Science.gov

Sample records for cme delivery format

  1. A Real Source of a Stealth CME - Energetics of a Filament Eruption and Giant Arcade Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Ayumi; Ishii, Takako T.; Otsuji, Kenichi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    Various active phenomena occurring on the solar surface are sources of disturbances in the solar-terrestrial environment. It is, however, sometimes said that solar flares, the most energetic explosions in the active phenome on the sun, are not crucially important for space weather researches, but coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are more significant. This is because not all flares are associated with CMEs, and therefore, not geo-effective, and because geo-effective CMEs sometimes occur without any notable active phenomena (such as flares) on the sun. The latter is sometimes called as a “stealth CME” event. However, for even such cases, we often see filament eruptions in H-alpha observations and formations of giant arcade in X-ray and/or extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations.The geomagnetic storm with the Dst index of -105 nT that occurred on October 8, 2012 was such a stealth event. We, on the other hand, recognize formation of an X-ray giant arcade and activation of an H-alpha filament on October 5, 2012. We examined the velocity field of the filament by using the H-alpha wing data obtained with SMART telescope at Hida Observatory, Kyoto University. We also derived the temperature and the volume emission measure by using the X-ray and EUV data obtained by Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA. We discuss the energetics of this event on the solar surface

  2. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....g., coral reef) and is classified as “landward” in Table 6.2, Volume I of the NRDAM/CME technical... kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “seaward” in Table 6.2, Volume I of..., seagrass, or kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef). Tidal current—currents caused by...

  3. Formation of hot channels in pre-CME coronal flux ropes and their role in the onset of eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuhong; Chatterjee, P.

    2013-07-01

    Using 3D magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of the eruption of coronal flux ropes, we examine the thermal features produced by current sheet formation and the associated “tether-cutting” reconnections. We find that current sheets form along topological structures identified as quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) during the pre-eruption stage. Tether-cutting reconnections in the current sheets produce a hot channel containing reconnected, twisted flux threading under the axis of the flux rope. This accumulation of twisted flux allows the flux rope to rise quasi-statically to the critical height for the onset of the torus instability, which leads to the dynamic eruption of the flux rope. The current sheet morphology and the hot channel that forms above it may explain the observed prominence “horns” enclosing a central cavity seen in AIA observations of coronal cavities. They may also be the cause of the X-ray emitting cores observed in some coronal cavities. We present a sequence of simulations to examine how the temperature and density of the hot channel depend on the properties of the coronal flux rope, and compare the results with multi-wavelength coronal observations of CMEs.

  4. CME Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.-H.; Gallagher, P. T.

    The goal of this study is to investigate the driving mechanisms of CMEs and to infer the magnetic field properties at the onset of the instability. We use EIT 195 Å images and LASCO white-light coronagraph data of a CME event that occurred on 17 December 2006. It was a long-duration event, and was associated with an occulted C2.1 class flare. To determine the driving mechanism, we quantitatively and qualitatively compared the observationally obtained kinematic evolution with that predicted by three CME models: the breakout model (BO, see Antiochos et al. 1999; Lynch et al. 2008; DeVore and Antiochos 2008), the catastrophe model (CM, see Priest and Forbes 2000), and the toroidal instability model (TI, see Chen 1989; Kliem and Török 2006). Our results indicate that this CME is best represented by the CM model. We infer that, at the onset of the instability, the Alfvén speed is approximately 120 km s-1 and the height of the flux rope is roughly 100-200Mm. These parameter values are related to the magnetic environment and the loop geometry and can be used to infer the magnetic condition at the onset of the eruption.We intend to submit the full analysis to A&A.

  5. Food formats for effective delivery of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Mary Ellen; Marco, Maria L

    2010-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria are increasingly incorporated into food products intended to confer health benefits in the human gut and beyond. Little is known about how the food matrix and product formulation impacts probiotic functionality, even though such information is essential to scientific understanding and regulatory substantiation of health benefits. The food format has the potential to affect probiotic survival, physiology, and potentially efficacy, but few comparative studies in humans have been conducted. Human studies should account for the effects of the food base on human health and the bioactive components present in the foods that may augment or diminish interactions of the probiotic with the human host. Some studies show that food ingredients such as prebiotics and milk components can improve probiotic survival during the shelf life of foods, which may enhance probiotic efficacy through increased dose effects. Furthermore, there are indications that synbiotic products are more effective than either probiotics or prebiotics alone. Identification of probiotic adaptations to the food and gut environments holds promise for determining the specific cell components and potential bacterial-food interactions necessary for health benefits and determining how these factors are affected by changes in food formulation and host diet. These studies, combined with controlled human studies, are important future research activities for advancing this field. PMID:22129330

  6. CME-CME interaction during the 2010 August 1 events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temmer, M.; Vrsnak, B.; Rollett, T.; Bein, B.; deKoning, C. A.; Liu, Y.; Bosman, E.; Davies, J. A.; Möstl, C.; Zic, T.; Veronig, A. M.; Bothmer, V.; Harrison, R.; Nitta, N.; Bisi, M.; Flor, O.; Eastwood, J.; Odstrcil, D.; Forsyth, R.

    2012-04-01

    We study a CME-CME interaction that occurred during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI data (COR and HI). The CMEs were Earth directed where clear signatures of magnetic flux ropes could be measured from in situ Wind data. To give evidence of the actual interaction we derive the direction of motion for both CMEs applying several independent methods. From this we obtain that both CMEs head into similar directions enabling us to actually observe the merging in the HI1 field-of-view (and rule out the possibility that this is just a line of sight effect). The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived when combining data points from remote observations with in situ parameters of the ICME measured at 1 AU. We study the evolution of the kinematical profile of the faster CME by applying a drag based model.

  7. The Flare/CME Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    We present evidence supporting the view that, while many flares are produced by a confined magnetic explosion that does not produce a CME, every CME is produced by an ejective magnetic explosion that also produces a flare. The evidence is that the observed heliocentric angular width of the full-blown CME plasmoid in the outer corona (at 3 to 20 solar radii) is about that predicted by the standard model for CME production, from the amount of magnetic flux covered by the co-produced flare arcade. In the standard model, sheared and twisted sigmoidal field in the core of an initially closed magnetic arcade erupts. As it erupts, tether-cutting reconnection, starting between the legs of the erupting sigmoid and continuing between the merging stretched legs of the enveloping arcade, simultaneously produces a growing flare arcade and unleashes the erupting sigmoid and arcade to become the low-beta plasmoid (magnetic bubble) that becomes the CME. The flare arcade is the downward product of the reconnection and the CME plasmoid is the upward product. The unleashed, expanding CME plasmoid is propelled into the outer corona and solar wind by its own magnetic field pushing on the surrounding field in the inner and outer corona. This tether-cutting scenario predicts that the amount of magnetic flux in the full-blown CME plasmoid nearly equals that covered by the full-grown flare arcade. This equality predicts (1) the field strength in the flare region from the ratio of the angular width of the CME in the outer corona to angular width of the full-grown flare arcade, and (2) an upper bound on the angular width of the CME in the outer corona from the total magnetic flux in the active region from which the CME explodes. We show that these predictions are fulfilled by observed CMEs. This agreement validates the standard model. The model explains (1) why most CMEs have much greater angular widths than their co-produced flares, and (2) why the radial path of a CME in the outer corona can be laterally far offset from the co-produced flare.

  8. Ensemble modeling of CME propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. O.; Arge, C. N.; Henney, C. J.; Odstrcil, D.; Millward, G. H.; Pizzo, V. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Wang-Sheeley-Arge(WSA)-Enlil-cone modeling system is used for making routine arrival time forecasts of the Earth-directed "halo" coronal mass ejections (CMEs), since they typically produce the most geoeffective events. A major objective of this work is to better understand the sensitivity of the WSA-Enlil modeling results to input model parameters and how these parameters contribute to the overall model uncertainty and performance. We present ensemble modeling results for a simple halo CME event that occurred on 15 February 2011 and a succession of three halo CME events that occurred on 2-4 August 2011. During this period the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) A and B spacecraft viewed the CMEs over the solar limb, thereby providing more reliable constraints on the initial CME geometries during the manual cone fitting process. To investigate the sensitivity of the modeled CME arrival times to small variations in the input cone properties, for each CME event we create an ensemble of numerical simulations based on multiple sets of cone parameters. We find that the accuracy of the modeled arrival times not only depends on the initial input CME geometry, but also on the reliable specification of the background solar wind, which is driven by the input maps of the photospheric magnetic field. As part of the modeling ensemble, we simulate the CME events using the traditional daily updated maps as well as those that are produced by the Air Force data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport (ADAPT) model, which provide a more instantaneous snapshot of the photospheric field distribution. For the August 2011 events, in particular, we find that the accuracy in the arrival time predictions also depends on whether the cone parameters for all three CMEs are specified in a single WSA-Enlil simulation. The inclusion/exclusion of one or two of the preceding CMEs affects the solar wind conditions through which the succeeding CME propagates.

  9. Multi-protein Delivery by Nanodiamonds Promotes Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, L.; Gatica, M.; Kim, H.; Osawa, E.; Ho, D.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE® for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  10. "Academic" CME and the social contract.

    PubMed

    Davis, D; Parboosingh, J

    1993-05-01

    The term academic continuing medical education (CME) is defined and explored from the perspective of forces that have made its usage necessary. These forces include the new understandings of the place, impact, and scope of CME, and, in particular, the increasing entrepreneurial interests in the field, unrelated to the improvement of physicians' competence or performance, or to health care outcomes. In addition to principles of CME provision promulgated by the Accreditation Council of CME, and those of ethical CME providers, academic CME implies the critical appraisal of the providers' activities, the creation of new knowledge about how physicians learn and change, and the dissemination of information based on such knowledge. Finally, the nature of academic CME providers is discussed, and the potential role of CME in fostering the social contract between the medical professional and society is explored. PMID:8484835

  11. The State of the Art in CME.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Robert K.

    1983-01-01

    The author describes major trends and directions related to continuing medical education (CME). The rapid changes he observed in the state of the art in CME are presented in relation to three historical periods in the past 16 years. (SSH)

  12. Reflections on CME Congress 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Alan B.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary reflects the author's impressions of Continuing Medical Education (CME) Congress 2012, a provocative international conference on professional development and quality improvement in the health professions that took place in Toronto, Ontario, last spring. The sessions he attended and conversations he had with other attendees were

  13. Reflections on CME Congress 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Alan B.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary reflects the author's impressions of Continuing Medical Education (CME) Congress 2012, a provocative international conference on professional development and quality improvement in the health professions that took place in Toronto, Ontario, last spring. The sessions he attended and conversations he had with other attendees were…

  14. Numerical models of Oort Cloud formation and comet delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaib, Nathan A.

    I use a newly designed numerical algorithm to simulate the dynamics of the Oort Cloud. The processes I model are the formation of the cloud, the current delivery of comets to the planetary region, and long-period comet production during comet showers. Concerning the cloud's formation, I find that the Sun's birth environment dramatically affects the structure of the inner Oort Cloud as well as the amount of material trapped in this region. In addition, the structure of this reservoir is also sensitive to the Sun's orbital history in the Milky Way. This raises the possibility that constraining our inner Oort Cloud's properties can constrain the Sun's dynamical history. In this regard, I use my simulations of comet delivery to better understand what the population of comets passing through the planetary region can tell us about the inner Oort Cloud. I find that the inner Oort Cloud (rather than the scattered disk) dominates the production of planet-crossing TNOs with perihelia beyond 15 AU and semimajor axes greater than a few hundred AU. My results indicate that two objects representing this population (2000 00 67 and 2006 SQ 372 ) have already been detected, and the detection of many analogous objects can constrain the inner Oort Cloud. In addition, these simulations of comet delivery also demonstrate that, contrary to previous understanding, the inner Oort Cloud is a significant and perhaps the dominant source of known long-period comets. This result can be used to place the first observationally motivated upper limit on the inner Oort Cloud's population. Finally, with this maximum population value, I use my comet shower simulations to show that comet showers are unlikely to be responsible for more than one minor extinction event since the Cambrian Explosion.

  15. A panoptic model for planetesimal formation and pebble delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krijt, S.; Ormel, C. W.; Dominik, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The journey from dust particle to planetesimal involves physical processes acting on scales ranging from micrometers (the sticking and restructuring of aggregates) to hundreds of astronomical units (the size of the turbulent protoplanetary nebula). Considering these processes simultaneously is essential when studying planetesimal formation. Aims: The goal of this work is to quantify where and when planetesimal formation can occur as the result of porous coagulation of icy grains and to understand how the process is influenced by the properties of the protoplanetary disk. Methods: We develop a novel, global, semi-analytical model for the evolution of the mass-dominating dust particles in a turbulent protoplanetary disk that takes into account the evolution of the dust surface density while preserving the essential characteristics of the porous coagulation process. This panoptic model is used to study the growth from sub-micron to planetesimal sizes in disks around Sun-like stars. Results: For highly porous ices, unaffected by collisional fragmentation and erosion, rapid growth to planetesimal sizes is possible in a zone stretching out to ~10 AU for massive disks. When porous coagulation is limited by erosive collisions, the formation of planetesimals through direct coagulation is not possible, but the creation of a large population of aggregates with Stokes numbers close to unity might trigger the streaming instability (SI). However, we find that reaching conditions necessary for SI is difficult and limited to dust-rich disks, (very) cold disks, or disks with weak turbulence. Conclusions: Behind the snow-line, porosity-driven aggregation of icy grains results in rapid (~104 yr) formation of planetesimals. If erosive collisions prevent this, SI might be triggered for specific disk conditions. The numerical approach introduced in this work is ideally suited for studying planetesimal formation and pebble delivery simultaneously and will help build a coherent picture of the start of the planet formation process.

  16. CME impact on Mercury's sputtered exospheric environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfleger, M.; Lichtenegger, H. I. M.; Lammer, H.; Mura, A.; Wurz, P.; Martin-Fernandez, J. A.

    2013-09-01

    Solar wind and magnetospheric plasma precipitation onto the surface of Mercury triggers the formation of exospheric particle populations by sputtering processes. Numerical modeling of Mercury's magnetosphere has shown that the weak intrinsic magnetic field of the planet is sufficient to prevent the equatorial regions from being impacted by solar wind ions during moderate solar wind conditions. However, intense fluxes of protons are expected to hit the auroral regions, giving rise to the release of surface elements at high latitudes by ion sputtering. During high solar wind dynamic pressure conditions in the case of CME events, the solar wind protons will have access to Mercury's entire dayside surface, which may result in a considerable filling of the exosphere by sputtered surface material.

  17. Objective CME detection over the solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbrecht, E.; Berghmans, D.

    We have developed a software package for 'Computer Aided CME Tracking' (CACTus), that autonomously detects CMEs in image sequences from LASCO. The crux of the CACTus software is the detection of CMEs as bright ridges in [height, time] maps using the Hough transform. The output is a list of events, similar to the classic catalogs, with principle angle, angular width and velocity estimation for each CME. In contrast to catalogs assembled by human operators, these CME detections by software can be faster and possibly also more objective, as the detection criterion is written explicitly in a program. Especially on the timescale of a solar cycle, it is questionnable whether human, visual CME detection is stable, as the operator gains experience or personnel is replaced. In this paper we overview the latest improvements of CACTUS and validate its performance by comparing the CACTus output with the classical, visually assembled CME catalogs. Discrepancies between the classical catalogs and the CACTUS catalogs are discussed. Such discrepancies highlight not only the performance of CACTUS but also the caveats of the classical catalogs. Indeed, CACTUS sometimes finds CMEs that are not listed in the catalogs or interpreted differently (eg halo CME or not). It is important to know these caveats when using the CME catalogs as input for statistical CME studies over the solar cycle. The near realtime output of the software is available on the web(http://sidc.oma.be/cactus) and is updated daily.

  18. CME for neurosurgeons in the Netherlands: the "quality" conferences.

    PubMed

    Mooij, J J A; Albrecht, K W; Grotenhuis, J A; Zeilstra, D J; Staal, M J; Koot, R W

    2009-02-01

    In 1993 the Netherlands Society for Neurosurgery started a yearly event, a "Quality Conference", specifically devoted to continuous medical education (CME). These conferences differ from "normal" scientific meetings, in the choice for specific topics, in the preparation with inquiries among all the Dutch neurosurgical centres, and in the way the results of these inquiries are discussed, preceded by lectures concerning the chosen topic by guest faculty and Dutch neurosurgeons. Each year's principal guest delivers the "Beks Lecture", named after the former professor in Neurosurgery in Groningen, Jan Beks. On several occasions, the foreign guests suggested to present this format for a larger neurosurgical forum. Therefore, it was decided to describe the various aspects of this format for CME in the Netherlands in a paper for Acta Neurochirugica. Examples of topics are given, a summary of two recent inquiries are presented and discussed, and the way of organizing such a conference including finance and the obligatory character are described. PMID:19194649

  19. The Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Luke

    2015-04-01

    Since the launch of the twin STEREO satellites in late 2006, the Heliospheric Imagers have been used, with good results, in tracking transients of solar origin, such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), out through the inner heliosphere. A frequently used approach is to build a "J-Map", in which multiple elongation profiles along a constant position angle are stacked in time, building an image in which radially propagating transients form curved tracks in the J-Map. From this the time-elongation profile of a solar transient can be manually identified. This is a time consuming and laborious process, and the results are subjective, depending on the skill and expertise of the investigator. With the Heliospheric Imager data it is possible to follow CMEs from the outer limits of the solar corona all the way to 1AU. Solar Stormwatch is a citizen science project that employs the power of thousands of volunteers to both identify and track CMEs in the Heliospheric Imager data. The CMEs identified by Solar Stormwatch are tracked many times by multiple users and this allows the calculation of consensus time-elongation profiles for each event and also provides an estimate of the error in the consensus profile. Therefore this system does not suffer from the potential subjectivity of individual researchers identifying and tracking CMEs. In this sense, the Solar Stormwatch system can be thought of as providing a middle ground between manually identified CME catalogues, such as the CDAW list, and CME catalogues generated through fully automated algorithms, such as CACtus and ARTEMIS etc. We provide a summary of the reduction of the Solar Stormwatch data into a catalogue of CMEs observed by STEREO-A and STEREO-B through the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and review some key statistical properties of these CMEs. Through some case studies of the propagation of CMEs out into the inner heliosphere we argue that the Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue, which publishes the time-elongation profiles of CMEs observed at multiple position angles, is a new and valuable dataset for space weather community.

  20. Energy spectral property in an isolated CME-driven shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Yan, Yi-Hua; Ding, Ming-De; Wang, Na; Shan, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Observations from multiple spacecraft show that there are energy spectral “breaks” at 1–10 MeV in some large CME-driven shocks. However, numerical models can hardly simulate this property due to high computational expense. The present paper focuses on analyzing these energy spectral “breaks” by Monte Carlo particle simulations of an isolated CME-driven shock. Taking the 2006 Dec 14 CME-driven shock as an example, we investigate the formation of this energy spectral property. For this purpose, we apply different values for the scattering time in our isolated shock model to obtain the highest energy “tails,” which can potentially exceed the “break” energy range. However, we have not found the highest energy “tails” beyond the “break” energy range, but instead find that the highest energy “tails” reach saturation near the range of energy at 5 MeV. So, we believe that there exists an energy spectral “cut off” in an isolated shock. If there is no interaction with another shock, there would not be formation of the energy spectral “break” property.

  1. Ensemble Modeling of CME Propagation and Geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. Leila; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Pulkkinen, Antti; MacNeice, Peter; Rastätter, Lutz; Odstrcil, Dusan; Jian, Lan; Richardson, Ian

    2015-04-01

    Ensemble modeling of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) provides a probabilistic forecast of CME arrival time which includes an estimation of arrival time uncertainty from the spread and distribution of predictions and forecast confidence in the likelihood of CME arrival. The real-time ensemble modeling of CME propagation uses the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-ENLIL+Cone model installed at the {Community Coordinated Modeling Center} (CCMC) and executed in real-time at the CCMC/{Space Weather Research Center}. The current implementation of this ensemble modeling method evaluates the sensitivity of WSA-ENLIL+Cone model simulations of CME propagation to initial CME parameters. We discuss the results of real-time ensemble simulations for a total of 35 CME events which occurred between January 2013 - July 2014. For the 17 events where the CME was predicted to arrive at Earth, the mean absolute arrival time prediction error was 12.3 hours, which is comparable to the errors reported in other studies. For predictions of CME arrival at Earth the correct rejection rate is 62%, the false-alarm rate is 38%, the correct alarm ratio is 77%, and false alarm ratio is 23%. The arrival time was within the range of the ensemble arrival predictions for 8 out of 17 events. The Brier Score for CME arrival predictions is 0.15 (where a score of 0 on a range of 0 to 1 is a perfect forecast), which indicates that on average, the predicted probability, or likelihood, of CME arrival is fairly accurate. The reliability of ensemble CME arrival predictions is heavily dependent on the initial distribution of CME input parameters (e.g. speed, direction, and width), particularly the median and spread. Preliminary analysis of the probabilistic forecasts suggests undervariability, indicating that these ensembles do not sample a wide enough spread in CME input parameters. Prediction errors can also arise from ambient model parameters, the accuracy of the solar wind background derived from coronal maps, or other model limitations. Finally, predictions of the KP geomagnetic index differ from observed values by less than one for 11 out of 17 of the ensembles and KP prediction errors computed from the mean predicted KP show a mean absolute error of 1.3. The CCMC, located at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, is an interagency partnership to facilitate community research and accelerate implementation of progress in research into space weather operations. The CCMC also serves the {Space Weather Scoreboard} website (http://kauai.ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov/SWScoreBoard) to the research community who may submit CME arrival time predictions in real-time for a variety of forecasting methods. The website facilitates model validation under real-time conditions and enables collaboration. For every CME event table on the site, the average of all submitted forecasts is automatically computed, thus itself providing a community-wide ensemble mean CME arrival time and impact forecast from a variety of models/methods.

  2. Commercial Buildings Partnership Projects - Metered Data Format and Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, Srinivas

    2010-11-16

    A number of the Commercial Building Partnership Projects (CBPs) will require metering, monitoring, data analysis and verification of savings after the retrofits are complete. Although monitoring and verification (M&V) agents are free to use any metering and monitoring devices that they chose, the data they collect should be reported to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in a standard format. PNNL will store the data collected in its CBP database for further use by PNNL and U.S. Department of Energy. This document describes the data storage process and the deliver format of the data from the M&V agents.

  3. An Optimal Delivery Format for Presentations Targeting Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin-Wells, Vonnette; Zimmerman, Teena; McDougall, Graham J., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    African-American, Hispanic, and white older adults (n=34) attended three information sessions presented via flipcharts, transparencies, and PowerPoint (one format per session). In focus groups, participants rated accessibility, novelty, and efficiency. They overwhelmingly preferred PowerPoint on all dimensions. (SK)

  4. Group, One-on-One, or Internet? Preferences for Mindfulness Meditation Delivery Format and their Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Wahbeh, Helané; Svalina, Matthew N.; Oken, Barry S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Group mindfulness meditation interventions have improved symptoms in many health conditions. However, many people are unwilling to receive group treatment, so alternative delivery methods such as individual and internet may be a useful option. The study objective was to examine mindfulness meditation intervention delivery format preferences and their relationship to potential predictors. Design An online survey was conducted of adult English speakers. Data was collected on interest and preference for internet, individual, or group formats of a mindfulness meditation intervention. Age, gender, personality, and posttraumatic stress disorder score and status and depression status were also collected. Results and Conclusions 500 eligible participants completed the survey (mean age 39±15; range 18–70; 68% female). Participants were more interested in the Internet (n=356) and individual formats (n=384) than the group format (n=245). Fifty-five participants (11%) said they would refuse a group format. Internet was the first choice format for most participants (Internet 212 (43%), Individual 187 (38%), Group 97 (20%) and group was the last choice for most participants (Internet 140 (29%), Individual 70 (14%), Group 279 (57%)). Age, extraversion and emotional stability were significant in predicting first choice format. These results support the need for more research and implementation of alternative mindfulness meditation intervention delivery formats. Future research will incorporate additional predictors and include a broader range of participants.

  5. Investigation of Reagent Delivery Formats in a Multivalent Malaria Sandwich Immunoassay and Implications for Assay Performance.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tinny; Robinson, Robert; Houghtaling, Jared; Fridley, Gina; Ramsey, Stephen A; Fu, Elain

    2016-02-16

    Conventional lateral flow tests (LFTs), the current standard bioassay format used in low-resource point-of-care (POC) settings, have limitations that have held back their application in the testing of low concentration analytes requiring high sensitivity and low limits of detection. LFTs use a premix format for a rapid one-step delivery of premixed sample and labeled antibody to the detection region. We have compared the signal characteristics of two types of reagent delivery formats in a model system of a sandwich immunoassay for malarial protein detection. The premix format produced a uniform binding profile within the detection region. In contrast, decoupling the delivery of sample and labeled antibody to the detection region in a sequential format produced a nonuniform binding profile in which the majority of the signal was localized to the upstream edge of the detection region. The assay response was characterized in both the sequential and premix formats. The sequential format had a 4- to 10-fold lower limit of detection than the premix format, depending on assay conjugate concentration. A mathematical model of the assay quantitatively reproduced the experimental binding profiles for a set of rate constants that were consistent with surface plasmon resonance measurements and absorbance measurements of the experimental multivalent malaria system. PMID:26835721

  6. HELCATS Prediction of Planetary CME arrival times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boakes, Peter; Moestl, Christian; Davies, Jackie; Harrison, Richard; Byrne, Jason; Barnes, David; Isavnin, Alexey; Kilpua, Emilia; Rollett, Tanja

    2015-04-01

    We present the first results of CME arrival time prediction at different planetary locations and their comparison to the in situ data within the HELCATS project. The EU FP7 HELCATS (Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis & Techniques Service) is a European effort to consolidate the exploitation of the maturing field of heliospheric imaging. HELCATS aims to catalogue solar wind transients, observed by the NASA STEREO Heliospheric Imager (HI) instruments, and validate different methods for the determination of their kinematic properties. This validation includes comparison with arrivals at Earth, and elsewhere in the heliosphere, as well as onsets at the Sun (http://www.helcats-fp7.eu/). A preliminary catalogue of manually identified CMEs, with over 1000 separate events, has been created from observations made by the STEREO/HI instruments covering the years 2007-2013. Initial speeds and directions of each CME have been derived through fitting the time elongation profile to the state of the art Self-Similar Expansion Fitting (SSEF) geometric technique (Davies et al., 2012). The technique assumes that, in the plane corresponding to the position angle of interest, CMEs can be modelled as circles subtending a fixed angular width to Sun-center and propagating anti-sunward in a fixed direction at a constant speed (we use an angular width of 30 degrees in our initial results). The model has advantages over previous geometric models (e.g. harmonic mean or fixed phi) as it allows one to predict whether a CME will 'hit' a specific heliospheric location, as well as to what degree (e.g. direct assault or glancing blow). We use correction formulae (Möstl and Davies, 2013) to convert CME speeds, direction and launch time to speed and arrival time at any in situ location. From the preliminary CME dataset, we derive arrival times for over 400 Earth-directed CMEs, and for over 100 Mercury-, Venus-, Mars- and Saturn-directed CMEs predicted to impact each planet. We present statistics of predicted CME arrival properties. In addition, we independently identify CME arrival at in situ locations using magnetic field data from the Venus Express, Messenger, and Ulysses spacecraft and show first comparisons to predicted arrival times. The results hold important implications for space weather prediction at Earth and other locations, allowing model and predicted CME parameters to be compared to their in situ counterparts.

  7. Predicting CME transit time with neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudar, Davor; Vrsnak, Bojan; Dumbovic, Mateja

    2014-05-01

    We compiled a list of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with known source position and their associated interplanetary CMEs, identified using in-situ measurement at Earth and determined their travel time to Earth. Using this dataset we constructed and trained the neural network to estimate the travel time to Earth based on the initial parameters of the CMEs. The analysis is mainly focused on the first order (linear) CME speed derived from LASCO measurements and central meridian distance of the CME source position (as derived from associated solar flare).

  8. Mechanism of Membranous Tunnelling Nanotube Formation in Viral Genome Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Bibiana; Gil-Carton, David; Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Bertin, Aurelie; Boulogne, Claire; Oksanen, Hanna M.; Bamford, Dennis H.; Abrescia, Nicola G. A.

    2013-01-01

    In internal membrane-containing viruses, a lipid vesicle enclosed by the icosahedral capsid protects the genome. It has been postulated that this internal membrane is the genome delivery device of the virus. Viruses built with this architectural principle infect hosts in all three domains of cellular life. Here, using a combination of electron microscopy techniques, we investigate bacteriophage PRD1, the best understood model for such viruses, to unveil the mechanism behind the genome translocation across the cell envelope. To deliver its double-stranded DNA, the icosahedral protein-rich virus membrane transforms into a tubular structure protruding from one of the 12 vertices of the capsid. We suggest that this viral nanotube exits from the same vertex used for DNA packaging, which is biochemically distinct from the other 11. The tube crosses the capsid through an aperture corresponding to the loss of the peripentonal P3 major capsid protein trimers, penton protein P31 and membrane protein P16. The remodeling of the internal viral membrane is nucleated by changes in osmolarity and loss of capsid-membrane interactions as consequence of the de-capping of the vertices. This engages the polymerization of the tail tube, which is structured by membrane-associated proteins. We have observed that the proteo-lipidic tube in vivo can pierce the gram-negative bacterial cell envelope allowing the viral genome to be shuttled to the host cell. The internal diameter of the tube allows one double-stranded DNA chain to be translocated. We conclude that the assembly principles of the viral tunneling nanotube take advantage of proteo-lipid interactions that confer to the tail tube elastic, mechanical and functional properties employed also in other protein-membrane systems. PMID:24086111

  9. Solar Back-sided Halo CME - Duration: 13 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Sun erupted with several CMEs (coronal mass ejections) during a period just over a day (Nov. 8-9, 2012), the largest of which was a halo CME. This CME appears to have originated from an active ...

  10. Balancing Instructional Techniques and Delivery Formats in Capstone Business Strategy Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alstete, Jeffrey W.; Beutell, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contend that collegiate programs should carefully plan their capstone courses in light of the educational mission, pedagogical content knowledge, instructional techniques and delivery formats. Design/methodology/approach: This is a concept paper with elements of theory building from the case of business…

  11. Parenting Interventions Implementation Science: How Delivery Format Impacts the Parenting Wisely Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Katie L.; Bacallao, Martica; Smokowski, Paul R.; Robertson, Caroline I. B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study examines the implementation and effectiveness of Parenting Wisely, an Internet-based parenting skills intervention. The study assesses whether parents benefit from Parenting Wisely participation and whether the delivery format influences program effectiveness. Method: This study uses a quasi-experimental design.

  12. Parenting Interventions Implementation Science: How Delivery Format Impacts the Parenting Wisely Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Katie L.; Bacallao, Martica; Smokowski, Paul R.; Robertson, Caroline I. B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study examines the implementation and effectiveness of Parenting Wisely, an Internet-based parenting skills intervention. The study assesses whether parents benefit from Parenting Wisely participation and whether the delivery format influences program effectiveness. Method: This study uses a quasi-experimental design.…

  13. A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. III. Catastrophe of the Eruptive Filament at a Magnetic Null Point and Formation of an Opposite-Handedness CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uralov, A. M.; Grechnev, V. V.; Rudenko, G. V.; Myshyakov, I. I.; Chertok, I. M.; Filippov, B. P.; Slemzin, V. A.

    2014-10-01

    Our analysis in Papers I and II (Grechnev et al., Solar Phys. 289, 289, 2014b and Solar Phys. 289, 1279, 2014c) of the 18 November 2003 solar event responsible for the 20 November geomagnetic superstorm has revealed a complex chain of eruptions. In particular, the eruptive filament encountered a topological discontinuity located near the solar disk center at a height of about 100 Mm, bifurcated, and transformed into a large cloud, which did not leave the Sun. Concurrently, an additional CME presumably erupted close to the bifurcation region. The conjectures about the responsibility of this compact CME for the superstorm and its disconnection from the Sun are confirmed in Paper IV (Grechnev et al., Solar Phys. submitted, 2014a), which concludes about its probable spheromak-like structure. The present article confirms the presence of a magnetic null point near the bifurcation region and addresses the origin of the magnetic helicity of the interplanetary magnetic clouds and their connection to the Sun. We find that the orientation of a magnetic dipole constituted by dimmed regions with the opposite magnetic polarities away from the parent active region corresponded to the direction of the axial field in the magnetic cloud, while the pre-eruptive filament mismatched it. To combine all of the listed findings, we propose an intrinsically three-dimensional scheme, in which a spheromak-like eruption originates via the interaction of the initially unconnected magnetic fluxes of the eruptive filament and pre-existing ones in the corona. Through a chain of magnetic reconnections their positive mutual helicity was transformed into the self-helicity of the spheromak-like magnetic cloud.

  14. The CME Flare Arcade and the Width of the CME in the Outer Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007, ApJ, 668, 1221) present evidence that (1) a CME is typically a magnetic bubble, a low-beta gplasmoid with legs h having roughly the 3D shape of a light bulb, and (2) in the outer corona the CME plasmoid is in lateral pressure equilibrium with the ambient magnetic field. They present three CMEs observed by SOHO/LASCO, each from a very different source located near the limb. One of these CMEs came from a compact ejective eruption from a small part of a sunspot active region, another came from a large quiet-region filament eruption, and the third CME, an extremely large and fast one, was produced in tandem with an X20 flare arcade that was centered on a huge delta sunspot. Each of these CMEs had more or less the classic lightbulb silhouette and attained a constant heliocentric angular width in the outer corona. This indicates that the CME plasmoid attained lateral magnetic pressure balance with the ambient radial magnetic field in the outer corona. This lateral pressure balance, together with the standard scenario for CME production by the eruption of a sheared-core magnetic arcade, yields the following simple estimate of the strength B(sub Flare) of the magnetic field in the flare arcade produced together with the CME: B(sub Flare) 1.4(theta CME/theta Flare)sup 2 G, where theta (sub CME) is the heliocentric angular width of the CME plasmoid in the outer corona and theta (sub Flare) is the heliocentric angular width of the full-grown flare arcade. Conversely, theta (sub CME) approximately equal to (R(sub Sun)sup -1(phi(sub Flare)/1.4)sup 1/2 radians, where Flare is the magnetic flux covered by the full-grown flare arcade. In addition to presenting the three CMEs of Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007) and their agreement with this relation between CME and Flare, we present a further empirical test of this relation. For CMEs that erupt from active regions, the co-produced flare arcade seldom if ever covers the entire active region: if AR is the total magnetic flux of the active region, Flare . AR, and we predict that CME. (R(sub Sun))sup -1(theta AR/1.4)sup 1/2 radians. For a random sample of 31 CMEs that erupted from active regions within 30 of the limb, for each CME we have measured CME from LASCO/C3 and have measured AR from a SOHO/MDI magnetogram of the source active region when it was within 30 of disk center. We find that each CME obeys the above predicted inequality, none having width greater than half of the upper bound given by theta(sub AR). Thus, an active region's magnetic flux content, together with its location on the solar disk, largely determines whether the active region can possibly produce a CME that is wide enough to intercept the Earth.

  15. The Growth, Characteristics, and Future of Online CME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John M., Jr.; Sklar, Bernard M.; Amend, Robert W.; Novalis-Marine, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Physician use of online continuing medical education (CME) is growing, but there are conflicting data on the uptake of online CME and few details on this market. Methods: Analyses of 11 years of data from the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) and a survey of 272 publicly available CME Web sites. …

  16. The Growth, Characteristics, and Future of Online CME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John M., Jr.; Sklar, Bernard M.; Amend, Robert W.; Novalis-Marine, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Physician use of online continuing medical education (CME) is growing, but there are conflicting data on the uptake of online CME and few details on this market. Methods: Analyses of 11 years of data from the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) and a survey of 272 publicly available CME Web sites.

  17. Using Focus Groups for Strategic Planning in a CME Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takhar, Jatinder; Tipping, Jane

    2008-01-01

    The University of Western Ontario, having established a fully functional continuing medical education (CME) office over the last 4 years, needed to plan the future for its academic CME unit. It needs a method for evaluating the progress and shaping the organizational future of the CME unit. A literature search and consultations suggested focus

  18. CME and Change in Practice: An Alternative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wergin, Jon F.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Results of a study by the American College of Cardiology revealed that continuing medical education (CME) courses contain relatively little information that is new to the audience, that other influences on practice interact with CME content, and that change attributable to CME is subtle and often delayed. (JOW)

  19. Sharing Collaborative Designs of Tobacco Cessation Performance Improvement CME Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullikin, Elizabeth A.; Ales, Mary W.; Cho, Jane; Nelson, Teena M.; Rodrigues, Shelly B.; Speight, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Performance Improvement Continuing Medical Education (PI CME) provides an important opportunity for CME providers to combine educational and quality health care improvement methodologies. Very few CME providers take on the challenges of planning this type of intervention because it is still a new practice and there are limited…

  20. Learning to Collaborate: A Case Study of Performance Improvement CME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shershneva, Marianna B.; Mullikin, Elizabeth A.; Loose, Anne-Sophie; Olson, Curtis A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Performance Improvement Continuing Medical Education (PI CME) is a mechanism for joining quality improvement (QI) in health care to continuing medical education (CME) systems together. Although QI practices and CME approaches have been recognized for years, what emerges from their integration is largely unfamiliar, because it

  1. Assessment of Barriers to Changing Practice as CME Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, David W.; Miller, Elaine K.; Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Brace, Nancy E.; Larson, R. Sam

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing medical education (CME) is meant to drive and support improvements in practice. To achieve this goal, CME activities must move beyond simply purveying knowledge, instead helping attendees to contextualize information and to develop strategies for implementing new learning. CME attendees face different barriers to…

  2. Learning to Collaborate: A Case Study of Performance Improvement CME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shershneva, Marianna B.; Mullikin, Elizabeth A.; Loose, Anne-Sophie; Olson, Curtis A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Performance Improvement Continuing Medical Education (PI CME) is a mechanism for joining quality improvement (QI) in health care to continuing medical education (CME) systems together. Although QI practices and CME approaches have been recognized for years, what emerges from their integration is largely unfamiliar, because it…

  3. Role of Components in the Formation of Self-microemulsifying Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, A. K.; Deshpande, P. B.; Kar, S. S.; Nayak, Usha Y.; Udupa, N.; Reddy, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical research is focused in designing novel drug delivery systems to improve the bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs. Self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems, one among the lipid-based dosage forms were proven to be promising in improving the oral bioavailability of such drugs by enhancing solubility, permeability and avoiding first-pass metabolism via enhanced lymphatic transport. Further, they have been successful in avoiding both inter and intra individual variations as well as the dose disproportionality. Aqueous insoluble drugs, in general, show greater solubility in lipid based excipients, and hence they are formulated as lipid based drug delivery systems. The extent of solubility of a hydrophobic drug in lipid excipients i.e. oil, surfactant and co-surfactant (components of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems) greatly affects the drug loading and in producing stable self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems. The present review highlighted the influence of physicochemical factors and structural features of the hydrophobic drug on its solubility in lipid excipients and an attempt was made to explore the role of each component of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems in the formation of stable microemulsion upon dilution. PMID:26180269

  4. Characteristics of Kinematics of a Coronal Mass Ejection during the 2010 August 1 CME-CME Interaction Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temmer, Manuela; Vršnak, Bojan; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; de Koning, Curt A.; Liu, Ying; Bosman, Eckhard; Davies, Jackie A.; Möstl, Christian; Žic, Tomislav; Veronig, Astrid M.; Bothmer, Volker; Harrison, Richard; Nitta, Nariaki; Bisi, Mario; Flor, Olga; Eastwood, Jonathan; Odstrcil, Dusan; Forsyth, Robert

    2012-04-01

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and heliospheric imager (HI) data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field of view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; ~1200 km s-1) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; ~700 km s-1). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2, suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  5. CHARACTERISTICS OF KINEMATICS OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION DURING THE 2010 AUGUST 1 CME-CME INTERACTION EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, Manuela; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; Moestl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M.; Flor, Olga; Vrsnak, Bojan; Zic, Tomislav; De Koning, Curt A.; Liu, Ying; Bosman, Eckhard; Davies, Jackie A.; Bothmer, Volker; Harrison, Richard; Nitta, Nariaki; Bisi, Mario; Eastwood, Jonathan; Forsyth, Robert; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2012-04-10

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and heliospheric imager (HI) data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field of view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; {approx}1200 km s{sup -1}) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; {approx}700 km s{sup -1}). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2, suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  6. Characteristics of Kinematics of a Coronal Mass Ejection During the 2010 August 1 CME-CME Interaction Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temmer, Manuela; Vrsnak, Bojan; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; de Koning, Curt A.; Liu, Ying; Bosman, Eckhard; Davies, Jackie A.; Mostl, Christian; Zic, Tomislav; Veronig, Astrid M.; Bothmer, Volker; Harrison, Richard; Nitta, Nariaki; Bisi, Mario; Flor, Olga; Eastwood, Jonathan; Odstrcil, Dusan; Forsyth, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and HI data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field-of-view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; (is) approximately 1200 km s-1) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; (is) approximately 700 km s-1). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2 suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  7. 3-D views of the expanding CME: from the Sun to 1AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouillard, Alexis P.

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional information on Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) can be obtained from a wide range of in-situ measurements and remote-sensing techniques. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white-light imaging sensed from several vantage points can be used to infer the 3-D geometry of the different parts that constitute a CME. High-resolution and high-cadence coronal imaging provides detailed information on the formation and release phase of a magnetic flux rope, the lateral expansion of the CME and the reconfiguration of the corona associated with the effects of pressure variations and reconnection. The evolution of the CME in the interplanetary medium and the connection of its various substructures with in-situ measurements can be obtained from multi-point heliospheric imaging.

  8. Radiology CME on the Web using secure document transfer and internationally distributed image servers.

    PubMed Central

    McEnery, K. W.; Roth, S. M.; Walkup, R. V.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a World Wide Web-based Continuing Medical Educational (CME) program in Diagnostic Radiology which allows accumulation of Category I credit. The program implements an unknown case presentation format which includes multiple choice questions, didactic information, and literature references with links to abstracts. Physician participation is anticipated to occur in brief sessions during which the program automatically tracks CME credit accumulation. To allow an interactive presentation, HTML electronic form documents are created "on the fly" by a Common Gateway Interface (CGI) application interfacing with several relational databases. The system is scalable with bandwidth intensive image transfers distributed over multiple internationally distributed image servers. For CME participants, the system utilizes documents encryption to ensure confidential physician interactions. PMID:8947623

  9. Contributions from Ultraviolet Spectroscopy to the Prediction of High-energy Proton Hazards from CME Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Raymond, J. C.; Cranmer, S. R.; Kohl, J. L.

    2004-05-01

    A significant potential hazard to astronauts and their equipment in interplanetary space is the relativistic proton flux produced by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares. The longest-duration phase of solar energetic particle (SEP) activity is believed to come from the CME shock as it propagates through the extended corona and heliosphere. Ultraviolet spectroscopy by SOHO has revealed a means for: (1) detecting and characterizing CME shocks in the corona, and (2) determining the plasma conditions in the pre-CME corona which are needed to understand the formation and evolution of shocks. Such remote sensing - combined with models of SEP acceleration and transport - can be used to predict the strength, duration, and production sites of the radiation. This poster describes the specific means by which ultraviolet spectroscopy and other remote-sensing data can be used to determine the inputs and boundary conditions for individual events (such as the October-November 2003 storms) in existing SEP model codes. We also discuss an additional potential source of SEP radiation associated with electric fields in the current sheets that form in flare regions in the wake of CME. Both observations and model calculations show that the reconnection-induced electric field can reach a maximum strength of a few V/cm within tens of minutes after the onset of the eruption, then decreases gradually over several hours. SEPs produced in these regions may account for X-rays and ? -rays observed prior to the formation of CME shocks. Ultraviolet spectroscopy has been shown to provide constraints on the plasma properties in all of the above CME features. This work is supported by NASA under grant NAG5-12865 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, and by the Swiss contribution to ESA's PRODEX program.

  10. Intrapericardial Delivery of Gelfoam Enables the Targeted Delivery of Periostin Peptide after Myocardial Infarction by Inducing Fibrin Clot Formation

    PubMed Central

    Polizzotti, Brian D.; Arab, Shima; Kühn, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Background Administration of a recombinant peptide of Periostin (rPN) has recently been shown to stimulate cardiomyocyte proliferation and angiogensis after myocardial infarction (MI) [1]. However, strategies for targeting the delivery of rPN to the heart are lacking. Intrapericardial administration of drug-eluting hydrogels may provide a clinically viable strategy for increasing myocardial retention, therapeutic efficacy, and bioactivity of rPN and to decrease systemic re-circulation. Methods and Results We investigated the ability of intrapericardial injections of drug-eluting hydrogels to deliver and prolong the release of rPN to the myocardium in a large animal model of myocardial infarction. Gelfoam is an FDA-approved hemostatic material commonly used in surgery, and is known to stimulate fibrin clot formation. We show that Gelfoam disks loaded with rPN, when implanted within the pericardium or peritoneum of mammals becomes encapsulated within a non-fibrotic fibrin-rich hydrogel, prolonging the in vitro and in vivo release of rPN. Administration into the pericardial cavity of pigs, following a complete occlusion of the left anterior descending artery, leads to greater induction of cardiomyocyte mitosis, increased cardiomyocyte cell cycle activity, and enhanced angiogenesis compared to direct injection of rPN alone. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that intrapericardial drug delivery of Gelfoam, enhanced by triggered clot formation, can be used to effectively deliver rPN to the myocardium in a clinically relevant model of myocardial infarction. The work presented here should enhance the translational potential of pharmaceutical-based strategies that must be targeted to the myocardium. PMID:22590609

  11. Radio signatures of CME-streamer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, Y.; Feng, S.; Kong, X.; Li, G.; Song, H.

    2011-12-01

    Recent observational finding of streamer waves using the LASCO white light data presents us interesting physical consequence of CME-streamer interactions [1, 2, 3]. CME-streamer interactions can also manifest themselves in the Type-II-related radio dynamic spectra as recorded by the ground-based or space-borne instruments. A large body of studies exists revealing the possible roles of pre-existing helmet streamers in the radio emission during a solar eruption. In this presentation, we will summary our efforts in classifying the roles of streamers affecting Type-II radio emissions. Generally speaking, there exist two groups of CME-streamer-Type-II events. In the first group, the shock as well as the Type-II radio emission seems to exist prior to the CME-streamer interaction. The interaction can be clearly discerned from the well-defined bump of the Type-II radio dynamic spectra. The spectral bump is a direct result of plasma emissions when the radio emitting region traversing the denser streamer structure. In the other group of events, the Type-II burst is excited as a result of the CME-streamer interaction. Either the shock is formed and radio-emitting electrons are accelerated inside the streamer, or a prior non-emitting shock becomes radio aloud during the interacting process. A novel triangular-streamer-shock model is proposed to interpret the associated electron acceleration inside the streamer. Observational examples of CME-streamer-radio events corresponding to both cases will be presented. [1] Chen, Y., Song, H.Q., Li, B., Xia, L.D., Wu, Z., Fu, H., Li, X., 2010, Astrophys. J. 714, 644 [2] Chen, Y., Feng, S.W., Li, B., Song, H.Q., Xia, L.D., Kong, X.L., Li, X., 2011, Astrophys. J. 728, 147 [3] Feng S. W., Chen Y., Li B., Song H. Q., Kong X. L., Xia L. D., Feng, X. S., 2011, Sol. Phys., DOI 10.1007/s11207-011-9814-6

  12. Morphology and Density Structure of Post-CME Current Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrsnak, B.; Poletto, G.; Vujic, E.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is believed to drag and open the coronal magnetic field, presumably leading to the formation of a large-scale current sheet and field relaxation by magnetic reconnection. This paper analyzes the physical characteristics of ray-like coronal features formed in the aftermath of CMEs, to confirm whether interpreting such phenomena in terms of a reconnecting current sheet is consistent with observations. Methods: The study focuses on UVCS/SOHO and LASCO/SOHO measurements of the ray width, density excess, and coronal velocity field as a function of the radial distance. The morphology of the rays implies that they are produced by Petschek-like reconnection in the large-scale current sheet formed in the wake of CME. The hypothesis is supported by the flow pattern, often showing outflows along the ray, and sometimes also inflows into the ray. The inferred inflow velocities range from 3 to 30 km/s, and are consistent with the narrow opening-angle of rays, which add up to a few degrees. The density of rays is an order of magnitude higher than in the ambient corona. The model results are consistent with the observations, revealing that the main cause of the density excess in rays is a transport of the dense plasma from lower to higher heights by the reconnection outflow.

  13. Simulations of the CME-Flare Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliem, B.; Török, T.; Forbes, T. G.

    2008-12-01

    Observations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares have revealed a high correlation between the acceleration of the ejecta and the plasma heating and particle acceleration signified by the soft and hard X-ray emissions of the associated flare. The latter are generally thought to result from magnetic reconnection. This finding has stimulated the discussion of the CME-flare relationship, but at the same time it has made it difficult to find a conclusive answer as to whether magnetic reconnection or an ideal MHD instability is the prime cause of the eruptions. Numerical simulations of unstable flux ropes will be presented that are in very satisfactory quantitative agreement with erupting filaments, both, confined to the corona and ejective (i.e., developing into a CME). Some of these simulations indeed show a high degree of synchronization between the initial exponential acceleration of the flux rope, due to the ideal MHD instability, and the development of reconnection flows. However, others show a very delayed onset of reconnection, even after the flux rope's acceleration peak. In addition, the reconnection flows generally lag behind the motions driven by the ideal instability as the flux rope rise velocity nears the saturation phase. Comparison of the simulation results with observations suggests that the ideal MHD process is the primary driver of the coupled CME-flare phenomenon. The strong differences in the degree of synchronization, which the simulated systems show in the main rise phase of the eruption, are related to the magnetic topology prior to the eruption. Given the observational result of a high correlation between CME and flare development (Zhang & Dere 2006), these simulations yield constraints on the topology and lead us to conclude that a seed for a reconnecting current sheet must typically be present already at the onset of the eruption.

  14. Simulations of the CME-Flare Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliem, B.; Török, T.

    2008-09-01

    Observations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares have revealed a high correlation between the acceleration of the ejecta and the plasma heating and particle acceleration signified by the soft and hard X-ray emissions of the associated flare. The latter are generally thought to result from magnetic reconnection. This finding has stimulated the discussion of the CME-flare relationship, but at the same time it has made it difficult to find a conclusive answer as to whether magnetic reconnection or an ideal MHD instability is the prime cause of the eruptions. Numerical simulations of unstable flux ropes will be presented that are in very satisfactory quantitative agreement with erupting filaments, both, confined to the corona and ejective (i.e., developing into a CME). Some of these simulations indeed show a high degree of synchronization between the initial exponential acceleration of the flux rope, due to the ideal MHD instability, and the development of reconnection flows. However, others show a very delayed onset of reconnection, even after the flux rope's acceleration peak. In addition, the reconnection flows generally lag behind the motions driven by the ideal instability as the flux rope rise velocity nears the saturation phase. Both findings indicate that the ideal MHD process is the primary driver of the coupled CME-flare phenomenon. The strong differences in the degree of synchronization, which the simulated systems show in the main rise phase of the eruption, are related to the magnetic topology prior to the eruption. Given the observational result of a high correlation between CME and flare development (Zhang & Dere 2006), these simulations yield constraints on the topology and lead us to conclude that a seed for a reconnecting current sheet must typically be present already at the onset of the eruption.

  15. Ly-alpha and white light observations of a CME during the Spartan 201-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassler, Don M.; Strachan, Leonard; Gardner, L. D.; Kohl, J. L.; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard R.; Strong, K.

    1994-01-01

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) near a large active region on the west limb was observed with the white light coronograph (WLC) and ultraviolet coronal spectrometer (UVCS) on the Spartan 201 satellite at 9:42 UT on 12 Apr. 1993. Soft X-ray images of the region below the CME were obtained out to 1.7 solar radii with the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh. After the event, the formation of a new helmet streamer could be seen in the polarized brightness (pB) images from the Mk III coronograph at Mauna Loa. The CME was observed from Spartan 201 in two different pB images obtained 14 min apart using the WLC, and was observed moving through the field-of-view of the UVCS integrated intensity slit. Ly-alpha intensities in the same region of the corona were obtained one orbit earlier (prior to the CME) using the Ly-alpha profile slit of the UVCS. These are the first Ly-alpha observations of a CME and may help constrain models of the electron temperature on CME's.

  16. Study of CME Properties Using High Resolution Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Ya. I.; Fainshtein, V. G.

    The joint use of high-resolution data from SDO and PROBA2 satellites and LASCO/SOHO coronographs enabled us to examine early stages of initiation and propagation of six limb CMEs registered in June 2010 - June 2011. For five events under consideration, the CME initiation is marked by filament (prominence) eruption or by a loop-like structure having another nature. Subsequently, several loop-like structures having higher brightness and following each other at different velocities appear in the region of the CME initiation. The CME frontal structure is formed by these loop-like structures. The CME kinematics and such CME characteristics as angular size and longitudinal to latitudinal size ratio was found for considered all events. We have drawn a conclusion about the possible existence of two CME types dependent on the velocity profile.

  17. Deflected Propagation ---- A Factor Deciding the Geoeffectiveness of A CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shen, C.; Liu, J.; Gui, B.; Wang, S.

    2010-12-01

    To answer the question if a CME can cause a significant change of the states of geo-space, the first issue we have to address is whether or not the CME will intersect with the Earth or what the trajectory of the CME is. From several observational cases and statistical studies, we show that the deflected propagations of CMEs are a common phenomenon. The amount of the deflection could be as large as several tens degrees in either latitude, longitude or both. Thus, an on-disk CME may not necessarily encounter the Earth, while a limb CME may be able to hit the Earth. Roughly, the CMEs' deflections can be classified as two different kinds. One is the deflection occurring in the corona, in which the CME's trajectory is controled by the distribution of the energy density of undisturbed coronal magnetic field. The other is that happenning in the IP space and in the ecliptic plane, in which the direction of the CME's propagation will be changed by the preceding or trailing background solar wind plasma depending on the velocity difference between the CME and ambient solar wind. Two models are proposed to describe the two different CME deflection behaviors, respectively. By applying the models to several cases, we may show that the trajectories of these CMEs predicted by the models match the observations fairly well.

  18. The anatomy of an outstanding CME meeting.

    PubMed

    Muroff, Lawrence R

    2005-06-01

    Organizing a continuing medical education (CME) meeting should not be a casual undertaking. It requires experience, staff support, and adequate funding. The sponsoring entity should have a thorough grounding in the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education mind-set, and the course should be within the mission of the organization. Needs of the potential attendees should be assessed and objectives developed to meet those needs. An evaluation process should be in place to ensure that the needs were addressed and met. Ideally, a postcourse evaluation should assess the impact of the meeting on the behavior and practice patterns of the registrants. Excellent teachers should be selected as faculty members. These educators should be given advance information about the characteristics of the attendees, their needs, and their expectations. Topics should be chosen for their relevance to the registrants, as opposed to the convenience of the faculty members. This paper deals with these issues and several related topics. It is based on the author's experience and supplemented by relevant peer-reviewed scientific literature. The CME "market" has a "caveat emptor" approach. PMID:17411871

  19. Forecasting a CME by Spectroscopic Precursor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.

    2012-02-01

    Multi-temperature plasma flows resulting from the interaction between a mature active region (AR) inside an equatorial coronal hole (CH) are investigated. Outflow velocities observed by Hinode EIS ranged from a few to 13 km s-1 for three days at the AR’s eastern and western edges. However, on the fourth day, velocities intensified up to 20 km s-1 at the AR’s western footpoint about six hours prior to a CME. 3D MHD numerical simulations of the observed magnetic configuration of the AR-CH complex showed that the expansion of the mature AR’s loops drives persistent outflows along the neighboring CH field (Murray et al. in Solar Phys. 261, 253, 2010). Based on these simulations, intensification of outflows observed pre-eruption on the AR’s western side where same-polarity AR and CH field interface, is interpreted to be the result of the expansion of a sigmoidal AR, in particular, a flux rope containing a filament that provides stronger compression of the neighboring CH field on this side of the AR. Intensification of outflows in the AR is proposed as a new type of CME precursor.

  20. Attendees' Perceptions of Commercial Influence in Noncommercially Funded CME Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, Elizabeth; Baer, Lee; Fromson, John A.; Gorrindo, Tristan; Iodice, Kristin E.; Birnbaum, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The controversy surrounding commercial support for continuing medical education (CME) programs has led to policy changes, but data show no significant difference in perceived bias between commercial and noncommercial CME. Indeed, what attendees perceive as commercial influence is not fully understood. We sought to clarify what…

  1. Developing an Instrument to Measure Bias in CME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takhar, Jatinder; Dixon, Dave; Donahue, Jill; Marlow, Bernard; Campbell, Craig; Silver, Ivan; Eadie, Jason; Monette, Celine; Rohan, Ivan; Sriharan, Abi; Raymond, Kathryn; Macnab, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The pharmaceutical industry, by funding over 60% of programs in the United States and Canada, plays a major role in continuing medical education (CME), but there are concerns about bias in such CME programs. Bias is difficult to define, and currently no tool is available to measure it. Methods: Representatives from industry and…

  2. CME masses measured by the HELIOS spacecraft photometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, B. V.; Webb, D. F.

    1995-01-01

    We have cataloged 160 CMEs detected in the HELIOS 1 and 2 90 deg zodiacal light photometers observed from 1975-1985. The HELIOS 1 and 2 spacecraft orbited from 0.3 to 1.0 AU on 6-month orbits. From the photometer observations of Thomson-scattered light in the inner heliosphere, we have determined CME masses for these events using two methods: (1) by integration over the contours drawn between the three photometers at a given time; and (2) by integration of the mass flow over time past a given photometer. The second method, not readily available using coronagraph observations, is derived from CME speeds measured by using the timing of the peak CME brightness from the 16 deg to 31 deg sets of photometers. The two different HELIOS methods of determining CME mass are consistent with one another for individual CMEs. We find that the CME mass values range from 10(exp 15)g to nearly 10(exp 17)g. We compare the mass distributions of HELIOS-measured CMEs with those from coronagraphs and find that CMEs measured by HELIOS over the same time interval are generally more massive. The solar cycle variation of the total CME mass present in the heliosphere varies by over a factor of approximately 15 from solar minimum to solar maximum. Slightly more massive CMEs carry the bulk of the CME mass during maximum. The total CME mass at solar maximum is found to be near 15% of the total solar wind mass.

  3. Developing an Instrument to Measure Bias in CME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takhar, Jatinder; Dixon, Dave; Donahue, Jill; Marlow, Bernard; Campbell, Craig; Silver, Ivan; Eadie, Jason; Monette, Celine; Rohan, Ivan; Sriharan, Abi; Raymond, Kathryn; Macnab, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The pharmaceutical industry, by funding over 60% of programs in the United States and Canada, plays a major role in continuing medical education (CME), but there are concerns about bias in such CME programs. Bias is difficult to define, and currently no tool is available to measure it. Methods: Representatives from industry and

  4. Evaluating Conflicts of Interest in Research Presented in CME Venues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Nancy L.; Galliher, James M.; Spano, Mindy S.; Main, Deborah S.; Brannigan, Michael; Pace, Wilson D.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: There is much in the literature regarding the potential for commercial bias in clinical research and in continuing medical education (CME), but no studies were found regarding the potential for bias in reporting original research in CME venues. This pilot study investigated the presence of perceived bias in oral and print content of…

  5. Improved Cardiovascular Prevention Using Best CME Practices: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laprise, Rejean; Thivierge, Robert; Gosselin, Gilbert; Bujas-Bobanovic, Maja; Vandal, Sylvie; Paquette, Daniel; Luneau, Micheline; Julien, Pierre; Goulet, Serge; Desaulniers, Jean; Maltais, Paule

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: It was hypothesized that after a continuing medical education (CME) event, practice enablers and reinforcers addressing main clinical barriers to preventive care would be more effective in improving general practitioners' (GPs) adherence to cardiovascular guidelines than a CME event only. Methods: A cluster-randomized trial was…

  6. Feasibility of a Knowledge Translation CME Program: "Courriels Cochrane"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland; Granikov, Vera; Theriault, Guylene; Fremont, Pierre; Burnand, Bernard; Mercer, Jay; Marlow, Bernard; Arroll, Bruce; Luconi, Francesca; Legare, France; Labrecque, Michel; Ladouceur, Roger; Bouthillier, France; Sridhar, Soumya Bindiganavile; Moscovici, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Systematic literature reviews provide best evidence, but are underused by clinicians. Thus, integrating Cochrane reviews into continuing medical education (CME) is challenging. We designed a pilot CME program where summaries of Cochrane reviews ("Courriels Cochrane") were disseminated by e-mail. Program participants automatically…

  7. The Nature of CME-flare Associated Coronal Dimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J.; Qiu, J.; Sullivan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map foot-points of the erupting flux rope. As emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may be used to diagnose initiation of CMEs. We analyze three events of flare, CME, and coronal dimming. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV variability Experiment (EVE) are used for observations of the dimming, and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatorys EUVI, COR1 and COR2 are used to obtain velocity for the associated CMEs. We also calculate the magnetic reconnection rate from the Helioseismic and Magnetic (HMI) combined with AIA 1600. The magnetic reconnection fluxes are correlated well with CME height profiles while the reconnection rate peaks at the CME acceleration maximum. In two events, the dimming light curve also shows good correlation with the CME height evolution. We model the dimming evolution based on several different assumptions of CME expansion: isothermal or adiabatic, self-similar or one-dimensional. The observed dimming light curves agree with the calculations based on one dimensional, isothermal CME expansion model. Dimming in the third event cannot be described by the above CME expansion models, and we speculate that the nature of dimming associated with the third CME event is different from the other two.

  8. Improved Cardiovascular Prevention Using Best CME Practices: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laprise, Rejean; Thivierge, Robert; Gosselin, Gilbert; Bujas-Bobanovic, Maja; Vandal, Sylvie; Paquette, Daniel; Luneau, Micheline; Julien, Pierre; Goulet, Serge; Desaulniers, Jean; Maltais, Paule

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: It was hypothesized that after a continuing medical education (CME) event, practice enablers and reinforcers addressing main clinical barriers to preventive care would be more effective in improving general practitioners' (GPs) adherence to cardiovascular guidelines than a CME event only. Methods: A cluster-randomized trial was

  9. Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Enthusiasm greeted the development of synthetic organic insecticides in the mid-twentieth century, only to see this give way to dismay and eventually scepticism and outright opposition by some. Regardless of how anyone feels about this issue, insecticides and other pesticides have become indispensable, which creates something of a dilemma. Possibly as a result of the shift in public attitude towards insecticides, genetic engineering of microbes was first met with scepticism and caution among scientists. Later, the development of genetically modified crop plants was met with an attitude that hardened into both acceptance and hard-core resistance. Transgenic insects, which came along at the dawn of the twenty-first century, encountered an entrenched opposition. Those of us responsible for studying the protection of crops have been affected more or less by these protagonist and antagonistic positions, and the experiences have often left one thoughtfully mystified as decisions are made by non-participants. Most of the issues boil down to concerns over delivery mechanisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:23852646

  10. Growth Factor Tethering to Protein Nanoparticles via Coiled-Coil Formation for Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Assal, Yasmine; Mizuguchi, Yoshinori; Mie, Masayasu; Kobatake, Eiry

    2015-08-19

    Protein-based nanoparticles are attractive carriers for drug delivery because they are biodegradable and can be genetically designed. Moreover, modification of protein-based nanoparticles with cell-specific ligands allows for active targeting abilities. Previously, we developed protein nanoparticles comprising genetically engineered elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) with fused polyaspartic acid tails (ELP-D). Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was displayed on the surface of the ELP-D nanoparticles via genetic design to allow for active cell-targeting abilities. Herein, we focused on the coiled-coil structural motif as a means for noncovalent tethering of growth factor to ELP-D. Specifically, two peptides known to form a heterodimer via a coiled-coil structural motif were fused to ELP-D and single-chain vascular endothelial growth factor (scVEGF121), to facilitate noncovalent tethering upon formation of the heterodimer coiled-coil structure. Drug-loaded growth factor-tethered ELP-Ds were found to be effective against cancer cells by provoking cell apoptosis. These results demonstrate that tethering growth factor to protein nanoparticles through coiled-coil formation yields a promising biomaterial candidate for targeted drug delivery. PMID:26079837

  11. Acceleration of Fast CME: A Parametric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. T.; Zhang, T. X.; Tan, A.

    2003-12-01

    The analysis of LASCO/SOHO, Skylab and Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) observations show that there are many CMEs initiated with streamer and flux-rope magnetic topology (Dere et al. 1999; St. Cyr et al., 1999; Plunkett et al., 2000). Two types of CMEs have been distinguished with different kinematic characteristics (MacQueen and Fisher, 1983; Andrews and Howard, 2001). These are fast CMEs with high initial speeds (i.e. constant speed) and slow CMEs with low initial speeds but gradual acceleration (i.e. accelerated CMEs). Efforts have been made to probe the underlying physics responsible for these dual characteristics. Low and Zhang (2002) proposed that fast and slow CMEs result from initial topology of the magnetic field characterized by normal and inverse quiescent prominences, respectively. Liu et al. have successfully performed a numerical MHD simulation for this scenario. In this presentation, we explore other possible processes using a 2.5D, time-dependent streamer and flux-rope MHD model (Wu and Guo, 1997) to investigate the dual kinematic properties of the CMEs by specifying the different initiation processes with a particular magnetic topology (i.e. inverse quiescent prominence magnetic topology). Two typical initiation processes are tested; (1) injection of the magnetic flux into the flux-rope causes additional Lorentz force to destabilize the streamer launching a CME (Wu et al., 1997) resulting in a category slow CME and (2) draining the plasma from the flux-rope together with flux injection leads to a balloon instability due to the magnetic buoyancy force which results in a impulsive eruption and launches a fast CME. References Andrews, M.D. and Howard, R.A., Space Sci. Rev., 95, 147, 2001 Dere, K.P. et al., Ap. J., 529, 575, 1999 Lin, et al., Proceedings of ICSC 2003: Solar Variability as an Input to the Earth's Environemnt, ESA-SP-535, 2003 (in press). Low, B.C. and Zhang, M., Ap. J., 564, L53, 2002. MacQueen, R.M. and Fisher, R.R., Solar Phys. 89, 89, 1983. Plunket, S., et al., Solar Phys. 194, 321, 2000. St. Cry., O.C. et al., J. Geophys. Res., 104, 12493, 1999. Wu, S.T. and Guo, W.P. in Coronal Mass Ejection, Geophys. Monogr. Ser. 99, (N. Crooker, et al. eds.), AGU Washington, DC 1997. Wu, S.T. et al., Solar Phys., 175, 719, 1997.

  12. Nanoparticle formation by using shellac and chitosan for a protein delivery system.

    PubMed

    Kraisit, Pakorn; Limmatvapirat, Sontaya; Nunthanid, Jurairat; Sriamornsak, Pornsak; Luangtana-anan, Manee

    2013-01-01

    The potential of using two natural polymers (chitosan and shellac) for the formation of nanoparticles by the process of ionic cross-linking to encapsulate bovine serum albumin, a model protein was investigated. Depending on the concentrations of chitosan, shellac and bovine serum albumin, three physical states - nanoparticle, aggregation, and solution could be observed as a result of the electrostatic force. The formation of nanoparticles was due to the balance between the repulsion force and attractive force while the imbalance between both forces resulted in the formation of aggregation and solution. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were applied to prove the nanoparticle formation. The particle size was characterized by the light scattering technique and was found in the range between 100 and 300 nm. The morphology of the particles, detected by transmission electron microscopy was spherical shape. The result showed that the zeta potential of the nanoparticles possessed positive charges. The concentrations of chitosan, shellac and bovine serum albumin had an influence on the physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles such as the particle size, the zeta potential, the encapsulation, the loading efficiencies and the cumulative release. Therefore, chitosan and shellac could be used to form nanoparticles for protein delivery by the ionic cross-linking method. PMID:22568768

  13. Do locations of CME source regions relative to the HSB determine the appearance of the CME?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Zhao, X. P.

    2002-05-01

    The relationship between CMEs and the coronal helmet streamer belt has been the subject of several studies. Recent studies using SOHO/LASCO observation presented a rather complicated picture of this relationship (Subramanian et al., 1999). It has been suggested that a CME may blowout, create, disturb, have no effect on or be clearly displaced from a streamer. We investigate the possibility that these different interactions may be due to the locations of the CME source regions relative to the helmet streamer belt. Estimated Helmet streamer belt configurations obtained using Potential Field Source Surface Models based on SOHO/MDI synoptic maps are compared with combined LASCO-EIT movies on the LASCO website for this study.

  14. What Do EUV Dimmings Tell Us About CME Topology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, B. J.; DeRosa, M. L.; Fisher, R. R.; Krista, L. D.; Kwon, R. Y.; Mason, J. P.; Mays, M. L.; Nitta, N.; Savani, N.; West, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale coronal EUV dimmings, developing on timescales of minutes to hours in association with a flare or filament eruption, are known to exhibit a high correlation with coronal mass ejections. However, it is not clear why some CMEs have dimmings and some do not, nor is it clear how these dimmings relate to CME topology. The inner coronal coverage of SDO AIA and STEREO EUVI, combined with the extended field of view of PROBA2's SWAP imager, allow us the opportunity to map the topology of a dimming region in three dimensions into an erupting CME. Although the location and extent of a dimming region appears to be the best indicator of the inner "footprint" of a CME, the correlation is far from perfect. However, dimmings can provide vital clues about the development and 3D kinematics of a CME. This is particularly important as we are entering an extended period of time where STEREO coronagraph images will not always be available, and therefore the 3D properties of a CME will be difficult to deduce. Therefore, understanding the inner coronal manifestations of a CME can provide clues to its structure and dynamics, even without multi-viewpoint coronagraph observations. We present the results of this combined analysis effort, along with a discussion of how dimmings can be used in forecasting CME directions.

  15. A framework for assessing the uncertainty in wave energy delivery to targeted subsurface formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karve, Pranav M.; Kallivokas, Loukas F.; Manuel, Lance

    2016-02-01

    Stress wave stimulation of geological formations has potential applications in petroleum engineering, hydro-geology, and environmental engineering. The stimulation can be applied using wave sources whose spatio-temporal characteristics are designed to focus the emitted wave energy into the target region. Typically, the design process involves numerical simulations of the underlying wave physics, and assumes a perfect knowledge of the material properties and the overall geometry of the geostructure. In practice, however, precise knowledge of the properties of the geological formations is elusive, and quantification of the reliability of a deterministic approach is crucial for evaluating the technical and economical feasibility of the design. In this article, we discuss a methodology that could be used to quantify the uncertainty in the wave energy delivery. We formulate the wave propagation problem for a two-dimensional, layered, isotropic, elastic solid truncated using hybrid perfectly-matched-layers (PMLs), and containing a target elastic or poroelastic inclusion. We define a wave motion metric to quantify the amount of the delivered wave energy. We, then, treat the material properties of the layers as random variables, and perform a first-order uncertainty analysis of the formation to compute the probabilities of failure to achieve threshold values of the motion metric. We illustrate the uncertainty quantification procedure using synthetic data.

  16. CME Interaction with Large-Scale Coronal Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswarny, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This talk presents some key observations that highlight the importance of CME interaction with other large scale structures such as CMEs and coronal holes . Such interactions depend on the phase of the solar cycle: during maximum, CMEs are ejected more frequently, so CME-CME interaction becomes dominant. During the rise phase, the polar coronal holes are strong, so the interaction between polar coronal holes and CMEs is important, which also leads to a possible increase in the number of interplanetary CMEs observed as magnetic clouds. During the declining phase, there are more equatorial coronal holes, so CMEs originating near these coronal holes are easily deflected. CMEs can be deflected toward and away from the Sun-Earth line resulting in interesting geospace consequences. For example, the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 23 was due to a CME that was deflected towards the Sun-earth line from E22. CME deflection away from the Sun-Earth line diminishes the chance of a CME producing a geomagnetic storm. CME interaction in the coronagraphic field of view was first identified using enhanced radio emission, which is an indication of acceleration of low energy (approx.10 keV) electrons in the interaction site. CME interaction, therefore, may also have implications for proton acceleration. For example, solar energetic particle events typically occur with a higher intensity, whenever multiple CMEs occur in quick succession from the same source region. CME deflection may also have implications to the arrival of energetic particles to earth because magnetic connectivity may be changed by the interaction. I illustrate the above points using examples from SOHO, STEREO, Wind, and ACE data .

  17. CME front and severe space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Skoug, R.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Rajesh, P. K.; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Batista, I. S.; Ebihara, Y.; Nakamura, T.

    2014-12-01

    Thanks to the work of a number of scientists who made it known that severe space weather can cause extensive social and economic disruptions in the modern high-technology society. It is therefore important to understand what determines the severity of space weather and whether it can be predicted. We present results obtained from the analysis of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), solar energetic particle (SEP) events, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), CME-magnetosphere coupling, and geomagnetic storms associated with the major space weather events since 1998 by combining data from the ACE and GOES satellites with geomagnetic parameters and the Carrington event of 1859, the Quebec event of 1989, and an event in 1958. The results seem to indicate that (1) it is the impulsive energy mainly due to the impulsive velocity and orientation of IMF Bz at the leading edge of the CMEs (or CME front) that determine the severity of space weather. (2) CMEs having high impulsive velocity (sudden nonfluctuating increase by over 275 km s-1 over the background) caused severe space weather (SvSW) in the heliosphere (failure of the solar wind ion mode of Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor in ACE) probably by suddenly accelerating the high-energy particles in the SEPs ahead directly or through the shocks. (3) The impact of such CMEs which also show the IMF Bz southward from the leading edge caused SvSW at the Earth including extreme geomagnetic storms of mean DstMP < -250 nT during main phases, and the known electric power outages happened during some of these SvSW events. (4) The higher the impulsive velocity, the more severe the space weather, like faster weather fronts and tsunami fronts causing more severe damage through impulsive action. (5) The CMEs having IMF Bz northward at the leading edge do not seem to cause SvSW on Earth, although, later when the IMF Bz turns southward, they can lead to super geomagnetic storms of intensity (Dstmin) less than even -400 nT.

  18. Can solar wind viscous drag account for CME deceleration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Prasad; Lara, Alejandro; Borgazzi, Andrea

    2012-07-01

    An understanding of the forces that act on Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in the interplanetary medium are of prime importance in predicting their arrival at the Earth. These forces have been evaluated so far only in terms of an empirical drag coefficient C_{D} 1 that quantifies the role of the aerodynamic drag experienced by a typical CME due to its interaction with the ambient solar wind. We examine microphysical models for viscosity in the turbulent solar wind and apply them to a simplified model for CME propagation. Using this, we obtain an analytical expression for the dynamical viscosity coefficient and C_{D} as a function of heliocentric distance. This is the first physical characterization of the important issue of the aerodynamic drag experienced by CMEs. Our results elucidate the essential physics involved in explaining observations of CME deceleration and have implications for predictions of CME arrival time at the Earth.

  19. December 2008 CME as Viewed by Spacecraft - Duration: 16 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Newly reprocessed images from NASA's STEREO-A spacecraft, allow scientists to trace the anatomy of the December 2008 CME as it moves and changes on its journey from the Sun to the Earth, identify t...

  20. Comparisons of Remote And In-situ CME Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinard, Alysha; Mulligan, T.; Lynch, B.

    2011-05-01

    We present a comparison of remote and in-situ CME ejecta using data from the Ulysses and SOHO missions. Quadrature occurs when two spacecraft form a 90 degree angle with the Sun. Quadrature studies allow the comparison of visible features of limb CMEs and and in-situ ICME properties. We investigate several events, including so-called "cannibal" CMEs, and compare the relationship between CME morphology and in-situ structures such as magnetic field, composition, and plasma properties.

  1. CME Onset and Take-Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2011-01-01

    For understanding and eventually predicting coronal mass ejections/eruptive flares, two critical questions must be answered: What is the mechanism for eruption onset, and what is the mechanism for the rapid acceleration? We address these questions in the context of the breakout model using 2.5D MHD simulations with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The AMR capability allowed us to achieve ultra-high numerical resolution and, thereby, determine the influence of the effective Lundquist number on the eruption. Our calculations show that, at least, for the breakout model, the onset of reconnection external to the highly sheared filament channel is the onset mechanism. Once this reconnection turns on, eruption is inevitable. However, as long as this is the only reconnection in the system, the eruption remains slow. We find that the eruption undergoes an abrupt "take-off" when the flare reconnection below the erupting plasmoid develops significant reconnection jets. We conclude that in fast CMEs, flare reconnection is the primary mechanism responsible for both flare heating and CME acceleration. We discuss the implications of these results for SDO observations and describe possible tests of the model.

  2. What Do EUV Dimmings Tell Us About CME Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Barbara J.; DeRosa, Marc L.; Fisher, Richard R.; Krista, Larisza D.; Kwon, Ryun Young; Mason, James P.; Mays, Mona L.; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Webb, David F.; West, Matthew J.

    2015-04-01

    Large-scale coronal EUV dimmings develop on timescales of hours in association with a flare or filament eruption, and are known to be well correlated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). However, it is not clear why some CMEs have dimmings and some do not, nor is it clear how these dimmings relate to CME topology. The inner coronal coverage of SDO AIA and STEREO EUVI, combined with the extended field of view of PROBA2's SWAP imager, allow us the opportunity to map the topology of a dimming region in three dimensions into an erupting CME. Although the location and extent of a dimming region appears to be the best indicator of the inner "footprint" of a CME, the correlation is far from perfect. However, dimmings can provide vital clues about the development and 3D kinematics of CMEs. This is particularly important as we are currently in an extended period where the STEREO coronagraph images are not always available and are increasingly "mirroring" LASCO images, and therefore the 3D properties of a CME will be difficult to deduce. Thus, understanding the inner coronal manifestations of a CME can provide clues to its structure and dynamics, even without multi-viewpoint coronagraph observations. We present the results of this combined analysis effort, along with a discussion of how dimmings can be used to forecast CME trajectories.

  3. Automated Prediction of CMEs Using Machine Learning of CME - Flare Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qahwaji, R.; Colak, T.; Al-Omari, M.; Ipson, S.

    2008-04-01

    Machine-learning algorithms are applied to explore the relation between significant flares and their associated CMEs. The NGDC flares catalogue and the SOHO/LASCO CME catalogue are processed to associate X and M-class flares with CMEs based on timing information. Automated systems are created to process and associate years of flare and CME data, which are later arranged in numerical-training vectors and fed to machine-learning algorithms to extract the embedded knowledge and provide learning rules that can be used for the automated prediction of CMEs. Properties representing the intensity, flare duration, and duration of decline and duration of growth are extracted from all the associated (A) and not-associated (NA) flares and converted to a numerical format that is suitable for machine-learning use. The machine-learning algorithms Cascade Correlation Neural Networks (CCNN) and Support Vector Machines (SVM) are used and compared in our work. The machine-learning systems predict, from the input of a flare’s properties, if the flare is likely to initiate a CME. Intensive experiments using Jack-knife techniques are carried out and the relationships between flare properties and CMEs are investigated using the results. The predictive performance of SVM and CCNN is analysed and recommendations for enhancing the performance are provided.

  4. Initiation of CMEs associated with filament eruption, and the nature of CME related shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainshtein, V. G.; Egorov, Ya. I.

    2015-02-01

    Using data from SDO, PROBA2 and other spacecraft, Fainshtein and Egorov (2013) have discovered processes accompanying initiation of six limb CMEs and have studied features of their motion. The said CMEs occurred after eruption of prominence or hot emission loop and were associated with X-ray flares. The follow-up study of the CMEs, associated with the prominence eruption, showed that the formation of such mass ejections and the initial stage of their motion may be characterised by special features. In this work, we give examples of CMEs with such features. We have revealed a positive correlation between the height of the CME-related eruptive prominence and the height of the frontal structure of CMEs measured before they began to move. By analysing two of the CMEs, using SDO data, we found out that the kinematics of CME body and its related shock differs considerably. We have established that the time dependence of shock position and velocity obtained from SDO data is in agreement with theoretical dependencies of variation in these motion parameters with time in the context of self-similar motion of an explosion shock. We have concluded that the shock are not piston-like with the CME body acting as a piston.

  5. Asymmetry in the CME-CME interaction process for the events from 2011 February 14-15

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Peinhart, V.; Vršnak, B.

    2014-04-20

    We present a detailed study of the interaction process of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) successively launched on 2011 February 14 (CME1) and 2011 February 15 (CME2). Reconstructing the three-dimensional shape and evolution of the flux ropes, we verify that the two CMEs interact. The frontal structure of both CMEs, measured along different position angles (PAs) over the entire latitudinal extent, reveals differences in the kinematics for the interacting flanks and the apexes. The interaction process is strongly PA-dependent in terms of timing as well as kinematical evolution. The central interaction occurs along PA-100°, which shows the strongest changes in kinematics. During interaction, CME1 accelerates from ∼400 km s{sup –1} to ∼700 km s{sup –1} and CME2 decelerates from ∼1300 km s{sup –1} to ∼600 km s{sup –1}. Our results indicate that a simplified scenario such as inelastic collision may not be sufficient to describe the CME-CME interaction. The magnetic field structures of the intertwining flux ropes and the momentum transfer due to shocks each play an important role in the interaction process.

  6. Effect of gravitational stratification on the propagation of a CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, P.; Mackay, D. H.; Poedts, S.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most violent phenomenon found on the Sun. One model that explains their occurrence is the flux rope ejection model. A magnetic flux rope is ejected from the solar corona and reaches the interplanetary space where it interacts with the pre-existing magnetic fields and plasma. Both gravity and the stratification of the corona affect the early evolution of the flux rope. Aims: Our aim is to study the role of gravitational stratification on the propagation of CMEs. In particular, we assess how it influences the speed and shape of CMEs and under what conditions the flux rope ejection becomes a CME or when it is quenched. Methods: We ran a set of MHD simulations that adopt an eruptive initial magnetic configuration that has already been shown to be suitable for a flux rope ejection. We varied the temperature of the backgroud corona and the intensity of the initial magnetic field to tune the gravitational stratification and the amount of ejected magnetic flux. We used an automatic technique to track the expansion and the propagation of the magnetic flux rope in the MHD simulations. From the analysis of the parameter space, we evaluate the role of gravitational stratification on the CME speed and expansion. Results: Our study shows that gravitational stratification plays a significant role in determining whether the flux rope ejection will turn into a full CME or whether the magnetic flux rope will stop in the corona. The CME speed is affected by the background corona where it travels faster when the corona is colder and when the initial magnetic field is more intense. The fastest CME we reproduce in our parameter space travels at ~850 km s-1. Moreover, the background gravitational stratification plays a role in the side expansion of the CME, and we find that when the background temperature is higher, the resulting shape of the CME is flattened more. Conclusions: Our study shows that although the initiation mechanisms of the CME are purely magnetic, the background coronal plasma plays a key role in the CME propagation, and full MHD models should be applied when one focuses especially on the production of a CME from a flux rope ejection. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. On the relation between Solar Filament disappearances and Halo CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltout, Mosalam; Hussein, Magda

    On the relation between solar filament disappearances and Halo CME M.M. Hussein(1) Abstract Filament eruptions, flares, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most important solar events as far as space weather effects are concerned, linking solar eruptions, major interplanetary disturbances, and geomagnetic storms. A halo CME, which is usually associated with activity near the solar disk center, has great influence on space weather because an Earthward halo CME is indicative of coronal mass and magnetic fields moving out toward the Earth, therefore likely to cause geoeffective disturbances. The majority of previous statistical studies regarding the connection between filament eruptions and CMEs because they could be detected, observed, and measured against the dark sky background. In this paper we present a comprehensive study of filament disappearances from 1996 to 2008, and Hallo CME data for the same period that presents solar cycle 23, to predict Hallo CME for the next ten years by using different statistical tools. 1. Assistant researcher Solar and Space researches Department in the National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (NRIAG)

  8. A Tiny Eruptive Filament as a Flux-Rope Progenitor and Driver of a Large-Scale CME and Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Kochanov, A. A.; Kuzmenko, I. V.; Prosovetsky, D. V.; Egorov, Y. I.; Fainshtein, V. G.; Kashapova, L. K.

    2016-04-01

    A solar eruptive event SOL2010-06-13 observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has been extensively discussed in the contexts of the CME development and an associated extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave-like transient in terms of a shock driven by the apparent CME rim. Continuing the analysis of this event, we have revealed an erupting flux rope, studied its properties, and detected wave signatures inside the developing CME. These findings have allowed us to establish new features in the genesis of the CME and associated EUV wave and to reconcile all of the episodes into a single causally related sequence. i) A hot 11 MK flux rope developed from the structures initially associated with a compact filament system. The flux rope expanded with an acceleration of up to 3 km s-2 one minute before a hard X-ray burst and earlier than any other structures, reached a velocity of 420 km s-1, and then decelerated to about 50 km s-1. ii) The CME development was driven by the expanding flux rope. Closed coronal structures above the rope got sequentially involved in the expansion from below upwards, came closer together, and apparently disappeared to reveal their common envelope, the visible rim, which became the outer boundary of the cavity. The rim was probably associated with the separatrix surface of a magnetic domain, which contained the pre-eruptive filament. iii) The rim formation was associated with a successive compression of the upper active-region structures into the CME frontal structure (FS). When the rim was formed, it resembled a piston. iv) The disturbance responsible for the consecutive CME formation episodes was excited by the flux rope inside the rim, and then propagated outward. EUV structures arranged at different heights started to accelerate, when their trajectories in the distance-time diagram were crossed by that of the fast front of this disturbance. v) Outside the rim and FS, the disturbance propagated like a blast wave, manifesting in a type II radio burst and a leading part of the EUV transient. Its main, trailing part was the FS, which consisted of swept-up 2 MK coronal loops enveloping the expanding rim. The wave decelerated and decayed into a weak disturbance soon afterwards, being not driven by the trailing piston, which slowed down.

  9. Nanoparticle (star polymer) delivery of nitric oxide effectively negates Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Duong, Hien T T; Jung, Kenward; Kutty, Samuel K; Agustina, Sri; Adnan, Nik Nik M; Basuki, Johan S; Kumar, Naresh; Davis, Thomas P; Barraud, Nicolas; Boyer, Cyrille

    2014-07-14

    Biofilms are increasingly recognized as playing a major role in human infectious diseases, as they can form on both living tissues and abiotic surfaces, with serious implications for applications that rely on prolonged exposure to the body such as implantable biomedical devices or catheters. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop improved therapeutics to effectively eradicate unwanted biofilms. Recently, the biological signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) was identified as a key regulator of dispersal events in biofilms. In this paper, we report a new class of core cross-linked star polymers designed to store and release nitric oxide, in a controlled way, for the dispersion of biofilms. First, core cross-linked star polymers were prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) via an arm first approach. Poly(oligoethylene methoxy acrylate) chains were synthesized by RAFT polymerization, and then chain extended in the presence of 2-vinyl-4,4-dimethyl-5-oxazolone monomer (VDM) with N,N-methylenebis(acrylamide) employed as a cross-linker to yield functional core cross-linked star polymers. Spermine was successfully attached to the star core by reaction with VDM. Finally, the secondary amine groups were reacted with NO gas to yield NO-core cross-linked star polymers. The core cross-linked star polymers were found to release NO in a controlled, slow delivery in bacterial cultures showing great efficacy in preventing both cell attachment and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa over time via a nontoxic mechanism, confining bacterial growth to the suspended liquid. PMID:24915286

  10. Development and Evaluation of CmeC Subunit Vaccine against Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ximin; Xu, Fuzhou; Lin, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading bacterial cause of human enteritis in many industrialized countries. There is no commercial vaccine against C. jejuni available to date. CmeC is an essential outer membrane component of CmeABC multidrug efflux pump that plays a critical role in antibiotic resistance and in vivo colonization of C. jejuni. CmeC is prevalent in C. jejuni strains and is dramatically induced and immunogenic in vivo. In this study, we analyzed CmeC sequence homology, examined in vitro immune protection of CmeC peptide antibodies, and produced full-length recombinant CmeC (rCmeC) for evaluating immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the CmeC subunit vaccine against C. jejuni using chicken model system. Amino acid sequences of CmeC from 24 diverse C. jejuni strains were determined and subjected to alignment, which revealed that CmeC is highly conserved in C. jejuni with a identity ranging from 97.3% to 100%. CmeC peptide antibodies inhibited the function of CmeABC efflux pump and enhanced susceptibility of C. jejuni to bile salts, the natural antimicrobial present in the intestine. Two full-length rCmeC proteins with N- or C-terminal His tag were produced in E. coli; the N-terminal His-tagged rCmeC with high purity and yield was obtained by single step affinity purification. The purified rCmeC was used in two vaccination trials using a chicken model of C. jejuni infection. Stimulation of CmeC-specific serum IgG responses via oral vaccination required immunization with higher doses of rCmeC (200?g) together with 70?g of mucosal adjuvant mLT (modified E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin). Subcutaneous vaccination of chickens with rCmeC remarkably stimulated both serum IgG and IgA responses. However, CmeC-specific intestinal secretory IgA response was not significantly stimulated regardless of vaccination regimen and the rCmeC vaccination did not confer protection against C. jejuni infection. Together, these findings provide further compelling evidence that CmeC is a promising subunit vaccine candidate against C. jejuni infection. However, the CmeC vaccination regimen should be optimized to enhance CmeC-specific mucosal immune response in for protection against C. jejuni. PMID:22140651

  11. Validation of CME Detection Software (CACTus) by Means of Simulated Data, and Analysis of Projection Effects on CME Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, K.; Jacobs, C.; Robbrecht, E.; de Groof, A.; Berghmans, D.; Poedts, S.

    2011-05-01

    In the context of space weather forecasting, an automated detection of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) becomes more and more important for efficiently handling a large data flow which is expected from recently-launched and future solar missions. In this paper we validate the detection software package "CACTus" by applying the program to synthetic data from our 3D time-dependent CME simulations instead of observational data. The main strength of this study is that we know in advance what should be detected. We describe the sensitivities and strengths of automated detection, more specific for the CACTus program, resulting in a better understanding of CME detection on one hand and the calibration of the CACTus software on the other hand, suggesting possible improvements of the package. In addition, the simulation is an ideal tool to investigate projection effects on CME velocity measurements.

  12. Coronal magnetic reconnection driven by CME expansionthe 2011 June 7 event

    SciTech Connect

    Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Baker, D.; Green, L. M.; Williams, D. R.; Carlyle, J.; Kliem, B.; Long, D. M.; Matthews, S. A.; Trk, T.; Pariat, E.; Valori, G.; Dmoulin, P.; Malherbe, J.-M.

    2014-06-10

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) erupt and expand in a magnetically structured solar corona. Various indirect observational pieces of evidence have shown that the magnetic field of CMEs reconnects with surrounding magnetic fields, forming, e.g., dimming regions distant from the CME source regions. Analyzing Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations of the eruption from AR 11226 on 2011 June 7, we present the first direct evidence of coronal magnetic reconnection between the fields of two adjacent active regions during a CME. The observations are presented jointly with a data-constrained numerical simulation, demonstrating the formation/intensification of current sheets along a hyperbolic flux tube at the interface between the CME and the neighboring AR 11227. Reconnection resulted in the formation of new magnetic connections between the erupting magnetic structure from AR 11226 and the neighboring active region AR 11227 about 200 Mm from the eruption site. The onset of reconnection first becomes apparent in the SDO/AIA images when filament plasma, originally contained within the erupting flux rope, is redirected toward remote areas in AR 11227, tracing the change of large-scale magnetic connectivity. The location of the coronal reconnection region becomes bright and directly observable at SDO/AIA wavelengths, owing to the presence of down-flowing cool, dense (10{sup 10} cm{sup 3}) filament plasma in its vicinity. The high-density plasma around the reconnection region is heated to coronal temperatures, presumably by slow-mode shocks and Coulomb collisions. These results provide the first direct observational evidence that CMEs reconnect with surrounding magnetic structures, leading to a large-scale reconfiguration of the coronal magnetic field.

  13. Investigation of CME properties using the data of SDO and PROBA2 spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainshtein, V. G.; Egorov, Ya. I.

    2013-01-01

    Formation and motion (at the initial stage) of six limb CMEs detected in the period June 2010 to June 2011 are investigated using the high-resolution data of the PROBA2 and SDO spacecraft combined with the data of SOHO/LASCO coronagraphs. It is demonstrated that several loop-like structures of enhanced brightness originate in the region of CME formation, and they move one after another with, as a rule, different velocities. These loop-like structures in the final analysis form the frontal structure of CME. Time dependences of the velocity and acceleration of the ejection's front are obtained for all CMEs under consideration. A conclusion is drawn about possible existence of two classes of CMEs depending on their velocity time profiles. Ejections, whose velocity after reaching its maximum sharply drops by a value of more than 100 km/s and then goes over into a regime of slow change, belong to the first class. Another class of CMEs is formed by ejections whose velocity changes slowly immediately after reaching the maximum. It is demonstrated that the CME's angular dimension increases at the initial stage of ejection motion up to a factor of 3 with a time scale of doubling the angular size value within the limits 3.5-11 min since the moment of the first measurement of this parameter of an ejection. For three CMEs it is shown that at the initial stage of their motion for a certain time interval they are stronger expanded than grow in the longitude direction.

  14. Prediction of Active-Region CME Productivity from Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We report results of an expanded evaluation of whole-active-region magnetic measures as predictors of active-region coronal mass ejection (CME) productivity. Previously, in a sample of 17 vector magnetograms of 12 bipolar active regions observed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph, from each magnetogram we extracted a measure of the size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux a) and four measures of the nonpotentiality of the active region: the strong-shear length L(sub SS), the strong-gradient length L(sub SG), the net vertical electric current I(sub N), and the net-current magnetic twist parameter alpha (sub IN). This sample size allowed us to show that each of the four nonpotentiality measures was statistically significantly correlated with active-region CME productivity in time windows of a few days centered on the day of the magnetogram. We have now added a fifth measure of active-region nonpotentiality (the best-constant-alpha magnetic twist parameter (alpha sub BC)), and have expanded the sample to 36 MSFC vector magnetograms of 31 bipolar active regions. This larger sample allows us to demonstrate statistically significant correlations of each of the five nonpotentiality measures with future CME productivity, in time windows of a few days starting from the day of the magnetogram. The two magnetic twist parameters (alpha (sub 1N) and alpha (sub BC)) are normalized measures of an active region s nonpotentially in that they do not depend directly on the size of the active region, while the other three nonpotentiality measures (L(sub SS), L(sub SG), and I(sub N)) are non-normalized measures in that they do depend directly on active-region size. We find (1) Each of the five nonpotentiality measures is statistically significantly correlated (correlation confidence level greater than 95%) with future CME productivity and has a CME prediction success rate of approximately 80%. (2) None of the nonpotentiality measures is a significantly better CME predictor than the others. (3) The active-region phi shows some correlation with CME productivity, but well below a statistically significant level (correlation confidence level less than approximately 80%; CME prediction success rate less than approximately 65%). (4) In addition to depending on magnetic twist, CME productivity appears to have some direct dependence on active-region size (rather than only an indirect dependence through a correlation of magnetic twist with active-region size), but it will take a still larger sample of active regions (50 or more) to certify this. (5) Of the five nonpotentiality measures, L(sub SG) appears to be the best for operational CME forecasting because it is as good or better a CME predictor than the others and it alone does not require a vector magnetogram; L(sub SG) can be measured from a line-of-sight magnetogram such as from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO).

  15. 01.22.12: SOHO's View of Earth-directed CME - Duration: 7 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory captured the coronal mass ejection (CME) in this video (which shows the sun's activity from January 19 to January 23). The CME is associate with an M8.7 class sol...

  16. Space Weather Model of July 22-23, 2012 CME - Duration: 5 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Space Weather Research Center modeled the July 23, 2012 CME using a modeling program called ENLIL. The CME can be seen to expand dramatically as it travels through space. By comparing how we...

  17. Quality framework proposal for Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Naomi G.; Arfman, John F.; Limary, Siviengxay

    2008-09-01

    This report proposes the first stage of a Quality Framework approach that can be used to evaluate and document Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects. The first stage of the Quality Framework defines two tools that will be used to evaluate a CME project. The first tool is used to decompose a CME project into its essential elements. These elements can then be evaluated for inherent quality by looking at the subelements that impact their level of quality maturity or rigor. Quality Readiness Levels (QRLs) are used to valuate project elements for inherent quality. The Framework provides guidance for the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders for CME project prerequisites that help to ensure the proper level of confidence in the deliverable given its intended use. The Framework also Provides a roadmap that defined when and how the Framework tools should be applied. Use of these tools allow the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders to understand what elements the project will use to execute the project, the inherent quality of the elements, which of those are critical to the project and why, and the risks associated to the project's elements.

  18. STEREO Captures Fastest CME to Date - Duration: 15 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows a coronal mass ejection (CME) on the sun from July 22, 2012 at 10:00 PM EDT until 2 AM on July 23 as captured by NASA's Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A). Be...

  19. Improving CME: Using Participant Satisfaction Measures to Specify Educational Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivieri, Jason J.; Regala, Roderick P.

    2013-01-01

    Imagine having developed a continuing medical education (CME) initiative to educate physicians on updated guidelines regarding high cholesterol in adults. This initiative consisted of didactic presentations and case-based discussions offered in 5 major US cities, followed by a Web-based enduring component to distill key points of the live

  20. Determining CME-driven shock parameters from remote sensing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, L.; Bothmer, V.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large scale eruptions of magnetized plasma propagating from the Sun into interplanetary space with speeds varying from a few tens to more than 2500 km s-1. They cause large-scale turbulence in the heliosphere and are the major drivers of space weather. Fast CMEs drive strong shocks in the corona and interplanetary medium and generate plasma turbulence in the post-shock regions ahead of the CME bodies. In this work results from the detailed analysis of a strong CME and shock event on April 3, 2010 are summarized. For this event the solar source region is identified and the CME and shock kinematics are determined from time series of white light images obtained by the SECCHI suite on board the STEREO spacecrafts. The shock's standoff distance, compression ratio and Mach number are derived. A comparison of the derived values with the in-situ measurements shows good agreement. Further comparison of the shock MHD parameters determined from remote sensing observations with in-situ data, including the calculation of power-spectra, will help validating the results and provide new insights into CME generated turbulence. The study will be extended to further events identified in STEREO observations.

  1. The new CORIMP CME catalog & 3D reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jason; Morgan, Huw; Gallagher, Peter; Habbal, Shadia; Davies, Jackie

    2015-04-01

    A new coronal mass ejection catalog has been built from a unique set of coronal image processing techniques, called CORIMP, that overcomes many of the limitations of current catalogs in operation. An online database has been produced for the SOHO/LASCO data and event detections therein; providing information on CME onset time, position angle, angular width, speed, acceleration, and mass, along with kinematic plots and observation movies. The high-fidelity and robustness of these methods and derived CME structure and kinematics will lead to an improved understanding of the dynamics of CMEs, and a realtime version of the algorithm has been implemented to provide CME detection alerts to the interested space weather community. Furthermore, STEREO data has been providing the ability to perform 3D reconstructions of CMEs that are observed in multipoint observations. This allows a determination of the 3D kinematics and morphologies of CMEs characterised in STEREO data via the 'elliptical tie-pointing' technique. The associated observations of SOHO, SDO and PROBA2 (and intended use of K-Cor) provide additional measurements and constraints on the CME analyses in order to improve their accuracy.

  2. Improving CME: Using Participant Satisfaction Measures to Specify Educational Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivieri, Jason J.; Regala, Roderick P.

    2013-01-01

    Imagine having developed a continuing medical education (CME) initiative to educate physicians on updated guidelines regarding high cholesterol in adults. This initiative consisted of didactic presentations and case-based discussions offered in 5 major US cities, followed by a Web-based enduring component to distill key points of the live…

  3. Obstetrician/Gynecologists and Postpartum Mental Health: Differences between CME Course Takers and Nontakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leddy, Meaghan A.; Farrow, Victoria A.; Joseph, Gerald F., Jr.; Schulkin, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing medical education (CME) courses are an essential component of professional development. Research indicates a continued need for understanding how and why physicians select certain CME courses, as well as the differences between CME course takers and nontakers. Purpose: Obstetrician-gynecologists (OB-GYNs) are health care

  4. Didactic CME and Practice Change: Don't Throw that Baby out Quite yet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Curtis A.; Tooman, Tricia R.

    2012-01-01

    Skepticism exists regarding the role of continuing medical education (CME) in improving physician performance. The harshest criticism has been reserved for didactic CME. Reviews of the scientific literature on the effectiveness of CME conclude that formal or didactic modes of education have little or no impact on clinical practice. This has led…

  5. Obstetrician/Gynecologists and Postpartum Mental Health: Differences between CME Course Takers and Nontakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leddy, Meaghan A.; Farrow, Victoria A.; Joseph, Gerald F., Jr.; Schulkin, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing medical education (CME) courses are an essential component of professional development. Research indicates a continued need for understanding how and why physicians select certain CME courses, as well as the differences between CME course takers and nontakers. Purpose: Obstetrician-gynecologists (OB-GYNs) are health care…

  6. Methods and apparatuses for reagent delivery, reactive barrier formation, and pest control

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Tyler [Pasco, WA; Kaplan, Daniel I [Aiken, SC; Last, George [Richland, WA

    2002-07-09

    A reagent delivery method includes positioning reagent delivery tubes in contact with soil. The tubes can include a wall that is permeable to a soil-modifying reagent. The method further includes supplying the reagent in the tubes, diffusing the reagent through the permeable wall and into the soil, and chemically modifying a selected component of the soil using the reagent. The tubes can be in subsurface contact with soil, including groundwater, and can be placed with directional drilling equipment independent of groundwater well casings. The soil-modifying reagent includes a variety of gases, liquids, colloids, and adsorbents that may be reactive or non-reactive with soil components. The method may be used inter alia to form reactive barriers, control pests, and enhance soil nutrients for microbes and plants.

  7. The television, school, and family project. V. The impact of curriculum delivery format on program acceptance.

    PubMed

    Brannon, B R; Dent, C W; Flay, B R; Smith, G; Sussman, S; Pentz, M A; Johnson, C A; Hansen, W B

    1989-07-01

    Social psychological interventions have been successful in preventing drug and tobacco use in adolescents, but target audience involvement has not been well documented. Examination of program acceptance is necessary to avoid ambiguity when interpreting findings within and across studies. This report presents results from a program acceptance study of a seventh-grade smoking/drug-use prevention and cessation field trial. The research design is an assessment of two experimentally manipulated variations in program delivery on the program acceptance of all provider and target groups involved. Experimental manipulations included classroom and mass broadcast television demonstrations of social resistance skills against pressures to smoke and use drugs. Three aspects of target audience program acceptance were assessed: participation, satisfaction, and perceived program efficacy. Respondents included the target audience (seventh-grade students and parents), instructors, classroom observers, and school administrative staff. Strong main effects of television delivery on student and parent participation were observed. The findings suggest the usefulness of student homework assignment to view television segments with parents at home as a strategy to achieve family involvement in school-based programs. Both television and classroom delivery separately demonstrated significant positive effects on overall program acceptance with moderate interactive effects on perceived program efficacy. While classroom teacher/observers and school administrators reported strong preferences for the experimental (social resistance) classroom curriculum, acceptance of experimental and comparison (information-based) curricula by the student/parent target audience was equivalent. PMID:2798371

  8. Focused Ultrasound-Mediated Drug Delivery from Microbubbles Reduces Drug Dose Necessary for Therapeutic Effect on Neointima Formation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Linsey C.; Dhanaliwala, Ali H.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hossack, John A.; Wamhoff, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that 1) neointimal formation in a rat carotid balloon injury model could be reduced in vivo following targeted ultrasound delivery of rapamycin-loaded microbubbles (RMBs), and 2) the addition of dual mode ultrasound decreases the total amount of drug needed to reduce neointima formation. Methods and Results Balloon injury was performed in rat carotids to induce neointima formation. High or low doses of RMBs were injected I.V. and ruptured at the site of injury with ultrasound. Compared to non-treated injured arteries, neointima formation was reduced by 0% and 35.9% with 108 RMBs, and by 28.7% and 34.9% in arteries treated with 109 RMBs with and without ultrasound respectively. Conclusion Without ultrasound, 10-fold higher concentrations of RMBs were needed to reduce neointima formation by at least 28%, whereas 108 RMBs combined with ultrasound were sufficient to achieve the same therapeutic effect demonstrating that this technology may have promise for localized potent drug therapy. PMID:21960561

  9. CME Prediction from Line-of-Sight Magnetogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    We have previously shown for bipolar active regions that measures of active-region nonpotentiality from vector magnetograms are correlated with active-region CME productivity. We have now obtained a measure from line-of-sight magnetograms that is well correlated both with our measures of active-region nonpotentiality from vector magnetograms and with active-region CME productivity. The measure is the length of strong-gradient main neutral line (L(sub G)). This is the length of the bipolar region's main neutral line on which the potential transverse field is greater than 150G, and the gradient in the line-of-sight field is greater than 50G/Mm. From the sample of 17 MSFC magnetograms of 12 basically bipolar active regions used in our previous paper, we find that L(sub G) is strongly correlated with one of our vector-magnetogram measures of nonpotentiality, the length of strong-gradient main neutral line L(sub SS) (99.7%). We also find that L(sub G) is as strongly correlated with CME productivity (99.7%) as is L(sub SS). Being obtainable from line-of-sight magnetograms, L(sub G) makes the much larger data set of line-of-sight magnetograms (i.e. from SOHO/MDI and Kitt Peak) available for CME prediction study. This is especially important for evolutionary studies, with SOHO/MDI having no daylight, cloudy weather, or atmospheric seeing problems. This work was supported by funding from NSF's division of Atmospheric Sciences (Space Weather and Shine Programs) and by NASA's office of Space Science (Living with a Star program Solar and Heliospheric Physics Supporting Research and Technology program).

  10. A Search for Extreme Ultraviolet Signatures of CME Initation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupert, W. M.

    2004-12-01

    Present models for the initiation of a CME involve magnetic reconnection either in a multipolar magnetic field overlying a filament channel or between emerging and existing magnetic flux in the vicinity of a filament channel. We have searched for evidence in EUV (195 Angstrom) images recorded by the EIT on SOHO and in other EUV images obtained by earlier instruments that might characterize the sites of such reconnection. No transient emission above a filament channel that might be indicative of magnetic reconnection has been found to date. We have, however, observed rapid changes in brightness or morphology of new emission regions, which represent the presence of newly emerged bipolar magnetic fields adjacent to and below filaments, just prior to and during filament eruption. In the SOHO observations these changes precede the acceleration phase of CMEs and the rapid rise of the GOES soft X-ray flux. Detecting short-lived transients with EIT is problematic because of its poor image-taking cadence (12-min) in the CME Watch mode. One instance of a transient EUV brightening preceding CME initiation has been reported (Dere et al., 1997) and earlier higher cadence observations provide several examples of short duration (1-2 min) EUV bursts in the immediate vicinity of filaments just prior to lift-off.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Multi-CME Events in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrcil, Dusan; Luhmann, Janet G.; Jian, Lan; Mays, Leila; Xie, Hong; Taktakishvilli, Aleksandre

    The ENLIL-based modeling system enables faster-than-real time simulations of corotating and transient heliospheric disturbances. This “hybrid” system does not simulate origin of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but uses appearance in coronagraphs, fits geometric and kinematic parameters, and launches a CME-like structure into the solar wind computed using the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) coronal model. Numerical heliospheric simulation then provides global context of CMEs propagating in the inner heliosphere and interacting with structured background solar wind and with other CMEs. In this presentation, we introduce the recent improvements that support modeling of the evolving background solar wind and continuous modeling of multiple-CME events. We simulated over 700 CMEs in 2011-2013 to validate and calibrate our new modeling system. In this presentation, we will show examples of multi-CME events in March 2012 and July 2012 periods of enhanced solar activity. We will present results of 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and compare them with remote white-light observations, with in-situ measurements of plasma parameters and detection of solar energetic particles (SEPs) at various spacecraft.

  12. Type II Radio Bursts as an Indicator of CME Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, C. A.; St Cyr, O. C.; Henning, C.; Xie, H.; Gilbert, H. R.; Orlove, M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Odstrcil, D.

    2011-12-01

    We examined a subset of nine low-frequency radio events with type II radio bursts that drifted below 2 megahertz and were detected by the WAVES investigation on the WIND spacecraft. For each event, we identified the associated coronal mass ejection (CME) and derived the electron density using a model of solar wind plasma frequency (fp ≈ 9 * ne1/2, where fp is plasma frequency in kHz and ne is electron density in cm-3) . We also used the pb_inverter program in SolarSoft developed by Howard and Hayes to examine the electron density structure. Expanding on the Van De Hulst process of inverting polarized brightness measurements, the program inverts total brightness measurements from SOHO LASCO images to extract electron density information. From the electron density inferred from radio spectra, we derived the location of the CME using five standard electron density to height models (Leblanc, 1996; Saito, 1977; Bougeret, 1984; Alvarez, 1973; and Fainberg, 1971). Using images from the LASCO instrument on SOHO and the SECCHI instrument on STEREO, we extracted locations of the leading edge of the CME and compared the heights and velocities to those found using the frequency data. For the lowest frequency events, we also compared our results to the outputs of ENLIL, a time-dependent, three-dimensional, MHD model of the heliosphere hosted by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  13. The relationship between CME momenta and magnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Lynch, B. J.; Welsch, B. T.; Bercik, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Free magnetic energy is the energy source of solar flares and CMEs. At theinitiation of a CME, the free magnetic energy converts to kinetic energy and few other types of energy. Observable magnetic field sudden changes havebeen found at the onset of flares. The Lorentz force around the onset of a flare have been formulated in recent studies and can be estimatedusing photospheric vector magnetic field data. It is proposed that outward Lorentz force impulses could be related to CME momenta. We analyze about 30 CMEs and their source region magnetic fields.The best vector magnetic field data are observed for active regions nearthe center of the solar disk. We first select CMEs that appear to be haloor partial halo CMEs in the LASCO images, and then we use STEREO SECCHI COR2white light images to estimate CME mass and speed. We then estimatethe Lorentz forces in the source active regions at the flare onset using SDO HMI photosheric vector magnetic field data.We report our work in progress and describe our analyses.

  14. On the Relationship between Solar Magnetic Forces and CME Momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Lynch, Ben; Sun, Xudong; Welsch, Brian T.; Bercik, David J.; Fisher, George H.

    2015-04-01

    Free magnetic energy is the energy source of solar flares and CMEs. At the initiation of a CME, the free magnetic energy converts to kinetic energy and few other types of energy. Observable magnetic field sudden changes have been found at the onset of flares. The Lorentz force around the onset of a flare have been formulated in recent studies and can be estimated using photospheric vector magnetic field data. It is proposed that outward Lorentz force impulses could be related to CME momenta. We analyze about 30 CMEs and their source region magnetic fields. The best vector magnetic field data are observed for active regions near the center of the solar disk. We first select CMEs that appear to be halo or partial halo CMEs in the LASCO images, and then we use STEREO SECCHI COR2 white light images to estimate CME mass and speed. We then estimate the Lorentz forces in the source active regions at the flare onset using SDO HMI photosheric vector magnetic field data. We report our studies and describe our analyses.This study is under the support of NSF grants.

  15. Solar Eruption Model Relating CME Kinematics to Flare Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moats, Stephanie; Reeves, K.

    2010-05-01

    The combination of a loss-of-equilibrium coronal mass ejection (CME) model with a multi-threaded flare loop model is used to develop a model of solar eruptions. The CME kinematics, thermal energy release, and flare emissions are compared in order to understand the relationship between these properties of solar eruptions. CME accelerations and peak x-ray fluxes are modeled for many different cases, and it is found that the timing of the peak flux derivative and the peak acceleration are well correlated when the inflow Alfven Mach number is fast and the magnetic field is high. The total thermal energy release and peak soft x-ray flux are observed to have a power law relationship, where the peak flux is about equal to the thermal energy to the power of alpha (alpha is between 2.54 and 1.54, depending on the reconnection rate). This finding conflicts with theoretical underpinnings of the Neupert Effect, which assumes the soft x-ray flux is proportional to the thermal energy release.

  16. Investigating the Relationship between Quality, Format and Delivery of Feedback for Written Assignments in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sopina, Elizaveta; McNeill, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Feedback can have a great impact on student learning. However, in order for it to be effective, feedback needs to be of high quality. Electronic marking has been one of the latest adaptations of technology in teaching and offers a new format of delivering feedback. There is little research investigating the impact the format of feedback has on…

  17. Simulating CME Eruptions from Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, W.; van der Holst, B.

    2014-12-01

    Fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) typically erupt from the filament channels of active regions where the magnetic field is in a highly non potential state. In this talk, we discuss two numerical models under development that will simulate the evolution of active regions and the buildup of magnetic energy that leads to filament eruptions and CMEs. The first model, the so called regional model simulates the area of an active region in a domain that extends from just above the photosphere at its base to a height of 100 Mm in the low corona. The physics of this model is extended magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), which includes such physical processes as field aligned heat conduction, radiative losses, and tabular equation of state that allow for a self-consistent treatment of the atmosphere including the transition region. For this model, boundary conditions for the magnetic field fields are specified directly from HMI vector magnetogram observations. The second model addresses the buoyant rise of magnetic flux from the convection zone through the photosphere to allow for the self consistent formation and evolution of active regions that leads to the buildup of magnetic free energy. We compare results from this second model to SDO/HMI observations of the 7 January 2014 events to show that the simulation has captured the basic physics of magnetic field evolution an energy build up necessary for large-scale eruptions.

  18. Modeling the Influence of Fatty Acid Incorporation on Mesophase Formation in Amphiphilic Therapeutic Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Le, By Tu C; Tran, Nhiem; Mulet, Xavier; Winkler, David A

    2016-03-01

    Dispersed amphiphile-fatty acid systems are of great interest in drug delivery and gene therapies because of their potential for triggered release of their payload. The mesophase behavior of these systems is extremely complex and is affected by environmental factors such as drug loading, percentage and nature of incorporated fatty acids, temperature, pH, and so forth. It is important to study phase behavior of amphiphilic materials as the mesophases directly influence the release rate of the incorporated drugs. We describe a robust machine learning method for predicting the phase behavior of these systems. We have developed models for each mesophase that simultaneous and reliably model the effects of amphiphile and fatty acid structure, concentration, and temperature and that make accurate predictions of these mesophases for conditions not used to train the models. PMID:26824251

  19. MHD simulations for investigating interaction processes between a CME and ambient solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Junmo; Magara, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    The interaction between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and ambient solar winds is one of the important issues of space weather because it affects the trajectory of a flying CME, which determines whether the CME hits the Earth and produces geomagnetic disturbances or not. In this study, two-step 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations including a spheromak-type CME and an ambient solar wind are performed to investigate their interaction processes such as deflection and rotation of a CME. We perform the 1st-step MHD simulation using averaged surface magnetic field data to construct a steady state with an ambient solar wind. A spheromak-type CME is then injected through the solar surface, and subsequent evolution is reproduced by performing the 2nd-step MHD simulation. We discuss key parameters that characterize interaction processes between a CME and ambient solar wind.

  20. STUDY OF THE 2007 APRIL 20 CME-COMET INTERACTION EVENT WITH AN MHD MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y. D.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Manchester, W. B.; Cohen, O.; Hansen, K. C.; Combi, M. R.; Gombosi, T. I.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-05-01

    This study examines the tail disconnection event on 2007 April 20 on comet 2P/Encke, caused by a coronal mass ejection (CME) at a heliocentric distance of 0.34 AU. During their interaction, both the CME and the comet are visible with high temporal and spatial resolution by the STEREO-A spacecraft. Previously, only current sheets or shocks have been accepted as possible reasons for comet tail disconnections, so it is puzzling that the CME caused this event. The MHD simulation presented in this work reproduces the interaction process and demonstrates how the CME triggered a tail disconnection in the April 20 event. It is found that the CME disturbs the comet with a combination of a 180 deg. sudden rotation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), followed by a 90 deg. gradual rotation. Such an interpretation applies our understanding of solar wind-comet interactions to determine the in situ IMF orientation of the CME encountering Encke.

  1. Interaction between CME and surrounding magnetic fields producing multiple flaring sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia M.

    2015-08-01

    L. van Driel-Gesztelyi (1,2,3), D. Baker (1), T. Török (4), E. Pariat (2), L.M. Green (1),D.R. Williams (1), J. Carlyle (1,5) G. Valori (1, 2), P. Démoulin (2), B. Kliem (1,7,8),D. Long (1), S.A. Matthews (1), J.-M. Malherbe (2)(1) UCL/MSSL, UK, (2) Paris Observatory, LESIA, CNRS, France, (3) Konkoly Observatory, Hungary, (4) Predictive Science, Dan Diego, USA, (5) Max Planck Inst., Göttingen, Germany, (6) INAF, Obs. Roma, Italy, (7) Potsdam Univ., Germany, (8) Yunnan Observatories, Kunming, ChinaAnalyzing Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations of the spectacular Coronal Mass Ejection eruption on 7 June 2011, we present evidence of coronal magnetic reconnection between the expanding magnetic structure of the CME and the magnetic fields of an adjacent active region (AR). The onset of reconnection first became apparent in the SDO/AIA images when filament plasma, originally contained within the erupting flux rope, was re-directed towards remote areas in the neighboring AR, tracing the change of large-scale magnetic connectivity. The observations are presented jointly with a topological analysis of the pre-eruption magnetic configuration, and a data-constrained numerical simulation of the three-AR complex, demonstrating the formation/intensification of current sheets along a pre-existing hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) at the interface between the CME and the neighboring AR, where a secondary flare ribbon was created. Reconnection across this current sheet resulted in the formation of new magnetic connections between the erupting magnetic structure and a neighboring AR about 200 Mm from the eruption site, in strong qualitative agreement with the observations. In addition, the CME temporarily created unusually dense plasma conditions around a reconnection region at high coronal altitudes, enabling us to observe emission resulting from it. We argue that this exceptional observation of a coronal brightening was directly observable at SDO/AIA wavelengths owing to the presence of down-flowing cool and dense (estimated to be of the order of 1010 cm-3) filament plasma in the vicinity of the reconnection region.

  2. Formation of vitamin D nanoemulsion-based delivery systems by spontaneous emulsification: factors affecting particle size and stability.

    PubMed

    Guttoff, Marrisa; Saberi, Amir Hossein; McClements, David Julian

    2015-03-15

    Oil-in-water nanoemulsions are particularly suitable for encapsulation of lipophilic nutraceuticals because of their ability to form stable and transparent delivery systems with high oral bioavailability. In this study, the influence of system composition and preparation conditions on the particle size and stability of vitamin D nanoemulsions prepared by spontaneous emulsification (SE) was investigated. SE relies on the formation of small oil droplets when an oil/surfactant mixture is titrated into an aqueous solution. The influence of oil phase composition (vitamin D and MCT), surfactant-to-oil ratio (SOR), surfactant type (Tween 20, 40, 60, 80 and 85), and stirring conditions on the initial particle size of vitamin D nanoemulsions was studied. Nanoemulsions with small droplet diameters (d<200 nm) could be formed using Tween 80 at SOR⩾1 at high stirring speeds (800 rpm). These systems were relatively stable to droplet growth at ambient temperatures (<10% in diameter after 1 month storage), but unstable to heating (T>80°C). The thermal stability of the nanoemulsions could be improved by adding a cosurfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS)). The spontaneous emulsification method is simple and inexpensive to carry out and therefore has great potential for forming nanoemulsion-based delivery systems for food, personal care, and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:25308650

  3. Enhanced skin delivery of genistein and other two isoflavones by microemulsion and prevention against UV irradiation-induced erythema formation.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Kana; Teraoka, Reiko; Morita, Shin-ya

    2010-03-01

    To improve the efficiency of the intradermal delivery of genistein and other two isoflavones (daidzein and biochanin A), we tried to clarify the usefulness of microemulsion by in vitro study on excised guinea pig dorsal skin and Yucatan micropig skin. Using microemulsion consisting of isopropyl myristate (IPM), 150 mM NaCl solution, Tween 80 and ethanol as a vehicle, the solubility of all the isoflavones markedly increased and significant amounts of isoflavones were delivered to the skin. The effect of water-in-oil (w/o)-type microemulsion D was larger than that of oil-in-water (o/w)-type microemulsion A. Among three isoflavones tested, the increase of genistein was most marked on both solubility and skin accumulation. Genistein retained in the skin significantly inhibited lipid peroxidation in vitro dose-dependently. Furthermore, pretreatment of guinea pig dorsal skin with genistein containing gel-like microemulsion D prevented UV irradiation-induced erythema formation. These findings indicate the potential use of w/o-type microemulsion for the delivery of genistein to protect skin against UV-induced oxidative damage. PMID:20190449

  4. Bone formation controlled by biologically relevant inorganic ions: role and controlled delivery from phosphate-based glasses.

    PubMed

    Lakhkar, Nilay J; Lee, In-Ho; Kim, Hae-Won; Salih, Vehid; Wall, Ivan B; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2013-04-01

    The role of metal ions in the body and particularly in the formation, regulation and maintenance of bone is only just starting to be unravelled. The role of some ions, such as zinc, is more clearly understood due to its central importance in proteins. However, a whole spectrum of other ions is known to affect bone formation but the exact mechanism is unclear as the effects can be complex, multifactorial and also subtle. Furthermore, a significant number of studies utilise single doses in cell culture medium, whereas the continual, sustained release of an ion may initiate and mediate a completely different response. We have reviewed the role of the most significant ions that are known to play a role in bone formation, namely calcium, zinc, strontium, magnesium, boron, titanium and also phosphate anions as well as copper and its role in angiogenesis, an important process interlinked with osteogenesis. This review will also examine how delivery systems may offer an alternative way of providing sustained release of these ions which may effect and potentiate a more appropriate and rapid tissue response. PMID:22664230

  5. A thermoresponsive polydiolcitrate-gelatin scaffold and delivery system mediates effective bone formation from BMP9-transduced mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jixing; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Yunxiao; Wei, Qiang; Wang, Xin; Yang, Jian; Tang, Shengli; Liu, Hao; Fan, Jiaming; Zhang, Fugui; Farina, Evan M; Mohammed, Maryam K; Zou, Yulong; Song, Dongzhe; Liao, Junyi; Huang, Jiayi; Guo, Dan; Lu, Minpeng; Liu, Feng; Liu, Jianxiang; Li, Li; Ma, Chao; Hu, Xue; Haydon, Rex C; Lee, Michael J; Reid, Russell R; Ameer, Guillermo A; Yang, Li; He, Tong-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Successful bone tissue engineering requires at the minimum sufficient osteoblast progenitors, efficient osteoinductive factors, and biocompatible scaffolding materials. We previously demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9) is one of the most potent factors in inducing osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Here, we investigated the potential use of a biodegradable citrate-based thermosensitive macromolecule, poly(polyethyleneglycol citrate-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) (PPCN) mixed with gelatin (PPCNG) as a scaffold for the delivery of BMP9-stimulated MSCs to promote localized bone formation. The addition of gelatin to PPCN effectively enhanced the cell adhesion and survival properties of MSCs entrapped within the gel in 3D culture. Using the BMP9-transduced MSC line immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts (iMEFs), we found that PPCNG facilitated BMP9-induced osteogenic differentiation of iMEFs in vivo and promoted the formation of well-ossified and vascularized trabecular bone-like structures in a mouse model of ectopic bone formation. Histologic evaluation revealed that vascularization of the bony masses retrieved from the iMEFs  +  PPCNG group was significantly more pronounced than that of the direct cell injection group. Accordingly, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression was shown to be significantly higher in the bony masses recovered from the iMEFs  +  PPCNG group. Taken together, our results suggest that PPCNG may serve as a novel biodegradable and injectable scaffold and carrier for gene and cell-based bone tissue engineering. PMID:27097687

  6. Crystal Structure of the Transcriptional Regulator CmeR From Campylobacter Jejuni

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, R.; Su, C.-C.; Shi, F.; McDermott, G.; Zhang, Q.; Yu, E.W.

    2009-06-01

    The CmeABC multidrug efflux pump, which belongs to the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) family, recognizes and extrudes a broad range of antimicrobial agents and is essential for Campylobacter jejuni colonization of the animal intestinal tract by mediating the efflux of bile acids. The expression of CmeABC is controlled by the transcriptional regulator CmeR, whose open reading frame is located immediately upstream of the cmeABC operon. To understand the structural basis of CmeR regulation, we have determined the crystal structure of CmeR to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, revealing a dimeric two-domain molecule with an entirely helical architecture similar to members of the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. Unlike the rest of the TetR regulators, CmeR has a large center-to-center distance (54 {angstrom}) between two N termini of the dimer, and a large flexible ligand-binding pocket in the C-terminal domain. Each monomer forms a 20 {angstrom} long tunnel-like cavity in the ligand-binding domain of CmeR and is occupied by a fortuitous ligand that is identified as glycerol. The binding of glycerol to CmeR induces a conformational state that is incompatible with target DNA. As glycerol has a chemical structure similar to that of potential ligands of CmeR, the structure obtained mimics the induced form of CmeR. These findings reveal novel structural features of a TetR family regulator, and provide new insight into the mechanisms of ligand binding and CmeR regulation.

  7. The Impact of Course Delivery Format on Wellness Patterns of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhart, Kim; Dimon, Chelsea

    2013-01-01

    University students (N = 103) enrolled in multiple wellness courses at a small northeastern public university completed a questionnaire measuring wellness patterns at the beginning and end of a wellness course delivered totally on line (web-based), in the traditional classroom, or in a mix of the two formats (blended). Attrition of participants…

  8. Does Delivery Format Make a Difference in Learning about Global and Cultural Understanding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Janita; Hammons, Stacy A.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed a learning outcome for nontraditional seniors who were in accelerated degree programs in both online and on-site formats. Using items from the National Survey of Student Engagement, researchers explored engagement with global understanding and cultural awareness. A quantitative, single-case analysis method was used to determine…

  9. Analyzing Reasons for Non-Adoption of Distance Delivery Formats in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gergen, Theresa; Roblyer, M. D.

    2013-01-01

    Though distance education formats could help address an urgent need for growth in the occupational therapy assistant (OTA) workforce, distance methods are not as accepted in these programs as they are in other professional and clinical programs. This study investigated whether beliefs and levels of experience of OTA program directors shaped their…

  10. Evolution of two Flaring Active Regions With CME Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2008-12-01

    We study the coronal magnetic field structure of two active regions, one during solar activity minimum (June 2007) and another one during a more active time (January 2004). The temporal evolution was explored with the help of nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolations of SOLIS/VSM and NAOJ/SFT photospheric vector magnetograms. We study the active region NOAA 10960 observed on 2007 June 7 with three SOLIS/VSM snapshots taken during a small C1.0 flare of time cadence 10 minutes and six snapshots during a quiet period. The total magnetic energy in the active region was approximately 3 × 1025 J. Before the flare the free magnetic energy was about 5~% of the potential field energy. A part of this excess energy was released during the flare, producing almost a potential configuration at the beginning of the quiet period. The return to an almost potential structure can be assigned to a CME as recorded by the SoHO/LASCO instrument on 2007 June 07 around 10 minutes after the flare peaked, so that whatever magnetic helicity was bodily removed from the structure. This was compared with active region 10540 observed on 2004 January 18 -- 21, which was analyzed with the help of vector magnetograph data from the Solar Flare Telescope in Japan of time cadence of about 1 day. The free energy was Efree≈ 66~% of the total energy which was sufficiently high to power a M6.1 flare on January 20, which was associated with a CME 20 minutes later. The activity of AR 10540 was significantly higher than for AR 10960, as was the total magnetic energy. Furthermore, we found the common feature that magnetic energy accumulates before the flare/CME and a significant part of the excess energy is released during the eruption.

  11. Formation of thermally reversible optically transparent emulsion-based delivery systems using spontaneous emulsification.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Amir Hossein; Fang, Yuan; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-28

    Transparent emulsion-based delivery systems suitable for encapsulating lipophilic bioactive agents can be fabricated using low-energy spontaneous emulsification methods. These emulsions are typically fabricated from non-ionic surfactants whose hydrophilic head groups are susceptible to dehydration upon heating. This phenomenon may promote emulsion instability due to enhanced droplet coalescence at elevated temperatures. Conversely, the same phenomenon can be used to fabricate optically transparent emulsions through the phase inversion temperature (PIT) method. The purpose of the current study was to examine the influence of oil phase composition and surfactant-to-oil ratio on the thermal behavior of surfactant-oil-water systems containing limonene, medium chain triglycerides (MCT), and Tween 60. Various types of thermal behavior (turbidity versus temperature profiles) were exhibited by these systems depending on their initial composition. For certain compositions, thermoreversible emulsions could be formed that were opaque at high temperatures but transparent at ambient temperatures. These systems may be particularly suitable for the encapsulation of bioactive agents in applications where optical clarity is important. PMID:26431057

  12. Electromediated formation of DNA complexes with cell membranes and its consequences for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Portet, Thomas; Favard, Cyril; Teissié, Justin; Dean, David S; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Electroporation is a physical method to induce the uptake of therapeutic drugs and DNA, by eukaryotic cells and tissues. The phenomena behind electro-mediated membrane permeabilization to plasmid DNA have been shown to be significantly more complex than those for small molecules. Small molecules cross the permeabilized membrane by diffusion whereas plasmid DNA first interacts with the electropermeabilized part of the cell surface, forming localized aggregates. The dynamics of this process is still poorly understood because direct observations have been limited to scales of the order of seconds. Here, cells are electropermeabilized in the presence of plasmid DNA and monitored with a temporal resolution of 2 ms. This allows us to show that during the first pulse application, plasmid complexes, or aggregates, start to form at distinct sites on the cell membrane. FRAP measurements show that the positions of these sites are remarkably immobile during the application of further pluses. A theoretical model is proposed to explain the appearance of distinct interaction sites, the quantitative increase in DNA and also their immobility leading to a tentative explanation for the success of electro-mediated gene delivery. PMID:21035428

  13. Genetic Basis and Functional Consequences of Differential Expression of the CmeABC Efflux Pump in Campylobacter jejuni Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Grinnage-Pulley, Tara; Zhang, Qijing

    2015-01-01

    The CmeABC multidrug efflux transporter of Campylobacter jejuni plays a key role in antimicrobial resistance and is suppressed by CmeR, a transcriptional regulator of the TetR family. Overexpression of CmeABC has been observed in laboratory-generated mutants, but it is unknown if this phenotype occurs naturally in C. jejuni isolates and if it has any functional consequences. To answer these questions, expression of cmeABC in natural isolates obtained from broiler chickens, turkeys and humans was examined, and the genetic mechanisms and role of cmeABC differential expression in antimicrobial resistance was determined. Among the 64 C. jejuni isolates examined in this study, 43 and 21 were phenotypically identified as overexpression (OEL) and wild-type expression (WEL) levels. Representative mutations of the cmeABC promoter and/or CmeR-coding sequence were analyzed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and transcriptional fusion assays. Reduced CmeR binding to the mutated cmeABC promoter sequences or decreased CmeR levels increased cmeABC expression. Several examined amino acid substitutions in CmeR did not affect its binding to the cmeABC promoter, but a mutation that led to C-terminal truncation of CmeR abolished its DNA-binding activity. Interestingly, some OEL isolates harbored no mutations in known regulatory elements, suggesting that cmeABC is also regulated by unidentified mechanisms. Overexpression of cmeABC did not affect the susceptibility of C. jejuni to most tested antimicrobials except for chloramphenicol, but promoted the emergence of ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants under antibiotic selection. These results link CmeABC overexpression in natural C. jejuni isolates to various mutations and indicate that this phenotypic change promotes the emergence of antibiotic-resistant mutants under selection pressure. Thus, differential expression of CmeABC may facilitate Campylobacter adaptation to antibiotic treatments. PMID:26132196

  14. Particle Acceleration by Cme-driven Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic particle (SEP) events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Peak particle intensities are a strong function of CME speed, although the intensities, spectra, and angular distributions of particles escaping the shock are highly modified by scattering on Alfven waves produced by the streaming particles themselves. Element abundances vary in complex ways because ions with different values of Q/A resonate with different parts of the wave spectrum, which varies with space and time. Just recently, we have begun to model these systematic variations theoretically and to explore other consequences of proton-generated waves.

  15. Scientific goals of the Cooperative Multiscale Experiment (CME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, William

    1993-01-01

    Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) form the focus of CME. Recent developments in global climate models, the urgent need to improve the representation of the physics of convection, radiation, the boundary layer, and orography, and the surge of interest in coupling hydrologic, chemistry, and atmospheric models of various scales, have emphasized the need for a broad interdisciplinary and multi-scale approach to understanding and predicting MCS's and their interactions with processes at other scales. The role of mesoscale systems in the large-scale atmospheric circulation, the representation of organized convection and other mesoscale flux sources in terms of bulk properties, and the mutually consistent treatment of water vapor, clouds, radiation, and precipitation, are all key scientific issues concerning which CME will seek to increase understanding. The manner in which convective, mesoscale, and larger scale processes interact to produce and organize MCS's, the moisture cycling properties of MCS's, and the use of coupled cloud/mesoscale models to better understand these processes, are also major objectives of CME. Particular emphasis will be placed on the multi-scale role of MCS's in the hydrological cycle and in the production and transport of chemical trace constituents. The scientific goals of the CME consist of the following: understand how the large and small scales of motion influence the location, structure, intensity, and life cycles of MCS's; understand processes and conditions that determine the relative roles of balanced (slow manifold) and unbalanced (fast manifold) circulations in the dynamics of MCS's throughout their life cycles; assess the predictability of MCS's and improve the quantitative forecasting of precipitation and severe weather events; quantify the upscale feedback of MCS's to the large-scale environment and determine interrelationships between MCS occurrence and variations in the large-scale flow and surface forcing; provide a data base for initialization and verification of coupled regional, mesoscale/hydrologic, mesoscale/chemistry, and prototype mesoscale/cloud-resolving models for prediction of severe weather, ceilings, and visibility; provide a data base for initialization and validation of cloud-resolving models, and for assisting in the fabrication, calibration, and testing of cloud and MCS parameterization schemes; and provide a data base for validation of four dimensional data assimilation schemes and algorithms for retrieving cloud and state parameters from remote sensing instrumentation.

  16. Cosmic Ray Anisotropy Near a CME-Driven Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leerungnavarat, K.; Ruffolo, D.; Bieber, J. W.

    2002-05-01

    As a CME-driven shock approaches and passes earth, neutron monitors and muon detectors observe enhancements of the cosmic ray anisotropy. Precursor anisotropies are caused by the interaction of the cosmic rays with the shock and provide useful information for space weather forecasting with a lead time of several hours. We numerically simulate the distribution of particles in position and pitch angle, and predict how the cosmic ray pitch angle distribution near the shock depends on particle energy and shock geometry. This work was supported by NSF grant ATM-0000315 and the Thailand Research Fund.

  17. Update from the BU-CME Group: Accurate Prediction of CME Deflection and Magnetic reconnection in the interior of interplanetary CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opher, M.; Kay, C.; Fermo, R. L.; Drake, J. F.; Evans, R. M.

    2013-05-01

    The accurate prediction of the path of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) plays an important role in space weather forecasting, and knowing the source location of the CME does not always suffice. During solar minimum, for example, polar coronal holes (CHs) can deflect high latitude CMEs toward the ecliptic plane and when CHs extend to lower latitudes deflections in other directions can occur. To predict whether a CME will impact Earth the effects of the solar background on the CME's trajectory must be taken into account. Here we develop a model (Kay et al. 2013), called ForeCAT (Forecasting a CME's Altered Trajectory), of CME deflection close to the Sun where magnetic forces dominate. Given the background solar wind conditions, the launch site of the CME, and the properties of the CME (such as its mass and size), ForeCAT predicts the deflection of the CME as well as the full trajectory as the CME propagates away from the Sun. For a magnetic background where the CME is launched from an active region located in between a CH and streamer region the strong magnetic gradients cause a deflection of 39.0o in latitude and 21.9o in longitude. Varying the CME's input parameters within observed ranges leads to deflections predominantly between 36.2o and 44.5o in latitude and between 19.5o and 27.9 in longitude. For all cases, the majority of the deflection occurs before the CME reaches a radial distance of 3 R⊙. Recent in situ observations of interplanetary mass ejections (ICMEs) found signatures of reconnection exhausts in their interior or trailing edge. This result suggests that the internal magnetic field reconnects with itself. To this end, we propose an approach (Fermo et al. 2013) borrowed from the fusion plasma community. Taylor (1974) showed that the lowest energy state corresponds to one in which \\grad × B = λ B. Variations from this state will result in the magnetic field trying to re-orient itself into the Taylor state solution, subject to the constraints that the toroidal flux and magnetic helicity are invariant. In tokamaks, the result is a sawtooth crash. In an ICME, if we likewise treat the flux rope as a toroidal flux tube, any variation from the Taylor state will result in reconnection within the interior of the flux tube, in accord with the observations by Gosling et al. (2007). We present MHD and PIC simulations that shows that indeed this is the case and discuss the implications for ICMEs.

  18. Effect of monoacyl phosphatidylcholine content on the formation of microemulsions and the dermal delivery of flufenamic acid.

    PubMed

    Hoppel, Magdalena; Juric, Sonja; Ettl, Hanna; Valenta, Claudia

    2015-02-01

    The choice of appropriate excipients is crucial for the success of a dermal drug delivery system. Especially surfactants should be chosen carefully, because of their possible interactions with the skin or the applied drug. Since monoacyl phosphatidylcholine (MAPL) exhibits great emulsification properties and can be derived from natural sources, it is of great interest as surfactant in microemulsions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the MAPL content on the formation of microemulsions. The great emulsification power of MAPL was confirmed by increased isotropic areas with increasing MAPL content. Moreover, a decrease in particle size, particle size distribution and viscosity with increasing MAPL content was determined. Besides its effects on microemulsion structure, MAPL exhibited a significant influence on the skin permeation of flufenamic acid. Interestingly, the higher the MAPL content, the lower was the skin permeation of flufenamic acid. A possible explanation might be that the hydrophilic MAPL could hinder the permeation of the lipophilic drug. In contrast, the skin permeation enhancing effects of the microemulsion with the lowest MAPL content might be attributed to formation of a patch-like structure and therefore better contact between the formulation and the skin. PMID:25542986

  19. Propagation of the 7 January 2014 CME and Resulting Geomagnetic Non-event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. L.; Thompson, B. J.; Jian, L. K.; Colaninno, R. C.; Odstrcil, D.; Möstl, C.; Temmer, M.; Savani, N. P.; Collinson, G.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P. J.; Zheng, Y.

    2015-10-01

    On 2014 January 7 an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) with a radial speed ≈2500 km s-1 was observed from near an active region close to disk center. This led many forecasters to estimate a rapid arrival at Earth (≈36 hr) and predict a strong geomagnetic storm. However, only a glancing CME arrival was observed at Earth with a transit time of ≈49 hr and a KP geomagnetic index of only 3-. We study the interplanetary propagation of this CME using the ensemble Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-ENLIL+Cone model, that allows a sampling of CME parameter uncertainties. We explore a series of simulations to isolate the effects of the background solar wind solution, CME shape, tilt, location, size, and speed, and the results are compared with observed in situ arrivals at Venus, Earth, and Mars. Our results show that a tilted ellipsoid CME shape improves the initial real-time prediction to better reflect the observed in situ signatures and the geomagnetic storm strength. CME parameters from the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model used as input to WSA-ENLIL+Cone, along with a tilted ellipsoid cloud shape, improve the arrival-time error by 14.5, 18.7, 23.4 hr for Venus, Earth, and Mars respectively. These results highlight that CME orientation and directionality with respect to observatories play an important role in understanding the propagation of this CME, and for forecasting other glancing CME arrivals. This study also demonstrates the importance of three-dimensional CME fitting made possible by multiple viewpoint imaging.

  20. Acceleration of SEPs in Flaring Loops and CME Driven shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahe; Chen, Qingrong

    2014-06-01

    We consider two stage acceleration of the Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs). The first occurring via the stochastic acceleration mechanism at the flare site in the corona, which produces the so-called impulsive SEPs, with anomalous abundances, as well as nonthermal particles responsible for the observed radiation. The second is re-acceleration the flare accelerated particles at the CME driven shock associated with larger, longer duration events with relatively normal abundances. Turbulence plays a major role in both stages. We will show how stochastic acceleration can explain some of the salient features of the impulsive SEP observations; such as extreme enrichment of 3He (and heavy ions), and the observed broad distributions and ranges of the 3He and 4He fluences. We will then show that the above hybrid mechanism of first stochastic acceleration of ions in the reconnecting coronal magnetic structures and then their re-acceleration in the CME shock can produce the varied shapes of the 3He and 4He spectra observed in all events ranging from weak impulsive to strong gradual events.

  1. SEP acceleration in CME driven shocks using a hybrid code

    SciTech Connect

    Gargaté, L.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-09-01

    We perform hybrid simulations of a super-Alfvénic quasi-parallel shock, driven by a coronal mass ejection (CME), propagating in the outer coronal/solar wind at distances of between 3 to 6 solar radii. The hybrid treatment of the problem enables the study of the shock propagation on the ion timescale, preserving ion kinetics and allowing for a self-consistent treatment of the shock propagation and particle acceleration. The CME plasma drags the embedded magnetic field lines stretching from the sun, and propagates out into interplanetary space at a greater velocity than the in situ solar wind, driving the shock, and producing very energetic particles. Our results show that electromagnetic Alfvén waves are generated at the shock front. The waves propagate upstream of the shock and are produced by the counter-streaming ions of the solar wind plasma being reflected at the shock. A significant fraction of the particles are accelerated in two distinct phases: first, particles drift from the shock and are accelerated in the upstream region, and second, particles arriving at the shock get trapped and are accelerated at the shock front. A fraction of the particles diffused back to the shock, which is consistent with the Fermi acceleration mechanism.

  2. Effect on the Lunar Exosphere of a CME Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Roseamry M.; Hurley, Dana M.; Farrell, William M.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that solar wind bombardment onto exposed surfaces in the solar system will produce an energetic component to the exospheres about those bodies. Laboratory experiments have shown that the sputter yield can be noticeably increased in the case of a good insulating surface. It is now known that the solar wind composition is highly dependent on the origin of the particular plasma. Using the measured composition of the slow wind. fast wind. solar energetic particle (SEP) population. and coronal mass ejection (CME), broken down into its various components, we have estimated the total sputter yield for each type of solar wind. The heavy ion component, especially the He(++) component, greatly enhances the total sputter yield during times when the heavy ion population is enhanced, most notably during a coronal mass ejection. To simulate the etfect on the lunar exosphere of a CME passage past the Moon, we ran a Monte Carlo code for the species Na, K, Mg and Ca.

  3. Effect on the Lunar Exosphere of a CME Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Hurley, Dana M.; Farrell, William M.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that solar wind bombardment onto exposed surfaces in the solar system will produce an energetic component to the exospheres about those bodies. Laboratory experiments have shown that the sputter yield can be noticeably increased in the case of a good insulating surface. It is now known that the solar wind composition is highly dependent on the origin of the particular plasma. Using the measured composition of the slow wind, fast wind, solar energetic particle (SEP) population, and coronal mass ejection (CME), broken down into its various components, we have estimated the total sputter yield for each type of solar wind. The heavy ion component, especially the He++ component, greatly enhances the total sputter yield during times when the heavy ion population is enhanced, most notably during a coronal mass ejection. To simulate the effect on the lunar exosphere of a CME passage past the Moon, we ran a Monte Carlo code for the species Na, K, Mg and Ca.

  4. An Intense Flare-CME Event in 2015: Propagation and Interaction Effects Between the Sun and Earth's Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johri, Abhishek; Manoharan, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    We report the interplanetary effects of a fast coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with the intense X2.7 flare that occurred on 05 May 2015. The near-Sun signatures of the CME at low-coronal heights [ {<} 2 R_{⊙}] are obtained from the EUV images at 171 Å and metric radio observations. The intensity and duration of the CME-driven radio bursts in the near-Sun and interplanetary medium indicate this CME event to be an energetic one. The interplanetary-scintillation data, along with the low-frequency radio spectrum, played a crucial role in understanding the radial evolution of the speed and expansion of the CME in the inner heliosphere as well as its interaction with a preceding slow CME. The estimation of the speed of the CME at several points along the Sun to 1 AU trajectory shows that: i) the CME went through a rapid acceleration as well as expansion up to a height of {≈} 6 R_{⊙}, and ii) the CME continued to propagate at speed {≥} 800 k} s^{-1} between the Sun and 1 AU. These results show that the CME likely overcame the drag exerted by the ambient/background solar wind with the support of its internal magnetic energy. When the CME interacted with a slow, preceding CME, the turbulence level associated with the CME-driven disturbance increased significantly.

  5. Neointimal formation following drug-eluting stents: physiology, timeline, and the influence of drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Young, John J

    2007-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stents (DES) is currently the preferred approach to the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease. Large, randomized trials have demonstrated a significant reduction in the incidence of restenosis and the need for target vessel revascularization following implantation of DES compared with bare-metal stents. Follow-up data extending out to 2 to 4 years have demonstrated efficacy in maintaining luminal patency, but recent concerns regarding potential late adverse effects with DES have been raised. These include aneurysm formation and hypersensitivity reactions, as well as subacute and late stent thrombosis requiring compliance with antiplatelet therapy for protracted periods of time. Evolving strategies to mitigate late adverse events with DES include acceleration of endothelialization, gene therapy targeting pro-healing pathways (ie, nitric oxide donors), smooth muscle cell growth inhibitors, bioabsorbable metal and polymeric stents, and concurrent use of local as well as systemic chemotherapy. PMID:17401309

  6. Exercise Motivation of College Students in Online, Face-to-Face, and Blended Basic Studies Physical Activity and Wellness Course Delivery Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidman, Cara Lynn; Fiala, Kelly Ann; D'Abundo, Michelle Lee

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess exercise motivation among college students self-selected into 4 online (OL) and face-to-face (F2F) basic studies' physical activity and wellness course delivery formats. Participants/Methods: Out of 1,037 enrolled students during the Spring 2009 semester, 602 responded online to demographic…

  7. Preliminary structural studies of the transcriptional regulator CmeR from Campylobacter jejuni

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Chih-Chia; Shi, Feng; Gu, Ruoyu; Li, Ming; McDermott, Gerry; Yu, Edward W.; Zhang, Qijing

    2007-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator CmeR from C. jejuni has been purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to a resolution of 2.2 Å. In Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans, the CmeR regulatory protein controls transcription of the multidrug transporter gene operon cmeABC. CmeR belongs to the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. The 210-residue CmeR consists of two functional motifs: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal ligand-binding domain. It is predicted that the DNA-binding domain interacts directly with target promoters, while the C-terminal motif interacts with inducing ligands (such as bile salts). As an initial step towards confirming this structural model, recombinant CmeR protein containing a 6×His tag at the N-terminus was crystallized. Crystals of ligand-free CmeR belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.4, b = 57.6, c = 93.3 Å. Diffraction was observed to at least 2.2 Å at 100 K. Analysis of the detailed CmeR structure is currently in progress.

  8. Promoting Free Online CME for Intimate Partner Violence: What Works at What Cost?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John M., Jr.; Novalis-Marine, Cheryl; Amend, Robert W.; Surprenant, Zita J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: There is a need to provide practicing physicians with training on the recognition and management of intimate partner violence (IPV). Online continuing medical education (CME) could help meet this need, but there is little information on the costs and effectiveness of promoting online CME to physicians. This lack of information may

  9. A Community-Based Trial of Online Intimate Partner Violence CME

    PubMed Central

    Short, Lynn M.; Surprenant, Zita J.; Harris, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is a broad need to improve physician continuing medical education (CME) in the management of intimate partner violence (IPV). However, there are only a few examples of successful IPV CME programs and none of these are suitable for widespread distribution. Design: Randomized, controlled trial beginning in September 2003 and ending November 2004. Data were analyzed in 2005. Setting/Participants: Fifty-two primary care physicians in small (< 8 physicians), community-based medical offices in Arizona and Missouri. Intervention: Twenty-three physicians completed a minimum of 4 hours of an asynchronous, multimedia, interactive, case-based, online CME program, which provided them flexibility in constructing their educational experience (“constructivism”). Control physicians received no CME. Main Outcome Measures: Scores on a standardized 10-scale self-reported survey of IPV knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and self-reported behaviors (KABB) administered prior to randomization and repeated at 6 and 12 months following the CME program. Results: Use of the online CME program was associated with a significant improvement in eight of 10 KABB outcomes, including physician self-efficacy and reported IPV management practices, over the study period. These measures did not improve in the control group. Conclusion: The Internet-based CME program was clearly effective in improving long-term individual educational outcomes, including self-reported IPV practices. This type of CME may be an effective and less costly alternative to live IPV training sessions and workshops. PMID:16459218

  10. KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY OF THE CME RECONNECTION OUTFLOW LAYER IN THE LOW CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Foullon, Claire; Verwichte, Erwin; Nykyri, Katariina; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Hannah, Iain G.

    2013-04-20

    New capabilities for studying the Sun allow us to image for the first time the magnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability developing at the surface of a fast coronal mass ejecta (CME) less than 150 Mm above the solar surface. We conduct a detailed observational investigation of this phenomenon, observed off the east solar limb on 2010 November 3, in the EUV with SDO/AIA. In conjunction with STEREO-B/EUVI, we derive the CME source surface position. We ascertain the timing and early evolution of the CME outflow leading to the instability onset. We perform image and spectral analysis, exploring the CME plasma structuring and its parabolic flow pattern. As we evaluate and validate the consistency of the observations with theoretical considerations and predictions, we take the view that the ejecta layer corresponds to a reconnection outflow layer surrounding the erupting flux rope, accounting for the timing, high temperature ({approx}11.6 MK), and high flow shear ({approx}680 km s{sup -1}) on the unstable CME northern flank and for the observed asymmetry between the CME flanks. From the irregular evolution of the CME flow pattern, we infer a shear gradient consistent with expected spatial flow variations across the KH-unstable flank. The KH phenomenon observed is tied to the first stage of a linked flare-CME event.

  11. Effect of CME on Primary Care and OB/GYN Treatment of Breast Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, David W.; Xu, Stanley; McClure, David

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: CME program planners are being asked to move beyond assessments of knowledge to assessing the impact of CME on practice and patient outcomes. Methods: We conducted a pre-post analysis of administrative data from 107 physicians, nurse practitioners (NPs), or physician's assistants (PAs) who attended one or two continuing medical

  12. Promoting Free Online CME for Intimate Partner Violence: What Works at What Cost?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John M., Jr.; Novalis-Marine, Cheryl; Amend, Robert W.; Surprenant, Zita J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: There is a need to provide practicing physicians with training on the recognition and management of intimate partner violence (IPV). Online continuing medical education (CME) could help meet this need, but there is little information on the costs and effectiveness of promoting online CME to physicians. This lack of information may…

  13. Effect of CME on Primary Care and OB/GYN Treatment of Breast Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, David W.; Xu, Stanley; McClure, David

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: CME program planners are being asked to move beyond assessments of knowledge to assessing the impact of CME on practice and patient outcomes. Methods: We conducted a pre-post analysis of administrative data from 107 physicians, nurse practitioners (NPs), or physician's assistants (PAs) who attended one or two continuing medical…

  14. Controlling Quality in CME/CPD by Measuring and Illuminating Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, David; Takhar, Jatinder; Macnab, Jennifer; Eadie, Jason; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Stenerson, Heather; Francois, Jose; Bell, Mary; Monette, Celine; Campbell, Craig; Marlow, Bernie

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: There has been a surge of interest in the area of bias in industry-supported continuing medical education/continuing professional development (CME/CPD) activities. In 2007, we published our first study on measuring bias in CME, demonstrating that our assessment tool was valid and reliable. In light of the increasing interest in this…

  15. Measuring Classroom Management Expertise (CME) of Teachers: A Video-Based Assessment Approach and Statistical Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    König, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The study aims at developing and exploring a novel video-based assessment that captures classroom management expertise (CME) of teachers and for which statistical results are provided. CME measurement is conceptualized by using four video clips that refer to typical classroom management situations in which teachers are heavily challenged…

  16. Biomimetic synthesized bimodal nanoporous silica: Bimodal mesostructure formation and application for ibuprofen delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Xu, Lu; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Hongyu; Lu, Fangzheng; Li, Sanming

    2016-01-01

    The present paper innovatively reports bimodal nanoporous silica synthesized using biomimetic method (B-BNS) with synthesized polymer (C16-L-serine) as template. Formation mechanism of B-BNS was deeply studied and exploration of its application as carrier of poorly water-soluble drug ibuprofen (IBU) was conducted. The bimodal nanopores and curved mesoscopic channels of B-BNS were achieved due to the dynamic self-assembly of C16-L-serine induced by silane coupling agent (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APTES) and silica source (tetraethoxysilane, TEOS). Characterization results confirmed the successful synthesis of B-BNS, and particularly, nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurement demonstrated that B-BNS was meso-meso porous silica material. In application, B-BNS loaded IBU with high drug loading content due to its enlarged nanopores. After being loaded, IBU presented amorphous phase because nanoporous space and curved mesoscopic channels of B-BNS prevented the crystallization of IBU. In vitro release result revealed that B-BNS controlled IBU release with two release phases based on bimodal nanopores and improved dissolution in simulated gastric fluid due to crystalline conversion of IBU. It is convincible that biomimetic method provides novel theory and insight for synthesizing bimodal nanoporous silica, and unique functionalities of B-BNS as drug carrier can undoubtedly promote the application of bimodal nanoporous silica and development of pharmaceutical science. PMID:26478410

  17. Automatic CME front edge detection from STEREO white-light coronagraph images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirnosov, Vladimir; Chang, Lin-Ching; Pulkkinen, Antti

    2015-08-01

    The coronagraph images captured by a Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) Ahead/Behind (A/B) spacecraft allow tracking of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from two different viewpoints and reconstructing its propagation in three-dimensional space. The reconstruction can be done using a triangulation technique that requires a CME front edge location. There are currently no robust automatic CME front edge detection methods that can be integrated with the triangulation technique. In this paper, we propose a novel automatic method to detect the front edge of the CME using STEREO coronagraph 2 red-colored Red, Green, Blue color model images. Our method consists of two modules: preprocessing and classification. The preprocessing module decomposes each coronagraph image into its three channels and uses only the red channel image for CME segmentation. The output of the preprocessing module is a set of segmented running-difference binary images which is fed into the classification module. These images are then transformed into polar coordinates followed by CME front edge detection based on the distance that CME travels in the field of view. The proposed method was validated against a manual method using total 56 CME events, 28 from STEREO A and 28 from STEREO B, captured in the period from 1 January 2008 to 16 August 2009. The results show that the proposed method is effective for CME front edge detection. The proposed method is useful in quantitative CME processing and analysis and will be immediately applicable to assist automatic triangulation method for real-time space weather forecasting.

  18. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A; Byrne, Barry J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. PMID:26053072

  19. E-learning for occupational physicians' CME: a study case.

    PubMed

    Mazzoleni, M Cristina; Rognoni, Carla; Finozzi, Enrico; Gri, Tommaso; Pagani, Marco; Imbriani, Marcello

    2011-01-01

    The present study reports the results of the evaluation of an e-learning CME course in the field of Occupational Medicine. In particular the following aspects have been investigated: If and how the course contents have met the educational users' needs; The effectiveness of the course in terms of knowledge improvement; Users' behaviour. Attendance data and results of a sample of 1128 attendees have been analyzed via ad hoc developed tools for direct inspection of Moodle CMS database. The results document the effectiveness of the e-learning course, as regards meeting the educational needs of physicians and also the improvement in terms of knowledge and problem solving skill acquisition. Users' behaviour has revealed a certain tendency for passing the tests, more than for pursuing the best possible result. Interaction with the tutor is low. PMID:21685595

  20. Nozzle Driven Shocks in Post-CME Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Roger B.; Longcope, D. W.; McKenzie, D. E.

    2012-05-01

    Models of patchy reconnection allow for heating and acceleration of plasma along reconnected field lines but do not offer a mechanism for transport of energy and momentum across field lines. Here we present a simple 2D model in which a localized region of reconnected flux creates an apparent constriction in the surrounding layer of unreconnected field. The moving constriction acts as a de Laval nozzle and ultimately leads to shocks which can extend out to several times the diameter of the flux tube, altering the density and temperature of the plasma in that region. These findings have direct implications for observations in the solar corona, particularly in regard to such phenomena as wakes seen behind supra-arcade downflows and high temperatures in post-CME current sheets. This work was supported by a joint grant from the NSF and DOE.

  1. CME propagation: where does solar wind drag 'take over'?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, P.

    2013-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun are known to be acted upon by driving as well as drag forces. They are generally thought to be driven by Lorentz self-forces, while the drag is due to viscous interaction with the ambient solar wind. However, the typical heliocentric distances at which driving forces cease to be dominant (and solar wind drag becomes important) is not obvious for most CMEs. We use a recently developed microphysical model for solar wind viscous drag (Subramanian, Lara and Borgazzi 2012) together with data for driving forces from a well observed set of flux rope CMEs to answer this question. These results are important for building quantitative models for CME propagation, especially for those CMEs which are not fast enough for one to assume that they are acted upon primarily by drag forces.

  2. Ion Transport in the September 24, 1998 CME Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, M. O.; Craven, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    On 24 September 1998 Earth's magnetosphere was impacted by a large CME with an associated shock front. This impact moved the magnetopause inward by several Re and pushed dayside magnetospheric boundaries anti-sunward by more than 1 Re. The resulting observations from the Polar spacecraft, which was located over the northern polar cap, show signatures of the polar cap, the cusp, and the mantle as these regions were moved across the spacecraft position. An enhanced Cleft Ion Fountain outflow was observed as Polar moved sunward towards the cusp following the shock passage. Analysis of these data shows the velocity filter/mass spectrometer nature of the CIF in association with anti-sunward convection. These signatures are used to investigate time scales for reconnection, energy transfer to the Ionosphere, and CIF outflow generation.

  3. CME Interaction with Coronal Holes and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.

    2008-01-01

    A significant number of interplanetary (IP) shocks (-17%) during cycle 23 were not followed by drivers. The number of such "driverless" shocks steadily increased with the solar cycle with 15%, 33%, and 52% occurring in the rise, maximum, and declining phase of the solar cycle. The solar sources of 15% of the driverless shocks were very close the central meridian of the Sun (within approx.15deg), which is quite unexpected. More interestingly, all the driverless shocks with their solar sources near the solar disk center occurred during the declining phase of solar cycle 23. When we investigated the coronal environment of the source regions of driverless shocks, we found that in each case there was at least one coronal hole nearby suggesting that the coronal holes might have deflected the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) away from the Sun-Earth line. The presence of abundant low-latitude coronal holes during the declining phase further explains why CMEs originating close to the disk center mimic the limb CMEs, which normally lead to driverless shocks due to purely geometrical reasons. We also examined the solar source regions of shocks with drivers. For these, the coronal holes were located such that they either had no influence on the CME trajectories. or they deflected the CMEs towards the Sun-Earth line. We also obtained the open magnetic field distribution on the Sun by performing a potential field source surface extrapolation to the corona. It was found that the CMEs generally move away from the open magnetic field regions. The CME-coronal hole interaction must be widespread in the declining phase, and may have a significant impact on the geoeffectiveness of CMEs.

  4. CME and associated phenomena on May 12, 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, L.; Jain, R.; Joshi, C.; Jaaffrey, S. N.

    2005-05-01

    The multispectral observations of NOAA active region No. 8038 during 10-13 May 1997 are presented. The observations of MDI/SOHO magnetograms show that in this active region continual but discrete growth and decay of magnetic field was taking place indicating either continuous evolution of magnetic flux or emergence of new flux region. The movie of these magnetograms reveal two important results that the major opposite polarities of pre-existing region were approaching towards each other, and a small north polarity flux i.e. moving magnetic feature (MMF) was ejecting out from major north polarity at a quasi-periodicity of about 10 hrs during 10-13 May 1997. It appears that as a result of flux cancellation by one such ejected north polarity flux with a newly emerged south polarity flux around 04:30 UT on 12 May 1997, a blast wave generated, seen by EIT/SOHO, producing CME and a moderate but long enduring 1B/C1.3 solar flare. The observations in Hα, soft X-ray, hard X-ray, ionospheric absorption, radio and interplanetary scintillations in association to this flare are presented in detail.. The multiwavelength observations of the flare showed occurrence of at least two phases of energy release, first at 04:42 and second at 04:47 UT. We propose a qualitative model to interpret the observations, which, however, also explains the generation of CME and associated flare with two stages of energy release. The occurrence of type II radio burst at 04:54 UT was perhaps due to shock produced by the plasmoid erupted during second energy release at higher altitude in the corona. It appears that the plasmoid traversed through shock in the interplanetary medium so as to enhance the scintillation index on 14 May as inferred from IPS observations.

  5. Transition of a traditional pharmacology course for dental students to an online delivery format: a pilot project.

    PubMed

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Brockman, William G

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the rationale and subsequent transition of a pharmacology course for dental students from a traditional face-to-face lecture format to online delivery using a course management system (CMS). A dental school faculty member with dental and pharmacology degrees and a Ph.D. was asked to serve as course director and to develop and implement a nontraditional course using the Blackboard CMS technology, which houses asynchronous course content materials, study guides, and online resource materials. Respondus software was used to create, manage, and administer weekly online quizzes. A comprehensive midterm and final examination were conducted in a traditional face-to-face setting. A survey was used to capture student satisfaction with this self-directed introductory pharmacology course. Participants were second-year dental students (Classes of 2011 and 2012). There was a survey response rate of 91 percent (179/197). The Likert-style survey questions produced ordinal data from which the median and interquartile range were calculated. On a scale in which 1=Poor, 5=Excellent, the median evaluation for the instructor was 4 (IQR=1.5). On a global question that asked how students rate the course overall, the median score was 4 (IQR=1.0). Results show that a majority of students were positive about the online delivery of the introductory pharmacology course and for many students this was their first online course experience. Resistance to self-directed learning was a theme with those students who rated the course poorly. In a comparison of overall course grades from the previous year, student performance in this course was much stronger. As a result of student feedback seeking more interaction with the course director, it was determined that the next time the course is offered there will be additional opportunities for greater face-to-face time with the instructor. Ongoing evaluation will be important as new teaching technologies emerge and are adopted for teaching and learning. PMID:21546597

  6. The Width of a CME and the Source of the Driving Magnetic Explosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Sterling, A. C.; Suess, S. T.

    2007-01-01

    We show that the strength of the magnetic field in the area covered by the flare arcade following a CME-producing ejective solar eruption can be estimated from the final angular width of the CME in the outer corona and the final angular width of the flare arcade. We assume (1) the flux-rope plasmoid ejected from the flare site becomes the interior of the CME plasmoid, (2) in the outer corona the CME is roughly a "spherical plasmoid with legs" shaped like a light bulb, and (3) beyond some height in or below the outer corona the CME plasmoid is in lateral pressure balance with the surrounding magnetic field. The strength of the nearly radial magnetic field in the outer corona is estimated from the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field measured by Ulysses. We apply this model to three well-observed CMEs that exploded from flare regions of extremely different size and magnetic setting. In each event, the estimated source-region field strength is appropriate for the magnetic setting of the flare. This agreement indicates via the model that CMEs (1) are propelled by the magnetic field of the CME plasmoid pushing against the surrounding magnetic field, and (2) can explode from flare regions that are laterally far offset from the radial path of the CME in the outer corona.

  7. 3D Numerical Study of Typical CME Event: The 2010-04-03 Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Feng, X. S.; Zhao, X.

    2014-12-01

    The coronal mass ejection (CME) event on April 3, 2010 is the first fast CME observed by STEREO SECCHI/HI for the full Sun-Earth line. Such an event provides us a good opportunity to study the propagation and evolution of CME from the Sun up to 1 AU. In this paper, we study the time-dependent evolution and propagation of this event from the Sun to Earth using the 3D SIP-CESE MHD model. The CME is initiated by a simple spherical plasmoid model: a spheromak magnetic structure with high speed, high pressure and high plasma density plasmoid. We find that the results can successfully reproduce the observations in the STEREO A/B COR1 and COR2 field of view and generate many basic structures of the in situ measurement: such as the similar curves of the plasma density and velocity, an increase in the magnetic field magnitude, the large-scale smooth magnetic field rotation and prolonged southward IMF (a well known source of magnetic storms). The MHD model gives the shock arrival time at Earth with an error of ˜ 1.5 hours. Finally, we analyze in detail the propagation velocity, the spread angle, the trajectory of CME. The speed of the CME rapidly increases from near the Sun, then decreases due to interaction with the solar wind ambient. The spread angle of the CME quickly increases due to lateral material expansion by the pressure gradients within the realistic solar wind background, then the expansion decreases with distance and ends until a pressure equilibrium is established. We also study the CME deflection and find that the CME almost does not deflects in the latitudinal and longitudinal direction during its propagation from the Sun to 1 AU.

  8. Effects of the 5 October 1996 CME at 4.4 AU: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, R.G.; Desai, M.I.; Sanderson, T.R.; Forsyth, R.J.; Gosling, J.T.

    1997-09-01

    The authors present observations from Ulysses associated with a large coronal mass ejection (CME) that lifted off the west limb of the Sun on 5 October, 1996. The study focuses on the effects of the interplanetary counterpart of the CME on the energetic particle populations at the location of Ulysses, in particular the effect on the sequence of corotating enhancements that had been observed prior to its arrival. They conclude that, despite its large spatial extent, the CME caused no permanent deformation of the heliospheric current sheet.

  9. Royal College's CME initiative focuses on lifelong, practice-integrated learning

    PubMed Central

    Berube, Brian

    1995-01-01

    An innovative continuing medical education (CME) initiative of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada is gaining worldwide attention. Emphasizing lifelong learning, the Maintenance of Competence Program gives college fellows an efficient, effective way to determine their educational needs, manage their CME activities and hone their clinical practice habits. More than half of college fellows are expected to join it by this summer. A spokesperson predicts that in 5 years bodies such as licensing authorities and hospital-privileges committees will require evidence of participation in a structured CME plan. Imagesp967-a

  10. Suppression of inhibitor formation against FVIII in a murine model of hemophilia A by oral delivery of antigens bioencapsulated in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Alexandra; Su, Jin; Lin, Shina; Wang, Xiaomei; Herzog, Roland W.

    2014-01-01

    Hemophilia A is the X-linked bleeding disorder caused by deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). To address serious complications of inhibitory antibody formation in current replacement therapy, we created tobacco transplastomic lines expressing FVIII antigens, heavy chain (HC) and C2, fused with the transmucosal carrier, cholera toxin B subunit. Cholera toxin B-HC and cholera toxin B-C2 fusion proteins expressed up to 80 or 370 g/g in fresh leaves, assembled into pentameric forms, and bound to GM1 receptors. Protection of FVIII antigen through bioencapsulation in plant cells and oral delivery to the gut immune system was confirmed by immunostaining. Feeding of HC/C2 mixture substantially suppressed T helper cell responses and inhibitor formation against FVIII in mice of 2 different strain backgrounds with hemophilia A. Prolonged oral delivery was required to control inhibitor formation long-term. Substantial reduction of inhibitor titers in preimmune mice demonstrated that the protocol could also reverse inhibitor formation. Gene expression and flow cytometry analyses showed upregulation of immune suppressive cytokines (transforming growth factor ? and interleukin 10). Adoptive transfer experiments confirmed an active suppression mechanism and revealed induction of CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25? T cells that potently suppressed anti-FVIII formation. In sum, these data support plant cell-based oral tolerance for suppression of inhibitor formation against FVIII. PMID:24825864

  11. ON A CORONAL BLOWOUT JET: THE FIRST OBSERVATION OF A SIMULTANEOUSLY PRODUCED BUBBLE-LIKE CME AND A JET-LIKE CME IN A SOLAR EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-02-01

    The coronal blowout jet is a peculiar category among various jet phenomena, in which the sheared base arch, often carrying a small filament, experiences a miniature version of blowout eruption that produces large-scale coronal mass ejection (CME). In this paper, we report such a coronal blowout jet with high-resolution multi-wavelength and multi-angle observations taken from Solar Dynamics Observatory, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, and Big Bear Solar Observatory. For the first time, we find that simultaneous bubble-like and jet-like CMEs were dynamically related to the blowout jet that showed cool and hot components next to each other. Our observational results indicate that (1) the cool component resulted from the eruption of the filament contained within the jet's base arch, and it further caused the bubble-like CME; (2) the jet-like CME was associated with the hot component, which was the outward moving heated plasma generated by the reconnection of the base arch and its ambient open field lines. On the other hand, bifurcation of the jet's cool component was also observed, which resulted from the uncoupling of the erupting filament's two legs that were highly twisted at the very beginning. Based on these results, we propose a model to interpret the coronal blowout jet, in which the external reconnection not only produces the jet-like CME, but also leads to the rising of the filament. Subsequently, internal reconnection starts underneath the rising filament and thereby causes the bubble-like CME.

  12. CME on Oct. 21, 2011 Caused Red Aurora in U.S. - Duration: 14 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The SOlar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this "coronograph" – so-called because the images block the sun, and only show the sun's atmosphere, or corona. The coronal mass ejection (CME)...

  13. SOHO Captures CME From X5.4 Solar Flare - Duration: 5 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this movie of the sun's coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with an X5.4 solar flare on the evening of March 6, 2012. The extremely fast and en...

  14. Radio Tracking of a White-Light CME from Solar Corona to Interplanetary Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Kaiser, Michael L.; Plunkett, S. P.; Prestage, N. P.

    1999-01-01

    We analyze the radio emissions associated with a flare/CME event on the sun. For this solar event there were type II radio emissions observed in both the metric and decametric to kilometric wavelength regimes. By comparing the dynamics of the CME with that implied by the frequencies and frequency-drift rates of the type II radio emissions, it is concluded that only the decametric/kilometric type II radio emissions are associated with the CME. We provide the first direct one-to-one comparison between a CME and the associated type II radio emissions. The dynamics implied by the metric type II radio emissions suggest a distinct coronal shock, associated with the flare, which only produces radio emissions in the low corona.

  15. ForeCAT: Using CME Deflections to Constrain their Mass and the Drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, C.; dos Santos, L. F. G.; Opher, M.

    2014-12-01

    Observations show that CMEs can deflect from a purely radial trajectory yet no consensus exists as to the cause of these deflections. The majority of the deflection motion occurs in the corona at distances where the magnetic energy dominates. Accordingly, many theories attribute the CME deflection to magnetic forces. In Kay et al. (2013) we presented ForeCAT, a model for CME deflections based on the magnetic forces (magnetic tension and magnetic pressure gradients). Kay et al. (2014) introduced an improved three-dimensional version of ForeCAT. Here we study the 2008 December 12 CME which occurred during solar minimum of Solar Cycle 24 (Byrne et al 2010, Gui et al. 2011, Liu et al 2010a,b). This CME erupted from high latitudes, and, despite the weak background magnetic field, deflected to the ecliptic, impacting Earth. From the observations, we are able to constrain all of the ForeCAT input parameters except for the CME mass and the drag coefficient that affects the CME motion. The reduced chi-square best fit to the observations constrains the CME mass range to 3e14 to 7e14 g and the drag coefficient range to 1.9 to 2.4. We explore the effects of a different magnetic background which decreases less rapidly than our standard Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model, as type II radio bursts suggest that the PFSS magnetic field decays too rapidly above active regions. For the case of the filament eruption of 2008 December 12 we find that the quiet sun coronal magnetic field should behave similar to the PFSS model. Finally, we present our current work exploring the case of the 2008 April 9 CME.

  16. Kinematic Treatment of CME Evolution in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete; Crooker, N. U.

    2004-01-01

    We present a kinematic study of the evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the solar wind. Specifically, we consider the effects of: (1) spherical expansion; and (2) uniform expansion due to pressure gradients between the Interplanetary CME (ICME) and the ambient solar wind. We compare these results with an MHD model, which allows us to isolate these effects from the combined kinematic and dynamical effects, which are included in MHD models. They also provide compelling evidence that the fundamental cross section of so-called "force-free" flux ropes (or magnetic clouds) is neither circular or elliptical, but rather a convex-outward, "pancake" shape. We apply a force-free fitting to the magnetic vectors from the MHD simulation to assess how the distortion of the flux rope affects the fitting. In spite of these limitations, force-free fittings, which are straightforward to apply, do provide an important description of a number of parameters, including the radial dimension, orientation and chirality of the ICME.

  17. CME-Associated Radio Bursts from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are closely associated with various types of radio bursts from the Sun. All radio bursts are due to nonthermal electrons, which are accelerated during the eruption of CMEs. Radio bursts at frequencies below about 15 MHz are of particular interest because they are associated with energetic CMEs that contribute to severe space weather. The low-frequency bursts need to be observed primarily from space because of the ionospheric cutoff. The main CME-related radio bursts are associated are: type III bursts due to accelerated electrons propagating along open magnetic field lines, type II bursts due to electrons accelerated in shocks, and type IV bursts due to electrons trapped in post-eruption arcades behind CMEs. This paper presents a summary of results obtained during solar cycle 23 primarily using the white-light coronagraphic observations from the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the WAVES experiment on board Wind. Particular emphasis will be placed on what we can learn about particle acceleration in the coronal and interplanetary medium by analyzing the CMEs and the associated radio bursts.

  18. On the identification of time interval threshold in the twin-CME scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liu-Guan; Li, Gang; Dong, Li-Hua; Jiang, Yong; Jian, Yi; Gu, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Recently it has been suggested that the "twin-CME" scenario may be a very effective mechanism in causing extreme solar energetic particle (SEP) events and, in particular, ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Ding et al. (2013) performed a statistical examination of the twin-CME scenario with a total of 126 fast and wide western coronal mass ejections (CMEs). They found that CMEs having a preceding CME with a speed > 300 km/s within 9 h from the same active region have larger probability of leading to large SEP events than CMEs that do not have preceding CMEs. The choice of 9 h being the time lag τ between the preceding CME and the main CME was based on some crude estimates of the decay time of the turbulence downstream of the shock driven by the preceding CME. In this work, we examine this choice. For the 126 fast wide CMEs examined in, we vary the time lag τ from 1 h to 24 h with an increment of 1 h. By considering three quantities whose values depend on the choice of this time lag τ, we show that the choice of 13 h for τ is more appropriate. Our study confirms our earlier result that twin CMEs are more likely to lead to large SEP events than single fast CMEs. The results shown here are of great relevance to space weather studies.

  19. Photospheric Vector Magnetic Field Evolution of NOAA Active Region 11504 and the Ensuing CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alexander; Green, Lucie; Valori, Gherardo; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Baker, Deborah; Brooks, David; Palmerio, Erika

    2016-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are eruptions of billions of tonnes of plasma from the Sun that drive the most severe space weather effects we observe. In order to be able to produce forecasts of space weather with lead times of the order of days, accurate predictions of the occurrence of CMEs must be developed. The eruptive active-region studied in this work (NOAA 11504) is complex, featuring fragmentation of penumbral magnetic field in the days prior to eruption, as well as rotation of the leading sunspot. SDO/HMI vector photospheric magnetic field measurements are utilised alongside SDO/AIA multi-wavelength extreme ultra-violet (EUV) observations to study the dynamics of the photospheric and coronal structures, as well as Hinode/EIS spectroscopic measurements, including elemental composition data. The EUV data show flare ribbons as well as coronal dimmings, which are used to infer the orientation of the erupting flux rope. This flux rope orientation is then compared to in situ measurements of the flux rope. The vector magnetic field data is used to determine the possible contributions the field fragmentation and sunspot rotation may have made to the formation of the flux rope and the triggering of the CME.

  20. Connecting Near-Sun CME flux Ropes to the 1-AU Flux Ropes using the Flare-CME Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.

    2013-07-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are closely related in various ways because the two phenomena are different manifestations of the same energy release in closed magnetic regions on the sun. Of particular interest is the relation between flare reconnection flux at the Sun and the poloidal flux of the 1-AU flux rope associated with the flare. If a flux rope forms due to flare reconnection, then the two fluxes are almost equal. The flare reconnection flux is normally computed from the flare-ribbon area and the photospheric field strength in the ribbon area. Here we report on another technique, which makes use of the area under the post-eruption arcade (PEA). We show that the reconnection flux derived from the PEA technique agrees with the one derived from flare ribbons. We also fit a flux rope to the white-light CME observations and derive the aspect ratio of the flux rope. Assuming self-similar expansion of the flux rope, we show that the magnetic content and size of the 1-AU flux rope can be predicted from the flare magnetic field (the average photospheric field strength within half of the PEA area) and the aspect ratio of the coronal flux rope. We illustrate the method with several examples.

  1. Forecast of a Daily Halo CME Occurrence Probability Depending on Class and Area Change of the Associated Sunspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kangjin; Moon, Yong-Jae; Lee, Jin-Yi

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the halo (partial and full) coronal mass ejection (CME) occurrence probability depending on class and area change of the associated sunspot using front-side halo CMEs from 1996 to 2011. We select the most halo CME-productive 14 sunspot classifications: Cao, Cko, Dai, Dao, Dko, Dki, Dkc, Eao, Eai, Eko, Eki, Ekc, Fki, and Fkc. For each class, we assign three subgroups according to sunspot class area change: "Decrease", "Steady", or "Increase". As a result, in the case of asymmetric (k) and compact (c) groups, their CME occurrence probabilities increase. We also find that the halo-CME occurrence probabilities for the "Increase" subgroups are noticeably higher than those for the other subgroups. Our results demonstrate statistically that magnetic-flux emergence or cancellation enhances CME occurrence. We expect that this model can be routinely operated to forecast the halo-CME occurrence probability.

  2. Forecast of geomagnetic storms using CME parameters and the WSA-ENLIL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Y.; Lee, J.; Jang, S.; Na, H.; Lee, J.

    2013-12-01

    Intense geomagnetic storms are caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun and their forecast is quite important in protecting space- and ground-based technological systems. The onset and strength of geomagnetic storms depend on the kinematic and magnetic properties of CMEs. Current forecast techniques mostly use solar wind in-situ measurements that provide only a short lead time. On the other hand, techniques using CME observations near the Sun have the potential to provide 1-3 days of lead time before the storm occurs. Therefore, one of the challenging issues is to forecast interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) southward components and hence geomagnetic storm strength with a lead-time on the order of 1-3 days. We are going to answer the following three questions: (1) when does a CME arrive at the Earth? (2) what is the probability that a CME can induce a geomagnetic storm? and (3) how strong is the storm? To address the first question, we forecast the arrival time and other physical parameters of CMEs at the Earth using the WSA-ENLIL model with three CME cone types. The second question is answered by examining the geoeffective and non-geoeffective CMEs depending on CME observations (speed, source location, earthward direction, magnetic field orientation, and cone-model output). The third question is addressed by examining the relationship between CME parameters and geomagnetic indices (or IMF southward component). The forecast method will be developed with a three-stage approach, which will make a prediction within four hours after the solar coronagraph data become available. We expect that this study will enable us to forecast the onset and strength of a geomagnetic storm a few days in advance using only CME parameters and the physics-based models.

  3. Conducting a University Career and Technical Education Degree Program through Multiple Technology Delivery Formats: A Working Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkle, Chris

    The Department of Industrial Technology Education (ITE) at Indiana State University offers approximately 20 courses per semester, split equally between undergraduate and graduate courses. Although all classes are offered on campus, almost half of the ITE courses are also taught using these three alternative simultaneous delivery methods: (1) for…

  4. The CORIMP CME Catalogue: Automatically Detecting and Tracking CMEs in Coronagraph Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jason; Morgan, H.; Habbal, S. R.

    2012-05-01

    Studying CMEs in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, and user-specific biases may be introduced through visual inspection of the images. The large amount of data available from the SOHO and STEREO missions also makes manual cataloguing of CMEs tedious, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required. This has led to the development of automated CME detection and cataloguing packages such as CACTus, SEEDS and ARTEMIS. Here we present the development of the CORIMP (coronal image processing) Catalogue: a new, automated, multiscale, CME detection and tracking catalogue, that overcomes many of the drawbacks of current catalogues. It works by first employing a dynamic CME separation technique to remove the static background, and then characterizing CME structure via a multiscale edge-detection algorithm. The detections are chained through time to determine the CME kinematics and morphological changes as it propagates across the plane-of-sky. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by its application to a selection of SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI images, as well as to synthetic coronagraph images created from a model corona with a variety of CMEs. These algorithms are being applied to the whole LASCO and SECCHI datasets, and a CORIMP catalogue of results will soon be available to the community.

  5. Solar Energetic Particles Acceleration and Transport Model Coupled With a Realistic CME Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I. V.; Roussev, I. I.; Kota, J.; Gombosi, T. I.; Manchester, W. B.

    2004-12-01

    Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) accelerated during and after a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) produce radiation hazards on board manned and unmanned spacecraft that are not shielded by the Earth's magnetic field. To investigate the particle acceleration by the shock wave which arises from the CME and a subsequent SEPs transport in the realistic magnetic field, a realistic magnetic field near the Sun and in the inner heliosphere should be taken into account. To achieve this, we coupled the available MHD model for CME, which is based on the BATSRUS code, to the kinetic code for SEP using Field-Line-Advection Model for a Particle Acceleration (FLAMPA). The FLAMPA assumes coronal and interplanenetary magnetic fields to be ideally frozen into a moving plasma and neglects the cross-field particle diffusion, however it involves the first order Fermi acceleration, particle adiabatic focusing and SEP scattering by a hydromagnetic turbulence. In this presentation we compare the SEP flux at 1 AU obtained with two alternative models for CME dynamics (using the Gibson-Low model or applying a slow sheared plasma motion to create a flux rope) and with two SEP models (averaged or not averaged by the particle pitch-angle). Comparing with the data observed at 1 AU after the 1998 May,2 event, we validate the models. The SEP acceleration in repetitive CME events will be provided too.

  6. Strong coronal deflection of a CME and its interplanetary evolution to Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möstl, Christian; Rollett, Tanja; Frahm, Rudy A.; Liu, Ying D.; Long, David M.; Colaninno, Robin C.; Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela; Farrugia, Charles J.; Posner, Arik; Dumbovic, Mateja; Janvier, Miho; Demoulin, Pascal; Boakes, Peter; Devos, Andy; Kraaikamp, Emil; Mays, Mona L.; Vrsnak, Bojan

    2015-04-01

    We discuss multipoint imaging and in situ observations of the coronal mass ejection (CME) on January 7 2014 which resulted in a major false alarm. While the source region was almost at disk center facing Earth, the eruption was strongly deflected in the corona, and in conjunction with its particular orientation this CME missed Earth almost entirely, leading to no significant geomagnetic effects. We demonstrate this by a synthesis of data from 7 different heliospheric and planetary space missions (STEREO-A/B, SOHO, SDO, Wind, Mars Express, Mars Science Laboratory). The CMEs ecliptic part was deflected by 37 ± 10° in heliospheric longitude, a value larger than previously thought. Multipoint in situ observations at Earth and Mars confirm the deflection, and are consistent with an elliptical interplanetary shock shape of aspect ratio 1.4 ± 0.4. We also discuss our new method, the Ellipse Evolution (ElEvo) model, which allows us to optimize the global shape of the CME shock with multipoint in situ observations of the interplanetary CME arrival. ElEvo, which is an extension to the Drag-Based-Model by Vrsnak et al., may also be used for real time space weather forecasting. The presented results enhance our understanding of CME deflection and shape, which are fundamental ingredients for improving space weather forecasts.

  7. Teaching tools useful to understand the Space Weather, through kinematic analysis of some CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amazo-Gomez, Eliana

    The earth is a planet belonging to a medium dynamic, interacting, is not restricted a closed system, but it is affected by her multiple external phenomena, storms geomagnetic, coronal mass ejections, spatial tremors, changes in the environment plasma and magnetic fields near the sun and affecting the planet and overall radiation from other parts of space are subject study space weather. In this work I teach to my school students some tools and main ideas about some things about the Space Weather, through the analysis to five CME events and the localization the CMEs sources. We use Stereo and ISWA tools and datasets, also SOHO and STEREO Within the missions (Cor 1.2, HI 1.2, of A & B and SOHO spacecraft/LASCO C2 & C3), we proceed to calibrate the data, and make movies of the CME seen from of all 3 spacecrafts, then we can estimate the CME front (position), calculate the velocity of the CME and plot the velocity/time diagram, create J-plots, and finally, we Infer the velocity of the CME out of the J-plot. The coronal mass ejections measures were compared with records and this got us some a description of the stage in which the dynamic system is they belong to the earth and the sun, the idea of this work was show and describe some of the measurements that are used to develop the study of Space Weather.

  8. Host-guest interaction induced supramolecular amphiphilic star architecture and uniform nanovesicle formation for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Ling; Liu, Kerh Li; Wen, Yuting; Song, Xia; Li, Jun

    2016-01-21

    A star polymer of poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) with adamantyl end-terminals extended from an α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) core is designed. It subsequently self-assembles to form controllable and uniform nanovesicles induced by host-guest interactions between heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-CD and the adamantyl ends. The nanovesicles are suitable for loading and intracellular delivery of the anticancer drug doxorubicin. PMID:26692041

  9. Formation and stabilization of nanoemulsion-based vitamin E delivery systems using natural biopolymers: Whey protein isolate and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    Natural biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum arabic (GA), were used to fabricate emulsion-based delivery systems for vitamin E-acetate. Stable delivery systems could be formed when vitamin E-acetate was mixed with sufficient orange oil prior to high pressure homogenization. WPI (d32=0.11 μm, 1% emulsifier) was better than GA (d32=0.38 μm, 10% emulsifier) at producing small droplets at low emulsifier concentrations. However, WPI-stabilized nanoemulsions were unstable to flocculation near the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.0), at high ionic strength (>100mM), and at elevated temperatures (>60 °C), whereas GA-stabilized emulsions were stable. This difference was attributed to differences in emulsifier stabilization mechanisms: WPI by electrostatic repulsion; GA by steric repulsion. These results provide useful information about the emulsifying and stabilizing capacities of natural biopolymers for forming food-grade vitamin-enriched delivery systems. PMID:26041190

  10. MLSO Mark III K-Coronameter Observations of the CME Rate from 1989 - 1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Flint, Q. A.; Xie, H.; Webb, D. F.; Burkepile, J. T.; Lecinski, A. R.; Quirk, C.; Stanger, A. L.

    2015-10-01

    We report here an attempt to fill the 1990 - 1995 gap in the CME rate using the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory's Mark III (Mk3) K-coronameter. The Mk3 instrument observed routinely several hours most days beginning in 1980 until it was upgraded to Mk4 in 1999. We describe the statistical properties of the CMEs detected during 1989 - 1996, and we determine a CME rate for each of those years. Since spaceborne coronagraphs have more complete duty cycles than a ground-based instrument at a single location, we compare the Mk3-derived CME rate from 1989 with the rate from the SMM C/P coronagraph, and from 1996 with the rate from the SOHO LASCO coronagraphs.

  11. Crystal structure of the Campylobacter jejuni CmeC outer membrane channel

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chih-Chia; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Kumar, Nitin; Long, Feng; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Lei, Hsiang-Ting; Delmar, Jared A; Do, Sylvia V; Chou, Tsung-Han; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Zhang, Qijing; Yu, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    As one of the world's most prevalent enteric pathogens, Campylobacter jejuni is a major causative agent of human enterocolitis and is responsible for more than 400 million cases of diarrhea each year. The impact of this pathogen on children is of particular significance. Campylobacter has developed resistance to many antimicrobial agents via multidrug efflux machinery. The CmeABC tripartite multidrug efflux pump, belonging to the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) superfamily, plays a major role in drug resistant phenotypes of C. jejuni. This efflux complex spans the entire cell envelop of C. jejuni and mediates resistance to various antibiotics and toxic compounds. We here report the crystal structure of C. jejuni CmeC, the outer membrane component of the CmeABC tripartite multidrug efflux system. The structure reveals a possible mechanism for substrate export. PMID:24753291

  12. Stereoscopic Analysis of STEREO/SECCHI Data for CME Trajectory Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liewer, P. C.; Hall, J. R.; Howard, R. A.; DeJong, E. M.; Thompson, W. T.; Thernisten, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) coronagraphs on the twin Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft provide simultaneous views of the corona and coronal mass ejections from two view points. Here, we analyze simultaneous image pairs using the technique of tie-pointing and triangulation (T&T) to determine the three-dimensional trajectory of seven coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The bright leading edge of a CME seen in coronagraph images results from line-of-sight integration through the CME front; the two STEREO coronagraphs see different apparent leading edges, leading to a systematic error in its three-dimensional reconstruction. We analyze this systematic error using a simple geometric model of a CME front. We validate the technique and analysis by comparing T&T trajectory determinations for seven CMEs with trajectories determined by Thernisien et al. (2009) using a forward modeling technique not susceptible to this systematic effect.

  13. Numerical simulation of multiple CME-driven shocks in the month of 2011 September

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Liou, Kan; Vourlidas, Angelos; Plunkett, Simon; Dryer, Murray; Wu, S. T.; Socker, Dennis; Wood, Brian E.; Hutting, Lynn; Howard, Russell A.

    2016-03-01

    A global, three-dimensional (3-D) numerical simulation model has been employed to study the Sun-to-Earth propagation of multiple (12) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their associated shocks in September 2011. The inputs to the simulation are based on actual solar observations, which include the CME speeds, source locations, and photospheric magnetic fields. The simulation result is fine tuned with in situ solar wind data observations at 1 AU by matching the arrival time of CME-driven shocks. During this period three CME-driven interplanetary (IP) shocks induced three sizable geomagnetic storms on 9, 17, and 26 September, with Dst values reaching -69, -70, and -101 nT, respectively. These storm events signify the commencement of geomagnetic activity in the solar cycle 24. The CME propagation speed near the Sun (e.g., < 30 RS) has been widely used to estimate the interplanetary CME (ICME)/Shock arrival time at 1 AU. Our simulation indicates that the background solar wind speed, as expected, is an important controlling parameter in the propagation of IP shocks and CMEs. Prediction of the ICME/shock arrival time at 1 AU can be more problematic for slow (e.g., < 500 km s-1) than fast CMEs (>1000 km s-1). This is because the effect of the background solar wind is more pronounced for slow CMEs. Here we demonstrate this difficulty with a slow (400 km s-1) CME event that arrived at the Earth in 3 days instead of the predicted 4.3 days. Our results also demonstrate that a long period (a month in this case) of simulation may be necessary to make meaningful solar source geomagnetic storm associations.

  14. The Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue: Results from the first space weather citizen science project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, L.; Scott, C.; Owens, M.; Lockwood, M.; Tucker-Hood, K.; Thomas, S.; Crothers, S.; Davies, J. A.; Harrison, R.; Lintott, C.; Simpson, R.; O'Donnell, J.; Smith, A. M.; Waterson, N.; Bamford, S.; Romeo, F.; Kukula, M.; Owens, B.; Savani, N.; Wilkinson, J.; Baeten, E.; Poeffel, L.; Harder, B.

    2014-12-01

    Solar Stormwatch was the first space weather citizen science project, the aim of which is to identify and track coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by the Heliospheric Imagers aboard the STEREO satellites. The project has now been running for approximately 4 years, with input from >16,000 citizen scientists, resulting in a data set of >38,000time-elongation profiles of CME trajectories, observed over 18 preselected position angles. We present our method for reducing this data set into a CME catalogue. The resulting catalogue consists of 144 CMEs over the period January 2007 to February 2010, of which 110 were observed by STEREO-A and 77 were observed by STEREO-B. For each CME, the time-elongation profiles generated by the citizen scientists are averaged into a consensus profile along each position angle that the event was tracked. We consider this catalogue to be unique, being at present the only citizen science-generated CME catalogue, tracking CMEs over an elongation range of 4° out to a maximum of approximately 70°. Using single spacecraft fitting techniques, we estimate the speed, direction, solar source region, and latitudinal width of each CME. This shows that at present, the Solar Stormwatch catalogue (which covers only solar minimum years) contains almost exclusively slow CMEs, with a mean speed of approximately 350 km s-1. The full catalogue is available for public access at www.met.reading.ac.uk/~spate/solarstormwatch. This includes, for each event, the unprocessed time-elongation profiles generated by Solar Stormwatch, the consensus time-elongation profiles, and a set of summary plots, as well as the estimated CME properties.

  15. Role of Ambient Solar Wind Conditions in CME evolution (P21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadav, R.; Jadeja, A. K.; Iyer, K. N.

    2006-11-01

    ipsraj@yahoo.com Solar events are mainly responsible for producing storms at the Earth. Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is a major cause for this. In this paper, Coronal Mass Ejections occurred during 1998-2004 are studied. Ambient solar wind does play some role in determining the effect of a CME. The effects produced at the Earth during the period 1999 2004 are considered and an attempt has been made to understand the role of ambient solar wind. This is to draw some conclusion about how some of the events become geo- effective.

  16. The analysis of CME on 18 June 2000 and the associated radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Xie, R. X.

    A small flare near the solar limb occurred on 18 June 2000 This flare associated with a short duration radio burst in the micro-wavelength In the metric bands the radio burst wear also short but very complex which was consist of fast drifting structure type III bursts and slow drifting structure type II burst The SXR data showed that this flare was impulsive followed with a gradual phase The image radio observation showed the bright structure moving along the direction of the CME s The associated CME was very significant and typical with high velocity larger than 600km s

  17. Host-guest interaction induced supramolecular amphiphilic star architecture and uniform nanovesicle formation for anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing-Ling; Liu, Kerh Li; Wen, Yuting; Song, Xia; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A star polymer of poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) with adamantyl end-terminals extended from an α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) core is designed. It subsequently self-assembles to form controllable and uniform nanovesicles induced by host-guest interactions between heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-CD and the adamantyl ends. The nanovesicles are suitable for loading and intracellular delivery of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.A star polymer of poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) with adamantyl end-terminals extended from an α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) core is designed. It subsequently self-assembles to form controllable and uniform nanovesicles induced by host-guest interactions between heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-CD and the adamantyl ends. The nanovesicles are suitable for loading and intracellular delivery of the anticancer drug doxorubicin. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Polymer synthesis, characterization, preparation of drug-loaded nanovesicles, intracellular drug release and cytotoxicity assays, TEM and DLS measurements. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06744h

  18. The Great "Non-Event" of 7 January 2014: Challenges in CME Arrival Time and Geomagnetic Storm Strength Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. L.; Thompson, B. J.; Jian, L.; Evans, R. M.; Savani, N.; Odstrcil, D.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Richardson, I. G.

    2014-12-01

    We present a case study of the 7 January 2014 event in order to highlight current challenges in space weather forecasting of CME arrival time and geomagnetic storm strength. On 7 January 2014 an X1.2 flare and CME with a radial speed ~2400 km/s was observed from active region 11943. The flaring region was only ten degrees southwest of disk center with extensive dimming south of the active region and preliminary analysis indicated a fairly rapid arrival at Earth (~36 hours). Of the eleven forecasting groups world-wide who participated in CCMC's Space Weather Scoreboard (http://kauai.ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov/SWScoreBoard), nine predicted early arrivals and six predicted dramatic geomagnetic storm impacts (Kp predictions ranged from 6 to 9). However, the CME only had a glancing blow arrival at Earth - Kp did not rise above 3 and there was no geomagnetic storm. What happened? One idea is that the large coronal hole to the northeast of the active region could have deflected the CME. This coronal hole produced a high speed stream near Earth reaching an uncommon speed of 900 km/s four days after the observed CME arrival. However, no clear CME deflection was observed in the outer coronagraph fields of view (~5-20Rs) where CME measurements are derived to initiate models, therefore deflection seems unlikely. Another idea is the effect of the CME flux rope orientation with respect to Earth orbit. We show that using elliptical major and minor axis widths obtained by GCS fitting for the initial CME parameters in ENLIL would have improved the forecast to better reflect the observed glancing blow in-situ signature. We also explore the WSA-ENLIL+Cone simulations, the background solar wind solution, and compare with the observed CME arrival at Venus (from Venus Express) and Earth.

  19. Effects of efflux-pump inducers and genetic variation of the multidrug transporter cmeB in biocide resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    PubMed

    Mavri, Ana; Smole Možina, Sonja

    2013-03-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps, such as CmeABC and CmeDEF, are involved in the resistance of Campylobacter to a broad spectrum of antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of two putative efflux-pump inducers, bile salts and sodium deoxycholate, on the resistance of Campylobacter to biocides (triclosan, benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine diacetate, cetylpyridinium chloride and trisodium phosphate), SDS and erythromycin. The involvement of the CmeABC and CmeDEF efflux pumps in this resistance was studied on the basis of the effects of bile salts and sodium deoxycholate in Campylobacter cmeB, cmeF and cmeR mutants. The genetic variation in the cmeB gene was also examined, to see whether this polymorphism is related to the function of the efflux pump. In 15 Campylobacter jejuni and 23 Campylobacter coli strains, bile salts and sodium deoxycholate increased the MICs of benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine diacetate, cetylpyridinium chloride and SDS, and decreased the MICs of triclosan, trisodium phosphate and erythromycin. Bile salts and sodium deoxycholate further decreased or increased the MICs of biocides and erythromycin in the cmeF and cmeR mutants. For cmeB polymorphisms, 17 different cmeB-specific PCR-RFLP patterns were identified: six within C. jejuni only, nine within C. coli only and two in both species. In conclusion, bile salts and sodium deoxycholate can increase or decrease bacterial resistance to structurally unrelated antimicrobials. The MIC increases in the cmeF and cmeR mutants indicated that at least one non-CmeABC efflux system is involved in resistance to biocides. These results indicate that the cmeB gene polymorphism identified is not associated with biocide and erythromycin resistance in Campylobacter. PMID:23161768

  20. Reconciling CME Kinematics using Radio and White-light Observations from STEREO and SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Xie, Hong; Makela, Pertti; Akiyama, Sachiko; Reiner, Michael; MacDowall, Robert

    2014-05-01

    We study the characteristics of nonthermal radio emission associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by STEREO, SOHO, and Wind spacecraft. In particular, we examine three backside CMEs associated with type II radio bursts at frequencies below 16 MHz. These bursts are known to be excellent indicators of solar energetic particle events. We use the universal drift rate spectrum of type II radio bursts and the inferred density scale heights in the corona and interplanetary medium o estimate the speed of the shock waves that produce the type II radio bursts. We find that the radio bursts can provide an accurate estimate of the CME speeds. We consider three backside events and a cannibalism event to show the usefulness of radio dynamic spectrum in inferring CME kinematics. We use radio direction finding technique to show that CME-CME interaction results in enhanced nonthermal radio emission. The radio data also provide constraints on the particle acceleration mechanisms and the reason for the energetic particles observed at wide-ranging longitudes. Finally we infer the shape and extent of the shock associated with one of the biggest solar energetic particle events in the space era.

  1. When to Recommend Compulsory versus Optional CME Programs? A Study to Establish Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Francois; Jacques, Andre; Brailovsky, Carlos; Sindon, Andre; Bordage, Georges

    1997-01-01

    A study designed to establish criteria for requiring continuing medical education (CME) for family physicians by analyzing 14 structured oral interviews (SOIs) with physicians. The SOI consists of 40 cases, focuses on 10 aspects of physician competence required to face critical practice issues. Judges determined from the interviews a number of…

  2. Constraints on CME Evolution from in situ Observations of Ionic Charge States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruesbeck, Jacob R.; Lepri, Susan T.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel procedure for deriving the physical properties of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMES) in the corona. Our methodology uses in-situ measurements of ionic charge states of C, O, Si and Fe in the heliosphere and interprets them in the context of a model for the early evolution of ICME plasma, between 2 - 5 R-solar. We find that the data can be fit only by an evolution that consists of an initial heating of the plasma, followed by an expansion that ultimately results in cooling. The heating profile is consistent with a compression of coronal plasma due to flare reconnect ion jets and an expansion cooling due to the ejection, as expected from the standard CME/flare model. The observed frozen-in ionic charge states reflect this time-history and, therefore, provide important constraints for the heating and expansion time-scales, as well as the maximum temperature the CME plasma is heated to during its eruption. Furthermore, our analysis places severe limits on the possible density of CME plasma in the corona. We discuss the implications of our results for CME models and for future analysis of ICME plasma composition.

  3. Homologous Flare-CME Events and Their Metric Type II Radio Burst Association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yashiro, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Uddin, W.; Srivastava, A. K.; Joshi, N. C.; Chandra, R.; Manoharan, P. K.; Mahalakshmi, K.; Dwivedi, V. C.; Jain, R.; Awasthi, A. K.; Nitta, N. V.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Choudhary, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    Active region NOAA 11158 produced many flares during its disk passage. At least two of these flares can be considered as homologous: the C6.6 flare at 06:51 UT and C9.4 flare at 12:41 UT on February 14, 2011. Both flares occurred at the same location (eastern edge of the active region) and have a similar decay of the GOES soft X-ray light curve. The associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were slow (334 and 337 km/s) and of similar apparent widths (43deg and 44deg), but they had different radio signatures. The second event was associated with a metric type II burst while the first one was not. The COR1 coronagraphs on board the STEREO spacecraft clearly show that the second CME propagated into the preceding CME that occurred 50 min before. These observations suggest that CME-CME interaction might be a key process in exciting the type II radio emission by slow CMEs.

  4. The Integrated Joslin Performance Improvement/CME Program: A New Paradigm for Better Diabetes Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Julie A.; Beaser, Richard S.; Neighbours, James; Shuman, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing continuing medical education is an essential component of life-long learning and can have a positive influence on patient outcomes. However, some evidence suggests that continuing medical education has not fulfilled its potential as a performance improvement (PI) tool, in part due to a paradigm of CME that has focused on the quantity of…

  5. To What Extent Does Continuing Professional Education (CPE) and Continuing Medical Education (CME) Affect Physicians Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kathleen A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore to what extent is there an understanding among physicians as to how continuing professional education (CPE) and Continuing Medical Education (CME) affect physicians practice? To address the question, focus groups were used to begin a process of identifying the components within each type of education so that…

  6. Are CME 'interactions' Really Important for Accelerating Major Solar Energetic Particle Events?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Lawrence, G. R.; Haggerty, D. K.; Kucera, T.; Szabo, A.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed that the presence or absence of an interaction with a preceding coronal mass ejection (CME) or other coronal structure within approximately 50R(sub s), of the Sun discriminates large, fast CMEs associated with major solar energetic particle (SEP) events from those that are not. We conclude that there is no compelling evidence that, if such interactions take place, they play an important role in SEP acceleration. Reasons include: The reported statistical results are consistent with a chance association between interacting CMEs and SEP events; Energetic SEPs are detected at Earth typically before or around the time when the primary CME enters the LASCO C2 field of view - interactions higher in the corona cannot play a role in acceleration of these particles; For approximately 60% of major SEP events in 1997-2001, the preceding CME fades into the background corona or is relatively narrow (less than 40 deg), suggesting any interaction will be weak; Radio signatures attributed to CME interaction occur after SEP acceleration has commenced.

  7. Solar Wind Electron Strahls Associated with a High-Latitude CME: Ulysses Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, M.; Pomoell, J.; Poedts, S.; Dumitrache, C.; Popescu, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    Counterstreaming beams of electrons are ubiquitous in coronal mass ejections (CMEs) - although their existence is not unanimously accepted as a necessary and/or sufficient signature of these events. We continue the investigation of a high-latitude CME registered by the Ulysses spacecraft on 18 - 19 January 2002 (Dumitrache, Popescu, and Oncica, Solar Phys. 272, 137, 2011), by surveying the solar-wind electron distributions associated with this event. The temporal evolution of the pitch-angle distributions reveals populations of electrons that are distinguishable through their anisotropy, with clear signatures of i) electron strahls, ii) counter-streaming in the magnetic clouds and their precursors, and iii) unidirectionality in the fast wind preceding the CME. The analysis of the counter-streams inside the CME allows us to elucidate the complexity of the magnetic-cloud structures embedded in the CME and to refine the borders of the event. Identifying such strahls in CMEs, which preserve properties of the low β [<1] coronal plasma, gives more support to the hypothesis that these populations are remnants of the hot coronal electrons that escape from the electrostatic potential of the Sun into the heliosphere.

  8. A CME-driven solar wind distrubance observed at both low and high heliographic latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Phillips, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    A solar wind disturbance produced by a fast coronal mass ejection, CME, that departed from the Sun on Feburary 20, 1994 was observed in the ecliptic plane at 1 AU by IMP 8 and at high heliographic latitudes at 3.53 AU by Ulysses. In the ecliptic the disturbance included a strong forward shock but no reverse shock, while at high latitudes the disturbance was bounded by a relatively weak forward-reverse shock pair. It is clear that the disturbance in the ecliptic plane was driven primarily by the relative speed between the CME and a slower ambient solar wind ahead, whereas at higher latitudes the disturbance was driven by expansion of the CME. The combined IMP 8 and Ulysses observations thus provide a graphic illustration of how a single fast CME can produce very different types of solar wind disturbances at low and high heliographic latitudes. Simple numerical simulations help explain observed differences at the two spacecraft. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Medical Education and Communication Companies Involved in CME: An Updated Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Eric D.; Overstreet, Karen M.; Parochka, Jacqueline N.; Lemon, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Medical Education and Communication Companies (MECCs) represent approximately 21% of the providers accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), yet relatively little is known about these organizations in the greater continuing medical education (CME) community. Two prior studies described them,…

  10. Interrater Reliability to Assure Valid Content in Peer Review of CME-Accredited Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Mark; Lado, Fred A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) provides guidelines for continuing medical education (CME) materials to mitigate problems in the independence or validity of content in certified activities; however, the process of peer review of materials appears largely unstudied and the reproducibility of…

  11. Organizational Change in Management of Hepatitis C: Evaluation of a CME Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrard, Judith; Choudary, Veena; Groom, Holly; Dieperink, Eric; Willenbring, Mark L.; Durfee, Janet M.; Ho, Samuel B.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Effective treatment regimens exist for the hepatitis C virus (HCV); however, clinicians are often resistant to evaluation or treatment of patients with alcohol or substance abuse problems. We describe a continuing medical education (CME) program for clinicians in a nationwide health care system, with emphasis on current treatment…

  12. Radio imaging of synchrotron emission associated with a CME on the 14th of August 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, H. M.; Krucker, S.; Raftery, C. L.; Saint-Hilaire, P.

    2012-12-01

    Radio observations can be used to identify sources of electron acceleration within flares and CMEs. In a small number of events, radio imaging has revealed the presence of synchrotron emission from nonthermal electrons in the expanding loops of the CME (Bastian et al. (2001), Maia et al. (2007) and Démoulin et al. (2012)). Events in which the synchrotron emission is sufficiently bright to be identified in the presence of plasma emission from radio bursts, which are prevalent at meter wavelengths, are infrequent. Using radio images from the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) we present observations of synchrotron emission associated with a CME which occurred on the 14th of August 2010. Using context observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the SWAP instrument onboard Proba2, the LASCO coronograph onboard SOHO and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we follow the propagation of the CME out to 2-3 solar radii and characterize the associated electron distribution. We find that the synchrotron emission is cospatial with the CME core.

  13. Modeling Extreme Space Weather Scenarios: July 23, 2012 Rare-Type CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwira, C. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather is a major concern for modern day society because of its adverse impacts on technological infrastructure such as power grids, oil pipelines, and global navigation systems. Particularly, earth directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main drivers of the most extreme geomagnetic storms in the near-Earth space environment. On 23 July 2012, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft observed in situ an extremely fast CME that traveled 0.96 astronomical units (~1 AU) in about 19 h. In our study, we use the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), a 3-D MHD based code, to perform simulations of this rare CME by considering STEREO-A in situ observations to represent the upstream L1 solar wind boundary conditions. The goal of the study is to investigate what would have happened if this Rare-type CME was Earth-bound. Global SWMF-generated ground geomagnetic field perturbations are used to compute the simulated induced geoelectric field at specific ground-based active magnetometer sites. Simulation results show that the July 23 CME would have produced ground effects comparable to previously observed extreme geomagnetic storms such as the Halloween 2003 storm. In addition, we discuss how this study compares to other independent studies on this same event.

  14. Interrater Reliability to Assure Valid Content in Peer Review of CME-Accredited Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Mark; Lado, Fred A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) provides guidelines for continuing medical education (CME) materials to mitigate problems in the independence or validity of content in certified activities; however, the process of peer review of materials appears largely unstudied and the reproducibility of

  15. Differences Between CME Associated and CH Associated RED Events During 2005 (P4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyana, R.; et al.

    2006-11-01

    As Part of study of RED (Relativistic Electron Decrease) events at Geostationary orbit, we have classified them on the basis of their solar cause. We find that the solar causes associated with RED events (J.J.Lee et.al., 2006) are Interplanetary Shocks (IPS), Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), Coronal Hole (CH), Flares, Magnetic Clouds and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIR). For present, we have taken CME and CH associated RED events during 2005. We study Interplanetary parameters (i.e. solar wind Velocity (Vsw), solar wind Ion density (Nsw), solar wind dynamic pressure (Pdsw), total Interplanetary magnetic field B along with its north-south component, Bz), Radiation belt parameters at geostationary orbit (i.e. electron flux>2Mev, Hp component (i.e. the component of magnetic field parallel to the spin axis of the satellite) and dayside magnetopause distance (MP)) and the geomagnetic indices (i.e. Dst, Kp and CRNM count). The parameters which show significant differences between CME and CH events are Vsw, Psw, B, Bz, Dst and Kp, with Vsw and Dstc showing the largest differences. As typical examples, in the case of the CME of 22nd January, 2005, Vsw touches over 975 km/sec and Dst is Sudden Storm Commencement (SSC) type with minimum Dst being 110 nT. In the case of the CH of 5th April, Vsw is only 650 km/sec and Dst is of Gradual Commencement (GC) type with minimum Dst of -80 nT. In this paper we present differences observed in the above mentioned parameters for several RED events associated with CME and CH during 2005.

  16. Differences between CME associated and CH associated RED events during 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyana, Radharani; Rajaram, Girija; Rathod, Jatin; Chandrasekhar Reddy, A.; Misra, D. S.; Patil, C. G.; Prasad, M. Y. S.

    2007-12-01

    As part of study of RED (Relativistic Electron Dropout) events at Geostationary orbit, we have classified them on the basis of their solar causes. We find that the solar causes associated with RED events are Interplanetary (IP) Shocks, Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), Flares, Magnetic Clouds and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIR) followed by Coronal Hole (CH) stream. Here we have taken CME and CH associated RED events during 2005. We have studied Interplanetary parameters (IP) (i.e. solar wind Velocity (Vsw), solar wind Ion density (Nsw), solar wind dynamic pressure (P_sw), total Interplanetary magnetic field B along with its north-south component, Bz), Radiation belt (RB) parameters at geostationary orbit (i.e. electron flux >2 MeV, Hp component (i.e. the component of magnetic field parallel to the spin axis of the satellite) and dayside magnetopause distance (MP)) and the geomagnetic indices (i.e. Dst and Kp) and Cosmic Ray Neutron Monitor (CRNM) count. The parameters which show significant differences between CME and CH events are Vsw, Psw, B, Bz, Dst and Kp, with Vsw and Dst showing the largest differences. As typical examples, in the case of the CME of 22 January, 2005, Vsw touches over 975 km s^{-1} and Dst is Sudden Storm Commencement (SSC) type with minimum Dst being -110 nT . In the case of the CH of 05 April, Vsw is only 650 km s^{-1} and Dst is of Gradual Commencement (GC) type with minimum Dst of -80 nT. In this paper we present differences observed in the above mentioned parameters for several RED events associated with CME and CH during 2005.

  17. Anabolic bone formation via a site-specific bone-targeting delivery system by interfering with semaphorin 4D expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufeng; Wei, Lingfei; Miron, Richard J; Shi, Bin; Bian, Zhuan

    2015-02-01

    Semaphorins have been recently targeted as new molecules directly implicated in the cell-cell communication that occurs between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Overexpression of certain semaphorins, such as semaphorin4D (sema4D), is found in an osteoporotic phenotype and plays a key role in osteoclast activity by suppressing osteoblast maturation, thus significantly altering the bone modeling cycle. In the present study, we fabricate a site-specific bone-targeting drug-delivery system from polymeric nanoparticles with the incorporation of siRNA interference molecule for sema4D and demonstrate their cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking within osteoclasts, thus preventing the suppression of osteoblast activity. We then demonstrate in an osteoporotic animal model induced by ovariectomy that weekly intravenous injections led to a significantly greater number of active osteoblasts at the bone surface, resulting in higher bone volume in compromised animals. The findings from the present study demonstrate a novel and promising site-specific therapeutic option for the treatment of osteoporosis via interference of the sema4D-plexin cell communication pathway between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. PMID:25088728

  18. The CME-driven shock wave on 2012 March 05 and radio triangulation of associated radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdalenic, Jasmina; Rodriguez, Luciano; Zhukov, Andrei; Krupar, Vratislav; Marque, Christophe; Cecconi, Baptiste; Mierla, Marilena; Maksimovic, Milan

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 05 solar eruptive event, with the emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main scopes of the study are the reconstruction of the propagation of the CME-driven shock wave using radio observations, and finding the relative positions of the CME, CME-driven shock wave and its radio signatures. For the first time radio triangulation is applied for different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations of STEREO and WIND spacecraft. The event on the 2012 March 05 was associated with a X1.1 flare, a full halo CME and long-lasting interplanetary type II radio burst. The results of the three dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR and HI observations), and modelling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 07 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated at the southern flank of the CME. This gives indication that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the enhanced emission of the interplanetary type II radio burst.

  19. Web-Based Delivery System for Disaster Prevention Information Using a New Jma Dpi Xml Format and Amedas Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, M.; Mori, M.

    2012-07-01

    The Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMeDAS) Data is used along with compound disaster information for a geographic information system (GIS) by integration into the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) disaster prevention information XML data. A JMA XML format is a next generation format that contains weather warnings, tsunami warnings, and earthquake information, etc. However, it is not possible to process it by reading disaster prevention information XML Data and AMeDAS Data directly to the GIS system. Therefore, development of a program that converts the data structure is important to consolidate a variety of disaster prevention information on the GIS system. Information on escape routes and evacuation sites, etc. were given as points for regional meteorological observation forecasts using AMeDAS Data by disaster prevention information XML data and integrating it where the disaster was generated, giving a range of expansion of damage and a damage level. There are two main aims; the first is to deliver these compound data of disaster prevention information XML data and AMeDAS Data via the Internet. The second aim is to provide GIS files (shapefile format) of these data to such as local governments for their individual analysis. This was furthermore confirmed to enable the construction of a system using WebGIS (Google Maps) and Open Source Software GIS to monitor disaster information at low cost.

  20. CME flux rope and shock identifications and locations: Comparison of white light data, Graduated Cylindrical Shell model, and MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Xie, Hong; St. Cyr, O. C.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-03-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are major transient phenomena in the solar corona that are observed with ground-based and spacecraft-based coronagraphs in white light or with in situ measurements by spacecraft. CMEs transport mass and momentum and often drive shocks. In order to derive the CME and shock trajectories with high precision, we apply the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model to fit a flux rope to the CME directed toward STEREO A after about 19:00 UT on 29 November 2013 and check the quality of the heliocentric distance-time evaluations by carrying out a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the same CME with the Block Adaptive Tree Solar-Wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code. Heliocentric distances of the CME and shock leading edges are determined from the simulated white light images and magnetic field strength data. We find very good agreement between the predicted and observed heliocentric distances, showing that the GCS model and the BATS-R-US simulation approach work very well and are consistent. In order to assess the validity of CME and shock identification criteria in coronagraph images, we also compute synthetic white light images of the CME and shock. We find that the outer edge of a cloud-like illuminated area in the observed and predicted images in fact coincides with the leading edge of the CME flux rope and that the outer edge of a faint illuminated band in front of the CME leading edge coincides with the CME-driven shock front.

  1. A Novel Approach of Daunorubicin Application on Formation of Proliferative Retinopathy Using a Porous Silicon Controlled Delivery System: Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Huiyuan; Huffman, Kristyn; Rios, Sandy; Freeman, William R.; Sailor, Michael J.; Cheng, Lingyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is the most common cause of poor visual outcomes in association with retinal detachment surgeries and ocular trauma. Daunorubicin (DNR) has shown the strongest efficacy in proliferation inhibition in vitro. However, clinical studies have shown only mild effect owing to limitations of narrow therapeutic window and short vitreous half-life. Methods. Three milligrams of DNR-loaded particles were intravitreally injected into 18 pigmented rabbits, and vitreous samples were collected up to 84 days for analysis. Thirty-seven rabbits were used for a dose-escalation (1, 3, 6 mg) safety and efficacy study in a rabbit PVR model using a pretreatment design. Results. Loading efficiency of DNR was 108.55 ± 12 μg per 1 mg particles. Eighty-four days of follow-up did not reveal any adverse reaction. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated a vitreous half-life of 29 days with a maximum DNR concentration of 178 ng/mL and a minimum concentration of 29 ng/mL at day 84. Daunorubicin-loaded porous silicon (pSi) particles were dosed 8 to 9 weeks before PVR induction, and PVR severity score was dose dependent (Spearman ρ = −0.25, P = 0.0005). Proliferative vitreoretinopathy with tractional retinal detachment was 88% in the control group, 63% in the low-dose group, 14% in the medium-dose group, and 0% in the high-dose group (Cochran-Armitage Trend Test, Z = 8.99, ρ = −0.67, P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Daunorubicin-loaded pSi particles can safely reside in the vitreous for at least 3 months. The pSi-based delivery expanded the therapeutic window of DNR by a factor of 862 and drove down the minimum effective concentration by a factor of 175. PMID:25829415

  2. Effects of Dynamical Evolution of Giant Planets on the Delivery of Atmophile Elements during Terrestrial Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Soko; Brasser, Ramon; Ida, Shigeru

    2016-02-01

    Recent observations started revealing the compositions of protostellar disks and planets beyond the solar system. In this paper, we explore how the compositions of terrestrial planets are affected by the dynamical evolution of giant planets. We estimate the initial compositions of the building blocks of these rocky planets by using a simple condensation model, and numerically study the compositions of planets formed in a few different formation models of the solar system. We find that the abundances of refractory and moderately volatile elements are nearly independent of formation models, and that all the models could reproduce the abundances of these elements of the Earth. The abundances of atmophile elements, on the other hand, depend on the scattering rate of icy planetesimals into the inner disk, as well as the mixing rate of the inner planetesimal disk. For the classical formation model, neither of these mechanisms are efficient and the accretion of atmophile elements during the final assembly of terrestrial planets appears to be difficult. For the Grand Tack model, both of these mechanisms are efficient, which leads to a relatively uniform accretion of atmophile elements in the inner disk. It is also possible to have a “hybrid” scenario where the mixing is not very efficient but the scattering is efficient. The abundances of atmophile elements in this case increase with orbital radii. Such a scenario may occur in some of the extrasolar planetary systems, which are not accompanied by giant planets or those without strong perturbations from giants. We also confirm that the Grand Tack scenario leads to the distribution of asteroid analogues where rocky planetesimals tend to exist interior to icy ones, and show that their overall compositions are consistent with S-type and C-type chondrites, respectively.

  3. INVESTIGATION OF THE FORMATION AND SEPARATION OF AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE FROM THE EXPANSION OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Olmedo, O.; Vourlidas, A.; Liu, Y. E-mail: jzhang7@gmu.edu

    2012-01-20

    We address the nature of EUV waves through direct observations of the formation of a diffuse wave driven by the expansion of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and its subsequent separation from the CME front. The wave and the CME on 2011 June 7 were well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Following the solar eruption onset, marked by the beginning of the rapid increasing of the CME velocity and the X-ray flux of accompanying flare, the CME exhibits a strong lateral expansion. During this impulsive expansion phase, the expansion speed of the CME bubble increases from 100 km s{sup -1} to 450 km s{sup -1} in only six minutes. An important finding is that a diffuse wave front starts to separate from the front of the expanding bubble shortly after the lateral expansion slows down. Also a type II burst is formed near the time of the separation. After the separation, two distinct fronts propagate with different kinematic properties. The diffuse front travels across the entire solar disk, while the sharp front rises up, forming the CME ejecta with the diffuse front ahead of it. These observations suggest that the previously termed EUV wave is a composite phenomenon and driven by the CME expansion. While the CME expansion is accelerating, the wave front is cospatial with the CME front, thus the two fronts are indiscernible. Following the end of the acceleration phase, the wave moves away from the CME front with a gradually increasing distance between them.

  4. The sustained delivery of resveratrol or a defined grape powder inhibits new blood vessel formation in a mouse model of choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Kanavi, Mozhgan Rezaie; Darjatmoko, Soesiawati; Wang, Shoujian; Azari, Amir A; Farnoodian, Mitra; Kenealey, Jason D; van Ginkel, Paul R; Albert, Daniel M; Sheibani, Nader; Polans, Arthur S

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether resveratrol or a defined, reconstituted grape powder can attenuate the formation of new blood vessels in a mouse model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). To accomplish this objective, C57BL/6J mice were randomized into control or treatment groups which received either resveratrol or grape powder by daily oral gavage, resveratrol or grape powder delivered ad libitum through the drinking water, or resveratrol by slow release via implanted osmotic pumps. A laser was used to rupture Bruch's membrane to induce CNV which was then detected in sclerochoroidal eyecups stained with antibodies against intercellular adhesion molecule-2. CNV area was measured using fluorescence microscopy and Image J software. Ad libitum delivery of both resveratrol and grape powder was shown to significantly reduce the extent of CNV by 68% and 57%, respectively. Parallel experiments conducted in vitro demonstrated that resveratrol activates p53 and inactivates Akt/protein kinase B in choroidal endothelial cells, contributing to its anti-proliferative and anti-migratory properties. In addition resveratrol was shown to inhibit the formation of endothelial cell networks, augmenting its overall anti-angiogenic effects. The non-toxic nature of resveratrol makes it an especially attractive candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of CNV. PMID:25361423

  5. The Sustained Delivery of Resveratrol or a Defined Grape Powder Inhibits New Blood Vessel Formation in a Mouse Model of Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Kanavi, Mozhgan Rezaie; Darjatmoko, Soesiawati; Wang, Shoujian; Azari, Amir A.; Farnoodian, Mitra; Kenealey, Jason D.; van Ginkel, Paul R.; Albert, Daniel M.; Sheibani, Nader; Polans, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether resveratrol or a defined, reconstituted grape powder can attenuate the formation of new blood vessels in a mouse model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). To accomplish this objective, C57BL/6J mice were randomized into control or treatment groups which received either resveratrol or grape powder by daily oral gavage, resveratrol or grape powder delivered ad libitum through the drinking water, or resveratrol by slow release via implanted osmotic pumps. A laser was used to rupture Bruch’s membrane to induce CNV which was then detected in sclerochoroidal eyecups stained with antibodies against intercellular adhesion molecule-2. CNV area was measured using fluorescence microscopy and Image J software. Ad libitum delivery of both resveratrol and grape powder was shown to significantly reduce the extent of CNV by 68% and 57%, respectively. Parallel experiments conducted in vitro demonstrated that resveratrol activates p53 and inactivates Akt/protein kinase B in choroidal endothelial cells, contributing to its anti-proliferative and anti-migratory properties. In addition resveratrol was shown to inhibit the formation of endothelial cell networks, augmenting its overall anti-angiogenic effects. The non-toxic nature of resveratrol makes it an especially attractive candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of CNV. PMID:25361423

  6. Compressed antisolvent precipitation and photopolymerization for the formation of crosslinked polymer microparticles useful for controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Jennifer Lani

    This work presents novel antisolvent processing technique entitled Compressed Antisolvent Precipitation and Photopolymerization (CAPP) useful for forming crosslinked polymer microparticles. In this process, an organic solvent dissolves monomer and polymerization photoinitiators to form a homogeneous solution. Photopolymerization and microparticle formation occur when the homogeneous solution is sprayed into a compressed antisolvent while being simultaneously exposed to initiating light. We investigated the method of particle formation in the CAPP process to explain the repeatable bimodal particle size distribution obtained under a variety of operating conditions. Ternary phase diagrams of antisolvent, monomer, and solvent solutions were constructed and specific spray paths from the resulting ternary phase diagrams were investigated and the significance of crossing the binodal, as well as the importance of where the binodal was crossed, was discovered. In addition, manipulation of injection conditions, varying process residence times, and nucleation rate calculations were explored to further investigate the means of particle formation. We demonstrate the feasibility of encapsulating therapeutic agents into highly crosslinked polymer particles using the CAPP process. Ion-paired tacrine, erythromycin, erythromycin estolate, and erythromycin ethyl succinate were CAPP processed with poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate monomers of several molecular weights so that the resulting particles would entrap different sized drugs in networks with varying mesh sizes. In vitro drug release profiles were obtained for all of the various drug-monomer combinations. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by fitting a short time approximation of Fickian release from a sphere of fixed diameter to the release data and were applied to a model of Fickian release from polydisperse spheres, and the results were compared to the in vitro release data. CAPP particle processing was explored in acetone, ethanol, and methanol with respect to reaction kinetics, particle size and morphology, particle double bond conversion, and in vitro drug release. A multifunctional anhydride monomer was also applied to the CAPP process and ion-paired tacrine was successfully encapsulated in the resulting surface eroding, crosslinked polymer microparticles. Degradation of and release from thin disks of photopolymerized monomer, poly(sebacic anhydride dimethacrylate), gave a kinetic constant for surface erosion, which was applied to predict the release of ion-paired tacrine from the CAPP-processed, degradable particles.

  7. Diversity of planetary systems in low-mass disks. Terrestrial-type planet formation and water delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronco, M. P.; de Elía, G. C.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Several studies, observational and theoretical, suggest that planetary systems with only rocky planets are the most common in the Universe. Aims: We study the diversity of planetary systems that might form around Sun-like stars in low-mass disks without gas-giant planets. We focus especially on the formation process of terrestrial planets in the habitable zone (HZ) and analyze their water contents with the goal to determine systems of astrobiological interest. In addition, we study the formation of planets on wide orbits because they can be detected with the microlensing technique. Methods: N-body simulations of high resolution were developed for a wide range of surface density profiles. A bimodal distribution of planetesimals and planetary embryos with different physical and orbital configurations was used to simulate the planetary accretion process. The surface density profile combines a power law for the inside of the disk of the form r-γ, with an exponential decay to the outside. We performed simulations adopting a disk of 0.03 M⊙ and values of γ = 0.5, 1 and 1.5. Results: All our simulations form planets in the HZ with different masses and final water contents depending on the three different profiles. For γ = 0.5, our simulations produce three planets in the HZ with masses ranging from 0.03 M⊕ to 0.1 M⊕ and water contents between 0.2 and 16 Earth oceans (1 Earth ocean =2.8 × 10-4 M⊕). For γ = 1, three planets form in the HZ with masses between 0.18 M⊕ and 0.52 M⊕ and water contents from 34 to 167 Earth oceans. Finally, for γ = 1.5, we find four planets in the HZ with masses ranging from 0.66 M⊕ to 2.21 M⊕ and water contents between 192 and 2326 Earth oceans. This profile shows distinctive results because it is the only one of those studied here that leads to the formation of water worlds. Conclusions: Since planetary systems with γ = 1 and 1.5 present planets in the HZ with suitable masses to retain a long-lived atmosphere and to maintain plate tectonics, they seem to be the most promising candidates to be potentially habitable. Particularly, these systems form Earths and Super-Earths of at least 3 M⊕ around the snow line, which can be discovered by the microlensing technique.

  8. MEMS: Enabled Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Angelica; Sheybani, Roya; Meng, Ellis

    2015-05-01

    Drug delivery systems play a crucial role in the treatment and management of medical conditions. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies have allowed the development of advanced miniaturized devices for medical and biological applications. This Review presents the use of MEMS technologies to produce drug delivery devices detailing the delivery mechanisms, device formats employed, and various biomedical applications. The integration of dosing control systems, examples of commercially available microtechnology-enabled drug delivery devices, remaining challenges, and future outlook are also discussed. PMID:25703045

  9. Factorial design optimization and characterization of poly-lactic acid (PLA) nanoparticle formation for the delivery of grape extracts.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Katherina; Aburto, Javiera; von Plessing, Carlos; Rockel, Marlene; Aspé, Estrella

    2016-09-15

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) extracted from grapes have several bioactive properties, giving them potential medical uses. However, PAs are unstable in the digestive tract and must be stabilized to allow oral administration, which can be accomplished by nanoencapsulation. In this study, PAs extracted from grape seed and skin were stabilized with poly-d,l-lactide (PLA) polymer by the emulsion-evaporation method. An experimental Box-Behnken design was implemented, evaluating the influence of three factors: sonication time (30-360s) for the emulsion formation, loading of grape extracts (5-20%) and concentration of stabilizing agent (polyvinyl alcohol, PVA: 1-3%). The process was optimized to achieve higher encapsulation efficiency (EE=82.7%) and a smaller size (256nm). The nanoparticles (NPs) were physically analyzed by TEM, FT-IR, TGA and DTG to characterize the nanoencapsulation process. In vitro release studies, through stomach and intestinal simulation, showed a sustained release of PAs from PLA-NPs. PMID:27080882

  10. Modeling CME-shock-driven storms in 2012-2013: MHD test particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Paral, J.; Kress, B. T.; Wiltberger, M.; Baker, D. N.; Foster, J. C.; Turner, D. L.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    The Van Allen Probes spacecraft have provided detailed observations of the energetic particles and fields environment for coronal mass ejection (CME)-shock-driven storms in 2012 to 2013 which have now been modeled with MHD test particle simulations. The Van Allen Probes orbital plane longitude moved from the dawn sector in 2012 to near midnight and prenoon for equinoctial storms of 2013, providing particularly good measurements of the inductive electric field response to magnetopause compression for the 8 October 2013 CME-shock-driven storm. An abrupt decrease in the outer boundary of outer zone electrons coincided with inward motion of the magnetopause for both 17 March and 8 October 2013 storms, as was the case for storms shortly after launch. Modeling magnetopause dropout events in 2013 with electric field diagnostics that were not available for storms immediately following launch have improved our understanding of the complex role that ULF waves play in radial transport during such events.

  11. High resolution numerical simulation of the 4 November 1997 CME event propagation into the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikov, S. N.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Feng, X. S.; Wu, S.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the time-dependent propagation of 4 November 1997 CME in the heliosphere and through the termination shock into the heliosheath. The input plasma data were obtained at 10 Sun radii (Rs) from the Solar-InterPlanetary Conservation Element/Solution Element (SIP-CESE) MHD model. The data were propagated to 50Rs using the Multi-Scale Fluid Kinetic Simulation Suite (MS-FLUKSS) developed at the University of Alabama in Huntsville and compared with the output of the SIP-CESE MHD model. The results appear to be in a good agreement. Time-dependent data obtained at 50 Rs was used in global simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with the local interstellar medium. We show the effects of the CME evolution onto the heliospheric interface.

  12. Using Ionic Charge States to Investigate the Relationship Between Eruptive Flare Emission and the Heating of CME Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, B. J.; Kazachenko, M.; Li, Y.; Reinard, A.; Mulligan, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    Suites of instruments aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft offer a set of new observations from multiple viewpoints that can be combined with theory and numerical modeling to provide a better understanding of CME initiation and energy release in eruptive flares. In situ observations of heavy ion charge state composition are a direct measure of the plasma properties in the CME source region in the corona. The ionic charge state composition of ejecta material is determined by the temperature and density evolution of plasma during eruptive flares. We will investigate the flare contribution to CME heating by examining the relationship between observed profiles of flare emission and the corresponding in situ ionic charge state observations. We will demonstrate the feasibility of using multi-wavelength EUV observations of the eruptive flare as constraints in the modeling of CME plasma evolution and its ionic charge state composition.

  13. Critical Role of Multidrug Efflux Pump CmeABC in Bile Resistance and In Vivo Colonization of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jun; Sahin, Orhan; Overbye Michel, Linda; Zhang, Qijing

    2003-01-01

    CmeABC functions as a multidrug efflux pump contributing to the resistance of Campylobacter to a broad range of antimicrobials. In this study, we examined the role of CmeABC in bile resistance and its contribution to the adaptation of Campylobacter jejuni in the intestinal tract of the chicken, a natural host and a major reservoir for Campylobacter. Inactivation of cmeABC drastically decreased the resistance of Campylobacter to various bile salts. Addition of choleate (2 mM) in culture medium impaired the in vitro growth of the cmeABC mutants but had no effect on the growth of the wild-type strain. Bile concentration varied in the duodenum, jejunum, and cecum of chicken intestine, and the inhibitory effect of the intestinal extracts on the in vitro growth of Campylobacter was well correlated with the total bile concentration in the individual sections of chicken intestine. When inoculated into chickens, the wild-type strain colonized the birds as early as day 2 postinoculation with a density as high as 107 CFU/g of feces. In contrast, the cmeABC mutants failed to colonize any of the inoculated chickens throughout the study. The minimum infective dose for the cmeABC mutant was at least 2.6 × 104-fold higher than that of the wild-type strain. Complementation of the cmeABC mutants with a wild-type cmeABC allele in trans fully restored the in vitro growth in bile-containing media and the in vivo colonization to the levels of the wild-type strain. Immunoblotting analysis indicated that CmeABC is expressed and immunogenic in chickens experimentally infected with C. jejuni. Together, these findings provide compelling evidence that CmeABC, by mediating resistance to bile salts in the intestinal tract, is required for successful colonization of C. jejuni in chickens. Inhibition of CmeABC function may not only control antibiotic resistance but also prevent the in vivo colonization of pathogenic Campylobacter. PMID:12874300

  14. The double-belt outer radiation belt during CME- and CIR-driven geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chongjing; Zong, Qiugang

    2013-10-01

    We have identified eight events with double-belt structure in the outer radiation belt from 110 coronal mass ejection (CME) driven magnetic storms and 223 corotating interaction regions (CIR) driven storms during 1994 to 2003 based on the SAMPEX data sets. Among them, three cases are related to CME-driven magnetic storms and five cases are related CIR-driven storms. All double-belt structure events in the outer radiation belt are found during the recovery phase of a magnetic storm for both CME- and CIR-related eventsthey usually start to form within 3-4 days after the onset of the magnetic storm. The preconditions needed to form a double-belt structure, for all the CME-related events, are found to be high solar wind dynamic pressure (Pdy) and southward interplanetary magnetic field Bz; nevertheless, for the CIR-related events, they are found to be associated with high-speed stream with southward interplanetary magnetic field, which is enhanced by a suitably orientated By component.It is further found that the flux distributions of the double-belt structure can be fitted well with a simply exponential decay function of L?. Based on the radiation belt content index, the proportion of the total number of 1.5-6.0 MeV electrons inside the position of maximum fluxes to that outside the maximum fluxes keeps rising during the double-belt period, which implies that the acceleration mainly occurs at regions inside the location of maximum fluxes. We suggest that the plasmapause and the strong wave-particle interactions with VLF and ULF waves near it play an important role in the development of the double-belt structures.

  15. The Double-belt Outer Radiation Belt During CME- and CIR-driven Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C.; Zong, Q.

    2013-12-01

    We have identified 8 events with double-belt structure in the outer radiation belt from 110 CME-driven magnetic storms and 223 CIR-driven storms during 1994 to 2003 based on the SAMPEX data sets. Among them, 3 cases are related to CME-driven magnetic storms and 5 cases are related CIR-driven storms. All double-belt structure events in the outer radiation belt are found during the recovery phase of a magnetic storm for both CME- and CIR-related events---they usually start to form within 3-4 days after the onset of the magnetic storm. The pre-conditions needed to form a double-belt structure, for all the CME-related events, are found to be high solar wind dynamic pressure (Pdy) and southward IMF Bz; Nevertheless, for the CIR-related events, they are found to be associated with high speed stream with southward interplanetary magnetic field caused by the Russell-McPherron effect. It is further found that the double-belt structure can be fitted well with a simple exponential decay function. Based on the RBC index, the proportion of the total number of 1.5-6.0MeV electrons inside the position of maximum fluxes to that outside the maximum fluxes keeps rising during the double-belt period, which implies that the acceleration mainly occurs at regions inside the location of maximum fluxes. We suggest that local acceleration mechanisms play an important role in the development of the higher belt during the period of the double-belt structure event in the outer radiation belt.

  16. The Dependence of Characteristic Times of Gradual SEP Events on Their Associated CME Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z. H.; Wang, C. B.; Xue, X. H.; Wang, Y. M.

    It is generally believed that coronal mass ejections CMEs are the drivers of shocks that accelerate gradual solar energetic particles SEPs One might expect that the characteristics of the SEP intensity time profiles observed at 1 AU are determined by properties of the associated CMEs such as the radial speed and the angular width Recently Kahler statistically investigated the characteristic times of gradual SEP events observed from 1998-2002 and their associated coronal mass ejection properties Astrophys J 628 1014--1022 2005 Three characteristic times of gradual SEP events are determined as functions of solar source longitude 1 T 0 the time from associated CME launch to SEP onset at 1 AU 2 T R the rise time from SEP onset to the time when the SEP intensity is a factor of 2 below peak intensity and 3 T D the duration over which the SEP intensity is within a factor of 2 of the peak intensity However in his study the CME speeds and angular widths are directly taken from the LASCO CME catalog In this study we analyze the radial speeds and the angular widths of CMEs by an ice-cream cone model and re-investigate their correlationships with the characteristic times of the corresponding SEP events We find T R and T D are significantly correlated with radial speed for SEP events in the best-connected longitude range and there is no correlation between T 0 and CME radial speed and angular width which is consistent with Kahler s results On the other hand it s found that T R and T D are also have

  17. Suppression of Active-Region CME Production by the Presence of Other Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser; Khazanov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    From the SOHO mission s data base of MDI full-disk magnetograms spanning solar cycle 23, we have obtained a set of 40,000 magnetograms of 1,300 active regions, tracking each active region across the 30 degree central solar disk. Each active region magnetogram is cropped from the full-disk magnetogram by an automated code. The cadence is 96 minutes. From each active-region magnetogram, we have measured two whole-active-region magnetic quantities: (1) the magnetic size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux), and (2) a gauge of the active region s free magnetic energy (part of the free energy is released in the production of a flare and/or CME eruption). From NOAA Flare/CME catalogs, we have obtained the event (Flare/CME/SEP event) production history of each active region. Using all these data, we find that for each type of eruptive event, an active region s expected rate of event production increases as a power law of our gauge of active-region free magnetic energy. We have also found that, among active regions having nearly the same free energy, the rate of the CME production is less when there are many other active regions on the disk than when there are few or none, but there is no significant discernible suppression of the rate of flare production. This indicates that the presence of other active regions somehow tends to inhibit an active region s flare-producing magnetic explosions from becoming CMEs, contrary to the expectation from the breakout model for the production of CMEs.

  18. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AN EUV CORONAL WAVE BASED ON THE 2009 FEBRUARY 13 CME EVENT OBSERVED BY STEREO

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Ofer; Attrill, Gemma D. R.; Wills-Davey, Meredith J.; Manchester, Ward B.

    2009-11-01

    On 2009 February 13, a coronal wave-CME-dimming event was observed in quadrature by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. We analyze this event using a three-dimensional, global magnetohydrodynamic model for the solar corona. The numerical simulation is driven and constrained by the observations, and indicates where magnetic reconnection occurs between the expanding CME core and surrounding environment. We focus primarily on the lower corona, extending out to 3 R{sub sun}; this range allows simultaneous comparison with both EUVI and COR1 data. Our simulation produces a diffuse coronal bright front remarkably similar to that observed by STEREO/EUVI at 195 A. It is made up of two components, and is the result of a combination of both wave and non-wave mechanisms. The CME becomes large-scale quite low (< 200 Mm) in the corona. It is not, however, an inherently large-scale event; rather, the expansion is facilitated by magnetic reconnection between the expanding CME core and the surrounding magnetic environment. In support of this, we also find numerous secondary dimmings, many far from the initial CME source region. Relating such dimmings to reconnecting field lines within the simulation provides further evidence that CME expansion leads to the 'opening' of coronal field lines on a global scale. Throughout the CME expansion, the coronal wave maps directly to the CME footprint. Our results suggest that the ongoing debate over the 'true' nature of diffuse coronal waves may be mischaracterized. It appears that both wave and non-wave models are required to explain the observations and understand the complex nature of these events.

  19. Charge state composition in coronal hole and CME related solar wind: Latitudinal variations observed by Ulysses and WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvin, A. B.; Gloeckler, G.

    1997-01-01

    Iron charge states in recurrent coronal hole-associated solar wind flows are obtained in the ecliptic by WIND/SMS, while measurements of iron and silicon from the polar coronal holes are available from Ulysses/SWICS. Ulysses/SWICS also provides ion composition of coronal mass ejection (CME)-related solar wind. Both coronal hole-associated and CME-related solar wind charge charges show heliographic latitudinal variations.

  20. Why Is the Great Solar Active Region 12192 Flare-rich but CME-poor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Bobra, Monica G.; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu, Yang; Li, Yan; Shen, Chenglong; Couvidat, Sebastien; Norton, Aimee A.; Fisher, George H.

    2015-05-01

    Solar active region (AR) 12192 of 2014 October hosts the largest sunspot group in 24 years. It is the most prolific flaring site of Cycle 24 so far, but surprisingly produced no coronal mass ejection (CME) from the core region during its disk passage. Here, we study the magnetic conditions that prevented eruption and the consequences that ensued. We find AR 12192 to be “big but mild” its core region exhibits weaker non-potentiality, stronger overlying field, and smaller flare-related field changes compared to two other major flare-CME-productive ARs (11429 and 11158). These differences are present in the intensive-type indices (e.g., means) but generally not the extensive ones (e.g., totals). AR 12192's large amount of magnetic free energy does not translate into CME productivity. The unexpected behavior suggests that AR eruptiveness is limited by some relative measure of magnetic non-potentiality over the restriction of background field, and that confined flares may leave weaker photospheric and coronal imprints compared to their eruptive counterparts.

  1. Why Is the Great Solar Active Region 12192 CME-Poor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Bobra, Monica G.; Hoeksema, Todd; Liu, Yang; Li, Yan; Shen, Chenglong; Couvidat, Sebastien; Norton, Aimee A.; Fisher, George H.

    2015-04-01

    Solar active region (AR) 12192 of October 2014 hosts the largest sunspot group in 24 years. It is the most prolific flaring site of Cycle 24, but surprisingly produced no coronal mass ejection (CME) from the core region during its disk passage. Here, we study the magnetic conditions that prevented eruption and the consequences that ensued. We find AR 12192 to be "big but mild"; its core region exhibits weaker non-potentiality, stronger overlying field, and smaller flare-related field changes compared to two other major flare-CME-productive ARs (11429 and 11158). These differences are present in the intensive-type indices (e.g., means) but generally not the extensive ones (e.g., totals). AR 12192's large amount of magnetic free energy does not translate into CME productivity. The unexpected behavior suggests that AR eruptiveness is limited by some relative measure of magnetic non-potentiality over the restriction of background field, and that confined flares may leave weaker photospheric and coronal imprints compared to their eruptive counterparts.

  2. Great Expectations: How STEREO Data Will Impact the Art of CME Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, J.

    2005-05-01

    Driven by modern space-based solar and solar-wind observations, three-dimensional (3D) models of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), both numerical magnetohydrodynamic[1-4] and semi-analytical[5-7], have produced many exciting results. From among the current avenues of model-driven CME research, we shall highlight two areas where STEREO data might be expected to have a significant impact: 1) the near-sun geometrical relationship between the CME, the embedded prominence, and the underlying magnetic structure, and 2) the morphology and dynamics of erupting flux-ropes in the interplanetary medium, especially halo CMEs. We shall discuss the expected impact of STEREO data on "state of the art", model-driven CME research. Supported by ONR and NASA [1] Roussev et al. 2003, ApJ, 588, L45 [2] Amari et al. 2003, ApJ, 595, 1231 [3] Lynch et al. 2004, ApJ, 617, 589 [4] Manchester et al. 2004, JGR, 109, doi:10.1029/2003JA010150 [5] Chen 1996, JGR, 101, 27499 [6] Gibson and Low 2000, JGR, 105, 18187 [7] Chen and Krall 2003, JGR, 108, doi:10.1029/2003JA009849

  3. Numerical Simulation of Multiple-CME Events in 2011-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrcil, Dusan; Jian, Lan; Luhmann, Janet; Mays, Leila; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Xie, Hong

    2014-05-01

    The ENLIL-based heliospheric modeling system enables faster-than-real time simulations of corotating and transient disturbances. This hybrid system does not simulate origin of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but uses appearance in coronagraphs, its geometric and kinematic parameters, and launches a CME-like structure into the solar wind computed using the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) coronal model. Propagation and interaction in the heliosphere is solved by a 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. In this presentation, we introduce the recent improvements that support modeling of the evolving background solar wind and modeling of multiple-CME events. These enhancements are needed especially for simulations of complex scenarios of multiple-transients interacting with each other and with corotating solar wind stream structures. We simulated over 700 CMEs in 2011-2013 to validate and calibrate new modeling system, and we will show examples of multi-CME events during August 2010. March 2012, and July 2012 periods of enhanced solar activity. We will present results of numerical simulations and compare them with remote white-light observations, with in-situ measurements of plasma parameters, and with detection of solar energetic particles (SEPs) at various spacecraft.

  4. Topological Evolution of a Fast Magnetic Breakout CME in 3-Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, B. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Luhmann, J. G.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    W present the extension of the magnetic breakout model for CME initiation to a fully 3-dimensional, spherical geometry. Given the increased complexity of the dynamic magnetic field interactions in 3-dimensions, we first present a summary of the well known axisymmetric breakout scenario in terms of the topological evolution associated with the various phases of the eruptive process. In this context, we discuss the completely analogous topological evolution during the magnetic breakout CME initiation process in the simplest 3-dimensional multipolar system. We show that an extended bipolar active region embedded in an oppositely directed background dipole field has all the necessary topological features required for magnetic breakout, i.e. a fan separatrix surface between the two distinct flux systems, a pair of spine fieldlines, and a true 3-dimensional coronal null point at their intersection. We then present the results of a numerical MHD simulation of this 3-dimensional system where boundary shearing flows introduce free magnetic energy, eventually leading to a fast magnetic breakout CME. The eruptive flare reconnection facilitates the rapid conversion of this stored free magnetic energy into kinetic energy and the associated acceleration causes the erupting field and plasma structure to reach an asymptotic eruption velocity of greater than or approx. equal to 1100 km/s over an approx.15 minute time period. The simulation results are discussed using the topological insight developed to interpret the various phases of the eruption and the complex, dynamic, and interacting magnetic field structures.

  5. Forecasting the magnetic vectors within a CME at L1 by using solar observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, N.; Vourlidas, A.; Szabo, A.; Mays, M. L.; Evans, R. M.; Thompson, B. J.; Richardson, I. G.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.

    2014-12-01

    The direction of magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections has important consequences to forecasting terrestrial behaviour, however forecasting these vectors remains predominately elusive. Here, we report that a simplified system is capable of replicating the broad field rotations seen within flux rope CMEs at L1 monitors. The predictions are performed under three main themes: 1) The majority of the field rotations can be simplified to the constant-alpha force-free (CAFF) flux model first implemented circa 1990. 2) The helicity will follow the Bothmer & Schwenn system that relies on a reliable helicity prediction of active regions during solar cycle. Which has been recently confirmed by Wang [2013 ApJ]. 3) The majority of the distortions, deflections and rotations will have already occurred within coronagraphic field of view, thereby allowing the creation of a projected "volume-of-influence" on the Sun, from which Earth's position relative to the CME can be estimated. This presentation will compare predicted results to the observations from 7 CME events and then estimate the sources of uncertainty. As an example, the difference in robust statistics from 2 solar cycles of CAFF model fittings for the field magnitude will be compared to estimates generated from simulated CME-sheaths within forecasting Enlil runs. The figure displays an example field vector forecast from the techniques employed above.

  6. Validation of a priori CME arrival predictions made using real-time heliospheric imager observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker-Hood, Kimberley; Scott, Chris; Owens, Mathew; Jackson, David; Barnard, Luke; Davies, Jackie A.; Crothers, Steve; Lintott, Chris; Simpson, Robert; Savani, Neel P.; Wilkinson, J.; Harder, B.; Eriksson, G. M.; L Baeten, E. M.; Wan Wah, Lily Lau

    2015-01-01

    Between December 2010 and March 2013, volunteers for the Solar Stormwatch (SSW) Citizen Science project have identified and analyzed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the near real-time Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Heliospheric Imager observations, in order to make "Fearless Forecasts" of CME arrival times and speeds at Earth. Of the 60 predictions of Earth-directed CMEs, 20 resulted in an identifiable Interplanetary CME (ICME) at Earth within 1.5-6 days, with an average error in predicted transit time of 22 h, and average transit time of 82.3 h. The average error in predicting arrival speed is 151 km s-1, with an average arrival speed of 425km s-1. In the same time period, there were 44 CMEs for which there are no corresponding SSW predictions, and there were 600 days on which there was neither a CME predicted nor observed. A number of metrics show that the SSW predictions do have useful forecast skill; however, there is still much room for improvement. We investigate potential improvements by using SSW inputs in three models of ICME propagation: two of constant acceleration and one of aerodynamic drag. We find that taking account of interplanetary acceleration can improve the average errors of transit time to 19 h and arrival speed to 77 km s-1.

  7. RECONNECTIONLESS CME ERUPTION: PUTTING THE ALY-STURROCK CONJECTURE TO REST

    SciTech Connect

    Rachmeler, L. A.; DeForest, C. E.; Kankelborg, C. C.

    2009-03-10

    We demonstrate that magnetic reconnection is not necessary to initiate fast Coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The Aly-Sturrock conjecture states that the magnetic energy of a given force-free boundary field is maximized when the field is open. This is problematic for CME initiation because it leaves little or no magnetic energy to drive the eruption, unless reconnection is present to allow some of the flux to escape without opening. Thus, it has been thought that reconnection must be present to initiate CMEs. This theory has not been subject to rigorous numerical testing because conventional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) numerical models contain numerical diffusion, which introduces uncontrolled numerical reconnection. We use a quasi-Lagrangian simulation technique to run the first controlled experiments of CME initiation in the complete lack of reconnection. We find that a flux rope confined by an arcade, when twisted beyond a critical amount, can escape to an open state, allowing some of the surrounding arcade to shrink, and releasing magnetic energy from the global field. This mechanism includes a true ideal MHD instability. We conclude that reconnection is not a necessary trigger for fast CME eruptions.

  8. Formation of microemulsions for using as cosmeceutical delivery systems: effects of various components and characteristics of some formulations.

    PubMed

    Wuttikul, Krisada; Boonme, Prapaporn

    2016-06-01

    Microemulsions are interesting formulations for cosmeceutical applications due to their good appearance, high solubilization power, thermodynamic stability, and enhancement of skin penetration. In addition, they can spontaneously form when suitable types and amounts of components are simply mixed. In this study, the phase behavior of the nonionic systems with various parameters was studied by construction of phase diagrams using titration method. Natural oils, i.e., coconut oil (CO), rice bran oil (RBO), and palm oil (PO), were analyzed for their fatty acid compositions and then mixed with blends of nonionic surfactants (Tween80: Span80) and water or mixtures of water and a cosolvent, propylene glycol (PG), to find the microemulsion regions. Subsequently, some microemulsions were selected for physical characterization. The largest microemulsion regions which were obtained from CO, RBO, and PO covered the sizes of 11.65, 9.84, and 9.24 %, respectively. The surfactant mixture at weight ratio of 1:1 was the most suitable for CO and PO, but for RBO, it was 2:1. PG could increase the microemulsion regions of PO from 9.24 to 15.33 %, depending on PG concentrations. Hence, the sizes of the microemulsion regions were related to oil types, surfactant mixtures, and ratios between water and PG. The studied microemulsions were water-in-oil (w/o) type, and their internal droplets were in the nanosize range. They exhibited Newtonian flow behavior and their mean viscosity values were from 247.53 to 690.35 cP which were correlated with the types and concentrations of the components in the formulations. In conclusion, natural oils could form w/o microemulsions with nonionic surfactants. The microemulsion formation and characteristics were related to many parameters of the components. PMID:26813671

  9. Tracking the CME-driven Shock Wave on 2012 March 5 and Radio Triangulation of Associated Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdalenić, J.; Marqué, C.; Krupar, V.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Maksimović, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.

  10. Tracking the CME-driven shock wave on 2012 March 5 and radio triangulation of associated radio emission

    SciTech Connect

    Magdalenić, J.; Marqué, C.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Krupar, V.; Maksimović, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.

  11. The Formation of Jupiter, the Jovian Early Bombardment and the Delivery of Water to the Asteroid Belt: The Case of (4) Vesta

    PubMed Central

    Turrini, Diego; Svetsov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The asteroid (4) Vesta, parent body of the Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite meteorites, is one of the first bodies that formed, mostly from volatile-depleted material, in the Solar System. The Dawn mission recently provided evidence that hydrated material was delivered to Vesta, possibly in a continuous way, over the last 4 Ga, while the study of the eucritic meteorites revealed a few samples that crystallized in presence of water and volatile elements. The formation of Jupiter and probably its migration occurred in the period when eucrites crystallized, and triggered a phase of bombardment that caused icy planetesimals to cross the asteroid belt. In this work, we study the flux of icy planetesimals on Vesta during the Jovian Early Bombardment and, using hydrodynamic simulations, the outcome of their collisions with the asteroid. We explore how the migration of the giant planet would affect the delivery of water and volatile materials to the asteroid and we discuss our results in the context of the geophysical and collisional evolution of Vesta. In particular, we argue that the observational data are best reproduced if the bulk of the impactors was represented by 1–2 km wide planetesimals and if Jupiter underwent a limited (a fraction of au) displacement. PMID:25370027

  12. Formation of a selenium-substituted rhodanese by reaction with selenite and glutathione: possible role of a protein perselenide in a selenium delivery system.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Y; Lacourciere, G; Stadtman, T C

    2001-08-14

    Selenophosphate is the active selenium-donor compound required by bacteria and mammals for the specific synthesis of Secys-tRNA, the precursor of selenocysteine in selenoenzymes. Although free selenide can be used in vitro for the synthesis of selenophosphate, the actual physiological selenium substrate has not been identified. Rhodanese (EC ) normally occurs as a persulfide of a critical cysteine residue and is believed to function as a sulfur-delivery protein. Also, it has been demonstrated that a selenium-substituted rhodanese (E-Se form) can exist in vitro. In this study, we have prepared and characterized an E-Se rhodanese. Persulfide-free bovine-liver rhodanese (E form) did not react with SeO(3)(2-) directly, but in the presence of reduced glutathione (GSH) and SeO(3)(2-) E-Se rhodanese was generated. These results indicate that the intermediates produced from the reaction of GSH with SeO(3)(2-) are required for the formation of a selenium-substituted rhodanese. E-Se rhodanese was stable in the presence of excess GSH at neutral pH at 37 degrees C. E-Se rhodanese could effectively replace the high concentrations of selenide normally used in the selenophosphate synthetase in vitro assay in which the selenium-dependent hydrolysis of ATP is measured. These results show that a selenium-bound rhodanese could be used as the selenium donor in the in vitro selenophosphate synthetase assay. PMID:11493708

  13. The formation of jupiter, the jovian early bombardment and the delivery of water to the asteroid belt: the case of (4) vesta.

    PubMed

    Turrini, Diego; Svetsov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The asteroid (4) Vesta, parent body of the Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite meteorites, is one of the first bodies that formed, mostly from volatile-depleted material, in the Solar System. The Dawn mission recently provided evidence that hydrated material was delivered to Vesta, possibly in a continuous way, over the last 4 Ga, while the study of the eucritic meteorites revealed a few samples that crystallized in presence of water and volatile elements. The formation of Jupiter and probably its migration occurred in the period when eucrites crystallized, and triggered a phase of bombardment that caused icy planetesimals to cross the asteroid belt. In this work, we study the flux of icy planetesimals on Vesta during the Jovian Early Bombardment and, using hydrodynamic simulations, the outcome of their collisions with the asteroid. We explore how the migration of the giant planet would affect the delivery of water and volatile materials to the asteroid and we discuss our results in the context of the geophysical and collisional evolution of Vesta. In particular, we argue that the observational data are best reproduced if the bulk of the impactors was represented by 1-2 km wide planetesimals and if Jupiter underwent a limited (a fraction of au) displacement. PMID:25370027

  14. Review on Current Sheets in CME Development: Theories and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jun; Murphy, Nicholas A.; Shen, Chengcai; Raymond, John C.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Zhong, Jiayong; Wu, Ning; Li, Yan

    2015-11-01

    We introduce how the catastrophe model for solar eruptions predicted the formation and development of the long current sheet (CS) and how the observations were used to recognize the CS at the place where the CS is presumably located. Then, we discuss the direct measurement of the CS region thickness by studying the brightness distribution of the CS region at different wavelengths. The thickness ranges from 104 km to about 105 km at heights between 0.27 and 1.16 R_{⊙} from the solar surface. But the traditional theory indicates that the CS is as thin as the proton Larmor radius, which is of order tens of meters in the corona. We look into the huge difference in the thickness between observations and theoretical expectations. The possible impacts that affect measurements and results are studied, and physical causes leading to a thick CS region in which reconnection can still occur at a reasonably fast rate are analyzed. Studies in both theories and observations suggest that the difference between the true value and the apparent value of the CS thickness is not significant as long as the CS could be recognised in observations. We review observations that show complex structures and flows inside the CS region and present recent numerical modelling results on some aspects of these structures. Both observations and numerical experiments indicate that the downward reconnection outflows are usually slower than the upward ones in the same eruptive event. Numerical simulations show that the complex structure inside CS and its temporal behavior as a result of turbulence and the Petschek-type slow-mode shock could probably account for the thick CS and fast reconnection. But whether the CS itself is that thick still remains unknown since, for the time being, we cannot measure the electric current directly in that region. We also review the most recent laboratory experiments of reconnection driven by energetic laser beams, and discuss some important topics for future works.

  15. Delivery presentations

    MedlinePlus

    Delivery presentation describes the way the baby is positioned to come down the birth canal for delivery. Your baby ... ultrasound may be able to confirm a brow presentation. More likely, your provider will detect this position ...

  16. The Properties of Solar Energetic Particle Event-Associated Coronal Mass Ejections Reported in Different CME Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cane, H. V.

    2015-06-01

    We compare estimates of the speed and width of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in several catalogs for the CMEs associated with ˜ 200 solar energetic particle (SEP) events in 2006 - 2013 that included 25 MeV protons. The catalogs used are: CDAW, CACTUS, SEEDS, and CORIMP, all derived from observations by the LASCO coronagraphs on the SOHO spacecraft, the CACTUS catalog derived from the COR2 coronagraphs on the STEREO-A and -B spacecraft, and the DONKI catalog, which uses observations from SOHO and the STEREO spacecraft. We illustrate how, for this set of events, CME parameters can differ considerably in each catalog. The well-known correlation between CME speed and proton event intensity is shown to be similar for most catalogs, but this is largely because it is determined by a few large particle events associated with fast CMEs, and small events associated with slow CMEs. Intermediate particle events "shuffle" in position when speeds from different catalogs are used. Quadrature spacecraft CME speeds do not improve the correlation. CME widths also vary widely between catalogs, and they are influenced by plane-of-the-sky projection and how the width is inferred from the coronagraph images. The high degree of association (˜ 50 %) between the 25 MeV proton events and "full halo" (360∘-width) CMEs as defined in the CDAW catalog is removed when other catalogs are considered. Using CME parameters from the quadrature spacecraft, the SEP intensity is correlated with CME width, which is also correlated with CME speed.

  17. AN INTERPRETATION OF GLE71 CONCURRENT CME-DRIVEN SHOCK WAVE

    SciTech Connect

    Firoz, Kazi A.; Rodríguez-Pacheco, J.; Zhang, Q. M.; Gan, W. Q.; Li, Y. P.; Moon, Y.-J.; Kudela, K.; Park, Y.-D.; Dorman, Lev I. E-mail: firoz.kazi@uah.es

    2014-08-01

    Particle accelerations in solar flares and CME-driven shocks can sometimes result in very high-energy particle events (≥1 GeV) that are known as ground level enhancements (GLEs). Recent studies on the first GLE event (GLE71 2012 May 17 01:50 UT) of solar cycle 24 suggested that CME-driven shock played a leading role in causing the event. To verify this claim, we have made an effort to interpret the GLE71 concurrent shock wave. For this, we have deduced the possible speed and height of the shock wave in terms of the frequency (MHz) of the solar radio type II burst and its drift rate (MHz min{sup –1}), and studied the temporal evolution of the particle intensity profiles at different heights of the solar corona. For a better perception of the particle acceleration in the shock, we have studied the solar radio type II burst with concurrent solar radio and electron fluxes. When the particle intensity profiles are necessarily shifted in time at ∼1 AU, it is found that the growth phases of the electron and cosmic ray intensity fluxes are strongly correlated (>0.91; ≥0.87) with the frequency drift rate of the type II burst, which is also consistent with the intensive particle accelerations at upper coronal heights (∼≥0.80 R {sub S} < 1.10 R {sub S}). Thus, we conclude that the CME-driven shock was possibly capable of producing the high-energy particle event. However, since the peaks of some flare components are found to be strongly associated with the fundamental phase of the type II burst, the preceding flare is supposed to contribute to the shock acceleration process.

  18. Type II solar radio bursts predicted by 3-D MHD CME and kinetic radio emission simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2014-01-01

    Impending space weather events at Earth are often signaled by type II solar radio bursts. These bursts are generated upstream of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that move away from the Sun. We combine elaborate three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic predictions of realistic CMEs near the Sun with a recent analytic kinetic radiation theory in order to simulate two type II bursts. Magnetograms of the Sun are used to reconstruct initial solar magnetic and active region fields for the modeling. STEREO spacecraft data are used to dimension the flux rope of the initial CME, launched into an empirical data-driven corona and solar wind. We demonstrate impressive accuracy in time, frequency, and intensity for the two type II bursts observed by the Wind spacecraft on 15 February 2011 and 7 March 2012. Propagation of the simulated CME-driven shocks through coronal plasmas containing preexisting density and magnetic field structures that stem from the coronal setup and CME initiation closely reproduce the isolated islands of type II emission observed. These islands form because of a competition between the growth of the radio source due to spherical expansion and a fragmentation of the radio source due to increasingly radial fields in the nose region of the shock and interactions with streamers in the flank regions of the shock. Our study provides strong support for this theory for type II bursts and implies that the physical processes involved are understood. It also supports a near-term capability to predict and track these events for space weather predictions.

  19. The Driving Magnetic Field and Reconnection in CME/Flare Eruptions and Coronal Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    Signatures of reconnection in major CME (coronal mass ejection)/flare eruptions and in coronal X-ray jets are illustrated and interpreted. The signatures are magnetic field lines and their feet that brighten in flare emission. CME/flare eruptions are magnetic explosions in which: 1. The field that erupts is initially a closed arcade. 2. At eruption onset, most of the free magnetic energy to be released is not stored in field bracketing a current sheet, but in sheared field in the core of the arcade. 3. The sheared core field erupts by a process that from its start or soon after involves fast "tether-cutting" reconnection at an initially small current sheet low in the sheared core field. If the arcade has oppositely-directed field over it, the eruption process from its start or soon after also involves fast "breakout" reconnection at an initially small current sheet between the arcade and the overarching field. These aspects are shown by the small area of the bright field lines and foot-point flare ribbons in the onset of the eruption. 4. At either small current sheet, the fast reconnection progressively unleashes the erupting core field to erupt with progressively greater force. In turn, the erupting core field drives the current sheet to become progressively larger and to undergo progressively greater fast reconnection in the explosive phase of the eruption, and the flare arcade and ribbons grow to become comparable to the pre-eruption arcade in lateral extent. In coronal X-ray jets: 1. The magnetic energy released in the jet is built up by the emergence of a magnetic arcade into surrounding unipolar "open" field. 2. A simple jet is produced when a burst of reconnection occurs at the current sheet between the arcade and the open field. This produces a bright reconnection jet and a bright reconnection arcade that are both much smaller in diameter that the driving arcade. 3. A more complex jet is produced when the arcade has a sheared core field and undergoes an ejective eruption in the manner of a miniature CME/flare eruption. The jet is then a combination of a miniature CME and the products of more widely distributed reconnection of the erupting arcade with the open field than in simple jets.

  20. Comparison of the WSA-ENLIL model with three CME cone types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Soojeong; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2013-07-01

    We have made a comparison of the CME-associated shock propagation based on the WSA-ENLIL model with three cone types using 29 halo CMEs from 2001 to 2002. These halo CMEs have cone model parameters as well as their associated interplanetary (IP) shocks. For this study we consider three different cone types (an asymmetric cone model, an ice-cream cone model and an elliptical cone model) to determine 3-D CME parameters (radial velocity, angular width and source location), which are the input values of the WSA-ENLIL model. The mean absolute error (MAE) of the arrival times for the asymmetric cone model is 10.6 hours, which is about 1 hour smaller than those of the other models. Their ensemble average of MAE is 9.5 hours. However, this value is still larger than that (8.7 hours) of the empirical model of Kim et al. (2007). We will compare their IP shock velocities and densities with those from ACE in-situ measurements and discuss them in terms of the prediction of geomagnetic storms.Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): We have made a comparison of the CME-associated shock propagation based on the WSA-ENLIL model with three cone types using 29 halo CMEs from 2001 to 2002. These halo CMEs have cone model parameters as well as their associated interplanetary (IP) shocks. For this study we consider three different cone types (an asymmetric cone model, an ice-cream cone model and an elliptical cone model) to determine 3-D CME parameters (radial velocity, angular width and source location), which are the input values of the WSA-ENLIL model. The mean absolute error (MAE) of the arrival times for the asymmetric cone model is 10.6 hours, which is about 1 hour smaller than those of the other models. Their ensemble average of MAE is 9.5 hours. However, this value is still larger than that (8.7 hours) of the empirical model of Kim et al. (2007). We will compare their IP shock velocities and densities with those from ACE in-situ measurements and discuss them in terms of the prediction of geomagnetic storms.

  1. The CME Rate over Four Solar Cycles: Filling the Final Gap with MLSO MK3 Observations [1989-1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Cyr, O. C.; Flint, Q.; Quirk, C. A.; Burkepile, J.; Webb, D. F.; Lecinski, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were discovered in the early 1970's by the OSO-7 coronagraph, and large numbers were characterized for the first time by the Skylab ATM coronagraph. Since 1973 there has been only a single major gap in CME coverage in white light. Instruments that have contributed to estimates of the rate and properties of CMEs have included: Skylab ATM (1973-1974); Helios photometers (1974-1981); Solwind (1979-1985); SMM C/P (1980; 1984-1989); SOHO LASCO (1996-present); the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI, 2003-2011); and STEREO SECCHI (2006-present). We report here the first attempt to fill the 1989-1996 gap in the CME rate using the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory's MK3 K-coronameter. The MK3 instrument observed routinely several hours most days beginning in 1980 until it was upgraded to MK4 in 1998. MK3 CMEs detected from 1980-1989 were compared with Solwind and SMM and reported by St. Cyr et al. (1999). Since spaceborne instruments have more complete duty cycles than a groundbased instrument at a single location, we have 'calibrated' the MK3-derived CME rate from 1989 with the SMM C/P coronagraph, and from 1996 with the SOHO LASCO coronagraphs. CME rate calculations have been documented in Webb & Howard (1994), St. Cyr et al. (2000) and Robbrecht et al. (2009). Here we provide the preliminary CME rate calculation for 1989-1996 using the MLSO MK3 coronameter.

  2. Speed evolution of CME/shocks using multi-spacecraft observations of type II radio bursts: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel-Hernandez, T.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Gonzalez-Esparza, J. A.; Ontiveros, V.

    2013-06-01

    We present a study which focuses on the speed evolution of a coronal mass ejection (CME)/shock associated with a type II radio burst observed on January 25, 2007. The type II burst feature had a multi-spacecraft coverage, being detected by the Wind/WAVES and the STEREO/WAVES radio instruments in the frequency range of 14 MHz to 90 kHz. The CME associated with the type II radio burst was observed by the SOHO/LASCO and the STEREO/SECCHI coronographs. Ground-based radio observations of the metric type II burst counterpart were obtained by the Bruny Island Radio Spectrometer (BIRS) in the frequency range of 40 MHz to 25 MHz. We analyzed the combined white-light and radio observations to infer the speed evolution of the CME/shock event. The CME/shock speed from the different data sets shows a significant deceleration near to the Sun followed by a slow and gradual deceleration in the interplanetary medium, which is consistent with the expected evolution of fast CME/shocks. Multi-spacecraft and combined white-light and radio observations are important to gain insight into the tracking of solar transients which propagate in the inner heliosphere.

  3. The Width of a Solar Coronal Mass Ejection and the Source of the Driving Magnetic Explosion: A Test of the Standard Scenario for CME Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Suess, Steven T.

    2007-01-01

    We show that the strength (B(sub F1are)) of the magnetic field in the area covered by the flare arcade following a CME-producing ejective solar eruption can be estimated from the final angular width (Final Theta(sub CME)) of the CME in the outer corona and the final angular width (Theta(sub Flare)) of the flare arcade: B(sub Flare) approx. equals 1.4[(Final Theta(sub CME)/Theta(sub Flare)] (exp 2)G. We assume (1) the flux-rope plasmoid ejected from the flare site becomes the interior of the CME plasmoid; (2) in the outer corona (R > 2 (solar radius)) the CME is roughly a "spherical plasmoid with legs" shaped like a lightbulb; and (3) beyond some height in or below the outer corona the CME plasmoid is in lateral pressure balance with the surrounding magnetic field. The strength of the nearly radial magnetic field in the outer corona is estimated from the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field measured by Ulysses. We apply this model to three well-observed CMEs that exploded from flare regions of extremely different size and magnetic setting. One of these CMEs was an over-and-out CME, that is, in the outer corona the CME was laterally far offset from the flare-marked source of the driving magnetic explosion. In each event, the estimated source-region field strength is appropriate for the magnetic setting of the flare. This agreement (1) indicates that CMEs are propelled by the magnetic field of the CME plasmoid pushing against the surrounding magnetic field; (2) supports the magnetic-arch-blowout scenario for over-and-out CMEs; and (3) shows that a CME's final angular width in the outer corona can be estimated from the amount of magnetic flux covered by the source-region flare arcade.

  4. Plasma properties from the multi-wavelength analysis of the November 1st 2003 CME/shock event

    PubMed Central

    Benna, Carlo; Mancuso, Salvatore; Giordano, Silvio; Gioannini, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of the spectral properties and dynamic evolution of a CME/shock event observed on November 1st 2003 in white-light by the LASCO coronagraph and in the ultraviolet by the UVCS instrument operating aboard SOHO, has been performed to compute the properties of some important plasma parameters in the middle corona below about 2R⊙. Simultaneous observations obtained with the MLSO/Mk4 white-light coronagraph, providing both the early evolution of the CME expansion in the corona and the pre-shock electron density profile along the CME front, were also used to study this event. By combining the above information with the analysis of the metric type II radio emission detected by ground-based radio spectrographs, we finally derive estimates of the values of the local Alfvén speed and magnetic field strength in the solar corona. PMID:25685432

  5. Plasma properties from the multi-wavelength analysis of the November 1st 2003 CME/shock event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benna, Carlo; Mancuso, Salvatore; Giordano, Silvio; Gioannini, Lorenzo

    2013-05-01

    The analysis of the spectral properties and dynamic evolution of a CME/shock event observed on November 1st 2003 in white-light by the LASCO coronagraph and in the ultraviolet by the UVCS instrument operating aboard SOHO, has been performed to compute the properties of some important plasma parameters in the middle corona below about 2R⊙. Simultaneous observations obtained with the MLSO/Mk4 white-light coronagraph, providing both the early evolution of the CME expansion in the corona and the pre-shock electron density profile along the CME front, were also used to study this event. By combining the above information with the analysis of the metric type II radio emission detected by ground-based radio spectrographs, we finally derive estimates of the values of the local Alfvén speed and magnetic field strength in the solar corona.

  6. The Divergence of CME and Sunspot Number Rates During Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David F.; St. Cyr, Orville Chris; Xie, Hong; Kuchar, Thomas Andrew

    2014-06-01

    In the previous three solar cycles the frequency of occurrence of CMEs observed in white light has closely tracked the solar cycle in both phase and amplitude, varying by an order of magnitude over the cycle. LASCO has now observed the entire solar Cycle 23 and continues to observe through the current rise and maximum phases of Cycle 24. Cycle 23 had an unusually long decline and extended minimum. During this period we have been able to image and count CMEs in the heliosphere, and can determine rates from both LASCO and STEREO SECCHI (since 2007) coronagraphs and from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI - since 2003) and the SECCHI Heliospheric Imagers in the heliosphere. Manual rates estimated by observers are now supplemented by counts from identifications made by automatic programs, such as contained in the SEEDS, CACTus and ARTEMIS catalogs. Since the cycle 23/24 minimum, the CME and sunspot number rates have diverged, with similar cycle 23/24 rise and peak CME rates but much lower SSN rates in this cycle. We will discuss these rate estimates and their implications for the evolution of the global solar magnetic field.

  7. Solar Source and CME Properties of Solar Cycle 23 Ground Level Enhancement Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Xie, H.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Makela, P.; Usoskin, I.

    2010-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 witnessed the most complete set of observations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) associated with the Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) events. GLE events are extreme cases of solar energetic particle (SEP) events in that the energetic particles penetrate Earth's neutral atmosphere to be detected by neutron monitors. In this paper we present the CME and their source properties that seem to be equally extreme. These observations are consistent with the idea that the GLE particles are accelerated in the same way as the regular SEP events by CME-driven shocks. While we cannot rule out the possibility of the presence of a flare component during GLE events, we can definitely say that a shock component is present in all the GLE events. We provide additional information on the GLE-associated type II radio bursts, complex type III radio bursts, and soft X-ray flares, which are not very different from those associated with large SEP events. Finally we compare the properties of GLEassociated CMEs in cycle 23 with those in cycle 22.

  8. Ion acceleration at CME-driven shocks near the Earth and the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Mihir; Dayeh, Maher; Ebert, Robert; Smith, Charles; Mason, Glenn; Li, G.

    2012-11-20

    We compare the behavior of heavy ion spectra during an Energetic Storm Particle (ESP) event that exhibited clear evidence of wave excitation with that observed during an intense, large gradual Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) event in which the associated <0.2 MeV/nucleon ions are delayed >12 hr. We interpret that the ESP event is an example of the first-order Fermi acceleration process where enhancements in the magnetic field power spectral densities around local ion cyclotron frequency {nu}{sub pc} indicate the presence of Alfven waves excited by accelerated protons streaming away from the in-situ interplanetary shock. The softening or unfolding of the CNO energy spectrum below {approx}200 keV/nucleon and the systematic organization of the Fe and O spectral roll-overs with the E/q ratio during the ESP event are likely due to M/Q-dependent trapping and scattering of the heavy ions by the proton-excited waves. Based on striking similarities in the spectral behavior observed upstream of both, the ESP and the SEP event, we suggest that coupling between proton-generated Alfven waves and energetic ions is also operating at the distant CME shock during the large, gradual SEP event, thereby providing us with a new, powerful tool to remotely probe the roles of shock geometries and wave-particle interactions at near-Sun CME-driven shocks.

  9. The Recovery of CME-Related Dimmings and the ICME's Enduring Magnetic Connection to the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attrill, G. D. R.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Démoulin, P.; Zhukov, A. N.; Steed, K.; Harra, L. K.; Mandrini, C. H.; Linker, J.

    2008-11-01

    It is generally accepted that transient coronal holes (TCHs, dimmings) correspond to the magnetic footpoints of CMEs that remain rooted in the Sun as the CME expands out into the interplanetary space. However, the observation that the average intensity of the 12 May 1997 dimmings recover to their pre-eruption intensity in SOHO/EIT data within 48 hours, whilst suprathermal unidirectional electron heat fluxes are observed at 1 AU in the related ICME more than 70 hours after the eruption, leads us to question why and how the dimmings disappear whilst the magnetic connectivity is maintained. We also examine two other CME-related dimming events: 13 May 2005 and 6 July 2006. We study the morphology of the dimmings and how they recover. We find that, far from exhibiting a uniform intensity, dimmings observed in SOHO/EIT data have a deep central core and a more shallow extended dimming area. The dimmings recover not only by shrinking of their outer boundaries but also by internal brightenings. We quantitatively demonstrate that the model developed by Fisk and Schwadron ( Astrophys. J. 560, 425, 2001) of interchange reconnections between “open” magnetic field and small coronal loops is a strong candidate for the mechanism facilitating the recovery of the dimmings. This process disperses the concentration of “open” magnetic field (forming the dimming) out into the surrounding quiet Sun, thus recovering the intensity of the dimmings whilst still maintaining the magnetic connectivity to the Sun.

  10. Longitudinal Dependence of SEP Peak Intensities as Evidence of CME-Driven Shock Particle Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lario, D.; Roelof, E. C.; Decker, R. B.

    2014-05-01

    Multi-spacecraft observations of solar energetic particle (SEP) events allow us to estimate the longitudinal distributions of SEP peak intensities. By fitting a Gaussian functional form to the ensemble of SEP peak intensities measured by two or more spacecraft as a function of the longitudinal distance between the associated parent solar flare and the footpoint labels of the magnetic field lines connecting each spacecraft with the Sun, we found that such distributions are not centered at nominal well-connected flare longitudes but slightly offset to the west of the associated flare (Lario et al. 2006, 2013). We offer an interpretation of this result in terms of long-lived particle injection from shocks driven by the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs). By assuming that (i) CME-driven shocks are centered on the longitude of the associated solar flare, (ii) the injection of shock accelerated particles maximizes at the nose of the shock which propagates radially outward from the Sun, and (iii) SEP particle injection from the shock starts at a certain distance above the solar surface, we infer an average radial distance where shocks are located when peak intensities in the prompt component of the SEP events are observed. We estimate the heliocentric distance of the CME-driven shock when particle injection from the shock maximizes and conclude that the injection of 20 MeV protons and near-relativistic electrons maximizes well inside 0.2 AU.

  11. PROPAGATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE JUNE 1st 2008 CME IN THE INTERPLANETARY MEDIUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Lamb, D. A.; Davila, J. M.; Vinas, A. F.; Moestl, C.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Malandraki, O.; Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.

    2009-12-01

    In this work we present a study of the coronal mass ejection (CME) of June 1st of 2008 in the interplanetary medium. This event has been extensively studied by others because of its favorable geometry and the possible consequences of its peculiar initiation for space weather forecasting. We show an analysis of the evolution of the CME in the interplanetary medium in order to shed some light on the propagation mechanism of the ICME. We have determined the typical shock associated characteristics of the ICME in order to understand the propagation properties. Using two different non force-free models of the magnetic cloud allows us to incorporate expansion of the cloud. We use in-situ measurements from STEREO B/IMPACT to characterize the ICME. In addition, we use images from STEREO A/SECCHI-HI to analyze the propagation and visual evolution of the associated flux rope in the interplanetary medium. We compare and contrast these observations with the results of the analytical models.

  12. Superposed epoch analysis of ion temperatures during CME- and CIR/HSS-driven storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesee, A. M.; Scime, E. E.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral atom Spectrometers (TWINS) Mission provides a global view of the magnetosphere with near-continuous coverage. Utilizing a novel technique to calculate ion temperatures from the TWINS energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements, we generate ion temperature maps of the magnetosphere. These maps can be used to study ion temperature evolution during geomagnetic storms. A superposed epoch analysis of the ion temperature evolution during 48 storms will be presented. Zaniewski et al. [2006] performed a superposed epoch analysis of ion temperatures by storm interval using data from the MENA instrument on the IMAGE mission, demonstrating significant dayside ion heating during the main phase. The TWINS measurements provide more continuous coverage and improved spatial and temporal resolution. Denton and Borovsky [2008] noted differences in ion temperature evolution at geosynchronous orbit between coronal mass ejection (CME)- and corotating interaction region (CIR)/high speed stream (HSS)- driven storms. Using our global ion temperature maps, we have found consistent results for select individual storms [Keesee et al., 2012]. We will present superposed epoch analyses for the subgroups of CME- and CIR/HSS-driven storms to compare global ion temperature evolution during the two types of storms.

  13. An Application of the Stereoscopic Self-similar-Expansion Model to the Determination of CME-Driven Shock Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, L.; Bothmer, V.

    2015-10-01

    We present an application of the stereoscopic self-similar-expansion model (SSSEM) to Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/ Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) observations of the CME on 3 April 2010 and its associated shock. The aim is to verify whether CME-driven shock parameters can be inferred from the analysis of j-maps. For this purpose, we used the SSSEM to derive the CME and the shock kinematics. Arrival times and speeds, inferred assuming either propagation at constant speed or with uniform deceleration, agree well with Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) measurements. The shock standoff distance [Δ], the density compression [ρd/ρu], and the Mach number [M] were calculated by combining the results obtained for the CME and shock kinematics with models for the shock location. Their values were extrapolated to L1 and compared to in-situ data. The in-situ standoff distance was obtained from ACE solar-wind measurements, and the Mach number and compression ratio were provided by the interplanetary shock database of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. They are ρd/ρu =2.84 and M = 2.2. The best fit to observations was obtained when the SSSEM half-width λ= 40°, and the CME and shock propagate with uniform deceleration. In this case we found Δ= 23 R_{⊙}, ρd/ρu =2.61, and M = 2.93. The study shows that CME-driven shock parameters can be estimated from the analysis of time-elongation plots and can be used to predict their in-situ values.

  14. [Home delivery].

    PubMed

    Olivier, S; Guidicelli, B; Gamerre, M

    1994-10-01

    Home delivery, although unconventional, has not totally disappeared. It sometimes results from the desire to "demedicalise" an event deemed natural and is sometimes the consequence of government policy and hence approved by medical authorities. This is the unique situation of Holland, where a highly efficient home delivery system has been created, with the possibility of transfer of the mother at any time to rapidly available emergency medical teams. In fact the large majority of home deliveries are accidental, unprepared and take place in the absence of any medical or paramedical assistance. All available studies show that perinatal and maternal morbidity associated with these accidental deliveries is greater than that of hospital deliveries, and this despite the setting up of emergency services responding as soon as a distress call is received. Home delivery should remain the exception at present since it is unable to guarantee a birth as undangerous as possible. PMID:7817075

  15. Future capabilities of CME polarimetric 3D reconstructions with the METIS instrument: A numerical test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, P.; Bemporad, A.; Mackay, D. H.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Understanding the 3D structure of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is crucial for understanding the nature and origin of solar eruptions. However, owing to the optical thinness of the solar corona we can only observe the line of sight integrated emission. As a consequence the resulting projection effects hide the true 3D structure of CMEs. To derive information on the 3D structure of CMEs from white-light (total and polarized brightness) images, the polarization ratio technique is widely used. The soon-to-be-launched METIS coronagraph on board Solar Orbiter will use this technique to produce new polarimetric images. Aims: This work considers the application of the polarization ratio technique to synthetic CME observations from METIS. In particular we determine the accuracy at which the position of the centre of mass, direction and speed of propagation, and the column density of the CME can be determined along the line of sight. Methods: We perform a 3D MHD simulation of a flux rope ejection where a CME is produced. From the simulation we (i) synthesize the corresponding METIS white-light (total and polarized brightness) images and (ii) apply the polarization ratio technique to these synthesized images and compare the results with the known density distribution from the MHD simulation. In addition, we use recent results that consider how the position of a single blob of plasma is measured depending on its projected position in the plane of the sky. From this we can interpret the results of the polarization ratio technique and give an estimation of the error associated with derived parameters. Results: We find that the polarization ratio technique reproduces with high accuracy the position of the centre of mass along the line of sight. However, some errors are inherently associated with this determination. The polarization ratio technique also allows information to be derived on the real 3D direction of propagation of the CME. The determination of this is of fundamental importance for future space weather forecasting. In addition, we find that the column density derived from white-light images is accurate and we propose an improved technique where the combined use of the polarization ratio technique and white-light images minimizes the error in the estimation of column densities. Moreover, by applying the comparison to a set of snapshots of the simulation we can also assess the errors related to the trajectory and the expansion of the CME. Conclusions: Our method allows us to thoroughly test the performance of the polarization ratio technique and allows a determination of the errors associated with it, which means that it can be used to quantify the results from the analysis of the forthcoming METIS observations in white light (total and polarized brightness). Finally, we describe a satellite observing configuration relative to the Earth that can allow the technique to be efficiently used for space weather predictions. A movie attached to Fig. 15 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. On the interplanetary evolution of CME-driven shocks: a comparison between remote sensing observations and in-situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, Laura; Bothmer, Volker

    2015-08-01

    Fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are a prime driver of major space weather effects and strong geomagnetic storms. When the CME propagation speed is higher than the Alfvn speed a shock forms in front of the CME leading edge. CME-driven shocks are observed in in-situ data and, with the advent of increasingly sensitive imaging instruments, also in remote sensing observations in the form of bright fronts ahead of the CMEs.In this work we present the study of 4 Earth-directed CMEs which drove shocks detected in STEREO COR 2 and HI observations. For each event we identify the source region and the signatures of CME eruption such as waves, EUV dimmings, flare and prominence eruptions. The shock and CME interplanetary evolution is determined from COR2 and HI observations via an application of triangulation techniques. Furthermore, propagation speed and arrival times are inferred. The CME geometry is modelled in COR2 via the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model and the assumption on self-similar expansion is tested by expanding the flux rope to the HI1 field of view. A combination of these results with models for the shock location allows to infer the time evolution of the compression ratio ?d/?u across the shock and of the upstream Mach number M at locations where no direct plasma measurements are available. These values, as well as the arrival time and speed, are compared to ACE in-situ measurements to validate the results. For the 03 April 2010 event, e.g., the values of the Mach number and the compression ratio extrapolated to the position of ACE are respectively 2.1 < ?d/?u < 2.4 and 2.3 < M < 2.5, in good agreement with the in-situ values found in literature, ?d/?u = 2.84 and M = 2.2. This study is carried out in conjunction to simulations of CME initiation. Combined results from observations and simulations allow to connect the interplanetary and near-Earth properties of CMEs to those of their source regions, and to the mechanisms of CME onset.

  17. On the interplanetary evolution of CME-driven shocks: a comparison between remote sensing observations and in-situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, Laura; Bothmer, Volker

    2015-08-01

    Fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are a prime driver of major space weather effects and strong geomagnetic storms. When the CME propagation speed is higher than the Alfvén speed a shock forms in front of the CME leading edge. CME-driven shocks are observed in in-situ data and, with the advent of increasingly sensitive imaging instruments, also in remote sensing observations in the form of bright fronts ahead of the CMEs.In this work we present the study of 4 Earth-directed CMEs which drove shocks detected in STEREO COR 2 and HI observations. For each event we identify the source region and the signatures of CME eruption such as waves, EUV dimmings, flare and prominence eruptions. The shock and CME interplanetary evolution is determined from COR2 and HI observations via an application of triangulation techniques. Furthermore, propagation speed and arrival times are inferred. The CME geometry is modelled in COR2 via the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model and the assumption on self-similar expansion is tested by expanding the flux rope to the HI1 field of view. A combination of these results with models for the shock location allows to infer the time evolution of the compression ratio ρd/ρu across the shock and of the upstream Mach number M at locations where no direct plasma measurements are available. These values, as well as the arrival time and speed, are compared to ACE in-situ measurements to validate the results. For the 03 April 2010 event, e.g., the values of the Mach number and the compression ratio extrapolated to the position of ACE are respectively 2.1 < ρd/ρu < 2.4 and 2.3 < M < 2.5, in good agreement with the in-situ values found in literature, ρd/ρu = 2.84 and M = 2.2. This study is carried out in conjunction to simulations of CME initiation. Combined results from observations and simulations allow to connect the interplanetary and near-Earth properties of CMEs to those of their source regions, and to the mechanisms of CME onset.

  18. C-ME: A 3D Community-Based, Real-Time Collaboration Tool for Scientific Research and Training

    PubMed Central

    Kolatkar, Anand; Kennedy, Kevin; Halabuk, Dan; Kunken, Josh; Marrinucci, Dena; Bethel, Kelly; Guzman, Rodney; Huckaby, Tim; Kuhn, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The need for effective collaboration tools is growing as multidisciplinary proteome-wide projects and distributed research teams become more common. The resulting data is often quite disparate, stored in separate locations, and not contextually related. Collaborative Molecular Modeling Environment (C-ME) is an interactive community-based collaboration system that allows researchers to organize information, visualize data on a two-dimensional (2-D) or three-dimensional (3-D) basis, and share and manage that information with collaborators in real time. C-ME stores the information in industry-standard databases that are immediately accessible by appropriate permission within the computer network directory service or anonymously across the internet through the C-ME application or through a web browser. The system addresses two important aspects of collaboration: context and information management. C-ME allows a researcher to use a 3-D atomic structure model or a 2-D image as a contextual basis on which to attach and share annotations to specific atoms or molecules or to specific regions of a 2-D image. These annotations provide additional information about the atomic structure or image data that can then be evaluated, amended or added to by other project members. PMID:18286178

  19. Relation Between the 3D-Geometry of the Coronal Wave and Associated CME During the 26 April 2008 Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.

    2011-01-01

    We study the kinematical characteristics and 3D geometry of a large-scale coronal wave that occurred in association with the 26 April 2008 flare-CME event. The wave was observed with the EUVI instruments aboard both STEREO spacecraft (STEREO-A and STEREO-B) with a mean speed of approx 240 km/s. The wave is more pronounced in the eastern propagation direction, and is thus, better observable in STEREO-B images. From STEREO-B observations we derive two separate initiation centers for the wave, and their locations fit with the coronal dimming regions. Assuming a simple geometry of the wave we reconstruct its 3D nature from combined STEREO-A and STEREO-B observations. We find that the wave structure is asymmetric with an inclination toward East. The associated CME has a deprojected speed of approx 750 +/- 50 km/s, and it shows a non-radial outward motion toward the East with respect to the underlying source region location. Applying the forward fitting model developed by Thernisien, Howard, and Vourlidas we derive the CME flux rope position on the solar surface to be close to the dimming regions. We conclude that the expanding flanks of the CME most likely drive and shape the coronal wave.

  20. 43 CFR 11.42 - How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE? 11.42 Section 11.42 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Type A Procedures § 11.42 How does the authorized...

  1. 43 CFR 11.42 - How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE? 11.42 Section 11.42 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Type A Procedures § 11.42 How does the authorized...

  2. 43 CFR 11.42 - How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE? 11.42 Section 11.42 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Type A Procedures § 11.42 How does the authorized...

  3. 43 CFR 11.42 - How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE? 11.42 Section 11.42 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Type A Procedures § 11.42 How does the authorized...

  4. 43 CFR 11.42 - How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE? 11.42 Section 11.42 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Type A Procedures § 11.42 How does the authorized...

  5. Simulation of the 23 July 2012 Extreme Space Weather Event: What if This Extremely Rare CME Was Earth Directed?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Mays, M. Leila; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, Kristin; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Zheng, Yihua; Glocer, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Extreme space weather events are known to cause adverse impacts on critical modern day technological infrastructure such as high-voltage electric power transmission grids. On 23 July 2012, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft observed in situ an extremely fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that traveled 0.96 astronomical units (approx. 1 AU) in about 19 h. Here we use the SpaceWeather Modeling Framework (SWMF) to perform a simulation of this rare CME.We consider STEREO-A in situ observations to represent the upstream L1 solar wind boundary conditions. The goal of this study is to examine what would have happened if this Rare-type CME was Earth-bound. Global SWMF-generated ground geomagnetic field perturbations are used to compute the simulated induced geoelectric field at specific ground-based active INTERMAGNET magnetometer sites. Simulation results show that while modeled global SYM-H index, a high-resolution equivalent of the Dst index, was comparable to previously observed severe geomagnetic storms such as the Halloween 2003 storm, the 23 July CME would have produced some of the largest geomagnetically induced electric fields, making it very geoeffective. These results have important practical applications for risk management of electrical power grids.

  6. Simulation of the 23 July 2012 extreme space weather event: What if this extremely rare CME was Earth directed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Leila Mays, M.; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, Kristin; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Zheng, Yihua; Glocer, Alex

    2013-12-01

    Extreme space weather events are known to cause adverse impacts on critical modern day technological infrastructure such as high-voltage electric power transmission grids. On 23 July 2012, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft observed in situ an extremely fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that traveled 0.96 astronomical units (˜1 AU) in about 19 h. Here we use the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) to perform a simulation of this rare CME. We consider STEREO-A in situ observations to represent the upstream L1 solar wind boundary conditions. The goal of this study is to examine what would have happened if this Rare-type CME was Earth-bound. Global SWMF-generated ground geomagnetic field perturbations are used to compute the simulated induced geoelectric field at specific ground-based active INTERMAGNET magnetometer sites. Simulation results show that while modeled global SYM-H index, a high-resolution equivalent of the Dst index, was comparable to previously observed severe geomagnetic storms such as the Halloween 2003 storm, the 23 July CME would have produced some of the largest geomagnetically induced electric fields, making it very geoeffective. These results have important practical applications for risk management of electrical power grids.

  7. Comparison of CME radial velocities from a flux rope model and an ice cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2011-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun are the largest energy release process in the solar system and act as the primary driver of geomagnetic storms and other space weather phenomena on the Earth. So it is very important to infer their directions, velocities and three-dimensional structures. In this study, we choose two different models to infer radial velocities of halo CMEs since 2008 : (1) an ice cream cone model by Xue et al (2005) using SOHO/LASCO data, (2) a flux rope model by Thernisien et al. (2009) using the STEREO/SECCHI data. In addition, we use another flux rope model in which the separation angle of flux rope is zero, which is morphologically similar to the ice cream cone model. The comparison shows that the CME radial velocities from among each model have very good correlations (R>0.9). We will extending this comparison to other partial CMEs observed by STEREO and SOHO.

  8. Wavelet analysis of CME, X-ray flare, and sunspot series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, M. R. G.; Pereira, E. S.; Cecatto, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are the most energetic transient phenomena taking place at the Sun. Together they are principally responsible for disturbances in outer geospace. Coronal mass ejections and solar flares are believed to be correlated with the solar cycle, which is mainly characterized by sunspot numbers. Aims: Here, we search for pattern identification in CMEs, X-ray solar flares, and sunspot number time series using a new data mining process and a quantitative procedure to correlate these series. Methods: This new process consists of the combination of a decomposition method with the wavelet transform technique applied to the series ranging from 2000 until 2012. A simple moving average is used for the time-series decomposition as a high-pass filter. A continuous wavelet transform is applied to the series in sequence, which permits us to uncover signals previously masked by the original time series. We made use of the wavelet coherence to find some correlation between the data. Results: The results have shown the existence of periodic and intermittent signals in the CMEs, flares, and sunspot time series. For the CME and flare series, few and relatively short time intervals without any signal were observed. Signals with an intermittent character take place during some epochs of the maximum and descending phases of the solar cycle 23 and rising phase of solar cycle 24. A comparison among X-ray flares, sunspots, and CME time series shows a stronger relation between flare and CMEs, although during some short intervals (four-eight months) and in a relatively narrow band. Yet, in contrast we have obtained a fainter or even absent relation between the X-ray flares and sunspot number series as well as between the CMEs and sunspot number series.

  9. Plasma Physical Parameters along CME-driven Shocks. II. Observation-Simulation Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchini, F.; Susino, R.; Bemporad, A.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we compare the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters along the 1999 June 11 coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven shock front with the results obtained from a CME-like event simulated with the FLIPMHD3D code, based on the FLIP-MHD particle-in-cell method. The observational data are retrieved from the combination of white-light coronagraphic data (for the upstream values) and the application of the Rankine-Hugoniot equations (for the downstream values). The comparison shows a higher compression ratio X and Alfvénic Mach number MA at the shock nose, and a stronger magnetic field deflection d toward the flanks, in agreement with observations. Then, we compare the spatial distribution of MA with the profiles obtained from the solutions of the shock adiabatic equation relating MA, X, and {θ }{Bn} (the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the shock front normal) for the special cases of parallel and perpendicular shock, and with a semi-empirical expression for a generically oblique shock. The semi-empirical curve approximates the actual values of MA very well, if the effects of a non-negligible shock thickness {δ }{sh} and plasma-to magnetic pressure ratio {β }u are taken into account throughout the computation. Moreover, the simulated shock turns out to be supercritical at the nose and sub-critical at the flanks. Finally, we develop a new one-dimensional Lagrangian ideal MHD method based on the GrAALE code, to simulate the ion-electron temperature decoupling due to the shock transit. Two models are used, a simple solar wind model and a variable-γ model. Both produce results in agreement with observations, the second one being capable of introducing the physics responsible for the additional electron heating due to secondary effects (collisions, Alfvén waves, etc.).

  10. Interrupted Eruption of Large Quiescent Filament Associated with a Halo CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosain, S.; Filippov, Boris; Ajor Maurya, Ram; Chandra, Ramesh

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the observations of an eruptive quiescent filament associated with a halo Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). We use observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO A/B) satellites. The filament exhibits a slow-rise phase followed by a gradual acceleration and then completely disappears. The filament could be traced in STEREO observations up to an altitude of about 1.44 {R}⊙ , where its rise speed reached ˜14 km s-1 and disappeared completely at about 10:32 UT on 2011 October 21. The CME associated with the filament eruption and two bright ribbons in the chromosphere both appeared at about 01:30 UT on October 22, i.e., 15 hr after the filament eruption was seen in He ii 304 Å filtergrams. We show that this delay is abnormally large even if the slow rise speed and slow acceleration of the filament are taken into account. To understand the cause of this delay, we compute the decay index (n) of the overlying coronal magnetic field. The height distribution of the decay index, n, suggests that the zone of instability (n \\gt 1) at a lower altitude, 144-480 Mm, is followed by a zone of stability (n \\lt 1) between 540 and 660 Mm. We interpret the observed delay to be due to the presence of the latter zone, i.e., the zone of stability, which could provide a second quasi-equilibrium state to the filament until it finally erupts.

  11. Shock wave driven by CME evidenced by metric type II burst and EUV wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha-Silva, R. D.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Selhorst, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Solar type II radio bursts are produced by plasma oscillations in the solar corona as a result of shock waves. The relationship between type II bursts and coronal shocks is well evidenced by observations since the 1960s. However, the drivers of the shocks associated with type II events at metric wavelengths remain as a controversial issue among solar physicists. The flares and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are considered as potential drivers of these shocks. In this article, we present an analysis of a metric type II burst observed on May 17, 2013, using data provided by spectrometers from e-CALLISTO (extended-Compound Astronomical Low-cost Low-frequency Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatories) and EUV images from the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI), aboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The event was associated with an M3.2 SXR flare and a halo CME. The EUV wave produced by the expansion of the CME was clear from the EUV images. The heights of the EUV wave fronts proved to be consistent with the heights of the radio source obtained with the 2-4 × Newkirk density model, which provided a clue to an oblique propagation of the type-II-emitting shock segment. The results for the magnetic field in the regions of the shock also revealed to be consistent with the heights of the radio source obtained using the 2-4 × Newkirk density model. Exponential fit on the intensity maxima of the harmonic emission provided a shock speed of ∼580-990 km s-1, consistent with the average speed of the associated EUV wave front of 626 km s-1.

  12. CME liftoff with high-frequency fragmented type II burst emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohjolainen, S.; Pomoell, J.; Vainio, R.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: Solar radio type II bursts are rarely seen at frequencies higher than a few hundred MHz. Since metric type II bursts are thought to be signatures of propagating shock waves, it is of interest to know how these shocks, and the type II bursts, are formed. In particular, how are high-frequency, fragmented type II bursts created? Are there differences in shock acceleration or in the surrounding medium that could explain the differences to the “typical” metric type IIs? Methods: We analyse one unusual metric type II event in detail, with comparison to white-light, EUV, and X-ray observations. As the radio event was associated with a flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME), we investigate their connection. We then utilize numerical MHD simulations to study the shock structure induced by an erupting CME in a model corona including dense loops. Results: Our simulations show that the fragmented part of the type II burst can be formed when a coronal shock driven by a mass ejection passes through a system of dense loops overlying the active region. To produce fragmented emission, the conditions for plasma emission have to be more favourable inside the loop than in the interloop area. The obvious hypothesis, consistent with our simulation model, is that the shock strength decreases significantly in the space between the denser loops. The later, more typical type II burst appears when the shock exits the dense loop system and finally, outside the active region, the type II burst dies out when the changing geometry no longer favours the electron shock-acceleration.

  13. Differences between the CME fronts tracked by an expert, an automated algorithm, and the Solar Stormwatch project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, L.; Scott, C. J.; Owens, M.; Lockwood, M.; Crothers, S. R.; Davies, J. A.; Harrison, R. A.

    2015-10-01

    Observations from the Heliospheric Imager (HI) instruments aboard the twin STEREO spacecraft have enabled the compilation of several catalogues of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), each characterizing the propagation of CMEs through the inner heliosphere. Three such catalogues are the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL)-HI event list, the Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue, and, presented here, the J-tracker catalogue. Each catalogue uses a different method to characterize the location of CME fronts in the HI images: manual identification by an expert, the statistical reduction of the manual identifications of many citizen scientists, and an automated algorithm. We provide a quantitative comparison of the differences between these catalogues and techniques, using 51 CMEs common to each catalogue. The time-elongation profiles of these CME fronts are compared, as are the estimates of the CME kinematics derived from application of three widely used single-spacecraft-fitting techniques. The J-tracker and RAL-HI profiles are most similar, while the Solar Stormwatch profiles display a small systematic offset. Evidence is presented that these differences arise because the RAL-HI and J-tracker profiles follow the sunward edge of CME density enhancements, while Solar Stormwatch profiles track closer to the antisunward (leading) edge. We demonstrate that the method used to produce the time-elongation profile typically introduces more variability into the kinematic estimates than differences between the various single-spacecraft-fitting techniques. This has implications for the repeatability and robustness of these types of analyses, arguably especially so in the context of space weather forecasting, where it could make the results strongly dependent on the methods used by the forecaster.

  14. A Full Study on the Sun-Earth Connection of an Earth-directed CME Magnetic Flux Rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemareddy, Panditi; Mishra, Wageesh

    2015-11-01

    We present an investigation of an eruption event of a coronal mass ejection (CME) magnetic flux rope (MFR) from the source active region (AR) NOAA 11719 on 2013 April 11 utilizing observations from the Solar Dynamic Observatory, the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and the WIND spacecraft. The source AR consists of a pre-existing sigmoidal structure stacked over a filament channel which is regarded as an MFR system. EUV observations of low corona suggest further development of this MFR system by added axial flux through tether-cutting reconnection of loops at the middle of the sigmoid under the influence of continuous slow flux motions for two days. Our study implies that the MFR system in the AR is initiated to upward motion by kink instability and further driven by torus instability. The CME morphology, captured in simultaneous three-point coronagraph observations, is fitted with a Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) model and discerns an MFR topology with its orientation aligning with a magnetic neutral line in the source AR. This MFR expands self-similarly and is found to have source AR twist signatures in the associated near-Earth magnetic cloud (MC). We further derived the kinematics of this CME propagation by employing a plethora of stereoscopic as well as single-spacecraft reconstruction techniques. While stereoscopic methods perform relatively poorly compared to other methods, fitting methods worked best in estimating the arrival time of the CME compared to in situ measurements. Supplied with the values of constrained solar wind velocity, drag parameter, and three-dimensional kinematics from the GCS fit, we construct CME kinematics from the drag-based model consistent with in situ MC arrival.

  15. Predicting CME Ejecta and Sheath Front Arrival at L1 with a Data-constrained Physical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Phillip; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    We present a method for predicting the arrival of a coronal mass ejection (CME) flux rope in situ, as well as the sheath of solar wind plasma accumulated ahead of the driver. For faster CMEs, the front of this sheath will be a shock. The method is based upon geometrical separate measurement of the CME ejecta and sheath. These measurements are used to constrain a drag-based model, improved by including both a height dependence and accurate de-projected velocities. We also constrain the geometry of the model to determine the error introduced as a function of the deviation of the CME nose from the Sun-Earth line. The CME standoff-distance in the heliosphere fit is also calculated, fit, and combined with the ejecta model to determine sheath arrival. Combining these factors allows us to create predictions for both fronts at the L1 point and compare them against observations. We demonstrate an ability to predict the sheath arrival with an average error of under 3.5 hr, with an rms error of about 1.58 hr. For the ejecta the error is less than 1.5 hr, with an rms error within 0.76 hr. We also discuss the physical implications of our model for CME expansion and density evolution. We show the power of our method with ideal data and demonstrate the practical implications of having a permanent L5 observer with space weather forecasting capabilities, while also discussing the limitations of the method that will have to be addressed in order to create a real-time forecasting tool.

  16. The Relationship Between CME Properties in the CDAW, CACTUS and SEEDS Catalogs and ?25 MeV Solar Proton Event Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cane, H. V.

    2013-12-01

    The existence of a correlation between the intensity of solar energetic proton (SEP) events and the speed of the associated coronal mass ejection near the Sun is well known, and is often interpreted as evidence for particle acceleration at CME-driven shocks. However, this correlation is far from perfect and might be improved by taking other parameters into consideration (e.g., CME width). In studies of cycle 23 SEP events, values of CME speed, width and other parameters were typically taken from the CDAWWeb LASCO CME catalog. This is compiled 'by hand' from examination of LASCO images by experienced observers. Other automated LASCO CME catalogs have now been developed, e.g., CACTUS (Royal Observatory of Belgium) and SEEDS (George Mason University), but the basic CME parameters do not always agree with those from the CDAWweb catalog since they are not determined in the same way. For example the 'CME speed' might be measured at a specific position angle against the plane of the sky in one catalog, or be the average of speeds taken along the CME front in another. Speeds may also be based on linear or higher order fits to the coronagraph images. There will also be projection effects in these plane of the sky speeds. Similarly, CME widths can vary between catalogs and are dependent on how they are defined. For example, the CDAW catalog lists any CME that surrounds the occulting disk as a 'halo' (360 deg. width) CME even though the CME may be highly-asymmetric and originate from a solar event far from central meridian. Another catalog may give a smaller width for the same CME. The problem of obtaining the 'true' CME width is especially acute for assessing the relationship between CME width and SEP properties when using the CDAW catalog since a significant fraction, if not the majority, of the CMEs associated with major SEP events are reported to be halo CMEs. In principle, observations of CMEs from the STEREO A and B spacecraft, launched in late 2006, might be used to overcome some of these problems. In particular, a spacecraft in quadrature with the solar source of an SEP event should observe the 'true' width and speed of the associated CME. However, STEREO CME parameters are derived using the CACTUS method, and cannot be directly compared with the LASCO CDAW catalog values that have been so widely used for many years. In this study, we will examine the relationship between the properties of CMEs in various catalogs and the intensities of a large sample of particle events that include ˜25 MeV protons in cycles 23 and 24. In particular, we will compare the proton intensity-speed relationships obtained using the CDAW, CACTUS and SEEDS LASCO catalogs, and also using the CACTUS values from whichever spacecraft (STEREO A, B or SOHO) is best in quadrature with the solar event. We will also examine whether there is any correlation between the width of the CMEs in the automated catalogs and proton intensity, and whether a combination of CME speed and width might improve the correlation with proton intensity.

  17. A Solar type-II radio burst from CME-coronal ray interaction: simultaneous radio and EUV imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Du, G.; Feng, L.; Feng, S.; Kong, X.; Guo, F.; Wang, B.; Li, G.

    2014-12-01

    Simultaneous radio and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/white-light imaging data are examined for a solar type II radioburst occurring on 2010 March 18 to deduce its source location. Using a bow-shock model, we reconstruct thethree-dimensional EUV wave front (presumably the type-II-emitting shock) based on the imaging data of the twoSolar TErrestrial RElations Observatory spacecraft. It is then combined with the Naņcay radio imaging data toinfer the three-dimensional position of the type II source. It is found that the type II source coincides with theinterface between the coronal mass ejection (CME) EUV wave front and a nearby coronal ray structure, providingevidence that the type II emission is physically related to the CME-ray interaction. This result, consistent withthose of previous studies, is based on simultaneous radio and EUV imaging data for the first time.

  18. Radio imaging spectroscopy of synchrotron emission associated with a CME on the 14th of August 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Hazel; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C.

    2013-07-01

    We present Nancay Radioheliograph observations of a moving type IV solar radio burst which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the SWAP instrument onboard Proba2 and by the LASCO white light coronograph. The burst emission was found to be cospatial with the core of the CME. Using radio imaging spectroscopy we are able to characterize the underlying electron distribution and plasma parameters within the source. Fitted spectra reveal a clear power law component consistent with optically thin synchrotron emission from accelerated electrons trapped in the erupting flux rope. As is often observed in type IV bursts, polarization measurements show the source to be moderately polarized during the peak of the burst, before steadily increasing to around 70% as the brightness temperature of the burst decays.

  19. Expanding Alternative Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltzer, Jan A.

    Alternative educational delivery systems that might be useful to community colleges are considered. The following categories of delivery systems are covered: broadcast delivery systems; copy delivery systems, print delivery systems, computer delivery systems, telephone delivery systems, and satellites. Among the applications for broadcast…

  20. Inner Heliospheric Evolution of a 'Stealth' CME Derived From Multi-view Imaging and Multipoint In-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Vourlidas, A.; Stenborg, G.; Savani, N.; Koval, A.; Szabo, A.; Jian, L.; Hidalgo, M.; Lepping, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main driver of Space Weather. Therefore, a precise forecasting of their likely geo-effectiveness relies on an accurate tracking of their morphological and kinematical evolution throughout the interplanetary medium. However, single view-point observations require many assumptions to model the development of the features of CMEs. Before of the STEREO mission, the most common hypotheses were those of radial propagation and self-similar expansion. The use of different view-points shows that at least for some cases, those assumptions are no longer valid. Typical attributes that can now been confirmed to exist are departures from radial propagation, over-expansion, and rotation along the propagation axis. Understanding of the 3D development and evolution of the CME features is therefore of utmost importance to help establish the connection between remote and in-situ observations, and hence help forecast Space Weather. We present on analysis of the morphological and kinematical evolution of a STEREO B-directed CME on 2009 August 25-27. By means of a comprehensive analysis of remote imaging observations provided by SOHO, STEREO and SDO missions, and in-situ measurements recorded by Wind, ACE, and Messenger, we prove in this paper that the event exhibits signatures of rotation, changes in the direction of propagation, and/or interaction with other magnetic obstacles. We propose a method to investigate the change of the CME Tilt from the analysis of Height-Time measurements and we found that the results are consistent with in-situ reconstructions and solar source analysis. If this result is validated in further work, it may have important implications for space weather studies and new generation of inner heliospheric missions because it will allow us to infer the ICME orientation at 1 AU using remote sensing observations of the first stages of the CME.

  1. Tracking the momentum flux of a CME and quantifying its influence on geomagnetically induced currents at Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, Neel; Vourlidas, Angelos; Pullkinen, Antti

    2013-04-01

    We investigate a CME propagating towards Earth on 29 March 2011. This event is specifically chosen for its predominately northward directed magnetic field, so that the influence from the momentum flux onto Earth can be isolated. We focus our study on understanding how a small Earth-directed segment propagates. Mass images are created from the white-light cameras onboard STEREO which are also converted into mass height-time maps (mass J-maps). The mass tracks on these J-maps correspond to the sheath region between the CME and its associated shock front as detected by in situ measurements at L1. A time-series of mass measurements from the STEREO COR-2A instrument are made along the Earth propagation direction. Qualitatively, this mass time-series shows a remarkable resemblance to the L1 in situ density series. The in situ measurements are used as inputs into a 3D magnetospheric space weather simulation from CCMC. These simulations display a sudden compression of the magnetosphere from the large momentum flux at the leading edge of the CME and predictions are made for the time-derivative of the magnetic field (dB/dt) on the ground. The predicted dB/dt were then compared with observations from specific equatorially-located ground stations and show notable similarity. This study of the momentum of a CME from the Sun down to its influence on magnetic ground stations on Earth is presented as preliminary proof of concept, such that future attempts may try to use remote sensing to create density and velocity time-series as inputs to magnetospheric simulations.

  2. Tracking the momentum flux of a CME and quantifying its influence on geomagnetically induced currents at Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, N. P.; Vourlidas, A.; Pulkkinen, A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Lavraud, B.; Owens, M. J.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate a CME propagating towards Earth on 29 March 2011. This event is specifically chosen for its predominately northward directed magnetic field, so that the influence from the momentum flux onto Earth can be isolated. We focus our study on understanding how a small Earth-directed segment propagates. Mass images are created from the white-light cameras onboard STEREO which are also converted into mass height-time maps (mass J-maps). The mass tracks on these J-maps correspond to the sheath region between the CME and its associated shock front as detected by in situ measurements at L1. A time-series of mass measurements from the STEREO COR-2A instrument are made along the Earth propagation direction. Qualitatively, this mass time-series shows a remarkable resemblance to the L1 in situ density series. The in situ measurements are used as inputs into a 3D magnetospheric space weather simulation from CCMC. These simulations display a sudden compression of the magnetosphere from the large momentum flux at the leading edge of the CME and predictions are made for the time-derivative of the magnetic field (dB/dt) on the ground. The predicted dB/dt were then compared with observations from specific equatorially-located ground stations and show notable similarity. This study of the momentum of a CME from the Sun down to its influence on magnetic ground stations on Earth is presented as preliminary proof of concept, such that future attempts may try to use remote sensing to create density and velocity time-series as inputs to magnetospheric simulations.

  3. Tracking the Momentum Flux of a CME and Quantifying Its Influence on Geomagnetically Induced Currents at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savani, N. P.; Vourlidas, A.; Pulkkinen, A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Lavraud, B.; Owens, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a coronal mass ejection (CME) propagating toward Earth on 29 March 2011. This event is specifically chosen for its predominately northward directed magnetic field, so that the influence from the momentum flux onto Earth can be isolated. We focus our study on understanding how a small Earth-directed segment propagates. Mass images are created from the white-light cameras onboard STEREO which are also converted into mass height-time maps (mass J-maps). The mass tracks on these J-maps correspond to the sheath region between the CME and its associated shockfront as detected by in situ measurements at L1. A time series of mass measurements from the STEREOCOR-2A instrument is made along the Earth propagation direction. Qualitatively, this mass time series shows a remarkable resemblance to the L1 in situ density series. The in situ measurements are used as inputs into a three-dimensional (3-D) magnetospheric space weather simulation from the Community Coordinated Modeling Center. These simulations display a sudden compression of the magnetosphere from the large momentum flux at the leading edge of the CME, and predictions are made for the time derivative of the magnetic field (dBdt) on the ground. The predicted dBdt values were then compared with the observations from specific equatorially located ground stations and showed notable similarity. This study of the momentum of a CME from the Sun down to its influence on magnetic ground stations on Earth is presented as a preliminary proof of concept, such that future attempts may try to use remote sensing to create density and velocity time series as inputs to magnetospheric simulations.

  4. Dependence of Sunspot Properties on Flare Occurrence and Flare-CME Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ya-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies showed that the intense flares tend to erupt from the large sunspot region with complex magnetic configuration and strong magnetic field. However, note that not all the active regions (ARs) classified as βγδ would produce X-class flares. To clarify the significance of sunspot properties on solar explosive events, we reexamine the dependence of flare magnitude on sunspot size and magnetic type during 1996-2014 based on the report of NOAA Solar Region Summary and the measurements of GOES soft X-ray flux. In particular, we focus on the βγδ-type ARs to relate the flare productivity to the sunspot area and magnetic field strength by means of the line-of-sight magnetograms from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. Two flare-productive ARs, 10486 and 12192, with βγδ magnetic configuration during most periods of their disk passages are further investigated to characterize the sunspots and flare-CME association.

  5. Particle escape in the interplanetary medium: Link between CME observations and MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Sophie; Antiochos, Spiro; DeVore, C. Richard

    Among the more hazardous forms of space weather at Earth and in the heliosphere are the intense solar energetic particle (SEP) bursts associated with fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and eruptive flares. A fundamental question to understand the origin and the evolution of solar energetic particles is: How do solar energetic particles escape the Sun? Answering this question is critical for understanding how the corona couples dynamically to the heliosphere during explosive events, and is fundamental to developing any future forecasting capability for SEP events. The release onto open field lines of energetic particles originating in the low corona is the bridge connecting the acceleration site to the interplanetary propagation and is, therefore, the key to reconciling remote and in-situ observations of energetic particles. Recent multi-instrument studies showed that CMEs are important factors that determine whether the energetic particles escape into the heliosphere and partly define the spatial distribution of particle flux. In order to understand how and why CMEs play a crucial role in the particle escape, we must understand the dynamics of the corona disturbed by a CME ejection. The details of the dynamics can be studied through MHD simulations. To advance understanding, it is pertinent to combine observations and simulations to develop models that respect the observational constraints. Thus, first we will describe the observational results, then discuss how MHD simulations help demonstrate why CMEs are important for particle release.

  6. Trauma-Informed Medical Care: A CME Communication Training for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bonnie L.; Saunders, Pamela A.; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders, medical morbidity, and healthcare costs. Yet trauma-related impacts have not received sufficient attention in primary care provider (PCP) training programs. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), and evaluated its efficacy. METHODS: We randomized PCPs to training or wait-list (delay) conditions; waitlist groups were trained after reassessment. The primary outcome assessing newly acquired skills was a patient-centeredness score derived from Roter Interactional Analysis System ratings of 90 taped visits between PCPs and standardized patients (SPs). PCPs were Family Medicine residents (n=17) and community physicians (n=13; 83% Family Medicine specialty), from four sites in the Washington DC metropolitan area. RESULTS: Immediately trained PCPs trended toward a larger increase in patient-centeredness than did the delayed PCPs (p < .09), with a moderate effect size (.66). The combined trained PCP groups showed a significant increase in patient-centeredness pre to post training, p < .01, Cohen’s D = .61. CONCLUSIONS: This is a promising approach to supporting relationship-based trauma-informed care among PCPs to help promote better patient health and higher compliance with medical treatment plans. PMID:25646872

  7. Comparison of CME masses and kinetic energies near the Sun and in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.; Howard, R. A.; Jackson, B. V.

    1995-01-01

    Masses have now been determined for many of the CMEs observed in the inner heliosphere by the HELIOS 1 and 2 zodiacal light photometers. The speed of the brightest material of each CME has also been measured so that, for events having both mass and speed determinations, the kinetic energies of the CMEs are estimated. We compare the masses and kinetic energies of the individual CMEs measured in the inner heliosphere by HELIOS and near the Sun from observations by the SOLWIND (1979-1983) and SMM coronagraphs (1980). Where feasible we also compare the speeds of the same CMEs. We find that the HELIOS masses and energies tend to be somewhat larger by factors of 2-5 than those derived from the coronagraph data. We also compare the distribution of the masses and energies of the HELIOS and coronagraph CMEs over the solar cycle. These results provide an important baseline for observations of CMEs from coronagraphs, from the ISEE-3/ICE, WIND and Ulysses spacecraft and in the future from SOHO.

  8. Modeling magnetohydrodynamics and non-equilibrium SoHO/UVCS line emission of CME shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, P.; Raymond, J. C.; Reale, F.

    The Coronal Mass Ejections are plasma clouds expelled from the Sun into the interplanetary medium. We study the propagation of shock waves in the solar corona generated during Coronal Mass Ejections by means of a numerical multi-dimensional MHD model. The model describes the MHD evolution of a compressible plasma in an ambient magnetic field including tensor thermal conduction, radiative losses as main physical effects. We use the MHD version of the FLASH parallel hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement, originally developed at the University of Chicago USA). The code is highly modular and made efficiently parallel with the Message Passing Interface library. We analyze the diagnostic signatures of shock fronts generated by supersonic CME fragments detectable with the UltraViolet Coronagraphic Spectrometer on board the SoHO mission. To this aim we perform 3D MHD simulations of the shock propagation for the time it takes to cross the UVCS slit positioned at a distance of a few solar radii from the solar surface. In the presence of highly effective thermal conduction the simulation takes 200000 time steps to cover 1000 s of evolution. Considering a 3-D domain of 256x256x512 grid cells this kind of simulations requires thousands of hours of computer time and therefore high performance computing (HPC) systems. The simulations were run on the CINECA IBM/SP5 HPC cluster within the INAF/CINECA agreement. We show simulation results and some implications for UVCS observations.

  9. Development of a full ice-cream cone model for halo CME structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae

    2015-04-01

    The determination of three dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, source location) of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is very important for space weather forecast. To estimate these parameters, several cone models based on a flat cone or a shallow ice-cream cone with spherical front have been suggested. In this study, we investigate which cone model is proper for halo CME morphology using 33 CMEs which are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or STEREO-A or B) and as limb CMEs by the other ones. From geometrical parameters of these CMEs such as their front curvature, we find that near full ice-cream cone CMEs (28 events) are dominant over shallow ice-cream cone CMEs (5 events). So we develop a new full ice-cream cone model by assuming that a full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. This model is carried out by the following steps: (1) construct a cone for given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection points with the observed ones. We apply this model to several halo CMEs and compare the results with those from other methods such as a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model and a geometrical triangulation method.

  10. Numerical experiments of magnetic reconnection in the solar flare and CME current sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zhixing; Lin, Jun; Shen, Chengcai

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection plays a critical role in the energy conversion in the solar eruption. This paper performs a set of MHD experiments for the magnetic reconnection process in a current sheet formed in a disrupting magnetic configuration. The eruption results from the loss of equilibrium in the magnetic configuration that includes a current-carrying flux rope, which is used to model the filament floating in the corona. In order to study the fine structure and micro process inside the current sheet (CS), the mesh refinement technology is used to depress the numerical diffusion. A uniform physical diffusion is applied and results in a Lundquist number S=10^4 in the vicinity of CS. Because of the advantage of the foregoing setting, some features appear with high resolution, including plasmoids due to the tearing mode and the plasmoid instabilities, turbulence regions, and the slow mode shocks. Inside CS, magnetic reconnection goes through the Sweet-Parker and the fractal fashions, and eventually, it displays a time-dependent Petschek pattern. Our results seem to support the concept of fractal reconnection suggested by Shibata et al. (1995) and Shibata & Tanuma (2001). And our results suggest that the CS evolves through a Sweet-Parker reconnection prior to the fast reconnection stage. For the first time, the detailed features and/or fine structures inside the CME/flare CS in the eruption were investigated in this work.

  11. The Solar Corona and a CME at the 2010 Total Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Rusin, V.; Druckmüllerová, H.; Saniga, M.; Lu, M.; Malamut, C.; Seaton, D. B.; Golub, L.; Engell, A. J.; Hill, S. W.; Lucas, R.

    2011-05-01

    The 11 July 2010 total solar eclipse was observed on the ground from French Polynesia and, 83 minutes later, from Easter Island, and near-simultaneous images were made with spacecraft instruments including AIA/SDO, HMI/SDO, EUVI/STEREO, SWAP/PROBA2, EIT/SOHO, and LASCO/SOHO. We report on changes in the corona detectable with high-resolution image processing of the ground-based eclipse coronal imaging, including two CME's that were seen to evolve. We compare with the spacecraft images to give a complete depiction of coronal structure at the time of the eclipse, which corresponded to a low but rising phase of the solar-activity cycle. We acknowledge the support of NASA's MSFC NNX10AK47A, NSF REU AST-1005024 with DoD ASSURE, VEGA 2/0098/10 of the Slovak Acad. Sci, 205/09/1469 of the Czech Science Foundation, PRODEX C90345 of ESA/BELSPO, FP7/2007-2013/218816 SOTERIA, Lockheed Martin; for equipment: Nikon Professional Services, ASTELCO Systems GmbH (Germany), and National Geographic Society's Photographic Division; and colleagues Y.-M. Wang (NRL), S. Habbal (U. Hawaii), H. Lanteires (Tatakoto), and J. Kern (Carnegie Obs.).

  12. Why S, Not X, Marks the Spot for CME/Flare Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse; Gary, Allen; Cirtain, Jonathan; Falconer, David

    2010-01-01

    For any major CME/flare eruption: I. The field that erupts is an arcade in which the interior is greatly sheared and twisted. Most of the free magnetic energy to be released: a) Is in the shear and twist of the interior field. b) Is Not due to a big current sheet. The eruption is unleashed by reconnection at a growing current sheet. The current sheet is still little when the reconnection turns on. The unleashed eruption then makes the current sheet much bigger by building it up faster than the reconnection can tear it down. II. Most X-ray jets work the opposite way: a) Tapped free energy is in the field of a pre-jet current sheet. b) Current sheet built by small arcade emerging into ambient field. c) Current sheet still much smaller than the arcade when reconnection turns on and tears it down, producing a jet. III. These rules reflect the low-beta condition in the eruptive magnetic field

  13. Preterm Delivery

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes the proportion of preterm infants—which are infants born prior to 37 weeks of gestation—born in the United States from 1995 to 2008. Preterm delivery is a leading cause of infant death. Scientists continue to explore possible links between ...

  14. Impacts of CME on the TEC at middle and low latitudes during maximum of the 24th solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migoya Orue, Yenca Olivia; Amory-Mazaudier, Christine; Radicella, Sandro; Nava, Bruno; Kashcheyev, Anton

    2015-04-01

    In this study we analyzed the impacts on the GNSS-derived Total Electron Content (TEC) of four selected CME hitting the Earth during the year 2013 at different stations of middle and low latitudes (Ebre, Rabat, Alexandria, San Fernando, M'barara, Matera and Dakar). In order to analyzed the seasonal behavior of TEC under these disturbed conditions in the mentioned stations we have selected four CME events occurred during the different seasons (January 19, March 17, July 9 and October 2) of year 2013, at a maximum of the sunspot cycle 24. At the beginning of each event there is an increase of TEC followed by a decrease. The first increase of TEC is a consequence of the Prompt Penetration of the Electric Field (PPEF). The depletion of the TEC is associated to the Disturbance Dynamo Electric Field (DDEF). In order to interpret the observations we analyzed the convection patterns at high latitudes given by the radar SUPERDARN. At low latitudes, we derived the ionospheric electric current disturbance Diono from ground magnetic variations. Diono is the sum of the DP2 (PPEF) and Ddyn (DDEF) electric current systems. Finally we found that the strength of the impact at middle and low latitudes depends on the time of the impact of the CME and the season.

  15. Observations on the Content of a Formal CME Course before and after Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Richard W.; Jennett, Penny A.

    1992-01-01

    Data from 13 of 50 physicians participating in continuing medical education refresher courses on hypertension and analysis of questions asked of medical information service databank were used to alter the delivery of refresher sessions. (SK)

  16. Pyomyositis after vaginal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, Eve; Eogan, Maeve; Holohan, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Pyomyositis is a purulent infection of skeletal muscle that arises from haematogenous spread, usually with abscess formation. It can develop after a transient bacteraemia of any cause. This type of infection has never been reported before in the literature after vaginal delivery. A 34-year-old woman had progressive severe pain in the left buttock and thigh and weakness in the left lower limb day 1 post spontaneous vaginal delivery. MRI showed severe oedema of the left gluteus, iliacus, piriformis and adductor muscles of the left thigh and a small fluid collection at the left hip joint. She was diagnosed with pyomyositis. She had fever of 37.9°C immediately postpartum and her risk factors for bacteraemia were a mild IV cannula-associated cellulitis and labour itself. She required prolonged treatment with antibiotics before significant clinical improvement was noted. PMID:22693277

  17. SCEC/CME CyberShake: Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Using 3D Seismic Waveform Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, S.; Maechling, P. J.; Cui, Y.; Faerman, M.; Field, E.; Graves, R.; Gupta, N.; Gupta, V.; Jordan, T. H.; Kesselman, C.; Mehta, G.; Okaya, D.; Vahi, K.; Zhao, L.

    2005-12-01

    Researchers on the SCEC Community Modeling Environment (SCEC/CME) Project are calculating Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Curves for several sites in the Los Angeles area. The hazard curves calculated in this study use Intensity Measure Relationships (IMRs) based on 3D ground motion simulations rather than on attenuation relationships. State-of-the-art Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) is currently conducted using IMRs that use empirically-based attenuation relationships. These attenuation relationships represent relatively simple analytical models based on the regression of observed data. However, it is widely believed that significant improvements in SHA will rely on the use of more physics-based, waveform modeling. In fact, a more physics-based approach to PSHA was endorsed in a recent assessment of earthquake science by National Research Council (2003). In order to introduce the use of 3D seismic waveform modeling into PSHA hazard curve calculations, the SCEC/CME CyberShake group is integrating state-of-the-art PSHA software tools (OpenSHA), SCEC-developed geophysical models (SCEC CVM3.0), validated anelastic wave modeling (AWM) software, and state-of-the-art computational technologies including high performance computing and grid-based scientific workflows in an effort to develop an OpenSHA-compatible 3D waveform-based IMR component. This will allow researchers to combine a new class of waveform-based IMRs with the large number of existing PSHA components, such as Earthquake Rupture Forecasts (ERF's), that are currently implemented in the OpenSHA system. To calculate a probabilistic hazard curve for a site of interest, we use the OpenSHA implementation of the NSHMP-2002 ERF and identify all ruptures within 200km of the site of interest. For each of these ruptures, we convert the NSHMP-2002 rupture definition into one, or more, Ruptures with Slip Time History (Rupture Variations) using newly developed Rupture Generator software. Strain Green Tensors are calculated for the site using well-validated AWM software together with the SCEC CVM3.0 3D velocity model. Then, using a reciprocity-based approach, we calculate synthetic seismograms for each Rupture Variation. The resulting suite of synthetics is processed to extract peak intensity measures of interest (such as spectral acceleration). The peak intensity measures are combined with the original rupture probabilities to produce probabilistic seismic hazard curves for the site. The CyberShake calculations are performed on high performance computing systems including multiple TeraGrid sites (currently SDSC and NCSA), and at USCs High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) center. The CyberShake job submission and data management uses a grid-based scientific workflow system based on the Virtual Data System (VDS) to manage the job scheduling and data management requirements of the work.

  18. CME-Producing Precursors to the 2006 December 13 X-Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Harra, Louise K.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2008-01-01

    We revisit one of the largest explosions observed during the Hinode era, the X4.3 class event of 2006 Dec 13. We gain insight into the main eruption through study of two sub-C-class precursor eruptions, occurring within 12 hours of and originating from the same (or nearby) neutral line as the X-flare. The precursors share some features in common with the main eruption, and their lower energy and consequent slower development renders interpretation of these features easier to decipher than in the rapidly explosive main eruption. In addition, because the weak precursors occurred in a magnetically strong region, magnetic connections indicated by soft X-ray loops are readily visible in these cases, while such connections can be much less apparent in weaker-region eruptions. Hinode/SOT magnetograms indicate that photospheric magnetic dynamic activity in the "magnetic core" is the likely ultimate source of the eruptions. All the eruptions, however, produce Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) that have wider spatial extent than the localized source region; this is a long-observed but puzzling phenomena, which can address directly here using the high-quality Hinode data. For the precursor eruptions, Hinode/XRT images show that the initial eruptions occur inside larger-scale magnetic structures that encompass the core. The exploding core field blows out this larger-scale structure, resulting in the CME having angular extent far exceeding that of the source-region core alone; this is the arch-arch-blowout scenario for CMEs of Moore & Sterling (2007). Similar processes occur in the main eruption, except that the much larger energy release in that eruption compared to the precursors results in much faster and larger-scale phenomena.

  19. Use of Yohkoh SXT in Measuring the Net Current and CME Productivity of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    In our investigation of the correlation of global nonpotentiality of active regions to their CME productivity (Falconer, D. A. 2001, JGR, in press, and Falconer, Moore, & Gary, 2000, EOS 82, 20 S323), we use Yohkoh SXT images for two purposes. The first use is to help resolve the 180o ambiguity in the direction of the observed transverse magnetic field. Resolution of the 180o ambiguity is important, since the net current, one of our measures of global nonpotentiality, is derived from integrating the dot product of the transverse field around a contour (IN = int BTcdot dl). The ambiguity results from the observed transverse field being determined from the linear polarization, which gives the plane of the direction, but leaves a 180o ambiguity. Automated methods to resolve the ambiguity ranging from the simple acute angle rule (Falconer, D. A. 2001) to the more sophisticated annealing method (Metcalf T. R. 1994). For many active regions, especially ones that are nearly potential these methods work well. But for very nonpotential active regions where the shear angle (the angle between the observed and potential transverse field) is near 90o throughout large swaths along the main neutral line, both methods can resolve the ambiguity incorrectly for long segments of the neutral line. By determining from coronal images, such as those from Yohkoh/SXT, the sense of shear along the main neutral line in the active region, these cases can be identified and corrected by a modification of the acute angle rule described here. The second use of Yohkoh/SXT in this study is to check for the cusped coronal arcades of long-duration eruptive flares. This signature is an excellent proxy for CMEs, and was used by Canfield, Hudson, and McKenzie (1999 GRL V26, 6, 627-630). This work is funded by NSF through the Space Weather Program and by NASA through the Solar Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program.

  20. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “landward” in Table 6.2, Volume I of... vegetation (e.g., wetlands, seagrass, or kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as... vegetation (e.g., wetlands, seagrass, or kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef). Tidal...

  1. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “landward” in Table 6.2, Volume I of... vegetation (e.g., wetlands, seagrass, or kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as... vegetation (e.g., wetlands, seagrass, or kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef). Tidal...

  2. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “landward” in Table 6.2, Volume I of... vegetation (e.g., wetlands, seagrass, or kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as... vegetation (e.g., wetlands, seagrass, or kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef). Tidal...

  3. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “landward” in Table 6.2, Volume I of... vegetation (e.g., wetlands, seagrass, or kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as... vegetation (e.g., wetlands, seagrass, or kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef). Tidal...

  4. Coronal mass ejection (CME) activity of low mass M stars as an important factor for the habitability of terrestrial exoplanets. I. CME impact on expected magnetospheres of Earth-like exoplanets in close-in habitable zones.

    PubMed

    Khodachenko, Maxim L; Ribas, Ignasi; Lammer, Helmut; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Leitner, Martin; Selsis, Franck; Eiroa, Carlos; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Biernat, Helfried K; Farrugia, Charles J; Rucker, Helmut O

    2007-02-01

    Low mass M- and K-type stars are much more numerous in the solar neighborhood than solar-like G-type stars. Therefore, some of them may appear as interesting candidates for the target star lists of terrestrial exoplanet (i.e., planets with mass, radius, and internal parameters identical to Earth) search programs like Darwin (ESA) or the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph/Inferometer (NASA). The higher level of stellar activity of low mass M stars, as compared to solar-like G stars, as well as the closer orbital distances of their habitable zones (HZs), means that terrestrial-type exoplanets within HZs of these stars are more influenced by stellar activity than one would expect for a planet in an HZ of a solar-like star. Here we examine the influences of stellar coronal mass ejection (CME) activity on planetary environments and the role CMEs may play in the definition of habitability criterion for the terrestrial type exoplanets near M stars. We pay attention to the fact that exoplanets within HZs that are in close proximity to low mass M stars may become tidally locked, which, in turn, can result in relatively weak intrinsic planetary magnetic moments. Taking into account existing observational data and models that involve the Sun and related hypothetical parameters of extrasolar CMEs (density, velocity, size, and occurrence rate), we show that Earth-like exoplanets within close-in HZs should experience a continuous CME exposure over long periods of time. This fact, together with small magnetic moments of tidally locked exoplanets, may result in little or no magnetospheric protection of planetary atmospheres from a dense flow of CME plasma. Magnetospheric standoff distances of weakly magnetized Earth-like exoplanets at orbital distances

  5. Testing the estimated hypothetical response of a major CME impact on Earth and its implications to space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Ramkumar; Reiff, Patricia; Russell, C. T.

    2015-05-01

    The high-speed coronal mass ejection (CME), ejected on 23 July 2012, observed by STEREO-A on the same day as the leading edge of the CME arrived at 1AU was unique both in respect to the observed plasma and magnetic structure and the large solar energetic particle flux that dynamically regulated the shock front. Because of its great intensity, it has been hailed as "Carrington 2" by some, warning that, had that CME been heading toward the Earth, it might have caused a major space weather event. We used the Rice Artificial Neural Network algorithms with the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field parameters measured in situ by STEREO-A as inputs to infer what the "geoeffectiveness" of that storm might have been. We have also used an MHD model in Open Geospace General Circulation Model to understand the global magnetospheric process in time sequence. We presently show our neural network models of Kp and Dst on our real-time prediction site: http://mms.rice.edu/realtime/forecast.html. Running this event through our models showed that, in fact, this would have been an exceptional event. Our results show a prediction resulting in a Kp value of 8+, a Dst of nearly -250 nT, but when assumptions about maximum dipole angle tilt and density are made, predictions resulting in Kp of 11- and Dst dipping close to -700 nT are found. Finally, when solar energetic proton flux is included, the Kp and Dst predictions drop to 8- and ≈-625 nT, respectively.

  6. Comparison of the CME-associated shock arrival times at the earth using the WSA-ENLIL model with three cone models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, S.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2012-12-01

    We have made a comparison of CME-associated shock arrival times at the earth based on the WSA-ENLIL model with three cone models using 29 halo CMEs from 2001 to 2002. These halo CMEs have cone model parameters from Michalek et al. (2007) as well as their associated interplanetary (IP) shocks. For this study we consider three different cone models (an asymmetric cone model, an ice-cream cone model and an elliptical cone model) to determine CME cone parameters (radial velocity, angular width and source location), which are used for input parameters of the WSA-ENLIL model. The mean absolute error (MAE) of the arrival times for the elliptical cone model is 10 hours, which is about 2 hours smaller than those of the other models. However, this value is still larger than that (8.7 hours) of an empirical model by Kim et al. (2007). We are investigating several possibilities on relatively large errors of the WSA-ENLIL cone model, which may be caused by CME-CME interaction, background solar wind speed, and/or CME density enhancement.

  7. Statistical relationship between CME speed and soft X-ray flux and fluence of the associated flare during solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Matamoros, Carolina; Klein, Karl-Ludwig

    We present a study of the statistical relationship between CME velocities reported in the SOHO/LASCO catalogue and soft X-Ray (SXR) measurements from the GOES satellites during the period 1996-2008, to explore the possible correlation between CME speed and parameters of the associated X-ray burst, peak flux and start-to-peak fluence. In order to minimize blurring by projection effects, we focused on CMEs originating near the solar limbs. The flare association was inferred from the backward extrapolation of the height-time trajectory of the CME, and was carefully checked for each event. For the resulting sample of 54 events we found similar positive correlations between the CME speed on the one hand, the SXR peak flux (r=0.50) and fluence (r=0.54) on the other. As a consistency check we compare the CME speeds inferred from SXR bursts with measurements by the STEREO mission for CMEs observed while the two spacecraft were near an angle of 90 degrees with the Sun-Earth line and we found that the calculated speeds are close to the measured value by the STEREO satellites. Furthermore we explore the usefulness of the method for estimating the ICME travel time to the Earth.

  8. Use of Yohkoh SXT in Measuring the Net Current and CME Productivity of Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In our investigation of the correlation of global nonpotentiality of active regions to their CME productivity (Falconer, D.A. 2001, JGR, in press, and Falconer, Moore, & Gary, 2000, EOS 82, 20 S323), we use Yohkoh SXT images for two purposes. The first use is to help resolve the 180 degree ambiguity in the direction of the observed transverse magnetic field. Resolution of the 180 degree ambiguity is important, since the net current, one of our measures of global nonpotentiality, is derived from integrating the dot product of the transverse field around a contour (I(sub N)=(integral)BT(raised dot)dl). The ambiguity results from the observed transverse field being determined from the linear polarization, which gives the plane of the direction, but leaves a 180 degrees ambiguity. Automated methods to resolve the ambiguity ranging from the simple acute angle rule (Falconer, D.A. 2001) to the more sophisticated annealing method (Metcalf T.R. 1994). For many active regions, especially ones that are nearly potential these methods work well. But for very nonpotential active regions where the shear angle (the angle between the observed and potential transverse field) is near 90 degrees throughout large swaths along the main neutral line, both methods can resolve the ambiguity incorrectly for long segments of the neutral line. By determining from coronal images, such as those from Yohkoh/SXT, the sense of shear along the main neutral line in the active region, these cases can be identified and corrected by a modification of the acute angle rule described here. The second use of Yohkoh/SXT in this study is to check for the cusped coronal arcades of long-duration eruptive flares. This signature is an excellent proxy for CMEs, and was used by Canfield, Hudson, and McKenzie (1999 GRL V26, 6, 627-630). This work is funded by NSF through the Space Weather Program and by NASA through the Solar Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program.

  9. A Parametric Study of Erupting Flux Rope Rotation: Modeling the 'Cartwheel CME' on 9 April 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliem, B.; Toeroek, T.; Thompson, W. T.

    2012-01-01

    The rotation of erupting filaments in the solar corona is addressed through a parametric simulation study of unstable, rotating flux ropes in bipolar force-free initial equilibrium. The Lorentz force due to the external shear-field component and the relaxation of tension in the twisted field are the major contributors to the rotation in this model, while reconnection with the ambient field is of minor importance, due to the field's simple structure. In the low-beta corona, the rotation is not guided by the changing orientation of the vertical field component's polarity inversion line with height. The model yields strong initial rotations which saturate in the corona and differ qualitatively from the profile of rotation vs. height obtained in a recent simulation of an eruption without preexisting flux rope. Both major mechanisms writhe the flux rope axis, converting part of the initial twist helicity, and produce rotation profiles which, to a large part, are very similar within a range of shear-twist combinations. A difference lies in the tendency of twist-driven rotation to saturate at lower heights than shear-driven rotation. For parameters characteristic of the source regions of erupting filaments and coronal mass ejections, the shear field is found to be the dominant origin of rotations in the corona and to be required if the rotation reaches angles of order 90 degrees and higher; it dominates even if the twist exceeds the threshold of the helical kink instability. The contributions by shear and twist to the total rotation can be disentangled in the analysis of observations if the rotation and rise profiles are simultaneously compared with model calculations. The resulting twist estimate allows one to judge whether the helical kink instability occurred. This is demonstrated for the erupting prominence in the "Cartwheel CME" on 9 April 2008, which has shown a rotation of approximately 115 deg. up to a height of 1.5 Solar R above the photosphere. Out of a range of initial equilibria which include strongly kink-unstable (Phi = 5 pi), weakly kink-unstable (Phi = 3.5 pi), and kink-stable (Phi = 2.5 pi) configurations, only the evolution of the weakly kink-unstable flux rope matches the observations in their entirety.

  10. Solar type II radio bursts associated with CME expansions as shown by EUV waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha-Silva, R. D.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Selhorst, C. L.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the physical conditions of the sources of two metric type II bursts associated with coronal mass ejection (CME) expansions with the aim of verifying the relationship between the shocks and the CMEs by comparing the heights of the radio sources and of the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves associated with the CMEs. Methods: The heights of the EUV waves associated with the events were determined in relation to the wave fronts. The heights of the shocks were estimated by applying two different density models to the frequencies of the type II emissions and compared with the heights of the EUV waves. For the event on 13 June 2010 that included band-splitting, the shock speed was estimated from the frequency drifts of the upper and lower frequency branches of the harmonic lane, taking into account the H/F frequency ratio fH/fF = 2. Exponential fits on the intensity maxima of the frequency branches were more consistent with the morphology of the spectrum of this event. For the event on 6 June 2012 that did not include band-splitting and showed a clear fundamental lane on the spectrum, the shock speed was directly estimated from the frequency drift of the fundamental emission, determined by linear fit on the intensity maxima of the lane. For each event, the most appropriate density model was adopted to estimate the physical parameters of the radio source. Results: The event on 13 June 2010 had a shock speed of 590-810 km s-1, consistent with the average speed of the EUV wave fronts of 610 km s-1. The event on 6 June 2012 had a shock speed of 250-550 km s-1, also consistent with the average speed of the EUV wave fronts of 420 km s-1. For both events, the heights of the EUV wave revealed to be compatible with the heights of the radio source, assuming a radial propagation of the type-II-emitting shock segment.

  11. Using SOHO to Understand CME-Producing Quiet-Region Filament Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.; Harra, L. K.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years we have been studying solar eruptions in an attempt to determine their primary initiation mechanism. We have focused on events involving filaments, because motions of the filaments just prior to their violent eruption are indicative of changes in the entire magnetic field system involved in the eruption. When the pre-eruption filament resides in a quiet region, the motions leading up to eruption are slower than in similar eruptions in active regions due to the weaker magnetic field strength and correspondingly lower Alfven velocities. These early motions manifest themselves in a slow rise (a few km/s) of the filament, in some cases lasting several hours. After this the filament and associated magnetic structures erupt rapidly, accelerating to speeds of a few 10 kmh over a few minutes. Because of their slow evolution, quiet-region eruptions such as these can be effectively studied in EUV with SOHO/EIT, with its regular cadence of about 12 min. For several cases we have combined EIT images with SOHO/MDI magnetograms and data from other other instruments, and compared our observations with predictions from various eruption scenarios, in particular the "breakout" (Antiochos 1998), "tether cutting" (e.g., Moore et al. 2001), and MHD instability mechanisms. Here we present a representative example of a quiet-region eruption involving a filament ejection, that occurred on 2001 February 28 in a magnetically quadrupolar region and produced a halo CME in SOHO/LASCO images. In addition to EIT and MDI, we analyzed spectral data from SOHO/CDS and soft X-ray (SXR) images from Yohkoh/SXT. We found that flux emergence occurred near one end of the filament, and that both this emergence and resulting microflaring in SXRs and EUV were temporally and spatially closely related to the start of the filament's slow rise. Intensity changes (dimmings and brightenings) in the EIT and SXT images indicate that fields far removed from the erupting core were involved in the eruption, and that breakout-type reconnection did occur. Our observations allow us to investigate whether breakout was the trigger of the eruption, or merely a consequence of a more fundamental eruption process such as tether cutting or MHD instability occurring in a complex magnetic environment.

  12. Real-Time CME Forecasting Using HMI Active-Region Magnetograms and Flare History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2011-01-01

    We have recently developed a method of predicting an active region s probability of producing a CME, an X-class Flare, an M-class Flare, or a Solar Energetic Particle Event from a free-energy proxy measured from SOHO/MDI line-of-sight magnetograms. This year we have added three major improvements to our forecast tool: 1) Transition from MDI magnetogram to SDO/HMI magnetogram allowing us near-real-time forecasts, 2) Automation of acquisition and measurement of HMI magnetograms giving us near-real-time forecasts (no older than 2 hours), and 3) Determination of how to improve forecast by using the active region s previous flare history in combination with its free-energy proxy. HMI was turned on in May 2010 and MDI was turned off in April 2011. Using the overlap period, we have calibrated HMI to yield what MDI would measure. This is important since the value of the free-energy proxy used for our forecast is resolution dependent, and the forecasts are made from results of a 1996-2004 database of MDI observations. With near-real-time magnetograms from HMI, near-real-time forecasts are now possible. We have augmented the code so that it continually acquires and measures new magnetograms as they become available online, and updates the whole-sun forecast from the coming day. The next planned improvement is to use an active region s previous flare history, in conjunction with its free-energy proxy, to forecast the active region s event rate. It has long been known that active regions that have produced flares in the past are likely to produce flares in the future, and that active regions that are nonpotential (have large free-energy) are more likely to produce flares in the future. This year we have determined that persistence of flaring is not just a reflection of an active region s free energy. In other words, after controlling for free energy, we have found that active regions that have flared recently are more likely to flare in the future.

  13. Driving Cartilage Formation in High-Density Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Aggregate and Sheet Constructs Without Exogenous Growth Factor Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Phuong N.; Solorio, Loran D.

    2014-01-01

    An attractive cell source for cartilage tissue engineering, human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) can be easily expanded and signaled to differentiate into chondrocytes. This study explores the influence of growth factor distribution and release kinetics on cartilage formation within 3D hASC constructs incorporated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-loaded gelatin microspheres. The amounts of microspheres, TGF-β1 concentration, and polymer degradation rate were varied within hASC aggregates. Microsphere and TGF-β1 loading concentrations were identified that resulted in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production comparable to those of control aggregates cultured in TGF-β1-containing medium. Self-assembling hASC sheets were then engineered for the production of larger, more clinically relevant constructs. Chondrogenesis was observed in hASC-only sheets cultured with exogenous TGF-β1 at 3 weeks. Importantly, sheets with incorporated TGF-β1-loaded microspheres achieved GAG production similar to sheets treated with exogenous TGF-β1. Cartilage formation was confirmed histologically via observation of cartilage-like morphology and GAG staining. This is the first demonstration of the self-assembly of hASCs into high-density cell sheets capable of forming cartilage in the presence of exogenous TGF-β1 or with TGF-β1-releasing microspheres. Microsphere incorporation may bypass the need for extended in vitro culture, potentially enabling hASC sheets to be implanted more rapidly into defects to regenerate cartilage in vivo. PMID:24873753

  14. Delivery of Phenamil Enhances BMP-2-Induced Osteogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells and Bone Formation in Calvarial Defects.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiabing; Im, Choong Sung; Cui, Zhong-Kai; Guo, Mian; Bezouglaia, Olga; Fartash, Armita; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Nguyen, John; Wu, Benjamin M; Aghaloo, Tara; Lee, Min

    2015-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been widely used for bone repair in the craniofacial region. However, its high dose requirement in clinical applications revealed adverse effects and inefficient bone formation, along with high cost. Here, we report a novel osteoinductive strategy to effectively complement the osteogenic activity of BMP-2 using phenamil, a small molecule that can induce osteogenic differentiation via stimulation of BMP signaling. Treatment of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) with BMP-2 in combination with phenamil significantly promoted the in vitro osteogenic differentiation of ASCs. The efficacy of the combination strategy of phenamil+BMP-2 was further confirmed in a mouse calvarial defect model using scaffolds consisting of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and apatite layer on their surfaces designed to slowly release phenamil and BMP-2. Six weeks after implantation, the scaffolds treated with phenamil+BMP-2 significantly promoted mouse calvarial regeneration as demonstrated by micro-computerized tomography and histology, compared with the groups treated with phenamil or BMP-2 alone. Moreover, the combination treatment reduced the BMP-2 dose without compromising calvarial healing efficacy. These results suggest promising complementary therapeutic strategies for bone repair in more efficient and cost-effective manners. PMID:25869476

  15. RECONNECTION OUTFLOWS AND CURRENT SHEET OBSERVED WITH HINODE/XRT IN THE 2008 APRIL 9 'CARTWHEEL CME' FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, Sabrina L.; McKenzie, David E.; Longcope, Dana W.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Forbes, Terry G.

    2010-10-10

    Supra-arcade downflows (SADs) have been observed with Yohkoh/SXT (soft X-rays (SXR)), TRACE (extreme ultraviolet (EUV)), SOHO/LASCO (white light), SOHO/SUMER (EUV spectra), and Hinode/XRT (SXR). Characteristics such as low emissivity and trajectories, which slow as they reach the top of the arcade, are consistent with post-reconnection magnetic flux tubes retracting from a reconnection site high in the corona until they reach a lower-energy magnetic configuration. Viewed from a perpendicular angle, SADs should appear as shrinking loops rather than downflowing voids. We present X-ray Telescope (XRT) observations of supra-arcade downflowing loops (SADLs) following a coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2008 April 9 and show that their speeds and decelerations are consistent with those determined for SADs. We also present evidence for a possible current sheet observed during this flare that extends between the flare arcade and the CME. Additionally, we show a correlation between reconnection outflows observed with XRT and outgoing flows observed with LASCO.

  16. X-ray Emission from Jupiter's Aurora - Chandra Observations in 2011: CME and/or Io Connection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, W.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Elsner, R.

    2014-04-01

    We report recent observations of Jupiter with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (Figure 1). Given that it is uncertain whether the solar wind has a significant impact on Jupiter's X-ray aurora, we investigate the possible effects of solar activity on our observations. Specifically, we analyse Jupiter X-ray emission at a time when propagation models predicted the arrival of a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) at Jupiter. We investigate spatial features and their temporal and morphological variability to determine whether in the short-term these might be impacted by the CME or changes in the orbital location of Io. In particular, we try to separate contributions from different charged particles thought to be at the origin of the emission. We investigate local time variations to determine whether Jupiter's magnetosphere compression might impact X-ray aurora signatures and we track the location of Io throughout the observation to further analyse whether its orbital-location impacts on X-ray emission. We also compare our analysis with previously published observations to search for any long-term variation in the system.

  17. Transcriptional Regulation of the CmeABC Multidrug Efflux Pump and the KatA Catalase by CosR in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sunyoung; Zhang, Qijing; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-01-01

    CosR is an essential response regulator in Campylobacter jejuni, a major food-borne pathogen causing enteritis worldwide. A transcriptomic analysis performed in this study discovered 93 genes whose transcriptional levels were changed >2-fold due to the repression of CosR expression by antisense peptide nucleic acid. The identified CosR-regulated genes are involved in various cellular functions, such as energy production, protein synthesis and folding, flagellum biogenesis, and lipid metabolism. Interestingly, 17 of the 93 CosR-regulated genes (18.3%) are predicted essential genes, indicating that CosR may participate in the regulation of vital biological processes in C. jejuni. In particular, CosR knockdown increased the transcriptional levels of cmeA, cmeB, and cmeC genes, whose protein product (CmeABC) is an important determinant conferring multidrug resistance in Campylobacter. Negative regulation of cmeABC by CosR was verified by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and PcmeABC::lacZ assay. The results of electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) and DNase I footprinting assays demonstrated that CosR directly binds to the cmeABC promoter. Another notable finding is that CosR regulates the transcription of katA, the sole catalase gene in C. jejuni. Further characterization with qRT-PCR, the catalase enzyme assay, EMSA, and DNase I footprinting assays successfully demonstrated that CosR affects the katA transcription and the catalase activity by direct interactions with the katA promoter. The findings in this study clearly demonstrated that CosR regulates resistance mechanisms in C. jejuni by controlling the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress defense and extrusion of toxic compounds out of the cell. PMID:23065977

  18. Typical CME-IP shock events during the ascending phase of Solar Cycle 24 and their arrival time predictions at Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Feng, X.

    2013-12-01

    Predicting arrival times of interplanetary (IP) shocks at the near Earth space is an important ingredient of space weather forecasting because the passage of an IP shock at Earth will compress the magnetosphere and produce corresponding space weather effects. We have developed a new shock arrival time prediction model, called SPM2, based on 551 solar disturbance events during Solar Cycle 23. Here new shock events in Solar Cycle 24 will be used to check the predicting performance of SPM2. 35 typical CME-IP shock events during the ascending phase of Solar Cycle 24 (2009-2013) with near-simultaneous coronagraph observations of CMEs and metric type II radio bursts are adopted as the sample events. Comparisons between the initial shock speed calculated from the type II burst drifting rate and the CME speed derived from coronagraph observations are investigated. It is found that the multi-spacecraft coronagraph observations combined with appropriate CME leading edge fitting model can give a more reliable CME radial speed than the type II burst shock speed. Then, SPM2 and an empirical model, which input the type II shock speed and CME speed respectively, are used to give the arrival time prediction of the associated IP shocks at the Earth orbit. The predicting precision of the empirical model would become better if the CME is tracked to a larger helio-distance. The prediction of SPM2 gives a similar predicting accuracy even its input parameters contain larger uncertainties. On this sense, the potential capability of the SPM2 model is also discussed in terms of real-time shock arrival time forecasts.

  19. A comparison of the effects of CIR- and CME-induced geomagnetic activity on thermospheric densities and spacecraft orbits: Case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang-Ming; Xu, Jiyao; Wang, Wenbin; Lei, Jiuhou; Burns, Alan G.

    2012-08-01

    So far studies of the effect of geomagnetic storms on thermospheric density and satellite orbits have been mainly focused on severe storm events caused by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). The effect of long-duration, less intensive geomagnetic activity that is related to Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) has not been fully explored. In this paper, thermospheric densities observed by the CHAMP satellite and its orbit parameters are used to compare the responses of satellite orbital altitudes to geomagnetic activity caused by CMEs and CIRs. Three cases are investigated in this paper. Each case had one or two CME storm(s) and one CIR storm that occurred successively. In these cases three out of four CME-storms were stronger than their corresponding CIR-storms, but the durations of these CME-storms were much shorter. Thus, the satellite orbit decay rates during CME-storms are usually larger than those during CIR-storms. However, CIR-storms often had long durations that perturbed satellite orbits for longer periods of time. As a result, the total thermospheric density changes and satellite orbit decays for the entire periods of CIR-storms were much greater than those for the CME-storms since these parameters were related to the total energy deposited into the thermosphere/ionosphere, which depended on both the strengths and the durations of the storms. This study indicates that more attention should be paid to CIR storms during the declining phase and during solar minimum, when they occur frequently and periodically. Whereas fewer CME storms occurring under these conditions. We also found that changes in thermospheric densities and CHAMP orbit decay rates correlated well with variations of auroral hemispheric power, but lagging by about 3-6 h.

  20. Comparisons of CME/ICME stand-off distance ratios from observations with those from semi-empirical relationships based on a bow shock theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Ok; Moon, Yong-Jae; Lee, Jin-Yi; Jang, Soojeong; Lee, Harim

    2016-05-01

    It is generally believed that fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their associated interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) can generate CME/ICME-driven shocks, which are characterized by faint structures ahead of CMEs in white-light coronagraph images and sheath structures in solar wind data. In this study, we examine whether the observational stand-off distance ratios, which are defined as stand-off distances divided by curvature radiuses, of CMEs and their associated ICMEs are explained by a bow-shock theory or not. For this, we select 16 CME-ICME pairs from September 2009 to October 2012 with the following conditions: (1) limb CMEs by SOHO and their associated ICMEs by twin STEREO spacecraft when both spacecraft were roughly in quadrature, and vice versa; (2) the faint structures ahead of limb CMEs are well identified; and (3) their associated ICMEs have corresponding sheath structures. We determine the observational stand-off distance ratios of the CMEs by using brightness profiles from LASCO-C2 (or SECCHI-COR2) observations. The stand-off distance ratios of the ICMEs are determined by using solar wind data (plasma speed, shock starting time, and ICME starting time) from STEREO-IMPACT/PLASTIC (OMNI database) observations. We compare our estimations with the theoretical stand-off distance ratios of the CME-ICME pairs using semi-empirical relationships based on the bow shock theory. We also examine the changes of observational stand-off distance ratios during CME propagations. We find the following results. (1) 60 % of fast CMEs (6/10), whose Mach number are greater than 1, are explained by the conventional theory in the acceptable ranges of adiabatic gamma and CME geometry. (2) 50 % of fast ICMEs (6/12) are explained by the conventional theory. (3) About 70 % of fast CME-ICME pairs (6/9), observational stand-off distance ratios decrease during CME propagations due to the deceleration of CMEs by the solar wind drag. Our results demonstrate that the observed signatures of several fast CME and ICME-driven shocks could be explained by the bow shock theory.

  1. Cytosolic Delivery of Granzyme B by Bacterial Toxins: Evidence that Endosomal Disruption, in Addition to Transmembrane Pore Formation, Is an Important Function of Perforin

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Kylie A.; Blink, Elizabeth; Sutton, Vivien R.; Froelich, Christopher J.; Jans, David A.; Trapani, Joseph A.

    1999-01-01

    Granule-mediated cell killing by cytotoxic lymphocytes requires the combined actions of a membranolytic protein, perforin, and granule-associated granzymes, but the mechanism by which they jointly kill cells is poorly understood. We have tested a series of membrane-disruptive agents including bacterial pore-forming toxins and hemolytic complement for their ability to replace perforin in facilitating granzyme B-mediated cell death. As with perforin, low concentrations of streptolysin O and pneumolysin (causing <10% 51Cr release) permitted granzyme B-dependent apoptosis of Jurkat and Yac-1 cells, but staphylococcal alpha-toxin and complement were ineffective, regardless of concentration. The ensuing nuclear apoptotic damage was caspase dependent and included cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, suggesting a mode of action similar to that of perforin. The plasma membrane lesions formed at low dose by perforin, pneumolysin, and streptolysin did not permit diffusion of fluorescein-labeled proteins as small as 8 kDa into the cell, indicating that large membrane defects are not necessary for granzymes (32 to 65 kDa) to enter the cytosol and induce apoptosis. The endosomolytic toxin, listeriolysin O, also effected granzyme B-mediated cell death at concentrations which produced no appreciable cell membrane damage. Cells pretreated with inhibitors of endosomal trafficking such as brefeldin A took up granzyme B normally but demonstrated seriously impaired nuclear targeting of granzyme B when perforin was also added, indicating that an important role of perforin is to disrupt vesicular protein trafficking. Surprisingly, cells exposed to granzyme B with perforin concentrations that produced nearly maximal 51Cr release (1,600 U/ml) also underwent apoptosis despite excluding a 8-kDa fluorescein-labeled protein marker. Only at concentrations of >4,000 U/ml were perforin pores demonstrably large enough to account for transmembrane diffusion of granzyme B. We conclude that pore formation may allow granzyme B direct cytosolic access only when perforin is delivered at very high concentrations, while perforin’s ability to disrupt endosomal trafficking may be crucial when it is present at lower concentrations or in killing cells that efficiently repair perforin pores. PMID:10567584

  2. The First Ground Level Enhancement Event of Solar Cycle 24: Direct Observation of Shock Formation and Particle Release Heights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Usoskin, I. G.; Davila, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the 2012 May 17 ground level enhancement (GLE) event, which is the first of its kind in solar cycle 24. This is the first GLE event to be fully observed close to the surface by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission.We determine the coronal mass ejection (CME) height at the start of the associated metric type II radio burst (i.e., shock formation height) as 1.38 Rs (from the Sun center). The CME height at the time of GLE particle release was directly measured from a STEREO image as 2.32 Rs, which agrees well with the estimation from CME kinematics. These heights are consistent with those obtained for cycle-23 GLEs using back-extrapolation. By contrasting the 2012 May 17 GLE with six other non-GLE eruptions from well-connected regions with similar or larger flare sizes and CME speeds, we find that the latitudinal distance from the ecliptic is rather large for the non-GLE events due to a combination of non-radial CME motion and unfavorable solar B0 angle, making the connectivity to Earth poorer. We also find that the coronal environment may play a role in deciding the shock strength.

  3. THE FIRST GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT EVENT OF SOLAR CYCLE 24: DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SHOCK FORMATION AND PARTICLE RELEASE HEIGHTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Davila, J. M.; Usoskin, I. G.

    2013-03-10

    We report on the 2012 May 17 ground level enhancement (GLE) event, which is the first of its kind in solar cycle 24. This is the first GLE event to be fully observed close to the surface by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission. We determine the coronal mass ejection (CME) height at the start of the associated metric type II radio burst (i.e., shock formation height) as 1.38 Rs (from the Sun center). The CME height at the time of GLE particle release was directly measured from a STEREO image as 2.32 Rs, which agrees well with the estimation from CME kinematics. These heights are consistent with those obtained for cycle-23 GLEs using back-extrapolation. By contrasting the 2012 May 17 GLE with six other non-GLE eruptions from well-connected regions with similar or larger flare sizes and CME speeds, we find that the latitudinal distance from the ecliptic is rather large for the non-GLE events due to a combination of non-radial CME motion and unfavorable solar B0 angle, making the connectivity to Earth poorer. We also find that the coronal environment may play a role in deciding the shock strength.

  4. Quantitative understanding of Forbush decrease drivers based on shock-only and CME-only models using global signature of February 14, 1978 event

    SciTech Connect

    Raghav, Anil; Lotekar, Ajay; Bhaskar, Ankush; Vichare, Geeta; Yadav, Virendra E-mail: ankushbhaskar@gmail.com E-mail: vicharegeeta@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    We have studied the Forbush decrease (FD) event that occurred on February 14, 1978 using 43 neutron monitor observatories to understand the global signature of FD. We have studied rigidity dependence of shock amplitude and total FD amplitude. We have found almost the same power law index for both shock phase amplitude and total FD amplitude. Local time variation of shock phase amplitude and maximum depression time of FD have been investigated which indicate possible effect of shock/CME orientation. We have analyzed rigidity dependence of time constants of two phase recovery. Time constants of slow component of recovery phase show rigidity dependence and imply possible effect of diffusion. Solar wind speed was observed to be well correlated with slow component of FD recovery phase. This indicates solar wind speed as possible driver of recovery phase. To investigate the contribution of interplanetary drivers, shock and CME in FD, we have used shock-only and CME-only models. We have applied these models separately to shock phase and main phase amplitudes respectively. This confirms presently accepted physical scenario that the first step of FD is due to propagating shock barrier and second step is due to flux rope of CME/magnetic cloud.

  5. Ocular delivery of macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Chun; Chiang, Bryce; Wu, Xianggen; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are making increasing impact on medicine, including treatment of indications in the eye. Macromolecular drugs are typically given by physician-administered invasive delivery methods, because non--invasive ocular delivery methods, such as eye drops, and systemic delivery, have low bioavailability and/or poor ocular targeting. There is a need to improve delivery of biopharmaceuticals to enable less-invasive delivery routes, less-frequent dosing through controlled-release drug delivery and improved drug targeting within the eye to increase efficacy and reduce side effects. This review discusses the barriers to drug delivery via various ophthalmic routes of administration in the context of macromolecule delivery and discusses efforts to develop controlled-release systems for delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the eye. The growing number of macromolecular therapies in the eye needs improved drug delivery methods that increase drug efficacy, safety and patient compliance. PMID:24998941

  6. Calculation of CME kinematics and propagation directions by connecting STEREO HI-images with in situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollett, Tanja; Moestl, Christian; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid; Biernat, Helfried K.

    On a sample of selected events we determined the propagation directions and the kinematics of several coronal mass ejections by using data provided by the Heliospheric Imagers (HI) and the PLASTIC and IMPACT instruments onboard the two STEREO satellites and the Wind spacecraft near Earth. We tracked for each CME the leading edge and core within time-elongation plots (Jplots) and converted the measured elongation angle into distance by using different methods (Point-P, Fixed-Phi and their harmonic mean). Furthermore, we used the Sheeley-method to fit our measurements and calculate the propagation angles and arrival times at the other spacecraft assuming that the CMEs propagate with constant velocity. Finally we discuss our results by comparing the kinematics derived from the different techniques.

  7. Correlation of the CME Productivity of Solar Active Regions with Measures of their Global Nonpotentiality from Vector Magnetograms: Baseline Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ron L.; Gary, G. Allen; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    From conventional magnetograms and chromospheric and coronal images, it is known qualitatively that the fastest coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are magnetic explosions from sunspot active regions in which the magnetic field is globally strongly sheared and twisted from its minimum-energy potential configuration. In this paper, we present measurements from active-region vector magnetograms that begin to quantify the dependence of the CME productivity of an active region on the global nonpotentiality of its magnetic field. From each of 17 magnetograms of 12 bipolar active regions, we obtain a measure of the size of the active region (the magnetic flux content, phi) and three different measures of the global nonpotentiality (L(sub SS), the length of strong-shear, strong-field main neutral line; I(sub N), the net electric current arching from one polarity to the other; and alpha = muI(subN/phi), a flux-normalized measure of the field twist).

  8. The CME/ICME relationship for the 3-5 April 2010 and Aug 1-4 2010 events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moestl, C.; Temmer, M.; Rollett, T.; Kilpua, E. K.; Farrugia, C. J.; Veronig, A.; Galvin, A. B.; Biernat, H. K.

    2010-12-01

    For two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) associated with interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) causing moderate geomagnetic storms in 2010, we discuss properties such as interplanetary propagation, orientation and arrival time calculation. We study heliospheric images of the CMEs provided by STEREO / HI in combination with in situ observations by the Wind spacecraft near Earth. The 3-5 April 2010 event was the first fast (800 km/s) ICME including a magnetic cloud observed by both the STEREO/HI instruments and a near Earth spacecraft. During the subsequent geomagnetic storm (minimum Dst = -72 nT, maximum Kp = 8-), communication with the Galaxy 15 satellite was lost. Using forward modeling in combination with HI techniques and the in situ velocity, we show that the ICME did not decelerate much between Sun and Earth. Earth was not hit directly, but the ICME flank was responsible for a long storm growth phase. The magnetic cloud (MC) inside the ICME cannot be modeled with approaches assuming an invariant direction. These observations confirm the hypotheses that parts of ICMEs classified as (1) long-duration MCs or (2) magnetic-cloud-like (MCL) structures can be a consequence of a spacecraft trajectory through the ICME flank. The 1-4 Aug 2010 events consisted of several CMEs accompanied by multiple ICME signatures near Earth, responsible for a two-step geomagnetic storm. We discuss which of the ICMEs correspond to the flare/filaments/CMEs observed by STEREO/COR/HI and SDO HMI/AIA observed closer to the Sun. We apply reconstruction methods to estimate the local flux rope orientation and other properties. The ICME signatures are linked to HI observations of the CME fronts, which yields full CME kinematics between the Sun and Earth. STEREO Ahead HI1/2 images of the 3-5 April 2010 Earth-directed coronal mass ejection.

  9. MICROWAVE QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN MULTI-TIMESCALES ASSOCIATED WITH A SOLAR FLARE/CME EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Baolin; Zhang Yin; Tan Chengming; Liu Yuying

    2010-11-01

    Microwave observations of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in multi-timescales at the Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer in Huairou (SBRS/Huairou) on 2006 December 13 are confirmed to be associated with an X3.4 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) event. It is most remarkable that the timescales of QPPs are distributed in a broad range from hectoseconds (very long period pulsation, VLP, P>100 s), decaseconds (long period pulsation, LPP, 10 < P < 100 s), a few seconds (short period pulsation, SPP, 1 < P < 10 s), deciseconds (slow very short period pulsation, slow-VSP, 0.1 < P < 1.0 s), to centiseconds (fast very short period pulsation, fast-VSP, P < 0.1 s), and form a broad hierarchy. The statistical distribution of QPPs in logarithmic period-duration space indicates that all the QPPs can be classified into two groups: group I includes VLP, LPP, SPP, and some slow-VSPs distributed approximately around a line; group II includes fast-VSP and most of the slow-VSPs dispersively distributed away from the above line. This feature implies that the generation mechanism of group I is different from group II. Group I is possibly related to some MHD oscillations in magnetized plasma loops in the active region; e.g., VLPs may be generated by standing slow sausage mode coupling, resonating with the underlying photospheric 5 minute oscillation, with the modulation amplified and forming the main framework of the whole flare/CME process; LPPs, SPPs, and some slow-VSPs are most likely to be caused by standing fast modes or LRC-circuit resonance in current-carrying plasma loops. Group II is possibly generated by modulations of resistive tearing-mode oscillations in electric current-carrying flaring loops.

  10. A model on CME/Flare initiation: Loss of Equilibrium caused by mass loss of quiescent prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George; Chon Nam, Sok; Kim, Mun Song; Kim, Jik Su

    2015-08-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) model should give an answer to enough energy storage for giant bulk plasma into interplanetary space to escape against the sun’s gravitation and its explosive eruption. Advocates of ‘Mass Loading’ model (e.g. Low, B. 1996, SP, 167, 217) suggested a simple mechanism of CME initiation, the loss of mass from a prominence anchoring magnetic flux rope, but they did not associate the mass loss with the loss of equilibrium. The catastrophic loss of equilibrium model is considered as to be a prospective CME/Flare model to explain sudden eruption of magnetic flux systems. Isenberg, P. A., et al (1993, ApJ, 417, 368)developed ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory of the magnetic flux rope to show occurrence of catastrophic loss of equilibrium according to increasing magnetic flux transported into corona.We begin with extending their study including gravity on prominence’s material to obtain equilibrium curves in case of given mass parameters, which are the strengths of the gravitational force compared with the characteristic magnetic force. Furthermore, we study quasi-static evolution of the system including massive prominence flux rope and current sheet below it to obtain equilibrium curves of prominence’s height according to decreasing mass parameter in a properly fixed magnetic environment. The curves show equilibrium loss behaviors to imply that mass loss result in equilibrium loss. Released fractions of magnetic energy are greater than corresponding zero-mass case. This eruption mechanism is expected to be able to apply to the eruptions of quiescent prominences, which is located in relatively weak magnetic environment with 105 km of scale length and 10G of photospheric magnetic field.

  11. An Ensemble Study of a January 2010 Coronal Mass Ejection (CME): Connecting a Non-obvious Solar Source with Its ICME/Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, D. F.; Bisi, M. M.; de Koning, C. A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Jackson, B. V.; Jian, L. K.; Lugaz, N.; Marubashi, K.; Möstl, C.; Romashets, E. P.; Wood, B. E.; Yu, H.-S.

    2014-11-01

    A distinct magnetic cloud (MC) was observed in-situ at the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO)-B on 20 - 21 January 2010. About three days earlier, on 17 January, a bright flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) were clearly observed by STEREO-B, which suggests that this was the progenitor of the MC. However, the in-situ speed of the event, several earlier weaker events, heliospheric imaging, and a longitude mismatch with the STEREO-B spacecraft made this interpretation unlikely. We searched for other possible solar eruptions that could have caused the MC and found a faint filament eruption and the associated CME on 14 - 15 January as the likely solar source event. We were able to confirm this source by using coronal imaging from the Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI)/EUVI and COR and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronograph (LASCO) telescopes and heliospheric imaging from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) and the STEREO/ Heliospheric Imager instruments. We use several empirical models to understand the three-dimensional geometry and propagation of the CME, analyze the in-situ characteristics of the associated ICME, and investigate the characteristics of the MC by comparing four independent flux-rope model fits with the launch observations and magnetic-field orientations. The geometry and orientations of the CME from the heliospheric-density reconstructions and the in-situ modeling are remarkably consistent. Lastly, this event demonstrates that a careful analysis of all aspects of the development and evolution of a CME is necessary to correctly identify the solar counterpart of an ICME/MC.

  12. Responsibility of a Filament Eruption for the Initiation of a Flare, CME, and Blast Wave, and its Possible Transformation into a Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Kuzmenko, I. V.; Kochanov, A. A.; Chertok, I. M.; Kalashnikov, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-instrument observations of two filament eruptions on 24 February and 11 May 2011 suggest the following updated scenario for eruptive flare, coronal mass ejection (CME), and shock wave evolution. An initial destabilization of a filament results in stretching out of the magnetic threads belonging to its body that are rooted in the photosphere along the inversion line. Their reconnection leads to i) heating of parts of the filament or its environment, ii) an initial development of the flare cusp, arcade, and ribbons, iii) an increasing similarity of the filament to a curved flux rope, and iv) to its acceleration. Then the pre-eruption arcade enveloping the filament becomes involved in reconnection according to the standard model and continues to form the flare arcade and ribbons. The poloidal magnetic flux in the curved rope developing from the filament progressively increases and forces its toroidal expansion. This flux rope impulsively expands and produces a magnetohydrodynamical disturbance, which rapidly steepens into a shock. The shock passes through the arcade that expands above the filament and then freely propagates for some time ahead of the CME like a decelerating blast wave. If the CME is slow, then the shock eventually decays. Otherwise, the frontal part of the shock changes into the bow-shock regime. This was observed for the first time in the 24 February 2011 event. When reconnection ceases, the flux rope relaxes and constitutes the CME core-cavity system. The expanding arcade develops into the CME frontal structure. We also found that reconnection in the current sheet of a remote streamer forced by the shock passage results in a running flare-like process within the streamer responsible for a type II burst. The development of dimming and various associated phenomena are discussed.

  13. Transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Langer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made an important contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. First-generation transdermal delivery systems have continued their steady increase in clinical use for delivery of small, lipophilic, low-dose drugs. Second-generation delivery systems using chemical enhancers, non-cavitational ultrasound and iontophoresis have also resulted in clinical products; the ability of iontophoresis to control delivery rates in real time provides added functionality. Third-generation delivery systems target their effects to skin’s barrier layer of stratum corneum using microneedles, thermal ablation, microdermabrasion, electroporation and cavitational ultrasound. Microneedles and thermal ablation are currently progressing through clinical trials for delivery of macromolecules and vaccines, such as insulin, parathyroid hormone and influenza vaccine. Using these novel second- and third-generation enhancement strategies, transdermal delivery is poised to significantly increase impact on medicine. PMID:18997767

  14. Transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Prausnitz, Mark R; Langer, Robert

    2008-11-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made an important contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. First-generation transdermal delivery systems have continued their steady increase in clinical use for delivery of small, lipophilic, low-dose drugs. Second-generation delivery systems using chemical enhancers, noncavitational ultrasound and iontophoresis have also resulted in clinical products; the ability of iontophoresis to control delivery rates in real time provides added functionality. Third-generation delivery systems target their effects to skin's barrier layer of stratum corneum using microneedles, thermal ablation, microdermabrasion, electroporation and cavitational ultrasound. Microneedles and thermal ablation are currently progressing through clinical trials for delivery of macromolecules and vaccines, such as insulin, parathyroid hormone and influenza vaccine. Using these novel second- and third-generation enhancement strategies, transdermal delivery is poised to significantly increase its impact on medicine. PMID:18997767

  15. Amphiplex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Shannon; Laaser, Jennifer; Lodge, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Polymer-micelle complexes are currently under heavy investigation due to their potential applications in targeted drug delivery and gene therapy, yet the dynamics of the complex formation is still relatively unstudied. By varying the ratios of poly(styrene sulfonate) chains and cationic poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(styrene) micelles and the ionic strength of the system, we created a variety of complex configurations of different sizes and charges. The complexes were characterized dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements which provided information regarding the hydrodynamic radius, distribution of sizes, and effective charge.

  16. Delivery by Cesarean Section

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Delivery by Cesarean Section Page Content Article Body More ... mother has had a previous baby by Cesarean delivery The obstetrician feels that the baby’s health might ...

  17. Thermosensitive polymers for drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Gutowska, A.; Kim, Sung Wan

    1996-12-31

    Thermosensitive polymers (TSP) demonstrating temperature-dependent temperature-dependent swelling in water have been extensively studied in recent years. Their molecular and physical properties have been tailored for a variety of biomedical and engineering uses. This presentation will discuss TSP based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its crosslinked networks modified with hydrophobic or hydrophilic components by copolymerization blending and formation of interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs). TSP designed for three different areas of drug delivery will be presented. First, heparin releasing temperature-sensitive polymers for the prevention of surface induced thrombosis will be presented as an example of a local macromolecular delivery from a surface of a medical device. Second, a new oral delivery device based on a novel mechanical squeezing concept, utilizing specific swelling-deswelling characteristics of temperature- and temperature/pH-sensitive hydrogels will be described. These hydrogels were synthesized to exhibit a controlled swelling-deswelling kinetics, hence a variety of release profiles may be generated: a delayed, a zero-order or an {open_quotes}on-off{close_quotes} release profile. Finally, thermally reversible polymeric gels as an extracellular matrix for the entrapment of pancreatic islet cells in biohybrid artificial pancreas for insulin delivery will be discussed.

  18. Articulating feedstock delivery device

    DOEpatents

    Jordan, Kevin

    2013-11-05

    A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

  19. Inner Heliospheric Evolution of a "Stealth" CME Derived from Multi-view Imaging and Multipoint in Situ observations. I. Propagation to 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Vourlidas, A.; Stenborg, G.; Savani, N. P.; Koval, A.; Szabo, A.; Jian, L. K.

    2013-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main driver of space weather. Therefore, a precise forecasting of their likely geo-effectiveness relies on an accurate tracking of their morphological and kinematical evolution throughout the interplanetary medium. However, single viewpoint observations require many assumptions to model the development of the features of CMEs. The most common hypotheses were those of radial propagation and self-similar expansion. The use of different viewpoints shows that, at least for some cases, those assumptions are no longer valid. From radial propagation, typical attributes that can now be confirmed to exist are over-expansion and/or rotation along the propagation axis. Understanding the 3D development and evolution of the CME features will help to establish the connection between remote and in situ observations, and hence help forecast space weather. We present an analysis of the morphological and kinematical evolution of a STEREO-B-directed CME on 2009 August 25-27. By means of a comprehensive analysis of remote imaging observations provided by the SOHO, STEREO, and SDO missions, and in situ measurements recorded by Wind, ACE, and MESSENGER, we prove in this paper that the event exhibits signatures of deflection, which are usually associated with changes in the direction of propagation and/or also with rotation. The interaction with other magnetic obstacles could act as a catalyst of deflection or rotation effects. We also propose a method to investigate the change of the CME tilt from the analysis of height-time direct measurements. If this method is validated in further work, it may have important implications for space weather studies because it will allow for inference of the interplanetary counterpart of the CME's orientation.

  20. Synopsis of Diet in Dermatology: A one day CME conducted by the Department of Dermatology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal, March 3, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Smitha S; Nayak, Sudhir UK; Shenoi, Shrutakirthi Damodar; Pai, Sathish Ballambat

    2013-01-01

    Food is intricately related to mind and body and is one of the elements sustaining life, in disease as well as in health. There are many myths and misgivings regarding partake of food and its medicinal properties. The Department of Dermatology, Kasturba Medical College (KMC), Manipal organized a continuing medical education (CME) on Diet in Dermatology on 3rd March 2013 focusing on pertinent issues regarding diet and medicinal use of food. PMID:24350027

  1. Inner heliospheric evolution of a 'STEALTH' CME derived from multi-view imaging and multipoint in situ observations. I. Propagation to 1 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Vourlidas, A.; Stenborg, G.; Savani, N. P.; Koval, A.; Szabo, A.; Jian, L. K.

    2013-12-10

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main driver of space weather. Therefore, a precise forecasting of their likely geo-effectiveness relies on an accurate tracking of their morphological and kinematical evolution throughout the interplanetary medium. However, single viewpoint observations require many assumptions to model the development of the features of CMEs. The most common hypotheses were those of radial propagation and self-similar expansion. The use of different viewpoints shows that, at least for some cases, those assumptions are no longer valid. From radial propagation, typical attributes that can now be confirmed to exist are over-expansion and/or rotation along the propagation axis. Understanding the 3D development and evolution of the CME features will help to establish the connection between remote and in situ observations, and hence help forecast space weather. We present an analysis of the morphological and kinematical evolution of a STEREO-B-directed CME on 2009 August 25-27. By means of a comprehensive analysis of remote imaging observations provided by the SOHO, STEREO, and SDO missions, and in situ measurements recorded by Wind, ACE, and MESSENGER, we prove in this paper that the event exhibits signatures of deflection, which are usually associated with changes in the direction of propagation and/or also with rotation. The interaction with other magnetic obstacles could act as a catalyst of deflection or rotation effects. We also propose a method to investigate the change of the CME tilt from the analysis of height-time direct measurements. If this method is validated in further work, it may have important implications for space weather studies because it will allow for inference of the interplanetary counterpart of the CME's orientation.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of interplanetary propagation of multiple coronal mass ejections with internal magnetic flux rope (SUSANOO-CME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, D.; Kataoka, R.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most important drivers of various types of space weather disturbance. Here we report a newly developed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the solar wind, including a series of multiple CMEs with internal spheromak-type magnetic fields. First, the polarity of the spheromak magnetic field is set as determined automatically according to the Hale-Nicholson law and the chirality law of Bothmer and Schwenn. The MHD simulation is therefore capable of predicting the time profile of the southward interplanetary magnetic field at the Earth, in relation to the passage of a magnetic cloud within a CME. This profile is the most important parameter for space weather forecasts of magnetic storms. In order to evaluate the current ability of our simulation, we demonstrate a test case: the propagation and interaction process of multiple CMEs associated with the highly complex active region NOAA 10486 in October to November 2003, and present the result of a simulation of the solar wind parameters at the Earth during the 2003 Halloween storms. We succeeded in reproducing the arrival at the Earth's position of a large amount of southward magnetic flux, which is capable of causing an intense magnetic storm. We find that the observed complex time profile of the solar wind parameters at the Earth could be reasonably well understood by the interaction of a few specific CMEs.

  3. First magnetic seismology of the CME reconnection outflow layer in the low corona with 2.5-D MHD simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykyri, Katariina; Foullon, Claire

    2013-08-01

    For conditions observed in the low corona, we perform 2.5-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) at the surface of a coronal mass ejection (CME). We match the observed time development of the KHI with simulated growth from 110 MHD experiments representing a parametric range of realistic magnetic field strengths and orientations and two key values of the velocity shear, ΔV, inferred from observations. The results are field strengths Be≈ 8-9 G and Bs≈ 10-11 G in the CME reconnection outflow layer and the surrounding sheath, respectively, for ΔV≈770kms-1; for nearly perpendicular orientation (1° tilt) of Bs with respect to the flow plane, Be can be tilted between 3 and 10°; tilting Bs up to 15° would slow the growth of the KHI by too much. Our simulations also reveal hidden dynamics and structure of the CME ejecta layer such as plasma mixing via reconnection in the vortices.

  4. Intracochlear Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Advances in molecular biology and in the basic understanding of the mechanisms associated with sensorineural hearing loss and other diseases of the inner ear, are paving the way towards new approaches for treatments for millions of patients. However, the cochlea is a particularly challenging target for drug therapy, and new technologies will be required to provide safe and efficacious delivery of these compounds. Emerging delivery systems based on microfluidic technologies are showing promise as a means for direct intracochlear delivery. Ultimately, these systems may serve as a means for extended delivery of regenerative compounds to restore hearing in patients suffering from a host of auditory diseases. Areas covered in this review Recent progress in the development of drug delivery systems capable of direct intracochlear delivery is reviewed, including passive systems such as osmotic pumps, active microfluidic devices, and systems combined with currently available devices such as cochlear implants. The aim of this article is to provide a concise review of intracochlear drug delivery systems currently under development, and ultimately capable of being combined with emerging therapeutic compounds for the treatment of inner ear diseases. Expert Opinion Safe and efficacious treatment of auditory diseases will require the development of microscale delivery devices, capable of extended operation and direct application to the inner ear. These advances will require miniaturization and integration of multiple functions, including drug storage, delivery, power management and sensing, ultimately enabling closed-loop control and timed-sequence delivery devices for treatment of these diseases. PMID:21615213

  5. Influence of solar flares and CME on the gaseous envelopes of hot Jupiter exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisikalo, Dmitry; Cherenkov, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Hot Jupiters, i.e. exoplanets having masses comparable to the mass of Jupiter and semimajor axes shorter than 0.1~AU, have a number of outstanding features, caused mostly by their proximity to the host star. As a matter of fact, the atmospheres of several dozens of these planets fill their Roche lobes, which results in a powerful outflow of material from the planet toward the host star. In addition, since the planet orbits at a short distance, its orbital velocity is supersonic, which causes the formation of a bow shock ahead of the planet. These effects substantially change the mechanism of interaction between the planet's gaseous envelope (atmosphere) and the stellar wind. In this paper, we investigate the flow pattern in the vicinity of a typical hot Jupiter by using 3D gas dynamic simulations. By considering the star-planet interaction we study variations in the structure of the hot Jupiter's envelope and estimate the variations of atmospheres mass-loss rate caused by the influence of typical solar flares and coronal mass ejections.

  6. Preliminary analysis of a CME observed by SOHO and Ulysses Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bemporad, A.; Poletto, G.; Romoli, M.; Suess, S. T.

    2003-01-01

    Over the last week of November 2002 SOHO/LASCO observed several Coronal Mass Ejections, most of which occurring in the NW quadrant. At that time SOHO/UVCS was involved in a SOHO-Sun-Ulysses quadrature campaign, making observations off the west limb of the Sun, at a northern latitude of 27 deg. Here we focus on data taken at 1.7 solar radii, over a time interval of approx. 7 hours, on 26/27 November 2002, when a large streamer disruption was imaged by LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. UVCS spectra revealed the presence of lines from both high and low ionization ions, such as C III, O VI, Si VIII, IX, and XII, Fe X and XVIII, which brighten at different times, with a different time scale and at different positions and are apparently related to different phenomena. In particular, the intensity increase and fast disappearance of the C III 977 Angstrom line represents the passage through the UVCS slit of cold material released in a jet imaged by EIT in the He II 304 Angstrom line. The persistent presence of the Fe XVIII 974 Angstrom line is not easily related to any special feature crossing the UVCS slit. We suggest to interpret this behavior in terms of the reconnection events which lead to the formation of loops observed in the EIT He II 304 Angstrom line.

  7. Commercial Document Delivery Services "Challenged" as EBSCO Drops Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machovec, George S.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the EBSCO decision to stop its traditional commercial document delivery business. High prices for copyright clearance, government subsidized services, electronic formats available on the Internet, Web-based services, and consortium-based licensing activities are discussed as influencing the market for document delivery. (LRW)

  8. Bioadhesive delivery systems for mucosal vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Baudner, Barbara C; O'Hagan, Derek T

    2010-12-01

    Mucosal vaccine delivery potentially induces mucosal as well as systemic immune responses and may have advantages particularly for optimal protection against pathogens that infect the host through mucosal surfaces. However, the delivery of antigens through mucosal membranes remains a major challenge due to unfavorable physiological conditions (pH and enzymes) and significant biological barriers, which restrict the uptake of antigens. To improve mucosal vaccine delivery, the use of bioadhesive delivery systems offers numerous advantages, including protection from degradation, increasing concentration of antigen in the vicinity of mucosal tissue for better absorption, extending their residence time, and/or targeting them to sites of antigen uptake. Although some bioadhesives have direct immune stimulating properties, it appears most likely that successful mucosal vaccination will require the addition of vaccine adjuvants for optimal immune responses, particularly if they are to be used in an unprimed population. Thus, complex vaccine formulations and delivery strategies have to be carefully designed to appropriately stimulate immune response for the target pathogen. In addition, careful consideration is needed to define the "best" route for mucosal immunization for each individual pathogen. PMID:21039314

  9. Information Delivery Systems: The Future Is Here.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Penelope Grenoble

    1993-01-01

    Looks at developments in information delivery (including new interactive media formats, vastly increased channel capacity for standard cable television, and the development of wireless cable and other distribution technologies) that are revolutionizing the communications industry. Raises questions about the role technical communicators are being…

  10. One Quiz File, Several Modes of Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, John C.

    2012-01-01

    This report offers online course designers, particularly those keen on using Moodle CMSs, a means of diversifying accessibility to their educational materials via multiple modes of delivery that do not require the creation of numerous files and formats for just one activity. The author has made contributions to the development of an open source…

  11. An Asynchronous Augmentation to Traditional Course Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Marvin L.; Wolverton, Mimi

    Asynchronous augmentation facilitates distributed learning, which relies heavily on technology and self-learning. This paper reports the results of delivering a real estate principles course using an asynchronous course delivery format. It highlights one of many ways to enhance learning using technology, and it provides information concerning how…

  12. Diffusive Electron Acceleration at Interplanetary CME Shocks: Comparison between events on 21 Feb 1994 and 15 July 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasawa, T.; Shimada, N.; Takei, Y.; Kawada, S.; Oka, M.; Den, M.; Mukai, T.; Saito, Y.

    2001-12-01

    While the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) process of electrons has significant astrophysical importance, reports of in situ observations of such process accompanying with interplanetary CME shocks at 1 AU have been limited to several big events, such as those on 21 Feb 1994 and 15 July 2000 [Shimada et al., ASS, 1999; Terasawa et al., ICRC, 2001]. In this presentation, we will present the results of comparative studies of these important events based on the GEOTAIL measurements. Common features of these events are, (1) high average propagation speeds from the sun to 1AU ( ~1300 km/s and ~1500 km/s), (2) high local propagation speeds at 1 AU ( ~920 km/s and ~1100 km/s), (3) exponential upstream time profiles of nonthermal electrons (up to 40 keV), and (4) nearly power-law energy spectrum. Despite these similarities, one noticeable difference among them was the relative flux increases of accelerated electrons: In the energy range of several keV to 20 keV nearly two-order of magnitude flux increases were observed at the former shock, while the corresponding increase at the latter shock was only a factor of ~3. We are now trying to identify the origin of this difference: One possibility is the different shock angles ( ~68 deg for the former, and ~48 deg for the latter). Further search for the difference in scattering agents of these electrons is also under way (For the former shock, intensification of whistler waves of several Hz was identified.)

  13. Analysis of EIT/LASCO Observations Using Available MHD Models: Investigation of CME Initiation Propagation and Geoeffectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2001-01-01

    The Sun's activity drives the variability of geospace (i.e., near-earth environment). Observations show that the ejection of plasma from the sun, called coronal mass ejections (CMEs), are the major cause of geomagnetic storms. This global-scale solar dynamical feature of coronal mass ejection was discovered almost three decades ago by the use of space-borne coronagraphs (OSO-7, Skylab/ATM and P78-1). Significant progress has been made in understanding the physical nature of the CMEs. Observations show that these global-scale CMEs have size in the order of a solar radius (approximately 6.7 x 10(exp 5) km) near the sun, and each event involves a mass of about 10(exp 15) g and an energy comparable to that of a large flare on the order of 10(exp 32) ergs. The radial propagation speeds of CMEs have a wide range from tens to thousands of kilometers per second. Thus, the transit time to near earth's environment [i.e., 1 AU (astronomical unit)] can be as fast as 40 hours to 100 hours. The typical transit time for geoeffective events is approximately 60-80 h. This paper consists of two parts: 1) A summary of the observed CMEs from Skylab to the present SOHO will be presented. Special attention will be made to SOHO/ LASCO/ EIT observations and their characteristics leading to a geoeffectiv a CME 2) The chronological development of theory and models to interpret the physical nature of this fascinating phenomenon will be reviewed. Finally, an example will be presented to illustrate the geoeffectiveness of the CMEs by using both observation and model.

  14. Community Digital Library Requirements for the Southern California Earthquake Center Community Modeling Environment (SCEC/CME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Faerman, M.; Minster, J.; Day, S. M.; Ely, G.

    2003-12-01

    A community digital library provides support for ingestion, organization, description, preservation, and access of digital entities. The technologies that traditionally provide these capabilities are digital libraries (ingestion, organization, description), persistent archives (preservation) and data grids (access). We present a design for the SCEC community digital library that incorporates aspects of all three systems. Multiple groups have created integrated environments that sustain large-scale scientific data collections. By examining these projects, the following stages of implementation can be identified: \\begin{itemize} Definition of semantic terms to associate with relevant information. This includes definition of uniform content descriptors to describe physical quantities relevant to the scientific discipline, and creation of concept spaces to define how the uniform content descriptors are logically related. Organization of digital entities into logical collections that make it simple to browse and manage related material. Definition of services that are used to access and manipulate material in the collection. Creation of a preservation environment for the long-term management of the collection. Each community is faced with heterogeneity that is introduced when data is distributed across multiple sites, or when multiple sets of collection semantics are used, and or when multiple scientific sub-disciplines are federated. We will present the relevant standards that simplify the implementation of the SCEC community library, the resource requirements for different types of data sets that drive the implementation, and the digital library processes that the SCEC community library will support. The SCEC community library can be viewed as the set of processing steps that are required to build the appropriate SCEC reference data sets (SCEC approved encoding format, SCEC approved descriptive metadata, SCEC approved collection organization, and SCEC managed storage location). Each digital entity that is ingested into the SCEC community library is processed and validated for conformance to SCEC standards. These steps generate provenance, descriptive, administrative, structural, and behavioral metadata. Using data grid technology, the descriptive metadata can be registered onto a logical name space that is controlled and managed by the SCEC digital library. A version of the SCEC community digital library is being implemented in the Storage Resource Broker. The SRB system provides almost all the features enumerated above. The peer-to-peer federation of metadata catalogs is planned for release in September, 2003. The SRB system is in production use in multiple projects, from high-energy physics, to astronomy, to earth systems science, to bio-informatics. The SCEC community library will be based on the definition of standard metadata attributes, the creation of logical collections within the SRB, the creation of access services, and the demonstration of a preservation environment. The use of the SRB for the SCEC digital library will sustain the expected collection size and collection capabilities.

  15. Drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D H; Mauger, J W

    1991-10-01

    New and emerging drug delivery systems for traditional drugs and the products of biotechnology are discussed, and the role of the pharmacist in ensuring the appropriate use of these systems is outlined. Advantages of advanced drug delivery systems over traditional systems are the ability to deliver a drug more selectively to a specific site; easier, more accurate, less frequent dosing; decreased variability in systemic drug concentrations; absorption that is more consistent with the site and mechanism of action; and reductions in toxic metabolites. Four basic strategies govern the mechanisms of advanced drug delivery: physical, chemical, biological, and mechanical. Oral drug delivery systems use natural and synthetic polymers to deliver the product to a specific region in the gastrointestinal tract in a timely manner that minimizes adverse effects and increases drug efficacy. Innovations in injectable and implantable delivery systems include emulsions, particulate delivery systems, micromolecular products and macromolecular drug adducts, and enzymatic-controlled delivery. Options for noninvasive drug delivery include the transdermal, respiratory, intranasal, ophthalmic, lymphatic, rectal, intravaginal, and intrauterine routes as well as topical application. Rapid growth is projected in the drug delivery systems market worldwide in the next five years. Genetic engineering has mandated the development of new strategies to deliver biotechnologically derived protein and peptide drugs and chemoimmunoconjugates. The role of the pharmacist in the era of advanced drug delivery systems will be broad based, including administering drugs, compounding, calculating dosages based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic monitoring, counseling, and research. The advent of advanced drug delivery systems offers pharmacists a new opportunity to assume an active role in patient care. PMID:1772110

  16. Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    The development of nonviral vectors for safe and efficient gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. An ideal nonviral vector must protect the gene against degradation by nuclease in the extracellular matrix, internalize the plasma membrane, escape from the endosomal compartment, unpackage the gene at some point and have no detrimental effects. In comparison to viruses, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to synthesize, less immunogenic, low in cost, and have no limitation in the size of a gene that can be delivered. Significant progress has been made in the basic science and applications of various nonviral gene delivery vectors; however, the majority of nonviral approaches are still inefficient and often toxic. To this end, two nonviral gene delivery systems using either biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles or cell penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes have been designed and studied using A549 human lung epithelial cells. PLG nanoparticles were optimized for gene delivery by varying particle surface chemistry using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (˜200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80-90%) and slowly released the same for two weeks. After a delay, moderate levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least two weeks. In contrast, gene expression mediated by polyethyleneimine (PEI) ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. On the other hand, a more simple method to synthesize 50-200 nm complexes capable of high transfection efficiency or high gene knockdown was also explored. Positively charged CPPs were complexed with pDNA or siRNA, which resulted in 'loose' (˜1 micron) particles. These were then condensed into small nanoparticles by using calcium, which formed "soft" crosslinks by interacting with both phosphates on nucleic acids and amines on CPPs. An optimal amount of CaCl2 produced stable, ˜100 nm complexes that exhibited higher transfection efficiency and gene silencing than PEI polyplexes. CPPs also displayed negligible cytotoxicity up to 5 mg/mL. Biophysical studies of the pDNA structure within complexes suggested that pDNA within CPP complexes (condensed with calcium) had similar structure, but enhanced thermal stability compared to PEI complexes. Thus, CPP complexes emerged as simple, attractive candidates for future studies on nonviral gene delivery in vivo.

  17. Formation of Opposite-Sign Magnetic Helicity by an Erupting Filament in a Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Kurokawa, Hiroki

    2004-06-01

    It is unclear whether it is possible for magnetic helical fields of opposite signs to co-exist in a coronal mass ejection (CME). During filament eruption with high-cadence observations for the initial stage, evidence is found for the formation of right-handed helical fields in a rising dextral filament that is embedded in a CME with helical fields in a left-handed sense. The data include Mees multi-off-band Hα observations with 16s cadence and TRACE 1600Å observations of 2s cadence. The filament material is ejected outward and is associated with the expanding CME, suggesting that both of the opposite-sign helical fields are injected into interplanetary space. In this paper, we consider the key observational features, including the formation of a coil-like structure (due to barb reconnections) and the alignment of reconnected field lines with the primary axis of the filament. It is found that they are consistent with the predicted changes during filament eruption by the filament model of Martin and McAllister. However, our results do not reject the filament model of Rust and Kumar. Moreover, a model that reconciles both of them seems to be more convenient for understanding the complicated observations. Therefore, the formation of opposite-sign helicity in an eruptive flux rope should be common for such types of filament eruptions.

  18. Transdermal Delivery by Iontophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Swati; Vengurlekar, Sudha; Rakesh, B.; Jain, S.; Srikarti, G.

    2008-01-01

    Recently there has been an increased interest in using iontophoretic technique for the transdermal delivery of medications, both ionic and nonionic. This article is an overview of the history of iontophoresis and factors affecting iontophoretic drug transfer for the systemic effects and laws for development of Transdermal delivery system are discussed. PMID:20390073

  19. Novel Aerosol Delivery Devices.

    PubMed

    Singh, Supriya; Kanbar-Agha, Faisal; Sharafkhaneh, Amir

    2015-08-01

    Delivery of medication to sites of action through airways has been used for centuries but has gained momentum in recent decades. Currently available modes of aerosol delivery offer advantages but still there are shortcomings. Delivery of active agents to sites of action is affected by many factors beyond the characteristics of the delivery devices, including the coordination between inhalation and actuation and dependence on the patient's inspiratory flow and breathing pattern. Recent advances in drug delivery focus around changes in the generation of particle size with better penetration to the targeted sites, easier activation of the device with inspiratory flow, ease of use including fewer steps in using the device, and better portability. Availability of computer chips allows for smart delivery devices to tailor delivery to the patient's breathing pattern and lung function. Further, smart devices can provide feedback to patients. Novel inhaler technologies, separately or in combination with new therapeutic agents, are in development not only for respiratory diseases but also for diseases of other systems. This article reviews some of the recent clinically relevant advances in aerosol delivery devices. PMID:26238640

  20. Elective Delivery Before 39 Weeks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Delivery, and Postpartum Care Elective Delivery Before 39 Weeks • What is a “medically indicated” delivery? • What is ... the baby grow and develop during the last weeks of pregnancy? • What are the risks for babies ...

  1. Genetic-Biochemical Analysis and Distribution of the Ambler Class A β-Lactamase CME-2, Responsible for Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporin Resistance in Chryseobacterium (Flavobacterium) meningosepticum

    PubMed Central

    Bellais, Samuel; Poirel, Laurent; Naas, Thierry; Girlich, Delphine; Nordmann, Patrice

    2000-01-01

    In vitro synergy between extended-spectrum cephalosporins and either clavulanic acid or cefoxitin was found for Chryseobacterium meningosepticum isolates during a double-disk assay on an agar plate. An extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) gene from a C. meningosepticum clinical isolate was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli DH10B. Its protein conferred resistance to most β-lactams including extended-spectrum cephalosporins but not to cephamycins or to imipenem. Its activity was strongly inhibited by clavulanic acid, sulbactam, and tazobactam, as well as by cephamycins and imipenem. Sequence analysis of the cloned DNA fragment revealed an open reading frame (ORF) of 891 bp with a G+C content of 33.9%, which lies close to the expected range of G+C contents of members of the Chryseobacterium genus. The ORF encoded a precursor protein of 297 amino acids, giving a mature protein with a molecular mass of 31 kDa and a pI value of 9.2 in E. coli. This gene was very likely chromosomally located. Amino acid sequence comparison showed that this β-lactamase, named CME-2 (C. meningosepticum ESBL), is a novel ESBL of the Ambler class A group (Bush functional group 2be), being weakly related to other class A β-lactamases. It shares only 39 and 35% identities with the ESBLs VEB-1 from E. coli MG-1 and CBL-A from Bacteroides uniformis, respectively. The distribution of blaCME-2 among unrelated C. meningosepticum species isolates showed that blaCME-2-like genes were found in the C. meningosepticum strains studied but were absent from strains of other C. meningosepticum-related species. Each C. meningosepticum strain produced at least two β-lactamases, with one of them being a noninducible serine ESBL with variable pIs ranging from 7.0 to 8.5. PMID:10602714

  2. Comparison of interplanetary CME arrival times and solar wind parameters based on the WSA-ENLIL model with three cone types and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Soojeong; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jae-Ok; Na, Hyeonock

    2014-09-01

    We have made a comparison between coronal mass ejection (CME)-associated shock propagations based on the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-ENLIL model using three cone types and in situ observations. For this we use 28 full-halo CMEs, whose cone parameters are determined and their corresponding interplanetary shocks were observed at the Earth, from 2001 to 2002. We consider three different cone types (an asymmetric cone model, an ice cream cone model, and an elliptical cone model) to determine 3-D CME cone parameters (radial velocity, angular width, and source location), which are the input values of the WSA-ENLIL model. The mean absolute error of the CME-associated shock travel times for the WSA-ENLIL model using the ice-cream cone model is 9.9 h, which is about 1 h smaller than those of the other models. We compare the peak values and profiles of solar wind parameters (speed and density) with in situ observations. We find that the root-mean-square errors of solar wind peak speed and density for the ice cream and asymmetric cone model are about 190 km/s and 24/cm3, respectively. We estimate the cross correlations between the models and observations within the time lag of ± 2 days from the shock travel time. The correlation coefficients between the solar wind speeds from the WSA-ENLIL model using three cone types and in situ observations are approximately 0.7, which is larger than those of solar wind density (cc ˜0.6). Our preliminary investigations show that the ice cream cone model seems to be better than the other cone models in terms of the input parameters of the WSA-ENLIL model.

  3. Pressure-driven high to low spin transition in the bimetallic quantum magnet [Ru2(O2CMe)4]3[Cr(CN)6

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neal, K. R.; Liu, Z.; Miller, Joel S.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Musfeldt, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron-based infrared and Raman spectroscopies were brought together with diamond anvil cell techniques and an analysis of the magnetic properties to investigate the pressure-induced high low spin transition in [Ru2(O2CMe)4]3[Cr(CN)6]. The extended nature of the diruthenium wavefunction combined with coupling to chromium-related local lattice distortions changes the relative energies of the and orbitals and drives the high low spin transition on the mixed-valence diruthenium complex. This is a rare example of an externally controlled metamagnetic transition in which both spin-orbit and spin-lattice interactions contribute to the mechanism.

  4. Nanosize drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Biswajit

    2013-01-01

    Nanosize materials provide hopes, speculations and chances for an unprecedented change in drug delivery in near future. Nanotechnology is an emerging field to produce nanomaterials for drug delivery that can offer a new tool, opportunities and scope to provide more focused and fine-tuned treatment of diseases at a molecular level, enhancing the therapeutic potential of drugs so that they become less toxic and more effective. Nanodimensional drug delivery systems are of great scientific interest as they project their tremendous utility because of their capability of altering biodistribution of therapeutic agents so that they can concentrate more in the target tissues. Nanosize drug delivery systems generally focus on formulating bioactive molecules in biocompatible nanosystems such as nanocrystals, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructure lipid carriers, lipid drug conjugates, nanoliposomes, dendrimers, nanoshells, emulsions, nanotubes, quantum dots etc. Extensively versatile molecules like synthetic chemicals to naturally occurring complex macromolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins could be dispensed in such formulations maintaining their stability and efficacy. Empty viral capsids are being tried to deliver drug as these uniformly sized bionanomaterials can be utilized to load drug to improve solubility, reduce toxicity and provide site specific targeting. Nanomedicines offer a wide scope for delivery of smart materials from tissue engineering to more recently artificial RBCs. Nanocomposites are the future hope for tailored and personalized medicines as well as for bone repairing and rectification of cartilage impairment. Nanosize drug delivery systems are addressing the challenges to overcome the delivery problems of wide ranges of drugs through their narrow submicron particle size range, easily manipulatable surface characteristics in achievement of versatile tissue targeting (includes active and passive drug targeting), controlled and sustained drug release property to achieve increased therapeutic efficacy and reduced side effects. Nanoparticles and nanoliposomes are emerging areas of nanotechnologies that have already begun to make an impact over new modalities for cancer chemotherapy, diagnosis as well as gene delivery. Presently it is possible to reduce the particle size in such a way that the particles can be easily injected or inhaled and many types of human cells are capable to internalize them. A number of fabrications such as PEGylation, specific antibody conjugation, aptamer ligation, specific ligand binding etc. on the nanosize delivery devices makes them in the streamline of research to particularly target the diseased cells thus avoiding the healthy one. Potential of nanosize carriers to cross the blood brain barrier encourages us to build up a new strategy for delivery of therapeutically active agents to the brain. Nanotechnology is showing an emerging effect in chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases etc. Nanosize vaccines are having greater effect in production of better immunity against pathogens through direct administration of medication to the specialized dendritic cells in the immune systems. Lots of hopes and speculations are reigning around the scientists with nanosize drug delivery systems that may revolutionize the drug delivery with the better understanding of drug action mechanism and identification of biomarker associated with specific diseases. Nanosize drug delivery systems are emerging with the promising strategies for efficient targeted drug delivery. The proper designing of these systems can make them capable for being independent in the normal tissue environments and selective at the diseased pharmacological site. Nanomaterials as formulations are already in the market or in clinical trials. Investigation on nanostructural drug delivery is a highly growing field today as an extensive amount of research is on with an expectation to open up new avenues to drug delivery. No doubt the next era of drug therapy will be greater influenced by nanoscale drug delivery systems. However these newer systems for delivery of bioactive molecules must be reliable, efficient and safe. PMID:25106648

  5. Neurotrophin delivery using nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Angelina; Angelov, Borislav; Drechsler, Markus; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2013-12-01

    Deficits or overexpression of neurotrophins cause neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. These proteins are required for the maintenance of the function, plasticity and survival of neurons in the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems. Significant efforts have been devoted to developing therapeutic delivery systems that enable control of neurotrophin dosage in the brain. Here, we suggest that nanoparticulate carriers favoring targeted delivery in specific brain areas and minimizing biodistribution to the systemic circulation should be developed toward clinical benefits of neuroregeneration. We also provide examples of improved targeted neurotrophin delivery to localized areas in the CNS. PMID:23891881

  6. Pulmonary vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dongmei; Hickey, Anthony J

    2007-04-01

    This review will discuss developments in the field of pulmonary vaccine delivery. The possibilities of adopting aerosol-generation technology and specific pharmaceutical formulations for the purpose of pulmonary immunization are described. Aerosol-generation systems might offer advantages with respect to vaccine stability and antigenicity. Adjuvants and their inclusion in vaccine-delivery systems are described. Other formulation components, such as surfactants, particulate systems and dispersion of the aerosols are detailed in this paper. The noninvasive, relatively safe and low-cost nature of pulmonary delivery may provide great benefits to the public health vaccination campaign. PMID:17408371

  7. Belgium. [CME Country Reports].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Documentation Center for Education in Europe.

    From the end of World War II to 1964, immigration trends in Belgium were largely governed by the need to supply workers for the coal industry, which led to an influx of Italians, Greeks, Spaniards, Turks, and Morrocans. In 1971 there were approximately 200,000 foreign workers in Belgium; the majority of these were Italian. Relying heavily on…

  8. Italy. [CME Country Reports].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Documentation Center for Education in Europe.

    Ever since 1946, increased emigration in Italy has been paralleled by a slow but steady increase in educational activity. In 1971, Law No. 153 was adopted which provides for special educational arrangements to be made for migrant workers and their spouses adopted by the Italian Government are based on the need for Italian children to: (1) be…

  9. Denmark. [CME Country Reports].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Documentation Center for Education in Europe.

    According to an agreement between the parties of the labour market and the Ministry of Labour, the immigration of foreign workers into Denmark takes place on a quota basis and conforms to a series of regulations, including a rule that the foreign worker, prior to departing from his country, must have made contract arrangements for his job. This…

  10. CME or PME?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Malcolm S. M.

    1990-01-01

    A concept of practice medical education could be a wonderfully challenging platform on which continuing medical education professionals could take their stand and define and develop the content and skills needed for more effective and relevant practice. (JOW)

  11. Current perspectives on intrathecal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bottros, Michael M; Christo, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Advances in intrathecal analgesia and intrathecal drug delivery systems have allowed for a range of medications to be used in the control of pain and spasticity. This technique allows for reduced medication doses that can decrease the side effects typically associated with oral or parenteral drug delivery. Recent expert panel consensus guidelines have provided care paths in the treatment of nociceptive, neuropathic, and mixed pain syndromes. While the data for pain relief, adverse effect reduction, and cost-effectiveness with cancer pain control are compelling, the evidence is less clear for noncancer pain, other than spasticity. Physicians should be aware of mechanical, pharmacological, surgical, and patient-specific complications, including possible granuloma formation. Newer intrathecal drug delivery systems may allow for better safety and quality of life outcomes. PMID:25395870

  12. Optically generated ultrasound for enhanced drug delivery

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R.; Campbell, Heather L.; Da Silva, Luiz

    2002-01-01

    High frequency acoustic waves, analogous to ultrasound, can enhance the delivery of therapeutic compounds into cells. The compounds delivered may be chemotherapeutic drugs, antibiotics, photodynamic drugs or gene therapies. The therapeutic compounds are administered systemically, or preferably locally to the targeted site. Local delivery can be accomplished through a needle, cannula, or through a variety of vascular catheters, depending on the location of routes of access. To enhance the systemic or local delivery of the therapeutic compounds, high frequency acoustic waves are generated locally near the target site, and preferably near the site of compound administration. The acoustic waves are produced via laser radiation interaction with an absorbing media and can be produced via thermoelastic expansion, thermodynamic vaporization, material ablation, or plasma formation. Acoustic waves have the effect of temporarily permeabilizing the membranes of local cells, increasing the diffusion of the therapeutic compound into the cells, allowing for decreased total body dosages, decreased side effects, and enabling new therapies.

  13. Project Delivery Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Thomas G.

    2003-01-01

    Describes project delivery methods that are replacing the traditional Design/Bid/Build linear approach to the management, design, and construction of new facilities. These variations can enhance construction management and teamwork. (SLD)

  14. Assisted Vaginal Delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivery include a long (more than 3 years) interval between pregnancies or a fetus that is estimated ... Gynecologists Resources & Publications Committee Opinions Practice Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal Practice Management Coding Health Info Technology ...

  15. DETERMINATION OF THE HELIOSPHERIC RADIAL MAGNETIC FIELD FROM THE STANDOFF DISTANCE OF A CME-DRIVEN SHOCK OBSERVED BY THE STEREO SPACECRAFT

    SciTech Connect

    Poomvises, Watanachak; Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Kwon, Ryun-Young; Olmedo, Oscar

    2012-10-20

    We report on the determination of radial magnetic field strength in the heliocentric distance range from 6 to 120 solar radii (R {sub Sun }) using data from Coronagraph 2 (COR2) and Heliospheric Imager I (HI1) instruments on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft following the standoff-distance method of Gopalswamy and Yashiro. We measured the shock standoff distance of the 2008 April 5 coronal mass ejection (CME) and determined the flux-rope curvature by fitting the three-dimensional shape of the CME using the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model. The radial magnetic field strength is computed from the Alfven speed and the density of the ambient medium. We also compare the derived magnetic field strength with in situ measurements made by the Helios spacecraft, which measured the magnetic field at the heliocentric distance range from 60 to 215 R {sub Sun }. We found that the radial magnetic field strength decreases from 28 mG at 6 R {sub Sun} to 0.17 mG at 120 R {sub Sun }. In addition, we found that the radial profile can be described by a power law.

  16. Determination of the Heliospheric Radial Magnetic Field from the Standoff Distance of a CME-Driven Shock Observed by the Stereo Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poomvises, Watanachak; Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Kwon, Ryun-Young; Olmedo, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    We report on the determination of radial magnetic field strength in the heliocentric distance range from 6 to 120 solar radii (R-solar) using data from Coronagraph 2 (COR2) and Heliospheric Imager I (HI1) instruments on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft following the standoff-distance method of Gopalswamy & Yashiro. We measured the shock standoff distance of the 2008 April 5 coronal mass ejection (CME) and determined the flux-rope curvature by fitting the three-dimensional shape of the CME using the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model. The radial magnetic field strength is computed from the Alfven speed and the density of the ambient medium. We also compare the derived magnetic field strength with in situ measurements made by the Helios spacecraft, which measured the magnetic field at the heliocentric distance range from 60 to 215 R-solar.We found that the radial magnetic field strength decreases from 28 mG at 6 R-solar to 0.17 mG at 120 R-solar. In addition, we found that the radial profile can be described by a power law.

  17. Hybrid use of combined and sequential delivery of growth factors and ultrasound stimulation in porous multilayer composite scaffolds to promote both vascularization and bone formation in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haoran; Liu, Xia; Zhu, Minghua; Luo, Guilin; Sun, Tao; Peng, Qiang; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Taijun; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Keliang; Feng, Bo; Weng, Jie; Wang, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a multilayer coating technology would be adopted to prepare a porous composite scaffold and the growth factor release and ultrasound techniques were introduced into bone tissue engineering to finally solve the problems of vascularization and bone formation in the scaffold whilst the designed multilayer composite with gradient degradation characteristics in the space was used to match the new bone growth process better. The results of animal experiments showed that the use of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) combined with growth factors demonstrated excellent capabilities and advantages in both vascularization and new bone formation in bone tissue engineering. The degradation of the used scaffold materials could match new bone formation very well. The results also showed that only RGD-promoted cell adhesion was insufficient to satisfy the needs of new bone formation while growth factors and LIPUS stimulation were the key factors in new bone formation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 195-208, 2016. PMID:26282063

  18. MHD modeling for Formation Process of Coronal Mass Ejections: Interaction between Ejecting Flux Rope and Ambient Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, Daikou; Kusano, Kanya; Miyoshi, Takahiro; Shibata, Kazunari

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), in which large amount of magnetic flux is launched into the interplanetary space, are most explosive phenomena in the solar corona. Due to their large influences to the space environment near the Earth, it is very important to make cleat how CMEs are formed and how determine the field orientations within CMEs. In order to examine the sufficient conditions, we performed three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of formation processes of CMEs, focusing on interaction (reconnection) between an ejecting flux rope and its ambient field. We examined three cases with different ambient fields: no ambient field, and cases with dipole field of two opposite directions which are parallel and anti-parallel to that of the flux rope surface. As the results, while the flux rope disappears in the anti-parallel case, in other cases the flux ropes can evolve to CMEs and however shows different amount of rotation of the flux rope. The results mean that the interaction between an ejecting flux rope and its ambient field is a significant process for determining CME formation and CME orientation, and also show that the amount and direction of magnetic flux within the flux rope and the ambient field are key parameters for CME formation. Especially, the interaction (reconnection) plays a significant role to the rotation of the flux rope, with a process similar to "tilting instability" in a spheromak-type experiment of laboratory plasma.

  19. Nanomedicine in pulmonary delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Heidi M; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Wu, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The lung is an attractive target for drug delivery due to noninvasive administration via inhalation aerosols, avoidance of first-pass metabolism, direct delivery to the site of action for the treatment of respiratory diseases, and the availability of a huge surface area for local drug action and systemic absorption of drug. Colloidal carriers (ie, nanocarrier systems) in pulmonary drug delivery offer many advantages such as the potential to achieve relatively uniform distribution of drug dose among the alveoli, achievement of improved solubility of the drug from its own aqueous solubility, a sustained drug release which consequently reduces dosing frequency, improves patient compliance, decreases incidence of side effects, and the potential of drug internalization by cells. This review focuses on the current status and explores the potential of colloidal carriers (ie, nanocarrier systems) in pulmonary drug delivery with special attention to their pharmaceutical aspects. Manufacturing processes, in vitro/in vivo evaluation methods, and regulatory/toxicity issues of nanomedicines in pulmonary delivery are also discussed. PMID:20054434

  20. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  1. Operative vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Yeomans, Edward R

    2010-03-01

    Operative vaginal delivery remains a valid option when problems arise in the second stage of labor. The most common indications are fetal compromise and failure to deliver spontaneously with maximum maternal effort. There is a clear trend to choose vacuum extraction over forceps to assist delivery, but the evidence supporting that trend is unconvincing. Recent literature confirms some advantages for forceps (eg, a lower failure rate) and some disadvantages for vacuum extraction (eg, increased neonatal injury), depending on the clinical circumstances. To preserve the option of forceps delivery, residency training programs must incorporate detailed instruction in forceps techniques and related skills into their curricula. Simulation training can enhance residents' understanding of mechanical principles and should logically precede clinical work. PMID:20177298

  2. Changes in Altitude Cause Unintended Insulin Delivery From Insulin Pumps

    PubMed Central

    King, Bruce R.; Goss, Peter W.; Paterson, Megan A.; Crock, Patricia A.; Anderson, Donald G.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Children and adults with type 1 diabetes who receive insulin pump therapy have reported hypoglycemia during air travel. We studied the effects of atmospheric pressure on insulin pump delivery. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Ten insulin pumps were connected to capillary tubes. The effects of changes in ambient pressure on insulin delivery, bubble formation, bubble size, and cartridge plunger movement were analyzed. RESULTS During a flight (200 mmHg pressure decrease), excess insulin delivery of 0.623% of the cartridge volume occurred (P < 0.001, Student t test). In hypobaric chamber studies, bubbles developed in the insulin when the pressure decreased and displaced the insulin out of the cartridge. Pre-existing bubbles changed in size consistent with Boyle law. Cartridge plunger movement did not occur in normal flight conditions but did occur when catastrophic plane depressurization was mimicked. CONCLUSIONS Atmospheric pressure reduction causes predictable, unintended insulin delivery in pumps by bubble formation and expansion of existing bubbles. PMID:21816978

  3. Redefining continuing education delivery.

    PubMed

    Carlton, K H

    1997-01-01

    Just as technology is transforming the delivery of education, the Internet and advanced telecommunication applications are changing the "face" of CE and the connotation of "lifelong learning." As late as the mid-1980s, a discussion of computer applications in nursing CE focused on the "timely" transition to microcomputers as tools for the enhancement of managerial tasks for increased productivity. Even as recently as 1990, there seemed to be "time" for those providers who were "slower to adopt innovation" to "catch up." Now, the CE provider who does not integrate the microcomputer and advanced telecommunications as an integral component of their delivery modalities may be outsourced rapidly by an educational or commercial competitive unit that is able to utilize the communication medium, mergers and partnerships, enterprise, and individual lifestyle and learning patterns that will epitomize the CE unit of the 21st century. As with the "re-engineering" of nursing education, the "re-engineered" delivery modalities of evolving CE entity might now best be conceptualized on a continuum from the traditional mode that time and place dependent to a mode of synchronous and asynchronous data and advanced telecommunication. Delivery methods will need to be selected according to the target populations, content, and situation. The health-care educational provider may discover, as in other industries, that a combination of distance and residential offerings will be the most successful medium for the delivery of CE to the progressively more "information and technologically savvy" lifelong learner of the 21st century. In addressing the dramatic effects of the information technology era on the refocused multimedia/interactive delivery method for student education, educators amply quoted Bob Dylan's phrase of the 1960s, "The times, they are a-changing." And so, we see that the times are also changing at an astronomical rate for the health-care educational provider as well as the individual health-care worker consumer. A number of national and world-wide trends are propelling rapid changes in the delivery modalities and types of emerging providers for health-care CE. Examples of these advanced telecommunications applications of CE opportunities for health-care personnel are becoming more prevalent in the literature and the pattern of CE marketing, and delivery evolution can be seen readily on the Internet. Continued program success and viability will belong to the individuals and organizations who are able to conceptualize and envision the positive transformations and opportunities that can occur from the evolving paradigm of education for the lifelong learner of the 21st century. PMID:9014388

  4. The delivery system matters.

    PubMed

    Crosson, Francis J

    2005-01-01

    To meet the quality, affordability, and access challenges of today's health care system, the Institute of Medicine's (IOM's) Crossing the Quality Chasm report described the critical competencies of a twenty-first-century health care system. A growing body of research suggests that the nation's multispecialty group practices most nearly meet the delivery system challenges set forth by the IOM. A variety of current public and private initiatives and potential policy options could act as catalysts for the development and spread of group practice-based, accountable delivery systems that are effective and efficient. PMID:16284026

  5. Systems and Components Fuel Delivery System, Water Delivery System, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Systems and Components - Fuel Delivery System, Water Delivery System, Derrick Crane System, and Crane System Details - Marshall Space Flight Center, F-1 Engine Static Test Stand, On Route 565 between Huntsville and Decatur, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  6. The effect of rhBMP-2 and PRP delivery by biodegradable β-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds on new bone formation in a non-through rabbit cranial defect model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyun-Pil; Mercado-Pagan, Angel E.; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kang, Seong-Soo; Choi, Taek-Hue; Bishop, Julius; Koh, Jeong-Tae; Maloney, William; Lee, Kwang-Min; Yang, Yunzhi; Park, Sang-Won

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated whether the combination of biodegradable β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) could accelerate bone formation and increase bone height using a rabbit non-through cranial bone defect model. Four non-through cylindrical bone defects with a diameter of 8-mm were surgically created on the cranium of rabbits. β-TCP scaffolds in the presence and absence of impregnated rhBMP-2 or PRP were placed into the defects. At 8 and 16 weeks after implantation, samples were dissected and fixed for analysis by microcomputed tomography and histology. Only defects with rhBMP-2 impregnated β-TCP scaffolds showed significantly enhanced bone formation compared to non-impregnated β-TCP scaffolds (p<0.05). Although new bone was higher than adjacent bone at 8 weeks after implantation, vertical bone augmentation was not observed at 16 weeks after implantation, probably due to scaffold resorption occurring concurrently with new bone formation. PMID:23779152

  7. Local magnetism in the molecule-based metamagnet [Ru2(O2CMe)4]3[Cr(CN)6] probed with implanted muons

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, T.; Pratt, F. L.; Blundell, S. J.; Steele, Andrew J.; Baker, Peter J.; Wright, Jack D.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Miller, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    We present a muon-spin relaxation study of local magnetism in the molecule-based metamagnet [Ru2(O2CMe)4]3[Cr(CN)6]. We observe magnetic order with TN = 33 K, although above 25 K the sublattice spins become less rigid and a degree of static magnetic disorder is observed. The comparison of measurements in applied magnetic field with simulations allows us to understand the origin of the muon response across the metamagnetic transition and to map out the phase diagram of the material. Applied hydrostatic pressures of up to 6 kbar lead to an increase in the local magnetic field along with a complex change in the internal magnetic field distribution.

  8. Caesarean delivery: conflicting interests.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Eduardo; Pérez Cárceles, Maria Dolores; Sánchez Ferrer, Maria Luisa; Machado, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Within the maternal-fetal relationship, interests may sometimes diverge. In this paper, a pregnant woman's refusal to undergo a caesarean delivery, which was recommended both to save the life of the fetus and to minimize risks to her, is described. The legal aspects involved in the conflict between maternal autonomy and fetal well-being are analysed. The patient requested an abortion because of the poor condition of the fetus; however, according to Spanish legislation, the possibility of abortion was rejected as the pregnancy was in its 27th week. The woman still persisted in her refusal to accept a caesarian delivery. After the medical team sought guidance on the course to follow, the Duty Court authorized a caesarean delivery against the wishes of the patient. From a legal point of view, at stake were the freedom of the woman - expressed by the decision to reject a caesarean delivery - and the life of the unborn child. In clinical treatment, the interests of the fetus are generally aligned with those of the pregnant woman. When they are not, it is the pregnant woman's autonomy that should be respected, and coercion should form no part of treatment, contrary to the decision of this court. PMID:26371711

  9. [Noninvasive insulin delivery systems].

    PubMed

    Zubaerova, D Kh; Larionova, N I

    2008-01-01

    The review considers commercial insulin formulations. Special attention is paid to the difficulties and strategies of development of alternative hormone delivery systems (buccal, transdermal, intranasal, pulmonary and oral). At the moment there is only one approved formulation of the noninvasive insulin in the world. PMID:18712083

  10. Breastfeeding After Cesarean Delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... news is that the method of delivery has little effect on your ability to nurse your baby. Your breast milk will come in almost as ... to help make you comfortable. In most cases, little of this medication passes ... to your baby. Some pain medications may temporarily make your newborn ...

  11. Educational Telecommunications Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, John A., Ed.; Biedenbach, Joseph M., Ed.

    This monograph is a single volume reference manual providing an overall review of the current status and likely near future application of six major educational telecommunications delivery technologies. The introduction provides an overview to the usage and potential for these systems in the context of the major educational issues involved. Each…

  12. Document Delivery Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Nancy Melin

    1992-01-01

    Presents highlights of research that used industrywide surveys, focus groups, personal interviews, and industry-published data to explore the future of electronic information delivery in libraries. Topics discussed include CD-ROMs; prices; full-text products; magnetic tape leasing; engineering and technical literature; connections between online

  13. Organogels in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Murdan, Sudaxshina

    2005-05-01

    In the last decade, interest in physical organogels has grown rapidly with the discovery and synthesis of a very large number of diverse molecules, which can gel organic solvents at low concentrations. The gelator molecules immobilise large volumes of liquid following their self-assembly into a variety of aggregates such as rods, tubules, fibres and platelets. The many interesting properties of these gels, such as their thermoreversibility, have led to much excitement over their industrial applications. However, only a few organogels are currently being studied as drug/vaccine delivery vehicles as most of the existing organogels are composed of pharmaceutically unacceptable organic liquids and/or unacceptable/untested gelators. In this paper a brief overview of organogels is presented, followed by a more in-depth review of the gels that have been investigated for drug and/or vaccine delivery. These include microemulsion-based gels and lecithin gels (studied for transdermal delivery), sorbitan monostearate organogels and amphiphilogels (studied as vaccine adjuvants and for oral and transdermal drug delivery, respectively), gels composed of alanine derivatives (investigated as in situ forming gels) and Eudragit organogels (studied as a matrix for suppositories). Finally, pluronic lecithin organogels, descendents of lecithin gels but which are not really organogels, are briefly discussed for their interesting history, their root and the wide interest in these systems. PMID:16296770

  14. Vaccine delivery using nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Anthony E; Titball, Richard; Williamson, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination has had a major impact on the control of infectious diseases. However, there are still many infectious diseases for which the development of an effective vaccine has been elusive. In many cases the failure to devise vaccines is a consequence of the inability of vaccine candidates to evoke appropriate immune responses. This is especially true where cellular immunity is required for protective immunity and this problem is compounded by the move toward devising sub-unit vaccines. Over the past decade nanoscale size (<1000 nm) materials such as virus-like particles, liposomes, ISCOMs, polymeric, and non-degradable nanospheres have received attention as potential delivery vehicles for vaccine antigens which can both stabilize vaccine antigens and act as adjuvants. Importantly, some of these nanoparticles (NPs) are able to enter antigen-presenting cells by different pathways, thereby modulating the immune response to the antigen. This may be critical for the induction of protective Th1-type immune responses to intracellular pathogens. Their properties also make them suitable for the delivery of antigens at mucosal surfaces and for intradermal administration. In this review we compare the utilities of different NP systems for the delivery of sub-unit vaccines and evaluate the potential of these delivery systems for the development of new vaccines against a range of pathogens. PMID:23532930

  15. Fluid delivery control system

    DOEpatents

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  16. Destabilization of a Solar Prominence/Filament Field System by a Series of Eight Homologous Eruptive Flares Leading to a CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Innes, Davina E.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2015-09-01

    Homologous flares are flares that occur repetitively in the same active region, with similar structure and morphology. A series of at least eight homologous flares occurred in active region NOAA 11237 over 2011 June 16-17. A nearby prominence/filament was rooted in the active region, and situated near the bottom of a coronal cavity. The active region was on the southeast solar limb as seen from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, and on the disk as viewed from the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory/EUVI-B. The dual perspective allows us to study in detail behavior of the prominence/filament material entrained in the magnetic field of the repeatedly erupting system. Each of the eruptions were mainly confined, but expelled hot material into the prominence/filament cavity system (PFCS). The field carrying and containing the ejected hot material interacted with the PFCS and caused it to inflate, resulting in a step-wise rise of the PFCS approximately in step with the homologous eruptions. The eighth eruption triggered the PFCS to move outward slowly, accompanied by a weak coronal dimming. As this slow PFCS eruption was underway, a final “ejective” flare occurred in the core of the active region, resulting in strong dimming in the EUVI-B images and expulsion of a coronal mass ejection (CME). A plausible scenario is that the repeated homologous flares could have gradually destabilized the PFCS, and its subsequent eruption removed field above the acitive region and in turn led to the ejective flare, strong dimming, and CME.

  17. Nanotopography applications in drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Laura A; Allen, Jessica L; Desai, Tejal A

    2016-01-01

    Refinement of micro- and nanofabrication in the semiconductor field has led to innovations in biomedical technologies. Nanotopography, in particular, shows great potential in facilitating drug delivery. The flexibility of fabrication techniques has created a diverse array of topographies that have been developed for drug delivery applications. Nanowires and nanostraws deliver drug cytosolically for in vitro and ex vivo applications. In vivo drug delivery is limited by the barrier function of the epithelium. Nanowires on microspheres increase adhesion and residence time for oral drug delivery, while also increasing permeability of the epithelium. Low aspect ratio nanocolumns increase paracellular permeability, and in conjunction with microneedles increase transdermal drug delivery of biologics in vivo. In summary, nanotopography is a versatile tool for drug delivery. It can deliver directly to cells or be used for in vivo delivery across epithelial barriers. This editorial highlights the application of nanotopography in the field of drug delivery. PMID:26512871

  18. DIRECT EVIDENCE FOR A FAST CORONAL MASS EJECTION DRIVEN BY THE PRIOR FORMATION AND SUBSEQUENT DESTABILIZATION OF A MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect

    Patsourakos, S.; Vourlidas, A.; Stenborg, G.

    2013-02-20

    Magnetic flux ropes play a central role in the physics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Although a flux-rope topology is inferred for the majority of coronagraphic observations of CMEs, a heated debate rages on whether the flux ropes pre-exist or whether they are formed on-the-fly during the eruption. Here, we present a detailed analysis of extreme-ultraviolet observations of the formation of a flux rope during a confined flare followed about 7 hr later by the ejection of the flux rope and an eruptive flare. The two flares occurred during 2012 July 18 and 19. The second event unleashed a fast (>1000 km s{sup -1}) CME. We present the first direct evidence of a fast CME driven by the prior formation and destabilization of a coronal magnetic flux rope formed during the confined flare on July 18.

  19. PECTIN IN CONTROLLED DRUG DELIVERY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlled drug delivery remains a research focus for public health to enhance patient compliance, drug efficiency and to reduce the side effects of drugs. Pectin, an edible plant polysaccharide, has shown potential for the construction of drug delivery systems for site-specific drug delivery. Sev...

  20. Peptide and protein delivery using new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashish; Jain, Aviral; Gulbake, Arvind; Shilpi, Satish; Hurkat, Pooja; Jain, Sanjay K

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical and biotechnological research sorts protein drug delivery systems by importance based on their various therapeutic applications. The effective and potent action of the proteins/peptides makes them the drugs of choice for the treatment of numerous diseases. Major research issues in protein delivery include the stabilization of proteins in delivery devices and the design of appropriate target-specific protein carriers. Many efforts have been made for effective delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs through various routes of administrations for successful therapeutic effects. Nanoparticles made of biodegradable polymers such as poly lactic acid, polycaprolactone, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), the poly(fumaric-co-sebacic) anhydride chitosan, and modified chitosan, as well as solid lipids, have shown great potential in the delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs. Moreover, scientists also have used liposomes, PEGylated liposomes, niosomes, and aquasomes, among others, for peptidal drug delivery. They also have developed hydrogels and transdermal drug delivery systems for peptidal drug delivery. A receptor-mediated delivery system is another attractive strategy to overcome the limitation in drug absorption that enables the transcytosis of the protein across the epithelial barrier. Modification such as PEGnology is applied to various proteins and peptides of the desired protein and peptides also increases the circulating life, solubility and stability, pharmacokinetic properties, and antigenicity of protein. This review focuses on various approaches for effective protein/peptidal drug delivery, with special emphasis on insulin delivery. PMID:23662604

  1. Coordination Compounds of Strontium. Syntheses, Characterizations, and Crystal Structures of [Sr(u-ONc)(2)(HONc(4))]2 and Sr(5)(u(4)-O)(u(3)-ONep)(4)(u-ONep)(4)(HONep)(solv)(4) (ONc=O(2)CCH(2)CMe(3));Nep=CH(2)CMe(3); solv=tetrahydrofuran or 1-methyl-imida

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Tafoya, Cory J.; Scott, Brian L.; Ziller, Joseph W.

    1999-07-21

    The authors have synthesized and characterized two novel Sr compounds: [Sr({mu}-ONc){sub 2}(HONc){sub 4}]{sub 2} (1, ONc = O{sub 2}CCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 3}), and Sr{sub 5}({mu}{sub 4}-O)({mu}{sub 3}-ONep){sub 4}({mu}-ONep){sub 4}(HONep)(solv){sub 4} [ONep = OCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 3}, solv = tetrahydrofuran (THF), 2a; 1-methyl-imidazole (MeIm), (2b)], that demonstrate increased solubility in comparison to the commercially available Sr precursors. The two metal centers of 1 share 4 unidentate bridging {mu}-ONc ligands and complete their octahedral geometry through the coordination of 4 monodentate terminal HONc ligands. The structure arrangement of the central core of 2a and b are identical, wherein 4 octahedral Sr atoms are arranged in a square geometry around a {mu}{sub 4}-O ligand. An additional 7-coordinated Sr atom sits directly atop the {mu}{sub 4}-O to form a square base pyramidal arrangement of the Sr atoms but the apical Sr-O distance is too long to be considered a bond. In solution, compound 1 is disrupted forming a monomer but 2a and b retain their structures.

  2. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rahamatullah; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Garland, Martin James; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2011-01-01

    Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal). PMID:21430958

  3. Delivery of the Obese Gravida.

    PubMed

    Faucett, Allison M; Metz, Torri D

    2016-03-01

    Obesity in pregnancy confers morbidity to both the mother and neonate. Obese women are at increased risk of cesarean delivery, operative vaginal delivery, and failed trial of labor after cesarean delivery. In addition to impacting the mode of delivery, obesity is associated with hemorrhage, infection, and thromboembolic complications in the peripartum period. The risk of these complications increases with increasing maternal body mass index. In this chapter, we discuss evidence-based strategies to mitigate these risks and to manage complications that occur at the time of delivery in obese parturients. PMID:26694496

  4. Single compartment drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Cima, Michael J; Lee, Heejin; Daniel, Karen; Tanenbaum, Laura M; Mantzavinou, Aikaterini; Spencer, Kevin C; Ong, Qunya; Sy, Jay C; Santini, John; Schoellhammer, Carl M; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert S

    2014-09-28

    Drug design is built on the concept that key molecular targets of disease are isolated in the diseased tissue. Systemic drug administration would be sufficient for targeting in such a case. It is, however, common for enzymes or receptors that are integral to disease to be structurally similar or identical to those that play important biological roles in normal tissues of the body. Additionally, systemic administration may not lead to local drug concentrations high enough to yield disease modification because of rapid systemic metabolism or lack of sufficient partitioning into the diseased tissue compartment. This review focuses on drug delivery methods that physically target drugs to individual compartments of the body. Compartments such as the bladder, peritoneum, brain, eye and skin are often sites of disease and can sometimes be viewed as "privileged," since they intrinsically hinder partitioning of systemically administered agents. These compartments have become the focus of a wide array of procedures and devices for direct administration of drugs. We discuss the rationale behind single compartment drug delivery for each of these compartments, and give an overview of examples at different development stages, from the lab bench to phase III clinical trials to clinical practice. We approach single compartment drug delivery from both a translational and a technological perspective. PMID:24798478

  5. Scanning slit delivery system.

    PubMed

    Hanna, K D; Chastang, J C; Asfar, L; Samson, J; Pouliquen, Y; Waring, G O

    1989-07-01

    We describe the structure and function of a delivery system designed for use with an argon fluoride excimer laser for corneal surgery. The basic principle of the delivery system is to shape the laser beam with a slit mask to a defined configuration. The image of the slit is moved across the cornea in a mathematically defined pattern to ablate a given amount of tissue, creating a new anterior radius of curvature for the cornea. The location of the beam on the cornea is determined by a rotating dove prism and a translating spherical lens, each of which is controlled by computer-regulated servomotors. The system is versatile and can be used for laser myopic or hyperopic keratomileusis, for correction of astigmatism by surface ablation, for creation of radial or transverse linear cuts, for excision of corneal buttons, and for uniform lamellar corneal smoothing procedures. The delivery system is currently used in the laboratory for the ablation of nonhuman primate corneas. PMID:2778685

  6. Nanovehicular Intracellular Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    PROKOP, ALES; DAVIDSON, JEFFREY M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood–brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list “elementary” phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  7. Single compartment drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cima, Michael J.; Lee, Heejin; Daniel, Karen; Tanenbaum, Laura M.; Mantzavinou, Aikaterini; Spencer, Kevin C.; Ong, Qunya; Sy, Jay C.; Santini, John; Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug design is built on the concept that key molecular targets of disease are isolated in the diseased tissue. Systemic drug administration would be sufficient for targeting in such a case. It is, however, common for enzymes or receptors that are integral to disease to be structurally similar or identical to those that play important biological roles in normal tissues of the body. Additionally, systemic administration may not lead to local drug concentrations high enough to yield disease modification because of rapid systemic metabolism or lack of sufficient partitioning into the diseased tissue compartment. This review focuses on drug delivery methods that physically target drugs to individual compartments of the body. Compartments such as the bladder, peritoneum, brain, eye and skin are often sites of disease and can sometimes be viewed as “privileged,” since they intrinsically hinder partitioning of systemically administered agents. These compartments have become the focus of a wide array of procedures and devices for direct administration of drugs. We discuss the rationale behind single compartment drug delivery for each of these compartments, and give an overview of examples at different development stages, from the lab bench to phase III clinical trials to clinical practice. We approach single compartment drug delivery from both a translational and a technological perspective. PMID:24798478

  8. Nutraceutics and delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Yoko; Nakashima, Hideki

    2004-07-01

    Medical treatment has been shifted to being more prophylactic as a recent trend. Postgenomic research has unveiled the fact that nutritional intervention has been strongly associated with genetic expressions, which are responsible for a variety of biological functions. Based on these findings, the prophylactic effects of dietary supplement and nutrient have been enthusiastically investigated. Preventing or retarding the onset of diseases has become a more attractive and cost effective strategy in the medical arena. Among other approaches to prevent diseases, antioxidants, which are found in many phytochemicals, have received much attention. However, most natural antioxidants such as alpha-tocopherol, ascorbic acid and others are biologically unstable, poorly soluble in water, and poorly distributed to target sites. Because of these shortcomings further prophylactic applications of dietary supplements have stagnated. This is partially due to a lack of basic awareness of drug delivery system for dietary supplements and nutrients. In this article, we strongly advocate serious consideration of the bioavailability of dietary supplements. Currently, there are some challenging works to improve their bioavailability using delivery systems such as liposomal formulations. We will discuss the target molecules of dietary supplements for prevention of diseases and also introduce the pioneering works of delivery systems for dietary supplements to promote their therapeutic value. PMID:15545088

  9. [Breech presentation and delivery procedure].

    PubMed

    Izetbegović, Sebija

    2006-01-01

    This retrospective study analysed the way of completing a breech delivery. The period between 2002-2005 at GAK Sarajevo was observed. The number of deliveries in this period was 7017, and out of total there were 245 breech presentation cases, making up 3,49 % of total deliveries. T'Ihe goal was to examine breech presentations in pregnant women with at least 37 weeks of gestation, our testing group consisted of 123 patients which makes up half the total number of breech presentations. We also observed occurence of patological conditions in pregnancy (EPH gestosis, RVP, dysproportio, oligo i polihydramnion), mother's diseses history (ST post SC, ST post conisationem, uterine malformations, luxatio coxae, epilepsy), as well as mother's age and number of previous deliveries. Out of 123 pregnancies, 79 (64,22 %) were completed by SC, 43 (34,95 %) were vaginal - manually assisted: Bracht-Veit-Smellie 24 (55,8 %) and Muller-Veit-Smellie 18 (41,8 %). Out of total number of pregnant women observed, 73 (59,34 %) had first delivery, 41 (33,33 %) second delivery, 4 (3,5 %) had third delivery, 1 (0,81 %) had fourth delivery, 2 (1,62 %) fifth delivery, 1 (0,81 %) sixt delivery and 1 (0.81 %) seventh delivery. PMID:17297861

  10. Particulate delivery systems for vaccines: what can we expect?

    PubMed

    Bramwell, Vincent W; Perrie, Yvonne

    2006-06-01

    In our attempts to thwart the unwanted attentions of microbes by prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination, the knowledge of interactions at the molecular level may prove to be an invaluable asset. This article examines how particulate delivery systems such as liposomes and polymer microspheres can be applied in the light of recent advances in immunological understanding. Some of the biological interactions of these delivery systems are discussed with relevance for antigen trafficking and molecular pathways of immunogenicity and emphasis on the possible interaction of liposomal components. In particular, traditional concepts such as antigen protection, delivery to antigen presenting cells and depot formation remain important aspects, whilst the inclusion of selected co-adjuvants and enhanced delivery of these moieties in conjunction with antigen now has a firm rationale. PMID:16734973

  11. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  12. Anemia and Oxygen Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    Clinical assessment of tissue oxygenation is challenging. Anemia reflects a decreased oxygen carrying capacity of the blood and its significance in the perioperative setting relates largely to the associated risk of insufficient oxygen delivery and cellular hypoxia. Until meaningful clinical measures of tissue oxygenation are available in veterinary practice, clinicians must rely on evaluation of a patient's hemodynamic and ventilatory performance, along with biochemical and hemogasometric measurements. Blood transfusion is used commonly for treatment of perioperative anemia, and may improve tissue oxygenation by normalizing the rheologic properties of blood and enhancing perfusion, independent of increases in oxygen carrying capacity. PMID:26033442

  13. DELIVERY OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Pisal, Dipak S.; Kosloski, Matthew P.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2009-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of protein therapeutics are limited by three interrelated pharmaceutical issues, in vitro and in vivo instability, immunogenicity and shorter half-lives. Novel drug modifications for overcoming these issues are under investigation and include covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polysialic acid, or glycolic acid, as well as developing new formulations containing nanoparticulate or colloidal systems (e.g. liposomes, polymeric microspheres, polymeric nanoparticles). Such strategies have the potential to develop as next generation protein therapeutics. This review includes a general discussion on these delivery approaches. PMID:20049941

  14. Importance of dual delivery systems for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Farokhi, Mehdi; Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Ou, Keng-Liang; Mao, Chuanbin; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2016-03-10

    Bone formation is a complex process that requires concerted function of multiple growth factors. For this, it is essential to design a delivery system with the ability to load multiple growth factors in order to mimic the natural microenvironment for bone tissue formation. However, the short half-lives of growth factors, their relatively large size, slow tissue penetration, and high toxicity suggest that conventional routes of administration are unlikely to be effective. Therefore, it seems that using multiple bioactive factors in different delivery systems can develop new strategies for improving bone tissue regeneration. Combination of these factors along with biomaterials that permit tunable release profiles would help to achieve truly spatiotemporal regulation during delivery. This review summarizes the various dual-control release systems that are used for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26805518

  15. Cubosomes and hexosomes as versatile platforms for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Intan D M; Moghimi, Seyed M; Yaghmur, Anan

    2015-12-01

    Nonlamellar liquid crystalline phases are attractive platforms for drug solubilization and targeted delivery. The attractiveness of this formulation principle is linked to the nanostructural versatility, compatiblity, digestiblity and bioadhesive properties of their lipid constituents, and the capability of solubilizing and sustaining the release of amphiphilic, hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs. Nonlamellar liquid crystalline phases offer two distinct promising strategies in the development of drug delivery systems. These comprise formation of ISAsomes (internally self-assembled 'somes' or particles) such as cubosomes and hexosomes, and in situ formation of parenteral dosage forms with tunable nanostructures at the site of administration. This review outlines the unique features of cubosomes and hexosomes and their potential utilization as promising platforms for drug delivery. PMID:26652281

  16. Polymers for Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liechty, William B.; Kryscio, David R.; Slaughter, Brandon V.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Polymers have played an integral role in the advancement of drug delivery technology by providing controlled release of therapeutic agents in constant doses over long periods, cyclic dosage, and tunable release of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. From early beginnings using off-the-shelf materials, the field has grown tremendously, driven in part by the innovations of chemical engineers. Modern advances in drug delivery are now predicated upon the rational design of polymers tailored for specific cargo and engineered to exert distinct biological functions. In this review, we highlight the fundamental drug delivery systems and their mathematical foundations and discuss the physiological barriers to drug delivery. We review the origins and applications of stimuli-responsive polymer systems and polymer therapeutics such as polymer-protein and polymer-drug conjugates. The latest developments in polymers capable of molecular recognition or directing intracellular delivery are surveyed to illustrate areas of research advancing the frontiers of drug delivery. PMID:22432577

  17. Height of Shock Formation in the Solar Corona Inferred from Observations of Type II Radio Bursts and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Makela, P.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Uddin, W.; Srivastava, A. K.; Joshi, N. C.; Chandra, R.; Manoharan, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    Employing coronagraphic and EUV observations close to the solar surface made by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission, we determined the heliocentric distance of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the starting time of associated metric type II bursts. We used the wave diameter and leading edge methods and measured the CME heights for a set of 32 metric type II bursts from solar cycle 24. We minimized the projection effects by making the measurements from a view that is roughly orthogonal to the direction of the ejection. We also chose image frames close to the onset times of the type II bursts, so no extrapolation was necessary. We found that the CMEs were located in the heliocentric distance range from 1.20 to 1.93 solar radii (Rs), with mean and median values of 1.43 and 1.38 Rs, respectively. We conclusively find that the shock formation can occur at heights substantially below 1.5 Rs. In a few cases, the CME height at type II onset was close to 2 Rs. In these cases, the starting frequency of the type II bursts was very low, in the range 25-40 MHz, which confirms that the shock can also form at larger heights. The starting frequencies of metric type II bursts have a weak correlation with the measured CME/shock heights and are consistent with the rapid decline of density with height in the inner corona.

  18. Height of shock formation in the solar corona inferred from observations of type II radio bursts and coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Mäkelä, P.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Uddin, W.; Srivastava, A. K.; Joshi, N. C.; Chandra, R.; Manoharan, P. K.; Mahalakshmi, K.; Dwivedi, V. C.; Jain, R.; Awasthi, A. K.; Nitta, N. V.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Choudhary, D. P.

    2013-06-01

    Employing coronagraphic and EUV observations close to the solar surface made by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission, we determined the heliocentric distance of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the starting time of associated metric type II bursts. We used the wave diameter and leading edge methods and measured the CME heights for a set of 32 metric type II bursts from solar cycle 24. We minimized the projection effects by making the measurements from a view that is roughly orthogonal to the direction of the ejection. We also chose image frames close to the onset times of the type II bursts, so no extrapolation was necessary. We found that the CMEs were located in the heliocentric distance range from 1.20 to 1.93 solar radii (Rs), with mean and median values of 1.43 and 1.38 Rs, respectively. We conclusively find that the shock formation can occur at heights substantially below 1.5 Rs. In a few cases, the CME height at type II onset was close to 2 Rs. In these cases, the starting frequency of the type II bursts was very low, in the range 25-40 MHz, which confirms that the shock can also form at larger heights. The starting frequencies of metric type II bursts have a weak correlation with the measured CME/shock heights and are consistent with the rapid decline of density with height in the inner corona.

  19. Photomechanical drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doukas, Apostolos G.; Lee, Shun

    2000-05-01

    Photomechanical waves (PW) are generated by Q-switched or mode-locked lasers. Ablation is a reliable method for generating PWs with consistent characteristics. Depending on the laser wavelength and target material, PWs with different parameters can be generated which allows the investigation of PWs with cells and tissue. PWs have been shown to permeabilize the stratum corneum (SC) in vivo and facilitate the transport of drugs into the skin. Once a drug has diffused into the dermis it can enter the vasculature, thus producing a systemic effect. Fluorescence microscopy of biopsies show that 40-kDa molecules can be delivered to a depth of > 300 micrometers into the viable skin of rats. Many important drugs such as insulin, and erythropoietin are smaller or comparable in size, making the PWs attractive for transdermal drug delivery. There are three possible pathways through the SC: Transappendageal via hair follicles or other appendages, transcellular through the corneocytes, and intercellular via the extracellular matrix. The intracellular route appears to be the most likely pathway of drug delivery through the SC.

  20. Radiotherapy delivery during motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceberg, Sofie; Bäck, Sven Å. J.

    2010-11-01

    This paper discusses the 3D dosimetric consequences of radiotherapy delivery during two kinds of motion, (i) the respiratory motion by the patient and (ii) the motion by the gantry while rotating around the patient. Respiratory motion primarily compromises treatments in the thorax and abdomen regions. Several strategies to reduce respiratory motion effects have been developed or are under development. The organ motion could for instance be measured and incorporated in the treatment planning, or adapted to by using respiratory gating and tumour-tracking delivery techniques. Gantry motion is involved in various forms of intensity-modulated arc-therapy techniques. The purpose is to increase the modulation by simultaneously varying the MLC positions, the rotation speed of the gantry, and the dose rate during the treatment. The advantage of these techniques is the increased possibility to deliver a high absorbed dose to the target volume while minimizing the dose to normal tissues. However, the dosimetric uncertainties associated with motion, small fields and steep dose gradients, has to be evaluated in detail, and this requires adequate true 3D dose-verification tools.

  1. California Integrated Service Delivery Evaluation Report. Phase I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Richard W.; Rossy, Gerard; Roberts, William; Chapman, Kenneth; Sanchez, Urte; Hanley, Chris

    2010-01-01

    This study is a formative evaluation of the OneStop Career Center Integrated Service Delivery (ISD) Model within the California Workforce System. The study was sponsored by the California Workforce Investment Board. The study completed four in-depth case studies of California OneStops to describe how they implemented the ISD model which brings…

  2. MRI in ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Li, S. Kevin; Lizak, Martin J.; Jeong, Eun-Kee

    2008-01-01

    Conventional pharmacokinetic methods for studying ocular drug delivery are invasive and cannot be conveniently applied to humans. The advancement of MRI technology has provided new opportunities in ocular drug-delivery research. MRI provides a means to non-invasively and continuously monitor ocular drug-delivery systems with a contrast agent or compound labeled with a contrast agent. It is a useful technique in pharmacokinetic studies, evaluation of drug-delivery methods, and drug-delivery device testing. Although the current status of the technology presents some major challenges to pharmaceutical research using MRI, it has a lot of potential. In the past decade, MRI has been used to examine ocular drug delivery via the subconjunctival route, intravitreal injection, intrascleral injection to the suprachoroidal space, episcleral and intravitreal implants, periocular injections, and ocular iontophoresis. In this review, the advantages and limitations of MRI in the study of ocular drug delivery are discussed. Different MR contrast agents and MRI techniques for ocular drug-delivery research are compared. Ocular drug-delivery studies using MRI are reviewed. PMID:18186077

  3. Challenges in media delivery systems and servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Viswanathan

    2005-03-01

    Although multimedia compression formats and protocols to stream such content have been around for a long time, there has been limited success in the adoption of open standards for streaming over IP (Internet Protocol) networks. The elements of such an end-to-end system will be introduced outlining the responsibilities of each element. The technical and financial challenges in building a viable multimedia streaming end-to-end system will be analyzed in detail in this paper outlining some solutions and areas for further research. Also, recent migration to IP in the backend video delivery network infrastructures have made it possible to use IP based media streaming solutions in non-IP last mile access networks like cable and wireless networks in addition to the DSL networks. The advantages of using IP streaming solutions in such networks will be outlined. However, there is a different set of challenges posed by such applications. The real time constraints are acute in each element of the media delivery end-to-end system. Meeting these real time constraints in general purpose non real time server systems is quite demanding. Quality of service, resource management, session management, fail-over, reliability, and cost are some important but challenging requirements in such systems. These will also be analyzed with suggested solutions. Content protection and rights management requirements are also very challenging for open standards based multimedia delivery systems. Interoperability unfortunately interferes with security in most of the current day systems. Some approaches to solve the interoperability problems will also be presented. The requirements, challenges, and possible solutions for delivering broadcast, on demand, and interactive video delivery applications for IP based media streaming systems will be analyzed in detail.

  4. Medical abortion service delivery.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, V; Rogers, M K; Vanderhei, D

    2000-08-01

    Medical abortion with mifepristone and methotrexate regimens may be offered in a variety of American medical practice settings. In this article the new provider will find information on all aspects of the patient care delivery system for medical abortion, including physical space requirements, staffing and training, patient flow, cost, security, marketing, and quality assurance. Because of the limited published data available regarding logistic issues surrounding abortion care, the information in this article derives largely from the experiences of providers who have established medical abortion practices in their offices or clinics. Its goals are to help make the initial start-up phase briefer and more rewarding for new providers, to offer helpful guidelines for incorporation of medical abortion into practice, and to encourage more practitioners to see the benefits of adding this option to their practices. PMID:10944366

  5. Economical ground data delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, Richard W.; Byrne, Russell H.; Bromberg, Daniel E.

    1994-01-01

    Data delivery in the Deep Space Network (DSN) involves transmission of a small amount of constant, high-priority traffic and a large amount of bursty, low priority data. The bursty traffic may be initially buffered and then metered back slowly as bandwidth becomes available. Today both types of data are transmitted over dedicated leased circuits. The authors investigated the potential of saving money by designing a hybrid communications architecture that uses leased circuits for high-priority network communications and dial-up circuits for low-priority traffic. Such an architecture may significantly reduce costs and provide an emergency backup. The architecture presented here may also be applied to any ground station-to-customer network within the range of a common carrier. The authors compare estimated costs for various scenarios and suggest security safeguards that should be considered.

  6. Fuel delivery system model

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, G.; Verma, A.

    1996-09-01

    A fuel delivery system hydraulic model has been developed by coupling a distributed hydraulic network model with lumped models for the various components of the fuel system like the injectors, regulators, accumulators, etc. The resulting governing equations are linearized around the nominal system pressure and integrated using a fourth order Runge-Kutta algorithm with a variable time-stepping scheme. The model assumes isothermal behavior, negligible frictional losses and single-phase flow. The goal of the model is to study small signal type perturbations around the operating system pressure. Typical outputs from exercising the model are presented. The model can be used to study fuel pressure and velocity transients throughout the system and to design the various fuel system components in a system context.

  7. Secondary fuel delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Parker, David M.; Cai, Weidong; Garan, Daniel W.; Harris, Arthur J.

    2010-02-23

    A secondary fuel delivery system for delivering a secondary stream of fuel and/or diluent to a secondary combustion zone located in the transition piece of a combustion engine, downstream of the engine primary combustion region is disclosed. The system includes a manifold formed integral to, and surrounding a portion of, the transition piece, a manifold inlet port, and a collection of injection nozzles. A flowsleeve augments fuel/diluent flow velocity and improves the system cooling effectiveness. Passive cooling elements, including effusion cooling holes located within the transition boundary and thermal-stress-dissipating gaps that resist thermal stress accumulation, provide supplemental heat dissipation in key areas. The system delivers a secondary fuel/diluent mixture to a secondary combustion zone located along the length of the transition piece, while reducing the impact of elevated vibration levels found within the transition piece and avoiding the heat dissipation difficulties often associated with traditional vibration reduction methods.

  8. Targeted delivery of nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Kumar Khanna, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    The role of targeting of the diseased region by a drug is emphasized. The rationale for resorting to nanomaterials as drug carriers is explained. A clear understanding of the biological environment, its degradation in diseased condition, and the interaction of the drug with it in normal condition and during illness lie at the core of successful drug delivery. Passive and active drug targeting approaches are differentiated. Commonly used drug targets, targeting ligands, and nanoscale systems are elaborated. Mechanisms of internalization of nanomedicines and circumventing P-glycoprotein mediated resistance are outlined. The paper presents an overview of the current scenario of targeted transportation of nanomedicines to the affected organ and suggests future research directions. PMID:22577576

  9. Topical delivery of hexamidine.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Nicola; Paz-Alvarez, Miguel; Matts, Paul J; Lever, Rebecca; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2016-06-15

    Hexamidine diisethionate (HEX D) has been used for its biocidal actions in topical preparations since the 1950s. Recent data also suggest that it plays a beneficial role in skin homeostasis. To date, the extent to which this compound penetrates the epidermis has not been reported nor how its topical delivery may be modulated. In the present work we set out to characterise the interaction of HEX D with the skin and to develop a range of simple formulations for topical targeting of the active. A further objective was to compare the skin penetration of HEX D with its corresponding dihydrochloride salt (HEX H) as the latter has more favourable physicochemical properties for skin uptake. Candidate vehicles were evaluated by in vitro Franz cell permeation studies using porcine skin. Initially, neat solvents were investigated and subsequently binary systems were examined. The solvents and chemical penetration enhancers investigated included glycerol, dimethyl isosorbide (DMI), isopropyl alcohol (IPA), 1,2-pentanol (1,2-PENT), polyethylene glycol (PEG) 200, propylene glycol (PG), propylene glycol monolaurate (PGML) and Transcutol(®)P (TC). Of a total of 30 binary solvent systems evaluated only 10 delivered higher amounts of active into the skin compared with the neat solvents. In terms of topical efficacy, formulations containing PGML far surpassed all other solvents or binary combinations. More than 70% of HEX H was extracted from the skin following application in PG:PGML (50:50). Interestingly, the same vehicle effectively promoted skin penetration of HEX D but demonstrated significantly lower uptake into and through the skin (30%). The findings confirm the unpredictable nature of excipients on delivery of actives with reference to skin even where there are minor differences in molecular structures. We also believe that they underline the ongoing necessity for fundamental studies on the interaction of topical excipients with the skin. PMID:27130367

  10. Emerging Frontiers in Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tibbitt, Mark W; Dahlman, James E; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-27

    Medicine relies on the use of pharmacologically active agents (drugs) to manage and treat disease. However, drugs are not inherently effective; the benefit of a drug is directly related to the manner by which it is administered or delivered. Drug delivery can affect drug pharmacokinetics, absorption, distribution, metabolism, duration of therapeutic effect, excretion, and toxicity. As new therapeutics (e.g., biologics) are being developed, there is an accompanying need for improved chemistries and materials to deliver them to the target site in the body, at a therapeutic concentration, and for the required period of time. In this Perspective, we provide an historical overview of drug delivery and controlled release followed by highlights of four emerging areas in the field of drug delivery: systemic RNA delivery, drug delivery for localized therapy, oral drug delivery systems, and biologic drug delivery systems. In each case, we present the barriers to effective drug delivery as well as chemical and materials advances that are enabling the field to overcome these hurdles for clinical impact. PMID:26741786

  11. Issues in Commercial Document Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcinko, Randall Wayne

    1997-01-01

    Discusses (1) the history of document delivery; (2) the delivery process--end-user request, intermediary request, vendor reference, citation verification, obtaining document and source relations, quality control, transferring document to client, customer service and status, invoicing and billing, research and development, and copyright; and (3)…

  12. Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team (HDTT) is to enable the development of hydrogen delivery technologies, which will allow for fuel cell competitiveness with gasoline and hybrid technologies by achieving an as-produced, delivered, and dispensed hydrogen cost of $2-$4 per gallon of gasoline equivalent of hydrogen.

  13. Advising Models and Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Margaret C.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews factors influencing the organization and delivery of academic advising services. Discusses the strengths and weaknesses of seven two-year college organizational models, including faculty only, supplementary, split, dual, total intake, satellite, and self-contained models. Describes advising delivery systems using faculty advisors,…

  14. FastStats: Births -- Method of Delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit Button NCHS Home Births - Method of Delivery Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are for the U.S. Number of vaginal deliveries: 2,699,951 Number of Cesarean deliveries: 1, ...

  15. Adapting Assessment Procedures for Delivery via an Automated Format.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Karen L.; And Others

    The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) decided to explore alternative examining procedures for positions covered by the Administrative Careers with America (ACWA) examination. One requirement for new procedures was that they be automated for use with OPM's recently developed Microcomputer Assisted Rating System (MARS), a highly efficient system…

  16. Two Distinct Course Formats in the Delivery of Connectivist MOOCs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, C. Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses based on the principles of connectivist educational pedagogy known as connectivist MOOCs (c-MOOCs) have been carried out with great success during the last years with hundreds of registered participants. Examples are CCK08 (2008), PLENK2010 (2010), MobiMOOC (2011), EduMOOC (2011), Change11 (2011/12), and LAK12 (2012).…

  17. Distance Education Quality Course Delivery Framework: A Formative Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berta, Michael Raymond

    2013-01-01

    In the Fall 2010 semester, student enrollment in distance education courses increased in the United States to over 6.1 million students taking at least one distance course. Distance education allows institutions to meet increasing demands from the government and business sectors for more graduates in ways that face-to-face courses cannot meet with…

  18. Cell-Mediated Drugs Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug targeting to sites of tissue injury, tumor or infection with limited toxicity is the goal for successful pharmaceutics. Immunocytes (including mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages), neutrophils, and lymphocytes) are highly mobile; they can migrate across impermeable barriers and release their drug cargo at sites of infection or tissue injury. Thus immune cells can be exploited as trojan horses for drug delivery. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW This paper reviews how immunocytes laden with drugs can cross the blood brain or blood tumor barriers, to facilitate treatments for infectious diseases, injury, cancer, or inflammatory diseases. The promises and perils of cell-mediated drug delivery are reviewed, with examples of how immunocytes can be harnessed to improve therapeutic end points. EXPERT OPINION Using cells as delivery vehicles enables targeted drug transport, and prolonged circulation times, along with reductions in cell and tissue toxicities. Such systems for drug carriage and targeted release represent a novel disease combating strategy being applied to a spectrum of human disorders. The design of nanocarriers for cell-mediated drug delivery may differ from those used for conventional drug delivery systems; nevertheless, engaging different defense mechanisms into drug delivery may open new perspectives for the active delivery of drugs. PMID:21348773

  19. New Evidence for the Role of Emerging Flux in a Solar Filament's Slow Rise Preceding its CME-Producing Fast Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Harra, Louis K.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    We observe the eruption of a large-scale (approx.300,000 km) quiet-region solar filament, leading to an Earth-directed "halo" coronal mass ejection (CME). We use coronal imaging data in EUV from the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite, and in soft X-rays (SXRs) from the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite. We also use spectroscopic data from the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS), magnetic data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), and white-light coronal data from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO), all on SOHO. Initially the filament shows a slow (approx.1 km/s projected against the solar disk) and approximately constant-velocity rise for about 6 hours, before erupting rapidly, reaching a velocity of approx. 8 km/s over the next approx. 25 min. CDS Doppler data show Earth-directed filament velocities ranging from < 20 km/s (the noise limit) during the slow-rise phase, to approx. 100 km/s-1 early in the eruption. Beginning within 10 hours prior to the start of the slow rise, localized new magnetic flux emerged near one end of the filament. Near the start of and during the slow-rise phase, SXR microflaring occurred repeatedly at the flux-emergence site, in conjunction with the development of a fan of SXR illumination of the magnetic arcade over the filament. The SXR microflares, development of the SXR fan, and motion of the slow-rising filament are all consistent with "tether-weakening" reconnection occurring between the newly-emerging flux and the overlying arcade field containing the filament field. The microflares and fan structure are not prominent in EUV, and would not have been detected without the SXR data. Standard "twin dimmings" occur near the location of the filament, and "remote dimmings" and "brightenings" occur further removed from the filament.

  20. [Delivery of premature infants].

    PubMed

    Eckman, A; Mottet, N; Ramanah, R; Riethmuller, D

    2015-10-01

    Prematurity is a frequent event and clearly raises an issue concerning how these fetuses with multiple weaknesses should be delivered. Although, a systematic abdominal approach has no scientific basis, there are cases where the caesarean is chosen because of other factors associated to prematurity such as any maternal or fetal indication to terminate the pregnancy while labour induction remains impossible. However, in case of breech presentation, which is often delivered by caesarean, the literature does recommend neither the vaginal nor the abdominal approach. Caesarean in case of prematurity is more difficult because of the absence of any inferior segment and implies making a large incision so as to easily extract these weak fetuses. Increased maternal morbidity related to preterm caesarean sections has been reported through out literature. The viability gestational age limit represents a confounding factor in most studies since caesarean is rarely chosen for these fetuses because of a very low expected survival rate, while it is probably in this situation that the abdominal approach could provide a real benefit. Larger studies are required to show potential advantages. Systematic use of episiotomies or instrumental deliveries in case of vaginal births is not recommended in case of prematurity. Protecting the fetal head with spatulas still requires further evaluations. PMID:26139037

  1. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Walley, Susan C; Jenssen, Brian P

    2015-11-01

    Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) are rapidly growing in popularity among youth. ENDS are handheld devices that produce an aerosolized mixture from a solution typically containing concentrated nicotine, flavoring chemicals, and propylene glycol to be inhaled by the user. ENDS are marketed under a variety of names, most commonly electronic cigarettes and e-cigarettes. In 2014, more youth reported using ENDS than any other tobacco product. ENDS pose health risks to both users and nonusers. Nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in ENDS solutions, is both highly addictive and toxic. In addition to nicotine, other toxicants, carcinogens, and metal particles have been detected in solutions and aerosols of ENDS. Nonusers are involuntarily exposed to the emissions of these devices with secondhand and thirdhand aerosol. The concentrated and often flavored nicotine in ENDS solutions poses a poisoning risk for young children. Reports of acute nicotine toxicity from US poison control centers have been increasing, with at least 1 child death reported from unintentional exposure to a nicotine-containing ENDS solution. With flavors, design, and marketing that appeal to youth, ENDS threaten to renormalize and glamorize nicotine and tobacco product use. There is a critical need for ENDS regulation, legislative action, and counter promotion to protect youth. ENDS have the potential to addict a new generation of youth to nicotine and reverse more than 50 years of progress in tobacco control. PMID:26504128

  2. Space age health care delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Space age health care delivery is being delivered to both NASA astronauts and employees with primary emphasis on preventive medicine. The program relies heavily on comprehensive health physical exams, health education, screening programs and physical fitness programs. Medical data from the program is stored in a computer bank so epidemiological significance can be established and better procedures can be obtained. Besides health care delivery to the NASA population, NASA is working with HEW on a telemedicine project STARPAHC, applying space technology to provide health care delivery to remotely located populations.

  3. Endovascular Gene Delivery from a Stent Platform: Gene- Eluting Stents

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Ilia; Chorny, Michael; Adamo, Richard F; Forbes, Scott P; Corrales, Ricardo A; Alferiev, Ivan S; Levy, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    A synergistic impact of research in the fields of post-angioplasty restenosis, drug-eluting stents and vascular gene therapy over the past 15 years has shaped the concept of gene-eluting stents. Gene-eluting stents hold promise of overcoming some biological and technical problems inherent to drug-eluting stent technology. As the field of gene-eluting stents matures it becomes evident that all three main design modules of a gene-eluting stent: a therapeutic transgene, a vector and a delivery system are equally important for accomplishing sustained inhibition of neointimal formation in arteries treated with gene delivery stents. This review summarizes prior work on stent-based gene delivery and discusses the main optimization strategies required to move the field of gene-eluting stents to clinical translation. PMID:26225356

  4. Drug Delivery to Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Blakeley, Jaishri

    2014-01-01

    A prerequisite for the efficacy of any cancer drug is that it reaches the tumor in therapeutic concentrations. This is difficult to accomplish in most systemic solid tumors because of factors such as variable hypoxia, intratumoral pressure gradients, and abnormal vasculature within the tumors. In brain cancer, the situation is complicated by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier, which serve as physical and physiologic obstacles for delivery of drugs to the central nervous sys tem. Many approaches to overcome, circumvent, disrupt, or manipulate the BBB to enhance delivery of drugs to brain tumors have been devised and are in active investi gation. These approaches include high-dose intravenous chemotherapy, intra-arterial drug delivery, local drug delivery via implanted polymers or catheters, BBB dis ruption, and biochemical modulation of drugs. PMID:18541119

  5. Bioresponsive matrices in drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    For years, the field of drug delivery has focused on (1) controlling the release of a therapeutic and (2) targeting the therapeutic to a specific cell type. These research endeavors have concentrated mainly on the development of new degradable polymers and molecule-labeled drug delivery vehicles. Recent interest in biomaterials that respond to their environment have opened new methods to trigger the release of drugs and localize the therapeutic within a particular site. These novel biomaterials, usually termed "smart" or "intelligent", are able to deliver a therapeutic agent based on either environmental cues or a remote stimulus. Stimuli-responsive materials could potentially elicit a therapeutically effective dose without adverse side effects. Polymers responding to different stimuli, such as pH, light, temperature, ultrasound, magnetism, or biomolecules have been investigated as potential drug delivery vehicles. This review describes the most recent advances in "smart" drug delivery systems that respond to one or multiple stimuli. PMID:21114841

  6. Adenosine-Associated Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Ghanem, Amyl; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside in every cell. Many critical treatments such as modulating irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias), regulation of central nervous system (CNS) activity, and inhibiting seizural episodes can be carried out using adenosine. Despite the significant potential therapeutic impact of adenosine and its derivatives, the severe side effects caused by their systemic administration have significantly limited their clinical use. In addition, due to adenosine’s extremely short half-life in human blood (less than 10 s), there is an unmet need for sustained delivery systems to enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. In this paper, various adenosine delivery techniques, including encapsulation into biodegradable polymers, cell-based delivery, implantable biomaterials, and mechanical-based delivery systems, are critically reviewed and the existing challenges are highlighted. PMID:26453156

  7. Variable delivery, fixed displacement pump

    DOEpatents

    Sommars, Mark F.

    2001-01-01

    A variable delivery, fixed displacement pump comprises a plurality of pistons reciprocated within corresponding cylinders in a cylinder block. The pistons are reciprocated by rotation of a fixed angle swash plate connected to the pistons. The pistons and cylinders cooperate to define a plurality of fluid compression chambers each have a delivery outlet. A vent port is provided from each fluid compression chamber to vent fluid therefrom during at least a portion of the reciprocal stroke of the piston. Each piston and cylinder combination cooperates to close the associated vent port during another portion of the reciprocal stroke so that fluid is then pumped through the associated delivery outlet. The delivery rate of the pump is varied by adjusting the axial position of the swash plate relative to the cylinder block, which varies the duration of the piston stroke during which the vent port is closed.

  8. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Adkison, Sarah E.; O’Connor, Richard J.; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Hyland, Andrew; Borland, Ron; Yong, Hua-Hie; Cummings, K. Michael; McNeill, Ann; Thrasher, James F.; Hammond, David; Fong, Geoffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) initially emerged in 2003 and have since become widely available globally, particularly over the Internet. Purpose Data on ENDS usage patterns are limited. The current paper examines patterns of ENDS awareness, use, and product-associated beliefs among current and former smokers in four countries. Methods Data come from Wave 8 of the International Tobacco Control Four-Country Survey, collected July 2010 to June 2011 and analyzed through June 2012. Respondents included 5939 current and former smokers in Canada (n=1581); the U.S. (n=1520); the United Kingdom (UK; n=1325); and Australia (n=1513). Results Overall, 46.6% were aware of ENDS (U.S.: 73%, UK: 54%, Canada: 40%, Australia: 20%); 7.6% had tried ENDS (16% of those aware of ENDS); and 2.9% were current users (39% of triers). Awareness of ENDS was higher among younger, non-minority smokers with higher incomes who were heavier smokers. Prevalence of trying ENDS was higher among younger, nondaily smokers with a high income and among those who perceived ENDS as less harmful than traditional cigarettes. Current use was higher among both nondaily and heavy (≥20 cigarettes per day) smokers. In all, 79.8% reported using ENDS because they were considered less harmful than traditional cigarettes; 75.4% stated that they used ENDS to help them reduce their smoking; and 85.1% reported using ENDS to help them quit smoking. Conclusions Awareness of ENDS is high, especially in countries where they are legal (i.e., the U.S. and UK). Because trial was associated with nondaily smoking and a desire to quit smoking, ENDS may have potential to serve as a cessation aid. PMID:23415116

  9. Development of insulin delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, N I; Siddiqui, Ni; Rahman, S; Nessa, A

    2008-01-01

    Delivery system of insulin is vital for its acceptance and adherence to therapy for achieving the glycemic targets. Enormous developments have occurred in the delivery system of insulin during the last twenty years and each improvement was aimed at two common goals: patients convenience and better glycemic control. Till to date, the various insulin delivery systems are: syringes/vials, injection aids, jet injectors, transmucosal delivery, transdermal delivery, external insulin infusion pump, implantable insulin pumps, insulin pens and insulin inhalers. Syringe/vial is the oldest and conventional method, still widely used and relatively cheaper. Modern plastic syringes are disposable, light weight with microfine needle for patients convenience and comfort. Oral route could be the most acceptable and viable, if the barriers can be overcome and under extensive trial. Insulin pen device is an important milestone in the delivery system of insulin as it is convenient, discrete, painless, attractive, portable with flexible life style and improved quality of life. More than 80% of European diabetic patients are using insulin pen. Future digital pen will have better memory option, blood glucose monitoring system, insulin dose calculator etc. Insulin infusion pump is a good option for the children, busy patients with flexible lifestyle and those who want to avoid multiple daily injections. Pulmonary route of insulin delivery is a promising, effective, non-invasive and acceptable alternative method. Exubera, the world first insulin inhaler was approved by FDA in 28 January 2006. But due to certain limitations, it has been withdrawn from the market in October 2007. The main concern of inhaled insulin are: long term pulmonary safety issues, cost effectiveness and user friendly device. In future, more acceptable and cost effective insulin inhaler will be introduced. Newer avenues are under extensive trial for better future insulin delivery systems. PMID:18285745

  10. Radiation delivery system and method

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, Scott A.; Robison, Thomas W.; Taylor, Craig M. V.

    2002-01-01

    A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

  11. Novel delivery systems for interferons.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Mehrdad; Zarrin, Abdolhossein; Foroozesh, Mahshid

    2007-01-01

    Interferons, IFNs, are among the most widely studied and clinically used biopharmaceuticals. Despite their invaluable therapeutic roles, the widespread use of IFNs suffers from some inherent limitations, mainly their relatively short circulation lifespan and their unwanted effects on some non-target tissues. Therefore, both these constraints have become the central focus points for the research efforts on the development of a variety of novel delivery systems for these therapeutic agents with the ultimate goal of improving their therapeutic end-points. Generally, the delivery systems currently under investigation for IFNs can be classified as particulate delivery systems, including micro- and nano-particles, liposomes, minipellets, cellular carriers, and non-particulate delivery systems, including PEGylated IFNs, other chemically conjugated IFNs, immunoconjugated IFNs, and genetically conjugated IFNs. All these strategies and techniques have their own possibilities and limitations, which should be taken into account when considering their clinical application. In this article, currently studied delivery systems/techniques for IFN delivery have been reviewed extensively, with the main focus on the pharmacokinetic consequences of each procedure. PMID:17849257

  12. Advances in Gene Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Suda, Takeshi; Zhang, Guisheng; Liu, Dexi

    2011-01-01

    The transfer of genes into cells, both in vitro and in vivo, is critical for studying gene function and conducting gene therapy. Methods that utilize viral and nonviral vectors, as well as physical approaches, have been explored. Viral vector-mediated gene transfer employs replication-deficient viruses such as retro-virus, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus and herpes simplex virus. A major advantage of viral vectors is their high gene delivery efficiency. The nonviral vectors developed so far include cationic liposomes, cationic polymers, synthetic peptides and naturally occurring compounds. These nonviral vectors appear to be highly effective in gene delivery to cultured cells in vitro but are significantly less effective in vivo. Physical methods utilize mechanical pressure, electric shock or hydrodynamic force to transiently permeate the cell membrane to transfer DNA into target cells. They are simpler than viral- and nonviral-based systems and highly effective for localized gene delivery. The past decade has seen significant efforts to establish the most desirable method for safe, effective and target-specific gene delivery, and good progress has been made. The objectives of this review are to (i) explain the rationale for the design of viral, nonviral and physical methods for gene delivery; (ii) provide a summary on recent advances in gene transfer technology; (iii) discuss advantages and disadvantages of each of the most commonly used gene delivery methods; and (iv) provide future perspectives. PMID:22200988

  13. Evolution of the magnetic helicity flux during the formation and eruption of flux ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, P.; Zuccarello, F. P.; Guglielmino, S. L.; Zuccarello, F.

    2014-10-20

    We describe the evolution and the magnetic helicity flux for two active regions (ARs) since their appearance on the solar disk: NOAA 11318 and NOAA 11675. Both ARs hosted the formation and destabilization of magnetic flux ropes. In the former AR, the formation of the flux rope culminated in a flare of C2.3 GOES class and a coronal mass ejection (CME) observed by Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment. In the latter AR, the region hosting the flux rope was involved in several flares, but only a partial eruption with signatures of a minor plasma outflow was observed. We found a different behavior in the accumulation of the magnetic helicity flux in the corona, depending on the magnetic configuration and on the location of the flux ropes in the ARs. Our results suggest that the complexity and strength of the photospheric magnetic field is only a partial indicator of the real likelihood of an AR producing the eruption of a flux rope and a subsequent CME.

  14. Nanogels for Oligonucleotide Delivery to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serguei V.; Batrakova, Elena V.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    Systemic delivery of oligonucleotides (ODN) to the central nervous system is needed for development of therapeutic and diagnostic modalities for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Macromolecules injected in blood are poorly transported across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and rapidly cleared from circulation. In this work we propose a novel system for ODN delivery to the brain based on nanoscale network of cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) and polyethylenimine (“nanogel”). The methods of synthesis of nanogel and its modification with specific targeting molecules are described. Nanogels can bind and encapsulate spontaneously negatively charged ODN, resulting in formation of stable aqueous dispersion of polyelectrolyte complex with particle sizes less than 100 nm. Using polarized monolayers of bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells as an in vitro model this study demonstrates that ODN incorporated in nanogel formulations can be effectively transported across the BBB. The transport efficacy is further increased when the surface of the nanogel is modified with transferrin or insulin. Importantly the ODN is transported across the brain microvessel cells through the transcellular pathway; after transport, ODN remains mostly incorporated in the nanogel and ODN displays little degradation compared to the free ODN. Using mouse model for biodistribution studies in vivo, this work demonstrated that as a result of incorporation into nanogel 1 h after intravenous injection the accumulation of a phosphorothioate ODN in the brain increases by over 15 fold while in liver and spleen decreases by 2-fold compared to the free ODN. Overall, this study suggests that nanogel is a promising system for delivery of ODN to the brain. PMID:14733583

  15. Gold Nanoparticles for Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ya; Jiang, Ziwen; Saha, Krishnendu; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Sung Tae; Landis, Ryan F; Rotello, Vincent M

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles provide an attractive and applicable scaffold for delivery of nucleic acids. In this review, we focus on the use of covalent and noncovalent gold nanoparticle conjugates for applications in gene delivery and RNA-interference technologies. We also discuss challenges in nucleic acid delivery, including endosomal entrapment/escape and active delivery/presentation of nucleic acids in the cell. PMID:24599278

  16. 19 CFR 10.101 - Immediate delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immediate delivery. 10.101 Section 10.101 Customs... Importations § 10.101 Immediate delivery. (a) Shipments entitled to immediate delivery. Shipments consigned to... as shipments the immediate delivery of which is necessary within the purview of section...

  17. 38 CFR 21.4505 - Check delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Check delivery. 21.4505...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Education Loans § 21.4505 Check delivery. (a) General. Education... surviving spouse is enrolled for delivery by the educational institution. (b) Delivery and certification....

  18. PEGylated cationic polylactides for hybrid biosynthetic gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Jones, Charles H; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Chen, Mingfu; Ravikrishnan, Anitha; Zhang, Hanguang; Gollakota, Akhila; Chung, Taichun; Cheng, Chong; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2015-03-01

    Genetic vaccination is predicated on the underlying principle that diseases can be prevented by the controlled introduction of genetic material encoding antigenic proteins from pathogenic organisms to elicit the formation of protective immune responses. Driving this process is the choice of carrier that is responsible for navigating the obstacles associated with gene delivery. In this work, we expand upon a novel class of hybrid biosynthetic gene delivery vectors that are composed of a biomaterial outer coating and a bacterial (Escherichia coli) inner core. Specifically, a series of newly developed biodegradable cationic polylactides (CPLAs) and their PEGylated variants were selected to investigate the role of low polydispersity index (PDI), charge density, and PEGylation upon hybrid vector assembly and gene delivery efficacy. Upon assembly, hybrid vectors mediated increased gene delivery beyond that of the individual bacterial vector in isolation, including assays with increasing medium protein content to highlight shielding properties afforded by the PEG-functionalized CPLA component. Furthermore, after extensive characterization of surface deposition of the polymer, results prompted a new model for describing hybrid vector assembly that includes cellular coating and penetration of the CPLA component. In summary, these results provide new options and insight toward the assembly and application of next-generation hybrid biosynthetic gene delivery vectors. PMID:25625426

  19. Collagen interactions: Drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Collagen is a major component in a wide range of drug delivery systems and biomaterial applications. Its basic physical and structural properties, together with its low immunogenicity and natural turnover, are keys to its biocompatibility and effectiveness. In addition to its material properties, the collagen triple-helix interacts with a large number of molecules that trigger biological events. Collagen interactions with cell surface receptors regulate many cellular processes, while interactions with other ECM components are critical for matrix structure and remodeling. Collagen also interacts with enzymes involved in its biosynthesis and degradation, including matrix metalloproteinases. Over the past decade, much information has been gained about the nature and specificity of collagen interactions with its partners. These studies have defined collagen sequences responsible for binding and the high-resolution structures of triple-helical peptides bound to its natural binding partners. Strategies to target collagen interactions are already being developed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies to interfere with collagen fibril formation and the use of triple-helical peptides to direct liposomes to melanoma cells. The molecular information about collagen interactions will further serve as a foundation for computational studies to design small molecules that can interfere with specific interactions or target tumor cells. Intelligent control of collagen biological interactions within a material context will expand the effectiveness of collagen-based drug delivery. PMID:26631222

  20. In situ forming polymeric drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Madan, M; Bajaj, A; Lewis, S; Udupa, N; Baig, J A

    2009-05-01

    In situ forming polymeric formulations are drug delivery systems that are in sol form before administration in the body, but once administered, undergo gelation in situ, to form a gel. The formation of gels depends on factors like temperature modulation, pH change, presence of ions and ultra violet irradiation, from which the drug gets released in a sustained and controlled manner. Various polymers that are used for the formulation of in situ gels include gellan gum, alginic acid, xyloglucan, pectin, chitosan, poly(DL-lactic acid), poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and poly-caprolactone. The choice of solvents like water, dimethylsulphoxide, N-methyl pyrrolidone, triacetin and 2-pyrrolidone for these formulations depends on the solubility of polymer used. Mainly in situ gels are administered by oral, ocular, rectal, vaginal, injectable and intraperitoneal routes. The in situ gel forming polymeric formulations offer several advantages like sustained and prolonged action in comparison to conventional drug delivery systems. The article presents a detailed review of these types of polymeric systems, their evaluation, advancements and their commercial formulations. From a manufacturing point of view, the production of such devices is less complex and thus lowers the investment and manufacturing cost. PMID:20490289

  1. Growth factor delivery for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gittens, S A; Uludag, H

    2001-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that undergoes significant turnover during the life cycle of an individual. Despite having a significant regenerative capability, trauma and other pathological scenarios commonly require therapeutic intervention to facilitate the healing process. Bone tissue engineering, where cellular and biological processes at a site are deliberately manipulated for a therapeutic outcome, offers a viable option for the treatment of skeletal diseases. In this review paper, we aim to provide a brief synopsis of cellular and molecular basis of bone formation that are pertinent to current efforts of bone healing. Different approaches for engineering bone tissue were presented with special emphasis on the use of soluble (diffusible) therapeutic agents to accelerate bone healing. The latter agents have been used for both local bone repair (i.e. introduction of agents directly to a site of repair) as well as systemic bone regeneration (i.e. delivery for regeneration throughout the skeletal system). Critical drug delivery and targeting issues pertinent for each mode of bone regeneration are provided. In addition, future challenges and opportunities in bone tissue engineering are proposed from the authors' perspective. PMID:11822814

  2. Controlled release polymeric ocular delivery of acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Praful Balavant; Dandagi, Panchaxari; Udupa, Nayanabhirama; Gopal, Shavi V; Jain, Samata S; Vasanth, Surenalli G

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate and evaluate controlled release polymeric ocular delivery of acyclovir. Reservoir-type ocular inserts were fabricated by sandwiching hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) matrix film containing acyclovir between two rate controlling membranes of cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP). The solubility and dissolution rate of poorly soluble acyclovir was enhanced by preparing binary systems with beta-cyclodextrin and then incorporated into HPMC matrix. Nine formulations (AB-1 to AB-9) with varying ratio of HPMC (drug matrix) and CAP (rate controlling membrane) were developed and sterilized by gamma radiation. The formulations were subjected to various physico-chemical evaluations. The in vitro release profile of all the formulations showed a steady, controlled drug release up to 20 h with non-Fickian diffusion behavior. A high correlation coefficient found between in vitro/in vivo release rate studies. Formation of acyclovir complex was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry. In addition, dissolution rate studies revealed improved solubility of acyclovir when complexed with beta-cyclodextrin. Stability studies showed that the ocular inserts could be stored safely at study storage conditions. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated controlled release formulation of acyclovir inserts for ocular delivery using biodegradable polymers. PMID:19772377

  3. In Situ Forming Polymeric Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Madan, M.; Bajaj, A.; Lewis, S.; Udupa, N.; Baig, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In situ forming polymeric formulations are drug delivery systems that are in sol form before administration in the body, but once administered, undergo gelation in situ, to form a gel. The formation of gels depends on factors like temperature modulation, pH change, presence of ions and ultra violet irradiation, from which the drug gets released in a sustained and controlled manner. Various polymers that are used for the formulation of in situ gels include gellan gum, alginic acid, xyloglucan, pectin, chitosan, poly(DL-lactic acid), poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and poly-caprolactone. The choice of solvents like water, dimethylsulphoxide, N-methyl pyrrolidone, triacetin and 2-pyrrolidone for these formulations depends on the solubility of polymer used. Mainly in situ gels are administered by oral, ocular, rectal, vaginal, injectable and intraperitoneal routes. The in situ gel forming polymeric formulations offer several advantages like sustained and prolonged action in comparison to conventional drug delivery systems. The article presents a detailed review of these types of polymeric systems, their evaluation, advancements and their commercial formulations. From a manufacturing point of view, the production of such devices is less complex and thus lowers the investment and manufacturing cost. PMID:20490289

  4. Dual-column capillary microextraction (CME) combined with electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) for the speciation of arsenic in human hair extracts.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fei; Hu, Bin

    2010-02-01

    In this work, dual-column capillary microextraction (CME) system consisting of N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (AAPTS)-silica coated capillary (C1) and 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTS)-silica coated capillary (C2) was developed for sequential separation/preconcentration of arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)] in the extracts of human hair followed by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) detection with iridium as permanent modifier. Various experimental parameters affecting the dual-column microextraction of different As species had been investigated in detail. It was found that at pH 9, As(V) and MMA could be quantitatively retained by C1 and only As(III) could be quantitatively retained by C2. With the aid of valve switching, As(V)/MMA(V) retained on C1 and As(III) retained on C2 could be sequentially desorbed by 10 microl of 0.01 mol l(-1) HNO(3) [for As(V)], 0.1 mol l(-1) HNO(3) [for MMA(V)] and 0.2 mol l(-1) HNO(3)-3% thiourea (m/v) [for As(III)], respectively, the eluents were immediately introduced into the Ir-coated graphite tubes for further ETV-ICP-MS detection. With two-step ETV pyrolysis program, Cl(-) in the sample matrix could be in situ removed, and the total As in the human hair extracts or digested solution could be interference-free, determined by ETV-ICP-MS. DMA(V) in the human hair extracts was obtained by subtraction of total As in the human hair extracts from other three As species. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits (3 sigma) of the method were 3.9 pg ml(-1) for As(III), 2.7 pg ml(-1) for As(V), 2.6 pg ml(-1) for MMA(V) and 124 pg ml(-1) for total As with the relative standard deviations less than 7.0% (C = 0.1 ng ml(-1), n = 7), and the enrichment factor was 286, 262 and 260 for As(III), As(V) and MMA(V), respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for the speciation of arsenic in the extracts of human hair. PMID:19950110

  5. Adaptively biased sequential importance sampling for rare events in reaction networks with comparison to exact solutions from finite buffer dCME method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Youfang; Liang, Jie

    2013-07-01

    Critical events that occur rarely in biological processes are of great importance, but are challenging to study using Monte Carlo simulation. By introducing biases to reaction selection and reaction rates, weighted stochastic simulation algorithms based on importance sampling allow rare events to be sampled more effectively. However, existing methods do not address the important issue of barrier crossing, which often arises from multistable networks and systems with complex probability landscape. In addition, the proliferation of parameters and the associated computing cost pose significant problems. Here we introduce a general theoretical framework for obtaining optimized biases in sampling individual reactions for estimating probabilities of rare events. We further describe a practical algorithm called adaptively biased sequential importance sampling (ABSIS) method for efficient probability estimation. By adopting a look-ahead strategy and by enumerating short paths from the current state, we estimate the reaction-specific and state-specific forward and backward moving probabilities of the system, which are then used to bias reaction selections. The ABSIS algorithm can automatically detect barrier-crossing regions, and can adjust bias adaptively at different steps of the sampling process, with bias determined by the outcome of exhaustively generated short paths. In addition, there are only two bias parameters to be determined, regardless of the number of the reactions and the complexity of the network. We have applied the ABSIS method to four biochemical networks: the birth-death process, the reversible isomerization, the bistable Schlögl model, and the enzymatic futile cycle model. For comparison, we have also applied the finite buffer discrete chemical master equation (dCME) method recently developed to obtain exact numerical solutions of the underlying discrete chemical master equations of these problems. This allows us to assess sampling results objectively by comparing simulation results with true answers. Overall, ABSIS can accurately and efficiently estimate rare event probabilities for all examples, often with smaller variance than other importance sampling algorithms. The ABSIS method is general and can be applied to study rare events of other stochastic networks with complex probability landscape.

  6. Therapeutic angiogenesis: controlled delivery of angiogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Hunghao; Wang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic angiogenesis aims at treating ischemic diseases by generating new blood vessels from existing vasculature. It relies on delivery of exogenous factors to stimulate neovasculature formation. Current strategies using genes, proteins and cells have demonstrated efficacy in animal models. However, clinical translation of any of the three approaches has proved to be challenging for various reasons. Administration of angiogenic factors is generally considered safe, according to accumulated trials, and offers off-the-shelf availability. However, many hurdles must be overcome before therapeutic angiogenesis can become a true human therapy. This article will highlight protein-based therapeutic angiogenesis, concisely review recent progress and examine critical challenges. We will discuss growth factors that have been widely utilized in promoting angiogenesis and compare their targets and functions. Lastly, since bolus injection of free proteins usually result in poor outcomes, we will focus on controlled release of proteins. PMID:22838066

  7. CME in the Soviet Union

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Marvin

    1978-01-01

    This article documents the system of continuing medical education in the Soviet Union, as seen through the eyes of a visiting Canadian physician. The information was not easily obtained, since the visit was fraught with administrative difficulties, but the experience was highly educational, giving particular insight into the advantages and disadvantages of an educational system which is totally government funded. PMID:21301547

  8. Transdermal Insulin Delivery Using Microdermabrasion

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Samantha; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Seong-O

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Transdermal insulin delivery is an attractive needle-free alternative to subcutaneous injection conventionally used to treat diabetes. However, skin’s barrier properties prevent insulin permeation at useful levels. Methods We investigated whether microdermabrasion can selectively remove skin’s surface layers to increase skin permeability as a method to administer insulin to diabetic rats. We further assessed the relative roles of stratum corneum and viable epidermis as barriers to insulin delivery. Results Pretreatment of skin with microdermabrasion to selectively remove stratum corneum did not have a significant effect on insulin delivery or reduction in blood glucose level (BGL). Removal of full epidermis by microdermabrasion significantly reduced BGL, similar to the positive control involving subcutaneous injection of 0.1U insulin. Significant pharmacokinetic differences between microdermabrasion and subcutaneous injection were faster time to peak insulin concentration after injection and larger peak insulin concentration and area-under-the-curve after microdermabrasion. Conclusions Microdermabrasion can increase skin permeability to insulin at levels sufficient to reduce BGL. Viable epidermis is a barrier to insulin delivery such that removal of full epidermis enables significantly more insulin delivery than removal of stratum corneum alone. PMID:21499837

  9. Bladder Injury During Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tarney, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in the United States with over 30% of deliveries occurring via this route. This number is likely to increase given decreasing rates of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and primary cesarean delivery on maternal request, which carries the inherent risk for intraoperative complications. Urologic injury is the most common injury at the time of either obstetric or gynecologic surgery, with the bladder being the most frequent organ damaged. Risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean section include previous cesarean delivery, adhesions, emergent cesarean delivery, and cesarean section performed at the time of the second stage of labor. Fortunately, most bladder injuries are recognized at the time of surgery, which is important, as quick recognition and repair are associated with a significant reduction in patient mortality. Although cesarean delivery is a cornerstone of obstetrics, there is a paucity of data in the literature either supporting or refuting specific techniques that are performed today. There is evidence to support double-layer closure of the hysterotomy, the routine use of adhesive barriers, and performing a Pfannenstiel skin incision versus a vertical midline subumbilical incision to decrease the risk for bladder injury during cesarean section. There is also no evidence that supports the creation of a bladder flap, although routinely performed during cesarean section, as a method to reduce the risk of bladder injury. Finally, more research is needed to determine if indwelling catheterization, exteriorization of the uterus, and methods to extend hysterotomy incision lead to bladder injury. PMID:24876830

  10. Buccal and sublingual vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Kraan, Heleen; Vrieling, Hilde; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Jiskoot, Wim; Kersten, Gideon; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2014-09-28

    Because of their large surface area and immunological competence, mucosal tissues are attractive administration and target sites for vaccination. An important characteristic of mucosal vaccination is its ability to elicit local immune responses, which act against infection at the site of pathogen entry. However, mucosal surfaces are endowed with potent and sophisticated tolerance mechanisms to prevent the immune system from overreacting to the many environmental antigens. Hence, mucosal vaccination may suppress the immune system instead of induce a protective immune response. Therefore, mucosal adjuvants and/or special antigen delivery systems as well as appropriate dosage forms are required in order to develop potent mucosal vaccines. Whereas oral, nasal and pulmonary vaccine delivery strategies have been described extensively, the sublingual and buccal routes have received considerably less attention. In this review, the characteristics of and approaches for sublingual and buccal vaccine delivery are described and compared with other mucosal vaccine delivery sites. We discuss recent progress and highlight promising developments in the search for vaccine formulations, including adjuvants and suitable dosage forms, which are likely critical for designing a successful sublingual or buccal vaccine. Finally, we outline the challenges, hurdles to overcome and formulation issues relevant for sublingual or buccal vaccine delivery. PMID:24911355

  11. Local drug delivery for enhancing fracture healing in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Kyllnen, Laura; D'Este, Matteo; Alini, Mauro; Eglin, David

    2015-01-01

    Fragility fractures can cause significant morbidity and mortality in patients with osteoporosis and inflict a considerable medical and socioeconomic burden. Moreover, treatment of an osteoporotic fracture is challenging due to the decreased strength of the surrounding bone and suboptimal healing capacity, predisposing both to fixation failure and non-union. Whereas a systemic osteoporosis treatment acts slowly, local release of osteogenic agents in osteoporotic fracture would act rapidly to increase bone strength and quality, as well as to reduce the bone healing period and prevent development of a problematic non-union. The identification of agents with potential to stimulate bone formation and improve implant fixation strength in osteoporotic bone has raised hope for the fast augmentation of osteoporotic fractures. Stimulation of bone formation by local delivery of growth factors is an approach already in clinical use for the treatment of non-unions, and could be utilized for osteoporotic fractures as well. Small molecules have also gained ground as stable and inexpensive compounds to enhance bone formation and tackle osteoporosis. The aim of this paper is to present the state of the art on local drug delivery in osteoporotic fractures. Advantages, disadvantages and underlying molecular mechanisms of different active species for local bone healing in osteoporotic bone are discussed. This review also identifies promising new candidate molecules and innovative approaches for the local drug delivery in osteoporotic bone. PMID:25218339

  12. Ultrasonic drug delivery in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Udroiu, Ion

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound-assisted drug delivery is an emerging technique that has the advantage of being non-invasive, efficiently and specifically targeted and controllable. While systemic drugs often show detrimental side effects, their ultrasound-triggered local release at the selected tissue may improve safety and specifity of therapy. An increasing amount of animal and preclinical studies demonstrates how ultrasound can also be used for increasing the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drug release to solid tumors. In particular, this technique may be functional to reach uniform delivery of chemotherapeutic agents throughout tumors, which is naturally restricted by their abnormal vascularization and interstitial pressure. This review deals with the physical mechanisms of ultrasound, the different kinds of drug carriers (microbubbles, liposomes and micelles) and the biological phenomena useful for cancer treatment (hyperthermia, sonoporation, enhanced extravasation, sonophoresis and blood-brain barrier disruption), showing how much ultrasonic drug delivery is a promising method in the oncological field. PMID:26011326

  13. Responsive foams for nanoparticle delivery.

    PubMed

    Tang, Christina; Xiao, Edward; Sinko, Patrick J; Szekely, Zoltan; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2015-09-01

    We have developed responsive foam systems for nanoparticle delivery. The foams are easy to make, stable at room temperature, and can be engineered to break in response to temperature or moisture. Temperature-responsive foams are based on the phase transition of long chain alcohols and could be produced using medical grade nitrous oxide as a propellant. These temperature-sensitive foams could be used for polyacrylic acid (PAA)-based nanoparticle delivery. We also discuss moisture-responsive foams made with soap pump dispensers. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoparticles or PMMA latex nanoparticles were loaded into Tween 20 foams and the particle size was not affected by the foam formulation or foam break. Using biocompatible detergents, we anticipate this will be a versatile and simple approach to producing foams for nanoparticle delivery with many potential pharmaceutical and personal care applications. PMID:26091943

  14. Opening the Black Box: Exploring the Effect of Transformation on Online Service Delivery in Local Governments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veenstra, Anne Fleur; Zuurmond, Arre

    To enhance the quality of their online service delivery, many government organizations seek to transform their organization beyond merely setting up a front office. This transformation includes elements such as the formation of service delivery chains, the adoption of a management strategy supporting process orientation and the implementation of enterprise architecture. This paper explores whether undertaking this transformation has a positive effect on the quality of online service delivery, using data gathered from seventy local governments. We found that having an externally oriented management strategy in place, adopting enterprise architecture, aligning information systems to business and sharing activities between processes and departments are positively related to the quality of online service delivery. We recommend that further research should be carried out to find out whether dimensions of organizational development too have an effect on online service delivery in the long term.

  15. Nucleic acid delivery: the missing pieces of the puzzle?

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Juliane; Szoka, Francis C.

    2012-01-01

    Conspectus The ability of gene or RNA interference (RNAi) delivery to increase or decrease virtually any protein in a cell opens the path for cures to most diseases that afflict humans. However, their high molecular weight, anionic nature, and instability in the presence of enzymes, pose major obstacles to nucleic acid delivery and frustrates their use as human therapies. This Account describes current ideas on the mechanisms in non-viral nucleic acid delivery and how lipidic and polymeric carriers overcome some of the critical barriers to delivery. A multitude of polymeric and lipidic vectors have been developed over the last 20 years, only a small fraction of them have progressed into clinical trials. Given that none of these vectors has received FDA approval, indicates that the current vectors do not yet have suitable properties for effective in vivo nucleic acid delivery. Nucleic acid delivery is a multistep process and inefficiencies at any stage result in a dramatic decrease in gene delivery or gene silencing. Despite this, the majority of studies investigating synthetic vectors focus solely on optimization of endosomal escape. A small number of studies address how to improve uptake via targeted delivery. A smaller fraction examine the intracellular fate of the delivery systems and nucleic acid cargo. The internalization of genes into the cell nucleus remains an inefficient and mysterious process. In the case of DNA delivery, strategies to increase and accelerate the migration of DNA through the cytoplasm and transport it through the nuclear membrane are required. The barriers to siRNA delivery are fewer: siRNA is more readily released from the carrier, siRNA is more resistant to enzymatic degradation and the target is in the cytoplasm; hence, siRNA delivery systems are becoming a clinical reality. With regard to siRNA therapy, the exact cytoplasmic location of RISC formation and activity is unknown. This makes specific targeting of the RISC for more efficient siRNA delivery difficult. Furthermore, identifying the factors favoring the binding of siRNA to Ago-2 and understanding how the half-life of siRNA and Ago-2/siRNA complex in the cytoplasm can be modulated without interfering with RISC functions that are essential for normal cell activity could increase siRNA delivery efficiency. In this manuscript we concisely review the current synthetic vectors and for a few of these, propose alternative strategies. We suggest how certain cellular mechanisms might be exploited to improve gene transfection and silencing. Finally, we raise the question if some carriers are delivering the siRNA to cells capable of repackaging the siRNA into exosomes. The exosomes would then transport the siRNA into a subsequent population of cells where the siRNA effect is manifest. This piggy-back mechanism may be responsible for reported deep tissue siRNA effects using certain carriers. PMID:22428908

  16. Cesarean delivery on maternal request.

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Meera; Visco, Anthony G; Hartmann, Katherine; Wechter, Mary Ellen; Gartlehner, Gerald; Wu, Jennifer M; Palmieri, Rachel; Funk, Michele Jonsson; Lux, Linda; Swinson, Tammeka; Lohr, Kathleen N

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The RTI International-University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Evidence-based Practice Center (RTI-UNC EPC) systematically reviewed the evidence on the trend and incidence of cesarean delivery (CD) in the United States and in other developed countries, maternal and infant outcomes of cesarean delivery on maternal request (CDMR) compared with planned vaginal delivery (PVD), factors affecting the magnitude of the benefits and harms of CDMR, and future research directions. DATA SOURCES We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Collaboration resources, and Embase and identified 1,406 articles to examine against a priori inclusion criteria. We included studies published from 1990 to the present, written in English. Studies had to include comparison between the key reference group (CDMR or proxies) and PVD. REVIEW METHODS A primary reviewer abstracted detailed data on key variables from included articles; a second senior reviewer confirmed accuracy. RESULTS We identified 13 articles for trends and incidence of CD, 54 for maternal and infant outcomes, and 5 on modifiers of CDMR. The incidence of CDMR appears to be increasing. However, accurately assessing either its true incidence or trends over time is difficult because currently CDMR is neither a well-recognized clinical entity nor an accurately reported indication for diagnostic coding or reimbursement. Virtually no studies exist on CDMR, so the knowledge base rests chiefly on indirect evidence from proxies possessing unique and significant limitations. Furthermore, most studies compared outcomes by actual routes of delivery, resulting in great uncertainty as to their relevance to planned routes of delivery. Primary CDMR and planned vaginal delivery likely do differ with respect to individual outcomes for either mothers or infants. However, our comprehensive assessment, across many different outcomes, suggests that no major differences exist between primary CDMR and planned vaginal delivery, but the evidence is too weak to conclude definitively that differences are completely absent. Given the limited data available, we cannot draw definitive conclusions about factors that might influence outcomes of planned CDMR versus PVD. CONCLUSIONS The evidence is significantly limited by its minimal relevance to primary CDMR. Future research requires developing consensus about terminology for both delivery routes and outcomes; creating a minimum data set of information about CDMR; improving study design and statistical analyses; attending to major outcomes and their special measurement issues; assessing both short- and long-term outcomes with better measurement strategies; dealing better with confounders; and considering the value or utility of different outcomes. PMID:17627329

  17. Microencapsulation of indocyanine green for potential applications in image-guided drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiqiang; Si, Ting; Xu, Ronald X

    2015-02-01

    We present a novel process to encapsulate indocyanine green (ICG) in liposomal droplets at high concentration for potential applications in image-guided drug delivery. The microencapsulation process follows two consecutive steps of droplet formation by liquid-driven coaxial flow focusing (LDCFF) and solvent removal by oil phase dewetting. These biocompatible lipid vesicles may have important applications in drug delivery and fluorescence imaging. PMID:25450664

  18. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  19. Optimizing gastrointestinal delivery of drugs.

    PubMed

    Wilding, I R; Davis, S S; O'Hagan, D T

    1994-06-01

    There is currently a great deal of effort being aimed at achieving effective delivery of novel therapeutic drugs, such as peptides, by the oral route. Opportunities have been identified which could lead to more convenient delivery systems for this class of drug. It is likely that a polypeptide given unprotected into the gastrointestinal environment will be degraded significantly. However, it is well known that small quantities of dietary proteins can be absorbed, even though these may have little or no physiological effect. It is felt that the colon may provide an advantageous absorption site for peptides. As a consequence there has been considerable interest, not only in the development of colonic delivery systems, but also in the establishment of strategies designed to maximize peptide absorption from the colon. Traditionally, vaccine research has been concerned with producing systemic immunity by parenteral immunization. However, the gradual acceptance of the importance of IgA in protecting mucosal surfaces against infection from numerous pathogenic organisms has led to an increased interest in oral immunization. Because of the existence of the CMIS, oral immunization induces secretory immunity in both the genital and respiratory tracts. Therefore, oral immunization offers the possibility for development of easily administered vaccines that will be effective in prevention against important respiratory and genital tract infections. The recent advances in recombinant DNA technology and the development of antigen delivery systems have given rise to optimism that several new and improved oral vaccines may be available by the next millennium. PMID:7949458

  20. Nanoparticles for Brain Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Masserini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system, one of the most delicate microenvironments of the body, is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulating its homeostasis. BBB is a highly complex structure that tightly regulates the movement of ions of a limited number of small molecules and of an even more restricted number of macromolecules from the blood to the brain, protecting it from injuries and diseases. However, the BBB also significantly precludes the delivery of drugs to the brain, thus, preventing the therapy of a number of neurological disorders. As a consequence, several strategies are currently being sought after to enhance the delivery of drugs across the BBB. Within this review, the recently born strategy of brain drug delivery based on the use of nanoparticles, multifunctional drug delivery systems with size in the order of one-billionth of meters, is described. The review also includes a brief description of the structural and physiological features of the barrier and of the most utilized nanoparticles for medical use. Finally, the potential neurotoxicity of nanoparticles is discussed, and future technological approaches are described. The strong efforts to allow the translation from preclinical to concrete clinical applications are worth the economic investments. PMID:25937958