Science.gov

Sample records for cme delivery format

  1. CME Theory and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, T. G.; Linker, J. A.; Chen, J.; Cid, C.; Kóta, J.; Lee, M. A.; Mann, G.; Mikić, Z.; Potgieter, M. S.; Schmidt, J. M.; Siscoe, G. L.; Vainio, R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Riley, P.

    This chapter provides an overview of current efforts in the theory and modeling of CMEs. Five key areas are discussed: (1) CME initiation; (2) CME evolution and propagation; (3) the structure of interplanetary CMEs derived from flux rope modeling; (4) CME shock formation in the inner corona; and (5) particle acceleration and transport at CME driven shocks. In the section on CME initiation three contemporary models are highlighted. Two of these focus on how energy stored in the coronal magnetic field can be released violently to drive CMEs. The third model assumes that CMEs can be directly driven by currents from below the photosphere. CMEs evolve considerably as they expand from the magnetically dominated lower corona into the advectively dominated solar wind. The section on evolution and propagation presents two approaches to the problem. One is primarily analytical and focuses on the key physical processes involved. The other is primarily numerical and illustrates the complexity of possible interactions between the CME and the ambient medium. The section on flux rope fitting reviews the accuracy and reliability of various methods. The section on shock formation considers the effect of the rapid decrease in the magnetic field and plasma density with height. Finally, in the section on particle acceleration and transport, some recent developments in the theory of diffusive particle acceleration at CME shocks are discussed. These include efforts to combine self-consistently the process of particle acceleration in the vicinity of the shock with the subsequent escape and transport of particles to distant regions.

  2. CME Theory and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, T. G.; Linker, J. A.; Chen, J.; Cid, C.; Kóta, J.; Lee, M. A.; Mann, G.; Mikić, Z.; Potgieter, M. S.; Schmidt, J. M.; Siscoe, G. L.; Vainio, R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Riley, P.

    2006-03-01

    This chapter provides an overview of current efforts in the theory and modeling of CMEs. Five key areas are discussed: (1) CME initiation; (2) CME evolution and propagation; (3) the structure of interplanetary CMEs derived from flux rope modeling; (4) CME shock formation in the inner corona; and (5) particle acceleration and transport at CME driven shocks. In the section on CME initiation three contemporary models are highlighted. Two of these focus on how energy stored in the coronal magnetic field can be released violently to drive CMEs. The third model assumes that CMEs can be directly driven by currents from below the photosphere. CMEs evolve considerably as they expand from the magnetically dominated lower corona into the advectively dominated solar wind. The section on evolution and propagation presents two approaches to the problem. One is primarily analytical and focuses on the key physical processes involved. The other is primarily numerical and illustrates the complexity of possible interactions between the CME and the ambient medium. The section on flux rope fitting reviews the accuracy and reliability of various methods. The section on shock formation considers the effect of the rapid decrease in the magnetic field and plasma density with height. Finally, in the section on particle acceleration and transport, some recent developments in the theory of diffusive particle acceleration at CME shocks are discussed. These include efforts to combine self-consistently the process of particle acceleration in the vicinity of the shock with the subsequent escape and transport of particles to distant regions.

  3. Evidence of a blast shock wave formation in a "CME-streamer" interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eselevich, V. G.; Eselevich, M. V.; Sadykov, V. M.; Zimovets, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the solar event on 16 February 2011 (SOL2011-02-16T14:19) allows to classify it as an "impulsive" coronal mass ejection (CME) event. It is argued that the observed deviation of a streamer ray from its pre-event state and generation of a metric type II radio burst in this event was a result of a "CME-streamer" interaction in the lower corona (r≲ 1.5R⊙). Most probably, it was a consequence of an impulsive action of a compressed magnetic field to the streamer. This compression of the coronal magnetic field was due to a moving and expanding magnetic flux rope, which was a core of the CME. The estimated radial speed of the type II burst sources was significantly (≈2-;8 times) larger than the radial speed of the erupting flux rope, and it decreased rapidly with time. This indicates that during the "CME-streamer" interaction a blast shock wave could be excited and propagated along the streamer.

  4. 3D MHD Simulations of the May 2, 1998 halo CME: Shock formation and SEP acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I. V.; Roussev, I. I.; Gombosi, T. I.; Forbes, T. G.; Lee, M. A.

    We present the results of two numerical models of the partial-halo CME event associated with NOAA AR8210 on May 2, 1998. Our simulations are fully three-dimensional and involve compressible magnetohydrodynamics with turbulent energy transport. We begin by first producing a steady-state solar wind for Carrington Rotation 1935/6, following the methodology described in Roussev et al. (2003). We impose shearing motions along the polarity inversion line of AR8210, followed by converging motions, both via the modification of the boundary conditions at the Sun's surface. As a consequence, a flux rope forms within the sheared arcade during the CME. The flux rope gradually accelerates, leaving behind the remnants of a flare loop system that results from ongoing magnetic reconnection in the naturally formed current sheet. The flux rope leaves the Sun, forming a CME emerging through a highly structured, ambient solar wind. A shock wave forms in front of the ejected matter. Estimates for the spectral index and cutoff energy for the diffusive solar energetic particle shock acceleration mechanism show that the protons can be efficiently accelerated up to energies 0.1-10 GeV.

  5. A Real Source of a Stealth CME - Energetics of a Filament Eruption and Giant Arcade Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Ayumi; Ishii, Takako T.; Otsuji, Kenichi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    Various active phenomena occurring on the solar surface are sources of disturbances in the solar-terrestrial environment. It is, however, sometimes said that solar flares, the most energetic explosions in the active phenome on the sun, are not crucially important for space weather researches, but coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are more significant. This is because not all flares are associated with CMEs, and therefore, not geo-effective, and because geo-effective CMEs sometimes occur without any notable active phenomena (such as flares) on the sun. The latter is sometimes called as a “stealth CME” event. However, for even such cases, we often see filament eruptions in H-alpha observations and formations of giant arcade in X-ray and/or extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations.The geomagnetic storm with the Dst index of -105 nT that occurred on October 8, 2012 was such a stealth event. We, on the other hand, recognize formation of an X-ray giant arcade and activation of an H-alpha filament on October 5, 2012. We examined the velocity field of the filament by using the H-alpha wing data obtained with SMART telescope at Hida Observatory, Kyoto University. We also derived the temperature and the volume emission measure by using the X-ray and EUV data obtained by Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA. We discuss the energetics of this event on the solar surface

  6. If formal CME is ineffective, why do physicians still participate?

    PubMed

    McLeod, P J; McLeod, A H

    2004-03-01

    Formal or traditional CME can be criticized because organizers often ignore adult learning principles when designing courses. Critics also suggest that formal CME courses have limited impact on attendees' behaviors and practices. The authors agree that attention must be paid to pedagogic principles to assure success of educational courses, but feel that the extant negative evidence related to the impact of formal CME is narrow in scope and of inadequate strength to seriously damn formal approaches. Survey responses were received from 853 practicing physicians who say they still regularly attend formal CME courses. They are motivated to attend to satisfy specific professional needs and for personal reasons. Formal CME is still popular despite what its critics say. The authors are convinced that attention to physicians' perceived needs, effective use of social marketing strategies, and adherence to adult learning principles can assure successful delivery of CME and that formal CME is a useful complement to physician-driven informal CME. PMID:15203529

  7. CME - Coming At You

    NASA Video Gallery

    An oldie but goody: The September 12, 2000 coronal mass ejection (CME), which moves directly from the sun's surface toward the viewer. This was recorded by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (S...

  8. CME Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.-H.; Gallagher, P. T.

    The goal of this study is to investigate the driving mechanisms of CMEs and to infer the magnetic field properties at the onset of the instability. We use EIT 195 Å images and LASCO white-light coronagraph data of a CME event that occurred on 17 December 2006. It was a long-duration event, and was associated with an occulted C2.1 class flare. To determine the driving mechanism, we quantitatively and qualitatively compared the observationally obtained kinematic evolution with that predicted by three CME models: the breakout model (BO, see Antiochos et al. 1999; Lynch et al. 2008; DeVore and Antiochos 2008), the catastrophe model (CM, see Priest and Forbes 2000), and the toroidal instability model (TI, see Chen 1989; Kliem and Török 2006). Our results indicate that this CME is best represented by the CM model. We infer that, at the onset of the instability, the Alfvén speed is approximately 120 km s-1 and the height of the flux rope is roughly 100-200Mm. These parameter values are related to the magnetic environment and the loop geometry and can be used to infer the magnetic condition at the onset of the eruption.We intend to submit the full analysis to A&A.

  9. Controlled Delivery of Zoledronate Improved Bone Formation Locally In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jiang; Lu, Qiang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Aiyuan; Guo, Quanyi; Gao, Xupeng; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) have been widely used in clinical treatment of bone diseases with increased bone resorption because of their strong affinity for bone and their inhibition of bone resorption. Recently, there has been growing interest in their improvement of bone formation. However, the effect of local controlled delivery of BPs is unclear. We used polylactide acid-glycolic acid copolymer (PLGA) as a drug carrier to deliver various doses of the bisphosphonate zoledronate (Zol) into the distal femur of 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats. After 6 weeks, samples were harvested and analyzed by micro-CT and histology. The average bone mineral density and mineralized bone volume fraction were higher with medium- and high-dose PLGA-Zol (30 and 300 µg Zol, respectively) than control and low-dose Zol (3 µg PLGA-Zol; p<0.05). Local controlled delivery of Zol decreased the numbers of osteoclast and increased the numbers of osteoblast. Moreover, local controlled delivery of medium- and high-dose Zol accelerated the expression of bone-formation markers. PLGA used as a drug carrier for controlled delivery of Zol may promote local bone formation. PMID:24618585

  10. Online CME usage patterns.

    PubMed

    Mazzoleni, M Cristina; Rognoni, Carla; Finozzi, Enrico; Giorgi, Ines; Pagani, Marco; Imbriani, Marcello

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports the findings of the analysis of a sample of 829 online Continuous Medical Education (CME) enrolments aimed at inspecting users' preferences and behaviours. The contents of the analyzed course are provided as online SCORM (Sharable Content Object Reference Model) resources together with the corresponding Pdf downloadable versions allowing different usage patterns (online only, Pdf only, online AND Pdf, mixed online OR Pdf). The results point out that there is not a specific preference for one of the four patterns and that most of the users access both navigable modules and Pdf documents. Demographic characteristics and initial knowledge level do not influence the choice of a specific usage pattern that probably depends on internal or context factors. From the point of view of knowledge acquisition, the four patterns are equivalent. As regards users' behaviour, the analysis has pointed out two issues: 1) the attitude to conclude the course in a short time and to reach good test scores, but not the excellence; 2) learning activity tracing data were not available for all the enrolments. Cues for discussion are proposed. PMID:21893749

  11. Ensemble modeling of CME propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. O.; Arge, C. N.; Henney, C. J.; Odstrcil, D.; Millward, G. H.; Pizzo, V. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Wang-Sheeley-Arge(WSA)-Enlil-cone modeling system is used for making routine arrival time forecasts of the Earth-directed "halo" coronal mass ejections (CMEs), since they typically produce the most geoeffective events. A major objective of this work is to better understand the sensitivity of the WSA-Enlil modeling results to input model parameters and how these parameters contribute to the overall model uncertainty and performance. We present ensemble modeling results for a simple halo CME event that occurred on 15 February 2011 and a succession of three halo CME events that occurred on 2-4 August 2011. During this period the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) A and B spacecraft viewed the CMEs over the solar limb, thereby providing more reliable constraints on the initial CME geometries during the manual cone fitting process. To investigate the sensitivity of the modeled CME arrival times to small variations in the input cone properties, for each CME event we create an ensemble of numerical simulations based on multiple sets of cone parameters. We find that the accuracy of the modeled arrival times not only depends on the initial input CME geometry, but also on the reliable specification of the background solar wind, which is driven by the input maps of the photospheric magnetic field. As part of the modeling ensemble, we simulate the CME events using the traditional daily updated maps as well as those that are produced by the Air Force data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport (ADAPT) model, which provide a more instantaneous snapshot of the photospheric field distribution. For the August 2011 events, in particular, we find that the accuracy in the arrival time predictions also depends on whether the cone parameters for all three CMEs are specified in a single WSA-Enlil simulation. The inclusion/exclusion of one or two of the preceding CMEs affects the solar wind conditions through which the succeeding CME propagates.

  12. Multi-protein delivery by nanodiamonds promotes bone formation.

    PubMed

    Moore, L; Gatica, M; Kim, H; Osawa, E; Ho, D

    2013-11-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE(®) for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  13. Multi-protein Delivery by Nanodiamonds Promotes Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, L.; Gatica, M.; Kim, H.; Osawa, E.; Ho, D.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE® for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  14. Continuing Medical Education: What Delivery Format Do Physicians Prefer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stancic, Nancy; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Prokhorov, Alexander V.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; McAlister, Alfred L.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Although physicians are in a unique position to prevent life-threatening outcomes by counseling patients to stop smoking, many of them miss the opportunity to intervene in their patients' use of tobacco. Nicotine Dependence Across the Lifespan was developed as a continuing medical education (CME) program to teach and encourage…

  15. Haze activity of different barley trypsin inhibitors of the chloroform/methanol type (BTI-CMe).

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingzhen; Huang, Lu; Huang, Yuqing; Wu, Dezhi; Hu, Hongliang; Li, Chengdao; Zhang, Guoping

    2014-12-15

    Our previous study found that the critical protein in SE (silica eluted) proteins is BTI-CMe, and assumed that SE-ve malt for brewing may improve the haze stability in beer. In this study, we investigated the difference in gene sequence and corresponding amino acid sequence of BTI-CMe between SE+ve and SE-ve types. The results showed that there were 7 amino acid differences between Yerong (SE-ve) and Franklin (SE+ve). Two types BTI-CMe were expressed in vitro and purified successfully. By adding the purified BTI-CMe into commercial beer, we found that both original turbidity and alcohol chill haze degree of beer were increased. BTI-CMe of SE-ve haplotype showed a lower level of haze formation in beer than SE+ve haplotype. Response surface methodology (RSM) was conducted to determine the relationship between BTI-CMe and tannic acid, and their effects on haze formation. It was found that (1) higher content of BTI-CMe and/or tannic acid in beer would give rise to higher turbidity; (2) there was a significant interaction between BTI-CMe and tannic acid; (3) haze activity disparity of BTI-CMe between two types was significantly and positively correlated with the tannic acid concentration. PMID:25038664

  16. The State of the Art in CME.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Robert K.

    1983-01-01

    The author describes major trends and directions related to continuing medical education (CME). The rapid changes he observed in the state of the art in CME are presented in relation to three historical periods in the past 16 years. (SSH)

  17. "Academic" CME and the social contract.

    PubMed

    Davis, D; Parboosingh, J

    1993-05-01

    The term academic continuing medical education (CME) is defined and explored from the perspective of forces that have made its usage necessary. These forces include the new understandings of the place, impact, and scope of CME, and, in particular, the increasing entrepreneurial interests in the field, unrelated to the improvement of physicians' competence or performance, or to health care outcomes. In addition to principles of CME provision promulgated by the Accreditation Council of CME, and those of ethical CME providers, academic CME implies the critical appraisal of the providers' activities, the creation of new knowledge about how physicians learn and change, and the dissemination of information based on such knowledge. Finally, the nature of academic CME providers is discussed, and the potential role of CME in fostering the social contract between the medical professional and society is explored. PMID:8484835

  18. Solar Back-sided Halo CME

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Sun erupted with several CMEs (coronal mass ejections) during a period just over a day (Nov. 8-9, 2012), the largest of which was a halo CME. This CME appears to have originated from an active ...

  19. Numerical models of Oort Cloud formation and comet delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaib, Nathan A.

    I use a newly designed numerical algorithm to simulate the dynamics of the Oort Cloud. The processes I model are the formation of the cloud, the current delivery of comets to the planetary region, and long-period comet production during comet showers. Concerning the cloud's formation, I find that the Sun's birth environment dramatically affects the structure of the inner Oort Cloud as well as the amount of material trapped in this region. In addition, the structure of this reservoir is also sensitive to the Sun's orbital history in the Milky Way. This raises the possibility that constraining our inner Oort Cloud's properties can constrain the Sun's dynamical history. In this regard, I use my simulations of comet delivery to better understand what the population of comets passing through the planetary region can tell us about the inner Oort Cloud. I find that the inner Oort Cloud (rather than the scattered disk) dominates the production of planet-crossing TNOs with perihelia beyond 15 AU and semimajor axes greater than a few hundred AU. My results indicate that two objects representing this population (2000 00 67 and 2006 SQ 372 ) have already been detected, and the detection of many analogous objects can constrain the inner Oort Cloud. In addition, these simulations of comet delivery also demonstrate that, contrary to previous understanding, the inner Oort Cloud is a significant and perhaps the dominant source of known long-period comets. This result can be used to place the first observationally motivated upper limit on the inner Oort Cloud's population. Finally, with this maximum population value, I use my comet shower simulations to show that comet showers are unlikely to be responsible for more than one minor extinction event since the Cambrian Explosion.

  20. Reflections on CME Congress 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Alan B.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary reflects the author's impressions of Continuing Medical Education (CME) Congress 2012, a provocative international conference on professional development and quality improvement in the health professions that took place in Toronto, Ontario, last spring. The sessions he attended and conversations he had with other attendees were…

  1. A panoptic model for planetesimal formation and pebble delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krijt, S.; Ormel, C. W.; Dominik, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The journey from dust particle to planetesimal involves physical processes acting on scales ranging from micrometers (the sticking and restructuring of aggregates) to hundreds of astronomical units (the size of the turbulent protoplanetary nebula). Considering these processes simultaneously is essential when studying planetesimal formation. Aims: The goal of this work is to quantify where and when planetesimal formation can occur as the result of porous coagulation of icy grains and to understand how the process is influenced by the properties of the protoplanetary disk. Methods: We develop a novel, global, semi-analytical model for the evolution of the mass-dominating dust particles in a turbulent protoplanetary disk that takes into account the evolution of the dust surface density while preserving the essential characteristics of the porous coagulation process. This panoptic model is used to study the growth from sub-micron to planetesimal sizes in disks around Sun-like stars. Results: For highly porous ices, unaffected by collisional fragmentation and erosion, rapid growth to planetesimal sizes is possible in a zone stretching out to ~10 AU for massive disks. When porous coagulation is limited by erosive collisions, the formation of planetesimals through direct coagulation is not possible, but the creation of a large population of aggregates with Stokes numbers close to unity might trigger the streaming instability (SI). However, we find that reaching conditions necessary for SI is difficult and limited to dust-rich disks, (very) cold disks, or disks with weak turbulence. Conclusions: Behind the snow-line, porosity-driven aggregation of icy grains results in rapid (~104 yr) formation of planetesimals. If erosive collisions prevent this, SI might be triggered for specific disk conditions. The numerical approach introduced in this work is ideally suited for studying planetesimal formation and pebble delivery simultaneously and will help build a coherent

  2. The Flare-CME Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftery, Claire; Gallagher, P. T.; Lin, C.

    2009-05-01

    The connection between flares and CMEs has long been hypothesized and modelled. However, a full understanding of the processes at work remains ambiguous. A detailed study of the kinematical evolution of a CME was conducted using instruments on STEREO. Flare parameters, such as the motion of soft X-ray sources, imaged using RHESSI, and emission measure and plasma temperature measured from Mercury MESSENGER are presented in conjunction with the CME data to explain the evolution of the entire system. These results are then compared to a number of theoretical models to determine which of the many hypotheses are most probable for this event. CLR is supported by an SPD studentship and the ESA/Prodex grant administered by Enterprise Ireland.

  3. The deflection of 2008 December 12 CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.; Wang, Y.; Liu, J.; Ye, P.; Wang, S.

    2010-12-01

    The deflection of CME, which would significant influence the CME's geoeffectiveness, is an important topic of space weather study. In this work, the deflection of 2008 December 12 CME during it propagated from the Sun to Earth will be detailed studied based on the combination of remote and in situ observations. First, the 3-dimensions parameters reconstructed by Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) model based on the STEREO observations were used to study the propagation direction evolution of this CME during it propagated in near solar space. During this phase, this CME deflect from high latitude region to equator in meridian plane but propagated almost along the longitude of W7 in ecliptic plane. Further, whether this CME deflected during it propagated in interplanetary space has also been checked. Based on the remote observations, if this CME propagated radially during it propagated in interplanetary space, it may arrived the Earth and then hit the STEREO A rather than hit STEREO B. But, the in situ observations show contrary results that this CME arrived the Earth and hit the STEREO B but missed STEREO A. This result show direct evidence that this CME deflected to east in ecliptic plane during it propagated in interplanetary space. The kinematic deflection model developed by Wang et. al (2004) has been applied on this CME. The calculation results of this model correspond well with the observational results.

  4. CME impact on Mercury's sputtered exospheric environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfleger, M.; Lichtenegger, H. I. M.; Lammer, H.; Mura, A.; Wurz, P.; Martin-Fernandez, J. A.

    2013-09-01

    Solar wind and magnetospheric plasma precipitation onto the surface of Mercury triggers the formation of exospheric particle populations by sputtering processes. Numerical modeling of Mercury's magnetosphere has shown that the weak intrinsic magnetic field of the planet is sufficient to prevent the equatorial regions from being impacted by solar wind ions during moderate solar wind conditions. However, intense fluxes of protons are expected to hit the auroral regions, giving rise to the release of surface elements at high latitudes by ion sputtering. During high solar wind dynamic pressure conditions in the case of CME events, the solar wind protons will have access to Mercury's entire dayside surface, which may result in a considerable filling of the exosphere by sputtered surface material.

  5. The energy sources of CME acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allawi, H.; Pohjolainen, S.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the possibility that during the fast acceleration phase of a coronal mass ejection (CME), a freely propagating shock wave could be launched. We test this hypothesis by calculating the speeds of blast waves by using the Taylor-Sedov equation in changing density solar atmosphere, and compare these speeds with the radio type II burst speeds during the CME event on 17 February 2000. The matching speeds and the realistic value of the blast wave energy, 10^{24} J, lead us to suggest that the CME acceleration phase may involve shocks separating from the initial CME driver.

  6. CME Ensemble Forecasting - A Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzo, V. J.; de Koning, C. A.; Cash, M. D.; Millward, G. H.; Biesecker, D. A.; Codrescu, M.; Puga, L.; Odstrcil, D.

    2014-12-01

    SWPC has been evaluating various approaches for ensemble forecasting of Earth-directed CMEs. We have developed the software infrastructure needed to support broad-ranging CME ensemble modeling, including composing, interpreting, and making intelligent use of ensemble simulations. The first step is to determine whether the physics of the interplanetary propagation of CMEs is better described as chaotic (like terrestrial weather) or deterministic (as in tsunami propagation). This is important, since different ensemble strategies are to be pursued under the two scenarios. We present the findings of a comprehensive study of CME ensembles in uniform and structured backgrounds that reveals systematic relationships between input cone parameters and ambient flow states and resulting transit times and velocity/density amplitudes at Earth. These results clearly indicate that the propagation of single CMEs to 1 AU is a deterministic process. Thus, the accuracy with which one can forecast the gross properties (such as arrival time) of CMEs at 1 AU is determined primarily by the accuracy of the inputs. This is no tautology - it means specifically that efforts to improve forecast accuracy should focus upon obtaining better inputs, as opposed to developing better propagation models. In a companion paper (deKoning et al., this conference), we compare in situ solar wind data with forecast events in the SWPC operational archive to show how the qualitative and quantitative findings presented here are entirely consistent with the observations and may lead to improved forecasts of arrival time at Earth.

  7. Objective CME detection over the solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbrecht, E.; Berghmans, D.

    We have developed a software package for 'Computer Aided CME Tracking' (CACTus), that autonomously detects CMEs in image sequences from LASCO. The crux of the CACTus software is the detection of CMEs as bright ridges in [height, time] maps using the Hough transform. The output is a list of events, similar to the classic catalogs, with principle angle, angular width and velocity estimation for each CME. In contrast to catalogs assembled by human operators, these CME detections by software can be faster and possibly also more objective, as the detection criterion is written explicitly in a program. Especially on the timescale of a solar cycle, it is questionnable whether human, visual CME detection is stable, as the operator gains experience or personnel is replaced. In this paper we overview the latest improvements of CACTUS and validate its performance by comparing the CACTus output with the classical, visually assembled CME catalogs. Discrepancies between the classical catalogs and the CACTUS catalogs are discussed. Such discrepancies highlight not only the performance of CACTUS but also the caveats of the classical catalogs. Indeed, CACTUS sometimes finds CMEs that are not listed in the catalogs or interpreted differently (eg halo CME or not). It is important to know these caveats when using the CME catalogs as input for statistical CME studies over the solar cycle. The near realtime output of the software is available on the web(http://sidc.oma.be/cactus) and is updated daily.

  8. CME for neurosurgeons in the Netherlands: the "quality" conferences.

    PubMed

    Mooij, J J A; Albrecht, K W; Grotenhuis, J A; Zeilstra, D J; Staal, M J; Koot, R W

    2009-02-01

    In 1993 the Netherlands Society for Neurosurgery started a yearly event, a "Quality Conference", specifically devoted to continuous medical education (CME). These conferences differ from "normal" scientific meetings, in the choice for specific topics, in the preparation with inquiries among all the Dutch neurosurgical centres, and in the way the results of these inquiries are discussed, preceded by lectures concerning the chosen topic by guest faculty and Dutch neurosurgeons. Each year's principal guest delivers the "Beks Lecture", named after the former professor in Neurosurgery in Groningen, Jan Beks. On several occasions, the foreign guests suggested to present this format for a larger neurosurgical forum. Therefore, it was decided to describe the various aspects of this format for CME in the Netherlands in a paper for Acta Neurochirugica. Examples of topics are given, a summary of two recent inquiries are presented and discussed, and the way of organizing such a conference including finance and the obligatory character are described. PMID:19194649

  9. The Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Luke

    2015-04-01

    Since the launch of the twin STEREO satellites in late 2006, the Heliospheric Imagers have been used, with good results, in tracking transients of solar origin, such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), out through the inner heliosphere. A frequently used approach is to build a "J-Map", in which multiple elongation profiles along a constant position angle are stacked in time, building an image in which radially propagating transients form curved tracks in the J-Map. From this the time-elongation profile of a solar transient can be manually identified. This is a time consuming and laborious process, and the results are subjective, depending on the skill and expertise of the investigator. With the Heliospheric Imager data it is possible to follow CMEs from the outer limits of the solar corona all the way to 1AU. Solar Stormwatch is a citizen science project that employs the power of thousands of volunteers to both identify and track CMEs in the Heliospheric Imager data. The CMEs identified by Solar Stormwatch are tracked many times by multiple users and this allows the calculation of consensus time-elongation profiles for each event and also provides an estimate of the error in the consensus profile. Therefore this system does not suffer from the potential subjectivity of individual researchers identifying and tracking CMEs. In this sense, the Solar Stormwatch system can be thought of as providing a middle ground between manually identified CME catalogues, such as the CDAW list, and CME catalogues generated through fully automated algorithms, such as CACtus and ARTEMIS etc. We provide a summary of the reduction of the Solar Stormwatch data into a catalogue of CMEs observed by STEREO-A and STEREO-B through the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and review some key statistical properties of these CMEs. Through some case studies of the propagation of CMEs out into the inner heliosphere we argue that the Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue, which publishes the time

  10. Factors influencing nursing students' preference for a hybrid format delivery in a pathophysiology course.

    PubMed

    Salamonson, Yenna; Lantz, Julie

    2005-01-01

    A growing number of courses in higher education are adopting a hybrid format of course delivery. Hybrid courses use both online learning activities with traditional classroom teaching and thus offer the efficiency and flexibility of online delivery without the complete loss of face-to-face contact. This paper explores students' satisfaction with a hybrid course delivery format, where students were required to attend the traditional tutorial session as well as complete the prescribed web-based learning activities. The study also sought to determine if age, part-time employment or academic performance were associated with satisfaction levels of the hybrid format. Participants were 143 undergraduate nursing students enrolled in a final year pathophysiology course at a university in Sydney, Australia. A survey design was used to evaluate hybrid versus traditional face-to-face classroom instruction, resulting in a high overall satisfaction with the hybrid course delivery format. Students' age and the hours they spent in part-time employment were not associated with satisfaction levels of the hybrid format. Students who achieved higher marks in the final examination expressed stronger preference for the traditional format of course delivery indicating a perceived reliance on teacher-based instruction. It is recommended that additional support be provided to students while they make the shift to a more active independent mode of learning when using web-based formats. PMID:15607242

  11. Ensemble Modeling of CME Propagation and Geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. Leila; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Pulkkinen, Antti; MacNeice, Peter; Rastätter, Lutz; Odstrcil, Dusan; Jian, Lan; Richardson, Ian

    2015-04-01

    Ensemble modeling of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) provides a probabilistic forecast of CME arrival time which includes an estimation of arrival time uncertainty from the spread and distribution of predictions and forecast confidence in the likelihood of CME arrival. The real-time ensemble modeling of CME propagation uses the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-ENLIL+Cone model installed at the {Community Coordinated Modeling Center} (CCMC) and executed in real-time at the CCMC/{Space Weather Research Center}. The current implementation of this ensemble modeling method evaluates the sensitivity of WSA-ENLIL+Cone model simulations of CME propagation to initial CME parameters. We discuss the results of real-time ensemble simulations for a total of 35 CME events which occurred between January 2013 - July 2014. For the 17 events where the CME was predicted to arrive at Earth, the mean absolute arrival time prediction error was 12.3 hours, which is comparable to the errors reported in other studies. For predictions of CME arrival at Earth the correct rejection rate is 62%, the false-alarm rate is 38%, the correct alarm ratio is 77%, and false alarm ratio is 23%. The arrival time was within the range of the ensemble arrival predictions for 8 out of 17 events. The Brier Score for CME arrival predictions is 0.15 (where a score of 0 on a range of 0 to 1 is a perfect forecast), which indicates that on average, the predicted probability, or likelihood, of CME arrival is fairly accurate. The reliability of ensemble CME arrival predictions is heavily dependent on the initial distribution of CME input parameters (e.g. speed, direction, and width), particularly the median and spread. Preliminary analysis of the probabilistic forecasts suggests undervariability, indicating that these ensembles do not sample a wide enough spread in CME input parameters. Prediction errors can also arise from ambient model parameters, the accuracy of the solar wind background derived from coronal maps, or other

  12. December 2008 CME as Viewed by Spacecraft

    NASA Video Gallery

    Newly reprocessed images from NASA's STEREO-A spacecraft, allow scientists to trace the anatomy of the December 2008 CME as it moves and changes on its journey from the Sun to the Earth, identify t...

  13. Commercial Buildings Partnership Projects - Metered Data Format and Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, Srinivas

    2010-11-16

    A number of the Commercial Building Partnership Projects (CBPs) will require metering, monitoring, data analysis and verification of savings after the retrofits are complete. Although monitoring and verification (M&V) agents are free to use any metering and monitoring devices that they chose, the data they collect should be reported to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in a standard format. PNNL will store the data collected in its CBP database for further use by PNNL and U.S. Department of Energy. This document describes the data storage process and the deliver format of the data from the M&V agents.

  14. Professional Development Integrating Technology: Does Delivery Format Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claesgens, Jennifer; Rubino-Hare, Lori; Bloom, Nena; Fredrickson, Kristi; Henderson-Dahms, Carol; Menasco, Jackie; Sample, James

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the two Power of Data (POD) projects was to increase science, technology and math skills through the implementation of project-based learning modules that teach students how to solve problems through data collection and analysis utilizing geospatial technologies. Professional development institutes in two formats were offered to…

  15. Group, One-on-One, or Internet? Preferences for Mindfulness Meditation Delivery Format and their Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Wahbeh, Helané; Svalina, Matthew N.; Oken, Barry S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Group mindfulness meditation interventions have improved symptoms in many health conditions. However, many people are unwilling to receive group treatment, so alternative delivery methods such as individual and internet may be a useful option. The study objective was to examine mindfulness meditation intervention delivery format preferences and their relationship to potential predictors. Design An online survey was conducted of adult English speakers. Data was collected on interest and preference for internet, individual, or group formats of a mindfulness meditation intervention. Age, gender, personality, and posttraumatic stress disorder score and status and depression status were also collected. Results and Conclusions 500 eligible participants completed the survey (mean age 39±15; range 18–70; 68% female). Participants were more interested in the Internet (n=356) and individual formats (n=384) than the group format (n=245). Fifty-five participants (11%) said they would refuse a group format. Internet was the first choice format for most participants (Internet 212 (43%), Individual 187 (38%), Group 97 (20%) and group was the last choice for most participants (Internet 140 (29%), Individual 70 (14%), Group 279 (57%)). Age, extraversion and emotional stability were significant in predicting first choice format. These results support the need for more research and implementation of alternative mindfulness meditation intervention delivery formats. Future research will incorporate additional predictors and include a broader range of participants. PMID:27057260

  16. Automatic CME Detection from Coronagraph Image Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liewer, P. C.; Dejong, E. M.; Hall, J. R.; Lorre, J. J.

    2005-12-01

    We have developed a technique for the automatic detection of coronal mass ejections using two sequential coronagraph images. The technique is based on tracking arc-like features from one image to the next; the feature's velocity is also determined. The method has been developed and tested using LASCO C2 and C3 data. The goal of this work is to develop an automatic CME detection algorithm that can be used on board the STEREO spacecraft to preferentially downlink data containing CMEs from an onboard "rotating" data buffer. Results for this detection technique compare very favorably with CMEs identified in the LASCO CME catalog (http://cdaw.gsfc.nasa.gov/CME_list/). For the periods when results were compared, no time periods with significant CMEs were missed using the automatic technique.

  17. Mechanism of Membranous Tunnelling Nanotube Formation in Viral Genome Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Bibiana; Gil-Carton, David; Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Bertin, Aurelie; Boulogne, Claire; Oksanen, Hanna M.; Bamford, Dennis H.; Abrescia, Nicola G. A.

    2013-01-01

    In internal membrane-containing viruses, a lipid vesicle enclosed by the icosahedral capsid protects the genome. It has been postulated that this internal membrane is the genome delivery device of the virus. Viruses built with this architectural principle infect hosts in all three domains of cellular life. Here, using a combination of electron microscopy techniques, we investigate bacteriophage PRD1, the best understood model for such viruses, to unveil the mechanism behind the genome translocation across the cell envelope. To deliver its double-stranded DNA, the icosahedral protein-rich virus membrane transforms into a tubular structure protruding from one of the 12 vertices of the capsid. We suggest that this viral nanotube exits from the same vertex used for DNA packaging, which is biochemically distinct from the other 11. The tube crosses the capsid through an aperture corresponding to the loss of the peripentonal P3 major capsid protein trimers, penton protein P31 and membrane protein P16. The remodeling of the internal viral membrane is nucleated by changes in osmolarity and loss of capsid-membrane interactions as consequence of the de-capping of the vertices. This engages the polymerization of the tail tube, which is structured by membrane-associated proteins. We have observed that the proteo-lipidic tube in vivo can pierce the gram-negative bacterial cell envelope allowing the viral genome to be shuttled to the host cell. The internal diameter of the tube allows one double-stranded DNA chain to be translocated. We conclude that the assembly principles of the viral tunneling nanotube take advantage of proteo-lipid interactions that confer to the tail tube elastic, mechanical and functional properties employed also in other protein-membrane systems. PMID:24086111

  18. HELCATS Prediction of Planetary CME arrival times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boakes, Peter; Moestl, Christian; Davies, Jackie; Harrison, Richard; Byrne, Jason; Barnes, David; Isavnin, Alexey; Kilpua, Emilia; Rollett, Tanja

    2015-04-01

    We present the first results of CME arrival time prediction at different planetary locations and their comparison to the in situ data within the HELCATS project. The EU FP7 HELCATS (Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis & Techniques Service) is a European effort to consolidate the exploitation of the maturing field of heliospheric imaging. HELCATS aims to catalogue solar wind transients, observed by the NASA STEREO Heliospheric Imager (HI) instruments, and validate different methods for the determination of their kinematic properties. This validation includes comparison with arrivals at Earth, and elsewhere in the heliosphere, as well as onsets at the Sun (http://www.helcats-fp7.eu/). A preliminary catalogue of manually identified CMEs, with over 1000 separate events, has been created from observations made by the STEREO/HI instruments covering the years 2007-2013. Initial speeds and directions of each CME have been derived through fitting the time elongation profile to the state of the art Self-Similar Expansion Fitting (SSEF) geometric technique (Davies et al., 2012). The technique assumes that, in the plane corresponding to the position angle of interest, CMEs can be modelled as circles subtending a fixed angular width to Sun-center and propagating anti-sunward in a fixed direction at a constant speed (we use an angular width of 30 degrees in our initial results). The model has advantages over previous geometric models (e.g. harmonic mean or fixed phi) as it allows one to predict whether a CME will 'hit' a specific heliospheric location, as well as to what degree (e.g. direct assault or glancing blow). We use correction formulae (Möstl and Davies, 2013) to convert CME speeds, direction and launch time to speed and arrival time at any in situ location. From the preliminary CME dataset, we derive arrival times for over 400 Earth-directed CMEs, and for over 100 Mercury-, Venus-, Mars- and Saturn-directed CMEs predicted to impact each planet. We present statistics of

  19. Space Weather Model of July 22-23, 2012 CME

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Space Weather Research Center modeled the July 23, 2012 CME using a modeling program called ENLIL. The CME can be seen to expand dramatically as it travels through space. By comparing how we...

  20. Educational Administration Students' Perceptions of Traditional vs. Online Instructional Delivery Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Paul E.; Diaz, Sebastian R.; Moore, Lucas C.; Deering, Pamela R.

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the perceptions of instructional delivery formats held by graduate students enrolled in a public school principal-preparation program. Two main research questions guided the study: How do students perceive the relative value of online courses as compared to traditional courses? and How do students perceive the relative…

  1. Balancing Instructional Techniques and Delivery Formats in Capstone Business Strategy Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alstete, Jeffrey W.; Beutell, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contend that collegiate programs should carefully plan their capstone courses in light of the educational mission, pedagogical content knowledge, instructional techniques and delivery formats. Design/methodology/approach: This is a concept paper with elements of theory building from the case of business…

  2. Parenting Interventions Implementation Science: How Delivery Format Impacts the Parenting Wisely Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Katie L.; Bacallao, Martica; Smokowski, Paul R.; Robertson, Caroline I. B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study examines the implementation and effectiveness of Parenting Wisely, an Internet-based parenting skills intervention. The study assesses whether parents benefit from Parenting Wisely participation and whether the delivery format influences program effectiveness. Method: This study uses a quasi-experimental design.…

  3. A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. III. Catastrophe of the Eruptive Filament at a Magnetic Null Point and Formation of an Opposite-Handedness CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uralov, A. M.; Grechnev, V. V.; Rudenko, G. V.; Myshyakov, I. I.; Chertok, I. M.; Filippov, B. P.; Slemzin, V. A.

    2014-10-01

    Our analysis in Papers I and II (Grechnev et al., Solar Phys. 289, 289, 2014b and Solar Phys. 289, 1279, 2014c) of the 18 November 2003 solar event responsible for the 20 November geomagnetic superstorm has revealed a complex chain of eruptions. In particular, the eruptive filament encountered a topological discontinuity located near the solar disk center at a height of about 100 Mm, bifurcated, and transformed into a large cloud, which did not leave the Sun. Concurrently, an additional CME presumably erupted close to the bifurcation region. The conjectures about the responsibility of this compact CME for the superstorm and its disconnection from the Sun are confirmed in Paper IV (Grechnev et al., Solar Phys. submitted, 2014a), which concludes about its probable spheromak-like structure. The present article confirms the presence of a magnetic null point near the bifurcation region and addresses the origin of the magnetic helicity of the interplanetary magnetic clouds and their connection to the Sun. We find that the orientation of a magnetic dipole constituted by dimmed regions with the opposite magnetic polarities away from the parent active region corresponded to the direction of the axial field in the magnetic cloud, while the pre-eruptive filament mismatched it. To combine all of the listed findings, we propose an intrinsically three-dimensional scheme, in which a spheromak-like eruption originates via the interaction of the initially unconnected magnetic fluxes of the eruptive filament and pre-existing ones in the corona. Through a chain of magnetic reconnections their positive mutual helicity was transformed into the self-helicity of the spheromak-like magnetic cloud.

  4. STEREO Captures Fastest CME to Date

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows a coronal mass ejection (CME) on the sun from July 22, 2012 at 10:00 PM EDT until 2 AM on July 23 as captured by NASA's Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A). Be...

  5. The CME Flare Arcade and the Width of the CME in the Outer Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007, ApJ, 668, 1221) present evidence that (1) a CME is typically a magnetic bubble, a low-beta gplasmoid with legs h having roughly the 3D shape of a light bulb, and (2) in the outer corona the CME plasmoid is in lateral pressure equilibrium with the ambient magnetic field. They present three CMEs observed by SOHO/LASCO, each from a very different source located near the limb. One of these CMEs came from a compact ejective eruption from a small part of a sunspot active region, another came from a large quiet-region filament eruption, and the third CME, an extremely large and fast one, was produced in tandem with an X20 flare arcade that was centered on a huge delta sunspot. Each of these CMEs had more or less the classic lightbulb silhouette and attained a constant heliocentric angular width in the outer corona. This indicates that the CME plasmoid attained lateral magnetic pressure balance with the ambient radial magnetic field in the outer corona. This lateral pressure balance, together with the standard scenario for CME production by the eruption of a sheared-core magnetic arcade, yields the following simple estimate of the strength B(sub Flare) of the magnetic field in the flare arcade produced together with the CME: B(sub Flare) 1.4(theta CME/theta Flare)sup 2 G, where theta (sub CME) is the heliocentric angular width of the CME plasmoid in the outer corona and theta (sub Flare) is the heliocentric angular width of the full-grown flare arcade. Conversely, theta (sub CME) approximately equal to (R(sub Sun)sup -1(phi(sub Flare)/1.4)sup 1/2 radians, where Flare is the magnetic flux covered by the full-grown flare arcade. In addition to presenting the three CMEs of Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007) and their agreement with this relation between CME and Flare, we present a further empirical test of this relation. For CMEs that erupt from active regions, the co-produced flare arcade seldom if ever covers the entire active region: if AR is

  6. The Growth, Characteristics, and Future of Online CME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John M., Jr.; Sklar, Bernard M.; Amend, Robert W.; Novalis-Marine, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Physician use of online continuing medical education (CME) is growing, but there are conflicting data on the uptake of online CME and few details on this market. Methods: Analyses of 11 years of data from the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) and a survey of 272 publicly available CME Web sites. …

  7. Sharing Collaborative Designs of Tobacco Cessation Performance Improvement CME Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullikin, Elizabeth A.; Ales, Mary W.; Cho, Jane; Nelson, Teena M.; Rodrigues, Shelly B.; Speight, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Performance Improvement Continuing Medical Education (PI CME) provides an important opportunity for CME providers to combine educational and quality health care improvement methodologies. Very few CME providers take on the challenges of planning this type of intervention because it is still a new practice and there are limited…

  8. Learning to Collaborate: A Case Study of Performance Improvement CME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shershneva, Marianna B.; Mullikin, Elizabeth A.; Loose, Anne-Sophie; Olson, Curtis A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Performance Improvement Continuing Medical Education (PI CME) is a mechanism for joining quality improvement (QI) in health care to continuing medical education (CME) systems together. Although QI practices and CME approaches have been recognized for years, what emerges from their integration is largely unfamiliar, because it…

  9. Assessment of Barriers to Changing Practice as CME Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, David W.; Miller, Elaine K.; Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Brace, Nancy E.; Larson, R. Sam

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing medical education (CME) is meant to drive and support improvements in practice. To achieve this goal, CME activities must move beyond simply purveying knowledge, instead helping attendees to contextualize information and to develop strategies for implementing new learning. CME attendees face different barriers to…

  10. CME and Change in Practice: An Alternative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wergin, Jon F.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Results of a study by the American College of Cardiology revealed that continuing medical education (CME) courses contain relatively little information that is new to the audience, that other influences on practice interact with CME content, and that change attributable to CME is subtle and often delayed. (JOW)

  11. Role of Components in the Formation of Self-microemulsifying Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, A. K.; Deshpande, P. B.; Kar, S. S.; Nayak, Usha Y.; Udupa, N.; Reddy, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical research is focused in designing novel drug delivery systems to improve the bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs. Self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems, one among the lipid-based dosage forms were proven to be promising in improving the oral bioavailability of such drugs by enhancing solubility, permeability and avoiding first-pass metabolism via enhanced lymphatic transport. Further, they have been successful in avoiding both inter and intra individual variations as well as the dose disproportionality. Aqueous insoluble drugs, in general, show greater solubility in lipid based excipients, and hence they are formulated as lipid based drug delivery systems. The extent of solubility of a hydrophobic drug in lipid excipients i.e. oil, surfactant and co-surfactant (components of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems) greatly affects the drug loading and in producing stable self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems. The present review highlighted the influence of physicochemical factors and structural features of the hydrophobic drug on its solubility in lipid excipients and an attempt was made to explore the role of each component of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems in the formation of stable microemulsion upon dilution. PMID:26180269

  12. CME impact on comet 67P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, Niklas J. T.; Andrews, David J.; Burch, Jim L.; Carr, Christopher M.; Cupido, Emanuele; Eriksson, Anders I.; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Goldstein, Ray; Henri, Pierre; Koenders, Christoph; Mandt, Kathy; Nilsson, Hans; Odelstad, Elias; Stenberg Wieser, Gabriella; Vigren, Erik

    2016-04-01

    We present observations from the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) of an impact of a coronal mass ejection (CMEs) on comet 67P. The CME impacted during a dayside excursion in early October 2015 when Rosetta slowly moved from a distance of ~300 km to 1500 km from the comet nucleus. Although this was still deep down in the cometary coma, the CME impact caused a significant disturbance to the plasma environment. As the CME impacted, the magnetic field strength increased to reach a maximum of 250 nT, which is the highest magnetic field strength ever observed at 67P. Lots of magnetic field oscillations and increased fluxes of energized (~100 eV) electrons and ions were observed concurrently, and the ionospheric low-energy plasma density increased by roughly one order of magnitude. An interesting phenomenon that could occur during a CME impact is a so-called tail disconnection event, when magnetic reconnection, either on the dayside of the comet or in the tail, causes a large fraction of the tail to be disconnected from the comet. Rosetta, being relatively close to the nucleus, can at best directly observe signatures of dayside reconnection when draped interplanetary magnetic fields of different polarities convects through the plasma environment and reconnects at the location of Rosetta. Rosetta cannot directly observe any tail-side disconnection event due to the orbit constraints. However, signatures of such events might resemble substorm effects in the terrestrial ionosphere with increased wave activity, increased ionization, energization of electrons and possibly ions. We discuss the RPC measurements during the October CME in this context and try to determine if a tail disconnection event could have occurred at this time.

  13. CHARACTERISTICS OF KINEMATICS OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION DURING THE 2010 AUGUST 1 CME-CME INTERACTION EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, Manuela; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; Moestl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M.; Flor, Olga; Vrsnak, Bojan; Zic, Tomislav; De Koning, Curt A.; Liu, Ying; Bosman, Eckhard; Davies, Jackie A.; Bothmer, Volker; Harrison, Richard; Nitta, Nariaki; Bisi, Mario; Eastwood, Jonathan; Forsyth, Robert; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2012-04-10

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and heliospheric imager (HI) data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field of view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; {approx}1200 km s{sup -1}) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; {approx}700 km s{sup -1}). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2, suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  14. Characteristics of Kinematics of a Coronal Mass Ejection During the 2010 August 1 CME-CME Interaction Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temmer, Manuela; Vrsnak, Bojan; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; de Koning, Curt A.; Liu, Ying; Bosman, Eckhard; Davies, Jackie A.; Mostl, Christian; Zic, Tomislav; Veronig, Astrid M.; Bothmer, Volker; Harrison, Richard; Nitta, Nariaki; Bisi, Mario; Flor, Olga; Eastwood, Jonathan; Odstrcil, Dusan; Forsyth, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and HI data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field-of-view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; (is) approximately 1200 km s-1) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; (is) approximately 700 km s-1). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2 suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  15. Plasmoid instability in a large post-CME current sheet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Huang, Y.; CenterIntegrated Computation; Analysis of Reconnection; Turbulence

    2011-12-01

    Solar flares and CME that cause violent space weather change have been studied for years. The standard model suggests that there is a current sheet connecting the CME and the site of the post-CME flare after the eruption, but understanding of the detailed physical mechanism of dynamical processes in the current sheet remains incomplete. Recently, the secondary plasmoid instabilities of large scale current sheet in high Lundquist number environment such as solar corona and the change of magnetic topology in such a current sheet system has become a subject of great interest (Bhattacharjee et al. 2009). In our work, we study a post-CME current sheet via both observation and simulation. We use SOHO/LASCO observations of a fast halo CME as well as a slow CME. After the fast halo CME event on January 8, 2002, we observe a long, thin current sheet which connects the CME to a flare site on the surface of the sun. In this current sheet we identify over 60 bright plasmoid-like blobs in 39 hours. In the slow CME event on June 25, 2005, we observe 32 such blobs in 18 hours after the formation of the current sheet. We simulate both cases using high-Lundquist-number resistive MHD simulations of the model of Lin & Forbes (2000), and demonstrate that the distribution of plasmoid size in both cases appears to conform well to a distribution function that is independent of the Lundquist number and predicted by theory. The average observed plasmoid speed in both cases is a fraction of the typical Alfven speed, qualitatively consistent with the simulations. Thus, we propose that these observations can be plausibly accounted for by the plasmoid instability of the large-scale current sheet. The observed bright blobs are probably evidence of large-scale plasmoids, and their behavior appears to be qualitatively consistent with high-Lundquist-number MHD simulations.
    observation case summary

  16. Contributions from Ultraviolet Spectroscopy to the Prediction of High-energy Proton Hazards from CME Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Raymond, J. C.; Cranmer, S. R.; Kohl, J. L.

    2004-05-01

    A significant potential hazard to astronauts and their equipment in interplanetary space is the relativistic proton flux produced by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares. The longest-duration phase of solar energetic particle (SEP) activity is believed to come from the CME shock as it propagates through the extended corona and heliosphere. Ultraviolet spectroscopy by SOHO has revealed a means for: (1) detecting and characterizing CME shocks in the corona, and (2) determining the plasma conditions in the pre-CME corona which are needed to understand the formation and evolution of shocks. Such remote sensing - combined with models of SEP acceleration and transport - can be used to predict the strength, duration, and production sites of the radiation. This poster describes the specific means by which ultraviolet spectroscopy and other remote-sensing data can be used to determine the inputs and boundary conditions for individual events (such as the October-November 2003 storms) in existing SEP model codes. We also discuss an additional potential source of SEP radiation associated with electric fields in the current sheets that form in flare regions in the wake of CME. Both observations and model calculations show that the reconnection-induced electric field can reach a maximum strength of a few V/cm within tens of minutes after the onset of the eruption, then decreases gradually over several hours. SEPs produced in these regions may account for X-rays and γ -rays observed prior to the formation of CME shocks. Ultraviolet spectroscopy has been shown to provide constraints on the plasma properties in all of the above CME features. This work is supported by NASA under grant NAG5-12865 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, and by the Swiss contribution to ESA's PRODEX program.

  17. Radio signatures of CME-streamer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, Y.; Feng, S.; Kong, X.; Li, G.; Song, H.

    2011-12-01

    Recent observational finding of streamer waves using the LASCO white light data presents us interesting physical consequence of CME-streamer interactions [1, 2, 3]. CME-streamer interactions can also manifest themselves in the Type-II-related radio dynamic spectra as recorded by the ground-based or space-borne instruments. A large body of studies exists revealing the possible roles of pre-existing helmet streamers in the radio emission during a solar eruption. In this presentation, we will summary our efforts in classifying the roles of streamers affecting Type-II radio emissions. Generally speaking, there exist two groups of CME-streamer-Type-II events. In the first group, the shock as well as the Type-II radio emission seems to exist prior to the CME-streamer interaction. The interaction can be clearly discerned from the well-defined bump of the Type-II radio dynamic spectra. The spectral bump is a direct result of plasma emissions when the radio emitting region traversing the denser streamer structure. In the other group of events, the Type-II burst is excited as a result of the CME-streamer interaction. Either the shock is formed and radio-emitting electrons are accelerated inside the streamer, or a prior non-emitting shock becomes radio aloud during the interacting process. A novel triangular-streamer-shock model is proposed to interpret the associated electron acceleration inside the streamer. Observational examples of CME-streamer-radio events corresponding to both cases will be presented. [1] Chen, Y., Song, H.Q., Li, B., Xia, L.D., Wu, Z., Fu, H., Li, X., 2010, Astrophys. J. 714, 644 [2] Chen, Y., Feng, S.W., Li, B., Song, H.Q., Xia, L.D., Kong, X.L., Li, X., 2011, Astrophys. J. 728, 147 [3] Feng S. W., Chen Y., Li B., Song H. Q., Kong X. L., Xia L. D., Feng, X. S., 2011, Sol. Phys., DOI 10.1007/s11207-011-9814-6

  18. Morphology and Density Structure of Post-CME Current Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrsnak, B.; Poletto, G.; Vujic, E.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is believed to drag and open the coronal magnetic field, presumably leading to the formation of a large-scale current sheet and field relaxation by magnetic reconnection. This paper analyzes the physical characteristics of ray-like coronal features formed in the aftermath of CMEs, to confirm whether interpreting such phenomena in terms of a reconnecting current sheet is consistent with observations. Methods: The study focuses on UVCS/SOHO and LASCO/SOHO measurements of the ray width, density excess, and coronal velocity field as a function of the radial distance. The morphology of the rays implies that they are produced by Petschek-like reconnection in the large-scale current sheet formed in the wake of CME. The hypothesis is supported by the flow pattern, often showing outflows along the ray, and sometimes also inflows into the ray. The inferred inflow velocities range from 3 to 30 km/s, and are consistent with the narrow opening-angle of rays, which add up to a few degrees. The density of rays is an order of magnitude higher than in the ambient corona. The model results are consistent with the observations, revealing that the main cause of the density excess in rays is a transport of the dense plasma from lower to higher heights by the reconnection outflow.

  19. Ly-alpha and white light observations of a CME during the Spartan 201-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassler, Don M.; Strachan, Leonard; Gardner, L. D.; Kohl, J. L.; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard R.; Strong, K.

    1994-01-01

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) near a large active region on the west limb was observed with the white light coronograph (WLC) and ultraviolet coronal spectrometer (UVCS) on the Spartan 201 satellite at 9:42 UT on 12 Apr. 1993. Soft X-ray images of the region below the CME were obtained out to 1.7 solar radii with the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh. After the event, the formation of a new helmet streamer could be seen in the polarized brightness (pB) images from the Mk III coronograph at Mauna Loa. The CME was observed from Spartan 201 in two different pB images obtained 14 min apart using the WLC, and was observed moving through the field-of-view of the UVCS integrated intensity slit. Ly-alpha intensities in the same region of the corona were obtained one orbit earlier (prior to the CME) using the Ly-alpha profile slit of the UVCS. These are the first Ly-alpha observations of a CME and may help constrain models of the electron temperature on CME's.

  20. Study of CME Properties Using High Resolution Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Ya. I.; Fainshtein, V. G.

    The joint use of high-resolution data from SDO and PROBA2 satellites and LASCO/SOHO coronographs enabled us to examine early stages of initiation and propagation of six limb CMEs registered in June 2010 - June 2011. For five events under consideration, the CME initiation is marked by filament (prominence) eruption or by a loop-like structure having another nature. Subsequently, several loop-like structures having higher brightness and following each other at different velocities appear in the region of the CME initiation. The CME frontal structure is formed by these loop-like structures. The CME kinematics and such CME characteristics as angular size and longitudinal to latitudinal size ratio was found for considered all events. We have drawn a conclusion about the possible existence of two CME types dependent on the velocity profile.

  1. Deflected Propagation ---- A Factor Deciding the Geoeffectiveness of A CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shen, C.; Liu, J.; Gui, B.; Wang, S.

    2010-12-01

    To answer the question if a CME can cause a significant change of the states of geo-space, the first issue we have to address is whether or not the CME will intersect with the Earth or what the trajectory of the CME is. From several observational cases and statistical studies, we show that the deflected propagations of CMEs are a common phenomenon. The amount of the deflection could be as large as several tens degrees in either latitude, longitude or both. Thus, an on-disk CME may not necessarily encounter the Earth, while a limb CME may be able to hit the Earth. Roughly, the CMEs' deflections can be classified as two different kinds. One is the deflection occurring in the corona, in which the CME's trajectory is controled by the distribution of the energy density of undisturbed coronal magnetic field. The other is that happenning in the IP space and in the ecliptic plane, in which the direction of the CME's propagation will be changed by the preceding or trailing background solar wind plasma depending on the velocity difference between the CME and ambient solar wind. Two models are proposed to describe the two different CME deflection behaviors, respectively. By applying the models to several cases, we may show that the trajectories of these CMEs predicted by the models match the observations fairly well.

  2. CME-CME Interaction As Revealed by MHD Simulations and SECCHI Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles; Roussev, Ilia; Moestl, Christian; Davies, Jackie; Gombosi, Tamas

    2012-07-01

    As we move towards solar maximum 24, immense progress can be expected in the forecasting and understanding of space weather and solar eruptions, thanks to the expanding fleet of satellites observing the Sun and the heliosphere (SOHO, Hinode, STEREO, SDO). As the frequency of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) increases to multiple eruptions per day, the interaction of successive CMEs in the inner heliosphere becomes more likely. CME-CME interaction is thought to be one major cause of intense and extreme geo-magnetic storms due to the compression of the magnetic field and the extended duration. In this talk, I will discuss how magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) models and remote-sensing observations can shed light on the physical processes during CME-CME interaction and help explain complex in situ measurements at 1 AU. I will present some recent remote-sensing observations by STEREO/SECCHI of CMEs interacting in the heliosphere and discuss how knowledge gained from past numerical and observational studies may help us predict geo-effective events associated with multiple CMEs from remote-sensing observations.

  3. Feasibility of a Knowledge Translation CME Program: "Courriels Cochrane"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland; Granikov, Vera; Theriault, Guylene; Fremont, Pierre; Burnand, Bernard; Mercer, Jay; Marlow, Bernard; Arroll, Bruce; Luconi, Francesca; Legare, France; Labrecque, Michel; Ladouceur, Roger; Bouthillier, France; Sridhar, Soumya Bindiganavile; Moscovici, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Systematic literature reviews provide best evidence, but are underused by clinicians. Thus, integrating Cochrane reviews into continuing medical education (CME) is challenging. We designed a pilot CME program where summaries of Cochrane reviews ("Courriels Cochrane") were disseminated by e-mail. Program participants automatically…

  4. Evaluating Conflicts of Interest in Research Presented in CME Venues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Nancy L.; Galliher, James M.; Spano, Mindy S.; Main, Deborah S.; Brannigan, Michael; Pace, Wilson D.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: There is much in the literature regarding the potential for commercial bias in clinical research and in continuing medical education (CME), but no studies were found regarding the potential for bias in reporting original research in CME venues. This pilot study investigated the presence of perceived bias in oral and print content of…

  5. Attendees' Perceptions of Commercial Influence in Noncommercially Funded CME Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, Elizabeth; Baer, Lee; Fromson, John A.; Gorrindo, Tristan; Iodice, Kristin E.; Birnbaum, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The controversy surrounding commercial support for continuing medical education (CME) programs has led to policy changes, but data show no significant difference in perceived bias between commercial and noncommercial CME. Indeed, what attendees perceive as commercial influence is not fully understood. We sought to clarify what…

  6. Developing an Instrument to Measure Bias in CME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takhar, Jatinder; Dixon, Dave; Donahue, Jill; Marlow, Bernard; Campbell, Craig; Silver, Ivan; Eadie, Jason; Monette, Celine; Rohan, Ivan; Sriharan, Abi; Raymond, Kathryn; Macnab, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The pharmaceutical industry, by funding over 60% of programs in the United States and Canada, plays a major role in continuing medical education (CME), but there are concerns about bias in such CME programs. Bias is difficult to define, and currently no tool is available to measure it. Methods: Representatives from industry and…

  7. Improved Cardiovascular Prevention Using Best CME Practices: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laprise, Rejean; Thivierge, Robert; Gosselin, Gilbert; Bujas-Bobanovic, Maja; Vandal, Sylvie; Paquette, Daniel; Luneau, Micheline; Julien, Pierre; Goulet, Serge; Desaulniers, Jean; Maltais, Paule

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: It was hypothesized that after a continuing medical education (CME) event, practice enablers and reinforcers addressing main clinical barriers to preventive care would be more effective in improving general practitioners' (GPs) adherence to cardiovascular guidelines than a CME event only. Methods: A cluster-randomized trial was…

  8. Comprehensive STEREO Observations of the 2008 February 4 CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. E.; Howard, R. A.; Plunkett, S. P.; Socker, D. G.

    2008-12-01

    Thanks to the two Heliospheric Imagers that are part of STEREO's SECCHI instrument package, the two STEREO spacecraft are the first that are capable of following a CME continuously from the Sun all the way to 1 AU, where the PLASTIC and IMPACT instruments on the spacecraft can then also provide in situ information on the CME, assuming it hits one of the the two satellites. We present the first kinematic study of a CME that has been observed in such a comprehensive manner. The event begins on 2008 February 4 and is successfully tracked by STEREO-A to 1 AU where it hits STEREO-B on February 7. This is therefore a good example of STEREO's capability for one satellite (STEREO-A in this case) to observe a white-light CME front hitting the other satellite (STEREO-B in this case) at the same time as that second satellite is measuring the CME properties in situ.

  9. Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Enthusiasm greeted the development of synthetic organic insecticides in the mid-twentieth century, only to see this give way to dismay and eventually scepticism and outright opposition by some. Regardless of how anyone feels about this issue, insecticides and other pesticides have become indispensable, which creates something of a dilemma. Possibly as a result of the shift in public attitude towards insecticides, genetic engineering of microbes was first met with scepticism and caution among scientists. Later, the development of genetically modified crop plants was met with an attitude that hardened into both acceptance and hard-core resistance. Transgenic insects, which came along at the dawn of the twenty-first century, encountered an entrenched opposition. Those of us responsible for studying the protection of crops have been affected more or less by these protagonist and antagonistic positions, and the experiences have often left one thoughtfully mystified as decisions are made by non-participants. Most of the issues boil down to concerns over delivery mechanisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:23852646

  10. Do locations of CME source regions relative to the HSB determine the appearance of the CME?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Zhao, X. P.

    2002-05-01

    The relationship between CMEs and the coronal helmet streamer belt has been the subject of several studies. Recent studies using SOHO/LASCO observation presented a rather complicated picture of this relationship (Subramanian et al., 1999). It has been suggested that a CME may blowout, create, disturb, have no effect on or be clearly displaced from a streamer. We investigate the possibility that these different interactions may be due to the locations of the CME source regions relative to the helmet streamer belt. Estimated Helmet streamer belt configurations obtained using Potential Field Source Surface Models based on SOHO/MDI synoptic maps are compared with combined LASCO-EIT movies on the LASCO website for this study.

  11. A framework for assessing the uncertainty in wave energy delivery to targeted subsurface formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karve, Pranav M.; Kallivokas, Loukas F.; Manuel, Lance

    2016-02-01

    Stress wave stimulation of geological formations has potential applications in petroleum engineering, hydro-geology, and environmental engineering. The stimulation can be applied using wave sources whose spatio-temporal characteristics are designed to focus the emitted wave energy into the target region. Typically, the design process involves numerical simulations of the underlying wave physics, and assumes a perfect knowledge of the material properties and the overall geometry of the geostructure. In practice, however, precise knowledge of the properties of the geological formations is elusive, and quantification of the reliability of a deterministic approach is crucial for evaluating the technical and economical feasibility of the design. In this article, we discuss a methodology that could be used to quantify the uncertainty in the wave energy delivery. We formulate the wave propagation problem for a two-dimensional, layered, isotropic, elastic solid truncated using hybrid perfectly-matched-layers (PMLs), and containing a target elastic or poroelastic inclusion. We define a wave motion metric to quantify the amount of the delivered wave energy. We, then, treat the material properties of the layers as random variables, and perform a first-order uncertainty analysis of the formation to compute the probabilities of failure to achieve threshold values of the motion metric. We illustrate the uncertainty quantification procedure using synthetic data.

  12. What Do EUV Dimmings Tell Us About CME Topology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, B. J.; DeRosa, M. L.; Fisher, R. R.; Krista, L. D.; Kwon, R. Y.; Mason, J. P.; Mays, M. L.; Nitta, N.; Savani, N.; West, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale coronal EUV dimmings, developing on timescales of minutes to hours in association with a flare or filament eruption, are known to exhibit a high correlation with coronal mass ejections. However, it is not clear why some CMEs have dimmings and some do not, nor is it clear how these dimmings relate to CME topology. The inner coronal coverage of SDO AIA and STEREO EUVI, combined with the extended field of view of PROBA2's SWAP imager, allow us the opportunity to map the topology of a dimming region in three dimensions into an erupting CME. Although the location and extent of a dimming region appears to be the best indicator of the inner "footprint" of a CME, the correlation is far from perfect. However, dimmings can provide vital clues about the development and 3D kinematics of a CME. This is particularly important as we are entering an extended period of time where STEREO coronagraph images will not always be available, and therefore the 3D properties of a CME will be difficult to deduce. Therefore, understanding the inner coronal manifestations of a CME can provide clues to its structure and dynamics, even without multi-viewpoint coronagraph observations. We present the results of this combined analysis effort, along with a discussion of how dimmings can be used in forecasting CME directions.

  13. On Flare and CME Predictability Based on Sunspot Group Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsós, M. B.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    We propose to apply the weighted horizontal magnetic gradient (WGM), introduced in Korsós et al. (2015), for analysing the pre-flare and pre-CME behaviour and evolution of Active Regions (ARs) using the SDO/HMI-Debrecen Data catalogue. To demonstrate the power of investigative capabilities of the WGM method in terms of flare/CME eruptions, we show the results of studying three typical active regions, namely, AR11818, AR12017 and AR11495. The choice of ARs represent typical cases of flaring with a fast CME, flare eruption without a CME and non-flaring cases, respectively. AR11818 produced an M1.4 energetic flare with a fast "halo" CME (vlinear=1202 km/s) while in AR12017 occurred an X1.0 flare without a CME. The AR11495 is a good example for non-flaring ARs. The value and temporal variation of WGM is found to possess potentially important diagnostic information about the intensity of expected flares. However, this test turns out not only to provide information about the intensity of expected flares but may also show whether a flare will occur with/without a fast CME.

  14. CME Interaction with Large-Scale Coronal Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswarny, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This talk presents some key observations that highlight the importance of CME interaction with other large scale structures such as CMEs and coronal holes . Such interactions depend on the phase of the solar cycle: during maximum, CMEs are ejected more frequently, so CME-CME interaction becomes dominant. During the rise phase, the polar coronal holes are strong, so the interaction between polar coronal holes and CMEs is important, which also leads to a possible increase in the number of interplanetary CMEs observed as magnetic clouds. During the declining phase, there are more equatorial coronal holes, so CMEs originating near these coronal holes are easily deflected. CMEs can be deflected toward and away from the Sun-Earth line resulting in interesting geospace consequences. For example, the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 23 was due to a CME that was deflected towards the Sun-earth line from E22. CME deflection away from the Sun-Earth line diminishes the chance of a CME producing a geomagnetic storm. CME interaction in the coronagraphic field of view was first identified using enhanced radio emission, which is an indication of acceleration of low energy (approx.10 keV) electrons in the interaction site. CME interaction, therefore, may also have implications for proton acceleration. For example, solar energetic particle events typically occur with a higher intensity, whenever multiple CMEs occur in quick succession from the same source region. CME deflection may also have implications to the arrival of energetic particles to earth because magnetic connectivity may be changed by the interaction. I illustrate the above points using examples from SOHO, STEREO, Wind, and ACE data .

  15. Tracking a CME from Cradle to Grave: A Multi-wavelength Analysis of the February 6-7, 1997 Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Kundu, M. R.; Hanaoka, Y.; Kosugi, T.; Hudson, H.; Nitta, N.; Thompson, B.; Gurman, J.; Plunkett, S.; Howard, R.; Burkepile, J.

    1997-05-01

    The partially earth-directed coronal mass ejection (CME) event of 1997 February 6-7 originated from the southwest quadrant of the sun. The CME accelerated from 170 km/s to about 830 km/s when it reached a distance of 25 solar radii. The CME was an arcade eruption followed by bright prominence core structures. The prominence core was tracked continuously from the solar surface to the interplanetary medium by combining data from the Nobeyama radioheliograph (microwaves), Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (He 10830 { Angstroms}), SOHO/EIT (EUV) and SOHO/LASCO (white light). The CME was accompanied by an arcade formation, fully observed by the YOHKOH/SXT (soft X-rays) and SOHO/EIT (EUV). The X-ray and EUV observations suggest that the reconnection proceeded from the northwest end to the southeast end of a filament channel. In the SOHO/EIT images, the the feet of the soft X-ray arcade were observed as EUV ribbons. The CME event also caused a medium sized geomagnetic storm: The hourly equatorial Dst values attained storm level during 18:00-19:00 UT on February 09. This means the disturbance took about 2.25 days to reach the Earth. The first signatures of an IP shock was a pressure jump in the WIND data around 13:00 UT on Feb 09, 1997 which lasted for about 14 hours, followed by flux rope signatures. This CME event confirms a number of ideas about CMEs: The three part structure (frontal bright arcade, dark cavity and prominence core), disappearing filament, elongated arcade formation, and terrestrial effects. We make use of the excellent data coverage from the solar surface to the Earth to address a number of issues regarding the origin and propagation of the geoeffective solar disturbances. We benefited from discussions at the first SOHO-Yohkoh Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop, held March 3-7, 1997, at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  16. CME front and severe space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Skoug, R.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Rajesh, P. K.; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Batista, I. S.; Ebihara, Y.; Nakamura, T.

    2014-12-01

    Thanks to the work of a number of scientists who made it known that severe space weather can cause extensive social and economic disruptions in the modern high-technology society. It is therefore important to understand what determines the severity of space weather and whether it can be predicted. We present results obtained from the analysis of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), solar energetic particle (SEP) events, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), CME-magnetosphere coupling, and geomagnetic storms associated with the major space weather events since 1998 by combining data from the ACE and GOES satellites with geomagnetic parameters and the Carrington event of 1859, the Quebec event of 1989, and an event in 1958. The results seem to indicate that (1) it is the impulsive energy mainly due to the impulsive velocity and orientation of IMF Bz at the leading edge of the CMEs (or CME front) that determine the severity of space weather. (2) CMEs having high impulsive velocity (sudden nonfluctuating increase by over 275 km s-1 over the background) caused severe space weather (SvSW) in the heliosphere (failure of the solar wind ion mode of Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor in ACE) probably by suddenly accelerating the high-energy particles in the SEPs ahead directly or through the shocks. (3) The impact of such CMEs which also show the IMF Bz southward from the leading edge caused SvSW at the Earth including extreme geomagnetic storms of mean DstMP < -250 nT during main phases, and the known electric power outages happened during some of these SvSW events. (4) The higher the impulsive velocity, the more severe the space weather, like faster weather fronts and tsunami fronts causing more severe damage through impulsive action. (5) The CMEs having IMF Bz northward at the leading edge do not seem to cause SvSW on Earth, although, later when the IMF Bz turns southward, they can lead to super geomagnetic storms of intensity (Dstmin) less than even -400 nT.

  17. SOHO Captures CME From X5.4 Solar Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this movie of the sun's coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with an X5.4 solar flare on the evening of March 6, 2012. The extremely fast and en...

  18. CME Onset and Take-Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2011-01-01

    For understanding and eventually predicting coronal mass ejections/eruptive flares, two critical questions must be answered: What is the mechanism for eruption onset, and what is the mechanism for the rapid acceleration? We address these questions in the context of the breakout model using 2.5D MHD simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The AMR capability allowed us to achieve ultra-high numerical resolution and, thereby, determine the influence of the effective Lundquist number on the eruption. Our calculations show that, at least, for the breakout model, the onset of reconnection external to the highly sheared filament channel is the onset mechanism. Once this reconnection turns on, eruption is inevitable. However, as long as this is the only reconnection in the system, the eruption remains slow. We find that the eruption undergoes an abrupt "take-off" when the flare reconnection below the erupting plasmoid develops significant reconnection jets. We conclude that in fast CMEs, flare reconnection is the primary mechanism responsible for both flare heating and CME acceleration. We discuss the implications of these results for SDO observations and describe possible tests of the model.

  19. Comparisons of Remote And In-situ CME Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinard, Alysha; Mulligan, T.; Lynch, B.

    2011-05-01

    We present a comparison of remote and in-situ CME ejecta using data from the Ulysses and SOHO missions. Quadrature occurs when two spacecraft form a 90 degree angle with the Sun. Quadrature studies allow the comparison of visible features of limb CMEs and and in-situ ICME properties. We investigate several events, including so-called "cannibal" CMEs, and compare the relationship between CME morphology and in-situ structures such as magnetic field, composition, and plasma properties.

  20. Evaluation of a thiolated chitosan scaffold for local delivery of BMP-2 for osteogenic differentiation and ectopic bone formation.

    PubMed

    Bae, In-Ho; Jeong, Byung-Chul; Kook, Min-Suk; Kim, Sun-Hun; Koh, Jeong-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Thiolated chitosan (Thio-CS) is a well-established pharmaceutical excipient for drug delivery. However, its use as a scaffold for bone formation has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of Thio-CS in bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) delivery and bone formation. In vitro study showed that BMP-2 interacted with the Thio-CS and did not affect the swelling behavior. The release kinetics of BMP-2 from the Thio-CS was slightly delayed (70%) within 7 days compared with that from collagen gel (Col-gel, 85%), which is widely used in BMP-2 delivery. The BMP-2 released from Thio-CS increased osteoblastic cell differentiation but did not show any cytotoxicity until 21 days. Analysis of the in vivo ectopic bone formation at 4 weeks of posttransplantation showed that use of Thio-CS for BMP-2 delivery induced more bone formation to a greater extent (1.8 fold) than that of Col-gel. However, bone mineral density in both bones was equivalent, regardless of Thio-CS or Col-gel carrier. Taken together, Thio-CS system might be useful for delivering osteogenic protein BMP-2 and present a promising bone regeneration strategy. PMID:24024213

  1. Coronal Current Sheet Evolution in the Aftermath of a CME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bemporad, A.; Poletto, G.; Suess, S. T.; Ko, Y.-K.; Schwadron, N. A.; Elliott, H. A.; Raymond, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    We report on SOHO-UVCS observations of coronal restructuring following a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) on November 26, 2002, at the time of a SOHO-Ulysses quadrature campaign. Starting about 3 hours after the CME, which was directed towards Ulysses, UVCS began taking spectra at 1.7 solar radii, covering emission from both cool and hot plasma. Observations continued, with occasional gaps, for more than 2 days. Emission in the 974.8 Angstrom line of [Fe XVIII], indicating temperatures above 6x10(6) K, was observed throughout the campaign in a spatially limited location. Comparison with EIT images shows the [Fe XVIII] emission to overlie a growing post-flare loop system formed in the aftermath of the CME. The emission most likely originates in a current sheet overlying the arcade. Analysis of the [Fe XVIII] emission allows us to infer the evolution of physical parameters in the current sheet over the entire span of our observations: in particular, we give the temperature vs. time in the current sheet and estimate the density. Ulysses was directly above the location of the CME and intercepted the ejecta. High ionization state Fe was detected by SWICS throughout the magnetic cloud associated with the CME, although the rapid temporal variation suggests bursty, rather than smooth, reconnection in the coronal current sheet. Both the remote and in situ observations are compared with predictions of theoretical CME models.

  2. Current Sheet Evolution in the Aftermath of a CME Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bemporad, A.; Poletto, G.; Suess, S. T.; Ko, Y.-K.; Schwadron, N. A.; Elliott, H. A.; Raymond, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    We report on SOHO-UVCS observations of the coronal restructuring following a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) on November 26,2002, at the time of a SOHO-Ulysses quadrature campaign. Starting about 3 hours after a CME in the NW quadrant, UVCS began taking spectra at 1.7 solar radius, covering emission from both cool and hot plasma. Observations continued, with occasional gaps, for more than 2 days. Emission in the 974.8 Angstrom line of [Fe XVIII], indicating temperatures above 6 x 10(exp 6) K, was observed throughout the campaign in a spatially limited location. Comparison with EIT images shows the Fe XVIII emission to overlie a growing post-flare loop system formed in the aftermath of the CME. The emission most likely originates in a current sheet overlying the arcade. Analysis of the [Fe XVIII] emission allows us to infer the evolution of physical parameters in the current sheet over the entire span of our observations: in particular, we give the temperature vs. time in the current sheet and estimate the density. At the time of the quadrature, Ulysses was directly above the location of the CME and intercepted the ejecta. High ionization state Fe was detected by Ulysses-SWICS throughout the magnetic cloud associated with the CME. Both the remote and in situ observations are compared with predictions of theoretical CME models.

  3. What Do EUV Dimmings Tell Us About CME Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Barbara J.; DeRosa, Marc L.; Fisher, Richard R.; Krista, Larisza D.; Kwon, Ryun Young; Mason, James P.; Mays, Mona L.; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Webb, David F.; West, Matthew J.

    2015-04-01

    Large-scale coronal EUV dimmings develop on timescales of hours in association with a flare or filament eruption, and are known to be well correlated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). However, it is not clear why some CMEs have dimmings and some do not, nor is it clear how these dimmings relate to CME topology. The inner coronal coverage of SDO AIA and STEREO EUVI, combined with the extended field of view of PROBA2's SWAP imager, allow us the opportunity to map the topology of a dimming region in three dimensions into an erupting CME. Although the location and extent of a dimming region appears to be the best indicator of the inner "footprint" of a CME, the correlation is far from perfect. However, dimmings can provide vital clues about the development and 3D kinematics of CMEs. This is particularly important as we are currently in an extended period where the STEREO coronagraph images are not always available and are increasingly "mirroring" LASCO images, and therefore the 3D properties of a CME will be difficult to deduce. Thus, understanding the inner coronal manifestations of a CME can provide clues to its structure and dynamics, even without multi-viewpoint coronagraph observations. We present the results of this combined analysis effort, along with a discussion of how dimmings can be used to forecast CME trajectories.

  4. The Nature of CME-flare-Associated Coronal Dimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. X.; Qiu, J.

    2016-07-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming that is evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As the emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect the properties of CMEs in the early phase of their eruption. In this study, we analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on 2011 December 26. We use the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory for disk observations of the dimming, and analyze images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory to obtain the height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also measure the magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to the flare ribbons, and it is observed in multiple EUV passbands. Rapid dimming starts after the onset of fast reconnection and CME acceleration, and its evolution tracks the CME height and flare reconnection. The spatial distribution of dimming exhibits cores of deep dimming with a rapid growth, and their light curves are approximately linearly scaled with the CME height profile. From the dimming analysis we infer the process of the CME expansion, and estimate properties of the CME.

  5. Automated Prediction of CMEs Using Machine Learning of CME - Flare Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qahwaji, R.; Colak, T.; Al-Omari, M.; Ipson, S.

    2008-04-01

    Machine-learning algorithms are applied to explore the relation between significant flares and their associated CMEs. The NGDC flares catalogue and the SOHO/LASCO CME catalogue are processed to associate X and M-class flares with CMEs based on timing information. Automated systems are created to process and associate years of flare and CME data, which are later arranged in numerical-training vectors and fed to machine-learning algorithms to extract the embedded knowledge and provide learning rules that can be used for the automated prediction of CMEs. Properties representing the intensity, flare duration, and duration of decline and duration of growth are extracted from all the associated (A) and not-associated (NA) flares and converted to a numerical format that is suitable for machine-learning use. The machine-learning algorithms Cascade Correlation Neural Networks (CCNN) and Support Vector Machines (SVM) are used and compared in our work. The machine-learning systems predict, from the input of a flare’s properties, if the flare is likely to initiate a CME. Intensive experiments using Jack-knife techniques are carried out and the relationships between flare properties and CMEs are investigated using the results. The predictive performance of SVM and CCNN is analysed and recommendations for enhancing the performance are provided.

  6. Initiation of CMEs associated with filament eruption, and the nature of CME related shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainshtein, V. G.; Egorov, Ya. I.

    2015-02-01

    Using data from SDO, PROBA2 and other spacecraft, Fainshtein and Egorov (2013) have discovered processes accompanying initiation of six limb CMEs and have studied features of their motion. The said CMEs occurred after eruption of prominence or hot emission loop and were associated with X-ray flares. The follow-up study of the CMEs, associated with the prominence eruption, showed that the formation of such mass ejections and the initial stage of their motion may be characterised by special features. In this work, we give examples of CMEs with such features. We have revealed a positive correlation between the height of the CME-related eruptive prominence and the height of the frontal structure of CMEs measured before they began to move. By analysing two of the CMEs, using SDO data, we found out that the kinematics of CME body and its related shock differs considerably. We have established that the time dependence of shock position and velocity obtained from SDO data is in agreement with theoretical dependencies of variation in these motion parameters with time in the context of self-similar motion of an explosion shock. We have concluded that the shock are not piston-like with the CME body acting as a piston.

  7. Asymmetry in the CME-CME interaction process for the events from 2011 February 14-15

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Peinhart, V.; Vršnak, B.

    2014-04-20

    We present a detailed study of the interaction process of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) successively launched on 2011 February 14 (CME1) and 2011 February 15 (CME2). Reconstructing the three-dimensional shape and evolution of the flux ropes, we verify that the two CMEs interact. The frontal structure of both CMEs, measured along different position angles (PAs) over the entire latitudinal extent, reveals differences in the kinematics for the interacting flanks and the apexes. The interaction process is strongly PA-dependent in terms of timing as well as kinematical evolution. The central interaction occurs along PA-100°, which shows the strongest changes in kinematics. During interaction, CME1 accelerates from ∼400 km s{sup –1} to ∼700 km s{sup –1} and CME2 decelerates from ∼1300 km s{sup –1} to ∼600 km s{sup –1}. Our results indicate that a simplified scenario such as inelastic collision may not be sufficient to describe the CME-CME interaction. The magnetic field structures of the intertwining flux ropes and the momentum transfer due to shocks each play an important role in the interaction process.

  8. Rethinking CME: an imperative for academic medicine and faculty development.

    PubMed

    Davis, David A; Prescott, John; Fordis, C Michael; Greenberg, Stephen B; Dewey, Charlene M; Brigham, Timothy; Lieberman, Steve A; Rockhold, Robin W; Lieff, Susan J; Tenner, Thomas E

    2011-04-01

    To help address the clinical care gap, a working group discussed the future of faculty development in academic medicine, explored problems within the large, current enterprise devoted to continuing medical education (CME), and described four domains core to its revitalization and reformation. These domains are (1) preparing and supporting an engaged clinician-learner, (2) improving the quality of knowledge or evidence shared, (3) enhancing the means by which to disseminate and implement that knowledge and evidence, and (4) reforming the patient, health care, and regulatory systems in and for which the process of CME exists. Reshaping these domains requires the consideration of a more seamless, evidence-based, and patient-oriented continuum of medical education. Revitalizing CME also requires the full engagement of the academic medical community and its faculty. To achieve the goal of creating a new, more effective, seamless process of CME, the working group recommended an active faculty development process to develop strong clinician-learners, strong involvement of academic health center leaders, the development of an educational home for clinician-learners, and a meaningful national conversation on the subject of CME. PMID:21346497

  9. CME impact on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, Niklas J. T.; Alho, M.; André, M.; Andrews, D. J.; Behar, E.; Burch, J. L.; Carr, C. M.; Cupido, E.; Engelhardt, I. A. D.; Eriksson, A. I.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Goetz, C.; Goldstein, R.; Henri, P.; Johansson, F. L.; Koenders, C.; Mandt, K.; Nilsson, H.; Odelstad, E.; Richter, I.; Simon Wedlund, C.; Stenberg Wieser, G.; Szego, K.; Vigren, E.; Volwerk, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present Rosetta observations from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the impact of a coronal mass ejection (CME). The CME impacted on 5-6 Oct 2015, when Rosetta was about 800 km from the comet nucleus, and 1.4 AU from the Sun. Upon impact, the plasma environment is compressed to the level that solar wind ions, not seen a few days earlier when at 1500 km, now reach Rosetta. In response to the compression, the flux of suprathermal electrons increases by a factor of 5-10 and the background magnetic field strength increases by a factor of ˜2.5. The plasma density increases by a factor of 10 and reaches 600 cm-3, due to increased particle impact ionisation, charge exchange and the adiabatic compression of the plasma environment. We also observe unprecedentedly large magnetic field spikes at 800 km, reaching above 200 nT, which are interpreted as magnetic flux ropes. We suggest that these could possibly be formed by magnetic reconnection processes in the coma as the magnetic field across the CME changes polarity, or as a consequence of strong shears causing Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the plasma flow. Due to the limited orbit of Rosetta, we are not able to observe if a tail disconnection occurs during the CME impact, which could be expected based on previous remote observations of other CME-comet interactions.

  10. Numerical Simulation of a Slow Streamer-Blowout CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Benjamin J.; Masson, Sophie; Li, Yan; DeVore, C. Richard; Luhmann, Janet; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-06-01

    We present a 3D numerical MHD simulation of the 2008 Jun 2 gradual streamer blowout CME that had virtually no identifiable low coronal signatures. We energize the field by simple footpoint shearing along the source region's polarity inversion line and model the background solar wind structure using an ˜2MK isothermal wind and a low-order potential field source surface representation of the CR2070 synoptic magnetogram. Our results show that the CME ``initiation’’ is obtained by slowly disrupting the quasi-steady-state configuration of the helmet streamer, resulting in the standard eruptive flare picture that ejects the sheared fields, but very slowly, on a relatively large scale, and with very little magnetic energy release. We obtain a relatively slow CME eruption of order the background solar wind speed and argue that these slow streamer blowout CMEs (now also known as ``stealth CMEs’’) are simply at the lowest end of the CME energy distribution. We present comparisons of the CME propagation through the corona (≤15Rs) in synthetic white-light images derived from the simulation density structure with multi-spacecraft coronagraph data from STEREO/SECCHI and SOHO/LASCO.

  11. A Tiny Eruptive Filament as a Flux-Rope Progenitor and Driver of a Large-Scale CME and Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Kochanov, A. A.; Kuzmenko, I. V.; Prosovetsky, D. V.; Egorov, Y. I.; Fainshtein, V. G.; Kashapova, L. K.

    2016-04-01

    A solar eruptive event SOL2010-06-13 observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has been extensively discussed in the contexts of the CME development and an associated extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave-like transient in terms of a shock driven by the apparent CME rim. Continuing the analysis of this event, we have revealed an erupting flux rope, studied its properties, and detected wave signatures inside the developing CME. These findings have allowed us to establish new features in the genesis of the CME and associated EUV wave and to reconcile all of the episodes into a single causally related sequence. i) A hot 11 MK flux rope developed from the structures initially associated with a compact filament system. The flux rope expanded with an acceleration of up to 3 km s-2 one minute before a hard X-ray burst and earlier than any other structures, reached a velocity of 420 km s-1, and then decelerated to about 50 km s-1. ii) The CME development was driven by the expanding flux rope. Closed coronal structures above the rope got sequentially involved in the expansion from below upwards, came closer together, and apparently disappeared to reveal their common envelope, the visible rim, which became the outer boundary of the cavity. The rim was probably associated with the separatrix surface of a magnetic domain, which contained the pre-eruptive filament. iii) The rim formation was associated with a successive compression of the upper active-region structures into the CME frontal structure (FS). When the rim was formed, it resembled a piston. iv) The disturbance responsible for the consecutive CME formation episodes was excited by the flux rope inside the rim, and then propagated outward. EUV structures arranged at different heights started to accelerate, when their trajectories in the distance-time diagram were crossed by that of the fast front of this disturbance. v) Outside the rim and FS, the disturbance propagated like

  12. Capillary microextraction (CME) and its application to trace elements analysis and their speciation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Zheng, Fei; He, Man; Zhang, Nan

    2009-09-14

    As a solvent-free miniaturized sample preparation technique, capillary microextraction (CME) has been hyphenated with different analytical instruments for trace elements analysis of environmental, biological, food and pharmaceutical samples. This review discusses the fundamentals and recent development of CME, including the theoretical basis, extraction modes (packed, open-tubular and monolithic CME) and capillary materials for CME. The emphasis is placed on the application of CME to trace/ultra-trace elements analysis and their speciation. Existing coating/monolithic materials used for CME are summarized together with a detailed overview of their preparation methods. PMID:19720168

  13. Global modeling of CME propagation in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzo, V. J.

    Begging the question of build-up, initiation, and launch, our ability to model the propagation of CMEs out into the interplanetary medium depends upon (1) how well we can characterize the timing, location, geometry, and dynamical content of the ejecta in the lower corona; (2) how well we know the background flow into which the CME propagates; and (3) how well we can describe the subsequent interaction between CME and the structured, background, quasi-steady wind. Simulations of CMEs are needed to help interpret observations of complicated transient structures and are essential to space weather applications. We assess where we stand in terms of observational and simulation capabilities for CME propagation models and offer suggestions for further development.

  14. Current Sheet Evolution In The Aftermath Of A CME Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bemporad, A.; Poletto, G.; Seuss, S. T.; Schwardron, N. A.; Elliott, H. A.; Raymond, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on SOHO UVCS observations of the coronal restructuring following a coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2002 November 26, at the time of a SOHO-Ulysses quadrature campaign. Starting about 1.5 hr after a CME in the northwest quadrant, UVCS began taking spectra at 1.7 R, covering emission from both cool and hot plasma. Observations continued, with occasional gaps, for more than 2 days. Emission in the 974.8 A line of [Fe XVIII], indicating temperatures above 6 x 10(exp 6) K, was observed throughout the campaign in a spatially limited location. Comparison with EIT images shows the [Fe XVIII] emission to overlie a growing post-flare loop system formed in the aftermath of the CME. The emission most likely originates in a current sheet overlying the arcade. Analysis of the [Fe XVIII] emission allows us to infer the evolution of physical parameters in the current sheet over the entire span of our observations: in particular, we give the temperature versus time in the current sheet and estimate its density. At the time of the quadrature, Ulysses was directly above the location of the CME and intercepted the ejecta. High ionization state Fe was detected by the Ulysses SWICS throughout the magnetic cloud associated with the CME, although its rapid temporal variation suggests bursty, rather than smooth, reconnection in the coronal current sheet. The SOHO-Ulysses data set provided us with the unique opportunity of analyzing a current sheet structure from its lowest coronal levels out to its in situ properties. Both the remote and in situ observations are compared with predictions of theoretical CME models.

  15. Validation of CME Detection Software (CACTus) by Means of Simulated Data, and Analysis of Projection Effects on CME Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, K.; Jacobs, C.; Robbrecht, E.; de Groof, A.; Berghmans, D.; Poedts, S.

    2011-05-01

    In the context of space weather forecasting, an automated detection of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) becomes more and more important for efficiently handling a large data flow which is expected from recently-launched and future solar missions. In this paper we validate the detection software package "CACTus" by applying the program to synthetic data from our 3D time-dependent CME simulations instead of observational data. The main strength of this study is that we know in advance what should be detected. We describe the sensitivities and strengths of automated detection, more specific for the CACTus program, resulting in a better understanding of CME detection on one hand and the calibration of the CACTus software on the other hand, suggesting possible improvements of the package. In addition, the simulation is an ideal tool to investigate projection effects on CME velocity measurements.

  16. Investigation of CME properties using the data of SDO and PROBA2 spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainshtein, V. G.; Egorov, Ya. I.

    2013-01-01

    Formation and motion (at the initial stage) of six limb CMEs detected in the period June 2010 to June 2011 are investigated using the high-resolution data of the PROBA2 and SDO spacecraft combined with the data of SOHO/LASCO coronagraphs. It is demonstrated that several loop-like structures of enhanced brightness originate in the region of CME formation, and they move one after another with, as a rule, different velocities. These loop-like structures in the final analysis form the frontal structure of CME. Time dependences of the velocity and acceleration of the ejection's front are obtained for all CMEs under consideration. A conclusion is drawn about possible existence of two classes of CMEs depending on their velocity time profiles. Ejections, whose velocity after reaching its maximum sharply drops by a value of more than 100 km/s and then goes over into a regime of slow change, belong to the first class. Another class of CMEs is formed by ejections whose velocity changes slowly immediately after reaching the maximum. It is demonstrated that the CME's angular dimension increases at the initial stage of ejection motion up to a factor of 3 with a time scale of doubling the angular size value within the limits 3.5-11 min since the moment of the first measurement of this parameter of an ejection. For three CMEs it is shown that at the initial stage of their motion for a certain time interval they are stronger expanded than grow in the longitude direction.

  17. Coronal magnetic reconnection driven by CME expansion—the 2011 June 7 event

    SciTech Connect

    Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Baker, D.; Green, L. M.; Williams, D. R.; Carlyle, J.; Kliem, B.; Long, D. M.; Matthews, S. A.; Török, T.; Pariat, E.; Valori, G.; Démoulin, P.; Malherbe, J.-M.

    2014-06-10

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) erupt and expand in a magnetically structured solar corona. Various indirect observational pieces of evidence have shown that the magnetic field of CMEs reconnects with surrounding magnetic fields, forming, e.g., dimming regions distant from the CME source regions. Analyzing Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations of the eruption from AR 11226 on 2011 June 7, we present the first direct evidence of coronal magnetic reconnection between the fields of two adjacent active regions during a CME. The observations are presented jointly with a data-constrained numerical simulation, demonstrating the formation/intensification of current sheets along a hyperbolic flux tube at the interface between the CME and the neighboring AR 11227. Reconnection resulted in the formation of new magnetic connections between the erupting magnetic structure from AR 11226 and the neighboring active region AR 11227 about 200 Mm from the eruption site. The onset of reconnection first becomes apparent in the SDO/AIA images when filament plasma, originally contained within the erupting flux rope, is redirected toward remote areas in AR 11227, tracing the change of large-scale magnetic connectivity. The location of the coronal reconnection region becomes bright and directly observable at SDO/AIA wavelengths, owing to the presence of down-flowing cool, dense (10{sup 10} cm{sup –3}) filament plasma in its vicinity. The high-density plasma around the reconnection region is heated to coronal temperatures, presumably by slow-mode shocks and Coulomb collisions. These results provide the first direct observational evidence that CMEs reconnect with surrounding magnetic structures, leading to a large-scale reconfiguration of the coronal magnetic field.

  18. Prediction of Active-Region CME Productivity from Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We report results of an expanded evaluation of whole-active-region magnetic measures as predictors of active-region coronal mass ejection (CME) productivity. Previously, in a sample of 17 vector magnetograms of 12 bipolar active regions observed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph, from each magnetogram we extracted a measure of the size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux a) and four measures of the nonpotentiality of the active region: the strong-shear length L(sub SS), the strong-gradient length L(sub SG), the net vertical electric current I(sub N), and the net-current magnetic twist parameter alpha (sub IN). This sample size allowed us to show that each of the four nonpotentiality measures was statistically significantly correlated with active-region CME productivity in time windows of a few days centered on the day of the magnetogram. We have now added a fifth measure of active-region nonpotentiality (the best-constant-alpha magnetic twist parameter (alpha sub BC)), and have expanded the sample to 36 MSFC vector magnetograms of 31 bipolar active regions. This larger sample allows us to demonstrate statistically significant correlations of each of the five nonpotentiality measures with future CME productivity, in time windows of a few days starting from the day of the magnetogram. The two magnetic twist parameters (alpha (sub 1N) and alpha (sub BC)) are normalized measures of an active region s nonpotentially in that they do not depend directly on the size of the active region, while the other three nonpotentiality measures (L(sub SS), L(sub SG), and I(sub N)) are non-normalized measures in that they do depend directly on active-region size. We find (1) Each of the five nonpotentiality measures is statistically significantly correlated (correlation confidence level greater than 95%) with future CME productivity and has a CME prediction success rate of approximately 80%. (2) None of the nonpotentiality

  19. 01.22.12: SOHO's View of Earth-directed CME

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory captured the coronal mass ejection (CME) in this video (which shows the sun's activity from January 19 to January 23). The CME is associate with an M8.7 class sol...

  20. Earnings in e-learning: knowledge, CME credits or both? Hints from analysis of attendance dynamics and users' behaviour.

    PubMed

    Mazzoleni, M Cristina; Rognoni, Carla; Finozzi, Enrico; Landro, Mauro; Capodaglio, Edda; Imbriani, Marcello; Giorgi, Ines

    2010-01-01

    Many papers report and convey positive opinion about the use of e-learning in the healthcare sector. The issue is how to exploit at best such a powerful instrument. Starting from data regarding the usage of a CME e-learning course, attendance dynamics and users' behaviour have been inspected with the aim of getting some hints about how to improve the development and the delivery of e-learning courses for CME, and to promote knowledge acquisition at best. The different paths followed by 7811 users have been modeled, from enrolment to conclusion/drop-out, then the behaviour in terms of effort, elapsed time, achieved result have been analyzed. The obtained results point out: good acceptance (retention rate 83%) of a not basic educational model and effectiveness (success rate 79%). At the same time the inspection of behaviour has shown that there is a good margin of possible improvement in terms of knowledge acquisition. Conclusions provide a list of issues to keep in mind during system development, in order to provide CME e-learning meeting both credit and knowledge acquisition goals. PMID:20841752

  1. Improving CME: Using Participant Satisfaction Measures to Specify Educational Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivieri, Jason J.; Regala, Roderick P.

    2013-01-01

    Imagine having developed a continuing medical education (CME) initiative to educate physicians on updated guidelines regarding high cholesterol in adults. This initiative consisted of didactic presentations and case-based discussions offered in 5 major US cities, followed by a Web-based enduring component to distill key points of the live…

  2. Quality framework proposal for Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Naomi G.; Arfman, John F.; Limary, Siviengxay

    2008-09-01

    This report proposes the first stage of a Quality Framework approach that can be used to evaluate and document Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects. The first stage of the Quality Framework defines two tools that will be used to evaluate a CME project. The first tool is used to decompose a CME project into its essential elements. These elements can then be evaluated for inherent quality by looking at the subelements that impact their level of quality maturity or rigor. Quality Readiness Levels (QRLs) are used to valuate project elements for inherent quality. The Framework provides guidance for the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders for CME project prerequisites that help to ensure the proper level of confidence in the deliverable given its intended use. The Framework also Provides a roadmap that defined when and how the Framework tools should be applied. Use of these tools allow the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders to understand what elements the project will use to execute the project, the inherent quality of the elements, which of those are critical to the project and why, and the risks associated to the project's elements.

  3. The new CORIMP CME catalog & 3D reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jason; Morgan, Huw; Gallagher, Peter; Habbal, Shadia; Davies, Jackie

    2015-04-01

    A new coronal mass ejection catalog has been built from a unique set of coronal image processing techniques, called CORIMP, that overcomes many of the limitations of current catalogs in operation. An online database has been produced for the SOHO/LASCO data and event detections therein; providing information on CME onset time, position angle, angular width, speed, acceleration, and mass, along with kinematic plots and observation movies. The high-fidelity and robustness of these methods and derived CME structure and kinematics will lead to an improved understanding of the dynamics of CMEs, and a realtime version of the algorithm has been implemented to provide CME detection alerts to the interested space weather community. Furthermore, STEREO data has been providing the ability to perform 3D reconstructions of CMEs that are observed in multipoint observations. This allows a determination of the 3D kinematics and morphologies of CMEs characterised in STEREO data via the 'elliptical tie-pointing' technique. The associated observations of SOHO, SDO and PROBA2 (and intended use of K-Cor) provide additional measurements and constraints on the CME analyses in order to improve their accuracy.

  4. Acceleration and Deceleration of Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, F.; Wu, S.; Feng, X. S.; Wu, C.

    2011-12-01

    A major challenge to the space weather forecasting community is accurate prediction of coronal mass ejections (CME) induced Shock Arrival Time (SAT) at Earth's environment. In order to improve the current accuracy, it is necessary to understand the physical processes of the acceleration and deceleration of the CME propagation in the heliosphere. We present a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the evolution of two interacting CMEs in a realistic ambient solar wind for the March 28-31, 2001 event. The forces which caused the acceleration and deceleration are analyzed in detail. The force which caused the acceleration are Lorenz force and pressure gradient and the forces which caused the deceleration are aerodynamic drag and the Sun's gravity. In addition the momentum exchange between the solar wind and the moving CMEs can cause acceleration and deceleration of the CME which are now analyzed. In this specific CME event (March 28-31, 2001), we also investigate the interactions of two CMEs causing the acceleration and deceleration of the CMEs.

  5. Determining CME-driven shock parameters from remote sensing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, L.; Bothmer, V.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large scale eruptions of magnetized plasma propagating from the Sun into interplanetary space with speeds varying from a few tens to more than 2500 km s-1. They cause large-scale turbulence in the heliosphere and are the major drivers of space weather. Fast CMEs drive strong shocks in the corona and interplanetary medium and generate plasma turbulence in the post-shock regions ahead of the CME bodies. In this work results from the detailed analysis of a strong CME and shock event on April 3, 2010 are summarized. For this event the solar source region is identified and the CME and shock kinematics are determined from time series of white light images obtained by the SECCHI suite on board the STEREO spacecrafts. The shock's standoff distance, compression ratio and Mach number are derived. A comparison of the derived values with the in-situ measurements shows good agreement. Further comparison of the shock MHD parameters determined from remote sensing observations with in-situ data, including the calculation of power-spectra, will help validating the results and provide new insights into CME generated turbulence. The study will be extended to further events identified in STEREO observations.

  6. Didactic CME and Practice Change: Don't Throw that Baby out Quite yet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Curtis A.; Tooman, Tricia R.

    2012-01-01

    Skepticism exists regarding the role of continuing medical education (CME) in improving physician performance. The harshest criticism has been reserved for didactic CME. Reviews of the scientific literature on the effectiveness of CME conclude that formal or didactic modes of education have little or no impact on clinical practice. This has led…

  7. Obstetrician/Gynecologists and Postpartum Mental Health: Differences between CME Course Takers and Nontakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leddy, Meaghan A.; Farrow, Victoria A.; Joseph, Gerald F., Jr.; Schulkin, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing medical education (CME) courses are an essential component of professional development. Research indicates a continued need for understanding how and why physicians select certain CME courses, as well as the differences between CME course takers and nontakers. Purpose: Obstetrician-gynecologists (OB-GYNs) are health care…

  8. Dual Repression of the Multidrug Efflux Pump CmeABC by CosR and CmeR in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Grinnage-Pulley, Tara; Mu, Yang; Dai, Lei; Zhang, Qijing

    2016-01-01

    During transmission and intestinal colonization, Campylobacter jejuni, a major foodborne human pathogen, experiences oxidative stress. CosR, a response regulator in C. jejuni, modulates the oxidative stress response and represses expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. CmeABC, a key component in resistance to toxic compounds including antimicrobials and bile salts, is also under negative regulation by CmeR, a TetR family transcriptional regulator. How CosR and CmeR interact in binding to the cmeABC promoter and how CosR senses oxidative stress are still unknown. To answer these questions, we conducted various experiments utilizing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and transcriptional fusion assays. CosR and CmeR bound independently to two separate sites of the cmeABC promoter, simultaneously repressing cmeABC expression. This dual binding of CosR and CmeR is optimal with a 17 base pair space between the two binding sites as mutations that shortened the distance between the binding sites decreased binding by CmeR and enhanced cmeABC expression. Additionally, the single cysteine residue (C218) of CosR was sensitive to oxidation, which altered the DNA-binding activity of CosR and dissociated CosR from the cmeABC promoter as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Replacement of C218 with serine rendered CosR insensitive to oxidation, suggesting a potential role of C218 in sensing oxidative stress and providing a possible mechanism for CosR-mediated response to oxidative stress. These findings reveal a dual regulatory role of CosR and CmeR in modulating cmeABC expression and suggest a potential mechanism that may explain overexpression of cmeABC in response to oxidative stress. Differential expression of cmeABC mediated by CmeR and CosR in response to different signals may facilitate adaptation of Campylobacter to various environmental conditions. PMID:27468281

  9. Methods and apparatuses for reagent delivery, reactive barrier formation, and pest control

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Tyler [Pasco, WA; Kaplan, Daniel I [Aiken, SC; Last, George [Richland, WA

    2002-07-09

    A reagent delivery method includes positioning reagent delivery tubes in contact with soil. The tubes can include a wall that is permeable to a soil-modifying reagent. The method further includes supplying the reagent in the tubes, diffusing the reagent through the permeable wall and into the soil, and chemically modifying a selected component of the soil using the reagent. The tubes can be in subsurface contact with soil, including groundwater, and can be placed with directional drilling equipment independent of groundwater well casings. The soil-modifying reagent includes a variety of gases, liquids, colloids, and adsorbents that may be reactive or non-reactive with soil components. The method may be used inter alia to form reactive barriers, control pests, and enhance soil nutrients for microbes and plants.

  10. A slow release calcium delivery system for the study of reparative dentine formation.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A R; Kirk, E E; Robinson, D H; Kardos, T B

    1998-06-01

    Several liquid, semi-solid and solid delivery systems were formulated and tested to devise a method of reproducibly administering accurate micro-doses of calcium into a 700 microns diameter cavity in a rat maxillary incisor tooth, in the absence of hydroxyl ions. Development of this delivery system was necessary to facilitate studies of the mechanisms of pulpal repair and odontoblast differentiation. The principal requirements for the delivery system were that it should be easily administered into a small pulp exposure in the rat incisor and that a greater than 1000-fold range in calcium ion concentrations could be incorporated and delivered for a period of 2-3 days, preferably in an acidic environment to minimize the effect of non-specific nucleation under alkaline conditions. Poly- (ethylene) glycol microspheres were found to be an ideal vehicle. Under the in vitro dissolution conditions used, complete release of all calcium salts occurred within 12-15 hours, except for the very water-insoluble calcium stearate. It was anticipated that the release of calcium ions would be significantly more prolonged in vivo because of the physical constraints of the prepared cavity as well as the restricted access to fluid flow. PMID:9863419

  11. The television, school, and family project. V. The impact of curriculum delivery format on program acceptance.

    PubMed

    Brannon, B R; Dent, C W; Flay, B R; Smith, G; Sussman, S; Pentz, M A; Johnson, C A; Hansen, W B

    1989-07-01

    Social psychological interventions have been successful in preventing drug and tobacco use in adolescents, but target audience involvement has not been well documented. Examination of program acceptance is necessary to avoid ambiguity when interpreting findings within and across studies. This report presents results from a program acceptance study of a seventh-grade smoking/drug-use prevention and cessation field trial. The research design is an assessment of two experimentally manipulated variations in program delivery on the program acceptance of all provider and target groups involved. Experimental manipulations included classroom and mass broadcast television demonstrations of social resistance skills against pressures to smoke and use drugs. Three aspects of target audience program acceptance were assessed: participation, satisfaction, and perceived program efficacy. Respondents included the target audience (seventh-grade students and parents), instructors, classroom observers, and school administrative staff. Strong main effects of television delivery on student and parent participation were observed. The findings suggest the usefulness of student homework assignment to view television segments with parents at home as a strategy to achieve family involvement in school-based programs. Both television and classroom delivery separately demonstrated significant positive effects on overall program acceptance with moderate interactive effects on perceived program efficacy. While classroom teacher/observers and school administrators reported strong preferences for the experimental (social resistance) classroom curriculum, acceptance of experimental and comparison (information-based) curricula by the student/parent target audience was equivalent. PMID:2798371

  12. The Geo-Effectiveness of CME-Driven Shocks and Sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaz, Noé; Al-haddad, Nada; Schwadron, Nathan; Riley, Pete; Farrugia, Charles; Winslow, Reka

    2016-07-01

    Past studies have found that ˜30% of intense geomagnetic storms and ˜20% of moderate geomagnetic storms are caused by forward fast magnetosonic shocks and the sheath plasma and magnetic field behind these shocks, making shocks the second most important cause of geomagnetic storms after magnetic ejecta. Since only about 20% of fast-mode shocks are followed by a moderate geomagnetic storm, it is important to understand which shock and upstream properties are most effective in creating optimal conditions for the development of geomagnetic storms. To do so, we identify all fast-mode forwards shocks (˜100), for which the sheath region resulted in a moderate or intense geomagnetic storm during solar cycles 23 and 24 (1997 - 2015). We find that about half such shocks are shocks propagating into a preceding CME or shocks propagating into the sheath region of a preceding shock. Overall, only a small fraction of shocks propagating through normal solar wind are geo-effective (less than 15%), whereas the majority of shocks propagating through a previous CME are geo-effective. We further discuss the conditions which can result in the formation of southward Bz in the sheath region behind a shock.

  13. Coronal Magnetic Field Measurement Using CME-Driven Shock Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswarmy, Nat; Nitta, N.; Yashiro, S.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.

    2012-01-01

    Collisionless shocks form ahead of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) when the CME speed exceeds the Alfven speed of the ambient plasma in the corona and interplanetary medium. The shock stands at a distance from the CME flux rope that depends on the shock Mach number, the geometry of the driver, and the adiabatic index. While the shock ahead of the CME has been observed for a long time in the in situ data, it has been identified recently near the Sun in the coronagraphic and EUV images. Unlike in situ observations, the imaging observations are two dimensional, so one can better discern the CME-shock relationship near the Sun. Gopalswamy and Yashiro demonstrated that the coronal magnetic field can be derived from the shock standoff distance measured in coronagraphic images. The method involves measuring the standoff distance, the radius of curvature of the flux rope, and assuming the value of the adiabatic index and deriving the Alfvenic Mach number. The next step is to derive the Alfvenic Mach number from the measured shock speed and an estimate of the local solar wind speed. The final step involves deriving the magnetic field from the Alfven speed by measuring the local plasma density either from coronagraphic (polarized brightness) images or from the band-splitting of type II radio bursts. In this paper, we derive the combined magnetic field profile from near the Sun to the edge of the LASCO field of view (1.5 to 30 solar radii) and compare it with the current model profiles.

  14. CME Prediction from Line-of-Sight Magnetogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    We have previously shown for bipolar active regions that measures of active-region nonpotentiality from vector magnetograms are correlated with active-region CME productivity. We have now obtained a measure from line-of-sight magnetograms that is well correlated both with our measures of active-region nonpotentiality from vector magnetograms and with active-region CME productivity. The measure is the length of strong-gradient main neutral line (L(sub G)). This is the length of the bipolar region's main neutral line on which the potential transverse field is greater than 150G, and the gradient in the line-of-sight field is greater than 50G/Mm. From the sample of 17 MSFC magnetograms of 12 basically bipolar active regions used in our previous paper, we find that L(sub G) is strongly correlated with one of our vector-magnetogram measures of nonpotentiality, the length of strong-gradient main neutral line L(sub SS) (99.7%). We also find that L(sub G) is as strongly correlated with CME productivity (99.7%) as is L(sub SS). Being obtainable from line-of-sight magnetograms, L(sub G) makes the much larger data set of line-of-sight magnetograms (i.e. from SOHO/MDI and Kitt Peak) available for CME prediction study. This is especially important for evolutionary studies, with SOHO/MDI having no daylight, cloudy weather, or atmospheric seeing problems. This work was supported by funding from NSF's division of Atmospheric Sciences (Space Weather and Shine Programs) and by NASA's office of Space Science (Living with a Star program Solar and Heliospheric Physics Supporting Research and Technology program).

  15. The New CME: Focus Shifts to Improving Physician Performance.

    PubMed

    Ortolon, Ken

    2010-10-01

    The traditional method of physicians earning continuing medical education credits by attending a lecture or case conference, watching a webinar, or reading a journal article is being replaceed with performance improvement CME. Requiring a much greater level of physician involvement, it involves chart audits to measure current physician performance, followed by an intervention to change physician behavior. Performance is then remeasured to gauge the level of improvement. PMID:20890801

  16. Investigating the Relationship between Quality, Format and Delivery of Feedback for Written Assignments in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sopina, Elizaveta; McNeill, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Feedback can have a great impact on student learning. However, in order for it to be effective, feedback needs to be of high quality. Electronic marking has been one of the latest adaptations of technology in teaching and offers a new format of delivering feedback. There is little research investigating the impact the format of feedback has on…

  17. Type II Radio Bursts as an Indicator of CME Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, C. A.; St Cyr, O. C.; Henning, C.; Xie, H.; Gilbert, H. R.; Orlove, M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Odstrcil, D.

    2011-12-01

    We examined a subset of nine low-frequency radio events with type II radio bursts that drifted below 2 megahertz and were detected by the WAVES investigation on the WIND spacecraft. For each event, we identified the associated coronal mass ejection (CME) and derived the electron density using a model of solar wind plasma frequency (fp ≈ 9 * ne1/2, where fp is plasma frequency in kHz and ne is electron density in cm-3) . We also used the pb_inverter program in SolarSoft developed by Howard and Hayes to examine the electron density structure. Expanding on the Van De Hulst process of inverting polarized brightness measurements, the program inverts total brightness measurements from SOHO LASCO images to extract electron density information. From the electron density inferred from radio spectra, we derived the location of the CME using five standard electron density to height models (Leblanc, 1996; Saito, 1977; Bougeret, 1984; Alvarez, 1973; and Fainberg, 1971). Using images from the LASCO instrument on SOHO and the SECCHI instrument on STEREO, we extracted locations of the leading edge of the CME and compared the heights and velocities to those found using the frequency data. For the lowest frequency events, we also compared our results to the outputs of ENLIL, a time-dependent, three-dimensional, MHD model of the heliosphere hosted by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  18. Formation of thermo-sensitive polyelectrolyte complex micelles from two biocompatible graft copolymers for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Guiying; Meng, Yanfeng; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Junshen

    2014-07-01

    Thermo-sensitive polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) micelles assembled from two biocompatible graft copolymers chitosan-g-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (CS-g-PNIPAM) and carboxymethyl cellulose-g-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (CMC-g-PNIPAM) were prepared for delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The PEC micelles showed a narrow size distribution with core-shell structure, in which the core formed from positively charged CS and negatively charged CMC by electrostatic interactions and the shell formed from thermo-sensitive PNIPAM. The synthesized PEC micelles have lower critical solution temperatures (LCST) in the region of 37°C, which is favorable for smart drug delivery applications. The hydrogen bondings between PEC micelles and 5-FU increased the drug loading. Changing temperature, pH or ionic strength, a sustained and controlled release was observed due to the deformation of PEC micelles. Adding glutaraldehyde, a chemical crosslinking reagent, was an efficient way to reinforce the micelles structure and decrease the initial burst release. Cytotoxicity assays showed that drug-loaded PEC micelles retained higher cell inhibition efficiency in HeLa cells. PMID:23894021

  19. Effects of different polysaccharides on the formation of egg yolk LDL complex nanogels for nutrient delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingyong; Hu, Qiaobin; Wang, Taoran; Xue, Jingyi; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-11-20

    Five polysaccharides, pectin, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), gum arabic, carrageenan and alginate, were studied to form complex nanogels with egg yolk low density lipoprotein (LDL). All nanogels were smaller than 85nm with high negative zeta potential, while LDL/carrageenan and LDL/alginate nanogels exhibited more heterogeneous size distribution. Fourier transform infrared spectrum suggested that hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions were involved to form nanogels. Overall, significant expansion of nanogels was observed after encapsulation of curcumin, being studied as a model lipophilic nutrient. Fluorescence spectra evidenced that LDL provided non-polar microenvironment for curcumin and polysaccharides played an important role in the encapsulation process. All nanogels showed sustained release of curcumin under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Furthermore, nanoscale, smooth and spherical ultrafine dry powders of nanogels were obtained by innovative nano spray drying technology. Our study indicated that LDL/polysaccharides may serve as potential oral delivery systems for lipophilic nutrients. PMID:27561504

  20. Delivery of rhBMP-2 Plasmid DNA Complexes via a PLLA/Collagen Electrospun Scaffold Induces Ectopic Bone Formation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xia; Komatsu, David E; Hadjiargyrou, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The development of effective strategies for gene delivery is a critical goal in DNA-based tissue engineering. Previously, our laboratory utilized the process of electrospinning to fabricate plasmid DNA-based polymeric scaffolds. Although there lease of DNA was robust, the in vitro transfection efficiency was low. In order to optimize these results, we recently modified our approach and utilized a strategy to adsorb plasmid DNA transfection complexes onto a PLLA/Collagen I electrospun scaffold for the delivery of recombinant human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (rhBMP-2). BMP-2 was selected since it is currently clinically used to stimulate osteogenesis. Initially, we tested this approach using β-gal plasmid DNA complexes adsorbed onto PLLA/Collagen I scaffolds and obtained a transfection efficiency of 41% of that of the positive control (over 90%, DNA complexes in solution). Next, we utilized the same approach using the rhBMP-2 plasmid DNA complexes with the pre-osteoblastic. cell line, MC3T3, and detected robust (13-fold) expression of rhBMP-2 mRNA following transfection. Lastly, a mouse muscle pouch model was used to evaluate in vivo gene delivery efficacy and ectopic bone inducing capability of the scaffold adsorbed rhBMP-2 transfection complexes. Results showed that both rhBMP-2mRNA and protein were expressed and stimulated some ectopic bone formation. As such, adsorption of plasmid DNA complexes can be an effective strategy for tissue engineering in vivo, but further research is required to optimize our approach and obtain a clinically meaningful tissue response. PMID:27319221

  1. MHD simulations for investigating interaction processes between a CME and ambient solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Junmo; Magara, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    The interaction between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and ambient solar winds is one of the important issues of space weather because it affects the trajectory of a flying CME, which determines whether the CME hits the Earth and produces geomagnetic disturbances or not. In this study, two-step 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations including a spheromak-type CME and an ambient solar wind are performed to investigate their interaction processes such as deflection and rotation of a CME. We perform the 1st-step MHD simulation using averaged surface magnetic field data to construct a steady state with an ambient solar wind. A spheromak-type CME is then injected through the solar surface, and subsequent evolution is reproduced by performing the 2nd-step MHD simulation. We discuss key parameters that characterize interaction processes between a CME and ambient solar wind.

  2. STUDY OF THE 2007 APRIL 20 CME-COMET INTERACTION EVENT WITH AN MHD MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y. D.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Manchester, W. B.; Cohen, O.; Hansen, K. C.; Combi, M. R.; Gombosi, T. I.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-05-01

    This study examines the tail disconnection event on 2007 April 20 on comet 2P/Encke, caused by a coronal mass ejection (CME) at a heliocentric distance of 0.34 AU. During their interaction, both the CME and the comet are visible with high temporal and spatial resolution by the STEREO-A spacecraft. Previously, only current sheets or shocks have been accepted as possible reasons for comet tail disconnections, so it is puzzling that the CME caused this event. The MHD simulation presented in this work reproduces the interaction process and demonstrates how the CME triggered a tail disconnection in the April 20 event. It is found that the CME disturbs the comet with a combination of a 180 deg. sudden rotation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), followed by a 90 deg. gradual rotation. Such an interpretation applies our understanding of solar wind-comet interactions to determine the in situ IMF orientation of the CME encountering Encke.

  3. Interaction between CME and surrounding magnetic fields producing multiple flaring sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia M.

    2015-08-01

    L. van Driel-Gesztelyi (1,2,3), D. Baker (1), T. Török (4), E. Pariat (2), L.M. Green (1),D.R. Williams (1), J. Carlyle (1,5) G. Valori (1, 2), P. Démoulin (2), B. Kliem (1,7,8),D. Long (1), S.A. Matthews (1), J.-M. Malherbe (2)(1) UCL/MSSL, UK, (2) Paris Observatory, LESIA, CNRS, France, (3) Konkoly Observatory, Hungary, (4) Predictive Science, Dan Diego, USA, (5) Max Planck Inst., Göttingen, Germany, (6) INAF, Obs. Roma, Italy, (7) Potsdam Univ., Germany, (8) Yunnan Observatories, Kunming, ChinaAnalyzing Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations of the spectacular Coronal Mass Ejection eruption on 7 June 2011, we present evidence of coronal magnetic reconnection between the expanding magnetic structure of the CME and the magnetic fields of an adjacent active region (AR). The onset of reconnection first became apparent in the SDO/AIA images when filament plasma, originally contained within the erupting flux rope, was re-directed towards remote areas in the neighboring AR, tracing the change of large-scale magnetic connectivity. The observations are presented jointly with a topological analysis of the pre-eruption magnetic configuration, and a data-constrained numerical simulation of the three-AR complex, demonstrating the formation/intensification of current sheets along a pre-existing hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) at the interface between the CME and the neighboring AR, where a secondary flare ribbon was created. Reconnection across this current sheet resulted in the formation of new magnetic connections between the erupting magnetic structure and a neighboring AR about 200 Mm from the eruption site, in strong qualitative agreement with the observations. In addition, the CME temporarily created unusually dense plasma conditions around a reconnection region at high coronal altitudes, enabling us to observe emission resulting from it. We argue that this exceptional observation of a coronal brightening was directly observable at SDO/AIA wavelengths owing to the

  4. Quantum dot formation and dynamic scaling behavior of SnO2 nanocrystals induced by pulsed delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. W.; Lai, J. K. L.; Shek, C. H.

    2006-01-01

    Quantum dot formation and dynamic scaling behavior of SnO2 nanocrystals in coalescence regime for growth by pulsed-laser deposition is explored experimentally and theoretically, and the same is compared with that for continuous vapor deposition such as molecular-beam epitaxy. Using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, unusual quantum dots of SnO2 nanocrystals are studied. We present kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations for pulsed-laser deposition in the submonolayer regime and give a description of the island distance versus pulse intensity. We found that the scaling exponent for pulsed-laser deposition is 1.28±0.03, which is significantly lower as compared to that for molecular-beam epitaxy (1.62±0.03). Theoretical simulations reveal that this attractive difference can be pursued to the large fraction of multiple droplet coalescence under pulsed vapor delivery.

  5. Does Delivery Format Make a Difference in Learning about Global and Cultural Understanding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Janita; Hammons, Stacy A.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed a learning outcome for nontraditional seniors who were in accelerated degree programs in both online and on-site formats. Using items from the National Survey of Student Engagement, researchers explored engagement with global understanding and cultural awareness. A quantitative, single-case analysis method was used to determine…

  6. Analyzing Reasons for Non-Adoption of Distance Delivery Formats in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gergen, Theresa; Roblyer, M. D.

    2013-01-01

    Though distance education formats could help address an urgent need for growth in the occupational therapy assistant (OTA) workforce, distance methods are not as accepted in these programs as they are in other professional and clinical programs. This study investigated whether beliefs and levels of experience of OTA program directors shaped their…

  7. Crystal Structure of the Transcriptional Regulator CmeR From Campylobacter Jejuni

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, R.; Su, C.-C.; Shi, F.; McDermott, G.; Zhang, Q.; Yu, E.W.

    2009-06-01

    The CmeABC multidrug efflux pump, which belongs to the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) family, recognizes and extrudes a broad range of antimicrobial agents and is essential for Campylobacter jejuni colonization of the animal intestinal tract by mediating the efflux of bile acids. The expression of CmeABC is controlled by the transcriptional regulator CmeR, whose open reading frame is located immediately upstream of the cmeABC operon. To understand the structural basis of CmeR regulation, we have determined the crystal structure of CmeR to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, revealing a dimeric two-domain molecule with an entirely helical architecture similar to members of the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. Unlike the rest of the TetR regulators, CmeR has a large center-to-center distance (54 {angstrom}) between two N termini of the dimer, and a large flexible ligand-binding pocket in the C-terminal domain. Each monomer forms a 20 {angstrom} long tunnel-like cavity in the ligand-binding domain of CmeR and is occupied by a fortuitous ligand that is identified as glycerol. The binding of glycerol to CmeR induces a conformational state that is incompatible with target DNA. As glycerol has a chemical structure similar to that of potential ligands of CmeR, the structure obtained mimics the induced form of CmeR. These findings reveal novel structural features of a TetR family regulator, and provide new insight into the mechanisms of ligand binding and CmeR regulation.

  8. Modulating Hydrogel Crosslink Density and Degradation to Control Bone Morphogenetic Protein Delivery and In Vivo Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Julianne L.; Ma, Henry; Rai, Reena; Burdick, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) show promise in therapies for improving bone formation after injury; however, the high supraphysiological concentrations required for desired osteoinductive effects, off-target concerns, costs, and patient variability have limited the use of BMP-based therapeutics. To better understand the role of biomaterial design in BMP delivery, a matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-sensitive hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel was used for BMP-2 delivery to evaluate the influence of hydrogel degradation rate on bone repair in vivo. Specifically, maleimide-modified HA (MaHA) macromers were crosslinked with difunctional MMP-sensitive peptides to permit protease-mediated hydrogel degradation and growth factor release. The compressive, rheological, and degradation properties of MaHA hydrogels were characterized as a function of crosslink density, which was varied through either MaHA concentration (1–5 wt%) or maleimide functionalization (10–40 %f). Generally, the compressive moduli increased, the time to gelation decreased, and the degradation rate decreased with increasing crosslink density. Furthermore, BMP-2 release increased with either a decrease in the initial crosslink density or an increase in collagenase concentration (non-specific MMP degradation). Lastly, two hydrogel formulations with distinct BMP-2 release profiles were evaluated in a critical-sized calvarial defect model in rats. After six weeks, minimal evidence of bone repair was observed within defects left empty or filled with hydrogels alone. For hydrogels that contained BMP-2, similar volumes of new bone tissue were formed; however, the faster degrading hydrogel exhibited improved cellular invasion, bone volume to total volume ratio, and overall defect filling. These results illustrate the importance of coordinating hydrogel degradation with the rate of new tissue formation. PMID:24905414

  9. Evolution of two Flaring Active Regions With CME Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2008-12-01

    We study the coronal magnetic field structure of two active regions, one during solar activity minimum (June 2007) and another one during a more active time (January 2004). The temporal evolution was explored with the help of nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolations of SOLIS/VSM and NAOJ/SFT photospheric vector magnetograms. We study the active region NOAA 10960 observed on 2007 June 7 with three SOLIS/VSM snapshots taken during a small C1.0 flare of time cadence 10 minutes and six snapshots during a quiet period. The total magnetic energy in the active region was approximately 3 × 1025 J. Before the flare the free magnetic energy was about 5~% of the potential field energy. A part of this excess energy was released during the flare, producing almost a potential configuration at the beginning of the quiet period. The return to an almost potential structure can be assigned to a CME as recorded by the SoHO/LASCO instrument on 2007 June 07 around 10 minutes after the flare peaked, so that whatever magnetic helicity was bodily removed from the structure. This was compared with active region 10540 observed on 2004 January 18 -- 21, which was analyzed with the help of vector magnetograph data from the Solar Flare Telescope in Japan of time cadence of about 1 day. The free energy was Efree≈ 66~% of the total energy which was sufficiently high to power a M6.1 flare on January 20, which was associated with a CME 20 minutes later. The activity of AR 10540 was significantly higher than for AR 10960, as was the total magnetic energy. Furthermore, we found the common feature that magnetic energy accumulates before the flare/CME and a significant part of the excess energy is released during the eruption.

  10. Particle Acceleration by Cme-driven Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic particle (SEP) events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Peak particle intensities are a strong function of CME speed, although the intensities, spectra, and angular distributions of particles escaping the shock are highly modified by scattering on Alfven waves produced by the streaming particles themselves. Element abundances vary in complex ways because ions with different values of Q/A resonate with different parts of the wave spectrum, which varies with space and time. Just recently, we have begun to model these systematic variations theoretically and to explore other consequences of proton-generated waves.

  11. Scientific goals of the Cooperative Multiscale Experiment (CME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, William

    1993-01-01

    Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) form the focus of CME. Recent developments in global climate models, the urgent need to improve the representation of the physics of convection, radiation, the boundary layer, and orography, and the surge of interest in coupling hydrologic, chemistry, and atmospheric models of various scales, have emphasized the need for a broad interdisciplinary and multi-scale approach to understanding and predicting MCS's and their interactions with processes at other scales. The role of mesoscale systems in the large-scale atmospheric circulation, the representation of organized convection and other mesoscale flux sources in terms of bulk properties, and the mutually consistent treatment of water vapor, clouds, radiation, and precipitation, are all key scientific issues concerning which CME will seek to increase understanding. The manner in which convective, mesoscale, and larger scale processes interact to produce and organize MCS's, the moisture cycling properties of MCS's, and the use of coupled cloud/mesoscale models to better understand these processes, are also major objectives of CME. Particular emphasis will be placed on the multi-scale role of MCS's in the hydrological cycle and in the production and transport of chemical trace constituents. The scientific goals of the CME consist of the following: understand how the large and small scales of motion influence the location, structure, intensity, and life cycles of MCS's; understand processes and conditions that determine the relative roles of balanced (slow manifold) and unbalanced (fast manifold) circulations in the dynamics of MCS's throughout their life cycles; assess the predictability of MCS's and improve the quantitative forecasting of precipitation and severe weather events; quantify the upscale feedback of MCS's to the large-scale environment and determine interrelationships between MCS occurrence and variations in the large-scale flow and surface forcing; provide a data base

  12. Propagation of the 7 January 2014 CME and Resulting Geomagnetic Non-event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. L.; Thompson, B. J.; Jian, L. K.; Colaninno, R. C.; Odstrcil, D.; Möstl, C.; Temmer, M.; Savani, N. P.; Collinson, G.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P. J.; Zheng, Y.

    2015-10-01

    On 2014 January 7 an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) with a radial speed ≈2500 km s-1 was observed from near an active region close to disk center. This led many forecasters to estimate a rapid arrival at Earth (≈36 hr) and predict a strong geomagnetic storm. However, only a glancing CME arrival was observed at Earth with a transit time of ≈49 hr and a KP geomagnetic index of only 3-. We study the interplanetary propagation of this CME using the ensemble Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-ENLIL+Cone model, that allows a sampling of CME parameter uncertainties. We explore a series of simulations to isolate the effects of the background solar wind solution, CME shape, tilt, location, size, and speed, and the results are compared with observed in situ arrivals at Venus, Earth, and Mars. Our results show that a tilted ellipsoid CME shape improves the initial real-time prediction to better reflect the observed in situ signatures and the geomagnetic storm strength. CME parameters from the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model used as input to WSA-ENLIL+Cone, along with a tilted ellipsoid cloud shape, improve the arrival-time error by 14.5, 18.7, 23.4 hr for Venus, Earth, and Mars respectively. These results highlight that CME orientation and directionality with respect to observatories play an important role in understanding the propagation of this CME, and for forecasting other glancing CME arrivals. This study also demonstrates the importance of three-dimensional CME fitting made possible by multiple viewpoint imaging.

  13. Propagation of the 7 January 2014 CME and Resulting Geomagnetic Non-event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. L.; Thompson, B. J.; Jian, L. K.; Colaninno, R. C.; Odstrcil, D.; Möstl, C.; Temmer, M.; Savani, N. P.; Collinson, G.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P. J.; Zheng, Y.

    2015-10-01

    On 2014 January 7 an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) with a radial speed ≈2500 km s‑1 was observed from near an active region close to disk center. This led many forecasters to estimate a rapid arrival at Earth (≈36 hr) and predict a strong geomagnetic storm. However, only a glancing CME arrival was observed at Earth with a transit time of ≈49 hr and a K P geomagnetic index of only 3‑. We study the interplanetary propagation of this CME using the ensemble Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)–ENLIL+Cone model, that allows a sampling of CME parameter uncertainties. We explore a series of simulations to isolate the effects of the background solar wind solution, CME shape, tilt, location, size, and speed, and the results are compared with observed in situ arrivals at Venus, Earth, and Mars. Our results show that a tilted ellipsoid CME shape improves the initial real-time prediction to better reflect the observed in situ signatures and the geomagnetic storm strength. CME parameters from the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model used as input to WSA–ENLIL+Cone, along with a tilted ellipsoid cloud shape, improve the arrival-time error by 14.5, 18.7, 23.4 hr for Venus, Earth, and Mars respectively. These results highlight that CME orientation and directionality with respect to observatories play an important role in understanding the propagation of this CME, and for forecasting other glancing CME arrivals. This study also demonstrates the importance of three-dimensional CME fitting made possible by multiple viewpoint imaging.

  14. Effect on the Lunar Exosphere of a CME Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Roseamry M.; Hurley, Dana M.; Farrell, William M.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that solar wind bombardment onto exposed surfaces in the solar system will produce an energetic component to the exospheres about those bodies. Laboratory experiments have shown that the sputter yield can be noticeably increased in the case of a good insulating surface. It is now known that the solar wind composition is highly dependent on the origin of the particular plasma. Using the measured composition of the slow wind. fast wind. solar energetic particle (SEP) population. and coronal mass ejection (CME), broken down into its various components, we have estimated the total sputter yield for each type of solar wind. The heavy ion component, especially the He(++) component, greatly enhances the total sputter yield during times when the heavy ion population is enhanced, most notably during a coronal mass ejection. To simulate the etfect on the lunar exosphere of a CME passage past the Moon, we ran a Monte Carlo code for the species Na, K, Mg and Ca.

  15. Effect on the Lunar Exosphere of a CME Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Hurley, Dana M.; Farrell, William M.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that solar wind bombardment onto exposed surfaces in the solar system will produce an energetic component to the exospheres about those bodies. Laboratory experiments have shown that the sputter yield can be noticeably increased in the case of a good insulating surface. It is now known that the solar wind composition is highly dependent on the origin of the particular plasma. Using the measured composition of the slow wind, fast wind, solar energetic particle (SEP) population, and coronal mass ejection (CME), broken down into its various components, we have estimated the total sputter yield for each type of solar wind. The heavy ion component, especially the He++ component, greatly enhances the total sputter yield during times when the heavy ion population is enhanced, most notably during a coronal mass ejection. To simulate the effect on the lunar exosphere of a CME passage past the Moon, we ran a Monte Carlo code for the species Na, K, Mg and Ca.

  16. Acceleration of SEPs in Flaring Loops and CME Driven shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahe; Chen, Qingrong

    2014-06-01

    We consider two stage acceleration of the Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs). The first occurring via the stochastic acceleration mechanism at the flare site in the corona, which produces the so-called impulsive SEPs, with anomalous abundances, as well as nonthermal particles responsible for the observed radiation. The second is re-acceleration the flare accelerated particles at the CME driven shock associated with larger, longer duration events with relatively normal abundances. Turbulence plays a major role in both stages. We will show how stochastic acceleration can explain some of the salient features of the impulsive SEP observations; such as extreme enrichment of 3He (and heavy ions), and the observed broad distributions and ranges of the 3He and 4He fluences. We will then show that the above hybrid mechanism of first stochastic acceleration of ions in the reconnecting coronal magnetic structures and then their re-acceleration in the CME shock can produce the varied shapes of the 3He and 4He spectra observed in all events ranging from weak impulsive to strong gradual events.

  17. SEP acceleration in CME driven shocks using a hybrid code

    SciTech Connect

    Gargaté, L.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-09-01

    We perform hybrid simulations of a super-Alfvénic quasi-parallel shock, driven by a coronal mass ejection (CME), propagating in the outer coronal/solar wind at distances of between 3 to 6 solar radii. The hybrid treatment of the problem enables the study of the shock propagation on the ion timescale, preserving ion kinetics and allowing for a self-consistent treatment of the shock propagation and particle acceleration. The CME plasma drags the embedded magnetic field lines stretching from the sun, and propagates out into interplanetary space at a greater velocity than the in situ solar wind, driving the shock, and producing very energetic particles. Our results show that electromagnetic Alfvén waves are generated at the shock front. The waves propagate upstream of the shock and are produced by the counter-streaming ions of the solar wind plasma being reflected at the shock. A significant fraction of the particles are accelerated in two distinct phases: first, particles drift from the shock and are accelerated in the upstream region, and second, particles arriving at the shock get trapped and are accelerated at the shock front. A fraction of the particles diffused back to the shock, which is consistent with the Fermi acceleration mechanism.

  18. CME dynamics using coronagraph and interplanetary ejecta observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Lago, Alisson; Demítrio Gonzalez Alarcon, Walter; da Silva, Marlos; de Lucas, Aline; Braga, Carlos Roberto; Ramos Vieira, Lucas

    One of the key issues of Space Weather is the dynamics of coronal mass ejections, from their release from the Sun, their propagation throughout the interplanetary space, eventually im-pacting the earth and other planets. These impacts of CMEs are the most important drivers of space weather phenomena. A number of empirical and analytical studies have addressed this point so far, using observations from coronagraphs and interplanetary monitors, in order to correlate CMEs observed near the Sun and in situ (e.g. earth vincity). However, results are far from conclusive. Error bars in CME travel time predictions from the Sun to earth, are of the order of 1 day, which is considerably big for the typical time scale of 1 to 3 days of their travel time. After many years of intensive investigations of CMEs observed with the Large An-gle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO), abord the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we found that the subset of interplanetary counterparts of CMEs, the ICMEs, with a well defined ejecta structure are those with best predictable behaviour. The prediction of these interplanetary ejecta travel time to earth, using coronagraph observations is the one with lowest error bar among other sets of events, such as interplanetary shock. We present a statistic study of all the CME-ejecta events observed by SOHO and by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite since 1997.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of CME Deflections in the Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Bin; Shen, Chenglong; Wang, Yuming; Ye, Pinzhong; Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Xuepu

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, ten CME events viewed by the STEREO twin spacecraft are analyzed to study the deflections of CMEs during their propagation in the corona. Based on the three-dimensional information of the CMEs derived by the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model (Thernisien, Howard, and Vourlidas in Astrophys. J. 652, 1305, 2006), it is found that the propagation directions of eight CMEs had changed. By applying the theoretical method proposed by Shen et al. ( Solar Phys. 269, 389, 2011) to all the CMEs, we found that the deflections are consistent, in strength and direction, with the gradient of the magnetic energy density. There is a positive correlation between the deflection rate and the strength of the magnetic energy density gradient and a weak anti-correlation between the deflection rate and the CME speed. Our results suggest that the deflections of CMEs are mainly controlled by the background magnetic field and can be quantitatively described by the magnetic energy density gradient (MEDG) model.

  20. Effects of Alternate Format In-Service Delivery on Teacher Knowledge Base and Problem-Solving Related to Autism & Adaptations: What Teachers Need to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruening, Marie Diane

    2010-01-01

    This study's purpose was to explore effectiveness of alternate format in-service delivery for what teachers needed to know to effectively teach their students with Autism Spectrum Disorder/High Functioning Autism/Asperger Syndrome (ASD/HFA/AS) in the general education setting. The study's research questions included: Did participants learn…

  1. An Intense Flare-CME Event in 2015: Propagation and Interaction Effects Between the Sun and Earth's Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johri, Abhishek; Manoharan, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    We report the interplanetary effects of a fast coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with the intense X2.7 flare that occurred on 05 May 2015. The near-Sun signatures of the CME at low-coronal heights [ {<} 2 R_{⊙}] are obtained from the EUV images at 171 Å and metric radio observations. The intensity and duration of the CME-driven radio bursts in the near-Sun and interplanetary medium indicate this CME event to be an energetic one. The interplanetary-scintillation data, along with the low-frequency radio spectrum, played a crucial role in understanding the radial evolution of the speed and expansion of the CME in the inner heliosphere as well as its interaction with a preceding slow CME. The estimation of the speed of the CME at several points along the Sun to 1 AU trajectory shows that: i) the CME went through a rapid acceleration as well as expansion up to a height of {≈} 6 R_{⊙}, and ii) the CME continued to propagate at speed {≥} 800 k} s^{-1} between the Sun and 1 AU. These results show that the CME likely overcame the drag exerted by the ambient/background solar wind with the support of its internal magnetic energy. When the CME interacted with a slow, preceding CME, the turbulence level associated with the CME-driven disturbance increased significantly.

  2. An Intense Flare-CME Event in 2015: Propagation and Interaction Effects Between the Sun and Earth's Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johri, Abhishek; Manoharan, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    We report the interplanetary effects of a fast coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with the intense X2.7 flare that occurred on 05 May 2015. The near-Sun signatures of the CME at low-coronal heights [{<} 2 R_{⊙}] are obtained from the EUV images at 171 Å and metric radio observations. The intensity and duration of the CME-driven radio bursts in the near-Sun and interplanetary medium indicate this CME event to be an energetic one. The interplanetary-scintillation data, along with the low-frequency radio spectrum, played a crucial role in understanding the radial evolution of the speed and expansion of the CME in the inner heliosphere as well as its interaction with a preceding slow CME. The estimation of the speed of the CME at several points along the Sun to 1 AU trajectory shows that: i) the CME went through a rapid acceleration as well as expansion up to a height of {≈} 6 R_{⊙}, and ii) the CME continued to propagate at speed {≥} 800 km s^{-1} between the Sun and 1 AU. These results show that the CME likely overcame the drag exerted by the ambient/background solar wind with the support of its internal magnetic energy. When the CME interacted with a slow, preceding CME, the turbulence level associated with the CME-driven disturbance increased significantly.

  3. Biomimetic synthesized bimodal nanoporous silica: Bimodal mesostructure formation and application for ibuprofen delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Xu, Lu; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Hongyu; Lu, Fangzheng; Li, Sanming

    2016-01-01

    The present paper innovatively reports bimodal nanoporous silica synthesized using biomimetic method (B-BNS) with synthesized polymer (C16-L-serine) as template. Formation mechanism of B-BNS was deeply studied and exploration of its application as carrier of poorly water-soluble drug ibuprofen (IBU) was conducted. The bimodal nanopores and curved mesoscopic channels of B-BNS were achieved due to the dynamic self-assembly of C16-L-serine induced by silane coupling agent (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APTES) and silica source (tetraethoxysilane, TEOS). Characterization results confirmed the successful synthesis of B-BNS, and particularly, nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurement demonstrated that B-BNS was meso-meso porous silica material. In application, B-BNS loaded IBU with high drug loading content due to its enlarged nanopores. After being loaded, IBU presented amorphous phase because nanoporous space and curved mesoscopic channels of B-BNS prevented the crystallization of IBU. In vitro release result revealed that B-BNS controlled IBU release with two release phases based on bimodal nanopores and improved dissolution in simulated gastric fluid due to crystalline conversion of IBU. It is convincible that biomimetic method provides novel theory and insight for synthesizing bimodal nanoporous silica, and unique functionalities of B-BNS as drug carrier can undoubtedly promote the application of bimodal nanoporous silica and development of pharmaceutical science. PMID:26478410

  4. A Reflective Learning Framework to Evaluate CME Effects on Practice Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Kit H.; Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland; Weston, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The importance of reflective practice is recognized by the adoption of a reflective learning model in continuing medical education (CME), but little is known about how to evaluate reflective learning in CME. Reflective learning seldom is defined in terms of specific cognitive processes or observable performances. Competency-based…

  5. Promoting Free Online CME for Intimate Partner Violence: What Works at What Cost?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John M., Jr.; Novalis-Marine, Cheryl; Amend, Robert W.; Surprenant, Zita J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: There is a need to provide practicing physicians with training on the recognition and management of intimate partner violence (IPV). Online continuing medical education (CME) could help meet this need, but there is little information on the costs and effectiveness of promoting online CME to physicians. This lack of information may…

  6. Effect of CME on Primary Care and OB/GYN Treatment of Breast Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, David W.; Xu, Stanley; McClure, David

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: CME program planners are being asked to move beyond assessments of knowledge to assessing the impact of CME on practice and patient outcomes. Methods: We conducted a pre-post analysis of administrative data from 107 physicians, nurse practitioners (NPs), or physician's assistants (PAs) who attended one or two continuing medical…

  7. Preliminary structural studies of the transcriptional regulator CmeR from Campylobacter jejuni

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Chih-Chia; Shi, Feng; Gu, Ruoyu; Li, Ming; McDermott, Gerry; Yu, Edward W.; Zhang, Qijing

    2007-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator CmeR from C. jejuni has been purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to a resolution of 2.2 Å. In Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans, the CmeR regulatory protein controls transcription of the multidrug transporter gene operon cmeABC. CmeR belongs to the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. The 210-residue CmeR consists of two functional motifs: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal ligand-binding domain. It is predicted that the DNA-binding domain interacts directly with target promoters, while the C-terminal motif interacts with inducing ligands (such as bile salts). As an initial step towards confirming this structural model, recombinant CmeR protein containing a 6×His tag at the N-terminus was crystallized. Crystals of ligand-free CmeR belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.4, b = 57.6, c = 93.3 Å. Diffraction was observed to at least 2.2 Å at 100 K. Analysis of the detailed CmeR structure is currently in progress.

  8. Controlling Quality in CME/CPD by Measuring and Illuminating Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, David; Takhar, Jatinder; Macnab, Jennifer; Eadie, Jason; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Stenerson, Heather; Francois, Jose; Bell, Mary; Monette, Celine; Campbell, Craig; Marlow, Bernie

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: There has been a surge of interest in the area of bias in industry-supported continuing medical education/continuing professional development (CME/CPD) activities. In 2007, we published our first study on measuring bias in CME, demonstrating that our assessment tool was valid and reliable. In light of the increasing interest in this…

  9. KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY OF THE CME RECONNECTION OUTFLOW LAYER IN THE LOW CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Foullon, Claire; Verwichte, Erwin; Nykyri, Katariina; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Hannah, Iain G.

    2013-04-20

    New capabilities for studying the Sun allow us to image for the first time the magnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability developing at the surface of a fast coronal mass ejecta (CME) less than 150 Mm above the solar surface. We conduct a detailed observational investigation of this phenomenon, observed off the east solar limb on 2010 November 3, in the EUV with SDO/AIA. In conjunction with STEREO-B/EUVI, we derive the CME source surface position. We ascertain the timing and early evolution of the CME outflow leading to the instability onset. We perform image and spectral analysis, exploring the CME plasma structuring and its parabolic flow pattern. As we evaluate and validate the consistency of the observations with theoretical considerations and predictions, we take the view that the ejecta layer corresponds to a reconnection outflow layer surrounding the erupting flux rope, accounting for the timing, high temperature ({approx}11.6 MK), and high flow shear ({approx}680 km s{sup -1}) on the unstable CME northern flank and for the observed asymmetry between the CME flanks. From the irregular evolution of the CME flow pattern, we infer a shear gradient consistent with expected spatial flow variations across the KH-unstable flank. The KH phenomenon observed is tied to the first stage of a linked flare-CME event.

  10. Measuring Classroom Management Expertise (CME) of Teachers: A Video-Based Assessment Approach and Statistical Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    König, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The study aims at developing and exploring a novel video-based assessment that captures classroom management expertise (CME) of teachers and for which statistical results are provided. CME measurement is conceptualized by using four video clips that refer to typical classroom management situations in which teachers are heavily challenged…

  11. MULTI-SPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS OF THE 2008 JANUARY 2 CME IN THE INNER HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X. H.; Feng, X. S.; Xiang, C. Q.; Li, Z.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, S. T.

    2010-05-10

    We perform a detailed analysis of a coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2008 January 2. The combination of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the twin STEREO spacecraft provides three-point observations of this CME. We track the CME in imaging observations and compare its morphology and kinematics viewed from different vantage points. The shape, angular width, distance, velocity, and acceleration of the CME front are different in the observations of these spacecraft. We also compare the efficiency of several methods, which convert the elongation angles of the CME front in images to radial distances. The results of our kinematic analysis demonstrate that this CME experiences a rapid acceleration at the early stage, which corresponds to the flash phase of the associated solar flare in time. Then, at a height of about 3.7 solar radius, the CME reaches a velocity of 790 km s{sup -1} and propagates outward without an obvious deceleration. Because of its propagation direction away from the observers, the CME is not detected in situ by either ACE or STEREO.

  12. Promoting Physician Preventive Practices: Needs Assessment for CME in Breast Cancer Detection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Dorothy S.; Burg, Mary Ann

    1989-01-01

    Needs assessment for a continuing medical education (CME) intervention directed at increasing breast cancer screening of women over 50 included a survey of target primary care physicians (n=323) to explore areas of interest for CME in breast care detection and to establish baseline screening practices. A survey of 1,440 women in the target age…

  13. Automatic CME front edge detection from STEREO white-light coronagraph images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirnosov, Vladimir; Chang, Lin-Ching; Pulkkinen, Antti

    2015-08-01

    The coronagraph images captured by a Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) Ahead/Behind (A/B) spacecraft allow tracking of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from two different viewpoints and reconstructing its propagation in three-dimensional space. The reconstruction can be done using a triangulation technique that requires a CME front edge location. There are currently no robust automatic CME front edge detection methods that can be integrated with the triangulation technique. In this paper, we propose a novel automatic method to detect the front edge of the CME using STEREO coronagraph 2 red-colored Red, Green, Blue color model images. Our method consists of two modules: preprocessing and classification. The preprocessing module decomposes each coronagraph image into its three channels and uses only the red channel image for CME segmentation. The output of the preprocessing module is a set of segmented running-difference binary images which is fed into the classification module. These images are then transformed into polar coordinates followed by CME front edge detection based on the distance that CME travels in the field of view. The proposed method was validated against a manual method using total 56 CME events, 28 from STEREO A and 28 from STEREO B, captured in the period from 1 January 2008 to 16 August 2009. The results show that the proposed method is effective for CME front edge detection. The proposed method is useful in quantitative CME processing and analysis and will be immediately applicable to assist automatic triangulation method for real-time space weather forecasting.

  14. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A.; Byrne, Barry J.; Herzog, Roland W.; Daniell, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Summary Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. PMID:26053072

  15. Co-delivery of cell-wall-forming enzymes in the same vesicle for coordinated fungal cell wall formation.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Martin; Martin-Urdiroz, Magdalena; Higuchi, Yujiro; Hacker, Christian; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Gurr, Sarah J; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Fungal cells are surrounded by an extracellular cell wall. This complex matrix of proteins and polysaccharides protects against adverse stresses and determines the shape of fungal cells. The polysaccharides of the fungal wall include 1,3-β-glucan and chitin, which are synthesized by membrane-bound synthases at the growing cell tip. A hallmark of filamentous fungi is the class V chitin synthase, which carries a myosin-motor domain. In the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis, the myosin-chitin synthase Mcs1 moves to the plasma membrane in secretory vesicles, being delivered by kinesin-1 and myosin-5. The myosin domain of Mcs1 enhances polar secretion by tethering vesicles at the site of exocytosis. It remains elusive, however, how other cell-wall-forming enzymes are delivered and how their activity is coordinated post secretion. Here, we show that the U. maydis class VII chitin synthase and 1,3-β-glucan synthase travel in Mcs1-containing vesicles, and that their apical secretion depends on Mcs1. Once in the plasma membrane, anchorage requires enzyme activity, which suggests co-synthesis of chitin and 1,3-β-glucan polysaccharides at sites of exocytosis. Thus, delivery of cell-wall-forming enzymes in Mcs1 vesicles ensures local foci of fungal cell wall formation. PMID:27563844

  16. E-learning for occupational physicians' CME: a study case.

    PubMed

    Mazzoleni, M Cristina; Rognoni, Carla; Finozzi, Enrico; Gri, Tommaso; Pagani, Marco; Imbriani, Marcello

    2011-01-01

    The present study reports the results of the evaluation of an e-learning CME course in the field of Occupational Medicine. In particular the following aspects have been investigated: If and how the course contents have met the educational users' needs; The effectiveness of the course in terms of knowledge improvement; Users' behaviour. Attendance data and results of a sample of 1128 attendees have been analyzed via ad hoc developed tools for direct inspection of Moodle CMS database. The results document the effectiveness of the e-learning course, as regards meeting the educational needs of physicians and also the improvement in terms of knowledge and problem solving skill acquisition. Users' behaviour has revealed a certain tendency for passing the tests, more than for pursuing the best possible result. Interaction with the tutor is low. PMID:21685595

  17. CME propagation: where does solar wind drag 'take over'?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, P.

    2013-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun are known to be acted upon by driving as well as drag forces. They are generally thought to be driven by Lorentz self-forces, while the drag is due to viscous interaction with the ambient solar wind. However, the typical heliocentric distances at which driving forces cease to be dominant (and solar wind drag becomes important) is not obvious for most CMEs. We use a recently developed microphysical model for solar wind viscous drag (Subramanian, Lara and Borgazzi 2012) together with data for driving forces from a well observed set of flux rope CMEs to answer this question. These results are important for building quantitative models for CME propagation, especially for those CMEs which are not fast enough for one to assume that they are acted upon primarily by drag forces.

  18. Combined Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares and Associated CME Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2016-07-01

    I will review some observations of the characteristics of accelerated electrons seen near Earth (as SEPs) and those producing flare radiation in the low corona and chromosphere. The similarities and differences between the numbers, spectral distribution, etc. of the two population can shed light on the mechanism and sites of the acceleration. I will show that in some events the origin of both population appears to be the flare site while in others, with harder SEP spectra, in addition to acceleration at the flare site, there appears to be a need for a second stage re-acceleration in the associated fast Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) environment. This scenario can also describe a similar dichotomy that exists between the so called impulsive, highly enriched (3He and heavy ions) and softer SEP ion events, and stronger more gradual SEP events with near normal ionic abundances and harder spectra. I will also describe under what conditions such hardening can be achieved.

  19. Nozzle Driven Shocks in Post-CME Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Roger B.; Longcope, D. W.; McKenzie, D. E.

    2012-05-01

    Models of patchy reconnection allow for heating and acceleration of plasma along reconnected field lines but do not offer a mechanism for transport of energy and momentum across field lines. Here we present a simple 2D model in which a localized region of reconnected flux creates an apparent constriction in the surrounding layer of unreconnected field. The moving constriction acts as a de Laval nozzle and ultimately leads to shocks which can extend out to several times the diameter of the flux tube, altering the density and temperature of the plasma in that region. These findings have direct implications for observations in the solar corona, particularly in regard to such phenomena as wakes seen behind supra-arcade downflows and high temperatures in post-CME current sheets. This work was supported by a joint grant from the NSF and DOE.

  20. CME Interaction with Coronal Holes and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.

    2008-01-01

    A significant number of interplanetary (IP) shocks (-17%) during cycle 23 were not followed by drivers. The number of such "driverless" shocks steadily increased with the solar cycle with 15%, 33%, and 52% occurring in the rise, maximum, and declining phase of the solar cycle. The solar sources of 15% of the driverless shocks were very close the central meridian of the Sun (within approx.15deg), which is quite unexpected. More interestingly, all the driverless shocks with their solar sources near the solar disk center occurred during the declining phase of solar cycle 23. When we investigated the coronal environment of the source regions of driverless shocks, we found that in each case there was at least one coronal hole nearby suggesting that the coronal holes might have deflected the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) away from the Sun-Earth line. The presence of abundant low-latitude coronal holes during the declining phase further explains why CMEs originating close to the disk center mimic the limb CMEs, which normally lead to driverless shocks due to purely geometrical reasons. We also examined the solar source regions of shocks with drivers. For these, the coronal holes were located such that they either had no influence on the CME trajectories. or they deflected the CMEs towards the Sun-Earth line. We also obtained the open magnetic field distribution on the Sun by performing a potential field source surface extrapolation to the corona. It was found that the CMEs generally move away from the open magnetic field regions. The CME-coronal hole interaction must be widespread in the declining phase, and may have a significant impact on the geoeffectiveness of CMEs.

  1. Transition of a traditional pharmacology course for dental students to an online delivery format: a pilot project.

    PubMed

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Brockman, William G

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the rationale and subsequent transition of a pharmacology course for dental students from a traditional face-to-face lecture format to online delivery using a course management system (CMS). A dental school faculty member with dental and pharmacology degrees and a Ph.D. was asked to serve as course director and to develop and implement a nontraditional course using the Blackboard CMS technology, which houses asynchronous course content materials, study guides, and online resource materials. Respondus software was used to create, manage, and administer weekly online quizzes. A comprehensive midterm and final examination were conducted in a traditional face-to-face setting. A survey was used to capture student satisfaction with this self-directed introductory pharmacology course. Participants were second-year dental students (Classes of 2011 and 2012). There was a survey response rate of 91 percent (179/197). The Likert-style survey questions produced ordinal data from which the median and interquartile range were calculated. On a scale in which 1=Poor, 5=Excellent, the median evaluation for the instructor was 4 (IQR=1.5). On a global question that asked how students rate the course overall, the median score was 4 (IQR=1.0). Results show that a majority of students were positive about the online delivery of the introductory pharmacology course and for many students this was their first online course experience. Resistance to self-directed learning was a theme with those students who rated the course poorly. In a comparison of overall course grades from the previous year, student performance in this course was much stronger. As a result of student feedback seeking more interaction with the course director, it was determined that the next time the course is offered there will be additional opportunities for greater face-to-face time with the instructor. Ongoing evaluation will be important as new teaching technologies emerge

  2. Radio Observations of the CME-poor region AR2192: a type II burst with no CME driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Vilmer, Nicole; Wakeford, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The remarkable sunspot group NOAA AR 2192 (October 2014) produced X-class flares without CMEs, and in general was large and powerful but with little heliospheric interaction. We discuss radio perspectives on the development of this region. In particular there were decametric type II bursts observed in association with jet-like flares SOL2014-10-21T12:28 (C4.4) and SOL2014-10-21T13:38 (M1.2), as first noted in the Glasgow Callisto observatory and confirmed via the Meudon decametric array. In cases such as this, the global coronal wave responsible for the type II emission seems to originate from an ejection of material flowing along a previously established field structure, rather than perpendicular to it as in a CME.

  3. The Width of a CME and the Source of the Driving Magnetic Explosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Sterling, A. C.; Suess, S. T.

    2007-01-01

    We show that the strength of the magnetic field in the area covered by the flare arcade following a CME-producing ejective solar eruption can be estimated from the final angular width of the CME in the outer corona and the final angular width of the flare arcade. We assume (1) the flux-rope plasmoid ejected from the flare site becomes the interior of the CME plasmoid, (2) in the outer corona the CME is roughly a "spherical plasmoid with legs" shaped like a light bulb, and (3) beyond some height in or below the outer corona the CME plasmoid is in lateral pressure balance with the surrounding magnetic field. The strength of the nearly radial magnetic field in the outer corona is estimated from the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field measured by Ulysses. We apply this model to three well-observed CMEs that exploded from flare regions of extremely different size and magnetic setting. In each event, the estimated source-region field strength is appropriate for the magnetic setting of the flare. This agreement indicates via the model that CMEs (1) are propelled by the magnetic field of the CME plasmoid pushing against the surrounding magnetic field, and (2) can explode from flare regions that are laterally far offset from the radial path of the CME in the outer corona.

  4. Heliospheric tracking of enhanced density structures of the 6 October 2010 CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Wageesh; Srivastava, Nandita

    2015-07-01

    A Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is an inhomogeneous structure consisting of different features which evolve differently with the propagation of the CME. Simultaneous heliospheric tracking of different observed features of a CME can improve our understanding about relative forces acting on them. It also helps to estimate accurately their arrival times at the Earth and identify them in in-situ data. This also enables finding any association between remotely observed features and in-situ observations near the Earth. In this paper, we attempt to continuously track two density enhanced features in the CME of 6 October 2010, one at the front and another at the rear edge. This is achieved by using time-elongation maps constructed from STEREO/SECCHI observations. We derive the kinematics of the tracked features using various reconstruction methods. The estimated kinematics are used as inputs in the Drag Based Model (DBM) to estimate the arrival time of the tracked features of the CME at L1. On comparing the estimated kinematics as well as the arrival times of the remotely observed features with in-situ observations by Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and Wind, we find that the tracked bright feature at the rear edge of 6 October 2010 CME corresponds most probably to the enhanced density structure after the magnetic cloud detected by ACE and Wind. In-situ plasma and compositional parameters provide evidence that the rear edge density structure may correspond to a filament associated with the CME while the density enhancement at the front corresponds to the leading edge of the CME. Based on this single event study, we discuss the relevance and significance of Heliospheric Imager (HI) observations in identification of the three-part structure of the CME.

  5. Effects of the 5 October 1996 CME at 4.4 AU: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, R.G.; Desai, M.I.; Sanderson, T.R.; Forsyth, R.J.; Gosling, J.T.

    1997-09-01

    The authors present observations from Ulysses associated with a large coronal mass ejection (CME) that lifted off the west limb of the Sun on 5 October, 1996. The study focuses on the effects of the interplanetary counterpart of the CME on the energetic particle populations at the location of Ulysses, in particular the effect on the sequence of corotating enhancements that had been observed prior to its arrival. They conclude that, despite its large spatial extent, the CME caused no permanent deformation of the heliospheric current sheet.

  6. Treatment of Viscosity in the Shock Waves Observed After Two Consecutive Coronal Mass Ejection Activities CME08/03/2012 and CME15/03/2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavus, Huseyin

    2016-07-01

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) is one of the most the powerful activities of the Sun. There is a possibility to produce shocks in the interplanetary medium after CMEs. Shock waves can be observed when the solar wind changes its velocity from being supersonic nature to being subsonic nature. The investigations of such activities have a central place in space weather purposes, since; the interaction of shocks with viscosity is one of the most important problems in the supersonic and compressible gas flow regime (Blazek in Computational fluid dynamics: principles and applications. Elsevier, Amsterdam 2001). The main aim of present work is to achieve a search for the viscosity effects in the shocks occurred after two consecutive coronal mass ejection activities in 2012 (i.e. CME08/03/2012 and CME15/03/2012).

  7. Radio Tracking of a White-Light CME from Solar Corona to Interplanetary Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Kaiser, Michael L.; Plunkett, S. P.; Prestage, N. P.

    1999-01-01

    We analyze the radio emissions associated with a flare/CME event on the sun. For this solar event there were type II radio emissions observed in both the metric and decametric to kilometric wavelength regimes. By comparing the dynamics of the CME with that implied by the frequencies and frequency-drift rates of the type II radio emissions, it is concluded that only the decametric/kilometric type II radio emissions are associated with the CME. We provide the first direct one-to-one comparison between a CME and the associated type II radio emissions. The dynamics implied by the metric type II radio emissions suggest a distinct coronal shock, associated with the flare, which only produces radio emissions in the low corona.

  8. CME on Oct. 21, 2011 Caused Red Aurora in U.S.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The SOlar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this "coronograph" – so-called because the images block the sun, and only show the sun's atmosphere, or corona. The coronal mass ejection (CME)...

  9. Dependence of CME Propagation on Parameters of the Ejecta and Ambient Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Lynch, B. J.; Luhmann, J. G.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Thernisien, A.; Vourlidas, A.; MacNeice, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    CME propagation through the heliosphere has been one of the most uncertain problems, due to its complex nature and sparse observations in the vast space. CME travel time, speed and trajectory have been often unpredictable, because they may be modified going through ambient solar wind streams and IMF structure. All of these parameters are important for understanding CMEs and their space weather consequences. Direct observations of CME propagation through to 1AU have only become a reality since the recent STEREO Heliospheric Imager (HI) observations. Based on a few strategically selected CMEs that vary in parameter space and situated in different solar wind/IMF conditions, we perform several CCMC ENLIL with cone model simulations to study the propagation. Comparisons between modeling results including CME driven shock properties, travel time, 3D trajectory, and distortion of the ejecta (limited to the model approximation) will be made. Comparisons are also made between modeling, HI imaging results, and observed in-situ parameters when available.

  10. The synthesis, X-ray and DFT structures of the free ansa-cyclopentadiene ligand C 5H 5CMe 2CMe 2C 5H 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacke, Matthias; Dunne, John Patrick; Fox, Shona; Linti, Gerald; Teuber, Roland

    2001-08-01

    The title compound 2,3-dicyclopentadiene-2,3-dimethylbutane (C 5H 5CMe 2CMe 2C 5H 5) 1 shows the typical staggered conformation of a highly substituted ethane derivative with the two largest substituents (C 5H 5) adopting a trans position. The molecule shows C 2 symmetry about the central C-C bond. Due to the high substitution, the central bond of the ethane is elongated to 160.0 pm (X-ray structure analysis) while the DFT calculation finds a value of 159.2 pm.

  11. Kinematic Treatment of CME Evolution in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete; Crooker, N. U.

    2004-01-01

    We present a kinematic study of the evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the solar wind. Specifically, we consider the effects of: (1) spherical expansion; and (2) uniform expansion due to pressure gradients between the Interplanetary CME (ICME) and the ambient solar wind. We compare these results with an MHD model, which allows us to isolate these effects from the combined kinematic and dynamical effects, which are included in MHD models. They also provide compelling evidence that the fundamental cross section of so-called "force-free" flux ropes (or magnetic clouds) is neither circular or elliptical, but rather a convex-outward, "pancake" shape. We apply a force-free fitting to the magnetic vectors from the MHD simulation to assess how the distortion of the flux rope affects the fitting. In spite of these limitations, force-free fittings, which are straightforward to apply, do provide an important description of a number of parameters, including the radial dimension, orientation and chirality of the ICME.

  12. CME Eruption Onset Observations from EIT and SXT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Why CMEs erupt is a major outstanding puzzle of solar physics. Signatures observable at the earliest stages of eruption onset may hold precious clues about the onset mechanism. We present observations in EUV from SOHO/EIT and in soft X-rays from Yohkoh/SXT of the re-eruption and eruption phases of CME expulsion, along with the eruption's magnetic setting found from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. Most of our events involve clearly-observable filament eruptions and multiple neutral lines, and we use the magnetic settings and motions of the filaments to help infer the geometry and behavior of the associated erupting magnetic fields. Pre-eruption and early-eruption signatures include a relatively slow filament rise prior to eruption, and intensity "dimmings" and brightenings, both in the immediate neighborhood of the "core" (location of greatest magnetic shear) of the erupting fields and at locations remote from the core. These signatures and their relative timings place observational constraints on eruption mechanisms; our recent work has focused on implications for the so-called "tether cutting" and "breakout" models, but the same observational constraints are applicable to any model.

  13. X-ray and EUV Observations of CME Eruption Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Why Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) erupt is a major outstanding puzzle of solar physics. Signatures observable at the earliest stages of eruption onset may hold precious clues about the onset mechanism. We present observations from SOHO/EIT and from TRACE in EUV, and from Yohkoh/SXT in soft X-rays of the pre-eruption and eruption phases of CME expulsion, along with the eruption's magnetic setting found from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. Most of our events involve clearly-observable filament eruptions and multiple neutral lines, and we use the magnetic settings and motions of the filaments to help infer the geometry and behavior of the associated erupting magnetic fields. Pre-eruption and early-eruption signatures include a relatively slow filament rise prior to eruption, and intensity "dimmings" and brightenings, both in the immediate neighborhood of the "core" (location of greatest magnetic shear) of the erupting fields and at locations remote from the core. These signatures and their relative timings place observational constraints on eruption mechanisms; our recent work has focused on implications for the so-called "tether cutting" and "breakout" models, but the same observational constraints are applicable to any model.

  14. X-Ray and EUV Observations of CME Eruption Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    Why CMEs erupt is a major outstanding puzzle of solar physics. Signatures observable at the earliest stages of eruption onset may hold precious clues about the onset mechanism. We summarize and discuss observations from SOHO/EIT in EUV and from Yohkoh/SXT in soft X-rays of the pre-eruption and eruption phases of three CME expulsions, along with the eruptions' magnetic setting inferred from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. Our events involve clearly-observable filament eruptions and multiple neutral lines, and we use the magnetic settings and motions of the filaments to help infer the geometry and behavior of the associated erupting magnetic fields. Pre-eruption and early-eruption signatures include a relatively slow filament rise prior to eruption, and intensity dimmings and brightenings, both in the immediate neighborhood of the "core" (location of greatest magnetic shear) of the erupting fields and at locations remote from the core. These signatures and their relative timings place observational constraints on eruption mechanisms; our recent work has focused on implications for the so-called "tether cutting" and "breakout" models, but the same observational constraints are applicable to any model.

  15. ForeCAT: Using CME Deflections to Constrain their Mass and the Drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, C.; dos Santos, L. F. G.; Opher, M.

    2014-12-01

    Observations show that CMEs can deflect from a purely radial trajectory yet no consensus exists as to the cause of these deflections. The majority of the deflection motion occurs in the corona at distances where the magnetic energy dominates. Accordingly, many theories attribute the CME deflection to magnetic forces. In Kay et al. (2013) we presented ForeCAT, a model for CME deflections based on the magnetic forces (magnetic tension and magnetic pressure gradients). Kay et al. (2014) introduced an improved three-dimensional version of ForeCAT. Here we study the 2008 December 12 CME which occurred during solar minimum of Solar Cycle 24 (Byrne et al 2010, Gui et al. 2011, Liu et al 2010a,b). This CME erupted from high latitudes, and, despite the weak background magnetic field, deflected to the ecliptic, impacting Earth. From the observations, we are able to constrain all of the ForeCAT input parameters except for the CME mass and the drag coefficient that affects the CME motion. The reduced chi-square best fit to the observations constrains the CME mass range to 3e14 to 7e14 g and the drag coefficient range to 1.9 to 2.4. We explore the effects of a different magnetic background which decreases less rapidly than our standard Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model, as type II radio bursts suggest that the PFSS magnetic field decays too rapidly above active regions. For the case of the filament eruption of 2008 December 12 we find that the quiet sun coronal magnetic field should behave similar to the PFSS model. Finally, we present our current work exploring the case of the 2008 April 9 CME.

  16. CME, Physicians, and Pavlov: Can We Change What Happens When Industry Rings the Bell?

    PubMed Central

    Lichter, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To show how physicians’ conditioned response to “keeping up” has helped industry’s opportunistic funding of continuing medical education (CME) and to propose ways to counter the conditioned response to the benefit of patients and the public. Methods Review of the literature and commentary on it. Results The pharmaceutical and device industries (hereafter referred to as industry) have a long history of bribing physicians to prescribe and use their products. Increasing pressure from Congress and the public has been brought to bear on industry gifting. This pressure, coinciding with increasing financial problems for the providers of CME, provided industry with reason and opportunity to expand its role in the financing of CME. Industry’s incentive to make its CME funding appear to be an arm’s-length transaction has spawned medical education service supplier (MESS) companies. Industry makes “unrestricted grants” to the MESS, and the MESS puts on the CME program. Helped by these CME programs, industry is able to subtly “buy” physicians one at a time, so that under the cover of “education” they and their academic institutions and medical organizations lose sight of being CME pawns in industry’s sole objective: profit. Conclusions Despite a vast literature showing how physician integrity is easy prey to industry, the medical profession continues to allow industry to have a detrimental influence on the practice of medicine and on physician respectability. It will take resolute action to change the medical profession’s conditioned response to industry’s CME bell and its negative effect on patients and the public. PMID:19277219

  17. Teleconferencing Cme Programs to Rural Physicians: The University of Calgary Teleconference Program

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, C.A.; Challis, E.B.; Lockyer, J.M.; White, L.; Adams, K.; Parboosingh, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    Continuing medical education (CME) provides practising family physicians with the cornerstone of maintenance and improvement of skills. In rural areas the problems of isolation and distance are a barrier to continuing medical education. Provision of CME programs by audio-teleconferencing is an attempt to overcome these problems. This article describes the teleconference program of The University of Calgary, how it has developed over the five years of its existence, and its impact on rural physicians. PMID:21263789

  18. A Radio Burst and Its Associated CME on March 17, 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y.; Pick, M.; Wang, M.; Krucker, S.; Vourlidas, A.

    2006-12-01

    In this study, we present a detailed analysis, based on multiwavelength observations and magnetic field extrapolation, of a radio and X-ray event observed on March 17, 2002. This event was accompanied by a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) observed by the Large-Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) aboard SOHO. During the main event, the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) mission observed a hard X-ray emission correlated in time with the development of a type III burst group. The CME development, the hard X-ray emission, and the type III burst group appear to be closely associated. The multifrequency Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) shows that the type III bursts are produced at a distance from the active region that progressively increases with time. Their emitting sources are distributed along the western edge of the CME. We conclude the type III electron beams propagate in the interface region between the ascending CME and the neighboring open field lines. Due to the development of the CME, this region becomes progressively highly compressed. By measuring, at each frequency, the shift versus time of the type III positions, we estimate that the electron density in this compression region increased roughly by a factor of 10 over a few minutes. Another signature of this compression region is a narrow white light feature interpreted as a coronal shock driven by the CME lateral expansion.

  19. In situ formation of nanocrystals from a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system to enhance oral bioavailability of fenofibrate

    PubMed Central

    Lin, You-Meei; Wu, Jui-Yu; Chen, Ying-Chen; Su, Yu-Der; Ke, Wen-Tin; Ho, Hsiu-O; Sheu, Ming-Thau

    2011-01-01

    Objectives In situ formation of nanocrystals and dissolution profiles of fenofibrate (FFB) from a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) were characterized. Methods SMEDDS formulated with Myritol® and surfactant mixture (Smix) of D-α-Tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) and either Tween® 20 (A, C, E, G, M, S, N, T, O) or Tween® 80 (B, D, F, H, P, U, Q, V, R) at various oil/Smix ratios (Group I: A and B of 0.42, C and D of 0.25, E and F of 0.11; Group II: G and H of 1.38, M and P of 1.11, S and U of 0.9, N and Q of 0.73, T and V of 0.58, and O and R of 0.46) and water contents (1: 9.5%, 2: 5.0%, 3: 0.0%, G–V: 4.5%). Their dissolutions were conducted at different rotation speeds. Two optimal SMEDDSs containing Tween 80(B2) or a higher oil/Smix ratio(Q) and B2(solution) were selected for pharmacokinetic study. Results FFB particles formed within the nanosize range from Group I gradually increased with time but decreased with increasing stirring rates. However, the mean size of FFB formed by B series was as low as 200 nm, which was smaller than that of A series at three stirring rates. The release rate from both groups obviously increased with increasing stirring rate. However, incomplete release was observed for S and N in Tween 20 series, whereas a faster release rate and complete release were observed for Tween 80 series with an insignificant difference among them. Results of pharmacokinetic study demonstrated that the highest-ranked area under the curve and Cmax values were for Q(SMEDDS) and B2(solution), respectively. The relative bioavailability of Q(SMEDDS) with respect to Tricor® was enhanced by about 1.14–1.22-fold. Conclusion SMEDDS, consisting of Myritol 318 and TPGS combined with Tween 80 at 4:1, was able to enhance the oral bioavailability of FFB. PMID:22072880

  20. Photospheric Vector Magnetic Field Evolution of NOAA Active Region 11504 and the Ensuing CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alexander; Green, Lucie; Valori, Gherardo; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Baker, Deborah; Brooks, David; Palmerio, Erika

    2016-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are eruptions of billions of tonnes of plasma from the Sun that drive the most severe space weather effects we observe. In order to be able to produce forecasts of space weather with lead times of the order of days, accurate predictions of the occurrence of CMEs must be developed. The eruptive active-region studied in this work (NOAA 11504) is complex, featuring fragmentation of penumbral magnetic field in the days prior to eruption, as well as rotation of the leading sunspot. SDO/HMI vector photospheric magnetic field measurements are utilised alongside SDO/AIA multi-wavelength extreme ultra-violet (EUV) observations to study the dynamics of the photospheric and coronal structures, as well as Hinode/EIS spectroscopic measurements, including elemental composition data. The EUV data show flare ribbons as well as coronal dimmings, which are used to infer the orientation of the erupting flux rope. This flux rope orientation is then compared to in situ measurements of the flux rope. The vector magnetic field data is used to determine the possible contributions the field fragmentation and sunspot rotation may have made to the formation of the flux rope and the triggering of the CME.

  1. Feasibility of Using a Bone-Targeted, Macromolecular Delivery System Coupled with Prostaglandin E1 to Promote Bone Formation in Aged, Estrogen-Deficient Rats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S. C.; Pan, H.; Wang, D.; Bowman, B. M.; Kopečková, P.; Kopeček, J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Macromolecular delivery systems have therapeutic uses because of their ability to deliver and release drugs to specific tissues. The uptake and localization of HPMA copolymers using Asp8 as the bone-targeting moiety was determined in aged, ovariectomized (ovx) rats. PGE1 was attached via a cathepsin K-sensitive linkage to HPMA copolymer–Asp8 conjugate and was tested to determine if it could promote bone formation. Materials and Methods The uptake of FITC-labeled HPMA copolymer–Asp8 conjugate (P-Asp8-FITC) on bone surfaces was compared with the mineralization marker, tetracycline. Then a targeted PGE1-HPMA copolymer conjugate (P-Asp8-FITC-PGE1) was given as a single injection and its effects on bone formation were measured 4 weeks later. Results P-Asp8-FITC preferentially deposited on resorption surfaces, unlike tetracycline. A single injection of P-Asp8-FITC-PGE1 resulted in greater indices of bone formation in aged, ovx rats. Conclusions HPMA copolymers can be targeted to bone surfaces using Asp8, with preferential uptake on resorption surfaces. Additionally, PGE1 attached to the Asp8-targeted HPMA copolymers and given by a single injection resulted in greater bone formation measured 4 weeks later. This initial in vivo study suggests that macromolecular delivery systems targeted to bone may offer some therapeutic opportunities and advantages for the treatment of skeletal diseases. PMID:18758923

  2. Ion acceleration near CME-driven interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir; Dayeh, Maher; Smith, Charles; Mason, Glenn; Lee, Martin

    2012-05-01

    We have surveyed properties of the magnetic field power spectral densities and energetic ions and compared them with the shock normal angles of 74 CME-driven IP shocks observed at ACE and Wind during solar cycle 23. We searched for events that exhibited clear signatures of first-order Fermi acceleration at quasi-parallel shocks and shock-drift acceleration at quasi-perpendicular shocks as predicted by the diffusive shock acceleration theory. Our results show that events with clear signatures of either shock-drift or first-order Fermi acceleration at 1 AU are rare, with 64 of the 74 IP shocks (~87%) exhibiting mixed signatures. We classify the remaining ten events as follows. (1) Four quasi-perpendicular shocks with θBn>70° exhibit no enhancements in the magnetic field power spectrum around the proton gyro-frequency and a slight hardening or no change in the ~80-300 keV/nucleon CNO spectral index across the shocks, indicating the absence of upstream wave activity and the re-acceleration of a pre-existing suprathermal seed spectrum. (2) Six quasi-parallel or oblique IP shocks with θBn<70° exhibit significant enhancements in the power spectral densities around the proton gyro-frequency and are accompanied by unfolding (softening) of the ~80-300 keV/nucleon CNO spectral index across the shocks, indicating the acceleration and efficient trapping of <300 keV/nucleon CNO ions by the Alfvén waves that were most likely excited by the accelerated protons as they streamed away from the shocks. In this paper, we present contrasting energetic particle and magnetic field observations near 2 IP shocks at 1 AU to highlight the complex signatures associated with the two distinct types of shock acceleration mechanisms.

  3. Forecast of a Daily Halo CME Occurrence Probability Depending on Class and Area Change of the Associated Sunspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kangjin; Moon, Yong-Jae; Lee, Jin-Yi

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the halo (partial and full) coronal mass ejection (CME) occurrence probability depending on class and area change of the associated sunspot using front-side halo CMEs from 1996 to 2011. We select the most halo CME-productive 14 sunspot classifications: Cao, Cko, Dai, Dao, Dko, Dki, Dkc, Eao, Eai, Eko, Eki, Ekc, Fki, and Fkc. For each class, we assign three subgroups according to sunspot class area change: "Decrease", "Steady", or "Increase". As a result, in the case of asymmetric (k) and compact (c) groups, their CME occurrence probabilities increase. We also find that the halo-CME occurrence probabilities for the "Increase" subgroups are noticeably higher than those for the other subgroups. Our results demonstrate statistically that magnetic-flux emergence or cancellation enhances CME occurrence. We expect that this model can be routinely operated to forecast the halo-CME occurrence probability.

  4. Conducting a University Career and Technical Education Degree Program through Multiple Technology Delivery Formats: A Working Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkle, Chris

    The Department of Industrial Technology Education (ITE) at Indiana State University offers approximately 20 courses per semester, split equally between undergraduate and graduate courses. Although all classes are offered on campus, almost half of the ITE courses are also taught using these three alternative simultaneous delivery methods: (1) for…

  5. Medical Problems Referred to a Care of the Elderly Physician: Insight for Future Geriatrics CME

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Robert; Gallinaro, Anna; Adleman, Jenna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Family physicians provide the majority of elderly patient care in Canada. Many experience significant challenges in serving this cohort. This study aimed to examine the medical problems of patients referred to a care of the elderly physician, to better understand the geriatric continuing medical education (CME) needs of family doctors. Methods A retrospective chart review of patients assessed at an urban outpatient seniors’ clinic between 2003 and 2008 was conducted. Data from 104 charts were analyzed and survey follow-up with 28 of the referring family physicians was undertaken. Main outcomes include the type and frequency of medical problems actually referred to a care of the elderly physician. Clarification of future geriatric CME topics of need was also assessed. Results Preventive care issues were addressed with 67 patients. Twenty-four required discussion of advance directives. The most common medical problems encountered were osteoarthritis (42), hypertension (34), osteoporosis (32), and depression or anxiety (23). Other common problems encountered that have not been highly cited as being a target of CME included musculoskeletal and joint pain (41), diabetes (23), neck and back pain (20), obesity (11), insomnia (11), and neuropathic, fibromyalgia and “leg cramps” pain (10). The referring family physicians surveyed agreed that these were topics of need for future CME. Conclusions The findings support geriatric CME for the common medical problems encountered. Chronic pain, diabetes, obesity and insomnia continue to be important unresolved issues previously unacknowledged by physicians as CME topics of need. Future CME focusing more on process of geriatric care may also be relevant. PMID:23983827

  6. Numerical Simulation of a "Stealth" CME: Why Slow and Simple is Not Mysterious

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, B. J.; Li, Y.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Luhmann, J. G.; Fisher, G. H.

    2011-12-01

    The stereoscopic viewing and improvements in coronagraph observations by STEREO/SECCHI and low corona EUV and X-ray observations at multiple wavelengths by STEREO, Hinode, and SDO -- combined with this solar minimum's exceptionally low activity -- have given rise to the community's interest in so-called "stealth" CMEs. A "stealth" CME is one in which there are almost no low coronal signatures of the CME eruption but often a very well resolved slow, flux-rope like eruption seen in the coronagraph data. The fact that the in situ observations of "stealth" CMEs have shown many of the signatures of magnetic clouds (including the interplanetary flux rope structure) poses the question, "Just how different these events are from normal CMEs?" We present a 3D numerical MHD simulation of the 2008 Jun 2 gradual streamer blowout CME which had virtually no identifiable low coronal signatures. We energize the field by simple footpoint shearing along the source region's polarity inversion line (PIL) and model the background solar wind structure using an ~2MK isothermal wind and a low-order PFSS representation of the CR2070 synoptic magnetogram. Our results will show that the CME "initiation" is obtained by slowly disrupting the quasi-steady-state configuration of the helmet streamer, resulting in the standard eruptive flare picture (albeit, on a large scale) that ejects the sheared fields and lowers the magnetic energy stored in filament channel. We obtain a relatively slow CME eruption and argue that these "stealth" CMEs are no different than the standard quasi-2D picture but are simply at the low end of the CME energy distribution. We will show preliminary comparisons between the simulation results and the coronagraph observations of the low coronal evolution of the CME.

  7. Probability of CME Impact on Exoplanets Orbiting M Dwarfs and Solar-like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, C.; Opher, M.; Kornbleuth, M.

    2016-08-01

    Solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce adverse space weather effects at Earth. Planets in the close habitable zone of magnetically active M dwarfs may experience more extreme space weather than at Earth, including frequent CME impacts leading to atmospheric erosion and leaving the surface exposed to extreme flare activity. Similar erosion may occur for hot Jupiters with close orbits around solar-like stars. We have developed a model, Forecasting a CME's Altered Trajectory (ForeCAT), which predicts a CME's deflection. We adapt ForeCAT to simulate CME deflections for the mid-type M dwarf V374 Peg and hot Jupiters with solar-type hosts. V374 Peg's strong magnetic fields can trap CMEs at the M dwarfs's Astrospheric Current Sheet, that is, the location of the minimum in the background magnetic field. Solar-type CMEs behave similarly, but have much smaller deflections and do not become trapped at the Astrospheric Current Sheet. The probability of planetary impact decreases with increasing inclination of the planetary orbit with respect to the Astrospheric Current Sheet: 0.5–5 CME impacts per day for M dwarf exoplanets, 0.05–0.5 CME impacts per day for solar-type hot Jupiters. We determine the minimum planetary magnetic field necessary to shield a planet's atmosphere from CME impacts. M dwarf exoplanets require values between tens and hundreds of Gauss. Hot Jupiters around a solar-type star, however, require a more reasonable <30 G. These values exceed the magnitude required to shield a planet from the stellar wind, suggesting that CMEs may be the key driver of atmospheric losses.

  8. Determining CME parameters by fitting heliospheric observations: Numerical investigation of the accuracy of the methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaz, Noé; Roussev, Ilia I.; Gombosi, Tamas I.

    2011-07-01

    Transients in the heliosphere, including coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and corotating interaction regions can be imaged to large heliocentric distances by heliospheric imagers (HIs), such as the HIs onboard STEREO and SMEI onboard Coriolis. These observations can be analyzed using different techniques to derive the CME speed and direction. In this paper, we use a three-dimensional (3-D) magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulation to investigate one of these methods, the fitting method of Sheeley et al. (1999) and Rouillard et al. (2008). Because we use a 3-D simulation, we can determine with great accuracy the CME initial speed, its speed at 1 AU and its average transit speed as well as its size and direction of propagation. We are able to compare the results of the fitting method with the values from the simulation for different viewing angles between the CME direction of propagation and the Sun-spacecraft line. We focus on one simulation of a wide (120-140°) CME, whose initial speed is about 800 km s -1. For this case, we find that the best-fit speed is in good agreement with the speed of the CME at 1 AU, and this, independently of the viewing angle. The fitted direction of propagation is not in good agreement with the viewing angle in the simulation, although smaller viewing angles result in smaller fitted directions. This is due to the extremely wide nature of the ejection. A new fitting method, proposed to take into account the CME width, results in better agreement between fitted and actual directions for directions close to the Sun-Earth line. For other directions, it gives results comparable to the fitting method of Sheeley et al. (1999). The CME deceleration has only a small effect on the fitted direction, resulting in fitted values about 1-4° higher than the actual values.

  9. The CORIMP CME Catalogue: Automatically Detecting and Tracking CMEs in Coronagraph Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jason; Morgan, H.; Habbal, S. R.

    2012-05-01

    Studying CMEs in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, and user-specific biases may be introduced through visual inspection of the images. The large amount of data available from the SOHO and STEREO missions also makes manual cataloguing of CMEs tedious, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required. This has led to the development of automated CME detection and cataloguing packages such as CACTus, SEEDS and ARTEMIS. Here we present the development of the CORIMP (coronal image processing) Catalogue: a new, automated, multiscale, CME detection and tracking catalogue, that overcomes many of the drawbacks of current catalogues. It works by first employing a dynamic CME separation technique to remove the static background, and then characterizing CME structure via a multiscale edge-detection algorithm. The detections are chained through time to determine the CME kinematics and morphological changes as it propagates across the plane-of-sky. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by its application to a selection of SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI images, as well as to synthetic coronagraph images created from a model corona with a variety of CMEs. These algorithms are being applied to the whole LASCO and SECCHI datasets, and a CORIMP catalogue of results will soon be available to the community.

  10. Teaching tools useful to understand the Space Weather, through kinematic analysis of some CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amazo-Gomez, Eliana

    The earth is a planet belonging to a medium dynamic, interacting, is not restricted a closed system, but it is affected by her multiple external phenomena, storms geomagnetic, coronal mass ejections, spatial tremors, changes in the environment plasma and magnetic fields near the sun and affecting the planet and overall radiation from other parts of space are subject study space weather. In this work I teach to my school students some tools and main ideas about some things about the Space Weather, through the analysis to five CME events and the localization the CMEs sources. We use Stereo and ISWA tools and datasets, also SOHO and STEREO Within the missions (Cor 1.2, HI 1.2, of A & B and SOHO spacecraft/LASCO C2 & C3), we proceed to calibrate the data, and make movies of the CME seen from of all 3 spacecrafts, then we can estimate the CME front (position), calculate the velocity of the CME and plot the velocity/time diagram, create J-plots, and finally, we Infer the velocity of the CME out of the J-plot. The coronal mass ejections measures were compared with records and this got us some a description of the stage in which the dynamic system is they belong to the earth and the sun, the idea of this work was show and describe some of the measurements that are used to develop the study of Space Weather.

  11. Strong coronal deflection of a CME and its interplanetary evolution to Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möstl, Christian; Rollett, Tanja; Frahm, Rudy A.; Liu, Ying D.; Long, David M.; Colaninno, Robin C.; Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela; Farrugia, Charles J.; Posner, Arik; Dumbovic, Mateja; Janvier, Miho; Demoulin, Pascal; Boakes, Peter; Devos, Andy; Kraaikamp, Emil; Mays, Mona L.; Vrsnak, Bojan

    2015-04-01

    We discuss multipoint imaging and in situ observations of the coronal mass ejection (CME) on January 7 2014 which resulted in a major false alarm. While the source region was almost at disk center facing Earth, the eruption was strongly deflected in the corona, and in conjunction with its particular orientation this CME missed Earth almost entirely, leading to no significant geomagnetic effects. We demonstrate this by a synthesis of data from 7 different heliospheric and planetary space missions (STEREO-A/B, SOHO, SDO, Wind, Mars Express, Mars Science Laboratory). The CMEs ecliptic part was deflected by 37 ± 10° in heliospheric longitude, a value larger than previously thought. Multipoint in situ observations at Earth and Mars confirm the deflection, and are consistent with an elliptical interplanetary shock shape of aspect ratio 1.4 ± 0.4. We also discuss our new method, the Ellipse Evolution (ElEvo) model, which allows us to optimize the global shape of the CME shock with multipoint in situ observations of the interplanetary CME arrival. ElEvo, which is an extension to the Drag-Based-Model by Vrsnak et al., may also be used for real time space weather forecasting. The presented results enhance our understanding of CME deflection and shape, which are fundamental ingredients for improving space weather forecasts.

  12. Host-guest interaction induced supramolecular amphiphilic star architecture and uniform nanovesicle formation for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Ling; Liu, Kerh Li; Wen, Yuting; Song, Xia; Li, Jun

    2016-01-21

    A star polymer of poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) with adamantyl end-terminals extended from an α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) core is designed. It subsequently self-assembles to form controllable and uniform nanovesicles induced by host-guest interactions between heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-CD and the adamantyl ends. The nanovesicles are suitable for loading and intracellular delivery of the anticancer drug doxorubicin. PMID:26692041

  13. Tablets of pre-liposomes govern in situ formation of liposomes: concept and potential of the novel drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Vanić, Željka; Planinšek, Odon; Škalko-Basnet, Nataša; Tho, Ingunn

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel drug delivery system for challenging drugs with potential for scale-up manufacturing and controlled release of incorporated drug. Pre-liposomes powder containing metronidazole, lecithin and mannitol, prepared by spray-drying, was mixed with different tableting excipients (microcrystalline cellulose, lactose monohydrate, mannitol, dibasic calcium phosphate, pregelatinized starch, pectin or chitosan) and compressed into tablets. The delivery system was characterized with respect to (i) dry powder characteristics, (ii) mechanical tablet properties and drug release, and (iii) liposomal characteristics. The pre-liposomes powder was free-flowing, and tablets of similarly high qualities as tablets made of physical mixtures were prepared with all excipients. Liposomes were formed in situ upon tablet disintegration, dissolution or erosion depending on the type of tablet excipient used. The liposomal characteristics and drug release were found to depend on the tablet excipient. The new delivery system offers a unique synergy between the ability of liposomes to encapsulate and protect drugs and increased stability provided by compressed formulations. It can be adjusted for drug administration via various routes, e.g. oral, buccal and vaginal. PMID:24929211

  14. Formation and stabilization of nanoemulsion-based vitamin E delivery systems using natural biopolymers: Whey protein isolate and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    Natural biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum arabic (GA), were used to fabricate emulsion-based delivery systems for vitamin E-acetate. Stable delivery systems could be formed when vitamin E-acetate was mixed with sufficient orange oil prior to high pressure homogenization. WPI (d32=0.11 μm, 1% emulsifier) was better than GA (d32=0.38 μm, 10% emulsifier) at producing small droplets at low emulsifier concentrations. However, WPI-stabilized nanoemulsions were unstable to flocculation near the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.0), at high ionic strength (>100mM), and at elevated temperatures (>60 °C), whereas GA-stabilized emulsions were stable. This difference was attributed to differences in emulsifier stabilization mechanisms: WPI by electrostatic repulsion; GA by steric repulsion. These results provide useful information about the emulsifying and stabilizing capacities of natural biopolymers for forming food-grade vitamin-enriched delivery systems. PMID:26041190

  15. Photographic studies of laser-induced bubble formation in absorbing liquids and on submerged targets: implications for drug delivery with microsecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shangguan, HanQun; Casperson, Lee W.; Paisley, Dennis L.; Prahl, Scott A.

    1998-08-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of blood clots in a fluid-filled blood vessel is accompanied by an explosive evaporation process. The resulting vapor bubble rapidly expands and collapses to disrupt the thrombus (blood clot). The hydrodynamic pressures following the bubble expansion and collapse can also be used as a driving force to deliver clot-dissolving agents into thrombus for enhancement of laser thrombolysis. Thus, the laser-induced bubble formation plays an important role in the thrombus removal process. We investigate the effects of boundary configurations and materials on bubble formation with time-resolved flash photography and high- speed photography. Potential applications in drug delivery using microsecond laser pulses are then discussed.

  16. Stereoscopic Analysis of STEREO/SECCHI Data for CME Trajectory Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liewer, P. C.; Hall, J. R.; Howard, R. A.; DeJong, E. M.; Thompson, W. T.; Thernisten, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) coronagraphs on the twin Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft provide simultaneous views of the corona and coronal mass ejections from two view points. Here, we analyze simultaneous image pairs using the technique of tie-pointing and triangulation (T&T) to determine the three-dimensional trajectory of seven coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The bright leading edge of a CME seen in coronagraph images results from line-of-sight integration through the CME front; the two STEREO coronagraphs see different apparent leading edges, leading to a systematic error in its three-dimensional reconstruction. We analyze this systematic error using a simple geometric model of a CME front. We validate the technique and analysis by comparing T&T trajectory determinations for seven CMEs with trajectories determined by Thernisien et al. (2009) using a forward modeling technique not susceptible to this systematic effect.

  17. Expanded Outcomes Framework for Effective CME - The Way Forward for Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Vakani, Farhan; Amin, Almas

    2015-06-01

    Continuing Medical Education (CME) providers recognize the importance to plan educational activities that focus to improving and assessing knowledge, competency and performance outcomes rather than on attendance and satisfaction. This perspective proposes using an expanded outcomes framework for planning and assessing CME. The expanded outcomes framework supports backward planning, that starts with the population health outcomes (level 7) and moves backward, to providing continuing education for physicians that may result in improved outcomes. We the authors recognize the complexity of this framework, the recently evolved CME system in Pakistan, and the limited resources; and therefore, we suggest that planning and assessment should begin at level 3, physician knowledge. Thus, be mindful of the end and the scope of this framework that is associated and leads toward the improvement of population health outcomes. PMID:26101001

  18. MLSO Mark III K-Coronameter Observations of the CME Rate from 1989 - 1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Flint, Q. A.; Xie, H.; Webb, D. F.; Burkepile, J. T.; Lecinski, A. R.; Quirk, C.; Stanger, A. L.

    2015-10-01

    We report here an attempt to fill the 1990 - 1995 gap in the CME rate using the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory's Mark III (Mk3) K-coronameter. The Mk3 instrument observed routinely several hours most days beginning in 1980 until it was upgraded to Mk4 in 1999. We describe the statistical properties of the CMEs detected during 1989 - 1996, and we determine a CME rate for each of those years. Since spaceborne coronagraphs have more complete duty cycles than a ground-based instrument at a single location, we compare the Mk3-derived CME rate from 1989 with the rate from the SMM C/P coronagraph, and from 1996 with the rate from the SOHO LASCO coronagraphs.

  19. The Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue: Results from the first space weather citizen science project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, L.; Scott, C.; Owens, M.; Lockwood, M.; Tucker-Hood, K.; Thomas, S.; Crothers, S.; Davies, J. A.; Harrison, R.; Lintott, C.; Simpson, R.; O'Donnell, J.; Smith, A. M.; Waterson, N.; Bamford, S.; Romeo, F.; Kukula, M.; Owens, B.; Savani, N.; Wilkinson, J.; Baeten, E.; Poeffel, L.; Harder, B.

    2014-12-01

    Solar Stormwatch was the first space weather citizen science project, the aim of which is to identify and track coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by the Heliospheric Imagers aboard the STEREO satellites. The project has now been running for approximately 4 years, with input from >16,000 citizen scientists, resulting in a data set of >38,000time-elongation profiles of CME trajectories, observed over 18 preselected position angles. We present our method for reducing this data set into a CME catalogue. The resulting catalogue consists of 144 CMEs over the period January 2007 to February 2010, of which 110 were observed by STEREO-A and 77 were observed by STEREO-B. For each CME, the time-elongation profiles generated by the citizen scientists are averaged into a consensus profile along each position angle that the event was tracked. We consider this catalogue to be unique, being at present the only citizen science-generated CME catalogue, tracking CMEs over an elongation range of 4° out to a maximum of approximately 70°. Using single spacecraft fitting techniques, we estimate the speed, direction, solar source region, and latitudinal width of each CME. This shows that at present, the Solar Stormwatch catalogue (which covers only solar minimum years) contains almost exclusively slow CMEs, with a mean speed of approximately 350 km s-1. The full catalogue is available for public access at www.met.reading.ac.uk/~spate/solarstormwatch. This includes, for each event, the unprocessed time-elongation profiles generated by Solar Stormwatch, the consensus time-elongation profiles, and a set of summary plots, as well as the estimated CME properties.

  20. Numerical simulation of multiple CME-driven shocks in the month of 2011 September

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Liou, Kan; Vourlidas, Angelos; Plunkett, Simon; Dryer, Murray; Wu, S. T.; Socker, Dennis; Wood, Brian E.; Hutting, Lynn; Howard, Russell A.

    2016-03-01

    A global, three-dimensional (3-D) numerical simulation model has been employed to study the Sun-to-Earth propagation of multiple (12) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their associated shocks in September 2011. The inputs to the simulation are based on actual solar observations, which include the CME speeds, source locations, and photospheric magnetic fields. The simulation result is fine tuned with in situ solar wind data observations at 1 AU by matching the arrival time of CME-driven shocks. During this period three CME-driven interplanetary (IP) shocks induced three sizable geomagnetic storms on 9, 17, and 26 September, with Dst values reaching -69, -70, and -101 nT, respectively. These storm events signify the commencement of geomagnetic activity in the solar cycle 24. The CME propagation speed near the Sun (e.g., < 30 RS) has been widely used to estimate the interplanetary CME (ICME)/Shock arrival time at 1 AU. Our simulation indicates that the background solar wind speed, as expected, is an important controlling parameter in the propagation of IP shocks and CMEs. Prediction of the ICME/shock arrival time at 1 AU can be more problematic for slow (e.g., < 500 km s-1) than fast CMEs (>1000 km s-1). This is because the effect of the background solar wind is more pronounced for slow CMEs. Here we demonstrate this difficulty with a slow (400 km s-1) CME event that arrived at the Earth in 3 days instead of the predicted 4.3 days. Our results also demonstrate that a long period (a month in this case) of simulation may be necessary to make meaningful solar source geomagnetic storm associations.

  1. Role of Ambient Solar Wind Conditions in CME evolution (P21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadav, R.; Jadeja, A. K.; Iyer, K. N.

    2006-11-01

    ipsraj@yahoo.com Solar events are mainly responsible for producing storms at the Earth. Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is a major cause for this. In this paper, Coronal Mass Ejections occurred during 1998-2004 are studied. Ambient solar wind does play some role in determining the effect of a CME. The effects produced at the Earth during the period 1999 2004 are considered and an attempt has been made to understand the role of ambient solar wind. This is to draw some conclusion about how some of the events become geo- effective.

  2. The analysis of CME on 18 June 2000 and the associated radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Xie, R. X.

    A small flare near the solar limb occurred on 18 June 2000 This flare associated with a short duration radio burst in the micro-wavelength In the metric bands the radio burst wear also short but very complex which was consist of fast drifting structure type III bursts and slow drifting structure type II burst The SXR data showed that this flare was impulsive followed with a gradual phase The image radio observation showed the bright structure moving along the direction of the CME s The associated CME was very significant and typical with high velocity larger than 600km s

  3. Enhancing Quality Improvements in Cancer Care Through CME Activities at a Nationally Recognized Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Marc; Morgan, Robert; Mendelsohn, Mary; Kagan, Jean; Saavedra, Crystal; Leong, Lucille

    2013-01-01

    Changing healthcare policy will undoubtedly affect the healthcare environment in which providers function. The current Fee for Service reimbursement model will be replaced by Value-Based Purchasing, where higher quality and more efficient care will be emphasized. Because of this, large healthcare organizations and individual providers must adapt to incorporate performance outcomes into patient care. Here, we present a Continuing Medical Education (CME)-based initiative at the City of Hope National Cancer Center that we believe can serve as a model for using CME as a value added component to achieving such a goal. PMID:23608956

  4. Host-guest interaction induced supramolecular amphiphilic star architecture and uniform nanovesicle formation for anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing-Ling; Liu, Kerh Li; Wen, Yuting; Song, Xia; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A star polymer of poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) with adamantyl end-terminals extended from an α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) core is designed. It subsequently self-assembles to form controllable and uniform nanovesicles induced by host-guest interactions between heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-CD and the adamantyl ends. The nanovesicles are suitable for loading and intracellular delivery of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.A star polymer of poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) with adamantyl end-terminals extended from an α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) core is designed. It subsequently self-assembles to form controllable and uniform nanovesicles induced by host-guest interactions between heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-CD and the adamantyl ends. The nanovesicles are suitable for loading and intracellular delivery of the anticancer drug doxorubicin. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Polymer synthesis, characterization, preparation of drug-loaded nanovesicles, intracellular drug release and cytotoxicity assays, TEM and DLS measurements. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06744h

  5. The Great "Non-Event" of 7 January 2014: Challenges in CME Arrival Time and Geomagnetic Storm Strength Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. L.; Thompson, B. J.; Jian, L.; Evans, R. M.; Savani, N.; Odstrcil, D.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Richardson, I. G.

    2014-12-01

    We present a case study of the 7 January 2014 event in order to highlight current challenges in space weather forecasting of CME arrival time and geomagnetic storm strength. On 7 January 2014 an X1.2 flare and CME with a radial speed ~2400 km/s was observed from active region 11943. The flaring region was only ten degrees southwest of disk center with extensive dimming south of the active region and preliminary analysis indicated a fairly rapid arrival at Earth (~36 hours). Of the eleven forecasting groups world-wide who participated in CCMC's Space Weather Scoreboard (http://kauai.ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov/SWScoreBoard), nine predicted early arrivals and six predicted dramatic geomagnetic storm impacts (Kp predictions ranged from 6 to 9). However, the CME only had a glancing blow arrival at Earth - Kp did not rise above 3 and there was no geomagnetic storm. What happened? One idea is that the large coronal hole to the northeast of the active region could have deflected the CME. This coronal hole produced a high speed stream near Earth reaching an uncommon speed of 900 km/s four days after the observed CME arrival. However, no clear CME deflection was observed in the outer coronagraph fields of view (~5-20Rs) where CME measurements are derived to initiate models, therefore deflection seems unlikely. Another idea is the effect of the CME flux rope orientation with respect to Earth orbit. We show that using elliptical major and minor axis widths obtained by GCS fitting for the initial CME parameters in ENLIL would have improved the forecast to better reflect the observed glancing blow in-situ signature. We also explore the WSA-ENLIL+Cone simulations, the background solar wind solution, and compare with the observed CME arrival at Venus (from Venus Express) and Earth.

  6. Interrater Reliability to Assure Valid Content in Peer Review of CME-Accredited Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Mark; Lado, Fred A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) provides guidelines for continuing medical education (CME) materials to mitigate problems in the independence or validity of content in certified activities; however, the process of peer review of materials appears largely unstudied and the reproducibility of…

  7. Organizational Change in Management of Hepatitis C: Evaluation of a CME Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrard, Judith; Choudary, Veena; Groom, Holly; Dieperink, Eric; Willenbring, Mark L.; Durfee, Janet M.; Ho, Samuel B.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Effective treatment regimens exist for the hepatitis C virus (HCV); however, clinicians are often resistant to evaluation or treatment of patients with alcohol or substance abuse problems. We describe a continuing medical education (CME) program for clinicians in a nationwide health care system, with emphasis on current treatment…

  8. Homologous Flare-CME Events and Their Metric Type II Radio Burst Association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yashiro, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Uddin, W.; Srivastava, A. K.; Joshi, N. C.; Chandra, R.; Manoharan, P. K.; Mahalakshmi, K.; Dwivedi, V. C.; Jain, R.; Awasthi, A. K.; Nitta, N. V.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Choudhary, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    Active region NOAA 11158 produced many flares during its disk passage. At least two of these flares can be considered as homologous: the C6.6 flare at 06:51 UT and C9.4 flare at 12:41 UT on February 14, 2011. Both flares occurred at the same location (eastern edge of the active region) and have a similar decay of the GOES soft X-ray light curve. The associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were slow (334 and 337 km/s) and of similar apparent widths (43deg and 44deg), but they had different radio signatures. The second event was associated with a metric type II burst while the first one was not. The COR1 coronagraphs on board the STEREO spacecraft clearly show that the second CME propagated into the preceding CME that occurred 50 min before. These observations suggest that CME-CME interaction might be a key process in exciting the type II radio emission by slow CMEs.

  9. Reconciling CME Kinematics using Radio and White-light Observations from STEREO and SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Xie, Hong; Makela, Pertti; Akiyama, Sachiko; Reiner, Michael; MacDowall, Robert

    2014-05-01

    We study the characteristics of nonthermal radio emission associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by STEREO, SOHO, and Wind spacecraft. In particular, we examine three backside CMEs associated with type II radio bursts at frequencies below 16 MHz. These bursts are known to be excellent indicators of solar energetic particle events. We use the universal drift rate spectrum of type II radio bursts and the inferred density scale heights in the corona and interplanetary medium o estimate the speed of the shock waves that produce the type II radio bursts. We find that the radio bursts can provide an accurate estimate of the CME speeds. We consider three backside events and a cannibalism event to show the usefulness of radio dynamic spectrum in inferring CME kinematics. We use radio direction finding technique to show that CME-CME interaction results in enhanced nonthermal radio emission. The radio data also provide constraints on the particle acceleration mechanisms and the reason for the energetic particles observed at wide-ranging longitudes. Finally we infer the shape and extent of the shock associated with one of the biggest solar energetic particle events in the space era.

  10. Medical Education and Communication Companies Involved in CME: An Updated Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Eric D.; Overstreet, Karen M.; Parochka, Jacqueline N.; Lemon, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Medical Education and Communication Companies (MECCs) represent approximately 21% of the providers accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), yet relatively little is known about these organizations in the greater continuing medical education (CME) community. Two prior studies described them,…

  11. Radio imaging of synchrotron emission associated with a CME on the 14th of August 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Raftery, C. L.; Saint-Hilaire, P.

    2012-12-01

    Radio observations can be used to identify sources of electron acceleration within flares and CMEs. In a small number of events, radio imaging has revealed the presence of synchrotron emission from nonthermal electrons in the expanding loops of the CME (Bastian et al. (2001), Maia et al. (2007) and Démoulin et al. (2012)). Events in which the synchrotron emission is sufficiently bright to be identified in the presence of plasma emission from radio bursts, which are prevalent at meter wavelengths, are infrequent. Using radio images from the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) we present observations of synchrotron emission associated with a CME which occurred on the 14th of August 2010. Using context observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the SWAP instrument onboard Proba2, the LASCO coronograph onboard SOHO and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we follow the propagation of the CME out to 2-3 solar radii and characterize the associated electron distribution. We find that the synchrotron emission is cospatial with the CME core.

  12. Modeling Extreme Space Weather Scenarios: July 23, 2012 Rare-Type CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwira, C. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather is a major concern for modern day society because of its adverse impacts on technological infrastructure such as power grids, oil pipelines, and global navigation systems. Particularly, earth directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main drivers of the most extreme geomagnetic storms in the near-Earth space environment. On 23 July 2012, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft observed in situ an extremely fast CME that traveled 0.96 astronomical units (~1 AU) in about 19 h. In our study, we use the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), a 3-D MHD based code, to perform simulations of this rare CME by considering STEREO-A in situ observations to represent the upstream L1 solar wind boundary conditions. The goal of the study is to investigate what would have happened if this Rare-type CME was Earth-bound. Global SWMF-generated ground geomagnetic field perturbations are used to compute the simulated induced geoelectric field at specific ground-based active magnetometer sites. Simulation results show that the July 23 CME would have produced ground effects comparable to previously observed extreme geomagnetic storms such as the Halloween 2003 storm. In addition, we discuss how this study compares to other independent studies on this same event.

  13. Analysis of Metric Type II Burst and EUV Waves Generated by Shock Wave Driven by Cme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha-Silva, Rafael; Fernandes, Francisco; Selhorst, Caius

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between solar type II radio bursts produced by plasma oscillations and coronal shocks is well shown since the 1960s. However, the details of the association between the drivers of the shocks and the metric type II bursts remains a controversial issue. The flares and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the potential drivers of these shocks. In this work, we present the analysis of a metric type II burst observed on May 17, 2013, by spectrometers from e-CALLISTO network and EUV images from the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI), aboard the STEREO. The event was associated with an M3.2 X-ray flare and a halo CME. The EUV images show the EUV wave was produced by the expansion of the CME. The heights of the EUV wave fronts and the magnetic field intensity determined in the regions of the shock are consistent with those the heights of radio source obtained with the three-fold Newkirk density model, which suggests an oblique propagation of the shock. The finding of an accelerating shock with speed of 530-640 km/s and of 870-1220 km/s for the first and the second stages of the type II emission, respectively, is consistent with both the average speed of the associated EUV wave front, of 626 km/s, during the initial expansion of the CME, and with the linear speed of the CME, of 1345 km/s. These results will be presented and discussed.

  14. The Integrated Joslin Performance Improvement/CME Program: A New Paradigm for Better Diabetes Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Julie A.; Beaser, Richard S.; Neighbours, James; Shuman, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing continuing medical education is an essential component of life-long learning and can have a positive influence on patient outcomes. However, some evidence suggests that continuing medical education has not fulfilled its potential as a performance improvement (PI) tool, in part due to a paradigm of CME that has focused on the quantity of…

  15. Are CME 'interactions' Really Important for Accelerating Major Solar Energetic Particle Events?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Lawrence, G. R.; Haggerty, D. K.; Kucera, T.; Szabo, A.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed that the presence or absence of an interaction with a preceding coronal mass ejection (CME) or other coronal structure within approximately 50R(sub s), of the Sun discriminates large, fast CMEs associated with major solar energetic particle (SEP) events from those that are not. We conclude that there is no compelling evidence that, if such interactions take place, they play an important role in SEP acceleration. Reasons include: The reported statistical results are consistent with a chance association between interacting CMEs and SEP events; Energetic SEPs are detected at Earth typically before or around the time when the primary CME enters the LASCO C2 field of view - interactions higher in the corona cannot play a role in acceleration of these particles; For approximately 60% of major SEP events in 1997-2001, the preceding CME fades into the background corona or is relatively narrow (less than 40 deg), suggesting any interaction will be weak; Radio signatures attributed to CME interaction occur after SEP acceleration has commenced.

  16. Constraints on CME Evolution from in situ Observations of Ionic Charge States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruesbeck, Jacob R.; Lepri, Susan T.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel procedure for deriving the physical properties of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMES) in the corona. Our methodology uses in-situ measurements of ionic charge states of C, O, Si and Fe in the heliosphere and interprets them in the context of a model for the early evolution of ICME plasma, between 2 - 5 R-solar. We find that the data can be fit only by an evolution that consists of an initial heating of the plasma, followed by an expansion that ultimately results in cooling. The heating profile is consistent with a compression of coronal plasma due to flare reconnect ion jets and an expansion cooling due to the ejection, as expected from the standard CME/flare model. The observed frozen-in ionic charge states reflect this time-history and, therefore, provide important constraints for the heating and expansion time-scales, as well as the maximum temperature the CME plasma is heated to during its eruption. Furthermore, our analysis places severe limits on the possible density of CME plasma in the corona. We discuss the implications of our results for CME models and for future analysis of ICME plasma composition.

  17. Solar Wind Electron Strahls Associated with a High-Latitude CME: Ulysses Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, M.; Pomoell, J.; Poedts, S.; Dumitrache, C.; Popescu, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    Counterstreaming beams of electrons are ubiquitous in coronal mass ejections (CMEs) - although their existence is not unanimously accepted as a necessary and/or sufficient signature of these events. We continue the investigation of a high-latitude CME registered by the Ulysses spacecraft on 18 - 19 January 2002 (Dumitrache, Popescu, and Oncica, Solar Phys. 272, 137, 2011), by surveying the solar-wind electron distributions associated with this event. The temporal evolution of the pitch-angle distributions reveals populations of electrons that are distinguishable through their anisotropy, with clear signatures of i) electron strahls, ii) counter-streaming in the magnetic clouds and their precursors, and iii) unidirectionality in the fast wind preceding the CME. The analysis of the counter-streams inside the CME allows us to elucidate the complexity of the magnetic-cloud structures embedded in the CME and to refine the borders of the event. Identifying such strahls in CMEs, which preserve properties of the low β [<1] coronal plasma, gives more support to the hypothesis that these populations are remnants of the hot coronal electrons that escape from the electrostatic potential of the Sun into the heliosphere.

  18. A CME-driven solar wind distrubance observed at both low and high heliographic latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Phillips, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    A solar wind disturbance produced by a fast coronal mass ejection, CME, that departed from the Sun on Feburary 20, 1994 was observed in the ecliptic plane at 1 AU by IMP 8 and at high heliographic latitudes at 3.53 AU by Ulysses. In the ecliptic the disturbance included a strong forward shock but no reverse shock, while at high latitudes the disturbance was bounded by a relatively weak forward-reverse shock pair. It is clear that the disturbance in the ecliptic plane was driven primarily by the relative speed between the CME and a slower ambient solar wind ahead, whereas at higher latitudes the disturbance was driven by expansion of the CME. The combined IMP 8 and Ulysses observations thus provide a graphic illustration of how a single fast CME can produce very different types of solar wind disturbances at low and high heliographic latitudes. Simple numerical simulations help explain observed differences at the two spacecraft. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Preparation of a matrix type multiple-unit gastro retentive floating drug delivery system for captopril based on gas formation technique: in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Meka, Lingam; Kesavan, Bhaskar; Chinnala, Krishna Mohan; Vobalaboina, Venkateswarlu; Yamsani, Madhusudan Rao

    2008-01-01

    A gastro retentive floating drug delivery system with multiple-unit minitab's based on gas formation technique was developed in order to prolong the gastric residence time and to increase the overall bioavailability of the drug. The system consists of the drug-containing core units prepared by direct compression process, which are coated with three successive layers of an inner seal coat, effervescent layer (sodium bicarbonate) and an outer gas-entrapped polymeric membrane of an polymethacrylates (Eudragit RL30D, RS30D, and combinations of them). Only the system using Eudragit RL30D and combination of them as a gas-entrapped polymeric membrane could float. The time to float decreased as amount of the effervescent agent increased and coating level of gas-entrapped polymeric membrane decreased. The optimum system floated completely within 3 min and maintained the buoyancy over a period of 12 h. The drug release was controlled and linear with the square root of time. Increasing coating level of gas-entrapped polymeric membrane decreased the drug release. Both the rapid floating and the controlled release properties were achieved in the multiple-unit floating drug delivery system developed in this present study. The analysis of the parameter dissolution data after storage at 40 degrees C and 75% RH for 3 months showed, no significant change indicating the two dissolution profiles were considered to be similar (f2 value is more than 50). PMID:18459051

  20. Differences between CME associated and CH associated RED events during 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyana, Radharani; Rajaram, Girija; Rathod, Jatin; Chandrasekhar Reddy, A.; Misra, D. S.; Patil, C. G.; Prasad, M. Y. S.

    2007-12-01

    As part of study of RED (Relativistic Electron Dropout) events at Geostationary orbit, we have classified them on the basis of their solar causes. We find that the solar causes associated with RED events are Interplanetary (IP) Shocks, Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), Flares, Magnetic Clouds and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIR) followed by Coronal Hole (CH) stream. Here we have taken CME and CH associated RED events during 2005. We have studied Interplanetary parameters (IP) (i.e. solar wind Velocity (Vsw), solar wind Ion density (Nsw), solar wind dynamic pressure (P_sw), total Interplanetary magnetic field B along with its north-south component, Bz), Radiation belt (RB) parameters at geostationary orbit (i.e. electron flux >2 MeV, Hp component (i.e. the component of magnetic field parallel to the spin axis of the satellite) and dayside magnetopause distance (MP)) and the geomagnetic indices (i.e. Dst and Kp) and Cosmic Ray Neutron Monitor (CRNM) count. The parameters which show significant differences between CME and CH events are Vsw, Psw, B, Bz, Dst and Kp, with Vsw and Dst showing the largest differences. As typical examples, in the case of the CME of 22 January, 2005, Vsw touches over 975 km s^{-1} and Dst is Sudden Storm Commencement (SSC) type with minimum Dst being -110 nT . In the case of the CH of 05 April, Vsw is only 650 km s^{-1} and Dst is of Gradual Commencement (GC) type with minimum Dst of -80 nT. In this paper we present differences observed in the above mentioned parameters for several RED events associated with CME and CH during 2005.

  1. Differences Between CME Associated and CH Associated RED Events During 2005 (P4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyana, R.; et al.

    2006-11-01

    As Part of study of RED (Relativistic Electron Decrease) events at Geostationary orbit, we have classified them on the basis of their solar cause. We find that the solar causes associated with RED events (J.J.Lee et.al., 2006) are Interplanetary Shocks (IPS), Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), Coronal Hole (CH), Flares, Magnetic Clouds and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIR). For present, we have taken CME and CH associated RED events during 2005. We study Interplanetary parameters (i.e. solar wind Velocity (Vsw), solar wind Ion density (Nsw), solar wind dynamic pressure (Pdsw), total Interplanetary magnetic field B along with its north-south component, Bz), Radiation belt parameters at geostationary orbit (i.e. electron flux>2Mev, Hp component (i.e. the component of magnetic field parallel to the spin axis of the satellite) and dayside magnetopause distance (MP)) and the geomagnetic indices (i.e. Dst, Kp and CRNM count). The parameters which show significant differences between CME and CH events are Vsw, Psw, B, Bz, Dst and Kp, with Vsw and Dstc showing the largest differences. As typical examples, in the case of the CME of 22nd January, 2005, Vsw touches over 975 km/sec and Dst is Sudden Storm Commencement (SSC) type with minimum Dst being 110 nT. In the case of the CH of 5th April, Vsw is only 650 km/sec and Dst is of Gradual Commencement (GC) type with minimum Dst of -80 nT. In this paper we present differences observed in the above mentioned parameters for several RED events associated with CME and CH during 2005.

  2. Web-Based Delivery System for Disaster Prevention Information Using a New Jma Dpi Xml Format and Amedas Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, M.; Mori, M.

    2012-07-01

    The Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMeDAS) Data is used along with compound disaster information for a geographic information system (GIS) by integration into the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) disaster prevention information XML data. A JMA XML format is a next generation format that contains weather warnings, tsunami warnings, and earthquake information, etc. However, it is not possible to process it by reading disaster prevention information XML Data and AMeDAS Data directly to the GIS system. Therefore, development of a program that converts the data structure is important to consolidate a variety of disaster prevention information on the GIS system. Information on escape routes and evacuation sites, etc. were given as points for regional meteorological observation forecasts using AMeDAS Data by disaster prevention information XML data and integrating it where the disaster was generated, giving a range of expansion of damage and a damage level. There are two main aims; the first is to deliver these compound data of disaster prevention information XML data and AMeDAS Data via the Internet. The second aim is to provide GIS files (shapefile format) of these data to such as local governments for their individual analysis. This was furthermore confirmed to enable the construction of a system using WebGIS (Google Maps) and Open Source Software GIS to monitor disaster information at low cost.

  3. CME flux rope and shock identifications and locations: Comparison of white light data, Graduated Cylindrical Shell model, and MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Xie, Hong; St. Cyr, O. C.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-03-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are major transient phenomena in the solar corona that are observed with ground-based and spacecraft-based coronagraphs in white light or with in situ measurements by spacecraft. CMEs transport mass and momentum and often drive shocks. In order to derive the CME and shock trajectories with high precision, we apply the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model to fit a flux rope to the CME directed toward STEREO A after about 19:00 UT on 29 November 2013 and check the quality of the heliocentric distance-time evaluations by carrying out a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the same CME with the Block Adaptive Tree Solar-Wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code. Heliocentric distances of the CME and shock leading edges are determined from the simulated white light images and magnetic field strength data. We find very good agreement between the predicted and observed heliocentric distances, showing that the GCS model and the BATS-R-US simulation approach work very well and are consistent. In order to assess the validity of CME and shock identification criteria in coronagraph images, we also compute synthetic white light images of the CME and shock. We find that the outer edge of a cloud-like illuminated area in the observed and predicted images in fact coincides with the leading edge of the CME flux rope and that the outer edge of a faint illuminated band in front of the CME leading edge coincides with the CME-driven shock front.

  4. A Novel Approach of Daunorubicin Application on Formation of Proliferative Retinopathy Using a Porous Silicon Controlled Delivery System: Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Huiyuan; Huffman, Kristyn; Rios, Sandy; Freeman, William R.; Sailor, Michael J.; Cheng, Lingyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is the most common cause of poor visual outcomes in association with retinal detachment surgeries and ocular trauma. Daunorubicin (DNR) has shown the strongest efficacy in proliferation inhibition in vitro. However, clinical studies have shown only mild effect owing to limitations of narrow therapeutic window and short vitreous half-life. Methods. Three milligrams of DNR-loaded particles were intravitreally injected into 18 pigmented rabbits, and vitreous samples were collected up to 84 days for analysis. Thirty-seven rabbits were used for a dose-escalation (1, 3, 6 mg) safety and efficacy study in a rabbit PVR model using a pretreatment design. Results. Loading efficiency of DNR was 108.55 ± 12 μg per 1 mg particles. Eighty-four days of follow-up did not reveal any adverse reaction. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated a vitreous half-life of 29 days with a maximum DNR concentration of 178 ng/mL and a minimum concentration of 29 ng/mL at day 84. Daunorubicin-loaded porous silicon (pSi) particles were dosed 8 to 9 weeks before PVR induction, and PVR severity score was dose dependent (Spearman ρ = −0.25, P = 0.0005). Proliferative vitreoretinopathy with tractional retinal detachment was 88% in the control group, 63% in the low-dose group, 14% in the medium-dose group, and 0% in the high-dose group (Cochran-Armitage Trend Test, Z = 8.99, ρ = −0.67, P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Daunorubicin-loaded pSi particles can safely reside in the vitreous for at least 3 months. The pSi-based delivery expanded the therapeutic window of DNR by a factor of 862 and drove down the minimum effective concentration by a factor of 175. PMID:25829415

  5. Effects of Dynamical Evolution of Giant Planets on the Delivery of Atmophile Elements during Terrestrial Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Soko; Brasser, Ramon; Ida, Shigeru

    2016-02-01

    Recent observations started revealing the compositions of protostellar disks and planets beyond the solar system. In this paper, we explore how the compositions of terrestrial planets are affected by the dynamical evolution of giant planets. We estimate the initial compositions of the building blocks of these rocky planets by using a simple condensation model, and numerically study the compositions of planets formed in a few different formation models of the solar system. We find that the abundances of refractory and moderately volatile elements are nearly independent of formation models, and that all the models could reproduce the abundances of these elements of the Earth. The abundances of atmophile elements, on the other hand, depend on the scattering rate of icy planetesimals into the inner disk, as well as the mixing rate of the inner planetesimal disk. For the classical formation model, neither of these mechanisms are efficient and the accretion of atmophile elements during the final assembly of terrestrial planets appears to be difficult. For the Grand Tack model, both of these mechanisms are efficient, which leads to a relatively uniform accretion of atmophile elements in the inner disk. It is also possible to have a “hybrid” scenario where the mixing is not very efficient but the scattering is efficient. The abundances of atmophile elements in this case increase with orbital radii. Such a scenario may occur in some of the extrasolar planetary systems, which are not accompanied by giant planets or those without strong perturbations from giants. We also confirm that the Grand Tack scenario leads to the distribution of asteroid analogues where rocky planetesimals tend to exist interior to icy ones, and show that their overall compositions are consistent with S-type and C-type chondrites, respectively.

  6. The SCEC Community Modeling Environment(SCEC/CME): A Collaboratory for Seismic Hazard Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Minster, J. B.; Moore, R.; Kesselman, C.

    2005-12-01

    The SCEC Community Modeling Environment (SCEC/CME) Project is an NSF-supported Geosciences/IT partnership that is actively developing an advanced information infrastructure for system-level earthquake science in Southern California. This partnership includes SCEC, USC's Information Sciences Institute (ISI), the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), the Incorporated Institutions for Research in Seismology (IRIS), and the U.S. Geological Survey. The goal of the SCEC/CME is to develop seismological applications and information technology (IT) infrastructure to support the development of Seismic Hazard Analysis (SHA) programs and other geophysical simulations. The SHA application programs developed on the Project include a Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis system called OpenSHA. OpenSHA computational elements that are currently available include a collection of attenuation relationships, and several Earthquake Rupture Forecasts (ERFs). Geophysicists in the collaboration have also developed Anelastic Wave Models (AWMs) using both finite-difference and finite-element approaches. Earthquake simulations using these codes have been run for a variety of earthquake sources. Rupture Dynamic Model (RDM) codes have also been developed that simulate friction-based fault slip. The SCEC/CME collaboration has also developed IT software and hardware infrastructure to support the development, execution, and analysis of these SHA programs. To support computationally expensive simulations, we have constructed a grid-based scientific workflow system. Using the SCEC grid, project collaborators can submit computations from the SCEC/CME servers to High Performance Computers at USC and TeraGrid High Performance Computing Centers. Data generated and archived by the SCEC/CME is stored in a digital library system, the Storage Resource Broker (SRB). This system provides a robust and secure system for maintaining the association between the data seta and their metadata. To provide an easy

  7. INVESTIGATION OF THE FORMATION AND SEPARATION OF AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE FROM THE EXPANSION OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Olmedo, O.; Vourlidas, A.; Liu, Y. E-mail: jzhang7@gmu.edu

    2012-01-20

    We address the nature of EUV waves through direct observations of the formation of a diffuse wave driven by the expansion of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and its subsequent separation from the CME front. The wave and the CME on 2011 June 7 were well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Following the solar eruption onset, marked by the beginning of the rapid increasing of the CME velocity and the X-ray flux of accompanying flare, the CME exhibits a strong lateral expansion. During this impulsive expansion phase, the expansion speed of the CME bubble increases from 100 km s{sup -1} to 450 km s{sup -1} in only six minutes. An important finding is that a diffuse wave front starts to separate from the front of the expanding bubble shortly after the lateral expansion slows down. Also a type II burst is formed near the time of the separation. After the separation, two distinct fronts propagate with different kinematic properties. The diffuse front travels across the entire solar disk, while the sharp front rises up, forming the CME ejecta with the diffuse front ahead of it. These observations suggest that the previously termed EUV wave is a composite phenomenon and driven by the CME expansion. While the CME expansion is accelerating, the wave front is cospatial with the CME front, thus the two fronts are indiscernible. Following the end of the acceleration phase, the wave moves away from the CME front with a gradually increasing distance between them.

  8. The Sustained Delivery of Resveratrol or a Defined Grape Powder Inhibits New Blood Vessel Formation in a Mouse Model of Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Kanavi, Mozhgan Rezaie; Darjatmoko, Soesiawati; Wang, Shoujian; Azari, Amir A.; Farnoodian, Mitra; Kenealey, Jason D.; van Ginkel, Paul R.; Albert, Daniel M.; Sheibani, Nader; Polans, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether resveratrol or a defined, reconstituted grape powder can attenuate the formation of new blood vessels in a mouse model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). To accomplish this objective, C57BL/6J mice were randomized into control or treatment groups which received either resveratrol or grape powder by daily oral gavage, resveratrol or grape powder delivered ad libitum through the drinking water, or resveratrol by slow release via implanted osmotic pumps. A laser was used to rupture Bruch’s membrane to induce CNV which was then detected in sclerochoroidal eyecups stained with antibodies against intercellular adhesion molecule-2. CNV area was measured using fluorescence microscopy and Image J software. Ad libitum delivery of both resveratrol and grape powder was shown to significantly reduce the extent of CNV by 68% and 57%, respectively. Parallel experiments conducted in vitro demonstrated that resveratrol activates p53 and inactivates Akt/protein kinase B in choroidal endothelial cells, contributing to its anti-proliferative and anti-migratory properties. In addition resveratrol was shown to inhibit the formation of endothelial cell networks, augmenting its overall anti-angiogenic effects. The non-toxic nature of resveratrol makes it an especially attractive candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of CNV. PMID:25361423

  9. CME-related particle acceleration regions during a simple eruptive event near solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Matamoros, Carolina; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Rouillard, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    An intriguing feature of many solar energetic particle (SEP) events is the detection of particles over a very extended range of longitudes in the Heliosphere. This may be due to peculiarities of the magnetic field in the corona, to a broad accelerator, to cross-field transport of the particles, or to a combination of these processes. The eruptive flare of the 26th of April 2008 offered an opportunity to study relevant processes under particularly favorable conditions, since it occurred in a very quiet solar and interplanetary environment. This allowed us to investigate the physical link between a single well-identified Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), electron acceleration as traced by radio emission, and the production of SEPs. We conduct a detailed analysis combining radio observations (Nançay Radioheliograph and Decameter Array, Wind/WAVES spectrograph) with remote-sensing observations of the corona in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white light as well as in-situ measurements of energetic particles near 1AU (SoHO and STEREO spacecraft). By combining images taken from multiple vantage points we were able to derive the time-dependent evolution of the 3-D pressure front developing around the erupting CME. Magnetic reconnection in the post-CME current sheet accelerated electrons that remained confined in closed magnetic fields in the corona, while the acceleration of escaping particles can be attributed to the pressure front generated ahead of the expanding CME. The CME accelerated electrons remotely from the parent active region, due to the interaction of its laterally expanding flank, traced by an EUV wave, with the ambient corona. SEPs detected at one STEREO spacecraft and SoHO were accelerated later, when the frontal shock of the CME intercepted the spacecraft-connected interplanetary magnetic field line. The injection regions into the Heliosphere inferred from the radio and SEP observations are separated in longitude by about 140°. The observations for this event

  10. Diversity of planetary systems in low-mass disks. Terrestrial-type planet formation and water delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, M. P.; de Elía, G. C.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Several studies, observational and theoretical, suggest that planetary systems with only rocky planets are the most common in the Universe. Aims: We study the diversity of planetary systems that might form around Sun-like stars in low-mass disks without gas-giant planets. We focus especially on the formation process of terrestrial planets in the habitable zone (HZ) and analyze their water contents with the goal to determine systems of astrobiological interest. In addition, we study the formation of planets on wide orbits because they can be detected with the microlensing technique. Methods: N-body simulations of high resolution were developed for a wide range of surface density profiles. A bimodal distribution of planetesimals and planetary embryos with different physical and orbital configurations was used to simulate the planetary accretion process. The surface density profile combines a power law for the inside of the disk of the form r-γ, with an exponential decay to the outside. We performed simulations adopting a disk of 0.03 M⊙ and values of γ = 0.5, 1 and 1.5. Results: All our simulations form planets in the HZ with different masses and final water contents depending on the three different profiles. For γ = 0.5, our simulations produce three planets in the HZ with masses ranging from 0.03 M⊕ to 0.1 M⊕ and water contents between 0.2 and 16 Earth oceans (1 Earth ocean =2.8 × 10-4 M⊕). For γ = 1, three planets form in the HZ with masses between 0.18 M⊕ and 0.52 M⊕ and water contents from 34 to 167 Earth oceans. Finally, for γ = 1.5, we find four planets in the HZ with masses ranging from 0.66 M⊕ to 2.21 M⊕ and water contents between 192 and 2326 Earth oceans. This profile shows distinctive results because it is the only one of those studied here that leads to the formation of water worlds. Conclusions: Since planetary systems with γ = 1 and 1.5 present planets in the HZ with suitable masses to retain a long-lived atmosphere and

  11. Compressed antisolvent precipitation and photopolymerization for the formation of crosslinked polymer microparticles useful for controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Jennifer Lani

    This work presents novel antisolvent processing technique entitled Compressed Antisolvent Precipitation and Photopolymerization (CAPP) useful for forming crosslinked polymer microparticles. In this process, an organic solvent dissolves monomer and polymerization photoinitiators to form a homogeneous solution. Photopolymerization and microparticle formation occur when the homogeneous solution is sprayed into a compressed antisolvent while being simultaneously exposed to initiating light. We investigated the method of particle formation in the CAPP process to explain the repeatable bimodal particle size distribution obtained under a variety of operating conditions. Ternary phase diagrams of antisolvent, monomer, and solvent solutions were constructed and specific spray paths from the resulting ternary phase diagrams were investigated and the significance of crossing the binodal, as well as the importance of where the binodal was crossed, was discovered. In addition, manipulation of injection conditions, varying process residence times, and nucleation rate calculations were explored to further investigate the means of particle formation. We demonstrate the feasibility of encapsulating therapeutic agents into highly crosslinked polymer particles using the CAPP process. Ion-paired tacrine, erythromycin, erythromycin estolate, and erythromycin ethyl succinate were CAPP processed with poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate monomers of several molecular weights so that the resulting particles would entrap different sized drugs in networks with varying mesh sizes. In vitro drug release profiles were obtained for all of the various drug-monomer combinations. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by fitting a short time approximation of Fickian release from a sphere of fixed diameter to the release data and were applied to a model of Fickian release from polydisperse spheres, and the results were compared to the in vitro release data. CAPP particle processing was explored in

  12. Factorial design optimization and characterization of poly-lactic acid (PLA) nanoparticle formation for the delivery of grape extracts.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Katherina; Aburto, Javiera; von Plessing, Carlos; Rockel, Marlene; Aspé, Estrella

    2016-09-15

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) extracted from grapes have several bioactive properties, giving them potential medical uses. However, PAs are unstable in the digestive tract and must be stabilized to allow oral administration, which can be accomplished by nanoencapsulation. In this study, PAs extracted from grape seed and skin were stabilized with poly-d,l-lactide (PLA) polymer by the emulsion-evaporation method. An experimental Box-Behnken design was implemented, evaluating the influence of three factors: sonication time (30-360s) for the emulsion formation, loading of grape extracts (5-20%) and concentration of stabilizing agent (polyvinyl alcohol, PVA: 1-3%). The process was optimized to achieve higher encapsulation efficiency (EE=82.7%) and a smaller size (256 nm). The nanoparticles (NPs) were physically analyzed by TEM, FT-IR, TGA and DTG to characterize the nanoencapsulation process. In vitro release studies, through stomach and intestinal simulation, showed a sustained release of PAs from PLA-NPs. PMID:27080882

  13. MEMS: Enabled Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Angelica; Sheybani, Roya; Meng, Ellis

    2015-05-01

    Drug delivery systems play a crucial role in the treatment and management of medical conditions. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies have allowed the development of advanced miniaturized devices for medical and biological applications. This Review presents the use of MEMS technologies to produce drug delivery devices detailing the delivery mechanisms, device formats employed, and various biomedical applications. The integration of dosing control systems, examples of commercially available microtechnology-enabled drug delivery devices, remaining challenges, and future outlook are also discussed. PMID:25703045

  14. White spot syndrome virus entry is dependent on multiple endocytic routes and strongly facilitated by Cq-GABARAP in a CME-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong-yuan; Shen, Kai-li; Chen, Zhen; Fan, Wei-wei; Xie, Xiao-lu; Meng, Chuang; Chang, Xue-jiao; Zheng, Li-bing; Jeswin, Joseph; Li, Cheng-hua; Wang, Ke-jian; Liu, Hai-peng

    2016-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a lethal pathogen of shrimp and many other crustaceans, including crayfish. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cellular entry remains elusive due to the lack of shrimp cell lines for viral propagation. Crayfish hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cell culture was recently established as a good model for WSSV infection study. Here, we showed that multiple endocytic routes, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), macropinocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, were indispensably employed for the viral entry into Hpt cell of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. Intriguingly, cellular autophagic activity was positively correlated with efficient viral entry, in which a key autophagy-related protein, γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-associated protein (Cq-GABARAP), that not only localized but also co-localized with WSSV on the Hpt cell membrane, strongly facilitated WSSV entry by binding to the viral envelope VP28 in a CME-dependent manner that was negatively regulated by Cq-Rac1. Furthermore, cytoskeletal components, including Cq-β-tubulin and Cq-β-actin, bound to both recombinant rCq-GABARAP and WSSV envelope proteins, which likely led to viral entry promotion via cooperation with rCq-GABARAP. Even under conditions that promoted viral entry, rCq-GABARAP significantly reduced viral replication at an early stage of infection, which was probably caused by the formation of WSSV aggregates in the cytoplasm. PMID:27385304

  15. White spot syndrome virus entry is dependent on multiple endocytic routes and strongly facilitated by Cq-GABARAP in a CME-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong-Yuan; Shen, Kai-Li; Chen, Zhen; Fan, Wei-Wei; Xie, Xiao-Lu; Meng, Chuang; Chang, Xue-Jiao; Zheng, Li-Bing; Jeswin, Joseph; Li, Cheng-Hua; Wang, Ke-Jian; Liu, Hai-Peng

    2016-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a lethal pathogen of shrimp and many other crustaceans, including crayfish. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cellular entry remains elusive due to the lack of shrimp cell lines for viral propagation. Crayfish hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cell culture was recently established as a good model for WSSV infection study. Here, we showed that multiple endocytic routes, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), macropinocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, were indispensably employed for the viral entry into Hpt cell of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. Intriguingly, cellular autophagic activity was positively correlated with efficient viral entry, in which a key autophagy-related protein, γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-associated protein (Cq-GABARAP), that not only localized but also co-localized with WSSV on the Hpt cell membrane, strongly facilitated WSSV entry by binding to the viral envelope VP28 in a CME-dependent manner that was negatively regulated by Cq-Rac1. Furthermore, cytoskeletal components, including Cq-β-tubulin and Cq-β-actin, bound to both recombinant rCq-GABARAP and WSSV envelope proteins, which likely led to viral entry promotion via cooperation with rCq-GABARAP. Even under conditions that promoted viral entry, rCq-GABARAP significantly reduced viral replication at an early stage of infection, which was probably caused by the formation of WSSV aggregates in the cytoplasm. PMID:27385304

  16. Modeling CME-shock-driven storms in 2012-2013: MHD test particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Paral, J.; Kress, B. T.; Wiltberger, M.; Baker, D. N.; Foster, J. C.; Turner, D. L.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    The Van Allen Probes spacecraft have provided detailed observations of the energetic particles and fields environment for coronal mass ejection (CME)-shock-driven storms in 2012 to 2013 which have now been modeled with MHD test particle simulations. The Van Allen Probes orbital plane longitude moved from the dawn sector in 2012 to near midnight and prenoon for equinoctial storms of 2013, providing particularly good measurements of the inductive electric field response to magnetopause compression for the 8 October 2013 CME-shock-driven storm. An abrupt decrease in the outer boundary of outer zone electrons coincided with inward motion of the magnetopause for both 17 March and 8 October 2013 storms, as was the case for storms shortly after launch. Modeling magnetopause dropout events in 2013 with electric field diagnostics that were not available for storms immediately following launch have improved our understanding of the complex role that ULF waves play in radial transport during such events.

  17. Initial fluxon models of CME onset: loss-of-equilibrium, breakout, tether-cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, C.

    2005-12-01

    I will present results from initial models of CME onset using a new force-free magnetic evolution code, FLUX, that uses the novel fluxon approach to MHD modeling. FLUX is a quasi-Lagrangian solver that is free of numerical reconnection and that I am making available as free software. It is currently suitable for studying evolving force-free equilibria in the presence of only controlled reconnection; development work is ongoing to add plasma static and dynamic forces. I plan to consider three simple configurations typical of three current genres of CME onset model: loss of equilibrium under smooth motion by the photosphere; "tether-cutting" (reconnection of a containment field underneath a twisted prominence field); and "breakout" (reconnection of a containment field above a twisted prominence field). In each case I will estimate the magnetic energy available to accelerate mass, and discuss the resulting shape of the remnant open field regions ("dimming regions") after liftoff.

  18. Thyroid function testing in eastern Nepal and the impact of CME on subsequent requests.

    PubMed

    Baral, N; Koner, B C; Lamsal, M; Niraula, I; Dhungel, S

    2001-07-01

    This study reveals 1 year's experience of the introduction of thyroid function tests (TFT) in B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences (BPKIHS), a Medical University situated in eastern Nepal. These were performed on theadvice of doctors working in this region. The rational TFT advice by the medical practitioners was evaluated according to how closely the advice was in line with the algorithms recommended in the textbooks. Only about 14% of the TFT advice followed some rational strategy. A retrospective analysis showed that rational TFT advice could have reduced the cost of a TFT investigation to 43.11% without altering the patient management and disease outcome. Continuing medical education (CME) lectures arranged for a limited number of doctors were found to improve the quality of the subsequentTFT advising pattern. This emphasizes the importance of CME while introducing a costly laboratory test panel (e.g.TFT, lipid profile) needing a strategic approach. PMID:11444339

  19. Impact of molecular weight on the formation of electrosprayed chitosan microcapsules as delivery vehicles for bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Mascaraque, Laura G; Sanchez, Gloria; López-Rubio, Amparo

    2016-10-01

    The molecular weight of chitosan is one of its most determinant characteristics, which affects its processability and its performance as a biomaterial. However, information about the effect of this parameter on the formation of electrosprayed chitosan microcapsules is scarce. In this work, the impact of chitosan molecular weight on its electrosprayability was studied and correlated with its effect on the viscosity, surface tension and electrical conductivity of solutions. A Discriminant Function Analysis revealed that the morphology of the electrosprayed chitosan materials could be correctly predicted using these three parameters for almost 85% of the samples. The suitability of using electrosprayed chitosan capsules as carriers for bioactive agents was also assessed by loading them with a model active compound, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). This encapsulation, with an estimated efficiency of around 80% in terms of preserved antioxidant activity, showed the potential to prolong the antiviral activity of EGCG against murine norovirus via gradual bioactive release combined with its protection against degradation in simulated physiological conditions. PMID:27312621

  20. The Dependence of Characteristic Times of Gradual SEP Events on Their Associated CME Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z. H.; Wang, C. B.; Xue, X. H.; Wang, Y. M.

    It is generally believed that coronal mass ejections CMEs are the drivers of shocks that accelerate gradual solar energetic particles SEPs One might expect that the characteristics of the SEP intensity time profiles observed at 1 AU are determined by properties of the associated CMEs such as the radial speed and the angular width Recently Kahler statistically investigated the characteristic times of gradual SEP events observed from 1998-2002 and their associated coronal mass ejection properties Astrophys J 628 1014--1022 2005 Three characteristic times of gradual SEP events are determined as functions of solar source longitude 1 T 0 the time from associated CME launch to SEP onset at 1 AU 2 T R the rise time from SEP onset to the time when the SEP intensity is a factor of 2 below peak intensity and 3 T D the duration over which the SEP intensity is within a factor of 2 of the peak intensity However in his study the CME speeds and angular widths are directly taken from the LASCO CME catalog In this study we analyze the radial speeds and the angular widths of CMEs by an ice-cream cone model and re-investigate their correlationships with the characteristic times of the corresponding SEP events We find T R and T D are significantly correlated with radial speed for SEP events in the best-connected longitude range and there is no correlation between T 0 and CME radial speed and angular width which is consistent with Kahler s results On the other hand it s found that T R and T D are also have

  1. Why is a Flare-rich Active Region CME-poor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijuan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Jingxiu; Shen, Chenglong; Ye, Pinzhong; Liu, Rui; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Quanhao; Wang, S.

    2016-08-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are the major sources of two of the most violent solar eruptions, namely flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The largest AR in the past 24 years, NOAA AR 12192, which crossed the visible disk from 2014 October 17 to 30, unusually produced more than one hundred flares, including 32 M-class and 6 X-class ones, but only one small CME. Flares and CMEs are believed to be two phenomena in the same eruptive process. Why is such a flare-rich AR so CME-poor? We compared this AR with other four ARs; two were productive in both and two were inert. The investigation of the photospheric parameters based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram reveals that the flare-rich AR 12192, as with the other two productive ARs, has larger magnetic flux, current, and free magnetic energy than the two inert ARs but, in contrast to the two productive ARs, it has no strong, concentrated current helicity along both sides of the flaring neutral line, indicating the absence of a mature magnetic structure consisting of highly sheared or twisted field lines. Furthermore, the decay index above the AR 12192 is relatively low, showing strong constraint. These results suggest that productive ARs are always large and have enough current and free energy to power flares, but whether or not a flare is accompanied by a CME is seemingly related to (1) the presence of a mature sheared or twisted core field serving as the seed of the CME, or (2) a weak enough constraint of the overlying arcades.

  2. Formation of microemulsions for using as cosmeceutical delivery systems: effects of various components and characteristics of some formulations.

    PubMed

    Wuttikul, Krisada; Boonme, Prapaporn

    2016-06-01

    Microemulsions are interesting formulations for cosmeceutical applications due to their good appearance, high solubilization power, thermodynamic stability, and enhancement of skin penetration. In addition, they can spontaneously form when suitable types and amounts of components are simply mixed. In this study, the phase behavior of the nonionic systems with various parameters was studied by construction of phase diagrams using titration method. Natural oils, i.e., coconut oil (CO), rice bran oil (RBO), and palm oil (PO), were analyzed for their fatty acid compositions and then mixed with blends of nonionic surfactants (Tween80: Span80) and water or mixtures of water and a cosolvent, propylene glycol (PG), to find the microemulsion regions. Subsequently, some microemulsions were selected for physical characterization. The largest microemulsion regions which were obtained from CO, RBO, and PO covered the sizes of 11.65, 9.84, and 9.24 %, respectively. The surfactant mixture at weight ratio of 1:1 was the most suitable for CO and PO, but for RBO, it was 2:1. PG could increase the microemulsion regions of PO from 9.24 to 15.33 %, depending on PG concentrations. Hence, the sizes of the microemulsion regions were related to oil types, surfactant mixtures, and ratios between water and PG. The studied microemulsions were water-in-oil (w/o) type, and their internal droplets were in the nanosize range. They exhibited Newtonian flow behavior and their mean viscosity values were from 247.53 to 690.35 cP which were correlated with the types and concentrations of the components in the formulations. In conclusion, natural oils could form w/o microemulsions with nonionic surfactants. The microemulsion formation and characteristics were related to many parameters of the components. PMID:26813671

  3. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AN EUV CORONAL WAVE BASED ON THE 2009 FEBRUARY 13 CME EVENT OBSERVED BY STEREO

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Ofer; Attrill, Gemma D. R.; Wills-Davey, Meredith J.; Manchester, Ward B.

    2009-11-01

    On 2009 February 13, a coronal wave-CME-dimming event was observed in quadrature by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. We analyze this event using a three-dimensional, global magnetohydrodynamic model for the solar corona. The numerical simulation is driven and constrained by the observations, and indicates where magnetic reconnection occurs between the expanding CME core and surrounding environment. We focus primarily on the lower corona, extending out to 3 R{sub sun}; this range allows simultaneous comparison with both EUVI and COR1 data. Our simulation produces a diffuse coronal bright front remarkably similar to that observed by STEREO/EUVI at 195 A. It is made up of two components, and is the result of a combination of both wave and non-wave mechanisms. The CME becomes large-scale quite low (< 200 Mm) in the corona. It is not, however, an inherently large-scale event; rather, the expansion is facilitated by magnetic reconnection between the expanding CME core and the surrounding magnetic environment. In support of this, we also find numerous secondary dimmings, many far from the initial CME source region. Relating such dimmings to reconnecting field lines within the simulation provides further evidence that CME expansion leads to the 'opening' of coronal field lines on a global scale. Throughout the CME expansion, the coronal wave maps directly to the CME footprint. Our results suggest that the ongoing debate over the 'true' nature of diffuse coronal waves may be mischaracterized. It appears that both wave and non-wave models are required to explain the observations and understand the complex nature of these events.

  4. Charge state composition in coronal hole and CME related solar wind: Latitudinal variations observed by Ulysses and WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvin, A. B.; Gloeckler, G.

    1997-01-01

    Iron charge states in recurrent coronal hole-associated solar wind flows are obtained in the ecliptic by WIND/SMS, while measurements of iron and silicon from the polar coronal holes are available from Ulysses/SWICS. Ulysses/SWICS also provides ion composition of coronal mass ejection (CME)-related solar wind. Both coronal hole-associated and CME-related solar wind charge charges show heliographic latitudinal variations.

  5. Why Is the Great Solar Active Region 12192 Flare-rich but CME-poor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Bobra, Monica G.; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu, Yang; Li, Yan; Shen, Chenglong; Couvidat, Sebastien; Norton, Aimee A.; Fisher, George H.

    2015-05-01

    Solar active region (AR) 12192 of 2014 October hosts the largest sunspot group in 24 years. It is the most prolific flaring site of Cycle 24 so far, but surprisingly produced no coronal mass ejection (CME) from the core region during its disk passage. Here, we study the magnetic conditions that prevented eruption and the consequences that ensued. We find AR 12192 to be “big but mild” its core region exhibits weaker non-potentiality, stronger overlying field, and smaller flare-related field changes compared to two other major flare-CME-productive ARs (11429 and 11158). These differences are present in the intensive-type indices (e.g., means) but generally not the extensive ones (e.g., totals). AR 12192's large amount of magnetic free energy does not translate into CME productivity. The unexpected behavior suggests that AR eruptiveness is limited by some relative measure of magnetic non-potentiality over the restriction of background field, and that confined flares may leave weaker photospheric and coronal imprints compared to their eruptive counterparts.

  6. Why Is the Great Solar Active Region 12192 CME-Poor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Bobra, Monica G.; Hoeksema, Todd; Liu, Yang; Li, Yan; Shen, Chenglong; Couvidat, Sebastien; Norton, Aimee A.; Fisher, George H.

    2015-04-01

    Solar active region (AR) 12192 of October 2014 hosts the largest sunspot group in 24 years. It is the most prolific flaring site of Cycle 24, but surprisingly produced no coronal mass ejection (CME) from the core region during its disk passage. Here, we study the magnetic conditions that prevented eruption and the consequences that ensued. We find AR 12192 to be "big but mild"; its core region exhibits weaker non-potentiality, stronger overlying field, and smaller flare-related field changes compared to two other major flare-CME-productive ARs (11429 and 11158). These differences are present in the intensive-type indices (e.g., means) but generally not the extensive ones (e.g., totals). AR 12192's large amount of magnetic free energy does not translate into CME productivity. The unexpected behavior suggests that AR eruptiveness is limited by some relative measure of magnetic non-potentiality over the restriction of background field, and that confined flares may leave weaker photospheric and coronal imprints compared to their eruptive counterparts.

  7. Heliospheric remote imaging and its relation to CME input to solar wind propagation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzo, V. J.; Biesecker, D. A.; Millward, G. H.; Odstrcil, D.

    2011-12-01

    The process of transitioning the WSA-Enlil solar wind forecast model into operations at the National Weather Service provides an opportunity to reconsider the nature of CME inputs as determined from coronagraph and heliospheric imaging observations. At present, the model uses an extremely simple hydrodynamic pulse (increase in density and speed over the inferred angular extent of the CME) to mimic the driver gas at the base of the interplanetary (IP) regime. However, it is clear from recent events (as well as from analyses of STEREO/LASCO events by others) that the form of the CME in the corona is in many cases quite complex, such that it is unclear what input to provide to this model or any IP model. It appears that fast CMEs in particular consist - in the corona - of a visible mass driver (with significant magnetic structure) surrounded by a strong, spreading wavefront. What is important for forecasting is to understand what part of that full structure actually contributes to the IP propagation, and what part dissipates near the near Sun. A serious study of the propagation of strong shocks in a structured corona and out into the hyperalvenic regime is one element needed to improve modeling capabilities; another would be to tie the coronal observations to more distant heliospheric imagery for a collection of such events.

  8. Topological Evolution of a Fast Magnetic Breakout CME in 3-Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, B. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Luhmann, J. G.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    W present the extension of the magnetic breakout model for CME initiation to a fully 3-dimensional, spherical geometry. Given the increased complexity of the dynamic magnetic field interactions in 3-dimensions, we first present a summary of the well known axisymmetric breakout scenario in terms of the topological evolution associated with the various phases of the eruptive process. In this context, we discuss the completely analogous topological evolution during the magnetic breakout CME initiation process in the simplest 3-dimensional multipolar system. We show that an extended bipolar active region embedded in an oppositely directed background dipole field has all the necessary topological features required for magnetic breakout, i.e. a fan separatrix surface between the two distinct flux systems, a pair of spine fieldlines, and a true 3-dimensional coronal null point at their intersection. We then present the results of a numerical MHD simulation of this 3-dimensional system where boundary shearing flows introduce free magnetic energy, eventually leading to a fast magnetic breakout CME. The eruptive flare reconnection facilitates the rapid conversion of this stored free magnetic energy into kinetic energy and the associated acceleration causes the erupting field and plasma structure to reach an asymptotic eruption velocity of greater than or approx. equal to 1100 km/s over an approx.15 minute time period. The simulation results are discussed using the topological insight developed to interpret the various phases of the eruption and the complex, dynamic, and interacting magnetic field structures.

  9. Solar Flare, CME, and Proton Event Rates Correlated with Sunspot Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, L. M.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Pernak, R.

    2015-12-01

    The newly revised sunspot number series allows for placing historical geoeffective storms in the context of several hundred years of solar activity. Using statistical analyses of the GOES X-ray and differential particle observations from the past ~30 years and the SOHO/LASCO CME catalog (1996-present), we present sunspot number dependent predictions for expected flare, SEP, and CME rates. In particular, we present X-ray flare rates as a function of sunspot number for the past three cycles. We also show, as in the attached figure, that the 1-8 Angstrom background flux is strongly correlated with sunspot number across solar cycles. Similarly, we show that the CME properties (e.g., velocity and width) are also correlated with sunspot number for cycles 23 and 24. Finally, SEP rates and background proton flux levels are also scaled to sunspot number. These rates will enable future predictions for geoeffective events and place historical storms in context of present solar activity.

  10. Tracking the CME-driven shock wave on 2012 March 5 and radio triangulation of associated radio emission

    SciTech Connect

    Magdalenić, J.; Marqué, C.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Krupar, V.; Maksimović, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.