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Sample records for cme delivery format

  1. Using Qualitative Research Methods: Moving Beyond Felt Needs in CME Design and Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitterman, Jeanne E.

    1999-01-01

    Phone interviews explored the attitudes of 27 course directors regarding continuing medical education (CME) needs. The action-reflection practitioner-inquiry method involved physicians and CME leadership in joint discourse for planning CME programs. (Author/JOW)

  2. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME II Appendix II to Part 11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Pt. 11, App. II Appendix II to Part 11—Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME...

  3. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME II Appendix II to Part 11 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Pt. 11, App. II Appendix II to Part 11—Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME...

  4. CME Initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems in solar physics is understanding the processes responsible for giant magnetic disruptions such as the event of July 14, 2000, which consisted of a massive filament ejection, a fast coronal mass ejection (CME), prolonged X-class flaring, and an intense particle storm. These major events are of critical importance because they drive the most destructive forms of space weather and they provide a unique opportunity to study, in revealing detail, MHD instability and nonequilibrium -- processes that are at the heart of plasma astrophysics. It is now widely accepted that CMEs/eruptive flares represent the explosive release of magnetic energy stored in the corona. Therefore, in order to understand the phenomenon, we must answer the following questions: What is the field structure responsible for the disruption and why is the energy released explosively? In this talk we address these two questions using the latest theories and numerical models for CMEs/eruptive flares.

  5. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...); and Substitute air temperature stated in degrees Celsius. For water temperature at the surface: Water... technical document); and Substitute water temperature stated in degrees Celsius. For total suspended... The NRDAM/CME begins its calculations at the point that the released substance entered water in...

  6. Optimal Multi-Temperature delivery frequency for small format stores

    E-print Network

    Barooah, Mayurpankhi

    2015-01-01

    Retailers are exploring more efficient ways to deliver to small format stores that demand frequent and small volume deliveries from Distribution Centers. The need to deliver products at different temperatures, viz. Ambient, ...

  7. Getting Under a CME's Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Koning, C. A.

    2014-05-01

    We present a new reconstruction technique for investigating the internal and global structure of a coronal mass ejection (CME). This technique, which we call CME Hull&Innards from Polarimetric Imaging (CHI-PI or ?-?), uses Thomson-scattered polarization measurements to locate CME structures in three-dimensional space, along with total brightness measurements to characterize the mass distribution of these structures. We apply ?-? reconstruction to the CME of 2008 December 12. Preliminary results clearly indicate sub-structure within the CME. There is also evidence for a lower-density cavity that may be associated with the CME's internal magnetic field.

  8. Multi-protein Delivery by Nanodiamonds Promotes Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, L.; Gatica, M.; Kim, H.; Osawa, E.; Ho, D.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE® for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  9. CME Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.-H.; Gallagher, P. T.

    The goal of this study is to investigate the driving mechanisms of CMEs and to infer the magnetic field properties at the onset of the instability. We use EIT 195 Å images and LASCO white-light coronagraph data of a CME event that occurred on 17 December 2006. It was a long-duration event, and was associated with an occulted C2.1 class flare. To determine the driving mechanism, we quantitatively and qualitatively compared the observationally obtained kinematic evolution with that predicted by three CME models: the breakout model (BO, see Antiochos et al. 1999; Lynch et al. 2008; DeVore and Antiochos 2008), the catastrophe model (CM, see Priest and Forbes 2000), and the toroidal instability model (TI, see Chen 1989; Kliem and Török 2006). Our results indicate that this CME is best represented by the CM model. We infer that, at the onset of the instability, the Alfvén speed is approximately 120 km s-1 and the height of the flux rope is roughly 100-200Mm. These parameter values are related to the magnetic environment and the loop geometry and can be used to infer the magnetic condition at the onset of the eruption.We intend to submit the full analysis to A&A.

  10. Ensemble modeling of CME propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. O.; Arge, C. N.; Henney, C. J.; Odstrcil, D.; Millward, G. H.; Pizzo, V. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Wang-Sheeley-Arge(WSA)-Enlil-cone modeling system is used for making routine arrival time forecasts of the Earth-directed "halo" coronal mass ejections (CMEs), since they typically produce the most geoeffective events. A major objective of this work is to better understand the sensitivity of the WSA-Enlil modeling results to input model parameters and how these parameters contribute to the overall model uncertainty and performance. We present ensemble modeling results for a simple halo CME event that occurred on 15 February 2011 and a succession of three halo CME events that occurred on 2-4 August 2011. During this period the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) A and B spacecraft viewed the CMEs over the solar limb, thereby providing more reliable constraints on the initial CME geometries during the manual cone fitting process. To investigate the sensitivity of the modeled CME arrival times to small variations in the input cone properties, for each CME event we create an ensemble of numerical simulations based on multiple sets of cone parameters. We find that the accuracy of the modeled arrival times not only depends on the initial input CME geometry, but also on the reliable specification of the background solar wind, which is driven by the input maps of the photospheric magnetic field. As part of the modeling ensemble, we simulate the CME events using the traditional daily updated maps as well as those that are produced by the Air Force data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport (ADAPT) model, which provide a more instantaneous snapshot of the photospheric field distribution. For the August 2011 events, in particular, we find that the accuracy in the arrival time predictions also depends on whether the cone parameters for all three CMEs are specified in a single WSA-Enlil simulation. The inclusion/exclusion of one or two of the preceding CMEs affects the solar wind conditions through which the succeeding CME propagates.

  11. Ensemble Modeling of CME Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. O.; Arge, C. N.; Odstr?il, D.; Millward, G.; Pizzo, V.; Quinn, J. M.; Henney, C. J.

    2013-07-01

    The current progression toward solar maximum provides a unique opportunity to use multi-perspective spacecraft observations together with numerical models to better understand the evolution and propagation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Of interest to both the scientific and forecasting communities are the Earth-directed "halo" CMEs, since they typically produce the most geoeffective events. However, determining the actual initial geometries of halo CMEs is a challenge due to the plane-of-sky projection effects. Thus the recent 15 February 2011 halo CME event has been selected for this study. During this event the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) A and B spacecraft were fortuitously located ˜ 90° away from the Sun-Earth line such that the CME was viewed as a limb event from these two spacecraft, thereby providing a more reliable constraint on the initial CME geometry. These multi-perspective observations were utilized to provide a simple geometrical description that assumes a cone shape for a CME to calculate its angular width and central position. The event was simulated using the coupled Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-Enlil 3D numerical solar corona-solar wind model. Daily updated global photospheric magnetic field maps were used to drive the background solar wind. To improve our modeling techniques, the sensitivity of the modeled CME arrival times to the initial input CME geometry was assessed by creating an ensemble of numerical simulations based on multiple sets of cone parameters for this event. It was found that the accuracy of the modeled arrival times not only depends on the initial input CME geometry, but also on the accuracy of the modeled solar wind background, which is driven by the input maps of the photospheric field. To improve the modeling of the background solar wind, the recently developed data-assimilated magnetic field synoptic maps produced by the Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport (ADAPT) model were used. The ADAPT maps provide a more instantaneous snapshot of the global photospheric field distribution than that provided by traditional daily updated synoptic maps. Using ADAPT to drive the background solar wind, an ensemble set of eight different CME arrival times was generated, where the spread in the predictions was ˜ 13 hours and was nearly centered on the observed CME shock arrival time.

  12. Reflections on CME Congress 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Alan B.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary reflects the author's impressions of Continuing Medical Education (CME) Congress 2012, a provocative international conference on professional development and quality improvement in the health professions that took place in Toronto, Ontario, last spring. The sessions he attended and conversations he had with other attendees were…

  13. Hematometra Formation- A Rare Complication of Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Sharma, Abha; Vaid, Neelam Bala

    2014-01-01

    Hematometra resulting from partial or complete obstruction of lower genital tract may be congenital or acquired. Commonest congenital causes are imperforate hymen and transverse vaginal septum. Acquired causes are senile atrophy of endocervical canal, scarring of the isthmus by synechiae, radiation and endocervical malignancy or due to surgical procedures. Various surgical procedures associated with hematometra are dilatation and curettage, cone biopsy, endometrial ablation, cryocoagulation and electrocautery. Hematometra following an abortion or cesarean delivery is rare. We report a case of hematometra following obstruction of outflow tract due to prior cesarean delivery. PMID:25302239

  14. Hematometra formation- a rare complication of cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Jain, Sandhya; Sharma, Abha; Vaid, Neelam Bala

    2014-08-01

    Hematometra resulting from partial or complete obstruction of lower genital tract may be congenital or acquired. Commonest congenital causes are imperforate hymen and transverse vaginal septum. Acquired causes are senile atrophy of endocervical canal, scarring of the isthmus by synechiae, radiation and endocervical malignancy or due to surgical procedures. Various surgical procedures associated with hematometra are dilatation and curettage, cone biopsy, endometrial ablation, cryocoagulation and electrocautery. Hematometra following an abortion or cesarean delivery is rare. We report a case of hematometra following obstruction of outflow tract due to prior cesarean delivery. PMID:25302239

  15. Simulations of Overexpanding CME Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliem, B.; Forbes, T.; Vourlidas, A.; Patsourakos, S.

    2010-12-01

    Coronal mass ejection (CME) cavities seen in white-light coronagraphs expand nearly self similarly in the outer corona and inner solar wind. Little is known about their initial expansion in the inner corona. A two-phase evolution, consisting of an initial overexpansion up to a heliocentric front height of about 1.5 solar radii, followed by nearly self-similar expansion, was recently discovered in STEREO/SECCHI observations of a fast CME (Patsourakos et al. 2010). The overexpansion is expressed as a decrease of the cavity aspect ratio (center height by radius) by at least a factor of 2 during the rise phase of the main CME acceleration. We present MHD simulations of erupting flux ropes that show the initial overexpansion of a cavity in line with the observed evolution. The contributions of ideal-MHD expansion and of magnetic reconnection to the growth of the flux rope and cavity in the simulations will be quantified to identify the primary cause of the overexpansion. This assesses the diagnostic potential of the overexpansion for the change of flux rope current and the role of magnetic reconnection in the early evolution of CMEs.

  16. Commercial Buildings Partnership Projects - Metered Data Format and Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, Srinivas

    2010-11-16

    A number of the Commercial Building Partnership Projects (CBPs) will require metering, monitoring, data analysis and verification of savings after the retrofits are complete. Although monitoring and verification (M&V) agents are free to use any metering and monitoring devices that they chose, the data they collect should be reported to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in a standard format. PNNL will store the data collected in its CBP database for further use by PNNL and U.S. Department of Energy. This document describes the data storage process and the deliver format of the data from the M&V agents.

  17. Professional Development Integrating Technology: Does Delivery Format Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claesgens, Jennifer; Rubino-Hare, Lori; Bloom, Nena; Fredrickson, Kristi; Henderson-Dahms, Carol; Menasco, Jackie; Sample, James

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the two Power of Data (POD) projects was to increase science, technology and math skills through the implementation of project-based learning modules that teach students how to solve problems through data collection and analysis utilizing geospatial technologies. Professional development institutes in two formats were offered to…

  18. Parenting Interventions Implementation Science: How Delivery Format Impacts the Parenting Wisely Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Katie L.; Bacallao, Martica; Smokowski, Paul R.; Robertson, Caroline I. B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study examines the implementation and effectiveness of Parenting Wisely, an Internet-based parenting skills intervention. The study assesses whether parents benefit from Parenting Wisely participation and whether the delivery format influences program effectiveness. Method: This study uses a quasi-experimental design.…

  19. LCDR Daniel Simon CME James R. Johnson

    E-print Network

    Michelle Pelke Executive Officer. MOC--P CDR Joe C. Bishop Chief, Operations, MOC-P LCDR Michael LevineLCDR Daniel Simon CME James R. Johnson -- CDR E.J. Van Den Ameele CME Brian A. Smith Rainier Fairweather -- CDR David J. Zezula 11_ :ill . N- I Bell M. Shimada -- CDR Brian Parker .brina Tar

  20. A panoptic model for planetesimal formation and pebble delivery

    E-print Network

    Krijt, Sebastiaan; Dominik, Carsten; Tielens, Alexander G G M

    2015-01-01

    The journey from dust particle to planetesimal involves physical processes acting on scales ranging from micrometers (the sticking and restructuring of aggregates) to hundreds of astronomical units (the size of the turbulent protoplanetary nebula). Considering these processes simultaneously is essential when studying planetesimal formation. We develop a novel, global, semi-analytical model for the evolution of the mass-dominating dust particles in a turbulent protoplanetary disk that takes into account the evolution of the dust surface density while preserving the essential characteristics of the porous coagulation process. This panoptic model is used to study the growth from submicron to planetesimal sizes in disks around Sun-like stars. For highly porous ices, unaffected by collisional fragmentation and erosion, rapid growth to planetesimal sizes is possible in a zone stretching out to ${\\sim}10\\mathrm{~AU}$ for massive disks. When porous coagulation is limited by erosive collisions, the formation of planet...

  1. Mechanism of Membranous Tunnelling Nanotube Formation in Viral Genome Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Bibiana; Gil-Carton, David; Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Bertin, Aurelie; Boulogne, Claire; Oksanen, Hanna M.; Bamford, Dennis H.; Abrescia, Nicola G. A.

    2013-01-01

    In internal membrane-containing viruses, a lipid vesicle enclosed by the icosahedral capsid protects the genome. It has been postulated that this internal membrane is the genome delivery device of the virus. Viruses built with this architectural principle infect hosts in all three domains of cellular life. Here, using a combination of electron microscopy techniques, we investigate bacteriophage PRD1, the best understood model for such viruses, to unveil the mechanism behind the genome translocation across the cell envelope. To deliver its double-stranded DNA, the icosahedral protein-rich virus membrane transforms into a tubular structure protruding from one of the 12 vertices of the capsid. We suggest that this viral nanotube exits from the same vertex used for DNA packaging, which is biochemically distinct from the other 11. The tube crosses the capsid through an aperture corresponding to the loss of the peripentonal P3 major capsid protein trimers, penton protein P31 and membrane protein P16. The remodeling of the internal viral membrane is nucleated by changes in osmolarity and loss of capsid-membrane interactions as consequence of the de-capping of the vertices. This engages the polymerization of the tail tube, which is structured by membrane-associated proteins. We have observed that the proteo-lipidic tube in vivo can pierce the gram-negative bacterial cell envelope allowing the viral genome to be shuttled to the host cell. The internal diameter of the tube allows one double-stranded DNA chain to be translocated. We conclude that the assembly principles of the viral tunneling nanotube take advantage of proteo-lipid interactions that confer to the tail tube elastic, mechanical and functional properties employed also in other protein-membrane systems. PMID:24086111

  2. Role of Components in the Formation of Self-microemulsifying Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, A. K.; Deshpande, P. B.; Kar, S. S.; Nayak, Usha Y.; Udupa, N.; Reddy, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical research is focused in designing novel drug delivery systems to improve the bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs. Self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems, one among the lipid-based dosage forms were proven to be promising in improving the oral bioavailability of such drugs by enhancing solubility, permeability and avoiding first-pass metabolism via enhanced lymphatic transport. Further, they have been successful in avoiding both inter and intra individual variations as well as the dose disproportionality. Aqueous insoluble drugs, in general, show greater solubility in lipid based excipients, and hence they are formulated as lipid based drug delivery systems. The extent of solubility of a hydrophobic drug in lipid excipients i.e. oil, surfactant and co-surfactant (components of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems) greatly affects the drug loading and in producing stable self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems. The present review highlighted the influence of physicochemical factors and structural features of the hydrophobic drug on its solubility in lipid excipients and an attempt was made to explore the role of each component of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems in the formation of stable microemulsion upon dilution. PMID:26180269

  3. The Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Luke

    2015-04-01

    Since the launch of the twin STEREO satellites in late 2006, the Heliospheric Imagers have been used, with good results, in tracking transients of solar origin, such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), out through the inner heliosphere. A frequently used approach is to build a "J-Map", in which multiple elongation profiles along a constant position angle are stacked in time, building an image in which radially propagating transients form curved tracks in the J-Map. From this the time-elongation profile of a solar transient can be manually identified. This is a time consuming and laborious process, and the results are subjective, depending on the skill and expertise of the investigator. With the Heliospheric Imager data it is possible to follow CMEs from the outer limits of the solar corona all the way to 1AU. Solar Stormwatch is a citizen science project that employs the power of thousands of volunteers to both identify and track CMEs in the Heliospheric Imager data. The CMEs identified by Solar Stormwatch are tracked many times by multiple users and this allows the calculation of consensus time-elongation profiles for each event and also provides an estimate of the error in the consensus profile. Therefore this system does not suffer from the potential subjectivity of individual researchers identifying and tracking CMEs. In this sense, the Solar Stormwatch system can be thought of as providing a middle ground between manually identified CME catalogues, such as the CDAW list, and CME catalogues generated through fully automated algorithms, such as CACtus and ARTEMIS etc. We provide a summary of the reduction of the Solar Stormwatch data into a catalogue of CMEs observed by STEREO-A and STEREO-B through the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and review some key statistical properties of these CMEs. Through some case studies of the propagation of CMEs out into the inner heliosphere we argue that the Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue, which publishes the time-elongation profiles of CMEs observed at multiple position angles, is a new and valuable dataset for space weather community.

  4. Calculation of Droplet Size and Formation Time in Electrohydrodynamic Based Pulsatile Drug Delivery System

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Yi; Hu, Junqiang; Lin, Qiao

    2012-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) generation, a commonly used method in BioMEMS, plays a significant role in the pulsed-release drug delivery system for a decade. In this paper, an EHD based drug delivery system is well designed, which can be used to generate a single drug droplet as small as 2.83 nL in 8.5 ms with a total device of 2x2x3 mm^3, and an external supplied voltage of 1500 V. Theoretically, we derive the expressions for the size and the formation time of a droplet generated by EHD method, while taking into account the drug supply rate, properties of liquid, gap between electrodes, nozzle size, and charged droplet neutralization. This work proves a repeatable, stable and controllable droplet generation and delivery system based on EHD method.

  5. Ensemble Modeling of CME Propagation and Geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. Leila; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Pulkkinen, Antti; MacNeice, Peter; Rastätter, Lutz; Odstrcil, Dusan; Jian, Lan; Richardson, Ian

    2015-04-01

    Ensemble modeling of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) provides a probabilistic forecast of CME arrival time which includes an estimation of arrival time uncertainty from the spread and distribution of predictions and forecast confidence in the likelihood of CME arrival. The real-time ensemble modeling of CME propagation uses the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-ENLIL+Cone model installed at the {Community Coordinated Modeling Center} (CCMC) and executed in real-time at the CCMC/{Space Weather Research Center}. The current implementation of this ensemble modeling method evaluates the sensitivity of WSA-ENLIL+Cone model simulations of CME propagation to initial CME parameters. We discuss the results of real-time ensemble simulations for a total of 35 CME events which occurred between January 2013 - July 2014. For the 17 events where the CME was predicted to arrive at Earth, the mean absolute arrival time prediction error was 12.3 hours, which is comparable to the errors reported in other studies. For predictions of CME arrival at Earth the correct rejection rate is 62%, the false-alarm rate is 38%, the correct alarm ratio is 77%, and false alarm ratio is 23%. The arrival time was within the range of the ensemble arrival predictions for 8 out of 17 events. The Brier Score for CME arrival predictions is 0.15 (where a score of 0 on a range of 0 to 1 is a perfect forecast), which indicates that on average, the predicted probability, or likelihood, of CME arrival is fairly accurate. The reliability of ensemble CME arrival predictions is heavily dependent on the initial distribution of CME input parameters (e.g. speed, direction, and width), particularly the median and spread. Preliminary analysis of the probabilistic forecasts suggests undervariability, indicating that these ensembles do not sample a wide enough spread in CME input parameters. Prediction errors can also arise from ambient model parameters, the accuracy of the solar wind background derived from coronal maps, or other model limitations. Finally, predictions of the KP geomagnetic index differ from observed values by less than one for 11 out of 17 of the ensembles and KP prediction errors computed from the mean predicted KP show a mean absolute error of 1.3. The CCMC, located at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, is an interagency partnership to facilitate community research and accelerate implementation of progress in research into space weather operations. The CCMC also serves the {Space Weather Scoreboard} website (http://kauai.ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov/SWScoreBoard) to the research community who may submit CME arrival time predictions in real-time for a variety of forecasting methods. The website facilitates model validation under real-time conditions and enables collaboration. For every CME event table on the site, the average of all submitted forecasts is automatically computed, thus itself providing a community-wide ensemble mean CME arrival time and impact forecast from a variety of models/methods.

  6. Commentary: CME and its role in the academic medical center: increasing integration, adding value.

    PubMed

    Davis, David A; Baron, Robert B; Grichnik, Katherine; Topulos, George P; Agus, Zalman S; Dorman, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Continuing medical education (CME), as it is currently structured, funded, and institutionalized, plays a marginal role in the academic medical center (AMC). In contrast, several models of more effective, integrated CME exist, and these enable the AMC to better achieve its potential in education, research, and health care delivery. Examples of such models are presented, emphasizing quality and performance improvement; regional, national, and public outreach; faculty and staff development; and research and scholarly activity. Although there are many reasons to maintain the status quo of CME programs, there are offsetting forces for change to be found in accreditation processes, movements toward maintenance of certification and licensure, and the need for the AMC to achieve higher quality standards. These models may offer a view of the potential of academic CME to be a major vehicle for the effective integration in quality, regional, and faculty development arenas, and as a scholarly and outcomes-oriented pursuit. Sitting at the right table and sufficiently integrated, CME holds real potential to help the AMC meet its multiple goals and missions. PMID:20042813

  7. Desktop document delivery using portable document format (PDF) files and the Web.

    PubMed

    Shipman, J P; Gembala, W L; Reeder, J M; Zick, B A; Rainwater, M J

    1998-07-01

    Desktop access to electronic full-text literature was rated one of the most desirable services in a client survey conducted by the University of Washington Libraries. The University of Washington Health Sciences Libraries (UW HSL) conducted a ten-month pilot test from August 1996 to May 1997 to determine the feasibility of delivering electronic journal articles via the Internet to remote faculty. Articles were scanned into Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF) files and delivered to individuals using Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) standard e-mail attachments and the Web. Participants retrieved scanned articles and used the Adobe Acrobat Reader software to view and print files. The pilot test required a special programming effort to automate the client notification and file deletion processes. Test participants were satisfied with the pilot test despite some technical difficulties. Desktop delivery is now offered as a routine delivery method from the UW HSL. PMID:9681165

  8. Biodegradable particle formation for drug and gene delivery using supercritical fluid and dense gas.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kenji

    2008-02-14

    Recent developments in biodegradable particle formation using supercritical fluids and dense gases have been reviewed with an emphasis on studies of micronizing and encapsulating poorly-soluble pharmaceuticals and gene. General review articles published in previous years have then been provided. A brief description of the operating principles of some types of particle formation processes is given. These include the rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS), the particles from gas-saturated solution (PGSS) processes, the gas antisolvent process (GAS), and the supercritical antisolvent process (SAS). The papers have been reviewed under two groups, one involving the production of particles from pure biodegradable substances, and the other involving coating, capsule, and impregnation that contain active components, especially those that relate to pharmaceuticals. This review is a comprehensive review specifically focused on the formation of biodegradable particles for drug and gene delivery system using supercritical fluid and dense gas. PMID:18061302

  9. HELCATS Prediction of Planetary CME arrival times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boakes, Peter; Moestl, Christian; Davies, Jackie; Harrison, Richard; Byrne, Jason; Barnes, David; Isavnin, Alexey; Kilpua, Emilia; Rollett, Tanja

    2015-04-01

    We present the first results of CME arrival time prediction at different planetary locations and their comparison to the in situ data within the HELCATS project. The EU FP7 HELCATS (Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis & Techniques Service) is a European effort to consolidate the exploitation of the maturing field of heliospheric imaging. HELCATS aims to catalogue solar wind transients, observed by the NASA STEREO Heliospheric Imager (HI) instruments, and validate different methods for the determination of their kinematic properties. This validation includes comparison with arrivals at Earth, and elsewhere in the heliosphere, as well as onsets at the Sun (http://www.helcats-fp7.eu/). A preliminary catalogue of manually identified CMEs, with over 1000 separate events, has been created from observations made by the STEREO/HI instruments covering the years 2007-2013. Initial speeds and directions of each CME have been derived through fitting the time elongation profile to the state of the art Self-Similar Expansion Fitting (SSEF) geometric technique (Davies et al., 2012). The technique assumes that, in the plane corresponding to the position angle of interest, CMEs can be modelled as circles subtending a fixed angular width to Sun-center and propagating anti-sunward in a fixed direction at a constant speed (we use an angular width of 30 degrees in our initial results). The model has advantages over previous geometric models (e.g. harmonic mean or fixed phi) as it allows one to predict whether a CME will 'hit' a specific heliospheric location, as well as to what degree (e.g. direct assault or glancing blow). We use correction formulae (Möstl and Davies, 2013) to convert CME speeds, direction and launch time to speed and arrival time at any in situ location. From the preliminary CME dataset, we derive arrival times for over 400 Earth-directed CMEs, and for over 100 Mercury-, Venus-, Mars- and Saturn-directed CMEs predicted to impact each planet. We present statistics of predicted CME arrival properties. In addition, we independently identify CME arrival at in situ locations using magnetic field data from the Venus Express, Messenger, and Ulysses spacecraft and show first comparisons to predicted arrival times. The results hold important implications for space weather prediction at Earth and other locations, allowing model and predicted CME parameters to be compared to their in situ counterparts.

  10. Solar Back-sided Halo CME - Duration: 13 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Sun erupted with several CMEs (coronal mass ejections) during a period just over a day (Nov. 8-9, 2012), the largest of which was a halo CME. This CME appears to have originated from an active ...

  11. pH-sensitive tubular polymersomes: formation and applications in cellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Robertson, James D; Yealland, Guy; Avila-Olias, Milagros; Chierico, Luca; Bandmann, Oliver; Renshaw, Stephen A; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2014-05-27

    Optimizing the shape of a nanovector influences its interaction with a cell and determines the internalization kinetics. Block copolymer amphiphiles self-assemble into monodisperse structures in aqueous solutions and have been explored extensively as drug delivery vectors. However, the structure of self-assembled block copolymers has mainly been limited to spherical vesicles or spherical and worm-like micelles. Here we show the controlled formation and purification of tubular polymersomes, long cylindrical vesicles. Tubular polymersomes are purified from other structures, and their formation is manipulated by incorporating the biocompatible membrane components cholesterol and phospholipids. Finally we show that these tubular polymersomes have different cellular internalization kinetics compared with spherical polymersomes and can successfully encapsulate and deliver fluorescent bovine serum albumin protein intracellularly. PMID:24724711

  12. A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. III. Catastrophe of the Eruptive Filament at a Magnetic Null Point and Formation of an Opposite-Handedness CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uralov, A. M.; Grechnev, V. V.; Rudenko, G. V.; Myshyakov, I. I.; Chertok, I. M.; Filippov, B. P.; Slemzin, V. A.

    2014-10-01

    Our analysis in Papers I and II (Grechnev et al., Solar Phys. 289, 289, 2014b and Solar Phys. 289, 1279, 2014c) of the 18 November 2003 solar event responsible for the 20 November geomagnetic superstorm has revealed a complex chain of eruptions. In particular, the eruptive filament encountered a topological discontinuity located near the solar disk center at a height of about 100 Mm, bifurcated, and transformed into a large cloud, which did not leave the Sun. Concurrently, an additional CME presumably erupted close to the bifurcation region. The conjectures about the responsibility of this compact CME for the superstorm and its disconnection from the Sun are confirmed in Paper IV (Grechnev et al., Solar Phys. submitted, 2014a), which concludes about its probable spheromak-like structure. The present article confirms the presence of a magnetic null point near the bifurcation region and addresses the origin of the magnetic helicity of the interplanetary magnetic clouds and their connection to the Sun. We find that the orientation of a magnetic dipole constituted by dimmed regions with the opposite magnetic polarities away from the parent active region corresponded to the direction of the axial field in the magnetic cloud, while the pre-eruptive filament mismatched it. To combine all of the listed findings, we propose an intrinsically three-dimensional scheme, in which a spheromak-like eruption originates via the interaction of the initially unconnected magnetic fluxes of the eruptive filament and pre-existing ones in the corona. Through a chain of magnetic reconnections their positive mutual helicity was transformed into the self-helicity of the spheromak-like magnetic cloud.

  13. National Child and Maternal Health Education Program (NCMHEP) Continuing Medical Education CME Course

    E-print Network

    Rau, Don C.

    Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland · Jane Lamp, MS, RN-BC, CNS, ClinicalNational Child and Maternal Health Education Program (NCMHEP) Continuing Medical Education CME a "free-flowing" roundtable discussion with four experts in the field of maternal and child health: Format

  14. Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Enthusiasm greeted the development of synthetic organic insecticides in the mid-twentieth century, only to see this give way to dismay and eventually scepticism and outright opposition by some. Regardless of how anyone feels about this issue, insecticides and other pesticides have become indispensable, which creates something of a dilemma. Possibly as a result of the shift in public attitude towards insecticides, genetic engineering of microbes was first met with scepticism and caution among scientists. Later, the development of genetically modified crop plants was met with an attitude that hardened into both acceptance and hard-core resistance. Transgenic insects, which came along at the dawn of the twenty-first century, encountered an entrenched opposition. Those of us responsible for studying the protection of crops have been affected more or less by these protagonist and antagonistic positions, and the experiences have often left one thoughtfully mystified as decisions are made by non-participants. Most of the issues boil down to concerns over delivery mechanisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:23852646

  15. Assessment of Barriers to Changing Practice as CME Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, David W.; Miller, Elaine K.; Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Brace, Nancy E.; Larson, R. Sam

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing medical education (CME) is meant to drive and support improvements in practice. To achieve this goal, CME activities must move beyond simply purveying knowledge, instead helping attendees to contextualize information and to develop strategies for implementing new learning. CME attendees face different barriers to…

  16. Using Focus Groups for Strategic Planning in a CME Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takhar, Jatinder; Tipping, Jane

    2008-01-01

    The University of Western Ontario, having established a fully functional continuing medical education (CME) office over the last 4 years, needed to plan the future for its academic CME unit. It needs a method for evaluating the progress and shaping the organizational future of the CME unit. A literature search and consultations suggested focus…

  17. CME and Change in Practice: An Alternative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wergin, Jon F.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Results of a study by the American College of Cardiology revealed that continuing medical education (CME) courses contain relatively little information that is new to the audience, that other influences on practice interact with CME content, and that change attributable to CME is subtle and often delayed. (JOW)

  18. Learning to Collaborate: A Case Study of Performance Improvement CME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shershneva, Marianna B.; Mullikin, Elizabeth A.; Loose, Anne-Sophie; Olson, Curtis A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Performance Improvement Continuing Medical Education (PI CME) is a mechanism for joining quality improvement (QI) in health care to continuing medical education (CME) systems together. Although QI practices and CME approaches have been recognized for years, what emerges from their integration is largely unfamiliar, because it…

  19. Sharing Collaborative Designs of Tobacco Cessation Performance Improvement CME Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullikin, Elizabeth A.; Ales, Mary W.; Cho, Jane; Nelson, Teena M.; Rodrigues, Shelly B.; Speight, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Performance Improvement Continuing Medical Education (PI CME) provides an important opportunity for CME providers to combine educational and quality health care improvement methodologies. Very few CME providers take on the challenges of planning this type of intervention because it is still a new practice and there are limited…

  20. The CME Flare Arcade and the Width of the CME in the Outer Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007, ApJ, 668, 1221) present evidence that (1) a CME is typically a magnetic bubble, a low-beta gplasmoid with legs h having roughly the 3D shape of a light bulb, and (2) in the outer corona the CME plasmoid is in lateral pressure equilibrium with the ambient magnetic field. They present three CMEs observed by SOHO/LASCO, each from a very different source located near the limb. One of these CMEs came from a compact ejective eruption from a small part of a sunspot active region, another came from a large quiet-region filament eruption, and the third CME, an extremely large and fast one, was produced in tandem with an X20 flare arcade that was centered on a huge delta sunspot. Each of these CMEs had more or less the classic lightbulb silhouette and attained a constant heliocentric angular width in the outer corona. This indicates that the CME plasmoid attained lateral magnetic pressure balance with the ambient radial magnetic field in the outer corona. This lateral pressure balance, together with the standard scenario for CME production by the eruption of a sheared-core magnetic arcade, yields the following simple estimate of the strength B(sub Flare) of the magnetic field in the flare arcade produced together with the CME: B(sub Flare) 1.4(theta CME/theta Flare)sup 2 G, where theta (sub CME) is the heliocentric angular width of the CME plasmoid in the outer corona and theta (sub Flare) is the heliocentric angular width of the full-grown flare arcade. Conversely, theta (sub CME) approximately equal to (R(sub Sun)sup -1(phi(sub Flare)/1.4)sup 1/2 radians, where Flare is the magnetic flux covered by the full-grown flare arcade. In addition to presenting the three CMEs of Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007) and their agreement with this relation between CME and Flare, we present a further empirical test of this relation. For CMEs that erupt from active regions, the co-produced flare arcade seldom if ever covers the entire active region: if AR is the total magnetic flux of the active region, Flare . AR, and we predict that CME. (R(sub Sun))sup -1(theta AR/1.4)sup 1/2 radians. For a random sample of 31 CMEs that erupted from active regions within 30 of the limb, for each CME we have measured CME from LASCO/C3 and have measured AR from a SOHO/MDI magnetogram of the source active region when it was within 30 of disk center. We find that each CME obeys the above predicted inequality, none having width greater than half of the upper bound given by theta(sub AR). Thus, an active region's magnetic flux content, together with its location on the solar disk, largely determines whether the active region can possibly produce a CME that is wide enough to intercept the Earth.

  1. Plasmoid instability in a large post-CME current sheet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Huang, Y.; CenterIntegrated Computation; Analysis of Reconnection; Turbulence

    2011-12-01

    Solar flares and CME that cause violent space weather change have been studied for years. The standard model suggests that there is a current sheet connecting the CME and the site of the post-CME flare after the eruption, but understanding of the detailed physical mechanism of dynamical processes in the current sheet remains incomplete. Recently, the secondary plasmoid instabilities of large scale current sheet in high Lundquist number environment such as solar corona and the change of magnetic topology in such a current sheet system has become a subject of great interest (Bhattacharjee et al. 2009). In our work, we study a post-CME current sheet via both observation and simulation. We use SOHO/LASCO observations of a fast halo CME as well as a slow CME. After the fast halo CME event on January 8, 2002, we observe a long, thin current sheet which connects the CME to a flare site on the surface of the sun. In this current sheet we identify over 60 bright plasmoid-like blobs in 39 hours. In the slow CME event on June 25, 2005, we observe 32 such blobs in 18 hours after the formation of the current sheet. We simulate both cases using high-Lundquist-number resistive MHD simulations of the model of Lin & Forbes (2000), and demonstrate that the distribution of plasmoid size in both cases appears to conform well to a distribution function that is independent of the Lundquist number and predicted by theory. The average observed plasmoid speed in both cases is a fraction of the typical Alfven speed, qualitatively consistent with the simulations. Thus, we propose that these observations can be plausibly accounted for by the plasmoid instability of the large-scale current sheet. The observed bright blobs are probably evidence of large-scale plasmoids, and their behavior appears to be qualitatively consistent with high-Lundquist-number MHD simulations.
    observation case summary

  2. Characteristics of Kinematics of a Coronal Mass Ejection During the 2010 August 1 CME-CME Interaction Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temmer, Manuela; Vrsnak, Bojan; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; de Koning, Curt A.; Liu, Ying; Bosman, Eckhard; Davies, Jackie A.; Mostl, Christian; Zic, Tomislav; Veronig, Astrid M.; Bothmer, Volker; Harrison, Richard; Nitta, Nariaki; Bisi, Mario; Flor, Olga; Eastwood, Jonathan; Odstrcil, Dusan; Forsyth, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and HI data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field-of-view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; (is) approximately 1200 km s-1) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; (is) approximately 700 km s-1). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2 suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  3. CHARACTERISTICS OF KINEMATICS OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION DURING THE 2010 AUGUST 1 CME-CME INTERACTION EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, Manuela; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; Moestl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M.; Flor, Olga; Vrsnak, Bojan; Zic, Tomislav; De Koning, Curt A.; Liu, Ying; Bosman, Eckhard; Davies, Jackie A.; Bothmer, Volker; Harrison, Richard; Nitta, Nariaki; Bisi, Mario; Eastwood, Jonathan; Forsyth, Robert; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2012-04-10

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and heliospheric imager (HI) data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field of view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; {approx}1200 km s{sup -1}) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; {approx}700 km s{sup -1}). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2, suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  4. Morphology and Density Structure of Post-CME Current Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrsnak, B.; Poletto, G.; Vujic, E.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is believed to drag and open the coronal magnetic field, presumably leading to the formation of a large-scale current sheet and field relaxation by magnetic reconnection. This paper analyzes the physical characteristics of ray-like coronal features formed in the aftermath of CMEs, to confirm whether interpreting such phenomena in terms of a reconnecting current sheet is consistent with observations. Methods: The study focuses on UVCS/SOHO and LASCO/SOHO measurements of the ray width, density excess, and coronal velocity field as a function of the radial distance. The morphology of the rays implies that they are produced by Petschek-like reconnection in the large-scale current sheet formed in the wake of CME. The hypothesis is supported by the flow pattern, often showing outflows along the ray, and sometimes also inflows into the ray. The inferred inflow velocities range from 3 to 30 km/s, and are consistent with the narrow opening-angle of rays, which add up to a few degrees. The density of rays is an order of magnitude higher than in the ambient corona. The model results are consistent with the observations, revealing that the main cause of the density excess in rays is a transport of the dense plasma from lower to higher heights by the reconnection outflow.

  5. Morphology and density of post-CME current sheets

    E-print Network

    Vršnak, B; Vuji?, E; Vourlidas, A; Ko, Y -K; Raymond, J C; Ciaravella, A; Žic, T; Webb, D F; Bemporad, A; Landini, F; Schettino, G; Jacobs, C; Suess, S T

    2009-01-01

    Eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) drags and "opens" the coronal magnetic field, presumably leading to the formation of a large-scale current sheet and the field relaxation by magnetic reconnection. We analyze physical characteristics of ray-like coronal features formed in the aftermath of CMEs, to check if the interpretation of this phenomenon in terms of reconnecting current sheet is consistent with the observations. The study is focused on measurements of the ray width, density excess, and coronal velocity field as a function of the radial distance. The morphology of rays indicates that they occur as a consequence of Petschek-like reconnection in the large scale current sheet formed in the wake of CME. The hypothesis is supported by the flow pattern, often showing outflows along the ray, and sometimes also inflows into the ray. The inferred inflow velocities range from 3 to 30 km s$^{-1}$, consistent with the narrow opening-angle of rays, adding up to a few degrees. The density of rays is an order o...

  6. Radio signatures of CME-streamer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, Y.; Feng, S.; Kong, X.; Li, G.; Song, H.

    2011-12-01

    Recent observational finding of streamer waves using the LASCO white light data presents us interesting physical consequence of CME-streamer interactions [1, 2, 3]. CME-streamer interactions can also manifest themselves in the Type-II-related radio dynamic spectra as recorded by the ground-based or space-borne instruments. A large body of studies exists revealing the possible roles of pre-existing helmet streamers in the radio emission during a solar eruption. In this presentation, we will summary our efforts in classifying the roles of streamers affecting Type-II radio emissions. Generally speaking, there exist two groups of CME-streamer-Type-II events. In the first group, the shock as well as the Type-II radio emission seems to exist prior to the CME-streamer interaction. The interaction can be clearly discerned from the well-defined bump of the Type-II radio dynamic spectra. The spectral bump is a direct result of plasma emissions when the radio emitting region traversing the denser streamer structure. In the other group of events, the Type-II burst is excited as a result of the CME-streamer interaction. Either the shock is formed and radio-emitting electrons are accelerated inside the streamer, or a prior non-emitting shock becomes radio aloud during the interacting process. A novel triangular-streamer-shock model is proposed to interpret the associated electron acceleration inside the streamer. Observational examples of CME-streamer-radio events corresponding to both cases will be presented. [1] Chen, Y., Song, H.Q., Li, B., Xia, L.D., Wu, Z., Fu, H., Li, X., 2010, Astrophys. J. 714, 644 [2] Chen, Y., Feng, S.W., Li, B., Song, H.Q., Xia, L.D., Kong, X.L., Li, X., 2011, Astrophys. J. 728, 147 [3] Feng S. W., Chen Y., Li B., Song H. Q., Kong X. L., Xia L. D., Feng, X. S., 2011, Sol. Phys., DOI 10.1007/s11207-011-9814-6

  7. Ly-alpha and white light observations of a CME during the Spartan 201-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassler, Don M.; Strachan, Leonard; Gardner, L. D.; Kohl, J. L.; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard R.; Strong, K.

    1994-01-01

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) near a large active region on the west limb was observed with the white light coronograph (WLC) and ultraviolet coronal spectrometer (UVCS) on the Spartan 201 satellite at 9:42 UT on 12 Apr. 1993. Soft X-ray images of the region below the CME were obtained out to 1.7 solar radii with the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh. After the event, the formation of a new helmet streamer could be seen in the polarized brightness (pB) images from the Mk III coronograph at Mauna Loa. The CME was observed from Spartan 201 in two different pB images obtained 14 min apart using the WLC, and was observed moving through the field-of-view of the UVCS integrated intensity slit. Ly-alpha intensities in the same region of the corona were obtained one orbit earlier (prior to the CME) using the Ly-alpha profile slit of the UVCS. These are the first Ly-alpha observations of a CME and may help constrain models of the electron temperature on CME's.

  8. Global Trends of CME Deflections Based on CME and Solar Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, C.; Opher, M.; Evans, R. M.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate space weather forecasting requires knowledge of the trajectory of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), including any deflections close to the Sun or through interplanetary space. Kay et al. introduced ForeCAT, a model of CME deflection resulting from the background solar magnetic field. For a magnetic field solution corresponding to Carrington Rotation (CR) 2029 (declining phase, 2005 April-May), the majority of the CMEs deflected to the Heliospheric Current Sheet, the minimum in magnetic pressure on global scales. Most of the deflection occurred below 4 {{R}? }. Here we extend ForeCAT to include a three-dimensional description of the deflecting CME. We attempt to answer the following questions: (1) do all CMEs deflect to the magnetic minimum? and (2) does most deflection occur within the first few solar radii (4 {{R}? })? Results for solar minimum and declining-phase CMEs show that not every CME deflects to the magnetic minimum and that typically the majority of the deflection occurs below 10 {{R}? }. Slow, wide, low-mass CMEs in declining-phase solar backgrounds with strong magnetic field and magnetic gradients exhibit the largest deflections. Local gradients related to active regions tend to cause the largest deviations from the deflection predicted by global magnetic gradients, but variations can also be seen for CMEs in the quiet-Sun regions of the declining-phase CR. We show the torques due to differential forces along the CME can cause rotation about the CME’s toroidal axis.

  9. Making other Earths: Dynamical Simulations of Terrestrial Planet Formation and Water Delivery

    E-print Network

    Sean N. Raymond; Thomas R. Quinn; Jonathan I. Lunine

    2003-08-09

    We present results from 42 simulations of late stage planetary accretion, focusing on the delivery of volatiles (primarily water) to the terrestrial planets. Our simulations include both planetary "embryos" (defined as Moon to Mars sized protoplanets) and planetesimals, assuming that the embryos formed via oligarchic growth. We investigate volatile delivery as a function of Jupiter's mass, position and eccentricity, the position of the snow line, and the density (in solids) of the solar nebula. In all simulations, we form 1-4 terrestrial planets inside 2 AU, which vary in mass and volatile content. In 42 simulations we have formed 43 planets between 0.8 and 1.5 AU, including 11 "habitable" planets between 0.9 and 1.1 AU. These planets range from dry worlds to "water worlds" with 100+ oceans of water (1 ocean = 1.5x10^24 g), and vary in mass between 0.23 and 3.85 Earth masses. There is a good deal of stochastic noise in these simulations, but the most important parameter is the planetesimal mass we choose, which reflects the surface density in solids past the snow line. A high density in this region results in the formation of a smaller number of terrestrial planets with larger masses and higher water content, as compared with planets which form in systems with lower densities. We find that an eccentric Jupiter produces drier terrestrial planets with higher eccentricities than a circular one. In cases with Jupiter at 7 AU, we form what we call "super embryos," 1-2 Earth mass protoplanets which can serve as the accretion seeds for 2+ Earth mass planets with large water contents.

  10. An Earth-Directed CME not Observed in LASCO Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.

    2010-12-01

    The COR1 coronagraphs on STEREO-A and -B observed an Earth-directed CME originating from N09W15 at 02:20 UT on 2010/07/09. The apparent CME speed is only 291 km/s, and the angular width is 60 degrees. The CME is somewhat slower than the average LASCO CME (average speed ~450 km/s) but not narrow. The CME was expected to be seen as a halo CME because of the geometry and large width. However, the CME could not be identified in the LASCO running difference movie because of the visibility of the white-light coronagraph. On the other hand, EUV images taken by SDO/AIA show a clear dimming to the northwest of the source region and a wave-like feature propagating to the east. Faint Earth-directed CMEs, seem to be better indicated by surface eruptive signatures such as dimming and EUV waves. We discuss how to estimate CME parameters using the EUV data alone.

  11. Developing an Instrument to Measure Bias in CME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takhar, Jatinder; Dixon, Dave; Donahue, Jill; Marlow, Bernard; Campbell, Craig; Silver, Ivan; Eadie, Jason; Monette, Celine; Rohan, Ivan; Sriharan, Abi; Raymond, Kathryn; Macnab, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The pharmaceutical industry, by funding over 60% of programs in the United States and Canada, plays a major role in continuing medical education (CME), but there are concerns about bias in such CME programs. Bias is difficult to define, and currently no tool is available to measure it. Methods: Representatives from industry and…

  12. Feasibility of a Knowledge Translation CME Program: "Courriels Cochrane"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland; Granikov, Vera; Theriault, Guylene; Fremont, Pierre; Burnand, Bernard; Mercer, Jay; Marlow, Bernard; Arroll, Bruce; Luconi, Francesca; Legare, France; Labrecque, Michel; Ladouceur, Roger; Bouthillier, France; Sridhar, Soumya Bindiganavile; Moscovici, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Systematic literature reviews provide best evidence, but are underused by clinicians. Thus, integrating Cochrane reviews into continuing medical education (CME) is challenging. We designed a pilot CME program where summaries of Cochrane reviews ("Courriels Cochrane") were disseminated by e-mail. Program participants automatically…

  13. Improved Cardiovascular Prevention Using Best CME Practices: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laprise, Rejean; Thivierge, Robert; Gosselin, Gilbert; Bujas-Bobanovic, Maja; Vandal, Sylvie; Paquette, Daniel; Luneau, Micheline; Julien, Pierre; Goulet, Serge; Desaulniers, Jean; Maltais, Paule

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: It was hypothesized that after a continuing medical education (CME) event, practice enablers and reinforcers addressing main clinical barriers to preventive care would be more effective in improving general practitioners' (GPs) adherence to cardiovascular guidelines than a CME event only. Methods: A cluster-randomized trial was…

  14. Nanoparticle (star polymer) delivery of nitric oxide effectively negates Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Duong, Hien T T; Jung, Kenward; Kutty, Samuel K; Agustina, Sri; Adnan, Nik Nik M; Basuki, Johan S; Kumar, Naresh; Davis, Thomas P; Barraud, Nicolas; Boyer, Cyrille

    2014-07-14

    Biofilms are increasingly recognized as playing a major role in human infectious diseases, as they can form on both living tissues and abiotic surfaces, with serious implications for applications that rely on prolonged exposure to the body such as implantable biomedical devices or catheters. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop improved therapeutics to effectively eradicate unwanted biofilms. Recently, the biological signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) was identified as a key regulator of dispersal events in biofilms. In this paper, we report a new class of core cross-linked star polymers designed to store and release nitric oxide, in a controlled way, for the dispersion of biofilms. First, core cross-linked star polymers were prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) via an arm first approach. Poly(oligoethylene methoxy acrylate) chains were synthesized by RAFT polymerization, and then chain extended in the presence of 2-vinyl-4,4-dimethyl-5-oxazolone monomer (VDM) with N,N-methylenebis(acrylamide) employed as a cross-linker to yield functional core cross-linked star polymers. Spermine was successfully attached to the star core by reaction with VDM. Finally, the secondary amine groups were reacted with NO gas to yield NO-core cross-linked star polymers. The core cross-linked star polymers were found to release NO in a controlled, slow delivery in bacterial cultures showing great efficacy in preventing both cell attachment and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa over time via a nontoxic mechanism, confining bacterial growth to the suspended liquid. PMID:24915286

  15. CARDIOTHORACIC ANESTHESIOLOGY: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery CME Program is located online at http://cme.ctsnetjournals.org.

    E-print Network

    Druzdzel, Marek J.

    ://cme.ctsnetjournals.org. To take the CME activity related to this article, you must have either an STS member or an individual non for attempting to wean patients from VAD support [4, 17­20]. Lack of a definitive marker in turn limits

  16. Automated Prediction of CMEs Using Machine Learning of CME - Flare Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qahwaji, R.; Colak, T.; Al-Omari, M.; Ipson, S.

    2008-04-01

    Machine-learning algorithms are applied to explore the relation between significant flares and their associated CMEs. The NGDC flares catalogue and the SOHO/LASCO CME catalogue are processed to associate X and M-class flares with CMEs based on timing information. Automated systems are created to process and associate years of flare and CME data, which are later arranged in numerical-training vectors and fed to machine-learning algorithms to extract the embedded knowledge and provide learning rules that can be used for the automated prediction of CMEs. Properties representing the intensity, flare duration, and duration of decline and duration of growth are extracted from all the associated (A) and not-associated (NA) flares and converted to a numerical format that is suitable for machine-learning use. The machine-learning algorithms Cascade Correlation Neural Networks (CCNN) and Support Vector Machines (SVM) are used and compared in our work. The machine-learning systems predict, from the input of a flare’s properties, if the flare is likely to initiate a CME. Intensive experiments using Jack-knife techniques are carried out and the relationships between flare properties and CMEs are investigated using the results. The predictive performance of SVM and CCNN is analysed and recommendations for enhancing the performance are provided.

  17. December 2008 CME as Viewed by Spacecraft - Duration: 16 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Newly reprocessed images from NASA's STEREO-A spacecraft, allow scientists to trace the anatomy of the December 2008 CME as it moves and changes on its journey from the Sun to the Earth, identify t...

  18. CME front and severe space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Skoug, R.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Rajesh, P. K.; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Batista, I. S.; Ebihara, Y.; Nakamura, T.

    2014-12-01

    Thanks to the work of a number of scientists who made it known that severe space weather can cause extensive social and economic disruptions in the modern high-technology society. It is therefore important to understand what determines the severity of space weather and whether it can be predicted. We present results obtained from the analysis of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), solar energetic particle (SEP) events, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), CME-magnetosphere coupling, and geomagnetic storms associated with the major space weather events since 1998 by combining data from the ACE and GOES satellites with geomagnetic parameters and the Carrington event of 1859, the Quebec event of 1989, and an event in 1958. The results seem to indicate that (1) it is the impulsive energy mainly due to the impulsive velocity and orientation of IMF Bz at the leading edge of the CMEs (or CME front) that determine the severity of space weather. (2) CMEs having high impulsive velocity (sudden nonfluctuating increase by over 275 km s-1 over the background) caused severe space weather (SvSW) in the heliosphere (failure of the solar wind ion mode of Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor in ACE) probably by suddenly accelerating the high-energy particles in the SEPs ahead directly or through the shocks. (3) The impact of such CMEs which also show the IMF Bz southward from the leading edge caused SvSW at the Earth including extreme geomagnetic storms of mean DstMP < -250 nT during main phases, and the known electric power outages happened during some of these SvSW events. (4) The higher the impulsive velocity, the more severe the space weather, like faster weather fronts and tsunami fronts causing more severe damage through impulsive action. (5) The CMEs having IMF Bz northward at the leading edge do not seem to cause SvSW on Earth, although, later when the IMF Bz turns southward, they can lead to super geomagnetic storms of intensity (Dstmin) less than even -400 nT.

  19. Analysis of CME Trajectories using STEREO Heliospheric Imager Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liewer, P. C.; de Jong, E. M.; Hall, J. R.; Howard, R. A.; Thompson, W. T.

    2009-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated the determination of the 3D (velocity and direction) trajectory of CMEs using stereoscopic analysis of a series of simultaneous coronagraph image pairs from the STEREO A and B spacecraft. Here, we use these trajectory results, together with an analysis of the CME tracks as seen in STEREO’s Heliospheric Imagers, to study the propagation of CMEs beyond the coronagraph field-of-view. In particular, we want to use the Heliospheric Imager data to better understand when and why CME trajectories deviate from radial, constant velocity propagation beyond 0.1 AU. Because of the wide field-of-view of the imagers, if propagation is radial at a constant velocity, then there is a simple analytic relationship between the shape of a CME’s track in a elongation versus time plot (where elongation is the angle between the Sun and the CME front) and the direction and speed of the CME. We compare the track of the CME’s bright leading edge in the HI image with this analytic prediction using the speed and direction determined from the coronagraphs to study deviations from this constant-velocity, radial propagation assumption. Further analysis of the Heliospheric Imager data may also reveal the cause of any observed acceleration or deceleration. We will also describe the software developed for this analysis.

  20. Current Sheet Evolution in the Aftermath of a CME Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bemporad, A.; Poletto, G.; Suess, S. T.; Ko, Y.-K.; Schwadron, N. A.; Elliott, H. A.; Raymond, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    We report on SOHO-UVCS observations of the coronal restructuring following a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) on November 26,2002, at the time of a SOHO-Ulysses quadrature campaign. Starting about 3 hours after a CME in the NW quadrant, UVCS began taking spectra at 1.7 solar radius, covering emission from both cool and hot plasma. Observations continued, with occasional gaps, for more than 2 days. Emission in the 974.8 Angstrom line of [Fe XVIII], indicating temperatures above 6 x 10(exp 6) K, was observed throughout the campaign in a spatially limited location. Comparison with EIT images shows the Fe XVIII emission to overlie a growing post-flare loop system formed in the aftermath of the CME. The emission most likely originates in a current sheet overlying the arcade. Analysis of the [Fe XVIII] emission allows us to infer the evolution of physical parameters in the current sheet over the entire span of our observations: in particular, we give the temperature vs. time in the current sheet and estimate the density. At the time of the quadrature, Ulysses was directly above the location of the CME and intercepted the ejecta. High ionization state Fe was detected by Ulysses-SWICS throughout the magnetic cloud associated with the CME. Both the remote and in situ observations are compared with predictions of theoretical CME models.

  1. Stent-based delivery of ABT-578 via a phosphorylcholine surface coating reduces neointimal formation in the porcine coronary model.

    PubMed

    Collingwood, Robin; Gibson, Lori; Sedlik, Souad; Virmani, Renu; Carter, Andrew J

    2005-06-01

    Stent-based delivery of the antiproliferative and immunosuppressive macrocyclic lactone sirolimus reduces neointimal formation and restenosis by cytostatic inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of stent-based delivery of ABT-578, a structurally unique macrocyclic lactone. Stainless steel balloon-expandable stents were coated with thin layer of phosphorylcholine (PC) or PC with ABT-578 (10 microg/mm). Fifteen juvenile domestic pigs underwent placement of oversized bare metal (n = 15), PC (n = 8), and PC with ABT-578 (n = 9) stents in the coronary arteries. At 28 days, histology demonstrated similar mean injury scores for the control, PC-, and ABT-578-coated stents. The mean neointimal area (mm2) was significantly reduced for ABT-578 (1.70 +/- 0.47) as compared with PC (2.82 +/- 1.24) and control (2.89 +/- 1.91) stents (P < or = 0.05). The 40% reduction in neointimal area resulted in significantly less mean percent diameter stenosis for ABT-578 (19.4% +/- 4.0%) as compared with PC (30.3 +/- 12.1 %) and control (29.4% +/- 15.5%) stents (P < or = 0.03). Twelve of the 45 bare metal stent cross-sections (26.7%) exhibited a giant cell reaction, while none of the sections from the ABT-578-eluting stents had a giant cell reaction (P = 0.004). Stent-based delivery of ABT-578 via a PC surface coating inhibits neointimal formation at 28 days in the porcine coronary model. Further study is necessary to determine the dose-response and long-term effects ABT-578-eluting stents in the porcine coronary model. PMID:15900559

  2. Methods and apparatuses for reagent delivery, reactive barrier formation, and pest control

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Tyler [Pasco, WA; Kaplan, Daniel I [Aiken, SC; Last, George [Richland, WA

    2002-07-09

    A reagent delivery method includes positioning reagent delivery tubes in contact with soil. The tubes can include a wall that is permeable to a soil-modifying reagent. The method further includes supplying the reagent in the tubes, diffusing the reagent through the permeable wall and into the soil, and chemically modifying a selected component of the soil using the reagent. The tubes can be in subsurface contact with soil, including groundwater, and can be placed with directional drilling equipment independent of groundwater well casings. The soil-modifying reagent includes a variety of gases, liquids, colloids, and adsorbents that may be reactive or non-reactive with soil components. The method may be used inter alia to form reactive barriers, control pests, and enhance soil nutrients for microbes and plants.

  3. Asymmetry in the CME-CME interaction process for the events from 2011 February 14-15

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Peinhart, V.; Vršnak, B.

    2014-04-20

    We present a detailed study of the interaction process of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) successively launched on 2011 February 14 (CME1) and 2011 February 15 (CME2). Reconstructing the three-dimensional shape and evolution of the flux ropes, we verify that the two CMEs interact. The frontal structure of both CMEs, measured along different position angles (PAs) over the entire latitudinal extent, reveals differences in the kinematics for the interacting flanks and the apexes. The interaction process is strongly PA-dependent in terms of timing as well as kinematical evolution. The central interaction occurs along PA-100°, which shows the strongest changes in kinematics. During interaction, CME1 accelerates from ?400 km s{sup –1} to ?700 km s{sup –1} and CME2 decelerates from ?1300 km s{sup –1} to ?600 km s{sup –1}. Our results indicate that a simplified scenario such as inelastic collision may not be sufficient to describe the CME-CME interaction. The magnetic field structures of the intertwining flux ropes and the momentum transfer due to shocks each play an important role in the interaction process.

  4. Continuous delivery of rhBMP2 and rhVEGF165 at a certain ratio enhances bone formation in mandibular defects over the delivery of rhBMP2 alone - An experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Lohse, N; Moser, N; Backhaus, S; Annen, T; Epple, M; Schliephake, H

    2015-12-28

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that different amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor and bone morphogenic protein differentially affect bone formation when applied for repair of non-healing defects in the rat mandible. Porous composite PDLLA/CaCO3 carriers were fabricated as slow release carriers and loaded with rhBMP2 and rhVEGF165 in 10 different dosage combinations using gas foaming with supercritical carbon dioxide. They were implanted in non-healing defects of the mandibles of 132 adult Wistar rats with additional lateral augmentation. Bone formation was assessed both radiographically (bone volume) and by histomorphometry (bone density). The use of carriers with a ratio of delivery of VEGF/BMP between 0.7 and 1.2 was significantly related to the occurrence of significant increases in radiographic bone volume and/or histologic bone density compared to the use of carriers with a ratio of delivery of ?0.5 when all intervals and all outcome parameters were considered. Moreover, simultaneous delivery at this ratio helped to "save" rhBMP2 as both bone volume and bone density after 13weeks were reached/surpassed using half the dosage required for rhBMP2 alone. It is concluded, that the combined delivery of rhVEGF165 and rhBMP2 for repair of critical size mandibular defects can significantly enhance volume and density of bone formation over delivery of rhBMP2 alone. It appears from the present results that continuous simultaneous delivery of rhVEGF165 and rhBMP2 at a ratio of approximately 1 is favourable for the enhancement of bone formation. PMID:26485046

  5. Investigating the Relationship between Quality, Format and Delivery of Feedback for Written Assignments in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sopina, Elizaveta; McNeill, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Feedback can have a great impact on student learning. However, in order for it to be effective, feedback needs to be of high quality. Electronic marking has been one of the latest adaptations of technology in teaching and offers a new format of delivering feedback. There is little research investigating the impact the format of feedback has on…

  6. Enhanced skin delivery of genistein and other two isoflavones by microemulsion and prevention against UV irradiation-induced erythema formation.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Kana; Teraoka, Reiko; Morita, Shin-ya

    2010-03-01

    To improve the efficiency of the intradermal delivery of genistein and other two isoflavones (daidzein and biochanin A), we tried to clarify the usefulness of microemulsion by in vitro study on excised guinea pig dorsal skin and Yucatan micropig skin. Using microemulsion consisting of isopropyl myristate (IPM), 150 mM NaCl solution, Tween 80 and ethanol as a vehicle, the solubility of all the isoflavones markedly increased and significant amounts of isoflavones were delivered to the skin. The effect of water-in-oil (w/o)-type microemulsion D was larger than that of oil-in-water (o/w)-type microemulsion A. Among three isoflavones tested, the increase of genistein was most marked on both solubility and skin accumulation. Genistein retained in the skin significantly inhibited lipid peroxidation in vitro dose-dependently. Furthermore, pretreatment of guinea pig dorsal skin with genistein containing gel-like microemulsion D prevented UV irradiation-induced erythema formation. These findings indicate the potential use of w/o-type microemulsion for the delivery of genistein to protect skin against UV-induced oxidative damage. PMID:20190449

  7. Investigation of CME properties using the data of SDO and PROBA2 spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainshtein, V. G.; Egorov, Ya. I.

    2013-01-01

    Formation and motion (at the initial stage) of six limb CMEs detected in the period June 2010 to June 2011 are investigated using the high-resolution data of the PROBA2 and SDO spacecraft combined with the data of SOHO/LASCO coronagraphs. It is demonstrated that several loop-like structures of enhanced brightness originate in the region of CME formation, and they move one after another with, as a rule, different velocities. These loop-like structures in the final analysis form the frontal structure of CME. Time dependences of the velocity and acceleration of the ejection's front are obtained for all CMEs under consideration. A conclusion is drawn about possible existence of two classes of CMEs depending on their velocity time profiles. Ejections, whose velocity after reaching its maximum sharply drops by a value of more than 100 km/s and then goes over into a regime of slow change, belong to the first class. Another class of CMEs is formed by ejections whose velocity changes slowly immediately after reaching the maximum. It is demonstrated that the CME's angular dimension increases at the initial stage of ejection motion up to a factor of 3 with a time scale of doubling the angular size value within the limits 3.5-11 min since the moment of the first measurement of this parameter of an ejection. For three CMEs it is shown that at the initial stage of their motion for a certain time interval they are stronger expanded than grow in the longitude direction.

  8. Current Sheet Evolution In The Aftermath Of A CME Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bemporad, A.; Poletto, G.; Seuss, S. T.; Schwardron, N. A.; Elliott, H. A.; Raymond, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on SOHO UVCS observations of the coronal restructuring following a coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2002 November 26, at the time of a SOHO-Ulysses quadrature campaign. Starting about 1.5 hr after a CME in the northwest quadrant, UVCS began taking spectra at 1.7 R, covering emission from both cool and hot plasma. Observations continued, with occasional gaps, for more than 2 days. Emission in the 974.8 A line of [Fe XVIII], indicating temperatures above 6 x 10(exp 6) K, was observed throughout the campaign in a spatially limited location. Comparison with EIT images shows the [Fe XVIII] emission to overlie a growing post-flare loop system formed in the aftermath of the CME. The emission most likely originates in a current sheet overlying the arcade. Analysis of the [Fe XVIII] emission allows us to infer the evolution of physical parameters in the current sheet over the entire span of our observations: in particular, we give the temperature versus time in the current sheet and estimate its density. At the time of the quadrature, Ulysses was directly above the location of the CME and intercepted the ejecta. High ionization state Fe was detected by the Ulysses SWICS throughout the magnetic cloud associated with the CME, although its rapid temporal variation suggests bursty, rather than smooth, reconnection in the coronal current sheet. The SOHO-Ulysses data set provided us with the unique opportunity of analyzing a current sheet structure from its lowest coronal levels out to its in situ properties. Both the remote and in situ observations are compared with predictions of theoretical CME models.

  9. SPE in Solar Cycle 24 : Flare and CME characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neflia, Neflia

    SPE is one of the most severe hazards in the space environment. Such events, tend to occur during periods of intense solar activity, and can lead to high radiation doses in short time intervals. The proton enhancements produced by these solar events may last several days and are very hard to predict in advance and they also can cause harm to both satellite and human in space. The most significant sources of proton in the interplanetary medium are both solar flares and interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In this study, I try to find the characteristic of Flare and CME that can cause the proton events in interplanetary medium. For my preliminary study, I will search flare characteristic such as class and position as an SPE causes. I also did the research with CME characteristic such as Angular Width (AW) and linier velocity. During solar cycle 24, the solar activity remain very low with several large flare and Halo CME. This low activity also occur on solar proton events in interplanetary medium. From January 2009 to May 2013, there are 25 SPEs with flux range from 12 - 6530 sfu (10 MeV). The solar flare during these events varies from C to X- class flare. From 27 X-class flare that occur during 2009 - May 2013, only 7 flares cause the SPE. Most of active region location are at solar Western Hemisphere (16/25). only 24 from 139 halo CME (AW=360) cause SPE. Although the probability of SPE from all flare and CME during this range of time is small but they have 3 common characteristics, ie, most of the SPE have active region position at Solar Western Hemisphere, the CME have AW=360 and they have a high linier velocity.

  10. 01.22.12: SOHO's View of Earth-directed CME - Duration: 7 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory captured the coronal mass ejection (CME) in this video (which shows the sun's activity from January 19 to January 23). The CME is associate with an M8.7 class sol...

  11. Space Weather Model of July 22-23, 2012 CME - Duration: 5 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Space Weather Research Center modeled the July 23, 2012 CME using a modeling program called ENLIL. The CME can be seen to expand dramatically as it travels through space. By comparing how we...

  12. Analyzing Reasons for Non-Adoption of Distance Delivery Formats in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gergen, Theresa; Roblyer, M. D.

    2013-01-01

    Though distance education formats could help address an urgent need for growth in the occupational therapy assistant (OTA) workforce, distance methods are not as accepted in these programs as they are in other professional and clinical programs. This study investigated whether beliefs and levels of experience of OTA program directors shaped their…

  13. The Impact of Course Delivery Format on Wellness Patterns of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhart, Kim; Dimon, Chelsea

    2013-01-01

    University students (N = 103) enrolled in multiple wellness courses at a small northeastern public university completed a questionnaire measuring wellness patterns at the beginning and end of a wellness course delivered totally on line (web-based), in the traditional classroom, or in a mix of the two formats (blended). Attrition of participants…

  14. Validation of CME Detection Software (CACTus) by Means of Simulated Data, and Analysis of Projection Effects on CME Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, K.; Jacobs, C.; Robbrecht, E.; de Groof, A.; Berghmans, D.; Poedts, S.

    2011-05-01

    In the context of space weather forecasting, an automated detection of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) becomes more and more important for efficiently handling a large data flow which is expected from recently-launched and future solar missions. In this paper we validate the detection software package "CACTus" by applying the program to synthetic data from our 3D time-dependent CME simulations instead of observational data. The main strength of this study is that we know in advance what should be detected. We describe the sensitivities and strengths of automated detection, more specific for the CACTus program, resulting in a better understanding of CME detection on one hand and the calibration of the CACTus software on the other hand, suggesting possible improvements of the package. In addition, the simulation is an ideal tool to investigate projection effects on CME velocity measurements.

  15. Effects of Alternate Format In-Service Delivery on Teacher Knowledge Base and Problem-Solving Related to Autism & Adaptations: What Teachers Need to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruening, Marie Diane

    2010-01-01

    This study's purpose was to explore effectiveness of alternate format in-service delivery for what teachers needed to know to effectively teach their students with Autism Spectrum Disorder/High Functioning Autism/Asperger Syndrome (ASD/HFA/AS) in the general education setting. The study's research questions included: Did participants learn…

  16. Exercise Motivation of College Students in Online, Face-to-Face, and Blended Basic Studies Physical Activity and Wellness Course Delivery Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidman, Cara Lynn; Fiala, Kelly Ann; D'Abundo, Michelle Lee

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess exercise motivation among college students self-selected into 4 online (OL) and face-to-face (F2F) basic studies' physical activity and wellness course delivery formats. Participants/Methods: Out of 1,037 enrolled students during the Spring 2009 semester, 602 responded online to demographic…

  17. Prediction of Active-Region CME Productivity from Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We report results of an expanded evaluation of whole-active-region magnetic measures as predictors of active-region coronal mass ejection (CME) productivity. Previously, in a sample of 17 vector magnetograms of 12 bipolar active regions observed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph, from each magnetogram we extracted a measure of the size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux a) and four measures of the nonpotentiality of the active region: the strong-shear length L(sub SS), the strong-gradient length L(sub SG), the net vertical electric current I(sub N), and the net-current magnetic twist parameter alpha (sub IN). This sample size allowed us to show that each of the four nonpotentiality measures was statistically significantly correlated with active-region CME productivity in time windows of a few days centered on the day of the magnetogram. We have now added a fifth measure of active-region nonpotentiality (the best-constant-alpha magnetic twist parameter (alpha sub BC)), and have expanded the sample to 36 MSFC vector magnetograms of 31 bipolar active regions. This larger sample allows us to demonstrate statistically significant correlations of each of the five nonpotentiality measures with future CME productivity, in time windows of a few days starting from the day of the magnetogram. The two magnetic twist parameters (alpha (sub 1N) and alpha (sub BC)) are normalized measures of an active region s nonpotentially in that they do not depend directly on the size of the active region, while the other three nonpotentiality measures (L(sub SS), L(sub SG), and I(sub N)) are non-normalized measures in that they do depend directly on active-region size. We find (1) Each of the five nonpotentiality measures is statistically significantly correlated (correlation confidence level greater than 95%) with future CME productivity and has a CME prediction success rate of approximately 80%. (2) None of the nonpotentiality measures is a significantly better CME predictor than the others. (3) The active-region phi shows some correlation with CME productivity, but well below a statistically significant level (correlation confidence level less than approximately 80%; CME prediction success rate less than approximately 65%). (4) In addition to depending on magnetic twist, CME productivity appears to have some direct dependence on active-region size (rather than only an indirect dependence through a correlation of magnetic twist with active-region size), but it will take a still larger sample of active regions (50 or more) to certify this. (5) Of the five nonpotentiality measures, L(sub SG) appears to be the best for operational CME forecasting because it is as good or better a CME predictor than the others and it alone does not require a vector magnetogram; L(sub SG) can be measured from a line-of-sight magnetogram such as from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO).

  18. Formation of thermally reversible optically transparent emulsion-based delivery systems using spontaneous emulsification.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Amir Hossein; Fang, Yuan; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    Transparent emulsion-based delivery systems suitable for encapsulating lipophilic bioactive agents can be fabricated using low-energy spontaneous emulsification methods. These emulsions are typically fabricated from non-ionic surfactants whose hydrophilic head groups are susceptible to dehydration upon heating. This phenomenon may promote emulsion instability due to enhanced droplet coalescence at elevated temperatures. Conversely, the same phenomenon can be used to fabricate optically transparent emulsions through the phase inversion temperature (PIT) method. The purpose of the current study was to examine the influence of oil phase composition and surfactant-to-oil ratio on the thermal behavior of surfactant-oil-water systems containing limonene, medium chain triglycerides (MCT), and Tween 60. Various types of thermal behavior (turbidity versus temperature profiles) were exhibited by these systems depending on their initial composition. For certain compositions, thermoreversible emulsions could be formed that were opaque at high temperatures but transparent at ambient temperatures. These systems may be particularly suitable for the encapsulation of bioactive agents in applications where optical clarity is important. PMID:26431057

  19. Nanosized hydroxyapatite and other calcium phosphates: chemistry of formation and application as drug and gene delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Uskokovi?, Vuk; Uskokovi?, Dragan P

    2011-01-01

    The first part of this review looks at the fundamental properties of hydroxyapatite (HAP), the basic mineral constituent of mammalian hard tissues, including the physicochemical features that govern its formation by precipitation. A special emphasis is placed on the analysis of qualities of different methods of synthesis and of the phase transformations intrinsic to the formation of HAP following precipitation from aqueous solutions. This serves as an introduction to the second part and the main subject of this review, which relates to the discourse regarding the prospects of fabrication of ultrafine, nanosized particles based on calcium phosphate carriers with various therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents coated on and/or encapsulated within the particles. It is said that the particles could be either surface-functionalized with amphiphiles, peptides, proteins, or nucleic acids or injected with therapeutic agents, magnetic ions, or fluorescent molecules. Depending on the additive, they could be subsequently used for a variety of applications, including the controlled delivery and release of therapeutic agents (extracellularly or intracellularly), magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia therapy, cell separation, blood detoxification, peptide or oligonucleotide chromatography and ultrasensitive detection of biomolecules, and in vivo and in vitro gene transfection. Calcium phosphate nanoparticles as carriers of therapeutic agents that would enable a controlled drug release to treat a given bone infection and at the same be resorbed in the body so as to regenerate hard tissue lost to disease are emphasized hereby as one of the potentially attractive smart materials for the modern medicine. PMID:21061364

  20. Obstetrician/Gynecologists and Postpartum Mental Health: Differences between CME Course Takers and Nontakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leddy, Meaghan A.; Farrow, Victoria A.; Joseph, Gerald F., Jr.; Schulkin, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing medical education (CME) courses are an essential component of professional development. Research indicates a continued need for understanding how and why physicians select certain CME courses, as well as the differences between CME course takers and nontakers. Purpose: Obstetrician-gynecologists (OB-GYNs) are health care…

  1. STEREO Captures Fastest CME to Date - Duration: 15 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows a coronal mass ejection (CME) on the sun from July 22, 2012 at 10:00 PM EDT until 2 AM on July 23 as captured by NASA's Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A). Be...

  2. Quality framework proposal for Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Naomi G.; Arfman, John F.; Limary, Siviengxay

    2008-09-01

    This report proposes the first stage of a Quality Framework approach that can be used to evaluate and document Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects. The first stage of the Quality Framework defines two tools that will be used to evaluate a CME project. The first tool is used to decompose a CME project into its essential elements. These elements can then be evaluated for inherent quality by looking at the subelements that impact their level of quality maturity or rigor. Quality Readiness Levels (QRLs) are used to valuate project elements for inherent quality. The Framework provides guidance for the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders for CME project prerequisites that help to ensure the proper level of confidence in the deliverable given its intended use. The Framework also Provides a roadmap that defined when and how the Framework tools should be applied. Use of these tools allow the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders to understand what elements the project will use to execute the project, the inherent quality of the elements, which of those are critical to the project and why, and the risks associated to the project's elements.

  3. The new CORIMP CME catalog & 3D reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jason; Morgan, Huw; Gallagher, Peter; Habbal, Shadia; Davies, Jackie

    2015-04-01

    A new coronal mass ejection catalog has been built from a unique set of coronal image processing techniques, called CORIMP, that overcomes many of the limitations of current catalogs in operation. An online database has been produced for the SOHO/LASCO data and event detections therein; providing information on CME onset time, position angle, angular width, speed, acceleration, and mass, along with kinematic plots and observation movies. The high-fidelity and robustness of these methods and derived CME structure and kinematics will lead to an improved understanding of the dynamics of CMEs, and a realtime version of the algorithm has been implemented to provide CME detection alerts to the interested space weather community. Furthermore, STEREO data has been providing the ability to perform 3D reconstructions of CMEs that are observed in multipoint observations. This allows a determination of the 3D kinematics and morphologies of CMEs characterised in STEREO data via the 'elliptical tie-pointing' technique. The associated observations of SOHO, SDO and PROBA2 (and intended use of K-Cor) provide additional measurements and constraints on the CME analyses in order to improve their accuracy.

  4. Time series of a CME blasting out from the Sun

    E-print Network

    Christian, Eric

    #12;Time series of a CME blasting out from the Sun Composite image of the Sun in UV light with the naked eye, the Sun seems static, placid, constant. From the ground, the only notice- able variations in the Sun are its location (where will it rise and set today?) and its color (will clouds cover

  5. Improving CME: Using Participant Satisfaction Measures to Specify Educational Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivieri, Jason J.; Regala, Roderick P.

    2013-01-01

    Imagine having developed a continuing medical education (CME) initiative to educate physicians on updated guidelines regarding high cholesterol in adults. This initiative consisted of didactic presentations and case-based discussions offered in 5 major US cities, followed by a Web-based enduring component to distill key points of the live…

  6. Register online at: cme.uchicago.edu The Drake Hotel

    E-print Network

    He, Chuan

    Register online at: cme.uchicago.edu The Drake Hotel Chicago, Illinois Conference Directors increased the scope and complexity of anesthesia care. New techniques, new drugs, new evidence, quality, drugs and monitors; · Incorporate these new tools into practice in the changing environment. Target

  7. Biomimetic synthesized bimodal nanoporous silica: Bimodal mesostructure formation and application for ibuprofen delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Xu, Lu; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Hongyu; Lu, Fangzheng; Li, Sanming

    2016-01-01

    The present paper innovatively reports bimodal nanoporous silica synthesized using biomimetic method (B-BNS) with synthesized polymer (C16-l-serine) as template. Formation mechanism of B-BNS was deeply studied and exploration of its application as carrier of poorly water-soluble drug ibuprofen (IBU) was conducted. The bimodal nanopores and curved mesoscopic channels of B-BNS were achieved due to the dynamic self-assembly of C16-l-serine induced by silane coupling agent (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APTES) and silica source (tetraethoxysilane, TEOS). Characterization results confirmed the successful synthesis of B-BNS, and particularly, nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurement demonstrated that B-BNS was meso-meso porous silica material. In application, B-BNS loaded IBU with high drug loading content due to its enlarged nanopores. After being loaded, IBU presented amorphous phase because nanoporous space and curved mesoscopic channels of B-BNS prevented the crystallization of IBU. In vitro release result revealed that B-BNS controlled IBU release with two release phases based on bimodal nanopores and improved dissolution in simulated gastric fluid due to crystalline conversion of IBU. It is convincible that biomimetic method provides novel theory and insight for synthesizing bimodal nanoporous silica, and unique functionalities of B-BNS as drug carrier can undoubtedly promote the application of bimodal nanoporous silica and development of pharmaceutical science. PMID:26478410

  8. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A; Byrne, Barry J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 ?g) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 ?g rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 ?g per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. PMID:26053072

  9. A simulation of a CME propagation and shock evolution in the lower solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. C.; Opher, M.; Cohen, O.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2007-12-01

    We present a simulation of the evolution of a CME (~800km/s at 5 solar radii) in the lower solar corona (until 5 solar radii) using Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF). The configuration of the sun's magnetic field is based on the MDI data on the solar surface during Carrington Rotation 1922. The pre-CME background solar wind is generated under this boundary condition and Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model. To initiate a CME, we inserted a Titov-Demoulin flux rope in an active region near the solar equator. The zone along nose of the CME is refined to resolve the CME-driven-shock. Our results show that a higher density region is followed by a dark cavity behind the shock and the higher density region is expanding while propagating away from the sun. These features are consistent with the CME observations which shows that a bright front followed by a dark area after the shock. After the initiation stage, in which the CME has a large acceleration followed by a deceleration, the CME demonstrates a nearly constant and slow acceleration of the order of 100m/s 2. At 5 solar radii, the CME has a speed of 800km/s. Although CME is accelerating, the Mach number of the shock is decreasing because the Alfven speed upstream of the shock is increasing. Detailed analysis of the pressures on the CME shows that the thermal pressure account for most of the acceleration of the CME and the magnetic pressure contribute to the acceleration at an early time but it becomes negligible when the CME moves further away from the sun. We also present the evolution of shock geometry near the nose of the CME and find that the shock is nearly perpendicular. Further investigation of the dependency in latitude of the shock and their effects on particle acceleration are required in a future work.

  10. Spectroscopic Detection of Turbulence in Post-CME Current Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemporad, A.

    2008-12-01

    Plasma in post-CME current sheets (CSs) is expected to be highly turbulent because of the tearing and coalescence instability and/or local microscopic instabilities. For this reason, in the last decade the inconsistency between the observed (~104-105 km) and the expected (~1-10 m) CS thickness has been tentatively explained in many MHD models as a consequence of plasma turbulence that should be able to significantly broaden the CS. However, from the observational point of view, little is known about this subject. A few post-CME CSs have been observed in UVCS spectra as a strong emission in the high-temperature [Fe XVIII] line, usually unobservable in the solar corona. In this work, published data on post-CME CSs observed by UVCS are reanalyzed, concentrating for the first time on the evolution of turbulence derived from the nonthermal broadening of the [Fe XVIII] line profiles. Derived turbulent speeds are on the order of ~60 km s-1 a few hours after the CME and slowly decay down to ~30 km s-1 in the following 2 days. From this evolution the anomalous diffusivity due to microinstabilities has been estimated, and the scenario of multiple small-scale reconnections is tested. Results show that the existence of many (~10-11 to 10-17 ?CS m-3) microscopic CSs (?CSs) of small sizes (~10-104 m) could explain not only the high CS temperatures but also the much larger observed thickness of macroscopic CSs, thanks to turbulent broadening.

  11. Type II Radio Bursts as an Indicator of CME Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, C. A.; St Cyr, O. C.; Henning, C.; Xie, H.; Gilbert, H. R.; Orlove, M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Odstrcil, D.

    2011-12-01

    We examined a subset of nine low-frequency radio events with type II radio bursts that drifted below 2 megahertz and were detected by the WAVES investigation on the WIND spacecraft. For each event, we identified the associated coronal mass ejection (CME) and derived the electron density using a model of solar wind plasma frequency (fp ? 9 * ne1/2, where fp is plasma frequency in kHz and ne is electron density in cm-3) . We also used the pb_inverter program in SolarSoft developed by Howard and Hayes to examine the electron density structure. Expanding on the Van De Hulst process of inverting polarized brightness measurements, the program inverts total brightness measurements from SOHO LASCO images to extract electron density information. From the electron density inferred from radio spectra, we derived the location of the CME using five standard electron density to height models (Leblanc, 1996; Saito, 1977; Bougeret, 1984; Alvarez, 1973; and Fainberg, 1971). Using images from the LASCO instrument on SOHO and the SECCHI instrument on STEREO, we extracted locations of the leading edge of the CME and compared the heights and velocities to those found using the frequency data. For the lowest frequency events, we also compared our results to the outputs of ENLIL, a time-dependent, three-dimensional, MHD model of the heliosphere hosted by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Multi-CME Events in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrcil, Dusan; Luhmann, Janet G.; Jian, Lan; Mays, Leila; Xie, Hong; Taktakishvilli, Aleksandre

    The ENLIL-based modeling system enables faster-than-real time simulations of corotating and transient heliospheric disturbances. This “hybrid” system does not simulate origin of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but uses appearance in coronagraphs, fits geometric and kinematic parameters, and launches a CME-like structure into the solar wind computed using the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) coronal model. Numerical heliospheric simulation then provides global context of CMEs propagating in the inner heliosphere and interacting with structured background solar wind and with other CMEs. In this presentation, we introduce the recent improvements that support modeling of the evolving background solar wind and continuous modeling of multiple-CME events. We simulated over 700 CMEs in 2011-2013 to validate and calibrate our new modeling system. In this presentation, we will show examples of multi-CME events in March 2012 and July 2012 periods of enhanced solar activity. We will present results of 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and compare them with remote white-light observations, with in-situ measurements of plasma parameters and detection of solar energetic particles (SEPs) at various spacecraft.

  13. CME propagation: Where does the solar wind drag take over?

    E-print Network

    Sachdeva, Nishtha; Colaninno, Robin; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the Sun-Earth dynamics of a set of eight well observed solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using data from the STEREO spacecraft. We seek to quantify the extent to which momentum coupling between these CMEs and the ambient solar wind (i.e., the aerodynamic drag) influences their dynamics. To this end, we use results from a 3D flux rope model fit to the CME data. We find that solar wind aerodynamic drag adequately accounts for the dynamics of the fastest CME in our sample. For the relatively slower CMEs, we find that drag-based models initiated below heliocentric distances ranging from 15 to 50 $R_{\\odot}$ cannot account for the observed CME trajectories. This is at variance with the general perception that the dynamics of slow CMEs are influenced primarily by solar wind drag from a few $R_{\\odot}$ onwards. Several slow CMEs propagate at roughly constant speeds above 15--50 $R_{\\odot}$. Drag-based models initiated above these heights therefore require negligible aerodynamic drag to explain their...

  14. CME Propagation: Where does Aerodynamic Drag 'Take Over'?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdeva, Nishtha; Subramanian, Prasad; Colaninno, Robin; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the Sun-Earth dynamics of a set of eight well observed solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using data from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft. We seek to quantify the extent to which momentum coupling between these CMEs and the ambient solar wind (i.e., the aerodynamic drag) influences their dynamics. To this end, we use results from a 3D flux rope model fit to the CME data. We find that solar wind aerodynamic drag adequately accounts for the dynamics of the fastest CME in our sample. For the relatively slower CMEs, we find that drag-based models initiated below heliocentric distances ranging from 15 to 50 {R}? cannot account for the observed CME trajectories. This is at variance with the general perception that the dynamics of slow CMEs are influenced primarily by solar wind drag from a few {R}? onwards. Several slow CMEs propagate at roughly constant speeds above 15-50 {R}? . Drag-based models initiated above these heights therefore require negligible aerodynamic drag to explain their observed trajectories.

  15. Interaction between CME and surrounding magnetic fields producing multiple flaring sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia M.

    2015-08-01

    L. van Driel-Gesztelyi (1,2,3), D. Baker (1), T. Török (4), E. Pariat (2), L.M. Green (1),D.R. Williams (1), J. Carlyle (1,5) G. Valori (1, 2), P. Démoulin (2), B. Kliem (1,7,8),D. Long (1), S.A. Matthews (1), J.-M. Malherbe (2)(1) UCL/MSSL, UK, (2) Paris Observatory, LESIA, CNRS, France, (3) Konkoly Observatory, Hungary, (4) Predictive Science, Dan Diego, USA, (5) Max Planck Inst., Göttingen, Germany, (6) INAF, Obs. Roma, Italy, (7) Potsdam Univ., Germany, (8) Yunnan Observatories, Kunming, ChinaAnalyzing Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations of the spectacular Coronal Mass Ejection eruption on 7 June 2011, we present evidence of coronal magnetic reconnection between the expanding magnetic structure of the CME and the magnetic fields of an adjacent active region (AR). The onset of reconnection first became apparent in the SDO/AIA images when filament plasma, originally contained within the erupting flux rope, was re-directed towards remote areas in the neighboring AR, tracing the change of large-scale magnetic connectivity. The observations are presented jointly with a topological analysis of the pre-eruption magnetic configuration, and a data-constrained numerical simulation of the three-AR complex, demonstrating the formation/intensification of current sheets along a pre-existing hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) at the interface between the CME and the neighboring AR, where a secondary flare ribbon was created. Reconnection across this current sheet resulted in the formation of new magnetic connections between the erupting magnetic structure and a neighboring AR about 200 Mm from the eruption site, in strong qualitative agreement with the observations. In addition, the CME temporarily created unusually dense plasma conditions around a reconnection region at high coronal altitudes, enabling us to observe emission resulting from it. We argue that this exceptional observation of a coronal brightening was directly observable at SDO/AIA wavelengths owing to the presence of down-flowing cool and dense (estimated to be of the order of 1010 cm-3) filament plasma in the vicinity of the reconnection region.

  16. Simulating CME Eruptions from Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, W.; van der Holst, B.

    2014-12-01

    Fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) typically erupt from the filament channels of active regions where the magnetic field is in a highly non potential state. In this talk, we discuss two numerical models under development that will simulate the evolution of active regions and the buildup of magnetic energy that leads to filament eruptions and CMEs. The first model, the so called regional model simulates the area of an active region in a domain that extends from just above the photosphere at its base to a height of 100 Mm in the low corona. The physics of this model is extended magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), which includes such physical processes as field aligned heat conduction, radiative losses, and tabular equation of state that allow for a self-consistent treatment of the atmosphere including the transition region. For this model, boundary conditions for the magnetic field fields are specified directly from HMI vector magnetogram observations. The second model addresses the buoyant rise of magnetic flux from the convection zone through the photosphere to allow for the self consistent formation and evolution of active regions that leads to the buildup of magnetic free energy. We compare results from this second model to SDO/HMI observations of the 7 January 2014 events to show that the simulation has captured the basic physics of magnetic field evolution an energy build up necessary for large-scale eruptions.

  17. Academic podcasting: quality media delivery.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Jacob S; Duvall, Scott L; Cowan, Derek L; Kamauu, Aaron W C

    2006-01-01

    A video podcast of the CME-approved University of Utah Department of Biomedical Informatics seminar was created in order to address issues with streaming video quality, take advantage of popular web-based syndication methods, and make the files available for convenient, subscription-based download. An RSS feed, which is automatically generated, contains links to the media files and allows viewers to easily subscribe to the weekly seminars in a format that guarantees consistent video quality. PMID:17238744

  18. STUDY OF THE 2007 APRIL 20 CME-COMET INTERACTION EVENT WITH AN MHD MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y. D.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Manchester, W. B.; Cohen, O.; Hansen, K. C.; Combi, M. R.; Gombosi, T. I.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-05-01

    This study examines the tail disconnection event on 2007 April 20 on comet 2P/Encke, caused by a coronal mass ejection (CME) at a heliocentric distance of 0.34 AU. During their interaction, both the CME and the comet are visible with high temporal and spatial resolution by the STEREO-A spacecraft. Previously, only current sheets or shocks have been accepted as possible reasons for comet tail disconnections, so it is puzzling that the CME caused this event. The MHD simulation presented in this work reproduces the interaction process and demonstrates how the CME triggered a tail disconnection in the April 20 event. It is found that the CME disturbs the comet with a combination of a 180 deg. sudden rotation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), followed by a 90 deg. gradual rotation. Such an interpretation applies our understanding of solar wind-comet interactions to determine the in situ IMF orientation of the CME encountering Encke.

  19. Genetic Basis and Functional Consequences of Differential Expression of the CmeABC Efflux Pump in Campylobacter jejuni Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Grinnage-Pulley, Tara; Zhang, Qijing

    2015-01-01

    The CmeABC multidrug efflux transporter of Campylobacter jejuni plays a key role in antimicrobial resistance and is suppressed by CmeR, a transcriptional regulator of the TetR family. Overexpression of CmeABC has been observed in laboratory-generated mutants, but it is unknown if this phenotype occurs naturally in C. jejuni isolates and if it has any functional consequences. To answer these questions, expression of cmeABC in natural isolates obtained from broiler chickens, turkeys and humans was examined, and the genetic mechanisms and role of cmeABC differential expression in antimicrobial resistance was determined. Among the 64 C. jejuni isolates examined in this study, 43 and 21 were phenotypically identified as overexpression (OEL) and wild-type expression (WEL) levels. Representative mutations of the cmeABC promoter and/or CmeR-coding sequence were analyzed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and transcriptional fusion assays. Reduced CmeR binding to the mutated cmeABC promoter sequences or decreased CmeR levels increased cmeABC expression. Several examined amino acid substitutions in CmeR did not affect its binding to the cmeABC promoter, but a mutation that led to C-terminal truncation of CmeR abolished its DNA-binding activity. Interestingly, some OEL isolates harbored no mutations in known regulatory elements, suggesting that cmeABC is also regulated by unidentified mechanisms. Overexpression of cmeABC did not affect the susceptibility of C. jejuni to most tested antimicrobials except for chloramphenicol, but promoted the emergence of ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants under antibiotic selection. These results link CmeABC overexpression in natural C. jejuni isolates to various mutations and indicate that this phenotypic change promotes the emergence of antibiotic-resistant mutants under selection pressure. Thus, differential expression of CmeABC may facilitate Campylobacter adaptation to antibiotic treatments. PMID:26132196

  20. Update from the BU-CME Group: Accurate Prediction of CME Deflection and Magnetic reconnection in the interior of interplanetary CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opher, M.; Kay, C.; Fermo, R. L.; Drake, J. F.; Evans, R. M.

    2013-05-01

    The accurate prediction of the path of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) plays an important role in space weather forecasting, and knowing the source location of the CME does not always suffice. During solar minimum, for example, polar coronal holes (CHs) can deflect high latitude CMEs toward the ecliptic plane and when CHs extend to lower latitudes deflections in other directions can occur. To predict whether a CME will impact Earth the effects of the solar background on the CME's trajectory must be taken into account. Here we develop a model (Kay et al. 2013), called ForeCAT (Forecasting a CME's Altered Trajectory), of CME deflection close to the Sun where magnetic forces dominate. Given the background solar wind conditions, the launch site of the CME, and the properties of the CME (such as its mass and size), ForeCAT predicts the deflection of the CME as well as the full trajectory as the CME propagates away from the Sun. For a magnetic background where the CME is launched from an active region located in between a CH and streamer region the strong magnetic gradients cause a deflection of 39.0o in latitude and 21.9o in longitude. Varying the CME's input parameters within observed ranges leads to deflections predominantly between 36.2o and 44.5o in latitude and between 19.5o and 27.9 in longitude. For all cases, the majority of the deflection occurs before the CME reaches a radial distance of 3 R?. Recent in situ observations of interplanetary mass ejections (ICMEs) found signatures of reconnection exhausts in their interior or trailing edge. This result suggests that the internal magnetic field reconnects with itself. To this end, we propose an approach (Fermo et al. 2013) borrowed from the fusion plasma community. Taylor (1974) showed that the lowest energy state corresponds to one in which \\grad × B = ? B. Variations from this state will result in the magnetic field trying to re-orient itself into the Taylor state solution, subject to the constraints that the toroidal flux and magnetic helicity are invariant. In tokamaks, the result is a sawtooth crash. In an ICME, if we likewise treat the flux rope as a toroidal flux tube, any variation from the Taylor state will result in reconnection within the interior of the flux tube, in accord with the observations by Gosling et al. (2007). We present MHD and PIC simulations that shows that indeed this is the case and discuss the implications for ICMEs.

  1. Evolution of two Flaring Active Regions With CME Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2008-12-01

    We study the coronal magnetic field structure of two active regions, one during solar activity minimum (June 2007) and another one during a more active time (January 2004). The temporal evolution was explored with the help of nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolations of SOLIS/VSM and NAOJ/SFT photospheric vector magnetograms. We study the active region NOAA 10960 observed on 2007 June 7 with three SOLIS/VSM snapshots taken during a small C1.0 flare of time cadence 10 minutes and six snapshots during a quiet period. The total magnetic energy in the active region was approximately 3 × 1025 J. Before the flare the free magnetic energy was about 5~% of the potential field energy. A part of this excess energy was released during the flare, producing almost a potential configuration at the beginning of the quiet period. The return to an almost potential structure can be assigned to a CME as recorded by the SoHO/LASCO instrument on 2007 June 07 around 10 minutes after the flare peaked, so that whatever magnetic helicity was bodily removed from the structure. This was compared with active region 10540 observed on 2004 January 18 -- 21, which was analyzed with the help of vector magnetograph data from the Solar Flare Telescope in Japan of time cadence of about 1 day. The free energy was Efree? 66~% of the total energy which was sufficiently high to power a M6.1 flare on January 20, which was associated with a CME 20 minutes later. The activity of AR 10540 was significantly higher than for AR 10960, as was the total magnetic energy. Furthermore, we found the common feature that magnetic energy accumulates before the flare/CME and a significant part of the excess energy is released during the eruption.

  2. Dual Delivery of EPO and BMP2 from a Novel Modular Poly-?-Caprolactone Construct to Increase the Bone Formation in Prefabricated Bone Flaps.

    PubMed

    Patel, Janki Jayesh; Modes, Jane E; Flanagan, Colleen L; Krebsbach, Paul H; Edwards, Sean P; Hollister, Scott J

    2015-09-01

    Poly-?-caprolactone (PCL) is a biocompatible polymer that has mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering; however, it must be integrated with biologics to stimulate bone formation. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) delivered from PCL produces bone when implanted subcutaneously, and erythropoietin (EPO) works synergistically with BMP2. In this study, EPO and BMP2 are adsorbed separately on two 3D-printed PCL scaffold modules that are assembled for codelivery on a single scaffold structure. This assembled modular PCL scaffold with dual BMP2 and EPO delivery was shown to increase bone growth in an ectopic location when compared with BMP2 delivery along a replicate scaffold structure. EPO (200?IU/mL) and BMP2 (65??g/mL) were adsorbed onto the outer and inner portions of a modular scaffold, respectively. Protein binding and release studies were first quantified. Subsequently, EPO+BMP2 and BMP2 scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in mice for 4 and 8 weeks, and the regenerated bone was analyzed with microcomputed tomography and histology; 8.6±1.4??g BMP2 (22%) and 140±29?IU EPO (69.8%) bound to the scaffold and <1% BMP2 and 83% EPO was released in 7 days. Increased endothelial cell proliferation on EPO-adsorbed PCL discs indicated protein bioactivity. At 4 and 8 weeks, dual BMP2 and EPO delivery regenerated more bone (5.1±1.1 and 5.5±1.6?mm(3)) than BMP2 alone (3.8±1.1 and 4.3±1.7?mm(3)). BMP2 and EPO scaffolds had more ingrowth (1.4%±0.6%) in the outer module when compared with BMP2 (0.8%±0.3%) at 4 weeks. Dual delivery produced more dense cellular marrow, while BMP2 had more fatty marrow. Dual EPO and BMP2 delivery is a potential method to regenerate bone faster for prefabricated flaps. PMID:25809081

  3. Particle Acceleration by Cme-driven Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic particle (SEP) events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Peak particle intensities are a strong function of CME speed, although the intensities, spectra, and angular distributions of particles escaping the shock are highly modified by scattering on Alfven waves produced by the streaming particles themselves. Element abundances vary in complex ways because ions with different values of Q/A resonate with different parts of the wave spectrum, which varies with space and time. Just recently, we have begun to model these systematic variations theoretically and to explore other consequences of proton-generated waves.

  4. Propagation of the 7 January 2014 CME and Resulting Geomagnetic Non-event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. L.; Thompson, B. J.; Jian, L. K.; Colaninno, R. C.; Odstrcil, D.; Möstl, C.; Temmer, M.; Savani, N. P.; Collinson, G.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P. J.; Zheng, Y.

    2015-10-01

    On 2014 January 7 an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) with a radial speed ?2500 km s?1 was observed from near an active region close to disk center. This led many forecasters to estimate a rapid arrival at Earth (?36 hr) and predict a strong geomagnetic storm. However, only a glancing CME arrival was observed at Earth with a transit time of ?49 hr and a KP geomagnetic index of only 3?. We study the interplanetary propagation of this CME using the ensemble Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)–ENLIL+Cone model, that allows a sampling of CME parameter uncertainties. We explore a series of simulations to isolate the effects of the background solar wind solution, CME shape, tilt, location, size, and speed, and the results are compared with observed in situ arrivals at Venus, Earth, and Mars. Our results show that a tilted ellipsoid CME shape improves the initial real-time prediction to better reflect the observed in situ signatures and the geomagnetic storm strength. CME parameters from the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model used as input to WSA–ENLIL+Cone, along with a tilted ellipsoid cloud shape, improve the arrival-time error by 14.5, 18.7, 23.4 hr for Venus, Earth, and Mars respectively. These results highlight that CME orientation and directionality with respect to observatories play an important role in understanding the propagation of this CME, and for forecasting other glancing CME arrivals. This study also demonstrates the importance of three-dimensional CME fitting made possible by multiple viewpoint imaging.

  5. Formation and stabilization of nanoemulsion-based vitamin E delivery systems using natural biopolymers: Whey protein isolate and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    Natural biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum arabic (GA), were used to fabricate emulsion-based delivery systems for vitamin E-acetate. Stable delivery systems could be formed when vitamin E-acetate was mixed with sufficient orange oil prior to high pressure homogenization. WPI (d32=0.11 ?m, 1% emulsifier) was better than GA (d32=0.38 ?m, 10% emulsifier) at producing small droplets at low emulsifier concentrations. However, WPI-stabilized nanoemulsions were unstable to flocculation near the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.0), at high ionic strength (>100mM), and at elevated temperatures (>60 °C), whereas GA-stabilized emulsions were stable. This difference was attributed to differences in emulsifier stabilization mechanisms: WPI by electrostatic repulsion; GA by steric repulsion. These results provide useful information about the emulsifying and stabilizing capacities of natural biopolymers for forming food-grade vitamin-enriched delivery systems. PMID:26041190

  6. Sigmoid CME Source Regions at The Sun: Some Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2000-01-01

    Identifying coronal mass ejection (CME) precursors in the solar corona would be an important step in space weather forecasting, as well as a vital key to understanding the physics of CMEs. Twisted magnetic field structures are suspected of being the source of at least some CMEs. These features can appear sigmoid (S or inverse-S) shaped in soft X-ray, (SXR) images. We review recent observations of these structures and their relation to CMEs. using SXR data from the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, and EUV data from the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the SOHO satellite. These observations indicate that the pre-eruption sigmoid patterns are more prominent in SXRs than in EUV, and that sigmoid precursors are present in over 50% of CMEs. These findings are important for CME research, and may potentially be a major component to space weather forecasting. So far, however, the studies have been subject to restrictions that will have to be relaxed before sigmoid morphology can be used as a reliable predictive too[. Moreover, some CMEs do not display a SXR sigmoid structure prior to eruption, and some others show no prominent SXR signature of any kind before or during eruption.

  7. Sigmoid CME Source Regions at the Sun: Some Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Identifying Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) precursors in the solar corona would be an important step in space weather forecasting, as well as a vital key to understanding the physics of CMEs. Twisted magnetic field structures are suspected of being the source of at least some CMEs. These features can appear sigmoid (S or inverse-S) shaped in soft X-ray (SXR) images. We review recent observations of these structures and their relation to CMEs, using soft X-ray (SXR) data from the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite, and EUV data from the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the SOHO satellite. These observations indicate that the pre-eruption sigmoid patterns are more prominent in SXRs than in EUV, and that sigmoid precursors are present in over 50% of CMEs. These findings are important for CME research, and may potentially be a major component to space weather forecasting. So far, however, the studies have been subject to restrictions that will have to be relaxed before sigmoid morphology can be used as a reliable predictive tool. Moreover, some CMEs do not display a SXR sigmoid structure prior to eruption, and some others show no prominent SXR signature of any kind before or during eruption.

  8. Effect on the Lunar Exosphere of a CME Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Hurley, Dana M.; Farrell, William M.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that solar wind bombardment onto exposed surfaces in the solar system will produce an energetic component to the exospheres about those bodies. Laboratory experiments have shown that the sputter yield can be noticeably increased in the case of a good insulating surface. It is now known that the solar wind composition is highly dependent on the origin of the particular plasma. Using the measured composition of the slow wind, fast wind, solar energetic particle (SEP) population, and coronal mass ejection (CME), broken down into its various components, we have estimated the total sputter yield for each type of solar wind. The heavy ion component, especially the He++ component, greatly enhances the total sputter yield during times when the heavy ion population is enhanced, most notably during a coronal mass ejection. To simulate the effect on the lunar exosphere of a CME passage past the Moon, we ran a Monte Carlo code for the species Na, K, Mg and Ca.

  9. SEP acceleration in CME driven shocks using a hybrid code

    SciTech Connect

    Gargaté, L.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-09-01

    We perform hybrid simulations of a super-Alfvénic quasi-parallel shock, driven by a coronal mass ejection (CME), propagating in the outer coronal/solar wind at distances of between 3 to 6 solar radii. The hybrid treatment of the problem enables the study of the shock propagation on the ion timescale, preserving ion kinetics and allowing for a self-consistent treatment of the shock propagation and particle acceleration. The CME plasma drags the embedded magnetic field lines stretching from the sun, and propagates out into interplanetary space at a greater velocity than the in situ solar wind, driving the shock, and producing very energetic particles. Our results show that electromagnetic Alfvén waves are generated at the shock front. The waves propagate upstream of the shock and are produced by the counter-streaming ions of the solar wind plasma being reflected at the shock. A significant fraction of the particles are accelerated in two distinct phases: first, particles drift from the shock and are accelerated in the upstream region, and second, particles arriving at the shock get trapped and are accelerated at the shock front. A fraction of the particles diffused back to the shock, which is consistent with the Fermi acceleration mechanism.

  10. Effect of CME on Primary Care and OB/GYN Treatment of Breast Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, David W.; Xu, Stanley; McClure, David

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: CME program planners are being asked to move beyond assessments of knowledge to assessing the impact of CME on practice and patient outcomes. Methods: We conducted a pre-post analysis of administrative data from 107 physicians, nurse practitioners (NPs), or physician's assistants (PAs) who attended one or two continuing medical…

  11. Promoting Free Online CME for Intimate Partner Violence: What Works at What Cost?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John M., Jr.; Novalis-Marine, Cheryl; Amend, Robert W.; Surprenant, Zita J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: There is a need to provide practicing physicians with training on the recognition and management of intimate partner violence (IPV). Online continuing medical education (CME) could help meet this need, but there is little information on the costs and effectiveness of promoting online CME to physicians. This lack of information may…

  12. KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY OF THE CME RECONNECTION OUTFLOW LAYER IN THE LOW CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Foullon, Claire; Verwichte, Erwin; Nykyri, Katariina; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Hannah, Iain G.

    2013-04-20

    New capabilities for studying the Sun allow us to image for the first time the magnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability developing at the surface of a fast coronal mass ejecta (CME) less than 150 Mm above the solar surface. We conduct a detailed observational investigation of this phenomenon, observed off the east solar limb on 2010 November 3, in the EUV with SDO/AIA. In conjunction with STEREO-B/EUVI, we derive the CME source surface position. We ascertain the timing and early evolution of the CME outflow leading to the instability onset. We perform image and spectral analysis, exploring the CME plasma structuring and its parabolic flow pattern. As we evaluate and validate the consistency of the observations with theoretical considerations and predictions, we take the view that the ejecta layer corresponds to a reconnection outflow layer surrounding the erupting flux rope, accounting for the timing, high temperature ({approx}11.6 MK), and high flow shear ({approx}680 km s{sup -1}) on the unstable CME northern flank and for the observed asymmetry between the CME flanks. From the irregular evolution of the CME flow pattern, we infer a shear gradient consistent with expected spatial flow variations across the KH-unstable flank. The KH phenomenon observed is tied to the first stage of a linked flare-CME event.

  13. A Pilot Study of CME on Risk Management in Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, James; Pichert, James W.; Habermann, Ralf; Ribble, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    This pilot study's purpose was to evaluate behavioral changes among medical directors and physicians following CME on risk management in long-term care (LTC) facilities. The setting was a satellite conference at the AGS Meeting Symposium 2000. CME participants included 51 medical directors, attending physicians, and nurses. Evaluations were based…

  14. Preliminary structural studies of the transcriptional regulator CmeR from Campylobacter jejuni

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Chih-Chia; Shi, Feng; Gu, Ruoyu; Li, Ming; McDermott, Gerry; Yu, Edward W.; Zhang, Qijing

    2007-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator CmeR from C. jejuni has been purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to a resolution of 2.2 Å. In Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans, the CmeR regulatory protein controls transcription of the multidrug transporter gene operon cmeABC. CmeR belongs to the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. The 210-residue CmeR consists of two functional motifs: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal ligand-binding domain. It is predicted that the DNA-binding domain interacts directly with target promoters, while the C-terminal motif interacts with inducing ligands (such as bile salts). As an initial step towards confirming this structural model, recombinant CmeR protein containing a 6×His tag at the N-terminus was crystallized. Crystals of ligand-free CmeR belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.4, b = 57.6, c = 93.3 Å. Diffraction was observed to at least 2.2 Å at 100 K. Analysis of the detailed CmeR structure is currently in progress.

  15. Tracking of Interplanetary CME/Shocks Using Type II Radio Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ontiveros-Hernandez, V.; Manuel-Hernandez, T.; Corona-Romero, P.; Gonzalez-Esparza, A.

    2012-12-01

    Interplanetary Type II radio burst radiation results from the excitation of plasma waves in the ambient medium by shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). These radio emissions provide a means of remotely tracking CME/shocks. The aim of this work is to combine, by using WIND/WAVES and STEREO/SWAVES radio data, different techniques to estimate the speed evolution of CME/shocks associated with Type II radio bursts. Moreover, in order to illuminate the CME/shock propagation, it is included an analysis of coronographic and heliospheric images, in situ data, and an analytical model of CME/shock propagation, which provide complementary information on CME/shocks propagating through the entire Sun-Earth connected space.

  16. Presence Of A Reverse Shock In The Evolution Of A CME In The Lower Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, I.; Opher, M.

    2008-12-01

    We study the birth and the evolution of a reverse shock in the evolution of a CME in the lower solar corona. We study the evolution of the CME with Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF). To initiate the CME, we inserted a Titov-Demoulin (TD) flux rope in an active region of the Sun with magnetic field based on the MDI data for the solar surface during Carrington rotation 1922. The CME advances on the top of a background solar wind created with the help of Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model. We'd explore the signature and characteristics of the reverse shock as the CME evolves through the lower corona. We also discuss it's implications on the acceleration of particles.

  17. Automatic CME front edge detection from STEREO white-light coronagraph images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirnosov, Vladimir; Chang, Lin-Ching; Pulkkinen, Antti

    2015-08-01

    The coronagraph images captured by a Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) Ahead/Behind (A/B) spacecraft allow tracking of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from two different viewpoints and reconstructing its propagation in three-dimensional space. The reconstruction can be done using a triangulation technique that requires a CME front edge location. There are currently no robust automatic CME front edge detection methods that can be integrated with the triangulation technique. In this paper, we propose a novel automatic method to detect the front edge of the CME using STEREO coronagraph 2 red-colored Red, Green, Blue color model images. Our method consists of two modules: preprocessing and classification. The preprocessing module decomposes each coronagraph image into its three channels and uses only the red channel image for CME segmentation. The output of the preprocessing module is a set of segmented running-difference binary images which is fed into the classification module. These images are then transformed into polar coordinates followed by CME front edge detection based on the distance that CME travels in the field of view. The proposed method was validated against a manual method using total 56 CME events, 28 from STEREO A and 28 from STEREO B, captured in the period from 1 January 2008 to 16 August 2009. The results show that the proposed method is effective for CME front edge detection. The proposed method is useful in quantitative CME processing and analysis and will be immediately applicable to assist automatic triangulation method for real-time space weather forecasting.

  18. Host-guest interaction induced supramolecular amphiphilic star architecture and uniform nanovesicle formation for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Ling; Liu, Kerh Li; Wen, Yuting; Song, Xia; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A star polymer of poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) with adamantyl end-terminals extended from an ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) core is designed. It subsequently self-assembles to form controllable and uniform nanovesicles induced by host-guest interactions between heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-?-CD and the adamantyl ends. The nanovesicles are suitable for loading and intracellular delivery of the anticancer drug doxorubicin. PMID:26692041

  19. Nozzle Driven Shocks in Post-CME Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Roger B.; Longcope, D. W.; McKenzie, D. E.

    2012-05-01

    Models of patchy reconnection allow for heating and acceleration of plasma along reconnected field lines but do not offer a mechanism for transport of energy and momentum across field lines. Here we present a simple 2D model in which a localized region of reconnected flux creates an apparent constriction in the surrounding layer of unreconnected field. The moving constriction acts as a de Laval nozzle and ultimately leads to shocks which can extend out to several times the diameter of the flux tube, altering the density and temperature of the plasma in that region. These findings have direct implications for observations in the solar corona, particularly in regard to such phenomena as wakes seen behind supra-arcade downflows and high temperatures in post-CME current sheets. This work was supported by a joint grant from the NSF and DOE.

  20. CME Interaction with Coronal Holes and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.

    2008-01-01

    A significant number of interplanetary (IP) shocks (-17%) during cycle 23 were not followed by drivers. The number of such "driverless" shocks steadily increased with the solar cycle with 15%, 33%, and 52% occurring in the rise, maximum, and declining phase of the solar cycle. The solar sources of 15% of the driverless shocks were very close the central meridian of the Sun (within approx.15deg), which is quite unexpected. More interestingly, all the driverless shocks with their solar sources near the solar disk center occurred during the declining phase of solar cycle 23. When we investigated the coronal environment of the source regions of driverless shocks, we found that in each case there was at least one coronal hole nearby suggesting that the coronal holes might have deflected the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) away from the Sun-Earth line. The presence of abundant low-latitude coronal holes during the declining phase further explains why CMEs originating close to the disk center mimic the limb CMEs, which normally lead to driverless shocks due to purely geometrical reasons. We also examined the solar source regions of shocks with drivers. For these, the coronal holes were located such that they either had no influence on the CME trajectories. or they deflected the CMEs towards the Sun-Earth line. We also obtained the open magnetic field distribution on the Sun by performing a potential field source surface extrapolation to the corona. It was found that the CMEs generally move away from the open magnetic field regions. The CME-coronal hole interaction must be widespread in the declining phase, and may have a significant impact on the geoeffectiveness of CMEs.

  1. Propagation of the 7 January 2014 CME and Resulting Geomagnetic Non-Event

    E-print Network

    Mays, M L; Jian, L K; Colaninno, R C; Odstrcil, D; Möstl, C; Temmer, M; Savani, N P; Taktakishvili, A; MacNeice, P J; Zheng, Y

    2015-01-01

    On 7 January 2014 an X1.2 flare and CME with a radial speed $\\approx$2500 km s$^{-1}$ was observed from near an active region close to disk center. This led many forecasters to estimate a rapid arrival at Earth ($\\approx$36 hours) and predict a strong geomagnetic storm. However, only a glancing CME arrival was observed at Earth with a transit time of $\\approx$49 hours and a $K_{\\rm P}$ geomagnetic index of only $3-$. We study the interplanetary propagation of this CME using the ensemble Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-ENLIL+Cone model, that allows a sampling of CME parameter uncertainties. We explore a series of simulations to isolate the effects of the background solar wind solution, CME shape, tilt, location, size, and speed, and the results are compared with observed in-situ arrivals at Venus, Earth, and Mars. Our results show that a tilted ellipsoid CME shape improves the initial real-time prediction to better reflect the observed in-situ signatures and the geomagnetic storm strength. CME parameters from the Grad...

  2. 3D Numerical Study of Typical CME Event: The 2010-04-03 Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Feng, X. S.; Zhao, X.

    2014-12-01

    The coronal mass ejection (CME) event on April 3, 2010 is the first fast CME observed by STEREO SECCHI/HI for the full Sun-Earth line. Such an event provides us a good opportunity to study the propagation and evolution of CME from the Sun up to 1 AU. In this paper, we study the time-dependent evolution and propagation of this event from the Sun to Earth using the 3D SIP-CESE MHD model. The CME is initiated by a simple spherical plasmoid model: a spheromak magnetic structure with high speed, high pressure and high plasma density plasmoid. We find that the results can successfully reproduce the observations in the STEREO A/B COR1 and COR2 field of view and generate many basic structures of the in situ measurement: such as the similar curves of the plasma density and velocity, an increase in the magnetic field magnitude, the large-scale smooth magnetic field rotation and prolonged southward IMF (a well known source of magnetic storms). The MHD model gives the shock arrival time at Earth with an error of ˜ 1.5 hours. Finally, we analyze in detail the propagation velocity, the spread angle, the trajectory of CME. The speed of the CME rapidly increases from near the Sun, then decreases due to interaction with the solar wind ambient. The spread angle of the CME quickly increases due to lateral material expansion by the pressure gradients within the realistic solar wind background, then the expansion decreases with distance and ends until a pressure equilibrium is established. We also study the CME deflection and find that the CME almost does not deflects in the latitudinal and longitudinal direction during its propagation from the Sun to 1 AU.

  3. Heliospheric tracking of enhanced density structures of the 6 October 2010 CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Wageesh; Srivastava, Nandita

    2015-07-01

    A Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is an inhomogeneous structure consisting of different features which evolve differently with the propagation of the CME. Simultaneous heliospheric tracking of different observed features of a CME can improve our understanding about relative forces acting on them. It also helps to estimate accurately their arrival times at the Earth and identify them in in-situ data. This also enables finding any association between remotely observed features and in-situ observations near the Earth. In this paper, we attempt to continuously track two density enhanced features in the CME of 6 October 2010, one at the front and another at the rear edge. This is achieved by using time-elongation maps constructed from STEREO/SECCHI observations. We derive the kinematics of the tracked features using various reconstruction methods. The estimated kinematics are used as inputs in the Drag Based Model (DBM) to estimate the arrival time of the tracked features of the CME at L1. On comparing the estimated kinematics as well as the arrival times of the remotely observed features with in-situ observations by Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and Wind, we find that the tracked bright feature at the rear edge of 6 October 2010 CME corresponds most probably to the enhanced density structure after the magnetic cloud detected by ACE and Wind. In-situ plasma and compositional parameters provide evidence that the rear edge density structure may correspond to a filament associated with the CME while the density enhancement at the front corresponds to the leading edge of the CME. Based on this single event study, we discuss the relevance and significance of Heliospheric Imager (HI) observations in identification of the three-part structure of the CME.

  4. Effects of the 5 October 1996 CME at 4.4 AU: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, R.G.; Desai, M.I.; Sanderson, T.R.; Forsyth, R.J.; Gosling, J.T.

    1997-09-01

    The authors present observations from Ulysses associated with a large coronal mass ejection (CME) that lifted off the west limb of the Sun on 5 October, 1996. The study focuses on the effects of the interplanetary counterpart of the CME on the energetic particle populations at the location of Ulysses, in particular the effect on the sequence of corotating enhancements that had been observed prior to its arrival. They conclude that, despite its large spatial extent, the CME caused no permanent deformation of the heliospheric current sheet.

  5. ON A CORONAL BLOWOUT JET: THE FIRST OBSERVATION OF A SIMULTANEOUSLY PRODUCED BUBBLE-LIKE CME AND A JET-LIKE CME IN A SOLAR EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-02-01

    The coronal blowout jet is a peculiar category among various jet phenomena, in which the sheared base arch, often carrying a small filament, experiences a miniature version of blowout eruption that produces large-scale coronal mass ejection (CME). In this paper, we report such a coronal blowout jet with high-resolution multi-wavelength and multi-angle observations taken from Solar Dynamics Observatory, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, and Big Bear Solar Observatory. For the first time, we find that simultaneous bubble-like and jet-like CMEs were dynamically related to the blowout jet that showed cool and hot components next to each other. Our observational results indicate that (1) the cool component resulted from the eruption of the filament contained within the jet's base arch, and it further caused the bubble-like CME; (2) the jet-like CME was associated with the hot component, which was the outward moving heated plasma generated by the reconnection of the base arch and its ambient open field lines. On the other hand, bifurcation of the jet's cool component was also observed, which resulted from the uncoupling of the erupting filament's two legs that were highly twisted at the very beginning. Based on these results, we propose a model to interpret the coronal blowout jet, in which the external reconnection not only produces the jet-like CME, but also leads to the rising of the filament. Subsequently, internal reconnection starts underneath the rising filament and thereby causes the bubble-like CME.

  6. MEMS: Enabled Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Angelica; Sheybani, Roya; Meng, Ellis

    2015-05-01

    Drug delivery systems play a crucial role in the treatment and management of medical conditions. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies have allowed the development of advanced miniaturized devices for medical and biological applications. This Review presents the use of MEMS technologies to produce drug delivery devices detailing the delivery mechanisms, device formats employed, and various biomedical applications. The integration of dosing control systems, examples of commercially available microtechnology-enabled drug delivery devices, remaining challenges, and future outlook are also discussed. PMID:25703045

  7. SOHO Captures CME From X5.4 Solar Flare - Duration: 5 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this movie of the sun's coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with an X5.4 solar flare on the evening of March 6, 2012. The extremely fast and en...

  8. Distribution of Solar Flares with Respect to Associated Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) Span During 1996 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, B.; Prasad, L.; Mathpal, Hema; Mathpal, R.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study we have selected 131 events of the flare-CME accompanied by type II radio burst chosen during the period from 1996 to 2012. Statistical analyses are performed to examine the distribution of solar flares with respect to CME span and it was found that from 131 events only 49 lie under the CME span, whereas 82 events are outside the CME span. Our analysis indicates that flare-CME accompanied by type II radio burst does not follow the CSHKP flare-CME model. Under the CME span, 57% events occurred in the northern region and 43% events in the southern region, whereas outside the CME span 51% events occurred in the northern region and 49% events in the southern region. The northern and southern hemispheres between 10 to 20o latitudinal belts are found to be more effective in producing events. We also found that under the CME span the maximum number of events resided at the center, and outside the CME span all the 82 events spread out to one particular side.

  9. Kinematic Treatment of CME Evolution in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete; Crooker, N. U.

    2004-01-01

    We present a kinematic study of the evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the solar wind. Specifically, we consider the effects of: (1) spherical expansion; and (2) uniform expansion due to pressure gradients between the Interplanetary CME (ICME) and the ambient solar wind. We compare these results with an MHD model, which allows us to isolate these effects from the combined kinematic and dynamical effects, which are included in MHD models. They also provide compelling evidence that the fundamental cross section of so-called "force-free" flux ropes (or magnetic clouds) is neither circular or elliptical, but rather a convex-outward, "pancake" shape. We apply a force-free fitting to the magnetic vectors from the MHD simulation to assess how the distortion of the flux rope affects the fitting. In spite of these limitations, force-free fittings, which are straightforward to apply, do provide an important description of a number of parameters, including the radial dimension, orientation and chirality of the ICME.

  10. X-ray and EUV Observations of CME Eruption Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Why Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) erupt is a major outstanding puzzle of solar physics. Signatures observable at the earliest stages of eruption onset may hold precious clues about the onset mechanism. We present observations from SOHO/EIT and from TRACE in EUV, and from Yohkoh/SXT in soft X-rays of the pre-eruption and eruption phases of CME expulsion, along with the eruption's magnetic setting found from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. Most of our events involve clearly-observable filament eruptions and multiple neutral lines, and we use the magnetic settings and motions of the filaments to help infer the geometry and behavior of the associated erupting magnetic fields. Pre-eruption and early-eruption signatures include a relatively slow filament rise prior to eruption, and intensity "dimmings" and brightenings, both in the immediate neighborhood of the "core" (location of greatest magnetic shear) of the erupting fields and at locations remote from the core. These signatures and their relative timings place observational constraints on eruption mechanisms; our recent work has focused on implications for the so-called "tether cutting" and "breakout" models, but the same observational constraints are applicable to any model.

  11. CME Eruption Onset Observations from EIT and SXT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Why CMEs erupt is a major outstanding puzzle of solar physics. Signatures observable at the earliest stages of eruption onset may hold precious clues about the onset mechanism. We present observations in EUV from SOHO/EIT and in soft X-rays from Yohkoh/SXT of the re-eruption and eruption phases of CME expulsion, along with the eruption's magnetic setting found from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. Most of our events involve clearly-observable filament eruptions and multiple neutral lines, and we use the magnetic settings and motions of the filaments to help infer the geometry and behavior of the associated erupting magnetic fields. Pre-eruption and early-eruption signatures include a relatively slow filament rise prior to eruption, and intensity "dimmings" and brightenings, both in the immediate neighborhood of the "core" (location of greatest magnetic shear) of the erupting fields and at locations remote from the core. These signatures and their relative timings place observational constraints on eruption mechanisms; our recent work has focused on implications for the so-called "tether cutting" and "breakout" models, but the same observational constraints are applicable to any model.

  12. CME and Reconnection Contributions to the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connick, D.; Schwadron, N. A.; Smith, C. W.

    2011-12-01

    Examination of L1 magnetic field data from the recent solar minimum reveals evidence for ongoing magnetic reconnection below the Alfven critical point and throughout the recent protracted solar minimum. This ongoing reconnection permits both the ejection of open field lines from the heliosphere and the creation of new magnetic loops that are capable of subduction below the photosphere. At the same time, a theory can be developed based on related published ideas wherein CMEs contribute magnetic field to interplanetary space that, in time, become part of the observed open field line population. What seems most interesting is that (1) throughout the recent protracted solar minimum the IMF flux drops steadily and the apparent reconnection continues at a very steady rate, and (2) the field model can account for this observation by using reasonable parameters for ICME flux content and reconnection rates. We will also show our efforts to account for the interplanetary magnetic field during the rising phase of the solar cycle as CME flux injection is balanced against reduction by field line reconnection.

  13. Connecting Near-Sun CME flux Ropes to the 1-AU Flux Ropes using the Flare-CME Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.

    2013-07-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are closely related in various ways because the two phenomena are different manifestations of the same energy release in closed magnetic regions on the sun. Of particular interest is the relation between flare reconnection flux at the Sun and the poloidal flux of the 1-AU flux rope associated with the flare. If a flux rope forms due to flare reconnection, then the two fluxes are almost equal. The flare reconnection flux is normally computed from the flare-ribbon area and the photospheric field strength in the ribbon area. Here we report on another technique, which makes use of the area under the post-eruption arcade (PEA). We show that the reconnection flux derived from the PEA technique agrees with the one derived from flare ribbons. We also fit a flux rope to the white-light CME observations and derive the aspect ratio of the flux rope. Assuming self-similar expansion of the flux rope, we show that the magnetic content and size of the 1-AU flux rope can be predicted from the flare magnetic field (the average photospheric field strength within half of the PEA area) and the aspect ratio of the coronal flux rope. We illustrate the method with several examples.

  14. A Novel Approach of Daunorubicin Application on Formation of Proliferative Retinopathy Using a Porous Silicon Controlled Delivery System: Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Huiyuan; Huffman, Kristyn; Rios, Sandy; Freeman, William R.; Sailor, Michael J.; Cheng, Lingyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is the most common cause of poor visual outcomes in association with retinal detachment surgeries and ocular trauma. Daunorubicin (DNR) has shown the strongest efficacy in proliferation inhibition in vitro. However, clinical studies have shown only mild effect owing to limitations of narrow therapeutic window and short vitreous half-life. Methods. Three milligrams of DNR-loaded particles were intravitreally injected into 18 pigmented rabbits, and vitreous samples were collected up to 84 days for analysis. Thirty-seven rabbits were used for a dose-escalation (1, 3, 6 mg) safety and efficacy study in a rabbit PVR model using a pretreatment design. Results. Loading efficiency of DNR was 108.55 ± 12 ?g per 1 mg particles. Eighty-four days of follow-up did not reveal any adverse reaction. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated a vitreous half-life of 29 days with a maximum DNR concentration of 178 ng/mL and a minimum concentration of 29 ng/mL at day 84. Daunorubicin-loaded porous silicon (pSi) particles were dosed 8 to 9 weeks before PVR induction, and PVR severity score was dose dependent (Spearman ? = ?0.25, P = 0.0005). Proliferative vitreoretinopathy with tractional retinal detachment was 88% in the control group, 63% in the low-dose group, 14% in the medium-dose group, and 0% in the high-dose group (Cochran-Armitage Trend Test, Z = 8.99, ? = ?0.67, P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Daunorubicin-loaded pSi particles can safely reside in the vitreous for at least 3 months. The pSi-based delivery expanded the therapeutic window of DNR by a factor of 862 and drove down the minimum effective concentration by a factor of 175. PMID:25829415

  15. Cme Cavity, Core And Flux Rope: New Insights From Sdo And Stereo Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Cheng, X.

    2011-05-01

    In white light coronagraph images, the brightness morphology of a CME often has a 3-part structure: a semi-circular-shaped bright leading front, a dark cavity enclosed by the leading front, and a blob-like core inside the cavity. It is believed that the underlying magnetic structure of a CME is a flux rope that consists of helical field lines wrapping around the central axis. Nevertheless, the relationship between the flux rope and CME cavity and core is poorly understood. We look into these issues using recent SDO observations. CME cavity and immediate leading front are observed in AIA passbands of low coronal temperatures (AIA 171 Å, 193 Å, 211 Å and 335 Å ), while CME core can be observed as an elongated hot channel in the AIA passbands of hot temperatures (AIA 94 Å and 131 Å). The hot channel initially appears in the shape of a sigmoid as viewed from the top, and a low lying central-dipped structure as viewed from the sides. Later, the hot channel starts to rise slowly and separates from the sigmoid. This slow-rise phase can last tens of minutes. In the meantime, the entire overlying arcade field starts to expand and develops into the cavity structure. As it rises, the hot channel appears closer to be a semi-circular loop, resembling the envisioned flux-rope shape. In this phase, these features are illuminated by EUV emissions, without apparent signature in GOES X-ray. However, this phase is followed by a sudden fast acceleration of the hot channel, strong expansion of the cool cavity, and the onset of the GOES X-ray flare (also flaring in EUV and other EM wavelengths). Based on the early examination of a limited number of eruptive events, we conclude that the flux rope exists before CME eruption, and later becomes the core of CME.

  16. The CORIMP CME Catalogue: Automatically Detecting and Tracking CMEs in Coronagraph Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jason; Morgan, H.; Habbal, S. R.

    2012-05-01

    Studying CMEs in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, and user-specific biases may be introduced through visual inspection of the images. The large amount of data available from the SOHO and STEREO missions also makes manual cataloguing of CMEs tedious, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required. This has led to the development of automated CME detection and cataloguing packages such as CACTus, SEEDS and ARTEMIS. Here we present the development of the CORIMP (coronal image processing) Catalogue: a new, automated, multiscale, CME detection and tracking catalogue, that overcomes many of the drawbacks of current catalogues. It works by first employing a dynamic CME separation technique to remove the static background, and then characterizing CME structure via a multiscale edge-detection algorithm. The detections are chained through time to determine the CME kinematics and morphological changes as it propagates across the plane-of-sky. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by its application to a selection of SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI images, as well as to synthetic coronagraph images created from a model corona with a variety of CMEs. These algorithms are being applied to the whole LASCO and SECCHI datasets, and a CORIMP catalogue of results will soon be available to the community.

  17. A Descriptive-Predictive Model of CME Propagation based on Multi-Instrument Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, H.; Iglesias, F. A.; St Cyr, O. C.; Kaiser, M. L.; Xie, H.; Quirk, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    The space weather field has thriven in the past decades, mainly given the proliferation of space missions devoted to study the Sun and its relations to Earth. In addition, the high dependence on technology developed by society demands that a solar event, its time of arrival at Earth, and its degree of geoeffectiveness can be promptly forecasted. The accurate prediction of a CME-driven shock arrival time at Earth is therefore challenging and crucial, so as to take emergency measures when required. In this direction, we have studied 90 Earth-directed events in different stages of their propagation from Sun to Earth. A descriptive model was derived from CME height-time information from SOHO/LASCO coronagraph data, interplanetary shock approximate locations derived from Type II radio emissions detected by Wind/WAVES, and shock time of arrival at L1 as seen in-situ by the ACE and/or Wind spacecraft. The descriptive model provided a general overview of CME-driven shocks kinematics, allowing the determination of typical propagation profiles and constrains on the main parameters. On the basis of these, a predictive model was formulated, which relies on CME and low-frequency type II radio emissions. We discuss results on CME-radio emission associations, characteristics of the propagation in the interplanetary medium, and the success of the predictive model to forecast the arrival times of shocks at Earth.

  18. Strong coronal deflection of a CME and its interplanetary evolution to Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möstl, Christian; Rollett, Tanja; Frahm, Rudy A.; Liu, Ying D.; Long, David M.; Colaninno, Robin C.; Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela; Farrugia, Charles J.; Posner, Arik; Dumbovic, Mateja; Janvier, Miho; Demoulin, Pascal; Boakes, Peter; Devos, Andy; Kraaikamp, Emil; Mays, Mona L.; Vrsnak, Bojan

    2015-04-01

    We discuss multipoint imaging and in situ observations of the coronal mass ejection (CME) on January 7 2014 which resulted in a major false alarm. While the source region was almost at disk center facing Earth, the eruption was strongly deflected in the corona, and in conjunction with its particular orientation this CME missed Earth almost entirely, leading to no significant geomagnetic effects. We demonstrate this by a synthesis of data from 7 different heliospheric and planetary space missions (STEREO-A/B, SOHO, SDO, Wind, Mars Express, Mars Science Laboratory). The CMEs ecliptic part was deflected by 37 ± 10° in heliospheric longitude, a value larger than previously thought. Multipoint in situ observations at Earth and Mars confirm the deflection, and are consistent with an elliptical interplanetary shock shape of aspect ratio 1.4 ± 0.4. We also discuss our new method, the Ellipse Evolution (ElEvo) model, which allows us to optimize the global shape of the CME shock with multipoint in situ observations of the interplanetary CME arrival. ElEvo, which is an extension to the Drag-Based-Model by Vrsnak et al., may also be used for real time space weather forecasting. The presented results enhance our understanding of CME deflection and shape, which are fundamental ingredients for improving space weather forecasts.

  19. The Formation of Jupiter, the Jovian Early Bombardment and the Delivery of Water to the Asteroid Belt: The Case of (4) Vesta

    PubMed Central

    Turrini, Diego; Svetsov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The asteroid (4) Vesta, parent body of the Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite meteorites, is one of the first bodies that formed, mostly from volatile-depleted material, in the Solar System. The Dawn mission recently provided evidence that hydrated material was delivered to Vesta, possibly in a continuous way, over the last 4 Ga, while the study of the eucritic meteorites revealed a few samples that crystallized in presence of water and volatile elements. The formation of Jupiter and probably its migration occurred in the period when eucrites crystallized, and triggered a phase of bombardment that caused icy planetesimals to cross the asteroid belt. In this work, we study the flux of icy planetesimals on Vesta during the Jovian Early Bombardment and, using hydrodynamic simulations, the outcome of their collisions with the asteroid. We explore how the migration of the giant planet would affect the delivery of water and volatile materials to the asteroid and we discuss our results in the context of the geophysical and collisional evolution of Vesta. In particular, we argue that the observational data are best reproduced if the bulk of the impactors was represented by 1–2 km wide planetesimals and if Jupiter underwent a limited (a fraction of au) displacement. PMID:25370027

  20. Stereoscopic Analysis of STEREO/SECCHI Data for CME Trajectory Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liewer, P. C.; Hall, J. R.; Howard, R. A.; DeJong, E. M.; Thompson, W. T.; Thernisten, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) coronagraphs on the twin Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft provide simultaneous views of the corona and coronal mass ejections from two view points. Here, we analyze simultaneous image pairs using the technique of tie-pointing and triangulation (T&T) to determine the three-dimensional trajectory of seven coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The bright leading edge of a CME seen in coronagraph images results from line-of-sight integration through the CME front; the two STEREO coronagraphs see different apparent leading edges, leading to a systematic error in its three-dimensional reconstruction. We analyze this systematic error using a simple geometric model of a CME front. We validate the technique and analysis by comparing T&T trajectory determinations for seven CMEs with trajectories determined by Thernisien et al. (2009) using a forward modeling technique not susceptible to this systematic effect.

  1. Speed evolution of CME/shocks using white-light and type II radio bursts observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ontiveros, V.; Manuel-Hernandez, T.

    2013-05-01

    We present a study which focuses on the speed evolution of CME/shocks associated with type II radio burst observations. Interplanetary Type II radio burst radiation results from the excitation of plasma waves in the ambient medium by shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections. These radio emissions provide a means of remotely tracking CME/shocks. The aim of this work is to present an analysis of some events of Type II radio bursts observed by Wind/WAVES and STEREO/SWAVES radio instruments. Linking remote-sensing observations with in-situ measurements provides a useful tool to track CME/shocks that move outward from the Sun to 1 AU.

  2. MLSO Mark III K-Coronameter Observations of the CME Rate from 1989 - 1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Flint, Q. A.; Xie, H.; Webb, D. F.; Burkepile, J. T.; Lecinski, A. R.; Quirk, C.; Stanger, A. L.

    2015-10-01

    We report here an attempt to fill the 1990 - 1995 gap in the CME rate using the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory's Mark III (Mk3) K-coronameter. The Mk3 instrument observed routinely several hours most days beginning in 1980 until it was upgraded to Mk4 in 1999. We describe the statistical properties of the CMEs detected during 1989 - 1996, and we determine a CME rate for each of those years. Since spaceborne coronagraphs have more complete duty cycles than a ground-based instrument at a single location, we compare the Mk3-derived CME rate from 1989 with the rate from the SMM C/P coronagraph, and from 1996 with the rate from the SOHO LASCO coronagraphs.

  3. Relation of CME apparent parameters with solar source regions during the solar minimum 1997 - 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuming

    According to the LASCO CME catalog, all the CMEs observed during 1997 - 1998 are investigated. By visually examing the LASCO and EIT movies, the source regions of them are identified, in which near half of them are believed come from front-side of solar disk. Based on the identified CME source locations, the following issues are addressed, (1) the statistical bias of halo CMEs, (2) projection effects, (3) invisibility of disk CMEs, and (4) deflection of CMEs in latitude. Further, for those CMEs originating from active regions (ARs), a technique of regiongrowing with thresholds is applied to determine the parameters of active regions based on MDI synoptic charts. Then the properties of ARs with/without CMEs and the AR capability of producing CMEs in regard to the CME numbers and the fastest speed are analyzed.

  4. Seed Population in Large Solar Energetic Particle Events and the Twin-CME Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liu-Guan; Li, Gang; Le, Gui-Ming; Gu, Bin; Cao, Xin-Xin

    2015-10-01

    It has recently been suggested that large solar energetic particle (SEP) events are often caused by twin coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In the twin-CME scenario, the preceding CME provides both an enhanced turbulence level and enhanced seed population at the main CME-driven shock. In this work, we study the effect of the preceding CMEs on the seed population. We examine event-integrated abundance of iron to oxygen ratio (Fe/O) at energies above 25 MeV/nuc for large SEP events in solar cycle 23. We find that the Fe/O ratio (normalized to the reference coronal value of 0.134) ?2.0 for almost all single-CME events and these events tend to have smaller peak intensities. In comparison, the Fe/O ratio of twin-CME events scatters in a larger range, reaching as high as 8, suggesting the presence of flare material from perhaps preceding flares. For extremely large SEP events with peak intensities above 1000 pfu, the Fe/O ratios drop below 2, indicating that the seed particles are dominated by coronal material rather than flare material in these extreme events. The Fe/O ratios of ground level enhancement (GLE) events, which are all twin-CME events, scatter in a broad range. For a given Fe/O ratio, GLE events tend to have larger peak intensities than non-GLE events. Using velocity dispersion analysis, we find that GLE events have lower solar particle release heights than non-GLE events, agreeing with earlier results by Reames.

  5. Role of Ambient Solar Wind Conditions in CME evolution (P21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadav, R.; Jadeja, A. K.; Iyer, K. N.

    2006-11-01

    ipsraj@yahoo.com Solar events are mainly responsible for producing storms at the Earth. Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is a major cause for this. In this paper, Coronal Mass Ejections occurred during 1998-2004 are studied. Ambient solar wind does play some role in determining the effect of a CME. The effects produced at the Earth during the period 1999 2004 are considered and an attempt has been made to understand the role of ambient solar wind. This is to draw some conclusion about how some of the events become geo- effective.

  6. Enhancing Quality Improvements in Cancer Care Through CME Activities at a Nationally Recognized Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Marc; Morgan, Robert; Mendelsohn, Mary; Kagan, Jean; Saavedra, Crystal; Leong, Lucille

    2013-01-01

    Changing healthcare policy will undoubtedly affect the healthcare environment in which providers function. The current Fee for Service reimbursement model will be replaced by Value-Based Purchasing, where higher quality and more efficient care will be emphasized. Because of this, large healthcare organizations and individual providers must adapt to incorporate performance outcomes into patient care. Here, we present a Continuing Medical Education (CME)-based initiative at the City of Hope National Cancer Center that we believe can serve as a model for using CME as a value added component to achieving such a goal. PMID:23608956

  7. LETTER OF AGREEMENT FOR COMMERCIAL SUPPORT OF CME LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, OFFICE OF MEDICAL EDUCATION (OME)

    E-print Network

    , OFFICE OF MEDICAL EDUCATION (OME) This document is a letter of agreement for LSU School of Medicine CME-1453 http://www.medschool.lsuhsc.edu/medical_education/cme/ #12;LETTER OF AGREEMENT FOR COMMERCIAL SUPPORT-kind), to the educational activity identified below, plus any educational partners involved in the planning

  8. Effects of efflux-pump inducers and genetic variation of the multidrug transporter cmeB in biocide resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    PubMed

    Mavri, Ana; Smole Možina, Sonja

    2013-03-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps, such as CmeABC and CmeDEF, are involved in the resistance of Campylobacter to a broad spectrum of antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of two putative efflux-pump inducers, bile salts and sodium deoxycholate, on the resistance of Campylobacter to biocides (triclosan, benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine diacetate, cetylpyridinium chloride and trisodium phosphate), SDS and erythromycin. The involvement of the CmeABC and CmeDEF efflux pumps in this resistance was studied on the basis of the effects of bile salts and sodium deoxycholate in Campylobacter cmeB, cmeF and cmeR mutants. The genetic variation in the cmeB gene was also examined, to see whether this polymorphism is related to the function of the efflux pump. In 15 Campylobacter jejuni and 23 Campylobacter coli strains, bile salts and sodium deoxycholate increased the MICs of benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine diacetate, cetylpyridinium chloride and SDS, and decreased the MICs of triclosan, trisodium phosphate and erythromycin. Bile salts and sodium deoxycholate further decreased or increased the MICs of biocides and erythromycin in the cmeF and cmeR mutants. For cmeB polymorphisms, 17 different cmeB-specific PCR-RFLP patterns were identified: six within C. jejuni only, nine within C. coli only and two in both species. In conclusion, bile salts and sodium deoxycholate can increase or decrease bacterial resistance to structurally unrelated antimicrobials. The MIC increases in the cmeF and cmeR mutants indicated that at least one non-CmeABC efflux system is involved in resistance to biocides. These results indicate that the cmeB gene polymorphism identified is not associated with biocide and erythromycin resistance in Campylobacter. PMID:23161768

  9. The Great "Non-Event" of 7 January 2014: Challenges in CME Arrival Time and Geomagnetic Storm Strength Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. L.; Thompson, B. J.; Jian, L.; Evans, R. M.; Savani, N.; Odstrcil, D.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Richardson, I. G.

    2014-12-01

    We present a case study of the 7 January 2014 event in order to highlight current challenges in space weather forecasting of CME arrival time and geomagnetic storm strength. On 7 January 2014 an X1.2 flare and CME with a radial speed ~2400 km/s was observed from active region 11943. The flaring region was only ten degrees southwest of disk center with extensive dimming south of the active region and preliminary analysis indicated a fairly rapid arrival at Earth (~36 hours). Of the eleven forecasting groups world-wide who participated in CCMC's Space Weather Scoreboard (http://kauai.ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov/SWScoreBoard), nine predicted early arrivals and six predicted dramatic geomagnetic storm impacts (Kp predictions ranged from 6 to 9). However, the CME only had a glancing blow arrival at Earth - Kp did not rise above 3 and there was no geomagnetic storm. What happened? One idea is that the large coronal hole to the northeast of the active region could have deflected the CME. This coronal hole produced a high speed stream near Earth reaching an uncommon speed of 900 km/s four days after the observed CME arrival. However, no clear CME deflection was observed in the outer coronagraph fields of view (~5-20Rs) where CME measurements are derived to initiate models, therefore deflection seems unlikely. Another idea is the effect of the CME flux rope orientation with respect to Earth orbit. We show that using elliptical major and minor axis widths obtained by GCS fitting for the initial CME parameters in ENLIL would have improved the forecast to better reflect the observed glancing blow in-situ signature. We also explore the WSA-ENLIL+Cone simulations, the background solar wind solution, and compare with the observed CME arrival at Venus (from Venus Express) and Earth.

  10. On GLE71 Concurrent CME-driven Shock Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abul Firoz, Kazi; Gan, Weiqun; Li, Youping; Rodríguez-Pacheco, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies, which were carried out based on both temporal and spatial evolutions, on the first GLE event of the solar cycle 24 (GLE71 17 May 2012) suggested that the CME-driven shock played the principal role to cause the event. To verify the claim, it is essential to illustrate the shock wave. For this purpose, we have carried out an investigation by using the spectral data of Wind-WAVES (NASA) for solar radio bursts while temporal data of cosmic ray intensity from SOPO and SOPB Neutron Monitors for GLE. To comprehend the particle acceleration in shock wave, we have exploited the concurrent electron fluxes from Wind spacecraft (NASA) and solar radio fluxes from NoRH (JAXA). When the temporal profiles are shifted necessarily at ~ 1 AU, the onset of the type II burst is observed nearly simultaneous with the onsets of the impulsive phases of the particle intensity, and the frequency drift follows the trends of decreasing electron density whereas the frequency drift rate follows the trends of increasing electron density. This extends the idea to study the polynomial correlations. It is found that there are strong correlations between frequency drift rate of type II burst and concurrent electron fluxes. The intensive particle accelerations occurred in between ~ 0.80 Rs and ~ 1.10 Rs altitude of the solar corona. Key results of the study are noted as follows. 1. Extreme emission phase of high frequency solar flux component is earlier than that of the low frequency solar flux while the flash phase of high energy flare component is earlier than that of low energy flare component. 2. Some of the high-energy flare components maintained very good correlations with fundamental phase of the type II burst, indicating that the flare flash phase was associated with the onset of the shock. This was further corroborated by the evidence that the principal drifting bands of the type II burst appeared as a continuous succession of type III burst, and some of the peaks of SFU components are coincidence with the onset of type II burst. This makes sense that the preceding flare might have scope to contribute any fractional amount of energy to the shock wave. 3. Although blast wave might be capable to produce GLE (presumably prompt event), the energy contribution of the preceding flare components to the shock wave did not expose any evidence to believe that the shock wave was turned into a blast wave. This was further realized by the fact that the low frequency spectral evolution in type II bursts has strong correlations with the concurrent particle fluxes, inferring that the strongest particle acceleration might have taken place at any higher altitude of the corona.

  11. Interrater Reliability to Assure Valid Content in Peer Review of CME-Accredited Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Mark; Lado, Fred A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) provides guidelines for continuing medical education (CME) materials to mitigate problems in the independence or validity of content in certified activities; however, the process of peer review of materials appears largely unstudied and the reproducibility of…

  12. Modeling Extreme Space Weather Scenarios: July 23, 2012 Rare-Type CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwira, C. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather is a major concern for modern day society because of its adverse impacts on technological infrastructure such as power grids, oil pipelines, and global navigation systems. Particularly, earth directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main drivers of the most extreme geomagnetic storms in the near-Earth space environment. On 23 July 2012, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft observed in situ an extremely fast CME that traveled 0.96 astronomical units (~1 AU) in about 19 h. In our study, we use the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), a 3-D MHD based code, to perform simulations of this rare CME by considering STEREO-A in situ observations to represent the upstream L1 solar wind boundary conditions. The goal of the study is to investigate what would have happened if this Rare-type CME was Earth-bound. Global SWMF-generated ground geomagnetic field perturbations are used to compute the simulated induced geoelectric field at specific ground-based active magnetometer sites. Simulation results show that the July 23 CME would have produced ground effects comparable to previously observed extreme geomagnetic storms such as the Halloween 2003 storm. In addition, we discuss how this study compares to other independent studies on this same event.

  13. The Integrated Joslin Performance Improvement/CME Program: A New Paradigm for Better Diabetes Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Julie A.; Beaser, Richard S.; Neighbours, James; Shuman, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing continuing medical education is an essential component of life-long learning and can have a positive influence on patient outcomes. However, some evidence suggests that continuing medical education has not fulfilled its potential as a performance improvement (PI) tool, in part due to a paradigm of CME that has focused on the quantity of…

  14. Solar Wind Electron Strahls Associated with a High-Latitude CME: Ulysses Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, M.; Pomoell, J.; Poedts, S.; Dumitrache, C.; Popescu, N. A.

    2014-11-01

    Counterstreaming beams of electrons are ubiquitous in coronal mass ejections (CMEs) - although their existence is not unanimously accepted as a necessary and/or sufficient signature of these events. We continue the investigation of a high-latitude CME registered by the Ulysses spacecraft on 18 - 19 January 2002 (Dumitrache, Popescu, and Oncica, Solar Phys. 272, 137, 2011), by surveying the solar-wind electron distributions associated with this event. The temporal evolution of the pitch-angle distributions reveals populations of electrons that are distinguishable through their anisotropy, with clear signatures of i) electron strahls, ii) counter-streaming in the magnetic clouds and their precursors, and iii) unidirectionality in the fast wind preceding the CME. The analysis of the counter-streams inside the CME allows us to elucidate the complexity of the magnetic-cloud structures embedded in the CME and to refine the borders of the event. Identifying such strahls in CMEs, which preserve properties of the low ? [<1] coronal plasma, gives more support to the hypothesis that these populations are remnants of the hot coronal electrons that escape from the electrostatic potential of the Sun into the heliosphere.

  15. A CME-driven solar wind distrubance observed at both low and high heliographic latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Phillips, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    A solar wind disturbance produced by a fast coronal mass ejection, CME, that departed from the Sun on Feburary 20, 1994 was observed in the ecliptic plane at 1 AU by IMP 8 and at high heliographic latitudes at 3.53 AU by Ulysses. In the ecliptic the disturbance included a strong forward shock but no reverse shock, while at high latitudes the disturbance was bounded by a relatively weak forward-reverse shock pair. It is clear that the disturbance in the ecliptic plane was driven primarily by the relative speed between the CME and a slower ambient solar wind ahead, whereas at higher latitudes the disturbance was driven by expansion of the CME. The combined IMP 8 and Ulysses observations thus provide a graphic illustration of how a single fast CME can produce very different types of solar wind disturbances at low and high heliographic latitudes. Simple numerical simulations help explain observed differences at the two spacecraft. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Observations and Magnetic Field Modeling of the Solar Flare/CME Event on 2010 April 8

    E-print Network

    Su, Yingna

    solar eclipse. The outermost region of the sun, the corona, extends from about 20,000 km above the sun a total solar eclipse or with special instruments. 1.1. Solar Eruptions We refer to three different typesObservations and Magnetic Field Modeling of the Solar Flare/CME Event on 2010 April 8 Vincent

  17. To What Extent Does Continuing Professional Education (CPE) and Continuing Medical Education (CME) Affect Physicians Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kathleen A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore to what extent is there an understanding among physicians as to how continuing professional education (CPE) and Continuing Medical Education (CME) affect physicians practice? To address the question, focus groups were used to begin a process of identifying the components within each type of education so that…

  18. CME 342.3 (3L-1.5P) VLSI Circuit Design

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    CME 342.3 (3L-1.5P) VLSI Circuit Design Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Fall 2013 Description: This is an introductory course in VLSI Systems and Design. CMOS logic circuits and fabrication digital circuits. They should be able to design for low power and speed, and testability. Prerequisites

  19. Diagnostic Role of PET in Dementia CME Author: Hossein Jadvar, MD, PhD, MPH

    E-print Network

    Jadvar, Hossein

    Diagnostic Role of PET in Dementia CME Author: Hossein Jadvar, MD, PhD, MPH Complete author of dementias such as Alzheimer's disease. Goal The objective of this activity is to spotlight the clinical of dementias such as Alzheimer's disease; to define appropriate settings for the use of this technology

  20. CME 332.3 (3L-1.5P) Real Time Computing

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    CME 332.3 (3L-1.5P) Real Time Computing Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Winter 2015 Description: Provides the foundations for the multi-disciplinary field of real-time systems. In addition to basic time-constrained design and analysis techniques, the course addresses the issues

  1. Reconciling CME Kinematics using Radio and White-light Observations from STEREO and SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Xie, Hong; Makela, Pertti; Akiyama, Sachiko; Reiner, Michael; MacDowall, Robert

    2014-05-01

    We study the characteristics of nonthermal radio emission associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by STEREO, SOHO, and Wind spacecraft. In particular, we examine three backside CMEs associated with type II radio bursts at frequencies below 16 MHz. These bursts are known to be excellent indicators of solar energetic particle events. We use the universal drift rate spectrum of type II radio bursts and the inferred density scale heights in the corona and interplanetary medium o estimate the speed of the shock waves that produce the type II radio bursts. We find that the radio bursts can provide an accurate estimate of the CME speeds. We consider three backside events and a cannibalism event to show the usefulness of radio dynamic spectrum in inferring CME kinematics. We use radio direction finding technique to show that CME-CME interaction results in enhanced nonthermal radio emission. The radio data also provide constraints on the particle acceleration mechanisms and the reason for the energetic particles observed at wide-ranging longitudes. Finally we infer the shape and extent of the shock associated with one of the biggest solar energetic particle events in the space era.

  2. Constraints on CME Evolution from in situ Observations of Ionic Charge States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruesbeck, Jacob R.; Lepri, Susan T.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel procedure for deriving the physical properties of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMES) in the corona. Our methodology uses in-situ measurements of ionic charge states of C, O, Si and Fe in the heliosphere and interprets them in the context of a model for the early evolution of ICME plasma, between 2 - 5 R-solar. We find that the data can be fit only by an evolution that consists of an initial heating of the plasma, followed by an expansion that ultimately results in cooling. The heating profile is consistent with a compression of coronal plasma due to flare reconnect ion jets and an expansion cooling due to the ejection, as expected from the standard CME/flare model. The observed frozen-in ionic charge states reflect this time-history and, therefore, provide important constraints for the heating and expansion time-scales, as well as the maximum temperature the CME plasma is heated to during its eruption. Furthermore, our analysis places severe limits on the possible density of CME plasma in the corona. We discuss the implications of our results for CME models and for future analysis of ICME plasma composition.

  3. Tracking of Interplanetary CME/Shocks evolution using Type II radio burst observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Gonzalez-Esparza, A.; Ontiveros, V.

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this work is to apply a new analysis technique, using Type II radio observations in the kilometric (km) domain obtained by the Thermal Noise Receiver (TNR) of the WIND/WAVES experiment, to infer the speed evolution of interplanetary (IP) CME/shocks. These CME/Shocks propagating in the IP medium can generate km Type II radio emissions that occur at the fundamental and/or harmonic of the plasma frequency, so these radio emissions provide a means of remotely tracking CME/shocks. We combine our results with previously reported speeds from coronagraph white light and interplanetary scintillation observations, and in-situ measurements, to study the temporal speed evolution of these events. The shock speed values obtained by our analysis technique are in a reasonable agreement with the speed measurements inferred by other techniques at different heliocentric distance ranges. The combination of all the speed measurements show a gradual deceleration of the CME/shocks as they propagate to 1 AU.

  4. Organizational Change in Management of Hepatitis C: Evaluation of a CME Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrard, Judith; Choudary, Veena; Groom, Holly; Dieperink, Eric; Willenbring, Mark L.; Durfee, Janet M.; Ho, Samuel B.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Effective treatment regimens exist for the hepatitis C virus (HCV); however, clinicians are often resistant to evaluation or treatment of patients with alcohol or substance abuse problems. We describe a continuing medical education (CME) program for clinicians in a nationwide health care system, with emphasis on current treatment…

  5. Homologous Flare-CME Events and Their Metric Type II Radio Burst Association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yashiro, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Uddin, W.; Srivastava, A. K.; Joshi, N. C.; Chandra, R.; Manoharan, P. K.; Mahalakshmi, K.; Dwivedi, V. C.; Jain, R.; Awasthi, A. K.; Nitta, N. V.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Choudhary, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    Active region NOAA 11158 produced many flares during its disk passage. At least two of these flares can be considered as homologous: the C6.6 flare at 06:51 UT and C9.4 flare at 12:41 UT on February 14, 2011. Both flares occurred at the same location (eastern edge of the active region) and have a similar decay of the GOES soft X-ray light curve. The associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were slow (334 and 337 km/s) and of similar apparent widths (43deg and 44deg), but they had different radio signatures. The second event was associated with a metric type II burst while the first one was not. The COR1 coronagraphs on board the STEREO spacecraft clearly show that the second CME propagated into the preceding CME that occurred 50 min before. These observations suggest that CME-CME interaction might be a key process in exciting the type II radio emission by slow CMEs.

  6. CME 433.3 (3L-3P alt. weeks) Digital Systems Architecture

    E-print Network

    Saskatchewan, University of

    CME 433.3 (3L-3P alt. weeks) Digital Systems Architecture Department of Electrical and Computer Architecture, 5th Ed.: A Quantitative Approach Behrooz Parhami, Computer Architecture: From Microprocessors Engineering Fall 2014-15 Description: Components and architecture complement each other in the design

  7. SYNTHESIS OF CME-ASSOCIATED MORETON AND EIT WAVE FEATURES FROM MHD SIMULATIONS

    E-print Network

    Chen, P. F.

    -mode shock wave that could emit type II radio bursts Space Science Reviews (2005) 121: 201­211 DOI: 10.1007/s, the shock was considered to be the flare-initiated blast wave (see Gopalswamy et al., 1998), while Cliver etSYNTHESIS OF CME-ASSOCIATED MORETON AND EIT WAVE FEATURES FROM MHD SIMULATIONS P. F. CHEN , M. D

  8. Delivery methods for LVSD systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasner, James H.; Brower, Bernard V.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present formats and delivery methods of Large Volume Streaming Data (LVSD) systems. LVSD systems collect TBs of data per mission with aggregate camera sizes in the 100 Mpixel to several Gpixel range at temporal rates of 2 - 60 Hz. We present options and recommendations for the different stages of LVSD data collection and delivery, to include the raw (multi-camera) data, delivery of processed (stabilized mosaic) data, and delivery of user-defined region of interest windows. Many LVSD systems use JPEG 2000 for the compression of raw and processed data. We explore the use of the JPEG 2000 Interactive Protocol (JPIP) for interactive client/server delivery to thick-clients (desktops and laptops) and MPEG-2 and H.264 to handheld thin-clients (tablets, cell phones). We also explore the use of 3D JPEG 2000 compression, defined in ISO 15444-2, for storage and delivery as well. The delivery of raw, processed, and region of interest data requires different metadata delivery techniques and metadata content. Beyond the format and delivery of data and metadata we discuss the requirements for a client/server protocol that provides data discovery and retrieval. Finally, we look into the future as LVSD systems perform automated processing to produce "information" from the original data. This information may include tracks of moving targets, changes of the background, snap shots of targets, fusion of multiple sensors, and information about "events" that have happened.

  9. The Properties of Solar Energetic Particle Event-Associated Coronal Mass Ejections Reported in Different CME Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cane, H. V.

    2015-06-01

    We compare estimates of the speed and width of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in several catalogs for the CMEs associated with ˜ 200 solar energetic particle (SEP) events in 2006 - 2013 that included 25 MeV protons. The catalogs used are: CDAW, CACTUS, SEEDS, and CORIMP, all derived from observations by the LASCO coronagraphs on the SOHO spacecraft, the CACTUS catalog derived from the COR2 coronagraphs on the STEREO-A and -B spacecraft, and the DONKI catalog, which uses observations from SOHO and the STEREO spacecraft. We illustrate how, for this set of events, CME parameters can differ considerably in each catalog. The well-known correlation between CME speed and proton event intensity is shown to be similar for most catalogs, but this is largely because it is determined by a few large particle events associated with fast CMEs, and small events associated with slow CMEs. Intermediate particle events "shuffle" in position when speeds from different catalogs are used. Quadrature spacecraft CME speeds do not improve the correlation. CME widths also vary widely between catalogs, and they are influenced by plane-of-the-sky projection and how the width is inferred from the coronagraph images. The high degree of association (˜ 50 %) between the 25 MeV proton events and "full halo" (360?-width) CMEs as defined in the CDAW catalog is removed when other catalogs are considered. Using CME parameters from the quadrature spacecraft, the SEP intensity is correlated with CME width, which is also correlated with CME speed.

  10. Innovative collagen nano-hydroxyapatite scaffolds offer a highly efficient non-viral gene delivery platform for stem cell-mediated bone formation.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Caroline M; Cunniffe, Gráinne M; Lyons, Frank G; Bessho, Kazuhisa; Dickson, Glenn R; Duffy, Garry P; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2012-02-01

    The ability of nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) particles developed in-house to act as non-viral delivery vectors is assessed. These nHA particles are combined with collagen to yield bioactive, biodegradable collagen nano-hydroxyapatite (coll-nHA) scaffolds. Their ability to act as gene-activated matrices for BMP2 delivery is demonstrated with successful transfection of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) resulting in high calcium production. PMID:22213347

  11. Analysis of the 3D Structure and Velocity of a CME on 2 January 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, F. M.; Cremades, H.

    We perform an analysis of the 3D structure and velocity of a CME (coronal mass ejection) ejected on 2 January 2008. The event was imaged by both STEREO A and B spacecraft (mutual separation of ˜44°), providing polarized images of the event from two different points of view. To obtain information on the 3D structure of the CME from polarized images, a polarization technique (Moran & Davila, Science 305, 66, 2003) is applied. Aided by this method, we have constructed topographical maps which show the height of the various event features from the plane of the sky (i.e. toward or away from the observer) and have dinamically analyzed and compared the real and projected on the plane of the sky velocities.

  12. Modeling CME-shock-driven storms in 2012-2013: MHD test particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Paral, J.; Kress, B. T.; Wiltberger, M.; Baker, D. N.; Foster, J. C.; Turner, D. L.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    The Van Allen Probes spacecraft have provided detailed observations of the energetic particles and fields environment for coronal mass ejection (CME)-shock-driven storms in 2012 to 2013 which have now been modeled with MHD test particle simulations. The Van Allen Probes orbital plane longitude moved from the dawn sector in 2012 to near midnight and prenoon for equinoctial storms of 2013, providing particularly good measurements of the inductive electric field response to magnetopause compression for the 8 October 2013 CME-shock-driven storm. An abrupt decrease in the outer boundary of outer zone electrons coincided with inward motion of the magnetopause for both 17 March and 8 October 2013 storms, as was the case for storms shortly after launch. Modeling magnetopause dropout events in 2013 with electric field diagnostics that were not available for storms immediately following launch have improved our understanding of the complex role that ULF waves play in radial transport during such events.

  13. Charge state composition in coronal hole and CME related solar wind: Latitudinal variations observed by Ulysses and WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvin, A. B.; Gloeckler, G.

    1997-01-01

    Iron charge states in recurrent coronal hole-associated solar wind flows are obtained in the ecliptic by WIND/SMS, while measurements of iron and silicon from the polar coronal holes are available from Ulysses/SWICS. Ulysses/SWICS also provides ion composition of coronal mass ejection (CME)-related solar wind. Both coronal hole-associated and CME-related solar wind charge charges show heliographic latitudinal variations.

  14. The ModelAssembler Community Modeling Environment (MA-CME): Expanded Access to Advanced Seismic Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Larsen, S.

    2006-12-01

    We introduce MA-CME, an open-source environment for all PCs, Macs, and workstations that configures advanced seismic modeling runs. It is intended for use by seismologists, engineers, and students. The environment combines geologic and geotechnical data sets with gridding, modeling, and output specifications into portal packs for execution on standalone workstations, clusters, and mega-facilities such as Sun Grid. A tutorial interface helps the user scale the grid to the facilities available, from small test runs to efforts requiring major resources. The input geologic data are kept in open, editable forms to promote the creation of models for new areas, the regional extension of existing grids, and the detailing of critical features within current models. MA-CME currently drives computations with the E3D and the open-source E3D/CODE3 advanced simulation platforms; additional platforms will be added. The ability of MA-CME to configure computations at a range of scales and model complexity is intended to promote wide use of advanced seismic modeling. Wide community use may lead to breakthrough insights into how geology controls earthquake ground motion. Advanced seismic modeling platforms, coupled with increasing availability of faster clusters, have rapidly improved the realism of such deterministic simulations. Yet the number of people able to configure and successfully run simulations through complex geology has not grown. Ground-motion simulations have been published only for a few scenarios in a limited number of urban areas. MA-CME has been used to configure simulations to 2-Hz frequency for the Reno and Las Vegas, Nevada; Grenoble, France; and Wellington, New Zealand regions including multiple basins, detailed geotechnical maps, and attenuation. The package is freely available on the web. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  15. A Comprehensive View of the 2006 December 13 CME: From the Sun to Interplanetary Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Schroeder, P. C.; Wang, L.; Lin, R. P.; Bale, S. D.; Li, Y.; Acuña, M. H.; Sauvaud, J.-A.

    2008-12-01

    The biggest halo coronal mass ejection (CME) since the Halloween storm in 2003, which occurred on 2006 December 13, is studied in terms of its solar source and heliospheric consequences. The CME was accompanied by an X3.4 flare, EUV dimmings, and coronal waves. It generated significant space weather effects such as an interplanetary shock, radio bursts, major solar energetic particle (SEP) events, and a magnetic cloud (MC) that were detected by a fleet of spacecraft including STEREO, ACE, WIND, and Ulysses. Reconstruction of the MC with the Grad-Shafranov (GS) method yields an axis orientation oblique to the flare ribbons. Observations of the SEP intensities and anisotropies show that the particles can be trapped, deflected, and reaccelerated by the large-scale transient structures. The CME-driven shock was observed at both the Earth and Ulysses when they were separated by 74° in latitude and 117° in longitude, which is the largest shock extent ever detected. The ejecta seem to have been missed at Ulysses. The shock arrival time at Ulysses is well predicted by an MHD model that can propagate the 1 AU data outward. The CME/shock is tracked remarkably well from the Sun all the way to Ulysses by coronagraph images, type II frequency drift, in situ measurements, and the MHD model. These results reveal a technique that combines MHD propagation of the solar wind and type II emissions to predict the shock arrival time at the Earth, which is a significant advance for space weather forecasting, especially when in situ data become available from the Solar Orbiter and Solar Sentinels.

  16. The Dependence of Characteristic Times of Gradual SEP Events on Their Associated CME Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z. H.; Wang, C. B.; Xue, X. H.; Wang, Y. M.

    It is generally believed that coronal mass ejections CMEs are the drivers of shocks that accelerate gradual solar energetic particles SEPs One might expect that the characteristics of the SEP intensity time profiles observed at 1 AU are determined by properties of the associated CMEs such as the radial speed and the angular width Recently Kahler statistically investigated the characteristic times of gradual SEP events observed from 1998-2002 and their associated coronal mass ejection properties Astrophys J 628 1014--1022 2005 Three characteristic times of gradual SEP events are determined as functions of solar source longitude 1 T 0 the time from associated CME launch to SEP onset at 1 AU 2 T R the rise time from SEP onset to the time when the SEP intensity is a factor of 2 below peak intensity and 3 T D the duration over which the SEP intensity is within a factor of 2 of the peak intensity However in his study the CME speeds and angular widths are directly taken from the LASCO CME catalog In this study we analyze the radial speeds and the angular widths of CMEs by an ice-cream cone model and re-investigate their correlationships with the characteristic times of the corresponding SEP events We find T R and T D are significantly correlated with radial speed for SEP events in the best-connected longitude range and there is no correlation between T 0 and CME radial speed and angular width which is consistent with Kahler s results On the other hand it s found that T R and T D are also have

  17. Delivery presentations

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your baby is positioned during delivery. The best position for the baby to be in to pass ... the body facing towards the mother's back. This position is called occiput anterior (OA). In breech position, ...

  18. Tracking the CME-driven Shock Wave on 2012 March 5 and Radio Triangulation of Associated Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdaleni?, J.; Marqué, C.; Krupar, V.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Maksimovi?, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.

  19. Tracking the CME-driven shock wave on 2012 March 5 and radio triangulation of associated radio emission

    SciTech Connect

    Magdaleni?, J.; Marqué, C.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Krupar, V.; Maksimovi?, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Multiple-CME Events in 2011-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrcil, Dusan; Jian, Lan; Luhmann, Janet; Mays, Leila; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Xie, Hong

    2014-05-01

    The ENLIL-based heliospheric modeling system enables faster-than-real time simulations of corotating and transient disturbances. This hybrid system does not simulate origin of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but uses appearance in coronagraphs, its geometric and kinematic parameters, and launches a CME-like structure into the solar wind computed using the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) coronal model. Propagation and interaction in the heliosphere is solved by a 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. In this presentation, we introduce the recent improvements that support modeling of the evolving background solar wind and modeling of multiple-CME events. These enhancements are needed especially for simulations of complex scenarios of multiple-transients interacting with each other and with corotating solar wind stream structures. We simulated over 700 CMEs in 2011-2013 to validate and calibrate new modeling system, and we will show examples of multi-CME events during August 2010. March 2012, and July 2012 periods of enhanced solar activity. We will present results of numerical simulations and compare them with remote white-light observations, with in-situ measurements of plasma parameters, and with detection of solar energetic particles (SEPs) at various spacecraft.

  1. Can We Predict CME Deflections Based on Solar Magnetic Field Configuration Alone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, C.; Opher, M.; Evans, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate space weather forecasting requires knowledge of the trajectory of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), including predicting CME deflections close to the Sun and through interplanetary space. Deflections of CMEs occur due to variations in the background magnetic field or solar wind speed, magnetic reconnection, and interactions with other CMEs. Using our newly developed model of CME deflections due to gradients in the background solar magnetic field, ForeCAT (Kay et al. 2013), we explore the questions: (a) do all simulated CMEs ultimately deflect to the minimum in the background solar magnetic field? (b) does the majority of the deflection occur in the lower corona below 4 Rs? ForeCAT does not include temporal variations in the magnetic field of active regions (ARs), spatial variations in the background solar wind speed, magnetic reconnection, or interactions with other CMEs. Therefore we focus on the effects of the steady state solar magnetic field. We explore two different Carrington Rotations (CRs): CR 2029 (April-May 2005) and CR 2077 (November-December 2008). Little is known about how the density and magnetic field fall with distance in the lower corona. We consider four density models derived from observations (Chen 1996, Mann et al. 2003, Guhathakurta et al. 2006, Leblanc et al. 1996) and two magnetic field models (PFSS and a scaled model). ForeCAT includes drag resulting from both CME propagation and deflection through the background solar wind. We vary the drag coefficient to explore the effect of drag on the deflection at 1 AU.

  2. Reconnectionless CME eruption: putting the Aly-Sturrock conjecture to rest

    E-print Network

    L. A. Rachmeler; C. E. DeForest; C. C. Kankelborg

    2008-12-17

    We demonstrate that magnetic reconnection is not necessary to initiate fast CMEs. The Aly-Sturrock conjecture states that the magnetic energy of a given force free boundary field is maximized when the field is open. This is problematic for CME initiation because it leaves little or no magnetic energy to drive the eruption, unless reconnection is present to allow some of the field to escape without opening. Thus, it has been thought that reconnection must be present to initiate CMEs. This theory has not been subject to rigorous numerical testing because conventional MHD numerical models contain numerical diffusion, which introduces uncontrolled numerical reconnection. We use a quasi-Lagrangian simulation technique to run the first controlled experiments of CME initiation in the complete lack of reconnection. We find that a flux rope confined by an arcade, when twisted beyond a critical amount, can escape to an open state, allowing some of the surrounding arcade to shrink and releasing magnetic energy from the global field. This mechanism includes a true ideal MHD instability. We conclude that reconnection is not a necessary trigger for fast CME eruptions.

  3. Topological Evolution of a Fast Magnetic Breakout CME in 3-Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, B. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Luhmann, J. G.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    W present the extension of the magnetic breakout model for CME initiation to a fully 3-dimensional, spherical geometry. Given the increased complexity of the dynamic magnetic field interactions in 3-dimensions, we first present a summary of the well known axisymmetric breakout scenario in terms of the topological evolution associated with the various phases of the eruptive process. In this context, we discuss the completely analogous topological evolution during the magnetic breakout CME initiation process in the simplest 3-dimensional multipolar system. We show that an extended bipolar active region embedded in an oppositely directed background dipole field has all the necessary topological features required for magnetic breakout, i.e. a fan separatrix surface between the two distinct flux systems, a pair of spine fieldlines, and a true 3-dimensional coronal null point at their intersection. We then present the results of a numerical MHD simulation of this 3-dimensional system where boundary shearing flows introduce free magnetic energy, eventually leading to a fast magnetic breakout CME. The eruptive flare reconnection facilitates the rapid conversion of this stored free magnetic energy into kinetic energy and the associated acceleration causes the erupting field and plasma structure to reach an asymptotic eruption velocity of greater than or approx. equal to 1100 km/s over an approx.15 minute time period. The simulation results are discussed using the topological insight developed to interpret the various phases of the eruption and the complex, dynamic, and interacting magnetic field structures.

  4. Forecasting the magnetic vectors within a CME at L1 by using solar observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, N.; Vourlidas, A.; Szabo, A.; Mays, M. L.; Evans, R. M.; Thompson, B. J.; Richardson, I. G.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.

    2014-12-01

    The direction of magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections has important consequences to forecasting terrestrial behaviour, however forecasting these vectors remains predominately elusive. Here, we report that a simplified system is capable of replicating the broad field rotations seen within flux rope CMEs at L1 monitors. The predictions are performed under three main themes: 1) The majority of the field rotations can be simplified to the constant-alpha force-free (CAFF) flux model first implemented circa 1990. 2) The helicity will follow the Bothmer & Schwenn system that relies on a reliable helicity prediction of active regions during solar cycle. Which has been recently confirmed by Wang [2013 ApJ]. 3) The majority of the distortions, deflections and rotations will have already occurred within coronagraphic field of view, thereby allowing the creation of a projected "volume-of-influence" on the Sun, from which Earth's position relative to the CME can be estimated. This presentation will compare predicted results to the observations from 7 CME events and then estimate the sources of uncertainty. As an example, the difference in robust statistics from 2 solar cycles of CAFF model fittings for the field magnitude will be compared to estimates generated from simulated CME-sheaths within forecasting Enlil runs. The figure displays an example field vector forecast from the techniques employed above.

  5. A Multi-vantage Point Study of the 15 February 2011 Interplanetary CME Event Using Models and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. O.; Arge, C. N.; Odstrcil, D.; Millward, G. H.; Pizzo, V. J.; Quinn, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    As we progress toward the next solar maximum, we have a unique opportunity to use multi-perspective spacecraft observations together with numerical models to better understand the evolution and propagation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Of interest to both the scientific and forecasting communities are the Earth-directed "halo" CMEs, since they typically produce the most geoeffective events. To accurately model a CME, its initial speed, size, and propagation orientation are measured from white light coronagraph observations obtained at L1 along the Sun-Earth line. However, it is well known that determining the actual initial geometries of halo CMEs is a challenge due to the plane-of-sky projection effects. We select for our study the recent 15 February 2011 halo CME event. During this time the STEREO-A and -B spacecraft were fortuitously located ~90 degrees away from the Sun-Earth line such that the CME was viewed as solar limb events from these two spacecraft, thereby providing a more reliable constraint on the initial CME geometry. Together with these multi-perspective observations, we use a simple geometrical description that assumes a cone shape for a CME to calculate its angular width and central position. We then simulate the event using the coupled Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)/Enlil 3D numerical solar corona-solar wind model. To drive the background solar wind we use daily updated global photospheric magnetic field maps (magnetograms) from the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG). A more global perspective of the propagation and evolution of the CME is obtained from the simulation results than that provided by only using spacecraft observations located at fixed vantage points. To improve our modeling techniques, we assess the sensitivity of the modeled CME arrival times to the initial input CME geometry by creating an ensemble of numerical simulations based on multiple sets of cone parameters for this event. We find that the accuracy of the modeled arrival times not only depends on the initial input CME geometry, but also on the accuracy of the modeled solar wind background, which is driven by the input magnetograms. Thus to improve our modeling of the background solar wind, we use the recently developed data-assimilated magnetograms produced by the Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport (ADAPT) model, which provide a more instantaneous snapshot of the global photospheric field distribution than that provided by traditional daily updated magnetograms. We present our modeling results in conjunction with observations of the CME and discuss the performance of the cone+WSA/Enlil model in reproducing the global properties of the event.

  6. Expanding Alternative Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltzer, Jan A.

    Alternative educational delivery systems that might be useful to community colleges are considered. The following categories of delivery systems are covered: broadcast delivery systems; copy delivery systems, print delivery systems, computer delivery systems, telephone delivery systems, and satellites. Among the applications for broadcast…

  7. Review on Current Sheets in CME Development: Theories and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jun; Murphy, Nicholas A.; Shen, Chengcai; Raymond, John C.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Zhong, Jiayong; Wu, Ning; Li, Yan

    2015-10-01

    We introduce how the catastrophe model for solar eruptions predicted the formation and development of the long current sheet (CS) and how the observations were used to recognize the CS at the place where the CS is presumably located. Then, we discuss the direct measurement of the CS region thickness by studying the brightness distribution of the CS region at different wavelengths. The thickness ranges from 104 km to about 105 km at heights between 0.27 and 1.16 R_{?} from the solar surface. But the traditional theory indicates that the CS is as thin as the proton Larmor radius, which is of order tens of meters in the corona. We look into the huge difference in the thickness between observations and theoretical expectations. The possible impacts that affect measurements and results are studied, and physical causes leading to a thick CS region in which reconnection can still occur at a reasonably fast rate are analyzed. Studies in both theories and observations suggest that the difference between the true value and the apparent value of the CS thickness is not significant as long as the CS could be recognised in observations. We review observations that show complex structures and flows inside the CS region and present recent numerical modelling results on some aspects of these structures. Both observations and numerical experiments indicate that the downward reconnection outflows are usually slower than the upward ones in the same eruptive event. Numerical simulations show that the complex structure inside CS and its temporal behavior as a result of turbulence and the Petschek-type slow-mode shock could probably account for the thick CS and fast reconnection. But whether the CS itself is that thick still remains unknown since, for the time being, we cannot measure the electric current directly in that region. We also review the most recent laboratory experiments of reconnection driven by energetic laser beams, and discuss some important topics for future works.

  8. Review on Current Sheets in CME Development: Theories and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jun; Murphy, Nicholas A.; Shen, Chengcai; Raymond, John C.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Zhong, Jiayong; Wu, Ning; Li, Yan

    2015-11-01

    We introduce how the catastrophe model for solar eruptions predicted the formation and development of the long current sheet (CS) and how the observations were used to recognize the CS at the place where the CS is presumably located. Then, we discuss the direct measurement of the CS region thickness by studying the brightness distribution of the CS region at different wavelengths. The thickness ranges from 104 km to about 105 km at heights between 0.27 and 1.16 R_{?} from the solar surface. But the traditional theory indicates that the CS is as thin as the proton Larmor radius, which is of order tens of meters in the corona. We look into the huge difference in the thickness between observations and theoretical expectations. The possible impacts that affect measurements and results are studied, and physical causes leading to a thick CS region in which reconnection can still occur at a reasonably fast rate are analyzed. Studies in both theories and observations suggest that the difference between the true value and the apparent value of the CS thickness is not significant as long as the CS could be recognised in observations. We review observations that show complex structures and flows inside the CS region and present recent numerical modelling results on some aspects of these structures. Both observations and numerical experiments indicate that the downward reconnection outflows are usually slower than the upward ones in the same eruptive event. Numerical simulations show that the complex structure inside CS and its temporal behavior as a result of turbulence and the Petschek-type slow-mode shock could probably account for the thick CS and fast reconnection. But whether the CS itself is that thick still remains unknown since, for the time being, we cannot measure the electric current directly in that region. We also review the most recent laboratory experiments of reconnection driven by energetic laser beams, and discuss some important topics for future works.

  9. Preterm Delivery

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes the proportion of preterm infants—which are infants born prior to 37 weeks of gestation—born in the United States from 1995 to 2008. Preterm delivery is a leading cause of infant death. Scientists continue to explore possible links between ...

  10. Speed evolution of CME/shocks using multi-spacecraft observations of type II radio bursts: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel-Hernandez, T.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Gonzalez-Esparza, J. A.; Ontiveros, V.

    2013-06-01

    We present a study which focuses on the speed evolution of a coronal mass ejection (CME)/shock associated with a type II radio burst observed on January 25, 2007. The type II burst feature had a multi-spacecraft coverage, being detected by the Wind/WAVES and the STEREO/WAVES radio instruments in the frequency range of 14 MHz to 90 kHz. The CME associated with the type II radio burst was observed by the SOHO/LASCO and the STEREO/SECCHI coronographs. Ground-based radio observations of the metric type II burst counterpart were obtained by the Bruny Island Radio Spectrometer (BIRS) in the frequency range of 40 MHz to 25 MHz. We analyzed the combined white-light and radio observations to infer the speed evolution of the CME/shock event. The CME/shock speed from the different data sets shows a significant deceleration near to the Sun followed by a slow and gradual deceleration in the interplanetary medium, which is consistent with the expected evolution of fast CME/shocks. Multi-spacecraft and combined white-light and radio observations are important to gain insight into the tracking of solar transients which propagate in the inner heliosphere.

  11. The CME Rate over Four Solar Cycles: Filling the Final Gap with MLSO MK3 Observations [1989-1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Cyr, O. C.; Flint, Q.; Quirk, C. A.; Burkepile, J.; Webb, D. F.; Lecinski, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were discovered in the early 1970's by the OSO-7 coronagraph, and large numbers were characterized for the first time by the Skylab ATM coronagraph. Since 1973 there has been only a single major gap in CME coverage in white light. Instruments that have contributed to estimates of the rate and properties of CMEs have included: Skylab ATM (1973-1974); Helios photometers (1974-1981); Solwind (1979-1985); SMM C/P (1980; 1984-1989); SOHO LASCO (1996-present); the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI, 2003-2011); and STEREO SECCHI (2006-present). We report here the first attempt to fill the 1989-1996 gap in the CME rate using the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory's MK3 K-coronameter. The MK3 instrument observed routinely several hours most days beginning in 1980 until it was upgraded to MK4 in 1998. MK3 CMEs detected from 1980-1989 were compared with Solwind and SMM and reported by St. Cyr et al. (1999). Since spaceborne instruments have more complete duty cycles than a groundbased instrument at a single location, we have 'calibrated' the MK3-derived CME rate from 1989 with the SMM C/P coronagraph, and from 1996 with the SOHO LASCO coronagraphs. CME rate calculations have been documented in Webb & Howard (1994), St. Cyr et al. (2000) and Robbrecht et al. (2009). Here we provide the preliminary CME rate calculation for 1989-1996 using the MLSO MK3 coronameter.

  12. AN INTERPRETATION OF GLE71 CONCURRENT CME-DRIVEN SHOCK WAVE

    SciTech Connect

    Firoz, Kazi A.; Rodríguez-Pacheco, J.; Zhang, Q. M.; Gan, W. Q.; Li, Y. P.; Moon, Y.-J.; Kudela, K.; Park, Y.-D.; Dorman, Lev I. E-mail: firoz.kazi@uah.es

    2014-08-01

    Particle accelerations in solar flares and CME-driven shocks can sometimes result in very high-energy particle events (?1 GeV) that are known as ground level enhancements (GLEs). Recent studies on the first GLE event (GLE71 2012 May 17 01:50 UT) of solar cycle 24 suggested that CME-driven shock played a leading role in causing the event. To verify this claim, we have made an effort to interpret the GLE71 concurrent shock wave. For this, we have deduced the possible speed and height of the shock wave in terms of the frequency (MHz) of the solar radio type II burst and its drift rate (MHz min{sup –1}), and studied the temporal evolution of the particle intensity profiles at different heights of the solar corona. For a better perception of the particle acceleration in the shock, we have studied the solar radio type II burst with concurrent solar radio and electron fluxes. When the particle intensity profiles are necessarily shifted in time at ?1 AU, it is found that the growth phases of the electron and cosmic ray intensity fluxes are strongly correlated (>0.91; ?0.87) with the frequency drift rate of the type II burst, which is also consistent with the intensive particle accelerations at upper coronal heights (??0.80 R {sub S} < 1.10 R {sub S}). Thus, we conclude that the CME-driven shock was possibly capable of producing the high-energy particle event. However, since the peaks of some flare components are found to be strongly associated with the fundamental phase of the type II burst, the preceding flare is supposed to contribute to the shock acceleration process.

  13. The Driving Magnetic Field and Reconnection in CME/Flare Eruptions and Coronal Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    Signatures of reconnection in major CME (coronal mass ejection)/flare eruptions and in coronal X-ray jets are illustrated and interpreted. The signatures are magnetic field lines and their feet that brighten in flare emission. CME/flare eruptions are magnetic explosions in which: 1. The field that erupts is initially a closed arcade. 2. At eruption onset, most of the free magnetic energy to be released is not stored in field bracketing a current sheet, but in sheared field in the core of the arcade. 3. The sheared core field erupts by a process that from its start or soon after involves fast "tether-cutting" reconnection at an initially small current sheet low in the sheared core field. If the arcade has oppositely-directed field over it, the eruption process from its start or soon after also involves fast "breakout" reconnection at an initially small current sheet between the arcade and the overarching field. These aspects are shown by the small area of the bright field lines and foot-point flare ribbons in the onset of the eruption. 4. At either small current sheet, the fast reconnection progressively unleashes the erupting core field to erupt with progressively greater force. In turn, the erupting core field drives the current sheet to become progressively larger and to undergo progressively greater fast reconnection in the explosive phase of the eruption, and the flare arcade and ribbons grow to become comparable to the pre-eruption arcade in lateral extent. In coronal X-ray jets: 1. The magnetic energy released in the jet is built up by the emergence of a magnetic arcade into surrounding unipolar "open" field. 2. A simple jet is produced when a burst of reconnection occurs at the current sheet between the arcade and the open field. This produces a bright reconnection jet and a bright reconnection arcade that are both much smaller in diameter that the driving arcade. 3. A more complex jet is produced when the arcade has a sheared core field and undergoes an ejective eruption in the manner of a miniature CME/flare eruption. The jet is then a combination of a miniature CME and the products of more widely distributed reconnection of the erupting arcade with the open field than in simple jets.

  14. Comparison of the WSA-ENLIL model with three CME cone types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Soojeong; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2013-07-01

    We have made a comparison of the CME-associated shock propagation based on the WSA-ENLIL model with three cone types using 29 halo CMEs from 2001 to 2002. These halo CMEs have cone model parameters as well as their associated interplanetary (IP) shocks. For this study we consider three different cone types (an asymmetric cone model, an ice-cream cone model and an elliptical cone model) to determine 3-D CME parameters (radial velocity, angular width and source location), which are the input values of the WSA-ENLIL model. The mean absolute error (MAE) of the arrival times for the asymmetric cone model is 10.6 hours, which is about 1 hour smaller than those of the other models. Their ensemble average of MAE is 9.5 hours. However, this value is still larger than that (8.7 hours) of the empirical model of Kim et al. (2007). We will compare their IP shock velocities and densities with those from ACE in-situ measurements and discuss them in terms of the prediction of geomagnetic storms.Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): We have made a comparison of the CME-associated shock propagation based on the WSA-ENLIL model with three cone types using 29 halo CMEs from 2001 to 2002. These halo CMEs have cone model parameters as well as their associated interplanetary (IP) shocks. For this study we consider three different cone types (an asymmetric cone model, an ice-cream cone model and an elliptical cone model) to determine 3-D CME parameters (radial velocity, angular width and source location), which are the input values of the WSA-ENLIL model. The mean absolute error (MAE) of the arrival times for the asymmetric cone model is 10.6 hours, which is about 1 hour smaller than those of the other models. Their ensemble average of MAE is 9.5 hours. However, this value is still larger than that (8.7 hours) of the empirical model of Kim et al. (2007). We will compare their IP shock velocities and densities with those from ACE in-situ measurements and discuss them in terms of the prediction of geomagnetic storms.

  15. The Width of a Solar Coronal Mass Ejection and the Source of the Driving Magnetic Explosion: A Test of the Standard Scenario for CME Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Suess, Steven T.

    2007-01-01

    We show that the strength (B(sub F1are)) of the magnetic field in the area covered by the flare arcade following a CME-producing ejective solar eruption can be estimated from the final angular width (Final Theta(sub CME)) of the CME in the outer corona and the final angular width (Theta(sub Flare)) of the flare arcade: B(sub Flare) approx. equals 1.4[(Final Theta(sub CME)/Theta(sub Flare)] (exp 2)G. We assume (1) the flux-rope plasmoid ejected from the flare site becomes the interior of the CME plasmoid; (2) in the outer corona (R > 2 (solar radius)) the CME is roughly a "spherical plasmoid with legs" shaped like a lightbulb; and (3) beyond some height in or below the outer corona the CME plasmoid is in lateral pressure balance with the surrounding magnetic field. The strength of the nearly radial magnetic field in the outer corona is estimated from the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field measured by Ulysses. We apply this model to three well-observed CMEs that exploded from flare regions of extremely different size and magnetic setting. One of these CMEs was an over-and-out CME, that is, in the outer corona the CME was laterally far offset from the flare-marked source of the driving magnetic explosion. In each event, the estimated source-region field strength is appropriate for the magnetic setting of the flare. This agreement (1) indicates that CMEs are propelled by the magnetic field of the CME plasmoid pushing against the surrounding magnetic field; (2) supports the magnetic-arch-blowout scenario for over-and-out CMEs; and (3) shows that a CME's final angular width in the outer corona can be estimated from the amount of magnetic flux covered by the source-region flare arcade.

  16. Plasma properties from the multi-wavelength analysis of the November 1st 2003 CME/shock event

    PubMed Central

    Benna, Carlo; Mancuso, Salvatore; Giordano, Silvio; Gioannini, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of the spectral properties and dynamic evolution of a CME/shock event observed on November 1st 2003 in white-light by the LASCO coronagraph and in the ultraviolet by the UVCS instrument operating aboard SOHO, has been performed to compute the properties of some important plasma parameters in the middle corona below about 2R?. Simultaneous observations obtained with the MLSO/Mk4 white-light coronagraph, providing both the early evolution of the CME expansion in the corona and the pre-shock electron density profile along the CME front, were also used to study this event. By combining the above information with the analysis of the metric type II radio emission detected by ground-based radio spectrographs, we finally derive estimates of the values of the local Alfvén speed and magnetic field strength in the solar corona. PMID:25685432

  17. An Application of the Stereoscopic Self-similar-Expansion Model to the Determination of CME-Driven Shock Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, L.; Bothmer, V.

    2015-10-01

    We present an application of the stereoscopic self-similar-expansion model (SSSEM) to Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/ Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) observations of the CME on 3 April 2010 and its associated shock. The aim is to verify whether CME-driven shock parameters can be inferred from the analysis of j-maps. For this purpose, we used the SSSEM to derive the CME and the shock kinematics. Arrival times and speeds, inferred assuming either propagation at constant speed or with uniform deceleration, agree well with Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) measurements. The shock standoff distance [?], the density compression [?d/?u], and the Mach number [M] were calculated by combining the results obtained for the CME and shock kinematics with models for the shock location. Their values were extrapolated to L1 and compared to in-situ data. The in-situ standoff distance was obtained from ACE solar-wind measurements, and the Mach number and compression ratio were provided by the interplanetary shock database of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. They are ?d/?u =2.84 and M = 2.2. The best fit to observations was obtained when the SSSEM half-width ?= 40°, and the CME and shock propagate with uniform deceleration. In this case we found ?= 23 R_{?}, ?d/?u =2.61, and M = 2.93. The study shows that CME-driven shock parameters can be estimated from the analysis of time-elongation plots and can be used to predict their in-situ values.

  18. An Application of the Stereoscopic Self-similar-Expansion Model to the Determination of CME-Driven Shock Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, L.; Bothmer, V.

    2015-09-01

    We present an application of the stereoscopic self-similar-expansion model (SSSEM) to Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) observations of the CME on 3 April 2010 and its associated shock. The aim is to verify whether CME-driven shock parameters can be inferred from the analysis of j-maps. For this purpose, we used the SSSEM to derive the CME and the shock kinematics. Arrival times and speeds, inferred assuming either propagation at constant speed or with uniform deceleration, agree well with Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) measurements. The shock standoff distance [?], the density compression [?d/?u], and the Mach number [M] were calculated by combining the results obtained for the CME and shock kinematics with models for the shock location. Their values were extrapolated to L1 and compared to in-situ data. The in-situ standoff distance was obtained from ACE solar-wind measurements, and the Mach number and compression ratio were provided by the interplanetary shock database of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. They are ?d/?u =2.84 and M = 2.2. The best fit to observations was obtained when the SSSEM half-width ?= 40°, and the CME and shock propagate with uniform deceleration. In this case we found ?= 23 R_{?}, ?d/?u =2.61, and M = 2.93. The study shows that CME-driven shock parameters can be estimated from the analysis of time-elongation plots and can be used to predict their in-situ values.

  19. Comparing CME Kinematics from Radio Type II Emissions and STEREO Heliospheric Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. E.; Reiner, M. J.

    2013-05-01

    The propagation of CMEs through the interplanetary medium (IPM) is both a topic of general interest for solar physicists, and a topic of practical importance for space weather forecasters, given the desire to accurately predict if and when eruptions observed at the Sun will reach Earth. Type II radio emissions measured by instruments such as WAVES on the Wind spacecraft have provided one way to study CME propagation through the inner heliosphere, at least for fast CMEs that generate strong shocks. The radio observations allow CMEs to be tracked long after they have left the field of view of coronagraphic imagers, such as SOHO/LASCO, which can only observe CMEs relatively close to the Sun. However, the two STEREO spacecraft launched in 2006 not only carry coronagraphs, they also carry heliospheric imagers, which can observe white light CME fronts all the way to 1 AU. Thus, in the STEREO era the IPM kinematics of fast CMEs can be measured both using radio and white light imaging. We compare the radio and imaging kinematic measurements for a number of recent events, including CMEs from 2011 March 7 and 2012 August 31.

  20. PROPAGATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE JUNE 1st 2008 CME IN THE INTERPLANETARY MEDIUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Lamb, D. A.; Davila, J. M.; Vinas, A. F.; Moestl, C.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Malandraki, O.; Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.

    2009-12-01

    In this work we present a study of the coronal mass ejection (CME) of June 1st of 2008 in the interplanetary medium. This event has been extensively studied by others because of its favorable geometry and the possible consequences of its peculiar initiation for space weather forecasting. We show an analysis of the evolution of the CME in the interplanetary medium in order to shed some light on the propagation mechanism of the ICME. We have determined the typical shock associated characteristics of the ICME in order to understand the propagation properties. Using two different non force-free models of the magnetic cloud allows us to incorporate expansion of the cloud. We use in-situ measurements from STEREO B/IMPACT to characterize the ICME. In addition, we use images from STEREO A/SECCHI-HI to analyze the propagation and visual evolution of the associated flux rope in the interplanetary medium. We compare and contrast these observations with the results of the analytical models.

  1. The Divergence of CME and Sunspot Number Rates During Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David F.; St. Cyr, Orville Chris; Xie, Hong; Kuchar, Thomas Andrew

    2014-06-01

    In the previous three solar cycles the frequency of occurrence of CMEs observed in white light has closely tracked the solar cycle in both phase and amplitude, varying by an order of magnitude over the cycle. LASCO has now observed the entire solar Cycle 23 and continues to observe through the current rise and maximum phases of Cycle 24. Cycle 23 had an unusually long decline and extended minimum. During this period we have been able to image and count CMEs in the heliosphere, and can determine rates from both LASCO and STEREO SECCHI (since 2007) coronagraphs and from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI - since 2003) and the SECCHI Heliospheric Imagers in the heliosphere. Manual rates estimated by observers are now supplemented by counts from identifications made by automatic programs, such as contained in the SEEDS, CACTus and ARTEMIS catalogs. Since the cycle 23/24 minimum, the CME and sunspot number rates have diverged, with similar cycle 23/24 rise and peak CME rates but much lower SSN rates in this cycle. We will discuss these rate estimates and their implications for the evolution of the global solar magnetic field.

  2. On the interplanetary evolution of CME-driven shocks: a comparison between remote sensing observations and in-situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, Laura; Bothmer, Volker

    2015-08-01

    Fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are a prime driver of major space weather effects and strong geomagnetic storms. When the CME propagation speed is higher than the Alfvén speed a shock forms in front of the CME leading edge. CME-driven shocks are observed in in-situ data and, with the advent of increasingly sensitive imaging instruments, also in remote sensing observations in the form of bright fronts ahead of the CMEs.In this work we present the study of 4 Earth-directed CMEs which drove shocks detected in STEREO COR 2 and HI observations. For each event we identify the source region and the signatures of CME eruption such as waves, EUV dimmings, flare and prominence eruptions. The shock and CME interplanetary evolution is determined from COR2 and HI observations via an application of triangulation techniques. Furthermore, propagation speed and arrival times are inferred. The CME geometry is modelled in COR2 via the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model and the assumption on self-similar expansion is tested by expanding the flux rope to the HI1 field of view. A combination of these results with models for the shock location allows to infer the time evolution of the compression ratio ?d/?u across the shock and of the upstream Mach number M at locations where no direct plasma measurements are available. These values, as well as the arrival time and speed, are compared to ACE in-situ measurements to validate the results. For the 03 April 2010 event, e.g., the values of the Mach number and the compression ratio extrapolated to the position of ACE are respectively 2.1 < ?d/?u < 2.4 and 2.3 < M < 2.5, in good agreement with the in-situ values found in literature, ?d/?u = 2.84 and M = 2.2. This study is carried out in conjunction to simulations of CME initiation. Combined results from observations and simulations allow to connect the interplanetary and near-Earth properties of CMEs to those of their source regions, and to the mechanisms of CME onset.

  3. Future capabilities of CME polarimetric 3D reconstructions with the METIS instrument: A numerical test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, P.; Bemporad, A.; Mackay, D. H.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Understanding the 3D structure of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is crucial for understanding the nature and origin of solar eruptions. However, owing to the optical thinness of the solar corona we can only observe the line of sight integrated emission. As a consequence the resulting projection effects hide the true 3D structure of CMEs. To derive information on the 3D structure of CMEs from white-light (total and polarized brightness) images, the polarization ratio technique is widely used. The soon-to-be-launched METIS coronagraph on board Solar Orbiter will use this technique to produce new polarimetric images. Aims: This work considers the application of the polarization ratio technique to synthetic CME observations from METIS. In particular we determine the accuracy at which the position of the centre of mass, direction and speed of propagation, and the column density of the CME can be determined along the line of sight. Methods: We perform a 3D MHD simulation of a flux rope ejection where a CME is produced. From the simulation we (i) synthesize the corresponding METIS white-light (total and polarized brightness) images and (ii) apply the polarization ratio technique to these synthesized images and compare the results with the known density distribution from the MHD simulation. In addition, we use recent results that consider how the position of a single blob of plasma is measured depending on its projected position in the plane of the sky. From this we can interpret the results of the polarization ratio technique and give an estimation of the error associated with derived parameters. Results: We find that the polarization ratio technique reproduces with high accuracy the position of the centre of mass along the line of sight. However, some errors are inherently associated with this determination. The polarization ratio technique also allows information to be derived on the real 3D direction of propagation of the CME. The determination of this is of fundamental importance for future space weather forecasting. In addition, we find that the column density derived from white-light images is accurate and we propose an improved technique where the combined use of the polarization ratio technique and white-light images minimizes the error in the estimation of column densities. Moreover, by applying the comparison to a set of snapshots of the simulation we can also assess the errors related to the trajectory and the expansion of the CME. Conclusions: Our method allows us to thoroughly test the performance of the polarization ratio technique and allows a determination of the errors associated with it, which means that it can be used to quantify the results from the analysis of the forthcoming METIS observations in white light (total and polarized brightness). Finally, we describe a satellite observing configuration relative to the Earth that can allow the technique to be efficiently used for space weather predictions. A movie attached to Fig. 15 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Simulation of the 23 July 2012 extreme space weather event: What if this extremely rare CME was Earth directed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Leila Mays, M.; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, Kristin; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Zheng, Yihua; Glocer, Alex

    2013-12-01

    Extreme space weather events are known to cause adverse impacts on critical modern day technological infrastructure such as high-voltage electric power transmission grids. On 23 July 2012, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft observed in situ an extremely fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that traveled 0.96 astronomical units (˜1 AU) in about 19 h. Here we use the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) to perform a simulation of this rare CME. We consider STEREO-A in situ observations to represent the upstream L1 solar wind boundary conditions. The goal of this study is to examine what would have happened if this Rare-type CME was Earth-bound. Global SWMF-generated ground geomagnetic field perturbations are used to compute the simulated induced geoelectric field at specific ground-based active INTERMAGNET magnetometer sites. Simulation results show that while modeled global SYM-H index, a high-resolution equivalent of the Dst index, was comparable to previously observed severe geomagnetic storms such as the Halloween 2003 storm, the 23 July CME would have produced some of the largest geomagnetically induced electric fields, making it very geoeffective. These results have important practical applications for risk management of electrical power grids.

  5. C-ME: A 3D Community-Based, Real-Time Collaboration Tool for Scientific Research and Training

    PubMed Central

    Kolatkar, Anand; Kennedy, Kevin; Halabuk, Dan; Kunken, Josh; Marrinucci, Dena; Bethel, Kelly; Guzman, Rodney; Huckaby, Tim; Kuhn, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The need for effective collaboration tools is growing as multidisciplinary proteome-wide projects and distributed research teams become more common. The resulting data is often quite disparate, stored in separate locations, and not contextually related. Collaborative Molecular Modeling Environment (C-ME) is an interactive community-based collaboration system that allows researchers to organize information, visualize data on a two-dimensional (2-D) or three-dimensional (3-D) basis, and share and manage that information with collaborators in real time. C-ME stores the information in industry-standard databases that are immediately accessible by appropriate permission within the computer network directory service or anonymously across the internet through the C-ME application or through a web browser. The system addresses two important aspects of collaboration: context and information management. C-ME allows a researcher to use a 3-D atomic structure model or a 2-D image as a contextual basis on which to attach and share annotations to specific atoms or molecules or to specific regions of a 2-D image. These annotations provide additional information about the atomic structure or image data that can then be evaluated, amended or added to by other project members. PMID:18286178

  6. Simulation of the 23 July 2012 Extreme Space Weather Event: What if This Extremely Rare CME Was Earth Directed?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Mays, M. Leila; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, Kristin; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Zheng, Yihua; Glocer, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Extreme space weather events are known to cause adverse impacts on critical modern day technological infrastructure such as high-voltage electric power transmission grids. On 23 July 2012, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft observed in situ an extremely fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that traveled 0.96 astronomical units (approx. 1 AU) in about 19 h. Here we use the SpaceWeather Modeling Framework (SWMF) to perform a simulation of this rare CME.We consider STEREO-A in situ observations to represent the upstream L1 solar wind boundary conditions. The goal of this study is to examine what would have happened if this Rare-type CME was Earth-bound. Global SWMF-generated ground geomagnetic field perturbations are used to compute the simulated induced geoelectric field at specific ground-based active INTERMAGNET magnetometer sites. Simulation results show that while modeled global SYM-H index, a high-resolution equivalent of the Dst index, was comparable to previously observed severe geomagnetic storms such as the Halloween 2003 storm, the 23 July CME would have produced some of the largest geomagnetically induced electric fields, making it very geoeffective. These results have important practical applications for risk management of electrical power grids.

  7. On the Relationship Between Coronal Magnetic Decay Index and CME Speed

    E-print Network

    Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations suggest that kink and torus instabilities are two potential contributors to the initiation and prorogation of eruptive events. A magnetic parameter named decay index (i.e., the coronal magnetic gradient of the overlying fields above the eruptive flux ropes) could play an important role in controlling kinematics of eruptions. Previous studies have identified a threshold range of the decay index that distinguishes between eruptive and confined configurations. Here we advance the study by investigating if there is a clear correlation between the decay index and CME speed. 38 CMEs associated with filament eruptions and/or two-ribbon flares are selected using the Halpha data from the Global Halpha Network. The filaments and flare ribbons observed in Halpha associated with the CMEs help to locate the magnetic polarity inversion line, along which the decay index is calculated based on the potential field extrapolation using MDI magnetograms as boundary conditions. The speeds of CMEs are obtaine...

  8. Comparison of CME radial velocities from a flux rope model and an ice cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2011-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun are the largest energy release process in the solar system and act as the primary driver of geomagnetic storms and other space weather phenomena on the Earth. So it is very important to infer their directions, velocities and three-dimensional structures. In this study, we choose two different models to infer radial velocities of halo CMEs since 2008 : (1) an ice cream cone model by Xue et al (2005) using SOHO/LASCO data, (2) a flux rope model by Thernisien et al. (2009) using the STEREO/SECCHI data. In addition, we use another flux rope model in which the separation angle of flux rope is zero, which is morphologically similar to the ice cream cone model. The comparison shows that the CME radial velocities from among each model have very good correlations (R>0.9). We will extending this comparison to other partial CMEs observed by STEREO and SOHO.

  9. A Full Study on the Sun–Earth Connection of an Earth-directed CME Magnetic Flux Rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemareddy, Panditi; Mishra, Wageesh

    2015-11-01

    We present an investigation of an eruption event of a coronal mass ejection (CME) magnetic flux rope (MFR) from the source active region (AR) NOAA 11719 on 2013 April 11 utilizing observations from the Solar Dynamic Observatory, the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and the WIND spacecraft. The source AR consists of a pre-existing sigmoidal structure stacked over a filament channel which is regarded as an MFR system. EUV observations of low corona suggest further development of this MFR system by added axial flux through tether-cutting reconnection of loops at the middle of the sigmoid under the influence of continuous slow flux motions for two days. Our study implies that the MFR system in the AR is initiated to upward motion by kink instability and further driven by torus instability. The CME morphology, captured in simultaneous three-point coronagraph observations, is fitted with a Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) model and discerns an MFR topology with its orientation aligning with a magnetic neutral line in the source AR. This MFR expands self-similarly and is found to have source AR twist signatures in the associated near-Earth magnetic cloud (MC). We further derived the kinematics of this CME propagation by employing a plethora of stereoscopic as well as single-spacecraft reconstruction techniques. While stereoscopic methods perform relatively poorly compared to other methods, fitting methods worked best in estimating the arrival time of the CME compared to in situ measurements. Supplied with the values of constrained solar wind velocity, drag parameter, and three-dimensional kinematics from the GCS fit, we construct CME kinematics from the drag-based model consistent with in situ MC arrival.

  10. Predicting CME Ejecta and Sheath Front Arrival at L1 with a Data-constrained Physical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Phillip; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    We present a method for predicting the arrival of a coronal mass ejection (CME) flux rope in situ, as well as the sheath of solar wind plasma accumulated ahead of the driver. For faster CMEs, the front of this sheath will be a shock. The method is based upon geometrical separate measurement of the CME ejecta and sheath. These measurements are used to constrain a drag-based model, improved by including both a height dependence and accurate de-projected velocities. We also constrain the geometry of the model to determine the error introduced as a function of the deviation of the CME nose from the Sun–Earth line. The CME standoff-distance in the heliosphere fit is also calculated, fit, and combined with the ejecta model to determine sheath arrival. Combining these factors allows us to create predictions for both fronts at the L1 point and compare them against observations. We demonstrate an ability to predict the sheath arrival with an average error of under 3.5 hr, with an rms error of about 1.58 hr. For the ejecta the error is less than 1.5 hr, with an rms error within 0.76 hr. We also discuss the physical implications of our model for CME expansion and density evolution. We show the power of our method with ideal data and demonstrate the practical implications of having a permanent L5 observer with space weather forecasting capabilities, while also discussing the limitations of the method that will have to be addressed in order to create a real-time forecasting tool.

  11. Wavelet analysis of CME, X-ray flare, and sunspot series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, M. R. G.; Pereira, E. S.; Cecatto, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are the most energetic transient phenomena taking place at the Sun. Together they are principally responsible for disturbances in outer geospace. Coronal mass ejections and solar flares are believed to be correlated with the solar cycle, which is mainly characterized by sunspot numbers. Aims: Here, we search for pattern identification in CMEs, X-ray solar flares, and sunspot number time series using a new data mining process and a quantitative procedure to correlate these series. Methods: This new process consists of the combination of a decomposition method with the wavelet transform technique applied to the series ranging from 2000 until 2012. A simple moving average is used for the time-series decomposition as a high-pass filter. A continuous wavelet transform is applied to the series in sequence, which permits us to uncover signals previously masked by the original time series. We made use of the wavelet coherence to find some correlation between the data. Results: The results have shown the existence of periodic and intermittent signals in the CMEs, flares, and sunspot time series. For the CME and flare series, few and relatively short time intervals without any signal were observed. Signals with an intermittent character take place during some epochs of the maximum and descending phases of the solar cycle 23 and rising phase of solar cycle 24. A comparison among X-ray flares, sunspots, and CME time series shows a stronger relation between flare and CMEs, although during some short intervals (four-eight months) and in a relatively narrow band. Yet, in contrast we have obtained a fainter or even absent relation between the X-ray flares and sunspot number series as well as between the CMEs and sunspot number series.

  12. Plasma Physical Parameters along CME-driven Shocks. II. Observation-Simulation Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchini, F.; Susino, R.; Bemporad, A.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we compare the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters along the 1999 June 11 coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven shock front with the results obtained from a CME-like event simulated with the FLIPMHD3D code, based on the FLIP-MHD particle-in-cell method. The observational data are retrieved from the combination of white-light coronagraphic data (for the upstream values) and the application of the Rankine-Hugoniot equations (for the downstream values). The comparison shows a higher compression ratio X and Alfvénic Mach number MA at the shock nose, and a stronger magnetic field deflection d toward the flanks, in agreement with observations. Then, we compare the spatial distribution of MA with the profiles obtained from the solutions of the shock adiabatic equation relating MA, X, and {? }{Bn} (the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the shock front normal) for the special cases of parallel and perpendicular shock, and with a semi-empirical expression for a generically oblique shock. The semi-empirical curve approximates the actual values of MA very well, if the effects of a non-negligible shock thickness {? }{sh} and plasma-to magnetic pressure ratio {? }u are taken into account throughout the computation. Moreover, the simulated shock turns out to be supercritical at the nose and sub-critical at the flanks. Finally, we develop a new one-dimensional Lagrangian ideal MHD method based on the GrAALE code, to simulate the ion-electron temperature decoupling due to the shock transit. Two models are used, a simple solar wind model and a variable-? model. Both produce results in agreement with observations, the second one being capable of introducing the physics responsible for the additional electron heating due to secondary effects (collisions, Alfvén waves, etc.).

  13. On-board CME detection algorithm for the Solar Orbiter-METIS coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemporad, A.; Andretta, V.; Pancrazzi, M.; Focardi, M.; Straus, T.; Sasso, C.; Spadaro, D.; Uslenghi, M.; Antonucci, E.; Fineschi, S.; Abbo, L.; Nicolini, G.; Landini, F.; Romoli, M.; Naletto, G.; Nicolosi, P.

    2014-07-01

    The METIS coronagraph is one of the instruments part of the payload of the ESA - Solar Orbiter mission to be launched in 2017. The spacecraft will operate much like a planetary encounter mission, with the main scientific activity taking place with the remote-sensing instruments during three 10-days intervals per orbit: optimization of the different instrument observing modes will be crucial. One of the key scientific targets of METIS will be the study of transient ejections of mass through the solar corona (Coronal Mass Ejections - CMEs) and their heliospheric evolution. METIS will provide for the first time imaging of CMEs in two different wavelengths: VL (visible light 580- 640 nm) and UV (Lyman-? line of HI at 121.6 nm). The detection of transient phenomena shall be managed directly by the METIS Processing and Power Unit (MPPU) by means of both external triggers ("flags") coming from other Solar Orbiter instruments, and internal "flags" produced directly by the METIS on-board software. METIS on-board algorithm for the automatic detection of CMEs will be based on running differences between consecutive images re-binned to very low resolution and thresholded for significant changes over a minimum value. Given the small relative variation of white light intensity during CMEs, the algorithm will take advantage of VL images acquired with different polarization angles to maximize the detection capability: possible false detections should be automatically managed by the algorithm. The algorithm will be able to provide the CME first detection time, latitudinal direction of propagation on the plane of the sky (within 45 degrees), a binary flag indicating whether a "halo CME" has been detected.

  14. The Relationship Between CME Properties in the CDAW, CACTUS and SEEDS Catalogs and ?25 MeV Solar Proton Event Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cane, H. V.

    2013-12-01

    The existence of a correlation between the intensity of solar energetic proton (SEP) events and the speed of the associated coronal mass ejection near the Sun is well known, and is often interpreted as evidence for particle acceleration at CME-driven shocks. However, this correlation is far from perfect and might be improved by taking other parameters into consideration (e.g., CME width). In studies of cycle 23 SEP events, values of CME speed, width and other parameters were typically taken from the CDAWWeb LASCO CME catalog. This is compiled 'by hand' from examination of LASCO images by experienced observers. Other automated LASCO CME catalogs have now been developed, e.g., CACTUS (Royal Observatory of Belgium) and SEEDS (George Mason University), but the basic CME parameters do not always agree with those from the CDAWweb catalog since they are not determined in the same way. For example the 'CME speed' might be measured at a specific position angle against the plane of the sky in one catalog, or be the average of speeds taken along the CME front in another. Speeds may also be based on linear or higher order fits to the coronagraph images. There will also be projection effects in these plane of the sky speeds. Similarly, CME widths can vary between catalogs and are dependent on how they are defined. For example, the CDAW catalog lists any CME that surrounds the occulting disk as a 'halo' (360 deg. width) CME even though the CME may be highly-asymmetric and originate from a solar event far from central meridian. Another catalog may give a smaller width for the same CME. The problem of obtaining the 'true' CME width is especially acute for assessing the relationship between CME width and SEP properties when using the CDAW catalog since a significant fraction, if not the majority, of the CMEs associated with major SEP events are reported to be halo CMEs. In principle, observations of CMEs from the STEREO A and B spacecraft, launched in late 2006, might be used to overcome some of these problems. In particular, a spacecraft in quadrature with the solar source of an SEP event should observe the 'true' width and speed of the associated CME. However, STEREO CME parameters are derived using the CACTUS method, and cannot be directly compared with the LASCO CDAW catalog values that have been so widely used for many years. In this study, we will examine the relationship between the properties of CMEs in various catalogs and the intensities of a large sample of particle events that include ˜25 MeV protons in cycles 23 and 24. In particular, we will compare the proton intensity-speed relationships obtained using the CDAW, CACTUS and SEEDS LASCO catalogs, and also using the CACTUS values from whichever spacecraft (STEREO A, B or SOHO) is best in quadrature with the solar event. We will also examine whether there is any correlation between the width of the CMEs in the automated catalogs and proton intensity, and whether a combination of CME speed and width might improve the correlation with proton intensity.

  15. Using Heliospheric Imaging for Storm Forecasting - SMEI CME Observations as a Tool for Operational Forecasting at AFWA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, D. F.; Johnston, J. C.; Fry, C. D.; Kuchar, T. A.

    2008-12-01

    Observations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from heliospheric imagers such as the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) can lead to significant improvements in operational space weather forecasting. We are working with the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) to ingest SMEI all-sky imagery with appropriate tools to help forecasters improve their operational space weather forecasts. We describe two approaches: 1) Near- real time analysis of propagating CMEs from SMEI images alone combined with near-Sun observations of CME onsets and, 2) Using these calculations of speed as a mid-course correction to the HAFv2 solar wind model forecasts. HAFv2 became operational at AFWA in late 2006. The objective is to determine a set of practical procedures that the duty forecaster can use to update or correct a solar wind forecast using heliospheric imager data. SMEI observations can be used inclusively to make storm forecasts, as recently discussed in Webb et al. (Space Weather, in press, 2008). We have developed a point-and-click analysis tool for use with SMEI images and are working with AFWA to ensure that timely SMEI images are available for analyses. When a frontside solar eruption occurs, especially if within about 45 deg. of Sun center, a forecaster checks for an associated CME observed by a coronagraph within an appropriate time window. If found, especially if the CME is a halo type, the forecaster checks SMEI observations about a day later, depending on the apparent initial CME speed, for possibly associated CMEs. If one is found, then the leading edge is measured over several successive frames and an elongation-time plot constructed. A minimum of three data points, i.e., over 3-4 orbits or about 6 hours, are necessary for such a plot. Using the solar source location and onset time of the CME from, e.g., SOHO observations, and assuming radial propagation, a distance-time relation is calculated and extrapolated to the 1 AU distance. As shown by Webb et al., the storm onset time is then expected to be about 3 hours after this 1 AU arrival time (AT). The prediction program is updated as more SMEI data become available. Currently when an appropriate solar event occurs, AFWA routinely runs the HAFv2 model to make a forecast of the shock and ejecta arrival times at Earth. SMEI data can be used to improve this prediction. The HAFv2 model can produce synthetic sky maps of predicted CME brightness for comparison with SMEI images. The forecaster uses SMEI imagery to observe and track the CME. The forecaster then measures the CME location and speed using the SMEI imagery and the HAFv2 synthetic sky maps. After comparing the SMEI and HAFv2 results, the forecaster can adjust a key input to HAFv2, such as the initial speed of the disturbance at the Sun or the mid-course speed. The forecaster then iteratively runs HAFv2 until the observed and forecast sky maps match. The final HAFv2 solution becomes the new forecast. When the CME/shock arrives at (or does not reach) Earth, the forecaster verifies the forecast and updates the forecast skill statistics. Eventually, we plan to develop a more automated version of this procedure.

  16. Ocular delivery of macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Chun; Chiang, Bryce; Wu, Xianggen; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are making increasing impact on medicine, including treatment of indications in the eye. Macromolecular drugs are typically given by physician-administered invasive delivery methods, because non--invasive ocular delivery methods, such as eye drops, and systemic delivery, have low bioavailability and/or poor ocular targeting. There is a need to improve delivery of biopharmaceuticals to enable less-invasive delivery routes, less-frequent dosing through controlled-release drug delivery and improved drug targeting within the eye to increase efficacy and reduce side effects. This review discusses the barriers to drug delivery via various ophthalmic routes of administration in the context of macromolecule delivery and discusses efforts to develop controlled-release systems for delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the eye. The growing number of macromolecular therapies in the eye needs improved drug delivery methods that increase drug efficacy, safety and patient compliance. PMID:24998941

  17. MHD Modeling of Coronal Large-Amplitude Waves Related to CME Lift-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomoell, J.; Vainio, R.; Kissmann, R.

    2008-12-01

    We have employed a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation code to study mass motions and large-amplitude coronal waves related to the lift-off of a coronal mass ejection (CME). The eruption of the filament is achieved by an artificial force acting on the plasma inside the flux rope. By varying the magnitude of this force, the reaction of the ambient corona to CMEs with different acceleration profiles can be studied. Our model of the ambient corona is gravitationally stratified with a quadrupolar magnetic field, resulting in an ambient Alfvén speed that increases as a function of height, as typically deduced for the low corona. The results of the simulations show that the erupting flux rope is surrounded by a shock front, which is strongest near the leading edge of the erupting mass, but also shows compression near the solar surface. For rapidly accelerating filaments, the shock front forms already in the low corona. Although the speed of the driver is less than the Alfvén speed near the top of the atmosphere, the shock survives in this region as well, but as a freely propagating wave. The leading edge of the shock becomes strong early enough to drive a metric type II burst in the corona. The speed of the weaker part of the shock front near the surface is lower, corresponding to the magnetosonic speed there. We analyze the (line-of-sight) emission measure of the corona during the simulation and recognize a wave receding from the eruption site, which strongly resembles EIT waves in the low corona. Behind the EIT wave, we clearly recognize a coronal dimming, also observed during CME lift-off. We point out that the morphology of the hot downstream region of the shock would be that of a hot erupting loop, so care has to be taken not to misinterpret soft X-ray imaging observations in this respect. Finally, the geometry of the magnetic field around the erupting mass is analyzed in terms of precipitation of particles accelerated in the eruption complex. Field lines connected to the shock are further away from the photospheric neutral line below the filament than the field lines connected to the current sheet below the flux rope. Thus, if the DC fields in the current sheet accelerate predominantly electrons and the shock accelerates ions, the geometry is consistent with recent observations of gamma rays being emitted further out from the neutral line than hard X-rays.

  18. The CME-ICME Connection and Interplanetary Structure During Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Lynch, B. J.; Luhmann, J. G.; Kilpua, E.; Toy, V.; Vourlidas, A.; Russell, C. T.; Galvin, A. B.

    2008-12-01

    When an interplanetary transient (ICME) exhibits a large angle and smooth rotation in the IMF vector, it is classified as a magnetic cloud (MC) and commonly interpreted as the signature of a magnetic flux rope. On the average bout a third of ICME ejecta are MCs, although the fraction seems to be larger during the quiet phase of the solar cycle. Non-flux rope ICMEs are likely (1) distorted during the transit through heliosphere, (2) observed at an unfavorable crossing angle if the ICME structure has spatial variation, (3) or are simply have a more complex internal structure. Five Magnetic Clouds (MC) have been found from a total of nine ICMEs observed during 2007 January 01 to 2008 August 31, when the separation of STEREO A (STA) and B (STB) spacecraft varied between 0.05 to 70.35 degrees heliolongitude. We investigate the four best MCs using observations from three spacecraft (STA, STB and ACE). The first MC seems to have been detected by all three spacecraft (STA and STB 40.4 degrees apart), while the latter three were detected by only one of the STEREO spacecraft and sometimes by ACE. From the inferred flux rope orientation at each crossing and the spatial variation of the ICME properties, we interpret how each MC flux rope was situated relative to the spacecraft, and its connection to the Sun from corresponding coronal and heliospheric modeling results. Each of the MCs can be associated at low confidence (in contrary to expectations for solar minimum time) with a CME observed by coronagraphs on board STEREO and/or SOHO. All potential parent CMEs were very slow in the 200 km/s range (plane-of-sky), but the speeds of the MCs were between ~390 and ~480 km/s, indicating acceleration in the heliosphere. Solar disk activities are minor around the four CMEs, with no GOES x-ray flares, and two possibly associated filament eruptions. Some CME structures appear to form in the coronagraph field of view rather than rising from below. Several low/mid- latitude coronal holes and a highly warped coronal streamer arcade and source surface neutral line dominate the coronal structure during the period of the study. Previous studies have shown that the MC fluxrope orientation may be aligned with the large-scale coronal streamer arcades. Estimated MC orientations are discussed and compared with events during the previous solar minimum, which exhibited a more dipolar coronal structure. This work was supported, in part, by NASA NNG06GE51G, NNX08AJ04G, and NAS5-03131.

  19. A solar type II radio burst from CME-coronal ray interaction:simultaneous radio and EUV imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Du, Guohui

    2014-06-01

    Simultaneous radio and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/white-light imaging data are examined for a solar type II radio burst occurring on 2010 March 18 to deduce its source location. Using a bow-shock model, we reconstruct the 3-dimensional EUV wave front (presumably the type-II emitting shock) based on the imaging data of the two STEREO spacecraft. It is then combined with the Nan\\c{c}ay radio imaging data to infer the 3-dimensional position of the type II source. It is found that the type II source coincides with the interface between the CME EUV wave front and a nearby coronal ray structure, providing evidence that the type II emission is physically related to the CME-ray interaction. This result, consistent with those of previous studies, is based on simultaneous radio and EUV imaging data for the first time.

  20. Tracking the Momentum Flux of a CME and Quantifying Its Influence on Geomagnetically Induced Currents at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savani, N. P.; Vourlidas, A.; Pulkkinen, A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Lavraud, B.; Owens, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a coronal mass ejection (CME) propagating toward Earth on 29 March 2011. This event is specifically chosen for its predominately northward directed magnetic field, so that the influence from the momentum flux onto Earth can be isolated. We focus our study on understanding how a small Earth-directed segment propagates. Mass images are created from the white-light cameras onboard STEREO which are also converted into mass height-time maps (mass J-maps). The mass tracks on these J-maps correspond to the sheath region between the CME and its associated shockfront as detected by in situ measurements at L1. A time series of mass measurements from the STEREOCOR-2A instrument is made along the Earth propagation direction. Qualitatively, this mass time series shows a remarkable resemblance to the L1 in situ density series. The in situ measurements are used as inputs into a three-dimensional (3-D) magnetospheric space weather simulation from the Community Coordinated Modeling Center. These simulations display a sudden compression of the magnetosphere from the large momentum flux at the leading edge of the CME, and predictions are made for the time derivative of the magnetic field (dBdt) on the ground. The predicted dBdt values were then compared with the observations from specific equatorially located ground stations and showed notable similarity. This study of the momentum of a CME from the Sun down to its influence on magnetic ground stations on Earth is presented as a preliminary proof of concept, such that future attempts may try to use remote sensing to create density and velocity time series as inputs to magnetospheric simulations.

  1. SMEI 3D RECONSTRUCTION OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION INTERACTING WITH A COROTATING SOLAR WIND DENSITY ENHANCEMENT: THE 2008 APRIL 26 CME

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B. V.; Buffington, A.; Hick, P. P.; Clover, J. M.; Bisi, M. M.; Webb, D. F.

    2010-12-01

    The Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) has recorded the brightness responses of hundreds of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the interplanetary medium. Using a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction technique that derives its perspective views from outward-flowing solar wind, analysis of SMEI data has revealed the shapes, extents, and masses of CMEs. Here, for the first time, and using SMEI data, we report on the 3D reconstruction of a CME that intersects a corotating region marked by a curved density enhancement in the ecliptic. Both the CME and the corotating region are reconstructed and demonstrate that the CME disrupts the otherwise regular density pattern of the corotating material. Most of the dense CME material passes north of the ecliptic and east of the Sun-Earth line: thus, in situ measurements in the ecliptic near Earth and at the Solar-TErrestrial RElations Observatory Behind spacecraft show the CME as a minor density increase in the solar wind. The mass of the dense portion of the CME is consistent with that measured by the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft, and is comparable to the masses of many other three-dimensionally reconstructed solar wind features at 1 AU observed in SMEI 3D reconstructions.

  2. The Properties of Solar Energetic Particle Event-Associated Coronal Mass Ejections Reported in Different CME Catalogs

    E-print Network

    Richardson, Ian G; Cane, Hilary V

    2015-01-01

    We compare estimates of the speed and width of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in several catalogs for the CMEs associated with ~200 solar energetic particle (SEP) events in 2006-2013 that included 25 MeV protons. The catalogs used are: CDAW, CACTUS, SEEDS and CORIMP, all derived from observations by the LASCO coronagraphs on the SOHO spacecraft, the CACTUS catalog derived from the COR2 coronagraphs on the STEREO-A and -B spacecraft, and the DONKI catalog, which uses observations from SOHO and the STEREO spacecraft. We illustrate how, for this set of events, CME parameters can differ considerably in each catalog. The well-known correlation between CME speed and proton event intensity is shown to be similar for most catalogs, but this is largely because it is determined by a few large particle events associated with fast CMEs, and small events associated with slow CMEs. Intermediate particle events "shuffle" in position when speeds from different catalogs are used. Quadrature spacecraft CME speeds do not improve...

  3. CHAMBER: A Regional Performance Improvement CME Initiative for Breast Cancer Health Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Linda M; Geradts, Joseph; Hamilton, Erika P; Havlin, Kathleen A; Kimmick, Gretchen G; Marcom, P Kelly; Spector, Neil L; Watson, Melanie; Rabin, Daniel U; Bruno, Theodore O; Noe, Amanda; Miller, Stacy; Subramaniam, Chitra; Layton, Sherry; Grichnik, Katherine

    2015-08-01

    CHAMBER was a regional educational initiative for providers of care to patients with HER2+ breast cancer. The study goals were to (1) enhance testing for HER2/neu overexpression in patients with invasive breast cancer; (2) increase the appropriate use of targeted therapy for patients with HER2+ breast cancer; and (3) enhance patients' coping ability. This Performance Improvement Continuing Medical Education (PI-CME) initiative included clinical practice assessment, educational activities, and reassessment. Chart review revealed a high rate of HER2 testing (98%) before and after education. Targeted therapy for patients with HER2+ breast cancer declined after the program (from 96% to 61%), perhaps attributable to an increase in awareness of medical reasons to avoid use of targeted therapy. Assessment for patients' emotional coping ability increased after education (from 55% to 76%; P=.01). Rates of testing for HER2 amplification and assessment of emotional well-being after education were consistent with ASCO Quality Oncology Practice Initiative benchmark values. Documentation of actions to address emotional problems remained an area for improvement. PMID:26285246

  4. Why S, Not X, Marks the Spot for CME/Flare Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse; Gary, Allen; Cirtain, Jonathan; Falconer, David

    2010-01-01

    For any major CME/flare eruption: I. The field that erupts is an arcade in which the interior is greatly sheared and twisted. Most of the free magnetic energy to be released: a) Is in the shear and twist of the interior field. b) Is Not due to a big current sheet. The eruption is unleashed by reconnection at a growing current sheet. The current sheet is still little when the reconnection turns on. The unleashed eruption then makes the current sheet much bigger by building it up faster than the reconnection can tear it down. II. Most X-ray jets work the opposite way: a) Tapped free energy is in the field of a pre-jet current sheet. b) Current sheet built by small arcade emerging into ambient field. c) Current sheet still much smaller than the arcade when reconnection turns on and tears it down, producing a jet. III. These rules reflect the low-beta condition in the eruptive magnetic field

  5. CME Mass Estimates via EVE Coronal Dimmings for X-class Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.; Hannah, Iain; Schrijver, Karel

    2014-06-01

    The EVE instrument on SDO detects post-flare dimmings, mainly in the spectral regions of Fe IX-XII in its MEGS-A range, which is available for most of the 29 X-class flares that have occurred between SDO launch and the end of April 2014. Based upon earlier X-ray observations we interpret these dimmings as the result of CME mass ejection from the low corona. We estimate the masses involved in these dimmings by deriving a best pre-event temperature and emission measure in the dimmed region from EVE, and a source volume from AIA images. The dimming for SOL2011-02-15, the first of these events, "peaked"at -3.4% in Fe IX in terms of the pre-event emission from the whole Sun, with smaller relative depletions in higher ionization states of Fe. The "maximum" occurred more than one hour after GOES peak. The dimming signature is generally cleanly measurable in the EVE/MEGS-A spectral samples at10 s cadence, with the dominant source of uncertainty stemming from the "sun-as-a-star" integrations; for example flare-related excess emission at a given wavelength tends to compensate for the dimming,and in this sense the mass estimate must be considered a lower limit. We address these uncertainties for the solar case by appealing to the AIA images, but for analogous processes in stellar flares one would not have this luxury.

  6. Comparison of CME masses and kinetic energies near the Sun and in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.; Howard, R. A.; Jackson, B. V.

    1995-01-01

    Masses have now been determined for many of the CMEs observed in the inner heliosphere by the HELIOS 1 and 2 zodiacal light photometers. The speed of the brightest material of each CME has also been measured so that, for events having both mass and speed determinations, the kinetic energies of the CMEs are estimated. We compare the masses and kinetic energies of the individual CMEs measured in the inner heliosphere by HELIOS and near the Sun from observations by the SOLWIND (1979-1983) and SMM coronagraphs (1980). Where feasible we also compare the speeds of the same CMEs. We find that the HELIOS masses and energies tend to be somewhat larger by factors of 2-5 than those derived from the coronagraph data. We also compare the distribution of the masses and energies of the HELIOS and coronagraph CMEs over the solar cycle. These results provide an important baseline for observations of CMEs from coronagraphs, from the ISEE-3/ICE, WIND and Ulysses spacecraft and in the future from SOHO.

  7. Statistical Study of CME Source Locations: I. Understanding CMEs Viewed in Coronagraphs

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yuming; Gui, Bin; Shen, Chenglong; Ye, Pinzhong; Wang, S; 10.1029/2010JA016101

    2011-01-01

    How to properly understand coronal mass ejections (CMEs) viewed in white-light coronagraphs is crucial to many relative researches in solar and space physics. The issue is now particularly addressed in this paper through studying the source locations of all the 1078 LASCO CMEs listed in CDAW CME catalog during 1997 -- 1998 and their correlation with CMEs' apparent parameters. By manually checking LASCO and EIT movies of these CMEs, we find that, except 231 CMEs whose source locations can not be identified due to poor data, there are 288 CMEs with location identified on the front-side solar disk, 234 CMEs appearing above solar limb, and 325 CMEs without evident eruptive signatures in the field of view of EIT. Based on the statistical results of CMEs' source locations, four physical issues, including (1) the missing rate of CMEs by SOHO LASCO and EIT, (2) the mass of CMEs, (3) the causes of halo CMEs and (4) the deflections of CMEs in the corona, are exhaustively analyzed. It is found that (1) about 32% of fron...

  8. Trauma-Informed Medical Care: A CME Communication Training for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bonnie L.; Saunders, Pamela A.; Power, Elizabeth; Dass-Brailsford, Priscilla; Schelbert, Kavitha Bhat; Giller, Esther; Wissow, Larry; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Mete, Mihriye

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Trauma exposure predicts mental disorders, medical morbidity, and healthcare costs. Yet trauma-related impacts have not received sufficient attention in primary care provider (PCP) training programs. This study adapted a theory-based approach to working with trauma survivors, Risking Connection, into a 6-hour CME course, Trauma-Informed Medical Care (TI-Med), and evaluated its efficacy. METHODS: We randomized PCPs to training or wait-list (delay) conditions; waitlist groups were trained after reassessment. The primary outcome assessing newly acquired skills was a patient-centeredness score derived from Roter Interactional Analysis System ratings of 90 taped visits between PCPs and standardized patients (SPs). PCPs were Family Medicine residents (n=17) and community physicians (n=13; 83% Family Medicine specialty), from four sites in the Washington DC metropolitan area. RESULTS: Immediately trained PCPs trended toward a larger increase in patient-centeredness than did the delayed PCPs (p < .09), with a moderate effect size (.66). The combined trained PCP groups showed a significant increase in patient-centeredness pre to post training, p < .01, Cohen’s D = .61. CONCLUSIONS: This is a promising approach to supporting relationship-based trauma-informed care among PCPs to help promote better patient health and higher compliance with medical treatment plans. PMID:25646872

  9. Development of a full ice-cream cone model for halo CME structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae

    2015-04-01

    The determination of three dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, source location) of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is very important for space weather forecast. To estimate these parameters, several cone models based on a flat cone or a shallow ice-cream cone with spherical front have been suggested. In this study, we investigate which cone model is proper for halo CME morphology using 33 CMEs which are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or STEREO-A or B) and as limb CMEs by the other ones. From geometrical parameters of these CMEs such as their front curvature, we find that near full ice-cream cone CMEs (28 events) are dominant over shallow ice-cream cone CMEs (5 events). So we develop a new full ice-cream cone model by assuming that a full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. This model is carried out by the following steps: (1) construct a cone for given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection points with the observed ones. We apply this model to several halo CMEs and compare the results with those from other methods such as a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model and a geometrical triangulation method.

  10. Numerical experiments of magnetic reconnection in the solar flare and CME current sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zhixing; Lin, Jun; Shen, Chengcai

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection plays a critical role in the energy conversion in the solar eruption. This paper performs a set of MHD experiments for the magnetic reconnection process in a current sheet formed in a disrupting magnetic configuration. The eruption results from the loss of equilibrium in the magnetic configuration that includes a current-carrying flux rope, which is used to model the filament floating in the corona. In order to study the fine structure and micro process inside the current sheet (CS), the mesh refinement technology is used to depress the numerical diffusion. A uniform physical diffusion is applied and results in a Lundquist number S=10^4 in the vicinity of CS. Because of the advantage of the foregoing setting, some features appear with high resolution, including plasmoids due to the tearing mode and the plasmoid instabilities, turbulence regions, and the slow mode shocks. Inside CS, magnetic reconnection goes through the Sweet-Parker and the fractal fashions, and eventually, it displays a time-dependent Petschek pattern. Our results seem to support the concept of fractal reconnection suggested by Shibata et al. (1995) and Shibata & Tanuma (2001). And our results suggest that the CS evolves through a Sweet-Parker reconnection prior to the fast reconnection stage. For the first time, the detailed features and/or fine structures inside the CME/flare CS in the eruption were investigated in this work.

  11. Transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Langer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made an important contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. First-generation transdermal delivery systems have continued their steady increase in clinical use for delivery of small, lipophilic, low-dose drugs. Second-generation delivery systems using chemical enhancers, non-cavitational ultrasound and iontophoresis have also resulted in clinical products; the ability of iontophoresis to control delivery rates in real time provides added functionality. Third-generation delivery systems target their effects to skin’s barrier layer of stratum corneum using microneedles, thermal ablation, microdermabrasion, electroporation and cavitational ultrasound. Microneedles and thermal ablation are currently progressing through clinical trials for delivery of macromolecules and vaccines, such as insulin, parathyroid hormone and influenza vaccine. Using these novel second- and third-generation enhancement strategies, transdermal delivery is poised to significantly increase impact on medicine. PMID:18997767

  12. Thermosensitive polymers for drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Gutowska, A.; Kim, Sung Wan

    1996-12-31

    Thermosensitive polymers (TSP) demonstrating temperature-dependent temperature-dependent swelling in water have been extensively studied in recent years. Their molecular and physical properties have been tailored for a variety of biomedical and engineering uses. This presentation will discuss TSP based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its crosslinked networks modified with hydrophobic or hydrophilic components by copolymerization blending and formation of interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs). TSP designed for three different areas of drug delivery will be presented. First, heparin releasing temperature-sensitive polymers for the prevention of surface induced thrombosis will be presented as an example of a local macromolecular delivery from a surface of a medical device. Second, a new oral delivery device based on a novel mechanical squeezing concept, utilizing specific swelling-deswelling characteristics of temperature- and temperature/pH-sensitive hydrogels will be described. These hydrogels were synthesized to exhibit a controlled swelling-deswelling kinetics, hence a variety of release profiles may be generated: a delayed, a zero-order or an {open_quotes}on-off{close_quotes} release profile. Finally, thermally reversible polymeric gels as an extracellular matrix for the entrapment of pancreatic islet cells in biohybrid artificial pancreas for insulin delivery will be discussed.

  13. E-mail access to NetCME: implementation of server push paradigm.

    PubMed Central

    McEnery, K. W.; Grossman, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a Continuing Medical Education project which utilizes e-mail delivery of HTML documents to facilitate participant access to case material. HTML e-mail is displayed directly within the e-mail reader of the Netscape browser. This system of proactive educational content delivery ensures simultaneous distribution to all participants. Although a more effective method of content distribution, the system preserves user confidentiality and maintains security. HTML e-mail is non-proprietary and could be integrated into existing Internet-based educational projects to facilitate user access. Images p694-a Figure 5 PMID:9357714

  14. Healthcare Delivery Research Blog

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Search form Search Search Healthcare Delivery Research Blog Toggle navigation Healthcare Delivery Research Blog Home Blog Purpose and Policies About HDRP Contact Us Subscribe

  15. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “landward” in Table 6.2, Volume I of... vegetation (e.g., wetlands, seagrass, or kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as... vegetation (e.g., wetlands, seagrass, or kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef). Tidal...

  16. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “landward” in Table 6.2, Volume I of... vegetation (e.g., wetlands, seagrass, or kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as... vegetation (e.g., wetlands, seagrass, or kelp) or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef). Tidal...

  17. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “landward...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “seaward...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef). Tidal current...

  18. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “landward...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “seaward...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef). Tidal current...

  19. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “landward...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “seaward...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef). Tidal current...

  20. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “landward...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “seaward...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef). Tidal current...

  1. 43 CFR Appendix II to Part 11 - Format for Data Inputs and Modifications to the NRDAM/CME

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “landward...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef) and is classified as “seaward...or invertebrate reef (e.g., coral reef). Tidal current...

  2. Articulating feedstock delivery device

    DOEpatents

    Jordan, Kevin

    2013-11-05

    A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

  3. Coronal mass ejection (CME) activity of low mass M stars as an important factor for the habitability of terrestrial exoplanets. I. CME impact on expected magnetospheres of Earth-like exoplanets in close-in habitable zones.

    PubMed

    Khodachenko, Maxim L; Ribas, Ignasi; Lammer, Helmut; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Leitner, Martin; Selsis, Franck; Eiroa, Carlos; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Biernat, Helfried K; Farrugia, Charles J; Rucker, Helmut O

    2007-02-01

    Low mass M- and K-type stars are much more numerous in the solar neighborhood than solar-like G-type stars. Therefore, some of them may appear as interesting candidates for the target star lists of terrestrial exoplanet (i.e., planets with mass, radius, and internal parameters identical to Earth) search programs like Darwin (ESA) or the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph/Inferometer (NASA). The higher level of stellar activity of low mass M stars, as compared to solar-like G stars, as well as the closer orbital distances of their habitable zones (HZs), means that terrestrial-type exoplanets within HZs of these stars are more influenced by stellar activity than one would expect for a planet in an HZ of a solar-like star. Here we examine the influences of stellar coronal mass ejection (CME) activity on planetary environments and the role CMEs may play in the definition of habitability criterion for the terrestrial type exoplanets near M stars. We pay attention to the fact that exoplanets within HZs that are in close proximity to low mass M stars may become tidally locked, which, in turn, can result in relatively weak intrinsic planetary magnetic moments. Taking into account existing observational data and models that involve the Sun and related hypothetical parameters of extrasolar CMEs (density, velocity, size, and occurrence rate), we show that Earth-like exoplanets within close-in HZs should experience a continuous CME exposure over long periods of time. This fact, together with small magnetic moments of tidally locked exoplanets, may result in little or no magnetospheric protection of planetary atmospheres from a dense flow of CME plasma. Magnetospheric standoff distances of weakly magnetized Earth-like exoplanets at orbital distances

  4. Amphiplex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Shannon; Laaser, Jennifer; Lodge, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Polymer-micelle complexes are currently under heavy investigation due to their potential applications in targeted drug delivery and gene therapy, yet the dynamics of the complex formation is still relatively unstudied. By varying the ratios of poly(styrene sulfonate) chains and cationic poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(styrene) micelles and the ionic strength of the system, we created a variety of complex configurations of different sizes and charges. The complexes were characterized dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements which provided information regarding the hydrodynamic radius, distribution of sizes, and effective charge.

  5. Coronal mass ejection (CME) activity of low mass M stars as an important factor for the habitability of terrestrial exoplanets. II. CME-induced ion pick up of Earth-like exoplanets in close-in habitable zones.

    PubMed

    Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Kulikov, Yuri N; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Terada, N; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Biernat, Helfried K; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Ribas, Ignasi; Penz, Thomas; Selsis, Franck

    2007-02-01

    Atmospheric erosion of CO2-rich Earth-size exoplanets due to coronal mass ejection (CME)-induced ion pick up within close-in habitable zones of active M-type dwarf stars is investigated. Since M stars are active at the X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) wave-lengths over long periods of time, we have applied a thermal balance model at various XUV flux input values for simulating the thermospheric heating by photodissociation and ionization processes due to exothermic chemical reactions and cooling by the CO2 infrared radiation in the 15 microm band. Our study shows that intense XUV radiation of active M stars results in atmospheric expansion and extended exospheres. Using thermospheric neutral and ion densities calculated for various XUV fluxes, we applied a numerical test particle model for simulation of atmospheric ion pick up loss from an extended exosphere arising from its interaction with expected minimum and maximum CME plasma flows. Our results indicate that the Earth-like exoplanets that have no, or weak, magnetic moments may lose tens to hundreds of bars of atmospheric pressure, or even their whole atmospheres due to the CME-induced O ion pick up at orbital distances CME plasma erosion. Therefore, we suggest that larger and more massive terrestrial-type exoplanets may better protect their atmospheres against CMEs, because the larger cores of such exoplanets would generate stronger magnetic moments and their higher gravitational acceleration would constrain the expansion of their thermosphere-exosphere regions and reduce atmospheric escape. PMID:17407407

  6. Comparison of the CME-associated shock arrival times at the earth using the WSA-ENLIL model with three cone models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, S.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2012-12-01

    We have made a comparison of CME-associated shock arrival times at the earth based on the WSA-ENLIL model with three cone models using 29 halo CMEs from 2001 to 2002. These halo CMEs have cone model parameters from Michalek et al. (2007) as well as their associated interplanetary (IP) shocks. For this study we consider three different cone models (an asymmetric cone model, an ice-cream cone model and an elliptical cone model) to determine CME cone parameters (radial velocity, angular width and source location), which are used for input parameters of the WSA-ENLIL model. The mean absolute error (MAE) of the arrival times for the elliptical cone model is 10 hours, which is about 2 hours smaller than those of the other models. However, this value is still larger than that (8.7 hours) of an empirical model by Kim et al. (2007). We are investigating several possibilities on relatively large errors of the WSA-ENLIL cone model, which may be caused by CME-CME interaction, background solar wind speed, and/or CME density enhancement.

  7. Testing the estimated hypothetical response of a major CME impact on Earth and its implications to space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Ramkumar; Reiff, Patricia; Russell, C. T.

    2015-05-01

    The high-speed coronal mass ejection (CME), ejected on 23 July 2012, observed by STEREO-A on the same day as the leading edge of the CME arrived at 1AU was unique both in respect to the observed plasma and magnetic structure and the large solar energetic particle flux that dynamically regulated the shock front. Because of its great intensity, it has been hailed as "Carrington 2" by some, warning that, had that CME been heading toward the Earth, it might have caused a major space weather event. We used the Rice Artificial Neural Network algorithms with the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field parameters measured in situ by STEREO-A as inputs to infer what the "geoeffectiveness" of that storm might have been. We have also used an MHD model in Open Geospace General Circulation Model to understand the global magnetospheric process in time sequence. We presently show our neural network models of Kp and Dst on our real-time prediction site: http://mms.rice.edu/realtime/forecast.html. Running this event through our models showed that, in fact, this would have been an exceptional event. Our results show a prediction resulting in a Kp value of 8+, a Dst of nearly -250 nT, but when assumptions about maximum dipole angle tilt and density are made, predictions resulting in Kp of 11- and Dst dipping close to -700 nT are found. Finally, when solar energetic proton flux is included, the Kp and Dst predictions drop to 8- and ?-625 nT, respectively.

  8. Global Numerical Modeling of SEP Acceleration by a CME Shock in the Solar Corona and Subsequent Transport to 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarev, K. A.; Evans, R. M.; Schwadron, N. A.; Dayeh, M. A.; Opher, M.; van der Holst, B.

    2012-12-01

    It has been suggested that solar energetic particles (SEP) may gain most of their energy at coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven shocks relatively close to the Sun. The observed and modeled Alfven speed profiles in the solar corona allow for fast shocks to develop within 10 solar radii. In addition, rapid changes occur in the ejected plasma structures and there is a great abundance of charged seed particles close to the Sun relative to the interplanetary populations. The combination of these conditions is favorable for the acceleration of large SEP fluxes, especially protons. However, the details of the acceleration process remain hidden due to the lack of in situ observations in the corona. As the next generation of solar exploratory missions (Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter) gets ready to probe the plasma and particle conditions near the Sun directly, a better understanding of SEP acceleration processes in the corona is necessary. We have developed a comprehensive model for studying proton acceleration and global interplanetary transport. It consists of two parts: a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model of the solar corona and interplanetary space (part of the Space Weather Modeling Framework), which we use to simulate the corona, solar wind, and a CME; and a global energetic particle acceleration and transport kinetic model (the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Module), which uses the results from the MHD simulation to model the time-dependent behavior of protons from the corona to 1 AU. We show that the shock and plasma structures may efficiently accelerate suprathermal protons to hundreds of MeV energies during their transit. We find that the resulting SEP spectra vary greatly depending on the location of their guiding field lines relative to the shock and CME.

  9. The solar minimum X2.6/1B flare and CME of 9 July 1996. Pt. 1; Solar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, M. D.; Dryer, M.; Aurass, H.; DeForest, C.; Kiplinger, A. L.; Meisner, R.; Paswaters, S. E.; Smith, Z.; Tappin, S. J.; Thompson, B. J.; Watari, S.-I.; Lamy, P.; Mann, G.; Schwenn, R.; Michels, D. J.; Brueckner, G. E.; Howard, R. A.; Koomen, M.

    1997-01-01

    The solar observations from GOES-8, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Yohkoh satellite concerning the events of the X-class flare are discussed. The Michelson Doppler imager (MDI) magnetometer shows a new region of magnetic activity in AR 7978. The rapid development and evolution of this region is shown by the MDI and the extreme-ultraviolet Doppler telescope (EDT) data. The coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed using coronagraphs are presented. The possible association between the CME and the X-flare is considered.

  10. One Quiz File, Several Modes of Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, John C.

    2012-01-01

    This report offers online course designers, particularly those keen on using Moodle CMSs, a means of diversifying accessibility to their educational materials via multiple modes of delivery that do not require the creation of numerous files and formats for just one activity. The author has made contributions to the development of an open source…

  11. An Asynchronous Augmentation to Traditional Course Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Marvin L.; Wolverton, Mimi

    Asynchronous augmentation facilitates distributed learning, which relies heavily on technology and self-learning. This paper reports the results of delivering a real estate principles course using an asynchronous course delivery format. It highlights one of many ways to enhance learning using technology, and it provides information concerning how…

  12. Information Delivery Systems: The Future Is Here.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Penelope Grenoble

    1993-01-01

    Looks at developments in information delivery (including new interactive media formats, vastly increased channel capacity for standard cable television, and the development of wireless cable and other distribution technologies) that are revolutionizing the communications industry. Raises questions about the role technical communicators are being…

  13. A Parametric Study of Erupting Flux Rope Rotation: Modeling the 'Cartwheel CME' on 9 April 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliem, B.; Toeroek, T.; Thompson, W. T.

    2012-01-01

    The rotation of erupting filaments in the solar corona is addressed through a parametric simulation study of unstable, rotating flux ropes in bipolar force-free initial equilibrium. The Lorentz force due to the external shear-field component and the relaxation of tension in the twisted field are the major contributors to the rotation in this model, while reconnection with the ambient field is of minor importance, due to the field's simple structure. In the low-beta corona, the rotation is not guided by the changing orientation of the vertical field component's polarity inversion line with height. The model yields strong initial rotations which saturate in the corona and differ qualitatively from the profile of rotation vs. height obtained in a recent simulation of an eruption without preexisting flux rope. Both major mechanisms writhe the flux rope axis, converting part of the initial twist helicity, and produce rotation profiles which, to a large part, are very similar within a range of shear-twist combinations. A difference lies in the tendency of twist-driven rotation to saturate at lower heights than shear-driven rotation. For parameters characteristic of the source regions of erupting filaments and coronal mass ejections, the shear field is found to be the dominant origin of rotations in the corona and to be required if the rotation reaches angles of order 90 degrees and higher; it dominates even if the twist exceeds the threshold of the helical kink instability. The contributions by shear and twist to the total rotation can be disentangled in the analysis of observations if the rotation and rise profiles are simultaneously compared with model calculations. The resulting twist estimate allows one to judge whether the helical kink instability occurred. This is demonstrated for the erupting prominence in the "Cartwheel CME" on 9 April 2008, which has shown a rotation of approximately 115 deg. up to a height of 1.5 Solar R above the photosphere. Out of a range of initial equilibria which include strongly kink-unstable (Phi = 5 pi), weakly kink-unstable (Phi = 3.5 pi), and kink-stable (Phi = 2.5 pi) configurations, only the evolution of the weakly kink-unstable flux rope matches the observations in their entirety.

  14. Substorms and polar cap convection: the 10 January 2004 interplanetary CME case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andalsvik, Y.; Sandholt, P. E.; Farrugia, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    The expansion-contraction model of Dungey cell plasma convection has two different convection sources, i.e. reconnections at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail. The spatial-temporal structure of the nightside source is not yet well understood. In this study we shall identify temporal variations in the winter polar cap convection structure during substorm activity under steady interplanetary conditions. Substorm activity (electrojets and particle precipitations) is monitored by excellent ground-satellite DMSP F15 conjunctions in the dusk-premidnight sector. We take advantage of the wide latitudinal coverage of the IMAGE chain of ground magnetometers in Svalbard - Scandinavia - Russia for the purpose of monitoring magnetic deflections associated with polar cap convection and substorm electrojets. These are augmented by direct observations of polar cap convection derived from SuperDARN radars and cross-track ion drift observations during traversals of polar cap along the dusk-dawn meridian by spacecraft DMSP F13. The interval we study is characterized by moderate, stable forcing of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system (EKL = 4.0-4.5 mV m-1; cross polar cap potential (CPCP), ? (Boyle) = 115 kV) during Earth passage of an interplanetary CME (ICME), choosing an 4-h interval where the magnetic field pointed continuously south-west (Bz < 0; By < 0). The combination of continuous monitoring of ground magnetic deflections and the F13 cross-track ion drift observations in the polar cap allows us to infer the temporal CPCP structure on time scales less than the ~10 min duration of F13 polar cap transits. We arrived at the following estimates of the dayside and nightside contributions to the CPCP (CPCP = CPCP/day + CPCP/night) under two intervals of substorm activity: CPCP/day ~110 kV; CPCP/night ~50 kV (45% CPCP increase during substorms). The temporal CPCP structure during one of the substorm cases resulted in a dawn-dusk convection asymmetry measured by DMSP F13 which is opposite to that expected from the prevailing negative By polarity of the ICME magnetic field, a clear indication of a nightside source.

  15. Use of Yohkoh SXT in Measuring the Net Current and CME Productivity of Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In our investigation of the correlation of global nonpotentiality of active regions to their CME productivity (Falconer, D.A. 2001, JGR, in press, and Falconer, Moore, & Gary, 2000, EOS 82, 20 S323), we use Yohkoh SXT images for two purposes. The first use is to help resolve the 180 degree ambiguity in the direction of the observed transverse magnetic field. Resolution of the 180 degree ambiguity is important, since the net current, one of our measures of global nonpotentiality, is derived from integrating the dot product of the transverse field around a contour (I(sub N)=(integral)BT(raised dot)dl). The ambiguity results from the observed transverse field being determined from the linear polarization, which gives the plane of the direction, but leaves a 180 degrees ambiguity. Automated methods to resolve the ambiguity ranging from the simple acute angle rule (Falconer, D.A. 2001) to the more sophisticated annealing method (Metcalf T.R. 1994). For many active regions, especially ones that are nearly potential these methods work well. But for very nonpotential active regions where the shear angle (the angle between the observed and potential transverse field) is near 90 degrees throughout large swaths along the main neutral line, both methods can resolve the ambiguity incorrectly for long segments of the neutral line. By determining from coronal images, such as those from Yohkoh/SXT, the sense of shear along the main neutral line in the active region, these cases can be identified and corrected by a modification of the acute angle rule described here. The second use of Yohkoh/SXT in this study is to check for the cusped coronal arcades of long-duration eruptive flares. This signature is an excellent proxy for CMEs, and was used by Canfield, Hudson, and McKenzie (1999 GRL V26, 6, 627-630). This work is funded by NSF through the Space Weather Program and by NASA through the Solar Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program.

  16. Using SOHO to Understand CME-Producing Quiet-Region Filament Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.; Harra, L. K.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years we have been studying solar eruptions in an attempt to determine their primary initiation mechanism. We have focused on events involving filaments, because motions of the filaments just prior to their violent eruption are indicative of changes in the entire magnetic field system involved in the eruption. When the pre-eruption filament resides in a quiet region, the motions leading up to eruption are slower than in similar eruptions in active regions due to the weaker magnetic field strength and correspondingly lower Alfven velocities. These early motions manifest themselves in a slow rise (a few km/s) of the filament, in some cases lasting several hours. After this the filament and associated magnetic structures erupt rapidly, accelerating to speeds of a few 10 kmh over a few minutes. Because of their slow evolution, quiet-region eruptions such as these can be effectively studied in EUV with SOHO/EIT, with its regular cadence of about 12 min. For several cases we have combined EIT images with SOHO/MDI magnetograms and data from other other instruments, and compared our observations with predictions from various eruption scenarios, in particular the "breakout" (Antiochos 1998), "tether cutting" (e.g., Moore et al. 2001), and MHD instability mechanisms. Here we present a representative example of a quiet-region eruption involving a filament ejection, that occurred on 2001 February 28 in a magnetically quadrupolar region and produced a halo CME in SOHO/LASCO images. In addition to EIT and MDI, we analyzed spectral data from SOHO/CDS and soft X-ray (SXR) images from Yohkoh/SXT. We found that flux emergence occurred near one end of the filament, and that both this emergence and resulting microflaring in SXRs and EUV were temporally and spatially closely related to the start of the filament's slow rise. Intensity changes (dimmings and brightenings) in the EIT and SXT images indicate that fields far removed from the erupting core were involved in the eruption, and that breakout-type reconnection did occur. Our observations allow us to investigate whether breakout was the trigger of the eruption, or merely a consequence of a more fundamental eruption process such as tether cutting or MHD instability occurring in a complex magnetic environment.

  17. Real-Time CME Forecasting Using HMI Active-Region Magnetograms and Flare History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2011-01-01

    We have recently developed a method of predicting an active region s probability of producing a CME, an X-class Flare, an M-class Flare, or a Solar Energetic Particle Event from a free-energy proxy measured from SOHO/MDI line-of-sight magnetograms. This year we have added three major improvements to our forecast tool: 1) Transition from MDI magnetogram to SDO/HMI magnetogram allowing us near-real-time forecasts, 2) Automation of acquisition and measurement of HMI magnetograms giving us near-real-time forecasts (no older than 2 hours), and 3) Determination of how to improve forecast by using the active region s previous flare history in combination with its free-energy proxy. HMI was turned on in May 2010 and MDI was turned off in April 2011. Using the overlap period, we have calibrated HMI to yield what MDI would measure. This is important since the value of the free-energy proxy used for our forecast is resolution dependent, and the forecasts are made from results of a 1996-2004 database of MDI observations. With near-real-time magnetograms from HMI, near-real-time forecasts are now possible. We have augmented the code so that it continually acquires and measures new magnetograms as they become available online, and updates the whole-sun forecast from the coming day. The next planned improvement is to use an active region s previous flare history, in conjunction with its free-energy proxy, to forecast the active region s event rate. It has long been known that active regions that have produced flares in the past are likely to produce flares in the future, and that active regions that are nonpotential (have large free-energy) are more likely to produce flares in the future. This year we have determined that persistence of flaring is not just a reflection of an active region s free energy. In other words, after controlling for free energy, we have found that active regions that have flared recently are more likely to flare in the future.

  18. Intracochlear Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Advances in molecular biology and in the basic understanding of the mechanisms associated with sensorineural hearing loss and other diseases of the inner ear, are paving the way towards new approaches for treatments for millions of patients. However, the cochlea is a particularly challenging target for drug therapy, and new technologies will be required to provide safe and efficacious delivery of these compounds. Emerging delivery systems based on microfluidic technologies are showing promise as a means for direct intracochlear delivery. Ultimately, these systems may serve as a means for extended delivery of regenerative compounds to restore hearing in patients suffering from a host of auditory diseases. Areas covered in this review Recent progress in the development of drug delivery systems capable of direct intracochlear delivery is reviewed, including passive systems such as osmotic pumps, active microfluidic devices, and systems combined with currently available devices such as cochlear implants. The aim of this article is to provide a concise review of intracochlear drug delivery systems currently under development, and ultimately capable of being combined with emerging therapeutic compounds for the treatment of inner ear diseases. Expert Opinion Safe and efficacious treatment of auditory diseases will require the development of microscale delivery devices, capable of extended operation and direct application to the inner ear. These advances will require miniaturization and integration of multiple functions, including drug storage, delivery, power management and sensing, ultimately enabling closed-loop control and timed-sequence delivery devices for treatment of these diseases. PMID:21615213

  19. Formation of slow shock pairs associated with coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. V.

    1990-01-01

    The formation of a forward-reverse slow shock pair in the solar corona is presently simulated by an MHD model that uses the Rankine-Hugoniot solution to calculate the flow-property jumps at all shock crossings. The shocks divide the solution-domain into several continuous flow regions whose respective governing characteristics are solved by the method of characteristics. The plasma impact compresses the plasma near the front of the coronal mass ejection (CME); as the CME-associated slow shock pair moves outwards in interplanetary space, it evolves into a pair of fast shocks. All three phenomena are eventually manifested in interplanetary space as a magnetic cloud accompanied by a fast shock pair, with a forward shock preceding the cloud and a reverse shock appearing either within or behind the cloud.

  20. Tracking the momentum flux of a CME and quantifying its influence on geomagnetically induced currents at Earth

    E-print Network

    Savani, Neel P; Pulkkinen, A; Nieves-Chinchilla, T; Lavraud, B; Owens, M J

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a CME propagating towards Earth on 29 March 2011. This event is specifically chosen for its predominately northward directed magnetic field, so that the influence from the momentum flux onto Earth can be isolated. We focus our study on understanding how a small Earth-directed segment propagates. Mass images are created from the white-light cameras onboard STEREO which are also converted into mass height-time maps (mass J-maps). The mass tracks on these J-maps correspond to the sheath region between the CME and its associated shock front as detected by in situ measurements at L1. A time-series of mass measurements from the STEREO COR-2A instrument are made along the Earth propagation direction. Qualitatively, this mass time-series shows a remarkable resemblance to the L1 in situ density series. The in situ measurements are used as inputs into a 3D magnetospheric space weather simulation from CCMC. These simulations display a sudden compression of the magnetosphere from the large momentum flux at...

  1. Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    The development of nonviral vectors for safe and efficient gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. An ideal nonviral vector must protect the gene against degradation by nuclease in the extracellular matrix, internalize the plasma membrane, escape from the endosomal compartment, unpackage the gene at some point and have no detrimental effects. In comparison to viruses, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to synthesize, less immunogenic, low in cost, and have no limitation in the size of a gene that can be delivered. Significant progress has been made in the basic science and applications of various nonviral gene delivery vectors; however, the majority of nonviral approaches are still inefficient and often toxic. To this end, two nonviral gene delivery systems using either biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles or cell penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes have been designed and studied using A549 human lung epithelial cells. PLG nanoparticles were optimized for gene delivery by varying particle surface chemistry using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (˜200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80-90%) and slowly released the same for two weeks. After a delay, moderate levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least two weeks. In contrast, gene expression mediated by polyethyleneimine (PEI) ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. On the other hand, a more simple method to synthesize 50-200 nm complexes capable of high transfection efficiency or high gene knockdown was also explored. Positively charged CPPs were complexed with pDNA or siRNA, which resulted in 'loose' (˜1 micron) particles. These were then condensed into small nanoparticles by using calcium, which formed "soft" crosslinks by interacting with both phosphates on nucleic acids and amines on CPPs. An optimal amount of CaCl2 produced stable, ˜100 nm complexes that exhibited higher transfection efficiency and gene silencing than PEI polyplexes. CPPs also displayed negligible cytotoxicity up to 5 mg/mL. Biophysical studies of the pDNA structure within complexes suggested that pDNA within CPP complexes (condensed with calcium) had similar structure, but enhanced thermal stability compared to PEI complexes. Thus, CPP complexes emerged as simple, attractive candidates for future studies on nonviral gene delivery in vivo.

  2. The US Postal Service (USPS) met with UCSF early in 2015 and confirmed that Mission Hall occupants should use the addressing format listed below to ensure timely delivery of USPS

    E-print Network

    Mullins, Dyche

    For UPS, Fedex, DHL, etc.: For UPS, Fedex, and other carriers you must use your geographic zip code, which://tools.usps.com/go/ZipLookupAction!input.action Sample Address for deliveries (FedEx, UPS, etc); Jane Doe UCSF Department Name, Box XXXX 550 16th Street

  3. Novel Aerosol Delivery Devices.

    PubMed

    Singh, Supriya; Kanbar-Agha, Faisal; Sharafkhaneh, Amir

    2015-08-01

    Delivery of medication to sites of action through airways has been used for centuries but has gained momentum in recent decades. Currently available modes of aerosol delivery offer advantages but still there are shortcomings. Delivery of active agents to sites of action is affected by many factors beyond the characteristics of the delivery devices, including the coordination between inhalation and actuation and dependence on the patient's inspiratory flow and breathing pattern. Recent advances in drug delivery focus around changes in the generation of particle size with better penetration to the targeted sites, easier activation of the device with inspiratory flow, ease of use including fewer steps in using the device, and better portability. Availability of computer chips allows for smart delivery devices to tailor delivery to the patient's breathing pattern and lung function. Further, smart devices can provide feedback to patients. Novel inhaler technologies, separately or in combination with new therapeutic agents, are in development not only for respiratory diseases but also for diseases of other systems. This article reviews some of the recent clinically relevant advances in aerosol delivery devices. PMID:26238640

  4. Elective Delivery Before 39 Weeks

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Delivery, and Postpartum Care Elective Delivery Before 39 Weeks • What is a “medically indicated” delivery? • What is ... the baby grow and develop during the last weeks of pregnancy? • What are the risks for babies ...

  5. Quantitative understanding of Forbush decrease drivers based on shock-only and CME-only models using global signature of February 14, 1978 event

    SciTech Connect

    Raghav, Anil; Lotekar, Ajay; Bhaskar, Ankush; Vichare, Geeta; Yadav, Virendra E-mail: ankushbhaskar@gmail.com E-mail: vicharegeeta@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    We have studied the Forbush decrease (FD) event that occurred on February 14, 1978 using 43 neutron monitor observatories to understand the global signature of FD. We have studied rigidity dependence of shock amplitude and total FD amplitude. We have found almost the same power law index for both shock phase amplitude and total FD amplitude. Local time variation of shock phase amplitude and maximum depression time of FD have been investigated which indicate possible effect of shock/CME orientation. We have analyzed rigidity dependence of time constants of two phase recovery. Time constants of slow component of recovery phase show rigidity dependence and imply possible effect of diffusion. Solar wind speed was observed to be well correlated with slow component of FD recovery phase. This indicates solar wind speed as possible driver of recovery phase. To investigate the contribution of interplanetary drivers, shock and CME in FD, we have used shock-only and CME-only models. We have applied these models separately to shock phase and main phase amplitudes respectively. This confirms presently accepted physical scenario that the first step of FD is due to propagating shock barrier and second step is due to flux rope of CME/magnetic cloud.

  6. Evolution of the 2012 July 12 CME from the Sun to the Earth: Data-Constrained Three-Dimensional MHD Simulations

    E-print Network

    Shen, Fang; Zhang, Jie; Hess, Phillip; Wang, Yuming; Feng, Xueshang; Cheng, Hongze; Yang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic process of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the heliosphere provides us the key information for evaluating CMEs' geo-effectiveness and improving the accurate prediction of CME induced Shock Arrival Time (SAT) at the Earth. We present a data constrained three dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the evolution of the CME in a realistic ambient solar wind for the July 12-16, 2012 event by using the 3D COIN-TVD MHD code. A detailed comparison of the kinematic evolution of the CME between the observations and the simulation is carried out, including the usage of the time-elongation maps from the perspectives of both Stereo A and Stereo B. In this case study, we find that our 3D COIN-TVD MHD model, with the magnetized plasma blob as the driver, is able to re-produce relatively well the real 3D nature of the CME in morphology and their evolution from the Sun to Earth. The simulation also provides a relatively satisfactory comparison with the in-situ plasma data from the Wind spacecraf...

  7. Comparative Guide to DCE Marketing Services Tiers All live CME courses accredited by HMS DCE receive Base Marketing Services.1 These newly streamlined

    E-print Network

    Dorf, Martin E.

    Comparative Guide to DCE Marketing Services Tiers All live CME courses accredited by HMS DCE receive Base Marketing Services.1 These newly streamlined services offer Course Directors and Administrators a standardized, comprehensive and economical solution for email and print marketing. Strategic

  8. Optically generated ultrasound for enhanced drug delivery

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Campbell, Heather L. (Baltimore, MD); Da Silva, Luiz (Danville, CA)

    2002-01-01

    High frequency acoustic waves, analogous to ultrasound, can enhance the delivery of therapeutic compounds into cells. The compounds delivered may be chemotherapeutic drugs, antibiotics, photodynamic drugs or gene therapies. The therapeutic compounds are administered systemically, or preferably locally to the targeted site. Local delivery can be accomplished through a needle, cannula, or through a variety of vascular catheters, depending on the location of routes of access. To enhance the systemic or local delivery of the therapeutic compounds, high frequency acoustic waves are generated locally near the target site, and preferably near the site of compound administration. The acoustic waves are produced via laser radiation interaction with an absorbing media and can be produced via thermoelastic expansion, thermodynamic vaporization, material ablation, or plasma formation. Acoustic waves have the effect of temporarily permeabilizing the membranes of local cells, increasing the diffusion of the therapeutic compound into the cells, allowing for decreased total body dosages, decreased side effects, and enabling new therapies.

  9. Current perspectives on intrathecal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bottros, Michael M; Christo, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Advances in intrathecal analgesia and intrathecal drug delivery systems have allowed for a range of medications to be used in the control of pain and spasticity. This technique allows for reduced medication doses that can decrease the side effects typically associated with oral or parenteral drug delivery. Recent expert panel consensus guidelines have provided care paths in the treatment of nociceptive, neuropathic, and mixed pain syndromes. While the data for pain relief, adverse effect reduction, and cost-effectiveness with cancer pain control are compelling, the evidence is less clear for noncancer pain, other than spasticity. Physicians should be aware of mechanical, pharmacological, surgical, and patient-specific complications, including possible granuloma formation. Newer intrathecal drug delivery systems may allow for better safety and quality of life outcomes. PMID:25395870

  10. Correlation of the CME Productivity of Solar Active Regions with Measures of their Global Nonpotentiality from Vector Magnetograms: Baseline Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ron L.; Gary, G. Allen; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    From conventional magnetograms and chromospheric and coronal images, it is known qualitatively that the fastest coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are magnetic explosions from sunspot active regions in which the magnetic field is globally strongly sheared and twisted from its minimum-energy potential configuration. In this paper, we present measurements from active-region vector magnetograms that begin to quantify the dependence of the CME productivity of an active region on the global nonpotentiality of its magnetic field. From each of 17 magnetograms of 12 bipolar active regions, we obtain a measure of the size of the active region (the magnetic flux content, phi) and three different measures of the global nonpotentiality (L(sub SS), the length of strong-shear, strong-field main neutral line; I(sub N), the net electric current arching from one polarity to the other; and alpha = muI(subN/phi), a flux-normalized measure of the field twist).

  11. Utilize the SpareX satellite to explore the energy spectrum ”break” of the CME-driven shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin

    2015-08-01

    Previous observations from the multiple spacecrafts show that there is an energy spectrum “break” at the energy range of 1-10MeV. However, these similar events are sparse relatively. To collecting these energy spectrum events, we will utilize EPT device aboard on the SpareX satellite to focus on the proton energy range of 1-10MeV. Theoretically, the “break” property would be associated with the limited size of the escaped free boundary of the CME-driven shock. In present work we will provide the simulated results of the different size of the foreshock in front of the shock to verify the connection with “break” of the energy spectrum at the energy range of 1-10MeV, which would be detected from the SpareX satellite.

  12. An Ensemble Study of a January 2010 Coronal Mass Ejection (CME): Connecting a Non-obvious Solar Source with Its ICME/Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, D. F.; Bisi, M. M.; de Koning, C. A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Jackson, B. V.; Jian, L. K.; Lugaz, N.; Marubashi, K.; Möstl, C.; Romashets, E. P.; Wood, B. E.; Yu, H.-S.

    2014-11-01

    A distinct magnetic cloud (MC) was observed in-situ at the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO)-B on 20 - 21 January 2010. About three days earlier, on 17 January, a bright flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) were clearly observed by STEREO-B, which suggests that this was the progenitor of the MC. However, the in-situ speed of the event, several earlier weaker events, heliospheric imaging, and a longitude mismatch with the STEREO-B spacecraft made this interpretation unlikely. We searched for other possible solar eruptions that could have caused the MC and found a faint filament eruption and the associated CME on 14 - 15 January as the likely solar source event. We were able to confirm this source by using coronal imaging from the Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI)/EUVI and COR and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronograph (LASCO) telescopes and heliospheric imaging from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) and the STEREO/ Heliospheric Imager instruments. We use several empirical models to understand the three-dimensional geometry and propagation of the CME, analyze the in-situ characteristics of the associated ICME, and investigate the characteristics of the MC by comparing four independent flux-rope model fits with the launch observations and magnetic-field orientations. The geometry and orientations of the CME from the heliospheric-density reconstructions and the in-situ modeling are remarkably consistent. Lastly, this event demonstrates that a careful analysis of all aspects of the development and evolution of a CME is necessary to correctly identify the solar counterpart of an ICME/MC.

  13. Recovering from Delivery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Expect Emotionally Emotionally, you may be feeling: "Baby blues." Many new moms have irritability, sadness, crying, or ... the first several days after delivery. These baby blues are very common and may be related to ...

  14. Nanosize drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Biswajit

    2013-01-01

    Nanosize materials provide hopes, speculations and chances for an unprecedented change in drug delivery in near future. Nanotechnology is an emerging field to produce nanomaterials for drug delivery that can offer a new tool, opportunities and scope to provide more focused and fine-tuned treatment of diseases at a molecular level, enhancing the therapeutic potential of drugs so that they become less toxic and more effective. Nanodimensional drug delivery systems are of great scientific interest as they project their tremendous utility because of their capability of altering biodistribution of therapeutic agents so that they can concentrate more in the target tissues. Nanosize drug delivery systems generally focus on formulating bioactive molecules in biocompatible nanosystems such as nanocrystals, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructure lipid carriers, lipid drug conjugates, nanoliposomes, dendrimers, nanoshells, emulsions, nanotubes, quantum dots etc. Extensively versatile molecules like synthetic chemicals to naturally occurring complex macromolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins could be dispensed in such formulations maintaining their stability and efficacy. Empty viral capsids are being tried to deliver drug as these uniformly sized bionanomaterials can be utilized to load drug to improve solubility, reduce toxicity and provide site specific targeting. Nanomedicines offer a wide scope for delivery of smart materials from tissue engineering to more recently artificial RBCs. Nanocomposites are the future hope for tailored and personalized medicines as well as for bone repairing and rectification of cartilage impairment. Nanosize drug delivery systems are addressing the challenges to overcome the delivery problems of wide ranges of drugs through their narrow submicron particle size range, easily manipulatable surface characteristics in achievement of versatile tissue targeting (includes active and passive drug targeting), controlled and sustained drug release property to achieve increased therapeutic efficacy and reduced side effects. Nanoparticles and nanoliposomes are emerging areas of nanotechnologies that have already begun to make an impact over new modalities for cancer chemotherapy, diagnosis as well as gene delivery. Presently it is possible to reduce the particle size in such a way that the particles can be easily injected or inhaled and many types of human cells are capable to internalize them. A number of fabrications such as PEGylation, specific antibody conjugation, aptamer ligation, specific ligand binding etc. on the nanosize delivery devices makes them in the streamline of research to particularly target the diseased cells thus avoiding the healthy one. Potential of nanosize carriers to cross the blood brain barrier encourages us to build up a new strategy for delivery of therapeutically active agents to the brain. Nanotechnology is showing an emerging effect in chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases etc. Nanosize vaccines are having greater effect in production of better immunity against pathogens through direct administration of medication to the specialized dendritic cells in the immune systems. Lots of hopes and speculations are reigning around the scientists with nanosize drug delivery systems that may revolutionize the drug delivery with the better understanding of drug action mechanism and identification of biomarker associated with specific diseases. Nanosize drug delivery systems are emerging with the promising strategies for efficient targeted drug delivery. The proper designing of these systems can make them capable for being independent in the normal tissue environments and selective at the diseased pharmacological site. Nanomaterials as formulations are already in the market or in clinical trials. Investigation on nanostructural drug delivery is a highly growing field today as an extensive amount of research is on with an expectation to open up new avenues to drug delivery. No doubt the next era of drug therapy will be greater influenced by nanoscale dr

  15. Healthcare Delivery Research Blog

    Cancer.gov

    Over the course of my career I have often been frustrated with the gap between the research I was conducting and the clinical operations of the health care delivery systems with which I was affiliated.

  16. Concept Formation Concept Formation

    E-print Network

    Goldstone, Robert

    Concept Formation 1 Concept Formation Robert L. Goldstone Thomas T. Hills Samuel B. Day Indiana, IN. 47408 Other Correspondences: rgoldsto@indiana.edu (812) 855-4853 Keywords: Concepts, Learning, Representation, Prototypes, Exemplars #12;Concept Formation 2 Concept Formation A concept is a mentally possessed

  17. Nanomedicine in pulmonary delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Heidi M; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Wu, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The lung is an attractive target for drug delivery due to noninvasive administration via inhalation aerosols, avoidance of first-pass metabolism, direct delivery to the site of action for the treatment of respiratory diseases, and the availability of a huge surface area for local drug action and systemic absorption of drug. Colloidal carriers (ie, nanocarrier systems) in pulmonary drug delivery offer many advantages such as the potential to achieve relatively uniform distribution of drug dose among the alveoli, achievement of improved solubility of the drug from its own aqueous solubility, a sustained drug release which consequently reduces dosing frequency, improves patient compliance, decreases incidence of side effects, and the potential of drug internalization by cells. This review focuses on the current status and explores the potential of colloidal carriers (ie, nanocarrier systems) in pulmonary drug delivery with special attention to their pharmaceutical aspects. Manufacturing processes, in vitro/in vivo evaluation methods, and regulatory/toxicity issues of nanomedicines in pulmonary delivery are also discussed. PMID:20054434

  18. A Study of the 12 June 2010 C6.1/SF flare associated with a CME, surge and energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Wahab; Jain, Rajmal; Manoharan, P. K.; Prasad Choudhary, Debi; Charan Dwivedi, Vidya; Aschwanden, Markus; Nitta, Nariaki; Gopalswamy, Nat; Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Chandra, Ramesh; Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Kayshap, Pradeep; Joshi, N. C.; Norris, Max; Makela, Pertti; Mahalaksh, K.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we present the multiwavelength analysis of the C6.1/SF flare on 12 June 2010 from NOAA AR 11081. The flare was observed by various ground based (ARIES H-alpha; HIRAS Radio) and space borne observatories (SDO, STEREO, SOHO, GOES). The flare was accompanied by a spray/surge and a slow coronal mass ejection (CME) that propagated with a speed of ~382 km/s. The eruption was associated with a weak solar energetic particle (SEP) event. The solar source of the eruption was a rapid emerging flux region. The eruption was also associated with the three major types of radio bursts (type II, III and IV). The interesting observation is the shock production (type II burst and SEP event) by a relatively slow CME. We interpret the results in the light of existing theories.

  19. Silicon Nanowires for Bioadhesion and Drug Delivery

    E-print Network

    Fischer, Kathleen Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Generation Adhesive Drug Delivery Systems. Nano Letters 9,Drug Delivery Goals for Oral Delivery Micro- and Nanoparticles Microparticles Nanoparticles Bioadhesion Chemical Bioadhesives Physical Adhesives Nano-

  20. Inner heliospheric evolution of a 'STEALTH' CME derived from multi-view imaging and multipoint in situ observations. I. Propagation to 1 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Vourlidas, A.; Stenborg, G.; Savani, N. P.; Koval, A.; Szabo, A.; Jian, L. K.

    2013-12-10

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main driver of space weather. Therefore, a precise forecasting of their likely geo-effectiveness relies on an accurate tracking of their morphological and kinematical evolution throughout the interplanetary medium. However, single viewpoint observations require many assumptions to model the development of the features of CMEs. The most common hypotheses were those of radial propagation and self-similar expansion. The use of different viewpoints shows that, at least for some cases, those assumptions are no longer valid. From radial propagation, typical attributes that can now be confirmed to exist are over-expansion and/or rotation along the propagation axis. Understanding the 3D development and evolution of the CME features will help to establish the connection between remote and in situ observations, and hence help forecast space weather. We present an analysis of the morphological and kinematical evolution of a STEREO-B-directed CME on 2009 August 25-27. By means of a comprehensive analysis of remote imaging observations provided by the SOHO, STEREO, and SDO missions, and in situ measurements recorded by Wind, ACE, and MESSENGER, we prove in this paper that the event exhibits signatures of deflection, which are usually associated with changes in the direction of propagation and/or also with rotation. The interaction with other magnetic obstacles could act as a catalyst of deflection or rotation effects. We also propose a method to investigate the change of the CME tilt from the analysis of height-time direct measurements. If this method is validated in further work, it may have important implications for space weather studies because it will allow for inference of the interplanetary counterpart of the CME's orientation.

  1. Synopsis of Diet in Dermatology: A one day CME conducted by the Department of Dermatology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal, March 3, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Smitha S; Nayak, Sudhir UK; Shenoi, Shrutakirthi Damodar; Pai, Sathish Ballambat

    2013-01-01

    Food is intricately related to mind and body and is one of the elements sustaining life, in disease as well as in health. There are many myths and misgivings regarding partake of food and its medicinal properties. The Department of Dermatology, Kasturba Medical College (KMC), Manipal organized a continuing medical education (CME) on Diet in Dermatology on 3rd March 2013 focusing on pertinent issues regarding diet and medicinal use of food. PMID:24350027

  2. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  3. Systems and Components Fuel Delivery System, Water Delivery System, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Systems and Components - Fuel Delivery System, Water Delivery System, Derrick Crane System, and Crane System Details - Marshall Space Flight Center, F-1 Engine Static Test Stand, On Route 565 between Huntsville and Decatur, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  4. Hybrid use of combined and sequential delivery of growth factors and ultrasound stimulation in porous multilayer composite scaffolds to promote both vascularization and bone formation in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haoran; Liu, Xia; Zhu, Minghua; Luo, Guilin; Sun, Tao; Peng, Qiang; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Taijun; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Keliang; Feng, Bo; Weng, Jie; Wang, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a multilayer coating technology would be adopted to prepare a porous composite scaffold and the growth factor release and ultrasound techniques were introduced into bone tissue engineering to finally solve the problems of vascularization and bone formation in the scaffold whilst the designed multilayer composite with gradient degradation characteristics in the space was used to match the new bone growth process better. The results of animal experiments showed that the use of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) combined with growth factors demonstrated excellent capabilities and advantages in both vascularization and new bone formation in bone tissue engineering. The degradation of the used scaffold materials could match new bone formation very well. The results also showed that only RGD-promoted cell adhesion was insufficient to satisfy the needs of new bone formation while growth factors and LIPUS stimulation were the key factors in new bone formation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 195-208, 2016. PMID:26282063

  5. Redefining continuing education delivery.

    PubMed

    Carlton, K H

    1997-01-01

    Just as technology is transforming the delivery of education, the Internet and advanced telecommunication applications are changing the "face" of CE and the connotation of "lifelong learning." As late as the mid-1980s, a discussion of computer applications in nursing CE focused on the "timely" transition to microcomputers as tools for the enhancement of managerial tasks for increased productivity. Even as recently as 1990, there seemed to be "time" for those providers who were "slower to adopt innovation" to "catch up." Now, the CE provider who does not integrate the microcomputer and advanced telecommunications as an integral component of their delivery modalities may be outsourced rapidly by an educational or commercial competitive unit that is able to utilize the communication medium, mergers and partnerships, enterprise, and individual lifestyle and learning patterns that will epitomize the CE unit of the 21st century. As with the "re-engineering" of nursing education, the "re-engineered" delivery modalities of evolving CE entity might now best be conceptualized on a continuum from the traditional mode that time and place dependent to a mode of synchronous and asynchronous data and advanced telecommunication. Delivery methods will need to be selected according to the target populations, content, and situation. The health-care educational provider may discover, as in other industries, that a combination of distance and residential offerings will be the most successful medium for the delivery of CE to the progressively more "information and technologically savvy" lifelong learner of the 21st century. In addressing the dramatic effects of the information technology era on the refocused multimedia/interactive delivery method for student education, educators amply quoted Bob Dylan's phrase of the 1960s, "The times, they are a-changing." And so, we see that the times are also changing at an astronomical rate for the health-care educational provider as well as the individual health-care worker consumer. A number of national and world-wide trends are propelling rapid changes in the delivery modalities and types of emerging providers for health-care CE. Examples of these advanced telecommunications applications of CE opportunities for health-care personnel are becoming more prevalent in the literature and the pattern of CE marketing, and delivery evolution can be seen readily on the Internet. Continued program success and viability will belong to the individuals and organizations who are able to conceptualize and envision the positive transformations and opportunities that can occur from the evolving paradigm of education for the lifelong learner of the 21st century. PMID:9014388

  6. Source region of the 2003 November 18 CME that led to the strongest magnetic storm of cycle 23

    E-print Network

    N. Srivastava; S. Mathew; R. Louis; T. Wiegelmann

    2008-12-30

    The super-storm of November 20, 2003 was associated with a high speed coronal mass ejection which originated in the NOAA AR 10501 on November 18. This coronal mass ejection had severe terrestrial consequences leading to a geomagnetic storm with DST index of -472 nT, the strongest of the current solar cycle. In this paper, we attempt to understand the factors that led to the coronal mass ejection on November 18. We have also studied the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field of NOAA AR 10501, the source region of this coronal mass ejection. For this purpose, the MDI line-of-sight magnetograms and vector magnetograms from Solar Flare Telescope, Mitaka, obtained during November, 17-19, 2003 were analysed. In particular, quantitative estimates of the temporal variation in magnetic flux, energy and magnetic field gradient were estimated for the source active region. The evolution of these quantities was studied for the 3-day period with an objective to understand the pre-flare configuration leading up to the moderate flare which was associated with the geo-effective coronal mass ejection. We also examined the chromospheric images recorded in H-alpha from Udaipur Solar Observatory to compare the flare location with regions of different magnetic field and energy. Our observations provide evidence that the flare associated with the CME occurred at a location marked by high magnetic field gradient which led to release of free energy stored in the active region.

  7. Filament Eruption in NOAA 11093 Leading to a Two-Ribbon M1 Class Flare and CME

    E-print Network

    Reddy, Vema; Ambastha, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength analysis of a two ribbon M1.0 class flare that occurred in NOAA Active Region 11093 on August 7, 2010. This event was extensively observed by the recent space borne instruments on board SDO in several wavelengths. Additional observational data was obtained from STEREO, RHESSI and also the ground based NSO/GONG $H\\alpha$ network telescope. From these observations, we inferred an upward rising motion of inverse S-shaped filament lying along the polarity inversion line (PIL) originating at the main sunspot. This motion appears to have triggered the filament eruption subsequent to the reconnection. As a result overlying field lines expanded, exploded as CME and material ejection was observed along the flux rope in STEREO/EUVI-A. The flare ribbons moved with significantly smaller separation velocity as compared to previous reports but not much difference was found in the calculated reconnection rates from the standard flare model. We suggest that observed flux emergence might have cause...

  8. Three-dimensional test particle simulation of the 17-18 March 2013 CME shock-driven storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao; Hudson, Mary; Kress, Brian; Paral, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Three-dimensional test particle simulation of energetic electrons (hundreds of keV to MeV), including both an initially trapped population and continuously injected population, driven by the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD model coupled with Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupler/Solver boundary conditions, is performed for the 17 March 2013 storm. The electron trajectories are calculated and weighted using the ESA model for electron flux versus energy and L. The simulation captures the flux dropout at both GOES 13 and GOES 15 locations after a strong CME (coronal mass ejection)-shock arrival which produced a Dst = -132 nT storm, and recovery to the prestorm value later, consistent with GOES satellite measurements. This study provides the first 3-D test particle simulation combining the trapped and injected populations. The result demonstrates that including both populations in the simulation is essential to study the dynamics of the outer radiation belt over the typical day-long timescale of ring current development, main phase, and early recovery phase.

  9. Nanotopography applications in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Laura A; Allen, Jessica L; Desai, Tejal A

    2015-12-01

    Refinement of micro- and nanofabrication in the semiconductor field has led to innovations in biomedical technologies. Nanotopography, in particular, shows great potential in facilitating drug delivery. The flexibility of fabrication techniques has created a diverse array of topographies that have been developed for drug delivery applications. Nanowires and nanostraws deliver drug cytosolically for in vitro and ex vivo applications. In vivo drug delivery is limited by the barrier function of the epithelium. Nanowires on microspheres increase adhesion and residence time for oral drug delivery, while also increasing permeability of the epithelium. Low aspect ratio nanocolumns increase paracellular permeability, and in conjunction with microneedles increase transdermal drug delivery of biologics in vivo. In summary, nanotopography is a versatile tool for drug delivery. It can deliver directly to cells or be used for in vivo delivery across epithelial barriers. This editorial highlights the application of nanotopography in the field of drug delivery. PMID:26512871

  10. Fluid delivery control system

    DOEpatents

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  11. Caesarean delivery: conflicting interests.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Eduardo; Pérez Cárceles, Maria Dolores; Sánchez Ferrer, Maria Luisa; Machado, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Within the maternal-fetal relationship, interests may sometimes diverge. In this paper, a pregnant woman's refusal to undergo a caesarean delivery, which was recommended both to save the life of the fetus and to minimize risks to her, is described. The legal aspects involved in the conflict between maternal autonomy and fetal well-being are analysed. The patient requested an abortion because of the poor condition of the fetus; however, according to Spanish legislation, the possibility of abortion was rejected as the pregnancy was in its 27th week. The woman still persisted in her refusal to accept a caesarian delivery. After the medical team sought guidance on the course to follow, the Duty Court authorized a caesarean delivery against the wishes of the patient. From a legal point of view, at stake were the freedom of the woman - expressed by the decision to reject a caesarean delivery - and the life of the unborn child. In clinical treatment, the interests of the fetus are generally aligned with those of the pregnant woman. When they are not, it is the pregnant woman's autonomy that should be respected, and coercion should form no part of treatment, contrary to the decision of this court. PMID:26371711

  12. Iontophoretic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Yogeshvar N; Naik, Aarti; Garrison, James; Guy, Richard H

    2004-03-27

    The composition and architecture of the stratum corneum render it a formidable barrier to the topical and transdermal administration of therapeutic agents. The physicochemical constraints severely limit the number of molecules that can be considered as realistic candidates for transdermal delivery. Iontophoresis provides a mechanism to enhance the penetration of hydrophilic and charged molecules across the skin. The principal distinguishing feature is the control afforded by iontophoresis and the ability to individualize therapies. This may become significant as the impact of interindividual variations in protein expression and the effect on drug metabolism and drug efficacy is better understood. In this review we describe the underlying mechanisms that drive iontophoresis and we discuss the impact of key experimental parameters-namely, drug concentration, applied current and pH-on iontophoretic delivery efficiency. We present a comprehensive and critical review of the different therapeutic classes and molecules that have been investigated as potential candidates for iontophoretic delivery. The iontophoretic delivery of peptides and proteins is also discussed. In the final section, we describe the development of the first pre-filled, pre-programmed iontophoretic device, which is scheduled to be commercialized during the course of 2004. PMID:15019750

  13. Vaccine delivery using nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Anthony E.; Titball, Richard; Williamson, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination has had a major impact on the control of infectious diseases. However, there are still many infectious diseases for which the development of an effective vaccine has been elusive. In many cases the failure to devise vaccines is a consequence of the inability of vaccine candidates to evoke appropriate immune responses. This is especially true where cellular immunity is required for protective immunity and this problem is compounded by the move toward devising sub-unit vaccines. Over the past decade nanoscale size (<1000 nm) materials such as virus-like particles, liposomes, ISCOMs, polymeric, and non-degradable nanospheres have received attention as potential delivery vehicles for vaccine antigens which can both stabilize vaccine antigens and act as adjuvants. Importantly, some of these nanoparticles (NPs) are able to enter antigen-presenting cells by different pathways, thereby modulating the immune response to the antigen. This may be critical for the induction of protective Th1-type immune responses to intracellular pathogens. Their properties also make them suitable for the delivery of antigens at mucosal surfaces and for intradermal administration. In this review we compare the utilities of different NP systems for the delivery of sub-unit vaccines and evaluate the potential of these delivery systems for the development of new vaccines against a range of pathogens. PMID:23532930

  14. GENE DELIVERY TO BONE

    PubMed Central

    Evans, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    Gene delivery to bone is useful both as an experimental tool and as a potential therapeutic strategy. Among its advantages over protein delivery are the potential for directed, sustained and regulated expression of authentically processed, nascent proteins. Although no clinical trials have been initiated, there is a substantial pre-clinical literature documenting the successful transfer of genes to bone, and their intraosseous expression. Recombinant vectors derived from adenovirus, retrovirus and lentivirus, as well as non-viral vectors, have been used for this purpose. Both ex vivo and in vivo strategies, including gene-activated matrices, have been explored. Ex vivo delivery has often employed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), partly because of their ability to differentiate into osteoblasts. MSCs also have the potential to home to bone after systemic administration, which could serve as a useful way to deliver transgenes in a disseminated fashion for the treatment of diseases affecting the whole skeleton, such as osteoporosis or osteogenesis imperfecta. Local delivery of osteogenic transgenes, particularly those encoding bone morphogenetic proteins, has shown great promise in a number of applications where it is necessary to regenerate bone. These include healing large segmental defects in long bones and the cranium, as well as spinal fusion and treating avascular necrosis. PMID:22480730

  15. Preliminary analysis of a CME observed by SOHO and Ulysses Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bemporad, A.; Poletto, G.; Romoli, M.; Suess, S. T.

    2003-01-01

    Over the last week of November 2002 SOHO/LASCO observed several Coronal Mass Ejections, most of which occurring in the NW quadrant. At that time SOHO/UVCS was involved in a SOHO-Sun-Ulysses quadrature campaign, making observations off the west limb of the Sun, at a northern latitude of 27 deg. Here we focus on data taken at 1.7 solar radii, over a time interval of approx. 7 hours, on 26/27 November 2002, when a large streamer disruption was imaged by LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. UVCS spectra revealed the presence of lines from both high and low ionization ions, such as C III, O VI, Si VIII, IX, and XII, Fe X and XVIII, which brighten at different times, with a different time scale and at different positions and are apparently related to different phenomena. In particular, the intensity increase and fast disappearance of the C III 977 Angstrom line represents the passage through the UVCS slit of cold material released in a jet imaged by EIT in the He II 304 Angstrom line. The persistent presence of the Fe XVIII 974 Angstrom line is not easily related to any special feature crossing the UVCS slit. We suggest to interpret this behavior in terms of the reconnection events which lead to the formation of loops observed in the EIT He II 304 Angstrom line.

  16. Influence of solar flares and CME on the gaseous envelopes of hot Jupiter exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisikalo, Dmitry; Cherenkov, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Hot Jupiters, i.e. exoplanets having masses comparable to the mass of Jupiter and semimajor axes shorter than 0.1~AU, have a number of outstanding features, caused mostly by their proximity to the host star. As a matter of fact, the atmospheres of several dozens of these planets fill their Roche lobes, which results in a powerful outflow of material from the planet toward the host star. In addition, since the planet orbits at a short distance, its orbital velocity is supersonic, which causes the formation of a bow shock ahead of the planet. These effects substantially change the mechanism of interaction between the planet's gaseous envelope (atmosphere) and the stellar wind. In this paper, we investigate the flow pattern in the vicinity of a typical hot Jupiter by using 3D gas dynamic simulations. By considering the star-planet interaction we study variations in the structure of the hot Jupiter's envelope and estimate the variations of atmosphere’s mass-loss rate caused by the influence of typical solar flares and coronal mass ejections.

  17. PECTIN IN CONTROLLED DRUG DELIVERY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlled drug delivery remains a research focus for public health to enhance patient compliance, drug efficiency and to reduce the side effects of drugs. Pectin, an edible plant polysaccharide, has shown potential for the construction of drug delivery systems for site-specific drug delivery. Sev...

  18. What Is a Cesarean Delivery?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... delivered by cesarean delivery may experience more breathing problems than infants born by vaginal delivery. 5 More information on this topic can be found in the final statement from a 2006 NIH State-of-the-Science Conference on Cesarean Delivery by Maternal Request . If ...

  19. Nanofibers used for the delivery of analgesics.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yuan-Yun; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Nanofibers are extremely advantageous for drug delivery because of their high surface area-to-volume ratios, high porosities and 3D open porous structures. Local delivery of analgesics by using nanofibers allows site-specificity and requires a lower overall drug dosage with lower adverse side effects. Different analgesics have been loaded onto various nanofibers, including those that are natural, synthetic and copolymer, for various medical applications. Analgesics can also be singly or coaxially loaded onto nanofibers to enhance clinical applications. In particular, analgesic-eluting nanofibers provide additional benefits to preventing wound adhesion and scar formation. This paper reviews current research and breakthrough discoveries on the innovative application of analgesic-loaded nanofibers that will alter the clinical therapy of pain. PMID:26080700

  20. Analysis of EIT/LASCO Observations Using Available MHD Models: Investigation of CME Initiation Propagation and Geoeffectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2001-01-01

    The Sun's activity drives the variability of geospace (i.e., near-earth environment). Observations show that the ejection of plasma from the sun, called coronal mass ejections (CMEs), are the major cause of geomagnetic storms. This global-scale solar dynamical feature of coronal mass ejection was discovered almost three decades ago by the use of space-borne coronagraphs (OSO-7, Skylab/ATM and P78-1). Significant progress has been made in understanding the physical nature of the CMEs. Observations show that these global-scale CMEs have size in the order of a solar radius (approximately 6.7 x 10(exp 5) km) near the sun, and each event involves a mass of about 10(exp 15) g and an energy comparable to that of a large flare on the order of 10(exp 32) ergs. The radial propagation speeds of CMEs have a wide range from tens to thousands of kilometers per second. Thus, the transit time to near earth's environment [i.e., 1 AU (astronomical unit)] can be as fast as 40 hours to 100 hours. The typical transit time for geoeffective events is approximately 60-80 h. This paper consists of two parts: 1) A summary of the observed CMEs from Skylab to the present SOHO will be presented. Special attention will be made to SOHO/ LASCO/ EIT observations and their characteristics leading to a geoeffectiv a CME 2) The chronological development of theory and models to interpret the physical nature of this fascinating phenomenon will be reviewed. Finally, an example will be presented to illustrate the geoeffectiveness of the CMEs by using both observation and model.

  1. Lewis acid promoted titanium alkylidene formation: off-cycle intermediates relevant to olefin trimerization catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Aaron; VanderVelde, David G; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2014-07-30

    Two new precatalysts for ethylene and ?-olefin trimerization, (FI)Ti(CH2SiMe3)2Me and (FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2Me (FI = phenoxy-imine), have been synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. (FI)Ti(CH2SiMe3)2Me can be activated with 1 equiv of B(C6F5)3 at room temperature to give the solvent-separated ion pair [(FI)Ti(CH2SiMe3)2][MeB(C6F5)3], which catalytically trimerizes ethylene or 1-pentene to produce 1-hexene or C15 olefins, respectively. The neopentyl analogue (FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2Me is unstable toward activation with B(C6F5)3 at room temperature, giving no discernible diamagnetic titanium complexes, but at -30 °C the following can be observed by NMR spectroscopy: (i) formation of the bis-neopentyl cation [(FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2](+), (ii) ?-elimination of neopentane to give the neopentylidene complex [(FI)Ti(?CHCMe3)](+), and (iii) subsequent conversion to the imido-olefin complex [(MeOAr2N?)Ti(OArHC?CHCMe3)](+) via an intramolecular metathesis reaction with the imine fragment of the (FI) ligand. If the reaction is carried out at low temperature in the presence of ethylene, catalytic production of 1-hexene is observed, in addition to the titanacyclobutane complex [(FI)Ti(CH(CMe3)CH2CH2)](+), resulting from addition of ethylene to the neopentylidene [(FI)Ti(?CHCMe3)](+). None of the complexes observed spectroscopically subsequent to [(FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2](+) is an intermediate or precursor for ethylene trimerization, but notwithstanding these off-cycle pathways, [(FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2](+) is a precatalyst that undergoes rapid initiation to generate a catalyst for trimerizing ethylene or 1-pentene. PMID:25007394

  2. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rahamatullah; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Garland, Martin James; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2011-01-01

    Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal). PMID:21430958

  3. Delivery of RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Li, Charles X; Parker, Amy; Menocal, Ellen; Xiang, Shuanglin; Borodyansky, Laura; Fruehauf, Johannes H

    2006-09-01

    Over the last few years, RNA Interference (RNAi), a naturally occurring mechanism of gene regulation conserved in plant and mammalian cells, has opened numerous novel opportunities for basic research across the field of biology. While RNAi has helped accelerate discovery and understanding of gene functions, it also has great potential as a therapeutic and potentially prophylactic modality. Challenging diseases failing conventional therapeutics could become treatable by specific silencing of key pathogenic genes. More specifically, therapeutic targets previously deemed "undruggable" by small molecules, are now coming within reach of RNAi based therapy. For RNAi to be effective and elicit gene silencing response, the double-stranded RNA molecules must be delivered to the target cell. Unfortunately, delivery of these RNA duplexes has been challenging, halting rapid development of RNAi-based therapies. In this review we present current advancements in the field of siRNA delivery methods, including the pros and cons of each method. PMID:16940756

  4. Community Digital Library Requirements for the Southern California Earthquake Center Community Modeling Environment (SCEC/CME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Faerman, M.; Minster, J.; Day, S. M.; Ely, G.

    2003-12-01

    A community digital library provides support for ingestion, organization, description, preservation, and access of digital entities. The technologies that traditionally provide these capabilities are digital libraries (ingestion, organization, description), persistent archives (preservation) and data grids (access). We present a design for the SCEC community digital library that incorporates aspects of all three systems. Multiple groups have created integrated environments that sustain large-scale scientific data collections. By examining these projects, the following stages of implementation can be identified: \\begin{itemize} Definition of semantic terms to associate with relevant information. This includes definition of uniform content descriptors to describe physical quantities relevant to the scientific discipline, and creation of concept spaces to define how the uniform content descriptors are logically related. Organization of digital entities into logical collections that make it simple to browse and manage related material. Definition of services that are used to access and manipulate material in the collection. Creation of a preservation environment for the long-term management of the collection. Each community is faced with heterogeneity that is introduced when data is distributed across multiple sites, or when multiple sets of collection semantics are used, and or when multiple scientific sub-disciplines are federated. We will present the relevant standards that simplify the implementation of the SCEC community library, the resource requirements for different types of data sets that drive the implementation, and the digital library processes that the SCEC community library will support. The SCEC community library can be viewed as the set of processing steps that are required to build the appropriate SCEC reference data sets (SCEC approved encoding format, SCEC approved descriptive metadata, SCEC approved collection organization, and SCEC managed storage location). Each digital entity that is ingested into the SCEC community library is processed and validated for conformance to SCEC standards. These steps generate provenance, descriptive, administrative, structural, and behavioral metadata. Using data grid technology, the descriptive metadata can be registered onto a logical name space that is controlled and managed by the SCEC digital library. A version of the SCEC community digital library is being implemented in the Storage Resource Broker. The SRB system provides almost all the features enumerated above. The peer-to-peer federation of metadata catalogs is planned for release in September, 2003. The SRB system is in production use in multiple projects, from high-energy physics, to astronomy, to earth systems science, to bio-informatics. The SCEC community library will be based on the definition of standard metadata attributes, the creation of logical collections within the SRB, the creation of access services, and the demonstration of a preservation environment. The use of the SRB for the SCEC digital library will sustain the expected collection size and collection capabilities.

  5. Aeolian Delivery of Organic Matter to a Middle Permian Deepwater Ramp 

    E-print Network

    Artan, Sinem

    2012-07-16

    of the Brushy Canyon Formation sandstones and siltstones to evaluate the significance of windblown dust in delivery of sediment and terrestrial organic matter to the Middle Permian Delaware Basin. Ramp siltstones of the basin have been interpreted...

  6. Supplementary Data Drug delivery

    E-print Network

    Seroude, Laurent

    to polymerize and dry at room temperature for 12 to 36 hours depending on the ambient humidity. 2. "Yeast paste (0.01% molasses/8.2% cornmeal/3.4% killed yeast/0.94% agar/0.18% benzoic acid/0.66% propionic acic" delivery: Appropriate volumes of 25 mg/ml RU486 stock solution was mixed with yeast paste (60.4% water, 39

  7. Nanovehicular Intracellular Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    PROKOP, ALES; DAVIDSON, JEFFREY M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood–brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list “elementary” phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  8. Transmembrane heme delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Barry S.; Beck, David L.; Monika, Elizabeth M.; Kranz, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    Heme proteins play pivotal roles in a wealth of biological processes. Despite this, the molecular mechanisms by which heme traverses bilayer membranes for use in biosynthetic reactions are unknown. The biosynthesis of c-type cytochromes requires that heme is transported to the bacterial periplasm or mitochondrial intermembrane space where it is covalently ligated to two reduced cysteinyl residues of the apocytochrome. Results herein suggest that a family of integral membrane proteins in prokaryotes, protozoans, and plants act as transmembrane heme delivery systems for the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes. The complete topology of a representative from each of the three subfamilies was experimentally determined. Key histidinyl residues and a conserved tryptophan-rich region (designated the WWD domain) are positioned at the site of cytochrome c assembly for all three subfamilies. These histidinyl residues were shown to be essential for function in one of the subfamilies, an ABC transporter encoded by helABCD. We believe that a directed heme delivery pathway is vital for the synthesis of cytochromes c, whereby heme iron is protected from oxidation via ligation to histidinyl residues within the delivery proteins. PMID:9560218

  9. Single compartment drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cima, Michael J.; Lee, Heejin; Daniel, Karen; Tanenbaum, Laura M.; Mantzavinou, Aikaterini; Spencer, Kevin C.; Ong, Qunya; Sy, Jay C.; Santini, John; Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug design is built on the concept that key molecular targets of disease are isolated in the diseased tissue. Systemic drug administration would be sufficient for targeting in such a case. It is, however, common for enzymes or receptors that are integral to disease to be structurally similar or identical to those that play important biological roles in normal tissues of the body. Additionally, systemic administration may not lead to local drug concentrations high enough to yield disease modification because of rapid systemic metabolism or lack of sufficient partitioning into the diseased tissue compartment. This review focuses on drug delivery methods that physically target drugs to individual compartments of the body. Compartments such as the bladder, peritoneum, brain, eye and skin are often sites of disease and can sometimes be viewed as “privileged,” since they intrinsically hinder partitioning of systemically administered agents. These compartments have become the focus of a wide array of procedures and devices for direct administration of drugs. We discuss the rationale behind single compartment drug delivery for each of these compartments, and give an overview of examples at different development stages, from the lab bench to phase III clinical trials to clinical practice. We approach single compartment drug delivery from both a translational and a technological perspective. PMID:24798478

  10. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  11. Novel antigen delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Maria; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2015-08-12

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the "E2 scaffold" of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  12. Bioreducible Poly(Beta-Amino Ester)s for Intracellular Delivery of SiRNA.

    PubMed

    Kozielski, Kristen L; Green, Jordan J

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool to target and knockdown gene expression in a sequence-specific manner. RNAi can be achieved by the intracellular introduction of SiRNA; however, intracellular SiRNA delivery remains a challenging obstacle. Herein we describe the use of bioreducible nanoparticles formed using poly(beta-amino ester)s (PBAEs) for safe and efficient SiRNA delivery. Methods for polymer synthesis, nanoparticle formation, and SiRNA delivery using these particles are described. A template protocol for nanoparticle screening is presented and can be used to quickly optimize SiRNA delivery for novel applications. PMID:26472444

  13. Comparison of interplanetary CME arrival times and solar wind parameters based on the WSA-ENLIL model with three cone types and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Soojeong; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jae-Ok; Na, Hyeonock

    2014-09-01

    We have made a comparison between coronal mass ejection (CME)-associated shock propagations based on the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-ENLIL model using three cone types and in situ observations. For this we use 28 full-halo CMEs, whose cone parameters are determined and their corresponding interplanetary shocks were observed at the Earth, from 2001 to 2002. We consider three different cone types (an asymmetric cone model, an ice cream cone model, and an elliptical cone model) to determine 3-D CME cone parameters (radial velocity, angular width, and source location), which are the input values of the WSA-ENLIL model. The mean absolute error of the CME-associated shock travel times for the WSA-ENLIL model using the ice-cream cone model is 9.9 h, which is about 1 h smaller than those of the other models. We compare the peak values and profiles of solar wind parameters (speed and density) with in situ observations. We find that the root-mean-square errors of solar wind peak speed and density for the ice cream and asymmetric cone model are about 190 km/s and 24/cm3, respectively. We estimate the cross correlations between the models and observations within the time lag of ± 2 days from the shock travel time. The correlation coefficients between the solar wind speeds from the WSA-ENLIL model using three cone types and in situ observations are approximately 0.7, which is larger than those of solar wind density (cc ˜0.6). Our preliminary investigations show that the ice cream cone model seems to be better than the other cone models in terms of the input parameters of the WSA-ENLIL model.

  14. Polysaccharides for colon targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chourasia, M K; Jain, S K

    2004-01-01

    Colon targeted drug delivery has the potential to deliver bioactive agents for the treatment of a variety of colonic diseases and to deliver proteins and peptides to the colon for their systemic absorption. Various strategies, currently available to target the release of drugs to colon, include formation of prodrug, coating of pH-sensitive polymers, use of colon-specific biodegradable polymers, timed released systems, osmotic systems, and pressure controlled drug delivery systems. Among the different approaches to achieve targeted drug release to the colon, the use of polymers especially biodegradable by colonic bacteria holds great promise. Polysaccharidases are bacterial enzymes that are available in sufficient quantity to be exploited in colon targeting of drugs. Based on this approach, various polysaccharides have been investigated for colon-specific drug release. These polysaccharides include pectin, guar gum, amylose, inulin, dextran, chitosan, and chondroitin sulphate. This family of natural polymers has an appeal to drug delivery as it is comprised of polymers with a large number of derivatizable groups, a wide range of molecular weights, varying chemical compositions, and, for the most part, low toxicity and biodegradability yet high stability. The most favorable property of these materials is their approval as pharmaceutical excipients. PMID:15200012

  15. Polymers for Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liechty, William B.; Kryscio, David R.; Slaughter, Brandon V.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Polymers have played an integral role in the advancement of drug delivery technology by providing controlled release of therapeutic agents in constant doses over long periods, cyclic dosage, and tunable release of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. From early beginnings using off-the-shelf materials, the field has grown tremendously, driven in part by the innovations of chemical engineers. Modern advances in drug delivery are now predicated upon the rational design of polymers tailored for specific cargo and engineered to exert distinct biological functions. In this review, we highlight the fundamental drug delivery systems and their mathematical foundations and discuss the physiological barriers to drug delivery. We review the origins and applications of stimuli-responsive polymer systems and polymer therapeutics such as polymer-protein and polymer-drug conjugates. The latest developments in polymers capable of molecular recognition or directing intracellular delivery are surveyed to illustrate areas of research advancing the frontiers of drug delivery. PMID:22432577

  16. DIRECT EVIDENCE FOR A FAST CORONAL MASS EJECTION DRIVEN BY THE PRIOR FORMATION AND SUBSEQUENT DESTABILIZATION OF A MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect

    Patsourakos, S.; Vourlidas, A.; Stenborg, G.

    2013-02-20

    Magnetic flux ropes play a central role in the physics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Although a flux-rope topology is inferred for the majority of coronagraphic observations of CMEs, a heated debate rages on whether the flux ropes pre-exist or whether they are formed on-the-fly during the eruption. Here, we present a detailed analysis of extreme-ultraviolet observations of the formation of a flux rope during a confined flare followed about 7 hr later by the ejection of the flux rope and an eruptive flare. The two flares occurred during 2012 July 18 and 19. The second event unleashed a fast (>1000 km s{sup -1}) CME. We present the first direct evidence of a fast CME driven by the prior formation and destabilization of a coronal magnetic flux rope formed during the confined flare on July 18.

  17. DELIVERY OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Pisal, Dipak S.; Kosloski, Matthew P.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2009-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of protein therapeutics are limited by three interrelated pharmaceutical issues, in vitro and in vivo instability, immunogenicity and shorter half-lives. Novel drug modifications for overcoming these issues are under investigation and include covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polysialic acid, or glycolic acid, as well as developing new formulations containing nanoparticulate or colloidal systems (e.g. liposomes, polymeric microspheres, polymeric nanoparticles). Such strategies have the potential to develop as next generation protein therapeutics. This review includes a general discussion on these delivery approaches. PMID:20049941

  18. Anemia and Oxygen Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    Clinical assessment of tissue oxygenation is challenging. Anemia reflects a decreased oxygen carrying capacity of the blood and its significance in the perioperative setting relates largely to the associated risk of insufficient oxygen delivery and cellular hypoxia. Until meaningful clinical measures of tissue oxygenation are available in veterinary practice, clinicians must rely on evaluation of a patient's hemodynamic and ventilatory performance, along with biochemical and hemogasometric measurements. Blood transfusion is used commonly for treatment of perioperative anemia, and may improve tissue oxygenation by normalizing the rheologic properties of blood and enhancing perfusion, independent of increases in oxygen carrying capacity. PMID:26033442

  19. Vaginal Birth After Cesarean Delivery: Deciding on a Trial of Labor After a Cesarean Delivery (TOLAC)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vaginal Birth After Cesarean Delivery: Deciding on a Trial of Labor After Cesarean Delivery • What is a ... birth after cesarean delivery ( VBAC) ? • What is a trial of labor after cesarean delivery ( TOLAC) ? • What are ...

  20. Information CME Details

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    and Palliative Care Resources: A Skill-Based Learning Conference January 9, 2015 8.30am ­ 4.30pm Consortium of San Mateo County www.hospitalconsort.org 330 Twin Dolphin Drive Redwood City, CA 94065 #12

  1. Belgium. [CME Country Reports].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Documentation Center for Education in Europe.

    From the end of World War II to 1964, immigration trends in Belgium were largely governed by the need to supply workers for the coal industry, which led to an influx of Italians, Greeks, Spaniards, Turks, and Morrocans. In 1971 there were approximately 200,000 foreign workers in Belgium; the majority of these were Italian. Relying heavily on…

  2. Norway. [CME Country Reports].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Documentation Center for Education in Europe.

    In Norway all children, regardless of nationality, who are of compulsory school age (7-16 years old) have a right and obligation to attend compulsory school. The local school board is responsible for arranging auxiliary teaching for pupils who require extra help, in accordance with the instructions issued by the Ministry of Church and Education.…

  3. CME or PME?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Malcolm S. M.

    1990-01-01

    A concept of practice medical education could be a wonderfully challenging platform on which continuing medical education professionals could take their stand and define and develop the content and skills needed for more effective and relevant practice. (JOW)

  4. Luxembourg. [CME Country Reports].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Documentation Center for Education in Europe.

    The Luxembourg policy for providing education and training for migrant workers and their children is to offer the same opportunities as for nationals. The main difficulties so far are providing for children aged 9 and over and teaching students, especially those with a Latin language as their mother tongue, the languages used in the host schools…

  5. Empirical Relationship Between CME Parameters and Geo-effectiveness of Halo CMEs in the Rising Phase of Solar Cycle 24 (2011 - 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugaraju, A.; Syed Ibrahim, M.; Moon, Y.-J.; Mujiber Rahman, A.; Umapathy, S.

    2015-05-01

    We analyzed the physical characteristics of 40 halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their geo-effective parameters observed during the period 2011 to 2013 in the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24. Out of all halo CMEs observed by SOHO/LASCO, we selected 40 halo CMEs and investigated their geomagnetic effects. In particular, we estimated the CME direction parameter (DP) from coronagraph observations, and we obtained the geomagnetic storm disturbance index ( Dst) value corresponding to each event by following certain criteria. We studied the correlation between near-Sun parameters of CMEs such as speed and DP with Dst. For this new set of events in the current solar cycle, the relations are found to be consistent with those of previous studies. When the direction parameter increases, the Dst value also increases for symmetrical halo CME ejections. If DP>0.6, these events produce high Dst values. In addition, the intensity of geomagnetic storm calculated using an empirical model with the near-Sun parameters is nearly equal to the observed values. More importantly, we find that the geo-effectiveness in the rising phase of Solar Cycle 24 is much weaker than that in Cycle 23.

  6. Determination of the Heliospheric Radial Magnetic Field from the Standoff Distance of a CME-Driven Shock Observed by the Stereo Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poomvises, Watanachak; Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Kwon, Ryun-Young; Olmedo, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    We report on the determination of radial magnetic field strength in the heliocentric distance range from 6 to 120 solar radii (R-solar) using data from Coronagraph 2 (COR2) and Heliospheric Imager I (HI1) instruments on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft following the standoff-distance method of Gopalswamy & Yashiro. We measured the shock standoff distance of the 2008 April 5 coronal mass ejection (CME) and determined the flux-rope curvature by fitting the three-dimensional shape of the CME using the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model. The radial magnetic field strength is computed from the Alfven speed and the density of the ambient medium. We also compare the derived magnetic field strength with in situ measurements made by the Helios spacecraft, which measured the magnetic field at the heliocentric distance range from 60 to 215 R-solar.We found that the radial magnetic field strength decreases from 28 mG at 6 R-solar to 0.17 mG at 120 R-solar. In addition, we found that the radial profile can be described by a power law.

  7. Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team (HDTT) is to enable the development of hydrogen delivery technologies, which will allow for fuel cell competitiveness with gasoline and hybrid technologies by achieving an as-produced, delivered, and dispensed hydrogen cost of $2-$4 per gallon of gasoline equivalent of hydrogen.

  8. Hydrogen Distribution and Delivery Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    2008-11-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen delivery technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how hydrogen is transported and delivered today, the challenges to delivering hydrogen for use as a widespread energy carrier, and the research goals for hydrogen delivery.

  9. Economical ground data delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, Richard W.; Byrne, Russell H.; Bromberg, Daniel E.

    1994-01-01

    Data delivery in the Deep Space Network (DSN) involves transmission of a small amount of constant, high-priority traffic and a large amount of bursty, low priority data. The bursty traffic may be initially buffered and then metered back slowly as bandwidth becomes available. Today both types of data are transmitted over dedicated leased circuits. The authors investigated the potential of saving money by designing a hybrid communications architecture that uses leased circuits for high-priority network communications and dial-up circuits for low-priority traffic. Such an architecture may significantly reduce costs and provide an emergency backup. The architecture presented here may also be applied to any ground station-to-customer network within the range of a common carrier. The authors compare estimated costs for various scenarios and suggest security safeguards that should be considered.

  10. Secondary fuel delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Parker, David M. (Oviedo, FL); Cai, Weidong (Oviedo, FL); Garan, Daniel W. (Orlando, FL); Harris, Arthur J. (Orlando, FL)

    2010-02-23

    A secondary fuel delivery system for delivering a secondary stream of fuel and/or diluent to a secondary combustion zone located in the transition piece of a combustion engine, downstream of the engine primary combustion region is disclosed. The system includes a manifold formed integral to, and surrounding a portion of, the transition piece, a manifold inlet port, and a collection of injection nozzles. A flowsleeve augments fuel/diluent flow velocity and improves the system cooling effectiveness. Passive cooling elements, including effusion cooling holes located within the transition boundary and thermal-stress-dissipating gaps that resist thermal stress accumulation, provide supplemental heat dissipation in key areas. The system delivers a secondary fuel/diluent mixture to a secondary combustion zone located along the length of the transition piece, while reducing the impact of elevated vibration levels found within the transition piece and avoiding the heat dissipation difficulties often associated with traditional vibration reduction methods.

  11. Rhythmomimetic drug delivery

    E-print Network

    Calderer, M Carme; Siegel, Ronald A; Yao, Lingxing

    2015-01-01

    We present modeling, analysis and numerical simulation of a prototype glucose driven drug delivery device based on chemomechanical interactions and volume phase transitions in polyelectrolyte gels. The device consists of two fluid compartments, an external cell (I) mimicking the physiological environment, and a closed chamber (II), separated by a hydrogel membrane. Cell I, which is held at constant pH and ionic strength, provides a constant supply of glucose to cell II, and also serves as clearance station for reaction products. Cell II contains the drug to be delivered to the body, an enzyme that catalyzes conversion of glucose into hydrogen ions, and a piece of marble to remove excess hydrogen ions that would otherwise overwhelm the system. When the membrane is swollen, glucose flux into Cell II is high, leading to rapid production of hydrogen ions. However, the hydrogen ions are not immediately released to Cell I but react, instead, with the negatively charged carboxyl groups of the membrane, which collaps...

  12. Targeted delivery of nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Kumar Khanna, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    The role of targeting of the diseased region by a drug is emphasized. The rationale for resorting to nanomaterials as drug carriers is explained. A clear understanding of the biological environment, its degradation in diseased condition, and the interaction of the drug with it in normal condition and during illness lie at the core of successful drug delivery. Passive and active drug targeting approaches are differentiated. Commonly used drug targets, targeting ligands, and nanoscale systems are elaborated. Mechanisms of internalization of nanomedicines and circumventing P-glycoprotein mediated resistance are outlined. The paper presents an overview of the current scenario of targeted transportation of nanomedicines to the affected organ and suggests future research directions. PMID:22577576

  13. Pulsatile Drug Delivery System Based on Electrohydrodynamic Method

    E-print Network

    Zheng, Yi; Hu, Junqiang; Gao, Wenle

    2012-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) generation, a commonly used method in BioMEMS, plays a significant role in the pulsatile drug delivery system for a decade. In this paper, an EHD based drug delivery system is well designed, which can be used to generate a single drug droplet as small as 2.83 nL in 8.5 ms with a total device of 2\\times2\\times3 mm^3, and an external supplied voltage of 1500 V. Theoretically, we derive the expressions for the size and the formation time of a droplet generated by EHD method, while taking into account the drug supply rate, properties of liquid, gap between two electrodes, nozzle size, and charged droplet neutralization. This work proves a repeatable, stable and controllable droplet generation and delivery system based on EHD method experimentally as well as theoretically.

  14. Controlled Release of Simvastatin from Biomimetic ?-TCP Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Joshua; Ito, Tomoko; Bishop, David; Otsuka, Makoto; Ben-Nissan, Besim; Milthorpe, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Simvastatin have been shown to induce bone formation and there is currently a urgent need to develop an appropriate delivery system to sustain the release of the drug to increase therapeutic efficacy whilst reducing side effects. In this study, a novel drug delivery system for simvastatin by means of hydrothermally converting marine exoskeletons to biocompatible beta-tricalcium phosphate was investigated. Furthermore, the release of simvastatin was controlled by the addition of an outer apatite coating layer. The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction analysis, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and mass spectroscopy confirming the conversion process. The in-vitro dissolution of key chemical compositional elements and the release of simvastatin were measured in simulated body fluid solution showing controlled release with reduction of approximately 25% compared with un-coated samples. This study shows the potential applications of marine structures as a drug delivery system for simvastatin. PMID:23349949

  15. Introducing the Healthcare Delivery Research Program | Healthcare Delivery Research Blog

    Cancer.gov

    Understanding the many challenges of cancer care is the focus of the new Healthcare Delivery Research Program in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

  16. Space age health care delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Space age health care delivery is being delivered to both NASA astronauts and employees with primary emphasis on preventive medicine. The program relies heavily on comprehensive health physical exams, health education, screening programs and physical fitness programs. Medical data from the program is stored in a computer bank so epidemiological significance can be established and better procedures can be obtained. Besides health care delivery to the NASA population, NASA is working with HEW on a telemedicine project STARPAHC, applying space technology to provide health care delivery to remotely located populations.

  17. Transmucosal macromolecular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Prego, C; García, M; Torres, D; Alonso, M J

    2005-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are the most common and convenient routes for delivering drugs to the body. However, macromolecular drugs such as peptides and proteins are unable to overcome the mucosal barriers and/or are degraded before reaching the blood stream. Among the approaches explored so far in order to optimize the transport of these macromolecules across mucosal barriers, the use of nanoparticulate carriers represents a challenging but promising strategy. The present paper aims to compare the characteristics and potential of nanostructures based on the mucoadhesive polysaccharide chitosan (CS). These are CS nanoparticles, CS-coated oil nanodroplets (nanocapsules) and CS-coated lipid nanoparticles. The characteristics and behavior of CS nanoparticles and CS-coated lipid nanoparticles already reported [A. Vila, A. Sanchez, M. Tobio, P. Calvo, M.J. Alonso, Design of biodegradable particles for protein delivery, J. Control. Rel. 78 (2002) 15-24; R. Fernandez-Urrusuno, P. Calvo, C. Remunan-Lopez, J.L. Vila-Jato, M.J. Alonso, Enhancement of nasal absorption of insulin using chitosan nanoparticles, Pharm. Res. 16 (1999) 1576-1581; M. Garcia-Fuentes, D. Torres, M.J. Alonso, New surface-modified lipid nanoparticles as delivery vehicles for salmon calcitonin (submitted for publication).] are compared with those of CS nanocapsules originally reported here. The three types of systems have a size in the nanometer range and a positive zeta potential that was attributed to the presence of CS on their surface. They showed an important capacity for the association of peptides such as insulin, salmon calcitonin and proteins, such as tetanus toxoid. Their mechanism of interaction with epithelia was investigated using the Caco-2 model cell line. The results showed that CS-coated systems caused a concentration-dependent reduction in the transepithelial resistance of the cell monolayer. Moreover, within the range of concentrations investigated, these systems were internalized in the monolayer in a concentration-dependent manner. This uptake was slightly enhanced by the presence of the CS coating but, as compared with previously published results [M. Garcia-Fuentes, C. Prego, D. Torres, M.J. Alonso, Triglyceride-chitosan nanostructures for oral calcitonin delivery: evaluation in the Caco-2 cell model and in vivo (submitted for publication)], highly dependent on the nature of the lipid core. Nevertheless, these differences in the uptake of the CS-coated systems (solid lipid core or oily core) by the Caco-2 cells did not have a consequence in the in vivo behaviour. Indeed, both CS-coated systems (nanocapsules and CS-coated nanoparticles) showed an important capacity to enhance the intestinal absorption of the model peptide, salmon calcitonin, as shown by the important and long-lasting decrease in the calcemia levels observed in rats. PMID:15588901

  18. Nanostructured materials for applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering*

    PubMed Central

    GOLDBERG, MICHAEL; LANGER, ROBERT; JIA, XINQIAO

    2010-01-01

    Research in the areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering has witnessed tremendous progress in recent years due to their unlimited potential to improve human health. Meanwhile, the development of nanotechnology provides opportunities to characterize, manipulate and organize matter systematically at the nanometer scale. Biomaterials with nano-scale organizations have been used as controlled release reservoirs for drug delivery and artificial matrices for tissue engineering. Drug-delivery systems can be synthesized with controlled composition, shape, size and morphology. Their surface properties can be manipulated to increase solubility, immunocompatibility and cellular uptake. The limitations of current drug delivery systems include suboptimal bioavailability, limited effective targeting and potential cytotoxicity. Promising and versatile nano-scale drug-delivery systems include nanoparticles, nanocapsules, nanotubes, nanogels and dendrimers. They can be used to deliver both small-molecule drugs and various classes of biomacromolecules, such as peptides, proteins, plasmid DNA and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides. Whereas traditional tissue-engineering scaffolds were based on hydrolytically degradable macroporous materials, current approaches emphasize the control over cell behaviors and tissue formation by nano-scale topography that closely mimics the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). The understanding that the natural ECM is a multifunctional nanocomposite motivated researchers to develop nanofibrous scaffolds through electrospinning or self-assembly. Nanocomposites containing nanocrystals have been shown to elicit active bone growth. Drug delivery and tissue engineering are closely related fields. In fact, tissue engineering can be viewed as a special case of drug delivery where the goal is to accomplish controlled delivery of mammalian cells. Controlled release of therapeutic factors in turn will enhance the efficacy of tissue engineering. From a materials point of view, both the drug-delivery vehicles and tissue-engineering scaffolds need to be biocompatible and biodegradable. The biological functions of encapsulated drugs and cells can be dramatically enhanced by designing biomaterials with controlled organizations at the nanometer scale. This review summarizes the most recent development in utilizing nanostructured materials for applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:17471764

  19. [Delivery of premature infants].

    PubMed

    Eckman, A; Mottet, N; Ramanah, R; Riethmuller, D

    2015-10-01

    Prematurity is a frequent event and clearly raises an issue concerning how these fetuses with multiple weaknesses should be delivered. Although, a systematic abdominal approach has no scientific basis, there are cases where the caesarean is chosen because of other factors associated to prematurity such as any maternal or fetal indication to terminate the pregnancy while labour induction remains impossible. However, in case of breech presentation, which is often delivered by caesarean, the literature does recommend neither the vaginal nor the abdominal approach. Caesarean in case of prematurity is more difficult because of the absence of any inferior segment and implies making a large incision so as to easily extract these weak fetuses. Increased maternal morbidity related to preterm caesarean sections has been reported through out literature. The viability gestational age limit represents a confounding factor in most studies since caesarean is rarely chosen for these fetuses because of a very low expected survival rate, while it is probably in this situation that the abdominal approach could provide a real benefit. Larger studies are required to show potential advantages. Systematic use of episiotomies or instrumental deliveries in case of vaginal births is not recommended in case of prematurity. Protecting the fetal head with spatulas still requires further evaluations. PMID:26139037

  20. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) are rapidly growing in popularity among youth. ENDS are handheld devices that produce an aerosolized mixture from a solution typically containing concentrated nicotine, flavoring chemicals, and propylene glycol to be inhaled by the user. ENDS are marketed under a variety of names, most commonly electronic cigarettes and e-cigarettes. In 2014, more youth reported using ENDS than any other tobacco product. ENDS pose health risks to both users and nonusers. Nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in ENDS solutions, is both highly addictive and toxic. In addition to nicotine, other toxicants, carcinogens, and metal particles have been detected in solutions and aerosols of ENDS. Nonusers are involuntarily exposed to the emissions of these devices with secondhand and thirdhand aerosol. The concentrated and often flavored nicotine in ENDS solutions poses a poisoning risk for young children. Reports of acute nicotine toxicity from US poison control centers have been increasing, with at least 1 child death reported from unintentional exposure to a nicotine-containing ENDS solution. With flavors, design, and marketing that appeal to youth, ENDS threaten to renormalize and glamorize nicotine and tobacco product use. There is a critical need for ENDS regulation, legislative action, and counter promotion to protect youth. ENDS have the potential to addict a new generation of youth to nicotine and reverse more than 50 years of progress in tobacco control. PMID:26504128

  1. Local magnetism in the molecule-based metamagnet [Ru2(O2CMe)4]3[Cr(CN)6] probed with implanted muons

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, T.; Pratt, F. L.; Blundell, S. J.; Steele, Andrew J.; Baker, Peter J.; Wright, Jack D.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Miller, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    We present a muon-spin relaxation study of local magnetism in the molecule-based metamagnet [Ru2(O2CMe)4]3[Cr(CN)6]. We observe magnetic order with TN = 33 K, although above 25 K the sublattice spins become less rigid and a degree of static magnetic disorder is observed. The comparison of measurements in applied magnetic field with simulations allows us to understand the origin of the muon response across the metamagnetic transition and to map out the phase diagram of the material. Applied hydrostatic pressures of up to 6 kbar lead to an increase in the local magnetic field along with a complex change in the internal magnetic field distribution.

  2. Bioresponsive matrices in drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    For years, the field of drug delivery has focused on (1) controlling the release of a therapeutic and (2) targeting the therapeutic to a specific cell type. These research endeavors have concentrated mainly on the development of new degradable polymers and molecule-labeled drug delivery vehicles. Recent interest in biomaterials that respond to their environment have opened new methods to trigger the release of drugs and localize the therapeutic within a particular site. These novel biomaterials, usually termed "smart" or "intelligent", are able to deliver a therapeutic agent based on either environmental cues or a remote stimulus. Stimuli-responsive materials could potentially elicit a therapeutically effective dose without adverse side effects. Polymers responding to different stimuli, such as pH, light, temperature, ultrasound, magnetism, or biomolecules have been investigated as potential drug delivery vehicles. This review describes the most recent advances in "smart" drug delivery systems that respond to one or multiple stimuli. PMID:21114841

  3. Cellular delivery using peptoid carriers 

    E-print Network

    Escher, Geraldine

    2013-06-29

    Efficient delivery into cells is essential for many applications. However, cellular access of “cell-impermeable” molecules, such as drugs, sensors, proteins and oligonucleotides, can often be severely limited due to the ...

  4. Workplace Learning and Flexible Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews some of the conceptualizations of workplace learning and its cognitive bases and examines workplaces as learning environments. Also considers the special challenges involved in the flexible delivery of training to workplaces. (SLD)

  5. Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    E-print Network

    Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed

    2011-04-26

    , two nonviral gene delivery systems using either biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles or cell penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes have been designed and studied using A549 human lung epithelial cells. PLG nanoparticles were...

  6. conferences | Healthcare Delivery Research Blog

    Cancer.gov

    Over the course of my career I have often been frustrated with the gap between the research I was conducting and the clinical operations of the health care delivery systems with which I was affiliated.

  7. Variable delivery, fixed displacement pump

    DOEpatents

    Sommars, Mark F. (Sparland, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A variable delivery, fixed displacement pump comprises a plurality of pistons reciprocated within corresponding cylinders in a cylinder block. The pistons are reciprocated by rotation of a fixed angle swash plate connected to the pistons. The pistons and cylinders cooperate to define a plurality of fluid compression chambers each have a delivery outlet. A vent port is provided from each fluid compression chamber to vent fluid therefrom during at least a portion of the reciprocal stroke of the piston. Each piston and cylinder combination cooperates to close the associated vent port during another portion of the reciprocal stroke so that fluid is then pumped through the associated delivery outlet. The delivery rate of the pump is varied by adjusting the axial position of the swash plate relative to the cylinder block, which varies the duration of the piston stroke during which the vent port is closed.

  8. Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    E-print Network

    Chow, Gan-Moog

    Nanoparticles were synthesized and modified for target drug delivery. The research involved the aqueous synthesis of near infrared (NIR) sensitive Au-Au2S nanoparticles. An anti-cancer drug (cis-platin) ...

  9. Best antibiotics for buccal delivery

    E-print Network

    Goldberg, Manijeh Nazari

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to identify the clinical and commercial benefits of switching from intravenous (IV) to buccal delivery of antibiotics. then, the research continued to select 3-5 antibiotics that best met ...

  10. 19 CFR 10.101 - Immediate delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immediate delivery. 10.101 Section 10.101 Customs... Importations § 10.101 Immediate delivery. (a) Shipments entitled to immediate delivery. Shipments consigned to... as shipments the immediate delivery of which is necessary within the purview of section...

  11. Novel polyoxazolines polymer drug delivery platform

    E-print Network

    Novel polyoxazolines polymer drug delivery platform Reference Number B68084 Introduction Oral and parenteral drug administration dominate the drug delivery market. The global market for oral drug delivery enhanced products was estimated to be worth around US$51 billion in 2009. Parenteral drug delivery

  12. 7 CFR 46.44 - Good delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good delivery. 46.44 Section 46.44 Agriculture... THAN RULES OF PRACTICE) UNDER THE PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES ACT, 1930 Good Delivery Standards § 46.44 Good delivery. Unless otherwise agreed to between the contracting parties, “Good Delivery”...

  13. 18 CFR 157.211 - Delivery points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Delivery points. 157... for Certain Transactions and Abandonment § 157.211 Delivery points. (a) Construction and operation—(1... delivery point, excluding the construction of certain delivery points subject to the prior...

  14. 38 CFR 21.4505 - Check delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Check delivery. 21.4505...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Education Loans § 21.4505 Check delivery. (a) General. Education... surviving spouse is enrolled for delivery by the educational institution. (b) Delivery and certification....

  15. 38 CFR 21.4505 - Check delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Check delivery. 21.4505...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Education Loans § 21.4505 Check delivery. (a) General. Education... surviving spouse is enrolled for delivery by the educational institution. (b) Delivery and certification....

  16. 19 CFR 10.101 - Immediate delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Immediate delivery. 10.101 Section 10.101 Customs... Importations § 10.101 Immediate delivery. (a) Shipments entitled to immediate delivery. Shipments consigned to... as shipments the immediate delivery of which is necessary within the purview of section...

  17. 19 CFR 10.101 - Immediate delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Immediate delivery. 10.101 Section 10.101 Customs... Importations § 10.101 Immediate delivery. (a) Shipments entitled to immediate delivery. Shipments consigned to... as shipments the immediate delivery of which is necessary within the purview of section...

  18. 18 CFR 157.211 - Delivery points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Delivery points. 157... for Certain Transactions and Abandonment § 157.211 Delivery points. (a) Construction and operation—(1... delivery point, excluding the construction of certain delivery points subject to the prior...

  19. 19 CFR 10.101 - Immediate delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Immediate delivery. 10.101 Section 10.101 Customs... Importations § 10.101 Immediate delivery. (a) Shipments entitled to immediate delivery. Shipments consigned to... as shipments the immediate delivery of which is necessary within the purview of section...

  20. 19 CFR 10.101 - Immediate delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Immediate delivery. 10.101 Section 10.101 Customs... Importations § 10.101 Immediate delivery. (a) Shipments entitled to immediate delivery. Shipments consigned to... as shipments the immediate delivery of which is necessary within the purview of section...

  1. 18 CFR 157.211 - Delivery points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Delivery points. 157... for Certain Transactions and Abandonment § 157.211 Delivery points. (a) Construction and operation—(1... delivery point, excluding the construction of certain delivery points subject to the prior...

  2. 38 CFR 21.4505 - Check delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Check delivery. 21.4505...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Education Loans § 21.4505 Check delivery. (a) General. Education... surviving spouse is enrolled for delivery by the educational institution. (b) Delivery and certification....

  3. Destabilization of a Solar Prominence/Filament Field System by a Series of Eight Homologous Eruptive Flares Leading to a CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Innes, Davina E.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2015-09-01

    Homologous flares are flares that occur repetitively in the same active region, with similar structure and morphology. A series of at least eight homologous flares occurred in active region NOAA 11237 over 2011 June 16-17. A nearby prominence/filament was rooted in the active region, and situated near the bottom of a coronal cavity. The active region was on the southeast solar limb as seen from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, and on the disk as viewed from the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory/EUVI-B. The dual perspective allows us to study in detail behavior of the prominence/filament material entrained in the magnetic field of the repeatedly erupting system. Each of the eruptions were mainly confined, but expelled hot material into the prominence/filament cavity system (PFCS). The field carrying and containing the ejected hot material interacted with the PFCS and caused it to inflate, resulting in a step-wise rise of the PFCS approximately in step with the homologous eruptions. The eighth eruption triggered the PFCS to move outward slowly, accompanied by a weak coronal dimming. As this slow PFCS eruption was underway, a final “ejective” flare occurred in the core of the active region, resulting in strong dimming in the EUVI-B images and expulsion of a coronal mass ejection (CME). A plausible scenario is that the repeated homologous flares could have gradually destabilized the PFCS, and its subsequent eruption removed field above the acitive region and in turn led to the ejective flare, strong dimming, and CME.

  4. Radiation delivery system and method

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

  5. STFC's Delivery Plan Scorecard 2011-2015 1 STFC's Delivery Plan Scorecard 2011-2015

    E-print Network

    STFC's Delivery Plan Scorecard 2011-2015 1 STFC's Delivery Plan Scorecard 2011-2015 STFC's Delivery's strategic objectives. This Scorecard sets out how we will deliver the commitments outlined in our Delivery identifies high level, strategic delivery mechanisms that are not activity based, in accordance with BIS

  6. Peptide-based gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Mahat, R I; Monera, O D; Smith, L C; Rolland, A

    1999-04-01

    To achieve effective plasmid-based gene therapy, the control of cellular access and uptake, intracellular trafficking and nuclear retention of plasmids must be achieved. Inefficient endosomal release, cytoplasmic transport and nuclear entry of plasmids are amongst some of the key limiting factors in the use of plasmids for effective gene therapy. A number of non-viral gene delivery systems have been designed to overcome these limiting factors. The most common approach to protect and control plasmid distribution is to complex plasmids with cationic lipids or polymers through electrostatic interactions. Endosomal release of plasmids can be achieved, for instance, by using pH-sensitive lipids, inactivated viral particles, endosomolytic peptides and polymers. Among the least explored gene delivery systems are those that consist mainly of synthetic, short peptides. Peptides can be incorporated into multicomponent gene delivery complexes for specific purposes, such as for DNA condensation, cell-specific targeting, endosomolysis or nuclear transport. The aims of this review are to: (i) explore the conceptual and experimental aspects of peptide-DNA interactions; (ii) critically assess the possible use of peptides for efficient gene transfer; and (iii) present an overview on the use of peptides to enhance the effectiveness of other gene delivery systems. On balance, peptide-based gene delivery systems appear to have a significant potential as commercially viable gene delivery products. PMID:11715946

  7. Controlled release polymeric ocular delivery of acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Praful Balavant; Dandagi, Panchaxari; Udupa, Nayanabhirama; Gopal, Shavi V; Jain, Samata S; Vasanth, Surenalli G

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate and evaluate controlled release polymeric ocular delivery of acyclovir. Reservoir-type ocular inserts were fabricated by sandwiching hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) matrix film containing acyclovir between two rate controlling membranes of cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP). The solubility and dissolution rate of poorly soluble acyclovir was enhanced by preparing binary systems with beta-cyclodextrin and then incorporated into HPMC matrix. Nine formulations (AB-1 to AB-9) with varying ratio of HPMC (drug matrix) and CAP (rate controlling membrane) were developed and sterilized by gamma radiation. The formulations were subjected to various physico-chemical evaluations. The in vitro release profile of all the formulations showed a steady, controlled drug release up to 20 h with non-Fickian diffusion behavior. A high correlation coefficient found between in vitro/in vivo release rate studies. Formation of acyclovir complex was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry. In addition, dissolution rate studies revealed improved solubility of acyclovir when complexed with beta-cyclodextrin. Stability studies showed that the ocular inserts could be stored safely at study storage conditions. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated controlled release formulation of acyclovir inserts for ocular delivery using biodegradable polymers. PMID:19772377

  8. Distance Education Quality Course Delivery Framework: A Formative Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berta, Michael Raymond

    2013-01-01

    In the Fall 2010 semester, student enrollment in distance education courses increased in the United States to over 6.1 million students taking at least one distance course. Distance education allows institutions to meet increasing demands from the government and business sectors for more graduates in ways that face-to-face courses cannot meet with…

  9. Two Distinct Course Formats in the Delivery of Connectivist MOOCs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, C. Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses based on the principles of connectivist educational pedagogy known as connectivist MOOCs (c-MOOCs) have been carried out with great success during the last years with hundreds of registered participants. Examples are CCK08 (2008), PLENK2010 (2010), MobiMOOC (2011), EduMOOC (2011), Change11 (2011/12), and LAK12 (2012).…

  10. Adapting Assessment Procedures for Delivery via an Automated Format.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Karen L.; And Others

    The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) decided to explore alternative examining procedures for positions covered by the Administrative Careers with America (ACWA) examination. One requirement for new procedures was that they be automated for use with OPM's recently developed Microcomputer Assisted Rating System (MARS), a highly efficient system…

  11. Rhythmomimetic drug delivery

    E-print Network

    M. Carme Calderer; Yoichiro Mori; Ronald A. Siegel; Lingxing Yao

    2015-01-06

    We present modeling, analysis and numerical simulation of a prototype glucose driven drug delivery device based on chemomechanical interactions and volume phase transitions in polyelectrolyte gels. The device consists of two fluid compartments, an external cell (I) mimicking the physiological environment, and a closed chamber (II), separated by a hydrogel membrane. Cell I, which is held at constant pH and ionic strength, provides a constant supply of glucose to cell II, and also serves as clearance station for reaction products. Cell II contains the drug to be delivered to the body, an enzyme that catalyzes conversion of glucose into hydrogen ions, and a piece of marble to remove excess hydrogen ions that would otherwise overwhelm the system. When the membrane is swollen, glucose flux into Cell II is high, leading to rapid production of hydrogen ions. However, the hydrogen ions are not immediately released to Cell I but react, instead, with the negatively charged carboxyl groups of the membrane, which collapses when a critical pH is reached in Cell II, substantially attenuating glucose transport and $\\textrm {H}^+$ production. Subsequent diffusion of attached $\\textrm {H}^+$ ions increases again the concentration of negative carboxyl groups in the membrane, causing the gel to re-swell, and the process is poised to repeat itself. Since drug release can only occur when the membrane is swollen, release occurs in rhythmic pulses that are coherent with the pH oscillations in Cell II and swelling oscillations of the membrane. The work to analyze them combines multiscale methods with tools from dynamical systems to show existence of sustained oscillations for a robust set of material parameters. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with earlier experimental results obtained with a laboratory device.

  12. Coordination Compounds of Strontium. Syntheses, Characterizations, and Crystal Structures of [Sr(u-ONc)(2)(HONc(4))]2 and Sr(5)(u(4)-O)(u(3)-ONep)(4)(u-ONep)(4)(HONep)(solv)(4) (ONc=O(2)CCH(2)CMe(3));Nep=CH(2)CMe(3); solv=tetrahydrofuran or 1-methyl-imida

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Tafoya, Cory J.; Scott, Brian L.; Ziller, Joseph W.

    1999-07-21

    The authors have synthesized and characterized two novel Sr compounds: [Sr({mu}-ONc){sub 2}(HONc){sub 4}]{sub 2} (1, ONc = O{sub 2}CCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 3}), and Sr{sub 5}({mu}{sub 4}-O)({mu}{sub 3}-ONep){sub 4}({mu}-ONep){sub 4}(HONep)(solv){sub 4} [ONep = OCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 3}, solv = tetrahydrofuran (THF), 2a; 1-methyl-imidazole (MeIm), (2b)], that demonstrate increased solubility in comparison to the commercially available Sr precursors. The two metal centers of 1 share 4 unidentate bridging {mu}-ONc ligands and complete their octahedral geometry through the coordination of 4 monodentate terminal HONc ligands. The structure arrangement of the central core of 2a and b are identical, wherein 4 octahedral Sr atoms are arranged in a square geometry around a {mu}{sub 4}-O ligand. An additional 7-coordinated Sr atom sits directly atop the {mu}{sub 4}-O to form a square base pyramidal arrangement of the Sr atoms but the apical Sr-O distance is too long to be considered a bond. In solution, compound 1 is disrupted forming a monomer but 2a and b retain their structures.

  13. Organ-targeted high-throughput in vivo biologics screen identifies materials for RNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tsung-Yao; Shi, Peng; Steinmeyer, Joseph D.; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Tillberg, Paul; Love, Kevin T.; Eimon, Peter M.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Therapies based on biologics involving delivery of proteins, DNA, and RNA are currently among the most promising approaches. However, although large combinatorial libraries of biologics and delivery vehicles can be readily synthesized, there are currently no means to rapidly characterize them in vivo using animal models. Here, we demonstrate high-throughput in vivo screening of biologics and delivery vehicles by automated delivery into target tissues of small vertebrates with developed organs. Individual zebrafish larvae are automatically oriented and immobilized within hydrogel droplets in an array format using a microfluidic system, and delivery vehicles are automatically microinjected to target organs with nearly perfect repeatability and precision. We screened a library of lipid-like delivery vehicles for their ability to facilitate the expression of protein-encoding RNAs in the central nervous system. We discovered delivery vehicles that are effective in both larval zebrafish and rats. Our results showed that the in vivo zebrafish model can be significantly more predictive of both false positives and false negatives in mammals than in vitro mammalian cell culture assays. Our screening results also suggest certain structure-activity relationship, which can potentially be applied to design novel delivery vehicles. PMID:25184623

  14. Operative delivery: yesterday and today.

    PubMed

    Low, James A

    2009-02-01

    The normal mechanism of labour leads to spontaneous vaginal delivery in many patients. However, from the beginning of time there has been a requirement for operative intervention to achieve delivery in some women. For centuries, to save the mother in an obstructed labour, the only option was craniotomy to deliver a dead child. The requirement for craniotomy decreased with the introduction of obstetric forceps and Caesarean section, but it is still needed in some situations. The role of obstetric forceps in the management of the second stage of labour has evolved over the last 300 years, initially for failure of the mechanism of labour and subsequently to shorten the second stage of labour for the benefit of the mother and child. The use of obstetric forceps peaked in the first half of the 20th century and has been decreasing steadily since that time. Caesarean section became a reasonable option for operative delivery towards the end of the 19th century with the availability of anaesthesia and procedures to control hemorrhage and prevent infection. The use of Caesarean section has increased steadily but variably in different countries throughout the 20th century. The incidence of operative intervention has increased from less than 1% of deliveries historically, to 10% at the end of the 19th century and to 40% at the end of the 20th century. The continuing challenge for those responsible for the delivery of the obstetric patient is to continue to examine the indications and appropriate procedures for operative intervention. PMID:19327212

  15. Bladder Injury During Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tarney, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in the United States with over 30% of deliveries occurring via this route. This number is likely to increase given decreasing rates of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and primary cesarean delivery on maternal request, which carries the inherent risk for intraoperative complications. Urologic injury is the most common injury at the time of either obstetric or gynecologic surgery, with the bladder being the most frequent organ damaged. Risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean section include previous cesarean delivery, adhesions, emergent cesarean delivery, and cesarean section performed at the time of the second stage of labor. Fortunately, most bladder injuries are recognized at the time of surgery, which is important, as quick recognition and repair are associated with a significant reduction in patient mortality. Although cesarean delivery is a cornerstone of obstetrics, there is a paucity of data in the literature either supporting or refuting specific techniques that are performed today. There is evidence to support double-layer closure of the hysterotomy, the routine use of adhesive barriers, and performing a Pfannenstiel skin incision versus a vertical midline subumbilical incision to decrease the risk for bladder injury during cesarean section. There is also no evidence that supports the creation of a bladder flap, although routinely performed during cesarean section, as a method to reduce the risk of bladder injury. Finally, more research is needed to determine if indwelling catheterization, exteriorization of the uterus, and methods to extend hysterotomy incision lead to bladder injury. PMID:24876830

  16. Optimised transdermal delivery of pravastatin.

    PubMed

    Burger, Cornel; Gerber, Minja; du Preez, Jan L; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2015-12-30

    Wiechers' programme "Formulating for Efficacy" initiated a new strategy to optimise the oil phase of topical formulations in order to achieve optimal transdermal drug delivery. This new approach uses the "Delivery Gap Theory" on any active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to test if it could enhance transdermal drug delivery. The aim of the study was to formulate six different semi-solid formulations (three creams and three emulgels) with 2% pravastatin as the API in order to investigate the "Delivery Gap Principle", by determining which formulation would deliver pravastatin best to the target-site (system circulation). The three cream- and three emulgel formulations had different polarities, i.e. a formulation with polarity equal to that of the stratum corneum (optimised), a non-polar (lipophilic)- and a polar (hydrophilic)-formulation. Franz cell diffusion studies were executed over 12h and the optimised emulgel (2.578?g/cm(2)) had the highest median amount per area obtained. Tape stripping followed the diffusion studies and in the stratum corneum-epidermis, the hydrophilic emulgel (1.448?g/ml) contained the highest median pravastatin concentration and the epidermis-dermis the optimised emulgel (0.849?g/ml) depicted the highest pravastatin concentration. During this study, it was observed that when both emulgel and cream formulations were compared; the emulgels enhanced the delivery of pravastatin more than the creams. PMID:26505148

  17. Recent advances in vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Ana S; Alonso, María J

    2016-01-01

    The field of vaccination is moving from the use of attenuated or inactivated pathogens to safer but less immunogenic protein and peptide antigens, which require stronger adjuvant compositions. Antigen delivery carriers appear to play an important role in vaccine development, providing not only antigen protection and controlled release but also an intrinsic adjuvant potential. Among them, carriers based on polymers and lipids are the most representative ones. Patent applications in this area have disclosed, either the design and preparation methods for new biocompatible antigen delivery systems or the application of the previously developed systems for the delivery of novel antigens. Some of them have also reported the use of these technologies for modern therapeutic vaccination approaches. PMID:26667309

  18. Ultrasonic drug delivery in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Udroiu, Ion

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound-assisted drug delivery is an emerging technique that has the advantage of being non-invasive, efficiently and specifically targeted and controllable. While systemic drugs often show detrimental side effects, their ultrasound-triggered local release at the selected tissue may improve safety and specifity of therapy. An increasing amount of animal and preclinical studies demonstrates how ultrasound can also be used for increasing the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drug release to solid tumors. In particular, this technique may be functional to reach uniform delivery of chemotherapeutic agents throughout tumors, which is naturally restricted by their abnormal vascularization and interstitial pressure. This review deals with the physical mechanisms of ultrasound, the different kinds of drug carriers (microbubbles, liposomes and micelles) and the biological phenomena useful for cancer treatment (hyperthermia, sonoporation, enhanced extravasation, sonophoresis and blood-brain barrier disruption), showing how much ultrasonic drug delivery is a promising method in the oncological field. PMID:26011326

  19. Composite nanoparticles for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhua; Huang, Leaf

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated gene and siRNA delivery has been an appealing area to gene therapists when they attempt to treat the diseases by manipulating the genetic information in the target cells. However, the advances in materials science could not keep up with the demand for multifunctional nanomaterials to achieve desired delivery efficiency. Researchers have thus taken an alternative approach to incorporate various materials into single composite nanoparticle using different fabrication methods. This approach allows nanoparticles to possess defined nanostructures as well as multiple functionalities to overcome the critical extracellular and intracellular barriers to successful gene delivery. This chapter will highlight the advances of fabrication methods that have the most potential to translate nanoparticles from bench to bedside. Furthermore, a major class of composite nanoparticle-lipid-based composite nanoparticles will be classified based on the components and reviewed in details. PMID:25409605

  20. Assessment of drug delivery devices.

    PubMed

    Batista, Elsa; Almeida, Nelson; Furtado, Andreia; Filipe, Eduarda; Sousa, Luis; Martins, Rui; Lucas, Peter; Petter, Harm Tido; Snijder, Roland; Timmerman, Annemoon

    2015-08-01

    For critical drug delivery, it is important to have a constant and well-known infusion rate delivered by the complete infusion set-up (pump, tubing, and accessories). Therefore, various drug delivery devices and accessories were tested in this article in terms of their infusion accuracy, start-up delay, response time, and dependency on the viscosity. These measurements were performed as part of the European funded research project MeDD. The obtained results show that the infusion accuracy of the devices is flow rate and accessory depended, especially for low flow rates. Viscosity does not have a significant impact on the flow rate accuracy. PMID:25945719

  1. Solid lipid nanoparticles: promising therapeutic nanocarriers for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Thukral, Dipti Kakkar; Dumoga, Shweta; Mishra, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    Development of colloidal delivery systems has opened new avenues/frontiers for improving drug delivery. Solid lipid nanoparticles have come up as the latest development in the arena of lipid based colloidal delivery systems after nanoemulsion and liposomes ever since their introduction in the early 1990s. In this review, the authors have made efforts to bring forth the essential and practically relevant aspects of SLNs. This review gives an overview of the preparation methods of solid lipid nanoparticles while mainly focussing on their biological applications including their projected applications in drug delivery. This review critically examines the influential factors governing the formation of SLNs and then discussing in detail the several techniques being utilized for their characterization. This review discusses the drug loading and drug release aspects of SLNs as these are useful biocompatible carriers of lipophilic and to a certain extent hydrophilic drugs. An updated list of drugs encapsulated into various lipids to prepare SLN formulations has been provided. Other relevant aspects pertaining to the clinical use of SLN formulations like their sterilization and storage stability have also been explained. A unique facet of this review is the discussion on the challenging issues of in vivo applications and recent progresses in overcoming these challenges which follows in the end. PMID:25469779

  2. Porous silicon microparticles for delivery of siRNA therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianliang; Wu, Xiaoyan; Lee, Yeonju; Wolfram, Joy; Yang, Zhizhou; Mao, Zong-Wan; Ferrari, Mauro; Shen, Haifa

    2015-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) can be used to suppress gene expression, thereby providing a new avenue for the treatment of various diseases. However, the successful implementation of siRNA therapy requires the use of delivery platforms that can overcome the major challenges of siRNA delivery, such as enzymatic degradation, low intracellular uptake and lysosomal entrapment. Here, a protocol for the preparation and use of a biocompatible and effective siRNA delivery system is presented. This platform consists of polyethylenimine (PEI) and arginine (Arg)-grafted porous silicon microparticles, which can be loaded with siRNA by performing a simple mixing step. The silicon particles are gradually degraded over time, thereby triggering the formation of Arg-PEI/siRNA nanoparticles. This delivery vehicle provides a means for protecting and internalizing siRNA, without causing cytotoxicity. The major steps of polycation functionalization, particle characterization, and siRNA loading are outlined in detail. In addition, the procedures for determining particle uptake, cytotoxicity, and transfection efficacy are also described. PMID:25651103

  3. Drug delivery strategies for therapeutic angiogenesis and antiangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhise, Nupura S; Shmueli, Ron B; Sunshine, Joel C; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Green, Jordan J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Angiogenesis is essential to human biology and of great clinical significance. Excessive or reduced angiogenesis can result in, or exacerbate, several disease states, including tumor formation, exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and ischemia. Innovative drug delivery systems can increase the effectiveness of therapies used to treat angiogenesis-related diseases. Areas covered This paper reviews the basic biology of angiogenesis, including current knowledge about its disruption in diseases, with the focus on cancer and AMD. Anti- and proangiogenic drugs available for clinical use or in development are also discussed, as well as experimental drug delivery systems that can potentially improve these therapies to enhance or reduce angiogenesis in a more controlled manner. Expert opinion Laboratory and clinical results have shown pro- or antiangiogenic drug delivery strategies to be effective in drastically slowing disease progression. Further research in this area will increase the efficacy, specificity and duration of these therapies. Future directions with composite drug delivery systems may make possible targeting of multiple factors for synergistic effects. PMID:21338327

  4. Cesarean delivery: counseling issues and complication management.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Jeffrey D; Murphy, Neil J

    2015-02-01

    Nearly one-third of all deliveries in the United States are cesarean deliveries. Compared with spontaneous vaginal delivery, cesarean delivery is associated with increased maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Interventions that decrease the chance of a cesarean delivery include avoiding non-medically indicated induction of labor, avoiding amniotomy, and having a doula present. In North America, the most common reasons for cesarean delivery include elective repeat cesarean delivery, dystocia or failure to progress, malpresentation, and fetal heart rate tracings that suggest fetal distress. Post-cesarean delivery complications include pain, endomyometritis, wound separation/infection, urinary tract infection, gastrointestinal problems, deep venous thrombosis, and septic thrombophlebitis. Women with no risk factors for deep venous thrombosis other than the postpartum state and the operative delivery do not require thromboembolism prophylaxis other than early ambulation. A pregnant woman's decision to attempt a trial of labor after cesarean delivery or have a planned repeat cesarean delivery involves a balancing of maternal and neonatal risks, as well as personal preference after counseling by her physician. Approximately 75% of attempted trials of labor after cesarean delivery are successful. Provision of advanced maternity care practices by family physicians, including serving as primary surgeons for cesarean deliveries, is consistent with the goals of the patient-centered medical home. PMID:25822271

  5. Waste feed delivery test and evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    O'TOOLE, S.M.

    1999-09-30

    This plan documents the Waste Feed Delivery Program test and evaluation planning and implementation approach. The purpose of this document is to define and communicate the Waste Feed Delivery Program Test and Evaluation scope, objectives, planning and implementation approach.

  6. Nanodisk: a versatile drug delivery platform

    E-print Network

    Ghosh, Mistuni

    2012-01-01

    makes ND a promising nano-platform for in vivo drug deliveryof nanotechnology on drug delivery. ACS Nano. Ryan RO.nano-scale level to improve bioavailability, increase plasma circulation time and achieve tissue specific drug delivery

  7. Packaging for a drug delivery microelectromechanical system

    E-print Network

    Ho Duc, Hong Linh, 1978-

    2005-01-01

    Local drug delivery is a fast expanding field, and has been a center of attention for researchers in medicine in the last decade. Its advantages over systemic drug delivery are clear in cancer therapy, with localized tumors. ...

  8. Compose tips | Healthcare Delivery Research Blog

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Search form Search Search Healthcare Delivery Research Blog Toggle navigation Healthcare Delivery Research Blog Home Blog Purpose and Policies About HDRP Contact Us Subscribe

  9. CSU Mail Production Center 6011 Campus Delivery

    E-print Network

    CSU Mail Production Center 6011 Campus Delivery Phone: 970-491-6142 Fax: 970-491-5012 E-mail: mail Mailings, Please Send Sample to Mail Production @ 6011 Campus Delivery Date Materials to Arrive Consider

  10. Evolution of the magnetic helicity flux during the formation and eruption of flux ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, P.; Zuccarello, F. P.; Guglielmino, S. L.; Zuccarello, F.

    2014-10-20

    We describe the evolution and the magnetic helicity flux for two active regions (ARs) since their appearance on the solar disk: NOAA 11318 and NOAA 11675. Both ARs hosted the formation and destabilization of magnetic flux ropes. In the former AR, the formation of the flux rope culminated in a flare of C2.3 GOES class and a coronal mass ejection (CME) observed by Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment. In the latter AR, the region hosting the flux rope was involved in several flares, but only a partial eruption with signatures of a minor plasma outflow was observed. We found a different behavior in the accumulation of the magnetic helicity flux in the corona, depending on the magnetic configuration and on the location of the flux ropes in the ARs. Our results suggest that the complexity and strength of the photospheric magnetic field is only a partial indicator of the real likelihood of an AR producing the eruption of a flux rope and a subsequent CME.

  11. On the existence of two different mechanisms of coronal mass ejection formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eselevich, Victor; Eselevich, Maxim

    Data from Mark 3 and 4, DPM (Mauna Loa Solar Observatory), and from spacecrafts place-SOHO (LASCO C2, EIT), STEREO (COR1, EUVI) were analyzed. It is demonstrated that the difference between the physical nature of the "impulsive" and the "gradual" CMEs is mainly represented by such parameters as the CME location, velocity and angular size at the moment the CME emerges. The "gradual" CMEs are formed in the corona at 0.1R0 ? h ? 0.7R0 above the limb of the Sun (R0 is the solar radius). They start moving, when their angular size is ? 15-65 degrees (in the heliocentric coordinate system) and their initial velocity V0 ? 0. A probable mechanism for their formation is the eruption of a coronal flux rope from the equilib-rium state. The formation of "impulsive" CMEs appears to begin under the photosphere of the Sun and may be related to ejection of floating magnetic tubes (flux ropes) from the convective zone. At the photospheric level, the radial velocities of such magnetic tubes exceed the local sound velocity and may reach hundreds km/s, while their angular sizes do not exceed ? (1-5)° . Possible ejection of magnetic tubes from the convective zone was theoretically demonstrated earlier.

  12. Polymeric micelles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Croy, S R; Kwon, G S

    2006-01-01

    Polymeric micelles are nanoscopic core/shell structures formed by amphiphilic block copolymers. Both the inherent and modifiable properties of polymeric micelles make them particularly well suited for drug delivery purposes. An emphasis of this review has been placed on both the description and characterization techniques of the physical properties of polymeric micelles. Relevant properties discussed include micellar association, morphology, size and stability. These properties and characterization techniques are included to provide context for the known advantages and applications of polymeric micelles for drug delivery. The advantages and applications discussed include solubilization of poorly soluble molecules, sustained release and size advantages, and protection of encapsulated substances from degradation and metabolism. The three most widely studied block copolymer classes are characterized by their hydrophobic blocks, and are poly(propylene oxide), poly(L-amino acid)s and poly(ester)s. These three classes of block copolymers are reviewed with multiple examples of current research in which formulation techniques with polymeric micelles have been applied to some of the most challenging molecules in the pharmaceutical industry. The polymeric micelles used for drug delivery in these examples have shown the abilities to attenuate toxicities, enhance delivery to desired biological sites and improve the therapeutic efficacy of active pharmaceutical ingredients. PMID:17168771

  13. Delivery System, 2003-2004.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Federal Student Aid (ED), Washington, DC.

    This workshop guide for financial aid administrators provides training in the federal student financial aid delivery system. An introduction enables the participant to share some information about his or her responsibilities and to reflect on the relevance of the training to the job. Session 1, "Application Systems," identifies methods of applying…

  14. Decationized polyplexes for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Novo, Luís; Mastrobattista, Enrico; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Lammers, Twan; Hennink, Wim E

    2015-04-01

    Gene therapy has received much attention in the field of drug delivery. Synthetic, nonviral gene delivery systems have gained increasing attention as vectors for gene therapy mainly due to a favorable immunogenicity profile and ease of manufacturing as compared to viral vectors. The great majority of these formulations are based on polycationic structures, due to their ability to interact with negatively charged nucleic acids to spontaneously form nanoparticles. In recent years, several polycationic systems have demonstrated high transfection in vitro. However, progress toward clinical applications has been slow, mainly because the cationic nature of these systems leads to intolerable toxicity levels, inappropriate biodistribution and unsatisfactory efficiency in vivo, particularly after systemic administration. Decationized polyplexes are a new class of gene delivery systems that have been developed as an alternative for conventional polycation-based systems. The major innovation introduced by decationized polyplexes is that these systems are based on neutral polymers, without any detrimental effect on the physicochemical stability or encapsulation ability, due to the transient presence of cationic charge and disulfide cross-links between the polymer chains by which the nucleic acids are physically entrapped in the particles. This editorial summarizes the most important features of decationized polyplexes and discusses potential implications for the development of new safe and efficient gene delivery systems. PMID:25425332

  15. Nanoparticles for Brain Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Masserini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system, one of the most delicate microenvironments of the body, is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulating its homeostasis. BBB is a highly complex structure that tightly regulates the movement of ions of a limited number of small molecules and of an even more restricted number of macromolecules from the blood to the brain, protecting it from injuries and diseases. However, the BBB also significantly precludes the delivery of drugs to the brain, thus, preventing the therapy of a number of neurological disorders. As a consequence, several strategies are currently being sought after to enhance the delivery of drugs across the BBB. Within this review, the recently born strategy of brain drug delivery based on the use of nanoparticles, multifunctional drug delivery systems with size in the order of one-billionth of meters, is described. The review also includes a brief description of the structural and physiological features of the barrier and of the most utilized nanoparticles for medical use. Finally, the potential neurotoxicity of nanoparticles is discussed, and future technological approaches are described. The strong efforts to allow the translation from preclinical to concrete clinical applications are worth the economic investments. PMID:25937958

  16. Document Delivery: Evaluating the Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Suzanne M.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses options available to libraries for document delivery. Topics include users' needs; cost; copyright compliance; traditional interlibrary loan; types of suppliers; selection criteria, including customer service; new developments in interlibrary loan, including outsourcing arrangements; and the need to evaluate suppliers. (LRW)

  17. Service Delivery Strategies for Multicultural

    E-print Network

    delivery strategies could meet the needs of most recreationists. Customer service has become of Land Management (BLM). These initiatives have a strong emphasis on customer service. To meet, maximizing customer service re- quires an understanding of the recreation preferences of an ethnically

  18. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  19. 43 CFR 418.7 - Who may receive irrigation deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Who may receive irrigation deliveries. 418.7 Section 418.7...Water Delivery § 418.7 Who may receive irrigation deliveries. Project irrigation water deliveries may be made only to...

  20. 43 CFR 418.7 - Who may receive irrigation deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 true Who may receive irrigation deliveries. 418.7 Section 418.7...Water Delivery § 418.7 Who may receive irrigation deliveries. Project irrigation water deliveries may be made only to...

  1. 43 CFR 418.7 - Who may receive irrigation deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Who may receive irrigation deliveries. 418.7 Section 418.7...Water Delivery § 418.7 Who may receive irrigation deliveries. Project irrigation water deliveries may be made only to...

  2. 43 CFR 418.7 - Who may receive irrigation deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Who may receive irrigation deliveries. 418.7 Section 418.7...Water Delivery § 418.7 Who may receive irrigation deliveries. Project irrigation water deliveries may be made only to...

  3. 43 CFR 418.7 - Who may receive irrigation deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Who may receive irrigation deliveries. 418.7 Section 418.7...Water Delivery § 418.7 Who may receive irrigation deliveries. Project irrigation water deliveries may be made only to...

  4. A New Brain Drug Delivery Strategy: Focused Ultrasound-Enhanced Intranasal Drug Delivery

    E-print Network

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    A New Brain Drug Delivery Strategy: Focused Ultrasound-Enhanced Intranasal Drug Delivery Hong Chen1 the delivery efficiency of intranasally administered drugs at a targeted location. After IN administration using fluorescence imaging of brain slices. The results showed that FUS+IN enhanced drug delivery within

  5. Osteogenesis imperfecta: cesarean deliveries in identical twins.

    PubMed

    Dinges, E; Ortner, C; Bollag, L; Davies, J; Landau, R

    2015-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a congenital disorder resulting in multiple fractures and extremely short stature, usually necessitating cesarean delivery. Identical twins with severe osteogenesis imperfecta each of whom underwent a cesarean delivery with different anesthetic modalities are presented. A review of the literature and anesthetic options for cesarean delivery and postoperative analgesia for women with osteogenesis imperfecta are discussed. PMID:25433579

  6. 43 CFR 418.4 - Prohibited deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prohibited deliveries. 418.4 Section 418.4... § 418.4 Prohibited deliveries. The District must not deliver Project water or permit its use except as... delivered to ineligible lands. Delivery of water to land in excess of established water duties is prohibited....

  7. Mercury Delivery System Tony Gabriel, Phil Spampinato

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Mercury Delivery System Issues Van Graves Tony Gabriel, Phil Spampinato Targetry Teleconference 21 during CERN tests - Investigate alternative Hg delivery systems · Experiment lends itself to non in downstream piping - Nozzle/piping changes will not affect Hg delivery ability - Jet characteristics should

  8. Accounts Receivable Operations 6024 Campus Delivery

    E-print Network

    Accounts Receivable Operations 6024 Campus Delivery Fort Collins CO 80523-6024 Graduate Assistant o If top portion is incomplete, it will be returned to the department o Please give campus delivery Receivable Operations, 555 S Howes Street 110, 6024 Campus Delivery. The lists can also be faxed to 491

  9. 43 CFR 418.4 - Prohibited deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prohibited deliveries. 418.4 Section 418.4... § 418.4 Prohibited deliveries. The District must not deliver Project water or permit its use except as... delivered to ineligible lands. Delivery of water to land in excess of established water duties is prohibited....

  10. 43 CFR 418.4 - Prohibited deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Prohibited deliveries. 418.4 Section 418.4... § 418.4 Prohibited deliveries. The District must not deliver Project water or permit its use except as... delivered to ineligible lands. Delivery of water to land in excess of established water duties is prohibited....

  11. 43 CFR 418.4 - Prohibited deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prohibited deliveries. 418.4 Section 418.4... § 418.4 Prohibited deliveries. The District must not deliver Project water or permit its use except as... delivered to ineligible lands. Delivery of water to land in excess of established water duties is prohibited....

  12. 43 CFR 418.4 - Prohibited deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prohibited deliveries. 418.4 Section 418.4... § 418.4 Prohibited deliveries. The District must not deliver Project water or permit its use except as... delivered to ineligible lands. Delivery of water to land in excess of established water duties is prohibited....

  13. Process Detail* 1. Reconcile Carrier Delivery

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Process Detail* 1. Reconcile Carrier Delivery 1. Count packages received, reconcile any differences and signer on "ERSO Incoming Delivery Log" 3. Separate packages by building. 4. Remove packing slip from "Purchase Order" tab 2. Fill in Customer Name, Final Destination, Purchasing Agent, and Delivery Log Name

  14. Chitosan-based delivery systems for diclofenac delivery: preparation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreve, Simina; Kacso, Irina; Bratu, Ioan; Indrea, Emil

    2009-08-01

    The preparation and characterization of novel materials for drug delivery has rapidly gained importance in development of innovative medicine. The paper concerns the uses of chitosan as an excipient in oral formulations and as a drug delivery vehicle for burnt painful injuries. The use of chitosan (CTS) as base in polyelectrolyte complex systems, to prepare liquid release systems as hydrogels and solid release systems as sponges is presented. In this paper the preparation of CTS hydrogels and sponges carrying diclofenac (DCF), as anti-inflammatory drug is reported. The immobilization of DCF in CTS is done by mixing the CTS hydrogel with the anti-inflammatory drug solutions. The concentration of anti-inflammatory drug in the CTS hydrogel generating the sponges was of 57 mg/l, 72 mg/l and 114 mg/l. The CTS sponges with anti-inflammatory drugs were prepared by freeze-drying at -610°C and 0,09 atm. The characterization of the hydrogels and sponges was done by infrared spectra (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS). The results indicated the formation of CTS-DCF intermediates. The DCF molecules are forming temporary chelates in CTS hydrogels and sponges and they are compatible with skin or some of biological fluids with satisfactory results.

  15. Sustained Delivery of Chondroitinase ABC from Hydrogel System

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Filippo; Veglianese, Pietro; Santoro, Marco; Papa, Simonetta; Rogora, Cristina; Dell’Oro, Valentina; Forloni, Gianluigi; Masi, Maurizio; Perale, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    In the injured spinal cord, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are the principal responsible of axon growth inhibition and they contribute to regenerative failure, promoting glial scar formation. Chondroitinase ABC (chABC) is known for being able to digest proteoglycans, thus degrading glial scar and favoring axonal regrowth. However, its classic administration is invasive, infection-prone and clinically problematic. An agarose-carbomer (AC1) hydrogel, already used in SCI repair strategies, was here investigated as a delivery system capable of an effective chABC administration: the material ability to include chABC within its pores and the possibility to be injected into the target tissue were firstly proved. Subsequently, release kinetic and the maintenance of enzymatic activity were positively assessed: AC1 hydrogel was thus confirmed to be a feasible tool for chABC delivery and a promising device for spinal cord injury topic repair strategies. PMID:24956524

  16. Applications of nanodiamonds in drug delivery and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Moosa, Basem; Fhayli, Karim; Li, Song; Julfakyan, Khatchatur; Ezzeddine, Alaa; Khashab, Niveen M

    2014-01-01

    The interest of researchers in utilizing nanomaterials as carriers for a wide spectrum of molecules has exploded in the last two decades. Nanodiamonds are one class of carbon-based nanomaterials that have emerged as promising drug delivery vehicles and imaging probes. Their ease of functionalization also led to the generation of stimuli-responsive nanodiamonds that deliver drugs on demand in a controlled manner. The ample surface area of NDs allowed for a higher loading of not only small molecules but also macromolecules like genes and proteins. Recently, the unique surface of NDs has attracted more attention as catalyst support in a huge range of organic modification and C-C bond formation reactions. Herein, recent advances in the utilization of nanodiamonds as a drug delivery vehicle and catalytical support are highlighted and summarized to illustrate the potential and versatility of this cheap and commercially available nanomaterial. PMID:24730266

  17. 29 CFR 780.154 - Delivery “to market.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Delivery âto market.â 780.154 Section 780.154 Labor... of Agriculture Specified Delivery Operations § 780.154 Delivery “to market.” The term “delivery... processor to which the farmer delivers his products. Delivery to market ends with the delivery of...

  18. 29 CFR 780.154 - Delivery “to market.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Delivery âto market.â 780.154 Section 780.154 Labor... of Agriculture Specified Delivery Operations § 780.154 Delivery “to market.” The term “delivery... processor to which the farmer delivers his products. Delivery to market ends with the delivery of...

  19. 29 CFR 780.154 - Delivery “to market.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Delivery âto market.â 780.154 Section 780.154 Labor... of Agriculture Specified Delivery Operations § 780.154 Delivery “to market.” The term “delivery... processor to which the farmer delivers his products. Delivery to market ends with the delivery of...

  20. 29 CFR 780.154 - Delivery “to market.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Delivery âto market.â 780.154 Section 780.154 Labor... of Agriculture Specified Delivery Operations § 780.154 Delivery “to market.” The term “delivery... processor to which the farmer delivers his products. Delivery to market ends with the delivery of...

  1. Management of twins: vaginal or cesarean delivery?

    PubMed

    Bibbo, Carolina; Robinson, Julian N

    2015-06-01

    Recent level I evidence from a single randomized-controlled trial has shown that there is no difference in fetal or neonatal outcomes (composite of fetal/neonatal death or serious neonatal morbidity) between planned cesarean delivery and planned vaginal delivery for twins between 32 and 38 6/7 weeks. As long as the presenting twin is vertex, vaginal delivery should be considered regardless of the presentation of the second twin. To avoid unnecessary cesarean deliveries and maternal morbidity, it is important to continue to train residents to perform obstetrics maneuvers necessary for vaginal delivery of twins such as vaginal breech extraction. PMID:25851847

  2. Nanoparticle Delivery Enhancement With Acoustically Activated Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Mullin, Lee B; Phillips, Linsey C; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The application of microbubbles and ultrasound to deliver nanoparticle carriers for drug and gene delivery is an area that has expanded greatly in recent years. Under ultrasound exposure, microbubbles can enhance nanoparticle delivery by increasing cellular and vascular permeability. In this review, the underlying mechanisms of enhanced nanoparticle delivery with ultrasound and microbubbles and various proposed delivery techniques are discussed. Additionally, types of nanoparticles currently being investigated in preclinical studies, as well as the general limitations and benefits of a microbubble-based approach to nanoparticle delivery are reviewed. PMID:23287914

  3. Ultrasound mediated nanoparticle drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Lee B.

    Ultrasound is not only a powerful diagnostic tool, but also a promising therapeutic technology that can be used to improve localized drug delivery. Microbubble contrast agents are micron sized encapsulated gas filled bubbles that are administered intravenously. Originally developed to enhance ultrasound images, microbubbles are highly echogenic due to the gas core that provides a detectable impedance difference from the surrounding medium. The core also allows for controlled response of the microbubbles to ultrasound pulses. Microbubbles can be pushed using acoustic radiation force and ruptured using high pressures. Destruction of microbubbles can increase permeability at the cellular and vascular level, which can be advantageous for drug delivery. Advances in drug delivery methods have been seen with the introduction of nanoparticles, nanometer sized objects often carrying a drug payload. In chemotherapy, nanoparticles can deliver drugs to tumors while limiting systemic exposure due to abnormalities in tumor vasculature such large gaps between endothelial cells that allow nanoparticles to enter into the interstitial space; this is referred to as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, this effect may be overestimated in many tumors. Additionally, only a small percentage of the injected dose accumulates in the tumor, which most the nanoparticles accumulating in the liver and spleen. It is hypothesized that combining the acoustic activity of an ultrasound contrast agent with the high payload and extravasation ability of a nanoparticle, localized delivery to the tumor with reduced systemic toxicity can be achieved. This method can be accomplished by either loading nanoparticles onto the shell of the microbubble or through a coadministration method of both nanoparticles and microbubbles. The work presented in this dissertation utilizes novel and commercial nanoparticle formulations, combined with microbubbles and a variety of ultrasound systems. Ultrasound parameters are optimized to achieve maximum cell internalization of molecules and increased nanoparticle delivery to a cell layer on a coverslip. In-vivo studies demonstrate the possibility of using a lower dose of paclitaxel to slow tumor growth rates, increase doxorubicin concentration in tumor tissue, and enhance tumor delivery of fluorescent molecules through treatments that combine nanoparticles with ultrasound and microbubbles.

  4. The transdermal delivery of fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Lane, Majella E

    2013-08-01

    The fentanyl patch is one of the great commercial successes in transdermal drug delivery. The suitability of this molecule for delivery through skin had been identified in the 1970s, and subsequently, a number of transdermal formulations became available on the market. This article reviews the development of fentanyl patch technology with particular emphasis on the pharmacokinetics and disposition of the drug when delivered through the skin. The various patch designs are considered as well as the bioequivalence of the different designs. The influence of heat on fentanyl permeation is highlighted. Post-mortem redistribution of fentanyl is discussed in light of the reported discrepancies in serum levels reported in patients after death compared with therapeutic levels in living subjects. Finally, alternatives to patch technology are considered, and recent novel transdermal formulations are highlighted. PMID:23419814

  5. AWIPS II Extended - Data Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R.; Schotz, S.; Calkins, J.; Gockel, B.; Ortiz, C.; Peter, R.

    2012-12-01

    AWIPS II Technology Infusion is a multiphase program. The first phase is the migration of the Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) and River Forecast Centers (RFCs) AWIPS I capabilities into a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), referred to as AWIPS II. AWIPS II is currently being deployed to Operational Test and Evaluation (OTE) and other select deployment sites. The subsequent phases of AWIPS Technology Infusion, known as AWIPS II Extended, include several projects that will improve technological capabilities of AWIPS II in order to enhance the NWS enterprise and improve services to partners. This paper summarizes AWIPS II Extended - Data Delivery project and reports on its status. Data Delivery enables AWIPS II users to discover, subscribe and access web-enabled data provider systems including the capability to subset datasets by space, time and parameter.

  6. Electronic MEMS for triggered delivery.

    PubMed

    Richards Grayson, Amy C; Scheidt Shawgo, Rebecca; Li, Yawen; Cima, Michael J

    2004-02-10

    Implantable electronic devices such as pacemakers and neural implants are often used for electrical stimulation. The usage of microfabrication techniques to produce microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) has allowed engineers to address a wider range of clinical indications. A new direction in the area of MEMS technology is the goal of achieving pulsatile drug delivery. The digital capabilities of MEMS may allow greater temporal control over drug release compared to traditional polymer-based systems, while the batch-processing techniques used in the microelectronics industry can lead to greater device uniformity and reproducibility than is currently available to the pharmaceutical industry. A repertoire of structures, including microreservoirs, micropumps, valves, and sensors, is being developed that will provide a strong foundation for the design of integrated, responsive MEMS for drug delivery. PMID:14741114

  7. Quantitative evaluation of 3D dosimetry for stereotactic volumetric-modulated arc delivery using COMPASS.

    PubMed

    Vikraman, Subramani; Manigandan, Durai; Karrthick, Karukkupalayam Palaniappan; Sambasivaselli, Raju; Senniandavar, Vellaingiri; Ramu, Mahendran; Rajesh, Thiyagarajan; Lutz, Muller; Muthukumaran, Manavalan; Karthikeyan, Nithyanantham; Tejinder, Kataria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the patient-specific 3D dosimetry tool COMPASS with 2D array MatriXX detector for stereotactic volumetric-modulated arc delivery. Twenty-five patients CT images and RT structures from different sites (brain, head & neck, thorax, abdomen, and spine) were taken from CyberKnife Multiplan planning system for this study. All these patients underwent radical stereotactic treatment in CyberKnife. For each patient, linac based volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) stereotactic plans were generated in Monaco TPS v3.1 using Elekta Beam Modulator MLC. Dose prescription was in the range of 5-20 Gy per fraction. Target prescription and critical organ constraints were tried to match the delivered treatment plans. Each plan quality was analyzed using conformity index (CI), conformity number (CN), gradient Index (GI), target coverage (TC), and dose to 95% of volume (D95). Monaco Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated treatment plan delivery accuracy was quantitatively evaluated with COMPASS-calculated (CCA) dose and COMPASS indirectly measured (CME) dose based on dose-volume histogram metrics. In order to ascertain the potential of COMPASS 3D dosimetry for stereotactic plan delivery, 2D fluence verification was performed with MatriXX using MultiCube phantom. Routine quality assurance of absolute point dose verification was performed to check the overall delivery accuracy. Quantitative analyses of dose delivery verification were compared with pass and fail criteria of 3 mm and 3% distance to agreement and dose differences. Gamma passing rate was compared with 2D fluence verification from MatriXX with MultiCube. Comparison of COMPASS reconstructed dose from measured fluence and COMPASS computed dose has shown a very good agreement with TPS calculated dose. Each plan was evaluated based on dose volume parameters for target volumes such as dose at 95% of volume (D95) and average dose. For critical organs dose at 20% of volume (D20), dose at 50% of volume (D50), and maximum point doses were evaluated. Comparison was carried out using gamma analysis with passing criteria of 3 mm and 3%. Mean deviation of 1.9% ± 1% was observed for dose at 95% of volume (D95) of target volumes, whereas much less difference was noticed for critical organs. However, significant dose difference was noticed in two cases due to the smaller tumor size. Evaluation of this study revealed that the COMPASS 3D dosimetry is efficient and easy to use for patient-specific QA of VMAT stereotactic delivery. 3D dosimetric QA with COMPASS provides additional degrees of freedom to check the high-dose modulated stereotactic delivery with very high precision on patient CT images. PMID:25679152

  8. Cyclodextrins in delivery systems: Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Tiwari, Ruchi; Rai, Awani K.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are a family of cyclic oligosaccharides with a hydrophilic outer surface and a lipophilic central cavity. CD molecules are relatively large with a number of hydrogen donors and acceptors and, thus in general, they do not permeate lipophilic membranes. In the pharmaceutical industry, CDs have mainly been used as complexing agents to increase aqueous solubility of poorly soluble drugs and to increase their bioavailability and stability. CDs are used in pharmaceutical applications for numerous purposes, including improving the bioavailability of drugs. Current CD-based therapeutics is described and possible future applications are discussed. CD-containing polymers are reviewed and their use in drug delivery is presented. Of specific interest is the use of CD-containing polymers to provide unique capabilities for the delivery of nucleic acids. Studies in both humans and animals have shown that CDs can be used to improve drug delivery from almost any type of drug formulation. Currently, there are approximately 30 different pharmaceutical products worldwide containing drug/CD complexes in the market. PMID:21814436

  9. Use and influence of Delivery and Birth Plans in the humanizing delivery process1

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Cortés, María; Armero-Barranco, David; Canteras-Jordana, Manuel; Martínez-Roche, María Emilia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: get to know, analyze and describe the current situation of the Delivery and Birth Plans in our context, comparing the delivery and birth process between women who presented a Delivery and Birth Plan and those who did not. METHOD: quantitative and cross-sectional, observational, descriptive and comparative cohort study, carried out over two years. All women who gave birth during the study period were selected, including 9303 women in the study. RESULTS: 132 Delivery and Birth Plans were presented during the first year of study and 108 during the second. Among the variables analyzed, a significant difference was found in "skin to skin contact", "choice of dilation and delivery posture", "use of enema", "intake of foods or fluids", "eutocic deliveries", "late clamping of the umbilical cord" and "perineal shaving". CONCLUSIONS: the Delivery and Birth Plans positively influence the delivery process and its outcome. Health policies are needed to increase the number of Delivery and Birth Plans in our hospitals. PMID:26155015

  10. A Blended Learning Lecture Delivery Model for Large and Diverse Undergraduate Cohorts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Wendy A.; Perini, Eloise; Rohlf, Vanessa; Toukhsati, Samia; Conduit, Russell; Sanson, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    A blended learning model was developed to enhance lecture delivery in a large, diverse introductory psychology unit, introducing the use of an online, personalized learning system for lecture preparation and using lecture time to extend students' understanding. Changes to the assessment included diagnostic, formative and summative online quizzes.…

  11. Sustainability of Farm Credit Delivery by Cooperatives and NGOs in Edo and Delta States, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alufohai, G. O.

    2006-01-01

    The paper examined the sustainability rates of co-operatives and NGOs in farm credit delivery in Edo and Delta States of Nigeria. The Subsidy Dependence Indices (SDI) and the capital formation rates were determined using both primary and secondary data obtained from 80 and 20 purposively selected cooperatives and NGOs respectively, based on their…

  12. 19 CFR Appendix B to Part 191 - Sample Formats for Applications for Specific Manufacturing Drawback Rulings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... published in the Customs Bulletin, as provided in 19 CFR 191.8. In these application formats, remarks in... obligations to obtain the appropriate certificates of delivery (19 CFR 191.10), certificates of manufacture and delivery (19 CFR 191.24), or both?) 2. Will an agent be used to process the designated or...

  13. 19 CFR Appendix B to Part 191 - Sample Formats for Applications for Specific Manufacturing Drawback Rulings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... published in the Customs Bulletin, as provided in 19 CFR 191.8. In these application formats, remarks in... obligations to obtain the appropriate certificates of delivery (19 CFR 191.10), certificates of manufacture and delivery (19 CFR 191.24), or both?) 2. Will an agent be used to process the designated or...

  14. Microneedles: an innovative platform for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Joanne; Donnelly, Ryan F; McCarthy, Helen O

    2015-08-01

    The advent of microneedle (MN) technology has provided a revolutionary platform for the delivery of therapeutic agents, particularly in the field of gene therapy. For over 20 years, the area of gene therapy has undergone intense innovation and progression which has seen advancement of the technology from an experimental concept to a widely acknowledged strategy for the treatment and prevention of numerous disease states. However, the true potential of gene therapy has yet to be achieved due to limitations in formulation and delivery technologies beyond parenteral injection of the DNA. Microneedle-mediated delivery provides a unique platform for the delivery of DNA therapeutics clinically. It provides a means to overcome the skin barriers to gene delivery and deposit the DNA directly into the dermal layers, a key site for delivery of therapeutics to treat a wide range of skin and cutaneous diseases. Additionally, the skin is a tissue rich in immune sentinels, an ideal target for the delivery of a DNA vaccine directly to the desired target cell populations. This review details the advancement of MN-mediated DNA delivery from proof-of-concept to the delivery of DNA encoding clinically relevant proteins and antigens and examines the key considerations for the improvement of the technology and progress into a clinically applicable delivery system. PMID:26122168

  15. The LITA Drill and Sample Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, G.; Yoon, S.; Zacny, K.; Wettergreeng, D.; Cabrol, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Life in the Atacama (LITA) project has a goal of demonstrating autonomous roving, sample acquisition, delivery and analysis operations in Atacama, Chile. To enable the sample handling requirement, Honeybee Robotics developed a rover-deployed, rotary-percussive, autonomous drill, called the LITA Drill, capable of penetrating to ~80 cm in various formations, capturing and delivering subsurface samples to a 20 cup carousel. The carousel has a built-in capability to press the samples within each cup, and position target cups underneath instruments for analysis. The drill and sample delivery system had to have mass and power requirements consistent with a flight system. The drill weighs 12 kg and uses less than 100 watt of power to penetrate ~80 cm. The LITA Drill auger has been designed with two distinct stages. The lower part has deep and gently sloping flutes for retaining powdered sample, while the upper section has shallow and steep flutes for preventing borehole collapse and for efficient movement of cuttings and fall back material out of the hole. The drill uses the so called 'bite-sampling' approach that is samples are taken in short, 5-10 cm bites. To take the first bite, the drill is lowered onto the ground and upon drilling of the first bite it is then retracted into an auger tube. The auger with the auger tube are then lifted off the ground and positioned next to the carousel. To deposit the sample, the auger is rotated and retracted above the auger tube. The cuttings retained on the flutes are either gravity fed or are brushed off by a passive side brush into the cup. After the sample from the first bite has been deposited, the drill is lowered back into the same hole to take the next bite. This process is repeated until a target depth is reached. The bite sampling is analogous to peck drilling in the machining process where a bit is periodically retracted to clear chips. If there is some fall back into the hole once the auger has cleared the hole, this fall back material will be augered out during auger re-insertion. The next bite will be taken only once the auger has reached the true bottom. In the bite sampling approach the stratigraphy is somewhat preserved since every time the sample is taken, it more or less represents the depth interval in the hole. There is going to be some level of cross contamination due to smearing of cuttings on the flutes against the borehole as the auger is being pulled out, or when formation is very porous and unstable. The goal of the first drill campaign in Atacama in May of 2012 was to demonstrate successful operation of the bite sampling method and to learn about diversity of soils and rocks in the Atacama. In 2013, the sampling system has been integrated onto the CMU Zoe rover and autonomously deployed in Atacama. The drill penetrated various formations and delivered samples to a carousel. When soil was very porous, poor sample recovery was observed. When the soil was dense and cohesive, sample recovery was 100% with little cross contamination. To enable greater sample recovery in loose and unstable formations, the auger diameter will be increased from the current 12.5 mm to 19 mm. Acknowledgements: The project has been funded by the NASA ASTEP program.

  16. Influence of a CME’s Initial Parameters on the Arrival of the Associated Interplanetary Shock at Earth and the Shock Propagational Model Version 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X. H.; Feng, X. S.

    2015-08-01

    Predicting the arrival times of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their related waves at Earth is an important aspect of space weather forecasting. The Shock Propagation Model (SPM) and its updated version (SPM2), which use the initial parameters of solar flare-Type II burst events as input, have been developed to predict the shock arrival time. This paper continues to investigate the influence of solar disturbances and their associated CMEs on the corresponding interplanetary (IP) shock’s arrival at Earth. It has been found that IP shocks associated with wider CMEs have a greater probability of reaching the Earth, and the CME speed obtained from coronagraph observations can be supplementary to the initial shock speed computed from Type II radio bursts when predicting the shock’s arrival time. Therefore, the third version of the model, i.e., SPM3, has been developed based on these findings. The new version combines the characteristics of solar flare-Type II events with the initial parameters of the accompanying CMEs to provide the prediction of the associated IP shock’s arrival at Earth. The prediction test for 498 events of Solar Cycle 23 reveals that the prediction success rate of SPM3 is 70%-71%, which is apparently higher than that of the previous SPM2 model (61%-63%). The transit time prediction error of SPM3 for the Earth-encountered shocks is within 9 hr (mean-absolute). Comparisons between SPM3 and other similar models also demonstrate that SPM3 has the highest success rate and best prediction performance.

  17. New Evidence for the Role of Emerging Flux in a Solar Filament's Slow Rise Preceding Its CME-producing Fast Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Harra, Louise K.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2007-11-01

    We observe the eruption of a large-scale (~300,000 km) quiet-region solar filament leading to an Earth-directed ``halo'' coronal mass ejection (CME), using data from EIT, CDS, MDI, and LASCO on SOHO and from SXT on Yohkoh. Initially the filament shows a slow (~1 km s-1 projected against the solar disk) and approximately constant velocity rise for about 6 hr, before erupting rapidly, reaching a velocity of ~8 km s-1 over the next ~25 minutes. CDS Doppler data show Earth-directed filament velocities ranging from <20 km s-1 (the noise limit) during the slow-rise phase, to ~100 km s-1 early in the eruption. Beginning within 10 hr prior to the start of the slow rise, localized new magnetic flux emerged near one end of the filament. Near the start of and during the slow-rise phase, soft X-ray (SXR) microflaring occurred repeatedly at the flux-emergence site, and the magnetic arcade over the filament progressively brightened in a fan of illumination in SXRs. These observations are consistent with ``tether-weakening'' reconnection occurring between the newly emerging flux and the overlying arcade field containing the filament, and apparently this reconnection is the cause of the filament's slow rise. We cannot, however, discern whether the transition from slow rise to fast eruption was caused by a final episode of tether-weakening reconnection, or by one or some combination of other possible mechanisms allowed by the observations. Intensity ``dimmings'' and ``brightenings'' occurring both near to and relatively far from the location of the filament are possible signatures of the expansion (``opening'') of the erupting field and its reconnection with overarching field during the eruption.

  18. Predictions and observations of HF radio propagation in the northerly ionosphere: The effect of the solar flares and a weak CME in early January 2014.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallam, Jonathan; Stocker, Alan J.; Warrington, Mike; Siddle, Dave; Zaalov, Nikolay; Honary, Farideh; Rogers, Neil; Boteler, David; Danskin, Donald

    2014-05-01

    We have previously reported on a significant new multi-national project to provide improved predictions and forecasts of HF radio propagation for commercial aircraft operating on trans-polar routes. In these regions, there are limited or no VHF air-traffic control facilities and geostationary satellites are below the horizon. Therefore HF radio remains important in maintaining communications with the aircraft at all times. Space weather disturbances can have a range of effects on the ionosphere and hence HF radio propagation - particularly in the polar cap. While severe space weather effects can lead to a total loss of communications (i.e. radio blackout), less intense events can still cause significant disruption. In this paper we will present the effect of a series of M and X class solar flares and a relatively weak CME on HF radio performance from 6 to 13 January 2014. This is an interesting interval from the point of view of HF radio propagation because while the solar effects on the ionosphere are significant, except for an interval of approximately 12 hours duration, they are not so intense as to produce a complete radio blackout on all paths. Observations of the signal-to-noise ratio, direction of arrival, and time of flight of HF radio signals on six paths (one entirely within the polar cap, three trans-auroral, and two sub-auroral) will be presented together with riometer measurements of the ionospheric absorption. Global maps of D-region absorption (D-region absorption prediction, DRAP) inferred from satellite measurements of the solar wind parameters will be compared with the HF and riometer observations. In addition, a ray-tracing model using a realistic background ionosphere and including localised features found in the ionospheric polar cap (e.g. polar patches and arcs) will be used to model the expected and observed HF radio propagation characteristics.

  19. New Evidence for the Role of Emerging Flux in a Solar Filament's Slow Rise Preceding its CME-Producing Fast Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Harra, Louis K.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2007-01-01

    We observe the eruption of a large-scale (approx.300,000 km) quiet-region solar filament, leading to an Earth-directed "halo" coronal mass ejection (CME). We use coronal imaging data in EUV from the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite, and in soft X-rays (SXRs) from the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) on the Yohkoh satellite. We also use spectroscopic data from the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS), magnetic data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), and white-light coronal data from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO), all on SOHO. Initially the filament shows a slow (approx.1 km/s projected against the solar disk) and approximately constant-velocity rise for about 6 hours, before erupting rapidly, reaching a velocity of approx. 8 km/s over the next approx. 25 min. CDS Doppler data show Earth-directed filament velocities ranging from < 20 km/s (the noise limit) during the slow-rise phase, to approx. 100 km/s-1 early in the eruption. Beginning within 10 hours prior to the start of the slow rise, localized new magnetic flux emerged near one end of the filament. Near the start of and during the slow-rise phase, SXR microflaring occurred repeatedly at the flux-emergence site, in conjunction with the development of a fan of SXR illumination of the magnetic arcade over the filament. The SXR microflares, development of the SXR fan, and motion of the slow-rising filament are all consistent with "tether-weakening" reconnection occurring between the newly-emerging flux and the overlying arcade field containing the filament field. The microflares and fan structure are not prominent in EUV, and would not have been detected without the SXR data. Standard "twin dimmings" occur near the location of the filament, and "remote dimmings" and "brightenings" occur further removed from the filament.

  20. Advances in Lymphatic Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nune, Satish K.; Gunda, Padmaja; Majeti, Bharat K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Forrest, M. Laird

    2011-01-01

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death after heart disease in the US. While metastasized cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon are incurable, before their distant spread, these diseases will have invaded the lymphatic system as a first step in their progression. Hence, proper evaluation of the disease state of the lymphatics which drain a tumor site is crucial to staging and the formation of a treatment plan. Current lymphatic imaging modalities with visible dyes and radionucleotide tracers offer limited sensitivity and poor resolution; however, newer tools using nanocarriers, quantum dots, and magnetic resonance imaging promise to vastly improve the staging of lymphatic spread without needless biopsies. Concurrent with the improvement of lymphatic imaging agents, has been the development of drug carriers that can localize chemotherapy to the lymphatic system, thus improving the treatment of localized disease while minimizing the exposure of healthy organs to cytotoxic drugs. This review will focus on the use of various nanoparticulate and polymeric systems that have been developed for imaging and drug delivery to the lymph system, how these new devices improve upon current technologies, and where further improvement is needed. PMID:21718728

  1. Advances in Lymphatic Imaging and Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Gunda, Padmaja; Majeti, Bharat K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Laird, Forrest M.

    2011-09-10

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death after heart disease in the US. While metastasized cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon are incurable, before their distant spread, these diseases will have invaded the lymphatic system as a first step in their progression. Hence, proper evaluation of the disease state of the lymphatics which drain a tumor site is crucial to staging and the formation of a treatment plan. Current lymphatic imaging modalities with visible dyes and radionucleotide tracers offer limited sensitivity and poor resolution; however, newer tools using nanocarriers, quantum dots, and magnetic resonance imaging promise to vastly improve the staging of lymphatic spread without needless biopsies. Concurrent with the improvement of lymphatic imaging agents, has been the development of drug carriers that can localize chemotherapy to the lymphatic system, thus improving the treatment of localized disease while minimizing the exposure of healthy organs to cytotoxic drugs. This review will focus on polymeric systems that have been developed for imaging and drug delivery to the lymph system, how these new devices improve upon current technologies, and where further improvement is needed.

  2. Diclofenac enables unprecedented week-long microneedle-enhanced delivery of a skin impermeable medication in humans

    PubMed Central

    Brogden, Nicole K.; Banks, Stan L.; Crofford, Leslie J.; Stinchcomb, Audra L.

    2013-01-01

    Microneedles applied to the skin create micropores, allowing transdermal drug delivery of skin-impermeable compounds. The first human study with this technique demonstrated delivery of naltrexone (an opioid antagonist) for two to three days. Rapid micropore closure, however, blunts the delivery window. Application of diclofenac (an anti-inflammatory) allows seven days of naltrexone delivery in animals. Purpose the purpose of the current work was to demonstrate delivery of naltrexone for seven days following one microneedle treatment in humans. Methods Human subjects were treated with microneedles, diclofenac (or placebo), and naltrexone. Impedance measurements were used as a surrogate marker to measure micropore formation, and plasma naltrexone concentrations were measured for seven days post-microneedle application. Results Impedance dropped significantly from baseline to post-microneedle treatment, confirming micropore formation. Naltrexone was detected for seven days in Group 1 (diclofenac + naltrexone, n = 6), vs. 72 hours in Group 2 (placebo + naltrexone, n = 2). At study completion, a significant difference in impedance was observed between intact and microneedle-treated skin in Group 1 (confirming the presence of micropores). Conclusion This is the first study demonstrating week-long drug delivery after one microneedle application, which would increase patient compliance and allow delivery of therapies for chronic diseases. PMID:23761054

  3. Microspheres and Nanotechnology for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jóhannesson, Gauti; Stefánsson, Einar; Loftsson, Thorsteinn

    2016-01-01

    Ocular drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye can be accomplished by invasive drug injections into different tissues of the eye and noninvasive topical treatment. Invasive treatment involves the risks of surgical trauma and infection, and conventional topical treatments are ineffective in delivering drugs to the posterior segment of the eye. In recent years, nanotechnology has become an ever-increasing part of ocular drug delivery. In the following, we briefly review microspheres and nanotechnology for drug delivery to the eye, including different forms of nanotechnology such as nanoparticles, microparticles, liposomes, microemulsions and micromachines. The permeation barriers and anatomical considerations linked to ocular drug delivery are discussed and a theoretical overview on drug delivery through biological membranes is given. Finally, in vitro, in vivo and human studies of x03B3;-cyclodextrin nanoparticle eyedrop suspensions are discussed as an example of nanotechnology used for drug delivery to the eye. PMID:26501994

  4. [Medico-legal incidence of instrumental delivery].

    PubMed

    Pierre, F; Jousse, M

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this data analysis on medical liability in professional guidelines on instrumental delivery, is to point out the most common difficulties to which obstetricians are exposed, and to discuss some aspects confronted to literature. Firstly, instrumental delivery is replaced in whole labour ward activity by unpublished results of a national enquiry on instrumental delivery concerning 239 337 deliveries during the year 2007. Then, the analysis of 61 data from legal claims in relation with instrumental deliveries between 1995 and 2007, to allow educational lessons. At last, few specific aspects of judicial expert opinion are confronted to literature and discussed: the effects of debriefing after operative childbirth; discussion on decision making and decision-to-delivery intervals. This chapter is concluded by different points on risk management in labour ward, mainly with potential interest of auditable standards and training with computer assisted simulation. PMID:19268204

  5. Drug delivery systems: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Tiwari, Ruchi; Sriwastawa, Birendra; Bhati, L; Pandey, S; Pandey, P; Bannerjee, Saurabh K

    2012-01-01

    Drug delivery is the method or process of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a therapeutic effect in humans or animals. For the treatment of human diseases, nasal and pulmonary routes of drug delivery are gaining increasing importance. These routes provide promising alternatives to parenteral drug delivery particularly for peptide and protein therapeutics. For this purpose, several drug delivery systems have been formulated and are being investigated for nasal and pulmonary delivery. These include liposomes, proliposomes, microspheres, gels, prodrugs, cyclodextrins, among others. Nanoparticles composed of biodegradable polymers show assurance in fulfilling the stringent requirements placed on these delivery systems, such as ability to be transferred into an aerosol, stability against forces generated during aerosolization, biocompatibility, targeting of specific sites or cell populations in the lung, release of the drug in a predetermined manner, and degradation within an acceptable period of time. PMID:23071954

  6. Fiber coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer (Fort Collins, CO); Willson, Bryan (Fort Collins, CO); Defoort, Morgan (Fort Collins, CO)

    2008-08-12

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, the spark delivery system including a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. In addition, the laser delivery assembly includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. In accordance with embodiments of the present invention, the assembly may be used to create a spark in a combustion engine. In accordance with other embodiments of the present invention, a method of using the spark delivery system is provided. In addition, a method of choosing an appropriate fiber for creating a spark using a laser beam is also presented.

  7. Intelligent hydrogels for drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    He, Liumin; Zuo, Qinhua; Xie, Shasha; Huang, Yuexin; Xue, Wei

    2011-09-01

    Intelligent hydrogel, also known as smart hydrogels, are materials with great potential for development in drug delivery system. Intelligent hydrogel also has the ability to perceive as a signal structure change and stimulation. The review introduces the temperature-, pH-, electric signal-, biochemical molecule-, light- and pressure- sensitive hydrogels. Finally, we described the application of intelligent hydrogel in drug delivery system and the recent patents involved for hydrogel in drug delivery. PMID:21834779

  8. Ocular Drug Delivery Using Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zderic, Vesna; Clark, John I.; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    Our goal was to evaluate ultrasound (US) enhancement of drug delivery through the cornea, and the histological appearance of the cornea, up to 24 h after treatment. The aqueous humor concentration of topically applied sodium fluorescein was determined quantitatively in US-treated and sham rabbit eyes in vivo. Gross and light microscopic examinations were used to observe structural changes in the cornea 0-24 h after US exposure. The increase in the dye concentration in aqueous humor, after the simultaneous application of 880 kHz US and the dye solution (for 5 min), was 2.4 times at 0.19 W/cm2, 3.8 times at 0.34 W/cm2, and 10.6 times at 0.56 W/m2 (p<0.05). The dye delivery was found to increase with increasing US intensity, which corresponded with an increase in cavitation activity. After the separate application of US and the dye solution, the increase in the dye concentration was 3.8 times at 0.56 W/cm2 (p<0.01), while no increase was achieved at 0.19-0.34 W/cm2. The majority of damaged cells were present in the surface layer of the corneal epithelium. Corneal pits, observed in the US-treated epithelium, completely disappeared within 90 min. The application of 880 kHz ultrasound provided enhancement in the delivery of a hydrophilic compound through the cornea while producing minor changes in the corneal epithelium.

  9. Sediment delivery after a wildfire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reneau, S.L.; Katzman, D.; Kuyumjian, G.A.; Lavine, A.; Malmon, D.V.

    2007-01-01

    We use a record of sedimentation a small reservoir within the Cerro Grande burn area, New Mexico, to document postfire delivery of ash, other fine-grained sediment carried in suspension within floods, and coarse-grained sediment transported as bedload over a five-year period. Ash content of sediment layers is estimated using fallout 137Cs as a tracer, and ash concentrations are shown to rapidly decrease through a series of moderate-intensity convective storms in the first rainy season after the fire. Over 90% of the ash was delivered to the reservoir in the first year, and ash concentrations in suspended sediment were negligible after the second year. Delivery of the remainder of the fine sediment also declined rapidly after the first year despite the occurrence of higher-intensity storms in the second year. Fine sediment loads after five years remained significantly above prefire averages. Deposition of coarse-grained sediment was irregular in time and was associated with transport by snowmelt runoff of sediment stored along the upstream channel during short-duration summer floods. Coarse sediment delivery in the first four years was strongly correlated with snowmelt volume, suggesting a transport-limited system with abundant available sediment. Transport rates of coarse sediment declined in the fifth year, consistent with a transition to a more stable channel as the accessible sediment supply was depleted and the channel bed coarsened. Maximum impacts from ash and other fine-grained sediment therefore occurred soon after the fire, whereas the downstream impacts from coarse-grained sediment were attenuated by the more gradual process of bedload sediment transport. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  10. SelfSelf--healing Powerhealing Power Delivery InfrastructureDelivery Infrastructure

    E-print Network

    Amin, S. Massoud

    SelfSelf--healing Powerhealing Power Delivery InfrastructureDelivery Infrastructure Massoud Amin, D what are we doing about it? Security Related Programs within EPRI Enterprise Information Security (EIS

  11. Emergency delivery of Vasopressin from an implantable MEMS rapid drug delivery device

    E-print Network

    Ho Duc, Hong Linh, 1978-

    2009-01-01

    An implantable rapid drug delivery device based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology was designed, fabricated and validated for the in vivo rapid delivery of vasopressin in a rabbit model. In vitro ...

  12. Delivery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Less - 2016-jan-fitness-100-calories.html Food & Fitness Burn 100 Calories in 30 Minutes or Less ... Power of Avocados - 2016-jan-avocados.html Food & Fitness The Power of Avocados Celebrate good fats as ...

  13. Opportunities in respiratory drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, John N; Giles, Rachael D

    2014-12-01

    A wide range of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease products are soon to be released onto the inhaled therapies market and differentiation between these devices will help them to gain market share over their competitors. Current legislation is directing healthcare towards being more efficient and cost-effective in order to continually provide quality care despite the challenges of aging populations and fewer resources. Devices and drugs that can be differentiated by producing improved patient outcomes would, therefore, be likely to win market share. In this perspective article, the current and potential opportunities for the successful delivery and differentiation of new inhaled drug products are discussed. PMID:25531928

  14. Evaluation of Retrofit Delivery Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, M.; Smith, P.; Porse, E.

    2013-07-01

    Residential energy retrofit activities are a critical component of efforts to increase energy efficiency in the U.S. building stock; however, retrofits account for a small percentage of aggregate energy savings at relatively high per unit costs. This report by Building America research team, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), describes barriers to widespread retrofits and evaluates opportunities to improve delivery of home retrofit measures by identifying economies of scale in marketing, energy assessments, and bulk purchasing through pilot programs in portions of Sonoma, Los Angeles, and San Joaquin Counties, CA. These targeted communities show potential and have revealed key strategies for program design, as outlined in the report.

  15. Soil Delivery to Phoenix Oven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows a view from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager's left eye after delivery of soil to the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA), taken on the 12th Martian day after landing (Sol 12, June $6, 2008).

    Soil is visible on both sides of the open doors of TEGA's #4 oven. Sensors inside the device indicate no soil passed through the screen and into the oven.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Medical care delivery in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Don F.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the delivery of medical care in space. The history of aviation medicine is reviewed. Medical support for the early space programs is discussed, including the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab programs. The process of training crew members for basic medical procedures for the Space Shuttle program is briefly described and medical problems during the Shuttle program are noted. Plans for inflight medical care on the Space Station are examined, including the equipment planned for the Health Maintenance Facility, the use of exercise to help prevent medical problems.

  17. Polymer functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes mediated drug delivery of gliotoxin in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Ira; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Kiml, Se-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    During recent years, significant development has been achieved in carbon nanotube conjugated with polymer system for drug delivery system (DDS). In the present study, we have prepared functionalized single walled carbon nanotube conjugated with chitooligosaccharide (f-SWNT-COS) as a Drug Delivery System. In addition, drug Gliotoxin (GTX) and targeting molecules (Lysozyme, p53 and Folic acid) have been incorporated into f-SWNT-COS. f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-p53, f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-lysozyme, f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-FA have been physiochemically characterized for DDS. FT-IR, SEM and TEM analysis confirmed the formation of chemical interaction and polymer coating. FT-IR result clearly confirmed the interaction between f-SWNT and COS. The effective drug release was monitored against cervical cancer (HeLa) cells and Breast Cancer (MCF-7) cells and it was found that all the three drug delivery systems showed significant cytotoxicity. f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-p53 delivery vehicle and its effective cytotoxicity on HeLa cells was further checked with fluorescent activated cell sorter analysis. Our results suggest that the f-SWNTs-COS-GTX-p53 is the most effective delivery vehicle with a controlled release and enhanced cytotoxicity rendered through apoptosis in human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells. These systems can further be used for the delivery of other commercially available anti cancer drugs as well. PMID:24724504

  18. Strategies for microsphere-mediated cellular delivery 

    E-print Network

    Cardenas-Maestre, Juan Manuel

    2011-11-23

    Amino-functionalised polystyrene microspheres are promising candidates as delivery systems due to their unique features, tunable surface functionalities, and controllable release of the cargo. Herein several strategies ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, Andrew S; Partanen, Ari; Yarmolenko, Pavel; Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Wood, Bradford J

    2015-11-01

    The use of clinical imaging modalities for the guidance of targeted drug delivery systems, known as image-guided drug delivery (IGDD), has emerged as a promising strategy for enhancing antitumor efficacy. MR imaging is particularly well suited for IGDD applications because of its ability to acquire images and quantitative measurements with high spatiotemporal resolution. The goal of IGDD strategies is to improve treatment outcomes by facilitating planning, real-time guidance, and personalization of pharmacologic interventions. This article reviews basic principles of targeted drug delivery and highlights the current status, emerging applications, and future paradigms of MR-guided drug delivery. PMID:26499281

  20. Dendrimers as Nanovectors for Nucleic Acid Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Qi; Peng, Ling

    2013-09-01

    Nucleic acid based gene therapy holds great promise in the treatment of various diseases. However, the success of both DNA- and siRNAbased gene therapies depends critically on safe and efficient nucleic acid delivery systems. Owing to their well-defined structure and multivalent cooperativity, dendrimers have attracted particular attention as ideal nanocarriers for nucleic acid delivery. The present chapter highlights the current status of dendrimers as non-viral nanovectors for both DNA and siRNA delivery, focusing on the different dendrimers investigated for their delivery efficiency with respect to structural alterations in the view to developing safe and efficient nanovectors for gene therapy application.

  1. Routes for Drug Delivery to the Retina: Topical, Transscleral, Suprachoroidal and Intravitreal Gas Phase Delivery.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Norihiro; Olsen, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    Local drug delivery to the posterior segment, particularly the macula, represents a significant challenge. In this chapter, we review current challenges, barriers and limitations. Due to the local drug delivery to the retina and macula, systemic side effects are limited. In this chapter, we also discuss the historical approaches, key aspects of ideal drug delivery systems, the use of animal models to study pharmacokinetics, and the principles of transscleral, suprachoroidal and gas phase drug delivery. PMID:26501685

  2. 48 CFR 252.237-7016 - Delivery tickets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the delivery ticket. (e) At the time of delivery, the Contractor shall record the weight and bag type... bag type are verified at time of delivery. Alternate II (DEC 1991). As prescribed in 237.7101(e)(2... copy of the delivery ticket. (e) At the time of delivery, the Contractor shall record the weight...

  3. 49 CFR 663.39 - Post-delivery audit review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Post-delivery audit review. 663.39 Section 663.39..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES Post-Delivery Audits § 663.39 Post-delivery audit review. (a) If a recipient cannot complete a post-delivery...

  4. 29 CFR 780.153 - Delivery “to storage.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Delivery âto storage.â 780.153 Section 780.153 Labor... of Agriculture Specified Delivery Operations § 780.153 Delivery “to storage.” The term “delivery to... held pending preparation for or delivery to market. The fact that the commodities have been...

  5. 43 CFR 418.11 - Valid headgate deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Valid headgate deliveries. 418.11 Section... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.11 Valid headgate deliveries. The valid water deliveries at the headgate... accordance with §§ 418.8 and 418.10. The District will regularly monitor all water deliveries and report...

  6. 29 CFR 780.153 - Delivery “to storage.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Delivery âto storage.â 780.153 Section 780.153 Labor... of Agriculture Specified Delivery Operations § 780.153 Delivery “to storage.” The term “delivery to... held pending preparation for or delivery to market. The fact that the commodities have been...

  7. 29 CFR 780.153 - Delivery “to storage.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Delivery âto storage.â 780.153 Section 780.153 Labor... of Agriculture Specified Delivery Operations § 780.153 Delivery “to storage.” The term “delivery to... held pending preparation for or delivery to market. The fact that the commodities have been...

  8. 43 CFR 418.11 - Valid headgate deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Valid headgate deliveries. 418.11 Section... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.11 Valid headgate deliveries. The valid water deliveries at the headgate... accordance with §§ 418.8 and 418.10. The District will regularly monitor all water deliveries and report...

  9. 29 CFR 780.153 - Delivery “to storage.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Delivery âto storage.â 780.153 Section 780.153 Labor... of Agriculture Specified Delivery Operations § 780.153 Delivery “to storage.” The term “delivery to... held pending preparation for or delivery to market. The fact that the commodities have been...

  10. 49 CFR 663.39 - Post-delivery audit review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Post-delivery audit review. 663.39 Section 663.39..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES Post-Delivery Audits § 663.39 Post-delivery audit review. (a) If a recipient cannot complete a post-delivery...

  11. 49 CFR 663.39 - Post-delivery audit review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Post-delivery audit review. 663.39 Section 663.39..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES Post-Delivery Audits § 663.39 Post-delivery audit review. (a) If a recipient cannot complete a post-delivery...

  12. 43 CFR 418.11 - Valid headgate deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valid headgate deliveries. 418.11 Section... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.11 Valid headgate deliveries. The valid water deliveries at the headgate... accordance with §§ 418.8 and 418.10. The District will regularly monitor all water deliveries and report...

  13. 49 CFR 663.39 - Post-delivery audit review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Post-delivery audit review. 663.39 Section 663.39..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES Post-Delivery Audits § 663.39 Post-delivery audit review. (a) If a recipient cannot complete a post-delivery...

  14. 48 CFR 52.211-8 - Time of Delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Time of Delivery. 52.211-8... Delivery. As prescribed in 11.404(a)(2), insert the following clause: Time of Delivery (JUN 1997) (a) The Government requires delivery to be made according to the following schedule: REQUIRED DELIVERY SCHEDULE...

  15. 48 CFR 52.211-8 - Time of Delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Time of Delivery. 52.211-8... Delivery. As prescribed in 11.404(a)(2), insert the following clause: Time of Delivery (JUN 1997) (a) The Government requires delivery to be made according to the following schedule: REQUIRED DELIVERY SCHEDULE...

  16. 49 CFR 663.39 - Post-delivery audit review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Post-delivery audit review. 663.39 Section 663.39..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PRE-AWARD AND POST-DELIVERY AUDITS OF ROLLING STOCK PURCHASES Post-Delivery Audits § 663.39 Post-delivery audit review. (a) If a recipient cannot complete a post-delivery...

  17. 48 CFR 52.211-8 - Time of Delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Time of Delivery. 52.211-8... Delivery. As prescribed in 11.404(a)(2), insert the following clause: Time of Delivery (JUN 1997) (a) The Government requires delivery to be made according to the following schedule: REQUIRED DELIVERY SCHEDULE...

  18. 43 CFR 418.11 - Valid headgate deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Valid headgate deliveries. 418.11 Section... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.11 Valid headgate deliveries. The valid water deliveries at the headgate... accordance with §§ 418.8 and 418.10. The District will regularly monitor all water deliveries and report...

  19. 29 CFR 780.153 - Delivery “to storage.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Delivery âto storage.â 780.153 Section 780.153 Labor... of Agriculture Specified Delivery Operations § 780.153 Delivery “to storage.” The term “delivery to... held pending preparation for or delivery to market. The fact that the commodities have been...

  20. 48 CFR 52.211-8 - Time of Delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Time of Delivery. 52.211-8... Delivery. As prescribed in 11.404(a)(2), insert the following clause: Time of Delivery (JUN 1997) (a) The Government requires delivery to be made according to the following schedule: REQUIRED DELIVERY SCHEDULE...

  1. 43 CFR 418.11 - Valid headgate deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Valid headgate deliveries. 418.11 Section... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.11 Valid headgate deliveries. The valid water deliveries at the headgate... accordance with §§ 418.8 and 418.10. The District will regularly monitor all water deliveries and report...

  2. Immunization delivery in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Omura, John; Buxton, Jane; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Catterson, Jason; Li, Jane; Derban, Andrea; Hasselback, Paul; Machin, Shelagh; Linekin, Michelle; Morgana, Tamsin; O’Briain, Barra; Scheifele, David; Dawar, Meena

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the experiences of family physicians and pediatricians delivering immunizations, including perceived barriers and supports. Design Qualitative study using focus groups. Setting Ten cities throughout British Columbia. Participants A total of 46 family physicians or general practitioners, 10 pediatricians, and 2 residents. Methods A semistructured dialogue guide was used by a trained facilitator to explore participants’ experiences and views related to immunization delivery in British Columbia. Verbatim transcriptions were independently coded by 2 researchers. Key themes were analyzed and identified in an iterative manner using interpretive description. Main findings Physicians highly valued vaccine delivery. Factors facilitating physician-delivered immunizations included strong beliefs in the value of vaccines and having adequate information. Identified barriers included the large time commitment and insufficient communication about program changes, new vaccines, and the adult immunization program in general. Some physicians reported good relationships with local public health, while others reported the opposite experience, and this varied by geographic location. Conclusion These findings suggest that physicians are supportive of delivering vaccines. However, there are opportunities to improve the sustainability of physician-delivered immunizations. While compensation schemes remain under the purview of the provincial governments, local public health authorities can address the information needs of physicians. PMID:24627403

  3. Episodic transdermal delivery of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ritu; Venkatesh, K S; Dwivedi, Anil Kumar; Misra, Amit

    2012-06-01

    Film-forming lotions, precast films and adhesive patches containing testosterone (T) were prepared by compounding vinylic, acrylic and cellulosic polymers with a variety of excipients in order to achieve distribution of T in domains of heterogeneity within multicomponent matrices. The feasibility of this approach in achieving episodic transdermal delivery of testosterone (T) was investigated. Composition-dependent differences in extent of in vitro drug release and periodicity were observed. Representative formulations showing the most pronounced episodic T release in vitro were tested in female rats. Whereas intravenously administered T decayed exponentially, three maxima of T in serum were observed upon application of selected formulations. Thus, peak serum concentrations of 240, 36, and 29 ng/dL were observed at 0.2, 5, and 16.8 h after application of the preferred lotion formulation, and 89, 65, and 64 ng/dL at 1, 16.4, and 48.8 h after patches. Deconvolution, noncompartment pharmacokinetic analysis and multiple peak fitting also indicated episodicity. These results suggest the feasibility of using transdermal systems for pulsatile T delivery in a variety of clinical applications, including hormone supplementation and male contraception. PMID:22533605

  4. Transungual delivery: deliberations and creeds.

    PubMed

    Thatai, P; Sapra, B

    2014-10-01

    Although considered as trifling illness, nail diseases have a reasonably high occurrence and a noteworthy impact on the patients' quality of life. Furthermore, there is a need to improve the topical treatment for nail diseases to avoid drug interactions and to reduce side effects associated with oral therapy. Topical drug delivery to the nails has established amplified consideration lately. Strategies (such as chemical enhancers, formulation strategies, physical and mechanical methods) are being investigated in order to improve drug permeability across the nail plate. The rationale of this review is to present contemporary information on the structure of human nail along with its comparison with animal hooves. Precincts of nail permeability have been briefly discussed with respect to factors like permeant's molecular size, hydrophilicity, charge and the nature of the vehicle. These factors affect drug uptake and permeation through the nail. Formulations like nail lacquers which mimic cosmetic varnish and colloidal carriers along with nail substitutes that can be utilized for transungual delivery have also been discussed. PMID:24888698

  5. Ungual and transungual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Shivakumar, H N; Juluri, Abhishek; Desai, B G; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2012-08-01

    Topical therapy is desirable in treatment of nail diseases like onychomycosis (fungal infection of nail) and psoriasis. The topical treatment avoids the adverse effects associated with systemic therapy, thereby enhancing the patient compliance and reducing the treatment cost. However the effectiveness of the topical therapies has been limited due to the poor permeability of the nail plate to topically applied therapeutic agents. Research over the past one decade has been focused on improving the transungual permeability by means of chemical treatment, penetration enhancers, mechanical and physical methods. The present review is an attempt to discuss the different physical and chemical methods employed to increase the permeability of the nail plate. Minimally invasive electrically mediated techniques such as iontophoresis have gained success in facilitating the transungual delivery of actives. In addition drug transport across the nail plate has been improved by filing the dorsal surface of the nail plate prior to application of topical formulation. But attempts to improve the trans-nail permeation using transdermal chemical enhancers have failed so far. Attempts are on to search suitable physical enhancement techniques and chemical transungual enhancers in view to maximize the drug delivery across the nail plate. PMID:22149347

  6. Family-centred care delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mayo-Bruinsma, Liesha; Hogg, William; Taljaard, Monica; Dahrouge, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether models of primary care service delivery differ in their provision of family-centred care (FCC) and to identify practice characteristics associated with FCC. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Primary care practices in Ontario (ie, 35 salaried community health centres, 35 fee-for-service practices, 32 capitation-based health service organizations, and 35 blended remuneration family health networks) that belong to 4 models of primary care service delivery. Participants A total of 137 practices, 363 providers, and 5144 patients. Main outcome measures Measures of FCC in patient and provider surveys were based on the Primary Care Assessment Tool. Statistical analyses were conducted using linear mixed regression models and generalized estimating equations. Results Patient-reported FCC scores were high and did not vary significantly by primary care model. Larger panel size in a practice was associated with lower odds of patients reporting FCC. Provider-reported FCC scores were significantly higher in community health centres than in family health networks (P = .035). A larger number of nurse practitioners and clinical services on-site were both associated with higher FCC scores, while scores decreased as the number of family physicians in a practice increased and if practices were more rural. Conclusion Based on provider and patient reports, primary care reform strategies that encourage larger practices and more patients per family physician might compromise the provision of FCC, while strategies that encourage multidisciplinary practices and a range of services might increase FCC. PMID:24235195

  7. Gantries and dose delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meer, David; Psoroulas, Serena

    2015-04-01

    Particle therapy is a field in remarkable development, with the goal of increasing the number of indications which could benefit from such treatments and the access to the therapy. The therapeutic usage of a particle beam defines the technical requirements of all the elements of the therapy chain: we summarize the main characteristics of accelerators, the beam line, the treatment room, the integrated therapy and imaging systems used in particle therapy. Aiming at a higher flexibility in the choice of treatments, an increasing number of centers around the world have chosen to equip their treatment rooms with gantries, rotating beam line structures that allow a complete flexibility in the choice of the treatment angle. We review the current designs. A particle therapy gantry though is a quite expensive structure, and future development will increasingly consider reducing the cost and the footprint. Increasing the number of indications also means development in the delivery techniques and solving some of the issues which traditionally affected particle therapy, for example the precision of the delivery in presence of motion and the large penumbras for low depths. We show the current strategies in these fields, focusing on pencil beam scanning (PBS), and give some hints about future developments.

  8. Superhydrophobic materials for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yohe, Stefan Thomas

    Superhydrophobicity is a property of material surfaces reflecting the ability to maintain air at the solid-liquid interface when in contact with water. These surfaces have characteristically high apparent contact angles, by definition exceeding 150°, as a result of the composite material-air surface formed under an applied water droplet. Superhydrophobic surfaces were first discovered on naturally occurring substrates, and have subsequently been fabricated in the last several decades to harness these favorable surface properties for a number of emerging applications, including their use in biomedical settings. This work describes fabrication and characterization of superhydrophobic 3D materials, as well as their use as drug delivery devices. Superhydrophobic 3D materials are distinct from 2D superhydrophobic surfaces in that air is maintained not just at the surface of the material, but also within the bulk. When the superhydrophobic 3D materials are submerged in water, water infiltrates slowly and continuously as a new water-air-material interface is formed with controlled displacement of air. Electrospinning and electrospraying are used to fabricate superhydrophobic 3D materials utilizing blends of the biocompatible polymers poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and poly(caprolactone-co-glycerol monostearate) (PGC-C18). PGC-C18 is significantly more hydrophobic than PCL (contact angle of 116° versus 83° for flat materials), and further additions of PGC-C18 into electrospun meshes and electrosprayed coatings affords increased stability of the entrapped air layer. For example, PCL meshes alone (500 mum thick) take 10 days to fully wet, and with 10% or 30% PGC-C18 addition wetting rates are dramatically slowed to 60% wetted by 77 days and 4% by 75 days, respectively. Stability of the superhydrophobic materials can be further probed with a variety of physio-chemical techniques, including pressure, surfactant containing solutions, and solvents of varying surface tension. Superhydrophobicity is shown to be enhanced with further increases in PGC-C18 content and surface roughness (a decrease in fiber size). We demonstrate the utility of superhydrophobicity as a method for drug delivery. When the camptothecin derivatives SN-38 and CPT-11 are encapsulated within electrospun meshes, changes in air layer stability (due to changes in PGC-C18 content) dictate the rate of drug release by controlling the rate in which water can permeate into the porous 3D electrospun structure. Drug release can be tuned from 2 weeks to >10 weeks from 300 mum meshes, and meshes effectively kill a variety of cancer cell lines (lung, colon, breast) when utilized in a cytotoxicity assay. After determining that air could be used to control the rate of drug release, superhydrophobic 3D materials are explored for three applications. First, meshes are considered as a potential combination reinforcement-drug delivery device for use in resectable colorectal cancer. Second, removal of the air layer in superhydrophobic meshes is used as a method to trigger drug release. The pressure generated from high-intensity focused ultrasound (0.75-4.25 MPa) can remove the air layer spatially and temporally, allowing drug release to be controlled with application of a sufficient treatment. Third, "connective" electrosprayed coatings are deposited on chemically distinct material surfaces, which are both three-dimensional and mechanically robust. In summary, superhydrophobic 3D materials are fabricated and characterized, and are utilized as drug delivery devices. Controlled air removal from these materials offers an entirely new strategy for drug delivery, and is promising for the applications considered in this work as well as many others.

  9. Gene delivery nanoparticles fabricated by supercritical fluid extraction of emulsions.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Aaron S; Ambati, Balamurali K; Kompella, Uday B

    2010-03-15

    Non-viral polymeric gene delivery systems offer increased protection from nuclease degradation, enhanced plasmid DNA (pDNA) uptake, and controlled dosing to sustain the duration of pDNA action. Such gene delivery systems can be formulated from biocompatible and biodegradable polymers such as poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA). Experimental loading of hydrophilic macromolecules such as pDNA is low in polymeric particles. The study purpose was to develop a supercritical fluid extraction of emulsions (SFEE) process based on CO(2) for preparing pEGFP-PLGA nanoparticles with high plasmid loading and loading efficiency. Another objective was to determine the efficacy of pFlt23k, an anti-angiogenic pDNA capable of inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion, following nanoparticle formation using the SFEE process. Results indicated that the SFEE process allows high actual loading of pDNA (19.7%, w/w), high loading efficiency (>98%), and low residual solvents (<50 ppm), due to rapid particle formation from efficient solvent removal provided by the SFEE process. pFlt23K-PLGA nanoparticles were capable of in vitro transfection, significantly reducing secreted VEGF from human lung alveolar epithelial cells (A549) under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. pFlt23K-PLGA nanoparticles did not exhibit cytotoxicity and are of potential value in treating neovascular disorders wherein VEGF levels are elevated. PMID:20025945

  10. Floating drug delivery of nevirapine as a gastroretentive system.

    PubMed

    Vedha, Hari Bn; Brahma, Reddy A; Samyuktha, Rani B

    2010-10-01

    A multiple-unit floating drug delivery system based on gas formation technique was developed, in order to prolong the gastric residence time and to increase the overall bioavailability of the dosage form. The floating bead formulations were prepared by dispersing nevirapine together with calcium carbonate in a mixture of sodium alginate and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose solution and then dripping the dispersion into an acidified solution of calcium chloride. Calcium alginate beads were formed, as the alginate underwent ionotropic gelation by calcium ions, and carbon dioxide developed from the reaction of carbonate salts with acid. The obtained beads were able to float due to CO(2)-gas formation and the gas entrapment by the polymeric membrane. The prepared beads were evaluated for percent drug loading, drug entrapment efficiency, morphology, surface topography, buoyancy, in-vitro release, and release kinetics. The formulations were optimized for different weight ratios of the gas-forming agent and sodium alginate. The beads containing higher amounts of calcium carbonate demonstrated an instantaneous, complete, and excellent floating ability over a period of 24 hours. The increased amount of the gas forming agent did not affect the time to float, but increased the drug release from the floating beads, while increasing the coating level of the gas-entrapped membrane, increased the time to float, and slightly retarded the drug release. Good floating properties and sustained drug release were achieved. Finally, these floating beads seemed to be a promising gastroretentive drug delivery system. PMID:21264092

  11. Elective Deliveries Before 39 Weeks of Pregnancy: Information for Moms to Be

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Us Spread the Word Order Materials Order Materials Focus on Late Preterm Birth Focus on Late Preterm Birth Preterm Birth Resources Know ... 2013, from http://www.nichd.nih.gov/ncmhep/focus/toolkit/Documents/CME_One_Pager.pdf (PDF - 24 ...

  12. An implantable MEMS drug delivery device for rapid delivery in ambulatory emergency care.

    PubMed

    Elman, N M; Ho Duc, H L; Cima, M J

    2009-06-01

    We introduce the first implantable drug delivery system based on MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems) technology specifically designed as a platform for treatment in ambulatory emergency care. The device is named IRD(3) (implantable rapid drug delivery device) and allows rapid delivery of drugs. Vasopressin was used as a model drug for in vitro tests as it is a commonly used drug for cardiac resuscitation. Experimental results reveal that the IRD(3) provides an effective method for rapid delivery without significant drug degradation. Several medical uses and delivery modalities for IRD(3) are proposed. PMID:19169826

  13. 18 CFR 157.211 - Delivery points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Delivery points. 157.211 Section 157.211 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... supporting data, of the impact of the service rendered through the proposed delivery tap upon the...

  14. 18 CFR 157.211 - Delivery points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Delivery points. 157.211 Section 157.211 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... supporting data, of the impact of the service rendered through the proposed delivery tap upon the...

  15. [Premature vaginal delivery with breech presentation].

    PubMed

    Christensen, Hanne

    2015-02-01

    Only a few cases of extremely premature deliveries with breech presentation are described in the literature. We report on a vaginal breech presentation case of a living child without neurologic problems after six months. Therefore, breech presentation may be a possibility when performing a vaginal delivery of extremely premature children. PMID:25697070

  16. 38 CFR 21.4505 - Check delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Check delivery. 21.4505...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Education Loans § 21.4505 Check delivery. (a) General. Education loans by the Department of Veterans Affairs shall be made by a check payable to the eligible spouse...

  17. 38 CFR 21.4505 - Check delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Check delivery. 21.4505...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Education Loans § 21.4505 Check delivery. (a) General. Education loans by the Department of Veterans Affairs shall be made by a check payable to the eligible spouse...

  18. International Document Delivery: The ADONIS Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Barrie; Campbell, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Describes the development of a project to test whether publishers can gain copyright revenue by supplying their journals in machine readable form for document delivery centers. Areas discussed include technical considerations; document delivery centers involved; workstation development; and statistical analyses to be reported at the end of the…

  19. Capillary Physiology and Drug Delivery in Central

    E-print Network

    Timmer, Jens

    Capillary Physiology and Drug Delivery in Central Nervous System Lymphomas Peter C. Warnke, MD,1 drug delivery, we quantita- tively assessed pharmacokinetic factors in seven patients. The capillary the chemosensitivity of primary cen- tral nervous system lymphomas to water-soluble drugs could result from improved

  20. 18 CFR 157.211 - Delivery points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...or operate any delivery point if: (i) The natural...for the account of, an end-user that is currently... (1) The name of the end-user, the location of the delivery point, and the distribution company currently serving the end-user; (2) A...