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Sample records for cluster forming clump

  1. Physical Conditions in Massive-Cluster-Forming Molecular Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schap, William; Barnes, Peter; Ginsburg, Adam; Ordonez, Tony

    2015-08-01

    The CHaMP project has identified a uniform sample of 303 massive (20-8000 M⊙), dense (200-30,000 cm-3) molecular clumps in a large sector of the southern Milky Way that includes much of the Carina Arm. These are the kinds of clumps that are likely to be the precursors to IRDCs, large stellar clusters, and massive stars. We report new results of the physical conditions in these clouds based on the J=1-0 emission at 3mm from the HCN molecule. Analysis of the HCN emission from these clumps reveals that the physical conditions in the gas (i.e., the excitation temperature, optical depth, and column density) do not follow the molecular line emissivity in a straightforward way. This means that large fractions of the molecular meterial involved in massive cluster formation, while not completely "dark", are under-luminous and easily missed in certain studies. Furthermore, the existence of significant amounts of under-luminous gas has important consequences for the interpretation of wider correlations, such as the star-formation efficiency (SFE, ie the stellar-to-gas mass ratio in a cloud) and, on the larger scale, the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. Therefore, some widely-used correlations may have hidden biases that depend on the hitherto poorly-characterised spatial variations in physical conditions, illustrated by our results.

  2. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Li, Zhi-Yun; Abel, Tom; Nakamura, Fumitaka; /Niigata U.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using three dimensional numerical simulations of effective resolution 2048{sup 3}. The calculations are carried out using a block structured adaptive mesh refinement code that solves the ideal MHD equations including self-gravity and implements accreting sink particles. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of {approx} 1,600 M{sub {circle_dot}} (containing {approx} 10{sup 2} initial Jeans masses), along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized 'core' that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which directly opposes the feeding processes. The outflows reduce the mass accretion rates onto the massive stars by breaking up the dense filaments that feed the massive star formation at early times, and by collectively slowing down the global collapse that fuel the massive star formation at late times. The latter is aided by a moderate magnetic field of strength in the observed range (corresponding to a dimensionless clump mass-to-flux ratio {lambda} {approx} a few); the field allows the outflow momenta to be deposited more efficiently inside the clump. We conclude that the massive star formation in our simulated turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clump is outflow-regulated and clump-fed (ORCF for short). An important implication is that the

  3. The connection between prestellar cores and filaments in cluster-forming clumps of the Aquila Rift complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves, Vera; André, Philippe; Maury, Anaëlle

    2015-08-01

    One of the main goals of the Herschel Gould Belt survey (André et al. 2010) is to elucidate the physicalmechanisms responsible for the formation and evolution of prestellar cores in molecular clouds. In theAquila cloud complex imaged with Herschel/SPIRE-PACS between 70-500 μm, we have recently identifieda complete sample of 651 starless cores, 446 of them are gravitationally-bound prestellar cores, likelyforming stars in the future. We also detected 58 protostellar cores (Könyves et al. 2010 and 2015, subm.- see http://gouldbelt-herschel.cea.fr/archives). This region is dominated by two (proto)clusters which arecurrently active sites of clustered star formation (SF): the filamentary Serpens South cloud and the W40HII region. The latter is powered by massive young stars, and a 2nd-generation SF can be witnessed inthe surroundings (Maury et al. 2011).Our Herschel observations also provide an unprecedented census of filaments in Aquila and suggest aclose connection between them and the formation process of prestellar cores, where both structures arehighly concentrated around the protoclusters. About 10-20% of the gas mass is in the form of filamentsbelow Av~7, while ~50-75% of the dense gas mass above Av~7-10 is in filamentary structures.Furthermore, ~90% of our prestellar cores are located above a background column density correspondingto Av~7, and ~75% of them lie within the densest filamentary structures with supercritical masses per unitlength >16 M⊙/pc. Indeed, a strong correlation is found between the spatial distribution of prestellar coresand the densest filaments.Comparing the statistics of cores and filaments with the number of young stellar objects found by Spitzerin the same complex, we also infer a typical timescale ~1 Myr for the formation and evolution of bothprestellar cores and filaments.In summary, our Herschel findings in Aquila support a filamentary paradigm for the early stages of SF,where the cores result from the gravitational fragmentation

  4. GAS CLUMPING IN THE OUTSKIRTS OF {Lambda}CDM CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Daisuke; Lau, Erwin T.

    2011-04-10

    Recent Suzaku X-ray observations revealed that the observed entropy profile of the intracluster medium (ICM) deviates significantly from the prediction of hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy clusters. In this work, we show that gas clumping introduces significant biases in X-ray measurements of the ICM profiles in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. Using hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation in a concordance {Lambda}CDM model, we demonstrate that gas clumping leads to an overestimate of the observed gas density and causes flattening of the entropy profile. Our results suggest that gas clumping must be taken into account when interpreting X-ray measurements of cluster outskirts.

  5. Stellar age spreads in clusters as imprints of cluster-parent clump densities

    SciTech Connect

    Parmentier, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Pfalzner, S.

    2014-08-20

    It has recently been suggested that high-density star clusters have stellar age distributions much narrower than that of the Orion Nebula Cluster, indicating a possible trend of narrower age distributions for denser clusters. We show this effect to likely arise from star formation being faster in gas with a higher density. We model the star formation history of molecular clumps in equilibrium by associating a star formation efficiency per free-fall time, ε{sub ff}, to their volume density profile. We focus on the case of isothermal spheres and we obtain the evolution with time of their star formation rate. Our model predicts a steady decline of the star formation rate, which we quantify with its half-life time, namely, the time needed for the star formation rate to drop to half its initial value. Given the uncertainties affecting the star formation efficiency per free-fall time, we consider two distinct values: ε{sub ff} = 0.1 and ε{sub ff} = 0.01. When ε{sub ff} = 0.1, the half-life time is of the order of the clump free-fall time, τ{sub ff}. As a result, the age distributions of stars formed in high-density clumps have smaller full-widths at half-maximum than those of stars formed in low-density clumps. When the star formation efficiency per free-fall time is 0.01, the half-life time is 10 times longer, i.e., 10 clump free-fall times. We explore what happens if the duration of star formation is shorter than 10τ{sub ff}, that is, if the half-life time of the star formation rate cannot be defined. There, we build on the invariance of the shape of the young cluster mass function to show that an anti-correlation between the clump density and the duration of star formation is expected. We therefore conclude that, regardless of whether the duration of star formation is longer than the star formation rate half-life time, denser molecular clumps yield narrower star age distributions in clusters. Published densities and stellar age spreads of young clusters and star-forming

  6. Stellar Age Spreads in Clusters as Imprints of Cluster-parent Clump Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, G.; Pfalzner, S.; Grebel, E. K.

    2014-08-01

    It has recently been suggested that high-density star clusters have stellar age distributions much narrower than that of the Orion Nebula Cluster, indicating a possible trend of narrower age distributions for denser clusters. We show this effect to likely arise from star formation being faster in gas with a higher density. We model the star formation history of molecular clumps in equilibrium by associating a star formation efficiency per free-fall time, epsilonff, to their volume density profile. We focus on the case of isothermal spheres and we obtain the evolution with time of their star formation rate. Our model predicts a steady decline of the star formation rate, which we quantify with its half-life time, namely, the time needed for the star formation rate to drop to half its initial value. Given the uncertainties affecting the star formation efficiency per free-fall time, we consider two distinct values: epsilonff = 0.1 and epsilonff = 0.01. When epsilonff = 0.1, the half-life time is of the order of the clump free-fall time, τff. As a result, the age distributions of stars formed in high-density clumps have smaller full-widths at half-maximum than those of stars formed in low-density clumps. When the star formation efficiency per free-fall time is 0.01, the half-life time is 10 times longer, i.e., 10 clump free-fall times. We explore what happens if the duration of star formation is shorter than 10τff, that is, if the half-life time of the star formation rate cannot be defined. There, we build on the invariance of the shape of the young cluster mass function to show that an anti-correlation between the clump density and the duration of star formation is expected. We therefore conclude that, regardless of whether the duration of star formation is longer than the star formation rate half-life time, denser molecular clumps yield narrower star age distributions in clusters. Published densities and stellar age spreads of young clusters and star-forming regions

  7. Clusters of Small Clumps Can Explain the Peculiar Properties of Giant Clumps in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, M.; Burkert, A.; Schartmann, M.

    2016-03-01

    Giant clumps are a characteristic feature of observed high-redshift disk galaxies. We propose that these kiloparsec-sized clumps have a complex substructure and are the result of many smaller clumps self-organizing themselves into clump clusters (CCs). This bottom-up scenario is in contrast to the common top-down view that these giant clumps form first and then sub-fragment. Using a high-resolution hydrodynamical simulation of an isolated, fragmented massive gas disk and mimicking the observations from Genzel et al. at z ˜ 2, we find remarkable agreement in many details. The CCs appear as single entities of sizes {R}{HWHM} ≃ \\0.9-1.4 kpc and masses ˜(1.5-3) × \\quad {10}9 {M}⊙ , representative of high-z observations. They are organized in a ring around the center of the galaxy. The origin of the observed clumps’ high intrinsic velocity dispersion {σ }{intrinsic} ≃ \\50-100 {km} {{{s}}}-1 is fully explained by the internal irregular motions of their substructure in our simulation. No additional energy input, e.g., via stellar feedback, is necessary. Furthermore, in agreement with observations, we find a small velocity gradient {V}{grad}\\quad ≃ 8-27 {km} {{{s}}}-1 {{kpc}}-1 along the CCs in the beam-smeared velocity residual maps, which corresponds to net prograde and retrograde rotation with respect to the rotation of the galactic disk. The CC scenario could have strong implications for the internal evolution, lifetimes, and the migration timescales of the observed giant clumps, bulge growth, and active galactic nucleus activity, stellar feedback, and the chemical enrichment history of galactic disks.

  8. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  9. ATLASGAL - towards a complete sample of massive star forming clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, J. S.; Moore, T. J. T.; Csengeri, T.; Wyrowski, F.; Schuller, F.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Mottram, J. C.; Thompson, M. A.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.; Bronfman, L.; Pfalzner, S.; König, C.; Wienen, M.

    2014-09-01

    By matching infrared-selected, massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and compact H II regions in the Red MSX Source survey to massive clumps found in the submillimetre ATLASGAL (APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy) survey, we have identified ˜1000 embedded young massive stars between 280° < ℓ < 350° and 10° < ℓ < 60° with | b | < 1.5°. Combined with an existing sample of radio-selected methanol masers and compact H II regions, the result is a catalogue of ˜1700 massive stars embedded within ˜1300 clumps located across the inner Galaxy, containing three observationally distinct subsamples, methanol-maser, MYSO and H II-region associations, covering the most important tracers of massive star formation, thought to represent key stages of evolution. We find that massive star formation is strongly correlated with the regions of highest column density in spherical, centrally condensed clumps. We find no significant differences between the three samples in clump structure or the relative location of the embedded stars, which suggests that the structure of a clump is set before the onset of star formation, and changes little as the embedded object evolves towards the main sequence. There is a strong linear correlation between clump mass and bolometric luminosity, with the most massive stars forming in the most massive clumps. We find that the MYSO and H II-region subsamples are likely to cover a similar range of evolutionary stages and that the majority are near the end of their main accretion phase. We find few infrared-bright MYSOs associated with the most massive clumps, probably due to very short pre-main-sequence lifetimes in the most luminous sources.

  10. MOLECULAR CLUMPS AND INFRARED CLUSTERS IN THE S247, S252, AND BFS52 REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Saito, Hiro; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Nishimura, Atsushi; Kimura, Kimihiro; Onishi, Toshikazu; Ogawa, Hideo

    2013-05-01

    We present results of the observations carried out toward the S247, S252, and BFS52 H II regions with various molecular lines using the 1.85 m radio telescope and the 45 m telescope at Nobeyama Radio Observatory. There are at least 11 young infrared clusters (IR clusters) within the observed region. We found that there are two velocity components in {sup 12}CO (J = 2-1), and also that their spatial distributions show an anti-correlation. The IR clusters are located at their interfaces, suggesting that two distinct clouds with different velocities are colliding with each other, which may have induced the cluster formation. Based on {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0) and C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) observations, we identified 16 clumps in and around the three H II regions. Eleven of the clumps are associated with the IR clusters and the other five clumps are not associated with any known young stellar objects. We investigated variations in the velocity dispersions of the 16 clumps as a function of the distance from the center of the clusters or the clumps. Clumps with clusters tend to have velocity dispersions that increase with distance from the cluster center, while clumps without clusters show a flat velocity dispersion over the clump extents. A {sup 12}CO outflow has been found in some of the clumps with IR clusters but not in the other clumps, supporting a strong relation of these clumps to the broader velocity dispersion region. We also estimated a mean star formation efficiency of {approx}30% for the clumps with IR clusters in the three H II regions.

  11. Entropy flattening, gas clumping, and turbulence in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Fusco-Femiano, R.; Lapi, A.

    2014-03-10

    Several physical processes and formation events are expected in cluster outskirts, a vast region up to now essentially not covered by observations. The recent Suzaku (X-ray) and Planck (Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect) observations out to the virial radius have highlighted in these peripheral regions a rather sharp decline of the intracluster gas temperature, an entropy flattening in contrast with the theoretically expected power law increase, the break of the hydrostatic equilibrium even in some relaxed clusters, a derived gas mass fraction above the cosmic value measured from several cosmic microwave background experiments, and a total X-ray mass lower than the weak lensing mass determinations. Here we present the analysis of four clusters (A1795, A2029, A2204, and A133) with the SuperModel that includes a nonthermal pressure component due to turbulence to sustain the hydrostatic equilibrium also in the cluster outskirts. In this way, we obtain a correct determination of the total X-ray mass and of the gas mass fraction; this in turn allows us to determine the level of the gas clumping that can affect the shape of the entropy profiles reported by the Suzaku observations. Our conclusion is that the role of the gas clumping is very marginal and that the observed entropy flattening is due to the rapid decrement of the temperature in the cluster outskirts caused by non-gravitational effects. Moreover, we show that the X-ray/SZ joint analysis from ROSAT and Planck data, as performed in some recent investigations, is inadequate for discriminating between a power law increase and a flattening of the entropy.

  12. MAPS OF MASSIVE CLUMPS IN THE EARLY STAGE OF CLUSTER FORMATION: TWO MODES OF CLUSTER FORMATION, COEVAL OR NON-COEVAL?

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Aya E.; Saito, Masao; Mauersberger, Rainer; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kurono, Yasutaka; Naoi, Takahiro

    2013-03-10

    We present maps of seven young massive molecular clumps within five target regions in C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) line emission, using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. These clumps, which are not associated with clusters, lie at distances between 0.7 and 2.1 kpc. We find C{sup 18}O clumps with radii of 0.5-1.7 pc, masses of 470-4200 M{sub Sun }, and velocity widths of 1.4-3.3 km s{sup -1}. All of the clumps are massive and approximately in virial equilibrium, suggesting they will potentially form clusters. Three of our target regions are associated with H II regions (CWHRs), while the other two are unassociated with H II regions (CWOHRs). The C{sup 18}O clumps can be classified into two morphological types: CWHRs with a filamentary or shell-like structure and spherical CWOHRs. The two CWOHRs have systematic velocity gradients. Using the publicly released WISE database, Class I and Class II protostellar candidates are identified within the C{sup 18}O clumps. The fraction of Class I candidates among all YSO candidates (Class I+Class II) is {>=}50% in CWHRs and {<=}50% in CWOHRs. We conclude that effects from the H II regions can be seen in (1) the spatial distributions of the clumps: filamentary or shell-like structure running along the H II regions; (2) the velocity structures of the clumps: large velocity dispersion along shells; and (3) the small age spreads of YSOs. The small spreads in age of the YSOs show that the presence of H II regions tends to trigger coeval cluster formation.

  13. A super lithium-rich red-clump star in the open cluster Trumpler 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, L.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Bonifacio, P.; Villanova, S.; Carraro, G.; Caffau, E.; Steffen, M.; Ahumada, J. A.; Beletsky, Y.; Beccari, G.

    2014-04-01

    Context. The existence of lithium-rich low-mass red giant stars still represents a challenge for stellar evolution models. Stellar clusters are privileged environments for this kind of investigation. Aims: To investigate the chemical abundance pattern of the old open cluster Trumpler 5, we observed a sample of four red-clump stars with high-resolution optical spectrographs. One of them (#3416) reveals extremely strong lithium lines in its spectrum. Methods: One-dimensional, local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis was performed on the spectra of the observed stars. A 3D-NLTE analysis was performed to derive the lithium abundance of star #3416. Results: Star #3416 is super Li-rich with A(Li) = 3.75 dex. The lack of 6Li enrichment (6Li/7Li < 2%), the low carbon isotopic ratio (12C/13C = 14 ± 3), and the lack of evidence for radial velocity variation or enhanced rotational velocity (vsini = 2.8 km s-1) all suggest that lithium production has occurred in this star through the Cameron & Fowler mechanism. Conclusions: We identified a super Li-rich core helium-burning, red-clump star in an open cluster. Internal production is the most likely cause of the observed enrichment. Given the expected short duration of a star's Li-rich phase, enrichment is likely to have occurred at the red clump or in the immediately preceding phases, namely during the He-flash at the tip of the red giant branch (RGB) or while ascending the brightest portion of the RGB. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 088.D-0045(A).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Properties of massive star-forming clumps with infall motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Jian-Jun; Esimbek, Jarken; Ji, Wei-Guang; Wu, Gang; Tang, Xin-Di; Komesh, Toktarkhan; Yuan, Ye; Li, Da-Lei; Baan, W. A.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we aim to characterize high-mass clumps with infall motions. We selected 327 clumps from the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90-GHz survey, and identified 100 infall candidates. Combined with the results of He et al., we obtained a sample of 732 high-mass clumps, including 231 massive infall candidates and 501 clumps where infall is not detected. Objects in our sample were classified as pre-stellar, proto-stellar, H II or photodissociation region (PDR). The detection rates of the infall candidates in the pre-stellar, proto-stellar, H II and PDR stages are 41.2 per cent, 36.6 per cent, 30.6 per cent and 12.7 per cent, respectively. The infall candidates have a higher H2 column density and volume density compared with the clumps where infall is not detected at every stage. For the infall candidates, the median values of the infall rates at the pre-stellar, proto-stellar, H II and PDR stages are 2.6 × 10-3, 7.0 × 10-3, 6.5 × 10-3 and 5.5 × 10-3 M⊙ yr-1, respectively. These values indicate that infall candidates at later evolutionary stages are still accumulating material efficiently. It is interesting to find that both infall candidates and clumps where infall is not detected show a clear trend of increasing mass from the pre-stellar to proto-stellar, and to the H II stages. The power indices of the clump mass function are 2.04 ± 0.16 and 2.17 ± 0.31 for the infall candidates and clumps where infall is not detected, respectively, which agree well with the power index of the stellar initial mass function (2.35) and the cold Planck cores (2.0).

  15. Properties of massive star-forming clumps with infall motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Jian-Jun; Esimbek, Jarken; Ji, Wei-Guang; Wu, Gang; Tang, Xin-Di; Komesh, Toktarkhan; Yuan, Ye; Li, Da-Lei; Baan, W. A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we aim to characterise high-mass clumps with infall motions. We selected 327 clumps from the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90-GHz (MALT90) survey, and identified 100 infall candidates. Combined with the results of He et al. (2015), we obtained a sample of 732 high-mass clumps, including 231 massive infall candidates and 501 clumps where infall is not detected. Objects in our sample were classified as pre-stellar, proto-stellar, HII or photo-dissociation region (PDR). The detection rates of the infall candidates in the pre-stellar, proto-stellar, HII and PDR stages are 41.2%, 36.6%, 30.6% and 12.7%, respectively. The infall candidates have a higher H2 column density and volume density compared with the clumps where infall is not detected at every stage. For the infall candidates, the median values of the infall rates at the pre-stellar, proto-stellar, HII and PDR stages are 2.6×10-3, 7.0×10-3, 6.5×10-3 and 5.5×10-3 M⊙ yr-1, respectively. These values indicate that infall candidates at later evolutionary stages are still accumulating material efficiently. It is interesting to find that both infall candidates and clumps where infall is not detected show a clear trend of increasing mass from the pre-stellar to proto-stellar, and to the HII stages. The power indices of the clump mass function (ClMF) are 2.04±0.16 and 2.17±0.31 for the infall candidates and clumps where infall is not detected, respectively, which agree well with the power index of the stellar initial mass function (2.35) and the cold Planck cores (2.0).

  16. An extremely young massive clump forming by gravitational collapse in a primordial galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanella, A.; Daddi, E.; Le Floc'h, E.; Bournaud, F.; Gobat, R.; Valentino, F.; Strazzullo, V.; Cibinel, A.; Onodera, M.; Perret, V.; Renaud, F.; Vignali, C.

    2015-05-01

    When cosmic star formation history reaches a peak (at about redshift z ~ 2), galaxies vigorously fed by cosmic reservoirs are dominated by gas and contain massive star-forming clumps, which are thought to form by violent gravitational instabilities in highly turbulent gas-rich disks. However, a clump formation event has not yet been observed, and it is debated whether clumps can survive energetic feedback from young stars, and afterwards migrate inwards to form galaxy bulges. Here we report the spatially resolved spectroscopy of a bright off-nuclear emission line region in a galaxy at z = 1.987. Although this region dominates star formation in the galaxy disk, its stellar continuum remains undetected in deep imaging, revealing an extremely young (less than ten million years old) massive clump, forming through the gravitational collapse of more than one billion solar masses of gas. Gas consumption in this young clump is more than tenfold faster than in the host galaxy, displaying high star-formation efficiency during this phase, in agreement with our hydrodynamic simulations. The frequency of older clumps with similar masses, coupled with our initial estimate of their formation rate (about 2.5 per billion years), supports long lifetimes (about 500 million years), favouring models in which clumps survive feedback and grow the bulges of present-day galaxies.

  17. An extremely young massive clump forming by gravitational collapse in a primordial galaxy.

    PubMed

    Zanella, A; Daddi, E; Le Floc'h, E; Bournaud, F; Gobat, R; Valentino, F; Strazzullo, V; Cibinel, A; Onodera, M; Perret, V; Renaud, F; Vignali, C

    2015-05-01

    When cosmic star formation history reaches a peak (at about redshift z ≈ 2), galaxies vigorously fed by cosmic reservoirs are dominated by gas and contain massive star-forming clumps, which are thought to form by violent gravitational instabilities in highly turbulent gas-rich disks. However, a clump formation event has not yet been observed, and it is debated whether clumps can survive energetic feedback from young stars, and afterwards migrate inwards to form galaxy bulges. Here we report the spatially resolved spectroscopy of a bright off-nuclear emission line region in a galaxy at z = 1.987. Although this region dominates star formation in the galaxy disk, its stellar continuum remains undetected in deep imaging, revealing an extremely young (less than ten million years old) massive clump, forming through the gravitational collapse of more than one billion solar masses of gas. Gas consumption in this young clump is more than tenfold faster than in the host galaxy, displaying high star-formation efficiency during this phase, in agreement with our hydrodynamic simulations. The frequency of older clumps with similar masses, coupled with our initial estimate of their formation rate (about 2.5 per billion years), supports long lifetimes (about 500 million years), favouring models in which clumps survive feedback and grow the bulges of present-day galaxies. PMID:25951282

  18. The global chemical properties of high-mass star forming clumps at different evolutionary stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Jun; Esimbek, Jarken; He, Yu-Xin; Li, Da-Lei; Tang, Xin-Di; Ji, Wei-Guang; Yuan, Ye; Guo, Wei-Hua

    2016-06-01

    A total of 197 relatively isolated high-mass star-forming clumps were selected from the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz (MALT90) survey data and their global chemical evolution investigated using four molecular lines, N2H+ (1--0), HCO+ (1--0), HCN (1-0), and HNC (1-0). The results suggest that the global averaged integrated intensity ratios I(HCO+)/I(HNC), I(HCN)/I(HNC), I(N2H+)/I(HCO+), and I(N2H+)/ I(HCN) are promising tracers for evolution of high-mass star-forming clumps. The global averaged column densities and abundances of N2H+, HCO+, HCN, and HNC increase as clumps evolve. The global averaged abundance ratios X(HCN)/X(HNC) could be used to trace evolution of high-mass star forming clumps, X(HCO+)/X(HNC) is more suitable for distinguishing high-mass star-forming clumps in prestellar (stage A) from those in protostellar (stage B) and HII/PDR region (stage C). These results suggest that the global averaged integrated intensity ratios between HCN (1-0), HNC (1-0), HCO+ (1--0) and N2H+ (1--0) are more suitable for tracing the evolution of high-mass star forming clumps. We also studied the chemical properties of the target high-mass star-forming clumps in each spiral arm of the Galaxy, and got results very different from those above. This is probably due to the relatively small sample in each spiral arm. For high-mass star-forming clumps in Sagittarius arm and Norma-Outer arm, comparing two groups located on one arm with different Galactocentric distances, the clumps near the Galactic Center appear to be younger than those far from the Galactic center, which may be due to more dense gas concentrated near the Galactic Center, and hence more massive stars being formed there.

  19. Properties of Star-forming Clumps in Galaxy Disks at z>1 from CANDELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindranath, Swara; Closson Ferguson, Henry; Guo, Yicheng

    2015-08-01

    Galaxies at z>1 often exhibit clumpy morphology, and the massive star-forming clumps are thought to be the result of violent disk instability in the gas-rich, turbulent galaxy disks. Their dynamical evolution happens on timescales much shorter compared to secular processes, transforming them into the more regular Hubble types. In order to study this transition, we have identified all the clumpy galaxies at 1clump-finder algorithm to identify the clumps, and used PSF photometry to obtain the flux of individual clumps across the optical and NIR wavelengths. In this presentation, I will present some of the results on the properties of clumps, their rest-frame colors, ages, and masses. I will discuss the trends in the observed properties with radius within galaxies, with redshift, and with the properties of the host galaxies, and discuss how these trends compare to the general predictions from theories of violent disk instabilities.

  20. KIC 8263801: A clump star in the Kepler open cluster NGC 6866 field?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedigamba, O. P.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we study the field of Kepler open cluster NGC 6866 using the data obtained from Kepler mission collected for a period of 4 years. We search for the red clump (RC) stars amongst the red giant (RG) stars showing solar-like oscillations using median gravity-mode period spacings (ΔP). We find a RG star KIC 8263801 having median gravity-mode period spacing 173.7 ± 6.4 s. We claim based on the median gravity-mode period spacing that KIC 8263801 is a secondary red clump (SRC) star which is massive enough to have ignited Helium burning in a non degenerate core. In the literature, no classification for KIC 8263801 has been provided. This is the first time that a star located in the field of NGC 6866 is classified in this manner.

  1. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Evidence for Dust Grain Evolution in Perseus Star-forming Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michael Chun-Yuan; Di Francesco, J.; Johnstone, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Hatchell, J.; Mottram, J. C.; Kirk, H.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Pezzuto, S.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Schneider-Bontemps, N.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2016-07-01

    The dust emissivity spectral index, β, is a critical parameter for deriving the mass and temperature of star-forming structures and, consequently, their gravitational stability. The β value is dependent on various dust grain properties, such as size, porosity, and surface composition, and is expected to vary as dust grains evolve. Here we present β, dust temperature, and optical depth maps of the star-forming clumps in the Perseus Molecular Cloud determined from fitting spectral energy distributions to combined Herschel and JCMT observations in the 160, 250, 350, 500, and 850 μm bands. Most of the derived β and dust temperature values fall within the ranges of 1.0–2.7 and 8–20 K, respectively. In Perseus, we find the β distribution differs significantly from clump to clump, indicative of grain growth. Furthermore, we also see significant localized β variations within individual clumps and find low-β regions correlate with local temperature peaks, hinting at the possible origins of low-β grains. Throughout Perseus, we also see indications of heating from B stars and embedded protostars, as well evidence of outflows shaping the local landscape.

  2. THE SINS SURVEY OF z {approx} 2 GALAXY KINEMATICS: PROPERTIES OF THE GIANT STAR-FORMING CLUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Genzel, R.; Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Genel, S.; Tacconi, L. J.; Buschkamp, P.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Kurk, J.; Newman, S.; Jones, T.; Shapiro, K.; Lilly, S. J.; Carollo, C. M.; Renzini, A.; Bouche, N.; Burkert, A.; Cresci, G.; Ceverino, D.; Dekel, A.; Hicks, E.

    2011-06-01

    We have studied the properties of giant star-forming clumps in five z {approx} 2 star-forming disks with deep SINFONI AO spectroscopy at the ESO VLT. The clumps reside in disk regions where the Toomre Q-parameter is below unity, consistent with their being bound and having formed from gravitational instability. Broad H{alpha}/[N II] line wings demonstrate that the clumps are launching sites of powerful outflows. The inferred outflow rates are comparable to or exceed the star formation rates, in one case by a factor of eight. Typical clumps may lose a fraction of their original gas by feedback in a few hundred million years, allowing them to migrate into the center. The most active clumps may lose much of their mass and disrupt in the disk. The clumps leave a modest imprint on the gas kinematics. Velocity gradients across the clumps are 10-40 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1}, similar to the galactic rotation gradients. Given beam smearing and clump sizes, these gradients may be consistent with significant rotational support in typical clumps. Extreme clumps may not be rotationally supported; either they are not virialized or they are predominantly pressure supported. The velocity dispersion is spatially rather constant and increases only weakly with star formation surface density. The large velocity dispersions may be driven by the release of gravitational energy, either at the outer disk/accreting streams interface, and/or by the clump migration within the disk. Spatial variations in the inferred gas phase oxygen abundance are broadly consistent with inside-out growing disks, and/or with inward migration of the clumps.

  3. Clumped X-ray emission around radio galaxies in Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Rhee, George; Owen, Frazer N.; Pinkney, Jason

    1994-01-01

    We have made a comparison of the X-ray and radio morphologies for a sample of 41 rich cluster fields using Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) and Very Large Array (VLA) 20 cm images. Surprisingly, we find that 75% of the radio galaxies have a statistically significant X-ray peak or subclump within 5 min of the radio galaxy position. The X-ray luminosity and the generally extended nature of the X-ray subclumps suggest that these subclumps are overdense regions emitting free-free radiation, although there is also evidence for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) X-ray emission coming from some of the more compact, high surface brightness X-ray peaks. Some interesting correlations with radio morphology were also discovered. For clusters which contain wide-angle-tailed radio sources associated with centrally dominant galaxies, there are significant elongations or clumps in the central X-ray emission which are unusual for this type of cluster. We suggest that cluster radio galaxies are pointers to particular clusters or regions within clusters that have recently undergone mergers between cluster subsystems.

  4. Distance moduli of open cluster NGC 6819 from Red Giant Clump stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedigamba, O. P.; Balona, L. A.; Medupe, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we study Kepler open cluster NGC 6819 using Kepler data of Red Giant Clump (RGC) single member (SM) stars. The Kepler data spans a period of 4 years starting in 2009. In particular, we derive distance moduli for each individual RGC star, from which we get the mean distance modulus of μ0 = 11.520 ± 0.105 mag for the cluster when we use reddening from the Kepler Input Catalogue (KIC) for each RGC star. A value of μ0 = 11.747 ± 0.086 mag is obtained when uniform reddening value E(B - V) = 0.15 is used for the cluster. The values of μ0 obtained with RGC stars are in agreement with the values in the literature with other methods. We report for the case of Kepler open cluster NGC 6819 that RGC stars can be used as 'distance candles' as has been done in the literature with other open clusters.

  5. Molecular emission in dense massive clumps from the star-forming regions S231-S235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladeyschikov, D. A.; Kirsanova, M. S.; Tsivilev, A. P.; Sobolev, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the study of the star-forming regions S231-S235 in radio lines of molecules of the interstellar medium—carbon monoxide (CO), ammonia (NH3), cyanoacetylene (HC3N), in maser lines—methanol (CH3OH) and water vapor (H2O). The regions S231-S235 belong to the giant molecular cloudG174+2.5. The goal of this paper is to search for new sources of emission toward molecular clumps and to estimate their physical parameters from CO and NH3 molecular lines. We obtained new detections ofNH3 andHC3Nlines in the sources WB89673 and WB89 668 which indicates the presence of high-density gas. From the CO line, we derived sizes, column densities, and masses of molecular clumps. From the NH3 line, we derived gas kinetic temperatures and number densities in molecular clumps. We determined that kinetic temperatures and number densities of molecular gas are within the limits 16-30 K and 2.8-7.2 × 103 cm-3 respectively. The shock-tracing line of CH3OH molecule at a frequency of 36.2 GHz was detected in WB89 673 for the first time.

  6. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arévalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-07-01

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ˜10-30 kpc within radii of 30-220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90-140 km s-1 on ˜20-30 kpc scales and 70-100 km s-1 on smaller scales ˜7-10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7-8 per cent for radii ˜30-220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3-4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density-velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  7. The Kinematic and Chemical Properties of a Potential Core-forming Clump: Perseus B1-E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadavoy, S. I.; Shirley, Y.; Di Francesco, J.; Henning, Th.; Currie, M. J.; André, Ph.; Pezzuto, S.

    2015-06-01

    We present 13CO and {{C}18}O (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) maps toward the core-forming Perseus B1-E clump using observations from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, the Submillimeter Telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory, and the IRAM 30 m telescope. We find that the 13CO and {{C}18}O line emission both have very complex velocity structures, indicative of multiple velocity components within the ambient gas. The (1-0) transitions reveal a radial velocity gradient across B1-E of ˜ 1 km {{s}-1} p{{c}-1} that increases from northwest to southeast, whereas the majority of the Perseus cloud has a radial velocity gradient increasing from southwest to northeast. In contrast, we see no evidence of a velocity gradient associated with the denser Herschel-identified substructures in B1-E. Additionally, the denser substructures have much lower systemic motions than the ambient clump material, which indicates that they are likely decoupled from the large-scale gas. Nevertheless, these substructures themselves have broad line widths (˜0.4 km {{s}-1}) similar to that of the {{C}18}O gas in the clump, which suggests they inherited their kinematic properties from the larger-scale, moderately dense gas. Finally, we find evidence of {{C}18}O depletion only toward one substructure, B1-E2, which is also the only object with narrow (transonic) line widths. We suggest that as prestellar cores form, their chemical and kinematic properties are linked in evolution, such that these objects must first dissipate their turbulence before they deplete in CO.

  8. EVIDENCE FOR INFLOW IN HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING CLUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, Megan; Shirley, Yancy L.; Wu Jingwen; Brogan, Crystal; Wootten, Alwyn; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi E-mail: yshirley@as.arizona.edu E-mail: cbrogan@nrao.edu E-mail: k.tatematsu@nao.ac.jp

    2011-10-10

    We analyze the HCO{sup +} 3-2 and H{sup 13}CO{sup +} 3-2 line profiles of 27 high-mass star-forming regions to identify asymmetries that are suggestive of mass inflow. Three quantitative measures of line asymmetry are used to indicate whether a line profile is blue, red, or neither-the ratio of the temperature of the blue and red peaks, the line skew, and the dimensionless parameter {delta}v. We find nine HCO{sup +} 3-2 line profiles with a significant blue asymmetry and four with significant red asymmetric profiles. Comparing our HCO{sup +} 3-2 results to HCN 3-2 observations from Wu et al., we find that eight of the blue and three of the red have profiles with the same asymmetry in HCN. The eight sources with blue asymmetries in both tracers are considered strong candidates for inflow. Quantitative measures of the asymmetry (e.g., {delta}v) tend to be larger for HCN. This, combined with possible HCO{sup +} abundance enhancements in outflows, suggests that HCN may be a better tracer of inflow. Understanding the behavior of common molecular tracers like HCO{sup +} in clumps of different masses is important for properly analyzing the line profiles seen in a sample of sources representing a broad range of clump masses. Such studies will soon be possible with the large number of sources with possible self-absorption seen in spectroscopic follow-up observations of clumps identified in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey.

  9. Calibrating the Optical Luminosity of Red Clump Stars: An Archival Study of Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocholski, Aaron

    2010-09-01

    The core helium burning stars of the red clump {RC} are a conspicuous feature in the color-magnitude diagram of many stellar populations. Its ease of identification, along with its relative brightness {M_I 0} make the RC a popular feature for HST studies of stellar populations in galaxies out to a few Mpc. Such studies generally interpret the data through comparison to theoretical isochrones. For accurate results, the theoretical predictions must be calibrated to match the RC properties of observed populations of known age and metallicity. However, no large scale studies of the luminosity of the RC currently exist in the optical bands. We propose to remedy this situation with an archival study of RC properties in star clusters in the Milky Way, LMC, and SMC. We will focus on HST images of globular clusters, but we will augment the sample with ground-based open cluster observations to extend the coverage of parameter space. The goal is to build a large and homogeneous database, through new analysis and incorporation of literature data, of cluster ages, abundances, distances, and RC photometry. This database will allow us to explore the variations in the RC luminosity as a function of age and [Fe/H] over the full range of parameter space where the RC exists, for both the V and I bands. The results will provide a fundamental calibration for all future HST studies of stellar populations and distances of nearby galaxies using the RC. They will also allow for verification or improvement of theoretical models for red giant phase evolution. This in turn will help many subjects, from stellar modeling to population synthesis and fitting of spectral energy distributions of distant galaxies.

  10. Understanding the star-forming environment in stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiya

    The main goal of this thesis is to investigate the physical conditions of the star-forming environment in stellar clusters, especially for the formation of low-mass cluster members. Embedded, young, and intermediate-mass stellar clusters around Herbig Ae/Be stars are sampled. Mid- and near-infrared observations identifying young stars and millimeter interferometric observations probing dense molecular gas and dust continuum are presented. These observations are used to reveal the large-scale young stellar population around the vicinity where the sampled clusters form, probe the physical conditions of dense molecular clumps which are capable of forming individual low-mass cluster members, and examine the influence of the most massive star in the cluster on its siblings and natal cluster-forming cloud. This study shows that stars within the cluster tend to seem younger than those outside the cluster, suggesting a higher and continuous star-forming rate within the cluster than outside, or massive stars are initiated later than low-mass stars within the same cloud. A thorough investigation of young stars and dense gas toward the MWC 1080 cluster further suggests a domination of the most massive star in the cluster on both the natal cloud dispersal and its low-mass cluster members. As active outflows and winds from the Herbig Ae/Be stars increase the non-thermal motion in the cloud, low-mass cluster members are formed within denser and more turbulent cores, than isolated low-mass star-forming cores. In addition, the strong gas dispersal from the Herbig Ae/Be stars also helps the removal of the circumstellar material around nearby low-mass stars. This makes these low-mass cluster members appear older. In summary, this thesis provides the observational evidence showing how the most massive star in the cluster affects the formation and evolution of low-mass cluster members and the physical conditions of star formation in the cluster.

  11. STAR-FORMING GAS IN YOUNG CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Philip C.

    2010-05-10

    Initial conditions for star formation in clusters are estimated for protostars whose masses follow the initial mass function from 0.05 to 10 solar masses. Star-forming infall is assumed equally likely to stop at any moment, due to gas dispersal dominated by stellar feedback. For spherical infall, the typical initial condensation must have a steep density gradient, as in low-mass cores, surrounded by a shallower gradient, as in the clumps around cores. These properties match observed column densities in cluster-forming regions when the mean infall stopping time is 0.05 Myr and the accretion efficiency is 0.5. The infall duration increases with final protostar mass, from 0.01 to 0.3 Myr, and the mass accretion rate increases from 3 to 300 x 10{sup -6} solar masses yr{sup -1}. The typical spherical accretion luminosity is {approx}5 solar luminosities, reducing the 'luminosity problem' to a factor of {approx}3. The initial condensation density gradient changes from steep to shallow at radius 0.04 pc, enclosing 0.9 solar masses, with mean column density 2 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} and with effective central temperature 16 K. These initial conditions are denser and warmer than those for isolated star formation.

  12. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. XIV. Physical Properties of Massive Starless and Star-forming Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Brian E.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Battersby, Cara; Rosolowsky, Erik W.; Ginsburg, Adam G.; Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P.; Pestalozzi, Michele R.; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J., II; Bally, John; Glenn, Jason

    2016-05-01

    We sort 4683 molecular clouds between 10° < ℓ < 65° from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey based on observational diagnostics of star formation activity: compact 70 μm sources, mid-IR color-selected YSOs, H2O and CH3OH masers, and UCH ii regions. We also present a combined NH3-derived gas kinetic temperature and H2O maser catalog for 1788 clumps from our own GBT 100 m observations and from the literature. We identify a subsample of 2223 (47.5%) starless clump candidates (SCCs), the largest and most robust sample identified from a blind survey to date. Distributions of flux density, flux concentration, solid angle, kinetic temperature, column density, radius, and mass show strong (>1 dex) progressions when sorted by star formation indicator. The median SCC is marginally subvirial (α ∼ 0.7) with >75% of clumps with known distance being gravitationally bound (α < 2). These samples show a statistically significant increase in the median clump mass of ΔM ∼ 170–370 M ⊙ from the starless candidates to clumps associated with protostars. This trend could be due to (i) mass growth of the clumps at \\dot{M}∼ 200{--}440 M ⊙ Myr‑1 for an average freefall 0.8 Myr timescale, (ii) a systematic factor of two increase in dust opacity from starless to protostellar phases, and/or (iii) a variation in the ratio of starless to protostellar clump lifetime that scales as ∼M ‑0.4. By comparing to the observed number of CH3OH maser containing clumps, we estimate the phase lifetime of massive (M > 103 M ⊙) starless clumps to be 0.37 ± 0.08 Myr (M/103 M ⊙)‑1 the majority (M < 450 M ⊙) have phase lifetimes longer than their average freefall time.

  13. Star Formation in the Perseus Molecular Cloud: A Detailed Look at Star-Forming Clumps with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadavoy, Sarah I.

    2013-08-01

    This dissertation presents new Herschel observations at 70 micron, 160 micron, 250 micron, 350 micron, and 500 micron of the Perseus molecular cloud from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. The Perseus molecular cloud is a nearby star-forming region consisting of seven main star-forming clumps. The Herschel observations are used to characterize and contrast the properties of these clumps, and to study their embedded core populations. First, we probed the exceptionally young clump, B1-E. Using complementary molecular line data, we demonstrate that B1-E is likely fragmenting into a first generation of dense cores in relative isolation. Such a core formation region has never been observed before. Second, we use complementary long wavelength observations at 850 micron to study the dust properties in the larger, more active B1 clump. We find that Herschel data alone cannot constrain well the dust properties of cold dust emission and that long wavelength observations are needed. Additionally, we find evidence of dust grain growth towards the dense cores in B1, where the dust emissivity index, beta, varies from the often assumed value of beta = 2. In the absence of long wavelength observations, however, assuming beta = 2 is preferable over measuring beta with the Herschel-only bands. Finally, we use the source extraction code, getsources, to identify the core populations within each clump from the Herschel data. In addition, we use complementary archival infrared observations to study their populations of young stellar objects (YSOs). We find that the more massive clumps have an excess of older stage YSOs, suggesting that these regions contracted first. Starless cores are typically associated with peaks in the column density, where those found towards regions of higher column density also have higher average densities and colder temperatures. Starless cores associated with a strong, local interstellar radiation field, however, have higher temperatures. We find that the clumps

  14. Multi-Physics Feedback Simulations with Realistic Initial Conditions of the Formation of Star Clusters: From Large Scale Magnetized Clouds to Turbulent Clumps to Cores to Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, R. I.; Li, P.; McKee, C. F.

    2015-10-01

    Multi-physics zoom-in adaptive mesh refinement simulations with feedback and realistic initial conditions, starting from large scale turbulent molecular clouds through the formation of clumps and cores to the formation os stellar clusters are presented. I give a summary of results at the different scales undergoing gravitational collapse from cloud to core to cluster formation. Detailed comparisons with observations are made at each stage of the simulations. In particular, properties of the magnetized clumps are compared with recent observations of Crutcher et al. 2010 and Crutcher 2012 and the magnetic field orientation in cloud clumps relative to the global mean field of the inter-cloud medium (Li et al. 2009). The Initial Mass Function (IMF) obtained is compared with the Chabrier IMF and the protostellar mass function of the cluster is compared with different theories.

  15. On the Cluster Physics of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and X-Ray Surveys. IV. Characterizing Density and Pressure Clumping due to Infalling Substructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, N.; Bond, J. R.; Pfrommer, C.; Sievers, J. L.

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the outskirts of galaxy clusters at the virial radius (R200) and beyond is critical for an accurate determination of cluster masses, structure growth, and to ensure unbiased cosmological parameter estimates from cluster surveys. This problem has drawn renewed interest due to recent determinations of gas mass fractions beyond R200, which appear to be considerably larger than the cosmic mean. Here, we use a large suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to study the inhomogeneity of the intra-cluster medium and employ different variants of simulated physics, including radiative gas physics and thermal feedback by active galactic nuclei. We find that density and pressure clumping closely trace each other as a function of radius, but the bias on density remains on average \\lt 20% within R200. At larger radii, clumping increases steeply due to the continuous infall of coherent structures that have not yet passed the accretion shock. Density and pressure clumping increase with cluster mass and redshift, which probes on average dynamically younger objects that are still in the process of assembling. The angular power spectra of gas density and pressure show that the clumping signal is dominated by large-scale cosmic filaments that reach from the cosmic web into the clusters, signaling the presence of gravitationally driven “super clumping.” While the prolateness of the gravitational halo potential implies an approximate radial correlation of these gaseous large-scale structures, gas density and pressure lose coherence on small scales across different radii due to dissipative gas physics. In contrast, the angular power spectrum of dark matter shows an almost uniform size distribution due to unimpeded subhalos. We provide a synopsis of the radial dependence of the clusters’ non-equilibrium measures (kinetic pressure support, ellipticity, and clumping) that all increase sharply beyond R200.

  16. Observations of Protostellar Outflow Feedback in Clustered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, F.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss the role of protostellar outflow feedback in clustered star formation using the observational data of recent molecular outflow surveys toward nearby cluster-forming clumps. We found that for almost all clumps, the outflow momentum injection rate is significantly larger than the turbulence dissipation rate. Therefore, the outflow feedback is likely to maintain supersonic turbulence in the clumps. For less massive clumps such as B59, L1551, and L1641N, the outflow kinetic energy is comparable to the clump gravitational energy. In such clumps, the outflow feedback probably affects significantly the clump dynamics. On the other hand, for clumps with masses larger than about 200 M⊙, the outflow kinetic energy is significantly smaller than the clump gravitational energy. Since the majority of stars form in such clumps, we conclude that outflow feedback cannot destroy the whole parent clump. These characteristics of the outflow feedback support the scenario of slow star formation.

  17. Interferometric Mapping of Magnetic Fields: The ALMA View of the Massive Star-forming Clump W43-MM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, Paulo C.; Girart, Josep M.; Hull, Charles L. H.; Sridharan, Tirupati K.; Louvet, Fabien; Plambeck, Richard; Li, Zhi-Yun; Crutcher, Richard M.; Lai, Shih-Ping

    2016-07-01

    Here, we present the first results from ALMA observations of 1 mm polarized dust emission toward the W43-MM1 high-mass star-forming clump. We have detected a highly fragmented filament with source masses ranging from 14 M {}ȯ to 312 M {}ȯ , where the largest fragment, source A, is believed to be one of the most massive in our Galaxy. We found a smooth, ordered, and detailed polarization pattern throughout the filament, which we used to derived magnetic field morphologies and strengths for 12 out of the 15 fragments detected ranging from 0.2 to 9 mG. The dynamical equilibrium of each fragment was evaluated finding that all the fragments are in a super-critical state that is consistent with previously detected infalling motions toward W43-MM1. Moreover, there are indications suggesting that the field is being dragged by gravity as the whole filament is collapsing.

  18. A UKIDSS-based search for low-mass stars and small stellar clumps in off-cloud parts of young star-forming regions *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perger, M.; Lodieu, N.; Martín, E. L.; Barrado Y Navascués, D.

    2011-07-01

    The form and universality of the mass function of young and nearby star-forming regions is still under debate. Its relation to the stellar density, its mass peak and the dependency on most recent models shows significant differencies for the various regions and remains unclear up to date. We aim to get a more complete census of two of such regions. We investigate yet unexplored areas of Orion and Taurus-Auriga, observed by the UKIDSS survey. In the latter, we search for low-mass stars via photometric and proper motion criteria and signs for variability. In Orion, we search for small stellar clumps via nearest-neighbor methods. Highlights in Taurus would be the finding of the missing low-mass stars and the detection of a young cluster T dwarf. In Orion, we discovered small stellar associations of its OB1b and OB1c populations. Combined with what is known in literature, we will provide by this investigations a general picture of the results of the star-forming processes in large areas of Taurus and Orion and probe the most recent models. Based on data of the UKIRT (operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the Science and Technology Facilities Council of the U.K.) Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS).Supported by the Marie Curie Research Training Network `CONSTELLATION' under grant no. MRTN-CT-2006-035890.

  19. The growth of the galaxy cluster Abell 85: mergers, shocks, stripping and seeding of clumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinohe, Y.; Werner, N.; Simionescu, A.; Allen, S. W.; Canning, R. E. A.; Ehlert, S.; Mernier, F.; Takahashi, T.

    2015-04-01

    We present the results of deep Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 85, which is currently undergoing at least two mergers, and in addition shows evidence for gas sloshing which extends out to r ≈ 600 kpc. One of the two infalling subclusters, to the south of the main cluster centre, has a dense, X-ray bright cool core and a tail extending to the south-east. The northern edge of this tail is strikingly smooth and sharp (narrower than the Coulomb mean free path of the ambient gas) over a length of 200 kpc, while towards the south-west the boundary of the tail is blurred and bent, indicating a difference in the plasma transport properties between these two edges. The thermodynamic structure of the tail strongly supports an overall north-westward motion. We propose, that a sloshing-induced tangential, ambient, coherent gas flow is bending the tail eastwards. The brightest galaxy of this subcluster is at the leading edge of the dense core, and is trailed by the tail of stripped gas, suggesting that the cool core of the subcluster has been almost completely destroyed by the time it reached its current radius of r ≈ 500 kpc. The surface-brightness excess, likely associated with gas stripped from the infalling southern subcluster, extends towards the south-east out to at least r500 of the main cluster, indicating that the stripping of infalling subclusters may seed gas inhomogeneities. The second merging subcluster appears to be a diffuse non-cool-core system. Its merger is likely supersonic with a Mach number of ≈1.4.

  20. Apex determination and detection of stellar clumps in the open cluster M 67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereshchagin, S. V.; Chupina, N. V.; Sariya, Devesh P.; Yadav, R. K. S.; Kumar, Brijesh

    2014-08-01

    We determined the cluster’s apex coordinates, studied the substructures and performed membership analysis in the central part (34‧×33‧) of the open cluster M 67. We used the individual stellar apexes method developed earlier and classical technique of proper motion diagrams in coordinate system connected with apex. The neighbour-to-neighbour distance technique was applied to detect space details. The membership list was corrected and some stars were excluded from the most probable members list. The apex coordinates have been determined as: A0=132.97° ± 0.81° and D0=11.85° ± 0.90°. The 2D-space star density field was analysed and high degree of inhomogeneity was found.

  1. Controversial age spreads from the main sequence turn-off and red clump in intermediate-age clusters in the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederhofer, F.; Bastian, N.; Kozhurina-Platais, V.; Hilker, M.; de Mink, S. E.; Cabrera-Ziri, I.; Li, C.; Ercolano, B.

    2016-02-01

    Most star clusters at an intermediate age (1-2 Gyr) in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds show a puzzling feature in their color-magnitude diagrams (CMD) that is not in agreement with a simple stellar population. The main sequence turn-off of these clusters is much broader than expected from photometric uncertainties. One interpretation of this feature is that age spreads of the order of 200-500 Myr exist within individual clusters, although this interpretation is highly debated. Such large age spreads should affect other parts of the CMD, which are sensitive to age, as well. In this study, we analyze the CMDs of a sample of 12 intermediate-age clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud that all show an extended turn-off using archival optical data taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. We fit the star formation history of the turn-off region and the red clump region independently. We find that in most cases, the age spreads inferred from the red clumps are smaller than those that result from the turn-off region. However, the age ranges that result from the red clump region are broader than expected for a single age. Only two out of 12 clusters in our sample show a red clump which seems to be consistent with a single age. As our results are ambiguous, by fitting the star formation histories to the red clump regions, we cannot ultimately tell if the extended main sequence turn-off feature is the result of an age spread or not. However, we do find that the width of the extended main sequence turn-off feature is correlated with the age of the clusters in a way which would be unexplained in the so-called age spread interpretation, but which may be expected if stellar rotation is the cause of the spread at the turn-off. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST

  2. Lithium Inventory of 2 Solar Mass Red Clump Stars in Open Clusters: A Test of the Helium Flash Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.

    2016-01-01

    The temperature distribution of field Li-rich red giants suggests the presence of a population of Li-rich red clump (RC) stars. One proposed explanation for this population is that all stars with masses near 2 solar mass experience a shortlived phase of Li-richness at the onset of core He-burning. Many of these stars have low C-12/C-13, a signature of deep mixing that is presumably associated with the Li regeneration. To test this purported mechanism of Li enrichment, we measured abundances in 38 RC stars and 6 red giant branch (RGB) stars in four open clusters selected to have RC masses near 2 solar mass. We find six Li-rich stars (A(Li) greater than or equal to 1.50 dex) of which only two may be RC stars. None of the RC stars have Li exceeding the levels observed in the RGB stars, but given the brevity of the suggested Li-rich phase and the modest sample size, it is probable that stars with larger Li-enrichments were missed simply by chance. However, we find very few stars in our sample with low C-12/C-13. Such low C-12/C-13, seen in many field Li-rich stars, should persist even after lithium has returned to normal low levels. Thus, if Li synthesis during the He flash occurs, it is a rare, but potentially long-lived occurrence rather than a short-lived phase for all stars. We estimate a conservative upper limit of the fraction of stars going through a Li-rich phase to be less than 47%, based on stars that have low C-12/C-13 for their observed A(Li).

  3. Lithium Inventory of 2 M ⊙ Red Clump Stars in Open Clusters: A Test of the Helium Flash Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.

    2016-08-01

    The temperature distribution of field Li-rich red giants suggests the presence of a population of Li-rich red clump (RC) stars. One proposed explanation for this population is that all stars with masses near 2 M ⊙ experience a short-lived phase of Li-richness at the onset of core He-burning. Many of these stars have low 12C/13C, a signature of deep mixing that is presumably associated with the Li regeneration. To test this purported mechanism of Li enrichment, we measured abundances in 38 RC stars and 6 red giant branch (RGB) stars in four open clusters selected to have RC masses near 2 M ⊙. We find six Li-rich stars (A(Li) ≥ 1.50 dex) of which only two may be RC stars. None of the RC stars have Li exceeding the levels observed in the RGB stars, but given the brevity of the suggested Li-rich phase and the modest sample size, it is probable that stars with larger Li-enrichments were missed simply by chance. However, we find very few stars in our sample with low 12C/13C. Such low 12C/13C, seen in many field Li-rich stars, should persist even after lithium has returned to normal low levels. Thus, if Li synthesis during the He flash occurs, it is a rare, but potentially long-lived occurrence rather than a short-lived phase for all stars. We estimate a conservative upper limit of the fraction of stars going through a Li-rich phase to be \\lt 47 % , based on stars that have low 12C/13C for their observed A(Li).

  4. Radiative Feedback of Forming Star Clusters on Their GMC Environments: Theory and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, C. S.; Pudritz, R. E.; Harris, W. E.

    2013-07-01

    Star clusters form from dense clumps within a molecular cloud. Radiation from these newly formed clusters feeds back on their natal molecular cloud through heating and ionization which ultimately stops gas accretion into the cluster. Recent studies suggest that radiative feedback effects from a single cluster may be sufficient to disrupt an entire cloud over a short timescale. Simulating cluster formation on a large scale, however, is computationally demanding due to the high number of stars involved. For this reason, we present a model for representing the radiative output of an entire cluster which involves randomly sampling an initial mass function (IMF) as the cluster accretes mass. We show that this model is able to reproduce the star formation histories of observed clusters. To examine the degree to which radiative feedback shapes the evolution of a molecular cloud, we use the FLASH adaptive-mesh refinement hydrodynamics code to simulate cluster formation in a turbulent cloud. Unlike previous studies, sink particles are used to represent a forming cluster rather than individual stars. Our cluster model is then coupled with a raytracing scheme to treat radiative transfer as the clusters grow in mass. This poster will outline the details of our model and present preliminary results from our 3D hydrodynamical simulations.

  5. Molecular clumps in the W51 giant molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, H.; Thompson, M. A.; Clark, J. S.; Chrysostomou, A.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we present a catalogue of dense molecular clumps located within the W51 giant molecular cloud (GMC). This work is based on Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme 13CO J = 3-2 observations of the W51 GMC and uses the automated CLUMPFIND algorithm to decompose the region into a total of 1575 clumps of which 1130 are associated with the W51 GMC. We clearly see the distinct structures of the W51 complex and the high-velocity stream previously reported. We find the clumps have characteristic diameters of 1.4 pc, excitation temperatures of 12 K, densities of 5.6 × 1021 cm-2, surface densities 0.02 g cm-2 and masses of 90 M⊙. We find a total mass of dense clumps within the GMC of 1.5 × 105 M⊙, with only 1 per cent of the clumps detected by number and 4 per cent by mass found to be supercritical. We find a clump-forming efficiency of 14 ± 1 per cent for the W51 GMC and a supercritical clump-forming efficiency of 0.5-0.5+2.3 per cent. Looking at the clump mass distribution, we find it is described by a single power law with a slope of α=2.4-0.1+0.2 above ˜100 M⊙. By comparing locations of supercritical clumps and young clusters, we see that any future star formation is likely to be located away from the currently active W51A region.

  6. SMOOTH(ER) STELLAR MASS MAPS IN CANDELS: CONSTRAINTS ON THE LONGEVITY OF CLUMPS IN HIGH-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wuyts, Stijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Genzel, Reinhard; Lutz, Dieter; Guo Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koo, David C.; McGrath, Elizabeth; Dekel, Avishai; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lotz, Jennifer; Hathi, Nimish P.; Huang, Kuang-Han; Newman, Jeffrey A.; and others

    2012-07-10

    We perform a detailed analysis of the resolved colors and stellar populations of a complete sample of 323 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 0.5 < z < 1.5 and 326 SFGs at 1.5 < z < 2.5 in the ERS and CANDELS-Deep region of GOODS-South. Galaxies were selected to be more massive than 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and have specific star formation rates (SFRs) above 1/t{sub H} . We model the seven-band optical ACS + near-IR WFC3 spectral energy distributions of individual bins of pixels, accounting simultaneously for the galaxy-integrated photometric constraints available over a longer wavelength range. We analyze variations in rest-frame color, stellar surface mass density, age, and extinction as a function of galactocentric radius and local surface brightness/density, and measure structural parameters on luminosity and stellar mass maps. We find evidence for redder colors, older stellar ages, and increased dust extinction in the nuclei of galaxies. Big star-forming clumps seen in star formation tracers are less prominent or even invisible in the inferred stellar mass distributions. Off-center clumps contribute up to {approx}20% to the integrated SFR, but only 7% or less to the integrated mass of all massive SFGs at z {approx} 1 and z {approx} 2, with the fractional contributions being a decreasing function of wavelength used to select the clumps. The stellar mass profiles tend to have smaller sizes and M20 coefficients, and higher concentration and Gini coefficients than the light distribution. Our results are consistent with an inside-out disk growth scenario with brief (100-200 Myr) episodic local enhancements in star formation superposed on the underlying disk. Alternatively, the young ages of off-center clumps may signal inward clump migration, provided this happens efficiently on the order of an orbital timescale.

  7. Annihilations of superheavy dark matter in superdense clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Berezinsky, V.; Dokuchaev, V.; Eroshenko, Yu.; Kachelriess, M.; Solberg, M. A.

    2010-05-15

    Superheavy dark matter (SHDM) exchanges energy with its environment much slower than particles with masses close to the electroweak scale and has therefore different small-scale clustering properties. Using the neutralino as candidate for the SHDM, we find that free-streaming allows the formation of DM clumps of all masses down to {approx}260m{sub {chi}}in the case of bino. If small-scale clumps evolve from a nonstandard, spiky spectrum of perturbations, DM clumps may form during the radiation-dominated era. These clumps are not destroyed by tidal interactions and can be extremely dense. In the case of a bino, a 'gravithermal catastrophe' can develop in the central part of the most dense clumps, increasing further the central density and thus the annihilation signal. In the case of a Higgsino, the annihilation signal is enhanced by the Sommerfeld effect. As a result annihilations of superheavy neutralinos in dense clumps may lead to observable fluxes of annihilation products in the form of ultrahigh energy particles, for both cases, Higgsinos and binos, as lightest supersymmetric particles.

  8. Interstellar Clump Behavior and Magnetic Effects in Small Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallée, Jacques P.

    2000-07-01

    Cold, dusty molecular clumps (0.01 pcclumps. There are universal physical relations in clumps governing mean parameters such as gas density n, diameter D, magnetic field B, and gas line width σ, with the forms ~Dc, ~p, ~k, <σ>~q. For clumps with diameters <0.5 pc, one finds c=-1.5+/-0.1, p=-1.5+/-0.1, k=1.0+/-0.2. These exponent values differ from those found by Larson for molecular clouds with sizes greater than 1 pc. These differences in c and k could be indicative of ongoing accretion processes in shocked media as a prelude to star formation. The energy distribution in clumps reveals the following: the support against gravitational collapse in clumps with sizes greater than 0.1 pc comes mainly from turbulent energy, while smaller clumps with sizes less than 0.1 pc are supported by both magnetic and turbulent energies. The clump size of 0.1 pc is critical in many other respects.

  9. The morphology of the sub-giant branch and red clump reveal no sign of age spreads in intermediate-age clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, N.; Niederhofer, F.

    2015-04-01

    A recent surprise in stellar cluster research, made possible through the precision of Hubble Space Telescope photometry, was that some intermediate-age (1-2 Gyr) clusters in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds have main-sequence turn-off (MSTO) widths that are significantly broader than would be expected for a simple stellar population (SSP). One interpretation of these extended MSTOs (eMSTOs) is that age spreads of the order of ˜500 Myr exist within the clusters, radically redefining our view of stellar clusters, which are traditionally thought of as single-age, single-metallicity stellar populations. Here we test this interpretation by studying other regions of the CMD that should also be affected by such large age spreads, namely the width of the sub-giant branch (SGB) and the red clump (RC). We study two massive clusters in the LMC that display the eMSTO phenomenon (NGC 1806 and NGC 1846) and show that both have SGB and RC morphologies that are in conflict with expectations if large age spreads exist within the clusters. We conclude that the SGB and RC widths are inconsistent with extended star formation histories within these clusters, hence age spreads are not likely to be the cause of the eMSTO phenomenon. Our results are in agreement with recent studies that also have cast doubt on whether large age spreads can exist in massive clusters; namely the failure to find age spreads in young massive clusters, a lack of gas/dust detected within massive clusters, and homogeneous abundances within clusters that exhibit the eMSTO phenomenon.

  10. VLT-SINFONI sub-kpc study of the star formation in local LIRGs and ULIRGs. Analysis of the global ΣSFR structure and characterisation of individual star-forming clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqueras López, J.; Colina, L.; Arribas, S.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Alonso-Herrero, A.

    2016-05-01

    identified a total of 95 individual star-forming clumps in our sample of U/LIRGs, with sizes that range within ~60-400 pc and ~300-1500 pc, and extinction-corrected Paα luminosities of ~105-107 L⊙ and ~106-108 L⊙ in LIRGs and ULIRGs, respectively. The ΣSFR of the clumps presents a wide range of values within 1-90 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 and 0.1-100 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 for LIRGs and ULIRGs. Star-forming clumps in LIRGs are about ten times larger and thousands of times more luminous than typical clumps in spiral galaxies, which is consistent with expected photon-bounded conditions in ionized nebulae that surround young stellar clusters. Clumps in ULIRGs have sizes similar (×0.5-1) to those of high-z clumps, having Paα luminosities similar to some high-z clumps, and about 10 times less luminous than the most luminous high-z clumps identified so far. This could be an indication that the most luminous giant clumps in high-z star-forming galaxies are forming stars with a higher surface density rate than low-z compact ULIRGs. We also observed a change in the slope of the L-r relation, from η = 3.04 of local samples to η = 1.88 from high-z observations. A likely explanation is that most luminous galaxies are interacting and merging, and therefore their size represents a combination of the distribution of the star-forming clumps within each galaxy in the system plus the additional effect of the projected distance between the galaxies. As a consequence, this produces an overall size that is larger than that of individual clumps, or galaxies (for integrated measurements) Final data products are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/A67

  11. Lithopanspermia in star-forming clusters.

    PubMed

    Adams, Fred C; Spergel, David N

    2005-08-01

    This paper considers the lithopanspermia hypothesis in star-forming groups and clusters, where the chances of biological material spreading from one solar system to another is greatly enhanced (relative to action in the field) because of the close proximity of the systems and lower relative velocities. These effects more than compensate for the reduced time spent in such crowded environments. This paper uses approximately 300,000 Monte Carlo scattering calculations to determine the cross sections for rocks to be captured by binaries and provides fitting formulae for other applications. We assess the odds of transfer as a function of the ejection speed v (eject) and number N(.) of members in the birth aggregate. The odds of any given ejected meteoroid being recaptured by another solar system are relatively low, about 1:10(3)-10(6) over the expected range of ejection speeds and cluster sizes. Because the number of ejected rocks (with mass m > 10 kg) per system can be large, N (R) approximately 10(16), virtually all solar systems are likely to share rocky ejecta with all of the other solar systems in their birth cluster. The number of ejected rocks that carry living microorganisms is much smaller and less certain, but we estimate that N (B) approximately 10(7) rocks can be ejected from a biologically active solar system. For typical birth environments, the capture of life-bearing rocks is expected to occur N (bio) asymptotically equal to 10-16,000 times (per cluster), depending on the ejection speeds. Only a small fraction (f (imp) approximately 10(4)) of the captured rocks impact the surfaces of terrestrial planets, so that N (lps) asymptotically equal to 10(3)-1.6 lithopanspermia events are expected per cluster (under favorable conditions). Finally, we discuss the question of internal versus external seeding of clusters and the possibility of Earth seeding young clusters over its biologically active lifetime. PMID:16078868

  12. Cloud Structure of Galactic OB Cluster-forming Regions from Combining Ground- and Space-based Bolometric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuxin; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Li, Di; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ginsburg, Adam; Pineda, Jaime E.; Qian, Lei; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; McLeod, Anna Faye; Rosolowsky, Erik; Dale, James E.; Immer, Katharina; Koch, Eric; Longmore, Steve; Walker, Daniel; Testi, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    We have developed an iterative procedure to systematically combine the millimeter and submillimeter images of OB cluster-forming molecular clouds, which were taken by ground-based (CSO, JCMT, APEX, and IRAM-30 m) and space telescopes (Herschel and Planck). For the seven luminous (L\\gt {10}6 L ⊙) Galactic OB cluster-forming molecular clouds selected for our analyses, namely W49A, W43-Main, W43-South, W33, G10.6-0.4, G10.2-0.3, and G10.3-0.1, we have performed single-component, modified blackbody fits to each pixel of the combined (sub)millimeter images, and the Herschel PACS and SPIRE images at shorter wavelengths. The ∼10″ resolution dust column density and temperature maps of these sources revealed dramatically different morphologies, indicating very different modes of OB cluster-formation, or parent molecular cloud structures in different evolutionary stages. The molecular clouds W49A, W33, and G10.6-0.4 show centrally concentrated massive molecular clumps that are connected with approximately radially orientated molecular gas filaments. The W43-Main and W43-South molecular cloud complexes, which are located at the intersection of the Galactic near 3 kpc (or Scutum) arm and the Galactic bar, show a widely scattered distribution of dense molecular clumps/cores over the observed ∼10 pc spatial scale. The relatively evolved sources G10.2-0.3 and G10.3-0.1 appear to be affected by stellar feedback, and show a complicated cloud morphology embedded with abundant dense molecular clumps/cores. We find that with the high angular resolution we achieved, our visual classification of cloud morphology can be linked to the systematically derived statistical quantities (i.e., the enclosed mass profile, the column density probability distribution function (N-PDF), the two-point correlation function of column density, and the probability distribution function of clump/core separations). In particular, the massive molecular gas clumps located at the center of G10

  13. Cloud Structure of Galactic OB Cluster-forming Regions from Combining Ground- and Space-based Bolometric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuxin; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Li, Di; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ginsburg, Adam; Pineda, Jaime E.; Qian, Lei; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; McLeod, Anna Faye; Rosolowsky, Erik; Dale, James E.; Immer, Katharina; Koch, Eric; Longmore, Steve; Walker, Daniel; Testi, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    We have developed an iterative procedure to systematically combine the millimeter and submillimeter images of OB cluster-forming molecular clouds, which were taken by ground-based (CSO, JCMT, APEX, and IRAM-30 m) and space telescopes (Herschel and Planck). For the seven luminous (L\\gt {10}6 L ⊙) Galactic OB cluster-forming molecular clouds selected for our analyses, namely W49A, W43-Main, W43-South, W33, G10.6-0.4, G10.2-0.3, and G10.3-0.1, we have performed single-component, modified blackbody fits to each pixel of the combined (sub)millimeter images, and the Herschel PACS and SPIRE images at shorter wavelengths. The ˜10″ resolution dust column density and temperature maps of these sources revealed dramatically different morphologies, indicating very different modes of OB cluster-formation, or parent molecular cloud structures in different evolutionary stages. The molecular clouds W49A, W33, and G10.6-0.4 show centrally concentrated massive molecular clumps that are connected with approximately radially orientated molecular gas filaments. The W43-Main and W43-South molecular cloud complexes, which are located at the intersection of the Galactic near 3 kpc (or Scutum) arm and the Galactic bar, show a widely scattered distribution of dense molecular clumps/cores over the observed ˜10 pc spatial scale. The relatively evolved sources G10.2-0.3 and G10.3-0.1 appear to be affected by stellar feedback, and show a complicated cloud morphology embedded with abundant dense molecular clumps/cores. We find that with the high angular resolution we achieved, our visual classification of cloud morphology can be linked to the systematically derived statistical quantities (i.e., the enclosed mass profile, the column density probability distribution function (N-PDF), the two-point correlation function of column density, and the probability distribution function of clump/core separations). In particular, the massive molecular gas clumps located at the center of G10.6-0.4 and

  14. THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF INTERACTIVE BINARY STARS TO DOUBLE MAIN-SEQUENCE TURNOFFS AND DUAL RED CLUMP OF INTERMEDIATE-AGE STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Wuming; Bi Shaolan; Tian Zhijia; Li Tanda; Liu Kang; Meng Xiangcun E-mail: woomyang@gmail.com

    2011-04-20

    Double or extended main-sequence turnoffs (DMSTOs) and dual red clump (RC) were observed in intermediate-age clusters, such as in NGC 1846 and 419. The DMSTOs are interpreted as that the cluster has two distinct stellar populations with differences in age of about 200-300 Myr but with the same metallicity. The dual RC is interpreted as a result of a prolonged star formation. Using a stellar population-synthesis method, we calculated the evolution of a binary-star stellar population. We found that binary interactions and merging can reproduce the dual RC in the color-magnitude diagrams of an intermediate-age cluster, whereas in actuality only a single population exists. Moreover, the binary interactions can lead to an extended main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) rather than DMSTOs. However, the rest of the main sequence, subgiant branch, and first giant branch are hardly spread by the binary interactions. Part of the observed dual RC and extended MSTO may be the results of binary interactions and mergers.

  15. Molecular gas of Planck cold dust clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuefang

    2015-08-01

    To probe dynamical processes and physical properties of Planck Cold Clumps, survey and mapping of 674 most reliable Planck cold dust clumps with J=1-0 of CO,13CO and C18O were made at PMO 13.7 m telescope. More than 600 molecular cores were obtained, which are mainly located in seven molecular complexes divided by Dame (1987). Parameters of cores in different regions are with some difference, showing different evolutional status and environment of the cores. As a whole they are quiescent. Some are with star forming activities. J=1-0 lines of HCO+ and HCN at CO emission peaks were also observed at PMO, of which 24 were mapped with IRAM 30 m telescope. Several cores were also observed with J=2-1 of CO and 13CO using CSO. Core splits were detected. Combining with infrared data more than 70% of CO cores are identified as starless. Planck cold clumps seem to be ideal samples to search for candidates of massive prestellar cores and pre-clusters.

  16. Cooperation, clumping and the evolution of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Biernaskie, Jay M; West, Stuart A

    2015-08-22

    The evolution of multicellular organisms represents one of the major evolutionary transitions in the history of life. A potential advantage of forming multicellular clumps is that it provides an efficiency benefit to pre-existing cooperation, such as the production of extracellular 'public goods'. However, this is complicated by the fact that cooperation could jointly evolve with clumping, and clumping could have multiple consequences for the evolution of cooperation. We model the evolution of clumping and a cooperative public good, showing that (i) when considered separately, both clumping and public goods production gradually increase with increasing genetic relatedness; (ii) in contrast, when the traits evolve jointly, a small increase in relatedness can lead to a major shift in evolutionary outcome—from a non-clumping state with low public goods production to a cooperative clumping state with high values of both traits; (iii) high relatedness makes it easier to get to the cooperative clumping state and (iv) clumping can be inhibited when it increases the number of cells that the benefits of cooperation must be shared with, but promoted when it increases relatedness between those cells. Overall, our results suggest that public goods sharing can facilitate the formation of well-integrated cooperative clumps as a first step in the evolution of multicellularity. PMID:26246549

  17. THE LIFE AND DEATH OF DENSE MOLECULAR CLUMPS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Seale, Jonathan P.; Looney, Leslie W.; Wong, Tony; Ott, Juergen; Klein, Uli; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2012-05-20

    We report the results of a high spatial (parsec) resolution HCO{sup +} (J = 1 {yields} 0) and HCN (J = 1 {yields} 0) emission survey toward the giant molecular clouds of the star formation regions N 105, N 113, N 159, and N 44 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The HCO{sup +} and HCN observations at 89.2 and 88.6 GHz, respectively, were conducted in the compact configuration of the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The emission is imaged into individual clumps with masses between 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} and radii of <1 pc to {approx}2 pc. Many of the clumps are coincident with indicators of current massive star formation, indicating that many of the clumps are associated with deeply embedded forming stars and star clusters. We find that massive young stellar object (YSO) bearing clumps tend to be larger ({approx}>1 pc), more massive (M {approx}> 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }), and have higher surface densities ({approx}1 g cm{sup -2}), while clumps without signs of star formation are smaller ({approx}<1 pc), less massive (M {approx}< 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }), and have lower surface densities ({approx}0.1 g cm{sup -2}). The dearth of massive (M > 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }) clumps not bearing massive YSOs suggests that the onset of star formation occurs rapidly once the clump has attained physical properties favorable to massive star formation. Using a large sample of LMC massive YSO mid-IR spectra, we estimate that {approx}2/3 of the massive YSOs for which there are Spitzer mid-IR spectra are no longer located in molecular clumps; we estimate that these young stars/clusters have destroyed their natal clumps on a timescale of at least {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} yr.

  18. Small-scale clumps in the Galactic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Berezinsky, V. S.; Dokuchaev, V. I. Eroshenko, Yu. N.

    2010-01-15

    A mass function of small-scale dark matter clumps is calculated. We take into account the tidal destruction of clumps at early stages of structure formation starting from a time of clump detachment from the Universe expansion. Only a small fraction of these clumps, {approx}0.1%, in each logarithmic mass interval {Delta} log M {approx} 1 survives the stage of hierarchical clustering. We calculate the probability of surviving of the remnants of dark matter clumps in the Galaxy by modelling the tidal destruction of the small-scale clumps by disk and stars. It is demonstrated that a substantial fraction of clump remnants may survive through the tidal destruction during the lifetime of the Galaxy if a radius of core is rather small. The resulting mass spectrum of survived clumps is extended down to the mass of the core of the cosmologically produced clumps with a minimal mass. The survived dense remnants of tidally destructed clumps provides a large contribution to the annihilation signal in the Galaxy. We describe the anisotropy of dark matter clump distribution caused by tidal destruction of clumps in the Galactic disk. A corresponding annihilation of dark matter particles in small-scale clumps produces the anisotropic gamma-ray signal with respect to the Galactic disk.

  19. Photoevaporation of Clumps in Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Uma; Hollenbach, David; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of an investigation of the effects of Far Ultraviolet (FUV) radiation (6.0eV < hv < 13.6eV) from hot early type OB stars on clumps in star-forming molecular clouds. Clumps in FUV-illuminated regions (or photodissociation regions or PDRs) undergo external heating and photodissociation as they are exposed to the FUV field, resulting in a loss of cold, molecular lump mass as it is converted to warm atomic gas. The heating, if rapid, creates strong photoevaporative mass flows off the clump surfaces, and drives shocks into the clumps, compressing them to high densities. The clumps lose mass on relatively short timescales. The evolution of an individual clump is found to be sensitive to three dimensionless parameters: Nc0, the ratio of the initial column density of the clump to the column N(0) approx. 10(exp 21) cm(exp -2) of a warm FUV-heated surface region; upsilon, the ratio of the sound speed in the heated surface to that in the cold clump material: and t(FUV)t(c), the ratio of the "turn-on time" t(FUV) of the heating flux on a clump to its initial sound crossing-time t(c). The evolution also depends on whether a confining interclump medium exists, or whether the interclump region has negligible pressure, as is the case for turbulence-generated clumps. In this paper, we use spherical 1-D numerical hydrodynamic models as well as approximate analytical models to study the dependence of clump photoevaporation on the physical parameters of the clump, and to derive the dynamical evolution, mass loss rates and photoevaporative timescales of a clump for a variety of astrophysical situations. Turbulent clumps evolve so that their column densities are equal to a critical value determined by the local FUV field, and typically have short photo evaporation timescales, approx. 10(exp 4-5) years for a 1 M(solar mass) clump in a typical star-forming region (Nc0 = 10, upsilon = 10). Clumps with insufficient magnetic pressure support, and in strong FUV fields

  20. How did the Virgo cluster form?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, Jenny G.; Gottlöber, Stefan; Hoffman, Yehuda; Yepes, Gustavo

    2016-08-01

    While the Virgo cluster is the nearest galaxy cluster and therefore the best observed one, little is known about its formation history. In this paper, a set of cosmological simulations that resemble the Local Universe is used to shed the first light on this mystery. The initial conditions for these simulations are constrained with galaxy peculiar velocities of the second catalogue of the Cosmicflows project using algorithms developed within the Constrained Local UniversE Simulation project. Boxes of 500 h-1 Mpc on a side are set to run a series of dark matter only constrained simulations. In each simulation, a unique dark matter halo can be reliably identified as Virgo's counterpart. The properties of these Virgo haloes are in agreement at a 10-20 per cent level with the global properties of the observed Virgo cluster. Their zero-velocity masses agree at 1σ with the observational mass estimate. In all the simulations, the matter falls on to the Virgo objects along a preferential direction that corresponds to the observational filament and the slowest direction of collapse. A study of the mass accretion history of the Virgo candidates reveals the most likely formation history of the Virgo cluster, namely a quiet accretion over the last 7 Gyr.

  1. Clumped isotope thermometry and catagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, J. M.; Clog, M. D.; Dallas, B.; Douglas, P. M.; Piasecki, A.; Sessions, A. L.; Stolper, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Clumped- and site-specific isotopic compositions of organic compounds can constrain their formation temperatures, sources, and chemical reaction histories. The large number of isotopologues of organic molecules may allow for the isotopic composition of a single compound to illuminate many processes. For example, it is possible that clumping or site specific effects in different parts of the same molecule will differ in blocking temperature, such that a molecule's full isotopic structure could simultaneously constrain conditions of biosynthesis, catagenic 'cracking', and storage in the crust. Recent innovations in high-resolution mass spectrometry and methods of IR and NMR spectroscopy make it possible to explore these questions. Methane is the first organic molecule to have its clumped isotope geochemistry analyzed in a variety of natural environments and controlled experiments. Methane generated through catagenic cracking of kerogen and other organic matter forms in equilibrium with respect to isotopic clumping, and preserves that state through later storage or migration, up to temperatures of ~250 ˚C. This kinetic behavior permits a variety of useful geological applications. But it is unexpected because the bulk stable isotope composition of thermogenic methane is thought to reflect kinetic isotope effects on irreversible reactions. Our observations imply a new interpretation of the chemical physics of catagenic methane formation. Additional instrument and methods developments are currently extending the measurement of isotopic clumping and position specific effects to larger alkanes, other hydrocarbon compounds, and amino acids. These measurements will ultimately expand our capacity to understand the formational conditions and fates of organic molecules in high- and low-temperature environments through geological time.

  2. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    PubMed Central

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  3. Statistical clumped isotope signatures.

    PubMed

    Röckmann, T; Popa, M E; Krol, M C; Hofmann, M E G

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  4. A submillimetre survey of the kinematics of the Perseus molecular cloud - III. Clump kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Emily I.; Richer, John S.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the kinematic properties of dense continuum clumps in the Perseus molecular cloud, derived from our wide-field C18O J = 3 → 2 data across four regions - NGC 1333, IC 348/HH 211, L1448 and L1455. Two distinct populations are examined, identified using the automated algorithms CLFIND (85 clumps) and GAUSSCLUMPS (122 clumps) on existing SCUBA 850-μm data. These kinematic signatures are compared to the clumps' dust continuum properties. We calculate each clump's non-thermal linewidth and virial mass from the associated C18O J = 3 → 2 spectrum. The clumps have supersonic linewidths, <σNT/cs>= 1.76 ± 0.09 (CLFIND population) and 1.71 ± 0.05 (with GAUSSCLUMPS). The linewidth distributions suggest the C18O line probes a lower density `envelope' rather than a dense inner core. Similar linewidth distributions for protostellar and starless clumps imply protostars do not have a significant impact on their immediate environment. The proximity to an active young stellar cluster seems to affect the linewidths: those in NGC 1333 are greater than elsewhere. In IC 348 the proximity to the old infrared cluster has little influence, with the linewidths being the smallest of all. The virial analysis suggests that the clumps are bound and close to equipartition, with virial masses similar to the masses derived from the continuum emission. In particular, the starless clumps occupy the same parameter space as the protostars, suggesting they are true stellar precursors and will go on to form stars. We also search for ordered C18O velocity gradients across the face of each core. Approximately one-third have significant detections, which we mainly interpret in terms of rotation. However, we note a correlation between the directions of the identified gradients and outflows across the protostars, indicating we may not have a purely rotational signature. The fitted gradients are in the range ? to 16 km s-1 pc-1, larger than found in previous work, probably as a result of the

  5. Anatomy of a high-mass star forming cloud: The G24.78+0.08 (proto)stellar cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaroni, R.; Codella, C.; Furuya, R. S.; Testi, L.

    2003-04-01

    We present the results of an interferometric and single-dish study of G24.78+0.08, a region associated with high-mass star formation. Observations have been carried out in several molecular species, which are suitable to trace environments with different densities and temperatures. Evidence for this region to contain a cluster of very young massive stellar objects has been presented in a previous paper (Furuya et al. \\cite{furu}). We suggest that the embedded stars might be too young to have affected the surrounding molecular cloud significantly on a large scale. This gives us the opportunity to investigate the configuration of the cloud as it was prior to the star formation episode. We assess that the (proto)stellar cluster lies at the center of a molecular clump with diameter of ~ 2 pc: to a good approximation this may be described as a spherically symmetric clump with density profile of the type nH_2~ R-1.8. Inside 0.5 pc from the center, instead, the gas is much more inhomogeneous and concentrated in a few high-density cores surrounding the (proto)stars. Our findings indicate that a self-regulating formation mechanism for the high-mass stars in G24.78 is plausible: in the proposed scenario star formation would occur from inside-out collapse of the parsec-scale clump, followed by infall reversal due to outflows powered by the newly formed massive stars. We also find that one of the two bipolar outflows powered by the embedded YSOs is more extended and hence older than the other, thus confirming the evolutionary sequence proposed in our previous article.

  6. Dense molecular clumps associated with the Large Magellanic Cloud supergiant shells LMC 4 and LMC 5

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Kosuke; Mizuno, Norikazu; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Onishi, Toshikazu; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Kawamura, Akiko; Muller, Erik; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Miura, Rie E.; Ezawa, Hajime; Dawson, Joanne; Tosaki, Tomoka; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the effects of supergiant shells (SGSs) and their interaction on dense molecular clumps by observing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) star-forming regions N48 and N49, which are located between two SGSs, LMC 4 and LMC 5. {sup 12}CO (J = 3-2, 1-0) and {sup 13}CO(J = 1-0) observations with the ASTE and Mopra telescopes have been carried out toward these regions. A clumpy distribution of dense molecular clumps is revealed with 7 pc spatial resolution. Large velocity gradient analysis shows that the molecular hydrogen densities (n(H{sub 2})) of the clumps are distributed from low to high density (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}) and their kinetic temperatures (T {sub kin}) are typically high (greater than 50 K). These clumps seem to be in the early stages of star formation, as also indicated from the distribution of Hα, young stellar object candidates, and IR emission. We found that the N48 region is located in the high column density H I envelope at the interface of the two SGSs and the star formation is relatively evolved, whereas the N49 region is associated with LMC 5 alone and the star formation is quiet. The clumps in the N48 region typically show high n(H{sub 2}) and T {sub kin}, which are as dense and warm as the clumps in LMC massive cluster-forming areas (30 Dor, N159). These results suggest that the large-scale structure of the SGSs, especially the interaction of two SGSs, works efficiently on the formation of dense molecular clumps and stars.

  7. HUBBLE SPIES HUGE CLUSTERS OF STARS FORMED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    BY ANCIENT ENCOUNTER This stunningly beautiful image [right] taken with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope shows the heart of the prototypical starburst galaxy M82. The ongoing violent star formation due to an ancient encounter with its large galactic neighbor, M81, gives this galaxy its disturbed appearance. The smaller picture at upper left shows the entire galaxy. The image was taken in December 1994 by the Kitt Peak National Observatory's 0.9-meter telescope. Hubble's view is represented by the white outline in the center. In the Hubble image, taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, the huge lanes of dust that crisscross M82's disk are another telltale sign of the flurry of star formation. Below the center and to the right, a strong galactic wind is spewing knotty filaments of hydrogen and nitrogen gas. More than 100 super star clusters -- very bright, compact groupings of about 100,000 stars -- are seen in this detailed Hubble picture as white dots sprinkled throughout M82's central region. The dark region just above the center of the picture is a huge dust cloud. A collaboration of European and American scientists used these clusters to date the ancient interaction between M82 and M81. About 600 million years ago, a region called 'M82 B' (the bright area just below and to the left of the central dust cloud) exploded with new stars. Scientists have discovered that this ancient starburst was triggered by the violent encounter with M81. M82 is a bright (eighth magnitude), nearby (12 million light-years from Earth) galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major (the Great Bear). The Hubble picture was taken Sept. 15, 1997. The natural-color composite was constructed from three Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 exposures, which were combined in chromatic order: 4,250 seconds through a blue filter (428 nm); 2,800 seconds through a green filter (520 nm); and 2,200 seconds through a red (820 nm) filter. Credits for Hubble image: NASA, ESA, R. de Grijs (Institute of

  8. Cluster speckle structures through multiple apertures forming a closed curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosso, E.; Tebaldi, M.; Lencina, A.; Bolognini, N.

    2010-04-01

    In this work, cluster-like speckle patterns are analyzed. These patterns are generated when a diffuser illuminated by coherent light is imaged by a lens having a pupil mask with multiple apertures forming a closed curve. We show that the cluster structure results from the complex modulation produced inside each speckle which is generated by multiple interferences of light through the apertures. In particular, when the apertures are uniformly distributed along a closed curve, the resulting image speckle cluster replicates the pupil aperture distribution. Experimental results and theoretical simulations show that cluster features depend on the apertures distribution and the size of the closed curves.

  9. Confronting the outflow-regulated cluster formation model with observations

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Li, Zhi-Yun E-mail: zl4h@virginia.edu

    2014-03-10

    Protostellar outflows have been shown theoretically to be capable of maintaining supersonic turbulence in cluster-forming clumps and keeping the star formation rate per free-fall time as low as a few percent. We aim to test two basic predictions of this outflow-regulated cluster formation model, namely, (1) the clump should be close to virial equilibrium and (2) the turbulence dissipation rate should be balanced by the outflow momentum injection rate, using recent outflow surveys toward eight nearby cluster-forming clumps (B59, L1551, L1641N, Serpens Main Cloud, Serpens South, ρ Oph, IC 348, and NGC 1333). We find, for almost all sources, that the clumps are close to virial equilibrium and the outflow momentum injection rate exceeds the turbulence momentum dissipation rate. In addition, the outflow kinetic energy is significantly smaller than the clump gravitational energy for intermediate and massive clumps with M {sub cl} ≳ a few × 10{sup 2} M {sub ☉}, suggesting that the outflow feedback is not enough to disperse the clump as a whole. The number of observed protostars also indicates that the star formation rate per free-fall time is as small as a few percent for all clumps. These observationally based results strengthen the case for outflow-regulated cluster formation.

  10. Abundant cyanopolyynes as a probe of infall in the Serpens South cluster-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, R. K.; Medeiros, L.; Schnee, S.; Bourke, T. L.; Francesco, J. Di; Gutermuth, R.; Myers, P. C.

    2013-12-01

    We have detected bright HC7N J = 21 - 20 emission towards multiple locations in the Serpens South cluster-forming region using the K-Band Focal Plane Array at the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. HC7N is seen primarily towards cold filamentary structures that have yet to form stars, largely avoiding the dense gas associated with small protostellar groups and the main central cluster of Serpens South. Where detected, the HC7N abundances are similar to those found in other nearby star-forming regions. Towards some HC7N `clumps', we find consistent variations in the line centroids relative to NH3 (1,1) emission, as well as systematic increases in the HC7N non-thermal line widths, which we argue reveal infall motions on to dense filaments within Serpens South with minimum mass accretion rates of M ˜ 2-5 M⊙ Myr-1. The relative abundance of NH3 to HC7N suggests that the HC7N is tracing gas that has been at densities n ˜ 104 cm-3 for time-scales t ≲ 1-2 × 105 yr. Since HC7N emission peaks are rarely co-located with those of either NH3 or continuum, it is likely that Serpens South is not particularly remarkable in its abundance of HC7N, but instead the serendipitous mapping of HC7N simultaneously with NH3 has allowed us to detect HC7N at low abundances in regions where it otherwise may not have been looked for. This result extends the known star-forming regions containing significant HC7N emission from typically quiescent regions, like the Taurus molecular cloud, to more complex, active environments.

  11. IRDC G030.88+00.13: A TALE OF TWO MASSIVE CLUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qizhou; Wang Ke

    2011-05-20

    Massive stars (M {approx}>10 M{sub sun}) form from collapse of parsec-scale molecular clumps. How molecular clumps fragment to give rise to massive stars in a cluster with a distribution of masses is unclear. We search for cold cores that may lead to future formation of massive stars in a massive (>10{sup 3} M{sub sun}), low luminosity (4.6 x 10{sup 2} L{sub sun}) infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G030.88+00.13. The NH{sub 3} data from the Very Large Array (VLA) and Green Bank Telescope reveal that the extinction feature seen in the infrared consists of two distinctive clumps along the same line of sight. The C1 clump at 97 km s{sup -1} coincides with the extinction in the Spitzer 8 and 24 {mu}m. Therefore, it is responsible for the majority of the IRDC. The C2 clump at 107 km s{sup -1} is more compact and has a peak temperature of 45 K. Compact dust cores and H{sub 2}O masers revealed in the Submillimeter Array and VLA observations are mostly associated with C2, and none are within the IRDC in C1. The luminosity indicates that neither the C1 nor C2 clump has yet to form massive protostars. But C1 might be at a precluster forming stage. The simulated observations rule out 0.1 pc cold cores with masses above 8 M{sub sun} within the IRDC. The core masses in C1 and C2 and those in high-mass protostellar objects suggest an evolutionary trend that the mass of cold cores increases over time. Based on our findings, we propose an empirical picture of massive star formation that protostellar cores and the embedded protostars undergo simultaneous mass growth during the protostellar evolution.

  12. THE STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF FORMING AND EARLY STAGE STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jaehnig, Karl O.; Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C. E-mail: ndario@ufl.edu

    2015-01-10

    We study the degree of angular substructure in the stellar position distribution of young members of Galactic star-forming regions, looking for correlations with distance from cluster center, surface number density of stars, and local dynamical age. To this end we adopt the catalog of members in 18 young (∼1-3 Myr) clusters from the Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray Survey and the statistical analysis of the angular dispersion parameter, δ{sub ADP,} {sub N}. We find statistically significant correlation between δ{sub ADP,} {sub N} and physical projected distance from the center of the clusters, with the centers appearing smoother than the outskirts, consistent with more rapid dynamical processing on local dynamical, free-fall or orbital timescales. Similarly, smoother distributions are seen in regions of higher surface density, or older dynamical ages. These results indicate that dynamical processing that erases substructure is already well-advanced in young, sometimes still-forming, clusters. Such observations of the dissipation of substructure have the potential to constrain theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of young and forming clusters.

  13. The Structural Evolution of Forming and Early Stage Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaehnig, Karl; Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2016-05-01

    We study the degree of angular substructure in the stellar position distribution of young members of Galactic star-forming regions, looking for correlations with distance from cluster center, surface number density of stars, and local dynamical age. To this end we adopt the catalog of members in 18 young (∼1-3 Myr) clusters from the Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray (MYStIX) Survey and the statistical analysis of the Angular Dispersion Parameter, δADP. We find statistically significant correlation between δADP and physical projected distance from the center of the clusters, with the centers appearing smoother than the outskirts, consistent with more rapid dynamical processing on local dynamical, free-fall or orbital timescales. Similarly, smoother distributions are seen in regions of higher surface density, or older dynamical ages. These results indicate that dynamical processing that erases substructure is already well-advanced in young, sometimes still-forming, clusters. Such observations of the dissipation of substructure have the potential to constrain theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of young and forming clusters.

  14. Mass-density relationship in molecular cloud clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkov, Sava; Veltchev, Todor V.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2011-12-01

    We study the mass-density relationship n ∝ mx in molecular cloud condensations (clumps), considering various equipartition relations between their gravitational, kinetic, internal and magnetic energies. Clumps are described statistically, with a density distribution that reflects a lognormal probability density function in turbulent cold interstellar medium. The clump mass-density exponent x derived at different scales L varies in most of the cases within the range -2.5 ≲x≲-0.2, with a pronounced scale dependence and in consistency with observations. When derived from the global size-mass relationship ? for set of clumps, generated at all scales, the clump mass-density exponent has typical values -3.0 ≲x(γglob) ≲-0.3 that depend on the forms of energy, included in the equipartition relations, and on the velocity scaling law, whereas the description of clump geometry is important when magnetic energy is taken into account.

  15. Automatic style clustering of printed characters in form images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changsong; Ding, Xiaoqing

    2005-01-01

    Style is an important feature of printed or handwritten characters. But it is not studied thoroughly compared with character recognition. In this paper, we try to learn how many typical styles exist in a kind of real world form images. A hierarchical clustering method has been developed and tested. A cross recognition error rate constraint is proposed to reduce the false combinations in the hierarchical clustering process, and a cluster selecting method is used to delete redundant or unsuitable clusters. Only a similarity measure between any patterns is needed by the algorithm. It is tested on a template matching based similarity measure which can be extended to any other feature and distance measure easily. The detailed comparing on every step"s effects is shown in the paper. Total 16 kinds of typical styles are found out, and by giving each character in each style a prototype for recognition, a 0.78% error rate is achieved by recognizing the testing set.

  16. Automatic style clustering of printed characters in form images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changsong; Ding, Xiaoqing

    2004-12-01

    Style is an important feature of printed or handwritten characters. But it is not studied thoroughly compared with character recognition. In this paper, we try to learn how many typical styles exist in a kind of real world form images. A hierarchical clustering method has been developed and tested. A cross recognition error rate constraint is proposed to reduce the false combinations in the hierarchical clustering process, and a cluster selecting method is used to delete redundant or unsuitable clusters. Only a similarity measure between any patterns is needed by the algorithm. It is tested on a template matching based similarity measure which can be extended to any other feature and distance measure easily. The detailed comparing on every step"s effects is shown in the paper. Total 16 kinds of typical styles are found out, and by giving each character in each style a prototype for recognition, a 0.78% error rate is achieved by recognizing the testing set.

  17. THE PROPERTIES OF THE STAR-FORMING INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM AT z = 0.8-2.2 FROM HiZELS: STAR FORMATION AND CLUMP SCALING LAWS IN GAS-RICH, TURBULENT DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Theuns, T.; Sobral, D.; Best, P. N.; Geach, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    We present adaptive optics assisted integral field spectroscopy of nine H{alpha}-selected galaxies at z = 0.84-2.23 drawn from the HiZELS narrowband survey. Our observations map the kinematics of these star-forming galaxies on {approx}kpc scales. We demonstrate that within the interstellar medium of these galaxies, the velocity dispersion of the star-forming gas ({sigma}) follows a scaling relation {sigma}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup 1/n} {sub SFR} + constant (where {Sigma}{sub SFR} is the star formation surface density and the constant includes the stellar surface density). Assuming the disks are marginally stable (Toomre Q = 1), this follows from the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation ({Sigma}{sub SFR} = A{Sigma} {sup n} {sub gas}), and we derive best-fit parameters of n = 1.34 {+-} 0.15 and A = 3.4{sup +2.5} {sub -1.6} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, consistent with the local relation, and implying cold molecular gas masses of M {sub gas} = 10{sup 9-10} M {sub Sun} and molecular gas fractions of M {sub gas}/(M {sub gas} + M {sub *}) = 0.3 {+-} 0.1, with a range of 10%-75%. We also identify 11 {approx}kpc-scale star-forming regions (clumps) within our sample and show that their sizes are comparable to the wavelength of the fastest growing mode. The luminosities and velocity dispersions of these clumps follow the same scaling relations as local H II regions, although their star formation densities are a factor {approx}15 {+-} 5 Multiplication-Sign higher than typically found locally. We discuss how the clump properties are related to the disk, and show that their high masses and luminosities are a consequence of the high disk surface density.

  18. Star Formation in Massive Clusters via Bondi Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Norman; Chang, Philip

    2012-02-01

    Essentially all stars form in giant molecular clouds (GMCs). However, inside GMCs, most of the gas does not participate in star formation; rather, denser gas accumulates in clumps in the GMC, with the bulk of the stars in a given GMC forming in a few of the most massive clumps. In the Milky Way, these clumps have masses M cl <~ 5 × 10-2 of the GMC, radii r cl ~ 1 pc, and free-fall times τcl ~ 2 × 105 yr. We show that clumps inside GMCs should accrete at a modified Bondi accretion rate, which depends on clump mass as \\dot{M}_{cl}\\sim M_{cl}^{5/4}. This rate is initially rather slow, usually slower than the initial star formation rate inside the clump (we adopt the common assumption that inside the clump, \\dot{M}_*=\\epsilon _ffM_{cl}/\\tau _{cl}, with epsilonff ≈ 0.017). However, after ~2 GMC free-fall times τGMC, the clump accretion rate accelerates rapidly; formally, the clump can accrete the entire GMC in ~3τGMC. At the same time, the star formation rate accelerates, tracking the Bondi accretion rate. If the GMC is disrupted by feedback from the largest clump, half the stars in that clump form in the final τGMC before the GMC is disrupted. The theory predicts that the distribution of effective star formation rates, measured per GMC free-fall time, is broad, ranging from ~0.001 up to 0.1 or larger and that the mass spectrum of star clusters is flatter than that of clumps, consistent with observations.

  19. STAR-FORMING GALAXY EVOLUTION IN NEARBY RICH CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, K. D.; Rieke, G. H.; Bai, L.

    2013-08-20

    Dense environments are known to quench star formation in galaxies, but it is still unknown what mechanism(s) are directly responsible. In this paper, we study the star formation of galaxies in A2029 and compare it to that of Coma, combining indicators at 24 {mu}m, H{alpha}, and UV down to rates of 0.03 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We show that A2029's star-forming galaxies follow the same mass-SFR relation as the field. The Coma cluster, on the other hand, has a population of galaxies with star formation rates (SFRs) significantly lower than the field mass-SFR relation, indicative of galaxies in the process of being quenched. Over half of these galaxies also host active galactic nuclei. Ram-pressure stripping and starvation/strangulation are the most likely mechanisms for suppressing the star formation in these galaxies, but we are unable to disentangle which is dominating. The differences we see between the two clusters' populations of star-forming galaxies may be related to their accretion histories, with A2029 having accreted its star-forming galaxies more recently than Coma. Additionally, many early-type galaxies in A2029 are detected at 24 {mu}m and/or in the far-UV, but this emission is not directly related to star formation. Similar galaxies have probably been classified as star forming in previous studies of dense clusters, possibly obscuring some of the effects of the cluster environment on true star-forming galaxies.

  20. From gas to stars in energetic environments: dense gas clumps in the 30 Doradus region within the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Crystal N.; Meier, David S.; Ott, Jürgen; Hughes, Annie; Wong, Tony; Looney, Leslie; Henkel, Christian; Chen, Rosie; Indebetouw, Remy; Muller, Erik; Pineda, Jorge L.; Seale, Jonathan

    2014-09-20

    We present parsec-scale interferometric maps of HCN(1-0) and HCO{sup +}(1-0) emission from dense gas in the star-forming region 30 Doradus, obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This extreme star-forming region, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), is characterized by a very intense ultraviolet ionizing radiation field and sub-solar metallicity, both of which are expected to impact molecular cloud structure. We detect 13 bright, dense clumps within the 30 Doradus-10 giant molecular cloud. Some of the clumps are aligned along a filamentary structure with a characteristic spacing that is consistent with formation via varicose fluid instability. Our analysis shows that the filament is gravitationally unstable and collapsing to form stars. There is a good correlation between HCO{sup +} emission in the filament and signatures of recent star formation activity including H{sub 2}O masers and young stellar objects (YSOs). YSOs seem to continue along the same direction of the filament toward the massive compact star cluster R136 in the southwest. We present detailed comparisons of clump properties (masses, linewidths, and sizes) in 30Dor-10 to those in other star forming regions of the LMC (N159, N113, N105, and N44). Our analysis shows that the 30Dor-10 clumps have similar masses but wider linewidths and similar HCN/HCO{sup +} (1-0) line ratios as clumps detected in other LMC star-forming regions. Our results suggest that the dense molecular gas clumps in the interior of 30Dor-10 are well shielded against the intense ionizing field that is present in the 30 Doradus region.

  1. Massive star clusters in a z=1 star-forming galaxy seen at a 100 pc scale thanks to strong gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Cava, Antonio; Richard, Johan; Schaerer, Daniel; Egami, Eiichi

    2015-08-01

    Deep and high-resolution imaging has revealed clumpy, rest-frame UV morphologies among z=1-3 galaxies. The majority of these galaxies has been shown to be dominated by ordered disk rotation, which led to the conclusion that the observed giant clumps, resolved on kpc-scales, are generated from disk fragmentation due to gravitational instability. State-of-the-art numerical simulations show that they may occupy a relevant role in galaxy evolution, contributing to the galactic bulge formation. Despite the high resolution attained by the most advanced ground- and space-based facilities, as well as in numerical simulations, the intrinsic typical masses and scale sizes of these star-forming clumps remain unconstrained, since they are barely resolved at z=1-3.Thanks to the amplification and stretching power provided by strong gravitational lensing, we are likely to reach the spatial resolving power for unveiling the physics of these star-forming regions. We report on the study of clumpy star formation observed in the Cosmic Snake, a strongly lensed galaxy at z=1, representative of the typical star-forming population close to the peak of Universe activity. About 20 clumps are identified in the HST images. Benefiting from extreme amplification factors up to 100, they are resolved down to an intrinsic scale of 100 pc, never reached before at z=1.The HST multi-wavelength analysis of these individual star clusters allows us to determine their intrinsic physical properties, showing stellar masses (Ms) from 106 to 108.3 Msun, sizes from 100 to 400 pc, and ages from 106 to 108.5 yr. The masses we find are in line with the new, very high resolution numerical simulations, which also suggest that the massive giant clumps previously observed at high redshift with Ms as high as 109-10 Msun may suffer from low resolution effects, being unresolved conglomerates of less massive star clusters. We also compare our results with those of massive young clusters in nearby galaxies. Our approved

  2. Solvated electrons formed in methanol cluster in ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Bartels, D. M.; Jonah, C. D.; Dimitrijevic, N. A.

    2000-03-09

    The authors have studied the spectral shift of the solvated electron in MeOH/C{sub 2}H{sub 6} mixture using pulse radiolysis. The solvated electrons were formed by ionizing the solution. The spectral shift can be explained in terms of MeOH cluster size formed in the solution. With increasing temperature at constant mole fraction of MeOH, the spectral maximum shifts toward low energy. The width at red side increased with increasing temperature, however, there is no significant changes in the blue side of the spectra with temperature.

  3. Extra-nuclear starbursts: young luminous Hinge clumps in interacting galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Beverly J.; Giroux, Mark L.; Soria, Roberto; Struck, Curtis; Swartz, Douglas A.; Yukita, Mihoko E-mail: girouxm@etsu.edu E-mail: curt@iastate.edu

    2014-03-01

    Hinge clumps are luminous knots of star formation near the base of tidal features in some interacting galaxies. We use archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV/optical/IR images and Chandra X-ray maps along with Galaxy Evolution Explorer UV, Spitzer IR, and ground-based optical/near-IR images to investigate the star forming properties in a sample of 12 hinge clumps in five interacting galaxies. The most extreme of these hinge clumps have star formation rates of 1-9 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, comparable to or larger than the 'overlap' region of intense star formation between the two disks of the colliding galaxy system the Antennae. In the HST images, we have found remarkably large and luminous sources at the centers of these hinge clumps. These objects are much larger and more luminous than typical 'super star clusters' in interacting galaxies, and are sometimes embedded in a linear ridge of fainter star clusters, consistent with star formation along a narrow caustic. These central sources have FWHM diameters of ∼70 pc, compared to ∼3 pc in 'ordinary' super star clusters. Their absolute I magnitudes range from M{sub I} ∼ – 12.2 to –16.5; thus, if they are individual star clusters they would lie near the top of the 'super star cluster' luminosity function of star clusters. These sources may not be individual star clusters, but instead may be tightly packed groups of clusters that are blended together in the HST images. Comparison to population synthesis modeling indicates that the hinge clumps contain a range of stellar ages. This is consistent with expectations based on models of galaxy interactions, which suggest that star formation may be prolonged in these regions. In the Chandra images, we have found strong X-ray emission from several of these hinge clumps. In most cases, this emission is well-resolved with Chandra and has a thermal X-ray spectrum, thus it is likely due to hot gas associated with the star formation. The ratio of the extinction

  4. On the Onset of Secondary Stellar Generations in Giant Star-forming Regions and Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palouš, J.; Wünsch, R.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.

    2014-09-01

    Here we consider the strong evolution experienced by the matter reinserted by massive stars, both in giant star-forming regions driven by a constant star formation rate and in massive and coeval superstar clusters. In both cases we take into consideration the changes induced by stellar evolution on the number of massive stars, the number of ionizing photons, and the integrated mechanical luminosity of the star-forming regions. The latter is at all times compared with the critical luminosity that defines, for a given size, the lower mechanical luminosity limit above which the matter reinserted via strong winds and supernova explosions suffers frequent and recurrent thermal instabilities that reduce its temperature and pressure and inhibit its exit as part of a global wind. Instead, the unstable reinserted matter is compressed by the pervasive hot gas, and photoionization maintains its temperature at T ~ 104 K. As the evolution proceeds, more unstable matter accumulates and the unstable clumps grow in size. Here we evaluate the possible self-shielding of thermally unstable clumps against the UV radiation field. Self-shielding allows for a further compression of the reinserted matter, which rapidly develops a high-density neutral core able to absorb in its outer skin the incoming UV radiation. Under such conditions the cold (T ~ 10 K) neutral cores soon surpass the Jeans limit and become gravitationally unstable, creating a new stellar generation with the matter reinserted by former massive stars. We present the results of several calculations of this positive star formation feedback scenario promoted by strong radiative cooling and mass loading.

  5. On the onset of secondary stellar generations in giant star-forming regions and massive star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Palouš, J.; Wünsch, R.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.

    2014-09-10

    Here we consider the strong evolution experienced by the matter reinserted by massive stars, both in giant star-forming regions driven by a constant star formation rate and in massive and coeval superstar clusters. In both cases we take into consideration the changes induced by stellar evolution on the number of massive stars, the number of ionizing photons, and the integrated mechanical luminosity of the star-forming regions. The latter is at all times compared with the critical luminosity that defines, for a given size, the lower mechanical luminosity limit above which the matter reinserted via strong winds and supernova explosions suffers frequent and recurrent thermal instabilities that reduce its temperature and pressure and inhibit its exit as part of a global wind. Instead, the unstable reinserted matter is compressed by the pervasive hot gas, and photoionization maintains its temperature at T ∼ 10{sup 4} K. As the evolution proceeds, more unstable matter accumulates and the unstable clumps grow in size. Here we evaluate the possible self-shielding of thermally unstable clumps against the UV radiation field. Self-shielding allows for a further compression of the reinserted matter, which rapidly develops a high-density neutral core able to absorb in its outer skin the incoming UV radiation. Under such conditions the cold (T ∼ 10 K) neutral cores soon surpass the Jeans limit and become gravitationally unstable, creating a new stellar generation with the matter reinserted by former massive stars. We present the results of several calculations of this positive star formation feedback scenario promoted by strong radiative cooling and mass loading.

  6. The physical state of selected cold clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikka, A.; Juvela, M.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Malinen, J.; Harju, J.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The study of prestellar cores is essential to understanding the initial stages of star formation. With Herschel more cold clumps have been detected than ever before. For this study we have selected 21 cold clumps from 20 Herschel fields observed as a follow-up on original Planck detections. We have observed these clumps in 13CO (1-0), C18O (1-0), and N2H+ (1-0) lines. Aims: Our aim is to find out if these cold clumps are prestellar. We have examined to what extent independent analysis of the dust and the molecular lines lead to similar conclusions about the masses of these objects. Methods: We calculate the clump masses and densities from the dust continuum and molecular line observations and compare these to each other and to the virial and Bonnor-Ebert masses calculated for each clump. Finally we examine two of the fields with radiative transfer models to estimate CO abundances. Results: When excitation temperatures could be estimated, the column densities derived from molecular line observations were comparable to those from dust continuum data. The median column density estimates are 4.2 × 1021 cm-2 and 5.5 × 1021 cm-2 for the line and dust emission data, respectively. The calculated abundances, column densities, volume densities, and masses all have large uncertainties and one must be careful when drawing conclusions. Abundance of 13CO was found in modeling the two clumps in the field G131.65+9.75 to be close to the usual value of 10-6. The abundance ratio of 13CO and C18O was ~10. Molecular abundances could only be estimated with modeling, relying on dust column density data. Conclusions: The results indicate that most cold clumps, even those with dust color temperatures close to 11 K, are not necessarily prestellar. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Properties of dense cores in clustered massive star-forming regions at high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Palau, Aina; Fontani, Francesco; Busquet, Gemma; Juárez, Carmen; Estalella, Robert; Tan, Jonathan C.; Sepúlveda, Inma; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang, Qizhou; Kurtz, Stan

    2013-07-01

    We aim at characterizing dense cores in the clustered environments associated with intermediate-/high-mass star-forming regions. For this, we present a uniform analysis of Very Large Array NH3 (1,1) and (2,2) observations towards a sample of 15 intermediate-/high-mass star-forming regions, where we identify a total of 73 cores, classify them as protostellar, quiescent starless, or perturbed starless, and derive some physical properties. The average sizes and ammonia column densities of the total sample are ˜0.06 pc and ˜1015 cm-2, respectively, with no significant differences between the starless and protostellar cores, while the linewidth and rotational temperature of quiescent starless cores are smaller, ˜1.0 km s-1 and 16 K, than linewidths and temperatures of protostellar (˜1.8 km s-1 and 21 K), and perturbed starless (˜1.4 km s-1 and 19 K) cores. Such linewidths and temperatures for these quiescent starless cores in the surroundings of intermediate-/high-mass stars are still significantly larger than the typical linewidths and rotational temperatures measured in starless cores of low-mass star-forming regions, implying an important non-thermal component. We confirm at high angular resolutions (spatial scales ˜0.05 pc) the correlations previously found with single-dish telescopes (spatial scales ≳ 0.1 pc) between the linewidth and the rotational temperature of the cores, as well as between the rotational temperature and the linewidth with respect to the bolometric luminosity. In addition, we find a correlation between the temperature of each core and the incident flux from the most massive star in the cluster, suggesting that the large temperatures measured in the starless cores of our sample could be due to heating from the nearby massive star. A simple virial equilibrium analysis seems to suggest a scenario of a self-similar, self-gravitating, turbulent, virialized hierarchy of structures from clumps (˜0.1-10 pc) to cores (˜0.05 pc). A closer

  8. Submillimeter Array High-angular Resolution Observations of the Monoceros R2 Star-forming Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierickx, M.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Rivilla, V. M.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-04-01

    We present the first high-angular resolution study of the MonR2 star-forming complex carried out with the Submillimeter Array at (sub-)millimeter wavelengths. We image the continuum and molecular line emission toward the young stellar objects in MonR2 at 0.85 and 1.3 mm, with resolutions ranging from 0.″ 5 to ˜3″. While free-free emission dominates the IRS1 and IRS2 continuum, dust thermal emission prevails for IRS3 and IRS5, giving envelope masses of ˜0.1-0.3 {{M}⊙ }. IRS5 splits into at least two sub-arcsecond scale sources, IRS5B and the more massive IRS5A. Our 12CO(2-1) images reveal 11 previously unknown molecular outflows in the MonR2 clump. Comparing these outflows with known IR sources in the IRS5 and IRS3 subclusters allows for tentative identification of driving stars. Line images of molecular species such as CH3CN or CH3OH show that, besides IRS3 (a well-known hot molecular core), IRS5 is also a chemically active source in the region. The gas excitation temperature derived from CH3CN lines toward IRS5 is 144 ± 15 K, indicating a deeply embedded protostar at the hot-core evolutionary stage. Spectral energy distribution fitting of IRS5 gives a mass of ˜7 M ⊙ and a luminosity of 300 {{L}⊙ } for the central source. The derived physical properties of the CO outflows suggest that they contribute to the turbulent support of the MonR2 complex and to the gas velocity dispersion in the clump’s center. The detection of a large number of CO outflows widespread across the region supports the competitive accretion scenario as origin of the MonR2 star cluster.

  9. Identification of protostellar clusters in the inner part of the milky way : Interaction between the ISM and star forming regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuret, M.; Billot, N.; Cambrésy, L.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Pezzuto, S.; Pestalozzi, M.; Schisano, E.

    2014-12-01

    Interactions between the interstellar medium (ISM) and young stellar objects (YSO) need to be investigated to better understand star formation. We used the Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) method to identify protostellar clusters in the inner part of galactic plane. Using heliocentric distance estimates, we obtained about 230 clusters over a 140 × 2 square degree region. Most of these clusters are correlated with Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) or H II regions. We conclude that clustering is more important for protostars than for prestellar clumps and that a strong correlation can be established between the distribution of H II regions, known star formation complexes and the YSOs identified in the Hi-GAL data.

  10. Diamond-like phases formed from fullerene-like clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenkov, E. A.; Greshnyakov, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The geometrically optimized structure and properties of thirteen diamond-like carbon phases formed by linking or combining fullerene-like clusters (C4, C6, C8, C12, C16, C24, or C48) have been investigated. Atoms in the structures of these phases are located in crystallographically equivalent positions. The calculations have been performed using the density functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation. The calculated values of the structural characteristics and properties (sublimation energies, bulk moduli, band gaps, X-ray diffraction patterns) of the studied diamond-like phases differ significantly from the corresponding values for cubic diamond.

  11. Hippocampal cells encode places by forming small anatomical clusters

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Nozomu H.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Akama, Keith T.; Soga, Tomoko; Ogawa, Sonoko; Pavlides, Constantine

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampus has been hypothesized to function as a “spatial” or “cognitive” map, however, the functional cellular organization of the spatial map remains a mystery. The majority of electrophysiological studies, thus far, have supported the view of a random-type organization in the hippocampus. However, using immediate early genes (IEGs) as an indicator of neuronal activity, we recently observed a cluster-type organization of hippocampal principal cells, whereby a small number (~4) of nearby cells were activated in animals exposed to a restricted part of an environment. To determine the fine structure of these clusters and to provide a 3D image of active hippocampal cells that encode for different parts of an environment, we established a functional mapping of immediate early genes (IEGs) zif268 and Homer1a, using in situ hybridization and 3D-reconstruction imaging methods. We found that, in animals exposed to the same location twice, there were significantly more double IEG-expressing cells, and the clusters of nearby cells were more “tightly” formed, in comparison to animals exposed to two different locations. We propose that spatial encoding recruits specific cell ensembles in the hippocampus and that with repeated exposure to the same place the ensembles become better organized to more accurately represent the “spatial map”. PMID:20060034

  12. Hippocampal cells encode places by forming small anatomical clusters.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, N H; Fukunaga, M; Akama, K T; Soga, T; Ogawa, S; Pavlides, C

    2010-03-31

    The hippocampus has been hypothesized to function as a "spatial" or "cognitive" map, however, the functional cellular organization of the spatial map remains a mystery. The majority of electrophysiological studies, thus far, have supported the view of a random-type organization in the hippocampus. However, using immediate early genes (IEGs) as an indicator of neuronal activity, we recently observed a cluster-type organization of hippocampal principal cells, whereby a small number ( approximately 4) of nearby cells were activated in rats exposed to a restricted part of an environment. To determine the fine structure of these clusters and to provide a 3D image of active hippocampal cells that encode for different parts of an environment, we established a functional mapping of IEGs zif268 and Homer1a, using in situ hybridization and 3D-reconstruction imaging methods. We found that, in rats exposed to the same location twice, there were significantly more double IEG-expressing cells, and the clusters of nearby cells were more "tightly" formed, in comparison to rats exposed to two different locations. We propose that spatial encoding recruits specific cell ensembles in the hippocampus and that with repeated exposure to the same place the ensembles become better organized to more accurately represent the "spatial map." PMID:20060034

  13. Chemical Diagnostics of the Massive Star Cluster-forming Cloud G33.92+0.11 I. 13CS, CH3OH, CH3CN, OCS, H2S, SO2, and SiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Young Chol; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Galvań-Madrid, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Large chemical diversity was found in the gas clumps associated with the massive star cluster-forming G33.92+0.11 region with sub-arcsecond angular resolution (0.″6–0.″8) observations with ALMA. The most prominent gas clumps are associated with the dust emission peaks A1, A2, and A5. The close correlation between CH3OH and OCS in the emission distributions strongly suggests that these species share a common origin of hot core grain mantle evaporation. The latest generation of star clusters are forming in the A5 clump, as indicated by multiple SiO outflows and its rich hot core chemistry. We also found a narrow SiO emission associated with the outflows, which may trace a cooled component of the outflows. Part of the chemical complexity may have resulted from the accreting gas from the ambient clouds, especially in the northern part of A1 and the southern part of A2. The chemical diversity found in this region is believed to mainly result from the different chemical evolutionary timescales of massive star formation. In particular, the abundance ratio between CH3OH and CH3CN may be a good chemical clock for the early phase of star formation.

  14. Stellar Clusters Forming in the Blue Dwarf Galaxy NGC 5253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    ; it is located at a distance of about 11 million light-years in the direction of the southern constellation Centaurus. Some time ago a group of European astronomers [1] decided to take a closer look at this object and to study star-forming processes in the primordial-like environment of this galaxy. True, NGC 5253 does contains some dust and heavier elements, but significantly less than our own Milky Way galaxy. However, it is quite extreme as a site of intense star formation, a profuse "starburst galaxy" in astronomical terminology, and a prime object for detailed studies of large-scale star formation. ESO PR Photo 31a/04 provides an impressive view of NGC 5253. This composite image is based on a near-infrared exposure obtained with the multi-mode ISAAC instrument mounted on the 8.2-m VLT Antu telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile), as well as two images in the optical waveband obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope data archive (located at ESO Garching). The VLT image (in the K-band at wavelength 2.16 μm) is coded red, the HST images are blue (V-band at 0.55 μm) and green (I-band at 0.79 μm), respectively. The enormous light-gathering capability and the fine optical quality of the VLT made it possible to obtain the very detailed near-infrared image (cf. PR Photo 31b/04) during an exposure lasting only 5 min. The excellent atmospheric conditions of Paranal at the time of the observation (seeing 0.4 arcsec) allow the combination of space- and ground-based data into a colour photo of this interesting object. A major dust lane is visible at the western (right) side of the galaxy, but patches of dust are visible all over, together with a large number of colourful stars and stellar clusters. The different colour shades are indicative of the ages of the objects and the degree of obscuration by interstellar dust. The near-infrared VLT image penetrates the dust clouds much better than the optical HST images, and some deeply embedded objects that are not

  15. SUBMILLIMETER OBSERVATIONS OF DENSE CLUMPS IN THE INFRARED DARK CLOUD G049.40-00.01

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Miju; Choi, Minho; Bieging, John H.; Rho, Jeonghee; Tsai, Chao-Wei

    2011-12-20

    We obtained 350 and 850 {mu}m continuum maps of the infrared dark cloud G049.40-00.01. Twenty-one dense clumps were identified within G049.40-00.01 based on the 350 {mu}m continuum map with an angular resolution of about 9.''6. We present submillimeter continuum maps and report physical properties of the clumps. The masses of clumps range from 50 to 600 M{sub Sun }. About 70% of the clumps are associated with bright 24 {mu}m emission sources, and they may contain protostars. The two most massive clumps show extended, enhanced 4.5 {mu}m emission indicating vigorous star-forming activity. The clump-size-mass distribution suggests that many of them are forming high-mass stars. G049.40-00.01 contains numerous objects in various evolutionary stages of star formation, from pre-protostellar clumps to H II regions.

  16. Superdense cosmological dark matter clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Berezinsky, V.; Dokuchaev, V.; Eroshenko, Yu.; Kachelriess, M.; Solberg, M. Aa.

    2010-05-15

    The formation and evolution of superdense clumps (or subhalos) is studied. Such clumps of dark matter (DM) can be produced by many mechanisms, most notably by spiky features in the spectrum of inflationary perturbations and by cosmological phase transitions. Being produced very early during the radiation-dominated epoch, superdense clumps evolve as isolated objects. They do not belong to hierarchical structures for a long time after production, and therefore they are not destroyed by tidal interactions during the formation of larger structures. For DM particles with masses close to the electroweak mass scale, superdense clumps evolve towards a power-law density profile {rho}(r){proportional_to}r{sup -1.8} with a central core. Superdense clumps cannot be composed of standard neutralinos, since their annihilations would overproduce the diffuse gamma radiation. If the clumps are constituted of superheavy DM particles and develop a sufficiently large central density, the evolution of their central part can lead to a ''gravithermal catastrophe.'' In such a case, the initial density profile turns into an isothermal profile with {rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -2} and a new, much smaller core in the center. Superdense clumps can be observed by gamma radiation from DM annihilations and by gravitational wave detectors, while the production of primordial black holes and cascade nucleosynthesis constrain this scenario.

  17. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XVIII. Star-forming dwarf galaxies in a cluster environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Hunt, L. K.; Madden, S. C.; Hughes, T. M.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Bizzocchi, L.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Clemens, M.; Corbelli, E.; Cortese, L.; Davies, J.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fritz, J.; Pappalardo, C.; Pierini, D.; Rémy-Ruyer, A.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S.; Vlahakis, C.

    2015-02-01

    To assess the effects of the cluster environment on the different components of the interstellar medium, we analyse the far-infrared (FIR) and submillimetre (submm) properties of a sample of star-forming dwarf galaxies detected by the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). We determine dust masses and dust temperatures by fitting a modified black body function to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Stellar and gas masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and metallicities are obtained from the analysis of a set of ancillary data. Dust is detected in 49 out of a total 140 optically identified dwarfs covered by the HeViCS field; considering only dwarfs brighter than mB = 18 mag, this gives a detection rate of 43%. After evaluating different emissivity indices, we find that the FIR-submm SEDs are best-fit by β = 1.5, with a median dust temperature Td = 22.4 K. Assuming β = 1.5, 67% of the 23 galaxies detected in all five Herschel bands show emission at 500 μm in excess of the modified black-body model. The fraction of galaxies with a submillimetre excess decreases for lower values of β, while a similarly high fraction (54%) is found if a β-free SED modelling is applied. The excess is inversely correlated with SFR and stellar masses. To study the variations in the global properties of our sample that come from environmental effects, we compare the Virgo dwarfs to other Herschel surveys,such as the Key Insights into Nearby Galaxies: Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH), the Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS), and the HeViCS Bright Galaxy Catalogue (BGC). We explore the relations between stellar mass and Hi fraction, specific star formation rate, dust fraction, gas-to-dust ratio over a wide range of stellar masses (from 107 to 1011 M⊙) for both dwarfs and spirals. Highly Hi-deficient Virgo dwarf galaxies are mostly characterised by quenched star formation activity and lower dust fractions giving hints for dust stripping in cluster dwarfs. However, to explain the

  18. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  19. Remarks on the clump theory

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.

    1986-07-01

    Further details are provided of a soon-to-be published dialog (Phys. Fluids 29 (July, 1986)) which discussed the role of the small scales in fluid clump theory. It is argued that the approximation of the clump lifetime which is compatible with exponentially rapid separation of adjacent orbits is inappropriate for the description of the dynamically important large scales. Various other remarks are made relating to the analytic treatment of strong drift-wave-like turbulence.

  20. Small scale clustering of late forming dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, S.; Corasaniti, P.-S.; Das, S.; Rasera, Y.

    2015-09-01

    We perform a study of the nonlinear clustering of matter in the late-forming dark matter (LFDM) scenario in which dark matter results from the transition of a nonminimally coupled scalar field from radiation to collisionless matter. A distinct feature of this model is the presence of a damped oscillatory cutoff in the linear matter power spectrum at small scales. We use a suite of high-resolution N-body simulations to study the imprints of LFDM on the nonlinear matter power spectrum, the halo mass and velocity functions and the halo density profiles. The model largely satisfies high-redshift matter power spectrum constraints from Lyman-α forest measurements, while it predicts suppressed abundance of low-mass halos (˜109- 1010 h-1 M⊙ ) at all redshifts compared to a vanilla Λ CDM model. The analysis of the LFDM halo velocity function shows a better agreement than the Λ CDM prediction with the observed abundance of low-velocity galaxies in the local volume. Halos with mass M ≳1011 h-1 M⊙ show minor departures of the density profiles from Λ CDM expectations, while smaller-mass halos are less dense, consistent with the fact that they form later than their Λ CDM counterparts.

  1. THE STRUCTURE OF THE STAR-FORMING CLUSTER RCW 38

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, E.; Wolk, S. J.; Bourke, T. L.; Spitzbart, B.; Megeath, S. T.; Gutermuth, R.

    2011-12-20

    We present a study of the structure of the high-mass star-forming region RCW 38 and the spatial distribution of its young stellar population. Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) photometry (3-8 {mu}m) is combined with Two Micron All Sky Survey near-IR data to identify young stellar objects (YSOs) by IR-excess emission from their circumstellar material. Chandra X-ray data are used to identify class III pre-main-sequence stars lacking circumstellar material. We identify 624 YSOs: 23 class 0/I and 90 flat spectrum protostars, 437 class II stars, and 74 class III stars. We also identify 29 (27 new) O star candidates over the IRAC field. Seventy-two stars exhibit IR-variability, including 7 class 0/I and 12 flat spectrum YSOs. A further 177 tentative candidates are identified by their location in the IRAC [3.6] versus [3.6]-[5.8] color-magnitude diagram. We find strong evidence of subclustering in the region. Three subclusters were identified surrounding the central cluster, with massive and variable stars in each subcluster. The central region shows evidence of distinct spatial distributions of the protostars and pre-main-sequence stars. A previously detected IR cluster, DB2001{sub O}bj36, has been established as a subcluster of RCW 38. This suggests that star formation in RCW 38 occurs over a more extended area than previously thought. The gas-to-dust ratio is examined using the X-ray derived hydrogen column density, N{sub H} and the K-band extinction, and found to be consistent with the diffuse interstellar medium, in contrast with Serpens and NGC 1333. We posit that the high photoionizing flux of massive stars in RCW 38 affects the agglomeration of the dust grains.

  2. Robustness of a partially interdependent network formed of clustered networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai; Huang, Xuqing; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2014-03-01

    Clustering, or transitivity, a behavior observed in real-world networks, affects network structure and function. This property has been studied extensively, but most of this research has been limited to clustering in single networks. The effect of clustering on the robustness of coupled networks, on the other hand, has received much less attention. Only the case of a pair of fully coupled networks with clustering has recently received study. Here we generalize the study of clustering of a fully coupled pair of networks and apply it to a partially interdependent network of networks with clustering within the network components. We show, both analytically and numerically, how clustering within networks affects the percolation properties of interdependent networks, including the percolation threshold, the size of the giant component, and the critical coupling point at which the first-order phase transition changes to a second-order phase transition as the coupling between the networks is reduced. We study two types of clustering, one proposed by Newman [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 058701 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.058701] in which the average degree is kept constant while the clustering is changed, and the other by Hackett et al. [Phys. Rev. E 83, 056107 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.83.056107] in which the degree distribution is kept constant. The first type of clustering is studied both analytically and numerically, and the second is studied numerically.

  3. Fuzzy clustering of facial form for prototyping environmental protection equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D.G.

    1994-07-01

    Emphasis on the human-to-aircraft interface has magnified in importance as the performance envelope of today`s aircraft has continued to expand. A major problem is that there has been a corresponding increase in the need for better fitting protection equipment and unfortunately it has become increasingly difficult for aircrew members to find equipment that will provide this level of fit. While protection equipment has, historically had poor fit characteristics, the issue has grown tremendously with the recent increase in the numbers of minorities and women. Fundamental to this problem are the archaic methods for sizing individual equipment and the methods for establishing a sizing system. This paper documents recent investigations by the author into developing new methods to overcome these problems. Research centered on the development of a new statistically based method for describing form and the application of fuzzy clustering using the new shape descriptors. A sizing system was developed from the application of the research, prototype masks were constructed and the hardware tested under flight conditions.

  4. HUBBLE SPIES HUGE CLUSTERS OF STARS FORMED BY ANCIENT ENCOUNTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope snapped these two views of the heart of the galaxy M82. The image at left was taken in visible light; the picture at right, in infrared light. In the infrared view, the telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer peered through thick dust lanes to find some of the galaxy's more than 100 super star clusters. The clusters are the larger pink and yellow dots scattered throughout the picture. They were formed during a violent collision with the galaxy M81 about 600 million years ago. The galaxy is 12 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major. The pictures were taken Sept. 15, 1997. Credits: NASA, ESA, R. de Grijs (Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge, UK) NOTE TO EDITORS: For additional information, please contact Richard de Grijs, Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK, +44(0)1223-337528 (phone), +44(0)1223-337523 (fax), grijs@ast.cam.ac.uk (e-mail). The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA), for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). This image is issued jointly by NASA and ESA. Electronic images, animation and additional information are available at: http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2001/08 and via links in http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/latest.html http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pictures.html http://hubble.stsci.edu/go/news http://hubble.esa.int To receive STScI press releases electronically, send an Internet electronic mail message to public-request@stsci.edu. Leave the subject line blank, and type the word subscribe in the body of the message. The system will respond with a confirmation of the subscription, and you will receive new press releases as they are issued. Please subscribe using the email account

  5. A comparison of the structure of solute clusters formed during thermal ageing and irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hyde, J M; Sha, G; Marquis, E A; Morley, A; Wilford, K B; Williams, T J

    2011-05-01

    Nanometre scale clusters form in Cu-containing reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels during neutron irradiation. These clusters have a deleterious effect on mechanical properties, which can result in embrittlement and limit the reactor operating life. Thermal ageing of RPV steels can also induce the formation of solute clusters but it is not clear how similar these are to those formed during irradiation. In this work atom probe tomography, combined with detailed structural assessments of the structure of solute clusters, is used to address this issue. A series of thermal ageing heat treatments has been performed on several high- and low-Ni RPV welds to produce 1-4 nm diameter solute clusters. The same materials have also been neutron irradiated. The results show that CuMnNiSi enriched clusters formed during thermal ageing have, on average, higher Cu contents and lower Mn, Ni and Si contents than those found in irradiation-induced clusters. The effect of increasing bulk Ni is to encourage the formation of clusters with significantly higher Ni content, slightly higher Mn and Si contents and significantly lower Cu contents. At very high doses and dose rates MnNiSi enriched clusters can form even in high-Cu welds. Despite differences in the compositions of individual clusters formed during irradiation and during thermal ageing, clusters in both exhibit similar structure. In particular, well developed clusters in both materials have Cu-enriched cores whose peripheries are enriched in Ni, Mn and, in most cases, Si. PMID:21227587

  6. The virial balance of clumps and cores in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, Sami; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Kim, Jongsoo; Burkert, Andreas; Shadmehri, Mohsen

    We analyse the virial balance of clumps and cores in a set of three-dimensional, driven, isothermal, magnetohydrodynamical simulations of molecular clouds. We apply a clump finding algorithm based on a density threshold and a friend of friend approach to isolate clumps and cores in the simulation box. For each clump, we calculate all the terms which enter the virial equation in its Eulerian form (EVT): 1/2 ddot I_E=2E_th+E_k-τ_th-τ_k+E_m+τ_m-1/2 dΦ/dt, where the left hand side is the second time derivative of the clump moment of inertia and on the right hand side the terms are (from left to right), the thermal volume energy, volume kinetic energy, surface thermal energy, surface kinetic energy, volume magnetic energy, surface magnetic energy, gravitational term and first time derivative of the flux of moment of inertia through the clump boundary. We also calculate for each clump and core other stability indicators commonly used in both observational and theoretical work such as the Jeans number J[c], mass-to magnetic flux ratio (normalized to the critical value for collapse) μ_[c] and the gravitational parameter α_[vir]. We show that :a) Clumps and cores are dynamical, out of equilibrium structures, b) Surface energy terms are as important as the volume ones in the overall energy balance, c) Not all clumps that have infall like motions are gravitationally bound, d) The near equality of the temporal terms in the EVT enables the usage of the other terms as a stability indicator (gravity versus other energies), and e) We establish the relationships between the classical parameters J[c], μ_[c] and α_[vir] which are used to compare the ratios of gravitational to thermal, magnetic, and kinetic energy in clumps to their counterparts in the EVT (i.e., for example J[c] is compared to IWI /I E[th] -?τ [th] I). Thus, we propose a method to test the clumps stability based on observations of their derived dynamical, thermal and magnetic properties.

  7. Forming Centaurus A's High M/L Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauda Bovill, Mia; Hyazinth Puzia, Thomas; Ricotti, Massimo; Taylor, Matthew Alan

    2015-08-01

    Using a set of high resolution N-body simulations, we develop a formation model for the high M/L globular clusters recently found around Centaurus A. In our model, the high M/L clusters are not true globular clusters, but rather the stripped cores of dwarf galaxies which underwent an epoch of efficient, concentrated star formation, possibly before or during the epoch of reionization. Given the known stellar masses of these objects, their halos virialized with relatively high masses and high redshift, falling into the Centaurus A with > 109 Msolar. These criteria give us a distribution of surviving subhalos which is consistent with the number and three dimensional distribution of the high M/L clusters within 100 pc of Centaurus A.

  8. Composition and topology of activity cliff clusters formed by bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-02-24

    The assessment of activity cliffs has thus far mostly focused on compound pairs, although the majority of activity cliffs are not formed in isolation but in a coordinated manner involving multiple active compounds and cliffs. However, the composition of coordinated activity cliff configurations and their topologies are unknown. Therefore, we have identified all activity cliff configurations formed by currently available bioactive compounds and analyzed them in network representations where activity cliff configurations occur as clusters. The composition, topology, frequency of occurrence, and target distribution of activity cliff clusters have been determined. A limited number of large cliff clusters with unique topologies were identified that were centers of activity cliff formation. These clusters originated from a small number of target sets. However, most clusters were of small to moderate size. Three basic topologies were sufficient to describe recurrent activity cliff cluster motifs/topologies. For example, frequently occurring clusters with star topology determined the scale-free character of the global activity cliff network and represented a characteristic activity cliff configuration. Large clusters with complex topology were often found to contain different combinations of basic topologies. Our study provides a first view of activity cliff configurations formed by currently available bioactive compounds and of the recurrent topologies of activity cliff clusters. Activity cliff clusters of defined topology can be selected, and from compounds forming the clusters, SAR information can be obtained. The SAR information of activity cliff clusters sharing a/one specific activity and topology can be compared. PMID:24437577

  9. STAR CLUSTERS IN A NUCLEAR STAR FORMING RING: THE DISAPPEARING STRING OF PEARLS

    SciTech Connect

    Väisänen, Petri; Barway, Sudhanshu; Randriamanakoto, Zara

    2014-12-20

    An analysis of the star cluster population in a low-luminosity early-type galaxy, NGC 2328, is presented. The clusters are found in a tight star forming nuclear spiral/ring pattern and we also identify a bar from structural two-dimensional decomposition. These massive clusters are forming very efficiently in the circumnuclear environment and they are young, possibly all less than 30 Myr of age. The clusters indicate an azimuthal age gradient, consistent with a ''pearls-on-a-string'' formation scenario, suggesting bar-driven gas inflow. The cluster mass function has a robust down turn at low masses at all age bins. Assuming clusters are born with a power-law distribution, this indicates extremely rapid disruption at timescales of just several million years. If found to be typical, it means that clusters born in dense circumnuclear rings do not survive to become old globular clusters in non-interacting systems.

  10. Stellar Clusters in the NGC 6334 Star-Forming Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Martin, Amanda L.; McNeill, Collin J.; Broos, Patrick S.; Garmire, Gordon P.

    2009-07-01

    The full stellar population of NGC 6334, one of the most spectacular regions of massive star formation in the nearby Galaxy, has not been well sampled in past studies. We analyze here a mosaic of two Chandra X-ray Observatory images of the region using sensitive data analysis methods, giving a list of 1607 faint X-ray sources with arcsecond positions and approximate line-of-sight absorption. About 95% of these are expected to be cluster members, most lower mass pre-main-sequence stars. Extrapolating to low X-ray levels, the total stellar population is estimated to be 20,000-30,000 pre-main-sequence stars. The X-ray sources show a complicated spatial pattern with ~10 distinct star clusters. The heavily obscured clusters are mostly associated with previously known far-infrared sources and radio H II regions. The lightly obscured clusters are mostly newly identified in the X-ray images. Dozens of likely OB stars are found, both in clusters and dispersed throughout the region, suggesting that star formation in the complex has proceeded over millions of years. A number of extraordinarily heavily absorbed X-ray sources are associated with the active regions of star formation.

  11. STELLAR CLUSTERS IN THE NGC 6334 STAR-FORMING COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Martin, Amanda L.; McNeill, Collin J.; Broos, Patrick S.; Garmire, Gordon P.

    2009-07-15

    The full stellar population of NGC 6334, one of the most spectacular regions of massive star formation in the nearby Galaxy, has not been well sampled in past studies. We analyze here a mosaic of two Chandra X-ray Observatory images of the region using sensitive data analysis methods, giving a list of 1607 faint X-ray sources with arcsecond positions and approximate line-of-sight absorption. About 95% of these are expected to be cluster members, most lower mass pre-main-sequence stars. Extrapolating to low X-ray levels, the total stellar population is estimated to be 20,000-30,000 pre-main-sequence stars. The X-ray sources show a complicated spatial pattern with {approx}10 distinct star clusters. The heavily obscured clusters are mostly associated with previously known far-infrared sources and radio H II regions. The lightly obscured clusters are mostly newly identified in the X-ray images. Dozens of likely OB stars are found, both in clusters and dispersed throughout the region, suggesting that star formation in the complex has proceeded over millions of years. A number of extraordinarily heavily absorbed X-ray sources are associated with the active regions of star formation.

  12. High-Redshift Clusters form NVSS: The TexOx Cluster (TOC) Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, S; Rawlings, S; Hill, G J

    2003-02-11

    The TexOx Cluster (TOC) Survey uses overdensities of radiosources in the NVSS to trace clusters of galaxies. The links between radiosources and rich environments make this a powerful way to find clusters which may potentially be overlooked by other selection techniques. By including constraints from optical surveys, TOC is an extremely efficient way to find clusters at high redshift. One such field, TOC J0233.3+3021, contains at least one galaxy cluster (at z {approx} 1.4) and has been detected using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. Even in targeted deep optical observations, however, distinguishing the cluster galaxies from the background is difficult, especially given the tendency of TOC to select fields containing multiple structures at different redshifts.

  13. The Spatial Distribution of the Young Stellar Clusters in the Star-forming Galaxy NGC 628

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasha, K.; Calzetti, D.; Adamo, A.; Kim, H.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Aloisi, A.; Bright, S. N.; Christian, C.; Cignoni, M.; Dale, D. A.; Dobbs, C.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Fumagalli, M.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Grebel, E. K.; Johnson, K. E.; Lee, J. C.; Messa, M.; Smith, L. J.; Ryon, J. E.; Thilker, D.; Ubeda, L.; Wofford, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a study of the spatial distribution of the stellar cluster populations in the star-forming galaxy NGC 628. Using Hubble Space Telescope broadband WFC3/UVIS UV and optical images from the Treasury Program LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey), we have identified 1392 potential young (≲ 100 Myr) stellar clusters within the galaxy using a combination of visual inspection and automatic selection. We investigate the clustering of these young stellar clusters and quantify the strength and change of clustering strength with scale using the two-point correlation function. We also investigate how image boundary conditions and dust lanes affect the observed clustering. The distribution of the clusters is well fit by a broken power law with negative exponent α. We recover a weighted mean index of α ˜ -0.8 for all spatial scales below the break at 3.″3 (158 pc at a distance of 9.9 Mpc) and an index of α ˜ -0.18 above 158 pc for the accumulation of all cluster types. The strength of the clustering increases with decreasing age and clusters older than 40 Myr lose their clustered structure very rapidly and tend to be randomly distributed in this galaxy, whereas the mass of the star cluster has little effect on the clustering strength. This is consistent with results from other studies that the morphological hierarchy in stellar clustering resembles the same hierarchy as the turbulent interstellar medium.

  14. The Evolution of the Globular Cluster System in a Triaxial Galaxy: Can a Galactic Nucleus Form by Globular Cluster Capture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Roberto

    1993-10-01

    Among the possible phenomena inducing evolution of the globular cluster system in an elliptical galaxy, dynamical friction due to field stars and tidal disruption caused by a central nucleus is of crucial importance. The aim of this paper is the study of the evolution of the globular cluster system in a triaxial galaxy in the presence of these phenomena. In particular, the possibility is examined that some galactic nuclei have been formed by frictionally decayed globular clusters moving in a triaxial potential. We find that the initial rapid growth of the nucleus, due mainly to massive clusters on box orbits falling in a short time scale into the galactic center, is later slowed by tidal disruption induced by the nucleus itself on less massive clusters in the way described by Ostriker, Binney, and Saha. The efficiency of dynamical friction is such to carry to the center of the galaxy enough globular cluster mass available to form a compact nucleus, but the actual modes and results of cluster-cluster encounters in the central potential well are complicated phenomena which remains to be investigated. The mass of the resulting nucleus is determined by the mutual feedback of the described processes, together with the initial spatial, velocity, and mass distributions of the globular cluster family. The effect on the system mass function is studied, showing the development of a low- and high-mass turnover even with an initially flat mass function. Moreover, in this paper is discussed the possibility that the globular cluster fall to the galactic center has been a cause of primordial violent galactic activity. An application of the model to M31 is presented.

  15. THERE ARE NO STARLESS MASSIVE PROTO-CLUSTERS IN THE FIRST QUADRANT OF THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, A.; Bally, J.; Battersby, C.; Bressert, E.

    2012-10-20

    We search the {lambda} = 1.1 mm Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey for clumps containing sufficient mass to form {approx}10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} star clusters. Eighteen candidate massive proto-clusters are identified in the first Galactic quadrant outside of the central kiloparsec. This sample is complete to clumps with mass M{sub clump} > 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} and radius r {approx}< 2.5 pc. The overall Galactic massive cluster formation rate is CFR(M{sub cluster} > 10{sup 4}) {approx}<5 Myr{sup -1}, which is in agreement with the rates inferred from Galactic open clusters and M31 massive clusters. We find that all massive proto-clusters in the first quadrant are actively forming massive stars and place an upper limit of {tau}{sub starless} < 0.5 Myr on the lifetime of the starless phase of massive cluster formation. If massive clusters go through a starless phase with all of their mass in a single clump, the lifetime of this phase is very short.

  16. Dynamics of disklike clusters formed in a magnetorheological fluid under a rotational magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Yutaka; Morimoto, Hisao; Maekawa, Toru

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the cluster formations and dynamics in a magnetorheological fluid under a rotational magnetic field focusing on the case of a relatively high volume fraction. We find that isotropic disklike clusters, which rotate more slowly than the field rotation, are formed at low Mason numbers (the ratio of viscous to magnetic forces) and, what is more, we show short rod clusters, which rotate stably thanks to the low Mason numbers and circulate along the surface of the disklike clusters. The circulation velocity of the surface particles is much higher than the rotational surface velocity of the rigid disklike clusters. PMID:15903473

  17. Predicted Sizes of Pressure-supported HI Clouds in the Outskirts of the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-06-01

    Using data from the ALFALFA AGES Arecibo HI survey of galaxies and the Virgo cluster X-ray pressure profiles from XMM-Newton, we investigate the possibility that starless dark HI clumps, also known as “dark galaxies,” are supported by external pressure in the surrounding intercluster medium. We find that the starless HI clump masses, velocity dispersions, and positions allow these clumps to be in pressure equilibrium with the X-ray gas near the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We predict the sizes of these clumps to range from 1 to 10 kpc, in agreement with the range of sizes found for spatially resolved HI starless clumps outside of Virgo. Based on the predicted HI surface density of the Virgo sources, as well as a sample of other similar resolved ALFALFA HI dark clumps with follow-up optical/radio observations, we predict that most of the HI dark clumps are on the cusp of forming stars. These HI sources therefore mark the transition between starless HI clouds and dwarf galaxies with stars.

  18. CO depletion in ATLASGAL-selected high-mass clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetti, A.; Wyrowski, F.; Brand, J.; Csengeri, T.; Fontani, F.; Walmsley, C. M.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Beuther, H.; Schuller, F.; Güsten, R.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    In the low-mass regime, it is found that the gas-phase abundances of C-bearing molecules in cold starless cores rapidly decrease with increasing density. Here the molecules tend to stick to the grains, forming ice mantles. We study CO depletion in the TOP100 sample of the ATLASGAL survey, and investigate its correlation with evolutionary stage and with the physical parameters of the sources. We use low-J emission lines of CO isotopologues and the dust continuum emission to infer the depletion factor fD. RATRAN one-dimensional models were also used to determine fD and to investigate the presence of depletion above a density threshold. The isotopic ratios and optical depth were derived with a Bayesian approach. We find a significant number of clumps with a large CO depletion, up to ˜20. Larger values are found for colder clumps, thus for earlier evolutionary phases. For massive clumps in the earliest stages of evolution we estimate the radius of the region where CO depletion is important to be a few tenths of a pc. CO depletion in high-mass clumps seems to behave as in the low-mass regime, with less evolved clumps showing larger values for the depletion than their more evolved counterparts, and increasing for denser sources.

  19. Carbonate clumped isotope bond reordering and geospeedometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Henkes, Gregory A.

    2012-10-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on the preference of 13C and 18O to form bonds with each other. At elevated temperatures such bond ordering is susceptible to resetting by diffusion of C and O through the solid mineral lattice. This type of bond reordering has the potential to obscure primary paleoclimate information, but could also provide a basis for reconstructing shallow crustal temperatures and cooling rates. We determined Arrhenius parameters for solid-state reordering of C-O bonds in two different calcites through a series of laboratory heating experiments. We find that the calcites have different susceptibilities to solid-state reordering. Reaction progress follows a first order rate law in both calcites, but only after an initial period of non-first order reaction that we suggest relates to annealing of nonequilibrium defects when the calcites are first heated to experimental temperature. We show that the apparent equilibrium temperature equations (or "closure temperature" equations) for carbonate clumped isotope reordering are analogous Dodson's equations for first order loss of daughter isotopes. For each calcite, the sensitivity of apparent equilibrium temperature to cooling rate is sufficiently high for inference of cooling rates within a factor of ˜5 or better for cooling rates ranging from tens of degrees per day to a few degrees per million years. However, because the calcites have different susceptibilities to reordering, each calcite defines its own cooling rate-apparent equilibrium temperature relationship. The cooling rates of Carrara marble inferred from carbonate clumped isotope geospeedometry are 10-6-10-3 degrees per annum and are in broad agreement with rates inferred from thermochronometric methods. Cooling rates for 13C-depleted calcites from the late Neoproterozoic Doushantou cap carbonates in south China are on the order of 102-104 degrees per annum, consistent with rapid cooling following formation of these calcites by a

  20. The simultaneous formation of massive stars and stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rowan J.; Longmore, Steven; Bonnell, Ian

    2009-12-01

    We show that massive stars and stellar clusters are formed simultaneously, the global evolution of the forming cluster is what allows the central stars to become massive. We predict that massive star-forming clumps, such as those observed in Motte et al., contract and grow in mass leading to the formation of massive stars. This occurs as mass is continually channelled from large radii on to the central protostars, which can become massive through accretion. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of massive star-forming clumps in a giant molecular cloud, we show that clumps are initially diffuse and filamentary, and become more concentrated as they collapse. Simulated interferometry observations of our data provide an explanation as to why young massive star-forming regions show more substructure than older ones. The most massive stars in our model are found within the most bound cluster. Most of the mass accreted by the massive stars was originally distributed throughout the clump at low densities and was later funnelled to the star due to global infall. Even with radiative feedback no massive pre-stellar cores are formed. The original cores are of intermediate mass and gain their additional mass in the protostellar stage. We also find that cores which form low-mass stars exist within the volume from which the high-mass stars accrete, but are largely unaffected by this process.

  1. Cluster separability in front-form particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.

    1986-01-01

    In relativistic quantum dynamics, the group structure demands that some transformations other than the time evolutions depend on dynamics. It is possible to choose the representation of a kinematic subgroup to be independent of the dynamics, leading to different ''forms of dynamics'' which are unitarily equivalen. In the ''front-form'' dynamics the kinematic subgroup leaves the light front invariant, and the rotations about any transverse axis are dynamical transformations. In the front form the kinematic subgroup includes the Lorentz transformations. The existence and construction of packing transformations in front-form particle dynamics are shown, and the general features of front-form dynamics needed for that purpose are reviewed. 5 refs. (LEW)

  2. Study of Galactic clumps with millimeter / submillimeter continuum and molecular emission: Early stages of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merello, Manuel Antonio

    2014-09-01

    Massive stars play a key role in the evolution of the Galaxy; hence they are important objects of study in astrophysics. Although they are rare compared to low mass stars, they are the principal source of heavy elements and UV radiation, affecting the process of formation of stars and planets, and the physical, chemical, and morphological structure of galaxies. Star clusters form in dense "clumps" (few parsecs in size) within giant molecular clouds, while individual stars form in cores (subparsec scale). An important step in the observational study of massive star formation is the identification and characterization of clumps. More detailed studies can then show how these clumps fragment into cores. Studies of clumps in our Galaxy will provide fundamental guidelines for the analysis of other galaxies, where individual clumps and cores cannot be resolved, and provide a catalog of interesting sources for observations of the Milky Way with a new generation of instruments, such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. Large-scale blind surveys of the Galactic plane at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths have recently been completed, allowing us to identify star forming clumps and improve our understanding of the early stages of massive stars. One of these studies, the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS), mapped the continuum emission at 1.1 mm over a large region of the northern Galactic plane at a resolution of 33", identifying 8559 compact sources throughout the Galaxy. In this dissertation, I present observations of a sample of sources from the BGPS catalog, obtained with the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II (SHARC-II). I present in this work 107 continuum emission maps at 350 μm at high angular resolution (8.500) toward clump-like sources and construct a catalog of BGPS substructures. I estimate clump properties such as temperatures and multiplicity of substructures, and compare my results with 350 μm continuum maps from the Hi

  3. The clustering evolution of dusty star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, William I.; Lacey, Cedric G.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Cole, Shaun

    2016-09-01

    We present predictions for the clustering of galaxies selected by their emission at far-infrared (FIR) and sub-millimetre wavelengths. This includes the first predictions for the effect of clustering biases induced by the coarse angular resolution of single-dish telescopes at these wavelengths. We combine a new version of the GALFORM model of galaxy formation with a self-consistent model for calculating the absorption and re-emission of radiation by interstellar dust. Model galaxies selected at 850μm reside in dark matter haloes of mass Mhalo ˜ 1011.5-1012 h-1 M⊙, independent of redshift (for 0.2 ≲ z ≲ 4) or flux (for 0.25 ≲ S850 μm ≲ 4 mJy). At z ˜ 2.5, the brightest galaxies (S850 μm > 4 mJy) exhibit a correlation length of r0=5.5_{-0.5}^{+0.3} h-1 Mpc, consistent with observations. We show that these galaxies have descendants with stellar masses M⋆ ˜ 1011 h-1 M⊙ occupying haloes spanning a broad range in mass Mhalo ˜ 1012-1014 h-1 M⊙. The FIR emissivity at shorter wavelengths (250, 350 and 500 μm) is also dominated by galaxies in the halo mass range Mhalo ˜ 1011.5-1012 h-1 M⊙, again independent of redshift (for 0.5 ≲ z ≲ 5). We compare our predictions for the angular power spectrum of cosmic infrared background anisotropies at these wavelengths with observations, finding agreement to within a factor of ˜2 over all scales and wavelengths, an improvement over earlier versions of the model. Simulating images at 850 μm, we show that confusion effects boost the measured angular correlation function on all scales by a factor of ˜4. This has important consequences, potentially leading to inferred halo masses being overestimated by an order of magnitude.

  4. The clustering evolution of dusty star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, William I.; Lacey, Cedric G.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Cole, Shaun

    2016-05-01

    We present predictions for the clustering of galaxies selected by their emission at far infra-red (FIR) and sub-millimetre wavelengths. This includes the first predictions for the effect of clustering biases induced by the coarse angular resolution of single-dish telescopes at these wavelengths. We combine a new version of the GALFORM model of galaxy formation with a self-consistent model for calculating the absorption and re-emission of radiation by interstellar dust. Model galaxies selected at 850 μm reside in dark matter halos of mass Mhalo ˜ 1011.5 - 1012 h-1 M⊙, independent of redshift (for 0.2 ≲ z ≲ 4) or flux (for 0.25 ≲ S850μm ≲ 4 mJy). At z ˜ 2.5, the brightest galaxies (S850μm > 4 mJy) exhibit a correlation length of r0=5.5_{-0.5}^{+0.3} h-1 Mpc, consistent with observations. We show that these galaxies have descendants with stellar masses M⋆ ˜ 1011 h-1 M⊙ occupying halos spanning a broad range in mass Mhalo ˜ 1012 - 1014 h-1 M⊙. The FIR emissivity at shorter wavelengths (250, 350 and 500 μm) is also dominated by galaxies in the halo mass range Mhalo ˜ 1011.5 - 1012 h-1 M⊙, again independent of redshift (for 0.5 ≲ z ≲ 5). We compare our predictions for the angular power spectrum of cosmic infra-red background anisotropies at these wavelengths with observations, finding agreement to within a factor of ˜2 over all scales and wavelengths, an improvement over earlier versions of the model. Simulating images at 850 μm, we show that confusion effects boost the measured angular correlation function on all scales by a factor of ˜4. This has important consequences, potentially leading to inferred halo masses being overestimated by an order of magnitude.

  5. Generation of self-clusters of galectin-1 in the farnesyl-bound form.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kazumi; Niwa, Yusuke; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu

    2016-01-01

    Ras protein is involved in a signal transduction cascade in cell growth, and cluster formation of H-Ras and human galectin-1 (Gal-1) complex is considered to be crucial to achieve its physiological roles. It is considered that the complex is formed through interactions between Gal-1 and the farnesyl group (farnesyl-dependent model), post-translationally modified to the C-terminal Cys, of H-Ras. We investigated the role of farnesyl-bound Gal-1 in the cluster formation by analyzing the structure and properties of Gal-1 bound to farnesyl thiosalicylic acid (FTS), a competitive inhibitor of the binding of H-Ras to Gal-1. Gal-1 exhibited self-cluster formation upon interaction with FTS, and small- and large-size clusters were formed depending on FTS concentration. The galactoside-binding pocket of Gal-1 in the FTS-bound form was found to play an important role in small-size cluster formation. Large-size clusters were likely formed by the interaction among the hydrophobic sites of Gal-1 in the FTS-bound form. The present results indicate that Gal-1 in the FTS-bound form has the ability to form self-clusters as well as intrinsic lectin activity. Relevance of the self-clustering of FTS-bound Gal-1 to the cluster formation of the H-Ras-Gal-1complex was discussed by taking account of the farnesyl-dependent model and another (Raf-dependent) model. PMID:27624845

  6. Nano-clustered Pd catalysts formed on GaN surface for green chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Motoi; Ueta, Yukiko; Konishi, Tomoya; Tsukamoto, Shiro

    2011-05-01

    We have succeeded in observing Pd nano-clusters, catalytic prime elements, on a GaN(0 0 0 1) surface by a scanning tunneling microscope for the first time. After the sample was reused, we found that nano-clusters (width: 11 nm, height: 2.2 nm) existed on the surface which still kept the catalytic activity, resulting that the neutral Pd atoms formed the nano-cluster. Moreover, the S-termination contributed to the formation of the dense and flat structure consisting of the Pd nano-clusters.

  7. Clumped isotope thermometry of cryogenic cave carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Tobias; Affek, Hagit P.; Zhang, Yi Ge; Dublyansky, Yuri; Spötl, Christoph; Immenhauser, Adrian; Richter, Detlev K.

    2014-02-01

    Freezing of cave pool water that is increasingly oversaturated with dissolved carbonate leads to precipitation of a very specific type of speleothems known as cryogenic cave carbonates (CCC). At present, two different environments for their formation have been proposed, based on their characteristic carbon and oxygen isotope ratios. Rapidly freezing thin water films result in the fast precipitation of fine-grained carbonate powder (CCCfine). This leads to rapid physicochemical changes including CO2 degassing and CaCO3 precipitation, resulting in significantly 13C-enriched carbonates. Alternatively, slow carbonate precipitation in ice-covered cave pools results in coarse crystalline CCC (CCCcoarse) yielding strongly 18O-depleted carbonate. This is due to the formation of relatively 18O-enriched ice causing the gradual depletion of 18O in the water from which the CCC precipitates. Cryogenic carbonates from Central European caves were found to have been formed primarily during the last glacial period, specifically during times of permafrost thawing, based on the oxygen isotope ratios and U-Th dating. Information about the precise conditions of CCCcoarse formation, i.e. whether these crystals formed under equilibrium or disequilibrium conditions with the parent fluid, however, is lacking. An improved understanding of CCCcoarse formation will increase the predictive value of this paleo-permafrost archive. Here we apply clumped isotopes to investigate the formation conditions of cryogenic carbonates using well-studied CCCcoarse from five different cave systems in western Germany. Carbonate clumped isotope measurements yielded apparent temperatures between 3 and 18 °C and thus exhibit clear evidence of isotopic disequilibrium. Although the very negative carbonate δ18O values can only be explained by gradual freezing of pool water accompanied by preferential incorporation of 18O into the ice, clumped isotope-derived temperatures significantly above expected freezing

  8. Metabolic adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to oxygen stress by cell-to-cell clumping and flocculation.

    PubMed

    Bible, Amber N; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-12-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists. PMID:26407887

  9. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    PubMed Central

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists. PMID:26407887

  10. Kinematics and dynamics of the MKW/AWM poor clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Kriessler, Jeffrey R.; Bird, Christina M.; Huchra, John P.

    1995-01-01

    We report 472 new redshifts for 416 galaxies in the regions of the 23 poor clusters of galaxies originally identified by Morgan, Kayser, and White (MKW), and Albert, White, and Morgan (AWM). Eighteen of the poor clusters now have 10 or more available redshifts within 1.5/h Mpc of the central galaxy; 11 clusters have at least 20 available redshifts. Based on the 21 clusters for which we have sufficient velocity information, the median velocity scale is 336 km/s, a factor of 2 smaller than found for rich clusters. Several of the poor clusters exhibit complex velocity distributions due to the presence of nearby clumps of galaxies. We check on the velocity of the dominant galaxy in each poor cluster relative to the remaining cluster members. Significantly high relative velocities of the dominant galaxy are found in only 4 of 21 poor clusters, 3 of which we suspect are due to contamination of the parent velocity distribution. Several statistical tests indicate that the D/cD galaxies are at the kinematic centers of the parent poor cluster velocity distributions. Mass-to-light ratios for 13 of the 15 poor clusters for which we have the required data are in the range 50 less than or = M/L(sub B(0)) less than or = 200 solar mass/solar luminosity. The complex nature of the regions surrounding many of the poor clusters suggests that these groupings may represent an early epoch of cluster formation. For example, the poor clusters MKW7 and MKWS are shown to be gravitationally bound and likely to merge to form a richer cluster within the next several Gyrs. Eight of the nine other poor clusters for which simple two-body dynamical models can be carried out are consistent with being bound to other clumps in their vicinity. Additional complex systems with more than two gravitationally bound clumps are observed among the poor clusters.

  11. Kinematics and dynamics of the MKW/AWM poor clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Kriessler, Jeffrey R.; Bird, Christina M.; Huchra, John P.

    1995-03-01

    We report 472 new redshifts for 416 galaxies in the regions of the 23 poor clusters of galaxies originally identified by Morgan, Kayser, and White (MKW), and Albert, White, and Morgan (AWM). Eighteen of the poor clusters now have 10 or more available redshifts within 1.5/h Mpc of the central galaxy; 11 clusters have at least 20 available redshifts. Based on the 21 clusters for which we have sufficient velocity information, the median velocity scale is 336 km/s, a factor of 2 smaller than found for rich clusters. Several of the poor clusters exhibit complex velocity distributions due to the presence of nearby clumps of galaxies. We check on the velocity of the dominant galaxy in each poor cluster relative to the remaining cluster members. Significantly high relative velocities of the dominant galaxy are found in only 4 of 21 poor clusters, 3 of which we suspect are due to contamination of the parent velocity distribution. Several statistical tests indicate that the D/cD galaxies are at the kinematic centers of the parent poor cluster velocity distributions. Mass-to-light ratios for 13 of the 15 poor clusters for which we have the required data are in the range 50 less than or = M/LB(0) less than or = 200 solar mass/solar luminosity. The complex nature of the regions surrounding many of the poor clusters suggests that these groupings may represent an early epoch of cluster formation. For example, the poor clusters MKW7 and MKWS are shown to be gravitationally bound and likely to merge to form a richer cluster within the next several Gyrs. Eight of the nine other poor clusters for which simple two-body dynamical models can be carried out are consistent with being bound to other clumps in their vicinity. Additional complex systems with more than two gravitationally bound clumps are observed among the poor clusters.

  12. CLUSTER FORMATION TRIGGERED BY FILAMENT COLLISIONS IN SERPENS SOUTH

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kawabe, Ryohei; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Sugitani, Koji; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Kimihiko; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kozu, Minato; Okada, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogawa, Hideo; Nishitani, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Izumi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Kameno, Seiji; Momose, Munetake; Nakajima, Taku; and others

    2014-08-20

    The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS (J{sub N} = 4{sub 3}-3{sub 2}), HC{sub 3}N (J = 5-4), N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0), and SiO (J = 2-1, v = 0) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N{sub 2}H{sup +} abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different V {sub LSR}. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few × 10{sup 5} yr because CCS is abundant only for a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is 0.4 × 10{sup 5} yr, is extremely high, about 70% in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.

  13. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE IRDC CLUMP G34.43+00.24 MM3: HOT CORE AND MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Takeshi; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Foster, Jonathan B.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, James M.; Kassis, Marc; Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Hirota, Tomoya

    2013-09-20

    We have observed a cluster forming clump (MM3) associated with the infrared dark cloud G34.43+00.24 in the 1.3 mm continuum and the CH{sub 3}OH, CS, {sup 13}CS, SiO, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CN, and HCOOCH{sub 3} lines with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array and in K-band with the Keck telescope. We have found a young outflow toward the center of this clump in the SiO, CS, and CH{sub 3}OH lines. This outflow is likely driven by a protostar embedded in a hot core, which is traced by the CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CN, HCOOCH{sub 3}, {sup 13}CS, and high excitation CH{sub 3}OH lines. The size of the hot core is about 800 × 300 AU in spite of its low mass (<1.1 M {sub ☉}), suggesting a high accretion rate or the presence of multiple star system harboring a few hot corinos. The outflow is highly collimated, and the dynamical timescale is estimated to be less than 740 yr. In addition, we have also detected extended emission of SiO, CS, and CH{sub 3}OH, which is not associated with the hot core and the outflow. This emission may be related to past star formation activity in the clump. Although G34.43+00.24 MM3 is surrounded by a dark feature in infrared, it has already experienced active formation of low-mass stars in an early stage of clump evolution.

  14. The luminosity of Population III star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSouza, Alexander L.; Basu, Shantanu

    2015-06-01

    We analyse the time evolution of the luminosity of a cluster of Population III protostars formed in the early Universe. We argue from the Jeans criterion that primordial gas can collapse to form a cluster of first stars that evolve relatively independently of one another (i.e. with negligible gravitational interaction). We model the collapse of individual protostellar clumps using non-axisymmetric numerical hydrodynamics simulations. Each collapse produces a protostar surrounded by a massive disc (i.e. Mdisc /M* ≳ 0.1), whose evolution we follow for a further 30-40 kyr. Gravitational instabilities result in the fragmentation and the formation of gravitationally bound clumps within the disc. The accretion of these fragments by the host protostar produces accretion and luminosity bursts on the order of 106 L⊙. Within the cluster, we show that a simultaneity of such events across several protostellar cluster members can elevate the cluster luminosity to 5-10 times greater than expected, and that the cluster spends ˜15 per cent of its star-forming history at these levels. This enhanced luminosity effect is particularly enabled in clusters of modest size with ≃10-20 members. In one such instance, we identify a confluence of burst events that raise the luminosity to nearly 1000 times greater than the cluster mean luminosity, resulting in L > 108 L⊙. This phenomenon arises solely through the gravitational-instability-driven episodic fragmentation and accretion that characterizes this early stage of protostellar evolution.

  15. Clump formation through colliding stellar winds in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón, D.; Ballone, A.; Cuadra, J.; Schartmann, M.; Burkert, A.; Gillessen, S.

    2016-02-01

    The gas cloud G2 is currently being tidally disrupted by the Galactic Centre supermassive black hole, Sgr A*. The region around the black hole is populated by ˜30 Wolf-Rayet stars, which produce strong outflows. We explore the possibility that gas clumps, such as G2, originate from the collision of stellar winds via the non-linear thin shell instability. Following an analytical approach, we study the thermal evolution of slabs formed in the symmetric collision of winds, evaluating whether instabilities occur, and estimating possible clump masses. We find that the collision of relatively slow (≲750 km s-1) and strong (˜10-5 M⊙ yr-1) stellar winds from stars at short separations (<10 mpc) is a process that indeed could produce clumps of G2's mass and above. Such short separation encounters of single stars along their known orbits are not common in the Galactic Centre, making this process a possible but unlikely origin for G2. We also discuss clump formation in close binaries such as IRS 16SW and in asymmetric encounters as promising alternatives that deserve further numerical study.

  16. Cluster and nebular properties of the central star-forming region of NGC 1140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, S. L.; Mengel, S.; de Grijs, R.; Smith, L. J.; Crowther, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    We present new high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) imaging of NGC 1140 and high spectral resolution Very Large Telescope/Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph spectroscopy of its central star-forming region. The central region contains several clusters, the two brightest of which are clusters 1 and 6 from Hunter, O'Connell & Gallagher, located within star-forming knots A and B, respectively. A nebular analysis indicates that the knots have a Large Magellanic Cloud-like metallicity of 12 + logO/H = 8.29 +/-0.09. According to continuum-subtracted Hα ACS imaging, cluster 1 dominates the nebular emission of the brighter knot A. Conversely, negligible nebular emission in knot B originates from cluster 6. Evolutionary synthesis modelling implies an age of 5 +/-1 Myr for cluster 1, from which a photometric mass of (1.1 +/-0.3) × 106Msolar is obtained. For this age and photometric mass, the modelling predicts the presence of ~5900 late O stars within cluster 1. Wolf-Rayet (WR) features are observed in knot A, suggesting 550 late-type nitrogen-rich (WNL) and 200 early-type carbon-rich (WCE) stars. Therefore, N(WR)/N(O) ~ 0.1, assuming that all the WR stars are located within cluster 1. The velocity dispersions of the clusters were measured from constituent red supergiants as σ ~ 23 +/-1kms-1 for cluster 1 and σ ~ 26 +/-1kms-1 for cluster 6. Combining σ with half-light radii of 8 +/- 2 and 6.0 +/-0.2 pc measured from the F625W ACS image implies virial masses of (10 +/-3) × 106 and (9.1 +/-0.8) × 106Msolar for clusters 1 and 6, respectively. The most likely reason for the difference between the dynamical and photometric masses of cluster 1 is that the velocity dispersion of knot A is not due solely to cluster 1, as assumed, but has an additional component associated with cluster 2. E-mail: s.moll@sheffield.ac.uk Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under programme ESO 71.B-0058(A

  17. Combinatorial effects on clumped isotopes and their significance in biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Laurence Y.

    2016-01-01

    The arrangement of isotopes within a collection of molecules records their physical and chemical histories. Clumped-isotope analysis interrogates these arrangements, i.e., how often rare isotopes are bound together, which in many cases can be explained by equilibrium and/or kinetic isotope fractionation. However, purely combinatorial effects, rooted in the statistics of pairing atoms in a closed system, are also relevant, and not well understood. Here, I show that combinatorial isotope effects are most important when two identical atoms are neighbors on the same molecule (e.g., O2, N2, and D-D clumping in CH4). When the two halves of an atom pair are either assembled with different isotopic preferences or drawn from different reservoirs, combinatorial effects cause depletions in clumped-isotope abundance that are most likely between zero and -1‰, although they could potentially be -10‰ or larger for D-D pairs. These depletions are of similar magnitude, but of opposite sign, to low-temperature equilibrium clumped-isotope effects for many small molecules. Enzymatic isotope-pairing reactions, which can have site-specific isotopic fractionation factors and atom reservoirs, should express this class of combinatorial isotope effect, although it is not limited to biological reactions. Chemical-kinetic isotope effects, which are related to a bond-forming transition state, arise independently and express second-order combinatorial effects related to the abundance of the rare isotope. Heteronuclear moeties (e.g., Csbnd O and Csbnd H), are insensitive to direct combinatorial influences, but secondary combinatorial influences are evident. In general, both combinatorial and chemical-kinetic factors are important for calculating and interpreting clumped-isotope signatures of kinetically controlled reactions. I apply this analytical framework to isotope-pairing reactions relevant to geochemical oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen cycling that may be influenced by combinatorial

  18. Disequilibrium in Clumped Isotopes Caused by Diagenesis in Tertiary Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, S.; Swart, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    This work examines the clumped isotopes and carbonate associated sulfate (CAS) within a system which is being altered from aragonite to calcite and being subjected to partial dolomitization within the marine realm. Samples were collected from Clino, a ≈670m long core which represents slope carbonates composed of varying percentages of aragonite, low-magnesium calcite (LMC), and dolomite. The concentrations of these endmembers differ dramatically over short distances and are associated with varying degrees of marine diagenesis. In the deeper water portion of the core, previous work has shown no evidence of exposure throughout nor is there any evidence for hydrothermal fluids existing in the Bahamas. Bulk samples were collected from the portions of the core in which dolomite was most prominent. Samples were treated and measured for CAS and for their clumped isotope value. They were then subjected to a series of buffered acetic acid leaches to remove the aragonite and LMC portion of the sample. There were up to three treatments per sample with the resulting sediment measured on XRD to determine its % dolomite composition. These treatments were then also measured for clumped isotopes. The δ34S of the sediments yielded values of up to 10‰ more positive than contemporaneous sweater and implicate bacterial sulfate reduction in the formation of these dolomites. Clumped isotope results of the separates allowed for the calculation of end-member formation temperatures for the LMC and dolomite, whilst using a mixing model to account for non-linearity in ∆47 between end-member combinations and varying ∆47-temperature equations. In contrast to other dolomites in the Bahamas proposed to have formed by massive flow of normal seawater, the Clino temperatures values were significantly elevated compared to the presumed equilibrium values. These data suggest that BSR may result in carbonates with clumped isotopic values significant elevated to equilibrium.

  19. A lower fragmentation mass scale in high-redshift galaxies and its implications on giant clumps: a systematic numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburello, Valentina; Mayer, Lucio; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

    2015-11-01

    We study the effect of sub-grid physics, galaxy mass, structural parameters and resolution on the fragmentation of gas-rich galaxy discs into massive star-forming clumps. The initial conditions are set up with the aid of the ARGO cosmological hydrodynamical simulation. Blast-wave feedback does not suppress fragmentation, but reduces both the number of clumps and the duration of the unstable phase. Once formed, bound clumps cannot be destroyed by our feedback model. Widespread fragmentation is promoted by high gas fractions and low halo concentrations. Yet giant clumps M > 108 M⊙ lasting several hundred Myr are rare and mainly produced by clump-clump mergers. They occur in massive discs with maximum rotational velocities Vmax > 250 km s-1 at z ˜ 2, at the high-mass end of the observed galaxy population at those redshifts. The typical gaseous and stellar masses of clumps in all runs are in the range ˜107-108 M⊙ for galaxies with disc mass in the range 1010-8 × 1010 M⊙. Clumps sizes are usually in the range 100-400 pc, in agreement with recent clump observations in lensed high-z galaxies. We argue that many of the giant clumps identified in observations are not due to in situ fragmentation, or are the result of blending of smaller structures owing to insufficient resolution. Using an analytical model describing local collapse inside spiral arms, we can predict the characteristic gaseous masses of clumps at the onset of fragmentation (˜3-5 × 107 M⊙) quite accurately, while the conventional Toomre mass overestimates them. Due to their moderate masses, clumps which migrate to the centre have marginal effect on bulge growth.

  20. Searching for star-forming dwarf galaxies in the Antlia cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaduvescu, O.; Kehrig, C.; Bassino, L. P.; Smith Castelli, A. V.; Calderón, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    Context. The formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in clusters need to be understood, and this requires large aperture telescopes. Aims: In this sense, we selected the Antlia cluster to continue our previous work in the Virgo, Fornax, and Hydra clusters and in the Local Volume (LV). Because of the scarce available literature data, we selected a small sample of five blue compact dwarf (BCD) candidates in Antlia for observation. Methods: Using the Gemini South and GMOS camera, we acquired the Hα imaging needed to detect star-forming regions in this sample. With the long-slit spectroscopic data of the brightest seven knots detected in three BCD candidates, we derived their basic chemical properties. Using archival VISTA VHS survey images, we derived KS magnitudes and surface brightness profile fits for the whole sample to assess basic physical properties. Results: FS90-98, FS90-106, and FS90-147 are confirmed as BCDs and cluster members, based on their morphology, KS surface photometry, oxygen abundance, and velocity redshift. FS90-155 and FS90-319 did not show any Hα emission, and they could not be confirmed as dwarf cluster star-forming galaxies. Based on our data, we studied some fundamental relations to compare star forming dwarfs (BCDs and dIs) in the LV and in the Virgo, Fornax, Hydra, and Antlia clusters. Conclusions: Star-forming dwarfs in nearby clusters appear to follow same fundamental relations in the near infrared with similar objects in the LV, specifically the size-luminosity and the metallicity-luminosity, while other more fundamental relations could not be checked in Antlia due to lack of data. Based on observations acquired at Gemini South (GS-2010A-Q-51 and GS-2012A-Q-59) and ESO VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS).

  1. Study for Planck Cold Clumps with molecular lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuefang

    2014-07-01

    To probe dynamical processes and physical properties of Planck Cold Clumps, we have observed 674 of the most reliable 915 sources with J=1-0 of CO,13CO and C18O using PMO 13.7 m telescope of Purple Mountain Observatory. J=1-0 lines of HCO+ and HCN at CO emission peaks were also observed, of which 24 were mapped with IRAM 30 m telescope. Results show excitation temperatures are from 4 to 17 K, and column densities range from 1020 to 4.5x1023 cm-2. Planck cold clumps have the smallest line width among samples of IRDCs, weak IRAS, EGOs, UC HII candidates and methanol maser chosen cores. However the lines are still wider than those of low-mass cores and have non-thermal supersonic dispersion. Filament is the majority in their morphologies and fragmented structures were found with dense molecular lines. More than 70% of CO cores are starless. Planck cold clumps seem to be ideal samples to search for candidates of massive prestellar cores and pre-clusters.

  2. Rotational support of giant clumps in high-z disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Dekel, Avishai; Mandelker, Nir; Bournaud, Frederic; Burkert, Andreas; Genzel, Reinhard; Primack, Joel

    2012-03-01

    We address the internal support against total free-fall collapse of the giant clumps that form by violent gravitational instability in high-z disc galaxies. Guidance is provided by an analytic model, where the protoclumps are cut from a rotating disc and collapse to equilibrium while preserving angular momentum. This model predicts prograde clump rotation, which dominates the support if the clump has contracted to a surface density contrast ≳10. This is confirmed in hydro adaptive mesh refinement zoom-in simulations of galaxies in a cosmological context. In most high-z clumps, the centrifugal force dominates the support, ?, where Vrot is the rotation velocity and the circular velocity Vcirc measures the potential well. The clump spin indeed tends to be in the sense of the global disc angular momentum, but substantial tilts are frequent, reflecting the highly warped nature of the high-z discs. Most clumps are in Jeans equilibrium, with the rest of the support provided by turbulence, partly driven by the gravitational instability itself. The general agreement between model and simulations indicates that angular momentum loss or gain in most clumps is limited to a factor of 2. Simulations of isolated gas-rich discs that resolve the clump substructure reveal that the cosmological simulations may overestimate ? by ˜30 per cent, but the dominance of rotational support at high z is not a resolution artefact. In turn, isolated gas-poor disc simulations produce at z= 0 smaller gaseous non-rotating transient clouds, indicating that the difference in rotational support is associated with the fraction of cold baryons in the disc. In our current cosmological simulations, the clump rotation velocity is typically more than twice the disc dispersion, Vrot˜ 100 km s-1, but when beam smearing of ≥0.1 arcsec is imposed, the rotation signal is reduced to a small gradient of ≤30 km s-1 kpc-1 across the clump. The velocity dispersion in the simulated clumps is comparable to the

  3. The structure and evolution of a forming galaxy cluster at z = 1.62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, N. A.; Muldrew, S. I.; Cooke, E. A.; Hartley, W. G.; Almaini, O.; Simpson, C. J.; Conselice, C. J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a comprehensive picture of the Cl 0218.3-0510 protocluster at z = 1.623 across 10 comoving Mpc. Using filters that tightly bracket the Balmer and 4000 Å breaks of the protocluster galaxies we obtain precise photometric redshifts resulting in a protocluster galaxy sample that is 89 ± 5 per cent complete and has a contamination of only 12 ± 5 per cent. Both star-forming and quiescent protocluster galaxies are located, which allows us to map the structure of the forming cluster for the first time. The protocluster contains six galaxy groups, the largest of which is the nascent cluster. Only a small minority of the protocluster galaxies are in the nascent cluster (11 per cent) or in the other galaxy groups (22 per cent), as most protocluster galaxies reside between the groups. Unobscured star-forming galaxies predominantly reside between the protocluster's groups, whereas red galaxies make up a large fraction of the groups' galactic content, so observing the protocluster through only one of these types of galaxies results in a biased view of the protocluster's structure. The structure of the protocluster reveals how much mass is available for the future growth of the cluster and we use the Millennium Simulation, scaled to a Planck cosmology, to predict that Cl 0218.3-0510 will evolve into a 2.7^{+3.9}_{-1.7}× 10^{14} M_{{⊙}} cluster by the present day.

  4. The star-forming history of the young cluster NGC 2264

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. T.; Strom, K. M.; Strom, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    UBVRI H-alpha photographic photometry was obtained for a sample of low-mass stars in the young open cluster NGC 2264 in order to investigate the star-forming history of this region. A theoretical H-R diagram was constructed for the sample of probable cluster members. Isochrones and evolutionary tracks were adopted from Cohen and Kuhi (1979). Evidence for a significant age spread in the cluster was found amounting to over ten million yr. In addition, the derived star formation rate as a function of stellar mass suggests that the principal star-forming mass range in NGC 2264 has proceeded sequentially in time from the lowest to the highest masses. The low-mass cluster stars were the first cluster members to form in significant numbers, although their present birth rate is much lower now than it was about ten million yr ago. The star-formation rate has risen to a peak at successively higher masses and then declined.

  5. A lower fragmentation mass scale for clumps in high redshift galaxies: a systematic numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburello, Valentina; Mayer, Lucio; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

    2015-08-01

    We perform a systematic study of the effect of sub-grid physics, resolution and structural parameters on the fragmentation of gas-rich galaxy discs into massive star forming clumps due to gravitational instability. We use the state-of-the-art zoom-in cosmological hydrodynamical simulation ARGO (Fiacconi et al. 2015) to set up the initial conditions of our models, and then carry out 26 high resolution controlled simulations of high-z galaxies using the GASOLINE2 code, which includes a modern, numerically robust SPH implementation.We find that when blast-wave feedback is included, the formation of long-lived, gravitationally bound clumps requires disc gas fractions of at least 50% and massive discs, which should have Vmax > 200 km/s at z ˜ 2, more massive than the typical galaxies expected at those redshifts.Less than 50 Myr after formation, clumps have stellar masses in the range 4 × 106 - 5 × 107 M⊙.Formation of clumps with mass exceeding ˜108 M⊙ is a rare occurrence, since it requires mergers between multiple massive clumps, as we verified by tracing back in time the particles belonging to such clumps. Such mergers happen after a few orbital times (˜200-300 Myr), but normally clumps migrate inward and are tidally disrupted on shorter timescales.Clump sizes are in the range 100-500 pc. We argue that giant clumps identified in observations (˜109 M⊙ and 1 kpc in size) might either have a different origin, such as minor mergers and clumpy gas accretion, or their sizes and masses may be overestimated due to resolution issues.Using an analytical model, already developed to explain the fragmentation scale in gravitationally unstable 3D protoplanetary discs, we can predict fairly accurately the characteristic gaseous masses of clumps soon after fragmentation, when standard Toome analysis becomes invalid.Due to their modest size, clumps have little effect on bulge growth as they migrate to the center. In our unstable discs a small bulge can form irrespective of

  6. ATLASGAL - properties of compact H II regions and their natal clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, J. S.; Thompson, M. A.; Moore, T. J. T.; Purcell, C. R.; Hoare, M. G.; Schuller, F.; Wyrowski, F.; Csengeri, T.; Menten, K. M.; Lumsden, S. L.; Kurtz, S.; Walmsley, C. M.; Bronfman, L.; Morgan, L. K.; Eden, D. J.; Russeil, D.

    2013-10-01

    We present a complete sample of molecular clumps containing compact and ultracompact H II (UC H II) regions between ℓ = 10° and 60° and |b| < 1°, identified by combining the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy submm and CORNISH radio continuum surveys with visual examination of archival infrared data. Our sample is complete to optically thin, compact and UC H II regions driven by a zero-age main-sequence star of spectral type B0 or earlier embedded within a 1000 M⊙ clump. In total we identify 213 compact and UC H II regions, associated with 170 clumps. Unambiguous kinematic distances are derived for these clumps and used to estimate their masses and physical sizes, as well as the Lyman continuum fluxes and sizes of their embedded H II regions. We find a clear lower envelope for the surface density of molecular clumps hosting massive star formation of 0.05 g cm-2, which is consistent with a similar sample of clumps associated with 6.7 GHz masers. The mass of the most massive embedded stars is closely correlated with the mass of their natal clump. Young B stars appear to be significantly more luminous in the ultraviolet than predicted by current stellar atmosphere models. The properties of clumps associated with compact and UC H II regions are very similar to those associated with 6.7 GHz methanol masers and we speculate that there is little evolution in the structure of the molecular clumps between these two phases. Finally, we identify a significant peak in the surface density of compact and UC H II-regions associated with the W49A star-forming complex, noting that this complex is truly one of the most massive and intense regions of star formation in the Galaxy.

  7. Recombination clumping factor during cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. E-mail: gnedin@fnal.gov

    2014-06-01

    We discuss the role of recombinations in the intergalactic medium, and the related concept of the clumping factor, during cosmic reionization. The clumping factor is, in general, a local quantity that depends on both the local overdensity and the scale below which the baryon density field can be assumed smooth. That scale, called the filtering scale, depends on over-density and local thermal history. We present a method for building a self-consistent analytical model of inhomogeneous reionization, assuming the linear growth rate of the density fluctuation, which simultaneously accounts for these effects. We show that taking into account the local clumping factor introduces significant corrections to the total recombination rate, compared to the model with a globally uniform clumping factor.

  8. Doubly charged CO2 clusters formed by ionization of doped helium nanodroplets☆

    PubMed Central

    Daxner, Matthias; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2014-01-01

    Helium nanodroplets are doped with carbon dioxide and ionized by electrons. Doubly charged cluster ions are, for the first time, identified based on their characteristic patterns of isotopologues. Thanks to the high mass resolution, large dynamic range, and a novel method to eliminate contributions from singly charged ions from the mass spectra, we are able to observe doubly charged cluster ions that are smaller than the ones reported in the past. The likely mechanism by which doubly charged ions are formed in doped helium droplets is discussed. PMID:25844051

  9. Clustered quantum dots in single GaN islands formed at threading dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gordon; Veit, Peter; Berger, Christoph; Bertram, Frank; Dadgar, Armin; Strittmatter, André; Christen, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    We give direct evidence of distinct quantum dot states clustered but also spatially separated in single GaN islands. Resulting from GaN layer growth on top of AlN, the islands are predominantly formed in close vicinity to threading dislocation bundles. Detailed analysis of the inner optical and structural properties, performed by nanoscale cathodoluminescence, reveals various sharp quantum dot emission lines from different regions in an otherwise continuous island. Thickness fluctuations found within these islands are made responsible for the clustering of quantum dot states.

  10. The rate and latency of star formation in dense, massive clumps in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, M.; Gutermuth, R.; Urquhart, J. S.; Csengeri, T.; Wienen, M.; Leurini, S.; Menten, K.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Newborn stars form within the localized, high density regions of molecular clouds. The sequence and rate at which stars form in dense clumps and the dependence on local and global environments are key factors in developing descriptions of stellar production in galaxies. Aims: We seek to observationally constrain the rate and latency of star formation in dense massive clumps that are distributed throughout the Galaxy and to compare these results to proposed prescriptions for stellar production. Methods: A sample of 24 μm-based Class I protostars are linked to dust clumps that are embedded within molecular clouds selected from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy. We determine the fraction of star-forming clumps, f∗, that imposes a constraint on the latency of star formation in units of a clump's lifetime. Protostellar masses are estimated from models of circumstellar environments of young stellar objects from which star formation rates are derived. Physical properties of the clumps are calculated from 870 μm dust continuum emission and NH3 line emission. Results: Linear correlations are identified between the star formation rate surface density, ΣSFR, and the quantities ΣH2/τff and ΣH2/τcross, suggesting that star formation is regulated at the local scales of molecular clouds. The measured fraction of star forming clumps is 23%. Accounting for star formation within clumps that are excluded from our sample due to 24 μm saturation, this fraction can be as high as 31%, which is similar to previous results. Dense, massive clumps form primarily low mass (<1-2 M⊙) stars with emergent 24 μm fluxes below our sensitivity limit or are incapable of forming any stars for the initial 70% of their lifetimes. The low fraction of star forming clumps in the Galactic center relative to those located in the disk of the Milky Way is verified. Full Tables 2-4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130

  11. GAS RESERVOIRS AND STAR FORMATION IN A FORMING GALAXY CLUSTER AT zbsime0.2

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, Yara L.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Deshev, Boris Z.; Van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.

    2012-09-10

    We present first results from the Blind Ultra-Deep H I Environmental Survey of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Our survey is the first direct imaging study of neutral atomic hydrogen gas in galaxies at a redshift where evolutionary processes begin to show. In this Letter we investigate star formation, H I content, and galaxy morphology, as a function of environment in Abell 2192 (at z = 0.1876). Using a three-dimensional visualization technique, we find that Abell 2192 is a cluster in the process of forming, with significant substructure in it. We distinguish four structures that are separated in redshift and/or space. The richest structure is the baby cluster itself, with a core of elliptical galaxies that coincides with (weak) X-ray emission, almost no H I detections, and suppressed star formation. Surrounding the cluster, we find a compact group where galaxies pre-process before falling into the cluster, and a scattered population of 'field-like' galaxies showing more star formation and H I detections. This cluster proves to be an excellent laboratory to understand the fate of the H I gas in the framework of galaxy evolution. We clearly see that the H I gas and the star formation correlate with morphology and environment at z {approx} 0.2. In particular, the fraction of H I detections is significantly affected by the environment. The effect starts to kick in in low-mass groups that pre-process the galaxies before they enter the cluster. Our results suggest that by the time the group galaxies fall into the cluster, they are already devoid of H I.

  12. A Clumped Isotope Calibration for Lacustrine Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsunaga, B. A.; Mering, J. A.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Dunbar, R. B.; Cohen, A. S.; Liu, X.; Kaufman, D. S.; Eagle, R.; Tripati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our capacity to understand Earth's environmental history is highly dependent on the accuracy of past climate reconstructions. Unfortunately, many terrestrial proxies—tree rings, speleothems, leaf margin analyses, etc.—are influenced by the effects of both temperature and precipitation. Methods that can isolate the effects of temperature alone are needed, and clumped isotope thermometry has the potential to be a useful tool for determining terrestrial climates. Multiple studies have shown that the fraction of 13C—18O bonds in carbonates is inversely related to the temperature at which the rocks formed and may be a useful proxy for reconstructing temperatures on land. An in-depth survey of lacustrine carbonates, however, has not yet been published. Therefore we have been measuring the abundance of 13C18O16O in the CO2 produced by the dissolution of modern lake samples' carbonate minerals in phosphoric acid and comparing results to independently known estimates of lake water temperature and air temperature. Some of the sample types we have investigated include endogenic carbonates, freshwater gastropods, bivalves, microbialites, and ooids.

  13. Thermodynamic stability and structural properties of cluster crystals formed by amphiphilic dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Dominic A.; Mladek, Bianca M.; Likos, Christos N.; Blaak, Ronald

    2016-05-01

    We pursue the goal of finding real-world examples of macromolecular aggregates that form cluster crystals, which have been predicted on the basis of coarse-grained, ultrasoft pair potentials belonging to a particular mathematical class [B. M. Mladek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 46, 045701 (2006)]. For this purpose, we examine in detail the phase behavior and structural properties of model amphiphilic dendrimers of the second generation by means of monomer-resolved computer simulations. On augmenting the density of these systems, a fluid comprised of clusters that contain several overlapping and penetrating macromolecules is spontaneously formed. Upon further compression of the system, a transition to multi-occupancy crystals takes place, the thermodynamic stability of which is demonstrated by means of free-energy calculations, and where the FCC is preferred over the BCC-phase. Contrary to predictions for coarse-grained theoretical models in which the particles interact exclusively by effective pair potentials, the internal degrees of freedom of these molecules cause the lattice constant to be density-dependent. Furthermore, the mechanical stability of monodisperse BCC and FCC cluster crystals is restricted to a bounded region in the plane of cluster occupation number versus density. The structural properties of the dendrimers in the dense crystals, including their overall sizes and the distribution of monomers are also thoroughly analyzed.

  14. Thermodynamic stability and structural properties of cluster crystals formed by amphiphilic dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Dominic A; Mladek, Bianca M; Likos, Christos N; Blaak, Ronald

    2016-05-28

    We pursue the goal of finding real-world examples of macromolecular aggregates that form cluster crystals, which have been predicted on the basis of coarse-grained, ultrasoft pair potentials belonging to a particular mathematical class [B. M. Mladek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 46, 045701 (2006)]. For this purpose, we examine in detail the phase behavior and structural properties of model amphiphilic dendrimers of the second generation by means of monomer-resolved computer simulations. On augmenting the density of these systems, a fluid comprised of clusters that contain several overlapping and penetrating macromolecules is spontaneously formed. Upon further compression of the system, a transition to multi-occupancy crystals takes place, the thermodynamic stability of which is demonstrated by means of free-energy calculations, and where the FCC is preferred over the BCC-phase. Contrary to predictions for coarse-grained theoretical models in which the particles interact exclusively by effective pair potentials, the internal degrees of freedom of these molecules cause the lattice constant to be density-dependent. Furthermore, the mechanical stability of monodisperse BCC and FCC cluster crystals is restricted to a bounded region in the plane of cluster occupation number versus density. The structural properties of the dendrimers in the dense crystals, including their overall sizes and the distribution of monomers are also thoroughly analyzed. PMID:27250325

  15. Cluster form factor calculation in the ab initio no-core shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, Petr

    2004-11-01

    We derive expressions for cluster overlap integrals or channel cluster form factors for ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) wave functions. These are used to obtain the spectroscopic factors and can serve as a starting point for the description of low-energy nuclear reactions. We consider the composite system and the target nucleus to be described in the Slater determinant (SD) harmonic oscillator (HO) basis while the projectile eigenstate to be expanded in the Jacobi coordinate HO basis. This is the most practical case. The spurious center of mass components present in the SD bases are removed exactly. The calculated cluster overlap integrals are translationally invariant. As an illustration, we present results of cluster form factor calculations for <{sup 5}He vertical bar{sup 4}He+n>, <{sup 5}He vertical bar{sup 3}H+d>, <{sup 6}Li vertical bar{sup 4}He+d>, <{sup 6}Be vertical bar{sup 3}He+{sup 3}He>, <{sup 7}Li vertical bar{sup 4}He+{sup 3}H>, <{sup 7}Li vertical bar{sup 6}Li+n>, <{sup 8}Be vertical bar{sup 6}Li+d>, <{sup 8}Be vertical bar{sup 7}Li+p>, <{sup 9}Li vertical bar{sup 8}Li+n>, and <{sup 13}C vertical bar{sup 12}C+n>, with all the nuclei described by multi-({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} NCSM wave functions.

  16. The Clumped Isotope Composition of Biogenic Methane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, A. L.; Douglas, P. M.; Eiler, J. M.; Stolper, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The excess or lack of 13CH3D, a doubly substituted ("clumped") isotopologue of methane, relative to that expected for a random distribution of isotopes across molecules, is a function of the processes that generated the methane. For high-temperature thermogenic methane, which typically achieves internal equilibrium, an excess of 13CH3D is expected and the amount of excess can serve as a thermometer. In contrast, biogenic methane often - though not always - has a smaller excess of clumped isotopologues, and sometimes even a deficit of clumped species ("anti-clumped"). The effect presumably arises from kinetic isotope effects accompanying enzymatic reactions in the methanogenic pathway, though the particular reaction(s) has not yet been positively identified. The decrease in clumping is also known to correlate with both the reversibility of the pathway and the methane flux. In this talk, we will present recent data bearing on the origin and utility of biologic fractionations of clumped isotopologues in methane. Preliminary data suggest that methane deriving from the fermentative pathway is enriched in D-bearing isotopologues, at the same level of clumping, relative to that derived from the CO2-reductive pathway. This property offers another potential means to distinguish biogenic methane sources in the environment. Recently, we have also begun to measure the 12CH2D2 isotopologue, for which equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects are predicted to be distinct from 13CH3D. Preliminary data suggest that the combination of both doubly-substituted isotopologues will be especially useful for disentangling mixtures containing biogenic gas.

  17. The G305 star-forming complex: the central star clusters Danks 1 and Danks 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ben; Clark, J. S.; Trombley, Christine; Figer, Donald F.; Najarro, Francisco; Crowther, Paul A.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Thompson, Mark; Urquhart, James S.; Hindson, Luke

    2012-01-01

    The G305 H II complex (G305.4+0.1) is one of the most massive star-forming structures yet identified within the Galaxy. It is host to many massive stars at all stages of formation and evolution, from embedded molecular cores to post-main-sequence stars. Here, we present a detailed near-infrared analysis of the two central star clusters Danks 1 and Danks 2, using Hubble Space Telescope+NICMOS imaging and Very Large Telescope+ISAAC spectroscopy. We find that the spectrophotometric distance to the clusters is consistent with the kinematic distance to the G305 complex, an average of all measurements giving a distance of 3.8 ± 0.6 kpc. From analysis of the stellar populations and the pre-main-sequence stars, we find that Danks 2 is the elder of the two clusters, with an age of 3+3- 1 Myr. Danks 1 is clearly younger with an age of 1.5+1.5- 0.5 Myr, and is dominated by three very luminous H-rich Wolf-Rayet stars which may have masses ≳100 M⊙. The two clusters have mass functions consistent with the Salpeter slope, and total cluster masses of 8000 ± 1500 and 3000 ± 800 M⊙ for Danks 1 and Danks 2, respectively. Danks 1 is significantly the more compact cluster of the two, and is one of the densest clusters in the Galaxy with log (ρ/M⊙ pc-3) = 5.5+0.5- 0.4. In addition to the clusters, there is a population of apparently isolated Wolf-Rayet stars within the molecular cloud's cavity. Our results suggest that the star-forming history of G305 began with the formation of Danks 2, and subsequently Danks 1, with the origin of the diffuse evolved population currently uncertain. Together, the massive stars at the centre of the G305 region appear to be clearing away what is left of the natal cloud, triggering a further generation of star formation at the cloud's periphery.

  18. Defect clusters formed from large collision cascades in fcc metals irradiated with spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Yoshiie, T.; Kawai, M.; Matsumura, H.; Iwase, H.; Abe, H.; Kim, S. W.; Matsunaga, T.

    2013-11-01

    Fcc pure metals were irradiated with spallation neutrons (energies up to 500 MeV) at room temperature to a neutron fluence of 1 × 1018 n m-2 at KENS, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). Defect clusters induced by large collision cascades were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In Au, large groups of defects included more than 10 clusters, and the damage zone extended over 50 nm, which was larger than that induced by fusion neutron irradiation (<20 nm). Although small stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) are formed in subcascades by fission and fusion neutron irradiation, dislocation loops were also observed in the present experiments. Large dislocation loops (>10 nm) were identified as vacancy type by the conventional inside-outside contrast method. Because of the low neutron fluence, spatial overlapping of collision cascades was ignored. Large vacancy loops are formed through cooperative reactions among subcascades in a single collision cascade with large recoil energy.

  19. Clustered streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles, Mars: Evidence for sediment deposition during floodwater ponding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burr, D.

    2005-01-01

    A unique clustering of layered streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles is hypothesized to reflect a significant hydraulic event. The forms, interpreted as sedimentary, are attributed to extensive sediment deposition during ponding and then streamlining of this sediment behind flow obstacles during ponded water outflow. These streamlined forms are analogous to those found in depositional basins and other loci of ponding in terrestrial catastrophic flood landscapes. These terrestrial streamlined forms can provide the best opportunity for reconstructing the history of the terrestrial flooding. Likewise, the streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles may provide the best opportunity to reconstruct the recent geologic history of this young Martian outflow channel. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Photothermolysis by laser-induced microbubbles generated around gold nanorod clusters selectively formed in leukemia cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina; Zhdanok, Sergei; Rostro, Betty; Simonette, Rebecca; Hafner, Jason; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael; Conjusteau, Andre; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    In an effort of developing clinical LANTCET (laser-activated nano-thermolysis as cell elimination technology) we achieved selective destruction of individual tumor cells through laser generation of vapor microbubbles around clusters of light absorbing gold nanorods (GNR) selectively formed in target tumor cells. Among all gold nanoparticles, nanorods offer the highest optical absorption in the near-infrared. We applied covalent conjugates of gold nanorods with targeting vectors such as monoclonal antibodies CD33 (specific for Acute Myeloid Leukemia), while GNR conjugates with polyethylene-glycol (PEG) were used as nonspecific targeting control. GNR clusters were formed inside the tumor cells at 37 °C due to endocytosis of large concentration of nanorods accumulated on the surface of tumor cells targeted at 4 °C. Formation of GNR clusters significantly reduces the threshold of tumor cell damage making LANTCET safe for normal cells. Appearance of GNR clusters was verified directly with optical resonance scattering microscopy. LANTCET was performed in vitro with living cells of (1) model myeloid K562 cells (CD33 positive), (2) primary human bone marrow CD33-positive blast cells from patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. Laser-induced microbubbles were generated and detected with a photothermal microscope equipped with a tunable Ti-Sa pulsed laser. GNT cluster formation caused a 100-fold decrease in the threshold optical fluence for laser microbubble generation in tumor cells compared with that in normal cells under the same targeting and irradiation conditions. Combining imaging based on resonance optical scattering with photothermal imaging of microbubbles, we developed a method for detection, image-guided treatment and monitoring of LANTCET. Pilot experiments were performed in flow mode bringing LANTCET closer to reality of clinical procedure of purging tumor cells from bone marrow grafts.

  1. The role of low-mass star clusters in forming the massive stars in DR 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Sanz-Forcada, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the young low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stellar population associated with the massive star-forming region DR 21 by using archival X-ray Chandra observations and by complementing them with existing optical and infrared (IR) surveys. The Chandra observations have revealed for the first time a new highly extincted population of PMS low-mass stars previously missed in observations at other wavelengths. The X-ray population exhibits three main stellar density peaks, coincident with the massive star-forming regions, being the DR 21 core the main peak. The cross-correlated X-ray/IR sample exhibits a radial `Spokes-like' stellar filamentary structure that extends from the DR 21 core towards the northeast. The near-IR data reveal a centrally peaked structure for the extinction, which exhibits its maximum in the DR 21 core and gradually decreases with the distance to the N-S cloud axis and to the cluster centre. We find evidence of a global mass segregation in the full low-mass stellar cluster, and of a stellar age segregation, with the youngest stars still embedded in the N-S cloud, and more evolved stars more spatially distributed. The results are consistent with the scenario where an elongated overall potential well created by the full low-mass stellar cluster funnels gas through filaments feeding stellar formation. Besides the full gravitational well, smaller scale local potential wells created by dense stellar sub-clusters of low-mass stars are privileged in the competition for the gas of the common reservoir, allowing the formation of massive stars. We also discuss the possibility that a stellar collision in the very dense stellar cluster revealed by Chandra in the DR 21 core is the origin of the large-scale and highly energetic outflow arising from this region.

  2. Formation of phase space holes and clumps.

    PubMed

    Lilley, M K; Nyqvist, R M

    2014-04-18

    It is shown that the formation of phase space holes and clumps in kinetically driven, dissipative systems is not restricted to the near threshold regime, as previously reported and widely believed. Specifically, we observe hole-clump generation from the edges of an unmodulated phase space plateau, created via excitation, phase mixing and subsequent dissipative decay of a linearly unstable bulk plasma mode in the electrostatic bump-on-tail model. This has now allowed us to elucidate the underlying physics of the hole-clump formation process for the first time. Holes and clumps develop from negative energy waves that arise due to the sharp gradients at the interface between the plateau and the nearly unperturbed, ambient distribution and destabilize in the presence of dissipation in the bulk plasma. We confirm this picture by demonstrating that the formation of such nonlinear structures in general does not rely on a "seed" wave, only on the ability of the system to generate a plateau. In addition, we observe repetitive cycles of plateau generation and erosion, the latter due to hole-clump formation and detachment, which appear to be insensitive to initial conditions and can persist for a long time. We present an intuitive discussion of why this continual regeneration occurs. PMID:24785043

  3. Pollen clumping and wind dispersal in an invasive angiosperm.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michael D; Chamecki, Marcelo; Brush, Grace S; Meneveau, Charles; Parlange, Marc B

    2009-09-01

    Pollen dispersal is a fundamental aspect of plant reproductive biology that maintains connectivity between spatially separated populations. Pollen clumping, a characteristic feature of insect-pollinated plants, is generally assumed to be a detriment to wind pollination because clumps disperse shorter distances than do solitary pollen grains. Yet pollen clumps have been observed in dispersion studies of some widely distributed wind-pollinated species. We used Ambrosia artemisiifolia (common ragweed; Asteraceae), a successful invasive angiosperm, to investigate the effect of clumping on wind dispersal of pollen under natural conditions in a large field. Results of simultaneous measurements of clump size both in pollen shedding from male flowers and airborne pollen being dispersed in the atmosphere are combined with a transport model to show that rather than being detrimental, clumps may actually be advantageous for wind pollination. Initial clumps can pollinate the parent population, while smaller clumps that arise from breakup of larger clumps can cross-pollinate distant populations. PMID:21622356

  4. Local-density-driven clustered star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, G.; Pfalzner, S.

    2013-01-01

    Context. A positive power-law trend between the local surface densities of molecular gas, Σgas, and young stellar objects, Σ ⋆ , in molecular clouds of the solar neighbourhood has recently been identified. How it relates to the properties of embedded clusters, in particular to the recently established radius-density relation, has so far not been investigated. Aims: We model the development of the stellar component of molecular clumps as a function of time and initial local volume density. Our study provides a coherent framework able to explain both the molecular-cloud and embedded-cluster relations quoted above. Methods: We associate the observed volume density gradient of molecular clumps to a density-dependent free-fall time. The molecular clump star formation history is obtained by applying a constant star formation efficiency per free-fall time, ɛff. Results: For the volume density profiles typical of observed molecular clumps (i.e. power-law slope ≃ -1.7), our model gives a star-gas surface-density relation of the form Σ⋆ ∝ Σgas2, which agrees very well with the observations. Taking the case of a molecular clump of mass M0 ≃ 104 M⊙ and radius R ≃ 6 pc experiencing star formation during 2 Myr, we derive what star formation efficiency per free-fall time matches the normalizations of the observed and predicted (Σ ⋆ , Σgas) relations best. We find ɛff ≃ 0.1. We show that the observed growth of embedded clusters, embodied by their radius-density relation, corresponds to a surface density threshold being applied to developing star-forming regions. The consequences of our model in terms of cluster survivability after residual star-forming gas expulsion are that, owing to the locally high star formation efficiency in the inner part of star-forming regions, global star formation efficiency as low as 10% can lead to the formation of bound gas-free star clusters.

  5. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    SciTech Connect

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-09-25

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacteriumAzospirillum brasilensenavigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motileA. brasilensecells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Finally, cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilicA. brasilensecells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.

  6. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-09-25

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacteriumAzospirillum brasilensenavigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motileA. brasilensecells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities,more » we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Finally, cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilicA. brasilensecells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.« less

  7. Physical and Chemical Properties of Protocluster Clumps and Massive Young Stellar Objects Associated to Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Gonzalez, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The study of high-mass stars is important not only because of the effects they produce in their environment through outflows, expanding HII regions, stellar winds, and eventually supernova shock waves, but also because they play a crucial role in estimating star formation rates in other galaxies. Although we have an accepted evolutionary scenario that explains (isolated) low-mass star formation, the processes that produce massive stars (M_star > 8 M_sol) and star clusters, especially their earliest stages, are not well understood. The newly discovered class of interstellar clouds now termed infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) represent excellent laboratories to study the earliest stages of high-mass star formation given that some of the clumps within them are known to have high masses (~100's M_sol), high densities (n > 10^5 cm^-3), and low temperatures (10-20K) as expected for the birthplaces of high-mass stars. Some questions remain unanswered: Do IRDCs harbor the very early stages of high-mass star formation, i.e., the pre-protocluster phase? If so, how do they compare with low-mass star formation sites? Is there chemical differentiation in IRDC clumps? What is the mass distribution of IRDCs? In this dissertation and for the first time, a catalog of 12529 IRDC candidates at 24 um has been created using archival data from the MIPSGAL/Spitzer survey, as a first step in searching for the massive pre-protocluster clumps. From this catalog, a sample of ~60 clumps has been selected in order to perform single-pointing observations with the IRAM 30m, Effelsberg 100m, and APEX 12m telescopes. One IRDC clump seems to be a promising candidate for being in the pre-protocluster phase. In addition, molecular line mapping observations have been performed on three clumps within IRDCs and a detailed chemical study of 10 molecular lines has been carried out. A larger difference in column densities and abundances has been found between these clumps and high-m! ass protostellar objects

  8. MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE ISOLATED MASSIVE DENSE CLUMP IRAS 20126+4104

    SciTech Connect

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Phillips, Thomas G.; Novak, Giles; Vaillancourt, John E.; Machida, Masahiro N.; Kataoka, Akimasa; Tomisaka, Kohji; Davidson, Jacqueline; Houde, Martin; Dowell, C. Darren; Leeuw, Lerothodi

    2012-05-10

    We measured polarized dust emission at 350 {mu}m toward the high-mass star-forming massive dense clump IRAS 20126+4104 using the SHARC II Polarimeter, SHARP, at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Most of the observed magnetic field vectors agree well with magnetic field vectors obtained from a numerical simulation for the case when the global magnetic field lines are inclined with respect to the rotation axis of the dense clump. The results of the numerical simulation show that rotation plays an important role on the evolution of the massive dense clump and its magnetic field. The direction of the cold CO 1-0 bipolar outflow is parallel to the observed magnetic field within the dense clump as well as the global magnetic field, as inferred from optical polarimetry data, indicating that the magnetic field also plays a critical role in an early stage of massive star formation. The large-scale Keplerian disk of the massive (proto)star rotates in an almost opposite sense to the clump's envelope. The observed magnetic field morphology and the counterrotating feature of the massive dense clump system provide hints to constrain the role of magnetic fields in the process of high-mass star formation.

  9. Slow formation of [3Fe-4S](1+) clusters in mutant forms of Desulfovibrio africanus ferredoxin III.

    PubMed

    Hannan, J P; Busch, J L; James, R; Thomson, A J; Moore, G R; Davy, S L

    2000-02-25

    Desulfovibrio africanus ferredoxin III (Da FdIII) readily interconverts between a 7Fe and an 8Fe form with Asp-14 believed to provide a cluster ligand in the latter form. To investigate the factors important for cluster interconversion in Fe/S cluster-containing proteins we have studied two variants of Da FdIII produced by site-directed mutagenesis, Asp14Glu and Asp14His, with cluster incorporation performed in vitro. Characterisation of these proteins by UV/visible, EPR and (1)H NMR spectroscopies revealed that the formation of the stable 7Fe form of these proteins takes some time to occur. Evidence is presented which indicates the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster is incorporated prior to the [3Fe-4S](1+) cluster. PMID:10692579

  10. SELF-CONVERGENCE OF RADIATIVELY COOLING CLUMPS IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Yirak, Kristopher; Frank, Adam; Cunningham, Andrew J.

    2010-10-10

    Isolated regions of higher density populate the interstellar medium (ISM) on all scales-from molecular clouds, to the star-forming regions known as cores, to heterogeneous ejecta found near planetary nebulae and supernova remnants. These clumps interact with winds and shocks from nearby energetic sources. Understanding the interactions of shocked clumps is vital to our understanding of the composition, morphology, and evolution of the ISM. The evolution of shocked clumps is well understood in the limiting 'adiabatic' case where physical processes such as self-gravity, heat conduction, radiative cooling, and magnetic fields are ignored. In this paper, we address the issue of evolution and convergence when one of these processes-radiative cooling-is included. Numeric convergence studies demonstrate that the evolution of an adiabatic clump is well captured by roughly 100 cells per clump radius. The presence of radiative cooling, however, imposes limits on the problem due to the removal of thermal energy. Numerical studies which include radiative cooling typically adopt the 100-200 cells per clump radius resolution. In this paper, we present the results of a convergence study for radiatively cooling clumps undertaken over a broad range of resolutions, from 12 to 1536 cells per clump radius, employing adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in a two-dimensional axisymmetric geometry (2.5 dimensions). We also provide a fully three-dimensional simulation, at 192 cells per clump radius, which supports our 2.5 dimensional results. We find no appreciable self-convergence at {approx}100 cells per clump radius as small-scale differences owing to increasingly resolving the cooling length have global effects. We therefore conclude that self-convergence is an insufficient criterion to apply on its own when addressing the question of sufficient resolution for radiatively cooled shocked clump simulations. We suggest the adoption of alternate criteria to support a statement of sufficient

  11. THE CLUSTERING AND HALO MASSES OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z < 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dolley, Tim; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Palamara, David P.; Beare, Richard; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Brodwin, Mark; Kochanek, C. S.; Dey, Arjun; Atlee, David W.

    2014-12-20

    We present clustering measurements and halo masses of star-forming galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. After excluding active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we construct a sample of 22,553 24 μm sources selected from 8.42 deg{sup 2} of the Spitzer MIPS AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey of Boötes. Mid-infrared imaging allows us to observe galaxies with the highest star formation rates (SFRs), less biased by dust obscuration afflicting the optical bands. We find that the galaxies with the highest SFRs have optical colors that are redder than typical blue cloud galaxies, with many residing within the green valley. At z > 0.4 our sample is dominated by luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L {sub TIR} > 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}) and is composed entirely of LIRGs and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs, L {sub TIR} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}) at z > 0.6. We observe weak clustering of r {sub 0} ≈ 3-6 h {sup –1} Mpc for almost all of our star-forming samples. We find that the clustering and halo mass depend on L {sub TIR} at all redshifts, where galaxies with higher L {sub TIR} (hence higher SFRs) have stronger clustering. Galaxies with the highest SFRs at each redshift typically reside within dark matter halos of M {sub halo} ≈ 10{sup 12.9} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}. This is consistent with a transitional halo mass, above which star formation is largely truncated, although we cannot exclude that ULIRGs reside within higher mass halos. By modeling the clustering evolution of halos, we connect our star-forming galaxy samples to their local descendants. Most star-forming galaxies at z < 1.0 are the progenitors of L ≲ 2.5 L {sub *} blue galaxies in the local universe, but star-forming galaxies with the highest SFRs (L {sub TIR} ≳ 10{sup 11.7} L {sub ☉}) at 0.6 < z < 1.0 are the progenitors of early-type galaxies in denser group environments.

  12. The initial mass function of star clusters that form in turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M. S.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2015-05-01

    We simulate the formation and evolution of young star clusters using the combination of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations and direct N-body simulations. We start by performing SPH simulations of the giant molecular cloud (GMC) with a turbulent velocity field, a mass of 4 × 104 to 5 × 106 M⊙, and a density between ρ ˜ 1.7 × 103 and 170 cm-3. We continue the hydrodynamical simulations for a free-fall time-scale (tff ≃ 0.83 and 2.5 Myr), and analyse the resulting structure of the collapsed cloud. We subsequently replace a density-selected subset of SPH particles with stars by adopting a local star formation efficiency proportional to ρ1/2. As a consequence, the local star formation efficiency exceeds 30 per cent, whereas globally only a few per cent of the gas is converted to stars. The stellar distribution by the time gas is converted to stars is very clumpy, with typically a dozen bound conglomerates that consist of 100-104 stars. We continue to evolve the stars dynamically using the collisional N-body method, which accurately treats all pairwise interactions, stellar collisions and stellar evolution. We analyse the results of the N-body simulations when the stars have an age of 2 and 10 Myr. During the dynamical simulations, massive clusters grow via hierarchical merging of smaller clusters. The shape of the cluster mass function that originates from an individual molecular cloud is consistent with a Schechter function with a power-law slope of β = -1.73 at 2 Myr and β = -1.67 at 10 Myr, which fits to observed cluster mass function of the Carina region. The superposition of mass functions have a power-law slope of ≲ -2, which fits the observed mass function of star clusters in the Milky Way, M31 and M83. We further find that the mass of the most massive cluster formed in a single molecular cloud with a mass of Mg scales with 6.1 M_g^{0.51} which also agrees with recent observation of the GMC and young clusters in M51.

  13. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli: identification of a gene cluster coding for bundle-forming pilus morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sohel, I; Puente, J L; Ramer, S W; Bieber, D; Wu, C Y; Schoolnik, G K

    1996-01-01

    Sequence flanking the bfpA locus on the enteroadherent factor plasmid of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strain B171-8 (O111:NM) was obtained to identify genes that might be required for bundle-forming pilus (BFP) biosynthesis. Deletion experiments led to the identification of a contiguous cluster of at least 12 open reading frames, including bfpA, that could direct the synthesis of a morphologically normal BFP filament. Within the bfp gene cluster, we identified open reading frames that share homology with other type IV pilus accessory genes and with genes required for transformation competence and protein secretion. Immediately upstream of the bfp gene cluster, we identified a potential replication origin including genes that are predicted to encode proteins homologous with replicase and resolvase. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of DNA from six additional EPEC serotypes showed that the organization of the bfp gene cluster and its juxtaposition with a potential plasmid origin of replication are highly conserved features of the EPEC biotype. PMID:8626330

  14. Planck early results. XXII. The submillimetre properties of a sample of Galactic cold clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cantalupo, C. M.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Doi, Y.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Ikeda, N.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Malinen, J.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Meny, C.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pagani, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Toth, V.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2011-12-01

    within factors of a few, to the gas linear mass densities. The analysis of this small set of cold clumps already probes a broad variety of structures in the C3PO sample, probably associated with different evolutionary stages, from cold and starless clumps, to young protostellar objects still embedded in their cold surrounding cloud. Because of the all-sky coverage and its sensitivity, Planck is able to detect and locate the coldest spots in massive elongated structures that may be the long-searched for progenitors of stellar clusters. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgCorresponding author: I. Ristorcelli, e-mail: isabelle.ristorcelli@irap.omp.eu

  15. The Distance to the Galactic Center Derived from Infrared Photometry of Bulge Red Clump Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Sato, Shuji; Kato, Daisuke; Nagayama, Takahiro; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Naoi, Takahiro; Sugitani, Koji; Tamura, Motohide

    2006-08-01

    On the basis of the near-infrared observations of bulge red clump stars near the Galactic center, we have determined the galactocentric distance to be R0=7.52+/-0.10 (stat) +/-0.35 (sys) kpc. We observed the red clump stars at |l|<~1.0d and 0.7d<~|b|<~1.0d with the IRSF 1.4 m telescope and the SIRIUS camera in the H and KS bands. After extinction and population corrections, we obtained (m-M)0=14.38+/-0.03 (stat) +/- 0.10 (sys). The statistical error is dominated by the uncertainty of the intrinsic local red clump stars' luminosity. The systematic error is estimated to be +/-0.10, including uncertainties in extinction and population correction, zero point of photometry, and the fitting of the luminosity function of the red clump stars. Our result, R0=7.52 kpc, is in excellent agreement with the distance determined geometrically with the star orbiting the massive black hole in the Galactic center. The recent result based on the spatial distribution of globular clusters is also consistent with our result. In addition, our study exhibits that the distance determination to the Galactic center with the red clump stars, even if the error of the population correction is taken into account, can achieve an uncertainty of about 5%, which is almost the same level as that in recent geometrical determinations.

  16. Ejection of gaseous clumps from gravitationally unstable protostellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, E. I.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We investigate the dynamics of gaseous clumps formed via gravitational fragmentation in young protostellar disks, focusing on the fragments that are ejected from the disk via many-body gravitational interaction. Methods: Numerical hydrodynamics simulations were employed to study the evolution of young protostellar disks that were formed from the collapse of rotating pre-stellar cores. Results: The protostellar disks that formed in our models undergo gravitational fragmentation driven by continuing mass-loading from parental collapsing cores. Several fragments can be ejected from the disk during the early evolution, but the low-mass fragments (<15 MJup) disperse, which creates spectacular bow-type structures while passing through the disk and collapsing core. The least massive fragment that survived the ejection (21 MJup) straddles the planetary-mass limit, while the most massive ejected fragments (145 MJup) can break up into several pieces, leading to the ejection of wide separation binary clumps in the brown-dwarf mass range. About half of the ejected fragments are gravitationally bound, the majority are supported by rotation against gravity, and all fragments have the specific angular momentum that is much higher than that expected for brown dwarfs. We found that the internal structure of the ejected fragments is distinct from what would be expected for gravitationally contracting clumps formed via molecular cloud fragmentation, which can help in differentiating their origin. Conclusions: The ejection of fragments is an important process, which is inherent to massive protostellar disks, and which produces freely floating pre-brown dwarf cores, regulates the disk and stellar masses and, potentially, enriches the intracluster medium with processed dust and complex organics.

  17. The Hercules Cluster Environment Impact on the Chemical History of Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, V.; VíLchez, J. M.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Papaderos, P.

    In this work we study the effects of the Hercules cluster environment on the chemical history of star-forming (SF) galaxies. For this purpose we have derived the gas metallicities, the mean stellar metallicities and ages, the masses and the luminosities of our sample of galaxies. We have found that our Hercules SF galaxies are either chemically evolved spirals with nearly flat oxygen gradients, or less metal-rich dwarf galaxies which appear to be the "newcomers" in the cluster. Most Hercules SF galaxies follow well defined mass-metallicity and luminosity-metallicity sequences; nevertheless significant outliers to these relations have been identified, illustrating how environmental effects can provide a physical source of dispersion in these fundamental relations.

  18. Clumped Isotopes in Bahamian Dolomites: A Rosetta Stone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, S.; Swart, P. K.; Arienzo, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Low temperature dolomite formation continues to be an enigmatic process. However, with the advent of the clumped isotope technique, there is an opportunity to determine the temperature of formation as well as the δ18O of the fluid (δ18Ow) from which it formed. By using samples with a well constrained geologic and thermal history, we have attempted to accurately develop a technique for the application of clumped isotopes to varying dolomite systems. Samples for this study were taken from two cores, one from the island of San Salvador and one on Great Bahama Bank (known as Clino), located on the eastern and western edges respectively of the Bahamian Archipelago. Both cores penetrate through Pleistocene to Miocene aged carbonates. The San Salvador core has a 110m section of pure, near stoichiometric dolomite, while the Clino core is of a mixed carbonate composition with varying abundances (0% - 50%) of calcian dolomite (42-46 mol % MgCO3). The water temperature profile of the Bahamas can be assumed over time due to the stable geology and no influence of higher temperature waters. Because of its location and the present burial depth, the largest influence on dolomite formation has been changes in sea level. As the dolomites from San Salvador are 100% dolomite, the Δ47 was determined directly. The Clino dolomites however were only partially dolomitized and so were treated with buffered acetic acid to remove non-dolomite carbonates. This was carried out in stages, using X-ray diffraction to determine composition, followed by the measurement of Δ47 after each leaching episode. Because the dolomite formation temperature and δ18Ow can be constrained, it becomes possible to evaluate the applicability of the multitude of clumped isotope correction schemes that have been applied to various dolomite samples. Also tested were several different equations which link temperature to the δ18O of the dolomite allowing the δ18O of the water to be calculated. This is a necessary

  19. Massive cold cloud clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. Viktor; Marton, Gabor; Zahorecz, Sarolta

    2015-08-01

    The all-sky Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC, Planck 2015 results XXVIII 2015) allows an almost unbiased study of the early phases of star-formation in our Galaxy. Several thousand of the clumps have also distance estimates allowing a mass, and density determination. The nature of Planck clumps varies from IRDCs to tiny nearby cold clouds with masses ranging from one to several tens of thousands solar masses. Some of the clumps are embedded in GMCs, others are isolated. Some are close or even very close to OB associations, while others lay far from any UV luminous objects.The small scale clustering of these objects was studied with the improved Minimum Spanning Tree method of Cartwright & Whitworth identifying groups in 3D space. As a result also massive cold cloud clusters were identified. We analyse the MST structures, and discuss their relation to ongoing and future massive star formation.

  20. Physical properties of Planck Cold Dust Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Liu, T.; Meng, F.; Yuan, J.; Zhang, T.; Chen, P.; Hu, R.; Li, D.; Qin, S.; Ju, B.

    2016-05-01

    To explore physical properties of Planck cold dust clumps, 674 of the pilot samples were observed at the 13.7 m telescope of Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO) in J = 1 - 0 transitions of CO, 13CO and C18O. HCO+, HCN and N2H+ emissions were also observed with PMO 13.7 m and IRAM 30 m telescopes. They are real cold and quiescent with mean Tk ˜ 10 K and mean FWHM of 13CO (1-0) 1.27 km s-1. Column density ranges from 1020 to 1022 cm-2. Gas of the Planck clumps extends molecular space in the Milky Way. Turbulence dominates in cores. Filament structure is the majority and most of the cores are starless. Ten percent of the cores show asymmetric emission features including blue- and red- profiles. Planck clumps include different cold or low luminosity sources. Dense cores constitute an ideal sample for studying initial state of star formation while the diffuse clumps are suitable for investigating the formation of cores.

  1. Familial clustering of the ataxic form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with Hirano bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Cartier, L; Gálvez, S; Gajdusek, D C

    1985-01-01

    A family cluster of the ataxic form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with one probable and two autopsy proven cases that occurred in a single generation between 1974 and 1982 is reported. The clinical characteristics of the cases are closely similar to those of kuru patients, with a fair correlation between the prominent truncal ataxia and the intense devastation of the cerebellar cortex most marked in the vermis. Pathologically, the marked hippocampal involvement rarely seen in typical transmissible Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and the finding of Hirano bodies in the Ammon's horn without specific Alzheimer's senile changes are noteworthy features. Images PMID:2984334

  2. How to Find Young Massive Cluster Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressert, E.; Ginsburg, A.; Bally, J.; Battersby, C.; Longmore, S.; Testi, L.

    2012-10-01

    We propose that bound, young massive stellar clusters form from dense clouds that have escape speeds greater than the sound speed in photo-ionized gas. In these clumps, radiative feedback in the form of gas ionization is bottled up, enabling star formation to proceed to sufficiently high efficiency so that the resulting star cluster remains bound even after gas removal. We estimate the observable properties of the massive proto-clusters (MPCs) for existing Galactic plane surveys and suggest how they may be sought in recent and upcoming extragalactic observations. These surveys will potentially provide a significant sample of MPC candidates that will allow us to better understand extreme star-formation and massive cluster formation in the Local Universe.

  3. HOW TO FIND YOUNG MASSIVE CLUSTER PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Bressert, E.; Longmore, S.; Testi, L.; Ginsburg, A.; Bally, J.; Battersby, C.

    2012-10-20

    We propose that bound, young massive stellar clusters form from dense clouds that have escape speeds greater than the sound speed in photo-ionized gas. In these clumps, radiative feedback in the form of gas ionization is bottled up, enabling star formation to proceed to sufficiently high efficiency so that the resulting star cluster remains bound even after gas removal. We estimate the observable properties of the massive proto-clusters (MPCs) for existing Galactic plane surveys and suggest how they may be sought in recent and upcoming extragalactic observations. These surveys will potentially provide a significant sample of MPC candidates that will allow us to better understand extreme star-formation and massive cluster formation in the Local Universe.

  4. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry in continental tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Katharine W.; Lechler, Alex R.

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing the thermal history of minerals and fluids in continental environments is a cornerstone of tectonics research. Paleotemperature constraints from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry have provided important tests of geodynamic, structural, topographic and basin evolution models. The thermometer is based on the 13C-18O bond ordering in carbonates (mass-47 anomaly, Δ47) and provides estimates of the carbonate formation temperature independent of the δ18O value of the water from which the carbonate grew; Δ47 is measured simultaneously with conventional measurements of carbonate δ13C and δ18O values, which together constrain the isotopic composition of the parent water. Depending on the geologic setting of carbonate growth, this information can help constrain paleoenvironmental conditions or basin temperatures and fluid sources. This review examines how clumped isotope thermometry can shed new light on problems in continental tectonics, focusing on paleoaltimetry, basin evolution and structural diagenesis applications. Paleoaltimetry is inherently difficult, and the precision in carbonate growth temperature estimates is at the limit of what is useful for quantitative paleoelevation reconstruction. Nevertheless, clumped isotope analyses have enabled workers to address previously intractable problems and in many settings offer the best chance of understanding topographic change from the geologic record. The portion of the shallow crust residing at temperatures up to ca. 200 °C is important as host to economic resources and records of tectonics and climate, and clumped isotope thermometry is one of the few proxies that can access this critical range with sensitivity to temperature alone. Only a handful of studies to date have used clumped isotopes to investigate diagenesis and other sub-surface processes using carbonate crystallization temperatures or the sensitivity of Δ47 values to a sample's thermal history. However, the thermometer is

  5. The Spiderweb Galaxy: A Forming Massive Cluster Galaxy at z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George K.; Overzier, Roderik A.; Zirm, Andrew W.; Ford, Holland C.; Kurk, Jaron; Pentericci, Laura; Blakeslee, John P.; Franx, Marijn; Illingworth, Garth D.; Postman, Marc; Rosati, Piero; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Venemans, Bram P.; Helder, Eveline

    2006-10-01

    We present a deep image of the radio galaxy MRC 1138-262 taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) at a redshift of z=2.2. The galaxy is known to have properties of a cD galaxy progenitor and be surrounded by a 3 Mpc-sized structure, identified with a protocluster. The morphology shown on the new deep HST ACS image is reminiscent of a spider's web. More than 10 individual clumpy features are observed, apparently star-forming satellite galaxies in the process of merging with the progenitor of a dominant cluster galaxy 11 Gyr ago. There is an extended emission component, implying that star formation was occurring over a 50×40 kpc region at a rate of more than 100 Msolar yr-1. A striking feature of the newly named ``Spiderweb galaxy'' is the presence of several faint linear galaxies within the merging structure. The dense environments and fast galaxy motions at the centers of protoclusters may stimulate the formation of these structures, which dominate the faint resolved galaxy populations in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The new image provides a unique testbed for simulations of forming dominant cluster galaxies.

  6. Heat conduction boundary layers of condensed clumps in cooling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehringer, H.; Fabian, A. C.

    1989-04-01

    The structure of heat conduction boundary layers of gaseous condensations embedded in the hot intergalactic gas in clusters of galaxies is investigated by means of steady, one-dimensional, hydrodynamic models. It is assumed that heat conduction is effective only on scales much smaller than the total region of the cooling flow. Models are calculated for an arbitrary scaling factor, accounting for the reduction in heat conduction efficiency compared to the classical Spitzer case. The results imply a lower limit to the size spectrum of the condensations. The enhancement of cooling in the ambient medium due to heat conduction losses is calculated for a range of clump parameters. The luminosity of several observable emission lines, the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray emission spectrum, and the column density of some important ions are determined for the model boundary layers and compared with observations.

  7. Clump detections and limits on moons in Jupiter's ring system.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Mark R; Cheng, Andrew F; Weaver, Harold A; Stern, S Alan; Spencer, John R; Throop, Henry B; Birath, Emma M; Rose, Debi; Moore, Jeffrey M

    2007-10-12

    The dusty jovian ring system must be replenished continuously from embedded source bodies. The New Horizons spacecraft has performed a comprehensive search for kilometer-sized moons within the system, which might have revealed the larger members of this population. No new moons were found, however, indicating a sharp cutoff in the population of jovian bodies smaller than 8-kilometer-radius Adrastea. However, the search revealed two families of clumps in the main ring: one close pair and one cluster of three to five. All orbit within a brighter ringlet just interior to Adrastea. Their properties are very different from those of the few other clumpy rings known; the origin and nonrandom distribution of these features remain unexplained, but resonant confinement by Metis may play a role. PMID:17932287

  8. X-RAY EMISSION LINE PROFILES FROM WIND CLUMP BOW SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ignace, R.; Waldron, W. L.; Cassinelli, J. P.; Burke, A. E. E-mail: wwaldron@satx.rr.com E-mail: burke.alexander@gmail.com

    2012-05-01

    The consequences of structured flows continue to be a pressing topic in relating spectral data to physical processes occurring in massive star winds. In a preceding paper, our group reported on hydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow past a rigid spherical clump to explore the structure of bow shocks that can form around wind clumps. Here we report on profiles of emission lines that arise from such bow shock morphologies. To compute emission line profiles, we adopt a two-component flow structure of wind and clumps using two 'beta' velocity laws. While individual bow shocks tend to generate double-horned emission line profiles, a group of bow shocks can lead to line profiles with a range of shapes with blueshifted peak emission that depends on the degree of X-ray photoabsorption by the interclump wind medium, the number of clump structures in the flow, and the radial distribution of the clumps. Using the two beta law prescription, the theoretical emission measure and temperature distribution throughout the wind can be derived. The emission measure tends to be power law, and the temperature distribution is broad in terms of wind velocity. Although restricted to the case of adiabatic cooling, our models highlight the influence of bow shock effects for hot plasma temperature and emission measure distributions in stellar winds and their impact on X-ray line profile shapes. Previous models have focused on geometrical considerations of the clumps and their distribution in the wind. Our results represent the first time that the temperature distribution of wind clump structures are explicitly and self-consistently accounted for in modeling X-ray line profile shapes for massive stars.

  9. Burial Diagenesis Effects on Clumped Isotope Signatures of Coexisting Dolomites and Calcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelstern, I. Z.; Lohmann, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope paleothermometry is a promising method for diagenetic and deep time paleoclimate studies, but original clumped isotope (Δ47) compositions can be altered by fluid and thermal diagenetic processes. Previous work shows Δ47 resetting of calcite occurs at temperatures exceeding 100°C over time periods of millions of years, but such thermally-driven effects have not been considered for dolomite. Differences between calcite and dolomite temperature calibrations are also largely unquantified, and the effect of burial diagenesis on dolomite Δ47 has not been measured. Coexisting calcites and dolomites in a ~4500 meter core from Andros Island, Bahamas, offer a unique opportunity to address these questions. These dolomites and calcites formed over a time span from the Cretaceous to Pleistocene under near-surface temperature conditions. Clumped isotope analysis of this material reveals that where these carbonate phases are buried to depths greater than ~3000 meters, realistic surface temperatures (~25 °C) are not preserved. Moreover, these phases do not record reasonable geothermal conditions (> 80 °C), but rather record temperatures between 40 and 60°C. Here we evaluate whether this Δ47 "error" is due to solid-state resetting of clumped isotopes, emplacement of minor burial cements, fabric retentive recrystallization, or some combination thereof. Our results show that clumped isotope compositions of both calcite and dolomite respond similarly to diagenetic resetting of primary values under conditions of burial. These data further emphasize the need to constrain the diagenetic history of samples used for clumped isotope work. The similar Δ47 temperatures recorded by each carbonate type suggest that dolomites and calcites are equally viable temperature proxy sources under shallow burial conditions, yet both seem equally susceptible to "resetting" of their primary clumped isotope abundances.

  10. Spectroscopic and functional characterization of iron-sulfur cluster-bound forms of Azotobacter vinelandii (Nif)IscA.

    PubMed

    Mapolelo, Daphne T; Zhang, Bo; Naik, Sunil G; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Johnson, Michael K

    2012-10-16

    The mechanism of [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly on A-type Fe-S cluster assembly proteins, in general, and the specific role of (Nif)IscA in the maturation of nitrogen fixation proteins are currently unknown. To address these questions, in vitro spectroscopic studies (UV-visible absorption/CD, resonance Raman and Mössbauer) have been used to investigate the mechanism of [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly on Azotobacter vinelandii(Nif)IscA, and the ability of (Nif)IscA to accept clusters from NifU and to donate clusters to the apo form of the nitrogenase Fe-protein. The results show that (Nif)IscA can rapidly and reversibly cycle between forms containing one [2Fe-2S](2+) and one [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster per homodimer via DTT-induced two-electron reductive coupling of two [2Fe-2S](2+) clusters and O(2)-induced [4Fe-4S](2+) oxidative cleavage. This unique type of cluster interconversion in response to cellular redox status and oxygen levels is likely to be important for the specific role of A-type proteins in the maturation of [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing proteins under aerobic growth or oxidative stress conditions. Only the [4Fe-4S](2+)-(Nif)IscA was competent for rapid activation of apo-nitrogenase Fe protein under anaerobic conditions. Apo-(Nif)IscA was shown to accept clusters from [4Fe-4S] cluster-bound NifU via rapid intact cluster transfer, indicating a potential role as a cluster carrier for delivery of clusters assembled on NifU. Overall the results support the proposal that A-type proteins can function as carrier proteins for clusters assembled on U-type proteins and suggest that they are likely to supply [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] for the maturation of [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing proteins under aerobic or oxidative stress growth conditions. PMID:23003323

  11. Stability of Galactic Gaseous Disks and the Formation of Massive Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Escala, Andres; Larson, Richard B.

    2008-08-21

    We study gravitational instabilities in disks, with special attention to the most massive clumps that form because they are expected to be the progenitors of globular-type clusters. The maximum unstable mass is set by rotation and depends only on the surface density and orbital frequency of the disk. We propose that the formation of massive clusters is related to this largest scale in galaxies not stabilized by rotation. Using data from the literature, we predict that globular-like clusters can form in nuclear starburst disks and protogalactic disks but not in typical spiral galaxies, in agreement with observations.

  12. Far-ultraviolet morphology of star-forming filaments in cool core brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, G. R.; O'Dea, C. P.; Baum, S. A.; Mittal, R.; McDonald, M. A.; Combes, F.; Li, Y.; McNamara, B. R.; Bremer, M. N.; Clarke, T. E.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Hamer, S. L.; Hogan, M. T.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Quillen, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Salomé, P.; Voit, G. M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a multiwavelength morphological analysis of star-forming clouds and filaments in the central (≲50 kpc) regions of 16 low-redshift (z < 0.3) cool core brightest cluster galaxies. New Hubble Space Telescope imaging of far-ultraviolet continuum emission from young (≲10 Myr), massive (≳5 M⊙) stars reveals filamentary and clumpy morphologies, which we quantify by means of structural indices. The FUV data are compared with X-ray, Lyα, narrow-band Hα, broad-band optical/IR, and radio maps, providing a high spatial resolution atlas of star formation locales relative to the ambient hot (˜107-8 K) and warm ionized (˜104 K) gas phases, as well as the old stellar population and radio-bright active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows. Nearly half of the sample possesses kpc-scale filaments that, in projection, extend towards and around radio lobes and/or X-ray cavities. These filaments may have been uplifted by the propagating jet or buoyant X-ray bubble, or may have formed in situ by cloud collapse at the interface of a radio lobe or rapid cooling in a cavity's compressed shell. The morphological diversity of nearly the entire FUV sample is reproduced by recent hydrodynamical simulations in which the AGN powers a self-regulating rain of thermally unstable star-forming clouds that precipitate from the hot atmosphere. In this model, precipitation triggers where the cooling-to-free-fall time ratio is tcool/tff ˜ 10. This condition is roughly met at the maximal projected FUV radius for more than half of our sample, and clustering about this ratio is stronger for sources with higher star formation rates.

  13. Integrin-Matrix Clusters Form Podosome-like Adhesions in the Absence of Traction Forces

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-han; Rafiq, Nisha Bte Mohd; Krishnasamy, Anitha; Hartman, Kevin L.; Jones, Gareth E.; Bershadsky, Alexander D.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Matrix-activated integrins can form different adhesion structures. We report that nontransformed fibroblasts develop podosome-like adhesions when spread on fluid Arg-Gly-Asp peptide (RGD)-lipid surfaces, whereas they habitually form focal adhesions on rigid RGD glass surfaces. Similar to classic macrophage podosomes, the podosome-like adhesions are protrusive and characterized by doughnut-shaped RGD rings that surround characteristic core components including F-actin, N-WASP, and Arp2/Arp3. Furthermore, there are 18 podosome markers in these adhesions, though they lack matrix metalloproteinases that characterize invadopodia and podosomes of Src-transformed cells. When nontransformed cells develop force on integrin-RGD clusters by pulling RGD lipids to prefabricated rigid barriers (metal lines spaced by 1–2 μm), these podosomes fail to form and instead form focal adhesions. The formation of podosomes on fluid surfaces is mediated by local activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and the production of phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5)-triphosphate (PIP3) in a FAK/PYK2-dependent manner. Enrichment of PIP3 precedes N-WASP activation and the recruitment of RhoA-GAP ARAP3. We propose that adhesion structures can be modulated by traction force development and that production of PIP3 stimulates podosome formation and subsequent RhoA downregulation in the absence of traction force. PMID:24290759

  14. THE CLUSTERED NATURE OF STAR FORMATION. PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE CLUSTERS IN THE STAR-FORMING REGION NGC 602/N90 IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Gennaro, Mario; Schmeja, Stefan; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Tognelli, Emanuele; Prada Moroni, Pier Giorgio

    2012-03-20

    Located at the tip of the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), the star-forming region NGC 602/N90 is characterized by the H II nebular ring N90 and the young cluster of pre-main-sequence (PMS) and early-type main-sequence stars NGC 602, located in the central area of the ring. We present a thorough cluster analysis of the stellar sample identified with Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys in the region. We show that apart from the central cluster low-mass PMS stars are congregated in 13 additional small, compact sub-clusters at the periphery of NGC 602, identified in terms of their higher stellar density with respect to the average background density derived from star counts. We find that the spatial distribution of the PMS stars is bimodal, with an unusually large fraction ({approx}60%) of the total population being clustered, while the remaining is diffusely distributed in the intercluster area, covering the whole central part of the region. From the corresponding color-magnitude diagrams we disentangle an age difference of {approx}2.5 Myr between NGC 602 and the compact sub-clusters, which appear younger, on the basis of comparison of the brighter PMS stars with evolutionary models, which we accurately calculated for the metal abundance of the SMC. The diffuse PMS population appears to host stars as old as those in NGC 602. Almost all detected PMS sub-clusters appear to be centrally concentrated. When the complete PMS stellar sample, including both clustered and diffused stars, is considered in our cluster analysis, it appears as a single centrally concentrated stellar agglomeration, covering the whole central area of the region. Considering also the hot massive stars of the system, we find evidence that this agglomeration is hierarchically structured. Based on our findings, we propose a scenario according to which the region NGC 602/N90 experiences an active clustered star formation for the last {approx}5 Myr. The central cluster NGC 602 was

  15. A detailed study of the high-mass clump interacting with the bubble N10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yingxiu; Zhou, Jianjun; Esimbek, Jarken; Ji, Weiguang; Wu, Gang; Yuan, Ye

    2013-06-01

    We performed a detailed study of the high-mass clump interacting with bubble N10 based on the spectral lines 12CO(3-2), HCO+(4-3), N2H+(4-3) and CH3OH(7(0,7)-6(0,6)) and continuum emission data at 450 μm and 850 μm released by CADC and Spitzer. A blue-shifted optically thick line 12CO(3-2) seems to indicate that the outer envelope of the high-mass clump is still falling toward the center. Detection of CH3OH(7(0,7)-6(0,6)) suggests that a hot core has formed around YSO N10-7. The position-velocity diagram of N2H+(4-3) indicates that the cold dense core of the clump has not been destroyed by the star formation activities. The mass of N10-7 is about 27.44 M ⊙. The ratio HCO+(4-3)/N2H+(4-3) in the outer part of the clump is larger than that in the inner part of it. The reason may be that the CO abundance relative to N2H+(4-3) is increased in the outer part of the high-mass clump, and more N2H+(4-3) were converted into HCO+(4-3).

  16. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, David T.; Gruen, Danielle S.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C.; Holden, James F.; Hristov, Alexander N.; Pohlman, John W.; Morrill, Penny L.; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; Ritter, Daniel J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Kubo, Michael D.; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M.; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply-substituted “clumped” isotopologues, e.g., 13CH3D, has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures; however, the impact of biological processes on methane’s clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on 13CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  17. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, David T.; Gruen, Danielle S.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C.; Holden, James F.; Hristov, Alexander N.; Pohlman, John W.; Morrill, Penny L.; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; Ritter, Daniel J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Kubo, Michael D.; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M.; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-04-01

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle, with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply substituted “clumped” isotopologues (for example, 13CH3D) has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures. However, the effect of biological processes on methane’s clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on 13CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation-temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  18. Multi-seeded multi-mode formation of embedded clusters in the RMC: Clusters formed in swept-up shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. Z.; Smith, M. D.

    2005-03-01

    This is the first of a series of three papers on clustered star formation in the Rosette Molecular Complex. Here we investigate star formation in the interfacing layers between the expanding Rosette Nebula and its surrounding cloud, based on an analysis of the spatially complete and unbiased 2MASS data. Two medium-mass infrared clusters with ages of around 1 Myr are identified in the south and south-east arcs of the fragmented shell. The majority of the candidate cluster members in these radiation and pressure-confined regions are found to be almost uniformly distributed, roughly following the compression layers traced by the distribution of optical depth at 100 μm, and may well develop into gravitationally unbound systems upon their emergence from the parental cloud. These expanding shells are believed to be playing important roles in impeding the emerging young open cluster NGC 2244 from intruding immediately and deeply into the ambient molecular cloud, where sequential formation of massive clusters is taking place. This publication makes use of 2MASS, the Two Micron All Sky Survey, a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, funded by the National Aeronautics and Space administration and the National Science Foundation.

  19. The long lives of giant clumps and the birth of outflows in gas-rich galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Bournaud, Frédéric; Renaud, Florent; Daddi, Emanuele; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared M.; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kraljic, Katarina; Le Floch', Emeric; Dekel, Avishai; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Teyssier, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Star-forming disk galaxies at high redshift are often subject to violent disk instability, characterized by giant clumps whose fate is yet to be understood. The main question is whether the clumps disrupt within their dynamical timescale (≤50 Myr), like the molecular clouds in today's galaxies, or whether they survive stellar feedback for more than a disk orbital time (≈300 Myr) in which case they can migrate inward and help building the central bulge. We present 3.5-7 pc resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift disks including photoionization, radiation pressure, and supernovae feedback. Our modeling of radiation pressure determines the mass loading and initial velocity of winds from basic physical principles. We find that the giant clumps produce steady outflow rates comparable to and sometimes somewhat larger than their star formation rate, with velocities largely sufficient to escape the galaxy. The clumps also lose mass, especially old stars, by tidal stripping, and the stellar populations contained in the clumps hence remain relatively young (≤200 Myr), as observed. The clumps survive gaseous outflows and stellar loss, because they are wandering in gas-rich turbulent disks from which they can reaccrete gas at high rates compensating for outflows and tidal stripping, overall keeping realistic and self-regulated gaseous and stellar masses. The outflow and accretion rates have specific timescales of a few 10{sup 8} yr, as opposed to rapid and repeated dispersion and reformation of clumps. Our simulations produce gaseous outflows with velocities, densities, and mass loading consistent with observations, and at the same time suggest that the giant clumps survive for hundreds of Myr and complete their migration to the center of high-redshift galaxies. These long-lived clumps are gas-dominated and contain a moderate mass fraction of stars; they drive inside-out disk evolution, thickening, spheroid growth, and fueling of the central

  20. The Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP): From Molecular Clouds to Massive Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter

    2015-08-01

    I review the major science outcomes to date of the Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars, and also report the latest observational results on this unbiased, uniform sample of massive, cluster-forming molecular clumps, based on new mm-wave and IR data. These clouds represent the vast, subthermally-excited population of clumps predicted by Narayanan et al (2008) to dominate the molecular mass of disk galaxies. Besides confirming their existence, we have presented evidence that these massive clumps probably spend a large fraction (90-95%) of their long lives (possibly up to 100 Myr) in a mostly quiescent, low star formation rate (SFR) state, which is likely ended when a density or internal pressure threshold is crossed, after which vigorous, massive cluster formation consumes the densest gas with a high SFR, dispersing the embedding envelope. New results presented in two posters at this Symposium include (1) the first analysis of HCN emission from the dense gas using a full LTE solution for the column density from the hyperfine line ratios (Schap et al), which identifies low-luminosity but high-column areas that significantly increase the clumps' mass estimates, and (2) the first deep photometry of clusters in this sample based on NIR AAT and CTIO data and MIR Warm Spitzer IRAC data (Dallilar et al), which gives basic cluster parameters such as mass and luminosity as well as the associated star formation efficiency (SFE).

  1. Multi-wavelength characterisation of z ~ 2 clustered, dusty star-forming galaxies discovered by Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Cacho, I.; Pierini, D.; Soucail, G.; Montier, L.; Dole, H.; Pointecouteau, E.; Pelló, R.; Le Floc'h, E.; Nesvadba, N.; Lagache, G.; Guery, D.; Cañameras, R.

    2016-01-01

    that Planck data can be used to detect the emission from clustered, dusty star-forming galaxies at high z, and, thus, to pierce through the early growth of cluster-scale structures.

  2. Centenarian scientists: an unusual cluster newly formed in the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Sri Kantha, S

    2001-12-01

    From biographical data sources on ranking scientists, I was able to identify 35 centenarians. Among these, only one (Michel Chevereul from France) lived before the 20th century. Since the remaining 34 individuals became centenarians only from 1965, I propose that centenarian scientists are an unusual cluster, first formed in the 20th century. Among these, all except one (Alice Hamilton) were men. Six centenarian scientists, including Hamilton, had received professional medical training. The nationality ranks of the 34 centenarian scientists identified in the 20th century show 26 Americans, 6 British, one German and one French. Four of the 26 Americans were immigrants from Europe. At least three centenarians, namely Michael Heidelberger, Nathaniel Kleitman and Victor Hamburger, belong to the 'Nobel class' category, being pioneers in the disciplines of immunochemistry, sleep physiology and neuroembryology respectively. PMID:11918440

  3. METAL FORMING AND FABRICATION CLUSTER--AN INVESTIGATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE CLUSTER CONCEPT AS A PROGRAM IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AT THE SECONDARY LEVEL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MALEY, DONALD

    THIS COURSE OUTLINE ON METAL FORMING AND FABRICATION IS PART OF THE FINAL REPORT ON "CLUSTER CONCEPT" COURSES IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION FOR SECONDARY EDUCATION (ED 010 301). EACH JOB ENTRY TASK WAS ANALYZED FOR HUMAN REQUIREMENTS (COMMUNICATION,MEASUREMENT, MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE, SKILLS, AND INFORMATION) NECESSARY TO PERFORMANCE OF THE TASK. THE TASK…

  4. Spherical cluster ensembles with fractal structure in LaSrMnO: New form of self-organization in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunev, V. D.; Samoilenko, Z. A.; Szymczak, H.; Szymczak, R.; Burkhovetski, V. V.; Lewandowski, S. J.

    2013-04-01

    The growth of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 films in magnetron plasma, in special conditions, leads to the appearance of ensembles of micron-sized spherical crystalline clusters with fractal structure, which we consider to be a new form of self-organization in solids. Each ensemble contains 105-106 elementary clusters, 100-250 Å in diameter. Interaction of the clusters in the ensemble is realized through the interatomic chemical bonds, intrinsic to the manganites. Integration of peripheral areas of interacting clusters results in the formation of common intercluster medium in the ensemble. We argue that the ensembles with fractal structure built into paramagnetic disordered matrix have ferromagnetic properties. Absence of sharp borders between elementary clusters and the presence of common intercluster medium inside each ensemble permits to rearrange magnetic order and to change the volume of the ferromagnetic phase, providing automatically a high sensitivity of the material to the external field.

  5. ATCA survey of ammonia in the galactic center: The temperatures of dense gas clumps between Sgr A* and Sgr B2

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Jürgen; Weiß, Axel; Henkel, Christian; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Meier, David S. E-mail: aweiss@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de E-mail: Lister.Staveley-Smith@uwa.edu.au

    2014-04-10

    We present a large-scale, interferometric survey of ammonia (1, 1) and (2, 2) toward the Galactic center observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The survey covers Δℓ ∼ 1° (∼150 pc at an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc) and Δb ∼ 0.°2 (∼30 pc) which spans the region between the supermassive black hole Sgr A* and the massive star forming region Sgr B2. The resolution is ∼20'' (∼0.8 pc) and emission at scales ≳ 2' (≳ 3.2 pc) is filtered out due to missing interferometric short spacings. Consequently, the data represent the denser, compact clouds and disregards the large-scale, diffuse gas. Many of the clumps align with the 100 pc dust ring and mostly anti-correlate with 1.2 cm continuum emission. We present a kinetic temperature map of the dense gas. The temperature distribution peaks at ∼38 K with a width at half maximum between 18 K and 61 K (measurements sensitive within T {sub kin} ∼ 10-80 K). Larger clumps are on average warmer than smaller clumps which suggests internal heating sources. Our observations indicate that the circumnuclear disk ∼1.5 pc around Sgr A* is supplied with gas from the 20 km s{sup –1} molecular cloud. This gas is substantially cooler than gas ∼3-15 pc away from Sgr A*. We find a strong temperature gradient across Sgr B2. Ammonia column densities correlate well with SCUBA 850 μm fluxes, but the relation is shifted from the origin, which may indicate a requirement for a minimum amount of dust to form and shield ammonia. Around the Arches and Quintuplet clusters we find shell morphologies with UV-influenced gas in their centers, followed by ammonia and radio continuum layers.

  6. Size, Kinetics, and Free Energy of Clusters Formed by Ultraweak Carbohydrate-Carbohydrate Bonds.

    PubMed

    Witt, Hannes; Savić, Filip; Oelkers, Marieelen; Awan, Shahid I; Werz, Daniel B; Geil, Burkhard; Janshoff, Andreas

    2016-04-12

    Weak noncovalent intermolecular interactions play a pivotal role in many biological processes such as cell adhesion or immunology, where the overall binding strength is controlled through bond association and dissociation dynamics as well as the cooperative action of many parallel bonds. Among the various molecules participating in weak bonds, carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are probably the most ancient ones allowing individual cells to reversibly enter the multicellular state and to tell apart self and nonself cells. Here, we scrutinized the kinetics and thermodynamics of small homomeric Lewis X-Lewis X ensembles formed in the contact zone of a membrane-coated colloidal probe and a solid supported membrane ensuring minimal nonspecific background interactions. We used an atomic force microscope to measure force distance curves at Piconewton resolution, which allowed us to measure the force due to unbinding of the colloidal probe and the planar membrane as a function of contact time. Applying a contact model, we could estimate the free binding energy of the formed adhesion cluster as a function of dwell time and thereby determine the precise size of the contact zone, the number of participating bonds, and the intrinsic rates of association and dissociation in the presence of calcium ions. The unbinding energy per bond was found to be on the order of 1 kBT. Approximately 30 bonds were opened simultaneously at an off-rate of koff = 7 ± 0.2 s(-1). PMID:27074683

  7. A multinuclear copper(I) cluster forms the dimerization interface in copper-loaded human copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Stasser, Jay P; Siluvai, Gnana S; Barry, Amanda N; Blackburn, Ninian J

    2007-10-23

    Copper binding and X-ray aborption spectroscopy studies are reported on untagged human CCS (hCCS; CCS = copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase) isolated using an intein self-cleaving vector and on single and double Cys to Ala mutants of the hCCS MTCQSC and CSC motifs of domains 1 (D1) and 3 (D3), respectively. The results on the wild-type protein confirmed earlier findings on the CCS-MBP (maltose binding protein) constructs, namely, that Cu(I) coordinates to the CXC motif, forming a cluster at the interface of two D3 polypeptides. In contrast to the single Cys to Ser mutations of the CCS-MBP protein (Stasser, J. P., Eisses, J. F., Barry, A. N., Kaplan, J. H., and Blackburn, N. J. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 3143-3152), single Cys to Ala mutations in D3 were sufficient to eliminate cluster formation and significantly reduce CCS activity. Analysis of the intensity of the Cu-Cu cluster interaction in C244A, C246A, and C244/246A variants suggested that the nuclearity of the cluster was greater than 2 and was most consistent with a Cu4S6 adamantane-type species. The relationship among cluster formation, oligomerization, and metal loading was evaluated. The results support a model in which Cu(I) binding converts the apo dimer with a D2-D2 interface to a new dimer connected by cluster formation at two D3 CSC motifs. The predominance of dimer over tetramer in the cluster-containing species strongly suggests that the D2 dimer interface remains open and available for sequestering an SOD1 monomer. This work implicates the copper cluster in the reactive form and adds detail to the cluster nuclearity and how copper loading affects the oligomerization states and reactivity of CCS for its partner SOD1. PMID:17902702

  8. A Multinuclear Copper(I) Cluster Forms the Dimerization Interface in Copper-Loaded Human Copper Chaperone for Superoxide Dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Stasser, J.P.; Siluvai, G.S.; Barry, A.N.; Blackburn, N.J.

    2009-06-04

    Copper binding and X-ray aborption spectroscopy studies are reported on untagged human CCS (hCCS; CCS = copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase) isolated using an intein self-cleaving vector and on single and double Cys to Ala mutants of the hCCS MTCQSC and CSC motifs of domains 1 (D1) and 3 (D3), respectively. The results on the wild-type protein confirmed earlier findings on the CCS-MBP (maltose binding protein) constructs, namely, that Cu(I) coordinates to the CXC motif, forming a cluster at the interface of two D3 polypeptides. In contrast to the single Cys to Ser mutations of the CCS-MBP protein (Stasser, J. P., Eisses, J. F., Barry, A. N., Kaplan, J. H., and Blackburn, N. J. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 3143-3152), single Cys to Ala mutations in D3 were sufficient to eliminate cluster formation and significantly reduce CCS activity. Analysis of the intensity of the Cu-Cu cluster interaction in C244A, C246A, and C244/246A variants suggested that the nuclearity of the cluster was greater than 2 and was most consistent with a Cu4S6 adamantane-type species. The relationship among cluster formation, oligomerization, and metal loading was evaluated. The results support a model in which Cu(I) binding converts the apo dimer with a D2-D2 interface to a new dimer connected by cluster formation at two D3 CSC motifs. The predominance of dimer over tetramer in the cluster-containing species strongly suggests that the D2 dimer interface remains open and available for sequestering an SOD1 monomer. This work implicates the copper cluster in the reactive form and adds detail to the cluster nuclearity and how copper loading affects the oligomerization states and reactivity of CCS for its partner SOD1.

  9. The initial conditions of stellar protocluster formation - II. A catalogue of starless and protostellar clumps embedded in IRDCs in the Galactic longitude range 15° ≤ l ≤ 55°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traficante, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Peretto, N.; Pineda, J. E.; Molinari, S.

    2015-08-01

    We present a catalogue of starless and protostellar clumps associated with infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) in a 40° wide region of the inner Galactic plane (|b| ≤ 1°). We have extracted the far-infrared (FIR) counterparts of 3493 IRDCs with known distance in the Galactic longitude range 15° ≤ l ≤ 55° and searched for the young clumps using Herschel infrared Galactic plane survey, the survey of the Galactic plane carried out with the Herschel satellite. Each clump is identified as a compact source detected at 160, 250 and 350 μm. The clumps have been classified as protostellar or starless, based on their emission (or lack of emission) at 70 μm. We identify 1723 clumps, 1056 (61 per cent) of which are protostellar and 667 (39 per cent) starless. These clumps are found within 764 different IRDCs, 375 (49 per cent) of which are only associated with protostellar clumps, 178 (23 per cent) only with starless clumps, and 211 (28 per cent) with both categories of clumps. The clumps have a median mass of ˜250 M⊙ and range up to >104 M⊙ in mass and up to 105 L⊙ in luminosity. The mass-radius distribution shows that almost 30 per cent of the starless clumps identified in this survey could form high-mass stars; however these massive clumps are confined in only ≃4 per cent of the IRDCs. Assuming a minimum mass surface density threshold for the formation of high-mass stars, the comparison of the numbers of massive starless clumps and those already containing embedded sources suggests an upper limit lifetime for the starless phase of ˜105 yr for clumps with a mass M > 500 M⊙.

  10. Clumps and Temporal Changes in the Jovian Ring System as Viewed by New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Cheng, A. F.; Weaver, H. A.; Stern, S. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Throop, H.; Birath, E. M.; Rose, D.; Moore, J. M.

    2007-10-01

    New Horizons obtained 400 ring images of the Jovian ring system using the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI). This camera has a broad bandpass spanning wavelengths λ = 0.35 to 0.85 µm. The ring was imaged at phase angles 7°-159°. In addition, one sequence of near-IR spectra (λ = 1.25 to 2.5 µm) was obtained by the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) for compositional studies. Two ring rotation movies during Jupiter approach were used to search for small moons embedded within the system. These bodies might serve as source bodies for the prevalent ring dust. No moons were detected down to a threshold of 500 m radius, suggesting a sharp cutoff in the population of inner Jovian moons below 8-km Adrastea. Although this search focused on the main Jovian ring, any 1-km moons from orbital radius r = 100,000 km to beyond the orbit of Amalthea (r = 181,000 km) should have been detected multiple times. More surprisingly, the ring revealed two clusters of tiny clumps, one pair and one set of three. These are definitively not moons because they have longitudinal extents of a few tenths of a degree. Separations between clumps are 2 to 4° but are not uniform. These clump families both orbit within a brightness peak just interior to the orbit of Adrastea, at r = 128,740 km. Their origin is unknown. They are not visible at high phase angles, indicating that they are composed primarily of larger "parent” bodies, not dust. They are definitely not related to a clump detected in Cassini images of the Jovian ring from December 2000, indicating that at least some ring clumps are transient. The large quadrant asymmetries reported in earlier images from Voyager and Galileo are completely absent in the new data.

  11. Clumped Methane Isotopologue Temperatures of Microbial Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, S.; Wang, D. T.; Gruen, D.; Delwiche, K.; Hemond, H.; Pohlman, J.

    2014-12-01

    We will report the abundance of 13CH3D, a clumped isotopologue of methane, in microbial methane sampled from natural environments. They yield some expected and some unexpected results reflecting both equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects controlling the abundance of 13CH3D in low temperature environments. The four isotopologues of methane (12CH4, 13CH4, 12CH3D and 13CH3D) were measured by a tunable infrared spectroscopy method at a precision of 0.2‰ and accuracy of 0.5‰ (Ono et al., 2014). Similar to carbonate clumped isotope thermometry, clumped isotopologues of methane become more stable at lower temperatures. The equilibrium constant for the isotope exchange reaction 13CH4 + 12CH3D ⇌ 13CH3D + 12CH4 deviates from unity by +6.3 to +3.5 ‰ for methane equilibrated between 4 and 121 °C, a range expected for microbial methanogenesis. This would be measurably-distinct from a thermogenic methane signal, which typically have apparent 13CH3D-based temperatures ranging from 150 to 220 °C (+3.0 to +2.2 ‰ clumped isotope effect; Ono et al., 2014; Stolper et al. 2014). Marine samples, such as methane clathrates and porewater methane from the Cascadia margin, have 13CH3D-based temperatures that appear to be consistent with isotopic equilibration at in situ temperatures that are reasonable for deep sedimentary environments. In contrast, methane from freshwater environments, such as a lake and a swamp, yield apparent temperatures that are much higher than the known or inferred environmental temperature. Mixing of two or more distinct sources of methane could potentially generate this high temperature bias. We suggest, however, that this high-temperature bias likely reflects a kinetic isotope fractionation intrinsic to methanogenesis in fresh water environments. In contrast, the low-temperature signals from marine methane could be related to the slow metabolic rates and reversibility of microbial methanogenesis and methanotrophy in marine sedimentary environments

  12. Gravitational microlensing as a probe for dark matter clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorova, E.; Sliusar, V. M.; Zhdanov, V. I.; Alexandrov, A. N.; Del Popolo, A.; Surdej, J.

    2016-04-01

    Extended dark matter (DM) substructures may play the role of microlenses in the Milky Way and in extragalactic gravitational lens systems (GLSs). We compare microlensing effects caused by point masses (Schwarzschild lenses) and extended clumps of matter using a simple model for the lens mapping. A superposition of the point mass and the extended clump is also considered. For special choices of the parameters, this model may represent a cusped clump of cold DM, a cored clump of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) or an ultra-compact minihalo of DM surrounding a massive point-like object. We built the resulting micro-amplification curves for various parameters of one clump moving with respect to the source in order to estimate differences between the light curves caused by clumps and by point lenses. The results show that it may be difficult to distinguish between these models. However, some region of the clump parameters can be restricted by considering the high amplification events at the present level of photometric accuracy. Then we estimate the statistical properties of the amplification curves in extragalactic GLSs. For this purpose, an ensemble of amplification curves is generated yielding the autocorrelation functions (ACFs) of the curves for different choices of the system parameters. We find that there can be a significant difference between these ACFs if the clump size is comparable with typical Einstein radii; as a rule, the contribution of clumps makes the ACFs less steep.

  13. Astrophysics. Multiple images of a highly magnified supernova formed by an early-type cluster galaxy lens.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patrick L; Rodney, Steven A; Treu, Tommaso; Foley, Ryan J; Brammer, Gabriel; Schmidt, Kasper B; Zitrin, Adi; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Graur, Or; Filippenko, Alexei V; Jha, Saurabh W; Riess, Adam G; Bradac, Marusa; Weiner, Benjamin J; Scolnic, Daniel; Malkan, Matthew A; von der Linden, Anja; Trenti, Michele; Hjorth, Jens; Gavazzi, Raphael; Fontana, Adriano; Merten, Julian C; McCully, Curtis; Jones, Tucker; Postman, Marc; Dressler, Alan; Patel, Brandon; Cenko, S Bradley; Graham, Melissa L; Tucker, Bradley E

    2015-03-01

    In 1964, Refsdal hypothesized that a supernova whose light traversed multiple paths around a strong gravitational lens could be used to measure the rate of cosmic expansion. We report the discovery of such a system. In Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we have found four images of a single supernova forming an Einstein cross configuration around a redshift z = 0.54 elliptical galaxy in the MACS J1149.6+2223 cluster. The cluster's gravitational potential also creates multiple images of the z = 1.49 spiral supernova host galaxy, and a future appearance of the supernova elsewhere in the cluster field is expected. The magnifications and staggered arrivals of the supernova images probe the cosmic expansion rate, as well as the distribution of matter in the galaxy and cluster lenses. PMID:25745167

  14. The Milky Way Project and ATLASGAL: The Distribution and Physical Properties of Cold Clumps Near Infrared Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrew, Sarah; Beuther, Henrik; Simpson, Robert; Csengeri, Timea; Wienen, Marion; Lintott, Chris. J.; Povich, Matthew S.; Beaumont, Chris; Schuller, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    We present a statistical study of the distribution and physical properties of cold, dense material in and around the inner Galactic Plane near-infrared bubbles as cataloged by the Milky Way Project citizen scientists. Using data from the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy 870 μm survey, we show that 48 ± 2% of all cold clumps in the studied survey region (| l| ≤slant 65^\\circ , | b| ≤slant 1^\\circ ) are found in close proximity to a bubble, and 25 ± 2% appear directly projected toward a bubble rim. A two-point correlation analysis confirms the strong correlation of massive cold clumps with expanding bubbles. It shows an overdensity of clumps along bubble rims that grows with increasing bubble size, which shows how interstellar medium material is reordered on large scales by bubble expansion around regions of massive star formation. The highest column density clumps appear to be resistent to the expansion, remaining overdense toward the bubbles’ interior rather than being swept up by the expanding edge. Spectroscopic observations in ammonia show that cold dust clumps near bubbles appear to be denser, hotter, and more turbulent than those in the field, offering circumstantial evidence that bubble-associated clumps are more likely to be forming stars. These observed differences in physical conditions persist beyond the region of the bubble rims.

  15. Characterization of [4Fe-4S]-containing and cluster-free forms of Streptomyces WhiD

    PubMed Central

    Crack, Jason C.; den Hengst, Chris D.; Jakimowicz, Piotr; Subramanian, Sowmya; Johnson, Michael K.; Buttner, Mark J.; Thomson, Andrew J.; Le Brun, Nick E.

    2009-01-01

    WhiD, a member of the WhiB-like (Wbl) family of iron-sulfur proteins found exclusively within the actinomycetes, is required for the late stages of sporulation in Streptomyces coelicolor. Like all other Wbl proteins, WhiD has not so far been purified in a soluble form that contains a significant amount of cluster and characterization has relied on cluster-reconstituted protein. Thus, a major goal in Wbl research is to obtain and characterize native protein containing iron-sulfur clusters. Here we report the analysis of S. coelicolor WhiD purified anaerobically from E. coli as a soluble protein containing a single [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster ligated by four cysteines. Upon exposure to oxygen, spectral features associated with the [4Fe-4S] cluster were lost in a slow reaction that unusually yielded apo-WhiD directly without significant concentrations of cluster intermediates. This process was found to be highly pH dependent with an optimal stability observed between pH 7.0 and 8.0. Low molecular weight thiols, including a mycothiol analogue and thioredoxin, exerted a small but significant protective effect against WhiD cluster loss, an activity that could be of physiological importance. [4Fe-4S]2+ WhiD was found to react much more rapidly with superoxide than with either oxygen or hydrogen peroxide, which may also be of physiological significance. Loss of the [4Fe-4S] cluster to form apo-protein destabilized the protein fold significantly, but did not lead to complete unfolding. Finally, apo-WhiD exhibited negligible activity in an insulin-based disulfide reductase assay demonstrating that it does not function as a general protein disulfide reductase. PMID:19954209

  16. Massive Clumps in Local Galaxies: Comparisons with High-redshift Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Sánchez Almeida, J.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Dewberry, J.; Putko, J.; Teich, Y.; Popinchalk, M.

    2013-09-01

    Local UV-bright galaxies in the Kiso survey include clumpy systems with kiloparsec-size star complexes that resemble clumpy young galaxies in surveys at high redshift. We compare clump masses and underlying disks in several dozen galaxies from each of these surveys to the star complexes and disks of normal spirals. Photometry and spectroscopy for the Kiso and spiral sample come from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that the largest Kiso clumpy galaxies resemble Ultra Deep Field (UDF) clumpies in terms of the star formation rates, clump masses, and clump surface densities. Clump masses and surface densities in normal spirals are smaller. If the clump masses are proportional to the turbulent Jeans mass in the interstellar medium, then for the most luminous galaxies in the sequence of normal:Kiso:UDF, the turbulent speeds and surface densities increase in the proportions 1.0:4.7:5.0 and 1.0:4.0:5.1, respectively, for fixed restframe B-band absolute magnitude. For the least luminous galaxies in the overlapping magnitude range, the turbulent speed and surface density trends are 1.0:2.7:7.4 and 1.0:1.4:3.0, respectively. We also find that while all three types have radially decreasing disk intensities when measured with ellipse-fit azimuthal averages, the average profiles are more irregular for UDF clumpies (which are viewed in their restframe UV) than for Kiso galaxies (viewed at g-band), and major axis intensity scans are even more irregular for the UDF than Kiso galaxies. Local clumpy galaxies in the Kiso survey appear to be intermediate between UDF clumpies and normal spirals.

  17. Stellar clustering as induced by a supernova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baierlein, R.; Schwing, E.; Herbst, W.

    1981-01-01

    A possible mechanism for the fragmentation of the expanding shock wave from a supernova to form stellar clusters is considered. A model of supernova shell expansion is constructed in which the ratio of magnetic field intensity to gas density remains constant during the one-dimensional compression of the interstellar medium by the shock, and the gas and field adjust to a quasi-equilibrium within the shell following shock passage. It is shown that the quasi-equilibrium, which may be considered as an isothermal atmosphere, is unstable to a hydromagnetic instability representing a form of the Parker instability, which results in a clumping of gas at intervals on the order of parsecs. The length and time scales of the instability are consistent with the clustering of newly formed stars observed in Canis Major R1, where there is evidence for supernova-induced star formation.

  18. The clump mass function of the dense clouds in the Carina nebula complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekruhl, S.; Preibisch, T.; Schuller, F.; Menten, K.

    2013-02-01

    Context. The question how the initial conditions in a star-forming region affect the resulting mass function of the forming stars is one of the most fundamental open topics in star formation theory. Aims: We want to characterize the properties of the cold dust clumps in the Carina nebula complex, which is one of the most massive star forming regions in our Galaxy and shows a very high level of massive star feedback. We derive the clump mass function (ClMF), explore the reliability of different clump extraction algorithms, and investigate the influence of the temperatures within the clouds on the resulting shape of the ClMF. Methods: We analyze a 1.25° × 1.25° wide-field submillimeter map obtained with LABOCA at the APEX telescope, which provides the first spatially complete survey of the clouds in the Carina nebula complex. We use the three clump-finding algorithms CLUMPFIND, GAUSSCLUMPS and SExtractor to identify individual clumps and determine their total fluxes. In addition to assuming a common "typical" temperature for all clouds, we also employ an empirical relation between cloud column densities and temperature to determine an estimate of the individual clump temperatures, and use this to determine individual clump masses. Results: We find that the ClMFs resulting from the different extraction methods show considerable differences in their shape. While the ClMF based on the CLUMPFIND extraction is very well described by a power-law (for clump masses well above the completeness limit), the ClMFs based on the extractions with GAUSSCLUMPS and SExtractor are better represented by a log-normal distribution. We also find that the use of individual clump temperatures leads to a shallower ClMF slope than the (often used) assumption of a common temperature (e.g. 20 K) of all clumps. Conclusions: The power-law of dN/dM ∝ M-1.95 we find for the CLUMPFIND sample is in good agreement with ClMF slopes found in previous studies of the ClMFs of other regions. The

  19. Clumped isotopes’ thermometry in land gastropod carbonate shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaarur, S.; Affek, H. P.

    2009-12-01

    The carbonate ‘clumped isotope’ (Δ47) thermometer is based on the dependence of the abundance of 13C-18O bonds in carbonates on the carbonate formation temperature. We repeated at higher analytical precision the original thermometer calibration experiments of Ghosh et al., (2006) using carbonates precipitated synthetically by slow degassing of CO2 from saturated Ca(HCO3)2 solutions at a temperature range of 8°C to 70°C. Our data fall within error of the original calibration and generally confirms it. However, the samples precipitated at lower temperatures are slightly shifted, forming a line with a lower slope, fitting better the theoretical calibration thermometer predicted by Guo et al., (in press). We tested the Δ47 thermometer in land gastropods (snails) by analyzing modern gastropod shells from various geographical locations in comparison to the gastropods’ growing season temperatures. No significant inhomogeneity was observed within an individual shell. Segments growing at different stages in the gastropods’ life (e.g., inner part of the helix reflecting young gastropod growth and outer shell that grew at older gastropod age) revealed no significant variations within a specimen in either Δ47 or δ18O, whereas δ13C varied significantly (0.5 ‰) implying a change in the gastropods’ food source. Inter-species comparison revealed significant δ13C and δ18O variations among specimens collected at the same location (Sphincterochila zonata and Trochoidea simulate, south Israel, and Pleurodonte acuta and Orthalicus undutus, Jamaica) but no significant interspecies variations in Δ47, providing a strong indication for carbonate precipitation in isotopic equilibrium. Gastropod shells do not grow year-round, with most gastropods being dormant during dry cold seasons. ‘Clumped isotopes’ values are therefore expected to record the temperature of the gastropods’ growth season. Hence gastropod ecology and preferred growth conditions has to be taken

  20. Gangliosides GM1 and GM3 in the Living Cell Membrane Form Clusters Susceptible to Cholesterol Depletion and Chilling

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Akikazu; Cheng, Jinglei; Hirakawa, Minako; Furukawa, Koichi; Kusunoki, Susumu

    2007-01-01

    Presence of microdomains has been postulated in the cell membrane, but two-dimensional distribution of lipid molecules has been difficult to determine in the submicrometer scale. In the present paper, we examined the distribution of gangliosides GM1 and GM3, putative raft molecules in the cell membrane, by immunoelectron microscopy using quick-frozen and freeze-fractured specimens. This method physically immobilized molecules in situ and thus minimized the possibility of artifactual perturbation. By point pattern analysis of immunogold labeling, GM1 was shown to make clusters of <100 nm in diameter in normal mouse fibroblasts. GM1-null fibroblasts were not labeled, but developed a similar clustered pattern when GM1 was administered. On cholesterol depletion or chilling, the clustering of both endogenous and exogenously-loaded GM1 decreased significantly, but the distribution showed marked regional heterogeneity in the cells. GM3 also showed cholesterol-dependent clustering, and although clusters of GM1 and GM3 were found to occasionally coincide, these aggregates were separated in most cases, suggesting the presence of heterogeneous microdomains. The present method enabled to capture the molecular distribution of lipids in the cell membrane, and demonstrated that GM1 and GM3 form clusters that are susceptible to cholesterol depletion and chilling. PMID:17392511

  1. The Spherically Symmetric Gravitational Collapse of a Clump of Solids in a Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, Karim; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2015-05-01

    In the subject of planetesimal formation, several mechanisms have been identified that create dense particle clumps in the solar nebula. The present work is concerned with the gravitational collapse of such clumps, idealized as being spherically symmetric. Fully nonlinear simulations using the two-fluid model are carried out (almost) up to the time when a central density singularity forms. We refer to this as the collapse time. The end result of the study is a parametrization of the collapse time, in order that it may be compared with timescales for various disruptive effects to which clumps may be subject in a particular situation. An important effect that determines the collapse time is that as the clump compresses, it also compresses the gas due to drag. This increases gas pressure, which retards particle collapse and can lead to oscillation in the size and density of the clump. In the limit of particles perfectly coupled to the gas, the characteristic ratio of gravitational force to gas pressure becomes relevant and defines a two-phase Jeans parameter, {{J}t}, which is the classical Jeans parameter with the speed of sound replaced by an effective wave speed in the coupled two-fluid medium. The parameter {{J}t} remains useful even away from the perfect coupling limit because it makes the simulation results insensitive to the initial density ratio of particles to gas (Φ0) as a separate parameter. A simple ordinary differential equation model is developed. It takes the form of two coupled non-linear oscillators and reproduces key features of the simulations. Finally, a parametric study of the time to collapse is performed and a formula (fit to the simulations) is developed. In the incompressible limit {{J}t}\\to 0, collapse time equals the self-sedimentation time, which is inversely proportional to the Stokes number. As {{J}t} increases, the collapse time decreases with {{J}t} and eventually becomes approximately equal to the dynamical time. Values of collapse

  2. The physical conditions in IRDC clumps from Herschel/HIFI observations of H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, R. F.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Wyrowski, F.; Herpin, F.; Frieswijk, W.

    2014-10-01

    Context. The earliest phases of high-mass star formation are poorly understood. Aims: Our goal is to determine the physical conditions and kinematic structure of massive starforming cloud clumps. Methods: We analyse H2O 557 GHz line profiles observed with HIFI toward four positions in two infrared-dark cloud clumps. By comparison with ground-based C17O, N2H+, CH3OH, and NH3 line observations, we constrain the volume density and kinetic temperature of the gas and estimate the column density and abundance of H2O and N2H+. Results: The observed water lines are complex with emission and absorption components. The absorption is redshifted and consistent with a cold envelope, while the emission is interpreted as resulting from proto-stellar outflows. The gas density in the clumps is ~107 cm-3. The o-H2O outflow column density is 0.3-3.0 × 1014 cm-2. The o-H2O absorption column density is between 1.5 × 1014 and 2.6 × 1015 cm-2 with cold o-H2O abundances between 1.5 × 10-9 and 3.1 × 10-8. Conclusions: All clumps have high gas densities (~107 cm-3) and display infalling gas. Three of the four clumps have outflows. The clumps form an evolutionary sequence as probed by H2O N2H+, NH3, and CH3OH. We find that G28-MM is the most evolved, followed by G11-MM and then G28-NH3. The least evolved clump is G11-NH3 which shows no signposts of starformation; G11-NH3 is a high-mass pre-stellar core. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia with important participation of NASA.Tables 4, 6, 8, 10, 11, and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFinal Herschel and APEX data used in the paper (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/570/A51

  3. The luminosity function of star clusters in 20 star-forming galaxies based on Hubble legacy archive photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Bowers, Ariel S.; Lindsay, Kevin; Ansari, Asna; Evans, Jessica; Chandar, Rupali; Larsen, Soeren

    2014-04-01

    Luminosity functions (LFs) have been determined for star cluster populations in 20 nearby (4-30 Mpc), star-forming galaxies based on Advanced Camera for Surveys source lists generated by the Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA). These cluster catalogs provide one of the largest sets of uniform, automatically generated cluster candidates available in the literature at present. Comparisons are made with other recently generated cluster catalogs demonstrating that the HLA-generated catalogs are of similar quality, but in general do not go as deep. A typical cluster LF can be approximated by a power law, dN/dL∝L {sup α}, with an average value for α of –2.37 and rms scatter = 0.18 when using the F814W ('I') band. A comparison of fitting results based on methods that use binned and unbinned data shows good agreement, although there may be a systematic tendency for the unbinned (maximum likelihood) method to give slightly more negative values of α for galaxies with steeper LFs. We find that galaxies with high rates of star formation (or equivalently, with the brightest or largest numbers of clusters) have a slight tendency to have shallower values of α. In particular, the Antennae galaxy (NGC 4038/39), a merging system with a relatively high star formation rate (SFR), has the second flattest LF in the sample. A tentative correlation may also be present between Hubble type and values of α, in the sense that later type galaxies (i.e., Sd and Sm) appear to have flatter LFs. Hence, while there do appear to be some weak correlations, the relative similarity in the values of α for a large number of star-forming galaxies suggests that, to first order, the LFs are fairly universal. We examine the bright end of the LFs and find evidence for a downturn, although it only pertains to about 1% of the clusters. Our uniform database results in a small scatter (≈0.4 to 0.5 mag) in the correlation between the magnitude of the brightest cluster (M {sub brightest}) and log of the number

  4. The clumped isotope geothermometer in soil and paleosol carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quade, J.; Eiler, J.; Daëron, M.; Achyuthan, H.

    2013-03-01

    We studied both modern soils and buried paleosols in order to understand the relationship of temperature (T°C(47)) estimated from clumped isotope compositions (Δ47) of soil carbonates to actual surface and burial temperatures. Carbonates from modern soils with differing rainfall seasonality were sampled from Arizona, Nevada, Tibet, Pakistan, and India. T°C(47) obtained from these soils shows that soil carbonate forms in the warmest months of the year, in the late morning to afternoon, and probably in response to intense soil dewatering. T°C(47) obtained from modern soil carbonate ranges from 10.8 to 39.5 °C. On average, T°C(47) exceeds mean annual temperature by 10-15 °C due to summertime bias in soil carbonate formation, and to summertime ground heating by incident solar radiation. Secondary controls on T°C(47) are soil depth and shading. Site mean annual air temperature (MAAT) across a broad range (0-30 °C) of site temperatures is highly correlated with T°C(47) from soils, following the equation: MAAT(°C)=1.20(T°C(47)0)-21.72(r2=0.92) where T°C(47)0 is the effective air temperature at the site estimated from T°C(47). The effective air temperature represents the air temperature required to account for the T°C(47) at each site, after consideration of variations in T°C(47) with soil depth and ground heating. The highly correlated relationship in this equation should now permit mean annual temperature in the past to be reconstructed from T°C(47) in paleosol carbonate, assuming one is studying paleosols that formed in environments generally similar in seasonality and ground cover to our calibration sites. T°C(47)0 decreases systematically with elevation gain in the Himalaya, following the equation: elevation(m)=-229(T°C(47)0)+9300(r2=0.95) Assuming that temperature varied similarly with elevation in the past, this equation can be used to reconstruct paleoelevation from clumped isotope analysis of ancient soil carbonates. We also measured T°C(47

  5. HerMES: Cosmic Infrared Background Anisotropies and the Clustering of Dusty Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, M. P.; Wang, L.; Zemcov, M.; Addison, G.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Aussel, H.; Béthermin, M.; Bock, J.; Boselli, A.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Casey, C. M.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Cooray, A.; De Zotti, G.; Dowell, C. D.; Farrah, D.; Franceschini, A.; Glenn, J.; Griffin, M.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Heinis, S.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Lagache, G.; Levenson, L.; Marchetti, L.; Marsden, G.; Nguyen, H. T.; O'Halloran, B.; Oliver, S. J.; Omont, A.; Page, M. J.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pearson, C. P.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Pohlen, M.; Rigopoulou, D.; Roseboom, I. G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Schulz, B.; Scott, D.; Seymour, N.; Shupe, D. L.; Smith, A. J.; Symeonidis, M.; Vaccari, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Vieira, J. D.; Wardlow, J.; Xu, C. K.

    2013-07-01

    We present measurements of the auto- and cross-frequency power spectra of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at 250, 350, and 500 μm (1200, 860, and 600 GHz) from observations totaling ~70 deg2 made with the SPIRE instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. We measure a fractional anisotropy δI/I = 14% ± 4%, detecting signatures arising from the clustering of dusty star-forming galaxies in both the linear (2-halo) and nonlinear (1-halo) regimes; and that the transition from the 2- to 1-halo terms, below which power originates predominantly from multiple galaxies within dark matter halos, occurs at k θ ~ 0.10-0.12 arcmin-1 (l ~ 2160-2380), from 250 to 500 μm. New to this paper is clear evidence of a dependence of the Poisson and 1-halo power on the flux-cut level of masked sources—suggesting that some fraction of the more luminous sources occupy more massive halos as satellites, or are possibly close pairs. We measure the cross-correlation power spectra between bands, finding that bands which are farthest apart are the least correlated, as well as hints of a reduction in the correlation between bands when resolved sources are more aggressively masked. In the second part of the paper, we attempt to interpret the measurements in the framework of the halo model. With the aim of fitting simultaneously with one model the power spectra, number counts, and absolute CIB level in all bands, we find that this is achievable by invoking a luminosity-mass relationship, such that the luminosity-to-mass ratio peaks at a particular halo mass scale and declines toward lower and higher mass halos. Our best-fit model finds that the halo mass which is most efficient at hosting star formation in the redshift range of peak star-forming activity, z ~ 1-3, is log(M peak/M ⊙) ~ 12.1 ± 0.5, and that the minimum halo mass to host infrared galaxies is log(M min/M ⊙) ~ 10.1 ± 0.6. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European

  6. HerMES: COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND ANISOTROPIES AND THE CLUSTERING OF DUSTY STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Viero, M. P.; Zemcov, M.; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Dowell, C. D.; Wang, L.; Addison, G.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Aussel, H.; Bethermin, M.; Casey, C. M.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; De Zotti, G.; Farrah, D.; and others

    2013-07-20

    We present measurements of the auto- and cross-frequency power spectra of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m (1200, 860, and 600 GHz) from observations totaling {approx}70 deg{sup 2} made with the SPIRE instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. We measure a fractional anisotropy {delta}I/I = 14% {+-} 4%, detecting signatures arising from the clustering of dusty star-forming galaxies in both the linear (2-halo) and nonlinear (1-halo) regimes; and that the transition from the 2- to 1-halo terms, below which power originates predominantly from multiple galaxies within dark matter halos, occurs at k{sub {theta}} {approx} 0.10-0.12 arcmin{sup -1} (l {approx} 2160-2380), from 250 to 500 {mu}m. New to this paper is clear evidence of a dependence of the Poisson and 1-halo power on the flux-cut level of masked sources-suggesting that some fraction of the more luminous sources occupy more massive halos as satellites, or are possibly close pairs. We measure the cross-correlation power spectra between bands, finding that bands which are farthest apart are the least correlated, as well as hints of a reduction in the correlation between bands when resolved sources are more aggressively masked. In the second part of the paper, we attempt to interpret the measurements in the framework of the halo model. With the aim of fitting simultaneously with one model the power spectra, number counts, and absolute CIB level in all bands, we find that this is achievable by invoking a luminosity-mass relationship, such that the luminosity-to-mass ratio peaks at a particular halo mass scale and declines toward lower and higher mass halos. Our best-fit model finds that the halo mass which is most efficient at hosting star formation in the redshift range of peak star-forming activity, z {approx} 1-3, is log(M{sub peak}/M{sub Sun }) {approx} 12.1 {+-} 0.5, and that the minimum halo mass to host infrared galaxies is log(M{sub min}/M{sub Sun }) {approx} 10

  7. Lanthanide, thorium, and uranium oxide clusters formed by DLV/FTICR

    SciTech Connect

    Pires de Matos, A.; Marcalo, J.; Leal, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    In this work the formation of clusters of all the lanthanides (except promethium), thorium and uranium by direct laser vaporization (DLV) of surface oxidized metallic targets in a vacuum of about 2 x 10{sup -8} Torr. The cluster ions were obtained using a Nd:YAG laser pulse (ca. 30 mJ at the fundamental 1064 nm wavelength) and the ions were stored in the trap of an Extrel (Waters) FTMS 2001-DT Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) spectrometer.

  8. THE BLAST VIEW OF THE STAR-FORMING REGION IN AQUILA (l = 45{sup 0}, b = 0{sup 0})

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Martin, Peter G.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume

    2010-11-01

    We have carried out the first general submillimeter analysis of the field toward GRSMC 45.46+0.05, a massive star-forming region in Aquila. The deconvolved 6 deg{sup 2} (3{sup 0} x 2{sup 0}) maps provided by BLAST in 2005 at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m were used to perform a preliminary characterization of the clump population previously investigated in the infrared, radio, and molecular maps. Interferometric CORNISH data at 4.8 GHz have also been used to characterize the Ultracompact H II regions (UCHIIRs) within the main clumps. By means of the BLAST maps, we have produced an initial census of the submillimeter structures that will be observed by Herschel, several of which are known Infrared Dark Clouds. Our spectral energy distributions of the main clumps in the field, located at {approx}7 kpc, reveal an active population with temperatures of T{approx} 35-40 K and masses of {approx}10{sup 3} M{sub sun} for a dust emissivity index {beta} = 1.5. The clump evolutionary stages range from evolved sources, with extended H II regions and prominent IR stellar population, to massive young stellar objects, prior to the formation of an UCHIIR. The CORNISH data have revealed the details of the stellar content and structure of the UCHIIRs. In most cases, the ionizing stars corresponding to the brightest radio detections are capable of accounting for the clump bolometric luminosity, in most cases powered by embedded OB stellar clusters.

  9. Clumps of hydrogenous planetoids as the dark matter of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Schild, Rudolph E.

    2011-11-01

    Hydrodynamic gravitational condensation theory and quasar-microlensing observations lead to the conclusion that the baryonic mass of most galaxies is dominated by dense clumps of hydrogenous planetoids. Star microlensing collaborations fail to detect planetoids as the dominant dark matter component of the inner Galaxy halo (within ≈ 30 kpc) by an unjustified uniform- number-density assumption that underestimates the average value. At plasma neutralization and photon decoupling, existing proto-galaxies should fragment at both proto-globular-cluster (PGC) ≈ 105M⊙ and terrestrial-mass scales ≈ 10-6M⊙, from Gibson's 1996 hydro-gravitational theory. Schild's 1996 interpretation was that the mass of the lens galaxy is dominated by "rogue planets ... likely to be the missing mass", from measured twinkling frequencies of the lensed quasar Q0957+561 A,B images and their time-delayed difference. Schild's findings of a 1.1 year image time delay with dominant planetoid image-twinkling-period are confirmed herein by three observatories.

  10. Observational constraints on star cluster formation theory. I. The mass-radius relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfalzner, S.; Kirk, H.; Sills, A.; Urquhart, J. S.; Kauffmann, J.; Kuhn, M. A.; Bhandare, A.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Stars form predominantly in groups usually denoted as clusters or associations. The observed stellar groups display a broad spectrum of masses, sizes, and other properties, so it is often assumed that there is no underlying structure in this diversity. Aims: Here we show that the assumption of an unstructured multitude of cluster or association types might be misleading. Current data compilations of clusters in the solar neighbourhood show correlations among cluster mass, size, age, maximum stellar mass, etc. In this first paper we take a closer look at the correlation of cluster mass and radius. Methods: We use literature data to explore relations in cluster and molecular core properties in the solar neighbourhood. Results: We show that for embedded clusters in the solar neighbourhood a clear correlation exists between cluster mass and half-mass radius of the form Mc = CRcγ with γ = 1.7 ± 0.2. This correlation holds for infrared K-band data, as well as for X-ray sources and clusters containing a hundred stars up to those consisting of a few tens of thousands of stars. The correlation is difficult to verify for clusters containing fewer than 30 stars owing to low-number statistics. Dense clumps of gas are the progenitors of the embedded clusters. We find almost the same slope for the mass-size relation of dense, massive clumps as for the embedded star clusters. This might point to a direct translation from gas to stellar mass: however, it is difficult to relate size measurements for clusters (stars) to those for gas profiles. Taking multiple paths for clump mass into cluster mass into account, we obtain an average star-formation efficiency of 18%+9.3-5.7 for the embedded clusters in the solar neighbourhood. Conclusions: The derived mass-radius relation gives constraints for the theory of clustered star formation. Analytical models and simulations of clustered star formation have to reproduce this relation in order to be realistic.

  11. The Influence of Kinetic Growth Factors on the Clumped Isotope Composition of Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. D.; Watkins, J. M.; Tripati, A.; Ryerson, F. J.; DePaolo, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Clumped isotope paleothermometry is based on the association of 13C and 18O within carbonate minerals. Although the influence of temperature on equilibrium 13C-18O bond ordering has been studied, recent oxygen isotope studies of inorganic calcite demonstrate that calcite grown in laboratory experiments and in many natural settings does not form in equilibrium with water. It is therefore likely that the carbon and clumped isotope composition of these calcite crystals are not representative of true thermodynamic equilibrium. To isolate kinetic clumped isotope effects that arise at the mineral-solution interface, clumped isotopic equilibrium of DIC species must be maintained. This can be accomplished by dissolving the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) into the solution, thereby reducing the time required for isotopic equilibration of DIC species by approximately two orders of magnitude between pH 7.7 and 9.3. We conduct calcite growth experiments aimed specifically at measuring the pH-dependence of kinetic clumped isotope effects during non-equilibrium precipitation of calcite. We precipitated calcite from aqueous solution at a constant pH and controlled supersaturation over the pH range 7.7-9.3 in the presence of CA. For each experiment, a gas mixture of N2 and CO2 is bubbled through a beaker of solution without seed crystals. As CO2 from the gas dissolves into solution, calcite crystals grow on the beaker walls. The pH of the solution is maintained by use of an autotitrator with NaOH as the titrant. We control the temperature, pH, the pCO2 of the gas inflow, and the gas inflow rate, and monitor the total alkalinity, the pCO2 of the gas outflow, and the amount of NaOH added. A constant crystal growth rate of ~1.6 mmol/m2/hr is maintained over all experiments. Results from these experiments are compared to predictions from a recently-developed isotopic ion-by-ion growth model of calcite. The model describes the rate, temperature and pH dependence of oxygen isotope uptake

  12. Using Spinning Dust Emission To Constrain The Evolution Of Dust Grains In Cold Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbs, C.; Paladini, R.; Cleary, K.; Grainge, K.; Muchovej, S.; Pearson, T.; Perrott, Y.; Rumsey, C.; Scaife, A.; Stevenson, M.; Villadsen, J.

    Within many molecular clouds in our Galaxy there are cold, dense regions known as cold clumps in which stars form. These dense environments provide a great location in which to study dust grain evolution. Given the low temperatures (˜10-15 K) and high densities (˜105 cm-3 ), these environments are dark at mid-infrared (IR) wavelengths and emit strongly at wavelengths ≥160 µm. The lack of mid-IR emission can be attributed to one of two reasons: i) a deficit of the small dust grains that emit stochastically at mid-IR wavelengths; or ii) small dust grains are present, but due to the high densities, the stellar photons cannot penetrate deep enough into the clumps to excite them. Using mid-IR observations alone it is impossible to distinguish between these two scenarios. However, by using spinning dust emission at cm wavelengths it is possible to break this degeneracy, because if small dust grains are present in these clumps, then even though stellar photons cannot excite them to emit at mid-IR wavelengths, these dust grains will be spunup by collisions and hence emit spinning dust radiation. If spinning dust were detected in these clumps it would prove that there are small dust grains present and that the lack of mid-IR emission is due to a lack of stellar photons. Conversely, a lack of spinning dust emission would indicate a deficit of small dust grains in these clumps. Since small dust grains require harsh radiation fields to be destroyed, a lack of small dust grains is likely a result of dust grain coagulation. With this in mind, we present preliminary results illustrating our method of using spinning dust observations to determine the evolution of small dust grains in these environments.

  13. Spherical cluster ensembles with fractal structure in LaSrMnO: New form of self-organization in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Okunev, V. D.; Samoilenko, Z. A.; Burkhovetski, V. V.; Szymczak, H.; Szymczak, R.; Lewandowski, S. J.

    2013-04-28

    The growth of La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} films in magnetron plasma, in special conditions, leads to the appearance of ensembles of micron-sized spherical crystalline clusters with fractal structure, which we consider to be a new form of self-organization in solids. Each ensemble contains 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} elementary clusters, 100-250 A in diameter. Interaction of the clusters in the ensemble is realized through the interatomic chemical bonds, intrinsic to the manganites. Integration of peripheral areas of interacting clusters results in the formation of common intercluster medium in the ensemble. We argue that the ensembles with fractal structure built into paramagnetic disordered matrix have ferromagnetic properties. Absence of sharp borders between elementary clusters and the presence of common intercluster medium inside each ensemble permits to rearrange magnetic order and to change the volume of the ferromagnetic phase, providing automatically a high sensitivity of the material to the external field.

  14. IN-SPIRALING CLUMPS IN BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Zhang Hongxin; Hunter, Deidre A.

    2012-03-10

    Giant star formation clumps in dwarf irregular galaxies can have masses exceeding a few percent of the galaxy mass enclosed inside their orbital radii. They can produce sufficient torques on dark matter halo particles, halo stars, and the surrounding disk to lose their angular momentum and spiral into the central region in 1 Gyr. Pairs of giant clumps with similarly large relative masses can interact and exchange angular momentum to the same degree. The result of this angular momentum loss is a growing central concentration of old stars, gas, and star formation that can produce a long-lived starburst in the inner region, identified with the blue compact dwarf (BCD) phase. This central concentration is proposed to be analogous to the bulge in a young spiral galaxy. Observations of star complexes in five local BCDs confirm the relatively large clump masses that are expected for this process. The observed clumps also seem to contain old field stars, even after background light subtraction, in which case the clumps may be long-lived. The two examples with clumps closest to the center have the largest relative clump masses and the greatest contributions from old stars. An additional indication that the dense central regions of BCDs are like bulges is the high ratio of the inner disk scale height to the scale length, which is comparable to 1 for four of the galaxies.

  15. Quantitative characterization of clumping in Scots pine crowns

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, Pauline; Mõttus, Matti; Rautiainen, Miina; Sievänen, Risto

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Proper characterization of the clumped structure of forests is needed for calculation of the absorbed radiation and photosynthetic production by a canopy. This study examined the dependency of crown-level clumping on tree size and growth conditions in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), and determined the ability of statistical canopy radiation models to quantify the degree of self-shading within crowns as a result of the clumping effect. Methods Twelve 3-D Scots pine trees were generated using an application of the LIGNUM model, and the crown-level clumping as quantified by the crown silhouette to total needle area ratio (STARcrown) was calculated. The results were compared with those produced by the stochastic approach of modelling tree crowns as geometric shapes filled with a random medium. Key Results Crown clumping was independent of tree height, needle area and growth conditions. The results supported the capability of the stochastic approach in characterizing clumping in crowns given that the outer shell of the tree crown is well represented. Conclusions Variation in the whole-stand clumping index is induced by differences in the spatial pattern of trees as a function of, for example, stand age rather than by changes in the degree of self-shading within individual crowns as they grow bigger. PMID:24431344

  16. Microlensing Optical Depth towards the Galactic Bulge Using Clump Giants from the MACHO Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Popowski, P; Griest, K; Thomas, C L; Cook, K H; Bennett, D P; Becker, A C; Alves, D R; Minniti, D; Drake, A J; Alcock, C; Allsman, R A; Axelrod, T S; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Nelson, C A; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Vandehei, T; Welch, D

    2005-07-14

    Using 7 years of MACHO survey data, we present a new determination of the optical depth to microlensing towards the Galactic bulge. We select the sample of 62 microlensing events (60 unique) on clump giant sources and perform a detailed efficiency analysis. We use only the clump giant sources because these are bright bulge stars and are not as strongly affected by blending as other events. Using a subsample of 42 clump events concentrated in an area of 4.5 deg{sup 2} with 739000 clump giant stars, we find {tau} = 2.17{sub -0.38}{sup +0.47} x 10{sup -6} at (l,b) = (1{sup o}.50, -2{sup o}.68), somewhat smaller than found in most previous MACHO studies, but in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. We also present the optical depth in each of the 19 fields in which we detected events, and find limits on optical depth for fields with no events. The errors in optical depth in individual fields are dominated by Poisson noise. We measure optical depth gradients of (1.06 {+-} 0.71) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} and (0.29 {+-} 0.43) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} in the galactic latitude b and longitude l directions, respectively. Finally, we discuss the possibility of anomalous duration distribution of events in the field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3{sup o}.11, -3{sup o}.01) as well as investigate spatial clustering of events in all fields.

  17. Preservation of carbonate clumped isotopes in sedimentary paleoclimate archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, G. A.; Passey, B. H.; Grossman, E. L.; Shenton, B.; Perez-Huerta, A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is increasingly used to reconstruct paleotemperatures of ancient terrestrial environments. One promising application is elucidating paleoelevation from carbonate archives such as paleosols, lacustrine marls, and fossil freshwater shells. Unlike conventional stable isotope approaches (e.g., mineral δ18O or δD), clumped isotope thermometry is independent of the isotopic composition of the precipitating waters and can therefore be used to reconstruct elevation by both the temperature-altitude relationship and the rainfall δ18O-altitude relationship. However, interpretation of clumped isotope data is not without its own complications. Like conventional stable isotopes, clumped isotope paleotemperatures can be effectively reset to warmer values by dissolution/reprecipitation-type diagenesis during sedimentary burial. It is also known that carbonate clumped isotope bonds (i.e., 13C-18O) are susceptible to 'reordering' in the solid mineral lattice at warmer burial temperatures, with laboratory studies of natural carbonates indicating activation of this phenomenon at temperatures as low as 100 °C over geologic timescales. A challenge in applying carbonate clumped isotope thermometry to natural samples is now evaluating terrestrial archives with respect to both types of alteration: 'open-system' alteration and 'closed-system' bond reordering. In this talk we will review our experimental efforts to constrain the kinetics of clumped isotope reordering, with relevance to low-temperature carbonates like fossil shells and early diagenetic minerals, and present new laboratory data that further inform our theoretical framework for the mechanism(s) of 13C-18O bond reordering. Together with traditional analytical and petrographic screening for recrystallization, empirical and laboratory studies of carbonate clumped isotope reordering represent the next steps in evaluating isotopic records of paleoclimate, paleobiology, and paleoelevation

  18. Star-Forming Brightest Cluster Galaxies at 0.25 < z < 1.25: A Transitioning Fuel Supply

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McDonald, M.; Stalder, B.; Bayliss, M.; Allen, S. W.; Applegate, D. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; et al

    2016-01-22

    In this paper, we present a multiwavelength study of the 90 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect by the South Pole Telescope, utilizing data from various ground- and space-based facilities. We infer the star-formation rate (SFR) for the BCG in each cluster—based on the UV and IR continuum luminosity, as well as the [O ii]λλ3726,3729 emission line luminosity in cases where spectroscopy is available—and find seven systems with SFR > 100 M⊙ yr-1. We find that the BCG SFR exceeds 10 M⊙ yr-1 in 31 of 90 (34%) cases at 0.25 < z < 1.25, compared to ~1%–5% at z ~ 0 from the literature. At z ≳ 1, this fraction increases tomore » $${92}_{-31}^{+6}$$%, implying a steady decrease in the BCG SFR over the past ~9 Gyr. At low-z, we find that the specific SFR in BCGs is declining more slowly with time than for field or cluster galaxies, which is most likely due to the replenishing fuel from the cooling ICM in relaxed, cool core clusters. At z ≳ 0.6, the correlation between the cluster central entropy and BCG star formation—which is well established at z ~ 0—is not present. Instead, we find that the most star-forming BCGs at high-z are found in the cores of dynamically unrelaxed clusters. We use data from the Hubble Space Telescope to investigate the rest-frame near-UV morphology of a subsample of the most star-forming BCGs, and find complex, highly asymmetric UV morphologies on scales as large as ~50–60 kpc. Finally, the high fraction of star-forming BCGs hosted in unrelaxed, non-cool core clusters at early times suggests that the dominant mode of fueling star formation in BCGs may have recently transitioned from galaxy–galaxy interactions to ICM cooling.« less

  19. Star-forming Brightest Cluster Galaxies at 0.25 > z > 1.25: A Transitioning Fuel Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Stalder, B.; Bayliss, M.; Allen, S. W.; Applegate, D. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chiu, I.; Desai, S.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Marrone, D. P.; Miller, E. D.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Stanford, S. A.; Stark, A. A.; Vieira, J. D.; Zenteno, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 90 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev Zel’dovich effect by the South Pole Telescope, utilizing data from various ground- and space-based facilities. We infer the star-formation rate (SFR) for the BCG in each cluster—based on the UV and IR continuum luminosity, as well as the [O ii]λλ3726,3729 emission line luminosity in cases where spectroscopy is available—and find seven systems with SFR > 100 M⊙ yr-1. We find that the BCG SFR exceeds 10 M⊙ yr-1 in 31 of 90 (34%) cases at 0.25 < z < 1.25, compared to ˜1%-5% at z ˜ 0 from the literature. At z ≳ 1, this fraction increases to {92}-31+6%, implying a steady decrease in the BCG SFR over the past ˜9 Gyr. At low-z, we find that the specific SFR in BCGs is declining more slowly with time than for field or cluster galaxies, which is most likely due to the replenishing fuel from the cooling ICM in relaxed, cool core clusters. At z ≳ 0.6, the correlation between the cluster central entropy and BCG star formation—which is well established at z ˜ 0—is not present. Instead, we find that the most star-forming BCGs at high-z are found in the cores of dynamically unrelaxed clusters. We use data from the Hubble Space Telescope to investigate the rest-frame near-UV morphology of a subsample of the most star-forming BCGs, and find complex, highly asymmetric UV morphologies on scales as large as ˜50-60 kpc. The high fraction of star-forming BCGs hosted in unrelaxed, non-cool core clusters at early times suggests that the dominant mode of fueling star formation in BCGs may have recently transitioned from galaxy-galaxy interactions to ICM cooling.

  20. Hydrogen abstraction in the neutral molecular cluster of benzophenone and hydrogen donors formed in a supersonic free jet expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Yoshihisa; Kajii, Yoshizumi; Obi, Kinichi

    1992-08-06

    This paper discusses how benzophenone undergoes photoreduction to form benzophenone ketyl radical by an intracellular reaction in the benzophenone 1,4-cyclohexadiene mixed expansion in a supersonic free jet expansion. No ketyl radical fluorescence is observed when triethylamine, 2-propanol, or ethanol is the hydrogen donor; thus the normal molecular cluster activity depends on the nature of the hydrogen donor. 36 refs., 5 figs.

  1. CLUMPY GALAXIES IN CANDELS. I. THE DEFINITION OF UV CLUMPS AND THE FRACTION OF CLUMPY GALAXIES AT 0.5 < z < 3

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Fang, Jerome J.; Bell, Eric F.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Lu, Yu; Mandelker, Nir; Dekel, Avishai; McIntosh, Daniel M.; Primack, Joel R.; Ceverino, Daniel; and others

    2015-02-10

    Although giant clumps of stars are thought to be crucial to galaxy formation and evolution, the most basic demographics of clumps are still uncertain, mainly because the definition of clumps has not been thoroughly discussed. In this paper, we carry out a study of the basic demographics of clumps in star-forming galaxies at 0.5 < z < 3, using our proposed physical definition that UV-bright clumps are discrete star-forming regions that individually contribute more than 8% of the rest-frame UV light of their galaxies. Clumps defined this way are significantly brighter than the H II regions of nearby large spiral galaxies, either individually or blended, when physical spatial resolution and cosmological dimming are considered. Under this definition, we measure the fraction of star-forming galaxies that have at least one off-center clump (f {sub clumpy}) and the contributions of clumps to the rest-frame UV light and star formation rate (SFR) of star-forming galaxies in the CANDELS/GOODS-S and UDS fields, where our mass-complete sample consists of 3239 galaxies with axial ratio q > 0.5. The redshift evolution of f {sub clumpy} changes with the stellar mass (M {sub *}) of the galaxies. Low-mass (log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) < 9.8) galaxies keep an almost constant f {sub clumpy} of ∼60% from z ∼ 3 to z ∼ 0.5. Intermediate-mass and massive galaxies drop their f {sub clumpy} from 55% at z ∼ 3 to 40% and 15%, respectively, at z ∼ 0.5. We find that (1) the trend of disk stabilization predicted by violent disk instability matches the f {sub clumpy} trend of massive galaxies; (2) minor mergers are a viable explanation of the f {sub clumpy} trend of intermediate-mass galaxies at z < 1.5, given a realistic observability timescale; and (3) major mergers are unlikely responsible for the f {sub clumpy} trend in all masses at z < 1.5. The clump contribution to the rest-frame UV light of star-forming galaxies shows a broad peak around galaxies with log (M {sub *}/M {sub

  2. The clump mass function of the dense clouds in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekruhl, Stephanie

    2013-07-01

    Stars form in dense, cold regions of dust and gas, called Molecular Clouds. The question how the initial conditions in these star-forming regions affect the resulting mass function of the forming stars is one of the most fundamental open problems in the theory of star formation. Therefore in this work we want to characterize the properties of the cold cloud structures in the Carina Nebula (NGC 3372). The Carina Nebula represents with a distance of 2.3kpc one of the nearest massive Galactic star forming regions, hosting at least 65 O-type stars. Therefore it is the best site to study in detail the physics of violent massive star formation. The feedback of the numerous hot stars disperses the parental cloud but also triggers the formation of new generations of stars. We use a 1.25° × 1.25° wide-field sub-millimetre map of the Carina Nebula obtained with LABOCA (870μm) at the APEX telescope to investigate its Clump Mass Function (ClMF). New deeper LABOCA maps of two selected regions experiencing different levels of stellar feedback will allow, due to their higher sensitivity, a more complete look on the cloud structures and the influence of the hot stars. To determine the ClMF of the Carina Nebula we use the three common clump-finding algorithms CLUMPFIND, GAUSSCLUMPS, and SExtractor. Each of these programs leads to a sample of clumps, whose positions, sizes, and intensities are calculated. For a reliable mass estimate the knowledge about the temperatures within the clumps is very important. In addition to the commonly used approach to assume a "typical" temperature for all clouds, we derive an empirical relation between cloud column density and temperature to determine an estimate of the individual clump temperatures. For all three samples we find clump temperatures between 8.5 K and 18.5 K. With these temperatures we are able to determine the individual clump masses. For masses above ∼50 M⊙ we find a power-law for all three ClMFs, with a power-law index

  3. A cluster in the making: ALMA reveals the initial conditions for high-mass cluster formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathborne, Jill

    2015-08-01

    Despite their importance, very little is known about the formation of star clusters. An understanding of their formation requires observations of their natal dust and gas well before the onset of star formation. In recent Galactic Plane surveys, one object, G0.253+0.016, stands out as extreme. Identified as a cold, dense, massive molecular clump devoid of prevalent star-formation, it has exactly the properties expected for a clump that may form an Arches-like cluster. Located at a distance of ~8.5 kpc, G0.253+0.016 lies ~100 pc from the Galactic Centre, in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ).In this talk I will showcase our recent ALMA data of the 90 GHz continuum and line emission toward G0.253+0.016. The data are spectacular reveal a complex network of structures: there is emission on all spatial scales, the morphology of which ranges from small, compact regions to extended, filamentary structures that are seen in both emission and absorption. A statistical analysis of the structure within G0.253+0.016 demonstrates the dominance of turbulence. The talk will summarise our recent results and the emerging picture of cluster formation in the extreme, high-pressure environment of the CMZ that is revealed by the new ALMA data.

  4. Probing the Dragonfish star-forming complex: the ionizing population of the young massive cluster Mercer 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente, D.; Najarro, F.; Borissova, J.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Hanson, M. M.; Trombley, C.; Figer, D. F.; Davies, B.; Garcia, M.; Kurtev, R.; Urbaneja, M. A.; Smith, L. C.; Lucas, P. W.; Herrero, A.

    2016-05-01

    It has recently been claimed that the nebula, Dragonfish, is powered by a superluminous but elusive OB association. However, systematic searches in near-infrared photometric surveys have found many other cluster candidates in this region of the sky. Among these, the first confirmed young massive cluster was Mercer 30, where Wolf-Rayet stars were found.We perform a new characterization of Mercer 30 with unprecedented accuracy, combining NICMOS/HST and VVV photometric data with multi-epoch ISAAC/VLT H- and K-band spectra. Stellar parameters for most of spectroscopically observed cluster members are found through precise non-LTE atmosphere modeling with the CMFGEN code. Our spectrophotometric study for this cluster yields a new, revised distance of d = (12.4 ± 1.7) kpc and a total of QHMc30 ≈ 6.70 × 1050 s-1 Lyman ionizing photons. A cluster age of (4.0 ± 0.8) Myr is found through isochrone fitting, and a total mass of (1.6 ± 0.6) × 104M⊙ is estimated, thanks to our extensive knowledge of the post-main-sequence population. As a consequence, membership of Mercer 30 to the Dragonfish star-forming complex is confirmed, allowing us to use this cluster as a probe for the whole complex, which turns out to be extremely large (~400 pc across) and located at the outer edge of the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm (~11 kpc from the Galactic center). The Dragonfish complex hosts 19 young clusters or cluster candidates (including Mercer 30 and a new candidate presented in this work) and an estimated minimum of nine field Wolf-Rayet stars. All these contributions account for, at least 73% of the ionization of the Dragonfish nebula and leaves little or no room for the alleged superluminous OB association; alternative explanations are discussed. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under programs IDs 179.B-2002, 081.D-0471, 083.D-0765, 087.D-0957, and 089.D-0989.

  5. Probing the Dragonfish star-forming complex: the ionizing population of the young massive cluster Mercer 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente, D.; Najarro, F.; Borissova, J.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Hanson, M. M.; Trombley, C.; Figer, D. F.; Davies, B.; Garcia, M.; Kurtev, R.; Urbaneja, M. A.; Smith, L. C.; Lucas, P. W.; Herrero, A.

    2016-04-01

    It has recently been claimed that the nebula, Dragonfish, is powered by a superluminous but elusive OB association. However, systematic searches in near-infrared photometric surveys have found many other cluster candidates in this region of the sky. Among these, the first confirmed young massive cluster was Mercer 30, where Wolf-Rayet stars were found.We perform a new characterization of Mercer 30 with unprecedented accuracy, combining NICMOS/HST and VVV photometric data with multi-epoch ISAAC/VLT H- and K-band spectra. Stellar parameters for most of spectroscopically observed cluster members are found through precise non-LTE atmosphere modeling with the CMFGEN code. Our spectrophotometric study for this cluster yields a new, revised distance of d = (12.4 ± 1.7) kpc and a total of QHMc30 ≈ 6.70 × 1050 s-1 Lyman ionizing photons. A cluster age of (4.0 ± 0.8) Myr is found through isochrone fitting, and a total mass of (1.6 ± 0.6) × 104M⊙ is estimated, thanks to our extensive knowledge of the post-main-sequence population. As a consequence, membership of Mercer 30 to the Dragonfish star-forming complex is confirmed, allowing us to use this cluster as a probe for the whole complex, which turns out to be extremely large (~400 pc across) and located at the outer edge of the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm (~11 kpc from the Galactic center). The Dragonfish complex hosts 19 young clusters or cluster candidates (including Mercer 30 and a new candidate presented in this work) and an estimated minimum of nine field Wolf-Rayet stars. All these contributions account for, at least 73% of the ionization of the Dragonfish nebula and leaves little or no room for the alleged superluminous OB association; alternative explanations are discussed. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under programs IDs 179.B-2002, 081.D-0471, 083.D-0765, 087.D-0957, and 089.D-0989.

  6. The Amyloid Precursor Protein Forms Plasmalemmal Clusters via Its Pathogenic Amyloid-β Domain

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Arne; Fischer, Sebastian; Lang, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a large, ubiquitous integral membrane protein with a small amyloid-β (Aβ) domain. In the human brain, endosomal processing of APP produces neurotoxic Aβ-peptides, which are involved in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we show that the Aβ sequence exerts a physiological function when still present in the unprocessed APP molecule. From the extracellular site, Aβ concentrates APP molecules into plasmalemmal membrane protein clusters. Moreover, Aβ stabilization of clusters is a prerequisite for their targeting to endocytic clathrin structures. Therefore, we conclude that the Aβ domain directly mediates a central step in APP trafficking, driving its own conversion into neurotoxic peptides. PMID:22455924

  7. DYNAMO survey: An upclose view of turbulent disks with massive starforming clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, David B.

    2015-08-01

    In this talk I will discuss properties of extremely gas rich, turbulent disk galaxies in the DYNAMO survey, an IFU survey of Halpha in ~100 galaxies at z~0.1. DYNAMO galaxies are selected to have the highest Halpha luminosity at their redshift, yet are not AGNs. Follow up results from HST, and kinematic maps from Keck and Gemini show that many DYNAMO galaxies are clumpy, rotating disks, with large internal velocity dispersion, similar to galaxies at z=1-2. In this talk I will show that gas fractions in DYNAMO galaxies are 20-40%, much higher than typical local Universe galaxies (1-8%). The gas fraction of DYNAMO galaxies is similar to that of z=1-2 disks (eg. PHIBBS survey). The DYNAMO galaxies offer a sample of galaxies gas rich, clumpy, turbulent disks at z~0.1. Using DYNAMO galaxies we can therefore constrain the properties of individual clumps with much higher precision than in z=2 galaxies. Unlike high redshift observations in our data the Jeans length is resolved, and we can therefore measure the size of star forming regions with much greater security. I will therefore show how effects from resolution are likely to affect the measurement of clump propoerties, and present an analysis of the sizes and luminosities of star forming regions of massive star forming clumps using HST maps of ionized gas. I will show that in gas rich disk galaxies the sizes of clumps is directly linked to the gas fraction and velocity dispersion of the disk, both predictions of the theory that instabilities lead to clumpy disks.

  8. Does Bi form clusters in GaAs1 - xBi x alloys?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punkkinen, M. P. J.; Laukkanen, P.; Kuzmin, M.; Levämäki, H.; Lång, J.; Tuominen, M.; Yasir, M.; Dahl, J.; Lu, S.; Delczeg-Czirjak, E. K.; Vitos, L.; Kokko, K.

    2014-11-01

    GaAs1 - xBi x alloys attract significant interest due to their potentiality for several applications, including solar cells. Recent experiments link the crucial optical properties of these alloys to Bi clustering at certain Bi compositions. Using ab initio calculations, we show that there is no thermodynamical driving force for the formation of small GaBi clusters incorporating As substitutional sites. However, the Ga vacancies should gather Bi atoms leading to small Bi clusters, and the Ga vacancies can act as nucleation centers for phase separation. The formation energy of the GaAs1 - xBi x with respect to GaAs and GaBi shows a maximum at intermediate Bi concentrations. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the GaAs1 - xBi x film growth is discussed. High Bi solubility is obtained, if the Bi atoms on the energetically favorable atom positions in the subsurface layer are relatively frozen. The Ga vacancy concentration may be increased by the incorporation of Bi. The Bi atoms can also prevent the out diffusion of Ga vacancies.

  9. Nanopore integrated with Au clusters formed under electron beam irradiation for single molecule analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seong Soo; Park, Myoung Jin; Han, Chul Hee; Kim, Sung In; Yoo, Jung Ho; Park, Kyung Jin; Park, Nam Kyou; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2016-02-01

    Recently the single molecules such as protein and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) have been successfully characterized using a solidstate nanopore with an electrical detection technique. However, the optical plasmonic nanopore has yet to be fabricated. The optical detection technique can be better utilized as next generation ultrafast geneome sequencing devices due to the possible utilization of the current optical technique for genome sequencing. In this report, we have investigated the Au nanopore formation under the electron beam irradiation on an Au aperture. The circular-type nanoopening with ~ 5 nm diameter on the diffused membrane is fabricated by using 2 keV electron beam irradiation by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). We found the Au cluster on the periphery of the drilled aperture under a 2 keV electron beam irradiation. Immediately right after electron beam irradiation, no Au cluster and no Au crystal lattice structure on the diffused plane are observed. However, after the sample was kept for ~ 6 months under a room environment, the Au clusters are found on the diffused membrane and the Au crystal lattice structures on the diffused membrane are also found using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. These phenomena can be attributed to Ostwald ripening. In addition, the Au nano-hole on the 40 nm thick Au membrane was also drilled by using 200 keV scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  10. Mid-infrared Extinction Mapping of Infrared Dark Clouds. II. The Structure of Massive Starless Cores and Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Michael J.; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2012-07-01

    We develop the mid-infrared extinction (MIREX) mapping technique of Butler & Tan (Paper I), presenting a new method to correct for the Galactic foreground emission based on observed saturation in independent cores. Using Spitzer GLIMPSE 8 μm images, this allows us to accurately probe mass surface densities, Σ, up to ~= 0.5 g cm-2 with 2'' resolution and mitigate one of the main sources of uncertainty associated with Galactic MIREX mapping. We then characterize the structure of 42 massive starless and early-stage cores and their surrounding clumps, selected from 10 infrared dark clouds, measuring Σcl(r) from the core/clump centers. We first assess the properties of the core/clump at a scale where the total enclosed mass as projected on the sky is M cl = 60 M ⊙. We find that these objects have a mean radius of R cl ~= 0.1 pc, mean \\bar{\\Sigma }_cl = 0.3\\:g\\:cm^{-2} and, if fitted by a power-law (PL) density profile \\rho _cl\\propto r^{-k_\\rho ,cl}, a mean value of k ρ, cl = 1.1. If we assume a core is embedded in each clump and subtract the surrounding clump envelope to derive the core properties, then we find a mean core density PL index of k ρ, c = 1.6. We repeat this analysis as a function of radius and derive the best-fitting PL plus uniform clump envelope model for each of the 42 core/clumps. The cores have typical masses of Mc ~ 100 M ⊙ and \\bar{\\Sigma }_c\\sim 0.1\\:g\\:cm^{-2}, and are embedded in clumps with comparable mass surface densities. We also consider Bonnor-Ebert density models, but these do not fit the observed Σ profiles as well as PLs. We conclude that massive starless cores exist and are well described by singular polytropic spheres. Their relatively low values of Σ and the fact that they are IR dark may imply that their fragmentation is inhibited by magnetic fields rather than radiative heating. Comparing to massive star-forming cores and clumps, there is tentative evidence for an evolution toward higher densities and steeper

  11. Cluster Formation in Protostellar Outflow-driven Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2006-04-01

    Most, perhaps all, stars go through a phase of vigorous outflow during formation. We examine, through three-dimensional MHD simulation, the effects of protostellar outflows on cluster formation. We find that the initial turbulence in the cluster-forming region is quickly replaced by motions generated by outflows. The protostellar outflow-driven turbulence (``protostellar turbulence'' for short) can keep the region close to a virial equilibrium long after the initial turbulence has decayed away. We argue that there exist two types of turbulence in star-forming clouds: a primordial (or ``interstellar'') turbulence and a protostellar turbulence, with the former transformed into the latter mostly in embedded clusters such as NGC 1333. Since the majority of stars are thought to form in clusters, an implication is that the stellar initial mass function is determined to a large extent by the stars themselves, through outflows that individually limit the mass accretion onto forming stars and collectively shape the environments (density structure and velocity field) in which most cluster members form. We speculate that massive cluster-forming clumps supported by protostellar turbulence gradually evolve toward a highly centrally condensed ``pivotal'' state, culminating in rapid formation of massive stars in the densest part through accretion.

  12. Follow-up observations of Planck cold clumps with ground-based telescopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tie

    2015-08-01

    Stars form in dense regions within molecular clouds, called pre-stellar cores (PSCs), which provide information on the initial conditions in the process of star formation. The low dust temperature (<14 K) of Planck cold clumps/cores makes them likely to be pre-stellar objects or at the very initial stage of protostellar collapse. We are conducting a legacy survey of Planck cold clumps with the JCMT, the TRAO 14-m, the KVN and TianMa 65-m telescopes. We aim to statistically study the initial conditions of star formation and cloud evolution in various kinds of environments. We have conducted some pilot observations with ground-based telescopes (JCMT, IRAM, PMO 14m, APEX, Mopra, Effelsberg 100 m, CSO and SMA). I will discuss the progress and the plans of this internationally collaborating project.

  13. Molecular gas clumps from the destruction of icy bodies in the β Pictoris debris disk.

    PubMed

    Dent, W R F; Wyatt, M C; Roberge, A; Augereau, J-C; Casassus, S; Corder, S; Greaves, J S; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I; Hales, A; Jackson, A P; Hughes, A Meredith; Lagrange, A-M; Matthews, B; Wilner, D

    2014-03-28

    Many stars are surrounded by disks of dusty debris formed in the collisions of asteroids, comets, and dwarf planets, but is gas also released in such events? Observations at submillimeter wavelengths of the archetypal debris disk around β Pictoris show that 0.3% of a Moon mass of carbon monoxide orbits in its debris belt. The gas distribution is highly asymmetric, with 30% found in a single clump 85 astronomical units from the star, in a plane closely aligned with the orbit of the inner planet, β Pictoris b. This gas clump delineates a region of enhanced collisions, either from a mean motion resonance with an unseen giant planet or from the remnants of a collision of Mars-mass planets. PMID:24603151

  14. Molecular Gas Clumps from the Destruction of Icy Bodies in the beta Pictoris Debris Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dent, W. R. F.; Wyatt, M. C.; Roberge, A.; Augereau, J. -C.; Casassus, S.; Corder, S.; Greaves, J. S.; DeGregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Hales, A.; Jackson, A. P.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Lagrange, A. -M.; Matthews, B.; Wilner, D.

    2014-01-01

    Many stars are surrounded by disks of dusty debris formed in the collisions of asteroids, comets and dwarf planets. But is gas also released in such events? Observations at sub-mm wavelengths of the archetypal debris disk around ß Pictoris show that 0.3% of a Moon mass of carbon monoxide orbits in its debris belt. The gas distribution is highly asymmetric, with 30% found in a single clump 85 AU from the star, in a plane closely aligned with the orbit of the inner planet, beta Pic b. This gas clump delineates a region of enhanced collisions, either from a mean motion resonance with an unseen giant planet, or from the remnants of a collision of Mars-mass planets.

  15. What the Spatial Distribution of Stars tells us about Star Formation and Massive Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressert, Eli; Bastian, N.; Testi, L.; Patience, J.; Longmore, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present a dissertation study on two recent results regarding the clustering properties of young stars. First, we discuss a global study of young stellar object (YSO) surface densities in star forming regions based on a comprehensive collection of Spitzer Space Telescope surveys, which encompasses nearly all star formation in the solar neighbourhood. It is shown that the distribution of YSO surface densities is a smooth distribution, being adequately described by a lognormal function from a few to 103 YSOs pc-2, with a peak at 22 YSOs pc-2 and a dispersion of 0.85. We find no evidence for multiple discrete modes of star-formation (e.g. clustered and distributed) and that not all stars form in clusters. A Herschel Space Observatory study confirms the YSO surface density results by observing and analyzing the prestellar core population in several star forming regions. Secondly, we propose that bound stellar clusters primarily form from dense clouds having escape speeds greater than the sound speed in photo-ionized gas. A list of giant molecular clumps with masses >103 M⊙ that have escape speeds greater than the sound speed in photo-ionized plasma is compiled from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. In these clumps, radiative feedback in the form of gas ionization is bottled up, enabling star formation to proceed to sufficiently high efficiency so that the resulting star cluster remains bound even after gas removal. We present over ten candidates that will most likely form >103 M⊙ star clusters and two of them that are comparable to NGC 3603 (>104 M⊙). Thus, providing us with an outlook on the next generation of star clusters in the Milky Way and clues to the initial conditions of massive cluster formation.

  16. Luminosity functions of YSO clusters in Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538 star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Devendra; Tamura, Motohide

    We have conducted deep near-infrared surveys of the Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538 massive star forming regions using simultaneous observations of the JHKs-band with the near-infrared camera SIRIUS on the UH 88-inch telescope and with SUBARU. The near-infrared surveys cover a total area of ~72 square arcmin of three regions with 10-sigma limiting magnitudes of ~19.5, 18.4 and 17.3 in J, H and Ks-band, respectively. Based on the color-color and color-magnitude diagrams and their clustering properties, the candidate young stellar objects are identified and their luminosity functions are constructed in Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538. A large number of previously unreported red sources (H-K > 2) have also been detected around these regions. We argue that these red stars are most probably pre-main sequence stars with intrinsic color excesses. The detected young stellar objects show a clear clustering pattern in each region: the Class I-like sources are mostly clustered in molecular cloud region, while the Class II-like sources in or around more evolved optical HII regions. We find that the slopes of the Ks-band luminosity functions of Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538 are lower than the typical values reported for the young embedded clusters and their stellar populations are primarily composed of low mass pre-main sequence stars. From the slopes of the Ks-band luminosity functions, we infer that Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538 star forming regions are rather young (age <=1 Myr).

  17. Luminosity functions of YSO clusters in Sh-2 255, W3 main and NGC 7538 star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Devendra; Tamura, Motohide; Sirius Team

    2006-03-01

    We have conducted deep near-infrared surveys of the Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538 massive star forming regions using simultaneous observations of the JHKs -band with the near-infrared camera SIRIUS on the UH 88-inch telescope. The near-infrared surveys cover a total area of ~72 square arcmin of three regions with 10-sigma limiting magnitudes of ~19.5, 18.4 and 17.3 in J, H and Ks-band, respectively. Based on the colour-colour and colour- magnitude diagrams and their clustering properties, the candidate young stellar objects are identified and their luminosity functions are constructed in Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538. A large number of previously unreported red sources (H - K > 2) have also been detected around these regions. We argue that these red stars are most probably pre-main sequence stars with intrinsic colour excesses. The detected young stellar objects show a clear clustering pattern in each region: the Class I-like sources are mostly clustered in molecular cloud region, while the Class II-like sources in or around more evolved optical H II regions. We find that the slopes of the Ks -band luminosity functions of Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538 are lower than the typical values reported for the young embedded clusters and their stellar populations are primarily composed of low mass pre-main sequence stars. From the slopes of the Ks -band luminosity functions, we infer that Sh-2 255, W3 Main and NGC 7538 star forming regions are rather young (age 1 Myr).

  18. Initial conditions of formation of starburst clusters: constraints from stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    Recent high resolution observations of dense regions of molecular clouds and massive gaseous clumps with instruments like Herschel and ALMA have revealed intricate and filamentary overdensity structures in them. Such progenitors of massive starburst clusters are in contrast with smooth, centrally-pronounced profiles of the latter. In this work, we intend to constrain massive, substructured stellar distributions that would evolve to cluster-like profiles at very young ages (~Myr), as seen in starburst clusters. Taking the well observed NGC3603 Young Cluster (NYC) as an example, we compute the infall and final merger of filament-like compact (0.1-0.3 pc) subclusters, totalling 10000 M_sun, from a range of spatial scales and modes of sub-clustering, using direct N-body calculations. These calculations infer an allowable span of approx. 2.5 pc from which the subclusters can fall in a gas potential and merge to form a single centrally-dense structure in near dynamical equilibrium, within the young age of NYC (1-2 Myr). However, these merged clusters are too compact and centrally overdense compared to typical young clusters. Our N-body calculations, beginning from such compact initial conditions, show that even stellar wind and supernova mass loss, dynamical heating from retaining black holes, external tidal field and heating due to tight O-star binaries together cannot expand these clusters to their observed sizes, even in 100 Myr. Hence an explosive gas dispersal phase seems essential for forming starburst and other young clusters observed in the Milky Way and in the Local Group which can expand the clusters to their observed sizes and concentrations; including that for NYC with approx. 30% clump star formation efficiency. However, some observed massive but highly extended (>10 pc) , >10 Myr old clusters better fit a slow (several Myr timescale) gas dispersal from parsec-scale initial profiles, which can be the future of embedded systems like W3 Main.

  19. EVOLUTION AND LIFETIME OF TRANSIENT CLUMPS IN THE TURBULENT INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Falceta-Goncalves, D.; Lazarian, A.

    2011-07-10

    We study the evolution of dense clumps and provide an argument that the existence of the clumps is not limited by their crossing times. We claim that the lifetimes of the clumps are determined by turbulent motions on a larger scale, and we predict the correlation of clump lifetime with column density. We use numerical simulations to successfully test this relation. In addition, we study the morphological asymmetry and the magnetization of the clumps as functions of their masses.

  20. Formation of cold clumps and filaments around superbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntormousi, Evangelia; Dawson, Joanne; Del Sordo, Fabio; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    The combined feedback of supernova explosions and stellar winds from associations of massive stars has a dramatic impact on their environment: Large amounts of energy coming from the ejecta create dense shocks around the associations, compressing the surrounding ISM and triggering the formation of molecular clouds and new stars. In this work we employ high-resolution, three-dimensional simulations of this process with the MHD code RAMSES to explore the effects of self-gravity and magnetic fields on the structure of the shells. Two superbubbles expand and collide in a turbulent diffuse medium. In the expansion phase rich dense structure appears on the surface of the shocks due to hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic instabilities. Although gravity seems to play a minor role in the formation and evolution of these dense clumps, magnetic fields completely alter both the expansion of the superbubble and the morphology of the dense gas, slowing the expansion down and causing the appearance of large-scale filaments. The collision does not help increase the amount of cold gas, but rather destroys a lot of the pre-existing dense structures. Finally, we compare clouds formed in these simulations with observations of a molecular cloud crushed between two superbubbles.

  1. Clumped isotope calibration data for lacustrine carbonates: A progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, A.

    2015-12-01

    Our capacity to understand Earth's environmental history is highly dependent on the accuracy of reconstructions of past climates. Lake sediments provide important archives of terrestrial climate change, and represent an important tool for reconstructing paleohydrology, paleoclimate, paleoenvironment, and paleoaltimetry. Unfortunately, while multiple methods for constraining marine temperature exist, quantitative terrestrial proxies are scarcer - tree rings, speleothems, and leaf margin analyses have all been used with varying degrees of accuracy. Clumped isotope thermometry has the potential to be a useful instrument for determining terrestrial climates: multiple studies have shown the fraction of 13C—18O bonds in carbonates is inversely related to the temperature at which the rocks formed. We have been measuring the abundance of 13C18O16O in the CO2 produced by the dissolution of carbonate minerals in phosphoric acid in modern lake samples and comparing results to independently known estimates of lake water temperature. Here we discuss an extensive calibration dataset comprised of 132 analyses of 97 samples from 44 localities, including microbialites, tufas, and micrites endogenic carbonates, freshwater gastropods, bivalves, microbialites, and ooids.

  2. Anomalous grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering studies of platinum nanoparticles formed by cluster deposition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeongdu; Seifert, Sönke; Riley, Stephen J; Tikhonov, George; Tomczyk, Nancy A; Vajda, Stefan; Winans, Randall E

    2005-08-15

    The size evolution of platinum nanoparticles formed on a SiO2/Si(111) substrate as a function of the level of surface coverage with deposited clusters has been investigated. The anisotropic shapes of sub-nanometer-size nanoparticles are changed to isotropic on the amorphous substrate as their sizes increased. Using anomalous grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering (AGISAXS), the scattering from nanoparticles on the surface of a substrate is well separated from that of surface roughness and fluorescence. We show that AGISAXS is a very effective method to subtract the background and can provide unbiased information about particle sizes of less than 1 nm. PMID:16229604

  3. Densely Packed Hydrophobic Clustering: Encapsulated Valerates Form a High-Temperature-Stable {Mo132 } Capsule System.

    PubMed

    Garai, Somenath; Bögge, Hartmut; Merca, Alice; Petina, Olga A; Grego, Alina; Gouzerh, Pierre; Haupt, Erhard T K; Weinstock, Ira A; Müller, Achim

    2016-06-01

    Porous molecular nanocontainers of {Mo132 }-type Keplerates offer unique opportunities to study a wide variety of relevant phenomena. An impressive example is provided by the highly reactive {Mo132 -CO3 } capsule, the reaction of which with valeric acid results in the very easy release of carbon dioxide and the uptake of 24 valerate ions/ligands that are integrated as a densely packed aggregate, thus indicating the unique possibility of hydrophobic clustering inside the cavity. Two-dimensional NMR techniques were used to demonstrate the presence of the 24 valerates and the stability of the capsule up to ca. 100 °C. Increasing the number of hydrophobic parts enhances the stability of the whole system. This situation also occurs in biological systems, such as globular proteins or protein pockets. PMID:27140207

  4. The effect of counteranions on the molecular structures of phosphanegold(i) cluster cations formed by polyoxometalate (POM)-mediated clusterization.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Eri; Yoshida, Takuya; Matsunaga, Satoshi; Nomiya, Kenji

    2016-09-14

    The effect of counteranions on the molecular structures of phosphanegold(i) cluster cations formed by polyoxometalate (POM)-mediated clusterization was investigated. A novel intercluster compound, [{(AuLCl)2(μ-OH)}2]3[α-PMo12O40]2·3EtOH (1-PMo12), was obtained as orange-yellow plate crystals in 12.0% yield from a 6 : 1 molar ratio reaction of the monomeric phosphanegold(i) carboxylato complex [Au(RS-pyrrld)(LCl)] (RS-Hpyrrld = RS-2-pyrrolidone-5-carboxylic acid; LCl = tris(4-chlorophenyl)phosphane) in CH2Cl2 with the free acid-form of Keggin polyoxometalate (POM), H3[α-PMo12O40]·14H2O. An EtOH/H2O (5 : 1, v/v) solvent mixture was used. The dimeric cation [{(AuLCl)2(μ-OH)}2](2+) in 1-PMo12 was in a parallel-edge arrangement that was formed by self-assembly through the inter-cationic aurophilic interactions of the μ-OH-bridged dinuclear phosphanegold(i) cation. The POM anion in 1-PMo12 was successfully exchanged with a smaller PF6(-) anion by the use of an anion-exchange resin. POM-free, colorless block crystals of [{(AuLCl)3(μ3-O)}2](PF6)2·4CH2Cl2 (2-PF6) were obtained by vapor diffusion in 14.1% yield. During the synthesis of 2-PF6, a compound with mixed counteranions (one POM and one PF6(-) anion), i.e. [{(AuLCl)4(μ4-O)}]2[α-PMo12O40]PF6 (3-PMo12PF6), was obtained in 66.4% yield. Both products were characterized by elemental analysis, TG/DTA, FT-IR, (31)P{(1)H} NMR, (1)H NMR, and X-ray crystallography. X-ray crystallography revealed that the countercation in 2-PF6 was the dimeric cation of the μ3-O-bridged tris{phosphanegold(i)} species, whereas that in 3-PMo12PF6 consisted of an unusual μ4-O-bridged tetragonal-pyramidal tetrakis{phosphanegold(i)} cation. Therefore, we concluded that the POM anion significantly contributed to the stabilization of these countercations (parallel-edged arrangement in 1-PMo12 and μ4-O-bridged tetragonal-pyramid in 3-PMo12PF6). Moreover, the previously reported yellow crystals of [{(AuLF)2(μ-OH)}2]3[PMo12O40]2·3

  5. Search for OB stars running away from young star clusters. II. The NGC 6357 star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Kroupa, P.; Oh, S.

    2011-11-01

    Dynamical few-body encounters in the dense cores of young massive star clusters are responsible for the loss of a significant fraction of their massive stellar content. Some of the escaping (runaway) stars move through the ambient medium supersonically and can be revealed via detection of their bow shocks (visible in the infrared, optical or radio). In this paper, which is the second of a series of papers devoted to the search for OB stars running away from young ( ≲ several Myr) Galactic clusters and OB associations, we present the results of the search for bow shocks around the star-forming region NGC 6357. Using the archival data of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite and the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the preliminary data release of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we discovered seven bow shocks, whose geometry is consistent with the possibility that they are generated by stars expelled from the young (~1-2 Myr) star clusters, Pismis 24 and AH03 J1725-34.4, associated with NGC 6357. Two of the seven bow shocks are driven by the already known OB stars, HD 319881 and [N78] 34. Follow-up spectroscopy of three other bow-shock-producing stars showed that they are massive (O-type) stars as well, while the 2MASS photometry of the remaining two stars suggests that they could be B0 V stars, provided that both are located at the same distance as NGC 6357. Detection of numerous massive stars ejected from the very young clusters is consistent with the theoretical expectation that star clusters can effectively lose massive stars at the very beginning of their dynamical evolution (long before the second mechanism for production of runaway stars, based on a supernova explosion in a massive tight binary system, begins to operate) and lends strong support to the idea that probably all field OB stars have been dynamically ejected from their birth clusters. A by-product of our search for bow shocks around NGC 6357 is the detection of three circular

  6. The SCUBA-2 cosmology legacy survey: Ultraluminous star-forming galaxies in a z = 1.6 cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Edge, A. C.; Simpson, J. M.; Geach, J. E.; Tadaki, K.; Arumugam, V.; Dunlop, J. S.; Ivison, R. J.; Hartley, W.; Almaini, O.; Conselice, C.; Bremer, M. N.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S. C.; Scott, D.; Simpson, C. J.; Karim, A.; Kodama, T.; and others

    2014-02-10

    We analyze new SCUBA-2 submillimeter and archival SPIRE far-infrared imaging of a z = 1.62 cluster, Cl 0218.3–0510, which lies in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey/Ultra-Deep Survey field of the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. Combining these tracers of obscured star-formation activity with the extensive photometric and spectroscopic information available for this field, we identify 31 far-infrared/submillimeter-detected probable cluster members with bolometric luminosities ≳10{sup 12} L {sub ☉} and show that by virtue of their dust content and activity, these represent some of the reddest and brightest galaxies in this structure. We exploit ALMA submillimeter continuum observations, which cover one of these sources, to confirm the identification of a SCUBA-2-detected ultraluminous star-forming galaxy in this structure. Integrating the total star-formation activity in the central region of the structure, we estimate that it is an order of magnitude higher (in a mass-normalized sense) than clusters at z ∼ 0.5-1. However, we also find that the most active cluster members do not reside in the densest regions of the structure, which instead host a population of passive and massive, red galaxies. We suggest that while the passive and active populations have comparable near-infrared luminosities at z = 1.6, M{sub H} ∼ –23, the subsequent stronger fading of the more active galaxies means that they will evolve into passive systems at the present day that are less luminous than the descendants of those galaxies that were already passive at z ∼ 1.6 (M{sub H} ∼ –20.5 and M{sub H} ∼ –21.5, respectively, at z ∼ 0). We conclude that the massive galaxy population in the dense cores of present-day clusters were already in place at z = 1.6 and that in Cl 0218.3–0510 we are seeing continuing infall of less extreme, but still ultraluminous, star-forming galaxies onto a pre-existing structure.

  7. Constraints on the formation and diagenesis of phosphorites using carbonate clumped isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolper, Daniel A.; Eiler, John M.

    2016-05-01

    The isotopic composition of apatites from sedimentary phosphorite deposits has been used previously to reconstruct ancient conditions on the surface of the Earth. However, questions remain as to whether these minerals retain their original isotopic composition or are modified during burial and lithification. To better understand how apatites in phosphorites form and are diagenetically modified, we present new isotopic measurements of δ18O values and clumped-isotope-based (Δ47) temperatures of carbonate groups in apatites from phosphorites from the past 265 million years. We compare these measurements to previously measured δ18O values of phosphate groups from the same apatites. These results indicate that the isotopic composition of many of the apatites do not record environmental conditions during formation but instead diagenetic conditions. To understand these results, we construct a model that describes the consequences of diagenetic modification of phosphorites as functions of the environmental conditions (i.e., temperature and δ18O values of the fluids) during initial precipitation and subsequent diagenesis. This model captures the basic features of the dataset and indicates that clumped-isotope-based temperatures provide additional quantitative constraints on both the formational environment of the apatites and subsequent diagenetic modification. Importantly, the combination of the model with the data indicates that the δ18O values and clumped-isotope temperatures recorded by phosphorites do not record either formation or diagenetic temperatures, but rather represent an integrated history that includes both the formation and diagenetic modification of the apatites.

  8. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY AND CHEMICAL HISTORY OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES IN THE HERCULES CLUSTER: THE EFFECTS OF THE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Petropoulou, V.; Vilchez, J.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Cedres, B.; Papaderos, P.; Magrini, L.; Reverte, D.

    2011-06-10

    Spatially resolved spectroscopy has been obtained for a sample of 27 star-forming (SF) galaxies selected from our deep H{alpha} survey of the Hercules cluster. We have applied spectral synthesis models to all emission-line spectra of this sample using the population synthesis code STARLIGHT and have obtained fundamental parameters of stellar components such as mean metallicity and age. The emission-line spectra were corrected for underlying stellar absorption using these spectral synthesis models. Line fluxes were measured and O/H and N/O gas chemical abundances were obtained using the latest empirical calibrations. We have derived the masses and total luminosities of the galaxies using available Sloan Digital Sky Survey broadband photometry. The effects of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of galaxies and on their mass-metallicity (MZ) and luminosity-metallicity (LZ) relations were studied by combining the derived gas metallicities, the mean stellar metallicities and ages, the masses and luminosities of the galaxies, and their existing H I data. Our Hercules SF galaxies are divided into three main subgroups: (1) chemically evolved spirals with truncated ionized-gas disks and nearly flat oxygen gradients, demonstrating the effect of ram-pressure stripping; (2) chemically evolved dwarfs/irregulars populating the highest local densities, possible products of tidal interactions in preprocessing events; and (3) less metallic dwarf galaxies that appear to be 'newcomers' to the cluster and are experiencing pressure-triggered star formation. Most Hercules SF galaxies follow well-defined MZ and LZ sequences (for both O/H and N/O), though the dwarf/irregular galaxies located at the densest regions appear to be outliers to these global relations, suggesting a physical reason for the dispersion in these fundamental relations. The Hercules cluster appears to be currently assembling via the merger of smaller substructures, providing an ideal laboratory where the

  9. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy and Chemical History of Star-forming Galaxies in the Hercules Cluster: The Effects of the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, V.; Vílchez, J.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Papaderos, P.; Magrini, L.; Cedrés, B.; Reverte, D.

    2011-06-01

    Spatially resolved spectroscopy has been obtained for a sample of 27 star-forming (SF) galaxies selected from our deep Hα survey of the Hercules cluster. We have applied spectral synthesis models to all emission-line spectra of this sample using the population synthesis code STARLIGHT and have obtained fundamental parameters of stellar components such as mean metallicity and age. The emission-line spectra were corrected for underlying stellar absorption using these spectral synthesis models. Line fluxes were measured and O/H and N/O gas chemical abundances were obtained using the latest empirical calibrations. We have derived the masses and total luminosities of the galaxies using available Sloan Digital Sky Survey broadband photometry. The effects of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of galaxies and on their mass-metallicity (MZ) and luminosity-metallicity (LZ) relations were studied by combining the derived gas metallicities, the mean stellar metallicities and ages, the masses and luminosities of the galaxies, and their existing H I data. Our Hercules SF galaxies are divided into three main subgroups: (1) chemically evolved spirals with truncated ionized-gas disks and nearly flat oxygen gradients, demonstrating the effect of ram-pressure stripping; (2) chemically evolved dwarfs/irregulars populating the highest local densities, possible products of tidal interactions in preprocessing events; and (3) less metallic dwarf galaxies that appear to be "newcomers" to the cluster and are experiencing pressure-triggered star formation. Most Hercules SF galaxies follow well-defined MZ and LZ sequences (for both O/H and N/O), though the dwarf/irregular galaxies located at the densest regions appear to be outliers to these global relations, suggesting a physical reason for the dispersion in these fundamental relations. The Hercules cluster appears to be currently assembling via the merger of smaller substructures, providing an ideal laboratory where the local

  10. Properties of Starless Clumps through Protoclusters from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Brian E.; Shirley, Yancy

    2014-07-01

    High mass stars play a key role in the physical and chemical evolution of the interstellar medium, yet the evolution of physical properties for high-mass star-forming regions remains unclear. We sort a sample of ~4668 molecular cloud clumps from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) into different evolutionary stages by combining the BGPS 1.1 mm continuum and observational diagnostics of star-formation activity from a variety of Galactic plane surveys: 70 um compact sources, mid-IR color-selected YSOs, H2O and CH3OH masers, EGOs, and UCHII regions. We apply Monte Carlo techniques to distance probability distribution functions (DPDFs) in order to marginalize over the kinematic distance ambiguity and calculate distributions for derived quantities of clumps in different evolutionary stages. We also present a combined NH3 and H2O maser catalog for ~1590 clumps from the literature and our own GBT 100m observations. We identify a sub-sample of 440 dense clumps with no star-formation indicators, representing the largest and most robust sample of pre-protocluster candidates from a blind survey to date. Distributions of I(HCO+), I(N2H+), dv(HCO+), dv(N2H+), mass surface density, and kinetic temperature show strong progressions when separated by evolutionary stage. No progressions are found in size or dust mass; however, weak progressions are observed in area > 2 pc^2 and dust mass > 3 10^3 Msun. An observed breakdown occurs in the size-linewidth relationship and we find no improvement when sampling by evolutionary stage.

  11. From Gas to Stars in Energetic Environments: Chemistry of Clumps in Giant Molecular Clouds Within the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Crystal N.; Meier, David S.; Ott, Juergen; Hughes, Annie; Wong, Tony H.

    2015-01-01

    We present parsec scale interferometric maps of HCN and HCO^{+} emission from dense gas in the star-forming region 30 Doradus, obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). This extreme star-forming region, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), is characterized by a very intense ultraviolet ionizing radiation field and sub-solar metallicity, both of which are expected to impact molecular cloud structure. We detect 13 bright, dense clumps within the 30 Doradus-10 giant molecular cloud. Some of the clumps are aligned along a filamentary structure with a characteristic spacing that is consistent with formation via the varicose fluid instability. Our analysis shows that the filament is gravitationally unstable and collapsing to form stars. There is a good correlation between HCO^{+} emission in the filament and signatures of recent star formation activity including H_{2}O masers and young stellar objects (YSOs). We present detailed comparisons of clump properties (masses, linewidths, sizes) in 30Dor-10 to those in other star forming regions of the LMC (N159, N113, N105, N44). Our analysis shows that the 30 Doradus-10 clumps have similar mass but wider linewidths and similar HCN/HCO^{+} (1-0) line ratios as clumps detected in other LMC star-forming regions. Our results suggest that the dense molecular gas clumps in the interior of 30Dor-10 are well-shielded against the intense ionizing field that is present in the 30 Doradus region. We also present preliminary results from follow up observations with the ATCA of a several molecular lines detected from the brightest clumps in 30 Doradus-10, N113 and N159W. The maps cover the following dense gas, photo-dominated regions (PDRs), and shock tracers: HCN, HCO^{+}, C_{2}H, SiO, HNCO, SiS, N_{2}H^{+}, CS, CH_{3}H, CH_{3}CN, {13}^CS, OCS, H_{2}, {34}^CS. These giant molecular clouds have varying radiation fields and energetics. We compare the chemistry within these giant molecular clouds to one another to

  12. Determination of the active form of the tetranuclear copper sulfur cluster in nitrous oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Esther M; Dell'Acqua, Simone; Ramos, Susana; Pauleta, Sofia R; Moura, Isabel; Solomon, Edward I

    2014-01-15

    N2OR has been found to have two structural forms of its tetranuclear copper active site, the 4CuS Cu(Z)* form and the 4Cu2S Cu(Z) form. EPR, resonance Raman, and MCD spectroscopies have been used to determine the redox states of these sites under different reductant conditions, showing that the Cu(Z)* site accesses the 1-hole and fully reduced redox states, while the Cu(Z) site accesses the 2-hole and 1-hole redox states. Single-turnover reactions of N2OR for Cu(Z) and Cu(Z)* poised in these redox states and steady-state turnover assays with different proportions of Cu(Z) and Cu(Z)* show that only fully reduced Cu(Z)* is catalytically competent in rapid turnover with N2O. PMID:24364717

  13. H-ATLAS: a candidate high redshift cluster/protocluster of star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, D. L.; Braglia, F.; Petitpas, G.; Greenslade, J.; Cooray, A.; Valiante, E.; De Zotti, G.; O'Halloran, B.; Holdship, J.; Morris, B.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Herranz, D.; Riechers, D.; Baes, M.; Bremer, M.; Bourne, N.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dariush, A.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Leeuw, L. L.; Maddox, S.; Michałowski, M. J.; Negrello, M.; Omont, A.; Oteo, I.; Serjeant, S.; Valtchanov, I.; Vieira, J. D.; Wardlow, J.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the region around the Planck-detected z = 3.26 gravitationally lensed galaxy HATLAS J114637.9-001132 (hereinafter HATLAS12-00) using both archival Herschel data from the H-ATLAS survey and using submm data obtained with both LABOCA and SCUBA2. The lensed source is found to be surrounded by a strong overdensity of both Herschel-SPIRE sources and submm sources. We detect 17 bright (S870 > ˜7 mJy) sources at >4σ closer than 5 arcmin to the lensed object at 850/870 μm. 10 of these sources have good cross-identifications with objects detected by Herschel-SPIRE which have redder colours than other sources in the field, with 350 μm flux >250 μm flux, suggesting that they lie at high redshift. Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations localise one of these companions to ˜1 arcsec, allowing unambiguous cross identification with a 3.6 and 4.5 μm Spitzer source. The optical/near-IR spectral energy distribution of this source is measured by further observations and found to be consistent with z > 2, but incompatible with lower redshifts. We conclude that this system may be a galaxy cluster/protocluster or larger scale structure that contains a number of galaxies undergoing starbursts at the same time.

  14. North African Jewish and non-Jewish populations form distinctive, orthogonal clusters.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Christopher L; Palamara, Pier F; Dubrovsky, Maya; Botigué, Laura R; Fellous, Marc; Atzmon, Gil; Oddoux, Carole; Pearlman, Alexander; Hao, Li; Henn, Brenna M; Burns, Edward; Bustamante, Carlos D; Comas, David; Friedman, Eitan; Pe'er, Itsik; Ostrer, Harry

    2012-08-21

    North African Jews constitute the second largest Jewish Diaspora group. However, their relatedness to each other; to European, Middle Eastern, and other Jewish Diaspora groups; and to their former North African non-Jewish neighbors has not been well defined. Here, genome-wide analysis of five North African Jewish groups (Moroccan, Algerian, Tunisian, Djerban, and Libyan) and comparison with other Jewish and non-Jewish groups demonstrated distinctive North African Jewish population clusters with proximity to other Jewish populations and variable degrees of Middle Eastern, European, and North African admixture. Two major subgroups were identified by principal component, neighbor joining tree, and identity-by-descent analysis-Moroccan/Algerian and Djerban/Libyan-that varied in their degree of European admixture. These populations showed a high degree of endogamy and were part of a larger Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jewish group. By principal component analysis, these North African groups were orthogonal to contemporary populations from North and South Morocco, Western Sahara, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. Thus, this study is compatible with the history of North African Jews-founding during Classical Antiquity with proselytism of local populations, followed by genetic isolation with the rise of Christianity and then Islam, and admixture following the emigration of Sephardic Jews during the Inquisition. PMID:22869716

  15. H-ATLAS: A Candidate High Redshift Cluster/Protocluster of Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, D. L.; Braglia, F.; Petitpas, G.; Greenslade, J.; Cooray, A.; Valiante, E.; De Zotti, G.; O'Halloran, B.; Holdship, J.; Morris, B.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Herranz, D.; Riechers, D.; Baes, M.; Bremer, M.; Bourne, N.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dariush, A.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Leeuw, L. L.; Maddox, S.; Michałowski, M. J.; Negrello, M.; Omont, A.; Oteo, I.; Serjeant, S.; Valtchanov, I.; Vieira, J. D.; Wardlow, J.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the region around the Planck-detected z=3.26 gravitationally lensed galaxy HATLAS J114637.9-001132 (hereinafter HATLAS12-00) using both archival Herschel data from the H-ATLAS survey and using submm data obtained with both LABOCA and SCUBA2. The lensed source is found to be surrounded by a strong overdensity of both Herschel-SPIRE sources and submm sources. We detect 17 bright (S870 > ˜7 mJy) sources at >4σ closer than 5 arcmin to the lensed object at 850/870μm. Ten of these sources have good cross-identifications with objects detected by Herschel-SPIRE which have redder colours than other sources in the field, with 350μm flux > 250μm flux, suggesting that they lie at high redshift. Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations localise one of these companions to ˜1 arcsecond, allowing unambiguous cross identification with a 3.6 and 4.5 μm Spitzer source. The optical/near-IR spectral energy distribution (SED) of this source is measured by further observations and found to be consistent with z > 2, but incompatible with lower redshifts. We conclude that this system may be a galaxy cluster/protocluster or larger scale structure that contains a number of galaxies undergoing starbursts at the same time.

  16. North African Jewish and non-Jewish populations form distinctive, orthogonal clusters

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christopher L.; Palamara, Pier F.; Dubrovsky, Maya; Botigué, Laura R.; Fellous, Marc; Atzmon, Gil; Oddoux, Carole; Pearlman, Alexander; Hao, Li; Henn, Brenna M.; Burns, Edward; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Comas, David; Friedman, Eitan; Pe'er, Itsik; Ostrer, Harry

    2012-01-01

    North African Jews constitute the second largest Jewish Diaspora group. However, their relatedness to each other; to European, Middle Eastern, and other Jewish Diaspora groups; and to their former North African non-Jewish neighbors has not been well defined. Here, genome-wide analysis of five North African Jewish groups (Moroccan, Algerian, Tunisian, Djerban, and Libyan) and comparison with other Jewish and non-Jewish groups demonstrated distinctive North African Jewish population clusters with proximity to other Jewish populations and variable degrees of Middle Eastern, European, and North African admixture. Two major subgroups were identified by principal component, neighbor joining tree, and identity-by-descent analysis—Moroccan/Algerian and Djerban/Libyan—that varied in their degree of European admixture. These populations showed a high degree of endogamy and were part of a larger Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jewish group. By principal component analysis, these North African groups were orthogonal to contemporary populations from North and South Morocco, Western Sahara, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. Thus, this study is compatible with the history of North African Jews—founding during Classical Antiquity with proselytism of local populations, followed by genetic isolation with the rise of Christianity and then Islam, and admixture following the emigration of Sephardic Jews during the Inquisition. PMID:22869716

  17. Clump formation through colliding stellar winds in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón, Diego

    2016-07-01

    The gas cloud G2 is currently being tidally disrupted by the Galactic Center super-massive black hole, Sgr A*. The region around the black hole is populated by ˜30 Wolf-Rayet stars, which produce strong outflows. Following an analytical approach, we explore the possibility that gas clumps, such as G2, originate from the collision of identical stellar winds via the Non-Linear Thin Shell Instability. We have found that the collision of relatively slow (<750 km s^{-1}) and strong (˜10^{-5} M_{⊙} yr^{-1}) stellar winds from stars at short separations (<2000 AU) is a process that indeed could produce clumps of G2's mass and above. Such short separation encounters of single stars along their orbits are not common in the Galactic Centre, however close binaries, such as IRS 16SW, are promising clump sources (see Calderón et al. 2016). We also present the first results of 2D models of colliding wind systems using the hydrodynamics adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES, aiming to obtain a clump mass function, and the rate of clump formation and ejection to the ISM. We study the effect of parameters such as wind properties, stellar separation and orbital motion, in order to understand how likely the formation of G2 is in this context.

  18. PARTICLE CLUMPING AND PLANETESIMAL FORMATION DEPEND STRONGLY ON METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, Anders; Youdin, Andrew; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2009-10-20

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of particle clumping and planetesimal formation in protoplanetary disks with varying amounts of solid material. As centimeter-size pebbles settle to the mid-plane, turbulence develops through vertical shearing and streaming instabilities. We find that when the pebble-to-gas column density ratio is 0.01, corresponding roughly to solar metallicity, clumping is weak, so the pebble density rarely exceeds the gas density. Doubling the column density ratio leads to a dramatic increase in clumping, with characteristic particle densities more than 10 times the gas density and maximum densities reaching several thousand times the gas density. This is consistent with unstratified simulations of the streaming instability that show strong clumping in particle-dominated flows. The clumps readily contract gravitationally into interacting planetesimals on the order of 100 km in radius. Our results suggest that the correlation between host star metallicity and exoplanets may reflect the early stages of planet formation. We further speculate that initially low-metallicity disks can be particle enriched during the gas dispersal phase, leading to a late burst of planetesimal formation.

  19. Yields of p, d, t formed in stopped pion absorption by intranuclear clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshev, B. A.; Gurov, Yu B.; Korotkova, L. Yu; Lapushkin, S. V.; Leonova, T. I.; Pritula, R. V.; Schurenkova, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    Results of the study of spectra and yields of p, d, t formed in stopped pion absorption by nuclei are presented. Data on charged particle formation have been obtained for 17 isotopes in wide atomic mass range (6 < A < 209). Empirical model was proposed to describe A- dependences of primary p, d, t yields.

  20. Clumped isotope geochemistry of mid-Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) rudist shells: paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, S.; Steuber, T.; Bernasconi, S.; Weissert, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Cretaceous period is generally considered to have been a time of climate warmth, but there is an ongoing dispute about the existence of Cretaceous cool episodes - including the short-termed installation of polar ice caps. The Late Barremian-Early Aptian represents a Cretaceous key interval in terms of paleoclimate and paleoceanography, as it provides evidence for (i) a cooler climate (Pucéat et al., 2003) and (ii) a considerable seasonality of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) at low latitudes (Steuber et al., 2005). The timing and significance of these cool episodes, however, are not well constrained. Recently published TEX86 data, in contrast to oxygen isotope paleotemperature estimates, now are in support of a climate scenario with equable hot (~30° C) tropical SSTs from the Early Cretaceous onwards. The aim of this project is to reconstruct the evolution of Barremian-Aptian sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the tropical Tethyan realm by use of a combined geochemical approach including oxygen isotope analysis and carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry. Paleotemperature proxies are based on the isotope geochemistry of low-Mg calcite of pristine rudist bivalve shells (Toucasia, Requienia) collected from different carbonate platform settings, including the Provence platform in SE France and the Adriatic Carbonate platform in Croatia. Carbonate clumped-isotope geochemistry deals with the state of ordering of rare isotopes in molecules, in particular with their tendency to form bonds with other rare isotopes (13C-18O) rather than with the most abundant ones. Carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry has been shown to allow for reconstructing (i) the temperature of carbonate mineral formation and calculating (ii) the isotopic composition of the water from which carbonate minerals were formed (by using the δ18O of the analysed carbonate sample). Our approach seeks to provide insights into possible biases in temperature estimates of different paleothermometers

  1. Calibration of the carbonate `clumped isotope' paleotemperature proxy using mollusc shells and benthic foraminiferal tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Came, R. E.; Curry, W. B.; Weidman, C. R.; Eiler, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    It has recently been shown that the carbonate `clumped isotope' thermometer can provide temperature constraints that depend only on the isotopic composition of carbonate (in particular, on the proportion of 13C and 18O that form bonds with each other), and that do not require assumptions about the isotopic composition of the water in which the carbonate formed (Ghosh et al., 2006). Furthermore, this novel method permits the calculation of seawater δ18O based on the clumped isotope temperature estimates and the simultaneously obtained δ18O of carbonate, thereby enabling the extraction of global ice volume estimates for both the recent and distant geologic past. Here we present clumped isotope analyses of several naturally occurring marine carbonates that calcified at known temperatures in the modern ocean. First, we analyzed benthic foraminiferal tests from six high-quality multicore tops collected in the Florida Strait, spanning a temperature range of 9.3-20.2 degrees C. Second, we analyzed shallow-water mollusc shells from a variety of different climate regimes, spanning a temperature range of 2.5-26.0 degrees C. We find that the calcitic foraminiferal species Cibicidoides spp. agrees well with the inorganic calcite precipitation experiments of Ghosh et al. (2006), while the aragonitic species Hoeglundina elegans is significantly offset. Similarly, clumped isotope results obtained from aragonitic mollusc shells also reveal an offset from the Ghosh et al. (2006) trend, although the offset observed in mollusc aragonite is quite different in nature from that observed in foraminiferal aragonite. Assuming our estimates of the growth temperatures of these naturally occurring organisms are correct, these results suggest that there are vital effects associated with the stable isotope compositions of the aragonite-precipitating organisms examined in this study; further work will be required to determine their cause. Nevertheless, the internal coherence of trends for

  2. Accretion of gaseous clumps from the Galactic Centre Mini-spiral onto Milky Way's supermassive black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas, Vladimir; Kunneriath, Devaky; Czerny, Bozena; Rozanska, Agata; Adhikari, Tek P.

    2016-07-01

    Evidence for reflection of X-rays on molecular clouds in the vicinity of Sagittarius A* super-massive black hole (Sgr A* SMBH) suggests that the center of Galaxy was active in its recent history. We investigate the idea of gaseous Mini-spiral pattern as the origin of material triggering this enhanced activity. Collisions between clumps of gas in the Mini-spiral can reduce their angular momentum and set some of the clumps on a plunging trajectory towards Sgr A* SMBH. It turns out that the amount of material in the Mini-spiral region is sufficient to sustain the required level of luminosity. We examine a possibility of Thermal Instability onset to describe the mechanism for elevated accretion during the past period. Our contribution extends a recent paper by including the effect of the Nuclear Star Cluster, which provides additional important contribution to the energy balance of the inter-stellar medium.

  3. The Interstellar Extinction Towards the Milky Way Bulge with Planetary Nebulae, Red Clump, and RR Lyrae Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataf, David M.

    2016-06-01

    I review the literature covering the issue of interstellar extinction towards the Milky Way bulge, with emphasis placed on findings from planetary nebulae, RR Lyrae, and red clump stars. I also report on observations from HI gas and globular clusters. I show that there has been substantial progress in this field in recent decades, most particularly from red clump stars. The spatial coverage of extinction maps has increased by a factor ~ 100 × in the past 20 yr, and the total-to-selective extinction ratios reported have shifted by ~ 20-25%, indicative of the improved accuracy and separately, of a steeper-than-standard extinction curve. Problems remain in modelling differential extinction, explaining anomalies involving the planetary nebulae, and understanding the difference between bulge extinction coefficients and `standard' literature values.

  4. The Application of Methane Clumped Isotope Measurements to Determine the Source of Large Methane Seeps in Alaskan Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, P. M.; Stolper, D. A.; Eiler, J. M.; Sessions, A. L.; Walter Anthony, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Natural methane emissions from the Arctic present an important potential feedback to global warming. Arctic methane emissions may come from either active microbial sources or from deep fossil reservoirs released by the thawing of permafrost and melting of glaciers. It is often difficult to distinguish between and quantify contributions from these methane sources based on stable isotope data. Analyses of methane clumped isotopes (isotopologues with two or more rare isotopes such as 13CH3D) can complement traditional stable isotope-based classifications of methane sources. This is because clumped isotope abundances (for isotopically equilibrated systems) are a function of temperature and can be used to identify pathways of methane generation. Additionally, distinctive effects of mixing on clumped isotope abundances make this analysis valuable for determining the origins of mixed gasses. We find large variability in clumped isotope compositions of methane from seeps in several lakes, including thermokarst lakes, across Alaska. At Lake Sukok in northern Alaska we observe the emission of dominantly thermogenic methane, with a formation temperature of at least 100° C. At several other lakes we find evidence for mixing between thermogenic methane and biogenic methane that forms in low-temperature isotopic equilibrium. For example, at Eyak Lake in southeastern Alaska, analysis of three methane samples results in a distinctive isotopic mixing line between a high-temperature end-member that formed between 100-170° C, and a biogenic end-member that formed in isotopic equilibrium between 0-20° C. In this respect, biogenic methane in these lakes resembles observations from marine gas seeps, oil degradation, and sub-surface aquifers. Interestingly, at Goldstream Lake in interior Alaska, methane with strongly depleted clumped-isotope abundances, indicative of disequilibrium gas formation, is found, similar to observations from methanogen culture experiments.

  5. Methane cycling. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane.

    PubMed

    Wang, David T; Gruen, Danielle S; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C; Holden, James F; Hristov, Alexander N; Pohlman, John W; Morrill, Penny L; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B; Reeves, Eoghan P; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N; Ritter, Daniel J; Seewald, Jeffrey S; McIntosh, Jennifer C; Hemond, Harold F; Kubo, Michael D; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-04-24

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle, with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply substituted "clumped" isotopologues (for example, (13)CH3D) has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures. However, the effect of biological processes on methane's clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on (13)CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation-temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters. PMID:25745067

  6. Cosmic Reionization On Computers III. The Clumping Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2015-09-09

    We use fully self-consistent numerical simulations of cosmic reionization, completed under the Cosmic Reionization On Computers project, to explore how well the recombinations in the ionized intergalactic medium (IGM) can be quantified by the effective "clumping factor." The density distribution in the simulations (and, presumably, in a real universe) is highly inhomogeneous and more-or-less smoothly varying in space. However, even in highly complex and dynamic environments, the concept of the IGM remains reasonably well-defined; the largest ambiguity comes from the unvirialized regions around galaxies that are over-ionized by the local enhancement in the radiation field ("proximity zones"). This ambiguity precludes computing the IGM clumping factor to better than about 20%. Furthermore, we discuss a "local clumping factor," defined over a particular spatial scale, and quantify its scatter on a given scale and its variation as a function of scale.

  7. Cosmic Reionization On Computers III. The Clumping Factor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2015-09-09

    We use fully self-consistent numerical simulations of cosmic reionization, completed under the Cosmic Reionization On Computers project, to explore how well the recombinations in the ionized intergalactic medium (IGM) can be quantified by the effective "clumping factor." The density distribution in the simulations (and, presumably, in a real universe) is highly inhomogeneous and more-or-less smoothly varying in space. However, even in highly complex and dynamic environments, the concept of the IGM remains reasonably well-defined; the largest ambiguity comes from the unvirialized regions around galaxies that are over-ionized by the local enhancement in the radiation field ("proximity zones"). This ambiguity precludesmore » computing the IGM clumping factor to better than about 20%. Furthermore, we discuss a "local clumping factor," defined over a particular spatial scale, and quantify its scatter on a given scale and its variation as a function of scale.« less

  8. Cluster of Genes That Encode Positive and Negative Elements Influencing Filament Length in a Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Merino-Puerto, Victoria; Herrero, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria perform oxygenic photosynthesis in vegetative cells and nitrogen fixation in heterocysts, and their filaments can be hundreds of cells long. In the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the genes in the fraC-fraD-fraE operon are required for filament integrity mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. The fraC operon transcript partially overlaps gene all2395, which lies in the opposite DNA strand and ends 1 bp beyond fraE. Gene all2395 produces transcripts of 1.35 kb (major transcript) and 2.2 kb (minor transcript) that overlap fraE and whose expression is dependent on the N-control transcription factor NtcA. Insertion of a gene cassette containing transcriptional terminators between fraE and all2395 prevented production of the antisense RNAs and resulted in an increased length of the cyanobacterial filaments. Deletion of all2395 resulted in a larger increase of filament length and in impaired growth, mainly under N2-fixing conditions and specifically on solid medium. We denote all2395 the fraF gene, which encodes a protein restricting filament length. A FraF-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein accumulated significantly in heterocysts. Similar to some heterocyst differentiation-related proteins such as HglK, HetL, and PatL, FraF is a pentapeptide repeat protein. We conclude that the fraC-fraD-fraE←fraF gene cluster (where the arrow indicates a change in orientation), in which cis antisense RNAs are produced, regulates morphology by encoding proteins that influence positively (FraC, FraD, FraE) or negatively (FraF) the length of the filament mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. This gene cluster is often conserved in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria. PMID:23813733

  9. Extinction in young massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Up to ages of ~100 Myr, massive clusters are still swamped in large amounts of gas and dust, causing considerable and uneven levels of extinction. At the same time, large grains (ices?) produced by type II supernovae profoundly alter the interstellar medium (ISM), thus resulting in extinction properties very different from those of the diffuse ISM. To obtain physically meaningful parameters of stars (luminosities, effective temperatures, masses, ages, etc.) we must understand and measure the local extinction law. We have developed a powerful method to unambiguously determine the extinction law everywhere across a cluster field, using multi-band photometry of red giant stars belonging to the red clump (RC) and are applying it to young massive clusters in the Local Group. In the Large Magellanic Cloud, with about 20 RC stars per arcmin2, for each field we can easily derive an accurate extinction curve over the entire wavelength range of the photometry. As an example, we present the extinction law of the Tarantula nebula (30 Dor) based on thousands of stars observed as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. We discuss how the incautious adoption of the Milky Way extinction law in the analysis of massive star forming regions may lead to serious underestimates of the fluxes and of the star formation rates by factors of 2 or more.

  10. Enhancing glass-forming ability via frustration of nano-clustering in alloys with a high solvent content

    PubMed Central

    Li, H. X.; Gao, J. E.; Wu, Y.; Jiao, Z. B.; Ma, D.; Stoica, A. D.; Wang, X. L.; Ren, Y.; Miller, M. K.; Lu, Z. P.

    2013-01-01

    The glass-forming ability (GFA) of alloys with a high-solvent content such as soft magnetic Fe-based and Al-based alloys is usually limited due to strong formation of the solvent-based solid solution phase. Herein, we report that the GFA of soft magnetic Fe-based alloys (with >70 at.% Fe to ensure large saturation magnetization) could be dramatically improved by doping with only 0.3 at.% Cu which has a positive enthalpy of mixing with Fe. It was found that an appropriate Cu addition could enhance the liquid phase stability and crystallization resistance by destabilizing the α-Fe nano-clusters due to the necessity to redistribute the Cu atoms. However, excessive Cu doping would stimulate nucleation of the α-Fe nano-clusters due to the repulsive nature between the Fe and Cu atoms, thus deteriorating the GFA. Our findings provide new insights into understanding of glass formation in general. PMID:23760427

  11. THE HIGH-VELOCITY MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN MASSIVE CLUSTER-FORMING REGION G10.6-0.4

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang Qizhou E-mail: pho@asiaa.sinica.edu.t

    2010-12-20

    We report the arcsecond resolution Submillimeter Array observations of the {sup 12}CO (2-1) transition in the massive cluster-forming region G10.6-0.4. In these observations, the high-velocity {sup 12}CO emission is resolved into individual outflow systems, which have a typical size scale of a few arcseconds. These molecular outflows are energetic and are interacting with the ambient molecular gas. By inspecting the shock signatures traced by CH{sub 3}OH, SiO, and HCN emissions, we suggest that abundant star formation activities are distributed over the entire 0.5 pc scale dense molecular envelope. The star formation efficiency over one global free-fall timescale (of the 0.5 pc molecular envelope, {approx}10{sup 5} years) is about a few percent. The total energy feedback of these high-velocity outflows is higher than 10{sup 47} erg, which is comparable to the total kinetic energy in the rotational motion of the dense molecular envelope. From order-of-magnitude estimations, we suggest that the energy injected from the protostellar outflows is capable of balancing the turbulent energy dissipation. No high-velocity bipolar molecular outflow associated with the central OB cluster is directly detected, which can be due to the photoionization.

  12. Interactions Between Forming Stars and Dense Gas in a Small Low Mass Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, Edwin F.; Wong, T.; Bourke, T. L.; Thompson, K. L.

    2011-05-01

    We present observations of dense gas and outflow activity in the Cederblad 110 region of the Chamaleleon I Dark Cloud. The region contains eight forming low mass stars in evolutionary stages ranging from Class 0 to Class II/III crowded into a 0.2 pc region with high surface density (Σ_YSO 150 pc^-2). The analysis of our N2H+ (J=1-0) maps indicates the presence of 15 solar masses of dense (n 10^5 cm^-3) gas in this region, much of which is unstable against gravitational collapse. The most unstable material is located near the Class 0 source MMS 1. Smaller column densities of more stable dense gas are found toward the region's Class I sources. Little or no dense gas is colocated with the Class II and III sources in the region. The outflow from the Class I source IRS 4 is interacting with the dense core associated with MMS 1. The molecular component of the outflow appears to be deflected by the densest part of the core, after which it plows through some of the lower column density portions of the core. The working surface at the head of the outflow lobe can be seen in the enhanced velocity dispersion of the dense gas. The Class III source IRS 2 may also be influencing the dense gas in the region. A dust temperature gradient across the core is consistent with warming from the 3.4 Lo source, and a sharp gradient in dense gas column density may be caused by winds from this source. Taken together, our data indicate that this region has been producing several young stars in the recent past, and that sources which began forming first are interacting with the remaining dense gas in the region, thereby influencing current and future star formation activity.

  13. Star-forming dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster: the link between molecular gas, atomic gas, and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Corbelli, E.; Bizzocchi, L.; Giovanardi, C.; Bomans, D.; Coelho, B.; De Looze, I.; Gonçalves, T. S.; Hunt, L. K.; Leonardo, E.; Madden, S.; Menéndez-Delmestre, K.; Pappalardo, C.; Riguccini, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present 12CO(1-0) and 12CO(2-1) observations of a sample of 20 star-forming dwarfs selected from the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, with oxygen abundances ranging from 12 + log (O / H) ~ 8.1 to 8.8. CO emission is observed in ten galaxies and marginally detected in another one. CO fluxes correlate with the FIR 250 μm emission, and the dwarfs follow the same linear relation that holds for more massive spiral galaxies extended to a wider dynamical range. We compare different methods to estimate H2 molecular masses, namely a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor and one dependent on H-band luminosity. The molecular-to-stellar mass ratio remains nearly constant at stellar masses ≲ 109 M⊙, contrary to the atomic hydrogen fraction, MHI/M∗, which increases inversely with M∗. The flattening of the MH2/M∗ ratio at low stellar masses does not seem to be related to the effects of the cluster environment because it occurs for both Hi-deficient and Hi-normal dwarfs. The molecular-to-atomic ratio is more tightly correlated with stellar surface density than metallicity, confirming that the interstellar gas pressure plays a key role in determining the balance between the two gaseous components of the interstellar medium. Virgo dwarfs follow the same linear trend between molecular gas mass and star formation rate as more massive spirals, but gas depletion timescales, τdep, are not constant and range between 100 Myr and 6 Gyr. The interaction with the Virgo cluster environment is removing the atomic gas and dust components of the dwarfs, but the molecular gas appears to be less affected at the current stage of evolution within the cluster. However, the correlation between Hi deficiency and the molecular gas depletion time suggests that the lack of gas replenishment from the outer regions of the disc is lowering the star formation activity. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30-m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany

  14. Shear heating and clumped isotope reordering in carbonate faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siman-Tov, Shalev; Affek, Hagit P.; Matthews, Alan; Aharonov, Einat; Reches, Ze'ev

    2016-07-01

    Natural faults are expected to heat rapidly during seismic slip and to cool quite quickly after the slip event. Here we examine clumped isotope thermometry for its ability to identify such short duration elevated temperature events along frictionally heated carbonate faults. Our approach is based on measured Δ47 values that reflect the distribution of oxygen and carbon isotopes in the calcite lattice, measuring the abundance of 13Csbnd 18O bonds, which is affected by temperature. We examine three types of calcite rock samples: (1) crushed limestone grains that were rapidly heated and then cooled in static laboratory experiments, simulating the temperature cycle experienced by fault rock during an earthquake slip; (2) limestone samples that were experimentally sheared to simulate earthquake slip events; and (3) samples from Fault Mirrors (FMs) collected from principle slip surfaces of three natural carbonate faults. Extensive FM surfaces are believed to form during earthquake slip. Our experimental results show that Δ47 values decrease rapidly (in the course of seconds) with increasing temperature and shear velocity. On the other hand, carbonate shear zones from natural faults do not show such Δ47 decrease. We suggest that the Δ47 response may be controlled by nano-size grains, the high abundance of defects, and highly stressed/strained grain boundaries within the carbonate fault zone that can reduce the activation energy for diffusion, and thus lead to an increased rate of isotopic disordering during shear experiments. In our laboratory experiments the high stress and strain on grain contacts and the presence of nanograins thus allows for rapid disordering so that a change in Δ47 occurs in a very short and relatively low intensity heating events. In natural faults it may also lead to isotopic ordering after the cessation of frictional heating thus erasing the high temperature signature of Δ47.

  15. Low density lipoprotein aged in plasma forms clusters resembling subendothelial droplets: aggregation via surface sites.

    PubMed

    De Spirito, Marco; Brunelli, Roberto; Mei, Giampiero; Bertani, Francesca R; Ciasca, Gabriele; Greco, Giulia; Papi, Massimiliano; Arcovito, Giuseppe; Ursini, Fulvio; Parasassi, Tiziana

    2006-06-01

    In early phases of atherogenesis, droplets and vesicles accumulate in the subendothelial extracellular space of arterial intima. There is much evidence to suggest that these droplets, ranging between 100 and 400 nm, derive from modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL). In investigations of the formation mechanism of these droplets, LDL fusion was previously induced in vitro by proteolysis, lipolysis, oxidation, and vigorous shaking, but all treatments failed to reproduce the size distribution range of in vivo droplets, mostly resulting, instead, in particles with a diameter intermediate between that of one and two LDL. Our approach was meant to mimic LDL aging in plasma. LDL isolated from plasma that was incubated overnight at 37 degrees C is slightly modified in the secondary structure of its protein component and is primed to form very large aggregates according to a reaction-limited mechanism. This mechanism requires interactions between selected surface sites, whereas massive fusion is ruled out. In the frame of the general theory for colloids, the aggregation of LDL aged in plasma fulfills all the requirements of the reaction-limited mechanism, encompassing 1), exponential growth; 2), fractal structure, with the dimension of elementary constituent still consistent with a single LDL; and 3), extreme polydispersity of aggregates, with shape and dimension very close to that of droplets observed in vivo. PMID:16533854

  16. Low Density Lipoprotein Aged in Plasma Forms Clusters Resembling Subendothelial Droplets: Aggregation via Surface Sites

    PubMed Central

    De Spirito, Marco; Brunelli, Roberto; Mei, Giampiero; Bertani, Francesca R.; Ciasca, Gabriele; Greco, Giulia; Papi, Massimiliano; Arcovito, Giuseppe; Ursini, Fulvio; Parasassi, Tiziana

    2006-01-01

    In early phases of atherogenesis, droplets and vesicles accumulate in the subendothelial extracellular space of arterial intima. There is much evidence to suggest that these droplets, ranging between 100 and 400 nm, derive from modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL). In investigations of the formation mechanism of these droplets, LDL fusion was previously induced in vitro by proteolysis, lipolysis, oxidation, and vigorous shaking, but all treatments failed to reproduce the size distribution range of in vivo droplets, mostly resulting, instead, in particles with a diameter intermediate between that of one and two LDL. Our approach was meant to mimic LDL aging in plasma. LDL isolated from plasma that was incubated overnight at 37°C is slightly modified in the secondary structure of its protein component and is primed to form very large aggregates according to a reaction-limited mechanism. This mechanism requires interactions between selected surface sites, whereas massive fusion is ruled out. In the frame of the general theory for colloids, the aggregation of LDL aged in plasma fulfills all the requirements of the reaction-limited mechanism, encompassing 1), exponential growth; 2), fractal structure, with the dimension of elementary constituent still consistent with a single LDL; and 3), extreme polydispersity of aggregates, with shape and dimension very close to that of droplets observed in vivo. PMID:16533854

  17. Theoretical Calibration on the 13C-18O Clumped Isotope Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Zhang, S. T.; LIU, Q.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) arisen from phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates has been noticed since the beginning of stable isotope geochemistry. However, the molecular level details of this reaction have not been fully understood yet. Equilibrium 13C-18O clumped isotope distribution in carbonates has been suggested as a new thermometer for surface temperature systems; nevertheless, existing Δ47-T relationships calibrated by several different groups are incompatible, generating substantial confusions and debates about those variations. Here we propose a new molecular-level mechanism with three parallel pathways for the phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates. We show that the KIE of such reaction can be different if the relative contributions of the three parallel pathways are changed. This new mechanism abandons completely a previously proposed molecular mechanism (i.e., Guo et al., 2009) and can explain (at least partly) why the Δ47-T relationships provided by different groups are different. Together with a re-calculated equilibrium clumped isotope fractionation factors of carbonate minerals using a new volume-variable-cluster-model method with higher theoretical-level treatments and higher-order anharmonic corrections, we present a theoretical (equilibrium + KIE) Δ47-T relationship for carbonates. Our theoretical calibration line is with large variations due to considering possible changes of relative contributions of the three parallel pathways and different carbonate mineral used. For minimizing the variation, we suggest using the same amount of sample, the same mineral and the same temperature of phosphoric acid digestion for this experiment.

  18. Investigating the origin of discrepancies in clumped isotope calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagle, R.

    2015-12-01

    The abundance of 13C-18O 'clumps' in calcite or aragonite of corals skeletons are a potentially valuable tool for reconstructing past ocean temperatures. However, corals are known to exhibit significant "vital effects" (i.e., non-equilibrium mineral compositions) in δ18O, which complicates its application in paleoclimate studies, and may also exhibit clumped isotope disequilibrium. Here we determined mass 47 anomalies (Δ47) in CO2 derived from cultured shallow water and live-collected deep-sea coral. In a species of cultured surface water coral, we find disequilibrium Δ47 and δ18O values that are consistent with a pH effect driving disequilibrium isotopic signatures. We go on to show that culturing specimens at elevated CO2 conditions drives changes in both Δ47 and δ18O that follows the same relationship defined for pH effects in inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments. This suggests that dissolved inorganic carbon speciation at the site of calcification and therefore fluid pH can effect the clumped isotope composition of biogenic minerals. In two different live-collected deep-sea coral taxa, we find distinct clumped isotope signatures and Δ47-temperature calibration relationships.

  19. A DELAUNAY TRIANGULATION APPROACH FOR SEGMENTING CLUMPS OF NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Quan; Chang, Hang; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-05-07

    Cell-based fluorescence imaging assays have the potential to generate massive amount of data, which requires detailed quantitative analysis. Often, as a result of fixation, labeled nuclei overlap and create a clump of cells. However, it is important to quantify phenotypic read out on a cell-by-cell basis. In this paper, we propose a novel method for decomposing clumps of nuclei using high-level geometric constraints that are derived from low-level features of maximum curvature computed along the contour of each clump. Points of maximum curvature are used as vertices for Delaunay triangulation (DT), which provides a setof edge hypotheses for decomposing a clump of nuclei. Each hypothesis is subsequently tested against a constraint satisfaction network for a near optimum decomposition. The proposed method is compared with other traditional techniques such as the watershed method with/without markers. The experimental results show that our approach can overcome the deficiencies of the traditional methods and is very effective in separating severely touching nuclei.

  20. Chemistry of dense clumps near moving Herbig-Haro objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, H.; Viti, S.; Williams, D. A.; Girart, J. M.; Morata, O.

    2011-09-01

    Localized regions of enhanced emission from HCO+, NH3 and other species near Herbig-Haro objects (HHOs) have been interpreted as arising in a photochemistry stimulated by the HHO radiation on high-density quiescent clumps in molecular clouds. Static models of this process have been successful in accounting for the variety of molecular species arising ahead of the jet; however, recent observations show that the enhanced molecular emission is widespread along the jet as well as ahead. Hence, a realistic model must take into account the movement of the radiation field past the clump. It was previously unclear as to whether the short interaction time between the clump and the HHO in a moving source model would allow molecules such as HCO+ to reach high enough levels, and to survive for long enough to be observed. In this work we model a moving radiation source that approaches and passes a clump. The chemical picture is qualitatively unchanged by the addition of the moving source, strengthening the idea that enhancements are due to evaporation of molecules from dust grains. In addition, in the case of several molecules, the enhanced emission regions are longer lived. Some photochemically induced species, including methanol, are expected to maintain high abundances for ˜104 yr.

  1. Fission and cluster decay of the {sup 76}Sr nucleus in the ground state and formed in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Raj K.; Sharma, Manoj K.; Singh, Sarbjit; Nouicer, Rachid; Beck, Christian

    1997-12-01

    Calculations for fission and cluster decay of {sup 76}Sr are presented for this nucleus to be in its ground state or formed as an excited compound system in heavy-ion reactions. The predicted mass distribution, for the dynamical collective mass transfer process assumed for fission of {sup 76}Sr, is clearly asymmetric, favoring {alpha} nuclei. Cluster decay is studied within a preformed cluster model, both for ground-state to ground-state decays and from excited compound system to the ground state(s) or excited states(s) of the fragments. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Gas of 96 Planck Cold Clumps in the Second Quadrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianwei; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Tie; Meng, Fanyi

    2016-06-01

    Ninety-six Planck cold dust clumps in the second quadrant were mapped with 12CO (1–0), 13CO (1–0), and C18O (1–0) lines at the 13.7 m telescope of Purple Mountain Observatory. 12CO (1–0) and 13CO (1–0) emissions were detected for all 96 clumps, while C18O (1–0) emissions were detected in 81 of them. Fifteen clumps have more than one velocity component. In the 115 mapped velocity components, 225 cores were obtained. We found that 23.1% of the cores have non-Gaussian profiles. We acquired the V lsr, FWHM, and T A of the lines. Distances, T ex, velocity dispersions, {N}{{{H}}2}, and masses were also derived. Generally, turbulence may dominant the cores because {σ }{NT}/{σ }{Therm}\\gt 1 in almost all of the cores and Larson’s relationship is not apparent in our massive cores. Virial parameters are adopted to test the gravitational stability of cores and 51% of the cores are likely collapsing. The core mass function of the cores in the range 0–1 kpc suggests a low core-to-star conversional efficiency (0.62%). Only 14 of 225 cores (6.2%) have associated stellar objects at their centers, while the others are starless. The morphologies of clumps are mainly filamentary structures. Seven clumps may be located on an extension of the new spiral arm in the second quadrant while three are on the known outer arm.

  3. Effects of Water on Carbonate Clumped Isotope Bond Reordering Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, D. C.; Passey, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope geothermometry is a powerful tool for reconstructing past temperatures, both in surface environments and in the shallow crust. The method is based on heavy isotope "clumps" within single carbonate groups (e.g., 13C18O16O2-2), whose overabundance beyond levels predicted by chance is determined by mineralization temperature. The degree of clumped isotope overabundance can change at elevated temperatures (ca. >100ºC) owing to solid-state diffusion of C and O through the mineral lattice. Understanding the kinetics of this clumped isotope reordering process is a prerequisite for application to geological questions involving samples that have been heated in the subsurface. Thus far, the effect of water on reordering kinetics has not been explored. The presence of water dramatically increases rates of oxygen self-diffusion in calcite, but whether this water-enhanced diffusion is limited to the mineral surface or extends into the bulk crystal lattice is not clear. Here we present experimentally determined Arrhenius parameters for reordering rates in optical calcite heated under aqueous high pressure (100 MPa) conditions. We observe only marginal increases in reordering rates under these wet, high pressure conditions relative to rates observed for the same material reacted under dry, low pressure conditions. The near identical clumped isotope reordering rates for wet and dry conditions contrasts with the orders of magnitude increase in oxygen diffusivity at the mineral surface when water is present. This suggests the latter effect arises from surface reactions that have minimal influence on the diffusivity of C or O in the bulk mineral. Our results also imply that previously published reordering kinetics determined under dry, low pressure experimental conditions are applicable to geological samples that have been heated in the presence of water.

  4. The Staphylococcus aureus Global Regulator MgrA Modulates Clumping and Virulence by Controlling Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Heidi A.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Merriman, Joseph A.; King, Jessica M.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen that causes devastating infections in a wide range of locations within the body. One of the defining characteristics of S. aureus is its ability to form clumps in the presence of soluble fibrinogen, which likely has a protective benefit and facilitates adhesion to host tissue. We have previously shown that the ArlRS two-component regulatory system controls clumping, in part by repressing production of the large surface protein Ebh. In this work we show that ArlRS does not directly regulate Ebh, but instead ArlRS activates expression of the global regulator MgrA. Strains lacking mgrA fail to clump in the presence of fibrinogen, and clumping can be restored to an arlRS mutant by overexpressing either arlRS or mgrA, indicating that ArlRS and MgrA constitute a regulatory pathway. We used RNA-seq to show that MgrA represses ebh, as well as seven cell wall-associated proteins (SraP, Spa, FnbB, SasG, SasC, FmtB, and SdrD). EMSA analysis showed that MgrA directly represses expression of ebh and sraP. Clumping can be restored to an mgrA mutant by deleting the genes for Ebh, SraP and SasG, suggesting that increased expression of these proteins blocks clumping by steric hindrance. We show that mgrA mutants are less virulent in a rabbit model of endocarditis, and virulence can be partially restored by deleting the genes for the surface proteins ebh, sraP, and sasG. While mgrA mutants are unable to clump, they are known to have enhanced biofilm capacity. We demonstrate that this increase in biofilm formation is partially due to up-regulation of SasG, a surface protein known to promote intercellular interactions. These results confirm that ArlRS and MgrA constitute a regulatory cascade, and that they control expression of a number of genes important for virulence, including those for eight large surface proteins. PMID:27144398

  5. Formation of Dense Clumps/Cores in Infrared Dark Clouds and Their Magnetic Field Properties from AMR MHD Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I.

    2014-07-01

    Massive infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) are believed to be the precursors to star clusters and massive stars (e.g. Bergin & Tafalla 2007). The supersonic turbulent nature of molecular clouds in the presence of magnetic fields poses a great challenge in understanding the structure and dynamics of molecular clouds and the star formation therein (e.g. Falgarone et al. 2008, Crutcher et al. 2010, Peretto & Fuller 2010, Hernandez & Tan 2011, Harcar et al. 2013, Kainulainen & Tan 2013). We perform two high resolution ideal MHD AMR simulations with supersonically driven turbulence on the formation of massive infrared dark clouds, using our radiative-MHD AMR code ORION2 (P.S. Li, et al. 2012), to reveal the complex 3D filamentary structure and the subsequent formation of dense clumps and cores inside the dark clouds. The two models differ only in field strength, with one model having an initial field 10 times as strong as the other. The magnetic properties of the clumps from the two models are compared with the Zeeman observations summarized in Crutcher et al. (2010). Our dense clumps exhibit a power-law relation between magnetic field strength and density similar to the observations. Despite the order of magnitude difference in initial field strength, with the magnetic field enhancement and fragmentation as the result of turbulence, the magnetic properties of clumps in the weak field model are remarkably similar to those in the strong field model, except for a clear difference in the magnetic field orientation with respect to the global mean field direction. The almost random orientation of the weak field simulation is inconsistent with the observation of the field orientation on large and small scales by H.-b. Li, et al. (2009). I will briefly summarize the physical properties of the filamentary dark clouds in the simulations and report a detailed comparison of the magnetic properties of dense clumps in the simulations with the Zeeman observations. We have continued the

  6. Kinetic effects in ‘clumped isotopes’: application to Soreq cave speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affek, H. P.; Ayalon, A.; Bar-Matthews, M.; Matthews, A.

    2009-12-01

    Carbonate ‘clumped isotopes’ reflect the formation temperatures of carbonates that are formed at thermodynamic equilibrium. However, kinetic isotope effects (KIE) are recognized in carbonates formed by CO2 degassing out of bicarbonate solution and are associated with the competition between the rate of degassing and the rate at which isotope equilibrium is regained between DIC and water. As such, carbonates produced from thin water films are especially sensitive to KIE, leading to offsets from equilibrium temperatures in speleothems. We have previously observed an offset of 8°C (0.036‰ offset in Δ47) in one stalagmite sample formed in Soreq cave (Israel) during the last 30 years, consistent with this kinetic process (Affek et al., 2008). The 6-7°C difference in ‘clumped isotopes’ temperatures between Last Glacial Maximum samples and this modern-day sample is consistent with independent estimates of this temperature difference in the region; thus supporting a first approximation assumption that the KIE offset in Soreq cave is constant over time. The dynamics of the approach to equilibrium in CO2-H2O isotope exchange shows identical rates for both δ18O and Δ47. Therefore the δ18O signal replication observed among stalagmites of the same age in Soreq suggests the likelihood of a similar replication in Δ47, in support for a constant KIE offset. A correction for a constant temperature offset, if valid, would enable application of ‘clumped isotopes’ to paleo-thermometry in Soreq cave, serving as a cave specific modification to the ‘clumped isotopes’ thermometer calibration. As a first test we have examined Δ47 in an additional number of modern-day deposits in the cave. First results indicate that Δ47 values of 3 new samples are within error of each other and within the error of the previously analyzed stalagmite, yielding an 8±1°C correction for the modern-day cave temperature. The new data thus provide further support for constant correction

  7. ION AND NEUTRAL MOLECULES IN THE W43-MM1(G30.79 FIR 10) INFALLING CLUMP

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes, Paulo C.

    2011-12-20

    The high-mass star-forming clump W43-MM1 has been mapped in N{sub 2}H{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), C{sup 18}O(3 {yields} 2), SiO(8 {yields} 7), and in a single pointing in DCO{sup +}(5 {yields} 4) toward the center of the clump. Column densities from these observations as well as previous HCO{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), HCN(4 {yields} 3), H{sup 13}CN(4 {yields} 3), and CS(7 {yields} 6) data have been derived using the RADEX code; results later have been used to derive chemical abundances at selected points in the MM1 main axis. We compare with chemical models to estimate an evolutionary age of 10{sup 4} years for a remarkable warm hot core inside MM1. We also proposed that the dust temperature derived from the spectral energy distribution fitting in MM1 is not representative of the gas temperature deep inside the clump because dust emission may have become optically thick. By deriving a deuterium fractionation of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, we estimate an electron fraction of X(e) = 6.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}. Thus, the coupling between the neutral gas and the magnetic field is estimated by computing the ambipolar diffusion Reynolds number R{sub m} = 18 and the wave coupling number W = 110. Considering that the infalling speed is slightly supersonic (M = 1.1) but sub-Alfvenic, we conclude that the MM1 clump has recently been or is in the process of decoupling the field from the neutral fluid. Thus, the MM1 clump appears to be in an intermediate stage of evolution in which a hot core has developed while the envelope is still infalling and not fully decoupled from the ambient magnetic field.

  8. Dense clumps of ionized gas near Pi Scorpii, as revealed by the fine-structure excitation of N II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertoldi, Frank; Jenkins, Edward B.

    1992-01-01

    The column density and the emission of the ionized gas along the line of sight toward the B1 V + B2 V binary star Pi Sco are measured on the basis of the fine-structure absorption lines of the ground state N II. It is found that the bulk of this ionized gas must be clumped on a length scale of 0.025 pc, which is far smaller than the observed size of the diffuse H II region surrounding Pi Sco of about 6 pc. The observed column density of S III toward Pi Sco yields an upper limit on the distance of the absorbing, clumped gas from the star of less than about 0.02 pc, assuming that both the N II and S III absorption arise from the same gas. The possibility that the ionized gas originates from a photoevaporating circumstellar disk directly surrounding Pi Sco is excluded, since such a disk would have an unusual size of order 0.025 pc and would have had to survive for the estimated age of Pi Sco of 5-8 Myr. The derived mean density of the clumped gas is of order 40/cu cm, so that the gas is at a pressure that far exceeds the mean pressure in the H II region. It is concluded that the ionized gas could originate from evaporation flows off a cluster of compact neutral objects that evaporate due to the ionizing radiation of Pi Sco.

  9. Early dynamical evolution of substructured stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Julien; Boily, Christian

    2015-08-01

    It is now widely accepted that stellar clusters form with a high level of substructure (Kuhn et al. 2014, Bate 2009), inherited from the molecular cloud and the star formation process. Evidence from observations and simulations also indicate the stars in such young clusters form a subvirial system (Kirk et al. 2007, Maschberger et al. 2010). The subsequent dynamical evolution can cause important mass loss, ejecting a large part of the birth population in the field. It can also imprint the stellar population and still be inferred from observations of evolved clusters. Nbody simulations allow a better understanding of these early twists and turns, given realistic initial conditions. Nowadays, substructured, clumpy young clusters are usually obtained through pseudo-fractal growth (Goodwin et al. 2004) and velocity inheritance. Such models are visually realistics and are very useful, they are however somewhat artificial in their velocity distribution. I introduce a new way to create clumpy initial conditions through a "Hubble expansion" which naturally produces self consistent clumps, velocity-wise. A velocity distribution analysis shows the new method produces realistic models, consistent with the dynamical state of the newly created cores in hydrodynamic simulation of cluster formation (Klessen & Burkert 2000). I use these initial conditions to investigate the dynamical evolution of young subvirial clusters, up to 80000 stars. I find an overall soft evolution, with hierarchical merging leading to a high level of mass segregation. I investigate the influence of the mass function on the fate of the cluster, specifically on the amount of mass loss induced by the early violent relaxation. Using a new binary detection algorithm, I also find a strong processing of the native binary population.

  10. CANDIDATE TIDAL DWARF GALAXIES IN Arp 305: LESSONS ON DWARF DETACHMENT AND GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, Mark; Smith, Beverly J.; Giroux, Mark L.; Hurlock, Sabrina; Struck, Curtis E-mail: smithbj@etsu.edu E-mail: zshh7@goldmail.etsu.edu

    2009-06-15

    To search for Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs) and to study star formation (SF) in tidal features, we are conducting a large UV imaging survey of interacting galaxies selected from the Arp (1996) Atlas using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) telescope. As part of that study, we present a GALEX UV and Sloan Digital Sky Survey and SARA optical study of the gas-rich interacting galaxy pair Arp 305 (NGC 4016/7). The GALEX UV data reveal much extended diffuse UV emission and SF outside the disks. This includes a luminous star-forming region between the two galaxies, and a number of such regions in tidal tails. We have identified 45 young star-forming clumps in Arp 305, including several TDG candidates. By comparing the UV and optical colors to population synthesis models, we determined that the clumps are very young, with several having ages {approx}6 Myr. We do not find many intermediate age clumps in spite of the fact that the last closest encounter was about 300 Myr ago. We have used a smooth particle hydrodynamics code to model the interaction and determine the fate of the star clusters and candidate TDGs.

  11. Far-infrared Dust Temperatures and Column Densities of the MALT90 Molecular Clump Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Contreras, Yanett; Smith, Howard A.; Jackson, James M.; Hoq, Sadia; Rathborne, Jill M.

    2015-12-01

    We present dust column densities and dust temperatures for ˜3000 young, high-mass molecular clumps from the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz survey, derived from adjusting single-temperature dust emission models to the far-infrared intensity maps measured between 160 and 870 μm from the Herschel/Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-Gal) and APEX/APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) surveys. We discuss the methodology employed in analyzing the data, calculating physical parameters, and estimating their uncertainties. The population average dust temperature of the clumps are 16.8 ± 0.2 K for the clumps that do not exhibit mid-infrared signatures of star formation (quiescent clumps), 18.6 ± 0.2 K for the clumps that display mid-infrared signatures of ongoing star formation but have not yet developed an H ii region (protostellar clumps), and 23.7 ± 0.2 and 28.1 ± 0.3 K for clumps associated with H ii and photo-dissociation regions, respectively. These four groups exhibit large overlaps in their temperature distributions, with dispersions ranging between 4 and 6 K. The median of the peak column densities of the protostellar clump population is 0.20 ± 0.02 g cm-2, which is about 50% higher compared to the median of the peak column densities associated with clumps in the other evolutionary stages. We compare the dust temperatures and column densities measured toward the center of the clumps with the mean values of each clump. We find that in the quiescent clumps, the dust temperature increases toward the outer regions and that these clumps are associated with the shallowest column density profiles. In contrast, molecular clumps in the protostellar or H ii region phase have dust temperature gradients more consistent with internal heating and are associated with steeper column density profiles compared with the quiescent clumps.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Young clumps embedded in IRDC (Traficante+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traficante, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Peretto, N.; Pineda, J. E.; Molinari, S.

    2015-06-01

    Photometric parameters for 667 starless clumps (sources identified at 160um with a counterpart at 250 and 350um) and 1056 protostellar clumps (sources identified at 160um with a counterpart at 70, 250 and 350um). Photometric parameters obtained with Hyper photometry code (2015A&A...574A.119T). The photometry is corrected for aperture and colour corrections. The parameter list is the standard Hyper output (see description below). SED fit parameters for 650 starless clumps and 1034 protostellar clumps (all clumps with good SED fitting: Chi2<10, Temperature<40K. See the paper for details) (4 data files).

  13. "Anticlumping" and Other Combinatorial Effects on Clumped Isotopes: Implications for Tracing Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, L.

    2015-12-01

    I present a mode of isotopic ordering that has purely combinatorial origins. It can be important when identical rare isotopes are paired by coincidence (e.g., they are neighbors on the same molecule), or when extrinsic factors govern the isotopic composition of the two atoms that share a chemical bond. By itself, combinatorial isotope pairing yields products with isotopes either randomly distributed or with a deficit relative to a random distribution of isotopes. These systematics arise because of an unconventional coupling between the formation of singly- and multiply-substituted isotopic moieties. In a random distribution, rare isotopes are symmetrically distributed: Single isotopic substitutions (e.g., H‒D and D‒H in H2) occur with equal probability, and double isotopic substitutions (e.g., D2) occur according to random chance. The absence of symmetry in a bond-making complex can yield unequal numbers of singly-substituted molecules (e.g., more H‒D than D‒H in H2), which is recorded in the product molecule as a deficit in doubly-substituted moieties and an "anticlumped" isotope distribution (i.e., Δn < 0). Enzymatic isotope pairing reactions, which can have site-specific isotopic fractionation factors and atom reservoirs, should express this class of combinatorial isotope effect. Chemical-kinetic isotope effects, which are related to the bond-forming transition state, arise independently and express second-order combinatorial effects. In general, both combinatorial and chemical factors are important for calculating and interpreting clumped-isotope signatures of individual reactions. In many reactions relevant to geochemical oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen cycling, combinatorial isotope pairing likely plays a strong role in the clumped isotope distribution of the products. These isotopic signatures, manifest as either directly bound isotope clumps or as features of a molecule's isotopic anatomy, could be exploited as tracers of biogeochemistry that can

  14. Clumping in the Cassini Division and C Ring: Constraints from Stellar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, J. E.; Jerousek, R. G.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-12-01

    Particles in Saturn's rings are engaged in a constant tug-of-war between interparticle gravitational and adhesive forces that lead to clumping, on the one hand, and Keplerian shear that inhibits accretion on the other. Depending on the surface mass density of the rings and the local orbital velocity, ephemeral clumps or self-gravity wakes can form, giving the rings granularity on the scale of the most-unstable length scale against gravitational collapse. The A ring and many regions of the B ring are dominated by self-gravity wakes with a typical radial wavelength of ~50-100 m. A characteristic of self-gravity wakes is that they can effectively shadow the relatively empty spaces in between them, depending on viewing geometry. This leads to geometry-dependent measurements of optical depth in occultations of the rings. The C ring and Cassini Division have significantly lower surface mass densities than the A and B ring such that in most of these regions the most-unstable wavelength is comparable to the size of the ring particles (~1 m) so that self-gravity wake formation is not expected nor have its characteristics in various measurements been observed. Here we present measurements of the optical depth of the C ring and Cassini Division with the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) showing variations with viewing geometry in the "ramp" regions and the Cassini Division "triple band". These variations are characteristic of self-gravity wakes. We place limits on clumping in other regions of the C ring and Cassini Division.

  15. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Classification of Ge hut clusters in arrays formed by molecular beam epitaxy at low temperatures on the Si(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arapkina, Larisa V.; Yuryev, Vladimir A.

    2010-06-01

    Ge hut clusters forming quantum dot arrays on the Si(001) surface in the process of low-temperature ultrahigh-vacuum molecular beam epitaxy are morphologically investigated and classified using in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy. It is found that two main Ge hut cluster types—pyramidal and wedge-shaped—have different atomic structures, and it is concluded that shape transitions between the two are impossible. Derivative cluster species — obelisks (or truncated wedges) and accreted wedges — are revealed and investigated for the first time and shown to start dominating at high Ge coverages. The uniformity of cluster arrays is shown to be controlled by the scatter in the lengths of wedge-like clusters. At low growth temperatures (360 °C), cluster nucleation during the growth of the array is observed for all values of Ge coverage except for a particular point at which the arrays are more uniform than at higher or lower coverages. At higher temperatures (530 °C), no cluster nucleation is observed after the initial formation of the array.

  16. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND DARK SATELLITE GALAXIES THROUGH THE STREAM VELOCITY

    SciTech Connect

    Naoz, Smadar; Narayan, Ramesh

    2014-08-10

    The formation of purely baryonic globular clusters with no gravitationally bound dark matter is still a theoretical challenge. We show that these objects might form naturally whenever there is a relative stream velocity between baryons and dark matter. The stream velocity causes a phase shift between linear modes of baryonic and dark matter perturbations, which translates to a spatial offset between the two components when they collapse. For a 2σ (3σ) density fluctuation, baryonic clumps with masses in the range 10{sup 5}-2.5 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} (10{sup 5}-4 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}) collapse outside the virial radii of their counterpart dark matter halos. These objects could survive as long-lived, dark-matter-free objects and might conceivably become globular clusters. In addition, their dark matter counterparts, which were deprived of gas, might become dark satellite galaxies.

  17. Dissociation and Re-Aggregation of Multicell-Ensheathed Fragments Responsible for Rapid Production of Massive Clumps of Leptothrix Sheaths.

    PubMed

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; McFarlane, Ian R; Tamura, Katsunori; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Species of the Fe/Mn-oxidizing bacteria Leptothrix produce tremendous amounts of microtubular, Fe/Mn-encrusted sheaths within a few days in outwells of groundwater that can rapidly clog water systems. To understand this mode of rapid sheath production and define the timescales involved, behaviors of sheath-forming Leptothrix sp. strain OUMS1 were examined using time-lapse video at the initial stage of sheath formation. OUMS1 formed clumps of tangled sheaths. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of a thin layer of bacterial exopolymer fibrils around catenulate cells (corresponding to the immature sheath). In time-lapse videos, numerous sheath filaments that extended from the periphery of sheath clumps repeatedly fragmented at the apex of the same fragment, the fragments then aggregated and again elongated, eventually forming a large sheath clump comprising tangled sheaths within two days. In this study, we found that fast microscopic fragmentation, dissociation, re-aggregation and re-elongation events are the basis of the rapid, massive production of Leptothrix sheaths typically observed at macroscopic scales. PMID:27490579

  18. Decay studies of 59Cu* formed in the 35Cl + 24Mg reaction using the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikraj, C.; Balasubramaniam, M.

    2013-02-01

    The reformulated dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) is applied to study the decay of odd-A and non-α structured 59Cu* formed in the 35Cl+24Mg reaction at Elab=275 MeV. Here, the temperature (T)-dependent binding energies due to Krappe are used. The roles of Wigner and pairing energies in the fragmentation potential are explicitly shown in this work. For the temperature T=4.1898 MeV corresponding to Elab=275 MeV, the contribution of pairing vanishes and the resulting structure of the fragmentation potential due to Wigner term is shown. In addition to this, we have studied the role of factor α appearing in the inertia part of the equation of motion dictating the mass-transfer process. It is shown that this factor has significant effect in the structure of preformation probability values and hence in turn we see significant changes in the cross sections. We compare the cross sections of the measured charge distributions of the fission fragments for two limiting values of the parameter α with the experimental data. In order to fit the total cross-section values, a linear relation is obtained between the free parameter of the model ▵R and the factor α appearing in the hydrodynamical mass.

  19. THE PREPARATION OF CURRICULUM MATERIALS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS FOR AN EXPERIMENTAL APPLICATION OF THE CLUSTER CONCEPT OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AT THE SECONDARY SCHOOL LEVEL. VOLUME III, INSTRUCTIONAL PLANS FOR THE METAL FORMING AND FABRICATION CLUSTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MALEY, DONALD

    DESIGNED FOR USE WITH 11TH AND 12TH GRADE STUDENTS, THIS CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR THE OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER IN METAL FORMING AND FABRICATION WAS DEVELOPED BY PARTICIPATING TEACHERS FROM RESULTS OF THE RESEARCH PROCEDURES DESCRIBED IN VOLUME I (VT 004 162). THE COURSE DESCRIPTION, NEED FOR THE COURSE, COURSE OBJECTIVES, PROCEDURES AND INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN…

  20. The Effects of Clumping on Wind Line Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinja, R. K.; Massa, D.; Fullerton, A. W.

    2008-01-01

    We review the effects of clumping on the profiles of resonance doublets. By allowing the ratio of the doublet oscillator strengths to be a free parameter, we demonstrate that doublet profiles contain more information than is normally utilized. In clumped (or porous) winds, this ratio can lie between unity and the ratio of the f-values, and can change as a function of velocity and time, depending on the fraction of the stellar disk that is covered by material moving at a particular velocity at a given moment. Using these insights, we present the results of SEI modeling of a sample of B supergiants, sigma Pup and a time series for a star whose terminal velocity is low enough to make the components of its Si VI lambda lambda 1400 independent. These results are interpreted within the framework of the Oskinova et al. (2007) model, and demonstrate how the doublet profiles can be used to extract information about wind structure.

  1. Thermal history of the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian boundary at Arrow Canyon, NV, USA: Insights from carbonate clumped isotopes and fluid inclusion microthermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenton, B.; Grossman, E. L.; Passey, B. H.; Henkes, G. A.; Becker, S. P.; Pottorf, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Constraining the temperature-time history of sedimentary basins is critical for understanding basin evolution and related problems, such as petroleum systems analysis and genesis of metallic ore deposits. The importance of burial history studies is confirmed by the abundance and diversity of techniques aimed at acquiring thermal history information. Often, multiple techniques are required to fully characterize sediment thermal histories because each tool targets different burial temperatures (e.g., maximum burial temperature, T-t points, or cooling rates) and different indicators may be limited by suitable study material or geologic setting. Therefore it is important to test new techniques, such as clumped isotopes, that may aid in reconstructing basin thermal histories. The potential utility of clumped isotopes as a thermal history tool is suggested by the observation of elevated clumped isotope temperatures in nominally well-preserved fossils, and also from recent laboratory heating experiments showing that C-O bonds can reorder in the solid-state during heating. While this phenomenon conceals primary paleoclimate information, it may record burial temperatures useful for constraining basin thermal histories. Here we present clumped isotope measurements from brachiopods, crinoids, diagenetic cements, and bulk matrix material collected from within ~ 50 m of the global stratotype section and point (GSSP) for the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian boundary along with new fluid inclusion microthermometry data. Preliminary clumped isotope temperatures range from ~100-165 °C and generally cluster based on component type. Secondary fluid inclusion assemblages in blocky calcite cement indicate that strata surrounding the GSSP experienced at least 175-180 °C during burial in the Antler foreland basin. The fact that clumped isotope temperatures in all carbonate components are lower than independently constrained peak temperature estimates from fluid inclusions suggests that

  2. 13CO Molecular Clouds and Clumps in the Galactic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Stark, A. A.

    2004-12-01

    Using the 13CO Bell Laboratories Survey for one third of galactic plane, (l, b) = (-5° to 117°, -1° to +1°), and our revised cloud identification code, 13CO clouds have been identified and cataloged as a function of threshold temperature; 1,400 of molecular clouds with 1 K threshold temperature and with a 4-threshold number of pixels, 629 clouds with 2 K threshold temperature, and 263 clouds with 3 K. Clouds with the brightest cores (TR*(13CO) > 3 K) are confined to the 5 Kpc Molecular Ring (l<40°) and l=80° region. In addition to cloud identification, dense clump regions can be located using this 13CO survey and then combined with existing UMass-Stony Brook 12CO data for the first quadrant of the Galactic Plane. Numbers of identified clumps are 3,156 with 0.4 threshold 13CO optical depth, 2,134 with 0.6, 1,190 with 0.8, and 662 with 1.0. It is found that the hot clumps are heavily crowded between l = 10° to 20°. Good correlation is found between 13CO integrated intensity and column density. We discuss some statistical characteristics of clouds, cores, and the column density distribution.

  3. Another cluster of red supergiants close to RSGC1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, I.; González-Fernández, C.; Marco, A.; Clark, J. S.; Martínez-Núñez, S.

    2010-04-01

    Context. Recent studies have revealed massive star clusters in a region of the Milky Way close to the tip of the Long Bar. These clusters are heavily obscured and are characterised by a population of red supergiants. Aims: We analyse a previously unreported concentration of bright red stars ~16' away from the cluster RSGC1 Methods: We utilised near IR photometry to identify candidate red supergiants and then K-band spectroscopy of a sample to characterise their properties. Results: We find a compact clump of eight red supergiants and five other candidates at some distance, one of which is spectroscopically confirmed as a red supergiant. These objects must form an open cluster, which we name Alicante 8. Because of the high reddening and strong field contamination, the cluster sequence is not clearly seen in 2MASS or UKIDSS near-IR photometry. From the analysis of the red supergiants, we infer an extinction AKS = 1.9 and an age close to 20 Myr. Conclusions: Though this cluster is smaller than the three known previously, its properties still suggest a mass in excess of 10 000 M⊙. Its discovery corroborates the hypothesis that star formation in this region has happened on a wide scale between ~10 and ~20 Myr ago.

  4. Coadsorption of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide on the nickel clusters deposited onto MgO(111) film formed on Mo(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, Tamerlan T.

    2004-10-01

    Coadsorption of NO and CO molecules on the Ni clusters deposited on MgO(111) film formed on a Mo(110) crystal has been studied by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). It is found that adsorption of NO molecules strongly affects the state of CO molecules, which were initially adsorbed on the Ni clusters. The observed features in RAIRS and TPD spectra are attributed to the change of the CO adsorption site and geometry, which is induced by NO adsorption.

  5. Molecular Clouds and Clumps in the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Ring Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Johnson, A. M.; Jackson, J. M.; Shah, R. Y.; Simon, R.

    2009-05-01

    The Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (BU-FCRAO) Galactic Ring Survey (GRS) of 13CO J = 1 → 0 emission covers Galactic longitudes 18° < ell < 55fdg7 and Galactic latitudes |b| <= 1°. Using the SEQUOIA array on the FCRAO 14 m telescope, the GRS fully sampled the 13CO Galactic emission (46'' angular resolution on a 22'' grid) and achieved a spectral resolution of 0.21 km s-1. Because the GRS uses 13CO, an optically thin tracer, rather than 12CO, an optically thick tracer, the GRS allows a much better determination of column density and also a cleaner separation of velocity components along a line of sight. With this homogeneous, fully sampled survey of 13CO emission, we have identified 829 molecular clouds and 6124 clumps throughout the inner Galaxy using the CLUMPFIND algorithm. Here we present details of the catalog and a preliminary analysis of the properties of the molecular clouds and their clumps. Moreover, we compare clouds inside and outside of the 5 kpc ring and find that clouds within the ring typically have warmer temperatures, higher column densities, larger areas, and more clumps compared with clouds located outside the ring. This is expected if these clouds are actively forming stars. This catalog provides a useful tool for the study of molecular clouds and their embedded young stellar objects.

  6. MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND CLUMPS IN THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY-FIVE COLLEGE RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GALACTIC RING SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Rathborne, J. M.; Johnson, A. M.; Jackson, J. M.; Shah, R. Y.; Simon, R. E-mail: alexj@bu.edu E-mail: ronak@bu.edu

    2009-05-15

    The Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (BU-FCRAO) Galactic Ring Survey (GRS) of {sup 13}CO J = 1 {yields} 0 emission covers Galactic longitudes 18{sup 0} < l < 55.{sup 0}7 and Galactic latitudes |b| {<=} 1{sup 0}. Using the SEQUOIA array on the FCRAO 14 m telescope, the GRS fully sampled the {sup 13}CO Galactic emission (46'' angular resolution on a 22'' grid) and achieved a spectral resolution of 0.21 km s{sup -1}. Because the GRS uses {sup 13}CO, an optically thin tracer, rather than {sup 12}CO, an optically thick tracer, the GRS allows a much better determination of column density and also a cleaner separation of velocity components along a line of sight. With this homogeneous, fully sampled survey of {sup 13}CO emission, we have identified 829 molecular clouds and 6124 clumps throughout the inner Galaxy using the CLUMPFIND algorithm. Here we present details of the catalog and a preliminary analysis of the properties of the molecular clouds and their clumps. Moreover, we compare clouds inside and outside of the 5 kpc ring and find that clouds within the ring typically have warmer temperatures, higher column densities, larger areas, and more clumps compared with clouds located outside the ring. This is expected if these clouds are actively forming stars. This catalog provides a useful tool for the study of molecular clouds and their embedded young stellar objects.

  7. LBT/LUCIFER view of star-forming galaxies in the cluster 7C 1756+6520 at z ˜ 1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Sommariva, Veronica; Cresci, Giovanni; Sani, Eleonora; Galametz, Audrey; Mannucci, Filippo; Petropoulou, Vasiliki; Fumana, Marco

    2012-10-01

    Galaxy clusters are key places to study the contribution of nature (i.e. mass and morphology) and nurture (i.e. environment) in the formation and evolution of galaxies. Recently, a number of clusters at z > 1, i.e. corresponding to the first epochs of the cluster formation, have been discovered and confirmed spectroscopically. We present new observations obtained with the LBT Near Infrared Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCIFER) spectrograph at Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) of a sample of star-forming galaxies associated with a large-scale structure around the radio galaxy 7C 1756+6520 at z = 1.42. Combining our spectroscopic data and the literature photometric data, we derived some of the properties of these galaxies: star formation rate, metallicity and stellar mass. With the aim of analysing the effect of the cluster environment on galaxy evolution, we have located the galaxies in the plane of the so-called fundamental metallicity relation (FMR), which is known not to evolve with redshift up to z = 2.5 for field galaxies, but it is still unexplored in rich environments at low and high redshifts. We found that the properties of the galaxies in the cluster 7C 1756+6520 are compatible with the FMR which suggests that the effect of the environment on galaxy metallicity at this early epoch of cluster formation is marginal. As a side study, we also report the spectroscopic analysis of a bright active galactic nucleus, belonging to the cluster, which shows a significant outflow of gas.

  8. Mutations in the Gene Encoding the Ancillary Pilin Subunit of the Streptococcus suis srtF Cluster Result in Pili Formed by the Major Subunit Only

    PubMed Central

    Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Takamatsu, Daisuke; la Cruz Domínguez-Punaro, María de; Lecours, Marie-Pier; Montpetit, Diane; Osaki, Makoto; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    Pili have been shown to contribute to the virulence of different Gram-positive pathogenic species. Among other critical steps of bacterial pathogenesis, these structures participate in adherence to host cells, colonization and systemic virulence. Recently, the presence of at least four discrete gene clusters encoding putative pili has been revealed in the major swine pathogen and emerging zoonotic agent Streptococcus suis. However, pili production by this species has not yet been demonstrated. In this study, we investigated the functionality of one of these pili clusters, known as the srtF pilus cluster, by the construction of mutant strains for each of the four genes of the cluster as well as by the generation of antibodies against the putative pilin subunits. Results revealed that the S. suis serotype 2 strain P1/7, as well as several other highly virulent invasive S. suis serotype 2 isolates express pili from this cluster. However, in most cases tested, and as a result of nonsense mutations at the 5′ end of the gene encoding the minor pilin subunit (a putative adhesin), pili were formed by the major pilin subunit only. We then evaluated the role these pili play in S. suis virulence. Abolishment of the expression of srtF cluster-encoded pili did not result in impaired interactions of S. suis with porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, non-piliated mutants were as virulent as the wild type strain when evaluated in a murine model of S. suis sepsis. Our results show that srtF cluster-encoded, S. suis pili are atypical compared to other Gram-positive pili. In addition, since the highly virulent strains under investigation are unlikely to produce other pili, our results suggest that pili might be dispensable for critical steps of the S. suis pathogenesis of infection. PMID:20052283

  9. Rates of formation and dissipation of clumping reveal lagged responses in tropical tree populations.

    PubMed

    Detto, Matteo; Muller-Landau, Helene C

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of spatial patterns of plant populations can provide important information about underlying processes, yet they have received relatively little attention to date. Here we investigate the rates of formation and dissipation of clusters and the relationship of these rates to the degree of aggregation (clumping) in models and in empirical data for tropical trees. In univariate models, exact solutions and simulations show that the rate of change of spatial patterns has a specific, linear relationship to the degree of aggregation at all scales. Shorter dispersal and/or weaker negative density dependence (NDD) result in both denser and longer-lasting clusters. In multivariate host-parasite models in contrast, the rate of change of spatial pattern is faster relative to the level of aggrega- tion. We then analyzed the dynamics of spatial patterns of stems ≥ 1 cm diameter in 221 tropical tree species from seven censuses spanning 28 yr. We found that for most species, the rates of change in spatial patterns were faster than predicted from univariate models given their aggregation. This indicates that more complex dynamics involving multivariate interactions induce time lags in responses to aggregation in these species. Such lags could arise, for example, if it takes time for natural enemies to locate aggregations of their hosts. This combination of theoretical and empirical results thus shows that complex multilevel models are needed to capture spatiotemporal dynamics of tropical forests and provides new insights into the processes structuring tropical plant communities. PMID:27349094

  10. Clumped isotope thermometry of modern and early Cretaceous molluscan carbonate from high-latitude seas (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, G. A.; Price, G. D.; Ambrose, W. G.; Carroll, M. L.; Passey, B. H.

    2010-12-01

    The carbonate clumped isotope thermometer is based on the temperature sensitivity of the relative abundance of carbonate ion groups containing 13C-18O bonds. One application of clumped isotope thermometry is to determine the temperature of ancient seawater from the skeletal material of calcium carbonate-secreting marine organisms. The relationship between Δ47, a parameter describing isotopic clumping, and the temperature of carbonate biomineralization has been well-defined for fish otoliths, corals, foraminifera, and coccolithophore tests, but few data have been published for brachiopods and bivalve mollusks. A comprehensive evaluation of the Δ47-temperature relationship for mollusks is required for paleotemperature interpretations from the marine fossil record. Here we present a more comprehensive calibration for modern mollusks, including bivalves, cephalopods, and gastropods. Further, we focus on a subset of cold water, high-latitude species collected in the northern Barents Sea. The observed Δ47-temperature relationship is similar to the theoretical relationship presented by Guo et al. (2009) but deviates at low temperatures from the original Ghosh et al. (2007) calibration curve. This divergence could be related to methodological differences or unaccounted differences in the biomineralization of mollusks versus that of other carbonate-secreting organisms at low temperature. One advantage of clumped isotope thermometry over traditional oxygen isotope thermometry is that it does not require assumptions about the isotopic composition of the water in which the carbonate formed. This may be particularly useful in Mesozoic paleoceanography where the oxygen isotope value of seawater is uncertain. Using clumped isotope thermometry applied to early Cretaceous (Valangian) belemnite carbonate from the Yatria River, sub-polar Urals, Siberia, we find shell growth temperatures of 20-26°C at a paleolatitude of ~60-65°N. Our data imply average seawater δ18O values of 0

  11. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-10-01

    "Clumped-isotope" thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope "clumps"). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals. We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect. Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3- and CO32-. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many natural systems. The two

  12. Inter- and intra-annual variations of clumping index derived from the MODIS BRDF product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Liming; Liu, Jane; Chen, Jing M.; Croft, Holly; Wang, Rong; Sprintsin, Michael; Zheng, Ting; Ryu, Youngryel; Pisek, Jan; Gonsamo, Alemu; Deng, Feng; Zhang, Yongqin

    2016-02-01

    Clumping index quantifies the level of foliage aggregation, relative to a random distribution, and is a key structural parameter of plant canopies and is widely used in ecological and meteorological models. In this study, the inter- and intra-annual variations in clumping index values, derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF product, are investigated at six forest sites, including conifer forests, a mixed deciduous forest and an oak-savanna system. We find that the clumping index displays large seasonal variation, particularly for the deciduous sites, with the magnitude in clumping index values at each site comparable on an intra-annual basis, and the seasonality of clumping index well captured after noise removal. For broadleaved and mixed forest sites, minimum clumping index values are usually found during the season when leaf area index is at its maximum. The magnitude of MODIS clumping index is validated by ground data collected from 17 sites. Validation shows that the MODIS clumping index can explain 75% of variance in measured values (bias = 0.03 and rmse = 0.08), although with a narrower amplitude in variation. This study suggests that the MODIS BRDF product has the potential to produce good seasonal trajectories of clumping index values, but with an improved estimation of background reflectance.

  13. Enhanced water window x-ray emission from in situ formed carbon clusters irradiated by intense ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, U.; Rao, B. S.; Arora, V.; Upadhyay, A.; Singhal, H.; Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Mukherjee, C.; Gupta, P. D.

    2013-07-29

    Enhanced water window x-ray emission (23–44 Å) from carbon clusters, formed in situ using a pre-pulse, irradiated by intense (I > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) ultra-short laser pulse, is demonstrated. An order of magnitude x-ray enhancement over planar graphite target is observed in carbon clusters, formed by a sub-ns pre-pulse, interacting with intense main pulse after a delay. The effect of the delay and the duration of the main pulse is studied for optimizing the x-ray emission in the water window region. This x-ray source has added advantages of being an efficient, high repetition rate, and low debris x-ray source.

  14. Use of density functional theory method to calculate structures of neutral carbon clusters Cn (3 ≤ n ≤ 24) and study their variability of structural forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, T. W.; Lai, S. K.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we present modifications to the well-known basin hopping (BH) optimization algorithm [D. J. Wales and J. P. Doye, J. Phys. Chem. A 101, 5111 (1997)] by incorporating in it the unique and specific nature of interactions among valence electrons and ions in carbon atoms through calculating the cluster's total energy by the density functional tight-binding (DFTB) theory, using it to find the lowest energy structures of carbon clusters and, from these optimized atomic and electronic structures, studying their varied forms of topological transitions, which include a linear chain, a monocyclic to a polycyclic ring, and a fullerene/cage-like geometry. In this modified BH (MBH) algorithm, we define a spatial volume within which the cluster's lowest energy structure is to be searched, and introduce in addition a cut-and-splice genetic operator to increase the searching performance of the energy minimum than the original BH technique. The present MBH/DFTB algorithm is, therefore, characteristically distinguishable from the original BH technique commonly applied to nonmetallic and metallic clusters, technically more thorough and natural in describing the intricate couplings between valence electrons and ions in a carbon cluster, and thus theoretically sound in putting these two charged components on an equal footing. The proposed modified minimization algorithm should be more appropriate, accurate, and precise in the description of a carbon cluster. We evaluate the present algorithm, its energy-minimum searching in particular, by its optimization robustness. Specifically, we first check the MBH/DFTB technique for two representative carbon clusters of larger size, i.e., C60 and C72 against the popular cut-and-splice approach [D. M. Deaven and K. M. Ho, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 288 (1995)] that normally is combined with the genetic algorithm method for finding the cluster's energy minimum, before employing it to investigate carbon clusters in the size range C3-C24

  15. Gravitational vortices and clump formation in Saturn's F ring during an encounter with Prometheus.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Phil J; Kusmartsev, Feodor V

    2013-01-01

    Saturn rings are most beautiful and dynamic places in the solar system, consisting of ice particles in a constant battle between the gravitational forces of Saturn and its many moons. Fan, spiral, propellers, moonlets and streamer-channels observed by CASSINI in the F-ring have been attributed to encounters by Prometheus on the F ring, with investigations of optical thickness revealing large populations of transient moonlets. Taking into account gravitational interaction between particles and a multi-stranded F-ring structure we show that Prometheus' encounters create rotational flows, like atmospheric vortices and the self-gravity enhances the accelerated growth and size of moonlets. Vortex patches form caustics, which is a primary cause of the transient particle density clumps of 20 km width and 100 km length, and they are elongated to cover an area of 1600 km by 150 km, which may eventually combine into a vortex sheet. PMID:23429480

  16. Gravitational Vortices And Clump Formation In Saturn's F ring During An Encounter With Prometheus

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.

    2013-01-01

    Saturn rings are most beautiful and dynamic places in the solar system, consisting of ice particles in a constant battle between the gravitational forces of Saturn and its many moons. Fan, spiral, propellers, moonlets and streamer-channels observed by CASSINI in the F-ring have been attributed to encounters by Prometheus on the F ring, with investigations of optical thickness revealing large populations of transient moonlets. Taking into account gravitational interaction between particles and a multi-stranded F-ring structure we show that Prometheus' encounters create rotational flows, like atmospheric vortices and the self-gravity enhances the accelerated growth and size of moonlets. Vortex patches form caustics, which is a primary cause of the transient particle density clumps of 20 km width and 100 km length, and they are elongated to cover an area of 1600 km by 150 km, which may eventually combine into a vortex sheet. PMID:23429480

  17. Gravitational Vortices And Clump Formation In Saturn's F ring During An Encounter With Prometheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.

    2013-02-01

    Saturn rings are most beautiful and dynamic places in the solar system, consisting of ice particles in a constant battle between the gravitational forces of Saturn and its many moons. Fan, spiral, propellers, moonlets and streamer-channels observed by CASSINI in the F-ring have been attributed to encounters by Prometheus on the F ring, with investigations of optical thickness revealing large populations of transient moonlets. Taking into account gravitational interaction between particles and a multi-stranded F-ring structure we show that Prometheus' encounters create rotational flows, like atmospheric vortices and the self-gravity enhances the accelerated growth and size of moonlets. Vortex patches form caustics, which is a primary cause of the transient particle density clumps of 20 km width and 100 km length, and they are elongated to cover an area of 1600 km by 150 km, which may eventually combine into a vortex sheet.

  18. Clumped isotope perturbation in tropospheric nitrous oxide from stratospheric photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Johan A.; Johnson, Matthew S.

    2015-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is potent greenhouse gas and source of ozone depleting NO to the stratosphere. Recent advances in mass spectrometry allow accurate measurement of multiply substituted ("clumped") N2O isotopocules, providing new constraints on the N2O source budget. However, this requires a quantification of the "clumped" N2O fractionation from stratospheric photolysis (main sink). We use time-dependent quantum dynamics and a 1-D atmospheric model to determine the effect of stratospheric photolysis on the abundances of multisubstituted N2O isotopocules in the atmosphere. The ultraviolet absorption cross sections of 557 (i.e., 15N15N17O), 458, 548, 457, and 547 are presented for the first time and used to derive altitude-dependent photolysis rates and fractionation constants. We find that photolysis alters the N2O isotopic composition with multisubstituted mass 47 isotopocules being less abundant than expected from stochastics (Δ47 = -1.7‰ in the troposphere and down to -12‰ in the upper stratosphere).

  19. Evaluation of meteoric calcite cements as a proxy material for mass-47 clumped isotope thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defliese, William F.; Lohmann, Kyger C.

    2016-01-01

    Meteoric diagenetic cements are ubiquitous throughout geologic history, affecting most carbonate exposures worldwide. They can often be difficult to interpret, as it is usually difficult to separate the influences of water δ18O and temperature on isotopic signals contained within the carbonate rock body. Despite this difficulty in interpretation, meteoric phreatic cements can potentially be a useful proxy material, as they form slowly in equilibrium at mean annual temperature and are not affected by any biogenic effects that can bias other proxy materials. We applied the mass-47 clumped isotope paleothermometer to Pleistocene and Holocene carbonates from Bermuda and Barbados in order to investigate the effects of meteoric diagenesis on Δ47 signals, and to determine their suitability as a paleotemperature proxy. Phreatic calcite cements are found to record the same temperatures as unaltered carbonate sediments, while any sample exhibiting vadose characteristics is biased towards unreasonably hot apparent formation temperatures. Burial heating and re-equilibration are not geologically viable explanations for the anomalously hot temperatures recorded in vadose cements, as neither Bermuda or Barbados has any burial history. Instead, it is likely that precipitation in the vadose zone occurs on timescales quicker than isotopic equilibrium can be achieved, driven by a combination of CO2 degassing and evaporation, which have been previously shown to cause problems in speleothems and pedogenic carbonates. We conclude by suggesting that meteoric phreatic calcites may be an ideal phase for paleotemperature reconstruction, as they accurately record mean annual temperatures and form under equilibrium conditions, while also being resistant to further mineral driven diagenesis. Vadose cements, and any sample likely affected by processes similar to vadose diagenesis, should be avoided for climate reconstructions using the mass-47 clumped isotope thermometer.

  20. Aggregated Clumps of Lithistid Sponges: A Singular, Reef-Like Bathyal Habitat with Relevant Paleontological Connections

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Manuel; Aguilar, Ricardo; Blanco, Jorge; García, Silvia; Serrano, Alberto; Punzón, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The advent of deep-sea exploration using video cameras has uncovered extensive sponge aggregations in virtually all oceans. Yet, a distinct type is herein reported from the Mediterranean: a monospecific reef-like formation built by the lithistid demosponge Leiodermatium pfeifferae. Erect, plate-like individuals (up to 80 cm) form bulky clumps, making up to 1.8 m high mounds (1.14 m on average) on the bottom, at a 760 m-deep seamount named SSS. The siliceous skeletal frameworks of the lithistids persist after sponge death, serving as a complex 3D substratum where new lithistids recruit, along with a varied fauna of other sessile and vagile organisms. The intricate aggregation of lithistid mounds functions as a “reef” formation, architecturally different from the archetypal "demosponge gardens" with disaggregating siliceous skeletons. Leiodermatium pfeifferae also occurred at two additional, close seamounts (EBJ and EBS), but, unlike at SSS, the isolated individuals never formed accretive clumps. The general oceanographic variables (temperature, salinity, dissolved nutrients, chlorophyll, and oxygen) revealed only minimal between-seamount differences, which cannot explain why sponge abundance at SSS is about two orders of magnitude higher than at EBJ or EBS. Large areas of the dense SSS aggregation were damaged, with detached and broken sponges and a few tangled fishing lines. Satellite vessel monitoring revealed low fishing activity around these seamounts. In contrast, international plans for gas and oil extraction at those locations raise serious concerns over the need for protecting urgently this unique, vulnerable habitat to avoid further alteration. Modern lithistids are a relict fauna from Jurassic and Cretaceous reefs and the roots of the very genus Leiodermatium can be traced back to those fossil formations. Therefore, understanding the causes behind the discovered lithistid aggregation is critical not only to its preservation, but also to elucidate how

  1. Aggregated clumps of lithistid sponges: a singular, reef-like bathyal habitat with relevant paleontological connections.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Manuel; Aguilar, Ricardo; Blanco, Jorge; García, Silvia; Serrano, Alberto; Punzón, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The advent of deep-sea exploration using video cameras has uncovered extensive sponge aggregations in virtually all oceans. Yet, a distinct type is herein reported from the Mediterranean: a monospecific reef-like formation built by the lithistid demosponge Leiodermatium pfeifferae. Erect, plate-like individuals (up to 80 cm) form bulky clumps, making up to 1.8 m high mounds (1.14 m on average) on the bottom, at a 760 m-deep seamount named SSS. The siliceous skeletal frameworks of the lithistids persist after sponge death, serving as a complex 3D substratum where new lithistids recruit, along with a varied fauna of other sessile and vagile organisms. The intricate aggregation of lithistid mounds functions as a "reef" formation, architecturally different from the archetypal "demosponge gardens" with disaggregating siliceous skeletons. Leiodermatium pfeifferae also occurred at two additional, close seamounts (EBJ and EBS), but, unlike at SSS, the isolated individuals never formed accretive clumps. The general oceanographic variables (temperature, salinity, dissolved nutrients, chlorophyll, and oxygen) revealed only minimal between-seamount differences, which cannot explain why sponge abundance at SSS is about two orders of magnitude higher than at EBJ or EBS. Large areas of the dense SSS aggregation were damaged, with detached and broken sponges and a few tangled fishing lines. Satellite vessel monitoring revealed low fishing activity around these seamounts. In contrast, international plans for gas and oil extraction at those locations raise serious concerns over the need for protecting urgently this unique, vulnerable habitat to avoid further alteration. Modern lithistids are a relict fauna from Jurassic and Cretaceous reefs and the roots of the very genus Leiodermatium can be traced back to those fossil formations. Therefore, understanding the causes behind the discovered lithistid aggregation is critical not only to its preservation, but also to elucidate how the

  2. Magnetohydrodynamical simulation of the formation of clumps and filaments in quiescent diffuse medium by thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareing, C. J.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Van Loo, S.

    2016-06-01

    We have used the adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic code, MG, to perform idealized 3D magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the formation of clumpy and filamentary structure in a thermally unstable medium without turbulence. A stationary thermally unstable spherical diffuse atomic cloud with uniform density in pressure equilibrium with low density surroundings was seeded with random density variations and allowed to evolve. A range of magnetic field strengths threading the cloud have been explored, from β = 0.1 to 1.0 to the zero magnetic field case (β = ∞), where β is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. Once the density inhomogeneities had developed to the point where gravity started to become important, self-gravity was introduced to the simulation. With no magnetic field, clouds and clumps form within the cloud with aspect ratios of around unity, whereas in the presence of a relatively strong field (β = 0.1) these become filaments, then evolve into interconnected corrugated sheets that are predominantly perpendicular to the magnetic field. With magnetic and thermal pressure equality (β = 1.0), filaments, clouds and clumps are formed. At any particular instant, the projection of the 3D structure on to a plane parallel to the magnetic field, i.e. a line of sight perpendicular to the magnetic field, resembles the appearance of filamentary molecular clouds. The filament densities, widths, velocity dispersions and temperatures resemble those observed in molecular clouds. In contrast, in the strong field case β = 0.1, projection of the 3D structure along a line of sight parallel to the magnetic field reveals a remarkably uniform structure.

  3. Decay of the compound nucleus *297118 formed in the reaction 249Cf+48Ca using the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, Gudveen; Kaur, Amandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-12-01

    The decay of the Z =118 , *297118 compound system, formed in the 249Cf+48Ca reaction, is studied for 2 n , 3 n , and 4 n emissions, by using the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) at compound-nucleus (CN) excitation energies ECN*=29.2 and 34.4 MeV. A parallel attempt is made to analyze the 294118 residue nucleus synthesized in the 250Cf+48Ca reaction, subsequent to the 4 n emission from the *298118 nucleus, to check the possibility of isotopic mixing in the 249Cf target used in the 249Cf+48Ca reaction. The possible role of deformations and orientations, together with different nuclear proximity potentials, is also investigated. In addition, an exclusive analysis of the mass distributions of Z =113 to 118 superheavy nuclei, formed in 48Ca -induced reactions, is explored within the DCM. A comparative importance of Prox-1977 and Prox-2000 potentials on the α -decay chains is also investigated, first by using the preformed cluster model (PCM) for spontaneous decays (T =0 ), the PCM (T =0 ), and then analyzing the possible role of excitation energy in PCM, i.e., PCM (T ≠0 ) , via the measured recoil energy of the residual 294118 nucleus left after 3 n emission from *297118 CN. The branching of α decay to the most-probable clusters is also examined for *294118 and its subsequent *290116 and *286114 parents occurring in the α -decay chain. Interestingly, the calculated decay half-lives for some clusters such as 86Kr , 84Se , and 80Ge , referring to doubly magic 208Pb or its neighboring daughter nucleus, present themselves as exciting new possibilities, though to date difficult to observe, of heavy cluster emissions in superheavy mass region.

  4. Molecular Line Emission Towards High-Mass Clumps: The MALT90 Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Whitaker, J. S.; Jackson, J. M.; Foster, J. B.; Contreras, Y.; Stephens, I. W.; Guzmán, A. E.; Longmore, S. N.; Sanhueza, P.; Schuller, F.; Wyrowski, F.; Urquhart, J. S.

    2016-07-01

    The Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz survey aims to characterise the physical and chemical evolution of high-mass clumps. Recently completed, it mapped 90 GHz line emission towards 3 246 high-mass clumps identified from the ATLASGAL 870 μm Galactic plane survey. By utilising the broad frequency coverage of the Mopra telescope's spectrometer, maps in 16 different emission lines were simultaneously obtained. Here, we describe the first catalogue of the detected line emission, generated by Gaussian profile fitting to spectra extracted towards each clumps' 870 μm dust continuum peak. Synthetic spectra show that the catalogue has a completeness of > 95%, a probability of a false-positive detection of < 0.3%, and a relative uncertainty in the measured quantities of < 20% over the range of detection criteria. The detection rates are highest for the (1-0) transitions of HCO+, HNC, N2H+, and HCN (~77-89%). Almost all clumps (~95%) are detected in at least one of the molecular transitions, just over half of the clumps (~53%) are detected in four or more of the transitions, while only one clump is detected in 13 transitions. We find several striking trends in the ensemble of properties for the different molecular transitions when plotted as a function of the clumps' evolutionary state as estimated from Spitzer mid-IR images, including (1) HNC is relatively brighter in colder, less evolved clumps than those that show active star formation, (2) N2H+ is relatively brighter in the earlier stages, (3) that the observed optical depth decreases as the clumps evolve, and (4) the optically thickest HCO+ emission shows a `blue-red asymmetry' indicating overall collapse that monotonically decreases as the clumps evolve. This catalogue represents the largest compiled database of line emission towards high-mass clumps and is a valuable data set for detailed studies of these objects.

  5. Derivation of Clumping Index via Using BRDF Models and MISR and MODIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, L.; Song, C.

    2007-12-01

    Clumping index quantified the level of foliage grouping within distinct canopy structures relative to a random distribution. Vegetation foliage clumping significantly alters its radiation environment and therefore affects vegetation growth as well as water and carbon cycles. The clumping index is useful in ecological and meteorological models because it provides new structural information in addition to the effective Leaf Area Index retrieved from mono-angle remote sensing. Multi-angle sensor, for example Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), observations provide a means to characterize the anisotropy of surface reflectance, which has been shown to contain information on the structure of vegetated surfaces. This study shows that available multi-angle data products, MISR RPV Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model parameters and MOIDS kernel-driven BRDF model parameters, can be used to computing the clumping index. First of all, the hotspot and darkspot reflectance were calculated by using MISR RPV and MOIDS kernel-driven BRDF models. Then the clumping index was obtained by applying existed relationship between the clumping index and an index derived hotspot and darkspot. The preliminary findings on estimating the clumping index are: 1) red band is better than near infrared band. 2) The hotspot and darkspot from smaller solar zenith angle is better than ones from larger solar zenith angle. 2) The kernel-driven model and MODIS BRDF parameters product is superior that the RPV model and MISR BRDF parameters product. In order to improve existed approaches of deriving the clumping from multi-angle measurements, the underlying mechanism of foliage structure determining the clumping index have been explored using a geometrical optical and radiative transfer model named GORT. This presentation will display the new methods of computing the clumping index from multi-angle measurements, and

  6. Large-scale clustering measurements with photometric redshifts: comparing the dark matter haloes of X-ray AGN, star-forming and passive galaxies at z ≈ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakis, A.; Mountrichas, G.; Salvato, M.; Rosario, D.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Lutz, D.; Nandra, K.; Coil, A.; Cooper, M. C.; Newman, J. A.; Berta, S.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.

    2014-10-01

    We combine multi-wavelength data in the AEGIS-XD and C-COSMOS surveys to measure the typical dark matter halo mass of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) [LX(2-10 keV) > 1042 erg s- 1] in comparison with far-infrared selected star-forming galaxies detected in the Herschel/PEP survey (PACS Evolutionary Probe; LIR > 1011 L⊙) and quiescent systems at z ≈ 1. We develop a novel method to measure the clustering of extragalactic populations that uses photometric redshift probability distribution functions in addition to any spectroscopy. This is advantageous in that all sources in the sample are used in the clustering analysis, not just the subset with secure spectroscopy. The method works best for large samples. The loss of accuracy because of the lack of spectroscopy is balanced by increasing the number of sources used to measure the clustering. We find that X-ray AGN, far-infrared selected star-forming galaxies and passive systems in the redshift interval 0.6 < z < 1.4 are found in haloes of similar mass, log MDMH/(M⊙ h-1) ≈ 13.0. We argue that this is because the galaxies in all three samples (AGN, star-forming, passive) have similar stellar mass distributions, approximated by the J-band luminosity. Therefore, all galaxies that can potentially host X-ray AGN, because they have stellar masses in the appropriate range, live in dark matter haloes of log MDMH/(M⊙ h-1) ≈ 13.0 independent of their star formation rates. This suggests that the stellar mass of X-ray AGN hosts is driving the observed clustering properties of this population. We also speculate that trends between AGN properties (e.g. luminosity, level of obscuration) and large-scale environment may be related to differences in the stellar mass of the host galaxies.

  7. A process-based model for non-equilibrium clumped isotope effects in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. M.; Hunt, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The equilibrium clumped isotope composition of carbonate minerals is independent of the composition of the aqueous solution. However, many carbonate minerals grow at rates that place them in a non-equilibrium regime with respect to carbon and oxygen isotopes with unknown consequences for clumped isotopes. We develop a process-based model that allows one to calculate the oxygen, carbon, and clumped isotope composition of calcite as a function of temperature, crystal growth rate, and solution pH. In the model, carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation occurs through the mass-dependent attachment/detachment kinetics of the isotopologues of HCO-3 and CO2-3 to and from the calcite surface, which in turn, influence the clumped isotope composition of calcite. At experimental and biogenic growth rates, the mineral is expected to inherit a clumped isotopic composition that is similar to that of the DIC pool, which helps to explain (1) why different organisms share the same clumped isotope versus temperature calibration curves, (2) why many inorganic calibration curves are slightly different from one another, and (3) why foraminifera, coccoliths, and deep sea corals can have near-equilibrium clumped isotope compositions but far-from-equilibrium carbon and oxygen isotope compositions. Some aspects of the model can be generalized to other mineral systems and should serve as a useful reference in future efforts to quantify kinetic clumped isotope effects.

  8. Synthesis And Characterization of Gamma-Al2O3-Supported Pt Catalysts From Pt(4) And Pt(6) Clusters Formed in Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Siani, A.; Wigal, K.R.; Alexeev, A.S.; Amiridis, M.D.

    2009-05-26

    Highly dispersed Pt catalysts were prepared by deposition of Pt{sub 4} and Pt{sub 6} clusters, initially formed in unprotected and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-protected colloidal Pt suspensions, onto a {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface. These catalysts were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies. The EXAFS results indicate that the supported Pt species formed were very similar in structure to those of the original clusters in the corresponding colloidal suspensions. The FTIR results further indicate that the {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported Pt{sub 4} clusters have significantly lower chemisorptive properties compared with larger supported Pt nanoparticles; nevertheless, the Pt{sub 4}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sample was active for the oxidation of CO with no need for additional activation treatment. In fact, treatment of this sample with H{sub 2} at 150--200 {sup o}C led to the formation of Pt aggregates with sizes of 1.0--1.6 nm, demonstrating that the surface Pt4 species readily sintered in this temperature range under reducing conditions.

  9. The Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps : Looking at the early stages of star-formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montier, Ludovic

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite has provided an unprecedented view of the submm sky, allowing us to search for the dust emission of Galactic cold sources. Combining Planck-HFI all-sky maps in the high frequency channels with the IRAS map at 100um, we built the Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC, Planck 2015 results XXVIII 2015), counting 13188 sources distributed over the whole sky, and following mainly the Galactic structures at low and intermediate latitudes. This is the first all-sky catalogue of Galactic cold sources obtained with a single instrument at this resolution and sensitivity, which opens a new window on star-formation processes in our Galaxy.I will briefly describe the colour detection method used to extract the Galactic cold sources, i.e., the Cold Core Colour Detection Tool (CoCoCoDeT, Montier et al. 2010), and its application to the Planck data. I will discuss the statistical distribution of the properties of the PGCC sources (in terms of dust temperature, distance, mass, density and luminosity), which illustrates that the PGCC catalogue spans a large variety of environments and objects, from molecular clouds to cold cores, and covers various stages of evolution. The Planck catalogue is a very powerful tool to study the formation and the evolution of prestellar objects and star-forming regions.I will finally present an overview of the Herschel Key Program Galactic Cold Cores (PI. M.Juvela), which allowed us to follow-up about 350 Planck Galactic Cold Clumps, in various stages of evolution and environments. With this program, the nature and the composition of the 5' Planck sources have been revealed at a sub-arcmin resolution, showing very different configurations, such as starless cold cores or multiple Young Stellar objects still embedded in their cold envelope.

  10. U-Pb Dating of Carbonates: A Complement to Clumped Isotope Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasbury, T.; Suarez, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonates are ubiquitous in nature, forming in a variety of settings at the surface and through burial. The field and petrographic relationships of carbonate phases can often be linked to the depositional setting and burial path(s) that the sedimentary pile has experienced. Clumped isotopes are taking on an important role of testing the temperature of formation of the carbonates, and combined with other approaches such as fluid inclusion analyses offers tremendous potential for testing basin evolution models. However, while the relative ages of carbonates are often fairly easily elucidated, the absolute ages of the events recorded in carbonates are not. U-Pb dating of carbonates offers the best potential for constraining the ages. However, not all fluids have favorable U/Ca ratios. U-Pb dated groundwater carbonates from the Late Triassic New Haven Arkose give an age of 211 +/- 2 Ma, consistent with the known age of deposition. Late bright luminescent calcite from the same formation gives an age of 81+/-11 Ma, constraining the age (both primary and secondary) of carbonate formation. Clumped isotope analyses of primary carbonate phases show somewhat elevated temperatures between 50-60o C, some 30 degrees hotter than other estimates for this Triassic equatorial setting, and are more likely the result of re-ordering of 13C-18O bonds at depth. Apparently the primary calcite, appears to have preserved its depositional U-Pb systematics, however bond re-ordering or recrystallization of these carbonates appear to reflect values closer to thermal equilibrium with the last phase of carbonate formation (bright luminescent calcite, 81 ± 11 Ma). Further work on these samples will target these younger calcites to determine if this later calcite phase records similar temperatures.

  11. WFC3 GRISM CONFIRMATION OF THE DISTANT CLUSTER Cl J1449+0856 AT (z) = 2.00: QUIESCENT AND STAR-FORMING GALAXY POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gobat, R.; Strazzullo, V.; Daddi, E.; Renzini, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Cimatti, A.; Scarlata, C.; Arimoto, N.

    2013-10-10

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) slitless spectroscopic observations of the distant cluster Cl J1449+0856. These cover a single pointing with 18 orbits of G141 spectroscopy and F140W imaging, allowing us to derive secure redshifts down to M{sub 140} ∼ 25.5 AB and 3σ line fluxes of ∼5 × 10{sup –18} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. In particular, we were able to spectroscopically confirm 12 early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the field up to z ∼ 3, 6 of which are in the cluster core, which represents the first direct spectroscopic confirmation of quiescent galaxies in a z = 2 cluster environment. With 140 redshifts in a ∼6 arcmin{sup 2} field, we can trace the spatial and redshift galaxy distribution in the cluster core and background field. We find two strong peaks at z = 2.00 and z = 2.07, where only one was seen in our previously published ground-based data. Due to the spectroscopic confirmation of the cluster ETGs, we can now reevaluate the redshift of Cl J1449+0856 at z = 2.00, rather than z = 2.07, with the background overdensity being revealed to be sparse and {sup s}heet{sup -}like. This presents an interesting case of chance alignment of two close yet unrelated structures, each one preferentially selected by different observing strategies. With 6 quiescent or early-type spectroscopic members and 20 star-forming ones, Cl J1449+0856 is now reliably confirmed to be at z = 2.00. The identified members can now allow for a detailed study of galaxy properties in the densest environment at z = 2.

  12. The Yeast Iron Regulatory Proteins Grx3/4 and Fra2 Form Heterodimeric Complexes Containing a [2Fe-2S] Cluster with Cysteinyl and Histidyl Ligation†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoran; Mapolelo, Daphne T.; Dingra, Nin N.; Naik, Sunil G.; Lees, Nicolas S.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Riggs-Gelasco, Pamela J.; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Johnson, Michael K.; Outten, Caryn E.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription of iron uptake and storage genes in S. cerevisiae is primarily regulated by the transcription factor Aft1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Aft1 is dependent upon mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biosynthesis via a signaling pathway that includes the cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3 and Grx4) and the BolA homologue Fra2. However the interactions between these proteins and the iron-dependent mechanism by which they control Aft1 localization are unclear. To reconstitute and characterize components of this signaling pathway in vitro, we have overexpressed yeast Fra2 and Grx3/4 in E. coli. We have shown that co-expression of recombinant Fra2 with Grx3 or Grx4 allows purification of a stable [2Fe-2S]2+ cluster-containing Fra2-Grx3 or Fra2-Grx4 heterodimeric complex. Reconstitution of a [2Fe-2S] cluster on Grx3 or Grx4 without Fra2 produces a [2Fe-2S]-bridged homodimer. UV-visible absorption and CD, resonance Raman, EPR, ENDOR, Mössbauer, and EXAFS studies of [2Fe-2S] Grx3/4 homodimers and the [2Fe-2S] Fra2-Grx3/4 heterodimers indicate that inclusion of Fra2 in the Grx3/4 Fe-S complex causes a change in the cluster stability and coordination environment. Taken together, our analytical, spectroscopic, and mutagenesis data indicate that Grx3/4 and Fra2 form a Fe-S-bridged heterodimeric complex with Fe ligands provided by the active site cysteine of Grx3/4, glutathione, and a histidine residue. Overall, these results suggest that the ability of the Fra2-Grx3/4 complex to assemble a [2Fe-2S] cluster may act as a signal to control the iron regulon in response to cellular iron status in yeast. PMID:19715344

  13. The Two Oxidized Forms of the Trinuclear Cu Cluster in the Multicopper Oxidases And Mechanism for the Decay of the Native Intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, J.; Liboiron, B.D.; Sarangi, R.; Hodgson, K.O.; Hedman, B.; Solomona, E.I.; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-10-10

    Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) catalyze the 4e{sup -} reduction of O2 to H2O. The reaction of the fully reduced enzyme with O2 generates the native intermediate (NI), which undergoes a slow decay to the resting enzyme in the absence of substrate. NI is a fully oxidized form, but its spectral features are very different from those of the resting form (also fully oxidized), because the type 2 and the coupled-binuclear type 3 Cu centers in the O2-reducing trinuclear Cu cluster site are isolated in the resting enzyme, whereas these are all bridged by a {mu}3-oxo ligand in NI. Notably, the one azide-bound NI (NI{sub Az}) exhibits spectral features very similar to those of NI, in which the {mu}3-oxo ligand in NI has been replaced by a {mu}3-bridged azide. Comparison of the spectral features of NI and NIAz, combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, allows refinement of the NI structure. The decay of NI to the resting enzyme proceeds via successive proton-assisted steps, whereas the rate-limiting step involves structural rearrangement of the {mu}3-oxo-bridge from inside to outside the cluster. This phenomenon is consistent with the slow rate of NI decay that uncouples the resting enzyme from the catalytic cycle, leaving NI as the catalytically relevant fully oxidized form of the MCO active site. The all-bridged structure of NI would facilitate electron transfer to all three Cu centers of the trinuclear cluster for rapid proton-coupled reduction of NI to the fully reduced form for catalytic turnover.

  14. The most massive gas clumps in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahorecz, Sarolta; Beuther, Henrik; Henning, Thomas; Linz, Hendrik; Tackenberg, Jochen; Schmiedeke, Anika; Schuller, Frederic; Urquhart, James; Wienen, Marion; Wyrowski, Friedrich

    2013-07-01

    In the recent years significant progress has been made in the understanding of high-mass star formation, although there are still open questions. Only a systematic survey can provide statistical data for unbiased studies. The APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL, Schuller et al. 2009, A&A, 605, 415) surveyed the southern sky at submillimeter wavelengths in dust continuum emission. We searched for the most massive dense gas condensations in the ATLASGAL survey within -60 < l < 60 degree and |b| < 1.5 degrees. We investigated the most luminous clumps and with the use of the Herschel Hi-GAL (Molinari et. al 2010, PASP, 122, 314) data we studied their basic physical parameters: distances, galactic distributions, temperatures, luminosites, masses.

  15. Towards Understanding Artifacts in the Clumped Isotope System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swart, P. K.; Staudigel, P. T.; Murray, S.

    2015-12-01

    The clumped isotope system in carbonates (Δ47) relies on the extraction of CO2 from the carbonate minerals using phosphoric acid. Despite the fact that this method dates back to the original stable isotopic work in the 1950s, there are significant aspects of the fractionation of the 18O/16O (and by inference the ratio of mass 47 to 44) which are not understood. We believe that subtle variations in the isotopic fractionation as a function of temperature, acid density (and acid preparation method), and extraction line design cause variation between the clumped isotope data produced by different laboratories. One of the most obvious of these is difference in reaction temperatures. While most laboratories employ temperatures of between 75 and 90oC, the original method employed a temperature of 25oC. Although various estimate of the difference in fractionation of Δ47 between 25 and 90oC have been made, we have measured significantly different values for dolomites compared to published data. In order to understand this we have performed experiments in sealed Pyrex vessels to measure the exchange between CO2 and 103% phosphoric acid. We have determined there to be significant and measurable changes in the Δ47 of CO2 when exposed to phosphoric acid. This exchange is a function of temperature, time, acid strength, and the surface area of the acid exposed to the CO2. We postulate that, perhaps as a result of the lower reaction rate of dolomite, compared to calcite, that there is greater opportunity for CO2 to exchange with the phosphoric acid as bubbles of CO2 are retained within the acid for longer periods of time. Such a mechanism would predict that well-ordered dolomites will have different fractionation compared to protodolomite. Similar differences might account for different fractionation for other carbonate minerals.

  16. The soil water balance in a mosaic of clumped vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzolla, Teresa; Manfreda, Salvatore; Caylor, Kelly; Gioia, Andrea; Iacobellis, Vito

    2014-05-01

    The spatio-temporal distribution of soil moisture influences the plant growth and the distribution of terrestrial vegetation. This effect is more evident in arid and semiarid ecosystems where the interaction between individuals and the water limited conditions play a fundamental role, providing environmental conditions which drive a variety of non-linear ecohydrological response functions (such as transpiration, photosynthesis, leakage). In this context, modeling vegetation patterns at multiple spatial aggregation scales is important to understand how different vegetation structures can modify the soil water distribution and the exchanged fluxes between soil and atmosphere. In the present paper, the effect of different spatial vegetation patterns, under different climatic scenarios, is investigated in a patchy vegetation mosaic generated by a random process of individual tree canopies and their accompanying root system. Vegetation pattern are generated using the mathematical framework proposed by Caylor et al. (2006) characterized by a three dimensional stochastic vegetation structure, based on the density, dispersion, size distribution, and allometry of individuals within a landscape. A Poisson distribution is applied to generate different distribution of individuals paying particular attention on the role of clumping on water distribution dynamics. The soil water balance is evaluated using the analytical expression proposed by Laio et al. (2001) to explore the influence of climate and vegetation patterns on soil water balance steady-state components (such as the average rates of evaporation, the root water uptake and leakage) and on the stress-weighted plant water uptake. Results of numerical simulations show that clumping may be beneficial for water use efficiency at the landscape scale. References Caylor, Kelly K., P. D'Odorico and I. Rodriguez Iturbe: On the ecohydrology of structurally heterogeneous semiarid landscape. Water Resour. Res., 28, W07424, 2006

  17. Dense Clumps and Candidates for Molecular Outflows in W40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Hara, Chihomi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Sugitani, Kouji; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2015-06-01

    We report the results of the 12CO (J = 3-2) and HCO+ (J = 4-3) observations of the W40 H ii region with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) 10 m telescope (HPBW ≃ 22″) to search for molecular outflows and dense clumps. We found that the velocity field in the region is highly complex, consisting of at least four distinct velocity components at VLSR ≃ 3, 5, 7, and 10 km s-1. The ˜7 km s-1 component represents the systemic velocity of cold gas surrounding the entire region, and causes heavy absorption in the 12CO spectra over the velocity range 6 ≲ VLSR ≲ 9 km s-1. The ˜5 and ˜10 km s-1 components exhibit high 12CO temperature (≳40 K) and are found mostly around the H ii region, suggesting that these components are likely to be tracing dense gas interacting with the expanding shell around the H ii region. Based on the 12CO data, we identified 13 regions of high velocity gas, which we interpret as candidate outflow lobes. Using the HCO+ data, we also identified six clumps and estimated their physical parameters. On the basis of the ASTE data and near-infrared images from 2MASS, we present an updated three-dimensional model of this region. In order to investigate molecular outflows in W40, the SiO (J = 1-0, v = 0) emission line and some other emission lines at 40 GHz were also observed with the 45 m telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory, but they were not detected at the present sensitivity.

  18. Rotational Velocities for B0-B3 Stars in Seven Young Clusters: Further Study of the Relationship between Rotation Speed and Density in Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, S. C.; Strom, S. E.; Dror, D.; Venn, K.

    2007-03-01

    We present the results of a study aimed at assessing the differences in the distribution of rotation speeds N(vsini) among young (1-15 Myr) B stars spanning a range of masses 6 Msolar>1 Msolar pc-3) ensembles that will survive as rich, bound stellar clusters for ages well in excess of 108 yr. Our results demonstrate (1) that independent of environment, the rotation rates for stars in this mass range do not change by more than 0.1 dex over ages t~1 to ~15 Myr; and (2) that stars formed in high-density regions lack the cohort of slow rotators that dominate the low-density regions and young field stars. We suggest that the differences in N(vsini) between low- and high-density regions may reflect a combination of initial conditions and environmental effects: (1) the higher turbulent speeds that characterize molecular gas in high-density, cluster-forming regions; and (2) the stronger UV radiation fields and high stellar densities that characterize such regions. Higher turbulent speeds may lead to higher time-averaged accretion rates during the stellar assembly phase. In the context of stellar angular momentum regulation via ``disk-locking,'' higher accretion rates lead to both higher initial angular momenta and evolution-driven increases in surface rotation rates as stars contract from the birth line to the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS). Stronger UV radiation fields and higher densities may lead to shorter disk lifetimes in cluster-forming regions. If so, B stars formed in dense clusters are more likely to be ``released'' from their disks early during their pre-main-sequence lifetimes and evolve into rapid rotators as they conserve angular momentum and spin up in response to contraction. By contrast, the majority of their brethren in low-density, association-forming regions can retain

  19. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multicomponent metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamical aspects of a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulations with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (self diffusion coefficient, self relaxation time, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx˜1300 K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs well above the melting point of the system (Tm˜900 K) in the equilibrium liquid state; and the crossover temperature Tx is roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature of the system (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a nonparametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter α2 and the four-point correlation function χ4.

  20. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature ismore » roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.« less

  1. Formation of compact clusters from high resolution hybrid cosmological simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Gray, William J.

    2013-11-20

    The early universe hosted a large population of small dark matter 'minihalos' that were too small to cool and form stars on their own. These existed as static objects around larger galaxies until acted upon by some outside influence. Outflows, which have been observed around a variety of galaxies, can provide this influence in such a way as to collapse, rather than disperse, the minihalo gas. Gray and Scannapieco performed an investigation in which idealized spherically symmetric minihalos were struck by enriched outflows. Here we perform high-resolution cosmological simulations that form realistic minihalos, which we then extract to perform a large suite of simulations of outflow-minihalo interactions including non-equilibrium chemical reactions. In all models, the shocked minihalo forms molecules through non-equilibrium reaction, and then cools to form dense, chemically homogenous clumps of star-forming gas. The formation of these high-redshift clusters may be observable with the next generation of telescopes and the largest of them should survive to the present-day, having properties similar to halo globular clusters.

  2. A parsec-resolution simulation of the Antennae galaxies: formation of star clusters during the merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, Florent; Bournaud, Frédéric; Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2015-01-01

    We present a hydrodynamical simulation of an Antennae-like galaxy merger at parsec resolution, including a multicomponent model for stellar feedback and reaching numerical convergence in the global star formation rate for the first time. We analyse the properties of the dense stellar objects formed during the different stages of the interaction. Each galactic encounter triggers a starburst activity, but the varying physical conditions change the triggering mechanism of each starburst. During the first two pericentre passages, the starburst is spatially extended and forms many star clusters. However, the starburst associated with the third, final passage is more centrally concentrated: stars form almost exclusively in the galactic nucleus and no new star cluster is formed. The maximum mass of stars clusters in this merger is more than 30 times higher than those in a simulation of an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy. Antennae-like mergers are therefore a formation channel of young massive clusters possibly leading to globular clusters. Monitoring the evolution of a few clusters reveals the diversity of formation scenarios including the gathering and merger of gas clumps, the monolithic formation and the hierarchical formation in sub-structures inside a single cloud. Two stellar objects formed in the simulation yield the same properties as ultracompact dwarf galaxies. They share the same formation scenario than the most massive clusters, but have a larger radius either since birth, or get it after a violent interaction with the galactic centre. The diversity of environments across space and time in a galaxy merger can account for the diversity of the stellar objects formed, both in terms of mass and size.

  3. Watching the Birth of a Galaxy Cluster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    First Visiting Astronomers to VLT ANTU Observe the Early Universe When the first 8.2-m VLT Unit Telescope (ANTU) was "handed over" to the scientists on April 1, 1999, the first "visiting astronomers" at Paranal were George Miley and Huub Rottgering from the Leiden Observatory (The Netherlands) [1]. They obtained unique pictures of a distant exploding galaxy known as 1138 - 262 . These images provide new information about how massive galaxies and clusters of galaxies may have formed in the early Universe. Formation of clusters of galaxies An intriguing question in modern astronomy is how the first galaxies and groupings or clusters of galaxies emerged from the primeval gas produced in the Big Bang. Some theories predict that giant galaxies, often found at the centres of rich galaxy clusters, are built up through a step-wise process. Clumps develop in this gas and stars condense out of those clumps to form small galaxies. Finally these small galaxies merge together to form larger units. An enigmatic class of objects important for investigating such scenarios are galaxies which emit intense radio emission from explosions that occur deep in their nuclei. The explosions are believed to be triggered when material from the merging swarm of smaller galaxies is fed into a rotating black hole located in the central regions. There is strong evidence that these distant radio galaxies are amongst the oldest and most massive galaxies in the early Universe and are often located at the heart of rich clusters of galaxies. They can therefore help pinpoint regions of the Universe in which large galaxies and clusters of galaxies are being formed. The radio galaxy 1138-262 The first visiting astronomers pointed ANTU towards a particularly important radio galaxy named 1138-262 . It is located in the southern constellation Hydra (The Water Snake). This galaxy was discovered some years ago using ESO's 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at La Silla. Because 1138-262 is at a distance of

  4. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature is roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.

  5. Detection of a dense clump in a filament interacting with W51e2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookerjea, B.; Vastel, C.; Hassel, G. E.; Gerin, M.; Pety, J.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Black, J. H.; Giesen, T.; Harrison, T.; Persson, C. M.; Stutzki, J.

    2014-06-01

    In the framework of the Herschel/PRISMAS guaranteed time key program, the line of sight to the distant ultracompact H ii region W51e2 has been observed using several selected molecular species. Most of the detected absorption features are not associated with the background high-mass star-forming region and probe the diffuse matter along the line of sight. We present here the detection of an additional narrow absorption feature at ~70 km s-1 in the observed spectra of HDO, NH3 and C3. The 70 km s-1 feature is not uniquely identifiable with the dynamic components (the main cloud and the large-scale foreground filament) so-far identified toward this region. The narrow absorption feature is similar to the one found toward low-mass protostars, which is characteristic of the presence of a cold external envelope. The far-infrared spectroscopic data were combined with existing ground-based observations of 12CO, 13CO, CCH, CN, and C3H2 to characterize the 70 km s-1 component. Using a non-LTE analysis of multiple transitions of NH3 and CN, we estimated the density (n(H2) ~ (1-5) × 105 cm-3) and temperature (10-30 K) for this narrow feature. We used a gas-grain warm-up based chemical model with physical parameters derived from the NH3 data to explain the observed abundances of the different chemical species. We propose that the 70 km s-1 narrow feature arises in a dense and cold clump that probably undergoes collapse to form a low-mass protostar, formed on the trailing side of the high-velocity filament, which is thought to be interacting with the W51 main cloud. While the fortuitous coincidence of the dense clump along the line of sight with the continuum-bright W51e2 compact H ii region has contributed to its nondetection in the continuum images, this same attribute makes it an appropriate source for absorption studies and in particular for ice studies of star-forming regions. Based on data acquired with Herschel and IRAM observatories. Herschel is an ESA space observatory

  6. Comparison of clumped isotope signatures of dolomite cements to fluid inclusion thermometry in the temperature range of 74-180 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Came, R. E.; Azmy, K.; Tripati, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Widespread application of the novel clumped isotope paleothermometer (Δ47) using carbonate samples from shallow crustal settings has been hindered by a lack of knowledge about clumped isotope systematics in carbonate minerals forming at temperatures greater than 50ºC. Furthermore, the utility of the Δ47 proxy in the mineral dolomite is limited because calibration data for dolomites that formed at any temperature are lacking. Consequently, applications involving diagenetic temperatures have required extrapolations beyond the range of most Δ47-temperature calibrations. Here we compare Δ47 values in dolomite cements to temperatures independently determined using fluid-inclusion microthermometry, and compare this rock-based "calibration" to previously published laboratory-derived calibrations for synthetic carbonates. This combination of approaches yields results that are consistent with the shallow calibration slope that has been reported from some laboratory experiments.

  7. Clumped isotope composition of cold-water corals: A role for vital effects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, Peter T.; Guo, Weifu; Robinson, Laura F.; Thiagarajan, Nivedita; Hendry, Katharine R.; Rosenheim, Brad E.; Leng, Melanie J.

    2016-04-01

    The carbonate clumped isotope thermometer is a promising tool for determining past ocean temperatures. It is based on the temperature dependence of rare isotopes 'clumping' into the same carbonate ion group in the carbonate mineral lattice. The extent of this clumping effect is independent of the isotope composition of the water from which carbonate precipitates, providing unique advantages over many other paleotemperature proxies. Existing calibrations of this thermometer in cold-water and warm-water corals suggest clumped isotope 'vital effects' are negligible in cold-water corals but may be significant in warm-water corals. Here, we test the calibration of the carbonate clumped isotope thermometer in cold-water corals with a recently collected and well characterised sample set spanning a range of coral genera (Balanophyllia, Caryophyllia, Dasmosmilia, Desmophyllum, Enallopsammia and Javania). The clumped isotope compositions (Δ47) of these corals exhibit systematic dependences on their growth temperatures, confirming the basis of the carbonate clumped isotope thermometer. However, some cold-water coral genera show Δ47 values that are higher than the expected equilibrium values by up to 0.05‰ (equivalent to underestimating temperature by ∼9 °C) similar to previous findings for some warm-water corals. This finding suggests that the vital effects affecting corals Δ47 are common to both warm- and cold-water corals. By comparison with models of the coral calcification process we suggest that the clumped isotope offsets in these genera are related to the kinetic isotope effects associated with CO2 hydration/hydroxylation reactions in the corals' calcifying fluid. Our findings complicate the use of the carbonate clumped isotope thermometer in corals, but suggest that species- or genus-specific calibrations could be useful for the future application of this paleotemperature proxy.

  8. Formation and internal structure of superdense dark matter clumps and ultracompact minihaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezinsky, V. S.; Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.

    2013-11-01

    We discuss the formation mechanisms and structure of the superdense dark matter clumps (SDMC) and ultracompact minihaloes (UCMH), outlining the differences between these types of DM objects. We define as SDMC the gravitationally bounded DM objects which have come into virial equilibrium at the radiation-dominated (RD) stage of the universe evolution. Such objects can be formed from the isocurvature (entropy) density perturbations or from the peaks in the spectrum of curvature (adiabatic) perturbation. The axion miniclusters (Kolb and Tkachev 1994) are the example of the former model. The system of central compact mass (e.g. in the form of SDMC or primordial black hole (PBH)) with the outer DM envelope formed in the process of secondary accretion we refer to as UCMH. Therefore, the SDMC can serve as the seed for the UCMH in some scenarios. Recently, the SDMC and UCMH were considered in the many works, and we try to systematize them here. We consider also the effect of asphericity of the initial density perturbation in the gravitational evolution, which decreases the SDMC amount and, as the result, suppresses the gamma-ray signal from DM annihilation.

  9. Inverse dynamical population synthesis. Constraining the initial conditions of young stellar clusters by studying their binary populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, M.; Kroupa, P.

    2012-07-01

    Binary populations in young star clusters show multiplicity fractions both lower and up to twice as high as those observed in the Galactic field. We follow the evolution of a population of binary stars in dense and loose star clusters starting with an invariant initial binary population and a formal multiplicity fraction of unity, and demonstrate that these models can explain the observed binary properties in Taurus, ρ Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Orion, IC 348, Upper Scorpius A, Praesepe, and the Pleiades. The model needs to consider solely different birth densities for these regions. The evolved theoretical orbital-parameter distributions are highly probable parent distributions for the observed ones. We constrain the birth conditions (stellar mass, Mecl, and half-mass radius, rh) for the derived progenitors of the star clusters and the overall present-day binary fractions allowed by the present model. The results compare very well with properties of molecular cloud clumps on the verge of star formation. Combining these with previously and independently obtained constraints on the birth densities of globular clusters, we identify a weak stellar mass - half-mass radius correlation for cluster-forming cloud clumps, rh/pc ∝ (Mecl/M⊙)0.13 ± 0.04. The ability of the model to reproduce the binary properties in all the investigated young objects, covering present-day densities from 1-10 stars pc-3 (Taurus) to 2 × 104 stars pc-3 (Orion), suggests that environment-dependent dynamical evolution plays an important role in shaping the present-day properties of binary populations in star clusters, and that the initial binary properties may not vary dramatically between different environments.

  10. Vertical velocities from proper motions of red clump giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Corredoira, M.; Abedi, H.; Garzón, F.; Figueras, F.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We derive the vertical velocities of disk stars in the range of Galactocentric radii of R = 5 - 16 kpc within 2 kpc in height from the Galactic plane. This kinematic information is connected to dynamical aspects in the formation and evolution of the Milky Way, such as the passage of satellites and vertical resonance and determines whether the warp is a long-lived or a transient feature. Methods: We used the PPMXL survey, which contains the USNO-B1 proper motions catalog cross-correlated with the astrometry and near-infrared photometry of the 2MASS point source catalog. To improve the accuracy of the proper motions, the systematic shifts from zero were calculated by using the average proper motions of quasars in this PPMXL survey, and we applied the corresponding correction to the proper motions of the whole survey, which reduces the systematic error. From the color-magnitude diagram K versus (J - K) we selected the standard candles corresponding to red clump giants and used the information of their proper motions to build a map of the vertical motions of our Galaxy. We derived the kinematics of the warp both analytically and through a particle simulation to fit these data. Complementarily, we also carried out the same analysis with red clump giants spectroscopically selected with APOGEE data, and we predict the improvements in accuracy that will be reached with future Gaia data. Results: A simple model of warp with the height of the disk zw(R,φ) = γ(R - R⊙)sin(φ - φw) fits the vertical motions if dot {γ }/γ = -34±17 Gyr-1; the contribution to dot {γ } comes from the southern warp and is negligible in the north. If we assume this 2σ detection to be real, the period of this oscillation is shorter than 0.43 Gyr at 68.3% C.L. and shorter than 4.64 Gyr at 95.4% C.L., which excludes with high confidence the slow variations (periods longer than 5 Gyr) that correspond to long-lived features. Our particle simulation also indicates a probable abrupt decrease

  11. Theory of "clumps" in drift-wave turbulence in tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaogang; Qiu, Xiaoming; X, M. Qhiu

    1986-08-01

    Basing on the new method of trajectory stochastic treatment advanced by one of the authors of this paper, the theory of "clumps" in driftwave turbulence in tokamak plasmas has been developed. It is shown that, as a longer time behaviour, plasmas in tokamaks will have the same "clumps" effects as those in uniform magnetic fields, although the diffusion crossing magnetic field lines in tokamaks will be enhanced. The influence of the non-uniformity of the magnetic field, such as curvature, shear, etc., on the transverse diffusion and the "clump" life-time is discussed.

  12. Mutational analysis of the [4Fe-4S]-cluster converting iron regulatory factor from its RNA-binding form to cytoplasmic aconitase.

    PubMed Central

    Hirling, H; Henderson, B R; Kühn, L C

    1994-01-01

    The control of cellular iron homeostasis involves the coordinate post-transcriptional regulation of ferritin mRNA translation and transferring receptor mRNA stability. These regulatory events are mediated by a soluble cytoplasmic protein, iron regulatory factor (IRF), which binds specifically to mRNA hairpin structures, termed iron-responsive elements (IREs), in the respective mRNAs. IRF is modulated by variations of cellular iron levels and exists as either an apo-protein or a [4Fe-4S]-cluster protein. The two conformations show distinct, mutually exclusive functions. High-affinity IRE binding is observed with the apo-form induced by iron deprivation, but is lost under high iron conditions when IRF is converted to the [4Fe-4S]-cluster form which shows cytoplasmic aconitase activity. Moreover, IRE binding is inactivated by the sulfhydryl-oxidizing agent diamide and fully activated in vitro by 2% 2-mercapto-ethanol, whereas alkylation of IRF inhibits IRE binding. In the present study, we analyzed each of the above features using site-directed mutants of recombinant human IRF. The results support the bifunctional nature of IRF. We conclude that cysteines 437, 503 and 506 anchor the [4Fe-4S]-cluster, and are essential to the aconitase activity. Mutagenesis changing any of the cysteines to serine leads to constitutive RNA binding in 0.02% 2-mercaptoethanol. Cysteine 437 is particularly critical to the RNA-protein interaction. The spontaneous or diamide-induced formation of disulfide bonds between cysteines 437 and 503 or 437 and 506, in apo-IRF, as well as its alkylation by N-ethylmaleimide, inhibit binding to the IRE.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7508861

  13. Free-form lensing implications for the collision of dark matter and gas in the frontier fields cluster MACS J0416.1-2403

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego, Jose M.; Broadhurst, Tom; Molnar, Sandor M.; Lam, Daniel; Lim, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    We present a free-form mass reconstruction of the massive lensing cluster MACS J0416.1-2403 using the latest Hubble Frontier Fields data. Our free-form method finds that the extended lensing pattern is generated by two elongated, closely projected clusters of similar mass. Our lens model identifies new lensed images with which we improve the accuracy of the dark matter distribution. We find that the bimodal mass distribution is nearly coincident with the bimodal X-ray emission, but with the two dark matter peaks lying closer together than the centroids of the X-ray emission. We can reproduce this behaviour with our hydrodynamical model, concluding that the clusters are significantly deflected around each other with the plane of the collision lying close to the line of sight. The projected mass profiles of both subclusters are well constrained in the region 30-165 kpc because of the many interior lensed images, leading to surprisingly flat mass profiles of both components at distances 30-100 kpc from the centre, in agreement with recent simulations of self-interacting dark matter. Using N-body simulations, we discuss the extent to which this may be generated by projection effects in our model as the cores graze each other. The relative velocity between the two cores is estimated to be about 1200 km s-1 and mostly along the line of sight so that our simulation is consistent with the relative redshift difference between the two cD galaxies (δz ≈ 0.04).

  14. How Escherichia coli lands and forms cell clusters on a surface: a new role of surface topography

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huan; Chen, Aaron; Song, Xinran; Brasch, Megan E.; Henderson, James H.; Ren, Dacheng

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial response to surface topography during biofilm formation was studied using 5 μm tall line patterns of poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Escherichia coli cells attached on top of protruding line patterns were found to align more perpendicularly to the orientation of line patterns when the pattern narrowed. Consistently, cell cluster formation per unit area on 5 μm wide line patterns was reduced by 14-fold compared to flat PDMS. Contrasting the reduced colony formation, cells attached on narrow patterns were longer and had higher transcriptional activities, suggesting that such unfavorable topography may present a stress to attached cells. Results of mutant studies indicate that flagellar motility is involved in the observed preference in cell orientation on narrow patterns, which was corroborated by the changes in cell rotation pattern before settling on different surface topographies. These findings led to a set of new design principles for creating antifouling topographies, which was validated using 10 μm tall hexagonal patterns. PMID:27412365

  15. How Escherichia coli lands and forms cell clusters on a surface: a new role of surface topography.

    PubMed

    Gu, Huan; Chen, Aaron; Song, Xinran; Brasch, Megan E; Henderson, James H; Ren, Dacheng

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial response to surface topography during biofilm formation was studied using 5 μm tall line patterns of poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Escherichia coli cells attached on top of protruding line patterns were found to align more perpendicularly to the orientation of line patterns when the pattern narrowed. Consistently, cell cluster formation per unit area on 5 μm wide line patterns was reduced by 14-fold compared to flat PDMS. Contrasting the reduced colony formation, cells attached on narrow patterns were longer and had higher transcriptional activities, suggesting that such unfavorable topography may present a stress to attached cells. Results of mutant studies indicate that flagellar motility is involved in the observed preference in cell orientation on narrow patterns, which was corroborated by the changes in cell rotation pattern before settling on different surface topographies. These findings led to a set of new design principles for creating antifouling topographies, which was validated using 10 μm tall hexagonal patterns. PMID:27412365

  16. A MALT90 study of the chemical properties of massive clumps and filaments of infrared dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miettinen, O.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) provide a useful testbed in which to investigate the genuine initial conditions and early stages of massive-star formation. Aims: We attempt to characterise the chemical properties of a sample of 35 massive clumps of IRDCs through multi-molecular line observations. We also search for possible evolutionary trends among the derived chemical parameters. Methods: The clumps are studied using the MALT90 (Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz) line survey data obtained with the Mopra 22 m telescope. The survey covers 16 different transitions near 90 GHz. The spectral-line data are used in concert with our previous LABOCA (Large APEX BOlometer CAmera) 870 μm dust emission data. Results: Eleven MALT90 transitions are detected towards the clumps at least at the 3σ level. Most of the detected species (SiO, C2H, HNCO, HCN, HCO+, HNC, HC3N, and N2H+) show spatially extended emission towards many of the sources. Most of the fractional abundances of the molecules with respect to H2 are found to be comparable to those determined in other recent similar studies of IRDC clumps. We found that the abundances of SiO, HNCO, and HCO+ are higher in IR-bright clumps than in IR-dark sources, reflecting a possible evolutionary trend. A hint of this trend is also seen for HNC and HC3N. An opposite trend is seen for the C2H and N2H+ abundances. Moreover, a positive correlation is found between the abundances of HCO+ and HNC, and between those of HNC and HCN. The HCN and HNC abundances also appear to increase as a function of the N2H+ abundance. The HNC/HCN and N2H+/HNC abundance ratios are derived to be near unity on average, while that of HC3N/HCN is ~10%. The N2H+/HNC ratio appears to increase as the clump evolves, while the HNC/HCO+ ratio shows the opposite behaviour. Conclusions: The detected SiO emission is probably caused by shocks driven by outflows in most cases, although shocks resulting from the cloud formation process could also play a role

  17. Flaring of tidally compressed dark-matter clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Kovetz, Ely D.; Silk, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    We explore the physics and observational consequences of tidal compression events (TCEs) of dark-matter clumps (DMCs) by supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Our analytic calculations show that a DMC approaching a SMBH much closer than the tidal radius undergoes significant compression along the axis perpendicular to the orbital plane, shortly after pericenter passage. For DMCs composed of self-annihilating dark-matter particles, we find that the boosted DMC density and velocity dispersion lead to a flaring of the annihilation rate, most pronounced for a velocity-dependent annihilation cross section. If the end products of the annihilation are photons, this results in a gamma-ray flare, detectable (and possibly already detected) by the Fermi telescope for a range of model parameters. If the end products of dark-matter annihilation are relativistic electrons and positrons and the local magnetic field is large enough, TCEs of DMCs can lead to flares of synchrotron radiation. Finally, TCEs of DMCs lead to a burst of gravitational waves, in addition to the ones radiated by the orbital motion alone, and with a different frequency spectrum. These transient phenomena provide interesting new avenues to explore the properties of dark matter.

  18. Clumped Signatures of Shallow Water Corals in Tobago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atasoy, D.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    The island of Tobago is seasonally bathed by the waters from the Orinoco and the Amazon and the δ18O of the coral skeleton responds annually to a change in temperature of approximately 4 °C as well as changes in the magnitude of outflow of the Orinoco, Amazon, and precipitation associated with the ITCZ. The clumped isotope makes it possible to distinguish the temperature induced δ18O signal from that exerted by the freshwater. We have utilized a specimen of Diploria strigosa collected in 1991 which has an extension rate of about 2 cm/yr allows between 4-5 samples to be collected within a yearly growth increment. Our data reveals temperature between 24 and 28 °C consistent with actual measurements and not offset towards lower values as in some previous studies. Once the temperature has been calculated it is possible to extract the δ18O of the water using one of the paleotemperature equations established for corals.

  19. RED CLUMP STARS IN THE SAGITTARIUS TIDAL STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Carrell, Kenneth; Chen Yuqin; Wilhelm, Ronald

    2012-07-15

    We have probed a section (l {approx} 150, b {approx} -60) of the trailing tidal arm of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy by identifying a sample of Red Clump (RC) stream stars. RC stars are not generally found in the halo field, but are found in significant numbers in both the Sagittarius galaxy and its tidal streams, making them excellent probes of stream characteristics. Our target sample was selected using photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 6, which was constrained in color to match the Sagittarius RC stars. Spectroscopic observations of the target stars were conducted at Kitt Peak National Observatory using the WIYN telescope. The resulting spectroscopic sample is magnitude limited and contains both main-sequence disk stars and evolved RC stars. We have developed a method to systematically separate these two stellar classes using kinematic information and a Bayesian approach for surface gravity determination. The resulting RC sample allows us to determine an absolute stellar density of {rho} = 2.7 {+-} 0.5 RC stars kpc{sup -3} at this location in the stream. Future measurements of stellar densities for a variety of populations and at various locations along the streams will lead to a much improved understanding of the original nature of the Sagittarius galaxy and the physical processes controlling its disruption and subsequent stream generation.

  20. Early Cretaceous Ocean Dynamics from Clumped Isotope Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanDeVelde, J. H.; Price, G. D.; Passey, B. H.; Grimes, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    Existing records suggest that Early Cretaceous temperatures were warmer than modern conditions, but were moderate compared to the mid-Cretaceous super-greenhouse. High-latitude marine oxygen isotopes indicate near-freezing polar temperatures, while glendonites and dropstones suggest periodic existence of polar ice. Conventional oxygen isotope paleothermometry is problematic due to its control by both temperature and seawater composition, which is dependent on both global ice volume and more regional hydrologic variations. In order to overcome this limitation, we performed clumped isotope analysis on belemnite rostra of Valanginian age (~140-134 Ma) from localities across a range of paleolatitudes. We find temperatures well above modern values for these sites, but still compatible with sub-freezing poles. Additionally, the oxygen isotopic composition of seawater calculated from these same analyses is remarkably similar to modern values, and differs significantly from modeled Cretaceous seawater. These high oxygen isotope ratios could be the product of isotopic disequilibrium in belemnites, but are more likely to be the result of previously unrecognized basin- or global-scale hydrological factors, or ice sheet growth. Our results therefore argue for a generally warm Valanginian climate but with the potential for significant polar ice.

  1. Clumped-Isotope Thermometry of Carbonate Veins from the SAFOD Borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luetkemeyer, P. B.; Kirschner, D. L.; Huntington, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    We present clumped-isotope and stable-isotope data from carbonate veins obtained from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) borehole. A number of models proposed to explain the apparent weakness of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) require fluids to be present in the fault zone. However, little is known about the presence, source(s), temperature, and migration pathways of these fluids. We investigate spatial trends in isotopic composition of veins within meters of two actively deforming strands of the SAF - the southern deformation zone (SDZ) and central deformation zone (CDZ). Two populations of veins are present based on the isotopic data. The first group of veins with calcite δ18O values < +15 ‰ (VSMOW) and δ 13C values > +1 ‰ (VPDB) are present in foliated siltstone and shale cataclasites from 3186 to 3194 meters MD and in sheared siltstones and sandstones of the CDZ from 3297 to 3301 meters MD. Clumped-isotope analyses for a subset of samples from this vein set indicate temperatures between 72 and 99 °C and calculated pore fluid δ18O values of -3.4 to +0.1‰ (VSMOW). A second group of veins with δ18O values between +17 and +25 ‰ (VSMOW) and δ13C values between +1 and -18 (VPDB) is present in the serpentinite-bearing SDZ from 3196 to 3197 meters MD and in siltstones from 3302 to 3310 meters MD. Veins in the SDZ record temperatures from 80 to 118 °C and calculated pore fluid δ18O values of -0.3 to +3.1‰ (VSMOW). Both vein populations record temperatures less than or within uncertainty of present-day borehole temperature of ca. 120 °C. We propose the first group of veins formed by precipitating from fluids charged with soil CO2 or biogenic methane that flowed along preexisting diagenetic fracture networks or fractures formed early in the evolution of the SAF. The second group of veins precipitated from fluids charged with thermogenic methane near present-day ambient temperatures and localized in a ~50 meter wide zone of damage along the

  2. The effect of clumped population structure on the variability of spreading dynamics.

    PubMed

    Black, Andrew J; House, Thomas; Keeling, Matt J; Ross, Joshua V

    2014-10-21

    Processes that spread through local contact, including outbreaks of infectious diseases, are inherently noisy, and are frequently observed to be far noisier than predicted by standard stochastic models that assume homogeneous mixing. One way to reproduce the observed levels of noise is to introduce significant individual-level heterogeneity with respect to infection processes, such that some individuals are expected to generate more secondary cases than others. Here we consider a population where individuals can be naturally aggregated into clumps (subpopulations) with stronger interaction within clumps than between them. This clumped structure induces significant increases in the noisiness of a spreading process, such as the transmission of infection, despite complete homogeneity at the individual level. Given the ubiquity of such clumped aggregations (such as homes, schools and workplaces for humans or farms for livestock) we suggest this as a plausible explanation for noisiness of many epidemic time series. PMID:24911778

  3. Red clump stars from the LAMOST data I: identification and distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jun-Chen; Liu, Chao; Deng, Li-Cai; Cui, Wen-Yuan; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yong-Hui; Yang, Ming; Wu, Yue

    2015-08-01

    We present a sample of about 120 000 red clump candidates selected from the LAMOST DR2 catalog based on the empirical distribution model in the effective temperature vs. surface gravity plane. Although, in general, red clump stars are considered as standard candles, they do not exactly stay in a narrow range of absolute magnitude, but may have a range of more than one magnitude depending on their initial mass. Consequently, conventional oversimplified distance estimations with the assumption of a fixed luminosity may lead to systematic bias related to the initial mass or age, which can potentially affect the study of the evolution of the Galaxy with red clump stars. We therefore employ an isochrone-based method to estimate the absolute magnitude of red clump stars from their observed surface gravities, effective temperatures and metallicities. We verify that the estimation removes the systematics well and provides initial mass/age estimates that are independent of distance with accuracy better than 10%.

  4. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  5. Clumped isotope thermometry of carbonatites as an indicator of diagenetic alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Kate J.; Schrag, Daniel P.

    2010-07-01

    We measure the clumped isotopic signature of carbonatites to assess the integrity of the clumped isotope paleothermometer over long timescales (10 7-10 9 years) and the susceptibility of the proxy to closed system re-equilibration of isotopes during burial diagenesis. We find pristine carbonatites that have primary oxygen isotope signatures, along with a Carrara marble standard, do not record clumped isotope signatures lighter than 0.31‰ suggesting atoms of carbon and oxygen freely exchange within the carbonate lattice at temperatures above 250-300 °C. There is no systematic trend in the clumped isotope signature of pristine carbonatites with age, although partial re-equilibration to lower temperatures can occur if a carbonatite has been exposed to burial temperatures for long periods of time. We conclude that the solid-state re-ordering of carbon and oxygen atoms is sufficiently slow to enable the use of clumped isotope paleothermometry on timescales of 10 8 years, but that diagenetic resetting can still occur, even without bulk recrystallization. In addition to the carbonatite data, an inorganic calibration of the clumped isotope paleothermometer for low temperature carbonates (7.5-77 °C) is presented and highlights the need for further inter-lab standardization.

  6. Formation and evolution of magnetised filaments in wind-swept turbulent clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banda-Barragan, Wladimir Eduardo; Federrath, Christoph; Crocker, Roland M.; Bicknell, Geoffrey Vincent; Parkin, Elliot Ross

    2015-08-01

    Using high-resolution three-dimensional simulations, we examine the formation and evolution of filamentary structures arising from magnetohydrodynamic interactions between supersonic winds and turbulent clumps in the interstellar medium. Previous numerical studies assumed homogenous density profiles, null velocity fields, and uniformly distributed magnetic fields as the initial conditions for interstellar clumps. Here, we have, for the first time, incorporated fractal clumps with log-normal density distributions, random velocity fields and turbulent magnetic fields (superimposed on top of a uniform background field). Disruptive processes, instigated by dynamical instabilities and akin to those observed in simulations with uniform media, lead to stripping of clump material and the subsequent formation of filamentary tails. The evolution of filaments in uniform and turbulent models is, however, radically different as evidenced by comparisons of global quantities in both scenarios. We show, for example, that turbulent clumps produce tails with higher velocity dispersions, increased gas mixing, greater kinetic energy, and lower plasma beta than their uniform counterparts. We attribute the observed differences to: 1) the turbulence-driven enhanced growth of dynamical instabilities (e.g. Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities) at fluid interfaces, and 2) the localised amplification of magnetic fields caused by the stretching of field lines trapped in the numerous surface deformations of fractal clumps. We briefly discuss the implications of this work to the physics of the optical filaments observed in the starburst galaxy M82.

  7. The height and seasonal variation of foliage clumping: implications for the remote sensing retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisek, J.

    2011-12-01

    Clumping index (CI) describes the level of foliage grouping within distinct canopy structures relative to a random distribution. Vegetation foliage clumping significantly alters its radiation environment and affects vegetation growth as well as water and carbon cycles. In moderate to dense forest stands, in-situ measurements near the ground surface may considerably underestimate the overall canopy-level clumping effect. This is because the large gaps between tree crowns at upper levels of the canopy may not be all measured near the ground due to obscurity by lower vegetation of branches. To assess the possible role of the vertical distribution of foliage clumping and the differences from the CI values measured at the forest floor, measurements of CI at different heights were conducted at three different stands: native cloud rainforest stand in Hawai'i, mature birch dominated stand in Jarvselja, Estonia, and boreal evergreen needleleaf stand in Hyytiala, Finland. Additionally, the seasonal variation of foliage clumping at scales larger than the shoot is reported for two RAMI birch and pine sites in Jarvselja, Estonia. This information about height and seasonal variations of CI is shown to be important for correct estimating and validating the foliage clumping from airborne/satellite remote sensing.

  8. X-Ray Emission from Clump Bow Shocks in Massive Star Wind Flows %C (C) 2007. Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy. All Rights Reserved.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Alexander E.; Ignace, Richard

    2007-09-01

    Recent observations have shown that the emission profiles of massive stars such as z Pup and z Ori have unusually hard x-ray emissions, and th= e x-ray line profiles tend to be symmetrical and only slightly blueshifted. We suggest a possible explanation for this: in the highly supersonic stellar winds that form around a massive star, locally denser regions of the wind form axially symmetric bow shock structures. We treat these denser regions as rigid spherical "clumps", and assume that they exist randomly around the star. The bow shock shape is parabolic, with temperatures along the shock in excess of 106 K, decreasing from a maximu= m temperature at the shock head. Taking into account stellar occultation, clump occultation, and optical depth parameters, we simulate the line profiles resulting from emission along the shock. We reasonably reproduce the main features of the observed line profiles, though some parameters, such as the speed of the clumps, remain unclear at this time.

  9. A STARBURSTING PROTO-CLUSTER IN MAKING ASSOCIATED WITH A RADIO GALAXY AT z = 2.53 DISCOVERED BY H{alpha} IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Masao; Kodama, Tadayuki; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Koyama, Yusei; Tanaka, Ichi

    2012-09-20

    We report a discovery of a proto-cluster in vigorous assembly and hosting strong star-forming activities, associated with a radio galaxy USS 1558-003 at z = 2.53, as traced by wide-field narrow-band H{alpha} imaging with MOIRCS on the Subaru Telescope. We find 68 H{alpha} emitters with dust-uncorrected star formation rates (SFRs) down to 8.6 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Their spatial distribution indicates that there are three prominent clumps of H{alpha} emitters: one surrounding the radio galaxy, the second located at {approx}1.5 Mpc away to the southwest, and the third located between the two. These contiguous three systems are very likely to merge together in the near future and may grow to a single more massive cluster at a later time. While most H{alpha} emitters reside in the 'blue cloud' on the color-magnitude diagram, some emitters have very red colors with J - K{sub s} > 1.38(AB). Interestingly, such red H{alpha} emitters are located toward the faint end of the red sequence, and they tend to be located in high density clumps. We do not see any statistically significant difference in the distributions of individual SFRs or stellar masses of the H{alpha} emitters between the dense clumps and the other regions, suggesting that this is one of the notable sites where the progenitors of massive galaxies in the present-day clusters were in their vigorous formation phase. Finally, we find that H{alpha} emission of the radio galaxy is fairly extended spatially over {approx}4.''5. However, it is not as widespread as its Ly{alpha} halo, meaning that the Ly{alpha} emission is indeed severely extended by resonant scattering.

  10. A Free-Form mass model of the Hubble Frontier Fields Cluster AS1063 (RXC J2248.7-4431) with over one hundred constraints.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego, Jose M.; Broadhurst, Tom; Wong, Jess; Silk, Joseph; Lim, Jeremy; Zheng, Wei; Lam, Daniel; Ford, Holland

    2016-04-01

    We derive a free-form mass distribution for the massive cluster AS1063 (z=0.348) using the completed optical imaging from the Hubble Frontier Fields program. Based on a subset of 11 multiply lensed systems with spectroscopic redshift we produce a lens model that is accurate enough to secure new multiply lensed systems, totalling over a 100 arclets, and to estimate their redshifts geometrically. Consistency is found between this precise model and that obtained using only the subset of lensed sources with spectroscopically measured redshifts.Although a relatively large elongation of the mass distribution is apparent relative to the X-ray map, no significant offset is found between the centroid of our mass distribution and that of the X-ray emission map, suggesting a relatively relaxed state for this cluster. For the well resolved lensed images we provide detailed model comparisons to illustrate the precision of our model and hence the reliability of our de-lensed sources. A clear linear structure is associated with one such source extending 23 kpc in length, that could be an example of jet-induced star formation, at redshift z ≈ 3.1.

  11. A free-form mass model of the Hubble Frontier Fields cluster AS1063 (RXC J2248.7-4431) with over one hundred constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego, Jose M.; Broadhurst, Tom; Wong, Jess; Silk, Joseph; Lim, Jeremy; Zheng, Wei; Lam, Daniel; Ford, Holland

    2016-07-01

    We derive a free-form mass distribution for the massive cluster AS1063 (z = 0.348) using the completed optical imaging from the Hubble Frontier Fields programmme. Based on a subset of 11 multiply lensed systems with spectroscopic redshift, we produce a lens model that is accurate enough to secure new multiply lensed systems, totalling over a 100 arclets, and to estimate their redshifts geometrically. Consistency is found between this precise model and that obtained using only the subset of lensed sources with spectroscopically measured redshifts. Although a relatively large elongation of the mass distribution is apparent relative to the X-ray map, no significant offset is found between the centroid of our mass distribution and that of the X-ray emission map, suggesting a relatively relaxed state for this cluster. For the well-resolved lensed images, we provide detailed model comparisons to illustrate the precision of our model and hence the reliability of our de-lensed sources. A clear linear structure is associated with one such source extending 23 kpc in length, that could be an example of jet-induced star formation, at redshift z ≈ 3.1.

  12. Kinetic isotope effect in CO2 degassing: Insight from clumped and oxygen isotopes in laboratory precipitation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affek, Hagit P.; Zaarur, Shikma

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory precipitation experiments provide the basis for the common calibration of both the oxygen isotope and the clumped isotope thermometers. These focus on CaCO3 crystals that form deep in the bulk of the solution, often by the bubbling of N2(g) through a saturated Ca(HCO3)2 solution, following the classic experiments on McCrea (1950). Here we examine oxygen and clumped isotopes in CaCO3 that was precipitated at the surface of a solution that undergoes passive CO2 degassing. This CaCO3 is affected by enhanced disequilibrium that is associated with degassing, and has therefore higher δ18O and lower Δ47 values than those of the accepted thermometer calibrations. These offsets from the common thermometers calibrations increase with decreasing temperature for Δ47 but decrease with decreasing temperature for δ18O. The Δ47-δ18O co-variance is therefore strongly temperature dependent, in contrast to theoretical predictions. This suggests an influence of additional fractionation in fast growing minerals, between DIC and calcite, that affects δ18O and counteracts some of the degassing related enrichment. This effect seems not to influence Δ47. The physical setup of CaCO3 minerals growing at the solution surface is analogous to the degassing and precipitation processes that occur in stalagmites, such that these laboratory experiments may help shed light on the isotopic disequilibrium that is observed in speleothems.

  13. Variations in soil carbonate formation and seasonal bias over >4 km of relief in the western Andes (30°S) revealed by clumped isotope thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgener, Landon; Huntington, Katharine W.; Hoke, Gregory D.; Schauer, Andrew; Ringham, Mallory C.; Latorre, Claudio; Díaz, Francisca P.

    2016-05-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry provides a new method for investigating long-standing questions regarding seasonal biases in soil carbonate formation and the relationship between soil carbonate formation temperatures recorded by clumped isotopes (T (Δ47)) and surface temperatures. We address these questions by comparing C, O, and clumped isotope data from Holocene soil carbonates to meteorological and in situ soil monitoring data along a 170 km transect with >4 km of relief in Chile (30°S). This arid transect experiences a winter wet season, and a >20 °C range in mean annual air temperature. We test the hypothesis that, regardless of soil moisture conditions, soil carbonates from arid regions record warm season biases and form in isotopic equilibrium with soil water and soil CO2. Below 3200 m, precipitation falls as rain and soil carbonate T (Δ47) values at depths >40 cm resemble summer soil temperatures. Above 3200 m, precipitation falls as snow and T (Δ47) values resemble mean annual soil temperatures. Soil carbonates from the highest site yield anomalous δ18 O, δ13 C, and T (Δ47) values indicative of kinetic isotope effects consistent with cryogenic carbonate formation. Our findings (1) demonstrate that soil carbonate T (Δ47) values from shallow (<40 cm) depths can be affected by short-term temperature changes following precipitation events; (2) suggest that only the largest precipitation events affect soil moisture at depths >40 cm; (3) highlight the role of the soil moisture regime in modulating the timing of soil carbonate formation, which affects the resulting carbonate T (Δ47) values; and (4) show that soil carbonates from high elevation or high latitude sites may form under non-equilibrium conditions. These findings underscore the importance of understanding past soil moisture conditions when attempting to reconstruct paleotemperatures using carbonate clumped isotope thermometry.

  14. The Magnetohydrodynamics of Supersonic Gas Clouds: MHD Cosmic Bullets and Wind-swept Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. W.; Ryu, Dongsu; Tregillis, I. L.

    1996-12-01

    We report an extensive set of two-dimensional MHD simulations exploring the role and evolution of magnetic fields in the dynamics of supersonic plasma clumps. We examine the influence of both ambient field strength and orientation on the problem. Of those two characteristics, field orientation is far more important in the cases we have considered with β0 = Pg/Pb ≥ 1. That is due to the geometry-sensitivity of field stretching/amplification from large-scale shearing motions around the bullet When the ambient magnetic field is transverse to the bullet motion, even a very modest field, well below equipartition strength, can be amplified by field line stretching around the bullet within a couple of bullet crushing times so that Maxwell stresses become comparable to the ram pressure associated with the bullet motion. The possibility is discussed that those situations might lead to large, induced electric potentials capable of accelerating charged particles. When the ambient field is aligned to the bullet motion, on the other hand, reconnection-prone topologies develop that shorten the stretched field and release much of the excess energy it contains. In this geometry, the Maxwell stresses on the bullet never approach the ram pressure level. In both cases, however, the presence of a field with even moderate initial strength acts to help the flow realign itself around the bullet into a smoother, more laminar form. That reduces bullet fragmentation tendencies caused by destructive instabilities. Eddies seem less effective at field amplification than flows around the bullet, because fields within eddies tend to be expelled to the eddy perimeters. Similar effects cause the magnetic field within the bullet itself to be reduced below its initial value over time. For oblique fields, we expect that the transverse field cases modeled here are more generally relevant What counts is whether field lines threading the face of the bullet are swept around it in a fashion that folds

  15. DC-SIGN; a related gene, DC-SIGNR; and CD23 form a cluster on 19p13.

    PubMed

    Soilleux, E J; Barten, R; Trowsdale, J

    2000-09-15

    DC-SIGN is a C-type lectin, expressed on a dendritic cell subset. It is able to bind ICAM3 and HIV gp120 in a calcium-dependent manner. Here we report the genomic organization of DC-SIGN and map it to chromosome 19p13 adjacent to the C-type lectin CD23 (FcepsilonRII). We also report a novel, closely linked gene, DC-SIGNR, which shows 73% identity to DC-SIGN at the nucleic acid level and a similar genomic organization. Proteins encoded by both genes have tracts of repeats of 23 aa, predicted to form a coiled coil neck region. They also possess motifs that are known to bind mannose in a calcium-dependent fashion. We show concomitant expression of the two genes in endometrium, placenta, and stimulated KG1 cells (phenotypically similar to monocyte-derived dendritic cells). The existence of a DC-SIGN-related gene calls for reinterpretation of the HIV data to consider possible DC-SIGN/DC-SIGNR hetero-oligomerization. PMID:10975799

  16. ATLASGAL-selected massive clumps in the inner Galaxy. II. Characterisation of different evolutionary stages and their SiO emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csengeri, T.; Leurini, S.; Wyrowski, F.; Urquhart, J. S.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, M.; Bontemps, S.; Wienen, M.; Beuther, H.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Schilke, P.; Schuller, F.; Zavagno, A.; Sanna, C.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The processes leading to the birth of high-mass stars are poorly understood. The key first step to reveal their formation processes is characterising the clumps and cores from which they form. Aims: We define a representative sample of massive clumps in different evolutionary stages selected from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL), from which we aim to establish a census of molecular tracers of their evolution. As a first step, we study the shock tracer, SiO, mainly associated with shocks from jets probing accretion processes. In low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs), outflow and jet activity decreases with time during the star formation processes. Recently, a similar scenario was suggested for massive clumps based on SiO observations. Here we analyse observations of the SiO (2-1) and (5-4) lines in a statistically significant sample to constrain the change of SiO abundance and the excitation conditions as a function of evolutionary stage of massive star-forming clumps. Methods: We performed an unbiased spectral line survey covering the 3-mm atmospheric window between 84-117 GHz with the IRAM 30 m telescope of a sample of 430 sources of the ATLASGAL survey, covering various evolutionary stages of massive clumps. A smaller sample of 128 clumps has been observed in the SiO (5-4) transition with the APEX telescope to complement the (2-1) line and probe the excitation conditions of the emitting gas. We derived detection rates to assess the star formation activity of the sample, and we estimated the column density and abundance using both an LTE approximation and non-LTE calculations for a smaller subsample, where both transitions have been observed. Results: We characterise the physical properties of the selected sources, which greatly supersedes the largest samples studied so far, and show that they are representative of different evolutionary stages. We report a high detection rate of >75% of the SiO (2-1) line and a >90% detection

  17. Theoretical estimation of 13C-D clumped isotope effects in methyl of several organic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, Q.; Yin, X.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments in mass spectrometry and tunable infrared laser direct absorption spectroscopy make it possible to measure 13C-D clumped isotope effects of methane. These techniques can be further applied to determine 13C-D clumped isotope effects of methyl fragments, therefore need accurate equilirbium Δi values to calibrate experimental measurements. In this study, we calculate temperature depandences of 13C-D clumped isotope signatures in methyl of several organic compounds including ethane, propane, acetic acid, etc. Our calculation are performed at CCSD/6-311+G(3df,3pd) by using Gaussian 03 program with no scale treament. Our results show that the Δi values of 13C-D clumping in methyl fragments of different organic compounds yield similar signals (~5.5‰ at 25˚C, slightly lower than Δi value of 13C-D clumping in methane). For testing the calculated accuracy, theoretical treaments beyond the harmonic level by including several higher-order corrections to the Bigeleisen-Mayer equation are used. Contributions from higher-order corrections (e.g., AnZPE, AnEXC, VrZPE, VrEXC, QmCorr and CenDist) are estimated to repire the ignorings of the Bigeleisen-Mayer equation (the anharmonic effects of vibration, vibration-rotation coupling, quantum mechanics and centrifugal distortion for rotation, etc.) for the calculation of partition function ratios. The results show that the higher-order corrections contribute ~0.05‰ at 25˚C, which is similar to the contribution for calculating 13C-D clumped isotope signature of methane. By comparing our calculated frequencies to the measured ones, the uncertainty of our calculation of Δi values 13C-D clumping in methyl fragments is considered to be within ~0.05‰ at room temperature.

  18. Applying clumped isotopes of O2 to atmospheric and biogeochemical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Laurence

    2016-04-01

    I will describe recent measurements of isotopic "clumps" in diatomic molecules, e.g., 18O18O in O2, which are being utilized to constrain atmospheric circulation on glacial-interglacial timescales and biogeochemical cycling in the oceans. While our understanding of these tracers is still evolving, several features of their geochemistry are apparent: (1) the proportional abundance of these isotopic "clumps" is governed by traditional chemical effects as well as combinatorial effects unique to clumped isotopes, and (2) when isotopic exchange reactions are disfavoured, chemical-kinetic and/or reservoir effects, rather than thermodynamic equilibrium, determine their clumped-isotope composition. Combinatorial clumped-isotope signatures imparted during photosynthesis are being developed as endmember signatures of gross primary productivity in the oceans. In addition, clumped-isotope measurements of O2 in the atmosphere (i.e., Δ36 values) suggest that isotopic clumping in O2 is continuously being altered by ozone photochemistry in the troposphere and stratosphere. Yet, the contrast in isotope-exchange rates between the stratosphere (where exchange is fast) and the troposphere (where exchange is slow) results in a gradient in Δ36 values with altitude, wherein stratospheric intrusions are detectable as elevated Δ36 values. Moreover, global chemical-transport model simulations suggest that ozone photochemistry in the troposphere re-orders the O2 reservoir in the troposphere on annual timescales. The Δ36 value at the surface is therefore sensitive to the tropospheric residence time of O2 with respect to stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Consequently, Δ36 values at the surface likely respond to changes in the strength of the global overturning circulation.

  19. Clumped Isotope Composition of Cold-Water Corals: A Role for Vital Effects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, P.; Guo, W.; Robinson, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements on a set of cold-water corals (mainly Desmophyllum dianthus) have suggested that their clumped isotope composition could serve as a promising proxy for reconstructing paleocean temperatures. Such measurements have also offered support for certain isotope models of coral calcification. However, there are differences in the clumped isotope compositions between warm-water and cold-water corals, suggesting that different kinds of corals could have differences in their biocalcification processes. In order to understand the systematics of clumped isotope variations in cold-water corals more fully, we present clumped isotope data from a range of cold-water coral species from the tropical Atlantic and the Southern Ocean.Our samples were either collected live or recently dead (14C ages < 1,000 yrs) with associated temperature data. They include a total of 11 solitary corals and 1 colonial coral from the Atlantic, and 8 solitary corals from the Southern Ocean. The data indicate that coral clumped isotope systematics may be more complicated than previously thought. For example, for the genus Caryophyllia we observe significant variations in clumped isotope compositions for corals which grew at the same temperature with an apparent negative correlation between Δ47 and δ18O, different to patterns previously observed in Desmophyllum. These results indicate that existing isotope models of biocalcification may not apply equally well to all corals. Clumped isotope vital effects may be present in certain cold-water corals as they are in warm-water corals, complicating the use of this paleoclimate proxy.

  20. Sex Pheromone Response, Clumping, and Slime Production in Enterococcal Strains Isolated from Occluded Biliary Stents

    PubMed Central

    Donelli, Gianfranco; Paoletti, Claudia; Baldassarri, Lucilla; Guaglianone, Emilio; Di Rosa, Roberta; Magi, Gloria; Spinaci, Cinzia; Facinelli, Bruna

    2004-01-01

    Bile-resistant bacteria, particularly gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, play an important role in biliary stent occlusion, because their sessile mode of growth protects them against host defenses and antimicrobial agents. Twelve E. faecalis and seven E. faecium strains isolated from occluded biliary stents have been investigated for slime production, presence of aggregation substance genes, and ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells. Ten isolates were strong producers of slime, and seven isolates produced clumps when exposed to pheromones of E. faecalis JH2-2 and/or OG1RF. The small E. faecium clumps differed from the large clumps of E. faecalis and were similar to those of E. faecium LS10(pBRG1) carrying a pheromone response plasmid. After induction with pheromones, the adhesion to Caco-2 cells of clumping-positive strains was found to increase from two- to fourfold. Amplicons of the expected size were detected in three clumping-positive and three clumping-negative E. faecalis isolates by using primers (agg) internal to a highly conserved region of the E. faecalis pheromone response plasmids pAD1, pPD1, and pCF10 and primers internal to prgB of the E. faecalis plasmid pCF10. The agg/prgB-positive E. faecalis strains were also positive in Southern hybridization experiments with a prgB-specific probe. No PCR products were obtained with the same primers from four clumping-positive isolates (one E. faecalis and three E. faecium strains), which were also Southern hybridization negative. Our results demonstrate that slime production and pheromone response are both present in isolated enterococci, suggesting that clinical strains with these features might have a selective advantage in colonizing biliary stents. PMID:15297477

  1. Characterizing star cluster formation with WISE: 652 newly found star clusters and candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, D.; Bica, E.; Bonatto, C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of 652 star clusters, stellar groups and candidates in the Milky Way with Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Most of the objects are projected close to Galactic plane and are embedded clusters. The present sample complements a similar study (Paper I) which provided 437 star clusters and alike. We find evidence that star formation processes span a wide range of sizes, from populous dense clusters to small compact embedded ones, sparse stellar groups or in relative isolation. The present list indicates multiple stellar generations during the embedded phase, with giant molecular clouds collapsing into several clumps composing an embedded cluster aggregate. We investigate the field star decontaminated colour-magnitude diagrams and radial density profiles of nine cluster candidates in the list, and derive their parameters, confirming them as embedded clusters.

  2. Ooid formation in the Great Salt Lake, Utah: Insights from clumped isotope paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. P.; Bird, J. T.; Meneske, M.; Stefurak, E. J.; Berelson, W.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Shapiro, R. S.; Sessions, A. L.; Tripati, A.; Corsetti, F. A.

    2013-12-01

    Ooids (coated grains formed in agitated environments) are a relatively common constituent of the sedimentary record through time, but details of their formation remain enigmatic. Although not as abundant today as at other times in the past, ooids are known from several key carbonate environments, including the Bahamas, Persian Gulf, Shark Bay, and the Great Salt Lake. We collected ooids from the Great Salt Lake in association with the International GeoBiology Summer Course in 2012 and 2013 from the north shore of Antelope Island and Spiral Jetty in order to investigate their origin. Petrographic investigation reveals the ooids are composed of aragonite, and display an alternating radial, concentric, and radial-concentric fabric. The delicate nature of the radial fabric is suggestive, but not conclusive, that they form currently (agitation would abrade the fabric). The nuclei are typically rod shaped micritic peloids (up to 80%) or siliciclastic mineral grains. The Great Salt Lake surface water temperature undergoes a predictable annual cycle, with summer months approaching 25 degrees C or more, and winter months dipping to 5 degrees C or less, depending on the region of the lake. Clumped isotope temperatures allow us to constrain ooid formation to the warm months. A contrast between the isotopic composition of the waters for Antelope Island (~0 per mill), likely affected by spring runoff, and the ooids of the same location (~4.5 per mill) further suggest ooid formation took place after the spring runoff, constraining ooid formation to between mid-June and October. We calculated the summer and winter carbonate saturation state of the lake, and while the lake is supersaturated throughout the year, it is significantly more saturated during the summer months. Our results give new insight into ooid formation in the Great Salt Lake, and suggest that the ooids form predominantly during the warm months following the spring runoff.

  3. 3D cluster members and near-infrared distance of open cluster NGC 6819

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin-Hua; Xu, Shou-Kun; Chen, Li

    2015-12-01

    In order to obtain clean members of the open cluster NGC 6819, the proper motions and radial velocities of 1691 stars are used to construct a three-dimensional (3D) velocity space. Based on the DBSCAN clustering algorithm, 537 3D cluster members are obtained. From the 537 3D cluster members, the average radial velocity and absolute proper motion of the cluster are Vr = +2.30 ± 0.04 km s-1 and (PMRA, PMDec) = (-2.5 ± 0.5, -4.3 ± 0.5) mas yr-1, respectively. The proper motions, radial velocities, spatial positions and color-magnitude diagram of the 537 3D members indicate that our membership determination is effective. Among the 537 3D cluster members, 15 red clump giants can be easily identified by eye and are used as reliable standard candles for the distance estimate of the cluster. The distance modulus of the cluster is determined to be (m - M)0 = 11.86 ± 0.05 mag (2355 ± 54 pc), which is quite consistent with published values. The uncertainty of our distance modulus is dominated by the intrinsic dispersion in the luminosities of red clump giants (˜ 0.04 mag).

  4. Probing the clumping structure of giant molecular clouds through the spectrum, polarisation and morphology of X-ray reflection nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, Margherita; Khatri, Rishi; Sunyaev, Rashid A.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a new method for probing global properties of clump populations in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the case where these act as X-ray reflection nebulae (XRNe), based on the study of the clumping's overall effect on the reflected X-ray signal, in particular on the Fe K-α line's shoulder. We consider the particular case of Sgr B2, one of the brightest and most massive XRN in the Galactic center (GC) region. We parametrise the gas distribution inside the cloud using a simple clumping model with theslope of the clump mass function (α), the minimum clump mass (mmin), the fraction of the cloud's mass contained in clumps (fDGMF), and the mass-size relation of individual clumps as free parameters, and investigate how these affect the reflected X-ray spectrum. In the case of very dense clumps, similar to those presently observed in Sgr B2, these occupy a small volume of the cloud and present a small projected area to the incoming X-ray radiation. We find that these contribute negligibly to the scattered X-rays. Clump populations with volume-filling factors of >10-3 do leave observational signatures, that are sensitive to the clump model parameters, in the reflected spectrum and polarisation. Future high angular resolution X-ray observations could therefore complement the traditional optical and radio observations of these GMCs, and prove to be a powerful probe in the study of their internal structure. Clumps in GMCs should further be visible both as bright spots and regions of heavy absorption in high resolution X-ray observations. We therefore also study the time-evolution of the X-ray morphology, under illumination by a transient source, as a probe of the 3D distribution and column density of individual clumps by future X-ray observatories.

  5. Genes Involved in Degradation of para-Nitrophenol Are Differentially Arranged in Form of Non-Contiguous Gene Clusters in Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98

    PubMed Central

    Vikram, Surendra; Pandey, Janmejay; Kumar, Shailesh; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradation of para-Nitrophenol (PNP) proceeds via two distinct pathways, having 1,2,3-benzenetriol (BT) and hydroquinone (HQ) as their respective terminal aromatic intermediates. Genes involved in these pathways have already been studied in different PNP degrading bacteria. Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98 degrades PNP via both the pathways. Earlier, we have sequenced and analyzed a ~41 kb fragment from the genomic library of strain SJ98. This DNA fragment was found to harbor all the lower pathway genes; however, genes responsible for the initial transformation of PNP could not be identified within this fragment. Now, we have sequenced and annotated the whole genome of strain SJ98 and found two ORFs (viz., pnpA and pnpB) showing maximum identity at amino acid level with p-nitrophenol 4-monooxygenase (PnpM) and p-benzoquinone reductase (BqR). Unlike the other PNP gene clusters reported earlier in different bacteria, these two ORFs in SJ98 genome are physically separated from the other genes of PNP degradation pathway. In order to ascertain the identity of ORFs pnpA and pnpB, we have performed in-vitro assays using recombinant proteins heterologously expressed and purified to homogeneity. Purified PnpA was found to be a functional PnpM and transformed PNP into benzoquinone (BQ), while PnpB was found to be a functional BqR which catalyzed the transformation of BQ into hydroquinone (HQ). Noticeably, PnpM from strain SJ98 could also transform a number of PNP analogues. Based on the above observations, we propose that the genes for PNP degradation in strain SJ98 are arranged differentially in form of non-contiguous gene clusters. This is the first report for such arrangement for gene clusters involved in PNP degradation. Therefore, we propose that PNP degradation in strain SJ98 could be an important model system for further studies on differential evolution of PNP degradation functions. PMID:24376843

  6. Siderite 'clumped' isotope thermometry: A new paleoclimate proxy for humid continental environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Alvaro; Tang, Jianwu; Rosenheim, Brad E.

    2014-02-01

    Clumped isotope measurements can be used to exploit the paleoclimatic potential of pedogenic siderite (FeCO3); however, the applicability of this method is held back by the lack of clumped isotope calibrations of mineralogies other than calcite and aragonite. Here we present an inorganic calibration of siderites grown in the laboratory between 21 and 51 °C. Linear regression of Δ47 values and temperature (106/T2, K) yields the following relationship (r2 = 0.997): Δ={(0.0356±0.0018)×106}/{T}+(0.172±0.019) We demonstrate that this calibration is indistinguishable from calcite at current levels of analytical precision. Our observations suggest that there is likely no large systematic bias in the clumped isotope acid fractionation factors between the two different carbonate minerals. We also present clumped isotope measurements of a natural siderite collected from Holocene sediments of the Mississippi River Delta. We find that siderites record warm season marsh water temperatures instead of mean annual temperatures as it has long been presumed. This finding has important implications for the accuracy of siderite stable isotope and clumped isotope based climate reconstructions.

  7. A Predator-Prey Model for Moon-Triggered Clumping in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Albers, N.; Meinke, B. K.; Sremcevic, M.; Madhusudhanan, P.; Colwell, J. E.; Jerousek, R. E.

    2011-10-01

    UVIS occultation data show clumping in Saturn's F ring and at the B ring outer edge, indicating aggregation and disaggregation at these locations that are perturbed by Mimas and by Prometheus. Timescales range from hours to months. Structure near the B ring edge is seen in power spectral analysis at scales 200m - 2000m. We quantify this sub-km structure using wavelet analysis that estimates the statistical significance of the features. Similar structure is also seen at the strongest density waves, with significance increasing with resonance strength (FIGURE 1). For the B ring outer edge, the strongest structure is seen at longitudes 90° and 270° relative to Mimas. This indicates a direct relation between the moon and the ring clumping. We propose that the collective behavior of the ring particles resembles a predatorprey system: the mean aggregate size is the prey, which feeds the velocity dispersion; conversely, increasing dispersion breaks up the aggregates. Moons may trigger clumping by streamline crowding, which reduces the relative velocity, leading to more aggregation and more clumping. Disaggregation may follow from disruptive collisions or tidal shedding as the clumps stir the relative velocity. For realistic values of the parameters this yields a limit cycle behavior, as for the ecology of foxes and hares or the "boom-bust" economic cycle. Solving for the longterm behavior of this forced system gives a periodic response at the perturbing frequency, with a phase lag roughly consistent with the UVIS occultation measurements (FIGURE 2).

  8. Clumped Isotope Thermometry of Geologic Methane (13CH3D) using Tunable Laser Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, S.; Zahniser, M. S.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Methane is both an alternative energy source as well as a significant greenhouse gas, and holds the potential for rapid release to the atmosphere, possibly triggering abrupt climate change in the past and in the future. The majority of methane on the Earth is biogenic, originating from microbial methanogenesis, or thermogenic sourced from previously formed biogenic organic materials. Methane can be also produced abiogenically during serpentinization and even mantle-sourced methane has been implicated. Carbon (13C/12C) and hydrogen (D/H) isotope ratios of methane and associated short chain hydrocarbons provide critical information about the abiogenic/biogenic origin of methane but data can be inconclusive. We have developed and tested a Tunable Infrared Laser Direct Absorption Spectroscopy (TILDAS) Instrument to be used for precise measurements of the abundance of doubly isotope-substituted methane (13CH3D). The TILDAS instrument measures direct absorption in the mid-infrared (~ 8 μm) region using continuous wave quantum cascade laser combined with a 76 m pathlength astigmatic absorption cell. Initial test result indicates the precision for 13CH4, 12CH3D and 13CH3D for 0.2 ‰ or better for comparison between two reference gases. Accuracy of the methods for δ13C and δD is evaluated by comparing measurements by conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Calibration of clumped isotope scale (δ13CH3D) is underway using methane produced at various temperatures. Following an isotope exchange reaction (13CH4 + 12CH3D ↔ 13CH3D + 12CH4), precise measurements of 13CH3D abundance is expected to provide new and critical information about the temperature at which methane was formed (or thermally equilibrated). Biogenic origin becomes highly unlikely, for example, if the estimated temperature is higher than 120°C, i.e., current high-temperature limit of microbial methanogenesis. Although significant questions remain regarding isotope exchange kinetics, and clumped

  9. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The balance between heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We study the long-term evolution of an idealized cool-core galaxy cluster under the influence of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback using three-dimensional high-resolution (60 pc) adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The feedback is modeled with a pair of precessing jets whose power is calculated based on the accretion rate of the cold gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH). The intracluster medium first cools into clumps along the propagation direction of the jets. As the jet power increases, gas condensation occurs isotropically, forming spatially extended structures that resemble the observed Hα filaments in Perseus and many other cool-core clusters. Jet heating elevates the gas entropy, halting clump formation. The cold gas that is not accreted onto the SMBH settles into a rotating disk of ∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The hot gas cools directly onto the disk while the SMBH accretes from its innermost region, powering the AGN that maintains a thermally balanced state for a few Gyr. The mass cooling rate averaged over 7 Gyr is ∼30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, an order of magnitude lower than the classic cooling flow value. Medium resolution simulations produce similar results, while in low resolution runs, the cluster experiences cycles of gas condensation and AGN outbursts. Owing to its self-regulating mechanism, AGN feedback can successfully balance cooling with a wide range of model parameters. Our model also produces cold structures in early stages that are in good agreement with the observations. However, the long-lived massive cold disk is unrealistic, suggesting that additional physical processes are still needed.

  10. The distribution of warm gas in the G327.3-0.6 massive star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leurini, S.; Wyrowski, F.; Herpin, F.; van der Tak, F.; Güsten, R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2013-02-01

    Aims: Most studies of high-mass star formation focus on massive and/or luminous clumps, but the physical properties of their larger scale environment are poorly known. In this work, we aim at characterising the effects of clustered star formation and feedback of massive stars on the surrounding medium by studying the distribution of warm gas through mid-J12CO and 13CO observations. Methods: We present APEX 12CO(6-5), (7-6), 13CO(6-5), (8-7) and HIFI 13CO(10-9) maps of the star forming region G327.36-0.6 with a linear size of ~3 pc × 4 pc. We infer the physical properties of the emitting gas on large scales through a local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis, while we apply a more sophisticated large velocity gradient approach on selected positions. Results: Maps of all lines are dominated in intensity by the photon dominated region around the Hii region G327.3-0.5. Mid-J12CO emission is detected over the whole extent of the maps with excitation temperatures ranging from 20 K up to 80 K in the gas around the Hii region, and H2 column densities from few 1021 cm-2 in the inter-clump gas to 3 × 1022 cm-2 towards the hot core G327.3-0.6. The warm gas (traced by 12 and 13CO(6-5) emission) is only a small percentage (~10%) of the total gas in the infrared dark cloud, while it reaches values up to ~35% of the total gas in the ring surrounding the Hii region. The 12CO ladders are qualitatively compatible with photon dominated region models for high density gas, but the much weaker than predicted 13CO emission suggests that it comes from a large number of clumps along the line of sight. All lines are detected in the inter-clump gas when averaged over a large region with an equivalent radius of 50''(~0.8 pc), implying that the mid-J12CO and 13CO inter-clump emission is due to high density components with low filling factor. Finally, the detection of the 13CO(10-9) line allows to disentangle the effects of gas temperature and gas density on the CO emission, which are

  11. Tropical Silurian Paleotemperatures from Clumped Isotope Analysis of Coexisting Dolomite and Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelstern, I. Z.; Lohmann, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    In many instances, pervasive diagenetic alteration of original material prevents the use of quantitative climate proxies on Paleozoic or older rocks. As an inherently diagenetic phase, dolomite may provide a more resilient paleotemperature resource. The Δ47 carbonate clumped isotope thermometer has been shown to be an accurate paleothermometer and, in a limited way, has been shown to be applicable to dolomites. The shallow water carbonates of the Pipe Creek Jr. Reef in central Indiana offer an opportunity to test the viability of the technique in ancient dolomite. After formation in the late Silurian, a sea level drop resulted in a diagenetic sequence of meteoric phreatic alteration of marine cement and biotic components, which included precipitation of dolomite cements inter-grown within the meteoric phreatic calcite cement. This was post-dated by a coarse void filling calcite spar formed at burial temperatures of ~100°C (based on fluid inclusion analysis). Preliminary analyses of coexisting dolomite and calcite suggest that near-surface temperatures are preserved in dolomites despite having experienced elevated thermal diagenetic effects.. In contrast, co-existing early-formed calcites exhibit resetting of earth surface temperatures to elevated values. Δ47 measurements in dolomites yield temperatures around 30°C using the Guo et al., (2009) theoretical calibration. This contrasts with analyses of early (original) and late (hydrothermal) calcites, which record temperatures greater than ~80°C using the Δ47-calcite calibration of Dennis and Schrag (2010). These data support the hypothesis that dolomite can be a more resilient paleotemperature proxy relative to calcite in deep-time studies. Temperatures from dolomites compare reasonably with other late Silurian paleoclimate studies, and offer insight into regional-scale paleoclimate.

  12. Probing the Peak Epoch of Cosmic Star Formation (1forming Galaxies Behind the Lensing Clusters: UV Luminosity Function and the Dust Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Anahita; Siana, Brian D.; Richard, Johan; Rafelski, Marc; Jauzac, Mathilde; Limousin, Marceau; Stark, Daniel; Teplitz, Harry I.

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a complete census of cosmic star formation requires an understanding of faint star-forming galaxies that are far below the detection limits of current surveys. To search for the faint galaxies, we use the power of strong gravitational lensing from foreground galaxy clusters to boost the detection limits of HST to much fainter luminosities. Using the WFC3/UVIS on board the HST, we obtain deep UV images of 4 lensing clusters with existing deep optical and near-infrared data (three from Frontier Fields survey). Building multiband photometric catalogs and applying a photometric redshift selection, we uncover a large population of dwarf galaxies (-18.5forming galaxies keeps increasing steeply toward very faint magnitudes (MUV=-12.5). As an important implication of a steep faint-end slope LF, we show that the faint galaxies (-18.550%) at these redshifts. We use this unique sample to investigate further the various properties of dwarf galaxies as it is claimed to deviate from the trends seen for the more massive galaxies. Recent hydro-dynamical simulations and observations of local dwarfs show that these galaxies have episodic bursts of star formation on short time scales (< 10 Myr). We find that the bursty star formation histories (SFHs) cause a large intrinsic scatter in UV colors (β) at MUV > -16, comparing a sample of low mass galaxies from simulations with bursty SFHs with our comprehensive measurements of the observed β values. As this scatter can also be due to the dust extinction, we distinguish these two effects by measuring the dust attenuation using Balmer decrement (Hα/Hβ) ratios from our MOSFIRE/Keck spectroscopy.

  13. A Computational Study of the Factors Influencing the PVC-Triggering Ability of a Cluster of Early Afterdepolarization-Capable Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zimik, Soling; Nayak, Alok Ranjan; Pandit, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Premature ventricular complexes (PVCs), which are abnormal impulse propagations in cardiac tissue, can develop because of various reasons including early afterdepolarizations (EADs). We show how a cluster of EAD-generating cells (EAD clump) can lead to PVCs in a model of cardiac tissue, and also investigate the factors that assist such clumps in triggering PVCs. In particular, we study, through computer simulations, the effects of the following factors on the PVC-triggering ability of an EAD clump: (1) the repolarization reserve (RR) of the EAD cells; (2) the size of the EAD clump; (3) the coupling strength between the EAD cells in the clump; and (4) the presence of fibroblasts in the EAD clump. We find that, although a low value of RR is necessary to generate EADs and hence PVCs, a very low value of RR leads to low-amplitude EAD oscillations that decay with time and do not lead to PVCs. We demonstrate that a certain threshold size of the EAD clump, or a reduction in the coupling strength between the EAD cells, in the clump, is required to trigger PVCs. We illustrate how randomly distributed inexcitable obstacles, which we use to model collagen deposits, affect PVC-triggering by an EAD clump. We show that the gap-junctional coupling of fibroblasts with myocytes can either assist or impede the PVC-triggering ability of an EAD clump, depending on the resting membrane potential of the fibroblasts and the coupling strength between the myocyte and fibroblasts. We also find that the triggering of PVCs by an EAD clump depends sensitively on factors like the pacing cycle length and the distribution pattern of the fibroblasts. PMID:26675670

  14. The formation of NGC 3603 young starburst cluster: `prompt' hierarchical assembly or monolithic starburst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-02-01

    The formation of very young massive clusters or `starburst' clusters is currently one of the most widely debated topic in astronomy. The classical notion dictates that a star cluster is formed in situ in a dense molecular gas clump. The stellar radiative and mechanical feedback to the residual gas energizes the latter until it escapes the system. The newly born gas-free young cluster eventually readjusts with the corresponding mass-loss. Based on the observed substructured morphologies of many young stellar associations, it is alternatively suggested that even the smooth-profiled massive clusters are also assembled from migrating less massive subclusters. A very young (age ≈ 1 Myr), massive (>104 M⊙) star cluster like the Galactic NGC 3603 young cluster (HD 97950) is an appropriate testbed for distinguishing between the above `monolithic' and `hierarchical' formation scenarios. A recent study by Banerjee & Kroupa demonstrates that the monolithic scenario remarkably reproduces the HD 97950 cluster. In particular, its shape, internal motion and the mass distribution of stars are found to follow naturally and consistently from a single model calculation undergoing ≈70 per cent by mass gas dispersal. In this work, we explore the possibility of the formation of the above cluster via hierarchical assembly of subclusters. These subclusters are initially distributed over a wide range of spatial volumes and have various modes of subclustering in both absence and presence of a background gas potential. Unlike the above monolithic initial system that reproduces HD 97950 very well, the same is found to be prohibitive with hierarchical assembly alone (with/without a gas potential). Only those systems which assemble promptly into a single cluster (in ≲1 Myr) from a close separation (all within ≲2 pc) could match the observed density profile of HD 97950 after a similar gas removal. These results therefore suggest that the NGC 3603 young cluster has formed essentially

  15. SOFIA follow-ups of massive clumps from the ATLASGAL galactic plane survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrowski, F.; Güsten, R.; Menten, K. M.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Csengeri, T.; König, C.; Urquhart, J. S.

    2016-05-01

    With the GREAT receiver at the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) we started a concerted observing effort towards a well selected sample of clumps with high masses covering a range of evolutionary stages based on their infrared properties. The sources were selected from the ATLASGAL sub-millimeter dust continuum survey of our Galaxy. The goal is threefold: (i) SOFIA/GREAT allows to study the cooling budget of the clumps, in particular with observations of the CII and OI cooling lines. (ii) With SOFIA/GREAT high-J CO lines can be observed to measure in combination with ground based data the CO SEDs of the sources. (iii) Using rotational transitions of ammonia at THz frequencies the kinematics of the clumps can be probed with absorption spectroscopy to search for infall. Here we will describe these efforts and in particular report new results from the ammonia 32+ - 22- (1.8 THz) observing program.

  16. Paired stable isotopes (O, C) and clumped isotope thermometry of magnesite and silica veins in the New Caledonia Peridotite Nappe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesnel, Benoît; Boulvais, Philippe; Gautier, Pierre; Cathelineau, Michel; John, Cédric M.; Dierick, Malorie; Agrinier, Pierre; Drouillet, Maxime

    2016-06-01

    The stable isotope compositions of veins provide information on the conditions of fluid-rock interaction and on the origin of fluids and temperatures. In New Caledonia, magnesite and silica veins occur throughout the Peridotite Nappe. In this work, we present stable isotope and clumped isotope data in order to constrain the conditions of fluid circulation and the relationship between fluid circulation and nickel ore-forming laterization focusing on the Koniambo Massif. For magnesite veins occurring at the base of the nappe, the high δ18O values between 27.8‰ and 29.5‰ attest to a low temperature formation. Clumped isotope analyses on magnesite give temperatures between 26 °C and 42 °C that are consistent with amorphous silica-magnesite oxygen isotope equilibrium. The meteoric origin of the fluid is indicated by calculated δ18Owater values between -3.4‰ to +1.5‰. Amorphous silica associated with magnesite or occurring in the coarse saprolite level displays a narrow range of δ18O values between 29.7‰ and 35.3‰. For quartz veins occurring at the top of the bedrock and at the saprolite level, commonly in association with Ni-talc-like minerals, the δ18O values are lower, between 21.8‰ and 29.0‰ and suggest low-temperature hydrothermal conditions (∼40-95 °C). Thermal equilibration of the fluid along the geothermic gradient before upward flow through the nappe and/or influence of exothermic reactions of serpentinization could be the source(s) of heat needed to form quartz veins under such conditions.

  17. Paired stable isotopes (O, C) and clumped isotope thermometry of magnesite and silica veins in the New Caledonia Peridotite Nappe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesnel, Benoît; Boulvais, Philippe; Gautier, Pierre; Cathelineau, Michel; John, Cédric M.; Dierick, Malorie; Agrinier, Pierre; Drouillet, Maxime

    2016-06-01

    The stable isotope compositions of veins provide information on the conditions of fluid-rock interaction and on the origin of fluids and temperatures. In New Caledonia, magnesite and silica veins occur throughout the Peridotite Nappe. In this work, we present stable isotope and clumped isotope data in order to constrain the conditions of fluid circulation and the relationship between fluid circulation and nickel ore-forming laterization focusing on the Koniambo Massif. For magnesite veins occurring at the base of the nappe, the high δ18O values between 27.8‰ and 29.5‰ attest to a low temperature formation. Clumped isotope analyses on magnesite give temperatures between 26 °C and 42 °C that are consistent with amorphous silica-magnesite oxygen isotope equilibrium. The meteoric origin of the fluid is indicated by calculated δ18Owater values between -3.4‰ to +1.5‰. Amorphous silica associated with magnesite or occurring in the coarse saprolite level displays a narrow range of δ18O values between 29.7‰ and 35.3‰. For quartz veins occurring at the top of the bedrock and at the saprolite level, commonly in association with Ni-talc-like minerals, the δ18O values are lower, between 21.8‰ and 29.0‰ and suggest low-temperature hydrothermal conditions (∼40-95 °C). Thermal equilibration of the fluid along the geothermic gradient before upward flow through the nappe and/or influence of exothermic reactions of serpentinization could be the source(s) of heat needed to form quartz veins under such conditions.

  18. TWO-STAGE FRAGMENTATION FOR CLUSTER FORMATION: ANALYTICAL MODEL AND OBSERVATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Nicole D.; Basu, Shantanu E-mail: basu@uwo.ca

    2012-12-10

    Linear analysis of the formation of protostellar cores in planar magnetic interstellar clouds shows that molecular clouds exhibit a preferred length scale for collapse that depends on the mass-to-flux ratio and neutral-ion collision time within the cloud. We extend this linear analysis to the context of clustered star formation. By combining the results of the linear analysis with a realistic ionization profile for the cloud, we find that a molecular cloud may evolve through two fragmentation events in the evolution toward the formation of stars. Our model suggests that the initial fragmentation into clumps occurs for a transcritical cloud on parsec scales while the second fragmentation can occur for transcritical and supercritical cores on subparsec scales. Comparison of our results with several star-forming regions (Perseus, Taurus, Pipe Nebula) shows support for a two-stage fragmentation model.

  19. Intercomparison of clumping index estimates from POLDER, MODIS, and MISR satellite data over reference sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisek, Jan; Govind, Ajit; Arndt, Stefan K.; Hocking, Darren; Wardlaw, Timothy J.; Fang, Hongliang; Matteucci, Giorgio; Longdoz, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Clumping index is the measure of foliage grouping relative to a random distribution of leaves in space. It is a key structural parameter of plant canopies that influences canopy radiation regimes and controls canopy photosynthesis and other land-atmosphere interactions. The Normalized Difference between Hotspot and Darkspot (NDHD) index has been previously used to retrieve global clumping index maps from POLarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER) data at ∼6 km resolution and the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) product from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) at 500 m resolution. Most recently the algorithm was also applied with Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) data at 275 m resolution over selected areas. In this study for the first time we characterized and compared the three products over a set of sites representing diverse biomes and different canopy structures. The products were also directly validated with both in-situ vertical profiles and available seasonal trajectories of clumping index over several sites. We demonstrated that the vertical distribution of foliage and especially the effect of understory need to be taken into account while validating foliage clumping products from remote sensing products with values measured in the field. Satellite measurements responded to the structural effects near the top of canopies, while ground measurements may be biased by the lower vegetation layers. Additionally, caution should be taken regarding the misclassification in land cover maps as their errors can propagate into the foliage clumping maps. Our results indicate that MODIS data and MISR data, with 275 m in particular, can provide good quality clumping index estimates at spatial scales pertinent for modeling local carbon and energy fluxes.

  20. Record of seasonal body fluid composition in Black Clam (Bivalve) using clumped isotope thermometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, H.; Naidu, P. K.; Ghosh, P.

    2012-12-01

    Application of clumped isotope thermometry (Ghosh et al., 2006) is highly debated while resolving the issue of kinetic effect during biogenic carbonate precipitation. Mollusks are particularly attractive target to study the kinetic effect (Eiler, 2011) in the biological system owing to its incremental growth ring patterns. This allows understanding the role of environmental parameters other than temperature driving the distribution of heavier isotopologues. Guo et al., (2010) indicated role of pH in driving the distribution of heavier isotopolgues in the carbonates. We investigated here clumped isotopic composition of Black Calm (bivalve shell) caught live from a location in Southern Indian Estuary. The region experiences large change in seasonal condition. The physical environmental parameters at that location were monitored for last 3 years at monthly interval. The salinity, temperature, pH information are available for all the months when mollusc growth bands are deposited. The bottom water of estuary, where bivalve thrives experience maximum temperature of 32°C during November and December, while temperature during Monsoon months (July, August) drops lows to 26°C. Initial results on clumped isotope thermometry on the growth bands precipitated suggests that during the time in a year when pH level is alkaline i.e. 8.0±0.2 there is large consistency between actual temperature and estimated temperature using clumped isotope based thermometry. While the pH drops towards acidic i.e. 6.8±0.1 lower temperature estimates compared to actual was recorded. The effect of metabolic rate and body temperature variability is not been investigated as suggested in case of land snails based clumped isotope thermometry (Zaarur et al., 2011). Mollusc shell can be used to trace the composition of environmental water while pH variation is minimal. In this presentation analyses of more shell specimen and explore the role of pH and osmo-regulation in mollusc determining the clumped

  1. The population of giant clumps in simulated high-z galaxies: in situ and ex situ migration and survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelker, Nir; Dekel, Avishai; Ceverino, Daniel; Tweed, Dylan; Moody, Christopher E.; Primack, Joel

    2014-10-01

    We study the properties of giant clumps and their radial gradients in high-z disc galaxies using AMR cosmological simulations. Our sample consists of 770 snapshots in the redshift range z = 4-1 from 29 galaxies that at z = 2 span the stellar mass range (0.2-3) × 1011 M⊙. Extended gas discs exist in 83 per cent of the snapshots. Clumps are identified by gas density in 3D and their stellar and dark matter components are considered thereafter. While most of the overdensities are diffuse and elongated, 91 per cent of their mass and 83 per cent of their star formation rate (SFR) are in compact round clumps. Nearly all galaxies have a central, massive bulge clump, while 70 per cent of the discs show off-centre clumps, 3-4 per galaxy. The fraction of clumpy discs peaks at intermediate disc masses. Clumps are divided based on dark matter content into in situ and ex situ originating from violent disc instability (VDI) and minor mergers, respectively. 60 per cent of the discs are in a VDI phase showing off-centre in situ clumps, which contribute 1-7 per cent of the disc mass and 5-45 per cent of its SFR. The in situ clumps constitute 75 per cent of the off-centre clumps in terms of number and SFR but only half the mass, each clump containing on average 1 per cent of the disc mass and 6 per cent of its SFR. They have young stellar ages, 100-400 Myr, and high specific SFR (sSFR), 1-10 Gyr-1. They exhibit gradients resulting from inward clump migration, where the inner clumps are somewhat more massive and older, with lower gas fraction and sSFR and higher metallicity. Similar observed gradients indicate that clumps survive outflows. The ex situ clumps have stellar ages 0.5-3 Gyr and sSFR ˜0.1-2 Gyr-1, and they exhibit weaker gradients. Massive clumps of old stars at large radii are likely ex situ mergers, though half of them share the disc rotation.

  2. Formation of a protocluster: A virialized structure from gravoturbulent collapse. I. Simulation of cluster formation in a collapsing molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Context. Stars are often observed to form in clusters and it is therefore important to understand how such a region of concentrated mass is assembled out of the diffuse medium. The properties of such a region eventually prescribe the important physical mechanisms and determine the characteristics of the stellar cluster. Aims: We study the formation of a gaseous protocluster inside a molecular cloud and associate its internal properties with those of the parent cloud by varying the level of the initial turbulence of the cloud with a view to better characterize the subsequent stellar cluster formation. Methods: We performed high resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of gaseous protoclusters forming in molecular clouds collapsing under self-gravity. We determined ellipsoidal cluster regions via gas kinematics and sink particle distribution, permitting us to determine the mass, size, and aspect ratio of the cluster. We studied the cluster properties, such as kinetic and gravitational energy, and made links to the parent cloud. Results: The gaseous protocluster is formed out of global collapse of a molecular cloud and has non-negligible rotation owing to angular momentum conservation during the collapse of the object. Most of the star formation occurs in this region, which occupies only a small volume fraction of the whole cloud. This dense entity is a result of the interplay between turbulence and gravity. We identify such regions in simulations and compare the gas and sink particles to observed star-forming clumps and embedded clusters, respectively. The gaseous protocluster inferred from simulation results presents a mass-size relation that is compatible with observations. We stress that the stellar cluster radius, although clearly correlated with the gas cluster radius, depends sensitively on its definition. Energy analysis is performed to confirm that the gaseous protocluster is a product of gravoturbulent reprocessing and that the support of turbulent

  3. Calorimetric study of crystal growth of ice in hydrated methemoglobin and of redistribution of the water clusters formed on melting the ice.

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, G; Mayer, E

    1994-01-01

    Calorimetric studies of the melting patterns of ice in hydrated methemoglobin powders containing between 0.43 and 0.58 (g water)/(g protein), and of their dependence on annealing at subzero temperatures and on isothermal treatment at ambient temperature are reported. Cooling rates were varied between approximately 1500 and 5 K min-1 and heating rate was 30 K min-1. Recrystallization of ice during annealing is observed at T > 228 K. The melting patterns of annealed samples are characteristically different from those of unannealed samples by the shifting of the melting temperature of the recrystallized ice fraction to higher temperatures toward the value of "bulk" ice. The "large" ice crystals formed during recrystallization melt on heating into "large" clusters of water whose redistribution and apparent equilibration is followed as a function of time and/or temperature by comparison with melting endotherms. We have also studied the effect of cooling rate on the melting pattern of ice with a methemoglobin sample containing 0.50 (g water)/(g protein), and we surmise that for this hydration cooling at rates of > or = approximately 150 K min-1 preserves on the whole the distribution of water molecules present at ambient temperature. PMID:7819504

  4. MOLECULAR ENVIRONMENTS OF 51 PLANCK COLD CLUMPS IN THE ORION COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn

    2012-09-15

    A mapping survey of 51 Planck cold clumps projected on the Orion complex was performed with J = 1-0 lines of {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO with the 13.7 m telescope at the Purple Mountain Observatory. The mean column densities of the Planck gas clumps range from 0.5 to 9.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, with an average value of (2.9 {+-} 1.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. The mean excitation temperatures of these clumps range from 7.4 to 21.1 K, with an average value of 12.1 {+-} 3.0 K and the average three-dimensional velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub 3D} in these molecular clumps is 0.66 {+-} 0.24 km s{sup -1}. Most of the clumps have {sigma}{sub NT} larger than or comparable to {sigma}{sub Therm}. The H{sub 2} column density of the molecular clumps calculated from molecular lines correlates with the aperture flux at 857 GHz of the dust emission. By analyzing the distributions of the physical parameters, we suggest that turbulent flows can shape the clump structure and dominate their density distribution on large scales, but not function on small scales due to local fluctuations. Eighty-two dense cores are identified in the molecular clumps. The dense cores have an average radius and local thermal equilibrium (LTE) mass of 0.34 {+-} 0.14 pc and 38{sup +5}{sub -30} M{sub Sun }, respectively. The structures of low column density cores are more affected by turbulence, while the structures of high column density cores are more affected by other factors, especially by gravity. The correlation of velocity dispersion versus core size is very weak for the dense cores. The dense cores are found to be most likely gravitationally bounded rather than pressure confined. The relationship between M{sub vir} and M{sub LTE} can be well fitted with a power law. The core mass function here is much flatter than the stellar initial mass function. The lognormal behavior of the core mass distribution is most likely determined by internal turbulence.

  5. Nearby Clumpy, Gas Rich, Star-forming Galaxies: Local Analogs of High-redshift Clumpy Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, C. A.; Pisano, D. J.; Mac Low, M.-M.; Kreckel, K.; Rabidoux, K.; Guzmán, R.

    2015-07-01

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) have enhanced star formation rates (SFRs) and compact morphologies. We combine Sloan Digital Sky Survey data with H i data of 29 LCBGs at redshift z ∼ 0 to understand their nature. We find that local LCBGs have high atomic gas fractions (∼50%) and SFRs per stellar mass consistent with some high-redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs). Many local LCBGs also have clumpy morphologies, with clumps distributed across their disks. Although rare, these galaxies appear to be similar to the clumpy SFGs commonly observed at z ∼ 1–3. Local LCBGs separate into three groups: (1) interacting galaxies (∼20%) (2) clumpy spirals (∼40%) and (3) non-clumpy, non-spirals with regular shapes and smaller effective radii and stellar masses (∼40%). It seems that the method of building up a high gas fraction, which then triggers star formation, is not the same for all local LCBGs. This may lead to a dichotomy in galaxy characteristics. We consider possible gas delivery scenarios and suggest that clumpy spirals, preferentially located in clusters and with companions, are smoothly accreting gas from tidally disrupted companions and/or intracluster gas enriched by stripped satellites. Conversely, as non-clumpy galaxies are preferentially located in the field and tend to be isolated, we suggest clumpy, cold streams, which destroy galaxy disks and prevent clump formation, as a likely gas delivery mechanism for these systems. Other possibilities include smooth cold streams, a series of minor mergers, or major interactions.

  6. Clumped isotopes reveal the influence of deformation style on fluid flow and cementation along the Moab Fault, Paradox Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, K. W.; Bergman, S.; Crider, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Brittle fault systems can serve as either conduits or barriers to fluid flow, impacting mass and heat transfer in the crust and influencing the potential storage and migration of hydrocarbons and geothermal fluids. For fault systems in porous sandstones, different classes of structures control both hydrological and mechanical behavior during fault evolution: while cataclastic deformation bands form zones of localized deformation and crushed grains that reduce permeability within and across fault zones, joints can act as significant conduits for fluid. We investigate the relationship between structures and fluid flow in porous sandstones by studying calcite cements along the Moab Fault, a large normal fault system in the Paradox Basin, Utah. We use clumped isotope thermometry of fault cements to independently determine both the temperature and δ18O of the water from which the cements grew, placing new constraints on the source and path of diagenetic fluids in the basin. Based on fluid inclusion micro-thermometry and stable isotopic analysis of calcite cements from the Moab Fault, previous workers have hypothesized that joints served as conduits for the ascension of warm (84-125 °C) basinal fluids and deeply circulating meteoric waters. At the minor joint-dominated fault segment from which these data were collected, clumped isotope temperatures range from 57±10 to 101±2°C (2 SE), consistent with this hypothesis. However, at the nearby intersection of two major fault segments - in a zone characterized by both deformation bands and abundant joints - we find a broad range of temperatures (12±4 to 78±4°C) that vary spatially with distance from the fault and correlate with variations in secondary deformation structures (joints and deformation bands). These data provide the first evidence for cement growth from Earth surface-temperature fluids along the Moab Fault and suggests that the Fault served as a conduit for both ascending and descending fluids. The spatial

  7. Modeling and predicting the shape of the far-infrared to submillimeter emission in ultra-compact HII regions and cold clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, D.; Mény, C.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Paladini, R.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bot, C.; Cambrésy, L.; Demyk, K.; Gromov, V.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Veneziani, M.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Dust properties are very likely affected by the environment in which dust grains evolve. For instance, some analyses of cold clumps (7-17 K) indicate that the aggregation process is favored in dense environments. However, studying warm (30-40 K) dust emission at long wavelength (λ> 300 μm) has been limited because it is difficult to combine far infrared-to-millimeter (FIR-to-mm) spectral coverage and high angular resolution for observations of warm dust grains. Aims: Using Herschel data from 70 to 500 μm, which are part of the Herschel infrared Galactic (Hi-GAL) survey combined with 1.1 mm data from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS), we compared emission in two types of environments: ultra-compact HII (UCHII) regions, and cold molecular clumps (denoted as cold clumps). With this comparison we tested dust emission models in the FIR-to-mm domain that reproduce emission in the diffuse medium, in these two environments (UCHII regions and cold clumps). We also investigated their ability to predict the dust emission in our Galaxy. Methods: We determined the emission spectra in twelve UCHII regions and twelve cold clumps, and derived the dust temperature (T) using the recent two-level system (TLS) model with three sets of parameters and the so-called T-β (temperature-dust emissivity index) phenomenological models, with β set to 1.5, 2 and 2.5. Results: We tested the applicability of the TLS model in warm regions for the first time. This analysis indicates distinct trends in the dust emission between cold and warm environments that are visible through changes in the dust emissivity index. However, with the use of standard parameters, the TLS model is able to reproduce the spectral behavior observed in cold and warm regions, from the change of the dust temperature alone, whereas a T-β model requires β to be known. Tables 2, 4, 7 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  9. On the interpretation of sub-giant branch morphologies of intermediate-age star clusters with extended main sequence turnoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Girardi, Léo; Rosenfield, Philip; Bressan, Alessandro; Marigo, Paola; Correnti, Matteo; Puzia, Thomas H.

    2015-06-01

    High-quality photometry of many star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds with ages of 1-2 Gyr revealed main sequence turnoffs (MSTOs) that are significantly wider than can be accounted for by a simple stellar population (SSP). Such extended MSTOs (eMSTOs) are often interpreted in terms of an age spread of several 108 yr, challenging the traditional view of star clusters as being formed in a single star formation episode. Li et al. and Bastian & Niederhofer recently investigated the sub-giant branches (SGBs) of NGC 1651, NGC 1806, and NGC 1846, three star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) that exhibit an eMSTO. They argued that the SGB of these star clusters can be explained only by an SSP. We study these and two other similar star clusters in the LMC, using extensive simulations of SSPs including unresolved binaries. We find that the shapes of the cross-SGB profiles of all star clusters in our sample are in fact consistent with their cross-MSTO profiles when the latter are interpreted as age distributions. Conversely, SGB morphologies of star clusters with eMSTOs are found to be inconsistent with those of simulated SSPs. Finally, we create PARSEC isochrones from tracks featuring a grid of convective overshoot levels and a very fine grid of stellar masses. A comparison of the observed photometry with these isochrones shows that the morphology of the red clump (RC) of such star clusters is also consistent with that implied by their MSTO in the age spread scenario. We conclude that the SGB and RC morphologies of star clusters featuring eMSTOs are consistent with the scenario in which the eMSTOs are caused by a distribution of stellar ages.

  10. MYStIX: Subclusters of Young Stars in Massive Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Michael A.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Baddeley, Adrian; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Povich, Matthew S.; Luhman, Kevin L.; Busk, Heather A.; Naylor, Tim; King, Robert R.; Garmire, Gordon P.

    2013-07-01

    The MYStIX (Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray; Feigelson et al. 2013) project provides improved censuses of young stars in 20 nearby OB-dominated star-forming regions that were observed by the Chandra X-ray observatory, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the UKIRT/UKIDSS and 2MASS surveys. The sample of >33,000 members reveals new details about the structure of clusters in these regions. Clusters of young stars are identified using finite mixture models -\\ the sums of isothermal ellipsoids used to model individual (sub)clusters. Maximum likelihood estimation is used to estimate the model parameters and the Akaike Information Criterion is used to detemine the number of subclusters. In the MYStIX star-forming regions, ˜150 subclusters are found (1 to >10 per region). The distribution of cluster core radii is log-normal, peaked at 0.18 pc (similar to the ONC) with a standard deviation of 0.4 dex. The locations of subclusters are often correlated with molecular-cloud clumps or cores. We also recover several well-known embedded subclusters such as the BN-KL region in Orion and the KW Object cluster in M 17. MYStIX star-forming regions typically have one dominant cluster surrounded by smaller subclusters and filamentary groups of young stars. Some clusters are well fit by the ellipsoid model (e.g. Flame Nebula), but others have lumpy structure and are poorly fit (e.g. M 17). A few clusters have a core-halo structure modeled with two overlapping ellipsoids (e.g. RCW 36). Clumpy and core-halo structures could originate in the merger of subclusters. There is a power-law relation between the fitted cluster central density and core radius (index slightly shallower than -3), which may be an effect of cluster expansion. There is also a statistically significant negative relation between median gas/dust absorption of a subcluster and the subcluster's size that can also be explained by cluster expansion if absorption acts as a proxy for age.

  11. Observations of the Most Massive Deeply Embedded Star Clusters in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván-Madrid, R.; Liu, H. B.

    2014-09-01

    We summarize our comprehensive gas surveys of some of the most luminous, deeply embedded (optically obscured) star formation regions in the Milky Way, which are the local cases of massive star clusters and/or associations in the making. Our approach emphasizes multi-scale, multi-resolution imaging in dust and free-free continuum, as well as in molecular and hydrogen recombination lines, to trace the multiple gas components from 0.1 pc (core scale) all the way up to the scales of the entire Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC), or ~ 100 pc. We highlight our results in W49A, the most luminous Galactic star formation region (L ~ 10^7 Lsun), which appears to be forming a young massive cluster (or a binary star cluster) with Mstar > 5 x 10^4 Msun that may remain bound after gas dispersal. The surveyed sources share elements in common, in particular, the 10-100 pc scale GMCs are filamentary but have one or two central condensations (clumps) far denser than the surrounding filaments that host the (forming) massive stars.

  12. ­­A Clumped Isotope Calibration for Terrestrial Microbial Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryshyn, V. A.; Mering, J. A.; Mitsunaga, B. A.; Eagle, R.; Dunbar, R. B.; Bhattacharya, A.; Tripati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate terrestrial paleotemperature records are key pieces of information in the paleoenvironmental reconstruction of Earth history. These records aid in building reliable climate models and help scientists understand the links between continental and oceanic climate data. Many different types of analyses are used to estimate terrestrial climate shifts, including leaf margin analysis, palynology, glacial deposits, elemental ratios, organic geochemistry, and stable isotopes of lacustrine deposits. Here we report a carbonate clumped isotope calibration for microbial carbonates. Application of the clumped isotope paleothermometer can potentially provide a direct temperature measurement of the water at the time of carbonate formation. Although different calibrations of the paleothermometer have been published for both inorganic and biotic carbonate minerals, the effects of clumping in microbialites (structures built under the influence of microbial activity) have not yet been quantified. Lacustrine microbialites present a potentially large, untapped archive of terrestrial climate data, however they are not strictly biotic or abiotic, but bio-induced carbonate, meaning that organisms (such as photosynthetic bacteria) influence but do not directly control precipitation. We have measured modern microbialites from multiple lacustrine sites and will report a comparison of these results to known water temperatures. Additionally we will compare lacustrine samples to marine microbialites (e.g., samples from Shark Bay) to assess potential differences between lacustrine and marine intertidal environments on clumped isotope compositions.

  13. MLAOS: a multi-point linear array of optical sensors for coniferous foliage clumping index measurement.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yonghua; Fu, Lizhe; Han, Wenchao; Zhu, Yeqing; Wang, Jindi

    2014-01-01

    The canopy foliage clumping effect is primarily caused by the non-random distribution of canopy foliage. Currently, measurements of clumping index (CI) by handheld instruments is typically time- and labor-intensive. We propose a low-cost and low-power automatic measurement system called Multi-point Linear Array of Optical Sensors (MLAOS), which consists of three above-canopy and nine below-canopy optical sensors that capture plant transmittance at different times of the day. Data communication between the MLAOS node is facilitated by using a ZigBee network, and the data are transmitted from the field MLAOS to a remote data server using the Internet. The choice of the electronic element and design of the MLAOS software is aimed at reducing costs and power consumption. A power consumption test showed that, when a 4000 mAH Li-ion battery is used, a maximum of 8-10 months of work can be achieved. A field experiment on a coniferous forest revealed that the CI of MLAOS may reveal a clumping effect that occurs within the canopy. In further work, measurement of the multi-scale clumping effect can be achieved by utilizing a greater number of MLAOS devices to capture the heterogeneity of the plant canopy. PMID:24859029

  14. Using red clump stars to decompose the galactic magnetic field with distance

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, Michael D.

    2014-09-01

    A new method for measuring the large-scale structure of the Galactic magnetic field is presented. The Galactic magnetic field has been probed through the Galactic disk with near-infrared starlight polarimetry; however, the distance to each background star is unknown. Using red clump stars as near-infrared standard candles, this work presents the first attempt to decompose the line-of-sight structure of the sky-projected Galactic magnetic field. Two example lines of sight are decomposed: toward a field with many red clump stars and toward a field with few red clump stars. A continuous estimate of magnetic field orientation over several kiloparsecs of distance is possible in the field with many red clump stars, while only discrete estimates are possible in the sparse example. Toward the outer Galaxy, there is a continuous field orientation with distance that shows evidence of perturbation by the Galactic warp. Toward the inner Galaxy, evidence for a large-scale change in the magnetic field geometry is consistent with models of magnetic field reversals, independently derived from Faraday rotation studies. A photo-polarimetric method for identifying candidate intrinsically polarized stars is also presented. The future application of this method to large regions of the sky will begin the process of mapping the Galactic magnetic field in a way never before possible.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Planck cold clumps survey in the Orion complex (Liu+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, H.

    2012-10-01

    Observations of 51 Planck cold clumps (from the survey of Wu et al. 2012, Cat. J/ApJ/756/76) in the Orion complex in 12CO (1-0), 13CO (1-0), and C18O (1-0) were carried out with the PMO 13.7m radio telescope from 2011 April to June. (4 data files).

  16. Swimming motility plays a key role in the stochastic dynamics of cell clumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xianghong; Nellas, Ricky B.; Byrn, Matthew W.; Russell, Matthew H.; Bible, Amber N.; Alexandre, Gladys; Shen, Tongye

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic cell-to-cell interactions are a prerequisite to many biological processes, including development and biofilm formation. Flagellum induced motility has been shown to modulate the initial cell-cell or cell-surface interaction and to contribute to the emergence of macroscopic patterns. While the role of swimming motility in surface colonization has been analyzed in some detail, a quantitative physical analysis of transient interactions between motile cells is lacking. We examined the Brownian dynamics of swimming cells in a crowded environment using a model of motorized adhesive tandem particles. Focusing on the motility and geometry of an exemplary motile bacterium Azospirillum brasilense, which is capable of transient cell-cell association (clumping), we constructed a physical model with proper parameters for the computer simulation of the clumping dynamics. By modulating mechanical interaction (‘stickiness’) between cells and swimming speed, we investigated how equilibrium and active features affect the clumping dynamics. We found that the modulation of active motion is required for the initial aggregation of cells to occur at a realistic time scale. Slowing down the rotation of flagellar motors (and thus swimming speeds) is correlated to the degree of clumping, which is consistent with the experimental results obtained for A. brasilense.

  17. Using Red Clump Stars to Decompose the Galactic Magnetic Field with Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Michael D.

    2014-09-01

    A new method for measuring the large-scale structure of the Galactic magnetic field is presented. The Galactic magnetic field has been probed through the Galactic disk with near-infrared starlight polarimetry; however, the distance to each background star is unknown. Using red clump stars as near-infrared standard candles, this work presents the first attempt to decompose the line-of-sight structure of the sky-projected Galactic magnetic field. Two example lines of sight are decomposed: toward a field with many red clump stars and toward a field with few red clump stars. A continuous estimate of magnetic field orientation over several kiloparsecs of distance is possible in the field with many red clump stars, while only discrete estimates are possible in the sparse example. Toward the outer Galaxy, there is a continuous field orientation with distance that shows evidence of perturbation by the Galactic warp. Toward the inner Galaxy, evidence for a large-scale change in the magnetic field geometry is consistent with models of magnetic field reversals, independently derived from Faraday rotation studies. A photo-polarimetric method for identifying candidate intrinsically polarized stars is also presented. The future application of this method to large regions of the sky will begin the process of mapping the Galactic magnetic field in a way never before possible.

  18. MLAOS: A Multi-Point Linear Array of Optical Sensors for Coniferous Foliage Clumping Index Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yonghua; Fu, Lizhe; Han, Wenchao; Zhu, Yeqing; Wang, Jindi

    2014-01-01

    The canopy foliage clumping effect is primarily caused by the non-random distribution of canopy foliage. Currently, measurements of clumping index (CI) by handheld instruments is typically time- and labor-intensive. We propose a low-cost and low-power automatic measurement system called Multi-point Linear Array of Optical Sensors (MLAOS), which consists of three above-canopy and nine below-canopy optical sensors that capture plant transmittance at different times of the day. Data communication between the MLAOS node is facilitated by using a ZigBee network, and the data are transmitted from the field MLAOS to a remote data server using the Internet. The choice of the electronic element and design of the MLAOS software is aimed at reducing costs and power consumption. A power consumption test showed that, when a 4000 mAH Li-ion battery is used, a maximum of 8–10 months of work can be achieved. A field experiment on a coniferous forest revealed that the CI of MLAOS may reveal a clumping effect that occurs within the canopy. In further work, measurement of the multi-scale clumping effect can be achieved by utilizing a greater number of MLAOS devices to capture the heterogeneity of the plant canopy. PMID:24859029

  19. CHEMISTRY IN INFRARED DARK CLOUD CLUMPS: A MOLECULAR LINE SURVEY AT 3 mm

    SciTech Connect

    Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, James M.; Foster, Jonathan B.; Finn, Susanna C.; Garay, Guido; Silva, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    We have observed 37 Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs), containing a total of 159 clumps, in high-density molecular tracers at 3 mm using the 22 m ATNF Mopra Telescope located in Australia. After determining kinematic distances, we eliminated clumps that are not located in IRDCs and clumps with a separation between them of less than one Mopra beam. Our final sample consists of 92 IRDC clumps. The most commonly detected molecular lines are (detection rates higher than 8%) N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HNC, HN{sup 13}C, HCO{sup +}, H{sup 13}CO{sup +}, HCN, C{sub 2}H, HC{sub 3}N, HNCO, and SiO. We investigate the behavior of the different molecular tracers and look for chemical variations as a function of an evolutionary sequence based on Spitzer IRAC and MIPS emission. We find that the molecular tracers behave differently through the evolutionary sequence and some of them can be used to yield useful relative age information. The presence of HNC and N{sub 2}H{sup +} lines does not depend on the star formation activity. On the other hand, HC{sub 3}N, HNCO, and SiO are predominantly detected in later stages of evolution. Optical depth calculations show that in IRDC clumps the N{sub 2}H{sup +} line is optically thin, the C{sub 2}H line is moderately optically thick, and HNC and HCO{sup +} are optically thick. The HCN hyperfine transitions are blended, and, in addition, show self-absorbed line profiles and extended wing emission. These factors combined prevent the use of HCN hyperfine transitions for the calculation of physical parameters. Total column densities of the different molecules, except C{sub 2}H, increase with the evolutionary stage of the clumps. Molecular abundances increase with the evolutionary stage for N{sub 2}H{sup +} and HCO{sup +}. The N{sub 2}H{sup +}/HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +}/HNC abundance ratios act as chemical clocks, increasing with the evolution of the clumps.

  20. The kinetics of clumped-isotope reactions in calcite and apatite from natural and experimental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolper, D. A.; Eiler, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of clumped isotopes of carbonate-bearing minerals are a powerful tool for reconstructing past surface temperatures and thermal histories of shallow crustal rocks. Because the clumped-isotope thermometer is based on homogenous-phase equilibrium, a sample's clumped-isotope temperature is susceptible to resetting through, for example, intracrystalline diffusion and redistribution of C and O isotopes during (re)heating or slow cooling. Quantitative knowledge of the kinetics of this resetting have received increasing attention (1-3) and is critical for understanding the meaning of clumped-isotope temperatures of samples with complex burial histories. To better constrain these kinetics and complement previous work (1-3) we performed heating experiments (400-700°C) on optical calcites and carbonate-bearing apatites. As previously observed (2-3), calcites exhibit non-first-order kinetics. The data were fit using a model that incorporates both diffusion and isotope-exchange reactions (4). The kinetics derived with this model using the optical-calcite heating experiments of (2) and those measured here are indistinguishable. The model predicts that subtle changes (>10°C) in measured calcite clumped-isotope temperatures can occur at burial temperatures between 60-100°C on million-year timescales. Though small, such changes may have an impact on clumped-isotope-based reconstructions of past surface temperatures and thermal histories. The derived kinetics were compared to clumped-isotope measurements of cogenetic calcites and apatites from slowly cooled carbonatite intrusions. Apparent temperatures are 70-140°C for apatites and 120-190°C for calcites. Measured temperatures for calcites match modeled temperatures using reasonable geological cooling rates. Natural apatite samples yield lower apparent temperatures than predicted based on the model. We propose that this difference is the result of annealment of structural damage in apatites (e.g., generated by