; Bowman, Kenneth P.; Gardner, Chester S.

    1992-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) play a crucial role in the ozone chemistry of the polar regions. Current chemical models rely on the presence of these clouds to explain the rapid destruction of ozone observed each spring in Antarctica. We present lidar observations of PCS's and stratospheric temperatures at the South Pole throughout the Antarctic winter and spring of 1990.

  14. Lidar Measurements of Wind and Cloud Around Venus from an Orbiting or Floating/Flying Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, U. N.; Limaye, S.; Emmitt, G.; Refaat, T. F.; Kavaya, M. J.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.

    2015-04-01

    Given the presence of clouds and haze in the upper portion of the Venus atmosphere, it is reasonable to consider a Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL) for making remote measurements of the 3D winds within the tops of clouds and the overlying haze layer.

  15. Lidar depolarization measurements of ice-precipitating liquid cloud layers during the 2012 Canadian Arctic ACE Validation Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, E. M.; Perro, C. W.; Nott, G. J.; Hopper, J.; Duck, T. J.; Sica, R. J.; Drummond, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    There is still great uncertainty in the relative abundance of liquid and solid particles in polar clouds, particularly in winter. Measurements of these quantities are important for the correct estimate of the local radiation budget. Depolarization measurements by the CANDAC Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar (CRL) at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80N, 86W) are improving our understanding in this area. The 2012 Canadian Arctic ACE Validation Campaign provided an opportunity to run the CRL depolarization channel nearly continuously (both day and night) throughout the polar sunrise season, measuring cloud particle phase with 7.5 m resolution in altitude and 1-minute time resolution in the troposphere. More than 10 co-located instruments, and additional detection channels of the CRL itself, make for a data set which is well-supported for intercomparison analyses. The CRL is a versatile instrument with eight detection channels, capable of measuring 532 nm (visible) and 355 nm (ultraviolet) elastic and nitrogen Raman backscatter, aerosol extinction, water vapour mixing ratio, tropospheric temperature profiles, as well as particulate properties including density and colour ratio. The 532 nm depolarization channel measures the extent to which the polarization state of the lidar beam is changed by scattering interactions with cloud particles in the sky, providing the ability to discern between ice crystals and liquid water droplets in polar clouds. This paper will focus on such measurements of early springtime clouds over Eureka. A nearly-continuous time series of depolarization was collected from late February through early April 2012 and provides a detailed case study of several distinct cloud features. Particular attention is paid to thin ice clouds of several varieties (both precipitating and non-precipitating, as well as some possible examples of mixed-phase clouds) and to ice-precipitating liquid cloud layers, examined in the context of local meteorological measurements. The high resolution of the CRL measurements is of importance for these cloud types as their morphology is variable on timescales of several minutes. Several examples in early March show layers < 40 m in vertical extent. There is the potential to expand this study to include data from the many other instruments at Eureka (e.g. millimeter cloud radar, microwave radiometer, several spectrometers), as well as satellite-borne instruments with overpasses of the high Arctic, in particular the ACE experiment.

  16. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect

    S, Motty G Satyanarayana, M. Krishnakumar, V. Dhaman, Reji k.

    2014-10-15

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  17. UV Raman lidar measurements of relative humidity for the characterization of cirrus cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.; Lin, R.-F.; Maestri, T.; Rizzi, R.; Masiello, G.

    2009-07-01

    Raman lidar measurements performed in Potenza by the Raman lidar system BASIL in the presence of cirrus clouds are discussed. Measurements were performed on 6 September 2004 in the frame of Italian phase of the EAQUATE Experiment. The major feature of BASIL is represented by its capability to perform high-resolution and accurate measurements of atmospheric temperature and water vapour, and consequently relative humidity, both in daytime and night-time, based on the application of the rotational and vibrational Raman lidar techniques in the UV. BASIL is also capable to provide measurements of the particle backscatter and extinction coefficient, and consequently lidar ratio (at the time of these measurements only at one wavelength), which are fundamental to infer geometrical and microphysical properties of clouds. A case study is discussed in order to assess the capability of Raman lidars to measure humidity in presence of cirrus clouds, both below and inside the cloud. While air inside the cloud layers is observed to be always under-saturated with respect to water, both ice super-saturation and under-saturation conditions are found inside these clouds. Upper tropospheric moistening is observed below the lower cloud layer. The synergic use of the data derived from the ground based Raman Lidar and of spectral radiances measured by the NAST-I Airborne Spectrometer allows to determine the temporal evolution of the atmospheric cooling/heating rates due to the presence of the cirrus cloud anvil. Lidar measurements beneath the cirrus cloud layer have been interpreted using a 1-D cirrus cloud model with explicit microphysics. The 1-D simulations indicates that sedimentation-moistening has contributed significantly to the moist anomaly, but other mechanisms are also contributing. This result supports the hypothesis that the observed mid-tropospheric humidification is a real feature which is strongly influenced by the sublimation of precipitating ice crystals. Results illustrated in this study demonstrate that Raman lidars, like the one used in this study, can resolve the spatial and temporal scales required for the study of cirrus cloud microphysical processes and appears sensitive enough to reveal and quantify upper tropospheric humidification associated with cirrus cloud sublimation.

  18. UV Raman lidar measurements of relative humidity for the characterization of cirrus cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.; Lin, R.-F.; Maestri, T.; Rizzi, R.; Masiello, G.

    2009-11-01

    Raman lidar measurements performed in Potenza by the Raman lidar system BASIL in the presence of cirrus clouds are discussed. Measurements were performed on 6 September 2004 in the frame of the Italian phase of the EAQUATE Experiment. The major feature of BASIL is represented by its capability to perform high-resolution and accurate measurements of atmospheric temperature and water vapour, and consequently relative humidity, both in daytime and night-time, based on the application of the rotational and vibrational Raman lidar techniques in the UV. BASIL is also capable to provide measurements of the particle backscatter and extinction coefficient, and consequently lidar ratio (at the time of these measurements, only at one wavelength), which are fundamental to infer geometrical and microphysical properties of clouds. A case study is discussed in order to assess the capability of Raman lidars to measure humidity in presence of cirrus clouds, both below and inside the cloud. While air inside the cloud layers is observed to be always under-saturated with respect to water, both ice super-saturation and under-saturation conditions are found inside these clouds. Upper tropospheric moistening is observed below the lower cloud layer. The synergic use of the data derived from the ground based Raman Lidar and of spectral radiances measured by the NAST-I Airborne Spectrometer allows the determination of the temporal evolution of the atmospheric cooling/heating rates due to the presence of the cirrus cloud. Lidar measurements beneath the cirrus cloud layer have been interpreted using a 1-D cirrus cloud model with explicit microphysics. The 1-D simulations indicate that sedimentation-moistening has contributed significantly to the moist anomaly, but other mechanisms are also contributing. This result supports the hypothesis that the observed mid-tropospheric humidification is a real feature which is strongly influenced by the sublimation of precipitating ice crystals. Results illustrated in this study demonstrate that Raman lidars, like the one used in this study, can resolve the spatial and temporal scales required for the study of cirrus cloud microphysical processes and appear sensitive enough to reveal and quantify upper tropospheric humidification associated with cirrus cloud sublimation.

  19. Retrieval of cloud microphysical parameters using the NOAA/PSD W-band cloud radar from R/V Ronald H. Brown during the VOCALS-REx field program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairall, C. W.; Deszoeke, S. P.; Moran, K.; Pezoa, S.; Wolfe, D. E.; Zuidema, P.

    2009-12-01

    The NOAA Physical Science Division deployed a new pitch-roll stabilized, vertically pointing W-band (94 GHz) Doppler cloud radar on the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown during the VOCALS-Rex field program in fall 2008 in the stratocumulus region off the coast of Chile. The radar operated at full sensitivity on Leg-2 (November 8-30, 2008). The radar produced profiles of full Doppler spectra and the first three moments of the spectral peak at 0.3 s time intervals; the vertical resolution is 25 m. Pitch-roll stabilization allows Doppler measurement of vertical motion without tilt-contamination by horizontal winds; ship heave is measured independently and subtracted from the radar vertical velocity to yield very accurate particle vertical motions. In this paper we describe the results of processing the radar moments in one-hour blocks to retrieve cloud and drizzle microphysical parameters using the method of Frisch, Fairall, and Snider, JAS1995. Additional inputs from a lidar ceilometer and a microwave radiometer are used. For cloud, profiles of liquid water and mean cloud drop radius are obtained; for drizzle profiles of liquid water, mean drizzle drop radius, and rainrate are obtained. Cloud microphysics processing is only possible in non-drizzling cases. The results are compared to analyses from the EPIC2001 field program in the same location.

  20. Stratospheric Clouds at South Pole During 1988 1. Results of Lidar Observations and Their Relationship to Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiocco, Giorgio; Cacciani, Marco; Di Girolamo, Paolo; Fu, Danielle; DeLuisi, John

    1992-04-01

    An optical radar-lidar-has been operational at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station since summer 1987-1988. The observations were specially directed to the detection of aerosol layers and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). The lidar utilized a Nd-YAG laser followed by a second harmonic generator, and a 0.5-m diameter Cassegrain receiving telescope. Results obtained during the period May-October 1988 are summarized. Some 10,000 profiles of the lidar echoes, each the result of 1-min averaging, were obtained. Data sets consisting of profiles of the scattering ratio and of the backscattering cross section Ba, based on half-hour averaging, are presented. The data can be related to profiles of the atmospheric temperature T, usually obtained on a daily basis at South Pole. Stratifications appear to have two distinct types of structures: one structure shows only a modest variation with height; the other is characterized by sharp features, with large changes of the cross section with height. The basic results, the relationship between Ba, and T, and their statistical relevance are considered in this paper. The microphysical interpretation, the attribution of these structures to PSC Type I and Type II, respectively involving the condensation of nitric acid trihydrate and of water ice, and the seasonal evolution of the phenomena are treated in a companion paper.

  1. Monostatic lidar/radar invisibility using coated spheres.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Peng-Wang; You, Yu; Kattawar, George W; Yang, Ping

    2008-02-01

    The Lorenz-Mie theory is revisited to explicitly include materials whose permeability is different from unity. The expansion coefficients of the scattered field are given for light scattering by both homogeneous and coated spheres. It is shown that the backscatter is exactly zero if the impedance of the spherical particles is equal to the intrinsic impedance of the surrounding medium. If spherical particles are sufficiently large, the zero backscatter can be explained as impedance matching using the asymptotic expression for the radar backscattering cross section. In the case of a coated sphere, the shell can be regarded as a cloak if the product of the thickness and the imaginary part of the refractive index of the outer shell is large. PMID:18542217

  2. Three-dimensional lidar point-cloud visualization and analysis of coseismic deformation using LidarViewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskin, M. E.; Kreylos, O.; Banesh, D.; Hamann, B.; Gold, P. O.; Elliott, A. J.; Hinojosa, A.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2012-12-01

    We summarize new point-cloud analysis techniques, and results obtained from lidar data collected from the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake surface rupture, using LidarViewer, an open-source software platform developed at the UC Davis KeckCAVES. Imaging of earthquake deformation with multi-resolution and multi-temporal lidar presents several challenges for visualization and analysis. Instruments, data resolution, and even the geodetic reference frame may change significantly between surveys. Grid-based techniques fail to adequately represent fully 3-D features, such as scarps and vegetation, and introduce aliasing artifacts that are especially troublesome when the deformation signal sought is less than the point spacing. Once obtained, the resulting dense field of 3-D vectors derived from differential lidar are difficult to visualize together with the terrain, limiting interpretation of these results. Points are the native, resolution-independent format of lidar, but working with massive point data sets can overwhelm system memory. LidarViewer overcomes these challenges using hierarchal data storage, view-dependent rendering, and an efficient, recursive data analysis framework. Pre-earthquake airborne lidar, collected as part of a regional survey, are very sparse (0.013 pts/m2) compared to the post-earthquake survey (9 pts/m2). A simple, \\chi2 minimization approach to matching these data sets takes advantage of this dramatic resolution difference to extract 3-D ground motion. We visualize the resulting displacement field in a 3-D environment using streamline-based approaches, colored by elevation change, and superimposed on the post-earthquake topography. This fused data product encourages exploration and assessment of the deformation signal and its relationship to landscape features, such as fault scarps, vegetation, and topographic relief. Terrestrial lidar scans collected within two weeks of the earthquake reveal the surface rupture at centimeter resolution. Virtual field measurements of offset features were collected using the full point-cloud in an immersive 3-D cave environment. Repeat measurements, both at a point and along strike, reveal substantial epistemic (interpretive) uncertainty that is generally greater than that reported by geologists working in the field after an earthquake. Combining observations from differential airborne and post-earthquake terrestrial lidar from the strike-slip Borrego fault reveals smooth coseismic slip gradients of 10-3, similar to strains measured from ground-surface deformation across strike. Higher strains are found along the Paso Superior normal fault surface rupture, due largely to distributed faulting and sagging of the hangingwall.

  3. Automated retrieval of cloud and aerosol properties from the ARM Raman lidar, part 1: feature detection

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Newsom, Rob K.; Turner, David D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2015-11-01

    A Feature detection and EXtinction retrieval (FEX) algorithm for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Raman lidar (RL) has been developed. Presented here is part 1 of the FEX algorithm: the detection of features including both clouds and aerosols. The approach of FEX is to use multiple quantities— scattering ratios derived using elastic and nitro-gen channel signals from two fields of view, the scattering ratio derived using only the elastic channel, and the total volume depolarization ratio— to identify features using range-dependent detection thresholds. FEX is designed to be context-sensitive with thresholds determined for each profile by calculating the expected clear-sky signal and noise. The use of multiple quantities pro-vides complementary depictions of cloud and aerosol locations and allows for consistency checks to improve the accuracy of the feature mask. The depolarization ratio is shown to be particularly effective at detecting optically-thin features containing non-spherical particles such as cirrus clouds. Improve-ments over the existing ARM RL cloud mask are shown. The performance of FEX is validated against a collocated micropulse lidar and observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite over the ARM Darwin, Australia site. While we focus on a specific lidar system, the FEX framework presented here is suitable for other Raman or high spectral resolution lidars.

  4. Macrophysical and optical properties of midlatitude high-altitude clouds from 4 ground-based lidars and collocated CALIOP observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, J. C.; Haeffelin, M.; Morille, Y.; Noel, V.; Keckhut, P.; Comstock, J.; Winker, D.; Chervet, P.; Roblin, A.

    2009-04-01

    Cirrus clouds not only play a major role in the energy budget of the Earth-Atmosphere system, but are also important in the hydrological cycle [Stephens et al., 1990; Webster, 1994]. According to satellite passive remote sensing, high-altitude clouds cover as much as 40% of the earth's surface on average (Liou 1986; Stubenrauch et al., 2006) and can reach 70% of cloud cover over the Tropics (Wang et al., 1996; Nazaryan et al., 2008). Hence, given their very large cloud cover, they have a major role in the climate system (Lynch et al. 2001). Cirrus clouds can be classified into three distinct families according to their optical thickness, namely subvisible clouds (OD<0.03), semi-transparent clouds (0.03clouds (0.3Lidar measurements however show that subvisible and semi-transparent clouds represent 50% or more of cirrus cloud population. The radiative effects of cirrus clouds are found to be significant by many studies both at the top of the atmosphere and surface. The contribution of the subvisible and semi-transparent classes is strongly affected by levels of other scatterers in the atmosphere (gases, aerosols). This makes them quite an important topic of study at the global scale. In the present work, we applied the cloud structure analysis algorithm STRAT to long time series of lidar backscatter profiles from multiple locations around the world. Our goal was to establish a Mid-Latitude climatology of cirrus clouds macrophysical properties based on active remote sensing: ground-based lidars at four mid-latitude observatories and the spaceborne instrument CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization). Lidar sampling, macrophysical (cloud base height, cloud top height, cloud thickness) and optical (cloud optical thickness) properties statistics are then evaluated and compared between the four observatories ground-based lidar measurements and quasi-simultaneously CALIOP overpasses. We note an overall good consistency in the macrophysical properties statistics derived from ground- based Lidar and CALIOP. For high altitude clouds, using consistent transmission-based retrieval methods, discrepancies are found in COT retrievals between ground Lidars and CALIOP. Ground-based Lidar retrievals contain less thick cirrus clouds than CALIOP. Overall, the results show that cirrus clouds with COD<0.1 (not included in historical cloud climatologies) represent 30-50% of the non-opaque cirrus class (COD<3, Pressure<440mb from ISCCP). Finally, we analyze the statistic consistencies between each dataset and investigate the possible bias due to lidar sampling and instrument/algorithm differences between ground-based lidar and CALIOP.

  5. Influence of daylight and noise current on cloud and aerosol observations by spaceborne elastic scattering lidar.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T Y; Imai, T; Uchino, O; Nagai, T

    1999-08-20

    The influence of daylight and noise current on cloud and aerosol observations by realistic spaceborne lidar was examined by computer simulations. The reflected solar radiations, which contaminate the daytime return signals of lidar operations, were strictly and explicitly estimated by accurate radiative transfer calculations. It was found that the model multilayer cirrus clouds and the boundary layer aerosols could be observed during the daytime and the nighttime with only a few laser shots. However, high background noise and noise current make it difficult to observe volcanic aerosols in middle and upper atmospheric layers. Optimal combinations of the laser power and receiver field of view are proposed to compensate for the negative influence that is due to these noises. For the computer simulations, we used a realistic set of lidar parameters similar to the Experimental Lidar in-Space Equipment of the National Space Development Agency of Japan. PMID:18324021

  6. Estimate of the global distribution of stratiform supercooled liquid water clouds using the LITE lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Robin J.; Behera, Mukunda D.; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Illingworth, Anthony J.

    2004-03-01

    Supercooled liquid water clouds can occur in the form of thin layers that have a much larger radiative impact than ice clouds of the same water content because of their smaller particle size, yet they are poorly represented in climate models. Such clouds may be easily distinguished from ice by their high lidar backscatter coefficient and sharp backscatter gradient at cloud top. In this paper, data from the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE), which flew on the space shuttle in 1994, are used to estimate the fraction of clouds that contain supercooled liquid water over the latitude range 60. Around 20% of clouds between -10C and -15C were found to contain liquid water, falling with temperature to essentially zero below -35C. Even from this limited dataset some clear latitudinal clear trends were evident, with a distinctly more frequent occurrence of supercooled water in clouds associated with mid-latitude weather systems in the southern hemisphere, as well as in tropical clouds warmer than around -15C. The results between 40 and 60N agree well with the distribution previously found at Chilbolton in Southern England (51N), implying that the forthcoming long-term lidar observations from space will be able to infer the global distribution of mixed-phase clouds with much greater accuracy and vertical resolution than has been possible until now.

  7. Validation of a radar doppler spectra simulator using measurements from the ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect

    Remillard, J.; Luke, E.; Kollias, P.

    2010-03-15

    The use of forward models as an alternative approach to compare models with observations contains advantages and challenges. Radar Doppler spectra simulators are not new; their application in high- resolution models with bin microphysics schemes could help to compare model output with the Doppler spectra recorded from the vertically pointing cloud radars at the ARM Climate Research Facility sites. The input parameters to a Doppler spectra simulator are both microphysical (e.g., particle size, shape, phase, and number concentration) and dynamical (e.g., resolved wind components and sub-grid turbulent kinetic energy). Libraries for spherical and non-spherical particles are then used to compute the backscattering cross-section and fall velocities, while the turbulence is parameterized as a Gaussian function with a prescribed width. The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) is used to determine the amount of noise added throughout the spectrum, and the spectral smoothing due to spectral averages is included to reproduce the averaging realized by cloud radars on successive returns. Thus, realistic Doppler spectra are obtained, and several parameters that relate to the morphological characteristics of the synthetically generated spectra are computed. Here, the results are compared to the new ARM microARSCL data products in an attempt to validate the simulator. Drizzling data obtained at the SGP site by the MMCR and the AMF site at Azores using the WACR are used to ensure the liquid part and the turbulence representation part of the simulator are properly accounted in the forward model.

  8. Assessing spaceborne lidar detection and characterization of aerosols near clouds using coincident airborne lidar and other measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Vaughan, M.; Omar, A. H.; Burton, S. P.; Rogers, R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    The objectives are to 1) evaluate potential shortcomings in the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aerosol height detection concerning specific biomass burning smoke events informed by airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) in different cloud environments and 2) study the lidar-derived atmospheric parameters in the vicinity of clouds for the cases where smoke is within or above clouds. In the case of light absorbing aerosols like biomass burning smoke, studies show that the greater the cloud cover below the aerosols, the more likely the aerosols are to heat the planet. An accurate aerosol height assumption is also crucial to a correct retrieval of aerosol chemical composition from passive space-based measurements (through the Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and aerosol absorption coefficient, as exemplified by aerosol retrievals using the passive Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)). Strong smoke events are recognized as very difficult to quantify from space using passive (MODIS, OMI etc...) or active (CALIOP) satellite sensors for different reasons. This study is performed through (i) the selection of smoke events with coincident CALIOP and airborne HSRL aerosol observations, with smoke presence determined according to the HSRL aerosol classification data, (ii) the order of such events by range of HSRL aerosol optical depth, total color ratio and depolarization ratio (the latter two informing on the size and shape of the particles) and the evaluation of CALIOP's detection, classification and retrieval performance for each event, (iii) the study of the HSRL (or CALIOP when available) atmospheric parameters (total color ratio, volume depolarization ratio, mean attenuated backscatter) in the vicinity of clouds for each smoke event.

  9. A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale Modeling Framework Global Climate Model with CloudSat Cloud Radar Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2009-01-13

    Over the last few years a new type of global climate model (GCM) has emerged in which a cloud-resolving model is embedded into each grid cell of a GCM. This new approach is frequently called a multiscale modeling framework (MMF) or superparameterization. In this article we present a comparison of MMF output with radar observations from the NASA CloudSat mission, which uses a near-nadir-pointing millimeter-wavelength radar to probe the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. We account for radar detection limits by simulating the 94 GHz radar reflectivity that CloudSat would observe from the high-resolution cloud-resolving model output produced by the MMF. Overall, the MMF does a good job of reproducing the broad pattern of tropical convergence zones, subtropical belts, and midlatitude storm tracks, as well as their changes in position with the annual solar cycle. Nonetheless, the comparison also reveals a number of model shortfalls including (1) excessive hydrometeor coverage at all altitudes over many convectively active regions, (2) a lack of low-level hydrometeors over all subtropical oceanic basins, (3) excessive low-level hydrometeor coverage (principally precipitating hydrometeors) in the midlatitude storm tracks of both hemispheres during the summer season (in each hemisphere), and (4) a thin band of low-level hydrometeors in the Southern Hemisphere of the central (and at times eastern and western) Pacific in the MMF, which is not observed by CloudSat. This band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels.

  10. Single Doppler radar and lidar studies of the dynamics of mixed layers and overlying stable regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Mei; Gal-Chen, Tzvi

    1991-01-01

    Some examples of profiles of PBL quantities retrieved from Doppler radar and lidar observations are shown, and the extent to which the deduced quantities agree with the traditional eddy viscosity concept is examined. It is found in one case that the concept of 'top down bottom up' diffusion introduced by Wyngaard (1983) is more pertinent than that of the eddy viscosity. In another case it is found that, in stable layers with sufficiently large Richardson number, the momentum fluxes could be counter-gradient. In this latter case the use of a negative turbulence diffusion coefficient would result in an ill-posed differential equation, thus confusing the 'diffusion problem'.

  11. Polar stratospheric cloud measurements by means of depolarization lidar in the Antarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanutti, L.

    1991-01-01

    POLE (Polar Ozone Lidar Experiment) is a cooperative project between the French and Italian services. It was started with the implementation of a first depolarization backscattering lidar for measurements both of background stratospheric aerosols and Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). A complex Ozone lidar was also installed which will replace the backscattering system and extend its measurements to tropospheric and stratospheric Ozone and to stratospheric and mesospheric temperatures. This new system allows also the measurement of the backscattered and depolarized signal produced by PSCs and background aerosols. The depolarization technique seemed to be quite efficient in the detection of different types of PSCs.

  12. Determining water cloud particle sizes from lidar depolarization measurements and time dependent multiple scattering coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, R. C.; Koenig, G. G.

    1992-01-01

    We present a technique of extracting water cloud particle size information from lidar measurements in conjunction with double scattering calculations. In this presentation, we describe the technique and give examples using data taken with the Air Force Phillips Laboratory's (Geophysics Directorate) low altitude Nd:YAG, elastic backscatter lidar. In a related presentation we describe the double scattering lidar model which we developed for this work. The technique uses simultaneous measurements of two orthogonal linear polarization components of lidar returns from water clouds or other media composed of spherical particles. Any depolarization of the incident lidar radiation backscattered by such a media can only be due to multiple scattering. The amount of depolarization is dependent on the extinction coefficient and the single scatter phase matrix, both of which are functions of position in the medium. The phase matrix is dependent on the index of refraction of the particles and the particle size distribution. Our technique is a modification of a procedure presented in Reference 1. There, particle sizes of water clouds are determined from double scattering calculations together with measurements of radiation scattered from volumes outside the lidar receiver's field of view (which can only be multiply scattered radiation). The methodology of our technique is similar but our 'probe' of the scattering phase function (and thus the particle size distribution) is different.

  13. Analysis of airborne Doppler lidar, Doppler radar and tall tower measurements of atmospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluestein, H. B.; Doviak, R. J.; Eilts, M. D.; Mccaul, E. W.; Rabin, R.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Zrnic, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The first experiment to combine airborne Doppler Lidar and ground-based dual Doppler Radar measurements of wind to detail the lower tropospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather was conducted in central Oklahoma during four days in June-July 1981. Data from these unique remote sensing instruments, coupled with data from conventional in-situ facilities, i.e., 500-m meteorological tower, rawinsonde, and surface based sensors, were analyzed to enhance understanding of wind, waves and turbulence. The purposes of the study were to: (1) compare winds mapped by ground-based dual Doppler radars, airborne Doppler lidar, and anemometers on a tower; (2) compare measured atmospheric boundary layer flow with flows predicted by theoretical models; (3) investigate the kinematic structure of air mass boundaries that precede the development of severe storms; and (4) study the kinematic structure of thunderstorm phenomena (downdrafts, gust fronts, etc.) that produce wind shear and turbulence hazardous to aircraft operations. The report consists of three parts: Part 1, Intercomparison of Wind Data from Airborne Lidar, Ground-Based Radars and Instrumented 444 m Tower; Part 2, The Structure of the Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer as Revealed by Lidar and Doppler Radars; and Part 3, Doppler Lidar Observations in Thunderstorm Environments.

  14. Second annual progress report of the Millimeter Wave Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Pazmany, A.L.; Sekelsky, S.M.; McIntosh, R.E.

    1992-06-07

    The Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) is a single antenna, two frequency (33 GHz and 95 GHz) polarimetric radar which is currently under the development at the University of Massachusetts (UMASS). This system will be capable of making four dimensional Doppler and polarimetric measurements of clouds. This report gives details about the status of the various subsystems under development and discusses current research activities.

  15. The problem of regime summaries of the data from radar observations. [for cloud system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divinskaya, B. S.; Salman, Y. M.

    1975-01-01

    Peculiarities of the radar information about clouds are examined in comparison with visual data. An objective radar classification is presented and the relation of it to the meteorological classification is shown. The advisability of storage and summarization of the primary radar data for regime purposes is substantiated.

  16. Detecting thermally driven cyclic deformation of an exfoliation sheet with lidar and radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Brian D.; Stock, Greg M.

    2014-01-01

    Rock falls from steep, exfoliating cliffs are common in many landscapes. Of the many mechanisms known to trigger rock falls, thermally driven deformation is among the least quantified, despite potentially being a prevalent trigger due to its occurrence at all times of year. Here we present the results of a field-based monitoring program using instrumentation, ground-based lidar, and ground-based radar to investigate the process of thermally driven deformation of an exfoliation sheet, and the ability of remote sensing tools to capture cyclic expansion and contraction patterns. Our results indicate that thermally driven exfoliation occurs on diurnal cycles and can be measured at the submillimeter to centimeter scale using high-resolution strain gauges, short-range (2 km) radar interfer-ometry.

  17. Lidar Monitoring of Clouds and Aerosols at the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    We report on findings from ongoing polarization lidar research at the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS). This facility was established in 1987, and the current total of lidar and radiometric measurements is approx. 2,900-h. Research at FARS has been applied to the climatological investigation of cirrus cloud properties for basic research and satellite measurement validation (currently in its 13th year), and studies of contrails, mixed phase clouds, and volcanic and Asian dust aerosols. Among the techniques utilized for monitoring cloud and aerosol properties are triple-wave length linear depolarization measurements, and high (1.5-m by 10-Hz) resolution scanning observations. The usefulness of extended time lidar studies for atmospheric and climate research is illustrated.

  18. Coherent lidar imaging of dust clouds: waveform comparison with the poly-phase (P4) modulation waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youmans, Douglas G.

    2008-04-01

    A dust or aerosol cloud represents a convenient target to examine the capabilities of range-resolved Doppler and intensity (RRDI) or inverse synthetic aperture ladar (ISAR) imaging coherent laser radar, known as coherent "lidar" for optically thin targets. The poly-phase P4 ladar waveform and its RRDI images are described and compared with previous pulse-burst, linear-FM chirp pulse-compression, pseudo-random phase modulation waveforms, and several other waveforms which have not been utilized to date. A "dust cloud" has very many independently moving point scatterers with velocities that are approximately Gaussian randomly distributed in x,y,z with standard deviations of about 10% of the mean wind + aerosol velocity. This is contrary to a hard-target where the point scatterers are rigidly attached and moving together. The dust cloud produced speckle effects for the various ladar waveforms are compared. In addition, a reference set of four corner-cube retro-reflectors within the dust cloud further illustrates the differences in the various waveform capabilities and resolution.

  19. The Structure and Phase of Cloud Tops as Observed by Polarization Lidar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinhirne, J. D.; Hansen, M. Z.; Simpson, J.

    1983-08-01

    High-resolution observations of the structure of cloud tops have been obtained with polarization lidar operated from a high altitude aircraft. Case studies of measurements acquired from cumuliform cloud systems are presented, two from September 1979 observations in the area of Florida and adjacent waters and a third during the May 1981 CCOPE experiment in southeast Montana. Accurate cloud top height structure and relative density of hydrometers are obtained from the lidar return signal intensity. Correlation between the signal return intensity and active updrafts was noted. Thin cirrus overlying developing turrets was observed in some cases. Typical values of the observed backscatter cross section were 0.1-0.5 (km sr1) for cumulonimbus tops.The depolarization ratio of the lidar signals was a function of the thermodynamic phase of cloud top areas. An increase of the cloud top depolarization with decreasing temperature was found for temperatures above and below 40C. The observed values of depolarization from water clouds were greater than reported by previous studies. Increased multiple scattering due to a larger range from the receiver to scattering medium is thought to have given rise to the greater water cloud depolarization for the cloud top measurements.

  20. GPGPU-based parallel processing of massive LiDAR point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xun; He, Wei

    2009-10-01

    Processing the massive LiDAR point cloud is a time consuming process due to the magnitude of the data involved and the highly computational iterative nature of the algorithms. In particular, many current and future applications of LiDAR require real- or near-real-time processing capabilities. Relevant examples include environmental studies, military applications, tracking and monitoring of hazards. Recent advances in Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) open a new era of General-Purpose Processing on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU). In this paper, we seek to harness the computing power available on contemporary Graphic Processing Units (GPUs), to accelerate the processing of massive LiDAR point cloud. We propose a CUDA-based method capable of accelerating processing of massive LiDAR point cloud on the CUDA-enabled GPU. Our experimental results showed that we are able to significantly reduce processing time of constructing TIN from LiDAR point cloud with GPGPU based parallel processing implementation, in comparison with the current state-of-the-art CPU-based algorithms.

  1. Process virtualization of large-scale lidar data in a cloud computing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Haiyan; Li, Jonathan; Zhong, Liang; Yongtao, Yu; Chapman, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Light detection and ranging (lidar) technologies have proven to be the most powerful tools to collect, within a short time, three-dimensional (3-D) point clouds with high-density, high-accuracy and significantly detailed surface information pertaining to terrain and objects. However, in terms of feature extraction and 3-D reconstruction in a computer-aided drawing (CAD) format, most of the existing stand-alone lidar data processing software packages are unable to process a large volume of lidar data in an effective and efficient fashion. To break this technical bottleneck, through the design of a Condor-based process virtualization platform, we presented in this paper a novel strategy that uses network-related computational resources to process, manage, and distribute vast quantities of lidar data in a cloud computing environment. Three extensive experiments with and without a cloud computing environment were compared. The experiment results demonstrated that the proposed process virtualization approach is promisingly applicable and effective in the management of large-scale lidar point clouds.

  2. Wide-Angle Imaging Lidar for Probing Spatially Complex Clouds: Instrument Development and Experimental Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, S. P.; Davis, A. B.; Ho, C.; Polonsky, I. N.

    2004-05-01

    Understanding multiple scattering in clouds is important to both passive and lidar remote sensing, as well as to climate studies. When probing clouds using conventional lidar, where returning light is collected within a very narrow field of view about the laser beam, multiple scattering is generally regarded as a problem for which corrections must be made. But because it has thoroughly sampled the interior of the cloud, multiply-scattered light, especially high-order scattered light, carries much additional information that conventional lidar discards. The new technique of off-beam lidar seeks specifically to study this highly-scattered light, which can spread laterally as much as kilometer away from the input beam. Wide-Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL) is the fullest realization of the off-beam lidar concept, combining high-resolution spatial imaging over a wide angular field together with high time resolution. WAIL data sets are, in essence, high-speed movies of the propagation of multiply-scattered light; mathematically, they embody the spatial and temporal Green function responses of the cloud. Here we describe the development of WAIL instrumentation at Los Alamos National Laboratory, including a WAIL implementation incorporating an ultra-high-speed (100 ps) microchannel-plate/crossed-delay-line imager and a more recent version using a gated intensified CCD capable of accommodating much higher photon rates. Strategies for performing WAIL measurements in daylight, prospects for WAIL measurements on highly complex broken cloud fields, and non-cloud applications for WAIL techniques ranging from probing sea ice to biomedical applications will also be discussed.

  3. First results of combined Fe-lidar/Radar measurements at Davis, 69 S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hffner, J.; Morris, R. J.; Kaifler, B.; Viehl, T.; Lbken, F.-J.

    2012-04-01

    The mobile scanning Fe-lidar of the IAP-Khlungsborn was moved to Davis, Antarctica, 69 S, 78 E during November 2010. This location was chosen because PMSE/NLC observations by MST-radar/RMR-lidar have been performed since 2003/2001 by the Australian Antarctic Division. Davis is the only station in Antarctica where comparable long-term observations to Alomar, 69 N are available. A comparison of both locations allows a detailed comparison of differences or similarities between the northern (NH) / southern hemisphere (SH) at mesopause altitudes. The Fe-lidar is a two wavelength system which measures Doppler temperature/vertical wind and iron densities by resonance scattering at 386 nm. The fundamental wavelength at 772 nm is used for aerosol measurements from the stratosphere to the mesosphere including NLC in summer or PSC in winter. Measurements are almost background free which allows year round operation independent of sunlight. At Davis the lidar was in operation 24% of the first year (2150 hours) which has not been achieved elsewhere with a mesospheric lidar. This unusual and already largest lidar data base of Antarctica shows the thermal structure of the mesopause region and the iron layer in great detail. Strong tides throughout the year have been observed and a link of the early part of the PMSE season to the stratospheric vortex has been found. More than 700 hours of temperature observation during the PMSE-season are compared with common volume PMSE/NLC observations. For the first time temperature and vertical wind measurements through PMSE and NLC have been achieved by a lidar showing that the SH in particular in December/January differs significantly from the NH in June/July. The temperature measurements near 86 km altitude show that the summer mesopause is surprisingly similar to the NH at PMSE altitudes but differs significantly at higher altitudes. Unlike the NH the southern mesopause altitude changes throughout the season by several kilometres. Depending on altitude temperatures can be warmer but also much colder than at the NH causing a change in PMSE altitude over the season.

  4. Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, A; Flynn, C

    2006-05-01

    The micropulse lidar (MPL) is a ground-based optical remote sensing system designed primarily to determine the altitude of clouds overhead. The physical principle is the same as for radar. Pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is infered. Besides real-time detection of clouds, post-processing of the lidar return can also characterize the extent and properties of aerosol or other particle-laden regions.

  5. Integrated radar and lidar analysis reveals extensive loss of remaining intact forest on Sumatra 2007-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, M. B.; Mitchard, E. T. A.

    2015-11-01

    Forests with high above-ground biomass (AGB), including those growing on peat swamps, have historically not been thought suitable for biomass mapping and change detection using synthetic aperture radar (SAR). However, by integrating L-band (λ = 0.23 m) SAR from the ALOS and lidar from the ICESat Earth-Observing satellites with 56 field plots, we were able to create a forest biomass and change map for a 10.7 Mha section of eastern Sumatra that still contains high AGB peat swamp forest. Using a time series of SAR data we estimated changes in both forest area and AGB. We estimate that there was 274 ± 68 Tg AGB remaining in natural forest (≥ 20 m height) in the study area in 2007, with this stock reducing by approximately 11.4 % over the subsequent 3 years. A total of 137.4 kha of the study area was deforested between 2007 and 2010, an average rate of 3.8 % yr-1. The ability to attribute forest loss to different initial biomass values allows for far more effective monitoring and baseline modelling for avoided deforestation projects than traditional, optical-based remote sensing. Furthermore, given SAR's ability to penetrate the smoke and cloud which normally obscure land cover change in this region, SAR-based forest monitoring can be relied on to provide frequent imagery. This study demonstrates that, even at L-band, which typically saturates at medium biomass levels (ca. 150 Mg ha-1), in conjunction with lidar data, it is possible to make reliable estimates of not just the area but also the carbon emissions resulting from land use change.

  6. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): A New Lidar for Aerosol and Cloud Profiling from the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; McGill, Mathew J.; Yorks. John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064,532,355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time (NRT) data capability ofthe ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as aerosol and air quality forecasting and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a summary of the science objectives and simulated data. Input from the ICAP community is desired to help plan our NRT mission goals and interactions with ICAP forecasters.

  7. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): a new lidar for aerosol and cloud profiling from the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, E. J.; McGill, M. J.; Yorks, J. E.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Palm, S. P.; Colarco, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064, 532, 355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time (NRT) data capability of the ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as aerosol and air quality forecasting and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a summary of the science objectives and simulated data. Results from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System general circulation model and data assimilation system (GEOS-5) have been used to generate the simulated data, and will be used to help process CATS data after launch.

  8. Comparison of ground-based LiDAR and ground-based radar of southwestern Colorado snowpack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, E. J.; Marshall, H.; Finnegan, D. C.; Deems, J. S.; Landry, C.

    2011-12-01

    New technologies and instrumentation can provide high resolution sampling of the spatial distribution of snowpack parameters such as snow depth, stratigraphy, and SWE at speeds and resolutions that are orders of magnitude larger than traditional manual observations. Both LiDAR and radar techniques have emerged as efficient tools for the characterization of snow at the study plot to basin scale. In this work, ground-based LiDAR scanning of the snow surface at Swamp Angel Study Plot, Senator Beck Basin, Colorado was performed in April 2010. The full-waveform scanning LiDAR operates at 1550-nm collecting both range measurements and calibrated intensity. The vertical/horizontal resolution is 0.015 degrees resulting in 3.3 million points in 5.5 minutes. Five different scanning positions were collected, registered, and geo-located. In a coordinated effort, a mobile FMCW radar (4-18 GHz) was deployed though the same study plot to collect transects for estimating snow depth, stratigraphy, and SWE. Precision differential GPS provided cm-level positions for each radar trace, which were acquired at a rate of 50 traces per second. In September 2010, ground-based LiDAR scans of the underlying terrain without snow were collected/processed and, in combination with the April 2010 snow surface, are used to derive a continuous model of snow depth distribution. The September 2010 snow-off surface is also compared to available digital elevation models for this area. Direct comparisons of the depths estimated by ground-based radar and the depths from the ground-based LiDAR model are performed. Volume calculations from the ground-based LiDAR snow depth model are presented and compared to that estimated from the radar transects.

  9. Optical and morphological properties of Cirrus clouds determined by the high spectral resolution lidar during FIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grund, Christian John; Eloranta, Edwin W.

    1990-01-01

    Cirrus clouds reflect incoming solar radiation and trap outgoing terrestrial radiation; therefore, accurate estimation of the global energy balance depends upon knowledge of the optical and physical properties of these clouds. Scattering and absorption by cirrus clouds affect measurements made by many satellite-borne and ground based remote sensors. Scattering of ambient light by the cloud, and thermal emissions from the cloud can increase measurement background noise. Multiple scattering processes can adversely affect the divergence of optical beams propagating through these clouds. Determination of the optical thickness and the vertical and horizontal extent of cirrus clouds is necessary to the evaluation of all of these effects. Lidar can be an effective tool for investigating these properties. During the FIRE cirrus IFO in Oct. to Nov. 1986, the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was operated from a rooftop site on the campus of the University of Wisconsin at Madison, Wisconsin. Approximately 124 hours of fall season data were acquired under a variety of cloud optical thickness conditions. Since the IFO, the HSRL data set was expanded by more than 63.5 hours of additional data acquired during all seasons. Measurements are presented for the range in optical thickness and backscattering phase function of the cirrus clouds, as well as contour maps of extinction corrected backscatter cross sections indicating cloud morphology. Color enhanced images of range-time indicator (RTI) displays a variety of cirrus clouds with approximately 30 sec time resolution are presented. The importance of extinction correction on the interpretation of cloud height and structure from lidar observations of optically thick cirrus are demonstrated.

  10. Cloud and Aerosol Retrieval for the 2001 GLAS Satellite Lidar Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Spinhirne, James D.

    2000-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) is scheduled for launch in July of 2001 aboard the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESAT). In addition to being a precision altimeter for mapping the height of the Earth's icesheets, GLAS will be an atmospheric lidar, sensitive enough to detect gaseous, aerosol, and cloud backscatter signals, at horizontal and vertical resolutions of 175 and 75m, respectively. GLAS will be the first lidar to produce temporally continuous atmospheric backscatter profiles with nearly global coverage (94-degree orbital inclination). With a projected operational lifetime of five years, GLAS will collect approximately six billion lidar return profiles. The large volume of data dictates that operational analysis algorithms, which need to keep pace with the data yield of the instrument, must be efficient. So, we need to evaluate the ability of operational algorithms to detect atmospheric constituents that affect global climate. We have to quantify, in a statistical manner, the accuracy and precision of GLAS cloud and aerosol observations. Our poster presentation will show the results of modeling studies that are designed to reveal the effectiveness and sensitivity of GLAS in detecting various atmospheric cloud and aerosol features. The studies consist of analyzing simulated lidar returns. Simulation cases are constructed either from idealized renditions of atmospheric cloud and aerosol layers or from data obtained by the NASA ER-2 Cloud Lidar System (CLS). The fabricated renditions permit quantitative evaluations of operational algorithms to retrieve cloud and aerosol parameters. The use of observational data permits the evaluations of performance for actual atmospheric conditions. The intended outcome of the presentation is that climatology community will be able to use the results of these studies to evaluate and quantify the impact of GLAS data upon atmospheric modeling efforts.

  11. Aerosol and Cloud Observations and Data Products by the GLAS Polar Orbiting Lidar Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, J. D.; Palm, S. P.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Mahesh, A.; Welton, E. J.

    2005-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) launched in 2003 is the first polar orbiting satellite lidar. The instrument was designed for high performance observations of the distribution and optical scattering cross sections of clouds and aerosol. The backscatter lidar operates at two wavelengths, 532 and 1064 nm. Both receiver channels meet and exceed their design goals, and beginning with a two month period through October and November 2003, an excellent global lidar data set now exists. The data products for atmospheric observations include the calibrated, attenuated backscatter cross section for cloud and aerosol; height detection for multiple cloud layers; planetary boundary layer height; cirrus and aerosol optical depth and the height distribution of aerosol and cloud scattering cross section profiles. The data sets are now in open release through the NASA data distribution system. The initial results on global statistics for cloud and aerosol distribution has been produced and in some cases compared to other satellite observations. The sensitivity of the cloud measurements is such that the 70% global cloud coverage result should be the most accurate to date. Results on the global distribution of aerosol are the first that produce the true height distribution for model inter-comparison.

  12. Classification of particle effective shape ratios in cirrus clouds based on the lidar depolarization ratio.

    PubMed

    Noel, Vincent; Chepfer, Helene; Ledanois, Guy; Delaval, Arnaud; Flamant, Pierre H

    2002-07-20

    A shape classification technique for cirrus clouds that could be applied to future spaceborne lidars is presented. A ray-tracing code has been developed to simulate backscattered and depolarized lidar signals from cirrus clouds made of hexagonal-based crystals with various compositions and optical depth, taking into account multiple scattering. This code was used first to study the sensitivity of the linear depolarization rate to cloud optical and microphysical properties, then to classify particle shapes in cirrus clouds based on depolarization ratio measurements. As an example this technique has been applied to lidar measurements from 15 mid-latitude cirrus cloud cases taken in Palaiseau, France. Results show a majority of near-unity shape ratios as well as a strong correlation between shape ratios and temperature: The lowest temperatures lead to high shape ratios. The application of this technique to space-borne measurements would allow a large-scale classification of shape ratios in cirrus clouds, leading to better knowledge of the vertical variability of shapes, their dependence on temperature, and the formation processes of clouds. PMID:12148751

  13. Cloud track wind using synergism of backscatter lidar and sky digital picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalesifard, Hamid R.; Abdi, Farhad; Flamant, Pierre H.

    2005-10-01

    Cloud altitude measurements by a 532nm backscatter Lidar and time lapsed digital photography are combined to monitor the cloud velocity profile. The cloud images are recorded in time steps of two seconds by a Nikon D100 digital camera through a 63 solid angle while the Lidar was measuring the cloud altitude. The images are recorded in 8 bits gray scale JPG format in an array of 22401488 pixels. To measure the angular displacement of different parts of the cloud, each image is meshed into an array of 4429 cells, each cell contains 5050 pixels. The grayscale density cross correlations between similar cells of successive images are computed using a MATLAB code developed by us for this application. The output products are the direction and the amount of displacement of each cell, in pixels. combining the results on cloud displacement with Lidar measurements enable to calculate the velocity vector in each cell. The resolution in velocity is about 1 ms-1 and 2 in direction. The calculation technique also is tested by simulating the cloud motion by moving the image pixels with a computer generated Gaussian velocity distribution.

  14. A 35-GHz polarimetrie Doppler radar and its application for observing clouds associated with Typhoon Nuri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Lingzhi; Liu, Lipingt; Feng, Sheng; Ge, Runsheng; Zhang, Zhe

    2011-07-01

    Millimeter-wavelength radar has proved to be an effective instrument for cloud observation and research. In this study, 8-mm-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR) with Doppler and polarization capabilities was used to investigate cloud dynamics in China for the first time. Its design, system specifications, calibration, and application in measuring clouds associated with typhoon are discussed in this article. The cloud radar measurements of radar reflectivity ( Z), Doppler velocity ( V r), velocity spectrum width ( S w) and the depolarization ratio ( L DR) at vertical incidence were used to analyze the microphysical and dynamic processes of the cloud system and precipitation associated with Typhoon Nuri, which occurred in southern China in August 2008. The results show the reflectivity observed using MMCR to be consistent with the echo height and the melting-layer location data obtained by the nearby China S-band new-generation weather radar (SA), but the Ka-band MMCR provided more detailed structural information about clouds and weak precipitation data than did the SA radar. The variation of radar reflectivity and L DR in vertical structure reveals the transformation of particle phase from ice to water. The vertical velocity and velocity spectrum width of MMCR observations indicate an updraft and strong turbulence in the stratiform cloud layer. MMCR provides a valuable new technology for meteorological research in China.

  15. Polar winter cloud depolarization measurements with the CANDAC Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, E. M.; Nott, G. J.; Duck, T. J.; Sica, R. J.; Doyle, J. G.; Pike-thackray, C.; Drummond, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Clouds introduce a significant positive forcing to the Arctic radiation budget and this is strongest during the polar winter when shortwave radiation is absent (Intrieri et al., 2002). The amount of forcing depends on the occurrence probability and optical depth of the clouds as well as the cloud particle phase (Ebert and Curry 1992). Mixed-phase clouds are particularly complex as they involve interactions between three phases of water (vapour, liquid and ice) coexisting in the same cloud. Although significant progress has been made in characterizing wintertime Arctic clouds (de Boer et al., 2009 and 2011), there is considerable variability in the relative abundance of particles of each phase, in the morphology of solid particles, and in precipitation rates depending on the meteorology at the time. The Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) Rayleigh-Mie-Raman Lidar (CRL) was installed in the Canadian High Arctic at Eureka, Nunavut (80N, 86W) in 2008-2009. The remotely-operated system began with measurement capabilities for multi-wavelength aerosol extinction, water vapour mixing ratio, and tropospheric temperature profiles, as well as backscatter cross section coefficient and colour ratio. In 2010, a new depolarization channel was added. The capability to measure the polarization state of the return signal allows the characterization of the cloud in terms of liquid and ice water content, enabling the lidar to probe all three phases of water in these clouds. Lidar depolarization results from 2010 and 2011 winter clouds at Eureka will be presented, with a focus on differences in downwelling radiation between mixed phase clouds and ice clouds. de Boer, G., E.W. Eloranta, and M.D. Shupe (2009), Arctic mixed-phase stratiform cloud properties from multiple years of surface-based measurements at two high-latitude locations, Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, 66 (9), 2874-2887. de Boer, G., H. Morrison, M. D. Shupe, and R. Hildner (2011), Evidence of liquid dependent ice nucleation in high-latitude stratiform clouds from surface remote sensors, Geophysical Research Letters, 38, L01803. Ebert, EE and J.A .Curry (1992), A parameterization of ice cloud optical properties for climate models, Journal of Geophysical Research 97:3831-3836. Intrieri JM, Fairall CW, Shupe MD, Persson POG, Andreas EL, Guest PS, Moritz RE. 2002. An annual cycle of Arctic surface cloud forcing at SHEBA. Journal of Geophysical Research 107 NO. C10, 8039 . Noel, V., H. Chepfer, M. Haeffelin, and Y. Morille (2006), Classification of ice crystal shapes in midlatitude ice clouds from three years of lidar observations over the SIRTA observatory. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 63:2978 - 2991.

  16. Observations of sub-tropical Cirrus clouds under Reunion Island with Lidar measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadet, B.; Goldfab, L.; Giraud, V.; Keckhut, P.

    2003-04-01

    Tropical cirrus, generated by either deep convection or by large-scale lifting, have a significant effect on climate through their influence on the radiation balance and thermal equilibrium of the Earth atmosphere. Hence, cirrus clouds occurrence and their optical properties are quite important for climate models, particularly in the tropics where they are poorly discriminate. The Observatoire de Physique de l'Atmosphere de la Reunion (OPAR) is located in the Indian Ocean just above the tropic of Capricorn; it makes quasi-continuous measurements in the southern hemisphere where there is a dearth of cirrus measurements. The OPAR station makes lidar measurement since 1994 and thus constitutes a temporally extensive lidar data base in the southern tropics. We have processed this lidar dataset between 1996 and 2001 to access a sub-tropical cirrus clouds climatology based on 6 years analysis. Results show that two main seasons prevail for cirrus clouds occurrence: an austral winter, from May to October, and an austral summer, from November to April. As expected, cirrus are present exclusively during the austral summer, 13% of measurements, than during the austral winter, when they were observed only once. Subvisible cirrus clouds, defined by an optical thickness below 0.03, compose a significant fraction, 65%, of the total cirrus observations. The annual cirrus occurrence frequency is well correlated with the annual water vapor distribution in the atmosphere. The sub-tropical cirrus clouds climatology derived from lidar data set under Reunion Island (21^oS, 55^oN) for the 1996-2001 period will be presented at the meeting. We should also be able to present preliminary results on their optical properties such as extinction and backscattered coefficients, and thus lidar ratio, which are deduced from the combined Raman and Rayleigh lidar observations.

  17. Lidar System for Airborne Measurement of Clouds and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Matthew; Scott, V. Stanley; Izquierdo, Luis Ramos; Marzouk, Joe

    2008-01-01

    A lidar system for measuring optical properties of clouds and aerosols at three wavelengths is depicted. The laser transmitter is based on a Nd:YVO4 laser crystal pumped by light coupled to the crystal via optical fibers from laser diodes that are located away from the crystal to aid in dissipating the heat generated in the diodes and their drive circuits. The output of the Nd:YVO4 crystal has a wavelength of 1064 nm, and is made to pass through frequency-doubling and frequency-tripling crystals. As a result, the net laser output is a collinear superposition of beams at wavelengths of 1064, 532, and 355 nm. The laser operates at a pulse-repetition rate of 5 kHz, emitting per-pulse energies of 50 microJ at 1064 nm, 25 microJ at 532 nm and 50 microJ at 355 nm. An important feature of this system is an integrating sphere located between the laser output and the laser beam expander lenses. The integrating sphere collects light scattered from the lenses. Three energy-monitor detectors are located at ports inside the integrating sphere. Each of these detectors is equipped with filters such that the laser output energy is measured independently for each wavelength. The laser output energy is measured on each pulse to enable the most accurate calibration possible. The 1064-nm and 532-nm photodetectors are, more specifically, single photon-counting modules (SPCMs). When used at 1064 nm, these detectors have approximately 3% quantum efficiency and low thermal noise (fewer than 200 counts per second). When used at 532 nm, the SPCMs have quantum efficiency of about 60%. The photodetector for the 355-nm channel is a photon-counting photomultiplier tube having a quantum efficiency of about 20%. The use of photon-counting detectors is made feasible by the low laser pulse energy. The main advantage of photon-counting is ease of inversion of data without need for complicated calibration schemes like those necessary for analog detectors. The disadvantage of photon-counting detectors is that they inherently have narrow dynamic ranges. However, by using photon-counting detectors along with a high-repetition rate laser, it is possible to obtain wide dynamic range through accumulation of counts over many pulses.

  18. Cloud model-based simulation of spaceborne radar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H.-Y. M.; Prasad, N.; Meneghini, R.; Tao, W.-K.; Jones, J. A.; Adler, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Simulations of observations from potential spaceborne radars are made based on storm structure generated from the three-dimensional (3D) Goddard cumulus ensemble model simulation of an intense overland convective system. Five frequencies of 3, 10, 14, 35, and 95 GHz are discussed, but the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission precipitation radar sensor frequency (14 GHz) is the focus of this study. Radar reflectives and their attenuation in various atmospheric conditions are studied in this simulation. With the attenuation from cloud and precipitation in the estimation of reflectivity factor (dBZ), the reflectivities in the lower atmosphere in the convective cores are significantly reduced. With spatial resolution of 4 km X 4 km, attenuation at 14 GHz may cause as large as a 20-dBZ difference between the simulated measurements of the peak, Z(sub mp) and near-surface reflectivity, Z(sub ms) in the most intense convective region. The Z(sub mp) occurs at various altitudes depending on the hydrometeor concentrations and their vertical distribution. Despite the significant attenuation in the intense cores, the presence of the rain maximum is easily detected by using information of Z(sub mp). In the stratiform region, the attenuation is quite limited (usually less than 5 dBZ), and the reduction of reflectivity is mostly related to the actual vertical structure of cloud distribution. Since Z(sub ms) suffers severe attenuation and tends to underestimate surface rainfall intensity in convective regions. Z(sub mp) can be more representative for rainfall retrieval in the lower atmosphere in these regions. In the stratiform region where attenuation is negligible, however, Z(sub mp) tends to overestimate surface rainfall and Z(sub ms) is more appropriate for rainfall retrieval. A hybrid technique using a weight between the two rain intensities is tested and found potentially usefull for future applications. The estimated surface rain-rate map based on this hybrid approach captures many of the details of the cloud model rain field but still slightly underestimates the rain-rate maximum.

  19. ARM Raman Lidar Measurements of High Ice Supersaturation in Cirrus Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Turner, David D.

    2004-09-01

    Water vapor amounts in the upper troposphere are crucial to understanding the radiative feedback of cirrus clouds on the Earth's climate. We use a unique, year-long dataset of water vapor mixing ratio inferred from ground-based Raman lidar measurements to study the role of ice supersaturation in ice nucleation processes. We find that ice supersaturation occurs 31% of the time in over 300,000 data points. We also examine the distribution of ice supersaturation with height and find that in the uppermost portion of a cloud layer, the air is ice supersaturated 43% of the time. These measurements show that large ice supersaturation is common in cirrus clouds, which supports the theory of ice forming homogeneously. Given the continuous nature of these Raman lidar measurements, our results have important implications for studying ice nucleation processes using cloud microphysical models.

  20. Evidence of High Ice Supersaturation in Cirrus Clouds Using ARM Raman Lidar Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Turner, David D.

    2004-06-05

    Water vapor amounts in the upper troposphere are crucial to understanding the radiative feedback of cirrus clouds on the Earths climate. We use a unique, year-long dataset of water vapor mixing ratio inferred from ground-based Raman lidar measurements to study the role of ice supersaturation in ice nucleation processes. We find that ice supersaturation occurs 31% of the time in over 300,000 data points. We also examine the distribution of ice supersaturation with height and find that in the uppermost portion of a cloud layer, the air is ice supersaturated 43% of the time. These measurements show that large ice supersaturation is common in cirrus clouds, which supports the theory of ice forming homogeneously. Given the continuous nature of these Raman lidar measurements, our results have important implications for studying ice nucleation processes using cloud microphysical models.

  1. Lidar and All-Sky IR Camera Cloud Measurements for LSST Scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebag, Jacques; Zimmer, P.; Klebe, D.; Mcgraw, J.; Krabbendam, V.

    2011-03-01

    LSST has acquired an all-sky thermal IR imager to evaluate its cloud detection performances to inform the automatic scheduling process during night operations. Observations in the 10micron window have long been used at observatories to detect the presence of thick clouds and recent progresses in IR detector performances should enable the detection of thin cirrus at high altitudes. Lidar is quite effective at measuring the altitude and the optical depth of thin cirrus clouds well below 1% transmission losses and is therefore a perfectly suited instrument to help evaluating the detection performance of the all-sky IR imager. For that purpose, the IR imager has been deployed at the UNM Campus Observatory in Albuquerque NM the location of the Astronomical Lidar for Extinction (ALE) and the two instruments were operated together under varying amounts of cloud coverage. The poster will present the results obtained so far from this set of simultaneous observations.

  2. Influence of characteristics of micro-bubble clouds on backscatter lidar signal.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yang, Kecheng; Xia, Min; Rao, Jionghui; Zhang, Wei

    2009-09-28

    Marine micro-bubbles are one of those important constituents that influence scattering characteristics of water column. Monte Carlo Based simulations show that a water entrained bubble cloud generate a characteristic backscatter of incident laser light [M. Xia, J. Opt. A: Pure Appl. Opt. 8, 350 (2006)]. This characteristic can be used to detect and localize bubble clouds, leading to wide ranging applications, especially in optical remote sensing. This paper describes tests of an underwater lidar system applied to detecting cloud of micro-bubbles. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that the system is capable of detecting bubbles ranging from diameter 10 microm approximately 200 microm, over a distance of 7-12 m from the detector. The dependence of the lidar return signal on size distribution of bubbles, concentration, thickness and location of bubble clouds is studied and compared with simulation results. PMID:19907564

  3. Detection of fault structures with airborne LiDAR point-cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Du, Lei

    2015-08-01

    The airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) technology is a new type of aerial earth observation method which can be used to produce high-precision DEM (Digital Elevation Model) quickly and reflect ground surface information directly. Fault structure is one of the key forms of crustal movement, and its quantitative description is the key to the research of crustal movement. The airborne LiDAR point-cloud data is used to detect and extract fault structures automatically based on linear extension, elevation mutation and slope abnormal characteristics. Firstly, the LiDAR point-cloud data is processed to filter out buildings, vegetation and other non-surface information with the TIN (Triangulated Irregular Network) filtering method and Burman model calibration method. TIN and DEM are made from the processed data sequentially. Secondly, linear fault structures are extracted based on dual-threshold method. Finally, high-precision DOM (Digital Orthophoto Map) and other geological knowledge are used to check the accuracy of fault structure extraction. An experiment is carried out in Beiya Village of Yunnan Province, China. With LiDAR technology, results reveal that: the airborne LiDAR point-cloud data can be utilized to extract linear fault structures accurately and automatically, measure information such as height, width and slope of fault structures with high precision, and detect faults in areas with vegetation coverage effectively.

  4. Simultaneous Lidar and All-Sky IR Camera Observations to Measure Cloud Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Peter C.; Sebag, J.; McGraw, J. T.; Zirzow, D. C.; Vorobiev, D. V.; UNM Measurement Astrophysics MAP Research Group

    2011-01-01

    We present initial results of combined lidar and all-sky thermal infrared camera measurements of transmission losses through clouds. Thermal IR observations in the 10 micron window have long been used at observatories to detect the presence of clouds by measuring the contrast in downwelling thermal radiation between clear and cloudy sky. The ability of these techniques to measure thin cirrus at high altitudes, the sort of clouds that typically ruin otherwise photometric conditions, has always been limited due to their low temperature and low emissivity. Lidar, on the other hand, is quite effective at measuring both the presence and optical depth of thin cirrus clouds, well below 1% transmission losses. A lidar can only operate in one direction at a time and thus is limited in its ability to measure transmission over wide fields of view. The combination of wide field thermal IR imaging plus lidar measurements of transmission hold significant promise for helping solve the time and field dependence of atmospheric transmission caused by clouds, especially sub-visual cirrus. To test this instrumental combination, the LSST all-sky infrared camera was deployed for several weeks at the UNM Campus Observatory in Albuquerque, NM, the location of the Astronomical Lidar for Extinction (ALE). The two instruments were operated together under various cloud cover conditions and when conditions permitted, narrowband photometry of bright stars was simultaneously obtained to verify the temporal and spatial variation of extinction. MAP atmospheric transmission research is supported by NIST Award 60NANB9D9121 and NSF Grant AST-1009878.

  5. Offshore wind farm flow measured by complementary remote sensing techniques: radar satellite TerraSAR-X and lidar windscanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneemann, J.; Hieronimus, J.; Jacobsen, S.; Lehner, S.; Khn, M.

    2015-06-01

    Scanning Doppler lidar systems offer continuous wind measurements with some kilometres of range and a spatial distribution of concurrent measurements down to some metres. The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite TerraSAR-X is capable to cover offshore areas of hundreds of square kilometres and to obtain wind data spatially distributed with some tens of metres. Images can be taken up to twice a day when the satellite passes the measurement site. Simultaneous wind speed measurements with ground based scanning Doppler lidar and TerraSAR-X in the region of the offshore wind farm alpha ventus in the German North Sea were collected. A comparison of both systems in free stream conditions is performed by extrapolating the lidardata to the measurement height of the radar satellite assuming a logarithmic wind profile. In wake conditions the wake tracks obtained by lidar and TerraSAR-X are compared. In free stream conditions the comparison reveals a mean absolute wind velocity difference ? 0.4 m/s in two of the four considered cases and 1.1 m/s in one case. The fourth case shows a bad agreement due to a unusually low radar backscatter in the satellite's measurement. In wake conditions the wind turbine wakes could be tracked in the lidar and the satellite data. The comparison for the considered case reveals similar wake tracks in principle, but no matching due to the time difference of the measurements and the lower spatial resolution of the radar measurements.

  6. DC-8 scanning lidar characterization of aircraft contrails and cirrus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Norman B.; Uthe, Edward E. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A Subsonic Assessment (SASS) element of the overall Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) was initiated by NASA to assess the atmospheric impact of subsonic aircraft. SRI was awarded a project to develop and test a scanning backscatter lidar for installation on the NASA DC-8 (year 1), participate in the Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) field program (year 2), and conduct a comprehensive analysis of field data (year 3). A scanning mirror pod attached to the DC-8 aircraft provides for scanning lidar observations ahead of the DC-8 and fixed-angle upward or downward observations. The lidar system installed within the DC-8 transmits 275 MJ at 1.06 gm wavelength or about 130 mJ at 1.06 and 0.53 gm simultaneously. Range-resolved aerosol backscatter is displayed in real time in terms of cloud/contrail spatial distributions. The objectives of the project are to map contrail/cloud vertical distributions ahead of DC-8; provide DC-8 guidance into enhanced scattering layers; document DC-8 flight path intersection of contrail and cloud geometries (in-situ measurement positions relative to cloud/contrail shape and an extension of in-situ measurements into the vertical -- integrated contrail/cloud properties); analyze contrail/cloud radiative properties with LIRAD (combined lidar and radiometry) technique; evaluate mean particle sizes of aircraft emissions from two-wavelength observations; study contrail/cloud interactions, diffusion, and mass decay/growth; and make observations in the near-field of aircraft engine emissions. The scanning mirror pod may also provide a scanning capability for other remote sensing instruments.

  7. Development of a scanning micro-pulse lidar for aerosol and cloud detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Wang, Zhangjun; Meng, Xiangqian; Qu, Junle; Du, Libin; Li, Xianxin; Lv, Bin; Kabanov, V. V.

    2014-11-01

    A scanning micro-pulse lidar (MPL) was developed by Institute of Oceanographic Instrumentation, Shandong Academy of Sciences, which can be used for routine observations of optical properties, temporal and spatial variation of atmospheric aerosol and cloud in the lower troposphere. In addition to the optical system design, the design of 3 dimensional (3-D) scanning system controlled by servo motors is analyzed, including servo motor selection and mechanical design. Through the measurements in Qingdao, it is proved that 3-D scanning system can control the lidar azimuth/elevation scanning with high precision. The lidar has good performance and can provide time-height indication (THI), range-height indication (RHI) and plane-position indication (PPI) of lidar signals which can well reflect the temporal and spatial variation of atmospheric aerosol.

  8. Modeling the performance of direct-detection Doppler lidar systems including cloud and solar background variability.

    PubMed

    McGill, M J; Hart, W D; McKay, J A; Spinhirne, J D

    1999-10-20

    Previous modeling of the performance of spaceborne direct-detection Doppler lidar systems assumed extremely idealized atmospheric models. Here we develop a technique for modeling the performance of these systems in a more realistic atmosphere, based on actual airborne lidar observations. The resulting atmospheric model contains cloud and aerosol variability that is absent in other simulations of spaceborne Doppler lidar instruments. To produce a realistic simulation of daytime performance, we include solar radiance values that are based on actual measurements and are allowed to vary as the viewing scene changes. Simulations are performed for two types of direct-detection Doppler lidar system: the double-edge and the multichannel techniques. Both systems were optimized to measure winds from Rayleigh backscatter at 355 nm. Simulations show that the measurement uncertainty during daytime is degraded by only approximately 10-20% compared with nighttime performance, provided that a proper solar filter is included in the instrument design. PMID:18324169

  9. ER-2 lidar measurements of stratocumulus cloud top structure on July 14, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, Reinout; Spinhirne, James D.

    1990-01-01

    On July 14, 1987 NASA's ER-2 high altitude aircraft flew a mission to measure the structure of stratocumulus clouds off the coast of California. A flight pattern was executed so that the two-dimensional variability of the clouds could be detected. The technique of analysis of the lidar data to measure cloud tops follows. First each signal is searched for its maximum in return strength. This maximum is caused by scattering of the laser light off cloud particles or from the ocean surface. Next the variance of the signal return above the level of maximum backscatter is determined. Cloud top is assigned to a level (above the level of maximum backscatter) where the backscatter exceeds the average variance. This two-step process is necessary because the level of maximum backscatter does not correspond to the cloud top. Ocean surface returns are easily separated from cloud returns in this process, described in detail by Boers, Spinhirne, and Hart (1988). Analysis of the data so far has shown that there were very few breaks in the clouds. Furthermore the layer top was very flat with local oscillations not exceeding 30 m. Such small cloud top variations are still well within the range of detectability, because the precision of this technique of cloud top detection has previously been established to be 13 to 15 m. Data are presently being analyzed to compute cloud top distributions and fractional cloudiness. The aim of this research is to relate the fractional cloudiness to the mean thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer. Researchers plan to compute spectral scales of the cloud top variability in two dimensions to determine the orientation of the clouds with respect to the mean wind. Furthermore the lidar derived cloud top distribution will be used in the computation of the thermodynamic and radiation budget of the boundary layer.

  10. Modeling urban LIDAR point clouds with combined 2D TIN and 3D tetrahedron structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Liao, Honggang; Chen, Menmen; Peng, Zhiyong

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents our research on exploring the combined 2D TIN and 3D Tetrahedra structure to quickly model large-range Urban LIDAR point clouds for 3D visualization purpose. To this end, Morphological grayscale reconstruction is first implemented to segment LIDAR point clouds into terrain and non-terrain regions. After that, segmented Lidar terrain points are modeled with Constrained Delaunay Triangulation under constrain of building boundary as well as non-terrain points are modeled with Power Crust algorithm to obtain reconstructed building surface. Next, two kinds of model are combined based on shared building boundary. Finally, 3D visualization of selected urban area with presented technique clearly demonstrates higherefficiency. Valuable conclusions are given as well.

  11. Arctic polar stratospheric cloud measurements by means of a four wavelength depolarization lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanutti, L.; Castagnoli, F.; Delguasta, M.; Flesia, C.; Godin, S.; Kolenda, J.; Kneipp, H.; Kyro, Esko; Matthey, R.; Morandi, M.

    1994-01-01

    A four wavelength depolarization backscattering lidar has been operated during the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) in Sodankyl, in the Finnish Arctic. The lidar performed measurements during the months of December 1991, January, February and March 1992. The Finnish Meteorological Institute during the same period launched regularly three Radiosondes per day, and three Ozone sondes per week. Both Mt. Pinatubo aerosols and Polar Stratospheric Clouds were measured. The use of four wavelengths, respectively at 355 nm, 532 nm , 750 nm, and 850 nm permits an inversion of the lidar data to determine aerosol particle size. The depolarization technique permits the identification of Polar Stratospheric Clouds. Frequent correlation between Ozone minima and peaks in the Mt. Pinatubo aerosol maxima were detected. Measurements were carried out both within and outside the Polar Vortex.

  12. DC-8 Scanning Lidar Characterization of Aircraft Contrails and Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uthe, Edward E.; Nielsen, Norman B.; Oseberg, Terje E.

    1998-01-01

    An angular-scanning large-aperture (36 cm) backscatter lidar was developed and deployed on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft as part of the SUCCESS (Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study) program. The lidar viewing direction could be scanned continuously during aircraft flight from vertically upward to forward to vertically downward, or the viewing could be at fixed angles. Real-time pictorial displays generated from the lidar signatures were broadcast on the DC-8 video network and used to locate clouds and contrails above, ahead of, and below the DC-8 to depict their spatial structure and to help select DC-8 altitudes for achieving optimum sampling by onboard in situ sensors. Several lidar receiver systems and real-time data displays were evaluated to help extend in situ data into vertical dimensions and to help establish possible lidar configurations and applications on future missions. Digital lidar signatures were recorded on 8 mm Exabyte tape and generated real-time displays were recorded on 8mm video tape. The digital records were transcribed in a common format to compact disks to facilitate data analysis and delivery to SUCCESS participants. Data selected from the real-time display video recordings were processed for publication-quality displays incorporating several standard lidar data corrections. Data examples are presented that illustrate: (1) correlation with particulate, gas, and radiometric measurements made by onboard sensors, (2) discrimination and identification between contrails observed by onboard sensors, (3) high-altitude (13 km) scattering layer that exhibits greatly enhanced vertical backscatter relative to off-vertical backscatter, and (4) mapping of vertical distributions of individual precipitating ice crystals and their capture by cloud layers. An angular scan plotting program was developed that accounts for DC-8 pitch and velocity.

  13. Calibration of the 1064 nm lidar channel using water phase and cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yonghua; Gan, Chuen Meei; Cordero, Lina; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred; Ahmed, Sam

    2011-07-20

    Calibration is essential to derive aerosol backscatter coefficients from elastic scattering lidar. Unlike the visible UV wavelengths where calibration is based on a molecular reference, calibration of the 1064 nm lidar channel requires other approaches, which depend on various assumptions. In this paper, we analyze two independent calibration methods which use (i) low-altitude water phase clouds and (ii) high cirrus clouds. In particular, we show that to achieve optimal performance, aerosol attenuation below the cloud base and cloud multiple scattering must be accounted for. When all important processes are considered, we find that these two independent methods can provide a consistent calibration constant with relative differences less than 15%. We apply these calibration techniques to demonstrate the stability of our lidar on a monthly scale, along with a natural reduction of the lidar efficiency on an annual scale. Furthermore, our calibration procedure allows us to derive consistent aerosol backscatter coefficients and angstrom coefficient profiles (532-1064 nm) along with column extinction-to-backscatter ratios which are in good agreement with sky radiometer inversions. PMID:21772382

  14. Depolarization, backscatter, and attenuation of CO/sub 2/ lidar by cirrus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, A.; Post, M.J.; Hall,Jr., F.F.

    1984-08-01

    A coherent CO/sub 2/ lidar system has been modified to record various states of polarization of the backscattered radiation. Methods for measuring the degree of polarization in the backscattered radiation as well as the optical thickness of clouds are described and demonstrated successfully.

  15. Airborne lidar observation of mountain-wave-induced polar stratospheric clouds during EASOE

    SciTech Connect

    Godin, S.; Megie, G.; David, C.; Haner, D. ); Flesia, C.; Emery, Y. )

    1994-06-22

    This article presents the results of airborne lidar measurements of aerosol and polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) above Kiruna. Polarization measurements allow the distinction between volcanic aerosols, and PSC. They observed PSC formations near Kiruna on December 11, 1991, extending over 100's of km west and east.

  16. Integrating Terrestrial LIDAR with Point Clouds Created from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslar, M.

    2015-08-01

    Using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) for the purposes of conducting high-accuracy aerial surveying has become a hot topic over the last year. One of the most promising means of conducting such a survey involves integrating a high-resolution non-metric digital camera with the UAV and using the principals of digital photogrammetry to produce high-density colorized point clouds. Through the use of stereo imagery, precise and accurate horizontal positioning information can be produced without the need for integration with any type of inertial navigation system (INS). Of course, some form of ground control is needed to achieve this result. Terrestrial LiDAR, either static or mobile, provides the solution. Points extracted from Terrestrial LiDAR can be used as control in the digital photogrammetry solution required by the UAV. In return, the UAV is an affordable solution for filling in the shadows and occlusions typically experienced by Terrestrial LiDAR. In this paper, the accuracies of points derived from a commercially available UAV solution will be examined and compared to the accuracies achievable by a commercially available LIDAR solution. It was found that the LiDAR system produced a point cloud that was twice as accurate as the point cloud produced by the UAV's photogrammetric solution. Both solutions gave results within a few centimetres of the control field. In addition the about of planar dispersion on the vertical wall surfaces in the UAV point cloud was found to be multiple times greater than that from the horizontal ground based UAV points or the LiDAR data.

  17. Characterization of vertical cloud variability over Europe using spatial lidar observations and regional simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakroun, M.; Bastin, S.; Chiriaco, M.; Chepfer, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we characterize the seasonal and inter-annual variabilities of cloud fraction profiles in both observations and simulation since they are critical to better assess the impact of clouds on climate variability. The spaceborne lidar onboard CALIPSO, providing cloud vertical profiles since 2006, is used together with a 23-year WRF simulation at 20 km resolution. A lidar simulator helps to compare consistently model with observations. The bias in observations due to the satellite under-sampling is first estimated. Then we examine the vertical variability of both occurrence and properties of clouds. It results that observations indicate a similar occurrence of low and high clouds over continent, and more high than low clouds over the sea except in summer. The simulation shows an overestimate (underestimate) of high (low) clouds comparing to observations, especially in summer. However the seasonal variability of cloud vertical profiles is well captured by WRF. Concerning inter-annual variability, observations show that in winter, those of high clouds is twice the low clouds one, an order of magnitude that is is well simulated. In summer, the observed inter-annual variability is vertically more homogeneous while the model still simulates more variability for high clouds than for low clouds. The good behavior of the simulation in winter allows us to use the 23 years of simulation and 8 years of observations to estimate the time period required to characterize the natural variability of the cloud fraction profile in winter, i.e. the time period required to detect significant anomalies and trends.

  18. Use of Probability Distribution Functions for Discriminating Between Cloud and Aerosol in Lidar Backscatter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, Davd M.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Poole, Lamont R.; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William; McGill, Mathew

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe the algorithm hat will be used during the upcoming Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission for discriminating between clouds and aerosols detected in two wavelength backscatter lidar profiles. We first analyze single-test and multiple-test classification approaches based on one-dimensional and multiple-dimensional probability density functions (PDFs) in the context of a two-class feature identification scheme. From these studies we derive an operational algorithm based on a set of 3-dimensional probability distribution functions characteristic of clouds and aerosols. A dataset acquired by the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) is used to test the algorithm. Comparisons are conducted between the CALIPSO algorithm results and the CPL data product. The results obtained show generally good agreement between the two methods. However, of a total of 228,264 layers analyzed, approximately 5.7% are classified as different types by the CALIPSO and CPL algorithm. This disparity is shown to be due largely to the misclassification of clouds as aerosols by the CPL algorithm. The use of 3-dimensional PDFs in the CALIPSO algorithm is found to significantly reduce this type of error. Dust presents a special case. Because the intrinsic scattering properties of dust layers can be very similar to those of clouds, additional algorithm testing was performed using an optically dense layer of Saharan dust measured during the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE). In general, the method is shown to distinguish reliably between dust layers and clouds. The relatively few erroneous classifications occurred most often in the LITE data, in those regions of the Saharan dust layer where the optical thickness was the highest.

  19. Estimation of Microphysical and Radiative Parameters of Precipitating Cloud Systems Using mm-Wavelength Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, Sergey Y.

    2009-03-01

    A remote sensing approach is described to retrieve cloud and rainfall parameters within the same precipitating system. This approach is based on mm-wavelength radar signal attenuation effects which are observed in a layer of liquid precipitation containing clouds and rainfall. The parameters of ice clouds in the upper part of startiform precipitating systems are then retrieved using the absolute measurements of radar reflectivity. In case of the ground-based radar location, these measurements are corrected for attenuation in the intervening layer of liquid hydrometers.

  20. ETO lidar studies of cirrostratus altocumulogenitus: Another role for supercooled liquid water in cirrus cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    1990-01-01

    Cirrus clouds have traditionally been viewed as cold, wispy, or stratiform ice clouds, typically displaying optical phenomena such as haloes. A composition entirely of hexagonal ice crystals, of one habit or another could only have a transitory existence in cirrus, since the concentrations of ice nuclei (IN) measured by various techniques (at the surface or in the lower troposphere) indicate an enormous number of IN that should be active at cirrus cloud temperatures. In light of recent instrumental aircraft and polarization lidar studies of cirrus clouds, it is clear that highly supercooled cloud droplets can sometimes be a component of cirrus clouds. It remains to be determined if supercooled liquid water (SLW) is present abundantly enough in cirrus to play a significant role in earth's radiance balance, or is merely a curious, infrequent occurrence. To help evaluate this issue, the UH polarization lidar FIRE Extended Time Observation (ETO) of cirrus clouds are being utilized to compile, among other parameters, a climatological record of SLW clouds associated with and within cirrus.

  1. Testing the Parameterizations of Cloud Base Mass-Flux for Shallow Cumulus Clouds using Cloud Radar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, A.; Kollias, P.; Albrecht, B. A.; Zhu, P.; Klein, S. A.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Shallow cumulus clouds have significant impact on the vertical distributions of heat and moisture and on surface energy fluxes over land through their effect on incoming shortwave radiation. The present resolutions of General Circulation Model (GCM) and Numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are not fine enough to simulate shallow clouds directly, leaving not much choice other than parameterizations evaluated using either Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and observations. The representation of these clouds in numerical models is an important and challenging issue in model development, because of its potential impacts on near-surface weather and long-term climate simulations. Recent studies through LES have shown that the mass flux is the important parameter for determining the characteristics of cumulus transports within cloud layer. Based on LES results and scaling arguments, substantial efforts have been made to parameterize the cloud base mass flux to improve the interactions between the subcloud and cloud layer. Despite these efforts, what factors control the mass flux and how the interaction between subcloud and cloud layers should be parameterized is not fully understood. From the observational perspective, studies have been done using aircraft and remote sensing platform to address the above issue; there have been insufficient observations to develop detailed composite studies under different conditions. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in Southern Great Plains (SGP) offers unique long-term measurements from cloud radars (35 and 94 GHz) along with synergetic measurements to address the above problem of non-precipitating shallow cumulus clouds over the SGP region. Doppler velocities from the cloud radar are processed to remove the insect contamination using a fuzzy-logic approach before they are used for the mass-flux calculation. The present observations are used to validate the existing mass-flux relations used in parameterizations. The possible factors [such as, effect of wind shear, transition layer strength, lower tropospheric relative humidity, large-scale vertical velocity and stability (CAPE and CIN)] that affects the mass-flux in addition to the convective velocity (w*) are studied using sounding and ECMWF model dataset. Furthermore, the data are classified based on time of the day, and for various cloud fractions and composite profiles are calculated to define the differences for different regimes.

  2. Lidar Observations of Tropical High-altitude Cirrus Clouds: Results form Dual Wavelength Raman Lidar Measurements During the ALBATROSS Campaign 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuber, R.; Wegener, Alfred; Schrems, O.; McDermid, I. S.

    1997-01-01

    Results from dual wavelength Raman Lidar Observations of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds are reported. Based on 107 hours of night-time measurements cirrus cloud were present in more than 50% of the observations at latitudes between 23.5 degress S and 23.5 degrees N and altitudes between 11 and 16km.

  3. Feature extraction from 3D lidar point clouds using image processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ling; Shortridge, Ashton; Lusch, David; Shi, Ruoming

    2011-10-01

    Airborne LiDAR data have become cost-effective to produce at local and regional scales across the United States and internationally. These data are typically collected and processed into surface data products by contractors for state and local communities. Current algorithms for advanced processing of LiDAR point cloud data are normally implemented in specialized, expensive software that is not available for many users, and these users are therefore unable to experiment with the LiDAR point cloud data directly for extracting desired feature classes. The objective of this research is to identify and assess automated, readily implementable GIS procedures to extract features like buildings, vegetated areas, parking lots and roads from LiDAR data using standard image processing tools, as such tools are relatively mature with many effective classification methods. The final procedure adopted employs four distinct stages. First, interpolation is used to transfer the 3D points to a high-resolution raster. Raster grids of both height and intensity are generated. Second, multiple raster maps - a normalized surface model (nDSM), difference of returns, slope, and the LiDAR intensity map - are conflated to generate a multi-channel image. Third, a feature space of this image is created. Finally, supervised classification on the feature space is implemented. The approach is demonstrated in both a conceptual model and on a complex real-world case study, and its strengths and limitations are addressed.

  4. Depolarization ratio and attenuated backscatter for nine cloud types: analyses based on collocated CALIPSO lidar and MODIS measurements.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyoun-Myoung; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W; Nasiri, Shaima L; Hu, Yongxiang; Minnis, Patrick; Trepte, Charles; Winker, David

    2008-03-17

    This paper reports on the relationship between lidar backscatter and the corresponding depolarization ratio for nine types of cloud systems. The data used in this study are the lidar returns measured by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aboard the Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite and the collocated cloud products derived from the observations made by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Aqua satellite. Specifically, the operational MODIS cloud optical thickness and cloud-top pressure products are used to classify cloud types on the basis of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud classification scheme. While the CALIPSO observations provide information for up to 10 cloud layers, in the present study only the uppermost clouds are considered. The layer-averaged attenuated backscatter (gamma') and layer-averaged depolarization ratio (delta) from the CALIPSO measurements show both water- and ice-phase features for global cirrus, cirrostratus, and deep convective cloud classes. Furthermore, we screen both the MODIS and CALIPSO data to eliminate cases in which CALIPSO detected two- or multi-layered clouds. It is shown that low gamma' values corresponding to uppermost thin clouds are largely eliminated in the CALIPSO delta-gamma' relationship for single-layered clouds. For mid-latitude and polar regions corresponding, respectively, to latitude belts 30 degrees -60 degrees and 60 degrees -90 degrees in both the hemispheres, a mixture of water and ice is also observed in the case of the altostratus class. MODIS cloud phase flags are also used to screen ice clouds. The resultant water clouds flagged by the MODIS algorithm show only water phase feature in the delta-gamma' relation observed by CALIOP; however, in the case of the ice clouds flagged by the MODIS algorithm, the co-existence of ice- and water-phase clouds is still observed in the CALIPSO delta-gamma' relationship. PMID:18542490

  5. NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor and Clouds During IHOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Demoz, Belay; DiGirolamo, Paolo; Comer, Joe; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Rei-Fong; Evans, Keith; Veselovskii, Igor

    2004-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) participated in the International H2O Project (IHOP) that occurred in May and June, 2002 in the midwestern part of the U.S. The SRL acquired measurements of water vapor, aerosols, cloud liquid and ice water, and temperature for more than 200 hours during IHOP. Here we report on the SRL water vapor and cirrus cloud measurements with particular emphasis being given to the measurements of June 19-20, 2002, which are motivating cirrus cloud model comparison studies.

  6. CALIPSO: Global Aerosol and Cloud Observations from Lidar and Passive Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Winker, D. M.; Pelon, J. R.; McCormick, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations) is an approved satellite mission being developed through collaboration between NASA and the French space agency CNES. The mission is scheduled for launch in 2004 and will operate for 3 years as part of a five-satellite formation called the Aqua constellation. This constellation will provide a unique data set on aerosol and cloud optical and physical properties and aerosol-cloud interactions that will substantially increase our understanding of the climate system and the potential for climate change.

  7. Automatic large-volume object region segmentation in LiDAR point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, Nina M.; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2014-10-01

    LiDAR is a remote sensing method which produces precise point clouds consisting of millions of geo-spatially located 3D data points. Because of the nature of LiDAR point clouds, it can often be difficult for analysts to accurately and efficiently recognize and categorize objects. The goal of this paper is automatic large-volume object region segmentation in LiDAR point clouds. This efficient segmentation technique is intended to be a pre- processing step for the eventual classification of objects within the point cloud. The data is initially segmented into local histogram bins. This local histogram bin representation allows for the efficient consolidation of the point cloud data into voxels without the loss of location information. Additionally, by binning the points, important feature information can be extracted, such as the distribution of points, the density of points and a local ground. From these local histograms, a 3D automatic seeded region growing technique is applied. This technique performs seed selection based on two criteria, similarity and Euclidean distance to nearest neighbors. The neighbors of selected seeds are then examined and assigned labels based on location and Euclidean distance to a region mean. After the initial segmentation step, region integration is performed to rejoin over-segmented regions. The large amount of points in LiDAR data can make other segmentation techniques extremely time consuming. In addition to producing accurate object segmentation results, the proposed local histogram binning process allows for efficient segmentation, covering a point cloud of over 9,000 points in 10 seconds.

  8. Mobile multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar for water vapor, cloud and aerosol measurement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songhua; Song, Xiaoquan; Liu, Bingyi; Dai, Guangyao; Liu, Jintao; Zhang, Kailin; Qin, Shengguang; Hua, Dengxin; Gao, Fei; Liu, Liping

    2015-12-28

    Aiming at the detection of atmospheric water vapor mixing ratio, depolarization ratio, backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient and cloud information, the Water vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WACAL) is developed by the lidar group at Ocean University of China. The lidar consists of transmitter, receiver, data acquisition and auxiliary system. For the measurement of various atmospheric physical properties, three channels including Raman channel, polarization channel and infrared channel are integrated in WACAL. The integration and working principle of these channels are introduced in details. The optical setup, the housekeeping of the system and the data retrieval routines are also presented. After the completion of the construction of the lidar, the WACAL system was installed in Ocean University of China (36.165N, 120.5E), Qingdao for the measurement of atmosphere during 2013 and 2014. The measurement principles and some case studies corresponding to various atmospheric physical properties are provided. Finally, the result of one continuous measurement example operated on 13 June 2014 is presented. The WACAL can measure the aerosol and cloud optical properties as well as the water vapor mixing ratio. It is useful for studying the direct and indirect effects of the aerosol on the climate change. PMID:26832047

  9. Advances in Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor, Cirrus Clouds and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Potter, John R.; Tola, Rebecca; Rush, Kurt; Veselovskii, Igor; Cadirola, Martin; Comer, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Narrow-band interference filters with improved transmission in the ultraviolet have been developed under NASA-funded research and used in the Raman Airborne Spectroscopic Lidar (RASL) in ground- based, upward-looking tests. RASL is an airborne Raman Lidar system designed to measure water vapor mixing ratio, and aerosol backscatter/extinction/depolarization. It also possesses the capability to make experimental measurements of cloud liquid water and carbon dioxide. It is being prepared for first flight tests during the summer of 2006. With the newly developed filters installed in RASL, measurements were made of atmospheric water vapor, cirrus cloud optical properties and carbon dioxide that improve upon any previously demonstrated using Raman lidar. Daytime boundary layer profiling of water vapor mixing ratio is performed with less than 5% random error using temporal and spatial resolution of 2-minutes and 60 - 210, respectively. Daytime cirrus cloud optical depth and extinction- to-backscatter ratio measurements are made using 1-minute average. Sufficient signal strength is demonstrated to permit the simultaneous profiling of carbon dioxide and water vapor mixing ratio into the free troposphere during the nighttime. Downward-looking from an airborne RASL should possess the same measurement statistics with approximately a factor of 5 - 10 decrease in averaging time. A description of the technology improvements are provided followed by examples of the improved Raman lidar measurements.

  10. Using LiDAR, RADAR, and Optical data to improve a NFMS in Kalimantan, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, S. C.; Saatchi, S. S.; Braswell, B. H., Jr.; Palace, M. W.; Salas, W.; Walker, S.; Hoekman, D.; Ipsan, C.; Brown, S.; Sullivan, F.

    2014-12-01

    Around the world, governments are establishing national forest monitoring systems (NFMS) that use a combination of remote sensing and ground-based forest carbon inventory approaches to estimate anthropogenic forest-related greenhouse gas emissions and removals. The NFMS forms the link between historical assessments and current/future assessments of forests, enabling consistency in the data and information to support the implementation of REDD+ activities. The creation of a reliable, transparent, and comprehensive NFMS is currently limited by a dearth of relevant data that are accurate, low-cost, and spatially resolved at subnational scales. With funding from a 3-year NASA Carbon Monitoring System project beginning in September 2013, we are developing, evaluating, and validating several critical components of an NFMS in Kalimantan, Indonesia, focusing on the use of LiDAR and radar imagery for improved carbon stock and forest degradation information. Here, we present results from an initial analysis of a spatially extensive set of LiDAR data collected across the Indonesian provinces on the island of Borneo together with RADAR and optical data. Our objectives are to evaluate sensor and platform tradeoffs systematically against in situ investments, as well as provide detailed tracking and characterization of uncertainty in a cost-benefit framework. Kalimantan is an ideal area to evaluate the use of remote sensing methods because measuring forest carbon stocks and their human caused changes with a high degree of certainty on the ground can be difficult. While our work focuses at the subnational scale for Kalimantan, we are targeting these methods for applicability across broader geographies and for implementation at various scales.

  11. Monitoring water levels by integrating optical and synthetic aperture radar water masks with lidar DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, C.; Brisco, B.; Patterson, S.

    2014-12-01

    The ability to map and monitor wetland and lake open water extent and levels across the landscape allows improved estimates of watershed water balance, surface storage and flood inundation. The study presents open water classifications over the wetland dominated Sheppard Slough watershed east of Calgary in western Canada using parallel temporal imagery captured from the RapidEye and RadarSat satellites throughout 2013, a year of widespread and costly flood inundation in this region. The optical and SAR-based temporal image stacks were integrated with a high-resolution lidar DEM in order to delineate regions of inundation on the DEM surface. GIS techniques were developed to extract lidar-derived water surface elevations and track the spatio-temporal variation in pond and lake water level across the watershed. Water bodies were assigned unique identifiers so that levels could be tracked and linked to their associated watershed channel reach. The procedure of optical image classification through to merging of individual water bodies into watershed channel topology and extracting reach water levels has been automated within python scripts. The presentation will describe: i) the procedures used; ii) a comparison of the SAR and optical classification and water level extraction results; iii) a discussion of the spatio-temporal variations in water level across the Sheppard Slough watershed; and iv) a commentary on how the approach could be implemented for web-based operational monitoring and as simulation initialisation inputs for flood inundation model studies.

  12. Aerosol and cloud typing with an automated 24/7 aerosol lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, Holger; Seifert, Patric; Wandinger, Ulla

    2015-04-01

    Modern sophisticated multi-wavelength Raman polarization lidars have the ability to measure autonomous and unattended in 24/7 mode. These aerosol lidars can deliver backscatter, extinction, and depolarization profiles of the atmosphere which can be used for a target categorization, i.e. the determination of different aerosol and cloud types. However, to derive the optical particle properties a calibration of the lidar signals in the free atmosphere, where only Rayleigh scattering occurs, is needed. This calibration is usually done manually case by case and thus prohibits automatic data analysis and particle typing. To overcome this limitation, the mobile EARLINET lidar PollyXT of TROPOS was deployed continuously without changes in the instrumental setup during two field campaigns in the framework of the German HD(CP)2 project to obtain temporally stable lidar signals. The temporal stability together with the high performance and good characterization of the lidar lead to the possibility of an absolute lidar calibration. The corresponding calibration constant was derived in two ways: first by using manually Raman and Klett retrievals for selected periods and second by using the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from co-located AERONET sun photometer measurements. The derived calibration constants show a high temporal stability and a good agreement between both methods and thus allowed the continuous calibration of the lidar and the retrieval of the attenuated backscatter coefficient at three wavelengths. In addition, the calibrated volume depolarization ratio, obtained following EARLINET recommendations, is continuously available. After correction for the molecular contribution, these four quantities were used for an aerosol and cloud typing in terms of particle size and shape. The final categorization leads to 11 categories, e.g. clean atmosphere, small spherical particles, large non-spherical particles, water droplets, ice crystals and corresponding mixtures. In this contribution, the application of this methodology for several case studies and the statistical analysis from the two field campaigns will be shown. For future applications it is planned to implement this approach in the CLOUDNET retrieval at sites for which an appropriate lidar is available to make use of the full instrument synergy which is required for advanced aerosol-cloud-interaction studies.

  13. The Polarization Lidar Technique for Cloud Research: A Review and Current Assessment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, Kenneth

    1991-12-01

    The development of the polarization lidar field over the past two decades is reviewed, and the current cloud-research capabilities and limitations are evaluated. Relying on fundamental scattering principles governing the interaction of polarized laser light with distinctly shaped hydrometers, this remote-sensing technique has contributed to our knowledge of the composition and structure of a variety of cloud types. For example, polarization lidar is a key component of current climate-research programs to characterize the properties of cirrus clouds, and is an integral part of multiple remote-sensor studies of mixed-phase cloud systems, such as winter mountain storms. Although unambiguous cloud-phase discrimination and the identification of some ice particle types and orientations are demonstrated capabilities, recent theoretical approaches involving ice crystal ray-tracing and cloud microphysical model simulations are, promising to increase the utility of the technique. New results simulating the single and multiple scattering properties of precipitating mixed-phase clouds are given for illustration of such methods.

  14. Analysis of Cassegrain Cloud Profiling Radar Antenna with Arbitrary Projected Apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussein, Z.; Im, E.

    2000-01-01

    A millimeter wave Cassegrain dual-reflector rada antenna (94GHz) with super-quadric projected aperture boundaries concept, that includes sub-reflector blockage effect, is evaluated for the spaceborne radar measurement of the vertical cloud profile structure.

  15. An Unattended Cloud-Profiling Radar for Use in Climate Research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Kenneth P.; Martner, Brooks E.; Post, M. J.; Kropfli, Robert A.; Welsh, David C.; Widener, Kevin B.

    1998-03-01

    A new millimeter-wave cloud radar (MMCR) has been designed to provide detailed, long-term observations of nonprecipitating and weakly precipitating clouds at Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Scientific requirements included excellent sensitivity and vertical resolution to detect weak and thin multiple layers of ice and liquid water clouds over the sites and long-term, unattended operations in remote locales. In response to these requirements, the innovative radar design features a vertically pointing, single-polarization, Doppler system operating at 35 GHz (Ka band). It uses a low-peak-power transmitter for long-term reliability and high-gain antenna and pulse-compressed waveforms to maximize sensitivity and resolution. The radar uses the same kind of signal processor as that used in commercial wind profilers. The first MMCR began operations at the CART in northern Oklahoma in late 1996 and has operated continuously there for thousands of hours. It routinely provides remarkably detailed images of the ever-changing cloud structure and kinematics over this densely instrumented site. Examples of the data are presented. The radar measurements will greatly improve quantitative documentation of cloud conditions over the CART sites and will bolster ARM research to understand how clouds impact climate through their effects on radiative transfer. Millimeter-wave radars such as the MMCR also have potential applications in the fields of aviation weather, weather modification, and basic cloud physics research.

  16. The eyesafe visioceilometer - A tactical visibility and cloud height lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, E. S.; Lentz, W. J.

    A recent breakthrough in the mathematical solution to the lidar equation combined with state-of-the-art microelectronics has made it possible to produce the first portable ceiling, visibility, and rangefinding device suitable for tactical use by the U.S. Army. The signal processor of the former XE-2 (Nd:YAG) can be adapted to an eyesafe unit by making use of an erbium glass laser and a GaInAs PIN photodiode detector. It is pointed out that the XE-3 (Eyesafe Visioceilometer) provides tactical real-time data when and where the user needs it, with an accuracy superior to existing nonportable runway equipment. Attention is given to system evolution, lidar theory, the relationship of backscattering and extinction coefficients, a system description, the transient recorder, the analysis of data, and details regarding tactical applications.

  17. Fingerprints of a riming event on cloud radar Doppler spectra: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalesse, H.; Szyrmer, W.; Kneifel, S.; Kollias, P.; Luke, E.

    2015-10-01

    Radar Doppler spectra measurements are exploited to study a riming event when precipitating ice from a seeder cloud sediments through a supercooled liquid water (SLW) layer. The observations were collected during the deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (ARM) mobile facility AMF2 at Hyytiälä, Finland during the BAECC (Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate Snowfall Experiment) field campaign. The presented analysis of the height evolution of the radar Doppler spectra is a state-of-the-art retrieval with profiling cloud radars in SLW layers beyond the traditional use of spectral moments. Dynamical effects are taken into account by following the particle population evolution along slanted tracks that are caused by horizontal advection of the cloud under wind shear conditions. In the SLW layer, the identified liquid peak is used as an air motion tracer to correct the Doppler spectra for vertical air motion and the ice peak is used to study the radar profiles of rimed particles. A 1-D steady-state bin microphysical model is constrained using the SLW and air motion profiles and cloud top radar observations. The observed radar moment profiles of the rimed snow can be simulated reasonably well by the model, but not without making several assumptions about the ice particle concentration and the relative role of deposition and aggregation. This suggests that in-situ observations of key ice properties are needed to complement the profiling radar observations before process-oriented studies can effectively evaluate ice microphysical parameterizations.

  18. Effects of Cloud on Goddard Lidar Observatory for Wind (GLOW) Performance and Analysis of Associated Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacha, Tulu

    The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Wind (GLOW), a mobile direct detection Doppler LIDAR based on molecular backscattering for measurement of wind in the troposphere and lower stratosphere region of atmosphere is operated and its errors characterized. It was operated at Howard University Beltsville Center for Climate Observation System (BCCOS) side by side with other operating instruments: the NASA/Langely Research Center Validation Lidar (VALIDAR), Leosphere WLS70, and other standard wind sensing instruments. The performance of Goddard Lidar Observatory for Wind (GLOW) is presented for various optical thicknesses of cloud conditions. It was also compared to VALIDAR under various conditions. These conditions include clear and cloudy sky regions. The performance degradation due to the presence of cirrus clouds is quantified by comparing the wind speed error to cloud thickness. The cloud thickness is quantified in terms of aerosol backscatter ratio (ASR) and cloud optical depth (COD). ASR and COD are determined from Howard University Raman Lidar (HURL) operating at the same station as GLOW. The wind speed error of GLOW was correlated with COD and aerosol backscatter ratio (ASR) which are determined from HURL data. The correlation related in a weak linear relationship. Finally, the wind speed measurements of GLOW were corrected using the quantitative relation from the correlation relations. Using ASR reduced the GLOW wind error from 19% to 8% in a thin cirrus cloud and from 58% to 28% in a relatively thick cloud. After correcting for cloud induced error, the remaining error is due to shot noise and atmospheric variability. Shot-noise error is the statistical random error of backscattered photons detected by photon multiplier tube (PMT) can only be minimized by averaging large number of data recorded. The atmospheric backscatter measured by GLOW along its line-of-sight direction is also used to analyze error due to atmospheric variability within the volume of measurement. GLOW scans in five different directions (vertical and at elevation angles of 45 in north, south, east, and west) to generate wind profiles. The non-uniformity of the atmosphere in all scanning directions is a factor contributing to the measurement error of GLOW. The atmospheric variability in the scanning region leads to difference in the intensity of backscattered signals for scanning directions. Taking the ratio of the north (east) to south (west) and comparing the statistical differences lead to a weak linear relation between atmospheric variability and line-of-sights wind speed differences. This relation was used to make correction which reduced by about 50%.

  19. Performance assessment of a triple-frequency spaceborne cloud-precipitation radar concept using a global cloud-resolving model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinonen, J.; Lebsock, M. D.; Tanelli, S.; Suzuki, K.; Yashiro, H.; Miyamoto, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Multi-frequency radars offer enhanced detection of clouds and precipitation compared to single-frequency systems, and are able to make more accurate retrievals when several frequencies are available simultaneously. An evaluation of a spaceborne three-frequency Ku-/Ka-/W-band radar system is presented in this study, based on modeling radar reflectivities from the results of a global cloud-resolving model with a 875 m grid spacing. To produce the reflectivities, a scattering model has been developed for each of the hydrometeor types produced by the model, as well as for melting snow. The effects of attenuation and multiple scattering on the radar signal are modeled using a radiative transfer model, while nonuniform beam filling is reproduced with spatial averaging. The combined effects of these are then quantified both globally and in six localized case studies. Two different orbital scenarios using the same radar are compared. Overall, based on the results, it is expected that the proposed radar would detect a high-quality signal in most clouds and precipitation. The main exceptions are the thinnest clouds that are below the detection threshold of the W-band channel, and at the opposite end of the scale, heavy convective rainfall where a combination of attenuation, multiple scattering and nonuniform beam filling commonly cause significant deterioration of the signal; thus, while the latter can be generally detected, the quality of the retrievals is likely to be degraded.

  20. Performance assessment of a triple-frequency spaceborne cloud-precipitation radar concept using a global cloud-resolving model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinonen, J.; Lebsock, M. D.; Tanelli, S.; Suzuki, K.; Yashiro, H.; Miyamoto, Y.

    2015-04-01

    Multi-frequency radars offer enhanced detection of clouds and precipitation compared to single-frequency systems, and are able to make more accurate retrievals when several frequencies are available simultaneously. An evaluation of a spaceborne three-frequency Ku/Ka/W-band radar system is presented in this study, based on modeling radar reflectivities from the results of a global cloud-resolving model with a 875 m grid spacing. To produce the reflectivities, a scattering model has been developed for each of the hydrometeor types produced by the model, as well as for melting snow. The effects of attenuation and multiple scattering on the radar signal are modeled using a radiative transfer model, while nonuniform beam filling is reproduced with spatial averaging. The combined effects of these are then quantified both globally and in five localized case studies. Two different orbital scenarios using the same radar are compared. Overall, based on the results, it is expected that the proposed radar would detect a high-quality signal in most clouds and precipitation. The main exceptions are the thinnest clouds that are below the detection threshold of the W-band channel, and at the opposite end of the scale, heavy convective rainfall where a combination of attenuation, multiple scattering and nonuniform beam filling commonly cause significant deterioration of the signal; thus, while the latter can be generally detected, the quality of the retrievals is likely to be degraded.

  1. Global distribution of instantaneous daytime radiative effects of high thin clouds observed by the cloud profiling radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Greenwald, Thomas J.; Yang, Ping; Ackerman, Steve; Huang, Hung-Lung

    2010-09-01

    The instantaneous daytime geographical distribution and radiative effects of high thin clouds (optical thickness < 5) are investigated on the basis of the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) radiative flux and cloud classification products. The regional features of the fraction and radiative effects of high thin clouds are associated with ITCZ, SPCZ and mid-latitude storm track regions. High thin clouds have positive net cloud-induced radiative effect (CRE) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and negative net CRE at the bottom of the atmosphere (BOA). The magnitudes of TOA and BOA CREs depend on cloud optical thickness, cloud fraction and geographical location. The magnitude of the net CRE of high thin clouds increases at both TOA and BOA as cloud optical thickness increases. Net CRE at both TOA and BOA contributes to a positive net CRE in-atmosphere and warms the atmosphere regardless of cloud fraction. The global annual mean of the net CRE multiplied by cloud fraction is 0.49 W/m2 at TOA, -0.54 W/m2 at BOA and 1.03 W/m2 in-atmosphere. The most radiatively effective cloud optical thickness of a high thin cloud is between 1-2 for the TOA and in-atmosphere CREs or 3-4 for the BOA CRE.

  2. A Multi-Frequency Wide-Swath Spaceborne Cloud and Precipitation Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Racette, Paul; Heymsfield, Gary; McLinden, Matthew; Venkatesh, Vijay; Coon, Michael; Perrine, Martin; Park, Richard; Cooley, Michael; Stenger, Pete; Spence, Thomas; Retelny, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Microwave and millimeter-wave radars have proven their effectiveness in cloud and precipitation observations. The NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey (DS) Aerosol, Cloud and Ecosystems (ACE) mission calls for a dual-frequency cloud radar (W band 94 GHz and Ka-band 35 GHz) for global measurements of cloud microphysical properties. Recently, there have been discussions of utilizing a tri-frequency (KuKaW-band) radar for a combined ACE and Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) follow-on mission that has evolved into the Cloud and Precipitation Process Mission (CaPPM) concept. In this presentation we will give an overview of the technology development efforts at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and at Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems (NGES) through projects funded by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). Our primary objective of this research is to advance the key enabling technologies for a tri-frequency (KuKaW-band) shared-aperture spaceborne imaging radar to provide unprecedented, simultaneous multi-frequency measurements that will enhance understanding of the effects of clouds and precipitation and their interaction on Earth climate change. Research effort has been focused on concept design and trade studies of the tri-frequency radar; investigating architectures that provide tri-band shared-aperture capability; advancing the development of the Ka band active electronically scanned array (AESA) transmitreceive (TR) module, and development of the advanced radar backend electronics.

  3. Polar stratospheric clouds observed by lidar at McMurdo Station during the 1993 winter

    SciTech Connect

    Adriani, A.; Gobbi, G.P.; Donfrancesco, G.D.

    1994-12-31

    Since 1990, a lidar system has been operating at McMurdo Station (78{degrees}S 167{degrees}E) during the local spring. In 1993, it performed measurements between 1 March and 10 October. The lidar can monitor the presence of clouds by measuring the light backscattered from the atmosphere. After system calibration, the received signal is compared with the one expected from an atmosphere not containing particles. On such a basis, a parameter called backscattering ratio, R, is calculated. When particles are not present R is 1. Any value larger than 1 is related to the presence of particles. Lidar can be used to monitor clouds in the lower stratosphere (polar stratospheric clouds - PSCs- or volcanic clouds). PSCs have an important role in the heterogeneous chemistry of the polar stratosphere, and their presence is strictly linked with the `ozone hole`. During the 1993 winter and spring, the antarctic stratosphere still presented a measurable amount of volcanic aerosol from the Mount Pinatubo eruption. The volcanic aerosols facilitated the formation of PSCs observed during the 1993 winter because they need condensation nuclei to form. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor and Cirrus Clouds During the Passage of Hurricane Bonnie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Demoz, B.; Starr, D. OC; Tobin, D.; Feltz, W.; Jedlovec, G. J.; Gutman, S. I.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Cardirola, M.; Melfi, S. H.; Schmidlin, F. J.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was stationed on Andros Island in the Bahamas during August - September, 1998 as a part of the third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) which focussed on hurricane development and tracking. During the period August 21 - 24, hurricane Bonnie passed near Andros Island and influenced the water vapor and cirrus cloud measurements acquired by the SRL. Two drying signatures related to the hurricane were recorded by the SRL (Scanning Raman Lidar) and other sensors. Cirrus cloud optical depths (at 351 nm) were also measured during this period. Optical depth values ranged from approximately 0.01 to 1.4. The influence of multiple scattering on these optical depth measurements was studied with the conclusion that the measured values of optical depth are less than the actual value by up to 20% . The UV/IR cirrus cloud optical depth ratio was estimated based on a comparison of lidar and GOES measurements. Simple radiative transfer model calculations compared with GOES satellite brightness temperatures indicate that satellite radiances are significantly affected by the presence of cirrus clouds if IR optical depths are approximately 0.02 or greater. This has implications for satellite cirrus detection requirements.

  5. Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Properties from AERI Lidar Observations: Algorithm and Results from SHEBA

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David D.

    2005-04-01

    A new approach to retrieve microphysical properties from mixed-phase Arctic clouds is presented. This mixed-phase cloud property retrieval algorithm (MIXCRA) retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective radius of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance and lidar cloud boundary observations. The theoretical basis for this technique is that the absorption coefficient of ice is greater than that of liquid water from 10 to 13 ?m, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16 to 25 ?m. MIXCRA retrievals are only valid for optically thin (?visible < 6) single-layer clouds when the precipitable water vapor is less than 1 cm. MIXCRA was applied to the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data that were collected during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment from November 1997 to May 1998, where 63% of all of the cloudy scenes above the SHEBA site met this specification. The retrieval determined that approximately 48% of these clouds were mixed phase and that a significant number of clouds (during all 7 months) contained liquid water, even for cloud temperatures as low as 240 K. The retrieved distributions of effective radii for water and ice particles in single-phase clouds are shown to be different than the effective radii in mixed-phase clouds.

  6. On the combined use of satellite multispectral and radar polarimetric measurements to infer cloud microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celano, M.; Porcù, F.; Alberoni, P. P.; Prodi, F.

    2008-10-01

    The extensive availability of multispectral satellite observations and polarimetric ground radar measurements enhances the remote sensing capabilities in studying structure and dynamics of cloud systems at all relevant scales. We present here a combined approach to perform a detailed cloud vertical structure analysis, by means of MODIS VIS-NIR products and C-band polarimetric radar data. Satellite products include estimates of cloud optical thickness, cloud particles effective radius and cloud top phase, to be matched with the polarimetric hydrometeor 3D classification as obtained by a fuzzy logic algorithm. The problem of matching of the two datasets is discussed and the procedure is applied to three case studies that occurred in Northern Italy. Results are presented in terms of vertical hydrometeor profile and satellite derived microphysical cloud properties, showing the capability of the combined approach in the 3D rendering of cloud structures, with envisaged applications for precipitation studies and data assimilation in meteorological models.

  7. Octree-based segmentation for terrestrial LiDAR point cloud data in industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yun-Ting; Bethel, James; Hu, Shuowen

    2016-03-01

    Automated and efficient algorithms to perform segmentation of terrestrial LiDAR data is critical for exploitation of 3D point clouds, where the ultimate goal is CAD modeling of the segmented data. In this work, a novel segmentation technique is proposed, starting with octree decomposition to recursively divide the scene into octants or voxels, followed by a novel split and merge framework that uses graph theory and a series of connectivity analyses to intelligently merge components into larger connected components. The connectivity analysis, based on a combination of proximity, orientation, and curvature connectivity criteria, is designed for the segmentation of pipes, vessels, and walls from terrestrial LiDAR data of piping systems at industrial sites, such as oil refineries, chemical plants, and steel mills. The proposed segmentation method is exercised on two terrestrial LiDAR datasets of a steel mill and a chemical plant, demonstrating its ability to correctly reassemble and segregate features of interest.

  8. Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor and Cirrus Clouds During The Passage of Hurricane Bonnie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Demoz, B.; Starr, D OC.; Eloranta, E. W.; Tobin, D.; Feltz, W.; Jedlovec, G. J.; Gutman, S. I.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was stationed on Andros Island in the Bahamas during August - September, 1998 as a part of the third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) which focussed on hurricane development and tracking. During the period August 21 - 24, hurricane Bonnie passed near Andros Island and influenced the water vapor and cirrus cloud measurements acquired by the SRL. Two drying signatures related to the hurricane were recorded by the SRL and other sensors. Cirrus cloud optical depths (at 351 nm) were also measured during this period. Optical depth values ranged from less than 0.01 to 1.5. The influence of multiple scattering on these optical depth measurements was studied. A correction technique is presented which minimizes the influences of multiple scattering and derives information about cirrus cloud optical and physical properties. The UV/IR cirrus cloud optical depth ratio was estimated based on a comparison of lidar and GOES measurements. Simple radiative transfer model calculations compared with GOES satellite brightness temperatures indicate that satellite radiances are significantly affected by the presence of cirrus clouds if IR optical depths are approximately 0.005 or greater. Using the ISCCP detection threshold for cirrus clouds on the GOES data presented here, a high bias of up to 40% in the GOES precipitable water retrieval was found.

  9. Lidar Investigation of Tropical Nocturnal Boundary Layer Aerosols and Cloud Macrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Manoj, M. G.; Devara, PC S.; Taraphdar, Sourav

    2013-10-01

    Observational evidence of two-way association between nocturnal boundary layer aerosols and cloud macrophysical properties under different meteorological conditions is reported in this paper. The study has been conducted during 2008-09 employing a high space-time resolution polarimetric micro-pulse lidar over a tropical urban station in India. Firstly, the study highlights the crucial role of boundary layer aerosols and background meteorology on the formation and structure of low-level stratiform clouds in the backdrop of different atmospheric stability conditions. Turbulent mixing induced by the wind shear at the station, which is associated with a complex terrain, is found to play a pivotal role in the formation and structural evolution of nocturnal boundary layer clouds. Secondly, it is shown that the trapping of energy in the form of outgoing terrestrial radiation by the overlying low-level clouds can enhance the aerosol mixing height associated with the nocturnal boundary layer. To substantiate this, the long-wave heating associated with cloud capping has been quantitatively estimated in an indirect way by employing an Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model version 2.2 developed by National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, USA, and supplementary data sets; and differentiated against other heating mechanisms. The present investigation as well establishes the potential of lidar remote-sensing technique in exploring some of the intriguing aspects of the cloud-environment relationship.

  10. Remote sensing measurements of the CO2 mixing ratio in the planetary boundary layer using cloud slicing with airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, Anand K.; Mao, Jianping; Abshire, James B.; Allan, Graham R.

    2015-03-01

    We have measured the CO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR) within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using cloud slicing with an airborne pulsed integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar from flight altitudes of up to 13 km. During a flight over Iowa in summer 2011, simultaneous measurement of the optical range and CO2 absorption to clouds and the ground were made using time-resolved detection of pulse echoes from each scattering surface. We determined the CO2 absorption in the PBL by differencing the two lidar-measured absorption line shapes, one to a broken shallow cumulus cloud layer located at the top of the PBL and the other to the ground. Solving for the CO2 VMR in the PBL and that of the free troposphere, we measured a ?15 ppm (4%) drawdown in the PBL. Both CO2 VMRs were within ?3 ppm of in situ CO2 profile measurements. We have also demonstrated cloud slicing using scatter from thin, diffuse cirrus clouds and cumulus clouds, which allowed solving for the CO2 VMR for three vertical layers. The technique and retrieval algorithm are applicable to a space-based lidar instrument as well as to lidar IPDA measurements of other trace gases. Thus, lidar cloud slicing also offers promise toward space-based remote sensing of vertical trace gas profiles in the atmosphere using a variety of clouds.

  11. Cloud vertical structures detected by lidar and its statistical results at HeRO site in Hefei, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lu; Liu, Dong; Wang, Zhien; Wang, Zhenzhu; Wu, Decheng; Bo, Guangyu; Wang, Yingjian

    2014-11-01

    Extensive studies have illustrated the importance of obtaining exact vertical structures of clouds and aerosols for satellite and relevant climate simulations. However, challenging exists, for example, in distinguishing clouds from aerosols at times. Accurate cloud vertical profiles are mainly determined by cloud bases and heights. Based on the ground-based lidar observations in Hefei Radiation Observatory (HeRO), the vertical structures of clouds and aerosols in Hefei area(31.89N 117.17E) during May 2012-May 2014 have been investigated. The results show that the cloud fraction in the autumn and winter is less than that in the summer and spring, and is largest in the spring followed by the summer. The cloud fractions in the autumn and winter are comparable. The low cloud accounts for the most portion of the total. Compared with the cloud of the other heights, the high cloud is the least in the winter. Nearly 50% of the total vertical profiles can be detected by lidar as clouds and the proportion of the cloud of different heights seems to be stable annually. The fraction of low cloud is nearly 45%, medium cloud is nearly 35%, and high cloud is nearly 20%. In comparison with the results derived from CALIPSO, it is found that high cloud is usually missed for the ground-based lidar, while low cloud is usually omitted for the satellite observations. A combination of ground-based and space-borne lidar could lead to more reliable results. Further analysis will be performed in future studies.

  12. Validation of Satellite-Based Objective Overshooting Cloud-Top Detection Methods Using CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedka, Kristopher M.; Dworak, Richard; Brunner, Jason; Feltz, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Two satellite infrared-based overshooting convective cloud-top (OT) detection methods have recently been described in the literature: 1) the 11-mm infrared window channel texture (IRW texture) method, which uses IRW channel brightness temperature (BT) spatial gradients and thresholds, and 2) the water vapor minus IRW BT difference (WV-IRW BTD). While both methods show good performance in published case study examples, it is important to quantitatively validate these methods relative to overshooting top events across the globe. Unfortunately, no overshooting top database currently exists that could be used in such study. This study examines National Aeronautics and Space Administration CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar data to develop an OT detection validation database that is used to evaluate the IRW-texture and WV-IRW BTD OT detection methods. CloudSat data were manually examined over a 1.5-yr period to identify cases in which the cloud top penetrates above the tropopause height defined by a numerical weather prediction model and the surrounding cirrus anvil cloud top, producing 111 confirmed overshooting top events. When applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R Series (GOES-R) Advanced Baseline Imager proxy data, the IRW-texture (WV-IRW BTD) method offered a 76% (96%) probability of OT detection (POD) and 16% (81%) false-alarm ratio. Case study examples show that WV-IRW BTD.0 K identifies much of the deep convective cloud top, while the IRW-texture method focuses only on regions with a spatial scale near that of commonly observed OTs. The POD decreases by 20% when IRW-texture is applied to current geostationary imager data, highlighting the importance of imager spatial resolution for observing and detecting OT regions.

  13. Retrieval of Atmospheric CO2 Concentration above Clouds and Cloud Top Pressure from Airborne Lidar Measurements during ASCENDS Science Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Rodriguez, M.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Kawa, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    NASA Goddard is developing an integrated-path, differential absorption (IPDA) lidar approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations from space as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) mission. The approach uses pulsed lasers to measure both CO2 and O2 absorption simultaneously in the vertical path to the surface at a number of wavelengths across a CO2 line at 1572.335 nm and an O2 line doublet near 764.7 nm. Measurements of time-resolved laser backscatter profiles from the atmosphere allow the technique to estimate column CO2 and O2 number density and range to cloud tops in addition to those to the ground. This allows retrievals of CO2 column above clouds and cloud top pressure, and all-sky measurement capability from space. This additional information can be used to evaluate atmospheric transport processes and other remote sensing carbon data in the free atmosphere, improve carbon data assimilation in models and help global and regional carbon flux estimates. We show some preliminary results of this capability using airborne lidar measurements from the summers of 2011 and 2014 ASCENDS science campaigns. These show simultaneous retrievals of CO2 and O2 column densities for laser returns from low-level marine stratus clouds in the west coast of California. This demonstrates the supplemental capability of the future space carbon mission to measure CO2 above clouds, which is valuable particularly for the areas with persistent cloud covers, e.g, tropical ITCZ, west coasts of continents with marine layered clouds and southern ocean with highest occurrence of low-level clouds, where underneath carbon cycles are active but passive remote sensing techniques using the reflected short wave sunlight are unable to measure accurately due to cloud scattering effect. We exercise cloud top pressure retrieval from O2 absorption measurements during the flights over the low-level marine stratus cloud decks, which is one of fundamental parameters related to cloud radiative forcing and their feedback to global warming. These retrievals are evaluated with those from in-situ measured during the campaigns.

  14. Lidar-radar velocimetry using a pulse-to-pulse coherent rf-modulated Q-switched laser.

    PubMed

    Vallet, M; Barreaux, J; Romanelli, M; Pillet, G; Thévenin, J; Wang, L; Brunel, M

    2013-08-01

    An rf-modulated pulse train from a passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser has been generated using an extra-cavity acousto-optic modulator. The rf modulation reproduces the spectral quality of the local oscillator. It leads to a high pulse-to-pulse phase coherence, i.e., phase memory, over thousands of pulses. The potentialities of this transmitter for lidar-radar are demonstrated by performing Doppler velocimetry on indoor moving targets. The experimental results are in good agreement with a model based on elementary signal processing theory. In particular, we show experimentally and theoretically that lidar-radar is a promising technique that allows discrimination between translation and rotation movements. Being independent of the laser internal dynamics, this scheme can be applied to any Q-switched laser. PMID:23913058

  15. Polarization lidars with conical scanning for retrieving the microphysical characteristics of cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoshonkin, Alexander V.; Borovoi, Anatoli G.; Liu, Dong; Wang, Zhenzhu; Balin, Yuri S.; Kustova, Natalia V.; Kokhanenko, Grigorii; Penner, Iogannes; Nasonov, Sergey V.; Bryukhanov, Ilia D.; Doroshkevich, Anton A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the first results of observations of cirrus clouds by polarization lidars with conical scanning, which were developed in Hefei (China) and in Tomsk (Russia). The light scattering matrix of ice crystal particles of cirrus clouds has been calculated for the first by the authors within the framework of the physical optics approximations in the case of conical scanning lidar. It is found that in this case the Mueller matrix consists of ten non-zero elements, four of which are small and can't be applied to interpret the azimuthal distribution of particle orientation. All the diagonal elements have a strong azimuthal dependence. Among the off-diagonal elements only one element M34 carries additional information for interpreting the azimuthal distribution.

  16. Cloud and Aerosol Measurements from the GLAS Polar Orbiting Lidar: First Year Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, J. D.; Palm, S. P.; Hlavka, D. L.; Hart, W. D.; Mahesh, A.; Welton, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) launched in 2003 is the first polar orbiting satellite lidar. The instrument was designed for high performance observations of the distribution and optical scattering cross sections of clouds and aerosol. GLAS is approaching six months of on orbit data operation. These data from thousands of orbits illustrate the ability of space lidar to accurately and dramatically measure the height distribution of global cloud and aerosol to an unprecedented degree. There were many intended science applications of the GLAS data and significant results have already been realized. One application is the accurate height distribution and coverage of global cloud cover with one goal of defining the limitation and inaccuracies of passive retrievals. Comparison to MODIS cloud retrievals shows notable discrepancies. Initial comparisons to NOAA 14&15 satellite cloud retrievals show basic similarity in overall cloud coverage, but important differences in height distribution. Because of the especially poor performance of passive cloud retrievals in polar regions, and partly because of high orbit track densities, the GLAS measurements are by far the most accurate measurement of Arctic and Antarctica cloud cover from space to date. Global aerosol height profiling is a fundamentally new measurement from space with multiple applications. A most important aerosol application is providing input to global aerosol generation and transport models. Another is improved measurement of aerosol optical depth. Oceanic surface energy flux derivation from PBL and LCL height measurements is another application of GLAS data that is being pursued. A special area of work for GLAS data is the correction and application of multiple scattering effects. Stretching of surface return pulses in excess of 40 m from cloud propagation effects and other interesting multiple scattering phenomena have been observed. As an EOS project instrument, GLAS data products are openly available to the science community. First year results from GLAS are summarized.

  17. Retrieval of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Microphysical Properties from Lidar Measurements: Dependence on Particle Shape Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Yang, P.; McGee, T. J.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A retrieval algorithm has been developed for the microphysical analysis of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) optical data obtained using lidar instrumentation. The parameterization scheme of the PSC microphysical properties allows for coexistence of up to three different particle types with size-dependent shapes. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method has been used to calculate optical properties of particles with maximum dimensions equal to or less than 2 mu m and with shapes that can be considered more representative of PSCs on the scale of individual crystals than the commonly assumed spheroids. Specifically. these are irregular and hexagonal crystals. Selection of the optical parameters that are input to the inversion algorithm is based on a potential data set such as that gathered by two of the lidars on board the NASA DC-8 during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 0 p (SAGE) Ozone Loss Validation experiment (SOLVE) campaign in winter 1999/2000: the Airborne Raman Ozone and Temperature Lidar (AROTEL) and the NASA Langley Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). The 0 microphysical retrieval algorithm has been applied to study how particle shape assumptions affect the inversion of lidar data measured in leewave PSCs. The model simulations show that under the assumption of spheroidal particle shapes, PSC surface and volume density are systematically smaller than the FDTD-based values by, respectively, approximately 10-30% and approximately 5-23%.

  18. Integrated radar and lidar analysis reveals extensive loss of remaining intact forest on Sumatra 2007-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, M. B.; Mitchard, E. T. A.

    2015-06-01

    Forests with high above ground biomass (AGB), including those growing on peat swamps, have historically not been thought suitable for biomass mapping and change detection using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). However, by integrating L-band (λ = 0.23 m) SAR with lidar data from the ALOS and ICESat earth-observing satellites respectively, and 56 forest plots, we were able to create a forest biomass and change map for a 10.7 Mha section of eastern Sumatra that still contains high AGB peat swamp forest. Using a time series of SAR data we estimated changes in both forest area and AGB. We estimate that there were 274 ± 68 Tg AGB remaining in natural forest (≥ 20 m height) in the study area in 2007, with this stock reducing by approximately 11.4% over the subsequent 3 years. A total of 137.4 kha of the study area were deforested between 2007 and 2010; an average rate of 3.8% yr-1. The ability to attribute forest loss to different initial biomass values allows for far more effective monitoring and baseline modelling for avoided deforestation projects than traditional, optical-based remote sensing. Furthermore, given SAR's ability to penetrate the smoke and cloud which normally obscure land cover change in this region, SAR-based forest monitoring can be relied on to provide frequent imagery. This study demonstrates that even at L-band, which typically saturates at medium biomass levels (ca. 150 Mg ha-1), it is possible to make reliable estimates of not just the area but the carbon emissions resulting from land use change.

  19. Determination of cloud effective particle size from the multiple-scattering effect on lidar integration-method temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Jens; Reichardt, Susanne

    2006-04-20

    A method is presented that permits the determination of the cloud effective particle size from Raman- or Rayleigh-integration temperature measurements that exploits the dependence of the multiple-scattering contributions to the lidar signals from heights above the cloud on the particle size of the cloud. Independent temperature information is needed for the determination of size. By use of Raman-integration temperatures, the technique is applied to cirrus measurements. The magnitude of the multiple-scattering effect and the above-cloud lidar signal strength limit the method's range of applicability to cirrus optical depths from 0.1 to 0.5. Our work implies that records of stratosphere temperature obtained with lidar may be affected by multiple scattering in clouds up to heights of 30 km and beyond. PMID:16633433

  20. Space-based laser for a cloud and aerosol backscatter lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, John H.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Williams-Byrd, Julie; Hovis, Floyd; Bradford, Charles M.; Schwiesow, Ron

    1999-01-22

    NASA Langley Research Center in conjunction with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., are developing a small, lightweight, diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser to enable a spaceborne backscatter lidar to measure clouds and aerosols. The frequency-doubled laser has total output energy of 220 mJ at 27 Hz. The laser has been specifically designed for space applications and features conductive cooling and a minimum three-year design life.

  1. Evaluation of Radar Reflectivity Based Estimates of Water Content in Stratiform Marine Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, Sergey Y.; Uttal, Taneil; Hazen, Duane A.

    2004-04-01

    The performance of radar reflectivity (Ze) based relations for retrievals of marine stratiform cloud liquid water content (LWC) is evaluated by comparing liquid water path (LWP) estimates from microwave radiometers with vertically integrated LWC values retrieved from radar measurements. Based on a measurement dataset from a research vessel in the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean, it is shown that reflectivity thresholding allows minimizing of the influence of drizzle drops present in marine stratiform clouds to the extent that LWP estimates from a ground-/shipborne radar can have uncertainties that might be acceptable for different applications. The accuracies of Ze-based retrievals depend on the thresholding level Zet, and they are generally better than a factor of 2 for Zet -15 dBZ. These accuracies typically improve when Zet is lowered; however, the amount of cloud profiles that pass thresholding diminishes as Zet is decreased from about 50% for a -15-dbZ threshold to only about 10% for a -25-dBZ threshold. Different thresholding strategies are considered. Ancillary information on cloud-base heights can improve LWP estimates from reflectivities. The ship-based dataset was used to simulate measurements from prospective 94-GHz spaceborne cloud radar (CloudSat). CloudSat measurements would, on average, detect about 75% of warm marine stratiform clouds, though many clouds with negligible presence of drizzle will be missed. Because of sensitivity and resolution issues for the spaceborne radar, reflectivity-based estimates of LWP are generally biased toward high values and have higher uncertainties when compared with the ground-based radar, for the same Zet.

  2. Impact of Non-Uniform Beam Filling on Spaceborne Cloud and Precipitation Radar Retrieval Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Sacco, Gian Franco; Durden, Stephen L.; Haddad, Ziad S.

    2012-01-01

    In this presentation we will discuss the performance of classification and retrieval algorithms for spaceborne cloud and precipitation radars such as the Global Precipitation Measurement mission Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (GPM/DPR), and notional radar for the Aerosol/Clouds/Ecosystem (ACE) mission and related concepts. Spaceborne radar measurements are simulated either from Airborne Precipitation Radar 2nd Generation observations, or from atmospheric model outputs via instrument simulators contained in the NASA Earth Observing Systems Simulators Suite (NEOS(sup 3)). Both methods account for the three dimensional nature of the scattering field at resolutions smaller than that of the spaceborne radar under consideration. We will focus on the impact of non-homogeneities of the field of hydrometeors within the beam. We will discuss also the performance of methods to identify and mitigate such conditions, and the resulting improvements in retrieval accuracy. The classification and retrieval algorithms analyzed in this study are those derived from APR-2's Suite of Processing and Retrieval Algorithms (ASPRA); here generalized to operate on an arbitrary set of radar configuration parameters to study the expected performance of spaceborne cloud and precipitation radars. The presentation will highlight which findings extend to other algorithm families and which ones do not.

  3. A Compact Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar for Observations of Aerosol and Cloud Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John W.; Cook, Anthony L.

    2002-01-01

    We are in the process of developing a nadir-viewing, aircraft-based high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) at NASA Langley Research Center. The system is designed to measure backscatter and extinction of aerosols and tenuous clouds. The primary uses of the instrument will be to validate spaceborne aerosol and cloud observations, carry out regional process studies, and assess the predictions of chemical transport models. In this paper, we provide an overview of the instrument design and present the results of simulations showing the instrument's capability to accurately measure extinction and extinction-to-backscatter ratio.

  4. Extracting vertical winds from simulated clouds with ground-based coherent Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Lottman, B T; Frehlich, R G

    1998-12-20

    The performance of mean velocity estimators is determined by computer simulations for solid-state coherent Doppler lidar measurements of wind fields at a cloud interface with deterministic profiles of velocity and aerosol backscatter. Performance of the velocity estimates is characterized by the standard deviation about the estimated mean and the bias referenced to the input velocity. A new class of estimators are required for cloud conditions, as traditional techniques result in biased estimates. We consider data with high signal energy that produces negligible random outliers. PMID:18301652

  5. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Profiling Radars: Second-Generation Sampling Strategies, Processing, and Cloud Data Products

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, Pavlos; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Miller, Mark A.; Luke, Edward; Johnson, Karen L.; Moran, Kenneth P.; Widener, Kevin B.; Albrecht, Bruce A.

    2007-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program operates millimeter-wavelength cloud radars in several climatologically distinct regions. The digital signal processors for these radars were recently upgraded and allow for enhancements in the operational parameters running on them. Recent evaluations of millimeter-wavelength cloud radar signal processing performance relative to the range of cloud dynamical and microphysical conditions encountered at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program sites have indicated that improvements are necessary, including significant improvement in temporal resolution (i.e., less than 1 s for dwell and 2 s for dwell and processing), wider Nyquist velocities, operational dealiasing of the recorded spectra, removal of pulse compression while sampling the boundary layer, and continuous recording of Doppler spectra. The new set of millimeter-wavelength cloud radar operational modes that incorporate these enhancements is presented. A significant change in radar sampling is the introduction of an uneven mode sequence with 50% of the sampling time dedicated to the lower atmosphere, allowing for detailed characterization of boundary layer clouds. The changes in the operational modes have a substantial impact on the post-processing algorithms that are used to extract cloud information from the radar data. New methods for post-processing of recorded Doppler spectra are presented that result in more accurate identification of radar clutter (e.g., insects) and extraction of turbulence and microphysical information. Results of recent studies on the error characteristics of derived Doppler moments are included so that uncertainty estimates are now included with the moments. A micro-scale data product based on the new temporal resolution of the millimeter-wavelength cloud radars is proposed that contains the number of local maxima in each Doppler spectrum, the Doppler moments of the primary peak, uncertainty estimates for the Doppler moments of the primary peak, Doppler moment shape parameters (e.g., skewness and kurtosis), and clear-air clutter flags. A macro-scale, or coarse temporal resolution, product is also proposed that includes summary statistics derived from the micro-scale product. These statistics characterize the microphysical and dynamical properties of clouds over time periods of 5 min and 60 min.

  6. Improved simulation of aerosol, cloud, and density measurements by shuttle lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Morley, B. M.; Livingston, J. M.; Grams, G. W.; Patterson, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    Data retrievals are simulated for a Nd:YAG lidar suitable for early flight on the space shuttle. Maximum assumed vertical and horizontal resolutions are 0.1 and 100 km, respectively, in the boundary layer, increasing to 2 and 2000 km in the mesosphere. Aerosol and cloud retrievals are simulated using 1.06 and 0.53 microns wavelengths independently. Error sources include signal measurement, conventional density information, atmospheric transmission, and lidar calibration. By day, tenuous clouds and Saharan and boundary layer aerosols are retrieved at both wavelengths. By night, these constituents are retrieved, plus upper tropospheric, stratospheric, and mesospheric aerosols and noctilucent clouds. Density, temperature, and improved aerosol and cloud retrievals are simulated by combining signals at 0.35, 1.06, and 0.53 microns. Particlate contamination limits the technique to the cloud free upper troposphere and above. Error bars automatically show effect of this contamination, as well as errors in absolute density nonmalization, reference temperature or pressure, and the sources listed above. For nonvolcanic conditions, relative density profiles have rms errors of 0.54 to 2% in the upper troposphere and stratosphere. Temperature profiles have rms errors of 1.2 to 2.5 K and can define the tropopause to 0.5 km and higher wave structures to 1 or 2 km.

  7. Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N. (Editor); Ismail, Syed (Editor); Schwemmer, Geary K. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the Nineteenth International Laser Radar Conference, held at Annapolis, Maryland, July 6-10, 1998; 260 papers were presented in both oral and poster sessions. The topics of the conference sessions were Aerosol Clouds, Multiple Scattering; Tropospheric Profiling, Stratospheric/Mesospheric Profiling; Wind Profiling; New Lidar Technology and Techniques; Lidar Applications, Including Altimetry and Marine; Space and Future Lidar; and Lidar Commercialization/Eye Safety. This conference reflects the breadth of research activities being conducted in the lidar field. These abstracts address subjects from lidar-based atmospheric investigations, development of new lasers and lidar system technology, and current and future space-based lidar systems.

  8. Macrophysical Properties of Tropical Cirrus Clouds from the CALIPSO Satellite and from Ground-based Micropulse and Raman Lidars

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, D.; Turner, David D.

    2013-08-27

    Lidar observations of cirrus cloud macrophysical properties over the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Darwin, Australia site are compared from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and In- frared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite, the ground-based ARM micropulse lidar (MPL), and the ARM Raman lidar (RL). Comparisons are made using the subset of profiles where the lidar beam is not fully attenuated. Daytime measurements using the RL are shown to be relatively unaffected by the solar background and are therefore suited for checking the validity of diurnal cycles. RL and CALIPSO cloud fraction profiles show good agreement while the MPL detects significantly less cirrus, particularly during the daytime. Both MPL and CALIPSO observations show that cirrus clouds occur less frequently during the day than at night at all altitudes. In contrast, the RL diurnal cy- cle is significantly different than zero only below about 11 km; where it is the opposite sign (i.e. more clouds during the daytime). For cirrus geomet- rical thickness, the MPL and CALIPSO observations agree well and both datasets have signficantly thinner clouds during the daytime than the RL. From the examination of hourly MPL and RL cirrus cloud thickness and through the application of daytime detection limits to all CALIPSO data we find that the decreased MPL and CALIPSO cloud thickness during the daytime is very likely a result of increased daytime noise. This study highlights the vast im- provement the RL provides (compared to the MPL) in the ARM program's ability to observe tropical cirrus clouds as well as a valuable ground-based lidar dataset for the validation of CALIPSO observations and to help im- prove our understanding of tropical cirrus clouds.

  9. Macrophysical properties of tropical cirrus clouds from the CALIPSO satellite and from ground-based micropulse and Raman lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, David M.; Turner, David D.

    2013-08-01

    Lidar observations of cirrus cloud macrophysical properties over the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Darwin, Australia, site are compared from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite, the ground-based ARM micropulse lidar (MPL), and the ARM Raman lidar (RL). Comparisons are made using the subset of profiles where the lidar beam is not fully attenuated. Daytime measurements using the RL are shown to be relatively unaffected by the solar background and are therefore suited for checking the validity of diurnal cycles. RL and CALIPSO cloud fraction profiles show good agreement while the MPL detects significantly less cirrus, particularly during the daytime. Both MPL and CALIPSO observations show that cirrus clouds occur less frequently during the day than at night at all altitudes. In contrast, the RL diurnal cycle is significantly different from zero only below about 11 km; where it is of opposite sign (i.e., more clouds during the daytime). For cirrus geometrical thickness, the MPL and CALIPSO observations agree well and both data sets have significantly thinner clouds during the daytime than the RL. From the examination of hourly MPL and RL cirrus cloud thickness and through the application of daytime detection limits to all CALIPSO data, we find that the decreased MPL and CALIPSO cloud thickness during the daytime is very likely a result of increased daytime noise. This study highlights the significant improvement the RL provides (compared to the MPL) in the ARM program's ability to observe tropical cirrus clouds and will help improve our understanding of these clouds. The RL also provides a valuable ground-based lidar data set for the evaluation of CALIPSO observations.

  10. An Aircraft And Radar Based Analysis Of Cloud And Precipitation Microphysics In Mid-Latitude Continental Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Kumjian, M.; Bansemer, A.; Giangrande, S. E.; Ryzhkov, A.; Toto, T.

    2014-12-01

    An observational analysis of precipitation microphysics was conducted using data obtained during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) that took place around the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Lamont, Oklahoma from April 22- June 6, 2011. MC3E was a collaborative campaign led by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission and the U.S. Department of Energy ARM program. MC3E provided a unique opportunity to compare in-situ data from aircraft based microphysical probes with data from polarimetric radars in the radar bright band region or melting layer. One of the primary objectives of this study was to understand how riming and aggregation affect polarimetric signatures. In depth case study analysis of cloud and precipitation microphysics was performed for two specific cases, April 27th, 2011 (A27) and May 20th, 2011 (M20). Both these cases provided coincident aircraft and radar data in extensive stratiform cloud regions. Measurements from the University of North Dakota (UND) Citation aircraft and polarimetric data from the ARM CSAPR data reveal interesting details of cloud scale processes. Observations based on data from cloud probes (2DC, CIP and HVPS) along with in-situ observations of environmental variables provide remarkable details of particle growth and cloud dynamics for both case studies. For the A27 case study, UND aircraft measurements from two successive spiral profiles through the stratiform cloud region showed a transition from a riming dominated region to an aggregation dominated region. This is supported by polarimetric data from the C-Band ARM Precipitation Radar (CSAPR ). An extensive region of trailing stratiform precipitation was sampled in the M20 case study, where the aggregation, melting, and evaporation processes were measured in detail with the in-situ microphysical instruments. Latest findings from MC3E based on this combined aircraft and polarimetric radar study will be presented at the conference.

  11. Performance of mean-frequency estimators for Doppler radar and lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, R. G.; Yadlowsky, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    The performance of mean-frequency estimators for Doppler radar and lidar measurements of winds is presented in terms of two basic parameters: Phi, the ratio of the average signal energy per estimate to the spectral noise level; and Omega, which is proportional to the number of independent samples per estimate. For fixed Phi and Omega, the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) (theoretical best performance) for unbiased estimators of mean frequency (normalized by the spectral width of the signal), signal power, and spectral width are essentially independent of the number of data samples M. For large Phi, the estimators of mean frequency are unbiased and the performance is independent of M. The spectral domain estimators and covariance based estimators are bounded by the approximate period of M. The spectral domain estimators and covariance based estimators are bounded by the approximate periodogram CRB. The standard deviation of the maximum-likelihood estimator approaches the exact CRB, which can be more than a factor of 2 better than the performance of the spectral domain estimators or covariance-based estimators for typical Omega. For small Phi, the estimators are biased due to the effects of the uncorrelated noise (white noise), which results in uniformly distributed 'bad' estimates. The fraction of bad estimates is a function of Phi and M with weak dependence on the parameter Omega. Simple empirical models describe the standard deviation of the good estimates and the fraction of bad estimates. For Doppler lidar and for large Phi, better performance is obtained by using many low-energy pulses instead of one pulse with the same total energy. For small Phi, the converse is true.

  12. An airborne 95 GHz dual-polarized radar for cloud studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pazmany, A.L.; McIntosh, R.E. . Microwave Remote Sensing Lab.); Kelly, R.D.; Vali, G. . Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences)

    1994-07-01

    A 95 GHz dual-polarization radar system was developed and flown on the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft, from which it measured reflectivity, depolarization, and Doppler-derived velocity mean and standard deviation of a variety of clouds. This paper describes the radar and a data acquisition system that uses commercially available digitizers, signal processors, and signal generators. The authors also describe the tradeoffs between spatial resolution and their ability to estimate reflectivity and velocity. This paper presents the first known airborne measurements of clouds made at 95 GHz; these are thought to be the most highly resolved millimeter-wave cloud images made to date. Depolarization, measured in terms of the linear depolarization ratio (LDR), was especially high in the melting band and in regions containing pristine ice crystals. These measurements demonstrate the advances that high-spatial-resolution airborne millimeter-wave radars offer for the study of cloud microphysical properties.

  13. The 94 GHz Cloud Radar System on a NASA ER-2 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Racette, Paul E.; Tian, Lin; Zenker, Ed

    2003-01-01

    The 94-GHz (W-band) Cloud Radar System (CRS) has been developed and flown on a NASA ER-2 high-altitude (20 km) aircraft. The CRS is a fully coherent, polarimeteric Doppler radar that is capable of detecting clouds and precipitation from the surface up to the aircraft altitude in the lower stratosphere. The radar is especially well suited for cirrus cloud studies because of its high sensitivity and fine spatial resolution. This paper describes the CRS motivation, instrument design, specifications, calibration, and preliminary data &om NASA s Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) field campaign. The unique combination of CRS with other sensors on the ER-2 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study cloud radiative effects on the global energy budget. CRS observations are being used to improve our knowledge of atmospheric scattering and attenuation characteristics at 94 GHz, and to provide datasets for algorithm implementation and validation for the upcoming NASA CloudSat mission that will use a 94-GHz spaceborne cloud radar to provide the first direct global survey of the vertical structure of cloud systems.

  14. Operational processing and cloud boundary detection from micro pulse lidar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Spinhirne, James D.; Scott, V. Stanley., III; Turner, David D.

    1998-01-01

    Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) was developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) as the result of research on space-borne lidar techniques. It was designed to provide continuous, unattended observations of all significant atmospheric cloud and aerosol structure with a rugged, compact system design and the benefit of eye safety (Spinhirne 1993). The significant eye safety feature is achieved by using low pulse energies and high pulse repetition rates compared to standard lidar systems. MPL systems use a diode pumped 10 microj, 2500 Hz doubled Nd:YLF laser. In addition, a solid state Geiger mode avalanche photo diode (GAPD) photon counting detector is used allowing for quantum efficiencies approaching 70%. Other design features have previously been noted by Spinhirne (1995). Though a commercially available instrument, with nearly 20 systems operating around the world, the most extensive MPL work has come from those operated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) (Stokes and Schwartz 1994) program. The diverse ability of the instrument relating to the measurement of basic cloud macrophysical structure and both cloud and aerosol radiative properties well suits the ARM research philosophy. MPL data can be used to yield many parameters including cloud boundary heights to the limit of signal attenuation, cloud scattering cross sections and optical thicknesses, planetary boundary layer heights and aerosol scattering profiles, including those into the stratosphere in nighttime cases (Hlavka et al 1996). System vertical resolution ranges from 30 m to 300 m (i.e. high and low resolution respectively) depending on system design. The lidar research group at GSFC plays an advisory role in the operation, calibration and maintenance of NASA and ARM owned MPL systems. Over the past three years, processing software and system correction techniques have been developed in anticipation of the increasing population of systems amongst the community. Datasets produced by three ARM-owned systems have served as the basis for this development. With two operating at the southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site (SGP CART) since December 1993 and another at the Manus Island Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (TWP ARCS) location in the tropical western Pacific since February 1997, the ARM archive contains over 4 years of observations. In addition, high resolution systems planning to come on-line at the North Slope, AK CART shortly with another scheduled to follow at the TWP ARCS-II will diversify this archive with more extensive observations.

  15. Fully Automated Detection of Cloud and Aerosol Layers in the CALIPSO Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Mark A.; Powell, Kathleen A.; Kuehn, Ralph E.; Young, Stuart A.; Winker, David M.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hunt, William H.; Liu, Zhaoyan; McGill, Matthew J.; Getzewich, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the vertical and horizontal extent of clouds and aerosols in the earth s atmosphere is critical in assessing the planet s radiation budget and for advancing human understanding of climate change issues. To retrieve this fundamental information from the elastic backscatter lidar data acquired during the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission, a selective, iterated boundary location (SIBYL) algorithm has been developed and deployed. SIBYL accomplishes its goals by integrating an adaptive context-sensitive profile scanner into an iterated multiresolution spatial averaging scheme. This paper provides an in-depth overview of the architecture and performance of the SIBYL algorithm. It begins with a brief review of the theory of target detection in noise-contaminated signals, and an enumeration of the practical constraints levied on the retrieval scheme by the design of the lidar hardware, the geometry of a space-based remote sensing platform, and the spatial variability of the measurement targets. Detailed descriptions are then provided for both the adaptive threshold algorithm used to detect features of interest within individual lidar profiles and the fully automated multiresolution averaging engine within which this profile scanner functions. The resulting fusion of profile scanner and averaging engine is specifically designed to optimize the trade-offs between the widely varying signal-to-noise ratio of the measurements and the disparate spatial resolutions of the detection targets. Throughout the paper, specific algorithm performance details are illustrated using examples drawn from the existing CALIPSO dataset. Overall performance is established by comparisons to existing layer height distributions obtained by other airborne and space-based lidars.

  16. Model interpretation of cloud observations by the LIDAR on the Phoenix Mars lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daerden, Frank; Whiteway, J. A.; Davy, R.; Komguem, L.; Dickinson, C.; Taylor, P. A.

    2010-05-01

    Phoenix LIDAR observations [Whiteway et al. 2009] of clouds and precipitation in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) on Mars have been interpreted by a microphysical model for Mars ice clouds in combination with a coupled PBL-Aeolian dust model [Davy et al. 2009, Daerden et al. 2010]. The model simulates nighttime clouds and fall streaks within the PBL that are similar in structure to the LIDAR observations. Sizes of precipitating crystals grow to sizes of 30-50 m effective radius, comparable to ice crystals observed in precipitation from terrestrial cirrus clouds which are formed under similar meteorological conditions. The observed regular daily pattern of water ice cloud formation and precipitation in the PBL is indicative of a diurnal process in the local water cycle in which the combination of strong daytime vertical mixing and nighttime precipitation of large ice crystals acts to confine water to the PBL [Whiteway et al. 2009]. The simulations support this interpretation. This process may contribute to the seasonal variation of atmospheric humidity. References Daerden, F., J.A. Whiteway, R. Davy, C. Verhoeven, L. Komguem, C. Dickinson, P. A. Taylor, N. Larsen (2010), Simulating Observed Boundary Layer Clouds on Mars, Geophys. Res. Lett., in press Davy, R., P. A. Taylor, W. Weng, and P.-Y. Li (2009), A model of dust in the Martian lower atmosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 114, D04108, doi:10.1029/2008JD010481 Whiteway, J.A., L. Komguem, C. Dickinson, C. Cook, M. Illnicki, J. Seabrook, V. Popovici, T.J. Duck, R. Davy, P.A. Taylor, J. Pathak, D. Fisher, A.I. Carswell, M. Daly, V. Hipkin, L. Tamppari, N. Renno, J. Moores, M. Lemmon, F. Daerden, H. Smith (2009), Mars Water Ice Clouds and Precipitation, Science 325, 68

  17. Polar stratospheric clouds at the South Pole in 1990: Lidar observations and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, R.L.; Bowman, K.P.; Gardner, C.S. )

    1993-01-20

    In December 1989 a Rayleigh/sodium lidar (589 nm) was installed at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station, and was used to measure stratospheric aerosol, temperature, and mesospheric sodium profiles through October 1990. Observations of stratospheric aerosol and temperature are presented in this paper. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were first observed in late May at about 20 km. As the lower stratosphere cooled further, PSCs were observed throughout the 12-27 km altitude region, and remained there from mid-June until late August. Observations in early September detected no PSCs above 21 km. An isolated cloud was observed in mid-October. Throughout the winter the clouds had small backscatter ratios (< 10). Observations made at two wavelengths in July show that the clouds are predominately composed of nitric acid trihydrate with associated Angstrom coefficients between 0.2 and 3.7. Comparison of the lidar data and balloon borne frost point measurements in late August indicate that the nitric acid mixing ratio was less than 1.5 ppbv. Observations over periods of several hours show downward motions in the cloud layers similar to the phase progressions of upwardly-propagating gravity waves. The vertical phase velocities of these features ([approx] 4 cm/s) are significantly faster than the expected settling velocities of the cloud particles. Both the backscatter ratio profiles and the radiosonde horizontal wind profiles show 1-4 km vertical structures. This suggests that the kilometer-scale vertical structure of the PSCs is maintained by low frequency gravity waves propagating through the cloud layers. 24 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. [The estimation of cirrus cloud particulate shape using combined simulation and a three-wavelength lidar measurement].

    PubMed

    Tao, Zong-Ming; Liu, Dong; Wei, He-Li; Ma, Xiao-Min; Shi, Bo; Nie, Miao; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Ying-Jian

    2013-07-01

    The global occurrence of cirrus clouds can reach as high as 30%, whose scattering properties are essential impact on the climatic model, radiative transfer, and remote sensing. Their scattering properties are determined by the ice crystal shape, size distribution, refractive index and so on. Retrieval of the backscattering color ratios of cirrus cloud using a 355, 532 and 1 064 nm three-wavelength lidar, combined with the simulation of the three backscattering color ratios of different ice crystal shape, the shape of the lidar-measured ice crystal can be estimated. The results indicate that the shape of cirrus cloud over Hefei city is mostly composed by aggregates. PMID:24059165

  19. Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor and Cirrus Clouds During the Passage of Hurricane Bonnie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Demoz, B.; Starr, O C.; Tobin, D.; Feltz, W.; Jedlovec, G. J.; Gutman, S. I.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Cadirola, M.; Melfi, S. H.; Schmidlin, F.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was stationed on Andros Island in the Bahamas during August - September, 1998 as a part of the third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) which focussed on hurricane development and tracking. During the period August 21 - 24, hurricane Bonnie passed near Andros Island and influenced the water vapor and cirrus cloud measurements acquired by the SRL. Two drying signatures related to the hurricane were recorded by the SRL and other sensors. Cirrus cloud optical depths (at 351 nm) were also measured during this period. Optical depth values ranged from approximately 0.01 to 1.4. The influence of multiple scattering on these optical depth measurements was studied with the conclusion that the measured values of optical depth are less than the actual value by up to 20%. The UV/lR cirrus cloud optical depth ratio was estimated based on a comparison of lidar and GOES measurements. Simple radiative transfer model calculations compared with GOES satellite brightness temperatures indicate that satellite radiances are significantly affected by the presence of cirrus clouds if IR optical depths are approximately 0.02 or greater. This has implications for satellite cirrus detection requirements.

  20. Retrieval of Cirrus Cloud Radiative and Backscattering Properties Using Combined Lidar and Infrared Radiometer (LIRAD) Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Sassen, Kenneth

    2001-10-01

    A method for retrieval of cirrus macrophysical and radiative properties using combined ruby lidar and infrared radiometer measurements is explained in detail. The retrieval algorithm includes estimation of a variable backscatter-to-extinction ratio for each lidar profile, which accounts for changes in cloud microphysical properties with time. The technique also utilizes a correlated K distribution radiative transfer model,where absorption coefficients K have been tabulated specifically for the bandwidth and filter function of the infrared radiometer. The radiative transfer model allows for estimation of infrared emission due to atmospheric water vapor,ozone,and carbon dioxide, which is essential for deriving cirrus radiative properties. Also described is an improved technique for estimation of upwelling IR radiation that is emitted by the surface of the earth and reflected by the cloud into the radiometer field-of-view. Derived cirrus cloud properties include base and top height and temperature, visible optical depth, emittance, backscatter-to-extinction ratio, and extinction-to-absorption ratio. The purpose of this algorithm is to facilitate the analysis of the extensive high-cloud dataset obtained at the University of Utah, Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing in Salt Lake City, UT. To illustrate the method, a cirrus case study is presented.

  1. Assessing riparian shade for the Lemhi River, Idaho using LiDAR: A point cloud analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaete, L.; Glenn, N. F.; Shrestha, R.; Shumar, M. L.; Mitchell, J.

    2012-12-01

    Riparian vegetation plays a crucial role in shading streams by reducing the amount of incoming solar insolation that would otherwise reach the water surface, negatively affecting water temperature and photosynthetic organisms within the water column. Unlike incoming solar insolation, riparian shade can be manipulated by adding or removing riparian vegetation, making it attractive for restoration as well as thermal credit trading programs. Before riparian shade can be evaluated in such trading programs, the existing riparian vegetation needs to be quantified. Several studies have investigated the utility of LiDAR derived canopy height models for estimating riparian shade, however, few to no studies have used point cloud data as a direct model input in order to improve the riparian shade estimates. Using point cloud data increases spatial resolution and the ability to extract vegetation shape information without losses due to interpolation/rasterization. In this study, we assessed the ability of LiDAR point cloud data to estimate riparian shade for 32 km of the Lemhi River in north central Idaho. Riparian shade quantification of the point cloud and canopy height models are compared to shade values calculated using established models in practice.

  2. Automatic Detection of Building Points from LIDAR and Dense Image Matching Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltezos, E.; Ioannidis, C.

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to detect automatically building points: (a) from LIDAR point cloud using simple techniques of filtering that enhance the geometric properties of each point, and (b) from a point cloud which is extracted applying dense image matching at high resolution colour-infrared (CIR) digital aerial imagery using the stereo method semi-global matching (SGM). At first step, the removal of the vegetation is carried out. At the LIDAR point cloud, two different methods are implemented and evaluated using initially the normals and the roughness values afterwards: (1) the proposed scan line smooth filtering and a thresholding process, and (2) a bilateral filtering and a thresholding process. For the case of the CIR point cloud, a variation of the normalized differential vegetation index (NDVI) is computed for the same purpose. Afterwards, the bare-earth is extracted using a morphological operator and removed from the rest scene so as to maintain the buildings points. The results of the extracted buildings applying each approach at an urban area in northern Greece are evaluated using an existing orthoimage as reference; also, the results are compared with the corresponding classified buildings extracted from two commercial software. Finally, in order to verify the utility and functionality of the extracted buildings points that achieved the best accuracy, the 3D models in terms of Level of Detail 1 (LoD 1) and a 3D building change detection process are indicatively performed on a sub-region of the overall scene.

  3. First temperature measurements within Polar Stratospheric Clouds with the Esrange lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtert, Peggy; Khaplanov, Mikhail; Khosrawi, Farahnaz; Gumbel, Jrg

    2013-04-01

    In the winter stratosphere polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) provide the surface for heterogeneous reactions which transform stable chlorine and bromine species into their highly reactive ozone-destroying states. PSCs are classified into three types (PSC Ia: nitric acid di- or trihydrate crystals, NAD or NAT; PSC Ib: supercooled liquid ternary solutions, STS; PSC II: ice) according to their particle composition and to their physical phase. The formation of PSCs depends strongly on temperature. For a comprehensive understanding of such temperature-dependent processes in the lower stratosphere, lidar measurements using the rotational-Raman technique are most suitable. The rotational-Raman technique allows for temperature measurements without a priori assumptions of the state of the atmosphere. The technique is feasible in aerosol layers and clouds, such as PSCs. A rotational-Raman channel for temperature measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere was added to the Esrange lidar in late 2010. The Esrange lidar operates at Esrange (68N, 21E) near the Swedish city of Kiruna. By combining rotational-Raman measurements (4-35 km height) and the integration technique (30-80 km height), the Esrange lidar is now capable of measuring atmospheric temperature profiles from the upper troposphere up to the mesosphere. Such measurements could be used to validate current lidar-based PSC classification schemes and the current understanding of PSC formation. The new capability of the instrument furthermore enables the studies of other clouds layers, temperature variations and exchange processes in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. These studies will take advantage of the geographical location of Esrange where mountain wave activity in the lee of the Scandinavian mountain range gives rise to a wide range of PSC growth conditions. Although several lidars are operated at polar latitudes, there are few instruments that are capable of measuring temperature profiles in the troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere, as well as aerosols extinction in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. In this study, we utilize measurements of PSCs and temperature during the winters 2010/11, 2011/12, and 2012/13 to gain insight into the temperature dependence of different PSC types.

  4. a Data Driven Method for Building Reconstruction from LiDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, M.; Arefi, H.

    2014-10-01

    Airborne laser scanning, commonly referred to as LiDAR, is a superior technology for three-dimensional data acquisition from Earth's surface with high speed and density. Building reconstruction is one of the main applications of LiDAR system which is considered in this study. For a 3D reconstruction of the buildings, the buildings points should be first separated from the other points such as; ground and vegetation. In this paper, a multi-agent strategy has been proposed for simultaneous extraction and segmentation of buildings from LiDAR point clouds. Height values, number of returned pulse, length of triangles, direction of normal vectors, and area are five criteria which have been utilized in this step. Next, the building edge points are detected using a new method named "Grid Erosion". A RANSAC based technique has been employed for edge line extraction. Regularization constraints are performed to achieve the final lines. Finally, by modelling of the roofs and walls, 3D building model is reconstructed. The results indicate that the proposed method could successfully extract the building from LiDAR data and generate the building models automatically. A qualitative and quantitative assessment of the proposed method is then provided.

  5. Airborne CO(2) coherent lidar for measurements of atmospheric aerosol and cloud backscatter.

    PubMed

    Menzies, R T; Tratt, D M

    1994-08-20

    An airborne CO(2) coherent lidar has been developed and flown on over 30 flights of the NASA DC-8 research aircraft to obtain aerosol and cloud backscatter and extinction data at a wavelength near 9m. Designed to operate in either zenith- or nadir-directed modes, the lidar can be used to measure vertical profiles of backscatter throughout the vertical extent of the troposphere and the lower stratosphere. Backscatter measurements in absolute units are obtained through a hard-target calibration methodology. The use of coherent detection results in high sensitivity and narrow field of view, the latter property greatly reducing multiple-scattering effects. Aerosol backscatter profile intercomparisons with other airborne and ground-based CO(2) lidars were conducted during instrument checkout flights over the NASA Ames Research Center before extended depolyment over the Pacific Ocean. Selected results from data taken during the flights over the Pacific Ocean are presented, emphasizing intercom arisons with backscatter profile data obtained at 1.06 m with a NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Nd:YAG lidar on the same flights. PMID:20935971

  6. Investigation of multiple scattering processes resolved in clouds using a flash lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimer, C. S.; Hu, Y.; Saiki, E.; Delker, T.; Applegate, J.; Ramond, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Topographic Mapping Flash Lidar (TMFL) instrument developed at Ball Aerospace has been used to investigate the phenomenon of multiple scattering of the lidar signal inside a medium such as a water cloud. This behavior has been observed during a recent flight of the instrument aboard a Twin Otter aircraft flying over a steam plume. TMFL illuminates a line that extends across-track, and signal was observed off-axis over multiple pixels of the flash focal plane array. Thus the multiple scattering intensities are spatially sub-sampled, in addition to obtaining range resolutions. Variation of scattering strengths with off-axis distance is compared to those predicted by atmospheric models. It has been hypothesized that multiple scattering effects could account for a major source of error for space-based lidars such as CALIPSO, which samples atmospheric backscatter over a column. However, the physics behind multiple scattering is not well -understood and thus the effect cannot be sufficiently characterized to improve the error bars. The spatial resolution TMFL therefore provides a tool to quantify the effects of the processes of multiple scattering in lidar instrument signal. In addition, TMFL has recorded returns from the surface of a lake, and the strength of water surface returns can be correlated to the roughness of the water. That in turn can be tied to aerosol concentrations near the water surface.

  7. Aerosol and cloud sensing with the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, D. M.; McCormick, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) is a multi-wavelength backscatter lidar developed by NASA Langley Research Center to fly on the Space Shuttle. The LITE instrument is built around a three-wavelength ND:YAG laser and a 1-meter diameter telescope. The laser operates at 10 Hz and produces about 500 mJ per pulse at 1064 nm and 532 nm, and 150 mJ per pulse at 355 nm. The objective of the LITE program is to develop the engineering processes required for space lidar and to demonstrate applications of space-based lidar to remote sensing of the atmosphere. The LITE instrument was designed to study a wide range of cloud and aerosol phenomena. To this end, a comprehensive program of scientific investigations has been planned for the upcoming mission. Simulations of on-orbit performance show the instrument has sufficient sensitivity to detect even thin cirrus on a single-shot basis. Signal averaging provides the capability of measuring the height and structure of the planetary boundary layer, aerosols in the free troposphere, the stratospheric aerosol layer, and density profiles to an altitude of 40 km. The instrument has successfully completed a ground-test phase and is scheduled to fly on the Space Shuttle Discovery for a 9-day mission in September 1994.

  8. Radar Detectability Studies of Slow and Small Zodiacal Dust Cloud Particles: II. A Study of Three Radars with Different Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, D.; Swarnalingam, N.; Plane, J. M. C.; Nesvorný, D.; Feng, W.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2015-07-01

    The sensitivity of radar systems to detect different velocity populations of the incoming micrometeoroid flux is often the first argument considered to explain disagreements between models of the Near-Earth dust environment and observations. Recently, this was argued by Nesvorný et al. to support the main conclusions of a Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model which predicts a flux of meteoric material into the Earth’s upper atmosphere mostly composed of small and very slow particles. In this paper, we expand on a new methodology developed by Janches et al. to test the ability of powerful radars to detect the meteoroid populations in question. In our previous work, we focused on Arecibo 430 MHz observations since it is the most sensitive radar that has been used for this type of observation to date. In this paper, we apply our methodology to two other systems, the 440 MHz Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar and the 46.5 Middle and Upper Atmosphere radar. We show that even with the less sensitive radars, the current ZDC model over-predicts radar observations. We discuss our results in light of new measurements by the Planck satellite which suggest that the ZDC particle population may be characterized by smaller sizes than previously believed. We conclude that the solution to finding agreement between the ZDC model and sensitive high power and large aperture meteor observations must be a combination of a re-examination not only of our knowledge of radar detection biases, but also the physical assumptions of the ZDC model itself.

  9. Cloud image retrieval and characterization using ground-based dual-wavelength radar at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon-Diaz, Nivia; Cruz-Pol, Sandra L.; Sekelsky, Stephen M.

    2003-04-01

    Characterization of the microphysical properties of non-precipitating stratus clouds including their suspended-water droplet size distribution and the cloud's liquid water content are estimated in this work. The dual wavelength ratio, DWR, and the differential extinction, DE, were computed at two millimeter frequencies, 33 GHz and 95 GHz, using UMass Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) to estimate the drop size distribution. Data from radiosonde observations (Raob) is used as input in a recently calibrated model for estimation of the gaseous attenuation at Ka.-band and Liebe's model at W-band. Integrated specific humidity from a radiometer is used to constrain the radiosonde specific humidity. The radar reflectivity is corrected to take into account the effect of the wind speed, the difference of beamwidth at both frequencies and the difference in sampled range cells. Radar reflectivity and ancillary data are combined to obtain the differential extinction and the estimated cloud's liquid water density. Profiles of the processed data, such as DE, the DWR and the cloud's liquid water density are presented. Cloud's water density and radar reflectivity were used for the size distribution estimation of the suspended water droplets and the median drop diameter.

  10. Estimating forest structure at five tropical forested sites using lidar point cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palace, M. W.; Sullivan, F.; Treuhaft, R. N.; Keller, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical forests are fundamental components in the global carbon cycle and are threatened by deforestation and climate change. Because of their importance in carbon dynamics, understanding the structural architecture of these forests is vital. Airborne lidar data provides a unique opportunity to examine not only the height of these forests, which is often used to estimate biomass, but also the crown geometry and vertical profile of the canopy. These structural attributes inform temporal and spatial apsects of carbon dynamics providing insight into the past disturbances and growth of forests. We examined airborne lidar point cloud data from five sites in the Brazilian Amazon collected during the years 2012 to 2014. We generated both digital elevation maps, canopy height models (CHM), and vertical vegetation profiles (VVP) in our analysis. We analyzed the CHM using crown delineation with an iterative maximum finding routine to find the tops of canopies, local maxima to determine edges of crowns, and two parameters that control termination of crown edges. We also ran textural analysis methods on the CHM and VVP. Using multiple linear regression models and boosted regression trees we estimated forest structural parameters including biomass, stem density, basal area, width and depth of crowns and stem size distribution. Structural attributes estimated from lidar point cloud data can improve our understanding of the carbon dynamics of tropical forests on a landscape level and regional level.

  11. Evaluation of gridded scanning ARM cloud radar reflectivity observations and vertical doppler velocity retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamer, K.; Tatarevic, A.; Jo, I.; Kollias, P.

    2014-04-01

    The scanning Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) cloud radars (SACRs) provide continuous atmospheric observations aspiring to capture the 3-D cloud-scale structure. Sampling clouds in 3-D is challenging due to their temporal-spatial scales, the need to sample the sky at high elevations and cloud radar limitations. Thus, a suggested scan strategy is to repetitively slice the atmosphere from horizon to horizon as clouds advect over the radar (Cross-Wind Range-Height Indicator - CW-RHI). Here, the processing and gridding of the SACR CW-RHI scans are presented. First, the SACR sample observations from the ARM Southern Great Plains and Cape Cod sites are post-processed (detection mask, gaseous attenuation correction, insect filtering and velocity de-aliasing). The resulting radial Doppler moment fields are then mapped to Cartesian coordinates with time as one of the dimensions. Next the Cartesian-gridded Doppler velocity fields are decomposed into the horizontal wind velocity contribution and the vertical Doppler velocity component. For validation purposes, all gridded and retrieved fields are compared to collocated zenith-pointing ARM cloud radar measurements. We consider that the SACR sensitivity loss with range, the cloud type observed and the research purpose should be considered in determining the gridded domain size. Our results also demonstrate that the gridded SACR observations resolve the main features of low and high stratiform clouds. It is established that the CW-RHI observations complemented with processing techniques could lead to robust 3-D cloud dynamical representations up to 25-30 degrees off zenith. The proposed gridded products are expected to advance our understanding of 3-D cloud morphology, dynamics and anisotropy and lead to more realistic 3-D radiative transfer calculations.

  12. Performance of the Lidar Design and Data Algorithms for the GLAS Global Cloud and Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.

    2007-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) launched in early 2003 is the first polar orbiting satellite lidar. The instrument design includes high performance observations of the distribution and optical scattering cross sections of atmospheric clouds and aerosol. The backscatter lidar operates at two wavelengths, 532 and 1064 nm. For the atmospheric cloud and aerosol measurements, the 532 nm channel was designed for ultra high efficiency with solid state photon counting detectors and etalon filtering. Data processing algorithms were developed to calibrate and normalize the signals and produce global scale data products of the height distribution of cloud and aerosol layers and their optical depths and particulate scattering cross sections up to the limit of optical attenuation. The paper will concentrate on the effectiveness and limitations of the lidar channel design and data product algorithms. Both atmospheric receiver channels meet and exceed their design goals. Geiger Mode Avalanche Photodiode modules are used for the 532 nm signal. The operational experience is that some signal artifacts and non-linearity require correction in data processing. As with all photon counting detectors, a pulse-pile-up calibration is an important aspect of the measurement. Additional signal corrections were found to be necessary relating to correction of a saturation signal-run-on effect and also for daytime data, a small range dependent variation in the responsivity. It was possible to correct for these signal errors in data processing and achieve the requirement to accurately profile aerosol and cloud cross section down to 10-7 llm-sr. The analysis procedure employs a precise calibration against molecular scattering in the mid-stratosphere. The 1064 nm channel detection employs a high-speed analog APD for surface and atmospheric measurements where the detection sensitivity is limited by detector noise and is over an order of magnitude less than at 532 nm. A unique feature of the GLAS is a full acquisition of the surface return pulse, which has important application to the atmospheric transmission retrieval.

  13. Measurements of cirrus cloud backscatter color ratio with a two-wavelength lidar.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zongming; McCormick, M Patrick; Wu, Dong; Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A

    2008-04-01

    We present observations of cirrus clouds from June 2006 to July 2007 performed by using a two-wavelength lidar located at Hampton University. For this time period, cirrus clouds were observed mostly in 7-13.5 km altitudes. Data analyses have been performed focusing on a color-ratio retrieval. In total, 86,369 samples from 1,689 profiles (1 min average and 15 m range resolution) containing cirrus clouds with attenuated backscatter ratio (ratio of attenuated total backscatter to the molecular backscatter) larger than 10 have been selected. The cirrus color ratio distribution shows a peak value at about 0.88 and a full width at half-maximum of 0.12. PMID:18382576

  14. Application of the CloudSat and NEXRAD Radars Toward Improvements in High Resolution Operational Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, A. L.; Haynes, J. A.; Case, J. L.; Jedlovec, G. L.; Lapenta, W. M.

    2008-01-01

    As computational power increases, operational forecast models are performing simulations with higher spatial resolution allowing for the transition from sub-grid scale cloud parameterizations to an explicit forecast of cloud characteristics and precipitation through the use of single- or multi-moment bulk water microphysics schemes. investments in space-borne and terrestrial remote sensing have developed the NASA CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar and the NOAA National Weather Service NEXRAD system, each providing observations related to the bulk properties of clouds and precipitation through measurements of reflectivity. CloudSat and NEXRAD system radars observed light to moderate snowfall in association with a cold-season, midlatitude cyclone traversing the Central United States in February 2007. These systems are responsible for widespread cloud cover and various types of precipitation, are of economic consequence, and pose a challenge to operational forecasters. This event is simulated with the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) Model, utilizing the NASA Goddard Cumulus Ensemble microphysics scheme. Comparisons are made between WRF-simulated and observed reflectivity available from the CloudSat and NEXRAD systems. The application of CloudSat reflectivity is made possible through the QuickBeam radiative transfer model, with cautious application applied in light of single scattering characteristics and spherical target assumptions. Significant differences are noted within modeled and observed cloud profiles, based upon simulated reflectivity, and modifications to the single-moment scheme are tested through a supplemental WRF forecast that incorporates a temperature dependent snow crystal size distribution.

  15. Southern Hemisphere Lidar Measurements of the Aerosol Clouds from Mt. Pinatubo and Mt. Hudson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Stuart A.; Manson, Peter J.; Patterson, Graeme R.

    1992-01-01

    On 19 Jul., 1991, during tests to determine the ability of the newly-modified CSIRO Ns:YAG lidar to measure signals from the stratosphere before the arrival of dust from the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, a strongly scattering layer was detected at an altitude of 2 km. That evening, the spectacular sunset and twilight were typical of volcanically disturbed conditions. Lidar measurements at 532 nm were made between 1400 and 1500 EST (0400-0500 UT) on 19 Jul. through broken cloud. Approximately 3800 laser firings were averaged in 256 shot blocks. These and subsequent data have been analyzed to produce profiles of aerosol volume backscatter function and scattering ratio. Clouds again prevented a clear view of the twilights on the next two nights, although there was some evidence for an enhanced glow. The evidence suggested that the aerosol layer had disappeared. An explanation for this disappearance and the earlier than expected arrival of the layer over Melbourne was required. Nimbus 7 TOMS data for 23 Jun. showed that the SO2 from the eruption had extended at least 11000 km to the west and that the southern boundary of the cloud had reached 15 degrees S just 8 days after the climactic eruption. It can be assumed that this cloud also contained dust and sulphuric acid aerosol. It was proposed that a section had then been broken away from the main cloud and carried south by a large scale eddy between the low latitude easterlies and the strong mid-latitude westerlies which finally carried the aerosol cloud over southern Australia. Accompanying 30 mb wind data showed a counter clockwise circulation, responsible for the transport, located in the South Atlantic Ocean.

  16. Fingerprints of a riming event on cloud radar Doppler spectra: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalesse, Heike; Szyrmer, Wanda; Kneifel, Stefan; Kollias, Pavlos; Luke, Edward

    2016-03-01

    Radar Doppler spectra measurements are exploited to study a riming event when precipitating ice from a seeder cloud sediment through a supercooled liquid water (SLW) layer. The focus is on the "golden sample" case study for this type of analysis based on observations collected during the deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (ARM) mobile facility AMF2 at Hyytiälä, Finland, during the Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) field campaign. The presented analysis of the height evolution of the radar Doppler spectra is a state-of-the-art retrieval with profiling cloud radars in SLW layers beyond the traditional use of spectral moments. Dynamical effects are considered by following the particle population evolution along slanted tracks that are caused by horizontal advection of the cloud under wind shear conditions. In the SLW layer, the identified liquid peak is used as an air motion tracer to correct the Doppler spectra for vertical air motion and the ice peak is used to study the radar profiles of rimed particles. A 1-D steady-state bin microphysical model is constrained using the SLW and air motion profiles and cloud top radar observations. The observed radar moment profiles of the rimed snow can be simulated reasonably well by the model, but not without making several assumptions about the ice particle concentration and the relative role of deposition and aggregation. This suggests that in situ observations of key ice properties are needed to complement the profiling radar observations before process-oriented studies can effectively evaluate ice microphysical parameterizations.

  17. Characterization of mid-latitude cirrus cloud with airborne and ground-based lidar measurements during ML_CIRRUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Silke; Forster, Linda; Wirth, Martin; Schfler, Andreas; Freudenthaler, Volker; Fix, Andreas; Mayer, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Cirrus clouds have a large impact on the Earth's climate and radiation budget, but their microphysical and radiative properties are still insufficiently understood. As these parameters are difficult to measure, our knowledge of the radiative effect of cirrus clouds is mainly based on theoretical simulations. But these simulations use idealized cloud structure and microphysics, as well as radiative transfer approximations. To improve our knowledge of mid-latitude cirrus clouds, measurements onboard the German research aircraft HALO were performed during the ML_CIRRUS campaign over Europe in March and April 2014. During ML_CIRRUS an extensive combination of in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation was used to study the microphysical, optical and radiative properties of cirrus clouds with respect to cirrus cloud formation and life time. During ML_CIRRUS the airborne water vapor differential absorption and high spectral resolution lidar WALES of DLR-Institute of Atmospheric Physics was operational onboard HALO to measure the 2-dimensional humidity distribution inside and outside of cirrus clouds as well as the cirrus clouds optical properties along the flight track. We will present first results of correlated analyses of the optical cirrus cloud properties and the relative humidity in- and outside the cloud, as well as on the distribution of relative humidity and optical properties within the cloud. In particular we investigate differences of the cirrus cloud properties with respect to cirrus cloud formation and life-time. Additionally, we will show first results of ground-based depolarization lidar measurements with the lidar system POLIS of Meteorological Institute of the LMU to study the optical properties of clouds considering different optical phenomena of the cirrus clouds.

  18. Lidar Investigations of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Clouds over Coastal Environment and its Diurnal Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Manoj; Rajeev, Kunjukrishnapillai; Nair, Anish Kumar M.

    Over the high pressure region, diurnal evolution of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) leads to the development of fair weather clouds, which in turn play an important role in modulating the thermodynamic structure of ABL, radiation balance at surface, and further development of ABL. As they usually cap the ABL, aerosol-cloud interaction in these clouds are expected to be quite large. Notwithstanding their importance, characteristics of the ABL clouds, their diurnal evolution and the resulting feedback are least explored. Major objectives of this study are to: (i) quantify the diurnal evolution of fair-weather ABL clouds and their characteristics (in terms of their altitude of occurrence, physical thickness and optical depth) based on multi-year (2008-2011) Micropulse Lidar observations at the coastal station, Thumba (8.5() N, 77() E), and (ii) explore the potential impact of these clouds in modulating the downwelling shortwave radiative flux at surface and further development of ABL. Altitude of occurrence of ABL clouds is found to undergo significant diurnal variation during the development of convective ABL (CABL). Typically, the ABL cloud base increases from <500 m at 09 LT to >1500 m at 12 LT. Base altitude of the ABL clouds is rather steady during the afternoon, associated with the stabilization of CABL development. Clouds in the nocturnal ABL (NABL) generally occur at the altitude of the preceding afternoon CABL height. Simultaneous occurrence of clouds in the thermal internal boundary layer (TIBL) and developed CABL/residual layer (RL) are also observed, through they are less frequent. The TIBL clouds are distinctly separated from those formed at the top of CABL/RL. Base heights of clouds are distinctly lower in TIBL and evolving CABL compared to those in developed CABL and RL, though their mean physical thickness are comparable (typically 250m). Optically thin clouds dominate the TIBL, compared to the other three regimes. Reduction in the instantaneous incoming shortwave flux by ABL clouds can be as large as 550 Wm(-2) and the associated surface cooling would inhibit the growth of thermals, causing a reduction in the rate of CABL growth.

  19. CO2 lidar technique for observing characteristic drop size in water clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.

    1993-01-01

    An analytical evaluation demonstrates that a calibrated 10.6 micron wavelength lidar can measure the mean radius and the effective radius of the drop size distribution in a water cloud. The radius parameter observed is a weighted average over the penetration depth of the pulse, with weighting factor decreasing with optical depth. In this method, the lidar signal is integrated and boundary conditions on optical depth are applied to obtain the average extinction-to-backscatter ratio. The radius parameter is determined by comparing the measured ratio with that found from Mie scatter calculations for a variety of typical drop size distributions. This extinction-to-backscatter method was originally proposed in the literature for measuring mode radius, but at 10.6-micron wavelength the current results show better accuracy for mean or effective radius. Other CO2 laser wavelengths can be used, but slightly more stable results are expected at longer wavelengths.

  20. Lidar data inversion for Cirrus clouds: An approach based on a statistical analysis of in situ microphysical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Febvre, G.

    1994-10-01

    The problem of the lidar equation inversion lies in the fact that it requires a lidar calibration or else a reference value from the studied medium. This paper presents an approach to calibrate the lidar by calculating the constant Ak (lidar constant A multiplied by the ratio of backscatter coefficient to extinction coefficient k). This approach is based on statistical analysis of in situ measurements. This analysis demonstrates that the extinction coefficient has a typical probablility distribution in cirrus clouds. The property of this distribution, as far as the attenuation of laser beam in the cloud, is used as a constraint to calculate the value of Ak. The validity of this method is discussed and results compared with two other inversion methods.

  1. Building a LiDAR point cloud simulator: Testing algorithms for high resolution topographic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrea, Dario; Abellán, Antonio; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Terrestrial laser technique (TLS) is becoming a common tool in Geosciences, with clear applications ranging from the generation of a high resolution 3D models to the monitoring of unstable slopes and the quantification of morphological changes. Nevertheless, like every measurement techniques, TLS still has some limitations that are not clearly understood and affect the accuracy of the dataset (point cloud). A challenge in LiDAR research is to understand the influence of instrumental parameters on measurement errors during LiDAR acquisition. Indeed, different critical parameters interact with the scans quality at different ranges: the existence of shadow areas, the spatial resolution (point density), and the diameter of the laser beam, the incidence angle and the single point accuracy. The objective of this study is to test the main limitations of different algorithms usually applied on point cloud data treatment, from alignment to monitoring. To this end, we built in MATLAB(c) environment a LiDAR point cloud simulator able to recreate the multiple sources of errors related to instrumental settings that we normally observe in real datasets. In a first step we characterized the error from single laser pulse by modelling the influence of range and incidence angle on single point data accuracy. In a second step, we simulated the scanning part of the system in order to analyze the shifting and angular error effects. Other parameters have been added to the point cloud simulator, such as point spacing, acquisition window, etc., in order to create point clouds of simple and/or complex geometries. We tested the influence of point density and vitiating point of view on the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) alignment and also in some deformation tracking algorithm with same point cloud geometry, in order to determine alignment and deformation detection threshold. We also generated a series of high resolution point clouds in order to model small changes on different environments (erosion, landslide monitoring, etc) and we then tested the use of filtering techniques using 3D moving windows along the space and time, which considerably reduces data scattering due to the benefits of data redundancy. In conclusion, the simulator allowed us to improve our different algorithms and to understand how instrumental error affects final results. And also, improve the methodology of scans acquisition to find the best compromise between point density, positioning and acquisition time with the best accuracy possible to characterize the topographic change.

  2. Characterization of sub-cloud vertical velocity distributions and precipitation-driven outflow dynamics using a ship-based, scanning Doppler lidar during VOCALS-Rex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, A.; Feingold, G.; Tucker, S. C.; Covert, D. S.; Hardesty, R.

    2010-12-01

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment NOAA's High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) operated from the RV Ronald H. Brown and made continuous measurements of sub-cloud horizontal and vertical wind speed and aerosol backscatter signal strength. We will present averaged profiles of vertical velocity distributions and turbulence parameters, stratified by a range of conditions including diurnal variation, precipitation, and distance from shore. The results point to a strong diurnal dependence in the strength of turbulence with nighttime conditions exhibiting stronger subcloud variance. Skewness shows less diurnal sensitivity with a trend towards more negative skewness near cloud base. Combining HRDL’s scanning horizontal wind speed measurements with other ship based in-situ and remote sensing measurements, we investigate the dynamics of precipitation-driven outflows and their impact on surface thermodynamic and aerosol properties. Using a sample of over 150 airmass transitions over the course of the 5 week deployment, we observed that warmer outflow air is typically drier, has less aerosol scattering and tends to have higher ozone concentrations (indicating the transport of air from above the boundary layer top). Transitions to cooler air are generally moister, have more aerosol scattering and show no significant change in ozone concentration. We will present animations of combined lidar/radar/GOES imagery that were used to facilitate visualization and interpretation of the dynamics of the outflows.

  3. TRMM Radar Observations of Cloud Tops in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcala, C. M.; Dessler, A. E.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Air dehydrates to stratospheric abundances in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). The role of overshooting convection in the dehydration process is not well understood. To study this effect, we use the TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) precipitation radar (PR) to measure the altitudes of cloud tops forming in the TTL. Because the radar signal is dominated by scatter from large particles, these cloud observations imply the presence of strong convective systems with large updraft. Both winter and summer data from two different years are examined to study both interseasonal and interannual variability. The global distribution of these clouds is in good agreement with those of the surface precipitation rates. In addition, the altitude distributions of these clouds follow an exponential dependence. However, clouds over continental regions typically extend to higher altitudes in the tropics. Almost no cloud tops were observed above 20 km. Comparison between the radar cloud tops and colocated IR brightness temperature measurements reveal a large difference in both the diurnal cycle and intensity between continental and oceanic convection.

  4. Estimation of cirrus cloud particle fallspeeds from vertically pointing Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Brad W.; Kropfli, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment 2 (FIRE 2) was conducted in Coffeyville, Kansas in late 1991 to study the microphysical and radiative properties of cirrus clouds. A variety of active and passive remote sensors were employed, including an 8-mm-wavelength cloud-sensing Doppler radar developed at the Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL). The radar, having excellent sensitivity to cloud particles (-30 dBZ at 10 km), good spatial resolution (37 m), and velocity precision (.05 ms -1), is an excellent tool for observing cirrus clouds. Having this radar directed toward the zenith for long periods of time during FIRE 2 permitted the reflectivity-weighted particle fallspeed to be related to reflectivity which allowed a separation of ice particle fallspeeds from vertical air motions. Additionally, such relationships proved useful in other multi-sensor techniques for determining vertical profiles of ice particle characteristic size and ice water content in cirrus clouds. The analysis method and the results of applying it to cirrus cloud reflectivity and velocity data collected during FIRE 2 are discussed.

  5. Comparison of lightning location data and polarisation radar observations of clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illingworth, A. J.; Lees, M. I.

    1991-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of both the precipitation and the lightning associated with thunderstorms show that the lightning is within 3 km of the maximum precipitation echo. The intensity and type of the precipitation is observed with 500 m spatial accuracy using an S-band polarization radar and the position of the lightning is inferred from a low frequency magnetic direction finding location system. Empirical adjustment to the angles using the redundancy of the lightning data reduce this error. Radar echoes above 45dBZ may be caused by soft hail or hailstones, but similarly intense echoes may result from melting snow. The data show that a new polarization radar parameter, the linear depolarization ratio, can distinguish between soft hail and melting snow, and that the intense radar echoes associated with melting snow pose no threat of lightning. A lightning risk only exists when the radar indicates that the clouds contain soft hail or hailstones.

  6. A composite study of Florida thunderstorms, using radar, cloud-to-ground lightning, and surface winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew I.; Lopez, Raul E.; Daugherty, John R.; Ortiz, Robert; Holle, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    Two thunderstorms occurring in Florida during the summer of 1987 are studied in order to determine the location of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning in terms of surface winds and radar reflectivity. Composites of radar, CG lightning locations, and surface winds during the development, mature, and dissipation stages of the storms are presented and analyzed. The relationship between lightning and radar reflectivity is examined. It is noted that the main CG lightning activity region is on the upshear side of the storm in the reflectivity gradient where upward motion is between the convergent gust front and reflectivity center, and lightning avoids areas of maximum reflectivity.

  7. Vertical velocities within a Cirrus cloud from Doppler lidar and aircraft measurements during FIRE: Implications for particle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    A large and comprehensive data set taken by the NOAA CO2 Doppler lidar, the NCAR King Air, and rawinsondes on 31 October 1986 during the FIRE (First ISCCP Regional Experiment) field program which took place in Wisconsin are presented. Vertical velocities are determined from the Doppler lidar data, and are compared with velocities derived from the aircraft microphysical data. The data are used for discussion of particle growth and dynamical processes operative within the cloud.

  8. Retrieval of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Microphysical Properties From Lidar Measurements: Dependence on Particle Shape Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, Susanne; Reichardt, Jens; Yang, Ping; McGee, Thomas J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of particle sizes and number densities of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) is highly important, because they are critical parameters for the modeling of the ozone chemistry of the stratosphere. In situ measurements of PSC particles are rare. the main instrument for the accumulation of PSC data are lidar systems. Therefore the derivation of some microphysical properties of PSCS from the optical parameters measured by lidars would be highly beneficial for ozone research. Inversion of lidar data obtained in the presence of PSCs formed from crystalline particles type 11 and the various nitric acid tri Ydrrate (NAT) types cannot be easily accomplished, because a suitable scattering theory for small faceted crystals has not been readily available tip to now. As a consequence, the T-matrix method is commonly used for the interpretation of these PSC lidar data. Here the assumption is made that the optical properties of an ensemble of spheroids resemble those of crystalline PSCs, and microphysical properties of the PSC are inferred from the optical signatures of the PSC at two or more wavelengths. The problem with the T-matrix approach is that the assumption of spheroidal instead of faceted particles can lead to dramatically wrong results: Usually cloud particle properties are deduced from analysis of lidar profiles of backscatter ratio and depolarization ratio. The particle contribution to the backscatter ratio is given by the product of the particle number density and the backscattering cross section. The latter is proportional to the value of the particle's scattering phase function at 180 degrees scattering angle. At 180 degrees however, the phase functions of rough, faceted crystals and of spheroids with same maximum dimension differ by a factor of 6. From this it follows that for a PSC consisting of faceted crystals, the particle number density is underestimated by roughly the same factor if spheroidal particles are unrealistically assumed. We are currently developing a retrieval technique for determining the microphysical parameters of crystalline PSCs that takes into account the faceted shape of the PSC particles. This approach utilizes finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of particle optical properties. The accuracy and the free choice of the shape of the scattering particle make the FDTD technique a promising tool for the inversion of PSC lidar data. A first comparison of FDTD and T-matrix calculations will be presented.

  9. Global Lidar Measurements of Clouds and Aerosols from Space Using the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, Dennis L.; Palm, S. P.; Welton, E. J.; Hart, W. D.; Spinhirne, J. D.; McGill, M.; Mahesh, A.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) is scheduled for launch on the ICESat satellite as part of the NASA EOS mission in 2002. GLAS will be used to perform high resolution surface altimetry and will also provide a continuously operating atmospheric lidar to profile clouds, aerosols, and the planetary boundary layer with horizontal and vertical resolution of 175 and 76.8 m, respectively. GLAS is the first active satellite atmospheric profiler to provide global coverage. Data products include direct measurements of the heights of aerosol and cloud layers, and the optical depth of transmissive layers. In this poster we provide an overview of the GLAS atmospheric data products, present a simulated GLAS data set, and show results from the simulated data set using the GLAS data processing algorithm. Optical results from the ER-2 Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL), which uses many of the same processing algorithms as GLAS, show algorithm performance with real atmospheric conditions during the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000).

  10. Intercomparison of snowfall estimates derived from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar and the ground based weather radar network over Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norin, L.; Devasthale, A.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Wood, N. B.; Smalley, M.

    2015-08-01

    To be able to estimate snowfall accurately is important for both weather and climate applications. Ground-based weather radars and space-based satellite sensors are often used as viable alternatives to rain-gauges to estimate precipitation in this context. The Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) onboard CloudSat is especially proving to be a useful tool to map snowfall globally, in part due to its high sensitivity to light precipitation and ability to provide near-global vertical structure. The importance of having snowfall estimates from CloudSat/CPR further increases in the high latitude regions as other ground-based observations become sparse and passive satellite sensors suffer from inherent limitations. Here we intercompared snowfall estimates from two observing systems, CloudSat and Swerad, the Swedish national weather radar network. Swerad offers one of the best calibrated data sets of precipitation amount at very high latitudes that are anchored to rain-gauges and that can be exploited to evaluate usefulness of CloudSat/CPR snowfall estimates in the polar regions. In total 7.2×105 matchups of CloudSat and Swerad over Sweden were inter-compared covering all but summer months (October to May) from 2008 to 2010. The intercomparison shows encouraging agreement between these two observing systems despite their different sensitivities and user applications. The best agreement is observed when CloudSat passes close to a Swerad station (46-82 km), when the observational conditions for both systems are comparable. Larger disagreements outside this range suggest that both platforms have difficulty with shallow snow but for different reasons. The correlation between Swerad and CloudSat degrades with increasing distance from the nearest Swerad station as Swerad's sensitivity decreases as a function of distance and Swerad also tends to overshoots low level precipitating systems further away from the station, leading to underestimation of snowfall rate and occasionally missing the precipitation altogether. Further investigations of various statistical metrics, such as the probability of detection, false alarm rate, hit rate, and the Hanssen-Kuipers skill scores, and the sensitivity of these metrics to snowfall rate and the distance from the radar station, were carried out. The results of these investigations highlight the strengths and the limitations of both observing systems at the lower and upper ends of snowfall distributions and the range of uncertainties that could be expected from these systems in the high latitude regions.

  11. Intercomparison of snowfall estimates derived from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar and the ground-based weather radar network over Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norin, L.; Devasthale, A.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Wood, N. B.; Smalley, M.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate snowfall estimates are important for both weather and climate applications. Ground-based weather radars and space-based satellite sensors are often used as viable alternatives to rain gauges to estimate precipitation in this context. In particular, the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on board CloudSat is proving to be a useful tool to map snowfall globally, in part due to its high sensitivity to light precipitation and its ability to provide near-global vertical structure. CloudSat snowfall estimates play a particularly important role in the high-latitude regions as other ground-based observations become sparse and passive satellite sensors suffer from inherent limitations. In this paper, snowfall estimates from two observing systems - Swerad, the Swedish national weather radar network, and CloudSat - are compared. Swerad offers a well-calibrated data set of precipitation rates with high spatial and temporal resolution, at very high latitudes. The measurements are anchored to rain gauges and provide valuable insights into the usefulness of CloudSat CPR's snowfall estimates in the polar regions. In total, 7.2 × 105 matchups of CloudSat and Swerad observations from 2008 through 2010 were intercompared, covering all but the summer months (June to September). The intercomparison shows encouraging agreement between the two observing systems despite their different sensitivities and user applications. The best agreement is observed when CloudSat passes close to a Swerad station (46-82 km), where the observational conditions for both systems are comparable. Larger disagreements outside this range suggest that both platforms have difficulty with shallow snow but for different reasons. The correlation between Swerad and CloudSat degrades with increasing distance from the nearest Swerad station, as Swerad's sensitivity decreases as a function of distance. Swerad also tends to overshoot low-level precipitating systems further away from the station, leading to an underestimation of snowfall rate and occasionally to missing precipitation altogether. Several statistical metrics - including the probability of detection, false alarm rate, hit rate, and Pierce's skill score - are calculated. The sensitivity of these metrics to the snowfall rate, as well as to the distance from the nearest radar station, are summarised. This highlights the strengths and the limitations of both observing systems at the lower and upper ends of the snowfall distributions as well as the range of uncertainties that can be expected from these systems in high-latitude regions.

  12. Analysis and Calibration of CRF Raman Lidar Cloud Liquid Water Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.D. Whiteman, D.N. Russo, F.

    2007-10-31

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Raman lidar (RL), located at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF), is a unique state-of-the-art active remote sensor that is able to measure profiles of water vapor, aerosol, and cloud properties at high temporal and vertical resolution throughout the diurnal cycle. In October 2005, the capability of the RL was extended by the addition of a new detection channel that is sensitive to the Raman scattering of liquid water. This new channel permits the system, in theory, to measure profiles of liquid water content (LWC) by the RL. To our knowledge, the ARM RL is the only operation lidar with this capability. The liquid water Raman backscattering cross-section is a relatively weak and spectrally broad feature, relative to the water vapor Raman backscatter signal. The wide bandpass required to achieve reasonable signal-to-noise in the liquid water channel essentially eliminates the ability to measure LWC profiles during the daytime in the presence of large solar background, and thus all LWC observations are nighttime only. Additionally, the wide bandpass increases the probability that other undesirable signals, such as fluorescence from aerosols, may contaminate the observation. The liquid water Raman cross-section has a small amount of overlap with the water vapor Raman cross-section, and thus there will be a small amount of cross-talk between the two signals, with water vapor contributing a small amount of signal to the LWC observation. And finally, there is significant uncertainty in the actual strength of the liquid water Raman cross-section in the literature. The calibrated LWC profiles, together with the coincident cloud backscatter observations also made by the RL, can be used to derive profiles of cloud droplet effective radius. By combining these profiles of effective radius in the lower portion of the cloud with the aerosol extinction measurements made below the cloud by the RL, the first aerosol indirect effect can be investigated using a single instrument, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with aligning the different sampling periods and fields of view of multiple instruments. We have applied a first principles calibration to the LWC profiles. This approach requires that the relative differences in optical efficiency between the water vapor and liquid water channels be known; this relative difference is easily computed using the efficiency values of the beam splitters and interference filters in the lidar that were provided by the vendors of these components. The first principles approach then transfers the calibration from the water vapor mixing ratio to the LWC using the difference in the optical efficiency and an interpolated value of the liquid water Raman cross section from the literature, and the better established water vapor Raman cross section. After accounting for all known error sources, the vertical integral of LWC was compared against a similar value retrieved from a co-located ground-based infrared radiometer. The RL and infrared radiometer have significantly different fields of view; thus to compare the two sensors the data were averaged to 5 min intervals where only cloudy samples were included in the average of each. While there is fair scatter in the data (r=0.47), there is also a clear indication of a positive correlation between the infrared and the RL values. The value of the slope of the regression is 0.49, which indicates a tendency of the RL measurements to underestimate the total liquid amount with respect to the infrared retrieval. Research continues to investigate the source of the bias, but the most likely candidate is the large uncertainty in the liquid water Raman cross-section as there have been no direct measurements made of this parameter at the lidars laser wavelength of 355 nm. The calibrated LWC profile was then used together with the cloud backscatter coefficient profile from the RL to derive profiles of cloud droplet effective radius and cloud droplet number density. These profiles of cloud droplet size together with the aerosol extinction observed by the same lidar are used to investigate the aerosol indirect effect in several case studies in August 2006. Russo F. An investigation of Raman lidar measurements and their application to the study of the aerosol indirect effect, PhD Thesis (2007). Russo F., D. N. Whiteman, D. D. Turner, B. B. Demoz, R. M. Hoff, I. Veselovskii, Measurements of the Aerosol Indirect Effect using a Raman lidar. Part 1: cloud liquid water measurements, manuscript in preparation. Russo F., D. N. Whiteman, D. D. Turner, B. B. Demoz, R. M. Hoff, I. Veselovskii, Measurements of the Aerosol Indirect Effect using a Raman lidar. Part 2: the calculation of IE, manuscript in preparation.

  13. Vertical distribution of clouds over Hampton, Virginia observed by lidar under the ECLIPS and FIRE ETO programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, M. A.; Winker, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    Intensive cloud lidar observations have been made by NASA Langley Research Center during the two observation phases of the ECLIPS project. Less intensive but longer term observations have been conducted as part of the FIRE extended time observation (ETO) program since 1987. We present a preliminary analysis of the vertical distribution of clouds based on these observations. A mean cirrus thickness of just under 1 km has been observed with a mean altitude of about 80 percent of the tropopause height. Based on the lidar data, cirrus coverage was estimated to be just under 20 percent, representing roughly 50 percent of all clouds studied. Cirrus was observed to have less seasonal variation than lower clouds. Mid-level clouds are found to occur primarily in association with frontal activity.

  14. New Lidar Capabilities in Space: An Overview of the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, M. J.; Yorks, J. E.; Hlavka, D. L.; Selmer, P. A.; Hart, W. D.; Palm, S. P.; Nowottnick, E. P.; Vaughan, M.; Rodier, S. D.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Buchard, V.

    2014-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), built at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a payload for the International Space Station (ISS), is set to launch in the late 2014. CATS is an elastic backscatter lidar operating in one of three science modes with three wavelengths (1064, 532, 355 nm) and HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at the 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths. The CATS science modes are described in Figure 1. The ISS orbit is a 51 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of about 405 km. This orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three day repeat cycle. Thus, science applications of CATS include cloud and aerosol climate studies, air quality monitoring, and smoke/volcanic plume tracking. Current uncertainties in cloud and aerosol properties limit our ability to accurately model the Earth's climate system and predict climate change. These limitations are due primarily to difficulties in adequately measuring aerosols and clouds on a global scale. A primary science objectives of CATS is to provide global aerosol and cloud vertical profile data in near real time to for assimilation in aerosol transport models such as the NASA GEOS-5 model. Furthermore, the vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties provided by CATS will complement current and future passive satellite sensors. Another important science objective of CATS is to advance technology in support of future mission development. CATS will employ 355 nm and HSRL capabilities, as well as depolarization at multiple wavelengths. These expanded measurement capabilities will provide the science community with new and improved global data products that have yet to be retrieved from space-based lidar. In preparation for launch, simulations of the CATS lidar signal are produced using GEOS5 model data to develop and test future data products. An example of the simulated CATS attenuated total backscatter for the 532 nm parallel channel is shown in Figure 2 using the GEOS-5 model forecast from 15 July 2009. This work provides an overview of the CATS mission, science objectives and simulated data.

  15. Cloud-Aerosol LIDAR and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) Spacecraft: Independent Technical Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbrech, Richard J.; McManamen, John P.; Wilson, Timmy R.; Robinson, Frank; Schoren, William R.

    2004-01-01

    CALIPSO is a joint science mission between the CNES, LaRC and GSFC. It was selected as an Earth System Science Pathfinder satellite mission in December 1998 to address the role of clouds and aerosols in the Earth's radiation budget. The spacecraft includes a NASA light detecting and ranging (LIDAR) instrument, a NASA wide-field camera and a CNES imaging infrared radiometer. The scope of this effort was a review of the Proteus propulsion bus design and an assessment of the potential for personnel exposure to hydrazine propellant.

  16. Cloud-Aerosol LIDAR and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) Spacecraft: Independent Technical Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbrech, Richard J.; McManamen, John P.; Wilson, Timmy R.; Robinson, Frank; Schoren, William R.

    2005-01-01

    CALIPSO is a joint science mission between the CNES, LaRC and GSFC. It was selected as an Earth System Science Pathfinder satellite mission in December 1998 to address the role of clouds and aerosols in the Earth's radiation budget. The spacecraft includes a NASA light detecting and ranging (LIDAR) instrument, a NASA wide-field camera and a CNES imaging infrared radiometer. The scope of this effort was a review of the Proteus propulsion bus design and an assessment of the potential for personnel exposure to hydrazine propellant.

  17. Airborne lidar observations of Arctic polar stratospheric clouds - Indications of two distinct growth stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, Lamont R; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1988-01-01

    Airborne lidar observations of Arctic polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) during January 1984 and January 1986 show contrast suggestive of two distinct PSC growth stages delineated by the frost-point temperature. Results obtained at temperatures 2-6 K above the frost point indicate a stage of significant, but limited, particle growth such as proposed in recent models of PSC formation by co-deposition of HNO3 and H2O vapors. Results obtained at a temperature near the frost point indicate the formation of somewhat larger crystalline particles.

  18. CART Raman Lidar Aerosol and Water Vapor Measurements in the Vicinity of Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Marian B.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Turner, David; Newsom, Rob; Sivaraman, Chitra

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol and water vapor profiles acquired by the Raman lidar instrument located at the Climate Research Facility (CRF) at Southern Great Plains (SGP) provide data necessary to investigate the atmospheric variability in the vicinity of clouds near the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Recent CARL upgrades and modifications to the routine processing algorithms afforded the necessarily high temporal and vertical data resolutions for these investigations. CARL measurements are used to investigate the behavior of aerosol backscattering and extinction and their correlation with water vapor and relative humidity.

  19. Constructing a Merged Cloud-Precipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney; Ellis, Scott; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Bharadwaj, Nitin

    2014-05-16

    To improve understanding of the convective processes key to the Madden-Julian-Oscillation (MJO) initiation, the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) collected four months of observations from three radars, the S-band Polarization Radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research & Teaching Radar (SMART-R), and Ka-band Zenith Radar (KAZR) on Addu Atoll in the tropical Indian Ocean. This study compares the measurements from the S-Pol and SMART-R to those from the more sensitive KAZR in order to characterize the hydrometeor detection capabilities of the two scanning precipitation radars. Frequency comparisons for precipitating convective clouds and non-precipitating high clouds agree much better than non-precipitating low clouds for both scanning radars due to issues in ground clutter. On average, SMART-R underestimates convective and high cloud tops by 0.3 to 1.1 km, while S-Pol underestimates cloud tops by less than 0.4 km for these cloud types. S-Pol shows excellent dynamic range in detecting various types of clouds and therefore its data are well suited for characterizing the evolution of the 3D cloud structures, complementing the profiling KAZR measurements. For detecting non-precipitating low clouds and thin cirrus clouds, KAZR remains the most reliable instrument. However, KAZR is attenuated in heavy precipitation and underestimates cloud top height due to rainfall attenuation 4.3% of the time during DYNAMO/AMIE. An empirical method to correct the KAZR cloud top heights is described, and a merged radar dataset is produced to provide improved cloud boundary estimates, microphysics and radiative heating retrievals.

  20. Breakthrough in multichannel laser-radar technology providing thousands of high-sensitive lidar receivers on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarte, Rudolf M.

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a new proved multi-channel laser-radar technology which enables several thousands of high-sensitive laser-radar or lidar receivers to be integrated on a fingernail-sized CMOS-chip for fast 3D-perception and, furthermore, to explain the huge number of resulting applications and to estimate the desirable scientific, economic and society impacts. These extraordinary capabilities rely on the revolutionary improvements introduced by a smart inherently-mixing photodiode with two controllable photo-current outputs [1]. We call it PMD (Photonic Mixer Device) because the opto-electronic mixing process is accomplished directly in the photonic state, followed by an integration process to get OE-correlation and the delay of the optical echo and the modulation signal. The PMD-principle provides an unbelievable simplification, size-reduction and improvement in Multi-Channel Light Detecting and Ranging as a MC-PMD-Lidar or 3D-PMD-camera without scanner. Thanks to the competence and merit of the PMDTechnologies GmbH in cooperation with the INV of the University of Siegen finally brought the PMD in big steps to reliability and to large pixel numbers and to products with today about 20.000 lidar receivers in a 120x160 PMD-matrix, which exhibits homogenous and exquisite specifications like very constant mean value and low standard deviation compared with conventional radar receivers. This innovation may be seen as a breakthrough in the history of camera development. The "3D-camera" of today comprises more 3D-pixels in a PMD-array than, about 1970, the first CCD-cameras contained 2D-pixel in a CCD-array. Both are of similar size aside from the modulated sender with integrated LED's or laser diodes required for a homogenous illumination of the field-of-view.

  1. Multiyear lidar observations of the descending nature of tropical cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Anish Kumar M.; Rajeev, K.; Mishra, Manoj Kumar; Thampi, Bijoy V.; Parameswaran, K.

    2012-09-01

    Sedimentation of ice particles from cirrus clouds is one of the main processes responsible for dehydration of the upper troposphere. Multiyear-long-duration lidar observations of tropical cirrus over Thiruvananthapuram (8.5N, 77E) show the descending nature of these clouds throughout the year, with a mean frequency of occurrence of 20%. Majority of these descending cirrus occur near the base of tropical tropopause layer (TTL), while their frequency of occurrence and vertical extent of descent near the cold point tropopause are considerably less. On average, vertical displacement of the top and base of cirrus is almost similar. The most probable vertical displacement of cirrus is 1.5 - 2.5 km with descent duration of 1-2 h. However, in >20% of the cases, the vertical displacement is >3 km and 40% of the descending cirrus layers last for 2-5 h. Around 95% of descending cirrus clouds have a settling speed <0.8 ms-1. On average, the percentage of clouds that are thickening or thinning by >300 m during descent are almost equal (23% each), while the thickening/thinning of the remaining 54% is <300 m. About 79% of these descending cirrus layers have cloud optical depth (COD) between 0.1 to 0.5. None of these clouds are of sub-visual type (COD <0.03). For the typical range of vertical displacements and CODs observed in the present study, the descending of cirrus clouds are estimated to decrease the longwave cloud radiative forcing at top of the atmosphere by 1 to 12.9 Wm-2.

  2. Horizontal and vertical structure of the Eyjafjallajkull ash cloud over the UK: a comparison of airborne lidar observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, A. L. M.; Dacre, H. F.; Thomson, D. J.; Marenco, F.

    2012-11-01

    During April and May 2010 the ash cloud from the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajkull caused widespread disruption to aviation over northern Europe. The location and impact of the eruption led to a wealth of observations of the ash cloud were being obtained which can be used to assess modelling of the long range transport of ash in the troposphere. The UK FAAM (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements) BAe-146-301 research aircraft overflew the ash cloud on a number of days during May. The aircraft carries a downward looking lidar which detected the ash layer through the backscatter of the laser light. In this study ash concentrations derived from the lidar are compared with simulations of the ash cloud made with NAME (Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment), a general purpose atmospheric transport and dispersion model. The simulated ash clouds are compared to the lidar data to determine how well NAME simulates the horizontal and vertical structure of the ash clouds. Comparison between the ash concentrations derived from the lidar and those from NAME is used to define the fraction of ash emitted in the eruption that is transported over long distances compared to the total emission of tephra. In making these comparisons possible position errors in the simulated ash clouds are identified and accounted for. The ash layers seen by the lidar considered in this study were thin, with typical depths of 550-750 m. The vertical structure of the ash cloud simulated by NAME was generally consistent with the observed ash layers, although the layers in the simulated ash clouds that are identified with observed ash layers are about twice the depth of the observed layers. The structure of the simulated ash clouds were sensitive to the profile of ash emissions that was assumed. In terms of horizontal and vertical structure the best results were obtained by assuming that the emission occurred at the top of the eruption plume, consistent with the observed structure of eruption plumes. However, early in the period when the intensity of the eruption was low, assuming that the emission of ash was uniform with height gives better guidance on the horizontal and vertical structure of the ash cloud. Comparison of the lidar concentrations with those from NAME show that 2-5% of the total mass erupted by the volcano remained in the ash cloud over the United Kingdom.

  3. Observations of atmospheric water vapor, aerosol, and cloud with a Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yufeng, Wang; Fei, Gao; Chengxuan, Zhu; Qing, Yan; Dengxin, Hua

    2014-11-01

    To realize the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio and rejection rate for elastic Mie-Rayleigh signals, a set of dichroic mirrors and narrow-band interference filters with high efficiency was proposed to constitute a new spectroscopy for atmospheric water vapor, aerosol, and cloud studies. Based on the curves of signal-to-noise ratio at three different channels, the actual rejection rates of elastic Mie-Rayleigh signals at the Raman channels were found to be higher than eight orders of magnitude with the cloudy conditions. Continuous nighttime observations showed that the statistical error of the water vapor mixing ratio was <10% at a height of 2.3 km with an aerosol backscatter ratio of 17. Temporal variations of water vapor and aerosols were obtained under the conditions of cloud and cloud-free, the change relevance between aerosol and water vapor was analyzed, and the growth characteristics of water vapor and aerosols showed a good agreement within the cloud layers. Obtained results indicate achievement of the continuous detection of water vapor, aerosol, and cloud with a high efficiency and stability by Raman lidar.

  4. Scale Dependence of Variability in Stratiform Clouds Based on Millimeter Wave Could Radar

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, Z.N.; Kogan, Y.L.; Mechem, D.B.

    2005-03-18

    Internal variability of stratiform clouds is manifested on grid scales ranging from cloud resolving models to general circulation models, and its accurate formulation is one of the most important tasks in improvement of model predictions. Understanding cloud variability on different scales will help to develop and improve subgrid-scale cloud parameterizations. Information about variability is also crucial when dealing with retrieval of microphysical information from observations of volume averaged reflectivity parameters, since neglecting variability can lead to substantial biases in estimation of retrieved microphysical variables. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) operates millimeter wave cloud radar (MMCR) at the ARM Climate Research Facility over the Southern Great Plains (ACRF SGP) that provides a unique opportunity to obtain continuous observations in order to address issues of cloud variability. These data contain information on spatial and/or temporal short- and long-range correlations in cloudiness, enabling scale-by-scale (scaling) analyses over a range of hundreds of meters to hundreds of kilometers. The objective of this study is to conduct an analysis based on radar reflectivity observations of clouds over the ACRF SGP site with special emphasis on boundary layer clouds, and the effect of drizzle.

  5. Influence of gravity waves and tides on mesospheric temperature inversion layers: simultaneous Rayleigh lidar and MF radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, S.; Sathishkumar, S.; Gurubaran, S.

    2008-11-01

    Three nights of simultaneous Rayleigh lidar temperature measurements over Gadanki (13.5 N, 79.2 E) and medium frequency (MF) radar wind measurements over Tirunelveli (8.7 N, 77.8 E) have been analyzed to illustrate the possible effects due to tidal-gravity wave interactions on upper mesospheric inversion layers. The occurrence of tidal gravity wave interaction is investigated using MF radar wind measurements in the altitude region 86 90 km. Of the three nights, it is found that tidal gravity wave interaction occurred in two nights. In the third night, diurnal tidal amplitude is found to be significantly larger. As suggested in Sica et al. (2007), mesospheric temperature inversion seems to be a signature of wave saturation in the mesosphere, since the temperature inversion occurs at heights, when the lapse rate is less than half the dry adiabatic lapse rate.

  6. Lidar Observations of the Pinatubo Stratospheric Aerosol Cloud over Frascati, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congeduti, Fernando; Adriani, Alberto; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Centurioni, Sante

    1992-01-01

    The Pinatubo eruption of June 1991 introduced large plumes into the local stratosphere. On several occasions, volcanic gases and particles reached altitudes of about 30 km, and spread towards the west. A lidar system has been operating to monitor the evolution of the stratospheric aerosol cloud. The backscattering ratio profiles of eight different measurements were chosen to summarize the most significant occurrences of the event. Since the beginning of the winter planetary wave activity, the Pinatubo cloud integrated backscatter exceeded El Chichon's. In this context, the perturbation generated by El Chichon can only be assumed as a lower limit of the one which will follow the Pinatubo eruption. Observations of the event are still in progress.

  7. The El Chichon volcanic cloud in the stratosphere - Lidar observation at Fukuoka and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Hirono, M.

    1984-12-01

    The El Chichon April 1982 eruption's stratospheric cloud was routinely observed by a Nd:YAG lidar system. These observations, together with numerical calculations, indicate that the stratospheric vertical eddy diffusion coefficient in the summer easterly region is of the order of 100 sq cm/sec or less. It is also predicted on these bases that the stratospheric materials of tropospheric origin should be found in smaller concentrations in the summer easterly wind region. It is suggested that the observed reincrease of the integrated backscattering coefficient in September-December 1982 was not caused only by the delayed oxidation of injected SO2, but also by seasonal variation of the meridional advective and diffusive transport from lower to higher latitudes. Nucleation within the cloud renders the simulated results more plausible, in view of observed results.

  8. Polar stratospheric clouds over Finland in the 2012/2013 Arctic winter measured by two Raman lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Anne; Giannakaki, Eleni; Kivi, Rigel; Schrems, Otto; Immler, Franz; Komppula, Mika

    2013-04-01

    Already in December 2012, the Arctic stratospheric vortex reached temperatures sufficiently low for polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation over wide areas of Northern Europe and whole Finland. Within Finland, stratospheric aerosol lidar measurements have been and are performed with two Raman lidar systems, the PollyXT, owned by the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) and situated well below the Arctic circle close to Kuopio (63 N, 27 E) and the MARL lidar owned by the Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), and situated at the FMI Arctic Research Centre in Sodankylä (67 N, 26 E). The PollyXT has been designed as an autonomous tropospheric lidar system, but it has proven to be able to detect aerosol backscatter and depolarization at least as high up as 25 km. Measurements are ongoing as far as low clouds allow for stratospheric analysis with both lidars until the end of PSC season in February. For the winter 2012/2013, PSC occurrence frequency, types and characteristics will be determined. Comparative analysis with Calipso lidar profiles covering Finland will be performed. Preliminary results from December 17-24 show PSCs detected in Kuopio during seven days with the PollyXT lidar. The altitude of the clouds varied in the range of 17-25 km. In Sodankylä the measurements were running on one day during the period and PSCs were observed between altitudes 17-25 km. For the same time period (December 17-24, 2012) CALIPSO has observed stratospheric layers at all overpasses over Finland (9 tracks on five days). The clouds were observed between 18.5 and 26 km, with varying geometric and optical thickness.

  9. 20 Years Lidar Observations of Clouds at the Edge of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, J.; Baumgarten, G.; Luebken, F.

    2013-12-01

    The highest clouds in the Earth atmosphere are located around 83 km altitude. They were first documented in 1885 and are called noctilucent clouds (NLC) because of the impressive bluish-white displays they form against the dark night sky. NLC occur during the summer months from mid to high latitudes and are a visible sign of the extreme conditions in the mesopause region. They consist of nano-sized ice particles (mean value 48×1 nm) which are subject to the variability of the ambient atmosphere. Ice formation and growth at these high altitudes is very sensitive to temperature and water vapor content which are hardly to measure directly with high accuracy. Thus NLC can act as tracers for short-term variations and are thought to document long-term atmospheric changes as well. We will report about our NLC time series obtained by laser optical remote sensing at the research station ALOMAR in Northern Norway (69°N, 16°E). The data archive obtained with the Rayleigh/Mie/Raman-lidar covers now 20 summer seasons and is the largest NLC data set acquired by lidar. It shows variabilities of basic cloud parameters like occurrence, altitude and brightness on time scales ranging from minutes to years. Using the capability of all three emitted laser wavelengths we are able to determine ice particle properties like mean and width of the size distribution and number density. This allows investigation of the cloud water content and its variability. Comparing our ground-based measurements on a fixed location to data sets obtained from sun-synchronous satellites shows certain differences. They could at least partly be attributed to the observation conditions like measurement volume, local time, scattering angles etc. We found atmospheric tides to have a significant influence on the NLC properties. Additionally microphysical processes limit the duration within the ice particles can be considered as passive tracers. Long-term data sets are subject to varying instrument sensitivities, caused by atmospheric transmission as well as system performance. We have investigated the temporal development of the lower lidar detection limit and its impact on the retrieved cloud properties. It is important to take these effects into account as they can change the tendency of long time series.

  10. A new high spectral resolution lidar technique for direct retrievals of cloud and aerosol extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Airborne Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (ACATS) is a Doppler lidar system and high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) recently developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). ACATS passes the returned atmospheric backscatter through a single etalon and divides the transmitted signal into several channels (wavelength intervals), which are measured simultaneously and independently (Figure 1). Both the particulate and molecular scattered signal can be directly and unambiguously measured, allowing for direct retrievals of particle extinction. The broad Rayleigh-scattered spectrum is imaged as a nearly flat background, illustrated in Figure 1c. The integral of the particulate backscattered spectrum is analogous to the aerosol measurement from the typical absorption filter HSRL technique in that the molecular and particulate backscatter components can be separated (Figure 1c and 1d). The main difference between HSRL systems that use the iodine filter technique and the multichannel etalon technique used in the ACATS instrument is that the latter directly measures the spectral broadening of the particulate backscatter using the etalon to filter out all backscattered light with the exception of a narrow wavelength interval (1.5 picometers for ACATS) that contains the particulate spectrum (grey, Figure 1a). This study outlines the method and retrieval algorithms for ACATS data products, focusing on the HSRL derived cloud and aerosol properties. While previous ground-based multi-channel etalon systems have been built and operated for wind retrievals, there has been no airborne demonstration of the technique and the method has not been used to derive HSRL cloud and aerosol properties. ACATS has flown on the NASA ER-2 during flights over Alaska in July 2014 and as part of the Wallops Airborne Vegetation Experiment (WAVE) in September 2012. This study will focus on the HSRL aspect of the ACATS instrument, since the method and retrieval algorithms have direct application to the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in late 2014. Initial ACATS HSRL results and data products, as well as comparisons to coincident Cloud Physics Lidar data will be presented.

  11. Optimal form and frequency of presentation of radar data on clouds and phenomena connected with them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salman, Y. M.; Divinskaya, B. S.

    1975-01-01

    The available data on the space and time structure of the radio echoes from different clouds is examined. On the basis of their analysis, a basis is given for the optimal form of presentation and the operational quality of renewal of radar information used for operational purposes in ZGMO and the TGMTs.

  12. Using multiparameter radars to estimate the attenuation and water content of clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, A.R.

    1995-09-01

    The attenuation of microwaves is caused not only by precipitation but also by clouds. Consequently, the presence of liquid cloud can affect estimates of rainfall rate computed from attenuation and reflectivity factors measured at higher frequencies typically used for spaceborne and airborne radars. Cloud attenuation also affects ground-based radar measurements of rainfall at frequencies as low as 5 GHz. This paper suggests an approach for determining the attenuation due to cloud (A{sub c}) and for estimating the cloud water content (W{sub c}) even in moderate rain by using radars operating at two frequencies with one of them capable of dual-linear (horizontal-vertical) polarization measurements. This analysis suggests that useful {open_quotes}instantaneous{close_quotes} estimates of A{sub c} and W{sub c} should be possible when an upper frequency of 13.8 GHz is used in conjunction with a lower frequency. These measurements could also be used to derive cloud attenuation statistics, potentially useful for developing techniques to help compensate for the effect of cloud attenuation on spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based radar estimates of rainfall. While this algorithm appears promising, it is particularly challenging to devise approaches to test this technique, not only because the necessary instruments do not yet exist but also because of a lack of a standard for comparison. Although a complete test appears out of reach at this time, it should be possible at least to explore the validity of certain aspects of the technology. One possible approach using measurements over extended volumes is discussed at the end of this paper. 19 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Cloud and Precipitation Properties Merged Dataset from Vertically Pointing ARM Radars During GOAmazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toto, T.; Giangrande, S. E.; Troyan, D.; Jensen, M. P.; Bartholomew, M. J.; Johnson, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Green Ocean Amazon (GOAmazon) field campaign is in its first year of a two-year deployment in the Amazon Basin to study aerosol and cloud lifecycles as they relate to cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Insights from GOAmazon datasets will fill gaps in our understanding, ultimately improving constraints in tropical rain forest climate model parameterizations. As part of GOAmazon, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) has been collecting a unique set of observations near Manacapuru, Brazil, a site known to experience both the pristine condition of its locale as well as, at times, the effects of the Manaus, Brazil, mega city pollution plume. In order to understand the effects of anthropogenic aerosol on clouds, radiative balance and climate, documentation of cloud and precipitation properties in the absence and presence of the Manaus plume is a necessary complement to the aerosol measurements collected during the campaign. The AMF is uniquely equipped to capture the most complete and continuous record of cloud and precipitation column properties using the UHF (915 MHz) ARM zenith radar (UAZR) and vertically pointing W-Band (95 GHz) ARM Cloud Radar (WACR). Together, these radars provide multiple methods (e.g., moment-based, dual-frequency, and Doppler spectral techniques) to retrieve properties of the cloud field that may be influenced by aerosols. This includes drop size distribution, dynamical and microphysical properties (e.g., vertical air motion, latent heat retrievals), and associated uncertainties. Additional quality assurance is available from independent rain gauge and column platforms. Here, we merge data from the UAZR and WACR (WACR-ARSCL VAP) radars, along with ARM Sounding observations and optical parsivel measurement constraints, to present a first look at select convective and stratiform events, their precipitation properties and statistical profile characterization.

  14. An investigation of mountain waves with lidar observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viezee, W.; Collis, R. T. H.; Lawrence, J. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    In March and April of 1969 and 1970, lidar (laser radar) observations of the atmospheric structure were made in the lee of the Sierra Nevada during the occurrence of mountain lee waves. Rawinsonde ascents and, on some occasions, research aircraft flights supported the lidar observations. The objective of the program was to explore the applicability of the lidar technique to atmospheric turbulence detection. The observations demonstrate that a ground-based lidar can delineate significant features of the atmospheric flow pattern by monitoring echoes from concentrations of particulate matter that characterize the airflow structure in the form of either visible or subvisible clouds and dust.

  15. Radiative effects of African dust and smoke observed from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, John E.; McGill, Matt; Rodier, Sharon; Vaughan, Mark; Hu, Yongxiang; Hlavka, Dennis

    2009-09-01

    Cloud and aerosol effects have a significant impact on the atmospheric radiation budget in the tropical Atlantic because of the spatial and temporal extent of desert dust and smoke from biomass burning in the atmosphere. The influences of African dust and smoke aerosols on cloud radiative properties over the tropical Atlantic Ocean were analyzed for the month of July for 3 years (2006-2008) using colocated data collected by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) and Aqua satellites. Aerosol layer height and type can be accurately determined using CALIOP data through directly measured parameters such as optical depth, volume depolarization ratio, attenuated backscatter, and color ratio. On average, clouds below 5 km had a daytime instantaneous shortwave (SW) radiative flux of 270.2 16.9 W/m2 and thin cirrus clouds had a SW radiative flux of 208.0 12.7 W/m2. When dust aerosols interacted with clouds below 5 km, as determined from CALIPSO, the SW radiative flux decreased to 205.4 13.0 W/m2. Similarly, smoke aerosols decreased the SW radiative flux of low clouds to a value of 240.0 16.6 W/m2. These decreases in SW radiative flux were likely attributed to the aerosol layer height and changes in cloud microphysics. CALIOP lidar observations, which more accurately identify aerosol layer height than passive instruments, appear essential for better understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions, a major uncertainty in predicting the climate system.

  16. D Building Reconstruction from LIDAR Point Clouds by Adaptive Dual Contouring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orthuber, E.; Avbelj, J.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel workflow for data-driven building reconstruction from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) point clouds. The method comprises building extraction, a detailed roof segmentation using region growing with adaptive thresholds, segment boundary creation, and a structural 3D building reconstruction approach using adaptive 2.5D Dual Contouring. First, a 2D-grid is overlain on the segmented point cloud. Second, in each grid cell 3D vertices of the building model are estimated from the corresponding LiDAR points. Then, the number of 3D vertices is reduced in a quad-tree collapsing procedure, and the remaining vertices are connected according to their adjacency in the grid. Roof segments are represented by a Triangular Irregular Network (TIN) and are connected to each other by common vertices or - at height discrepancies - by vertical walls. Resulting 3D building models show a very high accuracy and level of detail, including roof superstructures such as dormers. The workflow is tested and evaluated for two data sets, using the evaluation method and test data of the "ISPRS Test Project on Urban Classification and 3D Building Reconstruction" (Rottensteiner et al., 2012). Results show that the proposed method is comparable with the state of the art approaches, and outperforms them regarding undersegmentation and completeness of the scene reconstruction.

  17. On the air motion in continental shallow cumulus clouds: large-eddy simulation versus radar observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Chandra, A.; Klein, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Summertime observations for 13 years at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are used to study air motion in non-precipitating fair-weather shallow cumulus clouds. A composite shallow cumulus case is constructed based on an ensemble of days with observed active shallow cumulus clouds. Large-scale forcing for this composite case is derived accordingly based on observation-constrained variational analysis and is used to drive the large-eddy simulation (LES), whose set-up is most suitable to make an apple-to-apple comparison with radar observation at the site. At the same time, a novel retrieval algorithm, which can remove the insects' contamination on radar reflectivity, is applied to millimeter cloud radar 10s observations to get vertical velocity of air motion in the shallow cumulus cloud ensembles. We then focus on the behavior of cloudy profiles with liquid water path greater than 80 g/m^2. This is done because we believe this portion of cloud makes a major contribution to the total mass flux and by so doing, the uncertainty is minimized in the comparison between observation and LES results. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-641597

  18. Precipitating Snow Retrievals from Combined Airborne Cloud Radar and Millimeter-Wave Radiometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.

    2008-01-01

    An algorithm for retrieving snow over oceans from combined cloud radar and millimeter-wave radiometer observations is developed. The algorithm involves the use of physical models to simulate cloud radar and millimeter-wave radiometer observations from basic atmospheric variables such as hydrometeor content, temperature, and relative humidity profiles and is based on an optimal estimation technique to retrieve these variables from actual observations. A high-resolution simulation of a lake-effect snowstorm by a cloud-resolving model is used to test the algorithm. That is, synthetic observations are generated from the output of the cloud numerical model, and the retrieval algorithm is applied to the synthetic data. The algorithm performance is assessed by comparing the retrievals with the reference variables used in synthesizing the observations. The synthetic observation experiment indicates good performance of the retrieval algorithm. The algorithm is also applied to real observations from the Wakasa Bay field experiment that took place over the Sea of Japan in January and February 2003. The application of the retrieval algorithm to data from the field experiment yields snow estimates that are consistent with both the cloud radar and radiometer observations.

  19. Off-beam (multiply-scattered) lidar returns from stratus. 1; Cloud-information content and sensitivity to noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Cahalan, Robert F.

    1998-01-01

    We review the basic multiple scattering theory of off-beam lidar returns from optically thick clouds using the diffusion approximation. The shape of the temporal signal - the stretched pulse - depends primarily on the physical thickness of the cloud whereas its spatial counterpart - the diffuse spot - conveys specific information on the cloud's optical thickness, as do the absolute returns. This makes observation of the weak off-beam lidar returns an attractive prospect in remote sensing of cloud properties. By estimating the signal-to-noise ratio, we show that night-time measurements can be performed with existing technology. By the same criterion, day-time operation is a challenge that can only be met with a combination of cutting-edge techniques in filtering and in laser sources.

  20. High Resolution Radar Detection of Individual Raindrops in Natural Cloud Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J.; Flatau, P. J.; Harasti, P. R.; Yates, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    A high resolution C-band Doppler radar previously used to detect debris shed during space shuttle missions is shown to have the capability to determine the properties of individual raindrops in the free atmosphere. This is accomplished through a combination of the radar's narrow (0.22 degree) beamwidth, a range resolution as fine as 0.5m, and extremely high 3MW power. These attributes lead to exceptionally small radar pulse volumes (as low as 14m3 at the radar's minimum 2km range) and allow the radar to detect individual drops that exceed 0.5mm in diameter. As the radar transmits both a higher (0.5m) and lower (37m) range resolution waveform every other pulse, a unique opportunity arise to examine both the bulk radar reflectivity and individual particle properties at the same time. The larger individual drops detected by the radar appear in the radar data as bright, nearly linear, reflectivity "streaks" against the more uniform background reflectivity field generated by the population of smaller drops. These streaks can then be examined to infer the properties of the particles directly such as their size, fall velocity, concentration, and potentially other properties such as naturally occurring drop oscillations. Examples of the bulk and individual particle properties for several "streaks" associated with a deep convective system are examined. Additional high-resolution studies of the circulation fields associated with a shallow altocumulus layer and a long-lived radar reflectivity bright band associated with the melting layer within a meso-convective cloud system reveal new details of the internal circulation features associated with these phenomena.

  1. Lidar multiple scattering factors inferred from CALIPSO lidar and IIR retrievals of semi-transparent cirrus cloud optical depths over oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, A.; Pelon, J.; Vaughan, M. A.; Winker, D. M.; Trepte, C. R.; Dubuisson, P.

    2015-07-01

    Cirrus cloud absorption optical depths retrieved at 12.05 ?m are compared to extinction optical depths retrieved at 0.532 ?m from perfectly co-located observations of single-layered semi-transparent cirrus over ocean made by the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) and the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) flying on board the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite. IIR infrared absorption optical depths are compared to CALIOP visible extinction optical depths when the latter can be directly derived from the measured apparent two-way transmittance through the cloud. An evaluation of the CALIOP multiple scattering factor is inferred from these comparisons after assessing and correcting biases in IIR and CALIOP optical depths reported in version 3 data products. In particular, the blackbody radiance taken in the IIR version 3 algorithm is evaluated, and IIR retrievals are corrected accordingly. Numerical simulations and IIR retrievals of ice crystal sizes suggest that the ratios of CALIOP extinction and IIR absorption optical depths should remain roughly constant with respect to temperature. Instead, these ratios are found to increase quasi-linearly by about 40 % as the temperature at the layer centroid altitude decreases from 240 to 200 K. It is discussed that this behavior can be explained by variations of the multiple scattering factor ?T applied to correct the measured apparent two-way transmittance for contribution of forward-scattering. While the CALIOP version 3 retrievals hold ?T fixed at 0.6, this study shows that ?T varies with temperature (and hence cloud particle size) from ?T = 0.8 at 200 K to ?T = 0.5 at 240 K for single-layered semi-transparent cirrus clouds with optical depth larger than 0.3. The revised parameterization of ?T introduces a concomitant temperature dependence in the simultaneously derived CALIOP lidar ratios that is consistent with observed changes in CALIOP depolarization ratios and particle habits derived from IIR measurements.

  2. Polar Mesospheric Clouds and Rocket Exhaust in the Arctic Middle Atmosphere: Lidar Observations and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, R. L.; Deland, M. T.; Lieberman, R. S.; Walker, G. W.

    2010-12-01

    We report observations of polar mesospheric clouds (PMC) and rocket exhaust by ground-based lidar at Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR), Chatanika, Alaska (65N, 147W). The PMC observations have been made in late summer over several years in years when space shuttle launches both did and did not occur. The rocket exhaust observations have been made in late winter and spring on three nights when Black Brandt XII (two) and X (one) rockets were launched at PFRR. The PMCs are observed at altitudes between 80 and 86 km during visual displays. The rocket exhaust is observed at altitudes between 66 and 82 km, with the strongest echoes from the cloud at the higher altitudes. The aerosol backscatter ratios of the clouds and exhaust have magnitudes from 0.1 to 100. We consider the areal extent, seasonal evolution, and environmental conditions of the PMCs as observed by satellites (i.e., EOS-Aura/OMI, NOAA/SBUV, and EOS-Aura/MLS). We analyze the structure of the PMCs in different years in terms of current microphysical models and analyze the characteristics of the clouds in terms of the influence of space shuttle exhaust. We consider the formation of the rocket exhaust in terms of the combustion products of the rocket fuel and the environmental conditions measured by satellites (i.e., UARS/MLS). We compare and contrast the structure of the PMCs and rocket exhaust and discuss them as indicators of atmospheric conditions.

  3. Dual wavelength lidar observation of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds during the ALBATROSS 1996 Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerle, G.; Schfer, H.-J.; Neuber, R.; Schrems, O.; McDermid, I. S.

    Dual wavelength aerosol lidar observations of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds were performed during the ALBATROSS 1996 campaign aboard the research vessel POLARSTERN on the Atlantic ocean in October-November 1996. On the basis of 57 hours of night-time observations between 23.5N and 23.5S we find in 72% of the altitude profiles indications of the presence of cirrus cloud layers. This percentage drops to 32% at subtropical latitudes (23.5-30) based on 15 hours of data. About one-half of the subtropical and tropical cirrus layers are subvisual with an optical depth of less than 0.03 at a wavelength of 532 nm. In general the clouds exhibit high spatial and temporal variability on scales of a few tens of meters vertically and a few hundred meters horizontally. No clouds are observed above the tropopause. An abrupt change in the relation between the color ratios of the parallel and perpendicular backscatter coefficients at about 240 K is interpreted in terms of changes of particle shape and/or size distribution. At temperatures between 195 and 255 K only a small fraction of the observations are consistent with the presence of small particles with dimensions of less than 0.1 m.

  4. Uncertainty in Cloud Aerosol Transport System (CATS) Doppler Lidar Products and Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmer, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Cloud Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is both a high spectral resolution lidar and Doppler lidar currently being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for use as a demonstrator instrument for NASA’s Aerosol Cloud Ecosystem (ACE) Mission. CATS is intended to fly on NASA’s high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. CATS will be capable of measuring both aerosol properties and horizontal wind velocity as a function of altitude. The accuracy of these measurements is important to the success of the instrument and the ACE mission. Uncertainty equations for both the aerosol and wind products are derived. Initially the only sources of error are assumed to be instrument error in the spectral measurements. Using simulated CATS spectral measurements from simulated atmospheric profiles (an atmosphere with only a cirrus layer, an atmosphere with only a cumulus layer, an atmosphere with only an aerosol layer, and an atmosphere with no clouds or aerosols), the uncertainty in the aerosol and wind products are calculated. These calculated uncertainties are found to be within reason. Also worthy of consideration is the effect of aircraft motion on CATS’ wind measurements and products. An equation for the the nadir angle (assumed to be about 45 degrees for CATS), as well as the uncertainty in this angle, in terms of aircraft pitch and roll is derived. The effect of uncertainty in this angle on the uncertainty in CATS aerosol and wind products is calculated using the same simulated data previously mentioned, which is found to be insignificant for normal, steady flight.

  5. Development of Spaceborne Radar Simulator by NICT and JAXA using JMA Cloud-resolving Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, T.; Eito, H.; Aonashi, K.; Hashimoto, A.; Iguchi, T.; Hanado, H.; Shimizu, S.; Yoshida, N.; Oki, R.

    2009-12-01

    We are developing synthetic spaceborne radar data toward a simulation of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) aboard the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core-satellite. Our purposes are a production of test-bed data for higher level DPR algorithm developers, in addition to a diagnosis of a cloud resolving model (CRM). To make the synthetic data, we utilize the CRM by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA-NHM) (Ikawa and Saito 1991, Saito et al. 2006, 2007), and the spaceborne radar simulation algorithm by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) named as the Integrated Satellite Observation Simulator for Radar (ISOSIM-Radar). The ISOSIM-Radar simulates received power data in a field of view of the spaceborne radar with consideration to a scan angle of the radar (Oouchi et al. 2002, Kubota et al. 2009). The received power data are computed with gaseous and hydrometeor attenuations taken into account. The backscattering and extinction coefficients are calculated assuming the Mie approximation for all species. The dielectric constants for solid particles are computed by the Maxwell-Garnett model (Bohren and Battan 1982). Drop size distributions are treated in accordance with those of the JMA-NHM. We assume a spherical sea surface, a Gaussian antenna pattern, and 49 antenna beam directions for scan angles from -17 to 17 deg. in the PR. In this study, we report the diagnosis of the JMA-NHM with reference to the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) and CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) using the ISOSIM-Radar from the view of comparisons in cloud microphysics schemes of the JMA-NHM. We tested three kinds of explicit bulk microphysics schemes based on Lin et al. (1983), that is, three-ice 1-moment scheme, three-ice 2-moment scheme (Eito and Aonashi 2009), and newly developed four-ice full 2-moment scheme (Hashimoto 2008). The hydrometeor species considered here are rain, graupel, snow, cloud water, cloud ice and hail (4-ice scheme only). We examined a case of an intersection with the TRMM PR and the CloudSat CPR on 6th April 2008 over sea surface in the south of Kyushu Island of Japan. In this work, observed rainfall systems are simulated with one-way double nested domains having horizontal grid sizes of 5 km (outer) and 2 km (inner). Data used here are from the inner domain only. Results of the PR indicated better performances of 2-moment bulk schemes. It suggests that prognostic number concentrations of frozen hydrometeors are more effective in high altitudes and constant number concentrations can lead to the overestimation of the snow there. For three-ice schemes, simulated received power data overestimated above freezing levels with reference to the observed data. In contrast, the overestimation of frozen particles was heavily reduced for the four-ice scheme.

  6. Scanning ARM Cloud Radars. Part II: Data Quality Control and Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, Pavlos; Jo, Ieng; Borque, Paloma; Tatarevic, Aleksandra; Lamer, Katia; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin B.; Johnson, Karen L.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2014-03-01

    The Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACR’s) are the primary instruments for documenting the four-dimensional structure and evolution of clouds within a 20-30 km radius from the ARM fixed and mobile sites. Here, the post-processing of the calibrated SACR measurements is discussed. First, a feature mask algorithm that objectively determines the presence of significant radar returns is described. The feature mask algorithm is based on the statistical properties of radar receiver noise. It accounts for atmospheric emission and is applicable even for SACR profiles with few or no signal-free range gates. Using the nearest-in-time atmospheric sounding, the SACR radar reflectivities are corrected for gaseous attenuation (water vapor and oxygen) using a line-by-line absorption model. Despite having a high pulse repetition frequency, the SACR has a narrow Nyquist velocity limit and thus Doppler velocity folding is commonly observed. An unfolding algorithm that makes use of a first guess for the true Doppler velocity using horizontal wind measurements from the nearest sounding is described. The retrieval of the horizontal wind profile from the HS-RHI SACR scan observations and/or nearest sounding is described. The retrieved horizontal wind profile can be used to adaptively configure SACR scan strategies that depend on wind direction. Several remaining challenges are discussed, including the removal of insect and second-trip echoes. The described algorithms significantly enhance SACR data quality and constitute an important step towards the utilization of SACR measurements for cloud research.

  7. Development and Performance of the Millimeter-wave Cloud Profiling Radar at 95 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Toshiaki; Yamaguchi, Jun; Abe, Hideji; Futaba, Ken-Ichi; Yokote, Shin-Ichi; Kawamura, Youhei; Takamura, Tamio; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Ohno, Yuichi; Nakanishi, Yuji; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    We developed a cloud profiling radar, named FALCON-I, transmitting frequency-modulated continuous wave (FM-CW) at 95 GHz for high sensitivity and high spatial resolution ground-based observations. Millimeter wave at 95 GHz is used to realize high sensitivity to small cloud particles. An FM-CW type radar realizes similar sensitivity with much smaller output power to a pulse type radar. Two 1m-diameter parabolic antennas separated by 1.4m each other are used for transmitting and receiving the wave. The direction of the antennas is fixed at the zenith at this moment. The radar can observe clouds up to 20 km in height with a resolution of 9 m. Beam size of the antenna is as small as 0.2 degree of arc, which corresponds to 15 m at the range of 5 km. Observation results showed that the sensitivity of -34 dBZ is realized at 5 km in range, and good spatial resolutions.

  8. Efficient method for detecting and tracking rainfall clouds in non-Doppler radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaf, Ouarda; El Hamid Adane, Abd

    2014-01-01

    The precipitation echoes collected by non-Doppler meteorological radar are identified and tracked in the covered area. For that a sequence of images, recorded every 5 min by S-band radar in Bordeaux and previously filtered to remove the ground clutter, is considered. In these images, the radar echoes are labeled as precipitation cells and processed using the method of sum and difference histograms of gray levels. Textural parameters are extracted from these images by slicing an analysis window of 55 pixels. Energy and homogeneity are found to be the best discriminating parameters because each of them clearly assigns the radar echoes to either stratiform or cumuliform clouds. The convective cells mainly differ from the stratiform ones by their texture and the high values of their reflectivity factor. To account for the downpour development, the time variations of barycenter, surface area, and reflectivity factor have been analyzed for the precipitation cells in the sequence of radar images under consideration. In the case of cumuliform cells having reflectivity factor higher than 40 dBZ, the expansion of their surface area and their progress in the observed region constitute important information about the clouds leading to weather extremes.

  9. ESYRO Lidar system developments for troposphere monitoring of aerosols and clouds properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudose, Ovidiu-Gelu; Cazacu, Marius-Mihai; Timofte, Adrian; Balin, Ioan

    2011-11-01

    Aiming the remote sensing low cost, up-gradable and modular tools development for monitoring relevant atmospheric parameters and processes in the whole troposphere (from 250 m to 12-15 Km altitude), a new configuration LIDAR system, i.e. ESYROLIDAR, dedicated for tropospheric aerosols and clouds high temporal (minutes) and spatial resolutions (meters) monitoring have been developed and tested. This extremely up-gradable configuration of ESYROLIDAR is based on: a multi -wavelengths (1064, 532 and 355 nm) powerful (200, 100 and 45 mJ/pulse) and relatively high variable repetition rate (up to 30 Hz) Nd:YAG pulsed laser, a large Newtonian telescope (40 cm diameter of collector mirror) and a new opto-mechanics detection module built in an original "eye geometry" consideration. The firsts tests and measurements were performed at the site of Science and Technology Park TehnopolIS (Iasi city located on the northeastern region of Romania), using a basic configuration with a 532 nm elastic detection with depolarization study module. Different types of clouds up to 12 km in daylight are highlighted from this first measurement. Measurements and tests made in other recent campaigns for 355 nm elastic channel are also presented. The ability of the new LIDAR system to determine the height of planetary boundary layer (PBL) determined from the LIDAR signals, as well as the aerosols load and optical parameters (extinction and backscatter) and the evaluation of atmospheric dynamics at high spatial-temporal resolutions are clearly confirmed. This paper presents the ESYROLIDAR basic configuration with its two VIS elastic channels (532 nm, parallel and cross). The first measurements made with the UV (355 nm - interchangeable channel) and VIS (532 nm) elastic channels are illustrated by typical examples. The quality of ESYROLIDAR atmospheric profiles is based on advantages of low divergence (0.15 mrad), relatively high repetition rate (30 Hz) and the coaxial UV-VIS-NIR .The present challenges are first a new robust more automatized alignment system and second the integration of more Raman detection channels i.e. Raman H2O water vapor at 407 nm. This system is the base of the ROmanian LIdar NETwork (ROLINET).

  10. Extinction coefficients from lidar observations in ice clouds compared to in-situ measurements from the Cloud Integrating Nephelometer during CRYSTAL-FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noel, Vincent; Winker, D. M.; Garrett, T. J.; McGill, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of volume extinction coefficients in tropical ice clouds retrieved from two instruments : the 532-nm Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL), and the in-situ probe Cloud Integrating Nephelometer (CIN). Both instruments were mounted on airborne platforms during the CRYSTAL-FACE campaign and took measurements in ice clouds up to 17km. Coincident observations from three cloud cases are compared : one synoptically-generated cirrus cloud of low optical depth, and two ice clouds located on top of convective systems. Emphasis is put on the vertical variability of the extinction coefficient. Results show small differences on small spatial scales (approx. 100m) in retrievals from both instruments. Lidar retrievals also show higher extinction coefficients in the synoptic cirrus case, while the opposite tendency is observed in convective cloud systems. These differences are generally variations around the average profile given by the CPL though, and general trends on larger spatial scales are usually well reproduced. A good agreement exists between the two instruments, with an average difference of less than 16% on optical depth retrievals.

  11. Combined satellite and radar retrievals of drop concentration and CCN at convective cloud base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Fischman, Baruch; Zheng, Youtong; Goren, Tom; Giguzin, David

    2014-05-01

    The number of activated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) into cloud drops at the base of convective clouds (Na) is retrieved based on the high-resolution (375 m) satellite retrievals of vertical profiles of convective cloud drop effective radius (re). The maximum cloud base supersaturation (S) is calculated when Na is combined with radar-measured updraft and yields CCN(S), which was validated well against ground-based CCN measurements during the conditions of well-mixed boundary layer over the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric System Research Southern Great Plains site. Satellite retrieving Na is a new capability, which is one essential component of simultaneous measurements of cloud microstructure and CCN from space by using clouds as natural CCN chambers. This has to be complemented by a methodology for satellite estimates of cloud base updraft, which is yet to be developed and demonstrated. In the mean time, the retrieved Na can be used for the assimilation of the combined CCN and updraft effects on clouds in models.

  12. Space radar image of Western Pacific rain clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This radar image shows the ocean surface in a portion of the Western Pacific Ocean. Scientists are using images like this to study the occurrence, distribution and activity of tropical rain squalls and to understand the exchange of heat between the atmosphere and ocean and the upper layer mixing in the tropical oceans, which are critical factors for understanding the driving forces which produce the El Nino phenomenon. The white, curved area at the top of the image is a portion of the Ontong Java Atoll, part of the Solomon Islands group. The yellowish green area near the bottom of the image is an intense rain cell. This image is centered near 5.5 degrees South latitude and 159.5 degrees East longitude. The area shown is 50 kilometers by 21 kilometers (31 miles by 13 miles). This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 13th orbit on April 10, 1994. The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the SIR-C radar as follows: Red is C-band horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received and blue is L-band horizontally transmitted and received. The large rain cell is about 15 kilometers by 15 kilometers (9 miles by 9 miles) and contains two dark regions, one circular and one rectangular, inside it. Two smaller reddish cells are visible closer to the atoll. The red areas may be caused by reflection from ice particles in the colder, upper portion of the storm cell and not from the ocean surface at all. This provides direct evidence that it is raining within this storm cell, valuable information which is usually very difficult to measure over more remote regions of the ocean away from coastal-based weather systems. The dark holes in the middle of the cell are thought to be areas of very heavy rainfall which actually smooth out the ocean surface and result in lower radar returns. The surrounding ocean is blue to green plus black. Winds and currents cause the ocean surface to be rough and those variations on the surface affect how the radar signals bounce off the surface. The bright areas on the image correspond to areas where the wind speed is high. The highest winds are seen as the yellow-green region of the large rain cell. The lowest winds are seen inside the atoll as dark areas. Outside the rain cell, the winds are moderately low, which is indicated by the puff-like, blue patterns surrounding the cell and extending into the atoll. The long, thin, dark lines extending across the ocean are surface currents. Here the currents are likely accumulating natural oils caused by small marine biological organisms. The oils cause the small, wind-generated waves to be reduced in size or damped which produces a smooth, dark zone on the radar image.

  13. Dual-wavelength millimeter-wave radar measurements of cirrus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Sekelsky, S.M.; Firda, J.M.; McIntosh, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    In April 1994, the University of Massachusetts` 33-GHz/95-GHz Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) participated in the multi-sensor Remote Cloud Sensing (RCS) Intensive Operation Period (IOP), which was conducted at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART). During the 3-week experiment, CPRS measured a variety of cloud types and severe weather. In the context of global warming, the most significant measurements are dual-frequency observations of cirrus clouds, which may eventually be used to estimate ice crystal size and shape. Much of the cirrus data collected with CPRS show differences between 33-GHz and 95-GHz reflectivity measurements that are correlated with Doppler estimates of fall velocity. Because of the small range of reflectivity differences, a precise calibration of the radar is required and differential attenuation must also be removed from the data. Depolarization, which is an indicator of crystal shape, was also observed in several clouds. In this abstract we present examples of Mie scattering from cirrus and estimates of differential attenuation due to water vapor and oxygen that were derived from CART radiosonde measurements.

  14. Measurements of the Vertical Structure of Aerosols and Clouds Over the Ocean Using Micro-Pulse LIDAR Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Campbell, James R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Bates, David; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The determination of the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds over the ocean is needed for accurate retrievals of ocean color from satellites observations. The presence of absorbing aerosol layers, especially at altitudes above the boundary layer, has been shown to influence the calculation of ocean color. Also, satellite data must be correctly screened for the presence of clouds, particularly cirrus, in order to measure ocean color. One instrument capable of providing this information is a lidar, which uses pulses of laser light to profile the vertical distribution of aerosol and cloud layers in the atmosphere. However, lidar systems prior to the 1990s were large, expensive, and not eye-safe which made them unsuitable for cruise deployments. During the 1990s the first small, autonomous, and eye-safe lidar system became available: the micro-pulse lidar, or MPL. The MPL is a compact and eye-safe lidar system capable of determining the range of aerosols and clouds by firing a short pulse of laser light (523 nm) and measuring the time-of-flight from pulse transmission to reception of a returned signal. The returned signal is a function of time, converted into range using the speed of light, and is proportional to the amount of light backscattered by atmospheric molecules (Rayleigh scattering), aerosols, and clouds. The MPL achieves ANSI eye-safe standards by sending laser pulses at low energy (micro-J) and expanding the beam to 20.32 cm in diameter. A fast pulse-repetition-frequency (2500 Hz) is used to achieve a good signal-to-noise, despite the low output energy. The MPL has a small field-of-view (< 100 micro-rad) and signals received with the instrument do not contain multiple scattering effects. The MPL has been used successfully at a number of long-term sites and also in several field experiments around the world.

  15. Towards Realtime Assimilation of Doppler Radar Observations for Cloud-Resolving Hurricane Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Y.; Zhang, F.; Gamache, J. F.; Marks, F. D.

    2008-12-01

    This study explores the feasibility and impacts of on-demand, real-time assimilation of Doppler radar observations straight from the planes with an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to initialize a cloud-resolving hurricane prediction model. The NOAA P3 aircrafts have being flying into tropical cyclones to gather radar observations since 1994. These observations are significant in investigating and anglicizing hurricane's intensity, eye-wall structure and intensity changes, but the radar data has never been ingested into hurricane prediction models in real-time. Likely reasons are (1) insufficient model resolution due to inadequate computing resources for ingesting convective-scale details observed by the radar, (2) inadequacy of existing data assimilation method for operational models, and (3) lack of sufficient bandwidth in transmitting huge volume radar data to the ground in realtime. This work is built on our recent case studies of predicting the rapid formation and intensification of past hurricanes in assimilating both ground-base and/or airborne radial velocity into a cloud-resolving mesoscale model with EnKF. Under the auspices of NOAA Hurricane Forecasting Improvement Project (HFIP), we have access to the NSF-sponsored high-performance computing facility TACC at University of Texas at Austin that makes realtime cloud-resolving hurricane data assimilation and forecasting possible. We alleviate the requirement of large volume data transfer from the aircraft through developing a radar radial velocity data quality and thinning procedure (namely to produce superobervations or SOs) to significantly reduce the data size before being transferred. We have first conducted near realtime testing of the cloud-resolving data assimilation and forecasting with Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model using 40.5, 13.5, 4.5 and 1.5 km grid spacings and movable nested grids for Hurricanes Dolly and Fay (2008). As of today, we have successfully demonstrated the feasibility, data follow and effectiveness of on-demand, realtime data assimilation of airborne Doppler observations and subsequent cloud-resolving deterministic and ensemble hurricane forecasting for Hurricanes Gustav and Ike. We plan to conduct more assimilation experiments both in realtime and retrospectively to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of our data assimilation system for future on- demand cloud-resolving hurricane predictions.

  16. NEXRAD Weather Radar Observations of the 2006 Augustine Volcanic Eruption Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. J.; Scott, C.; Wood, J.; Hall, T.

    2006-12-01

    The 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska provided an exceptional opportunity to detect and measure explosive volcanic events and to track drifting volcanic clouds using WRS-88D (NEXRAD) weather radar data. Radar data complemented the real-time seismic monitoring by providing rapid confirmation of ash generation and cloud height. The explosive phase of the eruption consisted of thirteen discrete Vulcanian explosions from January 11 to 28, with seismic durations that ranged from one to eleven minutes. The ash columns and drifting clouds from all of the events were observed via a NEXRAD located 185 km NE of the volcano on the Kenai Peninsula (site PAHG). The radar was operated in both precipitation and clear air modes, resulting in a temporal resolution of 4.1 to 10 minutes per complete scan, respectively. Scan elevation angles for the radar beam centroid varied slightly depending upon mode of operation, but values of 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 degrees were typically used, corresponding to altitudes over the volcano of 3.8, 7.2, 10.5, and 13.8 km above sea level. Estimates of eruption cloud height were made by the National Weather Service (NWS) Anchorage Forecast Office using range-height indication cross-sections and radar echo tops (the altitude of the +18.5 dBZ reflectance surface). The observed cloud heights typically ranged from 7.5 to 10.5 km above sea level, with the exception of the January 17 event which briefly had an echo top of about 14 km. Most of the eruption clouds reached their maximum height in the first scan in which they were visible, suggesting an energetic and impulsive initial event, and were at lower heights in subsequent views. These height estimates may be minimum values because very fine-grained ash at the top of eruption clouds has low radar reflectance, and thus may not be observed. Height estimates were rapidly communicated to the NWS Alaska Aviation Weather Unit and the Alaska Volcano Observatory for use in hazard statements and related cloud dispersion modeling. Base reflectivity images at four scan angles provided additional insight into the vertical ash distribution. Generally, the eruption column and associated volcanic clouds had the greatest areal coverage and highest reflectivity values (as high as +60 dBZ) at the two lowest scan elevation angles (0.5 and 1.5 degrees or heights of about 3.8 to 7.2 km above sea level). The explosions on January 13 and 17 produced volcanic clouds that propagated upwind for ten to twenty minutes before dispersing, suggesting that some of the ash was being generated by pyroclastic flows on the flanks. Drifting volcanic clouds were tracked in the data for as long as two hours after the start of the eruption, with reflectivity values as low as -4 dBZ observed. Retrospective analyses of level-3 NEXRAD data from the Kenai (PAHG) and King Salmon (PAKC) radars (200 km SW of Augustine) examined radial base velocity and spectrum width (a measure of the velocity variance within a scan volume) at four scan angles. The highest base velocities observed were for the January 17 event, which reached 33 m/s, the maximum value computed by the level-3 algorithm. This event, and similar ones on January 13, were characterized by moderately high spectrum widths (as large as 9.8 m/s), indicative of turbulence and wind shear.

  17. Remote Sensing of Clouds using Satellites, Lidars, CLF/XLF and IR Cameras at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirinos, J.

    2015-12-01

    Clouds in the field of view of the fluorescence detectors affect the detection of the extensive air showers. Several remote sensing techniques are used to detect night-time clouds over the 3000 km2 of the Pierre Auger Observatory. Four lidars at the fluorescence detector sites are performing different patterns of scans of the surrounding sky detecting clouds. Two laser facilities (CLF and XLF) are shooting into the sky delivering cloud cover above them every 15 minutes. Four IR cameras detect the presence of clouds within the FOV of the fluorescence detectors every 5 minutes. A method using GOES-12 and GOES-13 satellites identifies night-time clouds twice per hour with a spatial resolution of 2.4 km by 5.5 km over the Observatory. We upload all this information into several databases to be used for the reconstruction of cosmic ray events and to find exotic events.

  18. Global Observations of Aerosols and Clouds from Combined Lidar and Passive Instruments to Improve Radiation Budget and Climate Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, David M.

    1999-01-01

    Current uncertainties in the effects of clouds and aerosols on the Earth radiation budget limit our understanding of the climate system and the potential for global climate change. Pathfinder Instruments for Cloud and Aerosol Spaceborne Observations - Climatologie Etendue des Nuages et des Aerosols (PICASSO-CENA) is a recently approved satellite mission within NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) program which will address these uncertainties with a unique suite of active and passive instruments. The Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) demonstrated the potential benefits of space lidar for studies of clouds and aerosols. PICASSO-CENA builds on this experience with a payload consisting of a two-wavelength polarization-sensitive lidar, an oxygen A-band spectrometer (ABS), an imaging infrared radiometer (IIR), and a wide field camera (WFC). Data from these instruments will be used to measure the vertical distributions of aerosols and clouds in the atmosphere, as well as optical and physical properties of aerosols and clouds which influence the Earth radiation budget. PICASSO-CENA will be flown in formation with the PM satellite of the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) to provide a comprehensive suite of coincident measurements of atmospheric state, aerosol and cloud optical properties, and radiative fluxes. The mission will address critical uncertainties iin the direct radiative forcing of aerosols and clouds as well as aerosol influences on cloud radiative properties and cloud-climate radiation feedbacks. PICASSO-CENA is planned for a three year mission, with a launch in early 2003. PICASSO-CENA is being developed within the framework of a collaboration between NASA and CNES.

  19. SSM/I and the Montagnana radar data fusion to analyze clouds over Tuscany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nativi, Stefano; Mazzetti, Paolo; Giuli, Dino

    2001-01-01

    The present work empirically deals with the challenging problem of the integration of data obtained from passive and active microwave sources, in order to develop procedures to suitably calibrate and validate satellite-based passive microwave rainfall algorithms by means of multi parameter radar information over midlatitude areas. Furthermore, this research tires to analyze the well-known beam-filling problem and the different microwave channel penetration top9ic. SSM/I passive microwave radiometer precipitation related parameters were analyzed against multi parameter radar Zh and Zdr 3D maps, obtained from the POLAR-55C multi parameter radar set near Florence, Italy. SSM/I-derived parameters, related to rainfall over land were analyzed by means of information derived form radar volume data. We faced several statistical analyses of the obtained data sets. Results report the effectiveness of Montagnana radar and SSM/I data fusion. In particular, it is assessed the utility of utilizing both active and passive microwave hydrometeor-related information in order to improve the inferences about monitored phenomena. Results are valuable in order to better calibrate and validate passive microwave algorithms for rainfall rate estimation and for cloud detection over land. Correlation values may be improved by filtering radar data according to several parameters thresholds, in order to tackle beam-filling problem and statistical issues.

  20. Characterization of Polar Stratospheric Clouds With Spaceborne Lidar: CALIPSO and the 2006 Antarctic Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Michael C.; Thomason, L. W.; Poole, Lamont R.; Winker, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The role of polar stratospheric clouds in polar ozone loss has been well documented. The CALIPSO satellite mission offers a new opportunity to characterize PSCs on spatial and temporal scales previously unavailable. A PSC detection algorithm based on a single wavelength threshold approach has been developed for CALIPSO. The method appears to accurately detect PSCs of all opacities, including tenuous clouds, with a very low rate of false positives and few missed clouds. We applied the algorithm to CALIPSO data acquired during the 2006 Antarctic winter season from 13 June through 31 October. The spatial and temporal distribution of CALIPSO PSC observations is illustrated with weekly maps of PSC occurrence. The evolution of the 2006 PSC season is depicted by time series of daily PSC frequency as a function of altitude. Comparisons with virtual solar occultation data indicate that CALIPSO provides a different view of the PSC season than attained with previous solar occultation satellites. Measurement-based time series of PSC areal coverage and vertically-integrated PSC volume are computed from the CALIPSO data. The observed area covered with PSCs is significantly smaller than would be inferred from a temperature-based proxy such as TNAT but is similar in magnitude to that inferred from TSTS. The potential of CALIPSO measurements for investigating PSC microphysics is illustrated using combinations of lidar backscatter coefficient and volume depolarization to infer composition for two CALIPSO PSC scenes.

  1. Estimate of the incoherent-scattering contribution to lidar backscatter from clouds.

    PubMed

    de Wolf, D A; Russchenberg, H W; Ligthart, L P

    1999-01-20

    Lidar backscatter from clouds in the Delft University of Technology experiment is complicated by the fact that the transmitter has a narrow beam width, whereas the receiver has a much wider one. The issue here is whether reception of light scattered incoherently by cloud particles can contribute appreciably to the received power. The incoherent contribution can come from within as well as from outside the transmitter beam but in any case is due to at least two scattering processes in the cloud that are not included in the coherent forward scatter that leads to the usual exponentially attenuated contribution from single-particle backscatter. It is conceivable that a sizable fraction of the total received power within the receiver beam width is due to such incoherent-scattering processes. The ratio of this contribution to the direct (but attenuated) reflection from a single particle is estimated here by means of a distorted-Born approximation to the wave equation (with an incident cw monochromatic wave) and by comparison of the magnitude of the doubly scattered to that of the singly scattered flux. The same expressions are also obtained from a radiative-transfer formalism. The ratio underestimates incoherent multiple scattering when it is not small. Corrections that are due to changes in polarization are noted. PMID:18305651

  2. Polar stratospheric clouds over McMurdo, Antarctica, during the 1991 spring: Lidar and particle counter measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Adriani, A.; Gobbi, G.P. ); Deshler, T.; Johnson, B.J. ); Donfrancesco, G.Di. )

    1992-09-04

    Lidar and balloonborne particle counter measurements were performed simultaneously on two days when polar stratospheric clouds were observed in late August 1991 at McMurdo, Antarctica. Both nitric acid trihydrate and ice clouds were observed in the lower stratosphere between 10 and 23 km in different formation stages and with different cooling rate; however in all cases the size distributions were bimodal. Comparison of scattering ratios measured by lidar and calculated from particle size distributions are in good agreement; however, discrepancies were observed when the lower stratosphere was highly perturbed by wave activity. Lee waves generated by air flowing over the Trans Antarctic Mountains induced ice cloud formation at altitudes as high as 20 km. No PSCs were observed after the end of August in 1991.

  3. Mother-of-pearl cloud particle size and composition from aircraft-based photography of coloration and lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Jens; Reichardt, Susanne; Hostetler, Chris A; Lucker, Patricia L; McGee, Thomas J; Twigg, Laurence W; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Schoeberl, Mark R; Yang, Ping

    2015-02-01

    During a Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas (SAGE)-III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE)-II science flight on 4 February 2003, a mother-of-pearl cloud over Iceland was underflown by the NASA DC-8 and measured with the lidars onboard. In addition, color photos were taken during the approach. Aided by extensive modeling of cloud coloration, the main results of the analysis of this unique data set are: (1) the polar stratospheric cloud was mountain wave-induced and of type II; (2) the spectacular color display was caused by ice particles with sizes around 2 μm. PMID:25967820

  4. Buildings classification from airborne LiDAR point clouds through OBIA and ontology driven approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomljenovic, Ivan; Belgiu, Mariana; Lampoltshammer, Thomas J.

    2013-04-01

    In the last years, airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data proved to be a valuable information resource for a vast number of applications ranging from land cover mapping to individual surface feature extraction from complex urban environments. To extract information from LiDAR data, users apply prior knowledge. Unfortunately, there is no consistent initiative for structuring this knowledge into data models that can be shared and reused across different applications and domains. The absence of such models poses great challenges to data interpretation, data fusion and integration as well as information transferability. The intention of this work is to describe the design, development and deployment of an ontology-based system to classify buildings from airborne LiDAR data. The novelty of this approach consists of the development of a domain ontology that specifies explicitly the knowledge used to extract features from airborne LiDAR data. The overall goal of this approach is to investigate the possibility for classification of features of interest from LiDAR data by means of domain ontology. The proposed workflow is applied to the building extraction process for the region of "Biberach an der Riss" in South Germany. Strip-adjusted and georeferenced airborne LiDAR data is processed based on geometrical and radiometric signatures stored within the point cloud. Region-growing segmentation algorithms are applied and segmented regions are exported to the GeoJSON format. Subsequently, the data is imported into the ontology-based reasoning process used to automatically classify exported features of interest. Based on the ontology it becomes possible to define domain concepts, associated properties and relations. As a consequence, the resulting specific body of knowledge restricts possible interpretation variants. Moreover, ontologies are machinable and thus it is possible to run reasoning on top of them. Available reasoners (FACT++, JESS, Pellet) are used to check the consistency of the developed ontologies, and logical reasoning is performed to infer implicit relations between defined concepts. The ontology for the definition of building is specified using the Ontology Web Language (OWL). It is the most widely used ontology language that is based on Description Logics (DL). DL allows the description of internal properties of modelled concepts (roof typology, shape, area, height etc.) and relationships between objects (IS_A, MEMBER_OF/INSTANCE_OF). It captures terminological knowledge (TBox) as well as assertional knowledge (ABox) - that represents facts about concept instances, i.e. the buildings in airborne LiDAR data. To assess the classification accuracy, ground truth data generated by visual interpretation and calculated classification results in terms of precision and recall are used. The advantages of this approach are: (i) flexibility, (ii) transferability, and (iii) extendibility - i.e. ontology can be extended with further concepts, data properties and object properties.

  5. Design and development of micro pulse lidar for cloud and aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, P. K.; Arya, B. C.; Ahammed, Y. Nazeer; Kumar, Arun; Kulkarni, P. S.; Jain, S. L.

    2008-12-01

    A micro pulse lidar (MPL) has been indigenously designed and developed at the National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi using a 532 nm, 500 pico second pulsed laser having average power of 50mW (at 7.5 KHz PRR). Photon counting technique has been incorporated using the conventional optics, multichannel scaler (Stanford Research Systems SR430) and high sensitive photomultiplier tube. The sensitivity, range and bin etc are computer controlled in the present system. The interfacing between MPL and computer has been achieved by serial (RS232) and parallel printer port. The necessary software and graphical user interface has been developed using visual basic. In addition to this the telescope cover status sensing circuit has been incorporated to avoid conflict between dark count and background acquisition. The micro pulse lidar will be used for the aerosol, boundary layer and the cloud studies at a bin resolution of 6 meters. In the present communication the details of the system and preliminary results will be presented.

  6. Quantification of waves in lidar observations of noctilucent clouds at scales from seconds to minutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaifler, N.; Baumgarten, G.; Fiedler, J.; Lbken, F.-J.

    2013-03-01

    We present small-scale structures and waves observed in noctilucent clouds by lidar at an unprecedented temporal resolution of 30 s and less. The measurements were taken with the Rayleigh-/Mie-/Raman-lidar at the ALOMAR observatory in northern Norway (69 N) in the years 2008-2011. We find multiple layer NLC in 7.9% of the time for a brightness threshold of ? ? = 1210-10 m-1 sr-1. In comparison to 10 min averaged data, the 30 s data set shows considerably more structure. For limited periods, quasi-monochromatic waves in NLC altitude variations are common, in accord with ground-based NLC imagery. For the combined dataset on the other hand, we do not find preferred periods but significant periods at all time scales observed (1 min to 1 h). Typical wave amplitudes in the layer vertical displacements are 0.2 km with maximum amplitudes up to 2.3 km. Average spectral slopes of temporal altitude and brightness variations are -1.84 0.31 for centroid altitude, -1.28 0.29 for peak brightness and -1.62 0.28 for integrated brightness. Evaluating a new single-pulse detection system, we observe altitude variations of 70 s period and spectral slopes down to a scale of 10 s. We evaluate the suitability of NLC parameters as tracers for gravity waves.

  7. Quantification of waves in lidar observations of noctilucent clouds at scales from seconds to minutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaifler, N.; Baumgarten, G.; Fiedler, J.; Lbken, F.-J.

    2013-12-01

    We present small-scale structures and waves observed in noctilucent clouds (NLC) by lidar at an unprecedented temporal resolution of 30 s or less. The measurements were taken with the Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at the ALOMAR observatory in northern Norway (69 N) in the years 2008-2011. We find multiple layer NLC in 7.9% of the time for a brightness threshold of ? ? = 12 10-10 m-1 sr-1. In comparison to 10 min averaged data, the 30 s dataset shows considerably more structure. For limited periods, quasi-monochromatic waves in NLC altitude variations are common, in accord with ground-based NLC imagery. For the combined dataset, on the other hand, we do not find preferred periods but rather significant periods at all timescales observed (1 min to 1 h). Typical wave amplitudes in the layer vertical displacements are 0.2 km with maximum amplitudes up to 2.3 km. Average spectral slopes of temporal altitude and brightness variations are -2.01 0.25 for centroid altitude, -1.41 0.24 for peak brightness and -1.73 0.25 for integrated brightness. Evaluating a new single-pulse detection system, we observe altitude variations of 70 s period and spectral slopes down to a scale of 10 s. We evaluate the suitability of NLC parameters as tracers for gravity waves.

  8. Change detection of trees in urban areas using multi-temporal airborne lidar point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wen; Xu, Sudan; Oude Elberink, Sander; Vosselman, George

    2012-09-01

    Light detection and ranging (lidar) provides a promising way of detecting changes of vegetation in three dimensions (3D) because the beam of laser may penetrate through the foliage of vegetation. This study aims at the detection of changes in trees in urban areas with a high level of automation using mutil-temporal airborne lidar point clouds. Three datasets covering a part of Rotterdam, the Netherlands, have been classified into several classes including trees. A connected components algorithm was applied first to group the points of trees together. The attributes of components were utilized to differentiate tree components from misclassified non-tree components. A point based local maxima algorithm was implemented to distinguish single tree from multiple tree components. After that, the parameters of trees were derived through two independent ways: a point based method using 3D alpha shapes and convex hulls; and a model based method which fits a Pollock tree model to the points. Then the changes were detected by comparing the parameters of corresponding tree components which were matched by a tree to tree matching algorithm using the overlapping of bounding boxes and point to point distances. The results were visualized and statistically analyzed. The difference of parameters and the difference of changes derived from point based and model based methods were both lower than 10%. The comparison of these two methods illustrates the consistency and stability of the parameters. The detected changes show the potential to monitor the growth and pruning of trees.

  9. Noctilucent cloud observations at mid-latitudes by lidar: mean state and relation to MSE and temperature during day and night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerding, Michael; Hffner, Josef; Kopp, Maren; Zecha, Marius; Lbken, Franz-Josef

    Since more than 120 years Noctilucent clouds (NLC) are observed every summer poleward of about 50 latitude. Even if NLC are much more frequent at polar latitudes, NLC observations at mid-latitudes are of particular importance since the average temperature is near the saturation temperature. Hence, NLC occurrence is expected to change strongly with only minor variations in water vapour concentration and temperature, e.g. due to planetary, tidal and gravity waves, and solar cycle. At Leibniz Institute of Atmospheric Physics at Khlungsborn, Germany (54 N, 12 E) NLC are observed since 1997 at 532 nm wavelength. Until 2008 the NLC occurrence rate was up to 12%, while 2009 showed record-high 19%. The altitude distribution centres at 82.9 km, i.e. similar to the polar NLC distribution even if the temperature structures are quite different at these heights. We will compare these mean NLC parameters from nighttime observations with data from the 2009 season, showing comparatively frequent and strong NLC. We will discuss the relation to simultaneously observed temperatures and wave activity for 2009 and previous years. We have set up a daylight capable lidar in summer 2009, measuring NLC independent of solar elevation. By this the retrieval of diurnal variation of NLC occurrence and strength will be possible at our mid-latitude site as one of very few stations in the world. Simultaneous observations of NLC and Mesospheric Summer Echoes (MSE) are limited to daytime since electron densities have to be sufficiently high. The new capabilities of the RMR lidar at Khlungsborn together with the OSWIN VHF radar and the K lidar allow first case studies from simultaneous NLC and MSE observations at mid-latitudes.

  10. Airborne lidar observations in the wintertime Arctic stratosphere - Polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Carter, A. F.; Higdon, N. S.; Butler, C. F.; Robinette, P. A.; Toon, O. B.; Schoeberl, M. R.

    1990-01-01

    Polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) distributions in the wintertime Arctic stratosphere and their optical characteristics were measured with a multiwavelength airborne lidar system as part of the 1989 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition. PSCs were observed on 10 flights between January 6 and February 2, 1989, into the polar vortex. The PSCs were found in the 14-27 km altitude range in regions where the temperatures were less than 195 K. Two types of aerosols with different optical characteristics (Types 1a and 1b) were observed in PSCs thought to be composed of nitric acid trihydrate. Water ice PSCs (Type 2) were observed to have high scattering ratios (greater than 10) and high aerosol depolarizations (greater than 10 percent) at temperatures less than 190 K.

  11. Airborne lidar observations in the wintertime Arctic stratosphere - Polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Carter, A. F.; Higdon, N. S.; Butler, C. F.; Robinette, P. A.; Toon, O. B.; Schoeberl, M. R.

    1990-03-01

    Polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) distributions in the wintertime Arctic stratosphere and their optical characteristics were measured with a multiwavelength airborne lidar system as part of the 1989 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition. PSCs were observed on 10 flights between January 6 and February 2, 1989, into the polar vortex. The PSCs were found in the 14-27 km altitude range in regions where the temperatures were less than 195 K. Two types of aerosols with different optical characteristics (Types 1a and 1b) were observed in PSCs thought to be composed of nitric acid trihydrate. Water ice PSCs (Type 2) were observed to have high scattering ratios (greater than 10) and high aerosol depolarizations (greater than 10 percent) at temperatures less than 190 K.

  12. Dual-polarization airborne lidar observations of polar stratospheric cloud evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, L.R.; McCormick, M.P. ); Kent, G.S.; Schaffner, S. ); Hunt, W.H. ); Osborn, M.T.; Pitts, M.C. )

    1990-03-01

    Dual-polarization {lambda}=0.532 {mu}m lidar data show systematic polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) evolution along a portion of the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition DC-8 flight of January 31, 1989. This flight leg was roughly aligned with air parcel motion on isentropic surfaces from 400-500K, where the local adiabatic cooling rate was {approximately}20 K/day. Type 1 PSCs show low depolarization ratios and scattering ratios which approach intermediate limiting values as ambient temperature decreases. These data suggest that Type 1 particles formed by rapid cooling may be nearly spherical and are restricted in size by partitioning of a limited HNO{sub 3} vapor supply among many competing growth sites. Type 2 PSCs appear at temperatures below estimated local frost points with increases in depolarization and scattering typical of larger ice crystals.

  13. Polarimetric Radar Observations of Arctic Clouds: Signal Processing and First Results from the may 2013 Iop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galletti, M.; Oue, M.; Verlinde, J.

    2013-12-01

    The ARM Climate Research Facility site at the North Slope of Alaska in Barrow provides polarimetric radar observations of Arctic clouds at X, Ka and W bands. During the May 2013 Scanning radar Intensive Observation Period, raw I and Q data were acquired with the X-SAPR and the Ka-W SACR for the purpose of validating existing, and testing new signal processing procedures specifically tailored for Arctic observations. The raw I and Q datasets were collected on May 3rd 2013 for the case of low-level boundary layer mixed-phase arctic clouds and on May 6th 2013 for the case of a synoptic low moving in from the west. http://www.arm.gov/campaigns/nsa2013nsasr The present paper describes the impact of signal processing procedures on the data, and establishes dual-polarization radar as a valuable tool for the microphysical characterization of ice clouds. In particular, the X-SAPR operates at STSR mode, making available differential reflectivity ZDR, copolar correlation coefficient ρhv, specific differential phase KDP and Degree of Polarization at Simultaneous Transmit DOPS. Low-level boundary layer mixed-phase Arctic clouds are characterized by layers of supercooled liquid water aloft, which present a stark polarimetric contrast with respect to the associated ice precipitation fallout. The ice particles falling from boundary layer Arctic clouds on May 2nd, 3rd and 4th 2013 (winds were very weak or absent) showed the remarkable property of being composed exclusively by large dendrites - fern-like, stellars, twelve-branched - indicating deposition as the main accretion mechanism. http://www.flickr.com/photos/michele_galletti/sets/72157633422079814/ Boundary Layer mixed-phase Arctic clouds provide an exceptional natural laboratory for the exploration of polarimetric signatures in presence of dendritic ice particles. The first-ever X-band analysis of differential reflectivity ZDR of mixed-phase Arctic clouds is presented in [1]. For the May 6th case, ice particle populations associated with frontal systems underwent more significant vertical mixing, and therefore more significant break-up and aggregation, with the overall result that ice particles possessed less geometrical symmetry, and consequently less prominent polarimetric contrast was detected by the radars. [1] Oue, Galletti, Verlinde "Observations of X-band differential reflectivity in Arctic mixed-phase clouds", submitted.

  14. BOREAS AFM-6 NOAA/ETL 35 GHz Cloud/Turbulence Radar GIF Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martner, Brooks E.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 35-GHz cloud-sensing radar in the Northern Study Area (NSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 16 Jul 1994 to 08 Aug 1994. This data set contains a time series of GIF images that show the structure of the lower atmosphere. The NOAA/ETL 35-GHz cloud/turbulence radar GIF images are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  15. Application of Cloude's target decomposition theorem to polarimetric imaging radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we applied Cloude's decomposition to imaging radar polarimetry. We show in detail how the decomposition results can guide the interpretation of scattering from vegetated areas. For multifrequency polarimetric radar measurements of a clear-cut area, the decomposition leads us to conclude that the vegetation is probably thin compared to even the C-band radar wavelength of 6 cm. For a frosted area, we notice an increased amount of even number of reflection scattering at P-band and L-band, probably the result of penetration through the coniferous canopy resulting in trunk-ground double reflection scattering. However, the scattering for the forested area is still dominated by scattering from randomly oriented cylinders. It is found that these cylinders are thicker than in the case of clear-cut areas, leading us to conclude that scattering from the branches probably dominates in this case.

  16. Cloud-base distribution and cirrus properties based on micropulse lidar measurements at a site in southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianjun; Li, Zhanqing; Zheng, Youfei; Cribb, Maureen

    2015-07-01

    The cloud fraction (CF) and cloud-base heights (CBHs), and cirrus properties, over a site in southeastern China from June 2008 to May 2009, are examined by a ground-based lidar. Results show that clouds occupied the sky 41% of the time. Significant seasonal variations in CF were found with a maximum/minimum during winter/summer and similar magnitudes of CF in spring and autumn. A distinct diurnal cycle in the overall mean CF was seen. Total, daytime, and nighttime annual mean CBHs were 3.052.73 km, 2.462.08 km, and 3.513.07 km, respectively. The lowest/highest CBH occurred around noon/midnight. Cirrus clouds were present 36.2% of the time at night with the percentage increased in summer and decreased in spring. Annual mean values for cirrus geometrical properties were 8.891.65 km, 9.801.70 km, 10.731.86 km and 1.830.91 km for the base, mid-cloud, top height, and the thickness, respectively. Seasonal variations in cirrus geometrical properties show a maximum/minimum in summer/winter for all cirrus geometrical parameters. The mean cirrus lidar ratio for all cirrus cases in our study was 2517 sr, with a smooth seasonal trend. The cirrus optical depth ranged from 0.001 to 2.475, with a mean of 0.340.33. Sub-visual, thin, and dense cirrus were observed in 12%, 43%, and 45% of the cases, respectively. More frequent, thicker cirrus clouds occurred in summer than in any other season. The properties of cirrus cloud over the site are compared with other lidar-based retrievals of midlatitude cirrus cloud properties.

  17. Radar derived storm dynamics for cloud-resolving model evaluation and climate model parameterization development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collis, S. M.; May, P. T.; Protat, A.; Fridlind, A. M.; Ackerman, A. S.; Williams, C. R.; Varble, A.; Zipser, E. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was conducted in and around the US Department of Energys Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Darwin site during January and February 2006. The field program gathered observations that have been used for initializing and driving cloud-resolving models (CRMs, with periodic boundary conditions) and limited-area models (LAMs, with open boundary conditions) for submission to the model intercomparison study, which is organized by the ARM and GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) programs. Measurements also included an extensive set of remotely sensed and in-situ quantities to evaluate model performance, assisting climate model parameterization development. For example, using a combination of operational Doppler radar and CPOL polartimetric research radar data vector winds have been retrieved in storms for part of the model intercomparison period. This presentation will outline the retrieval technique, show preliminary verification of the retrieved updraft intensities and showcase model-measurement comparison with output from the DHARMA cloud-resolving model focusing on vertical winds, a crucial aspect of simulated storm dynamics which exhibit a high degree of model to model variability. Initial comparison has most model updraft speeds substantially higher those retrieved from radar measurements. Investigations into the impact of sampling, scale differences and the cause for this discrepancy are ongoing as is the extension of comparisons to all CRM and LAM submissions. Details on the roll out of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funded precipitation radar infrastructure for ACRF and plans for geophysical retrievals from this new instrumentation will also be presented.

  18. Macrophysical and optical properties of midlatitude cirrus clouds from four ground-based lidars and collocated CALIOP observations

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, M.; Morille, Y.; Noel, V.; Keckhut, P.; Winker, D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Chervet, P.; Roblin, A.

    2010-05-27

    Ground-based lidar and CALIOP datasets gathered over four mid-latitude sites, two US and two French sites, are used to evaluate the consistency of cloud macrophysical and optical property climatologies that can be derived by such datasets. The consistency in average cloud height (both base and top height) between the CALIOP and ground datasets ranges from -0.4km to +0.5km. The cloud geometrical thickness distributions vary significantly between the different datasets, due in part to the original vertical resolutions of the lidar profiles. Average cloud geometrical thicknesses vary from 1.2 to 1.9km, i.e. by more than 50%. Cloud optical thickness distributions in subvisible, semi-transparent and moderate intervals differ by more than 50% between ground and space-based datasets. The cirrus clouds with 2 optical thickness below 0.1 (not included in historical cloud climatologies) represent 30-50% of the non-opaque cirrus class. The differences in average cloud base altitude between ground and CALIOP datasets of 0.0-0.1 km, 0.0-0.2 km and 0.0-0.2 km can be attributed to irregular sampling of seasonal variations in the ground-based data, to day-night differences in detection capabilities by CALIOP, and to the restriction to situations without low-level clouds in ground-based data, respectively. The cloud geometrical thicknesses are not affected by irregular sampling of seasonal variations in the ground-based data, while up to 0.0-0.2 km and 0.1-0.3 km differences can be attributed to day-night differences in detection capabilities by CALIOP, and to the restriction to situations without lowlevel clouds in ground-based data, respectively.

  19. Combining visible and infrared radiometry and lidar data to test ice clouds optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, A.; Maestri, T.; Rizzi, R.

    2010-03-01

    Measurements taken during the 2003 Pacific THORPEX Observing System Test (P-TOST) by the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS), the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) and the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) are compared to simulations performed with a line-by-line and multiple scattering modeling methodology (LBLMS). Formerly used for infrared hyper-spectral data analysis, LBLMS has been extended to the visible and near infrared with the inclusion of surface bi-directional reflectance properties. A number of scenes are evaluated: two clear scenes, one with nadir geometry and one cross-track encompassing sun glint, and three cloudy scenes, all with nadir geometry. CPL data is used to estimate the particulate optical depth at 532 nm for the clear and cloudy scenes. Cloud optical depth is also retrieved from S-HIS infrared window radiances, and it agrees with CPL values, to within natural variability. MAS data are simulated convolving high resolution radiances. The paper discusses the results of the comparisons for the clear cases and for the three cloudy cases. LBLMS clear simulations agree with MAS data to within 20% in the shortwave (SW) and near infrared (NIR) spectrum and within 2 K in the infrared (IR) range. It is shown that cloudy sky simulations using cloud parameters retrieved from IR radiances systematically underestimate the measured radiance in the SW and NIR by nearly 50%, although the IR retrieved optical thickness agree with same measured by CPL. MODIS radiances measured from Terra are also compared to LBLMS simulations in cloudy conditions using retrieved cloud optical depth and effective radius from MODIS, to understand the origin for the observed discrepancies. It is shown that the simulations agree, to within natural variability, with measurements in selected MODIS SW bands. The paper dwells on a possible explanation of these contraddictory results, involving the phase function of ice particles in the shortwave.

  20. Continuous Lidar Monitoring of Polar Stratospheric Clouds at the South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D

    2009-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) play a primary role in the formation of annual ozone holes over Antarctica during the austral sunrise. Meridional temperature gradients in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere, caused by strong radiative cooling, induce a broad dynamic vortex centered near the South Pole that decouples and insulates the winter polar airmass. PSC nucleate and grow as vortex temperatures gradually fall below equilibrium saturation and frost points for ambient sulfate, nitrate, and water vapor concentrations (generally below 197 K). Cloud surfaces promote heterogeneous reactions that convert stable chlorine and bromine-based molecules into photochemically active ones. As spring nears, and the sun reappears and rises, photolysis decomposes these partitioned compounds into individual halogen atoms that react with and catalytically destroy thousands of ozone molecules before they are stochastically neutralized. Despite a generic understanding of the ozone hole paradigm, many key components of the system, such as cloud occurrence, phase, and composition; particle growth mechanisms; and denitrification of the lower stratosphere have yet to be fully resolved. Satellite-based observations have dramatically improved the ability to detect PSC and quantify seasonal polar chemical partitioning. However, coverage directly over the Antarctic plateau is limited by polar-orbiting tracks that rarely exceed 80 degrees S. In December 1999, a NASA Micropulse Lidar Network instrument (MPLNET) was first deployed to the NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory (ESRL) Atmospheric Research Observatory at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station for continuous cloud and aerosol profiling. MPLNET instruments are eye-safe, capable of full-time autonomous operation, and suitably rugged and compact to withstand long-term remote deployment. With only brief interruptions during the winters of 2001 and 2002, a nearly continuous data archive exists to the present.

  1. Evaluation of the performance of the WRF model to reproduce the cloud cover and clouds features over the Mediterranean area using the CALIPSO lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastin, S.; Chepfer, H.; Chiriaco, M.; Cesana, G.

    2009-12-01

    It is widely accepted that clouds play a major role on weather and climate forecast. However, the representation of clouds in models is largely uncertain due (i) to the number of processes and interactions involved in the formation and persistence of a cloud and (ii) the difficulty in obtaining accurate observations of clouds at all altitudes and locations. The evaluation of mesoscale models using recently developed parameterizations in different areas is therefore an essential step towards the improvement of clouds representation in models. The Aqua-Train offers an unprecedented set of observations for the microphysical properties of clouds that is very useful for validation of clouds features in models, especially over the sea where ground based instrumentation can not furnish observations. To avoid any inversion of the observed lidar signal that could induce errors responsible for discrepancies between observations and model, we use a model-to-satellite approach (Chepfer et al., 2008) to diagnose the lidar signal directly from model outputs. We then compare the observed space borne lidar profiles with the simulated ones. In this paper, we choose to evaluate the Thompson et al. (2004, 2008) microphysics scheme within the WRF model over the Mediterranean area. The occurrence of severe weather phenomenons, as well as the probable role of Mediterranean sea on climate change make the understanding and the representation of processes in this area a challenge for the future. A statistical study is carried out over several full months of observations. The first stage of the analysis focuses on the cloud occurrence discrepancy between observations and model for the three classes of clouds (low-level, middle and high clouds). In particular the analysis aims to evaluate how much the absence of aerosols in the simulations may be a cause of discrepancies in this area. Chepfer H., S. Bony, D. Winker, M. Chiriaco, J-L. Dufresne, G. Sze, 2008: Use of CALIPSO lidar observations to evaluate the cloudiness simulated by a climate model. Geophys. Res. Let., 35, L15704, doi:10.1029/2008GL034207. Thompson G., R. M. Rasmussen, K. Manning, 2004: Explicit forecasts of winter precipitations using an improved bulk microphysics scheme. Part I: description and sensitivity analysis. Mon. Wea. Rev., 132, 519-542. Thompson G., P. Field, R. M. Rasmussen, W. D. Hall, 2008: Explicit forecasts of winter precipitations using an improved bulk microphysics scheme. Part II: Implementation of a new snow parameterization. Mon. Wea. Rev., 136, 5095-5115.

  2. Ice iron/sodium film as cause for high noctilucent cloud radar reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, P. M.

    2008-08-01

    Noctilucent clouds, tiny cold electrically charged ice grains located at about 85 km altitude, exhibit anomalously high radar reflectivity. It is shown that this observed high radar reflectivity can be explained by assuming the ice grains are coated by a thin metal film; substantial evidence exists indicating that such a film exists and is caused by the deposition of iron and sodium atoms on the ice grain from iron and sodium layers located immediately above the noctilucent cloud layer. The number of conduction electrons in the thin metal film coating an ice grain is very large. When averaged over the volume occupied by a large number of ice grains, the quivering of these metal film electrons provides a much larger contribution to radar reflectivity than does the much smaller number of dusty plasma electrons or electron holes. Using observations indicating that noctilucent clouds are the dominant sink for the summer-time iron and sodium layers, it is shown that a sufficiently thick metal layer should form on a typical ice grain in a few hours to a few days.

  3. Extended analysis of space borne active sensors for the interpretation of observed and simulated global cloud physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.; Okamoto, H.

    2011-12-01

    Combined observations from CloudSat/CALIPSO provide wide coverage of cloud vertical properties over the globe. A unique way to deal with the cloud microphysics retrieval, from these active sensors, at grids with insufficient numbers of observables was introduced to extend our earlier analyses of lidar/radar measurement from space. The method avoids the use of a prescribed parameterization among the observables and cloud microphysics and compares well with the lidar-radar method. Application of the approach provides further interpretation on the observed and simulated cloud physical properties at single instrument regions.

  4. Identification of a Debris Cloud from the Nuclear Powered SNAPSHOT Satellite with Haystack Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokely, C.; Stansbery, E.

    2006-01-01

    Data from the MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL) Long Range Imaging Radar (known as the Haystack radar) have been used in the past to examine families of objects from individual satellite breakups or families of orbiting objects that can be isolated in altitude and inclination. This is possible because for some time after a breakup, the debris cloud of particles can remain grouped together in similar orbit planes. This cloud will be visible to the radar, in fixed staring mode, for a short time twice each day, as the orbit plane moves through the field of view. There should be a unique three-dimensional pattern in observation time, range, and range rate which can identify the cloud. Eventually, through slightly differing precession rates of the right ascension of ascending node of the debris cloud, the observation time becomes distributed so that event identification becomes much more difficult. Analyses of the patterns in observation time, range, and range rate have identified good debris candidates released from the polar orbiting SNAPSHOT satellite (International Identifier: 1965-027A). For orbits near 90o inclination, there is essentially no precession of the orbit plane. The SNAPSHOT satellite is a well known nuclear powered satellite launched in 1965 to a near circular 1300 km orbit with an inclination of 90.3o. This satellite began releasing debris in 1979 with new pieces being discovered and cataloged over the years. 51 objects are still being tracked by the United States Space Surveillance Network. An analysis of the Haystack data has identified at least 60 pieces of debris separate from the 51 known tracked debris pieces, where all but 2 of the 60 pieces have a size less than 10cm. The altitude and inclination (derived from range-rate with a circular orbit assumption) are consistent with the SNAPSHOT satellite and its tracked debris cloud.

  5. Automatic registration of optical aerial imagery to a LiDAR point cloud for generation of city models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abayowa, Bernard O.; Yilmaz, Alper; Hardie, Russell C.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a framework for automatic registration of both the optical and 3D structural information extracted from oblique aerial imagery to a Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) point cloud without prior knowledge of an initial alignment. The framework employs a coarse to fine strategy in the estimation of the registration parameters. First, a dense 3D point cloud and the associated relative camera parameters are extracted from the optical aerial imagery using a state-of-the-art 3D reconstruction algorithm. Next, a digital surface model (DSM) is generated from both the LiDAR and the optical imagery-derived point clouds. Coarse registration parameters are then computed from salient features extracted from the LiDAR and optical imagery-derived DSMs. The registration parameters are further refined using the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm to minimize global error between the registered point clouds. The novelty of the proposed approach is in the computation of salient features from the DSMs, and the selection of matching salient features using geometric invariants coupled with Normalized Cross Correlation (NCC) match validation. The feature extraction and matching process enables the automatic estimation of the coarse registration parameters required for initializing the fine registration process. The registration framework is tested on a simulated scene and aerial datasets acquired in real urban environments. Results demonstrates the robustness of the framework for registering optical and 3D structural information extracted from aerial imagery to a LiDAR point cloud, when co-existing initial registration parameters are unavailable.

  6. Investigating particle orientation in cirrus clouds by measuring backscattering phase matrices with lidar.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Bruno V; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V; Volkov, Sergei N

    2004-12-20

    The relation between the orientation of particles in ice-crystal clouds and backscattering phase matrices (BSPMs) is considered. Parameters characterizing the predominant orientation of particles in the azimuthal direction and in the horizontal position are presented. The parameters are expressed through BSPM elements. A technique for measuring BSPM elements with lidar is described. Examples of some measurements are presented along with a statistical generalization of the results from more than 400 BSPM measurements. It is found that the orientation of coarse particles with large diameters in an azimuthal direction and in a horizontal position is more probable than in a random direction. However, the orientation of large particles is often masked by small particles that are not subject to the effect of orienting factors. Thus the mean parameters characterizing the state of orientation of particles in clouds as a whole correspond to weak orientation. It is supposed that the orientation of particles in the azimuthal direction is caused by wind-velocity pulsations. PMID:15646781

  7. Height Distribution Between Cloud and Aerosol Layers from the GLAS Spaceborne Lidar in the Indian Ocean Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, William D.; Spinhirne, James D.; Palm, Steven P.; Hlavka, Dennis L.

    2005-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), a nadir pointing lidar on the Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) launched in 2003, now provides important new global measurements of the relationship between the height distribution of cloud and aerosol layers. GLAS data have the capability to detect, locate, and distinguish between cloud and aerosol layers in the atmosphere up to 40 km altitude. The data product algorithm tests the product of the maximum attenuated backscatter coefficient b'(r) and the vertical gradient of b'(r) within a layer against a predetermined threshold. An initial case result for the critical Indian Ocean region is presented. From the results the relative height distribution between collocated aerosol and cloud shows extensive regions where cloud formation is well within dense aerosol scattering layers at the surface. Citation: Hart, W. D., J. D. Spinhime, S. P. Palm, and D. L. Hlavka (2005), Height distribution between cloud and aerosol layers from the GLAS spaceborne lidar in the Indian Ocean region,

  8. Updraft and downdraft characterization with Doppler lidar: cloud-free versus cumuli-topped mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansmann, A.; Fruntke, J.; Engelmann, R.

    2010-08-01

    For the first time, a comprehensive, height-resolved Doppler lidar study of updrafts and downdrafts in the mixing layer is presented. The Doppler lidar measurements were performed at Leipzig, Germany, in the summer half year of 2006. The conditional sampling method is applied to the measured vertical velocities to identify, count, and analyze significant updraft and downdraft events. Three cases of atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) evolution with and without fair-weather cumuli formation are discussed. Updrafts occur with an average frequency of 1-2 per unit length zi (boundary-layer depth zi), downdrafts 20-30% more frequently. In the case with cumuli formation, the draft occurrence frequency is enhanced by about 50% at cloud level or near cloud base. The counted updraft events cover 30-34%, downdrafts 53-57% of the velocity time series in the central part of the ABL (subcloud layer) during the main period of convective activity. By considering all drafts with horizontal extent >36 m in the analysis, the updraft mean horizontal extent ranges here from 200-420 m and is about 0.16 zi-0.18 zi in all three cases disregarding the occurrence of cumulus clouds. Downdraft extents are a factor of 1.3-1.5 larger. The average value of the updraft mean vertical velocities is 0.5-0.7 m/s or 0.40 w*-0.45 w* (convective velocity scale w*), and the negative downdraft mean vertical velocities are weaker by roughly 10-20%. The analysis of the relationship between the size (horizontal extent) of the updrafts and downdrafts and their mean vertical velocity reveals a pronounced increase of the average vertical velocity in updrafts from 0.4-0.5 m/s for small thermals (100-200 m) to about 1.5 m/s for large updrafts (>600 m) in the subcloud layer in the case with fair-weather cumuli. At cloudless conditions, the updraft velocities were found to be 20% smaller for the large thermals.

  9. Microphysical properties of the November 26 cirrus cloud retrieved by Doppler radar/IR radiometer technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matrosov, Sergey Y.; Kropfli, Robert A.; Orr, Brad W.; Snider, Jack B.

    1993-01-01

    Gaining information about cirrus cloud microphysics requires development of remote sensing techniques. In an earlier paper. Matrosov et al. (1992) proposed a method to estimate ice water path (IWP) (i.e., vertically integrated ice mass content IMC) and characteristic particle size averaged through the cloud from combined groundbased measurements of radar reflectivities and IR brightness temperatures of the downwelling thermal radiation in the transparency region of 10-12 mu m. For some applications, the vertically averaged characteristic particle sizes and IWP could be the appropriate information to use. However, vertical profiles of cloud microphysical parameters can provide a better understanding of cloud structure and development. Here we describe a further development of the previous method by Matrosov et al. (1992) for retrieving vertical profiles of cirrus particle sizes and IMC rather than their vertically averaged values. In addition to measurements of radar reflectivities, the measurements of Doppler velocities are used in the new method. This provides us with two vertical profiles of measurements to infer two vertical profiles of unknowns, i.e., particle characteristic sizes and IMC. Simultaneous measurements of the IR brightness temperatures are still needed to resolve an ambiguity in particle size-fall velocity relationships.

  10. Measurements of Ocean Surface Scattering Using an Airborne 94-GHz Cloud Radar: Implication for Calibration of Airborne and Spaceborne W-band Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Li-Hua; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Racette, Paul E.

    2004-01-01

    Scattering properties of the Ocean surface have been widely used as a calibration reference for airborne and spaceborne microwave sensors. However, at millimeter-wave frequencies, the ocean surface backscattering mechanism is still not well understood, in part, due to the lack of experimental measurements. During the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE), measurements of ocean surface backscattering were made using a 94-GHz (W-band) cloud radar onboard a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The measurement set includes the normalized Ocean surface cross section over a range of the incidence angles under a variety of wind conditions. Analysis of the radar measurements shows good agreement with a quasi-specular scattering model. This unprecedented dataset enhances our knowledge about the Ocean surface scattering mechanism at 94 GHz. The results of this work support the proposition of using the Ocean surface as a calibration reference for airborne millimeter-wave cloud radars and for the ongoing NASA CloudSat mission, which will use a 94-GHz spaceborne cloud radar for global cloud measurements.

  11. Coupling high resolution 3D point clouds from terrestrial LiDAR with high precision displacement time series from GB-InSAR to understand landslide kinematic: example of the La Perraire instability, Swiss Alps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, Clment; Baillifard, Franois; Harald Blikra, Lars; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Kristensen, Lene; Leva, Davide; Metzger, Richard; Rivolta, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Ground-Based Radar Interferometry have changed our perception and interpretation of slope activities for the last 20 years and are now routinely used for monitoring and even early warning purposes. Terrestrial LiDAR allows indeed to model topography with very high point density, even in steep slopes, and to extract 3D displacements of rock masses by comparing successive datasets. GB-InSAR techniques are able to detect mm displacements over large areas. Nevertheless, both techniques suffer of some limitations. The precision of LiDAR devices actually limits its ability to monitor very slow-moving landslides, as well as by the dam resolution and the particular geometry (in azimuth/range) of GB-InSAR data may complicate their interpretations. To overcome those limitations, tools were produced to truly combine strong advantages of both techniques, by coupling high resolution geometrical data from terrestrial LiDAR or photogrammetry with high precision displacement time series from GB-InSAR. We thus developed a new exportation module into the processing chain of LiSAmobile (GB-InSAR) devices in order to wrap radar results from their particular geometry on high resolution 3D point clouds with cm mean point spacing. Furthermore, we also added new importation and visualization functionalities into Coltop3D (software for geological interpretations of laser scanning data) to display those results in 3D and even analyzing displacement time series. This new method has also been optimized to create as few and small files as possible and for time processing. Advantages of coupling terrestrial LiDAR and GB-InSAR data will be illustrated on the La Perraire instability, an active large rockslide involving frequent rockfalls and threatening inhabitant within the Val de Bagnes in the Swiss Alps. This rock mass, monitored by LiDAR and GPS since 2006, is huge enough and long-term movements are big (up to 1.6 m in 6 years) and complex enough to make difficult point cloud comparisons and LiDAR interpretations. Two monitoring campaigns with GB-InSAR devices were later performed and caught mm daily displacements (up to 8 mm in 15 days in September 2011). By coupling both datasets, we were able to clearly identify back scarps, as well as the most active masses within the whole instability, and thus to map limits of the instability and stable parts of the slope. Here the integration and the coupling of ground-based monitoring techniques were necessary to understand the whole landslide kinematic.

  12. Cloud radar with hybrid mode towards estimation of shape and orientation of ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myagkov, A.; Seifert, P.; Bauer-Pfundstein, M.; Wandinger, U.

    2016-02-01

    This paper is devoted to the experimental quantitative characterization of the shape and orientation distribution of ice particles in clouds. The characterization is based on measured and modeled elevation dependencies of the polarimetric parameters differential reflectivity and correlation coefficient. The polarimetric data are obtained using a newly developed 35 GHz cloud radar MIRA-35 with hybrid polarimetric configuration and scanning capabilities. The full procedure chain of the technical implementation and the realization of the setup of the hybrid-mode cloud radar for the shape determination are presented. This includes the description of phase adjustments in the transmitting paths, the introduction of the general data processing scheme, correction of the data for the differences of amplifications and electrical path lengths in the transmitting and receiving channels, the rotation of the polarization basis by 45°, the correction of antenna effects on polarimetric measurements, the determination of spectral polarimetric variables, and the formulation of a scheme to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Modeling of the polarimetric variables is based on existing back-scattering models assuming the spheroidal representation of cloud scatterers. The parameters retrieved from the model are polarizability ratio and degree of orientation, which can be assigned to certain particle orientations and shapes. The developed algorithm is applied to a measurement of the hybrid-mode cloud radar taken on 20 October 2014 in Cabauw, the Netherlands, in the framework of the ACCEPT (Analysis of the Composition of Clouds with Extended Polarization Techniques) campaign. The case study shows the retrieved polarizability ratio and degree of orientation of ice particles for a cloud system of three cloud layers at different heights. Retrieved polarizability ratios are 0.43, 0.85, and 1.5 which correspond to oblate, quasi-spherical, and columnar ice particles, respectively. It is shown that the polarizability ratio is useful for the detection of aggregation/riming processes. The orientation of oblate and prolate particles is estimated to be close to horizontal while quasi-spherical particles were found to be more randomly oriented.

  13. Cloud radar with hybrid mode towards estimation of shape and orientation of ice crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myagkov, A.; Seifert, P.; Bauer-Pfundstein, M.; Wandinger, U.

    2015-09-01

    This paper is devoted to the experimental quantitative characterization of the shape and orientation distribution of ice particles in clouds. The characterization is based on measured and modeled elevation dependencies of the polarimetric parameters differential reflectivity and correlation coefficient. The polarimetric data is obtained using a newly developed 35 GHz cloud radar MIRA-35 with hybrid polarimetric configuration and scanning capabilities. The full procedure chain of the technical implementation and the realization of the setup of the hybrid-mode cloud radar for the shape determination are presented. This includes the description of phase adjustments in the transmitting paths, the introduction of the general data processing scheme, correction of the data for the differences of amplifications and electrical path lengths in the transmitting and receiving channels, the rotation of the polarization basis by 45°, the correction of antenna effects on polarimetric measurements, the determination of spectral polarimetric variables, and the formulation of a scheme to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Modeling of the polarimetric variables is based on existing back-scattering models assuming the spheroidal representation of cloud scatterers. The parameters retrieved from the model are polarizability ratio and degree of orientation, which can be assigned to certain particle orientations and shapes. The developed algorithm is applied to a measurement of the hybrid-mode cloud radar taken on 20 October 2014 in Cabauw, the Netherlands, in the frame of the ACCEPT (Analysis of the Composition of Clouds with Extended Polarization Techniques) campaign. The case study shows the retrieved polarizability ratio and degree of orientation of ice particles for a cloud system of three cloud layers at different heights. Retrieved polarizability ratios are 0.43, 0.85, and 1.5 which correspond to oblate, quasi-spherical, and columnar ice particles, respectively. It is shown that the polarizability ratio is useful for the detection of aggregation/riming processes. The orientation of oblate and prolate particles is estimated to be close to horizontal while quasi-spherical particles were found to be more randomly oriented.

  14. 16 year climatology of cirrus clouds over a tropical station in southern India using ground and space-based lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, A. K.; Gadhavi, H. S.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Raghunath, K.; Rao, S. V. B.; Jayaraman, A.

    2015-06-01

    16 year (1998-2013) climatology of cirrus clouds and their macrophysical (base height, top height and geometrical thickness) and optical properties (cloud optical thickness) observed using a ground-based lidar over Gadanki (13.5 N, 79.2 E), India, is presented. The climatology obtained from the ground-based lidar is compared with the climatology obtained from seven and half years (June 2006-December 2013) of Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations. A very good agreement is found between the two climatologies in spite of their opposite viewing geometries and difference in sampling frequencies. Nearly 50-55% of cirrus clouds were found to possess geometrical thickness less than 2 km. Ground-based lidar is found to detect more number of sub-visible clouds than CALIOP which has implications for global warming studies as sub-visible cirrus clouds have significant positive radiative forcing. Cirrus clouds with mid-cloud temperatures between -50 to -70 C have a mean geometrical thickness greater than 2 km in contrast to the earlier reported value of 1.7 km. Trend analyses reveal a statistically significant increase in the altitude of sub-visible cirrus clouds which is consistent with the recent climate model simulations. Also, the fraction of sub-visible cirrus cloud is found to be increasing during the last sixteen years (1998 to 2013) which has implications to the temperature and water vapour budget in the tropical tropopause layer.

  15. Scanning ARM Cloud Radars Part II. Data Quality Control and Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, Pavlos; Jo, Ieng; Borque, Paloma; Tatarevic, Aleksandra; Lamer, Katia; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin B.; Johnson, Karen; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2013-10-04

    The Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACR’s) are the primary instruments for documenting the four-dimensional structure and evolution of clouds within a 20-30 km radius from the ARM fixed and mobile sites. Here, the post-processing of the calibrated SACR measurements is discussed. First, a feature mask algorithm that objectively determines the presence of significant radar returns is described. The feature mask algorithm is based on the statistical properties of radar receiver noise. It accounts for atmospheric emission and is applicable even for SACR profiles with few or no signal-free range gates. Using the nearest-in-time atmospheric sounding, the SACR radar reflectivities are corrected for gaseous attenuation (water vapor and oxygen) using a line-by-line absorption model. Despite having a high pulse repetition frequency, the SACR has a narrow Nyquist velocity limit and thus Doppler velocity folding is commonly observed. An unfolding algorithm that makes use of a first guess for the true Doppler velocity using horizontal wind measurements from the nearest sounding is described. The retrieval of the horizontal wind profile from the Hemispherical Sky – Range Height Indicator SACR scan observations and/or nearest sounding is described. The retrieved horizontal wind profile can be used to adaptively configure SACR scan strategies that depend on wind direction. Several remaining challenges are discussed, including the removal of insect and second-trip echoes. The described algorithms significantly enhance SACR data quality and constitute an important step towards the utilization of SACR measurements for cloud research.

  16. Can we estimate precipitation rate during snowfall using a scanning terrestrial LiDAR?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeWinter, A. L.; Bair, E. H.; Davis, R. E.; Finnegan, D. C.; Gutmann, E. D.; Dozier, J.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate snowfall measurements in windy areas have proven difficult. To examine a new approach, we have installed an automatic scanning terrestrial LiDAR at Mammoth Mountain, CA. With this LiDAR, we have demonstrated effective snow depth mapping over a small study area of several hundred m2. The LiDAR also produces dense point clouds by detecting falling and blowing hydrometeors during storms. Daily counts of airborne detections from the LiDAR show excellent agreement with automated and manual snow water equivalent measurements, suggesting that LiDAR observations have the potential to directly estimate precipitation rate. Thus, we suggest LiDAR scanners offer advantages over precipitation radars, which could lead to more accurate precipitation rate estimates. For instance, uncertainties in mass-diameter and mass-fall speed relationships used in precipitation radar, combined with low reflectivity of snow in the microwave spectrum, produce errors of up to 3X in snowfall rates measured by radar. Since snow has more backscatter in the near-infrared wavelengths used by LiDAR compared to the wavelengths used by radar, and the LiDAR detects individual hydrometeors, our approach has more potential for directly estimating precipitation rate. A key uncertainty is hydrometeor mass. At our study site, we have also installed a Multi Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) to measure size, fallspeed, and mass of individual hydrometeors. By combining simultaneous MASC and LiDAR measurements, we can estimate precipitation density and rate.

  17. Autonomous full-time lidar measurements of polar stratospheric clouds at the South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, James R.

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) are an artifact of extremely low temperatures in the lower-stratosphere caused by a lack of sunlight during winter. Their presence induces increased concentrations of chlorine and bromine radicals that drive catalytic ozone destruction upon the return of sunlight in spring. An eye-safe micropulse lidar (MPL; 0.23 mum) was installed at the Scott-Amundsen South Pole Station, Antarctica in December 1999 to collect continuous long-term measurements of polar clouds. A four-year data subset for analyzing PSC is derived from measurements for austral winters 2000 and 2003--2005. A statistical algorithm based on MPL signal uncertainties is designed to retrieve PSC boundary heights, attenuated scattering ratios and demonstrate instrument performance for low signal-to-noise measurements. The MPL measurements consist mostly of Type II PSC (i.e., ice). The likelihood for Type I measurements are described for specific conditions. Seasonal PSC macrophysical properties are examined relative to thermodynamic and chemical characteristics. The potential for dehumidification and denitrification of the lower Antarctic stratosphere is examined by comparing PSC observations to theoretical predictions for cloud based on common scenarios for water vapor and nitric acid concentrations. Conceptual models for seasonal PSC occurrence, denitrification and dehumidification and ozone loss are described. A linear relationship is established between total integrated PSC scattering and ozone loss, with high correlation. Polar vortex dynamics are investigated in relation to PSC occurrence, including synoptic-scale geopotential height anomalies, isentropic airmass trajectories and local-scale gravity waves. Moisture overrunning, from quasi-adiabatic cooling and transport along isentropic boundaries, is considered a primary mechanism for PSC occurrence. Middle and late-season PSC are found to be the result of mixing of moist air from the outer edges of the vortex that coots upon reaching South Pole. Gravity waves are considered to be only a secondary influence on PSC nucleation and growth.

  18. Trajectory-Based Registration of 3d LIDAR Point Clouds Acquired with a Mobile Mapping System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressin, A.; Cannelle, B.; Mallet, C.; Papelard, J.-P.

    2012-07-01

    Thanks to a hybrid georeferencing unit coupling GNSS and IMU sensors, mobile mapping systems (MMS) with lidar sensors provide accurate 3D point clouds of the acquired areas, mainly urban cities. When dealing with several acquisitions of the same area with the same device, differences in the range of several tens of centimeters can be observed. Such degradation of the georeferencing accuracies are due to two main reasons: inertial drift and losses of GNSS signals in urban corridors. The purpose of this paper is therefore to correct these differences with an accurate ICP-based registration algorithm, and then to correct the MMS trajectory using these retrieved local transformation parameters.The trajectory loop information plays a key role for that purpose. We propose a four-step method starting from a 3D point cloud with overlapping parts, and the trajectory of the mobile mapping system. First, a polygonal approximation of the trajectory is computed in order to first divide the whole registration problem in local sub-issues. Secondly, we aim to find all the potential overlapping acquired areas between these segments using simple bounding box intersections. Thirdly, for each pair of overlapping areas, an efficient variant of the ICP algorithm is proposed to (1) prune cases where segments do not share point clouds of the same areas and (2) retrieve the transformation parameters, for real overlapping cases. Finally, all these transformations are linked together, and fed into a global distance compensation problem, allowing to adjust the MMS trajectories for several passages. As a conclusion, this method is successfully applied to data acquired over Paris (France) with the Stereopolis mobile mapping system.

  19. Evaluations of Three-Dimensional Building Model Reconstruction from LiDAR Point Clouds and Single-View Perspective Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, F.; Chang, H.

    2014-06-01

    This paper briefly presents two approaches for effective three-dimensional (3D) building model reconstruction from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data and single perspective view imagery and assesses their applicability to the reconstruction of 3D models of landmark or historical buildings. The collected LiDAR point clouds are registered based on conjugate points identified using a seven-parameter transformation system. Three dimensional models are generated using plan and surface fitting algorithms. The proposed single-view reconstruction (SVR) method is based on vanishing points and single-view metrology. More detailed models can also be generated according to semantic analysis of the faade images. Experimental results presented in this paper demonstrate that both TLS and SVR approaches can successfully produce accurate and detailed 3D building models from LiDAR point clouds or different types of single-view perspective images.

  20. Uncertainties in Ice-Sheet Altimetry from a Spaceborne 1064-nm Single-Channel Lidar Due to Undetected Thin Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yuekui; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Wiscombe, Warren; Yang, Ping

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat)-II mission, this paper studies the bias in surface-elevation measurements caused by undetected thin clouds. The ICESat-II satellite may only have a 1064-nm single-channel lidar onboard. Less sensitive to clouds than the 532-nm channel, the 1064-nm channel tends to miss thin clouds. Previous studies have demonstrated that scattering by cloud particles increases the photon-path length, thus resulting in biases in ice-sheet-elevation measurements from spaceborne lidars. This effect is referred to as atmospheric path delay. This paper complements previous studies in the following ways: First, atmospheric path delay is estimated over the ice sheets based on cloud statistics from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System onboard ICESat and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard Terra and Aqua. Second, the effect of cloud particle size and shape is studied with the state-of-the-art phase functions developed for MODIS cirrus- cloud microphysical model. Third, the contribution of various orders of scattering events to the path delay is studied, and an analytical model of the first-order scattering contribution is developed. This paper focuses on the path delay as a function of telescope field of view (FOV). The results show that reducing telescope FOV can significantly reduce the expected path delay. As an example, the average path delays for FOV = 167 microrad (a 100-m-diameter circle on the surface) caused by thin undetected clouds by the 1064-nm channel over Greenland and East Antarctica are illustrated.

  1. NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor and Cirrus Clouds during WVIOP2000 and AFWEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; DiGirolamo, P.; Demoz, B. B.; Turner, D.; Comstock, J.; Ismail, S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.; Goldsmith, J. E. M.; Abshire, James B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was deployed to the Southern Great Plains CART site from September - December, 2000 and participated in two field campaigns devoted to comparisons of various water vapor measurement technologies and calibrations. These campaigns were the Water Vapor Intensive Operations Period 2000 (WVIOP2000) and the ARM FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX). WVIOP2000 was devoted to validating water vapor measurements in the lower atmosphere while AFWEX had similar goals but for measurements in the upper troposphere. The SRL was significantly upgraded both optically and electronically prior to these field campaigns. These upgrades enabled the SRL to demonstrate the highest resolution lidar measurements of water vapor ever acquired during the nighttime and the highest S/N Raman lidar measurements of water vapor in the daytime; more than a factor of 2 increase in S/N versus the DOE CARL Raman Lidar. Examples of these new measurement capabilities along with comparisons of SRL and CARL, LASE, MPI-DIAL, in-situ sensors, radiosonde, and others will be presented. The profile comparisons of the SRL and CARL have revealed what appears to be an overlap correction or countrate correction problem in CARL. This may be involved in an overall dry bias in the precipitable water calibration of CARL with respect to the MWR of approx. 4%. Preliminary analysis indicates that the application of a temperature dependent correction to the narrowband Raman lidar measurements of water vapor improves the lidar/Vaisala radiosonde comparisons of upper tropospheric water vapor. Other results including the comparison of the first-ever simultaneous measurements from four water vapor lidar systems, a bore-wave event captured at high resolution by the SRL and cirrus cloud optical depth studies using the SRL and CARL will be presented at the meeting.

  2. Quantifying monthly to decadal subsidence and assessing collapse potential near the Wink sinkholes, west Texas, using airborne lidar, radar interferometry, and microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paine, J. G.; Collins, E.; Yang, D.; Andrews, J. R.; Averett, A.; Caudle, T.; Saylam, K.

    2014-12-01

    We are using airborne lidar and satellite-based radar interferometry (InSAR) to quantify short-term (months to years) and longer-term (decades) subsidence in the area surrounding two large (100- to 200-m diameter) sinkholes that formed above Permian bedded salt in 1980 and 2002 in the Wink area, west Texas. Radar interferograms constructed from synthetic aperture radar data acquired between 2008 and 2011 with the ALOS PALSAR L-band satellite-borne instrument reveal local areas that are subsiding at rates that reach a few cm per month. Subsiding areas identified on radar interferograms enable labor-intensive ground investigations (such as microgravity surveys) to focus on areas where subsidence is occurring and shallow-source mass deficits might exist that could be sites of future subsidence or collapse. Longer-term elevation changes are being quantified by comparing digital elevation models (DEMs) constructed from high-resolution airborne lidar data acquired over a 32-km2 area in 2013 with older, lower-resolution DEMs constructed from data acquired during the NASA- and NGA-sponsored Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission in February 2000 and from USGS aerial photogrammetry-derived topographic data from the 1960s. Total subsidence reaches more than 10 m over 45 years in some areas. Maximum rates of subsidence measured on annual (from InSAR) and decadal (from lidar) time scales are about 0.25 m/yr. In addition to showing the extent and magnitude of subsidence at the 1980 and 2002 sinkholes, comparison of the 2013 lidar-derived DEM with the 1960s photogrammetry-derived DEM revealed other locations that have undergone significant (more than 1 m) elevation change since the 1960s, but show no evidence of recent (2008 to 2011) ground motion from satellite radar interferograms. Regional coverage obtained by radar interferometry and local coverage obtained with airborne lidar show that areas of measurable subsidence are all within a few km of the 1980 and 2002 sinkholes.

  3. Long-term measurements of Polar Stratospheric Clouds with the Esrange lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtert, Peggy; Tesche, Matthias; Blum, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) play a key role for ozone depletion in the polar stratosphere whose magnitude depends on the type of PSC and its lifetime and extent. PSCs are classified into three types (PSC Ia: nitric acid di- or trihydrate crystals, NAD or NAT; PSC Ib: supercooled liquid ternary solutions, STS; PSC II: ice) according to their particle composition and to their physical phase. This study presents long-term statistics of PSC occurrence from measurements with the lidar system at the Esrange Space Centre (68N, 21E), northern Sweden. The study gives an overview of the occurrence frequency of different PSC types in connection to the prevailing meteorological conditions for the northern hemispheric winters from 1996/97 to 2013/14. During these 18 years, most of the measurements were conducted in January. The geographical location of Esrange in the lee of the Scandinavian mountain range allows for the observation of a wide range of PSC growth conditions due to mountain-wave activity. The Esrange lidar data set contains hourly mean values of the parallel and perpendicularly polarized backscatter ratio and the linear particle depolarization ratio - all measured at 532 nm. These parameters are used for PSC classification. The lowest occurrence frequency is found for PSCs of type II (6% for the entire period). This low occurrence rate is reasonable since PSCs of type II are formed at temperatures below the ice-frost point. Such temperatures are rarely reached in the Arctic polar vortex. Most of the observations between 1997 and 2014 showed low particle depolarization ratios and low backscatter ratios according to which observed PSCs were classified as type Ib (47%) or mixtures (33%). The remaining 13% of the observation were classified as type Ia PSCs (NAT particles).

  4. Layers of quasi-horizontally oriented ice crystals in cirrus clouds observed by a two-wavelength polarization lidar.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Balin, Yurii; Kokhanenko, Grigorii; Penner, Iogannes; Konoshonkin, Alexander; Kustova, Natalia

    2014-10-01

    Layers of quasi-horizontally oriented ice crystals in cirrus clouds are observed by a two-wavelength polarization lidar. These layers of thickness of several hundred meters are identified by three attributes: the backscatter reveals a sharp ridge while the depolarization ratio and color ratio become deep minima. These attributes have been justified by theoretical calculations of these quantities within the framework of the physical-optics approximation. PMID:25322032

  5. The influence of rain and clouds on a satellite dual frequency radar altimeter system operating at 13 and 35 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.; Monaldo, F. M.; Goldhirsh, J.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of inhomogeneous spatial attenuation resulting from clouds and rain on the altimeter estimate of the range to mean sea level are modelled. It is demonstrated that typical cloud and rain attenuation variability at commonly expected spatial scales can significantly degrade altimeter range precision. Rain cell and cloud scale sizes and attenuations are considered as factors. The model simulation of altimeter signature distortion is described, and the distortion of individual radar pulse waveforms by different spatial scales of attenuation is considered. Examples of range errors found for models of a single cloud, a rain cell, and cloud streets are discussed.

  6. Turbulence as observed by concurrent measurements made at NSSL using weather radar, Doppler radar, Doppler lidar and aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jean T.

    1987-01-01

    As air traffic increases and aircraft capability increases in range and operating altitude, the exposure to weather hazards increases. Turbulence and wind shears are two of the most important of these hazards that must be taken into account if safe flight operations are to be accomplished. Beginning in the early 1960's, Project Rough Rider began thunderstorm investigations. Past and present efforts at the National Severe Storm Laboratory (NSSL) to measure these flight safety hazards and to describe the use of Doppler radar to detect and qualify these hazards are summarized. In particular, the evolution of the Doppler-measured radial velocity spectrum width and its applicability to the problem of safe flight is presented.

  7. Polar Stratospheric Clouds from ground-based lidar and CALIPSO observations and Chemistry Climate Models evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierli, Federico; Di Liberto, Luca; Cairo, Francesco; Cagnazzo, Chiara; Snels, Marcel; Keckhut, Philippe; Jumelet, Julien; Pitts, Michael C.

    2014-05-01

    We evaluate the Antarctic PSC observational databases of CALIPSO and the ground-based lidars of NDACC (Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) located in McMurdo and Dumont D'Urville stations and provide a process-oriented evaluation of PSC in a subset of CCMVAL-2 chemistry-climate models. Lidar observatories have a decadal coverage, albeit with discontinuities, spanning from 1992 to today hence offering a unique database. A clear issue is the representativeness of ground-based long-term data series of the Antarctic stratosphere conditions that may limit their value in climatological studies and model evaluation. The comparison with the CALIPSO observations with a global coverage is, hence, a key issue. In turn, models can have a biased representation of the stratospheric conditions and of the PSC microphysics leading to large discrepancies in PSC occurrence and composition. CALIPSO observations indicate a large longitudinal variability in PSC formation in the polar atmosphere and ground-based observations are hence representative of different cloud conditions. Point-to-point comparison is difficult due to sparseness of the database (or PSC appearance at the edge of the vortex) and to intrinsic differences in spatial distribution between models and observations. So the use of simple diagnostics that are independent from instrumental coverage is fundamental. Comparison between ground-based and satellite borne-lidar is overall satisfactory and differences may be attributed to differences in coverage. As expected, McMurdo site is dominated by a NAT-type regime that is a clear feature of the eastern part of polar vortex while Dumont D'Urville is largely influenced by the transition at the edge the polar vortex resulting, on average, in a much reduced PSC coverage with a partition between NAT and STS cloud types. Data from the 5 CCMs having provided PSC surface areas on daily basis have been evaluated using the same diagnostic type that may be derived CALIPSO (i.e. frequency of PSC occurrence function of lon-lat, height and temperature) showing large differences that may be explained by the interplay of model temperatures that may show a large bias (negative for 3 models over 5) and the microphysical scheme itself. Two models in fact show an excess of NAT formation relative to ice clouds while two others have an unrealistic dominance of ice. Most of them show a somewhat too efficient PSC production with temperature decrease below NAT formation temperature. Evaluation CCMs with ground-based instruments databases should be done with great care due to the large spatial differences inside the polar vortex that are not fully reproduced by the models. In turn, longer series as provided by NDACC should be used to evaluate interannual variability and trends that is difficult to identify in the shorter CALIPSO database.

  8. Automated Detection of Geomorphic Features in LiDAR Point Clouds of Various Spatial Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorninger, Peter; Szkely, Balzs; Zmolyi, Andrs.; Nothegger, Clemens

    2010-05-01

    LiDAR, also referred to as laser scanning, has proved to be an important tool for topographic data acquisition. Terrestrial laser scanning allows for accurate (several millimeter) and high resolution (several centimeter) data acquisition at distances of up to some hundred meters. By contrast, airborne laser scanning allows for acquiring homogeneous data for large areas, albeit with lower accuracy (decimeter) and resolution (some ten points per square meter) compared to terrestrial laser scanning. Hence, terrestrial laser scanning is preferably used for precise data acquisition of limited areas such as landslides or steep structures, while airborne laser scanning is well suited for the acquisition of topographic data of huge areas or even country wide. Laser scanners acquire more or less homogeneously distributed point clouds. These points represent natural objects like terrain and vegetation and artificial objects like buildings, streets or power lines. Typical products derived from such data are geometric models such as digital surface models representing all natural and artificial objects and digital terrain models representing the geomorphic topography only. As the LiDAR technology evolves, the amount of data produced increases almost exponentially even in smaller projects. This means a considerable challenge for the end user of the data: the experimenter has to have enough knowledge, experience and computer capacity in order to manage the acquired dataset and to derive geomorphologically relevant information from the raw or intermediate data products. Additionally, all this information might need to be integrated with other data like orthophotos. In all theses cases, in general, interactive interpretation is necessary to determine geomorphic structures from such models to achieve effective data reduction. There is little support for the automatic determination of characteristic features and their statistical evaluation. From the lessons learnt from automated extraction and modeling of buildings (Dorninger & Pfeifer, 2008) we expected that similar generalizations for geomorphic features can be achieved. Our aim is to recognize as many features as possible from the point cloud in the same processing loop, if they can be geometrically described with appropriate accuracy (e.g., as a plane). For this, we propose to apply a segmentation process allowing determining connected, planar structures within a surface represented by a point cloud. It is based on a robust determination of local tangential planes for all points acquired (Nothegger & Dorninger, 2009). It assumes that for points, belonging to a distinct planar structure, similar tangential planes can be determined. In passing, points acquired at continuous such as vegetation can be identified and eliminated. The plane parameters are used to define a four-dimensional feature space which is used to determine seed-clusters globally for the whole are of interest. Starting from these seeds, all points defining a connected, planar region are assigned to a segment. Due to the design of the algorithm, millions of input points can be processed with acceptable processing time on standard computer systems. This allows for processing geomorphically representative areas at once. For each segment, numerous parameter are derived which can be used for further exploitation. These are, for example, location, area, aspect, slope, and roughness. To prove the applicability of our method for automated geomorphic terrain analysis, we used terrestrial and airborne laser scanning data, acquired at two locations. The data of the Doren landslide located in Vorarlberg, Austria, was acquired by a terrestrial Riegl LS-321 laser scanner in 2008, by a terrestrial Riegl LMS-Z420i laser scanner in 2009, and additionally by three airborne LiDAR measurement campaigns, organized by the Landesvermessungsamt Vorarlberg, Feldkirch, in 2003, 2006, and 2007. The measurement distance of the terrestrial measurements was considerably varying considerably because of the various base points that were neede

  9. Augmented reality system using lidar point cloud data for displaying dimensional information of objects on mobile phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Lohani, B.

    2014-05-01

    Mobile augmented reality system is the next generation technology to visualise 3D real world intelligently. The technology is expanding at a fast pace to upgrade the status of a smart phone to an intelligent device. The research problem identified and presented in the current work is to view actual dimensions of various objects that are captured by a smart phone in real time. The methodology proposed first establishes correspondence between LiDAR point cloud, that are stored in a server, and the image t hat is captured by a mobile. This correspondence is established using the exterior and interior orientation parameters of the mobile camera and the coordinates of LiDAR data points which lie in the viewshed of the mobile camera. A pseudo intensity image is generated using LiDAR points and their intensity. Mobile image and pseudo intensity image are then registered using image registration method SIFT thereby generating a pipeline to locate a point in point cloud corresponding to a point (pixel) on the mobile image. The second part of the method uses point cloud data for computing dimensional information corresponding t