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Sample records for cluster cooling flows

  1. Brightest Cluster Galaxies & Cooling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    In the absence of any form of feedback heating, the gas in the central regions of massive relaxed cluster should cool and initiate a cooling flow. The presence/efficiency of an additional heating and the ultimate fate of the cooling gas is the subject of an extensive debate. In the last decade, molecular and atomic gas have been found in many Brightest Cluster Galaxies. I will review these observational results and discuss their implication for galaxy formation/evolution, in the perspective of ALMA.

  2. Cooling Flow Spectra in Ginga Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1997-01-01

    The primary focus of this research project has been a joint analysis of Ginga LAC and Einstein SSS X-ray spectra of the hot gas in galaxy clusters with cooling flows is reported. We studied four clusters (A496, A1795, A2142 & A2199) and found their central temperatures to be cooler than in the exterior, which is expected from their having cooling flows. More interestingly, we found central metal abundance enhancements in two of the clusters, A496 and A2142. We have been assessing whether the abundance gradients (or lack thereof) in intracluster gas is correlated with galaxy morphological gradients in the host clusters. In rich, dense galaxy clusters, elliptical and SO galaxies are generally found in the cluster cores, while spiral galaxies are found in the outskirts. If the metals observed in clusters came from proto-ellipticals and proto-S0s blowing winds, then the metal distribution in intracluster gas may still reflect the distribution of their former host galaxies. In a research project which was inspired by the success of the Ginga LAC/Einstein SSS work, we analyzed X-ray spectra from the HEAO-A2 MED and the Einstein SSS to look for temperature gradients in cluster gas. The HEAO-A2 MED was also a non-imaging detector with a large field of view compared to the SSS, so we used the differing fields of view of the two instruments to extract spatial information. We found some evidence of cool gas in the outskirts of clusters, which may indicate that the nominally isothermal mass density distributions in these clusters are steepening in the outer parts of these clusters.

  3. Cooling flows in clusters of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Meiksin, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray measurements of many clusters of galaxies reveal a hot Intracluster Medium (ICM) that has a cooling time less than a Hubble time. The consequent decrease in the central pressure support of the ICM will result in an inward cooling flow. The inferred accretion rates are typically several hundred solar masses per year. The cD or giant elliptical found at the center of every cooling flow would be substantially altered by the accreted gas, and may even have been created by the flow. Optical, UV, and radio measurements, however, fail to find adequate evidence for massive amounts of cool gas. The lore is that the gas is transformed into stars of such low mass that they do not give very peculiar colors to the central galaxy. In this thesis, after a review of past and current literature, two tasks are undertaken. The first is to examine the role heat conduction could play. It is demonstrated that the density and temperature profiles of the cooling flows in Virgo and Perseus are consistent with a steady-state model in which that conduction reduces the accretion rates by an order of magnitude. The second task is to simulate the evolution of a cooling flow, and possible formation of a galaxy from thermal instabilities, in a proper cosmological setting. Two evolutionary stages are found, a dynamical accretion state composed of two competing similarity solutions followed by a quasi-steady-state cooling flow. The onset of the second stage is very recent. During either stage, so few stars may be created that their colors, even adopting a standard initial mass function, would be consistent with the existing optical and UV constraints.

  4. X ray opacity in cluster cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Michael W.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1993-01-01

    We have calculated the emergent x-ray properties for a set of spherically symmetric, steady-state cluster cooling flow models including the effects of radiative transfer. Opacity due to resonant x-ray lines, photoelectric absorption, and electron scattering have been included in these calculations, and homogeneous and inhomogeneous gas distributions were considered. The effects of photoionization opacity are small for both types of models. In contrast, resonant line optical depths can be quite high in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous models. The presence of turbulence in the gas can significantly lower the line opacity. We find that integrated x-ray spectra for the flow cooling now are only slightly affected by radiative transfer effects. However x-ray line surface brightness profiles can be dramatically affected by radiative transfer. Line profiles are also strongly affected by transfer effects. The combined effects of opacity and inflow cause many of the lines in optically thick models to be asymmetrical.

  5. On magnetothermal instability in cluster cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balbus, Steven A.

    1991-01-01

    Lagrangian techniques appropriate to a local calculation are used to show that a weak ordered magnetic field can result in a generic condensational mode in cluster cooling flows. However, thermal instability appears possible only if the conductivity is well below its Spitzer value, for all nonradial wavenumbers. Wavenumbers not subject to conductive damping are subject to buoyant oscillations. It is shown that when instability is present, lateral magnetic confinement of high thermal pressure regions in the plasma by radial magnetic field lines is responsible in at least equal measure with radially directed magnetic tension for the suppression of oscillations and the reappearance of local condensational modes. The general importance of even very modest magnetic fields for destabilizing thermal time scale perturbations is emphasized.

  6. The Physics of Cooling Flow Clusters with Central Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarazin, Craig L.

    2005-01-01

    Central galaxies in rich clusters are the sites of cluster cooling flows, with large masses of gas cooling through part of the X-ray band. Many of these galaxies host powerful radio sources. These sources can displace and compress the X-ray gas leading to enhanced cooling and star formation. We observed the bright cooling flow Abell 2626 with a strangely distorted central radio source. We wished to understand the interaction of radio and X-ray thermal plasma, and to determine the dynamical nature of this cluster. One aim was to constrain the source of additional pressure in radio "holes" in the X-ray emission needed to support overlying shells of X-ray gas. We also aimed to study the problem of the lack of kT < 1-2 keV gas in cooling flows by searching for abundance inhomogeneities, heating from the radio source, and excess absorption. We also have a Chandra observation of this cluster. There were problems with the pipeline processing of this data due to a telemetry dropout. We are publishing the Chandra and XMM data together. Delays with the Chandra data have slowed up the publication. At the center of the cluster, there is a complex interaction of the odd, Z-shaped radio source, and the X-ray plasma. However, there are no clear radio bubbles. Also, the cluster SO galaxy IC 5337, which is projected 1.5 arcmin west of the cluster center, has unusual tail-like structures in both the radio and X-ray. It appears to be falling into the cluster center. There is a hot, probably shocked region of gas to the southwest, which is apparently due to the merger of a subcluster in this part of the system. There is also a merging subcluster to the northeast. The axes of these two mergers agrees with a supercluster filament structure.

  7. A study of cooling flows in poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.; Dillingham, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    We observed three poor clusters with central dominant galaxies (AWM 4, MKW 4, and MKW 3's) using the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter on the ROSAT X-ray satellite. The images reveal smooth, symmetrical X-ray emission filling the cluster with a sharp peak on each central galaxy. The cluster surface brightness profiles can be decomposed using superposed King models for the central galaxy and the intracluster medium. The King model parameters for the cluster portions are consistent with previous observations of these clusters. The newly measured King model parameters for the central galaxies are typical of the X-ray surface brightness distributions of isolated elliptical galaxies. Spatially resolved temperature measurements in annular rings throughout the clusters show a nearly isothermal profile. Temperatures are consistent with previously measured values, but are much better determined. There is no significant drop in temperature noted in the innermost bins where cooling flows are likely to be present, nor is any excess absorption by cold gas required. All cold gas columns are consistent with galactic foreground absorption. We derive mass profiles for the clusters assuming both isothermal temperature profiles and cooling flow models with constant mass flow rates. Our results are consistent with previous Einstein IPC observations by Kriss, Cioffi, & Canizares, but extend the mass profiles out to 1 Mpc in these poor clusters.

  8. A study of cooling flows in poor clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.; Dillingham, Stephen

    1995-08-01

    We observed three poor clusters with central dominant galaxies (AWM 4, MKW 4, and MKW 3's) using the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter on the ROSAT X-ray satellite. The images reveal smooth, symmetrical X-ray emission filling the cluster with a sharp peak on each central galaxy. The cluster surface brightness profiles can be decomposed using superposed King models for the central galaxy and the intracluster medium. The King model parameters for the cluster portions are consistent with previous observations of these clusters. The newly measured King model parameters for the central galaxies are typical of the X-ray surface brightness distributions of isolated elliptical galaxies. Spatially resolved temperature measurements in annular rings throughout the clusters show a nearly isothermal profile. Temperatures are consistent with previously measured values, but are much better determined. There is no significant drop in temperature noted in the innermost bins where cooling flows are likely to be present, nor is any excess absorption by cold gas required. All cold gas columns are consistent with galactic foreground absorption. We derive mass profiles for the clusters assuming both isothermal temperature profiles and cooling flow models with constant mass flow rates. Our results are consistent with previous Einstein IPC observations by Kriss, Cioffi, & Canizares, but extend the mass profiles out to 1 Mpc in these poor clusters.

  9. Magnetic fields and the cluster cooling flow hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garasi, Christopher Joseph

    2001-12-01

    Through the development of modern observations and computational techniques, the picture associated with clusters of galaxies has become more complex. Initially thought to be isothermal and hydrostatic, the X-ray emitting intracluster medium (ICM) is now viewed as a turbulent, magnetized environment. Mergers, ejecta from member galaxies, and jets from active galactic nuclei all serve to perturb the ICM. Magnetic field has been detected at all spatial scales within the ICM, with magnetic pressure close to equipartition with the gas pressure near some cluster cores. All of these phenomena have an impact on the ICM. Nearly thirty years ago a subset of clusters of galaxies referred to as ``cooling flows'' were identified through enhanced X-ray emission above the typical cluster sample. The radiative cooling time for these systems was found to be shorter than the cluster age. It was hypothesized that radiative cooling should bring the ICM out of hydrostatic balance, evolving into a steady-state radial inflow. Since direct observation of material inflow is not yet possible, estimates of the mass accretion rate have come from X-ray observations. The dominant mechanism governing the dynamics of these environments was assumed to be purely hydrodynamic. The role which magnetic fields play within the ICM has come into question due to magnetic field measurements within the cores of ``cooling flows.'' Previous attempts have been made to address the importance of magnetic fields within the ICM, however, the conclusions have been conflicting. We investigate the impact which magnetic fields have on a radiatively collapsing environment using one-dimensional numerical simulations. A hydrodynamic baseline is first established, and then followed by simulations invoking ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) as well as magnetic dissipation. The results from the simulations indicate that hydrodynamics alone will not produce a solution which matches the observed characteristics of cooling

  10. Thermal conduction and reduced cooling flows in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, L. M.; Fabian, A. C.

    2004-02-01

    Conduction may play an important role in reducing cooling flows in galaxy clusters. We analyse a sample of 16 objects using Chandra data and find that a balance between electron conduction and cooling can exist in the hotter clusters (T>~ 5 keV), provided that the plasma conductivity is close to the unhindered Spitzer value. In the absence of any additional heat sources, a reduced mass inflow must then develop in the cooler objects in the sample. We fit cooling flow models to deprojected spectra and compare the spectral mass deposition rates found to the values required to account for the excess luminosity, assuming Spitzer-rate heat transfer over the observed temperature gradients. The measured mass inflow rates are insufficient to maintain energy balance in at least five clusters. However, emission from cooling gas may be partially absorbed. We also compute the flux supplied by turbulent heat transport and find conductivity profiles that follow a strikingly similar temperature dependence to the conductivity values required to prevent cooling. The larger-scale turbulent motions implied by this process are required to have velocities of between 10 and 50 per cent of the speed of sound in the local intracluster gas.

  11. Heat conduction in cooling flows. [in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; David, L. P.

    1988-01-01

    It has been suggested that electron conduction may significantly reduce the accretion rate (and star foramtion rate) for cooling flows in clusters of galaxies. A numerical hydrodynamics code was used to investigate the time behavior of cooling flows with conduction. The usual conduction coefficient is modified by an efficiency factor, mu, to realize the effects of tangled magnetic field lines. Two classes of models are considered, one where mu is independent of position and time, and one where inflow stretches the field lines and changes mu. In both cases, there is only a narrow range of initial conditions for mu in which the cluster accretion rate is reduced while a significant temperature gradient occurs. In the first case, no steady solution exists in which both conditions are met. In the second case, steady state solutions occur in which both conditions are met, but only for a narrow range of initial values where mu = 0.001.

  12. A cooling flow cluster at redshift z = 0.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolter, Anna; Schild, R.; Gioia, I. M.; Maccacaro, T.; Morris, S. L.; Nesci, R.; Perola, G. C.

    1990-01-01

    The cluster of galaxies 1E0839.9 + 2938, discovered in X-ray observations by Nesci et al. (1988), is characterized on the basis of VLA 6-cm radio observations, Whipple Observatory CCD photometry, and spectroscopic observations obtained with the Multiple Mirror Telescope and the 88-inch University of Hawaii Telescope at Mauna Kea. The data are presented in tables, maps, and sample images and spectra and briefly characterized. The bright X-ray object is identified with a cluster at redshift z = 0.195; its central galaxy has radio emission of 1.1 x 10 exp 24 W/Hz as well as strong optical line emission which is not restricted to its nucleus. It is concluded that 1E0839.9 + 2938 is a cooling-flow cluster similar to 3C295 (found at z = 0.461 by Henry et al., 1986). The need for space observations (by Rosat or the AXAF) to determine the object's X-ray luminosity distribution is indicated.

  13. A massive, cooling-flow-induced starburst in the core of a luminous cluster of galaxies.

    PubMed

    McDonald, M; Bayliss, M; Benson, B A; Foley, R J; Ruel, J; Sullivan, P; Veilleux, S; Aird, K A; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Bazin, G; Bleem, L E; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Desai, S; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J P; Egami, E; Forman, W R; Garmire, G P; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; Harrington, N L; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Liu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Miller, E D; Mocanu, L; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Murray, S S; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Rawle, T D; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Rex, M; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Simcoe, R; Song, J; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; Stubbs, C W; Suhada, R; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2012-08-16

    In the cores of some clusters of galaxies the hot intracluster plasma is dense enough that it should cool radiatively in the cluster's lifetime, leading to continuous 'cooling flows' of gas sinking towards the cluster centre, yet no such cooling flow has been observed. The low observed star-formation rates and cool gas masses for these 'cool-core' clusters suggest that much of the cooling must be offset by feedback to prevent the formation of a runaway cooling flow. Here we report X-ray, optical and infrared observations of the galaxy cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 (ref. 11) at redshift z = 0.596. These observations reveal an exceptionally luminous (8.2 × 10(45) erg s(-1)) galaxy cluster that hosts an extremely strong cooling flow (around 3,820 solar masses a year). Further, the central galaxy in this cluster appears to be experiencing a massive starburst (formation of around 740 solar masses a year), which suggests that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling in nearby cool-core clusters may not yet be fully established in SPT-CLJ2344-4243. This large star-formation rate implies that a significant fraction of the stars in the central galaxy of this cluster may form through accretion of the intracluster medium, rather than (as is currently thought) assembling entirely via mergers. PMID:22895340

  14. A massive, cooling-flow-induced starburst in the core of a luminous cluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Foley, R. J.; Ruel, J.; Sullivan, P.; Veilleux, S.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bazin, G.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P.; Egami, E.; Forman, W. R.; Garmire, G. P.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; High, F. W.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Joy, M.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, E. D.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T. E.; Murray, S. S.; Natoli, T.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Rawle, T. D.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Rex, M.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shaw, L.; Shirokoff, E.; Simcoe, R.; Song, J.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Stubbs, C. W.; Šuhada, R.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2012-08-01

    In the cores of some clusters of galaxies the hot intracluster plasma is dense enough that it should cool radiatively in the cluster's lifetime, leading to continuous `cooling flows' of gas sinking towards the cluster centre, yet no such cooling flow has been observed. The low observed star-formation rates and cool gas masses for these `cool-core' clusters suggest that much of the cooling must be offset by feedback to prevent the formation of a runaway cooling flow. Here we report X-ray, optical and infrared observations of the galaxy cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 (ref. 11) at redshift z = 0.596. These observations reveal an exceptionally luminous (8.2 × 1045 erg s-1) galaxy cluster that hosts an extremely strong cooling flow (around 3,820 solar masses a year). Further, the central galaxy in this cluster appears to be experiencing a massive starburst (formation of around 740 solar masses a year), which suggests that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling in nearby cool-core clusters may not yet be fully established in SPT-CLJ2344-4243. This large star-formation rate implies that a significant fraction of the stars in the central galaxy of this cluster may form through accretion of the intracluster medium, rather than (as is currently thought) assembling entirely via mergers.

  15. Star formation in cooling flows in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Brian R.; O'Connell, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    Spectrophotometry (wavelength = 3400-5100 A) has been obtained for the nuclei of 13 cD galaxies in cooling flows. Spectral anomalies are found in 8 of the objects, consisting of abnormally strong forbidden O II emission or excess flux effects. Consideration is given to metallicity effects, the relationship between UV excesses and the presence of massive OB stars formed from the cooling flows, and low-level effects related to accretion.

  16. Color gradients in cooling flow cluster central galaxies and the ionization of cluster emission line systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanishin, W.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary results are given for a program to measure color gradients in the central galaxies in clusters with a variety of cooling flow rates. The objectives are to search for extended blue continuum regions indicative of star formation, to study the spatial distribution of star formation, and to make a quantitative measure of the amount of light from young stars, which can lead to a measure of the star formation rate (for an assumed initial mass function). Four clusters with large masses and large cluster H-alpha emission fluxes are found to have an excess of blue light concentrated to the centers of the cluster central galaxy. Assumption of a disk IMF leads to the conclusion that the starlight might play a major role in ionizing the emission line gas in these clusters.

  17. ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION AND THE COOLING FLOW PROBLEM IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, Ian J.; Sharma, Prateek; Quataert, Eliot

    2009-09-20

    We examine the long-standing cooling flow problem in galaxy clusters with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of isolated clusters including radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. The central regions of the intracluster medium (ICM) can have cooling timescales of {approx}200 Myr or shorter-in order to prevent a cooling catastrophe the ICM must be heated by some mechanism such as active galactic nucleus feedback or thermal conduction from the thermal reservoir at large radii. The cores of galaxy clusters are linearly unstable to the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI), which significantly changes the thermodynamics of the cluster core. The HBI is a convective, buoyancy-driven instability that rearranges the magnetic field to be preferentially perpendicular to the temperature gradient. For a wide range of parameters, our simulations demonstrate that in the presence of the HBI, the effective radial thermal conductivity is reduced to {approx}<10% of the full Spitzer conductivity. With this suppression of conductive heating, the cooling catastrophe occurs on a timescale comparable to the central cooling time of the cluster. Thermal conduction alone is thus unlikely to stabilize clusters with low central entropies and short central cooling timescales. High central entropy clusters have sufficiently long cooling times that conduction can help stave off the cooling catastrophe for cosmologically interesting timescales.

  18. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE EXTENDED H{alpha} FILAMENTS IN COOLING FLOW CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: mcdonald@astro.umd.ed

    2010-10-01

    We present a high spatial resolution H{alpha} survey of 23 cooling flow clusters using the Maryland Magellan Tunable Filter, covering 1-2 orders of magnitude in cooling rate, dM/dt, temperature, and entropy. We find that 8/23 (35%) of our clusters have complex, filamentary morphologies at H{alpha}, while an additional 7/23 (30%) have marginally extended or nuclear H{alpha} emission, in general agreement with previous studies of line emission in cooling flow cluster brightest cluster galaxies. A weak correlation between the integrated near-UV luminosity and the H{alpha} luminosity is also found for our complete sample with a large amount of scatter about the expected relation for photoionization by young stars. We detect H{alpha} emission out to the X-ray cooling radius, but no further, in several clusters and find a strong correlation between the H{alpha} luminosity contained in filaments and the X-ray cooling flow rate of the cluster, suggesting that the warm ionized gas is linked to the cooling flow. Furthermore, we detect a strong enhancement in the cooling properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) coincident with the H{alpha} emission, compared to the surrounding ICM at the same radius. While the filaments in a few clusters may be entrained by buoyant radio bubbles, in general, the radially infalling cooling flow model provides a better explanation for the observed trends. The correlation of the H{alpha} and X-ray properties suggests that conduction may be important in keeping the filaments ionized. The thinness of the filaments suggests that magnetic fields are an important part of channeling the gas and shielding it from the surrounding hot ICM.

  19. On VI Observations of Galaxy Clusters: Evidence for Modest Cooling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Fabian, A. C.; Miller, Eric D.; Irwin, Jimmy A.

    2006-05-01

    A prediction of the galaxy-cluster cooling flow model is that as gas cools from the ambient cluster temperature, emission lines are produced in gas at subsequently decreasing temperatures. Gas passing through 105.5 K emits in the lines of O VI λλ1032, 1035, and here we report a FUSE study of these lines in three cooling flow clusters, Abell 426, Abell 1795, and AWM 7. No emission was detected from AWM 7, but O VI is detected from the centers of Abell 426 and Abell 1795, and possibly to the south of the center in Abell 1795, where X-ray and optical emission line filaments lie. In Abell 426 these line luminosities imply a cooling rate of 32+/-6 Msolar yr-1 within the central r=6.2 kpc region, while for Abell 1795 the central cooling rate is 26+/-7 Msolar yr-1 (within r=22 kpc), and about 42+/-9 Msolar yr-1 including the southern pointing. Including other studies, three of six clusters have O VI emission, and they also have star formation as well as emission lines from 104 K gas. These observations are generally consistent with the cooling flow model, but at a rate closer to 30 Msolar yr-1 than to the originally suggested values of 102-10 3 Msolar yr-1.

  20. FUSE Observations of Warm Gas in the Cooling Flow Clusters A1795 and A2597

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, W. R.; Cowie, L.; Davidsen, A.; Hu, E.; Hutchings, J.; Murphy, E.; Sembach, K.; Woodgate, B.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present far-ultraviolet spectroscopy of the cores of the massive cooling flow clusters Abell 1795 and 2597 obtained with FUSE. As the intracluster gas cools through 3 x 10(exp 5)K, it should emit strongly in the O VI lambda(lambda)1032,1038 resonance lines. We report the detection of O VI (lambda)1032 emission in A2597, with a line flux of 1.35 +/- 0.35 x 10(exp -15) erg/sq cm s, as well as detection of emission from C III (lambda)977. A marginal detection of C III (lambda)977 emission is also reported for A1795. These observations provide evidence for a direct link between the hot (10(exp 7) K) cooling flow gas and the cool (10(exp 4) K) gas in the optical emission line filaments. Assuming simple cooling flow models, the O VI line flux in A2597 corresponds to a mass deposition rate of approx. 40 solar mass /yr within the central 36 kpc. Emission from O VI (lambda)1032 was not detected in A1795, with an upper limit of 1.5 x 10(exp -15) erg/sq cm s, corresponding to a limit on the mass cooling flow rate of M(28 kpc) less than 28M solar mass/ yr. We have considered several explanations for the lack of detection of O VI emission in A1795 and the weaker than expected flux in A2597, including extinction by dust in the outer cluster, and quenching of thermal conduction by magnetic fields. We conclude that a turbulent mixing model, with some dust extinction, could explain our O VI results while also accounting for the puzzling lack of emission by Fe(sub XVII) in cluster cooling flows.

  1. Entropy Limit and the Cold Feedback Mechanism in Cooling Flow Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2008-09-01

    I propose an explanation for the finding that star formation and visible filaments strong in Hα emission in cooling flow clusters occur only if the minimum specific entropy and the radiative cooling time of the intracluster medium (ICM) are below a specific threshold. The explanation is based on the cold feedback mechanism. In this mechanism, the mass accreted by the central black hole originates in nonlinear overdense blobs of gas residing in an extended region of the cooling flow region. I use the criterion that the feedback cycle period must be longer than the radiative cooling time of dense blobs, for large quantities of gas to cool to low temperatures. The falling time of the dense blobs is parameterized by the ratio of the infall velocity to the sound speed. Another parameter is the ratio of the blobs' density to that of the surrounding ICM. By taking the values of the parameters as in previous papers on the cold feedback model, I derive an expression that gives the right value of the entropy threshold. Future studies will have to examine in more detail the role these parameters play, and will have to show that the observed sharp change in the behavior of clusters across the entropy, or radiative cooling time, threshold can be reproduced by the model.

  2. Marriage à-la-MOND: Baryonic dark matter in galaxy clusters and the cooling flow puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2008-05-01

    I start with a brief introduction to MOND phenomenology and its possible roots in cosmology—a notion that may turn out to be the most far reaching aspect of MOND. Next I discuss the implications of MOND for the dark matter (DM) doctrine: MOND's successes imply that baryons determine everything. For DM this would mean that the puny tail of leftover baryons in galaxies wags the hefty DM dog. This has to occur in many intricate ways, and despite the haphazard construction history of galaxies—a very tall order. I then concentrate on galaxy clusters in light of MOND, which still requires some yet undetected cluster dark matter, presumably in some baryonic form (CBDM). This CBDM might contribute to the heating of the X-ray emitting gas and thus alleviate the cooling flow puzzle. MOND, qua theory of dynamics, does not directly enter the microphysics of the gas; however, it does force a new outlook on the role of DM in shaping the cluster gas dynamics: MOND tells us that the cluster DM is not cold dark matter, is not so abundant, and is not expected in galaxies; it is thus not subject to constraints on baryonic DM in galaxies. The mass in CBDM required in a whole cluster is, typically, similar to that in hot gas, but is rather more centrally concentrated, totally dominating the core. The CBDM contribution to the baryon budget in the universe is thus small. Its properties, deduced for isolated clusters, are consistent with the observations of the "bullet cluster". Its kinetic energy reservoir is much larger than that of the hot gas in the core, and would suffice to keep the gas hot for many cooling times. Heating can be effected in various ways depending on the exact nature of the CBDM, from very massive black holes to cool, compact gas clouds.

  3. What we learn about cooling flows through the study of the 10,000 K gas in clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, Stefi A.

    1992-01-01

    The physical properties of the emission-line nebulae associated with central dominant galaxies in clusters are explored within the context of standard cooling-flow models of the hot ICM. It is pointed out that the properties of the 10,000 K gas are inconsistent with simple theories in which this gas has accreted out of the hot ICM in thermal instabilities within a standard cooling flow atmosphere. Several possible ramifications for our understanding of the properties of clusters and the hot intracluster medium are discussed.

  4. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 Solar Mass/yr. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar Mass/yr for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  5. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 solar mass per year. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar mass per year for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  6. ARCRAIDER. I. Detailed optical and X-ray analysis of the cooling flow cluster Z3146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausch, W.; Gitti, M.; Erben, T.; Schindler, S.

    2007-08-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the medium redshift (z = 0.2906) galaxy cluster Z3146 which is part of the ongoing ARCRAIDER project, a systematic search for gravitational arcs in massive clusters of galaxies. The analysis of Z3146 is based on deep optical wide field observations in the B, V and R bands obtained with the WFI@ESO2.2m, and shallow archival WFPC2@HST taken with the F606W filter, which are used for strong as well as weak lensing analyses. Additionally we have used publicly available XMM/Newton observations for a detailed X-ray analysis of Z3146. Both methods, lensing and X-ray, were used to determine the dynamical state and to estimate the total mass. We also identified four gravitational arc candidates. We find this cluster to be in a relaxed state, which is confirmed by a large cooling flow with nominal ~1600 M_⊙ per year, regular galaxy density and light distributions and a regular shape of the weak lensing mass reconstruction. The mass content derived with the different methods agrees well within 25% at r200=1661 h70-1 kpc indicating a velocity dispersion of σ_v=869+124-153 km s-1. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Institute (PID-number 8301). STScI is operated by the association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Also based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla or Paranal Observatories under programme ID 68.A-02555 and 073.A-0050 and on observations with XMM-Newton, an ESA Science Mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member states and the USA (NASA).

  7. Analysis of Mass Profiles and Cooling Flows of Bright, Early-Type Galaxies AO2, AO3 and Surface Brightness Profiles and Energetics of Intracluster Gas in Cool Galaxy Clusters AO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1998-01-01

    This final report uses ROSAT observations to analyze two different studies. These studies are: Analysis of Mass Profiles and Cooling Flows of Bright, Early-Type Galaxies; and Surface Brightness Profiles and Energetics of Intracluster Gas in Cool Galaxy Clusters.

  8. HIGH-RESOLUTION XMM-NEWTON SPECTROSCOPY OF THE COOLING FLOW CLUSTER A3112

    SciTech Connect

    Bulbul, G. Esra; Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam; Cottam, Jean; Loewenstein, Michael; Mushotzky, Richard; Shafer, Richard

    2012-03-01

    We examine high signal-to-noise XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) and Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) observations to determine the physical characteristics of the gas in the cool core and outskirts of the nearby rich cluster A3112. The XMM-Newton Extended Source Analysis Software data reduction and background modeling methods were used to analyze the XMM-Newton EPIC data. From the EPIC data, we find that the iron and silicon abundance gradients show significant increase toward the center of the cluster while the oxygen abundance profile is centrally peaked but has a shallower distribution than that of iron. The X-ray mass modeling is based on the temperature and deprojected density distributions of the intracluster medium determined from EPIC observations. The total mass of A3112 obeys the M-T scaling relations found using XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of massive clusters at r{sub 500}. The gas mass fraction f{sub gas} = 0.149{sup +0.036}{sub -0.032} at r{sub 500} is consistent with the seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results. The comparisons of line fluxes and flux limits on the Fe XVII and Fe XVIII lines obtained from high-resolution RGS spectra indicate that there is no spectral evidence for cooler gas associated with the cluster with temperature below 1.0 keV in the central <38'' ({approx}52 kpc) region of A3112. High-resolution RGS spectra also yield an upper limit to the turbulent motions in the compact core of A3112 (206 km s{sup -1}). We find that the contribution of turbulence to total energy is less than 6%. This upper limit is consistent with the energy contribution measured in recent high-resolution simulations of relaxed galaxy clusters.

  9. Mergers, cooling flows, and evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, W. B.

    1993-01-01

    Mergers (the capture of cold gas, especially) can have a profound influence on the hot coronal gas of early-type galaxies and clusters, potentially inducing symptoms hitherto attributed to a cooling flow, if thermal conduction is operative in the coronal plasma. Heat can be conducted from the hot phase into the cold phase, simultaneously ionizing the cold gas to make optical filaments, while locally cooling the coronal gas to mimic a cooling-flow. If there is heat conduction, though, there is no standard cooling-flow since radiative losses are balanced by conduction and not mass deposition. Amongst the strongest observational support for the existence of cooling-flows is the presence of intermediate temperature gas with x-ray emission-line strengths in agreement with cooling-flow models. Here, x-ray line strengths are calculated for this alternative model, in which mergers are responsible for the observed optical and x-ray properties. Since gas around 10(exp 4) K is thermally stable, the cold cloud need not necessarily evaporate and hydrostatic solutions exist. Good agreement with the x-ray data is obtained. The relative strengths of intermediate temperature x-ray emission lines are in significantly better agreement with a simple conduction model than with published cooling-flow models. The good agreement of the conduction model with optical, infrared and x-ray data indicates that significantly more theoretical effort into this type of solution would be profitable.

  10. Abundance gradients in cooling flow clusters: Ginga Large Area Counters and Einstein Solid State Spectrometer spectra of A496, A1795, A2142, and A2199

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III; Day, C. S. R.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hughes, John P.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the Ginga Large Area Counters (LAC) and Einstein Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) spectra of four cooling flow clusters, A496, A1795, A2142, and A2199, each of which shows firm evidence of a relatively cool component. The inclusion of such cool spectral components in joint fits of SSS and LAC data leads to somewhat higher global temperatures than are derived from the high-energy LAC data alone. We find little evidence of cool emission outside the SSS field of view. Metal abundances appear to be centrally enhanced in all four clusters, with varying degrees of model dependence and statistical significance: the evidence is statistically strongest for A496 and A2142, somewhat weaker for A2199 and weakest for A1795. We also explore the model dependence in the amount of cold, X-ray-absorbing matter discovered in these clusters by White et al.

  11. Cool Cluster Correctly Correlated

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey Aleksandrovich Varganov

    2005-12-17

    Atomic clusters are unique objects, which occupy an intermediate position between atoms and condensed matter systems. For a long time it was thought that physical and chemical properties of atomic dusters monotonically change with increasing size of the cluster from a single atom to a condensed matter system. However, recently it has become clear that many properties of atomic clusters can change drastically with the size of the clusters. Because physical and chemical properties of clusters can be adjusted simply by changing the cluster's size, different applications of atomic clusters were proposed. One example is the catalytic activity of clusters of specific sizes in different chemical reactions. Another example is a potential application of atomic clusters in microelectronics, where their band gaps can be adjusted by simply changing cluster sizes. In recent years significant advances in experimental techniques allow one to synthesize and study atomic clusters of specified sizes. However, the interpretation of the results is often difficult. The theoretical methods are frequently used to help in interpretation of complex experimental data. Most of the theoretical approaches have been based on empirical or semiempirical methods. These methods allow one to study large and small dusters using the same approximations. However, since empirical and semiempirical methods rely on simple models with many parameters, it is often difficult to estimate the quantitative and even qualitative accuracy of the results. On the other hand, because of significant advances in quantum chemical methods and computer capabilities, it is now possible to do high quality ab-initio calculations not only on systems of few atoms but on clusters of practical interest as well. In addition to accurate results for specific clusters, such methods can be used for benchmarking of different empirical and semiempirical approaches. The atomic clusters studied in this work contain from a few atoms to

  12. X-Ray spectroscopy of cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea

    1996-01-01

    Cooling flows in clusters of galaxies occur when the cooling time of the gas is shorter than the age of the cluster; material cools and falls to the center of the cluster potential. Evidence for short X-ray cooling times comes from imaging studies of clusters and X-ray spectroscopy of a few bright clusters. Because the mass accretion rate can be high (a few 100 solar mass units/year) the mass of material accumulated over the lifetime of a cluster can be as high as 10(exp 12) solar mass units. However, there is little evidence for this material at other wavelengths, and the final fate of the accretion material is unknown. X-ray spectra obtained with the Einstein SSS show evidence for absorption; if confirmed this result would imply that the accretion material is in the form of cool dense clouds. However ice on the SSS make these data difficult to interpret. We obtained ASCA spectra of the cooling flow cluster Abell 85. Our primary goals were to search for multi-temperature components that may be indicative of cool gas; search for temperature gradients across the cluster; and look for excess absorption in the cooling region.

  13. Extended, Dusty Star Formation Fueled by a Residual Cooling Flow in the Cluster of Galaxies Sérsic 159-03

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Werner, N.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Veilleux, S.

    2015-05-01

    While the cooling of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) in the cores of galaxy clusters is mostly counteracted by heating from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), the balance is not perfect. This can lead to residual cooling flows and low-level star formation, the physics of which is not well understood. Here we present a detailed study of the residual cooling flow in the center of the low mass galaxy cluster Sérsic 159-03 (A S1101; z = 0.058) using far-ultraviolet imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope and far-IR (FIR) spectroscopy and photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory, along with a wealth of archival data. We detect extended emission at UV, FIR, and [C ii], indicating a star formation rate of ˜1-3 {{M}⊙ } yr-1, depending on the indicator and assumptions made. The most recently formed stars (as indicated by high Hα/UV ratios) appear spatially coincident with the lowest entropy ICM. We speculate that this low-entropy gas has been displaced by the central AGN ˜7.5 kpc north of the cD galaxy. These data suggest that the displacement of the cooling core from the direct vicinity of the central AGN can temporarily break the feedback cycle and lead to cooling and star formation that is offset from the center of the galaxy. We find an abundance (˜107 {{M}⊙ }) of cold (20 K) dust in the center of the cluster and a second FIR peak ˜30 kpc to the north of the central galaxy. If confirmed to be associated with the cooling filaments, this would be the most extended complex of dust yet found in a cool core cluster.

  14. Hot versus Cold: the Dichotomy in Spherical Accretion of Cooling Flows onto Supermassive Black Holes in Elliptical Galaxies, Galaxy Groups, and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Feedback heating from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has been commonly invoked to suppress cooling flows predicted in hot gas in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters. Previous studies have focused on if and how AGN feedback heats the gas but have little paid attention to its triggering mechanism. Using spherically symmetric simulations, we investigate how large-scale cooling flows are accreted by central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in eight well-observed systems and find an interesting dichotomy. In massive clusters, the gas develops a central cooling catastrophe within about the cooling time (typically ~100-300 Myr), resulting in cold-mode accretion onto SMBHs. However, in our four simulated systems on group and galaxy scales at a low metallicity Z = 0.3 Z ⊙, the gas quickly settles into a long-term state that has a cuspy central temperature profile extending to several tens to about 100 pc. At the more realistic solar metallicity, two groups (with R e ~ 4 kpc) still host the long-term, hot-mode accretion. Both accretion modes naturally appear in our idealized calculations where only cooling, gas inflow, and compressional heating are considered. The long-term, hot-mode accretion is maintained by the quickly established closeness between the timescales of these processes, preferably in systems with low gas densities, low gas metallicities, and importantly, compact central galaxies, which result in strong gravitational acceleration and compressional heating at the intermediate radii. Our calculations predict that central cuspy temperature profiles appear more often in smaller systems than galaxy clusters, which instead often host significant cold gas and star formation.

  15. Hot versus cold: The dichotomy in spherical accretion of cooling flows onto supermassive black holes in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2014-01-10

    Feedback heating from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has been commonly invoked to suppress cooling flows predicted in hot gas in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters. Previous studies have focused on if and how AGN feedback heats the gas but have little paid attention to its triggering mechanism. Using spherically symmetric simulations, we investigate how large-scale cooling flows are accreted by central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in eight well-observed systems and find an interesting dichotomy. In massive clusters, the gas develops a central cooling catastrophe within about the cooling time (typically ∼100-300 Myr), resulting in cold-mode accretion onto SMBHs. However, in our four simulated systems on group and galaxy scales at a low metallicity Z = 0.3 Z {sub ☉}, the gas quickly settles into a long-term state that has a cuspy central temperature profile extending to several tens to about 100 pc. At the more realistic solar metallicity, two groups (with R {sub e} ∼ 4 kpc) still host the long-term, hot-mode accretion. Both accretion modes naturally appear in our idealized calculations where only cooling, gas inflow, and compressional heating are considered. The long-term, hot-mode accretion is maintained by the quickly established closeness between the timescales of these processes, preferably in systems with low gas densities, low gas metallicities, and importantly, compact central galaxies, which result in strong gravitational acceleration and compressional heating at the intermediate radii. Our calculations predict that central cuspy temperature profiles appear more often in smaller systems than galaxy clusters, which instead often host significant cold gas and star formation.

  16. Formation of Cool Cores in Galaxy Clusters via Hierarchical Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Burns, Jack O.; Loken, Chris; Norman, Michael L.; Bryan, Greg

    2004-05-01

    We present a new scenario for the formation of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters, based on results from recent high spatial dynamic range, adaptive mesh Eulerian hydrodynamic simulations of large-scale structure formation. We find that cores of cool gas, material that would be identified as a classical cooling flow on the basis of its X-ray luminosity excess and temperature profile, are built from the accretion of discrete stable subclusters. Any ``cooling flow'' present is overwhelmed by the velocity field within the cluster; the bulk flow of gas through the cluster typically has speeds up to about 2000 km s-1, and significant rotation is frequently present in the cluster core. The inclusion of consistent initial cosmological conditions for the cluster within its surrounding supercluster environment is crucial when the evolution of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters is simulated. This new model for the hierarchical assembly of cool gas naturally explains the high frequency of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters, despite the fact that a majority of these clusters show evidence of substructure that is believed to arise from recent merger activity. Furthermore, our simulations generate complex cluster cores in concordance with recent X-ray observations of cool fronts, cool ``bullets,'' and filaments in a number of galaxy clusters. Our simulations were computed with a coupled N-body, Eulerian, adaptive mesh refinement, hydrodynamics cosmology code that properly treats the effects of shocks and radiative cooling by the gas. We employ up to seven levels of refinement to attain a peak resolution of 15.6 kpc within a volume 256 Mpc on a side and assume a standard ΛCDM cosmology.

  17. Computing Cooling Flows in Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, J.

    1986-01-01

    Algorithm developed for calculating both quantity of compressor bleed flow required to cool turbine and resulting decrease in efficiency due to cooling air injected into gas stream. Program intended for use with axial-flow, air-breathing, jet-propulsion engines with variety of airfoil-cooling configurations. Algorithm results compared extremely well with figures given by major engine manufacturers for given bulk-metal temperatures and cooling configurations. Program written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  18. X-ray Spectroscopy of Cooling Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.R.; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2006-01-17

    We review the X-ray spectra of the cores of clusters of galaxies. Recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations have demonstrated a severe deficit of emission at the lowest X-ray temperatures as compared to that expected from simple radiative cooling models. The same observations have provided compelling evidence that the gas in the cores is cooling below half the maximum temperature. We review these results, discuss physical models of cooling clusters, and describe the X-ray instrumentation and analysis techniques used to make these observations. We discuss several viable mechanisms designed to cancel or distort the expected process of X-ray cluster cooling.

  19. Cooling dynamics of carbon cluster anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiromaru, H.; Furukawa, T.; Ito, G.; Kono, N.; Tanuma, H.; Matsumoto, J.; Goto, M.; Majima, T.; Sundén, A. E. K.; Najafian, K.; Pettersson, M. S.; Dynefors, B.; Hansen, K.; Azuma, T.

    2015-09-01

    A series of ion storage experiments on small carbon cluster anions was conducted to understand size-dependent cooling processes. The laser-induced delayed electron detachment time profile show clear even/odd alternation due to the presence of the electronic cooling. The time evolution of the internal energy distribution was simulated for Cn- (n=4 to 7) with a common procedure taking vibrational and electronic cooling into account.

  20. Black holes, cooling flows and galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Peacock, J A

    2005-03-15

    Central black holes in galaxies are now well established as a ubiquitous phenomenon, and this fact is important for theories of cosmological structure formation. Merging of galaxy haloes must preserve the proportionality between black hole mass and baryonic mass; the way in which this happens may help solve difficulties with existing ing models of galaxy formation, which suffer from excessive cooling and thus over- produce stars. Feedback from active nuclei may be the missing piece of the puzzle, regulating galaxy-scale cooling flows. Such a process now seems to be observed in cluster-scale cooling flows, where dissipation of sound waves generated by radio lobes can plausibly balance the energy lost in X-rays, at least in a time-averaged sense. PMID:15681292

  1. Cooling, AGN Feedback, and Star Formation in Simulated Cool-core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.; Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Voit, G. Mark; O'Shea, Brian W.; Donahue, Megan

    2015-10-01

    Numerical simulations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) feedback in cool-core galaxy clusters have successfully avoided classical cooling flows, but often produce too much cold gas. We perform adaptive mesh simulations that include momentum-driven AGN feedback, self-gravity, star formation, and stellar feedback, focusing on the interplay between cooling, AGN heating, and star formation in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps triggered by AGN jets and turbulence form filamentary structures tens of kpc long. This cold gas feeds both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst that increases the entropy of the intracluster medium (ICM) and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1-2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, leading to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and redevelops multiphase gas, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. There is good agreement between our simulated cluster and the observations of cool-core clusters. ICM cooling is dynamically balanced by AGN heating, and a cool-core appearance is preserved. The minimum cooling time to free-fall time ratio typically varies between a few and ≳ 20. The star formation rate (SFR) covers a wide range, from 0 to a few hundred {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1, with an average of ˜ 40 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1. The instantaneous SMBH accretion rate shows large variations on short timescales, but the average value correlates well with the SFR. Simulations without stellar feedback or self-gravity produce qualitatively similar results, but a lower SMBH feedback efficiency (0.1% compared to 1%) results in too many stars.

  2. Hydrodynamic models of AGN feedback in cooling core clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernaleo, John C.

    X-ray observations show that the Intra Cluster Medium (ICM) in many galaxy clusters is cooling at a rapid rate, often to the point that it should have radiated away all of its energy in less than the age of the cluster. There is however a very clear lack of enough cool end products of this gas in the centers of the clusters. Energetic arguments indicate that Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) should be capable of heating the inner regions of clusters enough to offset the radiative cooling; truncating massive galaxy formation and solving the cooling flow problem. We present three sets of high resolution, ideal hydrodynamic simulations with the ZEUS code to test this AGN heating paradigm. For the first set of simulations, we study the dependence of the interaction between the AGN jets and the ICM on the parameters of the jets themselves. We present a parameter survey of two-dimensional (axisymmetric) models of back-to-back jets injected into a cluster atmosphere. We follow the passive evolution of the resulting structures. These simulations fall into roughly two classes, cocoon-bounded and non-cocoon bounded. We find that the cocoon-bounded sources inject significantly more entropy into the core regions of the ICM atmosphere, even though the efficiency with which the energy is thermalized is independent of the morphological class. In all cases, a large fraction of the energy injected by the jet ends up as gravitational potential energy due to the expansion of the atmosphere. For the second set, we present three-dimensional simulations of jetted AGN that act in response to cooling-mediated accretion of an ICM atmosphere. We find that our models are incapable of producing a long term balance of heating and cooling; catastrophic cooling can be delayed by the jet action but inevitably takes hold. At the heart of the failure of these models is the formation of a low density channel through which the jet can freely flow, carrying its energy out of the cooling core. Finally, we

  3. Cooling, AGN Feedback and Star Formation in Cool-Core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg; Ruszkowski, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    The feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is widely considered to be the major heating source in cool-core galaxy clusters to prevent a classical cooling flow. Numerical simulations with AGN feedback have successfully suppressed radiative cooling, but generally fail to reproduce the right amount of cold gas and the expected cyclical AGN activities. We perform adaptive mesh simulations including both momentum-driven AGN feedback and star formation to study the interplay between cooling, AGN heating and star formation over ~ 6.5 Gyr time in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps first cool out of the ICM due to the non-liner perturbation driven by the AGN jets. These cold clumps feed both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst which increases the entropy of the ICM and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1-2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, which leads to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and develops multiphase gas again, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. The average star formation rate is ~40 solar mass/yr. The black hole accretion rate shows a large scatter, but the average correlates well with the star formation rate and is roughly one order of magnitude lower.

  4. Natural Flow Air Cooled Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanagnostopoulos, Y.; Themelis, P.

    2010-01-01

    Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. We performed experiments using a prototype based on three silicon photovoltaic modules placed in series to simulate a typical sloping building roof with photovoltaic installation. In this system the air flows through a channel on the rear side of PV panels. The potential for increasing the heat exchange from the photovoltaic panel to the circulating air by the addition of a thin metal sheet (TMS) in the middle of air channel or metal fins (FIN) along the air duct was examined. The operation of the device was studied with the air duct closed tightly to avoid air circulation (CLOSED) and the air duct open (REF), with the thin metal sheet (TMS) and with metal fins (FIN). In each case the experiments were performed under sunlight and the operating parameters of the experimental device determining the electrical and thermal performance of the system were observed and recorded during a whole day and for several days. We collected the data and form PV panels from the comparative diagrams of the experimental results regarding the temperature of solar cells, the electrical efficiency of the installation, the temperature of the back wall of the air duct and the temperature difference in the entrance and exit of the air duct. The comparative results from the measurements determine the improvement in electrical performance of the photovoltaic cells because of the reduction of their temperature, which is achieved by the naturally circulating air.

  5. Liquid cooled counter flow turbine bucket

    DOEpatents

    Dakin, James T.

    1982-09-21

    Means and a method are provided whereby liquid coolant flows radially outward through coolant passages in a liquid cooled turbine bucket under the influence of centrifugal force while in contact with countercurrently flowing coolant vapor such that liquid is entrained in the flow of vapor resulting in an increase in the wetted cooling area of the individual passages.

  6. Wavy flow cooling concept for turbine airfoils

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George

    2010-08-31

    An airfoil including an outer wall and a cooling cavity formed therein. The cooling cavity includes a leading edge flow channel located adjacent a leading edge of the airfoil and a trailing edge flow channel located adjacent a trailing edge of the airfoil. Each of the leading edge and trailing edge flow channels define respective first and second flow axes located between pressure and suction sides of the airfoil. A plurality of rib members are located within each of the flow channels, spaced along the flow axes, and alternately extending from opposing sides of the flow channels to define undulating flow paths through the flow channels.

  7. Beyond the Cool Core: The Formation of Cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. O.; Hallman, E. J.; Gantner, B.; Motl, P. M.; Norman, M. L.

    Why do some clusters have cool cores while others do not? In this paper, cosmological simulations, including radiative cooling and heating, are used to examine the formation and evolution of cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. Numerical CC clusters at z=0 accreted mass more slowly over time and grew enhanced cool cores via hierarchical mergers; when late major mergers occurred, the CCs survived the collisions. By contrast, NCC clusters of similar mass experienced major mergers early in their evolution that destroyed embryonic cool cores and produced conditions that prevent CC re-formation. We discuss observational consequences.

  8. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The balance between heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We study the long-term evolution of an idealized cool-core galaxy cluster under the influence of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback using three-dimensional high-resolution (60 pc) adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The feedback is modeled with a pair of precessing jets whose power is calculated based on the accretion rate of the cold gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH). The intracluster medium first cools into clumps along the propagation direction of the jets. As the jet power increases, gas condensation occurs isotropically, forming spatially extended structures that resemble the observed Hα filaments in Perseus and many other cool-core clusters. Jet heating elevates the gas entropy, halting clump formation. The cold gas that is not accreted onto the SMBH settles into a rotating disk of ∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The hot gas cools directly onto the disk while the SMBH accretes from its innermost region, powering the AGN that maintains a thermally balanced state for a few Gyr. The mass cooling rate averaged over 7 Gyr is ∼30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, an order of magnitude lower than the classic cooling flow value. Medium resolution simulations produce similar results, while in low resolution runs, the cluster experiences cycles of gas condensation and AGN outbursts. Owing to its self-regulating mechanism, AGN feedback can successfully balance cooling with a wide range of model parameters. Our model also produces cold structures in early stages that are in good agreement with the observations. However, the long-lived massive cold disk is unrealistic, suggesting that additional physical processes are still needed.

  9. Alternatives to the existence of large cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Wallace

    1990-01-01

    Arguments against the existence of large-scale cooling flows in clusters of galaxies are presented. The evidence for cooling flows is all circumstantial, consisting of observations of cool gas or hot gas with a radiative cooling time less than the Hubble time, or a central peak in the X-ray surface brightness profile. There is no evidence for large quantities (several tens to several hundreds of solar masses per year) of matter actually flowing anywhere. On the contrary, several lines of evidence suggest thaat cooling flows, if they exist, must be suppressed by one to two orders of magnitude from the values implied by simple estimates based on the radiative cooling time of the X-ray emitting gas. Two heat sources which might accomplish this, thermal conduction and relativistic particles, are considered, and an alternative to the standard model for cooling flows is presented: an accretion flow with feedback wherein the accretion of gas into a massive black hole in the central galaxy generates high energy particles that heat the gas and act to limit the accretion.

  10. Stopping Cooling Flows with Cosmic-Ray Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, William G.

    2009-04-01

    Multi-Gyr two-dimensional calculations describe the gas dynamical evolution of hot gas in the Virgo cluster resulting from intermittent cavities formed with cosmic rays. Without cosmic rays, the gas evolves into a cooling flow, depositing about 85 solar masses per year of cold gas in the cluster core—such uninhibited cooling conflicts with X-ray spectra and many other observations. When cosmic rays are produced or deposited 10 kpc from the cluster center in bursts of about 1059 erg lasting 20 Myr and spaced at intervals of 200 Myr, the central cooling rate is greatly reduced to {\\dot{M}} ≈ 0.1-1 solar masses per year, consistent with observations. After cosmic rays diffuse through the cavity walls, the ambient gas density is reduced and is buoyantly transported 30-70 kpc out into the cluster. Cosmic rays do not directly heat the gas and the modest shock heating around young cavities is offset by global cooling as the cluster gas expands. After several Gyr the hot gas density and temperature profiles remain similar to those observed, provided the time-averaged cosmic-ray luminosity is about L cr = 2.7 × 1043 erg s-1, approximately equal to the bolometric cooling rate LX within only ~56kpc. If an appreciable fraction of the relativistic cosmic rays is protons, gamma rays produced by pion decay following inelastic p-p collisions may be detected with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope.

  11. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES: THE ROLE OF STAR FORMATION IN COOLING FLOWS AND BCG EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dea, Kieran P.; Quillen, Alice C.; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Tremblay, Grant R.; Snios, Bradford T.; Baum, Stefi A.; Christiansen, Kevin; Noel-Storr, Jacob; Edge, Alastair C.; Donahue, Megan; Voit, G. Mark

    2010-08-20

    Quillen et al. and O'Dea et al. carried out a Spitzer study of a sample of 62 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) from the ROSAT brightest cluster sample, which were chosen based on their elevated H{alpha} flux. We present Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys far-ultraviolet (FUV) images of the Ly{alpha} and continuum emission of the luminous emission-line nebulae in seven BCGs found to have an infrared (IR) excess. We confirm that the BCGs are actively forming stars which suggests that the IR excess seen in these BCGs is indeed associated with star formation. Our observations are consistent with a scenario in which gas that cools from the intracluster medium fuels the star formation. The FUV continuum emission extends over a region {approx}7-28 kpc (largest linear size) and even larger in Ly{alpha}. The young stellar population required by the FUV observations would produce a significant fraction of the ionizing photons required to power the emission-line nebulae. Star formation rates estimated from the FUV continuum range from {approx}3 to {approx}14 times lower than those estimated from the IR, however, both the Balmer decrements in the central few arcseconds and detection of CO in most of these galaxies imply that there are regions of high extinction that could have absorbed much of the FUV continuum. Analysis of archival Very Large Array observations reveals compact radio sources in all seven BCGs and kpc scale jets in A-1835 and RXJ 2129+00. The four galaxies with archival deep Chandra observations exhibit asymmetric X-ray emission, the peaks of which are offset from the center of the BCG by {approx}10 kpc on average. A low feedback state for the active galactic nucleus could allow increased condensation of the hot gas into the center of the galaxy and the feeding of star formation.

  12. Why Do Only Some Galaxy Clusters Have Cool Cores?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Hallman, Eric J.; Gantner, Brennan; Motl, Patrick M.; Norman, Michael L.

    2008-03-01

    Flux-limited X-ray samples indicate that about half of rich galaxy clusters have cool cores. Why do only some clusters have cool cores while others do not? In this paper, cosmological N-body + Eulerian hydrodynamic simulations, including radiative cooling and heating, are used to address this question as we examine the formation and evolution of cool core (CC) and noncool core (NCC) clusters. These adaptive mesh refinement simulations produce both CC and NCC clusters in the same volume. They have a peak resolution of 15.6 h-1 kpc within a (256 h-1 Mpc)3 box. Our simulations suggest that there are important evolutionary differences between CC clusters and their NCC counterparts. Many of the numerical CC clusters accreted mass more slowly over time and grew enhanced CCs via hierarchical mergers; when late major mergers occurred, the CCs survived the collisions. By contrast, NCC clusters experienced major mergers early in their evolution that destroyed embryonic CCs and produced conditions that prevented CC reformation. As a result, our simulations predict observationally testable distinctions in the properties of CC and NCC beyond the core regions in clusters. In particular, we find differences between CC versus NCC clusters in the shapes of X-ray surface brightness profiles, between the temperatures and hardness ratios beyond the cores, between the distribution of masses, and between their supercluster environs. It also appears that CC clusters are no closer to hydrostatic equilibrium than NCC clusters, an issue important for precision cosmology measurements.

  13. Beyond The Cores Of Cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Hallman, E. J.; Motl, P. M.; Norman, M. L.

    2006-06-01

    We will present the results of cosmological hydro/N-body adaptive mesh refinement simulations in a concordance LCDM cosmology with a peak resolution of approximately 16 kpc. These simulations include radiative cooling, star formation, and supernova feedback. We find that there are very significant differences between cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) galaxy clusters in their properties beyond the cores (r>100 kpc). For example, the shapes and outer slopes of the synthetic X-ray surface brightness and the temperature profiles are strikingly different between NCC and CC clusters. Beta models are poor fits for r>500 kpc in CC clusters leading to inaccurate global mass estimates and strong deviations from scaling relations in contrast to NCC clusters. We will discuss possible explanations involving differences in the local environments in which these clusters form and evolve.

  14. The thermal structure of the cool core in the Phoenix cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozzi, Paolo

    2012-10-01

    The SZ-selected cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 at z~0.56 (the Phoenix cluster) shows for the first time a hint of a massive cooling-flow-induced starburst, suggesting that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling may not yet be fully established. We propose to robustly estimate the emission measure distribution of the cool core in the Phoenix cluster, and its temperature and abundance profiles out to 500 kpc, with a medium-deep (210 ks) EPIC observation, in order to investigate the actual structure of the cool core. The proposed study will provide secure science results with a relatively modest exposure, paving the way to an eventual deeper observation of this exceptional and puzzling source.

  15. Feedback Regulated Star Formation in Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant Russell

    2011-07-01

    The classical "cooling flow" model historically associated with "cool core" clusters of galaxies fails in the absence of an external, non-gravitational heating mechanism needed to offset catastrophic radiative losses of the X-ray bright intracluster medium (ICM). Numerous proposed solutions exist, including feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN), which may elegantly calibrate fundamental relationships such as the coupled co-evolution of black holes and the stellar component of their host galaxies. AGN feedback cannot completely offset cooling at all times, however, as the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in cool core clusters harbor extensive warm (˜104 K) and cold (10 < T < 104 K) gas reservoirs whose physical properties are regulated by ongoing star formation and an unknown, non-stellar heating mechanism. We present a doctoral thesis broadly related to these issues, particularly as they pertain to cooling flows, the triggering of AGN activity, and the associated energetic feedback that may play a critical role in heating the ambient environment on tens to hundreds of kiloparsec scales. We begin with a summary of the relevant background material, and in Chapter 2 we present a multiwavelength study of effervescent AGN heating in the cool core cluster Abell 2597. Previously unpublished Chandra X-ray data show the central regions of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) to be highly anisotropic on the scale of the BCG, permeated by a network of kpc-scale X-ray cavities, the largest of which is cospatial in projection with extended 330 MHz radio emission. We present spectral maps of projected, modeled gas properties fit to the X-ray data. The X-ray temperature map reveals two discrete, "hard-edged'' structures, including a ˜15 kpc "cold filament'' and an arc of hot gas which in projection borders the inner edge of the large X-ray cavity. We interpret the latter in the context of the effervescent AGN heating model, in which cavity enthalpy is thermalized as the

  16. Flow over gravel beds with clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, M.; Venditti, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    The structure of a gravel bed has been shown to alter the entrainment threshold. Structures such as clusters, reticulate stone cells and other discrete structures lock grains together, making it more difficult for them to be mobilized. These structures also generate form drag, reducing the shear stress available for mobilization. Form drag over gravel beds is often assumed to be negligible, but this assumption is not well supported. Here, we explore how cluster density and arrangement affect flow resistance and the flow structure over a fixed gravel bed in a flume experiment. Cluster density was varied from 6 to 68.3 clusters per square meter which corresponds to areal bed coverages of 2 to 17%. We used regular, irregular and random arrangements of the clusters. Our results show that flow resistance over a planar gravel bed initially declines, then increases with flow depth. The addition of clusters increases flow resistance, but the effect is dependent on cluster density, flow depth and arrangement. At the highest density, clusters can increase flow resistance as by as much as 8 times when compared to flat planar bed with no grain-related form drag. Spatially resolved observations of flow over the clusters indicate that a well-defined wake forms in the lee of each cluster. At low cluster density, the wakes are isolated and weak. As cluster density increases, the wakes become stronger. At the highest density, the wakes interact and the within cluster flow field detaches from the overlying flow. This generates a distinct shear layer at the height of the clusters. In spite of this change in the flow field at high density, our results suggest that flow resistance simply increases with cluster density. Our results suggest that the form drag associated with a gravel bed can be substantial and that it depends on the arrangement of the grains on the bed.

  17. Comparing Cool Cores in the Planck SZ Selected Samples of Clusters of Galaxies with Cool Cores in X-ray Selected Cluster Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christine; Santos, Felipe A.; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Lovisari, Lorenzo; Arnaud, Monique; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Churazov, Eugene; Ferrari, Chiara; Borgani, Stefano; Chandra-Planck Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The Planck mission provided a representative sample of clusters of galaxies over the entire sky. With completed Chandra observations of 165 Planck ESZ and cosmology sample clusters at z<0.35, we can now characterize each cluster in terms of its X-ray luminosity, gas temperature, gas mass, total mass, gas entropy, gas central cooling time, presence of active AGN, gas cavities, radio emission, and cluster morphology. In this presentation we compare the percentages of cool core and non-cool core clusters in the Planck-selected clusters with the percentages in X-ray selected cluster samples. We find a significantly smaller percentage of cool core clusters in the Planck sample than in X-ray selected cluster samples. We will discuss the primary reasons for this smaller percentage of cool-core clusters in the Planck-selected cluster sample than in X-ray-selected samples.

  18. ROSAT HRI images of Abell 85 and Abell 496: Evidence for inhomogeneities in cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea H.; Guimond, Stephen J.; Luginbuhl, Christian; Joy, Marshall

    1994-01-01

    We present ROSAT HRI images of two clusters of galaxies with cooling flows, Abell 496 and Abell 85. In these clusters, x-ray emission on small scales above the general cluster emission is significant at the 3 sigma level. There is no evidence for optical counterparts. The enhancements may be associated with lumps of gas at a lower temperature and higher density than the ambient medium, or hotter, denser gas perhaps compressed by magnetic fields. These observations can be used to test models of how thermal instabilities form and evolve in cooling flows.

  19. Probing the Physics of Gas in Cool Core Clusters: Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, William

    2010-09-01

    We recently detected high temperature gas at 10^5K associated with the low excitation 10^4K line emission filaments of M87. This is a profoundly important observation bearing on the physics of transport processes in cool core clusters. We propose to delve deeper into the physics of cool core clusters. We propose to use ACS to compare the spatial extent and morphology of the low and high temperature gas, to use the timely presence of COS to obtain a sensitive FUV spectrum of the hot gas, and, by introducing the notion of emission line polarimetry, seek a a potentially revolutionary new plasma diagnostic. The spatial distributions will reveal whether the hotter material is more spatially extended than the cooler; the FUV spectrum will permit derivation of the emission measure {essentially amount of gas} at each temperature between the 10^4K Halpha filaments and coronal gas at 10^7K. Together these strongly constrain plausible transport processes relating the hot and cool gas phases in this cool core cluster region, and hence the dominant physical processes at work. A novel ingredient is to obtain the optical images in polarimetric mode to probe emission line polarization levels, a diagnostic used in Solar physics to determine the relevance of collisional excitation processes such as electron impact polarization in thermal conduction or shocks. With this suite of straightforward, uniquely HST observations we may dramatically change the landscape of our understanding of the physics of cool core clusters

  20. Counter-Flow Cooling Tower Test Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Lukáš; Nožička, Jiří

    2014-03-01

    The article contains a design of a functional experimental model of a cross-flow mechanical draft cooling tower and the results and outcomes of measurements. This device is primarily used for measuring performance characteristics of cooling fills, but with a simple rebuild, it can be used for measuring other thermodynamic processes that take part in so-called wet cooling. The main advantages of the particular test cell lie in the accuracy, size, and the possibility of changing the water distribution level. This feature is very useful for measurements of fills of different heights without the influence of the spray and rain zone. The functionality of this test cell has been verified experimentally during assembly, and data from the measurement of common film cooling fills have been compared against the results taken from another experimental line. For the purpose of evaluating the data gathered, computational scripts were created in the MATLAB numerical computing environment. The first script is for exact calculation of the thermal balance of the model, and the second is for determining Merkel's number via Chebyshev's method.

  1. Heat conduction boundary layers of condensed clumps in cooling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehringer, H.; Fabian, A. C.

    1989-04-01

    The structure of heat conduction boundary layers of gaseous condensations embedded in the hot intergalactic gas in clusters of galaxies is investigated by means of steady, one-dimensional, hydrodynamic models. It is assumed that heat conduction is effective only on scales much smaller than the total region of the cooling flow. Models are calculated for an arbitrary scaling factor, accounting for the reduction in heat conduction efficiency compared to the classical Spitzer case. The results imply a lower limit to the size spectrum of the condensations. The enhancement of cooling in the ambient medium due to heat conduction losses is calculated for a range of clump parameters. The luminosity of several observable emission lines, the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray emission spectrum, and the column density of some important ions are determined for the model boundary layers and compared with observations.

  2. Multiphase groundwater flow near cooling plutons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayba, D.O.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate groundwater flow near cooling plutons with a computer program that can model multiphase flow, temperatures up to 1200??C, thermal pressurization, and temperature-dependent rock properties. A series of experiments examines the effects of host-rock permeability, size and depth of pluton emplacement, single versus multiple intrusions, the influence of a caprock, and the impact of topographically driven groundwater flow. We also reproduce and evaluate some of the pioneering numerical experiments on flow around plutons. Host-rock permeability is the principal factor influencing fluid circulation and heat transfer in hydrothermal systems. The hottest and most steam-rich systems develop where permeability is of the order of 10-15 m2. Temperatures and life spans of systems decrease with increasing permeability. Conduction-dominated systems, in which permeabilities are ???10-16m2, persist longer but exhibit relatively modest increases in near-surface temperatures relative to ambient conditions. Pluton size, emplacement depth, and initial thermal conditions have less influence on hydrothermal circulation patterns but affect the extent of boiling and duration of hydrothermal systems. Topographically driven groundwater flow can significantly alter hydrothermal circulation; however, a low-permeability caprock effectively decouples the topographically and density-driven systems and stabilizes the mixing interface between them thereby defining a likely ore-forming environment.

  3. Polarization diagnostics for cool core cluster emission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, W. B.; Pringle, J. E.; Cracraft, M.; Meyer, E. T.; Carswell, R. F.; Voit, G. M.; Donahue, M.; Hough, J. H.; Manset, N.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the interaction between low-excitation gas filaments at ∼10{sup 4} K, seen in optical line emission, and diffuse X-ray emitting coronal gas at ∼10{sup 7} K in the centers of galaxy clusters remains a puzzle. The presence of a strong, empirical correlation between the two gas phases is indicative of a fundamental relationship between them, though as yet of undetermined cause. The cooler filaments, originally thought to have condensed from the hot gas, could also arise from a merger or the disturbance of cool circumnuclear gas by nuclear activity. Here, we have searched for intrinsic line emission polarization in cool core galaxy clusters as a diagnostic of fundamental transport processes. Drawing on developments in solar astrophysics, direct energetic particle impact induced polarization holds the promise to definitively determine the role of collisional processes such as thermal conduction in the ISM physics of galaxy clusters, while providing insight into other highly anisotropic excitation mechanisms such as shocks, intense radiation fields, and suprathermal particles. Under certain physical conditions, theoretical calculations predict of the order of 10% polarization. Our observations of the filaments in four nearby cool core clusters place stringent upper limits (≲ 0.1%) on the presence of emission line polarization, requiring that if thermal conduction is operative, the thermal gradients are not in the saturated regime. This limit is consistent with theoretical models of the thermal structure of filament interfaces.

  4. The detection of distant cooling flows and the formation of dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabian, A. C.; Arnaud, K. A.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Cooling flows involving substantial mass inflow rates appear to be common in many nearby rich and poor clusters and in isolated galaxies. The extensive optical and ultraviolet filaments produced by the thermal instability of large flows are detectable out to redshifts greater than 1. It is proposed that this may explain the extended optical line emission reported in, and around, many distant radio galaxies, narrow-line quasars, and even nearby normal and active galaxies. An important diagnostic to distinguish cooling flows from other possible origins of emission line filaments is the presence of extensive regions at high thermal pressure. Other evidence for distant cooling flows and the resultant star formation is further discussed, together with the implications of cooling flow initial-mass functions for galaxy formation and the nature of 'dark' matter.

  5. Radiative cooling of Al{sub 4}{sup -} clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Toker, Y.; Aviv, O.; Eritt, M.; Rappaport, M. L.; Heber, O.; Zajfman, D.; Schwalm, D.

    2007-11-15

    The radiative cooling of isolated, negatively charged four-atom aluminum clusters has been measured using an electrostatic ion beam trap. Stored Al{sub 4}{sup -} ions were irradiated by a short laser pulse at different times after their production in a hot ion source, and delayed electron emission was observed up to hundreds of microseconds after the laser pulse. The decay curves could be well reproduced using an Arrhenius decay law and allowed us to deduce the cluster temperatures at the time of the laser pulse. Using this sensitive molecular thermometer, the cluster temperature could be determined as a function of storage time. The radiation intensity is found to decrease from 40 eV/s at T=1400 K to 1 eV/s at 500 K with a temperature dependence as given by T{sup b} with b=3.5{+-}0.2--i.e., similar to what would be expected from a blackbody. This cooling behavior requires the presence of either electronic transitions or very collective infrared-active vibrations at transition energies around {approx}200 meV.

  6. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method was developed to identify spatial patterns of planetary flow regimes, and to study transitions between them. This method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and second to Northern Hemisphere (NH) 500 mb data. The dynamical model is governed by the fully-nonlinear, equivalent-barotropic vorticity equation on the sphere. Clusters of point in the model's phase space are associated with either a few persistent or with many transient events. Two stationary clusters have patterns similar to unstable stationary model solutions, zonal, or blocked. Transient clusters of wave trains serve as way stations between the stationary ones. For the NH data, cluster analysis was performed in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters are found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, and transient clusters in the bandpass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band three pairs of clusters determine, respectively, EOFs 1, 2, and 3. They exhibit well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American (PNA) pattern and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data show strong bimodality. Clusters in the bandpass window show wave-train patterns in the two jet exit regions. They are related, as in the model, to transitions between stationary clusters.

  7. Vibronic spectroscopy of jet-cooled hydrogen-bonded clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhards, M.; Kimpfel, B.; Pohl, M.; Schmitt, M.; Kleinermanns, K.

    1992-07-01

    Mass-selected, two-photon resonant ionisation spectra of supersonically cooled p-cresol · (H 2O) n and phenol · (H 2O) n are reported. Cluster spectra with one, two and three water molecules attached can be unambiguously assigned. A monotonic shift of the electronic spectra with increasing cluster size is not observed here. The spectrum of p-cresol · (H 2O) 1, is red-shifted relative to the free p-cresol spectrum, while the p-cresol · (H 2O) 2,3 electronic origins are blue-shifted relative to p-cresol · (H 2O) 1 but still lie on the red side of the monomer. Simple, highest occupied molecular orbital—lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO—LUMO) considerations based on an initio calculations show that this can be explained by the inductive effect exerted on the O-atom of p-cresol, which acts as proton donor and acceptor in the H-bonding. The blue shift of n-π* transitions of H-bonded chromophores with carbonyl groups like CH 2O · (H 2O) 1 can be explained similarly. Vibrational spectra of supersonically cooled complexes of p-cresol with H 2O and CH 3OH were further analysed by dispersed fluorescence and stimulated emission, detected by two-colour ionisation dip. In p-cresol · (H 2O) 1, progressions of the intermolecular cluster stretch vibration and its combination bands with intramolecular cluster vibrations were observed with similar frequencies in the S 0 and S 1 states. In p-cresol · (H 2O) 3, further intense intermolecular bands arise, namely the hydrogen-bridge bending and torsion vibrations. This can be attributed to the lower symmetry of these clusters. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations show p-cresol · (H 2O) 3 to have a higher H-bond stretch frequency than p-cresol · (H 2O) 1, because its (unsymmetric) cyclic structure is more rigid. A characteristic pattern of CH 3 torsional bands in p-cresol is observed with complex structures due the CH 3 torsion—overall rotation interaction. Although their appearance is similar, the spacing of

  8. Chandra Observation of Abell 1142: A Cool-core Cluster Lacking a Central Brightest Cluster Galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Buote, David A.; Gastaldello, Fabio; van Weeren, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Abell 1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal-rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool-core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters, each of which contain one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ≈1200 km s‑1. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ≈2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous LX–TX scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched “cool core” of either of the subclusters from the BCG. The southern BCG consists of three individual galaxies residing within a radius of 5 kpc in projection. These galaxies should rapidly sink into the subcluster center due to the dynamical friction of a cuspy cold dark matter halo.

  9. Do radio mini-halos and gas heating in cool-core clusters have a common origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravi, L.; Gitti, M.; Brunetti, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter, we present a study of the central regions of cool-core clusters hosting radio mini-halos, which are diffuse synchrotron sources extended on cluster-scales surrounding the radio-loud brightest cluster galaxy. We aim to investigate the interplay between the thermal and non-thermal components in the intracluster medium in order to get more insights into these radio sources, whose nature is still unclear. It has recently been proposed that turbulence plays a role for heating the gas in cool cores. By assuming that mini-halos are powered by the same turbulence, we expect that the integrated radio luminosity of mini-halos, νPν, depends on the cooling flow power, PCF, which in turn constrains the energy available for the non-thermal components and emission in the cool-core region. We carried out a homogeneous re-analysis of X-ray Chandra data of the largest sample of cool-core clusters hosting radio mini-halos currently available (˜20 objects), finding a quasi-linear correlation, ν P_{ν } ∝ P_CF^{0.8}. We show that the scenario of a common origin of radio mini-halos and gas heating in cool-core clusters is energetically viable, provided that mini-halos trace regions where the magnetic field strength is B ≫ 0.5 μG.

  10. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method developed for the classification of quasi-stationary events into a few planetary flow regimes and for the examination of transitions between these regimes is described. The method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and then to a 500-mbar data set for Northern Hemisphere (NH), for which cluster analysis was carried out in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters were found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, while transient clusters were found in the band-pass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band, three pairs of clusters determined EOFs 1, 2, and 3, respectively; they exhibited well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American pattern, and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data exhibited strong bimodality.

  11. STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN THE COOL CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2011-06-20

    We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel) and H{alpha} (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to H{alpha} luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and H{alpha} morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (A1991, A2052, A2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given H{alpha} luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/H{alpha} ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming intrinsic extinction by modest amounts of dust (E(B - V) {approx} 0.2) or a top-heavy initial mass function in the extended filaments. The measured star formation rates vary from {approx}0.05 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in the nuclei of non-cooling systems, consistent with passive, red ellipticals, to {approx}5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in systems with complex, extended, optical filaments. Comparing the estimates of the star formation rate based on UV, H{alpha}, and infrared luminosities to the spectroscopically determined X-ray cooling rate suggests a star formation efficiency of 14{sup +18}{sub -8}%. This value represents the time-averaged fraction, by mass, of gas cooling out of the intracluster medium, which turns into stars and agrees well with the global fraction of baryons in stars required by simulations to reproduce the stellar mass function for galaxies. This result provides a new constraint on the efficiency of star formation in accreting systems.

  12. Effect of weak swirling flow on film cooling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gau, C.; Hwang, W. B.

    1990-10-01

    Experiments have been performed in a large circular pipe to study and obtain the film cooling effectivenesses with the presence of weak swirling flow in the mainstream. The swirling flow is generated by a flat vane swirler situated upstream. Cooling film is injected from an annular slot formed by the pipe wall and the circular cover plate. The radial temperature distribution measurements at several axial locations were used to infer the rate of mixing of film jet with swirling flow. The swirl number, which increases with turbulence intensity and swirl velocity in the mainstream, can significantly increase the mixing rate of film jet with swirl flow and decrease the film cooling effectiveness. During the course of the experiments, the blowing ratio ranged from 0.5 to 1.75 and the swirl number ranged from 0 to 0.6. Correlation equations for the film cooling effectiveness, which account for the effect of swirling flow, are obtained.

  13. TURBINE COOLING FLOW AND THE RESULTING DECREASE IN TURBINE EFFICIENCY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    This algorithm has been developed for calculating both the quantity of compressor bleed flow required to cool a turbine and the resulting decrease in efficiency due to cooling air injected into the gas stream. Because of the trend toward higher turbine inlet temperatures, it is important to accurately predict the required cooling flow. This program is intended for use with axial flow, air-breathing jet propulsion engines with a variety of airfoil cooling configurations. The algorithm results have compared extremely well with figures given by major engine manufacturers for given bulk metal temperatures and cooling configurations. The program calculates the required cooling flow and corresponding decrease in stage efficiency for each row of airfoils throughout the turbine. These values are combined with the thermodynamic efficiency of the uncooled turbine to predict the total bleed airflow required and the altered turbine efficiency. There are ten airfoil cooling configurations and the algorithm allows a different option for each row of cooled airfoils. Materials technology is incorporated and requires the date of the first year of service for the turbine stator vane and rotor blade. The user must specify pressure, temperatures, and gas flows into the turbine. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 3080 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 61K of 8 bit bytes. This program was developed in 1980.

  14. THE GROWTH OF COOL CORES AND EVOLUTION OF COOLING PROPERTIES IN A SAMPLE OF 83 GALAXY CLUSTERS AT 0.3 < z < 1.2 SELECTED FROM THE SPT-SZ SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; Bautz, M. W.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Vikhlinin, A.; Stalder, B.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; De Haan, T.; Lin, H. W.; Aird, K. A.; Bocquet, S.; Desai, S.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; and others

    2013-09-01

    We present first results on the cooling properties derived from Chandra X-ray observations of 83 high-redshift (0.3 < z < 1.2) massive galaxy clusters selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. We measure each cluster's central cooling time, central entropy, and mass deposition rate, and compare these properties to those for local cluster samples. We find no significant evolution from z {approx} 0 to z {approx} 1 in the distribution of these properties, suggesting that cooling in cluster cores is stable over long periods of time. We also find that the average cool core entropy profile in the inner {approx}100 kpc has not changed dramatically since z {approx} 1, implying that feedback must be providing nearly constant energy injection to maintain the observed ''entropy floor'' at {approx}10 keV cm{sup 2}. While the cooling properties appear roughly constant over long periods of time, we observe strong evolution in the gas density profile, with the normalized central density ({rho}{sub g,0}/{rho}{sub crit}) increasing by an order of magnitude from z {approx} 1 to z {approx} 0. When using metrics defined by the inner surface brightness profile of clusters, we find an apparent lack of classical, cuspy, cool-core clusters at z > 0.75, consistent with earlier reports for clusters at z > 0.5 using similar definitions. Our measurements indicate that cool cores have been steadily growing over the 8 Gyr spanned by our sample, consistent with a constant, {approx}150 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} cooling flow that is unable to cool below entropies of 10 keV cm{sup 2} and, instead, accumulates in the cluster center. We estimate that cool cores began to assemble in these massive systems at z{sub cool}=1.0{sup +1.0}{sub -0.2}, which represents the first constraints on the onset of cooling in galaxy cluster cores. At high redshift (z {approx}> 0.75), galaxy clusters may be classified as ''cooling flows'' (low central entropy, cooling time) but not

  15. The Growth of Cool Cores and Evolution of Cooling Properties in a Sample of 83 Galaxy Clusters at 0.3 < z < 1.2 Selected from the SPT-SZ Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Benson, B. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; Stalder, B.; Bleem, L. E.; de Haan, T.; Lin, H. W.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M. W.; Bayliss, M.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Desai, S.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P.; Foley, R. J.; Forman, W. R.; George, E. M.; Gettings, D.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; High, F. W.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Joy, M.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, E. D.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T. E.; Murray, S. S.; Nurgaliev, D.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Song, J.; Šuhada, R.; Spieler, H. G.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2013-09-01

    We present first results on the cooling properties derived from Chandra X-ray observations of 83 high-redshift (0.3 < z < 1.2) massive galaxy clusters selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signature in the South Pole Telescope data. We measure each cluster's central cooling time, central entropy, and mass deposition rate, and compare these properties to those for local cluster samples. We find no significant evolution from z ~ 0 to z ~ 1 in the distribution of these properties, suggesting that cooling in cluster cores is stable over long periods of time. We also find that the average cool core entropy profile in the inner ~100 kpc has not changed dramatically since z ~ 1, implying that feedback must be providing nearly constant energy injection to maintain the observed "entropy floor" at ~10 keV cm2. While the cooling properties appear roughly constant over long periods of time, we observe strong evolution in the gas density profile, with the normalized central density (ρ g, 0/ρcrit) increasing by an order of magnitude from z ~ 1 to z ~ 0. When using metrics defined by the inner surface brightness profile of clusters, we find an apparent lack of classical, cuspy, cool-core clusters at z > 0.75, consistent with earlier reports for clusters at z > 0.5 using similar definitions. Our measurements indicate that cool cores have been steadily growing over the 8 Gyr spanned by our sample, consistent with a constant, ~150 M ⊙ yr-1 cooling flow that is unable to cool below entropies of 10 keV cm2 and, instead, accumulates in the cluster center. We estimate that cool cores began to assemble in these massive systems at z_{cool}=1.0^{+1.0}_{-0.2}, which represents the first constraints on the onset of cooling in galaxy cluster cores. At high redshift (z >~ 0.75), galaxy clusters may be classified as "cooling flows" (low central entropy, cooling time) but not "cool cores" (cuspy surface brightness profile), meaning that care must be taken when classifying these high-z systems

  16. Integrated turbine-compressor provides air flow for cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, A.

    1970-01-01

    Modified supersonic turbine cycle provides cooling air to surrounding structures. Simplified mechanical design assures correct balance of air flow, allows direct issue of cool air to the structure, and assists in matching turbine work output to work input required by the compressor.

  17. Groundwater flow as a cooling agent of the continental lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Henk

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater that flows through the outer shell of the Earth as part of the hydrologic cycle influences the distribution of heat and, thereby, the temperature field in the Earth’s crust. Downward groundwater flow in recharge areas lowers crustal temperatures, whereas upward flow in discharge areas tends to raise temperatures relative to a purely conductive geothermal regime. Here I present numerical simulations of generalized topography-driven groundwater flow. The simulations suggest that groundwater-driven convective cooling exceeds groundwater-driven warming of the Earth’s crust, and hence that groundwater flow systems cause net temperature reductions of groundwater basins. Moreover, the simulations demonstrate that this cooling extends into the underlying crust and lithosphere. I find that horizontal components of groundwater flow play a central role in this net subsurface cooling by conveying relatively cold water to zones of upward groundwater flow. The model calculations suggest that the crust and lithosphere beneath groundwater basins can cool by several tens of degrees Celsius where groundwater flows over large distances in basins that consist of crustal rock. In contrast, groundwater-induced cooling is small in unconsolidated sedimentary settings, such as deltas.

  18. Large eddy simulations of turbulent flows on graphics processing units: Application to film-cooling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Aaron F.

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations can be very computationally expensive, especially for Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent ows. In LES the large, energy containing eddies are resolved by the computational mesh, but the smaller (sub-grid) scales are modeled. In DNS, all scales of turbulence are resolved, including the smallest dissipative (Kolmogorov) scales. Clusters of CPUs have been the standard approach for such simulations, but an emerging approach is the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), which deliver impressive computing performance compared to CPUs. Recently there has been great interest in the scientific computing community to use GPUs for general-purpose computation (such as the numerical solution of PDEs) rather than graphics rendering. To explore the use of GPUs for CFD simulations, an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver was developed for a GPU. This solver is capable of simulating unsteady laminar flows or performing a LES or DNS of turbulent ows. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved via a fractional-step method and are spatially discretized using the finite volume method on a Cartesian mesh. An immersed boundary method based on a ghost cell treatment was developed to handle flow past complex geometries. The implementation of these numerical methods had to suit the architecture of the GPU, which is designed for massive multithreading. The details of this implementation will be described, along with strategies for performance optimization. Validation of the GPU-based solver was performed for fundamental bench-mark problems, and a performance assessment indicated that the solver was over an order-of-magnitude faster compared to a CPU. The GPU-based Navier-Stokes solver was used to study film-cooling flows via Large Eddy Simulation. In modern gas turbine engines, the film-cooling method is used to protect turbine blades from hot combustion gases. Therefore, understanding the physics of

  19. Quantitative prediction of clustering instabilities in gas-solid homogeneous cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrenya, Christine; Mitrano, Peter; Li, Xiaoqi; Yin, Xiaolong

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic particle clusters are widely documented in gas-solid flow systems, including gasification units for coal or biomass, gravity-driven flow over an array of tubes, pneumatic transport lines, etc. Continuum descriptions based on kinetic theory have been known for over a decade to qualitatively predict the presence of such clustering instabilities. The quantitative ability of such continuum descriptions is relatively unexplored, however, and remains unclear given the low-Knudsen assumption upon which the descriptions are based. In particular, the concentration gradient is relatively large across the boundary between the cluster and the surrounding dilute region, which is counter to the small-gradient assumption inherent in the low-Knudsen-number expansion. In this work, we use direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a gas-solid homogeneous cooling system to determine the critical system size needed for the clustering instability to develop. We then compare the results to the same quantity predicted by a continuum description based on kinetic theory. The agreement is quite good over a wide range of parameters. This finding is reminiscent of molecular fluids, namely the ability of the Navier-Stokes equations to predict well outside the expected range of Knudsen numbers.

  20. Hot Gaseous Atmospheres in Galaxy Groups and Clusters Are Both Heated and Cooled by X-Ray Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brighenti, Fabrizio; Mathews, William G.; Temi, Pasquale

    2015-04-01

    Expanding X-ray cavities observed in hot gas atmospheres of many galaxy groups and clusters generate shock waves and turbulence that are primary heating mechanisms required to avoid uninhibited radiatively cooling flows which are not observed. However, we show here that the evolution of buoyant cavities also stimulates radiative cooling of observable masses of low-temperature gas. During their early evolution, radiative cooling occurs in the wakes of buoyant cavities in two locations: in thin radial filaments parallel to the buoyant velocity and more broadly in gas compressed beneath rising cavities. Radiation from these sustained compressions removes entropy from the hot gas. Gas experiencing the largest entropy loss cools first, followed by gas with progressively less entropy loss. Most cooling occurs at late times, ˜ 108-109 yr, long after the X-ray cavities have disrupted and are impossible to detect. During these late times, slightly denser low entropy gas sinks slowly toward the centers of the hot atmospheres where it cools intermittently, forming clouds near the cluster center. Single cavities of energy 1057-1058 ergs in the atmosphere of the NGC 5044 group create 108-109 M⊙ of cooled gas, exceeding the mass of extended molecular gas currently observed in that group. The cooled gas clouds we compute share many attributes with molecular clouds recently observed in NGC 5044 with ALMA: self-gravitationally unbound, dust-free, quasi-randomly distributed within a few kiloparsecs around the group center.

  1. Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

    2014-11-25

    Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

  2. AGN feedback and delivery methods for simulations of cool-core galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meece, Gregory Robert, Jr.

    Galaxy clusters are filled with a hot plasma called the intracluster medium, or ICM. In roughly half of clusters, the radiative cooling time is much shorter than the age of the cluster, meaning that the ICM should have had plenty of time to cool and form stars. Instead, observations show little cold gas in these clusters and star formation rates at least an order of magnitude below what is predicted. This dissertation explores a theory known as the Precipitation-regulated Feedback Hypothesis. As the ICM cools, thermal instability leads the formation of cold clouds that accrete onto a supermassive black hole, powering active galactic nuclei (AGN) that reheat the cluster. This feedback loop balances cooling and keeps the cluster in a rough state of thermal equilibrium.

  3. Cool Core Bias in Sunyaev-Zel’dovich Galaxy Cluster Surveys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lin, Henry W.; McDonald, Michael; Benson, Bradford; Miller, Eric

    2015-03-18

    Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) surveys find massive clusters of galaxies by measuring the inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background off of intra-cluster gas. The cluster selection function from such surveys is expected to be nearly independent of redshift and cluster astrophysics. In this work, we estimate the effect on the observed SZ signal of centrally-peaked gas density profiles (cool cores) and radio emission from the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) by creating mock observations of a sample of clusters that span the observed range of classical cooling rates and radio luminosities. For each cluster, we make simulated SZ observations by the Southmore » Pole Telescope and characterize the cluster selection function, but note that our results are broadly applicable to other SZ surveys. We find that the inclusion of a cool core can cause a change in the measured SPT significance of a cluster between 0.01%–10% at z > 0.3, increasing with cuspiness of the cool core and angular size on the sky of the cluster (i.e., decreasing redshift, increasing mass). We provide quantitative estimates of the bias in the SZ signal as a function of a gas density cuspiness parameter, redshift, mass, and the 1.4 GHz radio luminosity of the central AGN. Based on this work, we estimate that, for the Phoenix cluster (one of the strongest cool cores known), the presence of a cool core is biasing the SZ significance high by ~6%. The ubiquity of radio galaxies at the centers of cool core clusters will offset the cool core bias to varying degrees« less

  4. Cool Core Bias in Sunyaev-Zel’dovich Galaxy Cluster Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Henry W.; McDonald, Michael; Benson, Bradford; Miller, Eric

    2015-03-18

    Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) surveys find massive clusters of galaxies by measuring the inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background off of intra-cluster gas. The cluster selection function from such surveys is expected to be nearly independent of redshift and cluster astrophysics. In this work, we estimate the effect on the observed SZ signal of centrally-peaked gas density profiles (cool cores) and radio emission from the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) by creating mock observations of a sample of clusters that span the observed range of classical cooling rates and radio luminosities. For each cluster, we make simulated SZ observations by the South Pole Telescope and characterize the cluster selection function, but note that our results are broadly applicable to other SZ surveys. We find that the inclusion of a cool core can cause a change in the measured SPT significance of a cluster between 0.01%–10% at z > 0.3, increasing with cuspiness of the cool core and angular size on the sky of the cluster (i.e., decreasing redshift, increasing mass). We provide quantitative estimates of the bias in the SZ signal as a function of a gas density cuspiness parameter, redshift, mass, and the 1.4 GHz radio luminosity of the central AGN. Based on this work, we estimate that, for the Phoenix cluster (one of the strongest cool cores known), the presence of a cool core is biasing the SZ significance high by ~6%. The ubiquity of radio galaxies at the centers of cool core clusters will offset the cool core bias to varying degrees

  5. Inductively coupled plasma torch with laminar flow cooling

    DOEpatents

    Rayson, Gary D.; Shen, Yang

    1991-04-30

    An improved inductively coupled gas plasma torch. The torch includes inner and outer quartz sleeves and tubular insert snugly fitted between the sleeves. The insert includes outwardly opening longitudinal channels. Gas flowing through the channels of the insert emerges in a laminar flow along the inside surface of the outer sleeve, in the zone of plasma heating. The laminar flow cools the outer sleeve and enables the torch to operate at lower electrical power and gas consumption levels additionally, the laminar flow reduces noise levels in spectroscopic measurements of the gaseous plasma.

  6. Searching for Cooling Signatures in Strong Lensing Galaxy Clusters: Evidence Against Baryons Shaping the Matter Distribution in Cluster Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Peter; Bayliss, M.; McDonald, M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the growing number of galaxy clusters being discovered which exhibit strong gravitational lensing, the process by which the mass density profile of these clusters becomes centrally concentrated enough to produce high strong lensing cross-sections is not well understood. It has been suggested that the baryonic condensation of the intracluster medium (ICM) due to cooling may drag dark matter to the cores and thus steepen the profile. If this were the case, one would expect to observe signatures of strong ICM cooling (e.g., steep X-ray cores, optical emission line nebulae, star formation) in and around the central brightest cluster galaxy. In this work, we search for such evidence of ICM cooling in the first large, well-defined sample of strong lensing selected galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.6. Based on the known correlations between cooling rate and both optical emission line luminosity and specific star formation, as traced by [OII]λλ3727 emission and the 4000 angstrom break strength, respectively, we measure the fraction of clusters that have cooling signatures in a new sample of hundreds of strong lensing clusters, and compare this result to that in a control sample of thousands of optically-selected galaxy clusters. Our results argue against the ability of baryonic cooling in the cores of galaxy clusters to strongly modify the underlying dark matter potential, leading to an increase in strong lensing cross-sections. This work is supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 0754568 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  7. Intracluster medium cooling, AGN feedback, and brightest cluster galaxy properties of galaxy groups. Five properties where groups differ from clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadwaj, V.; Reiprich, T. H.; Schellenberger, G.; Eckmiller, H. J.; Mittal, R.; Israel, H.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We aim to investigate cool-core and non-cool-core properties of galaxy groups through X-ray data and compare them to the AGN radio output to understand the network of intracluster medium (ICM) cooling and feedback by supermassive black holes. We also aim to investigate the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) to see how they are affected by cooling and heating processes, and compare the properties of groups to those of clusters. Methods: Using Chandra data for a sample of 26 galaxy groups, we constrained the central cooling times (CCTs) of the ICM and classified the groups as strong cool-core (SCC), weak cool-core (WCC), and non-cool-core (NCC) based on their CCTs. The total radio luminosity of the BCG was obtained using radio catalogue data and/or literature, which in turn was compared to the cooling time of the ICM to understand the link between gas cooling and radio output. We determined K-band luminosities of the BCG with 2MASS data, and used a scaling relation to constrain the masses of the supermassive black holes, which were then compared to the radio output. We also tested for correlations between the BCG luminosity and the overall X-ray luminosity and mass of the group. The results obtained for the group sample were also compared to previous results for clusters. Results: The observed cool-core/non-cool-core fractions for groups are comparable to those of clusters. However, notable differences are seen: 1) for clusters, all SCCs have a central temperature drop, but for groups this is not the case as some have centrally rising temperature profiles despite very short cooling times; 2) while for the cluster sample, all SCC clusters have a central radio source as opposed to only 45% of the NCCs, for the group sample, all NCC groups have a central radio source as opposed to 77% of the SCC groups; 3) for clusters, there are indications of an anticorrelation trend between radio luminosity and CCT. However, for groups this trend is absent; 4) the indication of

  8. Thermal and flow measurements of continuous cryogenic spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Tsai, Huang-Hsiu

    2006-07-01

    The performance of single sprays for high heat flux cooling using R-134a was studied. The heat flux and heat transfer coefficient at the surface of a sprayed jet based on measurements of steady-state temperature gradients on a thin copper plate during continuous spraying. Meanwhile, the spray droplets flow characteristics was also quantified through laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements to obtain the local velocity distributions. The effects of mass flow rate and average droplet velocity, and spray exit-to-target distance on the surface heat flux including the corresponding critical heat flux (CHF) were explored through three different nozzle diameters of 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 mm. Finally, the effective use of the fluid being delivered based on the cooling efficiency and cooling effectiveness was also examined. The relationship between CHF and nozzle performance in terms of cooling efficiency and cooling effectiveness was found. The heat transfer removal rate can reach up to 140 W/cm(2) for the present nozzle size of d (j)=0.2 and 0.3 mm, which may enhance the current cryogen spray cooling (CSC) technique that assists laser therapy of dermatoses. PMID:16598481

  9. Compliant Metal Enhanced Convection Cooled Reverse-Flow Annular Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paskin, Marc D.; Acosta, Waldo A.

    1994-01-01

    A joint Army/NASA program was conducted to design, fabricate, and test an advanced, reverse-flow, small gas turbine combustor using a compliant metal enhanced (CME) convection wall cooling concept. The objectives of this effort were to develop a design method (basic design data base and analysis) for the CME cooling technique and tben demonstrate its application to an advanced cycle, small, reverse-flow combustor with 3000 F (1922 K) burner outlet temperature (BOT). The CME concept offers significant improvements in wall cooling effectiveness resulting in a large reduction in cooling air requirements. Therefore, more air is available for control of burner outlet temperature pattern in addition to the benefit of improved efficiency, reduced emissions, and smoke levels. Rig test results demonstrated the benefits and viability of the CME concept meeting or exceeding the aerothermal performance and liner wall temperature characteristics of similar lower temperature-rise combustors, achieving 0.15 pattern factor at 3000 F (1922 K) BOT, while utilizing approximately 80 percent less cooling air than conventional, film-cooled combustion systems.

  10. Lava Flows on Io: Modelling Cooling After Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Veeder, G. J.; Johnson, T. V.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    We have modeled the cooling of lava bodies on Io after solidification of the lava, a process that has been little explored since Carr (1986). With recent estimates of lava flow thicknesses on Io ranging from 1 m to 10 m, the modeling of thermal emission from active volcanism must take into account the cooling behaviour after the solidification of the lava, which we model using a finite-element model. Once a lava body is fully solidified, the surface temperature decreases faster, as heat loss is no longer buffered by release of latent heat. This is significant as observed surface temperature is often the only clue available to determine lava surface age. We also find that cooling from the base of the lava is an important process that accelerates the solidification of a flow and therefore subsequent cooling. It is necessary to constrain the cooling process in order to better understand temperature-area relationships on Io's surface and to carry out stochastic modelling of lava flow emplacement.

  11. DNS of stably stratified Ekman flow with surface cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohari, S. M. Iman; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2015-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of stably stratified Ekman flow are performed to study turbulence in an atmospheric boundary layer under surface cooling. Stability, classified by the normalized Monin-Obukhov (MO) length scale, is varied by imposing a range of cooling fluxes at the surface to mimic ground radiative cooling. The subsequent flow stability, measured by the MO length scale and bulk Richardson number, changes significantly as the flow evolves. We find considerable qualitative differences when a neutrally stratified Ekman flow is exposed to a constant surface cooling rather than a constant temperature, i.e. changes in the veering angle, super-gesotrophic velocity, surface shear velocity and the boundary layer height. Under strongly stable condition, the transient evolution shows the presence of intermittent turbulent patches. These patches contain small-scale, inclined hairpin structures that are organized into near-surface streaks. A low-level jet forms at steady state and the high-shear region between the surface and the low level jet is found to play a vital role in promoting turbulence. Our simplified setup is sufficient to observe turbulence collapse, intermittency and the low-level jet formation, indicating the applicability of this model to atmospheric problems.

  12. Computation of flow and heat transfer in rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, M

    2001-05-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations have been used to model the flow and the heat transfer that occurs in the internal cooling-air systems of gas turbines. Computations are performed to study the effect of gap ratio, Reynolds number and the mass flow rate on the flow and the heat transfer structure inside isothermal and heated rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air. Computations are compared with some of the recent experimental work on flow and heat transfer in rotating-cavities. The agreement between the computed and the available experimental data is reasonably good. PMID:11460668

  13. Numerical Flow Visualization in Basic- and Hyper-Cluster Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Athavale, M. M.; Braun, M. J.; Lattime, S.

    1997-01-01

    Packed spherical particle beds have wide applications throughout the process industry and are usually analyzed using an appropriate combination of laminar and turbulent flows with empirically derived coefficients of which the Ergun (1952) relation is probably the best known. The 3-D complexity of the void distribution within the beds has precluded detailed studies of sphere clusters. Numerical modeling and flow vector visualization for the basic tetra- and hexa-sphere clusters and two hyper-sphere clusters are presented at two Reynolds numbers, 400 and 1200. Cutting planes are used to enable visualization of the complex flows generated within the sphere clusters and are discussed herein. The boundary conditions and flow fields for the simple clusters are also compared to the hyper-clusters with larger variations found for hexa-clusters.

  14. Eocene cooling linked to early flow across the Tasmanian Gateway.

    PubMed

    Bijl, Peter K; Bendle, James A P; Bohaty, Steven M; Pross, Jörg; Schouten, Stefan; Tauxe, Lisa; Stickley, Catherine E; McKay, Robert M; Röhl, Ursula; Olney, Matthew; Sluijs, Appy; Escutia, Carlota; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2013-06-11

    The warmest global temperatures of the past 85 million years occurred during a prolonged greenhouse episode known as the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (52-50 Ma). The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum terminated with a long-term cooling trend that culminated in continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica from 34 Ma onward. Whereas early studies attributed the Eocene transition from greenhouse to icehouse climates to the tectonic opening of Southern Ocean gateways, more recent investigations invoked a dominant role of declining atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations (e.g., CO2). However, the scarcity of field data has prevented empirical evaluation of these hypotheses. We present marine microfossil and organic geochemical records spanning the early-to-middle Eocene transition from the Wilkes Land Margin, East Antarctica. Dinoflagellate biogeography and sea surface temperature paleothermometry reveal that the earliest throughflow of a westbound Antarctic Counter Current began ~49-50 Ma through a southern opening of the Tasmanian Gateway. This early opening occurs in conjunction with the simultaneous onset of regional surface water and continental cooling (2-4 °C), evidenced by biomarker- and pollen-based paleothermometry. We interpret that the westbound flowing current flow across the Tasmanian Gateway resulted in cooling of Antarctic surface waters and coasts, which was conveyed to global intermediate waters through invigorated deep convection in southern high latitudes. Although atmospheric CO2 forcing alone would provide a more uniform middle Eocene cooling, the opening of the Tasmanian Gateway better explains Southern Ocean surface water and global deep ocean cooling in the apparent absence of (sub-) equatorial cooling. PMID:23720311

  15. Eocene cooling linked to early flow across the Tasmanian Gateway

    PubMed Central

    Bijl, Peter K.; Bendle, James A. P.; Bohaty, Steven M.; Pross, Jörg; Schouten, Stefan; Tauxe, Lisa; Stickley, Catherine E.; McKay, Robert M.; Röhl, Ursula; Olney, Matthew; Sluijs, Appy; Escutia, Carlota; Brinkhuis, Henk; Klaus, Adam; Fehr, Annick; Williams, Trevor; Carr, Stephanie A.; Dunbar, Robert B.; Gonzàlez, Jhon J.; Hayden, Travis G.; Iwai, Masao; Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco J.; Katsuki, Kota; Kong, Gee Soo; Nakai, Mutsumi; Passchier, Sandra; Pekar, Stephen F.; Riesselman, Christina; Sakai, Toyosaburo; Shrivastava, Prakash K.; Sugisaki, Saiko; Tuo, Shouting; van de Flierdt, Tina; Welsh, Kevin; Yamane, Masako

    2013-01-01

    The warmest global temperatures of the past 85 million years occurred during a prolonged greenhouse episode known as the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (52–50 Ma). The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum terminated with a long-term cooling trend that culminated in continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica from 34 Ma onward. Whereas early studies attributed the Eocene transition from greenhouse to icehouse climates to the tectonic opening of Southern Ocean gateways, more recent investigations invoked a dominant role of declining atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations (e.g., CO2). However, the scarcity of field data has prevented empirical evaluation of these hypotheses. We present marine microfossil and organic geochemical records spanning the early-to-middle Eocene transition from the Wilkes Land Margin, East Antarctica. Dinoflagellate biogeography and sea surface temperature paleothermometry reveal that the earliest throughflow of a westbound Antarctic Counter Current began ∼49–50 Ma through a southern opening of the Tasmanian Gateway. This early opening occurs in conjunction with the simultaneous onset of regional surface water and continental cooling (2–4 °C), evidenced by biomarker- and pollen-based paleothermometry. We interpret that the westbound flowing current flow across the Tasmanian Gateway resulted in cooling of Antarctic surface waters and coasts, which was conveyed to global intermediate waters through invigorated deep convection in southern high latitudes. Although atmospheric CO2 forcing alone would provide a more uniform middle Eocene cooling, the opening of the Tasmanian Gateway better explains Southern Ocean surface water and global deep ocean cooling in the apparent absence of (sub-) equatorial cooling. PMID:23720311

  16. Chandra X-Ray Spectral Analysis of Cooling Flow Clousters, 2A 0335+096 and Abell 2199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Naomi; Ohto, Akimitsu; Fukazawa, Yasushi

    2003-06-01

    We report on a spatially resolved analysis of Chandra X-ray data on a nearby typical cooling flow cluster of galaxies 2A 0335 + 096, together with A2199 for a comparison. As recently found in the cores of other clusters, the temperature around the central part of 2A 0335 + 096 is 1.3-1.5keV, which is higher than that inferred from the cooling flow picture. Furthermore, the absorption column density is almost constant against the radius in 2A 0335 + 096; there is no evidence of excess absorption up to 200-250kpc. This indicates that no significant amount of cold material, which has cooled down, is present. These properties are similar to those of A2199. Since the cooling time in the central part is much shorter than the age of the clusters, a heating mechanism, which weakens the effect of radiative cooling, is expected to be present in the central part of both clusters of galaxies. Both 2A 0335 + 096 and A 2199 have radio jets associated with their cD galaxy. We discuss the possibility of heating processes caused by these radio jets by considering the thermal conduction and the sound velocity together with the observed disturbance of the ICM temperature and density. We conclude that the observed radio jets can produce local heating and/or cooling, but do not sufficiently reduce the overall radiative cooling. This implies that much more violent jets, whose emission has now decayed, heated up the cooling gas > 109 years ago.

  17. Film Cooling Flow Effects on Post-Combustor Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Thomas; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2003-01-01

    Film cooling injection is widely applied in the thermal design of turbomachinery, as it contributes to achieve higher operating temperature conditions of modern gas turbines, and to meet the requirements for reliability and life cycles. It is a significant part of the high-pressure turbine system. The film cooling injection, however, interacts with the main flow and is susceptible to have an influence on the aerodynamic performance of the cooled components, and through that may cause a penalty on the overall efficiency of the gas turbine. The main reasons are the loss of total pressure resulting from mixing the cooling air with mainstream and the reduction of the gas stagnation temperature at the exit of the combustion chamber to a lower value at the exit of nozzle guide vane. In addition, the impact of the injected air on the evolution of the trace species of the hot gas is not yet quite clear. This work computationally investigates the film cooling influence on post-combustor trace chemistry, as trace species in aircraft exhaust affect climate and ozone.

  18. Analysis of Turbine Blade Relative Cooling Flow Factor Used in the Subroutine Coolit Based on Film Cooling Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Heat transfer correlations of data on flat plates are used to explore the parameters in the Coolit program used for calculating the quantity of cooling air for controlling turbine blade temperature. Correlations for both convection and film cooling are explored for their relevance to predicting blade temperature as a function of a total cooling flow which is split between external film and internal convection flows. Similar trends to those in Coolit are predicted as a function of the percent of the total cooling flow that is in the film. The exceptions are that no film or 100 percent convection is predicted to not be able to control blade temperature, while leaving less than 25 percent of the cooling flow in the convection path results in nearing a limit on convection cooling as predicted by a thermal effectiveness parameter not presently used in Coolit.

  19. Jammed Clusters and Non-locality in Dense Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharel, Prashidha; Rognon, Pierre

    We investigate the micro-mechanisms underpinning dense granular flow behaviour from a series of DEM simulations of pure shear flows of dry grains. We observe the development of transient clusters of jammed particles within the flow. Typical size of such clusters is found to scale with the inertial number with a power law that is similar to the scaling of shear-rate profile relaxation lengths observed previously. Based on the simple argument that transient clusters of size l exist in the dense flow regime, the formulation of steady state condition for non-homogeneous shear flow results in a general non-local relation, which is similar in form to the non-local relation conjectured for soft glassy flows. These findings suggest the formation of jammed clusters to be the key micro-mechanism underpinning non-local behaviour in dense granular flows. Particles and Grains Laboratory, School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

  20. SEARCHING FOR COOLING SIGNATURES IN STRONG LENSING GALAXY CLUSTERS: EVIDENCE AGAINST BARYONS SHAPING THE MATTER DISTRIBUTION IN CLUSTER CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, Peter K.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; McDonald, Michael; Dahle, Hakon; Gladders, Michael D.; Sharon, Keren; Mushotzky, Richard

    2013-07-20

    The process by which the mass density profile of certain galaxy clusters becomes centrally concentrated enough to produce high strong lensing (SL) cross-sections is not well understood. It has been suggested that the baryonic condensation of the intracluster medium (ICM) due to cooling may drag dark matter to the cores and thus steepen the profile. In this work, we search for evidence of ongoing ICM cooling in the first large, well-defined sample of SL selected galaxy clusters in the range 0.1 < z < 0.6. Based on known correlations between the ICM cooling rate and both optical emission line luminosity and star formation, we measure, for a sample of 89 SL clusters, the fraction of clusters that have [O II]{lambda}{lambda}3727 emission in their brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). We find that the fraction of line-emitting BCGs is constant as a function of redshift for z > 0.2 and shows no statistically significant deviation from the total cluster population. Specific star formation rates, as traced by the strength of the 4000 A break, D{sub 4000}, are also consistent with the general cluster population. Finally, we use optical imaging of the SL clusters to measure the angular separation, R{sub arc}, between the arc and the center of mass of each lensing cluster in our sample and test for evidence of changing [O II] emission and D{sub 4000} as a function of R{sub arc}, a proxy observable for SL cross-sections. D{sub 4000} is constant with all values of R{sub arc}, and the [O II] emission fractions show no dependence on R{sub arc} for R{sub arc} > 10'' and only very marginal evidence of increased weak [O II] emission for systems with R{sub arc} < 10''. These results argue against the ability of baryonic cooling associated with cool core activity in the cores of galaxy clusters to strongly modify the underlying dark matter potential, leading to an increase in SL cross-sections.

  1. Removing Cool Cores and Central Metallicity Peaks in Galaxy Clusters with Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ~1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  2. How unusual is the cool-core radio halo cluster CL1821+643?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, Ruta; Parekh, Viral

    2016-07-01

    Massive galaxy clusters with cool cores typically host diffuse radio sources called mini-haloes, whereas, those with non-cool cores host radio haloes. We attempt to understand the unusual nature of the cool-core galaxy cluster CL1821+643, which hosts a megaparsec-scale radio halo, using new radio observations and morphological analysis of its intra-cluster medium. We present the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) 610-MHz image of the radio halo. The spectral index α, defined as S ∝ ν-α, of the radio halo is 1.0 ± 0.1 over the frequency range of 323-610-1665 MHz. Archival Chandra X-ray data were used to make surface brightness and temperature maps. The morphological parameters Gini, M20 and concentration (C) were calculated on X-ray surface brightness maps by including and excluding the central quasar (H1821+643) in the cluster. We find that the cluster CL1821+643, excluding the quasar, is a non-relaxed cluster as seen in the morphological parameter planes. It occupies the same region as other merging radio halo clusters in the temperature versus morphology parameter plane. We conclude that this cluster has experienced a non-core-disruptive merger.

  3. Origin and dynamics of emission line clouds in cooling flow environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Michael

    1990-01-01

    The author suggests that since clouds are born co-moving in a turbulent intra-cluster medium (ICM), the allowed parameter space can now be opened up to a more acceptable range. Large-scale motions can be driven in the central parts of cooling flows by a number of mechanisms including the motion of the central and other galaxies, and the dissipation of advected, focussed rotational and magnetic energy. In addition to the velocity width paradox, two other paradoxes (Heckman et al. 1989) can be solved if the ICM is turbulent. Firstly, the heating source for the emission line regions has always been puzzling - line luminosities are extremely high for a given (optical or radio) galaxy luminosity compared to those in non-cooling flow galaxies, therefore a mechanism peculiar to cooling flows must be at work. However most, if not all, previously suggested heating mechanisms either fail to provide enough ionization or give the wrong line ratios, or both. The kinetic energy in the turbulence provides a natural energy source if it can be efficiently converted to cloud heat. Researchers suggest that this can be done via magneto-hydrodynamic waves through plasma slip. Secondly, while the x ray observations indicate extended mass deposition, the optical line emission is more centrally concentrated. Since many of the turbulence-inducing mechanisms are strongest in the central regions of the ICM, so is the method of heating. In other words material is dropping out everywhere but only being lit up in the center.

  4. Deep Chandra study of the truncated cool core of the Ophiuchus cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, N.; Zhuravleva, I.; Canning, R. E. A.; Allen, S. W.; King, A. L.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Taylor, G. B.; Morris, R. G.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a deep (280 ks) Chandra observation of the Ophiuchus cluster, the second-brightest galaxy cluster in the X-ray sky. The cluster hosts a truncated cool core, with a temperature increasing from kT~1 keV in the core to kT~9 keV at r~30 kpc. Beyond r~30 kpc the intra-cluster medium (ICM) appears remarkably isothermal. The core is dynamically disturbed with multiple sloshing induced cold fronts, with indications for both Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The sloshing is the result of the strongly perturbed gravitational potential in the cluster core, with the central brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) being displaced southward from the global center of mass. The residual image reveals a likely subcluster south of the core at the projected distance of r~280 kpc. The cluster also harbors a likely radio phoenix, a source revived by adiabatic compression by gas motions in the ICM. Even though the Ophiuchus cluster is strongly dynamically active, the amplitude of density fluctuations outside of the cooling core is low, indicating velocities smaller than ~100 km/s. The density fluctuations might be damped by thermal conduction in the hot and remarkably isothermal ICM, resulting in our underestimate of gas velocities. We find a surprising, sharp surface brightness discontinuity, that is curved away from the core, at r~120 kpc to the southeast of the cluster center. We conclude that this feature is most likely due to gas dynamics associated with a merger and not a result of an extraordinary active galactic nucleus (AGN) outburst. The cooling core lacks any observable X-ray cavities and the AGN only displays weak, point-like radio emission, lacking lobes or jets, indicating that currently it may be largely dormant. The lack of strong AGN activity may be due to the bulk of the cooling taking place offset from the central supermassive black hole.

  5. Three-dimensional freezing of flowing water in a tube cooled by air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Beer, H.

    2015-05-01

    The 3-D freezing of flowing water in a copper tube cooled by air flow is investigated by means of a numerical analysis. The air flows normal to the tube axis. Several parameters as inlet water mean velocity w m , inlet water temperature T iℓ t , air flow temperature T a and air flow velocity u a are selected in the calculations to adapt it to a winter season actually encountered. The numerical results present the development of the ice layer mean thickness and its 3-D morphologies as well as the critical ice layer thickness in the tube choked by the ice layer.

  6. Clustering of inertial particles in compressible chaotic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Muñuzuri, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    Clustering of inertial particles is analyzed in chaotic compressible flows. A simplified dynamical model for the motion of inertial particles in a compressible flow has been derived. Clustering enhancement has been observed for intermediate Stokes times and characterized in terms of the number of particles with negative finite-time Lyapunov exponents and the Lyapunov dimension of the model attractor. Cluster formation has been observed to depend on the nature of the flow; vortical or shear. The motion of heavy and light particles is analyzed in terms of the compressibility and correlation length of the density field.

  7. Clustering of inertial particles in compressible chaotic flows.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Muñuzuri, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    Clustering of inertial particles is analyzed in chaotic compressible flows. A simplified dynamical model for the motion of inertial particles in a compressible flow has been derived. Clustering enhancement has been observed for intermediate Stokes times and characterized in terms of the number of particles with negative finite-time Lyapunov exponents and the Lyapunov dimension of the model attractor. Cluster formation has been observed to depend on the nature of the flow; vortical or shear. The motion of heavy and light particles is analyzed in terms of the compressibility and correlation length of the density field. PMID:26066228

  8. Red blood cell clustering in Poiseuille microcapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Misbah, Chaouqi; Guido, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) flowing in microcapillaries tend to associate into clusters, i.e., small trains of cells separated from each other by a distance comparable to cell size. This process is usually attributed to slower RBCs acting to create a sequence of trailing cells. Here, based on the first systematic investigation of collective RBC flow behavior in microcapillaries in vitro by high-speed video microscopy and numerical simulations, we show that RBC size polydispersity within the physiological range does not affect cluster stability. Lower applied pressure drops and longer residence times favor larger RBC clusters. A limiting cluster length, depending on the number of cells in a cluster, is found by increasing the applied pressure drop. The insight on the mechanism of RBC clustering provided by this work can be applied to further our understanding of RBC aggregability, which is a key parameter implicated in clotting and thrombus formation.

  9. Differences between hydrodynamic and macromolecule induced clusters in microcapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Claveria, Viviana; Aouane, Othmane; Coupier, Gwennou; Misbah, Chaouqi; Abkarian, Manouk

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have been shown that despite the large shear rates, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of RBC in microcapillaries under flow conditions. The contribution of hydrodynamical interactions and interactions induced by the presence of macromolecules in the cluster formation has not been established. In order to elucidate this mechanism, we compare experimentally in microchannels under flow condition, the pure hydrodynamical cluster formation of RBCs and the cluster formation of RBCs in the presence of macromolecules inducing aggregation. The results reveal strong differences in the cluster morphology. Emphasizing on the case of clusters formed by two cells, the surface to surface interdistances between the cells in the different solutions shows a bimodal distribution. Numerical simulations based on the boundary integral method showed a good agreement with the experimental findings.

  10. A Chandra Study of the Image Power Spectra of 41 Cool Core and Non-cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenhao; Xu, Haiguang; Zhu, Zhenghao; Li, Weitian; Hu, Dan; Wang, Jingying; Gu, Junhua; Gu, Liyi; Zhang, Zhongli; Liu, Chengze; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-06-01

    In this work we propose a new diagnostic to segregate cool core (CC) clusters from non-CC (NCC) clusters by studying the two-dimensional power spectra of the X-ray images observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory. Our sample contains 41 members (z=0.01{--}0.54) which are selected from the Chandra archive when a high photon count, an adequate angular resolution, a relatively complete detector coverage, and coincident CC–NCC classifications derived with three traditional diagnostics are simultaneously guaranteed. We find that in the log–log space the derived image power spectra can be well represented by a constant model component at large wavenumbers, while at small wavenumbers a power excess beyond the constant component appears in all clusters, with a clear tendency that the excess is stronger in CC clusters. By introducing a new CC diagnostic parameter, i.e., the power excess index (PEI), we classify the clusters in our sample and compare the results with those obtained with three traditional CC diagnostics. We find that the results agree with each other very well. By calculating the PEI values of the simulated clusters, we find that the new diagnostic works well at redshifts up to 0.5 for intermediately sized and massive clusters with a typical Chandra or XMM-Newton pointing observation. The new CC diagnostic has several advantages over its counterparts, e.g., it is free of the effects of the commonly seen centroid shift of the X-ray halo caused by merger event, and the corresponding calculation is straightforward, almost irrelevant to the complicated spectral analysis.

  11. Flow-induced vibration of component cooling water heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y.S.; Chen, S.S. . Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of flow-induced vibration problems of component cooling water heat exchangers in one of Taipower's nuclear power stations. Specifically, it describes flow-induced vibration phenomena, tests to identify the excitation mechanisms, measurement of response characteristics, analyses to predict tube response and wear, various design alterations, and modifications of the original design. Several unique features associated with the heat exchangers are demonstrated, including energy-trapping modes, existence of tube-support-plate (TSP)-inactive modes, and fluidelastic instability of TSP-active and -inactive modes. On the basis of this evaluation, the difficulties and future research needs for the evaluation of heat exchangers are identified. 11 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Development of forced flow cooled current leads for fusion magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, R.; Fink, S.; Friesinger, G.; Kienzler, A.; Lingor, A.; Schleinkofer, G.; Süßer, M.; Ulbricht, A.; Wüchner, F.; Zahn, G.

    2001-03-01

    During the past 15 years, the Institut für Technische Physik of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, has developed current leads cooled by forced-flow supercritical helium in the current range from 20 to 80 kA. The design is based on a separation of the current carrying part and the heat exchanger part as well as the presence of the so-called superconductor inserts made of Nb 3Sn wires inside the conductor in the heat exchanger area which allows the operation of the current lead at minimum helium mass flow in a wide current range. The paper describes the design and construction of the current leads as well as operation results obtained during various tests performed in the coil test facility TOSKA at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe.

  13. Influence of Flow Rotation Within a Cooling Tower on the Aerodynamic Interaction with Crosswind Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, M. M. Hemmasian; Dobrego, K. V.

    2014-03-01

    Environmental crosswind changes the aerodynamic pattern inside a cooling tower, destroys uniform and axisymmetric distribution of flow at its inlet and outlet, and may degrade fill zone performance. In this paper, the effect of flow rotation in the over-shower zone of a natural draft cooling tower (NDCT) on the aerodynamic interaction with crosswind is studied numerically. The 3D geometry of an actual NDCT and three models of induced rotation velocity fields are utilized for simulation. It is demonstrated that flow rotation results in homogenization of the aerodynamic field in the over-shower zone. The inhomogeneity of the velocity field in the outlet cross section decreases linearly with rotation intensification. The effect of main stream switching under strong wind conditions is found. It is shown that even moderate flow rotation eliminates this effect.

  14. Vortex generating flow passage design for increased film-cooling effectiveness and surface coverage. [aircraft engine blade cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    The fluid mechanics of the basic discrete hole film cooling process is described as an inclined jet in crossflow and a cusp shaped coolant flow channel contour that increases the efficiency of the film cooling process is hypothesized. The design concept requires the channel to generate a counter rotating vortex pair secondary flow within the jet stream by virture of flow passage geometry. The interaction of the vortex structures generated by both geometry and crossflow was examined in terms of film cooling effectiveness and surface coverage. Comparative data obtained with this vortex generating coolant passage showed up to factors of four increases in both effectiveness and surface coverage over that obtained with a standard round cross section flow passage. A streakline flow visualization technique was used to support the concept of the counter rotating vortex pair generating capability of the flow passage design.

  15. COOLING TIME, FREEFALL TIME, AND PRECIPITATION IN THE CORES OF ACCEPT GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, G. Mark; Donahue, Megan

    2015-01-20

    Star formation in the universe's largest galaxies—the ones at the centers of galaxy clusters—depends critically on the thermodynamic state of their hot gaseous atmospheres. Central galaxies with low-entropy, high-density atmospheres frequently contain multiphase star-forming gas, while those with high-entropy, low-density atmospheres never do. The dividing line between these two populations in central entropy, and therefore central cooling time, is amazingly sharp. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the dichotomy. One points out that thermal conduction can prevent radiative cooling of cluster cores above the dividing line. The other holds that cores below the dividing line are subject to thermal instability that fuels the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) through a cold-feedback mechanism. Here we explore those hypotheses with an analysis of the Hα properties of ACCEPT galaxy clusters. We find that the two hypotheses are likely to be complementary. Our results support a picture in which cold clouds inevitably precipitate out of cluster cores in which cooling outcompetes thermal conduction and rain down on the central black hole, causing AGN feedback that stabilizes the cluster core. In particular, the observed distribution of the cooling-time to freefall-time ratio is nearly identical to that seen in simulations of this cold-feedback process, implying that cold-phase accretion, and not Bondi-like accretion of hot-phase gas, is responsible for the AGN feedback that regulates star formation in large galaxies.

  16. Diffuse Extreme-Ultraviolet Emission from the Coma Cluster: Evidence for Rapidly Cooling Gases at Submegakelvin Temperatures

    PubMed

    Lieu; Mittaz; Bowyer; Breen; Lockman; Murphy; Hwang

    1996-11-22

    The central region of the Coma cluster of galaxies was observed in the energy band from 0.065 to 0.245 kiloelectron volts by the Deep Survey telescope aboard the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer. A diffuse emission halo of angular diameter approximately 30 arc minutes was detected. The extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) emission level exceeds that expected from the x-ray temperature gas in Coma. This halo suggests the presence of two more phases in the emitting gas, one at a temperature of approximately 2 x 10(6) kelvin and the other at approximately 8 x 10(5) kelvin. The latter phase cools rapidly and, in steady state, would have produced cold matter with a mass of approximately 10(14) solar masses within the EUV halo. Although a similar EUV enhancement was discovered in the Virgo cluster, this detection in Coma applies to a noncooling flow system. PMID:8910264

  17. Effects of Cooling and Star Formation on the Baryon Fractions in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.

    2005-06-01

    We study the effects of radiative cooling and galaxy formation on the baryon fractions in clusters using high-resolution cosmological simulations that resolve formation of cluster galaxies. The simulations of nine individual clusters spanning a decade in mass are performed with the shock-capturing Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement N-body+gasdynamical Adaptive Refinement Tree code. For each cluster the simulations were done in the adiabatic regime (without dissipation) and with radiative cooling and several physical processes critical to various aspects of galaxy formation: star formation, metal enrichment, and stellar feedback. We show that radiative cooling of gas and associated star formation increase the total baryon fractions within radii as large as the virial radius. The effect is strongest within cluster cores, where the simulations with cooling have baryon fractions larger than the universal value, in contrast to the adiabatic simulations in which the fraction of baryons is substantially smaller than the universal value. At larger radii (r>~r500) the cumulative baryon fractions in simulations with cooling are close to the universal value. The gas fractions in simulations with dissipation are reduced by ~20%-40% at r<0.3rvir and ~10% at larger radii compared to the adiabatic runs, because a fraction of gas is converted into stars. There is an indication that gas fractions within different radii increase with increasing cluster mass as fgas~M0.2vir. We find that the total baryon fraction within the cluster virial radius does not evolve with time in both adiabatic simulations and in simulations with cooling. The gas fractions in the latter decrease slightly from z=1 to 0 due to ongoing star formation. Finally, to evaluate systematic uncertainties in the baryon fraction in cosmological simulations we present a comparison of gas fractions in our adiabatic simulations to resimulations of the same objects with the entropy-conserving smoothed particle hydrodynamics

  18. Deep Chandra study of the truncated cool core of the Ophiuchus cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, N.; Zhuravleva, I.; Canning, R. E. A.; Allen, S. W.; King, A. L.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Taylor, G. B.; Morris, R. G.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a deep Chandra observation of the Ophiuchus cluster, the second brightest galaxy cluster in the X-ray sky. The cluster hosts a truncated cool core, with a temperature increasing from kT ˜ 1 keV in the core to kT ˜ 9 keV at r ˜ 30 kpc. Beyond r ˜ 30 kpc, the intracluster medium (ICM) appears remarkably isothermal. The core is dynamically disturbed with multiple sloshing-induced cold fronts, with indications for both Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The residual image reveals a likely subcluster south of the core at the projected distance of r ˜ 280 kpc. The cluster also harbours a likely radio phoenix, a source revived by adiabatic compression by gas motions in the ICM. Even though the Ophiuchus cluster is strongly dynamically active, the amplitude of density fluctuations outside of the cooling core is low, indicating velocities smaller than ˜100 km s-1. The density fluctuations might be damped by thermal conduction in the hot and remarkably isothermal ICM, resulting in our underestimate of gas velocities. We find a surprising, sharp surface brightness discontinuity, that is curved away from the core, at r ˜ 120 kpc to the south-east of the cluster centre. We conclude that this feature is most likely due to gas dynamics associated with a merger. The cooling core lacks any observable X-ray cavities and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) only displays weak, point-like radio emission, lacking lobes or jets. The lack of strong AGN activity may be due to the bulk of the cooling taking place offset from the central supermassive black hole.

  19. Algorithm for calculating turbine cooling flow and the resulting decrease in turbine efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for calculating both the quantity of compressor bleed flow required to cool the turbine and the decrease in turbine efficiency caused by the injection of cooling air into the gas stream. The algorithm, which is intended for an axial flow, air routine in a properly written thermodynamic cycle code. Ten different cooling configurations are available for each row of cooled airfoils in the turbine. Results from the algorithm are substantiated by comparison with flows predicted by major engine manufacturers for given bulk metal temperatures and given cooling configurations. A list of definitions for the terms in the subroutine is presented.

  20. On the nature of local instabilities in rotating galactic coronae and cool cores of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Nipoti, Carlo; Posti, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    A long-standing question is whether radiative cooling can lead to local condensation of cold gas in the hot atmospheres of galaxies and galaxy clusters. We address this problem by studying the nature of local instabilities in rotating, stratified, weakly magnetized, optically thin plasmas in the presence of radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction. For both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric linear perturbations, we provide general equations which can be applied locally to specific systems to establish whether they are unstable and, in case of instability, to determine the kind of evolution (monotonically growing or overstable) and the growth rates of the unstable modes. We present results for models of rotating plasmas representative of Milky-Way-like galaxy coronae and cool-cores of galaxy clusters. We show that the unstable modes arise from a combination of thermal, magnetothermal, magnetorotational, and heat-flux-driven buoyancy instabilities. Local condensation of cold clouds tends to be hampered in cluster cool cores, while it is possible under certain conditions in rotating galactic coronae. If the magnetic field is sufficiently weak, then the magnetorotational instability is dominant even in these pressure-supported systems.

  1. On the Nature of Local Instabilities in Rotating Galactic Coronae and Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nipoti, Carlo; Posti, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    A long-standing question is whether radiative cooling can lead to local condensation of cold gas in the hot atmospheres of galaxies and galaxy clusters. We address this problem by studying the nature of local instabilities in rotating, stratified, weakly magnetized, optically thin plasmas in the presence of radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction. For both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric linear perturbations, we provide general equations which can be applied locally to specific systems to establish whether they are unstable and, in case of instability, to determine the kind of evolution (monotonically growing or overstable) and the growth rates of the unstable modes. We present results for models of rotating plasmas representative of Milky-Way-like galaxy coronae and cool-cores of galaxy clusters. We show that the unstable modes arise from a combination of thermal, magnetothermal, magnetorotational, and heat-flux-driven buoyancy instabilities. Local condensation of cold clouds tends to be hampered in cluster cool cores, while it is possible under certain conditions in rotating galactic coronae. If the magnetic field is sufficiently weak, then the magnetorotational instability is dominant even in these pressure-supported systems.

  2. Experimental flow coefficients of a full-coverage film-cooled-vane chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.; Hippensteele, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    Ambient- and elevated-temperature flow tests were performed on a four-times-actual-size model of an impingement- and film-cooled segment of a core engine turbine vane. Tests were conducted with the impingement and film cooling plates combined to form a chamber and also with each of the individual separated plates. For the combined tests, the proximity of the film cooling plate affected the flow of coolant through the impingement plate, but not conversely. Impingement flow is presented in terms of a discharge coefficient, and the film cooling flow discharging into still air with no main stream gas flow is presented in terms of a total pressure-loss coefficient. The effects of main stream gas flow on discharge from the film cooling holes are evaluated as a function of coolant to main-stream gas momentum flux ratio. A smoothing technique is developed that identifies and helps reduce flow measurement data scatter.

  3. New Detections of Radio Minihalos in Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacintucci, Simona; Markevitch, Maxim; Venturi, Tiziana; Clarke, Tracy E.; Cassano, Rossella; Mazzotta, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    Cool cores of some galaxy clusters exhibit faint radio minihalos. Their origin is unclear, and their study has been limited by their small number. We undertook a systematic search for minihalos in a large sample of X-ray luminous clusters with high-quality radio data. In this article, we report four new minihalos (A 478, ZwCl 3146,RXJ 1532.9+3021, and A 2204) and five candidates found in the reanalyzed archival Very Large Array observations.The radio luminosities of our minihalos and candidates are in the range of 102325 W Hz1 at 1.4 GHz, which is consistent with these types of radio sources. Their sizes (40160 kpc in radius) are somewhat smaller than those of previously known minihalos. We combine our new detections with previously known minihalos, obtaining a total sample of 21 objects, and briefly compare the cluster radio properties to the average X-ray temperature and the total masses estimated from Planck.We find that nearly all clusters hosting minihalos are hot and massive. Beyond that, there is no clear correlation between the minihalo radio power and cluster temperature or mass (in contrast with the giant radio halos found in cluster mergers, whose radio luminosity correlates with the cluster mass). Chandra X-ray images indicate gas sloshing in the cool cores of most of our clusters, with minihalos contained within the sloshing regions in many of them. This supports the hypothesis that radio-emitting electrons are reaccelerated by sloshing. Advection of relativistic electrons by the sloshing gas may also play a role in the formation of the less extended minihalos.

  4. New detections of radio minihalos in cool cores of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Giacintucci, Simona; Markevitch, Maxim; Clarke, Tracy E.; Mazzotta, Pasquale

    2014-01-20

    Cool cores of some galaxy clusters exhibit faint radio 'minihalos'. Their origin is unclear, and their study has been limited by their small number. We undertook a systematic search for minihalos in a large sample of X-ray luminous clusters with high-quality radio data. In this article, we report four new minihalos (A 478, ZwCl 3146, RXJ 1532.9+3021, and A 2204) and five candidates found in the reanalyzed archival Very Large Array observations. The radio luminosities of our minihalos and candidates are in the range of 10{sup 23-25} W Hz{sup –1} at 1.4 GHz, which is consistent with these types of radio sources. Their sizes (40-160 kpc in radius) are somewhat smaller than those of previously known minihalos. We combine our new detections with previously known minihalos, obtaining a total sample of 21 objects, and briefly compare the cluster radio properties to the average X-ray temperature and the total masses estimated from Planck. We find that nearly all clusters hosting minihalos are hot and massive. Beyond that, there is no clear correlation between the minihalo radio power and cluster temperature or mass (in contrast with the giant radio halos found in cluster mergers, whose radio luminosity correlates with the cluster mass). Chandra X-ray images indicate gas sloshing in the cool cores of most of our clusters, with minihalos contained within the sloshing regions in many of them. This supports the hypothesis that radio-emitting electrons are reaccelerated by sloshing. Advection of relativistic electrons by the sloshing gas may also play a role in the formation of the less extended minihalos.

  5. Flow and heat transfer predictions for film cooling.

    PubMed

    Acharya, S; Tyagi, M; Hoda, A

    2001-05-01

    Film cooling flows are characterized by a row of jets injected at an angle from the blade surface or endwalls into the heated crossflow. The resulting flowfield is quite complex, and accurate predictions of the flow and heat transfer have been difficult to obtain, particularly in the near field of the injected jet. The flowfield is characterized by a spectrum of vortical structures including the dominant kidney vortex, the horse-shoe vortex, the wake vortices and the shear layer vortices. These anisotropic and unsteady structures are not well represented by empirical or ad-hoc turbulence models, and lead to inaccurate predictions in the near field of the jet. In this paper, a variety of modeling approaches have been reviewed, and the limitations of these approaches are identified. Recent emergence of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) tools allow the resolution of the coherent structure dynamics, and it is shown in this paper, that such approaches provide improved predictions over that obtained with turbulence models. PMID:11460622

  6. A 3.55 keV line from DM →a→γ: predictions for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Powell, Andrew J.

    2015-01-13

    We further study a scenario in which a 3.55 keV X-ray line arises from decay of dark matter to an axion-like particle (ALP), that subsequently converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. We perform numerical simulations of Gaussian random magnetic fields with radial scaling of the magnetic field magnitude with the electron density, for both cool-core 'Perseus' and non-cool-core 'Coma' electron density profiles. Using these, we quantitatively study the resulting signal strength and morphology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our study includes the effects of fields of view that cover only the central part of the cluster, the effects of offset pointings on the radial decline of signal strength and the effects of dividing clusters into annuli. We find good agreement with current data and make predictions for future analyses and observations.

  7. Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary system when rendered inoperable.

  8. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  9. Vibrational Relaxation of the Aqueous Proton in Acetonitrile: Ultrafast Cluster Cooling and Vibrational Predissociation.

    PubMed

    Ottosson, N; Liu, L; Bakker, H J

    2016-07-28

    We study the ultrafast O-H stretch vibrational relaxation dynamics of protonated water clusters embedded in a matrix of deuterated acetonitrile, using polarization-resolved mid-IR femtosecond spectroscopy. The clusters are produced by mixing triflic (trifluoromethanesulfonic) acid and H2O in molar ratios of 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3, thus varying the degree of hydration of the proton. At all hydration levels the excited O-H stretch vibration of the hydrated proton shows an ultrafast vibrational relaxation with a time constant T1 < 100 fs, leading to an ultrafast local heating of the protonated water cluster. This excess thermal energy, initially highly localized to the region of the excited proton, first re-distributes over the aqueous cluster and then dissipates into the surrounding acetonitrile matrix. For clusters with a triflic acid to H2O ratio of 1:3 these processes occur with time constants of 320 ± 20 fs and 1.4 ± 0.1 ps, respectively. The cooling of the clusters reveals a long-living, underlying transient absorption change with high anisotropy. We argue that this feature stems from the vibrational predissociation of a small fraction of the proton hydration structures, directly following the ultrafast infrared excitation. PMID:27333302

  10. Sloshing of the Magnetized Cool Gas in the Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Lee, D.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray observations of many clusters of galaxies reveal the presence of edges in surface brightness and temperature, known as "cold fronts". In relaxed clusters with cool cores, these edges have been interpreted as evidence for the "sloshing" of the core gas in the cluster's gravitational potential. The smoothness of these edges has been interpreted as evidence for the stabilizing effect of magnetic fields "draped" around the front surfaces. To check this hypothesis, we perform high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations of magnetized gas sloshing in galaxy clusters initiated by encounters with subclusters. We go beyond previous works on the simulation of cold fronts in a magnetized intracluster medium by simulating their formation in realistic, idealized mergers with high resolution ((Delta)x approx. 2 kpc). Our simulations sample a parameter space of plausible initial magnetic field strengths and field configurations. In the simulations, we observe strong velocity shears associated with the cold fronts amplifying the magnetic field along the cold front surfaces, increasing the magnetic field strength in these layers by up to an order of magnitude, and boosting the magnetic pressure up to near-equipartition with thermal pressure in some cases. In these layers, the magnetic field becomes strong enough to stabilize the cold fronts against Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, resulting in sharp, smooth fronts as those seen in observations of real clusters. These magnetic fields also result in strong suppression of mixing of high and low-entropy gas in the cluster, seen in our simulations of mergers in the absence of a magnetic field. As a result, the heating of the core due to sloshing is very modest and is unable to stave off a cooling catastrophe.

  11. Kinetic AGN feedback effects on cluster cool cores simulated using SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, Paramita; Murante, Giuseppe; Borgani, Stefano; Gaspari, Massimo; Granato, Gian Luigi; Monaco, Pierluigi; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia

    2016-09-01

    We implement novel numerical models of AGN feedback in the SPH code GADGET-3, where the energy from a supermassive black hole (BH) is coupled to the surrounding gas in the kinetic form. Gas particles lying inside a bi-conical volume around the BH are imparted a one-time velocity (10 000 km s-1) increment. We perform hydrodynamical simulations of isolated cluster (total mass 1014 h-1 M⊙), which is initially evolved to form a dense cool core, having central T ≤ 106 K. A BH resides at the cluster centre, and ejects energy. The feedback-driven fast wind undergoes shock with the slower moving gas, which causes the imparted kinetic energy to be thermalized. Bipolar bubble-like outflows form propagating radially outward to a distance of a few 100 kpc. The radial profiles of median gas properties are influenced by BH feedback in the inner regions (r < 20-50 kpc). BH kinetic feedback, with a large value of the feedback efficiency, depletes the inner cool gas and reduces the hot gas content, such that the initial cool core of the cluster is heated up within a time 1.9 Gyr, whereby the core median temperature rises to above 107 K, and the central entropy flattens. Our implementation of BH thermal feedback (using the same efficiency as kinetic), within the star formation model, cannot do this heating, where the cool core remains. The inclusion of cold gas accretion in the simulations produces naturally a duty cycle of the AGN with a periodicity of 100 Myr.

  12. The origin of molecular hydrogen emission in cooling-flow filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferland, G. J.; Fabian, A. C.; Hatch, N. A.; Johnstone, R. M.; Porter, R. L.; van Hoof, P. A. M.; Williams, R. J. R.

    2008-05-01

    The optical filaments found in many cooling flows in galaxy clusters consist of low-density (~103cm-3) cool (~103 K) gas surrounded by significant amounts of cosmic-ray and magnetic field energy. Their spectra show anomalously strong low-ionization and molecular emission lines when compared with Galactic molecular clouds exposed to ionizing radiation such as the Orion complex. Previous studies have shown that the spectra cannot be produced by O-star photoionization. Here, we calculate the physical conditions in dusty gas that is well shielded from external sources of ionizing photons and is energized either by cosmic rays or dissipative magnetohydrodynamics waves. Strong molecular hydrogen lines, with relative intensities similar to those observed, are produced. Selection effects introduced by the microphysics produce a correlation between the H2 line upper level energy and the population temperature. These selection effects allow a purely collisional gas to produce H2 emission that masquerades as starlight-pumped H2 but with intensities that are far stronger. This physics may find application to any environment where a broad range of gas densities or heating rates occur. Contains material ©British Crown copyright 2008/MoD. E-mail: gary@pa.uky.edu

  13. Intercooler cooling-air weight flow and pressure drop for minimum drag loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, J George; Valerino, Michael F

    1944-01-01

    An analysis has been made of the drag losses in airplane flight of cross-flow plate and tubular intercoolers to determine the cooling-air weight flow and pressure drop that give a minimum drag loss for any given cooling effectiveness and, thus, a maximum power-plant net gain due to charge-air cooling. The drag losses considered in this analysis are those due to (1) the extra drag imposed on the airplane by the weight of the intercooler, its duct, and its supports and (2) the drag sustained by the cooling air in flowing through the intercooler and its duct. The investigation covers a range of conditions of altitude, airspeed, lift-drag ratio, supercharger-pressure ratio, and supercharger adiabatic efficiency. The optimum values of cooling air pressure drop and weight flow ratio are tabulated. Curves are presented to illustrate the results of the analysis.

  14. Optimum design of bipolar plates for separate air flow cooling system of PEM fuel cells stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    The paper discusses about thermal management of PEM fuel cells. The objective is to define criteria and guidelines for the design of the air flow cooling system of fuel cells stacks for different combination of power density, bipolar plates material, air flow rate, operating temperature It is shown that the optimization of the geometry of the channel permits interesting margins for maintaining the use of separate air flow cooling systems for high power density PEM fuel cells.

  15. Constraints on molecular gas in cooling flows and powerful radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.; Maloney, Philip R.; Tacconi, Linda J.; Sparks, William B.

    1994-01-01

    We searched for molecular gas in a heterogeneous sample of five radio-loud galaxies (three of which are inferred to be in cooling flow clusters) using the Swedish-European Southern Observatory (Swedish-ESO) Submillimeter Telescope. We do not detect CO in emission in any of the cluster sources at a 3 sigma level of typically 15 mK. White et al. (1991) have suggested column densities of N(sub H) approximately 10(exp 21)/sq cm in these clusters with a spatial covering factor of order unity and a total mass of M approximately 10(exp 12) solar mass. Our limits are inconsistent with these column densities and spatial covering factor unless the molecular gas is very cold (kinetic temperature close to 2.7 K) or there only a few clouds along each line of sight. We estimate minimum temperatures in the range approximately 20-30 K. We find that clouds of atomic and molecular hydrogen require strict fine-tuning of parameter space in order to satisfy the requirements for the large column densities N(sub H) approximately 10(exp 21)/sq cm, unit covering factor, and a small number of clouds along the line of sight. Currently the only way molecular gas can be responsible for the X-ray absorption and still be consistent with our observations is if (1) there is of order one cloud along the line of sight and (2) the optical depth in C-12 1 to 0 is less than 10. In addition, we present a Very Large Array (VLA) image of NGC 4696 which suggests this object is a member of the class of 'amorphous cooling flow radio sources.' The C-12 1 to 0 line is detected in emission in PKS 0634-206, a classical double radio galaxy which is rich in extended optical emission line gas. The estimated molecular gas mass is M(sub mol) approximately 3 x 10(exp 9) solar mass and is much larger than that of the ionized component detected in hydrogen alpha suggesting that the emission-line nebula is radiation bounded.

  16. The cooling rates of pahoehoe flows: The importance of lava porosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Alun C.

    1993-01-01

    Many theoretical models have been put forward to account for the cooling history of a lava flow; however, only limited detailed field data exist to validate these models. To accurately model the cooling of lava flows, data are required, not only on the heat loss mechanisms, but also on the surface skin development and the causes of differing cooling rates. This paper argues that the cause of such variations in the cooling rates are attributed, primarily, to the vesicle content and degassing history of the lava.

  17. Abell 262 and RXJ0341: Two Brightest Cluster Galaxies with Line Emission Blanketing a Cool Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Louise O. V.; Heng, Renita

    2014-08-01

    Over the last decade, integral field (IFU) analysis of the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in several cool core clusters has revealed the central regions of these massive old red galaxies to be far from dead. Bright line emission alongside extended X-ray emission links nearby galaxies, is superposed upon vast dust lanes and extends out in long thin filaments from the galaxy core. Yet, to date no unifying picture has come into focus, and the activity across systems is currently seen as a grab-bag of possibile emission line mechanisms. Our primary goal is to work toward a consistent picture for why the BCGs seem are undergoing a renewed level of activity. One problem is most of the current data remains focused on mapping the very core of the BCG, but neglects surrounding galaxies. We propose to discover the full extent of line emission in a complementary pair of BCGs. In Abell 262, an extensive dust patch screens large portions of an otherwise smooth central galaxy, whereas RXJ0341 appears to be a double-core dust free BCG. We will map the full extent of the line emission in order to deduce whether the line emission is a product of local interactions, or the large-scale cluster X-ray gas. The narrow band filter set and large FOV afforded by the the Mayall MOSAIC-1 (MOSA) imager allows us to concurrently conduct an emission line survey of both clusters, locating all line emitting members and beginning a search for the effect of the environment of the different regions (outskirts vs. cluster core) out to the virial radius. We will combine our results with publically available data from 2MASS to determine the upper limits on specific star formation in the BCG and other cluster galaxies within the cluster virial radius.

  18. Particle flow reconstruction based on the directed tree clustering algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, D.; Lima, J. G. R.; McIntosh, R.; Zutshi, V.

    2006-10-27

    We present the status of particle flow algorithm development at Northern Illinois University. A key element in our approach is the calorimeter-based directed tree clustering algorithm. We have attempted to identify and tackle the essential challenges and analyze the effect of several different approaches to the reconstruction of jet energies and the Z-boson mass. A number of possibilities have been studied, such as analog vs. digital energy measurement, hit density-based clustering and the use of single or multiple energy thresholds. We plan to use this PFA-based reconstruction to compare some of the proposed detector technologies and geometries.

  19. An experimental study on the efficiency of transpiration cooling in laminar and turbulent hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülhan, A.; Braun, S.

    2011-03-01

    An experimental study on the efficiency of transpiration cooling in hypersonic laminar and turbulent flow regimes is carried out in the Hypersonic Windtunnel Cologne with a focus on the aerothermal problems downstream of the cooled model part. The model is made of a material of low thermal conductivity (PEEK) with an integrated probe of a porous material. The experimental setup allows the direct comparison of the thermal behavior of transpiration cooling to a well-defined and radiatively cooled reference surface. Experiments are performed at Mach number of 6 and two different Reynolds numbers. Air, argon and helium are used as coolants at various flow rates, in order to identify the influence of coolant medium on cooling efficiency. The cooling efficiency of air and argon is comparable. Helium provides significantly higher cooling efficiency at the same blowing ratio, i.e. same coolant mass flow rate. The experimental data shows that the efficiency of the transpiration cooling in turbulent flows is much lower than in laminar flow.

  20. Flow generated around particle clusters in a rotating ultrasonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, G

    1998-09-01

    A chamber cavity, which has a square cross section and pressure-release walls, is used to produce a well-defined, 160-kHz standing ultrasonic field. A suspension of latex microspheres in aqueous metrizamide fills the chamber. The chamber rotates about a horizontal axis producing the centripetal force necessary to contain the buoyant spheres in the axial region. At low particle concentrations, clusters of microspheres form at half-wavelength intervals near the axial positions of acoustic pressure amplitude (p0) minima, as expected because of rotational and acoustic radiation forces. At higher concentrations, additional particle distributions are often seen that suggest the presence of flow. When high concentrations of larger particles are used, small clusters also form at axial positions of p0 maxima. Theory for acoustic streaming in a rotating fluid predicts flow speeds that are too small to account for the observed flow. Reasonable agreement with observations is obtained using a theory for flow generated by the buoyant gravitational force acting on the clusters. PMID:9745732

  1. Powering of cool filaments in cluster cores by buoyant bubbles - I. Qualitative model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churazov, E.; Ruszkowski, M.; Schekochihin, A.

    2013-11-01

    Cool-core clusters (e.g. Perseus or M87) often possess a network of bright gaseous filaments, observed in radio, infrared, optical and X-ray bands. We propose that these filaments are powered by the reconnection of the magnetic field in the wakes of buoyant bubbles. Active galactic nucleus (AGN)-inflated bubbles of relativistic plasma rise buoyantly in the cluster atmosphere, stretching and amplifying the field in the wake to values of β = 8πPgas/B2 ˜ 1. The field lines in the wake have opposite directions and are forced together as the bubble motion stretches the filament. This setup bears strong similarity to the coronal loops on the Sun or to the Earth's magnetotail. The reconnection process naturally explains both the required level of local dissipation rate in filaments and the overall luminosity of filaments. The original source of power for the filaments is the potential energy of buoyant bubbles, inflated by the central AGN.

  2. Turbine systems and methods for using internal leakage flow for cooling

    DOEpatents

    Hernandez, Nestor; Gazzillo, Clement; Boss, Michael J.; Parry, William; Tyler, Karen J.

    2010-02-09

    A cooling system for a turbine with a first section and a second section. The first section may include a first line for diverting a first flow with a first temperature from the first section, a second line for diverting a second flow with a second temperature less than the first temperature from the first section, and a merged line for directing a merged flow of the first flow and the second flow to the second section.

  3. Galactic flows and the formation of stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the formation of stellar clusters from a Galactic scale SPH simulation. The simulation traces star formation over a 5 Myr timescale, with local gravitational instabilities resulting in ˜ 105 solar masses of star formation in the form of sink particles. The large scale flow dominates the compression from low densities before self-gravity takes over in higher density regions. We investigate the time evolution of the physical properties of the forming clusters including their half-mass radii, their energies and the depletion time of the gas.We show that the more massive clusters (up to ˜ 2 × 104 solar masses) gather their material from of order 10 pc due to the large scale motions associated with the spiral arm passage and shock. The bulk of the gas becomes gravitationally bound near 1-2 Myr before sink formation, and in the absence of feedback, significant accretion ongoing on longer timescales.

  4. Active Control of Jets in Cross-Flow for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.

    2003-01-01

    Jets in cross-flow have applications in film cooling of gas turbine vanes, blades and combustor liners. Their cooling effectiveness depends on the extent to which the cool jet-fluid adheres to the cooled component surface. Lift-off of the cooling jet flow or other mechanisms promoting mixing, cause loss of cooling effectiveness as they allow the hot "free-stream" fluid to come in contact with the component surface. The premise of this project is that cooling effectiveness can be improved by actively controlling (e.9. forcing, pulsing) the jet flow. Active control can be applied to prevent/delay lift-off and suppress mixing. Furthermore, an actively controlled film-cooling system coupled with appropriate sensory input (e.g. temperature or heat flux) can adapt to spatial and temporal variations of the hot-gas path. Thus, it is conceivable that the efficiency of film-cooling systems can be improved, resulting in coolant fluid economy. It is envisioned that Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) will play a role in the realization of such systems. As a first step, a feasibility study will be conducted to evaluate the concept, identify actuation and sensory elements and develop a control strategy. Part of this study will be the design of a proof-of-concept experiment and collection of necessary data.

  5. Cooling and deformation of sulfur flows. [from silicate lava on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, J. H.; Greeley, R.; Park, S. O.

    1983-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional cooling analysis is used to consider the cooling of a flow of pure sulfur on the Ionian surface by a combination of upward radiation and downward conduction, and some speculations on the nature of surface structures and optical properties for such a flow are made. It is concluded that surface folding caused by compressive stresses, crustal foundering due to tensile fracturing and density inversions, and local turbulence may result in regularly spaced surface ridges periodically interrupted by upwellings of liquid sulfur onto the frozen surface of the flow. The model suggests that although the color of the surface crust of a quickly quenched sulfur flow will not necessarily reflect the local internal temperature of the flow, diapiric upwellings and convection from beneath this crust should indicate the progressive cooling of the inner, more fluid zones of the flow.

  6. Far-ultraviolet morphology of star-forming filaments in cool core brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, G. R.; O'Dea, C. P.; Baum, S. A.; Mittal, R.; McDonald, M. A.; Combes, F.; Li, Y.; McNamara, B. R.; Bremer, M. N.; Clarke, T. E.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Hamer, S. L.; Hogan, M. T.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Quillen, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Salomé, P.; Voit, G. M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a multiwavelength morphological analysis of star-forming clouds and filaments in the central (≲50 kpc) regions of 16 low-redshift (z < 0.3) cool core brightest cluster galaxies. New Hubble Space Telescope imaging of far-ultraviolet continuum emission from young (≲10 Myr), massive (≳5 M⊙) stars reveals filamentary and clumpy morphologies, which we quantify by means of structural indices. The FUV data are compared with X-ray, Lyα, narrow-band Hα, broad-band optical/IR, and radio maps, providing a high spatial resolution atlas of star formation locales relative to the ambient hot (˜107-8 K) and warm ionized (˜104 K) gas phases, as well as the old stellar population and radio-bright active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows. Nearly half of the sample possesses kpc-scale filaments that, in projection, extend towards and around radio lobes and/or X-ray cavities. These filaments may have been uplifted by the propagating jet or buoyant X-ray bubble, or may have formed in situ by cloud collapse at the interface of a radio lobe or rapid cooling in a cavity's compressed shell. The morphological diversity of nearly the entire FUV sample is reproduced by recent hydrodynamical simulations in which the AGN powers a self-regulating rain of thermally unstable star-forming clouds that precipitate from the hot atmosphere. In this model, precipitation triggers where the cooling-to-free-fall time ratio is tcool/tff ˜ 10. This condition is roughly met at the maximal projected FUV radius for more than half of our sample, and clustering about this ratio is stronger for sources with higher star formation rates.

  7. A generalized one-dimensional computer code for turbomachinery cooling passage flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Roelke, Richard J.; Meitner, Peter L.

    1989-01-01

    A generalized one-dimensional computer code for analyzing the flow and heat transfer in the turbomachinery cooling passages was developed. This code is capable of handling rotating cooling passages with turbulators, 180 degree turns, pin fins, finned passages, by-pass flows, tip cap impingement flows, and flow branching. The code is an extension of a one-dimensional code developed by P. Meitner. In the subject code, correlations for both heat transfer coefficient and pressure loss computations were developed to model each of the above mentioned type of coolant passages. The code has the capability of independently computing the friction factor and heat transfer coefficient on each side of a rectangular passage. Either the mass flow at the inlet to the channel or the exit plane pressure can be specified. For a specified inlet total temperature, inlet total pressure, and exit static pressure, the code computers the flow rates through the main branch and the subbranches, flow through tip cap for impingement cooling, in addition to computing the coolant pressure, temperature, and heat transfer coefficient distribution in each coolant flow branch. Predictions from the subject code for both nonrotating and rotating passages agree well with experimental data. The code was used to analyze the cooling passage of a research cooled radial rotor.

  8. A generalized one dimensional computer code for turbomachinery cooling passage flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Roelke, Richard J.; Meitner, Peter L.

    1989-01-01

    A generalized one-dimensional computer code for analyzing the flow and heat transfer in the turbomachinery cooling passages was developed. This code is capable of handling rotating cooling passages with turbulators, 180 degree turns, pin fins, finned passages, by-pass flows, tip cap impingement flows, and flow branching. The code is an extension of a one-dimensional code developed by P. Meitner. In the subject code, correlations for both heat transfer coefficient and pressure loss computations were developed to model each of the above mentioned type of coolant passages. The code has the capability of independently computing the friction factor and heat transfer coefficient on each side of a rectangular passage. Either the mass flow at the inlet to the channel or the exit plane pressure can be specified. For a specified inlet total temperature, inlet total pressure, and exit static pressure, the code computers the flow rates through the main branch and the subbranches, flow through tip cap for impingement cooling, in addition to computing the coolant pressure, temperature, and heat transfer coefficient distribution in each coolant flow branch. Predictions from the subject code for both nonrotating and rotating passages agree well with experimental data. The code was used to analyze the cooling passage of a research cooled radial rotor.

  9. Efficient needle plasma actuators for flow control and surface cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pengfei; Portugal, Sherlie; Roy, Subrata

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a milliwatt class needle actuator suitable for plasma channels, vortex generation, and surface cooling. Electrode configurations tested for a channel configuration show 1400% and 300% increase in energy conversion efficiency as compared to conventional surface and channel corona actuators, respectively, generating up to 3.4 m/s air jet across the channel outlet. The positive polarity of the needle is shown to have a beneficial effect on actuator efficiency. Needle-plate configuration is demonstrated for improving cooling of a flat surface with a 57% increase in convective heat transfer coefficient. Vortex generation by selective input signal manipulation is also demonstrated.

  10. Skin cooling maintains cerebral blood flow velocity and orthostatic tolerance during tilting in heated humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thad E.; Cui, Jian; Zhang, Rong; Witkowski, Sarah; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance is reduced in the heat-stressed human. The purpose of this project was to identify whether skin-surface cooling improves orthostatic tolerance. Nine subjects were exposed to 10 min of 60 degrees head-up tilting in each of four conditions: normothermia (NT-tilt), heat stress (HT-tilt), normothermia plus skin-surface cooling 1 min before and throughout tilting (NT-tilt(cool)), and heat stress plus skin-surface cooling 1 min before and throughout tilting (HT-tilt(cool)). Heating and cooling were accomplished by perfusing 46 and 15 degrees C water, respectively, though a tube-lined suit worn by each subject. During HT-tilt, four of nine subjects developed presyncopal symptoms resulting in the termination of the tilt test. In contrast, no subject experienced presyncopal symptoms during NT-tilt, NT-tilt(cool), or HT-tilt(cool). During the HT-tilt procedure, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) decreased. However, during HT-tilt(cool), MAP, total peripheral resistance, and CBFV were significantly greater relative to HT-tilt (all P < 0.01). No differences were observed in calculated cerebral vascular resistance between the four conditions. These data suggest that skin-surface cooling prevents the fall in CBFV during upright tilting and improves orthostatic tolerance, presumably via maintenance of MAP. Hence, skin-surface cooling may be a potent countermeasure to protect against orthostatic intolerance observed in heat-stressed humans.

  11. Flow Integrating Section for a Gas Turbine Engine in Which Turbine Blades are Cooled by Full Compressor Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, W. Gene

    1999-11-14

    Routing of full compressor flow through hollow turbine blades achieves unusually effective blade cooling and allows a significant increase in turbine inlet gas temperature and, hence, engine efficiency. The invention, ''flow integrating section'' alleviates the turbine dissipation of kinetic energy of air jets leaving the hollow blades as they enter the compressor diffuser.

  12. Thermal mechanical modeling of cooling history and fracture development in inflationary basalt lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattenhorn, Simon A.; Schaefer, Conrad J.

    2008-03-01

    Thermal-mechanical analyses of isotherms in low-volume basalt flows having a range of aspect ratios agree with inferred isotherm patterns deduced from cooling fracture patterns in field examples on the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho, and highlight the caveats of analytical models of sheet flow cooling when considering low-volume flows. Our field observations show that low-volume lava flows have low aspect ratios (width divided by thickness), typically < 5. Four fracture types typically develop: column-bounding, column-normal, entablature (all of which are cooling fractures), and inflation fractures. Cooling fractures provide a proxy for isotherms during cooling and produce patterns that are strongly influenced by flow aspect ratio. Inflation fractures are induced by lava pressure-driven inflationary events and introduce a thermal perturbation to the flow interior that is clearly evidenced by fracture patterns around them. Inflation fracture growth occurs incrementally due to blunting of the lower tip within viscoelastic basalt, allowing the inflation fracture to pivot open. The final stage of growth involves propagation beyond the blunted tip towards the stress concentration at the tapered tip of a lava core, resulting in penetration of the core that causes quenching of the lava and the formation of a densely fractured entablature. We present numerical models that include the effects of inflation fractures on lava cooling and which support field-based inferences that inflation fractures depress the isotherms in the vicinity of the fracture, cause a subdivision of the lava core, control the location of the final portion of the lava flow to solidify, and cause significant changes in the local cooling fracture orientations. In addition to perturbing isotherms, inflation fractures cause a lava flow to completely solidify in a shorter amount of time than an identically shaped flow that does not contain an inflation fracture.

  13. Flow distribution analysis on the cooling tube network of ITER thermal shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Chung, Wooho; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Kyoung-O.; Ahn, Hee Jae; Lee, Hyeon Gon

    2014-01-01

    Thermal shield (TS) is to be installed between the vacuum vessel or the cryostat and the magnets in ITER tokamak to reduce the thermal radiation load to the magnets operating at 4.2K. The TS is cooled by pressurized helium gas at the inlet temperature of 80K. The cooling tube is welded on the TS panel surface and the composed flow network of the TS cooling tubes is complex. The flow rate in each panel should be matched to the thermal design value for effective radiation shielding. This paper presents one dimensional analysis on the flow distribution of cooling tube network for the ITER TS. The hydraulic cooling tube network is modeled by an electrical analogy. Only the cooling tube on the TS surface and its connecting pipe from the manifold are considered in the analysis model. Considering the frictional factor and the local loss in the cooling tube, the hydraulic resistance is expressed as a linear function with respect to mass flow rate. Sub-circuits in the TS are analyzed separately because each circuit is controlled by its own control valve independently. It is found that flow rates in some panels are insufficient compared with the design values. In order to improve the flow distribution, two kinds of design modifications are proposed. The first one is to connect the tubes of the adjacent panels. This will increase the resistance of the tube on the panel where the flow rate is excessive. The other design suggestion is that an orifice is installed at the exit of tube routing where the flow rate is to be reduced. The analysis for the design suggestions shows that the flow mal-distribution is improved significantly.

  14. Flow distribution analysis on the cooling tube network of ITER thermal shield

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Chung, Wooho; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Kyoung-O; Ahn, Hee Jae; Lee, Hyeon Gon

    2014-01-29

    Thermal shield (TS) is to be installed between the vacuum vessel or the cryostat and the magnets in ITER tokamak to reduce the thermal radiation load to the magnets operating at 4.2K. The TS is cooled by pressurized helium gas at the inlet temperature of 80K. The cooling tube is welded on the TS panel surface and the composed flow network of the TS cooling tubes is complex. The flow rate in each panel should be matched to the thermal design value for effective radiation shielding. This paper presents one dimensional analysis on the flow distribution of cooling tube network for the ITER TS. The hydraulic cooling tube network is modeled by an electrical analogy. Only the cooling tube on the TS surface and its connecting pipe from the manifold are considered in the analysis model. Considering the frictional factor and the local loss in the cooling tube, the hydraulic resistance is expressed as a linear function with respect to mass flow rate. Sub-circuits in the TS are analyzed separately because each circuit is controlled by its own control valve independently. It is found that flow rates in some panels are insufficient compared with the design values. In order to improve the flow distribution, two kinds of design modifications are proposed. The first one is to connect the tubes of the adjacent panels. This will increase the resistance of the tube on the panel where the flow rate is excessive. The other design suggestion is that an orifice is installed at the exit of tube routing where the flow rate is to be reduced. The analysis for the design suggestions shows that the flow mal-distribution is improved significantly.

  15. Evaluation of water cooled supersonic temperature and pressure probes for application to 1366 K flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas; Seiner, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Water cooled supersonic probes are developed to investigate total pressure, static pressure, and total temperature in high-temperature jet plumes and thereby determine the mean flow properties. Two probe concepts, designed for operation at up to 1366 K in a Mach 2 flow, are tested on a water cooled nozzle. The two probe designs - the unsymmetric four-tube cooling configuration and the symmetric annular cooling design - take measurements at 755, 1089, and 1366 K of the three parameters. The cooled total and static pressure readings are found to agree with previous test results with uncooled configurations. The total-temperature probe, however, is affected by the introduction of water coolant, and effect which is explained by the increased heat transfer across the thermocouple-bead surface. Further investigation of the effect of coolant on the temperature probe is proposed to mitigate the effect and calculate more accurate temperatures in jet plumes.

  16. Concept of CFD model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, T.

    2014-03-01

    The article deals with the development of CFD model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow. The physical phenomena taking place within a natural draft wet cooling tower are described by the system of conservation law equations along with additional equations. The heat and mass transfer in the counterflow wet-cooling tower fill are described by model [1] which is based on the system of ordinary differential equations. Utilization of model [1] of the fill allows us to apply commonly measured fill characteristics as shown by [2].The boundary value problem resulting from the fill model is solved separately. The system of conservation law equations is interlinked with the system of ordinary differential equations describing the phenomena occurring in the counterflow wet-cooling tower fill via heat and mass sources and via boundary conditions. The concept of numerical solution is presented for the quasi one dimensional model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow. The simulation results are shown.

  17. Clustering and turbophoresis in a shear flow without walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lillo, Filippo; Cencini, Massimo; Musacchio, Stefano; Boffetta, Guido

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the spatial distribution of inertial particles suspended in the bulk of a turbulent inhomogeneous flow. By means of direct numerical simulations of particle trajectories transported by the turbulent Kolmogorov flow, we study large and small scale mechanisms inducing inhomogeneities in the distribution of heavy particles. We discuss turbophoresis both for large and weak inertia, providing heuristic arguments for the functional form of the particle density profile. In particular, we argue and numerically confirm that the turbophoretic effect is maximal for particles of intermediate inertia. Our results indicate that small-scale fractal clustering and turbophoresis peak in different ranges in the particles' Stokes number and the separation of the two peaks increases with the flow's Reynolds number.

  18. Cluster-based reduced-order modelling of shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Eurika; Noack, Bernd R.; Cordier, Laurent; Spohn, Andreas; Segond, Marc; Abel, Markus; Daviller, Guillaume; Morzyński, Marek; Östh, Jan; Krajnović, Siniša; Niven, Robert K.

    2014-12-01

    Cluster-based reduced-order modelling (CROM) builds on the pioneering works of Gunzburger's group in cluster analysis [1] and Eckhardt's group in transition matrix models [2] and constitutes a potential alternative to reduced-order models based on a proper-orthogonal decomposition (POD). This strategy frames a time-resolved sequence of flow snapshots into a Markov model for the probabilities of cluster transitions. The information content of the Markov model is assessed with a Kullback-Leibler entropy. This entropy clearly discriminates between prediction times in which the initial conditions can be inferred by backward integration and the predictability horizon after which all information about the initial condition is lost. This approach is exemplified for a class of fluid dynamical benchmark problems like the periodic cylinder wake, the spatially evolving incompressible mixing layer, the bi-modal bluff body wake, and turbulent jet noise. For these examples, CROM is shown to distil nontrivial quasi-attractors and transition processes. CROM has numerous potential applications for the systematic identification of physical mechanisms of complex dynamics, for comparison of flow evolution models, and for the identification of precursors to desirable and undesirable events.

  19. Experimental study on corrugated cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minsung; Baik, Young-Jin; Park, Seong-Ryong; Ra, Ho-Sang; Lim, Hyug

    2010-11-15

    Experimental study on cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers (PHEs) was performed. The two prototype PHEs were manufactured in a stack of single-wave plates and double-wave plates in parallel. Cooling air flows through the PHEs in a crosswise direction against internal cooling water. The heat exchanger aims to substitute open-loop cooling towers with closed-loop water circulation, which guarantees cleanliness and compactness. In this study, the prototype PHEs were tested in a laboratory scale experiments. From the tests, double-wave PHE shows approximately 50% enhanced heat transfer performance compared to single-wave PHE. However, double-wave PHE costs 30% additional pressure drop. For commercialization, a wide channel design for air flow would be essential for reliable performance. (author)

  20. X-ray cavities and temperature jumps in the environment of the strong cool core cluster Abell 2390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonkamble, S. S.; Vagshette, N. D.; Pawar, P. K.; Patil, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present results based on the systematic analysis of high resolution 95 ks Chandra observations of the strong cool core cluster Abell 2390 at the redshift of z = 0.228 that hosts an energetic radio AGN. This analysis has enabled us to investigate five X-ray deficient cavities in the atmosphere of Abell 2390 within central 30''. Presence of these cavities have been confirmed through a variety of image processing techniques like, the surface brightness profiles, unsharp masked image, as well as 2D elliptical model subtracted residual map. Temperature profile as well as 2D temperature map revealed structures in the distribution of ICM, in the sense that ICM in the NW direction is cooler than that on the SE direction. Temperature jump in all directions is evident near 25'' (90.5 kpc) corresponding to the average Mach number 1.44± 0.05, while another jump from 7.47 keV to 9.10 keV at 68'' (246 kpc) in the north-west direction, corresponding to Mach number 1.22± 0.06 and these jumps are associated with the cold fronts. Tricolour map as well as hardness ratio map detects cool gas clumps in the central 30 kpc region of temperature 4.45_{-0.10}^{+0.16} keV. The entropy profile derived from the X-ray analysis is found to fall systematically inward in a power-law fashion and exhibits a floor near 12.20± 2.54 keV cm2 in the central region. This flattening of the entropy profile in the core region confirms the intermittent heating at the centre by AGN. The diffuse radio emission map at 1.4 GHz using VLA L-band data exhibits highly asymmetric morphology with an edge in the north-west direction coinciding with the X-ray edge seen in the unsharp mask image. The mechanical power injected by the AGN in the form of X-ray cavities is found to be 5.94× 10^{45} erg s^{-1} and is roughly an order of magnitude higher than the energy lost by the ICM in the form of X-ray emission, confirming that AGN feedback is capable enough to quench the cooling flow in this cluster.

  1. Central mass profiles of the nearby cool-core galaxy clusters Hydra A and A478

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, N.; Umetsu, K.; Tamura, T.; Fujita, Y.; Takizawa, M.; Matsushita, K.; Fukazawa, Y.; Futamase, T.; Kawaharada, M.; Miyazaki, S.; Mochizuki, Y.; Nakazawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Ota, N.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, K.; Tam, S. I.

    2016-03-01

    We perform a weak-lensing study of the nearby cool-core galaxy clusters, Hydra A (z = 0.0538) and A478 (z = 0.0881), of which the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) host the powerful activities of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For each cluster, the observed tangential shear profile is described well by either a single Navarro-Frenk-White model or a two-component model including the BCG as an unresolved point mass. For A478, we determine the BCG and its host-halo masses from a joint fit to weak-lensing and stellar photometry measurements. We find that the choice of initial mass functions (IMFs) can introduce a factor of 2 uncertainty in the BCG mass, whereas the BCG host-halo mass is constrained well by data. We perform a joint analysis of the weak-lensing and stellar kinematics data available for the Hydra A cluster, which allows us to constrain the central mass profile without assuming specific IMFs. We find that the central mass profile (r < 300 kpc) determined from the joint analysis is in excellent agreement with those from independent measurements, including dynamical masses estimated from the cold gas disc component, X-ray hydrostatic total mass estimates, and the central stellar mass estimated with the Salpeter IMF. The observed dark matter fraction around the BCG for Hydra A is found to be smaller than those predicted by adiabatic contraction models, suggesting the importance of other physical processes, such as AGN feedback and/or dissipationless mergers.

  2. THE EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENT ON THE FORMATION OF H{alpha} FILAMENTS AND COOL CORES IN GALAXY GROUPS AND CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2011-04-10

    We present the results of a combined X-ray and H{alpha} study of 10 galaxy groups and 17 galaxy clusters using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Maryland Magellan Tunable Filter. We find no difference in the morphology or detection frequency of H{alpha} filaments in groups versus clusters over the mass range 10{sup 13} < M{sub 500} < 10{sup 15} M{sub sun}. The detection frequency of H{alpha} emission is shown to be only weakly dependent on the total mass of the system at the 52% confidence level. In contrast, we find that the presence of H{alpha} filaments is strongly correlated with both the global (89% confidence level) and core (84%) intracluster medium (ICM) entropy, as well as the X-ray cooling rate (72%). The H{alpha} filaments are therefore an excellent proxy for the cooling ICM. The H{alpha} filaments are more strongly correlated with the cooling properties of the ICM than with the radio properties of the brightest cluster galaxy; this further supports the scenario where these filaments are directly associated with a thermally unstable, rapidly cooling ICM, rather than radio bubbles. The ICM cooling efficiency, defined as the X-ray cooling rate per unit gas mass, is shown to correlate with the total system mass, indicating that groups are more efficient at cooling than clusters. This result implies that, in systems with cool cores, active galactic nucleus feedback scales with the total mass of the system, in agreement with earlier suggestions.

  3. A spin-down clock for cool stars from observations of a 2.5-billion-year-old cluster.

    PubMed

    Meibom, Søren; Barnes, Sydney A; Platais, Imants; Gilliland, Ronald L; Latham, David W; Mathieu, Robert D

    2015-01-29

    The ages of the most common stars--low-mass (cool) stars like the Sun, and smaller--are difficult to derive because traditional dating methods use stellar properties that either change little as the stars age or are hard to measure. The rotation rates of all cool stars decrease substantially with time as the stars steadily lose their angular momenta. If properly calibrated, rotation therefore can act as a reliable determinant of their ages based on the method of gyrochronology. To calibrate gyrochronology, the relationship between rotation period and age must be determined for cool stars of different masses, which is best accomplished with rotation period measurements for stars in clusters with well-known ages. Hitherto, such measurements have been possible only in clusters with ages of less than about one billion years, and gyrochronology ages for older stars have been inferred from model predictions. Here we report rotation period measurements for 30 cool stars in the 2.5-billion-year-old cluster NGC 6819. The periods reveal a well-defined relationship between rotation period and stellar mass at the cluster age, suggesting that ages with a precision of order 10 per cent can be derived for large numbers of cool Galactic field stars. PMID:25539085

  4. A spin-down clock for cool stars from observations of a 2.5-billion-year-old cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, Søren; Barnes, Sydney A.; Platais, Imants; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Latham, David W.; Mathieu, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The ages of the most common stars--low-mass (cool) stars like the Sun, and smaller--are difficult to derive because traditional dating methods use stellar properties that either change little as the stars age or are hard to measure. The rotation rates of all cool stars decrease substantially with time as the stars steadily lose their angular momenta. If properly calibrated, rotation therefore can act as a reliable determinant of their ages based on the method of gyrochronology. To calibrate gyrochronology, the relationship between rotation period and age must be determined for cool stars of different masses, which is best accomplished with rotation period measurements for stars in clusters with well-known ages. Hitherto, such measurements have been possible only in clusters with ages of less than about one billion years, and gyrochronology ages for older stars have been inferred from model predictions. Here we report rotation period measurements for 30 cool stars in the 2.5-billion-year-old cluster NGC 6819. The periods reveal a well-defined relationship between rotation period and stellar mass at the cluster age, suggesting that ages with a precision of order 10 per cent can be derived for large numbers of cool Galactic field stars.

  5. A method for measuring cooling air flow in base coolant passages of rotating turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Pollack, F. G.

    1975-01-01

    Method accurately determines actual coolant mass flow rate in cooling passages of rotating turbine blades. Total and static pressures are measured in blade base coolant passages. Mass flow rates are calculated from these measurements of pressure, measured temperature and known area.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Surface and Volumetric Cooling using Optimal T- and Y-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    The T- and Y-shaped flow channels can be optimized for reduced pressure drop and pumping power. The results of the optimization are in the form of geometric parameters such as length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. While these flow channels are optimized for minimum pressure drop, they can also be used for surface and volumetric cooling applications such as heat exchangers, air conditioning and electronics cooling. In this paper, we studied the heat transfer characteristics of multiple T- and Y-shaped flow channel configurations using numerical simulations. All configurations are subjected to same pumping power and heat generation constraints and their heat transfer performance is studied.

  7. Water cooling system using a piezoelectrically actuated flow pump for a medical headlight system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Rogério F.; Vatanabe, Sandro L.; de Oliveira, Amaury R.; Nakasone, Paulo H.; Silva, Emílio C.

    2007-04-01

    The microchips inside modern electronic equipment generate heat and demand, each day, the use of more advanced cooling techniques as water cooling systems, for instance. These systems combined with piezoelectric flow pumps present some advantages such as higher thermal capacity, lower noise generation and miniaturization potential. The present work aims at the development of a water cooling system based on a piezoelectric flow pump for a head light system based on LEDs. The cooling system development consists in design, manufacturing and experimental characterization steps. In the design step, computational models of the pump, as well as the heat exchanger were built to perform sensitivity studies using ANSYS finite element software. This allowed us to achieve desired flow and heat exchange rates by varying the frequency and amplitude of the applied voltage. Other activities included the design of the heat exchanger and the dissipation module. The experimental tests of the cooling system consisted in measuring the temperature difference between the heat exchanger inlet and outlet to evaluate its thermal cooling capacity for different values of the flow rate. Comparisons between numerical and experimental results were also made.

  8. Forced flow heat transfer of supercritical hydrogen for superconductor cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotsu, M.; Shirai, Y.; Tatsumoto, H.; Hata, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Naruo, Y.; Inatani, H.

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer from inner side of a vertical tube to forced flow of hydrogen was measured at the pressure of 1.5 MPa. The test tubes were made of stainless steel 316L with the inner diameters from 3 mm to 9 mm and lengths from 100 mm to 250 mm. Heat transfer curves were obtained by gradually increasing the heating current to the test tube and raising the surface temperature up to around 200 K. Inlet fluid temperature and flow velocity were varied from 21 to 30 K and 0.5 to 12 m/s, respectively. Effects of inlet temperature, flow velocity and tube dimension were clearly observed. The heat transfer curve for each flow velocity consists of a lower temperature region with a higher gradient and higher temperature region with a lower gradient. The experimental results were compared with the authors' correlation presented formerly. It was confirmed that this correlation can describe the experimental results obtained here.

  9. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    This report details progress made on the jet impingement - liquid crystal - digital imaging experiment. With the design phase complete, the experiment is currently in the construction phase. In order to reach this phase two design related issues were resolved. The first issue was to determine NASP leading edge active cooling design parameters. Meetings were arranged with personnel at SAIC International, Torrance, CA in order to obtain recent publications that characterized expected leading edge heat fluxes as well as other details of NASP operating conditions. The information in these publications was used to estimate minimum and maximum jet Reynolds numbers needed to accomplish the required leading edge cooling, and to determine the parameters of the experiment. The details of this analysis are shown in Appendix A. One of the concerns for the NASP design is that of thermal stress due to large surface temperature gradients. Using a series of circular jets to cool the leading edge will cause a non-uniform temperature distribution and potentially large thermal stresses. Therefore it was decided to explore the feasibility of using a slot jet to cool the leading edge. The literature contains many investigations into circular jet heat transfer but few investigations of slot jet heat transfer. The first experiments will be done on circular jets impinging on a fiat plate and results compared to previously published data to establish the accuracy of the method. Subsequent experiments will be slot jets impinging on full scale models of the NASP leading edge. Table 1 shows the range of parameters to be explored. Next a preliminary design of the experiment was done. Previous papers which used a similar experimental technique were studied and elements of those experiments adapted to the jet impingement study. Trade-off studies were conducted to determine which design was the least expensive, easy to construct, and easy to use. Once the final design was settled, vendors were

  10. Modeling and simulation of mixing layer flows for rocket engine film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellimore, Kiran Hamilton Jeffrey

    Film cooling has been selected for the thermal protection of the composite nozzle extension of the J-2X engine which is currently being developed for the second stage of NASA's next generation launch vehicle, the Ares I rocket. However, several challenges remain in order to achieve effective film cooling of the nozzle extension and to ensure its safe operation. The extreme complexity of the flow (three-dimensional wakes, lateral flows, vorticity, and flow separation) makes predicting film cooling performance difficult. There is also a dearth of useful supersonic film cooling data available for engineers to use in engine design and a lack of maturity of CFD tools to quantitatively match supersonic film cooling data. This dissertation advances the state of the art in film cooling by presenting semi-empirical analytical models which improve the basic physical understanding and prediction of the effects of pressure gradients, compressibility and density gradients on film cooling effectiveness. These models are shown to correlate most experimental data well and to resolve several conflicts in the open literature. The core-to-coolant stream velocity ratio, R, and the Kays acceleration parameter, KP, are identified as the critical parameters needed to understand how pressure gradients influence film cooling performance. The convective Mach number, MC, the total temperature ratio, theta0, and the Mach number of the high speed stream, MHS, are shown to be important when explaining the effects of compressibility and density gradient on film cooling effectiveness. An advance in the simulation of film cooling flows is also presented through the development of a computationally inexpensive RANS methodology capable of correctly predicting film cooling performance under turbulent, subsonic conditions. The subsonic simulation results suggest that it in order to obtain accurate predictions using RANS it is essential to thoroughly characterize the turbulent states at the inlet of

  11. Computation of Turbulent Recirculating Flow in Channels, and for Impingement Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Byong Hoon

    1992-01-01

    Fully elliptic forms of the transport equations have been solved numerically for two flow configurations. The first is turbulent flow in a channel with transverse rectangular ribs, and the second is impingement cooling of a plane surface. Both flows are relevant to proposed designs for active cooling of hypersonic vehicles using supercritical hydrogen as the coolant. Flow downstream of an abrupt pipe expansion and of a backward-facing step were also solved with various near-wall turbulence models as benchmark problems. A simple form of periodicity boundary condition was used for the channel flow with transverse rectangular ribs. The effects of various parameters on heat transfer in channel flow with transverse ribs and in impingement cooling were investigated using the Yap modified Jones and Launder low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model. For the channel flow, predictions were in adequate agreement with experiment for constant property flow, with the results for friction superior to those for heat transfer. For impingement cooling, the agreement with experiment was generally good, but the results suggest that improved modelling of the dissipation rate of turbulence kinetic energy is required in order to obtain improved heat transfer prediction, especially near the stagnation point. The k-epsilon turbulence model was used to predict the mean flow and heat transfer for constant and variable property flows. The effect of variable properties for channel flow was investigated using the same turbulence model, but comparison with experiment yielded no clear conclusions. Also, the wall function method was modified for use in the variable properties flow with a non-adiabatic surface, and an empirical model is suggested to correctly account for the behavior of the viscous sublayer with heating.

  12. Emergency makeup flow model for the K-reactor cooling water basin

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, K.L.

    1994-12-31

    The Savannah River site installed the K-reactor cooling tower in 1993 to replace river water supplied to a 25-million-gal cooling basin with cooling tower recirculation. The reactor accident safety analysis assumes that cooling water recirculation is lost during the accident and basin level will drop. Emergency river water supply makeup valves will be opened manually to restore basin makeup and level and maintain shutdown safety. A hydraulic model scopes out valve flow response as the valves are opened. Scoping objectives are (a) valve flow rate response, (b) volumetric makeup with time, and (c) total volumetric makeup effect on basin emergency operating operating procedures. Model results could influence basin emergency operating procedures development before actual field test data are obtained.

  13. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    The work done during the progress report period from May-October 1992 is summarized. The effect of wall thermal boundary conditions on flows over a step or rib when repeated rib roughness is used for heating augmentation is examined. In numerical investigations of various such laminar and turbulent flows, the local heat transfer coefficients on a forward-facing step or on a rib were found to be very sensitive to the wall thermal boundary condition. For the computation of constant property laminar flow, the wall thermal boundary conditions were either a uniform heat flux or a uniform temperature. Results (Nusselt number and isotherms) of the studies are included. The second part of the work consisted of using PHOENICS to solve the conjugate heat transfer problem of flow over a rib in channel. Finally, the algebraic stress model in the TEAM (Turbulent Elliptic Algorithm-Manchester) code was tested for jet impingement flow, but there needs to be an addition of the energy equation to the code.

  14. A simple counter-flow cooling system for a supersonic free-jet beam source assembly.

    PubMed

    Barr, M; Fahy, A; Martens, J; Dastoor, P C

    2016-05-01

    A simple design for an inexpensive, cooled, free-jet beam source is described. The source assembly features an integrated cooling system as supplied by a counter-flow of chilled nitrogen, and is composed primarily of off-the-shelf tube fittings. The design facilitates rapid implementation and eases subsequent alignment with respect to any downstream beamline aperture. The source assembly outlined cools the full length of the stagnation volume, offering temperature control down to 100 K and long-term temperature stability better than ±1 K. PMID:27250408

  15. A simple counter-flow cooling system for a supersonic free-jet beam source assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, M.; Fahy, A.; Martens, J.; Dastoor, P. C.

    2016-05-01

    A simple design for an inexpensive, cooled, free-jet beam source is described. The source assembly features an integrated cooling system as supplied by a counter-flow of chilled nitrogen, and is composed primarily of off-the-shelf tube fittings. The design facilitates rapid implementation and eases subsequent alignment with respect to any downstream beamline aperture. The source assembly outlined cools the full length of the stagnation volume, offering temperature control down to 100 K and long-term temperature stability better than ±1 K.

  16. Options for Cryogenic Load Cooling with Forced Flow Helium Circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Knudsen, Venkatarao Ganni, Roberto Than

    2012-06-01

    Cryogenic pumps designed to circulate super-critical helium are commonly deemed necessary in many super-conducting magnet and other cooling applications. Acknowledging that these pumps are often located at the coldest temperature levels, their use introduces risks associated with the reliability of additional rotating machinery and an additional load on the refrigeration system. However, as it has been successfully demonstrated, this objective can be accomplished without using these pumps by the refrigeration system, resulting in lower system input power and improved reliability to the overall cryogenic system operations. In this paper we examine some trade-offs between using these pumps vs. using the refrigeration system directly with examples of processes that have used these concepts successfully and eliminated using such pumps

  17. Options for cryogenic load cooling with forced flow helium circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Peter; Ganni, Venkatarao; Than, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Cryogenic pumps designed to circulate super-critical helium are commonly deemed necessary in many super-conducting magnet and other cooling applications. Acknowledging that these pumps are often located at the coldest temperature levels, their use introduces risks associated with the reliability of additional rotating machinery and an additional load on the refrigeration system. However, as it has been successfully demonstrated, this objective can be accomplished without using these pumps by the refrigeration system, resulting in lower system input power and improved reliability to the overall cryogenic system operations. In this paper we examine some trade-offs between using these pumps vs. using the refrigeration system directly with examples of processes that have used these concepts successfully and eliminated using such pumps

  18. Effects of building-roof cooling on flow and air temperature in urban street canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Jin; Pardyjak, Eric; Kim, Do-Yong; Han, Kyoung-Soo; Kwon, Byung-Hyuk

    2014-05-01

    The effects of building-roof cooling on flow and air temperature in 3D urban street canyons are numerically investigated using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The aspect ratios of the building and street canyon considered are unity. For investigating the building-roof cooling effects, the building-roof temperatures are systematically changed. The traditional flow pattern including a portal vortex appears in the spanwise canyon. Compared with the case of the control run, there are minimal differences in flow pattern in the cases in which maximum building-roof cooling is considered. However, as the building roof becomes cooler, the mean kinetic energy increases and the air temperature decreases in the spanwise canyon. Building-roof cooling suppresses the upward and inward motions above the building roof, resultantly increasing the horizontal velocity near the roof level. The increase in wind velocity above the roof level intensifies the secondarily driven vortex circulation as well as the inward (outward) motion into (out of) the spanwise canyon. Finally, building-roof cooling reduces the air temperature in the spanwise canyon, supplying much relatively cool air from the streamwise canyon into the spanwise canyon.

  19. Effect of endwall cooling on secondary flows in turbine stator vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of endwall cooling on the secondary flow behavior and the aerodynamic performance of a core turbine stator vane was determined. The investigation was conducted in a cold-air, full-annular cascade, where three-dimensional effects were obtained. Two endwall cooling configurations were tested. In the first configuration, the cooling holes were oriented so that the coolant was injected in line with the inviscid streamline direction. In the second configuration, the coolant was injected at an angle of 15 deg to the inviscid streamline direction and oriented towards the vane pressure stator. In both cases the stator vanes were solid and uncooled so that the effect of endwall cooling was obtained directly. Total-pressure surveys were taken downstream of the stator vanes over a range of cooling flows at the design, mean-radius, critical velocity ratio of 0.778. Changes in the total-pressure contours downstream of the vanes were used to obtain the effect of endwall cooling on the secondary flows in the stator.

  20. Flow tube used to cool solar-pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    A flow tube has been designed and constructed to provide two major functions in the application of a laser beam for transmission of both sound and video. It maintains the YAG laser at the proper operating temperature of 300 degrees K under solar pumping conditions, and it serves as a pump cavity for the laser crystal.

  1. Measurements of mean flow and eddy transport over a film cooling surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Tsang, H.; Simon, T.; Eckert, E.

    1996-05-01

    Results of an experimental study of the effects of blowing Velocity Ratio (VR = 0.5 and 1.0) and Free-Stream Turbulence Intensity (FSTI = 0.5% and 12%) on turbulent transport over a film-cooling test surface are presented. The surface has a single lateral row of streamwise-oriented holes angled 35{degree} from the surface and separated from one another by three hole diameters. The film cooling flow and mainstream flow are at the same temperature and the film cooling is supplied through long delivery tubes. Velocity, turbulence intensity and eddy transport profiles are presented. The ratios of lateral eddy diffusivity to wall-normal eddy diffusivity values measured in this program (4-15) provide documentation of strong anisotropy of eddy transport in the flow.

  2. Two-phase flow in the cooling circuit of a cryogenic rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preclik, D.

    1992-07-01

    Transient two-phase flow was investigated for the hydrogen cooling circuit of the HM7 rocket engine. The nuclear reactor code ATHLET/THESEUS was adapted to cryogenics and applied to both principal and prototype experiments for validation and simulation purposes. The cooling circuit two-phase flow simulation focused on the hydrogen prechilling and pump transient phase prior to ignition. Both a single- and a multichannel model were designed and employed for a valve leakage flow, a nominal prechilling flow, and a prechilling with a subsequent pump-transient flow. The latter case was performed in order to evaluate the difference between a nominal and a delayed turbo-pump start-up. It was found that an extension of the nominal prechilling sequence in the order of 1 second is sufficient to finally provide for liquid injection conditions of hydrogen which, as commonly known, is undesirable for smooth ignition and engine starting transients.

  3. Observation of the core of the Perseus cluster with the Einstein solid state spectrometer: Cooling gas and elemental abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R. F.; Holt, S. S.; Smith, B. W.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    Solid State Spectrometer observations of the core of the Perseus cluster have resulted in the detection of X-ray emission lines due to Si, S, and Fe. Analysis of the spectrum indicates that the X-ray emission has at least two characteristic temperatures. This is interpreted in the framework of radiative accretion in the core of the cluster. The derived parameters are a cooling time tc less than 2 x 109 yrs for the low temperature gas, a mass accretion rate of approximately 300 Mo/yr and a characteristic size of 10 to 20 Kpc for the cool gas. The Fe abundance in the core, approximately 0.4, is similar to the Fe abundance averaged over the whole cluster indicating that Fe emission is not strongly concentrated about NGC 1275. The Si and S abundances are consistent with solar values.

  4. Preliminary analysis of problem of determining experimental performance of air-cooled turbine II : methods for determining cooling-air-flow characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Herman H , Jr

    1950-01-01

    In the determination of the performance of an air-cooled turbine, the cooling-air-flow characteristics between the root and the tip of the blades must be evaluated. The methods, which must be verified and the unknown functions evaluated, that are expected to permit the determination of pressure, temperature, and velocity through the blade cooling-air passages from specific investigation are presented.

  5. Testing the cooling flow model in the intermediate polar EX Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Raymond, J. C.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Mauche, C. W.; Suleimanov, V.

    2015-06-01

    We use the best available X-ray data from the intermediate polar EX Hydrae to study the cooling-flow model often applied to interpret the X-ray spectra of these accreting magnetic white dwarf binaries. First, we resolve a long-standing discrepancy between the X-ray and optical determinations of the mass of the white dwarf in EX Hya by applying new models of the inner disk truncation radius. Our fits to the X-ray spectrum now agree with the white dwarf mass of 0.79 M⊙ determined using dynamical methods through spectroscopic observations of the secondary. We use a simple isobaric cooling flow model to derive the emission line fluxes, emission measure distribution, and H-like to He-like line ratios for comparison with the 496 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating observation of EX Hydrae. We find that the H/He ratios are not well reproduced by this simple isobaric cooling flow model and show that while H-like line fluxes can be accurately predicted, fluxes of lower-Z He-like lines are significantly underestimated. This discrepancy suggests that an extra heating mechanism plays an important role at the base of the accretion column, where cooler ions form. We thus explored more complex cooling models, including the change of gravitational potential with height in the accretion column and a magnetic dipole geometry. None of these modifications to the standard cooling flow model are able to reproduce the observed line ratios. While a cooling flow model with subsolar (0.1 ⊙) abundances is able to reproduce the line ratios by reducing the cooling rate at temperatures lower than ~107.3 K, the predicted line-to-continuum ratios are much lower than observed. We discuss and discard mechanisms, such as photoionization, departures from constant pressure, resonant scattering, different electron-ion temperatures, and Compton cooling. Thermal conduction transfers energy from the region above 107 K, where the H-like lines are mostly formed, to the cooler regions where the

  6. Counter flow cooling drier with integrated heat recovery

    DOEpatents

    Shivvers, Steve D.

    2009-08-18

    A drier apparatus for removing water or other liquids from various materials includes a mixer, drying chamber, separator and regenerator and a method for use of the apparatus. The material to be dried is mixed with a heated media to form a mixture which then passes through the chamber. While passing through the chamber, a comparatively cool fluid is passed counter current through the mixture so that the mixture becomes cooler and drier and the fluid becomes hotter and more saturated with moisture. The mixture is then separated into drier material and media. The media is transferred to the regenerator and heated therein by the hot fluid from the chamber and supplemental heat is supplied to bring the media to a preselected temperature for mixing with the incoming material to be dried. In a closed loop embodiment of the apparatus, the fluid is also recycled from the regenerator to the chamber and a chiller is utilized to reduce the temperature of the fluid to a preselected temperature and dew point temperature.

  7. Flow measurement in base cooling air passages of a rotating turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Pollack, F. G.

    1974-01-01

    The operational performance is decribed of a shaft-mounted system for measuring the air mass flow rate in the base cooling passages of a rotating turbine blade. Shaft speeds of 0 to 9000 rpm, air mass flow rates of 0.0035 to 0.039 kg/sec (0.0077 to 0.085 lbm/sec), and blade air temperatures of 300 to 385 K (80 to 233 F) were measured. Comparisons of individual rotating blade flows and corresponding stationary supply orifice flows agreed to within 10 percent.

  8. Experimental studies of transpiration cooling with shock interaction in hypersonic flow, part B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the result of experimental studies conducted to examine the effects of the impingement of an oblique shock on the flowfield and surface characteristics of a transpiration-cooled wall in turbulent hypersonic flow. The principal objective of this work was to determine whether the interaction between the oblique shock and the low-momentum region of the transpiration-cooled boundary layer created a highly distorted flowfield and resulted in a significant reduction in the cooling effectiveness of the transpiration-cooled surface. As a part of this program, we also sought to determine the effectiveness of transpiration cooling with nitrogen and helium injectants for a wide range of blowing rates under constant-pressure conditions in the absence of shock interaction. This experimental program was conducted in the Calspan 48-Inch Shock Tunnel at nominal Mach numbers of 6 and 8, for a Reynolds number of 7.5 x 10(exp 6). For these test conditions, we obtained fully turbulent boundary layers upstream of the interaction regions over the transpiration-cooled segment of the flat plate. The experimental program was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, we examined the effects of mass-addition level and coolant properties on the cooling effectiveness of transpiration-cooled surfaces in the absence of shock interaction. In the second phase of the program, we examined the effects of oblique shock impingement on the flowfield and surface characteristics of a transpiration-cooled surface. The studies were conducted for a range of shock strengths with nitrogen and helium coolants to examine how the distribution of heat transfer and pressure and the characteristics of the flowfield in the interaction region varied with shock strength and the level of mass addition from the transpiration-cooled section of the model. The effects of the distribution of the blowing rate along the interaction regions were also examined for a range of blowing rates through the

  9. Evaluation of water cooled supersonic temperature and pressure probes for application to 2000 F flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T.; Seiner, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of water cooled supersonic probes used to study high temperature jet plumes is addressed. These probes are: total pressure, static pressure, and total temperature. The motivation for these experiments is the determination of high temperature supersonic jet mean flow properties. A 3.54 inch exit diameter water cooled nozzle was used in the tests. It is designed for exit Mach 2 at 2000 F exit total temperature. Tests were conducted using water cooled probes capable of operating in Mach 2 flow, up to 2000 F total temperature. Of the two designs tested, an annular cooling method was chosen as superior. Data at the jet exit planes, and along the jet centerline, were obtained for total temperatures of 900 F, 1500 F, and 2000 F, for each of the probes. The data obtained from the total and static pressure probes are consistent with prior low temperature results. However, the data obtained from the total temperature probe was affected by the water coolant. The total temperature probe was tested up to 2000 F with, and without, the cooling system turned on to better understand the heat transfer process at the thermocouple bead. The rate of heat transfer across the thermocouple bead was greater when the coolant was turned on than when the coolant was turned off. This accounted for the lower temperature measurement by the cooled probe. The velocity and Mach number at the exit plane and centerline locations were determined from the Rayleigh-Pitot tube formula.

  10. Local cooling alters neural mechanisms producing changes in peripheral blood flow by spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Barron, Kirk W; Chandler, Margaret J; Linderoth, Bengt; Foreman, Robert D

    2003-03-28

    This study was performed to investigate the respective role of sensory afferent and sympathetic fibers in peripheral vasodilatation induced by spinal cord stimulation at different hindpaw skin temperatures. Cooling the skin was used as a strategy to enhance sympathetic activity [Am. J. Physiol.: Heart Circ. Physiol. 263 (1992) H1197]. Cutaneous blood flow in the footpad of anesthetized rats was recorded using laser Doppler flowmetry. Local cooling (<25 degrees C) or moderate local cooling (25-28 degrees C) of the hindpaw was produced with a cooling copper coil. Spinal cord stimulation delivered at clinically relevant parameters and with 30%, 60%, and 90% of motor threshold induced the early phase of vasodilatation in the cooled and the moderately cooled hindpaw. In addition, spinal cord stimulation at 90% of motor threshold produced the late phase of vasodilatation only in the cooled hindpaw, which was possible to block by the autonomic ganglion-blocking agent, hexamethonium. The early responses to spinal cord stimulation in the moderately cooled hindpaw were not affected by hexamethonium. In contrast, both the early and the late phase responses were eliminated by CGRP (8-37), an antagonist of the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor. After dorsal rhizotomy, spinal cord stimulation at 90% of motor threshold elicited hexamethonium-sensitive vasodilatation in the cooled hindpaw (late phase). These results suggest that spinal cord stimulation-induced vasodilatation in the cooled hindpaw (<25 degrees C) is mediated via both the sensory afferent (early phase of vasodilatation) and via suppression of the sympathetic efferent activity (late phase) although the threshold for vasodilatation via the sympathetic efferent fibers is higher than that via sensory nerves. In contrast, vasodilatation via sensory afferent fibers may predominate with moderate temperatures (25-28 degrees C). Thus, two complementary mechanisms for spinal cord stimulation-induced vasodilatation may

  11. Petaflop hydrokinetic simulations of complex flows on massive GPU clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernaschi, M.; Bisson, M.; Fatica, M.; Melchionna, S.; Succi, S.

    2013-02-01

    We present recent extensions of the MUPHY computational framework for multi-scale simulation of complex bio-fluidic phenomena in real-life geometries. The new framework, which builds on concurrent advances of the computational modeling and parallelization techniques, is able to simulate suspensions with several hundreds of millions of finite-size bodies, interacting with each other and with the surrounding fluid, in geometries of realistic anatomic complexity. Blood flow through the human coronary arteries, at physiological hematocrit values, is simulated with a spatial resolution of 10 micrometers, comparable with the size of red blood cells. The simulation exhibits excellent parallel scalability on a cluster of 4000 M2050 Nvidia GPUs, with an aggregate performance close to 1 Petaflop/s.

  12. MEASURING THE GALAXY CLUSTER BULK FLOW FROM WMAP DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, S. J.; Church, S. E.; Mak, D. S. Y.; Pierpaoli, E.

    2011-08-20

    We have looked for bulk motions of galaxy clusters in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. We isolate the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal by filtering the WMAP Q-, V-, and W-band maps with multi-frequency matched filters that utilize the spatial properties of the kinetic SZ signal to optimize detection. We try two filters: a filter that has no spectral dependence, and a filter that utilizes the spectral properties of the kinetic and thermal SZ signals to remove the thermal SZ bias. We measure the monopole and dipole spherical harmonic coefficients of the kinetic SZ signal, as well as the l = 2-5 modes, at the locations of 736 ROSAT observed galaxy clusters. We find no significant power in the kinetic SZ signal at these multipoles with either filter, consistent with the {Lambda}CDM prediction. Our limits are a factor of {approx}3 more sensitive than the claimed bulk flow detection of Kashlinsky et al. Using simulations we estimate that in maps filtered by our matched filter with no spectral dependence there is a thermal SZ dipole that would be mistakenly measured as a bulk motion of {approx}2000-4000 km s{sup -1}. For the WMAP data, the signal-to-noise ratio obtained with the unbiased filter is almost an order of magnitude lower.

  13. Mysterious ionization in cooling flow filaments: a test with deep COS FUV spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant

    2013-10-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph is capable of unraveling a two decade old mystery regarding the filamentary emission line nebulae found in the brightest cluster galaxies {BCGs} of cool core {CC} clusters. These kpc-scale filaments are characterized by elevated H-alpha luminosities and puzzling ionization states that cannot be accounted for by recombination or photionization alone, and are instead excited by an unknown ionization mechanism. The most hotly debated proposed solutions invoke thermal conduction, shocks, or cosmic-ray heating, but progress toward consensus awaits unambiguous spectral discriminants between these models that can only be found in the FUV. We propose deep {9 orbit}, off-nuclear observations of two strategically selected BCGs in well-studied cool core clusters with cross-spectrum archival datasets. We also propose a shorter {5 orbit} on-nuclear observation for one of our targets to assess possible AGN contributions to the spectra. These proposed observations represent critical tests that can unambiguously discriminate between the various candidate ionziation models. Constraining the mechanisms by which CC BCG filaments are excited remains one of the most important roadblocks to a better understanding of cooling from hot ambient medium to cold star forming clouds and filaments, a process important for both galaxy and black hole growth. It is therefore important that, before HST ends its mission and we lose FUV capability, we advance our understanding of this decades old mystery.

  14. Effect of spray cooling on heat transfer in a two-phase helium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perraud, S.; Puech, L.; Thibault, P.; Rousset, B.; Wolf, P. E.

    2013-10-01

    We describe an experimental study of the phenomenon of spray cooling in the case of liquid helium, either normal or superfluid, and its relationship to the heat transfer between an atomized two-phase flow contained in a long pipe, and the pipe walls. This situation is discussed in the context of the cooling of the superconducting magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Experiments were conducted in a test loop reproducing the LHC cooling system, in which the vapor velocity and temperature could be varied in a large range. Shear induced atomization results in the generation of a droplet mist which was characterized by optical means. The thickness of the thin liquid film deposited on the walls by the mist was measured using interdigitated capacitors. The cooling power of the mist was measured using thermal probes, and correlated to the local mist density. Analysis of the results shows that superfluidity has only a limited influence on both the film thickness and the mist cooling power. Using a simple model, we show that the phenomenon of spray cooling accounts for the measured non-linearity of the global heat transfer. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our results for cooling the final focus magnets in an upgraded version of the LHC.

  15. Experimental Flow Performance Evaluation of novel miniaturized Advanced Piezoelectric Dual Cooling Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bock, H. P. J.; Jackson, J. L.; Whalen, B. P.; Chamarthy, P.

    2012-11-01

    In recent years, electronics systems have significantly reduced in size at maintained or increased functionality. This trend has led to an increased demand for smaller and more capable thermal management. However, miniaturization of conventional fan and heat sink cooling systems introduce significant size, weight and efficiency challenges. In this study the flow performance of a novel alternative thin form-factor cooling solution, the advanced piezoelectric dual cooling jet(DCJ), is evaluated. A DCJ is a system where two piezoelectric actuators are excited to produce air flow. The total height of the device is about 1mm. The design of the experimental method for evaluating the equivalent fan-curve of the DCJ device is described in detail. Experimental results in comparison to conventional fan solutions are provided. The DCJ is expected to be a good candidate for thermal management in next generation thin profile consumer electronics.

  16. Flow structure and heat exchange analysis in internal cooling channel of gas turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwaba, Ryszard; Kaczynski, Piotr; Doerffer, Piotr; Telega, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the study of the flow structure and heat transfer, and also their correlations on the four walls of a radial cooling passage model of a gas turbine blade. The investigations focus on heat transfer and aerodynamic measurements in the channel, which is an accurate representation of the configuration used in aeroengines. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient and the pressure drop used in the design of radial cooling passages are often developed from simplified models. It is important to note that real engine passages do not have perfect rectangular cross sections, but include corner fillet, ribs with fillet radii and special orientation. Therefore, this work provides detailed fluid flow and heat transfer data for a model of radial cooling geometry which possesses very realistic features.

  17. X-ray observations of complex temperature structure in the cool-core cluster A85

    SciTech Connect

    Schenck, David E.; Datta, Abhirup; Burns, Jack O.; Skillman, Sam

    2014-07-01

    X-ray observations were used to examine the complex temperature structure of A85, a cool-core galaxy cluster. Temperature features can provide evidence of merging events which shock heat the intracluster gas. Temperature maps were made from both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations. The combination of a new, long-exposure XMM observation and an improved temperature map binning technique produced the highest fidelity temperature maps of A85 to date. Hot regions were detected near the subclusters to the south and southwest in both the Chandra and XMM temperature maps. The presence of these structures implies A85 is not relaxed. The hot regions may indicate the presence of shocks. The Mach numbers were estimated to be ∼1.9 at the locations of the hot spots. Observational effects will tend to systematically reduce temperature jumps, so the measured Mach numbers are likely underestimated. Neither temperature map showed evidence for a shock in the vicinity of the presumed radio relic near the southwest subcluster. However, the presence of a weak shock cannot be ruled out. There was tension between the temperatures measured by the two instruments.

  18. Energy efficiency enhancements for semiconductors, communications, sensors and software achieved in cool silicon cluster project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellinger, Frank; Mikolajick, Thomas; Fettweis, Gerhard; Hentschel, Dieter; Kolodinski, Sabine; Warnecke, Helmut; Reppe, Thomas; Tzschoppe, Christoph; Dohl, Jan; Carta, Corrado; Fritsche, David; Tretter, Gregor; Wiatr, Maciej; Detlef Kronholz, Stefan; Mikalo, Ricardo Pablo; Heinrich, Harald; Paulo, Robert; Wolf, Robert; Hübner, Johannes; Waltsgott, Johannes; Meißner, Klaus; Richter, Robert; Michler, Oliver; Bausinger, Markus; Mehlich, Heiko; Hahmann, Martin; Möller, Henning; Wiemer, Maik; Holland, Hans-Jürgen; Gärtner, Roberto; Schubert, Stefan; Richter, Alexander; Strobel, Axel; Fehske, Albrecht; Cech, Sebastian; Aßmann, Uwe; Pawlak, Andreas; Schröter, Michael; Finger, Wolfgang; Schumann, Stefan; Höppner, Sebastian; Walter, Dennis; Eisenreich, Holger; Schüffny, René

    2013-07-01

    An overview about the German cluster project Cool Silicon aiming at increasing the energy efficiency for semiconductors, communications, sensors and software is presented. Examples for achievements are: 1000 times reduced gate leakage in transistors using high-fc (HKMG) materials compared to conventional poly-gate (SiON) devices at the same technology node; 700 V transistors integrated in standard 0.35 μm CMOS; solar cell efficiencies above 19% at < 200 W/m2 irradiation; 0.99 power factor, 87% efficiency and 0.088 distortion factor for dc supplies; 1 ns synchronization resolution via Ethernet; database accelerators allowing 85% energy savings for servers; adaptive software yielding energy reduction of 73% for e-Commerce applications; processors and corresponding data links with 40% and 70% energy savings, respectively, by adaption of clock frequency and supply voltage in less than 20 ns; clock generator chip with tunable frequency from 83-666 MHz and 0.62-1.6 mW dc power; 90 Gb/s on-chip link over 6 mm and efficiency of 174 fJ/mm; dynamic biasing system doubling efficiency in power amplifiers; 60 GHz BiCMOS frontends with dc power to bandwidth ratio of 0.17 mW/MHz; driver assistance systems reducing energy consumption by 10% in cars Contribution to the Topical Issue “International Semiconductor Conference Dresden-Grenoble - ISCDG 2012”, Edited by Gérard Ghibaudo, Francis Balestra and Simon Deleonibus.

  19. Measurements in film cooling flows: Hole L/D and turbulence intensity effects

    SciTech Connect

    Burd, S.W.; Kaszeta, R.W.; Simon, T.W.

    1996-12-31

    Hot-wire anemometry of simulated film cooling was used to study the influence of freestream turbulence intensity and film cooling hole length-to-diameter ratio on mean velocity and turbulence intensity. Measurements were made in the zone where the coolant and freestream flows mix. Flow from one row of film cooling holes with a streamwise injection of 35{degree} and no lateral injection and with a coolant- to-freestream flow velocity ratio of 1.0 was investigated under freestream turbulence levels of 0.5 and 12%. Coolant-to-freestream density ratio was unity. Two length-to-diameter ratios for the film cooling holes, 2.3 and 7.0, are tested. Results show that under low freestream turbulence conditions, pronounced differences exist in the flowfield between L/D=7.0 and 2.3; the differences are less prominent at high freestream turbulence intensities. Generally, short-L/D injection results in ``jetting`` of the coolant further into the freestream flow and enhanced mixing. Other changes in the flowfield attributable to a rise in freestream turbulence intensity to engine- representative conditions are documented. 15 figs, 2 tabs, refs.

  20. RADIO AND DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE DISTURBED COOL CORE CLUSTER ABELL 133

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, S. W.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Forman, W. R.; Murray, S. S.; Clarke, T. E.; Owers, M. S.; Sarazin, C. L.

    2010-10-10

    We present results based on new Chandra and multi-frequency radio observations of the disturbed cool core cluster Abell 133. The diffuse gas has a complex bird-like morphology, with a plume of emission extending from two symmetric wing-like features. The plume is capped with a filamentary radio structure that has been previously classified as a radio relic. X-ray spectral fits in the region of the relic indicate the presence of either high-temperature gas or non-thermal emission, although the measured photon index is flatter than would be expected if the non-thermal emission is from inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background by the radio-emitting particles. We find evidence for a weak elliptical X-ray surface brightness edge surrounding the core, which we show is consistent with a sloshing cold front. The plume is consistent with having formed due to uplift by a buoyantly rising radio bubble, now seen as the radio relic, and has properties consistent with buoyantly lifted plumes seen in other systems (e.g., M87). Alternatively, the plume may be a gas sloshing spiral viewed edge-on. Results from spectral analysis of the wing-like features are inconsistent with the previous suggestion that the wings formed due to the passage of a weak shock through the cool core. We instead conclude that the wings are due to X-ray cavities formed by displacement of X-ray gas by the radio relic. The central cD galaxy contains two small-scale cold gas clumps that are slightly offset from their optical and UV counterparts, suggestive of a galaxy-galaxy merger event. On larger scales, there is evidence for cluster substructure in both optical observations and the X-ray temperature map. We suggest that the Abell 133 cluster has recently undergone a merger event with an interloping subgroup, initialing gas sloshing in the core. The torus of sloshed gas is seen close to edge-on, leading to the somewhat ragged appearance of the elliptical surface brightness edge. We show

  1. Flow and Thermal Performance of a Water-Cooled Periodic Transversal Elliptical Microchannel Heat Sink for Chip Cooling.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Yang, Mo; Wang, Zhiyun; Xu, Hongtao; Zhang, Yuwen

    2015-04-01

    Flow and thermal performance of transversal elliptical microchannels were investigated as a passive scheme to enhance the heat transfer performance of laminar fluid flow. The periodic transversal elliptical micro-channel is designed and its pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics in laminar flow are numerically investigated. Based on the comparison with a conventional straight micro- channel having rectangular cross section, it is found that periodic transversal elliptical microchannel not only has great potential to reduce pressure drop but also dramatically enhances heat transfer performance. In addition, when the Reynolds number equals to 192, the pressure drop of the transversal elliptical channel is 36.5% lower than that of the straight channel, while the average Nusselt number is 72.8% higher; this indicates that the overall thermal performance of the periodic transversal elliptical microchannel is superior to the conventional straight microchannel. It is suggested that such transversal elliptical microchannel are attractive candidates for cooling future electronic chips effectively with much lower pressure drop. PMID:26353536

  2. Thermal characteristics of air flow cooling in the lithium ion batteries experimental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Lukhanin A.; Rohatgi U.; Belyaev, A.; Fedorchenko, D.; Khazhmuradov, M.; Lukhanin, O; Rudychev, I.

    2012-07-08

    A battery pack prototype has been designed and built to evaluate various air cooling concepts for the thermal management of Li-ion batteries. The heat generation from the Li-Ion batteries was simulated with electrical heat generation devices with the same dimensions as the Li-Ion battery (200 mm x 150 mm x 12 mm). Each battery simulator generates up to 15W of heat. There are 20 temperature probes placed uniformly on the surface of the battery simulator, which can measure temperatures in the range from -40 C to +120 C. The prototype for the pack has up to 100 battery simulators and temperature probes are recorder using a PC based DAQ system. We can measure the average surface temperature of the simulator, temperature distribution on each surface and temperature distributions in the pack. The pack which holds the battery simulators is built as a crate, with adjustable gap (varies from 2mm to 5mm) between the simulators for air flow channel studies. The total system flow rate and the inlet flow temperature are controlled during the test. The cooling channel with various heat transfer enhancing devices can be installed between the simulators to investigate the cooling performance. The prototype was designed to configure the number of cooling channels from one to hundred Li-ion battery simulators. The pack is thermally isolated which prevents heat transfer from the pack to the surroundings. The flow device can provide the air flow rate in the gap of up to 5m/s velocity and air temperature in the range from -30 C to +50 C. Test results are compared with computational modeling of the test configurations. The present test set up will be used for future tests for developing and validating new cooling concepts such as surface conditions or heat pipes.

  3. Effect of cooling on supraoptic neurohypophysial neuronal activity and on urine flow in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, A V; Pittman, Q J; Riphagen, C L

    1984-01-01

    The activity of antidromically identified supraoptic neurosecretory neurones was recorded in Sprague-Dawley rats under urethane or sodium pentobarbitone anaesthesia during cooling of the body with a cold pack. Of twelve phasic neurones studied during a complete cooling and rewarming cycle, six displayed an initial increase, followed by a depression in activity during the period of reduced body temperature. The remaining six phasic neurones did not alter their activity during cooling. Non-phasic neurohypophysial neurones displayed a reversible reduction (n = 8), or increase (n = 6) in activity during cooling, while seven neurones were unaffected by changes in body temperature. In four other anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, urine flow was reduced by approximately 50% during cooling; this was followed by a diuresis after removal of the cold pack and return of body temperature to normal. The antidiuresis did not occur in homozygous Brattleboro rats which lack arginine vasopressin. The electrophysiological data from a proportion of the supraoptic neurohypophysial neurones correlate with the observed changes in urine flow. PMID:6747884

  4. GALAXY CLUSTER BULK FLOWS AND COLLISION VELOCITIES IN QUMOND

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Harley; McGaugh, Stacy; Teuben, Peter; Angus, G. W. E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu E-mail: angus.gz@gmail.com

    2013-07-20

    We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet Cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for ''pink elephants'' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

  5. HIGH-REDSHIFT COOL-CORE GALAXY CLUSTERS DETECTED VIA THE SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT IN THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Semler, D. R.; Suhada, R.; Bazin, G.; Bocquet, S.; Desai, S.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; and others

    2012-12-20

    We report the first investigation of cool-core properties of galaxy clusters selected via their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. We use 13 galaxy clusters uniformly selected from 178 deg{sup 2} observed with the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and followed up by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. They form an approximately mass-limited sample (>3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} h {sup -1}{sub 70}) spanning redshifts 0.3 < z < 1.1. Using previously published X-ray-selected cluster samples, we compare two proxies of cool-core strength: surface brightness concentration (c{sub SB}) and cuspiness ({alpha}). We find that c{sub SB} is better constrained. We measure c{sub SB} for the SPT sample and find several new z > 0.5 cool-core clusters, including two strong cool cores. This rules out the hypothesis that there are no z > 0.5 clusters that qualify as strong cool cores at the 5.4{sigma} level. The fraction of strong cool-core clusters in the SPT sample in this redshift regime is between 7% and 56% (95% confidence). Although the SPT selection function is significantly different from the X-ray samples, the high-z c{sub SB} distribution for the SPT sample is statistically consistent with that of X-ray-selected samples at both low and high redshifts. The cool-core strength is inversely correlated with the offset between the brightest cluster galaxy and the X-ray centroid, providing evidence that the dynamical state affects the cool-core strength of the cluster. Larger SZ-selected samples will be crucial in understanding the evolution of cluster cool cores over cosmic time.

  6. High-redshift Cool-core Galaxy Clusters Detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in the South Pole Telescope Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semler, D. R.; Šuhada, R.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Bazin, G.; Bocquet, S.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Desai, S.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. P.; Foley, R. J.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; High, F. W.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Joy, M.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Montroy, T. E.; Murray, S. S.; Natoli, T.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shaw, L.; Shirokoff, E.; Song, J.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Stubbs, C. W.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2012-12-01

    We report the first investigation of cool-core properties of galaxy clusters selected via their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. We use 13 galaxy clusters uniformly selected from 178 deg2 observed with the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and followed up by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. They form an approximately mass-limited sample (>3 × 1014 M ⊙ h -1 70) spanning redshifts 0.3 < z < 1.1. Using previously published X-ray-selected cluster samples, we compare two proxies of cool-core strength: surface brightness concentration (c SB) and cuspiness (α). We find that c SB is better constrained. We measure c SB for the SPT sample and find several new z > 0.5 cool-core clusters, including two strong cool cores. This rules out the hypothesis that there are no z > 0.5 clusters that qualify as strong cool cores at the 5.4σ level. The fraction of strong cool-core clusters in the SPT sample in this redshift regime is between 7% and 56% (95% confidence). Although the SPT selection function is significantly different from the X-ray samples, the high-z c SB distribution for the SPT sample is statistically consistent with that of X-ray-selected samples at both low and high redshifts. The cool-core strength is inversely correlated with the offset between the brightest cluster galaxy and the X-ray centroid, providing evidence that the dynamical state affects the cool-core strength of the cluster. Larger SZ-selected samples will be crucial in understanding the evolution of cluster cool cores over cosmic time.

  7. Experimental study on heat transfer and flow resistance in improved latticework cooling channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongwu; Wang, Kai; Zhu, Jianqin; Pan, Wenyan

    2013-06-01

    Characteristics of heat transfer and flow resistance of the latticework (vortex) cooling channel with ribs truncated at their two ends were theoretically and experimentally studied compared with regular and smooth channels of the same configuration. The results showed: the heat transfer efficiency of the latticework channel with two slots was better than those of regular and smooth channels of the same configuration, its flow resistance situation in the slotted channel becomes quite complex; The flow resistances of 2 mm- and 4 mm-slotted channels were obviously lower than that of the regular channel, but they are still much higher than that of the smooth channel; Compared with the regular channel, the total heat transfer efficiencies of the slotted channels were pretty improved, among them the 4-mm slotted channel has the biggest enhancement. From the experimental results, it is obvious that the latticework channel with proper slots has a great prospect in the design of the inner cooling channels of turbine blades.

  8. Mitigation of Autoignition Due to Premixing in a Hypervelocity Flow Using Active Wall Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axdahl, Erik; Kumar, Ajay; Wilhite, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Preinjection of fuel on the forebody of an airbreathing vehicle is a proposed method to gain access to hypervelocity flight Mach numbers. However, this creates the possibility of autoignition either near the wall or in the core of the flow, thereby consuming fuel prematurely as well as increasing the amount of pressure drag on the vehicle. The computational fluid dynamics code VULCAN was used to conduct three dimensional simulations of the reacting flow in the vicinity of hydrogen injectors on a flat plate at conditions relevant to a Mach 12 notional flight vehicle forebody to determine the location where autoignition occurs. Active wall cooling strategies were formulated and simulated in response to regions of autoignition. It was found that tangential film cooling using hydrogen or helium were both able to nearly or completely eliminate wall autoignition in the flow domain of interest.

  9. AGN-driven perturbations in the intracluster medium of the cool-core cluster ZwCl 2701

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagshette, Nilkanth D.; Sonkamble, Satish S.; Naik, Sachindra; Patil, Madhav K.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results obtained from a total of 123 ks X-ray (Chandra) and 8 h of 1.4 GHz radio (Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope - GMRT) observations of the cool-core cluster ZwCl 2701 (z = 0.214). These observations of ZwCl 2701 showed the presence of an extensive pair of ellipsoidal cavities along the east and west directions within the central region < 20 kpc. Detection of bright rims around the cavities suggested that the radio lobes displaced X-ray-emitting hot gas forming shell-like structures. The total cavity power (mechanical power) that directly heated the surrounding gas and cooling luminosity of the cluster were estimated to be ˜2.27 × 1045 erg s-1 and 3.5 × 1044 erg s-1 , respectively. Comparable values of cavity power and cooling luminosity of ZwCl 2701 suggested that the mechanical power of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) outburst is large enough to balance the radiative cooling in the system. The star formation rate derived from the Hα luminosity was found to be ˜0.60 M⊙ yr-1, which is about three orders of magnitude lower than the cooling rate of ˜196 M⊙ yr-1. Detection of the floor in entropy profile of ZwCl 2701 suggested the presence of an alternative heating mechanism at the centre of the cluster. Lower value of the ratio (˜10-2) between black hole mass accretion rate and Eddington mass accretion rate suggested that launching of jet from the super massive black hole is efficient in ZwCl 2701. However, higher value of ratio (˜103) between black hole mass accretion rate and Bondi accretion rate indicated that the accretion rate required to create cavities is well above the Bondi accretion rate.

  10. Flow field analysis studies downstream of a cooling hole on a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranakoti, Ganesh; Marathe, Parag

    2014-10-01

    Flow field analysis is carried out computationally on a flat plate with 35° stream-wise coolant injection through a cylindrical film cooling hole. ANSYS Fluent 13.0 is used to perform computations using k-ɛrealizable turbulence model with enhanced wall functions. The Reynolds number ReD based on free stream velocity and diameter of hole is 15885 with blowing ratio M=0.5 and density ratio D.R=1.2. Streamlines are studied downstream of the film cooling hole in the present study.

  11. Cosmic ray transport in galaxy clusters: implications for radio halos, gamma-ray signatures, and cool core heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enßlin, T.; Pfrommer, C.; Miniati, F.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the interplay of cosmic ray (CR) propagation and advection in galaxy clusters. Propagation in form of CR diffusion and streaming tends to drive the CR radial profiles towards being flat, with equal CR number density everywhere. Advection of CR by the turbulent gas motions tends to produce centrally enhanced profiles. We assume that the CR streaming velocity is of the order of the sound velocity. This is motivated by plasma physical arguments. The CR streaming is then usually larger than typical advection velocities and becomes comparable or lower than this only for periods with trans- and super-sonic cluster turbulence. As a consequence a bimodality of the CR spatial distribution results. Strongly turbulent, merging clusters should have a more centrally concentrated CR energy density profile with respect to relaxed ones with very subsonic turbulence. This translates into a bimodality of the expected diffuse radio and gamma-ray emission of clusters, since more centrally concentrated CR will find higher target densities for hadronic CR proton interactions, higher plasma wave energy densities for CR electron and proton re-acceleration, and stronger magnetic fields. Thus, the observed bimodality of cluster radio halos appears to be a natural consequence of the interplay of CR transport processes, independent of the model of radio halo formation, be it hadronic interactions of CR protons or re-acceleration of low-energy CR electrons. Energy dependence of the CR propagation should lead to spectral steepening of dying radio halos. Furthermore, we show that the interplay of CR diffusion with advection implies first order CR re-acceleration in the pressure-stratified atmospheres of galaxy clusters. Finally, we argue that CR streaming could be important in turbulent cool cores of galaxy clusters since it heats preferentially the central gas with highest cooling rate.

  12. Measurements of Heat Transfer, Flow, and Pressures in a Simulated Turbine Blade Internal Cooling Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Louis M.; Thurman, Douglas R.; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Hippensteele, Steven A.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental study was made to obtain quantitative information on heat transfer, flow, and pressure distribution in a branched duct test section that had several significant features of an internal cooling passage of a turbine blade. The objective of this study was to generate a set of experimental data that could be used for validation of computer codes that would be used to model internal cooling. Surface heat transfer coefficients and entrance flow conditions were measured at nominal entrance Reynolds numbers of 45,000, 335,000, and 726,000. Heat transfer data were obtained by using a steady-state technique in which an Inconel heater sheet is attached to the surface and coated with liquid crystals. Visual and quantitative flow-field data from particle image velocimetry measurements for a plane at midchannel height for a Reynolds number of 45,000 were also obtained. The flow was seeded with polystyrene particles and illuminated by a laser light sheet. Pressure distribution measurements were made both on the surface with discrete holes and in the flow field with a total pressure probe. The flow-field measurements yielded flow-field velocities at selected locations. A relatively new method, pressure sensitive paint, was also used to measure surface pressure distribution. The pressure paint data obtained at Reynolds numbers of 335,000 and 726,000 compared well with the more standard method of measuring pressures by using discrete holes.

  13. The Effect of Cool Deformation on the Microstructural Evolution and Flow Strength of Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi Anijdan, Seyyed Hashem

    Cool deformation is a process in which a small amount of plastic deformation is applied at temperatures well below the end of the austenite transformation temperature. In this thesis, a systematic study was conducted to evaluate the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of microalloyed steels processed by thermomechanical schedules incorporating cool deformation. Thermodynamic analysis was conducted to predict equilibrium phases formed by the presence of microalloying elements such as Ti, Nb, Mo and their appearance were then elaborated by means of TEM microscopy. As well, continuous cooling torsion (CCT) was employed to study the transformation behavior of steels for austenite conditioned and unconditioned. Cool deformation was incorporated into a full scale simulation of hotrolling, and the effect of prior austenite conditioning on the cool deformability of microalloyed steels was investigated. Out of these studies, a new definition of no-recystallization temperature (Tnr) was proposed based on dynamic precipitation, which was then recognized in the Nb bearing steels by using TEM analysis as well as flow curves analysis. Results show that cool deformation greatly improves the strength of microalloyed steels. Of the several mechanisms identified, such as work hardening, precipitation, grain refinement, and strain induced transformation (SIT) of retained austenite, SIT was proposed, for the first time in microalloyed steels, to be the significant mechanism of strengthening due to the deformation in ferrite. Results also show that the effect of ferrite precipitation is greatly overshadowed by SIT at room temperature. Finally, considering the interplay of SIT and precipitation for the Nb bearing steels, a rolling schedule was designed incorporating austenite conditioning, cooling rate and cool deformation that maximized the strength.

  14. Exploring Inflated Pahohoe Lava Flow Morphologies and the Effects of Cooling Using a New Simulation Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L. S.; Baloga, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Pahoehoe lavas are recognized as an important landform on Earth, Mars and Io. Observations of such flows on Earth (e.g., Figure 1) indicate that the emplacement process is dominated by random effects. Existing models for lobate a`a lava flows that assume viscous fluid flow on an inclined plane are not appropriate for dealing with the numerous random factors present in pahoehoe emplacement. Thus, interpretation of emplacement conditions for pahoehoe lava flows on Mars requires fundamentally different models. A new model that implements a simulation approach has recently been developed that allows exploration of a variety of key influences on pahoehoe lobe emplacement (e.g., source shape, confinement, slope). One important factor that has an impact on the final topographic shape and morphology of a pahoehoe lobe is the volumetric flow rate of lava, where cooling of lava on the lobe surface influences the likelihood of subsequent breakouts.

  15. Flow-field analysis of anti-kidney vortex film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräf, Lars; Kleiser, Leonhard

    2012-02-01

    Film cooling is an important measure to enable an increase of the inlet temperature of a gas turbine and, thereby, to improve its overall efficiency. The coolant is ejected through spanwise rows of holes in the blades or endwalls to build up a film shielding the material. The holes often are inclined in the downstream direction and give rise to a kidney vortex. This is a counter-rotating vortex pair, with an upward flow direction between the two vortices, which tends to lift off the surface and to locally feed hot air towards the blade outside the pair. Reversing the rotational sense of the vortices reverses these two drawbacks into advantages. In the considered case, an anti-kidney vortex is generated using two subsequent rows of holes both inclined downstream and yawed spanwise with alternating angles. In a previous study, we performed large-eddy simulations (which focused on the fully turbulent boundary layer) of this anti-kidney vortex film-cooling and compared them to a corresponding physical experiment. The present work analyzes the simulated flow field in detail, beginning in the plenum (inside the blade or endwall) through the holes up to the mixture with the hot boundary layer. To identify the vortical structures found in the mean flow and in the instantaneous flow, we mostly use the λ 2 criterion and the line integral convolution (LIC) technique indicating sectional streamlines. The flow regions (coolant plenum, holes, and boundary layer) are studied subsequently and linked to each other. To track the anti-kidney vortex throughout the boundary layer, we propose two criteria which are based on vorticity and on LIC results. This enables us to associate the jet vortices with the cooling effectiveness at the wall, which is the key feature of film cooling.

  16. Development of an experiment for measuring film cooling performance in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqbool, Daanish

    This thesis describes the development of an experiment for acquiring supersonic film cooling performance data in canonical configurations suitable for code validation. A methodology for selecting appropriate experimental conditions is developed and used to select test conditions in the UMD atmospheric pressure wind tunnel that are relevant to film cooling conditions encountered in the J-2X rocket engine. A new technique for inferring wall heat flux with 10% uncertainty from temperature-time histories of embedded sensors is developed and implemented. Preliminary heat flux measurements on the uncooled upper wall and on the lower wall with the film cooling flow turned off suggest that RANS solvers using Menter's SST model are able to predict heat flux within 15% in the far-field (> 10 injection slot heights) but are very inaccurate in the near-field. However, more experiments are needed to confirm this finding. Preliminary Schlieren images showing the shear layer growth rate are also presented.

  17. Heat/mass transfer and flow characteristics of pin fin cooling channels in turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. C.; Saxena, A.

    Experiments studied the local heat/mass transfer distributions and pressure drops in pin fin channels that modeled internal cooling passages in gas turbine blades. Heat/mass transfer distributions were determined for a straight flow through a pin fin channel (H/D = 1.0, X/D = S/D = 2.5) and a flow through the pin fin channel with trailing edge flow ejection. The overall friction factor and local pressure drop results were obtained for various configurations and lengths of the trailing edge ejection holes. The results show that, when there is trailing edge flow ejection, the main flow stream turns toward the trailing edge ejection holes. The wake regions downstream of the pins and the regions affected by secondary flow shift toward the ejection holes. The local channel wall heat/mass transfer is generally high immediately upstream of a pin, in the wake region downstream of a pin, and in the regions affected by secondary flow. In the case with trailing edge flow ejection, the heat/mass transfer generally decreases in the radial direction as a result of the reducing radial mass flow rate. The overall friction is higher when the trailing edge ejection holes are longer and when they are configured such that more flow is forced further downstream in the pin fin channel before exiting through the ejection holes.

  18. Miocene lava flows and domes, cooling fractures, carapace breccia, and avalanche deposits near Goldstone, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buesch, D.

    2013-12-01

    Mapping and petrography of volcanic rocks in western Fort Irwin (FI), California, provide insights into the cooling history of lava flows and domes and the formation of associated carapace breccia and avalanche deposits. The rocks formed on the eastern margin of the 19-16 Ma Eagle Crags volcanic field (Sabin and others, 1994). Lava compositions range from porphyritic olivine basalt to aphyric rhyolite. Basalt flows are 1-5 m thick and <1-2 km long, and sequences 5-50 m thick are traceable for >7 km. Andesite to rhyolite flows are 30-80 m thick and <1-3 km long, and domes have 100-300 m relief and radial length of 0.6-1.2 km. Cooling fractures, identified by occurrence of margins and geometry, are in all lava flows and domes. Similar to a 'rim' (Buesch and others, 1996 & 1999; Buesch, 2006), a 'margin' is a region along a fracture wall with a finer texture or different type of crystallinity or vesicularity compared to rock inward from the fracture. At FI, margins occur on many fractures and typically are 0.5-3 mm wide. They indicate that a fracture formed during initial cooling, before the bulk of the rock crystallized. Planarity and surface roughness are used to analyze fractures (Buesch and others, 1996). Typically at FI, cooling fractures are planar and smooth, and post-cooling fractures are slightly irregular and slightly rough. Typically, plan views of cooling fractures are 5-6 sided in olivine basalt, and 4-sided in andesite to rhyolite. Fracture sets are mostly perpendicular to the original surface of a flow, and some bend toward the interior. Many lava flows and domes have lateral and capping breccias referred to as carapace breccia. Similar breccia also cloaks individual lobes of composite domes. Carapace breccia can grade down into a non-brecciated interior, but in some cases, compositionally similar late-stage flow-banded lava was injected beneath the breccia, Breccia fragments are vitric or crystallized, and many have margins that do not match those of

  19. Turbine endwall film cooling with combustor-turbine interface gap leakage flow: Effect of incidence angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Yuan, Xin

    2013-04-01

    This paper is focused on the film cooling performance of combustor-turbine leakage flow at off-design condition. The influence of incidence angle on film cooling effectiveness on first-stage vane endwall with combustor-turbine interface slot is studied. A baseline slot configuration is tested in a low speed four-blade cascade comprising a large-scale model of the GE-E3Nozzle Guide Vane (NGV). The slot has a forward expansion angle of 30 deg. to the endwall surface. The Reynolds number based on the axial chord and inlet velocity of the free-stream flow is 3.5 × 105 and the testing is done in a four-blade cascade with low Mach number condition (0.1 at the inlet). The blowing ratio of the coolant through the interface gap varies from M = 0.1 to M = 0.3, while the blowing ratio varies from M = 0.7 to M = 1.3 for the endwall film cooling holes. The film-cooling effectiveness distributions are obtained using the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique. The results show that with an increasing blowing ratio the film-cooling effectiveness increases on the endwall. As the incidence angle varies from i = +10 deg. to i = -10 deg., at low blowing ratio, the averaged film-cooling effectiveness changes slightly near the leading edge suction side area. The case of i = +10 deg. has better film-cooling performance at the downstream part of this region where the axial chord is between 0.15 and 0.25. However, the disadvantage of positive incidence appears when the blowing ratio increases, especially at the upstream part of near suction side region where the axial chord is between 0 and 0.15. On the main passage endwall surface, as the incidence angle changes from i = +10 deg. to i = -10 deg., the averaged film-cooling effectiveness changes slightly and the negative incidence appears to be more effective for the downstream part film cooling of the endwall surface where the axial chord is between 0.6 and 0.8.

  20. Connecting Star Formation Quenching with Galaxy Structure and Supermassive Black Holes through Gravitational Heating of Cooling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai

    2014-12-01

    Recent observations suggested that star formation quenching in galaxies is related to galaxy structure. Here we propose a new mechanism to explain the physical origin of this correlation. We assume that while quenching is maintained in quiescent galaxies by a feedback mechanism, cooling flows in the hot halo gas can still develop intermittently. We study cooling flows in a large suite of around 90 hydrodynamic simulations of an isolated galaxy group, and find that the flow development depends significantly on the gravitational potential well in the central galaxy. If the galaxy's gravity is not strong enough, cooling flows result in a central cooling catastrophe, supplying cold gas and feeding star formation to galactic bulges. When the bulge grows prominent enough, compressional heating starts to offset radiative cooling and maintains cooling flows in a long-term hot mode without producing a cooling catastrophe. Our model thus describes a self-limited growth channel for galaxy bulges and naturally explains the connection between quenching and bulge prominence. In particular, we explicitly demonstrate that M*/R_eff1.5 is a good structural predictor of quenching. We further find that the gravity from the central supermassive black hole also affects the bimodal fate of cooling flows, and we predict a more general quenching predictor to be M_bh1.6M*/R_eff1.5, which may be tested in future observational studies.

  1. CONNECTING STAR FORMATION QUENCHING WITH GALAXY STRUCTURE AND SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES THROUGH GRAVITATIONAL HEATING OF COOLING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fulai

    2014-12-20

    Recent observations suggested that star formation quenching in galaxies is related to galaxy structure. Here we propose a new mechanism to explain the physical origin of this correlation. We assume that while quenching is maintained in quiescent galaxies by a feedback mechanism, cooling flows in the hot halo gas can still develop intermittently. We study cooling flows in a large suite of around 90 hydrodynamic simulations of an isolated galaxy group, and find that the flow development depends significantly on the gravitational potential well in the central galaxy. If the galaxy's gravity is not strong enough, cooling flows result in a central cooling catastrophe, supplying cold gas and feeding star formation to galactic bulges. When the bulge grows prominent enough, compressional heating starts to offset radiative cooling and maintains cooling flows in a long-term hot mode without producing a cooling catastrophe. Our model thus describes a self-limited growth channel for galaxy bulges and naturally explains the connection between quenching and bulge prominence. In particular, we explicitly demonstrate that M{sub ∗}/R{sub eff}{sup 1.5} is a good structural predictor of quenching. We further find that the gravity from the central supermassive black hole also affects the bimodal fate of cooling flows, and we predict a more general quenching predictor to be M{sub bh}{sup 1.6}M{sub ∗}/R{sub eff}{sup 1.5}, which may be tested in future observational studies.

  2. Computational Flow Predictions for the Lower Plenum of a High-Temperature, Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-11-01

    Advanced gas-cooled reactors offer the potential advantage of higher efficiency and enhanced safety over present day nuclear reactors. Accurate simulation models of these Generation IV reactors are necessary for design and licensing. One design under consideration by the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) program is a modular, prismatic gas-cooled reactor. In this reactor, the lower plenum region may experience locally high temperatures that can adversely impact the plant's structural integrity. Since existing system analysis codes cannot capture the complex flow effects occurring in the lower plenum, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are being employed to model these flows [1]. The goal of the present study is to validate the CFD calculations using experimental data.

  3. The inviscid stability of supersonic flow past heated or cooled axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Stephen J.; Duck, Peter W.

    1992-01-01

    The inviscid, linear, nonaxisymmetric, temporal stability of the boundary layer associated with the supersonic flow past axisymmetric bodies (with particular emphasis on long thin, straight circular cylinders), subject to heated or cooled wall conditions is investigated. The eigenvalue problem is computed in some detail for a particular Mach number or 3.8, revealing that the effect of curvature and the choice of wall conditions both have a significant effect on the stability of the flow. Both the asymptotic, large azimuthal wavenumber solution and the asymptotic, far downstream solution are obtained for the stability analysis and compared with numerical results. Additionally, asymptotic analyses valid for large radii of curvature with cooled/heated wall conditions are presented. In general, important differences were found to exist between the wall temperature conditions imposed and the adiabatic wall conditions considered previously.

  4. The inviscid stability of supersonic flow past heated or cooled axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Stephen J.; Duck, Peter W.

    1990-01-01

    The inviscid, linear, nonaxisymmetric, temporal stability of the boundary layer associated with the supersonic flow past axisymmetric bodies (with particular emphasis on long thin, straight circular cylinders), subject to heated or cooled wall conditions is investigated. The eigenvalue problem is computed in some detail for a particular Mach number or 3.8, revealing that the effect of curvature and the choice of wall conditions both have a significant effect on the stability of the flow. Both the asymptotic, large azimuthal wavenumber solution and the asymptotic, far downstream solution are obtained for the stability analysis and compared with numerical results. Additionally, asymptotic analyses valid for large radii of curvature with cooled/heated wall conditions, are presented. In general, important differences were found to exist between the wall temperature conditions imposed and the adiabatic wall conditions considered previously.

  5. High Temperature Ceramic Guide Vane Temperature and Pressure Distribution Calculation for Flow with Cooling Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Rakesh

    2004-01-01

    A ceramic guide vane has been designed and tested for operation under high temperature. Previous efforts have suggested that some cooling flow may be required to alleviate the high temperatures observed near the trailing edge region. The present report describes briefly a three-dimensional viscous analysis carried out to calculate the temperature and pressure distribution on the blade surface and in the flow path with a jet of cooling air exiting from the suction surface near the trailing edge region. The data for analysis was obtained from Dr. Craig Robinson. The surface temperature and pressure distribution along with a flowfield distribution is shown in the results. The surface distribution is also given in a tabular form at the end of the document.

  6. Computational Flow Predictions for the Lower Plenum of a High-Temperature, Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2006-11-01

    Advanced gas-cooled reactors offer the potential advantage of higher efficiency and enhanced safety over present day nuclear reactors. Accurate simulation models of these Generation IV reactors are necessary for design and licensing. One design under consideration by the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) program is a modular, prismatic gas-cooled reactor. In this reactor, the lower plenum region may experience locally high temperatures that can adversely impact the plant’s structural integrity. Since existing system analysis codes cannot capture the complex flow effects occurring in the lower plenum, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are being employed to model these flows [1]. The goal of the present study is to validate the CFD calculations using experimental data.

  7. The Cooling Rate of an Active Aa Lava Flow Determined Using an Orbital Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Robert; Garbeil, Harold

    2010-05-01

    The surface temperature of an active lava flow is an important physical property to measure. Through its influence on lava crystallinity, cooling exerts a fundamental control on lava rheology. Remotely sensed thermal radiance data acquired by multispectral sensors such as Landsat Thematic Mapper and the Terra Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer, are of insufficient spectral and radiometric fidelity to allow for realistic determination of lava surface temperatures from Earth orbit. This paper presents results obtained from the analysis of active lava flows using hyperspectral data acquired by NASA's Earth Observing-1 Hyperion imaging spectrometer. The contiguous nature of the measured radiance spectrum in the 0.4-2.5 micron region means that, although sensor saturation most certainly occurs, unsaturated radiance data are always available from even the hottest, and most radiant, active lava flow surfaces. The increased number of wavebands available allows for the assumption of more complex flow surface temperature distributions in the radiance-to-temperature inversion processes. The technique is illustrated by using a hyperspectral image of the active lava lake at Erta Ale volcano, Ethiopia, a well characterized calibration target. We then go on to demonstrate how this approach can be used to constrain the surface cooling rate of an active lava flow at Mount Etna, Sicily, using three images acquired during a four day period in September 2004. The cooling rate of the active channel as determined from space falls within the limits commonly assumed in numerical lava flow models. The results provide insights into the temperature-radiance mixture modeling problem that will aid in the analysis of data acquired by future hyperspectral remote sensing missions, such as NASA's proposed HyspIRI mission.

  8. Simulation of Cold Flow in a Truncated Ideal Nozzle with Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braman, K. E.; Ruf, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Flow transients during rocket start-up and shut-down can lead to significant side loads on rocket nozzles. The capability to estimate these side loads computationally can streamline the nozzle design process. Towards this goal, the flow in a truncated ideal contour (TIC) nozzle has been simulated using RANS and URANS for a range of nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) aimed to match a series of cold flow experiments performed at the NASA MSFC Nozzle Test Facility. These simulations were performed with varying turbulence model choices and for four approximations of the supersonic film injection geometry, each of which was created with a different simplification of the test article geometry. The results show that although a reasonable match to experiment can be obtained with varying levels of geometric fidelity, the modeling choices made do not fully represent the physics of flow separation in a TIC nozzle with film cooling.

  9. A 3.55 keV line from DM → a → γ: predictions for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Powell, Andrew J. E-mail: andrew.powell2@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    We further study a scenario in which a 3.55 keV X-ray line arises from decay of dark matter to an axion-like particle (ALP), that subsequently converts to a photon in astrophysical magnetic fields. We perform numerical simulations of Gaussian random magnetic fields with radial scaling of the magnetic field magnitude with the electron density, for both cool-core 'Perseus' and non-cool-core 'Coma' electron density profiles. Using these, we quantitatively study the resulting signal strength and morphology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our study includes the effects of fields of view that cover only the central part of the cluster, the effects of offset pointings on the radial decline of signal strength and the effects of dividing clusters into annuli. We find good agreement with current data and make predictions for future analyses and observations.

  10. Vegetative growth and cluster development in Shiraz grapevines subjected to partial root-zone cooling

    PubMed Central

    Rogiers, Suzy Y.; Clarke, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity in root-zone temperature both vertically and horizontally may contribute to the uneven vegetative and reproductive growth often observed across vineyards. An experiment was designed to assess whether the warmed half of a grapevine root zone could compensate for the cooled half in terms of vegetative growth and reproductive development. We divided the root system of potted Shiraz grapevines bilaterally and applied either a cool or a warm treatment to each half from budburst to fruit set. Shoot growth and inflorescence development were monitored over the season. Simultaneous cooling and warming of parts of the root system decreased shoot elongation, leaf emergence and leaf expansion below that of plants with a fully warmed root zone, but not to the same extent as those with a fully cooled root zone. Inflorescence rachis length, flower number and berry number after fertilization were smaller only in those vines exposed to fully cooled root zones. After terminating the treatments, berry enlargement and the onset of veraison were slowed in those vines that had been exposed to complete or partial root-zone cooling. Grapevines exposed to partial root-zone cooling were thus delayed in vegetative and reproductive development, but the inhibition was greater in those plants whose entire root system had been cooled. PMID:24244839

  11. Mapping the particle acceleration in the cool core of the galaxy cluster RX J1720.1+2638

    SciTech Connect

    Giacintucci, S.; Markevitch, M.; Brunetti, G.; Venturi, T.; ZuHone, J. A.

    2014-11-01

    We present new deep, high-resolution radio images of the diffuse minihalo in the cool core of the galaxy cluster RX J1720.1+2638. The images have been obtained with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 317, 617, and 1280 MHz and with the Very Large Array at 1.5, 4.9, and 8.4 GHz, with angular resolutions ranging from 1'' to 10''. This represents the best radio spectral and imaging data set for any minihalo. Most of the radio flux of the minihalo arises from a bright central component with a maximum radius of ∼80 kpc. A fainter tail of emission extends out from the central component to form a spiral-shaped structure with a length of ∼230 kpc, seen at frequencies 1.5 GHz and below. We find indication of a possible steepening of the total radio spectrum of the minihalo at high frequencies. Furthermore, a spectral index image shows that the spectrum of the diffuse emission steepens with increasing distance along the tail. A striking spatial correlation is observed between the minihalo emission and two cold fronts visible in the Chandra X-ray image of this cool core. These cold fronts confine the minihalo, as also seen in numerical simulations of minihalo formation by sloshing-induced turbulence. All these observations favor the hypothesis that the radio-emitting electrons in cluster cool cores are produced by turbulent re-acceleration.

  12. The dance of heating and cooling in galaxy clusters: three-dimensional simulations of self-regulated active galactic nuclei outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.; Melioli, C.; Brighenti, F.; D'Ercole, A.

    2011-02-01

    It is now widely accepted that heating processes play a fundamental role in galaxy clusters, struggling in an intricate but fascinating ‘dance' with its antagonist, radiative cooling. Last-generation observations, especially X-ray, are giving us tiny hints about the notes of this endless ballet. Cavities, shocks, turbulence and wide absorption lines indicate that the central active nucleus is injecting a huge amount of energy in the intracluster medium. However, which is the real dominant engine of self-regulated heating? One of the models we propose is massive subrelativistic outflows, probably generated by a wind disc or just the result of the entrainment on kpc scale by the fast radio jet. Using a modified version of the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH 3.2, we have explored several feedback mechanisms that self-regulate the mechanical power. Two are the best schemes that answer our primary question, that is, quenching cooling flow and at the same time preserving a cool core appearance for a long-term evolution (7 Gyr): one is more explosive (with efficiencies ˜ 5 × 10-3-10-2), triggered by central cooled gas, and the other is gentler, ignited by hot gas Bondi accretion (with ɛ= 0.1). These three-dimensional simulations show that the total energy injected is not the key aspect, but the results strongly depend on how energy is given to the intracluster medium. We follow the dynamics of the best models (temperature, density, surface brightness maps and profiles) and produce many observable predictions: buoyant bubbles, ripples, turbulence, iron abundance maps and hydrostatic equilibrium deviation. We present an in-depth discussion of the merits and flaws of all our models, with a critical eye towards observational concordance.

  13. Formation of Globular Clusters in Atomic-cooling Halos Via Rapid Gas Condensation and Fragmentation during the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Cen, Renyue; Rosdahl, Joakim; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the formation of metal-poor globular clusters (GCs) at the center of two dark matter halos with {M}{{halo}}˜ 4× {10}7 {M}ȯ at z\\gt 10 using cosmological radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. We find that very compact (≲1 pc) and massive (˜ 6× {10}5 {M}ȯ ) clusters form rapidly when pristine gas collapses isothermally with the aid of efficient Lyα emission during the transition from molecular-cooling halos to atomic-cooling halos. Because the local free-fall time of dense star-forming gas is very short (\\ll 1 {{Myr}}), a large fraction of the collapsed gas is turned into stars before stellar feedback processes blow out the gas and shut down star formation. Although the early stage of star formation is limited to a small region of the central star-forming disk, we find that the disk quickly fragments due to metal enrichment from supernovae. Sub-clusters formed in the fragmented clouds eventually merge with the main cluster at the center. The simulated clusters closely resemble the local GCs in mass and size but show a metallicity spread that is much wider than found in the local GCs. We discuss a role of pre-enrichment by Pop III and II stars as a potential solution to the latter issue. Although not without shortcomings, it is encouraging that a naive blind (not tuned) cosmological simulation presents a possible channel for the formation of at least some massive GCs.

  14. FORMATION OF COMPACT STELLAR CLUSTERS BY HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXY OUTFLOWS. II. EFFECT OF TURBULENCE AND METAL-LINE COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2011-06-01

    In the primordial universe, low-mass structures with virial temperatures less than 10{sup 4} K were unable to cool by atomic line transitions, leading to a strong suppression of star formation. On the other hand, these 'minihalos' were highly prone to triggered star formation by interactions from nearby galaxy outflows. In Gray and Scannapieco, we explored the impact of nonequilibrium chemistry on these interactions. Here we turn our attention to the role of metals, carrying out a series of high-resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that include both metal cooling and a subgrid turbulent mixing model. Despite the presence of an additional coolant, we again find that outflow-minihalo interactions produce a distribution of dense, massive stellar clusters. We also find that these clusters are evenly enriched with metals to a final abundance of Z {approx} 10{sup -2} Z{sub sun}. As in our previous simulations, all of these properties suggest that these interactions may have given rise to present-day halo globular clusters.

  15. Hydrodynamic and macromolecules induced clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claveira, Viviana; Aouane, Othmane; Coupier, Gwennou; Misbah, Chaouqi; Abkarian, Manouk; Wagner, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have been shown that despite the large shear rates, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of RBC in microcapillaries under flow conditions. The contribution of hydrodynamic interactions and interactions induced by the presence of macromolecules in the cluster formation has not been established. In order to elucidate this mechanism, we compare experimentally in microchannels under flow condition, the pure hydrodynamic cluster formation of RBCs and the cluster formation of RBCs in the presence of macromolecules inducing aggregation. The results reveal strong differences in the cluster morphology. Emphasizing on the case of clusters formed by two cells, the surface to surface interdistances between the cells in the different solutions shows a bimodal distribution. Numerical simulations based on the boundary integral method showed a good agreement with the experimental findings.

  16. Incorporation of cooling-induced crystallization into a 2-dimensional axisymmetric conduit heat flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heptinstall, David; Bouvet de Maisonneuve, Caroline; Neuberg, Jurgen; Taisne, Benoit; Collinson, Amy

    2016-04-01

    Heat flow models can bring new insights into the thermal and rheological evolution of volcanic 3 systems. We shall investigate the thermal processes and timescales in a crystallizing, static 4 magma column, with a heat flow model of Soufriere Hills Volcano (SHV), Montserrat. The latent heat of crystallization is initially computed with MELTS, as a function of pressure and temperature for an andesitic melt (SHV groundmass starting composition). Three fractional crystallization simulations are performed; two with initial pressures of 34MPa (runs 1 & 2) and one of 25MPa (run 3). Decompression rate was varied between 0.1MPa/° C (runs 1 & 3) and 0.2MPa/° C (run 2). Natural and experimental matrix glass compositions are accurately reproduced by all MELTS runs. The cumulative latent heat released for runs 1, 2 and 3 differs by less than 9% (8.69E5 J/kg*K, 9.32E5 J/kg*K, and 9.49E5 J/kg*K respectively). The 2D axisymmetric conductive cooling simulations consider a 30m-diameter conduit that extends from the surface to a depth of 1500m (34MPa). The temporal evolution of temperature is closely tracked at depths of 10m, 750m and 1400m in the centre of the conduit, at the conduit walls, and 20m from the walls into the host rock. Following initial cooling by 7-15oC at 10m depth inside the conduit, the magma temperature rebounds through latent heat release by 32-35oC over 85-123 days to a maximum temperature of 1002-1005oC. At 10m depth, it takes 4.1-9.2 years for the magma column to cool by 108-131oC and crystallize to 75wt%, at which point it cannot be easily remobilized. It takes 11-31.5 years to reach the same crystallinity at 750-1400m depth. We find a wide range in cooling timescales, particularly at depths of 750m or greater, attributed to the initial run pressure and the dominant latent heat producing crystallizing phase, Albite-rich Plagioclase Feldspar. Run 1 is shown to cool fastest and run 3 cool the slowest, with surface emissivity having the strongest cooling

  17. Experimental and Analytical Investigation of the Coolant Flow Characteristics in Cooled Turbine Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damerow, W. P.; Murtaugh, J. P.; Burggraf, F.

    1972-01-01

    The flow characteristics of turbine airfoil cooling system components were experimentally investigated. Flow models representative of leading edge impingement, impingement with crossflow (midchord cooling), pin fins, feeder supply tube, and a composite model of a complete airfoil flow system were tested. Test conditions were set by varying pressure level to cover the Mach number and Reynolds number range of interest in advanced turbine applications. Selected geometrical variations were studied on each component model to determine these effects. Results of these tests were correlated and compared with data available in the literature. Orifice flow was correlated in terms of discharge coefficients. For the leading edge model this was found to be a weak function of hole Mach number and orifice-to-impinged wall spacing. In the impingement with crossflow tests, the discharge coefficient was found to be constant and thus independent of orifice Mach number, Reynolds number, crossflow rate, and impingement geometry. Crossflow channel pressure drop showed reasonable agreement with a simple one-dimensional momentum balance. Feeder tube orifice discharge coefficients correlated as a function of orifice Mach number and the ratio of the orifice-to-approach velocity heads. Pin fin data was correlated in terms of equivalent friction factor, which was found to be a function of Reynolds number and pin spacing but independent of pin height in the range tested.

  18. Effect of Coolant Temperature and Mass Flow on Film Cooling of Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier Stokes code has been used to study the effect of coolant temperature, and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness of a film-cooled turbine blade. The blade chosen is the VKI rotor with six rows of cooling holes including three rows on the shower head. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. Generally, the adiabatic effectiveness is lower for a higher coolant temperature due to nonlinear effects via the compressibility of air. However, over the suction side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness is higher for a higher coolant temperature than that for a lower coolant temperature when the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio is 5% or more. For a fixed coolant temperature, the effectiveness passes through a minima on the suction side of shower-head holes as the coolant to mainstream mass flow, ratio increases, while on the pressure side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness decreases with increase in coolant mass flow due to coolant jet lift-off. In all cases, the adiabatic effectiveness is highly three-dimensional.

  19. ASTER/AVHRR Data Hybridization to determine Pyroclastic Flow cooling curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reath, K. A.; Wright, R.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Shiveluch Volcano (Kamchatka, Russia) has been in a consistent state of eruption for the past 15 years. During this period different eruption styles have been documented including: sub-plinian events, dome growth and collapse, and subsequent debris flow deposits. For example, on June 25-26, 2009 a pyroclastic debris flow was emplaced and the eruption onset that produced it was recorded by a series of seismic events spanning several hours. However, due to cloud cover, visual confirmation of the exact emplacement time was obscured. Orbital remote sensing was able to image the deposit repeatedly over the subsequent months. ASTER is a high spatial resolution (90m), low temporal resolution (2 - 4 days at the poles, 16 days at the equator) thermal infrared (TIR) sensor on the NASA Terra satellite. AVHRR is a high temporal resolution (minutes to several hours), low spatial resolution (1km) spaceborne TIR sensor on a series of NOAA satellites. Combined, these sensors provide a unique opportunity to fuse high-spatial and high-temporal resolution data to better observe changes on the surface of the deposit over time. For example, ASTER data were used to determine the flow area and to provide several data points for average temperature while AVHRR data were used to increase the amount of data points. Through this method an accurate average cooling rate over a three month period was determined. This cooling curve was then examined to derive several features about the deposit that were previously unknown. The time of emplacement and period of time needed for negligible thermal output were first determined by extrapolating the cooling curve in time. The total amount of heat output and total flow volume of the deposit were also calculated. This volume was then compared to the volume of the dome to calculate the percentage of collapse. This method can be repeated for other flow deposits to determine if there is a consistent correlation between the dome growth rate, the average

  20. Compact counter-flow cooling system with subcooled gravity-fed circulating liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu.; Radovinsky, A.; Zhukovsky, A.; Sasaki, A.; Watanabe, H.; Kawahara, T.; Hamabe, M.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2010-11-01

    A liquid nitrogen (LN2) is usually used to keep the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable low temperature. A pump is utilized to circulate LN2 inside the cryopipes. In order to minimize heat leakage, a thermal siphon circulation scheme can be realized instead. Here, we discuss the effectiveness of thermal siphon with counter-flow circulation loop composed of cryogen flow channel and inner cable channel. The main feature of the system is the existence of essential parasitic heat exchange between upwards and downwards flows. Feasibility of the proposed scheme for cable up to 500 m in length has been investigated numerically. Calculated profiles of temperature and pressure show small differences of T and p in the inner and the outer flows at the same elevation, which allows not worrying about mechanical stability of the cable. In the case under consideration the thermal insulating properties of a conventional electrical insulating material (polypropylene laminated paper, PPLP) appear to be sufficient. Two interesting effects were disclosed due to analysis of subcooling of LN2. In case of highly inclined siphon subcooling causes significant increase of temperature maximum that can breakup of superconductivity. In case of slightly inclined siphon high heat flux from outer flow to inner flow causes condensation of nitrogen gas in outer channel. It leads to circulation loss. Results of numerical analyses indicate that counter-flow thermosiphon cooling system is a promising way to increase performance of short-length power transmission (PT) lines, but conventional subcooling technique should be applied carefully.

  1. AN HST/WFC3-UVIS VIEW OF THE STARBURST IN THE COOL CORE OF THE PHOENIX CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Bautz, Marshall W.; Benson, Bradford; Veilleux, Sylvain; Reichardt, Christian L.

    2013-03-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 observations of the core of the Phoenix cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243) in five broadband filters spanning rest-frame 1000-5500 A. These observations reveal complex, filamentary blue emission, extending for >40 kpc from the brightest cluster galaxy. We observe an underlying, diffuse population of old stars, following an r {sup 1/4} distribution, confirming that this system is somewhat relaxed. The spectral energy distribution in the inner part of the galaxy, as well as along the extended filaments, is a smooth continuum and is consistent with that of a star-forming galaxy, suggesting that the extended, filamentary emission is not due to the central active galactic nucleus, either from a large-scale ionized outflow or scattered polarized UV emission, but rather a massive population of young stars. We estimate an extinction-corrected star formation rate of 798 {+-} 42 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, consistent with our earlier work based on low spatial resolution ultraviolet, optical, and infrared imaging. The lack of tidal features and multiple bulges, combine with the need for an exceptionally massive (>10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) cold gas reservoir, suggest that this star formation is not the result of a merger of gas-rich galaxies. Instead, we propose that the high X-ray cooling rate of {approx}2700 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} is the origin of the cold gas reservoir. The combination of such a high cooling rate and the relatively weak radio source in the cluster core suggests that feedback has been unable to halt cooling in this system, leading to this tremendous burst of star formation.

  2. Performance evaluation on an air-cooled heat exchanger for alumina nanofluid under laminar flow

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the characteristics of alumina (Al2O3)/water nanofluid to determine the feasibility of its application in an air-cooled heat exchanger for heat dissipation for PEMFC or electronic chip cooling. The experimental sample was Al2O3/water nanofluid produced by the direct synthesis method at three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%). The experiments in this study measured the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluid with weight fractions and sample temperatures (20-60°C), and then used the nanofluid in an actual air-cooled heat exchanger to assess its heat exchange capacity and pressure drop under laminar flow. Experimental results show that the nanofluid has a higher heat exchange capacity than water, and a higher concentration of nanoparticles provides an even better ratio of the heat exchange. The maximum enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop for all the experimental parameters in this study was about 39% and 5.6%, respectively. In addition to nanoparticle concentration, the temperature and mass flow rates of the working fluid can affect the enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop of nanofluid. The cross-section aspect ratio of tube in the heat exchanger is another important factor to be taken into consideration. PMID:21827644

  3. Performance evaluation on an air-cooled heat exchanger for alumina nanofluid under laminar flow.

    PubMed

    Teng, Tun-Ping; Hung, Yi-Hsuan; Teng, Tun-Chien; Chen, Jyun-Hong

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the characteristics of alumina (Al2O3)/water nanofluid to determine the feasibility of its application in an air-cooled heat exchanger for heat dissipation for PEMFC or electronic chip cooling. The experimental sample was Al2O3/water nanofluid produced by the direct synthesis method at three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%). The experiments in this study measured the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluid with weight fractions and sample temperatures (20-60°C), and then used the nanofluid in an actual air-cooled heat exchanger to assess its heat exchange capacity and pressure drop under laminar flow. Experimental results show that the nanofluid has a higher heat exchange capacity than water, and a higher concentration of nanoparticles provides an even better ratio of the heat exchange. The maximum enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop for all the experimental parameters in this study was about 39% and 5.6%, respectively. In addition to nanoparticle concentration, the temperature and mass flow rates of the working fluid can affect the enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop of nanofluid. The cross-section aspect ratio of tube in the heat exchanger is another important factor to be taken into consideration. PMID:21827644

  4. Secondary instability of high-speed flows and the influence of wall cooling and suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, Nabil M.

    1992-01-01

    The periodic streamwise modulation of the supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers by a two-dimensional first-mode or second-mode wave makes the resulting base flow susceptible to a broadband spanwise-periodic three-dimensional type of instability. The principal parametric resonance of this instability (subharmonic) has been analyzed using Floquet theory. The effect of Mach number and the effectiveness of wall cooling or wall suction in controlling the onset, the growth rate, and the vortical structure of the subharmonic secondary instability are assessed for both a first-mode and a second-mode primary wave. Results indicate that the secondary subharmonic instability of an insulated wall boundary layer is weakened as Mach number increases. Cooling of the wall destabilizes the secondary subharmonic of a second-mode primary wave, but stabilizes it when the primary wave is a first mode. Suction stabilizes the secondary subharmonic at all Mach numbers.

  5. Secondary instability of high-speed flows and the influence of wall cooling and suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, Nabil M.

    1992-01-01

    The periodic streamwise modulation of the supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers by a two dimensional first mode or second mode wave makes the resulting base flow susceptible to a broadband spanwise-periodic three dimensional type of instability. The principal parametric resonance of this instability (subharmonic) was analyzed using Floquet theory. The effect of Mach number and the effectiveness of wall cooling or wall suction in controlling the onset, the growth rate, and the vortical nature of the subharmonic secondary instability are assessed for both a first mode and a second mode primary wave. Results indicate that the secondary subharmonic instability of the insulated wall boundary layer is weakened as Mach number increases. Cooling of the wall destabilizes the secondary subharmonic of a second mode primary wave, but stabilizes it when the primary wave is a first mode. Suction stabilizes the secondary subharmonic at all Mach numbers.

  6. Flow visualization of discrete hole film cooling for gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.; Russell, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    Film injection from discrete holes in a three row staggered array with 5-diameter spacing is studied. The boundary layer thickness-to-hole diameter ratio and Reynolds number are typical of gas turbine film cooling applications. Two different injection locations are studied to evaluate the effect of boundary layer thickness on film penetration and mixing. Detailed streaklines showing the turbulent motion of the injected air are obtained by photographing neutrally buoyant helium filled soap bubbles which follow the flow field. The bubble streaklines passing downstream injection locations are clearly identifiable and can be traced back to their origin. Visualization of surface temperature patterns obtained from infrared photographs of a similar film cooled surface are also included.

  7. Computer program for generating input for analysis of impingement-cooled, axial-flow turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, D.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program, TACTGRID, was developed to generate the geometrical input for the TACTI program, a program that calculates transient and steady state temperatures, pressures, and cooling flows in an impingement cooled turbine blade. Using spline curves, the TACTGRID program constructs the blade internal geometry from the previously designed external blade surface and newly selected wall and channel thicknesses. The TACTGRID program generates the TACTI calculational grid, calculates arc length between grid points required by TACTI as input, and prepares the namelist input data set used by TACTI for the blade geometry. In addition, TACTGRID produces a scaled computer plot of each blade slice, detailing the grid and calculational stations, and thus eliminates the need for intermediate drafting.

  8. Effect of cooling on pressure losses in U-type wavy pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtkowiak, J.; Popiel, C.O.

    2000-02-01

    Wavy pipes are used in many heat transfer devices, e.g., in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, floor and wall heating systems and in solar collectors. Here, results of pressure drop measurements under adiabatic and nonadiabatic (at T{sub w} const.) flow conditions in U-type wavy pipes having fixed dimensionless radius of centerline curvature 2R/d=6.62 and two dimensionless spacer lengths 1/d=0 and 1/d=39.7 are presented. The working fluid was water. The effects of cooling and spacer length were investigated. It is shown that cooling of water increases the friction factor. This increase is plausible attributed to the deformation of the velocity distribution resulting from the temperature dependence of the viscosity and density of water.

  9. Flow visualization of discrete-hole film cooling with spanwise injection over a cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    Insight into the fluid mechanics encountered when film air from a single row of holes is injected over a cylinder in a mainstream at conditions simulating a film cooled, turbulent-vane leading edge was investigated. Smoke was added to the cooling air to visualize its flow path. Film was injected in the spanwise direction at angles of 30 deg and 45 deg to the surface; at angular locations of 15 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg from the stagnation line; and at various blowing ratios. The observations were related to the measured heat transfer data of others. The results indicate that, in addition to the expected growth in film thickness and the greater penetration of the boundary layer with increasing blowing ration, there was an absence of spanwise spreading and only a small spanwise deflection of the injected film.

  10. Development of a Water Based, Critical Flow, Non-Vapor Compression cooling Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hosni, Mohammad H.

    2014-03-30

    Expansion of a high-pressure liquid refrigerant through the use of a thermostatic expansion valve or other device is commonplace in vapor-compression cycles to regulate the quality and flow rate of the refrigerant entering the evaporator. In vapor-compression systems, as the condensed refrigerant undergoes this expansion, its pressure and temperature drop, and part of the liquid evaporates. We (researchers at Kansas State University) are developing a cooling cycle that instead pumps a high-pressure refrigerant through a supersonic converging-diverging nozzle. As the liquid refrigerant passes through the nozzle, its velocity reaches supersonic (or critical-flow) conditions, substantially decreasing the refrigerant’s pressure. This sharp pressure change vaporizes some of the refrigerant and absorbs heat from the surrounding conditions during this phase change. Due to the design of the nozzle, a shockwave trips the supersonic two-phase refrigerant back to the starting conditions, condensing the remaining vapor. The critical-flow refrigeration cycle would provide space cooling, similar to a chiller, by running a secondary fluid such as water or glycol over one or more nozzles. Rather than utilizing a compressor to raise the pressure of the refrigerant, as in a vapor-cycle system, the critical-flow cycle utilizes a high-pressure pump to drive refrigerant liquid through the cooling cycle. Additionally, the design of the nozzle can be tailored for a given refrigerant, such that environmentally benign substances can act as the working fluid. This refrigeration cycle is still in early-stage development with prototype development several years away. The complex multi-phase flow at supersonic conditions presents numerous challenges to fully understanding and modeling the cycle. With the support of DOE and venture-capital investors, initial research was conducted at PAX Streamline, and later, at Caitin. We (researchers at Kansas State University) have continued development

  11. Significance of flow clustering and sequencing on sediment transport: 1D sediment transport modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Kazi; Allen, Deonie; Haynes, Heather

    2016-04-01

    This paper considers 1D hydraulic model data on the effect of high flow clusters and sequencing on sediment transport. Using observed flow gauge data from the River Caldew, England, a novel stochastic modelling approach was developed in order to create alternative 50 year flow sequences. Whilst the observed probability density of gauge data was preserved in all sequences, the order in which those flows occurred was varied using the output from a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) with generalised Pareto distribution (GP). In total, one hundred 50 year synthetic flow series were generated and used as the inflow boundary conditions for individual flow series model runs using the 1D sediment transport model HEC-RAS. The model routed graded sediment through the case study river reach to define the long-term morphological changes. Comparison of individual simulations provided a detailed understanding of the sensitivity of channel capacity to flow sequence. Specifically, each 50 year synthetic flow sequence was analysed using a 3-month, 6-month or 12-month rolling window approach and classified for clusters in peak discharge. As a cluster is described as a temporal grouping of flow events above a specified threshold, the threshold condition used herein is considered as a morphologically active channel forming discharge event. Thus, clusters were identified for peak discharges in excess of 10%, 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of the 1 year Return Period (RP) event. The window of above-peak flows also required cluster definition and was tested for timeframes 1, 2, 10 and 30 days. Subsequently, clusters could be described in terms of the number of events, maximum peak flow discharge, cumulative flow discharge and skewness (i.e. a description of the flow sequence). The model output for each cluster was analysed for the cumulative flow volume and cumulative sediment transport (mass). This was then compared to the total sediment transport of a single flow event of equivalent flow volume

  12. Investigation of the flow field downstream of a turbine trailing edge cooled nozzle guide vane

    SciTech Connect

    Sieverding, C.H.; Arts, T.; Denos, R.; Martelli, F.

    1996-04-01

    A trailing edge cooled low aspect ratio transonic turbine guide vane is investigated in the VKI Compression Tube Cascade Facility at an outlet Mach number {bar M}{sub 2,is} = 1.05 and a coolant flow rate {dot m}c/{dot m}g = 3 percent. The outlet flow field is surveyed by combined total-directional pressure probes and temperature probes. Special emphasis is put on the development of low blockage probes. Additional information is provided by oil flow visualizations and numerical flow visualizations with a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code. The test results describe the strong differences in the axial evolution of the hub and tip endwall and secondary flows and demonstrate the self-similarity of the midspan wake profiles. According to the total pressure and temperature profiles, the wake mixing appears to be very fast in the near-wake but very slow in the far-wake region. The total pressure wake profile appears to be little affected by the coolant flow ejection.

  13. A New Measurement of the Bulk Flow of X-Ray Luminous Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Ebeling, H.; Edge, A.; Kocevski, D.

    2010-01-01

    We present new measurements of the large-scale bulk flows of galaxy clusters based on five-year WMAP data and a significantly expanded X-ray cluster catalog. Our method probes the flow via measurements of the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect produced by the hot gas in moving clusters. It computes the dipole in the cosmic microwave background data at cluster pixels, which preserves the SZ component while integrating down other contributions. Our improved catalog of over 1000 clusters enables us to further investigate possible systematic effects and, thanks to a higher median cluster redshift, allows us to measure the bulk flow to larger scales. We present a corrected error treatment and demonstrate that the more X-ray luminous clusters, while fewer in number, have much larger optical depth, resulting in a higher dipole and thus a more accurate flow measurement. This results in the observed correlation of the dipole derived at the aperture of zero monopole with the monopole measured over the cluster central regions. This correlation is expected if the dipole is produced by the SZ effect and cannot be caused by unidentified systematics (or primary cosmic microwave background anisotropies). We measure that the flow is consistent with approximately constant velocity out to at least [similar, equals]800 Mpc. The significance of the measured signal peaks around 500 h -1 70 Mpc, most likely because the contribution from more distant clusters becomes progressively more diluted by the WMAP beam. However, at present, we cannot rule out that these more distant clusters simply contribute less to the overall motion.

  14. On the quasihydrostatic flows of radiatively cooling self-gravitating gas clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Meerson, B.; Megged, E.; Tajima, T.

    1995-03-01

    Two model problems are considered, illustrating the dynamics of quasihydrostatic flows of radiatively cooling, optically thin self-gravitating gas clouds. In the first problem, spherically symmetric flows in an unmagnetized plasma are considered. For a power-law dependence of the radiative loss function on the temperature, a one-parameter family of self-similar solutions is found. The authors concentrate on a constant-mass cloud, one of the cases, when the self-similarity indices are uniquely selected. In this case, the self-similar flow problem can be formally reduced to the classical Lane-Emden equation and therefore solved analytically. The cloud is shown to undergo radiative condensation, if the gas specific heat ratio {gamma} > 4/3. The condensation proceeds either gradually, or in the form of (quasihydrostatic) collapse. For {gamma} < 4/3, the cloud is shown to expand. The second problem addresses a magnetized plasma slab that undergoes quasihydrostatic radiative cooling and condensation. The problem is solved analytically, employing the Lagrangian mass coordinate.

  15. Sloshing, Shocks, and Bubbles in the Cool Core Cluster Abell 2052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Randall, S. W.; Clarke, T. E.; Sarazin, C. L.; McNamara, B. R.; Douglass, E. M.; McDonald, M.

    2011-05-01

    We present results from a very deep (650 ksec) Chandra X-ray observation of Abell 2052, as well as archival VLA radio observations. The data reveal exquisite detail in the inner parts of the cluster, including bubbles evacuated by the AGN's radio lobes, compressed bubble rims, filaments, and loops. Two concentric shocks are seen, and a temperature rise is measured for the innermost one. On larger scales, an excess surface brightness spiral feature is detected. The spiral has cooler temperatures and higher abundances than its surroundings, and is likely the result of sloshing gas initiated by a previous cluster-cluster or sub-cluster merger. Initial evidence for previously unseen bubbles at larger radii related to earlier outbursts from the AGN is presented. Support for this work was provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, through Chandra Award Number GO9-0147X.

  16. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Effects of Flow Control Devices Upon Flat-Plate Film Cooling Performance.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hirokazu; Funazaki, Ken-Ichi; Nakata, Ryota; Takahashi, Daichi

    2014-06-01

    This study deals with the experimental and numerical studies of the effect of flow control devices (FCDs) on the film cooling performance of a circular cooling hole on a flat plate. Two types of FCDs with different heights are examined in this study, where each of them is mounted to the flat plate upstream of the cooling hole by changing its lateral position with respect to the hole centerline. In order to measure the film effectiveness as well as heat transfer downstream of the cooling hole with upstream FCD, a transient method using a high-resolution infrared camera is adopted. The velocity field downstream of the cooling hole is captured by 3D laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). Furthermore, the aerodynamic loss associated with the cooling hole with/without FCD is measured by a total pressure probe rake. The experiments are carried out at blowing ratios ranging from 0.5 to 1.0. In addition, numerical simulations are also made to have a better understanding of the flow field. LES approach is employed to solve the flow field and visualize the vortex structure around the cooling hole with FCD. When a taller FCD is mounted to the plate, the film effectiveness tends to increase due to the vortex structure generated by the FCD. As FCD is laterally shifted from the centerline, the film effectiveness increases, while the lift-off of cooling air is also promoted when FCD is put on the center line. PMID:25278646

  17. Coarse Grid Modeling of Turbine Film Cooling Flows Using Volumetric Source Terms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D.; Hunter, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    The recent trend in numerical modeling of turbine film cooling flows has been toward higher fidelity grids and more complex geometries. This trend has been enabled by the rapid increase in computing power available to researchers. However, the turbine design community requires fast turnaround time in its design computations, rendering these comprehensive simulations ineffective in the design cycle. The present study describes a methodology for implementing a volumetric source term distribution in a coarse grid calculation that can model the small-scale and three-dimensional effects present in turbine film cooling flows. This model could be implemented in turbine design codes or in multistage turbomachinery codes such as APNASA, where the computational grid size may be larger than the film hole size. Detailed computations of a single row of 35 deg round holes on a flat plate have been obtained for blowing ratios of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0, and density ratios of 1.0 and 2.0 using a multiblock grid system to resolve the flows on both sides of the plate as well as inside the hole itself. These detailed flow fields were spatially averaged to generate a field of volumetric source terms for each conservative flow variable. Solutions were also obtained using three coarse grids having streamwise and spanwise grid spacings of 3d, 1d, and d/3. These coarse grid solutions used the integrated hole exit mass, momentum, energy, and turbulence quantities from the detailed solutions as volumetric source terms. It is shown that a uniform source term addition over a distance from the wall on the order of the hole diameter is able to predict adiabatic film effectiveness better than a near-wall source term model, while strictly enforcing correct values of integrated boundary layer quantities.

  18. Secondary instability of high-speed flows and the influence of wall cooling and suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, Nabil M.

    1991-01-01

    The periodic streamwise modulation of the supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers by a two-dimensional first-mode or second-mode wave makes the resulting base flow susceptible to a broad-band spanwise-periodic three-dimensional type of instability. The principal parametric resonance of this instability (subharmonic) has been analyzed using Floquet theory. The effect of Mach number and the effectiveness of wall cooling or wall suction in controlling the onset, the growth rate, and the vortical structure of the subharmonic secondary instability are assessed for both a first-mode and a second-mode primary wave.

  19. Streakline flow visualization of discrete-hole film cooling with normal, slanted, and compound angle injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.; Russell, L. M.

    1976-01-01

    Film injection from discrete holes in a three-row, staggered array with five-diameter spacing was studied for three hole angles: (1) normal, (2) slanted 30 deg to the surface in the direction of the main stream, and (3) slanted 30 deg to the surface and 45 deg laterally to the main stream. The ratio of the boundary layer thickness-to-hole diameter and Reynolds number were typical of gas-turbine film-cooling applications. Detailed streaklines showing the turbulent motion of the injected air were obtained by photographing very small neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles which follow the flow field.

  20. Behavior of fast moving flow of compressible gas in cylindrical pipe in presence of cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varshavsky, G A

    1951-01-01

    For compressible flow with friction in a cylindrical pipe the momentum, continuity, and heat-transfer equations are examined to determine whether an increase in Mach number ("thermal" Laval nozzle) is obtainable through heat conduction from the gas through the pipe walls. The analysis is based on the assumption that the wall temperature is negligibly small in comparison with the stagnation temperature of the gas. The analysis leads to a negative result. When the gas cooling is increased by also considering radiation to the wall, a limited region at high temperatures is obtained where Mach number increases were theoretically possible. Obtaining this condition practically is considered impossible.

  1. Cluster-size dependent randomization traffic flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kun; Wang, Bing-Hong; Fu, Chuan-Ji; Lu, Yu-Feng

    2007-11-01

    In order to exhibit the meta-stable states, several slow-to-start rules have been investigated as modification to Nagel-Schreckenberg (NS) model. These models can reproduce some realistic phenomena which are absent in the original NS model. But in these models, the size of cluster is still not considered as a useful parameter. In real traffic, the slow-to-start motion of a standing vehicle often depends on the degree of congestion which can be measured by the clusters' size. According to this idea, we propose a cluster-size dependent slow-to-start model based on the speed-dependent slow-to-start rule (VDR) model. It gives expected results through simulations. Comparing with the VDR model, our new model has a better traffic efficiency and shows richer complex characters.

  2. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF H{alpha} FILAMENTS IN COOL CORE CLUSTERS: KINEMATICS, REDDENING, AND SOURCES OF IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2012-02-20

    We have obtained deep, high spatial and spectral resolution, long-slit spectra of the H{alpha} nebulae in the cool cores of nine galaxy clusters. This sample provides a wealth of information on the ionization state, kinematics, and reddening of the warm gas in the cool cores of galaxy clusters. We find evidence for only small amounts of reddening in the extended, line-emitting filaments, with the majority of filaments having E(B - V) < 0.2. We find, in agreement with previous works, that the optical emission in cool core clusters has elevated low-ionization line ratios. The combination of [O III]/H{beta}, [N II]/H{alpha}, [S II]/H{alpha}, and [O I]/H{alpha} allow us to rule out collisional ionization by cosmic rays, thermal conduction, and photoionization by intracluster medium (ICM) X-rays and active galactic nuclei as strong contributors to the ionization in the bulk of the optical line-emitting gas in both the nuclei and filaments. The data are adequately described by a composite model of slow shocks and star formation. This model is further supported by an observed correlation between the line widths and low-ionization line ratios which becomes stronger in systems with more modest star formation activity based on far-ultraviolet observations. We find that the more extended, narrow filaments tend to have shallower velocity gradients and narrower line widths than the compact filamentary complexes. We confirm that the widths of the emission lines decrease with radius, from FWHM {approx}600 km s{sup -1} in the nuclei to FWHM {approx}100 km s{sup -1} in the most extended filaments. The variation of line width with radius is vastly different than what is measured from stellar absorption lines in a typical giant elliptical galaxy, suggesting that the velocity width of the warm gas may in fact be linked to ICM turbulence and, thus, may provide a glimpse into the amount of turbulence in cool cores. In the central regions (r < 10 kpc) of several systems the warm gas

  3. A Combined Experimental/Computational Study of Flow in Turbine Blade Cooling Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tse, D. G. N.; Kreskovsky, J. P.; Shamroth, S. J.; Mcgrath, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    Laser velocimetry was utilized to map the velocity field in a serpentine turbine blade cooling passage at Reynolds and Rotation numbers of up to 25.000 and 0.48. These results were used to assess the combined influence of passage curvature and Coriolis force on the secondary velocity field generated. A Navier-Stokes code (NASTAR) was validated against incompressible test data and then used to simulate the effect of buoyancy. The measurements show a net convection from the low pressure surface to high pressure surface. The interaction of the secondary flows induced by the turns and rotation produces swirl at the turns, which persisted beyond 2 hydraulic diameters downstream of the turns. The incompressible flow field predictions agree well with the measured velocities. With radially outward flow, the buoyancy force causes a further increase in velocity on the high pressure surface and a reduction on the low pressure surface. The results were analyzed in relation to the heat transfer measurements of Wagner et al. (1991). Predicted heat transfer is enhanced on the high pressure surfaces and in turns. The incompressible flow simulation underpredicts heat transfer in these locations. Improvements observed in compressible flow simulation indicate that the buoyancy force may be important.

  4. A combined experiment/computational study of flow in turbine blade cooling passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, D. G. N.; Kreskovsky, J. P.; Shamroth, S. J.; McGrath, D. B.

    1994-05-01

    Laser velocimetry was utilized to map the velocity field in a serpentine turbine blade cooling passage at Reynolds and Rotation numbers of up to 25.000 and 0.48. These results were used to assess the combined influence of passage curvature and Coriolis force on the secondary velocity field generated. A Navier-Stokes code (NASTAR) was validated against incompressible test data and then used to simulate the effect of buoyancy. The measurements show a net convection from the low pressure surface to high pressure surface. The interaction of the secondary flows induced by the turns and rotation produces swirl at the turns, which persisted beyond 2 hydraulic diameters downstream of the turns. The incompressible flow field predictions agree well with the measured velocities. With radially outward flow, the buoyancy force causes a further increase in velocity on the high pressure surface and a reduction on the low pressure surface. The results were analyzed in relation to the heat transfer measurements of Wagner et al. (1991). Predicted heat transfer is enhanced on the high pressure surfaces and in turns. The incompressible flow simulation underpredicts heat transfer in these locations. Improvements observed in compressible flow simulation indicate that the buoyancy force may be important.

  5. Experimental investigation of film cooling flow induced by shaped holes on a turbine blade.

    PubMed

    Barthet, S; Bario, F

    2001-05-01

    The present study is the second half of a piece of work carried out in collaboration with SNECMA. It investigates shaped hole film cooling, numerically and experimentally. The aim of this paper is the experimental analysis of shaped hole film cooling on a large scale turbine blade (1.4 m chord). The test section is a large scale turbine inlet guide vane cascade. The test airfoil is equipped with a row of nine 50 degrees sloped shaped holes. They are located on the suction side at 20% of the curvilinear length of the blade from the stagnation point. The inlet film cooling hole diameter is 12 mm. The jet flow is heated to 55 degrees C above the crossflow temperature. Velocity and temperature field measurements have been done to obtain mean and fluctuating values. The results are compared to those obtained by Béral on the same experimental apparatus and in the same test conditions, for a row of cylindrical holes. PMID:11460642

  6. Effect of solar radiation on the performance of cross flow wet cooling tower in hot climate of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banooni, Salem; Chitsazan, Ali

    2016-01-01

    In some cities such as Ahvaz-Iran, the solar radiation is very high and the annual-mean-daily of the global solar radiation is about 17.33 MJ m2 d-1. Solar radiation as an external heat source seems to affect the thermal performance of the cooling towers. Usually, in modeling cooling tower, the effects of solar radiation are ignored. To investigate the effect of sunshade on the performance and modeling of the cooling tower, the experiments were conducted in two different states, cooling towers with and without sunshade. In this study, the Merkel's approach and finite difference technique are used to predict the thermal behavior of cross flow wet cooling tower without sunshade and the results are compared with the data obtained from the cooling towers with and without sunshade. Results showed that the sunshade is very efficient and it reduced the outlet water temperature, the approach and the water exergy of the cooling tower up to 1.2 °C, 15 and 1.1 %, respectively and increased the range and the efficiency of the cooling tower up to 29 and 37 %, respectively. Also, the sunshade decreased the error between the experimental data of the cooling tower with sunshade and the modeling results of the cooling tower without sunshade 1.85 % in average.

  7. Channel flow modeling of impingement cooling of a rotating turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Local heat transfer distributions in impingement cooling have been measured by Kreatsoulas and Prieser for a range of conditions which model those in actual turbine blades, including the effects of rotation. These data were reported as local Nusselt numbers, but referred to coolant supply conditions. By means of a channel flow modeling of the flow in the supply and impingement passages, the same data are here presented in terms of local Nusselt number distributions such as are used in design. The results in this form are compared to the nonrotating impingement results of Chupp and to the rotating but nonimpingement results of Morris. Rotation reduces the mean Nusselt numbers from these found by Chupp by about 30 percent, and introduces important radial variations which are sensitive to rotation and to leading edge stagger angle.

  8. Streakline flow visualization of discrete hole film cooling with holes inclined 30 deg to surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.; Russell, L. M.; Lane, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Film injection from three rows of discrete holes angled 30 deg to the surface in line with mainstream flow and spaced 5 diameters apart in a staggered array was visualized by using helium bubbles as tracer particles. Both the main stream and the film injectant were ambient air. Detailed streaklines showing the turbulent motion of the film mixing with the main stream were obtained by photographing small, neutrally buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles which followed the flow field. The ratio of boundary layer thickness to hole diameter and the Reynolds number were typical of gas turbine film cooling applications. The results showed the behavior of the film and its interaction with the main stream for a range of blowing rates and two initial boundary layer thicknesses.

  9. Long Hole Film Cooling Dataset for CFD Development - Flow and Film Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Poinsatte, Phillip; Thurman, Douglas; Ameri, Ali

    2014-01-01

    An experiment investigating flow and heat transfer of long (length to diameter ratio of 18) cylindrical film cooling holes has been completed. In this paper, the thermal field in the flow and on the surface of the film cooled flat plate is presented for nominal freestream turbulence intensities of 1.5 and 8 percent. The holes are inclined at 30 deg above the downstream direction, injecting chilled air of density ratio 1.0 onto the surface of a flat plate. The diameter of the hole is 0.75 in. (approx. 0.02 m) with center to center spacing (pitch) of 3 hole diameters. Coolant was injected into the mainstream flow at nominal blowing ratios of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0. The Reynolds number of the freestream was approximately 11,000 based on hole diameter. Thermocouple surveys were used to characterize the thermal field. Infrared thermography was used to determine the adiabatic film effectiveness on the plate. Hotwire anemometry was used to provide flowfield physics and turbulence measurements. The results are compared to existing data in the literature. The aim of this work is to produce a benchmark dataset for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) development to eliminate the effects of hole length to diameter ratio and to improve resolution in the near-hole region. In this report, a Time Filtered Navier Stokes (TFNS), also known as Partially Resolved Navier Stokes (PRNS), method that was implemented in the Glenn-HT code is used to model coolant-mainstream interaction. This method is a high fidelity unsteady method that aims to represent large scale flow features and mixing more accurately.

  10. Mapping the dark matter in the NGC 5044 group with ROSAT: Evidence for a nearly homogeneous cooling flow with a cooling wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, Laurence P.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Daines, Stuart

    1994-01-01

    The NGC 5044 group of galaxies was observed by the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) for 30 ks during its reduced pointed phase (1991 July). Due to the relatively cool gas temperature in the group (kT = 0.98 +/- 0.02 keV) and the excellent photon statistics (65,000 net counts), we are able to determine precisely a number of fundamental properties of the group within 250 kpc of the central galaxy. In particular, we present model-independent measurements of the total gravitating mass, the temperature and abundance profiles of the gas, and the mass accretion rate. Between 60 and 250 kpc, the gas is nearly isothermal with T varies as r(exp (-0.13 +/- 0.03)). The total gravitating mass of the group can be unambiguously determined from the observed density and temperature profiles of the gas using the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium. Within 250 kpc, the gravitating mass is 1.6 x 10(exp 13) solar mass, yielding a mass-to-light ratio of 130 solar mass/solar luminosity. The baryons (gas and stars) comprise 12% of the total mass within this radius. At small radii, the temperature clearly increases outward and attains a maximum value at 60 kpc. The positive temperature gradient in the center of the group confirms the existence of a cooling flow. The cooling flow region extends well beyond the temperature maximum with a cooling radius between 100 and 150 kpc. There are two distinct regions in the cooling flow separated by the temperature maximum. In the outer region, the gas is nearly isothermal with a unifor m Fe abundance of approximately 80% solar, the flow is nearly homogeneous with dot-M= 20 to 25 solar mass/year, the X-ray contours are spherically symmetric, and rho(sub gas) varies as r(exp -1.6). In the inner region, the temperature profile has a positive gradient, the mass accretion rate decreases rapidly inward, the gas density profile is steeper, and the X-ray image shows some substrucutre. NGC 5044 is offset from the centroid of the outer X

  11. Preliminary Study of Turbulent Flow in the Lower Plenum of a Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Guillen; H.M.McIlroy

    2007-09-01

    A preliminary study of the turbulent flow in a scaled model of a portion of the lower plenum of a gas-cooled advanced reactor concept has been conducted. The reactor is configured such that hot gases at various temperatures exit the coolant channels in the reactor core, where they empty into a lower plenum and mix together with a crossflow past vertical cylindrical support columns, then exit through an outlet duct. An accurate assessment of the flow behavior will be necessary prior to final design to ensure that material structural limits are not exceeded. In this work, an idealized model was created to mimic a region of the lower plenum for a simplified set of conditions that enabled the flow to be treated as an isothermal, incompressible fluid with constant properties. This is a first step towards assessing complex thermal fluid phenomena in advanced reactor designs. Once such flows can be computed with confidence, heated flows will be examined. Experimental data was obtained using three-dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to obtain non-intrusive flow measurements for an unheated geometry. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) predictions of the flow were made using a commercial CFD code and compared to the experimental data. The work presented here is intended to be scoping in nature, since the purpose of this work is to identify improvements that can be made to subsequent computations and experiments. Rigorous validation of computational predictions will eventually be necessary for design and analysis of new reactor concepts, as well as for safety analysis and licensing calculations.

  12. A simple and highly stable free-flow electrophoresis device with thermoelectric cooling system.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian; Guo, Cheng-Gang; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Kong, Fan-Zhi; Shen, Qiao-Yi; Yang, Cheng-Zhang; Li, Jun; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Jin, Xin-Qiao

    2013-12-20

    Complex assembly, inconvenient operations, poor control of Joule heating and leakage of solution are still fundamental issues greatly hindering application of free-flow electrophoresis (FFE) for preparative purpose in bio-separation. To address these issues, a novel FFE device was developed based on our previous work. Firstly, a new mechanical structure was designed for compact assembly of separation chamber, fast removal of air bubble, and good anti-leakage performance. Secondly, a highly efficient thermoelectric cooling system was used for dispersing Joule heating for the first time. The systemic experiments revealed the three merits: (i) 3min assembly without any liquid leakage, 80 times faster than pervious FFE device designed by us or commercial device (4h); (ii) 5s removing of air bubble in chamber, 1000-fold faster than a normal one (2h or more) and (iii) good control of Joule heating by the cooling system. These merits endowed the device high stable thermo- and hydro-dynamic flow for long-term separation even under high electric field of 63V/cm. Finally, the developed device was used for up to 8h continuous separation of 5mg/mL fuchsin acid and purification of three model proteins of phycocyanin, myoglobin and cytochrome C, demonstrating the applicability of FFE. The developed FFE device has evident significance to the studies on stem cell, cell or organelle proteomics, and protein complex as well as micro- or nano-particles. PMID:24246174

  13. Simulation of hydrogen adsorption systems adopting the flow through cooling concept

    SciTech Connect

    Corgnale, Claudio; Hardy, Bruce; Chahine, Richard; Cossement, Daniel; Tamburello, David; Anton, Donald

    2014-10-13

    Hydrogen storage systems based on adsorbent materials have the potential of achieving the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) targets, especially in terms of gravimetric capacity. This paper deals with analysis of adsorption storage systems adopting the flow through cooling concept. By this approach the feeding hydrogen provides the needed cold to maintain the tank at low temperatures. Two adsorption systems have been examined and modeled adopting the Dubinin-Astakhov model, to see their performance under selected operating conditions. A first case has been analyzed, modeling a storage tank filled with carbon based material (namely MaxSorb®) and comparing the numerical outcomes with the available experimental results for a 2.5 L tank. Under selected operating conditions (minimum inlet hydrogen temperature of approximately 100 K and maximum pressure on the order of 8.5 MPa) and adopting the flow through cooling concept the material shows a gravimetric capacity of about 5.7 %. A second case has been modeled, examining the same tank filled with metal organic framework material (MOF5®) under approximately the same conditions. The model shows that the latter material can achieve a (material) gravimetric capacity on the order of 11%, making the system potentially able to achieve the DOE 2017 target.

  14. Paleo-heat flows, radioactive heat generation, and the cooling and deformation history of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Javier; López, Valle; Egea-González, Isabel

    2013-07-01

    Estimates of lithospheric strength for Mercury, based on the depth of thrust faults associated with large lobate scarps (which were most probably formed previously to ˜3 Ga) or on the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere supporting a broad rise in the northern smooth plains (whose formation is poorly constrained, but posterior to 3.8 Ga), serve as a basis for the calculation of paleo-heat flows, referred to the time when these structures were formed. The so-obtained paleo-heat flows can give information on the Urey ratio (Ur), the ratio between the total radioactive heat production and the total surface heat loss. By imposing the condition Ur < 1 (corresponding to a cooling Mercury, consistent with the observed widespread contraction), we obtain an upper limit of 0.4 times the average surface value for the abundance of heat-producing elements in the outer solid shell of Mercury. We also find that if the formation of the northern rise occurred in a time posterior to ˜3 Ga, then in that time the Urey ratio was lower, and the cooling more intense, than when most of large lobate scarps were formed. Thus, because largest lobate scarps deform older terrains (suggesting more intense contraction early in the mercurian history), we conclude that the northern rise was formed previously to 3 Ga. If the age of other smooth plains large wavelength deformations is similar, then tectonic activity in Mercury would have been limited in the last 3 billion of years.

  15. Simulation of hydrogen adsorption systems adopting the flow through cooling concept

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Corgnale, Claudio; Hardy, Bruce; Chahine, Richard; Cossement, Daniel; Tamburello, David; Anton, Donald

    2014-10-13

    Hydrogen storage systems based on adsorbent materials have the potential of achieving the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) targets, especially in terms of gravimetric capacity. This paper deals with analysis of adsorption storage systems adopting the flow through cooling concept. By this approach the feeding hydrogen provides the needed cold to maintain the tank at low temperatures. Two adsorption systems have been examined and modeled adopting the Dubinin-Astakhov model, to see their performance under selected operating conditions. A first case has been analyzed, modeling a storage tank filled with carbon based material (namely MaxSorb®) and comparing the numerical outcomes withmore » the available experimental results for a 2.5 L tank. Under selected operating conditions (minimum inlet hydrogen temperature of approximately 100 K and maximum pressure on the order of 8.5 MPa) and adopting the flow through cooling concept the material shows a gravimetric capacity of about 5.7 %. A second case has been modeled, examining the same tank filled with metal organic framework material (MOF5®) under approximately the same conditions. The model shows that the latter material can achieve a (material) gravimetric capacity on the order of 11%, making the system potentially able to achieve the DOE 2017 target.« less

  16. Measurement of Turbulent Flow Phenomena for the Lower Plenum of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink; Keith G. Condie; Glenn E. McCreery

    2007-09-01

    Mean velocity field and turbulence data are presented for flow phenomena in a lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR), such as in a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concept. In preparation for design, safety analyses and licensing, research has begun on readying the computational tools that will be needed to predict the thermal-hydraulics behavior of the reactor design. Fluid dynamics experiments have been designed and built to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and their turbulence models for a typical VHTR plenum geometry in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. This experiment has been proposed as a “Standard Problem” for assessing advanced reactor (CFD) analysis tools. Present results concentrate on the region of the plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered as multiple jets into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. A model of the lower plenum has been fabricated and scaled to the geometric dimensions of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Point Design. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to induce flow features somewhat comparable to those expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. Posts, side walls and end walls are fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The experiments were conducted in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine complex flow characteristics in passages and around objects to be obtained without locating a disturbing transducer in the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. The

  17. Measurement of Turbulent Flow Phenomena for the Lower Plenum of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2010-02-01

    Mean velocity field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics design (Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor). The datawere obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered as a benchmark for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The primary objective of this paper is to document the experiment and present a sample of the data set that has been established for this standard problem. Present results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flowin the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined crossflow—with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. Posts, side walls and end walls are fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive index of the mineral oil working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3D) particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet-jet Reynolds numbers (based on the hydraulic diameter of the jet

  18. Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a Lower Plenum Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-05-01

    Mean-velocity-field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. The data were obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. This paper reviews the experimental apparatus and procedures, presents a sample of the data set, and reviews the INL Standard Problem. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages in and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3-D) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12

  19. Flow visualization study in high aspect ratio cooling channels for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Giuliani, James E.

    1993-01-01

    The structural integrity of high pressure liquid propellant rocket engine thrust chambers is typically maintained through regenerative cooling. The coolant flows through passages formed either by constructing the chamber liner from tubes or by milling channels in a solid liner. Recently, Carlile and Quentmeyer showed life extending advantages (by lowering hot gas wall temperatures) of milling channels with larger height to width aspect ratios (AR is greater than 4) than the traditional, approximately square cross section, passages. Further, the total coolant pressure drop in the thrust chamber could also be reduced, resulting in lower turbomachinery power requirements. High aspect ratio cooling channels could offer many benefits to designers developing new high performance engines, such as the European Vulcain engine (which uses an aspect ratio up to 9). With platelet manufacturing technology, channel aspect ratios up to 15 could be formed offering potentially greater benefits. Some issues still exist with the high aspect ratio coolant channels. In a coolant passage of circular or square cross section, strong secondary vortices develop as the fluid passes through the curved throat region. These vortices mix the fluid and bring lower temperature coolant to the hot wall. Typically, the circulation enhances the heat transfer at the hot gas wall by about 40 percent over a straight channel. The effect that increasing channel aspect ratio has on the curvature heat transfer enhancement has not been sufficiently studied. If the increase in aspect ratio degrades the secondary flow, the fluid mixing will be reduced. Analysis has shown that reduced coolant mixing will result in significantly higher wall temperatures, due to thermal stratification in the coolant, thus decreasing the benefits of the high aspect ratio geometry. A better understanding of the fundamental flow phenomena in high aspect ratio channels with curvature is needed to fully evaluate the benefits of this

  20. The flow field in a high aspect ratio cooling duct with and without one heated wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochlitz, Henrik; Scholz, Peter; Fuchs, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The flow in a high aspect ratio generic cooling duct is described for different Reynolds numbers and for adiabatic as well as non-adiabatic conditions. The Reynolds number is varied in a range from 39,000 to 111,000. The generic cooling duct facility allows for applying a constant temperature on the duct's lower wall, and it ensures having well-defined boundary conditions. The high-quality, optical noninvasive measurement methods, namely Particle Image Velocimetry (2C2D-PIV, i.e., two velocity components in a plane), Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (3C2D-PIV, i.e., three velocity components in a plane) and Volumetric Particle Tracking Velocimetry (3C3D-PTV, i.e., three velocity components in a volume), are used to characterize the flow in detail. Pressure transducers are installed for measuring the pressure losses. The repeatability and the validity of the data are discussed in detail. For that purpose, modifications in the test facility and in the experimental setup as well as comparisons between the different measurement methods are given. A focus lies on the average velocity distribution and on the turbulent statistics. The longitudinal velocity profile is analyzed in detail for Reynolds number variations. Secondary flows are identified with velocities of two orders of magnitude smaller than the longitudinal velocity. Reynolds stress distributions are given for several different cases. The Reynolds number dependency of overline{u'^2} and overline{v'^2} is shown, and a comparison between the adiabatic and the heated case is given. overline{u'^2} changes significantly when the lower wall heat flux is applied, whereas overline{v'^2} and overline{u'v'} almost stay constant.

  1. Unscrambling the Omlette: a New Bubble and Crystal Clustering Mechanism in Chaotically Mixed Magma Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J.; Metcalfe, G.; Wang, S.; Barnes, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The concentration of bubbles, crystals or droplets into small volumes of magma is a key trigger for many interesting magmatic processes. For example, gas slugs driving Strombolian eruptions form from the coalesence of exsolved bubbles within a volcanic conduit, while Ni-Cu-PGE magmatic sulfide deposits require a concentration of dense sulfide droplets from a large volume of magma to form a massive ore body. However the physical mechanism for this clustering remains unresolved - especially since small particles in active magma flows are expected to mostly track flow streamlines rather than clustering. We have uncovered a previously unreported clustering mechanism which is applicable to magmatic flows. This mechanism involves the interaction of particles with two kinds of chaotic flow structure: (a) high-strain regions within the well-mixed chaotic zones of the flow, and (b) unmixed islands of stability within the chaotic flow, known as Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) regions. The first figure shows the difference between chaotic and KAM regions in a chaotic laminar pipe flow. Trapping occurs when particles are scattered from high-strain regions in the chaotic zones and become trapped in the KAM regions, leading to a rapid concentration of particles relative to their original distribution (shown in the second series of figures). Using a combination of these analogue experiments and theoretical analysis we outline the conditions under which this clustering process can occur. We examine the onset of secondary density-related instabilities and the effects of increased particle-particle interaction within the clustered particles, and highlight the impact of particle clustering on the dynamics of magma ascent and emplacement.

  2. AutoGate: A Macintosh cluster analysis program for flow cytometry data

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, G.C.; Parson, J.D.; Beckman, R.J. ); Stewart, S.J.; Stewart, C.C. )

    1993-01-01

    AutoGate, a cluster analysis program for Flow Cytometry Standard Data, has been developed for use on the Macintosh computer. AutoGate reads FCS format list mode files. It partitions the list mode events into a user-selected number of populations using K-means cluster analysis. One or more of the populations can be displayed as colored, bivariate dot plots. Eight variate data and up to twelve clusters can be analyzed. The dot plots can be saved as PICT format files. Data for individual clusters can be saved as FCS or ASCII format files. AutoGate is available from the authors through the National Flow Cytometry and Sorting Research Resource at Los Alamos.

  3. Experimental results for film cooling in 2-D supersonic flow including coolant delivery pressure, geometry, and incident shock effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, George C.; Nowak, Robert J.; Holden, Michael S.; Baker, N. R.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to establish some design parameters important to a supersonic film cooling system in a scramjet engine. A simple non-combusting two-dimensional flow configuration was used to isolate the film cooling phenomena. Parameters investigated include coolant delivery pressure, slot height and lip thickness, and incident shock location and strength. Design guidelines for use in engineering and trade studies are presented.

  4. MEASURING BULK FLOW OF GALAXY CLUSTERS USING KINEMATIC SUNYAEV-ZELDOVICH EFFECT: PREDICTION FOR PLANCK

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, D. S. Y.; Pierpaoli, E.; Osborne, S. J.

    2011-08-01

    We predict the performance of the Planck satellite in determining the bulk flow through kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) measurements. As velocity tracers, we use ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) clusters as well as expected cluster catalogs from the upcoming missions Planck and eRosita (All-Sky Survey: EASS). We implement a semi-analytical approach to simulate realistic Planck maps as well as Planck and eRosita cluster catalogs. We adopt an unbiased kSZ filter (UF) and matched filter (MF) to maximize the cluster kSZ signal-to-noise ratio. We find that the use of Planck cosmic microwave background maps in conjunction with the currently existing ROSAT cluster sample improves current upper limits on the bulk flow determination by a factor {approx}5 ({approx}10) when using the MF (UF). The accuracy of bulk flow measurement increases with the depth and abundance of the cluster sample: for an input bulk velocity of 500 km s{sup -1}, the UF recovered velocity errors decrease from 94 km s{sup -1} for RASS, to 73 km s{sup -1} for Planck, and to 24 km s{sup -1} for EASS; while the systematic bias decreases from 44% for RASS, 5% for Planck, to 0% for EASS. The 95% upper limit for the recovered bulk flow direction {Delta}{alpha} ranges between 4{sup 0} and 60{sup 0} depending on cluster sample and adopted filter. The kSZ dipole determination is mainly limited by the effects of thermal SZ emission in all cases but the one of EASS clusters analyzed with the unbiased filter. This fact makes the UF preferable to the MF when analyzing Planck maps.

  5. Thermal and flow analysis of a convection air-cooled ceramic coated porous metal concept for turbine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepka, F. S.

    1981-01-01

    The heat transfer and pressure drop through turbine vanes made of a sintered, porous metal coated with a thin layer of ceramic and convection cooled by spanwise flow of cooling air were analyzed. The analysis was made to determine the feasibility of using this concept for cooling very small turbines, primarily for short duration applications such as in missile engines. The analysis was made for gas conditions of approximately 10 and 40 atm and 1644 K and with turbine vanes made of felt type porous metals with relative densities from 0.2 to 0.6 and ceramic coating thicknesses of 0.076 to 0.254 mm.

  6. Clustering and flow around a sphere moving into a grain cloud.

    PubMed

    Seguin, A; Lefebvre-Lepot, A; Faure, S; Gondret, P

    2016-06-01

    A bidimensional simulation of a sphere moving at constant velocity into a cloud of smaller spherical grains far from any boundaries and without gravity is presented with a non-smooth contact dynamics method. A dense granular "cluster" zone builds progressively around the moving sphere until a stationary regime appears with a constant upstream cluster size. The key point is that the upstream cluster size increases with the initial solid fraction [Formula: see text] but the cluster packing fraction takes an about constant value independent of [Formula: see text]. Although the upstream cluster size around the moving sphere diverges when [Formula: see text] approaches a critical value, the drag force exerted by the grains on the sphere does not. The detailed analysis of the local strain rate and local stress fields made in the non-parallel granular flow inside the cluster allows us to extract the local invariants of the two tensors: dilation rate, shear rate, pressure and shear stress. Despite different spatial variations of these invariants, the local friction coefficient μ appears to depend only on the local inertial number I as well as the local solid fraction, which means that a local rheology does exist in the present non-parallel flow. The key point is that the spatial variations of I inside the cluster do not depend on the sphere velocity and explore only a small range around the value one. PMID:27339702

  7. THE X-RAY SPECTRUM OF THE COOLING-FLOW QUASAR H1821+643: A MASSIVE BLACK HOLE FEEDING OFF THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Lohfink, Anne M.; Babul, Arif; Fabian, Andrew C.; Russell, Helen R.; Walker, Stephen A.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie

    2014-09-10

    We present a deep Suzaku observation of H1821+643, an extremely rare example of a powerful quasar hosted by the central massive galaxy of a rich cooling-core cluster of galaxies. Informed by previous Chandra studies of the cluster, we achieve a spectral separation of emission from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and the intracluster medium (ICM). With a high degree of confidence, we identify the signatures of X-ray reflection/reprocessing by cold and slowly moving material in the AGN's immediate environment. The iron abundance of this matter is found to be significantly sub-solar (Z ≈ 0.4 Z {sub ☉}), an unusual finding for powerful AGN but in line with the idea that this quasar is feeding from the ICM via a Compton-induced cooling flow. We also find a subtle soft excess that can be described phenomenologically (with an additional blackbody component) or as ionized X-ray reflection from the inner regions of a high inclination (i ≈ 57°) accretion disk around a spinning (a > 0.4) black hole. We describe how the ionization state of the accretion disk can be used to constrain the Eddington fraction of the source. Applying these arguments to our spectrum implies an Eddington fraction of 0.25-0.5, with an associated black hole mass of 3--6×10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}.

  8. Effects of bulk flow pulsations on film cooling from different length injection holes at different blowing ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, H.J.; Lee, J.S.; Ligrani, P.M.

    1999-07-01

    Bulk flow pulsations in the form of sinusoidal variations of velocity and static pressure at injectant Strouhal numbers from 0.8 to 10.0 are investigated as they affect film cooling from a single row of simple angle holes. Similar flow variations are produced by potential flow interactions and passing shock waves near turbine surfaces in gas turbine engines. Time-averaged temperature distributions, phase-averaged temperature distributions, adiabatic film cooling effectiveness values, and iso-energetic Stranton numbers show that important alterations to film cooling protection occur as pulsation frequency, coolant Strouhal number, blowing ratio, and nondimensional injection hole length are changed. Overall, the pulsations affect film performance and behavior more significantly both as L/D decreases, and as blowing ratio decreases.

  9. Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a Lower Plenum Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Doanld M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2010-02-01

    Mean-velocity-field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. The data were obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate geometry scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages in and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3-D) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean bulk velocity) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. Uncertainty analyses and a discussion of the standard problem are included. The measurements reveal developing, non-uniform, turbulent flow in the

  10. Influence mechanism on flow and heat transfer characteristics for air-cooled steam condenser cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei Feng; Dai, Yi Ping; Li, Mao Qing; Ma, Qing Zhong

    2012-09-01

    Air-cooled steam condensers (ACSCs) have been extensively utilized to reject waste heat in power industry to save water resources. However, ACSC performance is so sensitive to ambient wind that almost all the air-cooled power plants in China are less efficient compared to design conditions. It is shown from previous research that the influence of ambient wind on the cell performance differs from its location in the condenser. As a result, a numerical model including two identical ACSC cells are established, and the different influence on the performance of the cells is demonstrated and analyzed through the computational fluid dynamics method. Despite the great influence from the wind speeds, similar cell performance is obtained for the two cells under both windless and wind speed conditions when the wind parallels to the steam duct. Fan volumetric effectiveness which characterizes the fan performance, as well as the exchanger heat transfer rate, drops obviously with the increasing wind speed, and performance difference between the exchanger pair in the same A-frame also rises continuously. Furthermore, different flow and heat transfer characteristics of the windward and leeward cell are obtained at different wind angles, and ambient wind enhances the performance of the leeward cell, while that of the windward one changes little.

  11. Analytical and numerical study on cooling flow field designs performance of PEM fuel cell with variable heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshari, Ebrahim; Ziaei-Rad, Masoud; Jahantigh, Nabi

    2016-06-01

    In PEM fuel cells, during electrochemical generation of electricity more than half of the chemical energy of hydrogen is converted to heat. This heat of reactions, if not exhausted properly, would impair the performance and durability of the cell. In general, large scale PEM fuel cells are cooled by liquid water that circulates through coolant flow channels formed in bipolar plates or in dedicated cooling plates. In this paper, a numerical method has been presented to study cooling and temperature distribution of a polymer membrane fuel cell stack. The heat flux on the cooling plate is variable. A three-dimensional model of fluid flow and heat transfer in cooling plates with 15 cm × 15 cm square area is considered and the performances of four different coolant flow field designs, parallel field and serpentine fields are compared in terms of maximum surface temperature, temperature uniformity and pressure drop characteristics. By comparing the results in two cases, the constant and variable heat flux, it is observed that applying constant heat flux instead of variable heat flux which is actually occurring in the fuel cells is not an accurate assumption. The numerical results indicated that the straight flow field model has temperature uniformity index and almost the same temperature difference with the serpentine models, while its pressure drop is less than all of the serpentine models. Another important advantage of this model is the much easier design and building than the spiral models.

  12. Modeling of skin cooling, blood flow, and optical properties in wounds created by electrical shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thu T. A.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Jordan, Marion H.; Jeng, James C.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2012-02-01

    High voltage electrical injuries may lead to irreversible tissue damage or even death. Research on tissue injury following high voltage shock is needed and may yield stage-appropriate therapy to reduce amputation rate. One of the mechanisms by which electricity damages tissue is through Joule heating, with subsequent protein denaturation. Previous studies have shown that blood flow had a significant effect on the cooling rate of heated subcutaneous tissue. To assess the thermal damage in tissue, this study focused on monitoring changes of temperature and optical properties of skin next to high voltage wounds. The burns were created between left fore limb and right hind limb extremities of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by a 1000VDC delivery shock system. A thermal camera was utilized to record temperature variation during the exposure. The experimental results were then validated using a thermal-electric finite element model (FEM).

  13. Flow Quantification from 2D Phase Contrast MRI in Renal Arteries Using Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zöllner, Frank G.; Monnsen, Jan Ankar; Lundervold, Arvid; Rørvik, Jarle

    We present an approach based on clustering to segment renal arteries from 2D PC Cine MR images to measure blood velocity and flow. Such information are important in grading renal artery stenosis and support the decision on surgical interventions like percutan transluminal angioplasty. Results show that the renal arteries could be extracted automatically and the corresponding velocity profiles could be calculated. Furthermore, the clustering could detect possible phase wrap effects automatically as well as differences in the blood flow patterns within the vessel.

  14. Flow control of an elongated jet in cross-flow: Film cooling effectiveness enhancement using surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audier, P.; Fénot, M.; Bénard, N.; Moreau, E.

    2016-02-01

    The case presented here deals with plasma flow control applied to a cross-flow configuration, more specifically to a film cooling system. The ability of a plasma dielectric barrier discharge actuator for film cooling effectiveness enhancement is investigated through an experimental set-up, including a film injection from an elongated slot into a thermally uniform cross-flow. Two-dimensional particle image velocimetry and infrared-thermography measurements are performed for three different blowing ratios of M = 0.4, 0.5, and 1. Results show that the effectiveness can be increased when the discharge is switched on, as predicted by the numerical results available in literature. Whatever the blowing ratio, the actuator induces a deflection of the jet flow towards the wall, increases its momentum, and delays its diffusion in the cross-flow.

  15. Some Aspects of Forecasting Severe Thunderstorms during Cool-Season Return-Flow Episodes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Steven J.

    1992-08-01

    Historically, the Gulf of Mexico has been considered a primary source of water vapor that influences the weather for much of the United States east of the Rocky Mountains. Although severe thunderstorms and tornadoes occur most frequently during the spring and summer months, the periodic transport of Gulf moisture inland ahead of traveling baroclinic waves can result in significant severe-weather episodes during the cool season.To gain insight into the short-range skill in forecasting surface synoptic patterns associated with moisture return from the Gulf, operational numerical weather prediction models from the National Meteorological Center were examined. Sea level pressure fields from the Limited-Area Fine-Mesh Model (LFM), Nested Grid Model (NGM), and the aviation (AVN) run of the Global Spectral Model, valid 48 h after initial data time, were evaluated for three cool-season cases that preceded severe local storm outbreaks. The NGM and AVN provided useful guidance in forecasting the onset of return flow along the Gulf coast. There was a slight tendency for these models to be slightly slow in the development of return flow. In contrast the LFM typically overforecasts the occurrence of return flow and tends to `open the Gulf' from west to east too quickly.Although the low-level synoptic pattern may be forecast correctly, the overall prediction process is hampered by a data void over the Gulf. It is hypothesized that when the return-flow moisture is located over the Gulf, model forecasts of stability and the resultant operational severe local storm forecasts are less skillful compared to situations when the moisture has spread inland already. This hypothesis is tested by examining the performance of the initial second-day (day 2) severe thunderstorm outlook issued by the National Severe Storms Forecast Center during the Gulf of Mexico Experiment (GUFMEX) in early 1988.It has been found that characteristically different air masses were present along the Gulf coast

  16. A numerical investigation of cluster fall velocity in vertical particle-laden turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier; National Renewable Energy Lab Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    Particle clusters are known to play a key role in the multiphase dynamics as well as secondary processes such as heat transfer and catalytic conversion within vertical pipe flows. For example, vertical risers in circulating fluidized bed reactors consists of a dilute suspension of particles that ascend in the core of the flow, then condense into clusters and descend at the walls. In this work, an Euler-Lagrange strategy is used to study particle cluster dynamics in turbulent risers for a range of Archimedes numbers and density ratios. The simulations are conducted in the framework of NGA, a high-order fully conservative code tailored for turbulent flows. The particles are solved in a Lagrangian framework and the two phases are coupled using a two-step filtering process to ensure conservation, as well as convergence during mesh refinement. Normal and tangential collisions are computed via a soft-sphere model. A conservative immersed boundary method is used to represent the 3D cylindrical geometry on a Cartesian mesh. Simulation results are compared with experimental correlations in terms of cluster fall velocity and size. The role of the carrier fluid on the cluster behavior is also studied.

  17. The relationship between the formation of clusters containing tetrahedral molecules and the dynamic and thermodynamic anomalies of cooled TIP4P/2005 water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Sang, Le

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to cool the simple liquid TPI4P/2005 water at 350 K to 100 K. We find that structural changes of the system cause dynamic and thermodynamic anomalies. A strong increase in the number of tetrahedral oxygen atoms and combinations of these atoms lead to water's a phase transition from a simple liquid form into a supercooled one or ice at T I = 200 K. In the initial stage, small patches containing tetrahedral oxygen atoms connect together to yield large clusters. The rapid drop in the number of clusters and the speedy growth in the size of the largest cluster lead to water's exhibiting anomalously dynamic behaviors at temperatures around 279 K. Our results also show that water is very stable in its supercooled or ice state, exhibiting no change in the mean squared displacement, light oscillation in the number of the clusters and in the size of the largest cluster.

  18. Simulation of supercritical flows in rocket-motor engines: application to cooling channel and injection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribert, G.; Taieb, D.; Petit, X.; Lartigue, G.; Domingo, P.

    2013-03-01

    To address physical modeling of supercritical multicomponent fluid flows, ideal-gas law must be changed to real-gas equation of state (EoS), thermodynamic and transport properties have to incorporate dense fluid corrections, and turbulence modeling has to be reconsidered compared to classical approaches. Real-gas thermodynamic is presently investigated with validation by NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) data. Two major issues of Liquid Rocket Engines (LRE) are also presented. The first one is the supercritical fluid flow inside small cooling channels. In a context of LRE, a strong heat flux coming from the combustion chamber (locally Φ ≈ 80 MW/m2) may lead to very steep density gradients close to the wall. These gradients have to be thermodynamically and numerically captured to properly reproduce in the simulation the mechanism of heat transfer from the wall to the fluid. This is done with a shock-capturing weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) numerical discretization scheme. The second issue is a supercritical fluid injection following experimental conditions [1] in which a trans- or supercritical nitrogen is injected into warm nitrogen. The two-dimensional results show vortex structures with high fluid density detaching from the main jet and persisting in the low-speed region with low fluid density.

  19. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special cluster issue on `Experimental studies of zonal flow and turbulence'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, S.-I.

    2005-07-01

    Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (PPCF) invites submissions on the topic of `Experimental studies of zonal flow and turbulence', for consideration for a special topical cluster of articles to be published early in 2006. The topical cluster will be published in an issue of PPCF, combined with regular articles. The Guest Editor for the special cluster will be S-I Itoh, Kyushu University, Japan. There has been remarkable progress in the area of structure formation by turbulence. One of the highlights has been the physics of zonal flow and drift wave turbulence in toroidal plasmas. Extensive theoretical as well as computational studies have revealed the various mechanisms in turbulence and zonal flows. At the same time, experimental research on the zonal flow, geodesic acoustic modes and generation of global electric field by turbulence has evolved rapidly. Fast growth in reports of experimental results has stimulated further efforts to develop increased knowledge and systematic understanding. Each paper considered for the special cluster should describe the present research status and new scientific knowledge/results from the authors on experimental studies of zonal flow, geodesic acoustic modes and generation of electric field by turbulence (including studies of Reynolds-Maxwell stresses, etc). Manuscripts submitted to this special cluster in Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion will be refereed according to the normal criteria and procedures of the journal. The Guest Editor guides the progress of the cluster from the initial open call, through the standard refereeing process, to publication. To be considered for inclusion in the special cluster, articles must be submitted by 2 September 2005 and must clearly state `for inclusion in the Turbulent Plasma Cluster'. Articles submitted after this deadline may not be included in the cluster issue but may be published in a later issue of the journal. Please submit your manuscript electronically via our web site at www

  20. 3-Dimensional numerical study of cooling performance of a heat sink with air-water flow through mini-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Sambit; Majumder, Abhik; Bhaumik, Swapan

    2016-07-01

    The present microelectronics market demands devices with high power dissipation capabilities having enhanced cooling per unit area. The drive for miniaturizing the devices to even micro level dimensions is shooting up the applied heat flux on such devices, resulting in complexity in heat transfer and cooling management. In this paper, a method of CPU processor cooling is introduced where active and passive cooling techniques are incorporated simultaneously. A heat sink consisting of fins is designed, where water flows internally through the mini-channel fins and air flows externally. Three dimensional numerical simulations are performed for large set of Reynolds number in laminar region using finite volume method for both developing flows. The dimensions of mini-channel fins are varied for several aspect ratios such as 1, 1.33, 2 and 4. Constant temperature (T) boundary condition is applied at heat sink base. Channel fluid temperature, pressure drop are analyzed to obtain best cooling option in the present study. It has been observed that as the aspect ratio of the channel decreases Nusselt number decreases while pressure drop increases. However, Nusselt number increases with increase in Reynolds number.

  1. Vortex-generating coolant-flow-passage design for increased film-cooling effectiveness and surface coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal film-cooling footprints observed by infrared imagery for three coolant-passage configurations embedded in adiabatic-test plates are discussed. The configurations included a standard round-hole cross section and two orientations of a vortex-generating flow passage. Both orientations showed up to factors of four increases in both film-cooling effectiveness and surface coverage over that obtained with the round coolant passage. The crossflow data covered a range of tunnel velocities from 15.5 to 45 m/sec with blowing rates from 0.20 to 2.05. A photographic streakline flow visualization technique supported the concept of the counterrotating apability of the flow passage design and gave visual credence to its role in inhibiting flow separation.

  2. Face cooling with mist water increases cerebral blood flow during exercise: effect of changes in facial skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Taiki; Horiuchi, Masahiro; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Subudhi, Andrew W; Sugawara, Jun; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2012-01-01

    Facial cooling (FC) increases cerebral blood flow (CBF) at rest and during exercise; however, the mechanism of this response remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to test our hypothesis that FC causes facial vasoconstriction that diverts skin blood flow (SkBF(face)) toward the middle cerebral artery (MCA V(mean)) at rest and to a greater extent during exercise. Nine healthy young subjects (20 ± 2 years) underwent 3 min of FC by fanning and spraying the face with a mist of cold water (~4°C) at rest and during steady-state exercise [heart rate (HR) of 120 bpm]. We focused on the difference between the averaged data acquired from 1 min immediately before FC and last 1 min of FC. SkBF(face), MCA V(mean), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were higher during exercise than at rest. As hypothesized, FC decreased SkBF(face) at rest (-32 ± 4%) and to a greater extent during exercise (-64 ± 10%, P = 0.012). Although MCA V(mean) was increased by FC (Rest, +1.4 ± 0.5 cm/s; Exercise, +1.4 ± 0.6 cm/s), the amount of the FC-evoked changes in MCA V(mean) at rest and during exercise differed among subjects. In addition, changes in MCA V(mean) with FC did not correlate with concomitant changes in SkBF(face) (r = 0.095, P = 0.709). MAP was also increased by FC (Rest, +6.2 ± 1.4 mmHg; Exercise, +4.2 ± 1.2 mmHg). These findings suggest that the FC-induced increase in CBF during exercise could not be explained only by change in SkBF(face). PMID:22934059

  3. One-heater flow-through polymerase chain reaction device by heat pipes cooling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jyh Jian; Liao, Ming Huei; Li, Kun Tze; Shen, Chia Ming

    2015-01-01

    the cooling module that has been designed for a PCR device. The unique architecture utilized in this flow-through PCR device is well applied to a low-cost PCR system. PMID:25713689

  4. A Preliminary Heat Flow Model for Cooling a Batholith near Ica, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, L. U.; Clausen, B. L.; Molano, J. C.; Martinez, A. M.; Poma, O.

    2014-12-01

    This research models the cooling of a suite in the Linga Super-unit located at the north end of the Arequipa segment in the Cretaceous Peruvian Coastal Batholith. The monzogabbro to granite Linga suite is approximately 50 km long and 15 km wide, with an estimated vertical extent of about 5 km originally intruded to a depth of 3 km. The emplacement was in andesitic volcanics on the west and the Pampahuasi diorite Super-unit on the east and has incorporated earlier gabbroic bodies. The Linga suite is thought to be the result of a sequence of three pulses: an elongate unit to the west then two elliptical units to the northeast and southeast. The data for modeling comes from field observations on internal and external contacts, some well-defined magma chamber walls and roof, pendant and stoped blocks, magma chamber zoning, the nature and distribution of enclaves and xenoliths, magmatic fabric, evidences of magma mingling, rock porosity, mineralogical associations in metamorphic aureoles, extensive mineralization and brecciated conduits, and the types of hydrothermal alteration varying with distance from contacts. More than forty hand samples, thin sections, and geochemical analyses were used to estimate water content, magma and country rock temperature, liquid density, and viscosity. Further data will come from: zircon U-Pb ages for country rock and magma batch timeframes, fluid inclusions for magma pressure and temperature, and δ18O data for source of hydrothermal fluids. Simple heat conduction calculations using MATLAB and HEAT 3D for a single tabular intrusion estimated a cooling time to solidus of about 300 k.y. More complex modeling includes magma convection and multiple intrusions. Extensive veining and pervasive alteration suggested the use of HYDROTHERM to model possible additional heat flow effects from hydrothermal fluids. Extensive propylitic and significant potassic alteration were observed and, with TerraSpec infrared spectroscopy to identify

  5. Analysis of metal temperature and coolant flow with a thermal-barrier coating on a full-coverage-film-cooled turbine vane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    The potential benefits of combining full-coverage film cooling with a thermal-barrier coating were investigated analytically for sections on the suction and pressure sides a high-temperature, high-pressure turbine vane. Metal and ceramic coating temperatures were calculated as a function of coating thickness and coolant flow. With a thermal-barrier coating, the coolant flows required for the chosen sections were half those of an uncoated design, and the metal outer temperatures were simultaneously reduced by over 111 K (200 F). For comparison, transpiration cooling was also investigated. Full-coverage film cooling of a coated vane required more coolant flow than did transpiration cooling.

  6. The effect of cooling management on blood flow to the dominant follicle and estrous cycle length at heat stress.

    PubMed

    Honig, Hen; Ofer, Lior; Kaim, Moshe; Jacobi, Shamay; Shinder, Dima; Gershon, Eran

    2016-07-15

    The use of ultrasound imaging for the examination of reproductive organs has contributed substantially to the fertility management of dairy cows around the world. This method has many advantages such as noninvasiveness and immediate availability of information. Adding Doppler index to the ultrasound imaging examination, improved the estimation of blood volume and flow rate to the ovaries in general and to the dominant follicle in particular. The aim of this study was to examine changes in the blood flow to the dominant follicle and compare them to the follicular development throughout the cycle. We further set out to examine the effects of different types of cooling management during the summer on the changes in blood flow to the dominant follicle. For this purpose, 24 Israeli-Holstein dairy cows, under heat stress, were randomly assigned one of two groups: one was exposed to five cooling sessions per day (5CS) and the other to eight cooling sessions per day (8CS). Blood flow to the dominant follicle was measured daily using Doppler index throughout the estrous cycle. No differences in the preovulatory dominant follicle diameter were detected between the two cooling management regimens during the cycle. However, the length of the first follicular wave was significantly longer, whereas the second follicular wave was nonsignificantly shorter in the 5CS group as compared to the 8CS group. In addition, no difference in blood flow was found during the first 18 days of the cycle between the two groups. However, from Day 20 until ovulation a higher rate of blood flow was measured in the ovaries of cows cooled 8 times per day as compared to the 5CS group. No differences in progesterone levels were noted. Finally, the estrous cycle length was shorter in the 8CS group as compared to the 5CS group. Our data suggest that blood flow to the dominant follicle and estrous cycle length is affected by heat stress. Using the appropriate cooling management during heat stress can

  7. Core flows and heat transfer induced by inhomogeneous cooling with sub- and supercritical convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, W.; Hori, K.; Wicht, J.

    2016-02-01

    The amount and spatial pattern of heat extracted from cores of terrestrial planets is ultimately controlled by the thermal structure of the lower rocky mantle. Using the most common model to tackle this problem, a rapidly rotating and differentially cooled spherical shell containing an incompressible and viscous liquid is numerically investigated. To gain the physical basics, we consider a simple, equatorial symmetric perturbation of the CMB heat flux shaped as a spherical harmonic Y11 . The thermodynamic properties of the induced flows mainly depend on the degree of nonlinearity parametrised by a horizontal Rayleigh number Rah =q∗ Ra , where q∗ is the relative CMB heat flux anomaly amplitude and Ra is the Rayleigh number which controls radial buoyancy-driven convection. Depending on Rah we identify and characterise three distinctive flow regimes through their spatial patterns, heat transport and flow speed scalings: in the linear conductive regime the radial inward flow is found to be phase shifted 90° eastwards from the maximal heat flux as predicted by a linear quasi-geostrophic model for rapidly rotating spherical systems. The advective regime is characterised by an increased Rah where nonlinearities become significant, but is still subcritical to radial convection. There the upwelling is dispersed and the downwelling is compressed by the thermal advection into a spiralling jet-like structure. As Rah becomes large enough for the radial convection to set in, the jet remains identifiable on time-average and significantly alters the global heat budget in the convective regime. Our results suggest, that the boundary forcing not only introduces a net horizontal heat transport but also suppresses the convection locally to such an extent, that the net Nusselt number is reduced by up to 50%, even though the mean CMB heat flux is conserved. This also implies that a planetary core will remain hotter under a non-homogeneous CMB heat flux and is less well mixed. A

  8. The influence of cooling on the advance of lava flows: insights from analogue experiments on the feedbacks between flow dynamics and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, F.; Kaminski, E.; Tait, S.; Limare, A.

    2012-12-01

    During an effusive volcanic eruption, the crisis management is mainly based on the prediction of lava flows advance and its velocity. The spreading of a lava flow, seen as a gravity current, depends on its "effective rheology" and the eruptive mass flux. These two parameters are not known a priori during an eruption and a key question is how to evaluate them in near real-time (rather than afterwards.) There is no generic macroscopic model for the rheology of an advancing lava flow, and analogue modelling is a precious tool to empirically estimate the rheology of a complex flow. We investigate through laboratory experiments the simultaneous spreading and cooling of horizontal currents fed at constant rate from a point source. The materials used are silicone oil (isoviscous), and poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) wax injected in liquid state and solidiying during its advance. In the isoviscous case, the temperature field is a passive tracer of the flow dynamics, whereas in the PEG experiments there is a feedback between the cooling of the flow and its effective rheology. We focus on the evolution of the current area and of the surface thermal structure, imaged with an infrared camera, to assess how the thermal structure can be related to the flow rate. The flow advance is continuous in the viscous case, and follows the predictions of Huppert (1982); in that case the surface temperature become steady after a transient time and the radiated heat flux is shown to be proportional to the input rate. For the PEG experiments, the spreading occurs through an alternation of stagnation and overflow phases, with a mean spreading rate decreasing as the experiment goes on. As in the case of lava flows, these experiments can exhibit a compound flow field, solid levees, thermal erosion, liquid overflows and channelization. A key observation is that the effective rheology of the solifying PEG material depends on the input flow rate, with high input rates yielding a rheology closer to the

  9. Fearsome Flashes: A Study Of The Evolution Of Flaring Rates In Cool Stars Using Kepler Cluster Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, Steven

    Strong solar flares can damage power grids, satellites, interrupt communications and GPS information, and threaten astronauts and high latitude air travelers. Despite the potential cost, their frequency is poorly determined. Beyond purely current terrestrial concerns, how the rate of large flares (and associated coronal mass ejections [CMEs], high-energy particle fluxes and far UV emission) varies over the stellar lifetime holds considerable astrophysical interest. These include: the contributions of flares to coronal energy budgets; the importance of flares and CMEs to terrestrial and exoplanet atmospheric and biological evolution; and importance of CME mass loss for angular momentum evolution. We will explore the rate of strong flares and its variation with stellar age, mass and rotation by studying Kepler data of cool stars in two open clusters NGC 6811 (age ~ 1 Gyr) and NGC 6819 (~2.5 Gyr). We will use two flare analysis methods to build white-light flare distributions for cluster stars. One subtracts a low-pass filtered version of the data and analyzes the residue for positive flux deviations, the other does a statistical analysis of the flux deviations vs. time lags compared with a model. For near- solar stars, a known solar relation can then be used to estimate X-ray production by the white-light flares. For stars much hotter or cooler or with significantly different chromospheric density, we will use particle code flare models including bombardment effects to estimate how the X-ray to white light scaling changes. With the X-ray values, we can estimate far UV fluxes and CME rates, building a picture of the flare effects; with the two cluster ages, we can make a first estimate of the solar rate (by projecting to the Sun's age) and begin to build up an understanding of flare rate evolution with mass and age. Our proposal falls squarely in the "Stellar Astrophysics and Exoplanets" research area, and is relevant to NASA astrophysics goals in promoting better

  10. Homogeneous and heterogeneous distributed cluster processing for two- and three-dimensional viscoelastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloch, A.; Grant, P. W.; Webster, M. F.

    2002-12-01

    A finite-element study of two- and three-dimensional incompressible viscoelastic flows in a planar lid-driven cavity and concentric rotating cylinders is presented. The hardware platforms consist of both homogeneous and heterogeneous clusters of workstations. A semi-implicit time-stepping Taylor-Galerkin scheme is employed using the message passing mechanism provided by the Parallel Virtual Machine libraries. DEC-alpha, Intel Solaris and AMD-K7(Athlon) Linux clusters are utilized. Parallel results are compared against single processor (sequentially) solutions, using the parallelism paradigm of domain decomposition. Communication is effectively masked and practically ideal, linear speed-up with the number of processors is realized.

  11. The study of a reactor cooling pump under two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Yuan, S. Q.; Wang, X. L.; Zhang, F.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the steady pressure field has been investigated numerically by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in a nuclear reactor cooling pump. As a multiphase approach the Eulerian-Eulerian two fluid model has been applied to calculated five computational models with different kinds of blades. The analysis of inner flow field of the five model pumps shows that the pressure in the impeller increases with the increase of the gas contents and the pressure distributions are irregular at the inlet of different blades when the gas contents less than 20%. With the increase of the number of blades, the vortexes at the outlet of impeller decrease whereas the vortexes in the deep of the volute markedly increases and high velocity of the fluid huddle is generated gradually at the outlet pipes. Under the action of centrifugal force and Coriolis force, gas phase mainly concentrated at the lower velocity and lower pressure area. The radial force on the impeller gradually increases with the increase of the gas contents.

  12. Hot accretion flow with radiative cooling: state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mao-Chun; Xie, Fu-Guo; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Gan, Zhaoming

    2016-06-01

    We investigate state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries through different parameters by using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulation method. For radiative cooling in hot accretion flow, we take into account the bremsstrahlung, synchrotron and synchrotron self-Comptonization self-consistently in the dynamics. Our main result is that the state transitions occur when the accretion rate reaches a critical value dot{M} ˜ 3α dot{M}_Edd, above which cold and dense clumpy/filamentary structures are formed, embedded within the hot gas. We argued this mode likely corresponds to the proposed two-phase accretion model, which may be responsible for the intermediate state of black hole X-ray binaries. When the accretion rate becomes sufficiently high, the clumpy/filamentary structures gradually merge and settle down on to the mid-plane. Eventually the accretion geometry transforms to a disc-corona configuration. In summary, our results are consistent with the truncated accretion scenario for the state transition.

  13. Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor short term thermal response to flow and reactivity transients

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The analyses reported here have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Division of Regulatory Applications of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The short-term thermal response of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is analyzed for a range of flow and reactivity transients. These include loss of forced circulation (LOFC) without scram, moisture ingress, spurious withdrawal of a control rod group, hypothetical large and rapid positive reactivity insertion, and a rapid core cooling event. The coupled heat transfer-neutron kinetics model is also described.

  14. Can standard cosmological models explain the observed Abell cluster bulk flow?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Michael A.; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Laure, Tod R.; Postman, Marc

    1995-01-01

    Lauer and Postman (LP) observed that all Abell clusters with redshifts less than 15,000 km/s appear to be participating in a bulk flow of 689 km/s with respect to the cosmic microwave background. We find this result difficult to reconcile with all popular models for large-scale structure formation that assume Gaussian initial conditions. This conclusion is based on Monte Carlo realizations of the LP data, drawn from large particle-mesh N-body simulations for six different models of the initial power spectrum (standard, tilted, and Omega(sub 0) = 0.3 cold dark matter, and two variants of the primordial baryon isocurvature model). We have taken special care to treat properly the longest-wavelength components of the power spectra. The simulations are sampled, 'observed,' and analyzed as identically as possible to the LP cluster sample. Large-scale bulk flows as measured from clusters in the simulations are in excellent agreement with those measured from the grid: the clusters do not exhibit any strong velocity bias on large scales. Bulk flows with amplitude as large as that reported by LP are not uncommon in the Monte Carlo data stes; the distribution of measured bulk flows before error bias subtraction is rougly Maxwellian, with a peak around 400 km/s. However the chi squared of the observed bulk flow, taking into account the anisotropy of the error ellipsoid, is much more difficult to match in the simulations. The models examined are ruled out at confidence levels between 94% and 98%.

  15. Cluster Analysis of Vortical Flow in Simulations of Cerebral Aneurysm Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Oeltze-Jafra, Steffen; Cebral, Juan R; Janiga, Gábor; Preim, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of blood flow provide new insights into the hemodynamics of vascular pathologies such as cerebral aneurysms. Understanding the relations between hemodynamics and aneurysm initiation, progression, and risk of rupture is crucial in diagnosis and treatment. Recent studies link the existence of vortices in the blood flow pattern to aneurysm rupture and report observations of embedded vortices -a larger vortex encloses a smaller one flowing in the opposite direction -whose implications are unclear. We present a clustering-based approach for the visual analysis of vortical flow in simulated cerebral aneurysm hemodynamics. We show how embedded vortices develop at saddle-node bifurcations on vortex core lines and convey the participating flow at full manifestation of the vortex by a fast and smart grouping of streamlines and the visualization of group representatives. The grouping result may be refined based on spectral clustering generating a more detailed visualization of the flow pattern, especially further off the core lines. We aim at supporting CFD engineers researching the biological implications of embedded vortices. PMID:26390475

  16. Performance of a 10-kJ SMES model cooled by liquid hydrogen thermo-siphon flow for ASPCS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makida, Y.; Shintomi, T.; Hamajima, T.; Ota, N.; Katsura, M.; Ando, K.; Takao, T.; Tsuda, M.; Miyagi, D.; Tsujigami, H.; Fujikawa, S.; Hirose, J.; Iwaki, K.; Komagome, T.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new electrical power storage and stabilization system, called an Advanced Superconducting Power Conditioning System (ASPCS), which consists of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) and hydrogen energy storage, converged on a liquid hydrogen station for fuel cell vehicles. A small 10- kJ SMES system, in which a BSCCO coil cooled by liquid hydrogen was installed, was developed to create an experimental model of an ASPCS. The SMES coil is conductively cooled by liquid hydrogen flow through a thermo-siphon line under a liquid hydrogen buffer tank. After fabrication of the system, cooldown tests were carried out using liquid hydrogen. The SMES coil was successfully charged up to a nominal current of 200 A. An eddy current loss, which was mainly induced in pure aluminum plates pasted onto each pancake coils for conduction cooling, was also measured.

  17. Learning Based Approach for Optimal Clustering of Distributed Program's Call Flow Graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abofathi, Yousef; Zarei, Bager; Parsa, Saeed

    Optimal clustering of call flow graph for reaching maximum concurrency in execution of distributable components is one of the NP-Complete problems. Learning automatas (LAs) are search tools which are used for solving many NP-Complete problems. In this paper a learning based algorithm is proposed to optimal clustering of call flow graph and appropriate distributing of programs in network level. The algorithm uses learning feature of LAs to search in state space. It has been shown that the speed of reaching to solution increases remarkably using LA in search process, and it also prevents algorithm from being trapped in local minimums. Experimental results show the superiority of proposed algorithm over others.

  18. A study of optimum cowl shapes and flow port locations for minimum drag with effective engine cooling, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. R.; Smetana, F. O.

    1980-01-01

    The listings, user's instructions, sample inputs, and sample outputs of two computer programs which are especially useful in obtaining an approximate solution of the viscous flow over an arbitrary nonlifting three dimensional body are provided. The first program performs a potential flow solution by a well known panel method and readjusts this initial solution to account for the effects of the boundary layer displacement thickness, a nonuniform but unidirectional onset flow field, and the presence of air intakes and exhausts. The second program is effectually a geometry package which allows the user to change or refine the shape of a body to satisfy particular needs without a significant amount of human intervention. An effort to reduce the cruise drag of light aircraft through an analytical study of the contributions to the drag arising from the engine cowl shape and the foward fuselage area and also that resulting from the cooling air mass flowing through intake and exhaust sites on the nacelle is presented. The programs may be effectively used to determine the appropriate body modifications or flow port locations to reduce the cruise drag as well as to provide sufficient air flow for cooling the engine.

  19. Experimental Analyses of Flow Field Structures around Clustered Linear Aerospike Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Mashio; Mori, Hideo; Nishihira, Ryutaro; Niimi, Tomohide

    2005-05-01

    An aerospike nozzle has been expected as a candidate for an engine of a reusable space shuttle to respond to growing demand for rocket-launching and its cost reduction. In this study, the flow field structures in any cross sections around clustered linear aerospike nozzles are visualized and analyzed, using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) of NO seeded in the carrier gas N2. Since flow field structures are affected mainly by pressure ratio (Ps/Pa, Ps: the source pressure in a reservoir, Pa: the ambient pressure in the vacuum chamber), the clustered linear aerospike nozzle is set inside a vacuum chamber to carry out the experiments in the wide range of pressure ratios from 75 to 200. Flow fields are visualized in several cross-sections, demonstrating the complicated three-dimensional flow field structures. Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) of PtTFPP bound by poly-IBM-co-TFEM is also applied to measurement of the complicated pressure distribution on the spike surface, and to verification of contribution of a truncation plane to the thrust. Finally, to examine the effect of the sidewalls attached to the aerospike nozzle, the flow fields around the nozzle with the sidewalls are compared with those without sidewalls.

  20. Deformation band clusters on Mars and implications for subsurface fluid flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okubo, C.H.; Schultz, R.A.; Chan, M.A.; Komatsu, G.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution imagery reveals unprecedented lines of evidence for the presence of deformation band clusters in layered sedimentary deposits in the equatorial region of Mars. Deformation bands are a class of geologic structural discontinuity that is a precursor to faults in clastic rocks and soils. Clusters of deformation bands, consisting of many hundreds of individual subparallel bands, can act as important structural controls on subsurface fluid flow in terrestrial reservoirs, and evidence of diagenetic processes is often preserved along them. Deformation band clusters are identified on Mars based on characteristic meter-scale architectures and geologic context as observed in data from the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera. The identification of deformation band clusters on Mars is a key to investigating the migration of fluids between surface and subsurface reservoirs in the planet's vast sedimentary deposits. Similar to terrestrial examples, evidence of diagenesis in the form of light- and dark-toned discoloration and wall-rock induration is recorded along many of the deformation band clusters on Mars. Therefore, these structures are important sites for future exploration and investigations into the geologic history of water and water-related processes on Mars. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  1. AN X-RAY COOLING-CORE CLUSTER SURROUNDING A LOW-POWER COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCE 1321+045

    SciTech Connect

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M.; Siemiginowska, A.; Labiano, A.

    2013-07-20

    We discovered an X-ray cluster in a Chandra observation of the compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio source 1321+045 (z = 0.263). CSS sources are thought to be young radio objects at the beginning of their evolution and can potentially test the cluster heating process. 1321+045 is a relatively low-luminosity source and its morphology consists of two radio lobes on the opposite sides of a radio core with no evidence for jets or hotspots. The optical emission line ratios are consistent with an interstellar medium dominated by active galactic nucleus photoionization with a small contribution from star formation, and no contributions from shocks. Based on these ratios, we classify 1321+045 as a low excitation galaxy (LEG) and suggest that its radioactivity is in a coasting phase. The X-ray emission associated with the radio source is detected with 36.1 {+-} 8.3 counts, but the origin of this emission is highly uncertain. The current X-ray image of the cluster does not show any signatures of a radio source impact on the cluster medium. Chandra detects the cluster emission at >3{sigma} level out to {approx}60'' (240 kpc). We obtain the best-fit beta model parameters of the surface brightness profile of {beta} = 0.58 {+-} 0.2 and a core radius of 9.4{sup +1.1}{sub -0.9} arcsec. The average temperature of the cluster is equal to kT = 4.4{sup +0.5}{sub -0.3} keV, with a temperature and cooling profile indicative of a cooling core. We measure the cluster luminosity L{sub (0.5-2{sub keV)}} = 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} and mass 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun}.

  2. Metal temperatures and coolant flow in a wire cloth transpiration cooled turbine vane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental heat transfer investigation was conducted on an air-cooled turbine vane made from wire-wound cloth material and supported by a central strut. Vane temperature data obtained are compared with temperature data from two full-coverage film-cooled vanes made of different laminated construction. Measured porous-airfoil temperatures are compared with predicted temperatures.

  3. FORTRAN program for calculating coolant flow and metal temperatures of a full-coverage-film-cooled vane or blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program that calculates the coolant flow and the metal temperatures of a full-coverage-film-cooled vane or blade was developed. The analysis was based on compressible, one-dimensional fluid flow and on one-dimensional heat transfer and treats the vane or blade shell as a porous wall. The calculated temperatures are average values for the shell outer-surface area associated with each film-cooling hole row. A thermal-barrier coating may be specified on the shell outer surface, and centrifugal effects can be included for blade calculations. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 and is operational on a UNIVAC 1100/42 computer. The method of analysis, the program input, the program output, and two sample problems are provided.

  4. Silicon Carbide Clusters Found in the Canyon Diablo Meteorite: Implications of Cooling Histories for Group IAB Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, I. S.; Winston, R.

    2009-12-01

    The Canyon Diablo Meteorite fell in the Arizona desert 50,000 years ago. Meteoritic irons tranported to humid areas often oxidize rapidly. One of our samples was a carbon nodule in a rusty Ni-Fe matrix. Another nodule we studied, retrieved by cutting open a fresh iron sample with a diamond-impregnated blade, was about 1 cm in diameter, with rdiating black veins. A hammer and carbide chisels were used to break up the nodules. Micron-sized grains in a Petri dish were hand-picked under a microscope.We found 8 individual silicon carbide (SiC) crystals which are either light blue, deep blue, light green, or deep green, and they are 80-120 microns in size. We also found 14 clusters of acicular or mosaic aggregates, 50-150 microns in size. A green mosaic contains more than 20 grains having black carbon rims. An X-ray study revealed that the individual crystals have well-ordered 3C, 6H, and 15R polytype structures. We interpret this as an indication of slow growth for a rather long period of time. On the other hand, the SiC aggregates seem to have nucleated rapidly in a chemically oversaturated environment, perhaps during a disturbance at a relatively recent time. Further work might help elucidate cooling, evolution and complex histories of IAB iron meteorites. It should be cautioned that if dissolution methods using strong acids to separate SiC would have destroyed the delicate aggregates, and disaggregated grains might have been classified as nanno-carbides, thus, an important aspect of history might have been obliterated.

  5. Cold-flow performance of several variations of a ram-air-cooled plug nozzle for supersonic-cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, D. E.; Nosek, S. M.; Straight, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained with a 21.59 cm (8.5 in.) diameter cold-flow model in a static altitude facility to determine the thrust and pumping characteristics of several variations of a ram-air-cooled plug nozzle. Tests were conducted over a range of nozzle pressure ratios simulating supersonic cruise and takeoff conditions. Primary throat area was also varied to simulate afterburner on and off. Effect of plug size, outer shroud length, primary nozzle geometry, and varying amounts of secondary flow were investigated. At a supersonic cruise pressure ratio of 27, nozzle efficiencies were 99.7 percent for the best configurations.

  6. Effects of gas flow rate on deposition rate and number of Si clusters incorporated into a-Si:H films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toko, Susumu; Torigoe, Yoshihiro; Keya, Kimitaka; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    The suppression of cluster incorporation into a-Si:H films is the key to better film stability, because incorporated clusters contribute to the formation of SiH2 bonds and hence lead to light-induced degradation of the films. To deposit stable a-Si:H solar cells at a high deposition rate (DR), we studied the effects of the gas flow rate on DR and the number of Si clusters incorporated into a-Si:H films with discharge power as a parameter, using a multihollow discharge-plasma chemical vapor deposition method. We succeeded in depositing high-quality a-Si:H films with the incorporation of few clusters at DR of 0.1 nm/s. We also found that, under a low gas flow rate and a high discharge power, high-density clusters exist in plasma and hence DR is reduced as a result of radical loss to the clusters.

  7. Measurements and computational analysis of heat transfer and flow in a simulated turbine blade internal cooling passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Louis M.; Thurman, Douglas R.; Simonyi, Patricia S.; Hippensteele, Steven A.; Poinsatte, Philip E.

    1993-01-01

    Visual and quantitative information was obtained on heat transfer and flow in a branched-duct test section that had several significant features of an internal cooling passage of a turbine blade. The objective of this study was to generate a set of experimental data that could be used to validate computer codes for internal cooling systems. Surface heat transfer coefficients and entrance flow conditions were measured at entrance Reynolds numbers of 45,000, 335,000, and 726,000. The heat transfer data were obtained using an Inconel heater sheet attached to the surface and coated with liquid crystals. Visual and quantitative flow field results using particle image velocimetry were also obtained for a plane at mid channel height for a Reynolds number of 45,000. The flow was seeded with polystyrene particles and illuminated by a laser light sheet. Computational results were determined for the same configurations and at matching Reynolds numbers; these surface heat transfer coefficients and flow velocities were computed with a commercially available code. The experimental and computational results were compared. Although some general trends did agree, there were inconsistencies in the temperature patterns as well as in the numerical results. These inconsistencies strongly suggest the need for further computational studies on complicated geometries such as the one studied.

  8. Investigation of annular flow at high evaporation rates in view of liquid film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahstoll, Juergen

    1988-01-01

    The process of liquid film cooling of combustion chamber walls which are subjected to extremely high heat rates was investigated. A theoretical model was developed for a reliable prediction of the film cooling length. The mass transfer at the liquid-gas interface results from evaporated liquid and entrained liquid droplets. The film cooling length analysis, which includes the physical effects in detail, is separated into two regions: heating the liquid and evaporating the liquid. The theoretical results were experimentally verified at high pressures and temperatures using a modified H2/O2-rocket motor. There is a good agreement between the theoretical and the experimental results over the experimental range.

  9. The Kepler Cluster Study: rotation period measurements for cool stars in the 2.5 billion year open cluster NGC 6819

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, Soren; Barnes, Sydney A.; Platais, Imants; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Latham, David W.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Kepler Science Team, Kepler Science Operations Center

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Cluster Study (KeCS) is a program to measure stellar rotation periods and search for planets around members of open star clusters within the field of view of NASA's Kepler mission. We present here the latest results from KeCS - measurements of stellar rotation periods in the 2.5 billion year open cluster NGC 6819 - and discuss their implications for a technique (gyrochronology) to determine stellar ages from stellar rotation.

  10. Very high temperature laminar flow of a gas through the entrance region of a cooled tube - Numerical calculations and experimental results.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    The laminar flow equations in differential form are solved numerically on a digital computer for flow of a very high temperature gas through the entrance region of an externally cooled tube. The solution method is described and calculations are carried out in conjunction with experimental measurements. The agreement with experiment is good, with the result indicating relatively large energy and momentum losses in the highly cooled flows considered where the pressure is nearly uniform along the flow and the core flow becomes non-adiabatic a few diameters downstream of the inlet. The effects of a large range of Reynolds number and Mach number (viscous dissipation) are also investigated.

  11. Anisotropic stress accumulation in cooling lava flows and resulting fracture patterns: Insights from starch-water desiccation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodge, Robert W. D.; Lescinsky, David T.

    2009-09-01

    Desiccation of starch-water slurries is a useful analog for the production of polygonal fractures/columnar joints in cooling lava flows. When left to dry completely, a simple mixture of 1:1 starch and water will produce columns that appear remarkably similar to natural columnar joints formed in cooled lava flows. Columns form when the accumulation of isotropic stress exceeds the tensile strength of a material, at which point a fracture forms and advances through the material perpendicular to the desiccating surface. Individual fractures will initially form orthogonal to the desiccation surface but will quickly evolve into a hexagonal fracture network that advances incrementally through the material. However, some fracture patterns found within natural lava flows are not hexagonal ( Lodge and Lescinsky, 2009-this issue), but rather have fracture lengths that are much longer than the distance to adjacent fractures. These fractures are commonly found at lava flows that have interacted with glacial ice during emplacement. The purpose of this study is to utilize starch analog experiments to better understand the formation of these fractures and the stress regimes responsible for their non-hexagonal patterns. To simulate anisotropic conditions during cooling, the starch slurry was poured into a container with a movable wall that was attached to a screw-type jack. The jack was then set to slowly extend or retract while the slurry desiccated. This resulted in either a decrease or increase in the chamber cross-sectional area thus creating compressional or extensional regimes. Decreasing chamber area (DCA) experiments resulted in fractures with larger lengths parallel to the direction of wall movement (also direction of compression). It also caused localized thrust faulting and curved column development. Increasing chamber area (ICA) experiments produced a zone of horizontal column development along the expanding margin (produced when the wall detached from the sample

  12. Swept-slot film-cooling effectiveness in hypersonic turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hefner, J. N.; Cary, A. M., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Measurement results are presented for the surface equilibrium temperature downstream of swept slots, with sonic tangential air injection into a thick hypersonic turbulent boundary layer. These results are compared with unswept slot results for cooling effectiveness.

  13. Economic and technical assessment of the desiccant wheel effect on the thermal performance of cross flow cooling towers in variable wet bulb temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banooni, Salem; Chitsazan, Ali

    2014-05-01

    Performance improvements of cross flow cooling towers in variable wet bulb temperature were performed. A conventional mathematical model is used to predict desiccant wheel effect on the performance of cooling tower. It is found that by using optimum parameters of desiccant wheel, the inlet air wet bulb temperature into the cooling tower would decrease more than 6 °C and outlet water temperature would decrease more than 4 °C.

  14. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and flow using V and broken V ribs within gas turbine blade cooling passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sourabh; Amano, R. S.

    2015-05-01

    Gas turbines are extensively used for aircraft propulsion, land-based power generation, and various industrial applications. With an increase in turbine rotor inlet temperatures, developments in innovative gas turbine cooling technology enhance the efficiency and power output; these advancements of turbine cooling have allowed engine designs to exceed normal material temperature limits. For internal cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to hot stream of gas are based on an increase in the heat transfer areas and on the promotion of turbulence of the cooling flow. In this study, an improvement in performance is obtained by casting repeated continuous V- and broken V-shaped ribs on one side of the two pass square channels into the core of the blade. A detailed experimental investigation is done for two pass square channels with a 180° turn. Detailed heat transfer distribution occurring in the ribbed passage is reported for a steady state experiment. Four different combinations of 60° V- and broken 60° V-ribs in a channel are considered. A series of thermocouples are used to obtain the temperature on the channel surface and local heat transfer coefficients are obtained for Reynolds numbers 16,000, 56,000 and 85,000 within the turbulent flow regime. Area averaged data are calculated in order to compare the overall performance of the tested ribbed surface and to evaluate the degree of heat transfer enhancement induced by the rib. Flow within the channels is characterized by heat transfer enhancing ribs, bends, rotation and buoyancy effects. A series of experimental measurements is performed to predict the overall performance of the channel. This paper presents an attempt to collect information about the Nusselt number, the pressure drop and the overall performance of the eight different ribbed ducts at the specified Reynolds number. The main contribution of this study is to evaluate the best combination of rib arrangements

  15. Heat transfer process under a film-cooled surface with presence of weak swirling flow in the mainstream

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.S.; Kung, T.L.; Gau, C.

    2007-11-15

    Experiments have been performed in a relatively large circular pipe to study and obtain the heat transfer data over a film-cooled surface, with the presence of weak swirling flow in the mainstream. The swirling flow is generated by a flat-vaned swirler situated upstream. A cooling film is injected from an annular slot formed by the pipe wall and the circular cover plate. The radial temperature distribution measurements at several axial locations were used to infer the film jet structure and the rate of mixing of the film jet with the swirling flow. The nondimensional parameters governing the heat transfer process under the film are derived from the system of governing equations. Experiments demonstrate that the swirl number, increasing with turbulence intensity and swirl velocity in the mainstream, can rapidly destroy the film jet structure and enhance the heat transfer process. During the course of the experiments, the blowing parameter ranged from 0.5 to 2 and the swirl number ranged from 0 to 0.6. Correlations for the Nusselt number which account for the effect of swirling flow are presented. (author)

  16. Mathematical Model of Two Phase Flow in Natural Draft Wet-Cooling Tower Including Flue Gas Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The previously developed model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow, heat and mass transfer is extended to be able to take into account the flow of supersaturated moist air. The two phase flow model is based on void fraction of gas phase which is included in the governing equations. Homogeneous equilibrium model, where the two phases are well mixed and have the same velocity, is used. The effect of flue gas injection is included into the developed mathematical model by using source terms in governing equations and by using momentum flux coefficient and kinetic energy flux coefficient. Heat and mass transfer in the fill zone is described by the system of ordinary differential equations, where the mass transfer is represented by measured fill Merkel number and heat transfer is calculated using prescribed Lewis factor.

  17. Magnetic self-assembly of microparticle clusters in an aqueous two-phase microfluidic cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Niki; Jones, Steven G.; Moon, Byeong-Ui; Tsai, Scott S. H.

    2015-11-01

    We present a technique that self-assembles paramagnetic microparticles on the interface of aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) fluids in a microfluidic cross-flow. A co-flow of the ATPS is formed in the microfluidic cross channel as the flows of a dilute dextran (DEX) phase, along with a flow-focused particle suspension, converges with a dilute polyethylene glycol (PEG) phase. The microparticles arrive at the liquid-liquid interface and self-assemble into particle clusters due to forces on the particles from an applied external magnetic field gradient, and the interfacial tension of the ATPS. The microparticles form clusters at the interface, and once the cluster size grows to a critical value, the cluster passes through the interface. We control the size of the self-assembled clusters, as they pass through the interface, by varying the strength of the applied magnetic field gradient and the ATPS interfacial tension. We observe rich assembly dynamics, from the formation of Pickering emulsions to clusters that are completely encapsulated inside DEX phase droplets. We anticipate that this microparticle self-assembly method may have important biotechnological applications that require the controlled assembly of cells into clusters.

  18. Cold air performance of a 12.766-centimeter-tip-diameter axial-flow cooled turbine. 2: Effect of air ejection on turbine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    An air cooled version of a single-stage, axial-flow turbine was investigated to determine aerodynamic performance with and without air ejection from the stator and rotor blades surfaces to simulate the effect of cooling air discharge. Air ejection rate was varied from 0 to 10 percent of turbine mass flow for both the stator and the rotor. A primary-to-air ejection temperature ratio of about 1 was maintained.

  19. Steady State Transportation Cooling in Porous Media Under Local, Non-Thermal Equilibrium Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Alvaro Che

    2002-01-01

    An analytical solution to the steady-state fluid temperature for 1-D (one dimensional) transpiration cooling has been derived. Transpiration cooling has potential use in the aerospace industry for protection against high heating environments for re-entry vehicles. Literature for analytical treatments of transpiration cooling has been largely confined to the assumption of thermal equilibrium between the porous matrix and fluid. In the present analysis, the fundamental fluid and matrix equations are coupled through a volumetric heat transfer coefficient and investigated in non-thermal equilibrium. The effects of varying the thermal conductivity of the solid matrix and the heat transfer coefficient are investigated. The results are also compared to existing experimental data.

  20. A study of optimum cowl shapes and flow port locations for minimum drag with effective engine cooling, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. R.; Smetana, F. O.

    1980-01-01

    The contributions to the cruise drag of light aircraft arising from the shape of the engine cowl and the forward fuselage area and also that resulting from the cooling air mass flow through intake and exhaust sites on the nacelle were analyzed. The methods employed for the calculation of the potential flow about an arbitrary three dimensional body are described with modifications to include the effects of boundary layer displacement thickness, a nonuniform onset flow field (such as that due to a rotating propeller), and the presence of air intakes and exhausts. A simple, reliable, largely automated scheme to better define or change the shape of a body is also presented. A technique was developed which can yield physically acceptable skin friction and pressure drag coefficients for isolated light aircraft bodies. For test cases on a blunt nose Cessna 182 fuselage, the technique predicted drag reductions as much as 28.5% by body recontouring and proper placements and sizing of the cooling air intakes and exhausts.

  1. Gravity-Driven Enhancement of Heavy Particle Clustering in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bec, Jérémie; Homann, Holger; Ray, Samriddhi Sankar

    2014-05-01

    Heavy particles suspended in a turbulent flow settle faster than in a still fluid. This effect stems from a preferential sampling of the regions where the fluid flows downward and is quantified here as a function of the level of turbulence, of particle inertia, and of the ratio between gravity and turbulent accelerations. By using analytical methods and detailed, state-of-the-art numerical simulations, settling is shown to induce an effective horizontal two-dimensional dynamics that increases clustering and reduce relative velocities between particles. These two competing effects can either increase or decrease the geometrical collision rates between same-size particles and are crucial for realistic modeling of coalescing particles.

  2. Particle image velocimetry measurements in a representative gas-cooled prismatic reactor core model for the estimation of bypass flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conder, Thomas E.

    Core bypass flow is considered one of the largest contributors to uncertainty in fuel temperature within the Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). It refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial regions between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. These flows are of concern because they reduce the desired flow rates in the coolant channels, and thereby have significant influence on the maximum fuel element and coolant exit temperatures. Thus, accurate prediction of the bypass flow is important because it directly impacts core temperature, influencing the life and efficiency of the reactor. An experiment was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory to quantify the flow in the coolant channels in relation to the interstitial gaps between fuel blocks in a representative MHTGR core. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the flow fields within a simplified model, which comprised of a stacked junction of six partial fuel blocks with nine coolant tubes, separated by a 6mm gap width. The model had three sections: The upper plenum, upper block, and lower block. Model components were fabricated from clear, fused quartz where optical access was needed for the PIV measurements. Measurements were taken in three streamwise locations: in the upper plenum and in the midsection of the large and small fuel blocks. A laser light sheet was oriented parallel to the flow, while velocity fields were measured at millimeter intervals across the width of the model, totaling 3,276 PIV measurement locations. Inlet conditions were varied to incorporate laminar, transition, and turbulent flows in the coolant channels---all which produced laminar flow in the gap and non-uniform, turbulent flow in the upper plenum. The images were analyzed to create vector maps, and the data was exported for processing and compilation. The bypass flow was estimated by calculating the flow rates through the coolant

  3. Critical flow and clustering in a model of granular transport: the interplay between drift and antidiffusion.

    PubMed

    Kanellopoulos, Giorgos; van der Weele, Ko

    2012-06-01

    We study the transport of granular matter through a staircaselike array of K vertically vibrated compartments. Given a constant inflow rate Qflow establishes itself along the entire length of the system. However, as soon as Q grows beyond the critical value Q{cr}(K) the particles form a cluster and the flow comes to a halt. Interestingly, this clustering is preceded by a subcritical warning signal: for Q values just below Q{cr}(K) the density profile along the conveyor belt spontaneously develops a pattern in which the compartments are alternatingly densely and sparsely populated. In a previous paper [Kanellopoulos and van der Weele, Int. J. Bifurcation Chaos 21, 2305 (2011)] this pattern was shown to be the result of a period-doubling bifurcation. The present paper aims at unravelling the physical mechanism that lies at the basis of the pattern formation. To this end we study the continuum version of the same system, replacing the compartment number k=1,...,K by a continuous variable x. The dynamics of the system is now described (instead of by K coupled ordinary differential equations) by a single partial differential equation of the Fokker-Planck type, with a drift and a diffusive term that both depend on the density. The drift term turns out to be responsible for the subcritical density oscillations, thereby paving the way for the eventual clustering which sets in when the diffusion coefficient becomes negative. The observed sequence of events in the granular transport system is thus explained as an interplay between drift and (anti)diffusion. PMID:23005082

  4. Estimating {Omega} from galaxy redshifts: Linear flow distortions and nonlinear clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, B.C. |; Warren, M.S.; Zurek, W.H.

    1997-02-01

    We propose a method to determine the cosmic mass density {Omega} from redshift-space distortions induced by large-scale flows in the presence of nonlinear clustering. Nonlinear structures in redshift space, such as fingers of God, can contaminate distortions from linear flows on scales as large as several times the small-scale pairwise velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub {nu}}. Following Peacock & Dodds, we work in the Fourier domain and propose a model to describe the anisotropy in the redshift-space power spectrum; tests with high-resolution numerical data demonstrate that the model is robust for both mass and biased galaxy halos on translinear scales and above. On the basis of this model, we propose an estimator of the linear growth parameter {beta}={Omega}{sup 0.6}/b, where b measures bias, derived from sampling functions that are tuned to eliminate distortions from nonlinear clustering. The measure is tested on the numerical data and found to recover the true value of {beta} to within {approximately}10{percent}. An analysis of {ital IRAS} 1.2 Jy galaxies yields {beta}=0.8{sub {minus}0.3}{sup +0.4} at a scale of 1000kms{sup {minus}1}, which is close to optimal given the shot noise and finite size of the survey. This measurement is consistent with dynamical estimates of {beta} derived from both real-space and redshift-space information. The importance of the method presented here is that nonlinear clustering effects are removed to enable linear correlation anisotropy measurements on scales approaching the translinear regime. We discuss implications for analyses of forthcoming optical redshift surveys in which the dispersion is more than a factor of 2 greater than in the {ital IRAS} data. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  5. Numerical investigation of film cooling flow induced by cylindrical and shaped holes.

    PubMed

    Barthet, S; Kulisa, P

    2001-05-01

    The present study is the second half of a two part work carried out in collaboration with SNECMA which tends to investigate a shaped hole film cooling experimentally and numerically. The aim of this paper is the numerical study of 3D phenomena induced by cylindrical and shaped hole film cooling on a flat wall. The two calculations show up classical structures such as horseshoe or kidney vortices and their differences according to the shape configuration. A detailed study demonstrates their influence on the jet behaviour. Comparing both cases reveals the impact of shaping on the velocity field and vortex motions. The calculations were performed by resolving the 3D Navier-Stokes equations associated with a k-epsilon turbulence model. The solver is the CANARI code developed by ONERA. PMID:11460649

  6. Quasi One-Dimensional Model of Natural Draft Wet-Cooling Tower Flow, Heat and Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    The article deals with the development of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow, heat and mass transfer. The moist air flow is described by the system of conservation laws along with additional equations. Moist air is assumed to be homogeneous mixture of dry air and water vapour. Liquid phase in the fill zone is described by the system of ordinary differential equations. Boundary value problem for the system of conservation laws is discretized in space using Kurganov-Tadmor central scheme and in time using strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta scheme. Initial value problems in the fill zone is solved by using standard fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme. The interaction between liquid water and moist air is done by source terms in governing equations.

  7. The flow-chart loop: temperature, density, and cooling observables supporting nanoflare coronal heating models

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Dhaliwal, R. S.; Christian, G. M.; Fair, C. B.

    2014-11-10

    We have tested three controversial properties for a target loop observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly: (1) overdense loops; (2) long-lifetime loops; and (3) multithermal loops. Our loop is overdense by a factor of about 10 compared to results expected from steady uniform heating models. If this were the only inconsistency, our loop could still be modeled as a single strand, but the density mismatch would imply that the heating must be impulsive. Moving on to the second observable, however, we find that the loop lifetime is at least an order of magnitude greater than the predicted cooling time. This implies that the loop cannot be composed of a single flux tube, even if the heating were dynamic, and must be multi-stranded. Finally, differential emission measure analysis shows that the cross-field temperature of the target loop is multithermal in the early and middle phases of its lifetime, but effectively isothermal before it fades from view. If these multithermal cooling results are found to be widespread, our results could resolve the original coronal loop controversy of 'isothermal' versus 'multithermal' cross-field temperatures. That is, the cross-field temperature is not always 'multithermal' nor is it always 'isothermal', but might change as the loop cools. We find that the existence and evolution of this loop is consistent with predictions of nanoflare heating.

  8. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Fanning, Alan W.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis of axisymmetric plume and base flow of film/dump cooled rocket nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, P. K.; Warsi, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Film/dump cooling a rocket nozzle with fuel rich gas, as in the National Launch System (NLS) Space Transportation Main Engine (STME), adds potential complexities for integrating the engine with the vehicle. The chief concern is that once the film coolant is exhausted from the nozzle, conditions may exist during flight for the fuel-rich film gases to be recirculated to the vehicle base region. The result could be significantly higher base temperatures than would be expected from a regeneratively cooled nozzle. CFD analyses were conduced to augment classical scaling techniques for vehicle base environments. The FDNS code with finite rate chemistry was used to simulate a single, axisymmetric STME plume and the NLS base area. Parallel calculations were made of the Saturn V S-1 C/F1 plume base area flows. The objective was to characterize the plume/freestream shear layer for both vehicles as inputs for scaling the S-C/F1 flight data to NLS/STME conditions. The code was validated on high speed flows with relevant physics. This paper contains the calculations for the NLS/STME plume for the baseline nozzle and a modified nozzle. The modified nozzle was intended to reduce the fuel available for recirculation to the vehicle base region. Plumes for both nozzles were calculated at 10kFT and 50kFT.

  10. A Computational Study for the Utilization of Jet Pulsations in Gas Turbine Film Cooling and Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kartuzova, Olga V.

    2012-01-01

    This report is the second part of a three-part final report of research performed under an NRA cooperative Agreement contract. The first part is NASA/CR-2012-217415. The third part is NASA/CR-2012-217417. Jets have been utilized in various turbomachinery applications in order to improve gas turbines performance. Jet pulsation is a promising technique because of the reduction in the amount of air removed from compressor. In this work two areas of pulsed jets applications were computationally investigated using the commercial code Fluent (ANSYS, Inc.); the first one is film cooling of High Pressure Turbine (HPT) blades and second one is flow separation control over Low Pressure Turbine (LPT) airfoil using Vortex Generator Jets (VGJ). Using pulsed jets for film cooling purposes can help to improve the effectiveness and thus allow higher turbine inlet temperature. Effects of the film hole geometry, blowing ratio and density ratio of the jet, pulsation frequency and duty cycle of blowing on the film cooling effectiveness were investigated. As for the low-pressure turbine (LPT) stages, the boundary layer separation on the suction side of airfoils can occur due to strong adverse pressure gradients. The problem is exacerbated as airfoil loading is increased. Active flow control could provide a means for minimizing separation under conditions where it is most severe (low Reynolds number), without causing additional losses under other conditions (high Reynolds number). The effects of the jet geometry, blowing ratio, density ratio, pulsation frequency and duty cycle on the size of the separated region were examined in this work. The results from Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes and Large Eddy Simulation computational approaches were compared with the experimental data.

  11. Simulation of Cold Flow in a Truncated Ideal Nozzle with Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braman, Kalen; Ruf, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Flow transients during rocket start-up and shut-down can lead to significant side loads on rocket nozzles. The capability to estimate these side loads computationally can streamline the nozzle design process. Towards this goal, the flow in a truncated ideal contour (TIC) nozzle has been simulated for a range of nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) aimed to match a series of cold flow experiments performed at the NASA MSFC Nozzle Test Facility. These simulations were performed with varying turbulence model choices and with four different versions of the TIC nozzle model geometry, each of which was created with a different simplification to the test article geometry.

  12. Building up water-wire clusters: isomer-selective ultraviolet and infrared spectra of jet-cooled 2-aminopurine (H2O)n, n = 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    Lobsiger, Simon; Sinha, Rajeev K; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2013-10-17

    2-Aminopurine (2AP) is an adenine analogue with a high fluorescence quantum yield in water solution, which renders it a useful real-time probe of DNA structure. We report the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectra of size-selected and jet-cooled 9H-2AP·(H2O)n clusters with n = 2 and 3. Mass- and species-specific UV/UV holeburning spectroscopy allows to separate the UV spectra of four cluster isomers in the 31,200–33,000 cm(–1) spectral region with electronic band origins at 31339, 31450, 31891, and 32163 cm(–1). Using IR/UV depletion spectroscopy in combination with B3LYP calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies, the H-bonding topologies of two isomers of the n = 2 and of two isomers of the n = 3 cluster are identified. One n = 2 isomer (denoted 2A) forms a water dimer chain between the N9H and N3 atoms at the sugar-edge site, the other isomer (denoted 2D) binds one H2O at the sugar-edge site and the other at the trans-amino site between the N1 atom and the NH2 group. For 2-aminopurine·(H2O)3, one isomer (denoted 3A) forms an H-bonded water wire at the sugar-edge site, while isomer 3B accommodates two H2O molecules at the sugar-edge and one at the trans-amino site. The approximate second-order coupled cluster (CC2) method predicts the adiabatic S1 ← S0 transitions of 9H-2-aminopurine and six water cluster isomers with n = 1–3 in very good agreement with the experimental 0(0)(0) frequencies, with differences of <0.6%. The stabilization of the S1(ππ*) state of 2-aminopurine by water clusters is highly regiospecific: Isomers with one or two H2O molecules H-bonded in the trans-amino position induce large spectra red shifts, corresponding to 1ππ* state stabilization of 10–12 kJ/mol, while water-wire cluster solvation at the sugar-edge leads to much smaller stabilization. The evolution of the IR spectra of the water-wire clusters with n = 1–3 that are H-bonded to the sugar-edge site is discussed. Qualitatively different regions (denoted I to IV

  13. Magnetic grain-size variations through an ash flow sheet: Influence on magnetic properties and implications for cooling history

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, J.G.

    1993-07-10

    Rock magnetic studies of tuffs are essential to the interpretation of paleomagnetic data derived from such rocks, provide a basis for interpretation of aeromagnetic data over volcanic terranes, and yield insights into the depositional and cooling histories of ash flow sheets. A rhyolitic ash flow sheet, the Miocene-aged Tiva Canyon Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, contains both titanomagnetite phenocrysts, present in the magma prior to eruption, and cubic Fe-oxide microcrystals that grew after emplacement. Systematic variations in the quantity and magnetic grain size of the microcrystals produce large variations in magnetic properties through a section of the ash flow sheet penetrated in a borehole on the Nevada Test Site. Natural remanent magnetization varies from less than 1 x 10{sup {minus}4} to more than 8 x 10{sup {minus}4} A m{sup 3} kg{sup {minus}1}, and in-phase magnetic susceptibility varies from less than 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} to more than 10 x 10{sup {minus}6} m{sup 3} kg{sup {minus}1}. The microcrystals, which include both magnetite and maghemite, have Curie points and maximum unblocking temperatures between 580{degrees}C and 640{degrees}C. Rock magnetic data, including in-phase and quadrature magnetic susceptibilities as well as hysteresis parameters, demonstrate that these microcrystals are of superparamagnetic and single-domain sizes. Titanomagnetite phenocrysts are the dominant remanence carriers in the central 50 m of the section, whereas microcrystals are important contributors to remanent magnetization and magnetic susceptibility in two 15-m-thick zones at the top and bottom. Within these zones the size of microcrystals decreases both toward the quenched margins and toward the interior of the sheet. The decrease in microcrystal size toward the interior of the sheet is interpreted to indicate the presence of a cooling break; possibly represented by a concentration of pumice. 32 refs., 11 figs.

  14. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Stewart, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

  15. Pliocene cooling enhanced by flow of low-salinity Bering Sea water to the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Horikawa, Keiji; Martin, Ellen E.; Basak, Chandranath; Onodera, Jonaotaro; Seki, Osamu; Sakamoto, Tatsuhiko; Ikehara, Minoru; Sakai, Saburo; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    Warming of high northern latitudes in the Pliocene (5.33–2.58 Myr ago) has been linked to the closure of the Central American Seaway and intensification of North Atlantic Deep Water. Subsequent cooling in the late Pliocene may be related to the effects of freshwater input from the Arctic Ocean via the Bering Strait, disrupting North Atlantic Deep Water formation and enhancing sea ice formation. However, the timing of Arctic freshening has not been defined. Here we present neodymium and lead isotope records of detrital sediment from the Bering Sea for the past 4.3 million years. Isotopic data suggest the presence of Alaskan glaciers as far back as 4.2 Myr ago, while diatom and C37:4 alkenone records show a long-term trend towards colder and fresher water in the Bering Sea beginning with the M2 glaciation (3.3 Myr ago). We argue that the introduction of low-salinity Bering Sea water to the Arctic Ocean by 3.3 Myr ago preconditioned the climate system for global cooling. PMID:26119338

  16. Pliocene cooling enhanced by flow of low-salinity Bering Sea water to the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Keiji; Martin, Ellen E; Basak, Chandranath; Onodera, Jonaotaro; Seki, Osamu; Sakamoto, Tatsuhiko; Ikehara, Minoru; Sakai, Saburo; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    Warming of high northern latitudes in the Pliocene (5.33-2.58 Myr ago) has been linked to the closure of the Central American Seaway and intensification of North Atlantic Deep Water. Subsequent cooling in the late Pliocene may be related to the effects of freshwater input from the Arctic Ocean via the Bering Strait, disrupting North Atlantic Deep Water formation and enhancing sea ice formation. However, the timing of Arctic freshening has not been defined. Here we present neodymium and lead isotope records of detrital sediment from the Bering Sea for the past 4.3 million years. Isotopic data suggest the presence of Alaskan glaciers as far back as 4.2 Myr ago, while diatom and C37:4 alkenone records show a long-term trend towards colder and fresher water in the Bering Sea beginning with the M2 glaciation (3.3 Myr ago). We argue that the introduction of low-salinity Bering Sea water to the Arctic Ocean by 3.3 Myr ago preconditioned the climate system for global cooling. PMID:26119338

  17. Pliocene cooling enhanced by flow of low-salinity Bering Sea water to the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, Keiji; Martin, Ellen E.; Basak, Chandranath; Onodera, Jonaotaro; Seki, Osamu; Sakamoto, Tatsuhiko; Ikehara, Minoru; Sakai, Saburo; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2015-06-01

    Warming of high northern latitudes in the Pliocene (5.33-2.58 Myr ago) has been linked to the closure of the Central American Seaway and intensification of North Atlantic Deep Water. Subsequent cooling in the late Pliocene may be related to the effects of freshwater input from the Arctic Ocean via the Bering Strait, disrupting North Atlantic Deep Water formation and enhancing sea ice formation. However, the timing of Arctic freshening has not been defined. Here we present neodymium and lead isotope records of detrital sediment from the Bering Sea for the past 4.3 million years. Isotopic data suggest the presence of Alaskan glaciers as far back as 4.2 Myr ago, while diatom and C37:4 alkenone records show a long-term trend towards colder and fresher water in the Bering Sea beginning with the M2 glaciation (3.3 Myr ago). We argue that the introduction of low-salinity Bering Sea water to the Arctic Ocean by 3.3 Myr ago preconditioned the climate system for global cooling.

  18. Clustering and relative velocity of heavy particles under gravitational settling in isotropic turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guodong; He, Guo-Wei

    2015-11-01

    Clustering and intermittency in radial relative velocity (RRV) of heavy particles of same size settling in turbulent flows can be remarkably changed due to gravity. Clustering is monotonically reduced at Stokes number less than 1 under gravity due to the disability of the centrifugal mechanism, however it is non-monotonically enhanced at Stokes number greater than 1 due to the multiplicative amplification in the case that the proposed effective Kubo number is less than 1. Although gravity causes monotonical reduction in the rms of RRV of particles at a given Stokes number with decreasing Froude number, the variation tendency in the tails of standardized PDF of RRV versus Froude number is obviously different: the tails become narrower at a small Stokes number, while they become broader at a large Stokes number. The mechanism of this variation stems from the compromise between the following two competing factors. The mitigation of correlation of particle positions and the regions of high strain rate which are more intermittent reduces the intermittency in RRV at small Stokes numbers, while the significant reduction in the backward-in-time relative separations will make particle pairs see small-scale structures, leading to a higher intermittency in RRV at large Stokes numbers. NSAF of China (grant number U1230126); NSFC (grant numbers 11072247 and 11232011).

  19. Determination of cluster composition in heteroaggregation of binary particle systems by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rollié, Sascha; Sundmacher, Kai

    2008-12-01

    Cluster composition in aggregation processes of multiple particle species can be dynamically determined by flow cytometry if particle populations are fluorescently labeled. By flow cytometric single particle analysis, aggregates can be characterized according to the exact amount of constituent particles, allowing the detailed and separate quantification of homo- and heteroaggregation. This contribution demonstrates the application of flow cytometry for the experimental detection of heteroaggregation in a binary particle mixture of oppositely charged polystyrene (PS) particles and Rhodamine-B labeled melamine-formaldehyde (MF-RhB) particles. Experiments with different particle concentration, temperature, mixing mode, ionic strength and particle mixing ratio are presented. Aggregation kinetics are enhanced with increasing particle concentration and temperature as well as by increased shear of mixing. These results represent well-known behavior published in previous investigations and validate the performance of flow cytometry for probing heteroaggregation processes. Physical insight with a novel level of detail is gained by the quantification of de- and restabilization phenomena. At low ionic strength, "raspberry"-type aggregates with PS cores are formed by primary heteroaggregation. At moderate particle number ratios, these aggregates are electrostatically destabilized and form more complex aggregates in a secondary heteroaggregation process. At high particle number ratios (> or =50:1), the raspberry-type aggregates are electrostatically restabilized and secondary heteroaggregation is prevented. The dynamic change of aggregate charge was verified by zeta-potential measurements. The elevation of salt concentration over several orders of magnitude retards aggregation dynamics, since attractive interparticle forces are diminished by an electrostatic double layer. This indicates that heteroaggregation induced by attractive interparticle forces is faster than aggregation

  20. Additions to compact heat exchanger technology: Jet impingement cooling & flow & heat transfer in metal foam-fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstad, Andrew J.

    Compact heat exchangers have been designed following the same basic methodology for over fifty years. However, with the present emphasis on energy efficiency and light weight of prime movers there is increasing demand for completely new heat exchangers. Moreover, new materials and mesoscale fabrication technologies offer the possibility of significantly improving heat exchanger performance over conventional designs. This work involves fundamental flow and heat transfer experimentation to explore two new heat exchange systems: in Part I, large arrays of impinging jets with local extraction and in Part II, metal foams used as fins. Jet impingement cooling is widely used in applications ranging from paper manufacturing to the cooling of gas turbine blades because of the very high local heat transfer coefficients that are possible. While the use of single jet impingement results in non-uniform cooling, increased and more uniform mean heat transfer coefficients may be attained by dividing the total cooling flow among an array of smaller jets. Unfortunately, when the spent fluid from the array's central jets interact with the outer jets, the overall mean heat transfer coefficient is reduced. This problem can be alleviated by locally extracting the spent fluid before it is able to interact with the surrounding jets. An experimental investigation was carried out on a compact impingement array (Xn/Djet = 2.34) utilizing local extraction of the spent fluid (Aspent/Ajet = 2.23) from the jet exit plane. Spatially resolved measurements of the mean velocity field within the array were carried out at jet Reynolds numbers of 2300 and 5300 by magnetic resonance velocimetry, MRV. The geometry provided for a smooth transition from the jet to the target surface and out through the extraction holes without obvious flow recirculation. Mean Nusselt number measurements were also carried out for a Reynolds number range of 2000 to 10,000. The Nusselt number was found to increase with the

  1. Modular jet impingement assemblies with passive and active flow control for electronics cooling

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Feng; Dede, Ercan Mehmet; Joshi, Shailesh

    2016-09-13

    Power electronics modules having modular jet impingement assembly utilized to cool heat generating devices are disclosed. The modular jet impingement assemblies include a modular manifold having a distribution recess, one or more angled inlet connection tubes positioned at an inlet end of the modular manifold that fluidly couple the inlet tube to the distribution recess and one or more outlet connection tubes positioned at an outlet end of the modular manifold that fluidly coupling the outlet tube to the distribution recess. The modular jet impingement assemblies include a manifold insert removably positioned within the distribution recess and include one or more inlet branch channels each including an impinging slot and one or more outlet branch channels each including a collecting slot. Further a heat transfer plate coupled to the modular manifold, the heat transfer plate comprising an impingement surface including an array of fins that extend toward the manifold insert.

  2. Influence of basal slip on the propagation and cooling of lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Oleg; Vedeneeva, Elena; Utkin, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    A thin layer approximation is used for studying of viscous gravity currents on the horizontal topography from a point source. The main difference from a self-similar solution obtained in Huppert (1982) is the account for partial slip of lava on the ground surface. We assume that the slip velocity is proportional to the tangential stress in some positive power. This condition is widely used in polymer science and for the flows on superhydrophobic surfaces. This condition is also applicable for lava flows because of a large roughness of volcanic terrains and the presence of unconsolidated material (ash, lapilli). The system of Stokes equations was reduced to a non-linear parabolic differential equation. Its solution was found both numerically and by a reduction to an ODE that describes similarity solution. In the latter case there is a dependence between lava mass growth rate and the power exponent in the friction law. It was shown that the presence of basal slip allows much faster propagation of lava flows in comparison with no-slip condition at the ground surface. Analytical solutions were proved by a good comparison with fully 2D axisymmetric finite volume simulations. Based on the velocity field obtained from a thin layer theory the heat budget of a lava flow was studied for the case of constant lava viscosity. Heat equation was solved in the lava domain with no flux condition at the bottom, radiative and convective fluxes at the free surface and the influx of a fresh magma from a point source. It was shown that due to a strong difference in the velocity profile the distribution of the temperature inside the lava flow is different in the cases of no-slip and partial slip conditions.

  3. On the Influence of Heating Surface Structure on Bubble Detachment in Sub-Cooled Nucleate Boiling Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Wu; Peipei Chen; Jones, Barclay G.; Newell, Ty A.

    2006-07-01

    This research examines the influence of heating surface structure on bubble detachment, which includes bubble departure and bubble lift-off, under sub-cooled nucleate boiling condition, in order to obtain better understanding to the bubble dynamics on horizontal flat heat exchangers. Refrigerant R-134a is chosen as a simulant fluid due to its merits of having smaller surface tension, reduced latent heat, and lower boiling temperature than water. Experiments were run with varying experimental parameters e.g. pressure, inlet sub-cooled level, and flow rate, etc. High speed digital images at frame rates up to 4000 frames/s were obtained, showing characteristics of bubble movement. Bubble radius and center coordinates were calculated via Canny's algorithm for edge detection and Fitzgibbon's algorithm for ellipse fitting. Results were compared against the model proposed by Klausner et al. for prediction of bubble detachment sizes. Good overall agreement was shown, with several minor modifications and suggestions made to the assumptions of the model. (authors)

  4. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    PubMed Central

    Brust, M.; Aouane, O.; Thiébaud, M.; Flormann, D.; Verdier, C.; Kaestner, L.; Laschke, M. W.; Selmi, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Misbah, C.; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects. PMID:24614613

  5. Propagation characteristics of young hot flow anomalies near the bow shock: Cluster observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, T.; Zhang, H.; Shi, Q. Q.; Zong, Q.-G.; Fu, S. Y.; Tian, A. M.; Sun, W. J.; Wang, S.; Parks, G. K.; Yao, S. T.; Rème, H.; Dandouras, I.

    2015-06-01

    Based on Cluster observations, the propagation velocities and normal directions of hot flow anomaly (HFA) boundaries upstream the Earth's bow shock are calculated. Twenty-one young HFAs, which have clear leading and trailing boundaries, were selected, and multispacecraft timing method considering errors was employed for the investigation. According to the difference in the propagation velocity of the leading and trailing edges, we categorized these events into three groups, namely, contracting, expanding, and stable events. The contraction speed is a few tens of kilometers per second for the contracting HFAs, and the expansion speed is tens to more than hundred kilometers per second for expanding events. For the stable events, the leading and trailing edges propagate at almost the same speed within the error range. We have further investigated what causes them to contract, expand, or stay stable by carefully calculating the thermal pressure of the young HFAs which have two distinct ion populations (solar wind beam and reflected flow). It is found that the extreme value of the sum of the magnetic and thermal pressure inside the HFAs compared with that of the nearest point outside of the leading edges is higher for expanding events and lower for contracting events, and there is no significant difference for the stable events, and the total pressure (sum of thermal, magnetic, and dynamic pressure) variation has a significant effect on the evolution for most (70%) of the HFAs, which implies that the pressure plays an important role in the evolution of young HFAs.

  6. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brust, M.; Aouane, O.; Thiébaud, M.; Flormann, D.; Verdier, C.; Kaestner, L.; Laschke, M. W.; Selmi, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Misbah, C.; Wagner, C.

    2014-03-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects.

  7. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows.

    PubMed

    Brust, M; Aouane, O; Thiébaud, M; Flormann, D; Verdier, C; Kaestner, L; Laschke, M W; Selmi, H; Benyoussef, A; Podgorski, T; Coupier, G; Misbah, C; Wagner, C

    2014-01-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects. PMID:24614613

  8. Study on the dynamic characteristics of flow over building cluster at high Reynolds number by large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, BoBin; Wang, ZhiShi; Cui, GuiXiang; Zhang, ZhaoShun

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the dynamic characteristics of building clusters are simulated by large eddy simulation at high Reynolds number for both homogeneous and heterogeneous building clusters. To save the computational cost a channel-like flow model is applied to the urban canopy with free slip condition at the upper boundary. The results show that the domain height is an important parameter for correct evaluation of the dynamic characteristics. The domain height must be greater than 8 h ( h is the average building height) in order to obtain correct roughness height while displacement height and roughness sublayer are less sensitive to the domain height. The Reynolds number effects on the dynamic characteristics and flow patterns are investigated. The turbulence intensity is stronger inside building cluster at high Reynolds number while turbulence intensity is almost unchanged with Reynolds number above the building cluster. Roughness height increases monotonously with Reynolds number by 20% from Re*=103 to Re*=105 but displacement height is almost unchanged. Within the canopy layer of heterogeneous building clusters, flow structures vary between buildings and turbulence is more active at high Reynolds number.

  9. Oscillatory Ignitions and Cool Flames Accompanying the Non-Isothermal Oxidation of Acetaldehyde in a Well Stirred, Flow Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, P.; Griffiths, J. F.; Hasko, S. M.; Lignola, P.-G.

    1981-02-01

    At the various boundaries between the five regions, sharp jumps occur from one kind of behaviour to another. At three segments of the boundary, there is hysteresis, the jumps occurring at different temperatures during heating (I --> II, III or IV) and cooling (II, III or IV --> I) traverses. There are thus regions of bistability, where identical external conditions - vessel temperatures, reactant pressures and flow rates - can give rise to alternative states inside the reactor. The two non-oscillatory, stationary states have different characters: I is a stable node and V is a stable focus. In region I, the reaction rate increases with temperature; but in region V, both reaction rate and extent of self-heating show a near-zero or negative temperature-coefficient.

  10. A Study on Bubble Departure and Bubble Lift-Off in Sub-Cooled Nucleate Boiling Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wen; Chen, Peipei; Jones, Barclay G.; Newell, Ty A.

    2006-07-01

    This research examines bubble departure and bubble lift-off phenomena under subcooled nucleate boiling condition, using a high fidelity digital imaging apparatus. Refrigerant R- 134a is chosen as a simulant fluid due to its merits of having smaller surface tension, reduced latent heat, and lower boiling temperature than water. Images at frame rates up to 4000 frames/s were obtained with varying experimental parameters e.g. pressure, inlet sub-cooled level, and flow rate, etc., showing characteristics of bubble behavior under different conditions. Bubble size and position information was calculated via Canny's algorithm for edge detection and Fitzgibbon's algorithm for ellipse fitting. Bubble departure and lift-off radiuses were obtained and compared with existing bubble forces and detachment models proposed by Thorncroft et al., with good agreement observed. (authors)

  11. CFD Analysis of Turbulent Flow Phenomena in the Lower Plenum of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    T. Gallaway; S.P. Antal; M.Z. Podowski; D.P. Guillen

    2007-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the implementation of a computational model of turbulent flow in a section of the lower plenum of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). The proposed model has been encoded in a state-of-the-art CFD code, NPHASE. The results of NPHASE predictions have been compared against the experimental data collected using a scaled model of a sub-region in the lower plenum of a modular prismatic gas-cooled reactor. It has been shown that the NPHASE-based model is capable of predicting a three-dimensional velocity field in a complex geometrical configuration of VHTR lower plenum. The current and future validations of computational predictions are necessary for design and analysis of new reactor concepts, as well as for safety analysis and licensing calculations.

  12. Influence of flow velocity on biofilm growth in a tubular heat exchanger-condenser cooled by seawater.

    PubMed

    Trueba, Alfredo; García, Sergio; Otero, Félix M; Vega, Luis M; Madariaga, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    The influence of flow velocity (FV) on the heat transfer process in tubes made from AISI 316L stainless steel in a heat exchanger-condenser cooled by seawater was evaluated based on the characteristics of the resulting biofilm that adhered to the internal surface of the tubes at velocities of 1, 1.2, 1.6, and 3 m s(-1). The results demonstrated that at a higher FV, despite being more compact and consistent, the biofilm was thinner with a lower concentration of solids, and smoother, which favoured the heat transfer process within the equipment. However, higher velocities increase the initial cost of the refrigerating water-pumping equipment and its energy consumption cost to compensate for the greater pressure drops produced in the tube. The velocity of 1.6 m s(-1) represented the equilibrium between the advantages and disadvantages of the variables analysed for the test conditions in this study. PMID:26222187

  13. Liquid-Cooled Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-cooled bra, offshoot of Apollo moon suit technology, aids the cancer-detection technique known as infrared thermography. Water flowing through tubes in the bra cools the skin surface to improve resolution of thermograph image.

  14. Investigating the Synthesis of Ligated Metal Clusters in Solution Using a Flow Reactor and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, Astrid M.; Laskin, Julia; Johnson, Grant E.

    2014-09-18

    The scalable synthesis of subnanometer metal clusters containing an exact number of atoms is of interest due to the highly size-dependent catalytic, electronic and optical properties of these species. While significant research has been conducted on the batch preparation of clusters through reduction synthesis in solution, the processes of metal complex reduction as well as cluster nucleation, growth and post-reduction etching are still not well understood. Herein, we demonstrate a temperature-controlled flow reactor for studying cluster formation in solution at well-defined conditions. Employing this technique methanol solutions of a chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold precursor, 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane capping ligand and borane-tert-butylamine reducing agent were combined in a mixing tee and introduced into a heated capillary with an adjustable length. In this manner, the temperature dependence of the relative abundance of different ionic reactants, intermediates and products synthesized in real time was characterized using online mass spectrometry. A wide distribution of doubly and triply charged cationic gold clusters was observed as well as smaller singly charged metal-ligand complexes. The results demonstrate that temperature plays a crucial role in determining the relative population of cationic gold clusters and, in general, that higher temperature promotes the formation of doubly charged clusters and singly charged metal-ligand complexes while hindering the growth of triply charged clusters. Moreover, the distribution of clusters observed at elevated temperatures is found to be consistent with that obtained at longer reaction times at room temperature, thereby demonstrating that heating may be used to access cluster distributions characteristic of different stages of reduction synthesis in solution.

  15. Simulations of Turbine Cooling Flows Using a Multiblock-Multigrid Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Ameri, Ali A.; Rigby, David L.

    1996-01-01

    Results from numerical simulations of air flow and heat transfer in a 'branched duct' geometry are presented. The geometry contains features, including pins and a partition, as are found in coolant passages of turbine blades. The simulations were performed using a multi-block structured grid system and a finite volume discretization of the governing equations (the compressible Navier-Stokes equations). The effects of turbulence on the mean flow and heat transfer were modeled using the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. The computed results are compared to experimental data. It was found that the extent of some regions of high heat transfer was somewhat under predicted. It is conjectured that the underlying reason is the local nature of the turbulence model which cannot account for upstream influence on the turbulence field. In general, however, the comparison with the experimental data is favorable.

  16. An analytical study of the effect of coolant flow variables on the kinetic energy output of a cooled turbine blade flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prust, H. W., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    The results of an analytical study to determine the effect of changes in the amount, velocity, injection location, injection angle, and temperature of coolant flow on blade row performance are presented. The results show that the change in output of a cooled turbine blade row relative to the specific output of the uncooled blade row can be positive, negative, or zero. Comparisons between the analytical results and experimental results for four different cases of coolant discharge, all at a coolant temperature ratio of unity, show good agreement for three cases and rather poor agreement for the other. To further test the validity of the method, more experimental data is needed, particularly at different coolant temperature ratios.

  17. Cool Indonesian throughflow as a consequence of restricted surface layer flow.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Arnold L; Susanto, R Dwi; Vranes, Kevin

    2003-10-23

    Approximately 10 million m3 x s(-1) of water flow from the Pacific Ocean into the Indian Ocean through the Indonesian seas. Within the Makassar Strait, the primary pathway of the flow, the Indonesian throughflow is far cooler than estimated earlier, as pointed out recently on the basis of ocean current and temperature measurements. Here we analyse ocean current and stratification data along with satellite-derived wind measurements, and find that during the boreal winter monsoon, the wind drives buoyant, low-salinity Java Sea surface water into the southern Makassar Strait, creating a northward pressure gradient in the surface layer of the strait. This surface layer 'freshwater plug' inhibits the warm surface water from the Pacific Ocean from flowing southward into the Indian Ocean, leading to a cooler Indian Ocean sea surface, which in turn may weaken the Asian monsoon. The summer wind reversal eliminates the obstructing pressure gradient, by transferring more-saline Banda Sea surface water into the southern Makassar Strait. The coupling of the southeast Asian freshwater budget to the Pacific and Indian Ocean surface temperatures by the proposed mechanism may represent an important negative feedback within the climate system. PMID:14574409

  18. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  19. Tunable far-IR laser spectroscopy of jet-cooled carbon clusters - The nu-2 bending vibration of C3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmuttenmaer, C. A.; Cohen, R. C.; Pugliano, N.; Heath, J. R.; Cooksy, A. L.

    1990-01-01

    Seven rovibrational transitions of the (01/1/0)-(00/0/0) fundamental bending band of C3 have been measured with high precision with the use of a tunable far-infrared laser spectrometer. The C3 molecules were produced by laser vaporization of a graphite rod and cooled in a supersonic expansion. The astrophysically important nu-2 fundamental frequency is determined to be 63.416529(40)/cm. These measurements provide the basis for studies of C3 in the interstellar medium with far-infrared astronomy.

  20. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    DOEpatents

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  1. Rotor cavity flow and heat transfer with inlet swirl and radial outflow of cooling air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staub, F. W.

    1992-06-01

    To enhance the reliability of turbine disk life prediction, experimental verification is necessary for analytical tools which calculate the heat transfer and flow field coefficients in turbine-stator cavities. A full-scale model of the forward cavity of a typical aircraft gas turbine is utilized employing a high-molecular-weight gas (Refrigerant-12) at ambient temperature and pressure conditions to match the dimensionless parameters at engine conditions. A first-order comparison is given of the velocity distribution and disk heat transfer coefficients calculated by the measured values and a CFD code.

  2. Effect of local cooling on skin temperature and blood flow of men in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, M.; Sachdeva, U.

    1993-12-01

    Alterations to the finger skin temperature (Tsk) and blood flow (FBF) before and after cold immersion on exposure to an Antarctic environment for 8 weeks were studied in 64 subjects. There was a significant fall in Tsk and increase in finger blood flow after 1 week of Antarctic exposure. The Tsk did not further change even after 8 weeks of stay in Antarctica but a significant increase in FBF was obtained after 8 weeks. The cold immersion test was performed at non-Antarctic and Antarctic conditions by immersing the hand for 2 min in 0 4° C cold water. In the non-Antarctic environment the Tsk and FBF dropped significantly ( P < 0.001) indicating a vasoconstriction response. Interestingly after 8 weeks of stay in Antarctic conditions, the skin temperature dropped ( P < 0.001) but the cold induced fall in FBF was inhibited. Based on these observations it may be hypothesized that continuous cold exposure in Antarctica results in vasodilatation, which overrides the stronger vasoactive response of acute cold exposure and thus prevents cold injuries.

  3. Cooling performance of a nanofluid flow in a heat sink microchannel with axial conduction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadi, M.; Shahmardan, M. M.; Norouzi, M.; Rashidi, A. M.; Behzadmehr, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the forced convection of a nanofluid flow in a microscale duct has been investigated numerically. The governing equations have been solved utilizing the finite volume method. Two different conjugated domains for both flow field and substrate have been considered in order to solve the hydrodynamic and thermal fields. The results of the present study are compared to those of analytical and experimental ones, and a good agreement has been observed. The effects of Reynolds number, thermal conductivity and thickness of substrate on the thermal and hydrodynamic indexes have been studied. In general, considering the wall affected the thermal parameter while it had no impact on the hydrodynamics behavior. The results show that the effect of nanoparticle volume fraction on the increasing of normalized local heat transfer coefficient is more efficient in thick walls. For higher Reynolds number, the effect of nanoparticle inclusion on axial distribution of heat flux at solid-fluid interface declines. Also, less end losses and further uniformity of axial heat flux lead to an increase in the local normalized heat transfer coefficient.

  4. Cooling performance of a nanofluid flow in a heat sink microchannel with axial conduction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadi, M.; Shahmardan, M. M.; Norouzi, M.; Rashidi, A. M.; Behzadmehr, A.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the forced convection of a nanofluid flow in a microscale duct has been investigated numerically. The governing equations have been solved utilizing the finite volume method. Two different conjugated domains for both flow field and substrate have been considered in order to solve the hydrodynamic and thermal fields. The results of the present study are compared to those of analytical and experimental ones, and a good agreement has been observed. The effects of Reynolds number, thermal conductivity and thickness of substrate on the thermal and hydrodynamic indexes have been studied. In general, considering the wall affected the thermal parameter while it had no impact on the hydrodynamics behavior. The results show that the effect of nanoparticle volume fraction on the increasing of normalized local heat transfer coefficient is more efficient in thick walls. For higher Reynolds number, the effect of nanoparticle inclusion on axial distribution of heat flux at solid-fluid interface declines. Also, less end losses and further uniformity of axial heat flux lead to an increase in the local normalized heat transfer coefficient.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope observations of the Kepler-field cluster NGC 6819 - I. The bottom of the white dwarf cooling sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedin, L. R.; Salaris, M.; Anderson, J.; Cassisi, S.; Milone, A. P.; Piotto, G.; King, I. R.; Bergeron, P.

    2015-04-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to reach the end of the white dwarf (WD) cooling sequence (CS) in the solar-metallicity open cluster NGC 6819. Our photometry and completeness tests show a sharp drop in the number of WDs along the CS at magnitudes fainter than mF606W = 26.050 ± 0.075. This implies an age of 2.25 ± 0.20 Gyr, consistent with the age of 2.25 ± 0.30 Gyr obtained from fits to the main-sequence turn-off. The use of different WD cooling models and initial-final-mass relations have a minor impact the WD age estimate, at the level of ˜0.1 Gyr. As an important by-product of this investigation we also release, in electronic format, both the catalogue of all the detected sources and the atlases of the region (in two filters). Indeed, this patch of sky studied by HST (of size ˜70 arcmin2) is entirely within the main Kepler-mission field, so the high-resolution images and deep catalogues will be particularly useful.

  6. Numerical Investigation of the Flow Dynamics and Evaporative Cooling of Water Droplets Impinging onto Heated Surfaces: An Effective Approach To Identify Spray Cooling Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Rui-Na; Ouyang, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Pei-Xue

    2016-09-13

    Numerical investigations of the dynamics and evaporative cooling of water droplets impinging onto heated surfaces can be used to identify spray cooling mechanisms. Droplet impingement dynamics and evaporation are simulated using the presented numerical model. Volume-of-fluid method is used in the model to track the free surface. The contact line dynamics was predicted from a dynamic contact angle model with the evaporation rate predicted by a kinetic theory model. A species transport equation was solved in the gas phase to describe the vapor convection and diffusion. The numerical model was validated by experimental data. The physical effects including the contact angle hysteresis and the thermocapillary effect are analyzed to offer guidance for future numerical models of droplet impingement cooling. The effects of various parameters including surface wettability, surface temperature, droplet velocity, droplet size, and droplet temperature were numerically studied from the standpoint of spray cooling. The numerical simulations offer profound analysis and deep insight into the spray cooling heat transfer mechanisms. PMID:27531256

  7. Transient convective structures in a cooled water layer in the presence of a drift flow and a surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutov, V. P.; Rybushkina, G. V.

    2016-02-01

    The paper is concerned with three-dimensional convective structures arising in a water layer cooled from above and covered by an adsorbed insoluble surfactant. The water is subjected to a laminar drift flow produced by tangential stresses on a free surface. The surface diffusion of the surfactant are taken into account within the approximation of a nondeformable flat surface. After appropriate reformulation of standard equations governing gravity-capillary convection and surfactant concentration, the problem is solved numerically using a pseudospectral method employed in our previous work. Development of the convective structures with increasing Reynolds number, surfactant film elasticity, and layer thickness is studied. The minimal layer thickness is chosen taking into account the results of relevant laboratory experiments. The cell-to-roll transition is revealed in the thin layer with increasing Reynolds number. The role of dissipation due to the surfactant film is elucidated by comparison with purely gravitational convection. The turbulent convection arising in a thicker layer subjected to a laminar shear flow is examined. Disordered streets containing elongated cells and swirl-like motions are revealed. Images of the surface temperature and the perturbed surfactant concentration are compared.

  8. Studies of Entropy Distributions in X-ray Luminous Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnolo, K. W.; Donahue, M. E.; Voit, G. M.; Sun, M.; Evrard, A. E.

    2005-12-01

    We present entropy distributions for a sample of galaxy clusters from the Chandra public archive, which builds on our previous analysis of nine nearby, bright clusters. By studying the entropy distribution within clusters we quantify the effect of radiative cooling, supernovae feedback, and AGN feedback on cluster properties. This expanded sample contains both cooling flow and non-cooling flow clusters while our previous work focused only on classical cooling flow clusters. We also test the predictions of Mathiesen and Evrard (2001) by checking whether the spectral fit temperature is an unbiased estimate of the mass-weighted temperature, and how this estimate effects the calculation of the intracluster medium mass. Temperature and entropy maps for the clusters in our sample using the Voronoi Tesselation method as employed by Statler et al (in preparation) will also be presented. These maps serve as a prelude to future work in which we will investigate how well such maps may represent the "true" projected quantities of a cluster by comparing deprojected real and simulated clusters from our sample and the Virtual Cluster Exploratory, respectively. Our discussion focuses on tying together feedback mechanisms with the breaking of self-similar relations expected in cluster and galaxy formation models.

  9. Star and cluster formation in NGC 1275

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richer, Harvey B.; Crabtree, Dennis R.; Fabian, A. C.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1993-01-01

    Luminous, blue, and unresolved objects have been found by imaging the nuclear region of the central galaxy in the Perseus Cluster, NGC 1275. Stellar formation in a cooling flow in which gas clouds confined by weak magnetic fields are allowed to remain at low densities is favored. Cloud-cloud collisions and coagulation in the high cloud density environment at the center of the galaxy then causes some clouds to become gravitationally unstable and to form globular clusters.

  10. A numerical model for gas-droplet flow application to liquid spray and cooling towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinacht, P.; Buchlin, J. M.

    1982-07-01

    A two dimensional model consisting of coupled sets of equations governing the gas and liquid phases is presented. Modeling the gas phase as a continuum allows use of the Navier-Stokes equations with momentum source terms included. The particle-gas momentum exchange and the influence of the gas flow on the droplet trajectories results in a coupling of both of these sets of equations. Numerical solution of these equations is made in an iterative fashion by solving first the liquid phase equations and then the gas phase equations until a steady state solution is reached. Solution of the liquid phase equations by a fourth order Runge-Kutta method allows subsequent determination of the droplet-gas momentum exchange field. The degrading effect of wind on a spray curtain is demonstrated, though calculations show that curtain performance can be improved by tilting the nozzle into the wind.

  11. Simulator test to study hot-flow problems related to a gas cooled reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, J. W.; Freeman, M. P.; Doak, K. W.; Thorpe, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    An advance study of materials, fuel injection, and hot flow problems related to the gas core nuclear rocket is reported. The first task was to test a previously constructed induction heated plasma GCNR simulator above 300 kW. A number of tests are reported operating in the range of 300 kW at 10,000 cps. A second simulator was designed but not constructed for cold-hot visualization studies using louvered walls. A third task was a paper investigation of practical uranium feed systems, including a detailed discussion of related problems. The last assignment resulted in two designs for plasma nozzle test devices that could be operated at 200 atm on hydrogen.

  12. PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MEASUREMENTS IN A REPRESENTATIVE GAS-COOLED PRISMATIC REACTOR CORE MODEL: FLOW IN THE COOLANT CHANNELS AND INTERSTITIAL BYPASS GAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Conder; Richard Skifton; Ralph Budwig

    2012-11-01

    Core bypass flow is one of the key issues with the prismatic Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, and it refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial, non-cooling passages between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. To determine the bypass flow, a double scale representative model was manufactured and installed in the Matched Index-of-Refraction flow facility; after which, stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the flow field within. PIV images were analyzed to produce vector maps, and flow rates were calculated by numerically integrating over the velocity field. It was found that the bypass flow varied between 6.9-15.8% for channel Reynolds numbers of 1,746 and 4,618. The results were compared to computational fluid dynamic (CFD) pre-test simulations. When compared to these pretest calculations, the CFD analysis appeared to under predict the flow through the gap.

  13. EISCAT-Cluster observations of quiet-time near-Earth magnetotail fast flows and their signatures in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitkänen, T.; Aikio, A. T.; Amm, O.; Kauristie, K.; Nilsson, H.; Kaila, K. U.

    2011-02-01

    We report observations of a sequence of quiet-time Earthward bursty bulk flows (BBFs) measured by the Cluster spacecraft in the near-tail plasma sheet (XGSM ~ -12 to -14 RE) in the evening sector, and by simultaneous high-resolution measurements in the northern conjugate ionosphere by the EISCAT radars, a MIRACLE all-sky camera and magnetometers, as well as a meridian-scanning photometer (MSP) in the Scandinavian sector on 17 October 2005. The BBFs at Cluster show signatures that are consistent with the plasma "bubble" model (Chen and Wolf, 1993, 1999), e.g. deflection and compression of the ambient plasma in front of the Earthward moving bubble, magnetic signatures of a flow shear region, and the proper flows inside the bubble. In addition, clear signatures of tailward return flows around the edges of the bubble can be identified. The duskside return flows are associated with significant decrease in plasma density, giving support to the recent suggestion by Walsh et al. (2009) of formation of a depleted wake. However, the same feature is not seen for the dawnside return flows, but rather an increase in density. In the ionosphere, EISCAT and optical measurements show that each of the studied BBFs is associated with an auroral streamer that starts from the vicinity of the polar cap boundary, intrudes equatorward, brakes at 68-70° aacgm MLAT and drifts westward along the proton oval. Within the streamer itself and poleward of it, the ionospheric plasma flow has an equatorward component, which is the ionospheric manifestation of the Earthward BBF channel. A sharp velocity shear appears at the equatorward edge of a streamer. We suggest that each BBF creates a local velocity shear in the ionosphere, in which the plasma flow poleward of and inside the streamer is in the direction of the streamer and southeastward. A northwestward return flow is located on the equatorward side. The return flow is associated with decreased plasma densities both in the ionosphere and in

  14. Kinetic-theory predictions of clustering instabilities in granular flows: beyond the small-Knudsen-number regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrano, Peter P.; Zenk, John R.; Benyahia, Sofiane; Galvin, Janine E.; Dahl, Steven R.; Hrenya, Christine M.

    2013-12-04

    In this work we quantitatively assess, via instabilities, a Navier–Stokes-order (small- Knudsen-number) continuum model based on the kinetic theory analogy and applied to inelastic spheres in a homogeneous cooling system. Dissipative collisions are known to give rise to instabilities, namely velocity vortices and particle clusters, for sufficiently large domains. We compare predictions for the critical length scales required for particle clustering obtained from transient simulations using the continuum model with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The agreement between continuum simulations and MD simulations is excellent, particularly given the presence of well-developed velocity vortices at the onset of clustering. More specifically, spatial mapping of the local velocity-field Knudsen numbers (Knu) at the time of cluster detection reveals Knu » 1 due to the presence of large velocity gradients associated with vortices. Although kinetic-theory-based continuum models are based on a small- Kn (i.e. small-gradient) assumption, our findings suggest that, similar to molecular gases, Navier–Stokes-order (small-Kn) theories are surprisingly accurate outside their expected range of validity.

  15. On using splitter plates and flow guide-vanes for battery module cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismailov, Kairat; Adair, Desmond; Massalin, Yerzhan; Bakenov, Zhumabay

    2016-03-01

    Thermal management of lithium-ion battery modules needs to be an integral part of the design process to guarantee that temperatures remain within a narrow optimal range. Also it is important to minimize uneven distribution of temperature throughout a battery module so as to enhance the battery life cycle, and, charge and discharge performances. This paper explores by simulation, the benefits of attaching thin surfaces extended into the near-wake of cylindrical lithium-ion cells, here termed integral wake splitters, and, of placing flow guide-vane in the vicinity of the near wake, regarding thermal management. When using the integral splitters it is found that the local Nusselt numbers in the very near wake of a single cylindrical cell are depressed and the temperature distribution within the cell was found to be reasonably constant. Similar results were found when the cells are in formation. Use of guide-vanes also show promise in maintaining constant temperature distributions throughout the module.

  16. Fundamental Study of a Jet-in-Cross-Flow Interacting with a Vortex Generator for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Khairul; Rigby, David; Heidmann, James

    2009-01-01

    Results of an experimental study are presented on the effectiveness of a vortex generator (VG) in preventing lift-off of a jet-in-cross-flow (JICF). The study is pertinent to film-cooling applications and its relevance to NASA programs is first briefly discussed. In the experiment, the jet issues into the boundary layer at an angle of 20deg to the free-stream. The effect of a triangular, ramp-shaped VG is studied while varying its geometry and location. Detailed flow-field properties are obtained for a case in which the height of the VG and the diameter of the orifice are comparable to the approach boundary layer thickness. The VG produces a streamwise vortex pair with vorticity magnitude three times larger (and of opposite sense) than that found in the JICF alone. Such a VG appears to be most effective in keeping the jet attached to the wall. The effect of parametric variation is studied mostly from surveys ten diameters downstream from the orifice. Results over a range of jet-to-freestream momentum flux ratio (1

  17. A cluster analysis method for identification of subpopulations of cells in flow cytometric list-mode arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Z. K.

    1985-01-01

    A specialized program was developed for flow cytometric list-mode data using an heirarchical tree method for identifying and enumerating individual subpopulations, the method of principal components for a two-dimensional display of 6-parameter data array, and a standard sorting algorithm for characterizing subpopulations. The program was tested against a published data set subjected to cluster analysis and experimental data sets from controlled flow cytometry experiments using a Coulter Electronics EPICS V Cell Sorter. A version of the program in compiled BASIC is usable on a 16-bit microcomputer with the MS-DOS operating system. It is specialized for 6 parameters and up to 20,000 cells. Its two-dimensional display of Euclidean distances reveals clusters clearly, as does its 1-dimensional display. The identified subpopulations can, in suitable experiments, be related to functional subpopulations of cells.

  18. Infrared laser spectroscopy of jet-cooled carbon clusters: the nu 5 band of linear C9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Orden, A.; Provencal, R. A.; Keutsch, F. N.; Saykally, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The nu 5 antisymmetric stretching vibration of 1 sigma+g C9 has been observed using direct infrared diode laser absorption spectroscopy of a pulsed supersonic cluster beam. Twenty-eight rovibrational transitions measured in the region of 2079-2081 cm-1 were assigned to this band. A combined least squares fit of these transitions with previously reported nu 6 transitions yielded the following molecular constants for the nu 5 band: nu 0 = 2 079.673 58(17) cm-1, B"= 0.014 321 4(10) cm-1, and B'=0.014 288 9(10) cm-1. The IR intensity of the nu 5 band relative to nu 6 was found to be 0.108 +/- 0.006. Theoretical predictions for the relative intensities vary widely depending upon the level of theory employed, and the experimental value reported here is in reasonable agreement only with the result obtained from the most sophisticated ab initio calculation considered (CCSD).

  19. An invariant descriptor for conjugate forced convection-conduction cooling of 3D protruding heaters in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini Alves, Thiago; Santos, Paulo H. D.; Barbur, Murilo A.

    2015-09-01

    In this research, the temperatures of threedimensional (3D) protruding heaters mounted on a conductive substrate in a horizontal rectangular channel with laminar airflow are related to the independent power dissipation in each heater by using a matrix G + with invariant coefficients, which are dimensionless. These coefficients are defined in this study as the conjugate influence coefficients ( g +) caused by the forced convection- conduction nature of the heaters' cooling process. The temperature increase of each heater in the channel is quantified to clearly identify the contributions attributed to the self-heating and power dissipation in the other heaters (both upstream and downstream). The conjugate coefficients are invariant with the heat generation rate in the array of heaters when assuming a defined geometry, invariable fluid and flow rate, and constant substrate and heater conductivities. The results are numerically obtained by considering three 3D protruding heaters on a twodimensional (2D) array by ANSYS/Fluent™ 15.0 software. The conservation equations are solved by a coupled procedure within a single calculation domain comprising of solid and fluid regions and by considering a steady state laminar airflow with constant properties. Some examples are shown, indicating the effects of substrate thermal conductivity and Reynolds number on conjugate influence coefficients.

  20. Massive molecular gas flows in the a1664 brightest cluster galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, H. R.; McNamara, B. R.; Main, R. A.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Edge, A. C.; Wilman, R. J.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Combes, F.; Salomé, P.; Fabian, A. C.; Murray, N.; Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.; Donahue, M.; Voit, G. M.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Tremblay, G. R.

    2014-03-20

    We report ALMA Early Science CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) observations of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in A1664. The BCG contains 1.1 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} of molecular gas divided roughly equally between two distinct velocity systems: one from –250 to +250 km s{sup –1} centered on the BCG's systemic velocity and a high-velocity system blueshifted by 570 km s{sup –1} with respect to the systemic velocity. The BCG's systemic component shows a smooth velocity gradient across the BCG center, suggestive of rotation about the nucleus. However, the mass and velocity structure are highly asymmetric and there is little star formation coincident with a putative disk. It may be an inflow of gas that will settle into a disk over several 10{sup 8} yr. The high-velocity system consists of two gas clumps, each ∼2 kpc across, located to the north and southeast of the nucleus. Each has a line of sight velocity spread of 250-300 km s{sup –1}. The velocity of the gas in the high-velocity system increases toward the BCG center and may be a massive flow into the nucleus. However, the velocity gradient is not smooth. These structures are also coincident with low optical-ultraviolet surface brightness regions, which could indicate dust extinction associated with each clump. The structure is complex, making a clear interpretation difficult, but if the dusty, molecular gas lies predominantly in front of the BCG, the blueshifted velocities would indicate an outflow. Based on the energy requirements, such a massive outflow would most likely be driven by the active galactic nucleus. A merger origin is unlikely but cannot be ruled out.

  1. Cluster observations of the dusk flank magnetopause near the sash: Ion dynamics and flow-through reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Nelson C.; Farrugia, Charles J.; Burke, William J.; Ober, Daniel M.; Mozer, Forrest S.; Rème, Henri; Dunlop, Malcolm; Siebert, Keith D.

    2012-10-01

    Compared to the dayside, dynamics on the flanks of the magnetopause are poorly understood. To help bridge this knowledge gap we analyzed Cluster plasma and field measurements acquired during a 90-min period on 20 November 2003 when Cluster crossed the magnetopause four times in the vicinity of the sash. MHD simulations provide a context for Cluster observations. Crossings were between the magnetosheath and an S-shaped plasma sheet, rather than to the open-field lobes of the magnetotail. Cluster encountered two regions of MHD-breaking differences between perpendicular ion velocities and E × B convection. Ion adiabatic expansion parameter (δi) calculations show that ion gyrotropy was not broken during an episode of strong Alfvén wave activity in the magnetosheath. However, gyrotropy was broken (δi > 1) during the fourth magnetopause crossing. In the magnetosheath, ion guiding-center motion was maintained but inertial effects associated with temporally varying electric fields are probable sources of velocity differences. Regarding the magnetopause crossing, the generalized Ohm's law limits possible sources for breaking ion gyrotropy to inertial forces and/or electron pressure gradients associated with a nearby reconnection event. We suggest that Cluster witnessed effects of a temporally varying and spatially limited, flow-through reconnection event between open mantle field lines from the two polar caps adding new closed flux to the LLBL at the sash. Future modeling of flank dynamics must consider inertial forces as significant drivers at the magnetopause and in the adjacent magnetosheath.

  2. Hydrogen film cooling investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Ewen, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Effects of flow turning, flow acceleration, and supersonic flow on film cooling were determined experimentally and correlated in terms of an entrainment film cooling model. Experiments were conducted using thin walled metal test sections, hot nitrogen mainstream gas, and ambient hydrogen or nitrogen as film coolants. The entrainment film cooling model relates film cooling effectiveness to the amount of mainstream gases entrained with the film coolant in a mixing layer. The experimental apparatus and the analytical model used are described in detail and correlations for the entrainment fraction and film coolant-to-wall heat transfer coefficient are presented.

  3. Analysis of Coolant-flow Requirements for an Improved, Internal-strut-supported, Air-cooled Turbine-rotor Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Wilson B; Nachtigall, Alfred J

    1952-01-01

    An analytical evaluation of a new typ An analytical evaluation of a new type of air-cooled turbine-rotor-blade design, based on the principle of submerging the load-carrying element in cooling air within a thin high-temperature sheel, indicates that this principle of blade design permits the load carrying element to be operated at considerably lower temperature than that of the enveloping shell. Comparison with an air-cooled shell-supported air-cooled blade has greater potentiality to withstand increased stresses that can be anticipated in future engines.

  4. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  5. Effect of grazing flow on the acoustic impedance of Helmholtz resonators consisting of single and clustered orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersch, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1979-01-01

    A semiempirical fluid mechanical model is derived for the acoustic behavior of thin-walled single orifice Helmholtz resonators in a grazing flow environment. The incident and cavity sound fields are connected in terms of an orifice discharge coefficient whose values are determined experimentally using the two-microphone method. Measurements show that at high grazing flow speeds, acoustical resistance is almost linearly proportional to the grazing flow speed and almost independent of incident sound pressure. The corresponding values of reactance are much smaller and tend towards zero. For thicker-walled orifice plates, resistance and reactance were observed to be less sensitive to grazing flow as the ratio of plate thickness to orifice diameter increased. Loud tones were observed to radiate from a single orifice Helmholtz resonator due to interaction between the grazing flow shear layer and the resonator cavity. Measurements showed that the tones radiated at a Strouhal number equal to 0.26. The effects of grazing flow on the impedance of Helmholtz resonators consisting of clusters of orifices was also studied. In general, both resistance and reaction were found to be virtually independent of orifice relative spacing and number. These findings are valid with and without grazing flow.

  6. Method for Calculation of Laminar Heat Transfer in Air Flow Around Cylinders of Arbitrary Cross Section (including Large Temperature Differences and Transpiration Cooling)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R; Livingood, John N B

    1953-01-01

    The solution of heat-transfer problems has become vital for many aeronautical applications. The shapes of objects to be cooled can often be approximated by cylinders of various cross sections with flow normal to the axis as, for instance heat transfer on gas-turbine blades and on air foils heated for deicing purposes. A laminar region always exists near the stagnation point of such objects. A method previously presented by E. R. G. Eckert permits the calculation of local heat transfer around the periphery of cylinders of arbitrary cross section in the laminar region for flow of a fluid with constant property values with an accuracy sufficient for engineering purposes. The method is based on exact solutions of the boundary-layer equations for incompressible wedge-type flow and on the postulate that at any point on the cylinder the boundary-layer growth is the same as that on a wedge with comparable flow conditions. This method is extended herein to take into account the influence of large temperature differences between the cylinder wall and the flow as well as the influence of transpiration cooling when the same medium as the outside flow is used as coolant.

  7. Searching for 300, 000 Degree Gas in the Core of the Phoenix Cluster with HST-COS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The high central density of the intracluster medium in some galaxy clusters suggests that the hot 10,000,000K gas should cool completely in less than a Hubble time. In these clusters, simple cooling models predict 100-1000 solar masses per year of cooling gas should fuel massive starbursts in the central galaxy. The fact that the typical central cluster galaxy is a massive, "red and dead" elliptical galaxy, with little evidence for a cool ISM, has led to the realization of the "cooling flow problem". It is now thought that mechanical feedback from the central supermassive blackhole, in the form of radio-blown bubbles, is offsetting cooling, leading to an exceptionally precise {residuals of less than 10 percent} balance between cooling and feedback in nearly every galaxy cluster in the local Universe. In the recently-discovered Phoenix cluster, where z=0.596, we observe an 800 solar mass per year starburst within the central galaxy which accounts for about 30 percent of the classical cooling prediction for this system. We speculate that this may represent the first "true" cooling flow, with the factor of 3 difference between cooling and star formation being attributed to star formation efficiency, rather than a problem with cooling. In order to test these predictions, we propose far-UV spectroscopic observations of the OVI 1032A emission line, which probes 10^5.5K gas, in the central galaxy of the Phoenix cluster. If detected at the expected levels, this would provide compelling evidence that the starburst is, indeed, fueled by runaway cooling of the intracluster medium, confirming the presence of the first, bonafide cooling flow.

  8. A scaling study of the natural circulation flow of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400 for designing a scale-down test facility for design verification

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, B. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.; Revankar, S. T.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper a scaling study on the steady state natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400 is described, and the scaling criteria for reproducing the same steady state thermalhydraulic characteristics of the natural circulation flow as a prototype core catcher cooling system in the scale-down test facility are derived in terms of the down-comer pipe diameter and orifice resistance. (authors)

  9. Analysis of loss-of-coolant and loss-of-flow accidents in the first wall cooling system of NET/ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komen, E. M. J.; Koning, H.

    1994-03-01

    This paper presents the thermal-hydraulic analysis of potential accidents in the first wall cooling system of the Next European Torus or the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. Three ex-vessel loss-of-coolant accidents, two in-vessel loss-of-coolant accidents, and three loss-of-flow accidents have been analyzed using the thermal-hydraulic system analysis code RELAP5/MOD3. The analyses deal with the transient thermal-hydraulic behavior inside the cooling systems and the temperature development inside the nuclear components during these accidents. The analysis of the different accident scenarios has been performed without operation of emergency cooling systems. The results of the analyses indicate that a loss of forced coolant flow through the first wall rapidly causes dryout in the first wall cooling pipes. Following dryout, melting in the first wall starts within about 130 s in case of ongoing plasma burning. In case of large break LOCAs and ongoing plasma burning, melting in the first wall starts about 90 s after accident initiation.

  10. Cold-air performance of a 12.766-centimeter-tip-diameter axial-flow cooled turbine. 1: Design and performance of a solid blade configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1975-01-01

    A solid blade version of a single-stage, axial-flow turbine was investigated to determine its performance over a range of speeds from 0 to 105 percent of equivalent design speed and over a range of total to static pressure ratios from 1.62 to 5.07. The results of this investigation will be used as a baseline for comparison with those obtained from a cooled version of this turbine.

  11. Flow visualization of film cooling with spanwise injection from a small array of holes and compound-angle injection from a large array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Film injection from discrete holes in a smooth, flat plate was studied for two configurations: (1) spanwise injection through a four hole staggered array; and (2) compound angle injection through a 49 hole staggered array. The ratio of boundary layer thicknesses to hole diameter and the Reynolds number were typical of gas turbine film cooling applications. Streaklines showing the motion of the injected air were obtained by photographing small, neutrally buoyant, helium-filled soap bubbles that followed the flow field.

  12. Clustering Instability in Sedimenting Gas-Solid Suspensions and its Influence on Flow Properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoqi; Yin, Xiaolong; Liu, Guodong

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that sedimentation or fluidization of solid particles through gas is unstable. Instability is usually recognized as particle clusters when the solid fraction is low, or as void `bubbles' when the solid volume fraction is high. Using particle-resolved numerical simulations, we studied cluster formation in gas-solid systems with gas-to-solid density ratio being 0.01 and 0.001. The particles are uniformly sized spheres with a terminal Re of 30. The solid fraction is 0.25. Up to 4808 particles were used such that the clustering phenomena can be adequately examined. In periodic computational domains whose lateral dimension is about eight particle diameters, nucleated particle clusters quickly coalesce and grow into traveling waves that span the entire width of the domain. Consequently, gas-solid drag is significantly increased compared to that in a homogeneous liquid-solid suspension, the lateral velocity variance is suppressed, and the particle velocity distributions are strongly non-Gaussian. When lateral dimension is increased to about thirty particle diameters, particle clusters never turn into width-spanning traveling waves. As results, the drag is similar to that in a homogeneous suspension, the lateral velocity variance is strongly enhanced and the vertical variance reduced, and particle velocity distributions are nearly Gaussian. These results suggest that the effect of particle clusters should be examined in domains with large lateral dimensions.

  13. Test of a forced-flow cooled 30 kA/23 kV current lead for the POLO model coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, R.; Friesinger, G.; Herz, W.; Irmisch, M.; Nother, G.; Schappals, L.; Schweikert, K.; Siewerdt, L.; Susser, M.; Ulbricht, A.

    1994-07-01

    A 30 kA/23 kV current lead cooled by forced-flow supercritical helium has been developed at KfK. It allows position independent installation and well controlled operation which would be advantageous for operation of all kind of superconducting forced-flow cooled magnets. The design of the lead is described in this paper. The main feature is the insertion of Nb3Sn wires inside the conductor of the heat exchanger allowing the operation at minimum mass flow in a wide current range. Measurement results are presented for steady-state operation up to 30 kA, for short time operation up to 50 kA, for pulsed operation up to +/-1000 A at 10 Hz, and for simulation of loss of mass flow. A high-voltage test up to 28 kV DC (direct current) has been done. The mass flow rate normalized to current is about 0.055 g/(s-kA) for 15 to 30 kA proving the effectiveness of the Nb3Sn inserts. Comparison to numerical calculations shows good agreement allowing extrapolation for the design of leads for currents up to 80 kA for ITER model coil tests in the TOSKA test facility at KfK.

  14. Formation of perched lava ponds on basaltic volcanoes: Interaction between cooling rate and flow geometry allows estimation of lava effusion rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.; Parfitt, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Perched lava ponds are infrequent but distinctive topographic features formed during some basaltic eruptions. Two such ponds, each approximately 150 m in diameter, formed during the 1968 eruption at Napau Crater and the 1974 eruption of Mauna Ulu, both on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Each one formed where a channelized, high volume flux lava flow encountered a sharp reduction of slope: the flow spread out radially and stalled, forming a well-defined terminal levee enclosing a nearly circular lava pond. We describe a model of how cooling limits the motion of lava spreading radially into a pond and compare this with the case of a channelized flow. The difference in geometry has a major effect, such that the size of a pond is a good indicator of the volume flux of the lava forming it. Lateral spreading on distal shallow slopes is a major factor limiting the lengths of lava flows.

  15. Development and Evaluation of an Externally Air-Cooled Low-Flow torch and the Attenuation of Space Charge and Matrix Effects in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Praphairaksit, N.

    2000-09-12

    An externally air-cooled low-flow torch has been constructed and successfully demonstrated for applications in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The torch is cooled by pressurized air flowing at {approximately}70 L/min through a quartz air jacket onto the exterior of the outer tube. The outer gas flow rate and operating RF forward power are reduced considerably. Although plasmas can be sustained at the operating power as low as 400 W with a 2 L/min of outer gas flow, somewhat higher power and outer gas flows are advisable. A stable and analytical useful plasma can be obtained at 850 W with an outer gas flow rate of {approximately}4 L/min. Under these conditions, the air-cooled plasma produces comparable sensitivities, doubly charged ion ratios, matrix effects and other analytical merits as those produced by a conventional torch while using significantly less argon and power requirements. Metal oxide ion ratios are slightly higher with the air-cooled plasma but can be mitigated by reducing the aerosol gas flow rate slightly with only minor sacrifice in analyte sensitivity. A methodology to alleviate the space charge and matrix effects in ICP-MS has been developed. A supplemental electron source adapted from a conventional electron impact ionizer is added to the base of the skimmer. Electrons supplied from this source downstream of the skimmer with suitable amount and energy can neutralize the positive ions in the beam extracted from the plasma and diminish the space charge repulsion between them. As a result, the overall ion transmission efficiency and consequent analyte ion sensitivities are significantly improved while other important analytical aspects, such as metal oxide ion ratio, doubly charged ion ratio and background ions remain relatively unchanged with the operation of this electron source. This technique not only improves the ion transmission efficiency but also minimizes the matrix effects drastically. The matrix-induced suppression

  16. Design of Cooling Channels of Preburners for Small Liquid Rocket Engines with Computational Flow and Heat Transfer Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, In-Sang; Lee, Seon-Mi; Moon, Il-Yoon; Yoo, Jae-Han; Lee, Soo-Yong

    2011-09-01

    A series of computational analyses was performed to predict the cooling process by the cooling channel of preburners used for kerosene-liquid oxygen staged combustion cycle rocket engines. As an oxygen-rich combustion occurs in the kerosene fueled preburner, it is of great importance to control the wall temperature so that it does not exceed the critical temperature. However, since the heat transfer is proportional to the speed of fluid running inside the channel, the high heat transfer leads to a trade-off of pressure loss. For this reason, it is necessary to establish a certain criteria between the pressure loss and the heat transfer or the wall surface temperature. The design factors of the cooling channel were determined by the computational research, and a test model was manufactured. The test model was used for the hot fire tests to prove the function of the cooling mechanism, among other purposes.

  17. Studies of shock/shock interaction on smooth and transpiration-cooled hemispherical nosetips in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, M. S.; Rodriguez, K. M.; Nowak, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental studies are conducted to examine the utilization of transpiration cooling to reduce the peak-heating loads in areas of shock/shock interaction. Smooth and transpiration-cooled nosetip models, 12 inches in diameter, were employed in these studies, which focused on defining the pressure distributions and heat transfer in type III and IV interaction areas. Transpiration cooling was determined to significantly increase the size of the shock layer and to move the peak-heating point around the body. A transpiration-cooling rate of more than 30 percent of the freestream maximum flux did not lower the peak-heating level more than 10 percent, but the integrated heating loads were reduced.

  18. Estimate of the Total Mechanical Feedback Energy from Galaxy Cluster-centered Black Holes: Implications for Black Hole Evolution, Cluster Gas Fraction, and Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, William G.; Guo, Fulai

    2011-09-01

    The total feedback energy injected into hot gas in galaxy clusters by central black holes can be estimated by comparing the potential energy of observed cluster gas profiles with the potential energy of non-radiating, feedback-free hot gas atmospheres resulting from gravitational collapse in clusters of the same total mass. Feedback energy from cluster-centered black holes expands the cluster gas, lowering the gas-to-dark-matter mass ratio below the cosmic value. Feedback energy is unnecessarily delivered by radio-emitting jets to distant gas far beyond the cooling radius where the cooling time equals the cluster lifetime. For clusters of mass (4-11) × 1014 M sun, estimates of the total feedback energy, (1-3) × 1063 erg, far exceed feedback energies estimated from observations of X-ray cavities and shocks in the cluster gas, energies gained from supernovae, and energies lost from cluster gas by radiation. The time-averaged mean feedback luminosity is comparable to those of powerful quasars, implying that some significant fraction of this energy may arise from the spin of the black hole. The universal entropy profile in feedback-free gaseous atmospheres in Navarro-Frenk-White cluster halos can be recovered by multiplying the observed gas entropy profile of any relaxed cluster by a factor involving the gas fraction profile. While the feedback energy and associated mass outflow in the clusters we consider far exceed that necessary to stop cooling inflow, the time-averaged mass outflow at the cooling radius almost exactly balances the mass that cools within this radius, an essential condition to shut down cluster cooling flows.

  19. Clustering and maximal flow in vehicular traffic through a sequence of traffic lights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2007-04-01

    We study the maximal current (maximum traffic capacity) of vehicular traffic through a sequence of traffic lights on a highway, where all signals turn on and off synchronously. The dynamical model of vehicular traffic controlled by signals is expressed in terms of a nonlinear map, where the excluded-volume effect is taken into account. The dynamical behaviors of vehicles are clarified by analyzing traffic patterns. The clustering of vehicles varies with the cycle time of signals. The maximum current is closely connected to vehicular clustering. Clustering of vehicles is controlled by varying both split and cycle time of signals. The dependence of the maximal current on both split and cycle time is derived.

  20. Properties of The Brightest Cluster Galaxy and Its Host Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, H.; Hayashida, K.; Takahara, F.

    2001-09-01

    We investigate the relation between the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) and its host cluster. A BCG is a bright and massive elliptical galaxy in a cluster of galaxies. The luminosity of a BCG is 10 times larger than that of normal field galaxy and the mass of a BCG is about 1013Msolar which corresponds to that of galaxy group. In order to explain the origin of BCGs, the following three models are proposed: (1) star formation from cooling flow. In this model, intracluster gas gradually condenses at the center of the cluster and forms the BCG. (2) ``Galactic cannibalism'' or the accretion of smaller galaxies. In this model, dynamical friction accounts for the formation of the BCG. These two models predict the BCG evolves with the evolution of cluster. (3) Galaxy merging in the early history of the formation of the cluster. In this model, the property of BCGs is determined no later than cluster collapse. In any model, the formation of BCGs is related to the collapse and formation of its host cluster. The relation between the BCG and its host cluster was studied by Edge (1991). Edge (1991) found that the optical luminosity of the BCG is positively correlated with the X-ray luminosity and temperature of its host cluster. Edge (1991) concludes that these correlations indicate that the BCG responds to the overall cluster properties. In order to investigate the other relation between the BCG and its host cluster, we analyzed ROSAT archival data and compared the displacement between the X-ray peak and the BCG with the Z parameter of the fundamental relation found by Fujita and Takahara (1999). It is found that the displacement is larger with decreasing Z. Furthermore, the large Z clusters tend to have a regular X-ray profile, which implies a relaxed system. The fundamental parameter Z depends mainly on the virial density ρvir, and is considered to be related to the formation epoch of the cluster, i.e., large Z clusters are old clusters and small Z clusters are young

  1. Minerals produced during cooling and hydrothermal alteration of ash flow tuff from Yellowstone drill hole Y-5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keith, T.E.C.; Muffler, L.J.P.

    1978-01-01

    A rhyolitic ash-flow tuff in a hydrothermally active area within the Yellowstone caldera was drilled in 1967, and cores were studied to determine the nature and distribution of primary and secondary mineral phases. The rocks have undergone a complex history of crystallization and hydrothermal alteration since their emplacement 600,000 years ago. During cooling from magmatic temperatures, the glassy groundmass underwent either devitrification to alkali feldspar + ??-cristobalite ?? tridymite or granophyric crystallization to alkali feldspar + quartz. Associated with the zones of granophyric crystallization are prismatic quartz crystals in cavities similar to those termed miarolitic in plutonic rocks. Vapor-phase alkali feldspar, tridymite, magnetite, and sporadic ??-cristobalite were deposited in cavities and in void spaces of pumice fragments. Subsequently, some of the vapor-phase alkali feldspar crystals were replaced by microcrystalline quartz, and the vapor-phase minerals were frosted by a coating of saccharoidal quartz. Hydrothermal minerals occur primarily as linings and fillings of cavities and fractures and as altered mafic phenocrysts. Chalcedony is the dominant mineral related to the present hydrothermal regime and occurs as microcrystalline material mixed with various amounts of hematite and goethite. The chalcedony displays intricate layering and was apparently deposited as opal from silica-rich water. Hematite and goethite also replace both mafic phenocrysts and vapor-phase magnetite. Other conspicuous hydrothermal minerals include montmorillonite, pyrite, mordenite, calcite, and fluorite. Clinoptilolite, erionite, illite, kaolinite, and manganese oxides are sporadic. The hydrothermal minerals show little correlation with temperature, but bladed calcite is restricted to a zone of boiling in the tuff and clearly was deposited when CO2 was lost during boiling. Fractures and breccias filled with chalcedony are common throughout Y-5 and may have been

  2. Cosmological Implications of ROSAT Observations of Distant Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, J.; Jones, C.; Forman, W.; Donnally, R. H.; Rines, K. J.

    1996-12-01

    We have used ROSAT HRI observations to study the structure and properties of clusters of galaxies at redshifts of z = 0.2 - 0.33. In our sample of thirteen clusters, seven show obvious substructure in the form of double peaked emission, elliptical iso-intensity contours, and offset centers. For a subset of nine clusters in our sample, the standard isothermal-hydrostatic model has been used to determine physical properties of the hot gas distribution of the clusters. From the measured high, central gas densities and short cooling times, we conclude that at least six of these nine clusters possess cooling flows in their cores. The gas density distributions were used to determine the gas masses of the clusters. With temperatures determined from ASCA observations (Rines, 1997), the total gravitational masses for Abell 963, CL 1358+6245, Abell 2219, Abell 115, and Abell 2390 have been computed within 1 Mpc (H_0 = 50 km s(-1) Mpc(-1) . The gas mass fractions within 1 Mpc measured for these clusters average ~ 25%, and range from 0.16% to 0.32%. As galaxies only contribute a small fraction of the total mass of the clusters, we can essentially take this to be the baryon fraction, f_b. Assuming light-element nucleosynthesis, the f_b for these clusters, and others (e.g. David et al. 1995), requires Omega to be much smaller than unity, and thus does not support the standard inflationary model for a closed universe. In a comparison with a sample of nearby clusters we find that the weighted average core radius for the clusters in our sample falls below the average nearby core radius. But, scatter in our sample and a strong possibility of sample bias towards clusters with small core radii (cooling flow clusters) places doubt on an actual increase in core radius size from z = 0.2 to the present. The cosmological implications of these results will be discussed.

  3. Investigation of heat transfer and flow using ribs within gas turbine blade cooling passage: Experimental and hybrid LES/RANS modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sourabh

    Gas turbines are extensively used for aircraft propulsion, land based power generation and various industrial applications. Developments in innovative gas turbine cooling technology enhance the efficiency and power output, with an increase in turbine rotor inlet temperatures. These advancements of turbine cooling have allowed engine design to exceed normal material temperature limits. For internal cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to hot stream are based on the increase of heat transfer areas and on promotion of turbulence of the cooling flow. In this study, it is obtained by casting repeated continuous V and broken V shaped ribs on one side of the two pass square channel into the core of blade. Despite extensive research on ribs, only few papers have validated the numerical data with experimental results in two pass channel. In the present study, detailed experimental investigation is carried out for two pass square channels with 180° turn. Detailed heat transfer distribution occurring in the ribbed passage is reported for steady state experiment. Four different combinations of 60° and Broken 60° V ribs in channel are considered. Thermocouples are used to obtain the temperature on the channel surface and local heat transfer coefficients are obtained for various Reynolds numbers, within the turbulent flow regime. Area averaged data are calculated in order to compare the overall performance of the tested ribbed surface and to evaluate the degree of heat transfer enhancement induced by the ribs with. Flow within the channels is characterized by heat transfer enhancing ribs, bends, rotation and buoyancy effects. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were carried out for the same geometries using different turbulence models such as k-o Shear stress transport (SST) and Reynolds stress model (RSM). These CFD simulations were based on advanced computing in order to improve the accuracy of three dimensional metal

  4. Hierarchical Bayesian clustering for nonstationary flood frequency analysis: Application to trends of annual maximum flow in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xun; Lall, Upmanu; Merz, Bruno; Dung, Nguyen Viet

    2015-08-01

    Especially for extreme precipitation or floods, there is considerable spatial and temporal variability in long term trends or in the response of station time series to large-scale climate indices. Consequently, identifying trends or sensitivity of these extremes to climate parameters can be marked by high uncertainty. When one develops a nonstationary frequency analysis model, a key step is the identification of potential trends or effects of climate indices on the station series. An automatic clustering procedure that effectively pools stations where there are similar responses is desirable to reduce the estimation variance, thus improving the identification of trends or responses, and accounting for spatial dependence. This paper presents a new hierarchical Bayesian approach for exploring homogeneity of response in large area data sets, through a multicomponent mixture model. The approach allows the reduction of uncertainties through both full pooling and partial pooling of stations across automatically chosen subsets of the data. We apply the model to study the trends in annual maximum daily stream flow at 68 gauges over Germany. The effects of changing the number of clusters and the parameters used for clustering are demonstrated. The results show that there are large, mainly upward trends in the gauges of the River Rhine Basin in Western Germany and along the main stream of the Danube River in the south, while there are also some small upward trends at gauges in Central and Northern Germany.

  5. Evaporative Cooling Membrane Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis (Inventor); Moskito, John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An evaporative cooling membrane device is disclosed having a flat or pleated plate housing with an enclosed bottom and an exposed top that is covered with at least one sheet of hydrophobic porous material having a thin thickness so as to serve as a membrane. The hydrophobic porous material has pores with predetermined dimensions so as to resist any fluid in its liquid state from passing therethrough but to allow passage of the fluid in its vapor state, thereby, causing the evaporation of the fluid and the cooling of the remaining fluid. The fluid has a predetermined flow rate. The evaporative cooling membrane device has a channel which is sized in cooperation with the predetermined flow rate of the fluid so as to produce laminar flow therein. The evaporative cooling membrane device provides for the convenient control of the evaporation rates of the circulating fluid by adjusting the flow rates of the laminar flowing fluid.

  6. Analysis of Regen Cooling in Rocket Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Brent (Technical Monitor); Merkle, C. L.; Li, D.; Sankaran, V.

    2004-01-01

    The use of detailed CFD modeling for the description of cooling in rocket chambers is discussed. The overall analysis includes a complete three-dimensional analysis of the flow in the regenerative cooling passages, conjugate heat transfer in the combustor walls, and the effects of film cooling on the inside chamber. The results in the present paper omit the effects of film cooling and include only regen cooling and the companion conjugate heat transfer. The hot combustion gases are replaced by a constant temperature wall boundary condition. Load balancing for parallel cluster computations is ensured by using single-block unstructured grids for both fluids and solids, and by using a 'multiple physical zones' to account for differences in the number of equations. Validation of the method is achieved by comparing simple two-dimensional solutions with analytical results. Representative results for cooling passages are presents showing the effects of heat conduction in the copper walls with tube aspect ratios of 1.5:l.

  7. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  8. Regeneratively cooled transition duct with transversely buffered impingement nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Jay A; Lee, Ching-Pang; Crawford, Michael E

    2015-04-21

    A cooling arrangement (56) having: a duct (30) configured to receive hot gases (16) from a combustor; and a flow sleeve (50) surrounding the duct and defining a cooling plenum (52) there between, wherein the flow sleeve is configured to form impingement cooling jets (70) emanating from dimples (82) in the flow sleeve effective to predominately cool the duct in an impingement cooling zone (60), and wherein the flow sleeve defines a convection cooling zone (64) effective to cool the duct solely via a cross-flow (76), the cross-flow comprising cooling fluid (72) exhausting from the impingement cooling zone. In the impingement cooling zone an undimpled portion (84) of the flow sleeve tapers away from the duct as the undimpled portion nears the convection cooling zone. The flow sleeve is configured to effect a greater velocity of the cross-flow in the convection cooling zone than in the impingement cooling zone.

  9. Investigation of Advanced Counterrotation Blade Configuration Concepts for High Speed Turboprop Systems. Task 8: Cooling Flow/heat Transfer Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Topp, David A.; Heidegger, Nathan J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    The focus of this task was to validate the ADPAC code for heat transfer calculations. To accomplish this goal, the ADPAC code was modified to allow for a Cartesian coordinate system capability and to add boundary conditions to handle spanwise periodicity and transpiration boundaries. The primary validation case was the film cooled C3X vane. The cooling hole modeling included both a porous region and grid in each discrete hold. Predictions for these models as well as smooth wall compared well with the experimental data.

  10. Optimum Conditions for the Efficacy and Safety of Cryofiltration Apheresis: An Analysis of Circuit Temperatures Depending on Plasma Flow Rate and Cooling Coil Lengths/Turns.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hirofumi; Kaneko, Shuzo; Sato, Yukihiro; Takano, Tomoo; Hosino, Toshihisa

    2015-08-01

    A system providing both appropriate cooling and warming are needed for the efficacy and safety of cryofiltration (CF) plasmapheresis. We measured some points of CF circuit temperatures with varying plasma flow rates (QP  = 10-40 mL/min) and the numbers of connecting cooling coils (one or two) under the conditions of blood flow rate (QB ) 100 mL/min with 7700-mm coil length, 19 turns, and 50-mL priming volume. We measured the respective temperatures of each point of starting/returning for an extracorporeal circuit (TA /TV ), intracooling coil (TC ), and post-plasma fractionator (PF) (TPF ). The subtraction of TV from TA (ΔT) was used as an indicator of safe return. There were no significant differences in TC , TPF , or ΔT in accordance with each QP between that of one and two coils. All of the Tc values under the condition QP  ≤ 20 mL/min achieved <4°C. The TPF under the condition QP  ≥ 20 mL/min was not significantly different compared to that of QP 30 mL/min (the lowest condition). Although the ΔT increased depending on the QP increase, the ΔT under the condition QP  ≤ 15 mL/min was not significantly different from that of the control (one-way double-filtration plasmapheresis [DFPP]) group. We conclude that (i) one coil is enough for effective cooling in CF, and (ii) an ideal QP that fulfills the required conditions for both effective cooling and sufficient warming of returning fluid does not exist, but QP from 15 to 20 mL/min may be a relevant range. PMID:26386219

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Program to Measure the Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor Lower Plenum for Validation of CFD Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-09-01

    The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a prismatic gas-cooled reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A description of the scaling analysis, experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that will be presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits high-quality measurements to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL MIR system is its large size which allows improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements

  12. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  13. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    2000-01-01

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  14. Turbine blade cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

  15. CD33 monoclonal antibody conjugated Au cluster nano-bioprobe for targeted flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Jayasimhan, Jasusri; Chandran, Parwathy; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Mony, Ullas; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-07-01

    Protein stabilized gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) are biocompatible, near-infrared (NIR) emitting nanosystems having a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report the development of a Au-NC based targeted fluorescent nano-bioprobe for the flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. Au-NCs with ~ 25-28 atoms showing bright red-NIR fluorescence (600-750 nm) and average size of ~ 0.8 nm were prepared by bovine serum albumin assisted reduction-cum-stabilization in aqueous phase. The protein protected clusters were conjugated with monoclonal antibody against CD33 myeloid antigen, which is overexpressed in ~ 99.2% of the primitive population of AML cells, as confirmed by immunophenotyping using flow cytometry. Au-NC-CD33 conjugates having average size of ~ 12 nm retained bright fluorescence over an extended duration of ~ a year, as the albumin protein protects Au-NCs against degradation. Nanotoxicity studies revealed excellent biocompatibility of Au-NC conjugates, as they showed no adverse effect on the cell viability and inflammatory response. Target specificity of the conjugates for detecting CD33 expressing AML cells (KG1a) in flow cytometry showed specific staining of ~ 95.4% of leukaemia cells within 1-2 h compared to a non-specific uptake of ~ 8.2% in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) which are CD33low. The confocal imaging also demonstrated the targeted uptake of CD33 conjugated Au-NCs by leukaemia cells, thus confirming the flow cytometry results. This study demonstrates that novel nano-bioprobes can be developed using protein protected fluorescent nanoclusters of Au for the molecular receptor targeted flow cytometry based detection and imaging of cancer cells.

  16. Studies of shock/shock interaction on smooth and transpiration-cooled hemispherical nosetips in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen M.

    1992-01-01

    A program of experimental research and analysis was conducted to examine the heat transfer and pressure distributions in regions of shock/shock interaction over smooth and transpiration-cooled hemispherical noseshapes. The objective of this investigation was to determine whether the large heat transfer generated in regions of shock/shock interaction can be reduced by transpiration cooling. The experimental program was conducted at Mach numbers of 12 to 16 in the Calspan 48-Inch Shock Tunnel. Type 3 and type 4 interaction regions were generated for a range of freestream unit Reynolds numbers to provide shear layer Reynolds numbers from 10 exp 4 to 10 exp 6 to enable laminar and turbulent interaction regions to be studied. Shock/shock interactions were investigated on a smooth hemispherical nosetip and a similar transpiration-cooled nosetip, with the latter configuration being examined for a range of surface blowing rates up to one-third of the freestream mass flux. While the heat transfer measurements on the smooth hemisphere without shock/shock interaction were in good agreement with Fay-Riddell predictions, those on the transpiration-cooled nosetip indicated that its intrinsic roughness caused heating-enhancement factors of over 1.5. In the shock/shock interaction studies on the smooth nosetip, detailed heat transfer and pressure measurements were obtained to map the variation of the distributions with shock-impingement position for a range of type 3 and type 4 interactions. Such sets of measurements were obtained for a range of unit Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers to obtain both laminar and turbulent interactions. The measurements indicated that shear layer transition has a significant influence on the heating rates for the type 4 interaction as well as the anticipated large effects on type 3 interaction heating. In the absence of blowing, the peak heating in the type 3 and type 4 interaction regions, over the transpiration-cooled model, did not appear to be

  17. Experimental heat transfer and flow results of a chordwise-finned turbine vane with impingement, film, and convection cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, J. W.; Lane, J. M.; Dengler, R. P.; Hickel, R. O.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental heat transfer data are presented for a vane tested in a turbojet engine at turbine inlet gas temperatures to 1644 K (2500 F), coolant temperatures to 700 K (800 F), and coolant-to-gas flow ratios to 0.187. Methods are presented for correlating heat transfer data and obtaining coolant flow distribution through the vane. Calculated and measured coolant flow distributions and vane metal temperatures are compared.

  18. Jet array impingement flow distributions and heat transfer characteristics. Effects of initial crossflow and nonuniform array geometry. [gas turbine engine component cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florschuetz, L. W.; Metzger, D. E.; Su, C. C.; Isoda, Y.; Tseng, H. H.

    1982-01-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of circular air jets impinging on a heat transfer surface parallel to the jet orifice plate are considered. The jet flow, after impingement, is constrained to exit in a single direction along the channel formed by the jet orifice plate and the heat transfer surface. The configurations considered are intended to model those of interest in current and contemplated gas turbine airfoil midchord cooling applications. The effects of an initial crossflow which approaches the array through an upstream extension of the channel are considered. Flow distributions as well as heat transfer coefficients and adiabatic wall temperatures resolved to one streamwise hole spacing were measured as a function of the initial crossflow rate and temperature relative to the jet flow rate and temperature. Both Nusselt number profiles and dimensionless adiabatic wall temperature (effectiveness) profiles are presented and discussed. Special test results which show a significant reduction of jet orifice discharge coefficients owing to the effect of a confined crossflow are also presented, along with a flow distribution model which incorporates those effects. A nonuniform array flow distribution model is developed and validated.

  19. Biophysical controls on cluster dynamics and architectural differentiation of microbial biofilms in contrasting flow environments.

    PubMed

    Hödl, Iris; Mari, Lorenzo; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Suweis, Samir; Besemer, Katharina; Rinaldo, Andrea; Battin, Tom J

    2014-03-01

    Ecology, with a traditional focus on plants and animals, seeks to understand the mechanisms underlying structure and dynamics of communities. In microbial ecology, the focus is changing from planktonic communities to attached biofilms that dominate microbial life in numerous systems. Therefore, interest in the structure and function of biofilms is on the rise. Biofilms can form reproducible physical structures (i.e. architecture) at the millimetre-scale, which are central to their functioning. However, the spatial dynamics of the clusters conferring physical structure to biofilms remains often elusive. By experimenting with complex microbial communities forming biofilms in contrasting hydrodynamic microenvironments in stream mesocosms, we show that morphogenesis results in 'ripple-like' and 'star-like' architectures--as they have also been reported from monospecies bacterial biofilms, for instance. To explore the potential contribution of demographic processes to these architectures, we propose a size-structured population model to simulate the dynamics of biofilm growth and cluster size distribution. Our findings establish that basic physical and demographic processes are key forces that shape apparently universal biofilm architectures as they occur in diverse microbial but also in single-species bacterial biofilms. PMID:23879839

  20. X-Ray Emission from a Simulated Cluster of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, John C.; Katz, Neal; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1994-01-01

    Using the 1993 cluster simulation of Katz & White, we analyze the intracluster medium and investigate the accuracy of the standard hydrostatic method for determining cluster masses. We show that the simulated cluster gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium with a subsonic flow toward the center. Inside a radius of (approx.) 100 kpc, this flow is in a steady state. The cooling time is shorter than a Hubble time within the central 50 kpc. The flow rate is regulated by the gas sink in the middle of the cluster and the PdV work done as the gas flows in, verifying the standard cooling flow scenario. We simulate observations of the cluster using the instrument parameters of the EXOSAT ME detector and the Einstein IPC detector. Even though the intracluster gas is not isothermal, isothermal models of the cluster, excluding regions within 100 kpc of galaxies, fit the EXOSAT X-ray spectra as well as they fit real clusters. The X- ray surface brightness distribution is similar to that of real clusters, again excluding the galaxies. We simulate the procedure used to determine the masses of real clusters. We use the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium together with the temperature derived from an isothermal fit to the simulated EXOSAT spectrum and the density profile derived from a fit to the simulated IPC surface brightness profile to determine the mass. A comparison of the derived mass profile to the actual mass profile shows that errors of a factor of 2 are possible. If the actual temperature profile is used, the cluster mass is found to an accuracy of better than 25% within the virial radius.

  1. Aqueous Iron-Sulfide Clusters in Variably Saturated Soil Systems: Implications for Iron Cycling and Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. T.; Hansen, D. J.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2008-12-01

    Iron and sulfur cycling is an important control on contaminant fate and transport, the availability of micronutrients and the physics of water flow. This study explores the effects of soil structure (i.e. layers, lenses, macropores, or fractures) on linked biogeochemical and hydrological processes involving Fe and S cycling in the vadose zone using packed soil columns. Three laboratory soil columns were constructed: a homogenized medium-grained sand, homogenized organic-rich loam, and a sand-over-loam layered column. Both upward and downward infiltration of water was evaluated during experiments to simulate rising water table and rainfall events respectively. Water samples extracted by lysimeter were analyzed for reduced species (including total sulfide, Fe(II), and FeSaq) voltammetrically using a mercury drop electrode. In addition to other reduced species, aqueous FeS clusters (FeSaq) were observed in two of the columns, with the greatest concentrations of FeSaq occurring in close proximity to the soil interface in the layered column. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of aqueous FeS clusters in partially saturated sediments. The aqueous nature of FeSaq allows it to be transported instead of precipitating and suggests that current conceptual models of iron-sulfur cycling may need to be adapted to account for an aqueous phase. The presence of iron-rich soil aggregates near the soil interface may indicate that FeS clusters played a critical role in the formation of soil aggregates that subsequently caused up to an order of magnitude decrease in hydraulic conductivity.

  2. A study on the effect of various design parameters on the natural circulation flow rate of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of EU-APR1400

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, B. W.; Ha, K. S.; Park, R. J.; Song, J. H.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a study on the effect of various design parameters such as the channel gap width, heat flux distribution, down-comer pipe size and two-phase flow slip ratio on the natural circulation flow rate is performed based on a physical model for a natural circulation flow along the flow path of the ex-vessel core catcher cooling system of an EU-APR1400, and these effects on the natural circulation flow rate are analyzed and compared with the minimum flow rate required for the safe operation of the system. (authors)

  3. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sanger, Philip Albert; Lindberg, Frank A.; Garcen, Walter

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  4. EFFECTS OF COMPTON COOLING ON OUTFLOW IN A TWO-COMPONENT ACCRETION FLOW AROUND A BLACK HOLE: RESULTS OF A COUPLED MONTE CARLO TOTAL VARIATION DIMINISHING SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Garain, Sudip K.; Ghosh, Himadri; Chakrabarti, Sandip K. E-mail: himadri@bose.res.in

    2012-10-20

    We investigate the effects of cooling of the Compton cloud on the outflow formation rate in an accretion disk around a black hole. We carry out a time-dependent numerical simulation where both the hydrodynamics and the radiative transfer processes are coupled together. We consider a two-component accretion flow in which the Keplerian disk is immersed into an accreting low-angular momentum flow (halo) around a black hole. The soft photons which originate from the Keplerian disk are inverse-Comptonized by the electrons in the halo and the region between the centrifugal pressure supported shocks and the horizon. We run several cases by changing the rate of the Keplerian disk and see the effects on the shock location and properties of the outflow and the spectrum. We show that as a result of Comptonization of the Compton cloud, the cloud becomes cooler with the increase in the Keplerian disk rate. As the resultant thermal pressure is reduced, the post-shock region collapses and the outflow rate is also reduced. Since the hard radiation is produced from the post-shock region, and the spectral slope increases with the reduction of the electron temperature, the cooling produces softer spectrum. We thus find a direct correlation between the spectral states and the outflow rates of an accreting black hole.

  5. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  6. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, E.P. Jr.

    1999-01-12

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed there between. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock. 2 figs.

  7. Nozzleless Spray Cooling Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar Man; Yeo, Leslie; Friend, James; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming Kwang

    2015-11-01

    Due to its reliability and portability, surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomization is an attractive approach for the generation of monodispersed microdroplets in microfluidics devices. Here, we present a nozzleless spray cooling technique via SAW atomization with key advantage of downward scalability by simply increasing the excitation frequency. With generation of micron size droplets through surface destabilization using SAW, the clogging issues commonly encountered by spraying nozzle can be neutralized. Using deionised water, cooling is improved when the atomization rate is increased and the position of the device is optimized such that the atomized droplets can be easily seeded into the upstream of the flow circulation. Cooling is further improved with the use of nanofluids; a suspension of nanoparticles in water. By increasing nanoparticle mass concentration from 1% to 3%, cooling is enhanced due to the deposition and formation of nanoparticle clusters on heated surface and eventually increase the surface area. However, further increase the concentration to 10% reduces the cooling efficiency due to drastic increase in viscosity μ that leads to lower atomization rate which scales as ṁ ~μ - 1 / 2 .

  8. Dynamics of the poor clusters MKW 4 and AWM 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malumuth, E. M.; Kriss, G. A.

    1986-09-01

    The authors have obtained redshifts and CCD photometry of nearly complete samples of galaxies within 1 Mpc of the centers of the Morgan poor clusters MKW 4 and AWM 4. These data are used to study the luminosity functions and the mass distributions of the clusters. For MKW 4 the authors have obtained a sufficient number of galaxy velocities (32) to construct a dynamical model for the cluster. Using the derived potential, they match the observed X-ray surface brightness profile if they allow for a weak cooling flow in the hot gas and if they take the mass distribution of the central galaxy into account. For AWM 4 no well-constrained models of the mass distribution could be obtained, but the best fitting models also give good agreement with X-ray data if a weak cooling flow in the hot gas is assumed.

  9. Enstrophy along particle trajectories through vortex clusters in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackl, Jason; Jimenez, Javier

    2013-11-01

    We augment the traditional study of wall-bounded turbulence from the Eulerian point of view by analyzing the Lagrangian trajectories of fluid tracers tracked in a DNS of a turbulent channel at Reτ = 2000 . After storing consecutive fields for 50 wall units in time, ensembles of O (106) particles seeded on short detached vortex clusters centered at both y+ ~ 200 and the core of the channel are tracked backward (Tb+ = - 50) in time, then restarted forward. Velocity gradients are interpolated along trajectories for these particles for a total duration of 100 units (Tforward+ = 50 past the seeding instant), providing representative histories of enstrophy acquisition and loss by fluid particles throughout the expected lifetime of intense vortical structures. The statistics of initial position X (Tb+ = - 50) , along with joint and conditional statistics of temporal increments of velocity and vorticity throughout the complete simulation (from T+ = - 50 to 50), describe how the structures above the buffer layer, typically educed from Eulerian variables, act on fluid, clarifying our understanding. The corresponding results for particles initialized in the core are compared to the particles initialized around vortices centered at y+ = 200 . Supported by ERC MULTIFLOW and BSC-RES FI-2013-1-0028.

  10. SWIFT—Scalable Clustering for Automated Identification of Rare Cell Populations in Large, High-Dimensional Flow Cytometry Datasets, Part 2: Biological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mosmann, Tim R; Naim, Iftekhar; Rebhahn, Jonathan; Datta, Suprakash; Cavenaugh, James S; Weaver, Jason M; Sharma, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    A multistage clustering and data processing method, SWIFT (detailed in a companion manuscript), has been developed to detect rare subpopulations in large, high-dimensional flow cytometry datasets. An iterative sampling procedure initially fits the data to multidimensional Gaussian distributions, then splitting and merging stages use a criterion of unimodality to optimize the detection of rare subpopulations, to converge on a consistent cluster number, and to describe non-Gaussian distributions. Probabilistic assignment of cells to clusters, visualization, and manipulation of clusters by their cluster medians, facilitate application of expert knowledge using standard flow cytometry programs. The dual problems of rigorously comparing similar complex samples, and enumerating absent or very rare cell subpopulations in negative controls, were solved by assigning cells in multiple samples to a cluster template derived from a single or combined sample. Comparison of antigen-stimulated and control human peripheral blood cell samples demonstrated that SWIFT could identify biologically significant subpopulations, such as rare cytokine-producing influenza-specific T cells. A sensitivity of better than one part per million was attained in very large samples. Results were highly consistent on biological replicates, yet the analysis was sensitive enough to show that multiple samples from the same subject were more similar than samples from different subjects. A companion manuscript (Part 1) details the algorithmic development of SWIFT. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. PMID:24532172

  11. An experimental study on sub-cooled flow boiling CHF of R134a at low pressure condition with atmospheric pressure (AP) plasma assisted surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seung Jun; Zou, Ling; Jones, Barclay G.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, sub-cooled flow boiling critical heat flux tests at low pressure were conducted in a rectangular flow channel with one uniformly heated surface, using simulant fluid R-134a as coolant. The experiments were conducted under the following conditions: (1) inlet pressure (P) of 400-800 kPa, (2) mass flux (G) of 124-248 kg/m2s, (3) inlet sub-cooling enthalpy (ΔHi) of 12~ 26 kJ/kg. Parametric trends of macroscopic system parameters (G, P, Hi) were examined by changing inlet conditions. Those trends were found to be generally consistent with previous understandings of CHF behavior at low pressure condition (i.e. reduced pressure less than 0.2). A fluid-to-fluid scaling model was utilized to convert the test data obtained with the simulant fluid (R-134a) into the prototypical fluid (water). The comparison between the converted CHF of equivalent water and CHF look-up table with same operation conditions were conducted, which showed good agreement. Furthermore, the effect of surface wettability on CHF was also investigated by applying atmospheric pressure plasma (AP-Plasma) treatment to modify the surface characteristic. With AP-Plasma treatment, the change of microscopic surface characteristic was measured in terms of static contact angle. The static contact angle was reduced from 80° on original non-treated surface to 15° on treated surface. An enhancement of 18% on CHF values under flow boiling conditions were observed on AP-Plasma treated surfaces compared to those on non-treated heating surfaces.

  12. Influence of temporal noise on the skin blood flow measurements performed by cooled thermal imaging camera: limit possibilities within each physiological frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagaidachnyi, A. A.; Volkov, I. U.; Fomin, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes limit possibilities of modern cooled thermal imaging cameras as a tool for estimation of blood flow oscillations at the surface of living body. Skin temperature oscillations, as we assumed, are a consequence of the blood flow oscillations. We considered the temperature sensitivity 0.01-0.02 °C as a typical for the most of modern cooled long wave thermal imaging cameras. Fourier filter used to investigate the temperature signal separately within endothelial, neurogenic, myogenic, respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges. The level of temporal noise has been estimated during measurements of no living body with stabilized temperature ~ 24°C. The level of temperature oscillations has been calculated for the group of healthy subjects within each frequency range. Thus, we were able to determine signal-to-noise ratio within frequency band [0.001, 1] Hz. As a result, we determine that skin temperature oscillations measured by thermal imaging camera with sensitivity 0.02°C have the upper frequency limit ~ 0.2 Hz. In other words, within the respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges of blood flow oscillations the noise level exceeds signal one, and temperature measurements at the skin surface are practically useless. The endothelial, neurogenic and myogenic components of the temperature oscillations contain ~98% of the total spectral power of the signal. We have plot the empirical extrapolated curve of sensitivity of thermal imaging camera vs. frequency of the temperature oscillations. The data analysis shows that measurements of skin temperature oscillations within respiratory and cardiac ranges require the temperature sensitivity at least ~ 0.01°C and 0.001°C, respectively.

  13. Calibrating AGN Feedback in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, M. W.

    2009-12-01

    Whether caused by AGN jets, shocks, or mergers, the most definitive evidence for heating in cluster cores comes from X-ray spectroscopy. Unfortunately such spectra are essentially limited to studying the emission spectrum from the cluster as a whole. However since the same underlying emission measure distribution produces both the observed CCD and RGS spectra, X-ray imaging can still provide spatial information on the heating process. Using Chandra archival data for a sample of 9 clusters, we demonstrate how imaging data can be used to constrain departures from a canonical, isobaric cooling flow model as a function of position in a given cluster. The results of this analysis are also shown for the deep archival exposure of the Perseus cluster. Such ``heating maps'' can provide constraints on both the location and magnitude of the heating in the cores of clusters. When combined with detections and spectral index maps from low-frequency radio observations, these maps can be used to distinguish between different models for heating in these objects.

  14. HST-COS SPECTROSCOPY OF THE COOLING FLOW IN A1795—EVIDENCE FOR INEFFICIENT STAR FORMATION IN CONDENSING INTRACLUSTER GAS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Ehlert, Steven; Roediger, Joel; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2014-08-20

    We present far-UV spectroscopy from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope of a cool, star-forming filament in the core of A1795. These data, which span 1025 Å < λ{sub rest} < 1700 Å, allow for the simultaneous modeling of the young stellar populations and the intermediate-temperature (10{sup 5.5} K) gas in this filament, which is far removed (∼30 kpc) from the direct influence of the central active galactic nucleus. Using a combination of UV absorption line indices and stellar population synthesis modeling, we find evidence for ongoing star formation, with the youngest stars having ages of 7.5{sub −2.0}{sup +2.5} Myr and metallicities of 0.4{sub −0.1}{sup +0.2} Z {sub ☉}. The latter is consistent with the local metallicity of the intracluster medium. We detect the O VI λ1038 line, measuring a flux of f {sub O} {sub VI,} {sub 1038} = 4.0 ± 0.9 × 10{sup –17} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. The O VI λ1032 line is redshifted such that it is coincident with a strong Galactic H{sub 2} absorption feature, and is not detected. The measured O VI λ1038 flux corresponds to a cooling rate of 0.85 ± 0.2 (stat) ± 0.15 (sys) M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} at ∼10{sup 5.5} K, assuming that the cooling proceeds isochorically, which is consistent with the classical X-ray luminosity-derived cooling rate in the same region. We measure a star formation rate of 0.11 ± 0.02 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} from the UV continuum, suggesting that star formation is proceeding at 13{sub −2}{sup +3}% efficiency in this filament. We propose that this inefficient star formation represents a significant contribution to the larger-scale cooling flow problem.

  15. On the Origin of Optical Filaments in Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, R. D., Jr.; Dupke, R. A.; White, R. E., III

    1997-05-01

    We present preliminary results of a test of competing scenarios for the formation of dusty optical filaments in the dominant galaxies at the centers of some cluster cooling flows. Two models are compared: the capture or disruption of gas-rich galaxies (Sparks, Ford & Kinney 1993) and the standard cooling flow condensate model (Mathews & Bregman 1978). The pros and cons of each model are discussed based on detailed morphological analysis of filaments and their possible association with galaxies in Abell 1795 and Abell 426.

  16. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  17. The Most Interesting Cluster in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markevitch, Maxim

    2003-09-01

    The galaxy cluster 1E0657-56 is a treasure trove of information on just about every problem in cluster physics. It is the only cluster known to have a shock front with M substantially greater than 1. The proposed 500 ks observation, combined with the existing 90 ks, will allow us to determine whether electrons are heated adiabatically or dissipatively in a shock and whether the electron-ion equilibration is efficient. We will search for an electron temperature precursor to the shock to estimate thermal conductivity. We also will determine the importance of gas turbulence and study the destruction of a cooling flow remnant by ram pressure. Combined with data from other wavelengths, this observation can also shed light on the nature of dark matter and the origin of cluster radio halos.

  18. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    DOEpatents

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  19. Plug cluster module demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    The low pressure, film cooled rocket engine design concept developed during two previous ALRC programs was re-evaluated for application as a module for a plug cluster engine capable of performing space shuttle OTV missions. The nominal engine mixture ratio was 5.5 and the engine life requirements were 1200 thermal cycles and 10 hours total operating life. The program consisted of pretest analysis; engine tests, performed using residual components; and posttest analysis. The pretest analysis indicated that operation of the operation of the film cooled engine at O/F = 5.5 was feasible. During the engine tests, steady state wall temperature and performance measurement were obtained over a range of film cooling flow rates, and the durability of the engine was demonstrated by firing the test engine 1220 times at a nominal performance ranging from 430 - 432 seconds. The performance of the test engine was limited by film coolant sleeve damage which had occurred during previous testing. The post-test analyses indicated that the nominal performance level can be increased to 436 seconds.

  20. Flow and heat transfer in an L-shaped cooling passage with ribs and pin fins for the trailing edge of a gas-turbine vane and blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardeshi, Irsha

    Efficient and effective cooling of the trailing edges of gas-turbine vanes and blades is challenging because there is very little space to work with. In this study, CFD simulations based on steady RANS closed by the shear-stress transport turbulence model were performed to study the flow and heat transfer in an L-shaped duct for the trailing edge under two operating conditions. One operating condition, referred to as the laboratory condition, where experimental measurements were made, has a Reynolds number at the duct inlet of ReD = 15,000, coolant inlet temperature of Tinlet = 300 K, wall temperature of Twall = 335 K, a back pressure of Pb = 1 atm. When rotating, the angular speed was O = 1,000 rpm. The other condition, referred to as the engine-relevant condition, has Re D = 150,000 at the duct inlet, Tinlet = 673 K, Twall = 1,173 K, and Pb = 25 atm. When rotating, O was 3,600 rpm. The objective is to understand the nature of the flow and heat transfer in an L-shaped cooling passage for the trailing edge that has a combination of ribs and pin fins under rotating and non-rotating conditions with focus on how pin fins and ribs distribute the flow throughout the passage and to understand what features of the flow and heat transfer can or cannot be extrapolated from the laboratory to the engine-relevant operating conditions. When there is no rotation, results obtained show that for both operating conditions, the pin fins minimized the size of the separation bubble when the flow exits the inlet duct into the expanded portion of the L-shaped duct. The size of the separation bubble at the tip of the L-shaped duct created by the adverse pressure gradient is quite large for the laboratory condition and relatively small for the engine condition. Each rib was found to create two sets of recirculating flows, one just upstream of the rib because of the adverse pressure gradient induced by the rib and one just downstream of the rib because of flow separation from a sharp edge

  1. Long-slit spectroscopy of gas in the cores of X-ray luminous clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, E. M.; Cowie, L. L.; Wang, Z.

    1985-01-01

    The results of long-slit spectroscopy obtained for the core regions of 14 clusters of galaxies are reported. The data are presented in detail. It is shown that the presence of optical emission is tied to the properties of the hot gas in the cluster and not to the morphology of the central galaxy or cluster, demonstrating that the optical systems are indeed formed by the cooling of hot gas. Cooling flows occur when the gas density exceeds a critical central value which corresponds to a cooling time scale which, it is argued, weakly favors low values of H(0). The kinematics of the gas flows are discussed. The excitation mechanisms, correlation of optical emission with radio properties, and upper limits on coronal line strengths from the hot gas are discussed.

  2. DISCOVERY OF 'WARM DUST' GALAXIES IN CLUSTERS AT z {approx} 0.3: EVIDENCE FOR STRIPPING OF COOL DUST IN THE DENSE ENVIRONMENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Rawle, T. D.; Rex, M.; Egami, E.; Walth, G.; Pereira, M. J.; Chung, S. M.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Smail, I.; Altieri, B.; Valtchanov, I.; Appleton, P.; Fadda, D.; Alba, A. Berciano; Blain, A. W.; Dessauges-Zavadsky, M.; Van der Werf, P. P.; Zemcov, M.

    2012-09-10

    Using far-infrared imaging from the 'Herschel Lensing Survey', we derive dust properties of spectroscopically confirmed cluster member galaxies within two massive systems at z {approx} 0.3: the merging Bullet Cluster and the more relaxed MS2137.3-2353. Most star-forming cluster sources ({approx}90%) have characteristic dust temperatures similar to local field galaxies of comparable infrared (IR) luminosity (T{sub dust} {approx} 30 K). Several sub-luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG; L{sub IR} < 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }) Bullet Cluster members are much warmer (T{sub dust} > 37 K) with far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) shapes resembling LIRG-type local templates. X-ray and mid-infrared data suggest that obscured active galactic nuclei do not contribute significantly to the infrared flux of these 'warm dust' galaxies. Sources of comparable IR luminosity and dust temperature are not observed in the relaxed cluster MS2137, although the significance is too low to speculate on an origin involving recent cluster merging. 'Warm dust' galaxies are, however, statistically rarer in field samples (>3{sigma}), indicating that the responsible mechanism may relate to the dense environment. The spatial distribution of these sources is similar to the whole far-infrared bright population, i.e., preferentially located in the cluster periphery, although the galaxy hosts tend toward lower stellar masses (M{sub *} < 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }). We propose dust stripping and heating processes which could be responsible for the unusually warm characteristic dust temperatures. A normal star-forming galaxy would need 30%-50% of its dust removed (preferentially stripped from the outer reaches, where dust is typically cooler) to recover an SED similar to a 'warm dust' galaxy. These progenitors would not require a higher IR luminosity or dust mass than the currently observed normal star-forming population.

  3. AGN Feedback And Evolution of Radio Sources: Discovery of An X-Ray Cluster Associated With Z=1 Quasar

    SciTech Connect

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Cheung, C.C.; LaMassa, S.; Burke, D.; Aldcroft, T.L.; Bechtold, J.; Elvis, M.; Worrall, D.M.; /Bristol U.

    2006-01-11

    We report the first significant detection of an X-ray cluster associated with a powerful (L{sub bol} {approx} 10{sup 47} erg sec{sup -1}) radio-loud quasar at high redshift (z=1.06). Diffuse X-ray emission is detected out to {approx} 120 kpc from the CSS quasar 3C 186. A strong Fe-line emission at the z{sub rest} = 1.06 confirms its thermal nature. We find that the CSS radio source is highly overpressured with respect to the thermal cluster medium by 2-3 orders of magnitude. This provides direct observational evidence that the radio source is not thermally confined as posited in the ''frustrated'' scenario for CSS sources. Instead, the radio source may be young and at an early stage of its evolution. This source provides the first detection of the AGN in outburst in the center of a cooling flow cluster. Powerful radio sources are thought to be triggered by the cooling flows. The evidence for the AGN activity and intermittent outbursts comes from the X-ray morphology of low redshift clusters, which usually do not harbour quasars. 3C186 is a young active radio source which can supply the energy into the cluster and potentially prevent its cooling. We discuss energetics related to the quasar activity and the cluster cooling flow, and possible feedback between the evolving radio source and the cluster.

  4. Large Eddy Simulation of a Film Cooling Flow Injected from an Inclined Discrete Cylindrical Hole into a Crossflow with Zero-Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Shyam, Vikram

    2012-01-01

    A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is performed of a high blowing ratio (M = 1.7) film cooling flow with density ratio of unity. Mean results are compared with experimental data to show the degree of fidelity achieved in the simulation. While the trends in the LES prediction are a noticeable improvement over Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) predictions, there is still a lack a spreading on the underside of the lifted jet. This is likely due to the inability of the LES to capture the full range of influential eddies on the underside of the jet due to their smaller structure. The unsteady structures in the turbulent coolant jet are also explored and related to turbulent mixing characteristics

  5. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOEpatents

    Hultgren, K.G.; McLaurin, L.D.; Bertsch, O.L.; Lowe, P.E.

    1998-05-26

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn. 5 figs.

  6. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOEpatents

    Hultgren, Kent Goran; McLaurin, Leroy Dixon; Bertsch, Oran Leroy; Lowe, Perry Eugene

    1998-01-01

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn.

  7. Inviscid-viscous interaction on triple-deck scales in a hypersonic flow with strong wall cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. N.; Cheng, H. K.; Lee, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of wall temperatures on the flow structure in a region near a laminar separation is presently studied on the triple-deck scales, for the case of a high supersonic flow's inviscid-viscous interactions. A critical wall-temperature range is identified whose lower deck pressure-displacement relation departs from that of the classical formulation; below it, the pressure-displacement relation undergoes still greater transformations in conjunction with drastic scale-changes in the triple deck. The reduced lower-deck problem falls into supercritical, transcritical, and subcritical domains. A computational study is conducted for the compressive free-interaction solutions, and solutions are obtained for a sharp-corner ramp in the three wall-temperature ranges.

  8. GINGA LAC and Einstein SSS X-ray Spectral Evidence of Abundance Gradients in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. E., III; Day, C. S. R.; Hatsukade, I.; Hughes, J. P.

    1993-12-01

    We jointly analyzed the Ginga LAC and Einstein SSS spectra of four cooling flow clusters: A496, A1795, A2142 & A2199. We took advantage of the two instruments' different fields of view (6 arcmin diameter for the SSS, 1times 2 degrees for the LAC) to determine whether there were spatial gradients in temperature, abundances and X-ray absorbing column densities. Each cluster has firm evidence of a relatively cool central component. The inclusion of such cool components in the joint spectral analysis leads to somewhat higher global temperature determinations than are derived from the higher energy LAC data alone. The abundances appear to be centrally enhanced in at least two (A496, A2142) and possibly three (A2199) of the four clusters. In these cases, the central cool component typically has abundances which exceed solar values. We also confirm the presence of large amounts of cold absorbing matter in three of the four clusters (A496, A1795 & A2199) and show that it is likely to be intrinsic to the cluster cooling flows.

  9. Analysis of LAC Observations of Clusters of Galaxies and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J.

    1996-01-01

    The following publications are included and serve as the final report: The X-ray Spectrum of Abell 665; Clusters of Galaxies; Ginga Observation of an Oxygen-rich Supernova Remnant; Ginga Observations of the Coma Cluster and Studies of the Spatial Distribution of Iron; A Measurement of the Hubble Constant from the X-ray Properties and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect of Abell 2218; Non-polytropic Model for the Coma Cluster; and Abundance Gradients in Cooling Flow Clusters: Ginga LAC (Large Area Counter) and Einstein SSS (Solid State Spectrometer) Spectra of A496, A1795, A2142, and A2199.

  10. Hot outflows in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.

    2015-10-01

    The gas-phase metallicity distribution has been analysed for the hot atmospheres of 29 galaxy clusters using Chandra X-ray Observatory observations. All host brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with X-ray cavity systems produced by radio AGN. We find high elemental abundances projected preferentially along the cavities of 16 clusters. The metal-rich plasma was apparently lifted out of the BCGs with the rising X-ray cavities (bubbles) to altitudes between twenty and several hundred kiloparsecs. A relationship between the maximum projected altitude of the uplifted gas (the `iron radius') and jet power is found with the form R_Fe ∝ P_jet^{0.45}. The estimated outflow rates are typically tens of solar masses per year but exceed 100 M⊙ yr- 1 in the most powerful AGN. The outflow rates are 10-20 per cent of the cooling rates, and thus alone are unable to offset a cooling inflow. Nevertheless, hot outflows effectively redistribute the cooling gas and may play a significant role at regulating star formation and AGN activity in BCGs and presumably in giant elliptical galaxies. The metallicity distribution overall can be complex, perhaps due to metal-rich gas returning in circulation flows or being blown around in the hot atmospheres. Roughly 15 per cent of the work done by the cavities is expended lifting the metal-enriched gas, implying their nuclear black holes have increased in mass by at least ˜107-109 M⊙. Finally, we show that hot outflows can account for the broad, gas-phase metallicity distribution compared to the stellar light profiles of BCGs, and we consider a possible connection between hot outflows and cold molecular gas flows discovered in recent Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations.

  11. Driving Perpendicular Heat Flow: (p×n)-Type Transverse Thermoelectrics for Microscale and Cryogenic Peltier Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanle; Birner, S.; Tang, Yang; Heinselman, K.; Grayson, M.

    2013-05-01

    Whereas thermoelectric performance is normally limited by the figure of merit ZT, transverse thermoelectrics can achieve arbitrarily large temperature differences in a single leg even with inferior ZT by being geometrically tapered. We introduce a band-engineered transverse thermoelectric with p-type Seebeck in one direction and n-type orthogonal, resulting in off-diagonal terms that drive heat flow transverse to electrical current. Such materials are advantageous for microscale devices and cryogenic temperatures—exactly the regimes where standard longitudinal thermoelectrics fail. InAs/GaSb type II superlattices are shown to have the appropriate band structure for use as a transverse thermoelectric.

  12. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  13. Measuring flow and pressure of lithium coolant under developmental testing of a high-temperature cooling system of a space nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V. Ya.; Sinyavsky, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    Sub-megawatt space NPP use lithium as a coolant and niobium alloy as a structural material. In order to refine the lithium-niobium technology of the material and design engineering, lithium-niobium loops were worked out in RSC Energia, and they were tested at a working temperature of lithium equal to 1070-1300 K. In order to measure the lithium flow and pressure, special gauges were developed, which made possible the calibration and checkout of the loops without their dismantling. The paper describes the architecture of the electromagnetic flowmeter and the electromagnetic vibrating-wire pressure transducer (gauge) for lithium coolant in the nuclear power plant cooling systems. The operating principles of these meters are presented. Flowmeters have been developed for channel diameters ranging from 10 to 100 mm, which are capable of measuring lithium flows in the range of 0.1 to 30 L/s with the error of 3% for design calibration and 1% for volume graduation. The temperature error of the pressure transducers does not exceed 0.4% per 100 K; the nonlinearity and hysteresis of the calibration curve do not exceed 0.3 and 0.4%, respectively. The transducer applications are illustrated by the examples of results obtained from tests on the NPP module mockup and heat pipes of a radiation cooler.

  14. Rotation Periods for Cool Stars in the 4 Gyr old Open Cluster M67, The Solar–Stellar Connection, and the Applicability of Gyrochronology to at least Solar Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Sydney A.; Weingrill, Joerg; Fritzewski, Dario; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Platais, Imants

    2016-05-01

    We report rotation periods for 20 cool (FGK) main sequence member stars of the 4 Gyr-old open cluster M67 (=NGC 2682), obtained by analyzing data from Campaign 5 of the K2 mission with the Kepler Space Telescope. The rotation periods delineate a sequence in the color–period diagram (CPD) of increasing period with redder color. This sequence represents a cross-section at the cluster age of the surface P = P(t, M), suggested in prior work to extend to at least solar age. The current Sun is located marginally (approximately 1σ) above M67 in the CPD, as its relative age leads us to expect, and lies on the P = P(t, M) surface to within measurement precision. We therefore conclude that the solar rotation rate is normal as compared with cluster stars, a fact that strengthens the solar–stellar connection. The agreement between the M67 rotation period measurements and prior predictions further implies that rotation periods, especially when coupled with appropriate supporting work such as spectroscopy, can provide reliable ages via gyrochronology for other similar FGK dwarfs from the early main sequence to solar age and likely until the main sequence turnoff. The M67 rotators have a rotational age of 4.2 Gyr with a standard deviation of 0.7 Gyr, implying that similar field stars can be age-dated to precisions of ∼17%. The rotational age of the M67 cluster as a whole is therefore 4.2 Gyr, but with a lower (averaged) uncertainty of 0.2 Gyr.

  15. Low-cost, heated, and/or cooled flow-through cell for transmission x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentoft, R. E.; Deutsch, S. E.; Gates, B. C.

    1996-06-01

    A transmission x-ray absorption spectroscopy cell that can be used for air-sensitive samples with in situ treatment is described. The cell is designed with a relatively small size for use with air-sensitive powdered catalyst samples that must be loaded in a glove box. Samples can be treated in situ with gas flow or vacuum and temperature control up to 500 °C. The cell is constructed of stainless steel and designed for durability as well as ease of repair. The cells are vacuum tight and equipped with beryllium windows sealed with vacuum O-ring flanges for easy loading. Each cell, with all parts excluding the windows, costs about 2700.

  16. Safety Investigation of Liquid-Metal-Cooled Nuclear Systems with Heat Exchanger in the Risers of Simple Flow-Path Pool Design

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, Johan; Wider, Hartmut U.

    2005-12-15

    Safety investigations were performed on 600- and 1426-MW(thermal) liquid-metal-cooled reactors with the heat exchangers (HXs) located in the risers of simple flow-path pool designs. This includes both critical reactors and accelerator-driven systems (ADSs) using liquid-metal coolants. For the 600-MW(thermal) ADS, the safety implications were examined for vessel sizes of two heights (11 and 15 m) and two diameters (6 and 10 m). Then, the reference design of 11-m height and 6-m diameter was compared with a similar design, but with the HXs located in the downcomers. The transients investigated were total-loss-of-power (TLOP), unprotected-loss-of-flow (ULOF), protected-loss-of-flow, and unprotected loss-of-heat-sink accidents. The 600-MW(thermal) ADS of 11-m height and 6-m diameter peaks at 1041 K after 29 h during a TLOP accident. If the diameter is increased to 10 m, it will peak after 55 h at a 178 K lower temperature thanks to its larger thermal inertia. The difference between locating the HXs in the risers and the downcomers is insignificant for this accident type. With the HXs in the risers, the temperature peaks at 1045 K after 28 h. During a ULOF accident in an ADS at full power, the core outlet temperature stabilizes at 1010 K, which is 337 K above the nominal outlet temperature. When the vessel height is increased to 15 m, the natural convection is improved, and the core outlet temperature stabilizes at 911 K. A Pb-cooled 1426-MW(thermal) reactor of 11-m height and 12-m diameter is also shown to be sufficiently coolable during a TLOP accident; i.e., it peaks at 1093 K after 49 h. In a pool-type design with a simple flow path, the use of HXs in the risers and flaps at their inlets that prevent a flow reversal will have significant safety advantages in case of HX tube failures. Steam or gas bubbles exiting from the secondary circuit cannot be dragged into the core region by the liquid-metal coolant. Instead, they would rise with the coolant and exit through the

  17. Efficient Synthesis of Ir-Polyoxometalate Cluster Using a Continuous Flow Apparatus and STM Investigation of Its Coassembly Behavior on HOPG Surface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyong; Chang, Shaoqing; Suryanto, Bryan H R; Gong, Chunhua; Zeng, Xianghua; Zhao, Chuan; Zeng, Qingdao; Xie, Jingli

    2016-06-01

    Taking advantage of a continuous-flow apparatus, the iridium(III)-containing polytungstate cluster K12Na2H2[Ir2Cl8P2W20O72]·37H2O (1) was obtained in a reasonable yield (13% based on IrCl3·H2O). Compound 1 was characterized by Fourier transform IR, UV-visible, (31)P NMR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and thermogravimetric analysis measurements. (31)P NMR, ESI-MS, and elemental analysis all indicated 1 was a new polytungstate cluster compared with the reported K14[(IrCl4)KP2W20O72] compound. Intriguingly, the successful isolation of 1 relied on the custom-built flow apparatus, demonstrating the uniqueness of continuous-flow chemistry to achieve crystalline materials. The catalytic properties of 1 were assessed by investigating the activity on catalyzing the electro-oxidation of ruthenium tris-2,2'-bipyridine [Ru(bpy)3](2+/3+). The voltammetric behavior suggested a coupled catalytic behavior between [Ru(bpy)3](3+/2+) and 1. Furthermore, on the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface, 1,3,5-tris(10-carboxydecyloxy) benzene (TCDB) was used as the two-dimensional host network to coassemble cluster 1; the surface morphology was observed by scanning tunneling microscope technique. "S"-shape of 1 was observed, indicating that the cluster could be accommodated in the cavity formed by two TCDB host molecules, leading to a TCDB/cluster binary structure. PMID:27163481

  18. Electronic and vibrational spectroscopic studies of jet-cooled 5-cyanoindole and its water clusters, 5CI-(H2O)n, (n = 0-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Ahreum; Moon, Cheol Joo; Ahn, Ahreum; Lee, Ji Hoon; Kim, Seong Keun; Choi, Myong Yong

    2016-08-01

    Mass-selected resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) and UV-UV hole-burning, and infrared-dip spectra of 5-cyanoindole (5CI) and its water clusters, 5CI-(H2O)n (n = 1 and 2) were measured. Although, the structures of 5CI-(H2O)1-2 are similar to those of 3CI-(H2O)1-2, the photofragmentation behaviors of the two systems are quite different due to the La-Lb state energy lowering and higher binding energies of 5CI-(H2O)1-2 compared to those of 3CI-(H2O)1-2. Especially for the case of 5CI-(H2O)2 cluster, shortening excited-state lifetime of 5CI-(H2O)2 causes the broad background in the R2PI spectrum of 5CI-(H2O)2.

  19. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    DOEpatents

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  20. Partitioning Between Plume and Diffuse Flow at the Grotto Vent Cluster, Main Endeavour Vent Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Past and Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, P. A.; Bemis, K. G.; Jones, C.; Jackson, D. R.; Mitsuzawa, K.; Palmer, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems discharge as plumes from discrete vents and as diffuse flow from surrounding areas that transfer heat and chemicals from the lithosphere into the ocean in quantitatively significant amounts. Our VIP (Vent Imaging Pacific) July 2000 experiment was designed to acoustically image and quantify these flows at vent clusters in the Main Endeavour field using a sonar system (Simrad SM 2000) mounted on ROV Jason from fixed positions on the seafloor using three methods that we developed. Buoyant plumes are reconstructed applying visualization techniques to volume backscatter from suspended particulates and density discontinuities in plumes. A Doppler algorithm is used to measure mean vertical velocity through plume cross sections and to calculate volume flux at different altitudes in a plume. Acoustic Scintillation Thermography (AST) is used to image irregular areas of diffuse flow. Results from a sulfide edifice (north tower of Grotto Vent cluster; height 12 m; diameter 10 m; sonar range 12 m) supplemented by additional AST measurements and in situ measurements of flow rate and temperature are tabulatd below: The higher diffuse than plume heat flux is consistent with prior studies at other sites. However, the ratio of diffuse to plume heat flux (range 23-353) is exceptionally large suggesting an overestimation of diffuse flow area at the high end and/or underestimation of plume flux. We are scheduled this fall to connect our next generation sonar system (COVIS=Cable Operated Vent Imaging Sonar) to the NEPTUNE Canada cabled observatory at the Grotto vent cluster. COVIS is designed to image plume and diffuse flow in space and in time, which will contribute to interpreting our past observations and to provide new insights on how partitioning may vary with time.

  1. Btu flow rate meter proof of concept demonstration for district heating and cooling systems: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Mawardi, O.K.

    1988-10-01

    This report describes a research effort devoted to the development and subsequent feasibility demonstration of an instrument for the remote sensing of the Btu flow rate in a steam or hot water heating system. The concept of the Btu meter is based on a differential hot wire anemometer invented by Osman K. Mawardi. The incentive in the development of this device is the increased demand for an inexpensive and accurate (better than 1%) Btu meter. The ability of the meter to be read remotely is essential, since it is an effective way of reducing the manpower costs of the company operating the heating system. Other features of the Btu meter which are included in the design are simplicity of construction, ruggedness, and flexibility of the electronic interfacing system. The latter feature permits the incorporation of the telemetering circuit in a telephone or radio-based communication system. Both of these alternatives are commercially available today and are quite economical. With small modifications of the interfacing circuitry, the meter can be linked to a fiber optics automated meter reading network. 15 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

  2. NightCool: A Nocturnal Radiation Cooling Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Danny S.; Sherwin, John R.; Hermelink, Andreas H.

    2008-08-26

    This report describes an experimental evaluation that was conducted on a night sky cooling system designed to substantially reduce space cooling needs in homes in North American climates. The system uses a sealed attic covered by a highly conductive metal roof (a roof integrated radiator) which is selectively linked by air flow to the main zone with the attic zone to provide cooling - largely during nighttime hours.

  3. DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF A2199: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN MERGER-INDUCED GAS MOTIONS AND NUCLEAR OUTBURSTS IN A COOL CORE CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Li, Zhiyuan; Forman, William R.; Kraft, Ralph P.; Lal, Dharam V.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Zhuravleva, Irina; Churazov, Eugene; Sanders, Jeremy S.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Johnson, Ryan E.

    2013-10-01

    We present new Chandra observations of A2199 that show evidence of gas sloshing due to a minor merger, as well as impacts of the radio source, 3C 338, hosted by the central galaxy, NGC 6166, on the intracluster gas. The new data are consistent with previous evidence of a Mach ≅ 1.46 shock 100'' from the cluster center, although there is still no convincing evidence for the expected temperature jump. Other interpretations of this feature are possible, but none is fully satisfactory. Large scale asymmetries, including enhanced X-ray emission 200'' southwest of the cluster center and a plume of low entropy, enriched gas reaching 50'' to the north of the center, are signatures of gas sloshing induced by core passage of a merging subcluster about 400 Myr ago. An association between the unusual radio ridge and low entropy gas are consistent with this feature being the remnant of a former radio jet that was swept away from the active galactic nucleus by gas sloshing. A large discrepancy between the energy required to produce the 100'' shock and the enthalpy of the outer radio lobes of 3C 338 suggests that the lobes were formed by a more recent, less powerful radio outburst. The lack of evidence for shocks in the central 10'' indicates that the power of the jet now is some two orders of magnitude smaller than when the 100'' shock was formed.

  4. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  5. Flow-Induced Vibration of a Reed in a Channel: Effect of Reed Shape on Convective Heat Transfer with Application to Electronic Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rips, Aaron; Shoele, Kourosh; Glezer, Ari; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    Flow-induced vibration of a reed (a thin plate or flag) in a channel can improve heat transfer efficiency in forced convection applications, allowing for more heat transfer for the same fan power. Such systems have wide ranging applications in electronic and power cooling. We investigate the effect of 3D reed shape on heat transfer enhancement. To study 3D effects, we first use 2D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations of an optimized reed (in terms of mass and stiffness) to generate a prescribed reed motion. We then apply that motion to a pseudo 3D reed (i.e. infinitely stiff in the spanwise direction) and study the heat transfer enhancement in a 3D channel. This method allows us to explore a large parameter space exhaustively, and using this method, we examine the effect of several parameters, such as reed planform and spanwise gap, on the heat transfer enhancements for forced convection in a channel. Simulations indicate that these geometrical feature have a significant effect on the vortex dynamics in the wake as well as the heat transfer efficiency. This work was supported by grants from AFOSR, EPRI and NSF.

  6. Final Report for Project DE-SC0006958: "An Investigation of the Effects of magnetic Fields and Collisionality on Shock Formation in Radiatively Cooled Plasma Flows"

    SciTech Connect

    Bott-Suzuki, Simon

    2014-11-05

    We have developed a new experimental platform to study bow-shock formation in plasma flows generated using an inverse wire array z-pinch. We have made significant progress on the analysis of both hydrodynamic and magnetized shocks using this system. The hydrodynamic experiments show formation of a well-defined Mach cone, and highly localized shock strong associated with radiative losses and rapidly cooling over the shock. Magnetized shocks show that the balance of magnetic and ram pressures dominate the evolution of the shock region, generating a low plasma beta void around the target. Manuscripts are in preparation for publication on both these topics. We have also published the development of a novel diagnostic method which allow recovery of interferometry and self-emission data along the same line of sight. Finally, we have carried out work to integrate a kinetic routine with the 3D MHD code Gorgon, however it remains to complete this process. Both undergraduate and graduate students have been involved in both the experimental work and publications.

  7. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  8. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F.; Cooke, Franklin E.; Fitch, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  9. Heat exchanger with auxiliary cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, John H.

    1980-01-01

    A heat exchanger with an auxiliary cooling system capable of cooling a nuclear reactor should the normal cooling mechanism become inoperable. A cooling coil is disposed around vertical heat transfer tubes that carry secondary coolant therethrough and is located in a downward flow of primary coolant that passes in heat transfer relationship with both the cooling coil and the vertical heat transfer tubes. A third coolant is pumped through the cooling coil which absorbs heat from the primary coolant which increases the downward flow of the primary coolant thereby increasing the natural circulation of the primary coolant through the nuclear reactor.

  10. The problem of cooling an air-cooled cylinder on an aircraft engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brevoort, M J; Joyner, U T

    1941-01-01

    An analysis of the cooling problem has been to show by what means the cooling of an air-cooled aircraft engine may be improved. Each means of improving cooling is analyzed on the basis of effectiveness in cooling with respect to power for cooling. The altitude problem is analyzed for both supercharged and unsupercharged engines. The case of ground cooling is also discussed. The heat-transfer process from the hot gases to the cylinder wall is discussed on the basis of the fundamentals of heat transfer and thermodynamics. Adiabatic air-temperature rise at a stagnation point in compressible flow is shown to depend only on the velocity of flow.

  11. A 10{sup 10} solar mass flow of molecular gas in the A1835 brightest cluster galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, B. R.; Russell, H. R.; Main, R. A.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Kirkpatrick, C. C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Edge, A. C.; Murray, N. W.; Hamer, S.; Combes, F.; Salome, P.; Fabian, A. C.; Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.; Bregman, J. N.; Donahue, M.; Voit, G. M.; Egami, E.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Tremblay, G.

    2014-04-10

    We report ALMA Early Science observations of the A1835 brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the CO (3-2) and CO (1-0) emission lines. We detect 5 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} of molecular gas within 10 kpc of the BCG. Its ensemble velocity profile width of ∼130 km s{sup –1} FWHM is too narrow for the molecular clouds to be supported in the galaxy by dynamic pressure. The gas may instead be supported in a rotating, turbulent disk oriented nearly face-on. Roughly 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} of molecular gas is projected 3-10 kpc to the northwest and to the east of the nucleus with line-of-sight velocities lying between –250 km s{sup –1} and +480 km s{sup –1} with respect to the systemic velocity. The high-velocity gas may be either inflowing or outflowing. However, the absence of high-velocity gas toward the nucleus that would be expected in a steady inflow, and its bipolar distribution on either side of the nucleus, are more naturally explained as outflow. Star formation and radiation from the active galactic nucleus (AGN) are both incapable of driving an outflow of this magnitude. The location of the high-velocity gas projected behind buoyantly rising X-ray cavities and favorable energetics suggest an outflow driven by the radio AGN. If so, the molecular outflow may be associated with a hot outflow on larger scales reported by Kirkpatrick and colleagues. The molecular gas flow rate of approximately 200 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} is comparable to the star formation rate of 100-180 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} in the central disk. How radio bubbles would lift dense molecular gas in their updrafts, how much gas will be lost to the BCG, and how much will return to fuel future star formation and AGN activity are poorly understood. Our results imply that radio-mechanical (radio-mode) feedback not only heats hot atmospheres surrounding elliptical galaxies and BCGs, but it is able to sweep higher density molecular gas away from their centers.

  12. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  13. Microtextured Surfaces for Turbine Blade Impingement Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Gas turbine engine technology is constantly challenged to operate at higher combustor outlet temperatures. In a modern gas turbine engine, these temperatures can exceed the blade and disk material limits by 600 F or more, necessitating both internal and film cooling schemes in addition to the use of thermal barrier coatings. Internal convective cooling is inadequate in many blade locations, and both internal and film cooling approaches can lead to significant performance penalties in the engine. Micro Cooling Concepts, Inc., has developed a turbine blade cooling concept that provides enhanced internal impingement cooling effectiveness via the use of microstructured impingement surfaces. These surfaces significantly increase the cooling capability of the impinging flow, as compared to a conventional untextured surface. This approach can be combined with microchannel cooling and external film cooling to tailor the cooling capability per the external heating profile. The cooling system then can be optimized to minimize impact on engine performance.

  14. Base Flow Characteristics for Several Four-Clustered Rocket Configurations at Mach Numbers from 2.0 to 3.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musial, Norman T.; Ward, James J.

    1961-01-01

    A generalized study of base flow phenomena has been conducted with four 500-pound-thrust JP-4 fuel-liquid-oxygen rocket motors installed in the base of a 12-inch-diameter cylindrical model. Data were obtained over a Mach number and nozzle pressure ratio range of 2.0 to 3.5 and 340 to 600, respectively. Base heat flux, gas temperature, and pressure were highest in the center of the cluster core and decreased in a radial direction. Although a maximum heat flux of 93 Btu per square foot per second was measured within the cluster core, peripheral heat fluxes were low, averaging about 5 Btu per square foot per second for all configurations. Generally base heat flux was found to be independent of Mach number over the range investigated. Base heat flux within the cluster core was decreased by increasing motor spacing, motor extension, a combination of increasing nozzle area ratio and decreasing exit angle and gimbaling the two side engines. Small amounts of nitrogen injected within the cluster core sharply reduced core heat flux.

  15. The Radio Properties of Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, M. T.

    2014-09-01

    Energetic feedback from the Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) is required to prevent catastrophic cooling of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) in galaxy clusters. Evidence for this is seen through the inflation of cavities in the ICM by AGN-launched, radio-emitting jets, and understanding this process is an active area of research. Radio observations play an integral role in this, as they trace the active stages of the feedback cycle. Understanding the radio properties of BCGs is therefore paramount for understanding both galaxy clusters and AGN feedback processes globally. Within this thesis, the BCGs in a large (>700) sample of X-ray selected clusters are studied. We observe these BCGs with a wide variety of facilities, building a census of their radio properties across a range of frequencies, timescales and angular resolutions. Radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are built for over 200 BCGs, and then decomposed into two components; a core, attributable to ongoing nuclear activity, and a non-core, attributable to historical accretion. Both components are not only more common, but also significantly more powerful in cool-core (CC) clusters than non-cool c